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Full text of "History of Dakota Territory"

G^^ 



GENEAL' 

978.3 

K61H 




HISTORY OF 
DAKOTA TERRITORY 

BY 

GEORGE W. KINGSBURY 



SOUTH DAKOTA 

ITS HISTORY AND ITS PEOPLE 

EDITED BY 

GEORGE MARTIN SMITH, B.A., A.M. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



ILLUSTRATED 



VOLUME V 



CHICAGO 

THE S. J. CLARKE PUBLISHING COMPANY 
1915 



1151092 




\'i:KXnl| KIJAXK >[. J'.YRXE 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



HON. FRANK 51. BYRNE. 

Hon. Frank M. Byrne, serving for the second term as governor of South Dakota, Is a 
statesman with a knowledge of the science of government and with a grasp of practical 
affairs that enables him to so perform the duties of his position as to render important 
service to the commonwealth. His entire life has been an expression of the spirit of western 
enterprise. He is of Irish ancestry and a native of Iowa, born October 23, 1858. His par- 
ents were both natives of Ireland. 

He was reared in the usual manner of the farm lad and educated in the public schools. 
The studious habits of his early life have continued with him and he remains today an 
omniverous reader. From his earliest youth he has "been a student of public affairs, intel- 
ligently interested in the leading questions and issues of the day. In 1879 a little while 
before he attained his majority, he came to Dakota territory and secured a homestead 
claim in McCook county, upon which he took up his abode, meeting the usual experiences, 
privations and hardships incident to pioneer life. In 1883 he removed to Faulk county and 
engaged in the real-estate and loan business for two years. He spent the years 1885 and 
1886 in North Dakota, where he gave his attention to the real-estate and insurance business 
and in 1888 he returned to Faulk county, where he took up the occupation of farming in con- 
nection with real-estate dealing, carrying on both lines extensively. 

The year which witnessed the admission of South Dakota into the Union was the year 
•n which Mr. Byrne was elected a member of the first state senate. Later he served four 
years as county treasurer of Faulk county. In 1906 he was again elected senator to repre- 
sent Faulk and Potter counties in the South Dakota general assembly. His legislative record 
is an enviable one. Through his efforts were secured the enactment of much progressive 
legislation that worked a complete revolution and much needed improvement on the old 
order. He introduced and secured the passage of an anti-pass law, which at the time, was the 
most stringent and effective ever enacted in the United States; he was also instrumental 
in securing the passage of the two cent fare law; the reciprocal demurrage law; the law 
requiring railroad companies to pay taxes on terminal property buildings, grounds, side 
and passing tracks, etc.; a law that has reduced express rates sixty-five per cent: and im- 
portant insurance li^i illation leading to the reorganization of the insurance department. He 
also was active in liriiiuiii;^ about the enactment of the anti-lobby law, which is most 
effective. He was recognized as one of the most active forces in the upper house and the 
course which he pursued always indicated a comprehensive study of the question under 
consideration. He actively supported the passage of the primary election law, the corrupt 
practice act, tlie law relating to corporation contributions to campaign funds and other im- 
portant railroad legislation, beside that already mentioned. His course received strong 
indorsement in his district in his reelection to the senate in 1908. 

In 1910 he was elected lieutenant governor of South Dakota for a two years' term and 
at the general election of 1912 was chosen chief executive of the state, in which office he so 
wisely directed the affairs of the commonwealth that he was reelected in 1914. His admin- 
istration is notable. for his furtherance of progressive legislation and much constructive 
work leading to the development of the state and to the adoption of higher civic standards 
and ideals. Important features of his administration are the creation of a tax commission, 
the passage of an inheritance tax law, the railroad rate legislation, the bank guarantee act, 
etc. In politics he is a republican. While he holds to the old principles of the party, he is 
ever ready to take a forward step, knowing that legislation and political service must keep 
abreast with the advancement of the times and meet the changing conditions brought about 
by an expanding civilization. Since 1889 he has been a member of the republican state cen- 
tral committee and has been most active in the work and councils of the party. 

5 



6 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

lu Ajjiil, 1SS8, Governor Byrne was married to Miss Emma Beaver, of Kenton, Oliio; 
they liave five sons : Carroll Beaver, Francis J., Malcolm, Joseph D. and Emmons. • The first 
named is a graduate of the Annapolis Naval Academy of the class of 1913 and is now 
an ensign in the United States navy. 

Governor Byrne is a Congregationalist and belongs to the various Masonic bodies, the 
Knights of Pythias and the Elks. Those hours which are usually termed leisure are devoted 
to reading as a means of recreation and such is his broad general information that associa- 
tion with him means expansion and elevation. His record as governor marks a most con- 
structive period in the history of South Dakota and along all lines he has been an advocate 
of progress and advancement. 

Perhaps no man in public life has had so few enemies. Even his political opponents 
entertain for him the warmest personal regard and admiration, recognizing the honesty of 
his convictions and the loyalty of his course. One of his pleasing traits is that he never 
forgets a friend, among all those whom he has known, the playmates of his boyhood, the 
associates of his early manhood, those whom he has met in business connections and his 
later associates in legislative circles. His life record finds embodiment in the words of 
Pope: 

"Statesman, yet friend to truth; of soul sincere. 
In action faithful and in honor clear; 
Who broke no promise, served no private end, 
■WTio gained no title and who lost no friend." 



ANATOLE F. LABRIE. 



Anatole F. Labrie is a member of the Spink County Abstract Company conducting busi- 
ness at Redfield. South Dakota has numbered him among her citizens since September, 
1880, in which year he came from Kankakee county, Illinois. He was born in that county, 
June 8, 1857, a son of Joseph E. and Marie L. (Brosseau) Labrie. The family is of French 
lineage and was established in Canada during the reign of Louis XIV of France. Joseph E. 
Labrie went from Canada to Illinois in 1847 and for twenty-five years was postmaster of 
Manteno and also served as justice of the peace. He was a well known and popular citizen 
there, having located in Kankakee county during pioneer times and being an active and 
valued factor in its public affairs. He died at Momence, Illinois, in 1903, when he was 
eighty years of age. His wife died in 1900 at the age of seventy-five years and they were 
laid to rest in the cemetery at Manteno. They had come to Spink county. South Dakota, in 
1883 and settled on a homestead, but in 1895 returned to Illinois. 

Anatole F. Labrie acquired his education in the public schools of his native county 
and in St. Viateur's College a.t Kankakee, in which he pursued his studies to the age of 
fourteen years. He then became assistant postmaster at Manteno under his father, re- 
maining in that position for nine years. On removing to South Dakota in September, 1880, 
he filed upon a homestead and in 1882 he engaged in the land business in connection with 
his brother, A. C. Labrie, at Frankfort. After five years there spent he removel to Doland, 
South Dakota, where he engaged in business with his brother, Joseph E. Labrie, for two 
years. In 1889 he was appointed clerk of the court and occupied that position for five 
years. On his retirement from the office, in 1894, he purchased an abstract business, which 
he conducted for four years. He then returned to the real-estate business in partnership 
with S. E. Wightman and H. A. Babcock and was thus engaged until 1903, when he 
removed to St. Paul and became interested in the piano trade in connection with J. 
Kalcheuer. There he remained until he again entered business circles in Redfield as pro- 
prietor of the Spink County Abstract Company. He has a splendid set of abstracts and is 
conducting a good business. He is also agent for various prominent fire insurance com- 
panies, writing many policies annually. 

On the 7th of April, 1885, Mr. Labrie was married in Frankfort, South Dakota, to Miss 
Rcgina A. Blain, a daughter of Nazaire and Marie L. (Brosseau) Blain. Her father was 
one of the pioneer farmers of Spink county. South Dakota, and now resides in Los Angele.'i, 
California. His wife passed away in 1908 and was laid to rest in Kankakee, Illinois. Mr. 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 7 

and Mrs. Labrie have four daughters and a son: Marie L., the wife of Leon A. Dunton, 
residing at St. Paul, Minnesota; Corinne, the wife of Paul R. Bohen, living at St. Paul, 
Minnesota; Irene, who is connected with St. Joseph's Hospital at St. Paul; Leila, at home; 
and Paul B., who is assisting his father. 

The family are Catholics in religious faith and Mr. Labrie assisted materially in the 
building of St. Bernard's Catholic church. He also belongs to the Knights of Columbus 
and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. His political indorsement is given the 
republican party and he has filled the office of deputy United States marshal. The various 
changes in his business career have usually meant a step in advance. He is now well 
established at the head of a growing business in Redfield and is numbered among the 
representative and worthy citizens of Spink county. 



•SXILLIAM H. WILLL\iIS. 



William H. Williams, president of the Woonsocket State Bank at Woonsocket, .South 
Dakota, was born at Hazel Green, Wisconsin, February 1, 1859. His father, J. F. Williams, 
a native of England, came to the United States about 1844 and devoted his life to farming 
but is now deceased. The mother, who bore the maiden name of Susan Busanko, was also 
of English birth and has passed away. 

William H. Williams was the sixth in order of birth in a family of eleven children. 
He acquired his education in the schools of his home town. When his school days were 
over lie began farming with his father, being thus engaged until about twenty-six years 
of age. He arrived in Dakota territory in 1884, settling in Sanborn county, where for six 
years he followed the occupation of farming. In 1890 he was elected county treasurer and 
so ably filled the position during his first term that he was reelected. He was afterward 
connected with various lines of business until 1898, when he founded the Merchants Bank, 
of which he became cashier, acting in that capacity until 1912, when he was elected to the 
presidency. In 1915 the Mercliants Bank and the Woonsocket State Bank were consolidated 
under the name of the Woonsocket State Bank and Mr. Williams was chosen president of 
the new organization. He is thoroughly acquainted with the different phases of the banking 
business and his knowledge thereof, combined with habits of unfaltering industry and close 
application, are important features in his growing success. In addition to his lianking 
interests he has considerable farm land, being now the owner of one of Sanborn county's 
finest and most modernly equipped and improved stock farms near Woonsocket. 

On the 18th of February, 1885, Mr. Williams was united in marriage to Miss Sallic 
Price, a daughter of John Price, of Galena, Illinois. They have two children, namely: 
Elsie, the wife of Harry W. Harvey, who is engaged in the insurance business in Woon- 
socket; and Florence. 

In his political views Mr. Williams is an earnest republican, and aside from filling tlie 
ofiice of county treasurer for two terms he has served as mayor of Woonsocket for four 
years, giving to the city a businesslike and public-s])iiited administration. He is interested 
m the good roads movement and in all those plans am! iiiiij.Lts which have for their object 
the welfare and benefit of the community. His lite lias lunai purposeful and resultant and 
his activities have been of such a character that they havu featured largely in the advance- 
ment of the community as well as constituting the source of his individual success. 



HOX. AXDREW S. AXDERSOX. 

Andrew S. Anderson, of Alsen, the eflicient state senator from his district, was born 
upon his father's farm in Clay county in 1877, a son of Solomon and Margaret (Erickson) 
Anderson, both of whom were born in Sweden. The father emigrated to the United States 
and settled in South Dakota in 1870, the mother arriving two years later. Her parents 
crossed the Atlantic in 1871 and her father proved up a homestead in Garfield township. 
The town of Alsen now stands upon his farm and is named after his home town in .Sweden. 



8 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

The iJiuents of A. S. Anderson were married in Clay county and for a time resided upon 
a homestead in Gleuwood township which Jlr. Anderson liad entered. Later the family 
home was established on section 13, Garfield township. Tlie father carried on general 
farming and stock-raising until his retirement from active life. He has now turned his 
business affairs over to his son, who is operating the home farm on section 13. The father 
owns altogether eight hundred acres of well Improved land in Clay and Union counties, all 
under a high state of cultivation. His liome farm is the best equipped and best improved 
iu the northern part of Claj' county and the most progressive and up-to-date methods and 
machinery are used in the cultivation of the fields, insuring a large yield per acre. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Solomon Anderson three children have been born, namely: Andrew S.; Emma, the 
wife of H. M. Holmquist, postmaster of Cedar Rapids, Iowa; and Edward, deceased. 

Andrew S. Anderson was reared in the county which is still his home and as a boy 
learned practical lessons in agriculture under the instruction of his father, becoming by the 
time he attained maturity a capable and efficient farmer. Since assuming charge of the 
homestead he has amply demonstrated his progressive spirit and sound business judgment, 
managing the farm work so as to secure the greatest results with the least expenditure of 
time and energy. Mr. Anderson is secretary and manager of the Alsen, Beresford & Emmet 
Telephone Company and is president of the Alsen Creamery Company. He has taken an 
active part in political afl'airs since attaining his majority and has held all of the township 
offices and has also served as justice of the peace. He is at present a member of the 
board of education in his township and does all in his power to further the advancement 
of the public schools. WTien but thirty-three years of age he was elected state senator and 
his record was so acceptable to his constituents that he was reelected in 1913 and at the 
expii-ation of his second term of service received his party's nomination for a third term, to 
which he was elected by a large majority. He has proved an able member of the state 
senate and has done valuable work as a member of important committees, while his speeches 
from the floor of the house have been effective and to the point. 

Mr. Anderson was married in 1898 to Miss Olga Berg, who was born at Dalesburg, Clay 
county, a daughter of Andrew Berg. She met a tragic death two months after her mar- 
riage, being killed in an accident. Mr. Anderson was married June 2, 1915, to Anna Marie 
Martenson, daughter of Lars Martenson of Vermillion, South Dakota. Fraternally he 
belongs to the iiasonic order, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Modern Woodmen 
of America and has held all of the chairs in the last named organization. He is justly con- 
sidered one of the leading men of his locality and has taken an important part in all 
movements inaugurated for the welfare and progress of his part of the state. 



HOX. WINFRED E. WHITTEMOHE. 

Among those who by popular suffrage have been called to direct the afl'airs of a common- 
wealth is numbered Hon. Winfred E. Whittemore, now a member of the state legislature, 
from the district comprising Hamlin and Deuel counties. In business connections he is well 
known as a real-estate and insurance broker of Estelline. New York numbers him among 
her native sons, his birth having occurred in Saratoga county, February 22, 1868, his parents 
being Josephus W. and Lucy A. (Hoyt) \^^littemore, both of whom were also natives of 
New York, where they were reared and married, subsequently locating on a farm in Saratoga 
county. They lived in the east until the spring of 1882 and then came to the west with 
Dakota territory as their destination. The father homesteaded a quarter section in Deuel 
county, two and a half miles northeast of Estelline, and there resided to the time of his 
death. He was killed in a storm in June, 1889, and after being thus widowed Mrs. Whitte- 
more removed to Estelline. 

Prior to his father's death Winfred E. Whittemore had been a student in the city schools 
of Estelline and had thus prepared for entrance into the State Agricultural College at Brook- 
ings, but owing to his father's death, he was obliged to change his plans and did not receive 
his college course. When eighteen years of age he began teaching and followed that profes- 
sion through the winter months and a part of the summer seasons for about ten years. In 
1891 he went to Minneapolis, where he pursued a business course in the Curtis Commercial 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 11 

College. He continued his work as an educator at intervals until the spring of 1895 but 
prior to that date had embarked in the real-estate business in partnership with H. H. Reeves, 
then cashier of tlio Bank of Estelline. Because of this partnership Mr. Whittemore at times 
worked in a cleii. al . apaiity in the bank but continued his activities in the real-estate field 
and in 1901 pinrli.i-.i'.l nis partner's interest and incorporated the business as the Whitte- 
more Land & InvustuK-nt Company, handling farm lands, loans and insurance. He now has a 
large clientage and is doing a good business in each department. He has brought many settlers 
to the county in his sale of farm lands, and also writes a large amount of insurance annually. 
In addition to his business in the town he owns five farms in Hamlin, Deuel and Brookings 
counties, having made judicious investment in real estate. In addition to his other interests 
he is a stockholder and a director of the Bank of Estelline. 

In 1895 Mr. Whittemore was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Rice, of Brookings 
county, and to them have been born four children. Walton H., Myrton R., Elwin C. and 
Dorothy M. Politically a republican, Mr. \Miittemore has for many years been an active 
factor in shaping the policy of his party in this portion of the state and has several times 
been called to public office. He served for one term as a member of the Estelline town board, 
has filled the office of township assessor and town clerk and in the fall of 1906 he was 
elected to the state legislature, serving through the tenth general assembly. In 1913 he was 
again chosen a member of that honorable body and in 1914 he was elected to represent his 
district in the state senate. His record at Pierre has repaid the support of his constituents, 
for he has given careful consideration to each question which came up for settlement and 
the weight of his influence has been cast on the side of the state's best interests. He had a 
very large part to do with the removal from the statute books in 1907 of the then notorious 
and rather infamous divorce law. He has ever placed the good of the commonwealth before 
personal aggrandizement and the benefit of the majority before partisanship. 



JOSEPH WEST. 



■Toseph West, a retired farmer, living near Volin, is one of the worthy pioneers of 
Yankton county, the period of his residence here covering forty-six years, his arrival in 
what was then Dakota territory dating from 1869. During his early residence here he 
endured all the hardships and privations that came to the pioneers but through determination 
and unfaltering perseverance he worked his way upward to success and is now classed among 
the substantial citizens of Volin and Yankton county. He was born near Londonderry, 
Ireland and comes of Scotch and English ancestry, although the family has lived in Ireland 
through many generations and there is still in possession of the family an old stone house 
built in 1610, which has been occupied by its members since that time. 

Reared and educated in the land of his nativity, .Joseph West subsequently decided 
to try his fortunes in the new world and accordingly, on the 4th of July, 1866, set sail from 
Liverpool for the United States, securing passage on the steamer City of Edinburg. Land- 
ing in New York on the 19th of that month, he soon afterward found work in the stone 
quarries of Connecticut just across the border line from New Y'ork. He carefully saved 
his earnings in the hope of some day establishing a home of his own and on the 19th day of 
April. 1S69, in New Y'ork, he was united in marriage to Miss Kate Inch, a native of County 
Derry, Ireland. On the date of their marriage they started for the west, with Y'ankton 
county. South Dakota, as their destination, Mrs. West having a brother, Thomas Inch, 
living in this section. Near his home Mr. West preempted a claim of one hundred and sixty 
acres, which he sold a year or two later for six hundred dollars, this sum being considered 
an exceptionally high price for that time. In November, 1872, Mr. West preempted his 
])resent acreage, located on section 14, Volin township, but as times were hard and money 
scarce he changed to a homestead claim, to which he eventually secured a deed. To this he 
has since added from time to time until he now owns five hundred and twenty acres 
conveniently located near Volin. His first home was a log cabin but this gave way to a 
comfortable frame house, which is surrounded with substantial outbuildings, all having 
been erected by Mr. West. He has also planted trees and now has a grove of fifteen acres 
which has supplied him with fuel for the past ten years in addition to selling some timber. 



12 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

In fact much of the lumber with which he erected his buiUlings was cut and sawed from 
his own timber. The land is so located that the drainage is sufficient for the cultivation 
of crops and his place is one of the finest farms in this section of the county. In establish- 
ing his home here, however, Mr. West has endured many hardships and had to overcome 
many obstacles. In 1873 and 1874 the grasshoppers almost entirely destroyed his crops and 
he has had periods of great trial in times of severe storms and blizzards to prevent the loss 
of stock, but, withal, he has gained success and has many pleasant memories of his earlj' 
life in this section of the country, for the neighbors gave to each other needed assistance 
and in many ways helped to brighten what would otherwise have been dark days. 

To Mr. and Mrs. West have been born three sons and one daughter, Mary, Ernest, 
Albert and Edwin. Albert makes his home in Albert Lea, Minnesota, where he follows his 
trade as a painter. The others are still under the parental roof and the sons manage the 
farm, while the father is now enjoying a well earned rest. The children have all been 
reared in Dakota and Mr. West gives to them credit for much of the material success that 
has come to the household. The family is an old and prominent one of Yankton county and 
fully merit the high regard and esteem in which they are uniformly held. 



GUY W. CRAWFORD. 



Guy W. Crawford, of Letcher, has been engaged in the grain business for twenty years. 
He was born in Tioga county, Pennsylvania, May 15, 1864, a son of Henry A. and Sarah 
Crawford. The family removed to Iowa in 1864 and Guy W. Crawford, who acquired his 
preliminary education in the public schools, afterward spent two years as a student in the 
Iowa Agricultural College at Ames. After leaving school he went to South Dakota and 
has been a resident of Letcher since 1885. For twenty years he has been a grain buyer, 
conducting a growing and profitable business. He is thoroughly acquainted with every 
phase of the grain trade in this section of the country and has met with growing success 
in his undertakings. 

In his political views Mr. Crawford is a republican, having supported the party since 
age conferred upon him the right of franchise. His interests and activity therein led ulti- 
mately to his election to the state legislature in 1912 and his reelection in 1914, and during 
the session or ihi3 ne was an active worker in the general assembly, taking part in many 
of the debates on the floor of the house and doing important service in committee rooms. 



JOHX STEDROKSKY. 



.John Stedronsky, of Wagner, is a member of the Stedrousky Brothers Company, engaged 
in tlie hardware and implement business both at Wagner and at Lake Andes. He is a 
representative of those progressive young business men who by their activity and enterprise 
are laying the foundation for South Dakota's substantial progress and prosperity. He was 
born at Lakeport, Yankton county, this state. May 4, 1873, his parents being John and 
Marie Stedronsky, who in the year 1868 left their native country, Bohemia, Austria, and 
located in Cleveland, Ohio. Later in the same year they came to Dakota territory and 
have since resided within its borders. 

Reared in his native town, John Stedronsky completed the eighth grade work in the 
public schools and afterward attended Yankton College for a short time. He engaged in 
teaching in the district schools of Yankton, Bon Homme and Charles Mix counties and when 
not devoting his energies to educational work gave his attention to farming. In 1907 he 
homesteadcd on the Yankton Indian reservation. His identification with commercial pur- 
suits, however, dates from 1901, in which year he established a hardware and implement 
business at Wagner. When that undertaking was placed upon a substantial basis, enjoying 
a growing trade, he organized the Stedronsky Brothers Company for the conduct not only 
of the Wagner enterprise but also for the establishment and conduct of a similar business 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 13 

at Lake Andes, South Dakota. The trade of the company has grown along snhstantial 
lines and the success of the business is gratifying. 

Mr. Stedronsky has been married twice. On the 30th of October, 1895, he wedded Miss 
Emanuela Cernik and following her demise married Miss Emily Teply, the wedding ceremony 
taking place on the 17th of April, 1900. He lias the following children: Charles, Edward, 
Rose, PIcnry Patrick, Ella Irene, Helen and Grace. 

Jlr. Stedronsky was born and baptized a Catholic but has joined -the Congregational 
church at Wagner. His military record covers service as a private of Company C, of the 
South Dakota National Guard, at Yankton. In politics he is a democrat and has always 
manifested deep and intelligent interest in political questions, state and national. Popular 
sull'rage called him to the office of mayor of Wagner in 1911 and he filled that position for 
four consecutive j'ears, bringing to bear practical and progressive business methods in the 
management of municipal affairs. He was then elected to represent his district in the state 
legislature and became one of the leaders in debate on the floor of the house during the 
Session of 1915. He also did important committee work and was connected with much 
constructive legislation. He studies political questions with thoroughness and his support 
of any measure is based upon his firm belief in its efficiency as a factor in good govern- 
ment. His interest in community affairs is indicated in the fact that he is an active member 
and one of the directors of the Wagner Commercial Club. He has become well known 
through fraternal relations, belonging to Alpha Lodge, No. 159, F. & A. M., of Wagner, of 
which he was master in 1911-12, while in Yankton Consistory he attained the thirty-second 
degree of the Scottish Rite. He is also a Noble of El Riad Temple of the Mystic Shrine and 
lie has membership in Wagner Lodge, I. 0. 0. F. The various interests of his life are well 
balanced, all given due consideration with regard to the rights and privileges of the individual 
and the opportunities and obligations of citizenship. 



FRANK BtTRGESS. 



Frank Burgess owns a farm of four hundred and eighty acres situated on sections 30 and 
38, Prairie Center township, his residence being on the latter section. His wife owns three 
hundred and twenty acres of land and, as their farms aJre well developed and carefully culti- 
vated, they receive therefrom a handsome annual income. Mr. Burgess was born in Beaver 
Dam, Dodge county, Wisconsin, February 33, 1853, a son of A. F. and Rebecca (Beckus) Bur- 
gess. The father was a pioneer of Wisconsin, settling there in 1844 upon a farm, where his 
death occurred when he had reached the age of seventy-four years. His wife survives and 
makes her home in Beaver Dam, Dodge aounty, at the remarkable age of ninety-five years. 
Jlr. Burgess was buried in the Clason Prairie cemetery. The family trace their ancestry 
back to one Thomas Burgess, who came to the new world from England on the Mayllower, 
and Asa Burgess, grandfather of the subject of this review, fought in the War of 1813. 

Frank Burgess was educated in Wisconsin, and after laying aside his books devoted his 
time to helping with the farm work. He came to South Dakota in 1881 and secured a pre- 
emption claim, his wife taking up a homestead at the same time. She inherited a quarter 
section and now owns three hundred and twenty acres, while Mr. Burgess has purchased an 
additional three hundred and twenty acres, making a total of eight hundred acres in their 
possession. Mr. Burgess and his sons cultivate the land, carrying on general farming, which 
they find more profitable than devoting their land exclusively to raising grain. They keep 
one hundred head of cattle, thirty-five head of horses and forty hogs and are quite successful 
as stock-raisers. As they understand the principles of agriculture and as they are energetic 
men of sound judgment, doing the right thing at the right time, their land returns to them 
large profits. 

Mr. Burgess was married at Watertown, March 18, 1883, to Miss Jennie Aldrich, a daugh- 
ter of Allen and Elizabeth (Parker) Aldrich. the former a pioneer farmer of Spink county. 
Both are now deceased and are buried in tin' Watertown cemetery. Mr. and Mrs. Burgess had 
five children: Mabel, who died in iiifnih y and is buried on the homestead, as there was then 
no cemetery; Alva, a farmer of Belle I'laiue township; Allen F., who farms part of his father's 
land; Rhea S., assisting his father in the work of the farm; and Mildred, who is living at 



14 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

home. Mr. Burgess is a republican, but reserves tlie riglit to vote independently. Fraternally 
he belongs to the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He came to South Dakota with a 
capital of but two hundred dollars. The greater part of his land has come into his possession 
as a result of his own labor and good management. He has followed the principle of attend- 
ing strictly to the matter at hand and of doing well everything that he has undertaken, so 
that his success is but natural. 



OLIVER MUNSOX. 



Oliver Munson, one of the jjrominent and well known citizens of Minnehaha county, 
where he has resided for four decades, now makes his home on section 23, Sioux Falls town- 
ship, and is successfully engaged in business as a farmer and dairyman. His birth occurred 
in northern Sweden on the 29th of July, 1851, his jmrents being Peter and Julia A. (Jenson) 
Munson. They emigrated to the United States in 1867 and first located in McKean county, 
Pennsylvania, while subsequently they took up their abode in Iowa. In 1872 or 1873 
they came to South Dakota, taking up a homestead claim on sections 28 and 33, Split Rock 
township, Minnehaha coimtj', where Peter Munson spent the remainder of his life. His 
wife survived him for one year. They had four children: Ella, deceased; Oliver; Hannah; 
and Magnus. 

Oliver Munson was reared at home and acquired a limited education in the common 
schools of his native land. On coming to this coimtry he found employment in the lumber 
woods in Pennsylvania. In the fall of 1875, when a young man of twenty-four years, he 
came to South Dakota and homesteaded a quarter section of land on section 19, Split 
Kock township, Minnehaha county, where he resided for twenty-six years. On the expiration 
of that period, in 1902, he purchased his present home place in Sioux Falls township, where 
he has remained continuously since. He devotes his attention to the pursuits of farming 
and dairying and in both branches of his business has met with success. 

On the 21st of August, 1873, Mr. Munson was united in marriage to Miss Kate Blom, 
who was born in Sweden and in 1871 crossed the Atlantic to the United States, locating 
in Kane, Pennsylvania. To our subject and his wife have been born three children, as 
follows: Edgar William, who is a resident of Watertown. South Dakota; Eleanora. de- 
ceased; and Anna, who gave her hand in marriage to Richard E. Brooks, of Sioux Falls, 
South Dakota. 

In his political views Mr. Munson is a stanch republican. He has served as a member of 
the town board and also on the srlidol Imanl in both Split Rock and Sioux Falls townships, 
ever discharging his public duties in a liijlily satisfactory and commendable manner. His 
religious faith is indicated by lii> lucinln i>liip in the Swedish Lutheran church, to which his 
wife also belongs. He has always sIk.wii ;;rcat interest in all that pertains to the general 
welfare and has been known as a ].ulili(->iiii ited man who has over found time and inclina- 
tion to cooperate in movements for t!ie yrneral good. In all the relations of life he has 
been honorable and straightforward, and his example is well worthy of emulation. 



]VL\URICE KELIHER. 



The spirit of enterprise, faith in the future and self-reliance that we have come to think 
of as belonging first of all to the west and that have been in such a large measure responsible 
for the almost unparalleled development of the country west of the Mississippi in the last 
half century have been the chief characteristics of Maurice Keliher, who is now one of the 
largest stockmen of the country but who came west when a young man with no capital save 
his industry and ability. He arrived in the Black Hills in the early days of that section and, 
seeing something of the possibilities of the region, remained and prospered in spite of the 
difficulties and discouragements that arose. 

He was horn in Bangor, Maine, July 30, 1840, and is a son of Michael and Ellen (O'Con- 
nor) Keliher. the former a native of County Kerry. Ireland, and the latter also born on the 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 17 

Kmerald Isle. In childhood they emigrated to America with their respective parents and 
both families settled in Maine, where the father and motlier of our subject grew up and 
were married. In the early '50s the family removed to Illinois and located upon a farm near 
Woodsfnck, .AlcIIenry county. There were four sons and three daughters, the subject of this 
review beiiij; the oldest son. 

Maurice Keliher attended the district schools and thus acquired a knowledge of the 
fundamental branches of learning, later supplementing the education thus gained by study 
in the high .school of Woodstock. At the age of seventeen years he becarue a blacksmith's 
apprentice but in 1867 concluded to try his fortune in the west and went to Colorado, where 
lie engaged in freighting, continuing in that occupation for several years in Colorado, 
Wyoming, Idaho and Montana. In 1873 he made his way to the Black Hills district and was 
engaged in freighting from the railroad to the Black Hills, Fort Robinson and various places. 
In 1879 he arrived in Pennington county and entered the cattle business. He prospered in 
that from the beginning and soon became one of the largest ranchers in that section of 
the state. Some years ago, when most of the men engaged in raising cattle gave up in 
despair because it seemed that conditions were so changed that the business was no longer 
prolitable, Mr. Keliher continued therein, believing that the time was coming when the 
demand for cattle would exceed the supply and when increased prices would make the busi- 
ness even more lucrative than at first. His judgment has been more than vindicated and 
for many years he has been one of the cattle kings of the west. His friends will tell you 
that he is a millionaire, but he himself merely says modestly that he has made a good living. 
His confidence in the stock business has only been equalled by his faith in the value of South 
Dakota lands and he holds title to many thousands of acres, his home ranch alone com- 
prising about nine thousand acres. 

Mr. Keliher was united in marriage on the 25th of November, 1878, to Miss Eleanor 
Walsh, a daughter of Thomas and Eleanor (Walsh) Walsh. Mr. and Mrs. Keliher have five 
children: .John Francis; Maurice, .Jr.; Eleanor, the wife of Grover Bedford, of Omaha, 
Nebraska; Marguerite, the wife of Phillip Randall, of Rapid City; and Marion, who married 
.John Ciowley, of Cheyenne, Wyoming. Tliere are also three grandchildren. Mr. and Mrs. 
Keliher are communicants of the Roman Catholic church and she takes a most active and 
Iielpful interest in the charitable activities of the church. 

Mr. Keliher is a republican and firm in his advocacy of the principles of that party. 
Fraternally he is a member of the Masonic blue lodge and chapter. He has profited by the 
opportunities offered by South Dakota and has in turn contributed largely to the welfare of 
the state, especially along the line of stock-raising, and the success that has rewarded his 
faith in the west is fully merited. He is one of the honored pioneers of the Black Hills 
country, and the respect and goodwill accorded him by his fellow citizens prove that he has 
been successful in life in more ways than in the accumulation of wealth. 



W. R. ROXALD. 



W. R. Ronald, who, since 1909, has been at the head of the business now conducted under 
the name of the Jlitchell Publishing Company at Mitchell. South Dakota, is closely asso- 
ciated with journalism and is also an active factor in the book-binding business and other 
similar enterprises. He was born in Grandview, Iowa, in 1879. His grandfather was one 
of the pioneers of that stat.^ and a-sisted in locating the capital at Iowa City. W. R. 
Ronald was but three yeai> oi a-i' wlim left an orphan and was given a home and educa- 
tion by his aunts. He sup]>iinuiitrd his early educational privileges by a course of study in 
Monmouth College at Monmoutli, Illinois, from which he was graduated with the class 
of 1898. He has since been identified with newspaper work and his progress in the field of 
journalism has been continuous. He has at all times kept in touch with the trend of 
modern thought and of progressiveness along the line of newspaper publication. He has been 
city editor of dailies published at Marion, Indiana, was on the Sioux City Tribune for eight 
years, holding positions ranging from that of Cub-reporter to managing editor. He be- 
came editor of the Sioux Falls (S. D.) Press in 1908 and so continued for two years. 

In November, 1909. 5Ir. Ronald bought out the Mitchell Printing Company and reor- 



18 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

ganized the business under the name of the ilitchell Publishing Company, in which con- 
nection he not only publishes the Jlitchell Daily Republican, one of the leading journals in 
this part of the state, but also conducts a general printing, book-binding and office supply 
business. The Daily Republican is one of the popular papers in its section of the state and 
because of its extensive patronage is an excellent advertising medium. It has been said 
that the newspaper is both the mirror and the molder of public opinion, which fact finds 
exemplification in the Republican which has been an influential factor in support of many 
worthy public projects, while at the same time it is an excellent medium of disseminating 
local and general news. 

Mr. Ronald was married in 1901 to Miss Ethel Bowman, of Marion, Indiana, and 
they have a son and daughter. The parents are widely and favorably known in Mitchell 
where they have gained an extensive circle of friends and Mr. Ronald is in close touch with 
all that pertains to the city's welfare and an earnest champion of everything that promotes 
substantial advancement for the comniunitv. 



HEXRY a. C. ROSE, M. D., OPT. G. 

In tiie practice of medicine in Rapid City Dr. Henry G. C. Rose has become well estab- 
lished as an able and successful physician, concentrating his energies upon a general office 
practice and specializing in the treatment of diseases of the eye. He is widely known to the 
profession in the state and enjoys the high regard of his fellow practitioners hj reason of his 
personal worth and his close conformity to the highest standard of piofessional ethics. 

Dr. Rose was bom in Mercer, Pennsylvania, January 10. 1841. a son of Marcus H. Rose. 
The ancestry is traced back to 1740, when representatives of the name located in Long Island, 
while at a later date others of the family settled in Doylestown, Pennsylvania. That was 
about the year 1803. The family is of English origin but with the desire to have greater 
religious freedom they left England and went to Holland. Andrew Rose, .Jr., the great- 
grandfather of Dr. Rose, took an active and helpful part in the war of the Revolution. He 
was a mechanic and operated what was known as the Rose furnace, where many of the guns 
and much of the ammunition for the Revolutionary soldiers were made. He was also the 
maternal great-grandfather of President William McKinley, who was a second cousin of 
Dr. Rose. Marcus H. Rose devoted his early manhood to the profession of teaching and after- 
ward engaged in the real-estate business. Later he lived in Cleveland, Ohio, where his death 
occurred. His wife bore the maiden name of Henrietta Wooschard Sloore and was a daugh- 
ter of Henry Moore, of Baltimore, and afterward of Sandusky, Ohio, where he passed away. 

Dr. Rose was the oldest of a family of seven children and two of his sisters and two of 
his brothers are yet, living. He was educated in Mercer Academy at Mercer, Pennsylvania, 
where he was studying at the time of the outbreak of the Civil war. He was among the 
first A'olunteers, enlisting in April, 1861. In July he went upon active duty and saw serv- 
ice continuously through the three succeeding years. In 1863 he was detailed as a clerk 
in the war department by Secretary Stanton and there continued until he left the service. 
He participated in the second battle of Bull Run, at the battle of :Mechanicsville, in the 
seven days' battle before Richmond, and in many other lesser engagements and he was 
mustered out in June, 1864, after which he returned home. 

In the same year the family removed to Cleveland, Ohio, and a short time afterward he 
entered the Cliarity Hospital Medical College, now the College of Physicians & Surgeons of 
that city, from which he was graduated with the class of 1867. He pursued a course in 
optical science in the Philadelphia Optical College and he began the practice of his profession 
in Cleveland but later removed to Conneaut, Ohio. Subsequently he practiced for a time in 
Chicago and afterward' in Milbank, Dakota territory, where he remained from 1881 until 
1904, or for a period of twenty-three years. He then went to San Jose, California, and 
afterward to Santa Cruz. In 1906 he located at Golden. Colorado, leaving California imme- 
diately after the earthquake of that year. In 1907 he returned to Dakota, settling at Rapid 
City, where he still continues in practice, specializing in the treatment of the eye and in 
general office practice. He was the organizer of the South Dakota State Medical Association 
and served as its secretary and he ranks high among the representatives of the profession. 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 19 

On the 7th of December, 1S76, Dr. Eose was married to Miss Thebe Tabor, a daughter 
of Captain Stephen and Charity (Nye) Taber, of Palmyra, Kew York. The family were 
formerly residents of New Bedford, Massachusetts, and during his active lifetime Captain 
Taber was commander of trading ships which sailed to all sections of the globe. Dr. and 
Mrs. Rose became the parents of two children: Pearl, now deceased; and Harry Taber, who 
is connected with the Rapid City postoffice. 

Dr. Eose is a republican where national issues are involved but casts an independent 
local ballot. He served as the first mayor of Milbank, South Dakota, and for many years 
he filled the ofiice of United States examining surgeon. He was also for nineteen or twenty 
years surgeon for the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul llailin:i.l. Kiatrrnally he is a Mason, 
a Knight of Pythias and a member of the Ancient (iidir ni L iiiud Workmen. He has always 
been devoted to his profession and has been a constant student of the science of medicine, 
keeping thoroughly abreast of the times. For an extended period he has been a representative 
of the medical fraternity of his state and his ability has gained him widespread prominence. 



DANIEL NEWCOMB HUNT. 



Daniel Xeweomb Hunt, who is conducting a growing and profitable business as the 
head of the Hunt Land Company with oftices in the Anderson block at Redfield, has con- 
tinuously resided in Spuik county since 1879. No feature of the history of Redfield and 
Spink county is unfamiliar to him and at all times he has cooperated in the plans and 
projects which have resulted in public benefit and improvement. He was born in Mans- 
field, Pennsylvania, January 28, 1843, and is a son of Daniel N. and Miranda B. (Allen) 
Himt. The father died in 1884 and the mother passed away in 1863, her grave being made 
at Granger, Minnesota, while he was laid to rest at Redfield. He was a physician in early 
life and practiced at Eeedsburg, Wisconsin, for a number of years, but after removing to 
ilinnesota turned his attention to farming, which he continued for five years. He died at 
the advanced age of eighty-five. The paternal grandfather of our subject. Captain Oiarles 
Hunt, fought in the Revolutionary war, as did also the maternal grandfather, whose father 
was a nephew of Ethan Allen of Ticonderoga fame. Our subject is also a descendant of 
one of the Newcomb brothers, who settled in New England in the early days of the history 
of that section of the countiy. 

Daniel N. Hunt devoted five years of his youth to attending school in Wisconsin, and 
after the removal of the family to Minnesota was under private instruction for two years. 
He then went to Decorah, Iowa, where he attended high school for two years, or until 
after the outbreak of the Civil war, when he put aside his textbooks and all personal con- 
siderations in order to aid his country. On the 15th of March, 18G3, he enlisted and 
remained with his command until September, 1865, when he was mustered out, having 
participated in a number of the important and hotly contested engagements of that long 
sanguinary conflict. Upon his return home he began farming with his father. Later he 
^pent one winter in a commercial school in Chicago and was for two years in southwestern 
Missouri and Texas, after which he returned to Minnesota, where he resumed farming, 
which he followed until 1879. On the expiration of that period he came to South Dakota, 
and on the 17th of April, 1879, located a claim in Spink county, about seven miles north- 
east of where Redfield now stands. He and L. J. Bancroft, who arrived in Spink county with 
his family on the same day and settled across the James river from Mr. Hunt, were the first 
settlers in the county. Mr. Hunt also began locating claims for others and proving their 
titles and has since dealt in land, buying and selling property. In recent years he has 
organized his business under the name of the Hunt Land Company, which has many clients 
and is doing a growing and successful business. He has made his home in the city of Redfield 
since 1883. 

At Granger, Minnesota, Mr. Hunt was united in marriage to Miss Adalyn J. Ellis, who 
is a native of Vermont and is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Dyer Ellis. The father died 
ill 1903 and was laid to rest in the Minneapolis cemetery. The mother now resides in that 
city at the remarkable old age of ninety-four years. Mr. Ellis was a native of Vermont 
and his wife of Ohio. When their daughter, Mrs. Hunt, was but a child the family removed 



20 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

to Wisconsin and subsequently became pioneer settlers of Jlinnesota. Jlr. and Jlrs. Hunt 
have become the parents of three children: Arlington C, a painter residing at Eedfield; 
May, the wife of W. W. Spain, of Sioux Falls; and Eay X., who is a clerk at Minneapolis, 
Minnesota. 

In his political views Mr. Hunt has ever been a stalwart republican and he comes 
of a family noted for patriotism and love of country. He has been called to several local 
offices. He served by appointment as register of deeds, was the first mayor of Eedfield and 
for five years filled the office of deputy clerk of the district court. He was a member of the 
first territorial constitutional convention held at Sioux Falls and he called the first repub- 
lican convention in Spink county at his house. He organized the first school district of 
the county in 1880, the meeting being held at his own home, and the school was taught 
by Florence Hall, now Mrs. C. G. Bickford. His labors in behalf of the welfare and upbuild- 
ing of the county can scarcely be overestimated. Wliile his ideals have been high, he has 
worked toward them along practical lines, and his labors have been attended with gratify- 
ing results. He belongs to the Masonic fraternity and to tlie Grand Army of the Eepublic 
and in days of peace he has ever been as true and loyal to the duties of citizenship as 
when he followed the old fiag upon southern battlefields. 



NOAH XEWBAXKS. 



Noah Newbanks is one of the pioneers of South Dakota, who for many years was suc- 
cessfully engaged in the freighting and live-stock business, and he now lives in Pierre, looking 
after his various interests. In 1905 he was one of the founders of the American Exchange 
Bank, of which he was vice president for some years. He has ever interested himself in the 
progi-ess and advancement of this state and by his activities has contributed toward making 
it the prosperous commonwealth which it now is. 

Mr. Newbanks was born in Seneca, Guernsey county, Ohio, on Cliristraas day, 1842, his 
parents being Strother McNeil and Sarah Sophia (Larrick) Newbanks, natives of Virginia. 
He went to school at Seneca, Ohio, and Independence, Missouri, to which state the family 
removed in 1849. He intermittently attended school until he was about twenty-one years of 
age, making use of the opportunities as they presented themselves for further study. In 
1859, when about eighteen years of age, Mr. Newbanks made his way to the gold mines of 
Colorado and there continued in the search of fortune in various mining camps until 1863, 
when he joined the parties making for the newly discovered Montana gold fields shortly after 
the discovery of the precious metal in Alder Gulch. Soon, however, he came to the conclusion 
that greater profits were to be made in the freighting business and engaged in that line, carry- 
ing goods from Salt Lake City to Virginia City, Montana. In the latter place he also engaged 
in mercantile business, and remained there until the fall of 1865. He was one of the pio- 
neers of the celebrated mining camp at Virginia City and there saw much of the rough mining 
life in its most primitive stage. A summary hanging was not an infrequent occurrence and 
often came in just retribution of a lawless career. From Montana Mr. Newbanks made his 
way to Salt Lake City, Utah, and then to San Francisco, crossing the ))lains to Golden Gate 
and there taking passage for New York by way of Cape Horn. While in Salt Lake City he 
met and became a friend of Brigham Young, being a frequent visitor at his home. 

From the eastern metropolis Mr. Newbanks returned to Missouri, where he was engaged 
in farming until 1868, when he made his way to Junction City, Kansas, where for one year he 
successfully conducted a mercantile establishment. At the expiration of that time he 
removed to Ellsworth, Kansas, being for two years a general merchant of that place. Eeturn- 
Ing to Missouri, he there engaged in agricultural pursuits until 1875 and then went to Denver, 
Colorado, remaining there for about twelve months. In 1876 he went to the Black Hills, 
reaching Custer City in April of that year, but removed shortly afterward to Rapid City, 
assisting in locating the town. He built the stockade and corral and helped in the erection 
of the blockhouse, which precautions were necessary for protection from Indians, who at that 
time were constantly on the warpath, although they mostly operated in small bands. Mr. 
Newbanks conducted a store in Rapid City for about two years and of the Indians of that 
period he writes as follows: "The only instance where the Indians did any great damage 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 21 

was about August 1, 1ST6, when they attacked us in our stronghold, but they did not succeed 
in doing us any injury other than driving our men to cover. But upon leaving the stockade 
they circled around to the west of Rapid City and killed four men who were going into town. 
Two of the party escaped and came with the news. We then went out and recovered the four 
bodies, wliich were brought to the town, burying "them in one grave. The next attack 
occurred early in September, when we had a running fight with the savages. They succeeded 
in taking all the cattle, but I saved my horses, getting them to the corral and thus protecting 
them." 

Mr. Newbanks remained in Rapid City until 1878, when he commenced freighting from 
I'ort Pierre to the Black Hill*, continuing in these operations until 1886. He then again 
located in Rapid I it \ and iiciL^lited between that point and Deadwood for about twelve 
mouths. In the full. ih in- -piiuj; he went to Whitewood, on the Chicago & Northwestern 
Bailway, a journey of twelve miles over rough roads. During this time he also hauled freight 
for the Homestake mine at Lead. In Whitewood he was engaged in the commission business 
and forwarded goods from the end of the Elkhorn Railroad to Deadwood, Lead and other 
points in the Black Hills. In 1889 Mr. Xewbanks disposed of his business Interests in White- 
wood and raise d cattle on an extensive scale in Custer county until the autumn of 18"J2, when 
he removed to Lyman count}', where he had a ranch of six hundred and forty acres. He 
afterward suicessfully raised cattle and horses in Stanley county, South Dakota, but in 1908 
sold out his livestock interests. In 1896 he had taken up his residence in Pierre and both 
he and liis wife have ever since remained in that city. In 1905 Mr. Newbanks was instru- 
mental in organizing the American Exchange Bank, of which he served as vice president for 
three years. Not only is he one of the pioneers of the state, but did much work that has 
made possible the incoming of civilization and stable government. He has always been public 
spirited and has ever given his support to worthy public enterprises. 

On November 29, 1885, at Kansas City, Kansas, Mr. Newbanks was united in marriage 
to Miss Mary Josephine Anderson, who was born in Sparta, Illinois, on the 8th of May, 1859, 
and is a daughter of Francis B. and Matilda T. Anderson. The former was a soldier In the 
Union ranks during the Civil war. Mr. Newbanks affiliates with the Baptist church, but 
Jlrs. Newbanks was' reared an Episcopalian. He supports the democratic party, although he 
is somewhat indejjendent in his views and gives more attention to the qualifications of a can- 
didate for office than he does to party affiliation. In 1897 he was appointed by Governor Lee 
commissioner of brands and marks (for cattle) and he has been a member of this commission 
nearly ever since, having been continued in office by each succeeding governor with the excep- 
tion of the first. Four years of this time he has served as chairman of this board and the 
satisfactorj' manner in which he has served the state is evident in the fact that he has been 
retained in the position by each succeeding administration. In 1905 :Hr. Newbanks was 
elected auditor of the city of Pierre and ably served for five years in that rapacity. Many 
are the interesting tales which he can relate of times when this state was in its formative 
period, and it must be highly satisfactory to him that lie has had the privilege of taking 
part in the molding of its history. He is lii;;lily rcs|nitcd and esteemed as a pioneer and as 
a man who has accompUshed something wcntli wlnlr, and such honor as has come to him is 
well earned and merited. He has turned his ability to good account in achieving success for 
himself and in contributing toward the prosperity of a great commonwealth which is indebted 
for its very existence to such hardy and enterprising pioneers as Noah Newbanks. 



HENRY C. FOGLESONG. 



Henry C. Foglesong is an extensive landowner of Belmont township. Spink county, 
iwning nine hundred and sixty-two acres lying mainly on section 10. He was born in 
ioodhue county, Minnesota. May 27, 1860. a son of Charles and Mary (Derking) Foglesong, 
ivho removed to Minnesota in 1856 and were numbered among the prominent early settlers 
if that state. The father is still living in Kenyon, Minnesota, at the age of eighty-two years, 
nit the mother passed away in 1915 at the age of seventy-four. 

Henry C. Foglesong attended the schools in the neighborhood of his father's farm, and 
ivhen sixteen years of age put aside his textbooks, devoting his entire time to assisting his 



22 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

father until ISSO. He then came to South Dakota and investigated conditions here. He 
returned to Minnesota, however, but in 1882 came again to this state, traveling from 
Watertown bj' stage, and entered a homestead. The following year he located permanently 
upon his land and has since resided there. He cultivates about five hundred acres and 
raises excellent crops annually. He also keeps twenty-four horses, about sixty-one cattle 
and thirty-five hogs in addition to engaging quite extensively in poultry raising. He has 
adapted his methods of farming to soil and climate and as he manages his affairs judiciously 
his yearly income is much more than suflicient for his living expenses. He has accumulated 
a competence and is considered one of the substantial men of his locality. 

Mr. Foglesong was married in Goodlivie county, Minnesota, on the 15th of March, 1883, 
to Miss Sophia Lips, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Lips. Both her parents are buried 
m Goodhue county. To Mr. and Mrs. Foglesong have been born six children: Alfred, in 
business at Tulare, Spink county; Arthur, who is farming in Belmont township, Spink 
county; Susan, the wife of Melvin A. BoUenbach, a farmer of Rice county, Minnesota; and 
Hattie, Pearl and Earl, at home. 

Mr. Foglesong is steadfast in his allegiance to the republican party and for ten years 
served as county supervisor. He is a member of the German Methodist Episcopal church, 
and is not only willing to contribute of his means to its support, but also takes an active 
part in its work. Fraternally he is a member of the Jlodern Woodmen of America. He 
attributes his success to his habits of industry and the assistance and encouragement of 
his good wife. They are one of the most highly esteemed couples of Spink county and 
their friends are legion. 



WILLIS H. BONHAM. 



Willis H. Bonham has for a number of years been the publisher of the Pioneer Times, 
an excellent morning daily of Deadwood, and has made his paper one of the leading journals 
of western South Dakota. He was born in Jasper county, Illinois, near the town of Newton, 
on the 13th of January, 1847, a son of Levi M. and Mary (Hunt) Bonham, both born near 
Richmond, Virginia, the father in 1813 and the mother in 1820. The father was a farmer 
and civil engineer and in 1840 went west, settling in Jasper county, Illinois. He was mar- 
ried in that state and continued to reside there until a few years before his death, when 
he removed to Iowa and located at Villisca, where both he and his wife passed away. His 
death occurred in 1890 and his widow survived him for five years. ^Vhile in Jasper county, 
Illinois, the father served for some time as county surveyor. 

Willis H. Bonham is the fourth in a family of eleven children born to his parents. He 
attended school in a log schoolhouse in Illinois, but his educational opportunities were quite 
limited, much of his knowledge being self acquired. At the age of eighteen he began working 
on neighboring farms in the Prairie state and so continued for two years, after which he 
removed to Denver, Colorado, where he learned the house decorating trade, which he followed 
for four years. He then came to Deadwood in 1877 and for one year did sign painting and 
then drifted into the newspaper business, being first employed in running a hand press on 
the Pioneer, the first paper in Deadwood, the date of its establishment being June 8, 1876. 
Its owners were Merrick & Laughlan and he continued with them for a number of years and 
was also connected with the Times, which was started in April, 1877, by Porter Warner. In 
1885 Mr. Bonham became the owner of the Pioneer and twelve years later purchased the 
Times and consolidated the two papers, forming the Pioneer Times. He has installed modern 
equipment and put in the first linotype machines used in Western Dakota. The Pioneer 
Times is issued as a morning daily and as a weekly paper. The old Pioneer was made a 
daily in 1877 and its successor, the Pioneer Times, has grown steadily in circulation and 
influence, being now one of the best dailies in western South Dakota. Its news columns 
give complete and reliable accounts of all happenings of local interest and also of events 
in the world at large. Its editorials are trenchant and its large circulation makes it an 
excellent advertising medium. The office is also prepared to do all kinds of job work and 
that department is proving a very lucrative one. Mr. Bonham is interested in a number 
of local business enterprises, being a director and stockholder in the Franklin Hotel Company, 




WILLIS H. BONHAM 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 25 

a stockholder in the Black Hills Trust & Savings Bank and in the First National Bank. He 
also is part owner of a number of gold mines and holds title to considerable real estate in 
Ueadwood and in Denver, Colorado. 

Mr. Bonham belongs to the Christian Science church and fraternally is a member of 
the Elks and the Knights of Pythias. His political allegiance is given to the republican 
jiarty and he has served as city clerk of Deadwood for four terms and as postmaster for 
one term, being capable and conscientious in the performance of his duties. He is widely 
known not only in Deadwood but throughout the Black Hills, and his ability and integrity 
have won for him many friends. 



MARVIN LOYD WEED. 



JIarvin Loyd Weed, a successful representative of business interests in Fort Pierre, is 
the proprietor of a general mercantile establishment and enjoys an enviable patronage in 
this connection. His birth occurred in Oakdale, Wisconsin, on the 11th of October, 1867, 
his parents being William David and Helen (Meloy) Weed. His paternal grandmother, 
Caroline (Jones) (originally Jans) Weed, was a descendant of Anneke Jans, who owned a 
farm in what is now the heart of New York city. 

Our subject was twelve years of age when in 1879 he accompanied the family on 
their removal to Solomon City, Kansas. The following year, however, they became resi- 
dents of Livermore, Humboldt county, Iowa, and from there removed to Sully county. 
South Dakota, on the 16th of May, 1884. The father, who was a shoemaker by trade, 
died in 1910, but the mother is still living and now makes her home in McMinnville. 
Oregon. 

Marvin L. Weed has devoted his attention to merchandising throughout his entire busi- 
ness career. He lived with his parents on the homestead until 1889, when he went to 
Onida, South Dakota, where he entered the employ of a mercantile establishment as clerk, 
remaining there until 1897. He was afterward in the employ of the McLaughlin Company 
at Highmore, South Dakota, but in 1902 located in Fort Pierre and was in the employ 
of E. F. Dorothy for two years. In 1904 he established the business which has since been 
conducted under the firm style of M. L. Weed & Company, being now the proprietor of 
an attractive and up-to-date establishment which enjoys an extensive and profitable trade. 
He carries a large and well selected stock of goods which he sells at reasonable prices and 
has an unassailable reputation for business integrity and fair dealing. 

On the 34th of June, 1903, at Genoa, Illinois, Mr. Weed was united in marriage to 
Miss Carrie Venelia Arnold, a daughter of Elijah B. Arnold, and they have one child, Helen 
Venelia Weed. In his political views Mr. Weed has always been a republican, regarding the 
principles of that party as most conducive to good government, and he is now acceptably 
serving as one of the county commissioners of Stanley county. 



FREDERICK W. MINTY, M. D. 

The rapid development of the science of surgery within the last few decades has been 
one of the greatest marvels of our modern civilization and it is but natural that many young 
men of great natural ability have been attracted to its study and practice. Dr. Frederick 
W. Minty is one of the leading surgeons of Rapid City and has already gained considerable 
prominence in that part of the state. He was born in Shannon, Illinois, April 28, 1882, 
a son of Rev. Walter F. Minty, a native of England. As a young man he emigrated to the 
United States and became one of the pioneer missionaries of the Methodist Episcopal 
church in the Black Hills country. His wife, who was in her maidenhood Maria S. Reming- 
ton, is still living and resides at Mitchell, this state. 

Dr. Minty is the third in order of birth in a family of five children, and after finishing 
the public school course entered the Dakota Wesleyan College. After leaving that institu- 
tion he took a medical course at the Sioux City College of Medicine and was graduated 



26 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

therefrom with the degree of M. D. in 1904. He first practiced his profession at Woon- 
socket, South Dakota, where he remained until 1907, and in that year he removed to Rapid 
City, which has since been his home. He has confined his work altogether to surgery and 
his wide experience and constant study are bringing him rapid advancement in his chosen 
profession. He founded the Jlethodist Deaconess Hospital of Rapid City and is the head 
surgeon of that institution. His private practice is large and of an important character 
and his reputation has already extended throughout his part of South Dakota. His high 
standing among his colleagues is indicated by the fact that he is secretary and treasurer of 
the Black Hills Medical Society and he is also a member of the Clinical Congress of Sur- 
geons of North America, a body composed only of surgeons of proven ability. 

Dr. Minty was married on the 10th of October, 1906, to Miss Caroline Crawford, daugh- 
ter of Captain James K. Crawford, of Sioux City, Iowa. The Doctor and his wife have 
two children. Earl and ilarion. His right of suffrage is exercised independently, as he pre- 
fers to vote for those candidates whom he deems best suited for the office rather than to 
follow blindly the dictates of party leaders. His religious allegiance is given to the Metho- 
dist church, in the work of which he is quite prominent, being a member of the board of 
trustees. Fraternally he is identified with the Masonic order. His greatest enjoyment out- 
side of his work is found in fishing, shooting and motoring, and he is very fond of all 
athletic sports. At college he took a leading part in athletics as a member of the track 
team and later coached the Sioux City Giants, which was considered the fastest basket- 
ball team of its day. He is an accomplished musician and quite prominent in musical 
circles, being known especially for his work as leader of the Methodist Episcopal churcli 
choir. He has not only succeeded professionally but has won financial prosperity and has 
invested quite heavily in irrigated ranch lands in Montana. While his labors as a surgeon 
require the greater part of his time and while he has won deserved recognition as an able 
representative of his profession he has also found opportunity to take part in many other 
activities of life and is a man of well balanced powers and interests. 



WALTER H. COX. 



W^alter H. Cox is a factor in journalistic circles of South Dakota as editor and publisher 
of the Fairfax Advertiser, which he purchased in 1909. His birth occurred in Lafayette, 
Indiana, on the 5th of September, 1860, his parents being Sanford C. and Cliarity E. (Davis) 
Cox, likewise natives of the Hoosier state. Joseph Cox, the paternal grandfather of our 
subject, was a native of Kentucky. For many years the Cox family have annually held a 
reunion at Campbell's Island in the Mississippi river. Sanford C. Cox was a lawyer by 
profession and an able writer, being the author of a volume of poems depicting pioneer days 
and also of a book entitled "History of the Wabash Valley." He was the first recorder of 
Tippecanoe county, Indiana, and a prominent political leader and speaker, stumping the 
state in the campaigns of both Lincoln and Grant. His religious faith was that of the 
Methodist church. His wife was a daughter of George Davis, who fell a victim to the cholera 
plague of the '40s, dying while on a trip to St. Louis. 

Walter H. Cox, the second in order of birth in a family of six children, acquired his 
education in the graded and high schools of his native town and since early boyhood has 
been interested in the newspaper business, printing a small sheet on a hand press while still 
in school. This was called the Lafayette Bee and later became one of the city's leading 
journals. Subsequently Mr. Cox and his brother Joseph established the Lafayette Call, 
which became one of the most widely read newspapers of the state. His brothers are prac- 
tical printers and the inventors of the Cox press and various other printing machinery in 
universal use. In 1887 Mr. Cox made his way westward and became connected with the 
Sioux City Daily Tribune of Sioux City, where he remained as general mechanical foreman 
until 1909. In that year he located in Fairfax, South Dakota, and purchased the Advertiser, 
of which he has since been the editor and publisher. The sheet is devoted to the dissemina- 
tion of local and general news and boasts an extensive advertising and subscription 
patronage. 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 27 

On May 11, 1878, Mr. Cox married Miss Anna Eeese, of Francesville, Indiana, and to 
this union were born two children: Jessie B. and Joseph S., who are now living in North 
Dakota. His first wife died in November, 1885, and on the 24th of October, 1894, Mr. Cox was 
united in marriage to Miss Bessie Richardson, by whom he has two children: Milton and 
Ralph. 

In politics Mr. Cox is a stanch republican, and in 1914 was elected to the state legis- 
lature, serving with distinction during the session of 1915 as chairman of the committees 
on engrossing and enrolling, insurance and printing. Iraternally he is identified with the 
ilodern Woodmen of America, while his religious faith is that of the Baptist church. As a 
means of recreation he indulges in hunting, boating and other outdoor sports. His baa 
been a well spent life, in which he has made good use of his opportunities. Early realizing 
that there is no excellence without labor and that the present and not the future holds one'a 
chance for advancement, he has so directed his efforts day by day that he has laid a solid 
foundation for a successful career. His friends — and they are many — find bim a genial, 
companionable gentleman and his good traits are acknowledged by all who know him. 



ERICK B. ERICKSON. 



Krick B. Erickson, a well known farmer of Clay county, was born in Sweden, August 
12, 1863, a son of Andrew B. and Bertha (Jens) Erickson, both of whom were natives of 
(Sweden. The father's birth occurred July 12, 1835, and in May, 1800, in his native land, 
he was married. Nine years later he came to the United States and a year later was 
followed by his family. Upon theu- anival a removal was made to Sioux City, which 
remained the family home for two years. In 1873 they emigrated to Dakota territory and 
Mr. Erickson homesteaded land southwest of Beresford, this state, where he resided for 
forty years. In 1913 he retired from active farm work and removed to Beresford, where he 
lived at the time of his death, which occurred October 17, 1913, when he was seventy-eight 
years old. He was one of the first to settle in that part of the state and experienced ah 
of the hardships and privations incident to making a home in a pioneer region. He was not 
discouraged and was rewarded by achieving personal success and by witnessing the rapid 
transformation that made of wild prairies cultivated farms and thriving towns. To him 
and his wife were born ten children : Erick B., of this review : August, who is farming 
near Newell, this state; Gertie, the wife of Ed Cambell, of Beresford; Charles, deceased; 
Alfred, of Clay county; Albert, residing in Beresford; Erika, deceased; Minnie, the wife 
of August Danielson; and two who died in infancy. 

Mr. Erickson was seven years old when he accompanied his mother to this country. 
He had onlj' attended school one week in his native land but after the family home was 
established in Sioux City he attended the public schools there. Subsequently his father 
removed to a farm and he then was a student in the country schools. However, he had 
but limited opportunities to secure a scholastic education as he was the oldest in the family 
and was compelled to work much of the time even during his boyhood. He put aside his 
text-books when sixteen years of age and began working for others at farm labor, being so 
employed in various states. After his marriage he rented a farm for two years and then 
homesteaded land in Lyman county, this state. He relinquished his homestead after 
residing thereon for three years and for about eight years rented land, after which he 
engaged in the livery business at Mission Hill for three years. At the end of that time 
he returned to Lyman county and homesteaded another quarter section but sold his improve- 
ments thereon after a short time. He went to Yankton, South Dakota, and after living 
there for a time purchased forty acres near that city and rented it for the first year. He 
then operated it himself for a year, after which he returned home and purchased the 
homestead from his father. The latter lived with our subject for fifteen months and then 
removed to Beresford, where he resided until his death. Mr. Erickson of this review still 
owns in addition to the home place of one hundred and sixty acres forty acres adjoining 
Yankton. He does general farming and the sale of his crops yields him a good sum of 
money annually. He has also given considerable attention to the stock business and finds 
that quite prontable. 



28 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

Mr. Eiickson was married on the 25th of June, 1890, to Miss Louisa Anderson, a native 
of Norway and a daughter of Andrew S. and Carolina Anderson. Both of her parents were 
born in Xorway and passed their entire lives there. The father was a farmer by occu- 
pation. Their family numbered eight children: John, of Norway; Louisa, the wife of our 
subject; Rika and Edward, who are residing on farms in Norway; Christian, of Portland, 
Oregon; Olina, who married Victor Bloomquist, of Minneapolis, Minnesota; Mary, of North 
Dakota ; and Julia, who is still living in Norway. To Mr. and Mrs. Erickson were born 
four children: Anna, a public-school graduate and the wife of Chris Steinbach, a merchant 
of Mission Hill, South Dakota; Esther, who is a graduate of the Yankton schools and is 
residing at home; Edna, at home; and one who died in infancy. 

Mr. Erickson is a democrat and although not an office seeker is at present serving as 
constable. He was formerly identified with the ancient Order of United Workmen and the 
Modern Woodmen of America but has severed his connection with those organizations. In 
all that he has done he has displayed the pioneer spirit, brooking no obstacles that might 
be overcome by determined effort and, believing always that industry, good judgment and 
perseverance would bring success, his faith has been justilied and he is now numbered 
among the prosperous agriculturists of Clay county. 



DANIEL SJHTH GLIDDEN. 



Sioux Falls numbers among its most representative and valued citizens Daniel S. Glidden, 
who has been a resident of the city since 187S. During the intervening period his interests 
have extended to many fields touching closely the political and business growth of the com- 
munity, so that he has taken an active part in the work of progress. He has been a power 
in the councils of the democratic party in his part of the territory and state and has held 
various positions of public trust and responsibility, all of which he filled with credit and 
ability. He is now practically retired from active business. 

Mr. Glidden was born in Clarendon, Orleans county. New York. February 24, 1844, and 
was reared upon a farm in that locality, attending the district schools during his childhood. 
He later completed his education at the Halley Academy and State Normal School at Brock- 
port, New York, and afterward taught in that state for one term. In 1867 he removed to 
Anamosa, Iowa, and there engaged in teaching school during the following winter, afterward 
moving to Indian Town, where he was in charge of the public schools for four years. Dur- 
ing the next four years he was interested in a mercantile business at Montour, Iowa, and at 
the same time had charge of the public schools of that community for four years. 

In 1878 Mr. Glidden removed to Sioux Falls, South Dakota, and he is consequently one 
of the early settlers in this city, in the development and growth of which he has taken an 
active interest since that time. For five years after his arrival he engaged in the boot and 
shoe business, but later he resumed his political activities, becoming a member of the terri- 
torial executive committee of the democratic party and treasurer of the organization. In 
1887 he was elected warden of the South Dakota penitentiary and he conducted that insti- 
tution for two years, with credit to himself and the territory. Of late years Mr. Glidden has 
given his attention to the insurance business in Sioux Falls and has built up a large and 
representative patronage, winning an enviable place in business circles. 

Mr. Glidden has been an active Mason for thirty-nine years and has held nearly every 
office in his lodge, chapter and commandery, being past master, past high priest and past 
commander. During the year 1887-8 he held the office of grand commander of the territory 
of Dakota. A wide reader and of broad and liberal views, he is regarded as one of the best 
informed men in the state and his discussion of any subject shows a cultured and well 
trained mind. These gifts make him very popular in social circles and during the period of 
his residence in Sioux Falls he has gained a wide and representative circle of friends. Sioux 
Falls is proud to number him among her citizens and he in turn is proud of the achievements 
of the city with which he has allied his interests for thirty-six years. 

In 1871 Mr. Glidden was united in marriage to Miss Josephine Martin, of Clarendon. New 
York, a daughter of Dan and Dorcas Martin, who were prominent citizens of that place. In 
the spring of 1885 Mr. and Mrs. Martin came to Sioiix Falls and made their home with our 




DANIEL S. GLIDDEX 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 31 

subject and his wife until called to their final rest. Mrs. Glidden has been very active in 
connection with the public library and its development. Some thirty years ago a little band 
of ten started an association to organize a library, Mrs. Gliddcn brcomina one of its 
charter members. For about fifteen years a small fee was charged ami tin- lilirai y was cared 
for by volunteers from the ranks of the organizers. From this a> a iiin Ini-. tin- Larnegie 
Library today has grown and jVIi'S. Glidden has been actively conm-itid uitli it througliout 
all these years in an ofHcial capacity, serving as a member of the board for many years and 
is still secretary. She is a member of the Woman's Study Club and was one of the charter 
members of The History Club, which was the first woman's club organized in the territory 
of Dakota. 



ETHAN ALLEN. 



Tlie name of Allen has been closely associated with the work of upbuilding and advance- 
ment in Rapid City and the Black Hills country. Ethan Allen was born at New Lebanon, 
Sullivan county, Indiana, March 7, 1864. His father, Levi Allen, who made farming a life 
occupation, died when his son Ethan was but five years of age. The mother bore the 
maiden name of Eliza J. Cartwright and both were natives of Indiana, to whicli state 
the paternal grandfather, John Allen, removed on leaving Kentucky. He befame one of 
the pioneers of Sullivan county, establishing his home thei-e in 1835. 

Ethan Allen acquired his education in the common schools of his native county and in 
a business college at Terre Haute, Indiana. At. the age of nineteen years he bicame con- 
nected with the news and confectionery business, having a lobby stand In the Sullivan 
postoftice, where he remained for three years. On the expiration of that period he sold 
out and came to Dakota ter-itory in May, 1886, to join his brother Edward. Making His 
way to Rapid City, the brothers formed a partnership for the conduct of a restaurant 
business and later established a confectionery store, which they conducted for a year and 
a half. In 1887 they went to the Box Elder district, where they began stock-raising and 
farming. They secured a homestead, a tree claim and a pr<'oni|itiiin claim in that district. 
The mother went to the Box Elder district with her two sens ami their adopted sister and 
likewise took a claim. The family added to their properties until tliey were owners of a 
ranch of twenty-four hundred acres, on which they engaged in the raising of cattle and 
horses and also carried on general farming and which was known as the Allen Brothers' A. 
L. N. lUneh. 

In 1901 Ethan Allen came to Rapid City and the following year disposed of his ranch 
interests. On settling in Rapid City he opened a real-estate office and the next year was 
joined by his brother Edward under the firm style of Allen Brothers. They have since 
continued in the real-estate business with gratifying success. They organized the Rapid 
City Real Estate & Abstract Company, of which Ethan Allen is the secretary and treasurer. 
He is likewise secretary of the Rapid City Implement Company and is a stockholder in the 
Rapid Town Site Company. He is the vice president and one of the stockholders in the 
Unity Block, Inc., and is a stockholder in the Dakota Power Company, in the Rapid City 
Packing Company, the First National Life and Accident Insurance Company, the Black 
Hills Building & Loan Company and in the Rajiid Invest imnt Companj'. He has thus 
extended his interests and activities to various ccHinerti..ii--. milNing him one of the leading 
business men of this section of the state. His interests lia\e e\er been of a character wliich 
have contributed to public progress as well as to individual success. 

Mr. Allen lost his mother on the 6th of August, 1912, when she had reached the age 
of seventy-four years. Since coming to South Dakota with her sons she had been continu- 
ously a resident of this state and had been connected with them in some of tlieir business 
investments. 

In his political views ilr. Allen has ever been an earnest republican and is one of the 
recognized leaders of the party in this section of the state. He was county assessor from 
1892 until 1895 inclusive, or for a term of four years, and for many years was treasurer 
of the Moulton school district. He also served as alderman of the first ward of Rapid 
City in 1907 and in 1911 he was appointed to fill a vacancy in the office of county treasurer. 



32 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

while later he was elected to that position for a term of two years, serving until January 
1, 1915. For six years he filled the ofBee of clerk of the school board and in May, 1914, he 
was elected one of the first three citj' commissioners for a term of four years. He was 
made commissioner of police, fire, streets, alleys and public property and is now serving in 
that capacity, making a most creditable record in office by his fidelity and devotion to the 
general welfare. 

In his fraternal connections Jlr. Allen is an Elk and a Knight of Pythias. In the lodge 
of the latter organization he has been keeper of the records and seal for five years. He 
belongs to the Methodist church, is a member of its board of trustees and is a director of 
the Mountain View Cemetery Association. He has always taken an active interest in all 
progressive movements and is one of the representative citizens of the county and state. 
His untiring efforts have carried him steadily forward and his work has ever been of an 
important nature, contributing to public progress as well as to individual success. 



CHARLES LANSING DAWLEY. 

Charles Lansing Dawley, successfully engaged in the real-estate and insurance business 
at De Smet, is well known as one of the honored pioneer settlers of the state, coming here 
more than a third of a century ago. His birth occurred in Plymouth, Wisconsin, on the 
29th of February, 1856, his parents being Richard L. and Mary (Averill) Dawley. He 
acquired his education in the public schools of St. Charles, Minnesota, and in 1879, when a 
young man of twenty-three years, came to South Dakota, locating at Goodwin, Deuel 
county. When De Smet was platted he removed to that place and there embarked in the 
lumber business, being thus engaged for six years. On the expiration of that period he was 
appointed clerk of courts under the Cleveland administration, holding that position all 
through the territorial days and serving as clerk under Judge, afterward Governor, Church. 
When the territory was divided he embarked in the real-estate and insurance business and 
in that field of activity has remained continuously to the present time, having won a. 
gratifying and well merited measure of prosperity through the careful conduct of his inter- 
ests. After arriving in this state he preempted the northwest quarter of section 22, town- 
ship 111, range 56, and also homesteaded the southeast quarter of section 21, township 111, 
range 56, and encountered many of the experiences and hardships of the pioneer in an 
undeveloped and sparsely settled region. 

On the 7th of December, 1887, Mr. Dawley was united in marriage to Miss Florence 
Garland, a daughter of Walter Garland, who came to South Dakota :n the year 1878. To 
them have been born two children, namely: Edmund, who died when eighteen years of age; 
and Walter A. 

Mr. Dawley is a stanch democrat in his political views and has done able service as a 
member of the city council and the school board. Fraternally he is identified with the 
Masons, having attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite and being a member 
of the Mystic Shrine at Sioux Falls. He also belongs to the Ancient Order of United Work- 
men and the Modern Woodmen of America. Hunting and fishing afford him recreation and 
pleasure and he is equally popular and esteemed in the social as well as the business circles 
of his adopted city and state. 



CHARLES R. ROBERTSON. 



Charles R. Robertson is a member of the Robertson-Schwartz Company at Redfield, 
where he has been active in business since 1911. Although the interim to the present is of 
brief duration, it has been sufficient to establish his position as an energetic, enterprising and 
ambitious business man— such a one as contributes to public prosperity while advancing 
individual success. He was born on the 5th of September, 1887, in Arlington, Wisconsin, 
and is a son of William and Janet (Mair) Robertson, natives of Scotland. The father was 
one of the pioneer settlers of the Badger state and there followed farming to the time of 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 33 

his death, which occurred November 2, 1909, when he was seventy-three years of age. His 
widow still resides in Lodi, where they reared their family of six children: Robert H., who 
is now residing in Creston, South Dakota; Agnes, at home; Thomas, who is living in Winne- 
bago, Minnesota; William, who died in May, 1913, at the age of thirty-seven years and 
was buried in Winnebago, Minnesota; Charles R.; and David J., who was manager of the 
advertising department of the Dakota Farmer, until September 1, 1914, when he resigned 
to enter the Iowa State College at Ames, Iowa, where he is specializing in animal hus- 
bandry. After completing his course there he intends to return to South Dakota and 
engage in modern scientific farming. 

Charles R. Robertson acquired his education in Arlington and Poynette, Wisconsin, and 
in Parker College, Winnebago, Minnesota, where he was graduated with the class of 1906. 
He then went to Minneapolis, where he was employed by Wyman Patridge & Company, 
wholesale dry-goods merchants, with whom he continued for one year, receiving his initial 
business experience there. He afterward went to Winnebago, Minnesota, where he had ex- 
perience in the retail dry-goods line, continuing for two years at that place. He subsequently 
occupied positions with various large department stores in Chicago and other cities before 
taking up Iiis permanent abode in South Dakota. He removed to this state from Lodi, Wis- 
consin. At Aberdeen, South Dakota, he was with the Olwin Angell Company with which he 
continued for two years and then established an exclusive shoe business at Aberdeen, which 
he conducted for two years. On selling out there in the spring of 1911, he came to Redfield 
and took over The Leader, a department store of Redfield, organizing the Robertson-Schwartz 
Company for the conduct of the business, which has proven successful from the beginning. 
Theirs is today one of the largest stores of the kind in South Dakota, outside of Sioux Falls, 
their trade covering a wide territory and reaching a large figure annually. They carry an 
extensive and carefully selected line of goods and their business merits the substantial 
growth wliich has come to it. 

On the 14th of February, 1914, in Kansas City, Missouri, Mr. Robertson was united 
in marriage to Miss Mary Armstrong, a daughter of Dr. J. Clayton Armstrong of that place, 
and their hospitable home is most popular with the many friends that they have won 
during the brief period of their residence in Redfield. In politics Mr. Robertson is a 
progressive republican and fraternally he is connected with the Masons in the lodge, chapter 
and commandery. Laudable ambition has guided him in all of his business relations and 
indefatigable energy and unfaltering determination are bringing to him substantial 



CAMILLO VON WOEHRMANX. 

Camillo Von Woehrmann, editor and owner of the Harney Peak Jlining News, published 
at Hill City, was born in Dresden, Germany, October 4, 1852, a son of Harry and Virginia 
\'on Woehrmann, both of whom were natives of Livonia, Russia, and never left Europe to 
become residents of the new world. 

Camillo Von Woehrmann attended college at Dresden and in 1875, when in the twenty- 
third year of his age, bade adieu to friends and native land and sailed for the United States. 
He landed at New York, after which he traveled through Texas and Old Mexico, and in 
the summer of 1877 arrived in the Hills. For a short time he was in Deadwood and then 
Avent to Rockerville, where he engaged in placer mining for six years. He devoted the suc- 
ceeding summer to prospecting for tin and in 1885 he arrived in Hill City, where he also 
prospected for tin. In 1890 he turned his attention to newspaper publication, purchasing a 
paper which had been established for about a month. He then began the publication of a 
democratic paper known as the Harney Peak Mining News, which he has since conducted. 
It is published weekly and is devoted to the interests of mining and to the Black Hills in 
general. It is a well patronized sheet and meets a need in the life of the community. Mr. 
Von Woehrmann is a stockholder in a number of mines near Hill City and also in Nevada 
but devotes the greater part of his attention to his newspaper office, which is equipped 
for all kinds of job printing and turns out excellent work. 

In his political views Mr. Von Woehrmann has always been a stalwart democrat and 
is now serving as justice of the peace, which position he has occupied continuously since 



34 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

1890. He is well known in Masonic circles, having taken tlie degrees of the Scottish Rite, 
and is the present master of the blue lodge at Hill City. He also has membership with the 
Elks at Rapid City. An alert, enterprising business man, he accomplishes what he under- 
takes and is ever actuated by the spirit of progress and advancement. 



KNUT HELGESEN. 



Among those of foreign birth who have become loyal and valuable citizens of this coun- 
try is numbered Knut Helgesen, a farmer and stock-raiser, residing on section 5, Spirit Mound 
township. Clay county. A native of Norway, his birth occurring in 1843, he remained there 
until a man of mature years and in 1888 emigrated to the United States, settling in South 
Dakota. His parents never left their native land. While in Norway Mr. Helgesen engaged 
in merchandising for many years and at the same time owned a fishing vessel. After arriv- 
ing in this state he worked at the carpenter's trade until his second marriage, which occurred 
in 1894, and since that date has devoted his time and attention to farming, owning a product- 
ive and valuable tract of land which comprises two hundred and eighty acres situated in 
school district No. 2, Spirit Mound township. Clay county. In addition to the production 
of grain he raises stock and finds that the two phases of agriculture coordinate well. He is 
energetic and enterprising and receives a good income from his farm. 

Mr. Helgesen was first married to Miss Guli Sirina, who passed away in 1883, and to 
that union were born seven children, six of whom survive: Helga Bernt, residing in Norway; 
Martha, whose home is at Great Falls, Montana; Engbaar, also living in Norway; Amelia, 
of Great Falls, Montana; Signi T. Constance, who lives in Norway; and Carl John, of 
Turner county. South Dakota. In 1894 Mr. Helgesen was joined in wedlock to Miss 
Martha Siverson, a native of Iowa and a daughter of Ingebrigt and Susan Siverson. Her 
parents were both born in Norway but emigrated to America in 1856 and settled in 
Iowa, where they resided for a time. They next went to Nebraska and a short time later 
removed to Dakota territory, where they continued to reside. The father was one of the first 
settlers of Clay county and took up both a preemption and homestead claim. He followed 
farming and stock-raising until his retirement from active life, passing away in 1896, having 
survived his wife for about twenty years. They were the parents of four daughters, two 
of whom survive: Mrs. Helgesen; and Gurine, the wife of John Rice, of Clay county, who 
purchased a part of the Siverson homestead. At one time Mr. Siverson owned nearly one 
thousand acres of land but at the time of his death had disposed of all but five hundred and 
twenty acres, all of which was under cultivation. Two hundred and sixty acres of Mr. 
Helgesen's farm was formerly in the possession of his father-in-law. To our subject and his 
wife was born a son, Simon, who died in infancy. 

Mr. and Mrs. Helgesen are members of the Lutheran church and are active in the sup- 
port of all good works. Mr. Helgesen is a republican in his political belief but has never 
sought nor desired public office. He takes, however, a commendable interest in the welfare 
of his community and is recognized as a good citizen. His record is one of honor and has 
gained him many stanch friends. 



JIRS. LYDIA BERNHARDINA JOHNSON. 

South Dakota is proud of the record of Mrs. Lydia Bernhardina Johnson, the wife of 
Julius H. Johnson of Fort Pierre. As lecturer and lawyer she has gained wide reputation 
and her clear and forceful presentation of the subjects of which she treats shows that she 
has mastered every phase of the point at issue. She has done effective work in club organ- 
izations, on the political platform and in behalf of progressive measures dealing with the 
most vital and significant problems of the age. Mrs. Johnson was born in Sweden, March 
6, 1875, a daughter of Jacob Erik and Caroline Ulrika (Erickson) Carlsson, the former for 
almost forty years a teacher in the schools of Sweden. It was in that country that Jlrs. 
Johnson acquired her early education and after coming to the new world she entered the 




MR. AND SIRS. KKUT HELGESEX 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 37 

high school of West Superior, Wisconsin; from wliich she was in due time graduateil. She 
next became a student in the University of Minnesota and won the Baciielor of Literatiu-e 
degree in 1900. Later slie studied for the bar and was graduated from tlie University of 
South Dakota with the Bachelor of Laws degree in 1912. 

It was on the 19th of June, 1901, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, that she became the wife of 
Julius H. Johnson, now a prominent lawyer and lecturer of South Dakota. Their home is in 
Fort Pierre, although public work calls them in many sections of the state. They are 
parents of a little daughter, Charlotte Amelia Johnson. In the Lutheran church they hold 
membership and Mrs. Johnson is also well known in club circles. She became a charter 
member of the Fort Pierre Woman's Club and her activity in the local organization led 
to her selection for state offices. She served as corresponding secretary from 1906 to 1908 
and as president of the South Dakota Federation of Women's Clubs from 1908 to 1910 
inclusive. She was likewise president of the South Dakota Equal SuiTrage Association in 
1909 and 1910. She is an advocate of the principles of the progressive party and was 
chosen by the national committee as a campaign speaker in 1912. She belongs to the 
Eastern Star, and is also an active worker in the Woman's Christian Temperance Union. 
Her interests are wide and she is active in that great field of social service where men and 
women are working together for the benefit and uplift of the race. On the lecture platform 
she has been wideh' known and extensive travel in Europe has given her a broad view 
of vital questions. She has been a close and discriminating student of manj- points now 
uppermost in the public mind. The following titles of her lectures indicate the extent and 
breadth of her investigations and researches: The School — Our Social Center; Domestic 
Science; Club Work — A Social Service; Equal Suffrage — Civic Duty; Child Labor and the 
Minimum Wage; Legal Status of Women; and Social and Industrial Justice. In all these 
ilrs. Johnson is doing much to solve the problems connected with the sociologic and economic 
questions of the day and her work is fruitful of good results. 



HIRAM B. BIERCE. 



Hiram B. Bierce is president of the Volin State Bank and an enterprising, alert and 
wide-awake citizen who has contributed in substantial measure to the upbuilding and 
advancement of the town and county in which he lives. He first came to Dakota in Sep- 
tember, 1876, to look over the country. He then returned to Iowa, but again came here in 
July, 1877, and has since been a resident of this state. He was born in Mercer county, Penn- 
sylvania, in 1854, a son of Watson and Emily (Ward) Bierce, who in 1865 left their home 
in the Keystone state and removed westward to Iowa. In 1881 they joined their son, Hiram 
B. Bierce in Dakota. The father died in Clay county, South Dakota, while the mother 
passed away in Brule county, this state. 

Following his arrival in Dakota territory, Hiram B. Bierce rented land and in that way 
continued to engage in farming for a decade, during which period he carefully saved his 
earnings. At the end of that time he bought a farm of one hundred and twenty acres on 
section 16, Bethel township. Clay county, where he established his home, and as the years 
passed his careful management of his business affairs and his practical methods of develop- 
ing his farm won him a substantial measure of prosperity. He continued to reside thereon 
until 1909. He sold the property in tliat year and the following year removed to Volin, 
where he has since made his home. He had become interested in the Volin State Bank upon 
its organization in 1902 and has since been identified therewith, advancing with the insti- 
tution until he is now president of the bank. He bends his energies toward its further 
development and the extension of its business relations and he has made it a strong financial 
concern. 

During the period of his residence in this state Mr. Bierce has won substantial success, 
yet all days have not been equally bright. In 1878 he had a crop of early wlieat devoured 
by grasshoppers, but later he plowed the land and raised a crop of corn on it in the same 
year. Other difficulties had to be encountered, but perseverance and determination enabled 
him to overcome the obstacles in his path and gradually he advanced toward the goal of 
success. 



38 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

In 1882 in Parker, South Dakota, ilr. Bierce was united in marriage to Miss Cynthia 
Eclielberry, a daughter of Abraham and Emily (Atwood) Echelberry, natives of Ohio and 
Virginia respectively. Their children were born during the period of their residence in 
Ohio. Their son John was the first of the family to come to Dakota, arriving about 1870, 
removing from Illinois to this state. He drove across the country with teams, being forty- 
one days upon the way. A married sister followed the next year. John Echelberry after- 
ward returned to Ohio, and, accompanied by his brothers, .Joseph and Louis, again drove to 
Dakota, settling in Clay county at a period wlien the work of progress and development 
seemed scarcely begun there. During the flood of March and April, 1881, the parents of 
Mrs. Bierce lived on the bluHs at the edge of the high water and gave refuge to many who 
fled from the flooded bottom lands. They were just removing to Dakota at that time and 
their furniture was still in the freight house at Vermillion. The high water lifted that 
freight house from its foundation and carried it down stream. The railroad lost many 
rods of its rails and the ties were washed from the roadbed and distributed along the 
bluffs. Mrs. Bierce's brother and sister who came in the early '70s lost many crops through 
drought and grasshoppers. One year in the '70s her sister brushed the snow from the vines 
in the garden and gathered a mess of peas on the 12th of April, a deep snow having fallen 
so late in the season. Mr. Bierce, too, has many recollections of the early days which were 
fraught with hardships, privations and trials. In the blizzard, which occuiTed on the 12tli 
of January, 1888, he had started to town on horseback. With the increasing severity of the 
storm he turned back, but could not get through on his horse and left it two miles from 
his home, making the remainder of the distance on foot. The snow was so deep along the 
hills that he sank in to his waist and knew he must try some other expedient than walking, 
so he lay down and rolled up hill until he reached solid ground. He feared that the supply 
of wood was not enough to keep his wife warm and returned in order that he might help 
her to be comfortable through the storm. Mrs. Bierce, however, did not realize the severity 
of the blizzard and was not worrj'ing in the least. 

Mr. Bierce is a republican in his political views, giving unfaltering allegiance to the 
principles of the party, yet never seeking nor desiring office as a reward for his fealty. 
He ranks high in Masonry, holding membership in the lodge and chapter at Vermillion, in 
the consistory at Yankton, in which he has attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish 
Rite, and in the Mystic Shrine at Sioux Falls. He exemplifies in his life the beneficent 
spirit of the craft, which is based upon a recognition of the brotherhood of mankind and 
the obligations thereby entailed. 



PETER M. BARNESS. 



Peter M. Barness, who owns a splendid farm of four hundred acres on section 33, 
Lincoln township, Spink county, is a native of South Dakota and was born on the old 
homestead which is now in possession of his mother, Mrs. Christina Barness. His father, 
Martin P. Barness, has passed away. The birth of Peter M. Barness occurred March 18, 1883, 
and he was reared under the parental roof, gaining much valuable knowledge by assisting 
with the work of the farm. At the usual age he entered the public schools of Lincoln town- 
ship and continued his studies until eighteen years of age. For four years he gave his 
parents the benefit of his labors and then worked at carpentering for one year. At the 
end of that time he again turned his attention to farming and has since followed that occu- 
pation. He is now operating four hundred acres of land, and is carrying on mixed farming, 
as he finds the raising of both grain and stock profitable. He keeps about twenty horses, 
eighteen cattle, and sixty hogs, in addition to several hundred chickens. He is alert, enter- 
prising and industrious and is already accounted one of the well-to-do farmers of his 
locality. 

Mr. Barness was married in the fall of 1905 in Mica, Washington, to Miss Margery 
McGaffin, a daughter of George and Eliza (Copeland) McGaffin, both of whom were born 
at Belfast, Ireland, but now reside at Niagara, North Dakota. They settled in Minnesota 
on emigrating to the new world but removed to Lincoln township, Spink county, in the 
early '80s. In 1904 they went to Washington but returned to North Dakota in 1907. Mrs. 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 39 

Barness is a native of the township in which she now makes her home. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Harness have been born two children: Eleanor M. and Milton G. Mr. Barness is inde- 
pendent in politics, casting his vote for those men and measures that he deems most likely 
to advance the community's interest. He is a son of a pioneer family and manifests the 
same courage and determination that characterized the early settlers of this state, and 
many movements for the general good have profited by his advice and cooperation. 



H. \V. PETERSOX. 



H. W. Peterson is a merchant and landowner residing at Alsen, on the line that 
separates Union and Clay counties. He was born in Illinois in 1882, a son of J. P. Peterson. 
The family removed to Clay county, this state, when Mr. Peterson of this review was but 
two years of age. The father proved up a homestead in Garfield township and operated 
that farm until his retirement in 1899. Since that time he has resided in Vermillion, and 
his wife is also living. Their family numbers five children: .Julia, the wife of C. H. Jacob- 
son, who is a partner of H. W. Peterson in the conduct of a mercantile business; P. H., 
residing on the old homestead: Clara, the wife of John Easmussen, of Union county; H. W.; 
and Meckie, the wife of J. W. Fowler, Jr., of Deadwood, Soutli Dakota. 

H. W. Peterson attended the public schools of Clay county until he was si.vteen years 
of age and then began working as a farm hand, so continuing until 1900. He then entered 
the employ of C. H. Jacobson, the owner of a store, as a clerk, and in 1908 was taken into 
the firm as a partner. They conduct a store at Beresford and one at Alsen, Mr. Peterson 
being the manager of the latter. He also has a third interest in one hundred and sixty 
acres of land in Lake county, this state, and is treasurer of the Alsen, Beresford & Emmet 
Telephone Company and treasurer of the Alsen Creamery Company. The store conducted 
by Mr. Peterson and his partner is one of the best equipped in their section of the state 
and the business is steadily growing in importance as the high quality of the goods and 
tlie reasonableness of the prices asked become more widely knwon. 

In 1909 Mr. Peterson was united In marriage to Miss Theodosia Spensley, who was 
born at Vermillion, Clay county, and is a daughter of ilr. and Mrs. J.. M. Spensley, the 
former a native of Dubuque. He and his wife were among the early settlers of Cla.v 
county and became the parents of five children: Pearl, who married W. H. Carter, a resi- 
dent of Montana; J. E., whose home is at Vermillion, this state; Ella, the wife of Hany 
Kolb, of Vermillion; Theodosia. now Mrs. Peterson; and Merrill, the wife of Josejih Kippil. 
of Lesterville. Mrs. Peterson attended the State Normal School after completing a public- 
school course and for six years previous to her marriage was engaged in teaching school. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Peterson have been born three children: lona Fern, whose birth occurred 
June 30, 1910; Avis M., born in November, 1911; and Elwin C, born in August, 1914. 

Mr. Peterson is a democrat and has served upon the county central committee, but is 
w ithout aspiration for office. Fraternally he belongs to the Masons, the Odd Fellows and 
the Modern Woodmen of America. He has proved a capable and resourceful business man 
and in developing his store has also aided in the commercial progress of Alsen. 



L. M. HANSON, D. D. 



Dr. L. M. Hanson is a successful young dental practitioner of De Smet, where he has 
followed his profession since 1910. His birth occurred in Howard, Miner county. South 
Dakota, on the 17th of February, 1890, his parents being H. M. and Cora B. Hanson, the 
former a homesteader of that county. The father of our subject subsequently became a 
banker and is now engaged in business as a dealer in farm implements, being widely recog- 
nized as one of the esteemed citizens and prosperous merchants of his community. 

L. M. Hanson was educated in the graded and high schools of Howard, and in 1907 
completed a course in the University of South Dakota at Vermillion. Having determined 
upon the practice of dentistry as a life work, he prepared for the profession as a student 



40 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

in the Northwestern University Dental School of Chicago, from which he was graduated 
in 1910. Thence he came direct to De Smet, South Dakota, where he has since remained 
and has been accorded an extensive and profitable practice. He has proven his skill and 
ability in the line of his chosen calling and has already won a creditable measure of success 
for one of his years. 

Dr. Hanson gives his political allegiance to the republican party, while his religious faith 
is that of the Episcopal church. Fraternally he is identified with De Smet Lodge, No. 55, 
A. F. & A. M.; Huron Lodge, No. 444, of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks; and 
Howard Lodge, No. 1333, of the Modern Brotherhood of America. He finds recreation and 
pleasure in hunting and fishing, and is popular in social circles by reason of a pleasing 
and genial disposition. South Dakota numbers him among its enterprising and worthy 
native sons, and in the line of his profession he is making steady and commendable 
progress. 



PAUL MURRAY YOUNG. 



Paul Murray Young, engaged in the practice of law at Mitchell, is one of the younger 
representatives of the bar to whom early manhood seems no check to professional progress. 
In fact, he has won a position that many an older representative of the legal profession 
might well envy. Mitchell is his native town, his birth having there occurred August 3, 
1884. His parents were Clark Montgomery and Retta (Murray) Young, natives of 
Holmes and Portage counties, Ohio, respectively. They arrived in South Dakota in 1883 
and Professor Y'oung was dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at the State University of 
South Dakota in Vermillion to the time of his death. He had been identified with the 
University for more than twenty years and was thus a prominent figure in educational 
circles of the northwest. His wife still resides at Vermillion. 

Paul Murray Young, the eldest in a family of three sons and one daughter, supple- 
mented his public-school course by study in the State University from which lie was grad- 
uated with the class of 1903. He secured the fii'st Rhodes scholarship from this state and 
in 1904 went to Oxford, England, continuing his studies there until graduated with honors 
in law in 1907. He represented the University of Oxford in field athletics and personally 
won the high and broad jumps. Following his return to America he was director of 
athletics in Huron College for one year and for two years at the State Normal School at 
Aberdeen, South Dakota. He then entered the law school of the State I'niversity and was 
graduated with the class of 1913. He was also a prominent representative of athletic 
interests at the State University, playing on all the football and baseball teams and holding 
the tennis championship. In 1912 he entered the law oflice of T. J. Spangler, senior partner 
in what is now the fir-m of Spangler & Haney and at the present writing is devoting his 
attention to professional interests. 

On the 7th of October, 1913, Mr. Young was married to Miss Alice Stenerson of 
Menomonie, Wisconsin. He belongs to Phi Delta Theta and to Phi Delta Phi. a legal 
fraternity, holds membership with the Masons and the Elks and is also a member of the 
Baptist church — associations which indicate much of the nature of his interests and the 
rules which govern his conduct. He has been a lifelong resident of the northwest and is 
imbued with the spirit of progress and enterprise characteristic of tliis section of the 
country. 



JOHN BENJAMIN MAYO. 



The city of Lead is justly proud of its efficient fire department, which ranks among the 
best in tlie state, and its (^xcellence is due in a large measure to the unceasing vigilance and 
the marked ability of the fire chief, John Benjamin Mayo. He was born in Greenville, Illi- 
nois, on the 17th of October, 1877, a son of Alonzo J. and Plioebe (Hoover) Mayo. The 
father was born near Greenville upon a farm that his father entered from the government. 




JOHN B. JIAYO 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 43 

The latter was Thomas J. Mayo, a native of Boston, Massachusetts. The great-grandfather 
of the subject of this review was born in Ireland and came with two brothers to this coun- 
try. He settled in Massachusetts but his brothers located in Virginia. Alonzo J. Mayo, 
who was a civil engineer, removed to Columbia, Tennessee, in 1881, and in 1888 went to 
Nevada, Missouri, where he remained for four years, after which he became a resident of 
Cliicago, where he still resides. 

John Benjamin Mayo was educated in the public schools of Nevada, Missouri, and Chi- 
cago, Illinois, and W'as graduated from the West Division high school in Chicago about 1894. 
He was employed at various occupations in that city until November 26, 1900, when he 
removed to Lead and became connected with the liquor business. He subsequently was a 
member of the firm of Kelly & Mayo, wholesale and retail dealers in liquor, and after dis- 
posing of his interest in this, was appointed chief of the fire department of Lead in 1914. 
During the years 1905, 1906 and 1907 he had served as chief of the volunteer fire department 
of the city, which was very efficient and had four hundred men on its rolls. Since assuming 
charge of the reorganized fire department Mr. Mayo has made it one of the best in the state 
of South Dakota and the citizens of Lead are assured of adequate protection from fire. He 
has been a member of the National Firemen's Association for a number of years and is also 
a member of the International Association of Fire Engineers. 

In 1911 Mr. Maj'o married Miss Genevieve Murry, of Sioux Falls, a daughter of .John 
Murry, a pioneer of this state. Mr. Mayo is a republican, as was his father and grandfatlier 
before him. In 1909 and 1910 he ably represented the fifth ward in the city council. He 
belongs to a number of fraternal organizations and secret societies, in many of which he has 
held office. Ilis time and thought are almost wholly given to the work of the fire depart- 
ment, in which he takes great pride, and he is a constant reader and student, especially along 
the lines of prevention and control, seeking always to increase the efficiency of his depart- 
ment. His devotion to duty has won him the esteem of his fellow citizens, who recognize the 
value of his services. 



DONALD ALEXANDER CRAWFORD. 

Donald Alexander Crawford, who has been successfully engaged in the practice of 
law at De Smet since 1903, has gained an enviable and W'ell merited reputation as one of 
tlie leading representatives of his profession in Kingsbury county and South Dakota. His 
birth occurred in Megantic county, Canada, on the 4th of April, 1867, his parents being 
Alexander and Jessie Crawford. In 1870 the family crossed the border into the T'nited 
States and took up a homestead claim in Plymouth county, Iowa. A decade later they 
came to Union county. South Dakota, and then took up a preemption claim in Hyde county, 
this state. Mrs. Crawford is still living, but the father of our subject passed away in 191.'5 
aiid in his death the community lost one of its honored pioneers and esteemed citizens. 

Donald A. Crawford, who was a youth of thirteen when he came with his parents to 
this state, supplemented his public-school education by a course of study in the LTniversity 
of South Dakota at Vermillion. Subsequently he entered the College of Law of the Uni- 
versity of Nebraska, and in 1902 was graduated from that institution. He first located for 
practice at Elk Point, South Dakota, and there followed his profession in association with 
H. M. Wallace for a period of nine months. In 1903 he removed to De Smet, where he has 
since remained, and he has been accorded a liberal and lucrative clientage. His standing 
in the profession is indicated in the fact that he was elected states attorney in 1910 and 
has served as city attorney for a number of years, his record in both connections being 
highly commendable and eminently satisfactory. He was also honored by his party with the 
election to county judge in 1914. In Inisiness circles his cooperation has likewise been 
sought and for seven years he served as secretary of the Waters Land & Loan Company, 
a local concern. 

In 1911 Mr. Crawford was united in marriage to Miss Nuna Symns. a daughter of T. II. 
Symns of Iowa and Montana. Mr. Crawford gives his political allegiance to the republican 
party and from 1S97 until 1901 held the office of county superintendent of schools in 
Union county. He is still doing valuable service in the interests of education as president 



44 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

of the De Smet school board. His religious faith is that of the Episcopal church, while 
fraternally he is identified with the Masons, belonging to the blue lodge and chapter of 
that organization, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks and the Woodmen. Coming to this state more than a third of a century 
ago, he has since been an interested witness of its growth and development and has done 
all in his power to further the work of progress along many lines, so that he has long 
been numbered among the prominent and valued citizens of the commonwealth. 



JOHN WESLEY PLATT. 



John Wesley Piatt, of Jlontrose, is engaged in the harness and shoe business and has 
a gratifying and profitable patronage. He was born in Ithaca, New York, August 24, 1857, 
a son of William S. and Catherine (Gibbs) Piatt. The father, who was a farmer, went to 
California in 1859 and started on the return trip home by vessel, but was never heard from 
afterward. The mother is still living. 

J. W. Piatt was not able to continue his education very far as he was compelled to 
go to work to assist in the support of the family when but a boy. He was apprenticed for 
seven years to the harness trade and in 1878, having completed his term of service, he went 
to Flandreau, South Dakota, and there followed his trade. After leaving that place he 
went to Dell Rapids and thence removed to Montrose in 1881. On the 1st of October, 1884, 
he went into business for himself and established the first harness store in his locality. 
He has been in business longer than any other merchant in Montrose, and the success that 
has steadily attended his eflorts during three decades is proof of the integrity of his deal- 
ings with his customers. He carries a fine line of harness and shoes, and is content with 
a reasonable profit, thus being able to sell his goods at a moderate price. His store has 
grown with the growth of the community and is a credit to its owner. He has preempted 
land in Moody county. 

Mr. Piatt was united in marriage to Miss JIarcia L. Sexton on the 28th of June, 1882. 
She is a daughter of A. L. and .Jennie Louise (Scellingerl Sexton, of Iowa, and by her 
marriage has become the mother of the following children: Louis W., Kenneth E., Catherine 
and Aaron. Mr. Piatt is a democrat, supporting the candidates and measures of that party 
at the polls, and for a number of years served as chairman of the town board. He was 
also on the school board for some time and as a director did much to further the progress 
of the public-school system. Fraternally he is connected with the Masonic order and the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen. He finds much pleasure in fishing and is a lover of 
outdoor life. He is in sympathy with all movements that have as their object the de- 
velopment of South Dakota, has found here splendid opportunities and has so utilized them 
that he has won material prosperity, although when he came he possessed very little capital. 



IRVING ir. DONALDSON. 



Irving M. Donaldson is a well known representative of business activity at Custer, 
where in 1915 he purchased the Peterson meat market, which he has since conducted. In 
1914 he opened a retail feed store and both lines of business are capably managed and are 
bringing to him growing success. He was born in Mercer county, Pennsylvania, November 
8, 1854, a son of James P. and Sarah J. (Eckels) Donaldson, who were also natives of Mercer 
county, born January 1, 1816, and September 3, 1829, respectively. The father made farm- 
ing his life work and in the year 1856 he removed westward with his family to Iowa, where 
he resided until his death, which occurred in Page county in 1883. His widow survived him 
for more than a quarter of a century, passing away in California in 1910. While devoting 
his life to agricultural pursuits, the father .also held various township offices and was a 
public-spirited and progressive citizen. 

Irving M. Donaldson is the eldest of seven children. He pursued his earlv education 
at College Springs, Iowa, where he attended the graded schools and later became a student 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 45 

ill Amity College. He remained with his father until he reached the age of twenty-one 
years and then took up the profession of teaching, being placed in charge of a high school 
at College Springs. He taught in that locality for nine years and in the spring of 1885 
came to South Dakota, settling in the eastern part of Custer county fifteen miles east of 
Hermosa. Upon the claim which he there secured he remained until the fall of 1887 and 
then went to Hermosa, where lie was employed in the general store of .John L. Buckingham 
until the fall of 1890. He was then elected to the office of register of deeds, in which 
position he served for four years, after which he was elected treasurer and acted in that 
capacity for a similar period. He next entered the employ of the M. J. Bailey Company of 
Custer, with which he continued for six years, at the end of which time the company dis- 
solved. Mr. Donaldson then continued with W. F. Hanley for six years, after which he went 
to Washington and was engaged in general merchandising at Clarkston, that state, for 
one year. The succeeding year was passed at Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, after which he returned 
to Custer and was in the employ of the McAdam Company for a year. At the end of that 
time he purchased the Peterson meat market, which he has since conducted with growing 
success. In the fall of 1914 he opened a general retail feed store, which he still conducts 
in connection with his other business, and is now numbered among the active, energetic 
merchants of the town. 

On the 3d of July, 1882, Mr. Donaldson was married to Miss Elizabeth McClelland, 
a native of Ohio, and they have become the parents of six children. Walter A., born March 
18, 1884, married Miss Emma Conrad and is engaged in the government forest service, 
making his home at White Sulphur Springs, Montana. Arvilla L., born April 12, 1885, 
resides with her aunt near Ferdinand, Idaho. Delia J., born November 2, 1889, is the 
wife of G. D. Reeder, living on the state game preserve in Custer county, being in the employ 
of the state. Homer J., born February 11, 1895, is assisting his father. Grace E. and Earl, 
twins, were born October 10, 1897. The former is at home, but the latter died at the age 
of four months. 

Fraternally Mr. Donaldson is connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
He has passed through all of the chairs of the local lodge and was representative to the 
grand lodge in 1911 and 1914. He also belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America and to 
the Modern Brotherhood of America. His political allegiance is given to the republican party 
and in addition to the offices already mentioned that he has filled, he is now serving as 
justice of the peace at Custer. His decisions are strictly fair and impartial and are win- 
ning for him "golden opinions from all sorts of people." His is a record of a busy life 
fraught with successful accomplishment and characterized by honorable purpose. 



EDWARD S. ALLEN. 



Edward .S. Allen is identified with various corporate interests which are factors in 
tlie business enterprise, development and prosperity of Rapid City and the surrounding 
country. He carefully formulates his plans, carries them forward to successful com- 
pletion and at all times follows constructive methods which do not interfere with the suc- 
cessful conduct of the business of others. He was born in Sullivan county, Indiana, March 
30, 1866, a son of Levi and Eliza J. (Cartwright) Allen. 

Ell ward S. Allen was educated in his native county, attending the grammar and high 
schools of the city of Sullivan, and for a time was employed as a clerk in his home city. 
The father died when his son Edward was a small boy and in 1886, accompanied bj- his 
mother and his brother Ethan, he came to Dakota territory, settling in Rapid City, where 
for a time the brothers conducted a restaurant and later carried on a confectionery busi- 
ness on Main street. As soon, however, as he became of legal age he began to exercise his 
right to government land by taking up a tree claim, a preemption and a homestead, and 
with his brother started in the ranching business on Box Elder creek, their interests being 
conducted under the linn style of Allen Brothers. After sixteen years of successful oper- 
ation they retired from the cattle business and entered the real-estate field under the same 
firm name and they havi' since lu'en among the important realty operators in this section of 
the state. Edward S. Allen is now the secretary of the Rapid Town Site Company, is presi- 



46 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

(Jeiit of the Rapid City Real Estate & Abstract Company; and is president of tlie Blaclc 
Hills Building & Loan Association, all of which are factors in the upbuilding and improve- 
ment of Rapid City and this section of the state, as well as important elements in the 
upbuilding of his own fortunes. He is likewise a stockholder in the Dakota Power Company 
and he owns some farm lands in addition to his extensive real-estate holdings. 

On the 27th of November, 1898, Mr. Allen was united in marriage to Miss Frances 
Crumrine, a daughter of Ezra and Parthenia (Kilgore) Crumrine. Mrs. Allen was born in 
Washington and in childhood came with her parents to South Dakota, the family home being 
established at Elk Point, where she was reared. She is now active in club, church and char- 
itable circles of the city and has done much good work along those lines in holding high the 
standards. 

Mr. Allen is a republican in his political views, voting for the men and measures of the 
party where national issues are involved but casting an independent local ballot. He served 
in 1910 and 1911 as a member of the city council and was commissioner of streets and 
alleys. Fraternally he is connected with the Knights of Pythias, the Elks and the Modern 
Brotherhood of America. His religious faith is that of the Methodist church, which finds in 
him a loyal member and he is now serving on its board of trustees. He is one of the 
substantial men of the city and his activities have been a distinct asset in the development 
of the best interests of the community. He has always taken a helpful part in promoting 
educational development and for some years has served as treasurer of the public school 
district. In a word, his influence and aid have always been given on the side of advance- 
ment and improvement and he has contributed to the intellectual and moral development 
of citv and county as well as to its material progress. 



F. R. BRUMWELL. 



F. E. Brumwell, a prominent and prosperous citizen of Huron, has here been engaged 
in the lumber business for the past quarter of a century and during that period has also 
handled the Deere farm machinery. He has likewise devoted considerable attention to the 
cattle business and owns an extensive ranch. His birth occurred in Iowa in 1859, his parents 
being Jacob and Sarah Brumwell, the former a farmer by occupation. Our subject attended 
the public schools in the acquirement of an education and subsequently became identified 
with the flour mill business at Shellsburg, Iowa. In 1882, when a young man of twenty- 
three, he made his way to Huron, South Dakota, afterward returned to his native state and 
in the spring of 1883 took up his permanent abode here, embarking in the flour, feed and 
fuel business. In 1888 he also became identified with the lumber business, which has claimed 
his attention throughout the intervening quarter of a century and in which he has met with 
gratifying success, owning yards at Huron, Cavour, St. Lawrence and Vayland and a newly 
established branch in Sioux Falls. During the past twenty-eight years he has also handled 
Deere farm machinery, his carefully managed interests in this connection augmenting his 
prosperity. He likewise has extensive agricultural interests and has devoted considerable 
attention to the cattle industry, owning the Plumbdale ranch of twenty-five hundred acres. 
Mr. Brumwell is a factor in financial circles as a director of the National Bank of Huron and 
was formerly the president of the old National Bank of Dakota. He has earned for himself 
an enviable reputation as a careful man of business, and in his dealings is known for his 
prompt and honorable methods, which have won him the deserved and unbounded confidence 
of his fellowmen. 

In 1887 Mr. Brumwell was united in marriage to Miss Clara E. Bowe, of Huron, South 
Dakota, who is a native of Iowa. Her father, S. A. Bowe, came to Huron in 1883 and was 
first engaged in business in association with F. R. Brumwell, while subsequently he went to 
the Black Hills. He now resides in North Dakota. Our subject and his wife have four living 
children. 

Mr. Brumwell gives his political allegiance to the republican party, while fraternally 
he is identified with the Ancient Order of United Workmen, the Elks, the Modern Woodmen 
of America and the Masons. He is connected with the last named order as a member of the 
blue lodge, chapter, council and commandery at Huron, has attained the thirty-second degree 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 49 

of the Scottish Rite and is a member of the Mystic Shrine. No breadth of suspicion has 
ever assailed his good name and on the contrary he stands as a splendid type of the honorable, 
reliable, successful man, the public-spirited citizen and the trustworthy friend. 



K. T. LOFTAAS. 



K. T. Loftaas, who has devoted his attention to general agricultural pursuits through- 
out his entire business career is now the owner of a productive farm of one hundred and 
sixty acres on section 17, Buffalo township, Minnehaha county. His birth occurred in Nor- 
way on the 2d of February, 1866, his parents being Tores and Martha Loftaas, who spent 
their entire lives in that country. He attended the common schools in the acquirement of 
an education and spent the first twenty-seven years of his life in the land of his nativity. 
In 1893 he crossed the Atlantic to the United States, locating in Humboldt county, Iowa, 
where he was employed as a farm hand for a time, while subsequently he cultivated rented 
land for about six years. In 1901 he came to South Dakota and purchased the farm of 
one hundred and sixty acres in Buffalo township, Minnehaha county, which he has since 
ownfed and operated. In the conduct of his agricultural interests he has won a gratifying 
measure of prosperity, for the well tilled fields annually yield golden harvests in return for 
the care and labor which he bestows upon them. 

In 1897 Mr. Loftaas was united in marriage to Miss Bertha Erickson, of IIuinl)oldt 
county, Iowa, by whom he has eight children, namely: Toby, Clarence. Arthur. MiuJa, 
Clara, Ella, Richard and Lester. Mr. Loftaas exercises his right of franrhix' in support 
of the men ami measures uf the republican party, believing firmly in its principles. His 
religious faith is indiratr.l liy his membership in the Norwegian Lutheran church, to which 
ills wife and (liildnii al^i ln/lnuL;. He has an extensive and favorable acquaintance through- 
out his community and enjoys an enviable reputation as a substantial agriculturist and 
esteemed citizen. 



ANDREW A. HEDIN. 



Among the well-to-do farmers and stock-raisers of Clay county is Andrew A. Hedin, 
w ho owns and operates a farm on section 13, Garfield township. He was born in Sweden in 
1«01 and resided tlicre until )iinc years old. In 1870 he was binuijlit to Anu'rira by his 
]iarents and his fatlur piovcd up a homestead on section 7, (.arti^'M tnw iisliiji, and 
operated that farm until liis retirement in 1910. He and his wife now live in Sionx City, 
Iowa. To their union were born eight children: Erick, a resident of Nelna^ka; I'.ritlia. the 
wife of Christian Nelson, of Sioux City. Iowa; Hans, a resident of Cliaii(~ Mi\ ..unity. 
South Dakota; Alma, the widow of Axel Anderson and a resident of ^i.nix i it>. I.iwa; 
August, of Idaho; Jewell, a traveling salesman for a sash and door company and a resident 
of Sioux City; and Enoch and Phillip, both of whom are deceased. 

Andrew A. Hedin began his education in his native land and continued it in the 
schools of Claj' county. When eighteen years of age he worked as a farm hand in this 
state for a while and then went to Wyoming, where he was employed as an engineer in a 
machine shop. In 1886 he returned to Clay county and was married, after which he began 
fanning upon the place which is still his home. He rented the farm for three years and 
tlien went again to W^yoming, where he spent a similar length of time. Upon coming back 
to this state he purchased the farm which he had previously rented and which compi-ises 
one hundred and sixty acres of fine land. He has made his home there ever since and 
lias met with gratifying success in its operation. He has added eighty acres of land, his 
holdings now comprising two hundred and forty acres all in a high state of cultivation. 
He is also a stockliolder in the A. B. E. Telephone Company, the Alsen Creamery Company 
of Alsen, and the Independent Harvester Company of Piano, Illinois. 

Mr. Hedin has been married three times, his first union being with Miss Christina 
Swedberg, a daughter of Erick and Anna Swedberg. She became the mother of six chil- 



50 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

dren, three of whom died in infancy, the others being: Henry, of Mitchell, South Dakota, 
a graduate of the State University and now a traveling salesman; Lillie, of Sioux City, Iowa; 
and Melvin E., who is a graduate of the Newdale school and is residing at home. The 
wife and mother died in 1904 and in the following year Mr. Hedin married Miss Ericka 
35rickson, who was born in Clay county, and to this union were born a son and daughter. 
The former, Bert, died when three years of age and the latter when an infant. Mrs. Hedin 
died in 1897 and in 1S9S Mr. Hedin was united in marriage to Miss Bertha Danielson, who 
was born in tSwcdrn in 1875. Her parents passed their entire lives in that country and 
botli have now i;iiiii_' tu tlieir reward. Their eight living children are: John, a resident of 
South Dakota; Axol: William, a resident of Greeley, Colorado; Victor, of Denver, that 
state; Mrs. Hedin; Gustave, of Arizona; and two who are still residing in Sweden. To 
Mr. Hedin's third marriage six children have been born: Effie, whose birth occurred in 
1900; Clifford, born in 1902; Florence, 1906; Leonard, 1908; Ethel, 1909; and Earl, born in 
1911. 

ilr. Hedin is a republican with liberal tendencies and has served as school du'ector for 
ton years. He and his family belong to the Swedish Baptist church and take a helpful 
interest in its work. He has never regretted his emigration to this country and has not 
only met with success here, but has thoroughly identified himself with the interests of his 
adopted state. 



FRED T. ARMSTRONG, D. D. S. 

Dr. Fred T. Armstrong, who since 1901 has been engaged in the practice of dental surgery 
in Sioux Falls, was born in Manchester, South Dakota, March 25, 1883, a son of David Newell 
and Mary W. (Nelson) Armstrong. The former, a native of Massachusetts, born in 184o, 
went to Manchester, in 1882, taking up his residence there when there was only one house 
upon the town site and he afterward moved to Sioux Falls and in 1911 to Minneapolis. In 
1915, while visiting in Sioux Falls, he died very suddenly but his widow survives. They 
were the parents of five sons: Frederick Taft; Harry N., of Sioux Falls; Charles 0., engaged 
in the automobile business in Sioux Falls; Victor S., of Minneapolis; and George H. 

Dr. Armstrong, who was the first white child born in Manchester,- acquired his early 
education in the public schools of Manchester, South Dakota, and later attended the Mankato 
(Minn.) Commercial College, from which he was graduated in 1903. Following this he became 
a student in the Chicago College of Dental Surgery and from that institution received his 
degree of D. D. S. in 1910. Immediately afterward he located for practice in Sioux Falls and 
he has already secured a large patronage which is continually growing as his skill and ability 
become more widely known. 

Dr. Armstrong is a member of the Country and Commercial clubs. He is a Scottish Rite 
Mason, holding membership in the Shrine and he is also an Elk. He gives his political alle- 
giance to the republican party. Along professional lines he is secretary and treasurer of the 
sixth district of the Odontographic Society of South Dakota and he is very well known in 
professional circles throughout the state. 



FRANK V. CAMPBELL. 



Frank V. Campbell is now the owner and proprietor of a farm implement and harness 
business in Redfield, which has been in existence since 1887 and whicli he conducts under 
the name of M. H. Campbell & Son. Three years before the establishment of the business 
his parents, Milo H. and Ella M. Campbell, arrived in South Dakota with their family, includ- 
ing Frank V. Campbell, who was born in Arcadia, Wisconsin, November 24, 1876. Settling 
at Westport, Brown county, the father there established a little general store, which he con- 
ducted in connection with a partner until 1885. He then disposed of his interest in the 
business and engaged in farming with his brother Benjamin E. until the spring of 1886. In 
that year he arrived in Redfield, where he opened a general store, which in the fall of 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA .51 

1887 he traded for an implement business, thereby becoming owner of a very small concern. 
Through his industry and close application, however, he developed the business until it 
became the largest of the kind in the county. In 1903 he retired from active life and 
removed to San Diego, California, where his demise occurred in 1910. His wife survives 
and still resides there. 

Frank V. Campbell was a lad of about eight years when he accompanied his parents to 
.South Dakota and in the public schools he pursued his education, thus qualifying for the 
responsibilities of later business life. He became the active associate and partner of his 
father in 1898 and is still in the implement and harness business. His trade is probably 
the largest in Spink county and is increasing annually in volume and importance. Every- 
tliing to be found in a first class establishment of this kind is carried in his store and his 
sales reach a gratifying figure. 

At Redfield, on the 5th of December, 1904, Frank V. Campbell was married to Miss 
Rub}' MacNeill, a daughter of William H. and JIatilda JIacKeill. Her father was a farmer 
and early settler of Spink county, South Dakota, but has been a resident of Oakland, 
California, since 1909. Mrs. MacNeill's death occurred in 1899. Mr. and Mrs. Campbell have 
a daughter, Aileen, six years of age. 

Mr. Campbell is a supporter of the republican party and is now serving as one of 
the aldermen of Redfield. He is a thirty-second degree Mason and also a member of the 
ilystic Shrine, and he belongs likewise to the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He 
rightfully attributes his success to perseverance and close application. He has been con- 
nected with Ills pri'scnt business from early childhood, assisting his father more and more 
largely as ln' ■jri'v\ in yrars and strength. Eventually he became a partner in the concern 
and added tu tlir fxpeiience and sound judgment of the father the enterprise, zeal and 
activity of the younger man, making this a strong combination, with the logical result that 
success came to them. Since his father's demise he has conducted the business alone. 



XILS .J. BRAKKE. 



For an extended period Nils J. Brakke was actively connected with agricultural inter- 
ests in Yankton county, but is now living retired, making his home in Volin. He arrived 
in Yankton county in October, 1866, and through the interv.nini; ]K-riiMl of almost a half 
century has been an interested witness of the growth and (l.\rlM|iniiiit of that part of 
the state. He was born in Norway, near Christiania, on the 4tli nf .luly. 1844. His parents 
(lied in that country, his father in 1847 and his mother in 1S76. Nils J. Brakke spent the 
days of his boyhood and youth in his native land and the educational privileges which he 
enjoyed were those afforded by the public schools. At length he determined to try his 
fortune in the new world and embarked on a sailing vessel at Christiania, spending six 
weeks at sea. He landed at Quebec and by way of the Great Lakes proceeded to Chicago 
and thence by rail to Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin. He spent that summer in Vernon county, 
Wisconsin, and then started for Dakota, making the overland trip from La Crosse, Wisconsin, 
by ox team and wagon. It required four weeks to complete the journey. He could have 
traveled by rail only to the Des Moines river. Sioux City at that time was no larger than 
the town of Volin today and there were no settlers between the Des Moines river and 
Sioux City. The man with whom Mr. Brakke traveled had a team of horses, while other 
emigrants of the party had ox teams. They camped out along the way and proceeded by 
slow stages, bvit ultimately reached tlieir destination. 

Mr. Brakke first secured work at fifty cents per day digging post holes, building fences 
and cutting hay and also in that first week he with another man cradled five acres of wheat. 
In 1867 he filed on land under the preemption law four miles west of Volin and later he 
sold that property and homesteaded five miles northwest of Volin, at which time there were 
)i() houses between his place and Sioux Falls. He experienced all of the hardships and priva- 
tions of pioneer life. One of the worst, storms that he ever saw occurred in March, 1868, 
when a blinding blizzard broke over the country. He was in town w^ien the storm came and 
started home, but had to remain over night a mile from his home, for the snow fell so fast 
and tlie wind blew at such a gale that lie could not see to proceed further. The worst storm 



52 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

in his remembrance, however, occurred on the 13th of January, 1870, when for three days 
he could not leave his house to go as far as the stable and feed the stock. It was like the 
storm of 1888, but lasted much longer. There were a few deer to be seen in this section 
of the country at tlie time of Mr. Brakke's arrival and occasionally one would pass his 
shanty. He lived first in a log house, but soon replaced it with a frame dwelling. The 
settlers suffered from grasshoppers for eleven years, but only on a few occasions did the 
pest take all of the crops, although one year their devastation was so great that what Mr. 
Brakke could secure from his fields would have hardly sold for a dollar. In the 70's the 
settlers suffered from drought. For a year the family lived on little more than bread, butter 
and milk. Their cow was their mainstay and they bought a little flour and meal. As the 
years passed, however, conditions changed and industry found its reward in success. Mr. 
Brakke erected fine buildings upon his farm, all of which are in a splendid state of repair. 
He continued to reside upon his farm until 1900, at which time he had accumulated six 
hundred acres of valuable and productive land, but now lives retired in Volin. From his 
property he derives a substantial annual income and his success is indeed well merited, 
as it is the direct reward of persistent, earnest labor. 

Mr. Brakke was married near Gayville on the 9th of August, 1868, to Miss Liza Olsberg, 
who was born in Norway and came to the United States in 1868, only a short time before 
her marriage. In his political views Mr. Brakke has always been a stalwart republican since 
becoming a naturalized American citizen and he served as county commissioner in the years 
1893-94-95, making a creditable record in ofiiee. He has ever been loyal to the best interests 
of the community and has cooperated in various measures for the public good, while at the 
same time tliioiii;h liis aiiiiiultuial interests he has contributed much to the material 
progress and Ijiijclit ot \aiiktiiii .nunty. There is no phase of pioneer life here with which 
he is not familiar and his riMiiiiiiscences of the early days are most interesting. 



FRANKLIN TAYLOR. 



The life history of Franklin Taylor constitutes an important chapter in the annals of 
South Dakota. He made farming his life work, but also took a most active part in politics 
and few men have had more intimate or accurate knowledge concerning the history of the 
state. He made his home in Fairview township, Clay county, casting in his lot with its 
pioneer settlers. 

The birth of Mr. Taylor occurred in Surrey county, North Carolina, on the 3d of August, 
1827, his parents being Benjamin and Margaret Taylor, both of wliom were natives of Curri- 
tuck county, North Carolina. His education was acquired in his native state and in 1853, 
when a young mdn of twenty-six years, he emigrated westward to Missouri, settling in 
Mercer county, where he engaged in teaching school. In 1854 he went to Iowa, where lie 
spent four years, and in 1858 he removed to Nebraska. A year later he crossed the river 
into Clay county, South Dakota and took up a homestead in Fairview township, after whicli 
he devoted his life to general agricultural pursuits. Not a furrow had been turned nor an 
improvement made upon his land when it came into his possession, but with characteristic 
energy he began its development and as the years passed converted it into productive fields. 
He prospered in his undertakings and ultimately added to his original holdings until he was the 
owner of three hundred and twenty acres of land at the time of his death. This constituted 
a valuable farm from which he derived a substantial annual income. 

Mr. Taylor was one of the leaders in political circles in Clay county and gave his 
allegiance to the democratic party. He was the first register of deeds in Clay county and in 
that office, as in many others which he filled, he proved his loyalty to the best interests of 
county and state by his unfaltering devotion to the public welfare. He left tlie impress 
of his individuality uimhi the laws of the state, being for five sessions a member of the legis- 
lature, his rorl.rtiMii Iii'mil; indicative of his personal popularity and the confidence and trust 
reposed in him l.y lii^ frllow townsmen. He was clerk of the first judicial court of Clay 
county and he served by appointment as county commissioner and afterward by election. He 
was also deputy collector of internal revenue. The cause of education found in him a stal- 
wart champion and he did effective and beneficial work for the schools. He was the second 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 55 

superintendent of schools in Clay county aiul for over twenty years he served as a member 
of the local school board. 

In 1870, at Vermillion, Mr. Taylor was united in marriage to Mrs. Martha G. Warner, 
the widow of Charles S. Warner, who by her first marriage had two children: Thomas G. 
Warner, now living in Quinn, South Dakota; and Mrs. Mary E. Lathrop, of Touchet, Wash- 
ington. Mr. and Mrs. Taylor became the parents of a daughter, M. Ethelda, the wife of 
William A. Ufford, a native of Iowa who came to South Dakota with his parents when but 
six months old. He acquired his education in the public schools of Clay county and in the 
State University at Vermillion. To Mr. and Mrs. Ufford have been born two sons: Frank 
S., who was born in 1897 and is now attending high school; and Fred W., who was bom 
April 22, 1900, and is also a high-school pupil. Mrs. Taylor died August 22, 1900, and the 
death of Mr. Taylor occurred in 1912. In their passing the community lost two of its most 
worthy, representative and valued pioneer settlers. It was Mr. Taylor and Captain Nelson 
Miner who selected the site for the first permanent sehoolhouse in Dakota territory, this 
site being in Vermillion, and there a beautiful monument has been erected, a picture of which 
appears elsewhere in this work. From the period of his early arrival here Mr. Taylor bore 
an active and helpful part in advancing the material, social, intellectual, political and moral 
welfare of the territory and of the state and his opinions concerning any point of Dakota's 
history were largely accepted as authority. 



HON. JOHN F. PARKS. 



Hon. John F. Parks is the superintendent of the Hot Springs Water, Light & Power 
Company, in which position he is now serving for his eighteenth year. Public trust has been 
reposed in him in other connections and his record has at all times been such as would bear 
the closest investigation and scrutiny. He was born at Louisville, Kentucky, May 2, 1860, 
a son of Joshua B. and Mary E. (Herr) Parks, both of whom were natives of Kentucky, born 
near Louisville. In early life the father followed farming in that state and about 1879 left 
Kentucky with his family, going to Chicago, Illinois, where he engaged in the hotel business 
for a decade. He arrived in the Black Hills in the year 1890, settling at Hot Springs, where 
he lived practically retired. He served as police magistrate for a number of years, but did 
not engage actively in business because he had come to the northwest for the benefit of his 
health. Here he lived retired until his death, which occurred about 1901, while his wife 
]iassed away several years later. W^hile in Kentucky he represented his district in the state 
legislature and was prominent in other connections there. He conducted a large livery busi- 
ness in Louisville, was a lover of fine horses and an excellent judge of horse flesh. His wife's 
])eople were among the pioneers of Kentucky who went to that state with Daniel Boone, and 
tliey were noted hunters during that period when Kentucky was known as the dark and 
bloody ground. 

John F. Parks was the second in a family of four children and after attending a private 
school in his native state he continued his education in Eugby College at Louisville. When 
a youth of seventeen years he was employed as bookkeeper by his father, whom he assisted 
generally until a short time after the family removed to Chicago. He then entered the 
employ of the Central Union Telephone Company as clerk and bookkeeper and continued with 
them for a period of ten years. He next entered a bank in Englewood, now a part of the 
city of Chicago, as a bookkeeper, remaining there for about a year, after which he removed 
to Hot Springs, South Dakota, and became cashier of the F'irst National Bank. When he 
had occupied that position for about two years he resigned and turned his attention to the 
real-estate and insurance business, in which he is still engaged. Few men have more intimate 
or accurate knowledge concerning realty values or know more concerning the property that 
is upon the market than Mr. Parks. He has also figured prominently in other business con- 
nections, having been elected president of the Peoples National Bank, in which capacity he 
served for five years, while at this writing in 1915, he is one of its directors. He is likewise 
president of the Evans Quarries, is president of the Parks & Marty Company and has been 
connected with many other important enterprises of his city. In business affairs he displays 
sound judgment, unfaltering enterprise and notable sagacity. Centuries ago an old Greek 



56 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

sage said: "Earn thy reward; the gods give nought to sloth." Mr. Parks early recognized 
the spirit of that admonition and throughout his business career industry has been the 
beacon light of his life. 

On the 2d of June, 1887, occurred the marriage of Mr. Parks and Miss Sallie M. Wilson, 
who was born near New Albany, Indiana, a daughter of James A. and Eleanor (Clark) Wilson, 
both of whom were natives of Kentucky. Her father was a photographer of New Albany for 
thirty-five years or longer and both he and his wife have now passed away. The latter died 
in Hot Springs and her remains were returned to Louisville for burial beside those of her 
husband. To jVIr. and Mis. Parks have been born six children. Walter E., who married Miss 
Theresa Keenan, resides at Hot Springs and under his father is connected with the Hot 
Springs Water, Light & Power Company, being assistant auditor of the company. James 
Floyd, the second of the family, is at home. Stanley M. was graduated from the high school 
with the class of 1914. Nellie is the wife of W. J. Schllleman, a printer residing at Casper, 
Wyoming. Margie W. and Gertrude J. are both at home. 

Mr. Parks occupies a prominent position in connection with fraternal interests, being 
identified with various organizations. He is an Elk, an Odd Fellow, a Yeoman, and he also 
has membership with the Modern Woodmen of America, the Modern Brotherhood of America 
and the Ancient Order of United Workmen. His religious belief Is that of the Christian 
Science church and his political faith is that of the republican party. He has served as county 
auditor for five years and as city auditor for nine years and has been a member of the board 
of education of Hot Springs for about eight years. In 1912 he was elected to the state senate 
and at the present time he is superintendent of the Hot Springs Water; Light & Power Com- 
pany, having occupied that position for eighteen years. No trust reposed in him has ever 
been betrayed in the slightest degree and in all of his ofllcial service he has placed the public 
good before personal aggrandizement. 



JAMES I. HEFFERXAN. 



James I Heffernan, who has devoted his attention to general agricultural pursuits in 
(Jrant county for the past thirty-four years, now owns and cultivates three hundred and 
twenty acres of rich and productive land on section 19, Melrose township, and is one of 
the best known citizens of his community. His birth occurred in Ireland on the 17th of 
March, 1855, his parents being Patrick and Alice (Irish) Hefiernan, who were born in the 
year 1810 and spent their entire lives on the Emerald isle, the father passing away in 1875 
and the mother in 1893. Patrick Heffernan was an agriculturist by occupation and suc- 
cessfully carried on farming throughout his active business career. In religious faith he 
was a devout Catholic. . To him and his wife were born seven children, six sons and one 
daughter, three of whom survive, as follows: Michael, who is living on the old family 
homestead In Ireland; John, a resident of Grant county. South Dakota, where he lives on 
a farm; and .James I., of this review. John Heffernan, the paternal grandfather of our 
subject, was also a farmer by occupation and died in Ireland. 

Jamos I. Heffernan acquired his education in his native country and after putting aside 
his textbooks continued to assist his father in the operation of the home farm until twenty- 
six years of age. In 1881 he crossed the Atlantic to the United States and settled in Grant 
county, South Dakota, first purchasing one hundred and sixty acres of land and subsequently 
buying another tract of similar size, so that his holdings now embrace three hundred and 
twenty acres. How^ greatly the value of this property has increased is Indicated in the 
fact that he was recently offered thu'teen thousand dollars for the first quarter section which 
lie obtained for five hundred and forty dollars. Mr. Heffernan owes his present prosperity 
entirely to his own well duected efforts and able management and is widely recognized as 
one of the substantial and representative agi-iculturists of his community. 

In 1S88 Mr. Heffernan was united In marriage to Miss Bridget Walsh, who was born in 
Illinois and comes of Irish descent. Their children are eight in number, as follows: Leo, 
who is engaged in farming; May, at home; Vincent, who Is pursuing a law course in the 
college at Valparaiso, Indiana; John Francis, who Is engaged in the drug business at Mcln- 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 57 

tosh, South Dakota; Andrew J., a school teacher by profession; and Clarence, Ellen and 
Ambrose, all at home. 

Politically Jlr. Heffernan is a democrat and for twenty-four years has ably served as 
supervisor of Melrose township, acting in that capacity at the present time, while for a 
period of twenty-six years he has held the office of school treasurer. Fraternally he is 
identified with the Ancient Order of United Workmen and his religious faith is that of the 
Catholic church. He has never had occasion to regret his determination to seek a home 
ill the new world, for here he found the opportunities whicli he sought and in their wise 
utilization has reached the desired goal. 



ALVA LEROY SOMMAKS. 



Alva Leroy Sommars is conducting a first class restaurant in Chester and is also pro- 
prietor of a pool room. A native of Wisconsin, he was born in Richland county in 1873, 
a son of John B. and Rosetta (Johnson) Sommars, who in the year 1881 removed with 
tlifir family to South Dakota, settling first at Dell Rapids. The father looked about him 
fur a favoiiilili' liMation and afterward purchased two relinquishments in Chester township, 
Lake couiif\. l\r tlnii took up his abode upon his land and at once began to cultivate the 
place, coiitiiiuiiiu .irtiM-ly in farming operations until 1895, when with a substantial compe- 
toiioe whicli he had acquired from his labors he retired to Sioux Falls. His wife passed 
away about five years ago and he is now in Arkansas. 

Alva L. Sommars was one of a family of six children, five sons and a daughter, and 
was a lad of about eight years when the family came to this state. He is therefore 
indebted to its public-school system for the educational opportunities which he enjoyed, 
and when his school days were over he learned the barber's trade, beginning at the age of 
i-ighteen years and following that occupation for eighteen years. On the 5th of August, 
nil 3, he became a resident of Chester and opened his present place of business. He has the 
largest restaurant business in the town and has been very successful, serving a good meal 
in attractive style and at reasonable prices. He also conducts a pool room and both branches 
of liis business are proving profitable. 

On the 4th of February, 1897, Mr. Sommars was united in marriage to Miss Gunda A. 
Olson, a daughter of Peter Olson of Norway. They have four children, namely: Sidney L., 
Florence, Caroline and Dora. Mr. Sommars votes with the democratic party and has held 
the office of constable but has not been an aspirant for political preferment. He holds mem- 
bership in the Methodist Episcopal church and enjoys the confidence and goodwill of his 
fellow townsmen. Although a resident of Chester for but three years, he has made many 
friends here and is widely and favorably known throughout the county in which much of his 
life has been passed. 



WILLIAM H. MUTH. 



William H. Muth, manufacturer of fixtures and interior finishings at Yankton, has 
been thus connected with the business interests of his city since 1899. A native of the 
state of New York, he was born May 20, 1864, a son of Valentine and Christina (Schilly) 
Muth, both of whom are now deceased. The father was a farmer by occupation and in 
following that pursuit provided for the support of his family of six children, of whom 
William H. is the fifth in order of birth. He was educated in the public schools and in 
the Skaneateles Academy at Skaneateles, New York. WTien , his school days were over 
he entered upon an apprenticeship to the cabinetmaker's trade in Rochester, New York, and 
was employed in that line of industrial activity for seven years. In 1897 he founded the 
Rochester Rug & Hassock Company, which has grown to be the largest plant of its kind 
in the United States. He continued in active connection with the business for two years, 
but in 1899 disposed of his interests there and came to Y'ankton, where he established a 
oaliinetmaking shop which he has developed into one of the city's profitable productive enter- 



58 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

prises, specializing in store and interior finishings. His output is of iiigli grade, displaying 
the finest workmanship with a thorough understanding of every phase of the business, and 
in some of the leading establishments of the city are seen his store fixtures and interior 
finishings. 

In 190+ Mr. iluth was united in marriage to Miss Verda Lee, a daughter of George S. 
Bailey, of Spokane, Washington, and they have gained many friends during the period of 
their residence in Yankton. They hold membership with the Congregational church, and 
Mr. Muth's views upon the temperance question are evidenced in the fact that he votes 
with the prohibition party. He is one of the city's substantial and respected citizens, his 
influence being against anything that is inimical to the best interests of the individual and 
the community. On the contrary he upholds every practical effort for good and for progress 
and the genuine worth of his character has established him firmly in the high regard of his 
fellow citizens. 



ALFBED LEE WYMAX, 



Alfred Lee Wyman is filling the office of county attorney and public interests are care- 
fully protected through his ability in handling the litigated interests in which the county 
becomes involved. The city of Yankton, in which he now resides, is the place of his nativity. 
He was born on the 9th of December, 1874, and is a son of Frank D. Wyman, a native of 
the state of New York, who, however, was taken to Walworth county, Wisconsin, during his 
infancy. He died December 13, 1913, at the age of seventy-two years. He had married Mat- 
tie C. Robertson, a native of Alabama, and she is still a resident of Y'ankton, In their fam- 
ily were six children, of whom three died in infancy, the others being: Mattie M., the wife 
of F. A. Kloppe, a resident of Yankton: Alfred Lee; and Lute A., who is engaged in the 
butchering business in Y'ankton. 

Alfred Lee Wyman was educated in the public schools of Y'ankton and is a high-school 
graduate. The profession of law proved to him an attractive one when he made choice of a 
life work and in preparation for practice he read law in the ofiice of French & Orvis. He 
was admitted to the bar in October, 1S96, and was thereafter variously employed until the 
fall of 1899, when he opened a law office in Bridgewater, McCook county, South Dakota, 
where he remained for two years. He then came to Yankton in January, 1902, and entered 
at once upon the active practice of his profession in this city. He remained in general prac- 
tice until elected state's attorney of Y'ankton county in the fall of 1904, qualifying for the 
office in January, 1905, He made so excellent a record in that position that he was reelected 
in 1906 and so served until January, 1909. He had been elected a member of the state legis- 
lature in 1908 and the following year entered upon his duties in that position. His course 
in the lower house led to his election to the state senate in the fall of 1910 for a two years' 
term and in both the upper and lower houses of the general assembly he gave careful consid- 
eration to the questions which came up for settlement. In the fall of 1912 and again in 1914 
he was reelected state's attorney of Yankton county and is serving in that position at the 
present time. From May, 1909, until May, 1914, four terms in all, he was city attorney and 
was reelected but refused to continue longer in the position. His political allegiance has 
always been given to the republican party and he has been an active, earnest and eflfective 
worker in its ranks, his opinions carrying weight in its local councils and his eflforts contrib- 
uting to its success. He has never desired to hold office, however, outside the strict path of 
his profession. 

On the 8th of December, 1900, Mr. Wyman was married to Miss Bessie M. White, a 
native of Hutchinson county, South Dakota, and a daughter of AV. B. White, a pioneer of 
that county, who laid out and platted the townsite of Olivet, the county seat. Mr. and Mrs, 
Wyman have become parents of seven children, as follows: Leila, who was born September 
30, 1901; Gale, whose birth occurred November 23, 1902; Frank, born February 2, 1904; 
Keith, April 6, 1905; Blake, December 25, 1908; Ward, October 13, 1910; and Lyle, Decem- 
ber 4, 1912, 

In fraternal circles Mr. Wyman is widely known and he is ever loyal to the basic prin- 
ciples upon which such organizations are founded. He has membership in St. John's Lodge, 




ALFRED L. WYilAN 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 61 

No. 1, A. F. & A. M., and in (iii.ntal I misistory, No. 1, S. P. R. S., has attained the thirty- 
second degree of the Scottish llitr. Ili' Inlongs also to Phoenix Lodge, No. 34, K. P.; Yank- 
ton Lodge, No. 994, B. P. O. V..: tin- Mdilern Woodmen of America; and the Ancient Order 
of United Worlcraen. Yankton county is proud of his record as that of one of her native 
suns, for, while there have been no spectacular phases in his life, he has been loyal to the 
duties which eacli day has brought him and has been actuated by a progressive spirit in all 
that he has undertaken, whereby he has won a creditable place as a representative of the 
Yankton county bar. 



ROBBIE \V. BAKER. 



Robbie W. Baker, who has been a resident of South Dakota for three decades, has for 
the past nineteen years been successfully engaged in the draying business at Redfield, 
Spink county, and in that connection has been accorded an extensive patronage. His birth 
occurred at Leon, near Sparta, Wisconsin, on the 12th of April, 1864, his parents being 
Ahnanza and Frances (Willsey) Baker. They came to this state in 1884, settling in Red- 
ticld. wlicre Ahnanza Baker remained a prominent and esteemed resident until his demise, 
whicli occurred in 1903. His widow made her home with our subject until April, 1915, when 
she too was called to her last rest. Both are buried at Redfield. 

Robbie W. Baker attendcil schiiol near S|iarta, Wisconsin, until eighteen years of age 
and subsequently fullo«cil taiiiiiiii; in his native state until 1884, when he came to South 
Dakota. Here he continued l[is idcntilication with agricultural interests for about twelve 
years and on the expiration of that period embarked in the draying business at Redfield, 
in which he has since been successfully engaged. He has built up an enviable and gratify- 
ing ])atTonage and his success may be attributed entirely to his own energy, perseverance 
anil judicious management. 

On :\Iarcli 21',. If^sT, near Sparta, Wisconsin, Mr. Baker was united in marriage to Miss 
Lma L'ritchett. a daughter of Joseph and Ruth (Sheldon) Critchett, who settled in Spink 
county in the "90s. The father passed away in 1906 and was buried at Ashton, South 
Dakota, but the mother survives and makes her home at Mellette, this state. Our subject 
and his wife have two sons, Morse and Lloyd, who assist their father in the conduct of 
liis business. 

-Mr. Baker gives his political allegiance to the republican party and has held school 
olliics in Spink county, the cause of education ever finding in him a stanch champion. He 
is identified fraternally with the Ancient Order of United Workmen, while his religious 
faitii is indicated by his membership in the Methodist church. He enjoys a high reputation 
in liis community and is esteemed for his many good qualities of character. 



GEORGE BOARDMAN. 



George Boardman, a well known and successful agriculturist of Wayne townshi]), .Minne- 
haha county, is busily engaged in thi- lultivath.n of two hundred acres of arable land. His 
birth occurred in Sioux Falls, South Daknta, un the 29th of December, 1880, his pannls luring 
(ieurge and Mary Boardman. The fathrr <;uni. to this state with the Sixth Iowa (.avalry 
in 1861 and served during the days of the Indian trouble in South Dakota. He underwent 
many interesting and exciting experiences during the campaign and was fond of relating to 
his children the stories of those stirring times. When the campaign was ended Mr. Boardman 
leturned to Iowa and was mustered out of the service. He then again came to South Dakota 
aiul took up his abode in Sioux Falls, opening the first bakery at that place and conducting 
his business in a tent. He also embarked in the stone business and quarried much of the 
stone that was used in the state buildings in various sections of South Dakota. George 
Boardman, Sr., passed away in 1910, after forty-five years' residence in this state, and his 
community mourned the loss of one of its best known and most respected citizens. His 
wife was called to her final rest in 1901. 



62 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

George Boaidman, whose name introduces this review, acquired his education in the 
graded and high schools of Sioux Falls and subsequently assisted his father in his work. 
He has followed farming on an extensive scale and now cultivates two hundred acres of land 
in Wayne township, one hundred and sixty of which he owns, having purchased the same in 
1913. He also acted as stage manager of the "new opera house" at Sioux Falls for a period 
of six years and is widely recognized as one of the substantial and enterprising young citizens 
of his native county and state. 

On the 26th of November, 1913, Mr. Boardman was united in marriage to Miss Mae 
Walker, a daughter of J. E. and Delia Walker of Sioux Falls. He gives his political allegiance 
to the republican party and is a Presbyterian in religious faith. In Masonry lie has attained 
high rank, belonging to both the Consistory and the Shrine at Sioux Falls. He is fond of 
baseball and other outdoor sports, which are his favorite form of recreation. As a lifelong 
resident of Minnehaha county he has been loj'al in his advocacy of everything pertaining to 
the welfare of the community and has made some substantial contributions to its develop- 
ment and progress. 



ANTON FREDERICK HENRIKSEN. 

Anton Frederick Henriksen, a well known farmer of Clay county, was born in Denmark, 
January 8, 1864, a son of Christian and Carolina (Clausen) Henriksen, both likewise natives 
of Denmark. In 1874 the family emigrated to America, coming direct to South Dakota, 
where the father purchased a homestead from his son, Claus Matson, who had resided in 
Garfield township. Clay county, for five years. Mr. Henriksen, Sr., lived upon his farm until 
his death in 1902. He survived his wife for three years, her demise occurring in 1899. They 
were the parents of ten children, namely: Claus Matson, who is a retired shoe merchant of 
Sioux City, Iowa; Rika, who married Louis Matson, of Nebraska, and at her demise left 
four children; Annie, Jens Peter, Jane C. and Ida, all deceased; Augusta, the wife of .Jens P. 
Jensen, of Vesington Springs, South Dakota; Anton Fred; and Carl H., who owns and oper- 
ates the family homestead in Clay county; and one who died in infancy. 

Anton F. Henriksen grew to manhood in Clay county and attended the district schools 
until he was seventeen years of age. After putting aside his textbooks he worked for others 
during the harvest season and then returned home and assisted his father. At the age of 
twenty he was married and rented a farm, which he operated for seven years. At the end 
of that time he had accumulated sufficient capital to enable him to buy one hundred and 
sixty acres and he later purchased an additional eighty-acre tract. All of his land is in a 
high state of cultivation and although he does general farming, his principal crop is corn. 
He also raises stock for the market, specializing in Red Polled cattle and Duroc Jersey hogs. 
His energy, industry and sound judgment are rewarded by abundant crops which find a ready 
sale on the market, and he also derives a good income from his stock-raising interests. He 
was one of the organizers of the A. B. & E. Telephone Company of South Dakota, for one 
term served as president of that company and for five years was a member of the board of 
directors. He was also an organizer of the Farmers Elevator Company of Beresford and for 
several years was a director therein. 

Mr. Henriksen was married September 5, 1884, Miss Christina Jensen, a native of Schles- 
wig and a daughter of H. P. and Magdelena Jensen, becoming his wife. To them have been 
born eight children: Clara, the wife of Holly Burnie, who is engaged in the meat business 
at Beresford; Mary, the wife of Chris Jensen, a farmer of Clay County; Christian, who is 
at home and is assisting his father with the farm work; Ida, the wife of Peter Rasmussen, 
a farmer of Clay county; Laura, who married Walter Rasmussen, a brother of Peter and a 
farmer of Union county; Hans P., who is attending school; Annie, fourteen years of age, also 
in school; and Frederick C, eleven years old and likewise a student in the public schools. 

Mr. Henriksen is a democrat and has served as trustee and as chairman of the township 
board, of which he was a member for twelve years. His membership in the Lutheran church 
is an indication of his religious belief, which is the guiding principle of his life. Fraternally 
he belongs to the Masonic blue lodge and to the Modern Woodmen of America, in which he 
has held all of the chairs. A great lover of outdoor sports, he finds much enjoyment in 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 63 

hunting and fishing. He is a representative of that large body of intelligent, energetic, pro- 
gressive farmers who constitute the greatest source of South Dakota's strength and to whom 
her development is largely due, and his upright life has gained him a high place in the 
estimation of those who know him. 



GUY RAJISEY, M. D. 



Dr. Guy Ramsey, physician and surgeon of Salem, South Dakota, where- he has practiced 
continuously for the past seven years, is widely recognized as an able and successful repre- 
sentative of his profession and as a leading citizen of his town. His birth occurred in Hunt- 
ingdon county, Pennsylvania, on the 17th of March, 1870, his parents being John F. and 
Mary Ellen (Graham ( Eunijey. who were born, reared and married in that county. In 1S7U 
they removed to Johnson county, Iowa, and there the father engaged in farming until 1900, 
when he put aside the active work of the fields and took up his abode in North Liberty, Iowa, 
where he and his wife have since lived retired. During the period of the Civil war he served 
in the Union army for three years as a member of the One Hundred and Forty-ninth Pennsyl- 
vania Volunteer Regiment. 

Guy Ramsey was reared under the parental roof and in the acquirement of an education 
attended the public schools and the Iowa City Academy. Subsequently he took up the pro- 
fession of teaching and during the following five years divided his time between teaching and 
farming. In 1897 he began the study of medicine, entering the medical department of Drake 
University at Des Moines, Iowa, and during his vacations spent his time in the office of Dr. 
James Murphy in Iowa. He won the degree of M. D. at Drake Univesity in 1901 and during 
the following summer resided at home. In October, 1901, he married Miss Emily Young, of 
Mount Pleasant, Iowa, and soon afterward located in Marathon, Iowa, where he began the 
practice of medicine. At the end of two years he removed to North Liberty and there followed 
his profession successfully for a period of four years. In 1907 he located in Salem, South 
Dakota, which city has remained the scene of his professional labors to the present time and 
in which he has built up an extensive and remunerative practice. He keeps in close touch 
with the advancement that is being continually made by the fraternity through his member- 
ship in the Mitchell District Medical Society, the Sioux Valley Medical Society, the South 
Dakota State Medical Society and the American Medical Association. The Doctor serves as 
pension examiner, being secretary of the board, and also acts in the capacity of coroner of 
McCook county and as city health officer. 

Dr. and Mrs. Ramsey have three children, namely: Paul Young, Mary Lurene and Philip 
Bruce. The mother is a graduate of the musical department of the Iowa Wesleyan University 
at Mount Pleasant, Iowa, and accomplished in both vocal and instrumental music. She takes 
a prominent part in the work of the Methodist Episcopal church and for six years has had 
charge of its choir. 

Dr. Ramsey is president of the Auto Club of Salem and also acts as chief executive officer 
of the Chautauqua Association and president of the lecture course. Fraternally he is identi- 
fied with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, belonging to Salem Lodge, No. 106. He 
has wisely used time and talents for the benefit of others as well as the promotion of his own 
interests, and his worth is acknowledged by all who know him. 



OLE T. NESSAN. 



Ole T. Nessan is now busily engaged in general farming, his home being in Mapleton 
township, where he is cultivating the farm upon which his father settled upon his arrival in 
South Dakota. It was upon this farm that Ole T. Nessan was born on the 15th of November, 
1873, his parents being Tosten and Ingeberg Nessan. On leaving his native land of Norway 
To.=iten Nessan crossed the Atlantic and established his home in Minnesota, where he resided 
for three years. On the expiration of that period he came to South Dakota in 1870 and 
secured a homestead claim on section 4, township 102, range 49, which he at once began to 



64 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

cultivate and develop, transforming it into rich fields. He added to the place until within its 
boundaries it comprised two hundred and forty acres, and his son Ole T. Nessan has pur- 
chased ' another tract of eighty acres, so that the farm today comprises three hundred and 
twenty acres of rich and productive land. The parents crossed the ocean in a sailing vessel 
which was forty-nine days in cuniiileting the voyage. It was a hope of improving his financial 
condition that led the liitlici tn mme to the new world and as the years have passed by ho 
has lived to see the hillilliiiriit vi his hope. For a while he was forced to endure the hardships 
and privations of pidiurr lite in South Dakota but he continued his efforts year after year 
until a- substantial ictiirn rewarded his labors. When he proved up his claim he had to walk 
to Vermillion tu secure title to his property. Both he and his wife are now living and he 
has reached the age of seventy-six years, while she is seventy years old. They have live 
living children, all of whom are in South Dakota, and two have passed away. 

On the old homestead farm Ole T. Nessan spent his youthful days and the public schools 
of the county afforded him his educational opportunities. He was early trained to farm 
work, becommg familiar with the best methods of tilling the soil and caring for the crops. 
When not in the schoolroom he worked in the fields and after his education was completed 
he concentrated his energies entirely upon farm work. At the present time he is actively 
engaged in the further development of the old homestead, relieving his father of further labor 
in this direction, so that Tosten Nessan is now living retired. The present highly cultivated 
appearance of the place is due to the son, who is progressive in all his methods and so prac- 
tical in all that he undertakes that his work is well managed and a substantial annual return 
is his. In addition to his other interests Mr. Nessan is vice president of the Farmers Cooper- 
ative Elevator Company of Baltic and is a stockholder of the Fanners Lumber Company, also 
of Baltic. Stock-raising is an important feature of his farm and he now has forty head of cat- 
tle and sixty head of hogs upon his place. He has the latest improved machinery to facilitate 
farm work and his crops show that he thoroughly understands scientific methods of tilling 
the soil. 

On the 18th of April, 1893, Mr. Nessan was married to Miss Lena Oyan, a daughter of 
Jens and Mary Oyan. Three children have been born of this union, Inez Madaline, Johnnie 
Teller and Lilly Judella. The parents hold membership in the Lutheran church and are 
interested in all that pertains to the moral progress of the community. Mr. Nessan votes 
with the republican party and keeps in touch with the leading questions and vital issues 
of the. day, so that he is able to support his position by intelligent argument. He belongs 
to the Modern Brotherhood of America. He has been township treasurer for thirteen years 
and is still the incumbent in that office and was formerly for five years treasurer of the 
school district. He stands for all that means advancement and improvement for the individual 
and for the community and he is a splendid representative of that class of progressive Nor- 
wegian farmers who have been instrumental in developing the northwest. He has always lived 
in this county and that his life has been well spent is indicated in the fact that many of the 
acquaintances of his youth are today numbered among his stanchest friends. 



C. DEXTER. 



J. C. Dexter has been actively and successfully identified with mercantile interests in 
Huron for several years, having opened a well appointed dry-goods store here in 1903. He 
was born in Canada on the 22d of September, 1874, and is a son of Thomas and Mary (Foulds) 
Dexter, natives of England. The father is deceased, but the mother is still living and makes 
her home in Winnipeg. Our subject acquired his education in the public .schools and at 
Central College of Stratford, Ontario. 

After putting aside his text-books Mr. Dexter secured employment in a dry-goods store 
in Ohio and there remained until 1903, when he went to Kenosha, Wisconsin. From there he 
proceeded to Chicago and after a short time spent at his home in Canada came to Huron, 
South Dakota. Here he embarked in business on his own account as a dry-goods merchant, 
buying the old M. Booth establishment, which he conducted for a short time under the name 
of Booth & Dexter, although he was the sole proprietor. In 1905 the name was changed to 
J. C. Dexter and the business moved to its present location on the 1st of September, that 




J. C. DEXTER 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 67 

year. In three years' time the business was trebled and he is now nearly doubling his floor 
space, intending to enlarge his stock. This will give him one of the largest ladies', misses' 
and children's ready-to-wear departments in the state. He carries an attractive and com- 
plete line of dry-goods besides ready-to-wear clothes, and is accorded a very liberal and 
gratifying patronage because of his reasonable prices, fair dealing and unassailable integrity. 
In connection with his other business he is a stockholder in the Hur-on Creamery. 

In 1900 Mr. Dexter was united in marriage to Miss Catherine Ward, of Kenosha, Wis- 
consin, by whom he has three sons: Edward C, Joseph W. and Gerald S., all at home. He 
gives his political allegiance to the republican party and is identified fraternally with the 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Knights of Pythias. He is well known and 
esteemed in both business and social circles of Huron and has exemplified the higliost stand- 
ards of manhood and citizenship in the varied relations of life. 



NORMAN D. WHITE. 



The hardships and privations of pioneer life have long since become a thing of the 
past, but it is within the memory of many residents of Yankton county that the early 
settlers were struggling with conditions that would have proved utterly disheartening to 
men of less resolute spirit and determination, but the pioneer settlers were made of sturdy 
stuir and they overcame the many obstacles which they met and as the years have passed 
have here biiilded a great commonwealth. Among those whose memory compasses the 
period of pioneer life in Yankton county is Norman D. White, who is now successfully 
following farming on section 34, Mission Hill township, that county. 

The White family is one of the best known in the southern part of Yankton county. 
Their ancestry is traced back to Elder John White and his wife, Mary, who sailed in tlie 
ship Lyon in June, 1632, and landed at Boston on Sunday, the 16th of September. Repre- 
sentatives of the family have been prominent in public affairs in the various localities in 
which they have lived. John White, father of Normati D. White, was born in Jamestown, 
New York, on the banks of the Chautauqua lake in 1826 and in the '40s removed westward 
to Illinois, securing a farm in Jo Daviess county on the state line near Scales Mound. 
While there he married Henrietta Phelps, also a representative of an early colonial family, 
descended from James Phelps, who was born in Tewksbury, England, in 1520. His son 
William, born about 1560, came with his wife, Dorothy, and their children to America when 
an old man on the vessel Mary and John, landing at Hull, near Boston, in 1030, and after- 
ward renioMn'j to DoicUcster. He was the progenitor of a large number of those in 
America toihiv \\li.. Ii.mi the name of Phelps. John White, having been induced to come te 
Dakota and luiy laml, made his way to Yankton and soon afterward purchased the Todd 
farm on James river east of the city of Yankton in the fall of 1880. After the flood of 
the following spring he could not have borrowed five hundred dollars on the entire farm, 
land having so greatly depreciated in the flood district. 

The first of the family to move to the Dakota farm was the e!ih-t ^nn. Tlicnias 
White, who came to the territory a few weeks after the waters of the ll""^! \r.\A ic.c.led 
and began the strenuous task of bringing order out of chaos. He reached Si..ii\ ( ity liuie 
11, 1881, and found the railroad washed out almost the entire distance from that point 
to Y'ankton, while the wagon roads were in such a state that they could not be traversed by 
teams. He was compelled to cross the river at that point, travel the blufl" roads through 
Nebraska and recross iiitu Dnkuta at Yankton, then double back to the James river ferry 
from there. With re^ohiti- s|iiiit he began the development of the home farm. The half 
section had been divided iiitu five fields and fenced with boards nailed upon cedar posts, 
luit of all the miles of fence barely forty posts remained after the flood. The new corn crib 
wliich had been built by Mr. White in the fall in which he purchased the farm was carried 
a half mile down stream and most of the lumber was stolen before Thomas White could 
arrive upon the scene Only titty-livi' in>ies of thi' f;un\ Avere under cultivation, but this 
amount Thomas White !;ipidly iiiei(:i-e.| and lie likewise lir.iiisht under cultivation the 
Erickson tract to tlie north, wlii.li was later a.l.h'd to the original jiurehase. the two tracts 
being developed into one of the finest farms in the James river valley. 



68 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

Tliomas White continued to live alone upon tlie farm until the spring of 1884, when 
his sister Delia, now Mrs. William C. Coulson, came to Dakota and kept house for him 
until the others of the family joined them. The father sold his farm in Illinois in February, 
1885, and on the 6th of April of that year started with his family for the northwest. They 
reached their destination four days later and here llr. White added to the original purchase 
until his landed possessions amounted to about thirteen hundred acres. He erected a large 
commodious dwelling, ample barns, sheds, cribs and other outbuildings, transforming his 
place into what was then one of the best improved farms of the territory. Mr. White 
passed away in 1897 and the mother's demise occurred in 1912. 

Of the children of Mr. and Mrs. John White, five now live in Yankton county. Thomas, 
the eldest of the children, was, as previously stated, the first of the family to come to 
Dakota. He remained upon the home farm until after his father's death and later began 
farming on his own account. He now owns a fine farm on the east bank of the James 
river three miles below the steel bridge. Cecil, the second, was the last of the family to come 
to Dakota. He was engaged in mercantile pursuits in Illinois and Wisconsin until 1894, 
when lie joined the others of the family in Yankton. He purchased a few acres from his 
father at the east end of the James river bridge ahd engaged in merchandising there. He 
also owns a tine farm nearby. Delia joined her brother Thomas in 1884, keeping house for 
him until tlie remainder of the family came to the territory. She is now the wife of 
William C. Coulson, of whom mention is made elsewhere in this volume. Norman D. and 
Addie, now the wife of William Van Eps, came to Dakota in 1885 with their parents. 

Norman D. White was born at Scales Mound, Jo Daviess county, Illinois, August 2, 
1863. Except for a year's visit at the home of a cousin in New York, liis entire life has been 
spent in Illinois and Dakota. He was a young man of about twenty-two years when the 
family removed to this state. 

On the 16th of April, 1904, he was united in marriage to Miss Blanche Hill, a native of 
Beresford, South Dakota, and a daughter of Eufus A. and Emma (Hatch) Hill. Mrs. White 
passed away November 24, 1913, leaving two children, Madras and Noble. 

The home farm of Norman D. White comprises two hundred and twenty acres of ricli 
and arable land and he also has an interest in three hundred acres of his father's farm. He 
has ever been an energetic, industrious agriculturist and employs the most modern methods 
in tilling his fields and producing his crops. His work has been attended with a substantial 
measure of success and his energy and capability place him with the leading agriculturists 
of his community. Fraternally he is well known as a member of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, the Order of Eagles and the Knights of the Maccabees. He now has a wide 
acquaintance in Yankton county and that part of the ^tate and his friends are many. 



JAMES A. BALL. 

•lanics A. Ball is capably filling the office of register of deeds, the duties of which posi- 
tion he assumed in .January, 1915. He was born in Cambridge, Story county, Iowa, July 17, 
1857, a son of Thomas A. and Serilda (Ballard) Ball, the former born in Carroll county, 
Indiana, December 30, 1835, and the latter in Illinois, May 2, 1836. The father, who was a 
farmer by occupation, removed to Iowa and settled in Story county, where he became a 
landowner, continuing the cultivation of his fields there until 1866, when he went with his 
family to Nebraska, establishing his home near Lincoln. Nebraska was at that time a terri- 
tory. He proved up the homestead, upon which he lived for about seven or eight years and 
then removed to Saunders county near Valparaiso, Nebraska, where he remained until 1878. 
At the end of that time he took up his abode in Thayer county. In 1881 he went to Superior, 
Nebraska, and thence came to the Black Hills, settling at Slinnekahta. where he lived prac- 
tically retired with a daughter. He is now living at the Soldiers' Home in Hot Springs. 
He loyally defended his country during the Civil war as a member of an Iowa regiment. 
His wife passed away in Edgemont, South Dakota, in 1902. 

James A. Ball attended the public schools near Lincoln. Nebraska, and at the age of 
eighteen years started out to make his own way in the world, working as a farm hand and 
in other capacities until February, 1879, when he removed to Furnas county, Nebraska, 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 69 

securing a claim near Beaver City. There he resided for five years, at the end of which time 
he sold his property and took up his abode in Nuckolls county, Nebraska, residing on a 
farm there through one season. The year 1885 witnessed his arrival in Fall River county, 
South Dakota. He settled at Cascade, where he engaged in ranching, farming and in the 
live-stock business, making his home at that place until he removed to Hot Springs after 
his election to the office of county register of deeds. He had never left the ranch previous 
til that time after first locating thereon. He operates a half section of ranch land and the 
labor he has bestowed upon the place has led to its substantial development and impiove- 
iiient, making bis ranch one of the valuable properties of the county. 

ilr. Ball has been twice married. On the 8th of September, 1880, he wedded Jliss Ida M. 
Hollett, who was born in Illinois, a daughter of William K. and Maria (Angel) HoUett, botli 
of wliom have passed away. Mrs. Ball died on the 30th of July, 1904. There were ten 
children born of that marriage: Bertha, the wife of D. J. Walker, a rancher of Ardmore, 
.South Dakota; Myrtle, the wife of Peter E. Danks, who is engaged in ranching near Edge- 
mont; McClellan, who married Miss Anna Bowman and resides on a ranch near Cascade; 
Cora, the wife of Henry Plumb, a ranchman of Arvado, Wyoming; Edward, who is engaged 
in the transfer business in Edgemont; Warner, who is conducting his father's ranch and 
resides at Cascade; Inez, the wife of Frank Wilson, an engineer of the Chicago, Burlington 
& Quincy Railroad, living at Alliance, Nebraska; Marie, who is attending high school; 
Urphie, also in school; and Lyle, who is living with Jlrs. Danks and attends school. On the 
TtU of February, 1906, Mr. Ball was again married, his second union being with Mrs. Lucy 
L. Hawn, a daughter of S. B. and Martha A. Sherman. Mrs. Ball was born at Boone, Iowa, 
and accompanied her parents to Nebraska and thence to Cascade, where she became the wife 
of Mr. Ball. Her father is now deceased, but her mother resides in Hot Springs. Mrs. 
Ball liad been previously married and by that marriage there were three children: William 
B., now deceased; Ruth S., residing in Sioux City, Iowa; and Richard, who is attending the 
State Normal School at Spearfish and resides with Mr. and Mrs. Ball. 

ilr. Ball has always been a democrat in his political views since age conferred upon him 
tile right of franchise. He never sought nor held office, however, until he consented to become 
tlie candidate for register of deeds, to which position he was elected in January, 1915. He 
belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church and honorable and upright principles have guided 
liiiu in all of his relations with his fellowmen. 



OLUF 0. GILSETH. 



Oluf O. Gilseth, a representative and enterprising agriculturist of Mapleton township, 
Minneliaha county, has always remained on the farm where he was born and has won pros- 
perity in its operation. His birth occurred on the 30th of August, 1870, his parents being 
Die and Anna (Moe) Gilseth, who emigrated to the United States in 1865 and first made 
their way to Goodhue county, Minnesota. The following year they came to South Dakota, 
homesteading the place which is now being operated by our subject and subsequently pur- 
chasing an adjoining tract of eighty acres. Ole Gilseth, who was born November 18, 1844, 
still survives at the age of seventh' years, but his wife has passed away. He was one of the 
first settlers in his section of the state and has witnessed its growth and development for 
nearly a half century, still taking an active and helpful interest in matters pertaining to the 
general welfare. 

Oluf 0. Gilseth attended the country schools in the acquirement of an education and 
after putting aside his textbooks assisted his father in the work of the home farm. In 
1903 the property was turned over to him by his father, and he has impro\'Bd and has 
operated the same continuously to the present time. The place is well appointed in every 
particular, and modern machinery facilitates the work of the fields. Mr. Gilseth owns thirty 
bead of cattle and has won a well merited measure of success in his undertakings as an 
agriculturist, being widely recognized as a progressive and jirosperous citizen. 

On the 26th of September, 1896, Mr. Gilseth was uiiKimI in miuriage to Miss Louisa 
M. Thompson, her parents being John and Cliristir.a Tliinii|is,.n, the former now deceased. 
To this union have been born four children, as follows. Amy, .lulia, Steplien and Bessie. 



70 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

Mr. Gilseth is a republican in politics and served for nine years as supervisor, while lie 
has also been connected with the school board as clerk and treasurer. He is a Lutheran 
in religious faith and is a man of domestic tastes who finds his greatest content in the home 
and home ties. As an upright, honorable citizen he enjoys the respect and esteem of the 
people of the community in which his entire life has been spent. 



JOHN L. LOCKHART. 



The business record of John L. Lockhart, of Pierre, in the field of real-estate and invest- 
ments is a most creditable one and has constituted an element of prosperity for the citj- as 
well as a source of individual success. Mr. Lockhart is a native of Portage, Columbia county, 
Wisconsin, born April IT, iS5(j. His parents, John and Agnes (Gray) Lockhart, were natives 
of Scotland and, leaving tlie hind of lulls and heather, in 1852 became residents of Wisconsin, 
where the father still resides but the mother passed away in March, 1901. 

John Lockhart was reared upon his father's farm in his native county, where he attended 
the district schools. His educational opportunities were somewhat limited but in the school 
of experience he has learned many valuable lessons and from the activities and conditions 
of life he has drawn correct conclusions. When twenty-four years of age he became fore- 
man in a logging camp, operating in Wisconsin for two years. In 1882 he arrived in Dakota 
territory, settling in Clark county, where he secured a homestead and preemption claim, 
remaining thereon for a year. He then removed to ,Milli;iiik, (iinnt county, where he engaged 
in the hardware business, successfully conducting that nil. i |iri>r lor a number of years. He 
never falters in the pursuit of a persistent purpose and lii^ dcterraination and energy have 
enabled him to carry forward to successful completion whatever he has undertaken. 

Mr. Lockhart has long been active politically and his patriotic citizenship and ability 
have received recognition in election to public office. In 1894 he was chosen commissioner 
of school and public lands for the state of South Dakota and in that year removed to Pierre, 
where he has since made his home. He proved a capable official, retiring from the position 
as he had entered it — with the confidence and goodwill of all, and in 1899 he embarked in 
general merchandising, in which he continued until 1906. Since that time he has engaged 
in the real-estate and investment business and has established a large clientele. He has been 
instrumental in inducing many settlers to come to his part of the state and securing for 
them favorable locations. He is thoroughly acquainti'd with nal-estate values, knows the 
property that is upon the market and is thus able to sucs^-tuUy liandle the interests of his 
many clients. 

In 1909 Mr. Lockhart was appointed register of the United States land office at Pierre 
and served in that office until August, 1913. He again became an active factor in politics, 
when, at the spring primaries in March, 1914, he was chosen chairman of the republican 
state central committee and in that connection successfuUj^ conducted the following cam- 
paign. His political record prior to his removal to the capital city is an interesting one and 
worthy of high commendation. In 1889, while a resident of Milbank, he was elected clerk 
of the courts of Grant county and was three times reelected. In the spring of 1893, while 
away from home his party, the republican, nominated him for mayor of ililbank and he proved 
to be the successful candidate at the polls. He wisely administered municipal affairs in that 
city for one term but refused a reelection. During the famous fight for the capital in 1904, 
in which Pierre sought to remain the capital city, Mr. Lockhart's activities were of such an 
important character that at the close of the campaign the citizens of Pierre presented him 
with a beautiful solid gold watch and chain, suitably inscribed, in recognition of his serv- 
ices, and this is today probably his proudest possession. His efl'orts, wiiether in behalf of 
his private interests or of the public have always been wisely directed. He possesses the 
faculty of viewing a question from every possible standpoint and thus arriving at a correct 
conclusion. His worth is widely acknowledged and his fellow townsmen entertain for him 
the highest regard. 

On the 1st of December, 1885, Mr. Lockhart was united in marriage to Miss Delilah C. 
Burman, a daughter of William and' Eliza (Russell) Burman, of Grant county. South Dakota. 
Their children are four in number, namely: John B., William H., Margaret E. and Grace G. 




JOHN L. LOCKHAET 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 73 

Mr. Lockhart holds membership with the Knights of Pythias and is a past chancellor com- 
mander of the lodge at Milbank. He has also been a member of the grand lodge of the state 
and is a member of the grand lodge of the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He is also a 
member of Huron Lodge, No. 444, B. P. O. E. The republican party numbers him among its 
most loyal and stalwart advocates and he has done everything in his power to advance its 
interests and secure its success. In matters of citizenship he is ever public-spirited and 
progressive and he cooperates heartily in every movement for the benefit and upbuilding of 
the capital and of the commonwealth. He belongs to that class of men who have been the 
architects and builders of their own fortunes. Starting out empty-handed, he has utilized 
energy, industry and honesty as weapons in winning the victory which has come to him in 
the business world. 



GEORGE G. BEEDLE. 



Although yet a young man George G. Beedle is the efficient cashier of the Bank of Bur- 
bank, of which he was one of the organizers, and in that capacity holds a position of im- 
portance in the financial world of his town. He was born in Blenheim, Ontario, Canada, 
October 10, 1890, a son of George A. and Phoebe (Brock) Beedle, both of whom were born 
in Michigan. The mother is a daughter of Dr. C. L. Brock and a sister of Dr. W. R. Brock, 
a physician of Sheldon, Iowa. George A. Beedle is engaged in business in Wynot, Nebraska, 
and his wife is also living. George G. Beedle is the eldest of their five children, the others 
being: Russell L., of Newcastle, Nebraska; Ralph, attending the high school at Wynot, 
Nebraska; Horace, who is attending school; and Marguerite. 

George G. Beedle accompanied his parents to Sheldon, Iowa, when a boy of eleven years, 
the family home being maintained there for one" year. Removal was then made to Sioux 
City, Iowa, where the father remained in business for fourteen years. Our subject attended 
graded school and also the high school in that city and then took an art course in the Chicago 
Academy of Fine Arts. After leaving school he accepted a position in Leed's Bank at Sioux 
City, Iowa, as assistant cashier. He held that position from October, 1910, until June, 1913, 
but at the last named date removed to Burbank, South Dakota, liaving accepted the position 
of cashier of the Bank of Burbank. He was one of the organizers of that institution and 
since June, 1913, has been its cashier. He understands well the details of banking work and 
also has a good grasp of the fundamental principles of finance that underlie the conduct of 
a bank. The institution of which he is cashier is a private bank and is owned by E. E. Hal- 
stead, of Ponca, Nebraska. 

Mr. Beedle was married on the 18th of June, 1913, to Miss Hulda L. Dills, a native of 
Sioux City, Iowa, and a daughter of Mrs. Ellen Dills, of that city. Mrs. Beedle is active 
in club work and also in church affairs, being a devoted member of the Presbyterian church. 
She is especially interested in the work of the Ladies' Aid Society but can be counted upon 
to assist in any good cause. Mr. Beedle is a democrat and has served on the election board 
of Sioux City, Iowa. Although he has been a resident of Burbank for less than two years 
he has already identified himself thoroughly with the progress of the community and has 
made a worthy place for himself in the estimation of the community. 



MARTIN OIEN. 



Martin Oien is an enterprising, representative and prosperous agriculturist of Mapleton 
township, owning and cultivating three hundred and seventy-one acres of productive land. 
He is numbered among the worthy native sons of South Dakota, his birth having occurred 
in Minnehaha county on the Sth of September, 1876. His parents, TTemming H. and Annie 
Oien, came to this state in 1872, the father preempting a tr:irt nf land. As the years have 
passed and prosperity has attended his efforts, he has exti mlrd his landed holdings until 
they now embrace six hundred and forty acres. Both he and his wife still survive, resid- 



74 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

ing on the old home farm four miles east of Baltic. They have lived in that locality for 
more than four decades and are widely and favorably known. 

Martin Oien attended the country schools of his native county in the acquirement of an 
education and after putting aside his textbooks assisted his father in the work of the home 
farm. Eventually his father-in-law gave him a quarter section of land in Mapleton town- 
ship, and to the operation of that place he has devoted his attention continuously for the 
past fifteen years. As his financial resources have increased, owing to his untiring industry 
and capable management, he has acquired more property by purchase and now owns three 
hundred and seventy-one acres. The fields annually yield golden harvests in return for the 
care and labor whieli he bestows upon them, and he has long enjoyed recognition among the 
substantial and representative agriculturists of his community. When he located on his 
present place there was only one small house on the farm and that structure, which is still 
standing and which is now used as a chicken house, is the oldest building in the locality and 
was erected by Jonas Nelson. He and John Thompson were the first settlers in the township. 

On the 13th of June, 1899, Mr. Oien was united in marriage to Miss Cleopatra H. 
Thompson, a daughter of John and Christina Thompson. They have six children, as follows: 
Annie, sixteen years of age; Helen, who is fourteen years old; Jennie, eleven; Clarence 
Gilmore, seven; Morris M. ; and Claris Henrietta. 

Mr. Oien is a republican in politics and has served as a member of the school board 
for eleven years, the cause of education ever finding in him a stanch champion. He is a 
Lutheran in religious faith and is a man of domestic tastes who finds his greatest happiness 
at his own fireside with his wife and children. His entire life has been spent in Minnehaha 
county, and that his career has ever been upright and honorable is indicated in the fact 
that the associates of his boyhood and youth are still numbered among his warm friends 
and admirers. 



EARL G. CLEGG, M. D. 



Dr. Earl G. Clegg, the well known practitioner of Harrisburg, South Dakota, was born 
in Ainsworth, Iowa, February 18, 1881, a son of .James Clegg, a native of Marietta, Ohio, 
born in 1844. The father removed to Illinois shortly after the Civil war and three years 
later went to Iowa, where he engaged in farming, founding the famous Pine Grove Stock 
Farm, vphich has been noted for many years for its herd of registered shorthorn cattle. The 
property is still owned by members of the family, his sons, J. E. and J. M., operating the 
farm under the name of Clegg Brothers. James Clegg passed away in 1907, having since 
1899 survived his wife, who in her maidenhood was Misfe ilary ilcCuUough. She was a 
native of Ohio, but was married in Illinois in 1866 and became the mother of five children, 
of whom the subject of this review is the youngest. 

Dr. Clegg received his elementary and secondary education in the grade and high schools 
of Ainsworth and at Washington Academy of Washington, Iowa. He then entered the ^'al- 
paraiso t'niversity at Valparaiso, Indiana, and upon the completion of the collegiate course 
received the Bachelor of Arts degree from that institution. He later took a law course and 
was admitted to the bar of South Dakota in 1906. After some time spent in practice h« 
decided that the profession of medicine was more congenial and, accordingly, went to Chi- 
cago, where he entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons, the medical department of 
the University of Illinois. He was graduated with the degree of M. D. from that institution 
with the class of 1910 and in the same year took a state board examination in South Dakota 
and located at Harrisburg, where he began practice. He has found the town such a good 
field that he has remained a resident thereof continuously since first locating there and has 
gained a reputation as an able and conscientious practitioner. He is careful in diagnosis 
and is very successful in prescribing the best remedies for each case that comes under his 
professional scrutiny. He is a member of the seventh district of the South Dakota Medical 
Association, of the South Dakota State Medical Society and of the American Medical Asso- 
ciation, and in this way keeps in touch with the latest developments in the science and prac- 
tice of medicine. In addition to active practice in his profession, he is the owner of a modern 
drug store. 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 75 

Dr. Clegg was married June 12, 1906, to Miss Ida Bellacli, of Tea, South Dakota. His 
jjolitieal alkgiaiice is given to the progressive republican party in national affairs, but he 
votes independently on local issues. He has served two terms as town clerk and in that 
capacity did muck able work lur the benelit ul the municipality. He is a member of Har- 
risburg Lodge, No. 16U, I, U. U. F. ; ^^i^lux falls Lodge, Nu, XIU:.;, B. P. 0. E.; and of Lnity 
Lodge, No. lao, A. F. & A. M., of Sioux Lulls. He also holds membership in Occidental Con- 
sistory of Sioux Lalls and in the El Kiad Temple of the Mystic Shrine at the same city. 
He is fond of out-door recreation, being an enthusiastic hunter, fisher and motorist. Dr. 
Clegg holds the respect of his fellow townsmen, not only as a physician of proven ability, 
but also iis a citizen of commendable public spirit. 



WILLIAM H. MILLER, JR. 



William H. Miller, Jr., of Canton, is one of the best known men of Lincoln county and 
was one of those who braved the hardships of pioneer life, coming to this state when it was 
as yet but sparsely settled. His father was also one of the early settlers of the section and 
achieved a position of prominence in his locality. William H. Miller, Jr., was born at 
Winooski Falls, Vermont, July 16, 1848, a son of William H. Miller, Sr., who was born in 
Dublin, Ireland, November 26, 182.3, and at the age of fifteen years enlisted as a musician 
in the Seventy-seventh Infantry of the British army and was stationed at a number of 
posts in the British Isles, including Calway, Annaugh, Belfast, Carlisle, Dover, Hanvec, 
Chatham and Sheerness and subsequently was sent to Jamaica, West Indies. He also saw- 
service in Nova Scotia at St. John, New Brunswick, and at Montreal, Quebec. At the last 
named place he purchased his freedom from further military service and in 1847 removed to 
Vermont, continuing to make his home there for a number of years. In 1860 he went to 
Madison, Wisconsin, and upon the outbreak of the Civil war was appointed by Governor 
Randall a lieutenant of the First Wisconsin Infantry. In the following December he wa? 
made major of the Second Wisconsin Cavalry and in 1863 was promoted by Governor Solomon 
to the rank of lieutenant colonel of the same regiment. He was a man of splendid physique 
and was considered one of the two best swordsmen in the army. Following the war he 
engaged in merchandising in Madison, Wisconsin, until 1874, when he removed to Canton, 
South Dakota, where he became a pioneer merchant and an influential citizen. He was for 
over a half century a Mason, having entered as an apprentice in Hiram Lodge, No. 5, A. F. 
& A. M., of Madison, Wisconsin, .July 19, 1858, taking the Fellow Craft degree August 30, 
1858, and becoming a Master Mason September 30, of the same year. In that year he also 
became a member of Madison Chapter, No. 4, of Madison, Wisconsin, receiving the Royal 
Arch degree, and on -the 27th of February, 1859, he was given the Red Cross degree, and 
on the 29th of March, 1859, he was made a Knight Templar in Robert McCoy Commandery, 
No. 3, Madison, Wisconsin. In 1875 he was honored by being made the first senior grand 
deacon of the grand lodge of South Dakota and two years later held the office of deputy grand 
master. He was one of the charter members of Silver Star Lodge, No. 4, of Canton, and 
served as first worshipful master therein during the years 1874-75-76. He married Miss 
Rachel Irwin, who passed away March 4, 1897, but he survived for a number of years, dying 
October 30, 1909. It may be appropriately said of him: 

". . . night came, releasing him from labor, 
When a hand as from darkness touched him — and he slept." 
Five of his children survive and hold his memory in the greatest love and veneration. 
Those living are as follows: William H., Jr., of this review; Mrs. Margaret Aikens, of Sioux 
Falls; and Jlrs. Lydia Fowler, Mrs. Nora Smith, and Mrs. Anna Rudolph, of Canton. The 
others were Mrs. Henry Conklin, of Seattle, Washington, and Thomas W. Miller, who died 
in Nebraska some years ago. 

William H. Miller, .Jr., was but a boy when he accompanied his parents to Madison, 
Wisconsin, and he received his general education in the public schools of that place. He sub- 
sequently took a course in the Bryant & Stratton Business College at Milwaukee and was 
then for a time proofreader on the State Journal of Madison. After serving as a newsboy 
on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway he turned his attention to farming, operat- 



76 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

ing a place owned by his father until 1868, when he removed to Sioux City, Iowa, remaining 
there but a short time. He was next in charge of the cattle herd of the Grand River Indian 
Agency and the following winter went to General Harney's headquarters at Peoria Bottoms, 
where he superintended the erection of a number of new buildings. Returning to Sioux 
City, he was then sent by the government in 1869 to Whitestone Indian Agency where he 
supervised the erection of buildings, and in ISTO went to Fort Thompson, where he had 
charge of the erection of the barracks and other post buildings. In 1871 he assisted in remov- 
ing the Indians from Whitestone Indian Agency to Big White Clay, now known as the 
Pine Ridge Agency. For some time afterward he served as assistant Indian agent. In 
1872 he returned to his home in Wisconsin for a visit, but in March of the following year 
removed to Canton, South Dakota, and began the improvement of land which he had pur- 
chased three years previously. He also took up a homestead near Worthing, in the same 
county, and now owns a fine farm of four hundred and forty acres near Canton and one of 
three hundred and twenty acres in Jerauld county. He has been known for many years as a 
successful breeder of horses, having probably the finest strain of registered Morgan horses 
in America. On one of Colonel Theodore Roosevelt's visits to South Dakota Mr. Miller pre- 
sented him with the splendid Morgau stallion, Pat Murphy, which was in turn, presented 
by the Colonel to the government experimental farm at Beltsville, Maryland, and was later 
transferred to the government farm at Middleburg, Vermont. Mr. Miller was also for a 
number of years an extensive breeder of blooded Devonshire cattle. Mr. Miller has done a 
great deal to raise the standard of stock throughout the state and has thus not only won 
for himself financial prosperity and a well known name among stockraisers, but he has also 
performed valuable service for the agricultural interests of South Dakota. 

Mr. Miller was married July 16, 1884, to Miss Anna Sundvold, a native of Xorway, who 
in her childhood came to America with her parents, both of whom were lost in the wreck 
of the vessel on which they crossed Lake Michigan to Wisconsin. Mr. Miller is a progressive 
republican in politics and is influential in the local party councils, but he has never sought 
any but county offices. He served for three years as county commissioner and was also 
elected justice of the peace, resigning, however, after a short time, as his business affairs 
claimed his undivided attention. He is a member of Silver Star Lodge, No. 4, A. F. & A. M., 
of Canton, and was one of the active promoters of the Masonic Temple Association, which 
erected the splendid temple at Canton. His religious adherence is given to the Episcopal 
church. He is one of the most prominent citizens of the county and has done a great deal 
in many ways to secure the material and moral welfare of his community. 



FEED HEGLIN. 



Many of the well-to-do and progressive farmers of South Dakota are natives of Sweden 
and to this class belongs Fred Heglin, of Clay county, a member of the state legislature, 
who was born in Sweden in 1859 of the marriage of Hans and Brita (Anderson) Hoglund. 
Both parents were born in that country and the father followed farming there. Upon his 
emigration to America he went to Council Bluflfs, Iowa, where he resided for a year, after 
which he came to South Dakota, taking up as a homestead the farm which, is now in pos- 
session of his son Fred. The claim comprised one hundred and sixty acres, but Mr. Heglin 
added four hundred acres to it and became recognized as one of the energetic and successful 
farmers of the county. When he first came to the state, however, he was in straitened cir- 
cumstances and after filing upon his homestead left his family thereon and walked to Omaha, 
a distance of some two hundred miles, in search of work, as there was at that time no oppor- 
tunity to make a living for his family in this state, which was a wild and unsettled region. 
He left home with but fifty cents in his pcwket and the long journey which he made on foot 
is an indication of his determination and strength of will. He is still living at the advanced 
age of eighty-nine years and is in excellent health. His wife died in 1913. To them were 
born three sons: John and Peter H., who are farming in Canada; and Fred, of this review. 

The last named was nine years of age when he accompanied his parents to this country 
and had attended school in his native land. He continued his education in the public schools 
of Council Bluffs, Iowa, and although quite naturally, he knew no English upon entering 




FKKP TIRGLIX 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 79 

school there, in three luonths he was far ahead of some in his classes. When eighteen years 
of age he entered the high school at Yankton, South Dakota, where he was a student until 
he was twenty-two years old. He then returned home and in connection with his brothers 
operated the farm. However, as his brothers were working for others, the greater part of 
the responsibility of the work of the homestead devolved upon him. In 1890 his father retired 
from active life and he assumed entire charge of the place. In 1894 he was elected county 
auditor and held that office for two terms. During that time he rented his farm and after 
the expiration of his second term accepted a position in the Clay County Bank, where he 
remained for one year. He then returned to the farm and resumed its operation. In 1912 
he was elected a member of the state legislature and is at present serving his second term. 
He had the honor of delivering the speech nominating for United States senator Dean Sterling, 
who was later elected. 

Mr. Heglin was married August 17, 1889, to Miss Elizabeth Ostlund, a native of Sweden, 
who accompanied her parents to the United States in 1868. Her father took up a home- 
stead in Clay county but subsequently returned to Sweden, where he is now living retired. 
His wife died in 1890. To Mr. and Mrs. Heglin have been born the following children: Edna, 
who is now at home but was formerly a student in the Univeisity of South Dakota, making 
a special study of music; Judith, a graduate of the high school of Vermillion, who is fitting 
herself for a teacher; Herbert, who is a high-school student; and Wallace, who is attending 
the district school. 

Mr. Heglin was formerly a populist but now gives his political allegiance to the repub- 
lican party. He has held various local offices and has always taken an active iiitiicst in tnwn- 
sliip and school affairs. His religious faith is that of the Lutheran church and lie is a diacon 
in the local organization of that denomination. He has added one hundred acres to tiic two 
hundred acres of land owned by his father and the farm is one of the best developed in the 
county, yielding a good financial return annually. In early manhood Mr. Heglin took up the 
study of music and organized the Dalesburg Band, which played at a number of state fairs. 
He was the leader of this band from its organization in 1887 until 1903 and under his direc- 
tion it became a musical organization of merit. For thirty years he has been the choir leader 
in the Lutheran church and in many ways has contributed to the musical development of his 
locality. He is a man of broad views and of well balanced personality and gives his sup- 
port to all movements that have as their object the material, moral or intellectual develop- 
ment of his part of the state. 



WILLIAM C. COULSOX. 



AVilliam C. Coulson is a resident farmer of Yankton precinct, Yankton county, and 
has made his home in Dakota since the spring of 1880. He was born in Pittsburgh, Penn- 
sylvania. September 20, 1860, a son of .John Coulson. also a native of Pittsburgh. The father 
ran on tlie river between Pittsburgh and New Orleans and also to some extent on the Missis- 
sippi north of St. Louis for forty years and three of his brothers were also river men. In 
1SS4 he purchased thirteen hundi-ed acres of land near Volin, this state, and turned his at- 
tention to the raising of cattle and sheep, conducting his ranching interests on an extensive 
scale. After many years he retired, sold his ranch and purchased one hundred and thirty- 
six acres of land in the Yankton precinct, where his son William now lives. Thereon he 
resided until his death, which occurred about 1897. His wife, who bore the maiden name 
of Kate Wakefield, was born near Pittsburgh and they became the parents of four chil- 
dren: Albert, now living in Los Angeles. California; Lizzie, the wife of J. N. Hassler, of 
Pawnee, Nebraska; Clara, the wife of Frank McDonald, also of Pawnee; and William C. 

The last named spent the greater part of his youth and acquired his education in 
Pittsburgh and at the age of seventeen years started out on his own account, going on a 
trip up the Missouri river to Fort Benton. It was in the spring of 1877 that he first came to 
Dakota on the steamer Rosebud, under Captain Grant Marsh. This boat wa^ built at 
Pittsburgh for the upper Missouri river trade and Sir. Coulson was a member of the first 
crew. The boat was loaded at Pittsburgh for St. Louis, where its cargo was then discharged 
and another taken on, the boat proceeding up the river with army supplies to the head of 



80 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

navigation at Fort Benton. Later tlie crew transferred to tlie Josephine running between 
Bismarck, tlie terminus of the Northern Pacific Railroad, and Fort Benton. Early in No- 
vember of that year Mr. Coulson came down the river to Yankton and returned by rail to 
Pittsburgh. He became engaged in the tobacco business at Pittsburgh, where he remained 
until the spring of 1880, when he returned to Dakota to make his permanent home. He 
came up the river with his father's family, making his way to Volin in 1884, and remained 
upon the ranch until the time of his marriage, which was celebrated September 38, 1887. 
He then began farming for himself, renting a ranch from his father-in-law for a year. He 
afterward lived upon another rented farm for three years and in 1891 located on his pres- 
ent farm on section 9, Yankton precinct. 

Mr. Coulson was united in marriage to Miss Delia White, who was born near Scales 
Mound, Illinois, a daughter of John and Henrietta (Phelps) Wliite. A brother of Mr. 
White, who had been in Dakota for a few years, returned to Illinois on a visit and induced 
John White to buy the Todd farm on the James river east of Yankton. He purchased the 
land at a low figure following the flood and sent his son Tom out that spring to take 
charge of the ranch. The latter kept bachelor's hall until 1884, when his sister Delia came to 
Dakota to act as his housekeeper. Later the father sold his farm in Illinois and in 1885 
came to Yankton county, purchasing the Erickson farm north of the 'Todd farm. Subse- 
quently he added to his holdings until he was the owner of thirteen hundred and fifty acres. 
He erected upon his land a large residence and made many other substantial and modern 
improvements, having one of the most desirable and attractive groups of farm buildings in 
the county. 

Mrs. Coulson was the third in a family of six children, all of whom are living in Yank- 
ton precinct, and by her marriage she has become the mother of three children: William 
S., at home; Shirley Wakefield, attending the Y'ankton high school; and Edward. 

Mr. Coulson is a democrat in his political viev/s but has never been an office seeker. 
While on the ranch near Volin he was frequently called out to fight prairie fires. During 
liis fir.st trip to Dakota he saw numerous bufi'aloes, which in those days ranged the prairies 
in the western part of the state. Wolves were also numerous enough to be pests and fre- 
quently stole young pigs and chickens from the farm of Mr. Coulson. Conditions have 
greatly changed, however, and every evidence of modern civilization is found in the fine 
farm homes and well developed fields to be seen in Y'ankton county. 



ADAM J. BLESER. 



Adam J. Bleser, who is successfully engaged in the real-estate and insurance business 
at Milbank, is a native of Manitowoc, Wisconsin, and was born on the 28th of August, 1852. 
His parents, Adam and Mary Elizabeth (Pauley) Bleser, were born respectively in Prussia 
in 1830 and in Alsace-Lorraine in July, 1834. The father emigrated to the United States 
when twenty years of age and settled in Manitowoc Rapids. Wisconsin, where he followed 
mercliandising for a number of years. Subsequently he removed to the town of Manitowoc 
and fiiterrd Imsincss circles there. His political belief was that of the democratic party and 
the ( atliiilii- clniKh IkkI in him a iipyal nii-niber. He was successful and highly esteemed and 
well likrd in hi.s loniiinuiity. His \\if(' is still living and resides at Manitowoc. To their 
union were born nine children, six of whom survive: Adam J.; D. B., who is a brewer re- 
siding in Manitowoc; N. J., who is engaged in the drug business in Milbank; Ida, the wife 
of Frank Miller, of Manitowoc; Theresa, who married .Joseph Stahley, of Manitowoc: and 
Josie, the wife of Captain Knudtson, of Manitowoc. He served as captain of a company 
during the Spanish-American war and has also been state senator, being the youngest mem- 
ber of the senate of Wisconsin at the time of his connection with that body. 

Adam J. Bleser attended the common schools in the acquirement of an education and 
in his early manhood taught for three years. He was then clerk in a dry-goods store at 
Appleton, Wisconsin, after which he became connected with the sewing-machine and musical 
instrument business. Later he was state agent for the Minneapolis Harvester Machine 
Company, with office at Milwaukee, and remained in that connection for two years. In 
October, 1878, he emigrated to Big Stone lake. South Dakota, and proved up on a homestead 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 81 

in tliiit lueality. He retained that property for a number of years and for eight years held 
tlif iilluc ul lUrk of the courts, being appointed to that position by Judge L. P. Kidder. 
l.atrr hv »or\oil as postmaster of Milbank for four years. Upon leaving that ofKce he be- 
came a commercial traveler for H. J. Hinze and remained in his employ for four years, hia 
territory extending to the Pacific coast. Upon severing his connection with Mr. Hinze our 
suljject located in Milbank, where he is now engaged in the insurance and real-estate busi- 
ness. He has gained a large and profitable clientage and is recognized as an expert in those 
lields. He was one of the organizers and is at present a director of the Milbank Cement 
Lonstruction Company, which makes a specialty of silos and also manufactures many other 
things of Portland cement. 

Mr. Bleser was married in 1873 to Miss Mary A. Sullivan, who was born in JIaumee, 
Uliio, but who resided in Manitowoc, Wisconsin, for a number of years previous to lier 
iiiarriage. To this union were born five children: Eugene J., who is engaged in tlie drug 
business in San Francisco; Arthur, a railroad man living in Oakland, California; Ella, who is 
teaching in California; Natalia, who is also teaching in that state; and Chauncey, likewise 
residing in the Golden state. 

Mr. Bleser is a republican in politics and has been an active worker in the party ranks. 
For twenty-four years he has served as justice of the peace, his long continuance in tlie 
office being the best proof of the acceptability of his services in that connection. He is well 
known fraternally, belonging to the Masonic blue lodge, of which he is a past master; the 
Koyal Arch chapter, of which he is past high priest; and the Knights Templar commandery. 
He was master of the blue lodge at the time of the dedication of the Masonic Temple at Mil- 
bank and served as a member of the building committee. He is also identified with the 
.Modern Woodmen of America. He was reared in the Catholic church and still attends the 
services of that cliurch although not now a communicant thereof. Since coming to Milbank 
lie has accumulated more than a competence and has gained the respect and esteem of his 
lellow citizens. His business ability is recognized, as is his integrity and public spirit. 



WILLIAM HENRY ROUNDS. 



For a ]ieriod of over twenty years William Henry Rounds has been regarded as the lead- 
ing clothier and merchant tailor in Sioux Falls and he still occupies this enviable position, 
his KiKcess coming as a natural result of his knowledge of merchandising, his aggressive 
liiisincss spirit and the style, quality and workmanship of his goods. He was born in St. 
• luliiis, Canada, November 26, 1865, and is a son of Albert and Betsy (Chamberlain) Rounds, 
natives of Vermont. His parents moved to Malone, New York, in 1866, and there the father 
died ill 1888, at the age of sixty-tWo years. The mother survives him and still makes her 
liome in Malone at the age of eighty-eight years. 

William Henry Rounds acquired his early education in the public schools of Malone, 
New York, and later attended Malone Academy. At the age of seventeen he laid aside his 
textbooks and turned his attention to the clothing business as salesman in a retail house 
ill his native city. In 1883 he came to Sioux Falls, South Dakota, and here, after clerking 
in various clothing stores until 1894, established himself in business as a clothier and mer- 
chant tailor. He occupies today a conspicuous place among the merchants of the northwest. 
For over twenty years his advertisements have been in the Sioux Falls papers and during 
that time his patronage has increased rapidly to its present proportions. Mr. Rounds has 
always prided himself upon the style, quality and workmanship of his clothes and his name 
lias come to be regarded as a synonym for quality, a fact which has had much to do with his 
continued success. Like other Sioux Falls merchants, he has recognized the certainty of a 
great future for the city and in 1910 secured one of its most beautiful storerooms, on the 
corner of Eleventh street and Phillips avenue, in the Boyce-Greely building. Scarcely any- 
where in the northwest can be found a store which will surpass his establishment, it being 
completely equipped in every detail. There are two entrances, one on Phillips avenue ami 
tlie other on the Eleventh street side. Great electric signs direct the way of the people to 
both entrances. He employs a large number of tailors, the manufacturing department being 
under tlie direction of August Reichard, who for more than thirteen years has been Mr. 



82 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

Rounds' cutter. Mr. Reichard attends the tailors' conventions in order tliat he may keep 
fully posted as to the very latest fashions in men's clothing and he has no superior in this 
particular line of work in the state. Mr. Rounds is himself a frequent visitor to New York, 
where he studies styles and general values. Upon entering the Eleventh street entrance to 
his store the visitor is confronted with a great showing of beautiful imported fabrics of such 
a variety of weave that it is an easy matter for even the most fastidious to find something 
to his liking. To accommodate the merchant tailoring department where the workers are 
engaged in the manufacturing of clothes another store is maintained where today there is a 
group of twenty tailors busily turning out men's attire to order. 

On the 31st of January, 1S91, at Janesville, Wisconsin, Mr. Rounds was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Jennie June Collier, and they have become the parents of four children: Har- 
riet, Elizabeth, Ruth and Janet. 

Mr. Rounds is a member of the Episcopal church and gives his political allegiance to the 
republican party. He was a charter member of Company B, Second Regiment Dakota Na- 
tional Guards, serving as a private and as a member of the regiment band. He holds mem- 
bership in the Elks, the Country, the Dacotah and the Commercial Clubs and belongs to tlie 
Masonic Shrine and the Kjiights of Pythias. He is, however, preeminently a business man, 
energetic, alert and enterprising, and has founded success upon a thorough knowledge of 
his business, upon intelligent management of his interests and upon thorough efficiency in 
every department. 



GUSTAVUS NORGREN. 



Gustavus Norgren, who has represented his district in the state legislature from Turner 
county, is today a well known and progressive farmer of Clay county. He was born in Sweden 
in 1850, a son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Shoberg) Norgren, who were also born in that coun- 
try but in 1868 emigrated with their family to America. The father took up a homestead 
in Clay county. South Dakota, and resided upon his quarter section of land until his demise 
in June, 1911. He had survived his wife for ten years. They were the parents of seven 
children: Augusta, who died in Sweden in childhood; Sophia, the widow of Peter Bystrom, 
of Centerville, this state; Gustavus; William, a fruit grower of Vancouver, Washington; 
Wilhelmina, the wife of Hans Quarnberg, of Belle Fourche, South Dakota; August, who 
resides upon the old homestead; and Johannah, who died when a young woman of nineteen 
years. 

Mr. Norgren grew to maturity in his native land, assisting his father with the work of 
the home farm and attending the public schools. When he was eighteen years of age his 
father emigrated to America and five months later the family followed him to this country. 
Mr. Norgren of this review attended school for a part of two sessions after coming to the 
United States but devoted the greater part of his time to farm work in the employ of others, 
being thus engaged for three years. He then came to South Dakota and took up a home- 
stead of one hundred and sixty acres in Clay county — the farm upon which he still resides. 
He immediately began improving his land and has continued its development throughout the 
intervening years, so that it is now one of the best farm properties of Clay county. From 
time to time he has purchased other land and now holds title to one thousand and ten acres,, 
all of which is under cultivation. His home farm comprises three hundred and seventy 
acres and is well provided with trees and has an excellent set of buildings. Mr. Norgren has 
planted all of the trees and erected all of the buildings upon his land, his residence being 
one of the finest in the county. When Clay county was still sparsely settled Mr. Norgren. 
in connection with another man, built and operated a flour mill at Centerville, but after 
twelve years sold out. He was one of the organizers of the First National Bank of Center- 
ville and for a time was a director therein. His chief interest, however, has always been 
his farming and his land has yielded him large returns. He does general farming, although 
his chief crop is corn, and he feeds a large number of cattle for the market each year. He 
also raises Chester White hogs. 

Mr. Norgren was married in 1876 to Miss Caroline Anderson, a native of Sweden and 
a daughter of Carl and Maria (Elberg) Anderson, both of whom were born in that country. 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 85 

Mr. and Mrs. Norgren have become the parents of the following children: Francis, who 
is engaged in farming in MeCook county, this state, is married and has three children. Etta 
is the wife of John Finley, of Centerville, and they have five children. Ida married Robert 
Quarnberg, a fruit raiser of Vancouver, Washington, by whom she has one child. Phillip 
is residing in Montana. Carl is a mechanical engineer residmg in Omaha, Nebraska. Ade- 
laide is now Mrs. Olaf Poison, of Clay county, this state. Anna married Dr. John Struble, of 
Centerville. 

Mr. Norgren is a republican and in 1899 represented his district in the state legislature. 
He was offered the nomination for a second term but refused, feeling that his private 
interests demand his entire attention. He has been a member of the school board of his 
township and during the ten years that he lived in Centerville was for six years a member 
of the city council. He has always been particularly interested in the welfare of the public 
schools and has done much to further educational advancement. His religious faith is that 
of the Free Mission church. His has been a life of useful activity and of strict adherence 
to high ethical standards and there is no more valued citizen in Clay county than Gustavus 
Norgren. 



MATTHEW A. MOOPvE. 



Matthew A. Moore is engaged in the insurance business in HoAvard and is meeting with 
well deserved success in that line. He is also a man of public affairs, having held among 
other offices that of county assessor. He was born March 16, 1S56, in Hemmingford, Quebec, 
a son of Robert and Matilda (Ray) Moore, both natives of Belfast, Ireland, the birth of the 
former occurring in 1788. In 1816 he went to Quebec and in that province homesteaded a 
farm whereon he resided until his demise, which occurred in F'ebruary, 1882, at the advanced 
age of ninety-four years. His widow survived but a few weeks, her demise occurring in 
-March of the same year. They reared a family of fourteen children. 

Matthew A. Moore attended common schools of his native province and in 1877, when 
a young man of twenty-one, left home and made his way to Mankato, Minnesota, where he 
resided for two years. He then went to Beaver Creek, Minnesota, and farmed for a year. 
In 1880 he removed to Miner county, where he had filed on a timber claim the year previous. 
Alter taking up his residence in the county he filed on a preemption claim and devoted his 
time to the cultivation of his land. He also homesteaded a farm adjoining Howard. In 
1883 he sold all of his land and purchased ten acres situated in Howard and there built a 
comfortable dwelling. He went into the insurance business, in which he is still engaged, as 
lie has found it both congenial and lucrative. 

Mr. Jloore was united in marriage on the 13th of August, 1884. to Miss Emma Gilmore, 
a daughter of John and Eliza (MorriMHii (liliiKire, of Russelltown, Quebec. Mr. Moore is a 
member of the Episcopal church and ir:itri naljy is identified with the Masonic order. His 
liolitical belief is that of the repulilican I'urty and he has held a number of local offices. 
He was tlie first county assessor of Miner county and has been deputy sheriff of the county 
at times for nine years. Faithfulness to duty and public spirit are among his outstanding 
characteristics and his many friends hold him in the highest esteem for his manliness and 
integrity. 



OLE H. WOLNER. 



A splendid farm of four hundred and eighty acres on section 35, Frankfort township, 
Spink county, is the property of Die H. Wolner and his energy and progressiveness are shown 
in its excellent condition. He was born in Christiania, Norway, November 10, 1863, a son of 
Hans and lllizalpcth (Johanson) Wolner. When but a child he lost his mother, but his 
fatlier Burvi\id until 1SSS. They were quite prominent farmers in their native land and 
both are liiuiiMl th.ic. They were the parents of eight children, namely: Syverine, the wife 
of John Johanson, a carpenter of Norway: Maren, the wife of Christopher Olson, a grocer of 



86 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

Norway; John, who passed away in 1869 and is buried in Xorway; Hans, who is farming in 
the land of the midnight sun; Caroline, who died in 190-t and is buried in Norway; Lauritz, 
a blacksmitli living in Norway; Ole H., of this review-; and Hannah, living in St. Paul, Minne- 
sota, the widow of Vincent Strommen, w'ho was killed in a railroad accident 

Ole H. Wolner is indebted to the public schools of his native land for his education. 
At the age of fifteen he left school and hired out as a blacksmith's apprentice for a three 
years' term. He then came to the United States and for four years worked as a farm liand 
in Jlinnesota. He next removed to South Dakota in 1S88 and for four years worked in the 
employ of others on farms. Later he purchased one hundred and sixty acres and began to 
cultivate liis land. As he was thoroughly versed in agricultural work and directed his labors 
wisely, prosperity came to him and from time to time he bought additional land until he now 
owns four hundred and eighty acres. He raises the crops that are best adapted to soil and 
climate and also keeps about twenty horses, twenty cattle and fifty hogs, beside raising 
poultry on an extensive scale. 

Mr. Wolner was married at Frankfort, this state, on the 3d of November, 1893, to Miss 
Jennie Gill, a daughter of Ole and Sophia (Torson) Gill. The latter died in 1880 and is 
buried in Norway, but the father survives and makes his home near Hitchcock, this state, 
having come here from Norway 'in 1881. They were the parents of five children, namely: 
Mrs. Wolner; Anna, who died in infancy in 1875; Tora, who died in infancy in 1877; Anna, 
who passed away in 1879; and Loren, who died in 1880. The four deceased are buried in 
Norwaj'. To Mr. and Mrs. Wolner have been born seven sons: Harry, who died in infancy; 
Henry, Edwin, Oscar, Willard, Herbert and ArthuT, all at home. 

Mr. Wolner is independent in politics, obeying the dictates of no party leaders, and since 
1902 he has served acceptably as township supervisor. His religious belief is that of the 
Congregational church and his daily life is in harmony with his profession. Fraternally 
lie is a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen. None begrudges him the large 
measure of success that is his, for it is recognized that his prosperity is due entirely to his 
tireless energy and his business ability. His activities have not only resulted in his accumu- 
lating a competence, but have been productive of good to his community. 



ANTON B. LORD. 



Anton B. Lord, the popular and efficient cashier of the Citizens State Bank of Eagle 
Butte, Dewey county, is a native of Sweden, born in Linkoping, July 3, 1880. His parents, 
Peter J. and Christina (Peterson) Lord, were also natives of that place. The father, who 
was a carpenter by trade, emigrated with his family to the United States in 1887 and located 
at Garfield, Kansas, where he spent eighteen months. Subsequently he took up his residence 
in Hutchinson, Kansas, where he remained until 1891, when he became a resident of Chicago. 
He was there employed at cabinet work in the Pullman shops until 1904, when his death 
occurred. He served in the regular array in Sweden. His widow is still living in Cliicago. 

A. B. Lord, who is the youngest of a family of four children and the only one surviving, 
received the greater part of his education in the public schools of Chicago, from which he 
was graduated. When fifteen years of age he began learning the painter's trade and followed 
that line of work until he was twenty-three years old, when he entered the employ of the 
Roseland Bank in Chicago, w^here he remained for eighteen months. He then took charge 
of a paint store in that city owned by A. Nehring and remained in that connection for two 
years. He next came to South Dakota and entered a claim near Eagle Butte, residing upon 
his land for one year. At the end of that time he became assistant cashier of the Citizens 
State Bank and in 1912, after serving for a year in that position, was made cashier, his 
advancement coming in recognition of his ability and integrity. The confidence placed in him 
lias been justified by his conduct of the bank. He gives the closest attention to all phases 
of its work and is recognized as one of the most capable bank officials of his county. He 
has other interests, as he owns considerable farming land in this state and is engaged in 
cattle raising. 

Mr. Lord was married August 20, 1903. to Miss Marie De Bruin, who was born in South 
Holland, Illinois, a daughter of Henry and Helen (Van Drunen) De Bruin, both natives of 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 87 

Holland. They resided in Chicago, Illinois, for fifty years, and the father passed away in 
that city in IMOO. The mother is now living in Chicago. To ilr. and Mrs. Lord have been 
born four children: Jlarie A., whose birth occurred in 1906; Bernard J., born in 1909; 
Anthony H., in 1911; and Helen Anna, in 1914. 

Mr. Lord is a republican and is stanch in his support of the principles of that party. 
He is at present serving as treasurer of Eagle Butte and is pioving an excellent ollicial. 
I'l-aternally he belongs to Eagle Butte Lodge, J^Jo. 172, A. F. & A. M., of which he is secretary. 
Although he is yet a young man, he has gained a measure of success which many a man 
much his senior might well envy. He takes justifiable pride in his material prosperity, but 
values yet more highly the respect and esteem in which he is held by his fellow citizens. 



Z. A. GRAIN. 



One of the progressive and glowing cities of South Dakota is that of Redfield. Its 
advancement has been made along substantial lines due to the sound judgment and intel- 
ligently directed efl'orts of its leading business men, to which class belongs Z. A. Crain, the 
president of the Redfield National Bank, to which oflice he was called in 1902. He arrived 
in South Dakota when a young man of twenty-four years, recognizing the opportunities here 
offered, and in the intervening period he has so directed his efl'orts that while contributing 
to his individual success he has also promoted the public welfare. He was born February 
17, 1S63, in Angola, Indiana, and is a son of A. D. and Harriet (Perry) Crain, the latter a 
descendant of Commodore Perry, the famous hero of the naval battle on Lake Erie. The 
Crain family comes of English ancestry but has been represented in America since early 
colonial days. Members of tlie family served in the Revolutionary war and the spirit of 
patriotism has always been strong among their descendants. A. D. Crain was a native of 
New London, Connecticut, and removing westward, took up his abode in Angola, Indiana, 
where his remaining days were passed. He devoted his life to farming through many years 
but retired about ten years prior to his demise, which occurred in 1894. His wife preceded 
liim to the home beyond, dying in 1892, and both are buried in the Angola cemetery. 

Z. A. Crain acquired his education in the schools of Angola, passing through consecutive 
grades until graduated from the high school with the class of 1883. He afterward spent 
three years in Hillsdale College of Michigan and then accepted the position of principal of 
the Angola high school. To a young man of energy and ambition such as Mr. Crain the 
northwest offered an irresistible attraction and he came to South Dakota in 1887, when a 
young man of twenty-four years, settling at Doland, Spink county. There he established 
and conducted a drug business for four years, at the end of which time he removed to Red- 
field, where he established and uicorporated the Redfield National Bank, of which lie is the 
president. This institution was founded upon a safe, conservative basis. He has ever recog- 
nized the fact that the bank which most carefully safeguards the interests of its depositors 
is the one the most worthy of patronage and therefore he has done everything in his power 
to make the institution perfectly sound and reliable. It has grown steadily until its 
deposits are now large. Upon his business he concentrates his energies and his wise direc- 
tion of the affairs of the bank has given him rank with the leading financiers of the city. 

At Redfield, on the 13th of June, 1895, Mr. Crain was united in marriage to Miss Grace 
J. Jerome, a daughter of John and Amy Jerome. Her father was at one time an attorney 
at law in Minerva, Ohio, and resided there until his death about 1910. During the period 
of the Civil war he went to the front as an officer of the Union army, faithfully defending 
the stars and stripes throughout that sanguinary conflict. He came of English and French 
descent. Mrs. Jerome now makes her home with our subject. To Mr. and Mrs. Crain have 
been born a son and a daughter: Ralph J., who was graduated from the Redfield high 
school with the class of 1912 and is now in college at Vermillion, South Dakota; and Vir- 
ginia, five years of age. 

Mr. Crain is a democrat in his political views, but is not a politician in the usually 
accepted sense of office seeking. He has a deep interest in everything pertaining to the wel- 
fare and progress of the city, county and state, however, and cooperates in many movements 
for the pubUc good. At present he is chairman of the board of education in Redfield and the 



88 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

public schools lind in him a stalwart champion. Fralernall)' lie is a Mason of high rank, 
belonging to the lodge, chapter and commandery at Kedtield. While engaged in the drug 
business he was honored with election to the presidency of the State Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation and at the present writing he is president of the Spink County Farm Improvement 
Association, which he instituted and organized in 1912. Aside from his banking interests he 
is a stockholder in various other concerns, all of which profit by the stimulus of his coopera- 
tion and keen business sagacity. Thoroughly reliable in all his dealings, he bears an unas- 
sailable reputation for business integrity and has indeed made for himself a creditable name 
and place in business circles and in public life. 



HAROLD EUGENE JUDGE. 



Harold Eugene Judge, a prominent and prosperous attorney of Sioux Falls, has here 
practiced his profession for the past two decades and since 1897 has been a member of the 
law firm of Aikens & Judge. His birth occurred in Floyd, Iowa, on the 7th of February, 
1873, his parents being Patrick Henry and Delia Cemira (Sutton) Judge. The father, a 
native of County Mayo, Ireland, emigrated to the United States with his parents. 

Harold E. Judge acquired his education in the public schools and an academy at Fort 
Dodge, Iowa, and subsequently entered the State University of Iowa at Iowa City, complet- 
ing the course in the law department with the class of 1894. He was admitted to the bar 
in the same year and located for practice in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. In 1895 he became 
interested in the newly organized firm of Aikens, Bailey & Voorhees, though his name was 
not used. Two years later Messrs. Aikens and Judge withdrew and formed a partnershiji 
which has been maintained to the present time. An extensive and lucrative clientage has 
been accorded them. Mr. Judge is known for the wide research and provident care with 
which he prepares his cases. In no instance has his reading ever been confined to the limita- 
tions of the question at issue; it has gone beyond and compassed every contingency and 
provided not alone for the expected, but for the unexpected, which happens in the courts 
quite as frequently as out of them. His logical grasp of facts and of principles of the law 
applicable to them has been another potent element in his success, and a remarkable clear- 
ness of expression, an adequate and precise diction, which enables him to make others unaer- 
stand not only the salient points of his argument, but his every fine gradation of meaning, 
may be accounted one of his most conspicuous gifts and accomplishments. 



LUCIEN W. STILWELL. 



Lucien W. Stilwell is proprietor of an extensive curio establishment at Deadwood and 
in this connection is widely known throughout the country, having built up an extensive 
business which extends to every state of the Union. He was born at Manlius, New York, 
on the 24th of March, 1844. His father, Lonson Stilwell, was also a native of the Empire 
state and a farmer by occupation. He wedded Mary K. \\Tiite, a daughter of Hamilton and 
Sarah J. White, and to Mr. and Jlrs. Lonson Stilwell were born eight children, of whom 
Lucien W. is the eldest. On leaving New York the father removed westward to F'ond du Lac 
county, Wisconsin, where he secured a claim of government land which he transformed into 
a productive farm, making his home thereon until his death in 1891. His widow survived him 
for a decade and passed away in North Dakota in 1901. 

Lucien W. Stilwell attended the district schools near Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, later was 
a student in a select school and afterward entered Ripon College, where he pursued the literary 
course and also a course in mathematics. When he had passed the period of school life he 
assisted his father upon the home farm until nineteen years of age. He next went to Cairo, 
Illinois, where he was employed in connection with a market and produce business. In 1864 
he began dealing in groceries on his own account as a partner in the firm of Bristol & Stilwell 
and remained in the grocery business for ten years. He then sold out to his partner, after 
which he entered the wholesale commission grain business as a member of the firm of Cun- 




LUCIEN W. STILWELL 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 91 

iiiiigham & Stilwell. In 1878, -when the yellow fever epidemic caused him to return to 
Wisconsin, he tarried there for but a brief period and then removed to Elgin, Illinois, where 
he became bookkeeper for the Elgin Watch Company. After three or. four months, however, 
he removed to Deadwood, Dakota territory, where he arrived in 1879 to take a position with 
the banking house of Stebbins, Post & Mund. This was later merged with the First National 
Bank and later Mr. Stilwell was for some years with the Merchants Bank of Deadwood as 
accountant. In the meantime he had begun in a small way to deal in curios, but the business 
grew to such large proportions and brought such satisfactory financial returns that in 1890 
he resigned his position at the bank to give his entire attention to the curio business in 
connection with the fire insurance business. His tnul.' rxtt-ijils, both as to sale and purchase, 
to every civilized country of the world and is largely wlmh.-alr tu dealers, museums, scientific 
laboratories, etc. His collection of Indian handiwork ;iiid relies, natural history, mineral, 
fossil and geological specimens, gems and elk teeth is among the most comprehensive and 
valuable in existence and he has furnished many consignments of specimens to the great 
British and European museums. He has made a deep study of his work and is a recognized 
authority, particularly on the geology of the northwest. An idea of tlir coHiplrtciiess of his 
collections may be gathered from the department devoted to Aniciiran anliaiulooy, which 
alone contains over ten thousand specimens. He has learned to idintily many ut these as 
to workmanship or to geological period upon sight with absolute accuracy. 

In September, 1873, Mr. Stilwell was united in marriage to Miss Julia A. Bristol, a native 
of Charleston, South Carolina, who removed to Connecticut. Her father, W'illiam Bontiquo 
Bristol, was engaged in the wholesale shoe business in New York city. Her brother, William 
M. Bristol, was one of the pioneer educators of South Dakota, serving for seven years as 
superintendent of the Yankton public schools. His later years were spent in Minneapolis, 
Minnesota, where he passed away in 1910. To Jlr. and Mrs. Stilwell have been born foiu- 
children, as follows: Mary Irene, the wife of Stephen C. Berry, of Belle Fourche, South 
Dakota, who holds the office of county surveyor of Butte county and by whom she 
has four children; Hugh Alvin, who died at the age of ten years; Donald Lonson, who 
wedded Miss Maude Kellerman and is a practicing physician and surgeon of Detroit, 
Michigan; and Nora Alice, who died in infancy. Mrs. Stilwell has taken a very active part in 
church and charitable work and in the work of the Epworth and .Junior Leagues and the Sunday 
school. She has for years been a member of the Twentieth Century Club and her cooperation 
is a feature in the growth and development of many projects for the public good. ' 

In politics Mr. Stilwell is a republican, versed in the significant political questions of the 
age yet not an office seeker. Both he and his wife have membership in the Methodist church. 
He is the present secretary and treasurer of the Deadwood Cemetery Association. He has 
always been an active worker in the cause of temperance and his cooperation mux always be 
counted upon in any movement looking toward the moral betterment of the coninninity. 
Deadwood has tgfison to be proud of him as a citizen, for his life work has jihieed him high 
among those whose names are well known in connection with scientific research. Moreover, his 
sterling traits of manhood and citizenship entitle him to prominent and honorable mention in 
this volume. 



ROBERT F. .JACOB. 



Among the prosperous farmers of Yankton precinct. Yankton county, is Robert F. .laeob. 
a son of Frederick and Magdalena (Kuepfer) Jacob. His birth occurred in Berne, Switzerland, 
November 6, 1867, and he resided there until 1884, when he accompanied his parents to Amer- 
ica. The family left Switzerland on the 24th of February and two days later sailed from 
Havre, France, on the steamer Labrador for New York, reaching that port after a voyage 
of thirteen days. In Switzerland the family had known relatives of the Burgi family of 
Yankton, this state, and upon reaching the new world made their way thither. The first 
summer in South Dakota the father worked at his trade of a stonemason and several of his 
boys worked as farm hands, Robert F. being employed by August Braunschreuther. The 
younger boys herded cattle for small wages. The following year Mr. Jacob rented the farm 
of Felix Von Ins at Rudolph's Hill and operated that place for nine years. Some of the 



92 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

trees on the place were planted by him and his sons. Their residence at that time was a 
log cabin, as were most of the pioneer homes. Mr. Jacob subsequently purchased land on 
section- 3, where he has since lived, and on section 10, Yankton precinct, his half section being 
one of the best farms of his locality. His sons are all located near him and are prospering 
as farmers. 

Robert F. .Jacob remained with his parents until after reaching his majority and then 
worked for two years as a farm hand for John Arndt. At the end of that time he was 
married and rented a farm from John Coulson for a year. As the drought killed his crops he 
began selling the milk from his two cows in order to make a living and found the business so 
profitable that he increased the number of cows gradually and in time had quite a large herd. 
In 1S84 he purchased his present farm in Yankton precinct and engaged in the dairy busi- 
ness on quite a large scale. He subsequently sold out but again entered the business, in 
which he successfully continued until 1914, when he sold his dairy interests, since confining 
his attention to farming. He first purchased forty acres of brush l&nd which he cleared and 
improved and later added an eighty acre tract, all of which is also cleared. He erected a 
fine residence, which is attractively furnished, and the work of the farm is expedited by 
excellent equipment, including a large barn, good granaries and a silo, while the farm ma- 
chinery used is of the most approved models. 

On the 25th of March, 1891, Mr. Jacob married Miss Bertha Tseli, a native of Switzer- 
land and a daughter of John Alfred Iseli. She emigrated to America in 1882, two years after 
her parents, who settled in Bon Homme county. They afterward lived in Nebraska and now 
are living retired in Yankton, South Dakota. To Mr. and Mrs. .facob have been born three 
children: Dora, at home; Bertha, the wife of Albert Bade, of Yankton; and Robert E., at 
home. 

Mr. Jacob is a stanch republican and can be counted upon to vote the ticket as he 
firmly believes that the principles of that party are most conducive to good government. 
He was reared in the faith of the German Reformed church and has never seen reason for 
departing therefrom. As a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, the Ancient Order 
of United Workmen and the Fraternal Order of Eagles he is well known in fraternal circles, 
where he has many warm friends. He has gained an enviable success as a dairyman and 
farmer and in so doing has adhered strictly to honorable business methods, thus winning the 
respect of all who have been connected Avith him in any way. 



ADELBERT P. JOHNSON. 



Adelbert P. Johnson, of Y'ankton, was born in Bradford county, Pennsylvania, July 14, 
1863. His father, H. H. Johnson, was likewise a native of that locality and came of Ger- 
man ancestry although the family has long been represented on American soil. The great 
grandfather was a native of Virginia and served as a soldier in the Revolutionary war. 
The same patriotic spirit was manifested by H. H. Johnson when at the time of the out- 
break of the Civil war he joined the army, giving valiant aid to the Union cause. He made 
farming his life work and at different times was called to public office — offices of honor 
and trust in his county, the duties of which he discharged ably, conscientiously and capably. 
He was born and reared in Bradford county and throughout that section of the state where 
he was widely known was most highly esteemed. He died in 1909, having for five years sur- 
vived his wife, who was in her maidenhood Miss Delilah Smith. She, too, was a native of 
Bradford county, Pennsylvania, where she was reared and educated, and there she passed 
away in 1904. Her parents were also natives of Bradford county but her great-grandmother 
was born in Germany. 

Adelbert P. Johnson was the third in order of birth in a family of eleven children and, 
like the others of the household, had the usual experiences of those who spend their youth 
upon a farm. There is something in the free outdoor life which splendidly qualifies the 
individual for later duties. The common school.s aftorded him his educational opportunities 
and he worked with his father in the fields until he reached the age of eighteen years, when 
he became an employe of a cousin in the dairy business. He devoted two years to that work 
and in 1883 came to the west, settling in Yankton, South Dakota, where he obtained similar 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 93 

employment, spending four years at dairy work. He then toolc up a liomestead, proved 
up on the same and thus became the owner of a good farm property in the northern part of 
Yanlcton county. After establishing his claim he returned to Yankton In 1887 and resumed 
work at the dairy business. He carefully saved his earnings through the succeeding year and 
in 188S embarked in business on his own account as the proprietor of a dairy. Although 
lu' began on a small scale his trade grew rapidly and his business became a large and prof- 
itable enterprise, which he cuniliuti'.l until 1S95, when he sold out in order to engage in the 
business of sinking artesian will-. In tlii> lie continued for two years, sinking a great many 
wells in Yankton county and uiniiiiiu ;i ^latifying measure of profit from his efforts in that 
direction. In 1898 he establislied a factory and began the manufacture of soft drinks in 
Yankton, conducting that business for seven years. It seems that all that he undertakes 
meets with gratifying returns, but the secret of his success is not hard to find as he is 
persistent, energetic and resolute. He disposed of that business in 1905 and through the 
succeeding three years was engaged in farming on his tract of one hundred and sixty acres of 
land adjoining Y'ankton. In 1908 he was made a member of the city police force and served 
tlirough the succeeding three years. He was then chosen deputy county sheriff and proved 
etiicient in that capacity. He is now first police of Yankton. 

In 1891 Mr. Johnson was married to Miss Nettie L. Cram, a native of New York, and 
they have one child, Eunice D. Mr. Johnson is a member of Dakota Lodge, No. 1, I. 0. 0. F., 
and of the Fraternal Order of Eagles, No. 1486. He has always been a republican in his 
political views and has taken an active part in the work of the party. 



CLARENCE CAREY CALDWELL. 

Clarence Carey Caldwell, called to the position of attorney general of South Dakota 
in the election of 1914 and raiikiiii; \>itli the ablest members of the bar. makes his home in 
Howard. He is a native son of tin- state his birth having occurred upon a farm in Minne- 
haha county. February 2, 1877. His fatlirr, George Caldwell, was a native of Posey county, 
Indiana, and in the year 1875 arrived in Dakota territory, settling on a farm near Sioux 
Falls, where he resided for twelve years or imtil his death, which occurred in 1887. His wife, 
who bore the maiden name of Mary E. Draper, is a native of Cambridge, Henry county, 
Illinois, and sinrc tlie death of her first husband has become the wife of J. R. Wilder of 
Hartfoi.l. s.Mitli Hakiita. Tlie three sons of the mother's first marriage are all graduates 
of the Sc.iitli Dakota State University and have become well known in professional circles. 
Clarence C. Caldwell is the eldest, his brother, Charles V.. is state's attorney of Minnehaha 
county and resides at Sioux Falls, while the youngest IikiiIki-. II Lcc. is a civil engineer of 
Jacksonville. Illinois. The Caldwell family is of Scotdi-li isli amcstry. tlie family having 
been established in Vermont at an early period in the develoi>meiit of the new world. There 
representatives of the name remained until the grandparents of Clarence C. Caldwell be- 
came residents of Indiana. 

After attending the district schools of Minnehaha county, C. C. Caldwell continued his 
education in the high school of Sioux Falls and in Sioux Falls College. He then entered 
tlie State University, in which he completed a classical course by graduation in 1902. at 
which time the Bachelor of Arts degree was conferred upon him. During the succeeding 
three years he served as principal of the high school of Vermillion. South Dakota, and also 
began the study of law. He pursued his preparation for the bar for a time in the University 
of Chicago but afterward returned to the University of South Dakota, from which he was 
graduated as a member of the class of 1906, winning the LL. B. degree. The same year 
lie removed to Howard and entered upon the practice of his profession, continuing his resi- 
dence there to the present time. No ilnn y mivifiate awaited him. Almost immediately his 
ability won him recognition and he lias adv iincl steadily in his profession, the court records 
giving evidence of his power and lesnuml nines-,. He served for three terms as state's 
attorney of Miner county, having been elected in 1906, in 1910 and again in 1912, remaining 
in that position until elected attorney general of South Dakota. He was secretary of the 
Howard school board for six years but resigned when elected attorney general of state. He 
was also city attorney of Howard and in the November election of 1914 he was chosen 



94 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

attorney general of the state on the republican ticket. He proved a very satisfactory official 
as state's attorney, displayed much initiative as well as absolute fearlessness and he had 
a high percentage of convictions to his credit. He possesses a thorough knowledge of 
statutory law and of precedent and prepares his cases with the utmost care. 

Mr. Caldwell was united in marriage June 16, 190S, to Miss Marie Bryant, a daughter 
of W. C. and Priscilla (Brown) Bryant, of Vermiilion, the former a retired merchant. Mr. 
and Mrs. Caldwell are the parents of a daughter, ilarion Priscilla, whose birth occurred Octo- 
ber 38, 1912. Mr. Caldwell is a memher of the Baptist cinirch, his wife of the Congregational, 
but there being no Baptist or Congregational church in Howard, they are attendants of 
the Methodist church. Fraternally Mr. Caldwell is connected with the JIasons and is a 
popular representative of the craft. He obtains literary recreation in the study of sociology, 
political science and governmental affairs and has comprehensive knowledge of the significant 
problems which are engaging the attention of thoughtful men of the age. He has taken a 
most prominent part in politics and is known as an eloquent, logical and convincing speaker 
concerning the issues of the day. He finds recreation in out-of-door sports, of which he is 
a devotee. He was prominent in athletic circles during his college days and played on the 
university football team. He is advancing steadily in professional ranks and is one of the 
leaders of the state's younger generation of lawyers. 



GEORGE C. LOHR. 



George C. Lohr is the efficient postmaster of Estelline, where he is also conducting a 
jewelry and drug business. He was born in Osage, Iowa, August 2, 1856, a son of Peter and 
Eva Lohr. The father, who was in the furniture and undertaking business in Osage, came 
to South Dakota in May, 1878, and preempted land where the town of Estelline now stands. 
He secured a tree claim covering the southeast quarter of section 24, Estelline township. On 
account of his business interests in Osage, Iowa, he could not remain upon his land, however, 
so surrendered his preemption to Thomas B. Elston, who proved up on It. Immediately after 
the father's return to Osage George C. Lohr and his brother, W. F., came to South Dakota 
and filed on a half section of land on section 23, which property is still in possession of our 
subject and includes twenty acres of timber land. The winter following their arrival in tliis 
state the brothers purchased from Mr. Elston the original claim of their father. When they 
settled in this locality there were no other white inhabitants here and the prairies were 
covered with long grass on which hundreds of antelope fed. The father died in 1905 and the 
mother passed away in 1907. 

George C. Lohr was the second in order of birth in a family of six children, five sons and 
one daughter. Spending his youthful days at the family home in Osage, Iowa, he there entered 
the public schools and passed through consecutive grades until he became a high-school 
student. Still later he pursued a course in the Cedar Valley Seminary at Osage. The father 
was in business in that city and George C. Lohr assisted him until his removal to South Dakota 
in 1878. He afterward gave his attention to farming in Hamlin county and when it was 
planned to found a town the family gave one hundred and sixty acres to be used as a townsite. 
Since that period George C. Lohr has been closely, prominently and helpfully associated with 
the upbuilding and development of this section. 

In 1881 he was appointed postmaster of Estelline and has occupied that position for a 
quarter of a century, faithfully, capably and promptly discharging the duties of his office. 
He has held the position continuously except during the two democratic administrations of 
Grover Cleveland. For a time he was in partnership with his brother in the implement busi- 
ness and later he purchased the interests of Clark & Weygant in the drug store in 18S3. In 
1886 he removed to his present location. The building was destroyed by fire in 1895, but he 
rebuilt the following year. In addition to selling drugs he carries an attractive line of 
jewelry, meeting the demands of the public in this regard. During much of this time 
Mr. Lohr was also interested with his brother in cultivating two sections of land but at 
length sold most of his property, although he still retains ownership of the old homestead. 
He has become a most important factor in the establishment and development of the various 
prominent business interests of Estelline and this section of the state. He is one of the three 




iEOEGE C. LOHR 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 97 

owners of the Estelline Electric Company, owning the electric light plant and the telephone 
system. He is president of the Bank of Estelline, is treasurer of the Druggist's Mutual Eire 
Insurance Company of South Dakota, is vice president of the Dempster State Bank, is 
secretary-treasurer of the E'armers Elevator Company of Estelline, and it was practically 
through his labors that the Masonic Temple was built. In his vocabulary there is no such 
word as fail. He carries forward to successful completion whatever he undertakes. His plans 
are carefully formed but once completed are promptly executed. He seems to readily recognize 
the possibilities of any situation and in his work he looks beyond the exigencies of the moment 
to the opportunities of the future. 

In 188U Mr. Lohr was united in marriage to Miss Letha M. Abbott, who died in 1893, 
leaving two children: A. Louise, now Mrs. L. B. Gibbs; and Mabel E. On the 28th of Novem- 
ber, 1912, Mr. Lohr was again married, his second union being with Anna L. Clark, a daughter 
of Amasa and Julia Clark. They were among the old-time settlers of the state and both have 
passed away. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lohr are adherents of the Congregational church and their many sterling 
traits of character have won for them high regard. In politics Mr. Lohr is a republican and 
for a number of years was mayor of his city. He is a very prominent Mason, belonging to 
Denver Chapter, R. A. M., at Arlington; the Knight Templar Commandery at Brookings and 
Sioux Falls Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He is also connected with the Elks at Watcrtown 
and with the Modern Woodmen of America, and both he and his wife are members of the 
Eastern Star. His life activities branch out along ramifying lines and make his work one of 
constantly broadening usefulness and value. What he has accomplished both for himself and 
for the communit}' places him among the valued citizens of the state. Estelline largely 
stands as a monument to his efforts and enterprise, for he has been instrumental in founding 
and promoting many of its leading business interests and in upholding as well its moral, 
political and legal status. 



PATRICK MCDONALD. 



Patrick McDonald is one of the most highly esteemed residents of Bon Homme county 
and justly so, for he came to this state in the '60s and for many years endured hardships 
that seem almost unbelievable in this day when pioneer conditions no longer exist. He is now 
living in honorable retirement on the site of the old village of Bon Homme and the number 
of his friends is only limited by the number of his acquaintances. 

Mr. McDonald was born at Castle Barr, County Mayo, Ireland, about 1831 and in 1853 
emigrated to America, first making his home in Ohio. During the Civil war he served in 
the Confederate army under General Fessenden of Holly Springs, Mississippi, and after the 
close of hostilities returned to Troy, Ohio, where his marriage occurred in 1864. Five years 
later he removed to Yankton, South Dakota, and was in the employ of Tom Pierce and other 
early contractors, helping to erect a number of buildings in the capital of the territory, in- 
cluding the first large hotel building of Yankton. Mr. McDonald subsequently filed on a 
quarter section of land three miles northeast of Bon Homme but returned to Yankton and 
worked there for two years before taking up his residence upon his land. He built a small 
housi' ;ind tlieii cstiililisliiMl his family there. He, however, was absent from home the greater 
part of the time, as he trcishted from Yankton to Fort Randall, supplying the officers at the 
Fort with biittci, r^gs, chickens and other provisions purchased at farms on the way or 
bought at Yankton to till an order. At one time Mr. McDonald drove to Sioux City for 
sometliing that he was unable to procure at Yankton. He made the trips from Y^ankton to 
the fort during the winter months as well as during the summer and slept under the wagon, 
waking up many mornings covered with snow. On such occasions the harness was sure to 
be buried in the snow and it had to be dug out before he could begin his journey for that 
day. 

On one trip to the fort Mr. McDonald encountered a heavy three days' snow storm and, 
being certain that the horses could not pull the loaded wagon through the drifted snow, he 
left his goods in the barn of a settler and started home with the empty wagon. He found 
the gulch at Choteau creek so badly drifted that he left the wagon there and continued on 



98 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

liis way witli tlie horses. Still later he left one horse at Emanuel creek and endeavored to 
reach home riding the other horse. Near Bon Homme he left that horse as well and crawled 
up the hill to the village on his hands and knees. When he reached the hotel there he was 
packed in snow, as it seemed that he was frozen. As soon as possible he continued his way 
home and upon his arrival there found his family safe. The Indians caused him no trouble, 
as they were friendly and had confidence in him. They frequently sold goods issued to them 
by the government and on one occasion Mr. McDonald purchased from them a suit of clothes 
for three dollars. After several years the danger of losing crops from the plague of grass- 
hoppers lessened and Mr. McDonald abandoned freighting and began the cultivation of his 
land, so continuing until he retired from active life a few years ago. He now lives in Bon 
Homme, where he is widely and favorably known. 

Mr. McDonald was married in 1864 to Jlrs. Hegen, a native of Scotland, and they became 
the parents of two children: Hannah, the wife of Tom Rodgers, of Yankton; and Peter, of 
Meade county. Mrs. McDonald died and in March, 1874, Jit. ilcDonald married Miss Kate 
Monahan, a native of Virginia. To their union seven children have been born: Mary, Julia, 
Sarsfield, Ellen, Rosa, Charles and Lillie. 

Mr. McDonald is a democrat and his religious allegiance is given to the Catholic church. 
His memory retains clearly the events and happenings of the early days in this state, and his 
reminiscences of pioneer times are of great value in making real to the present generation 
the heroic story of the settlement and development of the state. 



ERNEST J. STRAW. 



Among the well established real-estate men of Lincoln county is Ernest J. Straw, who 
has maintained an office at Canton for the past fourteen years and receives a liberal share 
of patronage from investors and homeseekers. He also deals extensively in automobiles, 
having now the largest concern of this character in the county, his partner being Ed L. 
Wendt. Mr. Straw is a native of Manitowoc county, Wisconsin, and was born August 26, 
1867, the youngest of three sons, who.se parents were Josiah and Joanna (Hann) Straw, both 
of W'hom were natives of New Hampshire, the former born in Plymouth, September 15, 1827. 
They were reared and married in the state of their nativity, and in 1837 removed to Wis- 
consin, locating in Manitowoc county, where the father engaged in the lumber business. 
In 1870 he removed with his family to South Dakota, locating on a farm three and a half 
miles northwest of Canton, and with the conduct of that place he was identified for thirty 
years, or throughout the remainder of his active business career. He then put aside busi- 
ness cares to spend his last days in honorable retirement, taking up his abode in the city 
of Canton, where he passed away on the 29th of March, 1911, in the eighty-fourth year of 
his age. His widow still survives at the very advanced age of eighty-seven years and is 
now making her home with her son Ernest J. in Canton. 

A little lad of but three years when the family home was established here Ernest J. 
Straw acquired his preliminary education in the district schools of Lincoln county. This 
knowledge was supplemented by a course of study in Augustana College at Canton. After 
completing his education he engaged in the men's clothing and furnishings business in Canton 
on his own account, thus spending four years. He ne.xt engaged in farming for five years 
and still owns a valuable tract of three hundred and twenty acres in Lincoln county, and in 
addition has four hundred and eighty acres in Hand county. In 1900 he left the farm and 
removed to Canton where he began handling real estate on his own account, having as his 
partner Ed L. Wendt. Through perseverance and honorable methods he has developed a 
lucrative and growing patronage. He has been active in securing substantial improvements 
which are essential elements in the upbuilding of any community and as his investments 
have been judiciously placed they have produced gratifying financial returns. In connection 
with real estate Mr. Straw and his partner also deal extensively in automobiles, selling more 
cars than any other firm engaged in the business in the county, and he also owns stock in the 
Farmers Lumber Company. He occupies one of the finest residence properties in Canton. 

It was on the 23d of July, 1889, that Mr. Straw led to the marriage altar Miss Luella 
A. Wendt. a daughter of Ernest Wendt, the pioneer merchant of this section of South Dakota. 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 99 

Mrs. Straw is a charming woman, who presides with gracious hospitality over their pleasant 
home. Both she and Mr. Straw are members of the Methodist church, in the work of which 
she is active and she is also deeply interested in all charitable movements. Where national 
issues are invdhnl. .Mr. Straw supports the candidates of the republican party but at local 
elections vut.~ iihlr|icihl.iitly. He is a valued member of the Masonic body, holding mem- 
liersliip in Sihii stai l.ndge, No. 4, at Canton. His recreation lies in motoring, fishing and 
hunting. He is known as a man of the strictest integrity and his conscientious attention to 
the wants of his patrons has gained for him an enviable standing in business. 



MISS DEJIAH DILLEHE. 



Jliss nemah Dillehe is county superintendent of schools in Meade county and probably 
the youngest to fill such a position in the state. She was born in a log cabin in Boulder 
Park, about five miles southeast of Ueadwood, a daughter of Andrew and Ausna (Botne) 
Dillehe. The father's birth occurred in Kansas in 1858 and the mother was born in Norway, 
February 36, 1868. He came to the Hills about the year 1877, his paTents conducting a hotel 
at Old Crook City. He assisted them in that business but later became a sawyer by trade 
and was thus engaged up to the time of his death. He was killed by the explosion of a 
boiler in the mill in which he was employed. He made his home upon a timber claim near 
Deadwood and he was closely associated with the early development of that region. His 
widow became the wife of Jesse Cox and now resides at Tilford, Meade county. Mr. Cox, now 
a ranchman, was formerly the owner of extensive sawmill interests and also has large land 
lioldings. There were three children of the first marriage: Edwin, who resides with his 
niotlier and follows the occupation of farming; Demah, of this review; and Drucy, assistant 
county superintendent. 

The elder daughter attended school at Tilford until slie riMilied the eighth grade. She 
afterward became a student in Lead, where she pursued her studies until graduated from 
the high school with the class of 1907. She took post-graduate work at the State Normal in 
the years 1908 and 1909 and has devoted her attention to education since that time. She 
has the first life diploma recorded in Meade county. She accepted a position as teacher in 
the schools of Whitewood, where she remained for two years and then was at Hill City as 
jirincipal for one year. At the end of that time she became a candidate for the office of 
county superintendent of schools and was elected in 1913, taking the office on the 1st of 
January, 1913. She was reelected in 1914 with a large majority. She is one of the young- 
est, if not the youngest county superintendent in tlie state nf South Dakota but she is 
giving excellent satisfaction, in this position, being must jniiMr.ssive in her work in relation 
to the schools, into which she has introduced valualile inipK'ivements. She stimulates the 
interest of teachers and pupils by her own zeal in the work and under her guidance the 
schools liave made rapid advancement. She is well known in the locality in which she lives. 



WILLIAM S. DOLAN. 



William S. Dolan, of Milbank, is the proprietor and editor of the Grant County Review, 
which exercises a potent influence in shaping public opinion in that county. He is a man of 
affairs and is a leader in various movements seeking the community advancement. He was 
born in Watertown, AVisconsin, November 39, 1886, a son of Phillip and Anna (Murray) 
Dolan. His paternal grandfather, William Dolan, was born in Ireland but moved to Wis- 
consin when that state was still a pioneer district. He had previously been employed in the 
waterworks in New York city and was quite well-to-do. He became the owner of a farm, 
which he made one of the valuable properties of his locality. The maternal grandfather, 
James Murray, was also a native of Ireland and likewise became a pioneer settler of Wis- 
consin, where he followed agricultural pursuits. Phillip Dolan was born in New York city 
in 1841 and accompanied his parents to W^isconsin in 1836. Upon reaching mature years he 
purchased a farm and also entered land from the government in Dodge county, on which 



100 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

he i-fsidfJ for tifty-one years. He gained financial independence and is now living retired in 
Madelia, Minnesota. His wife, who was born, reared and married in. Columbus, Wisconsin, 
died in 1887. To them were born three children: Mary and Clara, both unmarried; and Wil- 
liam S., of this review. The father is a democrat in politics and his religious faith is that 
of the Roman Catholic church. 

William S. Dolan received his early education in the country schools of Wisconsin, later 
attended a convent school at Madelia, Minnesota, and prepared for the business world by 
taking a commercial course in St. Thomas College at St. Paul, graduating therefrom in 1906. 
He was employed as a bookkeeper for some time, but in December, 1906, when a young man 
of twenty years, removed to Milbank, South Dakota, and began to work on the Grant County 
Review. In 1911 he purchased the paper, which is published weekly and has a circulation of 
two thousand. It gives excellent local and general news service and is liberally patronized 
as an advertising medium by the business men of the county. Mr. Dolan also does a large 
job printing business, turning out excellent work in that line. 

In 1913 Mr. Dolan married Miss Christina Olson, a daughter of O. A. Olson, a farmer 
residing in Grant county. Mr. Dolan is a leader in local democratic circles and personally 
and through the medium of his paper has done much to secure the success of his party in 
Grant county. He belongs to the Woodmen, the Catholic Order of Foresters and the Knights 
of Columbus, his affiliation with the last two orders indicating his membership in the Roman 
Catholic church. He understands all phases of newspaper work and has proved not only 
an excellent editor but a capable business manager. He has thoroughly identified his inter- 
ests with those of Grant county and Milbank and has been instrumental in securing the 
progress of liis community along a number of lines. 



FRANK A. SWEZEY, M. D. 



Dr. Frank A. Swezey is engaged in the practice of medicine and surgery at Wakonda and 
has won recognition as an able representative of the profession. He was born in Iowa 
February 19, 1871, and is a son of Lewis T. and Emma (OUver) Swezey, the former born in 
Rockford, Illinois, July 25, 1840, and the latter in Grant county, Wisconsin, January 13, 1851. 
The father settled in western Iowa before the period of railroad building in that section of the 
state and established a lumber yard at Newell, there conducting the business until 1887, when 
he sold out and removed to Vermillion, Dakota territory. He purchased the old Clay County 
Bank, reorganized it and continued its management, serving as its president, he and Mr. 
Barrett being the chief stockholders. After a time the bank was again reorganized into a 
national bank and Mr. Swezey proved most capable in successfully directing the affairs of the 
institution, which he supervised imtil his death, February 5, 1913. He was also Identified 
with the Bank of Wakonda and was one of the prominent and well kno'wn financiers of Clay 
county. His political allegiance was given to the republican party and he served on the state 
board of regents for two years, but could never be called a politician in the sense of oflSce 
seeking. His wife passed away only a few days before his death. In the family were three 
children, but Dr. Swezey is the only son. His sisters are : Gertrude, now the wife of Robert 
Fox, who is engaged in the real-estate, land and loan business in Oklahoma; and Bernice, who 
is a graduate of the State University at Vermillion and is now engaged in teaching. 

Dr. Swezey spent the first sixteen years of his life in his native state and then accom- 
panied his parents to Dakota territory, where he continued his education, begun in the public 
schools of Iowa, in the State University at Vermillion. His professional course was pursued 
in Rush Medical College of Chicago, from which he was graduated in 1894. He at once located 
in Wakonda, where he established an office and has carried on practice as both a physician 
and surgeon. At the same time he has conducted other business interests of importance. He 
is a stockholder and one of the directors of the Vermillion National Bank, is the vice president 
and a stockholder of the Bank of Wakonda and is the owner of several farms in Clay county, 
which are well improved and highly cultivated. He has a model farm located two miles from 
Wakonda. 

In 1905 Dr. Swezey was united in marriage to Miss Antonia Huclsman, a native of Iowa 
and a daughter of John Huelsman. They are the parents of one son, Lewis. Dr. Swezey 




LEWIS T. SWEZEY 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 103 

his right of franchise in support of the men and measures of the republican party, 
but the honors and emoluments of office have no attraction for him. He is well known in 
fraternal circles, however, having passed through all of the chairs in the Odd Fellows lodge, 
while in Masonry he has attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite. For twenty- 
eight years he has been a resident of Clay county and throughout the entire period has borne 
his part in the work of public progress and improvement, supporting all measures which have 
had for their object the benefit and welfare of the community. 



WILLIAil D. STITES 



William D. Stites has proved a wise and conscientious officer of justice as desk sergeant 
of Sioux Falls and has succeeded in the difficult task of upholding the dignity of the law and 
also of making due allowance for circumstances in dealing with the many cases that come 
before him for trial. He was born in Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania, on the 13th of September, 
1S44, a son of George and Martha Stites, the former a contractor of that place. The family 
removed to Rockford, Illinois, when our subject was ten j'ears old and there the parents 
continued to reside until their deaths. Mr. Stites was educated in the public schools and in 
the Rockford high school. At the early age of seventeen years he joined the Eighth Illinois 
Cavalry and was with the Army of the Potomac from September, 1861, to July, 1865. He 
was wounded and was afterward made hospital steward of the First Separate Brigade, depart- 
ment of Washington. He was twice taken prisoner by Moseley and endured all of the hard- 
ships and privations of war. When peace was concluded and his services were no longer 
needed in defense of the Union he was mustered out and went to Chicago, where he clerked 
in a drug store for a year. At the end of that time he removed to Sioux City. Iowa, and 
became connected with the drug business there, being associated with C. K. Howard and 
C. Kent. 

In 1873 he disposed of his interest in Sioux City and moved to Sioux Falls. He joined 
his former partner, C. K. Howard, in the formation of a mercantile firm, which conducted a 
general store in Sioux Falls until 1886. During that time Mr. Stites served as deputy treas- 
urer for fourteen years and at the time of the admission of the state to the Union he was 
serving as clerk of the court. His next official prefeiment came to liiiii when lie was elected 
police justice at the time that the city adopted thr r..iiii)ii->i..ii phm ,,f •juvrrnment. He 
served in that office for six years and after it was ;il.uli.~ln.l wa- :i|.|i.,iiitia day desk ser- 
geant, which position he still holds. The duties of his olli.c .l.inaiul, in inhlitidii to a knowl- 
edge of the city ordinances and general principles of law, an ability to judge men accurately 
and to use tact and above all common sense in dealing with them. He has unusual insight 
into human nature and his nice sense of proportion and practical wisdom enables him to 
so effectively deal with the offenders that come before him that the number of petty crimes 
and misdeineanors in the city is kept at a minimum. 

Mr. Stites was married in 1868 to Miss Helen Howard, a daughter of Hiram Howard, 
and they have become the parents of the following children: William H., who died at the 
age of thirty-three years and who was manager of the Cudahy Packing Plant at Kansas City; 
Mrs. Grace H. Steensen; Charles K.; Mrs. Faye Hitchcock; and Stanley. Mr. and Mrs. Stite-s 
also have three grandchildren. He is a Protestant and his political allegiance is given to the 
democratic party. He has attained the thirty-second degree in Masonry and has held all of 
the oillces in tlie Masonic bodies. He was grand commander of the state of South Dakota 
and organized the chapter, commandery and Shrine of Sioux Falls. He maintains pleasant 
rciations with his old army comrades in blue as a member of the Grand Army of the Repub- 
lic and finds satisfaction in the thought that at the time of his country's need he did not 
fail her. He was present at Ford's theater when Lincoln was shot and his graphic account of 
this and its historic significance was most interestingly given to his Grand Army Post in the 
following words: 

Dear Comrades and Sons of Veterans: 

It is appropriate that upon this occasion, we should consider one of the greatest and 
most sorrowful events in the historv of the United States as well as in the civilized world, 



104 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

lor in that event was finished the life work of tlie man whose Emancipation Proelamation 
made possible the establishing of the Orders to which we as Veterans and Sons of Veterans 
are proud to belong. 

Every G. A. R. button and every souvenir badge worn in the United States today, is 
but a part of the magnificent monument, which the citizens of the United States have 
erected, in history, to the memory of Abraham Lincoln, and were George Washington alive 
today, his voice would be heard in praise of the man who died, that all men, of all creeds 
and colors and previous conditions of servitude, in these United States might be free. 

Two great incidents mark as many epochs in the history of our beloved country. One 
was the birth of George Washington and the other the death of Abraham Lincoln. Washing- 
ton's birth marked the dawn of our day of freedom from British oppression and Lincoln's 
death sounded the death knell of the last fabric of that sentiment which harbored a desire 
to enslave one race to enrich another, upon this continent. 

It was my privilege to be in the audience in Ford's theatre in Washington, on the night 
of the 14th of April, 1865, when the shot was fired which forever sealed the doom of the 
slave traffic in the civilized world, as did the shots which the men with Sherman on his way 
to the sea, fired at Rebellion, seal the doom of the confederacy. The memory of that night 
will linger with me longer than any other incident of my life. I could not forget it if I 
would. Some things are written upon the tablets of our memory, indelibly and forever. I 
wish I might take you back over the half century which has elapsed since that night and 
have 3'ou sit with me in Ford's theatre, in Washington. I wish you might experience what I 
experienced that night when the words "Lincoln is Shot" came to us from a man who }iad 
climbed to the theatre box where the martyr had been witnessing the play of Laura Keene, 
a charming American actress, presenting "Our American Cousin" and President Lincoln was 
present. 

It was about 9:30 o'clock. The play had progressed smoothly and there had been noth- 
ing tocause a ripple of discomfort, when suddenly a shot rang out upon the air. The stage 
was clear at that moment and we thought that this shot was but one of the incidents of the 
drama. Immediately a man appeared upon the railing which ran around the box in which 
President Lincoln was sitting. He jumped for the stage. A spur on one of his feet caught 
in the folds of the American flag and the grand old banner tripped that traitor, just as she 
has tripped every traitor who has been disloyal to her. He struck the stage and his leg 
was broken, but he halted not. Arising, he waved a revolver in the air, shouted his defiance 
and fled from the theatre. 

The scene which followed was a tragedy in itself. Absolute quiet and then a growling 
uproar. People crowded like mad for the entrances and having gained the outer air, in 
frantic effort to know more of what had happened struggled like madmen to get in again. 
Mr. Lincoln was carried to a house opposite the theatre, where he died at about seven 
o'clock the next morning. 

His assassin aided by confederates crossed the Potomac river, near Port Tobacco, Mary- 
land to Mathias Point, Virginia, on Saturday, April 23, and on Monday, April 34, he crossed 
the Rappahannock river from Port Conway to Port Royal and took refuge in a barn. He 
was located in that stable, on Wednesday, April 26, and killed by members of a detachment 
of cavalry from the Sixteenth New York. 

The assassination of Lincoln was the result of a conspiracy to kill the men who were 
putting down the rebellion. History tells of the attempt to kill Secretary of State Seward, 
on the same night that Lincoln was shot, which attempt was made by Lewis Payne, who was 
in the conspiracy with Booth. Of the conspirators the following we're caught and tried before 
a military commission in Washington, on May 9, 1865, upon a charge of conspiracy to kill 
the president and other high officials of the government: David H. Harold, G. A. Atzerodt, 
Lewis Payne, Michael O'Laughlin, Edward Spangler, Samuel Arnold, Mary E. Surratt, and 
Dr. Samuel A. Mudd. Harold, Atzerodt, Payne and Mrs. Surratt were hanged, O'Laughlin, 
Arnold and Mudd sent to prison for life and Spangler was imprisoned for six years. 

I belonged to the Eighth Illinois Cavalry, which was then on duty at Fairfax Courthouse, 
Virginia, a few miles from Alexandria. I was in Washington on April 14 on business and 
attended the theatre that night. My seat was located where I could see into Lincoln's box 
and after the shot was fired Booth jumped from the box to the stage, his spur caught in the 
folds of a flag which was draped in front of the box. After lighting he limped across the stage 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 105 

and escaped from the theatre by the back door to his horse which was waiting in the 
rear. 1 cannot describe the excitement which followed. I could not get out of the city until 
the night of the 15th. No one was allowed to leave the city until after the government was 
satisfied that John Wilkes Booth had escaped, and when I arrived in camp I gave the first 
information my regiment had of ihe assassination of Lincoln. 

After being shot Lincoln was carried across the street to a brick house where he died. 
That building is owned by the government now and is called "Lincoln Memorial Museum" and 
some three thousand Lincoln relics are to be seen there. Among those relics is the flag which 
was draped in front of Lincoln's box where he was shot, and the rent in the flag, made by 
Booth's spur, is plainly seen. The spur is also among the relics. That spur, catching in that 
Hag, caused Booth to fall and break his leg, which fracture undoubtedly made his capture 
more easy. 



WILLL\M P. COLLLNS, iL D. 

Dr. William P. Collins is well known as a successful medical practitioner of Howard, 
South Dakota, wlu-re lie has followed his profession continuously for the past thirteen years. 
His birth occurred in South Kli;in. Illinois, on the 20th of February, 1875, his parents being 
Nathan Perry and .Mary (\\hLtt'ord) Collins, the former a native of St. Charles, Illinois, 
and the latter of Erie, Pennsylvania. Nathan P. Collins was a physician bj' profession. 

William P. Collins acquired his early education in the public schools and was graduated 
from the Elgin Academy in 1896. Two years later, having determined upon the practice 
of medicine as a life work, he entered the Bennett College of Eclectic Medicine and Surgery 
at Chicago, from which institution he was graduated in 1901. Dnvinj tlir l'.ill..\ving year he 
served as liouse physician in Bennett Hospital. In May, 1902, he loent. ,1 i,.i [Mactiee in How- 
ard, South Dakota, and that city has since remained the scene of liis iiroicsaiunal labors. 
He has demonstrated his skill in the successful treatment of numerous diflicult cases, and 
the extensive practice accorded him is a merited tribute to his ability in the field of his 
chosen calling. He belongs to the South Dakota Eclectic Medical Association, of which lie 
is secretary and treasvu-er, and also to the National Eclectic Medical Association. 

On the 13th of August, 1902, Dr. Collins was united in marriage to Miss Agnes Neuman, 
of Chicago, by whom he has had three children, as follows: Nathan P., born March 16, 1904, 
and Cedric E., born on the 26th of June, 1907, both of whom are public-school students in 
Howard; and William P., deceased. Dr. Collins gives his pohtical allegiance to the republican 
party and is identified fraternally with the Masons and the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, while his religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Methodist Episcopal 
church. All who know him recognize his loyalty and progressiveness in citizenship as well 
as his faithfulness in friendship. 



REV. G. B. HOFFMANN. 



Rev. G. B. Hofl'mann, pastor of St. Martin's church at Emery, South Dakota, was born 
in Glendorf, Germany, on the 20th of March, 1862, and was educated partly in Germany and 
])artly at St. Meinrad, Indiana, where he pursued his theological education. He attended the 
gymnasium of Osnabrueck, Hanover, and was ordained to the priesthood by Bishop Marty, 
the first bishop of Sioux Falls, in the year 1894. His first pastorate was at White Lake, 
South Dakota, where he remained for eight years. He then removed to Emery, at which 
time there was only a small church there. The congregation was organized in 1880. Father 
Menrad McCarthy said the first mass but they had no regular pastor. A little church was 
built, but it was destroyed some time afterward by a wind storm and the congregation then 
removed to a small place in another part of town. In 1882 Father Quinn of Alexandria 
took charge and was instrumental in erecting the church that was blown down. In 1885 
Father Lawlor, residing at Alexandria, attended to the Emery congregation, which he served 
up to the time of his death in 1900. He was succeeded by Father Hoffmann and an inde- 



106 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

pendent parish was established, it having previously been a mission. The parish house was 
built in that year and in 1904 the old church, proving too small, was replaced by a new 
edifice. In 1910 the present parochial school was built and there are now over one hundred 
children in attendance, the Sisters of St. Francis, who are from Milwaukee, acting as teach- 
ers. There are now about eighty-five families in the parish and the work is steadily develop- 
ing under the direction of Father Hoffmann. 



EINER JOHNSOX. 



Einer Johnson, a bank cashier at Volin and recognized as a wide-awake, alert and enter- 
prising business man, has been a resident of Dakota territory since 1882, in which year he 
reached Yankton, having come direct from Norway. He was born near Trondhjem June 27, 
1862. With five young companions and an older man who had been in America for several 
years he sailed from his native city for Hull, England, on a small vessel, and they proceeded 
by rail to Glasgow, where they arrived at two o'clock in the morning. They knew no hotel 
to which to go and a Scotchman offered to help them. He found a place for them in the slum 
part of the city and routed the old landlady out of her own bed, which was so large that the 
seven found room in it without severe crowding. They remained there several days, fearing 
to mix with the tough crowd outside. At length they sailed on the State of Nebraska, the 
largest ship on the State line, and were eleven days in reachinig New York, from which point 
they made their way direct to Y'ankton, arriving on the 12th of June, 1882. The parents of 
our subject, who were Jonas and Oline Johnson, came to America four years later and settled 
in Y'ankton county, this state. 

In a few days Einer Johnson found work as a carrier in the brickyard of E. JI. Coates, 
who was making the brick with which to build his drug store. Mr. Johnson afterward worked 
on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad between Y'ankton and Scotland, finishing his 
labors by bolting all of the north line of rails between the two towns, while a friend bolted 
all of the plates of the other rail. He spent the following winter in farm work, for which he 
received only his board and the opportunity to attend school. There were five young men in 
the class and the now venerable teacher, B. A. E. Bagstad, took particular pains to help them 
in the mastery of a text-book written in their native tongue, the title of which, translated into 
our language, would be called "One Hundred Hours in English." Mr. Johnson afterward 
entered the employ of Louis Sampson, then in the implement business in Yankton, and still 
later was in the Gross Hardware establishment of that city, where he remained for twelve 
and a half years. During these years he made friends throughout all parts of the county 
and in the fall of 1900 they elected him county treasurer, which office he filled creditably for 
four years. On his retirement he accepted the position of bookkeeper in the Y'ankton National 
Bank, in which he continued for a year, and was then offered the entire management of 
the Citizens State Bank in Irene with the official title of cashier. At the end of the first year 
the oflScials of the Volin State Bank offered him the position of cashier and manager of their, 
establishment and he has since continued there, giving his entire attention to the control of 
the bank. 

Mr. Johnson married Miss Helen Grandberg, a native of Christiania, Norway. She came 
with her mother, Mrs. Carrie Grandberg, and the family of boys and girls to the new -world, 
and they lived first at Parker, South Dakota, but later removed to Y'ankton, where she formed 
the acquaintance of Mr. Johnson, who sought her hand in marriage. They have become the 
parents of three children : Edna, who completed the work of the kindergarten department of 
the normal course in Yankton College and is now employed in the schools of Pierre; Clara, a 
graduate of the Volin high school of the class of 191.5; and Richard, who completes the family 

Mr. Johnson well remembers the blizzard of January, 1888. He was working in a store 
and he weathered the storm for a distance of eight blocks which he traversed in order to take 
the team to the barn and care for them. He returned in safety, while others were lost in 
going a half block. That night there was to have been a banquet and entertainment by the 
ladies of the church at Turner hall and their provisions were all there. Mr. Johnson, with two 
or three others, remained up during the night, keeping the fires burning that the supplies 
might not freeze. In the early days the settlers had to resort to many expedients in order 




XKK .lOHXSOX 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA lO'J 

to meet the conditions that existed, and various ways were utilized to earn a living that would 
create surprise now. One of the expedients to which Mr. Johnson resorted in order to keep 
himself in funds was the gathering of Cottonwood seedlings, which he sold at a dollar and a 
quarter per thousand to the stores, where they were as staple an article of trade as ammuni- 
tion or flour. Such conditions have long since passed and South Dakota has taken her place 
among the great and growing commonwealths of the country, already enjoying a substantial 
measure of prosperity, while the promises for the future are bright. Mr. Johnson is well 
known not only as the enterprising cashier of the Bank of Volin, but in various relations is 
widely known throughout his part of the state and is a popular and highly esteemed citizen. 
He holds membership with the Lutheran church of Volin and he belongs to Dakota Lodge, 
No. 1, L 0. 0. F.; the Elks Lodge No. 994; and the' lodge of Uniied Workmen, No. 101, all of 
Yankton, in which organizations he is popular, numbering his friends by the score. 



FRANK NOONAN. 



Frank Noonan, of Lead, is the retiring sheriff of Lawrence county and in the two terms 
that he has held office has made a most commendable record. He was born in Yankton, this 
state, on the 14th of January, 1879, a son of James and Catherine (Morgan) Noonan. The 
father still resides in Y'ankton. 

Frank Noonan was the seventh child in the family and was reared and educated in the 
public schools of his home locality. He was reared on his father's farm, which was situated 
nine miles northeast of Y'ankton, and assisted his father in the cultivation of the land until 
he was nineteen years of age. Although his school days were limited he learned lessons of 
great importance while familiarizing himself with agricultural methods as he came to realize 
the value of thoroughness and promptness and to take pride in doing well the task at hand. 
Wlien nineteen years of age he became an employe of the South Dakota Hospital for the 
Insane at Yankton and remained in that connection for two and one-half years. In 1902 
he removed to Deadwood and for a little more than a year worked for the Homestake Min- 
ing Company. In 1903 he became a member of the police force of Lead and after serving for 
two years and three months was made chief of police in May, 1905. He was reappointed 
under four different mayors, which indicates his efficienc}', and In November, 1910, was elected 
sheriff of the count}' upon the republican ticket. His splendid record in that office led to his 
reelection in 1912. He will retire on the 1st of January, 1915, after four years' service 
as sheriff and his record in that capacity is one upon which he may look back with pride. 
He intends to operate his ranch of one hundred and sixty acres situated twenty miles south 
of Deadwood upon his return to private life. 

On the 3d of July, 1912, Mr. Noonan was married to Miss Angela Rochefort, of Lead. 
He is a momcbr of Lead Lodge, No. 747, B. P. 0. E. His fearlessness as an officer of the 
law has gained for him the respect of all good citizens and he is a valued resident of Law- 
rence county. 



.JAMES W. MATTES. 



.Tames W. ilattes is the proprietor of the Delmonico Cafe at Redfield and has continued 
in this business since the 1st of January, 1910. He was born in Huron, South Dakota, on the 
1st of July, 1884, and is a son of Christopher and Mary Jane (Wood) Mattes, who are now 
residents of Redfield. The former came to South Dakota in 1879 as a section hand and 
assisted in building the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad. He continued in the service of 
the company and gradually worked his way upward until he is one of the oldest engineers 
on the road, having been in the employ of that company for about thirt.y-eight years. Botli 
he and his wife are now fifty-five years of age and they are numbered among the well known 
and highly esteemed citizens of Redfield. The father holds the record of not having missed 
a pay check in thirty-seven years. To him and his wife have been born eiglit children, as fol- 
lows: James W., of this review; Frank H., at liome; Christopher A., Jr., registry clerk in 



110 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

the postoffice at Helena, Arkansas; Ben E. and Ralpli, both of whom are in the service of 
their brother James; Earl, who died in infancy; and another son and daughter who also 
passed away in infancy. 

James W. Mattes pursued his education in the Redfield high school and the college of 
that place, continuing his studies to the age of twenty years, when he accepted a position as 
telegraph operator on the Northwestern Railroad, being employed in that way for about five 
years. He afterward worked for the Northern Pacific Railroad Company at Dickinson, North 
Dakota, for five months and subsequently spent a year in the employ of the Wood Commis- 
sion Company at St. Paul. He next bought a popcorn stand at Redfield, which he managed 
for a year, at the end of which time he became proprietor of the Delmonieo Cafe of Redfield 
and now has the largest business of the kind in the town. 

Sir. Mattes is independent in politics. Fraternally, however, he is well known as a 
Mason and a Red Man. He resides with his parents at No. 107 South Bryant street, where 
the family have a good home. His youth was largely a period of earnest and unremitting 
toil and in the habits of industry and determination which he then formed he laid the foun- 
tlation for his present 



HON. THOMAS JAMES LAW. 

Hon. Thomas James Law, city attorney of Clear Lake and one of the prominent attor- 
neys of Deuel county, was born in Chicago, Illinois, on the 17th of January, 1870, a son of 
Thomas J. and Josephine M. (Stanley) Law, the former a native of Canada and the latter of 
New York state. Becoming a resident of the Badger state in his boyhood days, Thomas J. 
Law, Sr., was graduated from the normal school at Platteville, Wisconsin, and subsequently 
took up the study of law, under Judge Higbee, one of the pi'ominent barristers of that state. 
After his admission to the bar he opened an office at Shullsburg, Wisconsin, where his active 
professional life was passed. He was one of the successful attorneys of the state and served 
for several years as county judge in Lafayette county, his course on the bench being in 
harmony with his record as a man and as a lawyer — characterized by the highest sense of 
personal and professional honor and distinguished by a masterful grasp of every problem pre- 
sented for solution. He died April 1, 1910, at the age of seventy-three years, but the mother 
survives and yet makes her home in Shullsburg. 

Thomas James Law, whose name introduces this record, was reared in Shullsburg and 
educated in its public schools, passing through consecutive grades until graduated from the 
high school with the class of 1887. He then took up the study of law in his father's oflBce 
and in the fall of 1889 entered the law department of the University of Wisconsin at Madi- 
son, from which he was graduated on the 1st of July, 1891. In October of the same year he 
went to Clear Lake, South Dakota, where he opened an office and has continued in successful 
practice since that time, rising to a high rank in his profession as he has developed his powers 
and promoted his talents through wide reading, research and experience. He was elected 
states attorney in 1896, serving until 1900, and was again called to that office in 1903, serving 
until 1906. In 1912 he was elected to represent the district composed of Deuel and Hamlin 
counties in the state legislature, in which official capacity he made a most satisfactory 
record, giving due and careful attention to all the significant problems which came up for 
settlement. He is the present city attorney of Clear Lake and he has enjoyed a large 
practice throughout the period of his residence there— a practice that has connected him 
with much important litigation tried in the courts of the district. 

In 1894 Mr. Law was united in marriage to Miss Ethel Roberts, a daughter of William 
and Mary Roberts, of Clear Lake, and a native of Canada. Four children were born to 
this marriage, Elsie, Stanley, Dolores and Thomas. The wife and mother passed away in 
1908 and in 1913 Mr. Law was again married, his second union being with Miss Anna 
Kluckman, a daughter of Frederick and Augusta Kluckman, of Clear Lake. By this mar- 
liage he has two children, Frederick and Carroll. 

Mr. Law holds membership in Phoenix Lodge, No. 29, A. F. & A. M., of Clear Lake; 
in Watortown Chapter, R. A. M.; and in the Watertown lodge of Elks. He is likewise a 
member of the Order of the Eastern Star and of the Modern Woodmen and he has member- 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 111 

ship in the Clear Lake Commercial Club. He is today one of the best known men of the 
eastern part of the state and has made an excellent record in office and also in practice, while 
in private life he has gained the confidence and warm regard of a circle of friends that is 
almost coextensive with the circle of his acquaintance. 



ALBERT MATSON. 



Albert Matson, states attorney at Brookings, who since his admission to the bar has 
made continuous progress until he stands today among the able lawyers of his section of the 
state, was born in Chicago, Illinois, on the 16th of December, 1871, a son of Andrew and 
Kllen (Johnson) Matson, both of whom were natives of Sweden, where they were reared and 
married. The}^ came to the United States in 1S65, settling in Chicago, and the father, who 
was a carpenter and cabinetmaker by trade, worked in the car shops of Chicago, doing fine 
work on the building of passenger coaches. In 1881 he came to South Dakota, taking up a 
homestead in Clark county, and subsequently he acquired two other quarter sections, thus 
becoming the owner of valuable property ere his death, which occurred in 1910. His widow 
still resides on the homestead claim. 

Albert Matson was a little lad of ten summers when the family came to this state 
and upon the home farm spent the days of his boyhood and youth. He acquired his educa- 
tion in the public schools and in the South Dakota State College at Brookings. Completing his 
education, he was soon after appointed court reporter at Brookings, in which capacity he 
continued for eight years, and while thus engaged his deep interest in law practice was 
aroused, leading him to the study of law, to which he devoted his leisure hours. From 1899 
until 1906 he was engaged in the real-estate business in Brookings and during that period 
continued to read law, being admitted to the bar in the latter year. In the fall of that year 
he was elected county judge of Brookings count}' and served continuously upon the bench 
until January, 1911, at which time he was elected to his present office of states attoi'ney. 
He is an able lawyer, one who holds to high professional standards and whose ability is 
more and more widely recognized. 

In August, 1896, Mr. Matson was married to Miss Mary Sinjen, of Brookings, and they 
have become parents of six sons, Charles G., Arthur B., Wilfred F., Lyle F., Walter A. and 
Robert N. Mr. Matson belongs to Brookings Lodge, No. 40, I. 0. 0. F., and to the Modern 
Woodmen camp. He also has membership with the Brookings Commercial Club and is one 
of the representative men of the citj' — alert and enterprising, watchful of every opportunity 
pointing the way for the benefit and upbuilding of the city. 



JAMES W. ROSS, D. D, S. 



.\lthough Dr. James W. Ross has given the greater part of his attention to the practice 
of Ills priifession, in wliich he has met with gratifying success, he has also participated in 
[lublic allairs and has ably served as mayor of Milbank. He was born in Brandon, Vermont, 
December 11, 1S66, a son of Wallace A. and Hattie E. (Bush) Ross. The maternal grand- 
father, Sej-mour Bush, who was a lifelong resident of Vermont, conducted a prosperous 
wholesale and retail harness establishment. Wallace A. Ross was born in the Green Moun- 
tain state in 1845 and upon removing; wistwiinl took up his residence in Northfield, Minne- 
sota, where he passed away the year artn liis arrival in that city. He was a merchant by 
occupation. His political belief was that cf the republican party and his religious faith that 
of the Protestant Episcopal church. He served in the Civil war with a Vermont regiment of 
volunteer infantry and held the rank of first lieutenant when but eighteen years of age. 
While at the front he contracted a disease that caused his death in 1874. His widow was 
also born in Vermont, her natal year being 1847, and she is still living. To their union were 
born two children but one is now deceased. 

.James W. Ross was educated in the public schools of Brandon, Vermont, Northfield, 
Minnesota, and in Carleton College, Penn College of Dental Surgery and the Jefl'erson Medi- 



112 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

cal College of Philadelphia. A thorough general and technical education thus prepared him 
for his life work and has been a large factor in his subsequent success. He practiced dentis- 
try in Minnesota, South Dakota and North Dakota and on the 20th of June, 1886, arrived in 
Milbank, where he has since resided. He has gained an enviable reputation in his profession 
and has built up a large and lucrative practice. 

In May, 1892, Dr. Ross married Miss Florence V. Owen, -who was born in Massachusetts. 
The Doctor is a republican and has always kept well informed on the questions and issues 
.before the public. In local affairs he has been quite influential and has taken a leading part 
in various movements seeking public advancement. Aside from holding a number of minor 
offices he has served on the Milbank council for a number of years and was for two years 
mayor of the city, giving the municipality an administration characterized by efficiency and 
integrity. Fraternally he belongs to the Masonic lodge, in which he is serving as senior 
warden; to the Royal Arch Chapter; the Knights of Pythias, in which he is past chancellor 
commander; and the Watertown Lodge of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. During 
the many years that lie has resided in Milbank he has gained a host of warm friends and 
tlie sincere respect of all who have come in contact with him, as in the various relations of 
life he has measured up to the highest standards of manhood. . 



SAMUEL JACOBSOX. 



Samuel Jacobson, a well known banker and business man of Wakonda, was born in 
Racine, Wisconsin, February 16, 1878, a son of Chris and Annie L. Jacobson, natives of Den- 
mark and Texas respectively. The father emigrated to the United States in early manhood 
and made his way to Racine, Wisconsin, where he was married in 1877. Two years later he 
removed to Nebraska, whence in 1888 he came to South Dakota, settling in Clay county. He 
established a mercantile business in Wakonda and conducted the same until his retirement in 
1910. He also dealt in real estate and was the owner of a large amount of land but is now 
living retired at Wakonda. His wife also survives. His political allegiance is given the, 
republican party and fraternally he is connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellowh, 
the Knights of Pythias and the Modern Woodmen of America. To him and his wife have been 
born four sons: Samuel, of this review; Lauris, of Racine, Wisconsin, who is a bookkeeper in 
the employ of J. I. Case; Albert, who is in business at Sand Point, Idaho; and Clarence, a 
merchant of Dover, Idaho. 

Samuel Jacobson attended the public schools of Clay county and after com])leting the 
course there entered the State University of South Dakota at Vermillion, where he prepared 
for a business career by taking a commercial course, from which he was graduated in 1895. 
In August of that year he became bookkeeper for the Bank of Wakonda and held that position 
until he won promotion to assistant cashier. In 1904 he was made cashier and is still serving 
in that capacity. The institution is conducted on a conservative basis, insuring its depositors 
of ample security, but it is also up-to-date and progressive, serving the community in the 
many ways possible to a modern bank. Much of the prosperity of the institution is due to 
the business acumen and personal care of Mr. Jacobson, who is one of the leaders in tin- 
financial circles of Clay county. He is also one of the main stockholders of the bank, which 
was organized in 1893 as the Bank of Wakonda. Its capital stock is twenty-four thousand 
dollars, its surplus six thousand dollars, its undivided profits over four thousand dollars and 
its deposits more than four hundred thousand dollars. The present officers are: M. J. Chancy, 
president; F. A. Swezey, vice president; Samuel Jacobson, cashier; and Cliarles Londahl, 
assistant cashier. 

Mr. Jacobson is secretary of and a stockholder in the Wakonda Telephone Company, 
Avhich was organized in 1903 and with which he has since been identified. He is a stockholder 
of the Wakonda Electric Light Plant and is secretary of the company, and is also interested 
in farming and stock raising. He deals in land to some extent and finds that business a 
profitable one. He owns a fine residence in Wakonda and is one of the well-to-do citizens of 
that town. 

Mr. Jacobson was married in 1896 to Jliss Mary J. Mcllvcna. who was born in Clay 
county, of the marriage of Joseph and Catherine Mcllvena. Her parents came to this state 




SAirUEL .TACOBSOy 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 115 

at an early day and the father took up a homestead in Clay county, near Wakonda, which he 
operated until his death. To him and his wife were born four daughters: Agnes, w'ho died in 
I'JOS; Lucy, the wife of Samuel Artz, who is residing upon the old homestead; Margaret, the 
wife of A. H. Hohf, of Wortliing, South Dakota; and Mrs. Jacobson. 

Mr. Jacobson is a republican but is liberal in his views, voting independently when he 
deems that such a course would best further the public welfare. He has served as chairman 
of the county central committee, but has had no ambition for office himself. He and his wife 
are members of the Congregational church and contribute to its support. Fraternally he is 
a thirty-second degree Mason and a Shriner, being a member of El Riad Temple of Sioux 
Falls, South Dakota. He is also a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the 
Modern Woodmen of America. 



AMOS M. RICHARDSON. 



Amos M. Richardson is the vice president of the State Bank of Spencer and a well known 
and progressive business man of that town. Iowa claims him as a native son, his birth having 
occurred in Polk county on the 30th of June, 1879, his parents being Mose and Carrie 
(Landy) Richardson. The father was a farmer by occupation and for many years engaged 
in the tilling of the soil, but is now living retired at Sioux Falls. 

At the usual age Amos M. Richardson became a public-school pupil and when lie had 
mastered the branches of learning taught through public instruction he pursued a business 
course in the Capital City Commercial College at Des Moines. He made his initial step in 
the business world as an employe of a lumber firm at Inwood, Iowa, with which he was con- 
nected for three and a half years. He then located in Ireton, Iowa, where he engaged in the 
same line of business for five years. In January, 1914, he arrived in Spencer and purchased 
an interest in the State Bank, being elected to the position of vice president, in which con- 
nection he has since continued, thus becoming an active factor in the financial circles of 
McCook county. He is also secretary and treasurer of the Farmers Elevator and is con- 
nected with the electric light plant. In a word, he is interested in everything that pertains 
to the welfare and upbuilding of his town along business lines and his activity in other fields 
has also been of worth to the community. In politics he is a republican and, while he does 
not seek nor desire public office, he cooperates in all the movements wl]irli are ill^tituted for 
furthering the civic welfare. His religious faith is that of the Liitlu'iiin cluinli and his 
fraternal relations are with the Masonic and the Odd Fellows lodye^ at Spcmcr. He is 
deeply interested in South Dakota and its welfare, intending to make his future home here, 
and he is displaying characteristic energy in advancing the interests of town and county. 



BRLTNKE H. LUBBERS. 

Brunke II. Lubbers, a well known farmer of Bon Homme county, was born in the village 
of \'arsiim-Fehn. in East Friesland, kingdom of Hanover, Germany, on the 27th of February, 
1857. His parents were Henry and Anna (Garrelts) Lubbers. The father, a blacksmith by 
trade, became convinced that better opportunities awaited him in the new world and in the 
fall of 1866 he and his wife and all but two of their children emigrated to America, settling 
in Freeport, Illinois, where he established a blacksmith shop and purchased a few acres of 
hiiLil. upon which there was a small house. Our subject and his eldest sister were left behind 
wlicn the rest of the family crossed the Atlantic to the western continent, but a year and a 
lialf later, in April, 1868, they sailed from Bremerhaven on the steamer Bremen, landing in 
New York in May after a stormy voyage. As soon as possible they journeyed to Freeport, 
Illinois, and there joined the family. The father continued to work at his trade there 
until his death and his wife also passed away in that city. 

B. H. Lubbers attended school at Freeport and as soon as old enough became his father's 
assistant in the blacksmith shop. Later he was for three years employed at farm work 
and then married and bci;an farming on liis own account. He rented land in Stephenson 



116 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

county for three years, but in 1SS4 removed farther west and purchased a farm in Grundy 
county, Iowa, which he cultivated and developed for ten years. In 1894 he sold that land and 
came to South Dakota, purchasing a farm on section 20, Cleveland precinct, Bon Homme 
county. He immediately began its improvement and still resides thereon, having in the 
meantime added to his holdings until he now owns three hundred and sixty acres. Capacious 
barns, granaries, the latest improved machinery and a garage are found upon his farm, which 
is further enhanced in value by groves and orchards. There is also a running stream tlirough 
the place. His residence is well designed and is one of the most attractive country homes 
in Bon Homme. 

Mr. Lubbers was married in Stephenson county, Illinois, to iliss Ella Zimmerman, a 
native of East Friesland, whence her parents, Fred and Gretge (Amilsberg) Zimmerman, 
emigrated to America in 1865. To Mr. and Mrs. Lubbers have been born eleven children, of 
whom eight survive. Henry has filed on a section homestead in western Nebraska under the 
Kincaid law. Fred cultivates part of his father's farm and married Jennie Johnson, of 
Bon Homme county, by whom he has two sons and one daughter. Gretge, or Grace, if the 
English form of the name is used, married George Sheffield, a farmer living north of Tyndal!, 
and is the motlier of three sons and one daughter. Anna is the wife of Fred Etherton, of 
Bon Homme county, and has two sons. The four younger children are; Bertha, Ella, George 
and Albert, all at home. 

Mr. Lubbers is a republican, believing that the principles of that party are best adapted 
to secure the prosperity of the country. He and his family belong to the German Baptist 
church of which he has been a member since attaining his majority. He is a valued citizen 
of Bon Homme county and is doing his full share in the development of agricultural interests 
there and also aids in the progress of his community' along moral, intellectual and spiritual 
lines. 



FRANIC W. DOUTHITT. 



Frank W. Douthitt, secretary and manager of the Big Stone City Canning Company, 
lias a wide acquaintance among the men in business along this particular line, for he has a 
broad knowledge of this work in which he has been engaged throughout almost his entire 
business career. He was born in Indianapolis, Indiana. .January 19, 1875, a son of E. M. 
and Florence (Scribner) Douthitt, and in both the paternal and maternal lines comes of 
New England stock. In the maternal line he is related to the Scribners, publishers of the 
well known magazine. His father was born in Paris, Illinois, in 1835, and died in 1899, 
w'hile the mother, who was a native of Indianapolis, born in 1845, passed away in Seattle, 
Washington, in 1905. In their family were seven children, of whom six survive: A. G., who 
is connected with the Big Stone City Canning Company; Ada, the wife of John Oran, a car- 
penter of Indianapolis, Indiana; Frank W.; C. M., who is Il]]y^iral director in the university 
at Athens, Ohio; L. B., who is manager of the canning faitoiy in Alimtevideo,' Minnesota; 
and Ella, who is a stenographer in a bank at Seattle. Tin- fatlici of this family was a 
contractor and builder and for many years made his home in Indianapolis. He was a well- 
educated man and in politics was a democrat. 

Frank W. Douthitt was reared in the city of his nativity and was educated in the 
schools there. He made his initial step in the business world by working in a ladder factory, 
beginning that work at the age of thirteen, ere he had completed his education. He then 
enteied a canning factory in Indianapolis with the intention of learning the business. After 
he had gained a thorough knowledge thereof he took charge of a factory in Muncie, Indiana, 
but after a time spent there went to Cokato, Minnesota, where he managed a plant of 
similar character until 1906. He then purchased a third interest in the Big Stone Canning 
Compan}', of which he has since served as secretary and manager. This is one of the im- 
portant industrial concerns of that locality. The business is capitalized at fifty thousand 
dollars, while the output of the plant is seventy-five carloads of corn per year. The product 
of this plant is of the highest grade and therefore finds a ready sale on the market, ilr. 
Douthitt has a thorough knowledge of the canning business and he is now known as one of 
the best informed men in this line in the United States. 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 117 

Mr. Douthitt was married in 1S97, to Miss Orpha Powell, of Indianapolis, a daughter of 
George Powell, a wagonmaker of that city but formerly of Ohio. The home of Mr. and Mrs. 
Douthitt has a thorough knowledge of the canning business and he is now known as one of 
si.xteeu and six years, and both in school. 

In politics ilr. Douthitt is a republican and it was on that ticket that he was 
elected mayor ot Big Stone City, having filled this executive position to the satisfaction of 
the general public for the past six years, and during his incumbency in office he has insti- 
tuted many needed reforms and improvements. He is a Mason, belonging to both the lodge 
and the chapter. He is likewise a member of the National Canners Association, serving on 
the executive board; and of the Minnesota Canners Association and is now secretary and 
treasurer of the latter organization. It is said that the man with a purpose wins and this is 
verified in the life of Mr. Douthitt, for when starting out in the business world in early 
youth he put forward every endeavor to make today find him further advanced in his desires 
than yesterday and he looked forward to tomorrow to add to his attainments. With him 
it lias been a constant progression toward the desired end until today he stands among the 
successful few in industrial circles in the state. 



FREDERICK FISCHBACH. 



One of the e.xtensive landowners of South Dakota is Frederick Fischbach, whose holdings 
comprise twelve hundred and eighty acres in Mellette township, Spink county, and in Kondell 
township, Brown county. Recognizing the fact that real estate is the safest of all invest- 
ments, he has kept adding to his property and is today one ot the prosperous agriculturists 
wliose lilc work should serve to inspire and encourage others. He is a native of Germany, 
liis liiitli having occurred near Trier, in the Rhine Province, on the 20th of October, 1850, 
his parents being Nicholas and Gertrude Fischbach, both of whom spent their entire lives in 
tlieir native land and now lie buried at Seffern, near Trier. 

Tlie educational opportunities which Fred Fischbach enjoyed were those accorded by the 
public schools of his native country, where he remained until c-if;hteen years of age, when lie 
bade adieu to the fatherland and sailed for the new worhl. Iliis was in 1868. He brought 
with him very limited capital and faced the necessity oi liiHliiii; immediate employment in 
order to provide for his own support. He began working as a farm hand in Wisconsin, near 
La Crosse, and there remained for some time, after which he removed to Colorado, where he 
lived until he came to South Dakota in 1886. Twenty-nine years have since come and gone 
— years which have brought many changes for the state and for Mr. Fischbach, who within 
that period lias advanced steadily until he today is recognized as one of the men of affluence 
iu liis locality. He took up a preemption in Edmunds county, which he sold after two 
years, and then rented land which he today owns. When it was possible he purchased the 
place and. adding thereto, he is today one of the large property holders of Spink county. 
Carefully and diligently he has continued his work until he now has extensive fields under 
cultivation, from which he annually harvests good crops. He also has upon his place thirty 
head of cattle, eighteen head of horses and a large number of hogs. He has erected a fine 
residence, in the rear of which stand good barns and other outbuildings, and these in turn are 
surrounded by well tilled fields, the farm present ini; .\ luo-t n.at ami fhiilty appearance. 

On the 25th of October, 1881, in Dcum i , ( oloudo, \li 1 ,-rlili:irli was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Frances Breidenbach, a dauglitc^i oi iliinani ami iaiiyna iKoler) Breidenbach. 
Her father was a farmer by occupation and an earh' settler of Wisconsin. At the time of the 
Civil war he enlisted for active service at the front and did valiant duty in defense of the 
T'nion. He became one of the pioneer residents of McPherson county. South Dakota, and con- 
tributed to its early material development, continuing his residence in this state until his 
death, which occurred July 14, 1896, when he was seventy-three years of age. His wife fol- 
lowed him to the grave in 1906, when she was seventy-nine years of age, and both lie buried 
in the Sacred Heart cemetery at Aberdeen, South Dakota. They were members of the Catho- 
lic church and both were of German descent. To Mr. and ilrs. Fischbach have been born 
eight children: Frank, who died in infancy and was buried in Denver, Colorado; Mary, who 
has been a teacher but is now at home; Gertrude, who has been superintendent and is now 



118 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

deputy superintendent of schools at Redfield, South Dakota; Fred, who follows farming near 
the old home place, and who married Barbara Von Ruden, of Westby, Wisconsin, June 6, 
1911, and lias three children, Catherine Frances, Frederick Conrad and Paul Henry; Joseph 
B. and Bernard, who are assisting their father; Edwin, who died in infancy and was interred 
in the Sacred Heart cemetery at Aberdeen; and John, who is a graduate of the Redfield high 
school and no\y at home. 

The religious faith of the family is that of the Catholic church and Mr. Fischbach's 
political belief is that of the democratic party. He has filled the offices of clerk and assessor 
and has served in various other township offices, the duties of which he has ever discharged 
promptly, capably and loyally. H one were to analyze his life record it would certainly be 
found that hard work, sobriety and perseverance have been salient features in his success 
and he also attributes his advancement to the loyalty and encouragement of his wife, who 
has, indeed, been a faithful helpmate and companion to him. 



■.MIL MELLOil. 



Emil Jlellom has made a creditable and commendalile record as assistant cashier of the 
Colton State Bank, which position he has held continuously since January 1, 1905. His birth 
occurred in Deuel county. South Dakota, on the 9th of April, 1881, his parents being Julius 
and Dorothea Mellom, who had a family of twelve children. The father, who survives, 
makes his home in Alberta, Canada, but the mother has passed away. 

Emil ilellom acquired his earlier education in the public schools and later attended the 
Madison State Normal School and the Lutheran Normal School of Sioux Falls. Subsequently 
he worked in the office of his father, who had been elected to the position of county treasurer. 
On the 1st of January, 1905, he came to Colton as assistant cashier of the Colton State 
Bank, in which capacity he has served continuously since with great efficiency and credit. 

Mr. ilellom wedded Miss Clara Sando, whose father. Rev. 0. Sando, was the first Luth- 
eran minister of South Dakota. They have four children: Lorenz, Valborg, Clare and Kath- 
ryn. In politics Mr. Mellom is a republican and for five years he ably discharged the duties 
devolving upon him in the position of school treasurer. His religious faith is that of the 
Lutheran church, while fraternally he is identified with the Masons and the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. He has ahvays remained in this state and is well known as one of its 
wortliv native sons. 



DONALD R. GUSTAFSON. 



Donald R. Gustafson, a well known citizen of Lead, efficiently served as auditor of Law- 
rence county, but was not a candidate for reelection to that office in the spring of 1915. He 
was born in Colman, Moody county, this state, in 1882, a son of John Alfred and Anna 
(Danielson) Gustafson, natives of Sweden and Norway respectively. The father was but a 
boy of twelve years when he crossed the Atlantic and made his way to Michigan. In 1875 
he removed to Moody county, this state, and there secured a homestead. In 1878 he made his 
way to Lead, in the Black Hills, and followed mining for a number of years. In April, 1910, 
he removed to California, where he died the following year. The mother is still a resident 
of that state. Of their four children Hjelmar is now in Alaska; Agnes is living with her 
mother; and George is in Montana. 

Donald R. Gustafson was the third in the family and was educated in the public and 
high schools of Lead. F'oUowing his graduation from high school he took a business course 
in the Augustana College at Rock Island, Illinois, after which he returned to Lead and 
entered the employ of the Homestake Mining Company, with which he remained for a few 
years. In 1905 he was appointed deputy auditor of Lawrence county and served for three 
years under Captain McLaughlin, or until 1908. In that year he was elected auditor on the 
republican ticket and reelected in 1910, serving until March, 1913. In February, 1914, he was 
appointed to the office by the county commissioners to fill the unexpired term of John L. 




DOXALD R. GUSTAFSON 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 121 

Baker, which expired in March, 1915. His long service in the office is the best proof of the 
ability with which he discharged the duties devolving upoii him as auditor. He is methodical, 
prompt and accurate and his books were always in fine condition. He has devoted practically 
all of his time and attention to his official work and his record is a most creditable one. 

Mr. Gu.stafson was married in February, li)ll, to Miss Inez M. Muses, of Bixby, Perkins 
county, .South Dakota. She is an Episcopalian in religious faith, while Mr. Uustafsoii is a 
member of the Lutheran church of Lead and is always willing to give of his time and means 
to the furtherance of all worthy enterprises. He has voted for the candidates of the repub- 
lican party since aged conferred upon him the right of franchise and has for years been quite 
active in political affairs. Fraternally he belongs to Golden Star Lodge, No. 9, A. F. & A. M., 
of Lead; Golden Belt Chapter, No. 35, R. A. M., of Lead; Black Hills Council, No. 3, R. & S. M., 
of Lead; Black Hills Consistory, No. 3, A. & A. S. R. of Deadwood; and Naja Temple, A. A. O. 
N. M. S., of Deadwood. He also holds membership in Lead Lodge, No. 747, B. P. 0. E., of Lead 
He is widely known not only in Lead but throughout Lawrence county, and the circle of his 
friends is large as his character is one that commands respect and inspires goodwill. 



CHARLES S. O'TOOLE, M. D. 

Dr. Cliarles S. O'Toole, of Watertown, is well known in professional circles throu<ilu]ut 
northeastern South Dakota and is generally recognized as a progressive and able physician 
and surgeon. He was born in Humboldt county, Iowa, on the 5th of May, 1870, a sou of 
Patrick and Catherine (Toole) O'Toole, both natives of Ireland. They giew to maturity in 
the Enu'rald Isle and, convinced that better opportunities for advancement were to be found 
in this country, they crossed the Atlantic and located in Pennsylvania. Their marriage 
occurred in the Keystone state and the father was for many years employed in the rolling 
mills of Pittsburg and, as wages were unusually high at that time and as he was a skilled 
workman, he earned from eight to ten dollars per day. In 1860 he removed to Iowa with 
his family and there followed farming. Both he and his wife passed away in that state, he 
surviving to the advanced age of eighty-six years. He was very successful as a farmer and 
became a large landowner. 

Dr. Charles S. O'Toole remained at home during his boyhood and youth and a great deal 
of his time was taken up in acquiring an education. He also aided his father in the work 
of the farm and thus received valuable training in manual labor which supplemented admir- 
ably the knowledge of books gained in the schools. He attended the public and high schools 
of Estherville and Charles City, Iowa, and while a high school student in the latter place 
worked in a drug store, thus paying a considerable part of his expenses. He subsequently 
entered a pharmaceutical college in Des Moines, from which he was graduated in 1893, For 
a time he taught school and worked as a pharmacist, but in 1895 he began the study of 
medicine, entering the Illinois Medical College in Chicago. He took a three years' course 
there and completed a two years' course at the Barnes Medical College at St. Louis, from 
which he was graduated with the class of 1900. He first opened an office for practice iu 
Wessington Springs, South Dakota, but two or three months after his arrival here the town 
burned down and he then removed to Vienna, where he resided until 1914 and where he built 
up an extensive and remunerative practice. In October of that year he left Vienna and, 
after two months devoted to post-graduate work, located in Watertown where, by invitation 
of the board of directors of the new Luther Hospital, he became one of the surgeons on the 
staff of that institution. He is a member of the Watertown District Medical Society, of tlie 
Sioux Valli.\ Mi'.li.al Society, .the South Dakota State Medical Society and the American 
Medical Association and finds these connections invaluable as a means of keeping abreast of 
the discoveries that are being made in the field of medical researcli and of aci|uainting him- 
self with the improved methods devised by the capable practitioners of tlu' loimtry. 

Dr. O'Toole was married in 1902 to Miss Blanche F. Parks, danijlitcr of l". M, Parks, of 
Sioux City, Iowa. They have become the parents of two cliililroTi: ( hailis, aiixd eleven and 
Lovenia, aged six. The family are devout communicants oi thr (alholir rliurrli. He is a 
member of several fraternal organizations, but is not actiM' in llu-ir work. He finds' his 
greatest interest in his professional lalxn- and concentrates his energies upon the broaden- 



122 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

ing of his professional knowledge and the increasing of his efficiency as a physician and sur- 
geon. His constant study and professional zeal have made him one of the leading physicians 
and surgeops of the northeastern part of the state and have gained him a steadily increas- 
ing practice. He adheres closely to high standards of professional ethics and his life as a 
man and citizen is also above reproach. 



J. P. ALEXANDER. 



.J. P. Alexander is a member of the law firm of Hall, Alexander & Purdy of Brookings 
and as such has engaged in practice since 1912. He was admitted to the bar, however, in 
1880 and has had continued experience in the field of his chosen profession since that time. 
He was born in Northfield, Minnesota, on the 9th of March, 1857, and is a son of John J. and 
Ann (Tollefson) Alexander, the former a native of the state of New York and the latter of 
Norway. Removing westward, the father established his home in Rock county, Wisconsin, and 
in 1854 left that district to become a resident of Rice county, Minnesota, where he secured 
a homestead, upon which he lived until the time of his death, his labors being evidenced in 
the excellent appearance of the place, which he converted from a tract of wild land into richly 
productive fields. He was also a prominent factor in democratic circles in his part of the 
state and represented his district for two terms in the Minnesota legislature, aiding in shap- 
ing the policy of the state during that period. He died in 1891, at the age of fifty-eight 
years, while his wife survives at the age of seventy-nine years and resides in Northfield. 

There were no unusual or spectacular phases to change the routine of home life for 
J. P. Alexander during the days of his boyhood and youth. He supplemented public-school 
studies by a course in Carleton College of Northfield, Minnesota, from which he was graduated 
with the class of 1877, winning the degree of Bachelor of Arts. At the age of twenty years 
he took up the study of law in the office of Morris Lamprey of St. Paul, and was admitted 
to the Minnesota bar in 1880. Soon afterward he entered upon practice and has since con- 
tinued active in the profession, making steady progress as the years have gone by. The 
same year in which he was admitted he was married and then opened a law office in North- 
field, where he remained until 1885, when he removed to Groton, Dakota territory, now Brown 
county. South Dakota. There he remained for two years and then went to ELkton, where 
he was in active practice until 1912, when he came to Brookings and formed his present law 
partnership, being now a member of the firm of Hall, Alexander & Purdy. This firm enjoys 
a liberal share of the public patronage and its clientage is of a character that connects it 
with the most important litigation heard in the courts of the district. 

Mr. Alexander was united in marriage to Miss Adeline Chamberlin, of High Forest, 
Minnesota, and to them have been born two children: John C, who is assistant freight 
auditor of the Soo lines at Minneapolis; and James G., cashier of the First State Bank of St. 
Peter, Minnesota. 

Mr. Alexander has always given his political allegiance to the democratic party since 
age conferred upon him the right of franchise and in 1890 he was elected county judge of 
Brookings county, serving upon the bench for two years. He belongs to Elkton Lodge, No. 
57, F. & A. M., and to the Brookings Commercial Club. His wife is a member of the Presby- 
terian church and with Judge Alexander attends its services. They are well known citizens 
of Brookings and in a profession where advancement depends entirely upon individual merit 
Judge Alexander has made a creditable name and place for himself. 



DAVID DUNWOODY. 



Most of the families who settled in or near the town of Scotland, South Dakota, were 
of Scotch birth and they and their descendants have pioved among the most valued citizens 
of Bon Homme county. David Dunwoody is a well-to-do farmer of that county. His father, 
Jam'es Dunwoody, was a resident of County Down, Ireland, where he w.as married to Miss 
Mary Johnston, who was also of Scotch descent. In the early '60s they emigrated to America 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 123 

and settled in Wisconsin, where they lived for ten years. They then removed to Bon Homme 
county, and Mr. Dunwoody filed on the south half of section 35 under the homestead and 
timber laws. He developed his land into a fine, productive farm and further increased its 
value by planting many acres of trees, which, in the forty years that have since intervened, 
have grown into almost a forest. The family obtains all of the fuel needed from the large 
growtii and that without noticeably afl'ecting the size or denseness of the woods. After 
having filed upon his land Mr. Dunwoody went to Yankton and for two years rented a farm 
on the Jim river east of that town. At the end of that time he returned to his claim and 
erected a frame house, in which he and his wife resided until their deaths, which occurred 
when they had reached an advanced age. 

David Dunwoody was reared upon the home farm and after attending the country schools 
was for several terms a student at the Scotland Academy. He remained with his parents 
until they passed away and is still cultivating the home farm, his sisters, Mary and Margaret, 
Iceeping house for him. 

Mr. Dunwoody gives his political allegiance to the republican party, while fraternally 
he is a member of the Masonic lodge at Tyndall. He possesses the sterling traits of character 
usually associated with his nationality and has gained a high place in the estimation of those 
who know him. 



JOSEPH IvUBLER. 



Joseph Kubler, the founder and editor of the Custer Chronicle, a paper which is well 
known in the Black Hills district and which is in its thirty-sixth volume, was born in Alsace, 
(Germany, on the 33d of August, 1854, a son of Joseph and Louise (Weyer) Kubler, both also 
natives of that province. 

Mr. Kubler of this review was left an orphan when but fifteen years of age, his mother 
passing away at that time while his father died when the son was but an infant. His educa- 
tion was acquired in his native country and when he was about seventeen years of age he 
left the fatherland and emigrated to America, locating first in Jackson, Mississippi, where he 
found employment with a street car company as a conductor. After working in that capacity 
for three years he went to Denver, Colorado, where he was engaged in the confectionery 
business for about eighteen months. Upon selling out he entered the office of a printing firm 
and there learned the printer's trade. In 1876 he arrived in the Black Hills, reaching Custer 
on the 4th of April, 1876. He with others intended to start a newspaper there but finding 
the conditions unfavorable, removed to Deadwood and Mr. Kubler worked upon the first issue 
of The Pioneer, which name was given to the new paper started there. He continued to reside 
in that city until 1880 and then returned to Custer and in connection with A. D. Clark estab- 
lished the Custer Chronicle, which has had a continuous existence since that time. In 1885 Mr. 
Kubler bought out his partner's interest and for the intervening thirty years has been sole 
owner of the paper. As Custer and the district surrounding it have grown in population and 
in wealth the circulation of the paper has increased and its conduct has proved a profitable 
as well as a congenial business. Mr. Kubler is also a stockholder in the First National Bank 
of Custer and owns both residence and business property in that city, where he is recognized 
as a substantial citizen. 

In June, 1881, Mr. Kubler was united in marriage with Miss Louise Kapp, a native of 
Germany, whose parents remained lifelong residents of the fatherland. Mr. and Mrs. Kubler 
have seven children: Joseph W., who is assisting his father; Willi;iin 1^.. of Dradwood, who 
is manager for the Cudahy Packing Company at that place; Carl II.. wlin is iniployed in the 
postoffice at Deadwood; Eva E., the wife of Joseph S. Baker, assistant ini-tnia-,tor of Dead- 
wood; Frank, who is helping his father in the printing oftice; and Grace D. and Louise, at 
home. 

Mr. Kubler is a republican in his political belief and has held a number of offices of respon- 
sibility. For thirteen years, from 1900 to July, 1913, he was postmaster of Custer and has 
been a member of the town board and of the board of education, of which he was chairman 
in 1914. He is quite well known fraternally. In the Masonic lodge he has held all of the 
cliairs and for three successive terms was master. He has attained the thirty-second degree 



124 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

in tlie Scottish Rite and is also a Mystic Shriner. He is identified with the Knights of Pythias 
and has served in all of the offices of the local lodge of that order. He is connected with public 
utilities at Custer as president of the Electric Light, Heat & Power Company and in that 
capacity keeps ever in mind the intimate relation between the welfare of the people and the 
service given by such companies as the one of which he is the executive head. He has demon- 
strated his power to direct and control extensive interests and has also proven his loyalty to 
the general good. As editor of the Custer Chronicle he has been responsible in no small 
measure for many movements that have resulted greatly to the benefit of the commiuiity and 
his name is justly honored in his part of the state. 



C. H. OLSEX. 



C. H. Olsen, residing at Viborg, Turner county, is well known as a representative of 
financial interests there, being president of the Bank of Viborg. He was born October 18, 1878, 
in the county in which he still lives, his parents being Lars P. and Maren Olsen. The father 
came to Dakota territory in 1873, at a period when the work of progress and improvement 
seemed scarcely begun. He homesteaded three miles west of Centerville, securing the north- 
west quarter of section 19, township 96, range 52. For several years he carried on general 
agricultural pursuits there but passed away in November, 1881. His widow still survives. 

C. H. Olsen has always been a resident of Turner county and in the district schools he 
pursued his early education, while later he attended the Sioux Falls College, pursuing an 
academic course. When his textbooks were put aside he turned his attention to merchandising 
and the grain business, in which he continued for ten years. He had previously been upon 
the home farm and he early became familiar with the best methods of tilling the soil and 
caring for the crops. After being connected with agricultural and mercantile interests he 
turned his attention to financial affairs and in the spring of 1910 entered the Bank of 
Viborg as its vice president. In January, 1911, he was elected president and the business of 
the bank has been constantly increasing under his careful direction. He has closely studied 
every phase of the business, has watched the trend of the times and has so controlled the 
bank's interests that it has greatly profited thereby. He is also interested in real estate in 
South Dakota and, as he knows property values, he has thus been able to make judicious 
investments. 

On the 29th of November, 1905, Mr. Olsen was united in marriage to Miss Agneta Tychsen, 
her father being Rev. N. Tychsen, who was a member of the territorial convention at Yankton 
and homesteaded the land which comprises the present site of Viborg. Our subject and his 
wife have two children, Evangeline and Grace, who are six and two years of age respectively. 

The religious faith df the family is that of the Baptist church and in politics Mr. Olsen 
is a progressive republican. He is interested in South Dakota and its development and co- 
operates heartily in the plans and movements for the general upbuilding and improvement of 
the section of the state in which he makes his home. He served for several years as a member 
of the city council of Viborg and in the spring of 1914 was elected mayor, in which position 
he is giving to the city efficient and valuable service, looking ever to the benefit of the com- 
munity at large. 



HON. MARK W. BAILEY. 



In the demise of the Hon. ilark W. Bailey Soutli Dakota lost a citizen who had con- 
tributed nuieh of value to the development of the country. He was born at Laporte, Indiana, 
on the 9th of June, 1848, and in the following spring was taken by his parents to Boscobel, 
Grant county, Wisconsin, where his boyhood was spent and he acquired his education. At 
the age of fourteen years he was messenger in the Wisconsin legislature and was then regarded 
as a bright, active boy of unusual promise. When but eighteen years of age he began teach- 
ing and taught a year at Prairie du Chien, at Minona, Slenasha and Boscobel. WTiile teach- 
ing he devoted the time not required by his work in that connection to the study of law and 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 127 

luid very little assistance during the whole time that he was iJiU'Suing his professional course. 
i)n the ITtli of November, 1871, he was admitted to the bar at Prairie du Chien before Judge 
Mills of the Mftli judicial circuit. He had previously also studied surveying and civil engineer- 
ing. In October, 1873, he came to Dakota territory and for a tew weeks was in the oflice 
of Judge Smith, of Vermillion. In January, 1873, he removed to Canton, where he resided 
until his death. After his arrival in the latter city he devoted his attention chiefly to the 
Ijractice of law. At times, however, when the business of the profession did not occupy all 
his time he engaged in other pursuits. For instance, in the summer of 1873 he, in company 
with Mr. Rea, was awarded a surveying contract by the government and the following summer 
was given the contract on the line of the Northern Pacific Railroad. He went into the field 
and gave the work of both contracts his personal attention. In the fall of the same year he 
was nominated by the republicans of his district as their candidate for the upper house of the 
Daknfa Icuislatuie and was elected by a large majority after a brief but sharp campaign. 
He w.i^ a N-.i-linii and active member of the legislature which convened the following winter. 
That X -Miiii will be remembered as very important, as those who had been engaged in com- 
|iiling tlie laws of the territory submitted their work for legislative approval. Members of 
the legislature at that time say that the labors of Mr. Bailey were second to none in value. 

The legislature adjourned in February, 1877, and about the 1st of April following Mr. 
ISailey went to the Black Hills. He had been given charge of an important mining case in 
the Hills and went there to give the matter his personal attention. His journey was a severe 
and laborious one and the following July he suffered a severe attack of fever. A month later 
he returned to Canton much broken in health. He recovered sulIlriiMitly. however, to take 
an active part in the cases tried at the October term of tin- di-tiirt iiMirt. The following 
winter it was evident that his strength was fast failing and aluiut tla- Nt of April he became 
utterly prostrated. Again he rallied and went to the home of his parents at Fennimore, Wis- 
consin, where his death occurred on the 15th of November, 1878. His professional attain- 
ments were high and his ability as a lawyer commanded the respect of his brethren in the 
profession. A naturally keen mind, careful study of statute and precedent, care in the prep- 
aration of cases and a convincing manner combined to make him an opponent to be feared. 
He never used his powers for base ends, realizing that if the law is to be held in the honor 
that should be accorded it the legal profession must adhere to high standards of justice and 
integrity and must place right before personal gain. 

Mr. Bailey was married in 1876 to Miss Maggie Miller, who survives him. 



ANDREW H. HOYNE, M. D. 



Dr. Andrew H. Hoyne is a leading physician and surgeon of McCook county, South 
Dakota, who has practiced in Salem continuuu-ly ^iii. c April. 1<J07. He is numbered among the 
worthy native sons of this state, his birth lia\in,i; <.(riiiicd in Turner county on the 20th of 
March, 1877. His parents, Kels L. and Dorotla a il In i^tmson) Hoyne, were born, reared and 
married in Denmark. About 1867 they crossed the Atlantic to the United States, locating in 
Racine, Wisconsin, and in 1873 came to South Dakota, homesteading a quarter section of 
land in Turner county. Subsequently Nels L. Hoyne also took up a tree claim and later 
bought other land, owning at the present time an entire section. He is now living retired in 
Centerville, Turner county, and is a well known and highly esteemed citizen of the com- 
munity which has been his home for more than four decades. 

A. H. Hoyne was reared under the parental roof and began his education in the public 
schools. Subsequently he pursued a four years course at Yankton College of Yankton, South 
Dakota, and completed his studies in Colorado College of Colorado Springs, Colorado, from 
which institution he was ;ii aihiatiMl in 1901 with the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy. He 
thin t.ilh.wi.l til.' |iri.lrssi,ai ui (.acdiing for one year and in 1902 took up the study of medi- 
cine, cntcriiii; the Si.iiix ( it y ( .illcge of Medicine, which institution conferred upon him the 
degree of M. D. in r.Hii;. Dr. Ilnyne next served a year's intenu'ship in St. Joseph's Hospital 
of Sioux Falls and in April, \<M)7. located in Salem, wlieie hr lia- iMaeti.c.l continuously 
throughout the intervening ei-lit years. He belongs to the Miteliell Medi.al S.ieiety. the Sioux 
\'allev iledical Society, the South Dakota State Medical Society and the American Medical 



128 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

Association. He keeps tlioroughly informed as to tlie latest advances in medicine and surgery 
and indeed it is doubtful whether any of the younger physicians in the state have a more 
favorable outlook at the present time than Dr. A. H. Hoyne. 

On September 29, 1909, he was united in marriage to Miss Alice Mielke, of Salem, a 
daughter of William and Elizabeth (Glaser) Mielke. Ur. and Mrs. Hoyne have one son, Rob- 
ert Maclay, born July 2, 1915. Fraternally he is identified with the Woodmen of the World, 
the Ancient Order of United Workmen, the Ivnights of Pythias, Fortitude Lodge, No. 73, A. F. 
& A. M. and Salem Chapter, No. 34, R. A. M. He is popular in both social and professional 
circles in his community and by conscientious service in his chosen calling has gained just 
recognition as one of the most successful medical practitioners in McCook county. 



CHARLES HERBERT PECItHAM. 

Charles Herbert Peckham, a leading and prosperous citizen of Alexandria, was appointed 
postmaster by President Wilson on the 17th of May, 1914, and is ably discharging his duties 
in that connection. His birth occurred in Eugene, Oregon, on the 15th of February, 1875, his 
parents being J. E. and Almira Peckham, who came to South Dakota in 1879. The father 
homesteaded a tract of land and successfully carried on agricultural pursuits for fourteen 
years, while subsequently he embarked in the hardware business, conducting an enterprise 
of that character for a number of years prior to his death, which occurred in 1913. The 
mother survives, however, and is well known and highly esteemed in her home community. 

Charles Herbert Peckham, who was a little lad of four years when brought to this state 
by his parents, acquired his early education in the district schools and later pursued a high- 
school course at Alexandria. Subsequently he was apprenticed to the plumbing and tinning 
trades and for some time followed those occupations. He now owns a half interest in the 
hardware store of Peckham & Johnson and is likewise the owner of tlie city gas plant, thus 
easily maintaining his position among the prominent and successful business men of Alexan- 
dria. On the 17th of May, 1914, he was appointed postmaster by President Wilson and has 
since conducted the office in a most capable and satisfactory manner. 

On the 7th of July, 1897, Mr. Peckham was united in marriage to Miss Sybil Vickers, 
a daughter of John Vickers. They have one child, Harriett. Mr. Peckham gives his political 
allegiance to the democracy and has been a delegate to the state conventions of his party. 
Fraternally he is identified with the Woodmen, the Yeomen and the Masons, while his 
religious faith is that of the Presbyterian church. He is a man of sterling traits of character 
who receives the high regard and confidence of his- fellowmen and takes as much interest in 
movements for the general advancement and development as in the promotion of his own 
success. 



WILLIAM W. SANDERS. 



William W. Sanders, one of the owners and editors of the Garretson News, with which 
he has been continuously connected since the 1st of January, 1910, was born in Nemaha 
county, Nebraska, on the 20th of August, 1857, his birthplace being one of the old-time dug- 
outs which were common in the period of pioneer development in that state. His parents 
were Thomas N. and Julia M. (Hickman) Sanders, the former a native of Shelby county, 
Indiana, and the latter of southwestern Ohio. They were married in Edgar county, Illinois, 
m'1854 and two years afterward removed to Nebraska, becoming pioneer residents of that 
state. The father preempted one hundred and sixty acres of land and afterward home- 
steaded one hundred and sixty acres in Pawnee county, but was scared out by the Indians 
and returned to Nemaha county. He died on the 18th of December, 1S85, but his widow 
survived for more than two decades, passing away December 28, 1907. 

William W. Sanders pursued his education in the public schools at Brownville, Nebraska, 
to the age of fifteen years, when lie entered upon an apprenticeship to the printer's trade in 
the office of the Brownville Democrat. The name of this paper was subsequently changed to 
the Nemaha County Granger and jMr. Sanders remained in connection therewith for eight 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 129 

ycar-s. He worked liis way steadily upward I'lom one position to anotlier and when he 
resigned was foreman of the office. Following his resignation he purchased the Nemaha 
Tiiiic'S in 1880 and published it through the succeeding four years. He next bought the 
Advertiser at Auburn, Nebraska, and in 1SS5 sold the Times. In 1887 he removed the 
Advertiser to Nemaha and in 1889 again bought the Times, consolidating the two papers, 
which he continued to publish under the name of the Advertiser until 1909. In that year 
Mr. Sanders arrived in 8outh Dakota, settling in Garretson, where six months later he 
formed a partnership with his nephew, John P. Sanders, and purchased the Garretson News, 
of which they took possession on the 1st of January, 1910. Mr. Sanders has since been iden- 
tified with that publication, which is devoted to the dissemination of general and local news 
and is one of the popular newspapers of eastern South Dakota, with a good circulation and 
a liberal advertising patronage. For thirty-five years ^Ir. Sanders has been a newspaper 
publisher and he has been very successful in his chosen field of work. 

At Brownville, Nebraska, on the 5th of December, 1881, Mr. Sanders was united in 
marriage to Bliss Alice R. Berger, of that place, and to thein have been born a son and a 
daughter: William F., who is now station agent on the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Rail- 
road at Bruning, Nebraska; and Nellie, the wife of A. J. Rowen, a resident farmer of Millelacs 
county, Minnesota. 

Mr. Sanders is a republican in politics and publishes his paper in the interest of the 
party. He belongs to Hope Lodge, No. 29, A. F. & A. M., of Nemaha, Nebraska, and to the 
Order of the Eastern Star. He holds membership in the Methodist Episcopal church and 
served as clerk of the school board for five terms. He is interested in all that pertains to 
the material, mental and moral progress of the community and gives active aid in further- 
ing movements for the general good, his efforts being attended with substantial results. 



WILLIAM F. GLASIER, M. D. 

Dr. William F. Glasier, engaged in the practice of medicine at Sisseton, was born in 
Livingston county, Illinois, January 4, 1883, a son of Peter and Anna (Fahr) Glasier, both of 
whom were natives of Alsace-Lorraine and were of German parentage. The father was born 
June 26, 1827, and passed away July 13, 1911. The mother's birth occurred November 8, 
1847, and they were married in Germany, after which they emigrated to the United States 
in 1869, settling in New Jersey. The father was an iron worker and about 1875 removed to 
Illinois, where he turned his attention to the occupation of farming. Still later he became 
a resident of Iowa, where he purchased and improved a tract of land but retired some years 
prior to his death, having met with a fair measure of success in his business undertakings. 
In his political views he was a republican, always giving his support to the principles of 
that Jiarty after becoming a naturalized American citizen. His religious faith was that of 
the Lutheran church. In their family were six children: Lena, who became the wife of 
Joseph Rodgers and is now a widow living in St. James, Minnesota; Elizabeth, who is a 
resident of Iowa; Peter, a mining engineer living in Goldfield, Nevada; Jacob, an agricul- 
turist residing in St. James, Minnesota; William F., of this review; and John, a contractor 
of Denver, Colorado. 

William F. Glasier pursued a high-school education at Whittemore, Iowa, and was 
graduated with the class of 1901. He afterward spent a year and a half at Highland Park 
College in Des Moines, where he piu'sued a course in pharmacy, being graduated there on the 
:i0th of January, 1905. He was afterward employed in a drug store for a while and still 
later he entered upon the study of medicine, to which he devoted two years in Keokuk, 
Iowa. He also attended the medical department of the University of Illinois at Chicago 
and w-as there graduated with the class of 1910. After spending a year as interne in St. 
Anne's Hospital in Chicago he located in Sis.'seton in 1911 and entered independently upon 
the practice of medicine. Subsequently, however, he admitted Dr. C. M. Peterson to a 
partncr.ship and they opened a hospital containing fifteen beds. Dr. Glasier now has an 
extensive general practice and also does considerable surgical work, possessing marked skill 
and ability in that connection. 

On the IGth of October, 1911, Dr. Glasier was united in marriage to Miss Thelma Han- 



130 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

son, a luitivf of Pipestone. Jliniiesota, and a Uaugliter of N. H. Hanson, wlio beeame an 
early settler of Minnesota and embarked in merchandising at Pipestone. Our subject and 
his wife have two sons, namely: William Albert, who was born .lanuary 8, 1913; and Robert 
A., whose birth occurred July 31, 1914. 

Dr. Glasier is a member of the Norwegian Lutheran church and is a prominent Mason, 
belonging to the consistory at Des Moines, Iowa. In politics he is a republican and has 
served as coroner of Roberts county and as a member of the board of health, serving at one 
time as vice president of that board. He is a member of the Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity, 
connected with the Illinois Alpha. He devotes all of his time to his profession. He is also 
the owner of a farm of two hundred and forty acres located in Roberts county. His pro- 
fessional services are discharged with a sense of conscientious obligation and his ability has 
gained him prominence in his chosen field and won for him a growing practice. 



JOSIAH F. WAGNKR. 



Among the commercial enterprises of Garden City which contribute to the upbuilding of 
the town is the drug store of which Josiah F. Wagner is the proprietor. He settled here when 
Garden City contained a population of less than one hundred inhabitants and has since been 
an interested witness of the changes which time and man have wrought. 

He was born in Hancock county, Ohio, on the 25th of February, 1879, and two years later 
the family home was established in South Dakota. His father, John D. Wagner, homesteaded 
in Spink county and at once began to develop and improve his tract of land, which up to that 
time was uncultivated prairie. He became an extensive stock-raiser, making a specialty of 
sheep and shorthorn cattle, and as time passed on the importance and extent of his business 
interests placed him in the front rank among the stock-raisers of his section of the state. 
He owned six hundred and forty acres of land, which gave him excellent grazing giound for 
his stock. In 1891, on account of ill health, he disposed of his interests in Spink county and 
removed to Minneapolis, where he could have hospital treatment. Later he embarked in the 
cigar and tobacco business at that place but after a few years sold out and is now practically 
living retired. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Elizabeth Feller, passed away Novem- 
ber 3, 1890, at the age of forty-five years. 

After the death of the mother, and on account of the illness of the father, the home 
was broken up and Josiah F. Wagner lived with relatives and others until about fourteen 
years of age. At that time he went to live with W. J. Jones, a druggist, of Frankfort, Spink 
county. South Dakota,' and remained with him until he had attained his majority. It was 
there that the word "home" came to have a real meaning, for his advantages and training 
were all that could be desii-ed. He attended the public schools and was graduated from the 
high school of Frankfort with the class of 1902. While pursuing his studies he took the 
druggist's examination and won his certificate on the 20th of July, 1898. After completing 
his school work he continued with Mr. Jones in the conduct of his drug store and when the 
latter sold out to Noah Edwards, Mr. Wagner became the manager for the new proprietor, 
remaining in charge of the business for two years. In 1903 he came to Garden City, where he 
embarked in the drug business on his own account, erecting first a little frame building in 
which to place his stock. At that time there was a population of only about one hundred 
here, and there were many who believed that such a venture as Mr. Wagner was making would 
not prove successful, but he saw the possibilities for the future growth and development of 
the town and felt that existing conditions in South Dakota would speedily bring about a 
change. He now has a large and well appointed drug store and from time to time has 
increased his stock in order to meet growing demands of the trade. He has erected a fine 
business block and occupies his old building with an up-to-date furniture store, carrying a 
large line, and he also conducts an undertaking business. He owns other property in Garden 
City and at the present writing is erecting an attractive modern residence — a bungalow con- 
taining seven rooms. 

On the 19th of June, 1912, Mr. Wagner was united in marriage to Miss Grace B. Keyes, 
a daughter of Eugene R. Keyes, formerly of Minnesota but now residing in Henry, Codingtoiv 
county, South Dakota, and they have one child, Grace E., born November 10, 1913. 




Ml I'. WAGXKK 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 133 

The parents are members of the Methodist ilninli ami Mi. Wai^ner is also well known 
as a prominent Mason, belonging to the lodge, cliaiitn ami the Ka.^tcin Star. He is also con- 
nected with the Benevolent Protective Order of Klks. in iiolitics lie is a republican and at one 
time was a candidate for state senator. He is a stockholder in the Farmers Elevator and 
Hall Association and in 1911 he was made president of the South Dakota Druggists Associa- 
tion, a fact which indicates his high standing in the regard of those who are engaged in a 
similar line at hiisincss. He believes in advancement, and cai-li stc]i in his career has been 
a forward mir. In iiininj. him a broader outlook and wider ('P]hji t\initi.s. When he arrived here 
he had but liniitcd capital but has steadily worked his way upward, improving his opportuni- 
ties, and toda.y he is at the head of an extensive, growing and prosperous business and is 
acknowledged one of the foremost factors in the material growth and development of his city. 



ELLIOTT BUSHFIELD McKEEVER. 

Elliott Bushfield McKeever, formerly a well known resident of Aberdeen, South Dakota, 
but now living in Moline, Illinois, was born in Hendrysburg, Belmont county, Ohio, March 
23, 1845, a son of John McKeever, whose father was Alexander McKeever, a native of 
Scotland, who settled in Washington county, Pennsylvania. The mother of our subject, 
Mrs. Melinda (Dallas) McKeever, was a daughter of Robert A. Dallas, who was born in 
England. 

Elliott B. McKeever attended the Harlem Springs Seminary, Cornell College at Mount 
Vernon, Iowa, and Scio College at Scio, Ohio, from which he was ^..i a. hiatal with the 
Bachelor of Science degree In 1872. For a number of years he devutid lii- time in public 
school work and from 1894 to 1898 was county sujierintendent of s.lio.ils i.r lii.ik Island 
county, Illinois, after removing to that state finm Clintun, Iowa, in the late 'TOs. He 
was a very successful educator, as he understud.l t Inn niiulily the conditions met with in the 
conduct of the public schools and kept in touch with |im;;ressive movements in the field of 
education — movements which seek to bring about a closer relation between the work of the 
schools and modern life. In the discharge of his important duties he served his community 
well and proved himself a public-spirited citizen. He also gave evidence of his patriotism 
and willingness to subordinate personal interests to the general welfare when, in 1863, he 
enlisted in Company L, Ninth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, under command of 
Colonel W. D. Hamilton. The command remained at Camp Chase, Ohio, for a few weeks, 
spent in organization and drill, and was then sent to join Sherman's army at the front, 
remaining with him from that time until the surrender of .Johnston in North Carolina, in 
the spring of 1865. Mr. McKeever took part in the fight around Atlanta that led to the 
capture of that city, in the famous march to the sea, and in the campaign northward through 
the Carolinas. Following the surrender of Johnston, the command to which Mr. McKeever 
belonged was stationed in North Carolina to preserve the peace, and remained there until 
July, when it was honorably discharged. He reached his home in Ohio on the 5th of 
August, 1865. 

Mr. McKeever was a strong supporter of the republican party until the Chicago con- 
vention of 1912, when he became a progressive of the Roosevelt type. He is liberal and 
broad-minded in his attitude upon important questions of the day, believing in giving 
woman the full right of franchise and favoring the initiative, referendum and recall. He 
is also unalterably opposed to the saloon and to all that it represents, and does everything 
in his power to secure the abolishment of the liquor traffic. The principles and ideals 
which govern his life are found in the teachings of the Methodist Episcopal church, of 
which he has been a member since he was thirteen years of age. For years he has been 
an active worker in the church and Sunday-school and he is seeking constantly to advance 
the interests of religion. Fraternally he belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America, 
being a charter member of Abraham Lincoln Camp, at Moline, Illinois, and he is also a 
charter member of R. H. Graham Post, No. 313, G. A. R., of Moline, in which he has filled 
the offices of quartermaster, chaplain, adjutant, junior vice commander, senior vice com- 
mander and commander. All who have been brought in contact with him acknowledge the 



134 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

yenuiue worth of his character and hold him in unqualified respect, and he has made and 
retained many warm personal friends. 

ilr. Mclveever was married on the 23d of December, 1ST3, at Conotton, Ohio, to iliss 
Laura Holmes, a daughter of John M. and Emily S. Holmes, of that place. Her father 
was an active anti-slavery republican and an intimate friend and supporter of John A. 
Bingham. His wife, who was a Quaker and as strongly opposed to slavery as he, was a 
cousin of Edwin M. Stanton, secretary of war. A man of initiative and sound judgment, 
Jlr. Holmes was one of the first to introduce Merino sheep into eastern Ohio, proving that 
they could be profitably raised in that section. To Mr. and Mrs. McKeever were born three 
children: John Herbert, who married Miss Maude Bradfield, of Barnesville, Ohio, and a 
sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work; Blanche, the wife of Dr. William Lewis 
Judkins, of Barnesville; and Emily R., who married William C. Bartlett, of Peoria, Illinois. 
The wife and mother passed away March IS, 1909, and on the 13th of September, 1913, at 
Kochelle, Illinois, Mr. McKeever married Miss Florence Stratford, of that place. 



SILAS ELLSWORTH MORRIS. 

Honored and respected by all, there is no man who occupies a more enviable position in 
financial and business circles in Mitchell and South Dakota than does Silas Ellsworth Morris, 
not alone by reason of the success he has achieved, but also because of the straightforward 
business policy and progressive methods which he has followed. He was born in Mount Car- 
roll, Illinois, November 37, 1861, and is a son of Joseph P. and Jemina (Barrett) Morris, 
both of whom were natives of Dayton, Ohio. The mother resided in that state to the time 
of her marriage but in his boyhood days Joseph P. Morris accompanied his parents on their 
removal to Wisconsin, where he was reared. In early married life he left that state and 
removed to a farm near Mount Carroll, Illinois, where both he and his wife spent their 
remaining days. 

Silas Ellsworth Morris is the eldest son and third in order of birth in a family of six 
children. He spent his youthful days upon the home farm, during which period he became 
familiar with the best methods of tilling the soil and caring for the crops, for his time was 
divided between the labors of the fields and the duties of the schoolroom. He was educated 
in the Northern Illinois College at Fulton, Illinois, and was giaduated in 1882. He taught 
school until 1SS4 and then turned from professional to commercial pursuits, entering the 
clothing business at Darlington, Wisconsin. In June, 1886, he became identified with bank- 
ing interests at Doland, South Dakota, where he was made cashier of the First National Bank. 
Since that time he has been an important factor in financial circles of this state and has made 
continuous progress, his efforts reaching out along constantly broadening lines of thought and 
of usefulness. In 1895 he accepted the presidency of the Merchants' Bank at Redfield, South 
Dakota, and in February, 1906, purchased a controlling interest in the stock of the Western 
National Bank of Mitchell of which he became president. He has been actively identified with 
the banking business for twenty-nine years, is now president of four different banks and a 
director in twelve others. It seems that every phase of the business is thoroughly familiar 
to him and his understanding of the rules and laws that govern banking is comprehensive 
and exact, enabling him to readily solve intricate and involved financial problems. He is also 
greatly interested in farm lands and in stock raising and feeding. He is an officer in many 
corporations and is greatly interested in the Dakota Improved Seed Company of Mitchell 
which furnishes seeds of excellent quality to farmers, employing an expert to test the seeds 
which they send out. 

While the business success of Mr. Morris would alone entitle him to mention as one 
of the representative citizens of South Dakota, there are other lines of activity which make 
him equally entitled to prominence and distinction. He stands for all that is progressive 
in the public life of the community and indorses every measure that promises to promote 
civic virtue and civic pride. He is a stalwart champion of the cause of education and an 
earnest worker in behalf of moral progress. For the last six years he has been a member 
of the board of education of Mitchell, and he is now president of the board of trustees 
of the Dakota Wesleyan University at Mitchell. For many years he was chairman of the 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 135 

official board of the Methodist Episcopal church of Mitchell, which is the largest in the state, 
three times he was sent to the general conference from the state and he was the first sec- 
retary of the Layman Association of the Dakota Conference. He is likewise a member of 
the national committee of the layman's mission movement and his work in behalf of the 
church has been far-reaching and effective. He has made liberal donations of time and 
money in the interests of the university at Mitchell and has been a generous contributor 
to the endowment fund. 

In 1884 Mr. Morris was united in marriage to Miss Estella May Hall of Fulton, 
Whiteside county, Illinois, who is prominent in the church work and in several ladies' 
organizations. Mr and Mrs. Morris have four children: Florence, who is the wife of 
Howard Kingsbury of Hartford, South Dakota ; Le Roy Hall, who is married and is assistant 
cashier of the Western National Bank of Mitchell; Stanley E., who is married and is assist- 
ant cashier of the State Bank at F'ulton, South Dakota; and Whitney, who is a student in 
the military college at Faribault, Minnesota. 

Mr. Morris always gives his political allegiance to the republican party and has ever 
kept well informed on the questions and issues of the day. His fraternal relations are 
with the Benevolent Protective Order of EUcs and with the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen. Progress and patriotism might well be termed the keynote of his character, 
having been the guiding forces in his life. He has never hesitated to take a forward step 
where the way has seemed open and his eiiti-rpi ise and even-paced energy have carried him 
into important relations. At the same time he has never neglected the higher and holier 
duties of life, thus maintaining an even balance with his business activities. 



DENNIS CLIFFORD. 



South Dakota has proven a splendid agricultural state. Its undulating lands are rich 
and productive, responding readily to the care and labor bestowed upon them by the agricul- 
turist. Among those who are winning success in the tilling of the soil in Spink county is 
Dennis Clifford, who owns a farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Three Rivers township, 
which he is now improving. Upon this place he has lived since 1880, in which year he came 
to South Dakota from Watertown, Wisconsin. It was in the Badger state that he was 
born, his birth occurring at Neenah, Wisconsin, on the 9th of October, 1S57, his parents 
being Patrick and Julia (Fleming) Clifford. While the name seems to be English the 
family on both sides is of Irish ancestry. The father, who was born in Ireland but came to 
the ITnited States as a young man, died while serving his adopted country in the Civil war. 
His wife, who was born in County Kerry, Ireland, near the Lakes of Killarney but came to 
tlic new world when sixteen years old, long survived him, passing away July 3, 1910, and 
lies buried in Redfield, South Dakota. 

Dennis Clifford was a public-school pupil during that period which he devoted to mas- 
tering the branches of learning that are regarded as essential to advancement and success 
in later life. He worked for others through the summer months, beginning as soon as he 
was large enough to be of value around a farm and after completing his schooling he con- 
tinued to engage in farm work. On coming to South Dakota he took up a tree claim and 
later a homestead, on which he is living today. Not a furrow had been turned or an im- 
jirovement made when the place came into his possession, but he was not afraid of hard work 
and did not hesitate to undertake the task of breaking the sod and converting the wild 
prairie into jn-oductive fields. The work of plowing, harrowing and planting was at once 
undertaken and in due course of time he gathered good harvests. Year by year he brought 
still more of the farm under cultivation and he now employs the most modern methods in the 
production of splendid crops of wheat and corn and also in the raising of stock of all kinds. 
He has made a study of his business and so conducts his work that splendid results obtain. 

At Sioux Falls, on January 3, 1908, Mr. Clifford was united in marriage to Miss Margaret 
Brennan, a daughter of John and Mary A. (Burns) Brennan, of Janesville, Wisconsin, both 
now deceased, their remains being interred in a cemetery at Janesville. Mr. and Mrs. 
Clifford have two children, Margaret F. and Mary Josephine. Theirs is a pleasant home, 
wliich was erected by Mr. Clifford, and in fact all of the improvements upon the property 



136 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

liave been made by him. He adlieres to tlie Catholic faith and in politics votes independently, 
suppoiting men and measures rather than party. A residence of thirty-five years in Spink 
county has made him largely familiar with its history, for when he took up his abode there 
the work of progress and development seemed scarcely begun. He has since borne his part 
in liringing about the changes which have made it one of the progressive and highly devel- 
oped counties of the state. 



JOEL MARSH. 



•Joel Marsh, a Sanborn county pioneer and the owner of the Standard Stock Farm, 
was born in Grundy county, Illinois, November 6, 1S50, a son of William B. and Hannah 
Marsh. The parents were natives of Ohio and about 1840 removed westward to Illinois. 
In their family were five children. 

.Joel Marsh was the third in order of birth and was educated in the district schools 
and remained upon the home farm until he reached his twenty-first year, when he engaged 
in farming on his own account in his native state. There he remained in active business 
for about a decade, and in 1883 came to Dakota territory, where he took up a homestead 
and later acquired an additional quarter section. His three hundred and twenty acre 
farm is devoted to the production of diversified crops and annually he gathers golden 
harvests as the reward for the care and labor which he bestows upon the fields. He is 
also well known as a breeder of Percheron horses and shorthorn cattle, and from this 
branch of his business derives a gratifying annual income. 

On the 17th of January, 1878, Mr. Marsh was united in marriage to Miss Oral Louise 
Cragg, who died in 1893, leaving two children: Louis B., who has the active managemejit 
of the homestead farm; and William Arthur, who is now a ranchman of Meade county. 
South Dakota. The former married Emma R. West and has two children, George A. and 
Milton N. 

In his political views Mr. Marsh has always lieeu a republican where national issues 
are involved, but casts an independent ballot at local elections. For more than twenty 
years he has served as a member of the township board and his influence is always on the 
side of advancement and improvement. He belongs to the Methodist church and in various 
ways contributes to the county's advancement along material, intellectual, social and moral 
lines. He is a representative of the most progressive type of citizenship, belonging to that 
class of men who have been active in developing good roads, improving public schools and 
supporting all other progressive movements. He experienced the struggles and hardships 
of pioneer days, coming to the county before the building of railways, and, in fact, he was 
largely instrumental in securing the establishment of the railway through this point and 
helped to grade the road between Letcher and Woonsocket. At the time of his arrival 
his nearest market was at Letcher, twelve miles distant. He did not quail at the condi- 
tions which pioneer life imposes, however, but with resolute purpose set to work to estab- 
lish a home and win success, and his prosperity is due to good business management and 
the utilization of modern methods. 



GEORGE L. HICKMAN, M. D. 

Dr. George L. Hickman, engaged in the practice of medicine and surgery in Bryant, was 
well qualified for his chosen calling by thorough collegiate training and keeps in touch with 
the trend of modern thought by further reading and study. He was born in Galena, Illinois, 
on the 7th of January, 1S79, and is a son of George and Roxanna (Howe) Hickman, the 
former a native of Rothenburg, Germany, and the latter of Pennsylvania. The father came 
to the United States with his parents when a child of six years, the family home being estab- 
lished in EuflFalo. New York, whence a removal was subsequently made to Illinois. In the 
nu'antime Roxanna Howe had become a resident of that state, accompanying her parents to 
the middle west, and in Illinois she became the wife of George Hickman. In 1881 they arrived 











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DR. (;l-:ORGE L. HT(K.MA> 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 139 

in South Dakota and since that time have been residents at various periods of Brown, 
Marsliall and McPherson counties, but for a quarter of a century have lived in the last named. 
Mr. Hickman's active life has been devoted almost entirely to educational work and he was 
one of the first county superintendents of schools of Marshall county, where he also served 
as probate judge. For twelve years he has served at different times as county superintendent 
of schools of McPherson county, being now the incumbent in that office. In the fall of 1889 
he was elected to represent his district in the state legislature, serving for one term. He- 
is one of the foremost citizens of McPherson county, his influence has been a potent element 
for progress along material, political and educational lines, and his opinions bear the stamp 
of close reasoning and of honorable purpose. His wife passed away on the 16th of July, 1912, 
to the deep regret of many. 

Dr. Hickman had excellent home training as a guide to character building. After master- 
ing the elementary branches of learning taught in the public scIhkjIs lie attfUilnl tlic l!;itli 
high school, from which he was graduated with the class of I'jn l . Sulisicim/nt ly hr hcranu' 
a student in the Dakota University at Mitchell and also attendr.l Ihc' Alin ilccii State .Nm mal. 
For some years he gave his attention to educational work, teaching his lirst sclinol in 
McPherson county in 1898. He abandoned that profession, however, in 1905 and entered upon 
the study of medicine. In the fall of that year he matriculated in the Keokuk Medical 
College at Keokuk, Iowa, where he remained as a student for three years. He then completed 
his course in the College of Physicians and Surgeons, the medical department of the Uni- 
versity of Illinois, at Chicago, and was graduated therefrom with the class of 1909. In the 
following January ho located at Wentworth, South Dakota, where he was in successful 
practice for three and a half years. In July, 1913, he came to Bryant and in the short space 
of one year has built up a lucrative practice, his ability enabling him to cope with many of 
the intricate and involved problems which continually confront the physician. 

On the 30th of June, 1909, Dr. Hickman was married to Miss Marie Dawson, of Farming- 
ton, low-a, and to them have been born two children, a son and daughter. Elwood L. and 
Leona M. Tlie parents are members of the Congregational church and Dr. TTickinan l..'luiigs 
to Bryant Lodge, No. 105, I. 0. O. F., to the INIodern Woodmen of America ami tl.r ^ .miiikii, 
while along strictly professional lines his connection is with the Watertown Disliirt .Mi^lical 
Society and the South Dakota Medical Society. He has ever been cognizant of the fact that 
success depends upon the individual and that he who does not advance cannot even stand 
still but must retrograde. Accordingly he has improved his opportunities to keep informed 
concerning the progressive thought of the profession in its scientilic investigations and 
researches and has thus kept his ability up to par. 



HENRY ALLEN PIKE. 



The demise of Henry Allen Pike, of Tyndall, was not only an occasion of much 
sorrow to his family and personal friends, but was also a matter of deep regret in tin- 
journalistic circles of the state, as he had been for years one of the prominent editors of 
South Dakota. He was a descendant of an old and well known New England family, his 
grandmother being a cousin of Ethan Allen of Ticonderoga fame. The subject of this 
review was born in the state of New York, but when he was but a lad his parents moved 
to Iowa and he early learned the printer's trade in that state. At the age of seventeen 
he became an editor, and from that time xintil his death, which occurred in 1912, he never 
vacated the editorial chair. In 1888 he came to Tyndall, Bon Homme county, Dakota terri- 
tory, and purchased the Register, from Bradford & Richmond. He made this paper an 
organ of the democratic party and it became one of the influential journals of this section 
of the state. His editorials were not only potent forces in advancing the cause of the demo- 
cratic party, but they were also important factors in the promotion of many movements 
for the community welfare of Tyndall. Tiie news columns gave to subscribers of the paper 
reliable accounts of current happenings in the locality and al>i> in the world at large, while 
the wide circulation of the Register made it an excellent advertising medium. In Cleve- 
land's second term Mr. Pike was appointed postmaster of Tyndall and held the office for 
four years. While still a resident of Iowa, in connection Avitli his journalistic work he 



140 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

served as superintendent of schools for Palo Alto county and throughout his life nianifestcil 
u deep interest in everything pertaining to educational advancement. He was also promi- 
nent in Iowa in the councils of the democratic party, and was for several terms chairman 
of the state cential committee, in addition to serving as delegate to many county and 
state conventions. His fraternal allegiance was given to the Masonic order, his membership 
being in the lodge at Tyndall. 

Mr. Pike was married June 4, 1895, to Miss Mary Cullen, a native of Cedar county, 
Nebraska, and a daughter of Martin and Catherine (Sullivan) Cullen, natives of County 
Wexford and County Waterford, Ireland, respectively. They were among the early settlers 
of Cedar county, but since the death of his wife Mr. Cullen has made his home with a son, 
W. V. Cullen, who resides in Lyman county, South Dakota. A son, Stillman, was born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Pike November 26, 1896. From the time of her marriage the latter has taken 
a lively interest in journalism and, as she learned all the details of the printer's art thor- 
oughly, she is well qualified to publish the Register. She has continued its publication since 
the demise of her husband in 1912 and edits the paper as well as oversees its printing. 
She has maintained the high standard set by Mr. Pike, and not only is the paper an 
excellent purveyor of news, but it is also a stanch and effective advocate of democratic 
principles. She is a Presbyterian in her religious belief and takes an active interest in 
the work of that church. After the blizzard of January 12, 1888, which left so much 
death and destruction in its wake, the remains of nineteen who had perished in the storm 
were laid out in the office of Mr. Pike. Over on the south side of the river Mr. Cullen, 
father of Mrs. Pike, made his way to the sohoolhouse through the blinding and suffocating 
storm and took the teacher and four children home with him and kept them throughout 
the night. Mr. Pike did a great deal to advance the material and moral welfare of his 
county, and the results of his well spent life are increasingly apparent, even though he 
himself has passed to his reward. His memory is held in high honor by all who were privi- 
leged to call him friend. 



EDWIN JI. HARPER. 



Grant county is fortunate in having as its auditor Edwin M. Harper, a man of unques- 
tioned ability and integrity and one who understood fully the details of the work of the 
office when elected to the position, as he had previously served as deputy auditor. He was 
born in Chautauqua county. New York, March 17, 1853, a son of William and Desdemona 
(Mitchell) Harper. His paternal grandfather, Hugh Harper, was born in Ireland but emi- 
grated to the United States, settling in New York, where he lived until called by death. 
William Harper, who was born on the Emerald Isle in 1819, came to the United States when 
a youth of sixteen years and for some time resided in New Y'ork. In 1856 he removed to 
Minnesota, where he homesteaded land. He followed agricultural pursuits throughout his 
life and gained considerable success. He passed away in December, 1895, in the faith of 
the Seventh Day Adventist church, although he had belonged to the Baptist church in his 
early life. His political belief was that of the republican party and he was elected to a 
number of local offices. His wife, who was born in New York state in 1822, died in June, 
1858. She was a member of the Baptist church. 

Edwin M. Harper was educated in the schools of Spring Valley, Minnesota, and in 1876 
was graduated from the high school. He taught for three years in Minnesota but in 1882 
came to South Dakota and entered a claim in Brown county, continuing to reside thereon 
until 1892. That year witnessed his arrival in Grant county and he purchased a farm 
which he still owns and the operation of which he supervises. From 1905 to 1911 he engaged 
in the grain business in Twin Brooks and later he was for four years deputy county auditor. 
In 1914 he was elected county auditor on the republican ticket and is now devoting his 
time to the discharge of his official duties. His previous service as deputy well qualified 
him to fill the office of auditor and he is prompt and accurate in the performance of the 
duties devolving upon him. His service is proving very satisfactory to his constituents 
and he is popular throughout the county. 

In February, 1882, Mr. Harper married Miss Mary Sweet, a daughter of Dempster 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 141 

Sweet, of New York. She passed away in 1885, leaving a son, William, who is now farming 
in North Dakota. In 1887 Jlr. Harper married Miss Mabel Tower, daughter of David Tower, 
a native of Canada. To this union have been born two children: Edwin M., who is in a 
bakery in Milbank; and Mary H., at home. 

Mr. Harper is a stalwart republican in his political belief and does all in his power to 
further the success of his party. Fraternally he is a Mason, belonging to the blue lodge 
and Royal Arch chapter, and both he and his wife are identified with the Order of the 
Eastern Star. He is now serving as senior deacon in the lodge. His identification with 
Masonry and his membership in the Methodist Episcopal church indicate the high moral 
principles which govern his life and which have gained him the confidence and respect of all 
who have been brought into contact with him. 



JOHN McGOWAN. 



John McGowan is the efficient postmaster at Hartford, coming to this position after 
many years' service in connection with railroads. He was born in Pennsylvania on the 5th 
of August, 1859, and is a son of Patrick and Catherine McGowan. The mother has passed 
away, but the father is still living at the age of eighty-nine years. He was formerly engaged 
in railroading and farming. The son pursued his education in the public schools of the 
Keystone state and made his initial step in the business world in connection with mining, 
which he followed for four years. He was engaged in railroading for thirty-three years, 
assisting in building the Omaha Railroad in 1888, after which he was continuously in the 
employ of the railroad until August, 1913. In that connection he was advanced in recognition 
of his faithfulness and capability and when he resigned he was track foreman. Mr. McGowan 
was appointed postmaster on the 1st of August, 1913, and left the railroad service to assume 
the duties of that position, in which he has since continued, carefully and systematically 
directing the work that falls to his lot. 

In November, 1889, Mr. McGowan was married to Miss Emelia Halm, a daughter of 
Ferdinand Hahn, and their children are Mrs. Emelia C. Kiens, Mrs. Charlotte Ebersviller and 
Morton, who is at home. The religious faith of the familj* is that of the Catholic church 
and the political belief of Mr. McGowan is that of the democratic party. He belongs to the 
Odd Fellows Society, to the Modern Woodmen and to the Ancient Order of United Workmen 
and in those lodges has many warm friends. He has resided continuously in South Dakota 
since 1879, when he came with his father and mother to this state and through the interim 
to the present he has led a busy, industrious and useful life, winning the respect of those 
with whom he has been associated, while the experience gained has well prepared him for 
the responsible official duties that now devolve upon him. 



JOHN 0. STRAND. 



John 0. Strand is conducting an abstract office in Howard and has won a reputation 
for accurate and thorough work in that connection. He has also been closely identified with 
public affairs, having held a number of local offices. He was born in Norway, on the 1st 
of February, 1858, a son of T. 0. Strand, whose birth occurred in Norway on the 25th of 
March, 1824. The mother, likewise a native of the land of the midnight sun, was in her 
maidenhood Bergit Ashland. The parents came to De Kalb county, Illinois, in 1861 and 
remained there upon a farm for five years, subsequently removing to Freeborn county, 
Minnesota, where they continued to reside for fifteen years. In 1881 they came to Miner 
county. South Dakota, and homesteaded land. The father passed away upon his farm in 
Miner county, January 14, 1889, and his demise was much regretted by his many friends 
and neighbors. 

John 0. Strand completed the course in the common schools of Freeborn county, Min- 
nesota, and attended the Augsburg Seminary in Minneapolis, Minnesota, from 1878 until 
1881. He subsequently took up a homestead in Miner county in his own name and remained 



142 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

upon tlic farm until 1888, when he was elected county treasurer and held the office for two 
years. When his term exi)ired he engaged in mercantile business at Carthage, continuing 
in that line for eight years. At the end of that time his business was destroyed by fire 
and, as lie was appointed clerk of the commissioners court of the public land office, he did 
not continue his mercantile enterprise. He held the office to which he was appointed for 
two years, making his residence during that time in Pierre. After resigning the position 
he opened an abstract office in Howard and has since devoted his time to its conduct. He has 
a large clientage and his abstracts are all prepared with great care so that they are in fact 
an accurate record of all transactions recorded alfecting the property concerned. He has had 
some banking experience, as he was cashier of the Merchants Bank at Carthage for two 
years, proving himself an efficient and popular official. 

Mr. Strand was married June 25, 1896, to Miss Lilly Johnson, a daughter of Bernt 
Johnson. Seven children have been born to this union as follows: Tansea J., whose birtli 
occurred January 7, 1898; Agnes B., who was born March 26, 1899; John R., May 36, 1901; 
Lllah, January 4, 1903; Norman V., September, 1908; Vivian E., whose birth occurred in 
February, 1910; and Fern Iris, who was born November 11, 1912. The children are all 
attending the public and high schools of Howard. Mr. Strand is a prominent member of 
the Lutheran church, of which he is a trustee and also superintendent of the Sunday-school. 
His political allegiance is given to the republican party and he is now serving his secoiul 
terra as alderman. FratenHlly he is a Mason and has many friends in that organization 
and in the community at large. 



MURRAY W. \Vi:STFALL. 



For sixteen consecutive years JIurray W. Westfall of Watertown has been one of the 
county commissioners of Codington county and is the only man who has been thus honored, 
for no other commissioner has been continued for so long a period in the office. In former 
years he was actively engaged in farming in this part of the state but is now largely living 
retired from business cares. 

He was born in Iowa City, Iowa, on the 16th of December, 1846, a son of the Rev. I. M. 
and Amanda Westfall. His father engaged in preaching in Iowa City when it was the capital 
of the territory of Iowa. He was a member of the Universalist church and took an active 
part in promoting that doctrine in the middle west in pioneer times. He afterward became 
a physician and continued actively in the practice of medicine for twenty- five years. In 
1861 he had removed to Rochester, Minnesota, where he resided until 1880, when the family 
came to South Dakota and Dr. W^estfall secured a homestead. He was a most dignified, 
courteous and kindly gentleman, well worthy the honor and high regard which were every- 
where accorded him. 

Murray W. Westfall came with the family to South Dakota and he, too, secured a 
homestead, which he located on section 24, Oxford township, Hamlin county, while his father's 
claim was in Codington county. Dr. Westfall in addition to directing the development of 
his place also engaged in the practice of medicine in Watertown, and there passed away in 
1889, while his wife died in the year 1888. Dr. Westfall was a man of prominence in the 
different communities in which he lived and was made a delegate to the constitutional con- 
vention of South Dakota, which met at Sioux Falls. His ability as a medical practitioner 
and his influence on the side of moral progress also made him a factor in the upbuilding of 
his city and state. 

Murray W. Westfall was educated in the public schools but because of delicate health 
liis opportunities in that direction were somewhat limited. He was twenty-one years of 
age when he began farming on his own account in Minnesota, where he followed that occupa- 
tion for about fifteen years, and then came to South Dakota, as previously stated, in 1880. 
In addition to securing a homestead he also obtained a tree claim and bent every energy 
toward bringing the land under cultivation and transforming it into richly productive fields. 
He remained upon the farm for seven years but about 188T removed to Watertown. He 
now owns and rents his father's old homestead and through the careful and economical man- 




MRS. ilURRAY W. WESTFALL 




MIKRAY W. WKSTl-A 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA lil 

agement of his business interests, his close application and his industry has won a substantial 
measure of success. 

On the 21st of December, 1867, Mr. Westfall was united in marriage to Miss Adele 
Clough, a daughter of Charles and Adaline Clough, both of whom have passed away. Mr. 
and Mrs. Westfall have no children of their own, but adopted a boy, Claude C, now thirty- 
tive years of age, upon whom they have bestowed every care and attention. He is now in 
Krem, North Dakota. 

Mr. Westfall holds membership with the Elks. He gives his political allegiance to the 
republican party, which he has supported since age conferred upon him the right of franchise. 
For one term he served as a member of the city council of Wateitown and in 1898 he was 
elected county commissioner, which position he has since filled through reelection for sixteen 
consecutive years, having the honor of being the oldest member of the county board in years 
of continuous service. He likewise held township offices in Hamlin county and for three 
years was a member of the school board of Watertown. He is deeply interested in the 
upbuilding of his city and is enthusiastic in his advocacy of South Dakota. In Watertown 
and throughout Codington county he is widely known, and both he and his wife have a large 
circle of warm friends. 



MOSES FANTLE. 



lew men are more prominent or more widely known in the enterprising city of Yank- 
ton than Moses Fantle who, as a member of tlie firm of Fantle Brothers, has been an import- 
ant factor in business circles and his prosperity is well deserved. Mr. Fantle was born in 
Ann Arbor, Michigan, March 8, 1874, a son of Charles and Regina (Gregor) Fantle, both of 
whom were natives of Austria. The father came as a lad to the United States and making 
his way to Ann Arbor, Michigan, there made his home with relatives, while the mother was 
likewise brought to this country in her childhood days. The father grew to manhood in Ann 
Arbor and in early life engaged in merchandising, conducting an establishment of that 
character there for thirty-five years. In 1884 the family removed to St. Paul and in that 
city the father engaged in business with his two sons, his death occurring there in 1908, 
when he had reached the ripe old age of seventy-nine years. The mother still survives, 
making her home in St. Paul. The four sons of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Fantle are: Charles 
and Samuel, who are engaged in merchandising in Sioux Falls, South Dakota; and William 
and Moses, engaged in a similar enterprise in Yankton. 

Moses Fantle was a little lad of ten years at the time the family removed from Ann 
Arbor to St. Paul, so that his education was mainly acquired in the public schools of the 
latter city, and in the high school, from which he was graduated in 1893. Immediately 
thereafter he came to Yankton to engage in the mercantile business with his brother Wil- 
liam and has since been connected with this enterprise, the brothers doing business under 
the firm style of Fantle Brothers. As the years have passed the business has grown and 
today they occupy a building three stories in height, with basement, and this is considered 
one of the best mercantile establishments in the state of South Dakota. The brothers have 
made a deep study of the needs and demands of the public. They carry a large and care- 
fully selected line of goods, which they sell at right prices, and this, in connection with 
tlieir just treatment of patrons, constitutes the basis of their success. 

In addition to his otlier interests Mr. Fantle is connected with banking, being a director 
in the Dakota National Bank. 

On the 17th of November, 1909, Mr. Fantle was united in marriage to Miss Carrie S. 
Freud, a daughter of Leopold and Hannah (Sittig) Freud, of Detroit, Michigan, in which 
city the father is a capitalist and real-estate operator, and who for many years had important 
mining interests in northern Michigan. The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Fantle has been 
blessed with an interesting little daughter, Regine. 

Mr. Fantle gives his political support to the republican party. He is prominent in 
Masonic circles, having attained the thirty-second degree in that order and he also belongs 
to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He likewise holds membership relations with 
the Noon Day and the Commercial Clubs. He seeks rest and recreation from business cares 



148 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

in out door sports. He has ever been a busy man and has been largely instrumental 
building up one of the largest mercantile establishments in the state which stands as 
tribute to the business genius of two of Yankton's youngest merchants. 



REV. GEORGE MAcCONNACfflE. 

Rev. George MacConnaehie, pastor of St. Bernard's Catholic church at Redfield, where 
he took up his abode on the 1st of October, 1900, came from Edinburgh, Scotland, and is a 
native of Banffshire, Scotland, born February 16, 1875. His parents were John and Jessie 
(MacDonald) MacConnaehie, who spent their entire lives in the land of hills and heather. 
The father conducted an extensive distillery business in Scotland and was a prominent 
citizen of that part of the country in which lie lived. It is said, moreover, that his name is 
frequently on the lips of every ohl sett hi in the eastern part of the country. He passed 
away in 1887, while his wife survived until 1888. 

At the usual age George JlacConnachie began his education in the schools of Scotland, 
which he attended until he reached his fourteenth year. He then entered Blair's National 
College of Scotland, in which he spent five years, after which he became a student in the 
Royal Scotch College at Valladolid, Spam, where lie remained for seven years. He was then 
ordained to the priesthood in Spain, after whiili he n-tuiind to Scotland, where he remained 
for six months. He left that country for America un tlie 24th of March, 1900, and, making 
his way into the interior of the countr}', settled at Redfield in October, taking up his work 
as pastor of St. Bernard's Catholic church. His efforts here have resulted beneficially to 
the parish. He has erected the parish house which he now occupies and in 1909 he was 
instrumental in building St. Bernard's church. Every rock in the church was blasted by 
him. The church is an attractive edifice and stands as a monument to Father MacCon- 
nachie's devotion to the cause. Moreover in the fifteen years of his connection with the 
church he has never missed a service. He enjoys fishing and hunting but the only recre- 
ation he has are trips of a few hours around Redfield. He relates many amusing experiences 
of his boyhood in the hills of Scotland, has "the saving sense of humor" and is a most 
interesting talker, but at all times his priestly duties are his first thought. 



THOMAS W. DELICATE. 



Thomas W. Delicate, who is president of the Custer County Bank of Custer and is 
also identified with other interests- in that county, was born in Johnson county, Illinois, 
on the 2d of July, 1867, the second of six children whose parents were Henry and Harriet 
(Bunney) Delicate, both natives of England, where they were reared and married. They 
settled in Illinois upon emigrating to the United States and the father, who was a Methodist 
minister, held a number of offices in that state, where he continued to reside until his 
death, which occurred in March, 1881, when he had reached the age of fifty-two years. 
His widow survived for over two decades, dying on the 22d of November, 1902. 

Thomas W. Delicate attended school in his native county and later became a student 
in the high school at Nebraska City, Nebraska. When about sixteen years of age he 
found employment as clerk in a grocery store but continued to attend school, working out- 
side of school hours. After spending about two years in this way he removed with his 
mother to Nebraska City and attended high school there for one winter, after which he 
entered the employ of the Otoe County National Bank at that place and remained in that 
connection for three years. On the 30th of March. 1890, he removed to the Black Hills 
and in April of that year was instrumental in organizing the Custer County Bank and 
became its assistant cashier, the original charter being dated about April 1, 1890. After 
serving faithfully as assistant cashier for a number of years and demonstrating his ability 
to direct the policy of the institution he was made cashier and in Januarj', 1910, he was 
elected president of the institution. He has since continued in that capacity and is ranked 
among the judicious and able financiers of his county. He is also secretary and treasurer 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 149 

of the Custer Electric Light, Heating & Power Company, treasurer of the Eldorado Mutual 
Telephone Company and of the Custer Mutal Telephone Company. Since taking up his 
residence in Custer lie has also found time to engage in the insurance business, handling 
botli fire and life insurance and representing some of the best old line companies. 

.Air. Delicate was married May 15, 1894, to Miss Pearl Maple, a native of Illinois and 
a daugliter of Dr. .1. B. Maple, whose birth occurred in Jefferson county, Ohio, on the Ttli 
of February, 1836. His parents, William R. and Nancy (Maple) Maple, were both born in 
Ohio, the father in 1800 and the mother in 1801. William E. Maple was a farmer by 
occupation and passed away in November, 1856, having survived his wife since September, 
1854. They were the parents of nine children, of whom Dr. Maple was the fifth. After 
attending the district schools he became a student in the Mount Vernon Boarding School 
and subsequently attended t!ie Ohio Wesleyan University at Delaware, Ohio, for three 
years. He began his preparation for the medical profession there and subsequently entered 
the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, where he attended tlie first course of medical 
lectures given in that institution. In 1877 he went to St. Louis and entered the Missouri 
Medical College, wliich conferred upon him the degree of M. D. in 1878. After practicing 
in Martinsburg, Illinois, for three years he went to Stonington, that state, where he 
remained for about ten years. He next removed to Sidney, Nebraska, and three years 
later went to Benkclninii. Nebraska, where he remained for nine years. In July, 1891, he 
became a resident of ( ustcr. South Dakota, where he died March 25, 1915. He was twice 
married, his first union tieing with Miss Libbie McWhinney, a native of Illinois, who died 
in 1878. She had three cliildren: Fannie, who died when four months old; Pearl, now Mrs. 
Dtlicate; and Dollie, now Mrs. Ward B. Clarke, of Chicago. For his second wife Dr. Maple 
wedded Mrs. Rebecca A. Zook, a native of Indiana, by whom he has a son, J. Boyce, born 
in 1896 and now engaged in fruit growing in California. By her first marriage Mrs. Maple 
«as the mother of three children. Dr. Maple was a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
cluirdi and fraternally was connected with the Owls and the Grand Army of the Republic. 
In June, 1862, he enlisted in Company C, Eighty-sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and was 
made corporal. Most of the time of his enlistment he was acting hospital steward. His 
political allegiance was given to the democratic party and while living at Sidney, Nebraska, 
he was medical examiner for the pension office. He was also superintendent of the board 
of health of Custer county for many years. 

Mr. and Mrs. Delicate have two sons: Gerald B., whose birtli occurred on the 17th 
of July, 1895, and who is attending Evanston Academy at I'^ar.stoii, lllin.iis; ami Denis A., 
born October 21, 1901. attending the public scliools of Cliiiau". Mi-. Dcliratr resides in 
tliat city during the school year in order tliat the children may havi' the excellent advantages 
there offered. 

Mr. Delicate is a republican, has served as treasurer of Custer and is now treasurer 
of tlie board of education. Fraternally he is quite well known as he is at present worthy 
master of Custer City Lodge, No. 66, A. F. &. A. M., and is a tliirty-second degree Mason, 
belonging to Black Hills Consistory. No. 3. In liis life he exemplifies the high moral 
principles that are the foundation of the order. Moreover, he holds membership in Custer 
Lodge, No. 131, I. O. 0. F., in which he has filled all of the ulliii'S. and the local camp of 
the Modern Woodmen of America. The Congregational ilniicli finds in him a loyal and 
consistent member and there is no organization nor iiinviiihiit that has as its object the 
welfare of the community that does not profit by his cooperation and support. 



J. A. EOTT, M. D. 

Although Dr. J. A. Rott has been located in practice in Big Stone City for only two 
years, yet he has gained a large practice and stands well in the community which he has 
elected to make his home. He had the advantage of study in the old world, for he was 
born in Vienna, Austria, September 6, 1849, a son of Charles and Caroline (Wiesinger) Rott, 
wlio were likewise natives of Vienna and there spent their entire lives. The father was 
born in 1808, while the mother was six years his junior, her birth having occurred in 1814. 
Tliey were married in 1840 and became the parents of nine children, the son J. A. being the 



150 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

sixth in order of birth. The father acquired his education in Prague and received the LL. D. 
degree, after which he practiced as an attorney and also was chief justice. He became a 
well read man and gained a competence but through giving financial aid to a friend he lost 
all his means. Both he and his wife were communicants of the Catholic church, in the faith 
of which they died, the former in 1880 and the latter in 1866. 

Dr. J. A. Rott was accorded the best educational advantages that were obtainable in 
the old world. He pursued a course in the University of Austria at Prague, later studied 
in Paris, France, and then at Vienna, where he was graduated in 1872. He then became an 
interne for four years in the General Hospital in Vienna, and for two years was in the 
Maternity Hospital there, while for one year he did work in the Childrens Hospital at that 
place. This gave him a practical knowledge of medicine and surgery, which, added to his 
knowledge gained in colleges, ranked him with the best read men in medicine in his locality. 
For fifteen years he engaged in practice in his native country, and then in 1887, believing 
that better opportunities awaited him in the United States, set sail for the new world. 
Landing in New York city, he there engaged In the practice of his profession during the 
succeeding four years, after which he went to Little Koek, Arkansas, and practiced six 
years. He next spent five years in Conway, that state, after which he spent a short time 
in Pukwana, South Dakota. He then removed to Eureka, where he continued in practice 
six years prior to his removal to Big Stone City, arriving there in 1913. During this brief 
period he has built up a good practice, for the general public recognizes his worth and ability 
and he has become one of the well known practitioners in this part of the state. 

Dr. Rott was married, in 1896, to Miss Ada Francisco, of New York, at Minneapolis, 
Minnesota, the wedding ceremony being performed by Archbishop Ireland. They now have 
one son, Alfred, who is in school. Mrs. Rott is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
In politics the Doctor is independent. In the line of his profession he has a creditable 
military record, for prior to his emigration to the new world he served in the army as a 
surgeon during the years 1878 and 1879. He also keeps in touch with the advance that is 
being made along the line of medicine and surgery through his membership in the Physicians 
and Surgeons Medical Society and the American Association of Progressive Medicine which 
is a society composed of thirty thousand surgeons of high rank throughout the United 
States. He is a man of culture and wide learning and his ability and skill have frequently 
been demonstrated in the successful handling of a number of complex medical problems. 
Although his residence in Big Stone City covers but a brief period he has already gained a 
wide acquaintance there and is highly esteemed not only as a practitioner but as a citizen 
and friend. 



EDGAR LEWIS SISHTH. 



Edgar Lewis Smith, a prominent real-estate dealer of Sioux Falls, who has been closely 
connected with important business interests in the city for over a quarter of a century, was 
born in Cabot Plains, Washington county, Vermont, April 10, 1850. He is a son of Daniel 
and Betsey (Hassom) Smith, the former born in Marshfield, Vermont, in 1816, and the latter 
in 1811. His paternal grandfather, Joshua Smith, was born in 1773, and it is probable that 
he was a native of Connecticut, as was his wife, who was in her maidenhood Miss Keturia 
Loveland. The grandfather passed away in 1857. The parents of our subject are also 
deceased, the father dying in 1893 in Marshfield, Vermont, and the mother in 1881. They had 
eight children, of whom two died in infancy, six grew to maturity and four survive. 

Edgar Lewis Smith acquired his early education in the public schools of Cabot Plains 
and Marshfield, Vermont, and later attended Goddard Seminary at Barre, that state, from 
which institution he was graduated in 1872. He was afterward for some time engaged in 
teaching, following which he bought a small sawmill in Marshfield, operating this until 1884. 
In that year he removed to Sioux Falls, South Dakota, and in 1885 established himself in 
the coal and wood business. Soon afterward he also began dealing in real estate, and this 
branch of his activities grew so rapidly that in 1898 he discontinued the coal and wood 
business. He owns a great deal of valuable property in Sioux Falls, including a business 
block in the heart of the city, and he is known as an expert judge of property values. 




DGAK L. SMITH 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 153 

On the 17th of May, 1S79, in Marshfield, Vermont, Mr. Smith married Miss Viana E. 
Wooster, who died in Sioux Falls in June, 1904, leaving a daughter, Alice C, who is now 
deceased. On the 15th of July, 1908, Mr. Smith was again married, his second wife being 
Miss Nellie B. Jones. 

Mr. Smith was a member of the Vermont St.-ite Militia in his early years; is connected 
fraternally with tlie Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Woodmen of the World; and 
is independent in his political views. His interests have been thoroughly identified with 
those of Sioux Falls for over twenty-five years and his influence has been a tangible force 
for good in the community. 



JUNIUS N. MANLEY. 



Junius N. Manley is the efficient sheriff of Grant county and is also connected with 
business interests of Milbank as the owner of a large livery barn. He was born iu Richland 
county, Wisconsin, September 34, .1865, a son of Joseph and Olive (Salisbury) Manley. His 
paternal grandfather, Durias Manley, was born in Pennsylvania but emigrated to Wis- 
consin, where he was living at the time of his demise. The maternal grandfather, William 
.Salisbury, was a native of New York but became a pioneer settler of Ohio, where his death 
occurred. Joseph Manley was born in Ohio in 1835 and was married in Wisconsin on the 
4th of July, 1859, to Miss Salisbury, who was born in Summit county, Ohio. The father 
followed agricultural pursuits throughout his life and for several years resided in Wis- 
consin, wliere he removed in young manliood. In 1870, however, he went with his family to 
northwestern Iowa, making the journey with an ox-team. He continued to reside in that 
section until called by death. He was a democrat in politics and held a number of minor 
positions of trust. He was a loyal member of the Grand Army of the Republic, being 
eligible to that organization because of his service in the Civil war as a member of the 
Eleventh Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry. 

Junius N. Manley was educated in the country schools of northwestern Iowa and during 
his boyhood and youth assisted his father with the work of the home farm. Upon reaching 
mature years he continued to follow the occupation to which he had been reared and gave 
his attention to farming until 1901, when he removed to Milbank, South Dakota, and became 
the proprietor of a livery business, which he still owns, although he now gives the greater 
part of liis time and attention to his duties as sheriff. Although Grant county is republican 
by about four to one he was elected sheriff by a good majority, which is an eloquent tribute 
to his personal popularity and the confidence which the people of the county have in his 
ability and integrity. He has served in the office but a comparatively short time but has 
already proved his fitness for the position which he fills. 

Mr. Manley was married in 1893 to Miss Minnie Hinz, who was born in Iowa, where 
her marriage occurred. They have two children: Forrest, wlio is serving as deputy sheriff; 
and Lloyd, who is a student in the State University. 

Mr. Manley is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and has served through 
all of the chairs. He has always been active in local political affairs, being one of the 
effective workers in the ranks of tlie democratic partj'. In all that he does he is alert and 
energetic and his enterprise and good business ability are the qualities which have made 
possible his success as he began his independent business career without capital and without 
the aid of influential friends. 



JOSEPH SCHWARTZ, M. D. 

Dr. Joseph Schwartz, physician and surgeon, has carefully prepared for his chosen 
profession and is now not only in private practice but is also acting as physician of the 
state penitentiary at Sioux Falls. Humanity has spoken in reference to the treatment of 
criminals and neglect and abuse have given way to physical and moral care for those who 
hav broken the laws of the land combined with effort to awaken such principles of man- 



154 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

hood as generally tell for good citizenship after liberation. Dr. Schwartz in his professional 
capacity is rendering valuable service to the state and also has a good private practice in 
Sioux Falls. 

He was born in Bern, Switzerland, in 1864, a son of Joseph and Elizabeth (Aebi) 
Schwartz, the former an Austrian by birth. He enjoyed the advantages of good schools in 
his native land, pursuing a high-school course ere coming to the new world. It was in 1883 
that he crossed the Atlantic and established his home in Washington county, Iowa. He 
became a student in the Iowa State University where he pursued the medical course until 
graduated with the class of 1893. Not content with the knowledge thus acquired, he has 
since taken post-graduate work in Vienna and in his native city of Bern and has always 
remained a wide reader of professional literature, thus keeping in touch with the advanced 
thought and methods of the day. Following his graduation in 1893 he located at Hartford, 
South Dakota, where he practiced for fifteen years, or until 1908, when he removed to Sioux 
Falls, where he has now made his home for about seven years. It was not long before he 
secured a good practice there which is further supplemented by his service as physician of 
the state penitentiary. 

On the 11th of September, 1898, in Washington, Iowa, Dr. Schwartz was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Grace Armacost and to them have been born three daughters: Ksther E., 
Isabelle and Margaret. He has attained high rank in Masonry, being a Knight Templar, a 
thirt}'- second degree Scottish Rite Mason and a member of the Mystic Shrine. He is also 
connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, with the Modern Woodmen of 
America, the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Dacotah Club. 

In his political views Dr. Schwartz is a republican of the progressive type. In fact, 
progress may well be termed the keynote of his character, whether in relation to municipal 
or federal government, to his professional duties or to any other vital interest of life. 



HENRY P. WILL. 



Henry P. Will, banker and capitalist, is associated with the Wessington Springs State 
Bank as its vice president. He was born in Clayton county, Iowa, June 12, 1862, a son of 
James Will, a native of Scotland, who came to the United States in 1858. He settled in 
Massachusetts and in 1862 removed to Clayton county, Iowa, where he took up his abode 
upon a farm, to which he devoted his attention for a number of years, but eventually 
removed to Aurelia, Iowa, where his death occurred. His wife, who bore the maiden name 
of Margaret Gay, was a native of Scotland and is also deceased. 

Henry P. Will is the sixth in a family of thirteen children. His educational advan- 
tages were limited to the opportunities aflforded in the district schools and he attended 
those but a comparatively brief time. He remained upon the homestead farm until his 
twenty-second year, and in 1883 he left Iowa on horseback, the horse which he rode being 
almost his sole possession. Traveling northward, he became a resident of Jerauld county, 
Dakota territory, settling on land that is still a part of his extensive ranch properties. 
He was ambitious and industrious, and by judicious management and foresight he has 
added to his original quarter section until he is todaj' the owner of eight thousand acres 
of the finest stock and farm lands to be found in central South Dakota, having large 
holdings in Jerauld, Hand, Harding and Buffalo counties. His business interests along that 
line have been most carefully and systematically managed. He has developed his farm 
according to progressive, modern methods and has raised stock in large numbers. He also 
became interested in the Wessington Springs State Bank in 1907 as a stockholder and 
director and later was chosen vice president. 

On December 24, 1889, Mr. Will was married to Miss Laura A. Hanebuth, a daughter 
of August E. Hanebuth, a pioneer resident of Jerauld county, and to them have been born 
four children, Lester Kyle, Zaida Muriel, Anna Lucile, and Henry Bernard. 

Mr. Will is a republican where national issues are involved, but casts an independent 
local ballot, regarding only the fitness of the candidate for the office which he seeks. His 
religious belief is that of the Methodist church. He is serving as one of the trustees in 
the church in which he has membership, contributes generously to its support and liberally 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 155 

aids in the work of its various charities. He is truly a selt'-inade man, for he came to tliis 
state with no capital save a keen business sense and laudable ambition. He felt that it 
would be a wise course to make investment in farm and ranch lands and he has kept 
adding to his holdings, for he realized the state's possibilities and has done much to 
develop the counties in which his properties lie. His commendable course may well serve 
as an example to others, showing what may be accomplished when energy, industry and 
integrity go hand in hand. 



WALLACE E. PURDY. 



Wallace E. Purdy is the youngest member of the law firm of Hall, Alexander & Purdy, 
one of the strongest firms practicing at the bar of Brookings. He was born in Brooklyn, 
New York, February 3, 1883, his parents being George E. and Rhoda C. (Wallace) Purdy. 
His ancestry in the paternal line can be traced back in the state of New York to the 
eighteenth century. The great-great-grandfather, David Purdy, was born at North Castle, 
New York, in 1791, but of his father the family has no record. The mother's people — the 
Wallaces — came to North America about two generations ago, settling in Canada and 
thence drifting over into the United States, settling in Ohio. The father met and married 
his life's helpmate in Brooklyn, where she was visiting a sister, having gone to that city 
from her home in Cleveland, Oliio. In October, 1889, George E. Purdy came to South 
Dakota and settled in Brookings, where for the past ten years he has been the custodian 
of the buildings at the State College. 

Wallace E. Purdy was a little lad of but six years at the time of the arrival in this 
state. He at once entered the public schools and when he had mastered the course of 
instruction therein taught he entered the South Dakota State College at Brookings. Imme- 
diately following the completion of his studies he took up. the study of law in 1902 in 
the office of Cheever & Cheever, of Brookings, and in October, 1906, he was admitted to 
the South Dakota bar. He then entered upon the practice of his profession and a year 
later became a member of the law firm of Hall, Alexander & Purdy, one of the leading 
law firms of eastern South Dakota. He is a young man of ambition and energy, quali- 
ties which are as requisite in law practice as in commercial or industrial lines. He was 
elected to the office of state's attorney of Brookings county in November, 1914. 

In 1907 Mr. Purdy was united in marriage to Miss Lola C. La Grave, of Faribault, 
Minnesota, and to this marriage has been born a daugliter, Helen Jean. Mr. Purdy is a 
member of Brookings Lodge, No. 24, A. F. & A. M., and also of the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen, the Improved Order of Red Men and the Brookings Commenial Cluli. He 
likewise has membership with the Baptist church, while his wife is an Episr.>|i;ili;ui. They 
are a well known and popular young couple of the city and the number of their friends 
attests the attractiveness of their social qualities and of their warm-hearted hospitality. 



MARTIN T. AUSTIN. 



Martin T. Austin, an agriculturist residing in Taopi township, Minnehaha county, is 
widely recognized as one of the well known, esteemed and representative citizens of his 
community. His birth occurred in Iowa on the 12th of .lanuary, 1865, his parents being 
Thomas and Esther Austin, who came to this state in 18S5. The father, who followed 
farming throughout his active business career, died February 18, 1915, at the venerable 
age of ninety-five years, while the mother has reached the age of ninety-one. She is well 
known and highly regarded in the community which has now been her home for three 
decades. 

Martin T. Austin attended the public schools in the acquirement of an education, but 
his advantages in this direction were very limited, for he and his three brothers were 
obliged to provide for their own support early in life. However, he studied diligently 
when opportunity offered and thus secured a good practical education. Previous to his 



156 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

removal to South Dakota he was engaged in farming in Minnesota for a time. In 1SS5, 
when a young man of twenty, he came to tliis state, purchasing and locating on a quarter 
section of land which he cultivated for seven years. On the expiration of that period 
he removed to Baltic, Minnehaha county, and for two years was employed as clerk in a 
farmers' cooperative store. Subsequently he again turned his attention to agiicultural 
pursuits, buying a tract of school land in the first year that such property was ofiered 
for sale. He later spent three and a half years in Tennessee, and in 1901 returned to 
South Dakota, purchasing the farm which he had disposed of in 1898. Mr. Austin had sold 
the property for eighteen hundred dollars, and paid thirty-six hundred dollars for it on 
again taking possession. He has retained the place to the present time, but rents the 
land and devotes his attention to threshing. Success has attended his undertakings, and 
he is numbered among the substantial and enterprising citizens of his community. 

On the 3d of January, 1885, Mr. Austin was united in marriage to Miss Annie Johnson, 
a daughter of John Johnson. He is a republican in politics, has been a nominee for the 
legislatiu-e and has ably served in a number of township offices. His religious faith is that 
of the Lutheran church. He is well known in Minnehaha county, and in all of his dealings 
with his fellowmen has demonstrated his right to their regard and confidence. 



EDWARD ROGERS. 



Edward Rogers, of Custer, Custer county, South Dakota, is one of the prominent business 
men of his locality as he is interested in a number of valuable mines, owns real estate and 
also gives considerable attention to the raising of sheep. A native of Devonshire, England, 
he was born on the 14th of May, 1844, a son of Edward and Elizabeth (Sprague) Rogers, 
both likewise natives of that county. The father, who was a mine superintendent, remained 
a life-long resident of his native land and was highly esteemed by those who knew him. 
Both he and his wife passed away in England. 

Edward Rogers, who is the third in order of birth in a family of seven children, attended 
school in Devonshire and also in Wales. His educational opportunities were very limited 
as he never attended school after he was eight years of age, but he has studied privately 
and, as he has a naturally keen and retentive mind, is todaj' a well informed man. He is 
also exceptionally good as a speller and mathematician and is, moreover, an unusually fine 
penman. On leaving school he went into the mines and continued to engage in that line of 
work until he emigrated to the United States. He landed in New York city and immediately 
made his way to Pennsylvania, where he worked in the mines for a short time. He next 
went to Virginia City, Nevada, and for about two years was employed in the mines there, 
in which, owing to peculiar local conditions, the heat is so intense that it is impossible for 
the miners to work in them for more than a few hours at a time. In 1876 he came to the 
Black Hills from Grass Valley, California, where he had been employed in mines. He trav- 
eled by rail to Cheyenne and then walked the greater part of the distance to Custer. For 
about two years he was employed in the mines at Deadwood. At the end of that time he 
made his way to Hill City and engaged in prospecting in that region, locating the Grizzly 
Bear mine in company with a Mr. Cook. They developed and worked that property for 
ten years and when they sold out Mr. Rogers removed to Custer and began prospecting in 
that vicinity. He discovered the Matteen tin mine, near Hill City, and after three years 
disposed of his share — a third interest in the mine — for ten thousand dollars. He also dis- 
covered the Darwin tin mine, where the tin boulder was found, which he sold for ten 
thousand dollars and which was shipped to England. He is at present associated with 
William Tarrant, of Custer, and they are operating the Baker and Empire mines, which 
they will patent this year, and they also own a number of other prospects. Mr. Rogers like- 
wise has a large number of sheep, which he has leased to others for a specified sum for a 
year. In addition to mining property which he owns individually he holds title to a tract 
of land in the vicinity of Custer and has thirty-six lots in that city and a number of busi- 
ness and residence properties there. 

Mr. Rogers was married on the 18th of July, 1S89, to Miss .lulia Martin, who was born 
at Painesville, Ohio. Her parents, William and Margaret (Green) Martin, were born in 




EDWARD ROGERS 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 159 

Ireland, the father in Tullamore, Kings count}', on the 8th of February, 1808, and tlie mother 
in County Cavan, April 11, 1835. They were married in Painesville, Ohio, and after residing 
there for about three years removed to a farm in that state, where the father gave his atten- 
tion to agricultural pursuits for some time. AVhen Mrs. Rogers was but four years of age 
her father met with a serious accident and was unable to do much work thereafter. He 
passed away in 1S93 and her mother died in 1890. To their union were born seven children, 
of whom she is the second. Her father had been previously married and had five children 
by his first wife, who died on the voyage from Ireland to the United States. Mrs. Rogers 
was educated at Flint, Jlichigan. By her marriage she has become the mother of three chil- 
dren, two of whom died in infancy. Edward Cook, who was born on the 4th of October, 
1893, attended Colorado College at Colorado Springs in 1913 and is now a student in the 
University of Nebraska, preparing for the legal profession. 

Jlr. Rogers is a republican with independent tendencies but has never taken an active 
part in political affairs, having been too much occupied with his individual interests. How- 
ever, he has served acceptably upon the town board. Fraternally his allegiance is given to 
the ilasonic order, in which he has taken the thirty-second degree in the Scottish Rite and 
has crossed the sands of the desert with the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He also belongs 
to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Owls. He has won financial independence 
and has also gained the goodwill and higli regard of his fellow citizens as his outstanding 
characteristics are such as invariably command respect. 



HENRY MARTY. 



Henry Marty, the energetic and capable cashier of the Peoples National Bank of Hot 
Springs, is of eastern birth, born in the vicinity of Woonsocket, Rhode Island, August 34, 
1863, a son of John C. and Katherine (Marty) Marty. Both were born in Switzerland, 
but their marriage occurred in Norway, whence they emigrated to the United States in 
1856, locating in Massachusetts near the line separating that state from Rhode Island. 
They subsequently became residents of the latter state. The father was a carpenter by 
trade, but during his later life confined his attention almost exclusively to farming. In 
1SC7 he removed with his family to Clay county, Kansas, where he is still living at the 
advanced age of eighty-seven years,- having survived his wife since 1911. 

Henry Marty was the second in order of birth in a family of five children, and during 
his boyhood days devoted the usual amount of time to acquiring an education, attending 
the Clay county district school. When seventeen years of age he removed from Kansas 
to Fall River county, Dakota territory, and became a cowboy, so continuing until 1889. 
He then went to Hot Springs and for a number of years engaged in mercantile business. 
In 1903 he was elected county auditor, and was reelected, serving in all for four years. 
Upon leaving ths^t office he engaged in the insurance business, but in 1908 aided in organ- 
izing the Peoples National Bank and became the assistant cashier of that institution. He 
proved so capable a bank official that in March, 1909, he was made cashier and has since 
served in that capacity to the satisfaction of the stockholders, directors and general 
public. He is naturally methodical, has a good understanding of banking conditions and 
principles and has excellent judgment in financial matters. The affairs of the bank are in 
an excellent condition and its cashier is considered one of the leaders in financial circles 
in Hot Springs. He is also connected with the firm of Parks & Marty, who are engaged in 
the real-estate business, specializing in the buying and selling of farm lands. 

Mr. Marty was married August 23, 1885, to Miss Mary Petty, a native of Sarpy 
county, Nebraska, and a daughter of Edmund and .Jane (Coleman) Petty, both of whom 
were born in Canada. However they emigrated to Nebraska in early life and there the 
father owned land which he cultivated until he came to Dakota territory in the spring 
of 1880. He first located on Centennial Prairie, near Deadwood, and there engaged in the 
stock business for a year, at the end of which time he removed to Hot Springs. He con- 
tinued to deal in stock and was very successful in that occupation. For two terms he was 
the sheriff of the county and his fearless discharge of his duties won him high com- 
mendation. He passed away in December, 1904, and is survived by his widow, who still 



160 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

resides in South Dakota. Mrs. Marty is the eldest of their six children. To Jlr. and Mrs. 
Marty have been born ten children : Henry E., who resides about eighteen miles southwest 
of Hot Springs, where he owns a stock ranch; George, who is living in Hot Springs and is 
engaged in the transfer business; Roy, who is a stockman living near Henry; Harry, of 
Hot Springs, who is living at home and is in the mercantile business; Mary, a high school 
student; and Martha, Edith, Artcmus, Donald and Katherine, all attending school. Mr. 
Marty is a democrat and is at present serving as school treasurer. Aside from his service 
as county auditor, he has held other office, as he was a member of the first city council. 
He is a member of the Elks lodge at Rapid City and his attractive social qualities have 
won him many warm friends, while his unquestioned probity and business ability have 
gained him the respect of all who have had dealings with him. 



ELI THOMAS. 



Eli Thomas has since September, 1903, been engaged in the publication of the Armour 
Chronicle-Tribune, which is one of the leading weekly papers of the southern section of 
the state. A native of England, he was born in Churchstanton, Devonshire, January 24, 
1867, and is a son of .John and 5Iavy Ann (Whitefield) Thomas. His education was acquired 
in schools of his native country and tliere he learned the carpenter's trade. He was twenty- 
four years of age when he left England and sought a home in the new world, making his 
way in 1891 to Howard, South Dakota, where for ten years he engaged in carpentering. On 
the expiration of that period, however, he became identified with journalism and has since 
been active in that field. It was in 1901 that he purchased the Howard Democrat, a weekly 
paper which he continued to edit and publish for eighteen months. In September, 1903, he 
purchased the Armour Chronicle-Tribune, which he has now owned and published for 
twelve years. He keeps in touch with that progress which has characterized newspaper 
publication in the last few years and has made the Chronicle-Tribune one of the leading 
weekly papers of the southern part of the state. He is well known in newspaper circles 
and enjoys the highest respect of colleagues and contemporaries. 

On the 3d of October, 1891, Mr. Thomas was united in marriage to iliss Matilda Dunbar, 
her parents being Robert and Betsy Dunbar, natives of ^Yellington, Somerset, England. In 
his political views Mr. Thomas is a republican and supports the principles of that party 
through the columns of his paper. He is well known in fraternal connections, holding mem- 
bership in Arcania Lodge, No". 97, F. & A. M.; Yankton Consistory, S. P. R. S.; El Riad 
Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Sioux Falls; the Knights of Pythias lodge; and the Modern 
Woodmen camp. His loyalty to the teachings of these organizations has made him one of 
their valued representatives and the spirit of helpfulness which constitutes the basic element 
in each finds expression in his life. He has never had occasion to regret his determination 
to come to the new world. He brought with him no false ideas that success was to be had 
for the asking and, basing his advancement upon energy, close application and persistency 
of purpose, he has steadily worked his way upward. 



SHERMAX LULL, M. D. 



Dr. Sherman Lull, a successful medical practitioner of Summit, has continuously 
followed his profession in this state during the past twenty-three years. His birth 
occurred in Winterset, Iowa, on the 29th of September, 1865, his parents being T. S. and 
Sarah (Howard) Lull, both of whom were natives of Ohio. The father went to Iowa in 
an early day, and there spent the remainder of his life, devoting his attention to general 
agricultural pursuits with gratifying and well merited success, so that he was enabled to 
spend his last days in honorable retirement. He gave his political allegiance to the repub- 
lican party and held a number of township offices, ably discharging the duties devolving 
upon him. His religious faith was indicated by his membership in the Baptist church, 
while his wife belonged to the Methodist Episcopal church. He was twice married, his 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 161 

first union being with Hiss Elizabeth Sterman, whom lie wedded in Ohio and by whom 
he had four children. The eldest son served as a soldier in the Civil war. For his second 
wife T. S. Lull chose Miss Sarah Howard, by whom he had six children, as follows: Mrs. 
Amanda Misseldine, who is a widow residing in Des Moines, Iowa, and two of whose sons 
are practicing attorneys of that city; Norman, a machinist living in Iowa; Leonard, who 
follows farming in Iowa; Converse, an agriculturist of Minnesota; Sherman, of this review; 
and Mrs. Levi Farris, whose husband is an agriculturist of Iowa. 

Sherman Lull began his education in the country schools and continued his studies 
in the Dexter Normal School at Dexter, Iowa. Subsequently he followed the profession 
of teaching for five terms, and while thus engaged began the study of medicine, later enter- 
ing the Ens worth Central Medical College of St. Joseph, Missouri, from which institution 
he was graduated in 1892. He then came to South Dakota, locating for practice in 
Vienna, Clark county, where he remained for three years and at the end of that time, in 
1895, opened an office at Summit. Three years later, however, he removed to Webster, 
where he remained in practice for six years, while the following four years were spent 
in the work of his profession at Waubay. On the expiration of that period he returned to 
Summit and has there remained continuously to the present time, enjoying an extensive 
and gratifying practice that has come in recognition of his skill and ability as demon- 
strated in the successful treatment of many patients. He belongs to the Aberdeen District 
Medical Society, acts as superintendent of the Roberts county board of health and also 
serves as examiner for a number of fraternal insurance orders. 

In 1897 Dr. Lull was united in marriage to Miss Celia Wilson, a native of Concordia, 
Kansas, who passed away in October, 1912. To them were born three children, Thelma 
Lucile, John Sherman and Helen Sayre, all of whom are attending school in Bozeman, 
Montana. Dr. Lull is a republican in his political views and is making an excellent record 
as a member of the city council. Fraternally he is identified with the Masons and the 
Knights of Pythias, and his wife was a devoted and consistent member of the Saints 
cliurch. Attractive social qualities have gained him a host of friends and he is prominent 
in both social and professional circles. 



WILBERT E. COLE. 



Wilbert E. Cole is cashier of the First State Bank of Ashton. His residence in 
South Dakota covers a period of twenty-four years and during that time he has ever 
been a factor in the growth and development of the state, for he has believed in its future 
and has recognized its possibilities. He lived for a time at Mason City, Iowa, before 
coming to South Dakota, and at a prior period his home was in Iowa county, Wisconsin. 
It was there that he was born on the 19th of September, 1862, his parents being John E. 
and Sarah J. (Sangwin) Cole. The father died in May, 1913, and his remains were 
interred in Mountain View cemetery at Pasadena, California. His widow makes her 
home at Alhambra. They were the parents of eight children: Wilbert E. ; Ida, the wife 
of Charles I. Tenney, a gas contractor of Des Moines, Iowa; Charles G., an insurance agent 
at Seattle, Washington; Perry 0., who is principal of the public school at San Gabriel, 
California; Edith, the wife of Gurdeou Vermilyea, a resident of Alhambra, California; 
Franklin J., who is judge of the superior court at El Centro, California; Elmer J., who 
is engaged in the laundry business in South Milwaukee, Wisconsin; and Grace, the wife 
of Austin G. Johnson, a school teacher of Springfield, Massachusetts. 

W. E. Cole was quite young when the family removed from W^isconsin to Iowa, and 
in the schools of the latter state he pursued his education to the age of nineteen years. 
He afterward assisted his father upon the home farm until he reached the age of twenty- 
four years and then took a course in a business college. About the same time he began 
learning telegraphy, at which he w^orked until 1891, when he took a position with the 
Cliicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad Company in Orient, South Dakota, where he 
arrived May 29, 1891. He remained with that corporation until 1906, having in the 
meantime been transferred to Ashton, but in that year he was called to his present posi- 
tion as cashier of the First State Bank of Ashton. He is courteous and obliging in his 



162 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

treatment of the patrons of the bank, is loyal to the interests of its officials and by his 
close application and ability is conti-ibuting to the success of the institution. He is also 
conducting a good business as an insurance agent. 

Mr. Cole votes with the republican party, but, while he keeps well informed on the 
questions and issues of the day, he does not seek nor desire office. He belongs to the 
Masonic lodge of Ashton, of which he is the secretary, and he also has membership with 
the Ancient Order of United Workmen. His religious faith is that of the Methodist church 
and in its teachings are found the motive springs of his conduct. 



HAROLD HENDRICKSOX. 



The office of register of deeds of Lawrence county is held by Harold Hendrickson of 
Deadwood, who has amply proven his fitness for the position. He was born in Throndhjem, 
Norway, on the 31st of July, 1868, a son of Hendrick and Dorothy (Hauges) Hendrickson, 
both likewise natives of the land of the midnight sun. The father served as an officer in the 
regular army until he was forty years of age and then became superintendent of a large 
shipbuilding company, retaining that position until his death, which occurred about 1908. 
The mother still resides in her native land. 

Harold Hendrickson attended school in Norway and after coming to this country was 
a student at Hauges Seminary of Red Wing, Minnesota. He began working for others at 
the age of fifteen and clerked in a general store in Norway until the year 1887, the year of 
his emigration to this country. In May of that year he located at Red Wing, Minnesota, 
and found employment in a lumberyard. As before stated, he attended school for a time in 
Red Wing and then went to Minneapolis, where he was engaged in the lumber business for 
one summer. At the end of that time he went to Ely, Minnesota, where he clerked in a 
store for two years, and in 1893 he came to Lead, working in the mill of the Homestake 
Mining Company for about twenty years, his length of service indicating his ability and 
fidelity to trust. At the end of that time he was elected register of deeds, which office he is 
now filling to the satisfaction of his constituents. He devotes his entire time to the work 
of the office and is systematic and accurate. 

In April, 1894, Mr. Hendrickson was united in marriage to Miss Ida Maria Sederberg, a 
native of North Branch, Minnesota. Her parents, Olaus and Martha Sederberg, were natives 
of Sweden, whence they emigrated to this country about 1869, settling in Minnesota. Her 
father, who was a successful farmer, passed away in 1906, but the mother still resides in 
that state. To Mr. and Mrs. Hendrickson have been born three children: Edward Herbert, 
who is employed in the Homestake foundry; Virgil Harold, a high-school student; and 
William Le Roy, also in school. 

Mr. Hendrickson is a member of the Lutheran church and in politics supports the 
principles an^ candidates of the republican party. Fraternally he is identified with the Elks; 
the United Workmen, in which he has served as master; and the Eagles. When he came to 
this country as a youth he knew no English, but he did not allow himself to be discouraged 
by this handicap and began at once to learn the language. His perseverance enabled him to 
overcome that and other obstacles and he has gained an honorable place in his adopted 
communitv. 



JOHN E. HIPPLE. 



John E. Hippie, a prominent representative of journalistic interests in South Dakota, 
is the well known editor of the Capital-Journal at Pierre and also publishes several other 
papers. His birth occurred in Perry county, Pennsylvania, on the 20th of July, 1865. his 
parents being Oliver F. and Mary E. Hippie. He is a descendant of the Ball, George Wash- 
ington and Custer families. His education was acquired in the common schools, and the 
entire period of his business career has been spent in the journalistic field. He came to 
Dakota in the winter of 1879, settling in the then Armstrong county, now Hutchinson 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 165 

county, remaining on tlie farm with his mother until 1886, when he engaged in news- 
[japer work as a partner in The Dalcota City Advance, which was later changed to the 
Parkston Advance on the advent of the railroad from Scotland to Mitchell. He came to 
Pierre, establishing the State Publishing Company in 1898, and in 1903, retired from that 
company and started the Hippie Printing Company, taking over the daily and weekly 
Capital-Journal in 1905. His connection with the printing business in South Dakota has 
included the law publications as well as newspaper and general job printing. 

His labors have been of farreaehing eii'eet. The press has not only recorded the history 
of advancement, but has also ever been the leader in the work of progress and improve- 
ment — the vanguard of civilization. The philosopher of some centuries ago proclaimed the 
truth that "the pen is mightier than tlie sword," and the statement is continually being 
verifled in the affairs of life. In molding public opinion the power of the newspaper can- 
not be estimated, but at all events its influence is greater than that of any otlier single 
agency. 

On the 11th of November, 1896, in Ashton, South Dakota, Jlr. Hippie was united in 
marriage to Miss Ruth Bowman, a daughter of S. W. Bowman, who was a pioneer settler 
of Wisconsin and South Dakota. Our subject and his wife have two children, Robert B. 
and James B. 

Mr. Hippie is a republican in politics and served in both town and township offices at 
Parkston, South Dakota, while from 1893 until 1896 he held the office of state auditor, 
making a splendid record in that connection. He is a worthy exemplar of the Masonic 
fraternity and a member of the Capital City Commandery, K. T., and served as grand high 
priest of the Royal Arch Masons in South Dakota during the year 1909. His other fraternal 
connections are with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Fraternal Order of 
Eagles, the Modern Brotherhood of America and the Modern Woodmen, and he is held in 
high esteem by his brethren of those organizations. 



WALTER S. HARRISON. 



Walter S. Harrison, who owns and operates four hundred acres of fine land in Bon 
Homme county, was born near the old village of Bon Homme, August 11, 1875, a son of 
Francis W. and Martha (Abbott) Harrison, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this 
work. The first part of his childhood was spent upon his birthplace, but he grew to 
manhood upon the farm where he still resides. He gave his time and labor to his parents 
until he attained his majority, and then he and his brother William started farming in 
partnership, renting the homestead. The brothers kept bachelor's hall until the older, 
William, married and brought his bride home. Fourteen months later Mr. Harrison of 
this review married and established a home of his own. In 1908 William Harrison 
removed to his farm a few miles west, leaving Walter S. in entire possession of the home- 
stead. He has since given his undivided attention to its operation -and now owns four 
hundred acres of the finest land in the northwest. He is up-to-date and alert and is 
always willing to utilize the results of agricultural experiments, believing that by so 
doing he can secure greater efficiency in his work. His labor is rewarded by excellent 
crops and his annual income is a gratifying one. 

Mr. Harrison was married at Tyndall, this state, March 1, 1906, to Miss Nellie 
Fenenga, who was born on the island of Schiermonicoog, Holland, on the 15th of January, 
1879, a daughter of Jacob and Lolina (Viser) Fenenga. In 1881 the family sailed from 
Rotterdam for New York, and subsequently made their way to Chicago, where Mr. 
Fenenga found employment for two years in the Pullman shops, working as a fine cabinet- 
maker. Upon leaving Chicago, Mr. Fenenga and his family came to this state and pur- 
chased a farm in Douglas county, where they lived for twelve years. A removal was sub- 
sequently made to Lyman county, which remained the family home for about fifteen years. 
Mr. Fenenga eventually sold his farm and removed to Ashland, Wisconsin, but now spends 
a part of each year in Bon Homme county and part of the time with a married daughter 
who lives in Amsterdam, Holland. Another daughter is a missionary at Mardin, in eastern 
Turkey, between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, and two sons are living in Oregon. 



166 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

Mr. and ilrs. Harrison have three children, Mabel. Francis and Lola. The wife and mother 
is a member of the Congregational church and quite active in church work. Mr. Harrison 
is a progressive in hia political belief. 

At the time of the memorable blizzard on the 12th of January, 1888, Mr. Harrison 
and his brother^ were in school. He made his way for a half mile along a wire fence to 
his uncle's and remained there all night, but his brothers went on until they reached 
a neighbor's within a half mile of their home and spent the night there. Mr. Harrison is 
held in the highest esteem and honor in his native county and is loyal to the interests 
of South Dakota, believing firmly in her future. 



RAYMOND D. BURR. 



Raymond D. Burr, a resident of Montrose, is a well known figure in financial circles 
of his part of the state as president of the Montrose Bank. He was born in Trumansburg, 
New York, on the 5th of November, 1877, a son of Elmer C. and Ella M. Burr, farming 
people who are residents of Trumansburg. At the usual age the son entered the public 
schools, passing through consecutive grades until he became a high-school pupil. He 
afterward attended Palmer Institute at Lakemont, New York, and when his school days 
were over took up the profession of teaching, which he followed for five years in the state 
of New York and for a similar period in South Dakota, coming to this state in 1903. 
While engaged in teaching he had opportunity to study conditions in the state and 
believed that there was a good field for banking at Jlontrose. Accordingly, in 1908, he 
entered the Montrose Bank, which w^as organized in 1886. He became its vice president 
and so continued until 1912, when he was elected to the presidency and as such is now 
guiding the institution, which is enjoying a steady and substantial growth and which 
conducts a general banking business. He also deals in automobiles, handling the Over- 
land car. He has a side interest in chickens, which he greatly enjoys raising. His landed 
possessions include two farms of three hundred acres. 

On the 2d of June, 1907, Mr. Burr was united in marriage to Miss Magna Nelson, a 
daughter of Ludwig and Marie (Goberg) Nelson, a representative of a pioneer family. 
They have a son, Eugene D., six years of age, attending school, and a daughter, Ella 
Marie, born July 3, 1915. The parents are members of the Baptist church, and Mr. Burr 
also has membership with the Masons, the Mystic Shrine, the Knights of Pythias, and the 
Modern Woodmen, to the teachings and purposes of which organizations he Is loyal. His 
political views accord with the platform of the republican party, and he has served as 
president of the town board and as clerk of the school board. He is Interested in every- 
thing pertaining to the welfare and upbuilding of the community in which he makes his 
home and in the advancement of the state at large. When he has a leisure moment he 
enjoys a fishing or hunting trip, but he concentrates his efforts upon his business affairs 
and is constantly seeking new methods to enlarge the field of his usefulness and add to 
his legitimate success. 



JAMES A. COCHRAN. 



James A. Cochran, a prominent and well known pioneer, is living retired in Milbank. 
His birth occurred In Aurora, Illinois, on the 11th of October, 1854. His parents, Charles 
and Isabelle (Wliitelaw) Cochran, were natives of Perth, Scotland, the former born in 
1817 and the latter in 1822. They were married in their native land, but in 1850 emi- 
grated to America, and, making their way westward, settled in Chicago. The father, 
wlio was a mason by trade, worked in that city and at Aurora, Illinois, but at length 
removed with his family to Wisconsin, where he followed agricultural pursuits. He accu- 
mulated four hundred and sixty acres of land and at the time of his demise was well-to-do, 
although he had been In limited financial circumstances when he emigrated to this 
country. He was a republican in his political belief and held membership in the Pres- 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 167 

byterian church. Both he and his wife died at New Hampton, Iowa, in the year 1900. To 
their union were born six children, of whom four are living: James A.; William, who is 
farming in Canada; Emily, who is the wife of Dudley Summerville, a farmer residing in 
Oklahoma; and Ida, now Mrs. William Bunson, who is living on a farm in Iowa. 

James A. Cochran received his education in the common schools of Iowa and during 
his boyhood also gained valuable training in agricultural work. In 1879, when twenty-five 
years of age, he emigrated to Grant county. South Dakota, and homesteaded a quarter 
section of land. From time to time he added to his holdings and now holds title to five 
hundred and sixty acres, all of which he has rented to others. For many years, however, 
he personally operated his farms and his energy and good judgment were attested by the 
gratifying income which his labor yielded him. Since 1907 he has lived in Milbank and 
occupies a comfortable residence, which he erected. 

Mr. Cochran was married in 18S6 to Miss Annie Miller, a daughter of Charles Miller, 
who is a retired farmer living at New Hampton, Iowa. To this union have been born three 
cliildren: Bert Edward, who is a lineman with the Chicago, ililwaukee & St. Paul Rail- 
road; Ethel, who is teaching school in North Dakota; and Milton, who is attending school. 

Mr. Cochran is identified witb the Masonic lodge and the Royal Arch chapter, and is 
also a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen. A stanch republican in politics, 
he has always worked loyally for the success of his party. For twelve years he served as 
township treasurer, and since 1913 has been a member of the city council of Milbank. A 
substantial resident, he is also a public-spirited citizen, doing all in his power to promote 
the progress of the community along worthy lines. 



•JAMES R. WARDEN. 



.James R. Warden is a retired farmer living in Redfield, where he engages in the 
jnactice of veterinary surgery. Thirty-six years have come and gone since he arrived 
in this state a young man of twenty-four years. His birth occurred in Dodge county, 
Wisconsin, on the 20th of March, 1855, his parents being William and Olive (Allen) 
Warden. The father came to this state as a pioneer settler and was extensively engaged 
in farming in Spink county and also in dealing in horses, making a specialty of Percherons 
and having on hand at times as many as forty head of registered stock. He did much to 
im]n-ove the grade of horses raised in this section of the state and his efforts were an 
element in progressive farming which brought about results highly beneficial to the 
county. He died on the 11th of November, 1908, having survived his wife, whose demise 
occurred July 30, 1900. Both were laid to rest in Green Lawn cemetery of Redfield. They 
were highly esteemed citizens, their many good traits of heart and mind winning for 
them the confidence and goodwill of those who knew them. 

James R. Warden is indebted to the public-school system of Wisconsin for the edu- 
cational privileges which he enjoyed. He continued to attend school until seventeen 
years of age and then concentrated his efforts upon farm work, with which he had 
previously become familiar by assisting his father in the fields at the old homestead. 
In 1879 he determined to try his fortune elsewhere and made his way to South Dakota, 
casting in his lot with the early residents of Spink county. His father had just arrived in 
Spink county and he settled on adjoining land seven miles east of Redfield. He began 
farming, which he carried on continuously and successfully for a quarter of a century, 
bringing his fields to a high state of cultivation and adding to his farm many modern 
and attractive improvements, which indicated his progessive spirit and his practical 
methods. Year by year he tilled the soil, raising good crops, and at length, with a hand- 
some competence secured as a reward of, his labors, he put aside the work of the farm 
and took up his abode in Redfield, where he now makes his home. 

On the 12th of January, 1881, in Neosho, Wisconsin, Mr. Warden was vmited in mar- 
riage to Miss Annie Katherine Wiser, a daughter of Mathias and Margaret (Gray) Wiser. 
Her father died October 15, 1885, and her mother, long surviving him, passed away Sep- 
tember 1, 1907, while on a visit to South Dakota. In 1880, before her marriage, Mrs 
Warden came to South Dakota and located and proved up a homestead. Mr. and Mrs. 



168 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

Warden have become parents of two children, Pearl I. and Jessie W., both at home. The 
latter has completed a course at Redfield College. 

In his political views Mr. Warden is an earnest democrat, believing in the principles 
of that party. He is a thirty-second degree Mason, a Sliriner, an Odd Fellow, an Elk and 
a United Workman, and to the teachings of these organizations is loyal, being in full 
accord with their basic purposes, which recognize the brotherhood of mankind and the 
individual's obligations to his fellows. Mr. Warden has never felt that he made a mistake 
in changing his place of residence from Wisconsin to South Dakota, for here he found 
the opportunities which he sought, and in their improvement has gi-adually worked his 
way upward. He lived in the territory ten years before the admission of the state into 
the Union, and at all times he has been a public-spirited citizen, active and helpful in his 
relations to measures which he deems of greatest worth in promoting the public welfare. 



FRANK D. PECIvHAM. 



Frank D. Peckham, who has been a resident of Hanson county for more than a third 
of a century, or during nearly his entire life, has for the past six years served as cashier 
of the F'irst National Bank of Alexandria. His birth occurred in Portage, Wisconsin, on 
the 20th of March, 1877, his parents being J. E. and Almira Peckham, of whom more 
extended mention is made on another page of this work in connection with the sketch of 
Charles Herbert Peckham, brother of our subject. 

F. D. Peckham, who was but two years of age when the family home was estab- 
lished in this state, attended the public schools in the acquirement of an education, and 
after putting aside his textbooks was apprenticed to newspaper work, devoting his time 
thereto for five years. Subsequently he served as deputy in different county offices, and 
later followed the profession of teaching for a year, afterward securing a position as 
stenographer with a law firm. In 1898 he entered the employ of the First National Bank 
of Alexandria in a subordinate position, but his ability and worth brought him recogni- 
tion and in 1909 he was chosen cashier of the institution. In that capacity he has since 
served and his efforts have been an appreciable factor in the steady growth and success 
which the bank has enjoyed. He is also president of the Emery State Bank of Emery, 
this state. Moreover, he is interested in the raising of thoroughbred stock and owns one 
hundred head of shorthorn cattle and a half section of land near Alexandria. 

On the 7th of May, 1898, Mr. Peckham was united in marriage to Miss Florence 
Durkee, a daughter of F. A. and Mary (Wakeman) Durkee. Their children are five in 
number, namely: Ellsworth, Donald, Howard, Norma and Francis. Politically Mr. Peck- 
ham is a stanch republican, and for seven years he served as city treasurer. His religious 
faith is that of the Methodist church. Fraternally he is a worthy exemplar of the 
Masonic order, having attained the thirty-second degi-ee of the Scottish Rite and belong- 
ing to the consistory at Yankton and the Mystic Shrine at Sioux. Falls. Steadily he has 
worked his way upward, improving the opportunities which have come to him, and his 
energy and persistency of purpose have made him not only a successful business man 
but also a valued citizen of his community. 



C. J. GLOOD. 



C. J. Glood is connected with the firm of Jorgensen Brothers, dealers in hardware and 
implements at Viborg. He was born in Denmark on the 20th of February, 1872, his parents 
being Rasmus and Bine Jorgensen. The year 1892 witnessed the arrival of the family in 
South Dakota. They reached their destination in the spring of that year and located six 
miles west of Viborg, where the father secured a tract of wild land and with characteristic 
energy immediately began the development of a farm, devoting his remaining days to its 
cultivation and improvement. He has now passed away but the mother makes her home in 
ViborK. 




C. J. GLOOD 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 171 

In the acquirement of his education C. J. Glood attended the public schools near his 
father's home and afterward became a student in the College of Denmark. The period of his 
boj'hood and youth was passed in his native land but he preceded his father's family to 
America and, like many other of his countrymen, made his way to the northwest. In 1892 
he changed his name from C. Jorgensen to C. J. Glood. He began business where the town of 
Viborg was started and afterward went to Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and for ten years was in the 
employ of the Electric Railroad Company at that place. In 1903 he returned to Viborg and 
established the hardware and implement business in which he is now engaged as a member 
of the firm of Jorgensen Brothers. From the beginning success has attended the venture. 
They have carried a large and carefully selected line of goods and have won popular favor 
through their honorable dealings, their courteous treatment of their patrons and their 
earnest efforts to please. In 1906 Mr. Glood extended the scope of his business activities by 
establishing a branch at Irene, South Dakota, in connection with his brothers. They started 
in a modest way but the business has constantly developed and the branch is now a sub- 
stantial institution. In addition Mr. Glood is a stockholder in the Scandinavian Bank of 
Viborg and is interested in realty, being the owner of three-quarters of a section of farm 
land in the state. 

On the 31st of October', 1897, Mr. Glood was united in marriage to Miss Cena Anderson, 
a daughter of L. H. Anderson. To them have been born four sons and four daughters, namely : 
Royal, Verne, Thorvald, Carl, Idalean, Gagmar, Marjorie and Clarabell, students in the 
public schools. 

Mr. Glood and his family attend the Lutheran church, in which he holds membership, 
and he is also an Odd Fellow and a Royal Arch Mason, guiding his life by the teachings of 
those organizations, the fraternities, like the church, inculcating the highest standards of 
manhood. 



SAMUEL U. COE. 



As register of deeds of Custer county, Samuel U. Coe is making a record that is dis- 
tinctly creditable to himself and very satisfactory to his constituents. He is also 
connected with agricultural interests, as he owns a quarter section of excellent land in the 
county. Born in Independence, Buchanan county, Iowa, on the 5th of March, 1866, he is 
a son of David V. and Almira (Sufficool) Coe, natives of Ohio, who became early settlers 
of Buchanan county, Iowa. The father engaged in farming there until 1S71, when he 
removed to Neligh, Nebraska, and resided upon a homestead there for about three years. 
At the end of that time he turned his attention to the hotel business, conducting a 
hostelry in Neligh for six or seven years. Upon disposing of his interests in that con- 
nection he entered the lumber business, and some time later engaged in genera! mer- 
chandising. F'or many years he resided in Custer and other towns in South Dakota, but 
is now living retired in Neligh, where he is widely known. He erected a number of 
houses there and was for a long time actively connected with the financial and com- 
mercial expansion of the city. At the time of the Civil war he enlisted in the Ninth 
Iowa Volunteer Infantry, and served for one year, when he was honorably discharged on 
account of disability. His wife passed to her reward in 1906. 

Samuel U. Coe, who is one of the older children in a family of ten, attended school 
at Neligh, Nebraska, and completed his education by a course at the Omaha Commercial 
College. When twenty years of age he became the manager of a country store in Holt 
county, Nebraska, and after remaining in that connection for about seven years removed 
to the Black Hills in 1890. He became the owner of one hundred and sixty acres thirty 
miles west of Custer and gave his attention to ranching until elected county auditor, 
which office he held for four years. He is now register of deeds, and as he is accurate and 
s}'stematie, prompt and thoroughly reliable, the allairs of the office are in excellent 
hands. He still owns his land and supervises the raising of high grade stock thereon. 

Mr. Coe was married on the 27th of October, 1897, to Miss Olive M. Gurney, who 
was born at New Hampton, Iowa, a daughter of Julius H. and Sarah (Clark) Gurney, 
the latter a native of the state of New York. The father, who was an attorney by pro- 
Vol. V— s 



172 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

fession, removed to Xeligh, Nebraska, with his family and there engaged in practice for a 
number of years. He was recognized as one of the leaders in the legal profession and 
for one term served as county judge. He also was identified with agricultural interests, 
as he was an extensive land owner. Both he and his wife have passed away, but their 
memory is yet cherished bj' those who knew them intimately. Jlr. and Jlrs. Coe had live 
children, Glenn M., Inez M., Ralph L., Sadie B. and Raymond, all attending scliool. On 
the 9th of May, 1913, the wife and mother passed away. 

Mr. Coe is a republican and has been elected to a number of positions of responsibility 
and public trust. He has served as county assessor for one term, as deputy assessor for 
three terms, was county auditor for two terms, and is now register of deeds. He has 
always discharged his official duties with a sense of conscientious obligation, and his 
fellow citizens have the utmost confidence in his ability. Fraternally he is connected with 
the Odd Fellows lodge, of which he served as treasurer for two years, and he is a most 
loyal member of that order. He has the greatest faith in the future of his county and 
state and can always be dependend upon to do everything within his power to further the 
interests of Custer county and South Dakota. 



JAMES L. PRATT. 



James L. Pratt, publisher of the Elkton Record, of Elkton, Brookings county, is one 
of the oldest newspaper men in his section of the state, and the oldest in his county a.-; 
to the management of the same sheet. He was born in Allamakee county, Iowa, Sep- 
tember 13, 1856, the parental home being a log cabin with a big fireplace. Indians and 
wolves were frequently seen, the one being almost as wild as the other. His parents 
were Azel and Mary (Hersey) Pratt, both of whom were natives of Maine, but in 1848 
removed to Iowa, where they became pioneer settlers, won prosperity and passed to the 
great beyond in 1881. 

James L. Pratt was reared in his native county and acquired his early education in 
the select, district and public schools of Waukon, the county seat, the town having received 
its name from John Waukon, a grand old Indian chief. During his boyhood days, when 
not in school, Mr. Pratt worked with his father, who was a carpenter, receiving a penny 
a day during his early youth and ending his apprenticeship when sixteen years of age 
at three dollars per day. About that time Mr. Pratt became devil in a printing office, 
spending six months in that way in the office of the Postville (la.) Review. Later he 
engaged with the Standard, of Waukon, where he remained for four years, and later he 
looked after the welfare of the Waukon Democrat for another four years. He then 
returned to carpentering, which he followed for some time until called to Pipestone, Minne- 
sota, to take charge of the Republican of that city in 1882. He remained in connection 
with that paper until 1885, when he removed to the little town of Elkton, South Dakota, 
and purchased the Record, which had been launched a little more than a year before and 
which since 1885 has been owned and edited by Mr. Pratt. 

Mr. Pratt is a true republican and has never felt that tliere was occasion to change 
his party connection. He has held many offices of trust, the duties of which have been 
promptly and creditably discharged. In fact, he has been a dominant factor in the repub- 
lican party in his section of the state for a number ni yc:ii- ami has served as a delegate 
to both territorial and state conventions. He is ]ii(.iiiiiiiiit. tn,i. in fraternal circles and 
uses the signs and passwords of nearly all the best known si'rrct organizations. 

On the 31st of March, 1880, Mr. Pratt was united in marriage to Miss Edith F. 
Wedgewood, who was born in Castalia, Iowa, and is a daughter of the late John M. 
Wedgewood, a prominent Baptist minister of his day. Mr. and Mrs. Pratt are the parents 
of six children. Ada M., a graduate of the Elkton high school, of the Cedar Valley Semi- 
nary at Osage, Iowa, the State Normal at Winona, Minnesota, and also of the Madison 
(Wis.) University, has made a success as a teacher, and efficiently filled the office of 
deputy county superintendent of schools of Brookings county. Jesse L. Pratt was grad- 
uated from the Elkton high school, the Osage Seminary and the Mankato (Minn.) Com- 
mercial College, and is now bookkeeper and accountant with the Parke & Grant Mercantile 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 173 

Coiupany, of Watertown, South Dakota. Vein and Vera are twins, the former an electrician 
and the latter a teacher in the high school at Benson, Minnesota. Gladys is a graduate 
of the EUvton high school and graduated from the Jladison (S. D.) Normal in 1915. Kuth 
is now in the eighth grade in the public schools of Elkton. 

Mr. I'ratt publishes an attractive paper, is well versed in every phase and form of 
newspaper art, has kept in touch with the trend of progress as manifest in modern jour- 
nalism and through the columns of his paper has been an efficient and inlluential advocate 
of public progress in Brookings county and municipal welfare in Elkton. 



HENRY A. GEIIM. 



As cashier and director of the State Bank of Manchester, Henry A. Gehm is in a 
position to influence to a considerable extent the commercial and financial prosperity of 
^Manchester and vicinity. He is one of the younger business men of the town, his birth 
having occurred on the 21st of October, 1887. His parents were John and Lucy Gehm, and 
the father was one of the first to take up land in Kingsbury county, preempting a quarter 
of section oO, township 110, range 56. He also entered a desert claim and for many years 
he opeiatid his laini, but in 1914 retired from active life and is now residing at De Smet. 

Henry A. Gehm attended the public schools and after completing the course there 
ofi'ered entered a business college at Fremont, Nebraska. After completing his preparation 
for a business life he entered the De Smet National Bank as bookkeeper and remained in 
that capacity for two and half years. He was then made cashier of the State Bank of 
Manchester, of which his father is president, and his brother, Robert Gehm, vice presi- 
dent. The executive officers are well fitted for their work and have instituted and main- 
tained a policy of conservatism tempered with progressiveness that neither endangers the 
funds on deposit through ill advised investment nor retards the normal progiess of Man- 
chester and its vicinity by undue timidity. Henry A. Gehm, the cashier of the bank, has 
large voice in its management, has developed financial acumen beyond his years and has 
also acquired a detailed knowledge of the routine of banking practice. 

Mr. Gehm was married December 22, 1909, to Miss Florence Hennen, a daughter of 
Jerry Hennen, and to their union have been born a son and daughter, Edna and Kenneth. 
Mr. Gehm is a protestant, and in politics is identified with the progressive party. He is 
also a Mason and his life is an embodiment of the spirit of the fraternity. He has the 
greatest faith in the future of South Dakota and does all within his power to hasten the 
healthy development of the state along all lines, and is known to his fellow citizens as one 
who is not bound by tradition, but, on the contrary, is progressive and willing to further 
new plans and movements that promise to better conditions. 



WILLIAM MINOW. 



William Minow, a highly esteemed and successful farmer of Bon Homme county, was 
born in the village of Letschin, Brandenburg, Prussia, February 23, 1844. As nearly as 
can be ascertained, the family is of Polish descent and the name was originally Von 
Minowski. The parents of our subject were Christian and Maria (Sommerfeld) Minow, 
who in 1869 emigrated to Ackley, Iowa, wliere the father passed away. The mother accom- 
panied William to South Dakota. 

William Minow attended school for seven years during the summer and winter, and 
his only vacation periods were during the time of wheat harvest in August and the potato 
harvest in September. After putting aside his text-books he learned the blacksmith's 
trade and when the time eame for him to serve in the army he was detailed to work in 
shops at Berlin, Cologne, Spandau and other large cities. Even during the war with 
Denmark in 1864, and with Austria in 1866, he did not have to serve in the field but 
worked in shops and arsenals, repairing cannon and other equipment. In 1868 he sailed 
from Hamburg on the Cymbria and after eleven days landed in New York. He made 



174 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

his way immediately to Ackley, Iowa, and there worked at liis trade until 1878, when he 
removed to Dakota territory and settled on his present farm, on section 17, Albion pre- 
cinct, Bon Homme county. He bought a relinquishment and filed on his land as a home- 
stead claim, and subsequently purchased a quarter section adjoining, upon which his 
son now lives. The land was open prairie at the time that it came into his possession 
and he planted a grove and orchard as soon as possible. The trees are now large and he 
derives much pleasure from them, while the giove is a desirable protection against the 
wind, and the orchard supplies an abundance of fruit. He built as a residence a small 
frame house, which he has since enlarged, so that it is now one of the commodious homes 
in his county. He has labored untiringly and to good effect, seeking always the maximum 
efficiency in his work, and now has a comfortable competence. 

Mr. Minow was married in Ackley, Iowa, to Miss Dorothy Meyer, a native of Hanover, 
Germany, and a daughter of August and Kathcrine (Meyer) Meyer, who, although of the 
same name, were not related. To Mr. and Mrs. Minow were born seven children: Amanda, 
who married Frank Smith, of Avon, this state; Frieda, the wife of George Smith, a farmer 
residing north of Avon; William, who married Miss Nola Shaver and who is engaged in 
agricultural pursuits in Albion precinct; Edward, who married Lena Bangert and is oper- 
ating one of his father's farms; Ella and August, who are at home; and Louise, who is 
the wife of George '\Mieeler, a farmer of Albion precinct. Mrs. Minow passed away 
July 3, 1908. 

Mr. Minow is a Lutheran and is a generous contributor to that church. His political 
allegiance is given to the democratic party and he served as deputy assessor for one terra. 
His sterling worth and agreeable personality have won for him the friendship of many, 
and all who know him hold him in high respect. 



HENRY J. STONE. 



Henry J. Stone, who owns a barber shop in Custer and is also extensively interested m 
mining, was born on one of the Fox islands in Lake Michigan. When he was a child the 
family went to Chicago on a small vessel owned by his father, who later sold the ship and 
purchased a residence in Chicago but was not permitted to enjoy his new home long as he 
and a son and daughter all died in that city within a week of cholera. The mother sub- 
sequently returned with the remainder of the family to the island where our subject was 
born and was there married a second time, the ceremony being performed at the lighthouse. 
Mr. Stone of this review was about ten years of age when his mother and stepfather removed 
to Story county, Iowa, and not long afterward he and his sister left home as there was 
considerable friction between them and their stepfather. His sister was about tw^elve 
years of age at that time and lived with a farmer in Story county until her marriage. The 
mother and stepfather eventually removed to Minnesota, where she passed away a number 
of years later. She returned to Adams county to visit her daughter and our subject saw 
her then. A younger brother, George, remained with his mother and stepfather and our 
subject has never seen him since the removal of the family to Minnesota. 

Mr. Stone of this review fir.st resided with a Mr. French after leaving home and following 
the demise of that gentleman made his home with William Thompson, also a resident of Story 
county, for about six months. He then returned to the French home and assisted Mrs. 
French with the work of the place. Some time later he went to live with William Larrabee 
and upon their removal from Story county he went to the home of Eli French, a brother of 
the Mr. French with whom he had previously lived. Subsequently he made his home with a 
Mr. Evans but as he was not allowed to go to school he went to the home of a Mr. Cross, 
with whom he remained about nine months, during which time he attended school for about 
six weeks. Upon leaving that place he lived with a Mr. Kegley until the outbreak of the 
war. Mr. Stone was then a youth in his teens and became a member of Company D, Tenth 
Iowa Regiment, enlisting on the 26th of August, 1861. He served for over four years, being 
mustered out at Little Rock, Arkansas, on the 15th of August, 1865. He then went to 
Boone county, Iowa, and worked upon a farm, thus providing for his support. He realized 
the need of a better education and attended school there for several winters, after which he 




HENRY J. STOXE 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 177 

attended the State Agiieultural College during the first year of its existence. Upon leaving 
that institution he taught school for two terms, one term in Story county and one in Boone 
county, but in 1872 he abandoned teaching and went to Grand Island, Nebraska. He entered 
a claim in Merrick county, that state, and proved up on his land, residing there until about 
1879. In that year he went to Sidney, South Dakota, and in 1880 he arrived in Rocker- 
ville, this state, where he remained until 1881, which year witnessed his removal to Custer. 
He opened a barber shop in that city and has since owned and conducted it, his place of 
business remaining the same room throughout the intervening third of a century. He has 
built up a large business and derives therefrom a good income. He also owns stock in the 
Custer Electric Light, Heat & Power Company and is extensively interested in mining 
projects in Colorado and the Black Hills, also in oil at Newcastle, Wyoming, and has a third 
interest in the Glen Rock Mining Company, which owns valuable mines seven miles west of 
Custer. 

Mr. Stone is independent in his political views, supporting the candidate whom he deems 
best fitted for the office in question without regard to his party ties. Since taking up his 
residence in Custer Mr. Stone has traveled extensively and has gained much valuable 
knowledge and experience from visiting various parts of the country. In 1886 he spent con- 
siderable time in California and in 1893 he visited the World's Fair in Chicago. In 1913 
he traveled over a number of the southern states, including Tennessee, Kentucky, Georgia 
and Alabama, and continued his journey to Iowa, visiting a sister who resides at Mount 
Etna, Adams county, that state. He has also gone to Rhode Island and New York and 
has a knowledge of conditions in all sections of the country. His success is the more creditable 
when the fact is considered that he has been dependent upon his own resources since about 
ten years of age and that everything that he has accomplished has been the result of his 
own efforts and ambition. The qualities of perseverance, determination and courage are 
everywhere admired but are deemed especially worthy of praise in the west and Mr. Stone 
is deservedly held in high regard in Custer. 



BENEDICT E. NELSON. 



Benedict E. Nelson, who has resided on his farm in Buffalo township, Minneuaha 
county, for the past thirty-seven years, was the first settler in his section and now owns 
six hundred and forty acres of valuable land which he cultivates with the assistance of 
his sons. His birth occurred in Norway on the 20th of March, 1852, his parents being 
Nels Z. and Olena Begorset, both of whom are deceased. The father followed farming 
throughout his active business career. 

Benedict E. Nelson acquired his early education in the common schools of his native 
land and continued his studies in the United States, emigrating to this country in 1871, 
wlien a young man of nineteen years. He first took up his abode in Dane county, Wis- 
consin, and there worked as a farm hand for seven years. On the expiration of that period, 
in 1878, he came to South Dakota, locating on his present place in Buffalo township, 
Minnehaha county, on the 21st of May of that year. He preempted and filed on a tree 
claim and subsequently added two quarter sections to his holdings, so that he now owns 
six hundred and forty acres of rich and productive land. Mr. Nelson operates the prop- 
erty with the assistance of his sons, and also devotes considerable attention to live stock, 
keeping eighty head of cattle, one hundred head of hogs and eighty head of sheep. He 
utilizes the latest improved machinery in the work of the fields and employs modern 
methods in the cultivation of his land. His was the first house erected in Buffalo town- 
ship, and part of the structure is still standing. As the years have gone by he has won 
a gratifying measure of prosperity in the able management of his agricultural interests, 
and he has long been numbered among the successful, representative and esteemed citizens 
of his community. 

On May 18, 1879, Mr. Nelson was united in marriage to Miss Christina Johnson, her 
parents being Hendrick and Carrie Johnson, who took up their abode in Wisconsin in 1848 
and who have passed away. Our subject and his wife have the following children: Nora, 



178 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

who gave her hand in marriage to Moses Erdahl; and Oscar Lewis, Clarence and Benjamin, 
all of whom are at home. 

In politics Mr. Nelson is a stanch republican. He has served at intervals as chair- 
man of the township board, has been treasurer of the school board for a period of twenty 
years, and has also acted in the capacity of road overseer, ever discharging his official 
duties in a prompt and able manner. He is a trustee of St. Jacob's Lutheran church, to 
which his wife also belongs. Mr. Nelson is one of the oldest pioneers of his locality and 
has seen it developed from a frontier region into a district inhabited by an industrious, 
prosperous, enlightened and progressive people. 



D. A. FORD. 



D. A. Ford, a well known merchant of Hill City, is a native of Canada, born on Prince 
Edvrard Island, on the 34th of September, 1854, of the marriage of John and Jane (McDon- 
ald) Ford, both also born in that province. The father was a shipironer by trade and took 
contracts in that line of work. He also owned and operated a farm and was an energetic 
and capable man. He and his wife remained lifelong residents of Prince Edward Island. 

D. A. Ford, who was the third in a family of seven children, attended school in his 
native province. When twenty years of age he came to the States, locating in Boston, and 
there worked at the carpenter's trade for about three years. His next removal was to 
Otsego county, Michigan, where he continued to follow that trade, and for ten years he 
engaged in contracting there. In 1889 he removed to Rapid City, South Dakota, and after 
spending about two months there made his way to Hill City during the tin boom. He was 
a painting and decorating contractor for a number of years and then, purchasing a stock 
of general merchandise, has since 1902 devoted his entire time to the building up of his 
trade. He carries goods of high quality and as his prices are reasonable and his business 
methods open and above board, he is rewarded by a patronage that is constantly increasing 
in volume. 

Mr. Ford was married on the 25th of February, 1S88, to Miss Sadie C. Teese, a native of 
Goderich, Canada, and a daughter of John T. and Katherine (Buchanan) Teese, both for 
many years 'residents of Scotland. Mr. and Mrs. Ford have four children : Lela, deceased ; 
Galen G., who is operating a stock ranch ; Orville, who is in partnership with his brother 
Galen G.; and Melva, the wife of Clayton P. Wilson, who is engaged in the grocery business 
in Rapid City. Mr. Ford is a republican and is at present serving his ward as alderman, but 
has never held any other political office. He belongs to Hill City Lodge, No. 112, A. F. & A. M., 
in which he has held all of the chairs; also to the chapter, and commandery, of Rapid City; 
.and to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. In 1912 he was a delegate to the Grand 
Lodge of Masons at Pierre and he has also represented his district in the grand lodge of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. His prominence in those organizations indicates his 
popularity and his warm social nature, while the respect in which he is held in the business 
■circles of Hill City testifies to his ability and integrity. 



ALFRED C. FOGLESONG. 



Alfred C. Foglesong is conducting business as a hardware and implement merchant in 
Tulare. He was born January 9, 1884, in the vicinity of the town in which he now makes 
his home, his parents being Henry C. and Sophia (Lips) Foglesong, who reside in Belmont 
township, Spink county, about eight miles east of Tulare on what is known as the old 
family homestead. The father was one of the pioneer settlers and became one of the 
prominent residents of the county, taking an active and helpful part in all that pertained 
to the welfare and upbuilding of his district. 

Alfred C. Foglesong was a pupil in the rural schools of Belmont township and continued 
his education at Charles City, Iowa, but left school at the age of nineteen years and returned 
to the old home farm, upon which he remained until he reached the age of twenty-two years. 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 179 

Ih: then establislied a general store in Tulare wliieh lie conducted for about four years and 
on the expiration of that period was appointed postiiuister of Tulare. At the same time 
he beyan dealing in hardware and farm inipleiiienis ami is now conducting a growing and 
gratifying business in that line of trade, lb' >tudii - the needs and wishes of his patrons 
and the honorable and reliable methods whieh he inauijiuated have been strong elements in 
his success. For nine years he was eonneeteil w itli the |">>tollice either as assistant postmaster 
or as postmaster, and held the latter position until 1915. 

Mr. Foglesong was married near Tulare on the 1st of Kovember, 1906, to Miss Rose 
Marzahn, the adopted daughter of August and Mary Marzalm, now living near Tulare. Her 
own parents, Christ and Sophia Eiclienberger are deceased and are buried in Redfield ceme- 
tery. Jlr. and Mrs. Foglesong have become parents of two children: Mildred, yet at home; 
and Leland, who died in infancy. 

Mr. Foglesong holds membership in the German Methodist Episcopal church, belongs 
also to the Masonic lodge and gives his political indorsement to the republican party. Tlip 
principles which have governed his life are those which everywhere command respect and 
conlidence. He has the goodwill of his fellow townsmen and their high regard. He is a 
typical American citizen, ready at all times to do his duty and actuated by that laudable 
ambition which is not only the basis of success but also the foundation for general 
advancement. 



WALFRED F. CARLBERG. 



Walfred F. Carlberg is recognized as one of the republican leaders of Roberts county 
and is also well known in business circles, conducting a sales agency for various automo- 
biles. He was born at Spring Garden, Goodhue county, Minnesota, September 19, 1872, a 
son of Andrew and Maria (Olson) Carlberg, both of whom were natives of Sweden, in 
which country they were reared and married. After crossing the Atlantic to the new 
world they settled in Minnesota, wliere the father engaged in farming, residing for several 
j'cars in Goodhue county. In 1877 he removed to Bigstonc comity, where he homesteaded, 
becoming one of the first settlers of that locality. He contributed in large measure to its 
development and aided in laying broad and deep the foundation upon which has been 
built its present prosperity. In politics he was always an earnest and active republican. 
He belonged to the Lutheran church, took a very active interest in the church work and 
was leader of the singing for a number of years. To him and his wife were born eight 
children, five of whom are yet living: Charlie, a resident farmer of Bigstone coiuity, 
Minnesota; Mary, the wife of Louis Harrison, a retired farmer living in Clinton, Minne- 
sota ; Anna, the wife of Swan Erickson, a farmer living near Clinton ; Albert, who is 
engaged in the land and insurance business at Grassrange, Montana; and Walfred F., of 
this review. 

The last named was a little lad of five summers at the time of the removal of the 
family to Bigstone county, where he pursued his education in the country schools. He 
worked on a farm until 1892 and then went to Clinton, Minnesota, where he learned the 
blacksmith's trade, which he there followed until 1897. That year witnessed his arrival 
in Sisseton, where he conducted a blacksmith shop for four years. He did general black- 
smithing and enjoyed a large patronage. The industry which he displayed and his honor- 
able methods were the features which won him a substantial business and brought to him 
a gratifying financial return. He extended liis interests to include an implement business, 
which he carried on in connection with bla. ksiiiUliiiiL: until 1901, when he sold his shop 
and turned his attention to the general hardware trade, being in partnership with his 
brother, A. B. Carlberg. In 1905 the brothers sold their hardware stock, and our subject 
purchased his brother's interest and concentrated his efforts upon the implement business. 
At the present time, however, he is engaged in the automobile business, conducting a sales 
agency, handling the Ford and Reo cars. Success in large measure is attending his efforts, 
and already this year he has sold more than one hundred cars. 

In 1893 Mr. Carlberg was united in marriage to Miss Henrietta Goebel, who was born 
in Minnesota, a daughter of Henry Goebel, one of the early settlers of that state. Her 



ISO HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

father engaged in merchandising in several towns in Minnesota and in South Dakota, and 
is now a resident of St. Paul. To Mr. and Mrs. Carlberg has been born a son, Kenneth, 
thirteen years of age. 

In addition to his home property and his business in Sisseton, Mr. Carlberg owns a 
good farm in Roberts county. He and his wife hold membership in the Presbyterian church 
and are people of the highest respectability and worth. Fraternally he is connected with 
the Knights of Pythias and has served as vice chancellor in his lodge for several years. 
In politics he is an active republican, interested in the success of the party, and is now 
serving as chairman of the central county committee. He has also been school treasurer 
and his aid and cooperation can be counted upon to further any plan or measure for the 
public good along the lines of steady development. He possesses the enterprise which has 
been the dominant spirit in the upbuilding of the northwest, and the success which has 
attended him in his business career shows that his efforts have been put forth along pro- 
gressive lines. 



L. T. TVEDT. 



L, T. Tvedt, one of the venerable citizens and retired agriculturists of Taopi township, 
has been a resident of this state for more than three decades and is the owner of a valuable 
farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Minnehaha county and forty acres in Brown county. 
His birth occurred in Norway on the 1st of April, 1834, his parents being T. L. and Anna 
Tvedt, botli of whom are deceased. The father devoted his attention to farming and stock- 
raising throughout his active business career. 

L. T. Tvedt acquu'ed his education in the schools of his native land and after putting 
aside his textbooks started out as an agriculturist on his own account. In 1856, when a 
young man of twenty-two, he wedded Miss Mary Widen, of Norway, and they have five 
living children. The family emigrated to the United States in 1882, locating in Iowa, 
where they remained for one year. In 1883 they came to South Dakota and during the first 
two years of their residence in this state lived with a sister of Mr. Tvedt. Subsequently 
our subject purchased the farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Taopi township on which 
he has resided continuously since and in the operation of which he has won a gratifying 
and well merited measure of prosperity. The property is splendidly equipped in every 
particular, modern machinery facilitates the work of the fields and the place has been 
bi ought to a high state of cultivation and improvement. Mr. Tvedt has twenty head of 
cattle and sixty head of hogs. He also owns a tract of forty acres in Brown county but is 
no longer engaged in agricultural pursuits, leaving the active work of the fields to his son, 
William L. 

Mr. Tvedt gives his political allegiance to the republican party, while his religious faith 
is that of the Lutheran church. He is fond of fishing and derives therefrom both recreation 
and pleasuie. He has never regretted his determination to establish his home in the new 
world, for here he has won a comfortable competence and the high esteem of the people of his 
community. Mr. Tvedt has now passed the eighty-first milestone on life's journey and can 
look back upon an active, honorable and useful career. 



M. L. TOBIN. 



In the spring of 1883, M. L. Tobin established a blacksmith shop in Huron which he has 
conducted continuously throughout the intervening three decades, now owning the finest shop 
of the kind in South Dakota. He has also been prominent in public life and served as a 
member of the state senate from 1907 until 1909. His birth occurred in Massachusetts on 
the 33d of January, 1857, his parents being I'atrick and Katherine (Morrisey) Tobin, of that 
state. In 1858 they removed to Janesville, Wisconsin, and there spent the remainder of their 
lives. 

M. L. Tobin attended the public schools in the acquirement of an education and subse- 




il. L. T<:)BIX 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 183 

quently learned the blacksmith's trade. In the spring of 18S3, in association with Frank 
Wilson of Janesville, he came to Huron, South Dakota, and opened a blacksmith shop, 
which he has carried on continuously since, with the exception of but one day. His shop was 
destroyed by fire on the 21st of January, 1903, but he immediately secured other quarters. 
In the early days he manufactured wagons and buggies. Mr. Tobin's shop is well equipped 
in every particular, having electric light and power and the most modern machinery. It is, 
in fact, one of the best establishments of the kind in the entire state, and in its conduct our 
subject has won a gratifying and well merited measure of prosperity. He is a director of 
the machinery department of the state board of agriculture, being appointed by Governor 
Vessey and reappointed under Governor Byrne on the 20th of March, 1913, and also has 
charge of machinery and acts as superintendent of grounds for the State Fair Association. 

In 1S83 Mr. Tobin was united in marriage to Miss Emma Higgins, of Janesville, Wis- 
consin, by whom he has two children, Florence and Floyd J. He gives his political allegiance 
to the republican party and has ably served as a member of the town council for many 
years, while he has also been one of the commissioners of Huron. He was likewise honored 
by election to the state senate and remained an active and valued member of that legis- 
lative body from 190? until 1913, having in the meantime been reelected. Mr. Tobin belongs 
to the Knights of Columbus, the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Modern Woodmen 
of America, the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Royal Americans, and with his 
family attends the Catholic church. He enjoys the respect and confidence of all with whom 
he has had transactions and has achieved creditable success in the development of his busi- 
ness, which annually nets him a comfortable income. 



HIRAM H. MILLARD. 



Hiram H. Millard is filling the position of postmaster at Summit. He was born in 
Pennsylvania, August 29, 1849, a son of Harvey and Nancy (Courtright) Millard, both of 
whom were natives of the Empire state, the former born in 1817 and the latter in 1820. In 
childhood they removed with their respective parents to Pennsylvania and were reared and 
married in that state. In their family were four children, three of whom survive, namely: 
Andrew, who follows farming in Nebraska; Arad, a veterinary surgeon of Fond du Lac, 
Wisconsin; and Hiram H., of this review. The death of the father occurred in 1908, while 
the mother passed away in 1910, dying in the faith of the Presbyterian church, of which 
she had long been a devoted member. In his political views Mr. Millard was a democrat and 
filled some minor political oflSces. At an early day, before the war, he had removed with 
his family to Wisconsin and there he continued in the practice of veterinary surgery, which 
he made his life work. He was very successful, being accorded a large practice, and thus 
he provided a comfortable living for his family. He was a son of Ora Millard, a native of 
New York, as was the maternal grandfather, Joseph Courtright, who served as a soldier in 
the War of 1812 and was afterward granted a pension by the government. 

Following the removal of the family to Wisconsin, Hiram H. Millard acquired his edu- 
cation in the schools of that state and in early life he learned the carpenter's trade, which 
he followed for several years, becoming a contractor. On leaving Wisconsin he went to 
Iowa, where he engaged in carpentering for fourteen years and on the expiration of that 
period he came to South Dakota, settling in Summit in 1898. He then took up a claim 
in Roberts county and is still the owner of one hundred and sLxty acres of land which he 
developed and improved, making his home thereon for ten years. At the end of that time 
he established his residence in Summit, in April, 1908, and in the intervening period he has 
erected several houses in the town, thus contributing to its material development. 

In 1875 Mr. Millard was united in marriage to Miss Hattie E. O'Dell, a native of New 
York and a daughter of Joseph O'Dell, who was an early settler of Wisconsin and subse- 
quently became an agriculturist of South Dakota. Mr. and Mrs. Millard have two sons: 
Frank, who is a railroad man residing in Council BluflFs, Iowa; and Robert, who works for 
the street car company in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. 

Mr. Millard has always been active in politics and has firm faith in the principles of 
the democratic party. He has held some township offices and on the 16th of December, 



184 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

1914, he was appointed by Presidoiit Wilsun to the position of postmaster at Summit, in 
which capacity he is now serving. He belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and 
to the Jlodern Woodmen of America and his religious faith is manifest in his membership 
in the Christian church. His fellow townsmen recognize in him a man of sterling worth 
whose motives will bear close investigation and scrutiny and whose life has measured up to 
high standards. Although he started out a poor boy, he has won a fair measure of success 
and at the same time has maintained an honorable name in all business relations. 



HOX. HENRY HEINTZ. 



Hon. Henry Heintz, one of the leading and highly esteemed citizens of Brookings county, 
South Dakota, has there resided continuously for more than a third of a century and 
since 1901 has held the office of postmaster at Elkton. His birth occurred in Luxemburg 
on the 1st of October, 1848, his parents being George and Madaline (Lambarell) Heintz, 
both of whom there passed away. He was reared at home, acquired his education in the 
public schools and spent some years in travel through France. For about seven years he 
made his home in Paris but in 1871 crossed the Atlantic to the United States. In 1878 he 
came to South Dakota, locating in Brookings county and taking up a homestead near the 
present site of Elkton, which had not yet sprung into existence. He was obliged to make 
his filing on his homestead at Flandreau, and as there was still no railroad or other road 
of any kind, traveled by compass across the prairie. Mr. Heintz resided on his farm and 
carried on general agricultural pursuits continuously and successfully for about twenty-three 
years or until 1901, when he took up his abode in Elkton in order to assume the duties of 
postmaster, to which office he had previously been appointed under President William 
McKinley. Subsequently he received appointments from Presidents Roosevelt and Taft and 
has held the position continuously since 1901, making a highly satisfactory and commendable 

In 1890 Mr. Heintz was elected on the republican ticket to represent his district in the 
state legislature, in which he served during the session of 1890-91, faithfully and ably 
promoting the interests and welfare of his constituency. He is a worthy exemplar of the 
Masonic fraternity, belonging to Elkton Lodge, No. 57, A. F. & A. M., and is likewise a 
member of Elkton Lodge, No. 124, of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. His life has 
been actuated by high principles and characterized by manly conduct and in the community 
where he has now lived for more than a third of a century he enjoys that warm personal 
friendship and kindly esteem which are always given in recognition of genuine worth in the 
individual. 



LEWIS F. BARBER, V. S. 



Dr. Lewis F. Barber, a successful veterinary surgeon of Tyndall, belongs to a family that 
has numerous representatives in this country. There are several branches of the family 
in America and, although an attempt has been made, it has been found impossible to trace 
them back to a common ancestor in the mother country. The branch to which Dr. Barber 
belongs is descended from John Barber, of Yorkshire, England, whose son, Robert, emigrated 
to the colony of Delaware about 1687. His father, David W. Barber, was born in Penn- 
sylvania, April 2, 1837, a son of James W. Barber, who in 1847 removed with his family to 
Freeport, Hlinois, purchasing a farm situated two miles north of the town. David W. 
Barber was reared in Illinois and was married in Freeport, on the 7th of November, 1862, 
to Miss Anna E. Crocker, a daughter of Luther E. and Everetta S. Crocker. By her mar- 
riage she became the mother of eight children: Mrs. Margaret Colgan, Mrs. Carrie A. Dun- 
woodie, Elizabeth, James W., Lewis F., Mrs. Nettie Berry, Edward S., Samuel and Joseph. 
In 1872 David W. Barber removed with his family to the old town of Bon Homme, South 
Dakota, and there opened a general store which he conducted for a period of five years. He 
subsequently entered a claim six miles southeast of Tyndall and lived thereon for three 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 185 

jears, perfecting his title to the land. In 1883 he went to Tyndall and opened a general 
store, continuing in this business until 1894. At that time he returned to his farm, on 
which he resided until 1905, when he went to De Funiak county, Florida. However, he 
remained there only two years, after which he returned to Tyndall, much preferring this 
state as a place of residence to the peninsular state. He has filled many positions of trust 
and responsibility with honor, having been postmaster of old Bon Homme for seven years, 
and having also served as county treasurer, judge of the probate court and justice of the 
peace. 

Lewis F. Barber was the second sou born to his parents and is a native of Bon Homme 
county, his birth having occuned at the old town of Bon Homme, September 2, 1872, a few 
months after the family mi,L;iut<cl truiii Illinois to South Dakota. He grew to manhood 
in his native county and bore his share of responsibility for the cultivation of the farm. 
He also assisted his father in the general store which the latter owned. In 1900 he began 
a three years' course in the Cliicago Veterinary College and was duly graduated from that 
institution in 1903. He immediately located in Tyndall for the practice of his profession, 
forming a partnership with H. 0. Sanford, the tirm being known as Sanford & Barber. This 
association was nuiintained to the mutual ])rulit of tlie [lartners until 1907, when Dr. Barber 
bought out Mr. iSanford. The following year his elder brother, having in the meantime 
completed the course in the same college, was admitted to partnership, the firm being now 
known as Barber Brothers. They are thoroughly prepared for the practice of veterinary 
medicine and surgery and are proving very successful in their professional work. Their 
hospital is well appointed and has proved of great value to the stockraisers of the county. 

Dr. Barber was married September 12, 1902, to Miss Lucile C'ooley, a daughter of J. P. 
Cooley, who was a well known banker and stockman of Bon Homme county, but is now 
deceased. Dr. and Mrs. Barber have a daughter, Helen. The parents are members of the 
Congregational church and contribute to its support. Dr. Barber has a creditable military 
record, as he served for eighteen months in the Philippine Islands as a member of the First 
South Dakota Volunteer Infantry under Colonel Frost of Yankton. In one of the many 
skirmishes in which he was engaged, he sustained a wound, from the effects of which he has 
never fully recovered. Dr. Barber has proven himself a man of ability in his chosen pro- 
fession and as a private citizen has manifested those manly qualities of character which 
invariably win respect and honor. He is widely known throughout the county and all who 
have been brought in contact with him hold him in high esteem. 



KARL T. AISENBREY. 



Karl T. Aiscnbrey, a resident of Alpena, occupying the position of cashier of the Bank 
of Alpena, was born in Hutchinson county. South Dakota. October 7, 1889, a son of Karl W. 
Aisenbrey, a native of Germany, who came to America in 1873. He was one of the pioneer 
residents of Hutchinson county, where his father, Andrew Aisenbrey, was one of the first to 
secure a homestead claim. For many years Karl Aisi nlirry, Sr.. was identified with agricul- 
tural pursuits but is now retired from active busim-- and r.-idcs in Alpena. He married 
.Johanna Bachmann and they became the parents of scv.-n cliiMn-n. 

Karl T. Aisenbrey, the fifth in order of birth, attended the public schools of his native 
county and afterward entered the Sioux Falls Business College, in which he completed the 
full course of study. He taught school for a year but afterward resumed the occupation 
to which he had been reared, devoting three years to farming in Beadle county. In 1909 he 
purchased an interest in the Bank of Alpena and was appointed its cashier. He has the 
active management of the institution and is a member of its board of directors. He is a 
young man of good business ability who carefully watches over the interests of the institu- 
tion and wisely safeguards the depositors. 

On the 26th of November, 1913, Mr. Aisenbrey was married to Miss Isadore McMillan, 
a daughter of W. Hodge and Medora (Kerns) McMillan, of Alpena. They have one child, 
Neda Bertha. Mr. Aisenbrey votes with the republican party where national issues and 
questions are involved but does not feel bound by party ties at local elections and casts his 
ballot according to the dictates of his judgment, basing his vote upon the capability of the 



186 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

eaiiditlates. He is a member of the Dutch Reformed churcli and he finds recreation in all 
healthful outdoor sports, particularly enjoying hunting and fishing trips. Already he has 
won recognition as one of the county's capable and progressive young business men and the 
course which he has thus far pursued argues well for the future. 



E. F. BAKER. 



E. F. Baker, a representative and substantial citizen of Minnehaha countj'. South Dakota, 
has for the past seventeen years held the important position of manager of the E. A. Brown 
Elevator & Grain Company at Garretson. His birth occurred in Prince Edward Island, 
Canada, on the Gth of April, 1862, his parents being Jesse and Jane (Leard) Baker, who were 
there born, reared and married. The father, an agriculturist by occupation, died in 1914, 
and the mother passed away there in December, 1907. 

E. F. Baker was reared under the parental roof and acquired a limited education in the 
common schools. In 1884, when a young man of twenty-two years, he left home and came 
to South Dakota, locating at Valley Springs, where he worked as a carpenter for two 
summers, having served an apprenticeship at that trade in Prince Edward Island. Subse- 
quently he embarked in the butchering business at Beaver Creek, but his establishment was 
destroyed by fire in 1889 and for about three years afterward he was engaged in well 
drilling. On the expiration of that period he again turned his attention to the butchering 
business, conducting an enterprise of that character at Luverne, Minnesota, for two years. 
In 1898 he was placed in charge of E. A. Brown's grain business at Garretson, South Dakota, 
and in that capacity has ably served to the present time or for a period of seventeen years. 
In this connection he has manifested excellent business ability and sound judgment, his 
efforts contributing in no small degree to the continued growth and success of the concern 
which he represents. 

In 1886 Mr. Baker was joined in wedlock to Miss Mary Rogers, a native of Prince 
Edward Island, by whom he had two children: Jessie Margaret, who died when sixteen 
years old; and Ethel May, who graduated from Yankton College in 1915. He gives his 
political allegiance to the republican party and in 1911 and 1912 served as mayor of Garret- 
son, while for eight years he was a member of the school board and served by appointment 
one year on the council. Fraternally he is identified with the Masons, belonging to Unity 
Lodge, No. 130, and his wife is a devoted member of the Presbyterian church. During the 
period of his residence in Garretson he has become widely and favorably known and he 
holds the esteem and confidence of all with whom business or official relations have brought 
him in contact. 



GEORGE BUTTERFIELD SAMMONS. 

George Butterfield Sammons was one of the pioneer merchants of Sioux Falls, the third 
in reality, arriving here in 1873. He passed away at the home of his daughter, Mrs. J. D. 
Russell, in that city, November 20, 1914. He was born in Utica, New York, on the 24th of 
April, 1834, a son of Benjamin and Amanda (Butterfield) Sammons, the former of Scotch 
parentage. 

George Butterfield Sammons received his education in the public schools and in a private 
academy and upon putting aside his textbooks found employment in a hardware store as 
bookkeeper. His business e-xperience convinced him of the value of a thorough commercial 
training and he therefore entered a business college and prepared for the work of an expert 
accountant. He was next connected with a number of firms in Utica, New York. Subse- 
quently he removed to Illinois and later to Nashua, Iowa. He next went to Frankville, Iowa, 
where he engaged in business, but in 1871 he made his way to Minnehaha county, Dakota, 
and took up a homestead in the southeastern part of Benton township. He then returned 
to Iowa and did not locate in this state until 1873. As soon as he proved up on his claim 
he disposed of it and in 1873 embarked in the dry-goods and grocery business in Sioux Fallfi. 




JEORGK n. SAiDIOX.'- 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 189 

At that time there were only two others in business in the city, tliese being Charles Howard 
and William Van Epps. In 1880 he moved his stock to Brandon, where he conducted a gen- 
eral store for a time. At length, however, he returned to Sioux Falls and engaged in the 
grocery business with Samuel Cochran, which association was continued with mutual pleas- 
ure and profit until 1908, when the partnership was dissolved. The firm was widely known 
and enjoyed a reputation for commercial honor and integrity that was unassailable. They 
carried a large stock of goods and their customers could always be sure that groceries bought 
from them were fresh. After disposing of his interest in the business Mr. Sammons was for 
two years in the county auditor's office. He was active until failing health caused him to 
retire and at the time of his death he was residing with his daughter. 

In 1856 Mr. Sammons was united in marriage to Miss Ada A. Robinson, a daughter of 
Elijah and Elizabeth (Jefferson) Robinson. Her paternal ancestors were of Scotch extrac- 
tion and early settlers of Vermont. The Jefferson family was also of early origin and 
among those who came to America on the Mayflower was one Jepson, which name was after- 
ward changed to Jefferson. Mrs. Robinson, the mother of Mrs. Sammons, was a poetess of 
ability and was associated with Susan B. Anthony in her great work. To Mr. and Mrs. Sam- 
mons were born two children: William H., who is now residing in Ely, Nevada; and Jennie 
R., the wife of J. D. Russell, of Sioux Falls, who is connected with the Chicago, Milwaukee & 
St. Paul Railroad. They have a daughter, Winifred C. Mrs. Sammons passed away October 
28, 1911, three years before the demise of her husband. 

Mr. Sammons was a republican in politics and was the first treasurer of Sioux Falls, 
holding that office for one year at that time and later for five years, and discharging his 
duties with conscientiousness and ability. His religious adherence was given to the Baptist 
church. He was one of the charter members of the first Masonic lodge in Sioux Falls and 
was always enthusiastic in his allegiance to that order, embodying in his life its principle 
of human brotherhood. He last attended lodge on the occasion of the installation of officers, 
at which time he was taken ill and brought home, never being able to go out again. He 
broke down completely but was in no pain, merely the surrender of nature to old age. He 
was one of the real pioneers of his city and manifested those sturdy virtues that enabled 
the early settler to endure the hardships of a new country and to lay broad and deep the 
foundation for a great commonwealth. He was well known and those who knew him most 
intimately had for him the highest regard. 



GEORGE PHILIP. 



George Philip, member of the South Dakota bar, practicing at Fort Pierre since June, 
1906, is one of the younger representatives of the profession, yet his comparatively young 
manhood seems no bar to his progress, whi.li is liascl ii|miii ('uiii|in limsive kiiowliMlu;o of 
the law, the result of close and discriminating; stn.l\. lie was born at Fort Aniiustus, 
Scotland, .July 16, 1880, and is a son of Rol>crt and ( atlnaine I'liilip. lloth parents ]mssed 
away in his early years, the father dying in April, 1884, and the mother in October, 1887. 
The usual public school advantages were enjoyed by the son, and then, ambitious to enter 
upon a professional career, he afterward took up the study of law in the University of 
Michigan, from which he was graduated in June, 1906. Before beginning practice he had 
business experience along several lines. He was at different times a lumberjack, cowboy 
and farmer, and manifested industry and diligence along all those lines just as he has 
since entering upon the practice of law. He prepares his cases with thoroughness, presents 
his cause skillfully and logically, and the successes which he has already won are bringing 
to him an ever increasing clientage. He was formerly one of the directors of the F'ort 
Pierre National Bank. On the 1st of January, 1908, the law firm of Philip & Waggoner 
was formed and has a large clientele in the general practice of law. 

On the 30th of May, 1911, at Fort Pierre, Mr. Philip was united in marriage to Miss 
Isle Waldron, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Waldron. The father came to the terri- 
tory of Dakota with his family in the early '60s, setthng at Yankton. Her mother, who 
bore the maiden name of Jane E. Van Metre, was born near Vermillion, South Dakota, and 
was one of the first pupils in the "Old Log Schoolhouse" in that locality. Mr. and Mrs. 



190 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

Philip have two children, a son and a daughter: George, Jr., born April 14, l',)12; and 
Jean, born January 14, 1914. 

Mr. Philip gives stalwart support to the democratic party and was a delegate to the 
democratic national convention in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1912, when Woodrow Wilson 
was nominated. From the United States attorney general he received the appointment 
of assistant United States district attorney for the district of South Dakota, taking office 
January 1, 1914. He is one of the best known representatives of Masonry in the state 
and has been honored with various offices in the fraternity. He belongs to Hiram Lodge, 
No. 123, A. F. & A. M., of Fort Pierre, of which he is past master. He also belongs to 
Pierre Chapter, No. 23, R. A. M., of which he was high priest for one year. He became a 
Bjiight Templar in Brule Commandery, No. 19, of Chamberlain, South Dakota, but after- 
ward demitted to Capital City Commandery, No. 21, at Pierre, of which he was the first 
eminent commander. He likewise belongs to Oriental Consistory, No. 1, S. P. K. S., of 
Yankton, which he joined in March, 1903, and since 1910 he has been wise master of 
Mackey Chapter, No. 1, Rose Croix. In 1911 he was made knight commander of the Court 
of Honor, and he has been junior grand warden of the Grand Lodge, to which office he was 
elected in June, 1911, while in June, 1912, he became senior grand warden. In June. 1913, 
he was made deputy grand master, and in June, 1914, was elected grand master, retiring in 
June, 1915. His administration is regarded as a most important and progressive era in 
the history of Masonry in South Dakota. He is a Mystic Shriner, belonging to Naja 
Temple at Deadwood, South Dakota. He also belongs to Huron Lodge, No. 444, B. P. O. E., 
while in the strict path of his profession his membership connections are with the South 
Dakota State Bar Association and the American Bar Association. His life, well spent, has 
gained him high regard and has brought him to a prominent position in social and pro- 
circles. 



JAMES KIRK. 



James Kirk has had quite an eventful life, as for a number of years he was a mission- 
ary in Africa, for a time was in business there, and is now engaged in farming in Bon Homme 
county, this state, where he is one of the best known and wealthiest men. He was born 
on a farm known as Crary Hill, parish of Duris Deer, Dumfriesshire, Scotland, November 
9, 1854, a son of John and Margaret (McKeen) Kirk, both of whom died in their native 
land. In 1869, when a youth of about fifteen j-ears, James Kirk emigrated to America, sail- 
ing from Liverpool and joining his brother Robert, who was a farmer in Gallatin county, 
Missouri. The two worked all winter on the construction of a railroad bridge at St. 
Charles, Missouri, and then .James Kirk went to Minnesota, where he was employed on 
farms for two years. 

In the meantime his brother became a student in the L'nion Park Theological Seminary 
in Chicago. James Kirk visited him in that city in October, 1871, shortly after the grciU 
fire. He then went south and ran a sawmill and later a cotton gin in Tennessee and in 
Miss)ssi]>pi. His next removal was to Colorado, where he bought sheep for about six 
months. Upon returning east he worked in Chicago for a year and while there made 
arrangements for going to Africa in 1873 under the control of the American Missionary 
Association. He visted his parents in Sanquhar, Dumfriesshire, for six months, and then 
went to the Sherbro Island, on the west coast of Africa, where he labored for three 
yeais and three months as a missionary. At the end of that time he was forced to 
return to a more temperate climate, as his health was becoming impaired. He returned 
to Scotland and there married, but after a few months returned to Africa, this time being 
sent by the Church Missionary Society and stationed in the Niger river region, in Soudan. 
After remaining there for three years and three months he again returned home to recu- 
perate, and upon going back to Africa for a third time entered into partnership with John 
Dulzel Fairly at Lagos, on the west coast. They kept a trading store there, dealing in 
general supplies, but after one year Mr. Kirk found his health was again failing and 
went home. He returned to Africa a fourth time but became convinced that he could not 
endure the climate any longer and sold his interest in the store to Mr. Fairly after six 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 191 

or eight months. He again visited his relatives in Scotland and then emigrated with his 
family to America and settled upon the farm where he now lives. Before bringing his 
family he made a trip to America and purchased the south half of section 26, Hancock 
]irociiut, Bon nuiiiiin' i(.iiiity. :\rr. Kirk now has about one thousand acres of some of the 
liiicht land ill till' slatr. In tlir suiniiii'r of 1914 he helped to organize the Farmers and 
Mi-rch.mts Statr liaiik at S|u ini^lii'M, this state, and is still one of that institution's largest 
stockholders. His brother Robert became a farmer and minister of Bon Homme county- 
after completing his course in the Union Park Seminary of Chicago, and owns a great deal 
of land in South Dakota, although a few years ago he removed to Virginia, where he 
now lives. 

James Kirk was married in 1875 to Miss Mary Mair, a native of Galston, Ayrshire, 
Scotland, and a daughter of Robert and Margaret (Young) Mair. The mother died in 
Scotland, but the father subsequently came to America and passed away in South Dakota. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Kirk five children have been born. John, who is now managing the home 
faim, is proving unusually successful as an agriculturist. He spent four years as a 
student in Yankton College, graduated from the State Agricultural College at Brookings, 
and took a post-graduate course at the State University of Wisconsin at Madison, that 
state. There he met Miss Edna Murray Ketcham, whom he married and who is a graduate 
of the State University of Wisconsin. Margaret was for three years a student in Yankton 
College, and is now a nurse in the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Hospital at Mobridge, 
this state. Mary, James, Jr., and Louise have all graduated from the State Normal School 
at Springfield, and Mary was graduated from Vermillion. James, Jr., graduated from the 
Springfield Normal, after which he took the course in the State University at Vermillion 
and then completed his legal education at Seattle, Washington. He entered an ofK.-r, at 
Wagner, Charles Mix county, this state, and is proving an able attorney. Louise is now 
teaching at Lake Andes. 

Mr. Kirk is a republican and is a devoted member of the Presbyterian church. Fra- 
ternally he is a Mason and has attained the thirty-second degree. His has been a life in 
which intense moral fervor and an unusual business ability have been combined, and he 
has been a moving force in both the material and spiritual interests of the communities 
in which he has resided. He is not only one of the substantial men of Bon Homme county 
but he is also one of the most respected, because of his personal worth and close adherence 
to the standards of Christianity. 



JONATHAN NHLES DUNHAM. 

Jonathan Niles Dunham, lawyer and journalist of Mitchell, was born at Orland. Indiana. 
October 18, 1854. His father, Daniel Dunham, removed to the vicinity of Orland with his 
parents in 1836. His ancestors had settled amid the Catskill mountains in New York 
long prior to the Revolutionary war. The mother of J. N. Dunham bore the maiden name 
of Mary A. Niles and was born in Lorain county, Ohio. Her ancestors were early settlers 
of Massachusetts, and one of them was at Deerfield, Massachusetts, at the time of the 
memorable Indian massacre there. Her grandfather, Jonathan Niles, participated in the 
battle of Bunker Hill. About the year 1845 her parents removed with their family from 
Ohio to Indiana, settling near Orland, and it was in that locality that she formed the 
acquaintance of Daniel Dunham, who sought her hand in marriage. 

J. N. Dunham, whose name introduces this review, attended the common schools of 
Lagrange county, Indiana, and also the collegiate institute at Ontario, Indiana. He pur- 
sued the study of law in DeWitt, Iowa, and was admitted to the bar in 1877. He was a 
young man of nineteen years when he went to Iowa, remaining a resident of Clinton and 
Delaware counties from 1873 until 1883. In October of the latter year he removed to 
Jerauld county, Dakota territory, where he has since made his home. Throughout the 
intervening period he has been active at the bar and in journalism and is an able lawyer, 
well versed in the principles of jurisprudence. In 1889, when the state was admitted to 
the Union, he was serving by appointment as clerk of the courts of Jerauld county. 

At Wheatland, Iowa, on the 18th of September, 1877, Mr. Dunham was united in mar- 



192 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

riage to Miss Clara A. Rogers, a daughter of S. H. Rogers. Her ancestors were among the 
early Puritans of New England, and later were among the prominent families of the state 
of New York. Mr. and Mrs. Dunham have two children. Grace E. gave her hand in mar- 
riage to Professor A. H. Avery, at Woonsocket, South Dakota, her husband being now 
superintendent of the city schools of Spencer, Iowa. Fred N. Dunham, who wedded Miss 
Rachel Allison, of White, South Dakota, is now serving as postmaster at Wessington 
Springs, this state. 

Mr. Dunham has always been a republican in his political views since age conferred 
upon him the right of franchise, but has never sought the honors and emoluments of office 
as a reward for party fealty. His long residence in the state, covering a period of almost 
a third of a century, has made him largely familiar with the events which figure most 
prominently in its annals. Moreover, he is the author of a history of Jerauld county, 
which was published in 1910, and now has in preparation a history of Davison county, 
South Dakota. • Always interested in matters of historical research, there are few so well 
prepared to speak of the early days and of the later period of development and progress. 



WALTER H. CAER. 



Walter H. Carr is one of the prominent pioneer merchants of South Dakota, in which 
connection he has become widely and favorably known. He is also prominent in Grand 
Army circles, being numbered among the honored veterans of the Civil war to whom the 
country owes a debt of gratitude that can never be paid. He was born in England on the 
27th of February, 1848, a son of William and Ann (Kinder) Carr, the former a practicing 
physician. The family came to the United States about 1851 and settled near Utica, New 
York. The father died In 1873 at Bloomington, Indiana, while the motlier later passed away 
at Utica, New York. 

Walter H. Carr was a little lad of but three summers when the family came to the 
United States. He was educated in the public schools of New York and was about twelve 
years of age at the time of the outbreak of the Civil war. Two years later, or in 1863, he 
enlisted in defense of the Union, becoming a member of Company D, Second New Y'ork Heavy 
Artillery, enlisting in that command at Utica. He was just past fifteen years of age at 
the time, being one of the youngest to enter the army from New York. One of his two 
brothers joined the same company and with other recruits was sent on to Washington to 
join the regiment, which was then stationed at Fort C. F. Smith, Virginia, on the Potomac 
river, near W^ashington, D. C. There the recruits were taught all the arts of war in both 
artillery and infantry practice and prepared for the hard military service that was soon to 
follow. About the 17th of May, 1864, the regiment was ordered to the front and was 
attached to the famous Second Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, under the leadership of 
that gallant commander, General W. S. Hancock. The army had just participated in the 
great battle of the Wilderness near Richmond, Virginia. His regiment joined the Second 
Corps just in time to be ordered into the battle of Spottsylvania, Virginia, where they lost a 
large number of men in killed, captured and wounded. Mr. Carr was afterward in the engage- 
ments at North Ann, Virginia, May 22; Totopotomoy, May 31st; Cold Harbor, June od; 
Petersburg, June 16th to 18th; Strawberry Plain, July 28th; Deep Bottom, August 14-16; and 
Reams Station, August 25, 1864. At the last named place he and his brother, Henry Carr, 
were taken prisoners on the skirmish line. His brother, Henry, died many years afterward 
at Utica, New York, passing away in 1911, but the other brother, Charles, who had joined 
the army, was killed at Petersburg, Virginia, at the battle of the Mine, July 30, 1864. 

After Walter H. and Henry Carr were captured at Reams Station they were sent to 
Petersburg, thence to Richmond and were confined in Libby prison two weeks, after which 
they were transferred to Belle Isle, near Richmond, Virginia, where they remained for about 
two weeks. In the latter part of September he and his brother were transferred from 
Belle Isle prison pen to Salisbury (N. C.) prison pen, being confined there until February 
22, 1865, when they were sent to Goldsboro, North Carolina, where they were paroled. They 
then marched to Wilmington, North Carolina, and remained in camp about one week, after 
which they went to Annapolis, Maryland, by steamer, there entering a parole camp, where 




WALTKH H. CA 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 195 

they remained until discharged on the 10th of June, 1865, on account of the close of the war. 
Walter H. Carr suffered all of the horrors of the various prisons, where no comforts were 
supplied and where the scanty provisions were of such a nature that they were unfit to eat 
had not absolute hunger and starvation driven the men to it. While there incarcerated he 
saw hundreds about him die of exposure and starvation. When the war closed he was dis- 
charged and returned home, but he was greatly broken down in health owing to the hard- 
ships of his prison life. His strength was so greatly exhausted that he was unable to walk 
and was carried into the house. His military record is one of which he has every reason to 
be proud, for he rendered nearly two years' faithful service to his country and yet was 
scarcely more than seventeen years of age when the war ended. 

When Mr. Carr had sufficiently recovered his health he was employed in various ■v\ays 
until May, 1867, when he left Utica, New York, for Yankton, Dakota Territory. He made 
his way to Omaha, Nebraska, and by steamer proceeded up the Missouri river to Yankton, 
where he arrived on the 10th of June, 1867. There was no railroad in those days and 
pioneer conditions were everywhere prevalent. Judge W. W. Brookings of Yankton was a 
friend of Mr. Carr and it was through his influence that the latter came to Dakota Terri- 
tory. His first work in this territory was in hauling corn from Yankton to Sioux Falls 
with ox teams, the corn being used by the soldiers at the fort. Soon after his arrival here 
he took a preemption claim on Smutty Bear Bottom and lived there for two years. On the 
6th of JIarch, 1876, he engaged in business on Third street in Yankton and continued there 
until UiOO, wlien he removed to Hurley, South Dakota, and established the grocery store of 
which he has now been proprietor for over fifteen years. His success has been due to his 
enterprising and thoroughly reliable methods. 

On the 30th of February, 1878, Mr. Carr was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth 
Allen, a daughter of Joseph Allen. The wedding ceremony was performed by the Rev. 
Melancthon Hoyt at Swan Lake, Dakota Territory, which town was then the county seat of 
Turner county but is no longer in existence. They have three children, namely: Allen 
Charles, a veteran of the Spanish-American war, serving one year in the Philippines, who is 
now residing in Hurley, South Dakota; Louis Edward, of Minneapolis, Minnesota; and 
Emma Grace. There are also two grandchildren, Walter Mills and Carroll Beulah, children 
of Allen C. Carr. 

In his political views Mr. Carr has always been a stalwart republican since age conferred 
upon him the right of franchise. He is a Mason, belonging to St. John's Lodge, No. 1. at 
Yankton, South Dakota. Since joining the Grand Army of the Republic he has been most 
active in its work. He served as commander of Phil Kearney Post at Yankton, South 
Dakota, in 1883, and has been commander of E. S. McCook Post of Hurley for the past eight 
years. He has also been senior vice commander of the State Department of the G. A. R. 
of South Dakota and has served as a delegate to many national encampments. He proudly 
wears the little bronze button of the order and he is one of its most popular and best known 
representatives in South Dakota. He is also one of the oldest living pioneers in South Dakota 
and has been an active factor in the upbuilding and development of the territory and state, 
sharing the hardships of pioneer life and taking part in the later work of improvement. He 
is well known not only in Yankton and Turner counties but throughout southeastern 
Dakota, where he is honored and respected as a citizen who has cheerfully and wisely per- 
formed his full share in building up, from the foundation, one of the famous sovereign 
states of the Union. 



CORNELIUS W. AND HENRY A. MARTENS. 

Cornelius W. and Henry A. Martens are successfully engaged in the general real-estate 
business in Milbank. They are the sons of John and Theodora fTilh'iiiaiiRi :\l:utens, both 
natives of Holland, born respectively in 1829 and 1832. The paternal grandfather, Martin 
Martens, who was a painter by trade and also followed agricultural pursuits, died in Green 
Bay, AVisconsin. The maternal grandfather passed awa\- in Holland. In 1850 John Mar- 
tens came to the United States and settled in Green Bay, Wisconsin. Subsequently he 
turned his attention to farming and still later entered the hotel business. In 1878 he came 



196 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

to South Dakota and took up a homestead, on which he is still living. His political belief 
is that of the democratic party and he is active in public afl'airs. His religious faith is 
that of the Roman Catholic church. His vcife passed away in 1913. They were married 
in 1857 and became the parents of nine children, seven of whom survive: M. P., who resides 
in Colgan, North Dakota, and is employed in a store; Cornelius W. and Henry A.; Joseph A., 
who is living in Seattle, Washington; Frank J., who is residing on land belonging to his 
father; Albert W., on the home farm; and Mary G., the wife of A. Vanstralen, likewise 
residing upon the homestead. 

Cornelius W. Martens was born in Green Bay, Wisconsin, on the 31st of January, IStjO, 
and received his general education in the school conducted by the Sisters of Notre Dame in 
Green Bay and also took a course in the Green Bay Business College, from which he grad- 
uated in ISTU. For three years he worked at the printer's trade and then removed to South 
Dakota and assisted his father with the work of developing his claim. In 1888 he was 
elected register of deeds, an office which he held for four years. At the end of that time 
he purchased a farm, which he operated until 1897, when he entered the Farmers Bank at 
Milbank. He remained with that institution for eight years. In 1904, in partnership with 
his brother Henry A., he embarked in the real-estate business in Milbank and they Ixave 
been accorded a liberal patronage and have gained an enviable reputation in local business 
circles. They buy and sell outright and also on commission. They own personally much 
city real estate and in connection with his brother he holds title to many acres of land in 
Grant and Roberts counties. 

Cornelius W. Martens was married on the 8th of February, 1888, at Big Stone, Soutli 
Dakota, to Mary J. Walsh, a native of Minnesota. They have become the parents of eleven 
children, namely : WMUiam J., who is in the lumber business in Webster, South Dakota ; 
Winnie T., at home; Francis M., who is connected with a garage at Webster; Margaret M., 
who completed the nurses' training course at the Mercy Hospital in Chicago this year; 
Irene H., who is a student in the Aberdeen State Normal College; Agnes E., Catherine and 
John E., all attending high school; Alice and Grace M., both of whom are students; and 
Mary P. 

Henry A. Martens was born in Green Bay on the 3d of February, 1863, and was educated 
in the schools of his native city. On starting out on his independent business career he 
followed the printer's trade but later engaged in the abstract business. He was also at 
one time deputy register of deeds. Since 1904 he has been engaged in the real-estate business 
in partnership with his brother Cornelius W. 

Henry A. Martens was married in October, 1893, to Miss Agatha Baxter, of Minneapolis, 
and their two children are: James, ten years of age; and Henry, a child of five years. 
Both Cornelius W. and Henry A. Martens are democrats in polities, belong to the Knights of 
Columbus and hold membership in the Roman Catholic church. They are much interested in 
everything that relates to the development of their community and cooperate in all move- 
ments which seek to promote the expansion and growth of Milbank. Both possess excellent 
business ability and the success which they have achieved is the result of their own energy, 
initiative and good management. 



FRANK A. LITTLE. 



Frank A. Little, an energetic and successful young lawyer of Hot Springs, is a native 
of South Dakota, born in Custer county, August 4, 1889. His parents, H. C. and Elvira J. 
(Loehr) Little, were both born near Elkhart, Indiana, the father in 1862 and the mother 
two years later. In early manhood Mr. Little, who was a wood worker, was employed in 
factories in northern Indiana. In 1888 he removed to South Dakota and located in Custer 
county, settling northeast of Bufi'alo Gap. After a short time he went to Hot Springs, 
where he is still residing and where he is engaged in the painting and decorating business. 
His wife is also living. Three of their six children are living: Frank A.; Howard, who is 
attending a technical school at Oakland, California; and Mary, who is a student in the Hot 
Springs high school. 

Frank A. Little was the third child born to his parents and at the usual age entered 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA l'J7 

tile |jublic schools ot' Hut. Springs, continuing therein until graduated from the higli school. 
He subsequently attended the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor and graihiated fioni 
the law department of that institution with the class of 1910. He has always di.-played 
great industry and energy and when but twelve years of age, although residing at home, 
lie worked for others when not in school, thus earning sufficient money to purchase his 
books and clothing. He continued to work outside of school hours and when, at the age of 
seventeen years, he entered law school, he had money in the bank. Upon his graduation 
therefrom he was but twenty years of age, although he had accomplished at that time more 
than many a man several years his senior. He went to San Diego, California, wliere he 
practiced his profession for a few months, after which he returned to Hot Springs, where 
he has since resided. He has won a large clientage and has not only gained an enviable 
reputation as a trial lawyer but his advice is often sought in settling legal questions that 
do not come before the courts. He lias practiced alone and the success that he has gained 
lias been due entirely to his own ability and initiative. He is also a stockholder in the 
Stockman's Bank of Hot Springs. 

Mr. Little is a democrat and is chairman of the democratic county central committee, 
is states attorney and is also city attorney, serving his fourth term in that capacity. 
Fraternally he belongs to the blue lodge and chapter of the Masonic order and has held 
olhce in those bodies, having served as secretary and as senior deacon of the lodge and is 
now junior warden, while of the chapter he is treasurer. He is also connected with the 
Veoinen, in which he is foreman, and the Woodmen of the World, in which he is clerk. He 
has achieved much for his years and is not only popular socially but is also respected 
jirofessionally by his brother attorneys and by the general public. 



FRANCIS M. CKAIN. M. D. 



In the thirty-three years of his practice of medicine and surgery in Spink county Dr. 
Francis M. Crain has become well established as one of the leading physicians of Redfield 
and his section of the state. Throughout the entire period he has kept in touch with the 
trend of modern thought and progress in connection with the science of medicine and his 
work has been fruitful of excellent results. A native of Indiana, lie was born in the town 
of Angola. -Tune ."i, ls:,r. and is a son of Abram D. and Harriett (Perry) Crain. The father 
was a pioneer -.ttlcr <'f Indiana, to which state he went with his parents from New York. 
Ho was a native, huxiever. of Canada, and the family is of Scotch lineage. In both the 
paternal ami maternal lines Dr. Crain represents old families that have been established on 
the American continent since the colonial period in the history of this country. Both his 
father and mother are now deceased and their remains were interred at Angola, Indiana. 
The latter was a cousin of Commodore Perry, the famous naval iiiiiiiiiaiiiler. 

After completing a course of study in the Angola high scIhm.I \h\ (rain entered the Fort 
Wayne Medical College of Indiana, from which he was graduated with tlie class of 1882. 
The following year he came to South Dakota and entered upon the active practice of his 
jirofession in Doland. In 1891 he matriculated in the Rush Medical College of Chicago and 
was graduated therefrom in the spring of 1892. In 1899 he took post-graduate work in New 
^'ork city. Throughout the period of his residence here he has been a close student of the 
Jirofession along all those lines where science has brought to light new truths concerning 
the origin and treatment of disease. He is accorded an extensive and well merited practice, 
which is indicative of his success in professional work. He is a director of the Redfield 
National Bank and in connection with his brother, who is president of that bank, he owns 
about eighteen hundred acres of South Dakota land. 

On the 4th of November, 1885, in Doland, Dr. Crain was united in marriage to Miss 
Mildred J. Moore, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ezra Moore, who were farming people of 
New York state and now lie buried at Potsdam, New Y'ork. Dr. and Mrs. Crain have 
become parents of four cliildren: Castle, who is a graduate of the Northwestern University 
at Evanston. llliii..is. and is now deputy county treasurer of Spink county; Cleveland C, 
who graduated in I'll:, from the South Dakota University; Carroll F., who is now a medical 
student in the State University; and Crystal, a high-school student in Redfield. 



198 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

In his political views Dr. Grain is a democrat and is an ardent admirer of the principles 
of the party. He is a Royal Arch and Knight Templar Mason, a member of the Modern 
Woodmen of America and the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He is likewise a member 
of the South Dakota State Medical Society, of which he is now first vice president, and of 
the American Medical Associatien. He has ever been conscientious in the treatment of his 
patients and unfaltering in his attention to the duties of the profession. Thus he has 
gradually advanced in his chosen calling and for a long period has maintained a foremost 
position among leading physicians and surgeons of Spink county. 



EARLE R. SLIFER. 



Earle R. Slifer, the popular and able young states attorney of Chamberlain, Brule 
county, is a native of Oregon, Illinois, born on the 17th of March, 1888, of the marriage of 
J. L. and Elizabeth Slifer. The father is engaged in the loan business in Kimball, this 
state, the family having removed to South Dakota in 1906. 

Earle R. Slifer was educated in the public and high schools of Oregon, Illinois, and in 
the University of Michigan, graduating from the law department thereof with the class 
of 1909. Upon completing his course he took the bar examination in Illinois and was 
admitted to practice in that state. In February, 1911, he settled in Chamberlain, South 
Dakota, and opened an office. He has already achieved a large measure of success for one 
of his years, and in the fall of 1914 was elected states attorney. He has a mind that is 
naturally keen in insight and accurate in reasoning, and his natural ability, combined with 
his thorough training in the principles of law, make him an able representative of the 
legal profession. He has the respect not only of the community but also of his colleagues. 

Mr. Slifer is a Protestant in religion; gives his political allegiance to the republican 
party; and fraternally is connected with the Masonic order. He is also a member of the 
City Library Board and the Commercial Club, and is heartily in sympathy with all its 
projects for the business expansion of Chamberlain. He has thoroughly identified himself 
with the community of which he is a resident and manifests a commendable public spirit. 
He has youth, prosperity and the prospect of achieving still greater success in the years 
to come. 



HON. JOHN WALLACE PECIvHAM. 

Hon. John Wallace Peckham is proprietor of the Parkston Advance, with which paper 
he has been continuously connected since 1904. At the same time he is a recognized leader 
in republican politics in his part of the state and is now representing his district in the 
South Dakota senate. He was born in Portage, Wisconsin, on the 10th of March, 1873, and 
is a son of John E. and Elmira (Staves) Peckham. The family came to South Dakota in 
1878, settling first in Hanson county a mile west of Emery, where the father homesteaded 
the southwest quarter of section 26, township 101, range 57. There he engaged in farming, 
breaking the sod and converting a tract of wild land into rich and productive fields. He 
continued the cultivation of the place until 1889, in which year he removed to Alexandria, 
where he engaged in the draying business. Still later he became connected with the hard- 
ware trade there and when he sold out he removed to Charles City. He was deputy oil 
inspector under his son, John W., Avho served as state oil inspector from the 1st of July, 
1909, until April, 1913. At a later date Mr. Peckham was elected county auditor of Hanson 
county but died on the 26th of February, 1913, just after entering upon the duties of his 
position. The mother still survives. 

John W. Peckham pursued his education in the public schools and was graduated from 
the high school of Alexandria, South Dakota. Later he studied at Yankton College and then 
turned his attention to newspaper publication at Alexandria, being owner and editor of the 
Alexandria Journal from 1896 until 1902. He then sold out and in 1904 came to Parkston, 
where he purchased the Parkston Advance, which he has since owned and published, making 
it a very readable and popular journal. His patronage is steadily increasing as the country 




HON. .li.iHX W. PKCKHAM 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 201 

develops and the paper has become an excellent advertising medium. It is published in the 
interest of the republican party, of which Mr. Peekham has ever been a stalwart advocate, 
and his editorials, terse and trenchant, set forth clearly the attitude of the party and the 
reasons for giving it support. In November, 1914, he was elected on the republican ticket 
to the office of state senator from the seventh district and his friends and champions, who 
are many, feel certain that he will make as creditable a record as one of the lawmakers of 
the state as he has done in the other offices which he has filled. As previously stated, he 
was oil inspector for South Dakota for four years and he was city auditor for six years. 
He has also been active in shaping the policy of the republican party and has been state 
committeeman from his county. 

Mr. Peekham is a well known Mason and is a member of the consistory at Yankton. 
He belongs also to the Woodmen and to the Workmen. His cooperation has been given to 
many plans and projects for the upbuilding of South Dakota and aside from newspaper 
publication he is interested in the canning factory at Parkston as one of its stockholders. 
In his life there has been an even balance between his business activity and his eflforts in 
behalf of the public welfare, no duty being neglected in either connection, while his efforts 
have at all times been effective and resultant. 



HON. ADOLPH KOCH. 



Hon. Adolph Koch, one of the leading citizens of eastern Minnehaha county, owns 
and operates a farm of one hundred and sixty acres on section 33, Highland township, 
which is one of the best improved properties in the county. He has also represented his 
district in the state legislature for one terra, being elected in 1911. His birth occurred 
in Scott county, Iowa, on the 18th of September, 1870, and he is a son of John H. and 
Dora (Hanneman) Koch, who were born, reared and married in Germany, in which country 
two of their children were born. About 1844 they emigrated to the United States, locat- 
ing in Davenport, Iowa, where John H. Koch found employment in the works of the John 
Deere Plow Company and was connected with that concern for two years. Subsequently 
lie conducted a blacksmith shop for some years, having learned the trade of a blacksmith 
in Germany. Some time in the '50s he turned his attention to general agricultural pur- 
suits, operating a farm in Scott county, Iowa, until within a short time prior to his 
death. His last days were spent in Davenport, where his demise occurred in September, 
1913, when he had attained the venerable age of ninety-three years. 

Adolph Koch was reared under the parental roof and attended the common schools 
in the acquirement of an education. He remained at home until twenty-three years of 
age, and in 1893 started out as an agriculturist on his own account, cultivating rented 
land in Scott county, Iowa, for one year. On the expiration of that period he took up his 
abode in Rock county, Minnesota, one mile from the South Dakota line, and there contin- 
ued farming as a renter. In 1903 he removed to his present South Dakota farm, which 
he had purcha.sed about two years before and on which he has resided continuously during 
the past twelve years. The place comprises one hundred and sixty acres and has been 
developed into one of the most highly improved farms in Minnehaha county. Mr. Koch 
has replaced all the old. buildings with modern and commodious structures, including a 
handsome residence, substantial barn and outbuildings. He follows general farming in 
accordance with scientific principles and his efforts have been attended with a most grati- 
fying measure of success. He is a stockholder and a member of the board of directors of 
the Farmers Elevator Company of Sherman, and also acts as vice president of the Farmers 
Savings Bank of Sherman. 

In 1893 Mr. Koch was united in marriage to Miss Amelia Damman, of Eldridge, Iowa, 
by whom he has a son, Richard, who was born on the 15th of January, 1894, and has been 
educated in the common schools and at Brookings College. Mr. Koch gives his political 
allegiance to the republican party and for the past six years has ably discharged the duties 
devolving upon him in the capacity of township supervisor. In 1911 he was elected to 
represent his district in the state legislature and in that important body served with honor 
to himself and satisfaction to his constituents. His fraternal relations are with the 



202 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

j\Iodeiii Woodmen of America. He possesses many qualities that have commended him to 
the friendship and kindly regard- of all with whom he has come in contact, and he deserves 
to be classed with the representative residents of South Dakota. 



REV. NICHOLAS STOLTZ. 



Rev. Nicholas Stoltz, pastor of St. Maurice church, near Florence, entered upon the 
active work of the priestliood in 1886. He was born in Luxembourg, December 11, 1859, 
a son of Peter and Margaret Stoltz. He was educated at Louvain University and in St. 
Francis' Seminary at Milwaukee, Wisconsin. After pursuing the required literary, theo- 
logical and philosophical courses he was ordained to the priesthood by Archbishop Heiss 
in 1886 for the Omaha diocese, including Nebraska, North and South Dakota and Wyoming. 
In these then wild countries Father Stoltz labored as a pioneer and endured many hard- 
ships and privations incident to work upon the frontier, making his visits on horseback, 
riding long distances across the country before the days of railroad building, visiting isolated 
Catholic families and ministering to the needs of the people of the faith wherever he could. 
For the past twenty years his labors liavp lioon confined to South Dakota, and in 1S98 he 
went to the Black Hills, where he rcinaim.l iiiilil I'JOT. « hen he came to Florence. 

Father Stoltz holds membership in Uhuk Hills ( Muiicil, No. 703, K. C, at Deadwood, 
having been a charter member of that Council. He is devoted to the spiritual upbuilding 
and development of the state and is an ardent churchman, doing all in his power to pro- 
mote the interests of Catholicism in South Dakota. His work has had farreaching effects 
and the churches under his care have grown numerically and spiritually. 



WILLL-VM TARRANT. 



William Tarrant has been engaged in mining during practically his entire active life 
and has an interest in many excellent mining properties. He is a native of Berkshire, Eng- 
land, born on the 27th of .January, 1849, and is the youngest of six children, whose parents, 
George and Mary Ann (Chandler) Tarrant were both born in England. The father was 
private secretary to an English nobleman but in the year 1850 he removed with his family to 
the United States, locating in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Subsequently they went to Janes- 
ville, that state, where he purchased ten acres of land and started a nursery. He was an 
expert horticulturist and proved very successful in his undertaking. In 1852 he passed away 
but was survived by his widow until 1896. Two of his brothers became state representatives, 
one being sent to the legislature from Pepin county, Wisconsin, and the other from Rock 
county, Wisconsin. 

William Tarrant attended school in Janesville, Wisconsin, and was also under the private 
instruction of Professor Hodge of that place and was a schoolmate of Frances Willard. He 
likewise attended school in Rock county, Wisconsin, and a private academy at Durand. When 
about sixteen years of age he went to work for others as a hired hand, but after spending 
eight months in that way went to Waverly, Iowa, where he was employed in a grain ware- 
house for a short time. He then became grain buyer for a firm and continued in that capac- 
ity for four and a half years. He next went to Montana, going up the Missouri river to 
Helena, in the vicinity of which city he prospected and mined upon his own claims for five 
years. At the end of that time he returned east, settling at Independence, Iowa, where he 
engaged in buying grain for two years. He was there married and in March, 1876, came with 
his wife to South Dakota, arriving at Buffalo Gap on the 11th of that month. He purchased 
a mining claim at the mouth of Gold Run on the Whitewood and also bought a claim on 
Bobtail Gulch. He sold the Whitewood claim for three hundred dollars, but worked the other 
claim for a time, although he subsequently sold it also. He then entered into partnership 
with Mr. Hatch and they went through all the camps on Iron creek without purchasing any 
property. While on that trip they met a man who told them of the massacre of Custer on 
Little Big Horn river. After returning to Whitewood they learned of a herd of milch cows 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 203 

which were being driven in from Bismarck, North Dakota, and, seeing a good business oppor- 
tunity, purchased the herd and started a dairy. In the following fall thej' found that they 
did not have enough feed for the cattle upon the ranch and moved them to Cleghorn Springs, 
just above the site of Rapid City. Leaving Mr. Hatch in charge of the cattle and providing 
a herder to care for them, Mr. Tarrant drove to Yankton and was the lirst man to drive a 
team across the ice at Pierre. -He drove Irom Yankton to Webster City and later continued 
his way to Independence, where his wife was still residing. In February, 1877, he returned 
to Yankton, arriving on the day that McCall was hung for the murder of Wild Bill. After 
unloadiiiL; his team at Y'ankton Mr. Tarrant drove back to Rapid City by way of Pierre and 
upon arriving at his destination learned that the Indians had made a raid ami ilrivin ufl 
his milch cows and also his horses. He had turned the. horses which he was driving; i.\it and 
they were also taken by the Indians. He held his ranch only by squatter's rii^lit ami was 
eventually compelled to give it up. He subsequently prospected for a short time but then 
returned to the Deadwood district and went to work for Myers & Belding on a ditch which 
was to furnish water for the first mill at Lead. In the early part of the winter he went into 
the Badlands hunting deer and sold the venison. The latter part of the winter he and another 
man drove a tunnel on a claim which they had taken and in the spring they removed to 
Hill City, where they located a paying placer mine, which they worked until June. They 
then organized a local company to dig a drain ditch to facilitate working a rich placer min- 
ing claim. Eighteen men were engaged in this work, but after it was completed it was 
found to be of no value, although fifty pounds of gold had been taken from the stream lead- 
ing into it. In the meantime Mrs. Tarrant had joined her husband and they established their 
home in the Hills. Mr. Tarrant next took charge of the day shift on a hydraulic project 
Iielow Hill City and continued there until winter. ^Vllile there he met John Spargo, master 
mechanic of the great Homestake Mining Company. During the winter Mr. Tarrant found 
good diggings on French creek near Custer and the following spring removed with his fam- 
ily to Custer. During the summer he mined on French creek but in the fall he again went 
hunting, selling the meat at Deadwood. In the winter he returned to Custer and engaged 
in developing claims near that city until Qiristmas. He then formed a partnership with M. 
H. Kendig and located a ranch near Buff'alo Gap. Mr. Kendig gave his time to freighting, 
while Mr. Tarrant managed the ranch. After about two years the latter sold out his inter- 
est in the ranch and returned to Iowa with his family. They remained at Independence, but 
he went to Chicago and began speculating in grain. After a short time, however, the Coeur 
d'Alene exc-itnin'iit attiacted him to Idaho and he prospected near the British line. He also 
built two hiiu-is in Murray, Idaho. Upon returning to the Black Hills he located a copper 
mine at Frcncli cink and spent the winter there. He filed upon a homestead near Fairburn 
and. sending for liis wife and family, established his home there. He resided there for ten 
years and during that time engaged in mining and also operated his ranch. Upon leaving 
that place he again went to Custer and gave his undivided attention to mining. After he 
sold the ranch his family joined him in Custer, which is still their home. He concentrates 
his time and energy upon his mining interests and owns a number of gold and tin prospects. 
He has mined in many places in the Black Hills, in British Columbia, in Alaska and in 
Cobalt, Ontario. He has gained much valuable knowledge of various parts of the country 
and has met with many interesting experiences, all of which have developed in him a 
splendid self-reliance and coolness in time of danger. For ten years he has resided in 
Custer and is well known and highly esteemed in that city and its vicinity. 

On the 2d of December, 1875, Mr. Tarrant married Miss Anna Fuhrman, who was born 
in Hungary, just three miles from the Austrian line and only a few miles from Vienna. Her 
parents, Martin and Anna (Tatchenger) Fuhrman, were also born in that place, the father 
in November, 1811, and the mother on the 26th of July, 1830. Mr. Fuhrman was a farmer 
by occupation and in 1857 emigrated with his family to this country, settling in Indiana 
twenty-five miles from Chicago. After residing there for eight years, or in the spring of 
1865, they removed to a farm near Independence, Iowa, where they lived for a decade. They 
then removed to the Black Hills and located upon a ranch three miles from Fairburn, Custer 
county, where both passed away, the father in 1900 and the mother in 1908. They were the 
parents of eleven children, of whom Mrs. Tarrant is the eldest. Mr. and Mrs. Tarrant have 
three children: William K., who is engaged in business in Buffalo, Wyoming, married Miss 
Evelyn Durst and they have three children. Paul C, Clifford B. and Bertram R.; Roy C, 



204 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

residing at Sheridan, Wyoming, who is engaged in the automobile business and is also an oil 
operator, married Miss Helen Walters, of Omaha, and has an adopted son, Roy C. Angela 
is the wife of William Barnwell and the mother of a son, Roy. 

Mr. Tarrant is a republican but has never desired public office. His life has been one 
of intense activity and the success which he has gained is solely the result of his energy. 
Initiative and knowledge of mining, to which he has devoted practically his entire life. 



WILLIAM THEODORE DOOLITTLE. 

Sioux Falls has a valued citizen in William Theodore Doplittle, who is a veteran rail- 
road man and a prominent Mason. Moreover, he enjoys the distinction of being the best 
mayor that the city has ever had and his devotion to the public good stands as an unques- 
tioned fact in his career, whether occupying office or out of it. He was born March 30, 1849, 
in Loudonville, Ohio, and the ancestry of the family can be traced back to the sixteenth 
century. 

Mr. Doolittle's parents, Lucius and Eleanor (Ayres) Doolittle, removed to Upper San- 
dusky, Ohio, in 1859 and there the son attended the public schools to the age of fourteen 
years. The father was well-to-do and had planned a good education for his son, but when 
the Pittsburg, Fort Wayne & Cliicago Railroad, the second line constructed in Ohio, was 
built through Sandusky William T. Doolittle was so much impressed that he decided to be 
a railroad man and, much against the wishes of his parents, abandoned the schoolroom to 
take up railroad work. He went to Fort Wayne, Indiana, vhere the new shops of the road 
were opened, and there served an apprenticeship of three years. When a youth of seven- 
teen he went upon the road as a fireman and after serving two years in that capacity was 
promoted to the position of engineer of a freight train. A year later he was given a 
passenger run, which he held for two years and when the engineers of the line went upon 
a strike he removed westward to Sioux City, Iowa, in March, 1873. At that date he entered 
the employ of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railroad, with which he con- 
tinued on the run from Sioux City to St. James, Minnesota, until 1878. In that year was 
built the first road that ever entered Sioux Falls and Mr. Doolittle ran the first train into 
the city. With the exception of one year, when he was instructor for the road, he has 
remained upon this run continuously since, covering a period of thirty-seven years, but 
has been with the company for about forty-three years. Mr. Doolittle is a member of the 
Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, an organization with seventy-two thousand mem- 
bers. He organized the first division of the order in the northwest at Sioux City in 1876. 
The grand international division of the order with headquarters at Cleveland, Ohio, pre- 
sented him on the 16th of August, 1913, with a medal in appreciation of his forty years 
of faithful service for the order and made him an honorary member of the grand lodge for 
life. Of the seven thousand employes of the Omaha road he has the honor of being No. 1 
on their lists. In fact, there is no other one of the seven thousand employes on the two 
thousand miles of road who was with the company when Mr. Doolittle joined it. This 
road has a Veterans Association and Mr. Doolittle is one of the one hundred and sixty-two 
who have been with the company for more than thirty years and is thus entitled to member- 
ship in and is a member of the association. 

Mr. Doolittle has been in only one raih-oad wreck and that was when they were run- 
ning a double header through a blinding snow storm, the front engine breaking down and 
leaving the rails and pulling him with it. He was pinned under the engine for an hour 
and a half with the thermometer thirty degrees below zero yet escaped with only a broken 
jaw and lacerated face. In 1879 he figured in an incident which brought to him a thirty 
days' vacation. R. F. Pettigrew, a Sioux Falls attorney, boarded the train in Minneapolis 
with a deed that would clear up the title to what is now the town site of Sioux Falls. 
The title heretofore had been clouded as the only title was on Indian script. Mr. Pettigrew 
saw the Minneapolis attorney board the same train and knew that he had a quitclaim deed 
to this property. If he reached the courthouse in Sioux Falls first and recorded the deed 
it would give him the title to the property on which the Sioux Falls people had built their 
homes. If Mr. Pettigrew recorded his deed first the homes of the people would be saved 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 207 

to them. He stepped into a telegraph office on the waj' only to learn that the other attorney 
liad wired first for a cab to meet him at the train. Greatly worried, he walked up to the 
engine on which was his friend, William T. Doolittle, and told him of the situation. Mr. 
Doolittle then instructed Mr. Pettigrew to come and get on the engine at the first station 
out of Sioux Falls, which he did, not saying a word to the conductor or anyone. A few 
miles out of Sioux Falls Mr. Doolittle stopped his train, uncoupled his engine and made the 
run in, getting Mr. Pettigrew there first to record the deed and thereby saviui; thr Imiiies of 
the people. He was called into the office of one of the railroad officials, wlici tolil Ijim tliat 
the attorney had started suit against the railroad for fifty thousand dollars and tliat his 
dismissal was demanded. He replied: "If my disinissul will appease the wrath of this 
gentleman it is of small matter," and he ex|ilaiiiiil tln' situation to the superintendent, who 
instead o£ dismissing him gave him a thirty-(la\ >' hiv-uii with full pay. 

Mr. Doolittle has ever had the interests of Sioux Falls at heart and a recognition of 
this fact has led to his selection for various positions of public trust. He was elected alder- 
man of the first ward in 1896 and was reelected in 1898, acting as president of the city 
council in 1897. He was on the committee with C. A. Jewett and J. W. Tuthill to build the 
new waterworks plant for the city of Sioux Falls and the work was completed at a figure 
less than the estimated cost. This was one job entirely free from any suspicion of graft. 
On the 31st of April, 1908, Mr. Doolittle was elected mayor and it is generally admitted 
without argument that he gave the city the cleanest administration that it has ever had. 
The opposition tried to unearth some skeleton in his private or public life that would be to 
his discredit, but the only thing that they could find w-as the story that he did not obey 
the orders of the railroad company when he uncoupled his engine and brought Mr. Pettigrew 
to Sioux Falls — an act which won for him the gratitude of the residents of the town. As 
the chief executive of the city he stood constantly for reform and progress, working untir- 
ingly for the interests of the people. 

On the 26th of December, 1873, Mr. Doolittle was married to Miss Catherine Stroch and 
they became the parents of three children: Jessie, who died at the age of three years; 
Walter S.; and Grace. Walter S., now an engineer on the Omaha road, wedded Marie 
Freeble, of Sioux Falls, and they have five children, Eden K., Eunice, Norman, Theodore 
Frederick and Richard, the eldest of whom is now attending high school in Sioux Falls. 
Walter S. Doolittle served in the Spanish-American war, going out as a private in Company 
B, but at the end of the war had risen to the rank of first lieutenant. The daughter Grace 
is the wife of Xeil D. Graham, a commercial traveler living in Sioux Falls, and they have one 
child, Janet Catherine. 

The family are Episcopalians in religious faith and Mr. Doolittle is a very prominent 
and influential Mason. He has taken the degrees of the York and Scottish Rites and was 
potentate of El Riad Temple, A. A. 0. N. M. S., for four years and grand commander of the 
Grand Commandery of Knights Templar of South Dakota. He has also been president of 
the Masonic Temple Association from its beaiiiiiiiij; and lias ever taken the keenest and most 
helpful interest in the work of the craft. The lifr ri(iiiil of no man in piiblie office has been 
more fearless in conduct and stainless in reputatiun and over his life history there falls no 
shadow of wrong nor suspicion of evil. 



NILS F. NELSON. 



Nils F. Nelson, who is engaged in the drug business in Milbank, and who is also a 
manufacturer of cigars, is a native of Sweden, born March 15, 1873, a son of Nils F. 
Nelson, who was born in 1833 and died in 1911, having spent his entire life in the land of 
his natiWty. In his early life he engaged in the lumber business there, but later turned 
his attention to farming and became very successful. He had lived retired, however, for 
five years prior to his demise. In his family were four children: Mrs. Christina Swanson, 
who resides in Stockholm, Soutli Dakota; Anna Charlotte, the wife of John Olson, and a 
resident of Minneapolis; Ani^nsta. tlic wife of Fred Lofquist, a farmer living near La Bolt, 
tliis state; and Nils F. The fatlicr of tliis family was a devout member of the Lutheran 
cliuich and was an active worker in chiu'ch and educational circles. 



208 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

Nils F. Nelson was reared under the parental roof to the age of fifteen years and 
during that period attended the public scnools. Foreseeing that there was no future for 
him in his native land and having heard and read a great deal about the freedom and 
opportunity for advancement in this country, he decided to leave home and accordingly 
in 1888 set sail for the United States, his sisters having preceded liira to this country. 
He made his way at once to South Dakota, where lived two of his sisters. He lived with 
his sister, Mrs. Swanson, and for a short time attended school. He then spent four months 
with a gang of workmen on the railroad. He next engaged in work in the harvest fields 
and later spent one winter in the lumber camps of Wisconsin. He then went to JCan 
Claire, that state, and worked for a time in a grist mill and later was employed in a 
sawmill in Minneapolis. After spending some time in the harvest fields of the north, 
he engaged as clerk in a drug store in Milbank, working for F. W. Poppe there for three 
years. He was then engaged in a similar capacity in Minneapolis for four years. During 
all this time he had carefully saved his earnings in the hope of some day engaging in 
business on his own account, and to this end, in 1898, he embarked in the drug business 
in Milbank. He began in a small way, but success attended him from the beginning. In 
1906 he also opened a cigar factory and now manufactures over five hundred thousand cigars 
per year, this output being disposed of to the local trade. He gives his entire attention to 
his varied business interests and this has constituted the secret of his success. 

He is a member of the National Guards and at one time was first lieutenant of the 
organization. He gives his political support to the republican party. He has attained high 
rank in Masonry, being a member of the Mystic Shrine at Aberdeen. He also holds mem- 
bership with the Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias and in these organizations has 
passed through all of the chairs, while of the Fraternal Order of Eagles he is also a mem- 
ber. He has made the best possible use of the opportunities that have been presented and 
today stands among the successful and enterprising young business men of his section of the 
state. 



Wn^LIAJI A. NE\TN-. 



William A. Nevin, of Custer, who is treasurer of Custer county and is also engaged 
in ranching and mining in that county in partnership with his father, was born at Center 
Point, Iowa, on the 22d of September, 1876, a son of William and Elizabeth (Daugherty) 
Nevin, both natives of Pickaway county, Ohio, the father born on the 19th of April, 1833, 
and the mother on the 27th of December of that year. In 1842 William Nevin accompanied 
his parents to Iowa and in his young manhood became a general merchant in Center Point, 
that state. However, late in the '50s he went to California and there engaged in ranching 
and mining for some time. Upon his return to Center Point he again gave his attention 
to mercantile pursuits but in 1879 came to the Black Hills and located at Four Mile, a min- 
ing settlement west of Custer. He still lives in that locality and is engaged in ranching and 
mining. To him and his wife have been born three children. 

William A. Nevin, the youngest, attended school at Center Point, Iowa, and when sixteen 
years of age became a clerk in a general store at that place. After spending four years in 
commercial life he removed to the Black Hills, arriving there in 1896. He went to his father's 
ranch and for seven years taught school. He and his father are partners in business. They 
are interested in both ranching and mining and as they are experienced in those occupations 
and are energetic and display excellent jiidgment their resources are increasing from year to 
year. William A. Nevin, however, has other interests that demand the greater part of his 
time, as he is serving his second term as county treasruer and allows nothing to interfere 
with the faithful discharge of his duties in that office. 

Mr. Nevin was married on the 25th of October, 1895, Miss Rilla Mae Willis, a native 
of Rochester, New York, becoming his wife. Her parents, George M. and Ida (Wilcox) Willis, 
were both natives of the state of New York and the father was by occupation a traveling 
salesman, handling mercantile lines. To their union were born five children, of whom Mrs. 
Nevin is the eldest. She has a daughter, Elizabeth Ida, whose birth occurred on the 27tli 
of June, 1908. 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 209 

Mr. Nevin is a republican and from IDo:: to Hidt \v:is county auditor, while he has been 
further honored by election as coujity tuMsm ci . in wlii.h office he is serving his second 
term. Fraternally he is connected witli tlu^ Knijlils ,,i I'ytliias and he is at present chancellor 
coiunuuider of the local lodge. Since fakiiiu up his residence in Custer county he has not 
only demonstrated his ability and ecniMieiitioiiMiess but has also manifested attractive per- 
sonal cliaracteristics that have won liim iiiaiiy wnrm and loyal friends. 



DONALD K. BARRETT. 



Donald K. Barrett, an able attorney of Plankinton, was born in Sigourney, Iowa, on the 
23d of April, 1890, a son of J. C. and Emma Barrett. In I'JOS, wlien he was a youth of thir- 
teen, the family removed to South Dakota and located upon a farm in Aurora county in the 
vicinity of Plankinton, where the parents still reside. 

D. K. Barrett attended the public schools, was graduated from the Plankinton high 
school, and later entered the State University of South Dakota at Vermillion, where, after 
completing a four years' law course, he was graduated with the class of 1913. He returned 
to Aurora county, took up his residence in Plankinton and began the practice of his pro- 
fession. Although young in years and also in his profession, he has already demonstrated 
that he possesses not only a good knowledge of the principles of jurisprudence but also that 
lie is fitted by nature for the practice of law. 

Mr. Barrett is a Protesjant and in politics supports the republican party. South Dakota 
linds him a loj'al, public spirited and progressive citizen who can be counted upon to do his 
part to aid in the accomplishment of a project calculated to advance the public interests. 



ORVILLE STEWART. 



Among the substantial farmers of Bon Homme county is numbered Orville Stewiui, wlio 
was born in JMcDonough county, Illinois, on the 9th of August, 1876, a sen c.f S;iniiiel ;iiii| 
h:iizabeth f^NIcKenzie) Stewart, natives of Indiana and Illinois respectively. Hi< resided in 
Illinois until 1899, when he removed to Guthrie county. Iowa, and there worked at farm labor 
for about a year. After that lie cultivated rented land until 1903, when he removed to South 
Dakota. He rented the McNeill farm in Bon Homme county first and later operated other 
farms in llie vii'inity of Tyndall until March, 1912, when he purchased his present farm, 
which comprises the southeast quarter of section 34, Jefferson precinct. The land has excellent 
natural drainage and as it is fertile and is kept in fine condition it produces good crops 
annually. The house, wliicli is larse and heated by hot water, has a commanding position 
upon a Iiill and is protertrd ficmi the "iiul li\ a fine grove. There are also large barns, 
granaries and other uutbuildiiiys which provide shelter for grain and stock. Mr. Stewart 
uses the latest machinery in his work and is willing to adopt any method that promises to 
make his labor more efficient. 

Mr. Stewart was married in Guthrie county, Iowa, on the 23d of October, 1901. to Miss 
Sylvia South, a daughter of Wellington and Linda (McNeill) South, natives of New York 
and Ohio respectively. In 1882 Mr. South removed to Dakota territory and first rented a 
tarm two miles east of Springfield but afterward took up his residence in Springfield, where 
he lived retired for two years. He then returned to Guthrie county, Iowa. Two of the chil- 
dren born to him and his wife are living in Bon Homme county, Mrs. Stewart and Charles, 
who is farming in .lefferson precinct. 

Mr. South had a narrow escape from death by freezing January 12, 1888, when the worst 
]<]\/y:\u\ ill the history of the northwest occurred. He started to deliver a sleighload of hogs 
to .T. H. Saiiloid. who resided on the edge of Tyndall. and was within a quarter of a mile of 
liis destination when the blizzard broke in its fury and he found himself unable to see owing 
to the bliniliiig snow. He took the harness off from his horses and started with them to find 
shelter. He ran into an old threshing machine, which provided some protection against the 
storm for the horses and he himself remained there until three o'clock in the morning, when 



210 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

tlii' stoim had subsided somewliat and he was enabled to reach the residence of a Mr. Jansen, 
wlicre he was revived. He supposed that the hogs that he was bringing to ilr. Sanford had 
perished, but that gentleman had found them in the morning and had taken them and the 
team to a warm shed and all of the animals survived the storm. 



RALPH COWLES. 

There is nothing spectacular in the record of a farmer who has devoted his life always 
to the tilling of the soil, but more than a century ago George Washington said that "agri- 
culture is the most useful as well as the most honorable occupation of man," and this truth 
stands today. Among those who are taking advantage of the excellent opportunities for 
agricultural activity in South Dakota is Ralph Cowles, who owns a farm of three hundred 
and twenty acres on section 9, Mellette township, Spink county. Thirty-five years have 
come and gone since he arrived in this state in the spring of 1879. He is today the oldest 
resident in Spink county in years of continuous connection therewith and before his arrival 
in South Dakota he had made his home in the middle west, living in Winona, Minnesota. 
• Mr. Cowles was born near Ashtabula, Ohio, on the 4th of March, 1836, and has, therefore, 
passed the seventy-ninth milestone on life's journey. His parents were Joel G. and Sallie 
(Hotchkiss) Cowles. The Cowles family is of English origin and the ancestry is traced 
back to John Cowles who came to the new world on the Mayflower and was among the 
Puritans who settled in Massachusetts. Ralph Cowles is a direct descendant of the sixth 
son of John Cowles and is the eighth in the family of eleven children who were born to 
Joel G. and Sallie (Hotchkiss) Oowles. The father was a native of New England and 
removed from Connecticut to Ohio, becoming one of the early settlers of that state, where 
he followed farming. In old age he went to Baraboo, Wisconsin, where he died in 1868, at 
the age of seventy-nine years. His wife survived until 1870, passing away at the age of 
seventy-five years, and both were interred in a cemetery at Baraboo. 

At the usual age Ralph Cowles began his education, entering the public schools of 
Geneva, Ohio, where he continued his studies until he reached the age of twenty years. He 
afterward accompanied his parents on their removal to Baraboo, Wisconsin, and started to 
earn his own living by working as a farm hand. He was ambitious to engage in farming on 
his own account, however, and soon rented land, but in the spring of 1862 he put aside all 
business and personal considerations in order to espouse the cause of the Union, enlisting 
as a member of Company F, Twenty-third Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry. He remained with 
that regiment until honorably discharged on account of disability in the spring of 18C3. 
His health had become so seriously impaired that for two years thereafter he was imder the 
physician's care and was unable to do any work. 

In 1865 Mr. Cowles removed to Martin county, Minnesota, where he secured a homestead 
claim, which he improved and developed, residing thereon for eleven years. He then returned 
to Winona county, Minnesota, where he lived until coming to South Dakota in the spring 
of 1879, at which time he settled upon the tract of land that constitutes his present well 
improved farm. He was, indeed, a pioneer of this section. Hardly a settlement had been 
made in all this part of the state. The great broad prairies were just as they had come 
from the hand of nature, covered with their long grasses, starred with a million wild flowers 
in the months of June, but in midwinter covered with a dense and unbroken sheet of snow. 
Far remote from civilization seemed the little home of Ralph Cowles, who found it neces- 
sary to go clear to Watertown, a distance of eighty-five miles, for his mail, while along the 
Jim river at that> time there lived only three families. Mr. Cowles improved his entire farm, 
carrying on general agricultural pursuits, and he made a success in his undertakings. He 
continued active in business until 1900, when he put aside the more arduous work of the 
farm and retired. He still owns his property of three hundred and twenty acres, situated 
on section 9, Mellette township, Spink county, and he likewise owns a residence in the 
town of Mellette and another fine home on the lake in Ashtabula, Ohio. 

In 1860 occurred the marriage of Mr. Cowles and Miss Susan A. Chase, who died in 
May, 1883. Their children were as follows: Ida Luella, deceased; Howard H., who has 
passed away and was laid to rest in Martin county, Minnesota; Bertha, the wife of D. C. 




RALPH COW'LES 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 213 

Baker, a farmer residing at Chance, Soutli Dakota; Arthur B., deceased; Leona, the wife of 
Z. Knapp, living at Dawson, North Dakota; Clarence, a resident farmer of Rondell township. 
Brown county, with land also in Mellette township, Spink county; Charles R., who died 
and was buried in Winona county, Minnesota; Elmer, who is farming the old homestead: 
Walter G., a farmer of Mellette township, Spink county; and Susan M., who at her death 
was laid to rest in Rondell township. Brown county. After the death of his first wife Mr. 
Cowles was again married, his second union being in 1884 with Mrs. Bassinger of Baraboo, 
Wisconsin, whose maiden name was Julia A. Kellog. She died and was buried in the Ron- 
dell cemetery. For his third wife Mr. Cowles in 1896 chose Mi-s. Eliza A. Crawford, who 
departed this life on the 16th of August, 1913, and was buried at Northville, South Dakota. 

In politics Mr. Cowles has always been a stalwart republican since the organization of 
the party and was the second county commissioner of the state. He holds membership with 
the Grand Army of the Republic and his belief in the teacliings of the Congregational 
church, of which he has long been a devoted member, has been a guiding element in his 
life. There is no man better qualiiied to speak with authority concerning early events in 
the history of Spink coimty and this part of the state than Ralph Cowles, who for thirty- 
sis years has here resided, witnessing all the changes which have occurred and taking part in 
many plans for the upbuilding and development of the community. Drifting Goose and his 
tribe still made their camp at the place now known as "The Island" or "Armourdale." wliich 
is near Mr. Cowles homestead. This chief and his squaw frequently ate with Mr. Cowles in 
the latter's dugout, and all the Indians were friendly with him. Now there is no indication 
of this having been the habitation of the red men becavise the entire district is settled up by 
a prosperous and contented people. Work — earnest, persistent work — has been the basis upon 
which he has built his success, enabling him now to live retired. 

His son Elmer E. Cowles, now occupying and operating the old homestead, married 
Miss Margaret Bruns, a daughter of Henry and Helen (Frels) Bruns, and they have two 
daughters and a son, Bernice H., Verna M. and Ralph H. Elmer E. Cowles built an elevator 
for his father at Mellette for his own use. Like his father, he has led a busy and useful 
life and ranks with the leading agriculturists of his part of the state. 



CARL D. JOHNSON. 



Carl D. Johnson is the junior partner in the law firm of McFarland & Johnson, attorneys 
at Watertown, and while one of the younger representatives of the profession has already 
attained a position which many an older practitioner might well envy. He was born in 
Raymond, South Dakota, February 31, 1886, a son of Alexander C. and Ida R. .Johnson, who 
in the year 1S79 came to what was then Dakota territory. The father secured a homestead 
and tree claim but later disposed of that property and is now in the employ of the North- 
western Railroad Company at Chicago as passenger traffic manager. 

Carl D. Johnson spent his youthful days under the parental roof, mastering the branches 
of learning taught in the public schools and afterward attending the Shattuck Military 
Academy at Faribault, Minnesota, where he pursued a preparatory course. Subsequently he 
entered the University of Wisconsin, in which be continued for a year, and afterward became 
a student in the University of South Dakota, where he pursued a law course and was grad- 
uated with the class of 1910. The following year he went to Yale, wJiere he continued his 
law studies and was graduated within the classic walls of that old institution in 1911. 

Returning to his native state. Mr. Johnson settled in Watertown, where he practiced as 
the assistant of Mr. McFarland until November, 1912, when he was admitted to a partnership 
under the present firm style of McFarland & Johnson. He is yet a young man but already 
he has attained a creditable position at the bar and his abiltiy is developing year by year 
and month by month as he takes charge of important cases, for which he always makes thor- 
ough preparation before entering the courts. 

On the 20th of June, 1914, 5Ir. .Johnson was united in marriage to Jliss Mahren Finnerud. 
a daughter of H. M. and Mary Alice Finnerud. of whom mention is made elsewhere in this 
volume. The young couple are well known and popular in the city where they reside. Mr. 
Johnson is an Episcopalian in faith, while his wife holds membership in tlie Congregational 



2U HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

eliurch. Fratenially lie is counected with the Elks and politically with the republican party. 
Fishing, liunting and motoring are his chief sources of recreation but he never allows out- 
side interests to interfere with the faithful performance of his professional duties and he is 
winning for himself a well earned reputation bv reason of his fidelity to his clients' interests. 



LE ROY ANGEL, M. D. 



Dr. Le Key Angel, engaged in the practice of medicine and surgery at Montrose, was 
born at Moravia, Ohio, on the 15th of April, 18S4. His parents are Le Roy Scott and Louise 
(Pabst) Angel, both of whom are living in Colorado, where the father is engaged in the real- 
estate business. After enjoying the advantages aflorded in the public schools Dr. Angel 
attended Fremont College of Nebraska, where he pursued a scientific course and also the 
pharmaceutical course, being graduated upon the completion of the former in 1904 and of the 
latter in 1905. He next entered the medical department of the Northwestern University 
at Chicago, where he pursued the regular four years course, and was graduated in June, 1910. 
He then had the benefit of two years' experience in Mercy Hospital at Chicago, where he put 
his theoretical knowledge to the practical test and gained that broad and varied experience 
which only hospital service can bring. Thus splendidly equipped for his chosen life work, 
he came to South Dakota in 1912 and opened his office in Montrose. Here he has met with 
a fair measure of success, gaining a goodly share of the public patronage. He belongs to the 
Sioux Valley Medical Association and he keeps in touch with the advanced thought of the 
profession through wide reading of medical journals and late publications. 

On the 12th of June, 1912, Dr. Angel was united in marriage to Miss Irene McAufRe, a 
daughter of James and Anna McAuffie, of New York, and they have one son, James Lee. Dr. 
Angel is a Presbyterian in religious faith, while his wife is a communicant of the Catholic 
church. His political support is given to the democratic party, but he has neither time nor 
inclination for office, preferring to concentrate his energies upon his professional duties and 
through close and undivided attention to his chosen life work he is making steady advance- 
ment and has ulrcady gained a measure of success that many an older practitioner might 



ANTON MORGEN. 

Wisconsin has furnished to South Dakota a large percentage of her citizens of worth — 
men who have come from families that display energy and enterprise among their chief 
characteristics. Of this class Anton Morgen is a worthy representative and Spink county 
numbers him among her wide-awake and progressive farmers. He owns an excellent tract 
of land of three hundred and twenty acres in Mellette township, upon which he has resided 
for a considerable period. He dates his residence in this state from 1884, at which time 
his parents removed with their family from Fond du Lac county, Wisconsin, to South Dakota. 
His father, Nicholas Morgen, was a native of Germany and in his boyhood crossed the 
Atlantic to the new world with his parents. He made farming his life work, carrying on 
general agricultural pursuits in Wisconsin until 1884, when he brought his family to Spink 
county and proved up upon a claim northeast from Mellette. In early manhood he had 
wedded Margaret Gau, also a native of Germany, whence she came to the new world in 
her girlhood days. For a considerable period they traveled life's journey together, but were 
separated by the death of the wife on the 18th of June, 1903, her remains being interred in 
tlie Aberdeen Cemeterj'. Mr. Morgen survives and is now living in Warner, South Dakota, 
at the ripe old age of eighty years. 

Their son, Anton Morgen, was born March 28, 1877, in Fond du Lac county, Wisconsin, 
and was therefore but seven years of age when brought by his parents to this state. He 
became a pupil in the district school near the old home, devoting the major part of his 
time there to the mastery of the common branches of learning until he reached the age 
of fourteen years. He afterward assisted his father in farm work until twenty years of age 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 215 

;iml later he rented a farm for two years. He next purchased one hundred and sixty acres 
and. extending its boundaries, has' become owner of three Imndred and twenty acres in 
Mellette township, Spink county. He has also bought one hundred and sixty acres in 
Brown county and is devoting his attention to general agricultural pursuits. The work 
wliich he does is fraught with good results, both in tlie cultivation of his crops and in the 
raising of stock. He keeps upon his place about eighteen head of horses, thirty head of 
cattle and other stock and his farm is well equipped in every particular. He is also a 
stockholder in the elevator at Mellette. 

In Redfield, on the 22d of October, 1901, Mr. Morten was united in marriage to Miss 
Knuna Wli.'fU.ck. a dau-litcr of Everett and Agn,.., W h.-clock, the former a pioneer miller 
who built the mill in Kainpeska and also the null in Watortown. After running the latter 
for .soiii.' time he ii-turm-il to Kampeska, where butli he and his wife are now residing. Mr. 
ami Mrs. Morgen have live children: Wallace, Frederick and Harold, all of whom are attend- 
ing .school; and Paul and Grace, at home. 

In his political views Mr. Morgen is a republican and his religious faith is that of the 
Catholic church. A life of unremitting toil has brought to Mr. Morgen the substantial 
measure of success which he now enjoys and which is the fitting reward and logical outcome 
of his capable business management. He has made improvements on two different farms, 
erecting good buildings, setting out trees and cultivating the fields. Thus he has contributed 
to the general development of Spink county, which numbers him among her worthy pioneer 
settlers. Here he has lived from the age of seven years to the present time and his sub- 
stantial qualities liave gained for him the friendshi]i and high regard of those whom he 
lias met all along the way. 



OLAF MELBY. 



For the past ten years Olaf ilelby has been successfully engaged in business as the 
projuietor of a drug store and implement shop at Summit, conducting the only establish- 
ments of the kind in the town. His birth occurred in Norway on the 7th of F'ebruary, 1883, 
his parents being Ole and Ingeborg Melby, who were born in the years 1840 and 1845, 
res])ectively, and were married in 1863. They emigrated to the United States in 1890 
and took uj) their abode at Westby, Wisconsin, where they have resided continuously to the 
present time. Olaf Jlelby, Sr., worked as a shoemaker throughout his active business career 
and is now living retired in the enjoyment of well earned rest, having won a gratifying com- 
petence. His political allegiance is given to the republican party, while his religious faith 
is indicated by his membership in the United Lutheran church. In manner he is quiet and 
unassuming, but the sterling traits of his character have been manifest in various relations 
and have gained him the regard and esteem of all with whom he has come in contact. To 
hini anil his wife liave been born ten children, eight of whom survive. 

Olaf .Mc-lliy. the seventh in order of birth in his father's family, was a lad of seven years 
when he ac<oni|ianied his parents on the voyage to the United States. He supplemented 
his eaily eihiiation by a grammar-school course at Bloomingdale, Wisconsin, and subse- 
quent ly entiTed the School of Pharmacy of Valparaiso University at Valparaiso, Indiana, 
rrmn wliicli institution he was graduated in 1905. He was president of his class which indi- 
cates his high standing among his classmates. He secured a position as clerk in a drug store 
(d Wisconsin but later in the same year located in Summit, South Dakota, and there pur- 
chased the drug store of Clay Carpenter, having since conducted the same with excellent 
success. This is the only drug store in the town and he is likewise the proprietor of the 
(inly implement shop in Summit. In both lines he is accorded an extensive and well merited 
patronage, having gained an enviable reputation as an enterprising, reliable and progressive 
merchant. 

In 1907 Mr. Melby was united in marriage to Miss Pauline Unseth, of Westby, Wiscon- 
sin, by whom he has two sons. ()r\illr ami Lyman, who are six and three years of age re- 
spectively. He exercises his right ni handiise in support of the men and measures of the 
di'mocracy and has been an active worker in the local ranks of the party, while for five years 
he has ably served in the capacity of town clerk. Both he and his wife attend the services 



216 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

of tlie Lutheran church, and fraternally he is identified with the Woodmen. Though still 
a young man, he has already made a record in business circles which augurs well for a future 
of continued and growing prosperity. 



HON. CHAUNCEY LYNCH 'WOOD. 

Hon. Chauncey Lynch Wood, lawyer and prominent pioneer of Rapid City, ranked witli 
its leading and valued residents from the days of its early development until his death. He 
was born April 21, 1S51, in Jones county, Iowa, of which his parents were pioneers. His 
father was a native of St. Lawrence county. New Y'ork, and the mother of Tennessee, while 
both dated their American ancestry back to colonial days. The son acquired his early educa- 
tion in Jones county, in the meanwhile working with his father upon the home farm. He 
afterward attended Cornell College at Mount Vernon, Iowa, and, thinking to make the 
practice of law his life work, entered upon preparation for the bar in the Iowa State Uni- 
versity, from which he was graduated with the class of 1875. 

Mr. Wood then taught school for a time but in 1877 began practice at Anamosa, Iowa, 
where he remained until April, 1878, when he arrived in Rapid City, Dakota, where he joined 
the Hon. J. W. Nowlin, who had made his way to the Black Hills the previous year. Accord- 
ing to an agreement of their college days that they would practice in partnership as soon 
as the opportunity offered, they formed the firm of Nowlin & Wood and continued together 
successfully, their practice growing rapidly, while they advanced in prominence until they 
reached a foremost place at the bar of their county. Their relationship was maintained 
until Mr. Nowlin was selected for the position of first judge of the seventh circuit court ot 
South Dakota in 1889. Mr. Wood was then alone for a time but was afterward joined by 
Judge C. J. Buell in a partnership that was maintained for twelve years. In 1903 he again 
resumed practice alone and was found on one side or the other of most of the important 
litigation coming before the courts in the western part of South Dakota and also practiced 
extensively in the United States courts. He won distinction as a most capable advocate and 
a trial lawyer of unusual skill, and he was noted for the eloquence, terseness and logic of 
his pleas. 

From 1895 until 1900 Mr. Wood was special a.ssistant United States attorney and in 
that capacity had charge of the litigation arising out of timber claims in which the govern- 
ment was involved. In 18S3 he was a member of the voluntary constitutional convention 
and also of the convention of 1889, which framed the present state constitution. In those 
connections he gave most thoughtful and earnest consideration to the grave questions and 
problems which came up for settlement and his influence was always on (he side of the 
general public looking to the further development and welfare of the state. 

A life long democrat, Mr. Wood was many times honored by his party with the candi- 
dacy for various important public posts. In 1893 he was the democratic nominee for judge 
of the supreme court and in 1892 was candidate for United States congress. His party being 
in the minority, however, he was unsuccessful in the contest. In 1894 he was elected 
mayor of Rapid City, was reelected in 1899 and in 1898 was chosen state's attorney for 
Pennington county. In 1910 he was his party's candidate for governor of South Dakota and 
his opinions always carried weight in the democratic councils, while many of the opposition 
recognized the integrity and public spirit of his citizenship. During his service as mayor 
of Rapid City the plan of paying the expense of the city government from a special fund 
was devised and in other connections his ministration was most businesslike, progressive 
and beneficially resultant. Outside of his professional interests he had large property 
holdings and was extensively engaged in the raising of cattle. He also had large investments 
in ranch lands, in mining properties and in city real estate. 

In 1885 Mr. Wood was married to Miss Ruth Robinson, and to them were born two 
sons, Ben M. and Buell R, Mrs. Wood passed away July 4, 1887 and Mr. Wood died in Seattle, 
Washington, January 16, 1911. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity, prominent in 
lodge, chapter, commandery and Mystic Shrine. He loved and believed in Rapid City, the 
Black Hills country and the great state of South Dakota and worked untiringly for pulilic 
benefit. He devoted his time, money and energies to the advance and promotion of thi' 




BEX M. woon 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 221 

interests of his city, county and state, and few men took a more prominent or liolpful part 
in tlie upbuilding of tlie Black Hills district. He was a generous and loyal friend and ever 
held friendship inviolable. He was a genial, generous, kindly and inimitable story teller 
and was the life of any social gathering in which he was present. When death caHed liini 
tlie deepest regret was manifest on every side. His funeral was the most impressive ever 
held in the history of Rapid City and was a fitting expression of the high i-egard in wIikIi 
he was held by the host of friends who had for so many years looked upon him as tlu-ir 
ideal of manhood. 



BEN M. WOOD. 



Ben M. Wood is prominently identilied with a movement that is a significant factor in 
advancing modern civilization. Not only in South Dakota but throughout various other 
parts of the country is he known as an advocate of good roads and one whose study has 
covered every phase of the question. In Rapid City, where he makes his home, he is per- 
haps best known as junior partner in the law firm of Cull & Wood, his partner being Loomis 
S. Cull. This does not cover the scope of his activities, however, for he is entitled to three- 
fold prominence, being a recognized leader of the democratic party in South Dakota. He 
would have been the democratic candidate for mayor under the commission plan had not his 
age prevented, for he is yet one of the young men of the state, his birth having occurred in 
the city where he still makes his home, March 25, 1887. His father was the late Chauncey 
L. Wood, who was again and again elected to the mayoralty of Rapid City and who in 1910 
was the democratic candidate for governor. Moreover, he was recognized as a lawyer of 
profound learning, and his example has been the stimulating influence in the life of his son. 

The youthful days of Ben M. Wood were devoted to the acquirement of an education in 
Kansas, Missouri and South Dakota, and in preparation for law practice he entered the Uni- 
versity of South Dakota, from which he was graduated in 1910, the LL. B. degree being at 
that time conferred upon him. He at once became the professional associate of his father, 
but their connection was terminated by the sudden death of the senior partner in January, 

1911. Mr. Wood took over his father's law practice and remained alone until September, 

1912, when he entered into partnership with Judge Loomis S. Cull under the present firm 
style of Cull & Wood. His ability to solve intricate law problems and present his cause with 
clearness and force are qualities which are bringing him more and more to the front as a 
practitioner. It is in connection with political affairs and the good roads movement, however, 
that Mr. Wood is most widely known outside of his home town. Interested in the political 
situation and questions of the day from early manhood, he has become a recognized leader 
in the state and in 1912 was elected temporary and afterward made permanent chairman of 
the democratic state convention held at Pierre on the 31st of January. That was the larg- 
est democratic gathering ever held in the state and on that occasion his friends strongly 
urged him to become a candidate for the office of attorney general on the democratic ticket, 
but he refused. In fact, he has steadily refused to accept proffered county and state offices, 
preferring that his public service shall be done as a private citizen. In April, 1912, he 
organized the Western South Dakota Fair Association, capitalized for fifty thousand dol- 
lars, of which he was the secretary, and its success is primarily due to his efforts. It has 
been a stimulating influence in holding high standards before the people and is an incentive 
for progressive effort along all lines of industrial, commercial and agricultural activity. Mr. 
Wood recognized its possibilities for far-reaching effectiveness and his work in that con- 
nection has been indeed resultant. 

In 1912 the question of good roads was becoming one of wide interest in the state and 
in March Mr. W^ood was selected as a delegate to the convention which formed the South 
Dakota Scenic Highway Association, of which he was chosen secretary. Up to that time 
he had taken little active interest in the question of good roads, but he never enters upon 
any work blindly and he began to read extensively all the literature that he coulil |>ripi-ure 
upon the subject and his earnest interest and enthusiasm were aroused. Nntmr ^iltr.l him 
with oratorical power and his ability in this direction made his addresses upon the snhjcct 
of good roads of great interest so that his services were soon in demand wherever tlie 



222 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

question was being discussed. On the 21st of August, 1912, at Pierre, tlie South Dakota Good 
Road Association was organized and Mr. Wood was unanimously selected as secretary. On 
the same occasion Governor Vessey appointed him as his personal representative on the 
pathfinder tour from Winnipeg to Galveston over the Meridian highwaj-, but he was unable 
to make the trip because of the responsibility attendant upon the management and launch- 
ing of the Western South Dakota State Fair. Prior to the assembling of the thirteenth 
session of the state legislature he devoted several months to careful study and preparation 
of a good road law for South Dakota, which eventually was passed. In 1013 he organized a 
pathfinder party to tour the transcontinental route from Chicago to the Yellowstone Park, 
which is known as the Black and Yellow Trail. He went upon the Chautauqua platform as 
a speaker upon the subject of good roads, appearing in thirteen different states, and every- 
where he has been listened to with interest and attention. He is a fluent speaker, possesses 
a large. vocabulary and a pleasing address. On July 1, 1913, he was appointed to the long 
term on the South Dakota State Highway Commission, by Governor Frank M. Byrne. 

That Mr. Wood possesses the, confidence of his fellow townsmen was shown in their 
efforts to make him a candidate for the mayoralty in the fall of 1913, but the age limit, 
prescribed by the statutes of the state for mayors elected under the commission form of 
government was twenty-six and Mr. Wood lacked three months of having attained that 
age. He was consequently barred from the office, but whether in office or out of it there is 
no question as to Mr. Wood's public spirit and his devotion to the general good. He stands 
preeminently for progress and, attacking everything with a contagious enthusiasm, he wins 
for his cause a large following. In the political campaign of 1914 he was intimately asso- 
ciated with the candidacy of Hon. Harry L. Gandy, who by his successful election stands as 
the first democrat to be elected to congress from the state of South Dakota. 



GEORGE B. LA CROIX. 



George B. La Croix, conducting business as a dealer in farm implements at Mellette, 
opened his store in 1909. In the intervening period he has built up a good trade, having tho 
patronage of a large surrounding territory. He has lived in South Dakota since 1885, com- 
ing to the west from Forestville, New York, where he was born on the 21st of September, 
1863. His father, Alexander La Croix, was a native of France and from that country came 
to the United States. He was married in New York and his wife's maiden name was Fuller. 
In early life he learned the cooper's trade, which he followed for many years, utilizing it as 
a source of income for himself and family. With the oiitbreak of the war with Mexico in the 
'40s he joined the army to defend the interests of this country and again he enlisted under 
the stars and stripes for service in the Union army during the Civil war. No native son of 
America was more loyal or devoted to its interests and when he passed away in 1903 at the 
venerable age of eighty-five years and was laid to rest in a cemetery at Forestville, New 
York, the community mourned the loss of one of its valuable and honored citizens. His 
widow now resides in Lancaster, Ohio. 

George B. La Croix acquired his education in the country schools of the Empire state, 
pursuing his studies to the age of fourteen years. He then began work upon his father's 
farm and continued actively therein rmtil he had attained his majority. He then came to 
South Dakota and was employed at farm labor during the first year. He afterward rented 
land and started to buy and sell stock at Mellette, in which he has been engaged for the past 
two decades, successfully following the business at the present time. In 1909 he established 
his farm implement business and his fair prices and earnest efforts to please his patrons 
have gained for him a gratifying measure of prosperity. 

On the 1st of September, 1887. at Mellette, Mr. La Croix was married to Miss Winnie 
Lee, a daughter of Jacob and Sarah Lee. The former was a hotel proprietor and died at 
Long Beach, California, and his remains were brought back to Mellette for interment. His 
widow survives and still makes her home at Long Beach. Mr. and Mrs. La Croix have a 
daughter. Hazel, who is a graduate of the Mellette high school and of the Comnoch school at 
Los Angeles. California, in which city she makes her home with her grandmother. 

Mr. La Croi.x is an exemplary representative of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 223 

!id of the Masonic fratoniity and in tlie latter has advanced to the thirty-second degree 
f tlie Scottisli Rite and is a member of the Mystic Shrine. He is in thorough sympathy 
itli tlie purposes of tlie craft, which recognizes the brotherhood of mankind. Politically he 
a democrat and has filled the office of deputy sheriff and marshal of Mellette. Throughout 
is entire life he has depended solely upon his own efl'orts, never having the assistance of 
iherited wealth or of influential friends. He early realized that industry is the key that 
iilocks the ]iortals to prosperity and his has been a very active life, in which diligence 
lul deteiiiiination have brought to Iiim the merited reward of labor. 



PAUL DUTCHER. 



There are few who have had a more potent influence in shaping public thought and 
action, particularly along political lines, than lias Paul Dutcher of Brookings, who is owner 
and editor of the Re;;i>tcr. His |ia|ii-i- has dune much to mold public opinion and in indi- 
vidual effort, too, he Ili- aiclcd in s|i,i|iiiiu tlh- |»ilicy that has molded the destiny of terri- 
tory and state. He was Ihhh AtiL;nst 'J. Isi,:;. ai Stoughton, Dane county, Wisconsin, a son 
of Curtis E. and l.iirinda ( . (Matti.ei ii\itrliri. (Iir former born in May, 1831, and the latter 
September 2"), l.s:;K 'I'ln^ iiictliei suivIms and imw makes her home with her son. W. E. 
Dutcher, in Abcnlcin, South Dakota, but tlic father passed away when his son Paul was but 
nine years of age. 

The latter was educated in the public schools of Wisconsin but necessity compelled him 
early to earn his living and at the age of fifteen years he entered the employ of Cramer, 
Aikens & Cramer, publishers of the Evening Wisconsin at Milwaukee. This was his initial 
step in the field of journalism and at the age of nineteen, in company with his brother, he 
took over the Waterloo Journal, which they published for about two years. Mr. Dutcher 
then came west in August, 1884, and located in the town of Clark in Dakota territory. The 
same fall he purchased and became the publisher of the Raymond Gazette in the western 
part of Clark county. He made it an organ of the republican party and was quite active 
and induential in territorial politics, serving as a delegate to the last territorial convention, 
held at Jamestown, now North Dakota. He was also a delegate from Clark county to the 
first republican convention of South Dakota, held at Huron. The notable feature of this 
convention was the placing of a prohibition plank in the platform and it carrii'd willi it Mr. 
Dutcher's vote. Always an admirer and stanch friend of the Hon. Carl G. SIhiwo.hI. ii.,w 
judge of the third circuit, Mr. Dutcher assisted in his election as a delegate to tlic lonslitn- 
tional convention of 1885 and attciwaicl as the first state senator from Clark county. 

At that time Mr. Dutcliei was a instirc ol the j)eace and the postmaster, as well as a 
jiublisher in his home town. He .iiin\a>il ila' iricinlship and intimate acquaintance of such 
men as John E. Bennett, afteiwaul |\i,li;i' .ai tla- sn|)reme bench; S. H. Elrod, governor from 
1905 until 1907; and S. J. (Ciiklin. in.in,, i and for a number of years adjutant general. 
A. C. Johnson, passenger and tiallic nianai^i i fur the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad at 
Chicago, was Mr. Dutcher's neighbor at Raj'inond. Among the pioneers and men of promi- 
nence Mr. Dutcher enjoyed the acquaintance of such men as Gideon C. Moody, who was 
United States senator from 1889 until 1891; R. E. Pettigrew, who was senator from 1889 
until 1901; Oscar S. Gifi'ord and John A. Pickler, members of congress from 1889 to 189G. 
He was intimately acquainted with the last territorial and the first state governor, Hon. 
A. C. Mellette, and for three years served as aide-de-camp on the staff of Governor Charles 
H. Sheldon with the rank of colonel. He numbered among his personal friends C. N. Her- 
ried, A. 0. Ringsrud, Thomas Thorson and W. H. Roddle. the last three being secretaries of 
state in successive order from 1889 until 1900. In 1895 Mr. Dutcher was assistant to 
tlie chief clerk of the house of representatives. 

In June, 1890, Mr. llutcher removed to Brookings, establishing the Brookings Register 
and afterward absorbing the Sentinel. In 1906 the Brookings Individual was taken over and 
consolidated with the Register, wliieli is today one of the best weeklies published in the 
state. Mr. Dutcher enjoys the distiiation of being one of less than a half dn/en inililislieis 
in the state who have been continuously in the publishing business since 1SS4. lie has been 
a member of the South Dakota Press Association since it was organized in 1SS4 and was its 



224 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

first trtasurei-. He was the first secretary of the present organization of the Broolcings Com- 
mercial Club, which is one of the best and most active organizations of this kind in the state. 
He has always been an advocate of South Dakota and her opportunities, has been an in- 
defatigable worker for her upbuilding and as a promoter has done much to advance her 
interests. He is prominent in Masonic circles, being a past commander, a past high priest, 
a past master and a past patron. His life has been actuated by the spirit of advancement 
and the result of his labors has been farreaching and beneficial. 



LOUIS F. MICHAEL. 



Louis F. Michael, a retired farmer living in Lesterville, Yankton county, has been a 
resident of Dakota since 1867 and is therefore entitled to recognition as one of the real 
pioneers of the state. He was born near Coblenz, in the Rhine province of Prussia, on the 
19th of August, 1839, a son of Henry and Charlotte (Otto) Michael. In 1845 they emigrated 
to America from Germany, landing in New Orleans on St. Patrick's day after a voyage of 
thirteen weeks on the sailing vessel First Monarch, which put out from Liverpool. Mr. 
Michael had friends at Lawrenceburg, Indiana, but did not stop there when the boat on 
which the family was journeying up the Ohio passed that town but continued to Cincinnati. 
Not long afterward, however, the family went to Lawrenceburg, where they lived for eighteen 
months, after which a removal was made to Rushville, Indiana, where the father ran a dray 
and also a stage line to Connersville. It took eighteen horses for the business, as Mr. 
Michael ran two stages each way per day. He died in Indiana in 1864, at the age of fifty 
years, and his wife passed away in Denver, Colorado, in 1890, at the advanced age of 
eighty-five. In their family were the following children: Louis F., of this review; Henry 
W., who has been engaged in business in Denver since 1862; Mrs. Elizabeth Mack, a widow; 
Anthony, who died in Denver; and Charlotte, the wife of Charles Burgess, of Denver. 

Louis F. Michael was but a child of six years when he accompanied his parents on their 
journey to the new world and acquired his education in the United States. He early began 
to assist his father and when fourteen years of age drove a four-horse stage daily. He 
learned the butcher's trade and worked at that until two years before the outbreak of the 
Civil war. He and a friend had begun dealing in horses and had bought a number which 
they were taking to Cincinnati to sell when Fort Sumter was fired upon. Mr. Michael 
immediately left for home and directed his partner to complete the business transaction. 
He was the seventh man to enroll in Company F, Sixteenth Volunteer Regiment and was 
appointed corporal. His command passed through Baltimore the night after the Baltimore 
massacre and the men were given strict orders not to create a disturbance nor reply to jeers. 
Mr. Michael went into a bakery owned by an Irishman to buy lunch for himself and his 
comrades, but the proprietor refused to sell to him, whereupon his men wrecked the place 
and took the entire stock. The first skirmish in which his command participated was at 
Darnestown, Maryland. They then cfossed the mountains and passed down through Lees- 
burg and Manassas Junction but were afterward sent to Washington. The winter was 
spent in camp at Frederick, where Mr. Michael was made commissary sergeant. 

As the time of enlistment had expired, the men were sent home, but Mr. Michael 
veteranized, becoming a member of Company C, Sixteenth Indiana Regiment. He was sent 
to Cumberland Gap with his command and participated in the battle at Richmond, Kentucky, 
where the entire regiment was captured with the exception of Mr. Michael and nineteen 
other men. He was next sent to Memphis, thence up White river, where he aided in taking 
Arkansas Post. The regiment of which he was a member planted the first flag on the fort 
with a loss of but four killed and four wounded. Mr. Michael, who by this time held the 
rank of second sergeant, was put in command of his company, as all of the higher officers 
were killed or disabled, and after the capture of the fort was commissioned second lieutenant. 
Not long afterward Lieutenant Michael and fifty men were sent to capture some rebels in 
a house near Point Gibson, whose presence had been reported by a negro. The Union 
soldiers surrounded the house and captured all of the rebels and the captain found fifteen 
hundred dollars in gold in the attic. When negotiations were undertaken concerning the 




<:»UIS F. inCHAEL 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 227 

surrender of Vicksburg, General Pemberton first sent Bowen, a subaltern, as his representa- 
tive, but General Grant sent back word dii-eoting General Pemberton to come in person. 
This he did and Lieutenant Michael had the honor of escorting him to Grant's presence, 
taking care that he was blindfolded until he was well within the Union lines. Lieutenant 
Michael heard General Grant make his terms, which were those of unconditional surrender 
and which gave him his nickname of Unconditional Surrender Grant. At the close of the 
siege the regiment of which Mr. Michael was a member had but two hundred and twenty-five 
men left, so terrible had been the casualties. The command was next sent to Jackson, Mis- 
sissippi, where it assisted in driving Johnson from that section, and while in that campaign 
Lieutenant Michael's company saved a piano from a burning house for a northern lady 
who was teaching in the south and had been unable to return north. Not long after this 
incident he was sent out with a squad of men to superintend the unloading of the steamer 
City of Memphis and he and his men were on the shore when the ship was blown up by the 
explosion resulting from a shell being dropped on the boat by a negro. Many of the deck 
hands were killed, but Mr. Michael and his squad were far enough away to escape injury. 
He was on the expedition up Red river under the command of General Banks, and the regi- 
ment captured thirty-five hundred steers and fifteen thousand dollars in Confederate money 
on Vermilion Bayou. The cattle were worth much more than the money and were taken to 
Franklin, Louisiana, from which point they were sent to New Orleans to supply beef to the 
army there. At Alexandria Lieutenant Michaels and his squad of men captured seventy- 
eight men and officers and the next engagement in which he participated was the battle of 
Sabine Crossroads. When the war closed he was stati.'iird nt 'ri|ili:iuN. l,oiii>i;Lna, and was 
mustered out at New Orleans, although he was not cli>( hai-cd nnlil lie rr:i.li.d liKliaiiapidis. 

Not long after the close of the war an uncle of Mr. M m liacr.-. wlm was living at New 
Orleans, died and his widow sent for our subject to help her settle the estate. He therefore 
returned to the Crescent city and while there contracted yellow fever and for fifteen days 
was very ill. In the fall of 1866 he went up the river to St. Louis, where he remained until 
the spring of the following year, when he was employed as a butcher to go to Fort Benton, 
Montana, in the government service. Passage was taken on the steamer Ida Stockdale, but 
he was taken oft' at Leavenworth, Kansas, and sent with an expedition that was to try to 
get through to California. They encountered many Indians and after a great deal of fight- 
ing had to return and give up the trip. Seven hundred teams accompanied by two com- 
panies of soldiers then started overland for Fort Benton, Montana, which they finally reached 
in safety. 

In the fall of 1867 Mr. Michael made his way down tlie Missouri river as far as Sioux 
('ity, but, finding no work there, continued to St. Joseph. Missouri, where he was employed 
in a packing house throughout the winter. In the spring of 1S68 he came to Dakota terri- 
tory and was associated with Harney, establishing reservations and placing the Indians 
thereon. He was in the employ of the government at the opening of the Grand river, the 
Cheyenne and the Lower Brule agencies, furnished beef to the Indians, being located about 
fifteen miles from Fort Sully and ten miles above the site of Pierre. After being in the 
government employ for nine months he went to Sioux City but soon heard that J. R. San- 
burn of Yankton needed a man in his meat market and immediately applied for th.- ]iiisiti(in, 
which he secured. At the end of six months he, in connection with a partnci, l).>iii;lit tlio 
business. In the meantime he had filed on a homestead near Lakeport, YaTiktoii rnuiity, 
and by using his land rights as a soldier secured a patent thereto in 1872. Following his 
marriage he removed to his farm, to which he added from time to time until he was the 
owner of six hundred and forty acres of land. He resided upon his homestead and concen- 
trated his energies upon its improvement and cultivation until the death of his wife, when 
he retired from active life, disposing of part of his land, for which he received one hundred 
and twenty dollars per acre. For a number of years he has lived in Lesterville, enjoying at 
his ease tlie comforts of life, as his labor in former years enabled him to acquire more than 
a competence. 

Mr. Michael was married on the 16th of May. 1870, in Yankton, to Miss Annie Cap, 
a daughter of Daniel and Mary Cap, natives of Bohemia. To Mr. and Mrs. Michael were 
liorn one son and ten daughters, of whom five daughters have passed away. The surviving 
children are: Lizzie, the wife of Albert Tank, who is farmina; in Yankton county; Anna, 
now Mrs. George Bellamy, of Mitchell; Henry W., who is engaged in the insurance and real- 



228 . HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

estate business in Lesterville; Cliarlotte, the wile of George Kremer, of Lesterville; Mary, 
a graduate nurse of Norfolk, Nebraska; and Margaret, still at home. 

Mr. Michael is a democrat and cast his first vote for Stephen A. Douglas. As a membei' 
of Phil Kearney Post, G. A. R., of Yankton, he is associated with others who defended the 
Union in the Civil war and finds much pleasure in reviewing the occurrences of those stormy 
days. He has a fine voice and is a valued member of the German Singing Society of Lester- 
ville. While living in Indianapolis he was a member of a lire company and on one occasion 
rescued a lady by jumping a story and a half with her from a ladder, both escaping uninjured, 
as they were caught in a canvas. He experienced a number of the severe storms of the 
early days and during the blizzard in October, 1871, lost his way while endeavoring to find 
his father-in-law's house, to which he and his wife were going, as theirs was unlinished. 
After wandering about for two hours they succeeded in finding a neighbor's house, where 
they were sheltered. Mr. Michael's faith in South Dakota has been justified and the hard- 
ships of the early days are forgotten in the prosperit}^ of the present. 



WARD BERTRAM DYER. 



Ward Bertram Djer, of the law firm of House & Dyer, of Chamberlain, was born in 
Ohio, on the 25th of July, 18S0, a son of Alvin and Mary Dyer, both of whom are deceased. 
The father was by profession a physician. Ward B. Dyer received his elementary and second- 
ary education in the public schools and took his law course in the Ohio State University, 
from which he was graduated in 1906. For about a year he practiced in his native state 
and then came to South Dakota, locating successively at Gann Valley, Kimball and Cham- 
berlain. In 1912 he formed a partnership with Mr. House and they are now known as two 
of the best lawyers in Brule county. They have a large practice and represent important 
interests. 

Mr. Dyer was married on the 8th of July, 1906, to Miss Bessie L. Wagner, a native of 
Ohio, and a daughter of John and Margaret (Book) Wagner, of Canton, Ohio, They have 
one daughter, Margaret. Mr. and Mrs. Dyer attend the Congregational church. He is a 
republican and while living in Buffalo county, this state, served acceptably as states attor- 
ney. Fraternally he is connected with the Masonic order, in which he has taken the chapter 
degrees in the York Rite, and he is also identified with the Woodmen and the Odd Fellows. 
He is a stockliolder and director of the Kimball State Bank and has already made his pres- 
ence felt in Chamberlain, where he is recognized as one of the leading young professional 
men of the town and as an excellent citizen. 



TIMOTHY COLE. 



Timothy Cole, living retired at Tyndall, is well known throughout Bon Homme county 
and that section of the state. He and his three brothers and sister, Mrs. Bridget Cogan, 
were among the first settlers in Old Bon Homme and were among the most infiucntial resi- 
dents of their county for many years. Timothy Cole was born at Newark, New Jersey, 
October 22, 1845, and his parents, Bernard and Catherine Ann (McCormack) Cole, were born 
near Castlereagh, County Roscommon, Ireland. They emigrated to America in the early '40s, 
embarking at Liverpool on a sailing vessel bound for New York which required thirteen 
weeks and three days to make the trip. Mr. Cole found work at Newark, New Jersey, and 
passed away there about 1850. Five or six years later his widow brought her family west 
and two of the boys went to Sheboygan, Wisconsin, to make their home with a wealthy 
bachelor uncle, Colonel Bartholomew Cole, a veteran of the Mexican war. But the boys 
rebelled at the latter'a strict discipline and the arrangement was soon terminated. The 
inother then came west and lived for a time in Milwaukee and then in Beaver Dam and 
Winnebago. Wisconsin, still later in Dubuque, and after that she established her home half 
way between Clarksville and Hannibal, Missouri, where the family was living at the open- 
ing of the Civil war. Bernard and Timothy served during the greater part of the conflict. 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 229 

At the beginning of the war Timothy was too young for service on the battle line and there- 
fore enlisted in the Tliird Missouri State Cavalry, a militia organization, but later became 
a nifniber of the Forty-ninth Missouri Infantry, under Colonel D. P. Dyer, now a well known 
member of the St. Louis bar. Bernard and Timothy Cole saw active service in Alabama, 
Mississippi and Louisiana and participated in one of the last engagements of the war, the 
siege of Spanish Fort. Following the war the family removed to Dakota territory, where 
Bernard Cole had previously established himself as a blacksmith in the old town of Bon 
Horame. Upon his arrival in the territory in 1868, Timothy Cole established a wood yard 
four or five miles east of Bon Homme. At the end of a year he returned to Missouri and 
remained tw^o or three years when he again came to South Dakota and filed on a homestead 
claim on section 26, Cleveland precinct, which remained his home until March, 1909, when 
he removed to Tyndall, where he has since lived retired. While actively engaged in agri- 
cultural pursuits he was known as a progressive, alert and energetic farmer and he accumu- 
lated more than a competence, which enables him to spend his remaining days in ease and 
leisure. 

Mr. Cole was married in the fall of 1866, in Millwood, Lincoln county, Missouri, to Miss 
Elizabeth Blake, a native of Virginia, whose birth occurred in March, 1849. Her parents, 
Shelton and Fannie (Fortune) Blake, emigrated to Jefferson county, Missouri, in 1852 with 
their family and there the father farmed during the remainder of his life. Mrs. Cole attended 
tlie high school of St. Louis and Guardian Angel Academy, where she became a convert to 
the Catholic faith. Of the ten children born to the union of Mr. and Mrs. Cole nine survive, 
four sons and five daughters, who reside in Bon Homme, Charles Mix, Gregory, Tripp, Meade 
and Yankton counties, this state. 

Mr. Cole is a democrat and stanchly supports the candidates of that party at the polls. 
He and his family all belong to the Catholic church and he is a comrade of Springfield Post, 
0. A. R. He experienced all of the hardships and privations that fell to the lot of the early 
settlers in this state, the blizzards in winter, the prairie fires in the late summer and autumn, 
the grasshopper plagues and the isolation common to frontier life everywhere. He is held in 
tlie highest esteem in his community and tlie honor that is his is' richly deserved. 



WILLIAM E. RYAN. 



William E. Ryan, an energetic and enterprising business man, now president of the First 
Kational Bank of Letcher, was born in Grant county, Wisconsin, May 16, 1865. His father, 
John Ryan, was a native of the Badger state and was a son of John Ryan, Sr., who was 
born in Ireland and on coming to America made his way into the interior of the country, 
settling in Wisconsin among the pioneers of 1834. His son and namesake married Cath- 
erine Lewis and to them were born nine children. 

William E. Ryan, the second in order of birth, acquired his education in the country 
schools of Wisconsin and has been identified with the business interests of South Dakota 
since 1893, w'hen he established a lumber yard at Letcher, building up one of the leading 
enterprises of the kind in the county. This he conducted with growing success until 1910, 
when he sold his plant to the J. F. Anderson Lumber Company. In the meantime his trade 
had steadily grown and his enterprise had become one of the leading business concerns of 
the district. In 1900 Mr. Ryan assisted in organizing the Letcher State Bank at Letcher, 
of which he was chosen president, and when that institution was changed to the First Na- 
tional Bank he continued as its chief officer. He has been largely responsible for making it 
one of the strong financial institutions of the state. It has been developed along a substan- 
tial basis and in keeping with modern business ethics and its success is attributable largely 
to his executive force, his keen insight and his well defined plans. He also has important 
farm and ranch interests, owning two thousand acres of improved land upon which he is 
successfully engaged in breeding cattle. Indeed he has been for many years one of the 
largest breeders and dealers in live stock in his part of the state and as he is familiar with 
every phase of the business and knows the market he is thus able to direct his interests and 
his investments in live stock so as to secure a good return therefrom. 

In 1889 Mr. Ryan was united in marriage to Miss Mabel Smith, a daughter of .J. P. and 



230 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

Cora (Derby) Smitli, who were among the early settlers of Sanborn county, coming from 
Vermont in 1885. To Mr. and Mrs. Ryan have been born four children, namely: Cora 
Blanche; Kathryn, the wife of Laurence Smith, of St. Louis, Missouri; Myrtle G.; and 
Helen A. 

Politically Mr. Ryan is an earnest republican and he has been a member of the school 
board for many years. Fraternally he is a Mason, an Odd Fellow and an Elk and is loyal to 
the teachings of those organizations, exemplifying in his life the beneficent spirit upon which 
they are based. He believes in giving to each individual the opportunity which should be 
his and he has never won his success at the price of another's failure. On the contrary, his 
prosperity has been largely due to his faith in the future of the state and the excellence of 
his judgment in making investments which have justified the soundness of his opinions. 



JAMES E. PLATT. 



James E. Piatt is a man of prominence not only in the city of Clark and the county 
of that name but also in banking circles of South Dakota and the nation, as he is secretary 
of the State Bankers Association and is a member of the executive council of the American 
Bankers Association. He is mayor of his city, secretary of the Commercial Club and presi- 
dent of the Security Bank. His influence is felt in almost all aspects of public and civic 
life, and his energy and clearness of vision enable him to accomplish much for the general 
good. 

Mr. Piatt was born in New York state on the 11th of March, 1866, a son of James N. 
and Laura (Sibley) Piatt, both Ukewise natives of the Empire state, their births occurring 
in Otsego county. They were there reared and married. The father, who was a Methodist 
minister, went west to Iowa about 1870 and subsequently filled pulpits at Eddyville, Park- 
ersburg, Earlville, Epworth, Manchester, Marion, Fayette and Nashua. In 1884 he brought 
his family to this state and settled in Clark. He later became one of the organizers of the 
Security Bank and was subsequently made president of the institution, in which capacity he 
served until his death, in April, 1906, when he was sixty-eight years of age. His widow 
survives and makes her home in Clark. 

James E. Piatt was reared at home and acquired his education in the common schools 
and at the Manchester (la.) high school, graduating from the latter institution with the 
class of 1881, being its youngest member as he was only fifteen years of age. Subsequently 
he attended Cornell College at Mount Vernon, Iowa, the Upper Iowa University at Fayette 
and Epworth Seminary at Epworth. He completed a classical course in the last mentioned 
school in 1884 and immediately afterward came to Clark, South Dakota, where he found 
employment in the D. Wayne & Sons Banking House for four years. In 1888 he assisted 
in organizing the Security Bank of Clark and on September 1st of that year the institution 
opened its doors for business with Mr. Piatt as its first cashier. In 1890 his father was 
made president of the bank and served in that capacity until his death, which occurred in 
1906. James E. Piatt held the position of cashier until 1913, when he was elected president 
of the institution, in which capacity he is now serving. His long banking experience has 
made him thoroughly familiar with the daily routine and his years of service in an adminis- 
trative position have developed his natural executive ability, while his constant study of 
the monetary and commercial problems that affect banking has made him unusually compe- 
tent to erect larger policies of the bank with which he is connected. The same qualities have 
gained him a position of leadership in the State Bankers Association, in which he holds the 
office of secretary. 

On June 19, 1900, Mr. Piatt was united in marriage with Miss Katherine A. Boyle, wlio 
for a number of years taught in the Clark city schools. Two children have been born to 
this marriage, Lois and Robert. The parents are members of the Methodist Episcopal church 
and Jlr. Piatt has sung in the choir for some twenty-five years. 

Mr. Piatt gives his political allegiance to the republican party and is the present mayor 
of the city. Fraternally he is very prominent in Masonry, being a member of Clark Lodge, 
No. 42, A. F. & A. M.; Olivet Chapter, No. 14, R. A. M.; Watertown Commandery, K. T.; 
South Dakota Consistory, No. 4, A. & A. S. R., of Aberdeen; El Riad Temple of the Mystic 




.TAIIES E, PLA 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 233 

Shrine of Sioux Falls; and the Jlasonic Veterans Association. He also belongs to VVatertown 
Lodge, No. 838, B. P. 0. E.; Myrtle Lodge, No. 43, K. P.; Clark Lodge, No. 60, 1. O. O. P., 
and the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He has served as state grand chancellor and 
supreme representative in the Knights of Pythias and for the past eight years has been 
grand receiver of the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He likewise holds membership in 
the Watertown Country Club and the Minneapolis Athletic Club. P'or twenty years he has 
been treasurer of the State Pair Association and is major paymaster of the South Dakota 
State Militia. He is secretary of the Commercial Club of Clark and much of the achieve- 
ment of that organization is due to his fidelity and initiative. He is connected in important 
capacities with many and varied associations and movements and it is only his great energy, 
power of quick decision and efficiency that enable him to successfully discharge all of the 
duties devolving upon him. There is no man in Clark county who has done more notable 
public service, and his integrity is as generally conceded as his ability. 



WALTER E. FINK. 



Walter E. Fink, the able young auditor (it (_ ii>tii ciunity and one of the esteemed resi- 
dents of Custer, was born in Milwaukee, U'isrdiiMn, on the 12th of January, 1880, the eldest 
of three children, whose parents are Simon and llaiiiiali (Tutkin) Pink, the former born in 
ililwaukee and the latter in Pennsylvania. The father engaged in the hardware business 
after emigrating to Jlilwaukee and has been connected with that business continuously for 
lifty-two years. 

Walter E. Fink attended the ward and high schools of ililwaukee but when eighteen 
years of age he put aside his textbooks. He served in the United States Naval Hospital at 
Brooklyn for three and a half years and in 1899 arrived in the Black Hills and entered the 
employ of the Wabash Gold Mining Company. After continuing with them for a year he 
taught school at Four Mile for one year and then turned his attention to mining again. He 
also clerked in a general store at Custer until he was elected in 1914, as county auditor. In 
•lannary, 1915, he took charge of the office and has already demonstrated his ability to 
handle its affairs satisfactorily. 

Mr. Fink was married on the 31st of December, 1903, to Miss Ida Bostrom, who was 
born at F'our Mile, Custer county, of the marriage of John and Fredricka (Lindstrom) Bostrum, 
both natives of Sweden. They emigrated to the United States many years ago and settled 
at Cheyenne, Wyoming, where the father was engaged in mechanical work. He removed to 
South Dakota in the early part of the history of this state and resided at Rapid City for 
about two years. For nine years the family home was on Hay Creek and at the end of 
that time a removal was made to Four Mile. The father engaged in ranching there until 
the fall of 1912, when he removed to San Diego, California, and is now following the car- 
penter's trade there. To him and his wife have been born two children, of whom Mrs. Fink 
is the younger. By her marriage she has three children: Carmencita Ethel, at school; Claudia 
Amelia; and Rosetta Lina. 

Mr. Fink is a republican and is one of the loyal party workers in his county. Fraternally 
he is identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He is still interested in a num- 
lier of mining ventures but concentrates practically his entire time and attention upon the 
duties of the auditor's office, and his ability and conscientiousness make it certain that his 
record in that connection will be a creditable one. 



FERNANDO A. FORD. 

Fernando A. F'ord is the owner of a farm of five hundred acres situated principally on 
sections 28 and 33, Mellette township, Spink county. In the spring of 1884 he came to South 
Dakota and in the intervening period to the present time has borne an active and helpful 
part in the work of general improvement and progress. He is a native of Cliautauqua county. 
New York, born on the 26th of July, 1858, and is a son of Alvin and Caroline (Baleom) 



2.34 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

Ford. In the paternal line he comes of English ancestry, the family, however, being founded 
in America long prior to the Kevolutionary war. The Balcom family was established in 
Massachusetts at an early day, many generations having resided on this side the Atlantic, 
and a great-uncle of Mr. Ford was one of the officers with the Continental army in the war 
lor independence. His father, Alvin Ford, devoted the greater part of his life to merchandis- 
ing and died in 1872, at the age of forty-three years, his remains being interred in Chautauqua 
county, New York. His widow survives at the advanced age of eighty-four years and makes 
her home with her son, Fernando A. 

F. A. Ford, having attended the public schools to the age of seventeen years, then 
started out in business life, for it was necessary that he aid in the support of the family. 
He continued his residence in his native county until twenty-six years of age, when, in 18S4, 
he left the Empire state and made his way to the northwest, which was being opened for 
settlement. South Dakota was his destination and following his arrival he took up land 
from the government in Potter county, which he began to improve and develop. Later, how- 
ever, he sold that property and invested in three hundred and twenty acres. To this he has 
since added as his financial resources have increased until he is now the owner of five hun- 
dred acres of rich and arable land lying mainly on sections 28 and 33, Mellette township. 
As soon as he could transform the wild prairie by breaking the sod he would put in a crop 
and for a considerable period gave his attention almost exclusively to the raising of grain, 
but during the past ten or twelve years he has been extensively engaged in stock-raising, 
handling horses and hogs. This branch of his business is proving profitable and he is today 
one of the substantial farmers of the state, which has more wealth per capita than any 
other state in the Union. 

On the 28th of February, 1893, Mr. Ford was united in marriage to Miss Bertha Schulz, 
a daughter of Henry and Augusta Schulz. natives of Germany, who emigrated to this country 
and settled in McPherson county. South Dakota. Later they removed to Oregon but in 1892 
located in Spink county. South Dakota. However, after a few years they again removed 
to Oregon and now reside at Medford, Jackson county, that state. Mr. and Mrs. Ford have 
become the parents of ten children: Hugo, who is living at home but has begun his inde- 
pendent career by renting five hundred and fifteen acres of land; Freda, the wife of .Joseph 
E. Kingsley, who is farming in Mellette township, Spink county; Martha and Juna, who arr 
attending the Normal School at Aberdeen; Bertha, Florence, Henry, Matthew and Theodore, 
all attending the district school; and Eugene, a little lad of three summers, who completes 
the family. 

Mr. Ford is a stalwart advocate of republican principles and, although not an office 
seeker, he is ever ready to encourage and assist worthy enterprises, cooperating with many 
movements which have been of material benefit and value to the community. He belongs to 
the Ancient Order of United Workmen and has many friends in that organization. He has 
erected upon his place a fine residence, a substantial barn, two silos and a number of other 
buildings, making the place one of the finely modern properties of Spink county, giving every 
evidence of the care and labor and the progressive spirit of the owner. Mr. Ford is today 
numbered among the prosperous citizens of his county and well merits the rich return that 
has come to him, for it is the logical result and direct outcome of his efforts. 



HON. AUGUST C. BUENSTAD. 

Hon. August C. Burnstad, now living largely retired at Florence, has lived to witness a 
remarkable transformation in South Dakota. He arrived in pioneer times, driving a team of 
oxen across the country, and aided in transforming broad prairie land into richly productive 
fields. He met many of the hardships and privations of life upon the frontier, but with 
the passing years success attended his well directed efforts and he became the possessor of 
a handsome competence, which now enables him to rest from further labor. He was born 
In Norway, August 11, 1S53, a son of Chris and Martha Burnstad, both of whom passed away 
in that country. The father devoted his life to farming. 

In the common schools of his native country August C. Burnstad pursued his education 
and then, attracted by the favorable reports which he heard concerning the opportunities anil 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 2:^5 

advantages of the new world, he sailed for America when but sixteen years of age and settled 
in Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, in 1869. There he remained until 1880, working in the lum- 
ber woods, at the end of which time he made his way to South Dakota, settling in Eden 
township, Codington county. He traveled after the primitive manner of the times, driving 
a team of oxen hitched to a covered wagon. He homesteaded on section 34 and secured a tree 
claim on the same section. There was no competition for land there, for he was the first 
settler in the township. With characteristic energy he began to develop the place and con- 
tinued operating the two claims until seven years ago, when he removed to Florence. In 
1U14, however, he again began to cultivate his farm. At one time his landed possessions were 
more extensive, but he sold a portion of his holdings. His first work was done Avith the four 
oxen with which he had made the journey to South Dakota. Every evidence of frontier life 
was here to be seen. He had to haul his grain to and obtain his supplies from Watertown, 
twenty-five miles distant. No roads had been laid out and there were many hardships an<l 
privations to be met. The seasons were so dry that crops were poor and the winters were 
very severe, but as the years have gone on Mr. Burnstad has won a substantial measure of 
prosperity in the development and improvement of his farm. He is now a stockholder and 
director of the farmers' elevator, is a stockholder in the F'armers State Bank and also buys 
and ships cattle, for, while his competence is sufTicient to enable him to live retired, indolence 
and idleness are utterly foreign to his nature and he cannot content himself without some 
occupation. 

At Luverne, Minnesota, in July, 1880, Mr. Burnstad was united in marriage to Miss 
Dorothy Best, a daughter of Valentine Best, who came from Canada. Their children, all born 
upon the farm, are: John, who is now engaged in farming and cattle-raising in Canada; 
Gracie, who died in 1898, at the age of fifteen years; Carl, who is conducting a drug store in 
Watertown ; Hattie, the wife of E. Meyers, who has been postmaster of Florence since the 
establishment of the town; and Jessie, at home. 

Mr. Burnstad is connected with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Mod- 
ern Woodmen of America. He is deeply interested in everything pertaining to the welfare 
and progress of town, county and state and his efforts have been a substantial element in 
promoting public progress in his community. His fellow townsmen, appreciative of his 
worth, ability and public spirit, have frequently called him to office. He has served in 
various township positions, was county commissioner from 1894 until 1900, is a member of 
the school board of Florence at the present writing and in 1901 was elected a member of the 
state legislature, in which he proved so faithful to the interests of the commonwealth that 
he was reelected in 1903 and again in 1909 and 1911. He stands loyally for all that he 
believes to be beneficial to the commonwealth and is just as stalwart in his opposition to any 
interests which he believes will be inimical to the advancement of the state. 



ELMER F. SCOTT. 



Elmer F. Scott, a druggist of Chamberlain, is one of the well known business men of that 
city, where he has resided for a number of years. He is a native of Iowa, born July 18, 1859, 
a son of Samuel and Sarah Scott, both now deceased. The father, who was a contractor, was 
one of the pioneers of Iowa. 

E. F. Scott acquired his education in the public schools of Cherokee, Iowa, and upon 
starting out upon his business career found a position as clerk in a drug store. He worked 
in that capacity until 1883, when he came to South Dakota and established a drug store of 
his own, being one of the pioneers in that business in Brule county. When he arrived in 
Cliamberlain it was but a little village on the western frontier and it required great faith 
in the future of the west to foresee the rapid development that has so changed conditions 
in Brule county and indeed in the whole state of South Dakota. Mr. Scott decided to cast 
in his lot with that of the new town and has remained through good times and bad. On the 
whole however, he has prospered beyond his expectations and has seen the little villajre grow 
to a thriving town. His first store was in a little frame building, sixteen by twenty- fo>ir 
feet, but he now occupies a two story brick structure, covering two lots, which he built in 
1913. He does a large business annually and is one of the substantial men of Brule county. 



236 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

In addition to his large and paying business, he owns stock in the Whitbeck National Bank 
of Chamberlain. His natural business ability and his long experience as a di-uggist com- 
bine to make him one of the leading men in his section of the state in his line and his 
patronage comes from a wide territory. His financial success is equalled by the lespect 
which is accorded him by his fellow citizens, who justly hold him in high esteem. 

In April, 1883, Mr. Scott married Miss Katie Hurley, a daughter of William Hurley, ot 
Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Scott have a son. Marc W., who is a registered druggist and is asso- 
ciated with his father in the conduct of his store. 

The family are Protestants and are identified with many movements that seek the 
moral advancement of the community. Mr. Scott is a republican and has served as city 
clerk and as alderman for six years, while for eight years he was a member of the school 
board. Fraternally he is quite well known in the Masonic order, has taken the thirty-second 
degree in the Scottish Rite and is also a member of the Mystic Shrine. He is also identified 
with the Elks and the Knights of Pythias. 



EUDOLPHUS D. JENNIKGS, M. D. 

Dr. Kudolphus D. Jennings, a well known physician and surgeon of Hot Springs, has 
been prominently connected with the development of South Dakota for many years, 
arrived here before there was a mile of railroad in the entire state. He is a native of Fre 
mont, Sandusky county, Ohio, born November 21, 1853, and is a son of F. A. and Luella 
(Wringler) Jennings born respectively in New York and Pennsylvania. The father was 
a physician and early in his life removed to Ohio, locating in Maumee, where he practiced 
his profession in connection with his father. During the cholera epidemic of 1855 he con- 
tracted the disease and succeeded in curing himself, which won considerable notice, as 
his was the first case cured. In 1856 he left that city and located at Dewitt, Clinton county, 
Iowa, and practiced there until he passed away about 1868. His wife had died many years 
previously, her demise occurring when our subject was yet a child in arms. The father raised 
a regiment of soldiers for the Union army in the fall of 1862, being a recruiting officer, but 
was never at the front himself. To him and his wife were born five children. 

Dr. Rudolphus D. Jennings entered Cornell College of Mount Vernon, Iowa, when sixteen 
years of age and when eighteen years old, in May, 1872, removed to Bismarck, Dakota ter- 
ritory, where he engaged in teaching school. He was for a time a bookkeeper and clerk for 
the Puget Sound Land Company, with which he was connected for three years. In 1876 he 
located at Deadwood and there engaged in the mercantile business. He became deputy 
collector of internal revenue and engaged in a number of occupations such as mining, con- 
tracting and architectural work. In 1881 he removed to Hot Springs and it was largely 
through his endeavor that the place became noted as a health resort. He became much 
interested in the study of medicine and attended the Chicago Medical College and also Kings 
College and Hospital of London, England, thus preparing himself thoroughly for the work 
of a physician and surgeon. Since his graduation in medicine he has practiced in Hot Springs 
and his patients are among the representative people of the city. In September, 1906, he 
was appointed governor of the Battle Jlountain Sanitarium and held that position for one 
year, after which he resumed his private practice. He has great faith in the future of South 
Dakota and owns considerable land in Fall River county. 

Dr. .Jennings was married in August, 1879, to Miss Mattie May Curtis, a native of 
Cleveland, Ohio, and a daughter of Sidney and Abigail (Bundy) Curtis, both of whom are now 
deceased. They removed to Iowa, where the father farmed and raised stock, and both 
passed away near Sioux City, that state. Dr. and Mrs. Jennings have two children. Abbie 
is the wife of J. C. Spencer, who is living retired in Hot Springs and who is one of the 
well-to-do men of his section of the state, as he is the owner of Sylvan lake, an ex-stockman 
and miner, having opened among others the Golden Reward mine. Louise is attending high 
school. 

Dr. Jennings is a republican and was the first clerk of the courts in Burley county. 
Dakota territory. For five years he served as superintendent of the state board of health 
and during that time inaugurated a number of movements that contributed much toward the 



as I 
he \ 




DR. RUDOLPHUS D. JEXXIXGS 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 239 

spread of hygienic knowledge in tlie state. He is a member of tlie blue lodge, chapter, the 
council and the commandery of the York Rite of Masons and has taken all of the degrees 
in the Scottish Rite up to and including the thirty-second, belonging to the consistory at 
Deadwood. For a number of years he was a member of the Grand Commandery and is well 
known in Masonry. He is also identified with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. 
Dr. Jennings arrived in this state before many settlements had been made and practically 
all of the city of Hot Springs is on the land which he entered as a homestead. He is the 
inventor and has patented a preparation for the prevention of parasitic diseases in trees. 
It is in the form of a powder which is inserted in a hole bored in the base of the tree near 
tlie ground. Practically all of liis tiTiu'. however, is devoted to his profession and as a 
physician and surgeon he has i^aiind an mviable reputation in Hot Springs and its vicinity, 
holding not only the confidence of xhv ucneral public but also that of his colleagues. 



ELMER E. WILLARD. 



Elmer E. Willard, who has spent practically his entire life on the old homestead farm in 
Taopi township, Minnehaha county, where his father located about thirty-seven years ago, 
is busily engaged in the cultivation of a half section of rich and productive land. His 
birth occurred in Lyon county, Iowa, on the 3d of December, 1878, his parents being Levi 
and Mary Willard, who in 1879 came to Minnehaha county. South Dakota, locating in Taopi 
township. The father acquired a homestead and also a timber claim and devoted his atten- 
tion to agricultural pursuits throughout the remainder of his active business career, owning 
two hundred and forty acres of valuable land at the time of his retirement. He is now liv- 
ing in Colton at the age of sixty-seven years, while his wife has attained the. age of sixty- 
four. They were among the first settlers of their locality and experienced all the hardships 
and privations of life in an undeveloped region. Markets were distant and no roads had been 
laid out. As the years have passed, however, they have witnessed and aided in the won- 
derful transformation that has occurred as pioneer conditions have given way before the 
onward march of civilization. They are the parents of two sons and two daughters. 

Elmer E. Willard attended the common schools in pursuit of an education and also took 
a six months' business course in the University of South Dakota at Vermillion. He then 
returned to assist his father in the operation of the home farm in Taopi township and has 
remained thereon continuously since, being actively engaged in the cultivation of a half 
section of land. He utilizes the latest improved machinery to facilitate the work of the 
fields and also feeds fifty head of cattle, one hundred head of sheep and one hundred head 
of hogs. As an agriculturist he has manifested ability and knowledge which insure his 
continued success. 

On the 31st of January, 1910, Mr. Willard was united in marriage to Miss Bertha Waston, 
by whom he has three children, Myrle, three years old; Mabel, two years of age; and 
Elsie, an infant. 

At the polls Mr. Willard supports the men and measures of the republican party and he 
has ably served in the office of town clerk. His wife is a devoted member of the Lutheran 
church but he has not identified himself with any denomination, though always endeavoring 
to exemplify in his life the highest principles of Christianity. In motoring and fishing he 
finds needed recreation and much pleasure. He is a man who takes a deep interest in the 
general welfare of the community, and he commands the respect and confidence of his fellow 
citizens. 



JACOB G. TOWLE. M. D. 



For a half century Dr. .Jacob G. Towle has engaged in the practice of medicine and is 
one of the most capable representatives of the profession not only in Roberts county but in 
his part of the state. He has lived in Sisseton since 1904 and has established and now con- 
ducts the Sisseton Hospital. He was born in Jackson, Michigan, on the 3d of June, 1846, 
his parents being Jacob G. and Jane (Sharpsteeiie) Towle, both of whom were natives of 



240 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

Genesee county, New York. The ancesti'y of the family in America can be traced back to 
Jacob Towle, who came to the new world in 1620. Tlie grandfather of our subject also 
bore the name of Jacob Towle and was a native of New York. The father, who was born 
in the year 1S08, died in 1879, while the mother, who was born in 1810, passed away iu 1895 
at the advanced age of eighty-five years. They were married in Michigan, having gone to 
that state in early life. The. father was a physician and devoted his entire career to active 
practice. He followed his profession in Jackson, Michigan, until 1854 and then removed to 
Mauston, Wisconsin, where he continued in active practice to the time of his death. His 
two children followed in his professional footsteps, his daughter. Dr. Jane Towle, being now 
a member of the medical profession in Eau Claire, Wisconsin. In his political views Dr. 
Jacob G. Towle, Sr., was always a stalwart republican and at the time of the Civil war he 
served as a member of a Wisconsin regiment, giving valiant aid to the country in the 
struggle to preserve the Union. 

Following the removal of the family to Wisconsin, Dr. Towle of this review there 
acquired the greater part of his education and afterward engaged in teaching for sixteen 
terms. He has practiced medicine for a half century and, entering the Bennett Medical Col- 
lege of Chicago, he was graduated therefrom in 1891. He has kept in touch with the 
advancement of the profession through wide reading and study and is thoroughly informed 
concerning modern methods. He was in active piactice at Mauston, Wisconsin, until 1879, 
when he removed to Lake county. South Dakota, remaining there until 1904. He practiced 
and conducted a drug store there and for eight years was postmaster of Towle, which was 
later named Oldham. In 1904 he removed to Sisseton where he is accorded a liberal 
patronage. He also established the Sisseton Hospital, which is well equipped for all kinds 
of surgical work and for the care of the sick. 

On the 3d of April, 1867, Dr. Towle was married to Miss Adelia Northrup, a niece of 
William P. Lyon, who was associate justice of the supreme court of Wisconsin. She was 
born in Wisconsin and died in 1888. In the family were five sons, of whom three are living: 
Wilson J., now of Minneapolis; Austin, living at Lily, South Dakota; and Junior, living in 
Hettinger, North Dakota. The wife and mother was a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church and she had many excellent traits of character which endeared her to her friends. 
Twenty-three years after losing his first wife Dr. Towle was again married in March, 1911, 
his second union being with Mrs. Lucinda McDermott. She is a member of the Episcopal 
church. 

Dr. Towle holds membership with the American Yeomen and in politics he is independ- 
ent. While in Juneau county, Wisconsin, he was elected county superintendent of schools 
and he was also appointed register of deeds to fill out an unexpired term. He is a member 
of the State Eclectic Society and is an able practicing physician whose skill is manifest in 
the excellent results which have attended his eftorts to relieve suffering and restore health. 



GEORGE CARROLL SMITH. 

George Carroll Smith, who is well known in business circles at Hot Springs as cashier 
of the Bank of Hot Springs, was born at Horicon, Dodge county, Wisconsin, January 24, 
1867, a son of Samuel L. and Jeanette H. (Herrick) Smith. The father was born in Elmira, 
New York, and the mother just across the line in Pennsylvania. Mr. Smith in early life 
became a railroad man and was connected with the Union Pacific railroad for many years. 
He was a conductor and as the road was built westward he removed westward. In 1872 
he took up his residence at Cheyenne. Wyoming, and twelve years later moved to Rathdrum, 
Idaho, which remained his home until he located in Spokane, Washington, where he passed 
away in 1908, his wife dying four years later. 

George Carroll Smith, the second of niiie children, attended school in Cheyenne until 
he was thirteen years of age, but when only nine years old began selling newspapers in 
that city, being so engaged until he was fourteen. He then worked on the government sur- 
vey for two years, after which he removed to the state of Washington and became con- 
nected with mercantile business at Ainsworth. a town which has now gone out of existence. 
After a year spent there he went to Rathdrum, Idaho, where he engaged in merchandising 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 241 

until 18S4, ■when his store was burned and all of his stock. He was compelled to begin at 
Hie bottom again and worked for others until 1S86, when he removed to Buffalo Gap, this 
state. He entered the Lake & Halley Bank there as bookkeeper and proved so valuable that 
lie was made cashier January 1, 1S87. He continued in that capacity until New Year's 
Day, 1894, when the bank was moved to Hot Springs and the name was changed to the Bank 
iif Hot Springs. He is the present cashier of that institution and takes just pride in its 
;,'rowth and solidity, while niiirli of its |ir(i>|'ri ity is diintly due to his vigilance and sound 
financial judgment. He devot's Ins nitne time l(. tin' l.ank and is popular with stockholders 
and directors of the institutiuii as will as with tin- -.■iicial public. 

Un the 10th of December, 1889, Mr. Smith was united in marriage to Miss Mary E. 
Woods, who was born at Monmouth, Illinois, a daughter of Wilson and Rebecca (Armstrong) 
Woods. Tlie family removed to Iowa and thence to Nebraska, where they remained until 
1876, when they went to Wyoming. The father js deceased, but the mother still resides at 
C'heyenne. The acquaintanceship of Mr. and Mrs. Smith began when they were twelve years 
of age and their married life has been one of close companionship. To their union has been 
born a daughter, FJiea, who is now tlie wife of Joe Roth, of Omaha, Nebraska, who is presi- 
dent of tlie Aiiierican Sarcophagus Company. Mr. Smith is a republican, but has never aspired 
to political ollico. altlicaiL:li he sii\ed on the board of education at Buffalo Gap. His religious 
faith is that of tin- l"i r^hytci ian .hiurli and ti atiinally he is connected with the blue lodge 
and the chapter of ti"' .Ma-oi,i.- md. i and w itli tlir lOastern Star. His life is in harmony with 
the teachings of tliu>c ll^^alli;'.atinll.-, and tlir r.'S]ii-i.t and esteem of his fellows is his in gen- 
erous measure. 



C. B. JENSEN. 



C. B. Jensen was a pioneer settler of the vicinity of Oldham and a well known dealer in 
farm implements of that town. He had other extensive interests as he was a breeder of 
|)ure bred Jersey cattle and also dealt in imported Percheron horses. In addition to this 
he owned some two thousand acres of land in the state and did quite an impoi'tant real-estate 
business. He was a native of Germany, born September 19, 1861, of the marriage of .lens 
J. and Mary W. Jensen. The father, who was a farmer, is deceased, as is also the mother. 

C. B. Jensen was educated in the fatherland and was there apprenticed to the black- 
smith's trade until ISSo and then emigrated to the United States, as he had heard much 
concerning the unusual opportunities which the great middle west afforded. He first located 
in Iowa but after spending a year there removed to Lake Preston, South Dakota. In 1887 
he went to Oldham and opened the first blacksmith shop in that place. The lumber for 
the building was purchased at Madison and taken to Oldham. He did blacksmithing until 
1890, when he turned his attention to the implement business. The old shop, the first busi- 
ness building in Oldham, is twelve by fourteen feet in dimensions and around it Mr. Jensen 
built other structures until his place of business covered nearly an entire block. He carried 
farm implements, shelf and heavy hardware, paints, oils, furniture, etc., and as he under- 
stood thoroughly the needs and demands of his customers and purchased his stock with 
the local conditions in mind he was able to supply his trade with the articles desired without 
the long delay occasioned by the necessity of ordering them from elsewhere. He was also 
engaged in the breeding of pedigreed Jersey cattle and dealt in pedigreed imported Percheron 
horses and mares. He did much to raise the standard of stock in the county and was a mem- 
ber of the Aberdeen Angus Society and the Percheron Horse Society. He was very fond of 
horses and cattle and his love for the work was one factor in his marked success as a stock- 
man. South Dakota has gained quite a reputation as a stock-raising state and there are no 
finer horses and cattle in its limits than those which were found upon the farm of Mr. Jensen. 
He manifested his faith in the value of South Dakota land by becoming the owner of over two 
thousand acres in Kingsbury county, most of which lies adjacent to Oldham. He also sold 
a great deal of land and his real-estate business was quite important. 

On the 9th of November, 1888, the marriage of Mr. Jensen and Miss Netta Christensen, 
a daughter of Soren Christensen, was solemnized. To their union were born the following 
children: Jens J., Soren C, C. Boysen, Kelly M., Jlinnie, Adolph, Elvin, Olga and Merle. His 



24'> HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

children were associated with Mr. Jensen in business and the family is highly respected in 
commercial circles. 

Mr. Jensen was a Lutheran in his religious faith and in politics gives his adherence to 
the republican party. Fraternally he was identified with the Modern Woodmen of America. 
At five o'clock in the morning on the 9th of February, 1915, a fire broke out which destroyed 
the residence and store of Mr. Jensen, causing him a loss of about sixty thousand dollars, 
on which he carried only five thousand dollars insurance. He had been ill for two years and 
on that morning he fled from his home into the cold, where he remained for some time until 
a friend took him' into his home. The excitement and the exposure incident to the fire 
undoubtedly hastened his death. After that he was able to be about for two daj-s ere death 
called him on the 24th of July, 1915. His demise was a matter of deep regret to many who 
knew him and respected him as a thoroughly enterprising and upright business man, a pro- 
gressive citizen and a faithful friend. As one of the early residents of his section of the 
state he contributed much to its substantial development and progress and his name will 
long be remembered and honored in the community in which he lived. 



ELMER R. CAMPBELL. 



Elmer R. Campbell is a young business man of enterprising, progressive spirit who is 
filling the position of cashier of the State Bank of Spencer. He has always been a resident 
of the middle west and is imbued with the spirit of progress which has ever actuated this 
section of the country. His birth occurred at Hanover, Jo Daviess county, Illinois, on the 
9th of September, 1886, his parents being Robert H. and Cora E. (Reed) Campbell, the for- 
mer being now a resident of Ireton, Iowa, and the mother died January 16, 1915. For many 
years the father carried on agricultural pursuits and thus provided for the needs of his 
family, but is now living retired. 

Elmer R. Campbell was educated in the rural public schools and also attended the high 
school at Ireton, Iowa. He also spent a year in college and a year in the University of Storm 
Lake, Iowa, thus being well trained for the later responsibilities and duties of life. When 
his textbooks were put aside he turned his attention to the banking business, becoming 
assistant cashier in the Farmers & Merchants Baidi at Ireton, Iowa, where he remained for 
five and a half years, gaining an intimate and comprehensive knowledge of various phases 
of the banking business. He then came to South Dakota and on the 1st of January, 1914, 
entered the State Bank of Spencer as cashier and has since been active in managing the 
bank, of which his father is the president. 

On the 30th of August, 1911, Mr. Campbell was married to Miss Lillian M. Mauer, a 
daughter of C. A. and Louisa (Koch) Mauer, of Le Mars, Iowa, and to this imion has been 
born a son, Eugene M. Both Mr. and Mrs. Campbell hold membership in the Presbyterian 
church and already they have won for themselves an enviable position in the social circles 
of the town, gaining many friends by reason of their sterling traits of character. In polities 
Mr. Campbell is a progressive republican and fraternally he is connected with the Modern 
Woodmen of America and the Masonic blue lodge. His chief source of recreation comes 
through the automobile. He intends to make South Dakota his home and although he has 
been a resident of the state for less than two years he has already won for himself a cred- 
itable position in business and other connections. 



SILAS B. ENSIGN, M. B. 



Dr. Silas B. Ensign, of Lake Preston, South Dakota, enjoyed a large practice while 
living in Iowa but since coming to South Dakota has devoted his attention largely to 
farming interests. He is now, however, living retired. He was born in Delaware county. 
New York, September 25, 1839, a son of Elias and Clara Ensign, the former a well ktiown 
farmer. Both are now deceased. 




DR. SILAS B. EXSKJX 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 245 

Dr. Ensign gained his knowledge of the fundamental branches of learning in the public 
schools and obtained his knowledge of medicine largely by private study. He was given 
a diploma by the Cedar Valley Medical Association, which credential was accepted by the 
state authorities, and he practiced in Butler and Grundy counties, Iowa, for thirty-five years. 
He gained an enviable reputation for success in his chosen profession but because of failing 
health left that state and removed to South Dakota, locating upon a homestead. He also 
took up a desert claim, upon which he now makes his home and which is situated just outside 
the town of Lake Preston. That town was not in existence at the time that he came to this 
state. Upon his arrival here he turned his attention to farming and in the course of time 
his health improved, but he did not give up his agricultural pursuits. At the time of his 
arrival the section of the state in which he lives abounded with game and conditions were 
those of a pioneer section. 

Dr. Ensign was married on the 33d of October, 1879, to Miss Hattie H. Strout, a 
daughter of Benjamin B. Strout. The Doctor and his wife have no children of their own, but 
have an adopted daughter, Hattie R. Whiteraan, who is a resident of Iowa. Dr. Ensign is 
a Christadelphian in his religious belief and in politics is an advocate of reform movements. 
He owns one hundred and forty acres of good land, is a stockholder in the Cooperative Com- 
pany and the Lake Preston Milling Company. He finds his chief delight in study and reading 
and has written quite extensively, especially upon religious subjects. He has read widely 
and thought dct^ph' along those lines and as he possesses a clear, forceful style, his writings 
are favorably received. He was at one time quite prominent in the populist party in his 
section, being chairman of tlie cmnily c.iniiiiiltrc. ami Has asked to run for senator but 
declined the nomination. All « ho haM' Immh ailinillcd into the circle of his friendship are 
proud of being numbered amoiiy liis irninl-. ami otc.an liim highly, knowing him to be a 
man of strong mentality, upriglit character and attractive personality. 



HON. EDGAR KELLEY. 



Hon. Edgar Kelley, who since 1905 has lived retired in Milbank, South Dakota, is one 
of the huge landowners of Grant county, where he has a section of land. He was born in 
Walwortli county, Wisconsin, November 23, 1S51, a son of Stephen and Mary A. (Liddell) 
Kelley. The father was born and reared in Herkimer county, New York, and comes of 
Scotch-Irish descent, the family having been established in America in early colonial days, 
at which time tliey took up their abode in New England. The mother, who was born in 
r.uvlington, Vermont, was of English lineage. The father, upon leaving his nati\e state, 
came to the middle west, settling in Wisconsin, where he engaged in farniiim until Isci;. 
He then removed to Freeborn county, Minpesota, where he continued farming. W'liilc still 
a resident of Wisconsin, however, he became a member of Company I, Forty-sixtli Wisconsin 
Volunteer Infantry, and did valiant duty at the front. His death occurred in 1898 and the 
death of his wife occurred in 1895, when she was seventy-one years of age. In their family 
\\ere three sons and three daughters, all of whom survive with the exception of Benjamin 
and William. 

Edgar Kelley accompanied his parents on tlieir various removals and acquired his educa- 
tion in the schools of Wisconsin, Minnesota and Iowa, having removed to the latter state 
when he was twenty years of age. After completing his studies he engaged in fai'ming for 
tluce years in Franklin county, that state, when he returned to the home farm in Minnesota 
anil assumed charge of the homestead for his father. In 1879 he went to Grant county, 
South Dakota, and entered a homestead claim in Melrose township, which constitutes a 
])ortion of his present holdings. He at once undertook the development and improvement of 
his jilace and it is today one of the model farms of that section of Grant county. There are 
iound modern and substantial buildings and good fences, while the soil has been brought to 
tliat point where it is adapted to raising the various cereals produced in this state. He 
also gave much attention to the rai^-iiii; of liw stork ami had a dairy in connection with 
his farm. Despite the fact that lio h il a Inisx ami aili\r life on the farm he always fouiiil 
time to cooperate in movements in wU'uU the piihlir liiiirlitod. He was one of the organizers 
(if tl'c creamerv at Milbank in 1S95 and trom that time to 1913 served on the directorate. 



246 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

He is also a stockholder and director of the Farmers Cooperative Elevator Company at Mil- 
bank, which is one of the successful concerns of that section of the state, having in 1903 
paid a dividend of fifty per cent. He is also a director in the Merchants National Bank 
there. His energy has frequently been at the service of the community as will be seen in 
the fact that he was called to serve in the state legislature in 1903, his work there proving 
so efTective and so helpful that he was again called to serve in 1905. In the latter year 
he put aside all business cares and took up his abode in Milbank, where he occupies a nice 
residence and is now living in honorable retirement. 

Mr. Kelley was married July 26, 1879, to Miss Eliza Bessenger, who was born and 
reared in Freeborn county, Minnesota, a daughter of Morris and Anna Bessenger, who were 
natives of Germany. Her father was a marble dealer in his native land and became an 
early settler of Minnesota. Mr. and Mrs. Kelley have a son and daughter: Elmer, who is a 
graduate of the business college at Mankato, and is now on his father's farm; and Elsie 
il., the wife of Henry Vandervoort, a prominent farmer of Grant county. Mr. Kelley gives 
firm support to the republican party. He belongs to the Masons, to the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen and to the Yeomen. On all public questions where the best interests of 
the community are involved he is ever to be found on the right side. He is a successful man 
because of the use he has made of his talents and his opportunities, because his thoughts 
are not self-centered but are given to the mastery of life problems and the fulfillment of his 
duty as a man in his relations to his fellowmen and as a citizen in his relations to his city, 
state and country. 



CHRIST J. BAXGERT. 



Christ J. Bangert has represented his district in the state legislature and is now mayor 
of Avon and in all of his public service has proved efficient and conscientious. He was born 
in the village of Hesperinghausen, forty-five miles from Berlin, Prussia, a son of Fred and 
Minnie (Volke) Bangert, who in 1871 emigrated to America, sailing from Bremen Haven on 
the steamer Rhine, which arrived in New York after a voyage of twelve days. Mrs. Bangert 
had a brother living at Alden, Hardin county, Iowa, and the family located there, the father 
finding work herding cattle, harvesting, etc. In 1878 they removed to what is now Bon Homme 
county. South Dakota, and the father filed on a homestead seven miles south of Avon. He 
devoted his time to the cultivation of his farm and resided there until his demise. To him 
and his wife were born eight children: Charles, deceased; Christ J.; Mary, the wife of 
Herman Walkes, residing near Avon ; Nettie, deceased ; Louise, who married Klase Walkes, 
a farmer living a mile south of Avon; Minnie, now Jlrs. Henry Lamkce, of Avon; and Fred 
and Herman, who are farming south of Avon. The two younger children were born in this 
country. 

Christ J. Bangert secured work near Lakeport soon after arriving in this state and was 
there at the time of the flood of March, 1881, and helped to rescue a Mr. Jasper and his 
daughter from the roof of their house, the rest of the family having fled earlier. Added to 
the terror of the water was the sufl"ering occasioned by the cold and the young lady lost three 
of her fingers by freezing during her hours spent upon the housetop. Mr. Bangert relates 
many interesting reminiscences of the early days and tales of the privations and hardships 
which were met by the early settlers. At the time of the great blizzard of January 12, 1888, 
it was necessary for him to go out in the storm to gather corn to burn, as the coal bin was 
filled with snow packed so tightly that it was impossible to get at the fuel. For four years 
Mr. Bangert worked at Lakeport with the exception of three months in the third winter, 
when lie went home to attend school. Upon attaining his majority he filed on a homestead 
claim two miles north of Avon, and later he purchased one hundred and twenty acres more, 
remaining upon the farm for a number of years. In 1902 he removed to Avon, where he 
has since resided. While living upon the farm he learned the carpenter's trade and since 
removing to Avon has done considerable work as a contractor and builder. In fact, he has 
erected most of the houses in that town. In 1907 he became associated in the grain busi- 
ness with Henry D. Giedd and the connection has since been continued with mutiuil pleasure 
and profit. 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 247 

Mr. Bangeit has been married three times, his first union being with Miss Lena Walkes, 
who died, leaving an infant daughter, Lena, now Mrs. Ed. Minow living soutlieast of Avon. 
Mr. Bangert subsequently married Miss Carrie Wallces, who became the mother of a son, 
Keuben, and passed away when he was eight years old. Mr. Bangert's third marriage was 
witli Johanna Billiguiier, who has also passed away. To their union two children were born, 
Elgin Tlieodore and Pearl Netta, both in school. 

Mr. Bangert is a ii|iiilp|i(aii and was a member of the state legislature in 1897 and again 
in lUOl. He is servini: lii^ thii.l term as mayor of Avon and is giving the municipality an 
excellent administration iharaetirized by businesslike methods and strict honesty. He does 
not belong to any church but attends the services and contributes to the support of all de- 
nominations. Mr. Bangert is well known in his section of the state and wherever known is 
liiglily esteemed, his admirable qualities of character gaining him the high regard of all who 
are brought in contact with him. 



CARL A. AUSTIN. 



Carl A. Austin, a representative and enterprising agriculturist of Minnehaha county. 
South Dakota, is the owner of a well improved farm of one hundred and seventy acres in 
Taoi)i township. His birth occurred in jMinnesota on the 2Tth of June, 1882, his parents 
being A. T. and Christina Austin, who are people of Scandinavian extraction. In 1884 the 
family came to South Dakota, purchasing one hundred and sixty acres of land in Grand 
Meadow township, Minnehaha county, where Mr. Austin was successfully engaged in farming 
throiigliout the remainder of his active business career. He and his wife are now residing 
at Cdlton, enjoying the fruits of their former toil in well earned retirement. Mr. and Mrs. 
A. T. Austin liavo lived in the community continuously for the past three decades and have 
gained an cNtrnsiN !■ and favorable acquaintance. 

Carl -\. .\u-tin ar.|uirod his early education in the public schools and subsequent!)' at- 
tended the Lutlieran Normal School of Sioux Falls. He then returned to the home farm but 
subsequently took up a claim in North Dakota. In 1909 he purchased one hundred and 
seventy acres of land in Taopi township, Minnehaha county, and has since devoted his time 
and energies to its operation. He utilizes up-to-date farm machinery to facilitate the work 
of the fields and in the conduct of his agricultural interests is meeting with excellent results. 
In connection with the cultivation of cereals he keeps about twenty head of cattle and 
one hundred and twenty-five head of hogs, his live-stock interests proving a profitable branch 
of Ills business. 

On the oOth of March, 1910, Mr. Austin married Jliss Agnes Rygg, a daughter of Andrew 
Ryiig, one of the honored pioneer residents of South Dakota. Our subject and his wife had 
three children, Walter Eugene, born January 1, 1911, who died July 12, 1913; Gertrude, born 
September 14, 1912; and Dagmore C, born September 21, 1914. Mr. Austin gives his political 
allegiance to the republican party and is a Lutheran in religious faith. He belongs to the 
Farm, Stock and Home Club and is an enthusiastic supporter of all measures instituted to 
jiromote the general welfare and which will advance the best interests of South Dakota. 
He has many friends in his home community and enjoys an enviable reputation as a pro- 
gressive and successful young agriculturist. 



EARLE MOXTGOJIERY YOUNG, il. D. 

Dr. Earle Montgomery Young, a popular physician of Plankinton, has already gained 
liigh rank in his profession and has the confidence of his colleagues and the general public. 
He was born in Tyndall. South Dakota, on the 3d of February, 1887, a son of C. M. and 
Retta F. (Murray) Younj. The father was an educator and for twenty-two years was asso- 
ciated with the State I'liivcrsity of South Dakota at Vermillion. Previous to his con- 
nection with that institution he was a high-school teacher and was at one time the editor 
of a paper at Tyndall. At the time of his death he was dean of the college of arts and 



248 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

sciences of the university and as he was the first man to hold that position he was largely 
responsible for the organization of that college and the formulation of the policies that gov- 
erned the various departments thereof in their relation to each other and to the university 
as a whole. He was the author of a number of educational works of merit and was well 
known and highly respected in the educational world. 

Dr. Young attended the public and high schools of Vermillion and the State University. 
He was graduated from the latter institution with the degrees of A. B. and il. A., in 1908 and 
then entered Rush Medical College of Chicago for preparation for the medical profession. 
He was graduated in December, 1912, but did not consider that he was fully qualified for 
the independent practice of medicine and therefore spent a year and a half as interne, thus 
gaining practical experience. For six months he was connected with the Home for Desti- 
tute Children and for one year was interne in the Presbyterian Hospital under Dr. D. W. 
Graham. Upon returning to South Dakota he located at Mount Vernon, where he practiced 
for a short time, but on the 1st of August, 1914, he removed to Plankinton, where he has 
since resided. He is accurate in diagnosis and as he keeps thoroughly informed as to the 
latest improvements in medical practice and the discoveries of investigators he gives his 
patients the benefit of the advance that is constantly being made in medical science. He 
has gained a large and lucrative practice and is highly esteemed by his colleagues. He is 
now county physician and he belongs to the Mitchell District Medical Society and to the 
American Medical Association. Di'. Young is an adherent of the Baptist church and fra- 
ternally is identified with the Masons, the Odd Fellows and a number of college fraternities. 
He has great faith in the future of South Dakota and is making his life a factor in the 
development of his section of the state. A representative of one of the early and influential 
families of South Dakota, he is proud of the fact that his parents were among those who 
laid the foundation for the greatness of the commonwealth, and he believes the opportunities 
oUVred the ambitious young professional man liere are equal to those found elsewhere. 



CHARLES ANDREW CHRISTOPHERSON. 

Charles Andrew Christopherson, a lawyer of Sioux Falls, recognized at the outset of his 
career the fact that advancement at the bar must depend upon individual merit and capability. 
Accordingly he has been most determined and careful in preparing his law cases and wisely 
employs every legitimate advantage to attain success, but, while his devotion to his clients' 
interests is proverbial, he never forgets that he owes a still higher allegiance to the majesty 
of the law. 

Mr. Christopherson was born in Amherst, Minnesota, July 23, 1871. His father, Knute C. 
Christopherson, was a native of Norway, born on the 24th of June, 1836. In 1850, or when 
a youth of fourteen years, he came to the United States, settling in Wisconsin, and later he 
removed westward to Amherst, Minnesota, where he established a home. He conducted a 
farm in that locality and devoted his remaining days to the tilling of the soil, passing away 
February 11, 1894. He was a devoted member of and an activer worker in the Lutheran 
church, and his life was at all times guided by high and honorable principles. In early man- 
hood he wedded Julia Nelson, who was born November 15, 1843, and was called to her final 
rest on the 8th of May, 1904. In their family were seven children: Gilbert C, who is presi- 
dent of the Sioux Falls Business College in Sioux F'alls; Henry M., living on the old homestead; 
Charles Andrew; Mary C, who is in Portland, Oregon; Alfred J., also of Portland; and two 
who died in infancy. 

Charles A. Christopherson attended the Amherst public schools, also pursuing the high- 
school branches, and later he attended the business and normal school at Sioux Falls. Deciding 
upon the practice of law as a life work, he began reading with that end in view and in 1893 
was admitted to the bar. The following year he entered upon the active work of the pro- 
fession, practicing alone until 1913, when he admitted Fredolph H. Melquist to a partnership 
under the firm style of Christopherson & Melquist. They engage in the general practice of 
law, and their clientage is now large and of a distinctively representative character. 

On the 30th of November, 1897, Mr. Cliristoplierson w^as married to Miss Abbie Deyoe, a 
daughter of James P. and Jennie (Yorker) Deyoe, both of whom were natives of the Empire 




CHARLES A. CHRISTOPHERSOX 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 231 

state. Removing westward, they settled in Cedar Falls, Iowa, where for many years the 
father carried on merchandising. Their daughter was born and reared in Cedar Falls. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Christopherson have been born two children, Wanda M. and Charles A. 

The republican party counts Mr. Christopherson as one of its strongest iiiilmsi r> where 
state and national issues are involved; at local elections he votes indepenilnitly. .nn-iilri iiig 
only the capability of the candidate and not his partisan connections. He was a mriiiluT of 
the house of representatives of the thirteenth general assembly of South Dakota and made an 
excellent record as one of the lawmakers of the state. He was reelected to that position, 
becoming a member of the fourteenth legislative assembly, and was unanimously indorsed by 
the republican caucus as their iii.niiiin' fnr speaker of the house, and at the opening of the 
session on the 5th of Januaiy. la! "., \\a> ilnted speaker, in which capacity he served through- 
out that session. For six yeais lir mtmcI as a member of the Sioux Falls school board and 
for three years was its president. In Masonry he has attained the Knights Templar degree 
of the York Rite, the thirty-second degree, K. C. C. H., of the Scottish Rite, and has become a 
Noble of the Mystic Shrine and is a past grand high priest of the Grand Chapter of Royal 
Arch Masons of this state. He belongs also to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Elks 
and the Knights of Pythias, and in all the local bodies of these organizations has filled practi- 
cally all of the chairs. He is likewise a member of the Dacotah, Minnehaha, Country and 
Commercial Clubs and of the Congregational church, associations which indicate niueli of the 
nature of his interests and the rules which govern his conduct. His influence is always on 
the side of right and progress, and he has done much to uphold the legal and political status 
of his section of the state and further its intellectual and moral upbuilding. 



JUDGE .JAMES JI. HODGSON*. 

The members of the h-^a\ ]iiofession occupy an important place in society, and the inter- 
ests of life, liberty ami justice- are largely entrusted to their care. A community therefore 
is to be congratulated when the members of its bench or bar are men not only of ability but 
also of integrity. Such a man is Judge James M. Hodgson, who for a number of years has 
practiced his profession at Deadwood. He was born at Leeds, England, on the 3d of June, 
1H70, a son of Joseph and Hannah (Brown) Hodgson. The mother was born in Leeds in 
1836 and the father in the same locality in 1831. He accompanied his parents to America 
when he was about twelve years of age and the family located near Winchester, Illinois, 
where they remained for about eight years. At the end of that time they returned to Eng- 
land, .xniit iii'j an Mhh'i liiothri. John Hodgson, who remained in Brooklyn. In 1881 Joseph 
Hu(l;j-Mii rami' ai^aiii td Aiiiciica, locating in Butte county, South Dakota, in July of that year. 
He srttlril ii|i..ii a ranch anil there remained until his death, which occurred on the 7th of 
December, 1SS4, his widow surviving until January 12, 1892. They were the parents of 
seven children, of whom the subject of this review was the sixth in order of birth. 

James M. Hodgson after coming to this country lived for several years upon farms about 
tliirty-five miles from I )ra.l\M"iil, He then went into the law office of Charles W. Brown, 
remaining there for twn \cai~ a- an assistant, reading law in the meantime. He next went to 
Omaha, where he Avas . in[il,,y. d in the states attorney's office of Douglas county for two 
years. In 1898 he returned to Deadwood and became connected with the law firm of Temple 
& McLaughlin, with whom he remained for a year. In 1899 he went to Colorado and prac- 
ticed his profession for three years, after which he was so engaged for four years in Omaha. 
In 1906 he returned to Deadwood and in the intervening years has acquired an extensive and 
representative clientage, as he prepares his cases with great care, providing for all possible 
contingencies, and is forcible in the presentation of his cause before the court. He has in- 
vested quite heavily in real estate and owns a large stock ranch in Butte county. South 
Dakota. 

Mr. Hodgson was married in .January, 1902. to Margaret Rogers, a native of Perth- 
shire, Scotland, and a daughter of Frank and Margaret (McGregor) Rogers, both natives of 
Scotland. They came to the United States many years ago and located in Ogdensburg, 
New York. The father was a farmer and passed away in that state. The family subse- 
(|iicntly rrmoved to Jlissouri and the mother passed away in Trenton. Missouri, ilrs. Hodg- 



252 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

son is the }-oungest of two children born to lier parents and was but tliree years of age 
when lier fatlier died. Mr. and Mrs. Hodgson have two children: Ellen Adelaide Clifford and 
Joseph Beresford Hodgson. Fraternally Judge Hodgson belongs to the Elks and the Masons. 
On November 3, 1914, he was elected county judge of Lawrence county on the republican 
ticket, having been a lifelong republican. 



FRANK L. KRAilER. 



Frank L. Kramer, a well known business man of Chamberlain, was born on the 23d 
of May, 1886, a son of M. M. and Kate C. Kramer, who came to South Dakota thirty-five 
years ago. The father established the Kramer Mercantile Company many years ago and is 
still the president of that concern. 

Frank L. Kramer was educated in the public and high schools of his native city and after 
putting aside his textbooks organized the Chamberlain Wholesale Grocery Company, of 
which he has been the jnesident since its .iii;;;iii/,it ii'ii. In 1906 the concern was incorporated 
with a capital of sixty tlio\isand ddllais and simi- its inception it has invariably paid good 
dividends. It is an important factor in the commercial life of Cliamberlain and Brule county 
and Sir. Kramer deserves much credit for its organization and successful conduct. He is 
also active in the management of the Kramer Mercantile Company, of which his father is 
president. 

Mr. Kramer was married on the 6th of October, 1910, to Miss Louie Cook, a daughter 
of Walter Cook. Mr. Kramer is a Catholic and holds membership in Maher Council, K. C. 
His wife is an adherent of the Congi-egational chinch. Mr. Kramer is a stockholder in the 
National Life Insurance Company of Pierre and is a valued member of the Commercial 
Club, of which he has served as secretary, being in hearty sympathy with the efforts of that 
organization to stimulate the business growth of Chamberlain and its vicinity. He is pro- 
gressive in all things and has the respect of his fellow citizens not only as an able business 
man but also as a gentleman whose integrity has never been questioned and whose courtesy 
is unfailing. 



GEORGE NELSON BREED. 



George Nelson Breed was born near Bloomington, Wisconsin, October 16, 1837. At the 
age of sixteen years he entered the office of the Advocate, a newspaper published at Lan- 
caster, Wisconsin, as an apprentice. A year later the .Advocate suspended and he secured 
employment with M. P. Rindlaub on the Platteville Witness, with which paper he was con- 
nected for three years. He afterward worked as a printer at Galesburg, Illinois, and at 
River Falls and Brodhead, Wisconsin, and after coming to Brookings, South Dakota, on the 
26th of October, 1880, he worked on the Press. During that memorable winter of deep snow, 
blizzards and blockades, with the consequent deprivations, Mr. Breed twice made trips to 
Aurora, a distance of six miles and return, to secure paper on which to print the Press. He 
organized the first temperance society in Brookings county and was otherwise connected with 
the moral progress and uplift of the community, being elected the second Sunday-school 
superintendent in Brookings at a time when all denominations met together in the Methodist 
Episcopal church. With almost every feature of benefit in the life of the community he 
was connected. He was a member of the first cornet band in the city, organized in 1882, and 
the same year he launched the Brookings County Sentinel, which he sold but afterward 
bought back and merged with the Brookings Register, which he started in 1890. In 1907 
he organized the Register Publishing Company and also began the publication of the Min- 
nesota and Dakota Farmer, which had a phenomenal growth under his able management. 
In 1908 he was appointed postmaster of Brookings and held the office for four years. He 
devoted his entire time to his duties and assisted in the organization of the Tri-State Post- 
masters' Association, composed of postmasters of Minnesota and North and South Dakota. 
Of this he was elected the president. In the establishment of the handsome new postoffice 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 253 

building in Brookings he had all the preliminary details to work out for the department. 
His record as postmaster is an enviable one and he left the service with a splendid reputation 
for initiative and efficiency. In 1913 he launched the South Dakota Home Messenger, making 
this the fourth newspaper which he had started in his city, where lie has resided continu- 
ously for thirty-five years. 

Men who are agyri'ssivp. even though unselfish in their motives, always have enemies. 
This criterion holds y,i>ui\ in tlir subject of this sketch. His fight against the saloons, which 
were dispensed with liy the ritv t«enty-five years ago and have since been kept out, his fight 
for the municipal ownership of all public utilities, including the electric lighting, telephone, 
waterworks and central steam-heating systems, have proven a boon to the city and furnish 
revenues for public improvements. All these have received his determined support against 
the strongest opposition of those who were personally interested in controlling them. He 
has never faltered, however, in his course for the benefit and upbuilding of Brookings and the 
advancement of its interests along material, intellectual and moral lines and also the line 
of social reform and civic progress. Mr. Breed was a representative for Brookings county 
at the first convention held for statehood in Sioux Falls and also attended the pioneer edi- 
torial association held at Huron, Xovember 16, 1883. It would be impossible to measure 
tlie extent of his inlluence, but the work has gone forward and the public acknowledges its 
indebtedness to him for his untiring and resultant ell'orts. 



WALLACE J. LOUCKS. 



Wallace J. Loucks is a representative business man of McCook county engaged in the 
jewelry business at Spencer. He was born at Kockford, Iowa, on the 9th of September, 1872, 
and is a son of George and Harriett (Wiley) Loucks. The family came to South Dakota in 
1877, settling at Trent, Moody coimty, where the father entered land from the government, 
securing both a tree claim and a preemption. There was not an improvement upon his place, 
the land being just as it came from the hand of nature. It was a difiicult task to break the 
sod and prcjiarc the fields for cultivation, but he resolutely set to work to accomplish this 
and in due time the w-ild prairie was transformed into a productive farm, upon which he 
resided until 1910. in the meantime harvesting good crops year after }'ear so that his finan- 
cial resourcrs nniiually increased. At length, when he had acquired a handsome competence, 
he retired fmni artivc Im-m.-s lii'|. and took up his abode in Trent. While living there he 
served as post master for a few years. He is now living retired in Colorado, but his wife 
has passed awaj'. 

Wallace ,T. Loucks pursued a public-school education and added to that training a com- 
mercial course in the Sioux Falls Business Collcao. .\ftrr leaving school he engaged in teach- 
ing for a few years and then entered upon ciminni rial lilc as an employe in the store of S. 
V. Mallory, with whom he learned the jeweliy Imsiirc s^,. In 1910 he removed to Spencer, 
where he opened his present store. He carries a lar.ye and well selected line of jewelry and 
has done well, his tra.lr r..n-tanlly increasing. It is known that his business methods are 
tlioroughly reliable and Ilia* ]\i- | nts forth every possible effort to please his patrons. He is 
likewise financially intere.sted in the Spencer Light & Power Plant. 

On the 1st of January, 1902, Mr. Loucks was joined in wedlock to Miss Lillie Jones, a 
daughter of Stephen and Mary A. (Gott) Jones, of Linn county, Iowa, who came to South 
Dakota fourteen years ago. Mrs. Jones has passed away. Mr. and Mrs. Loucks have one 
child, Arland W. The parents occupy an enviable social position and their home is the 
abode of warm-hearted hospitality. 

Mr. Loucks is deeply interested in South Dakota, rejoices in its advancement and does 
all in his power to further its progress. He is recognized in his community as a public- 
spirited citizen, has served as treasurer of independent school district, No. 20, for the last 
three years, and has been reelected for another term of three years. He holds membership 
with the Masonic lodge at Spencer and with the Modern Woodmen and in the camp of the 
hitter has liecii cln k for fifteen years. His position on the temperance question is indicated 
in tlie stalwart siii]port wliich he gives to the prohibition party. His religious faith is that 
of the Baptist churcli, which he liberally supports, doing all he can to further its work. For 



254 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

many years he has held the office of deacon, for fifteen years has served as clerk of the church 
and for several years was superintendent of the Sunday school. His life record measures 
up to high standards of manhood and he enjoys the respect and esteem of all with whom 
he has been brought in contact. 



T. T. OMDALEX. 



T. T. Omdalen, now living in honorable retirement at Hetland, is a representative of one 
of the oldest pioneer families of the locality and was for more than a third of a century 
actively and successfully identified with agricultural interests here, still owning eight hundred 
acres of valuable land. His birth occurred in Norway on the 5th of November, 1S42, his 
parents being T. T. and Tina 0. Omdalen, whom he accompanied on their emigration to the 
United States in 1871. During the first seven years of their residence in the new world the 
family lived in Wisconsin and then, in 1878, came to South Dakota. The father homesteaded 
the northwest quarter of section 1, township 54, range 110, Kingsbury county, but died tlie 
year following his arrival in this state. The mother, surviving him for more than a quarter 
of a century, was called to her final rest in 1906. 

T. T. Omdalen acquired his education in the schools of his native land and was a young 
man of about twenty-nine when he came to America. On arriving in South Dakota he pre- 
empted the southeast quarter of section 1 and a tree claim and also homesteaded the north- 
west quarter of section 12, township 54, range 110, Kingsbury county. Here he devoted his 
attention to farming with great success for over a third of a century or until the time of 
his retirement in 1914, when he took up his abode in Hetland, turning over the active work 
of the fields to his sons. Mr. Omdalen now owns eight hundred acres of rich and productive 
land and is widely recognized as one of the prosperous citizens and esteemed early settlers of 
the community. He enjoys the distinction of having raised the first colt in Kingsbury county, 
and he is a stockholder in the Farmers Elevator Company. 

As a companion and helpmate on the journey of life Mr. Omdalen chose Miss Julia 
Thorgenson, by whom he has the following children: T. T. T.; Thomas Edward; Olovis; and 
Oscar, who was the first child born in Kingsbury county. 

Mr. Omdalen gives his political allegiance to the republican party and has ably served 
as a member of the school board, being a stanch friend of the cause of education. His religious 
faith is that of the Lutheran church and he exemplifies its teachings in his daily life. The 
hope that led him to establish his home in the new world has been more than realized, for here 
he found the opportunities which he sought and in their wise utilization won a place among 
the substantial and respected citizens of his community. He has witnessed the growth and 
development of South Dakota in the past thirty-seven years and is therefore largely familiar 
with its annals from pioneer times down to the present. 



CHARLES D. TIDEICK. 



Charles D. Tidrick, who is successfully engaged in the abstract, loan and real-estate 
business in Chamberlain, Brule county, was born in Winterset, Iowa, on the 24th of May, 
1863, a son of Levi JL and Martha (Bell) Tidrick, pioneers of Iowa who settled at Raccoon 
Forks in 1840, a number of years before that state was admitted to the union. Both passed 
awaj' at their home in Iowa. 

Charles D. Tidrick entered the State University of Iowa after completing his preliminary 
education and remained in that institution for three years, leaving while a junior. In 
1884 he located in northwestern Iowa as a representative of Slagle & Company, who had a 
number of lumber yards in that section. He was in the employ of that company in various 
places in Iowa and South Dakota, but in 1892 came to Chamberlain, where he engaged in the 
real-estate business. Some time afterward he organized the Bank of Iowa and Dakota, which 
is now conducted under the name of the Chamberlain State Bank. For a number of years 
he was president of the institution, but after its reorganization in 1896 he concentrated his 




MR. AND .MR 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 257 

attention upon the abstract, loan and real-estate business, in which he is still engaged. He 
negotiates many important transfers of realty and has placed many loans, while his activity 
in the abstract business is also profitable. He was one of the organizers of the First Na- 
tional Life Insurance Company of Pierre and for five years was its vice president. He also 
helped to organize the Queen City Insurance Company and he organized and owned for a 
time the local gas plant and electric light plant. He is now secretary of the water company 
and is a stockholder in various local enterprises. His varied business interests have brought 
him to tlie fore and he is widely known all over the northwest and wherever known is held 
in liigll respect. 

Mr. Tidrick was married in April, 1894, to Miss Lillian Love, a daughter of Daniel Love, 
ilr. and Jlrs. Tidrick have three children: Eugenia, who is teaching school in Chamberlain; 
and Mary and Frances. The family attend the Kpiscopal cliurch and support the movements 
seeking the moral betterment of the community. Mi. Tidrick is a democrat in polities and 
has served as county commissioner, on the city ((luiiiil and on the school board for a num- 
ber of years. For eighteen years he was United .States commissioner and he has always given 
the same care to the public interests intrusted to him that he has given to his private busi- 
ness aflairs. Fraternally he is a Knight Templar Mason and also belongs to El Riad Temple 
of the Mystic Shrine at Sioux Falls. He has membership relations with the Elks as well. 
In addition to the business interests already mentioned he owns much real estate in South 
Dakota and he is enthusiastic about the future of the state and is at all times willing to do 
anything within liis power to aid in its development. 



WADE S. NIXON. 



Wade S. Nixon, of Milbank, was for four years county register of deeds and for four 
years held the office of county auditor, proving an excellent and conscientious official. His 
birth occurred in Butler county. Ohio, December 13, 1864. He is a son of Richard and Abbie 
(Ayers) Nixon, both natives of the Buckeye state. The paternal grandfather was .lohn Nixon 
and the family is of English descent. Richard Nixon was a cooper by trade but in his later 
years gave much of his attention to farming. He gave his political allegiance to the whig 
party until it dissolved and then joined the ranks of the republican party. In religious 
faith he was a Presbyterian. He served for three years in tlie Civil war as a member of the 
Sixty-ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry and participated in many important battles. He died 
in 1885, when sixty-six years of age, his birth having occurred in 1819. His wife passed 
away in 1887, when sixty years old, and her natal year was 1837. They were married in 
Ohio in 1844 and became the parents of nine children, of whom seven are still living, namely: 
George C, a retired farmer residing in Wilmot. this state; Mary, the wife of John Spinner, 
a farmer and carpenter residing in Ohio; Mrs. Keever, a widow living in Mason, Ohio: Lydia, 
also a resident of the Buckeye state; Wade S.; Mrs. Marion Guthrie, who resides in Stark 
county, Ohio; and A. M., who is now city assessor and justice of the pea.ce and who was 
for four years postmaster at Milbank. 

AVade S. Ni.xon attended the public schools of Ohio in the acquirement of an education 
and was graduated from the high school of Mason, that state, in 1883. He farmed in Ohio 
for some time but in 1888 went to Colorado, where he took up a claim, upon which he resided 
for two years. He became a resident of Grant county, South Dakota, in 1895 and in 1898 
removed to JSIilbank, where he engaged in the hotel business for six years. In the fall of 
1904 he was elected register of deeds and held that office for four years, after which he was 
for two years deputy county auditor, his excellent record in that capacity leading to his 
election as auditor, in which capacity he served until March 1, 1915. While in public office 
he concentrated his energies upon the discharge of his duties and his work was performed 
in a systematic and eificient manner. He owns considerable land in Colorado and also holds 
title to town lots in various places. 

Mr. Nixon was united in marriage in 1903 to Miss .Jennie Wise, a native of Jlinnesota, 
and their four children are: Richard, Lois and Edith, who are in school; and Marion. 

^Ir. Nixon attends the Congregational church and fraternally is well known, belonging 
to Milbank Lodge, No. 20, A. F. & A. M., of whicli lie has served as senior warden, and to 



258 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

the Knights of Pythias, in wliich he was chancellor commander. In the latter order he served 
for three years as grand trustee of the Grand LiOdge of South Dakota. His political belief 
is that of the republican party and he works loyally for its success at the polls. He is now a 
member of the board of education and takes a citizen's interest in all matters of public 
concern. I'or two years he was captain of Company K of tlie South Dakota National Guard 
and in all relations of life he has measured up to high standards of manhood and has gained 
the confidence and the unqualified respect of all who have been brought in contact with him. 



JOHN GANGE. 



John Gange was an active business man in the enterprising little town of Mellette, 
«here he conducted a grocery store and was also proprietor of a livery barn until his death, 
which occurred April 19, 1915. In addition he was one of the extensive landowners of this 
part of the state, his holdings comprising about two thousand six hundred acres in Spink, 
Edmunds and Sparta counties. At the time of his demise more than a third of a century 
had come and gone since he arrived in South Dakota and he had been throughout the entire 
period an interested witness of the changes wrought by time and man bringing about the 
development and prosperity of the state. He was only about a year and a half old at the 
time of his arrival in the United States, his birth having occurred in Prince Edward Island, 
Canada, March 11, 1835, bis parents being James and Mary J. (Hacker) Gange. The family 
is of English descent and was founded on American soil in 1814, by the grandfather of our 
subject, subsequently he settled in Prince Edward Island. The father was a sailor and 
laborer and at the time of the Mexican war he espoused the cause of this country and did 
active duty in defense of its interests in 1846. Later he located in Wisconsin, where he 
lived for many years but in 1880 he came to South Dakota, where his remaining days were 
passed, his death occurring in 1883, his grave being made in Northville, this state. His 
wife died in 1885 and was laid to rest in Carroll county, Illinois. 

John Gange largely acquired his education in the schools of New York and in Jlount 
Carroll and Freeport, Illinois, completing his course in Green county, Wisconsin. He worked 
his way through school and his desire and determination to secure an education indicated the 
strength of his character. He afterward purchased a farm in Wisconsin and about 1876 went 
to Nebraska where he remained until the fall of 1880, when he came to South Dakota. He 
then filed upon a homestead three miles north of Mellette and met the necessary conditions 
that brought to him a clear title to the property. At length, in connection with a partner, 
he opened the Bank of Mellette and after a time purchased his partner's interest, remaining 
as sole proprietor for a period. At length he closed out the bank, however, but paid dollar 
for dollar on deiJosits. In order to do so he had to mortgage his land and then he set 
himself to the task of clearing the property. His farm work was conducted in such a prac- 
tical and progressive manner that success attended his eflTorts and at his death he was one of 
the extensive landowners of South Dakota, his holdings embracing about two thousand six 
hundred acres lying in three different counties. He carried on general agricultural pursuits, 
cultivating various crops and also raising cattle and hogs. He continued in that business 
up to the end of his life and the wisdom of his judgment in business aft'airs was recognized 
by all who knew aught of his career. He was likewise a stockholder in the Duxburv Ele- 
vator Company and in the Farmers Elevator of Mellette. 

On the 15th of May, 1861, in Green county, Wisconsin, Mr. Gange was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Elizabeth Crouch, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Crouch, who were pio- 
neer farming people of Wisconsin. They have both passed away and their remains were 
interred in the cemetery near Monroe, Green county. Mr. and Mrs. Gange became parents of 
se\en children: George W., a wheat buyer and farmer living in Mellette; Albert J., who 
follows farming in Mellette township; Elizabeth, the wife of J. CuUings, now proprietor of 
his father-in-law's store; Nancy J., the wife of Fred Potter, a landowner of Faulk county, 
residing at Cresbard; John T., who follows farming in Faulk county; William E., who died 
in 1911 and Avas buried in the Mellette cemetery; and Charles, who died in infancy, his grave 
being made near York, Nebraska. The wife and mother passed away in 1905 at the age of 
sixty-eight years. She was a devoted companion and helpmate, sharing with her husband in 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTx\ 259 

all of the privations and hardships in the early days and always encouraging him by her 
loyal support. She possessed, too, other traits of character which won for her the friendship 
of all with whom she came in contact and her death was therefore deeply regretted. 

ilr. Gange voted with the democratic party and he was a Mason of high 
rank in the Scottish Rite and was also a member of the Mystic Shrine. He owned 
and occupied an attractive home in Mellette and had erected several other resi- 
dences and other buildings, his real estate investments proving the wisdom of his 
business judgment. He never feared to venture where favoring opportunity pointed out the 
way and yet he was actuated by no spirit of vaulting ambition. He was content to do the 
duty that each day brought and in the faithful performance thereof found strength and 
encouragement for the labors of the succeeding day. Advancing step by step, his outlook had 
continuously broadened and lie was regarded as one of the forceful and resourceful citizens 
of Spink county whose ability and enterprise had proven factors in the substantial develop- 
ment of his part of the state. He passed away April 19, 1915, and was buried at Mellette. 



ANTON S. NEDVED. 



Anton S. Nedved, a farmer of Jackson precinct, Bon Homme county, has been a resident 
of this state for forty-six years, arriving here in the 'BOs, when white settlers were just be- 
ginning to take up land and a score of years before the admission of the state into the 
Inion. He was born May 14, 1861, three miles west of Prague, Bohemia, in the village of 
C'hynava, and remained in his native land until the spring of 1867, when, a child of six 
years, he accompanied his parents, Frank and Veronica Nedved, to the new world. The 
family sailed from Bremen and as the steamer on which they had intended to cross the ocean 
\\ as delayed two or three days they were prevailed upon to embark on a sailing vessel which 
was ready to start, as it was represented to them that by so doing they would save heavy 
expenses for board in port. The passage was a long and stormy one and it was nine weeks 
after embarking at Bremen that the family landed in New York city. They made their way 
direct to Cleveland and there the father found Avork on the canals and railroads. There were 
a number of his fellow countrymen in Cleveland and upon hearing of a Bohemian colony 
which was forming in Chicago for the purpose of taking up land in the west the Bohe- 
mians in Cleveland appointed Mr. Nedved to make the trip to Nebraska and investigate the 
ojipoitunities there. Early in 1869 he arrived in South Dakota with a party who were being 
sliown lands on the Niobrara. Sir. Nedved understood German as well as the Bohemian lan- 
guage and overheard the surveyor who was engaged to mark out the lands ri'iuaik that tlie 
Bohemians must have lived in a poor country to take up such land as was beiny ^llll^vn tliini. 
Jlr. Nedved with three others then left the party in the night and made their way down the 
river banks to Yankton, arriving there on the Fourth of .July. They were all day crossing the 
river at that point as the only means of transportation available was a small flatboat pro- 
pelled by oars. Their wagon was taken apart and carried over, a few pieces at a time, and 
their oxen were taken one at a time, after which their provisions were transported to the 
other side. They were pleased with the land in the vicinity of Yankton and Mr. Nedved 
homesteaded a quarter section nine miles west of that city. The family joined him there 
and the residence was for a time a small cabin of cottonwood lumber even to the shingles. 
As prosperity came to him he built a commodious house and erected barns, granaries and all 
of the necessary outbuildings. He passed away upon his homestead in April, 1914, at the 
advanced age of eighty-six. His wife's death occurred in 1894. To their union were born 
nine children, seven of whom survive. 

Anton S. Nedved grew to manhood upon the homestead west of Yankton and passed 
through the hardships of the early days in this state but has never regretted those experi- 
ences, it being rather a source of pride to him that he had his share in the first work of 
redeeming the land from the wilderness. His education was acquired in the early district 
schools and under the instruction of his father he learned valuable lessons in practical agricul- 
ture, being by the time that he reached his majority an able and efficient farmer. 

On the loth of July, 1884, Mr. Nedved married Miss Anna Smcjkal, a native of Cleveland, 
Ohio, and a daughter of James and Anna (Mach) Smejkal, natives of Bohemia. To :Mr. 



260 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

and Mrs. Nedvcd has been born a daughter, Bessie, who is now a student in the Tyndall 
high school. 

Mr. Nedved is a democi'at and a comnuinicant of tlie Catholic churcli. His fraternal 
relations are with the Modern \Yoodmen of America, the Yeomen, and the Z. C. B. J., a Bohe- 
mian society. Mr. Xedved remembers a number of notable storms and recalls vividly the 
winter of the deep snow and the ilood that resulted therefrom. His most interesting experience, 
however, was that in connection with the blizzard of the 12th of Januaiy, 1888. He had 
gone to town and was on his way home when the blizzard broke and he reached his brother's 
place without much trouble. He knew that there was not sufficient wood in the house to 
last during a severe storm and therefore determined to reach home if possible. Accordingly, 
he put his team in his brother's barn and started home on foot, but after running into the 
well house, which was situated on an entirely different part of the farm than the residence, 
he decided that to attempt to reach the latter would be to risk losing his way and returned 
to his brother's where he remained for the night. His brother was unable to reach home 
from town and remained there all night. The wife of our subject fortunately saw the storm 
coming and housed all of the stock, remedying the deficiency in the wood supply by burning 
boxes. As Mr. and Mrs. Nedved bore their share of the privations that were the lot of the 
early settlers and as they labored long and diligently to make for themselves a home in tliis 
new country it is but fitting that they should now enjoy not only material prosperity but 
also the esteem and respect of all who are associated with them. Mr. Nedved always works 
for the good of the county in which he lives. He has held several minor offices. He has been 
clerk of Nedved school district No. 47 for nineteen years and served nine years as road 
supervisor, one year as township supervisor, and three years as president of Z. C. B. J., a 
Bohemian society. 



JAMES GRAHAM. 



James Graham is general manager of the Hill City Lumber Company, wliich concern owns 
the electric light, heat and power company of Hill City, and he has a number of other busi- 
ness interests, being a representative citizen of Pennington county. His birth occurred in 
Potosi, Grant county, Wisconsin, on the 15th of February, 1866, and he is the youngest of 
five children, whose parents were Dr. Theodore and Serena (Lewis) Graham, natives of Penn- 
slyvania and Lancaster, Wisconsin, respectively. The father, who was a physician and surgeon, 
removed to the Badger state about 1850 and located at Potosi. The region was still sparselj' 
settled, and as he was the only medical practitioner within a radius of from twenty-five to 
thirty miles, his life was that of the pioneer physician who is compelled to make long journeys 
over bad roads at all times of the day or night and who must to an unusual extent forget 
all personal considerations in the performance of his work of healing disease and relieving 
suffering. He continued to practice until his death, which occurred about 1875. He had 
survived his wife since 1866, her demise occurring when our subject was but an infant. 

James Graham attended the Cumberland Valley State Normal School at Shippensburg, 
Pennsylvania, and thus received a good education that has proved of much value to him in his 
later life. He was but five years of age when he went to live with an aunt, his father's sister, 
who resided in Pennsylvania, and he remained with her until her demise, which occurred when 
he was nineteen years of age. He then went to Seymour, Indiana, where he was employed 
in a hotel for about two years. At the end of that time he became manager of the hostelry 
and continued in that capacity for three years, after which he went to Louisville, Kentucky, 
and entered the emjiloy of the E. Bull Medical Company as a traveling salesman. Following 
the demise of Dr." Bull, the head of the company, IMr. Graham went to Florida as the repre- 
sentative of his widow. He remained in the Peninsular state for a year, looking after her 
fruit groves and real-estate interests, but at the end of that time came to South Dakota, 
locating in Hill City and entering the employ of the Buckeye Mining Company. He continued 
to mine until 1904, when he established the Hill City Lumber Company, of which he has since 
been general manager, secretary and treasurer. The concern has branches at Ardmore, Edge- 
mont and Argentine, South Dakota, and is now rebuilding its plant at the last named place, 
which was destroyed bv fire. The company not only does an extensive business in lumber and 




JAMES GRAHAM 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 26;i 

is well and favorably known tu tlir tr;\(li'. but al-u (umis tlie electric light, heat and power 
company of Hill City. Theii (..iitiniird siirri>s ba,-. Ih'.ii diuj mainly to the constant vigilance 
and wise management of Jlr. Cialiaiii, Ihcir general iiiaiiager. He also conducts a stock and 
hay ranch four miles from Hill City and is a stockholder in the Gopher Mining Company and 
in the Cumberland Mining Company, of which he has been secretary and treasurer for a 
number of years. 

On the 29th of January, 1902, Mr. Graham was joined in marriage to Miss Agnes Borkey, 
who was born at Johnstown, Pennsylvania, a daughter of Solomon and Cecilia (Willebrand) 
Borkey, also natives of Pennsylvania. About a quarter of a century ago they removed to 
South Dakota and located at Ardmore, where the father was extensively engaged in ranching 
and farming, operating about five sections of land. To him and his wife were born ten chil- 
dren, of whom Mrs. Graham is the fifth. 

Mr. Graham is a republican, but, although he is not lacking in a proper int<-rrst in |iul)lic 
affairs, he has never desired to hold office. His membership in the Elks Lud^ir. Ni.. i\s',, uf 
Rapid City, affords him opportunity for the expression of his capacit}' for coiuraihsliip and 
he is pojiular in that organization. Since taking up his residence in Hill City he has made for 
himself an important place in the business life of the city and many of those who have come 
in contact with him have become his warm friends. 



ALFRED J. ABBOTT. 



Alfred J. Abbott, who has represented hi.s district in the state legislature, has resided 
in Bon Homme county since S.'ptiMiilH r :.':;, i^i,;. and lias witnessed practically the entire 
<lcvelopment of the state, as wlicn In ranic [\\i-\r was lint a little fringe of settlements in 
flio southeastern corner. He «a-- bnrn li.rrnilM'i :.':.', ls-14. in Yorkshire, England, the fifth in 
a family of eleven children whose parents were Thomas and Emma (Dunley) Abbott, who 
were likew'ise born in that count}', the birth of the former occurring August 8, 1809, and that 
of the latter November 8, 1813. They were married April 6, 1837, in Yorkshire, and there 
their children were born. The births of three, including Alfred J., occurred at the coopera- 
tive store of which the father was the manager. In December, 1848, the family left England 
on a sailing vessel bound for America ami alter a voj'age of ten weeks reached New Orleans 
by way of Jama'ca. At the ( Kscnt ( iiy tiny tmpk a river steamer for St. Louis and later 
continued their way up the >l i^-i--i|i|ii and Illinois rivers to Peoria, Illinois. Thomas, one 
of the children, two years or aur. died mi tin' li.iat and was buried after reaching Peoria. 
Tlie family proceeded overland as far as Ottawa, Illinois, and there the mother and children 
remained while Mr. Abbott went on foot to Dane county, Wisconsin, to get a friend, Samuel 
Clark, to give them a wagon. It was not until the 1st of June, nearly six months after 
leaving home, that the family arrived at their destination near Albion, Wisconsin. There 
the mother died August 27, 1865, but the father survived for many years, his demise oc- 
curring on January 35, 1892, when he had reached the advanced age of eighty-two. He was 
a man of upright character and much esteemed in his community. 

Alfred J. Abbott was in his fourth year when the family emigrated to America. He 
received his education in the schools of Wisconsin, and remained at home until he was 
twenty-three years of age, giving his father the benefit of his labor. In order to get enough 
money to come to Dakota he husked corn bj' moonlight after having already done a full 
day's work. By this means he was able to save just enough to pay his way to South 
Dakota accompanied by his brother William and when he arrived in Bon Homme county his 
last dollar was gone. He was not in the least discouraged and filed on the east half of the 
southwest quarter and the north half of the southeast quarter of section 1, township 93, 
range 59, and that farm has remained his home ever since. He, however, has added to Ins 
holdings and his place after setting aside land for his children comprises five hundred and 
sixty acres. He has also donated a half section of land in Charles Mix county to Yankton 
College, of which he is a trustee. Energy. |ini.ji v<^iMin'SJ and thrift are his salient char- 
acteristics and it is to those qualities that hi- -in ,(■-- i- .Inc. 

On the 23d of March, 1876, Mr. Abbott was iinil.il in marriage, in Albion. Wisconsin, 
til Miss Susanna Bussey, a native of the Badger state and a daughter of Benjamin and Jane 



264 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

• North) Bussey, who were born in England but who emigrated to Wisconsin when that state 
was upon the western frontier. To Mr. and Jlrs. Abbott sbc children have been born, three 
of whom are living: William E., attending Columbia School of Oratory of Cliicago; Emma 
Jane, who attended Yankton Ciillinr and subsequently married Hugh Madole, a farmer; 
and Hazel Belle, who also atUndcl \aiikton College. Mr. and Mrs. Madole live upon a 
quarter section of land adjuiuinj; in r lailn-r's farm and given to them by him. Their first- 
born, Jean Elizabeth, is the first grandcliild in the family. 

Mr. Abbott and his family are members of the Congregational church and are known as 
.supporters of every good cause. He is an adiierent of the republican party and casts his 
ballot for its candidates and measures. In 1868 he represented the Bon Homme district in the 
icrrituiial legislature and made a creditable record in that connection. He takes justifiable 
pride in having cast the first vote ever cast in the general assembly for state-wide prohibition 
in South Dakota. He also held various county offices during early days being county treas- 
urer in 1868 when the total collections were about two hundred and fifty dollars. He has 
also served as trustee for various state and church institutions and there has never been any 
question as to his probity or ability. 

One of Mr. Abbott's earliest childhood recollections is that of seeing the Light Brigade 
known as the Qufeen's Own on its way to win immortality at Balaklava in tlie Crimean war. 
After reaching the United States he had a narrow escape from drowning, as on leaving the 
boat at Peoria, Illinois, a tipsy Irishman, noticing that he was separated from his parents, 
took him in his arms and started for the wharf. Just before reaching it he reeled and fell off 
the gangplank into the river. He hastened to wade out, leaving the boy in the water, but 
was driven back by the mate at the point of a pistol to rescue the child, who was carried to 
the furnace room and restored to consciousness. It was some time before his parents found 
him or learned of the accident. After Ids arrival in this state he had many hardships to 
endure and many discouragements but his determination never faltered and he eventually 
won great material prosperity. In the early days prairie fires were a constant menace, grass- 
hopper plagues ravaged the crops and blizzards were common occurrences during the winters. 
At the time of the most memorable blizzard, that of the 12th of January, 1888, Mr. Abbott 
was in a well, cleaning it, and wondered what caused the sudden darkness and it was with 
difficulty that he made his way to the house. His recollections of pioneer days are valuable 
contributions to the history of the state, as he remembers many of the notables of the 
frontier — Harney, Crook, Custer and a number of famous Indian chiefs. To him and to 
all of the pioneers, who like him, laid the foundation for the development of their section of 
the state, is due the greatest honor and respect and it is fitting that the story of the 
obstacles overcome and the work achieved should be preserved for the present generation. 



HON. OLYJIPHIOUS S. THOMPSON. 

Hon, Olymphious S. Thompson, who has represented his district in the state legislature, 
is a native son of South Dakota and of Minnehaha county, where he resides, his home being 
on section 29, Sverdrup township. His birth occurred on the same farm, February 18, 18T5, 
his parents being John and Kirsti (Syverson) Thompson, natives of Norway, who came to 
the L'nited States as children. A sketch of tlie father appears elsewhere in this work. He 
passed away July 2, 1913, but tlie nnithcr is still living, enjoying the respect and esteem of 
all who know her. 

Olymphious S. Thompson was reared at home and enjoyed such educational advantages 
as were offered by the common schools of the district. Upon reaching manhood he continued 
working with his father on the home farm until 190-1, when the place was deeded to him. 
He has since had the entire management of the farm, which comprises five hundred and three 
acres, including in its limits the Old Settlers picnic grounds in Sverdrup township. The farm 
is situated in the Sioux river valley and is one of the most valuable and best improved agri- 
cultural properties in the county. ' Its well kept buildings and fences and the high state of 
cultivation of its fields all indicate the progressiveness and energy of the owner. He is 
identified with the business interests of the county as president of the Farmers Mutual Fire 
& Lightning Insurance Company, director of the Crooks Lumber Company of Crooks, director 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 265 

of the Cooperative Lumber Company of BaUic. ami ilinrtur of the Dell Rapids Hospital Asso- 
ciation. He was also proprietor of the Morclicl.l Ckiih i .iiniiany, but exchanged this interest 
for one hundred and sixtj' acres in North Daki.t:i ;inil lia> also purchased four hundred acres 
in Lake county, South Dakota. He is also ticasmn nl tlic l-^arly Scttlns As-iMJatiun. 

Mr. Thompson was married in 1898 to Mi>s Salina CiUi'tli. <.l Mapl.tcii l.n\ii>hi|i, Min- 
nehaha county, a daughter of Die Gilseth, one ul the picuicrr M'ttlcrs <i\ the ti.wnshiii, liav- 
ing located there in 1S66. By her marriage she became tlie mother of a daughter, Cora Agnes. 
JNIrs. Thompson died in 1905, and in 1909 Mr. Thompson married Miss Julia Vollan, of 
Sverdrup township, a daughter of .John Vollan, deceased, one of the early settlers of the 
county. Mr. and Mrs. Thoni|isiiii attend the services of the Lutheran church, of whicli they 
are loyal members. He is a icpiililicai] in politics and, as before stated, represented his 
district in the last state legi^latuir, lii, nrurd being so satisfactory that he was again made 
his party's candidate and rc.K , tnl. Ilr i^ a son of one of the most prominent of the pioneer 
i^ettlers of the county and has iiini-~(li jil.li'd to the honor in which the name of Thompson is 
held in this region, upholdiui; tin' laiiiily liadition of integrity and able public service. 



REV. WILLIAM ECKL. 



Rev. \\'illiam Eckl is the pastor of St. Joseph's church at Waverly. He was born in 
Bavaria, ( hi many, on the 5th of May, 1878. His parents, Francis and Theresa Eckl, are 
farniiiiu |ic.i|ilr and both are yet living. Their son William attended the parochial schools 
of ];a\aii:i an. I in 1S97, when a youth of nineteen years, crossed the Atlantic to the new 
world, scttli]iii lirst in Alabama, where he i cniuined for a year. He then removed westward 
to Illinois. l.iTumini; ronncctiMl witli the Henedietine Monastery. He studied at Cluny, Illi- 
nois. 1(11 a time ami purMied his tlieuln^ieal studies in the St. Paul Seminary at St. Paul, 
Minnesota, thus iinalilying for the priesthood. He was ordained on the 13th of June, 1904, 
at St. Paul by Archliishop Ireland with a class of twenty-one, being ordained for the St. 
Paul diiioese. He was then assigned to the church of St. Francis de Sales of St. Paul as 
assistant ami there remained for fourteen moiiths, after whicli he was aiipniiiteil |iaster of 
the Calliidie eliiueli near Rogers, Minnesota, where he continued for four \ear~. dn the 
expiration ol that period he came to South Dakota in the fall of 1909 and was a^siiimd to 
dut}' in tile patish of Hillsview, McPherson county, where he continued for a \ear an! i ii^ht 
numtlis. at the end of which time he was called to his present pastorate, in .hai-'^ •■< St. 
.luse]iirs ehureh at Waverly. Here he has made extensive repairs on the eliiiirh |iiii|ieity 
and has erected the present beautiful parish house. The congregation numbers about forty 
families and the work is well organized, there being an Altar Society and an Infant Jesus 
Sodality. 



ERNEST P. DE MOULIN. 



Ernest P. De Jloulin, who -is actively engaged in business in Hot Springs as the president 
of a company dealing in farm lands and in farm loans, is a native of Illinois, born at James- 
town, Clinton county, June 13, 1881. His parents, Nathan and Fannie (Comlpi) He Moulin, 
were born respectively in France, March 16, 1835, and in Switzerland, .him' 2:;, 1S43. They 
emigrated to America when quite young and their marriage was celebrated in this country. 
Mr. De Moulin was but sixteen years of age when he accompanied his parents on their ,iour- 
ney across the Atlantic to New Orleans, whence they went by boat to St. Louis. Not long 
afterward the family located on a farm in Clinton county. Illinois, of which the father became 
the owner and on which he resided for more than fifty years. About 1906 he retired and 
removed to Highland, Illinois, where his death occurred February 15, 1913. He is survived 
by his widow, who is still living at that place. He was quite prominent in his community 
and held a number of local offices. He was twice married, the mother of Ernest P. being his 
second wife. To their union were born seven children. 

Ernest P. De Moulin, the fourth in order of birth, attended the district schools of Clin- 
ton county, Illinois, but when in the eighth grade became a pupil in the schools of Sebastapol, 



266 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

Madison county. His higher education was acquired at Eflingham College. When twenty 
years of age he went to Chicago and entered the employ of the Chicago Street Railway Com- 
pany, but remained with that corporation only a short time. He next accepted a position as 
stenographer and bookkeeper and was employed in oflice work in that city for ten years. He 
rose to the position of office manager and manager of the loan department in a large real- 
estate office and gained much valuable experience during "the decade that he resided in 
Chicago. Upon leaving there he went to Oelrichs and opened a farm-loan office, which, how- 
ever, he conducted but a short time. His next removal was to Hot Springs and he entered 
business in that city as a dealer in farm lands and farm loans. After a short time he estab- 
lished a partnership with L. H. Hedrick, which was maintained for a few months, when the 
business was incorporated and Mr. De Moulin purchased his partner's interest in the com- 
pany, of which he is now president and general manager. Owing to his natural business abil- 
ity and his long experience in such matters he is very successful in his operations and 
annually negotiates many important transfers of realty, while he has so placed his farm 
loans that he has suffered practically no losses during the years that he has made loans. 
He is also president of the State Bank of Oelrichs and owns his residence in Hot Springs, 
which is one of the comfortable homes of that city. 

Mr. De Moulin was united in marriage, September 7, 1905, to Miss Virginia E. Southard, 
who was born at Mohawk, New York, a daughter of Samuel L. and Susan H. (Woodruff) 
Southard. Her parents afterward became residents of Chicago, where her father passed 
awaj' in June, 1906. The mother is now living in Hot Springs. To Mr. and Mrs. De Moulin 
four children have been born as follows: Robert Southard, whose natal day was .January 29, 
1909; Ernest Paul, born June 29, 1910; ilary Elizabeth, May 8, 1912; and Virginia Helen, 
October 4,' 1914. 

Mr. De Jloulin is a supporter of the republican party, but has never cared to take an 
active part in political affairs, feeling that his own interests demand his entire attention. 
His religious faith is indicated by his membership in the First Church of Christ, Scientist, of 
Boston, Massachusetts. His life of integrity and useful activity entitles him to the lespect 
and esteem of his fellow townsmen and he is justly regarded as one of the valued citizens of 
Hot Springs. 

In recognition of the executive ability displayed by Mr. De Jloulin in his business sphere 
and of his adaptability to the management of important affairs he was persuaded, in January, 
1915, to accept the presidency of the Hot Springs Commercial Club, an incorporated organiza- 
tion of leading business men of Hot Springs in the interest of business and social advance- 
ment, and immediately following in the same month he was called to the presidency of the 
'Black Hills Angostura Association," an organization covering several towns in two coun- 
ties in the interest of reclamation work and which is destined to bring about the investment 
of millions of dollars for the development of territory tributary to Hot Springs and other 
towns and for the development of Hot Springs itself. 



.JOHX S. GOODRELL. 



As chief engineer of the Battle Mountain Sanitarium, .John S. Coodrcll. of Hot Springs, 
holds a position of much responsibility, but he has proved more than equal to all demands 
made upon his professional knowledge and execytive ability. He was born in Washington 
county, Iowa, June 10, 1850, a son of Stewart and Elizabeth (Israel) Goodrell, both of whom 
were born in Westchester county, Pennsylvania. The father was engaged in carpentering in 
early life in Ohio and also in Iowa, and later he was in the employ of the Ohio & Iowa 
Railroad Company as a bridge builder. He became the owner of valuable farming land in 
Iowa and there passed away on the 33d of November, 1873, having survived his wife since 
August, 1854. He served as a private in an Ohio regiment in the Mexican war and was quite 
prominent in public affairs in Iowa, being a member of the legislature for three terms and 
having a seat in the first constitutional convention of that state. At the time of his death 
he was United States pension agent for Iowa and Nebra.ska. 

John S. Goodrell is the next to the oldest of the living children born to his parents and 
his boyhood days were passed under the parental roof, while his early education was that 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 269 

atlurcled in the country schools of Iowa. When seventeen years of age he left home and went 
to New York city, where he began learning the machinist's trade, entering a shop there as 
an apprentice. He continued in that shop for four years and si.x months and at the end of 
tliat time was employed as an engineer on tug boats in New York harbor, being for four 
years chief engineer. He also made three voyages across the Atlantic as assistant engineer, 
and upon leaving the marine service entered the employ of the Chicago, Rock Island &, Pacific 
lUiilroad. After serving with that company as engineer for a year he became, in April, 1873, 
chief engineer of the capitol at Des iloines, Iowa, which position he held for a number of 
years. He was next in the employ of the Des Moines City Street Railway Company as chief 
engineer and master mechanic for eleven years and later engaged in mining in the Ozark 
Jlountains of Missouri for four years. In 1905 he was appointed chief engineer of the Battle 
Mountain Sanitarium of Hot Springs and is still serving in that capacity. He is also con- 
sulting engineer for the Water, Light & Power Company of Hot Springs and for the State 
Soldiers Home at Hot Springs. His long experience in his line of work well qualifies him for 
his duties and he keeps the plants under his supervision at the point of highest efficiency. 

Mr. Goodrell was married on Christmas eve, 1874, to Miss Alice Hendricks, who was born 
near Fort Wayne, Indiana. Her parents, Joel and Leah (Gish) Hendricks, were both natives 
of Pennsylvania but were married in Ohio. The father was a civil engineer and an unusually 
fine mathematician. He passed away in 1899 in Des Moines, Iowa, to which place he had 
removed with his family, and his wife died in January, 1915. He was made surgeon of an 
Indiana regiment in the Civil war and was wounded after about eight months' service, being 
mustered out subsequently on account of disability. He held a number of offices in Indiana, 
being both state senator and state representative and also filling the position of county 
surveyor. .■» 

Mrs. Goodrell is the fifth in order of birth in a family of nine children. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Gooilrell have been born four children: Rose A., the wife of George L. Garton, a resident of 
Des iloines and cashier in the postoffice there; Mabel M., the wife of Albert Horning, a resi- 
dent of Des Moines, where he is engaged in the insurance business; and Edna and Ethel, twins. 
The former is the wife of Clyde Martin, a farmer residing near Greenfield, Iowa, and Ethel 
is teaching stenography in the Des Moines high school. 

Mr. Goodrell is a republican and has held a number of local offices, discharging his duties 
with ability and conscientiousness. Fraternally he belongs to Home Lodge, No. 370, F. & 
A. il., at Des Moines, and to Ben Hur Tribe. The respect which is so freely accorded him is 
but the fitting reward of a life of honorable and successful activity. 



KNUTE LEWIS. 



Knute Lewis, a breeder of pure bred draft horses living at Lake Preston, Kingsbiu-y 
county, is one of the pioneers of that place, having built the first store in the town. He has 
also served as its mayor. He was born in Deerfield, Wisconsin, May 31, 1853, a son of Lars 
and Marith (Olson) Lewis, both of whom are deceased. The early education of Knute Lewis 
was that afforded by the district schools of his native state and his later training was 
acquired in the State University of Wisconsin at Madison. After leaving school he spent 
eight years teaching and clerking in country stores of Wisconsin and Minnesota. In Septem- 
ber, 1880, he removed to South Dakota and located a mile and a half east of the site of 
Lake Preston. He erected a small store at the point where he settled and later, when the 
town of Lake Preston was established, he built the first store there, opening his establish- 
ment for business on the 14th of August, 1881. He sold the first goods in Lake Preston and 
continued to conduct his store there until 1907, when he disposed of the business. While 
still engaged in merchandising he began dealing in and raising blooded stock and since sell- 
ing his store he has given most of his attention to stock-raising. He raises blooded draft 
horses and derives a handsome profit from the sale of his animals. He is also engaged in 
the cultivation of the soil and in connection with his brother owns eighteen hundred acres 
of good land. 

Mr. Lewis was married on the 3d of June, 1885. to Miss Bertha Peterson, a daughter of 
Ole Peterson, and to that union the fnllowins children have been born: Bencdicta M. and 



270 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

Edwin H., both graduates of Yankton College; Emma E., who will graduate at Yankton Col- 
lege in 1916; Alma Louise; and Ruth E. Mr. Lewis is a proliiliitionist and has taken a lead- 
ing part in the fight against liquor traffic which he believes is lopdiisilile for many of the 
ills of the body politic. He was twice a candidate upon the ju uliiliitiunist ticket for governor 
of the state, was his party's candidate for state i-epresentative and has also been his party's 
choice for railroad commissioner. He was a member of the first state constitutional con- 
vention which met at Sioux Falls in 18S5 and at that time did all in his power to secure a 
prohibition clause in the organic law of South Dakota. During the entire existence of the 
South Dakota Scandinavian Total Abstinence Society Mr. Lewis served as its president. He 
has been president of the board of trustees of Lake Preston and served three terms upon 
the school board. His beliefs and convictions are known to all, as his stand upon a matter 
is never an equivocal one, and he is not afraid to work earnestly for a cause which he believes 
to be a righteous one. His undoubted sincerity and his upright life command the respect 
of all and his personal friends, who are man_y, value highlj' his good opinion. 



FRANK PEYTON GANNAWAY. 

Frank Peyton Gannaway, who is now serving as postmaster of Chamberlain, was born in 
Hardinsburg, Kentucky, on the 5th of July, 1S59, of the marriage of David C. and Cornelia 
(Peyton) Gannaway, both of whom have passed away. The father was a merchant^ and 
farmer and was successful in those occupations. 

Frank P- gannaway received a public school education and after putting aside his text- 
books worked for a wholesale grocery firm for eight years but in 1886 was appointed as 
farmer to the Lower Brule agency in this state. After four years' acceptable service in that 
position he was appointed trader for the Indians and discharged the duties devolving upon 
him in that capacity for twelve years. He then turned his attention to the stock and cattle 
business and not long afterward opened a meat market in Chamberlain which he conducted 
successfully for fifteen years. In 1914, however, he sold out as he was appointed postmaster 
of Chamberlain by President Wilson. Since assuming charge of the office he has demonstrated 
his fitness for the position and the work entrusted to him has been performed with con- 
scientiousness and ability. 

Mr. Gannaway was married on the 27th of .January, 1889, to Miss Helen .Johnson, a teacher 
at the Lower Brule agency. They have the following children, Ruth Slary, Cornelia Helen, 
Margaret Lillian and Frank Clinton. Mr. Gannaway is a democrat and has been one of the 
loyal party workers in Brule county. He was the first county treasurer elected in Lyman 
county and since removing to Chamberlain he has served on the board of aldermen and the 
school board. The teachings of the Congregational church, to which he belongs, form the 
guiding principles of his life and he contributes liberally to the furtherance of the work of 
that organization. Fraternally he is connected w ith the Masonic order, in which he has taken 
the Knights Templar degree. He also has membership with the Workmen and the Elks. 
His great interest in everything pertaining to the welfare of the citj' has prompted him to 
affiliate himself with the Commercial Club and he can always be dependeded upon to aid in 
carrying out any plan that has as its object tlie commercial expansion of the city. 



WILLIAM HENRY ALLEN. 



William Henry Allen, cashier of the Woonsocket State Bank, was born at Troy, Oliio, 
July 1, 1862, and is the youngest in a family of four children whose parents were William 
Henry and Margaret (Miller) Allen. The father was a merchant of Troy, Ohio, but died when 
his son William w^as but a year old. The boy was reared in his native town, where he re- 
ceived but limited educational privileges, as it was necessary for him to begin earning his 
living at an early age. He was afterward employed as a hotel clerk in Peoria and in Dixon, 
Illinois, in Clinton, low^a, and at Sterling, Illinois. He came to Woonsocket in 1S94 and 
became clerk and manager of a clothing store. Subsequently he accepted the position of clerk 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 271 

in a bank, was advanced to the position of assistant casliier in tlie Citizens Banlc and still 
later served as assistant cashier in the Citizens National Bank. In 1906 he joined Ellis M. 
Smith in organizing the Woonsocket State Bank, which opened its doors for business January 
15, 1907, and of which he has since been the cashier, the success of the institution being at- 
tributable in no small degree to his spirit of enterprise, his administrative ability and his 
executive power. In addition to his banking interests he has real estate in various parts of 
South Dakota. He owns farm lands In both Xmlli ami South Dakota, his holdings amount- 
ing to two tliousand acres. From his property, tlinrini,., lie derives a substantial income 
that has made him one of the well-to-do-citi/ms d W Honsocket. 

On the 17th of November, 1891, Mr. Allen was united in marriage to Miss Rosa J. Barth, 
her parents being August and Carrie (Walter) Barth, the former one of the earliest settlers 
of Woonsocket. To them have been born four children, namely: Walter Barth, Esther Al- 
vina Marguerite, Frederica and Phoebe P>ose. 

Mr. Allen enjoys hunting and fishing and also finds recreation in running his automo- 
bile. His life is actuated by higli and honorable principles and is in harmony with his record 
as a member of the Episcopal church, in which he is serving as treasurer and trustee. He 
holds membership with tlie Kniglits of Pythias and the Ancient Order of United Workmen 
and in the latter has filled the ollice of treasurer. In 1915 he was elected treasurer of the 
Sanborn County Fair Association and he has served as treasurer of the Coyot Club and of the 
Commercial Club. He gives his political allegiance to the republican party. That he has 
the confidence and goodwill of his fellow townsmen is plainly indicated in the fact that he 
has been city treasurer for twenty years, his long retention in office standing as incontro- 
vertible proof of his loyalty and ability. He is a self-made man, possessing laudable ambi- 
tion, and he persists in a well defined course until he has reached the goal of success. 
Economy, good business judgment and the ability to readily discriminate between the essen- 
tial and the nonessential in business affairs have been important elements in his success, 
bringing him to the creditable place which he now occupies as a banker and landowner. 



C. A. SWENSON. 



C. A. Swenson is proprietor of the Golden Rule department store at Sisseton. He belongs 
to that class of men who, when opportunity points the way, find the path to success. He 
has never been afraid of close application nor hard work and his energy and firm purpose 
liave enabled him to gain a creditable position among the business men of Roberts county. 
He was born in Lucas county, Iowa, December 8, 1872, a son of A. G. and Christina C. (John- 
son) Swenson, both of whom were born in Sweden. The father, whose birth occurred on the 
13th of May, 1847, died in the year 1895, while the mother, who was born on the 22d of 
August, 1853, is still living. They came to the United States in 1869 and were married in 
Chariton, Iowa. The father was a farmer and also a minister of the gospel, and he con- 
tinued a resident of Iowa until called to his final rest. In his business affairs he won suc- 
cess and at tlie same time exercised a potent influence for good in the community in which 
he lived. His political indorsement was given to the republican party and in all matters of 
citizenship he displayed a conscientious devotion to the general good. 

C. A. Swenson is the eldest in a family of eight children, all of whom survive. He was 
educated in the schools of Chariton, Iowa, passing through the different grades, and he started 
out in business life on his own account when a youth of eighteen, securing a clerkship in a 
store in that town. That he was industrious, faithful and thoroughly reliable is indicated 
in the fact that he remained with liis firsf em|iloyer for eialit years. He then went to 
Ottumwa, Iowa, and spent three years as an em|)lnye of J. A. Phillips, after which he removed 
to Minneapolis and was with the Pnw rrs :\Iercanti1e Company for two years. On the expira- 
tion of that period he went to Sis,,.fon witli the Peever Mercantile Company and eventually 
became one of the partners in the liiisiiifss, but the firm failed and he was left with notliing. 
He then established the Golden Rule store upon borrowed capital and the success which has 
since attended his efforts is indicated in the fact that he now has the largest establishment 
of the kind in Sisseton, handling an extensive line of dry goods and ready-to-wear clothing. 
He has produced for his customers the latest that the market affords and his reasonable 



272 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

prices and fair dealing, as well as the courteuns treatment which he accords his cusluniers, 
have been the salient features in winning for him an extensive and gratifying patronage. In 
the six years in which the Golden Rule store has been established the business has been 
built up until he now carries a stock valued at twenty-five thousand dollars and employs 
seven clerks. 

In 1907 jMr. Swenson was united in marriage to Miss Clara E. Pryor, a native of Min- 
nesota, and a daughter of Norman J. Pryor, one of the early settlers of Minnesota, where he 
followed farming and merchandising. He now lives with his son-in-law and daughter. 

In his political views Mr. Swenson is a republican, while his religious faith is that of 
the Presbyterian church. He takes an active and helpful interest in community affairs and 
strongly indorses and supports all those movements which are a matter of civic virtue and 
civic pride. His attention is largely devoted to his business and his close application has been 
one of the strong features in his success, combined with his ability to readily discriminate' 
between the essential and the nonessential. 



WILLIAM \V. OLUS. 



William W. Olds, of Custer, is a successful representative of mining interests and lias 
found prosperity in that industry which has made the Black Hills famous the world over 
and wliich contributes so largely to the wealth of the southwestern part of the state. He was 
born. in Carroll county, Indiana, October 22, 1848, of the marriage of Reuben P. and Philenii 
(Buckingha:m) Olds, both natives of Ohio. In early manhood the father engaged in speculat- 
ing and went to California about 1850. He was with the party who discovered Boise Basin 
in Idaho and afterward located Olds' Ferry on the Snake river. That point was a busy and 
important one, as all of the freight bound to Boise, Idaho, and LTmatilla, Oregon, was trans- 
ported over the river there. Upon selling his property there about 1868 Mr. Olds located at 
Walla Walla, Washington, where he purchased land and turned his attention to farming;. 
While a resident of Josephine county, Oregon, he was elected to various county and town 
offices which he filled acceptably. He passed away in 1873 and his wife died when our subject 
was a child. They were the parents of three children, of whom William W. is the second m 
order of birth. Mary F. is the widow of Samuel F. Coit, a farmer and stockman who resided 
at Hudson, Wisconsin. He passed away in the spring of 1914 and his widow is now residing 
at Washington. D. C. Julia married J. C. Baker, of Bandon, Oregon, who owns and operatic 
the Bandon Creamery. 

William W. Olds attended public school at Hudson, Wisconsin, and after completing hi> 
preparatory work at Oregon City, Oregon, entered Willamette University at Salem. When 
nineteen years of age he went to Idaho and took charge of a gang of men who were working 
on a toll road for his father. The following year he went to the mines at Shasta, Baker 
county, Oregon, and continued there until a party started for the head waters of the Snake 
river in 1869. He was in that region when the first railroad crossed the continent and was 
present when the golden spike was driven connecting the Central Pacific with the Union 
Pacific. He mined for some time on the bars of Snake river and invented a process for savinL; 
fine gold. In the fall of 1869 he went to Texas and for three years devoted his attention to 
the cattle business. He drove three herds to Kansas and upon disposing of his cattle went tn 
California and entered the employ of a railroad company at Santa Cruz, that state. He 
checked out and shipped redwood ties for some time, but in the winter of 1876 he arrived in 
the Black Hills. He traveled as far as Sidney on the Union Pacific, but at that point with 
three others hired a four-horse team and was driven to Deadwood. He engaged in mining; 
there until the summer of 1877, when he removed to Custer. He organized the Ruberta 
Mining &. Milling Company and the May Mining Company, both of which are operating a 
number of paying mines. He engages in quartz mining chiefly and his various mining pro]i- 
erties are yielding him a good income. Since coming to the Black Hills he has also equippi^l 
and sold seven ranches and still has his homestead right. At one time he held title to tlir 
Cascade Springs at Hot Springs and he also formerly owned the Crown Hill mining group at 
Bald mountain, the Hudson group of mines above Central and other properties. He under- 
stands mining thoroughly and devotes his entire attention to that business. 




UII.I.IAM W 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 275 

ilr. Olds was married on the 9th of November, ISSO, to Miss I'auliiiL' Pettijuliii, wlio was 
born iu Chile, t^outh America. Her father, William Pettijohn, who was a native ol iiissouri, 
served in the iiexiean war and was captured and imprisoned in iie.xioo City. Alter regaining 
his liberty he went to Chile, South America, where he was married to a Spanish lady, and 
lor thirty years he engaged in mercantile business there. At length he returned to the 
Lnited States with his family and they resided in this country for two years, alter which he 
again went to Chile. He had a contract on the Harry Meggs Railroad, furnishing all ot the 
lime and kindred products used for the culvert and bridge work. Three years after his return 
to Chile ilr. Tettijohn started for the United States to visit his two daughters, but died at 
sea and was buiied off Panama. His widow is still a resident of Santiago, Chile. They were 
the parents of six children, of whom Mrs. Olds is the third in order of birth. She was edu- 
cated in St. Louis, Missouri, and was married at the time of the visit of the family to the 
United States. Mr. and Jlrs. Olds liuvc two children: Frank R., who is now in the employ of 
the government forestry bim-au and is stationed at Custer; and Ruby M., who received her 
education at the Speartish Nuniial ^iliuul and is now in South America under a three year 
contract to establish a normal school at Santiago, Chile. She has been very successful and 
tlie School now has an enrollment of over four hundred and has already made itself felt as a 
powerful educational force. 

Mr. Olds is a republican and for one term was register of deeds and for three terms served 
on the town board. For a number of years he has been a member of the school board and 
has always taken the keenest interest in the welfare of the public schools. Fraternally he is 
a member of the Masonic blue lodge at Custer, in which he is past master and is the present 
senior warden. The greater part of his time has naturally been taken up with his own business 
interests, which he has managed successfully, thus gaining financial independence, but lie has 
also found time to cooperate with worthy movements and is justly considered a valualile and 
public-spirited citizen. 



MARCUS J. DE WOLF. 

Marcus J. De W^olf is a farmer and stockman residing at Letcher. A native of the Empire 
state, he was born in Genesee county, October 4, 1843, and is a son of Peter and Lavina 
(Bates) De Wolf. The father was also a native of New York and a farmer by occupation. 
The paternal grandfather was Captain John De Wolf, who served as a United States army 
officer in the War of 1812. 

Marcus J. De Wolf went with his father's family to Michigan when in Iii- iiinrtccnth 
year, their home being established at Prairieville. He supplemented his piiblir -, lh..>l .iliira- 
tion, acquired in the state of New York, by a commercial course at the l^i-tiiun llu-imss 
College in Poughkeepsie, New York, and he also attended the Baptist College ,it l\al;iiiiii/iMi, 
Jliohigan. Thus he became well qualified for the onerous and responsible diitii's tliat liave 
since devolved upon him. In March, 1865, he enlisted for service in an imli|irii(lint nmi- 
pany, known as Company I, of the New Y'ork troops, and remained in the service until the 
close of the war, being mustered out the following May. 

After finishing his education at Eastman's Business College Mr. De Wolf was fi>r si.x 
months employed as clerk in the old City Hotel of Chicago and the following five or six years 
were devoted to teaching in the Iowa public schools, and later in the Michigan schools. He 
then went to Madison, Wisconsin, where he opened an art store, which he conducted until 
1887. He then removed to Dakota territory and tmik up his homestead at Letcher, Sanborn 
county. He still resides on the old Imiiii stead f.nin and lias made additions to the original 
tract until he now has a farm of four Imndred an. I ei-lity acres, splendidly improved accord- 
ing to the modern ideas of farm development. For three years during his residence at Letcher 
he conducted a large general mercantile store. He has been for many years one of the 
state's leading breeders of registered Hereford cattle and Duroc-Jersey hogs, and is well 
known as a horticulturist as well, having throiii;li a luiiu series of experiments demonstrated 
the state's possibilities for fruit growing. He lia^ stielie,! the questions of soil and climate 
in connection with fruit production and has aeliie\. il e\rellent results, constituting an example 
that others have profitably followed. For many years ho has been one of the most active 



276 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

members of the South Dakota Horticultural Society and was formerly president of that 
organization. He is equally well known because of his live-stock interests and his herds of 
cattle and hogs are noted for their excellence in South Dakota and adjoining states. He is 
a member of a number of breeders' associations, including the National Hereford and Duroc- 
Jersey Associations. In addition to his South Dakota holdings he has lands in North Dakota 
and in Florida has orauge grove interests. He has been active in both the study of and the 
demonstration of modern scientific farming methods, keeps abreast with the times in connec- 
tion with all branches of agriculture, horticulture and stock-raising, and, indeed, has set a 
pace which many others have followed to their credit and benefit. 

Mr. De Wolf is an enthusiastic advocate of the good roads movement, realizing how 
important an asset are good roads in the shipment of produce and how great a time-saving 
force in allowing travelers to reach quickly a given destination. He is a republican and, 
while taking no very active part in politics, has served in various local official capacities. 

On the -ith of July, 18T6, Mr. De Wolf was married to Mi's. Annette (Killian) Stevenson 
of eastern New York, their wedding day being the one hundredth anniversary of the Declara- 
tion of Independence. They have two children: Frederick A., now living in Los Angeles, 
California; and Beatrice, the wife of L. B. Jacobus, of Letcher, by whom she has three chil- 
dren, Kenneth, Marcus Ryland and Cliarmion. 

Mr. De Wolf was reared in the Baptist faith but now affiliates with the Congregational 
church and has for years been a trustee and treasurer of the local organization. His influence 
has given impetus to all progressive movements having to do with the civic betterment of 
the community. His business activity balances up with the principles of truth and honor 
and his success is due to his business intelligence, his steady and persistent application to 
the business in hand and to his well earned reputation for straightforward dealing. All these 
have been contributing elements to his prosperity. Business, however, has constituted but 
one phase of his existence and he has always found time for that public service which is 
prompted by devotion to the general good. He has long been a strong temperance advocate 
and he has contributed as well to the social and moral progress of the community in which 
he has resided for more than a quarter of a century. He is now devoting his attention to 
his private interests and investments and he possesses a comfortable fortune that is the 
merited reward of earnest, persistent labor. 



NELIUS JULIAN XESSA, M. D. 

Dr. Nelius Julian Nessa, who since the fall of 1909 has engaged in the practice of medi- 
cine and surgery at Sioirx Falls, was born upon his father's farm in Fillmore county, Min- 
nesota, November 3, 1880. His father, John N. Johnson Nessa, was the second white child 
born in Preble township, Fillmore county, his natal year being 1853. He was a son of Nels 
Johnson Nessa, who was born in Norway and came to America in 1848. He made farming 
his life work and in 1853 located in southeast ^Minnesota, being one of the first Northmen 
who settled there in pioneer days, and is still living, one of the last living pioneers in that 
community. His son, John N. Johnson Nessa, was a prominent political leader of the north- 
west, active in the republican party, which elected him to the state legislature of IMinnesota. 
The mother of Dr. Nessa bore the maiden name of Josephine Larsen but was American born. 
Her parents were also pioneers in southeast Minnesota. In both the paternal and maternal 
lines Dr. Nessa is descended from a worthy Scandinavian ancestry. His youthful days were 
spent on the home farm in Fillmore county and he attended the local schools. Later he 
became a student in the Decorah (la.) Normal School and engaged in teaching in 1898-9. 
He afterward entered the University of Minnesota, where he remained for six years, pur- 
suing a broad and liberal , course and gi-aduating in 1901 as a pharmaceutical chemist. He 
then^decided to study medicine and after four years devoted to the principles of the science 
was graduated in 1905 and received his professional degree. He then located at Brewster, 
Minnesota, where he continued in practice for four years after which he went to Chicago for 
post-graduate work. In the fall of 1909 he located in Sioux Falls, where he has since remained 
and in the interim he has built up a large and distinctively representative practice, having 
the patronage of some of the best families of the city. 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 277 

In June, 1914, Dr. Nessa was married to Florence Bankson, a daughter of John A. and 
Lottie (Johnson) Bankson, who immigrated to this country from Sweden in their youth. 
ills. Xessa was born in Sioux Falls and previous to her marriage taught in the public schools 
of her native city. 

Dr. Nessa was reared in the Lutheran faith. His political support is given to tht 
republican party but he is without desii'e for public office. Fraternally he is connected with 
the ilasons, having attained the thirty-second degree iii tiie Scottish Rite and also crossed 
the sands of tlie deceit with the Nobles of the Mystie Slnine. He is also connected with the 
Elks lodge, being tlieir e.xalted ruler for 1015, with the Country and Commercial Clubs and 
is interested in all that pertains to the welfare and progress of city, state and nation, cooperat- 
ing in many movements which are a matter of civic virtue and civic pride. 



JACOB WERNLI. 



Jacob Wernli, who owns and operates a well improved farm of three hundred and twenty 
acres in Grand Meadow township, Minnehaha county, is numbered among the representative 
and enterprising agriculturists of his community. His birth occurred in Switzerland, on the 
3d of April, 1861, his parents being Jacob and Maria Wernli, both of whom died in that 
country. The father, who was prominent in politics and held many important offices, passed 
away in 1S78, while the demise of the mother occurred when she had attained the age of 
seventy-eight years. 

Jacob Wernli acquired a good education in his native land and after putting aside his 
textbooks turned his attention to agricultural pursuits. On attaining his majority he emi- 
grated to the United States, taking up his abode in Highland, Madison county, Illinois, where 
he remained for six years. On the expiration of that period he removed to Iowa and in that 
state continued his residence for a quarter of a century. In 1913 he came to South Dakota 
and purchased three hundred and twenty acres of land in Grand Meadow township, Minnehaha 
county, which he is now cultivating with excellent success. He also devotes some attention 
to live stock, having thirty head of cattle and one hundred hogs. He utilizes the latest 
improved machinery to facilitate the work of the fields and is a modern and progressive 
agriculturist whose labors are directed along the most practical lines. 

Mr. Wernli has been married twice. In 1890 he wedded Miss Eliza Egger, by whom he 
had a son and a daughter, namely: George; and E. Bertha, who follows the profession of 
teaching in Iowa. The wife and mother passed away on the 16th of June, 1892, and on the 
12th of September, 1893, Mr. Wernli married Miss Maggie Egger, by whom he has the fol- 
lowing children: Lena, Selma, Raymond, Harry, Edna, Marie and Junior Egger. 

Mr. Wernli is a democrat in politics and is now serving as president of the school board, 
the cause of education having ever found in hira a stanch champion. In religious faith he is 
a Reformed Protestant, while fraternally he is identified with the Modern Woodmen of 
America and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, having taken all the degrees in the lat- 
ter organization. His life has been upright and honorable in all relations and his record is 
one well worthy of emulation. 



WILLIAM S. ELDER. 



William S. Elder has claimed Deadwood as his residence since 1887, and he has been 
closely associated with all the different movements for the development of the rich resources 
of that locality and for the upbuilding of his adopted city. He was born near the village 
of Warsaw, in Coshocton county, Ohio, on the 15th day of October, 1858, a son of John G. and 
Jane (Moff'att) Elder. 

Mr. Elder comes of Scotch-Irish ancestry, his paternal grandfather, John Elder, having 
migrated from Ireland to Virginia in the early part of the eighteenth century and thence 
into Ohio where he was one of the earliest settlers of Coshocton county. The Moff'atts came 
from Scotland settling first in Massachusetts and later migrating to Orange county, New 



278 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

York, where Alexander Moffatt, the grandfather of Jaue Jloffatt, enlisted under Anthony 
Wayne in the Revolutionary war and with several brothers served until its close. 

William S. Elder attended a country sehool of Coshocton county, Ohio, in his boyhood 
and afterward the village high school of Warsa^^■. Later he was prepared for college at the 
Jefferson Academy, Cannonsburg, Pennsylvania, and entered Princeton College in 1882, graduat- 
ing with the class of 1886. After leaving college he spent one year as a newspaper reporter 
on the New York Commercial Advertiser, (now the New York Globe) and came to the Black 
Hills (then Dakota territory), in 1887. During his first few months residence in the Black 
Hills, Mr. Elder acted as a correspondent for the New Y'ork Herald and was connected with 
the local newspapers, but entering the law office of Gideon C. Moody in the spring of 1888, 
he was admitted to the bar of Lawrence county in 1889 and began at once the practice of 
the law. 

Mr. Elder has given much time to business enterprises outside of his profession and has 
been instrumental in bringing a great deal of capital into the Black Hills. The romance of 
gold mining has had a fascination for him, and to the development of the rich mineral 
resources of the district he has given greatly of his time and energy. 

In politics William S. Elder is emphatically a progressive and independent citizen, 
going where his judgment and conscience lead him and affiliating with whatever party 
organization represents for the time being his political convictions and promises best to 
carry them into effect. From 1902 to 1906 he served on the city council of Deadwood, and 
was an active and efficient councilman. He was a candidate for mayor of Deadwood in 1906 
on the independent ticket and lacked but a few votes of being elected after a most exciting 
contest. 

Mr. Elder was married on the 25th of September, 1893, to Miss Maud Eccles, of Tecvmiseh, 
Michigan, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James C. Eccles. They have one son, Duncan Eccles, 
born September 6, 1898. 

Mr. Elder is a member of the order of Elks and is a Mason, and is much interested in 
sociological and educational work. 



FRITZ PREUSS. 



Fritz Preuss, who has devoted his attention to agricultural pursuits in ilinnehaha county 
for the past three decades, now cultivates four hundred and forty acres of rich and productive 
land on sections 25, 26 and 36, Mapleton township, and is also engaged in the raising of fancy 
stock. His birth occurred in Germany on the 1st of April, 1868, his parents being Henry and 
Anna (Smith) Preuss, both of whom passed away in that country. The father was an agri- 
culturist by occupation and followed farming throughout his active business career. 

Fritz Preuss acquired his education in the common schools of his native land and when 
a youth of sixteen crossed the Atlantic to the United States, receiving the passage money from 
his father, to whom it was later repaid. He made his way direct to Sioux Falls, South 
Dakota, and then went into the country, working for his board as a farm hand during the 
first few months and afterward working by the day, while subsequently he worked with a, 
threshing crew. During three winter seasons he attended school, doing chores to pay for his 
board. He remained in the employ of William Bailey, some four miles west of Sioux Falls, 
for about five years and afterward spent a year with John Olgar. At the end of that time 
he started out as an agriculturist on his own account, renting the farm of William Bailey for 
one year on halves and the next year giving one-third of the proceeds as rent. Subsequently 
he rented a farm of several hundred acres in connection with his brother-in-law, Fritz Carls, 
for two years, and then rented for eight years the same farm alone. He next purchased two 
hundred and forty acres and has added to it by purchase until he now cultivates four hundred 
and forty acres on sections 25, 26 and 36, Mapleton township, and also devotes considerable 
attention to the raising of fancy stock, having seventy head of cattle and two hundred pigs. 
Eleven of his forty-seven sows are registered and there are also sixty-five pigs to be registered. 
He is a stockholder in the Farmers Mutual Insurance Company and has long been numbered 
among the substantial and representative citizens of his community. Upon his place he has 
erected commodious and substantial buildings, including a good residence, barns, silos and 




ilR. AND :\IRS. FRITZ PREL> 



THE PREUSS HOMESTEAD 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 281 

other outbuildings. Wlien he purchased his present farm there was standing upon it the 
first frame house erected in that locality. 

On the 4th of January, 1894, Mr. Preuss was united in marriage to iliss Alviiia Lembcke, 
a native of Germany and a daughter of John and Mary (Pagel) Lembcke. She was fourteen 
years of age when the family emigrated to the United States and settled in Wisconsin. Two 
years later they came to McCook county, South Dakota, where the parents spent some years, 
but both died at the home of a son in Nebraska. To Mr. and Mrs. Preuss have been born 
the following children: Ella, now the wife of Bruno Gibhard, of Canova, South Dakota; 
Meta W.; Ernest; Margaret; John, who was accidentally killed; Frederick; Alvina; and 
Loretta. AH arc natives of this state. 

Politically Mr. Preuss is a republican, loyally supporting the men and measures of that 
party. He has served as chairman of the district school board and also as treasurer, proving 
a capable incumbent in both capacities. His religious faith is indicated by his membership 
in the German Lutheran church, the teachings of which he exemplifies in his daily lite. 
Coming to the new world in his youth, he eagerly embraced the opportunities afforded in a 
land unhampered by caste or class and has worked his way steadily upward to an enviable 
position among the citizens of his adopted county and state. 



JOHX E. CHASE. 



John E. Chase is a man of marked energy, industry and enterprise — a typical business 
man of the northwest, possessing in large measure the qualities which have brought about 
tlie present develoimiciit aiul [unsperity of South Dakota. He today owns a valuable farm 
of seven hundred and twenty aires in Jefferson township, Spink county, and thirteen hun- 
dred and twenty acres in Hughes county. Upon the former place he resides, bending liis 
energies to tlie further cultivation of that farm and to stockraising. In his vocabulary there 
is no such word as fail and throughout his entire career when he has met obstacles and 
ditficnlties they have seemed not to discourage him but have rather become an impetus foi: 
renewed and further effort on his part. 

Mr. Chase is of English lineage, although the family was established in America prior 
to the Revolutionary war, the first representatives of the family in America taking up th'Ar 
abode in Vermont. John E. Chase was bom in Bristol, Wisconsin, on the 1st of Ma)% 1869, 
a son of Willis and Mary Jane (Weed) Chase. The father followed carpentering in the 
Badger state and also carried on farming in connection with carpentering after his removal 
to South Dakota, which occurred in 1880. In the meantime the family had lived for a time 
in tile little town of Chaseburg, Wisconsin, which was named in their honor. During the 
Civil war the father responded to the country's call for troops, participated in a number of 
hotly contested engagements and won promotion to the rank of corporal. He made a credit- 
able military record and throughout his entire life was most loyal to the best interests of 
his country, the spirit of patriotism being strong within him. He died in April, 1902, at the 
age of sixty-five years and his wife passed away in 1893 when fifty-two years of age. They 
were laid to rest in the cemetery at Ashton, South Dakota, and many friends mourned their 
loss. 

John E. Chase was a little lad of eleven summers when the family left Wisconsin and 
came to this state. He attended the country schools, but is largely a self-educated as well' 
as a self-made man, having never been able to attend school since the age of sixteen years 
and previous to that time often attending only through the winter seasons. When he left 
school he devoted all of his time and attention to the task of assisting his father upon the 
farm, on whicli Willis Chase had filed in 1879. Mr. Cliase of this review inherited only one 
hundred and sixty acres and the remainder of his property he has acquired through his own 
eflorts, increasing his holdings by degrees until he is today one of the largest landowners in 
his section of the state, his possessions aggregating more than two thousand acres. His 
home property is a splendid farm of seven hundred and twenty acres, much of which is highly 
cultivated. He raises all the various crops adapted to soil and climate and he is also exten- 
sively and successfully engaged in stock-raising, keeping on hand as many as one hundred 
and ninety liead of cattle, eighty head of hogs and a large amount of other stock. His annual 



282 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

sales return to him a gratifying income and his business methods are in keeping witli tlie 
most progressive ideas. He cultivates altogether about nine hundred acres and is numbered 
among the most prosperous residents of his part of the state, a position to which he has 
attained entirely through his own ability. 

In Aberdeen, South Dakota, on the 13th of ilay, 1903, Mr. Chase was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Lizzie Sherman, a daughter of Valentine Sherman. Her father was one of the 
early settlers in the vicinity of Mitchell, South Dakota, and took an active and helpful part 
in improving that section of the state. Both he and his wife spent their last days in the 
liome of Mr. and Mrs. Chase and when called to their final rest their remains were Interred 
in the Mitchell cemetery. 

Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Chase — Jane, Willis and Catherine. Their 
home is a beautiful residence, which was erected by Mr. Chase — one of the most attractive 
and modern farm dwellings in not only Spink but also adjoining counties. He has made a 
great many improvements upon his property and in fact, none of the accessories and con- 
veniences of a model farm of the twentietli century arc lacking. He uses the latest improved 
machinery, employs scientific methods in tilling his fields and in raising liis stock and has 
learned to use time and material to the best possible advantage — which is tlie secret of all 
success. In politics he is an earnest republican and has been nominated for the office of 
county commissioner, while at the present time he is serving tnr thi' >erciiid tirm as town- 
ship treasurer. His record in office is unassailable, being chanu tii i/c.l hy the utniust fidelity 
to duty. Mr. Chase belongs to the Independent Order of Odd I'.IIdws, Imt toniriitrates his 
energies mainly upon his business affairs. He has never been remiss in tlie duties of citi- 
zenship and in furthering public progress his aid has been of a most practical and resultant 
character. Close application and indefatigable energy, intelligently directed, have been the 
means of bringing him to the present prominent position which he occupies as one of the 
foremost citizens and successful business men of this state. 



FRED H. KLUCKMAN. 



Fred H. Kluckman is the cashier of tlie Farmers State Bank of Kranzburg and through- 
out much of his life has been identified with the banking business, so that he is thoroughly 
familiar with its general phases and capable of conducting the interests of the institution 
with which he is now associated. He was born in Deuel county. South Dakota, on Christmas 
day of 1888 and is a son of Fred and Gusta Kluckman. The family came to this state about 
1880 and purchased a preemption claim west of Clear Lake in Deuel county, where the 
father still carries on general farming. In 1913 he was called upon to mourn the loss of his 
wife, who passed away on the 6th of January of that year. In their family were seven chil- 
dren, four sons and three daughters. 

Fred H. Kluckman was educated in the country schools and in the high school at Clear 
Lake, where he spent one year, while later he pursued a commercial course at Grand Island, 
Nebraska. When his studies were finished he returned to the home farm, upon which he 
lived for a brief period. Thinking to find other pursuits more congenial, however, he entered 
the law office of Law & Knight at Clear Lake on the 1st of November, 1909, but the con- 
dition of his eyes caused him to abandon his studies after six months. He then returned to 
the farm for a short time and afterward entered the First National Bank at Julesburg, 
Colorado, as bookkeeper, spending a year and a half in that place. He next went to Cheyenne, 
where he continued for three months, liciiii; riiinioidil witli tlic Kelly Mercantile Company 
as bookkeeper. On the expiration of tliat pn iml In' ntmnr.l licmie but continued on the 
farm for only a little time, when he eiitrrr.l thf Fainuis State Hank at Thomas, serving as 
cashier for a year. On the 16th of December, 1912, he assumed the duties of cashier in the 
Farmers State Bank of Kranzburg, taking charge of the organization of the bank, of which 
he is now one of the stockholders and directors. He is also a stockholder and the secretary 
of the Farmers Elevator Company. 

Mr. Kluckman has filled the office of justice of the peace, his decisions being strictly 
fair and impartial, and for the past two years he has been township assessor. His political 
indorsement is given the republican party. He has membership in the Methodist church and 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

with the Royal Highlanders — associations which indicate much of the nature ni liis 
and the rules which govern his conduct. When he has leisure he enjoys nu>tuiiiiL; 
and fishing. He is a progressive young man, his future full of promise, and the 
which he has already displayed prevent any hesitancy in predicting for him success, 
ment and honor in the future. 



JOHN H. BINGHAM. 



John H. Bingham, who is engaged in the abstract business in Chamberlain, Brule county, 
was born in Chippewa countj', Wisconsin, on the 3,3d nf Novcinbm-, 1S72, of the marriage of 
Orin F. and Catherine Bingham. In 1881 the family ninovid to South Dakota and located 
at Bijou Hills, Brule county, where the father honicslca.lcd liiiid which he farmed for a 
number of years. Both he and his wife have now passed away. 

.John H. Bingliam was but nine years of age when he accompanied the family to this 
state and continued his education in the public schools. Later he entered Yankton College 
and upon leaving that institution taught school during the winter and farmed in the spring 
and summer for about ten years. At the end of tliat time he removed to Chamberlain 
and entered the abstract business, in which he has continued to the present time. He has 
a complete set of abstract books and as he is painstaking in his work has built up an envi- 
able reputation for accuracy and completeness. He derives a good income from his activity 
in that field and is recognized as a successful business man. 

In April, 1908, occurred the marriage of Mr. Bingham and Miss Kate Boyles, a daughter 
of Judge Samuel Boyles, of Yankton. Both she and her brother, Virgil D., are writers of 
national reputation, being the authors of the following novels: "Langford of the Three 
Bars;" "Homesteaders;" "The Spirit Trail;" and the "Hoosier Volunteers," all of which have 
had a large sale. Mr. and Mrs. Bingham have a daughter, Martha. 

The parents are communicants of the Episcopal church. Mr. Bingham is a member of 
the Masonic order and of the Eastern Star and his wife also belongs to the latter organiza- 
tion. His political support is given to the republican party and he has served as city auditor. 
He is an enthusiastic member of the Commercial Club and has great faith in the future of 
Chamberlain and Brule county. He is president of the Island Park & Chautauqua Associa- 
tion. The island on which the meetings are held consists of about one thousand acres and 
was given to the city of Chamberlain by a special act of congress. It is being developed and 
is now one of the finest parks in the state. In all public movements relating to the betterment 
of the community he is a cooperant factor. Both Mr. and Mrs. Bingham are well known and 
highly esteemed and are numbered among the prominent and valued residents of their city. 



ALBERT J. LINDAHL. 



Albert J. Lindahl, the eflicient treasurer of Grant county, is one of the valued citizens of 
Milbank. A native of Minnesota, his birth occurred in Willmar, August 6, 1883, and he is a 
son of Thomas and Hadda (Rungquist) Lindahl, both of whom were born in Sweden, the 
former in 1847 and the latter in 1853. The maternal gi-andfather, John Rungquist, emi- 
grated to America and for a number of years followed farming in South Dakota. Thomas 
Lindahl came to the United States not long after the close of the Civil war and first settled 
in St. Paul, after which he removed successively to Chicago and to Willmar, Minnesota. He 
purchased land in that locality and was for five years a resident of Kandiyohi county. In 
1884 he removed to Grant county. South Dakota, purchased a relinquishment :uiJ |iro\rfl up 
a claim on which he still resides. He has added to his holdings, which now . ■iiii|ii i-c f.nu- 
hundred and eighty acres, and his farm is recognized as one of the most valuable properties 
in the county. He is also president of the Farmers State Bank of Strandburg. When he 
came to this state he was a comparatively poor man but, utilizing the opportunities here 
offered, has gained financial independence. In religious faith he is a Free Baptist and his 
political allegiance is given to the republican party. He was married in Chicago and to him 



284 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

and his wife liave been born nine children, namely: Edward, who is deputy treasurer; Clara 
and Fred, both at home; Albert J.; Harry, who is living in northern Minnesota and who is 
assistant cashier of a bank; and Robert, Emil, Arthur and Joseph, all at home. 

Albert J. Lindahl received his education in the public schools and in the State Agricul- 
tural College at Brookings, which he attended for two years. He grew to manhood upon 
his father's farm and qontinued to give his time to agricultural pursuits until 1909, when 
he became deputy county treasurer. He held that office until the fall of 1912, when he was 
elected treasurer, which position he is still filling. He devotes his entire time to the duties 
of his office and is accurate, systematic and prompt in the performance of the work devolving 
upon him. He has demonstrated that the confidence placed in his ability and integrity is well 
founded and his services are ver}' satisfactorj' to his constituents. 

Mr. Lindahl is a stalwart supporter of the principles of the republican party as he 
believes that they are best calculated to promote the welfare of the country. Fraternally he 
belongs to Milbank Lodge, No. 20, A. F. & A. il., of which he is secretary, and Milbank 
Chapter, No. 15, R. A. M. All who know him esteem him highly and he has also made many 
warm personal friends. 



JOHN T. DOYLE. 



John T. Doyle, postmaster of Plankinton, was born in Scott county, Iowa, on the 3d 
of February, 1879, a son of John and Ellen Doyle. The father, who was a farmer, has passed 
away. John T. Doyle took a eommeicial course at the Iowa State College, after completing 
his studies in the public schools, and upon starting out for himself engaged in farming in his 
native state. In 1901, however, he came to South Dakota, locating first at Alexandria, 
Hanson county. Some time later he invested in land in Aurora county and then removed to 
Plankinton, where he engaged in the real-estate business until appointed postmaster by Presi- 
dent Wilson, taking charge of the office on the 22d of May, 1914. He is naturally methodical 
and accurate and the affaii's of the office are managed efficiently and with dispatch. He is 
also connected with a number of local concerns, being a stockholder of the Farmers Elevator 
Company, of the Fair Association and of the Qtizens Cooperative Telephone Company. 

Mr. Doyle was married on the 28th of April, 1899, to Miss Agnes O'Connor, a daughter 
of Dennis D. O'Connor. Mr. Doyle is a communicant of the Catholic church and fraternally 
is connected with Maher Council, Knights of Columbus, at Mitchell, South Dakota. His 
ballot is cast in support of the measures and candidates of the democratic party, of which 
lie is a stanch adherent. He is energetic, progressive .^nd public-spirited and is justly 
accounted a valuable citizen of Plankinton. 



REV. M. J. BURKEL- 



Rev. M. J. Burkel, pastor of Holy Trinity church at Ethan, was born at Fredonia. Wis- 
consin, March 8, 1883, a son of John and Susanna (La Fontaine) Burkel. The father was 
a farmer by occupation but at the time of the Civil war put aside all business and personal 
considerations and in response to his country's call for aid enlisted in the Union army in 
1862, becoming a member of the Wisconsin Vohmteers, with which he served until 1864. 
After the war his attention was given to farming until death ended his labors on the 20th of 
October, 1912. He had for a number of years survived his wife, who passed away in 1900. 

M. J. Burkel pursued his early education in the rural schools of his native county and 
subsequently entered the College of St. Lawrence at Mount Calvary, Wisconsin, where he 
pursued his studies for four years. He was afterward for six years a student in St. Paul's 
Seminary at St. Paul, Minnesota, and after having thus prepared for holy orders he WiT: 
ordained to the priesthood on the 11th of June, 1908, at St. Paul, by Archbishop Ireland. His 
first mission was as assistant at White Lake, South Dakota, where he remained for six 
months. Subsequently he spent nine months as assistant pastor of the church at Kimball 
and still later was assistant at the cathedral in Sioux Falls. He was next assigned as minister 



PIISTURY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 287 

of the Catholic church at Orient, Faulk county, where he remained lor four years, and while 
there he was instrumental in securing the erection of a parish house at a cost of six thousand 
dollars. On the 1st of September 1914, he came to Ethan, his duties to include pastoral 
work in connection with the mission at Emsley, nine miles wot, having i iylity families. 

Until the year 1889 the Catholics of Ethan were membiT> oi m -. Irtrr and Paul church 
at Starr, but in that year they erected a church, there beiiiy nwui,. n laiuilies in the parish. 
During the winter months services were held once a month on a week day and during the 
summer months once on a week day and once on a Sunday. The first resident priest was 
Father S^tanton, who was succeeded by Father Lawrence Kerley, who remained until Novem- 
ber, 1903. No service was then held from that time until August, 1904, when, on the 22d of 
August, Rev. L. G. Brones was sent to reorganize the parish. Soon after his arrival prepara- 
tions were made for a new church and two acres of land w'ere purchased April 10, 1904, the 
new church being dedicated September 21, 1905, by the Right Rev. Bishop O'Gorman. 
Catholicism has since grown and developed rapidly in Ethan and the work is now being ably 
carried on by Father Burkel. 

In his political views Father Burkel is a republican, while fraternally he is connected 
with the Knights of Columbus and the Mutual Brotherhood of Iowa. He is fond of outdoor 
life and in that way takes his recreation. He is much interested in South Dakota and its 
development, and indorses many measures and movements which tend to the upbuilding and 
progress of the section in which he lives. 



H. I. OLSTOX. 



One of the leading men of his section of the state, H. I. Olston, president of the Jler- 
chants Exchange Bank of Lake Preston, is widely known and highly respected wherever 
known. He was born in Bergen, Norway, Sr|i(riiil>er 14, 1859, a son of Iver and Kari (Suph- 
ellen) Olston. Two years later the iamily ciniLiiatcd to the United States and located in 
Minnesota, which remained their Unmv uiilil lss4, when a removal was made to South 
Dakota and the family located upon a farm north of Lake Preston. H, I, Olston purchased 
a relinquishment in that vicinity and made extensive improvements upon the land. He had 
received an excellent education, attending the State Normal School at Mankato, after at- 
tending the high school at Albert Lea, Minnesota. He had taiii;lit scluml while still living 
in Minnesota and after removing to South Dakota continued in tliat |ii'it, s>ion for two years, 
teaching in the winter and farming in the summer. In 1SS6 lif i'iiM>\ d tu the town of Lake 
Preston and engaged in the real-estate business there for four years, after which he pur- 
chased an interest in the bank .He also became one of the bank's officials, the first office 
which he held being that of assistant cashier. His grasp of the principles of banking and 
his familiarity with banking routine led to his advancement and he was made cashier. Later 
he was chosen president and for the past ten years has acceptably continued in that im- 
portant connection. When he entered the bank its deposits totaled twelve thousand dollars 
and now they aggregate two hundred and fifty thousand dollars. Much of this growth is 
naturally due to the development of the region served by the bank but much of it is to be 
attributed to the sagacity and farsightedness of Mr, Olston and his associates, who have so 
directed the policy of the institution that its growth has kept pace with that of this section 
of the state. 

Mr. Olston was married November 26, 1883, to Jliss Lena Guttersen, a daughter of 
Egil Guttersen. and to them have been born the following children: Ida, now Mrs. Charles 
Nicoud; Edward and Herbert, both employes in the bank of which their father is president; 
Arthur, who died November 24, 1911, at the age of twenty-one while a student in the State 
University of South Dakota at Vermilion; Stella, who is teaching in Mount Vernon; Mae, 
attending the State University; Clara; Ruth, who died December 24. 1909, when eleven 
years old; and Helen, Evelin and Mildred, at home. 

Mr. Olston is a republican and at one time served as mayor of Lake Preston. He is 
also vice president of the school board. He is one of the leaders in religious circles in 
Lake Preston and he has been secretary of the local Lutheran church for twenty-seven 
years. For the same length of time he has taught in the Sunday school. He has attained 



288 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

the thirty-second degree in Masonry, belonging to tlie consistory at Aberdeen^ and also has 
membership in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Ancient Order of United Work- 
men. He has gained considerable wealth, owns quite a little real estate in South Dakota, 
is a stockholder in the Farmers Elevator and the Lake Preston Milling Company, and is 
president of the Security Bank of Webster, tlie Peoples State Bank of Bradley and the Esmond 
State Bank of Esmond. His opinion carries great weight in financial circles in his part of 
the state and the inlluence that his position and knowledge of banking give him is invariably 
used for the general prosperity and the public good. 



ROBERT C. BAKE WELL. 



Robert C. Bakewell, the efficient young state's attorney of Aurora county, is a native 
of Plankinton, born on the 5th of September, 1886, a son of Samuel H. and Martha (Cawley) 
Bakewell. The father came to South Dakota in 1881 and was here married, his wife having 
been principal of schools in Plankinton before her marriage. The father was a lawyer but 
after coming to the territory he homesteaded land in Aurora county and resided thereon 
until he proved up his claim. He then removed to Plankinton and entered upon the practice 
of his profession. He held many public offices, was for years county attorney and in 1883 
w'as elected probate judge. Ha was also honored by elevation to the county bench. In 1909 
he was appointed to the state board of Charities and Corrections and was a member of that 
body when his death occurred. He took much interest in the work of the board and was 
one of its most valued members. 

Robert C. Bakewell entered the public schools at the usual age and was advanced from 
grade to grade until he was prepared to enter the State University of South Dakota at Ver- 
million, where he took three years of collegiate work. He then entered the law department 
of the university, from which he was graduated with the degree of LL. B. in 1907. He 
returned to Plankinton and entered into partnership with his father, the firm name being 
Bakewell & Bakewell. Since his father's death he has practiced alone and is today recognized 
as one of the leading attorneys of his county. He is exceptionally well fitted for the profes- 
sion by natural ability, early training and thorough study of the principles underlying all 
systems of law and he also has a detailed knowledge of statutes and precedents. He appears 
as counsel in much of the important litigation tried in his district and has the respect and 
confidence of his colleagues as well as of the general public. 

On the 2d of March, 1912, Mr. Bakewell married Miss Leonne Irons, a daughter of 
John and Hattie Irons. Mr. and Mrs. Bakewell have two sons, Samuel Paul and Robert, Jr. 
Mr. Bakewell is a republican and has always taken a keen interest in local politics. For eight 
years he served as city attorney and is now state's attorney. In religious faith he is a Prot- 
estant, while fraternally he is connected with the Elks, Masons and Beta Theta Pi, one of the 
leading college fraternities. He believes thoroughly in the future of the city and of its institu- 
tions. He has high rank in his profession and his character is such that he is personally 
popular and respected and his friends prophesy for him yet greater success in his chosen 
calling. 



PETER E. E. LEE. 



Peter E. E. Lee, a real-estate dealer conducting business at Summit, was born in Norway, 
August 27, 1866. His father, Elling Lee, was born in that country in 1805 and there wedded 
Christina Larson, whose birth occurred in 1840. They became the parents of six children, of 
whom four are living: Annie, the wife of Gust Lee, a resident farmer of Minnesota; Peter 
E. E.; Mary, who married Ludwig Olson, of Norway; and Nels, a farmer living at Summit. 
Throughout his entire life the father carried on the work of the fields and his death occurred 
in Norway in 1S85. In 1906 Mrs. Lee came to America and is now living in Summit. She is 
a consistent member of the Lutheran church, to which her husband also belonged. 

Peter E. E. Lee pursued his education in his native country, completing his course by 
graduation from a military college there. In 1891 he crossed the water and after living for 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 289 

a time in Chicago made his way to Tower, Minnesota, but on the 12th of August, 1894, 
located in Summit, South Dakota. For a time he engaged in selling nursery stock but about 
fifteen years ago turned his attention to the real-estate business and sells on commission 
besides handling property which he purchases outright. He is thoroughly conversant with 
realty values, knows the property that is upon the market and has won a large clientage 
that has made his business a profitable one. While the greater part of his time and atten- 
tion are devoted to his real-estate interests he is also known in financial circles as the vice 
president of the First State Bank. 

In 1006 ilr. Lee married Miss Nina Nelson, a native of Norway, and they have five 
children; Ftliel and Jlaniie, both in school; Eliza, six years of age; Jerald, five years; and 
Nina, who is the baby of the household. 

Mr. Ja'c has served as assessor and treasurer of Summit township, to which offices he 
^^■as elected on the republican ticket, but the honors and emoluments of office have little 
attraction for him as he prefers to concentrate his energies upon his business affairs and it 
has been his close application and unabating energy that have gained for him a creditable 
place among the prosperous business men of Roberts county. 



WILLIAM SCHNEIDER. 



William Schneider, of Cleveland township. Bon Homme county, is one of the most 
,progrissi\ .■ laiiniis of the state and is deservedly successful in his agricultural operations. 
Jlr. Sihiiriil. 1 s uniestry is mainly French, although there is a German strain in his lineage, 
as is indicated by his surname. His father, Eugene Schneider, was an Alsatian by birth 
and was thoroughly French in his sympathies and tastes. His wife, who bore the name of 
Margaret Curie, was a native of France and may have belonged to the same family that 
produced the famous French scientist of that name. Mr. and Mrs. Schneider were the parents 
of seven sons and one daughter, all of whom still survive but one son. Only two, however, 
reside in Bon Homme county — William, and a sister, Emily, who is now the wife of Hugh G. 
Gunn. fniiiii rly luiuity commissioner from Scotland. 

\\ illiaiii s, liiii'JdiT was born in Washington county, Iowa, where his parents had settled 
in till- '.Mis. his iKital day being December 2, 1863. He resided on the home farm until the 
spring of issl, lireoming familiar in the meantime with all branches of agricultural work. 
His father had foreseen the value of South Dakota land and had purchased a farm in this 
state, near which an older brother of our subject had homesteaded two years earlier and was 
then living. In 1881 he assumed the management of tlie home farm and thus relieved Wil- 
liam, who had been operating it for some time. The latter then came to South Dakota, ar- 
riving here early in March, 1883. He went as far as Jlitchell l>y train and from that point, 
in company with a neighbor, started overland for Scotland, iicmi- «liirh town George 
Sclmeider and a sister were living. Towards evening he and hi^ i'oiii|i:iiiinn began to inquire 
at the houses along the way if they could obtain a nighfs loduiriL;, but t.. tlieir surprise were 
refused. The settlers were members of a German colony from Russia who had not yet 
acquired the western spirit of hospitality. The travelers eventually found an empty shed 
and spent the night there. Mr. Schneider worked for two years in the employ of his brother, 
but as the crops failed both years received practically nothing for his labor. The second 
winter his brother and sister went home, intending to be gone but two weeks, but it was 
three months before they returned. During that time he had the entire responsibility of the 
farm and also had to do all of the necessary house work. In th.' ~|iriiii; of 1885 he left his 
brother George and joined his brother Louis, who was li\iiiL: immi tin \i!l:i.ji' of Bon Homme. 
After remaining in his service for two years William Sihii.-i^lri hlhiu'I and the following 
spring removed to a farm of his own. After eight years he rented his hinu licre and removed 
to Iowa where he lived six years. He then returned to his farm in Smith Dakota where he 
has since resided. He purchased the land from his father for sixteen hundred dollars, which 
was quite an advance over the price paid by his father, which Avas but tliree hundred and 
fifty dollars. At the present time, however, it could not be bought for ten times the amount 
paid by our subject, such has been the rapid development of the state and the consequent 
increase in land values. Mr. Schneider of this review at length purchased a second quarter 



290 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

section, payiii{.' therefor fifty dollars per acre and that land would now bring more than 
double the purchase price. His three hundred and twenty acre tract is fertile and produces 
excellent crops annually. Mr. Schneider possesses the thrift characteristic of the French 
nation and this trait, in connection with his energy and initiative, has won him gratifying 



Mr. Schneider was married in Springfield, this state, July 4. 18S5, to Miss Maggie Egan, 
a native of Virginia, who came to Dakota at an early date with her mother Mrs. Patrick 
McDonald. Mr. and Mrs. Schneider have become the parents of nine children. Frank, their 
ftrstborn, died at the age of eight years while attending business college at Grand Island, 
Nebraska. Mary E. B. at home is an artist in needlework, doing fine embroidery and drawn 
work. William L. is working in Tyndall. .Joseph, Paul, Violet, Edna, Grace and Leo are all 
at home. Mary, William, Joseph and Violet have attended the Springfield Normal School. 
Mr. Schneider was reared in the Catholic church and his family are devout communicants 
thereof. 

Mr. Schneider came to this state wlien there were still many evidences of pioneer life 
and although buffalo, deer and antelope had disappeared, wolves were still seen occasionally. 
Twisted hay was the common fuel for the first year or two and one winter he and his brother 
mowed the long slough grass above the ice of a frozen marsh. Prairie fires were not at all 
uncommon and while living with his brother in Scotland he had to fight fire for nearly three 
weeks. On the 12th of -January, 1888, he and Albert Eymer went to Bon Homme Island 
for wood and when the cloud of ice dust enveloped them and the temperature descended 
a degree a minute, they started home in haste with their sleighloads of wood. As the 
storm grew worse rapidly they left their wood and made their way as quickly as possible, 
homeward. For a time they found shelter in an old log house, but later in the afternoon, 
seeing no sign of abatement in the storm, they trudged through the blinding ice dust to the 
old Bon Homme store, where they spent the night. There were twelve or fifteen others who 
had taken refuge there and about midnight the company made an oyster stew from canned 
oysters found in the store. The group was in high spirits and the feast was one never to 
be forgotten. The energy and willingness to take advanced steps that characterized Mr. 
Schneider in the early days of the state are still salient traits of his character and are mani- 
testcd in his progressive methods of farming. In the summer of 1914 he added to his equip- 
ment a large traction engine and a gang plow and before August was two-thirds gone he 
had plowed one hundred and forty acres of land and sowed to wheat all the land he desired 
to seed that year, although most of his neighbors had plowed but a few rods of land by 
that time. He is always among the first to adopt any improved machinery and he is always 
willing to utilize a new method that promises to make farming more efficient. He has 
contributed much to the development of the agricultural interests of his county and is one 
of the leaders in the effort to place farming upon a more scientific basis. He is not only up- 
to-date and successful as an agricultiu'ist, but as a man he commands the respect of all who 
know him, his life being upright and honorable. 



DAVID 0. CTIOOKS. 



A student of history cannot cany his investigations far into the record of Minnehaha 
county without learning that the Crooks family has long been prominent not only in the 
pioneer development but also in the later progress of this section of the state. The enter- 
prising town in which the subject of this review makes his home was named in honor of the 
family. The work of progress and development here instituted by the father is still con- 
tinued by David 0. Crooks, who is justly accounted one of the most progressive men of his 
section. 

He was born near Quebec, Canada, on the 30th of November, 1854, and is a son of .John 
Nelson and Caroline M. Crooks, the former a farmer by occupation. On leaving Canada in 
the spring of 1855 John Crooks removed with his family to Wisconsin, settling in Columbia 
county, and later he resided for a number of years in Dane county. It was during the period 
of the family's residence there that David 0. Crooks acquired a common-school education at 
Black Earth, Wisconsin. Later the family removed to Iowa, where they remained for six 




DAVID 0. CROOKS 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 293 

years, and again David Crooks attended school there. In 1873 they came to South Dakota, 
settling on the present site of the town of Crooks, where the father homesteaded. His son 
David, then a young man of nineteen years, secured a preemption and timber claim in McCook 
county and the town of Crooks now stands upon a part of his preemption claim in Minnehaha 
county. It has a population of one hundred and is about the only town of its size that can 
boast of a water works. The plant is owned by David 0. Crooks, who lias been most active in 
promoting public progress and improvement in this section. 

The family were among the pioneer settlers of the state, establishing their home here 
when the work of progress and improvement seemed scarcely begun. From that time to the 
present representatives of the family have been very active in forwarding the work of public 
improvement. The father died in 1882, but the mother, surviving for an extended period, 
passed away in 1905. 

For about ten years David 0. Crooks was engaged in general merchandising, conducting 
a well appointed store, in which he carried a large and carefully selected line of goods. It 
was in the spring of 1904 that the townsite was platted and called Crooks, in honor of the 
family. Since the building of the railroad David 0. Crooks has acted as depot and express 
agent. He is also a stockholder in the Farmers Lumber & Klcvutcr Cumpany and president 
of the Ci'ooks State Bank in addition to being owner of the w;it< r wcuk- and lighting plant. 

On the 24th of January, 1887, occurred the marriage of ilr. Crouks and Miss Nettie Tyler, 
and to tliem have been born four children: Arthur Roy, who is cashier of the Crooks State 
Bank, while his wife is assistant cashier; Minnie; Grace; and Robert. The parents are mem- 
bers of the Christian church and in their lives exenvplify its teachings. Mr. Crooks votes with 
the republican party, doing all in his power to promote its growth and insure its success. F'or 
six years he served as a member of the township board and for twelve years he served as 
postmaster at Crooks, retiring in 1913. He was also school treasurer of his district for twelve 
years. He is identified with the Ancient Order of United Workmen and with the Modern 
Woodmen of America, and all of his different associations are those which promote high 
standards of living. His influence is always on the side of progress and advancement, of truth 
and right. 



THOMAS L. CHAPPELL. 



Thomas L. Chappell is one of the foremost citizens and successful financiers of Brook- 
ings, South Dakota. His birth occurred in Elk Grove, Wisconsin, on the 18th of April, 1858, 
his parents being Edward and Eliza (Pierce) Chappell, who were born, reared and married 
in Caiiilicnic. En.^Ian.l. In 1834 they crossed the Atlantic to the United States, locating first 
at llarrislairji. Pennsylvania, and subsequently in McConnellsburg, that state. Thence they 
removed to Wisconsin in 1857, taking up their abode on a farm in Elk Grove, where the 
father devoted his attention to general a,i;ri('iiltin:il pursuits hn aliout f^cnty years. On the 
expiration of that period he removed tn l'lattr\ illc. \\ is.oiisin. ami aliout 1882 established 
his home in Iveyville, Iowa, where he spent tlie remainder uf his life in honorable retirement 
and where his wife also passed away. 

Thomas L. Chappell was reared under the parental roof and supplemented his early edu- 
cation, acquired in the public schools, by a four years' course in the State Normal School at 
Platteville, Wisconsin. He then followed farming in the Badger state for five years, and 
subsequently spent four years on a farm at Rockwell, Iowa. During the next three years he 
acted as manager of the Farmers Incorporated Cooperative Society, which handles grain, coal, 
live stock, flour, lumber, etc., and is one of the largest institutions of the kind in the United 
States at the present time. Mr. Chappell was made manager immediately after its incorpora- 
tion and laid the cornerstone for the subsequent growth and splendid development of the 
enterprise. In 1892 he severed his connection with the company and organized the F'armers 
State Bank at Rockwell, Iowa, becoming cashier of the institution and also a member of its 
board of directors. For a period of ten and a half years he had charge of the financial policy 
of the bank, and his efforts were a potent factor in its continued Liruwth and success. In 1902 
he came west in search of a suitable location for a new bank, ami after traveling through 
Iowa, North and South Dakota and southern Minnesota he touk up his permanent abode at 



294 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

Brookings, this state, on the 16th of August of that year. Here he organized the Farmers 
National Banlc, was made cashier and directed its policy, with the result that the institution 
is now one of the successful and sound financial concerns of the state. He retired from the 
banking business in 1915. He owns the brick block formerly occupied by the postotEce and 
also seven residence buildings, five of which are of the most modern construction. 

In 1880 Mr. Chappell was united in marriage to Miss Minnie Vincent, of Galena, Illinois, 
by whom he has six children, as follows: Bessie, who is a graduate of the Brookings high 
school and the South Dakota State College at Brookings, also has a degree from Chicago Uni- 
versity and pursued special work in the Iowa State Teachers' College of Cedar Falls and is 
now engaged in teaching at Lamar, Colorado; Elsie, a graduate of the South Dakota State 
College of Brookings, who is the wife of J. W. Wilson, a son of J. W. Wilson, Sr., former 
secretary of the United States department of agriculture; William, an electrician residing in 
San Francisco, California; Vincent, who is a graduate of the South Dakota State College 
of Brookings, and is now a member of the faculty of the Iowa State College at Ames; 
Mabel, a graduate of the public schools, who is now attending South Dakota State College; 
and Genevieve, a public-school student. 

Mr. Chappell is a republican in politics but has never sought nor desired office as a reward 
for his party fealty. He is a valued member of the Brookings Commercial Club, and fra- 
ternally is identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, belonging to Brookings 
Lodge, No. 40. His religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Methodist Episcopal 
church, of which he serves as treasurer and to which his wife also belongs. They enjoy a 
wide acquaintance throughout the community, and attractive social qualities have gained 
for them the high regard of many friends. 



^VILLIAM F. EMANUEL. 



William F. Emanuel, the proprietor of a general store in Milbank, was born in Augusta, 
Wisconsin, on the 20th of July, 1885. His grandparents were lifelong residents of Germany. 
His parents, Charles and Eleanor (Acker) Emanuel, were also natives of Germany, born 
respectively in 1830 and in 1832. They were married in Germany and continued to reside 
there for about ten years thereafter. At the end of that time they emigrated to the United 
States and settled in Wisconsin, where the father passed away in 1906. His political faith 
was that of the democratic party and his religious allegiance was given to the Lutheran 
church. His widow is still living. To them wore born nine children, eight of whom survive, 
namely: Amelia, the wife of Phillip Trieber, a music dealer of Augusta, Wisconsin; Ed, 
who established a furniture and undertaking business in Milbank in 1881 and who in 1910 
sold out to AYilliam F. Emanuel, since which time he has lived retired; Emil, who is the 
proprietor of a hardware and furniture establishment in Berthold, North Dakota; Bertha, 
the wife of August Bundt, a railroad man of Augusta, Wisconsin; Henry, of Shawano, Wis- 
consin, who is traveling for Armour's; Emma, the wife of Otto Schadler, a merchant of 
Augusta, Wisconsin; Herman, who is a merchant of Fairchild, Wisconsin; and William F. 
Carl died at sea frhen six years of age while the family were crossing the Atlantic to the 
United States. 

William F. Emanuel received his education in the public schools of Augusta, Wisconsin, 
and on putting aside his textbooks removed to Milbank, South Dakota, where he clerked in 
the store owned by his brother Ed. As the years passed he gained more and more knowledge 
of the mercantile business and in 1910 bought out his brother. He has since owned and 
conducted the store and is recognized as one of the efficient business men of Milbank He 
carries furniture, including musical instruments, wallpaper, rugs and carpets and also has 
an undertaking department. His stock is large and well selected. He enjoys a gratifying 
patronage, which is well merited, as his goods are of high quality and his prices reasonable. 

On the 3d of .lune, 1911, Mr. Emanuel was married to Miss Elsie Mullen, a daughter of 
Adelbert Mullen, who was born near Wells, Minnesota. Mr. Emanuel is a republican in 
politics but has never desired to hold office, as his business demands his entire time. Frater- 
nally he is quite prominent locally, belonging to the Masonic order, in which he is identified 
with the blue lodge, the Royal Arch chapter, and the Mystic Shrine. He is also connected 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 295 

with the Knights of Pythias lodge, in which he is now vice chancellor, the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows and the Modern Woodmen. His religious faith is that of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. The gratifying measure of success which he has gained is doubly credit- 
able in that it is due entirely to his own energy and sound judgment, as he began his career 
witliout capital. Personally he is popular, and all who have been brought into contact with 
|]im hold him in high esteem. 



AVILBER I). TODD. 



Wilber D. Todd, the clerk of the courts of Custer county, is an esteemed resident of 
Custer and has many friends in that city. A native of Peoria, Illinois, he was born on the 
31st of Maj', 1863, the eldest of four children, whose parents were Charles and Mary (Bundy) 
Todd, born respectively in Pennsylvania in 1823 and in Ohio in 1835. The father learned the 
miller's trade in his native state and subsequently removed to Illinois, where his marriage 
occurred. Still later he and his family emigrated to Iowa and after living in Jasper county 
removed to Audubon county. They resided there from 1871 until 1890, when a removal 
was made to the Black Hills. The father lived retired after coming to this state and passed 
away in 1898. His widow survived until September, 1912. 

Wilber D. Todd attended school in Audubon county, Iowa, but when eighteen years of 
age became a farm hand and was so employed in Iowa until the spring of 1887. In that year 
he emigrated to the Black Hills and began mining. He became interested in a number of 
inining properties and also worked as a stone and brick mason. In 1898 he enlisted in Com- 
pany I, First South Dakota Infantry, for service in the Philippine Islands, and was on 
duty there for eighteen months. Company I went from Custer and was under command of 
Captain Charles Denney. Upon his return home Mr. Todd resumed his prospecting and still 
retains his mining interests. He also continued to give some time to work as a mason. He 
has acquired one hundred and fifty-two acres of land a half mile south of Custer and super- 
vises his ranching interests. In 1914 he was elected clerk of the courts and in January, 
1915, assumed the duties of that office. There has never been any question of his reliability 
and his fellow citizens have the utmost confidence in his faithfulness. He is prompt and 
accurate and is proving a competent official. 

Mr. Todd is a democrat and is loyal in his support of that party at the polls. Frater- 
nally he is identified with the Knights of Pythias and is popular in that organization. He is 
widl known in Custer county and those w^ho have been most intimately associated with him 
hold him in liigh esteem, which is proof of a life lived in accordance with high principles. 



C. W. STONER. 



C. W. Stoner, a dealer in lumber, grain, machinery and coal, is a highly esteemed 
resident of Iroquois, and served for four years as a member of the state legislature. He 
was born September 2, 1854, at Decatur, Michigan, a son of C. W. and Roxy (Tyler) Stoner. 
In 1882 the family removed to South Dakota and located upon a homestead two and a half 
miles south of Iroquois. The father cultivated that land for some years but after the death 
of his wife made his home with his son, C. W., until he too was called to his reward at the 
venerable age of eighty-nine years. 

C. W. Stoner was educated in the public schools of Michigan and after putting aside 
liis te.xt-books was connected with the manufacture of lumber and shingles until 1883, when 
he removed to South Dakota. He settled in Beadle county, where he homesteaded land, 
which he farmed for two years. At the end of that time he went to Iroquois and entered 
the mercantile field as a dealer in lumber, gi'ain, machinery and coal. His business has 
increased steadily, keeping pace with the development of the country and he has become 
recognized as one of the leaders in commercial circles in Iroquois. He was the first and 
is now the oldest grain dealer in his part of the state. 

On the 3d of Jnlv, 1879, Mr. Stoner was united in marriage to Miss Belle Field, a 



296 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

daughter of Warren Field, a resident of ilicliigan. They have the following children: 
Ray W.; Edna, now Mrs. John McDeid; Ida, now Mrs. Truman Crowell; Gladys, who is now 
Mrs. L. Little; Minnie, who married H. Scott; Clayton, at home; and Imogene G., now Mrs. 
W. Jordan. Mr. Stoner is a republican and was county commissioner from 1903 to 1907. In 
the latter year he took office as a member of the state legislature and served until 1911, 
making a very creditable record in that capacity. His religious belief is indicated in his 
membership in the Methodist Episcopal church. He is quite prominent fraternally, being a 
Mason, an Odd Fellow, an Elk, a member of the Modern Woodmen of America and the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen. He is also identified with the Rebekahs. He is thoroughly 
interested in all that pertains to the welfare of his adopted state, is willing, if need be, to 
sacrifice personal advantage to the public good, and this spirit, combined with his agreeable 
personality, and integrity, has gained him not only the respect but also the good will of 
the community. 



HARTFORD NELSON GATES. 

Hartford Nelson Gates was well known as a representative of industrial activity in 
Sioux Falls, where he made his home for a quarter of a century. He had therefore been a 
witness of almost its entire growth and development and ever manifested a public-spirited 
interest in all that pertained to its welfare. His fellow townsmen, appreciative of this fact. 
several times called him to public office, so that his name is inseparably interwoven with tlic 
history of his city. He had just closed a service as one of the city officials when death calleil 
him and the efficiency of his work in behalf of Sioux Falls was recognized by all. 

Mr. Gates was born in Hemmingford, Canada, March 4, 1846, a son of Thomas C. and 
Mary Ann (Dawson) Gates. Like a number of the sterling citizens of this section of the 
country, he was of Scotch descent. His father was a native of Scotland, born in 1818. Leav- 
ing the land of hills and heather, he crossed the Atlantic to Canada about 1841 and his last 
days were spent in Village Creek, Iowa, where he passed away in 1880, after having devoted 
the greater part of his life to merchandising. His wife was a native of Ireland and they were 
married before leaving Great Britain. They had six sons and four daughters, of whom four 
sons and a daughter are yet living. 

Hartford N. Gates attended school at Havelock, Canada, to the age of thirteen years 
and then went to the Champlain (N. Y.) Academy, where he pursued his studies to the age 
of eighteen years. The succeeding three years were spent in Centerville, New York, and in 
1866, when in the twenty-first year of his age, he went to Lansing, Iowa, where he engaged 
in the business of drilling wells, both artesian and farm wells. He was so engaged at that 
place until 1889, when he came to Sioux Falls, where he continued in the same line of busi- 
ness, meeting with excellent success in his undertakings because of the capability and fidelity 
which he displayed in executing his contracts. He also had other business interests, being 
president of the Sioux Falls Land Company, operating in Custer county, Montana. 

On Christmas Day of 1870, at Waukon, Iowa, Mr. Gates was married to Miss Susanna W. 
Aird, who was born in Albany, New York, a daughter of Ronald McDonald Aird. In her girl- 
hood the family removed to Iowa, where the father died, but the mother afterward came to 
South Dakota, passing away in Sioux Falls in July, 1911, at the advanced age of nearly 
ninety years. Mr. and Mrs. Gates spent several years of their married life in Iowa and in 
1889 came to Sioux Falls, where they afterward resided. Unto them were born two daughters. 
Jessie A. and Mary L., the latter the wife of C. Linton Muggah, of Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin. 
The former has been a teacher in the Sioux Falls public schools for fifteen years and has been 
principal of the Hawthorn school since 1905. 

In religious faith the family are Baptists and in his political belief Mr. Gates was a 
republican. He held membership with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and with the 
Commercial Club. Several times during the period of his residence in Sioux Falls he was 
called to public office. He was elected alderman in 1900 for a term of two years and was 
twice reelected, so that his incumbency covered six years. In 1909 he was elected city com- 
missioner for two years and in 1911 was reelected for five years, so that he was serving in 
that capacity at the time of his death, and the record that he made was a highly commendable 





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HARTFORD X. (JATES 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 299 

and creditable one and won for him warm encomiums from his fellow townsmen. lie passed 
away May 14, 1915. His health had been failing for several months l>\it he laithfuUy per- 
formed his official duties, had completed his work and had prepared all oi his ]>apers for his 
successor. He had submitted them and had them approved and the last meeting had ended 
when his strength gave way and he was carried to his home, where he suffered for thirteen 
days, when death called him and he was carried to his last resting place. He had refused to 
become a candidate for reelection. He had served the city for thirteen consecutive years and 
when the new form of city government, which changed the commissioners from five to three, 
was installed he refused to become a nominee. His worth was widely recognized by all and 
his death was the occasion of deep and widespread regret. 



CHRISTEN C. THOMPSON. 



Christen C. Thompson, a representative and enterprising agriculturist of Minnehaha 
county, residing on section 34, Taopi township, owns and operates a well improved farm 
comprising one hundred and sixty acres. His birth occurred in Vernon county, Wisconsin, 
on the 18th of February, 1864, his parents being Christen C. and Isabelle Thompson, both of 
whom are natives of Norway. They emigrated to the United States about 1845, as young 
man and young woman, crossing the ocean on the same sailing vessel, which consumed seven 
weeks in making the voyage. They took up their abode among the earliest pioneers of 
Vernon county, Wisconsin, and there resided until 1875, when they removed to Rock county, 
Minnesota, where they have made their home to the present time. Mr. and Mrs. Christen C. 
Thompson are the oldest couple in Rock county, being eighty-nine and eighty-seven years 
of age respectively. 

Christen C. Thompson attended the district schools in the acquirement of an education. 
In IHSS, when a young man of twenty-four years, he started out as an agriculturist on his 
ow n a<cuunt and during the succeeding seventeen years cultivated rented land in Rock county. 
In the spring of 1905 he came to South Dakota, exchanging a Minnesota farm for one in Lin- 
coln county, this state. The land, however, was low and flat and Mr. Thonipsini ixprriinced 
much trouble on account of excessive moisture. In 1911 he traded his propiity in Liiiculn 
county for a farm of one hundred and si.xty acres on section 34, Taopi townslii|i. .Minnelialia 
county, which he has operated continuously and successfully since. Under his able manage- 
ment this has become a productive and valuable property, and his success places him among 
the representative and prominent agriculturists of his community. 

In 1896 Mr. Thompson was joined in wedlock to Miss Mary Rue, of Rock county, Min- 
nesota, by whom he has eight children, namely: Glen, Roy, Oden, William, Elsie, Inga, 
Amanda and Florence. Mr. Thompson gives his political allegiance to tlie republican party 
and is now serving as constable of Taopi township. His icliiiioiis laith is indicated by his 
membership in the Norwegian Liitlician iliiiicli. to wliiili Ins wii.' and iliilihcii also belong. 
His life has been active, useful and upii,i;lit and his many e.\cM-llcMit (pialities of mind and 
character have gained him a wide circle of friends. 



J. ORREN WEST. 



J. Orren West is cultivating a farm of three hundred and twenty acres in Three Rivera 
township, Spink county, which belongs to his father-in-law, .John Clifford, and in its develop 
ment he displays a thorough understanding of modern agricultural methods. He has always 
lived in that county, having been born about six miles north of Doland, on the old family 
homestead, October 2, 1884. He is a son of Charles and Elenora West, who came to this 
state in 1880 and secured a claim near Doland, the father performiu'v the arduous task of 
developing and improving the place, wliicli was entirely wild when it (anic> into his posses- 
sion. He was a veteran of the Civil war, doing a.-tive scrvire in sn|.port of th.' inicm 
cause. He died in August, 1900, at the age of sixty-four years, and was laid to icst in the 
Doland cemetery, while liis widow, still surviving, makes her home with their son Orren. 



300 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

The I'auiily is of Scotch-Irish lineage in the paternal line and of German descent in the 
maternal line. The grandfather, Christian Alspaugh, came from Germany to the new world 
and at the time of hostilities between the north and the south espoused the Union cause, 
spending some time at the front in active defense of the stars and stripes. 

In a public school near his father's home J. Orren West pursued his studies until his 
textbooks were put aside at the age of fourteen j-ears. He worked for others during the 
summer months and continued to engage in farm work after completing his schooling, becom- 
ing familiar with all of -the duties and labors that fall to the lot of the agriculturist. His 
training was very thorough, so that he was well qualified to engage in business on his own 
account when in 1909 he rented the place upon which he now resides. He devotes much of his 
time to stock-raising, making a specialty of handling shorthorn cattle and mule-foot hogs. 
The high grade of his stock Insures a ready sale upon the market and his success is increasing 
year by year. 

At Watertown, South Dakota, Mr. West was united in marriage on the 2d of December, 
1907, to Miss Julia Clifford, a daughter of John and Elizabeth Clifford, the former a promi- 
nent farmer and old settler of Spink county. The mother died in 1888 and her remains 
were interred in the family burial lot in Watertown. An account of the lives of Mr. and 
Mrs. Clifford appears elsewhere in this work. Mr. and Mrs. West have become the parents 
of four daughters and one son : Ellen May, Elizabeth Lonora, Catherine Julia, Margaret Irene, 
and John Clifford. Mr. West has filled the office of overseer but prefers to concentrate his 
energies upon his private business interests rather than upon public affairs. He is working 
diligently and his persistency of purpose and energy are elements in his growing prosperity. 



BEXJAMIN F. WILLSOX. 



Benjamin F. Willson, a real-estate dealer operating in Summit, was born in Noble 
county, Indiana, February 15, 1860, a son of Cassius Wilder and Rosanna (Marsh) Willson. 
The grandfather, Cassius Willson, Sr., was a native of New York and died in Ohio, while the 
maternal grandfather, Nathaniel Marsh, was a native of Vermont and spent his last days in 
the Soldiers' Home at Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He had served throughout the Civil war as a 
soldier in the Union army and he had three sons in the service with him. The father of our 
subject was born in the state of New York in 1830 and after living for a time in Ohio removed 
to Indiana, where he purchased land and carried on farming. In 1866 he took his family 
to Minnesota and became the owner of a farm in Olmsted county, upon which he resided 
for more than a quarter of a century. In the fall of 1892 he arrived in South Dakota and 
engaged in the butchering business at South Shore, while later he turned his attention to 
the grocery trade in the same town. In 1899 he located in Summit, where his remaining 
days were passed. His wife was born in the Green Mountain state in January, 1835, and 
their marriage was celebrated in Ohio. The father passed away in Summit, May 24, 1901, 
while his widow survived until December, 1913. In the various communities in which they 
lived they enjoyed the warm regard of those with whom they came in contact. In politics 
Mr. Willson was active as a stalwart republican and he held a number of township offices. 
To him and his wife were born nine children, of whom seven are living: John Riley, who is 
engaged in the transfer business at Osage, Iowa; G. E., the Watertown, South Dakota, repre- 
sentative of the International Harvester Company and also an auctioneer; Benjamin F.; 
Mrs. G. W. Cram, of Salt Lake City, Utah, whose husband is a railroad man; H. A., who 
is engaged in the real-estate business in Kansas City, Missouri ; C. M., proprietor of a billiard 
Hall at Aberdeen; and G. B., a barber of Watertown. 

Benjamin F. Willson, accompanying his parents to Minnesota when a lad of six years, 
pursued his education in the district schools of Olmsted county and afterward took up the 
occupation of farming, which he followed until 1894. In the meantime he had secured a 
homestead claim in Grant county. South Dakota, in 1881, retaining the ownership of that 
property until 1913. When he put aside the active work of the farm in 1894 he removed 
to South Shore, where he lived a short time, and in 1895 he engaged in the transfer business 
in Osage, Iowa, there remaining until 1898. In that year he went to Austin, Minnesota, 
where for six months he conducted a hotel, and on the 1st of September, 1898, he removed to 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 301 

Summit, South Dakota, where he engaged in the liotel business for sixteen years and one 
month. He was quite successful in that connection and although he reached Summit with 
a capital of but five hundred dollars is now one of the prosperous citizens of his part of the 
state. He has largely retired from active business although he deals to some extent in real 
estate and is the owner of a half section of land in Canada. 

On the 3d of February, 1892, Mr. Willson wedded Miss Ethel Teuney, a native of Wis- 
consin. He belongs to the Masonic fraternity and both he and his wife are connected with 
the Order of the Eastern Star. He is also identified with the Jlodern Woodmen of America 
and liis political allegiance is given to the republican party. He has held all of the town 
offices, the duties of which he has discharged with promptness and fidelity, but whether in 
olHce or out of it he is ever a loyal, public-spii'ited citizen and he has cooperated in many 
movements which have been directly beneficial to his community. 



HANS MARTIN FINNERUD, M. D. 

Dr. Hans Martin Finnerud is a physician and surgeon, who has figured as well in a 
prominent connection with the business life of Watertown. He was born in Norway on the 
33d of May, 1S59, and, there spending his youthful days, acquired an education in the 
public schools of his native country. In ISSO, when a young man of twenty-one years, 
lie came to the United States, first making his way to St. Peter, Minnesota, where he 
found employment in the state insane hospital, a work which proved attractive to him 
inasmuch as he had previously determined upon taking up the study of medicine. This 
gave him opportunity for further investigation along the line of mental and nervous diseases. 
In the fall of 1883 he entered Beloit College at Beloit, Wisconsin, where he pursued a 
scientific course. During his student days there he spent the vacation periods at work in 
the insane hii-|nt:il of S(. Peter and his earnings enabled him to continue his college course. 
He spent time, s^mi- in licloit College and in 1886 went to Chicago, where he matriculated in 
the Halineniaiiii Miilical College, from which he was graduated with tbe class of 1889. His 
first location as a practitioner was at Ashley, North Dakota, where he remained until 
October, 1890. He then removed to Watertown, where he has since been in successful prac- 
tice, and is a well known member of the medical fraternity in eastern South Dakota. He 
lias constantly broadened his knowledge and promoted his efficiency by attending clinics in 
Chicago and has done post-graduate work at various times, thus keeping fully abreast with 
the advancement which has characterized medical science. He is a member of the South 
Dakota State Medical Society and the American Medical Association. 

While prominently connected with the profession. Dr. Finnerud is perhaps equally 
well known in business associations. He was one of the four men who organized the 
Watertown Gas & Light Company and is still serving on its board of directors. He was 
also one of the organizers of the Security National Bank of Watertown and has been vice 
president of the institution since it was established. In 1906 he became one of the prin- 
cipal factors in the organization of the Dakota Life Insurance Company and was the moving 
spirit in the reorganization of the company in 1909, when the charter was changed and the 
business placed on a successful financial basis, so that within the short space of five years 
they have written insurance representing nearly ten million dollars and have a million 
dollars in assets. Dr. Finnerud has served as vice president and medical examiner, in both 
of which capacities he is still acting. 

In June, 1892, Dr. Finnerud was united in marriage to Miss Mary Alice Mclntyre, of 
Watertown, and to them have been born three children, two daughters and a son: Mahren 
Adelaide, the wife of C. D. Johnson, an attorney of Watertown; Clark Wylie, who is attend- 
ing the Wisconsin State University at Madison; and Florence, a student at Oak Hall in 
St. Paul. 

Dr. Finnerud is a representative of the Masonic fraternity, of the Knights of Pythias 
and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He is also a member of the Watertown 
Country Club and of the Commercial Club of Watertown. In politics a republican, he has 
never sought public office, but in 1913 at the earnest solicitation of his friends he accepted 
the nomination for state senator and was elected to that office. At various times he has been 



302 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

called upon to act in different capacities, member of the board of regents, member of the 
board of examining physicians, etc. He has also served for some years as a member of the 
school board, stanchly advocating progressiveness in connection with the system of public 
education. Religiously he is of the Lutheran faith, while his wife is a member of the 
Congregational church. Both are held in high esteem, occupying an enviable position in the 
social circles of the city, and the attractiveness of their home is heightened by their warm- 
hearted hospitality. 



WILLIAil .J. yUIRK. 



William J. (hiirk, postmaster of Kimball, was born in Ireland on tlie 8th of August, 
1873, a son of Patrick and Laticia Quirk, who, in 1880, left the Emerald isle and came to 
the United States, making their way to South Dakota. The father homesteaded land at Elk 
Point and devoted the remainder of his life to farming there. His wife has also gone to her 
last rest. 

William J. Quirk was but seven years of age when the family took up their abode in 
this state and his education was acquired in the district schools. After leaving school he 
turned his attention to railroading and was employed on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. 
Paul Railroad for about fifteen years. At the end of that time he received an appointment 
from President Wilson as postmaster of Kimball and assumed the duties of that office. 
He is prompt and systematic in his performance of the tasks that devolve upon him, and 
the mails are handled with dispatch and accuracy. He is also courteous and is proving 
popular as well as efficient. 

Mr. Quirk is a member of Maher Council, Knights of Columbus, a fact which indicates 
his membership in the Catholic church. His political views coincide with the principles of 
the democratic party which he supports by his ballot. He has thoroughly identified his 
interests with those of his community and is willing to make any sacrifice of time and 
energy to advance the development of Kimball and Brule county. 



JOHN R. THOMPSON, M. D. 



Dr. John R. Thompson was for a number of years successfully engaged in the practice of 
his profession in Northville, South Dakota, but since 1906 has retired therefrom and has 
devoted his entire time to the management of his eigliteen lumdred and eighty acres of land, 
which he rents to others. He was born in Kane county, Illinois, September 13, 18.58, and is 
a son of Thomas J. and Hannah A. (Tucker) Thompson. Both the Thompson and Tucker fam- 
ilies came to this country from England in colonial days. The mother was a descendant of 
John R. Tucker, who was descended from Thomas Dickerman, who located in Massachusetts in 
1635. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Thompson were numbered among the pioneers of the prairie 
state, settling there in 1849, but in 1880 the father and his son, John R., came to South 
Dakota, where they took up land. The father then returned to Kane county, Illinois, and the 
following year brought the other members of the family to this state. He died in April, 1908, 
at the age of seventy-five years, having survived his wife for four years. Her demise occurred 
on the 8th of April, 1904, when she was sixty-five years of age. Both are buried in the 
Northville cemetery. 

Dr. Thompson received his elementary education in the public schools of Burlington, Kane 
county, Illinois, after which he attended Elgin Academy for two years. On leaving that 
institution he entered Bennett Medical College in Chicago and was graduated therefrom in 
1884 with the degree of M. D. He took an additional course in the College of Physicians & 
Surgeons at Chicago and was graduated from that institution in 1885, receiving the degree 
of M. D. from that institution also. He returned to Northville, this state, in that year and 
continued in the practice of his profession until 1906. He was very successful as a physician 
and built up a large and representative practice. He was careful to take into consideration 
all conditions indicated upon making a diagnosis and after once determining the nature of 




DR. .lOUX R. THOiU'SDX 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 305 

the disease his wide medical knowledge enabled him to prescribe the right remedy. He was 
to many ot his patients much more than a physician, being also a valued friend; and the con- 
fidence which he inspired in his professional ability and in his genuine worth was an important 
factor in his success as a physician. In connection with his practce he managed his farms 
and although his holdings were at first limited to a preemption, homestead and tree claim, 
he purchased additional land from time to time until he became the owner of eighteen hun- 
dred acres, which he still owns and which he rents to others. 

Dr. Thompson has been twice married. On May 29, 1887, he wedded Miss Etta M. 
Gregory, a native of Waybridge, Vermont, and a daughter of Leander D. and Eliza Gregory, 
both of whom have passed away and were laid to rest in a cemetery at Reloit. \\'iscoii^in. 
Mrs. Thompson died on March 4, 1907, and was buried at Northville, South Daknt.i. slu- was 
the mother of one daughter, Ketha A., now the wife of James P. Townsend. a traveling; salis- 
man residing at Watertown, this state. They have two children, Etta Adeline and Jlarjiarct 
Catherine. On March 24, 1909, Dr. Thompson was again married, his second union being with 
Miss Luzetta W. Dittes, a daughter of Fred and Mary Dittes, who reside at Mnnticello, 
Minnesota, but formerly lived in Roberts county, this state, where Mrs. Thompson was born. 
The Doctor and his wife have a daughter, Mary Hannah. 

Dr. Thompson is a republican in his political belief and is president of the board of 
education. Since retiring from practice he has also retired from all societies. He has been 
of great service to his community as a physician and as a public-spirited citizen he has 
done much to further many movements looking toward the betterment of the community, 
while as a large landowner he has been instrumental in aiding the agricultural development 
of Spink county. He has improved all of his land with buildings and has also sunk three 
or four artesian wells besides bringing the land itself to a high state of cultivation. His 
life has been a useful one along many lines of endeavor and he is now living retired from 
the cares and responsibilities of active life, rich in the honor and esteem of all who know 



ANDREW JOHNSON. 



Andrew Johnson, who passed away in Hartford township, Minneliaha county, on the 
7th of September, 1913, was an honored pioneer agriculturist of South Dakota who success- 
fully followed farming here for a third of a century, owning three quarter sections of valu- 
able land. His birth occurred in Sweden on the 1st of September, 1846, his parents being 
Gens and Inga Poison, both of whom are deceased. The father was a farmer by occupation. 

Andrew Johnson obtained his education in the common schools of his native land and 
after putting aside his textbooks assisted his father in the work of the home farm. In 1870, 
when a young man of twenty- four years, he crossed the Atlantic to the United States, 
locating in Wisconsin, where he was employed as a farm hand for nine years. On the expir- 
ation of that period, in 1879, he came to Minnehaha county. South Dakota, homesteading a 
quarter section of land in Hartford township and also taking up a timber claim of eighty 
acres which he later sold. He improved his property in excellent manner, erecting all the 
buildings, and conducted agricultural interests successfully throughout the remainder of 
his life. At the time of his demise he owned three quarter sections of land which are now 
being cultivated by his sons, Melvin and Rudolph, who, like their father before them, employ 
the latest improved machinery to facilitate the work of the fields. They also devote con- 
siderable attention to live stock, feeding seventy head of cattle and "one hundred head 
of hogs. 

On the 19th of December, 1883, Jlr. Johnson was united in marriage to Miss Neta 
Person, a daughter of Per and Anna Bcngstson, both of whom are deceased. Mr. and Mrs. 
Johnson became the parents of the following children: Ida, who gave her hand in marriage 
to J. L. .Johnson; Bessie Pauline, who is the wife of Albert Johnson; Anna Nathalia, who 
wedded Ned Hanson; and Ebba Alfreda, Carl Melvin and Ernest Rudolph, all at home. 

Mr. Johnson was a republican in politics and a Lutheran in religious faith. He was a 
stockholder in the Farmers Lumber Company of Crooks and enjoyed enviable recognition 
among the substantial and representative citizens of the community which had known him 
from pioneer times. He experienced all of the hardships and privations which confronted 



306 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

the early settlers who established homes in this state when it was still largely a wild and 
undeveloped region. His death occurred on the Tth of September, 1913, when he had attained 
the age of sixty-seven years, and his remains were interred in the Benton cemetery. His 
life had been upright and honorable in its varied relations and his demise was the occasion 
of deep regret to his many friends. 



FRED LEMAN PADDOCK 



F. L. Paddock, familiarly known as "Tom," has passed the greater part of his life in 
Bon Homme county, where he is now farming in Cleveland precinct. He was born at Lime 
Springs, Howard county, Iowa, March 15, 1868, a son of Charles A. and Sarah (Barnes) Pad- 
dock. The father, a native of Cook couiity, Illinois, was born January 9, 1837, and was a 
scion of old New England stock. His parents, Richard and Nancy (Betts) Paddock, were 
born in Oneida county. New York. Mrs. Sarali (Barnes) Paddock was a daughter of Elisha 
and Sally (Palmer) Barnes. Richard Paddock came west in the early '30s and settled in 
Cook county, Hlinois, when Chicago was a mere village and about 1841 removed there. Five 
years later he emigrated to McHenry county and in 1887 went to Minneapolis, where he 
passed away in 1894, at the advanced age of eighty-seven years. His wife died in McHenry 
county in 1883. 

In 1862 Charles Paddock removed still farther west and settled in Howard county, Iowa, 
finding employment at his trade as a mason around Lime Springs until he came to South 
Dakota in 1873. Loading his worldly possessions into a prairie schooner drawn by oxen, he 
staited in September on a journej' of three hundred miles to his destination in Bon Homme 
county, arriving October 10, 1873, having previously inspected the country and decided 
upon his location. The journey took twenty-four days and was not without its hardships. 
He first filed on a preemption claim, but later changed to a homestead claim, his farm com- 
prising the northwest quarter of section 20, township 94, range 59. As the family arrived 
too late in the fall to build a house Mr. Paddock rented for the winter, but in the spring 
built a small log house, to which he added another room in 1876. Three years later he 
added a half story and replaced the straw and clay roof with shingles, making his residence 
a very comfortable pioneer dwelling. In the early days before his land was producing to its 
fullest extent and when the prices for produce were very low he followed the trades of mason 
and plasterer throughout the winter and thus kept his family supplied with the necessities 
of life. Later he concentrated his attention upon his farming interests, from which he 
derived a gratifying income. He had but fifty cents when he reached Yankton and the 
comfortable competence which he accumulated was the reward of much toil and self-denial 
and the use of good judgment. In 1880 he and his wife united with the Congregational 
church and his political allegiance was given to the republican party. From 1SS5 until 1892 
he served on the state board of agriculture and in that capacity did much to further the 
development of scientific farming in the state. He retired and removed to Oregon in 1899 
where he passed away November 26, 1902, and his wife died in that state March 16, 1900. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Paddock were born ten children, eight of whom survive: Elliott, who is 
engaged in the real-estate business at Pierson, Iowa; James and Willis, who are living in 
Oregon; F. L., of this review; Nellie, living in Oregon; Nena, the wife of Milton TurnbuU, 
of Oregon; Anna, who married William P. Eymer, of Tyndall, South Dakota; and Albert, 
a veterinary surgeon living in Oregon. Emma, who died in 1897, was the wife of I. W. 
Seman, formerly a stockman of Mtchell, South Dakota. Frank A. died in Union, Oregon, in 
I'.IOfi. 

F. L. I'addock was a child of five years when he accompanied his parents on their over- 
land journey from Iowa to Bon Homme county, and well remembers the long trip made in 
covered wagons. He vividly recalls passing through Sioux Falls, which at that time consisted 
of but a few log houses on the banks of the Sioux river. He remained upon the homestead 
until he was twenty-two years of age and acquired his education in the public schools. 
Upon leaving home he went to Iowa and engaged in draying there for three years. At 
Estherville, that state, in connection with a partner, he built a feed shed which they operated 
for a year and then sold at a good profit. Mr. Paddock then turned his attention to the 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 307 

lumber business, being engaged therein in Story county, Iowa, for two years, at the end of 
which time he was compelled to quit because of illness. He went to Oregon to recuperate 
and remained upon the coast for a year, returning, in March, 1903, to the old homestead 
in Bon Homme county. The last eleven years have been passed thereon and he has not 
unly prospered financially but has enjoyed good health in the bracing climate of South 
Dakota. His farm is well improved and in a liigh state of cultivation, producing excellent 
crops annually, from the sale of wliirh Mr. I'iiiMink derives a good income. 

He was married in Story county, iuw;;, l.luuary 9, 1898, to Miss Ma}' Eatherton, a 
daughter of Caleb and Margaret (liunuuglisj ll.itherton, both natives of Ohio. Mrs. Pad- 
dock was born in Jones county, Iowa, and has passed her entire life in the west. By her 
marriage she has become the mother of seven children, namely: Freda, who died in infancy; 
Ruth and Nina, twins; Marie and Mary, twins; and Frederick and Charles. The parents 
belong to the Methodist Episcopal church and take a helpful interest in its activities. 

Mr. Paddock gives his political allegiance to the progressive party, and while living in 
Iowa was a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. In the winter of 1880 and 
1881, the winter of the deep snow, as it is known, a drift over fifteen feet deep formed in 
the young trees surrounding the garden of Mr. Paddock and did not disappear until June, 
the continued seepage keeping the garden so wet that it was necessary to make the garden 
for that season elsewhere. Although the big game had been driven from the country before 
the '70s Mr. Paddock occasionally saw a few antelope, but did not have an opportunity to 
hunt them. His life is typical of the men who have done the greater part in developing the 
state of South Dakota and his salient characteristics have been energy, sound, practical 
judgment, determination and integrity, traits which are universally honored. 



HON. JOHN B. TRIPP. 



Hon. John B. Tnpp, of White Lake, Aurora county, the present representative in the 
!-tate legislature from the fifteenth district, was born in Brooklyn, Connecticut, on the 16th 
of January, 1856, a son of Perry G. and Lydia A. Tripp, both of whom are deceased. The 
father was a farmer by occupation and was known as a man of unquestioned integrity, of 
industry and of enterprise. 

John B. Tripp received an excellent education, attending both the public schools and a 
private academy. In early manhood he taught for a number of winters and subsequently 
worked in a meat market for three years. In 1883, when a young man of twenty-seven, 
he determined to emigrate westward, having heard much of the superior advantages of this 
section of the country. He homesteaded land on section 2, township 102, range 66. He at 
once concentrated his energies upon the cultivation and improvement of hia land and has 
been very successful as a farmer and stock-raiser, now owning a section, which he operates 
with the assistance of his son. Perry G. Tripp. In the early years of his residence in this 
state he worked in the United States Indian service at Rosebud for thirteen years during 
the dry season, first as a teacher and later as superintendent of the boarding school, which 
position he held for four years. He is one of the well-to-do men of his locality and takes just 
pride in the fact that his success is due to his willingness to work, his exercise of sound 
judgment and his habit of thrift. 

On the 14th of February, 1877, Mr. Tripp married Miss Emelina Hill, a daughter of 
Charles Hill. Jlr. and Mrs. Tripp became the parents of the following children; Charles 
Hill, who died when a young man of twenty-six years; John B.; Lydia A.; Mrs. C. Higgle; 
Emma C, who is teaching school; and Perry G., who is associated with his father in the 
operation of the latter's land. Mr. and Mrs. Tripp have five grandchildren. He is a Baptist 
in religious faith, while his wife is a member of the Presbyterian church. 

Mr. Tripp is a republican and has held several positions of trust and honor. He is 
now supervisor of Gales township, and has served acceptably as clerk of the school board, 
while in the fall of 1914 he was elected to represent the fifteenth district In the state 
legislature. He has always taken a keen interest in public affairs and is well informed 
on the issues of the day, while his integrity and public spirit are unquestioned. Fraternally 
he is connected with the Masonic order, belonging to Pilgrim Chapter, No. 32, R. A. M., of 



308 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

Chamberlain, South Dakota. He believes thoroughly in the importance of cooperation among 
larmers and is a stockholder of the Farmers Elevator Company, of which he has been secre- 
tary since its organization. He is indifterent to nothing that concerns the interests of South 
Dakota and it is to such men as he that the state must look for its future advancement 
and progress. He is fond of the oilt-of-doors and finds much pleasure in motoring, fishing 
and hunting. A man of well balanced personality, he does not allow either work or recreation 
to take up an undue amount of his time and he is liberal and broadminded in his views. 
Aurora county has benefited much from liis residunue within its borders and he is one of its 
most valued citizens. 



HON. ROBERT FLOYD KERR. 

Hon. Robert Floyd Kerr, educator, editor and legislator, has left the impress of his indi- 
viduality upon the history of the state along various lines which have marked intellectual 
public progress. He is a native of Indiana, his birth having occurred in Sugar Grove, Tippe 
canoe county, on the 12th of April, 1850, and is today an honored resident of Brookings, 
South Dakota. His father, Andrew J. Kerr, was a native of Franklin county, Ohio, while 
his grandfather, Samuel Kerr, was born in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, and the great-grand- 
father, John Kerr, was the founder of the family in America, having emigrated from the 
north of Ireland during the colonial epoch in the history of this country. He settled in Penn- 
sylvania and subsequently enlisted for service in the colonial army, with which he took part 
in the war of the revolution. The mother of Hon. Robert F. Kerr bore the maiden name of 
Nancy Sayers, and she, too, was descended from Revolutionary stock. Her mother belonged 
to the McMillan family which sent several representatives to the American army at the 
time of thi' war for independence. 

Rolicit F. Kerr acquired his preliminary education in the public schools of Tippecanoe 
county. Inilianii, and at the age of nineteen taught one term of school in Warren county, 
Indiana. He afterward entered Wabash College at Crawfordsville, there continuing his 
studies through one term, after which he taught another term in the school in which he had 
first been employed. In 1872 he matriculated in Asbury College, now known as DePauw 
University, at Greencastle, Indiana, and thereafter continued to teach and attend college at 
intervals, depending upon the teaching to secure the necessary funds in order to enable him to 
meet his college expenses. He was a student at DePauw University during the terms of 1876 
and 1877, completing the classical course and winning the Bachelor of Arts degree upon gradu- 
ation with the class of 1877. Following this he was employed as a teacher in the Kentland 
(Ind.) public schools and in the spring of 1878 was chosen county superintendent of schools in 
, Newton county, Indiana. In April, 1879, he went to Japan, where for eighteen months he was 
employed as a teacher in the provincial school at Hirosald, Japan, and in October, 1880, he 
returned to the United States. During the two succeeding years he served in the engineering 
department on the survey of the route of the Clover Leaf Railroad through Ohio, Indiana and 
Illinois, although he had no knowledge of the details of that business when first employed. In 
nine months he had gained such technical knowledge and skill that he was placed in charge of a 
corps of men. He returned to the educational field in 1883 and through that and the suc- 
ceeding year was assistant principal of the high school of Blair, Nebraska. In 1885 he came 
to Brookings, South Dakota, to accept the principalship of the preparatory department and the 
professorship of history in the State College. This school had been organized but one year 
before and he became one of the effective forces in shaping the educational system of the insti- 
tution with which he was so long to be associated. He served as professor of history and 
economics from 1887 until 1892. In the latter year the college was placed under different 
executive control and Professor Kerr left the school. In 1894 he was elected county super- 
intendent of schools of Brookings, which incumbency he retained until his recall to the South 
Dakota State College in 1899 as principal of the preparatory department and librarian of the 
college, with which he remained until 1905. He received the degree of Master of Arts from 
DePauw University in 1880 and at different periods has done active and important work, 
tliat has furthered public progress or promoted educational advancement. He served as jirivatc 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 311 

secietary to Governor Elrod of South Dakota in 1905 and 1906 and he was editor of tlie 
Minnesota and Dakota Farmer, published at Brookings, from 1907 until Xovrnilirr, 1910. 

Mr. Kerr lias also left the impress of his individuality upon the jHilitioal records of the 
state, for he was a niimber of the South Dakota legislature, from 1911 until 1913. He was 
also one of the lnun.leis in 1901 of the South Dakota State Historical Society, was made a 
member of its hoard ul directors, was subsequently elected its president and has long been a 
liberal contributor of articles concerning South Dakota history to ne\v.-.|ia|.ers, eneyelniiedias 
and historical publications. He is the author of the Block Map and Manual ui S.nitli Dakota 
and along more local lines his activities have been equally pronounced and beiieli.ial. He is 
today secretary of the Brookings Building and Loan Association and is publicity nurn of 
the Brookings Commercial Club. He is likewise manager of the Brookings Chautauqua 
Association. In Masonry he has attained high rank, having not only taken the degrees of 
the blue lodge but also of capitular and chivalric Masonry as a member of the chapter and 
commandery at Brookings. He likewise has membership with El Riad Temple, A. A. 0. N. 
M. S., of Sioux Falls, and with the Beta Theta Pi, a college fraternity. He is active in church 
work and has affiliated with the Methodist Episcopal denomination. It is impossible to 
measure the extent of his influence. While holding to high ideals, his methods have been 
practical and substantial results have been achieved. At all times he has been actuated by 
the spirit of progress and the results that have followed his labors have been of substan- 
tial benefit in shaping the history of the state. 



VINCENT KOFTAN. 



The Koftan family are numbered among those sturdy citizens of South Dakota who claim 
lloliemia as their native land and A'incent Koftan is one of the best known and most highh^ 
esteemed agriculturists of Bon Homme county. He was born in the village of Pustovyette, 
Bohemia, October 27, 1859. He was in his eighth year when he accompanied the other members 
of the family to America in the spring of 1867. His parents were Frank and .Josephine 
(Schwartz) Koftan who, thinking to better their lot in the new world, sailed from Bremen for 
Quebec with their family, and after a voyage of more than two months reached their destina- 
tion. They were held in quarantine on the island for three weeks because of a rash from which 
one (if the children was suffering, and which no doubt was brought about by the poor ship's 
fa;e. From Quebec the family went by way of Chicago to Aspinwall, Nebraska, and there 
the father purchased two teams and filed on land eight miles north of Pawnee City. That 
farm remained the family home for many years, but after his sons, Vincent and Joseph, 
were established in South Dakota Frank Koftan sold his farm in Nebraska and removed with 
the rest of his family to this state, securing a fine farm southeast of Tyndall, which now 
belongs to his son Charles. The father's death occurred on the 25th of April, 1901, in 
Tyndall. to which |ilace he had retired a few years previousljr. His widow survives and 
lives in Tynilall. All of their eight children are living, namely: Vincent; Joseph, residing in 
Kock county. Nebraska; Barbara, the wife of .Tames Benesh, of Bon Homme county; Frank 
and John, who are both farming in Cleveland township, that county; Charles, who is residing 
on the old home ^ilace; .Josephine, the wife of Anthony Fajfar; and Robert, a prominent 
attorney of Green Bay, Wisconsin. 

Vincent Koftan well remembers the long voyage to Quebec and the journey across the 
country to Nebraska. He had attended school but a short time in Bohemia as he was but 
seven years of age when the family emigrated to the new world and at the time that 
they settled in Pawnee county, Nebraska, the schools were somewhat primitive there and 
his education was therefore limited. In the fall of 1SS3. in company with his brother .Josejih. 
he purchased a (piarter section of land in Bon Honime coMiity, this state, as they believed 
that this then new country was destined to become i ].ios|i,ioii-, and populous region. The 
brothers divided their quarter section, Vincent takiu'i the \vc-.t half. Soon afterward they 
built a small farmhouse on .Joseph's tract and there kept bachelors' hall ujitil .Josejih mar- 
ried, after which our subject continued to live with his brother for two or three years. He 
then built a comfortable dwelling for himself of the chalk rock abounding in that section and 
for seven vears not onlv developed his farm, but also did the necessary housework. He 



312 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

still lives upon that place and its splendid condition testifies to his energy and good 
judgment. When Mr. Koftan first began cultivating his farm it was prairie ground upon 
which only grass grew, but one of the first things that he did was to plant a fine grove of 
deciduous trees and many pines and cedars. He has six acres of fine orchard, all of which 
is protected by a heavy windbreak of evergreens and other trees. He has made extensive 
additions to the house, erected a number of farm buildings and otherwise added to the 
value of his property. He owns two hundred acres in the home place and one hundred and 
si.xty acres north of Tyndall and is one of the well-to-do agriculturists of his county. 

Mr. Koftan has considerable inventive genius and has recently patented in the United 
States and some foreign countries, a truck for raising automobiles off their tires. Simplicity, 
ease of operation and cheapness of manufacture are some of the good points of the device, 
which is also so made as to lessen the liability of breakage. 

Mr. Koftan was married three miles west of Tyndall to Miss Eluora Abbott, a daughter 
of William and Sarah A. (Wilman) Abbott, and a native of Dane county, Wisconsin, born 
February 13, 1871. Her father was born in England, and in 1868 emigrated to Wisconsin, 
coming thence to South Dakota in 1875. Mrs. Koftan was in school the day of the great 
blizzard and with the rest of the children remained at the schoolhouse over night. Mr. and 
Mrs. Koftan have two daughters, Belle Violet and Mattie Louise. They and their mother 
arc members of the Christian church and Mr. Koftan is a republican in his political belief. 
He has become thoroughly American and is one of the most esteemed residents of his section 
of the state, where those who know him are his friends. 



HON. PHILO HALL. 



Hon. Philo Hall, one of the foremost members of the bar of eastern South Dakota, has 
been engaged in practice at Brookings for more than a quarter of a century and has also 
been a prominent figure in the public life of the state. As a member of the well known 
law firm of Hall, Alexander & Purdy he has been accorded an enviable and gratifying 
clientage. His birth occurred in Waseca county, Minnesota, on the 31st of December, 1865, 
his parents being Philo and Mary E. (Green) Hall, the former a native of Canada and the 
latter of New York city, ^\^len a young man Philo Hall, Sr., crossed the border into the 
United States and attended school at Kenosha, Wisconsin. Subsequently he removed to 
Waseca county, Minnesota, where he met and married Miss Green, who had accompanied her 
parents on their removal to the Gopher state in girlhood. During the period of the Civil 
war he served for three years with the First Minnesota Infantry, acting as first sergeant 
of his company and making a most creditable military record. After returning from the 
front he embarked in the merchandising business at Wilton and later conducted a similar 
enterprise at Waseca. In 1879 he went to Sioux Falls, South Dakota, and was there suc- 
cessfully engaged in business until his demise, wliich occurred in 1883. His widow, who 
survives, now makes her home in Brookings. 

Philo Hall was reared imder the parental roof and in the acquirement of an education 
attended the public schools of Waseca, Minnesota, and the Baptist College of Sioux Falls. 
Following his graduation he located in Brookings in 1883, there took up the study of law 
in the office of .Judge J. 0. Andrews and was admitted to the bar in 1887. Throughout the 
intervening twenty-eight years to the present time he has remained an active and successful 
representative of the legal profession in Brookings. Gaining merited recognition in political 
and public life, he was first chosen for the office of states attorney and filled the same most 
creditably for two terras. In 1901 he was elected to the state senate of South Dakota, 
remaining a member of that body for one term and ably representing the interests of his 
constituents. In 1902 he was chosen attorney general of South Dakota, holding that impor- 
tant office for two terms or until 1906, when he was elected to congress from his district and 
served for one term. Since its conclusion he has given his undivided attention to his law 
practice and enjoys the distinction of being one of the leading representatives of the pro- 
fession in eastern South Dakota. 

In April, 1890. Mr. Hall was joined in wedlock to Mrs. Mary A. Cooke, of Brookings, by 
whom he has had three children, two of whom survive, as follows: Vivian, who is the 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 313 

wife of Henrj- Shea, assistant professor in chemistry in the South Dakota State College of 
Brookings; and Morell, who is a student in the Brookings high school. 

Mr. Hall's fraternal relations are with the following organizations: Brookings Lodge, 
No. 24, A. F. & A. M.; Brookings Chapter, No. IS, R. A. M.; Brookings Commander}-, K. T.; 
El Riad Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S., of Sioux Falls; Brookings Lodge, No. 40, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows; and the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He is also a valued 
member of the Brookings Commercial Club, and Mrs. Hall belongs to the Baptist church. 
He has wisely used the talents with which nature has endowed him and his record proves 
that he regards a public office as a public trust — and it is a well known fact that no trust 
reposed in him has ever been betrayed in the slightest degree. 



LESLIE G. HILL, M. D., F. A. C. S. 

Dr. Leslie G. Hill, specializing in the treatment of diseases of the eye, ear, nose and 
throat, is today one of the best known representatives of the medical profession in South 
Dakota. He was born in Kenosha, Wisconsin, May 31, 1868, and is a son of Edward and 
Isabelle (Stannard) Hill, both of whom were natives of the state of New York. In early 
life, however, they became residents of Kenosha, Wisconsin, where they were married. The 
lather became a farmer of Mitchell county, Iowa, in 1869, and there carried on general 
agricultural pursuits until 1S94. In 1911 he was called upon to mourn the loss of his 
wite, but he survives at the age of seventy-nine years and now resides in Osage, Mitchell 
county. He has long been an exemplary member and active worker in the Masonic fraternity. 

Dr. Hill was reared amid rural surroundings, with the usual experiences of the farm 
lad. He suppkineiitod a public-school education by study in the Cedar Valley Seminary at 
Osage, Iowa, from which he was graduated with the class of 1887. Two years prior thereto, 
however, he began teaching, being then a youth of seventeen years, and he followed that 
profession for four years, but regarded it merely as an initial step to other professional 
labor, taking up the study of medicine in 1890, reading under the preceptorship of Dr. George 
H. Ripley of Kenosha, Wisconsin, who for some years was a member of the state board of 
health of Wisconsin and one of the foremost representatives of the medical profession there. 
In 1891 Dr. Hill entered the Hahnemann Medical College of Chicago, completing the course 
witli the class of 1895. He then returned home and the first important event following was 
his marriage to Miss Helen St. John of Cedar Falls, Iowa, who is a lady of liberal education, 
being a graduate of the Iowa State Teachers' College. They established their home in 
Sibley, Iowa, where Dr. Hill remained in general practice for five years. He was most 
liberally patronized, building up a practice of extensive proportions, and during that period 
he also served as coroner of the county. 

In 1902 he removed to Chicago in order to enter upon the treatment of diseases of 
the eye, ear, nose and throat. He spent two and a half years in Chicago, Philadelphia and 
New York in his special work and subsequently studied luider Dr. L. Webster Fox of 
Philadelphia, one of the greatest ophthalmologists of the world, then at the head of the 
Medico Cliivuraiial College, from which Dr. Hill received his diploma in June, 1908. How- 
ever, in tlie meantime — 1904 — he had located in Watertown, being the first physician to 
specialize exclusively in treatment of the eye, ear, nose and throat in this section of the 
state. He has kept in touch with the advancement of the times in medical science pertaining 
to his work and each year has pursued post-graduate courses, giving him intimate and 
accurate knowledge of the most modern methods and the latest scientific investigations 
which have to bear upon his particular field. He is a member of the staflf of the new Luther 
Hospital of Watertown, and is oculist for the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway Com- 
pany. He has a license permitting him to practice in seven different states. 

In 1907 Dr. Hill was appointed a member of the state board of medical examiners of 
South Dakota and soon thereafter was elected president of the board, while later he was 
chosen secretary and executive officer. He was also appointed by Governor Vessey a 
member of the national board of reciprocity and examination and his activity in that 
important position led to his advanced ideas on medical registration being adopted, so that 
thev are now in operation in many states. Under Dr. Hill's administration the South 



314 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

Dakota state requirements were advanced to the highest plane of eflrciency. He is a nicm- 
her of the ^Vatertown District Medical Society, the Sioux Valley Medical Society, the Soutli 
Dakota State Medical Society, the Iowa and the Nebraska State Medical Societies and the 
American Medical Association, the last named having elected him a delegate to its national 
lonvention in 1U15. In the same year he was elected to fellowship in the American College 
of Surgeons. 

Dr. and Mrs. Hill have become the parents of three children, Helen Maud, Leslie St. John 
and Dorothy Alice. The family is a prominent one socially in Watcrtown and Dr. Hill is a 
valued member of the ilasonic fraternity, belongs also to the Knights of Pythias and is a 
life member of Watertown Lodge, No. 838, B. P. 0. E. He also belongs to the Watertown 
Country Club and he is president of the board of trustees of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
I'rogress might well be termed the keynote of his character. The spirit of advancement has 
always actuated him and he stands today among the foremost representatives of his pro- 
fession because of his wide study, the thoroughness with which he has mastered the work 
of the profession and his ready and accurate adaptability of his learning to specific needs. 
Witluiut invidious distinction he may be termed one of the eminent specialists of Soutli 



COLONEL MELVIN GRIGSBY. 



Colonel Melvin Grigsby, of Sioux Falls, is recognized as one of the foremost citizens o 
the state of South Dakota. For a number of years he served ably in the important and 
responsible office of attorney general of the state and during the Spanish-American war he 
was colonel of the Third United States Volunteer Cavalry, which he organized and which 
was known as Grigsby's Cowboys. Moreover, it was due to his efforts that the formation 
of a regiment of United States volunteer cavalry was made possible. The initiative which 
he displayed at that time is characteristic of the man and of the west, where he has resided 
throughout his entire life. 

Colonel Grigsby was born in Potosi, Grant county, Wisconsin, June 8, 1845, a son of 
William E. and Rhoda Grigsby. The father was employed in the lead mines near Potosi but 
when his son Melvin was four years old he removed to a farm two miles from the village 
and there the Colonel grew to manhood. His summers were devoted to assisting his father 
with the farm work and during the winters he attended school, which was held in an old 
log house. At the outbreak of the Civil war, although he was but a youth of sixteen, he 
desired to go to the front but his father thought him too young and sent him to school in 
Lancaster, Wisconsin. In the fall of that year Colonel C. C. Washburne went to Lancaster 
to recruit men for the Second Wisconsin Cavalry. This made young Grigsby more anxious 
then ever to join the army and he at length obtained his father's consent to enlist in Com- 
pany C, Second Wisconsin Cavalry, which was recruited at Patch Grove, Grant county, by 
Captain R. R. Woods. The other officers were: Myron W. Woods, first lieutenant; and D. 
C. Riley, second lieutenant, the former of whom subsequently became major and the latter 
captain. Colonel Grigsby was at the front for more than three years and experienced all of 
the hardships of the war. He was captured and was imprisoned at Canton, Mississippi: at 
Cahaba, Alabama; Andersonville, Georgia, where he remained six months; and at Florence, 
South Carolina, from which place he escaped on the 10th of January, 1865, reaching Sher- 
man's army on the 1st of February. He escaped once and was recaptured, but finally suc- 
ceeded in getting away. The story of his escapes, together with his experiences in rebel 
prisons, has been told by himself in a book entitled "The Smoked Yank." 

After the conclusion of the war Colonel Grigsby entered the University of Wisconsin at 
Madison, where he remained for one year, and later became a student in the State Normal 
School at Platteville, from wliich he was graduated in 1869. He was for a year principal 
of the schools of Horicon, Wisconsin, and for a similar period held the office of principal of 
the Darlington, Wisconsin, schools and later was principal of the graded schools of Delavan, 
Wisconsin. In the meantime he had taken up the study of law and he completed his prepara- 
tion for the bar in the office of Pitt Dewey, of Lancaster. In 1872 he was admitted to the 
bar and not long afterward started on horseback to find a promising location for a young 
attorney in the northwest. In .June of that year he arrived in Sioux Falls and, being pleased 



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COLOXEL ilELVIX GRIGSBY 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 317 

with the prospects, decided to locate there. He formed a partnersliip witli R. F. Pettigrew 
for the practice of law and the conduct of a real-estate business and this association was 
continued with mutual pleasure and profit until 1876. In 1877, with George M. Smith, 
Colonel Grigsby established the Dakota Pantagraph at Sioux Falls, which, however, he sold 
in a few months. He and Mr. Smith also started the Bank of Egan at Egan, of which 
Colonel Grigsby was the first president, and the Union Bank at Elk Point, of which he also 
served as the first president. 

The fitness of Colonel Grigsby for public office was early recognized by his fellow citi- 
zens and in 1883 at the first city election of Sioux Falls he was elected alderman from the 
third ward, which oflSce he held for two terms. For one year he was clerk of the courts of 
Minnehaha county and in 1886 at the territorial congressional convention at Watertown he 
received almost enough votes for the nomination. In that same year he was elected to the 
tei'ritorial council and served in that capacity with marked ability. He was a delegate to 
the constitutional convention which met at Sioux Falls and thus had a part in the making 
of the organic law of the state. Until 1894 he supported the republican 'party but as he 
believed in the free coinage of silver he transferred his allegiance to the populist party in 
that year and was nominated for the state senate. Two years later he was the populist 
candidate for attorney general and campaigned the state for Bryan and free silver. He was 
not only elected but received more votes than any other candidate on the populist ticket in 
the state. He proved an efficient and conscientious oflicial and made a record of which he 
has every reason to be proud. In 1913 he was a candidate for the United States senate. 

Colonel Grigsby was serving as attorney general of South Dakota at the time of the 
sinking of the Maine and at once recognized the fact that this was almost certain to lead 
to war with Spain. He was very anxious to raise a regiment but knew that he would not 
be able to secure a commission in a volunteer regiment as Governor Lee, who by virtue of 
his office had the power of appointing all otEcers, was his bitter enemy. As Colonel Grigsby 
was thinking over the situation he saw a number of cowboys galloping up on their horses 
and it flushed upon him that the western cowboys would make unusually eSicient soldiers. 
He at once telegraphed to President McKinley the following message: "The sinking of 
the Maine means war. In that event the cowboys of these western plains will make the 
best soldiers that can be secured on short notice. I tender my services in this connection." 
He watched very carefully the proceedings in congress and when he learned that a law pro- 
viding for the formation of volunteer regiments for service in the Spanish-American war was 
about to be passed he went to Washington. On the night before his arrival in the capital the 
bill passed the house and was sent to the senate committee on military affairs. Colonel 
Grigsby secured a copy of the bill and wrote an amendment which authorized the raising of 
three regiments to be composed of men of special qualifications as to horsemanship and 
marksmanship, to be recruited from the nation at large and the officers thereof to be 
appointed by the president. He interviewed Assistant Secretary of War Micklejohn, who 
said that there was no use of trying to get the amendment added to the bill, and Assistant 
Secretary of the Navy, Theodore Roosevelt, who said that he would be very glad to help 
him get the amendment through but that he was so busy that it was impossible for him to 
do anything at that time. Colonel Grigsby then went to the senate and found that the com- 
mittee on military affairs was in session. He explained the amendment to Senator Warren, 
wlio said that it was a good thing but that it would be impossible for it to be added as the 
committee would report the bill within twenty minutes. Colonel Grigsby, however, finally 
succeeded in getting the amendment called to the attention of the committee and when the bill 
was reported it contained the amendment exactly as it had been written by Colonel Grigsby. 
The bill passed the senate that day and was then sent back to the house, where it was 
passed without objection to the amendment. The following morning it was signed by the 
president and became a law. It was due to this amendment that Leonard Wood was appointed 
colonel and Theodore Roosevelt lieutenant colonel of the First Regiment of the United States 
Volunteer Cavalry, Colonel Torrey colonel of the second regiment and our subject the colonel 
of the third. He at once began to recruit the regiment, which was mustered in on the 19th of 
May and left the next day for Chickamauga, where the training camp was situated. They 
were popularly known as "Grigsby's Cowboys." Colonel Grigsby was very popular with his 
men and by the time that they were called into active service they were a well drilled and 
effective regiment. When they were mustered out he was presented with a beautiful sword 
by the other officers of the command. On the 2d of June Colonel Grigsby was appointed 



318 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

acting brigadier general and placed in charge of the First Cavalry Brigade, First Army Corj^s, 
and during the entire summer he had about thirty-five hundred cavalrymen in training. He 
remained in the service until the 8th of September, 1899, when he was mustered out. When 
Colonel Grigsby became an officer in the United States army Governor Andrew Lee asked for 
his resignation from the office of attorney general of South Dakota, which, however, he 
refused to give. The governor then requested that the United States officials discharge 
Colonel Grigsby from the army, maintaining that he could not legally hold both positions. 
The United States attorney general, however, ruled that the governor of South Dakota had 
nothing to say regarding the United States army and so Colonel Grigsby continued to hold 
both offices. 

Colonel Grigsby was married in March, 1873, at Delavan, Wisconsin, to Miss Fannie L. 
Kingsbury, a sister of Hon. George W. Kingsbury, the author of the "History of Dakota Ter- 
ritory." To this union have been born four children: Sioux K., an attorney of Sioux Falls; 
George B., now mayor of Nome, Alaska; Fannie Lou, of Sioux Falls; and John T., familiarly 
known as "Jack," who is a practicing attorney of Flandreau, South Dakota. 

The three regiments of Rough Riders which served in the Spanish-American war attracted 
a great deal of attention and proved unusually efficient soldiers and Colonel Grigsby takes 
justifiable pride in the fact that it was due to his efl'orts that their formation was poss'ible. 
His service in the Civil war made him a valuable officer and as colonel of the Third Regiment 
of United States Volunteer Cavalry and later as acting brigadier general of the First Cavalry 
Brigade, First Army Corps, he rendered his country invaluable service. For many years ho 
has been prominent in the affairs of the state of South Dakota and is leaving the impress 
of his individuality upon the history of the state. 



OTTO ZELL. 



Otto Zell is the owner of a farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Jefferson township, 
Spink county, and in addition rents and cultivates two hundred and forty acres in that town- 
ship, having thus given his attention uninterruptedly to agricultural pursuits in Spink county 
since 1912. The year in which he attained his majority was the one which witnessed his 
arrival in South Dakota. He removed from Dodge county, Wisconsin, attracted by the 
growing opportunities of the northwest. His birth occurred in Pommern, Germany, Novem- 
ber 24, 1865, his parents being John and Wilhelmina Zell, who were also natives of Germany, 
whence they came to the new world with their family in 1869. They settled first in Wis- 
consin, where the father engaged in farming, and on coming to South Dakota in 1886 he took 
up a homestead, which he developed and improved through the succeeding years to the time 
of his death, which occurred in 1909, when he had reached the ripe old age of seventy-eight 
years. For a considerable period he had survived his wife, who passed away in 1898, the 
remains of both being interred in a cemetery at Warner, South Dakota. 

Otto Zell began his education in the schools of Dodge county, Wisconsin, pursuing his 
studies to the age of fourteen, at which time he started out in life on his own account. His 
youth was therefore largely a period of earnest and unremitting toil. He was employed as 
a farm hand by others until he reached the age of thirty years, and then, wishing to have his 
labors more directly benefit himself, he began farming on rented land in Brown county. He 
carefully saved his earnings until his industry and frugal expenditures brought him a suffi- 
cient capital to enable him to purchase his present property in 1909. He has since carried 
on general farming, and that his methods are practical and progressive is indicated by the 
excellent appearance of his place, on which he has made all the modern improvements. 

On the 28th of June, 1899, at Warner, South Dakota, Mr. Zell was united in marriage 
to Miss Esther B. Roby, a daughter of Milton and Julia Roby, who were pioneer farming 
people of Faulk county. Her father died in 1896 and his remains were interred near Myron 
church, near Faulkton, South Dakota. Her mother lives at Warner. Mr. and Mrs. Zell have 
three children, Clifford F., John L. and Hyacinth Irene, all of whom are attending school. 

Mr. Zell votes with the republican party and its platform finds in him a stanch indorser. 
He holds membership in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and in the Rebekahs, to the 
latter of which Mrs. Zell also belongs. He is likewise a member of the Modern Woodmen of 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 319 

America and the Ancient Order of United Workmen, but these things are but side issues in 
liis life, the main feature of which is farming. He has worked persistently and energetically 
and as the architect of his own fortunes has builded wisely and well. 



STEVE CLAUSEN. 



Steve Clausen, who has been actively engaged in general agricultural pursuits in Minne- 
haha county since jiioiiccr times, is now the owner of a valuable farm embracing four hun- 
dred acres in Tao]ii township. His birth occurred in Norway on the 18th of December, 1859, 
his parents being Halvor and Anna Clausen. On emigrating to the United States they located 
in Fillmore county, Minnesota, where the father followed farming until he came to South 
Dakota and homesteaded a tract of land in Minnehaha county. His family was among the 
first to settle in this section and experienced the grasshopper plague and other hardships of 
the early days. Halvor Clausen passed away in 1894, but his widow is still living. 

Steve Clausen acquired his education in Norway and has devoted his time and energies 
to agriculture since putting aside his textbooks. He came to this state with his father 
in the early days of its history. Prosperity has attended his undertakings as a farmer and 
he is now the owner of four hundred acres of rich and productive land. In the cultivation 
of this property he has won a measure of success that well entitles him to recognition 
among the representative and enterprising citizens of the community. 

In 1888 Mr. Clausen was united in marriage to Miss Sophia Carsrud, who died in 1891. 
Six years later he wedded Miss Louise Johnson, a daughter of John Johnson. He gives 
his political allegiance to the republican party and is a loyal and public-spirited citizen who 
manifests helpful interest in all matters pertaining to the growth and development of this 
state. His religious faith is that of the Lutheran church. In motoring he finds much pleasure 
and needed recreation. During a long residence here he has become widely and favorably 
known, his upright and honorable life commanding for him the respect and confidence of all 
with whom he comes in contact. 



HENRY F. BAKTELT. 



Henry F. Bartelt. a prominent lawyer of Kimball, Brule county, was born on the 23d 
of May, 1882, near Washta, Iowa, of the marriage of Henry and Elizabeth Bartelt. The 
father, who devoted his active years to agricultural pursuits, is now living retired, but the 
mother has passed to the Great Beyond. 

Henry F. Bartelt attended the public schools of Cedar Rapids and Holstein, li.wa, r-rmliiat- 
ing from the Holstein High School in due time. After a clerkship of several years in one 
of the leading law offices of Sioux Falls, South Dakota, he matriculated in tlie State rniver- 
sity of Iowa, at Iowa City, from which he was graduated in 1911, with the LL. B. degree, 
at the head of his class. 

While in law school Mr. Bartelt enjoyed the unique distinction of being the only man 
in the history of the university who had been admitted to the bar of another state and all 
the federal courts prior to graduation. Shortly after his graduation he arrived at Kimball 
and opened an office for the practice of his profession. He has succeeded beyond his expecta- 
tions and is today recognized as one of the leaders of the bar, although he is yet but a young 
man. The wide experience which he has gained both before and after beginning practice, in 
addition to his thorough training in the principles of the law, has helped him forge rapidly to 
the front, and he is building up a reputation as one of the best lawyers of his section of the 
state. 

On the 19tli of July, 1911, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Bartelt and Miss Margaret 
E. Brandt, a daughter of Ludwig and Caroline Brandt, of Sioux Falls. Mr. Bartelt believes 
in the wisdom of the policies of the republican party, and is an ardent supporter of its prin- 
ciples. Although a Lutheran from birth, the local Presbyterian church finds him a constant 
attendant and he takes a commendable interest in its work. Fraternallv he is identified 



320 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

with the Cdd Fellows, belonging both to the subordinate lodge and to the encampment, 
and of the latter is a past chief patriarch. He is also secretary of the local German- 
American Alliance, a branch of the state body of that name. As he is public- spirited to a 
marked degree, it is but natural that he is a member of the Commercial Club, and all of 
the projects of that body for the business and civic growth of Kimball find him an enthus- 
iastic supporter. In the four years in which he has resided in Kimball he has gained the 
unqualified respect of his fellow citizens and he has also made many warm personal friends, 
who value hi:< good opinion most highly. 



WILLIAM BAILEY. 



William Bailey, one of the best known and influential citizens of Wayne township, Min- 
nehaha county, is an agriculturist residing on section 15, where he owns two hundred and 
fourteen acres of land and where he has lived continuously during the past forty-five years. 
He enjoys the distinction of being one of the earliest. settlers of Wayne township. He w.ia 
born in Belfast, Ireland, of Scotch parentage, on the 17th of June, 1846, his parents being 
John and Jane (Johnstone) Bailey, who died on the Emerald isle. 

William Bailey was reared at home, acquiring his education in the public schools of his 
native land. In 1868, when a young man of twenty-two, he crossed the Atlantic to the 
L'nited States and spent two years touring the country in search of a desirable per- 
manent location. In 1870 he came to Minnehaha county, South Dakota, where in June 
of that year he took up land, being among the first to file on a homestead in this immediate 
vicinity. As above stated, he has remained on this property for the past forty-five years 
and is widely and favorably known throughout the community. Mr. Bailey extended the 
boundaries of his farm until at one time it embraced three hundred and twenty acres, but 
now owns only two hundred and fourteen acres. He also owns a fruit ranch of forty acres 
in Texas and spends many of his winters in that state. During the summer of 1910 he 
visited Scotland, England and Ireland, renewing acquaintance with a number of his old 
schoolmates. As an agriculturist he has met with gratifying and well merited success that 
has won him a place among the substantial and representative citizens of his county. 

In 1872 Mr. Bailey was united in marriage to Miss Martha Foster, of Minnehaha county, 
who is a native of Canada. Her parents, Robert and Lilly (Scott) Foster, were born in Scot- 
land and were among the early pioneers of this state. Our subject and his wife have five 
children, as follows: William, an agriculturist residing in Texas; Leslie, who is at home; 
Clifford, also at home; Essie, who gave her hand in marriage to William Foster and resides in 
Texas; and Belle, the wife of Robert Johnson, who is engaged in farming in Minnehaha 
county. 

In his political views Mr. Bailey is a republican, loyally supporting the men and meas- 
ures of that party. He has served as a member of the town board and also on the school 
board for many years past, discharging his official duties in a highly efficient and commend- 
able manner. Fraternally he is identified with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, 
belonging to Sioux Falls Lodge, No. 263. Like his ancestors he is a Presbyterian in religious 
belief but now attends the services of the Methodist Episcopal church, of which his wife is 
a devoted member. Coming to the new world in early manhood, he wisely utilized the oppor- 
tunities here aff'ordcd and has won both prosperity and an honored name. 



MAJOR WILLIAil H. STANLEY. 

Major William H. Stanley, who is treasurer and also quartermaster of the Battle 
Mountain Sanitarium, was born in West Salem, La Crosse county, Wisconsin, September 
27, 1866. Data concerning his parents will be found in the sketch of .John Stanley, which 
appears elsewhere in this work. He obtained his education in the common schools of Wis- 
consin and South Dakota and when about seventeen years of age entered the office of 
tlie Dakota News, a paper publi.=:hed at Watertown by Mr. Mellette, who subsequently became 




■\\ 1 1 I I \ \ I I ; \ 1 1 I \ 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA ;J23 

yovernoi-of the state. Mr. Stanley remained ^vith that paper until its consolidation with the 
( ourier and worked upon the Courier-News, as the paper was then known, for five or six 
months. At the end of that time he returned to Deuel county in the spring of 1886 and 
spent the following summer with his brother John at Hermosa, Custer county, this state. 
In the spring of 18S7 Mr. Stanley returned home and not long afterward accompanied his 
parents to Hot Springs. In the summer of that year he purchased the' interests of Dr. 
Stewart in the Star and a few months later became sole owner of that paper, which he 
conducted for three years, after which he sold it to N. C. Nash, of Canton, and entered 
the Minnekahta Bank. He was with that institution for only a short time, however, as upon 
the organization of the First National Bank of Hot Springs he became its assistant cashier, 
wliich position he held until 1893. After severing his connection with the First National 
Hank he served for two terms as county auditor and then became connected with his brother 
in the conduct of the Hot Springs Star, so continuing until he was appointed secretary of 
the state railroad commission in 1901, with offices at Sioux Falls. He served in that con- 
nection until he w-as appointed treasurer of the Battle Mountain Sanitarium, a national home 
for disabled volunteer soldiers, beginning his duties in that capacity August 16, 1909. Since 
December, 1911, he has also been quartermaster, which is rather unusual, the Battle Moun- 
tain Sanitarium being the only branch of the national home in which the two offices are 
combined. Major Stanley is also associated with his brother in various irrigation projects 
iuul together with C. A. Stewart owns a large irrigated fruit farm on Fall river. He also 
owns land on Cheyenne river which is devoted to farming and grazing. 

Major Stanley was married on the 18th of December, 1889, his bride being Miss Blanche 
Stewart, data concerning whose parents is found in the sketch of Charles A. Stewart. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Stanley has been born a !-:on, Stewart W., whose birth occurred December 29, 
1890. He was given excellent educational advantages and graduated from the engineering 
school of the University of Wisconsin with the class of 1911. He possesses not only a well 
trained mind, but also a splendid physique and he is now a lieutenant in the Coast Artillery 
service, stationed at present at Corregidor Island, near Manilla, Philippine Islands. 

Major Stanley is a member of the Baptist church- and can always be counted upon to 
aid in securing the moral advancement of his community. He is a stanch republican and is 
affiliated with the organization known as the Stalwarts. He served by appointment of 
District Judge Thomas as clerk of the courts of Fall River county and, as previously stated, 
held the position of county auditor, being the incumbent of that office for four years. He 
is affiliated with a number of fraternal ordeis, belonging to the Elks, the Modern Wood- 
men of America, the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Knights of Pythias, and is 
popular in those organizations. He is quite widely known throughout the state, and all 
those who have been brought in contact with him hold him in high respect and esteem, as 
he possesses those qualities of genuine manhood tliat universally command honor. 



FRANK B. LOCKWOOD. 

Frank B. Lockwood, who has been a resident of South Dakota for more than a third 
of a century, was for a number of years actively and successfully identified with agricultural 
interests and is now spending -the evening of life in honorable retirement at Humboldt, 
Minnehaha county. He likewise held public office for a long period and is widely recognized 
as one of the highly respected citizens of his communitj'. His birth occurred in the village 
of Cross River, Westchester county, New York, on the 15th of March, 1839, his parents 
being .John P. and Jane A. (Barnhart) Lockwood, who spent the closing years of their lives 
in Huron county, Ohio. The father, a school teacher by profession, was identified with educa: 
tional interests for many years. 

Frank B. Lockwood was but three vears of age when his parents established their home 
, in Huron county, Ohio-, and it was there that he was reared and acquired a common-school 
education. On attainiiii; his majority he adopted farming as a vocation and was thus en- 
j-aged at the time nf t]„- ..ntl.ivak of the Civil war. In June. 1861, he enlisted as a private 
of Company D, Tw.nty lillh Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and with that command went to the 
licnt, his regiment Ijeing assigned to the Army of West Virginia. In May, 1862. his com- 



324 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

pany was withdrawn from the Twenty-fifth Regiment and organized into tlie Twelfth Ohio 
Independent Battery of Light Artillery, under which command he served until the cessation of 
hostilities between the north and the south. Among the important engagements in which he 
participated were the battles of Cheat Mountain, West Virginia, Summit of Allegheny Moun- 
tain, Cedar Mountain, Murfreesboro, Tennessee, Second Bull Run and Fredericksburg. He 
likewise took part in numerous smaller engagements, and when the country no longer 
needed his services returned to Ohio with a most creditable military record. 

Mr. Lockwood remained in the Buckeye state but a short time, however, removing to 
Moline, Illinois, where he was employed as clerk by a grain firm for one year. Subsequently 
he identified himself with lumber interests, being connected with the business at different 
times at points in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Iowa until 1879. In that year he came to South 
Dakota and located in McCook county, filing on a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres. 
He turned the virgin soil and built a home, remaining on the place until 1884, when he dis- 
posed of his property and purchased a farm of one hundred and sLxty acres in Humboldt 
township, Minnehaha county, near the town of Humboldt. There he carried on agricultural 
pursuits continuously and successfully until 1892, when he put aside the active work of 
the fields and took up his abode in Humboldt. In January, 1893, he was appointed post- 
master of the town, holding that position continuously for thirteen years and making a 
highly commendable record in that connection. He was also elected township clerk in 1893 
and held that office for twenty-two consecutive years. During this period he was appointed 
notary public and for six years served in that capacity. Mr. Lockwood allied himself with 
the republican party soon after its birth and has remained a consistent supporter of its 
principles to the present time. He is a valued member of Joe Hooker Post, No. 10, G. A. K., 
of Sioux Falls. 

On Christmas Day of 1883, at Salem, South Dakota, Mr. Lockwood was united in mar- 
riage to Mrs. Celestia A. (Dodge) Royce, the widow of Daniel D. Royce, of Ohio. She was 
born in Ashtabula county, Ohio, in 1840, and her father, Gilead Dodge, was one of the 
pioneer settlers of that county. Frank B. Lockwood is well known as a man of sterling 
character and has long been numbered among the highly esteemed and honored citizens of 
the community in which he resides. 



MARK A. WILLIS. 

Mark A. Willis, one of the leading business men of Custer and the owner of the 
largest dry-goods store in Custer county, w-as born in Springwater, Livingston countj', New 
York, on the 22d of August, 1867, the ninth in a famil}^ of ten children born to Nelson and 
Mary (Walker) Willis, both likewise natives of Livingston county. The father was a farmer 
by occupation and continued to follow agricultiual pursuits until called to his reward. 

Mark A. Willis attended school in S|niiii;\v;itiT and was also a student at a school in 
Oeneseo, New York, when Dr. William 1. Aliliii' was principal. When about fourteen years 
of age he began working in a printing ullicf and was so employed for about two years, after 
which he w-as engaged in farm work in connection with his brother. It was subsequent to 
that time that he entered the normal school at Geneseo and after leaving that institution he 
began teaching, following that profession for four years in his native state. He then became 
connected with a lumber firm in Rochester, but in 1891 he emigrated westward, making his 
way direct to Custer, South Dakota. He had been elected principal of the city schools and 
assumed his duties on Monday morning, although he had only arrived in the city the evening 
before. He taught the remainder of that year and all of the following year, and then 
turned his attention to the business world, establishing a dry-goods stoie. In the fall of 
1900 he was burned out, but he reopened his store as soon as possible and now carries the 
largest and most complete stock of dry-goods, boots and shoes and men's furnishings in 
Custer county. His patrons come from a wide territory and custom once gained is retained, 
as his policy is not merely to make sales, but rather to sell goods that will give permanent 
satisfaction. He is also a stockholder in the Electric Light & Power Company. 

Mr. Willis was married on the 25th of November, 1892, to Miss Adella Dunn, a native 
of WcM Henrietta, New Y'ork, and a daughter of Hiram and Harriet (Reed) Dunn, both also 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 325 

natives of that county. The father was a farmer and both he and his wife spent their 
entire lives in the Empire state. Mr. and Mrs. Willis have two children: Merle, whose 
birth occurred on the 15th of March, 1900, and who is a high-school student; and Harriet 
Adella, born on the 24th of October, 1909. 

My. Willis is a republican and has been a factor in the direction of public affairs. For 
a number of terms he was president of the town board and is now serving his eighth year 
as a uunnbor of the school board. Altliough not a church member, he attends the Methodist 
Episcopal ehureli and liis inlluence is invariably on the side of right and justice. He is a 
luyal member of the Odd Fellows lodge, in which he has held all of the chairs, and has many 
friends in tliat organization and also among his fellow citizens who are not his brethren in 
that order. He has had much to do with the commercial expansion of Custer and his busi- 
ness ability has gained him the sincere respect of all who have had dealings with him, while 
at the same time he has gained the esteem of the community for his unswerving integrity. 



REV. TIMOTHY J. O'GORMAN. 

Rev. Timothy J. O'Gorman, pastor of St. Margaret's church of Kimball and of Holy 
Trinity ehurcli of Bendon, was born in Ireland on the 4th of June, 1874, a son of John and 
Anna OXJorman, both of whom have been called to their reward. The father was a 
farmer by occupation and was much esteemed m his community. 

Rev. O'Gorman attended the public schools of Ireland in his boyhood and took a thor- 
ough classical course at St. Patrick's College of Carlow, Ireland, after which he entered St. 
John's College at Brooklyn, New York, where he continued his education. His theological study 
was done at St. Vincent's College in Philadelphia and he was ordained at Germantown, Penn- 
sylvania, on the 23d of April, 1903, by Bishop Prendergast. The first three years after his 
ordination Rev. O'Gorman spent in teaching in St. John's College at Brooklyn, but in the 
tall of 1906 he came to South Dakota and was given charge of the mission at Kimball. He 
was stationed there for one year and was then for a short time at Britton, after which he 
went to Henry, where he remained for two years. While there the St. Henry's residence 
was built and paid for in full. In 1906 he returned to Kimball and took charge of St. 
Margaret's parish. The church is one of the oldest in this part of the state as it was 
established as a mission thirty years ago. In the seven years of Father O'Gorman's pastorate 
much good has been accomplished, the church has been strengthened spiritually and its influ- 
ence in the community has increased. Its temporal interests have also been well managed 
and its financial affairs are in splendid condition. He also attends a mission at Bendon, 
which he visits and holds mass on the second and fourth Sundays. 

Father O'Gorman is a member of Creton Council, K. C, and is quite active in the work 
of tliat order, believing that in uniting the men of the Catliolic faith a valuable service is 
performed. Wliile his greatest care is given to the upbuilding of his church and the spiritual 
needs of liis parishioners, he also finds time to do much for the moral advancement of the 
community as a whole and his labors in that regard have won him respect and esteem. 



JOSEPH HENRY BECHTOLD. 

Joseph Henry Bechtold, proprietor of a first class jewelry establishment in Sioux Falls, 
was born in St. Joseph, Minnesota, August 5, 1874. He is a son of John George and Theresa 
(Vogele) Bechtold, the former of whom died in 1900, at the age of seventy-one, and the 
latter in 1910. The father was a native of Baden, Germany, and came to America in 1851. 
He left four sons and three daughters, one of the latter being Sister Paula at St. Joseph's 
Convent, St. .Joseph, Minnesota. 

J.,so|,li IT. Tioclitnld acquirrd his education in the public schools of St. Joseph, Minnesota, 
and hil.i :il(iiiJ,d St. .I.ilni's I iiixcrsity at Collegeville, Minnesota, graduating from the 
c(Jiiiniri( iai (i( |i:ii tiiieiit in l.^'.i:.'. In the fall of that year he entered a jeweler's store in St. 
Cloud. .Minnesota, starting at a dollar and a half per week in order to learn the trade. 



326 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

At the end of four and one-half years he moved to Duluth, Minnesota, and followed the 
jeweler's trade there for three years, after which he came to Sioux Falls and bought the 
jew^elry business with which he has since been identified. He is recognized as a man ot 
integrity and honor, and his straightforward business methods have gained him the confidence 
of the public. 

Aside from his jewelry business Mr. Bechtold has built up an optical business by far 
the largest in the Dakotas, his store being the first and only exclusive optical store in this 
state. He may rightfully be called the father of optometry in South Dakota, as it was 
he who called together the opticians and optometrists of the state. The first meeting was 
held in Sioux Falls in October, 1903. Mr. Bechtold called the meeting to order and nomi- 
nated his former partner, W. H. Fritz, as the first president of the South Dakota Association 
of Optometrists, which was then formed. Mr. Bechtold has been affiliated with the asso- 
ciation ever since, and in 1911 served as its secretary. In that year the first determined 
effort was made to have enacted an optometry law requiring all persons wishing to practice 
optometry to pass an examination before the state board of examiners. On account of the 
demands made upon him by his steadily growing business Mr. Bechtold was forced to resign 
bis position as secretary of the association, but continued to work for the passage of the 
law. Eventually Senator Cone, of Sioux Falls, succeeded in bringing about the enactment 
of the bill into a law and Mr. Bechtold was jubilant when he received word that it had 
passed and had received tlie governor's signature. 

On the 17th of October, 1901. at Duluth, Minnesota, Mr. Bechtold was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Mary Gertrude Nolan and they have become the parents of six children: Leo 
Vincent, Oswald John George, Mary Theresa, Ursula Marcel, Urban Ignatius and Paul 
Benedict. 

Mr. Bechtold is a member of the Roman Catholic church and is connected fraternally 
with the Knights of Columbus. Those who know him recognize in him many sterling traits 
of character and his business ability is such as will undoubtedly win for him further 
success with the passing years. Believing that every man shduld have a hobby, his is the 
weather and he keeps an accurate record thereof for the government, having been appointed 
voluntary observer November 1, 1908, and special observer in April 1913. 



THEODORE 0. TORBERSON. 



Theodore 0. Torberson is a prominent and well known citizen of Lincoln county, resid- 
ing at Canton. He is numbered among the worthy native sons of South Dakota, his birth 
having occurred in Canton township, Lincoln county, on the 23d of March, 1874, his parents 
being Ole and Svanoug Torberson, natives of Norway. They emigrated to the United States 
in young manhood and young womanhood, the former making the- voyage in 1869 and the 
latter in 1870. Ole Torberson located in Oskaloosa, Iowa, and the lady who later became 
his wife took up her abode in Stoughton, Wisconsin. Their marriage was celebrated in Lin- 
coln county. South Dakota, in 1873. Mr. Torberson filed on a homestead in Canton town- 
ship, that county, and resided thereon throughout the remainder of his life, passing away on 
the 10th of August, 1908. His widow still survives. 

Theodore 0. Torberson was reared under the parental roof and in the acquirement ot an 
education attended the rural schools of Lincoln county. On attaining his majority he began 
farming for himself, renting a quarter section of land near the homestead which he cultivated 
in company with his brothers. During the years 1S96, 1898, 1900 and 1903 he taught in 
the district schools, and in the alternating years remained at home in order that his brothers 
might attend school. In 1902 he bought his first tract of land, in association with his 
brother, Bernard, with whom he farmed in partnership for some years. Subsequently they 
divided their interests and in 1908 our subject bought the farm of two hundred and forty 
acres w^hich he now owns and which is located in the southwestern corner of Canton township 
and adjoins the home place, one of the finest farms in Lincoln county. Mr. Torberson has 
never lived on that farm but resided within a half mile of that section until 1911, when he 
took up his abode in Canton to assume the duties of the county auditor's office, to which he 
had been chosen in the November election of 1910, and to which he was reelected in 1912. He 




THEODORE 0. TORBERSOX 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 329 

pioveJ an efficient and conscientious official. He is a republican in politics and has been 
an active worker in the interests of the party since attaining his majority. 

Mr. Torberson was married September 2, 1914, to Matilda, a daughter of Peter and 
Marie Kjerstad, natives of Norway, who emigrated to America and are now residing in 
Cantcm, South Dakota. Mr. Torberson has fraternal relations with the following organiza- 
tions: Centennial Lodge, No. 10, I. 0. 0. F., of Canton, and its auxiliary — Columbia Lodge, 
Ne. 17; and Homestead No. 307 of the American Brotherhood of Yeomen at Canton. He is 
also a popular member of the Commercial Club at Canton, and in the community where his 
entire life has been spent enjoys an enviable reputation as a leading, enterprising and pro- 
gressive citizen. 



JOHN A. COLE. 

John A. Cole, a farmer of Bon Homme county, was born April 1, 1874, in that county, 
a son of Thomas and Anna (Carroll) Cole. The latter was born in Castlereagh, County 
Roscommon, Ireland, and was a daughter of John and Nellie (Finan) Carroll, the former of 
whom passed away on the Emerald isle. Tlie latter emigrated to America and passed away 
in Iowa. Anna Carroll, emigrated to America at the same time and for a time made her 
home with an uncle in Wisconsin, subsequently residing in St. Louis with another uncle. 
She was married to Thomas Cole in April, 1869, and now resides on the oid home farm with 
her son Ben. Mr. Cole was one of four brothers, Bartholomew, Thomas, Barney and Timothy, 
who, togetlier with their sister, the venerable Mrs. Cogan, played such a large part in the 
development of Bon Homme county. Their parents were Bernard and Catherine Ann (Mc- 
Cormacki Cole, natives of County Roscommon, Ireland, whence they emigrated to America 
and resiiUd for a time in Newark, New Jersey, where the death of the father occurred. 
Tlic nicither came west with her sons, Thomas and Timothy, and her daugliier, the other 
two sons having previously arrived in South Dakota. They had come west, expecting to 
make tlicir home with a bachelor uncle who had been- a soldier in the Mexican war, but 
owing to the severity of the latter's discipline, both ran away and Barney, who was then 
eight years of age, did not rejoin the familj' until he w-as a lad of sixteen. Mrs. Cole came 
west with her other children in order to find her two lost boys and lived for a time in Milwau- 
kee and other Wisconsin towns and in Dubuque, Iowa, but finally took up her residence on a 
farm a few miles from Clarksville, in Pike county, Missouri, where the family was reunited. 
For many j-ears Thomas Cole was his mother's mainstay upon the farm, as the other three 
boys were soldiers in the Union army. Thomas was drafted but as he was better able to 
carry on the farm work than Barney and as the latter was eager to enlist he went in his 
brother's place. 

Thomas Cole learned the hatter's trade in Newark but after removing to the west 
devoted his attention to farming, filing on a homestead two miles north and two miles west 
of old Bon Homme. Later he purchased a farm in Cleveland precinct, which was his home 
at the time of his death. To him and his wife were born nine children: Nellie, the wife 
of William McMahon, now living near Parkston, South Dakota; Kate, who married Edward 
Hoey, who is living near Wagner, this state; Bernard, who died when nine months of age; 
John A., of this review; Thomas Jr., who lives near Wagner; Ben, who is at home upon the 
farm with his mother; Mary, who died when nineteen years of age; Susan, who died at the 
age of five years; and Bartholomew, now of Gouward, Alberta, Canada. 

Jolin A. Cole remained under the parental roof until he attained his majority, when he 
honu'steaded in Charles Mix county, living on his land long enough to receive his patent. 
Returning to Bon Homme county, he rented the home farm until 1912, when he purchased 
his present place, which is the western half of section 15, in Cleveland precinct. There are 
good substantial buildings, extensive groves and a fine orchard on the place which is well 
stocked and is being developed into one of the best farms in the county. 

Mr. Cole was married January 19, 1909, to Miss Mary Benesh, a native of Bon Homme 
county and a daughter of James and Barbara (Koftan) Benesh. both of whom were born in 
Bohemia. In the spring of 1871 Mr. Benesh sailed from Hamburg to America, the voyage 
lasting seventeen days. He made his way to Chicago and worked there for a year and a half. 



330 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

being in that city at the time of the great fire in October, 1871. In the following year he 
removed to Pawnee county, Nebraska, joining a colony of his fellow countrymen and working 
at farm labor for nine years. He saved his money and purchased a farm and subsequently 
he removed to Bon Homme county and bought land north of Bon Homme church, still later 
becoming the owner of the farm he now occupies in Springfield precinct. Mrs. Cole is the 
seventh in a family of ten children and by her marriage has become the mother of four 
sons: Cletus, Fuman, Vitalis and Nester. 

Mr. Cole was at school with his brothers and sisters on the day of the great blizzard in 
1888 but succeeded with his brother Thomas in reaching home, going more than a mile 
without a fence to guide them. His younger brothers and sisters remained over night at a 
neighbor's house. Mr. Cole is a democrat and belongs to the Catholic church, as do his 
family. He is a man of considerable influence in his locality and has a high place in the 
esteem of his fellowmen, who know him to be able, determined and energetic, and he also 
has the sincere and unstinted liking of those who know him and who call him familiarly by 
his boyhood name, Johnnie. His life has been a successful one, not only in the accumulation 
of wealth but also in gaining honor and regard. 



CARL EATON FELLOWS. 



Carl Eaton Fellows, a druggist of White Lake, Aurora county, is a native of the state, 
born at Plankinton on the 19th of August, 1889, a son of Hubbard F. and Hattie B. Fellows, 
the former one of the most prominent attorneys of South Dakota. 

Carl E. Fellows was educated in the public schools and was graduated from the high 
school in Plankinton. He then entered Brookings College and was graduated from the 
school of pharmacy on the 4th of June, 1911. He worked in Plankinton in the" employ of 
W. J. Chevalier until the 1st of November, 1911, when he removed to White Lake and 
opened a drug store of his own. It is fully equipped and in addition to carrying a large 
stock of pure drugs he handles a complete line of druggists' sundries. He has already gained 
a place among the prominent business men of the town and has built up a good trade in 
his line. 

Mr. Fellows is a democrat and is stanch in his support of the principles and candidates of 
that party. His religious belief is that of the Presbyterian church, of which he is a member. 
Fraternally he is a Mason and an Elk. He is a valued addition to the citizenship of the 
town and is contributing to the development of his community not only along business lines 
but along those things that have to do with civic and moral 



DENNIS J. DELANEY. 



Dennis J. Delauey, the efficient postmaster of Custer, was born in Chicago, Illinois, 
on the 25th of March, 1868, a son of Martin H. and Ann (Delaney) Delaney, natives, 
respectively, of Kings county and Queens county, Ireland. They were, married at Cincin- 
nati, Ohio, and the father followed the carpenter's trade in that city until after the Civil 
war. They then removed to Chicago and he continued to work at his trade until after the 
great fire of 1871. As his health was impaired from overwork in the rebuilding of the 
city he returned to Ireland and was living there at the time of his demise, which occurred in 
1875. His widow survived until 1895. 

Dennis J. Delaney, the second in a family of three children, attended the Sacred Heart 
school of Chicago and the night school of the Bryant &, Stratton Business College. Wlien 
about eleven years old he began workmg for others in Chicago and for one year was with 
the N. K. Fairbank Company, after which he engaged in the printing business as an employe 
of Jamison & Morse, who did book and job work. He was in the printing business for about 
seven years and then became cashier and bookkeeper for the Keeley Brewing Company. 
After ten years spent in that capacity he became a traveling salesman for the Charles I'. 
Kellogg Company, a clothing house of Chicago, and was later in the employ of Crouse & 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 331 

Braiidegee. He traveled for about six years and then entered the retail clothing business in 
Rapid City, Soutli Dakota, in connection with Lathrop & Reeves. After two years, however, 
lie returned to the road and covered a number of the western states, including Montana, 
Jdalio and Wyoming as a clothing salesman with headquarters at Chicago. On removing to 
Custer, South Dakota, he was employed as a clerk by a Mr. Willis for about six years, or 
until appointed postmaster. He is a courteous and accomodating official, accurate and 
systematic in handling the mails, and his record as a postmaster is a very creditable one. 
He owns business property in Custer and is a substantial resident of that city. 

Mr. Delaney was married, in July, 1911, to Mrs. Frances McLaughlin, who was born 
at Center Point, Iowa, of the marriage of James B. and Martha J. Burns. Both her father 
and mother have passed away. Her first husband was T. P. McLaughlin and they were 
the parents of a daughter, Elizabeth B., who makes her home with her mother and 
stepfather. 

Mr. Delaney is a democrat and has served upon the town board of Custer for three 
years. In 1900 he was nominated upon the democratic ticket for county auditor but as 
Custer county is one of the strongest republican counties in the state it was a foregone 
conclusion that the democratic ticket would lose and its candidates were hardly considered 
worth paj'ing any attention to. However, when the votes were counted to the surprise of all, 
Mr. Delaney, the democratic candidate for auditor, was defeated by but seventy-three votes, 
although his opponent was one of the strongest republicans in the county, the heavy vote 
which Mr. Delaney polled being a tribute to his personal popularity and the confidence that 
people have in his integrity and ability. In 1913 he was appointed postmaster and in the 
discharge of his duties lie has earned the commendation of his fellow citizens. His religious 
faith ia that of the Roman Catholic church and he can always be counted upon to further 
movements seeking the moral betterment of his community. He is a man of great energy 
and has the vitality and power of endurance of a man ten or fifteen years his junior. He 
lias not only prospered in his individual affairs but has also been a factor in the advance- 
ment of Custer and his personality has enabled him to make and retain a host of warm 
friends. 



F. S. BROWN. 



F. S. Brown is the efficient cashier of the State Bank of Doland, which position he has 
occupied since 1898. However, for a much longer period he has been a resident of South 
Dakota, having arrived in the spring of 1883, at which time he left his old home in Sauk 
county, Wisconsin, where he was born on the 12th of June, 1857. He is a son of Jabez and 
Sarah (Van Dorflinger) Brown, the former a pioneer settler of Sauk county, in the improve- 
ment and material development of which he took an active interest. In addition to tilling 
the soil and successfully carrying on farming pursuits he also engaged in teaching school 
and was a prominent factor in the educational progress of the community. He died in 1902, 
at the age of seventy-eight years, having for only a few months survived his wife. They 
were laid to rest side by side in a cemetery at Madison, Wisconsin. 

F. S. Brown pursued a public- school education and afterward attended Ripon College 
of Wisconsin, continuing his studies to the age of twenty-one years. He afterward took up 
the profession of teaching, which he followed in various rural and town schools of Wis- 
consin for five years. On the expiration of that period he came to South Dakota, thinking 
that in the new and growing territory good opportunities were offered for advancement. 
He first became agent for a grain elevator company at Doland and while in that employ 
became thoroughly familiar with the trade and its opportunities. Accordingly from 1890 
until 1898 he engaged in buying grain on his own account and then turned his attention to 
the banking business, entering the State Bank of Doland, of which he is the cashier and 
one of the directors. Through this connection he is recognized as one of the leading business 
men of the town and he was also one of the organizers of the Doland Electric Company, of 
which he is now the treasurer. 

On the 29th of June, 1881, at North Freedom, Wisconsin, Mr. Brown was united in 
marriage to Miss Agnes Dickey, her parents being John and Agnes Dickey, the former of 
Scotch descent and a pioneer settler of Wisconsin. Our subject and his wife have two 



332 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

cliildren: Paul L., who acts as assistant cashier of the State Bank of Doland; and Donald 
C, who is employed as bookkeeper in the Merchants Bank at Redfield, South Dakota. 

Mr. Brown exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and measures of the 
republican party and has held the office of president of the board of education for ten 
years and has served on the board for a much longer period. He was instrumental in 
erecting the school building at Doland and he is a trustee of the Dakota Wesleyan University 
at Mitchell. The cause of education has ever found in him a stalwart champion and his 
efforts along that line have been beneficial and farreaching. Fraternally he is connected 
with the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He made no mistake in choosing Spink county 
as a place of residence, for there he found good opportunities and has steadily worked his 
way upward, his efforts proving an element in the county's growth and advancement as 
well as a source of individual success. 



OLE HAXSON". 



Ole Hanson, an agriculturist living on section 14, Burk township, has been a resident 
of Minnehaha count}' for the past four decades and still owns four hundred acres of valuable 
and pioductive land. His birth occurred in Norway on the 27th of September, 1848, his 
parents being Hans Thompson and Nellie Olson, who spent their entire lives in that 
country. The father was a seafaring man and for many years acted as a pilot. He died 
at sea while at his post of duty. 

Ole Hanson was reared to manhood under the parental roof and obtained his education 
in tlie common schools. In 1871, when a young man of twenty-three years, he crossed the 
Atlantic to the United States and took up his abode in Winneshiek county, Iowa. Three 
years later, in 1874, he came to South Dakota and filed on a homestead and a timber claim. 
He then returned to Iowa and in the spring of ISTS brought his family to the new home 
in South Dakota. Throughout the intervening years to the present time he has devoted his 
attention to agricultural pursuits with excellent results and still owns four hundred acres 
of rich and productive land. He deeded one hundred and sixty acres to his sons. 

In October, 1873, Mr. Hanson was united in marriage to Miss Annie Larson, of Winne-. 
shiek county, Iowa. She is a native of Norway and accompanied her parents on their emi- 
gration to the new world in 1866. By her marriage she has become the mother of eleven 
children, nine of whom survive, namely: Henry 0., who follows farming in Burk township, 
Minnehaha county; Lewis 0., an agriculturist residing in Saskatchewan, Canada; Albert ()., 
a farmer living in Burk township, Minnehaha county; Severin 0. and Thomas O., who assist 
their father in the operation of the home farm; Nellie, at home; Hannah 0., who is the 
widow of E. S. Pierce and resides in Sioux Falls; Lena, who gave hef hand in marriage to 
Joseph Hanson, of Sioux Falls; and Minnie, who married Leo Moore, of Sioux Falls. 

In his political views Mr. Hanson is a progressive republican. For the past six years 
he has served as township treasurer of Burk township, making a creditable and commendable 
record in that connection. His religious faith is indicated by his membership in the United 
Lutheran church, to which his wife and cliildren also belong. The hope that led him to 
leave his native land and seek a home in the new world has been more than realized, for 
here he found the opportunities which he sought and in their wise utilization has won and 
maintained a place among the substantial and esteemed citizens of his community. 



IRVIN SIMMONS. 



Among the many progressive and successful farmers in Spink county is Irvin Simmons, 
who owns three hundred and twenty acres of land on section 15, Beotia township, and is 
recognized as one of the most up-to-date and most prosperous of them all. He is thoroughly 
identified with its interests, having lived there for over three decades and having done nimh 
in that time to aid in its agricultural development. 

Mr. Simmons was born near Middleton, Dane county, Wisconsin, on the 2Sth of May, 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 335 

1853, and is a son of Jeremiah and Almira (Bulloelc) Simmons, lioth ot wliom were natives 
of New York state. Previous to coming to Wisconsin tlie fatlier was a factory worlier, but 
after removing to that state, in 1848, he devoted his time to farming. He went to Wis- 
consin by way of the Erie canal to Buffalo, thence by steamboat to Milwaukee and from 
that point by ox team to Middleton. He remained a resident of the Badger state until 1881, 
but then came to South Dakota, settling near the James river in Spink county. Ten years 
after locating here he passed away, but his wife survived until 1910. Both are buried in 
the town of Springfield, Wisconsin. On the paternal side our subject is of Dutch descent, 
but his maternal ancestors were of English and Scotch extraction, but all came to this country 
lung before the Revolution. 

Irvin Simmons was educated in Wisconsin and after leaving school assisted his father 
in the work of the farm until he was a young man of twenty-four years. He then bought 
land and operated it for a time, but subsequently sold, after which he came to South Dakota. 
Upon his arrival in this state he settled upon prairie land and immediately began its improve- 
ment. He has brought it to a high state of cultivation and has made many improvements 
thereon. Everything is kept in excellent repair and the appearance of the place indicates 
the enterprise and good management of its owner. He does mixed farming and in addition 
to raising grain keeps considerable stock. He derives a gratifying income from his own 
farm and also operates three hundred acres of rented land, which increases his profits 
materially. 

Mr. Simmons was united in marriage in Springfield, Wisconsin, on the 10th of June, 1877, 
to Miss Emily J. Slark, a daughter of Abraham and Orpha (Huntington) Slark, who were 
early settlers of Wisconsin and natives of England and Canada, respectively. The father is 
now a resident of Hudson, Wisconsin, but the mother has passed away and was buried at 
Tyndall, South Dakota. 

Mr. and Mrs. Simmons are the parents of ten children, namely: William, who died April 
26, 1891, and was buried in the Conde cemetery; Boyd, who was born in 1885 and died in 
December, 1903, interment being made in Conde; Gordon, a farmer of Tetouke township; 
Harvey, a well driller, living in North Dakota; Frank, Charles and Ray, who are assisting 
their father; Gladys, a graduate of the Conde high school and now a school teacher; Elmer, 
assisting his father; and Mabel, attending school. 

Mr. Simmons is independent in politics and votes for the man rather than for the party. 
He and his wife are well known throughout Spink county and are held in respect and honor, 
as their lives have always conformed to the highest standards of moralitv. 



ARTHUR ROLLAND SCHLOSSER. 

The South Dakota Training School takes high rank among the state institutions for 
the education and moral development of delinquent children and much of the credit for its 
standing is due to the efficient superintendent, Arthur Rolland Schlosser, who was born in 
Lodi, Wisconsin, on the 30th of June, 1880, a son of George and Helen (Chandler) Schlosser. 
In 1881 the family removed to this state, locating at Blunt, Hughes county, where the 
father conducted the Blunt Advocate until 1889. In that year he removed with his family 
to Aberdeen, which remained his place of residence until 1896, when the family went to Sioux 
Falls. There he again engaged in newspaper work. 

Arthur Rolland Schlosser received a high school education and at the time of the 
Spanish-American war enlisted in the First South Dakota Volunteer Infantry and for a year 
and a half followed the colors in the Philippines, assisting in putting down the insurrection of 
the natives. He held the rank of first sergeant of Company B and proved a valiant soldier. 
Upon his return to the States he worked at various things until 1901, when he came to the 
South Dakota Training School in the capacity of assistant superintendent. He applied 
himself diligently mastering the duties of his new position and proved so efficient that in 
April, 1911. he was elected superintendent, succeeding Mr. Young. He has a good intellectual 
grasp of the problems that confront the school and is expert in devising methods to meet 
its particular needs, while his understanding of the children for whom the school is con- 
(hioti'd is a large factor in his success as superintendent. However, the discipline of the 



336 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

school is excellent and does much toward developing a real respect for law and order. Jlr. 
Schlosser has the sincere regard and hearty cooperation of the other officials of the insti- 
tution who number twenty-one. There are five teachers in the school of letters and music 
alone. "The childi-en are required to attend school as long as they are in the institution and 
are given the benefits of an excellent common and high school course. The girls, of whom 
there are thii'ty-two, are also taught vocal and instrumental music, are trained in every 
phase of housekeeping and are likewise taught sewing. It is hoped that a vocational depart- 
ment can soon be provided, in which they can also learn a trade. There are ninety-two 
boys and they are employed in operating the eight liundred acre farm and in raising live 
stock. As soon as possible trade departments will be established and the boys given an 
opportunity to learn another occupation as well as farming. The school supports a first 
class band, has a moving picture machine and provides other amusements for the children, 
realizing the value of wholesome recreation in their development. The boys and girls are 
committed to the care of the institution by the courts of the state and remain in the school 
until twenty-one years of age unless sooner discharged by proper authority. By a ruling 
of the Board of Charities and Corrections they are required to remain at the institution for 
one year before an application for a parole or release will be passed upon, and then it is 
necessary that their conduct while in the institution should have been satisfactory and 
that proper arrangements be made for their future care, training and employment. The 
children leaving the institution before twenty-one are under the care of the state parole 
officer until given their final discharge. The institution has fully justified itself by its 
results and there are many men and women in all walks of life who are useful and honored 
citizens of their communities who have succeeded primarily because of the training that 
they received at the school of which Mr. Schlosser is now superintendent. It is located on 
eight hundred acres of the best Aurora county land and was established by the territorial 
legislature of 1885. The first building was completed in 1887 and on the 10th of November, 
1888, the first child was admitted. In 1899 the girls' building was erected. Since its estab- 
lishment the institution has cared for seven hundred and seventy boys and two hundred 
and two girls and its present enrollment of ninety boys and thirty-two girls is the largest 
in its history. 

Mr. Schlosser was married on the :id of March, 1903, to Miss Edna McGarraugh, a 
daughter of J. T. and Nancy (Howard) McOarraugh. To Mr. and Mrs. Schlosser have been 
born a son and daughter, George and Margaret. Mr. Schlosser is a republican in politics, 
in religion is a member of the Congregational church and fraternally is identified with the 
Masonic order, being a thirty-second degree Scottish Rite Mason and a member of the 
Mystic Shrine at Sioux Falls. He takes the greatest interest in his duties as superintendent 
of" the South Dakota Training School, is always seeking to make its work more elTective 
along some line, and at all times places the welfare of the sciiool above all other interests. 



LEW E. FOSS. 



L. E. Foss, cashier of the Citizens State Bank at Henry, is one of the prosperous busi- 
ness men of the town. He was born in Sogndal, Sogn, Norway, September 23, 1872, a son 
of Erick and Mary Foss, both of whom passed away in the land of the midnight sun. He 
was reared at home, attended the public schools in his pursuit of an education, and was also 
a student in a college located in his home town. When not attending to school duties, he 
was working for his father on the farm so that he early learned the duties and tasks of the 
farmer. In 1890, when but eighteen years of age, he left Norway and come to the United 
States, joining his brother who was living at Vienna, Clark county, South Dakota. He went 
to work on the section, being so engaged in the summer and attending school during the 
winter months. In this way he learned the English language and so fitted himself for a 
successful career in this country. Subsequently lie attended business college in Watertown, 
as he wished to familiarize himself with business procedure here, and after completing tlie 
course he secured a position as clerk in a store in Vienna. Subsequently he worked in his 
brother's store in Clark, but about 1899 left there and went to Henry, South Dakota, in order 
to learn the lumber business. For the next five years he was employed in yards of the 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 337 

Hays-Lucas Lumber Company, but in 1905, seeing that another bank was needed in Henry, 
he organized the Citizens State Bank and on the 12th of September of that year the new 
institution opened its doors to the public. He was made cashier of the bank and has since 
continued in that capacity, proving an able financier and displaying excellent judgment in 
the investment of the bank's funds and in the placing of credit. 

Mr. Foss was married to Miss Gertrude Kvam, a native of Norway, and to this union 
two children have been born, of whom one, Noel, whose natal day was September 14, 1905, 
survives. The father is a republican in politics and fraternally is a member of the Odd 
Fellows, Knights of Pythias, and of the Modern Woodmen of America. He and his wife are 
both members of the Lutheran church and exemplify in their lives the teachings of that 
historic faith. Mr. Foss has thoroughly identified himself with the institutions of his 
adopted country and has proven himself a valuable citizen of South Dakota. He is very 
ajipreciative of the opportunities in America and thinks that what he has done can be 
duplicated by any one if he is determined to succeed. He has many friends in Codington 
and Clark counties, where he is recognized not only as an efficient business man, but as a 
man of attractive personality and sterling qualities of character. 



JOHN FRIDKICH. 



John Fridrich, a well known and successful farmer of Cleveland precinct, Bon Homme 
county, was born in the village of Zamnel, Cech, a son of John and Anna (Novotne) Frid- 
rich, the latter of whom died in Cech. The former came to America in his old age and filed 
on a homestead west of Tabor, which, however, he was not permitted to enjoy long, as he died 
a few years after coming to the United States. 

John Fridrich of this review remained in his native village attending school and learn- 
ing the blacksmith trade until he was nineteen years of age and then embarked at Bremen 
for the new world, taking passage in a full rigged sailing vessel. After a stormy voyage of 
seven weeks he landed at New York, but almost immediately made his way across the 
country to Iowa, where for two years he was employed at blacksmithing in a German colony 
at Homestead, Iowa county. He then came to Dakota territory and secured a quarter sec- 
tion of land three miles west of Tabor, this state. He bought additional land from time to 
time and after residing upon that farm for eighteen years sold and purchased his present 
home on section 11, Cleveland precinct, Bon Homme county, to which he has added until his 
holdings aggregate almost eleven hundred acres. His land is naturally fertile and is kept in 
a high state of cultivation so that it is but natural that his crops are excellent. In 1893 
lie erected a large brick house and the other buildings on the farm are also substantial and 
commodious. He has one of the largest and best basement barns in his nart of the state 
and numerous cribs, granaries and other outbuildings. On each quarter section he has 
planted lines of trees which now furnish fuel for the household and make a grateful shade 
in summer. 

Mr. Fridrich was married in Bon Homme county to Miss Annie Dvoraeek, and they have 
eight sons and four daughters, August, John, Clarence, Edward, Henry, Joseph, Leo, Arthur, 
Bessie, Mollie, Hettie and Emma. Mr. Fridrich was reared in the Catholic church, is a 
member of the C. S. P. S. and in politics supports the democratic party. He will never 
forget his experience in the blizzard on the 12th of January, 18S8. He had witnessed a 
similar, but less severe, storm early in March, 1870, and when in 1888 the cloud of frozen 
mist moved down upon the country he knew what to expect. Hurrying out, accompanied by 
a faithful dog, he drove his cattle and horses to the barnyard, leaving them there to find 
shelter for themselves. He then went with the wind to the southeast corner of his farm 
where the district school was situated and warned the teacher to keep the children in the 
schoolhouse through the night, promising to return if possible with food. On the way back 
to the house he became bewildered and wandered around for quite a while before he heard 
the wind whi|iping the trees of the grove and followed the sound, finding to his joy that it 
was his own grove. He then felt his way along fences to the barnyard, saw that his stock 
was housed and fed and then went to the house and waited for his wife to prepare an 
abundant luncheon for the teacher and school children. Without telling her of liaving been 



338 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

lost, knowing that if he did so that she would object to his going out again, he started for 
the schoolhouse. Again he drifted with the wind and reached the sehoolhouse in safety. 
However, feeding the children was not the only problem, as they must be kept awake, which 
was something of a task, as the cold was intense and benumbing. All during the night he 
kept a roaring fire, while the teacher kept the children interested in games and all passed 
through the night safely and reached their homes in the morning. There were many 
experiences in pioneer days that tried the mettle of men and women, but the courage and 
determination of the early settlers were equal to all emergencies and as a result of those 
early years of struggle foundations foi' a great state were laid and the present development 
of South Dakota made possible. 



CHARLES K. HOWARD. 



Charles K. Howard, of Rapid City, was one of the early settlers of South Dakota as in 
1863 he was appointed trader of the United States military post known as Fort Dakota. 
Previous to that time he had been identified with the northwest as he was in the employ 
of the American Fur Company of Sioux City, Iowa, which traded to Fort Pierre, and he 
therefore knows practically all of the history of the settlement and development of the 
great state of South Dakota. After abandoning trading he turned his attention to ranch- 
ing and became one of the important cattle men of the state, owning six or seven thousand 
acres of land and many thousand head of cattle. In 1910, however, he disposed of his inter- 
ests in that connection and is now residing in Rapid City. Although he has reached the age 
of eighty years he is still enjoying excellent health and has the vigor and energy of a man 
many years his junior. As he could not be content without some occupation he engages in 
the real-estate business to some extent. 

Mr. Howard was born in Red Hook on the Hudson, on the 17th of May, 1835, and is a 
son of Hiram H. and Louisa (Kent) Howard. His father, who was also a native of the 
Empire state, was in his early manhood engaged in lumbering in Canada but later returned 
to his native state and devoted the remainder of his life to keeping a hotel. He passed away 
in 1879. C. K. Howard has three sisters, one of whom, ilrs. \V. D. Stites, is a resident 
of Sioux Falls. 

Mr. Howard received a public school education and also attended Hamilton College for 
one year. He left home when about fourteen years of age and for about six years worked 
as a farm hand in his native state. In 1855, when twenty years of age, he emigrated west- 
ward and after reaching Dubuque continued his journey across the state of Iowa by stage. 
From Kanesville, now Council Bluflfs, he went to Sioux City, where he entered the employ 
of the American Fur Company, trading to Fort Pierre. He remained with them for about 
two years and then engaged in the steamboating service between Sioux City and Covington 
and subsequently was connected with the drug business in partnership with a cousin, Charles 
Kent. About 1863 a military post, known as Fort Dakota, was established in Dakota terri- 
tory and he was appointed post trader. Subsequently he removed to what became Sioux 
Falls and there built the first house and later the first brick building, which was known as 
the Howard & Taylor block. He continued as a trader until 1883 and as by that time the 
state was becoming fairly well settled and as the trading business was not so profitable as 
it had been in the earlier days he turned his attention to cattle ranching, owning large 
tracts of land on the Cheyenne river about one hundred and twenty miles from Fort Pierre. 
He continued in that business until 1910 and became widely known as a cattle man. He made 
and lost several fortimes but is now one of the wealthy men of his part of the state. On 
retiring from ranching in 1910 he disposed of six or seven thousand acres of land and is now 
living in Rapid City. He is eighty years of age and has remarkable vigor and endurance for 
his years, a fact which he attributes largely to his open-air life. He still takes a keen inter- 
est in all public affairs and in all events of general interest, living in the present rather than 
in the past. 

In 1861 Mr. Howard was married to Miss .Teanetto Rickets, who passed away in 1864, 
leaving a daughter. Mrs. Mary Pender, who resides in Minnesota. In 1870 Mr. Howard was 
married at Eureka Springs, Missouri, to Miss Catherine Franklin, who passed away in 1913. 




CHARLES K. HOWARD 



HISTURY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 341 

Mr. Howard is a demoorat in politics and has taken quite an active part in public affairs. 
For fourteen consecutive years he was treasurer of Minnehaha county, his continued reelection 
proving beyond a doubt the satisfactoriness of his services. Fraternally he belongs to the 
Klks and the ilasons, being a member of the blue lodge and royal arch chapter in the lat- 
ter order. During the early days in this state when white settlers were few and far between 
he had many thrilling experiences with the Indians and became thoroughly acquainted with 
all phases of life on the remote frontier. As the state has developed he has adapted himself 
to the changing conditions and has been an important factor in the progress of the sections 
with which he has been connected. His high standing as a cattle rancher is indicated by the 
fact that he is ex-president of the Western South Dakota Stockmen's Association. He lias 
manifested not only the hardy spirit, the courage and the endurance of the pioneer but also 
the foresight, the ability to see things in large and the sound judgment of the man who suc- 
cessfully directs extensive business interests. He receives the honor and respect to which 
he is entitled as one of those who have been forces in the making of the present state of 
South Dakota with its wonderful material development and its equally great progress along 
lines of civic and moral advancement, and the record of his life is one which should inspire 
others to greater achievement. 



CHARLES J. KOCH. 



Charles J. Koch, a well known farmer of Grant county, has also given considerable 
time to liis work as treasurer of the Evangelical Insurance Company, a mutual concern 
doing an extensive business in North and South Dakota. He was born in Manitowoc county, 
Wisconsin, January 5, 1866, and is a son of Frederick and Albertina (Trapp) Koch. The 
paternal grandfather, Ludwig Koch, died in Wisconsin and the maternal grandfather, Leopold 
Trapp, who was a farmer by occupation, also passed away in that state. Both w-ere natives 
of Germany, as were the parents of our subject. Frederick Koch was born in 1831 and died 
June 1, 1912, while his wife, who still survives, was born in 1845. He became a resident 
of Wisconsin at the age of sixteen years and she at the age of ten. There they grew to 
maturity and there their marriage occurred. He followed farming in the Badger state 
until 1883, when he removed to Minnesota. He gained a competence and was one of the 
respected residents of his locality. His politiral allruiamc was given to the republican 
party and his religious belief was that of the i:\ an^i In ,il iliurch, in the work of which he 
took an active and helpful part. To liim and In-. \\\u- w.ic liorn seven children: Charles J.; 
Fred W., a sketch of whom appears elsewhere ui this work; C4eorge H., an agriculturist of 
Grant county; John and Ed., who are fainiiuj; in Minnesota; Jennie, the wife of Fred Koehn- 
topp, who is farming in Minnesota; and Arthur, who resides upon the old homestead in that 
state. 

Charles .1. Koch was educated in Wisconsin and Minnesota and early in life began assist- 
ing w'itli the work of the home farm. He has continued to follow agricultural pursuits and 
is a progressive and representative farmer. While living in Minnesota he also dealt in 
land to some extent. In 1909 he removed to Grant county. South Dakota, purchasing six 
hundred and eighty acres of good land wliieh he has so improved that it is now one of the 
finest and best developed farms in the county. He raises chiefly small grains and hogs and 
derives a handsome income from his agricultural pursuits. He is a director and the treasurer 
of the Evangelical Insurance Company, a state mutual company and one of the largest in 
Dakota. They have at present about eighteen million dollars insurance in force and their 
policy-holders are largely wealthy farmers of the Dakotas. The company started as a small 
church insurance company but its policy has always been based upon sound business prin- 
ciples and it has giown steadily and rapidly, becoming one of the leading concerns of the 
kind in the northwest. Mr. Koch gives a great deal of time to his duties as treasurer of this 
organization and is proving a very capable official. 

:\lr. Koch was married in 1890 to Miss Emma Lenz, who was born near Red Wing, 
iliniics,,ta, and tlicy had two children: Sadie, who married Henry Lind, a farmer of Crant 
ccuiity; and (inirc, at home. The wife and mother passed away in 1905 and in 1907 Jlr. 
Knell married Miss Emma Liebing, a native of Grant county and a daughter of Henry Licbing, 



342 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

one of the first settlers of that county. To this union two children have been born: Verna, 
who is attending school; and Floyd. 

Mr. Koch is a republican and has held various local offices, including that of town 
treasurer, which he has filled since his removal to the county. He is also a member of 
the school board. He is very active in the afl'airs of the Evangelical church, of which he is 
an influential member, and is always ready to cooperate in movements seeking the moral 
welfare of his community. He is a man of great mental vigor and energy and of excellent 
judgment and he has carried forward to successful completion all that lie has undertaken. 



AilZI BKARUF.ilPHL. 



Amzi Beardemphl is busily engaged in the cultivation of a farm of three hundred and 
twenty acres, situated in Jefferson township, Spink county. He is a young man of marked 
enterprise and determination, not afraid of work and eager at all times to improve his 
opportunities. South Dakota numbers him among her native sons and he was born May 25, 
1890, his parents being Charles and Lydia (Ward) Beardemphl. The father was one of the 
first settlers of Spink county, casting in his lot there when the district was an almost 
unbroken wilderness. He took up a homestead, broke the sod, began to plant the fields 
and cultivate his crops and in due time as the result of the success which he had already 
acliieved he was able to increase his holdings and add to his farm until within its bound- 
aries were comprised six hundred and forty acres. For a considerable period he continu- 
ously and successfully operated his land and then retired, taking up his abode at Des Jloines, 
Washington. The family name indicates that they are of German lineage. 

Spending his youthful days under th" parental roof, Amzi Beardemphl attended the 
country schools and afterward continued his education in Asliton, but put aside his textbooks 
when he reached the age of fourteen and concentrated his efforts upon farm work, assisting 
his parents until his father's retirement from active business. He then went with his 
parents to the state of Washington but returned to South Dakota within a year and began 
to cultivate rented land. He has since carried on general agricultural pursuits and is now 
busily engaged in cultivating a farm of three hundred and twenty acres in Jefferson town- 
ship, not far from Ashton. Success has crowned his efi'orts and annually he gathers good 
harvests as a reward for the care and labor which he bestows upon his fields. 

On the 5th of April, 1913, at Redfield, Mr. Beardemphl was married to Miss Edith 
Bymers, a daughter of Peter and Flora (Spoolstra) Bymers, the former a farmer of Spink 
county. They have one child, Lydia, and in 1915 lost one, Edith May, at the age of six 
weeks. Jlr. Beardemphl is yet a young man, his life record covering only a quarter of a 
century. He has made a creditable name and place for himself and the future will 
undoubtedly bring to him larger success, for he is industrious and ambitious. 



.JOSEPH SCHIT^TE. 



.Joseph Schulte is an undertaker residing at Deadwood and also conducts a picture store 
and picture-framing establishment. He was born in the province of Westphalia, Germany, 
in August, 1859, a son of Wunibald and Regina (Bitter) Schulte, both natives of that 
locality. Both have passed to their reward. The father was a farmer by occupation and 
Mr. Schulte was reared upon the home farm. He attended the public schools until he 
reached the age of seventeen years and was then apprenticed for three years to a cabinet- 
maker. At the end of that time he began to follow his trade independently and was so 
engaged until he was a young man of twenty-three years. During that time he traveled 
throughout Germany, supporting himself by working as a cabinetmaker. 

In 1882 he came to the United States and located in Detroit, Michigan, where he was 
employed by the Pullman Company and by the cabinetmaking department of a large furni- 
ture store. He remained there for two years, after which he went to Dayton, Ohio, and 
entered the employ of Barney & Smith, car builders, remaining with them for two years. 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 343 

He next worked for Burke & Jay, of Grand Rajiids, Miiliinan, being so engaged for six years. 
At tlie end of that time he assumed the maiuigi-iiuiit nl a turniture store in Crete, Nebraska, 
wliere lie remained for one year. He then wunt to l-i itinl, that state, and became manager 
of a furniture store tliere for a simihir period o! tiiii.'. He Ijoii^lit tlic l,u.xinr;,s in c-n- 
iiection witli a ilr. S|,illman, the firm being known us Siiillmaii .V >rhnlt.', and y.-nrAinr,] in 
that eonueetion until IS'JS, or for six years. He thrn sold uut lii- iiitri,-f.t to In- partner 
and went to Grand Island, Nebraska, where he entered the employ of Joseph JSonderman, 
the proprietor of a furniture and undertaking establishment. Mr. Sehulte managed the 
business for a number of years but on tlie 12th of April, 1910, removed to Deadwood and 
purchased of B. S. Boot the undertaking business which lie still conducts. He understands 
the principles of cnibahning well and as he gives deft and unobtrusive service he is known as 
one of the best undertakers in the city. He also has a large picture store and picture-fram- 
ing establishment in connection with his business and this branch of his activities is a very 
profitable one. 

On the 4th of September, 1888, Mr. Scluilte was married to Miss Elizabeth Jloore, of 
ilichigan. They have three children: George, who was born in 1890, at Crete, Nebraska, and 
is now associated with his father in business; and Irene and Pauline, twins. Mr. Sehulte is 
a republican and is at present representing the second ward upon the Deadwood city council. 
Fraternally he belongs to the Ancient Order of rnitcd Workmen, the Modern Woodmen of 
America, Lodge No. 1186, the Elks and the I'.j'jK-, all .ii Deadwood. In all that he does he 
manifests the characteristic German trait of t li.n .>u,t:liiiis, and as his business integrity has 
never been doubted his financial success is but natural. His sterling qualities of character 
have won him the respect of all who have come in contact with him and he is a valued resi- 
dent of the city. 



HON. BENJAMIN BUSSEY. 



Hon. Benjamin Bussey has served his district acceptably in the state legislature and 
is known in Bon Homme county as a progressive and successful farmer. He was born in 
Dane county, Wisconsin, on the 28th of October, 1849, a son of John and Jane (North) 
Bussey, who were natives of Yorkshire, England, and the vicinity of ShefHeld, England, 
respectively. In 1843 they emigrated to America, making the voyage on a sailing vessel, 
which was long in crossing the Atlantic, as it encountered severe storms. They settled in 
Dane county, Wisconsin, where the father passed away in 1851. The mother survived for 
many yi'urs. and, shortly after tjaying a visit to l,ri Jiildren in Bon Homme county, died 
ill the liadg'er state, in 1906 or 1907, when sr\rnl\ llm- \ rars of age. 

Benjamin Bussey was reared in his natuc cniiniv and there became familiar with 
agricultural work. He was married there in 1870 and in the following summer drove a team 
to Calhoun coniify, Iowa, where for several months he engaged in breaking prairie. Later in 
the fall he threshed there, remaining in that county until the close of the season. While he- 
was working in Iowa his wife was teaching in Wisconsin. After his return to the Badger 
state he reiited land until May, 1874, when he shipped his stock and household goods to 
Yankton, Dakota territory, which was tlien the terminus of the Dakota Southern Railroad. 
He filed on a homestead and a timber claim on sections 1 and 12, Albion precinct, Bon 
Hoinme county, and those claims constitute his present farm. He rented land near Bon 
Homme village soon after coming to the territory and broke the sod as he found time to 
do so. During 1876 he freighted from Y'ankton to Fort Bennett, as he was able to realize 
but little from his crops owing to the plague of grasshoppers. One of his first acts was to- 
plant trees upon his place and he now has a fine grove. He later purchased eighty acres 
more and now owns four hundred acres of fertile, well improved land, from which he derives 
a good income annually. He is progressive and energetic and his success naturally follows. 

Mr. Bussey was married, on the 24th of November, 1870, in Emerald Grove, Wisconsin, 
to Miss Annie' M. Hamnn-rquist, a nati^.. of Wisconsin, and a daughter of Charlo. G. and 
Amelia (Reuterskioldi llai,in,ri.|ui-t. nativ,-s of Sweden, who about 1845 emi-rat, ,1 tn Aiiun.a 
and settled in Dane ec.nnty. Wis,-..nsiii. Mrs. Bussey passed away on the IStli of Sr|.trnilK-r, 
1908, leaving a son. Frank C, who now has full charge of the operation of the homestead. 



344 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

He married Miss Elizabeth Koenig, a native of Bon Homme county, and a daughter of August 
and Caroline. (Minow) Koenig, who are mentioned on another page of this work. Mr. and 
Mrs. Frank C. Bussey have three children, Benjamin, Mamie and Ethel. 

Benjamin Bussey is a republican and has held a number of offices of trust and responsi- 
bility. He served as county commissioner, as deputy sheriff under Ed Benedict and for two 
years as a member of the lower house of the state legislature. His religious affiliation is 
with the Congregational church and fraternallj- he is a Jlason, belonging to the blue lodge 
at Tyndall and the consistory at Yankton. 

Mrs. Bussey's reminiscences of pioneer life are most interesting. On the morning of 
the 12th of January, 1888, Mr. Bussey went to Tyndall to deliver milk and the great blizzard 
that has made that date famous in South Dakota overtook him before he reached home. 
He stopped at the schoolhouse and got his son and drove in his cutter in the direction of his 
residence. The wind was so strong that it blew the milk cans from the sleigh, but the 
patient horse plodded on and after several hours by following the wire fence Mr. Bussey 
found the road leading towards his home. He had to abandon the cutter later and, putting 
his son on the horse, covered with a blanket to keep him warm, led the horse until he found 
the driveway leading to the house, which they reached in safety. Although in the early days 
Mr. Bussey endured the privations of pioneer times, he now enjoys not only the necessities 
and comforts, but many of the luxuries of life. He has a fine large residence, which is 
thorough!}' modern in its appointments and which is supplied with gas from its own plant. 
A beautiful lawn and a large grove beautify the place and large barns and other outbuild- 
ings provide ampl}' for the shelter of the stock and grain. A grove in front of Mr. Bussey's 
house is a favorite picnic ground and he invariably makes all welcome. His agreeable per- 
sonality and generous spirit have won him many friends and the sterling worth of his char- 
acter has enabled him to retain friendship once gained. 



CLYDE H. KING. 



Clyde H. King, a prominent representative of the legal fraternity in South Dakota, has 
maintained an office at Salem, in McCook county, for the past three years and has held the 
important position of states attorney since 1912. His birth occurred in Green county, Wis- 
consin, on the 10th of September, 1879, his parents being James P. and Marietta (McQari- 
non) King, the former a farmer by occupation. James P. King came to South Dakota in 
the spring of 1882 and homesteaded in Sanborn county, his being one of the pioneer families 
there. He is now living retired in Artesian, that county, and holds the office of county 
commissioner. The period of his residence in the community covers nearly a third of a cen- 
tury, and he enjoys an extensive and favorable acquaintance. His wife is deceased. 

Clyde H. King acquired his early education in the public schools and afterward attended 
the University of South Dakota at Vermillion, which institution conferred upon him the 
decree of Bachelor of Arts. Subsequently he embarked in the banking business, remaining 
identified with financial interests for four years. He likewise acted as principal of a high 
school and later took up a homestead claim, which, however, he eventually sold. Having 
determined upon the practice of law as a life work, he entered the School of Law of the 
University of South Dakota at Vermillion and a year later, in October, 1911, took the bar 
examination. He then opened an office in Salem and has there practiced his profession con- 
tinuously since, being accorded a liberal and lucrative clientage. He is so well read in the 
minutiae of the law that he is able to base his arguments upon thorough knowledge of and 
familiarity with precedents, and to present a case upon its merits, never failing to recognize 
the main point at issue and never neglecting to give a thorough preparation. His pleas have 
been characterized by a terse and decisive logic and a lucid presentation rather than by 
flights of oratorv, and his power is the greater before court or jury from the fact that it 
is recognized that his aim is ever to secure justice and not to enshroud the cause in a 
sentimental garb of illusion which will thwart the principles of right and equity involved. 
In 1912 he was elected states attorney and served two years, filling that responsible position 
in a highly commendable and efficient manner. 

On the 21st of April, 1908, ilr. King was united in marriage to Miss Roxciena Andrews. 




CLYDE H. KIX( 



HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 347 

a daughter of Cornelius Andrews of Vermillion, South Dakota. To this union two children 
have been born, namely, Ruth and Elizabeth. Mr. King is a republican in politics, was 
appointed city auditor on the 1st of January, and is also clerk of the board of education. 
He is a Methodist in religious faith, while fraternally he is identified with the Masons and 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He is fond of outdoor sports and these afford him 
needed recreation. He is everywhere recognized as a man of firm convictions, to which lie is 
thoroughly loyal, and his many admirable traits of character have won him high and enduring 
regard. 



THOMAS W. WEISS. 



Tliomas W. Weiss, a pioneer and the owner of a garage in Kimball, was born in Mil- 
waukee, Wisconsin, on the 19th of November, 1853, a son of John and Katherina AVeiss, who 
in 1879 came with their family to South Dakota. The subject of this review had filed on 
a homestead sixteen miles northeast of Mitchell, in Hanson county, in 1877, and thereon 
the family located. The father subsequently also took up a claim. Both he and his wife 
have passed away. 

Thomas W. Weiss was educated in the district schools of his native state and after 
putting aside his textbooks gave his entire time to assisting his father with the farm work 
until he was twenty-eight years of age, when he began his independent career as an agri- 
culturist. He continued to farm for fourteen years and then for two years traveled in the 
south. He next went to the Pacific coast, where he resided for two years, after which he 
returned to his farm in Hanson county, this state, and remained there until the spring of 
1892. He then sold his land and removed to Kimball, where he engaged in the restaurant 
business for six years, after which he disposed of it and established a garage, which he 
has since conducted. He was among the first to see the possibilities in business upciKNl up 
by the rapid development of the automobile and as -he has kept pace with tlic iii.liistry 
his annual profits have always been gratifying. His garage is a concrete l)iiiMiii^. ilrsigiied 
and erected especially for the purpose, and he does a large general repair business. He is 
also agent for the Buick and Dodge cars and makes a large number of sales annually. He 
is likewise a stockholder in the Brule Mercantile Company of Kimball and he is interested 
in threshing, having an outfit which he operates every fall, having continued this business 
for the past twenty-six years. 

On the 19th of November, 1892, Mr. Weiss was united in marriage with Miss Eliza A. 
Small, daughter of John Small. Mr. and Jlrs. Weiss are communicants of the Catholic 
church and he also belongs to Maher Council, K. C. He is likewise identified with the 
^Modern Woodmen of America. His political support is given to the democratic party. He 
believes firmly in the prosperity in store for this section of the state and has invested 
quite heavily in land in Brule county. He is alert, progressive and energetic and as he is 
also upright and honorable in all his dealings he enjoys the unqualified respect of his fellow 
citizens. 



CHARLES J. ANDERBERG. 



Charles J. Anderberg, residing on section 33, Taopi township, is one of the successful 
and substantial agriculturists of Minnehaha county. His birth occurred in Sweden on the 
21st of May, 1S58, his parents being .lohn and Christine (Nicholas) Anderberg, likewise 
natives of that country, who emigrate.! to the United States in 1870. They took up their 
abode in Chicago, Illinois, where the fatlier wmkod at the painter's trade until 1878, when 
he went to Sioux Falls, South Dakota. Four or five years later he purchased and removed 
to a farm in Grand Meadow township, Minnehaha county, which he still owned at the time 
of his death, which took place in June, 1915, when he was in his eighty-third year. He was 
widely and favorably known throughout the eoufity which had been his home for a period 
of about thirty-seven years. 



348 HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

Cliarles J. Anderberg, who was a youth of twelve years when his parents came to this 
country and located in Chicago, attended the public schools of that city. When fifteen or 
sixteen years of age he began an apprenticeship at the painter's trade and after completing 
his term of indenture worked as a journeyman painter in Chicago until the spring of 187'J. 
At that time he removed to Sioux Falls, South Dakota, where he opened a shop and was 
engaged in business as a contractor and painter for about nine years. Soon after coming 
to this state and after attaining his majority he filed on his present homestead in Taopi 
township, on which he made the required improvements. He did not take up his abode 
thereon until 1888 but since tliat time has been continuously and successfully engaged in 
the operation of the farm. He gives his place careful personal supervision and always fol- 
lows the best and most modern agricultural methods. 

On the 2d of July, 1884, Mr. Anderberg was united in marriage to Miss Lena Brakke, a 
sister of C. S. Brakke, who is president of the Farmers State Bank in Flandi-eau, South 
Dakota. To our subject and his wife have been born nine cliiMrin, i'i;;lit of whom still 
survive, as follows: Alfred N., who is a homesteader in Montana; Di'lhi May, who is the 
wife of P. C. Petersen, a farmer of Moody county. South Dakota; Kdith Luella, who attended 
the Madison State Normal School and Sioiix Falls College and who now follows the pro- 
fession of teaching in Montana, where she is proving up on a homestead; Linda Teresa, 
who also attended the Madison State Normal .School and Sioux Falls College and wiio is 
now a teacher and is proving up on a homestead in Montana; Mabel Caroline, who was edu- 
cated in the Madison State Normal School of iladison, South Dakota, and who is now a 
teacher in the district schools and lives at home; Fern Myrtle, who is now in the sophomore 
year in the Sioux Falls high school; Pearl Amy, who is in the junior year in high school; and 
Clifford, at home. In his political views Mr. Anderberg is independent, supporting men and 
measures rather than party. The period of his residence in Minnehaha county covers thirty- 
six years and he is well entitled to representation nmong its prosperous agriculturists and 
esteemed citizens. 



WILLIAM A. ilERTENS. 

William A. ilertcns, who holds title to five hundred and sixty acres of excellent land in 
Grant county, was born in Germany, on the 9th of -June, 1861. His parents, Joseph ani! 
Annie (Peal) Mertens, were also natives of Germany and both were born in 1835. They were 
married and remained there until 1871. when they crossed the Atlantic to the new workl 
riiaking their w-ay to McHenry pouTitr, Illinois, where the father followed the mason's trade 
and also operated a small farm «hi(li lir ..wncd. He passed away there in 1909, but is sur- 
vived by his widow. He was a rc|iiilili."iii in politics and in religious faith a Lutheran. To 
him and his wife were born nine childruu. uf whom five are still living, namely: Bertha, the 
wife of Louis Haight, a farmer residing in Illinois; William A.; and .Julius, Albert and Herman, 
all of whom are farming in Illinois. 

William A. Mertens received his education in the common schools and during his boy- 
hood and youth also assisted in the work of the home farm. He followed agricultural pur- 
suits in the Prairie state until 1886, when he removed to Grant county. South Dakota, and 
purchased a relinquishment, on which he proved up. Subsequently he sold that place and 
purchased a quarter section of land near Milbank, for wliich he paid thirteen hundred dollars. 
Later he bought an additional eighty acre tract which cost him one thousand dollars and 
subsequently he added still further to his holdings. At length he disposed of three eighty- 
acre tracts for five thousand dollars, after which he purchased four hundred and eighty acres 
tor ten thousand five hundred and sixty dollars. He placed a mortgage of six thousand and 
sixty dollars upon the farm which, however, he paid in six years. He erected a beautiful 
residence upon his new homestead and has made many other improvements upon his farm, 
which is one of the most valuable of the county. He owns in all five hundred and sixty acres 
of excellent land, which is worth about one hundred and twenty-five dollars per acre, and 
he carries on general farming and stock-raising. However he specializes to some extent in 
breeding Percheron horses a