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Full text of "History of Daviess and Gentry counties, Missouri"

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•X AND 
'CvDATIONS 




JOHN c lp:opakd 




R. M McCAMMON 



THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



ASTii!{. LBNOX AND 

tili'i:n foundations 

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HISTORY 



OF 



DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 



MISSOURI 



DAVIESS COUNTY 

BY 

JOHN C. LEOPARD AND BUEL LEOPARD 



GENTRY COUNTY 

BY 

R. M. McCAMMON AND MARY McCAMMON HILLMAN 



ILLUSTRATED 



HISTORICAL PUBLISHING COMPANY 

TOPEKA— INDIANAPOLIS 

1922 



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Asroi!, i.rxox and 

- TJLDE.N Ff ■vri'/nONS 
K 1943 * L 



PREFACE 



It is the aim of the editors of the History of Daviess County to present 
in substantial form an authentic history of the county and its people, to 
which the present and future generations may refer with confidence and 
satisfaction as the years come and go, and that it may be a matter of pre- 
manent record for all time. It is not an easy matter to write the history 
of such a county as Daviess. Much more research was required than was 
anticipated as every effort has been made to secure accuracy. Many events 
had an influence in shaping the destiny of this county. 

The chief sources of material were the county records, newspapers, 
reports of the state departments, the history of the county published in 
1882, "Early Days on Grand River and the Mormon War" by R. J. Britton, 
the Memoirs of Major J. H. McGee, "Memories" by John F. Jordin, and 
"Recollections" by H. C. McDougal. 

The writers have made requests for information upon various subjects 
of a large number of men and women, almost all of whom have responded 
willingly and promptly. To them the writers feel greatly indebted and 
while it is impossible to mention them all, this must not be taken to indicate 
a lack of appreciation of their efforts. 

Among those who have been especially painstaking in supplying infor- 
n mation are Mrs. Mary Cruzen, Samuel F. Sperry, Sr., George W. Williams, 
^ S. W. Brandom, W. C. Gillihan, C. H. Longfellow, H. J. Hollis, E. A. Martin, 
^ Mrs. W. W. Ament, Dr. M. A. Smith, and Mrs. J. W. McClasky. 
^ THE EDITORS. 

^ Gallatin, Mo., June 1, 1922. 



INDEX. 



Abarr, Millege Lester 884 

Adkisson, W. C 663 

Adams, Edward 805 

Adams, George P 466 

Adams, M. E 72>2, 

Adams, Willis 529 

Adkison, Shannon 453 

Agee, Carl J 828 

Akes, Emert 472 

Alexander, Joshua W 331 

Allen, Charles S 668 

Allen, F. T 669 

Allen, John Henry 647 

Allen, S. W 1002 

Allenbrand, R. J 541 

Allsup, J. W 400 

Ament, W. W 695 

Austin, Fred S 528 

Arnold, W. L 430 

Bacon, Henry G 727 

Bacon, Jason 898 

Ball, John Lemuel 855 

Ball, Robt. J 901 

Ball, Thomas J 854 

Bare, H. W 470 

Barger, Dr. J. N 921 

Barlow, T. C 987 

Barnes, John H 804 

Bartlett, Oscar A 724 

Bayless, White 954 

Beauchamp, Lemuel 553 

Beck, H. M 749 

Bell, Amanda M 953 

Bennett, James B 416 

Best, Arthur 1023 

Bethel, Eugene L 604 

Birge, Ed E 837 

Birge, James 760 

Bishop, M. V 738 

Black, Edgar 887 

Black, R. M 983 

Blackburn, D. A 391 

Blackburn, Frank H 899 



Blackburn, John A 899 

Blackburn. W. E 386 

Blacklock, Eben E 621 

Blacklock, Ebenezer Edgar 615 

Blacklock, L. Bruce 622 

Blacklock, William L. 616 

Blair, J. S 983 

Blakely, S. W 418 

Boley, Benjamin 810 

Bonham, William W 625 

Bowman, Lewis M 1035 

Brandom, Silvester W 576 

Bray, William E 915 

Brewer, Enoch W 645 

Brodrick, Isaac F 876 

Brown, Cornelius 623 

Brown, E. G 703 

Brown, J. Forrest 417 

Brown, John N 348 

Brown, Alarcus M 488 

Brown, N. B 997 

Brown, Rufus Fayette 617 

Brown, T. T 991 

Brown, Thomas 808 

Brown, W. P 958 

Brown, W. T 444 

Brown, Walter W 878 

Brown, William H 957 

Bruce, Charles A 743 

Burge, W. F 421 

Burkhart, George 535 

Burtch, Dr. J. A 759 

Burton, HalHe 340 

Butler, Granville 838 

Cain, John J 572 

Caldwell, Joseph M 904 

Campbell, A. B 517 

Campbell, Dr. James Clyde 1007 

Campbell, Dr. Malcomb Monroe... 593 

Canaday, Andrew W 881 

Canaday, William Calvin 785 

Caraway, W. T 933 

Carlow, Peoples Bank of 417 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 



Carter, Annie Laurie (Akin) 539 

Carter. H. F 532 

Carter. Salathiel 592 

Carter. W. H 624 

Castor, Grant 729 

Chamberlain, C. S 750 

Chambers, Mrs. James A 753 

Chapman. Henry 868 

Chapman. R. W 1019 

Chenoweth, M. W 502 

Childers, J. J. 818 

Chilton. F 671 

Clagett. Dr. D. M 696 

Clark, S. J 990 

Cline, W. G 600 

Colburn, Byron 722 

Cole, J. 732 

Cole, Ramus M 973 

Cole, W. L 610 

Collier, D. L 589 

Collier, William H 660 

Conrad, Joseph 723 

Cook, Frank H 967 

Cook, William S 634 

Cooper, L. T 875 

Cooper, Truman 586 

Cooper, W. T 451 

Coppersmith, Dr. A. W 793 

Cornett, R. L 1037 

Cottrill. David Marshall 557 

Cottrill. David Alars . hall 557 

Coulter, Johnson Wesley 489 

Courtier. Devi^itt C 1023 

Cousins, O. G 857 

Cox, Joseph M 423 

Cox, Levi P 454 

Cox, Walter 432 

Crane. William Milton 883 

Creekmore, Rev. Grant 1027 

Creighton, Sterling Harrison 965 

Critten, James 419 

Croy, Amos B 599 

Croy, B. E 373 

Croy, E. A 442 

Crowder, Charles Bruce 700 

Cruzen, Nathaniel G Zll 

Culver, Elmer L 480 

Cummings, John M 637 

Cunningham, J. H 649 



Dale, Lawrence T 848 

Dator. William E 643 

Davidson, J. E 488 

Davis. D. Harfield 387 

Day, E. B 927 

Day, Joseph Owen 631 

DeFord, Alva E 674 

DeFord, Melvin Ross 682 

Degginger, J. H 844 

Denny, Lewis W 522 

De Vorss, J. William 436 

Dice, George E 977 

Dieter. Thomas J 829 

Dills. Henry P 551 

Doak, Harry A 391 

Doak, Novia 447 

Doak, Peter P 390 

Dockery, Alexander M 352 

Dougan, Don C 783 

Dowell, William 755 

Downning, Charles L 925 

Doyle, John R 494 

Dresbach, J. A 585 

Dresbach, Samuel H 579 

Drummond, J. B., Sr 420 

Drummond, James M 435 

Dudley, Col. Boyd 344 

Dudley, Boyd, Jr 344 

Dunavan, Lewis R 816 

Duncan, Earl Clifford 860 

Duncan, Frank W 858 

Duncan, Harrison M 781 

Dunnington, J. F 400 

Dunshee, Harry J 877 

Edwards, Thomas J 929 

Elder, William Carson 474 

Ellis, John M 1012 

EUis, N. G 1008 

Embree, Charles 601 

Enyart, James E 536 

Ernst, C. E 424 

Ethel, Willis J 834 

Etter, R. L., Sr 367 

Evans, Claude M 641 

Evans, James J 820 

Evans, William B 882 

Everly, C. C 989 

Everly, C. H 389 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 



Everly, Henry H 1025 

Everly, S. H 754 

ENving, George D 958 

Farmers and Mechanics Bank, The. 571 

Faulkner, James R 756 

Fetters, Enoch 625 

Feurt, Homer 336 

Feurt, W. H 962 

Fields, Clarence Riley 1038 

Fields, Victor 583 

Fisher, Daniel M 365 

Fitterer, Enos 379 

Fitterer, Frank A 379 

Fitterer, Oscar L 380 

Flowers, Dale S 468 

Foley, E. M., Jr 704 

Folgate, Chauncey 787 

Follett, D. H 629 

Fore, Ted 508 

Francisco, Cort 995 

Frost, Thomas L 702 

Fulton, A. J 683 

Galbreath, John 765 

Gall, Samuel L 619 

Gallatin Trust Company, The 1034 

Galpin, Peter 693 

Gardner, Dr. P. L 372 

Gartin, Andrew C 473 

Gartin, Ray S 812 

Gay, George R 928 

Gay, James 864 

Gildow, J. Frank 744 

Giles, F. L 817 

Giles, Oliver 655 

Gillespie, J. H 986 

Gillett, F. M 831 

Gillett, John R 936 

Glendenning, Milton 523 

Goodbar, George C 383 

Goodwine, Andrew J 802 

Gould, Will S 768 

Grace, John W 537 

Grace, O. L 497 

Graham, Amaziah A 950 

Graham, Dr. James B 987 

Grantham, Herbert C 1034 

Grantham, Lincoln 801 



Graves. P. M 830 

Graves, W. P 605 

Green, E. P 515 

Green, George E 889 

Green, Henry H 939 

Green, John Francis 456 

Green, M. M 511 

Greenlee, Claud A 573 

Greenwell, Alexander 512 

Greenwood, E. H 929 

Gregg, Aaron 790 

Gregory, James M 569 

Griffeth, C. J 888 

Griffin, W. P 691 

Grissinger, Guy Forrest... 587 

Guerin, James 431 

Guess, John H 505 

Gurthep, J. B 1018 

Hadley, Larkin Francis 520 

Hager, John T 780 

Hamilton, T. E 432 

Hamilton, Wood H 384 

Hamm, Fred 652 

Hammer, Charles E 630 

Hammer, Peter 833 

Handy, W. R % 449 

Harden, William S 595 

Harding, Samuel Oscar 494 

Hardinger, Dr. S. L 996 

Hardwick, John R 642 

Hargis, Dr. Wm. H 956 

Harlow, E. J 394 

Harlow, J. Sam 393 

Harman, A. M 740 

Harpster, Ray 832 

Harrah, Harley J 1033 

Harris, George Dowe 917 

Harris, George W 863 

Harris, Lewis Allen 714 

Harrison, Clifford Melvin 656 

Hartsock, W. E 840 

Hathaway, W. E 734 

Hawthorne, Lester L 584 

Hays, Charles E 459 

Hays, John B 460 

Hedges, Dr. Frank 984 

Helms, Everett H 981 

Hemry, Charles 368 



HISTORY OP DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 



Henderson, Mary Ellen 880 

Henry. Edmon 994 

Hess, Charles A 889 

Heyde, Maxmilian 598 

Heyser, Stanley 736 

Hill, James C 934 

Hinote, J. W 885 

Hise, S. R 542 

Hisel, D. E 982 

Holden, Thomas C 481 

Holmes, Henry 909 

Hopkins, Charles E 787 

Hosman, Leonard M 376 

Houston, George B 412 

Houston, W. F 915 

Hoyt, John H 650 

Hudson, Richard 800 

Hulet, Lewis C 515 

Humphrey, T. M 601 

Hundley, John A 479 

Hunter, Jesse T 464 

Hutcherson, William P 964 

James, John Thomas 1022 

Jameson, Hiram Ramsay 620 

Jameson, Madison Finley 851 

Jameson, William Alexander 644 

Jamesport, Commercial Bank of... 426 
Jamesport, Peoples Ex. Bank of.... 458 

Jarrett, Samuel A 960 

JefTeries, Thomas J 784 

Jenkins, W. E 931 

Jinkins, Joseph 747 

Johnson, G. W 746 

Johnson, James A 821 

Johnson, James Franklin 442 

Johnson, James L 707 

Johnson, H. L 687 

Johnson, V. P 989 

Johnson, W. A 920 

Jolly, Albert Newton 659 

Jolly, Frank S 814 

Jolly, Henry C 646 

Jolly, James Perry 552 

Jones, Jacob 825 

J ones, Standish E 843 

Kaufman, John W 975 

Karrar, Armand 483 



Keck, E. A 731 

Kelso, Henry C 717 

Kemp, J. H 720 

Kent, Charles H 839 

Kerfoot, William H 558 

Kerlin, John W 806 

Kerwin, Thomas 798 

Kibler, James C 980 

Killam, Sam C 448 

Kingsborough, Dimmon D 477 

Kingsley, C. E 735 

Kirk, Patrick 823 

Knauer, Charles L 350 

Knight, Idella 640 

Knight, M. N 439 

Knight, V. E 910 

Koch, George B 457 

Koger, John Henry 1011 

Korn, Charles 884 

Landes, Daniel 445 

Landes, F. S 748 

Lankford, E. S 396 

Lankford, E. T 396 

Law, M. L 822 

Lawson, Joseph G 976 

Lay, W. T 923 

Lear, Henry 1021 

Lee, Wesley, Jr 725 

Limpp, Rufus H 611 

Lindsey, Charles T 890 

Link, W. C 359 

Littlewood, C. E 563 

Litton, J. S 914 

Lively, Ivo W 426 

Lockwood, E. C 581 

Loest, L. C 636 

Long, James W 437 

Love, Penn 922 

Lowrey, Charles N 943 

Lowrie, D. Luther 343 

Lyons, H. E 507 

McAllister, M. F 942 

McCammon, Robt. M 1031 

McCarty, John H 866 

McCaskey, J. B 679 

McCampbell, Walter E 524 

McClaskey, John W 446 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 



McClure, Elcania 763 

McClure, Jonathan 856 

McClure, W. T 425 

McConkey, Samuel R 779 

McCoy, Jesse James 896 

McCoy, John R 461 

McCoy, S. D 574 

McCray, Robert D 872 

McCue, J. L 428 

McCue, P. S 458 

McCue, R. M 381 

McCullough, Joseph Lafayette 870 

McDaniel, George W 657 

McDaniel, J. W 992 

McDonald, J. B 942 

McElvain, Joseph 338 

McElroy, T. H 799 

McGinnis, Asa Hardin 900 

McKenney, Keeran 852 

McKnight, James W 827 

McMahan, H. C 443 

McMillen, Albert 850 

McMillen, J. L 853 

McMillen, Patrick Henry 513 

Macy, Perry 404 

Macy, Seth 403 

Macy, W. C 392 

Mallory, James M 699 

Manion, Edward W 554 

Mann, Alva 638 

Mann, Clem P 767 

Mann, Moses 560 

Manring, James A 709 

Manring, Jordan William 711 

Marlow, L. C 433 

Martin, T. A 412 

Mathews, Alonzo 1026 

Maupin, R. E 935 

Meadows, J. E 970 

Meadows, Mary Elizabeth 1009 

Meadows, Oscar P 1010 

Melton, William Ellis 549 

Mendenhall, C. C 578 

Mettle, Oliver 360 

Miller, A. 509 

Miller, A. W 751 

Miller, Charles B 1004 

Miller, James M 665 



Miller, Martin Van Buren 544 

Milligan, William J 797 

Millman, Isaac 684 

Millstead, Hayden 946 

Minor, Leland F 979 

Mitchell, George William 548 

Miock, George 673 

Monk, Jesse W 658 

Monroe, Jonathan S 506 

Moody, Wade D 940 

Mooney, P. A 966 

Moore, E. E 562 

Morris, Theodore F 664 

Morris, Tmiothy 1015 

Morris, W. J 1014 

Morrison, G. M. Dallas 791 

Morton, Frank 612 

Mothersead, Charles H 465 

Moulten, L. T 1036 

Murphy, Robert 493 

Murray, G. G 361 

Musselman, John 342 

Nalle, John 1025 

Naylor, W. E 419 

Neal, Joab P 789 

Needles, Simpson ,W 530 

Neth, Albert 690 

Newcomb, J. E 594 

Newman, A. A 907 

Newman, Jacob 846 

Nickerson, James H 969 

Nugent, Dr. J. T 455 

O'Hare, Hugh Elwood 963 

O'Mara, James 497 

O'Toole, James M 925 

Olsen, George A 698 

Osborn, Henry 655 

Osborn, W. T 906 

Pangburn, Marion Edgar 937 

Pape, Carsen 909 

Parks, William 609 

Parman, Orville S 463 

Pate, John A 761 

Patterson, M. H 911 

Patrick, Benedict W 409 

Patton, H. E Z72, 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 



Patton, Isaac Gentry 498 

Patton. J. T 985 

Patton, Jefferson P 974 

Patton, John F 774 

Patton, Joseph Henry 653 

Patton, William A 842 

Payne, Clinton L 375 

Peniston, Anthony 608 

Peniston, George H 414 

Peters, Mrs. Ida M 721 

Pierce, Benjamin 583 

Pierce, Fred L 402 

Pierce, Lee R 374 

Pipkin, Dr. Charles 930 

Place, A. J 339 

Pogue, George H 752 

Pogue, W. C 388 

Potter, Charles 835 

Powell, Lew Wallace 912 

Powers, Harvey 796 

Powers, J. Clark 795 

Preston, John 504 

Price, Aseph Butler 545 

Prichard, William M 944 

Prior, Crittenden D 1028 

Pulsifer, Joseph R 824 

Quigley, Silas Edgar Ill 

Quisenberry, P. T 811 

Railsback, Daniel 924 

Ralph, W. D 519 

Ramsbotton, William 404 

Ray, Charles 561 

Ray, James M 771 

Reed, George W ITh 

Reed, J. W 747 

Reed, John W 1000 

Reich, J. L 680 

Reid, Adelbert W 686 

Rhea, George W 730 

Rice, D. P 550 

Richardson, Philip 874 

Ridinger, G. W 409 

Rigney, T. N 484 

Rizzi, A 611 

Robertson, James 565 

Robertson, Wesley L 672 

Robinson, D. H 1001 



Robinson, J. H 918 

Robinson, O. P 972 

Robison, John B 540 

Robison, Lester M 503 

Roper, William Terry 893 

Royston, Mrs. Ada M 948 

Runyon, Charles Henry 588 

Runyan, George Sterling 534 

Rybolt, Edward E 998 

Sager, George A 580 

Sager, W. F 794 

Sale, J. M 865 

Sale, Phillip 543 

Sampson, W. B 605 

Sanford, Thomas H 591 

Schwyhart, M. S 745 

Scott, Charles L 770 

Scott, H. C 397 

Scott, J. C 757 

Scott, Roy T 719 

Scrivner, V. H 438 

Sealey, George F 635 

Seller, A. F 363 

Semple, Malcolm Monroe 501 

Shakleford, Dr. Earl 949 

Shockley, T. R 440 

Shoemaker, Everett M 716 

Short, Alexander 726 

Shrike, John J 614 

Sidens, William J 568 

Slagle, W. M 873 

Smith, Asa L 1015 

Smith, Dr. M. A 356 

Smith, Edgar L 556 

Smith, Frank L 776 

Smith, J. J 590 

Smith, James D 469 

Smith, Kimbro 971 

Smith, W. D 772 

Smith, W. Glen 354 

Snapp, Delbert D 607 

Snider, J. M 422 

Spaht, Gustave 602 

Speers, William 670 

Sperry, Samuel F 1016 

Spiers, Amos 978 

Stapleton, Robert E 905 

Stapleton, William Peery 491 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 



Steininan, Edward 826 

Stephens, Arthur M 366 

Stewart, J. R 892 

Stewart, John W 666 

Stith, James 762 

Stout, C. J 358 

Stovall, Hardin N 951 

Strasser, John A 708 

Streeter, Cyrus 678 

Stroup, Silas M 908 

Summa, Earl 567 

Summa, Ira 567 

Surface, Samuel R 677 

Sutton, John George 813 

Sweaney, Boon L 897 

Sweat, J. R 662 

Swisher, C. H 742 

Tate, J. H 349 

Temple, W. A 836 

Terry, Anda B 974 

Thomas, Joseph 862 

Thomas, William 803 

Thompson, Dr. A 895 

Thompson, Dr. R. V HI 

Thompson, W. L 766 

Tibbs, J. L 739 

Todd, Levi 472 

Tolbert, J. W 441 

Tolen, Mark 415 

Townsend, W. P 408 

Trimm, James C 1029 

Trosper, Milton 401 

Trosper, William B 688 

Tuggle, Floyd S 394 

Tunnell, Clarence E 632 

Turner, Edwin 955 

Uhlig, Paul J 786 

Utz, Alfred E 1006 

Utz, J. J 815 

Utz, William L 1017 

Vandermark, James Edward 525 

Van Hoozer, Jonathan W 527 

Vaughn, James 628 

Wade, Allen F 1035 

Wade, I. L 410 



Wagers, J. T. 617 

Walker. John W 510 

Walp, Henry S 894 

Walls, Boyd E 993 

Waltemath, John A 496 

Waltemath, Fred 809 

Ware, B. F 415 

Warren, A. H 429 

Washburn, L. E 807 

Waters, Davis E 952 

Watkins, George P 769 

Weldon, J. H 406 

Weldon, William G 758 

Wellman, William Z 741 

West, Edward F 689 

Wetzel, Reuben 736 

Whaley, M. P 462 

Wharton, David Amos 861 

Wheatley, Charles T 627 

White, Jerome C 681 

Whitt, O. R 999 

Whitton, Charles R 782 

Whitton, Rufus 848 

Wiglesworth, Ovelman 713 

Wilder, John F 7:!,7 

Wiles, Ralph 427 

Williams, George W 995 

Wilmore, D. C. . . . ^. 597 

Wilson, Samuel 72>2> 

Wood, Mrs. Ada 1003 

Wood, R. F 961 

Wooden, M. H 675 

Wooderson, David H 500 

Wooderson, Frank 841 

Woodring, R. E 1020 

Woodruff, Frank A 369 

Wynne, H. S 991 

Yadon, John A 867 

Yates, Benjamin A 941 

Yates, C. G 750 

Yates, M. B 947 

Yeater, H. C • , 486 

Yoell, E. G 919 

Yost, Cornelius 968 

Youtsey, Archibald S., Jr 398 

Youtsey, Eben Estes 398 

Youtsey, O. S .926 



PART I. 



History of Daviess Counhj. 



CHAPTER I. 



EARLY SETTLEMENT. 



TERRITORY EMBRACING DAVIESS COUNTY— INDIAN OCCUPATION— FIRST SETTLERS- 
SETTLEMENT OF BENTON TOWNSHIP— SETTLEMENT IN OTHER TOWNSHIPS- 
NATIVITY OF PIONEER SETTLERS— CHARACTER AND NATIVITY OF LATER 
ARRIVALS 65-70 



CHAPTER II. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE COUNTY. 



PETITION PRESENTED IN 1836 BY ALEXANDER DONIPHAN— LOCATION OF COUNTY 
SEAT— TOWN ORDERED PI>ATTED AND SALE OF LOTS— REPORT OF COMMIS- 
SIONERS—EFFORT TO REMOVE COUNTY SEAT TO CRAVENSVILLE— OTHER 
EFFORTS TO CHANGE COUNTY SEAT 71-74 



CHAPTER III. 



COUNTY BUILDINGS. 



COURT HOUSE— JAIL— COUNTY FARM AND BUILDINGS 75-81 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

CHAPTER IV. 



CITIES AND TOWNS. 



GALLATIN— COFFEY— WINSTON— PATTONSBITRG - JAMESON— CARLOW — LOCK 
SPRINGS— ALTAMONT— CIVIL BEND — MILLPORT — ADAM-ONDI-AHMON — CRAV- 
ENSVILLE— PRAIRIE CITT—CRITTENDEN— ECLIPSE— OLD PATTONSBURG— VIC- 
TORIA— ALTA VISTA— BANCROFT 82-90 



CHAPTER V. 



MILITARY HISTORY. 



BLACK HAWK WAR— HEATHERLY WAR— MEXICAN WAR— COL. WICKHAM'S MILITIA 
COMPANY, COMPANY A, SECOND MISSOURI REGIMENT. N. G. M 91-93 



CHAPTER VI. 



THE MORMONS IN DAVIESS COUNTY. 



LYMAN WIGHT THE FIRST MORMON TO SETTLE IN DAVIESS COUNTY— HEADQUAR- 
TERS AT FAR WEST— JOSEPH SMITH, JR., SELECTS SITE OF STRAKE IN 
DAVIESS COUNTY— GROWTH OF TOWN— FIRST MORMON TROUBLE— LATER 
DEVELOPMENTS- THE MORMON WAR— MOBOLIZATION OF TROOPS— EXTERMIN- 
ATION ORDER— MAUN'S MILL MASSACRE— MORMONS SURRENDERED TO MILITIA 
LEADERS TAKEN TO INDEPENDENCE- SUBSEQUENT TRIAI.— REMAINS OF 
MORMON OCCUPATION 94-101 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

CHAPTER VII. 



THE CIVIL WAR. 



SENTIMENT DIVIDED IN DAVIESS COUNTY— ACTIVITIES OF UNION MEN IN 1861— 
COMPANIES ORGANIZED— HEADQUARTERS ESTABLISHED AT GALLATIN— GUER- 
RILLA WARFARE— SKIRMISH — BOUNTY OFFERED TO VOLUNTEERS — UNION 
SOLDIERS FROM DAVIESS COUNTY— COMPANY A— COMPANY G— COMPANY B— 
FORTY-THIRD INFANTRY— SPECIAL ORDER NO. 6— CONFEDERATES— CIVIL WAR 
INCIDENTS . ia2-121 



CHAPTER VIII. 



PIONEER AND MODERN TRANSPORTATION. 



STAGE LINES— FERRIES— NAVIGATION— ROADS— RAILROADS 122-132 



CHAPTER IX. 



CHURCHES. 

PIONEER MINISTERS— PIONEER CHURCHES— CAMP MEETING — CHURCH SERVICES- 
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH— CATHOI>IC CHURCH— CHRISTIAN CHURCH— EVAN- 
GELICAL CHURCH — BAPTIST CHURCH — METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH — 
METHODIST EPISCOPAL SOUTH— PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH— SEVENTH DAY AD- 
VENTISTS 133-145 



CHAPTER X. 



SCHOOLS. 



EARLY DAY SUBSCRIPTION SCHOOLS— PIONEER TEACHERS— FIRST SCHOOL HOUSE- 
LOCATION OF EARLY SCHOOLS— TEACHER'S INSTITUTES— HIGH SCHOOLS— CON- 
SOLIDATED HIGH SCHOOLS— APPROVED RURAL SCHOOLS— GRAND RIVER COL- 
LEGE—GRAND RIVER ACADEMY— GALLATIN ACADEMY 146-153 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

CHAPTER XI. 



BENCH AND BAR. 



THREE CIRCUIT JUDGES FROM DAVIESS COUNTY— FIRST TERM OF CIRCUIT COURT 
HELD IN 1837— FIRST BUSINESS TRANSACTED— CHANGES IN JUDICIAL CIRCUIT- 
CIRCUIT JUDGES— LAWYERS IN 1860— LAWYERS WHO CAME AFTER THE CIVIL 
WAR— ATTORNEYS IN 1882— PRESENT DAY ATTORNEYS— THE TRIAL OF FRANK 
James 154-158 



CHAPTER XII. 



THE MEDICAL PROFESSION. 



WM. P. THOMPSON THE FIRST DOCTOR IN THE GRaND RIVER COUNTRY— OTHER 
EARLY DAY DOCTORS— THE LIFE AND PRACTICE OF PIONEER DOCTORS— THE 
DAVIESS COUNTY MEDICAL SOCIETY— THE GRAND RIVER MEDICAL ASSOCIA- 
TION 159-160 



CHAPTER XIII. 



THE PRESS. 



FIRST PAPER PUBLISHED IN THE GRAND RIVER COUNTRY IN 1843— FIRST NEWS- 
PAPER PUBLISHED IN DAVIESS COUNTY IN 1853— EARLY DAY NEWSPAPERS 
AND PUBLISHERS— ED. HOWE ENGAGED IN NEWSPAPER WORK HERE— LATER 
PUBLICATIONS— NEWSPAPERS AT GALLATIN, WINSTON, COFFEY, LOCK- 
SPRINGS, JAMESON, ALTAMONT, JAMESPORT, PATTONSBURG AND OTHER 
PLACES 161-168 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

CHAPTER XIV. 



A CHAPTER OF "FIRSTS.' 



169-172 



CHAPTER XV. 



OFFICIALS. 



UNITED STATES OFFICIALS— STATE OFFICIALS— DA^^ESS COUNTY REPRSENTA- 
TIVES— COUNTY TREASURERS— PROBATE JUDGES— COURT OF COMMON PLEAS- 
RECORDERS — SHERIFFS — PROSECUTING ATTORNEYS — CIRCUIT CLERKS- 
COUNTY CLERKS— COUNTY JUDGES 173-179 



CHAPTER XVI. 



THE WORLD WAR. 



BARLEY ENTRANTS FROM DAVIESS COUNTY— FIRST REGISTRATION— DRAWING 
UNDER THE SELECTIVE DRAFT— EXEMPTION BOARD— FIRST GROUP OF MEN 
CHOSEN— LEAVING FOR CAMP— KILLED IN ACTION— DIED OF DISEASE— 
WOUNDED— DAVIESS COl^NTY SOLDIERS— RETURN OF SOLDIERS— AUXILIARY 
WAR WORK— LIBERTY LOANS— UNITED T\"AR WORK CAMPAIGN— THRIFT STAMP 
CAMPAIGN— COUNCIL OF DEFENSE 180-194 



CHAPTER XVII. 



AMERICAN RED CROSS. 



FIRST APPEAL— DAVIESS COUNTY CHAPTER ORGANIZED— BRANCH CHAPTERS- 
GROWTH IN MEMBERSHIP— SCHOOL AUXILIARY— RED CROSS WEEK— FIRST AID 
CLASS— MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE— WELCOME HOME ENTERTAIN- 
MENT—AWARDS FOR SERVICE— PEACE PROGRAM 195-199 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

CHAPTER XVIII. 



SOCIETIES AND LODGES. 



GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC— SONS OP" VETERANS— PATRONS OF HUSBANDRY- 
YOUNG MENS CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION— IGNITED CONFEDERATE VETERANS— 
P. E. O. SISTERHOOD— JAMESPORT FORTNIGHTLY CLUB— DAVIESS COUNTY 
IMMIGRATION SOCIETY— DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION- THE W. 
C. T. U.— MASONIC— EASTERN STAR— KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS— I. O. O. F.— RE- 
BEKAHS— AMERICAN LEGION 200-211 



PART 11. 



History of Gentry County. 



CHAPTER I. 



INTRODUCTORY. 



THE AUTHOR'S OBSERVATION OF SIXTY-FIVE YEARS IN GENTRY COUNTY— HIGH 

POINTS OF HISTORY— PROGRESS OF GENTRY COUNTY— ADHERENCE TO FACTS— 

"HARKING BACK" 213-214 



CHAPTER II. 



TERRITORIAL HISTORY. 



CLAIMED BY RIGHT OF DISCOVERY— INDIANS' RIGHTS SWEPT ASIDE— LOUISIANA 
PURCHASE— TERRITORY OF MISSOURI ORGANIZED- HOWARD COUNTY BSTAB- 
LISHED— "THE MOTHER OF COUNTIES" -GENTRY COUNTY ORGANIZED IN 1845— 
NAMED IN HONOR OF COLONEL GENTRY— LOCATION 215-216 



CHAPTER III. 



NATURAL RESOURCES AND TOPOGRAPHY. 



WHAT CONSTITUTES NATURAL RESOURCES— AVAILABLE AND POTENTIAL— MIN- 
ERAL SPRINGS— RAINFALL— PHYSICAL FEATURES— SCENERY AND SOIL— "A 
LAND OP PROMISE." 217-218 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

CHAPTER IV. 



EARJ^Y SETTLEMENTS. 



NONE OF THE FIRST SETTLERS NOW LIVING — CONQUEST OF THE NINETEENTH 

• CENTURY— "V^HHAT THE PIONEERS BROUGHT— THEIR AMBITIONS- SETTLEMENT 

BEGAN IN 1834— FIRST SETTLERS— OTHER SETTLERS— FIRST SCHOOL— FIRST 

POSTOFFICE— FIRST WHITE CHILD BORN IN COUNTY— FIRST CHURCH— EARLY 

PREACHERS 219-221 



CHAPTER V. 



PIONEER LIFE. 



REMINISCENT AND TRADITIONAL — THE PIONEER'S HOME — IMPLEMENTS — HIS 
TRIALS AND PRIVATIONS— SCARCITY OF NECESSITIES— BUILDING THE LOG 
CABIN— THE CRUDE FURNITURE— COMMUNITY SPIRIT— PASTIMES— GAME AND 
FISH— THE BLACKSMITH— GRISTMILL AND TRADING POST 222-228 



CHAPTER VI. 



FIRST COURTS. 



MET IN 1845— OFFICERS APPOINTED— BUSINESS TRANSACTED— CREATED SIX MUNIC- 
IPAL TOWNSHIPS— FIRST PETITION FILED IN CIRCUT COURT— EARLY RECORDS 
—RECORD BOOK STILL IN EXISTENCE 229-234 



CHAPTER VII. 



COUNTY BUILDINGS. 



COURTHOUSE— JAIL— COUNTY FARM BUILDINGS 235-241 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

CHAPTER VIII. 



TOWNSHIPS. 



ATHENS— BOGLE— COOPER— HOWARD— JACKSON— HUGGINS— MILLER— WILSON. 242-259 

CHAPTER IX. 



CITIES AND TOWNS. 



ALBANY— AT FIRST CALLED ATHENS— LOCATION— FIRST HOUSE— FIRST BUSINESS 
AND PROFESSIONAL MEN— TOWN INCORPORATED— FIRST SCHOOLS AND OTHER 
INSTITUTIONS— NEWSPAPERS— CHRISTIAN CHURCH— PRESBYTERIAN— METHO- 
DIST EPISCOPAL— BAPTIST— LIBRARY 260-271 



CHAPTER X. 



CITIES AND TOWNS— CONTINUED. 



STANBERRY— KING CITY— GENTRYVILLE—McFALL— FORD CITY— ALANTHUS— ISLAND 
CITY— DARLINGTON— BERLIN— GENTRY— EVONA— OTHER TOWNS 272-281 



CHAPTER XI. 



AGRICULTURE AND ALLIED INDUSTRY. 



FAVORABLE SOIL AND CLIMATE— DIVERSITY OF PRODUCTS— CORN EXHIBITS— POUL- 
TRY SHOW— COMPARISON OF 1902 CROP— LIVE STOCK AND OTHER PRODUCTS- 
DOMESTIC ANIMALS— WORLD'S FAIR WINNERS— STOCK BREEDERS— POULTRY 
EXPERTS— FINE GRASSES — CALF AND PIG SHOW — HORSES — "IF GENTRY 
COUNTY WERE MY NATIVE LAND." 282-294 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

CHAPTER XII. 



CIVIL WAR PERIOD 



OPINIONS DIVIDED— P0PI;LATI0N MADE UP OF NORTHERNERS AND SOUTHERNERS- 
DEVELOPMENT RETARDED— FEDERAL CONTROL MAINTAINED 295-296 

CHAPTER XIII. 



RAILROADS AND HIGHWAYS. 



AGITATION FOR RAILWAYS BEGINS— FIRST ROAD IN THE COUNTY— THE WABASH- 
LEON, MOUNT AYER AND SOUTHWESTERN— STATIONS IN THE COUNTY— HIGH- 
WAYS— JEFFERSON HIGHWAY— HARD SURFACE ROADS 296-298 



CHAPTER XIV. 



SCHOOLS. 



PUBLIC SCHOOLS— TEACHERS INSTITUTE— HIGHER STANDARDS— HEALTH WORK IN 
SCHOOLS — TEACHERS ASSOCIATION — CONOLIDATION — PALMER COLLEGE — 
NORTHWEST MISSOURI COLLEGE— CENTRAL CHRISTIAN COLLEGE 299-305 

CHAPTER XV. 



LODGES, SOCIETIES AND CLUBS. 



MASONIC LODGES— THE EASTERN STAR— INDEPENDENT ORDER OF ODD FELLOWS- 
WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN TEMPERANCE UNION— CIVIC CLUB— LADIES LITERARY 
CLUB— DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION- P. E. O.— CHAMBER OF 
COMMERCE 306-312 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

CHAPTER XVI. 



WORLD WAR. 



GENTRY COUNTY RESPONDS— TWENTY-NINE GOLD STARS— A LIST OF EX-SERVICE 
MEN FROM GENTRY COUNTY— NECROLOGY— RED CROSS AND OTHER ORGANI- 
ZATIONS—BOND SALES 313-325 



CHAPTER XVII. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 



COUNTY COURT JUDGES— PROBATE JUDGES— CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT— CLERKS 
OF COUNTY COURTS— CIRCUIT AND COUNTY ATTORNEYS— SHERIFFS— COLLEC- 
TORS— ASSESSORS— TREASURERS— JUDGES OF THE CIRCUIT COURT— REPRE- 
SENTATIVES— COUNTY SURVEYORS— SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENTS— CORONERS- 
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATORS '■ 326-330 



PART III. 



Biographical. 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Albany High School Building 213 

Alexander, Joshua W 331 

Allsup, J. W 400 

Austin, Fred S 528 

Bank Building Robbed by the James 

Boys 128 

Bennett, James B 416 

Brandom, Silvester W 576 

Brown, Mrs. Elizabeth A 488 

Brown, Marcus M 488 

Caldwell, Joseph M 904 

Carter, Mr. and Mrs. Salathiel 592 

Carter, W. H. and Grandson 624 

Court House, Daviess County 65 

Court House, Gentry County 213 

Culver, Elmer L 480 

Culver, Mrs. Mary Olive 480 

Dale, Lawrence T 848 

Dockery, Alexander M 352 

Dudley, Col. Boyd 344 

Dunavan, Lewis R 816 

Dunavan, Mrs. Lewis R 816 

Enyart, James E 536 

Ernst, C. E 424 

Foley, E. M., Jr 704 

Gallatin. South Side Square 96 

Gay, George R 928 

Gay, James and Anna F 864 

Gillett, Mr. and Mrs. John R 936 

Gould, Residence of Will S 768 

Green, Mr. and Mrs. J. F. and chil- 
dren 456 

Greenwell, Alexander 512 

Griffeth, Mr. and Mrs. C. J 888 

Hadley, Larkin F 520 

Hadley, Mrs. Larkin F 520 

Hamilton, Wood H 384 

Harpster, Ray 832 

Harrison, Clifford M 656 

Hedges, Dr. Frank 984 

Henderson, Mr. and Mrs. John F... 880 

Hemry, Charles 368 

High School Building, Gallatin 96 

Hosman, Leonard M 376 

Hudson, Mr. and Mrs. Richard 800 



Hunter, Jesse T. and Family 464 

Jarrett, Samuel A and Almira 960 

Jefferies, Thomas J 784 

Johnson, W. A 920 

Jolly, Mr. and Mrs. Jarhes Perry... 552 

Kemp, J. H 720 

Killam, Sam C 448 

Knight, Residence of Idella 640 

Leopard, John C Frontispiece 

McCammon, R. M Frontispiece 

McClure, Jonathan 856 

McClure, Mrs. Jonathan 856 

McCoy, Mr. and Mrs. J. J 896 

McCray, Robert D 872 

McDaniel, J. W 992 

McDaniel, J. W. Mrs 992 

Macy, W. C 392 

Mann, Moses 560 

Mettle, Oliver 360 

Miller, Martin Van Buren 544 

Milling Company, Daviess County.. 600 

Palmer College 304 

Peniston, Mr. and Mrs. Anthony... 608 

Pogue, George H 752 

Powell, Mr. and Mrs. Lew W^allace 

and daughter 912 

Preston, Mr. and Mrs. John 504 

Prichard, William M. and Family... 944 

Robertson, Wesley L 672 

Shockley, L. L 440 

Stanberry Public School 212 

Stanberry, South Side of Park 304 

Stanberry, View of First Street.... 112 

Todd. Mr. and Mrs. Levi 472 

Townsend, W. P 408 

Transportation, Early Day 240 

Trosper, Mr. and Mrs. William B... 688 

Yost, Cornelius 968 

Y. M. C. A. Building, Gallatin 192 

Waltemath, John A 496 

Waltemath, Mrs. John .\ 496 

Waters, Davis E 952 

Waters, Mrs. Davis E 952 

Waters, Residence of Davis E 952 

Wetzel, Mr. and Mrs. Reuben 736 



^'■^v Yoaiv' 



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ACTOft, LENOX AND 
^"U,l,S FOUNDATIONS 



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PART I. 



History of Daviess Counhj, 



CHAPTER I. 



EARLY SETTLEMENT. 



TERRITORY EMBRACING DAVIESS COUNTY- INDIAN OCCUPATION— FIRST SETTLERS- 
SETTLEMENT OF BENTON TOWNSHIP— SETTLEMENT IN OTHER TOWNSHIPS- 
NATIVITY OF PIONEER SETTLERS— CHARACTER AND NATIVITY OF LATER 
ARRIVALS. 

The territory now embraced in Daviess County was at the formation 
of the State of Missouri, attached to the county of St. Charles, which in- 
cluded all of the territory lying North of the Missouri River as well as some 
territory south of the river. The County of Howard was organized by the 
territorial legislature in January, 1816, and the present Daviess County was 
attached to this new county. In 1820 the first State Legislature organized 
the County of Ray which embraced that part of the State lying North of 
the Missouri River and west of Grand River. 

It was not until 1830, however, that the first white man settled in 
what is now Daviess County. This territory had formerly been inhabited 
by tribes of Sacs, Foxes, Pottawatomies and Musquakies and it was not 
until 1834 that the last Indian camp disappeared. Their last camp was 
Auberry Grove, north of the present town of Jamesport. It is said that 
hunters and trappers had visited this section of the country as early as 
1826 but no homes had been built prior to 1830. 

Probably the first house in the county was built by John and Mayberry 
Splawn, who came to the county in Jan., 1830. The cabin was erected near 
the present site of the Rock Island depot. The Splawns soon removed east 
of Gallatin to what is still known as Splawn Ridge. The third cabin was 
built by John Tarwater. The Splawns, Tarwaters and Stephen Roberts 
came in January a^d February. In the spring James Weldon, Benedict 



66 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Weldon, Humphrey Best, Daniel Devaul and his son, James R., John 
Stokes, Christopher Stone and his sons, James, Hardin, Robert and Wil- 
ham and John Edward followed. 

In 1831, many settlers came in. The following settled on Honey and 
Marrowbone Creeks: Josiah and Jesse Morin, Thomas Edwards, Lewis 
Linville, Philip Covington and Elisha B. Creekmore. Not far away lived 
Andrew McHaney and Meriwether T. Green, Jacob S. Rogers, L. Brook- 
shier, William Runnels, Thomas Auberry and William Morgan also came 
in 1831. Rogers settled below the mouth of Honey Creek and had a ferry. 
The others of those last named settled east of the river not far from the 
Splawns, Edwards and oth€rs. 

Robert P. Peniston, Sr., and his son, William P. came to the county in 
1831. The family had come out from Kentucky the year before and had 
settled in Ray County. Mr. Peniston, after visiting this county, was so 
favorably impressed that he decided to locate on the site afterwards known 
as Millport. The rest of the family were Robert P., Jr., Thomas, Francis 
and Theodore. From 1831 to 1833, Benjamin Sampson, Elijah Frost, H. 
W. Enyart, Benjamin Vasser, William Prewett, Benjamin Burns, Wiley 
Cope and family, Russell and Solomon Frazier, Jerry Burns and John 
McCully all settled in what later became Grindstone Township, now Mar- 
ion and Benton Townships. Adam Black located in Jamesport Township. 

The first settlement in Benton Township was in 1833. Benjamin 
Sampson came from Tennessee and settled on the western side of the 
township — about a mile from the county line. Later in the year H. W. 
Enyart came, locating a little over a mile from Mr. Sampson. During the 
winter and the following spring Benjamin and Jerry Burns, John McCul- 
ly, Charles and Isaac Burns and John Githens, all natives of Kentucky, lo- 
cated in the township. Mr. Enyart taught the first school and built the 
first loom used in the township. Liberty and later St. Joseph were the 
principal trading points of these settlers. 

Colfax Township was first settled by Mormons in 1836. Practically 
nothing is known of settlements made there prior to 1840. Probably the 
first settlers after the Mormons were James, Joseph and Edward Wood, 
all of whom came from Kentucky in 1839. Abner Osborn, from Indiana, 
soon followed. Benjamin Rowell, from New York, came in 1840 and lo- 
cated on the south side of Marrowbone Creek. In 1841 John Castor, a 
soldier in the war of 1812, came from Ohio. He had seven sons, who also 
became citizens of this township. Other pioneers in this locality were 
the Kelsos, Rev. Jeremiah Lenhart, Ira Hulette, Luther Cole, Jesse Osborn, 
and James Drake, all of whom came in 1841 and 1842. Camden was the 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 67 

chief trading point for these settlers, with Richmond and occasionally Lib- 
erty receiving a share of the trade. 

The first settler in Grand River Township was Solomon Tetherow, 
who came in the spring of 1831. There is some doubt as to whether 
Mr. Tetherow or John Splawn built the first cabin in the county. William 
Bowman, the first sheriff of the county, came a few weeks afterwards. 
In 1833 John Tarwater and his wife, Nancy Tarwater, located in this 
township, but had lived at another point in the county prior to that time. 
John Martin and his wife came in 1833, Adam Black in 1834, John Roland, 
Alfred Coots and James O'Dell in 1835. Richmond and Liberty were the 
chief trading points of these settlers. 

1831 marks the first settlement in what is now Harrison Township, 
Eli Wilson and Benedict Weldon came first, both from Tennessee. Nicholas 
and Elijah Trosper, Thomas Reed and Manuel Martin, all Kentuckians, 
came soon afterwards. Obediah Ramsbottom, another of the pioneer set- 
tlers of this township, was a native of England. 

Jackson Township had as its first permanent resident Robert P. Pen- 
iston, who built a cabin there in 1833. Daniel Girdner, John Oxford and 
Robert McHaney also staked out claims there. All of these settlers were 
from Kentucky. The first loom in the township was owned by Mrs. John 
Oxford. 

Thomas Auberry was the first settler in Jamesport Township. Prior 
to his coming to Daviess County in 1834, he had been a resident in Ray 
County and had laid out the town of Richmond. He is described as being 
"a preacher, doctor, farmer, horse-trader, horse-racer, surveyor," 
and "could play at cards so as to come out ahead about as often as 
his opponent." Settlers came slowly to this section of the county — they 
preferred the timber to the prairie. In 1837 and 1838 a number of Vir- 
ginians came in — James Callison, Richard Hill, John McClung and Robert 
Miller. Isaac Jordin, James C. Hill and others came within a short tme. 

Jefferson was one of the first townships to attract homeseekers. 
Anderson Smith, a native of Tennessee, and his wife came from Clay 
County in 1834. Judge Henderson and John Owings, came the same year. 
During the next two years John Higgins, Elijah Armstrong and Wiley 
Cope, all from Tennessee, became residents of the township. 

William M. Prewett and John Smith were the first settlers in Liberty 
Township. They came in the spring of 1834. H. W. and Elisha Creek- 
more, Tobias Miller and T. P. Gilreath came a few months later. All 
but John Smith were Kentuckians, although several of them resided in 
other counties in Missouri before coming to Daviess County. During the 
first two years the settlers had to go to Richmond or Liberty to have their 



68 , HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

grain ground. A few years later a mill was built on the border of DeKalb 
County and the longer journeys were no longer necessary. 

Lincoln Township was settled comparatively late, John Williams, 
who came in 1837, being the first resident. Mrs. Sarah Williams soon set- 
tled in the same section. Reuben Macy and Thomas Brown followed in 
1838. All came from Kentucky. Peter Bear, a native of Ohio, came 
in March, 1839, and John Mikels, a native of Kentucky but for a time 
a resident of Indiana, come the same month. Other pioneer settlers 
were William and Berg Shirley, from Indiana, Jacob Brown, from Ohio, 
and Joseph Everly, originally from Pennsylvania but more recently a res- 
ident of Indiana. 

David and James Brown came to this county in 1832 and settled in 
what later became Marion Township. Ebenezer Fields, Thomas Penning- 
ton and a few others came in 1833. Before 1838 Rebecca Clevenger, 
David Groomer, Taylor McCulley, William Roper and Elijah Frost had be- 
come residents of the township. The majority of these settlers came 
from Kentucky. Asa, Ross and Henry Vanover, also from Kentucky, came 
in 1838. Mrs. Rebecca Clevenger and Mrs. William Roper were especially 
noted for their skill in weaving. 

Many of the early settlers of Monroe Township have already been 
mentioned. Hardin Stone, Samuel McDow, John Stokes, and William 
Stone came in 1833. The next year Andrew McHaney, M. Wilson, T. B. 
Blakely, George Hemry, B. Osborn, Elijah Foley, William Splawn and 
others arrived. The Stones were from the Carolinas, McHaneys from 
Virginia and the Stokes from Kentucky. 

The first residents of Salem Township were Jonathan and Alexander 
Liggett, natives of Tennessee, who came in 1837. A short time later 
Aurelius Richardson, A. G. Dergin and Matthew Harboard settled in the 
vicinity of where Coffey is now located. John Severe came in 1841 and 
built a water-mill at the Rocky Ford on Cypress Creek. 

In 1833 James McCreary preempted a piece of land in what is now 
Sheridan Township. E. Mann and several others whose names are not 
known, came the same year, Isaac Splawn, Benjamin Rowell, E. Kelso, 
Charles McGee, Nathan Marsh, Anthony Mullins, E. Hulett, and A. Mc- 
Murtry came the following year. In 1840 the McMurtrys, John, Joseph, 
George and Samuel, brothers of A. McMurtry, came from Tennessee. 
George and Reuben Noah, from Ohio, became residents the same year. 
Richard Woodress, Dr. Samuel Venable, Thomas Kries, were also among 
the 1840 immigrants. 

The first settlement in Union Township was made in 1831. In 1830 a 
hunting party from Ray County made up of John Stone, John Stokes, Dan- 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES ■ 69 

iel Devaul, Wyman Vanderpool, Thomas Linville and two others, had 
been so well pleased with the country that they staked out claims in 1831. 
The Splawns, Creekmores, Penistons and others came in 1831, 1832, and 
1833. Millport was located in Union Township, and as a trading center 
tended to attract residents to that section of the county. The location of 
the county seat in Union Township also tended to give it a lead. Other 
settlers who came prior to 1840 were John A. Williams, Thomas W. Jacobs, 
Thomas Clingan, William C. Atkinson, Jacob Stollings, Lewis J. Dodd, 
Philip Covington, and Marshall K. Howell. 

John Williams, a native of North Carolina and James Munn, of Ken- 
tucky, settled in the northern part of Washington Township in 1836. D. 
Nelson Foster and his wife came in 1838 from Franklin County, Indiana, 
and William Taylor from Kentucky. 

A glance over the first few pages of this chapter shows that the over- 
whelming majority of the early settlers were from south of the Ohio River 
and of the Mason and Dixon line. A few were from Indiana and Ohio, 
but practically none were from New England or the Central Atlantic states. 
Upon examining the sketches of pioneers written by John F. Jordin in 
his "Memoirs," all except one of the subjects came from Kentucky, Vir- 
ginia, Tennessee and North Carolina. The McCues, Prices, Jordins, Sur- 
ges, Gillilans, Hills, Drummonds and Callisons were from Virginia; the 
Blakelys, Penistons and Ballingers from Kentucky, the Oxfords from North 
Carolina, and the Dinsmores from Tennessee. 

At a later date the character of the population became more cosmo- 
politan. In the history of the county published in 1882, sketches of 395 
Daviess County citizens are given. Classifying them according to the 
place of birth, the following is obtained. 

Missouri 79 or 20 % 

Virginia 74 or 18.98% 

Ohio 55 or 13.94% 

Illinois^ 40 or 10.12% 

Kentucky .... 33 or 8.36% 

Indiana 23 or 5.82% 

Foreign 19 or 4.89% 

Pennsylvania 16 or 4.05%> 
Tennessee. . . .14 or 3.55% 
Maryland .... 10 or 2.53% 

Five were from Vermont, three from Wisconsin, eight from North 
Carolina, four from New York, four from Iowa, one each from Alabama, 



70 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Deleware, Michigan, Connecticut, Massachusetts and Mississippi, two from 
New Jersey. Of those of foreign birth, nine were from England, four from 
Canada, five from Germany, four from Ireland, and one from Scotland. 
By taking the same group and eliminating those who came to the 
county after 1860 a much larger percentage is found to have come from 
the Southern states. Of the 395, only 192 came to the county before that 
date and the chart then stands: 

Virginia 55, or 26.65% 

Kentucky 26, or 13.52% 

Ohio 26, or 13.52% 

Indiana 20, or 10.41% 

Tennessee 11, or 5.72% 

Missouri 17, or 8.85% 

North Carolina 9, or 4.69% 
Pennsylvania ... 3, or 3.65% 

Illinois 7, or 3.65% 

Maryland 6, or 3.13% 

In the latter group nearly 54 per cent were from the Southern states 
as against 37 per cent in the first group. In neither group was an attempt 
made to separate residents from Virginia and West Virginia. Most of 
them came before the separation of West Virginia, and the biographies 
frequently did not state the location in the state from which the subject 
came. It is interesting to note that a great many of those who were born 
in Ohio and Indiana were of Virginia stock. The parents came from Vir- 
ginia, stopped in one of these states for a number of years, and then moved 
on to Missouri, 

While the 395 used as a study was only a small part of the population, 
it is probably large enough to be fairly representative of the county. A 
similar study now would probably show a larger percentage born in Mis- 
souri, and a greater number born in the adjoining states of Illinois and 
Iowa. 



CHAPTER II. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE COUNTY. 



PETITION PRESENTED IN 1836 BY ALEXANDER DONIPHAN— LOCATION OF COUNTY 
SEAT— TOWN ORDERED PLATTED AND SALE OF LOTS— REPORT OF COMMIS- 
SIONERS—EFFORT TO REMOVE COUNTY SEAT TO CRAVENSVILLE— OTHER 
EFFORTS TO CHANGE COUNTY SEAT. 

On Nov. 29, 1836, Mr. Alexander W. Doniphan, then representative 
from Clay County, presented to the House of Representatives "the petition 
of sundry inhabitants of the territory attached to the County of Ray, pray- 
ing the organization of a new county," "and also a petition of sundry citi- 
zens of the same place and for the same purpose." Upon Mr. Doniphan's 
motion, the petitions were referred to a select committee, Messrs. Doni- 
phan, Head and Nolan. 

On Dec. 19th, Mr. Doniphan, as spokesman of the committee, reported 
a bill to organize the counties of Caldwell and Daviess. The Journal does 
not give the original bill, but only change was made in the form — an 
amendment changing the boundry line of Caldwell County. This amend- 
ment was proposed by Mr. Blythe of Ray County and adopted on Dec. 21st. 

On Dec. 20th, the bill was reported to the Senate, and on Dec. 27th, 
the Senate reported that it had concurred in the passage of the bill. On 
Dec. 29th, the committee on enrolled bills reported that this act with others 
had been presented to the Governor for his signature. . The bill was ap- 
proved by Governor Boggs on Dec. 29, 1836, 

Location of the County Seat. — The act creating Daviess and 
Caldwell Counties provided that a commission composed of Joseph Baxter, 
of Clay County, Cornelius Gilliam of Clinton County, and William W. 
Mauzee of Ray County, to select a seat of justice for each of the new coun- 
ties. They were to meet at the home of Francis McGuire in Caldwell county 
on the 1st Monday in April, 1837, and select a site for the county seat 
of that county, proceeding as soon as possible to Daviess County. The 
citizens north of the river and those on the south desired the county seat 
on their side of the river. The south side won, but there has always been 



72 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

a feeling among the people north of the river that the seat of justice 
should be removed to some point further north. 

Just why one of the already established towns, Millsport or Cravens- 
ville was not selected is not known. A site was chosen and the name 
Gallatin was given to it. The town was ordered to be platted and a sale 
of lots to take place Jan. 8, 1838. Lots might be bought on one or two 
years credit from the date of sale. 

It was not, however, until Sept. 3, 1839, that the report of the com- 
missioners was recorded, and then they had to be hunted up by the county 
clerk, Robert Wilson. Their report read as follows: 
To The Honorable The County Court of Daviess County: 

We, Joseph Baxter, Cornelius Gilliam and Jacob Riffe, being duly ap- 
pointed commissioners to select and locate the seat of justice for the 
County of Daviess, respectfully submit the following report to your Hon- 
orable Body, After being duly qualified, we proceeded to your county on 
the 11th day of September, 1837, and succeeded in finding the center of 
said county, and after a minute examination of the county for several 
miles around said center, we selected and made the location of said seat of 
justice on the northwest quarter of Section No. 20, in Township No. 59, 
of Range No. 27, and designated the place by setting a stake in the presence 
of a number of your citizens on the 13th day of September, 1837, and 
we believe that said location is the most eligible that can be made within 
four miles of the center of your county. 

Respectfully yours, 

Joseph Baxter, 
Jacob Riff'e. 

Jacob Riffe had been appointed to take the place of William Manzee 
who was "very ill and likely to die." 

In 1840 a petition was presented to the county court signed by William 
Michael, Joseph Everly and others asking for the removal of the county 
seat to Cravensville. This would place the seat of justice within a half 
mile of the geographical center of the county. Another reason given for 
asking for the removal was because Gallatin was located "in that part of 
the county which is mostly prairie and cannot admit so dense a population 
as the parts lying west, northwest, north and east of the center of the 
county, with the elements necessary to make settlements." According to 
the petitioners, this would in the future make Gallatin difficult of access 
to the future population. According to tradition, Judge M. T. Green threw 
the petition to the floor and stamped on it, 93 names were signed to the 
petition. At that time there were 280 taxable inhabitants in the county 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 73 

and the law required the concurrence of three-fifths of the taxpayers in 
order to secure removal. Lacking the requisite 168 votes, the petition was 
rejected. 

In locating the county seat all the requirements of the law were not 
strictly complied with, and a question arising as to the legality of the pro- 
ceedings, it was thought best to secure the passage of a legalizing act by 
the Legislature. The request for this act was referred to a committee of 
the Senate. It is evident from the report that the citizens desiring the 
removal of the county seat had not been idle. The report of the com- 
mittee found on page 187 of the Journal of the Senate, 1841, is as follows: 

"Tuesday, Jan. 12, 1841. The committee on the judiciary considered 
with some care the papers and evidence of witnesses in relation to the 
contest about the county seat of Daviess County. They believe that the 
County of Daviess has a good title to the tract of land on which Gallatin, 
the present county seat, is located, but that there have been some inequal- 
ities in the location of the county seat, particularly in the fact that the 
title papers of the county seat not having been submitted to and approved 
by the circuit court of the county. 

"The remonstrance against the bill to legalize the county seat renders 
it probable that a majority of the citizens of that county are opposed to 
Gallatin being continued as the county seat, but as there is considerable 
contrariety of opinion on that subject and as lots have been sold and con- 
tracts made for public buildings at that place, the committee thinks it 
best to legalize the present county seat at Gallatin with the express stipu- 
lation that the seat of justice of said county may be removed at any time 
hereafter by the citizens of said county under the general law if the re- 
quisite number in favor of adopting such a course. The committee there- 
fore report back the bill with an amendment." 

In accordance with the report of the committee the legalizing act was 
passed and approved by the Governor in Jan. 29, 1841. The act empha- 
sized the duty of the county court to order an election for the removal of 
the county seat if demanded by three-fifths of the taxpayers. 

Another attempt to remove the seat of justice north of the river was 
made in the winter of 1865-66. Cravensville had now disappeared but it 
was proposed to locate a new town nearer the geographical center of the 
county than Gallatin. The effort was without result. 

An attempt to change the boundary line between Caldwell and Daviess 
had been made in????. Mention of the bill is made in the Legislative 
Journals, but since it did not pass the changes contemplated are not knonw. 

In 1867 and 1868, however, Gallatin citizens were suddenly alarmed 
by a petition presented to the Legislature by the residents of Hamilton. 



74 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Hamilton is on the Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad and was nearly three 
times the size of Kingston, the county seat of Caldwell County. But Ham- 
ilton was not in the center of the county, so the citizens undertook to put 
themselves in the center of the county. The petition to the Legislature 
asked that Township 58 be set off from Daviess County and added to 
Caldwell and that a tract of land six miles in width extending the whole 
length of the south side of Harrison County be added to Daviess. While 
putting Hamilton in a position to secure the county seat, it meant that Gal- 
latin and Bethany would be within three or four miles within the southern 
lines of their counties. A letter in the North Missourian of Dec. 24, 1867, 
from W. T, Foster, of Pilot Grove, Daviess County, stated that a majority 
of the people desired the change. This statement was at least open to 
debate. About the feeling of the people of Gallatin there was no doubt. 
Captain Ballinger was sent to Jefferson City to protest against the pass- 
age of such a bill. On Jan. 28, 1868, he telegraphed that the question was 
"dead and buried" by the Legislature. 

Since that time no attempt has been made to change the county line, 
nor the county seat. Until after the building of the new courthouse at 
Gallatin there was always a feeling that there was still a chance for the 
seat of justice being removed north of the river and the largest number 
of votes cast against the building of the courthouse was found in the north- 
ern townships. 



CHAPTER III. 



COUNTY BUILDINGS. 



COURT HOUSE— JAII.— COUNTY FARM AND BUILDINGS. 

Court House. — Daviess County's first court house was a private resi- 
dence — the home of EHsha B. Creekmore. Here both the county and cir- 
cuit courts met. At the march term of the county court, 1838, the ques- 
tion of the erection of a court house and jail was discussed, and the fol- 
lowing order was made: 

"It is hereby ordered by the court that Philip Covington be and is here- 
by appointed Superintendent of the court house and jail which is to be built 
in Gallatin, and that he draft a plan of said building and report to this 
court at its next regular term." 

On March 26, 1838, this plan was presented and approved and an ap- 
propriation of $6,000 made for the erection of the building. May 25, 1838, 
was set as the day on which the contract for the building would be let to 
the lowest bidder. The order further provided that the contractor should 
be bound in a sufficient bond for the completion of the building within three 
years, and that one-third of the payments be made annually. 

Mr. Creekmore's home being outside of the county seat, the court, in 
May, 1839, ordered that court from that time on should be held in Gallatin. 
Mr. Creekmore was paid $13 for house rent for circuit court. He was 
treasurer for the first eighteen months, and he evidently paid no attention 
to the court order that business was to be transacted at the county seat, for 
he later made that statement that for the first half of his term of service 
he received no salary and that he was finally dismissed because he persist- 
ed in keeping his office at home instead of in Gallatin. 

Just when the contract for the court house was let is not known, but 
at the March term of the county court, 1839, a contract with Thomas N. 
Aubrey, Robert P. Peniston and William P. Peniston was rescinded, and 
"Philip Covington, superintendent of said courthouse is hereby authorized 
to give up the bond for the completion of said building to the said con- 
tractors on the receipt of his obligation for the payment thereof." Evi- 



76 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

dently Aubrey and the Penistons had taken no steps towards carrying the 
contract into execution. 

The court then tried two men — Jacob Stollings and W. C. Livcy. 
Their plans were accepted in March, 1840. The specifications provided 
that the foundation was to be three feet thick, the brick wall of the first 
story to be 18 inches thick, second story 13 inches thick ; the building was 
to be four square, two additional windows in the upper story, one over each 
door, the wall and the roof were to be painted Venetian red, doors to be 
painted a beech yellow, the door and window casings and sash to be painted 
with white lead. The window blinds were to be green and the window 
frames were to be put in plain and arch braces and mouldings to be put in 
afterwards. The contractor was to be put under bond to put up the walls 
and roof in one year and the remaining part in two years, each part pay- 
able when completed. 

In writing of the building of this first courthouse, J. F. Jordin says: 
"So it was that these sturdy old pioneers with the entire revenue amount- 
ing to but $286.44 started boldly to build a $6000 courthouse and a $400 
jail. But there were giants in those days ! Men who were in the habit 
of doing impossible things, men with civic pride who realized that their 
lot had been cast in a land rich in latent natural resources and with brave 
hearts and willing hands they approached the task of proving themselves 
worthy of such a heritage. * * * * Coonskins were current money 
of the realm and at 50 cents apiece it would have taken 12,800 coons to pay 
for these public improvements." 

Work was begun in the summer of 1840. The enterprise seems to 
have been backed financially by Benedict Weldon. Various changes were 
made in the plans, more time was granted, there were changes in contrac- 
tors, and finally on May 1, 1843, the following court order was made: 

"Now on this day come Joseph L. Nelson and prayed the court to re- 
ceive the court house as finished (except the repairing of two windows 
which have been broken since the completion, one bolt on each of the out- 
side doors, repairing the plastering in second story and penciling chim- 
neys) and that the court would order the Superintendent to deliver to him 
the said Nelson the bonds executed to the county by Benedict Weldon for 
the completion of said house. Whereupon the court proceeded to examine 
the house, after which mature deliberation being thereupon had, it is 
ordered that the house be received as finished with the exceptions above 
named; that Tobias Miller, the superintendent, deliver up to said Nelson 
the bonds of Benedict Weldon aforesaid." The total cost of the court- 
house was $8094.55 Its dedication went uncelebrated. A writer in the 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 77 

Gallatin Democrat of Oct. 8, 1908, gives the following description of the 
building: 

"The old courthouse was square, probably 40x40, no record existing 
of its exact dimensions. There were two double door openings, one each 
on the west and south. The courtroom took up the entire lower floor. The 
rostrum was on the north side built high so that the feet of those on it 
were above the eye level of the seated spectators. The courtroom was fur- 
nished with wooden benches. Here it was that James S. Rollins and R. 
M, Stewart, candidates for governor, met in a joint debate and would have 
pummeled each other with their fists but for the prompt intervention of 
friends. 

"The stairway leading to the second floor was at the southwest corner. 
There were four rooms upstairs, one too small for practical use on account 
of th(e stairs, but was the office for many years of the early day lawyers 
beginning with the late John A. Leopard. The probate office was in the 
northeast room, the recorder's in the northwest and the sheriff's in the 
southeast." 

A single story, two room structure was built about 1858 just east of 
the courthouse and in it the circuit clerk and recorded, the offices being 
under one official at that time, and county clerk's offices were established. 
There were no vaults in the offices and the records were kept in desks or 
racks having little or no protection. 

A wooden tower surrounded by a balcony and ornamented with a brass 
ball the size of a washtub topped the building. On gala days the band 
occupied the balcony and the tower was decorated with flags. This cupola 
was a constant source of trouble. It would leak. As early as 1849 the 
court paid $85 to have it guaranteed waterproof for two years and in 1870 
the total repairs on the courthouse amounted to $1500. 

As early as 1865 we find the local papers complaining of the condition 
of the courthouse. The old building grew more and more unsatisfactory 
and in 1883 the Frank James trial was held in a building owned by Judge 
Alexander on the west side of the public square on the site now occupied 
by the Payne Furniture Company. On June 12, Mr. Lamkin, of the Galla- 
tin Democrat, had published this statement: "It is said that Governor 
Crittenden and Phelps, General Shelby and other eminent men will be in 
Gallatin to attend the James trial, and it is enough to make every citizen 
of Daviess County blush with shame to be compelled to point to this miser- 
able abode of bats and owls and say to these eminent visitors, "This is our 
courthouse." After the trial the county court entered into negotiations with 
Mr. Alexander, and the building was arranged to accommodate the circuit 



78 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

court and one or two county offices. The old court house was torn down 
in 1886, but the side building remained for several more years. 

In 1890 the building owned by Judge Alexander burned and the Pro- 
bate records were destroyed. The present building on the same site was 
then erected. 

Several propositions to vote bonds for a new courthouse were voted 
down. In 1889 a proposition to erect a $50,000 courthouse was rejected by 
a majority against of 223 votes. In March, 1902, the county court, on the 
petition of the required number of taxpayers ordered an election to be held 
on April 22, on the question of erecting a new courthouse at a cost of not 
to exceed $75,000, to be paid for in bonds payable in five and due in ten 
years, to be paid by a levy of not to exceed 25 cents on the $100 valuation. 
A very light vote was cast and the vote stood 1526 for and 1118 against, 
but since a two- thirds majority was necessary, the proposition was lost. 

In September of the same year, a petition was presented to the court 
asking for a vote on the question of issuing bonds not to exceed $70,000, 
bearing 4 per cent interest and maturing in five years. At the election 
on Nov, 4, the vote stood 1821 for and 1054 against, Washington, James- 
port and Lock Springs precincts having a majority against. 

The voters having twice within a year rejected propositions for build- 
ing, the county court felt justified in making a contract for the use of the 
Alexander block for a period of seven years. 

The question was still kept before the people by the press, and in 
1905 petitions were again circulated for another submission of the propo- 
sition. It was proposed to build a $75,000 courthouse, to be paid for by a 
special tax of four direct levies of 20 cents each rather than by issuing 
bonds. More than 500 singned the petition and it was presented to the 
county court by D. H. Davis. Accordingly, December 9th was set as the 
day of election. Mass meetings were held all over the county. This time 
the vote was 2299 for and 803 against. Only four townships failed to give 
the proposition a two-thirds majority, and two of these went more than 
two to one against. 

An advisory committee was appointed by the county court in Febru- 
ary, 1906. The members were Frank Ray, W. T. Smith, H. R. Hill, R. E. 
Maupin, W. C. Pogue, John R. Handy, W. P. Minnick, D. H. Davis, W. H. 
Kindig, E. G. Brown, J. H. Wise, Grant McCrary, E. M. Foley and Moses 
Mann. The court selected as a building committee A. M. Dockery, C. M. 
Harrison, J. W. Meade, Boyd Dudley and Weasley L. Robertson. 

In April, 1906, architects submitted plans to the county court, but de- 
cision was deferred for a time. The plans and specifications of P. H. 
Weathers were adopted, and in August the contract for the construction 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 79 

of the building were let to M. T. Lewman, of Louisville, Kentucky, at $69,- 
625. Work was begun early in November, with J. W. Alexander, Superin- 
tendent of construction, and M. E. Pangburn, accountant. In April, 1907, 
the foundation was pronounced satisfactory. The cornerstone of the 
building was laid on May 24, 1907, the Masonic lodge having charge of 
the ceremony. On Monday, August 31, 1908, the court formally accepted 
the courthouse and final payment was made to the Louisville company. 

The formal dedication took place Oct. 5th. In the morning the corner- 
stone of the Y. M. C. A. was laid, the Masons having charge. In the after- 
noon the meeting was called to order by Judge George A. McWilliams. 

Jail. — As stated in the account of the courthouse, Philip Covington 
was ordered in March 1838 to draw up plans for a jail. The plan was ac- 
cepted and an appropriation of $400 was made for that purpose. The 
contract was awarded to John B. Comer in May, 1838, and a year was 
allowed in which to erect the building. Mr. Comer was unable to finish 
the work in that time and in June of the following year an extension of 
time until December 25 was granted him. The court may have considered 
a jail to be of more immediate importance than a courthouse as three years 
was allowed for the building of the latter. The lack of a good jail was 
presented rather forcibly to the citizens when in July, 1839 Mayberry 
Mitchell presented the court with an account in favor of certain citizens 
of Clay County for guarding Joseph Smith and others. The bill amounted 
to $480. Since the entire revenue derived from taxation that year amout- 
ed to but $460.30, $125.45 of which was delinquent, the dismay of the court 
may be easily imagined. The matter was laid over to the August term, 
and court refused to allow the claim. It was then by agreement certified 
to the circuit court for final adjudication. This court found for the citi- 
zens of Clay County and in Sept., 1840, the court ordered the claim to be 
paid. 

Again John B. Comer asked for an additional year in which to com- 
plete the jail. The building was finally ready for occupancy in March, 
1841. The jail is described as follows in Kost's History of Daviess County: 

"It stood on the next block north of the public square in Gallatin, and 
was made of hewn timber one foot square and notched down so as to fit 
close. It was double, on one pin within another, with four inches of space 
between them. This space was filled with straight poles dropped down 
from the top. The bottom or floor was also double, like the sides. The 
inner space of the building was 20 feet square and the height of the 
ceiling was also 20 feet. The only entrance was through a trap-door in 
the center of the ceiling." 

The total cost of this prison was $560. In April, 1857, the court ap- 



80 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

propriated $4000 to build a stone jail in the northwest corner of the public 
square. James McFerran was appointed to superintendent its construc- 
tion. The building was completed Nov. 15, 1858, and cost $7850. In June, 
1859, a kitchen and smokehouse were added at a cost of $579. This jail 
burned in ????, the general opinion being that it was set on fire. 

In 1887, it was decided by the county court to errect a new jail, $11,- 
000 of the county funds being appropriated for that purpose. A. M. Irving 
was appointed commissioner, and submitted plans for a jail and sheriff's 
residence. This jail has been used ever since. Recently a survey was 
made by W. L. Nelson, representing the State Board of Charities, of the 
jails of the state. He described thirty-two as being below a descent stand- 
ard as to ventilation, sanitation, size or security. The Daviess County 
jail was among the 32. 

County Farm. — The first move to secure a permanent home for 
the care of the destitute of the county was made in 1864. Prior to that 
time the care of the poor had been let out by the sheriff to the lowest bid- 
der. Occasionally the court would assume the responsibility and fix the 
terms for their support. The terms ranged all the way from $25 to $100 
a year, paid quarterly. 

At the December term of the county court, 1864, Andrew Shriver and 
Samuel A. Richardson were appointed commissioners to select a site for 
an almshouse and to report in January, 1865. A tax of one-sixth of one 
per cent on all subjects of taxation was ordered to defray the expense of 
purchasing the farm and erecting the necessary buildings. 

The commissioners reported that of the several farms offered, what 
was known as the Ward farm seemed to them the best suited for the pur- 
pose and recommended its purchase at $15 per acre. The farm of 160 
acres was purchased at that price, William W. Everly acting as agent for 
the county. The following terms were agreed upon ; one half cash, $800 
within two months and $400 within six months, with ten per cent interest 
upon deferred payments. 

This farm was of little use to the county. No buildings were put up, 
and after a few years it was sold and another farm selected. 

The farm of John Cooper was purchased by the county court in July, 
1873. The tract included 100 acres and the purchase price was $2000. 

In 1914 an examination of the county farm disclosed that miserable 
conditions obtained. The conditions, when reported, created a demand 
for a decided change. A petition was then circulated asking for a special 
election to vote on the question of erecting a modern infirmary. The peti- 
tion was signed by nearly 700 taxpayers. The court accordingly in March 
1915 ordered an election to be held the first Tuesday in June. The propo- 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 81 

sition was to sell the present farm and purchase a site nearer the county 
seat. A special tax of 10 cents on the $100 valuation for two years was 
ordered to pay for the new building. This proposition was rejected by the 
voters. 

Since that improvements have been made on the present farm, and 
while conditions are far from ideal, things are in a fair condition. 

Not all of the poor are cared for at the county farai. A number are 
allowed a certain amount a month, while other needy persons are given oc- 
casional help. 

The county also has the expense of a number in the various state in- 
stitutions. At the end of 1920 the county had supported 42 persons in state 
hospitals and assisted 47 not in state hospitals. The total amount expended 
by the county for poor persons in state hospitals was $987.90, while the 
sum expended for poor persons not in state hospitals was $4864.18. 



CHAPTER IV. 



CITIES AND TOWNS. 



GALLATIN — COFFEY — WINSTON — PATTONSBITRG — JAMESON — CARLOW — LOCK 
SPRINGS— ALTAMONT— CIVIL BEND — MILLPORT — ADAM-ONDI-AHMON — CRAV- 
ENSVILLE— PRAIRIE CITY— CRITTENDEN— ECLIPSE— OLD PATTONSBURG— VIC- 
TORIA— ALTA VISTA— BANCROFT. 

Gallatin. — The events connected with the selection of the site for the 
seat of justice have already been mentioned. The land upon which the 
town is located was preempted by Philip Covington. Some difficulty later 
arose over the title and it was not until 1869 that the necessary quit claim 
deed was secured. The town was platted in December, 1837 and the first lots 
were sold Jan. 8, 1858. Main and Grand streets were each to be 80 feet 
wide, and all other streets 60 feet in width. Jacob Stollings built the first 
house in the town — located where the Etter Dry Goods Company now has 
its store. At about the same time George W. Worthington put up a build- 
ing for a dram shop. The first grocery store was kept by John A. Williams. 
Thomas W. Jacobs opened a dry goods store and Jesse Adamson a grocery. 
Compton and Mann a general store. All of these business establishments 
were started before June, 1838. The first tavern was opened by Lewis J. 
Dodd, while the "Mansion House" was opened in 1844 by Stollings and Peck. 

Gallatin was first incorporated in 1854, the trustees being Thomas T. 
Frame, Joseph L. Wilson, Alfred L. Barnett, George W. Brosius and Robert 
Wilson. For some unknown reason no other trustees were elected under 
this charter. On Nov. 7, 1854, Gallatin was again incorporated. Dr. John 
Cravens, Adam Clemdenen, James Owings, Henry Whittington and Otis B. 
Richardson were appointed the first trustees. By 1857 the town had a pop- 
ulation of about 400 and then asked for incorporation as a city. The Gen- 
eral Assembly passed the necessary act and it was approved by the Gov- 
ernor Nov. 21, 1857. The first election of Mayor and Council was held in 
May, 1858 when the following were elected. William M. Givens, Mayor ; J. 
H. McGee, S. T. Hill, John Ballinger and Henry W. Lile, Council. The 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 83 

Council then appointed William M. Sheets, Clerk, William T. Osborn, Treas- 
urer and C. A, Witt, Marshall and Collector. 

During the Civil War there were no elections, control of affairs being 
largely in the hands of the militia. In Nov., 1866, upon the petition of 
Joseph of McGee and a hundred and one other residents tax payers, the 
county court appointed Joab Woodruff, Joseph H. McGee, Samuel A. Rich- 
ardson, D. L. Kost and John Ballinger, Trustees for the town until next 
election. This enabling act seemed unsatisfactory and in Sept., 1868 a 
number of citizens petitioned W. C. Gillihan, who was a notary public to 
call an election to fill all vacancies in "ofhce elective under the charter of 
said city". The election of D. Harfield Davis as Mayor, Jacob Woodruff, 
Robert H, Grantham, Benton Miller and James D. Vance, members of the 
council. 

A new charter was granted Gallatin in 1870 by the General Assembly, 
and the first election under it was held the first Tuesday of April 1870, and 
resulted in the selection of D. C. McDougal, Mayor, Joel H. Brundidge, 
Thomas J. Grain, A. M. Irving and Amos Poe, council. 

In 1877 an attempt was made to have Gallatin become a city of the 
Fourth Class, but the proposition was defeated by a vote of 33 to 94. The 
city continued to operate under its special charter until 1908 when by a 
vote of 260 to 105 Gallatin became a city of the Fourth Class. 

A number of additions have been made to the original town site. 

In 1878 it was decided to macadamize the public square. The work 
was under the direction of Squire Ewing. Morley and Venable were given 
the contract for the south side at $2.00 per square of 10 feet. By 1882 the 
work had been completed, as well as a road to the Rock Island depot. It is 
now proposed to have the main streets paved. In 1905 an ordinance was 
passed providing that all new sidewalks put down must be made of brick 
or granetoid. 

In 1906 Governor Dockery purchased a tract of land which he presented 
to the town for a park. Additional land was purchased and Dockery Park 
was formally dedicated on June 18, 1907. For many years the Catholic 
church had owned a lot in Gallatin near the park. A controversy later 
arose over the ownership and finally in 1909 an acre adjoining the park 
was exchanged for the land in controversy. In the same year Governor 
Dockery added two more acres to the park. 

Since 1911 Gallatin has maintained a Chautauqua which is managed 
by a group of citizens, rather than by a Chautauqua company. 

The population of Gallatin in 1890 was 1,489 ; in 1900, 1,780 ; in 1910, 
1,825 ; and in 1920 it was 1,747. 

Jamesport. — The story of the founding of Jamesport is best related 



84 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

in the words of one of the founders, Dr. J. T. Allen, who in 1905 wrote a 
series of articles for the North Missourian entitled, "Recollections of an 
Old Settler." 

"James Gillilan's house stood near where the school house now stands, 
only on the West side of the street. Remember that there was nothing 
east of that but prairie. I built my office in his yard in the spring of 1856. 
I made a trip to Virginia in that fall. When I left I told Mr. Gillilan to 
finish my office. When I returned it was nearly Christmas, but Mr. Gillilan 
had not done a thing to my office. When I asked why, he said he thought 
I would want to go to one of the new towns, which had been laid out in my 
absence. I was, as the saying goes, knocked clear out of the persimmon 
tree, as the understanding was when I left we would lay out a town where 
it now exists. There was a spritely widow, a Mrs. Murray, who had laid 
out a town three miles north of the Jamesport-to-be, and she called it 
Edray. If any doubts this, look at the records in your county clerk's office. 
Another town was laid out by Mr. Smith about two miles east. As I had 
devoted a great deal of time in studying the law about how to lay out 
towns, I found that Mr. Smith, although he had advertised sale of lots, had 
violated the law by not having previously recorded the plat as the law di- 
rects. So I scared him off by a threat of the law, and I told Mr. Gillilan I 
thought we could beat the widow, as this was the place for the town. So 
with his consent I platted the old town and got a young man named Solo- 
mon to survey it. Not being accustomed to laying out towns, I made the 
streets too narrow. Mr. Gillihan gave me choice of a half block, with the 
privilege to select where I wished. I selected the lots where the old Buz- 
zard bank stood. On the other half was erected the first hotel. We had 
a public sale of lots and did well. I will state here that with Mr. Gillilan's 
consent we had an agreement that no saloon should be allowed to hold any 
lot. They finally beat us in this. *As the children of darkness are always 
wiser in their generation than the children of light.' 

"This is a true story of the origin of Jamesport. Mr. Gillilan and my- 
self pondered a long time as to the name we should give our new foundling, 
and as we were both named James, we concluded to call it for ourselves." 

The town grew slowly, having in 1870 only about 120 inhabitants, 
with the building of the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad, now a part of 
the Rock Island system, Jamesport took on new life. The first train came 
thru the town on June 25, 1871. New business houses began to be built. 
A grain house was erected by Franklin Collison in the summer of that year, 
Dunn & Miller started a large store building and a lumber yard established. 
In 1872 the Jones Mill was built. Between July 1, 1871 and Jan. 1, 1872, 
forty dwellings and ten stores were built. 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 85 

In 1872 a petition was presented to the county clerk asking that James- 
port be incorporated. 

Franklin Callison, Nathaniel G. Cruzen, Maro Thomas, A. B. Barnes 
and Isaiah H. Jones, were appointed trustees. 

By 1875 the population had increased to 400. In that year the board 
of trustees undertook numerous improvements, sidewalks and street cross- 
ings were put in. 

In Jan. 22, 1881, Jamesport voted to become a city of the fourth class. 
The vote being 78 to 22. Franklin Callison was the first mayor and P. H. 
Lilly, J. C. Murray, Horatio Bunker and J. H. Berry made up the first 
board of aldermen. 

The Commercial Club has been especially active in the improvement 
of roads. 

Jamesport has one of the prettiest parks in this section of the state. 

Coffey. — Located in Salem township is a small town platted under the 
name of Salem but the post-office is known as Coffey. The official name of 
the town is now seldom used. It was platted in 1856, and the plat recorded 
July 29th of that year. In an account of the life of William Galbreath the 
following data was obtained: "Uncle Billy Galbreath came to Daviess 
County in Oct., 1848, and settled on the site of what is today Coffeyburg.** 
*** He gave the ground on which Pennebakers store now stands to Cole 
Brown and Frederick Westpheling in the early Fifties, provided they 
would establish a general merchandise store, which they did, ****** Uncle 
Billy was one of the committee, which secured the crossing of the old state 
roads from Plattsburg to Trenton and Hamilton to Bethany at Coffeyburg 
and the store located at the crossroads did a thriving business." The first 
residence was built by Edwin Mclntire. William Triplett had the first 
blacksmith shop and William Gillispie the first cabinet shop. The town be- 
gan to get daily mails in 1876. 

The building of the K. C. & I. Railroad which passes through the town 
made it an important center in that part of the county. The population 
in 1920 was 367. 

Winston. — The 1882 history makes the following statements regard- 
ing Winston: "It has a greater extent of rich farming country tributary 
to it than any town in the county, not even excepting Gallatin, and if a 
public spirit of enterprise is exhibited will soon rival in population and 
wealth the seat of justice of Daviess." 

The Chicago and Southwestern railroad was completed in the summer 
of 1871. At that time a station was established about halfway between 
Gallatin and Cameron. This station was at first called Crofton. The land 
upon which the town was built was owned by Mrs. Susan Ethington, Fred- 



86 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

erick Croft, Jacob Fleisher and Henry Koons. A large portion of the site 
was donated to the railroad company for railroad and town purposes. The 
railroad conveyed the land to a group of men in Gallatin known as the Gal- 
latin Company. The company pushed the sale of lots. The town then be- 
came known as Winson or Winstonville. The postoffice was established at 
this point in Feb., 1872, and F. B. Brown was the first postmaster. There 
being another postoffice in the state called Winson the postoffice here was 
called Emporia. Up into the eighties the town was frequently referred to 
by this name. 

T. J. Jefferies was the first station agent and the first store was open- 
ed by Joseph Swike in 1871. Henry Koons established the first hotel. The 
first physician was Dr. Wilson, and Dr. D. M. Clagett came in 1874. 

The town was incorporated in March, 1878, and T. J. Jefferies, D. M. 
Clagett, Jonas Potts, John T. Taylor and Otho Preston were the first 
trustees. 

A commercial club was organzied in 1906. 

The town has a population of 339. 

Pattonsburg. — The plat of Pattonsburg is filed under the name of Elm 
Flat. It is located in the bottoms of Sampson Creek and took the name 
from the number of elms growing there. About a mile and a half north of 
the town stood old Pattonsburg. When the Chillicothe and Omaha Railroad 
was being built through the county in 1871, Benton Township subscribed 
$20,000.00 to the road, said road to run through the old town of Patton- 
burg. But instead the company built to Big Creek and there stopped for 
a time. Business men from Pattonsburg began to move to the railroad and 
soon the old town was deserted. The new town grew rapidly. A list of 
business references in 1876 contains the following names. E. H. Tillery, 
proprietor of the Valley house, Alex Edson proprietor of the Forest House. 

Elm Flat was first incorporated Aug. 7, 1877, but an error had been 
made in the description of the land. On Sept. 10th, the court granted the 
amended petition. 

W. G. Weldon, John W. Casebolt, F. E. Venable, Thomas J. Mattingly 
and E. B. Christie constituted the first board of trustees. 

On May 28, 1895, the business section was almost entirely destroyed 
by fire. The loss was estimated at more than $50,000. New buildings were 
soon put up. 

In 1909 the county was subjected to the most disastrous flood in its 
history. On July 6th, the flood began. Big and Sampson creeks and Grand 
river rose rapidly. A band of some thirty men headed by Mayor Maupin 
started working on the dike near Pattonsburg, thinking that by rip-rap- 
ping a great of the danger could be averted. Within a few hours the town 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 87 

was under water except some of the houses in Highland addition. The 
new drainage project which is on foot in that section of the county will 
when completed, prevent the recurrence of a like disaster. 

The population is 1068. The town has always had a group of business 
men who were interested in good roads and they have managed to secure 
the location of a number of trails thru Pattonsburg. 

The citizens have recently opened a country club house. 

Jameson. — The St. Louis, Chillicothe & Omaha Railroad completed its 
road as far as the location of Jameson in June, 1871. A surveying party 
from Chillicothe laid out a town at this point, completing the work on June 
12, 1871. Benjamin G. Kimball was appointed as agent for the company 
and on the following Monday, he began selling lots at $100 each. The land 
upon which the town was laid out was entered by Charles Cravens on Oct. 
2, 1854, and a year later a tract adjoining it by Ark Briggs. Henry Briggs 
owned the land at the time the town was laid out. At first the postoffice 
was known as Feurt Summitt, but the name was afterwards changed to 
Jameson. 

Herbert D. White put up the first building, a small frame building used 
for a grocery and restaurant. The store building of a Mr. Threlkeld and 
James F. Hamaker were erected within a short time. Elijah Hubbard was 
in charge of the first hotel. J. W. Wanamaker, a blacksmith and wagon- 
maker, soon opened a shop and did a lively business. William McCoy start- 
ed a livery and feed stable. The first drug store was owned by Dr. William 
Allen, who was also the town's first physician. The first lumber yard was 
owned by Leeper & Grappler. 

John A. Brown was the first postmaster, but was soon succeeded by 
Dr. Walker. Squire Scott, one of the justices of Grand River Township, 
held the first court in Jameson. The railroad books show that 24 cars of 
grain and 53 cars of stock were shipped from the new town during Oct. 
and Nov., 1871. 

On Oct. 12, 1876, Jameson was incorporated, and A. 0. Siple, W. T. 
Stovall ,J. M. Raley, A. Ingraham, and S. F. Howell were appointed trustees. 

In 1882, a plot of ground was laid off for a public park. Here has been 
held the annual event of greatest social importance to Jameson and the 
surrounding community, the K. P. picnic, held each year on Aug. 9th. 

The population of Jameson was 329 in 1920. 

Carlow, an incorporated village in Jackson Township, is a station of 
the Wabash Railroad. The town has several stores and a bank. A con- 
solidated school has recently been built on a site a short distance north of 
the village. 

Lock Springs is in the southeast part of Jackson Township on the 



88 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Wabash railroad. In 1890, it had 212 inhabitants ; in 1900, 246 ; in 1910, 
255; and in 1920, 288. 

Altamont is the youngest town in the county. In the early nineties, 
the C. R. I. & P. Railroad built an extension of its line to St. Joseph. Win- 
ston had expected that the division point would be at that place. Instead 
the junction was located about three miles nearer Gallatin, and called Alta- 
mont, meaning "High Mountain", and so named because of its elevation of 
1,002 feet at the railroad depot. 

All of the members of the present town board are women, with one 
exception. It is the first town of the county to elect women to such posi- 
tions. The population in 1920 was 349. 

Civil Bend is an unincorporated village located in Marion Township. 
It was laid out by Gilbert Canfield in 1868. The first business house was 
built by John T. Price, and N. B. Brown was another of the early merch- 
ants. In 1880 the population was 78. With the coming of the railroads, 
other towns located along the railroad prospered at the expense of Civil 
Bend, which has declined in population and business importance since 1880. 

Mill Port was a thriving village when Daviess county was organized 
in 1836. At that time the settlers on Lick Fork, Honey creek and Grind- 
stone creek combined and managed to have the countj^ seat located south 
of Grand river. This marked the end of the prosperous career of the first 
town in the county. Mill Port merchants lost no time in removing to the 
county seat, where they were among the first merchants of the new town 
of Gallatin. In the fall of 1838 Mill Port was burned by the Mormons and 
no attempt was made to rebuild it. 

Adam-ondi-Ahmon. — Early in 1837 Mormon immigrants began to flock 
into Daviess County. They settled mainly south of the river. At the time 
the administrative headquarters of the Mormon church had just been 
estabhshed at Far West in Caldwell County. In April, 1838, Joseph Smith, 
Jr., had one of his famous revelations which resulted in the establishment 
of a Mormon town in Daviess County. Following the vision he tells in his 
History of the Church how in May of that year he came up Grand river 
until he came to the home of Lyman Wight, one of the most prominent of 
his followers. Here they selected a town site, four miles south and one- 
half mile west of Gallatin. This place had been called Spring Hill, but 
by order of the prophet it was now named Adam-ondi-Ahmon. 

' Gravensville. — After the Mormons were driven from Adam-ondi- 
Ahmon, a new town was established on the same site by Dr. John Crav- 
ens, who had come from Virginia and had settled in Saline County, a short 
time before the outbreak of the Mormon trouble. The town was called 
Ctavensville. For a number of years Gravensville contested with Gallatin 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 89 

for the county seat. At one time 93 of the 280 taxpayers of the county 
petitioned to have Cravensville made the seat of justice, but the county 
court rejected the proposal. The town had ten or twelve dwelling houses, 
several stores and about 60 inhabitants. 

Prairie City. — The plat of Prairie City, located in the northern part 
of the county, was filed by J. R. Vancil on June 1, 1857. As late as 1870 
the village had an assessed valuation of $365, but at that time it had prac- 
tically disappeared. 

Crittenden was located in the southwestern part of Lincoln Town- 
ship. Stage lines passed through it four times a week. In 1860 Joseph 
H. Herndon was postmaster. After the war practically nothing was heard 
of the village. 

Eclipse had practically no existence except on paper. The plat was 
recorded Dec. 15, 1856 by James Blizzard. 

Old Pattonsburg- was located about one and one-half miles north of 
the present town of that name. About 1845 Matthew Patton built on Big 
Creek the first water-mill in Benton Township. The settlement which 
sprang up near the mill was at first called Patton Mill, but was later chang- 
ed to Pattonburg. 

In 1872 the Wabash Railroad built as far as the present site of Pat- 
tonsburg, which was then known as Elm Flat. The business men soon be- 
gan to remove to the Flats, but they took the name of the town with them. 
The old town rapidly disappeared, and is now a cornfield. 

Victoria. — Jefferson Township furnished sites for two towns, which 
are now extinct. Victoria, named for the English queen, was laid out in 
in 1855 by John Osborn, and was located less than a mile from the southern 
line of the township in Section 32. 

When the Hannibal and St. Joseph railroad was built, trade was di- 
verted to Cameron and when later the Rock Island was built thru the 
country, Victoria was again overlooked and has been practically extinct 
since 1880. 

Alta Vista, also located in Jefferson township, was laid out by M. D. 
Hines, in 1856. Mr. Mines conducted the first store located in the new town. 
Alta Vista had the distinction of giving the first barbecue in the county on 
July 4, 1858. Alta Vista has also disappeared, the name remaining only to 
designate the neighborhood. 

Bancroft was situated about a mile from the Sullivan County line in 
Lincoln Township. In 1859 John Oram and Thomas Mickels each gave five 
acres for the town site. The first merchant was Washington Nichols and 
Lon Chaplin had the first blacksmith shop. This town enjoyed a greater 
prosperity than its contemporaries. About 1890 the Omaha and Quincy 



90 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Railroad was built through the county, missing Bancroft by about a mile. 
Oilman was built at that distance from Bancroft. From that time on the 
town fought a losing fight and has now ceased to exist. 



CHAPTER V. 



MILITARY HISTORY. 



BLACK HAWK "WAR— HEATHERLY W^AR— MEXICAN WAR— COL. WICKHAM'S MILITLV 
COMPANY, COMPANY A, SECOND MISSOURI REGIMENT, N. G. M. 

Black Hawk War. — Settlers had just begun to come into what is now 
Daviess County when all of North Missouri was aroused over the threaten- 
ed attack of Indians under Chief Black Hawk, In the fall of 1831, many 
of the settlers took their families back nearer the Missouri River where 
the county was more thickly populated and better protection was offered, 
in case of attack by the Indians. It is said that Daniel Devaul when 
the first alarm came announced his intention of staying and seeing the 
thing through. He made a very heavy door to replace the thin slab one, 
and cut holes through which to shoot. A few of the neighbors decided to 
stand by him and the Devaul cabin was arranged to withstand the seige. 
About this time a second alarm came, conditions seemed much more terri- 
fying. Mr. Devaul and his two friends decided not to risk their lives any 
longer and followed the neighbors to a place of safety. Some of the pio- 
neers who did not leave the county built a block house surrounded by pali- 
sades near a spring on the old John Merritt farm. Scouts were sent out 
and every one was ready for business if the Indians appeared. But there 
was no need for alarm as the Indians who sometimes visited the county 
were very peaceably inclined. 

A company of rangers was organized in Ray County by Colonel Skouts 
and many young men living within the boundaries of the present Daviess 
County joined the company. Among them were Hardin Stone, Theodore 
Peniston and Milford Donaho. Maj. McGee relates this incident which 
occured while the men were in service : 

"It was while scouting at the head waters of the Chariton river that 
the rangers met a company from Howard County on a similar warlike mis- 
sion. During the meeting the question of markmanship came up and a 
shooting match was arranged between the two companies. A Mr. Josiah 
Davis was selected by the Howard County boys to show Daviess County 
youngsters how to handle shooting irons while the gallant hunter and rang- 
er Milford Donaho was selected as the Ray and Daviess County representa- 



92 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

tive to show the Howard County boys that while they could hold a full 
hand at brag, when it came to a sharp eye and a steady hand the rangers 
were at home to all comers. It was reported a close match, but Mr. Donaho 
was declared the winner." 

The Indian War was soon over and with the danger removed the set- 
tlers soon began to return and many others came with them. 

The Heatherly War. — What is usually styled the "Heatherly War" is 
important chiefly because of the excitement it created in the northwestern 
counties. A family by the name of Heatherly lived in what is now Grundy 
County on Medicine river. With them were four men, Thomas, Watkins, 
Hawkins and a colored man. All were regarded as rather desprate charac- 
ters.. In 1836 they were organized into a regular horse-stealing band, and 
made raids wherever there was any chance of meeting with success. In 
the fall of that year they took horses from a man by the name of Dunbar 
and his companion. Both men were killed trying to defend their property. 
The character of the Heatherly gang being pretty well known, they were 
under the necessity of doing something to divert suspicion. They there- 
fore invented the story that the Indians, the lowas and the Sacs, were on 
the warpath, scalping and killing and burning the homes of the settlers. 
Any mention of an attack by the Indians was terrifying to the settlers and 
they had visions of whole armies of savages pouring in upon them. The 
inhabitants at Moore's and Thompson's settlements assembled. Those at 
Moore's hastily built a block house. The militia was ordered out by Gen- 
eral Thompson, two companies were ordered out from Ray, and two from 
Clay, a number joining from Daviess and Livingston. It was soon learned 
that it was a false alarm and the settlers determined to find out the cause. 
It was soon traced to the Heatherly gang, who had stated that Indians had 
been murdering. The bodies of the two men were found in the river. De- 
tection being practically certain, Hawkins, one of the gang, turned state's 
evidence. The gang was sent to the penitentiary. 

The Mexican War. — The exploits of the Missouri troops in the Mexi- 
can War are too well known to need repetition. Daviess County's part in the 
struggle is harder to determine. In 1846 a volunteer company was raised 
in Ray County and mustered into service on the first of August. This 
company, Company "G", Battallion of Missouri Mounted Rifles, was com- 
manded by Captain Israel R. Hindley. A number of Daviess County men 
joined this company. Captain Hindley was killed at the Battle of Mors, 
and William M. Jacobs then became captain. This company was a part of 
the command of Colonel Alexander W. Doniphan. A company was raised 
in northern part of Daviess County, and in Harrison and Gentry Counties. 
This group became Company "H" in a regiment which went from Jackson 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 93 

County. Captain Simons, who had raised the company, died on the way out 
and Benjamin Salmon, of Daviess County, was elected to fill the vacancy. 
In July, in a fight with the Apache Indians and Mexicans, Captain Salmon 
was severely wounded. After the battle he was removed to a hospital at 
Toas where he died the following February. Other members of Company 
"H" from this county were Nathaniel H. Blakley, Granville D. Sego, James 
A. Robinson, John M. Conkle, Samuel Gunter, Henry Johnson, Jacob Hoover 
and Captain Meredith Morris. 

William Y. Slack of Livingston County organized a company in that 
county, and a number of Daviess countians enlisted. Among them were 
Captain John W. Sheets, Francis Peniston, Jack Edwards, Thomas Latham, 
James Wynne and John B. Comer. 

Major S. P. Cox was a member of Company "D" of the Oregon Battal- 
ion. This battalion was ordered to Mexico, but before they got out of 
reach were ordered back and sent to Nebraska to keep the Indians quiet. 
Stokes and English (first names not known,) Thomas B. Lynch, A. T. Pat- 
ton, George W. Nickell, J. L. Haynes, W. P. Young (Ohio), and Henry 
Akins Roberts (Illinois) were also veterans of the Mexican War. Stokes 
died in service. There were, no doubt, many others from Daviess County 
or who at some time have lived in the county who served in this war. 

The return of these soldiers was not allowed to pass unnoticed and 
the homecoming is described by Major McGee, "The citizens to honor them 
had a great barbecue. Colonel Doniphan, their commander, was invited to 
be present and deliver the speech of the occasion. The ground selected 
was what is now enclosed in Block E, McGee's Addition to the city of Gal- 
latin, all the ridge east of town being then heavily timbered. The tables 
were spread on the top of the hill. The trenches for roasting the meat 
were dug on the brow of the hill just above the spring now owned by Will- 
iam Adams. Colonel Doniphan was present and talked for about an hour 
in his usual style. He gave the boys a great deal of credit." 

Col. Wickham's Militia, Co., A, 2nd Missouri Regiment, N. G. M. — 
About 1882, Col. J. A. Wickham of Gallatin was made a field officer of the 
Second Missouri Regiment, N. G. M. Company "A" was organized in Gal- 
latin, but some of its members lived in other parts of the county. The 
armory was over Etter's store. A list of the officers of Company "A" was 
published in the Gallatin Democrat of May 27, 1882, which is given below: 

A. M. Irving, Captain; Frank Clingan, First Lieutenant; George T. 
Crozier, Second Lieutenant. 

Non-commissoined Officers: William Johnson, First Sergeant; O. A. 
Smalley, Second Sergeant, C. A. Stout, Third Sergeant, J. A. Selby, Fourth 
Sergeant ; George H. Smith, Fifth Sergeant. 



CHAPTER VI. 



THE MORMONS IN DAVIESS COUNTY. 



LYMAN WIGHT THE FIRST MORMON TO SETTLE IN DAVIESS COUNTY— HEADQUAR- 
TERS AT FAR WEST— JOSEPH SMITH, JR., SELECTS SITE OF STRAKE IN 
DAVIESS COUNTY— GROWTH OF TOWN— FIRST MORMON TROUBLE— LATER 
DEVELOPMENTS— THE MORMON WAR— MOBOLIZATION OF TROOPS— EXTERMIN- 
ATION ORDER— MAUN' S MILL MASSACRE— MORMONS SURRENDERED- TO MILITIA 
LEADERS TAKEN TO INDEPENDENCE— SUBSEQUENT TRIAL— REMAINS OF 
MORMON OCCUPATION. 

The facts included in this chapter are taken largely from "Early Days 
on Grand River and the Mormon War," by R, J. Britton, who has made a 
most thorough investigation of the subject. 

The first Mormon to settle in Daviess County was Lyman Wight, who 
came in 1837. He had left Ohio, hoping to be allowed to live in peace, and 
settled first in Jackson and later in Ray County. Being driven from both 
counties he came to Daviess County. 

At this time the Mormons had just located their administration head- 
quarters at Far West, in Caldwell County, and Joseph Smith, Jr., the pro- 
phet began to select various places in the neighboring territory as stakes. 
On May 18, 1838, Joseph Smith Jr., and others traveled north to the mouth 
of Honey Creek, and the next morning crossed Grand River at the mouth 
of Honey Creek and Nelson's Ferry, and followed the river to the home of 
Lyman Wright. Near this place Smith selected the site of the city, "which 
the brethern called 'Spring Hill,' but by the mouth of the Lord it was named 
Adam-ondi-Ahmon, because, said he, it is the place where Adam shall come 
to visit his people, or the ancient of days shall sit, as spoken of by Daniel, 
the prophet." (Smith, History of the Church.) 

The new town grew rapidly, soon having over 500 inhabitants, a good 
wagon road was built between Adam-ondi-Ahmon and Far West, making 
communication easy between the two points. 

A number of Mormons entered land, and it seemed for a time they had 
indeed reached a land where they might live peacefully. But soon friction 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 95 

arose between them and their Gentile neighbors. The Gentiles grew sus- 
picious of the Mormons and no doubt held them responsible for many 
acts of depredation with which they had nothing to do. A secret society 
called the Danites was organized by the followers of Smith. The highest 
degree in this order was that of "Destroying Angel." Whatever the real 
purpose of this organization may have been, the other settlers in the county 
believed that its purpose was to plunder and rob those who were not be- 
lievers in their doctrine. The wrath of the Gentiles can be easily imagined. 

The first outbreak came in Aug. 6, 1838. A general election was being 
held in Gallatin. The Missourians attempted to keep the saints from vot- 
ing and a general fight followed. One man was stabbed, and about twenty 
others injured, but no one was killed. The Missourians were victorious, 
and the saints had to leave. After this, according to the phophet, "The 
brethern held a council about one-fourth of a mile out of town, where they 
saw mobbing recruits coming in, in small parties of from five to 25 in num- 
ber, armed with clubs, pistols, dirks, knives, and some guns, cursing and 
swearing. The brethern, not having arms thought it wisdom to return to 
their farms collect their families, and hide them in a thicket of hazel bush, 
which they did, and stood sentry around them through the night, while the 
women and children lay on the ground in the rain." 

The news of this engagement reached Far West the next day, it being 
reported that several of the saints had been killed, and were refused burial 
by the Gentiles. Accordingly a group started to the scene of hostilities. 
Thinking that Adam Black, then a justice of the peace, was largely respon- 
sible for the difficulty, the saints called on him and secured his promise not 
to do them any violence so long as he was not molested. 

A meeting was arranged between some of the citizens of Mill Port and 
the saints of Adam-ondi-Ahmon — Joseph Morin, John Williams, James 
B. Turner and others representing the Missourians ; Lyman Wight, Vinson 
Knight, John Smith, Reynolds Gaboon being the leaders for the saints. At 
this meeting each agreed to preserve the oth^s' rights, and that neither 
would uphold wrongdoing, and that all offenders would be dealt with ac- 
cording to the law. 

Shortly after this, Aug. 10th, affidavits were sworn to in Ray County 
by William P. Peniston, William Bowman, Wilson McKinney and John 
Netherton, stating that Adam Black had been intimidated by the Mormons, 
and that their leaders intended to "intimidate and drive from the county 
all the old citizens, and possess themselves of their land, or force such as do 
not leave to come into their measures and submit to their dictation." 

On Aug. 16th, the sheriff of Daviess County, accompanied by Judge 
Morin called upon Joseph Smith Jr., at Far West with a writ to take him 



96 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

to Daviess County for trial for visiting the county on the 7th. He inform- 
ed the sheriff that while he would submit to the laws of the land, he wished 
to be tried in Caldwell County since the attitude of the people of Daviess 
was so unfriendly. The sheriff then went to Richmond to see Judge King, 
and returning informed the prophet that he was not in his jurisdiction and 
that he could not act in Caldwell. 

On Sept. 2nd, Joseph Smith Jr., sent for General David R. Atchison, 
who was in command of a division of the State Militia, hoping that his 
presence would stop the citizens of Daviess preparing for hostilities. He 
also wrote to Austin A. King, circuit judge, asking him to assist in putting 
down what he termed as a "mob." General Atchison arrived the next day 
and was employed as counsel by the Mormons, as was his partner, Alexan- 
der W. Doniphan. Joseph Smith Jr., and Lyman Wight agreeing to a pre- 
liminary hearing before Judge King, in Daviess County, arrangements 
were made for the trial to be held at Mr. Littlefield's near the present site 
of Winston. 

Court was convened at the Littlefield home on Sept. 6th, but no testi- 
mony was taken and the case was continued until the next morning, at a 
Mr. Rgalin's who lived further south, within a half mile of the Caldwell 
County line. William P. Peniston was the prosecutor and Adam Black, 
the only witness for the state. The hearing resulted in Smith and Wight 
being bound over to court on a $500 bond. 

At this time a wagon load of fire arms was being sent from Richmond 
to Daviess County. Learning of this the civil authorities at Far West de- 
cided to intercept them. A writ was issued, the wagon surrounded and 
John B. Comer, William L. McHaney and Allen Miller put under arrest. 
These men were held till Sept. 12th. Their preliminary trial was held at 
Far West, when they were bound over to the circuit court, the charge 
against Comer being "attempting to smuggle arms to a mob," and the 
others as accomplices. 

The arrest caused a great deal of excitement. The Missourians peti- 
tioned the Governor to drive the Mormons from the state, while the saints 
petitioned for his protection. On Sept, 11th, General Atchison ordered the 
mihtia to Caldwell and Daviess Counties. The order was given to General 
Doniphan, who reported on Sept. 15th that he had ordered Col. William A. 
Dunn to raise four companies of mounted riflemen of 50 men each, and pro- 
ceed to the scene of the excitement. General Doniphan, accompanied by 
his aide, then went to Far West, where he took charge of Comer, McHaney 
and Miller, and collected the arms captured by the saints. The arms were 
sent to General Atchison. Comer was also sent to Ray County, while the 




HIGH SCHOOL BUILDING, GALLATIN 



South Side of Square, GaJlatin, Mo. 




MS** 



S^4 





'Sfei.jat *,^ «^ -^^S^^iJSSS?'^ 



SOUTH SIDE OF SQUARE, GALLATIN 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 97 

other two were taken to Daviess County by General Doniphan where they 
were released on parole. 

Arriving at the camp of the citizens of Daviess and adjoining counties, 
he read them General Atchison's order to dispearse. They insisted that 
they were acting only for the purpose of defending themselves, but General 
Doniphan reported "They still continue in arms marching and counter- 
marching." Proceeding to the camp of the Mormons, Colonel Wight in 
charge of the troops agreed to disband and to turn over all Mormons accus- 
ed of crime if the opposing side should also disband. "I intend to occupy 
this position until your arrival, and I deem it best," wrote General Doni- 
phan to General Atchison, "to preserve peace and prevent an engagement 
between the parties, and if kept so for a few days they will doubtless dis- 
band without coercion." Shortly thereafter. General Doniphan arrived 
and reported to the Governor that there were 200 or 300 men in arms from 
Livingston, Carroll and Saline Counties under the command of a Dr. Aus- . 
tin of Carroll County, whom he ordered home. "The citizens of Daviess 
County, or a large portion of them residing on each side of the Grand River 
have left their farms and removed their families either to the adjoining 
county or collected them together at a place called Camp Ground. The 
Mormons of Daviess County had also left their farms and had encamped for 
safety at a place immediately on the east band of Grand River, called Adam- 
ondi-Ahmon. Both parties have been scouting through the country and 
occasionally taking prisoners and threatening and insulting each other, but 
as yet no blood has been shed. I have been informed by the Mormons that 
all of those who have been charged with a violation of the law will be in to- 
day for trial. When that is done the troops under my command will be no 
longer required in this county if the citizens of other counties will return 
to their respective homes. I have proposed to leave two companies of 50 
men each in this county and to discharge the remainder of the troops." 

On the 18th, Governor Boggs ordered the 4th division, commanded by 
General S. D. Lucas to the county, evidently considering that the force was 
not large enough, or that General Atchison underestimated the gravity 
of the situation. 

Later General Atchison wrote the Governor that the citizens of other 
counties had gone to their homes, as had also the Mormons, and that he 
considered the insurrection at an end for the present. However, a portion 
of the military force was left in the county under the command of General 
Parks. On Sept. 25th, he wrote General Atchison that a committee from 
Daviess County would meet the next day with a committee of Mormons at 
Adam-ondi-Ahmon to propose to them to buy or sell. 

But the suspension of hostilities in Daviess County was followed by as 



98 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

serious trouble with the saints in Carroll County. The Mormons finally 
agreed to leave the county, and they then joined their fellow -believers at 
Far West. 

Here on the morning of Oct. 15th, a company of about 100 men was 
organized. The commander was a Mormon, Lieutenant Colonel Hinkle, 
who held a commission in the State Militia. It is said that he acted under 
the order of General Doniphan. This company, accompanied by Joseph 
Smith, Jr., then went to Adam-ondi-Ahmon. On the 18th of October about 
150 Mormons came to Gallatin, and finding but a few men in the place, took 
possession of the town. Removing the goods from the stores, the business 
houses were burned. According to Major McGee, "We could stand in our 
dooryard and see houses burning every night for over two weeks. The Mor- 
mons completely gutted Daviess County. There was scarcely a Missourian 
home left standing in the county. Nearly every one was burned. Their 
flight from the county had been so precipitated that they left all they had 
behind, taking only their families and teams. The Mormons secured all 
their property and took it to De Amon and there placed it in what was term- 
ed the Lord's Storehouse, to be issued out to the saints as they might need." 

According to the Prophet, the Missourians removed the contents of 
their houses and set fire to them themselves and then accused the saints of 
doing it. He also tells of threats made by the "mob," as he termed all his 
enemies. 

During this time, on Oct. 18, 1838, General Parks came to Daviess 
County and went at once to the home of Lyman Wight, at Adam-ondi-Ah- 
man. On the 25th, a small engagement took place near the ford of Crook- 
ed Creek, and several of the Mormons were killed. 

The following day Governor Boggs ordered a large force of the militia 
into Daviess County. This order came as a result of petitions, he says, 
stating that "The Mormons with an armed force have expelled the inhabi- 
tants of that county from their homes, have pillaged and burned their 
dwellings, driven off their stock, and were destroying their crops ; that they, 
the Mormons, have burned to ashes the towns of Gallatin and Mill Port in 
said county, the former being the county seat of said county, and including 
the clerk's office and all the public records of the county, and that there is 
not now a civil officer within said county." On the 27th, the Governor 
issued his famous 'Exterminating Order,' addressed to General Clark, in 
which he states 'The Mormons must be treated as enemies, and must be ex- 
terminated or driven from the state, if necessary, for the public good. Their 
outrages are beyond all description. If you can increase your force you 
are authorized to do so, to any extent you may think necessary." It is 
said that General Atchison, upon receiving this letter, withdrew from the 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 99 

military force, saying he would not be a party to the enforcement of such 
inhuman commands. On the other hand, it is also stated that he was re- 
lieved of his command by the Governor. 

According to "The History of the Church/' the Danites were organiz- 
ed at this time by a Dr. Avard. In a speech to his followers he instructed 
them to rob and plunder from the gentiles as this was the way to build up 
the kingdom of God — laws were of no consequence under the new dispen- 
sation. Naturally, this aroused the ire of the gentiles, and they were in 
no frame of mind to believe the statements of the presidency of the church 
that Avard's actions were unauthorized and met with the disapproval of the 
Mormon authorities. 

In the meanwhile troops were gathered in obedience to the call of the 
Governor, and the feeling between the two factions increased. On Oct. 30th, 
what is usually referred to as Haun's Mill Massacre took place in Caldwell 
County. On Oct. 30, 1838, a force of between 2,200 and 3,000 men gather- 
ed near Far West under Generals Lucas, Wilson and Doniphan. Before 
the expected battle the leaders of the Mormons were delivered to the militia 
through one of their number, Colonel Hinkle, who was supposed to be in 
command of the Mormon forces. He had also made terms upon which the 
Mormons agreed to leave the state. The Mormons later gave up their 
arms and were ordered to leave the state. Their leaders were tried before 
a military court (though Lyman Wight was the only one connected with 
the military) and sentenced to be shot. General Doniphan refused to obey 
the orders and threatened General Lucas if they had them executed. The 
order was never carried out. According to the interpretation placed upon 
one of the articles of agreement the church membership was held liable for 
the payment of the debts of the war waged against them, and in this man- 
ner deprived of their property. No hearing was given them. 

On Nov. 4th, John B. Clark assumed command in Far West, with ex- 
plicit orders from the Governor to carry out his "Exterminating order." In 
speaking of the Mormons, he reviewed the terms of the treaty, stating that 
the first three provisions had been complied with — their leaders given up 
for trial, their arms given up, and their property signed over to defray the 
expenses of the war. He then advised them to comply as quickly as pos- 
sbile with the last provision — to leave the state. 

On Nov. 6, 1838, the Governor wrote General Clark, directing him to 
hold a military court of inquiry in Daviess County. General Clark then 
ordered Bragadier-General Robert Wilson to go to Adam-ondi-Ahman for 
this purpose. He arrived there on the 8th. Every man in town was put 
under guard, and the court established, with Adam Black as judge, and a 
soldier in General Clark's command as prosecuting attorney. At the end 



SoTlvGB 



100 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

of three days, every man tried was honorably acquitted. General Wilson 
then ordered every family to be out of town within ten days. They might 
spend the winter in Caldwell County, but must leave the state then on pen- 
alty of extermination. This is a sample of the permits issued to those 
against whom a charge had been sustained: 

"I permit David Holman to remove to Caldwell County, there to re- 
main during the winter or to pass out of the state. 
Nov. 10, 1838. (Signed) R. Wilson, Brigadier General, 

By F. G. C, Aide." 

On Nov. 2nd, Joseph Smith Jr., Sidney Rigdon, Hiram Smith and other 
Mormon leaders were started for Independence under a strong gUard. They 
were detained at. Richmond and there 53 were held for trial, charged with 
high treason against the state, murder, burglary, arson, robbery and lar- 
ceny. Austin A. King presided at the trial. The testimony of Samson Avard, 
mentioned above in connection with the Danite band, gave testimony which 
confirmed the beliefs of the Gentiles regarding the purpose of that organ- 
ization. Smith states that in his diary Avard swore falsely in order to 
save himself. When the defendants were called upon for witnesses. Smith 
says that, "The persons whose names were given were thrown into jail and 
the few who were allowed to testify were prevented by threats from telling 
the truth as much as possible." In spite of this 23 prisoners were dismissed 
for lack of evidence. Finally, all but Lyman Wight, Hiram Smith, Caleb 
Baldwin, Alexander McRae and Joseph Smith, Jr., and four others were 
released. The first group was sent to Liberty, the other four to Boone 
County. P. P. Pratt and Morris Phelps escaped from the Boone County 
jail, July 4, 1839. Follet escaped with them but was recaptured. Luman 
Gibbs, the remaining one of the four, apostatized and was acquitted. 

Joseph Smith Jr., and his companions arrived in Liberty on the first 
day of December, 1838. 

After various preliminaries and during which time the prisoners ap- 
pealed to the Legislature and the Supreme Court and no action taken, — on 
April 6, 1839, Judge Austin A. King ordered them taken to Daviess Coun- 
ty. On April 8th. they were delivered to Sheriff Wm A. Morgan of Daviess 
County. The grand jury was in session at the time, and returned a true 
bill for treason against the prisoners and others. The witnesses were: 
Samon Avard, Waterman Phillips, Adam Blaxer, Josiah Marin, John Cor- 
ril, J. L. Rogers, Francis McGuire, Lebum Marrin, Henry McHenry, John 
Edwards, John Brown, Robert McGaugh, John B. Comer, Jackson Job and 
Ira Glaze. 

Indictments against the prisoners for murder, treason, burglary, lar- 
ceny, theft and receiving stolen goods, were also returned by this jury. The 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 101 

prisoners pleaded not guilty when brought up for the trial before Judge 
Thomas C. Burch. A change of venue was asked by Smith and his compan- 
ions on the ground that the judge had been of counsel in the cause. The 
request was granted and the case transferred to the circuit court of Boone 
County. 

On April 15, 1839, William Morgan and four guards started to Colum- 
bia, Mo., with the five prisoners. On the night of the 16th the Mormons 
escaped. 

Only one log cabin remains to mark the site of the Mormon town, 
Adam-ondi-Ahman. On the elevation nearby grows a giant hackberry tree, 
at the foot of which is a pile of limestone. This spot is commonly referred 
to as "Adam's Grave." 



CHAPTER VII. 



THE CIVIL WAR. 



SENTIMENT DIVIDED IN DAVIESS COUNTY— ACTIVITIES OF UNION MEN IN 1861— 
COMPANIES ORGANIZED— HEADQUARTERS ESTABLISHED AT GALLATIN— GUER- 
RILLA WARFARE— SKIRMISH — BOUNTY OFFERED TO VOLUNTEERS — UNION 
SOLDIERS FROM DAVIESS COUNTY— COMPANY A— COMPANY G — COMPANY B— 
FORTY-THIRD INFANTRY— SPECIAL ORDER NO. 6— CONFEDERATES— CIVIL WAR 
INCIDENTS. 

At the outbreak of the Civil War, the people of Daviess County were 
divided in sentiment, probably the majority of them, however, being South- 
ern sympathizers. Major McGee reports that while there were plenty of 
Union men in the county, in Gallatin there were only 20 men who, in the 
fall of 1860, favored standing by the Union and only eight would declare it 
openly. Judge S. A. Richardson, S. B. Cox, John Ballinger, Harfield Davis, 
Owen H. McGee, William V. McGee and Joseph H. McGee. James McFer- 
ran, councellor of the group, kept in the background. The southeast cor- 
ner of the square in Gallatin, occupied by Davis and Son, druggists, was 
known as "Secession Corner." While Harfield Davis was a Union man his 
father was a violent rebel. Finally the firm dissolved, Baalis Davis going 
into business at Chillicothe. 

The activities of the Union men during 1861 are told by Major McGee 
in the following paragraphs : 

"Dr. C. C. Hogan, my old family physician, had raised a company for the 
rebel army, had them camped on Grand River bottoms, about three miles 
from town. Rebel companies were now organizing and drilling all over 
the country. Many of them would come upon the platform in front of my 
office while Judge Richardson and I were in there and talk so that we could 
hear them. They would purpose taking out what few Union men there 
were in Gallatin and hang them. They never did. This kind of life could 
not be borne always. We decided to put an end to it. Upon consulting 
Major Cox, Captain Ballinger, brother William, John Shriver and myself, 
we concluded to leave town and raise one or more companies, then come 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 103 

back, take possession of the place, keep it. * * * We set the time for 
us to leave. It was arranged that all should get an early dinner, then meet 
at my house promptly at 12 m. At 12 o'clock sharp we all mounted our 
horses, laid our rifles before us on our saddles. Two abreast we galloped up 
the street and by "Secession Corner." More than 20 rebels were standing 
looking at us as we galloped past. They had never dreamed of such a 
thing. Their eyes bulged out to such an extent that you could have almost 
thrown a lariat around them. I had part of a company enlisted who were 
to meet us at Honey Creek. We went by, got them, went on to Cameron. 
Dr. Folmsbee had enlisted a company on the east side of Grand River and 
met us at Cameron. I had about half enough to organize a company. 

"Learning that Colonel Craynor was disbanding his men at St. Joseph 
and knowing that all the Civil Bend boys who were with him would reenlist, 
Capt. Ballinger and myself got on the train. We went to St. Joseph to see 
them ; found that they had all started for home across he country. We re- 
turned to Comeron the same night. Early next morning we mounted our 
horses and struck across the country to intercept them. We halted them 
late in the evening, made arrangements with them to meet at a neighbor's 
the next morning and go with us to Comeron to enlist. We all met the 
next morning an went to Cameron. We were mustered into six months' 
service under the call made by Governor Gamble. Col. James H. Birch 
was our mustering officer. As Dr. Folmsbee had his company first made 
up, his was Company A. Mine was Company B. Major Cox was mustered 
in as Major over our two companies. Meredith Morris was my first lieuten- 
ant, McLain Wilson my second lieutenant. 

"We were mustered in Sept. 18, 1861. We had no arms but our old 
shot guns and rifles. * * * -!= We got word that Price had sent troops 
across the river to tear up the H. & St. J. R. R. The objective point would 
be Cameron. We kept our horses saddled and bridled for two nights ; had 
pickets out for five and ten miles on the Lexington road. 

"Judge Birch, father of Colonel Birch, our mustering officer, got on the 
engine with the engineer, (it was not safe to run a train on the railroad on 
account of Bushwackers) and went to Hannibal, got on a stemboat there 
and went to St. Louis ; gave his individual bond for guns with which to arm 
our two companies ; did not leave the city until he saw them boxed and shij)- 
ped to us. They were nothing but old Springfield muskets. We were sup- 
plied with fixed ammunition, which made them a great improvement on 
our former arms. We still remained at Cameron practicing our arms and 
scouting through the country. 

"Captain Folmsbee and myself concluded we would take a survey of 
the county around Gallatin. When we started, I supposed we were coming 



104 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

to Gallatin. When we got as far as where the Round school house now 
stands, four miles west of Gallatin, Captain Folmsbee, being the ranking 
captain, ordered the command to take the road leading to Esquire William 
Everly's, near where the Crab Orchard church now stands. I was anxious 
to see home. Tried to get him to change his order. He declined doing so. 
It was probably well enough that he did not, as I afterwards learned that 
Dr. Hogan's rebel company was expecting us and had concealed themselves 
on each side of the road west of Major Cox's and intended bushwacking 
us as we came in. We went to Squire Everly's and struck camp, which was 
afterwards known as Camp Everly. 

"We remained at Camp Everly until we had seen our families and learn- 
ed all we could as to the intention of the rebels. It is singular how numbers 
can be magnified. In Captain Folmsbee's company and my own we had 
probably 150 men all told. Yet the rebels at Gallatin who could by occupy- 
ing the cupola of the court house and using a field glass take in our camp, 
as it was only four miles off, had magnified our number to 1000 men. We 
did not try to undeceive them. After we had remained in camp as long as we 
thought best, we concluded to break camp and return again to the railroad 
where we could get our supplies. We camped the first night after leaving 
Camp Everly at old Uncle John Castor's on Marrowbone Creek. We were 
treated to the best he had on his farm. Next day we moved to Kidder on 
the H. & St. J. R. R. Made our quarters in the depot. Major S. P. Cox 
now took command of us as our major. We remained at Kidder some two 
or three weeks drilling. It was determined to return to Gallatin even if we 
had to fight our way in. We broke camp at Kidder early in the morning 
and started for Gallatin. We were not interrupted on the way, entered, 
took possession of Gallatin without opposition. To say that we were joy- 
fully received would be partly true and partly false. By our families and 
Union friends we were joyfully received but by the rebels of the town, they 
would rather, as one woman expressed it, "have seen the devil coming into 
town." The drama was now changed. For the last two months the town 
and country had been under the control of the rebels. Union men fared 
badly. Now that we had possession they expected there would be a retalia- 
tion. 

'T forgot to state that before we left Kidder some of the boys whilst on 
a scout duty had captured Dr. Hogan. He had taken his company off south 
to Price's army, had returned to recruit others. We countermanded his 
orders. Captain Ballinger and myself took him to Hannibal, where he was 
confined as a prisoner of war until he took the oath. He was paroled. It 
took the rebel portion of Gallatin some time to settle down to the conviction 
that they were still in the Union. They finally gave up all hopes of Price 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 105 

coming to relieve them, accepted the situation hoping and praying for the 
success of the Southern Confederacy." 

Major Samuel P. Cox established his headquarters in Gallatin. In ad- 
dition to the companies commanded by McGee and Folmsbee, Captain 
Brumfield's company from the northern part of the county and two from 
Harrison County were stationed there. The rest of the winter was passed 
in scouting through the country, keeping out Confederate recruiting offi- 
cers, arresting Confederates and requiring them to take the oath. 

Service in the six months militia being ended in January, 1862, plans 
were made to organize a regiment of cavalry of the Missouri State Militia. 
In April the regiment was formed with James McFerran as colonel. Three 
of the companies were raised in Daviess County, Company A, under Cap- 
tain Joseph H. McGee, Company B, under Captain W. H. Folmsbee, and 
Company G, under Captain John Ballinger. 

On April 9, 1862, the field and staff officers were commissioned. The 
batallion was perfected March 26th, except companies G and H, which 
were added April 9, 1862. On May 28th, two new companies were added. 
In February, 1863, the Fifth Missouri Cavalry (ten companies) was broken 
up and three of the companies added to Colonel McFerran's regiment, while 
Companies A. and D. were broken up. 

Only one engagement took place in Daviess County and it was only a 
slight skirmish — a sort of game of hide-and-seek. The, official account of 
the encounter is found in the official records of the Union and Confederate 
Armies, Series I, Vol. 13, p. 207: 

"Headquarters, Breckenridge, Mo., Aug. 16, 1862. 

I have the honor to report that on the 5th instant 14 men of the First 
Regiment of Cavalry, Missouri State Militia, under Lieutenant Goodbrake, 
and 21 militia, under Captain Vickers, making in all 35 men, near Cravens- 
ville, in Daviess County, Mo., were fired upon from the brush by 85 guerril- 
las, under Davis and Kirk. The engagement lasted for about an hour and 
a half, and resulted in the defeat of the guerrillas, with a loss of six killed 
and ten wounded, 15 horses, and ten guns. We had three severely and two 
slightly, wounded. Our wounded are all doing well and will recover. 

"On the 6th a notorious guerrilla and outlaw named Wicklin was shot 
and on the 7th a notorious guerrilla named Daniel Hale was also shot by 
our troops in the forks of Grand River." 

James McFerran, Colonel Commanding First Regiment Cavalry, 
M. S. M. 

Major James Rainsford, Assistant Adjutant General, St. Joseph, Mo. 

A more detailed and widely varying account of this skirmish is given 
by John F. Jordin. He says : 



106 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

"Jesse Clark, who father was a Presbyterian preacher, and one of 
the pioneers of Livingston County, came into this section from Mercer 
County where he was then Hving, and having many friends and acquain- 
tances in this and Livingston Counties he organized a small company of 
volunteers for the rebel service. Clark represented to his friends that 
there were many adherents to the cause of the South in Mercer and Schuy- 
ler Counties and that if a company could be formed and invade those coun- 
ties these men would flock to their standard. The company was formed, 
that is, a few adventurous spirits were gotten together and started on this 
wild goose chase. They invaded Mercer, passed through Schuyler, back 
across Harrison, over into Worth and Gentry Counties, but the expected 
accesion to their ranks did not materialize, so the expedition turned and 
headed for Daviess County and home. The original number augumented 
by some 30 or 40 recruits nearly all of whom were unarmed were met near 
Di-Ammon by a considerable force of Federal troops under the command 
of Captain Woodrow. 

"A skirmish at once ensued. About 15 of the rebels who had guns 
held the Union soldiers in check until their unarmed companions got away. 
Among those on the firing line were the men before mentioned. It was 
their first baptism in the fire and smoke of battle but not a man flinched. 
A desultory fire was kept up by both parties until nightfall. Charles Goben 
was the only man hit on the Confederate side and in the darkness the little 
band became separated and he was not missed until the next day when it 
was found that Goben and Thomas Hicklin had been left behind. Hicklin 
was unhurt but his horse had given out and he had wandered about in the 
darkness and became lost. The next day he and Goben were captured by 
the Federal troops. After his capture Hicklin was questioned about the 
fight and as to whether or not he had taken part in it. He admitted at 
once that he had. He was then asked to give the names of those who were 
with him. This he politely, but firmly, refused to do. Threats and per- 
suasion alike failed to move him and he remained steadfast in his refusal 
to betray his comrades. At last he was given to understand in unmistake- 
able language that if he persisted in his refusal to answer his life would 
pay the forfeit. His answer to this grim ultimatum was characteristic of 
the super-courage and unfaltering loyalty of the man; "Be not afraid of 
them that kill the body," said he, 'and after that they have no more that 
they can do, but I will forewarn you whom ye shall fear ; Fear him which 
after he hath killed hath power to cast into hell; yea, I say to you, fear 
him.' " Thomas Hicklin had been a devout student of the Bible, and it 
was fitting that the final answer that was to decide his fate was given in the 
words of the Master. He was taken out on the prairie upon or near the 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 107 

present farm of Robert Johnson in Grand River Township and there a pla- 
toon of soldiers were drawn up and Hicklin was placed in position to re- 
ceive their fire. An attempt was made to blindfold him but at his request 
this was not done. And so it was with a courage that never faltered and 
a firmness that the terrors of death could not shake this loyal soul calmly 
met his fate. Truly, 'Greater love hath no man than this : that a man lay 
down his life for his friends.' " 

Some of the Daviess County Federal troops took part in various en- 
gagements in northeast Missouri in pursuit of Porter. Others were en- 
gaged in the pursuit of Poindexter's men in Livingston and Linn Counties. 
In August, 1862, the first regiment was sent to Lexington. For some time 
these men took part in various engagements in Layfette, Johnson, Jackson, 
Cass, Bates, Vernon, Cooper and Saline Counties. In 1864, the regiment 
was sent to Sedalia and then on to Jefferson City, reaching the latter place 
in October and taking part in various engagements in the vicinity. Early 
in 1865 the regiment helped exterminate guerillas in central Missouri. 

The county must have been quite thoroughly scouted. An examina- 
tion of the history of the various organizations shows that the following 
Union troops were on scouting duty : Livingston County Home Guard, Cox's 
Batallion, James' Batallion, Burris' Batallion. The last named organiza- 
tion was mustered out of service at Gallatin March 14, 1862. A Harrison 
County Batallion was mustered into service at Gallatin Oct. 5, 1861, and 
discharged at the same place on March 14, 1862. 

In 1864 the county offered a bounty to all who would volunteer in the 
service of the United States. The county's quota under this call was 169. 
A tax was ordered to be levied in 1865 to pay a bounty of $100 to each 
volunteer. 82 names were reported as joining under this act. 

The Adjutant General reported that up to Dec. 31, 1863, the number 
of men reported in the services from Daviess County was distributed as 
follows : 

18th Infantry 2 

23rd Infantry 39 

25th Infantry 60 

35th Infantry 2 

2nd Cavalry 3 

11th Cavalry 32 

12th Cavalry. 1 

Total 139 



108 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Illinois Regiments 7 

1st Nebraska Inf 1 

Total 8 

Missouri State Militia: 

First Cavalry ..467 

Sixth Cavalry 14 

Total 481 

In the abstracts of quotas and credits for the state of Missouri during 
1864 and 1865, 261 men had been called before Dec. 19, 1864, while the 
county was credited with 284 enlistments. Under the call of Dec. 19, 1864, 
the county's quota was 90, but only 30 responded to the call. 

The following list of Union soldiers is taken from the 1882 history of 
Daviess Cuonty: 

Company A. — This company was mustered into service Feb. 3, 1862, 
at Gallatin, Mo., by Capt. T. B. Biggers. This company was commanded by 
Capt. Joseph H. McGee, of Gallatin ; First Lieutenant Meredith Morris, of 
Pattonsburg, and Second Lieutenant McLain Wilson, of Monroe Township. 
On April 3, 1863, Joseph McGee was promoted to major; March 26, 1863, 
Meredith Morris succeeded him as captain; Benton Miller as 1st lieuten- 
ant, and McLain Wilson holding his position as 2nd lieutenant. Captain 
Morris was dismissed April 26, 1865 ; Lieut. Miller was mustered out 
Feb. 11, 1865, and McLain Wilson resigned April 23, 1864. 

ROLL OF COMPANY A. 

Privates. 

Bear, Martin L. Doll, John H. 

Blenkenship, Benjamin F. Flemming, Thomas J. 

Blenkenship, Alfred Flemming, William H. 

Browning, Alfred. Frazier, Levi. 

Browning, William R. Fields, Stephen. 

Barber, Elisha. Frazier, Samuel. 

Bartlett, John. Gray, James. 

Brown, Solomon. Gentry, John A. 

Crawford, Benj. R. Gentis, David. 

Cutshall, John R. Grantham, John E. 

Clore, George W. Garrison, Benj. F. 

Dutcher, William R. Gray, William A. 

Downing, William. Handel, Isaac I. 

Downing, Thomas. Harrah, James C. 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 109 

Hughes, John S. Powell, George W. 

Holmes, Henry. Powell, William C. 

Haver, John. Persinger, John. 

Hughes, Joseph. Royston, William H. 

Hayes, Thomas F. Royston, James M. 

Hines, James A. Royston, Benj. F. 

Harter, George W. Reed, Orange. 

Jones, John R. Roney, William. 

Johnson, Eleazer. Smith, Martin. 

Leard, Alfred C. Sweaney, Andrew. 

Leard, Robert J. Snider, Lewis. 

Leard, William A. Schaffer, David. 

McGee, James. Shriver, Nathan. 

McCrary, John W. Shipley, James H. 

Marshall, Dennis. Travis, Charles. 

Moore, Robert N. Utterback, Ferdinand. 

Netherton, James C. Whitman, Thomas W. 

Poe, Jonathan. Woodey, Nathan. 

Transferred : 

Kenney, Patrick S., first sergeant. Leard, Alfred C. 

Groomer, David, first corporal. Lewis, Jacob. 

Cope, John, prive. Lewis, Joseph P. 

Frazier, William, private. Hamm, John, 

Frazier, Henry C. Jeffries, Martin P. 

Hilton, William H. O'Neil, Thomas. 

Discharged for Disability: 

Bear, Peter, second sergeant. Everly, Samuel H., private. 

Tipton, George W., fifth sergeant. Field, Riley, private. 

Stone, George W., third sergeant. Grantham, William D., private. 
Grantham, Robert H., sixth sergeant. Miller, William F., private. 

Peniston, Thomas, bugler. Sweaney, George, private. 

Miller, Seamon, private. Sego, Charles B., private. 
Leard, James G., private. 

Died of Disease. 
Handel, Edward W. Dale, Thomas J. 

Non-Commissioned Officers — Sergeants. 

Benton Miller, orderly sergeant. David E. Youtsey, second sergeant. 

W. V. McGee, quarter-master sergt. William L. Powell, third sergeant. 

William C. Gillihan, company sergt. Lewis Heaston, fourth sergeant. 
Benjamin F. Poe, first sergeant. 



110 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 



Corporals . 

First, Isaac H. Wilson. Fifth, George T. Netherton. 

Second, Daniel Johns. Sixth, Charles W. Lake. 

Third, Joshua Brown. Seventh, Wiley W. Stone. 

Fourth, James Browning. Eighth, John W. Hancock. 

Company G. — Company G was organized March 27, 1862, with John 
Ballinger as captain. The original roll of the company could not be found, 
but the roll of the company when mustered out was preserved by Lieut. 
David Groomer. 

ROLL OF COMPANY G. 
Privates. 



Brown, David. 
Blakely, Andrew C. 
Caldwell, James H. 
Crowder, James M. 
Cope, John. 
Endicott, Jacob I. 
Frazier, William. 
Frazier, Miles. 
Fansler, Thomas. 
Fansler, William. 
Fitts, Jackson. 
Galbreath, Squire. 
Hilton, William H. 
Hill, David. 
Hindman, John U. 
Jeffries, Martin P. 
Leeper, Joseph. 
Mitchell, John T. 
Morgan, Asa. 
McBride, Sylvester K. 
McBride, James. 
Miller, George W. 
Oram, James. 
Peugh, George W. 
Reynolds, John M. 
Shriver, Francis W. 
Shriver, Nova Zembla. 
Sabens, Thomas B. 
Smith, Jeremiah. 
Dilley, Barnett. 



Splawn, John R. 
Splawn, Isaac N. 
Smith, John M. 
Jeffries, George W. 
Walker, Albert G. 
Ham, John F. 
Hines, Benj. F. 
Miller, Michael. 
Harris, Seth H. 
Orr, Jasper N. 
Payne, Ebenezer. 
Way, Charles A. 
Orr, Moses. 
Rowhuff, James. 
French, Jesse N. 
Day, John M. 
Osborn, Carlow B. 
Simms, Thomas. 
Allen, Charles W. 
Bailey, Jasper N. 
Benedict, Moses. 
Cope, Wiley. 
Cope, William B. 
Cain, George L. 
Duskins, William F. 
Elliott, Gilford. 
Gilkey, Robert T. 
Grindstaff, Julias. 
Johnson, James G. 
Jacques, Gabriel M. 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 



111 



Hall, George W. 
Lewis, Joseph P. 
Miller, John H. 
McClure, James. 
McClure, David. 
Owen, Richard. 
Payne, Reuben L. 
Pilcher, Francis L. 
Rop, James L. 
Rowland, John D. 

Lewis Jacob, bugler, 

James, John. 
Clevinger, Pitman A. 
Place, Peter. 
Gillihan, Benona H. 



Risdon, John, drunkenness. 
Jordan, James, drunkenness. 
Harmon, Jacob C. 
Harmon, Richard M., disability. 
Harmon, David, disability. 
Murphy, Thomas, drunkenness. 
O'Neal, Thomas, disability. 
Shadwick, Levi, disability. 
England, William, disability. 
Fields, Thomas, disability. 
Brown, Joel R., disability. 
Keene, Joseph B., disability. 
Place, Richard J., disability. 
Knight, Thomas, disability. 
Brown, Joel R., disability. 
Dilley, Barnett, disability. 
Splawn, John B., disability. 



Rhoades, Charles W. 
Sabens, William M. 
Stout, William S. 
Starr, William M. 
Starr, James, 
Stephens, Wiley. 
Wright, John R. 
Wheeling, Harrison. 
Worley, William T. 
Wilson, Matthew. 
Killed in Battle, 
killed Aug. 9, 1862, at Panther Creek, Mo. 

Died. 

Fitts, George W. 
Orr, Patrick M. 
Pennington, William J. 

Discharged. 

Smith, John N., disability. 
Splawn, Isaac N., disability. 
Smith, John N., disability. 
Jefferies, George W., disability. 
Walker, Alfred G., disability. 
Ham, John T., disability. 
Hines, Benj. F,, disability. 
Miller, Michael, disability. 
Harris, Seth H., disability. 
Orr, Jasper N., disability. 
Payne, Ebenezer, disability. 
Way, Charles A., disability. 
Orr, Moses, disability. 
Rowhuff, James, disability. 
French, Jesse N., disability. 
Day, John M., horse stealing. 



Moore, James. 



Deserted. 

Stephens, John E. 
Non-Commissioned Officers — Sergeants. 
Alfred R, Leard. David K. Eeads. 

Joseph Dilley. Charles M. Rogers. 

Benj. H. Hines. EH McClure. 



112 



HISTORY OF DAVIE3S AND GENTRY COUNTIES 



Davis Lewellyn. 
Isaac Summers. 

David M. Heath, discharged for 
disabihty. 



Corporals : 



William G. Stow. 

Bailey Webb. 

Harvey Dilley. 

William H. Elliott. 

Carl R. Lord, discharged for dis- 
ability. 

Joseph P. Lewis, discharged for 
disability. 

Ira C. Tuttle, discharged for dis- 
ability. 



Nathan Johnson, discharged for 

disability. 
James Johnson, died at home, 

Daviess County Nov. 3, 1862. 

Henry C. Frazier. 

Willis Dilley. 

Daniel Pilcher. 

Henry Dilley, discharged for dis- 
ability. 

George W. Hall, discharged for 
disability. 

John L. Shriver, discharged for 
disability. 

Luther Ferrington, deserted on 



May 16, 1863. 
Company B. — The original roll of this company was lost. The follow- 
ing list is as nearly correct as possible. 



Privates. 



Alexander, John. 
Allen, Isaac. 

Atwell, 

Brown, William. 
Baker, Guy. 
Baker, Harvey. 
Bashford, Cline. 
Butler, Francis. 
Butrick, William. 
Butrick, G. 
Bender, James. 
Bender, Robert. 
Bender, John. 
Blessing, Henry. 
Critton, Erve. 
Critton, James. 
Cole, Harvey. 
Collins, Thomas. 
Sactor, J. 
Castor, Benjamin. 
Castor, William. 
Castor, C. 



Critton, Joseph. 
Charles, C. 
Daniels, C. 
Daniels, James. 

Elmore, 

Enyhart, Richard. 
French, J. 

Fulcher, 

Fannon, William. 
Fannon, Joseph. 
Gipson, Thomas. 
Harolson, 



Henderson, 

Harmon, J. 
Hoover, Isaac. 

Harmon, 

John, B. 
Keene, Gabriel. 
Knight, J. 
Laswell, John. 
Laswell, A. J. 
Landers, Joseph. 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 



113 



Leber, Isaac. 
Lewis, Sylvester. 
Mann, Adam. 
Morris, John. 

Miries, 

Myers, S. 

McFarland, Marshall. 
McGarvin, David. 
McGarvin, Dennis. 
McCarty, Dennis. 
McCarty, David. 
McClure, John. 
Matthews, David. 
McKinney, Arthur. 
Nichols, D. 
Norton, J. 
Noah, Uriah. 
Nichols, Joseph. 
Nichols, Rhodes. 
Nichols, John. 
Nations, Edward. 



Ohar, M. 
Place, F. A. 
Paxton, Doc. 
Reader, Robert. 
Renn, William. 
Rhodes, N. 
Snider, Henry. 

Snider, Henry, Caldwell County. 
Shanks, Michael. 
Story, G. 
Story, Mounce. 
Story, John. 
Sego, Lemuel. 
Sitch, Perry. 
Savey, William. 
Savey, L. 
Tracy, D. 
Woodson, Richard. 
Wilson, Adam. 
Ward, James. 
Webster, Hiram. 
Non-Commissioned Officers. 
Daniel Lebow, sergeant. 



Forty-third Infantry, Missouri Volunteers. 

The Forty-third Regiment was organized, September 22, 1864, under 
the command of Chester Harding, Jr., of St. Louis as colonel. Only one 
company was partially organized from Daviess County, under the captaincy 
of William F. Flint, whose address was given as Bethany, but who, after 
the war became sheriff of Daviess County. A portion only of the names 
can be given and all of these were not from this county. They were in 
active service in the Central Missouri District and were mustered out of 
service June 30, 1865. 

Privates. 



Brown, Joel E. 
Bowyer, William 
Hendick, T. J. 
Hendrick, John 
Herndon, Isaac 
Irwin, Joseph 
Daniels, Richard 
Frazier, Joseph 



Bolin, William 
Eads, WiUiam 
Rader, John 
Cline, John 
Robb, James 
Foster, Andrew J. 
Terry, David 
Terry, Aaron 



114 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Terry, David T. Chapman, Alonzo 

Miers, William Chapman, C. 

Poe, James Sarrah, Jacob 

Smith, W. T. Henderson, John 

Smith, John E, Endicott, Jacob 

Wright, James Greenwood, F. L., drummer 

Royston, Powell Flint, Larkin S., fifer 

Yost, Cornelius 

Non-Commissioned Officers — Sergeants. 
First, Nathan E. Reed, Fourth, William Tibbies, 

Second, Silas H, Hammond, Fifth, Hugh Sharon, discharged, 

Third, L. L. Terry, Fifth, Robert S. Terry, promoted 

Corporals : 
First, Isaac N. Goodwin, Fifth, Joseph H. Knott, 

Second, James 0. Frisbee, Sixth, Sideon Smith, 

Third, John F. Silby, Seventh, John Hendricks, 

Fourth, Philip Higgins, Eighth, Corydon Hart. 

There were in the above company fifty-five more privates whose 
names could not be secured, and part of them were from Daviess County. 

Special Order No. Six. — Among the orders which were issued applying 
to the county, Special Order No. Six was probably the most drastic. 

Headquarters, Sub-district of Chillicothe, 
Chillicothe, Mo., Dec. 17, 1864. 
Special Order No. Six: 

The committees named below are hereby appointed for Daviess County 
whose duty it is in their respective townships to prepare and put in the 
hands of Lieutenant-Colonel Samuel P. Cox at Gallatin with the least pos- 
sible delay a list of all persons of their respective townships who have been 
in the rebel army designating those who are or have been attached to guer- 
illa or bushwhacking organizations, also including all persons against whom 
evidence of aiding armed rebels or bushwhackers and the withholding of 
information concerning their presence and movement can be furnished. 
This list will give the name, age and residence of each person, when he 
joined the rebel army, what family he has and where they are now living, 
the age of the eldest child at home, present value of personal property, 
number of acres of real estate and such additional remarks touching each 
family as to enable the military to arrive at just conclusion in the premises. 

Committees : 

Gallatin Township: Joseph H. McGee, William Bristow and Jacob Woodruff. 
Jackson Township: Lieut. Mounts Nichols, W. G, Eads, George N, Smith. 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 115 

Harrison Township: John H. Tuggle, Thomas R. Tuggle, Manuel Martin. 
Jefferson Township: James L. Powell, G. M. Lile, G. M. Tipton. 
Pattonsburg Township: Dr. William Pyle, Capt. M. Morris, Henry Dilley. 
Salem Township: Judge B. M. Coffey, Capts. W. B. Brown and Andrew 

Barr. 
Grand River Township: Judge Peter Bear, J. P. Brown, M. Netherton. 

The closing events of the war are chronicled in the Gallatin North Mis- 
sourian, established in 1864. On Nov. 17th of that year, an account was 
published of the fight with Price near Independence, and the Big Blue in 
which many Daviess countians took part. 

On April 5, 1865, news reached Gallatin that Petersburg and Richmond 
had surrendered to Grant. At four o'clock a meeting was held in the court 
house and enthusiastic speeches made. Committees were appointed to plan 
for the proper celebration of the event. All citizens were requested to 
illuminate their homes. Postmaster Taylor, Bob Graves and Major Cox 
hurriedly collected enough money to brilliantly illuminate all the windows 
in the court house and get up an oyster benefit. The banquet committee 
was composed of S. A. Richardson, Major McGee and Dr. Givens. The 
paper reports that most every house was illuminated. 

On April 8th, Salem celebrated the surrender of Richmond on a grand 
scale. The speakers were Captain Brown, J. H. Hardin, R. H. Vandivert 
and others. 

During 1864 and 1865 a great many new settlers came into the county. 
Fearing that the newcomers might have disloyal tendencies, a meeting 
was held Jan. 28, 1865, and a resolution passed that a committee be appoint- 
ed to find out the political affiliations of those proposing to settle in the 
county, and that none but loyal persons were to be allowed to come into the 
county to live. 

Confederates. — Although a large number of men from the county 
went into the Southern army and while many of the non-combatants were 
Confederate sympathizers, the county was at all times under the control 
of the Federal authorities. Little can be learned of the activities of the 
Confederates. Major McGee mentions a company raised by Dr. C. C. 
Hogan. The recruiting service of John D. Casey, Will Jordin, Logan En- 
yart and others are occasionally referred to. It was necessary, with the 
Federals in control, to proceed secretly. After evading the local authori- 
ties, the danger of crossing the Missouri river to join the Southern Army 
was yet to be encountered. Some were turned back, but it is estimated 
that more than 300 from Daviess County were in the Confederate Army. 
Efforts have been made to compile a list of these soldiers, but it is far from 
complete. Names of Confederate soldiers who were not residents of the 



116 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 



county at the time, but have at a later date lived here are also included for 
several reasons. In the first place, it is not always possible to be sure 
whether the soldier was living in the county during the war. Second, since 
no concerted effort has been made until recently to collect records of these 
soldiers, it may be of value to those interested to have the record, even 
though he served in another state. 

Thanks are due Mr. N. A. Baker, Mrs. Mary Cruzen, Mr. George Will- 
iams and Mr. Samuel Sperry, Sr., for assistance in compiling the list. 



H. E. Acton, 
Frank Abcock, 
J. H. Abcock, 
George P. Allen, 
William Anderson, 
Lut Ashby, 
N. A. Baker, 
Noah J. Black, 
A. C. Ball, 
Alfred F. Barnett, 

Blizzard, 

W. S. Beard, 
L. M. Best, 
Thomas Bradshaw, 
James A. Bowen, 
W. H. Bray, 
Joseph Breeden, 
James Brosius, 
Thomas B. Brookshire, 
Nathan Broughton, 
Calvin Burge, 
John W. Burge, 
J. C. Byrd, 
John D. Casey, 
Richard Childs, 
William Childs, 
Henry Clothier, 
Pit Cloudas, 
John B. Comer, 
Jerre C. Cravens, 
Dr. John Cravens, 
John Cravens, Jr., 
William Cravens, 



Jesse A. Creekmore, 
Nathaniel G. Cruzen, 
William Cruzen, 
William Darr, 
Edward Davis, 
Dr. F. M. Davis, 
Josiah Davis, 
William Davis, 
James R. Dehring, 
Jesse Dehring, 
A. L. Deavers, 
Arthur Dever, 
Jim Dever, 
J. T. Dunn, 
Harve Ellis, 
L. A. Elhs, 
Logan Enyart, 

Rev. Enyart, 

James W. Estes, 
George D. Ewing, 
Hiram Faulkner, 
Mat Foley, 
T. R. Ford, 
Thos. Gee, 
Dick Gilkey, 
Press Githens, 
Doute Githens, 
Pack Githens, 
John D. Gillilan, 
Mathias Gillilan, 
N. B. Githens, 
Charles Goben, 
J. T. Green, 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 



117 



Jack Haines, 

Henry Harnes, 

A. N. Harper, 

Cap Harper, 

Hardin Hartley, 

Jacob Haynes, 

Dave Hays, 

Patrick H. Hawkins (?) 

T. B. Head, 

Frank Hicklin (?) 

Tom Hicklin, ( ?) 

Dr. John Hillman, 

Dr. C. C. Hogan, 

George Hopkins, 

J. Houghton, 

James M. Hunter, 

John Hyatt, (?) 

John Irving, 

Richard Irving, 

William Irving, 

T. B. Jackson, 

Thos. Jennings, 

James Jordin, 

William Jordin, 

H. H. Justus, 

Daniel Kessler, 

John Kessler, 

Joseph Kirk, 

James F. Knight, 

James Lamey, 

Thos. Lathrop, 

Dee Lawson, 

William Ledgewood, 

John Lile, 

Henry Lockwood, 

Lockwood, 

Lockwood, 

Sam Lowrey, 
Gus. A. Lynn, 
David Martin, 
John Middleton, 



Wm. Mead, 
George McCartney, 
William McCartney, 
Wm. Henry McClung, 
R. J. McClane, 
Sam McClane, 
M. B. McClung, 
J. W. McCullough, 
Frank McCue, 
George McCue, 
James McCue, 
Paul McCue, 

McCue, 

McCue, 

R. M. McCue, 
Archie McDaniel, 
Martin McDaniel, 
William McDaniel, 
Dock McDonald, 
Jno. McLauglin,^ 
James McMillion, 
John A. McNeel, 
John H. McNeill, 
William S. McNeill, 
John Macrander, 
M. T. Mallory, 
Alexander Mann, 
Independence Mann, 
Jacob Mann, 
Dr. J. B. Marley, 
Alphonso E. Martin, 
Gabriel May, 
James W. Miller, 
John H. Miller, 
Robert Miller, 
Alfred C. Minnick, 
Tim Murray, 
Davis Nance, 
J. W. Neill, 
William N. Nickell, 
G. I. O'Ferrell, 



118 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 



W. T. Osborn, 
Bob Owens, 
Jacob Oxford, 
Asa Payne, 
Henry Payne, 
Francis Peniston, 
H. C. Peniston, 
John Perry, 
Wm. Perry, 
B. F. Pugh, ( ?) 
Lute Powell, 
John Pryor, 
J. A. Scott, 
John Sheeler, 
Bootes Shultz, 
Edward Shultz, 
Peter Shultz, 
Sidney Shultz, 
Tom Shultz, 
Dick Shutluth, 
Emanuel Small, 
George C. Smith, 
George H. Smith, 
I. V. Smith, 
Stephen Smith, 
Jack Sperry, 
E. W. Stafford, 
Joseph Stamper, 



W. T. Stovall, 
Maro Thomas, 
John Taylor, 
Obediah Taylor, 
J. E. Tomlinson, 
Milton Tye, 
Thomas Tye, 
Richard Vallandingham, 
Monroe Ware, 
Joseph Weldon, 
Nick Weldon, 
Martin Weldon, 
George W. Williams, 
Monroe Williams, 
Roger Williams, 
Samuel Wilson, 
Jason Winburn, 
Charles F. Witten, 
William F. Witten, 
John H. Wood, 
Bob Woodring, 
Colley Woodring, 
Asa Worrell, 
Hill Workman, 
John Workman, 
James Wynn, 
John Wynn, 
M. W. Yeager, 



Cap Stone, 

Civil War Incidents. — Along toward the beginning of the war. Will 
Jordin was recruiting for the Confederate army, and some six or seven of 
them started south. They were seen by Captain Mounts Nichols and his 
company of militia, who at once started in pursuit. The recruits kept 
ahead until Grand River was reached. The river was frozen over, but 
there was considerable doubt as to whether it would bear them and their 
horses, Jordin, who was small and was riding a small horse, got safely 
across. Mr. John F. Jordin's account of the incident continues : "Next came 
Tom Bradshaw on a mule and the mule skated across in good style. The 
others encouraged by scattering fire from their pursuers who were now 
within shooting distance made an attempt to cross, when a powerful horse 
ridden by Ed McClung broke through the ice and stopped the retreat. Jor- 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 119 

din was the only man in the crowd that was armed and seeing that it 
would be useless to attempt to rescue his companions turned reluctantly 
away and with Bradshaw continued on their way. The only casualty in 
this engagement was the wounding of Bradshaw's mule, which was shot 
through the ear, Bradshaw soon tired of soldiering and returned home and 
afterwards served in the 'Mackerel Brigade' as the Home Guards were call- 
ed, for a sufficient length of time to entitle him to a pension, which he still 
lives to draw with more pleasure than he did his gun in the days of '61." 

This incident is related by Mr. Jordin in his "Memories": 
"In November, 1863, George and Frank McCue and a comrade named 
Markham left the Confederate army, undertook to make their way north 
in order that Frank, who was suffering with serious wounds, might be 
properly cared for. As the boys reached the old neighborhood, a cold driz- 
zling rain set in, turning into sleet. They went into camp at a place near 
Uncle Isaac's, known as the 'rock house.' They had made the trip thus 
far on horseback but Frank was now thoroughly exhausted by the suffer- 
ing and exposure incident to their long and tiresome journey. The weather 
continued to be inclement and George decided to go to Uncle Isaac and make 
their condition known. He did so and uncle at once directed them to bring 
Frank to the house, which they did at once. George and Markham con- 
tinued their journey, but Frank remained for some days resting and recup- 
erating his strength. Then one night Tom Bradshaw came with a covered 
wagon and took Frank to Iowa where he was cared for at the home of a 
friend until some time during the following year, when he died. 

"Uncle was not ignorant of what the probable consequences of this act 
would be. He knew that in giving food and shelter to Frank McCue he 
was violating the military law, which forbade the giving of aid and com- 
fort to those in rebellion. He knew that to reach out the hand of mercy 
and try to save this battered piece of fiosam cast up by the waves from the 
crimson sea of war was an offense so grave that he who committed it en- 
dangered his liberty, perhaps his life. But knowing all this, be it said to 
his credit, he never hesitated for a moment. Let the consequence be what 
they may,' said he, 'it shall never be said that I turned one of my neighbor's 
children from my doors when he was hungry, sick and without shelter.' 
There was a committee in each township, composed of three members, 
whose duty it was to promptly report offenses of this kind. The names of 
the men composing these committees as I write but I have no desire to open 
old wounds. The matter was, however, promptly reported to Lieut. Col. 
S. P. Cox, at Gallatin. But Col. Cox possessed that generous nature that 
always characterizes the truly brave man and friendly warning was given 
and uncle bade farewell to his home, and left, never to return." 



120 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

In account of Jefferson Kelley, a jack-of-all- trades who made a meager 
living by doing odd jobs for the neighbors, Mr. Jordin tells the following 
story : 

"It was the custom during the war to hold prayer meetings at private 
residences, and a man's welcome more often depended upon his political 
faith rather than his religious convictions. Here the gray-haired father 
invoked the divine protection for his boy who was battling at the front, and 
for the ultimate triumph of the cause he believed to be just. While Kelly 
had neither boy nor political convictions he always rose to the spirit of the 
occasion and if prayer could have saved the day and turned the tide of bat- 
tle the Southern Confederacy would have won hands down. At one of 
these meetings, held at Uncle Isaac Jordin's, Kelly was called on to lead 
in prayer. He opened up all right and got through with preliminary mat- 
ters in his usual felicitious manner, but somehow when he came to discuss 
political issues he seemed to lose his grip. Isaac Oxford and I were small 
boys at the time and were devoutly kneeling in a dark corner of the room. 
It occurred to us that Jeff needed encouragement and we began to supple- 
ment his feeble petitions with hearty 'Amens,' 'Do, Lord,' and 'God Grant 
It.' Kelley did not know the source of the endorsement which he was re- 
ceiving, but it revived him at once, and he fairly outdid himself, much to 
the delight of two small boys. But the sequel for one of us at least was not 
so amusing. Mother was present, recognized my voice and gave me one 
of the worst whippings that I ever received. That settled the matter so 
far as I was concerned. I never encouraged Kelley after that. He might 
have got stuck in the middle of a prayer, and stayed there, .for all I cared." 

Irresponsible bands of militia frequently went about the county sub- 
jecting the Southern sympathizers to petty annoyances. During a meeting 
at Ketron Chapel a group of these men passed and decided it would be 
great sport to put a flag over the door, so that those coming out of the 
church had to pass under it. The people were indignant, but were wise 
enough not to protest. But when one young woman walked out, she seized 
the flag and tore it in two. She was arrested and taken to Chillicothe, 
where she was forced to take the oath of allegiance. Having taken the 
oath to support the Union, she turned to the authorities and announced, 
"I'll keep that if I want to." 

Jonathan Oxford was an avowed Southern sympathizer, and made no 
effort to conceal his feelings. He was arrested and taken to Breckenridge. 
He was paroled by the military authorities and ordered to report again in 
30 days. A few days later, on April 3, 1863, a group of armed men came 
to the house and told him he must go to Breckenridge to answer his parole. 
Since it then lacked about 15 days until he was supposed to report, he ob- 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 121 

jected, but was forced to go. Next morning he was found dead by the 
roadside, his body riddled by bullets and no clue was ever found as to the 
identy of the murderers. 

James Weldon had served in the Confederate army, but had returned 
home, taken the oath and was a member of the Home Guard. A captain 
from Caldwell County, with a group of his men, was passing through the 
country, and knowing that Weldon had once been a Confederate, had him 
taken from his home and murdered. 

No less tragic was the death of William Crews, which occurred in 1866, 
but was the direct outgrowth of Civil War enmities. A debate concerning 
the doctrines of the Universalist church was being held at Clear Creek 
church and a large crowd was in attendance. During the noon hour. Crews 
was standing with his back to a tree talking to a group of girls. A man 
approached and offered him an apple, which he laughingly accepted. Two 
men were waiting for the signal, and now approached with drawn revolvers. 
Miss Ann Weldon, seeing them, gave a warning cry to Crews and struck the 
pistol so that it was discharged in the air and injured no one. The other 
man, said to have been Broomfield, fired and Crews fell dead. The murder- 
ers rode away unmolested and no effort seems to have been made to arrest 
them. The events which lead up to the murder go far back into the Civil 
War. The father of William Crews was a strong Southern sympathizer, 
and was compelled to leave home. Crews, at that time, a youngster of 
about 14, said and did a good many things calculated to arouse the ire of the 
military authorities. He was arrested and taken to Breckenridge, but was 
soon released. Later he was again arrested. His mother became anxious 
about him and induced his brother and Thomas Perry to attempt his rescue. 
The plan was discovered and when the attempt was made, George Crews 
and Perry were killed. The boy saw the killing and vowed to avenge their 
deaths. He made no secret of his intention and it was no doubt because 
of these threats that he was sought and murdered by men who had reason 
to fear him. 

Among the persons arrested after the ironclad oaths provided for in 
the Constitution of 1865 went into effect, was the Rev. B. F. Kenny, a well 
known Baptist minister. He was charged with preaching without having 
taken the oath. Justice Daniels held that he was not guilty because he did 
not take a text — that he did not preach but simply stood at the side of the 
pulpit and talked to the people. 



CHAPTER VIII. 



PIONEER AND MODERN TRANSPORTATION. 



STAGE LINES— FERRIES— NAVIGATION— ROADS— RAILROADS. 

Stage Lines. — Before the building of the railroads, the people depend- 
ed largely upon river transportation. The people of Daviess County and 
adjoining territory when making a journey of any length had to go to 
some point on the Missouri River — Richmond Landing, Brunswick or 
Lexington, usually — to take the boat. Where river transportation was im- 
practicable, the people depended upon stage lines. The Missouri Register 
of 1855, published a time card for Gallatin and St. Joseph Coach Line, 
which left Gallatin on Monday at six A. M. and arrived at St. Joseph on 
Tuesday at 1 P. M. It returned to Gallatin on Wednesday at 6:00 P. M. 
Only one round trip was made a week. 

M. T. Green owned one of the early stage lines. His line operated 
between Gallatin, Hamilton and Richmond. One of his drivers was George 
W. Runnells. After the building of the Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad, 
hacks were run from the nearest points, Chillicothe and Hamilton, to points 
to the north. The line from Chillicothe to Bethany passed through 
Jamesport. In 1865 Captain John Ballinger was running a passenger hack 
between Hamilton and Gallatin every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. 
At the same time. Major S. P. Cox was operating a tri-weekly hack from 
Gallatin to Bethany. 

As late as 1976, the Valley House at Elm Flat advertised the "Gentry- 
ville and Albany stage line to and from this house daily". But after the 
extension of the railroad beyond Elm Flat, this line was discontinued. 

Ferries. — The first ferry license recorded is one issued to James 
Hunter. He was granted the privilege of keeping a "public ferry" on the 
west fork of the Grand River at the mouth of Honey creek for six months. 
His license for the six months cost him $2.50. 

Jacob S. Rogers was granted a license in 1837. When the license was 
renewed later in the year, the rates which he might charge were fixed by 
the county court as follows : 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 123 

Eight horse or ox team and wagon $1.00 

Six horse or ox team and wagon ,75 

Four or five horse or ox team and wagon .62 

Three horse or ox team and wagon .37 

One horse or ox team and wagon.. .25 

Man and horse.. 12 

Footman . 06 

Loose cattle, horses and mules .06 

Hogs and sheep 03 

In 1839 Jacob S. Rogers was granted the right to operate a ferry in 
Grand River Township. In the same year James Taylor and John Cravens 
were granted ferry licenses, the first in Grindstone Township, the latter at 
Adam-ondi-Ahmon. After a few years bridges were built and there was 
no longer the same necessity for ferries. As late, however, as 1864, a 
license was granted to Joseph H. Herndon to operate a ferry at Shriver mill 
on Grand river, and one to Francis W. Payne to operate a ferry at Peniston 
Crossing on Grand river. 

Navigation. — It will be noticed that the first town in the county was 
located on Grand river, and was called Millport. Its founders evidently had 
hopes that the new city would become an important port. Before the days 
of railroads the people had to depend much more upon river transportation 
than at present and Grand River was regarded as a decided asset to the new 
county. Accordingly, the residents of the Grand river country obtained 
the passage of an act of the General Assembly declaring "all that portion 
of north Grand river from its mouth to where the township line dividing 
Townships 62 and 63 north crosses the east and west forks of the said river 
shall be and the same is declared to be a public highway to be navigated by 
all perons whatsoever." The act was approved Feb. 13, 1839. 

At the session of the Legislature which met in 1840 and 1841, the 
Board of Internal Improvements reported that a survey of north Grand 
river had been made and stated rather fully what improvements would 
have to be made before navigation on this river would be profitable. The 
board seemed to think the project altogether practicable. 

Two years later this board again reported on the proposition and con- 
cluded with this paragraph (See Appendix, House Journal, 1842, 1843, 

page 624). 

"By improving its navigation in the matter contemplated by the bill 
herewith reported, a large territory would be greatly benefitted, including 
not only the counties through which it runs and on which it borders, but 
also that of Grundy and the extensive back country attached to these coun- 
ties, a space sufficient for the erection of 'four additional new counties. 



124 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

making in all a territory comprising more than three thousand square 
miles". 

The Grand River Association was incorporated bj^ the 1848-1849 ses- 
sion of the General Assembly. By it the counties of Chariton, Carroll, 
Livingston, Daviess and Grundy "and such other counties as shall invest 
funds in the association hereby established" were incorporated. The object 
of the Asociation was "to enter upon north Grand river in this state and 
to improve the navigation thereof from its mouth to the mouth of Big creek 
on the west fork thereof and to the town of Trenton on the east fork of said 
river for steamboat, vessels, rafts and other crafts". The Association was 
capitalized at $200,000, divided into shares of $20 each. Each county in- 
vesting in the organization was to appoint a director to represent the 
county, such director to hold office for the term of one year. Full power to 
carry out the objects of the Association was granted. 

Nothing came of these plans for the navigation of Grand river. A few 
skiffs made trips up and down the river, but the improvements contemp- 
lated were never made, and larger boats have never been seen. 

In 1847, Robert P. Peniston built a large flatboat, loading it with hoop- 
poles, wheat, bacon and hemp, he started for St. Louis. At Compton's 
Ferry on Grand river, the boat sunk and all the cargo was lost, except a 
portion of the hemp. The cargo was valued at $1500, and no insurance was 
carried. This was probably the only flatboat to attempt the trip to St. 
Louis. 

Roads. — A map of Missouri showing early Indian trails shows that 
one trail extended through Daviess County. Major H. S. Long says that 
it skirted the east side of Grand river and was 60 miles long, and that 
when he followed it in 1819 it was known at "Fields trace". At the upper 
end (in what is now Worth County) it joined another trail running north- 
west. This trail to the headwaters of Grand river was a favorite warpath 
by the Sankees, Foxes and Pottawatomies into the Osage country. 

Soon after the organization of the county, the county court took steps 
toward laying out a system of roads. In 1837 road commissioners were ap- 
pointed for each of the three townships, Adam Black for Grand River, 
Elijah Foley and Philip Covington for Honey Creek, and John Wright for 
Grindstone Township. No record has been found showing the roads laid 
out by these commissioners. 

Mitchell's map of 1844 shows only one road in Daviess County, which 
ran from Gallatin to Far West and on to Macon Court House. This road 
was built by the Mormons and was said to have been an unusually good 
thoroughfare compared with the other roads in the vicinity. 

In 1849—54 road overseers were appointed. It would seem that with 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 125 

SO many, no one person would have his business interests seriously interfer- 
ed with by the duties of the office. 

An examination of Mitchell's "New Travellers Guide Through the 
United States" of 1849 shows the stage roads through Missouri. This 
shows a road from Gallatin to Chillicothe, and from north to Cravensville, 
where it divided, one road going to Sandsville and the other running north 
and a little east until it met another road just this side of the Iowa line. 
Thre was also a road from Gallatin to Plattsburg, Far West and Mount 
Refuge. From Far West and Plattsburg, roads led directly to Richmond. 

In June, 1859, the following road district were formed: Grand River 
road district Nos. 1, 2, 3 and 4; Jackson road districts Nos. 5, 6 and 7; 
Salem road district Nos. 8, 9 and 10 ; Benton road districts Nos. 11, 12 and 
13; Jefferson road districts Nos. 14, 15, 16, 17 and 18; Gallatin road dis- 
tricts Nos. 19, 20, 21 and 22 ; Harrison road districts Nos. 23 and 24. 

The General Assembly of Missouri established a number of state roads 
prior to the Civil War. Among those passing through Daviess County 
were: 

(1) A road from Pattonsburg to St. Joseph, approved Feb. 22, 1845. 
Repealed in 1853. 

(2) A road from Camden to Taylor's Ferry in Daviess County, ap 
proved March 24, 1845. 

(3) A road from Gallatin to St. Joseph, via Maysville, approved Feb. 
23, 1853. 

(4) A road form Bethany to Gallatin, approved Feb. 24, 1853. 

(5) A road from Spring Hill to Bethany, to run "through or near 
Auberry and Pilot Grove in Daviess County", approved Feb. 27, 1857. 

(6) A road from Richmond to Trenton, via Kingston and Gallatin, 
approved March 20, 1860. 

In 1860, the Legislature passed an act for opening and repairing roads 
and highways in the County of Daviess. The County Court was given 
power to make and enforce all orders necessary. All county roads must be 
not less than twenty nor more than -40 feet wide. Section 4 provides that 
"all county roads shall be cleared of trees and limbs of trees which may in- 
commode horsemen or carriages, and no stump shall exceed eight inches in 
height, and wet grounds and small watercourses shall be cauusewayed or 
bridged in such manner as to enable horsemen and carriages to pass with 
safety". 

All able-bodied men between the ages of 16 and 45 who had resided in 
the state sixty days and in the district one month were subject to work on 
the roads, and when called by the road overseer were obliged to respond or 
forfeit and pay One Dollar for each day he might fail to attend, or Two 



126 . HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Dollars for each day he should attend and fail to work with due diligence. 

The overseer was required to erect a post at every cross-roads or fork, 
"unless a suitable tree be found at the proper place, to which shall be af- 
fixed a finger board containing a legible inscription directing the way and 
noting the distance to the next remarkable place on the road". 

Overseers were to be paid from the road and canal fund. The law 
provided making out new roads and altering old ones, for the formation of 
road districts, and contained prvisions necessary to carry into effect the 
provisions of the law. 

It was not, however, until after 1900 that much interest was taken in 
the improvement of roads. Interest had previously been centered largely 
upon securing the most convenient route and in the building of bridges 
across the streams. Soon with the introduction of the motor car, the im- 
provement of highways became a necessity. 

The road drag came into use. The Daviess County Good Roads As- 
sociation was organized with James Tuggle as President and C. M. Harri- 
son as Secretary. A county convention was called by them for May 2, 
1903, which resulted in aroused interest in the movement. 

To mention all of the road meetings which have been held and to dis- 
cuss the preliminaries leading to the location of the various trails through 
the county would take much more space than is available. Only a few of 
the events will be mentioned, as indicative of the work done in the county. 

All the townships but one sent representatives to a meeting held in 
Gallatin in March, 1914, to discuss the joint purchase of power road outfits. 
A committee was appointed to further consider the matter. Nothing was 
done in the matter. Union Township, however, later purchasing a crusher 
to supply rock for its roads. 

In August of the same year. Governor Major issued a proclamation 
asking all citizens to work on the roads on two days. Many Daviess Coun- 
tians responded to the call. 

A big road meeting and banquet was given at Pattonsburg in March, 
1914, for the committees on cross-state highways. 

In June, 1914, the Omaha and St. Louis Highway was, after consider- 
able discussion, located through Gallatin, Lock Springs, Jameson and Pat- 
tonsburg, and in December the St. Paul, Des Moines and Kansas City trail 
was fixed from Bethany to Pattonsburg, and through Winston to Cameron. 

A law of the General Assembly passed in 1913 provided for highways 
between every county seat. On July 3rd, the commission met in Gallatin 
and located these thoroughfares — from Gallatin to Maysville, Gallatin to 
Albany, Gallatin to Bethany, Gallatin to Trenton, Gallatin to Chillicothe, 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 127 

and Gallatin to Kingston. There was considerable rivalry between various 
neighborhoods to determine the road to be used for this purpose. 

Jamesport has always been active in the movement for better roads. 
The following clipping from a 1915 paper tells something of the work done 
in that section of the county: 

"The Commercial Club and Jamesport Township oflficials put in some 
good work the past summer. Money to be used on the Jamesport-Ash 
Grove road to almost $1500 was subscribed. A little more than a like 
amount was subscribed for the Jamesport-Olive Church road. A requisi- 
tion was made for state aid for both roads and for Jamesport Township. 
When the state funds for permanent road work reached Gallatin, it was 
found that the State Auditor had sent to this county about $2079.69. Of 
this amount Jamesport Township received $240.33, Ash Grove road $379.90 
and the Olive Church road about $383. This makes a total of $1009.23, or 
almost half the amount sent in for the whole county." 

The citizens of Colfax Township made arrangements for an election 
to be held on June 6, 1916, to vote on a $15,000 road bond issue, bonds to 
run for twenty years. A petition signed by at least sixty citizens was pre- 
sented to the county court in May, and the election was authorized. Be- 
fore the date of the election, however the leaders, among whom were H. L. 
Buck and F. E. Warner, decided to call it off. The time was not ripe, in 
their estimation. Some were indifferent, and the proposition was not gen- 
erally understood. 

The latter part of April, 1916, the Pattonburg Commercial Club enter- 
tained over 700 Jefferson Highway boosters at a banquet given at the M. 
E. Church, South. This is probably the largest road meeting ever held in 
the county. Representatives from Bethany, Ridgeway, Coffey, Jameson, 
Maryville, McFall, Hamilton, Altamont, Winston, Gallatin, Santa Rosa, 
Civil Bend and St. Joseph were present. 

After the McColluough-Morgan amendment to the Hawes law went in- 
to effect there was a great rush to get applications for State and Federal 
aid before the State Highway Commission. By Dec. 1, 1920, the commis- 
sion had approved 184 projects. Among these were two in Daviess County, 
one a 24 foot graded earth road 8.87 miles in length, running east and west 
through the Gallatin-Jamesport district. It was estimated that the road 
would cost $139,664.83, of which $69,832.41 would be paid by the Federal 
and $4,440.00 by the state government. 

The second project approved was a 24 foot earth road 7.64 miles in 
length between Jamesport and the Grundy County line, with an estimated 
cost of $41,634.56, with Federal aid amounting to $2,817.28, and state aid 
amounting to $3,820.00. 



128 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

The reports of the State Highway Board show that at the close of the 
biennial period in 1920, a total of $6,770.65 had been paid Daviess County 
for dragging the inter-county seat roads, $1,213.58 in 1917, $2,045.17 in 
1918 and $549.20 in 1919, $2,962.70 in 1920. 

For the four years ending in 1920, the summary of the State High- 
way Board shows that for Daviess County $5,460,00 has been paid to state 
surveys, $16,720.22 had been paid on road work by the State Highway De- 
partment, and that $98,909.69 in State and Federal aid had been allotted 
the county. The figures show that $71,297.11 had been paid and allotted 
in excess of the automobile licenses paid into the state road fund during 
the same period. 

Under the new highway law, Daviess County will have 82.6 miles of 
road. The bulletin published in March 1921 by the State Highway Depart- 
ment, "Tentative Designation of State Roads", described these as follows: 

Sec. 8a Road — Beginning at the DeKalb-Daviess County line near the 
southwest corner of Daviess County, thence in a northeasterly direction 
through Winston, Altamont and Gallatin to the Grundy-Daviess County 
line a distance of approximately 42.5 miles. 

Sec. 8b Road — Beginning at Gallatin, thence south to the Daviess- 
Caldwell County line. A distance of approximately 12.1 miles. 

Sec. 10 Road — Beginning at the Daviess-Harrison County line north 
to Pattonburg, thence in a southerly direction through Pattonsburg to 
Altamont. A distance of approximately 21 miles. 

Sec. 10 Road — Beginning at the DeKalb-Daviess County line near 
Weatherby thence south and east to a point on the state road near Winston. 
A distance of approximately 7 miles. 

The state is divided into six districts. The first district is composed 
of, Atchison, Andrew, Clinton, Clay, Caldwell, Carroll, DeKalb Daviess , 
Grundy, Gentry, Holt, Harrison, Jackson, Livingston, Mercer, Nodaway ; 
Platte, Ray and Worth Counties. A. C. Lingley, St. Joseph, is the division 
engineer. 

As an incentive to roadbuilding, the Federal Government donated 650 
trucks and tractors to be used for this purpose. The records of the State 
Highway Board, July, 1921, showed that five trucks and one tractor had 
been allotted to Daviess County. 

Railroads. — The settlers were not slow to realize the importance to 
their communities of the location of the railroads. Towns and counties 
untouched by the railroads would clearly suffer, to the profit of those lo- 
cated along them, and this fact not only created intense rivalry among the 
various towns and counties but also operated to the advantage of the rail- 
roads and their promoters who were in a position to demand concessions 



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HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 129 

and assistance from the localities traversed by them as well as to derive 
profit from speculation in lands along the proposed routes. 

The first railroad project to take definite form contemplated a road 
across northern Missouri, connecting Hannibal and St. Joseph. In Feb., 
1847, the Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad was chartered by the Legislature. 
Robert Wilson, of Daviess County, was named as one of the directors. A 
vigorous canvass was immediately opened along the line to secure subscrip- 
tions from the several counties. Meetings were held in every county seat 
and town. A large meeting or convention, was held in Chillicothe, June 2, 
1847, at which delegates from Buchanan, DeKalb, Ray, Grundy, Caldwell, 
Livingston, Linn, Macon, Shelby and Marion Counties were present. Judge 
Austin A. King of Ray County, was elected president, and Dr. John Crav- 
ens, of Daviess County, was one of the Vice-Presidents. The delegates 
from Daviess County were Robert Wilson, John B. Comer, Volney E. Bragg, 
William P. Peniston, James Turley, Thomas T. Frame, Jacob S. Rogers, 
M. T. Green, John Mann, Woody Manson and John Cravens. Upon the rec- 
ommendation of a committee appointed to submit subjects for the action 
of the convention, the following measures were adpted: (1) The appoint- 
ment of three to draft an address to the people of western Missouri setting 
forth the advantages of the proposed roads. Volney E. Bragg, of Daviess 
County, was a member of this committee. (2) The appointment of a com- 
mittee of three to petition the Missouri Legislature for such aid as "can 
be afforded consistently with the rights of other sections of the state." 
(3) The appointment of a committee of three to petition Congress to donate 
alternate sections of land within six miles on each side of said road when 
located. Dr. John Cravens was a member of this committee. The dele- 
gates agreed to withhold political support from any candidate for a state 
office or for Congress who failed to pledge his aid to the project. 

In Feb., 1850, the Missouri Legislature pledged $1,500,000 in bonds to 
the enterprise. A number of counties subscribed stock in the company. 
In May, 1851, Daviess County voted $30,000 of stock, and James McFerran 
was appointed county agent to represent the county and vote its stock. 
Two routes had been proposed for the road, one of which passed through 
Grundy and Daviess Counties, and the other through the tier of counties 
south of Daviess. Daviess County also offered to donate the right of way 
and to take $20,000 additional stock if the railroad were located by the 
northern route and should pass through or adjacent to Gallatin. The road 
as finally located, did not pass through the county and a settlement was 
made between the county and the railroad by which the county's stock was 
surrendered. 

By appropriate acts of Congress and of the State Legislature, the road 



130 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

was granted every alternate section of land for six miles in width on each 
side of the railroad in aid of the proposed enterprise. Under these acts, a 
considerable body of land in Daviess County came to be owned by the rail- 
road company. 

In the years following the location of the Hannibal & St. Joseph Rail- 
road, the citizens of Daviess County and of other communities not ade- 
quately served by existing railroads were active in the promotion of other 
railroad projects. Among the roads proposed were the Hamilton, Gallatin 
and Bethany Railroad, chartered in 1855, with seven Daviess Countians as 
directors, having as its objective a line from Hamilton passing through 
Gallatin, Bethany and Eagleville, and thence to the Iowa line, and also the 
Parkville and Grand River Railroad, which comtemplated a line from Park- 
ville to the Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad, thence by Gallatin and Trenton 
to the Missouri state line in the direction of Burlington, Iowa. Neither 
project was carried out. 

During 1866, it was proposed to build a line having Kansas City and 
Des Moines as its terminal points. The route to be taken through Daviess 
County was the subject of a warm contest between Civil Bend and Gallatin. 
The road had been first surveyed through Cameron, Civil Bend, Pattons- 
burg and Bethany, while Gallatin urged that the route be changed so as to 
pass through Gallatin, then to Bethany. 

Finally, plans for railroad building in the county began to take definite 
shape, and in 1868 the county court agreed to subscribe $150,000 for the 
Leavenworth and Des Moines Railroad on the condition that the railroad be 
built through the county and a depot be constructed within one thousand 
yards of the county court house in Gallatin. It is also agreed that $150,- 
000 would be subscribed to the Chillicothe & Omaha Railroad, a depot to be 
built within one-half mile of Gallatin. The county court also agreed to 
and did issue bonds to the Chicago & Southwestern Railway, to whom the 
bonds voted to the Leavenworth & Des Moines Railroad were also issued, 
in the sum of $60,000 for and in behalf of the people of a strip ten miles 
wide along the railway, generally known as the Ten-mile Strip Bonds. 

On April 5, 1871, the first rail was laid within Daviess County on the 
Chillicothe & Omaha line. The track was soon completed to Gallatin, and 
before the end of the year was built as far as Elm Flat, now Pattonsburg, 
where it stopped. Pattonsburg remained the terminal point of the road 
until 1879, at which time it was completed to Omaha and in October of that 
year the road was opened for through traffic. 

The year 1871 also marked the completion of the Chicago & South- 
westen Railroad line. The forces engaged in the building of the road and 
working from opposite ends of the road, met in Colfax Township, a few 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 131 

miles southwest of Winston, where with a cermony befitting the occasion, 
the last spike was driven. On Sept. 26, 1871, the opening of the road was 
celebrated by the running of an excursion train, upon which a number of 
Gallatin citizens were guests. 

The years that followed the building of these roads were marked by 
protracted litigation and bitter feeling between the railroads and the peo- 
ple of the county. The Chillicothe & Omaha Railroad aroused the ire of the 
people of Gallatin by failing to run their road across the river and by at- 
tempting to build up a rival town at the crossing of the Chicago & South- 
western road about two miles east of Gallatin and to remove the postoffice 
to that place. Likewise, the people of Pattonsburg and Benton Township 
became embittered because of the company's failure to complete the road 
through that township. The township had subscribed $20,000 toward the 
railroad upon the condition that it should run through the center of the 
township. As constructed, it ran to Elm Flat, near the southeast corner 
of the township and there stopped. The road was run about two miles 
south of old Pattonsburg, with the deliberate purpose, it was charged by 
the citizens, of destroying that town in order that the promoters might 
profit by speculation in the surrounding lands. Certainly, it had that effect, 
and old Pattonsburg soon disappeared. The action of the company led the 
township to contest the validity of the $20,000 subscription and in the suit 
that followed the township was successful. 

The feeling of opposition to the railroads, created largely by the fail- 
ure to construct their roads where desired, soon led to a demand from the 
people of many sections of the county that the county court contest the val- 
idity of the bonds issued to the two railroads. Indignation ran high, and 
mass-meetings were held throughout the county, at which the purpose was 
declared of refusing to pay taxes to meet the interest on the bonds, and 
calling upon judges and clerks who had issued and delivered them to resign. 
Finally, on Oct. 2, 1872, the county court made an order declaring the 
Chicago & Southwestern bond issue and the Ten-mile Strip bonds invalid 
and ordering that the interest should not be paid nor any tax levy of taxes 
made to meet the same. Suit was institued to test the validity of the 
bonds, and litigation continued for several years. The Ten-mile Strip bonds 
were held invalid, and the county secured a very favorable compromise on 
a large portion of the bonds and paid them off in cash. The remainder were 
paid off at their maturity in 1891. 

In the early nineties, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad, the 
successor of the old Chicago & Southwestern, built a branch line from Alta- 
mont to St. Joseph. 

In 1897 and 1898, rights of way for another road through the county 



132 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

was secured, and shortly therafter another road, the Omaha, Kansas City 
& Eastern Railroad, was constructed, passing through Coffey, Pattonsburg 
and southwesterly in the direction of Kansas City. The name of the road 
has since been changed to the Quincy, Omaha & Kansas City Railroad. 

The Board of Equalization report of 1921 shows the Wabash Railway 
Company having a mileage of 35.81, and a valuation of $1,343,949.30 ; the 
Quincy, Omaha & Kansas City Railroad, 18.56 miles, valuation $229,372.80; 
Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway, 35.33 miles, valuation $1,021,037, 



CHAPTER IX. 



CHURCHES. 



PIONEER MINISTERS— PIONEER CHURCHES— CAMP MEETING— CHURCH SERVICES- 
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH— CATHOLIC CHURCH— CHRISTIAN CHURCH— EVAN- 
GELICAL CHURCH — BAPTIST CHURCH — METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH — 
METHODIST EPISCOPAL SOUTH -PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH— SEVENTH DAY AD- 

VBNTISTS. 

Pioneer Ministers. — Rev. James McMahon was the first minister to 
hold religious services in Daviess County. His church was the out-of -doors, 
for he stood under an oak tree near the site where Robert Peniston later 
built the first mill in the county. This was on Aug. 25, 1830. Mr. Mc- 
Mahon was of the Methodist faith. 

Other ministers of the same denomination were Abraham Millice, who 
came in 1834, and who organized a church at Jonathan Liggett's residence 
in Salem Township in 1839 ; George Waugh, who preached the first sermon 
in Benton Township in 1834 ; Isaac Burns, J. T. V. Duberry, J. Barker and 
Thomas Ellington. Most of these belonged to the now extinct type known 
as ''circuit riders". The following account of the activities of the pioneer 
circuit rider is given by the late John F. Jordin : 

"The circuit rider followed close upon the heels of the early settlers, 
and was always a welcome guest in the log cabins of our fathers. He was 
usually a man of little learning, but unbounded zeal ; a man with an easy 
conscience and a good digestion. He travelled from one settlement to an- 
other on horseback, carrying a pair of huge saddle-bags, which contained 
a few articles of clothing, a Bible, and tracts on various religious subjects, 
thus combining the offices of preacher and colporteur. He .was moved by 
an honest desire to be useful and helpful to his fellowmen, and although 
he asked for nothing beyond the means of subsistence, he gave freely of 
all that he possessed. It mattered little whether he was called upon to per- 
form a marriage ceremony, preach a funeral, assist at a log-rolling or take 
up a corner at a house-raising, he waited for no second invitation, but just 
sailed in and did his level best. He knew his people and kept in touch with 



134 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

them. But he never lost caste by assisting in heavy work. Always he 
was a preacher and was respected and venerated as a man set apart for 
God's work. If he assisted at a house-raising or any kind of work on which 
a number of men were engaged, he generally made it a condition precedent 
that if he helped them work through the day they were to come at night 
to some cabin in the neighborhood and hear him preach. And thus did the 
circuit-rider "Become all things to all men, that by all means he might 
save some". 

The second preacher in the county was a Baptist, the Rev. William 
Michaels. He held services at the home of a Mr. Atkinson and in several 
other homes. In 1840 he organized the Pilot Grove Baptist Church. Rev. 
Jonathan Smith was another pioneer minister of this denomination. He 
settled in Washington Township in 1840, and for many years was a most 
valued worker. 

Probably the first Presbyterian to preach in the county was the Rev. 
Robert Morgan. His first services were held at the home of Robert Miller. 

Elder George Flint preached for the members of the Christian Church 
some time in the forties. Other early ministers of this faith who held re- 
ligious services in the county were Dr. Jourdan, of Chillicothe, Missouri, 
John H. Ballinger, David T. Wright and Joseph Davis. 

Pioneer Churches. — The first church services were usually held in the 
cabins of the settlers or out of doors, when the weather permitted. Some- 
times a tobacco barn served as a church. Before long, however, there was 
a general desire for special church buildings. Usually these were very 
crude structures, at least when compared with the churches of today. 
Typical of the church of the early days was the old Lick Fork Baptist 
church. 

The Camp Meeting. — To the pioneer the camp meeting was an event 
to be looked forward to throughout the whole year. They were usually 
held in the late summer after the crops were laid by. Rude cabins and 
tents were erected and a small city flourished for the few weeks of the 
meeting. Socially it meant as much to the early settlers as it did religious- 
ly. 

Probably the first camp meeting in the Grand River country were held 
on the Kessler farm in Livingston County. The date of the first one is not 
known but it was prior to 1839. A spring furnished abundant water for 
the campers. Many Daviess countians attended these meetings annually. 

In 1855 the meeting place was changed to the James Callison farm a 
short distance northwest of Jamesport. It was an ideal spot for a camp 
meeting. A beautiful grove of white oak trees furnished abundant shade 
and a large spring nearby assured a supply of water. Because of its near- 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 135 

ness to town few cabins were erected there, but some tents were put up. 
The last meeting on this ground was in August and September, 1857, which 
ended in a free-for-all fight. There were no saloons near and the neighbor- 
ing landowners refused to let anything be sold on their land without con- 
sent of the managers of the meeting. Because he was refused a license to 
sell cider and cakes, one man became so incensed that he bought a barrel 
of Bourbon and established what was then called a "Texas" on nearby rail- 
road land. One of the patrons of this establishment was arrested at the 
camp meeting and his comrades came down to rescue him, but found that 
the Methodists were quite vigorous in the use of clubs and fists. 

Church Services — As hymn books were scarce, the hymns were usual- 
ly "lined", that is, the preacher read a couple of lines and these were then 
sung by the congregation. This, of course, took some time, but time was 
no particular item at a church service then. Neither did they sing the first 
second and last stnazas of a hymn — the whole song was sung regardless of 
the number of stanzas. Among the favorites were, "How Tedious and 
Tasteless the Hour," "Rock of Ages," and "Oh, Tell Me, Happy Sailor." 
Musical instruments were unknown in the early days, in fact, were gener- 
ally regarded with disfavor, if not with actual animosity. 

Sermons were also long. Doctrinal sermons were heard much more 
frequently than today. The horrors of the hereafter were dwelt frequent- 
ly upon, and in the words of Billy Sunday, the hereafter pictured in ser- 
mons today is a regular summer resort compared to that depicted in the 
sermons of the early days. Mr. Jordin gives a vivid picture of one of these 
sermons delivered by a Presbyterian divine, William Houston, who, he said, 
impressed him more than any preacher he ever heard. 

"I remember of listening to Houston preach one night from the words : 
'Ephriam is a cake not turned. Strangers have devoured his strength and 
he knoweth it not. Yea, gray hairs are here and there upon him, yet he 
knoweth it not.' He must have spoken for at least two hours. It was one 
of the most terrific arraignments of the world, the flesh and the devil that 
I ever listened to. Nor was his preaching ineffective. I saw one night 21 
new converts who had come into the fold under his preaching stand up to 
testify as to what the Lord had done for them. It was an indescribable 
scene and one long to be remembered by those who witnessed it." 

Congregational Church. — There is some difference of opinion as to 
the date of the organization of the Gallatin Congregational church. Judge 
J. T. Day gives the date as May 5, 1866. The history of Daviess County, 
published in 1882, places the date at May 6, 1876. The meeting at which 
the organization was perfected was held in the court house. The Rev. O. 
A. Thomas of Richmond preached in the morning, and Rev. B. Turner of 



136 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Hannibal in the evening. The membership was so small that the congre- 
gation soon disbanded. No church building was erected. 

Catholic Church. — Only one church of the Catholic faith has ever been 
built in Daviess County. This church was situated a short distance from 
old Bancroft. It was dedicated June 28, 1878, by the Right Rev. Bishop 
Hogan, sasisted by Revs. Kennedy and O'Leary. The church had only a 
few members, but it was hoped that a strong church would be built up. 
The congregation is no longer in existence, those who remain in its mem- 
bership attending the church at Oilman. 

For many years the Catholic church owned a lot in Oallatin. As time 
went on and there was not enough people of that faith in the vicinity to 
justify the building of a church, the lot was finally donated to- the city of 
Oallatin to become a part of Dockery Park. 

Christian Church. — The Altamont Christian Church was organized 
in 1890. It has a membership of 110. and a Bible School enrollment of 80. 
The value of the church building is $2500. 

Soon after the Civil War a church of this denomination was establish- 
ed at Carlow. It has a membership of 75, and its church property is valued 
at $2,000. 

The Christian church at Civil Bend was organized in February, 1868. 
A church building was errected in 1872. The church has a membership of 
125, and a Sunday School with an enrollment of about 100. The church 
property is valued at $2,500. Elisha Frost, Barney Shriver and Oeorge 
Roberts are among its leading members. 

The Coffey Christian church was organized about 1890. On its mem- 
bership books are 125 names, and the Bible School has an enrollment of 
about 70. 

The Christian church of Oallatin was organized in June, 1843, with 41 
charter members. Services were held in the court house until the war, 
when that building was taken over by the militia. The congregation then 
worshipped in the Methodist and Cumberland Presbyterian churches. The 
church went down during the war, and was reorganized in 1865, with 23 
members. In 1866 a large frame church costing some $4,000 was erected 
across the street and a little north of the present church. In 1898 the 
church now used was erected, a commodious basement being added in 1921, 
making it of the total value of about $15,000. The total membership of the 
church is 512, with a Bible School enrollment of 450. The pastor is W. 
H. Funderburk, and among its officials are W. C. Oillihan, Joshua W. Alex- 
ander, Howard Poage, A. H. Pettijohn and John Reid. 

March 24, 1872, is given as the date of the organization of the James- 
son Christian church. A church was first erected in 1875 at a cost of some 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 137 

$800. The membership has now reached 100 to 125 members, with a Sun- 
day School enrollment of between 90 and 100. The value of the church 
property is $4,000. 

The Jamesport Church of Christ was organized in 1868 or 1869. For 
a time they held services in the Methodist Episcopal Church South. They 
now have a large frame church valued at about $2,000. The membership 
of the church is 100, with a Bible School enrollment of 90. 

Old Union church was built by several denominations, and is open to 
all. The Christian church has an interest in the church. A union Sunday 
School is maintained. The church property is valued at $1,200. 

One of the earliest Christian churches in the county is the Clear Creek 
church. It was organized before the Civil War. No report is made from 
church in the 1921 yearbook. The church property is valued at $1,200. 

The Lock Springs congregation was organized in 1875, though an or- 
ganization had been effected prior to this time. Among the leaders of the 
earlier organization were G. L. Ballinger, William Eads and Hiram Poe. 
The church now has a membership of 75, with a Sunday School enrolling 
about the same number. The church is valued at $2,500. 

The Madison Square church was organized about 1870, and some years 
later a church building erected, now valued at about $200. It has a mem- 
bership of 75, and a Sunday School enrollment of 60. 

The second largest Christian church in the county is at Pattonsburg. 
It was organized about 1872, though prior to the war there had been a 
prosperous congregation. A frame church was erected, but this was badly 
damaged by the floods of 1909, and a new church built, being dedicated in 
June, 1914. The property is now valued at $20,000. The church enroll- 
ment is 217, and the Sunday School enrollment 230. There is also an or- 
ganization of the C. W. B. M. 

Prairie City Christian church was established in 1897. It has a church 
building valued at about $1,500, and a membership of 125. Its Bible 
School enrollment is about 65. 

Whitefield church, organized in 1880. A church building was started 
the same year. The membership is now between 50 and 75. The church 
has no organization now. 

Splawn Ridge church near Gallatin was organized about 1904, and a 
church built the same year, which is valued at from $1,200 to $1,500. There 
are about 35 members. 

Scotland Church of Christ, formerly known as Pilot Grove, is located 
in Washington Township and was established in 1856. The church now 
has a membership of 200, and a church building valued at $2,500. 

Oak Ridge Christian church was organized in 1876, but did not have a 



138 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

church building until 1871. There were 28 charter members. The build- 
ing is valued at $1,200. The enrollment of the church is 50 and of the 
Sunday School, 40. 

The pastors of this denomination, as listed in the 1921 Yearbook, are 
Charles P. Murphy, Altamont; Earl Stark, Civil Bend and Pattonburg; Z. 
Mitchell, Madison Square and Coffey ; W. H. Funderburk, Gallatin ; H. H. 
Tinsley, Lock Springs ; and C. E. Hunt, Whitefield. 

Evangelical Church. — As far back as 1868, an Evangelical Church was 
located in School District No. 1, in Colfax Township. In the fall of 1879, 
it was decided to build a church in Winston. A brick church 32x44 feet 
was erected. The congregation was largely made up of Pennsylvania Ger- 
mans, among them the Triems. In 1882 the church had a membership 
of 50. As time passed the membership dwindled and in 1918 the few re- 
maining members reluctantly decided to disband. The church has now 
been torn down and a residence occupies the church site. 

Baptist Church. — The Baptist churches of Daviess County, together 
with four Harrison County churches are organized into the Daviess County 
Baptist Association. The officers are, O. E. Turner, Moderator; S. W. 
Brandom, Secretary ; and A. R. Graham, Treasurer. The 20th annual meet- 
ing was held in Pattonsburg, Sept. 10, 11, 1921. The statistics below are 
from that report. 

The Altamont church, the youngest in the county, was organized in 
1900. It has a membership of 37 and a Sunday School enrollment of 33. 
The church is free from indebtedness and is valued at $1,500. Clerk, Elva 
Cole. Pastor, Dan R. Gott. 

A church was organized at Coffey in 1888. The church property is 
valued at $6,500, but there is a debt upon it of about $400. There are 148 
members of the church, and 45 enrolled in Sunday School. Pastor, W. A. 
Hyde. Clerk, Miss Eileen Lowe. 

The Crab Orchard Baptist church was originally called the South Big 
Creek church, and under this name was organized by Elder Benjamin Smith 
and Deacon Samuel Penn on Dec. 5, 1846. There were eight charter mem- 
bers. On the first Sunday in April, 1860, the congregation unanimously 
decided to change the name to Crab Orchard. B, F. Kenney was the pastor 
at that time. The present church house was erected in 1860, and is valued 
at $1,200. The membership is about 40. Clerk, Mrs. Hattie Adams . 

Three Baptist churches have been organized in Gallatin. Of the first 
nothing can be learned. The next one was organized in 1855 by Elders R. 
C. Hill and Franklin Graves. Meetings were held over a store where the 
postoffice now is. R. C. Hill was the first pastor and was succeeded in 1857 
by B. F. Kenney. Arrangements for building a church were begun but 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 139 

the war made it necessary to disband. Mr. Kenney continued to preach 
there as often as possible and in 1870, Kenney Chapel Baptist church was 
organized. Meetings were held in the Cumberland Presbyterian church 
until the completion of the Baptist church which was located one block 
north of the northwest corner of the public square. In 1905, the congre- 
gation began making plans for a new church, work, however, not beginning 
until 1910. The church was formerly dedicated June 4, 1911. A home for 
the pastor was purchased in 1914. The value of the church property is 
estimated at $17,400. The present membership, 245. Sunday School en- 
rollment, 225. Pastor, R. F. Judson. Clerk, A. R. Maffitt. 

Grand River Baptist church, the oldest of the denomination, and the 
first or second of any denomination, in the county, was organized Dec. 14, 
1833. For years they worshiped in a log school house. The first church 
was erected in 1864. A few years ago a new building was put up, and is 
valued at $3,000. There are now 109 members of the church and the Sun- 
day School enrollment is 50. Pastor, B. Venable. Clerk, Virgil Jenkins. 

Hickory Creek church, located in Washington Township, was erected in 
1869 by a stock company formed of those in the neighborhood interested 
in having a church in the community. The church cost $1,700. A board 
of trustees was elected, and the first board was comprised of Gabriel Feurt, 
J. C. Glaze and William Grant. The first pastors in charge were J. L. 
Netherton for the Baptists, and J. H. Tharp for the Presbyterians. The 
church is now inactive. The Baptists report 25 members. Grit Feurt is 
the clerk. 

The Jameson church was organized in 1892. Although one of the new- 
est churches, it has the second largest membership of any Baptist church 
in the county — 189. The Sunday School enrollment is 117. A Woman's 
Missionary Society and Young Women's Auxiliary are maintained. Pastor, 
C. W. Kent. Clerk, F. L. Scott. The value of the church property is $5000. 

The church at Jamesport was established in 1867. For some time 
services were held in the Methodist church. About 1882 a church house 
was erected. Many improvements have been made, and the property is 
now valued at $3,500. It has 87 members, and 85 in the Sunday School. 
Mrs. Dan R. Gott is president of the Ladies Aid Society. Pastor, Dan R. 
Gott. Clerk, Miss Jennie Harrah. 

Lick Fork, in Harrison Township, is the largest rural Baptist church in 
the county. It has a membership of 186, and a Sunday School enrollment 
of 23. A women's missionary society is also maintained. It was organized 
in 1867 or 1869, with nine members. A church was built in 1871. The pas- 
tor is Ellwood James, and Clarence Dewey is clerk. 

The Rev. B. F. Kenney and the Rev. Mr. Black assisted in organizing 



140 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

the church in Sheridan Township in July, 1858. The church building is 
valued at $1,200. The congregation numbers 37 members, and the Sunday 
School enrolls 30. W. M. Bristow is clerk. 

New Salem church is in the southwest corner of Jefferson Township. 
It was organized in 1846 and was formerly known at Victoria church. It 
was then one of the most. prominent churches in the county, but its mem- 
bership has now declined to 30. The church is valued at $1,200. Joseph 
Coin is clerk. 

Olive church was organized in 1872. The church property is valued 
at $1,500. There are 65 members and 34 are enrolled in the Sunday School. 
The pastor is Lewis Clark, and the clerk is Otto Critten. 

A church was established at Pattonsburg in 1881. A church building 
was erected in that year at a cost of $1,500. The church now used is val- 
ued at $7,500. The membership is 154, and the Sunday School enrollment, 
159. A Women's Missionary Society and Ladies Aid Society are maintain- 
ed by the members. The pastor is J. W. Trower, and A. J. Coffey, is clerk. 

In 1880, the Rev. Joseph Wood organized a church in Lincoln Town- 
ship, three miles south of old Bancroft. For a time it was called for the 
organizer, but the name has been changed to Pilot Grove church. There 
are now 51 members, and 40 are enrolled in the Sunday School. The church 
is valued at $1,200. Richard Griffith is clerk. 

Pilot Grove Church No. 2, was organized in 1886. It has 83 members, 
the Sunday School enrolling 27. The church building is valued at $3,000. 
W. E. Kaufman is pastor and A. L. Mann is clerk. 

Pleasant Ridge church has a membership of 83 and a Sunday School 
enrollment of 59. The church property is valued at $1,200. Lillie Weldon 
is clerk. 

Union Grove church was organized in 1886. The church has an en- 
enrollment of 59. The church property is valued at $1,200. Lillie Weldon 
is clerk. 

The Winston church has a membership of 128, and the Sunday School 
has an enrollment of 100. Mrs. V. C. Huffman is president of the Ladies 
Aid Society. A. B. Brown is pastor, and Cora McWilliams, clerk. The 
church property is valued at $3,000. 

In addition to Baptist churches, which are members of the Daviess 
County Baptist Association, this denomination holds an interest in Old 
Union church which is owned jointly by the Christian and Baptist churches. 
Services are no longer held there regularly. Hickory Creek church, now 
inactive, was owned by the Baptists and Presbyterians. 

The Old School Baptists established a church in Lincoln Township in 
1859. Rev. James M. Ward was the first pastor. The church is still active. 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 141 

Another church of this denomination was organized in 1850 in Colfax 
Township. 

There are two Free Will Baptist churches in the county — the Muddy 
(Philadelphia) Free Will Baptist church and the Center Point Free Will 
Baptist church. Both are in the northern part of the county. 

The Methodist Episcopal Church. — There are in the county six Meth- 
odist Episcopal churches forming a part of the Cameron District. 

Altamont Methodist church has a church building valued at $4,000. It 
has 169 full and 12 preparatory members. The pastor is W. T. Cline. The 
church at Mabel is part of the Altamont charge. 

F. A. Tinney is pastor of the churches at Coffey and Oilman. The two 
charges have a membership of 231, and a Sunday School enrollment of 233. 
The two churches are valued at $9,500. 

The church at Civil Bend was organized in 1865 through the efforts of 
Rev David Heath. There were about 15 charter members. A frame church 
was built in 1868, costing about $1,500. A parsonage was also erected. 

The Jamesport church was organized in 1869, with a membership of 
25. The first church building was put up in 1871 and dedicated by Rev. 
Oscar Deshles. It was a frame building, and an addition was added in 1883. 
In 1903 a new lot was purchased a block from the business section of the 
town and on it was erected a brick building valued at about $12,000. An 
addition was added the past summer. The church now has about 286 
members with a Sunday School enrollment of 315 and an average atten- 
dance of 139. The pastor is A. S. Olsen. 

The church was established at Winston in 1874 under the direction of 
Rev. H. S. Barnes. The following year a frame church building was begun 
but was not completed until 1876. The membership is now 320, with a 
Sunday School enrollment of 268. The pastor is Rev. C. H. Ragsdale. The 
church property is valued at $10,000, the parsonage at $2,000. 

The first Methodist church at Pattonsburg was built in 1882. Before 
it was entirely completed it was sold to the Christian church. A congrega- 
tion had been organized some time before this date. Services were held in 
the Baptist church until the building of the Methodist church in 1887. This 
church was a frame structure valued at about $1,200. The pastor lived 
at Jameson until about 1886, when a parsonage was built at Pattonsburg. 
The first pastor to occupy this home was Rev. Hunt, and the church was 
begun during his pastorate. Rev. S. B. Tabor was pastor at the time of its 
completion. It was dedicated by Bishop Hendricks, January, 1888. This 
church was used until after the floods of 1909, after which a large and com- 
modious church was built, which is valued at $25,000. The parsonage is 
valued at $4,000. The membership of the church is now 312, of the Sunday 



142 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

School, 225. The Women's Missionary Society, 21. The pastor is K. T. 
Davis. 

Methodist Episcopal Church, South. — The Gallatin church was organ- 
ized in 1832, but the records prior to 1839 have been lost. It was probably 
included in a circuit, and the latter date is usually given as the date of or- 
ganization. There was neither church nor school house in the county be- 
fore 1835. The first preaching of any denomination in the county was 
held at the cabin of Hardin Stone by the Rev. Hardin Ellington about 1833. 
The first regular pastor was Rev. Abraham Millice in 1839 and 1840. In 1859 
a frame church was erected at a cost of about $1,500, and was dedicated 
by Rev. E. K. Miller. This building was replaced in 1886 by another frame 
structure at a cost of $3,500. It was dedicated by Rev. John D. Vincil. The 
last service was held in this church July 28, 1912, The new building, valu- 
ed at $35,000, was dedicated in January, 1913, by Dr. W. F. McMurray. The 
church has a membership of 384. The first Sunday School in the county 
was organized in this church in 1850, with Judge John D. Coulson as super- 
intendent. The enrollment is now 250. A Ladies Aid Society and Wo- 
man's Missionary Society are maintained. A parsonage valued at $4,000 
is owned by the church. The pastor. Rev. S. E. Hoover, also preaches at 
Centenary twice a month. 

Centenary was organized in 1882 by Rev, Atterbury. There were only 
seven members at this time. Uncle Davis Van Dyke and six ladies. They 
collected money and material and built a church, which was dedicated by 
Rev. R. H. Cooper in 1883. This church was in a thriving condition for 
years as at one time they had as many as 250 members. Of late years 
many have moved their membership to Gallatin and towns nearby, so that 
only about 50 members are left. Sunday School is held during the summer 
months, E. G, Knight, being superintendent. 

Wesley Chapel, three miles north of Pattonsburg, was originally a 
North Methodist church. About 25 years ago. Bethel and Ellis Chapel 
united and remodeled Wesley Chapel. It has since been of the Methodist 
church, South. The church is valued at about $3,000. There is a member- 
ship of about 40. 

The Methodist Episcopal church. South, at Jamesport, was built in 
1879, at a cost of $1,500. It was dedicated by the Rev. E. R, Hendricks. 
In 1882 the church had a membership of 26, which has increased to 226 at 
the present time. It has a Sunday School enrollment of about 300. The 
church has been remodelled and an addition built, the structure now being 
valued at $5,000. A parsonage is located about three blocks from the 
church. C. L, Green is the pastor. 

The Lock Springs church was organized in 1865. The names of only 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 143 

four of the original members are known — Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Drummond, 
and John and James Brown. A building was soon erected. In 1882 the 
church had a membership of over 200. The church is now on the Lock 
Springs circuit, composed of Lock Springs, Mt. Olive, Spring Hill and Cen- 
tral Chapel, the last three being in Livingston County. The churches of 
the circuit have a total membership of 436. The four churches are valued 
at $8,000. A parsonage, valued at $1,500, is owned by the churches. The 
pastor is F. G. Seyforth. 

In the early eighties a revival meeting was held at the old Honey Creek 
school house, now known as the Shiner school house. As a result of the 
meeting it was decided to build a church in the vicinity. Through the per- 
sonal efforts of Wes. Woods and other prominent citizens, funds were secur 
ed. Most of the work on the building was done by the members. The 
church Monroe Chapel was dedicated in 1889 by Willis E. Dockery. For a 
time the congregation flourished, but now the major portion of the original 
members have died, others have moved away, and the motor cars have 
placed the remaining members in closer touch with the Gallatin church. In 
1921, the church disbanded and the building was sold. 

The first church to be built in Jamesport Township was Ketron Chapel, 
erected in 1858 or 1859 at a cost of $750. It was a frame building 46 by 56 
feet. It was named for William Ketron, a prominent minister. A few 
years later this church was sold and a new church erected some distance 
away. The new church was built in 1879 at a cost of $1,000, and was ded- 
icated by Rev. John D. Vincil. Since that time the church has been thoroly 
remodeled. Prior to the erection of the church building, a Methodist con- 
gregation had existed in this community, which had held services regularly 
since 1838. In 1842 a class was organized with Isaac Jordin as leader. The 
first minister was Rev. Reuben Aldridge, who preached for this congrega- 
tion in 1838. 

The church known as White Oak was organized in 1866 by Rev. J. F. 
Shores, and for four years services were held in a school house. In 1870, 
a church was built about one-half mile south of Jameson at a cost of $1,500. 
For a number of years Harold L. Yates was superintendent of the Sunday 
School. The church was destroyed by fire in 1874. 

The same year the principal members of White Oak Chapel organized 
the Jameson church, and a building was erected, costing when completed 
about $1,800. The church maintains a Sunday School of over 150 members 
and a Women's Missionary Society. The Jameson, Wesley Chapel and Ket- 
ron churches now form the Jameson circuit, of which Rev. A. Snowden is 
pastor. The three churches have a melnbership of 125. A parsonage val- 
ued at $2,000 is owned by the churches. 



144 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Presbyterian Church.-There are at present five Presbyterian churches 
in Daviess County, Gallatin, Bethel, Prairie, Grand River and Lock Springs. 
They form a part of the Presbytery of McGee. 

The Gallatin church was formed by the union of the First Presbyterian 
and Cumberland Presbyterian churches in 1905. 

The Cumberland Presbyterian church was organized on Dec. 24, 1857, 
under the direction of Rev. W. D. Mahan. The following year a church 
was built at a cost of $1,200. The present church was built in 1892 at a 
cost of $7,000. 

The First Presbyterian church was organized April 29, 1871. A frame 
building was erected on the lot now occupied by the Virgil Wynne residence. 
The church had a devoted, but never a large membership. In May, 1905, 
at a congregational meeting, it was voted to unite with the Cumberland 
Presbyterian church. 

The church now has an enrollment of 118, the Sunday School of 115, 
and the Women's Missionary Society of 35. A manse is owned by the 
church and is located on a lot adjoining the church building. For nine 
years the Rev. J. H. Tharp was pastor of this church, also preaching in a 
number of other churches in the county. The pastor at present is C. W. 
Smith. 

Bethel church dates its origin back to 1860. On April 26 of that year, 
a group of Presbyterians effected an organization at the Goodbar School 
house under the leadership of the Rev. J. W. French. Owing to the Civil 
War the congregation soon became discouraged. After the close of the 
war, there was an attempt to get the congregation together, but it was not 
fully reorganized until 1871. A church building was then begun and com- 
pleted the following year at a cost of $2,126. When the two Presbyterian 
churches united, the Hopewell congregation was added to the Bethel con- 
gregation. The membership of the church now numbers 20. 

Old Harmony church, northeast of Carlow, was built in 1869. In 1887 
Prairie Valley church was built by the members of old Harmony and the old 
church was abandoned. The church now has a membership of 60, and a 
Sunday School enrollment of 50. The pastor is Rev. L. E. Brown. 

In 1913, the Bethel and Prairie Valley churches purchased a tract of 
land at Blake and erected a most attractive manse. 

Grand River church was erected a number of years ago. The congre- 
gation has gradually become scattered and at the last report to the General 
Assembly, it had only two members. In 1921 the McGee Presbytery ap- 
pointed the Rev. C. W. Smith and Elder J. A. Selby a special committee to 
investigate the condition of the church and report what steps should be 
taken regarding it. 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 145 

The church at Lock Springs was organized in 1860. The first pastor 
was Rev. John French. This congregation is now the largest of the Pres- 
byterian denomination in the county, having a membership of 186, and a 
Sunday School enrollment of about 100. A manse is owned by the church. 
T. M. Click is the pastor. 

Seventh Day Adventists. — The Seventh Day Adventists have one 
church in the county which is located in Jefferson Township. The leading 
member of the original congregation was Joseph H. Mallory. Desiring a 
church of his own faith near his home, he and with the other members of 
the congregation selected a site on his farm and work was immediately 
begun on a church which was completed in 1885. Seven years later Mr. 
Mallory and his wife conveyed the land upon which the church was situated 
to the Seventh Day Adventists General Conference Association. Some 
years later it was discovered that the land was not correctly described, and 
a suit is now pending to determine the title of the church site. 



CHAPTER X. 



SCHOOLS. 



EARLY DAY SUBSCRIPTION SCHOOLS— PIONEER TEACHERS— FIRST SCHOOL HOUSE- 
LOCATION OF EARLY SCHOOLS— TEACHER'S INSTITUTES— HIGH SCHOOLS— CON- 
SOLIDATED HIGH SCHOOLS— APPROVED RURAL SCHOOLS— GRAND RIVER COL- 
LEGE—GRAND RIVER ACADEMY— GALLATIN ACADEMY. 

Before the organization of the pubhc school system subscription 
schools were established. The 1882 history of the county says, "In 1835 
schools were taught, and from that day there has been no faltering by the 
way." However, no record of a school is found prior to 1837. This school 
was taught by H. W. Enyart, in Benton Township, in the summer of 1837. 
The term lasted for three months and in the following winter he taught 
another term of the same length. The salary was $2.00 per scholar, one 
account says $2.50, and was payable in produce, corn, deerskins, honey, etc. 
Occasionally money was paid but this was the exception rather than the 
rule. 

A. S. Youtsey taught the first school in Union Township in a small 
cabin adjoining his farm. His terms were $3.50 per student for a session 
of three months. The first school house in the county was erected on his 
farm. The lumber was furnished by the settlers. The carpenter work 
cost $25 and William Bixby was the contractor. 

The following account of the first schools in Jamesport Township is 
given in the 1882 history, "The first school taught was in a log cabin on 
Auberry's farm and taught by Lewis McCoy. This was in 1838. He got 
$6.00 per month, for six pupils and boarded around. On the John Hill place 
was the first school house and school was kept by James H. B. McFerran; 
who afterwards was a lawyer and banker at Gallatin, and now lives in Colo- 
rado. He had some seven or eight pupils and taught for $2.00 per scholar, 
a session of three months. It is evident that it was not the superabundance 
of wealth realized from teaching that caused him to take his departure." 

The first school house in Benton Township was built in the summer of 
1842. It was made of round lots, 16x18 feet, in size and had a dirt floor. 
It had a clapboard roof held with mud. The equipment consisted of smooth 
purcheon seats and desks. The building was put up by the neighbors, 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 147 

among them being Isaac and David Groomer, John D. WiUiams, John Gith- 
ens and Joseph McCrasky. This building was in the north half of the sec- 
tion 28. John Githens taught the first school here and had about 20 pupils 
and received $3.50 per scholar for a three months term. 

In 1846 the first school house was built in Colfax Township, and was 
on the Caster farm in section 15. Miss Elizabeth Morton was the first to 
teach in the building and she received, regardless of the number of pupils, 
$10.00 per month for her services. Not more than a year later a school 
was taught in the west side of the township by M. C. Weddle and he charged 
$1.00 tuition per pupil. 

James Jeffries taught the first school in Lincoln Township in 1844. The 
school house was erected on Section 30, between ten and 15 pupils attended 
the first term. Mr. Jeffries was paid $15.00 per month. 

The first school house in Marion Township was built of small lots or 
poles, Jonathan Trotter was the first teacher. A Mr. Peiffer taught the 
first school in Jackson Township on Penniston's Ridge. Here the first school 
building was erected at a cost of from $15.00 to $20.00. The first school in 
Liberty Township was taught by Joseph Starling. 

Two school houses were built in Sheridan Township in 1842. C. Need- 
ier was the first teacher, receiveing $1.50 per pupil unless the higher 
branches were taught. 

Just who taught the first school in Monroe Township is not known. 
R. Owens taught in the township in 1837. James Hemly is supposed to have 
taught prior to that time but the exact date cannot be determined. The 
first school house was built, at a cost of about $40.00, in the Hickory Grove 
neighborhood. This was in 1840. The trustees of this school were Hardin 
Stone, Elijah Whitt, and George Hemry. 

William P. Dunnington was one of the first to teach in Harrison Town- 
ship. He had about 15 pupils in 1838 and 1839. The first school was taught 
in 1836 but was poorly attended and the name of the teacher is not remem- 
bered. 

A Maine Yankee, Dr. Watts, was not only the first physician in Salem 
Township, but the first school teacher. 

In 1840 some of the settlers in Washington Township erected a school 
house on the banks of Honey Creek. John D. Inlow, (or Enlow,) taught 
here, having as many as 20 pupils. A large number for those days. In the 
late winter of 1841-42 this building was washed away. 

Teachers Institutes. — After the public schools were fairly well organ- 
ized it was customary to hold county institutes. These were held just be- 
fore examinations for county certificates were given and the courses offer- 
ed were largely preparatory for these examinations. 



148 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

In 1869 W. M. Bostaph reported to the state superintendent of schools, 
"The county teachers institute in this county is in a flourishing condition, 
with about 50 members, most of whom are regular attendants, and a lively 
interest is being maifested by some of them." 

The report of 1883-84 shows that an institute was held in Daviess 
County under the management of B. F. Brown with H. H. King as instruc- 
tor. The session lasted 30 days and 47 teachers were in attendance. 

During the summer of 1885, the institute was managed by W. T. Paugh 
with B. F. Duncan and J. J. Bryant. The term lasted ten days and was at- 
tended by 71 tecahers . 

The instructors during the summer of 1887 were Laura Hyden, C. H. 
Dutcher and F. A. Swanger, and W. T. Pugh was again manager. Again 
the attendance showed an increase, 98 being enrolled. Each teacher paid 
a tuition of $3.10 for the 19 day session. 

H, Hamilton was in charge of the institute in 1889 and B. F. Heaton 
and others were the instructors. An institute lasting from July 9 to July 
27, in 1895 and was under the management of C. A. Savage. F. W. Williams 
and W. H. Buch and A. R. Alexander were the teachers. The enrollment 
reached 122. At the end of the session 16 first grade, 32 second grade and 
49 third grade certificates were granted. 

The teachers in the 1900 session which met from July 17, to August 
4, were A. D. Edmison, J. L. Gallatin and F. W. Williams. 78 were enrolled. 

The character of these teachers' meetings has been greatly changed. 
The state university and the teacher's colleges have supplanted the county 
institute for courses of insruction. Even the county meetings which usual- 
ly lasted a couple of days in August and in November are being superceded 
by the state and district associations. 

At the time of the organization of the county statuary provisions were 
in force for the organization of public schools to be supported out of the 
school funds of each county and local taxation. In 1842, the first apportion- 
ment of state money was made, but Daviess County had no schools entitled 
to this fund. At the next apportionment in February, 1843, one school re- 
ceived state aid. District No. 1, in Township 59, Range 26. 42 children 
were taught in the school out of a possible enrollment of 59. The account 
of state money received was $35.40 when the fifth apportionment in Jan- 
uary, 1846, was made, four schools were entitled to aid and the sum received 
was $146.74. 

The report of the state superintendent of schools for the year 1854 
contains much detailed information regarding the schools. 

At that time the effort from Daviess County showed that out of the 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 149 

2,345 children between the ages of five and 20, 1,084 were enrolled in the 
schools. The average attendance was, however, much lower than this. 30 
teachers were employed, 23 of whom were men. The average salary per 
month for the men was $19.12, while the women had to content themselves 
with an average of $10.60. The average length of the school year was four 
months, seven days. The sum of $442.00 was reported raised for building 
and repairing school houses. 

The school system continued to grow until the Civil War. During that 
period many of the schools were suspended. By 1886 the system had been 
somewhat reorganized and the report for that year showed that there were 
in the county 61 primary schools and three private or select schools, with 
an average school term of four and one third months and an average atten- 
dance of 29. 

For the school year ending in June, 1821, the reports show that the 
enumeration for that year was 4,105. The decreases in enumeration are 
to be accounted for in decrease in the whole population of the county. The 
average daily attendance was 3,538. Two schools have less than a six 
months term. 16 have between six and eight months. 60 have eight 
months, and seven have a nine months term. 297 pupils were graduated 
from the common school course in 1921. 

There were 153 teachers employed in the schools, 25 men and 128 
women, while in 1854, only seven of the 30 teachers employed were women. 
There still remains, however, considerable differnce in the average salary 
paid men and women. In 1921 the average salary per month for the for- 
mer was $110, for women $80. Of the 153, 18 held state, 41 held normal 
and 94 held county certificates. The estimated value of school property in 
the county is $250,000, while equipment is valued at $35,000. 

Hight Schools. — High Schools were early established in the county. 
The report of the state superintendent in 1910 showed that Gallatin main- 
tained a first class, Plattonburg a third class and Jamesport an unclassified 
high school. 

In the last 11 years great progress has been made. By 1915 there were 
three first class high schools. Gallatin, Jamesport and Pattonsburg; two 
third class high schools, Coffey and Jameson. The schools. at Altamont 
Lock Springs and Winston were on the unclassified list. Which schools of 
Coffey, Jameson and Lock Springs, had been added to the list of first class 
high schools in 1921. There were third class schools at Altamont, Winston, 
Blake and Carlow. 

Two high schools provide training for teachers — Gallatin and Pattons- 
burg. At Gallatin the class is taught by Mrs. Clara Wills, at Pattonsburg 
by R. F. Wood. 



150 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Vocational agriculture is taught at Jameson and Gallatin. 

The Winston opera house is being remodeled for use as a high school. 
The building is so located that the city park can be used as a play ground. 

The Jamesport high school building was erected in 1914. The Galla- 
tin building was completed in 1910. 

The first consolidated high school in the county was built at Jameson. 
The district being formed by the union of Jameson, Laswell, Brown, Brushy 
Creek and the Grant schools. The first week in February, 1914, a petition 
signed by 36 taxpayers, asking for consolidation was presented to I. J. 
Vogelgesang, county superintendent. The election was held later in the 
month and was carried by a vote of 142 to 69. The question of providing 
transportation for school children which was presented as a separate pro- 
position carried by a vote of 154 to 15. Two weeks later the new district 
voted a bond issue of $20,000 for the erection of a school building. Early 
in March the district acquired four acres for a campus, and the contract let 
for the building. Seven new school wagons each accommodating 25 pupils 
were also contracted for. 

Suit was then made to disorganize the district ; was made a test case 
before the Supreme Court. The auditor declining to register the bonds. 
The court decided that the consolidation was legal and the new directors 
proceeded with the work. 

Two elections were brought to disorganize the district but both failed. 

School opened Oct. 4, 1915, with B. F. Brown as principal. 

In 1916 the county court ordered school districts known as Prairie Val- 
ley 63 and Mann 64, to be hereafter designated as Blake school district No. 
63-64. An attractive building was erected. In addition to the elementary 
school work, two years of hight school work was offered. 

Approved Rural Schools. — In 1909 the state superintendent formulated 
a plan for the approval of rural schools. In 1910, Daviess County had ten 
approved schools — Barnett, Johnson, Haw Branch, Madison and Swisher 
with Bert E. Morgan, F. W. Williams, Edna OflJield, Blanche Ayres and 
Orpha Leabo as teachers. 

By Jan. 1, 1916 the number had a little more than doubled, 11 schools: 
Everly, Virginia Ridge, Barnett, Prairie Hall, Splawn's Ridge, Prairie Hill, 
Castor and Madison being on the approved list. 

The schools placed on the standard Hst in 1921 and their teachers are, 
Liberty, James I. Ray; Netherton, Mrs. Irvin Schapaugh ; Goodbar, Mary 
Croy; Fairview, Orla Olsen; Prairie Hall, Gertrude Parmley; Pleasant 
Grove, Bernice Miller; Blake, Mrs. Alvin Nebelsick ; Island No. 10, Ferm 
Meloy ; Wooderson, Ora Quitmyer ; Allen, Mary Temple. 

Grand River College. — Grand River College, then located at Edinburg, 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 151 

in Grundy County, was organized and opened to the public in 1850. It was 
a co-educational institution, and is said to have been the first college in the 
state to admit women on equal terms with men. It was first called Grand 
River College Association. It had its inception in the enterprising spirit 
of the Baptists of Grundy and adjoining counties. Several years later the 
name of the organization was changed and the institution incorporated as 
Grand River College. For 40 years this unpretentions college maintained 
a record of faithful and efficient work. Its faculty included some of the 
ablest educators in the state. 

Edinburg was an inland town, and in 1892, the trustees decided that in 
order to make the college more accessible, enlarge its facilities and increase 
its usefulness, its removal to another location was desirable. Gallatin was 
selected. The citizens of Gallatin agreed to furnish the college site and to 
erect a building, to cost when completed, including furnishings, not less 
than $15,000, and when completed, to convey the site and buildings to the 
six Baptist Associations, Mt. Moriah, West Fork, North Grand River, Gen- 
try, Livingston and Linn County. The gift was made with the understand- 
ing that a college in all its appointments to the educational demands of the 
age should be maintained. Any surplus remaining from the sale of town 
lots in the College Addition to Gallatin, after appropriating the $15,000 for 
the building, was to be added to the permanent endowment fund. The cit- 
izens further agreed to raise within two years after the opening of the col- 
lege an amount which when added to this surplus would be $5,000. 

The college started out under very favorable conditions. Dr. W. Pope 
Yeaman, a prominent Missouri educator, who had formerly been chancellor 
of William Jewell College and president of the Board of Curators of the Uni- 
versity of Missouri, was secured as president. 

The college had seven departments, philosophy, languages, mathe- 
matics and astronomy, natural science, literature and history, art, and 
preparatory. It conferred the degrees of Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of 
Arts, and Master of Arts, and certificates of graduation were given in any 
department upon the completion of the studies in that department. 

The college opened its first session at Gallatin, Oct. 3, 1893. During the 
first year, 106 students were enrolled, 60 others being enrolled in the pre- 
paratory department, taught in the old college building at Edinburgh. 

On Jan. 16, 1893, the charter of the college was approved by the county 
court, the Board of Trustees being C. P. Brandon, W. L. Merritt, I. H. Bo- 
hannon, Joseph Koger, J. N. Brassfield, I. S. Lowry, E. A. Excun, F. P. 
Bain, Jasper Shoemaker, S. R. Dillion, E. D. Isbell, George Tuggle and Gab- 
riel Feurt. 

The second year a law department was added, the work being conducted 



152 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

by J. W. Alexander and President Yeaman. The total enrollment that year 
reached 137. 

Dr. Yeaman resigned in 1897, and the school was taken over by the 
Hatton brothers, J. H. Hatton being president, M. W. Hatton, vice-president 
and R. E. Hatton, secretary. 

In 1902, J. H. Hatton resigned and H. E. Osborn of Warrensburg was 
chosen as his successor. In November of the same year, President Osborn 
resigned. A successor was not secured until August, 1913, when the Rev. 
James Rice, of Bolivar, Mo., was chosen. Under the agreement with him, 
the college was to be endowed and put upon a permanent basis. The trus- 
tees, were, however, unable to endow the college, and after a rather long 
struggle, the work was abandoned temporarily. 

Grand River Academy. — Some time after the closing of Grand River 
College, an offer was made by William Jewell College, of Liberty, to take 
over the property and use it as a preparatory school. In February, 1905, 
the trustees of the college met in Gallatin, and voted to accept the offer, 
upon the condition that William Jewell College would provide for the mort- 
gage indebtedness of Grand River College, amounting to about $1200. The 
proposition made by William Jewell College was to take over the property, 
changing the name to Grand River Baptist Academy of William Jewell 
College, and to provide an endowment for the institution. 

In May, 1906, the Board of Trustees of Grand River College decided to 
accept the offer, with some slight modifications, and arrangements were 
then made to open the Academy under the principalship of Rev. 0. L. Wood, 
on Sept. 19, 1906. 

At the first commencement, three were graduated in music, Blanche 
Deem, Charity Macy and Helen Weiser. Bessie Fannin, Lennis Downing, 
Etta Fox, Claude Fannin, Jessie Wilson, Irene Stout and Frances completed 
the business course. 

The enrollment increased during the second year, reaching 100 in Jan- 
uary, 1908.. 

In the summer of 1908, plans were set on foot to erect a new dormitory, 
since the main building did not furnish accomodations for all the students. 
To meet the growing demands of the school, several cottages near the 
Academy were rented. 

During the summer of 1909, plans were completed for the erection of 
a $6,000 dormitory. The site selected was just west of the main building. 
Work was begun in August and was practically completed, when the 
Academy closed in 1910. 

After again remaining vacant for several years, another attempt was 
made to revive Grand River College. In February, 1914, Dr. E. W. Dow 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 153 

begun negotiations with William Jewell College for the purchase of the 
building. The Commercial Club invited Dr. Dow to visit Gallatin to inves- 
tigate the proposition. He came in April. He proposed to open a school 
for girls and asked the citizens of Gallatin to subscribe $500 annually for 
five years, payable at the end of each school year. 

Arrangements were made for the opening of the school in September. 
At first it was called the Dow College for Girls, but it was later decided to 
retain the name of the original institution. The faculty was composed of 
Dr. and Mrs. Dow, Miss Helen Dow, Miss Mary Dow, in the Academic De- 
partment, Prof. Dunwoody, Music Miss Ruth Early, Art, and Miss Eliza- 
beth Reneau, Commercial Department. The enrollment during the first 
year was near 50. The next year the standard of the college was raised, 
and a full four years' course oflfered. In 1916 the A. B. degree was confer- 
red upon Miss Ethel Ramsbottom. 

The third year there were three graduates from the preparatory de- 
partment, Mary Moore, Lucille Netherton and Ruth Ramsbottom, and 
Georgia O'Hare from the collegiate department. 

In 1918, the graduates were Cecil Burns, Fay Croy, Esther Foley, Mary 
Croy and Edna Merritt. 

During the fall of 1918, an attempt was made to make Grand River 
College an accredited military school for the Students Army Training 
Corps. Negotiations were well under way and promised to be successful, 
but before the petition was acted upon by the government, the college burn- 
ed. The dormitory, built in 1909, but which was never used, is all that is 
left to show for this institution of higher learning. 

Gallatin Academy. — The State Legislature of 1849 passed an act in- 
corporated the Daviess County Female Academy, pursuant to the provi- 
sions of which, the county court, in July, 1849, appointed as the first board 
of trustees Jonathan E. Mann, Volney E. Bragg, Francis M. Estes, Joseph 
L. Nelson, John D. Williams, Benedict Weldon and John D. Coulson. 

Six years later the legislature passed an act incorporateing the Daviess 
County Academy and Masonic Hall, naming as the first directors : John 
Cravens, Samuel Bryan, John D. Coulson, Thomas T. Frame, Nathan Gil- 
lilan, James McFerran, and Edgar C. Kelso. 

Just when the Academy opened is not known. The first principal was 
a Mr. Tuttle, and Miss Addie Cauthorn, later Mrs. W. M. Givens, was its 
first teacher of Latin and Greek. 

Others who taught at the Academy were J. S. Huffacre, R. M. Messick, 
Arthur C. Weston, John C. Vertrees, Miss Carrie Smith, Mrs. Ann Givens 
Cauthorn, and Miss Hattie Atchison, (Mrs. A. M. Irving) . 



CHAPTER XL 



BENCH AND BAR. 



THREE CIRCUIT JUDGES FROM DAVIESS COUNTY— FIRST TERM OF CIRCUIT COURT 
HELD IN 1837— FIRST BUSINESS TRANSACTED— CHANGES IN JUDICIAL CIRCUIT- 
CIRCUIT JUDGES— LAWYERS IN 1860— LAWYERS WHO CAME AFTER THE CIVIL 
WAR— ATTORNEYS IN 1882— PRESENT DAY ATTORNEYS—THE TRIAL OF FRANK 
JAMES. 

In the little more than 85 years of its existence, Daviess County has 
furnished three Circuit Judges, James McFerran, Samuel A. Richardson 
and Joshua W. Alexander. 

The first term of the circuit court was held at the home of Elisha B. 
Creekmore on the first Thursday after the fourth Monday in July, 1837. 
Judge Austin A. King presided. Thomas C. Burch acted Prosecuting At- 
torney, James B. Turner as Clerk, and William Bowman, Sheriff. The 
county was then a part of the Fifth Judicial Circuit. The court lasted one 
day, disposed of two petitions in debt and continued a third. The grand 
jury returned one indictment, for manslaughter. The third session of the 
court, in March, 1838, was more exciting. It had been discovered that bet- 
ting on and playing at cards were indictable offenses, and the grand jury 
proceeded to do its duty. It returned 43 indictments for these offenses, 
trespass, peddling without a license, and similar offenses which the free- 
dom loving pioneer had regarded as among his inalienable rights to life, 
liberty and the pursuit of happiness. The session lasted several days. The 
40 persons idicted for betting at cards were each fined $5.00. All paid but 
William Cates, who insisted upon a trial by jury of his peers. This being 
granted, he was fined One Cent by said peers. It might be remarked in- 
cidently that this was the first term of court which paid expenses. 

Judge King held court in the county until 1839, when he was succeeded 
by Thomas C. Burch. The same year Daviess County became a part of the 
Eleventh Judicial Circuit, composed of Chariton, Ray, Daviess, Livings- 
ton, Macon, Linn, and Graundy counties with James A. Clark of Chariton 
County, as Judge, B. F. Stringfellow, of Chariton, Circuit Attorney. The 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 155 

following lawyers were members of the bar: Philip L. Edwards and Amos 
Reese, of Richmond; Benjamin F. Tarr and William Y. Slack, ChilHcothe; 
Anderson S. Harris, of Brunswick, Wesley Halliburton, of Bloomington; 
and Ebenezer H. Wood, of Trenton. From 1841 until 1848, Austin A. 
King was again Circuit Judge, with George W. Dunn as Circuit Attorney. 
The first resident attorneys were admitted to the bar in March, 1845 ; The- 
odore Peniston, George W. Poage, and Gabriel M. Keene, Volney E. Bragg 
and James H. B. McFerran located in Gallatin in 1848. Other attorneys 
who practiced in the early courts of the county were: Mordecai Oliver, 
Christian Garner, John C. Griffin, John H. Shanklin and Joseph T. Tindall, 
all non-residents. 

George W. Dunn became judge in 1848, and served for the following 
ten years. Mordecai Oliver was Circuit Attorney. He was succeeded in 
1852 by Christian Garner. In 1855, James H. B. McFerran became the first 
county attorney. 

Daviess County now became a part of the Seventh Judicial Circuit, 
and in 1859 James H. B. McFerran was elected judge, serving until 1864. 
James Clark, of Livingston County, became Judge in 1864. 

A change was again made in the circuits in 1872, Daviess County being 
made a part of the 28th circuit, composed of Gentry, Worth and Harrison 
counties. Samuel A. Richardson was made judge, serving until 1880. 

The next circuit judge was John C. Howell, of Bethany. 

A Missouri State Gazeteer and Business Directory, published in the 
year 1860 lists the following lawyers in Daviess County: B. M. Butler and 
S. B. Gutherie, of Cravensville ; J. K. Cravens, R. L. Dodge, R. E. Douglas, 
J. H. Kinkead, John A. Leopard and Samuel A. Richardson, of Gallatin. 
This list is probably quite incomplete. 

During and following the close of the Civil War, a number of lawyers 
came to the county. Among these were William A. Hargis, John Conover, 
Wm. A. McDowell, Madison A. BalHnger, Frank Ewing, Henry C. Mc- 
Dougal, D. L. Kost, W. T. Sullivan and others. 

Of those who were practicing in the county in 1882, the history pub- 
lished in that year makes the comments found below : 

"Marcus A. Low, now in Trenton, one of the best corporation lawyers 
in the State". 

"Judge Samuel A. Richardson, oldest and most successful pract- 
itioner here." 

"William M. Rush Jr., a fluent speaker, logical and convincing." 

"Joshua F. Hicklin, a close student, with unblemished character and 
a reputation for honesty and fairness that is universally admired by both 
the bar and the people of the county. 



156 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

"H. C. McDougal, a successful young lawyer and genial gentlemen." 
"William C. Gillihan, by untiring energy he has succeeded in his pro- 
fession." 

"Samuel T. Brosius, a young lawyer of great industry, is making a 
success." 

"Loren G. Rowell, a lawyer of tact and talent." 
"D. L. Kost, has been an editor and much of a politician." 
"William N. Richardson, a member of the bar, but finds more money 
in stock-raising." 

"R. A. Vance, practices in this court, but gives his attention chiefly 
to speculation." 

"Adams Ballinger, is a young and promising lawyer, just commencing 
to practice." 

"John A. Keck has been admitted, but is now merchandising." 
"Boyd Dudley, youngest member of the bar, now in Socorro, New 
Mexico." 

"William M. Bostaph, a strict and careful business man." 
"William D. Hamilton, endowed with sense, energy and pluck." 
"Thomas R. Shaw, the present judge of probate, practiced success- 
fully before going into office five years ago." 

"Oscar Saylor, now singly and surely succeeding." 
"J. A. Holliday, making commercial law a specialty." 
"Joshua W. Alexander, is young and his future is full of bright pros- 
pect for honor in his profession." 

"Milt Ewing, a young man of ability and learning." 
"Edward E. Yates, a promising young man, a good talker, good 
student, splendid business qualifications." 

"G. A. Chapman, E. A. Huson and W. W. Snider are young and prom- 
ising attorneys at Winston." 

"Thomas A. Gaines, at Jameson, has long been in the practice, and re- 
ceives his share of the legal business." 

"Wm. G. Gallison, at Jamesport, practices successfully, but gives more 
time and attention to cattle-raising." 

Forty years has wrought many changes in the personal of the bar. 
Of those above mentioned, only two are new practicing actively — J. W. 
Alexander and Boyd Dudley. W. C. Gillihan, while still living, has been 
compelled because of ill health to retire almost completely from the prac- 
tice. Some have left Gallatin and attained eminence in the practice else- 
where, among whom are Ed. E. Yates, who has for many years maintained 
a f oremose place among the lawyers of Kansas City ; H. C. McDougal, who 
also removed to Kansas City, where he died a few years ago; and M. A. 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 157 

Low, whose remarkable career as a corporation lawyer was brought to close 
with his death at Topeka, Kansas, only a few months ago. With the pass- 
ing of the years, the youth of the bar of 1882 has become the veteran of 
the present, and Boyd Dudley, then referred to as the youngest member 
is now probably the oldest in point of continuous active practice within the 
county. The period of practice of J. W. Alexander has been divided by a 
term of highly honorable public service, in which he served successively 
as Circuit Judge, Congressman and Secretary of Commerce. Thomas R. 
Shaw still resides at Gallatin, but does not practice. S. T. Brosius resides 
at Alton, Missouri, and D. L. Kost at Gentry, Arkansas. 

In the later eighties John C. Leopard and J. A. Selby were admitted to 
practice, and have resided and practiced in Gallatin continuously since that 
time. Others admitted since that time and who complete the ranks of 
the present bar are Nathaniel G. Cruzen, Lewis B. Gilliam, O. C. Mettle, 
Dean H. Leopard, Charles D. Brandom, and S. W. Brandom, of Gallatin; 
George B. Padget and M. E. Pangburn, of Pattonsburg. 

While it is not the purpose of this history to recite in detail all trials 
for murder and robbery that have taken place in the county, it might be 
of interest to give some space to what was probably the most noted case 
ever tried in Daviess County — the trial of Frank James. 

On Dec. 7, 1869, between twelve and one o'clock, two men entered the 
office of the Daviess County Savings Association. One of them asked the 
cashier, Captain John W. Sheets, to change a hundred dollar bill. Cashier 
Sheets went into the back room to get the money, when he was shot. Hear- 
ing the shot, Mr. McDowell, the only other person in the bank, turned 
quickly and was immediately covered. He managed however to get out of 
the door and gave the alarm, although pursued by one of the bandits who 
shot at him several times. Hastily gathering up what funds they could get 
quickly, they mounted their horses and rode away, closely pursued by citi- 
zens who had heard the alarm. They managed to escape. One of the horses 
escaped and it was afterwards proved that it had at one time been the prop- 
erty of Jesse James. In a letter to Governor McClurg, dated June, 1870, 
Jesse James stoutly denied that he had anything to do with the robbery 
and murder, and said that while the horse captured had belonged to him, 
he had sold it prior to this time. A number of people testified that they 
had seen him at other places during the time of the robbery . 

On the night of July 15, 1881, the Rock Island train was robbed by 
seven men, who boarded the train at Winston, and began work as soon as 
they were out of town. When the order of "Everybody down" was not 
obeyed by Conductor Westfall, he was promptly shot down. Other shots 



158 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

were fired, Frank McMillan also being killed. Two of the men took charge 
of the engine, while others entered the baggage car and forced the mes- 
senger to open the safe. The amount secured was estimated from $3,000 to 
$15,000. Again the James gang was suspected of the robbery and murder, 
but again nothing could be proved. 

In 1882, Frank James gave himself up upon the promise of the Gover- 
nor that he would be given a fair trial. He was brought to Gallatin in 
December, and was confined in the stone jail which was on the northwest 
corner of the public square. The trial was begun Aug. 20, 1883, Judge 
Goodman, of Albany, presiding. Dr. A. F. McFarland was Circuit Clerk, 
and his deputy was William Sheets. George T. Crozier was sheriff and his 
deputy was Gabe W. Cox. Major S. P. Cox, A. P. Shour, John Bowen and 
William Hamilton were also deputies and jury attendants. 

The attorneys for the State were William H. Wallace, of Kansas City, 
John H. Shanklin, of Trenton, William D. Hamilton, Prosecuting Attorney 
of Daviess County, and J. F. Hicklin, Gallatin, Frank James had as his 
attorneys, Charles P. Johnson, John M. Glover, of St. Louis, John M. Slover, 
of Independence, Mo., J. W. Alexander and Wm. Rush, Jr., of Gallatin, and 
Judge John F. Phillips, of Kansas City. 

The jurors were J. B. Smith, age 26 ; Charles R. Nance, 45 ; Jason Win- 
burn, 39; Richard E. Hale, 24; James Snider, 37; Benjamin Feurt, 37; 
Lorenzo Gilbreath, 46 ; W. F. Richardson, 53 ; William Merritt, 33 ; Oscar 
Chamberlain, 31 ; A. B. Shellman, 37 ; James Boggs, 57. 

The selection of this jury required four days. Over 200 witnesses were 
subpoenaed. Among them were Mrs. Sarah Hite, Dick Liddell, General 
Joe Shelby, Mrs. Zerelda Samuels, John D. Samuels and Mrs. Allen Palmer. 

The crowds which a trial of this sort would attract can be imagined. 
All the leading newspapers in the country sent special representatives. 

The jury stood 11 to 1 in favor of acquittal on the first ballot. Lorenzo 
Gilbreath being the only one favoring conviction. He soon gave in and 
James was acquitted. 



CHAPTER XII. 



THE MEDICAL PROFESSION. 



WM. P. THOMPSON THE FIRST DOCTOR IN THE GRAND RIVER COUNTRY— OTHER 
EARLY DAY DOCTORS— THE LIFE AND PRACTICE OF PIONEER DOCTORS— THE 
DAVIESS COUNTY MEDICAL SOCIETY— THE GRAND RIVER MEDICAL ASSOCIA- 
TION. 

The first doctor to practice in this part of the Grand River country 
was WilHam P. Thompson. He was a native of South CaroKna. Coming 
west he settled first in Ray County. In 1833 he made his home in what 
afterwards became Madison Township in Grundy County. His services as 
a physician were soon in demand and for years he had a most extensive 
practice. 

Dr. Smith, Dr. Robert Ellis, Dr. Hoover and Samuel Venable, were 
the pioneer physicians in Union Township. Dr. Ellis went to California in 
the early days. The first resident physician in Jamesport Township was 
Dr. Kehr. After practicing for some ten years, he moved to Memphis, 
Tennessee. 

Dr. William Henderson came from Kentucky in 1835 and was the first 
doctor to reside in Benton Township. Soon afterwards Dr. Yater settled 
in the same township. Both enjoyed a splendid practice. 

Dr. D. B. Hill was the first physician to make his home in Lincoln 
Township. He came from Adams County, Illinois, and settled near 
Bancroft. 

Drs. J. W. Hightree and Whitley Miller were the first to practice in 
Marion Township. Dr. R. B. Ellis, a native of Vermont, was the first physi- 
cian to settle in Jackson Township. Dr. William Livcy, a native of Virginia, 
came to Liberty Township in 1838. He remained only two years and then 
moved away. 

Dr. John Cravens came to the county in 1837, settling first at Adam- 
ondi-Ahmon, or Cravensville, as the town was later called. Some years 
afterwards he moved to Gallatin and lived on the corner now occupied by 
the Farmers Exchange Bank. He was a native of Rockingham County, 
Virginia. 



160 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Dr. William Allen, who came from Carroll County, was the first prac- 
ticing physician of Harrison Township. After a few years he removed to 
Orgeon. 

A Dr. Watts, from Maine, practiced for a few years in Salem Town- 
ship, being the first resident physician there. 

In 1860, the following physicians were practicing in the county: E. M. 
Breeden, G. D. Pyles, R. M. Robertson, K. Scott, all of Cravensville. 

G. W. Brosius, John Cravens, F, M, Estes, W. M. Givens, and C. C. 
Hogan, all of Gallatin. 

J. T. Allen, Jesse Bright, of Jamesport. 

J. W. Pyle, Thomas Simms, Pattonburg. 

This list is taken from a state gazeteer published in that year and the 
data is probably incomplete. 

The life of a physician was in those days no easy task. Long rides in 
all kinds of weather, poor roads to travel over or none at all. Little train- 
ing was necessary — only a comparative few medicines were used, calomel, 
quinine, rhubarb and a few others being the standbys. But most of the 
physicians were, according to the standards of the day, well-educated, and 
when we consider how little was known of the causes and treatment of 
diseases, the wonder is that they were so successful. Even rather difficult 
operations were sometimes performed. 

Daviess County Medical Society. — The Daviess County Medical So- 
ciety was organized Dec. 19,1877, as a means of discussing problems of gen- 
eral interest to the profession. Some sixteen were present at the time of 
organization. Duly qualified physicians alone were admitted to member- 
ship. The first officers were: Dr. W. M. Givens, President; Dr. F. C. East- 
man, First Vice-President ; Dr. R. H. Robertson, Second Vice-President ; 
Dr. D. F. Long, Treasurer ; Dr. D. F. Hanna, Secretary. Other members of 
the society were: James T. Allen, Alexander M. Dockery, G. W. Hutchison, 
W. E. Black, A. H. Campbell, James H. Berry, D. M. Glagett, M. McClung, 
W. H. Folmsbee, David Macy and J. H. Harmon. 

After about a year and a half, this society was merged into a larger 
organization known as the Grand River Medical Association. The physi- 
cians of five counties united in forming this society. Meeting were held 
semi-annually. One meeting was held in Chillicothe each year, on the first 
Tuesday in June. The other meeting was held on the first Tuesday in 
December at alternate places. Dr. W. M. Givens served as president for 
one year. 



CHAPTER XIII. 



THE PRESS. 



FIRST PAPER PUBLISHED IN THE GRAND RIVER COUNTRY IN 1843— FIRST NEWS- 
PAPER PUBLISHED IN DAVIESS COUNTY IN 1853— EARLY DAY NEWSPAPERS 
AND PUBLISHERS— ED. HOWE ENGAGED IN NEWSPAPER WORK HERE— LATER 
PUBLICATIONS— NEWSPAPERS AT GALLATIN. WINSTON, COFFEY, LOCK- 
SPRINGS, JAMESON, ALTAMONT, JAMESPORT, PATTONSBURG AND OTHER 
PLACES. 

No newspaper was published in the Grand River country until 1843. 
At that time James H. Darlington established the Grand River Chronicle 
at Chillicothe. Under his management, the paper became one of the most 
influential in North Missouri. His son, E. S. Darlington, took charge of 
the paper in 1855, and published it until 1860. Because of its advocacy 
of the doctrine of secession, the paper was suppressed^ by the Federal 
authorities. This paper no doubt had some subscribers in Daviess County. 

It was not until 1853 that a newspaper was published within the 
county. At that time the Missouri Sun was established by Stearns and 
McKean. It was Democratic in politics. 

In 1917 a copy of this paper was found by J. C. McDonald, which was 
dated Feb. 1, 1855. A description of the paper was given by the Jameson 
Gem: 

"The paper shows a splendid advertising patronage from business 
firms in Gallatin, Brunswick, St. Joseph, Pattonsburg, Chillicothe, Kings- 
ton and other places. One Gallatin merchant ran a want ad to buy up 1000 
yards of brown jeans, 1000 yards of white linsey, 500 dozen. pair of socks 
and other home-made products. One pecuhar advertisement was that of 
S. Bryan, who offered to pay the highest prices in trade for deerskins." 

Two years later Frame & McKean became the proprietors, and the 
name of the paper was changed to the Gallatin Sun, and for the next three 
years, it upheld the politics of the "Know Nothing" party. The failure of 
the party meant the death of the paper. 

After the failure of the Sun in 1858, Edward S. Darlington, former 



162 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

editor of the Grand River Chronicle, bought the materials and began the 
publication of a Democratic sheet, known as the Western Register. He 
continued the paper for four years, when it was sold. Mr. Darlington at 
various times edited papers at Chillicothe, Trenton, Kirksville, Lawson, 
Holt, Rayville, Columbia, Fulton and other places. He died near Richmond 
in 1912. According to D. H. Davis, while Darlington was in Gallatin, he 
fell heir to an estate in Virginia, most of which he spent in buying a negro 
servant. The servant soon skipped to Kansas and sent back word that he 
was free as his former master. 

James Graham, who purchased the Western Register from E. S. Darl- 
ington in 1862, changed the name of the paper to the Peoples Press. Al- 
though Mr. Graham was a Democrat, he made it a local rather than a 
party organ. In spite of its conservativeness, the editor incurred the wrath 
of the militia, and in 1864 the paper was suspended. 

The establishment of the North Missourian is told by Mr. Kost, one 
of its first editors, in the Dec. 29, 1905, issue of that paper. He tells of 
coming to Gallatin in Aug., 1864, and of meeting B. J. Waters, a young 
lawyer, who suggested that they buy out Mr. Graham. 

The first issue came out Aug. 28, 1864. Six months later B. J. Waters 
sold his interest to Mr. Kost and removed to Ray County and at the next 
election was elected to the Legislature from that county. In 1865, J. T. 
Day became associated with Mr, Kost. At this time there was no news- 
paper in DeKalb County, and the Missourian managed to get most of the 
printing from that county. In 1871 Mr. Kost disposed of his interest to 
W. T. Foster. Mr. Kost later represented Daviess County in both branches 
of the State Legislature. 

In March, 1873, Mr. Foster retired, and Josiah Powell purchased his in- 
terest. Mr, Powell sold out to William T. Sullivan in Aug., 1875, and re- 
moved to Chillicothe, where for twenty years he served as surveyor and 
deputy. 

Mr. Sullivan was a leader of the Radical party. In 1881 he was ap- 
pointed to a government position in the Pension Department, continuing 
in that work nearly six years. For 25 years he was a post-office inspector. 
He died in 1910. 

Mr. Day disposed of his interest in the Missourian, and for a time Mr. 
Sullivan was sole editor. 

Harley Brundidge then became one of the editors. He retired after 
two years. Mr. Brundidge has since attained considerable fame as an edi- 
tor, becoming chief director of the Los Angelos Express and Tribune. He 
was a member of the board that framed the charter for Los Angeles. At 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 163 

present he is President of the Railroad Commission of the state of Cali- 
fornia. 

In 1893 or 1894, R. M. Harrah purchased the Missourian. He was suc- 
ceeded by D. H. Gilchrist, who soon disposed of it to C. M. Harrison. Mr. 
Harrison continued to edit the paper until 1909, when the paper was pur- 
chased by S. G. McDowell, a former editor of Bethany. In 1913, Mr. Har- 
rison and his son, Fred M. Harrison, again acquired the paper and it has 
continued under their management up to the present time. Fred M. Har- 
rison having the active management. 

Ed. Howe, later editor of the Atchison Globe, was once an employee of 
the North Missourian. An interesting account of his life in Gallatin, is 
written by Judge McDougal. 

"Twenty-six years ago, when I, a stranger in a strange land, was 
wrestling with the mysteries of Blackstone here at Gallatin, a rosy-faced, 
good-natured printer boy struck town and went to setting type in the 
North Missourian office, then owned and edited by Kost & Day. We took 
our meals at Mrs. Emmons boarding house * * * * The printer boy 
heard everything, said little, was full of quiet, quaint humor, and had sense, 
and I became very fond of him. So after he drifted away from here, I kept 
track of him but did not appreciate his well-earned fame until I read his 
'Story of a Country Town' only a few years ago. That settled it, for the 
'Twin Mounds' of that book is Bethany, the county seat next north of us, 
and Howe's old home. And no old citizen of Gallatin can read the book 
without recognizing at once John Williams as the 'nervous little druggist,' 
old man Jacobs as the 'big fat blacksmith' and Harfield Davis' drug store 
as 'the place where all questions, political, religious and social were dis- 
cussed and settled,' although Howe does not directly name either." 

Although not mentioned in any history of the county, the Columbia 
Statesman makes mention of a Democratic paper published in Gallatin 
from January, 1854, through 1858. The paper was published by G. W. 
Gardner and L. R. Stephens, and was known as the Gallatin Spectator. 

The Democratic paper which had been published prior to and during 
the war had in the latter part of the war incurred the enmity of the militia 
and had been suppressed. The party now demanded an organ of expression, 
and the Torchlight was established in the summer of 1866, by James M. 
Gallimore and William H. Schrader. In October of the same year, Mr. 
Schrader sold his interest to his partner and went to Maryville, where in 
1869 he acquired an interest in the Maryville Register, later the DeKalb 
County Herald. On Jan. 30, 1869, Mr. Gallimore sold the paper to Thomas 
and George Frame, and the paper was edited by Thomas Frame. In July, 
1869, D. Harfield Davis took charge of the paper and from that time on the 



164 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

succcess of the paper was assured. The name was soon changed to Dem- 
ocrat. 

Mr. Davis remained an editor until June 30, 1870, when he retired for 
a few months in favor of Frank P. Warner. In the fall of 1871 Mr. Davis 
again became editor. During this time the paper was gaining in popularity, 
and was organizing the Democratic party into fighting form. In 1872, 
Mr. Davis again retired temporarily and during the campaign of 1872 the 
Democrat was edited by S. M. C. Reynolds. For the first time since the 
war, the Democratic party won out in the county election. In December, 
1872, Mr. Davis again assumed the management of the paper, which he 
retained until Feb. 26, 1874, when he sold the office and good will to Dr. 
W. E. Black, Milt Ewing and Dr. N. M. Smith. Dr. Smith withdrew in 
November of the same year. On Jan. 1, 1875, S. L. Harvey, then of Tren- 
ton, purchased the paper and became proprietor, but remained only a few 
months. He then sold out to Lewis Lamkin. Mr. Harvey later edited 
papers in Trenton, Centerville, Iowa, and Neosho. 

Mr. Lamkin remained editor of the Democrat for several years. He 
was one of the best known editors in Missouri. He died at Lee's Summitt 
in 1907. He assisted in establishing the first paper in Kansas City, moving 
the press from Independence. 

Wesley L. Robertson purchased the Democrat in 1889, and continued as 
editor until 1894, when J. F. Jordin took charge. Mr. Jordin owned the 
paper only three years, at the end of which time it became the property of 
Gus Leftwich. After a few months, in March, 1898, he again became editor 
with Robert J. Ball as his partner. They continued to publish the paper 
until the death of Mr. Robertson in December, 1919. A few months later, 
Mr. Ball purchased his partner's interest, and is assisted in the publication 
of the paper by R. L. Etter, Jr. 

The Daviess County Republican, a short-lived paper, was published in 
Gallatin. The last issue was in February, 1902. In the Gallatin Democrat 
of the following week, C. M. C. Showalter, the editor, made the following 
statement: "Not having been notified that last week's Daviess County 
Republican would be my last issue before the paper was out, I did not make 
my bow to the patrons of the paper as I should have, which I very much 
regret. I have no apologies to make ; I have done my best under the unfav- 
orable circumstances that I have contended with." H. L. Eads, W. T. 
Paugh and others owned the plant. 

The New Era was started in December, 1880, by E. A. Martin, now of 
the Pattonsburg Call. After nine months, the paper was suspended. 

The next newspaper met with somewhat better success. The Winston 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 165 

Independent was founded in 1883 by Harvey L. Cross and was continued 
until about 1887. Mr. Cross is now editor of the Bentonville (Ark.) Sun. 

The Winston Star, edited by H. J. Hollis, was established May 3, 1888, 
and published by him until July 1, 1901, when the plant was sold to James 
H. Wise. 

Mr. Wise then changed the name to the Winston Sentinel, with H. L. 
Johnson as its editor. On July 21, 1902, Dudley A. Reid became editor and 
proprietor and continued its publication until May 16, 1903. At that time 
the plant was purchased by T. H. Black. On April 8, 1909, the paper be- 
came the property of Williams & Black until Sept. 7, of the same year. It 
was then taken over by Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Black. Virgil H. Black became 
the owner on July 21, 1910, and continued as editor until Sept. 7, 1916. 
The plant was purchased by Benton B, Smith, and published by him until 
the editor was inducted into military service. Until his return from the 
army in June, 1919, the paper was edited by the present editor, Howard J. 
Hollis. Immediately after his return, Mr. Smith sold the paper to C. A. 
Smith. Mr. Hollis continued as editor and business manager. Mr. C. A. 
Smith died on Dec. 7, 1918, and on Nov. 1, 1919, Mr. Hollis purchased the 
entire equipment and goodwill of the Sentinal, and is still its owner and 
editor. 

About 1891, the Winston Mirror was founded by W. W. Arnold. With- 
in the next two years the paper became the property of Edward A. Truitt. 
It suspended about 1894, 

The Coffeyburg Life was established in 1897 by I. J. Vogelgesang. It 
was published for only a short time. The next paper was the Sun, owned 
and edited by Allen F. Wade, present editor of the Jameson Gem. It was 
established in 1899 and published until about 1901. A paper was also es- 
tablished by Rupe & Son, known as the Headlight, which was short-lived. 

In April, 1904, Ben Sailor, who had been editing the Altamont Index, 
moved the Index plant to Coffey, and the first issue of the Enterprise ap- 
peared in May of that year. Mr. Sailor was succeeded a few years later 
by W. F. Rice. A short time later Thomas Cunningham became editor. 
W. T. Pugh became the owner in 1910 or 1911. 

The first editor of the Lock Springs Herald was T, E. Piatt, who start- 
ed the paper about 1900. It was independenet in politics. He sold his in- 
terest to J. B. Ferguson in 1907 or 1908, who continued to edit the paper 
until his death in May, 1917. Charles R. Clark then took charge of the 
paper, but in May, 1918, he sold it to Charles E. Cook, In July, 1918, the 
writer of the Lock Springs items in the Gallatin Democrat complains that 
the "Lock Springs Herald closed its doors some two months ago and quit 
business. We suppose the owner went to seek greener fields." 



166 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Lock Springs was then without a newspaper until a few months ago, 
when the Era was estabhshed. 

The Jameson Reporter was estabhshed in 1884. On Jan. 1, 1885, M. 
F. Stripes took charge, but nine months later gave it up, having purchased 
the Jamesport Gazette which he published for so many years. 

In 1891, E. A. Martin, editor of the Pattonsburg Call, began the pub- 
lication of the Larconic, which was printed in the Call office. This paper 
continued quite successfully until 1897, when the Call office burned. There 
was no insurance on the plant. The Larconic was then discontinued. 

For a short time Jameson was without a newspaper. In 1899 or 1900 
the Journal was established by C. C. Bartruff. This paper was continued 
until 1903. It was independent in politics. 

Allen F. Wade became the next Jameson editor. The Gem was estab- 
lished about 1913. It was an independent weekly. 

The first newspaper was established in Altamont in 1894 or 1895, under 
the name of the Index. Joe H. Hess was its editor in 1899-1900, and he 
was succeeded by George W. Crenshaw, In 1902 Ben F. Sailor bought the 
paper. Two years later, in April, 1904, it suspended publication and Mr. 
Sailor moved the plant to Coffey. About a month later the Index reap- 
peared, edited by Al Snow. Its next editor was D. M. Fisher. The paper 
was discontinued. 

The Live Wire was a short-lived publication. It was established about 
the same time as the Index. 

The Altamont Times was started by Leo Sharp in 1908. Some two 
years later Barrett & Clark became its editors. They were succeeded by 
George G. Tedrick, the present owner. The paper had always been listed 
as independent in politics until the last few years when it has carried the 
Republican label. 

Jamesport has had a number of newspapers, but its first one, the 
Gazette, has outlived all of them, and is today the only paper in the town. 
The first number of the Gazette was issued March 8, 1877. Its editors 
were M. O. Cloudas and Joe Wright, son of Elder D. T. Wright, editor of 
the Christian Pioneer. This number announced that the paper would be 
issued "every Thursday from the corner of Main and East Streets, James- 
port, Missouri. Our politics and religion — got none. Our rates are the 
same to everybody, $1.50 per year in advance." On Sept. 1, 1886, M. F. 
Stipes became the editor of the paper. For some time it was published 
semi-weekly. The paper was alternately Democratic and independent in 
its politics, being listed in the 1889-1890 and 1891-1892 state manuals as an 
independent paper, while from 1893 to 1904 it was classed as Democratic, 
and after that it was again ranked as independent. Mr. Stipes was a his- 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 167 

torian of considerable ability, being the author of "Gleanings in Missouri 
History," and various historical articles. Mr. Stipes disposed of the news- 
paper about 1913, and died in Jamesport, Oct. 14, 1916. 

Upon the retirement of Mr. Stipes, Thomas R. Shaw, Jr., became the 
editor. He continued it as an independent sheet and changed it to a weekly 
paper. In January, 1918, the paper was sold to a Mr. Ryal. Albert F. Hulen 
is the present owner and editor. Since about 1900 the Gazette has had no 
rival in the town. 

The Gallatin Democrat of March 17, 1883, contains the following item: 
"The Jamesport Observer has suspended. Our young friend, Sam Buzzard, 
has too good a financial head to waste money on so precarious an enter- 
prise." Just when this paper was started has not been ascertained, but it 
evidently was short lived. 

The Jamesport Herald was established about 1889. Robert M. Harrah 
was editor of the paper until 1893 or 1894, when he became editor of the 
Gallatin North Missourian. The paper was not affiliated with an political 
party, but since its editor later became the editor of the Republican North 
Missourian, it is probable that he had strong tendencies toward that party. 

In 1899 or 1900, Ed A. Sproul started an independent paper known as 
the Jamesport Natural Gas. It was published only a short time. The 
editor went west and has since been connected with various papers. 

The first paper published in Pattonsburg was the Call, the first issue of 
which appeared in September, 1881. Since its establishment, the paper 
has been edited by Eugene A. Martin. Mr. Martin is a native of Iowa, 
but the family removed to Hamilton, Mo., while he was still a small boy. 
Here he learned the printer's trade and worked at Brookfield, Laclede, 
Kingston, and Linneus, and assisted in establishing the Hamiltonian. In 
December, 1880, he came to Daviess County and founded the Winston New 
Era. The paper was published only nine months. He then established 
the Call. During 1889 and 1890 the paper was semi-weekly and again in 
1911 it was published twice a week. It is independent in its political policy. 
Mr. Martin also published for a time the Jameson Larconic. No other 
editor has seen so many years of service in the county. 

Missouri Veteran was established at Pattonsburg in 1884 by Col. W. 
B. Watts, a veteran printer. After about a year he disposed of the paper 
to Charles E. Hill, a real estate man. A short time afterwards the paper 
was suspended. 

Dr. William Neil established the Star in the early nineties. About 
1895, Charles P. Warner took over the paper and changed its name to the 
Star-Press. He soon gave it up, and W. S. Daniels became its editor. About 
1898, Mr. Daniels disposed of the paper to E. A. McCollom. It was sus- 



168 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

pended about 1900. Under Mr. Daniels the paper was listed as Republican 
in politics, but under Mr. McCollum as Democratic. 

During the summer and fall of 1894, a paper was edited by Anthony 
Dahl. 

At one time Pattonsburg had three newspapers, the Call (independent) 
the Star-Press (Democratic,) and the Life (Republican.) This latter paper 
was edited a short time by W. T. Paugh, who about 1898, moved the plant 
of the Coffey Life to Pattonsburg. The paper was published for a year or 
two and the plant was again moved to Coffey. In 1901, it was purchased by 
John Adams, a school teacher, who again brought it to Pattonsburg, where 
he established the Courier. Joe Wright was also connected with the paper. 
It lasted only a short time, not long enough to be listed in the state man- 
uals. The plant finally landed in Gallatin where it became the Daviess 
County Republican, which had a brief and troubled existence. 

Still later a man from Camden Point started a paper which lasted only 
a few months. This was the Call's last competitor, and from the length of 
time it was published, it did not cause much competition. 



CHAPTER XIV. 



A CHAPTER OF "FIRSTS." 



Jacob Stollings kept the first boarding house in Gallatin. 

Daviess County first inhabited by the white man in 1830. 

First cabin built in the county by John Splawn and his son, Mayberry 
Splawn, in January, 1830. 

First house built on the site of Millport by Robert P. Peniston and his 
son, Wm. P. Peniston, in 1831. 

First crop planted on the prairie land of the county by William Prewett 
in 1834. 

First county court held near present site of Gallatin at the home of 
Philip Covington, in Feb. 17, 1837. 

First election called for April 29, 1837, to elect two justices of the 
peace and one constable for each township. None held in Honey Creek 
and Grand River Townships, and another called for May 29, 1837. 

First grocer's license granted to John A. Williams, April 2, 1837. 

Ferry license across Grand River granted Jacob S. Rogers in Nov. 
1837. 

First term of court held at Gallatin, Sept. 3, 1838. 

First court of appeal for Daviess County, called at Gallatin, Aug. 4, 
1839. 

First census taken by Wm. P. Peniston and allowed $60 for same in 
1840. 

William H. Harrison, first free person of color found asking for a li- 
cense to reside in the state. Granted license "so long as he is of good be- 
havior." 1845. 

First record of the action of a coroner. Jacob Stollings presented a 
bill to county court for holding an inquest, February, 1847. 

One hundred dollars allowed to pay surveyors in Daviess County for 
the survey of the Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad. First railway business 
transacted by the court in the county, 1851. 

First telegraph line over the Chicago & Southwestern Railway route 
reached Gallatin at 12 m. Thursday, Aug. 17, 1871. A message was sent 
to Chicago and an answer received that afternoon. 



170 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

First rail laid within the county on the St. Louis, Chillicothe & Omaha 
line, April 5, 1871. 

First excursion to celebrate the opening of the Chicago & Southwest- 
ern arrival, Sept. 26, 1871. 

First term of circuit court held in the county, Austin A. King, judge, 
July 18, 1837, at the home of Elisha B. Creekmore. 

First power of attorney recorded, Oct. 3, 1838. 

First bridge built in the county by Adam Black across Muddy Creek 
on road from Diamon to Chillicothe, 1841. 

First iron bridge contracted for, 1877. 

First postoffice in Daviess County located at Millsport, 1835, moved to 
Gallatin in 1837. 

First daily mails received at Gallatin, from Hamilton to Gallatin, April 
1, 1870. 

First daily mail train on Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad com- 
menced Feb. 1, 1873. 

First appraisement on record, 1837. 

James Miller commissioned first justice of the peace, Jan. 5, 1839. 

The first deaths in the county were the two children of Stephen Rob- 
erts. Both died on the same day, in March, 1830. 

Elizabeth Tarwater, daughter of John and Ruth Tarwater, was the 
first child born in Daviess County. The date of her birth was Jan. 8, 1832. 

The first sermon was preached by James McMahon, a Methodist min- 
ister, under a tree near the place where Millport was later located, on April 
25, 1830. The second preacher in the county was William Michaels of the 
Baptist church. 

Dr. William P. Thompson was the first physician. He settled just 
over the line in Grundy County in 1833. 

The first mill was owned by Robert P. Peniston. The work of putting 
it up was done by Milford Donaho and "Jake," a slave owned by Mr. Pen- 
iston. 

The first cattle brand on record was filed May 8, 1837, by Robert P. 
Peniston, and his mark was "crop and hole in the right ear, swallow fork in 
the left ear." Among those who registered marks in 1838 were Evan and 
William Morgan, Vincent Smith, Thomas Edwards, Sarah Williams, Adam 
Black, John W. Freeman, Benedict Weldon, Elijah Foley, Silas Best, Will- 
iam Nation, Andrew McHaney and Nathan Price. 

The first slave in the county was "Jake," owned by Robert P. Peniston. 

Mrs. Nancy Peniston wove the first cloth. 

The first recorded literary attempt by a Daviess County women was a 
poem by Minnie Hammer. 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 171 

The first court house was completed in 1843. 

The first buggy ever used in the county was built by Thomas Clingan 
in 1838. 

The first cooking stove in the county was owned by a hotel in Pattons- 
burg. Elijah Hubbard was the first to own one for family use. Mrs. 
Lydia Smith Youtsey, in a letter to the Gallatin Democrat, on her 59th 
wedding anniversary, said, "My father sent my brother to St. Joseph to 
get a cooking stove. It was the first one brought into the neighborhood 
and most all our neighbors came to see us cook on it. Now we have more 
stoves than vituals." 

The following is a portion of a letter written by Nathan Shriver in 
1915: "I was a member of the first brass band that Gallatin had. It was 
organized in 1857 or 1858, We played at county fairs and on other noted 
occasions up to 1861. Then the war burst it all up to pieces. Some of the 
members went north, some south and some stayed at home. Some of your 
now honorable townsmen were members of that band, D. Harfield Davis, 
William Sheets. Others were Dr. Charles Hogan, William Osborn, Robert 
Owens, Capt. John Sheets and Elwood Lewis." 

First mercantile licenses issued in the county in 1837 were as follows: 
April 7, John A, Williams, grocer, $5; April 8, John Wright, merchandise, 
$15; May 8, Thos. W. Jacobs, merchandise, $15; May 8, Jesse Adamson, 
grocer, $5 ; June 25, Worthington & McKinney, merchandise, $15 ; James 
Hunter, ferry on Grand River, $2.50. 

First case in the circuit court was John Ragland vs. Jacob B. and Will- 
iam Oxford, appeal. An entry of nonsuit was made. 

First houses on the present site of Jamesport were two Mormon cabins, 
one of which was just south of the old M. E. church, the other was near the 
I. O. O. F. cemetery. 

The first store in Jamesport was opened about 1855 by John and Isaac 
Faulkner, just north of the George B. Callison home. 

January 13, 1838, is the date of the first deed on record. It was given 
by Francis C. Case and Mary, his wife, to Elisha Groves, and vonveyed land 
in Section 13, Township 58, Range 28. 

Theodore Penniston, George W. Poag and G. W. Keene were the first 
attorneys admitted to the bar in the county. They were admitted in March 
1855. 

The first application for a dramshop to be refused was on Nov. 1, 1860. 

The first newspaper printed in the county was the "Missouri Sun," 
established at Gallatin in 1853, published by Stearns and McKean. 

So far as can be learned the first school in the county was in Benton 
Township in the spring of 1837, with H, W. Enyhart as teacher. The term 



172 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

was three months and tuition was $2.00 a pupil, which might be paid in 
produce. 

Early marriages: Enoch Riggs-Ann Littlefield, May, 1838, by Elisha 
H. Groves; Jonatha Hall-Matilda Roberts, February 13, 1838, by H. W. 
Enyhart, J. P.; Benjamin Crandle-Rebecca Simmons, April 29, 1838, by 
Lyman Wight; Josiah Summer-Betsey Ireland, June 13, 1838, by Nathan 
West ; John McCrary-Lucinda Splawn, March 26, 1838, by James McMahon ; 
Robert Jobe-Margaret Splawn, March 26, 1838, by James McMahon ; Robert 
Jobe-Margaret Adkins, Feb. 11, 1838, by Christopher Nations; Andrew I. 
Williams-Rachel Heckman, Feb. 22, 1838, by James Miller, J. P. ; Samuel H. 
0. Urvin-Specy L. G. Dunk, June 7, 1838, by Harvey Green; Benjamin I. 
Grubb-Eliza Ann Liggett, March 15, 1838, by James McMahon. 

Elisha Trosper-Margaret Trosper, Nov. 17, 1837, by Elijah Foley, J. P. 



CHAPTER XV. 



OFFICIALS. 



UNITED STATES OFFICIALS— STATE OFFICIALS— DAVIESS COUNTY REPRSENTA- 
TIVES— COUNTY TREASURERS— PROBATE JUDGES— COURT OF COMMON PLEAS- 
RECORDERS — SHERIFFS — PROSECUTING ATTORNEYS — CIRCUIT CLERKS- 
COUNTY CLERKS— COUNTY JUDGES. 

United States Officials. — While Daviess County has not furnished Mis- 
souri with a Senator, two United States Senators from other states have 
been prior to their election, residents of the county — James Thompson Far- 
ley, Senator from California, 1879-1885, and Chester I. Long, from Kansas, 
1903 to 1909. Two Daviess Countians have been members of the House 
of Representatives, Alexander M. Dockery and Joshua W. Alexander, both 
of Gallatin. Mr. Dockery was elected in 1882, and served for 16 years. Mr. 
Alexander was elected in 1906 and served until his resignation in December, 
1919. 

The same two men mentioned above have held other high positions in 
the Federal government. A. M. Dockery served as Assistant Postmaster 
General during the Wilson administration. On Dec. 3, 1919, Mr. Alexander 
was appointed Secretary of Commerce by President Wilson, and served un- 
til the close of Mr. Wilson's term of office. During the McKinley adminis- 
tration Webster Davis, former Gallatin resident, and at one time mayor of 
Kansas City, was Assistant Secretary of the Interior. 

State Officials. — One governor of the state has come from Daviess 
County, Alexander M. Dockery being elected in 1900, for a term of four 
years. The county had delegates in the 1861-1865 conventions. In the 
1846 convention, delegates from other counties in the district were chosen. 

Judge James McFerran of Gallatin, was one of the delegates to the 
convention elected in 1861, which was elected to determine the relations 
between Missouri and the Union. He was a Union man and Jater a Colonel 
of the First M. S. Cavalry. Judge McFerran had served as representative 
and State Senator and as Circuit Judge. He organized the first bank in 
the county. He later moved to Chillicothe and in 1873 to Colorado Springs, 



174 . HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

where he was engaged in the banking business, and was among the capital- 
ists who developed the Cripple Creek gold mines. 

Dr. William H. Folmsbee was a delegate to the constitutional conven- 
tion of 1865. He located in Gallatin in 1859. He served during a part of 
the Civil War as captain of Company D, First Cavalry Regiment, M. S. M., 
resigning in 1862, when he was elected to the legislature. For many years 
he was a leader in the Republican party in the county and in the state. 

None of the delegates to the 1875 convention were from Daviess 
County, although one of them, J. A. Holliday, subsequently lived in Gallatin 
for a short time. 

In the election of delegates to the constitutional convention now in 
session, J. W. Alexander, one of the delegates-at-large, received a larger 
number of votes than any other candidate. The vote for Judge Alexander 
was 77,177, or more than 2,000 more than the next highest candidate, 
Stephen B. Hunter, of Cape Girardeau, who received 74,720 votes. 

Major Joseph H. McGee was Register of Lands during the administra- 
tion of Joseph McClurg, being elected in 1868. Major McGee was also 
United States Marshal for the western district, besides holding various 
county offices. He was a staunch Union man. 

Joseph A. Wickham, of Gallatin, was an Adjutant General of Missouri 
longer than any other holder of that office. He had served in Company C, 
68th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, during the Civil War. He was mayor of 
Gallatin for two terms, and city treasurer for five years. In 1889, Gover- 
nor Francis appointed his Adjutant General and Governor Stone reappoint- 
ed him. He resigned in 1897, and soon afterwards removed to Kennett, 
Mo., where he died in 1911. 

Ed E. Yates of Kansas City, but a native of Daviess County, was ap- 
pointed superintendent of insurance by Governor Dockery in June, 1902. 
He resigned in the latter part of the year, and his brother, Robert G. Yates, 
was appointed as his successor. This office the latter held until October 
1905. 

There have been only three state senators from Daviess County. James 
McFerran was elected in 1858, but resigned the following year. David L. 
Kost was senator for two years, being elected to fill a vacancy caused by 
the death of Joseph Truex. He served in the 33rd General Assembly. Mr. 
Kost was one of the founders of the North Missourian, and Superintendent 
of Registration and member of the Missouri House of Representatives in 
1871. Henry L. Eads, a lawyer of Pattonsburg, was elected to the senate 
in 1906. He had served as postmaster at Pattonsburg. 

James McFerran became circuit judge in 1859 and held the office until 
1864. Upon the formation of the 28th judicial circuit in 1872, Samuel A. 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 



175 



Rihardson was elected judge. He made the race as a non-partisan. He was 
re-elected to the same position in 1874 and served until 1881. J. W. Alex- 
ander was appointed judge by Governor Stephens in January, 1901, and 
served until his election to Congress in the fall of 1906. 

Following is a list of Daviess County representatives in the state legis- 
lature: 



10th G. A., 1838— John D. Williams. 
11th G. A., 1840— Benedict Weldon. 
12th G. A., 1842— John A. Williams. 
13th G. A., 1844 — Benjamin Salmon. 
14th G. A., 1846— Wiley Pool. 
15th G. A., 1848— George W. Poage. 
16th G. A., 1850— John D. Williams. 
17th G. A., 1852— John J. Ford. 
18th G. A., 1854— John D. Williams. 
19th G. A., 1856— James McFerran. 
20th G. A., 1858— Thomas McGauh. 



Robert C. Williams.42nd G. A 

43rd G. A 



21stG. A., 1860 

22nd G. A., 1862— W. H. Folmsbee. 
23rd G. A., 1864— Thomas Sims. 
24th G. A., 1867— J. A. Brown. 
25th G. A., 1869— James L. Powell. 
26th G. A., 1871— David L. Kost. 
27th G. A., 1873— Ebenezer West. 
28th G. A., 1875— William B. Smith. 
29th G. A., 1877— E. Wiley Payne. 
30th G. A., 1879— Elijah Hubbard. 



31st G. A., 1881— Andrew L. Buzzard. 
32nd G. A., 1883— J. W. Alexander. 
33rd G. A., 1885— J. W. Alexander. 
34th G. A., 1887— J. W. Alexander. 
35th G. A., 1889— William Hickman . 
36th G. A., 1891— William Hickman. 
37th G. A., 1893— William E. Black. 
38th G. A., 1895— P. R. DeFord. 
39th G. A., 1897— Joseph Wood. 
40th G. A,. 1899— Wm. D. Hamilton. 

1901— Wm. D. Hamilton. 

, 1903 — J. L. Davisson. 

, 1905— W. E. Land. 
44th G. A., 1907— S. W. Brandon. 
45th G. A., 1909 — Horace L. Johnson. 
46th G. A., 1911— Floyd S. Tuggle. 
47th G. A., 1913— Floyd S. Tuggle. 
48th G. A., 1915— Floyd S. Tuggle. 
49th G. A., 1917— Floyd S. Tuggle. 
50th G. A., 1919— Fred L. Dunlap. 
51st G. A., 1921— Fred L. Dunlap. 



41st G. A. 



1837— John A. Williams. 
1838— Elisha B. Creekmore. 
1839— Adam Clendenen. 
1856— Robert F. Owings. 
I860— John Ballinger. 
1862— David H. Davis. 
1864— Owen H. McGee. 
1868— Thomas J. Flint. 
1870— Hadley Brown. 
1872— Hadley Brown. 
1874— A. F. Barnett. 
1876— A. F. Barnett. 
1878— Lewis P. DeHart. 



County Treasurers. 

1880— Lewis P. DeHart. 
1882— W. M. Givens. 
1884— W. M. Givens. 
1886— N. B. Brown. 
1888— N. B. Brown. 
1890— Gabriel Feurt. 



1892 — George W. Henderson. 

— A. M. Irving. 
1894— M. G. Netherton. 
1896 — Howard Poage. 
1898— Howard Poage. 
1900— Maro Thomas. 
1902— Maro Thomas. 



176 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 



1904— C. H. Weldon. 
1906— C. H. Weldon. 
1908— W. D. McDonald. 



1855— Robert Wilson. 
1856— Gabriel M. Keene. 

^p ^p ^h fj* n 

1872— Henry C. McDoiigal. 
1876— Thomas R. Shaw 
jS-^.-i— Thoma? R Shaw. 
1880— Thomas R. Shaw. 
1882 — Frank Ewing. 
188 I— Frank Ewing. 
1886— Frank Ewing. 
1888— Frank Ewing. 
1890— Frank Ewing. 



1912— W. D. McDonald. 
1916 — Moses Mann. 
1920— Lee R. Pierce. 



Probate Judges. 

1892- 
1894- 
•= * 1896- 
1898- 
1900- 
1902- 
1904- 
1906- 
1910- 
1914- 
1918- 



-Frank Ewing. 
-J. T. Day. 
-J. T. Day. 
-Thomas R. Shaw. 
-Thomas R. Shaw. 
-Thomas R. Shaw. 
-Thomas R. Shaw. 
-P. P. Doak. 
-P. P. Doak. 
-J. M. McClaskey. 
-Oliver 0. Mettle. 



1866- 



1838- 
1844- 
1850- 
1856- 
1862- 
1865- 
1870- 
1874- 
1878- 
1882- 



1837- 
1838- 
1840- 
1839- 
1844- 
1848- 
1852- 
1856- 
1858- 



Judges Court of Common Pleas. 

-Joseph H. McGee. 1868— R. L. Dodge. 



-Robert Wilson. 
-Wm. P. Peniston. 
-Thomas T. Frame. 
-John W. Sheets. 
-S. P. Cox. 
-R. H. Grantham. 
-J. H. Frost. 
-Wm. S. Abell. 
-Wm. S. Abell. 
-S. D. Stephens. 

-William Bowman. 
-Willam Morgan. 
-William P. Peniston. 
-John Pinkerton, 
-Meriwether T. Green. 
-John W. Sheets. 
-Thomas S. McGaugh. 
-Charles A. Cravens. 
-James J. Minor. 



Recorders. 

1886— S. D. Stephens. 
1890— H. A. Pilcher. 
1894—0. B. Price. 
1898— F. E. Clingan. 
1902— A. R. Maffitt. 
1906— W. E. Wampler. 
1910— D. M. Cashman. 
— T. L. Cashman. 
1914_D. 0. Richardson. 
1918— R. E. Stapleton. 



Sheriffs. 

1862- 
1866- 
1868- 
1870- 
1872- 
1874- 
1876- 
1878- 
1880- 



-Andrew Shriver. 
-John Ballinger. 
-William F. Flint. 
-Thomas J. Flint. 
-James T. Dunn. 
-James T. Dunn. 
-A. L. Martin. 
-A. L. Martin. 
-George T. Crozier. 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 



177 



1882- 

1884- 
1888- 
1890- 
1892- 
1896- 
1898- 
1900- 

1855- 
1859- 
1866- 
1868- 
1872- 
1874- 
1876- 
1878- 
1880- 
1882- 
1884- 
1886- 
1888- 
1890- 
1892- 

1837- 
1838- 
1844- 
1856- 
1856- 
1862- 
1864- 
1870- 
1874- 
1878- 
1882- 

1837- 
1838- 
1844- 



-George T. Crozier. 
-James H, Witt. 
-Gabe W. Cox. 
-0. P. Walters. 
-E. S. Lankford. 
-William A. Johnson. 
-William A. Johnson. 
-R. D. McCray. 



1902— R. D. McCray. 
1904 — William T. Hutchinson. 
1906 — William T. Hutchinson. 
1908— J. A. Blair. 
1912 — Sam R. Surface. 
1916_J. A. Blair. 
1920— J. Frank Gildow. 



Prosecuting 

-James H. McFerran. 
-Samuel A. Richardson. 
-John Conover. 
-William C. Gillihan. 
-William C. Gillihan. 
-William M. Rush. 
-William M. Rush. 
-J. F. Hicklin. 
-J. F. Hicklin. 
-William D. Hamilton. 
-William D. Hamilton. 
-Gus A. Chapman. 
-Gus A. Chapman. 
-J. A. Selby. 
-William C. Gillihan. 



Attorneys. 

1894_R. J. Britton. 
1896 — John C. Leopard. 
1898— John C. Leopard. 
1900— Harry K. Allen. 
1902— John C. Leopard. 
1904— Thomas H. Hicklin. 
1906— Thomas H. Hicklin. 
1908— Fred Fair. 
1910— George B. Padget. 
1912— George B. Padget. 
1914— Thomas H. Hicklin. 
1916— Lewis B. Gillihan. 
1918— Lewis B. Gillihan. 
1920— M. E. Pangburn. 



-James B. Turner. 
-Robert Wilson. 
-Thomas T. Frame. 
-Joseph H. McGee. 
-John W. Sheets. 
-Samuel P. Cox. 
-Robert H. Grantham. 
-A. M. Sweaney. 
-A. F. McFarland. 
-A. F. McFarland. 
-A. F. McFarland. 



Circuit Clerks. 

1886— W. H. McClung. 
1890— W. H. McClung. 
1894 — James N. Netherton. 
1898 — L J. Vogelgesang. 
1902 — L J. Vogelgesang. 
1906— A. B. Evans. 
1910— A. B. Evans. 
1914— W. C. Tague. 
1918— H. C. Scott ; resigned 1921. 
1921 — William Scott; appointed for 
unexpired term of H. C. Scott. 



County Clerks. 

-James B. Turner, March 15. 1856 — Joseph H. McGee, Aug. 4. 
-Robert Wilson, Aug. 2nd. 1868— William M. Bostaph. 

-Thomas T. Frame. 1874— John P. Smith. 



178 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

1876— John P. Smith. 1898— R. G. Yates. 

1878— Pines R. Dunn. 1902— N. R. Barnett. 

1880— Pines R. Dunn. 1906 — H. F. Lawrence. 

1882— J. W. Miller. 1910— S. L. McClure. 

1886— Silas C. Rowland. 1914— Bert H. Tarwater. 

1890— E. H. Tillery. 1918— Harley J. Harrah. 
1894—0. P. Walter. 

County Judges. 

1837 — John W. Freeman, presiding justice; Vincent T. Smith, William Mor- 
gan, (succeeded by Josiah Morin.) 

1838 — Meriwether T. Green, presiding justice; James H. Wilson; Adam 
Black. 

1842 — John Cravens, presiding justice; Wiley Pool; Wm. M. Livcy. 

1844 — John Cravens, presiding justice, Thomas Greenwood, Nathaniel Mar- 
tin. 

1846 — John A. Tuggle, presiding justice; Robert Wilson; Tobias Miller, 
(succeeded by M. T. Green.) 

1850 — John Cravens, presiding justice, (succeeded by John A. W^illiams;) 
Hadley Brown, John P. Lotz. 

1852 — Hadley Brown, presiding justice; John Gillilan; John P. Lotz. 

1854 — John D. Coulson, presiding justice, David Henderson; John Hill. 

1858 — David Henderson, presiding justice; Bailey H. Coffey; Peter Bear. 

1860 — David Henderson, presiding justice; John D. Coulson, Bailey H. 
Coffey. 

1862 — David Henderson, presiding justice; John D. Coulson, Bailey H. 
Coffey. 

1864 — Bailey H. Coffey, presiding justice; John D. Coulson, Peter Bear. 

1866 — Bailey H. Coffey, presiding justice; Peter Bear, Wm. Bristow. 

1868 — Peter Bear, presiding justice; William Bristow, G. M. Keene. 

1870 — M. Morris, presiding justice, G. M. Keen, Gabriel Feurt. 

1872 — Gabriel Feurt, chairman ; Nathan E. Reed, Nathan Nichols, William 
Earl, John Haver, Benjamin G. Kimball, Robert C. Williams, William 
Smith, John D. Coulson, William Prewitt, Wesley Lee, S. R. Gurney, 
George E. Barkdoll, John A. Tuggle, Thomas W. Reed. 

1873 — B. H. Coffey, chairman; William Adams, Nathan Nichols, Henry 
Ramey, J. E. Grantham, B. G. Kimball, R. C. Williams, William 
Smith, B. F. Stout, William Prewitt, Wesley Lee, S. R. Gurney, 
George E. Barkdoll, John A. Tuggle, Thomas B. Tuggle, Gabriel 
Feurt, Moses Brown, Sr., four years, B. B. Perry, two years. 

1874 — George W. Henderson, 

1875— A. E. Woodruff. 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 179 

1876 — Gabriel Feurt, presiding justice; Moses Brown, Sr., Joh A. Tuggle, 
Aaron E. Woodruff, George W. Henderson. 

1B77 — Gabriel Feurt, presiding justice; John A. Tuggle, A. M. Irving, 
Moses Brown, Sr., Aaron E. Woodruff. 

1879 — John A. Tuggle, presiding justice; John S. Graham, Gabriel L. Ball- 
inger. 

1880 — John A. Tuggle, presiding justice; John D. Coulson, Henry F. Wynn. 

1882 — R. C. Williams, presiding judge; Jacob M. Poage; WilHam P. Heyser. 

1884 — R. C. Williams, presiding judge; Jacob M. Poage, William P. Heyser. 

1886 — R. C. Williams, presiding judge; J. E. Grantham, William P. Heyesr. 

1888 — R. C. Williams, presiding judge; John H. Heath; Gerofie W. 
Cauthorn. 

1890 — John A. Dunn, presiding judge; William R. Cole; Jason Winburn. 

1892 — John A. Dunn, presiding judge; William R. Cole; Jason Winburn. 

1894 — J. H. Carter, presiding judge; J. H. Heath ; T. B. Crowder. 

1896 — J. H. Carter, presiding judge; Philip Shaw; T. B. Crowder. 

1898 — T. B. Crowder, presiding judge; G. N. Gromer, W. E. Blackburn. 

1900 — T. B. Crowder, presiding judge; L. M. Best; Henry J. Lynch. 

1902 — N. B. Brown, presiding judge; L. M. Best; Daniel Blackburn. 

1904 — R. McGahey, presiding judge; W. J. Gromer, Daniel Blackburn. 

1906 — G. A. McWilliams, presiding judge; W. J. Gromer; James P. Tar- 
water. 

1908 — G. A. McWilliams, presiding judge; W. J. Gromer, Wm. E. Naylor. 

1910 — John W. Thompson, presiding judge; A. I. Pratt, E. S. Lankford. 

1912 — John W. Thompson, presiding judge; Frank P. Keplar, E. S. Lank- 
ford. 

1914 — John W. Thompson, presiding judge; Frank P. Keplar, E. S. Lank- 
ford. 

1916 — John W. Thompson, presiding judge; R. A. Daniels, M. N. Knight. 

1920 — Daniel Blackburn, presiding judge; (resigned, and R. 0. Strong 
appointed to fill vacancy;) R. A. Daniels, N. R. Barnett. 



CHAPTER XVI. 



THE WORLD WAR. 



EARLEY ENTRANTS FROM DAVIESS COUNTY— FIRST REGISTRATION— DRAWING 
UNDER THE SBUECTIVE DRAFT— EXEMPTION BOARD— FIRST GROUP OF MEN 
CHOSEN— LEAVING FOR CAMP— KILLED IN ACTION— DIED OF DISEASE— 
WOUNDED— DAVIESS COUNTY SOLDIERS— RETURN OF SOLDIERS— AITXILIARY 
WAR WORK— LIBERTY LOANS— UNITED WAR WORK CAMPAIGN— THRIFT STAMP 
CAMPAIGN— COUNCIL OF DEFENSE. 

One Daviess Countian, Paul, Gillihan, was a member of the first con- 
tingent sent overseas in the World War. He had been in the Regular 
Army for several years. Others from the county in the Regular Army fol- 
lowed shortly thereafter, 

R. L. Etter, Jr., L. T. Killam, Fred McFarland and Charles A. Shaw, 
attended the first officers training camp. As soon as war was declared 
a number of young men enlisted. 

June 5th, was the day set aside for the registration of all men between 
the age of 21 and 30, made necessary by the National Universal Service 
Act. Complete registration returns showed 1288 men of military age in 
the county. Of this number 451 did not claim exemption, while 837 gave 
some reason for being excused. 14 colored men and two aliens registered. 

The following account is given by the Gallatin Democrat of the draw- 
ing of the first ten Daviess County men : 

"The first number was drawn by Secretary of War Baker at 9:30 
o'clock a. m., and proved to be 258. This is the number of Leonard E. Pat- 
terson, who fives on Route 5, east of Gafiatin, and to him is the honor of 
being the first Daviess County young man to be called to the service of his 
country. The second number, 458, also calls another Gallatin man, W. H. 
McGee, the popular Wabash agent. The third, 854, is held by a Jameson 
young man. Otto McCartney, and the fourth, 1095, is the number of George 
Reed Netherton, of Coffey. Another Jameson boy, Henry D. French, is 
the fifth, with 783, and Pattonsburg scored sixth with No. 1117, held by 
William P. Tunnell. Jameson also got seventh, with No. 837, held by Ira 
C. Robinson, and Gallatin scored again with number 337, held by James 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 181 

Henry Ramsbottom. Jamesport's first numbers were 676, held by Earl 
Goodbar, and 275, held by Sherman Wright Blakely. 

On August 8th, the exemption board, consisting of Dr. L. R, Doolin, 
County Clerk, Bert H. Tarwater, and Sheriff, J. A. Blair, began the work 
of passing on the eligibility of those subject to the draft. 

The first group of men chosen and called into the service from Daviess 
County were: Leonard Patterson, Ira C. Robinson, William P. Tunnell, 
James H. Ramsbottom, Ashford Bowman, Marshall L. Lowery, and Daniel 
Lewis Collier. This contingent left Gallatin for the training camp, Sept. 6, 
1917. Before their departure, a luncheon was given for them at the Y. M. 
C. A. At 2:30 the school children carrying flags assembled and sang pa- 
triotic songs. Headed by the local band and accompanied by several Con- 
federate and Union soldiers, the school children and a large crowd of citi- 
zens, the boys marched to the Rock Island depot where they entrained for 
Ft. Riley. 

On Sept. 19, 55 Daviess Countians left for camp, and on Oct. 3rd, a 
group of 14. From that time on to the close of the war, groups of men in 
varying numbers were called and sent to camps throughout the country for 
training. As each group left the county for camp some sort of recognition 
was given of the fact that they were entering the country's service and that 
the citizens appreciated the sacrifices they were making. 

A large group of the younger registrants attended various Students 
Army Training Camps, located at the state university and certain colleges 
in the state. 

Following is a list of those in the service whose home was in the 
county, or whose parents or guardians resided here. The list was compiled 
by the Daviess County Chapter, American Red Cross, and published in the 
Gallatin papers, May, 1919: 

Killed in Action. 

Francis V. Frazier Robert Adkinson 

William Seller • Ray Noll 

Wallace McAfee Charles Shaw 

C. H. Roy Stanley Benard 

John Tracy John Whetstone 

Died of Disease. 

Daniel Collier William Robinson 

Alexander Dowell Joseph Linville 

Francis McCray Emmitt Downs 

Virgil Utz Lloyd Biddle 

Wilford Smith Robert C. Holmes 



182 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 



Bert Ayres 
Othal Lukehart 
Earl Weist 

Charles McLaughlin 
Frank Stapleton 
Roy Stephenson 
Charles Graham 
Evan Edwards 
Homer Venable 
Henry Ramsbottom 
Lloyd Welson 
Leroy Spidle 
Sam Graham 
Charles Plymell 
Ora Butcher 
Frank Brown 
Eddie Earl Smith 
Lee Goodbar 
Hobart Brown 



DAVIESS 



Aid, Harry 
Aid, Kenneth 
Ayres, Allen 
Akes, Elva 
Alexander, L. 
Andrews, Floyd 
Alexander, Walter 
Alexander, Preston 
Ayres, Bert 
Adkinson, Robert 
Barnett, Corbin 
Ballard, Myrl 
Becker, Arthur 
Becker, John A. 
Blackburn, Forest 
Blair, Forest 
Blair, Russell 
Bruce, William B. 



Elmer Oak 
George Hudson 

Wounded. 

Clyde Robinson 
Ronald Ginder 
Alex Stephenson 
John Swafford 
Homer Lunnon 
Clarence Morris 
Kenneth Aid 
Freeman M. Buchanan 
Robert P. Hoover 
Arthur King 
Joe H. McCormick 
Ernest Mott 
William P. Tunnell 
James Turner 
Edward Vanover 
Roger W. Vipond 

COUNTY SOLDIERS. 
Gallatin. 

Beck, H. Boyd 
Brosius, W. L. 
Butler, Ivale 
Butler, Charles 
Butler, Alva 
Booth, Raymond 
Berg, Willie, 
Brady, Orville 
Black, Estie 
Black, Virgil 
Biddle, Lloyd 
Clark, Kenneth 
Cole, Elgin 
Chamberlain, Cyrus 
Croy, Earl 
Cornell, Cravens 
Culver, Ernie 
Culver, Luther 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 



183 



Cravens, Chas. Ed. 
Cruzen, Richard 
Chadwick, George A. 
Cooper, Egner 
Dunnington, Claud 
Day, Frank 
Day, Virgil 
Dewey, Clarence 
Dumm, John H. 
Dumm, William 
Douglas, Lloyd 
Dow, John 
Drummond, Ray 
Doak, Edgar 
Dudley, Boyd, Jr. 
Earnshaw, George 
Earnshaw, Steel 
Earnshaw, Bert 
Etter, Robert 
Evans, Roy 
Edwards, Evan 
Davis, Harfield 
Farrar, Joe 
Ferguson, Julius 
Fitterer, Clinghan 
Ford, Edrick 
Frazier, Francis V. 
Foley, Oscar 
Gaines, Charles 
Gillihan, Paul 
Gillihan, Ben 
Gillispie, James 
Gosnelll, Dan W. 
Griffith, Howard 
Griffith, Harry 
Graham, Charles W. 
Graham, Samuel 
Graham, Leonard 
Graham, Homer 
Graham, Lawrence 
Gilbert, James 



Hockensmith, R. 
Harlow, Roy 
Hamilton, Ezra 
Handy, Glen 
Harmon, Lloyd 
Hesler, Carl 
Hesler, Harry 
Hershberger, F. 
Harris, Charles 
Harris, John 
Hamilton, Lewis 
Hager, Everett 
Harrison, Fred 
Hawkins, Harvey 
Hughes, Claud 
Houghton, Hugh 
Jackson, Alva 
Irving, Robert 
Ingersoll, Hulett 
James, Ray 
James, Oda 
Ketchum, George 
Kemp, Jasen 
Lukehart, Earl 
Lewis, Ben 
Knight, Jesse 
Koger, Cleo 
Lukehart, Othal 
Lynch, Artie 
Leopard, Dean 
Lunnon, Homer 
Long, Homer 
Lowrie, Joseph 
Meade, Dudley 
Meade, Feurt 
Meade, Homer 
Morris, Harley 
Morris, Clarence 
McGlaughlin, Charles 
Murray, Ozier 
Mann, Marion 



184 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 



Mann, Harry 
McClure, J. C. 
McAfee, Wallace 
McSparrin, Wallace 
McGill, Earl 
Mettle, Omer 
Merritt, Paul 
Moss, Patton 
Nichols, Otis 
Nichols, Roy 
Nichols, James 
New, Vernon 
Nida, James 
Netherton, Earl 
O'Toole, Tom 
Osborn, Edwin 
Page, William C. 
Page, Marion 
Page, Elvin 
Payne, Elias 
Poage, Grady 
Place, Roscoe 
Place, Otis 
Pendelton, Dewey 
Penniston, J. B. 
Patterson, Leonard 
Pilcher, Harry 
Pilcher, Roy 
Pierce, Lloyd 
Russel, Elbert 
Ramsbottom, H. 
Richards, Frank 
Richard, William 
Rogers, Clarence 
Rulon, Woody 
Roach, Lewis 
Runnels, Cleo 
Ramsbottom, J. 
Robinson, William 
Smith, M. A. 
Seller, William 



Stephenson, Roy 
Stewart, Carl 
Stewart, Henry 
Stapleton, Frank 
Stapleton, Charles 
Smith, Byron 
Smith, Earl 
Sullivan, John 
Shipley, Leo 
Smith, Eben 
Selby, John 
Selby, Seth 
Swafford, Homer 
Swafford, John 
Swafford, R. E. 
Sharrah, James 
Thompson, Victor 
Tolan, Ross 
Thomas, James 
Tarwater, Thurman 
Teel, Claud 
Trotter, Roy 
Trotter, Mack 
Venable, Homer 
Vanable, Frank 
Vanover, Edward 
Vanover, Sam 
Vipond, William J. 
Vipond, Roger 
Welden, Lloyd 
Welch, Dean 
Whitt, Woody 
Whitt, Lando 
Wood, Ray 
Wynne, Justin 
Wynne, Carry 
Wulliams, Earl 
Wynne, Kenneth 
Weist, Earl 
Whitt, Charles 
Whitt, Jonah 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 



185 



Whitt, Howard 
White, E. H. 
Wilson, Wm. Boyd 
Walton, Harvey 
Williams, Milton 

Athy, James Roy 
Aimes, Floyd, H. 
Brown, Neal 
Baker, James A. 
Barnett, Fallis 
Baker, Albert B. 
Brown, Grover 
Brown, Colbert 
Bond R. E. 
Buzard, R. L. 
Caldwell, George A. 
Caraway, Levi E. 
Caraway, Sidney 
Coberly, Oscar L. 
Coberly, Orville S. 
Dowell, Ray 
Dowell, Alexander 
Drummond, Kerry 
Drummond, Glesner 
DeVorss, Wm. Earl 
Doty, J. E. 
Evans, George H. 
Evans, Wm. Charles 
English, John M. 
Fletcher Ernie 
Goodbar, Earl 
Goodbar, Charles L. 
Goodbar, Rolling 
Gildow, O. L. 
Gildow, John F. 
Gott, Loyd 
Griffith, Bert 
Gillilan, Frank 
Foster, Charles 
Harding, Orville 



Jamesport. 



Williams, Vernon 
Walker, Robert 
Yates, Ralph 
Yates, Paul 
Youtsey, Frank 
t. 

Hampton, Homer N. 
Hill, Wilbuer 
Hill, Leon 
Haley, James L. 
Havet, Cecil E. 
Hill, Joseph Carl 
Hill, Thurman, L. 
Harrah, Mark 
Houston, LeRoy 
Harris, Paul W. 
Hallem, A. J. 
Justus, Harry 
Jenkins, A. Lee 
Johnson, Walter B. 
Kelly, Edward C. 
Kingdon, Howard 
Kelley, Albert 
Lunnon, Homer 
Layson, Manly G. 
Lawrence, Webster 
Langford, Lowell 
Langford, Ross 
Lockridge, Frank 
Lent, Fred 
Lumpkin, Harold 
Lankford, Thomas 
Lankford, Leslie 
Lankford, Wilbur 
Mann, Gordon 
McGahey, Glenn 
Markham, Claud H. 
McMahan, Fern H. 
McClung, R. Earl 
McCrary, Robert F. 
McAllister, Harry 



186 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 



McAllister, Arthur 
Martin, James R. 
Martin, Adger 
Miller, Claud 
Miller, Harry 
Marks, Arthur E. 
McCue, Robert 
McCollum, N. 
McVey, Clarence 
Nighswonger, John 
Nolle, Ray 
Nolle, Earl 
Nickell, Gay 
Nighswonger, Jesse 
Owens, Ray E. 
Osborn, Claud N. 
Pliley, Wm. L. 
King, Albert 
Prior, Paul Dewill 
Pogue, Grady 
Poe, Forest 
Ray, James Ivan 
Riley, John F. 
Richmond, Forest 
Roy, C. H, 
Robinson, Clyde 
Robinson, Harvey 
Richardson, Nathan 
Reed, Harvey 
Reed, Perry 
Reed, Rolla 
Ruble, Franklin J. 
Somerville, George 
Sharrah, James B. 

Brookshire, R. O. 
Brookshire, H. L. 
Boucher, Earl 
Blakely, S. W. 
Bennett, Enid A. 
Burton, Vernie 



Stephens, Eddi B. 
Shaffer, Gordon L. 
Scott, James A. 
Scott, James, J. 
Smith, Eddie Earl 
Songer, Herbert L. 
Smith, Lee H. 
Stoller, Clifton H. 
Shaw, Boyd Scott 
Scott, Roy 
Shaffer, Gordon 
Truitt, James 
Thomas, Howard 
Thompson, Arthur 
Thompson, Earl V. 
Ward, John D. 
Ward, Vess J. 
Whittaker, H. R. 
Wynne, Allen F. 
Whitley, A. E. 
Wilks, Presley H. 
Witten, Ralph 
Witten, Herbert 
Wiles, Ralph J. 
Wiles, William A. 
Wells, Clarence 
Woods, Otis 
Wheeler, Harry C. 
Winbar, Ivan C. 
Ware, Orville R. 
Wills, Clarence L. 
Ware, Noble O.. 
Williams, Harry 

Lock Springs. 

Coberly, Oscar Lee 
Coberly, Orville S. 
Cox, Lewis L. 
Drummond, W. L. 
Egbert, Archie Lee 
Hise, Earnest L. 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 



187 



Herbert, Charles E. 
Harvey, Karl 
Huffman, Roy 
Jordin, Charles 
McCollum, Joe 
Minnick, James P. 
Minnick, Ben F. 
Minnick, Earl R. 
Mason, Ray 
McCrary, Chester 

Bell, Henry 
Bell, Orlando 
Bell, George 
Boyer, Clyde 
Brown, Earl 
Estes, James 
Fleming, Claud 
Frazier, Elra 
Frazier, Wm. F. 

Bristow, Frank 
Doll, Earl 
Fuller, Earl 
Gilbert, James W. 
Hosman, Floyd 
Johnson, Clarence 
Kirchofer, Reo 
Kirchofer, George 
Lee, Jesse 
Linval, Joseph 
Morrow, Earl 

Barnes, Arthur 
Bernard, Donald 
Brewer, Emmitt 
Boyd, Erskine 
Bowman, Millard 
Bray, Porr 
Bray, Carl 
Blankenship, F. 



Sloan, O. W. 
Smith, Thesler J. 
Ranes, Virgil A. 
Ragan, Virgil D.. 
Tague, Vernie 
Wilson, Drury 
Wilson, Harry 
Wade, Clarence C. 
Wade, Raymond V. 
Wade, A. B. 
Civil Bend. 

Ginder, Ronald 
Ginder, Roger 
Huff, Jonathan 
Hibbs, Ward 
Lee, Victor 
Shaw, Charles 
Palmer, Macey 
Snyder, David L. 
Snyder, Charles 
Mt. Nebo. 

McBrayer, Carl 
Newby, James 
Newby, Ray 
Neel, Charles 
Peters, George 
Short, Stephen H. 
Short, Tinsley 
Snow, Carl 
Snow, Walter 
Williams, Earl 

Pattonsburg. 

Best, Guy 
Becket, Paul 
Becket, Maurice 
Brannan, Robert 
Burns, J. L 
Buck, Roscoe 
Bernard, Stanley 
Burk, Alva 



188 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 



Butcher, Oma 
Butcher, Ora 
Creekmore, Lloyd 
Clevenger, Jerry 
Campbell, J. C. 
Carter, E. S. 
Cruits, Fred D. 
Carter, David 
Caster, Glen 
Dix, Robert 
Devers, Claud 
Elam, Leslie 
Elam, Merlin 
Ferguson, J. L. 
Ferguson, Joe 
Fisher, Delbert 
Fitts, Isaac McCord 
Francisco, Walter 
Graham, Darius G. 
Graham, C. B. 
Groomer, Louis D. 
Groomer, Logan, Jr. 
Gambill, Esquire 
Gardner, Ezra 
Gotchel, Owen 
Croetecke, James 
Guilkey, Floyd 
Hart, Arthur 
Heath, William 
Heath, John 
Hedges, Frank 
Hurley, A. R. 
Hooper, W. H. 
Helms, Frank 
Horton, Joseph 
Harris, Elmer 
Huff, Jonathan 
James, Robert 
Johnson, Robert 
Lowrie, Marshall 
Lipps, Orval 



Lear, Albert 
Lambert, J. C. 
Maupin, Curtman 
Murphy, Wayne 
Morris, Carl 
Morris, Floyd 
Morris, Robert 
Morris, Herman 
Morris, Meredith 
Mott, Ernest 
Meyer, Ashley C. 
Markham, Roy 
Martin, Clark 
Nolle, David 
Newman, Harry 
Newman, Clyde 
Newton, Hue 
Persinger, Roscoe 
Phillips, Bartley 
Phillips, Houston 
Price, Lloyd 
Price, George 
Price, Rupert 
Rogers, Elmer 
Roberts, M. Henry 
Reed, Crafton 
Reed, Frank 
Rice, Harley 
Royston, Cecil 
Royston, Jerry 
Royston, Albert 
Royston, Emil 
Royston, Homer 
Savage, Edward 
Shepherd, James 
Smith, Herman 
Sadler, Emil 
Salmon, George 
Sweany, Lee 
Stalbert, Frank 
Smart, Thomas L. 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 



189 



Taylor, Harve 
Thompson, Kenneth 
Tunnel, Harve 
Tunnel, William 
Tunnel, Charles 
Trotter, Clarence 
Thompson, Marvin 
Utz, Virgil 
Vanness, Fred 
Williams, Sam 
Williams, Charles 

Bartlett, Carl 
Bell, Harvey E. 
Bowman, Ashford 
Brown, Curtis 
Brown, Earl H. 
Black, Virgil 
Burgert, Alfred 
Baldwin, Harry 
Crowder, Cleo 
Carey, William 
Campbell, Dennis 
Caster, Cleo 
Croll, Frank 
Clapper, Ernest 
Clapper, Roswell 
Dean, Lawrence 
Downs, Emmitt E. 
Downs, Benjamin 
Edwards, Victor F. 
Dunlap, John Carl 
Dunlap, Rudin 
Gould Clem 
Gibson, Crval 
Hangley, Jay 
Hangley, H. S. G. 
Haley, James L. 
Huffman, Marshall 
Hudson, Lester 
Hudson, George 



Winston. 



Weldon, Moss E. 
Walker, Ray 

Wade, 

Webb, C. E. 
Wyrick, Lucian 
Wyrick, Stephen C. 
Warford, John V. 
Warford, Lester 
Warford, Charles 
Webb, Lester 
Yost, Earnie 

Kelso, Thomas 
Loop, John 
Loomis, Neil 
Lehr, Ashel 
Loomis, Wilber 
Miles, Bernley 
Osborn, Charles T. 
Potter, McKinley 
Potter, Theron 
Potter, Lewis 
Parmley, Thomas 
Manring, Carl 
Manring, Glen 
Manring, Earl 
Morrison, Harvey 
Norton, Elmer 
Oaks, Elmer 
Steel, Herbert 
Steel, Ralph D. 
Peters, George R. 
Reid, Lloyd 
Reid, Clyde 
Reid, Conley 
Schuele, Phillip . 
Schuele, Henry 
Smith, James B. 
Smith, William W. 
Shaw, Floyd 
Strong, Morris 



190 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 



Stewart, Howard 
Trotter, Lewis 
Thomas, Scy Milton 
Uthe, Jurd 
Willis, Walter 

Andrews, Harold 
Barlow, George 
Briner, George 
Brown, Frank 
Cox, Elbert 
Contrail, W. J. 
Carter, Marion 
Day, Roy 
Estes, James 
Feurt, Cleo 
Feurt, Charles 
Feurt, Vernon 
Feurt, James 
Gains, Roy C. 
Gisebert, Walter 
Gisebert, Charles 
Harrington, John R. 
Hankins, John E. 
Hoyle, Grover 
Irwin, Howard 

Abbott, Walter 
Bartlett, Garland 
Bolar, Albert 
Chambers, Poe 
Chambers, Ray 
Cunningham, Jas. 
Davisson, David 
Elkins, Vile 
Gear, Walter 
Glaze, Perry E. 
Hathaway, Earl 
Harrington, Chas. 
Harrington, Roscoe 
Holcomb, Harley 



Woody, James P. 
Wise, Chester 
Worrel, Adeson H. 
Wooden, Maurice 



Jameson. 



Coffey. 



Jenkins, Virgil 
Jobe, Charles . 
Landes, Carl 
Knecht, William 
Knott, Wood 
McKenney, Jett L. 
McDonald, Allen 
McGee, Paul 
Mikes, John 
O'Brian, Chas. R. P. 
Pugh, Samuel 
Reed, Lan 
Pugh, Allen 
Robertson, Ira 
Sabens, Earl 
Scott, Henry * 
Schaffer, Homer 
Shemwell, Bishop 
Smith, Wilford 
Walls, Cecil 

Hoover, Henry H. 
Hoover, Jacob A. 
Hoover, Robert P. 
Hampton, Earl 
Iddings, Eddie 
Kinkade, Kinnish 
Martin, Charles H. 
Patton, John 
Parrett, Charles 
Plymell, Charles D. 
Plymell, Emil 
Prindle, Ralph 
Pugh, Hasset 
Roland, Harry 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 



191 



Scott, John T. 
Smith, Floyd 
Snyder, Everett 
Snyder, Roy 
Stitt, Herman 

Banks, Roy 
Barkdoll, Victor 
Boyd, Grover 
Brassfield, Leonard 
Campion, Fred 
Cornelius, Vern 
Cook, John W. 
Cook, Willis 
Deany, Wilford 
Drake, Marion 
Duffey, Earl 
Faw, Sarvey 
Faw, Aaron 
Foltz, Filmore 
Foster, Carney 
Grove, Paul 
Hendricks, Roy 

Alexander, Earl 
Cox, Ralph 
Davis, Toney 
Miller, Carl 
Puckett, James 
Spidle, Forest L. 
Spidle, Samuel 
Townsand, Charles 
Townsand, Willard 

Lambert, J. C. 
Nigh, J. W. 
Wade, H. L. 
Whetstone, John 
Smith, George 
Yost, Harvey 
Hart, Clarence 



Stretch, Omar G. 
Thompson, Toney 
Tracy, John 
Witten, John F. 



Altamont 



Kemp, Henry 
Kuebler, Leon 
Kuebler, Roland 
Lindsey, Fred 
Patton, Herbert 
Pierce, Robert 
Roper, Lester 
Snyder, Loren 
Stephenson, E. F. 
Stephens, John J. 
Stephens, Leonard 
Stephens, John 
Stephenson, Ellis 
Tedrick, Orson 
Wathen, Clarence 
Youtsey, Charles 

Lick Fork. 

Townsand, Frank 
Taylor, Peter 
Townsand, Glen 
Rogers, Sherman 
Reed, George 
Trosper, Roy 
Trosper, Nicholas 
Tuggle, Leslie 

Pattonsburg 

Bland, Earl 
Davis, Ray 
Chappell, Paul 
Morris, Clyde 
Kerns, Charles 
Gromer, S. A. 
Blankenship, Arch 



192 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Williams, Walter Shackelford, E. U. 

Carter, Lawrence Armstead, Harry 

James, Floyd Williams, Joseph 

Jameson. 

Findley, Ben Turner, James 

McClary, Leslie Murry, Ozar D. 

Lewis, Clarence Gustalson, Carl 

Scott, Roy Beck, Boyd 

Palmer, Macy Hansher, Roy 

Trotter, Lyle Gould, Robin P. 

Foster, Charles Francisco, Walter 

Dunn, Chas. W. 

The Distinguished Service Cross was awarded to three Daviess 
County boys: Ora Lee Butcher, John W. McAfee, and Charles A. Shaw. 

Return of Soldiers. 

Soon after the signing of the armistice, the men in camps were sent 
home. On January 1, the first of a series of "Welcome Home" recep- 
tions was given in Gallatin, The reception was in charge of the Can- 
teen Service of the Red Cross. By the middle of the summer a large 
number of those overseas had also returned. It was then decided by the 
Red Cross to give a "Welcome Home" celebration on July 4th to the 725 
Daviess Countians who had been in the service. An address of welcome 
was given by ex-Governor A. M, Dockery, followed by responses by 
Henry Ramsbottom and Frank Gildow and an address by Col, Ruby D. 
Garrett of Kansas City, Gold pins were presented as souvenirs on be- 
half of the Red Cross to each soldier. Mrs. James Manring was awarded 
a prize for having more sons in the service than any mother present. 
Prizes were awarded the prettiest babies whose fathers were in the 
service, the prizes being awarded to Gretchen Etter, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. R. L. Etter, Jr., and Walter William Colbert, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Walter Colbert, Various communities also gave recognition of the 
return of the soldiers and sailors. 

Auxiliary War Work. 

The following figures show the contributions made by Daviess 
County to Liberty Loan Campaigns, War Charities and Welfare organi- 
zations: 



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I— I 




THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



ASTOR, LENOX AND 

TILDEN FOUNDATIONS 

B L 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 193 

Liberty Loans. 

Date Chairman Quota Sold 

First June 24, 1917 R.V.Thompson $221,088 

Second Oct. 24, 1917 E. G Urban 233,000 $194,150 

Third April 6, 1918 G. G Murray 239,000 399,250 

Fourth Sept. 28, 1918 555,000 591,550 

Victory April, 1918 R.V.Thompson 427,000 417,400 

Y. M. C. A. Drive, 1917. 

Quota, $6,000.00; raised, $9,327.76; C. L. Knauer, County Chair- 
man. 

United War Work Campaign, 1918. 

Funds to be divided between Y. M. C. A. , Y. W. C. A., Salvation 
Army and four other welfare organizations.) 

Quota, $18,800.00 (later raised to $28,000.00) ; raised, $24,878.65; 
C. L. Knauer, County Chairman. 

Armenian, Grecian and Servian Relief, January, 1919. 

Quota, $4,000.00; raised, $3,282.66; Floyd S. Tuggle, County Chair- 
man. 

Thrift Stamp Campaign, 1918. 

The entire quota of $352,000.00 was subscribed. The exact figures 
are not at hand. The county chairman was Homer Feurt. 

Daviess County Council of Defense. 

Chairman, Hon. Floyd S. Tuggle, Gallatin. Secretary, Dean E. 
Handy, Gallatin. Simon Arnold, Jamesport; Dr. G. M. Wooden, Win- 
ston; Dr. S. L. Hardinger, Pattonsburg; R. E. Maupin, Pattonsburg; L 
L. Wade, Lock Springs; Mrs. Chas. Arnold, Jamesport. 

Township Councils of Defense. 

Benton — R. C. Maupin, O. P. Meadows, W. A. Warford, Geo. N. 
Groomer, Raleigh A. Utz, M. E. Pangburn, Geo. N. Frazier, E. A. Mar- 
tin, Mrs. Ben A. Yates. 

Colfax — C. H. Bryant, L. Hudson, C. W. Shreckengaust, V. E. Fox- 
worthy, A. C. Triem, E. W. Manring, Dr. D. M. Claggett. 

Grand River — R. A. Daniels, George Goodbar, John F. Wilder, G. 
W. Case, James Barnett, Virgil Gaines, S. C. Shaffer, Forest Everly. 

Jamesport — S. E. Arnold, Joseph Foster, D. H. Robinson, Sam Gant, 
S. B. Currin, W. L. McClure, C. L. Hampshirt. 

Liberty — Dan Fisher, W. P. Griffin, H. E. Posten, Amos Steigers, 
M. T. Lankford, E. G. Urban, T. L. Sturgeon, W. E. Hathway. 



194 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Monroe — F. E. Mueller, W. D. Statler, Jas. O'Toole, E. T. Lank- 
ford, E. J. Harlow, S. J. Dunlap, E. W. Foley. 

Daviess — Frank Kissinger, W. M. Bristow, W. S. Sailor, Lewis Doll, 
Grant McCleary, S. A. Gaines, J. W. Morrow, W. W. Edwards. 

Union — W. R. Handy, W. C. Pogue, Penn Love, R. B. Moss, Roy 
Whitt, Charles Hemry, R. J. Ball, Glenn Smith. 

Harrison — J. G. Lawson, W. B. Trosper, B. W. Patrick, Gates Wool- 
sey, Lynn Newman, Jacob Treon, John Boyd, J. W. Goins. 

Jackson — L L. Wade, M. R. Weed, A. C. Buckingham, E. H. Green- 
wood, S. L. McClure, Ezra Hamilton, R. W. Burge, Rev. Orr, Iva Drum- 
mond. 

Lincoln — J. R. Baker, R. D. McCray, E. R. Leigh, R. C. Griffith, B. 
F. Bedford, Albert Springs, Elmer Wickizer, M. F. Ward. 

Marion — J. H. Haver, Harve Zentz, Mrs. J. H. Henderson, John J. 
Johnson, Chas. Snider, Grvy Schriver, Mrs. John Shaw. 

Salem — W. Guy Welden, Robt. D. Kincade, J. E. Gotschall, Harper 
Butler, J. F. Holmes, W. T. Siple, J. A. Burtch, J. A. Chambers. 



CHAPTER XVII. 



AMERICAN RED CROSS. 



FIRST APPEAL— DAVIESS COUNTY CHAPTER ORGANIZED— BRANCH CHAPTERS- 
GROWTH IN MEMBERSHIP— SCHOOL AUXILIARY— RED CROSS WEEK— FIRST AID 
CLASS— MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE— WELCOME HOME ENTERTAIN- 
MENT—AWARDS FOR SERVICE— PEACE PROGRAM. 

On May 3, 1917, a letter appeared in the local county papers signed 
"Monroe Township Patriot," making an appeal for funds for the Red 
Cross for the benefit of the sick and wounded soldiers in France. At the 
same time expressions came from other sections of the county favoring 
the local organization of the Red Cross and kindred societies. The first 
start toward a Red Cross fund was made about the same time when Mrs. 
James P. Tarwater sent a check to the editor of the Gallatin Democrat, 
together with an earnest appeal to the women of the county to organize 
this great work. 

The general desire thus expressed to do and give soon began to take 
definite form, manifesting itself in the organization of local welfare 
bodies, some of which later affiliated with the Red Cross. The Daugh- 
ters of the American Revolution first made arrangements for opening 
rooms for the making of articles necessary for the comfort of the sol- 
diers, and a class was organized May 26th to receive instructions in the 
making of surgical dressings. The National League for Women was or- 
ganized in Gallatin June 1, 1917, with the following officers: President, 
Mrs. Boyd Dudley; Vice-President, Mrs. Arch Thompson; Secretary, 
Golden Etter; Treasurer, Mrs. Floyd Tuggle. Interest in the League 
grew rapidly. About the same time a group of girls at Winston organ- 
ized a club to do knitting. A branch of the National League for Women's 
Service was organized at Jamesport in June of the same year, the fol- 
lowing officers being elected: President, Mrs. I. C. Hill; Vice-President, 
Mrs. L. N. Callison; Secretary, Mrs. Lewis Marlow; Treasurer, Mrs. 
Frankie Carr. 

The organization of the Daviess County Chapter of the American 



196 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Red Cross dates from June 23, 1917. The movement was headed by- 
Mayer Penn Love of Gallatin and met with the hearty co-operation of the 
community. A canvass for memberships in Gallatin and other towns in 
the county met with a liberal response. A permanent organization was 
effected at a meeting held at the courthouse on July 23rd, and the fol- 
lowing were elected : Simon Arnold, Jamesport, Chairman ; Penn Love, 
Gallatin, Vice-Chairman ; George B. Koch, Jamesport, Secretary; Dr. R. 
V. Thompson, Gallatin, Treasurer. 

The work of organizing branch chapters and women's auxiliaries 
was soon begun. Gallatin branch organized Sept. 24 with an initial 
membership of almost 200. Branch organizations were also perfected at 
Altamont, Winston, Jameson and Pattonsburg, before the end of the 
month. Organizations such as the National League for Women's Service 
came into the Red Cross. The branch organizations, with the first chair- 
men, are as follows: Gallatin, Charles Brandon; Altamont, Mrs. John 
Vanover; Coffey, J. A. Chambers; Jameson, Mrs. C. A. Feurt; James- 
port, E. F. Ashbrook; Lock Springs, F. M. Achauer; Lick Fork, Mrs. 
Lena Ramsbottom; Mt. Nebo, Henry McCord; Pattonsburg, Rev. Pow- 
ell A. Smith; Winston, Miss Emma Triem ; Blake, J. O. Stanley; Civil 
Bend, Mrs. S. L. Hardinger; Wesley Chapel, Walter Edwards. 

Mrs. Victoria Tuggle was chosen Executive Secretary of the Home 
Service Committee of the County Chapter. Before taking up the work in 
December, she went to St. Louis where she took a course of training 
givn at the Divisional Headquarters of the A. R. C. 

Membership in the organization grew rapidly, reaching 1748 on 
Dec. 19, 1917, and in the nation-wide Christmas, 1917, membership 
drive, under the leadership of W. Glen Smith, the county's quota of 3,- 
000 was greatly exceeded, a total of 5,136 new members being added by 
January 1, 1918. This increase in membership was distributed among 
the various branches as follows: Gallatin, 1,100; Pattonsburg, 1,088; 
Jamesport, 908; Winston, 499; Coffey, 401; Jameson, 319; Civil Bend, 
242; Lick Fork, 200; Altamont, 194; Lock Springs, 150; Mt. Nebo, 134; 
non- resident, 1. 

In February, 1918, came the call of President Wilson asking that 
between Feb. 12 and 22 a school auxiliary of the American Red Cross 
be organized in every school in the nation ; Mrs. Eunice E. Hosman was 
made chairman and George B. Koch treasurer of the committee in 
charge of this work inthe county. Other members of the committee were 
Boyd Dudley, G. N. Gromer, E. H. Greenwood, J. F. Holmes, Sam Clark, 
O. T. Brown, Dell Alleman and Ben Wood. 

During Red Cross Week, beginning May 20, 1918, a drive, under 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 197 

the chairmanship of J. M. Bauer, was begun which by Aug. 13 had pro- 
duced a fund of $64,000, winning for Daviess County the distinction of 
being the banner county in the southwestern division composed of Mis- 
souri, Kansas, Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas and Louisiana. 

A First Aid class was conducted in Gallatin, beginning the first 
week in November, 1918, Dr. Norman being in charge. 

On Nov. 26, 1918, the county executive committee met in Gallatin 
and elected the following committee: Rev. Powell A. Smith and Mrs. 
S. L. Hardinger, Pattonsburg; Miss Emma Triem and Mrs, Virgil Black, 
Winston; Mrs. Lena Ramsbottom, Charles Brandom and W. C. Pogue, 
Gallatin; George H. Pogue, Jamesport; Mrs. C. A. Feurt, Jameson; Mrs. 
John Vanover, Altamont; Mrs. Henry Duffey, Pattonsburg; J. G. Law- 
son, Breckinridge; S. L. McClure, Lock Springs. Several attempts were 
made to elect officers, the first group selected by the committee declined 
to serve. For a time after the armistice interest in the organization was 
at ebb. 

W. R. Handy was in charge of the membership drive for 1918. 

After the signing of the armistice the Red Cross sponsored a series 
of Welcome Home entertainments for the soldiers. On July 4, 1919, a 
home-coming celebration was given at Gallatin, at which badges were 
presented to each of the soldiers. 

The foregoing account is entirely inadequate in expressing the part 
that the American Red Cross played during the war. Red Cross work 
and other war activities superseded all social activities. Practically all 
other organizations were temporarily disbanded. Nor can any account 
ever adequately tell of the hours of patient service, the endless making 
of pads, hospital garments, bandages, and the continual click of the 
knitting needles turning out sweaters, helmets, scarfs, socks and wrist- 
lets. The lists published below show in part the work done by the 
county chapter. A committee on awards was formed to ascertain the 
service given in the various departments. Awards were necessarily 
based on the number of hours of Red Cross work done from April 6, 
1917, to Dec. 24, 1918. A badge with a blue ribbon having two white 
stripes represented three units of six months with 2,400 hours' service. 
This was awarded to the following: Penn Love, Mrs. V. A. Tuggle, Mrs. 
Belle Dudley and Mrs. R. V. Thompson. 

For 1,600 hours or 12 months continuous service, the badge had a 
blue ribbon with one white stripe. This emblem was awarded to Mrs. 
C. A. Feurt, Mrs. J. W. Jenkins, Jameson; Mrs. L C. Hill; Mrs. Morgan 
Hill, Jr., Mrs. Anna Carter and Mrs. Mollie McClure, Jamesport; Mrs. 



198 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Minnie McElfresh, Mrs. Trave Campbell, and Mrs. Glasson, Pattons- 
burg; Mrs. W. S. Whitt, Mrs. L. M. Hosman, Miss Ona Fletcher, Mrs. 
Edna Cruzen, Mrs. H. A. Pilcher, Gallatin; Miss Emma Triem, Mrs. Earl 
Manring, and Mrs. D. M. Clagett, Winston. 

The badge with a plain blue ribbon attached represented six months 
of continuous service with a minimum of 800 hours service and was 
awarded to the following: Mrs. E. F. West, Winston; Mrs. Maggie, 
Tague, Mrs. Belle Sperry, W. J. Gromer, Mrs. Emma Hardinger, Mrs. 
Lucy Maupin, Mrs. Lucy Yercion, Rev. Powell Smith, Pattonsburg; Mrs. 
Allen Selby, Miss Kate Young, Mrs. Martha Williams, Moses Mann, 
Mrs. Emma Schmidt. Mrs. H. T. Leeper, Mrs. John Kemp, Mrs. J. C. 
Leopard, Mrs. Cora Barlow, Mrs. Susan Osborn, Mrs. Sallie Burbank, 
Mrs. Wood Hamilton, Gallatin; Mrs. John Vanover, Altamont; Mrs. 
Letha Mann, Mrs. Dora Hays, Mrs. C. P. Mann, Mrs. G. W. Edwards, 
Mrs. Emma Merrill, Claries Arnold, Mrs. George Mundell, Mrs. Emma 
Stipes, Jamesport; Mrs. Geo. Mc Williams, Winston. 

Sixty others were awarded the badge with the plain khaki colored 
ribbon, representing 400 hours of work. These names are omitted for 
lack of space. 

When one adds to this 82,400 hours, the dozens of others who gave 
freely of their time, but who were not included in the awards and when 
it is also taken into consideration that the majority of the people work- 
ing had a good day's work to do every day without including this work, 
the result seems all the more remarkable. 

Peace Program of the American Red Cross — In the latter part of 
1919 Mrs. Vessey, a Red Cross nurse was brought to the county. She 
conducted classes in Home Nursing in six centers. Certificates were 
awarded to 179 who finished the course ; many others were present for 
part of the lectures. First aid courses have been given in three schools, 
by Dr. J. Z. Parker at Pattonsburg, Dr. T. E. Cooper at Gallatin, and Dr. 
Glen Johnson at Winston. 

The work done during the year 1921 is clearly set forth in a small 
pamphlet published by the chapter. The chapter officers are: Mrs. V. 
A. Tuggle, chairman; Mrs. Frank Davis, vice-chairman; Mrs. H. A. 
Pilcher, secretary ; Dr. R. V. Thompson, treasurer. 

The health work of the Executive Secretary, Mrs. H. A. Pilcher, is 
reported as follows: Two classes, first aid, 110 pupils; 3 high schools 
co-operate with Red Cross in nutrition work; 100 correct class work 
charts; 100 graph charts; 100 daily food records furnished them; two 
schools, hot lunch ; 32 sanitary drinking fountains; 6 Fairbanks scales in 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 199 

town schools for weighing and measuring; 65 health posters made; 35 
babies weighed and measured monthly and records kept; 100 health 
pamphlets distributed; 8 practical nurses secured for families; 5 prac- 
tical nurses furnished families; 1 tonsil operation by home doctors; 9 
hospital cases; 2 children for specialist examination; 4 families fur- 
nished serum for diphtheria. 

This list shows only a part of the work done. Among other things 
the secretary reported that 595 home visits had been made, 23 schools 
enrolled as Junior Red Cross auxiliaries, with 2,000 pupils enrolled; 300 
ex-service men given information and aid, 100 filed for vocational train- 
ing and 24 were given training; 100 filed for compensation and 33 of 
the applications were granted, 24 given dental work, 36 received hos- 
pitalization, 158 given medical examination, 40 civilian families helped. 

The total expenses of the chapter for the year were $2,590.77, total 
branch and chapter expense, $2,900. 



CHAPTER XVIII. 



SOCIETIES AND LODGES. 



GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC— SONS OF VETERANS— PATRONS OF HUSBANDRY- 
YOUNG MENS CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION— UNITED CONFEDERATE VETERANS— 
P. E. O. SISTERHOOD— JAMESPORT FORTNIGHTLY CLUB— DAVIESS COUNTY 
IMMIGRATION SOCIETY— DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION— THE W. 
C. T. U.— MASONIC— EASTERN STAR— KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS— I. O. O. F.— RE- 
BEKAHS— AMERICAN LEGION. 

Grand Army of the Republic. — The first post of the G. A. R. in the 

county was organized at Winston, then called Emporia, and was called 
Kilpatrick Post No, 66. The date of the organization was the latter part 
of 1882, or early in 1883, as it is first listed in the 1883 report of the G. 
A. R., Department of Missouri. The first commander was Wesley Lee. 

Gallatin had the next organization — Lewis Post No. 104, the name 
of which was later changed to Nichols Post. Benton Miller was the first 
commander and at the state meeting in 1884, the post was represented 
by Benton Miller, A. M. Irving and H. C. McDougal. 

Salem Post No. 128 was organized shortly afterwards and R. M. 
Askins was its commander. 

Victoria had an organization known as the James N. Whitehead 
Post No. 171. V. P. Dillingham was the first commander of the Post. 

Jamesport Post No. 220 was organized in 1884, with Jacob Kene- 
strick as the first commander. 

S. L. Turley Post No. 222 was organized about the same time at 
Bancroft, with C. D. Knight commander. 

Jameson was not long in following the example of the other towns, 
and organized the John Kennett Post No. 226. 

Pattonsburg Post No. 242 was the next Post in the county. 

In 1887 the Bob Ford Post No. 303 at Coffeyburg appears for the 
first time in a state report. Cornelius Yost was the first commander. 

In 1890 the camps had the following commanders. Where the post 
was inspected during the year, the number of members in good stand- 
ing is also given : 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 201 

By 1895 the number of members in the organization had begun to 
decrease. A report of members in the various camps for 1894 shows 
that of the Daviess County Posts, the Post at Bancroft led with a mem- 
bership of 44, Winston coming next with 37, Jamesport with 33, Galla- 
tin 23, Pattonsburg 18, Coffeyburg 11. 

After 1895 few of the Posts made reports or sent delegates to the 
state meetings, and an account of their proceedings are difficult to ob- 
tain. In 1905 one of the local papers made the statement that there was 
only one active camp in the county, the Bob Ford Post. The following 
week the Jamesport correspondent replied that the organization there 
was still in fine working order. The members of the G. A. R. of the 
various towns hold meetings occasionally, but their numbers are now so 
few that the organization is no longer the force that it was in the eighties 
and nineties. 

Sons of Veterans. — In June, 1914, through the work of Rev. A. O. 
Hunsaker, a post of the Sons of Veterans was organized at Altamont, 
and was known as Altamont Camp No. 26. 

Patrons of Husbandry. — The first grange of the Patrons of Hus- 
bandry was established in 1873, but reached its greatest strength in the 
late summer of 1874. 

The Daviess County Council of the Patrons of Husbandry, organ- 
ized Oct. 15, 1873, was composed of the subordinate granges or local 
organizations which had complied with the order of the association. 
Annual meetings were held on the first Tuesday in September, and 
other regular meetings in December, March and June. 

The first officers of the county organization were William D. Mc- 
Donald, president; James L. Powell, secretary; Gabriel Feurt, treas- 
urer; J. P. Drummond, Samuel Kindig and R. M. Jackson, trustees; B. 
G. Kimball, business agent. 

During 1873 and 1874, twenty granges were affiliated with the 
county organization, about half of them being organized at the time of 
the formation of the county association. 

The organization of the county reached its climax in 1874, but as 
late as 1877 there were still grange stores in operation. In the early 
fall of 1877 a Grange picnic was given in Woodruff's grove, near Galla- 
tin, and was attended by a large crowd. Judge Peter Bear presided, and 
speeches were made by D. L. Kost, Rev. J. L. Netherton and others. 

Could the organization have been kept free from politics it would 
probably have been much more effective. As it was, the order was 
practically dead by 1880. 

Young Men's Christian Association. — During the winter of 1886 



202 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

and 1887, a revival meeting was held in Gallatin by the Rev. Z. M. Wil- 
liams, now president of Central College for Women at Lexington, Mo., 
who was then pastor of the Methodist Church, Shortly after the close 
of the services, some of the young men decided to organize a Y. M. C. A. 
Accordingly a meeting was held in the Methodist Church Sunday after- 
noon, Jan. 16, 1887, with Dr. Williams presiding, and W. T. Osborn as 
temporary secretary. 

The first officers were Ed. E. Yates, president; Charles L. Knauer, 
first vice-president; Wesley L. Robertson, second vice-president; and 
Clint A. Stout, secretary. 

Mr. Yates served as president for four years. He was succeeded by 
C. L. Knauer, who held the office for two years. In 1893, S. T. Brosius 
was elected president, and the following year Joshua W. Alexander 
headed the organization. Since that time C. L. Knauer has been pres- 
ident. Mr. Knauer has also taken a prominent part in State Y. M. C. A. 
work. 

The need of a large building was soon evident, and the first thought 
was to buy a lot and erect a building, but it was later, in 1889, decided 
to purchase the building now occupied by office of the superintendent of 
the city electric light plant. The price paid was $1600. The upper 
floor was converted into a reading room and auditorium. For many 
years the first floor was occupied by the post office. 

The need of a gymnasium was felt for some time before the present 
building was erected. In January, 1903, a meeting was called to dis- 
cuss the advisability of fitting up a gymnasium. It was not until Jan- 
uary, 1908, however, that the work was undertaken. A membership 
drive was then begun, 200 members being the goal. Subscriptions were 
also taken for the improvement fund, A fund of about $2,000 was 
raised. 

In the meantime Mr. Knauer had interested the state committee 
in the work and that organization decided to attempt the institution of 
a county Y. M. C. A., using Gallatin as a sort of experiment station. To 
help in the movement, Mr. Knauer offered the Gallatin Y. M. C. A. a 
lot one block from the public square, and $600 if the association would 
raise the funds for a modern building. The offer was accepted, the old 
building disposed of at $1,000, and the remainder raised by public sub- 
scription. The whole amounted to about $7,000. 

The new building was completed in January, 1909. It contains a 
gymnasium, which can also be used as an auditorium. A kitchen adjoin- 
ing also makes it convenient to use the gymnasium as a dining room. 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 203 

The main room is used as a social meeting place, the second floor for a 
library. 

In the space back of the building is a tennis court. About two 
years ago, the lot adjoining the building on the west was purchased, a 
large portion of the price being donated by Governor Dockery, and the 
remainder raised by public subscription. 

The first full-time secretary employed was Fred Vollmer, who came 
in 1908, and continued in the position until 1915, when he was succeeded 
by Frank K. Zoll, and he in turn by Rush Tuttle. The present secretary 
is Alfred N. Sanson, 

United Confederate Veterans. — So far as can be learned, only one 
camp of the United Confederate Veterans has ever been organized in 
Daviess County. The exact date of the organization is not known, but 
it was probably in the early part of 1897. In the first annual report of 
the United Confederate Veterans of Missouri, the Surgeon John Cravens 
Camp No. 912 is reported with Independence Mann as Commander, 
J. W. Miller, Adjutant. For a number of years, N. A. Baker served as 
adjutant. The camp has not been active for several years. The last 
commander was George W. Williams. 

In 1906 and 1907, reunions were held to which the "Boys in Blue" 
were given cordial invitations to attend. 

Below are given the names of those who belonged to the organiza- 
tion, together with the record of their service. The lilst was made up 
from the records of the camp, obtained through the kindness of Adju- 
tant N. A. Baker. 

Allen, Dr. J. T. Co. A, Col. Reeves' Regt., Mo. Cavalry. 
Baker, N. A., Sergeant, Co. K, Twenty-second Va. Infantry. 
Bowen, James A., Stanwerty's Staff. 
Burge, John W., Co. B, Elliot's Battalion. 
Ball, A. C, Private, Capt. Austin's Independent Company. 
Beard, W. S., Co. B. First Arkansas Infantry. 
Best, L. M., Co. G, First Mo. Cavalry. 
Broughton, Nathan, Private Co. K, Tenth Mo. Cavalry. 
Burge, J. W., Private, Co. H. Eleventh Missouri Infantry. 
Cruzen, Nathaniel G., Private, Co. E, Ninth Missouri, Infantry. 
Cloudas, Pitt, Private, Co. K, Sixth Missouri, Infantry. 
Dehring, James R., Private, Co. G. First Missouri Cavalry. 
Ellis, L. A., Private, Co. G. First Missouri, Cavalry. 
Ellis, L. A., Private, Co. G, First Missouri Cavalry. 
Ewing, George D., Private, Co. A, Fourth Ky. Cavalry. 
Enyart, Logan, Captain, Missouri, State Guards. 



204 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Estes, J. W., Private, Co. I, Fifty-fourth Ky. 

Ford, T. R., Private, Co. I, Twelfth Tenn., Cavalry. 

Green, J. T. Private, Co. G, Col. Reeves' Regt., Missouri Cavalry. 

Houghton, J., Private, Co. B, Sixth Va. Cavalry. 

Hunter, James M., Private, Co. A, Wither's Artilery. 

Hopkins, George, Private, Co. D, Third & Fifth Missouri Infantry. 

Harper, A. N., Captain, Co. F. Ninth Tenn. Cavalry. 

Jackson, T. B. Paymaster, Third Division Missouri, State Guards. 

Lynn, Gus A., Private, Co. G., First Missouri Cavalry. 

Mallory, M. T. Private, Co., E, Thirtieth Va. Battalion Infantry. 

McClane, R. J. 

McCue, R. M., Private, Co. B, Elliott's Battalion. 

McCue, James, Lieutenant, Co. B, Elliott's Battalion. 

McCue, George, Company B, Elliott's Battalion. 

McNeil, John, McNeil's Co., Reeves' Regiment, Missouri Cavalry. 

May, Gabriel, Private, Co. E, Fourth Ky. Cavalry. 

Mann, Independence, Co. E, Third Missouri, Infantry. 

McCartney, William, Co. F, Sixtieth Va. Infantry. 

McCartney, George, Co. F, Sixtieth Va. Infantry. 

McCullough, S. W., Co. H, Tenth Missouri, Infantry. 

McMillion, James, Sergeant, Co. G. First Missouri Cavalry. 

Neal, J. W., Private, Co. F. Fourth Va. Infantry. 

Nickell, William N., Co. D, Twenty-seventh Vo. Infantry. 

O'Farrall, G. I., Lieutenant, Co. C. Shelby's Brigade. 

Scott, J. A., Capt. Co. E, Twenty-sixth Va. Battalion Infantry. 

Stovall, W. T. Fourth Tenn. Cavalry. 

Thomas, Dr. Maro, Forty-ninth Tenn. Infantry, Detach Service. 

Tomlinson, John E, Private, Co. D, Shelby's Brigade. 

Vallandingham, R., Private, Col. Reeves' Regt. 

Wilson, Samuel, Private, Second Texas Battery. 

Williams, Roger, Private, Col. Reeves' Regt. 

Williams, George, Private, Col. Reeves' Regt. 

Winburn, Jason, Lieutenant, Co. D, Second Ky. Cavalry. 

Worrell, Asas, Lieutenant, Co. K. Col. Bolt's Brigade. 

Woods, John H. Captain, Co. I, Sixteenth Va Cavalry. 

Yeager, M. W., Co. I, Second Texas Cavalry. 

Smith, I. v., Co. E, Cockrel's Brigade. 

Shultz, Peter. 

Stafford, E. W., McCamma's Battalion, Wise's Brigade. 

P. E. O. Sisterhood. — B. C. Chapter of the P. E. O. Sisterhood was 
organized at Pattonsburg, May 12, 1909. The charter members were 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 205 

Miss Matie Kelly, Mrs. Minnie McElfresh, Mrs. Anna B. Yates, Mrs. 
Anna Haas, Mrs. Blanche Gorsuch, Mrs. Rhea McCue, Mrs. Mucy Mau- 
pin, Mrs. Ellen Groomer, Miss Elsie Fisher, and Miss Edith Bray. There 
are now fifteen resident and nine non-resident members. The president 
of the organization for the year 1922-1923 is Mrs. Lowell Bray. The 
following have served as president of the organization : Mrs. Minnie 
McElfresh, Miss Matie Kelly, Mrs. Anna Yates, Mrs. Lucy Maupin, Mrs. 
Blanche Gorsuch, Mrs. Sallie Cook, Mrs. Elsie Harris, Mrs. Sallie Fraz- 
ier, Mrs. Cena Wright, Mrs. Dorothy Maupin and Miss Hattie McDaniel. 
The pastor's study in each of the three Pattonsburg churches have been 
furnished by the order, and a large number of books added to the public 
library. 

B. Q. Chapter of the P. E. O. Sisterhood was organized at Gallatin, 
Sept. 17, 1912. The charter members were Mrs. Maude Clingan Fit- 
terer, Mrs. Rebecca C. Townsend, Mrs. Josephine B. Davis, Mrs. Vennie 
Love, Mrs. Lillian M. Clingan, Mrs. Minnie B. Mann, Mrs. Kate C. Os- 
born. Miss Lida May Clinghan, and Miss India Irving Richardson. The 
organization has now seventeen resident and four non-resident members. 
The president for the year 1921-22 is Mrs. Kate C. Osborn. Mrs. Mollie 
Dahl, Mrs. Gertrude C. Gillihan, Mrs. Maude C. Fitterer and Mrs. Bess 
C. Murray have served as presidents of the organization. 

Jamesport Fortnightly Club. — The Jamesport Fortnightly Club has 
been since 1911 a member of the Missouri Federation of Women's Clubs. 
It is also a member of the General Federation of Women's Clubs. The 
club has twenty members. The officers for 1921-1922 are: Miss Leda 
R. Malone, President; Mrs. Floyd Ames, secretary. During the past 
year a study has been made of the history of Missouri. 

Daviess County Immigration Society. — Thinking that the county 
needed new settlers, and that if the advantages of the country were 
known, this increase in population would necessarily follow, the Daviess 
County Immigration Society was formed in 1875. The board of di- 
rectors consisted of H. C. McDougal, James L. Davis, T. B. Yates, John 
Ballinger, S, P. Cox, James T. Dunn, and Milt Ewing. The following 
township committeemen were chosen: S. A. Richardson, George Tuggle 
and James Stigers, of Gallatin; H. P. Hubbard, of Hamilton; T. J. Jef- 
feries, Winstonville ; W. B. Smith, and Michael Murray, Jamesport; 
Thomas B. Crowder, Alta Vista ; Elijah Hubbard, Jameson ; James L. 
Powell, Civil Bend; R. S. Hall, Breckenridge ; John F. McDougal and 
Bernard Markey, Bancroft; B. H. Coffey, Coffeyburg; T. J. Mattingly, 
Pattonsburg. 



206 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

A committee was appointed to write a brief descriptive history of 
the county, giving such facts as would interest prospective settlers. Five 
thousand copies of this pamphlet were printed for free distribution in 
1876. The organization lasted only a short time. 

The Gallatin Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution 
was organized Oct. 8, 1913, with the State Regent Mrs. George McFar- 
lane present. There M^ere seventeen charter members. The first of- 
ficers of the organization were: Regent, Mrs. Mollie P. Brosius; Vice 
Regent, Mrs. Maude Fitterer; Registrar, Miss Amy Smith; Secretary, 
Mrs. Margaret Thompson; Corresponding Secretary, Mrs. Minnie 
Achuff; Treasurer, Miss Eloise Wynne; Historian, Mrs. Vennie Love. 
The chapter now has fifteen resident and seven non-resident members. 
Mrs. C. R. Brandon is the Regent. A flag pole and flag were given the 
public school soon after the outbreak of the World War. A flag pole 
was erected in the court house yard by the citizens of Gallatin, the flag 
being donated to the county court by the D. A. R. society. The first 
definite step to organize the women for war work was taken by this 
organization. 

The W. C. T. U. — Since the Woman's Christian Temperance Union 
is the only temperance organization which has remained active for any 
length of time, a sketch of the organization is included here, the data 
being furnished by Mrs. John W. McClaskey. 

Gallatin had a branch organization of the Women's Christian Tem- 
perance Union since 1885, the leaders in the early years of its organiza- 
tion being Mrs. Thomas Crane, Mrs. A. T. Ray, who is still very active in 
the work, Mrs. Tom Brown, Mrs. Dr. Pipkin, and Mrs. Dan Critten. In 
later years Mrs. Fred Fair, Mrs. H. A. Kerr, Mrs. A. H. Pettijohn, Mrs. 
Harry Pilcher and Mrs. J. W. McClaskey have been among the leaders 
of the work. 

Unions are also active at Pattonsburg, Coffey and Jamesport. 
Among the leaders at Pattonsburg are Mrs. N. G. Ellis, Mrs. W. P. Brod- 
beck, Mrs. E. O. Turner and Mrs. R. F. Wood, who among them have 
held the presidency of the organization for the past twelve years. The 
leader of the work at Coffey is Mrs. Ollie Siple, who was president of 
the county organization for a number of years and has always been a 
willing and capable worker in the organization. The Jamesport organ- 
ization has existed since 1891, and among the leaders have been Mrs. 
Harry Jones, Mrs. Longfellow, Mrs. Hill, Mrs. Pease and others. 

In the year 1910 the state was divided into counties, for the purpose 
of organization, instead of into districts, as before. Daviess County 
was organized in 1911, Mrs. John W. McClaskey being chosen Presi- 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 207 

dent, and Mrs. Harry Jones, of Jamesport, Vice-president. In June, 
1912, the first county convention was held in Gallatin. Mrs. OUie Siple, 
of Coffey, was chosen President to succeed Mrs. McClaskey, whose ill 
health compelled her retirement. Mrs. Siple continued in the presidency 
of the organization for three years, when Mrs. McClaskey was again 
chosen. Mrs. N. G. Ellis, of Pattonsburg, has also served as President 
of the county organization. Mrs. John W. McClaskey now holds the 
office. 

All of the unions have been active in all lines of the organization's 
work. Effective work has been done in the way of Medal contests, in- 
struction in citizenship, scientific temperance instruction, child welfare, 
law enforcement, Sabbath observance and a number of other activities. 

Masonic Lodge. — Pattonsburg Lodge No. 65, was established at Pat- 
tonsburg, in 1854. It was removed to the new town in 1877. The chapter 
has a membership of 81. Charles Gorsuch is W. M., and J. B. Sentz, 
Secretary. 

Earl Lodge No. 285, at Coffey, has 68 members. The present officers 
are H. A. Cunningham, W. M., and C. W. Githens, Secretary. 

Western Star Lodge No. 15, at Winston, was originally located at 
Victoria. It was removed to Winston in 1879. The chapter has a mem- 
bership of 82. Dell Alleman is W. M., and A. E. DeFord, Secretary. 

Altamont Lodge No. 108, was organized about 1918, and has a mem- 
bership of 52. The officers are J. Lester Johnson, W. M., and Ben F. Kuhns, 
Secretary. 

Lock Springs Lodge No. 488, was organized in 1874, with 7 charter 
members, all of whom are dead. The officers are W. F. Brookshier, W. M., 
J. W. Bills, S. W.; J. E. Smith, J. W. ; A. D. Manned, Secy.; I. L. Wade, 
Treasurer. 

Jamesport Lodge No. 201, was organized April 5, 1866, with James T. 
Allen, W. M. This chapter continued in existence until 1892, when the 
charter was arrested. In the winter of 1897, the present lodge. No. 564, 
was organized with the following officers : John Brookshier, W. M. ; Jerd 
Graves, S. W. ; Wm. Drummond, J. W. ; R. L. Isherwood, Secy. ; William 
McNeil, Treas. There were at that time about 25 members. 

The date of the charter is Oct. 19. 1898. There are now about 125 
members, with the following officers: George B. Koch, W. M. ; W. E. Bray, 
S. W. ; H. S. Hook, J. W. ; C. A. Lewis, Secy. ; W. T. McClure, Treas. 

Gallatin Lodge No. 106, was instituted Oct. 16, 1879, a chapter organ- 
ized many years before having been disbanded. The first officers were A. 
F. McFarland, W. M. ; John H. Ball, S. W. ; George Tuggle, J. W. ; Henry E. 



208 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Orcutt, Secy. ; T. B. Yates, Treas. It now has a membership of about 150. 
The officers are T. E. Cooper, W. M. ; Ralph Yates, S. W. ; Roy Trotter, J. 
W. ; N. S. Givens, Secretary. 

Royal Arch Chapter, No. 11 at Gallatin, was instituted Oct. 10, 1867, 
with Nelson M. Smith, H. P.; James L. Davis, King; Robert L. Dodge, 
Scribe. The chapter now has about 250 members. 

Order of the Eastern Star. — Corinthian Chapter 0. E. S., at Gallatin, 
received its charter Oct. 7, 1875, with A. F. McFarland, a Master Mason as 
W. P. ; Mrs. M. Sue Black, W. M. ; and Villa S. Ladd, A. M. The present 
officers are Mrs. Roy Dean, W. M. ; Virgil Chrane, W. P. ; Mrs. Guy Murray, 
A. M. ; Mrs. Elmer Blackburn, Secy. ; Mrs. John Musselman, Treas. 

Jameson Chapter 0. E. S., No. 45, was organized in 1896, with 20 
charter members. The first officers were Mrs. V. Dunn, W, M. ; John 
Handy, W. P. ; Mrs. V. Dunn, A. M. ; Mrs. John Irwin, Secy. ; Mrs. Alice 
Stovall, Treas., There are now 60 members of the order with the follow- 
ing officers : Mrs. Gertrude Smith, W. M. ; John Robinson, W. P. ; Miss Susie 
Martin, A. M. ; Mrs. Ruth J. Dunn, Secy. ; Mrs. Mary Gaines, Treas. 

Pattonsburg Chapter No. 199, 0. E. S., was organized Oct. 12, 1901, 
with 21 members. The first officers were Mrs. Lucy Maupin, W. M. ; M. B. 
Yates, W. P. ; Mrs. Rosa Gough, A. M. The present officers are Mrs. 
Goldena Smart, W. M. ; Thomas Smart, W. P. ; Mrs. Hattie McDaniels, A. 
M. ; Mrs. Daisie Ross, Secy.; Mrs. Emma Bray, Treasurer. 

Ideal Chapter 0. E. S., No. 119, at Jamesport was organized in May, 
1902, and a charter was granted Oct. 30, 1902. The first officers of the 
organization were Mrs. Ida Sutcliffe, W. M. ; John R. Handy, W. P.; 
Miss Mabel Lumpkin, A. M. ; Mrs. Lizzie Phipps, Secy. ; Mrs. Emma Hill, 
Treas. The present officers are Mrs. Dora Tye, W. M. ; R. M. Cole, W. P. ; 
Mrs. 0. J. Sommerville, A. M. ; Mrs. Martha Bray, Secy.; Mrs. Nancy 
Drummond, Treasurer. 

Lock Springs, Lock Springs Chapter No. 83, O. E. S., was organized 
in 1902 with 20 charter members, and the following officers : Mary J. Min- 
nick, W. M. ; H. F. Lawrence, W. P. ; Margaret M. Wade, A. M. ; I. L. Wade, 
Secy. ; Jessie Lawrence, Treas. The order now has a membership of 64, 
with Rosa Litton, W. M. ; J. R. Stanley, W. P. ; Ella Bills, A. M. ; W. F. 
Broosshier, Secy.; I. L. Wade, Treas. 

Winston Chapter No. 182, O. E. S., was organized in 1917, in 25 
charter members. The first officers were Mrs. Edna Manning Alva De- 
Ford, W. M. ; Mrs. Cressie DeFord, A.M. ; Mrs. Eetta McCaskey, Sec. ; Mrs. 
Addie Claggett, Treas. At present the chapter has the following officers : 
Mrs. Tracy Orcutt, W. M. ; Ralph Orcutt, W. P. ; Mrs. Letha Taylor, A. M. ; 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 209 

Mrs. Blanche Gysin, Secy.; Mrs. Addie Claggett, Treas. There are 55 
members. 

Altamont Chapter 0. E. S. No. 432, was organized in 1919 with Mrs. 
Ruth Riggs, as W. M., and John Vanover, W. P. ; Christine Layman, A. M. ; 
Florence Vanover, Treasurer ; Martha Wallace, Secy. The present officers 
are: Cora Black, W. M. ; Lester Johnson, W. M. ; May Rhemes, A. M. ; 
Christine Layman, Secy. ; Georgia Burns, Treas. There are 79 members 
of the order. 

Knights of Phythias. — Banner Lodge No. 88, at Jamesport had, ac- 
cording t othe 1920 report, 126 members During the year five new mem- 
bers had been added and two lost. The property of the lodge is valued at 
$848.96, and its assets amount to $1230.02. J. F. Jackson was the deputy 
in 1920, and Robert McCue, keeper of the records and seal. 

Jameson Lodge No. 255, had in 1920, 84 members, 11 more than in 
1919. The lodge property was valued at $300, and its total assets amount- 
ed to $1626.42. A, E. Geisbert was deputy and J. C. McDonald, keeper 
of the records and seal. 

On page 27 of the 1920 report, under the title "Charters Arrested," 
appears the following : 

"Pattonsburg Lodge No. 247, Pattonsburg, April 3rd, 1919, by S. D. G. 
C. W. F. Drummond, who after paying all bills remitted $178.95 in cash 
and a note for $351.20 secured by deed of trust on real estate, 21 members 
paying dues and retaining membership in the Home State' Lodge." 

I. o. O. F.— Gallatin Lodge No. 167, A^as organized May 22, 1867, with 
W. H. Folmsbee, N. G.; S. A. Black, V. G. ; Pines R. Dunn, R. S. ; R. L. 
Dodge, F. S. The order now' has 225 members. The officers are: J. E. 
Swafford, N. G.; Lewis Smith, V. G. ; A. R. Maffitt, R. S. ; Fred Weiser, F. 
S. ; Homer Feurt, Treas. 

Jamesport Lodge No. 339, was organized May 19, 1876, with P. R. 
Dunn, N. G. ; W. F. Boyd, V. G. ; W. A. Wynn, Secy. ; and S. T. Haynes, 
Treas. There are now 73 members of the chapter. 

Wilbur Lodge No. 403 at Pattonsburg was organized Feb. 23, 1881. 
It has a membership of 117. 

Winston Lodge No. 371 was organized March 5, 1877, with F. B. H. 
Brown as N. G. ; Joseph Swike, V. G. ; John T. Shaw, Secy. ; and M. J. Ben- 
son, Treasurer. The chapter now has a membership of 37, with the follow- 
ing officers : W. H. Kauffman, N. G. ; John Walp, V. G. ; and R. J. Kimber- 
ling, Secy. 

Civil Bend Lodge No. 203 was instituted Feb. 15, 1869, with A. M. 



210 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Swaney, N. G. ; W. S. Mallory, V. G. ; J. H. Frost, R. S. ; John Easter, P. S. ; 
T. J. Swaney, P. S. The chapter now has 41 members. 

Lock Springs Lodge No. 380 has a membership of 43. Coffeyburg 
No. 520, has a membership of 117. Altamont Lodge No. 607 has a mem- 
bership of 66. The hall was destroyed by fire in 1921, and plans are being 
made to rebuild. 

There are about 725 members of the I. 0. 0. F. in the county. 

Rebekahs. — Sarah Rebekah Lodge was organized at Pattonsburg about 
1890. The officers are Mrs. lone Bloom, N. G. ; Mrs. Etta Crump, V. G. ; 
Mrs. Minnie McElfresh, Secy. ; and H. D. Milstead, Treas. 

The first officers of the New Hope Rebekah Lodge at Lock Springs 
were, Mrs. T. A. Abbott, N. G. ; I. L. Wade, V. G. ; Brumett Bowersock, 
Treasurer. The present officers are Mrs. Ora Trosper, N. G. ; Mrs. May 
Eads, V. G. ; Mrs. Mary Eads, R. S. ; Mrs. Anna Garr, F. S. ; Mrs. Brumett 
Bowersox, Treas. 

Altamont Rebekah Lodge No. 525, was organized at Altamont about 
1908 with 60 members. Mrs. Dan Fisher was the first Noble Grand and 
Mrs. Abe Wills, the first Vice Grand. The other officers are not known as 
the records were destroyed by fire. The present officers are Pearl Roberts, 
N. G. ; Jessie Snyder, V. G. ; Cena Curtis, Secy. ; Georgia Burns, Treas. 
There are 53 members of the chapter. 

A Rebekah lodge was organized at Civil Bend, but was disbanded 
about 15 years ago. Another chapter was organized April 1, 1921, and 
is known as Augusta Rebekah Lodge No. 741. The officers are Mrs. Pearl 
Smith, N. G. ; Mrs. LilHe Faiber, V. G, ; Mrs. Bettie Brown, F. S. ; John 
Field, C. S.; Clyde Frost, Treas. There are 24 members. 

Coffey Rebekah Lodge No. 287 was organized in May, 1901 with 28 
members. Miss Emma Hendrix, N. G. ; Mrs. Fannie Dryer, V. G. ; Miss 
Mollie Armstrong, C. S. ; Miss Phena Everly, F. S. ; Mrs. Lou Witten, Treas. 
There are now 89 members of the chapter with the following officers : Mrs. 
Kattie Miller, N. G. ; Mrs. Lillian Weldon, V. G. ; Mrs. Frankie Wright, R. 
S. ; Mrs. Merle Williams, F. S. ; Mrs. Hattie Glaze, Treas. 

One of the most flourishing chapters of the order is found at James- 
port. Two state presidents have come from this organization, Mrs. Mary 
Buren and Miss Ethel Langford. 

The Gallatin Rebekah Lodge was organized about 1893. The present 
officers are, Mrs. Maude Galpin, N. G. ; Mrs. Ada Witten, V. G. ; Miss Ber- 
nice Ramsbottom, R. S. ; Mrs. Stella Hunt, F. S. 

American Legion. — The first chapter of the American Legion was 
organized in Gallatin, Sept. 2, 1919, with a charter membership of 30. It 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 211 

was decided that the organization should be known as the Wallace McAfee 
Post, The following officers were elected: Post Commander, Dr. M, A. 
Smith; Vice Commander, Dean H. Leopard; Adjutant, H. C. Venable; 
Finance Officer, Harley Morris ; Historian, Fred M. Harrison. Harley 
Morris is now Post Commander. There are about 90 members. 

The Ray Noll Post No. 79 was organized at Jamesport, Sept. 18, 1919, 
with 30 members. Neal 0. McCollum was the first Post Commander; 
Viwell Lankford, Vice Commander; Charles Evans, Sergeant at Arms; 0. 
L. Gildow, Finance Officer; J. Frank Gildow, Historian; Lee Goodbar, Ad- 
jutant. The post now has 55 paid up members. A hall is owned by the 
organization. There is a Women's Auxiliary with a membership of 47. 
Charles Evans is Post Commander ; Clarence Wells, Vice Post Commander ; 
J. R. Wiles, Adjutant; 0. L. Gildow, Finance Officer; Leslie Lankford, His- 
torian. 

The Shaw- Whetstone Post No. 227, at Pattonsburg, has a membership 
of about 90. E. U. Shackelford is commander, and T. L. Smart, Vice Com- 
mander. W. L. Moody is the Adjutant. 



THE 



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ORK 



^^Bl'f UBHAUY 



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GENTRY COUNTY COURT HOUSE, ALBANY 




HIGH SCHOOL BUILDING. ALBANY 



PART 11. 



History of Gentry County. 



CHAPTER I. 



INTRODUCTORY. 



THE AUTHOR'S OBSERVATION OF SIXTY-FIVE YEARS IN GENTRY COUNTY— HIGH 
POINTS OF HISTORY— PROGRESS OF GENTRY COUNTY— ADHERENCE TO FACTS— 
"HARKING BACK" 

With a commendable lack of confidence the writer undertakes the 
preparation of his county's history. At the impressionable age of 14 
years the author arrived in Gentry County in 1856, 22 years after the 
earliest white settlers. At that date all leading facts of local history 
were still distinct in the general consciousness. Sixty-five years resi- 
dence have given the writer personal acquaintance and friendship with 
many of the county fathers. 

There must of necessity be high points in any history. The most 
interesting feature of local county history is the usual, every day life of 
the people. Pioneer life, because of its vast difference from that which 
comes later, is of highest interest to posterity. 

History should reveal the advancement, the obstacles, and the man- 
ner of their overcoming. More than this, history should indicate the rate 
of progress. Posterity will ask, "How far did Gentry County travel in 
the way of progress and development?" The best answer to this ques- 
tion is a vivid picture of out activities today, material, social and benevo- 
lent. For instance, agriculture and allied interest will be one of the high 
points ; education will be one and response to the World's War crisis will 
be another. With a rigid adherence to facts, every effort is made to 
preserve the high lights, and to give due proportion to larger things. 

Those readers who held acquaintance with the author will gener- 
ously indulge him in the following literary extravagance. 



214 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

HARKING BACK 

In the Grand River Valley, I'm contented to dwell. 
The allotment of Providence pleases me well. 
I'm walking with industry, day in and day out, 
And collecting the comforts she's never without. 
Like a deep rooted tree in the midst of the grove, 
I am firmly attached in the bondage of love. 
To my friends and the scenes that environ my home, 
Untempted by specious allurements to roam. 

Though storms overhead at intervals beat. 
And hindering meshes entangle my feet. 
With heaven above and Missouri beneath, 
Not a shade of distrust ever wavers my faith. 
Content with the blessings, I've had in the past, 
And the promise that seed time and harvest shall last, 
I'll continue to plod in the fields I have known, 
Ever generous to wield where faithfully sown. 

No envious yearnings for the rich and the great, 
Whose cares grow apace with increasing estate, 
In the furrows of plenty, unburdened by wealth. 
My life ripples onward in the sunshine of health. 
Now the time is far spent ; my day is at close ; 
The sunset invites me to final repose, 
And I'll find it secure in a higher-up Land. 
While my body decays on the banks of the Grand. 



CHAPTER II. 



TERRITORIAL HISTORY. 



CLAIMED BY RIGHT OP DISCOVERY— INDIANS' RIGHTS SWEPT ASIDE— LOUISIANA 
PURCHASE— TERRITORY OF MISSOURI ORGANIZED— HOWARD COUNTY ESTAB- 
LISHED— "THE MOTHER OF COUNTIES"— GENTRY COUNTY ORGANIZED IN 1845— 
NAMED IN HONOR OF COLONEL GENTRY— LOCATION. 

Gentry County in Northwest Missouri is a parcel of territory from 
that vast domain in the New World west of the Mississippi River, 
claimed by right of discovery, in the name of Louis XIV, for the king- 
dom of France. 

The Indians, the original inhabitants, being almost entirely no- 
madic, were adjudged uncivilized, and their rights were swept aside 
with more or less promptitude, by the great powers of Europe. Under 
the name of "the Province of Louisiana," France maintained undisputed 
control until the close of the old French War in 1763, when this large 
region was ceded to Spain. 

After 37 years control, Spain, in 1800, ceded to France this great 
possession. In April 1803 Napoleon sold and ceded the entire realm to 
the United States for $15,000,000.00. In October of the same year. 
President Madison was authorized by Congress to take possession and 
provide provisional government. 

In March 1804 the division of the Louisianna Purchase was author- 
ized, this was effected a month later when the southern portion was 
named the Territory of Orleans, and the northern portion was set apart 
as the District of Upper Louisiana, under the temporary jurisdiction of 
Indiana Territory, the 33rd parallel North latitude being the dividing 
line. The present state of Missouri was embraced in the District of 
Upper Louisiana. 

In 1805 the District of Upper Louisiana, coming under its own Ter- 
ritorial government on July 4th of the same year. In 1812 this terri- 
tory was organized, or reorganized, as the Territory of Missouri under 
act of congress approved June 4th. In 1819, a portion of the Territory 



216 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

of Missouri was set apart and organized as the Territory of Arkansas. 

In 1816, Howard County was established out of portions of St. Louis 
and St. Charles Counties. This county, known as "Mother of Counties," 
comprised the whole northwest portion of the territory. Howard County 
was named in honor of General Benjamin Howard, acting governor of 
the territory, which was established in 1816. Settlements were begun 
as early as 1807 by Daniel Boone, Benjamin Cooper, and others. In 
1820 Ray County was formed from the western part of Howard County. 
In 1821 the territory was admitted into the Union as the State of Mis- 
souri. In 1822 Clay County was formed from the west half of Ray 
County. In 1833 Clinton County was formed from the northern portion 
of Clay County. 

In 1841 the present counties of Gentry and Worth were set apart 
from Clinton County, located and named Gentry County but was not 
organized till 1845. In 1861 Worth County was detached from Gentry 
County, leaving the County its present dimensions, 24 miles long, north 
and south, and 20^ miles wide, east and west. Located specifically, as 
townships, 61,62,63,64, in ranges 30, 31 and 32 and 2^ miles on the 
east side of the same townships in range 33. The western boundary 
being the old state line, definitely fixed by act of 1845. 

Colonel Richard Gentry, whose honored name is borne by the 
county, was probably a native of Missouri and of Boone County, where 
he was living in 1836, at the outbreak of the Florida War. He raised a 
volunteer regiment for service in that war and led them with devotion 
and honor to the field of Okeechobee, where at the moment of promised 
victory, he received a mortal wound, but for an hour, in the face of 
death, he directed and cheered his troops to final triumph. The same 
night his brave spirit passed to a hero's reward. In 1842 his regimental 
flag was presented by the state with all appropriate honors to his widow. 

Gentry County is bounded on the north by Worth County, on the 
east by Harrison and Daviess Counties, on the south by DeKalb County, 
and on the west by Andrew and Nodaway Counties, and lies just above 
the 40th degree of North latitude, and in Longitude 17 degrees west 
from Washington. Most of the county is watered by Grand River — 
East, West and Middle forks and tributaries. In the extreme southwest 
begins the Platte River slope. 



CHAPTER III. 



NATURAL RESOURCES AND TOPOGRAPHY. 



WHAT CONSTITUTES NATURAL RESOURCES— AVAILABLE AND POTENTIAL— MIN- 
ERAL SPRINGS— RAINFALL— PHYSICAL FEATURES— SCENERY AND SOIL— "'A 
LAND OF PROMISE". 

The natural resources of an undeveloped country include not only 
what the first settlers saw, but also whatever they found — whatever 
proved to their benefit or assistance in their struggle with the wilder- 
ness, the location of groves for shelter, the quality and use of timber, for 
fuel, building and implements, the abundant native grasses for grazing 
and forage, such game as was native to the country, the fish of its 
streams and the natural sources of good water, the stone for foundation 
work, the temperature, the rain fall and the quality of the soil. For 
none of these things did the pioneers bring with them. Gentry County 
with 60,000 acres of scattered groves and forests, was hospitable to the 
and abundance of fuel, with excellent oak for building, walnut for fur- 
niture and hickory for implements. Gentry County was also rich in 
grass land for pasture and hay stack. The early settler could have his 
wood lot at one hand and his cow lot at the other. As to game, if the 
earliest comers had the greater loneliness and the more privations, they 
also had more venison, more turkeys, grouse and pheasants, and possibly 
more time for fishing. They also found a well watered country, rivers, 
creeks, and springs, enough for all, distributed over the entire county. 
They found limestone for all necessary uses. They found a growing cli- 
mate, a sufficient rainfall and a responsive soil. Live stock throve and 
crops were abundant. Food for man and beast became plentiful. 

Thus it will be seen that Gentry County, in common with all North- 
west Missouri, was rich in resources quickly available to the early set- 
tler, while the potential resources native to the county, were beyond any 
power of estimation possible to the first residents. What could they 
know of timothy, of red clover, of blue grass, of high class stock, of 
creamery and poultry shipments? To those natural resources which 



218 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

aided the settlers in their plans for permanent occupation, should be 
added some that tended to relieve pioneer life from monotony and to im- 
part to it a sporting flavor, as the locating of her trees, the gathering 
of wild fruits and nuts, and the hunting and trapping of fur bearing ani- 
mals. Though this phase of life has little to do with permanent civiliza- 
tion, it was probably very interesting and profitable, since it seems a 
trustworthy conclusion that the region was early relieved of any inroads 
from Indian hunters. 

While not of interest to early settlers. Gentry County possesses fine 
mineral and medicinal springs. 

The average yearly rainfall and melted snow is 36.62 inches, dis- 
tributed by seasons as follows: winter 5.25 inches, spring 9.25 inches, 
summer 14.50, autumn 7.62. 

The physical features of Gentry County are pleasing to the eye, and 
very favorable to all agricultural pursuits. There are three classes of 
land ; river bottoms, the breaks or broken hills, and back of the broken 
lands are large areas of higher undulating prairie — ideal land for gen- 
eral farming. 

At many points of elevation the views are far reaching and unsur- 
passed in their blending of streams, timber and rolling hills, in all their 
native beauty. The slopes are usually long and moderate and the nat- 
ural drainage is everywhere so sufficient that but a negligible part of 
Gentry County could ever have been classed as water or swamp lands. 
The soil is everywhere, a rich black loam with excellent clay subsoil. 
The prairie carried a heavier covering of rich top soil than did the tim- 
bered lands. 

This is what the early settlers beheld; a rich soil, an open country, 
ready for subjection, and promising both speedy and enduring rewards 
to the labor and intelligence of civilized man. The native woods and for- 
ests covered the fifth part of the county's extent — so well distributed 
that no part seemed naked. To the pioneers of vision it probably 
appeared a land of promise, a place of splendid possibilities, an empire 
of opportunities, where one could work in hope, and where dreams 
might come true. With all its natural resources it was still a wilderness, 
producing nothing for the comfort and progress of humanity. 



CHAPTER IV. 



EARLY SETTLEMENTS. 



NONE OF THE FIRST SETTLERS NOW LIVING— CONQUEST OF THE NINETEENTH 
CENTURY— WHAT THE PIONEERS BROT'GHT— THEIR AMBITIONS— SETTLEMENT 
BEGAN IN 1834— FIRST SETTLERS— OTHER SETTLERS— FIRST SCHOOI^FIRST 
POSTOFFICE— FIRST WHITE CHILD BORN IN COUNTY— FIRST CHURCH— EARLY 
PREACHERS. 

After 88 years, it is naturally impossible that any of the first set- 
tlers should still be living — The History of 1882 was prepared while 
Isaac Miller, one of the first four was still a resident of the county. At 
that time the leading facts could easily be verified. Logically the His- 
tory of 1882 is the basis of authentic first things. 

From the dawn of history, families, tribes, communities, and nations 
have taken keen delight in all facts and traditions concerning their ori- 
gin, and early development. 

In the larger sense the settlement and growth of Gentry County is 
part and parcel of that great immigration and conquest of the 19th cen- 
tury which followed as a natural result of the independence of the 
United States. The strong and resolute swarmed westward to subdue 
and occupy the Valley of the Mississippi and its tributaries. Gladstone 
declared it, "The greatest peaceful monument of Civilized Man, to the 
greatest tract of fertile land on the face of the Earth." 

The present generation is close enough to this great beginning to 
have interests, many and varied and often personal, apart from that 
which is merly historical. It is possible to know whence we came, how 
we were derived, why we are what we are. It is possible, in considering 
the beginning of things less than 90 years ago in the wilds of Gentry 
County, to trace the influence of Virginia, Tennessee and Kentucky. 
Other influences are as easily and definitely traced. If the pioneers 
came with empty hands, they came with sound minds and strong hearts. 
They brought the experience of ages of struggle and progress and 
mental and moral attainments that go to explain their speedy and mar- 
velous successes. 



220 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Each pioneer held one personal ambition — to win a home and the 
means of its maintenance, of this he was conscious. But in the mass the 
pioneers were part of something great, something racial and something 
national. They were empire builders. 

The county is divided at the present time into eight municipal town- 
ships, as follows: Miller, Athens, Howard, Bogle, Wilson, Huggins, 
Cooper and Jackson. Settlement began in the spring of 1834, 11 years 
before the organization of the county. In this year came four men, 
Isaac and Tobias Miller, William Marton and John Roberts, natives of 
Kentucky and Tennessee, locating in what is now known as Miller 
Township at Greenwell Ford. With them this same year are associated 
the names of two others, David Henderson and Robert Ready. They 
raised a crop of corn on the north bank of Grand River. 

In 1835 the second settlement was made, also in Miller Township 
near what is now known as Gentryville, when John Gulp, Benjamin Gulp 
and Elisha Gameron from Tennessee and Milton Foster from Kentucky, 
with some others from the same states located in the township. 

In 1838, the first store was opened by a Mr. Stevenson, three miles 
northeast of Gentryville. Also in 1838, the first mill in the county was 
erected by Taylor McGully, four miles east of Gentryville. 

In 1836 Daniel Saunders from North Carolina settled in Athens 
Township, two miles south of Albany, at Sandsville. 

The first settlers usually selected timber land for homes and for cul- 
tivation. Most of them came from old forest regions, and all traditions 
were in favor of cleared land in preference to prairie. 

As early as 1836, settlers began to arrive in ever increasing num- 
bers, and by the time of county organization, in 1845, over two hundred 
prominent names — heads of families — were added to the few forerun- 
ners of 1834-35-36. 

In 1838 the first school house was built, east of Gentryville, in the 
neighborhood of John D. Burbon and Jacob Jones. John Githius taught 
the first school during the winter of 1838-39. It was a log building 20 
feet square with puncheon floor and roofed with clapboards ; in place 
of a window a log was left out on one side, and the space covered with 
greased paper. 

In 1838 the first postoffice was established at Sandsville, two miles 
south of Albany. Daniel Saunders was postmaster and the mail was car- 
ried from Sandsville to Plattsburg, Clinton County by Levi Baldock, con- 
tractor. 

In 1939 the first white child was born in the county, named Nancy 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 221 

M. Miller, daughter of Isaac Miller. She became the wife of W. P. 
Gartin. 

In 1840 the first water mill was built at Gentryville by Charles Gay 
and John T. Hunter. It was a log house with one run of buhr stones. 
The mill stones were chipped from native "Nigger Head" rocks by 
Joshua Potter, a pioneer citizen. This location was first called Gay's 
mill. The oldest town of the county grew up around it, and was for a 
time called Columbus. In 1850 the Legislature changed the name to the 
present name, Gentryville. 

In 1842, four miles east of Gentryville, the first church house was 
built by James C. Patton and others. The denomination was New School 
Presbyterian (Mount Zion, or Brushy), but the building was free to all 
denominations, and was used by Methodists, Baptists and Christians. 

The earliest preachers were John Udell and Hiram Wariner, Chris- 
tians; Lorenzo D. Waugh, Methodist; and Timothy Morgan, Pres- 
byterian. 

In 1845 the county was organized and the first court house built. 

April 3rd, 1845 — first marriage, Abraham Popples and Barbara 
Rhudy, 



CHAPTER V. 



PIONEER LIFE. 



REMINISCENT AND TRADITIONAL — THE PIONEER'S HOME — IMPLEMENTS — HIS 
TRIALS AND PRIVATIONS— SCARCITY OF NECESSITIES— BUILDING THE LOG 
CABIN— THE CRUDE FURNITURE— COMMUNITY SPIRIT— PASTIMES— GAME AND 
FISH— THE BLACKSMITH— GRISTMILL AND TRADING POST. 

Pioneer life when fairly treated is of deepest interest to all who 
come after. Direct history records what they did and its results. This 
chapter, somewhat different, should tell how they did it. It should 
intimately and sympathetically enter into their daily life with its labor, 
patience, self-denial, handicaps, sufferings, its successes, its personal 
gladness, its neighborhood pleasures and its community achievements. 

There is a sort of cumulative glamour attached to the reminiscen- 
ces and traditions of the first year of pioneer experience. The personal 
triumphs are recalled and related, the anniversaries and various assem- 
blings are in a manner relived again and again. All that was fine, joy- 
ous, successful, is preserved; much that was otherwise is dropped if not 
forgotten. It is therefore highly proper that the actual should be placed 
side by side with the more pleasurable traditional. 

The pioneer, at his winter fireside, with his family about him is indeed 
a cheerful prospect. The cheeriness of the picture contrasts agreeably 
with the crudeness of his cabin and its meagre furniture. However, but 
little of his life was spent at that cheerful fireside. His labor was heavy, 
and often vexatious. His days were slow and lonely. The immediate 
results were so slender that he was often discouraged. His implements 
were clumsy makeshifts, his motive power limited. He could only 
dream of the tools and teams he would like to have. The "good time . 
coming" seemed very far off. If he had a journey to make, it was a ser- 
ious matter. The imperfect trail would stretch itself, the hours would 
drag and the team would weary. He felt the discomfort of cold or heat, 
and the pangs of hunger. If a bridge were out, or a ford swollen, the 
delay would take his thoughts to the folks at home. Gloomy question- 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 223 

ings would beset his mind and heart. When could he reach home? 
What were the folks thinking? Would they be afraid? Would they 
worry? Were they safe? Reaching home at last, he might be weather- 
worn and fatigued, until exhaustion rendered enjoyment impossible. 

To many pioneers, it was an endless grind of toil, endurance, plain 
feeding and solid slumber. His brave, patient helpmeet, likewise, had 
much of loneliness. Perhaps she spent happy, hopeful hours helping 
with outside efforts, but in the cabin, alone or with infant children, how 
many hours of brooding solitude were hers. She too must dream of 
comforts for which her woman's soul was longing, so little that was con- 
venient and encouraging, so little beauty, so much plainness. The wild- 
erness without, frugality within. No neighbors within hailing distance, 
fewest of books, no magazines, a stray newspaper at odd times, per- 
haps twice a year tidings came from the old home, or from friends in 
other settlements. Little wonder that the dear old faces seem engraved 
with half a century of exile. There was sickness too, also death. Chills 
and fever, ague, that did not often kill, but always blighted, stealing 
energy, hope and happiness. It was often the woman's lot to watch 
the slow course of disappearing vitality, or with shrinking heart to 
behold the swift work of malignant disease. At times the able were so 
few and scattered they could but half attend the unable. At all such 
times the women, sensing what was lacking more clearly than the man, 
womankind suffered more. 

Again and again in those early years there were lean seasons, spells 
of scarcity. Something had broken the ordinary run of things. Bad luck 
would bring the wolf to the door, and encourage him to wait and watch. 
The reason might be any one of many. The man of the house might be 
ailing and laid up, at a critical time in the crop season. He might meet 
with an accident and broken limbs. The sickness of wife and children 
might consume his whole time and energy. The straying of stock might 
greatly delay him. Sometimes the strayed stock was not recovered. The 
result would be tragic. The loss of only one cow, dead, strayed or 
stolen, would bring a sense of panic to the housewife, and deepest gloom 
to the children. During such seasons of privation, it is incredible how 
the craving for certain articles of food would grow in the thoughts of the 
family as they divided their meagre rations. This craving might be for 
salt side-meat, for cheese or for butter, or it might be a longing for 
pickles. But it would be very vivid and terribly persistent. It is related 
in the chronicles of De Soto's followers, after they had crossed the Mis- 
sissippi and before they found the salt springs on White River, that a 
soldier one day cried out, "Oh, if I could only have just one slice of meat 



224 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

with salt, I could be patient." He voiced a longing that first, last or 
between times, has gripped every man, woman and child among the 
pioneers. 

It is' right that these first great costs of our inheritance should be 
remembered. We are the heirs of a conquest that was truly fine in the 
elements of labor, patience, and heroic endurance. With a deep sense 
of the multiplied obligations thus created, we turn with gratitude to all 
that was pleasurable and prosperous in the experience of these honored 
fathers and mothers of the early days. When youth, vitality, and energy 
come face to face with opportunity, hope springs at once to fullgrown 
strength. Anticipation flushes the heart, and the mind puts the hands 
to work. The early settler found a wilderness. There was no house, 
but the family could build a home ; humble as it might be there was the 
hope of better ahead. There were no fields, but they could enclose and 
clear. If the labor was heavy, it was for themselves and their children 
they were working. Hope and faith were shining to cheer them onward. 

The first homes were not the log cabin of usual build. They are 
best described as shelter, whatever the newcomer could devise, what- 
ever he could throw together with his own hands, a place to stay, tem- 
porary quarters. The wagon cover might be part with poles and bark, 
picturesque but not permanent. In some cases there flimsy shelters were 
used much longer than was first intended. Soon, however, the typical, 
strong built, permanent log cabin appeared. This meant more than one 
or two men's work. The settler selected his trees, felled and cut them 
into lengths. Then a small boy, if one there was, and a yoke of oxen 
snaked them to the desired location, and all was ready for the "Raising." 
"The cabins were of round logs, notched together at the corners, 
ribbed with poles, and covered with boards split from a tree. A punch- 
eon floor was then laid down, a hole cut in the end and a stick chimney 
run up. A clapboard door was made; a window was opened by cut- 
ting out a hole in the side or end, two feet square, finished without glass, 
often with greased paper for transparency. The chinking between the 
logs held the mud with which it was daubed. The roof might be clap- 
boards, bark or thatch, and the house was ready." 

Skill, as always, was at a premium. It was a proud day in the life 
of a stripling or youth when at a "raisin" he was first allowed to "carry 
a corner," as the notching M^as styled. At his first effort he was allowed 
one misfit, or renotching to make the fit. The second mistake disquali- 
fied him for that day. The writer, then under 17, carried his first corner 
to the top, renotching but once. 

The one legged bedstead could only be made in a corner of the 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 225 

cabin, but the two legged table could be adjusted most any place. 
Shelves were easy and pegs abundant, while the cross poles which sus- 
tained the floor of the loft were made to do duty for whatever might be 
hung up. Peg-leg benches took the place of chairs. Pots, pans and skil- 
lets were hung about the fireplace, all without nails or bolts. The 
auger was mighty in those days. Thus was the home made ready. 

The raising of the cabin was a social event for the entire neighbor- 
hood. Every man and boy wanted to be present. They gathered early 
and with much chaffing and up to date slang, they got busy. It was the 
aim of all that the "heft" of the work should be completed in time for a 
one or two o'clock dinner, at least the unskilled labor should be finished ; 
only the deft finishing touches were left for after dinner. The main 
body of the gathering must be free for play. Always there were wives 
and sisters in numbers sufficient to make the big dinner a matter of easy 
and merry achievement for the ladies assembled. The day recalled 
happy memories in the hearts of the older ones, while the younger were 
laying the foundation of future memories of their own. The bashful 
youth had his moment of supreme daring, and the clever damsel found 
her chance for sweet graciousness in a manner so casual as to deceive 
the very expert. If, in the main, human happiness is pretty evenly bal- 
anced, so is wisdom pretty evenly distributed. "Wisdom is justified of 
her children," measured by this standard, the generation that built log 
cabins, classes right along with almost any other. 

The cabin raising was a typical occasion. It was just one phase of 
that community spirit which was more fully shared by all the inhabi- 
tants than is possible in the fuller development which follows pioneer 
life. They had so much in common. They were all poor together, all 
working for a similar purpose. Each one needed the support of all the 
rest. Only as they gave mutual assistance could any of them succeed. 
For peace, for protection, for happiness, for success, none of them lived, 
or could live, unto himself. This community of interest and of sentiment, 
produced a hospitality and a fellowship, which is the admiration of the 
generations that follow. 

A writer forty years closer to these first things puts the case with 
great clearness. "It was a time of self reliance and brave, persevering 
toil, of privations cheerfully endured, and the experience of one settler 
was practically that of every other; all faced the same hardships. They 
stood on an equal footing. There were no castes. Aristocratic preten- 
tions did not exist and would not have been tolerated. The only nobility 
was the nobility of generosity. The bond of sympathy was the con- 
sciousness of common hardships." They were sensitive to each others 



226 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

needs and misfortunes. They needed no urging to help in time of 
trouble. The victim of storm or fire was speedily and cheerfully re- 
stored to the general equality in all he had lost. The restoration was as 
prompt as if ties of blood were in force. 

Neighbors were on the best of terms; envy, jealousy and strife had 
no place among them. They were a little world, or a large family, far 
removed from the great world of the East. To quote again : "This 
general state of feeling among the pioneers was by no means peculiar to 
Gentry County, although it was strongly illustrated here. It prevailed 
generally throughout the West, during the time of early settlement. 
The very nature of things taught the settlers the necessity of dwelling 
together in all good will. It was their only protection. They had come 
far away from a well established reign of law, and entered a new 
country where the civil authority was still feeble and totally unable to 
afford protection and redress grievances. Here the settlers lived some 
little time before there was an officer of the law in the country. Each 
man's protection was in the good will and friendship of those about 
him, and the thing any man might well dread was the ill will of the 
community. It was more terrible than law. It was no uncommon thing 
in the early times for hardened men who had no fears of jails or 
penitentiaries to stand in great fear of the indignation of a pioneer 
community." This community spirit was intensely practical. If one 
neighbor killed a beef, a pig, or a deer, he shared with the rest. A 
writer of 1882 laments the speedy passing of this communal interest, and 
disparages the cold, selfish, calculating orderliness which had even then 
taken place. In 1922 his criticism is better understood. In the early 
times there was the occasional ne'er-do-well who failed to kill his beef, 
pig, or deer, in his turn, and it was a joke to be winked at. But progress 
and industry while tolerating such individuals, cannot encourage them. 
Such people make a visible difference between themselves and the gen- 
eral run of which they are usually the first to complain. 

The common heart of Gentry County is as kind and generous today 
as it was in 1850. The unfortunate and afflicted, receive sincere sympa- 
thy and ready assistance, and the care of them is more effectual and con- 
tinuous than was possible seventy years ago. 

The pleasures of those early days were carried with a whole 
hearted enthusiasm, almost beyond our present comprehension. The 
shooting match when it occurred had the whole field to itself. The last 
quilting was over and gone, the nest fish fry was not yet dated. The 
same was true of each recreation in its turn. For the time being each 
was all in all. The question is often asked why we do not have such 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 227 

spelling schools and such religious revivals as in the early days. The 
answer is this. No one bit of knowledge can now enthuse the whole 
people. We are learning scores of things. Neither can any one senti- 
ment, no matter how sacred, ever again dominate the emotions of an 
entire community. Progress implies an increasing number of interesting 
aims and purposes. In the nature of things they compete one with 
another. The result should be a well balanced civilization. 

Physical well being no longer means a periodic abundance of good 
things after long periods of scant tables; but a sane and continuous 
enjoyment of sufficient food in comfortable homes. Education no longer 
means an occasional triumph of memory, but a universal distribution of 
useful and entertaining knowledge that sweetens and dignifies every 
day life. Religion no longer means a season of annual exalted emotion, 
but a settled conviction of endeavor after righteousness, with an abiding 
sense of God's power and goodness, and daily offerings of praise and 
gratitude. 

Anything, which offered to break the monotony of pioneer isola- 
tion, was welcome, and the most was made of it. They even invented 
diversions which had no other purpose. One community had this annual 
custom, sometime during roasting ear season. The whole family would 
load up and drive for miles, until they found a corn field whose owner 
they did not know. There they would camp, gather corn for a roasting, 
carefully extract a rail or two without greatly harming the fence, and 
preceed to feast. If the owner happened along, he "threw in" with them 
and got acquainted. 

The settlers had game and fish in abundance and variety. Turkey, 
geese, duck, prairie chickens, pheasants, quails. Also butter, honey, 
and lard. Of what use are the latter without bread? Above many things, 
they wanted bread. As roasting ear season passed, they grated corn and 
made fritter cakes. Lard for the griddle, butter for the fritter cake, and 
honey for the trimming. They had hand mills, and hominy blocks and 
horse mills. All these meant bread more or less, before water grist 
mills came into use. No doubt it tasted fine and went well with flesh, 
fowl and fish. Beeswax, coonskins and other peltry were their first 
trade commodities. Money was not; trade was everything; even the 
postmaster accepted coonskins for postage. 

Let no one imagine that pioneer life lacked established customs. 
The game, whether of work or of play, had its rules, and those who took 
part must mind the rules. The Anglo-Saxon spirit of fair play pervaded 
all activity. At quilting bees, each man must pay a dollar in money, or 
split a hundred rails. As dollars were scarce, the men usually worked 



228 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

on the logs while the ladies quilted. The party in the evening would be 
full of life and zest. Music and dancing might last till day break. Then 
came the hazardous task of seeing the ladies "safe home." The "mitten," 
a pet among some of the young ladies, was dreaded by the young men as 
a most vicious varmit. Strange to say, if a youth caught one, he never 
boasted. 

"The smith, a mighty man is he," was not written of any pioneer 
and for some reason earlier histories have neglected him. There can be 
no doubt that the blacksmith's shop was an early fact, ranking with 
grist mills and trading posts. The implements of the early farmers in 
their many imperfections must often have gone to the smith. Happy 
was that neighborhood when the mill, the store, and the shop were 
grouped. Such was not always the case, and the pioneer less favored 
had before him the possible necessity of a journey in two or three direc- 
tions. Going to mill or the store might be postponed during spells of bad 
weather. When it could no longer be put off, the weather might even 
turn worse. Many are the tales told of long waiting at the mill or the 
smithy, of high water, and lost bridges, and of all-night drives. 

As time passed "Old Settlers Day," came into vogue, specially 
designed to cherish these memories. They were also preserved in many 
other ways. As the number of pioneers diminished, the survivors be- 
came notable persons at all picnics and community gatherings. Each 
one representing something particular and personal. As more time 
elapsed the sons and daughters of first settlers had their place in help- 
ing to perpetuate these lovable traditions of early experience. 



CHAPTER VI. 



FIRST COURTS. 



MET IN 1845— OFFICERS APPOINTED— BUSINESS TRANSACTED— CREATED SIX MUNIC- 
IPAL TOWNSHIPS— FIRST PETITION FILED IN CIRCm' COURT— EARLY RECORDS 
—RECORD BOOK STILL IN EXISTENCE. 

The first county court of Gentry County met on the 5th day of 
May, 1845, at the house of Daniel Sanders. The record is as follows: 

"May 5th, A. D. 1845. 

Be it remembered, that on the first Monday of May and the fifth 
day of said month, in the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred 
and forty-five, the county court of the county aforesaid, met in pursu- 
ance of law, at the house of Daniel Sanders, in Sandsville, in said 
county, the place designated by law for holding courts in the County of 
Gentry aforesaid. Present, Michael Maltsberger, William Steel and 
Samuel Collins, Esq'rs, county justices of said county, James M. Howell, 
sheriff and George W. Birch, clerk ; when and where the following pro- 
ceedings were had and done, to wit; Michael Maltsberger, William Steel 
and Samuel Collins present their commissions from the Governor, under 
seal of the state, appointing them justices of this court, who thereupon 
took the oath of office required by law. 

Whereupon the court was opened by proclamation by the sheriff; 
then the said court proceeded to elect Michael Maltsberger, Esq., one 
of their body as president of the said court. 

The court appoints George W. Birch as clerk pro tem of this court, 
who thereupon enters into bond according to law, for faithful per- 
formance of said trust, in the sum of five thousand dollars with Peter 
Culp, Daniel Sanders, John Culp, Gideon Wright and Christopher F. 
Bartlay as his security, which is approved by the court, and thereupon 
said George W. Birch takes the oath of office required by law. 

James M. Howell, the sheriff, filed his bond as collector of the 
county. John Huggins was appointed assessor; John Plaster, surveyor; 
John B. Hundley, treasurer, and Elisha Perkins, coroner. 



230 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

It was ordered by the court that the county seat, which had been 
located by the commissioners, Ebenezer H. Wood and Armstrong 
McClintock, be called Athens. The court then adjourned from the 
house of Daniel Sanders to the house of William Daily, in the town of 
Athens. 

The above constituted the business of the county court the first 
day. The other county commissioner was Stephen Jones. 

On the 6th day of May, 1845, the court met again at the house of 
William Daily in the town of Athens. The county was then divided 
into six municipal townships, which were bounded and named as 
follows: 

Commencing at the southeast corner of the county proper, thence 
running west with the county line to the southwest corner of said 
county ; thence north with said county line nine miles ; thence east 
across the county to the east boundary of said county ; thence south 
nine miles to the place of beginning, to be known and called Miller 
Township ; place of voting at Gay's Mill. 

Commencing at the northeast corner of the first township ; thence run- 
ning with said township line to the west boundary of the County of Gentry ; 
thence nine miles north, with the county line ; thence east across the county 
to the east boundary of the county ; thence south nine miles to the place of 
beginning, to be known and called Athens Township ; place of voting at the 
seat of justice of said county. 

Third Township — Commencing at the northeast corner of Athens 
Township ; thence west with the line of said township to the bank of the 
East Fork of Grand River ; thence with the meanders of said river ta the 
north boundary of the said county proper; thence east with the county to 
the northeast corner of said county; thence south with the county line to 
the place of beginning, to be known and called Howard Township ; place of 
voting at Lacy Carter's. 

Fourth Township — Commencing at the southwest corner of the third 
township; thence with the line of the second township, to the west 
boundary of the county ; thence with the county line to the north bound- 
ary of the third township ; thence down the river with the meanders of 
said river, to the place of beginning, to be called and known as Bogle 
Township ; place of voting at Jason Bogle's. 

The territory on the east side of the Middle Fork of Grand River, to 
be known and called Allen Township ; place of voting at Sweems' Mill. 

The territory on the west side of the Middle Fork of Grand River, to 
be called and known as Green Township ; place of voting at Philip Norris*. 

These townships have undergone many changes, since first organ- 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 231 

ized in 1845 ; two of them now constitute a part of Worth County. Since 
then, the County of Gentry has been divided into eight municipal town- 
ships, the names and boundaries of which we give when treating of the 
history of the history of the townships proper. 

Ebenezer H. Wood and Armstrong McClintock were allowed, respec- 
tively, the sum of twenty-eight and twenty-four dollars, for their services 
as commissioners in locating the county seatw 

Elisha Cameron was appointed county seat commissioner. 

Ebenezer H. Wood was appointed county attorney for twelve 
months. 

An orphan boy, named John Gay, was brought before the court and 
Jonathan Hosier was appointed his guardian. 

James M. Howell was appointed administrator of the estate of James 
Baker, deceased. 

A license to sell goods and merchandise was granted to E. P. Howell. 

The court met again on the 7th day of May, when the following pro- 
ceedings were had : 

John Plaster was appointed a justice of the peace for Athens Town- 
ship. 

Elisha Cameron was ordered to advertise and sell a portion of the town 
lots of Athens, on the 16th day of June, 1845, and was further ordered to 
lay the town of Athens off into a public square, into lots, avenues, streets, 
alleys, etc., the number of lots to be ninety-six. 

The court then adjourned to meet on June 2, 1845. 

Among other things done at the June term of court were the fol- 
lowoing: 

Ordered by the court that Elisha Cameron be appointed superintendent 
for the County of Gentry, to superintend a final settlement between the 
County of Clinton and the County of Gentry. 

Elisha Cameron was also appointed to superintend the building of the 
county jail at Athens. 

William Bentley was made justice of the peace of Howard Township, 
as was also John C. Williams. 

John Plaster was appointed justice of the peace of Athens Township; 
Walter Savage, also of Athens Township ; Charles Claggett and John Fox, 
of Athens Township ; Aristippus Brown, of Mills Township ; Jesse Lewis, 
of Green Township ; 0. H. Sweem, of Allen Township. 

John Plaster was allowed ten dollars for surveying a portion of the 
county seat. 

Levi Baldock was allowed three dollars, as axman, in the survey of the 
county seat. 



232 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Elisha Cameron was allowed four dollars, as flagman, during the sur- 
vey. 

Samuel H. O. Irvin was appointed constable of Athens Township; 
William McNatt, constable of Miller Township; Archibald Ross, constable 
of Howard Township. 

The first Circuit Court was held at Athens, on March 12, 1846. Hon. 
Solomon L. Leonard was the judge presiding. James M. Howell was sher- 
iff; Elijah P. Howell, clerk; and Isaac N. Jones, circuit attorney. 

The first petition filed in the Circuit Court of Gentry County, was 
that of William Smith vs. A. Higgins, and reads as follows : 
Gentry Circuit Court, September Term, A. D., 1845. 

William Smith, by his attorney, Ebenezer H. Wood, complains of Al- 
fred Higgins in a plea of trespass, for that the said Alfred Higgins, on the 
7th day of July, A. D. 1845, at the County of Gentry and State of Missouri, 
with force and arms in and upon the said William Smith, made an assault, 
and him then and there beat, bruised, wounded and evil entreated and other 
enormities to the said William Smith, the said Alfred Higgins then and 
there did against the peace and to the damage of the said William Smith, 
fifteen hundred dollars, and thereupon he brings his suit, etc. By his at- 
torney. E. H. WOOD. 

On the back of said petition are the following endorsements: 

"William Smith vs. A. Higgins. Trespass. Damage, $1,500. 

Filed August 18, A. D. 1845. E. P. HOWELL, Clerk." 

"The clerk of the Circuit Court in and for the County of Gentry and 
State of Missouri, will please issue a summons, returnable at the next term 
of this court, August 18, 1845. E. H. WOOD, 

Attorney for Plaintiff." 

I certify that I executed the within writ and declaration, by leaving 
a copy of the same with the wife of the defendant, at the residence of Al- 
fred Higgins, as the law directs, on the 21st day of August, A. D., 1845. 

JAMES M. HOWELL, Sheriff." 

The first case that came before the grand jury for investigation was 
the State of Missouri vs. John K. Kennedy, charged with the murder of his 
wife, in Athens Township. The papers in the case were filed March 12, 
1846. 

The first grand jurors were Richard Chene worth, Elijah Carter, Wil- 
liam Green, Isaac N. Carson, Nathaniel Mothersead, John Q. Smith, David 
Buckridge, James C. Patton, Abel Yates, Jefferson Taliaferro, James M. 
Marrs, John Job, Adam Black, Henry P. Hiller, Franklin W. Seats, and 
John Plaster. 

The following is a record of some of the first marriages in the county : 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 233 

I, W. Bentley, a justice of the peace, within and for the county afore- 
said, do certify that on the third day of April, 1845, I joined in marriage 
Abraham Peppels and Barbara Rhudy. 

Given under my hand this 3d day of April, 1845. 

W. BENTLEY, J. P. 

I, W. Bentley, a justice of the peace, within and for the county afore- 
said, do certify that on the first day of May, 1845, I joined in marriage An- 
drew Keer and Jane Castor. 

Given under my hand this first day of May, 1845. 

W. BENTLEY, J. P. 

I, W. Bentley, a justice of the peace, within and for the county 
aforesaid, do certify that on the 29th day of May, 1845, I joined in mar- 
riage Samson Castor and Martha Ross. 

Given under my hand this 29th day of May, 1845. 

W. BENTLEY, J. P. 

This is to certify that the undersigned, ordained minister of the gos- 
pel, did, on July the 14th, 1845, solemnize the rites of matrimony be- 
tween Mr. Daniel M. Thomas and Miss Susan Jane Low. 

TIMOTHY MORGAN. 

I, Abraham S. Weese, a justice of the peace, within and for the 
county aforesaid, do certify that on the 7th day of August, 1845, I joined 
together in marriage Alexander Smith to Susan Adams. 

Given under my hand this 7th day of November, 1S45. 

A. WEESE, J. P. 

I hereby certify, that on the 3d day of November, A. D. 1845, I sol- 
emnized a marriage between Rev. Timothy Morgan and Miss Belinda J. 
Patton, both of said county. 

Given under my hand this 3d day of November, 1845. 

E. A. CARSON, 
An Ordained Minister of the Gospel. 

This is to certify that I, Zachariah Linville, an ordained minister of 
the gospel, did, on the 19th day of June, 1845, unite in matrimony James 
S. Leverich and Elizabeth Burton, according to law. 

Given under my hand this 24th day of December, 1845. 

ZACHARIAH LINVILLE. 

During the year 1845, fourteen marriages were recorded. 

The original real estate records are still in existence. The book in 
which they are recorded contains 413 pages, and although its leaves 
have become yellowed and soiled by time, it is in a good state of preser- 
vation. Here are found, promiscuously recorded, mortgages, bills of 
sale, chattel mortgages, powers of attorney, indentures of apprentice- 



234 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

ship, warranty deeds, etc. The character of the penmanship and the or- 
thography are generally good. Bills of sale, mortgages, and deeds, were 
in early times usually drawn up by justices of the peace, who, while they 
were men of good judgment, of unimpeachable integrity, were fre- 
quently unlearned and unlettered, as nearly all the early records testify, 
yet the early records of Gentry County are generally an exception to this 
rule. The fact must not be lost sight of, however, that the early officials 
of the newly organized counties in this western county, were hardy back- 
woodsmen, whose continual struggle for a livelihood precluded the pos- 
sibility of devoting any time to self culture. 



CHAPTER VII. 



COUNTY BUILDINGS. 



COURTHOUSE— JAIL— COUNTY FARM BUILDINGS. 

The second Court House was wrecked by a violent windstorm from 
the north on July 13, 1883, a storm of considerable extent and destruc- 
tion. The uper story collapsed and the lower rooms were a wreck of 
brick and mortar. Fortunately the various records were not seriously 
injured and a watch was kept over the ruins until all valuable papers 
could be placed in safety. 

On July 16th an order of the Court placed the records of the circuit 
court, the probate court in the sheriff's office in the block at northeast 
corner of court house square. At the same time the records of the county 
clerk were placed in the Peery Block at northwest corner of court house 
square. These buildings being deemed safe as well as convenient. 

Immediately agitation began for the removal of the seat of justice 
to the center of the county. As a result, the first petition, Sept. 4, 1883, 
for a new court house to be built in Albany, came to nothing. 

On May 7, 1884, the county court made an order for the erection of 
a court house and appointed L. H. Peery and S. W. Clark to procure 
plans and specifications and estimates of costs for approval of the court, 
and when so approved to proceed to have the buildings erected. In the 
meantime a large number of citizens were working vigorously for the 
removal of the county seat, and on June 2, 1884, a motion was filed ask- 
ing that the court order of May 7th be annulled. This motion was over- 
ruled by the court. 

On June 8, 1884, L. H. Peery and S. W. Clark reported progress in 
accordance with the court order of May 7, 1884. The report was made 
of record and is as follows: Comes now L. H. Peery and S. W. Clark, 
superintendents, appointed and qualified at the May term, 1884, of this 
court, to build a court house at the established seat of justice, Gentry 
County, and submit plans and specifications, and the court approves the 
plans prepared by the architects. 



236 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

The superintendents, the said Peery and Clark, advertised the let- 
ting of the court house on June 26, 1884, in the Albany Ledger, the Al- 
bany Memoranda, St. Joseph Daily Gazette, the St. Joseph Daily Her- 
ald and the Omaha Bee, said letting to be in parts. At the letting Rufus 
K. Allen of St. Joseph, was the lowest and best bidder for enclosing, 
roofing and finishing the outside of said building for $22,000.00 and the 
work was let to him to be completed on or before Dec, 1, 1884; $15,- 
000.00 to be paid by Gentry County, and the balance of $7,000.00 to be 
paid by the citizens of Albany, L. H. Peery and S. W. Clark, Superin- 
tendents. All of which was considered and approved by by the Court. 
The contract and bond were also approved and placed on file. 

The wreckage of the old court house including the foundation, was 
removed, and the work of building a new court house on the same 
ground was commenced July 18, 1884. The work was carried forward 
as rapidly as possible. 

The opposition was also busy. On August 6, 1884, C. M. Gorman 
and others in sufficient numbers filed a petition for an election, for the 
purpose of submitting a proposition to remove the seat of justice to the 
center of the county. Accordingly, the court made an order that the 
proposition be voted on at the next general election, Nov., 4, 1884, and 
that the county clerk give notice thereof by advertisement according to 
law. The result was so decidedly against the proposition as to be con- 
sidered a final settlement of the question. The order for an election did 
not delay the work, and on the 24th of August, about one month after 
the brick work was begun, the corner stone was laid in the presence of 
the greatest crowd assembled in Albany up to that time. 

For the first time in the history of Albany, the Missouri Grand 
Lodge A. F. & A. M. was called to order by Hon. A. M. Dockery at 12 :30 
o'clock in the Albany lodge room. The following were the officers of the 
Grand Lodge acting on this occasion: A. M. Dockery, G. M. ; Hugh Ste- 
venson, G. S. W. ; J. T. Dunn, G. J. W. ; G. P. Bigelow, D. D. G. M. The 
Lodge was formed in the hall, and marched down to the street, when it 
was joined by the Commandery, G. A. R. Post, the A. O. U. W., and the 
Knights of Pythias. The line of march was taken up, and headed by the 
Bethany band, the procession mover around several adjacent squares, 
marching into the court house yard at the southeast corner, forming as 
near as possible a hollow square at the northeast corner of the new 
building. 

The stone had been swung into position by a derrick, and after 
prayer by Rev. J. A. Blakey, the ceremonies proper were performed, 
and the stone lowered into its resting place, there perhaps to remain for 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 237 

many generations to come. Although the crowd was large there was not 
a jar of discord to mar the occasion. A cavity was cut out of the stone, 
into which was fitted a copper box, as a receptacle for articles to be de- 
posited as historical relics of future generations. 

The following was a partial list of the deposits : A list of the sub- 
scribers and the amount subscribed by each for the erection of the court 
house ; cards of invitation to the corner stone ceremony ; a history of the 
Girls Wide Awake Club ; a copy of the city ordinances of the City of Al- 
bany; a copy of the Albany Weekly Ledger; archives of the Albany M. 
E. Church ; copies of the orders of county court, pertaining to the build- 
ing of the court house ; silver shield pin, by J. R. Saunders ; coin of S. W. 
Clark, marked "S. W. C." ; family record of C. S. Canaday ; copy of the 
Albany Sun, containing an account of the storm that destroyed the old 
court house by J. M. Davis; by the A. O. U. W., a silver anchor and 
shield, and constitution and by-laws and list of members; archives of 
the Christian Church, Albany; English coin by R. L. Whaley; card by 
C. B. Hinkley; list of members of the Gentry County Bar Association; 
copy of King City Chronicle ; premium list Gentry County Fair Associa- 
tion, 1884; list of members of Island City Lodge, No. 109 A. F. & A. M., 
at Stanberry; archives of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, Al- 
bany; copy of the Home Guide, by Hubbard and Hubbard; list of mem- 
bers and by-laws of Lodge No. 195, L O. O. F., Albany; engraved silver 
coin by L. H. Peery; archives of the M. E. Church, South, at Albany; 
sentiments of Dr. J. L. Coffey; list of members of Athens Lodge No. 127, 
A. F. & A. M., Albany; archives of the Presbyterian Church, Albany; 
copy of American Freeman; copy of the Bethany Broad Axe; copy of 
Stanberry Sentinel ; Bible by Athens Lodge ; card, C. Crossan ; card, S. 
P. Larmer; card by W. E. Alexander; archives of Gentry Post, G. A. R., 
Albany; engraved silver coin by J. W. Barkley; silver coin by C. C. 
Byrne ; family record by R. A. Scarborough ; archives of Captain Little 
Post, G. A. R. ; history of Gentry County, Missouri ; card of Patton, Cra- 
mer and Austin; copy of memoranda; card of Thomas, McCullough & 
Peery; by-laws of Bethany Commandery, K. T., Royal Arch Chapter 
and A. F. & A. M. Lodges; Cumberland Presbyterian paper by C. M. 
Boshart; coin by G. F. Peery; card by Jno. T. Haynes; card of G. W. 
Combs; family record, Geo. Carlock; coin by C. T. Lyttle; coin by J. F. 
Gulp, Jr. ; list of workmen employed in building court house. 

The court house block is 200 feet square. The building is of substan- 
tial build and symmetrical architecture with cupola, of usual brick with 
stone pointing and slate roof, three stories high. The interior finish was 
also let to R. K. Allen. The first floor is complete with halls and com- 



238 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

modious office rooms with vaults. The second floor has the circuit court 
room with all appropriate adjuncts. On its completion the new building 
was accepted June 5, 1885, at a total cost of $29,100.00. 

The block was also enclosed with ornamental iron fence, but in 
time this gave place to permanent concrete walls with the 10 feet of 
concrete pavement at their base, thus giving to the court house grounds 
a pleasing elevation of several feet. In 1904 during the mayorality of 
R. M, McCammon, the fair way of 60 feet around the court house square, 
with its four intersections, was paved with vitrified brick. 

As early as 1891, W. F. Greenlee and others proposed raising money 
to equip the cupola with a first class town clock, and some money was 
raised. But the proposal was not carried far at that time. About 1900, 
the young ladies formed the "Town Clock Club." This club in several 
agreeable ways raised most of the money needed. The city furnished a 
small sum, and in 1902, the clock was installed, which strikes the hours 
upon a splendid bell. 

In 1906 the ''White Way," with more than four score globes, was 
extended around the Public Square ; thus assuring all desirable illumi- 
nation. 

Our court house and surroundings are complete, permanent and 
pleasing. 

The first court house of Gentry County was built in 1845. The plan 
was submitted by Isaac Cameron, the commissioner of the county seat, 
on the 2d day of June, 1845, as follows: 

"A wall of hewed logs, twenty-four feet by twenty feet, of good 
durable timber, two stories high, logs to be eight inches thick, and to 
face ten inches in the middle ; the upper story to be divided into three 
rooms, to be covered in with joint shingle roof; a brick chimney with 
two fire places ; a stairway to the second story ; two floors, the lower 
laid with square joints, and the upper tongued and grooved; two doors 
and two windows in the lower story, and one window and one door in 
each of the upper rooms; to be pointed with lime mortar, and a circle 
bar and judge's bench made in the lower story; all to be done in a good, 
workmanlike manner." 

The building stood upon lot number four, in block number two. It 
was afterwards sold with the lot, to Judge Elias Parrot, for about $275. 

On the 7th day of December, 1852, the county court made the fol- 
lowing order in reference to the building of the second court house : 

"It is ordered by the court here that a court house be built in the 
town of Athens, the seat of justice of this county, and that the sum of 
$5,000 be appropriated for the building thereof." 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 239 

William M. Albin was appointed superintendent of the building. 

On the 7th day of March, 1853, the court ordered that an additional 
sum of $1,000 be appropriated toward the building of a court house. 

The court also ordered that the county court borrow so much of the 
road, canal, county improvement and common school fund as was neces- 
sary to build the court house. This order was made in pursuance of a 
petition, signed by a majority of the voters of the county, asking that 
body to use the funds named above, and was authorized by an act of the 
legislature, approved Feb. 24, 1853. 

On the 5th day of July, 1853, the court ordered the levying of a tax 
of one-fifth of one per cent., and a poll tax of 37 5 cents on all persons 
subject to state tax, to aid in the construction of the court house. Oct. 
25, 1853, the court borrowed $621.61 from the internal improvement 
fund, to pay the two first installments due on the court house. Dec. 6, 
1853. the court borrowed $700. Miller R. Craig and Joseph Selecman 
were paid the above amount of $700, as sub-contractors. March 6, 1854, 
court borrowed $500. June 5, 1854, court borrowed $500. Nov. 15, 
.1854, court borrowed $500. July 13, 1855, court borrowed $500. Nov. 
6, 1855, court borrowed $276. July 6, 1858, court borrowed $300. Dec. 
23, 1858, court borrowed $741.25. 

The court house was a brick building, 45x60 feet, and two stories in 
height, the first story being 15 feet high and the second ten feet,, and a 
portico on the south end 12 feet in width, extending the whole height of 
the building. The court room was at first in the lower story, 40x45 feet, 
with two small rooms at the south end, and a hall between. The upper 
story was divided into four rooms for public hall and jury rooms. In 
1875 the court house was remodeled, so as to arrange the second story 
for the court room, with the offices below. Connected with the county 
and circuit clerks offices was a fire-proof vault, in which are kept the 
records. 

In May, 1846, the county court ordered the building of a jail, and 
Elisha Cameron was appointed commissioner to let and superintend the 
building of the same, and he not qualifying, E. H. Wood was appointed 
in his place. The jail was built in 1846 and 1847, and was a log building 
about 24 feet square, built of hewn logs, with double walls, a space be- 
ing left between the walls and timbers placed in an upright position 
therein. It was two stories high, with an entrance from the ground to 
the second story, and a trap-door in the floor of the second story as an 
entrance to the first story. The jail cost about $500, and was burned in 
1850. The county had no jail thereafter till 1859, when a second jail 
was erected on the northeast corner of the public square, Redmond 



240 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Whitton being the contractor, for the sum of $3,230. This building was 
about 20 feet square, the outside being brick and inside timber two 
inches thick, and covered with iron bars, crossing each other and spiked 
to the timber. It was two stories high, with same character of entrance 
as the first jail. It was not a safe jail for prisoners. In the fall of 1874, 
the county erected a third jail, at a cost of $11,500, the size of which is 
96 feet square, built of brick, two stories high, with a basement. 

The County Farm — The history of 1882 closed with Walter Glad- 
stone, superintendent of the recently acquired farm in Bogle Township, 
and its thousand dollar home for indigent pijpr. 

Mr. Gladstone remained in charge for some time. By good manage- 
ment he restored the run-down farm and produced most of the home sus- 
tenance. By careful economy, he was able to keep the average number of 
inmates in reasonable comfort. It was a great improvement on the sys- 
tem of contracting or allowancing, which so long prevailed to the humilia- 
tion of the county. 

Wm. Loyd, C. A. Kennedy and other following superintendents effi- 
ciently carried on the poor home until December, 1906, when it was burn-' 
ed. The inmates were then installed in a large hotel at Siloam Springs. 
In December, 1908, this hotel was burned and again the unfortunate ones 
were homeless. However, public sentiment was now fully arroused, and 
the building of a suitable and permanent home had already been decreed, 
which this second fire only served to hasten. The Albany Canning Fac- 
tory was leased for a temporary home. 

The farm in Bogle Township had been disposed of and on July 7, 1908, 
a county farm was bought from Mary R. Monroe for $7500.00, in Section 
36, two miles south of Albany, a splendid location. 

At the general election Nov. 3, 1908, $20,000.00 bonds were voted for 
building a county home. Nov. 1, 1911, $15,000.00 ten-year bonds were 
sold. Dec. 13, 1911, the bid of Chas. Harrison for the building, except 
plumbing and heating, was accepted at $11,995.00. F. B. Thompson se- 
cured contract for plumbing and heating. Geo. R. Williams was super- 
intendent of construction. 

The members of the county court for 1911-'12 deserve great credit 
for their zeal in providing funds and pushing the work of construction, and 
for the intelligent care with which they looked after the county poor from 
the time they took office until the opening of the new home in the fall of 
1912. They were untiring, first, in having the money provided by direct 
issuei of bonds in accordance with the vote of 1908, instead of taking it 
from the road and bridge funds, and second in their painstaking decisions 



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THE NEW YORK 
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,^STOU, LENOX AND 
TlI.nEN FOUNDATIONS 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 241 

regarding plans, material and workmanship, by which Gentry County se- 
cured one of the best constructed, most conveniently arranged, perfectly 
equipped, and most comfortable homes for its indigent charges that can be 
found in the state of Missouri. 

Sept. 17, 1912, the county court made a tour of inspection. The work 
was then practically complete, ready for the adjustment of a few minor 
items, and a general cleanup for permanent occupancy. 

The following description is as apt in this good year of 1922, as it 
was in 1912,. 

The two-story section of the new home has been arranged for the 
living rooms of the superintendent and his family, and the one-story 
wings to the north and south are cut off into dormitories, sitting rooms 
and special sleeping rooms for the inmates, while the west section of the 
building has been especially erected for the kitchen and dining-rooms. 
In the west section are also bath rooms for both male and female inmates 
and in the main wings are separate toilet rooms for men and women. 

A large boiler and pressure tank in the basement forces hot and cold 
water to all parts of the building, and all the rooms and halls are heated by 
the modern steam-heating plant which has been installed in the basement. 
There is also a large laundry room in the basement, together with ample 
storage room, should it ever be needed, some excellent rooms for inmates 
could be arranged on the basement floor. The plumbing work and the 
steam-heating plant are the best that the court could buy, and has been in- 
stalled with the utmost care. Under the careful superintendency of Geo. 
R. Williams, the carpentering, brick work and other details of construc- 
tion have been so carefully handled that it is safe to say there is not a 
public building in north Missouri that can show more careful workman- 
ship that the new home. The large barn and chicken house have been 
built with a view to permanency, and none of the work about the place 
has been slighted. 

The new home should be ample for the care of Gentry County's pau- 
per charges for fifty years to come. It is located on one of the best tracts 
of ground in this section ; is only about a mile from the geographical center 
of the county ; is convenient to both the railroads and the county seat, and, 
standing on one of the highest spots in this part of the county, commands 
a view for miles in all directions. 

Mr. Walter Brown is now the efficient superintendent. 



CHAPTER VIII. 



TOWNSHIPS. 



ATHENS— BOGI.E— COOPER— HOWARD— JACKSON— HUGGINS— MILLER— WILSON. 

Athens Township, is bounded as follows : Beginning at the northeast 
corner of section 1, township 63, range 30 ; thence west about seven miles 
to the east fork of Grand River ; thence following the meanderings of said 
river to the north line of section 23, township 63, range 31; thence west 
about two miles to the middle fork of Grand River ; thence down said river 
to the south line of section 13, township 62, range 31 ; thence east to the 
Harrison County line; thence north nine miles to the place of beginning. 
It contains 73.05 square miles. 

Some of the early settlers of Athens Township were the following: 
J. B. Kingsborough, Iri Orton, Alfred Orton, Robert Dubois and William 
Green, all from Richland County, Ohio. In 1836, two of these parties 
passed through this section, seeking a location, and had selected a mill-site 
near the town of Gentryville. Being pleased with this western country, 
they returned to Ohio, where they remained until the spring of 1838, when 
they again left their homes in the East, in company with Dubois, Green 
and Kingsborough above mentioned. Orton and Kingsborough came thru 
on horseback to Peoria, Illinois, where they were rejoined by the others, 
who had traveled by water. Here they purchased an outfit, coming the 
balance of the way by land, in a two-horse wagon. The men were all 
young and single, except Dubois, who was married, but left his family in 
Ohio. They reached the neighborhood of Gentryville, on the evening of 
June 12, 1838, stopping with William Martin, one of the earliest pioneers 
of the county. Here they sojourned during the summer, rented a few 
acres of ground from Martin and planted it in corn. They afterwards lo- 
cated in Athens Township, one and one half miles north of Albany, or 
where the town of Athens was located — Kingsborough opening a farm. 

Michael Maltsberger came from Tennessee, before the county was or- 
ganized, and located three miles southeast of Albany, where he continued 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 243 

to reside until his removal to Texas. Maltsberger was commissioned by 
the Governor one of the first county court justices, and was one of the 
three persons elected to that position at the election of 1846, the first elec- 
tion held in the county. It was at his suggestion that the county seat was 
called Athens, for the town of Athens, in McMinn County, Tennessee. 

George K. and Benjamin Gulp came from Kentucky in the spring of 
1835, and located on and near Jacob Miller's place, two miles west of Al- 
bany. They came to Clay County, Mo., where they remained about one 
year, and came from that county to Gentry, bringing all their worldly 
goods on a horse. 

Ke,lse and David Culp came about the same time, settling also near 
Albany. 

Levi Baldock, another Kentuckian, settled one mile south of Albany, 
Daniel Saunders, from North Carolina, located two miles south of Albany, 
at Sandsville which was named after him. The county court of Gentry 
County met for the first time in his cabin, and organized in May, 1846. 
Daniel Saunders was the first postmaster in the county, being appointed 
to that position about the year 1838. James, Simon and Stephen Lever- 
ich, from Virginia, were among the early settlers, stopping in the neigh- 
borhood of Sandsville. 

Henry P. Miller was also from Virginia, and opened a farm adjoining 
the townsite of Albany. 

George Smith said when he and his brother came to Gentry County, 
the Indians were here in large numbers, for two or three years, and that 
wild game was in great abundance in every portion of the county. He 
killed a large deer on the spot where the courthouse now stands. 

John Q. Smith, from Kentucky, located about one mile northeast of the 
town. Andrew J, Bulla, from Virginia, settled two miles northeast, and 
Thomas Peery, also a Virginian, three miles northeast of Albany. 

Samuel McKillen, from Scotland, Gideon Wright, from Clay County, 
James B. Hunter, from New York and Ohio, Benjamin and Joseph Twedell 
from Illinois, and Charles Rund from Austria, all located in the township 
at an early day, and near the town of Athens, as it was then called. 

Allen Meek, from Clay County, and at one time a soldier in the United 
States Regular Army, was an early settler. Daniel Spainhower came from 
Casey County, Kentucky, in 1884, settling about five miles northeast of 
Albany, on what was known as the Hardin farm, where he remained 
until 1852, when he moved onto a farm ten miles north of Albany, where 
he continued to reside until 1874, when he came to Albany. 

Caleb S. Canaday emigrated from Casey County, Ky., in 1828 to Illi- 



244 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

nois to Morgan and Montgomery Counties, thence to Gentry County, Ath- 
ens Township, in 1844, locating six miles northeast of Albany, where he 
lived until 1872, when he became a resident of Albany. He was probate 
judge of the county in 1872. 

Elisha Cameron came among the earliest. He was a prominent and 
influential citizen of the county, and filled numerous positions of honor and 
trust, among which were the offices of commissioner of the seat of justice, 
county commissioner and sheriff. 

Among others, were Robert Carter, Walter Savage, William Childers, 
Peter Vesser, Jink Vesser, Jesse Martin, James Marrs, Jesse Gay, William 
G. Williams, who was the first representative from the County of Gentry 
in the legislature, and was probate judge of the county, Henry P. Milier, 
Miles Orton, George Brown, John Brown, John W. Canaday, James L. Can- 
aday, George W. Birch, Samuel Trvin, Charles W. Claggett, Mason Ciag 
gett, Thomas E. Peery, William A. Peery, John j.' Hundley, Jacob New- 
man, James Thompson, Nathaniel Thompson, John Handy, Edward Mc- 
Cart, William McCart, George C. Needles, William Steel, Joseph Siddons, 
James B. Hunter, Eli P. Hardin, David O'Brien, Christopher Bartley, 
William Rice, David Prunty, Zachariah Spriggs, William Ward, Jr., 
Henry Ward, John Fox, Josiah Fox, William Fox, Charles F. Rund, Will- 
iam Brooks, John Riley, William Grants, Willis B. Sampson, Warren 
Leftwich, Hiram Warner and William Glendenning. 

Bogle Township. — Beginning at the northwest corner of section 
two ; thence east eight miles to the east fork of Grand River ; then follow- 
ing the meanderings of the river to the south line of section 35, township 
64, range 31 ; thence west to the southwest corner of section 35, township 
64, range 32 ; thence north six miles to the place of beginning, containing 
44 square miles. 

Early settlers in this township were John Ross and his son, John who 
came from Nova Scotia about the year 1841 or 1842 and settled west of 
the Middle Fork of Grand River. 

William Glendenning came from Ohio, about the year 1841, and set- 
tled west of the Middle Fork on the bank of the str3am. The Rosses and 
William Glendenning were doubtless the first white men to locate per- 
manently in Bogle Township. 

Alexander Newman emigrated from Tennessee about the year 1842, 
and located between the East and Middle Forks of Grand River. At the 
time of his death he was a citizen of St. Joseph, Mo. 

William Allen came to Gentry County prior to 1844, and located on 
the west side of the East Fork of Grand River, where he continued to live 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 245 

until 1850, when he went to Oregon, A man by the name of Harris lo- 
cated about the same time, and in the same neighborhood. He left the 
country several years afterwards. 

Thomas Martin came to the county about the year 1874, and settled 
what was called the Jack Ray farm, between the East and Middle Forks. 
Martin went to Oregon in 1863. 

Jesse Martin, brother of Thomas Martin, located in Bogle Township 
prior to 1884, and settled in the same locality where his brother Thomas 
had lived. Jesse went to California in 1849. 

James Dean came from Callaway County, Missouri, in an early day, 
first locating in Athens Township, where he remained until 1847, when 
he enlisted as a soldier for the Mexican War. He returned from the war 
in 1848, and settled between the East and Middle Forks of Grand River, 
in Bogle Township. 

Alexander Guynn emigrated from Ohio prior to the year 1844, and 
located in the same locality. 

Harris Green came from South Missouri in 1846 or 1847 and settled 
in the same neighborhood, where he died. 

L. L. L. Shockley, from Gasconade County, Missouri, came in 1842,, 
and settled on section 27, township 64, range 31. 

William and Thomas David, coming from Gasconade County, Mo., set- 
tled about three-quarters of a mile south of Mr. Shockley's farm. They 
finally moved to Iowa, near Red Oak Junction. James Murphey, and De- 
catur Murphey, his brother, came from Illinois about the year 1846 and 
settled west of the Middle Fork of Grand River. Frederick Summa lo- 
cated in the same neighborhood about 1846. Reuben Cox came from 
Gasconade County, Missouri, and settled in Bogle Township at an early 
day. He moved to the mountains in 1862 or 1863. A man by the name 
of Ingles and his son Coleman, also opened a farm between the Middle 
and East Forks of the Grand River. 

Then came John Lawrence from Ohio, in 1850, and improved a 
place west of the Middle Fork. William A. Snyder, from Indiana, came 
also in 1855, taking a claim in the same locality. Snyder is still living, 
but Lawrence is dead. John Patton was one of the settlers of this town- 
ship in 1850. 

James Long and Reuben Long took a claim in the northwestern part 
of Bogle Township. 

Uriah Wells, Jonothan Bogue and Grayble all located in the west part 
of the township. 

Wright Stevens built the first grist mill (horse power) on Bear 



246 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Creek in the northwestern part of the township. It was a primitive struc- 
ture, and rested upon four to eight forks, eight or ten feet above the 
ground. It had a pair of burrs made of lost rock, and turned out from 
three to five bushels per day. A son of Wright Stevens, who was about 
16 years of age, committed suicide prior to 1850 by hanging, committing 
the deed with green bark, which he used instead of rope. About 1858, 
on the same farm, a man by the name of Timmons was waylaid, shot and 
killed by Milligan and Kestler. At a still later period, and on an adjoin- 
ing farm, Enwhistle killed Fightner. 

Thomas Napier, familiarly known as "Father Napier," settled near the 
Worth County line, in the northwest part of the township. He came prior 
to 1850, and he is said to have been familiar with the Old and New Testa- 
ment scriptures that he could quote from memory almost any passage con- 
tained in either of them. 

Joshua Cox and Reuben Cox were among the early settlers, locating 
in the eastern part of the township. Benjamin Dawson became a resident 
of the township about 1850. He was from Kentucky. 

Luman Yates, son-in-law of Thomas Martin, settled near Martin, and 
later went to California. Beverly Mahoney came from Indiana prior to 
1850, and settled in Bogle Township. Dr. Jabez Hunt, from Ohio, located 
near Union Grove postofRce. He died in the winter of 1881, in Gentry- 
ville. Noah and Alexander Hise, from Ohio, settled in this township prior 
to 1850. 

J. J. Patton came from Indiana in 1856. Philip Hinote, who was also 
an Indianian, located in Bogle Township in 1850. Henry Ross emigrated 
from Ohio in the Spring of 1855. William Hough took up his line of march 
westward from North Carolina at a very early day. 

The Protestant Episcopal organization built a house of worship in 
1881. The constituent members were Wisley Lawrence and family, John 
J. Swank, Andrew Henderson and family, William Stebbins and family. 

The Missionary Baptist, United Brethren and the Christian denomi- 
nations, each hold services in the different school houses of the township. 

Probably the first school in Bogle Township, was taught by a man 
named Brison ; the school house was a log cabin, located in district number 
six, and was erected in 1855. The teacher was from Tennessee, and taught 
what was called a loud school, where each pupil studies his or her les- 
sons aloud. 

The pioneer grist mill of Bogle Township was a horse mill, built prior 
to 1850, by John Armstrong, and located on Linn Creek. The mill was 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 247 

standing in 1855, but since that time both mill and owner have passed 
away. . , 

William Jackson and brother built the next grist and saw mill and sold 
the same to Martin Mervin, who moved the machinery onto the land owned 
by John J. Patton. 

Cooper Township. — Commencing at the northwest corner of the 
northeast quarter of section three, township 63, range 33; thence 
east to the West Fork of Grand River; then down said river to the south 
line of section 13, township 62, range 31; thence west to the Nodaway 
County line; thence north to place of beginning, containing 76 square 
miles. 

Early settlers in Cooper Township were : John Hussey, William R. 
James, James House, James H. Saunders, Dr. T, C. Hussey, Benjamin 
Floyd, John J. Stansbury, Green B. Cooper, William Hall, James House, 
Silas Houston, John N. Ross, Thomas W. W^ilson, John J. Gish, Charles 
B. Newhall, Ephriam Shisler, Isreal Shisler, Thomas Irons, John Cooper, 
L, E. Shadduck, Lewis Christian, James Rouse, John T. Daniel, James R. 
Farriss, John H. Kay, J. L. Edster, Fred Cogdill, James Stockton, Sidney 
Wilson, George Wilson, William Harkrider, Enoch Liggett, L N. Malson, 
Robert Webber, Elijah Hathaway, Sylvanus Hathaway, Wilson J. 
Wheeler, L N. Morris, J. W. Boner, William McCurry, Anderson Red- 
ding, Joshua Cranor, Henry Cobb, Reuben Perkins, B. Steves, T. C. Hus- 
sey, H. H. Hussey. 

Howard Township. — Howard Township is bounded as follows: 
Beginning at the northeast corner of section one, township 64, range 30 ; 
thence west six miles to the East Fork of Grand River; thence down 
said river to the south line of section 36, township 64, range 31 ; thence 
east seven miles to the west line of Harrison County; thence north six 
miles to the place of beginning, 39 square miles. 

Samuel and Asa Howard, after whom Howard Township takes its 
name, came about 1840 from Ohio, and located near the southwest cor- 
ner of the township, near the East Fork of Grand River. Samuel went 
to Iowa. 

William Bently, Sr., from West Virginia, but came from Illinois 
here, in 1838, and settled in the southwest corner of the township. He 
was sheriff of the county whence he came to Illinois, and ran for that 
office here, but was defeated. He served as one of the justices of the 
peace of Howard Township in an early day. He was a soldier in the 
Mexican War, and was in some of the most sanguinary battles of that 
struggle, being present at the Battle of Monterey and at the capture of 



248 HISTORY OP DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

the City of Mexico. He returned to Gentry County after the Mexican 
War, and in 1850 went to California, where he died. 

David Rhudy emigrated from Tazewell County, Virginia, about the 
year 1842, and located on Muddy Creek, in the northwest part of the 
township. He moved away and has been dead for many years. 

John Finley came from Tennessee in 1838, settling in Daviess 
County, Missouri. He was in the Mormon War of that year, and located 
in Gentry County, on Muddy Creek, in 1841 or 1842. Inseparably asso- 
ciated with the name of John Finley is that of Sicamac, the name of a 
horse prized very highly by him. 

William Smith settled in Daviess County, Missouri, prior to 1838, 
and was in the Mormon difficulties at Far West. He located in Howard 
Township in 1844, and afterwards moved to Worth County, where he 
died. He was a native of Tennessee. 

James and Nathaniel Blakely came from Tennessee to Daviess 
County, Missouri, in 1844. These men were exceedingly fond of frontier 
life, spending the greater portion of their time in hunting game, wild 
honey, and in fishing. Jesse Blakely, another brother, who came in 
1845, was killed in New Mexico. 

Old man Blakely and his wife were also early settlers of Gentry 
County. They were taken sick on the same day, and died about the 
same time, and were buried in the same coffin. 

Charles Roe came in 1840, remained two or three years, and went 
to Iowa. 

Edward Nance arrived in 1842, and was about the first blacksmith 
to ply his trade in Howard Township. 

John Handy, a native of Kentucky, but from Illinois to Gentry 
County, pitched his tent near Muddy Creek, on the 16th section. He 
afterwards moved to Athens Township, and upon the organization of 
the county, moved to the town of Athens, now Albany, and kept the 
first tavern that was ever opened to the public in the town. 

John Plaster came from Indiana at an early day, lived in Miller and 
Athens, and moved to Howard Township about 1850. He filled various 
offices in the county, among which was that of surveyor, assessor and 
justice of the peace. 

Madison Marrs, formerly from Virginia, but came from Illinois to 
this county, in 1840, and located on Panther Creek. This creek takes 
its name from the fact of a panther being killed upon its banks by some 
hunters who were passing through the country several years before the 
permanent settlement of Gentry County. 

Elijah Vincent, John and Samuel Carter, together with big and 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 249 

little John and Richard Glendenning, came to the township in the fall of 
1841, and settled on the south bank of Panther Creek, three-quarters of 
a mile north of the line of Athens Township. From these two families 
and their relations sprang the M. E. Church of Gentry County. They 
were great friends of Methodism, being prominent and active members 
of that church, their homes being headquarters for the entertainment of 
the ministers of that church. 

The first camp meeting that was held in Gentry County was on the 
farm of the Carters, above named, which took place about the year 1842 
or 1843. It began on Thursday and continued over Sunday. There were 
about 200 persons in attendance, coming from Daviess, DeKalb, Noda- 
way, Gentry and other counties, and they came generally in ox wagons 
and were well supplied with provisions, which they cooked and ate upon 
the ground. Among the ministers officiating upon that occasion were 
Isaac Bums and Noah Richardson, both of whom were devoted and earn- 
est servants of God. It was an occasion characterized by a manifesta- 
tion of genuine Christian piety. 

Sampson Caster settled near the Rosses in an early day, where he 
continued to reside until his death, which occurred in the winter of 
1881. He was from Pennsylvania. Iri Hewlett came from Ohio about 
1846. 

Lace Carter, was also among the early pioneers to Howard Town- 
ship. He was said to have excelled as a bee hunter; he was also fond of 
hunting and trapping wild game. After remaining here a few years, he 
left for Iowa, where he continued to live until his death, which occurred 
many years ago ; being inseparably connected with his two most faithful 
companions — his gun and his dog. 

John C. Williams, Thomas Williams, Evan D. Williams, William H. 
Williams and James Williams were also among the early settlers of 
the township. 

George W. Needels came from Ohio prior to 1845, and located in 
this township. He was one of the county judges of Gentry County in 
1864 and '66. He was a farmer and also the proprietor of the American 
Freeman, an anti-monoply, anti-secret-society weekly newspaper. 

David Gulp and Thomas Cook, William Stevenson and George 
Smith were also early settlers. 

Hugh Ross was, perhaps, the pioneer school teacher of the town- 
ship. Peter Wilson emigrated from Old Virginia, near Richmond, and 
located south of Muddy Creek, in the north part of the township, on the 
Rhudy farm. He was an active member of the M. E. Church, South. 



250 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Giles and Henry Parman emigrated from Tennessee and settled in 
Howard Township quite early. Henry Parman went to California 
shortly after the gold excitement of 1850, where he died. 

John Hunger, who was also from Tennessee, came in 1842, and was 
the first blacksmith in Howard Township. A man by the name of Hixon 
and his brother-in-law, Saylee, came to the township prior to 1850 
Hixon afterwards killed Saylee, which was one of the earliest murders 
in Gentry County. Charles McNeece came from Clay County, Missouri, 
formerly from Tennessee, settled east of a town known as Elenora. 

Solomon Yates, Abram Yates, Henry Sourds, Aaron Allen and Sam- 
uel Colvin, were also early settlers of the township. 

About 1841, a family named Robinson, consisting of two or three 
brothers and as many sisters, came from Clay County, Missouria, and 
located near Muddy Creek, or in the forks of Muddy Creek. Potter Har- 
rington, from Clay County, who resided near the Robinsons, went to 
visit them one afternoon, remaining till dark before attempting to return 
home. In the meantime a heavy shower of rain had fallen, and the 
creek had risen rapidly. Harrington mounted his horse, being some- 
what intoxicated, it is said, and started for home. He rode into the 
creek; his horse came out upon the opposite shore, riderless. Harring- 
ton was drowned ; his body, however, was never afterwards indentified. 
Some boys who w^ere fishing in the creek the following spring discovered 
the bones of a human skeleton ; this skeleton was supposed to be the 
remains of Potter Harrington. The bones were collected and carefully 
interred on the banks of the stream, near the place where they were 
found. Harrington drowning at night, or being last seen at night, 
when he left Robinson's cabin — the Robinsons being a rough, drinking 
indecent, and immoral people, were arrested, charged with the murder 
of Harrington, and taken before 'Squire Tip Brown, of Gentryville, but 
for want of sufficient testimony, authorizing the justice to hold them for 
trial till the succeeding term of the circuit court, they were discharged. 

As early, perhaps, as 1855, a brick church edifice was erected by 
George W. Needels and others near the former's residence and called 
Needel's Church. The denomination known as the Methodist Episcopal 
worshipped there for many years. Among the early members of this 
church were George W. Needels, Sr., and wife, George W. Needels, Jr., 
and wife, Thomas Needels and wife and Barrett Needels, who was a 
preacher. The old brick church was taken down, and near it was 
erected a frame building. 

The Cumberland Presbyterians built a house of worship on John 
Wayman's land. It was built prior to 1860. Wayman and family, 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 251 

Archibald Ross, James Castor and wife, Mayhew Harris and wife, Rob- 
ert Reddy and wife, and Wiley and wife were among the organiz- 
ing members. Rev. John Wayman was the first pastor. The building is 
still standing. The Christian M. E. Church and M. E. Church, South, not 
having any houses of worship of their own, hold services either in other 
houses or in the different township school houses. 

Jackson Township. — The boundaries of Jackson Township are : 
Beginning at the northeast corner of section 24, township 62, range 
32, thence west eight and a half miles; thence south nine miles; thence 
east eight and a half miles ; thence north nine miles to place of beginning. 
There are 76.5 square miles in the township. 

Among the early settlers of Jackson Township were J.J. Taylor 
and his brother, G. P. Taylor, from Scott County, Illinois; the latter came 
in 1855 and the former in 1856, and located about three miles northeast 
of King City. Ithra Todd settled four miles east of town, prior to 1856. 

William Ring, Allison, Elijah Hull and Manlove Cranor were all 

residents of the township at an early day. 

Porter Hardin, Rufus Brown, Love Millen, John G. Millen, Oscar 
Griswold, Samuel Millen, Harvey White and Thomas Payne were all in 
the township prior to 1860, and located near the present site of King 
City. 

William Currel, from the southern part of Missouri, came alsa prior 
to 1855, but left soon after. Levi Wood located west of the town, was 
from Boone County, Missouri, but afterwards removed to Worth County. 

R. M. Brown came with his father. E. K. Wood, settled about four 
miles northwest. Andrew Tomlinson came at a later date from Indiana. 

David Cranor, William and Moses Cranor were among the early 
settlers. 

Tiney Helton, from Kentucky, settled in the northwest corner of 
the township in 1840. He was a man of decided characteristics, and was 
exceedingly fond of frontier life. He spent much of his time in the 
woods and on the banks of the neighboring streams in search of bees, 
honey and wild game. His cabin stood near Wild Cat Branch, where 
he lived a number of years, finally going to Arkansas and locating 
among the Ozark Mountains. It is said by those who know him, that 
wild cats and coons were among his favorite meats. His cabin was 
without a floor, other than the ground. His pigs and lambs were raised 
in the cabin, where they shared with his family about the same fare. 

Harrison Ballard, Israel Cook, Edwin Winchester, Daniel Raridan, 
Thomas Stegall, Adam Combs, Lewis Russell, Coleman Fugate and Will- 
iam Cogdill, all came before 1845. 



252 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Huggins Township. — Huggins Township is bounded as follows: 
Beginning at the West Fork of Grand River, where the same crosses 
the south line of section 32, township 64, range 32 ; thence down said 
river to the southwest corner of section 36, township 63, range 32; 
thence following the meanderings of said river to where the same inter- 
sects the Middle Fork of Grand River; thence up the Middle Fork to 
the north line of section 21, township 63, range 31; thence east to the 
East Fork of Grand River; thence up said river to the south line of sec- 
tion 35, township 64, range 31 ; thence west to the place of beginning. 
Containing 37 square miles. 

The pioneers who first settled Huggins Township, or that territory 
now known as Huggins Township (it being once a part of Athens Town- 
ship) located near, or in the timber on the banks of the streams. Grand 
River, eighty five years ago contained a much larger volume of water than 
it does now. Its native timber belts were larger, darker, and more 
dense, abounding in a variety of game, and its waters teemed with fish, 
all of which constituted incentives that were not easily resisted by the 
old settler. 

One of the first to locate in this township was Samuel Collins, who 
came from Indiana about the year 1842, and settled on the southwest 
side of the township, near the West Fork of Grand River. He was one 
of the three county judges, the first that the county had in 1845, his 
associates being Michael Moltsberger and William Steele. They were 
commissioned as judges by the governor of the state. Prior to the Kan- 
sas and Nebraska troubles. Judge Collins moved to Buchanan County 
and built a brick residence within a few miles of St. Joseph. He finally 
about the time of the breaking out of the civil war moved to Kansas. 
He is said to have been a rough, overbearing man, and constantly at war 
with his neighbors. He was killed in a difficulty in Kansas. 

Frank Alexander came from Ohio prior to 1884, and settled near 
the West Fork of Grand River. He built the first stream saw and grist 
mill erected in Huggins Township. 

Peter Vesser came from Tennessee in a very early day, as did John 
and George Brown, and settled in the Forks of Grand River; they were 
Indian traders, and possessed but little refinement, either in dress or 
manners. John Brown died here and George moved to Texas. 

Lemuel Lyle came from Kentucky prior to 1844, and located 
between the East and Middle Forks of Grand River. 

Strother Ball came from Clay County, Missouri, to Gentry County, 
and located near the Middle Fork of Grand River, in 1844. He was a 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 253 

native of Kentucky ; went to Texas where he died. He was a minister 
of the Hard Shell Baptist denomination. 

Wright Stephens from Kentucky, settled near the forks of Grand 
River. He erected a saw mill in Worth County, in which he lost one of 
his arms. He went to Texas before the war. 

Hiram Warner, from Kentucky, came in 1845, and located in the 
forks of Grand River. Mr. Warner was a minister of the Christian 
church and lived and died an exemplary Christian life. 

William J. Canaday, Sr., originally from Kentucky, but came from 
Illinois to Gentry County, in 1845 and located between the forks of the 
river. 

Lewis David, from South Missouri, came in 1845, and settled on 
Caleb S. Canaday's farm, where he died. 

Thomas and Calvin David, who were also from South Missouri, set- 
tled on the Middle Fork of Grand River. 

George O. Carlock came in 1842, from Tennessee, and settled west 
of the Middle Fork of Grand River. He died in 1881, at the age of 83 
years. His son, Henry Carlock, who settled with his father, at the same 
date, was a soldier in the Union army and died at Jefferson City, in 1862. 

In 1842, Uriah Wells came from Indiana and settled west of the 
Middle Fork of Grand River. He afterwards went to Iowa, where he 
died. 

Jonathan Bogue was also an early settler, from Indiana, settled 
west of the East Fork of Grand River. 

William Cox, from South Missouri, came in 1845, and settled west 
of the Middle Fork of Grand River. He went to Oregon before the Civil 
War. 

Meredith Shockley was also from South Missouri, and settled west 
of the Middle Fork, where he died. He was a Methodist preacher. 

John Huggins, after whom the township received its name, came 
from Ohio, about the year 1845, and settled west of the Middle Fork, at 
Hugginsville, which also took its name from John Huggins, where was 
afterwards established a post office. In 1868 and '70 he was one of the 
county judges of Gentry County. John Armstrong, son-in-law of Hug- 
gins, located about the same time near Hugginsville. 

William and Elisha Poole came from Ohio, at an early day. 

Elisha and Isaac Enochs, from Ohio, located also near Hugginsville. 

Frederick Watson, a native of Scotland, but from Ohio to Gentry 
County, was one of the earliest settlers, locating west of the Middle 
Fork of Grand River. 



254 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

James Hall, from one of the Eastern States, settled near Grand 
River, where he died. 

James McGuire came from Kentucky in 1842 or 1843, with his 
father, both settling on the West Fork of Grand River. His father went 
to Oregon. 

In 1845 William Rhoades came from Clay County, Missouri, and set- 
tled on the Middle Fork of Grand River, in the bottom. 

Andy Mackey located between the Middle and East Forks. 

Valentine Waltrip settled here at an early day. 

Among the earliest settlers was Solomon Graybill, from South Mis- 
souri. 

Morris B. Huggins, John Armstrong, Francis H. Alexander, Corne- 
lius Enochs, David Buckridge, James F. Hall, Samuel Gunter and Wilson 
T. Canaday, were all among the earliest settlers of Huggins Township. 

A church was built in Huggins Township as early at 1848. It was 
a brick edifice, and the land was donated by William J. Canaday, as was 
also the cemetery, which is one of the oldest in the county, and is the last 
resting place of many of the old pioneers and their wives. The first min- 
ister to officiate within its walls was Hiram Warner, who continued to 
fill its pulpit for nineteen consecutive years. As above stated, he was 
from Kentucky, and an Elder in the Christian Church. Among the 
persons organizing this church were William J. Canaday and wife, 
George Brown and wife, Uriah Wells and wife, Henry Carlock and wife, 

George O. Carlock and wife, Edwin Miller and wife, and Constance 

and wife. Jasper H. Coffey succeeded Warner. Rev. Ripley and wife, 
each of whom proclaimed the glad tidings of salvation, also labored 
irregularly for some years in this church. Barton W. Wadkins is the 
minister in charge at the present time. The brick church (Christian) 
was wrecked by storm in 1883. A frame building soon took its place 
and the work of this church has been continued. 

The Capel, located at Hugginsville, was erected about 1854, by the 
M. E. Church society. Meredith Shockley and Herald Johnson were 
among its earliest ministers. John Huggins and wife, William Poole 
and wife, Robert Morris and wife, John Ross, Sr., Mrs. John Armstrong, 
and others, assisted at its organization. 

Miller Township. — Miller Township is bounded as follows:! Begin- 
ning at the northeast corner of section 24, township 62, range 30 ; thence 
west 12 miles; thence south nine miles; thence east 12 miles; thence 
north nine miles to place of beginning, containing 108 square miles. 

Miller Township was the first settled in the county, that is to say, 
the first emigrants coming to the county located in Miller Township, and 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 255 

near what are now known as Greenwell Ford and Gentryville. It is the 
southeast township of the county, the line of Daviess County forming its 
eastern boundary. Daviess County was organized in 1836. Settlements, 
however, had been made in that county several years prior to that date. 
Because of its contiguity to Daviess County, which had been settled from 
twelve to fifteen years, Miller Township received the first emigration 
coming westward. The Grand River, with its affluents, affording ample 
water-power for mill sites, and the abundant supply of timber which 
fringed these streams, as well as the fertility of the soil, constituted at- 
tractions such as were sought after by the pioneers, coming from the well 
watered and well timbered districts of the Eastern and Southern States. 
In 1832 Isaac Miller and his brother, Tobias, came from Garrett 
County, Kentucky, to Clay County, where they remained for two years. 
During the fall of that year and the succeeding fall, 1832-33, he came 
to Gentry County in company with a number of young men in search of 
game and wild honey. His immediate companions in the fall of 1833 
were his brother, Moses Miller, David Henderson, Lewis Arnold and 
William Arnold, all from Kentucky. There were three wagons in the 
company, containing from three to five men each, besides the wagon 
under the control of Mr. Miller and his party. They crossed Grand River 
near what was afterwards known as Patton's Ford, and after remaining 
in the vicinity of what is now Gentryville and Greenwell Ford for sev- 
eral weeks, they returned to Clay County, taking with them an abun- 
dance of honey. Having, during his sojourn in Clay County, made the 
acquaintance of William Martin and John Roberts, both of whom were 
from Tennessee, they concluded to come together to Gentry County, and 
accordingly in the winter of 1834, in February, they arrived at Green- 
well Ford. They built a cabin on the north side of the river, about forty 
steps from the bank, north of the ford. At that time the locality had not 
been named, nor had a ford or crossing place been established. When 
Mr. Miller and his companions reached the end of their journey they 
found a large band of Fox and Sac Indians, who had been camping there 
that winter. They soon erected their cabin and prepared to raise a small 
crop of corn in the spring of 1834, putting in fifteen acres. At that time 
there were no mills or trading posts nearer than Clay County, where they 
were compelled to go for their supplies, at long intervals, a distance of 
about seventy miles. After spending the winter and summer in their 
cabin, Martin, Roberts and Tobias Miller, each took a claim. Martin 
located three-fourths of a mile east of the ford, on what was not inaptly 
called then "Poverty Point," from the fact that the location was poor, 
sandy and barren. Here Martin died many years ago. 



256 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

John Roberts, of whom we have spoken in the history of Albany, 
lived a short time near Greenwell Ford, and then moved on to the town 
site of Albany, from which place he went to Illinois. 

Tobias Miller, settled southeast of the ford, on the east side of the 
river. After two or three years he removed to Daviess County, Mo., and 
died there, about the year 1857. Isaac Miller then became and continued 
the solitary occupant of the old cabin near the ford, until he located on 
the northwest quarter of section 23, township 62, range 31, two miles 
south of Greenwell Ford, where he lived until 1881, when he sold to his 
son. While living at Greenwell Ford, Mr. Miller observed a large bald- 
headed eagle, which had built her nest in a dead sycamore tree near his 
cabin. The top of the tree had been broken off by the wind, leaving 
about 70 feet of the trunk standing. Upon this stump the proud bird had 
built her nest, where for two or three succeeding summers she raised 
her brood. 

This region of country was the hunter's paradise, and it was annu- 
ally visited for several years after its settlement by the whites, by the 
Indians of the Platte Purchase, who always returned to their homes with 
a winters' supply of elk and deer. 

In the fall of 1835, Mr. Miller, while standing upon the brow of an 
upland prairie, saw on the plains below 127 deer in a single herd. Such 
were visions which not unfrequently delighted the eyes and gladdened 
the hearts of the brave pionrees who pitched their tents upon the banks 
of the Grand River. 

In 1835, the year following the first settlements made in the county, 
emigration began to come quite rapidly. During that year, among those 
who settled in Miller Township were John Gulp, from Tennessee; Mil- 
ton Foster, from Kentucky ; a German by the name of Taughlemyer, who 
afterwards removed to Platte County; Benjamin Gulp, from Tennessee; 
Elisha Cameron, from Tennessee, and a number of others, principally 
from Kentucky and Tennessee, all locating within a few miles of Gentry- 
ville. 

Nancy J. Miller, daughter of Isaac Miller, was the first white child 
born in the county, the date of her birth being October, 1839. When 
grown to womanhood she married W. P. Garten. 

Among the earliest settlers of this township was Judge Jacob Jones, 
who came from Muskingum County, Ohio, in 1839, arriving here on the 
1st day of February, of that year. He came by land, through the newly 
settled states of Indiana and Illinois, crossing the Mississippi River at 
Quincy. He purchased from John McCully, his claim, located five miles 
east of Gentryville and one mile from the Daviess County line, subject 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 257 

to a survey. McCully was a Kentuckian and had lived on his claim about 
two years, and then moved to Daviess County, Mo. Judge Jones contin- 
ued to reside upon this farm, where he made substantial improvements, 
until 1865, when he located at Albany, the county seat. He was one of 
the prominent citizens of the county and was one of the county judges 
in 1862 and in 1866. 

Jesse Green, from Kentucky, located near the center of the town- 
ship, prior to 1839. Shortly after the discovery of gold in California, he, 
in company with a number of others from Gentry County, went to that 
state, where he afterwards died. 

Clayton T. Robinson, also a Kentuckian, located in the northwest 
part of the township prior to 1839. Charles Gay, from Ohio, came to the 
county prior to 1839 and settled at or near Gentryville, and was one of 
the men who built at Gentryville in 1840 the first water mill that was 
ever erected in the county, the place being called at that time Gay's 
Mill. This primitive structure was built of logs, about 24 feet square, and 
was operated with one pair of stones and had an upright saw. These 
stones were made in the county by Joshua Potter out of what is called 
"Nigger Head," or lost rock. This mill was washed away by the freshet 
of 1844, and was rebuilt in 1844 and 1845, constructed in the second in- 
stance of logs, but had two runs of stones. It was washed away in 1851, 
and again rebuilt. 

John T. Hunter, a son-in-law of Charles Gay above named, came 
with Gay from Ohio, settling also at or near Gentryville, and became the 
partner of Gay in the erection of the water mill above mentioned. In 
1851 the mill was sold to J. C. and T. J. Patton and rebuilt in 1853-4. 
John Graham & Brother bought it in 1863, and was washed away again 
in 1865. Mr. Hunter afterwards became a citizen of eastern Oregon. 
Aristippus Brown, from Kentucky, located near Gentryville, prior to 
1839, and finally went to California. 

Taylor McCully, from Kentucky, settled about four miles east of 
Gentryville, about the year 1836. He erected the first horse mill worked 
by lever power in the county, as early as 1837 or '38, at or near the 
place of his residence. It was afterwards operated by Levi Baldock. 
The facilities for obtaining breadstuffs then were very meagre and in- 
complete. An entire day was doubtless consumed by mills similar to this 
in grinding form two to five bushels of corn, and it is said that Levi Bal- 
dock, the last proprietor of this mill, possessed an old hound that some- 
times lapped up the meal as rapidly as the mill ground it, and in the in- 
tervals looked up towards the hopper and barked for more. The origi- 
nal settlers of the county generally grated their meal at home, which 



258 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

made very excellent bread, especially when eaten hot, with native honey, 
of which at that time, the forests along the streams abounded. 

George and Wm. Weese located west of Gentryville prior to 1839. 
Charles Roberson, from Kentucky, settled north of Gentryville in 1839. 

John Patton, of Kentucky, settled in the northeast corner of the 
township prior to 1839. Being smitten with the gold fever, which pre- 
vailed so universally in this country in 1849, he went to California. Upon 
his homeward voyage from California, where he had remained a short 
time, he died on board of a ship, in the Gulf of Mexico. Byron Linville 
and James M. Howell, from Tennessee, were also early settlers in this 
township. William McNatt and Paschal O. Roberson, from Kentucky, 
the former locating east of Gentryville two miles and the latter north of 
Gentryville, were also among the prioneers. Charles Pryor and William 
Newby settled south of Gentryville. John D. Burton, from Kentucky, lo- 
cated on the Taylor McCully farm, at an early day. Caleb Sampson set- 
tled one mile southeast of Judge Jones, prior to 1836. 

James C. Patton was born in Augusta County, Va., July 24, 1787. 
In 1809 he emigrated from Virginia to Knox County, Tennessee, where 
he continued to reside till March, 1819. He then moved to Monroe 
County, Tennessee, where he lived till the spring of 1841, when he came 
to Daviess County, Missouri, where he lived till Sept. 14, 1841, when he 
came to Gentry County, Missouri, settling in Miller Township, not far 
from Gentryville. He died in 1862, at Albany. 

In 1840, E. W. Dunegan, a native of Kentucky, but from Montgom- 
ery County, Indiana, to Missouri, located in Miller Township. In June. 
1841, Mr. Dunegan commenced a three months' school two miles above 
Gentryville, on the east side of Grand River. A few days before his 
school opened, the neighbors of the vicinity, living in a radius of per- 
haps ten miles, met and erected the school house, which was a log build- 
ing, 16 feet square, a portion of one of the logs being taken out for a 
window. There were enrolled 22 pupils in this the pioneer school of Gen- 
try County, the names of 20 of whom are here given: A. J. Ward, A. 
Ward, Joseph Ward, Daniel Gay, J. S. Ward. James W. Crawford, G. 
W. Crawford, William Osborn, William Ward, Miriam Foster, Susan 
Foster, Margaret Foster, Nancy Ready, Ellen Ready, Louisa Smith, Ju- 
dith Smith, Barbara Smith, Loretta Warren, Sarah Osborn, Sarah A. 
Ward. 

Wilson Township. — Wilson Township is bounded as follows: Be- 
ginning at the northwest corner of the northeast quarter of section 3, town- 
ship 64, range 33 ; thence east six and a half miles ; thence south six miles ; 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 259 

thence west six and a half miles; thence north to the place of beginning; 
39 square miles, 25,000 acres. 

One of the first pioneers to pitch his tent within the limits of what 
is now known as Wilson Township, was Abraham Enyart, He came from 
Clinton County, Mo., where he had gone from Kentucky, before Clinton 
County was organized, about the year 1831. He was an elder in the 
Christian Church, and a physician. As early as 1837 or 1838, he made 
visits to Gentry County, where at regular intervals he conducted religi- 
ous services. Finally, in 1840, he settled in the northern part of Wilson 
Township, about four miles north of Alanthus. He was instrumental in 
securing the first post office in the township, and named it Alanthus. 

In 1842 or 1843, John Bryson from Tennessee, located in the north- 
east corner of the township. He has filled the position of justice of the 
peace for a number of years. 

Samuel and Captain Bryson were also among the early settlers to 
this portion of the county. 

Thomas Stanley was also one of the pioneers, settling in the north- 
east part of the township. He left the county many years ago. 

Squire Chapman located near Alanthus. 

Lemuel Wadkins, who was also an elder of the Christian Church, 
was among the early settlers. 

Two or three families of Wrights, Levi and Riley Osborn, George 
Smith and one of the Granthams, all came at an early day, as did Lean- 
der and Jesse Coffey from Indiana. Jesse Coffey was a physician, resid- 
ing at Alanthus. 

William Richardson settled south of Alanthus. 

Enoch Liggett, was also an early settler. In 1856, in 1862 and 1864, 
he was one of the judges of the county court. 



CHAPTER IX. 



CITIES AND TOWNS. 



ALBANY— AT FIRST CALLED ATHENS— LOCATION— FIRST HOUSE— FIRST BUSINESS 
AND PROFESSIONAL MEN— TOWN INCORPORATED— FIRST SCHOOLS AND OTHER 
INSTITUTIONS— NEWSPAPERS— CHRISTIAN CHURCH— PRESBYTERIAN— METHO- 
DIST EPISCOPAL— BAPTIST— LIBRARY. 

Albany. — Albany, the county seat of Gentry County, was laid out 
in May, 1845, by Elisha Cameron, the commissioner of the county seat. 
It was first known as the town of Athens. The following is his report of 
the same: 

"Now comes Elisha Cameron, commissioner of the seat of justice of 
Gentry County, and State of Missouri, and submits a report to this court, 
which is ordered to be recorded as follows, to wit: By order of the 
county court, met on the 8th day of May, A. D. 1845, at the town of 
Athens, the seat of justice of the county of Gentry, and proceeded to lay 
off a portion of the tract of land known as the southeast quarter of sec- 
tion number twenty-four (24), in township number sixty-three (63) of 
range number thirty-one (31), west of the fifth principal meridian, into 
a square, lots, avenues, streets, lanes and alleys. Commencing in the 
northeast corner of the above mentioned tract of land, at the half mile 
stake, on the range line dividing ranges 30 and 31 ; thence running south 
173 feet; thence west 12 feet, which constitutes the northeast corner of 
block number one (1), and lot number one (1) ; thence running west 
198 feet to the beginning, constituting one block, containing lots num- 
ber (1), two (2), three (3), four (4), five (5) and six (6), each lot 66 
feet in front and 93 feet back, making an alley of 12 feet, running east 
and west through said block ; thence commencing at the southeast cor- 
ner of block number one: thence running south 66 feet and cornering, 
composing Clay Street, running east and west; thence proceeded to lay 
off 15 blocks, each block containing six lots and a 12-foot alley. Blocks, 
lots, alleys and square, each of the size of the above mentioned block, 
lots, streets, alleys and square, making 90 lots, six streets, three of which 



History of daviess and gentry counties 261 

running east and west and three north and south, each 60 feet wide." 

As will be seen, the town of Athens was laid out during the month 
of May, 1845, by Elisha Cameron, commissioner of the county seat, and 
the first sale of town lots was made on the 16th of June thereafter. 

The town is handsomely located, about five miles northeast of the 
geographical center of the county, in the midst of a beautiful and fertile 
country. The original town site is a broad elevation, gently sloping to- 
wards the south and southwest, and commands a fine view of the coun- 
try, stretching out in the latter direction. The northern part of the town 
is upon ground still more elevated, from which the observer may see in 
the distance the green fields and attractive homes of the farmer, and 
still beyond, the dark timber belts which skirt the higher grounds to- 
wards the east, and fringe the affluents of Grand River to the south and 
westward. 

Albany has a population of 2016 according to the census of 1920. 

The original proprietor of the quarter section of land, upon which 
Athens was located, was John Roberts, a native of one of the Southern 
States. When he located here, is not definitely known. Judge Kingsbo- 
rough came in 1838, and says that the cabin which Roberts had built on 
the town site, looked as if it had been standing several years. This cabin 
was located southeast of the jail, where the Central Hotel now stands, 
and was constructed of white oak logs. Roberts sold his interest in the 
land to William Dailey, from Ohio, about the year 1842. Dailey died in 
Montgomery County, Illinois, in 1852, where he had moved in 1846, hav- 
ing exchanged 200 acres of land, north of Athens, for land in Illinois, 
with Robert C. Canaday. Dailey quit-claimed his interest in the land, 
where the town was located, in August, 1845, and Elisha Cameron pur- 
chased the same at the land office, at Plattsburg, Mo., for the sum of 
$200 in the name of the county. 

The first house erected in the town, after the location of the county 
seat, was that of Elijah P. Howell. It was a log house, with shed at- 
tached, and stood near the Central Hotel. Howell built this for a busi- 
ness house, and sold goods and general merchandise, being the first mer- 
chant who sold goods in Athens. Howell came from Clinton County to 
this place. He was one of the pioneer merchants of Plattsburg, having 
sold goods there as early as 1833 and 1834, or soon after the location of 
the town. He was the first county and circuit court clerk, and went to 
California in 1849, where he died. He was a great hunter, and killed 30 
deer near the town, in the winter of 1848. 

John Handy, came from Montgomery County, Illinois, locating first 
in Howard Township, and built the next house in the new town of 



262 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Athens, which he used as a hotel, or as it was called in those days — 
tavern. Joseph Cole, from Virginia, was the first saddler. 

John Patton had the honor of keeping the first saloon in Athens, 
and built a log house, wherein to vend whisky, hickory nuts and soft 
soap. 

John B. Hundley built the next house. He afterwards built a brick 
store on the same lot. Mr. Hundley came from Green County, Tennes- 
see, in 1845, and located near Evona. 

The first blacksmith in the town was John W. Shockley, from Gas- 
conade County, Missouri. John T. and Lewis Rowe were also among the 
earliest blacksmiths. William Armstrong and William Cook, from Ill- 
inois, also put up a blacksmith and repair shop on the west side of the 
public square. 

The next hotel was erected by John Thompson. 

The first shoemaker was James Shelby, George B. Clover, from In- 
diana, coming next in 1853. Joseph Kingsborough, from Ohio, was the 
pioneer shoemaker of Athens Township and probably the first shoe- 
maker in Gentry County, as he came as early as 1838. Kingsborough 
made the boots worn by Dr. Williams to the legislature in 1846. 

Walter Savage was among the first carpenters. He came from Clay 
County in 1846, and built a house south of the Gentry County Bank. 

Robert C. Canaday, erected the first frame house in 1846, in the 
north part t)f town. The sills, studding, rafters and sleepers were hewed. 
The boards (four feet boards) were cut and split from a white oak tree, 
and shaved, and with these a house, 20x24 feet was made, containing 
two rooms below and one above. It was considered the most magnificent 
structure of that day in all this region of country. It was taken down in 
1880. 

The first brick building was erected by C. B. Hartwell, who came 
from Montgomery County, Illinois, in 1847. It stood about half a block 
north of the Evans House. Hartwell was a builder and contractor, and 
built this for a business house, two stories high. The upper story was oc- 
cupied by the Masonic order, the first organized in the town. The first 
floor was a store room. Here a man named Lehman sold goods, as did 
Isadore and Francis B. Robidoux, one of whom was a brother and the 
other a nephew of Joseph Robidoux, the founder of St. Joseph, Mo. 
Hartwell went to Lincoln, Neb. 

P. K. Price was the first saddler in the town, and built a brick house 
(which was probably the second brick) south of the public square. Price 
went to Texas. 

John B. Hundley and Alexander Patton built and operated the first 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 263 

steam mill (grist and saw) in the town. This mill had two pairs of burrs. 
The mill was afterwards moved to Island Branch. 

Dr. J. W. Stapleton came from Daviess County, Missouri, formerly 
from Virginia, in 1847, and opened a tan yard, about four blocks west of 
the public square. !He sold his tannery to Samuel Fry, from Ohio, and 
Fry sold to Joseph Davidson, from Virginia. 

The first physician to practice his profession in the town was Dr. 
William G. Williams. The doctor was the second physician in the county 
— Dr. Hood, of Miller Township, being the first. Dr. Williams came to 
Gentry County in January, 1845, and settled a half-mile north of Al- 
bany. He was a native of Taswell County, Virginia, whence he moved 
in October, 1843, sojourning a short time in Harrison and Grundy Coun- 
ties, Missouri, and arriving here, as stated, in 1845. At the time of his 
locating there was much malaria, the field of his practice reaching to 
Gentryville on the south and to the Iowa line on the north. Shortly 
after his arrival he was absent from his home two days and nights, pro- 
fessionally engaged, and during this time he treated 40 patients, all of 
whom were suffering with fever and ague. 

The next physician was Cyrus Hubbard, a graduate of the Univer- 
sity of Maine and a brother of Governor Hubbard, of that State. He lo- 
cated at Sandsville. The doctor was not only a thorough physician, but 
a man of fine classical and literary attainments, and notwithstanding 
his many eccentricities, he is said to have been eminently successful. 

The first attorney was Colonel E. H. Wood, who was appointed one 
of the commissioners from Daviess County, formerly from Bucyrus, Ohio, 
to locate the county seat of Gentry. He soon after moved to Albany, and 
engaged in the practice of law. He died in 1847, being the first person 
who died in the town. 

The next attorney was Moses H. Simonds, from Plattsburg, Clinton 
County, to Athens, and formerly from Ohio. Simonds was a graduate of 
Ohio University, and a man of excellent scholarship. He taught school 
and studied law at Plattsburg. He finally raised a company of volun- 
teers, for the Mexican War, and died on the way to Mexico. 

Judge George W. Lewis arrived in Gentry County in October, 1846, 
and was the third attorney to practice his profession in Albany, and the 
third attorney in the county. The judge came from Greenbriar County, 
West Virginia. 

Robert Evans, from Kentucky, was the first man in Albany who died 
a violent death. He was shot with a horse pistol, in the hands of Benja- 
min Allen, in the street. Both men were drinking. Evans had drawn his 
knife, when he was shot by Allen, who was arrested and confined in the 



264 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

jail in Andrew County, whence he succeeded in making his escape be- 
fore his trial. 

James Lainhart, from Adair County, Kentucky, came in 1850. 

Merrill, a Baptist preacher, was among the early settlers. 

The parties above mentioned constitute some of the earliest pion- 
eers, among the business and professional men of Albany. 

There was a post office in Clark County, Missouri, called Athens, 
and this being also the name of the county seat of Gentry County, the 
mail intended for Athens, Gentry County, was occasionally sent to 
Athens post office, Clark County. In order to obviate the difficulties 
which grew out of a similarity of names in these post offices, the name 
of Athens, Gentry County, was changed in 1857, by special act of the 
legislature, to Albany, which name the county seat has borne ever since. 

The town of Albany was incorporated on the 5th day of February, 
1851, by the county court, and again in 1857 by the legislature. The cor- 
porate limits of the town began at block number 70, running east to the 
east corner of the town quarter, and included 16 rods of John B. Hun- 
dley's land: thence north to the north line of R. C. Canaday's Addition; 
thence west to the line running north of the first mentioned boundary; 
thence south to the beginning. 

John Handy, Walter Savage, Calvin B. Hartwell, F. B. Robinson and 
John Thompson were appointed the first trustees of the town. 

The first private subscription school was taught in Albany by a 
man by the name of Boston, in the latter part of 1845. 

The second teacher was Judge George W. Lewis, who opened a 
school in 1846, just north of town, and afterwards taught in the town. 

The next teacher was Cyrus Hubbard, a physician and lawyer, from 
Clinton County, Missouri, in 1846, of whom we have already spoken. 

There were many other teachers after these, among whom were 
William M. Albin, Gordon Ruby, Mrs. M. J. Hardesty and others. 

The first school building, frame (common school) was erected in 
1858 or '59. 

The first grist and saw mill in Albany, was built by Redman Whit- 
ten and Alexander Patton, about the year 185 — . 

The first (exclusively) saw mill, was erected by Charles Gilbert in 
1854, which became also, afterward, a grist mill. 

John Graham and George W. Stapleton built a grist mill. 

Spainhouer, Twist & Co., built the next mill, (grist) near the de- 
pot. 

The first carding machine was put up by Martha Gulp ; and Calla- 
han Spessard operated the second, and Jacob Newman the third and last. 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 265 

Charles Gilbert, from Ohio, came in 1848, and erected a foundry 
and machine shop in 1867. His moulding room! is 18x66 feet; his main 
building, 24x52 feet, two stories high. 

Fred Watson began operating a foundry and machine shop in 1880. 

A broom factory was operated from 1867 to 1871, by G. C. and W. 
T. Lainhart. 

Charles G. Comstock, Esq., who came to Albany from New York, 
in 1859, was the pioneer banker of the town, and first operated a bank 
by himself, from January, 1870, to July, the same year, when was estab- 
lished the Exchange Bank of Comstock & Millen, Charles G. Comstock 
and M. L, Millen being the partners. This firm continued to do business 
until July 24, 1876, when it was succeeded by the Gentry County Bank, 
which was organized with a capital of $100,000. 

Bank of Albany was established on the 9th day of April, 1877, by 
27 stockholders, and reorganized June 1, 1878, with 25 stockholders. 

The first newspaper ever published in the town of Albany was 
called the Albany Courier, edited by J. H. Brakey, about the year 1857, 
who continued its publication until 1858, when he was succeeded by 
George C. Deming and J. C. De Haven, as De Haven & Deming. De 
Haven sold in 1860 to a Mr. Fuller, and Deming also sold to him in 1861, 
and he moved the ofRce and material to Dallas County, Iowa. The paper 
was neutral in politics. 

The second newspaper was the Grand River News, established in 
1864, by Comstock & Stewart, of which George C. Deming assumed edi- 
torial management. These parties, Comtsock & Stewart, sold to Deming 
& Matthewson the following year, Deming subsequently purchasing the 
interest of Matthewson. In the fall of 1868, Deming sold to Robert N. 
Traver, at present one of the editors of the St. Joseph Herald. He ran 
the News until March, 1873, when he sold to George W. Needels. The 
News was Republican in politics. 

When the paper was purchased by Mr. Needels, he changed its 
name to the American Freeman. 

Gentry County Beacon was established in 1874, by Williams & Aus- 
tin, in the spring of that year, being discontinued after the fall election. 
Democratic. White & Hampton began the publication of the Gentry 
County Chronicle in 1875, which continued to exist until about 1877. 
Republican. The Sun was established on the 10th of January, 1880, by 
J. M. Davis, and has continued under the same management up to the 
present time. It is independent in politics, is an eight column folio, and 
has a circulation of about eight hundred. 

J. W. Waldo and J. E. Mann began the publication of the Albany 



266 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Ledger in May, 1868, and disposed of the same in July following, to C. 
H. S. Goodman. The Ledger has been Democratic in politics from the 
date of its establishment. 

The Christian Church of Albany. — (Prepared by D. D. Kingsbor- 
ough. — The history of this church divides itself naturally into three dis- 
tinct periods: The period of pioneer work; the period of development; 
and the period of organized work. 

The period of pioneer work was marked by intense sectarian prej- 
udice and opposition. The pioneers who blazed the way for the future 
church were pecularly fitted for the duties imposed upon them by the 
existing conditions ; being well grounded in the Holy Scriptures, its pre- 
cepts and promises, its commands and doctrines; the duties it imposed 
and above all the Gospel plan of salvation from sin, and each one was 
ever ready to defend his position against every assault. 

The first evangelist in this community was Elias Shortridge, who 
held a meeting in August, 1859, at the old Thompson place a few miles 
south of town, on what is now the Evona road. He preached a new gos- 
pel, or rather the old gospel in a new way, and men and women heard 
this earnest preacher and his simple story of a reasonable and under- 
standable salvation, with gladness, and entered into the service of Christ 
with a new joy and purpose. Among the body of those believers were 
the Sampsons, the Gulps, the Smiths, the Spessards, the Thompsons, the 
Davidsons, the Hopkins, the Stephens, the Gotts, the Lainharts, and 
others. 

Preacher Shortridge was a man of considerable ability, judged by 
the standards of his day; thoroughly versed in the scriptures, he was 
able to quote from memory whole chapters and even books of the Holy 
Bible, and was proficient in the use of the sword of the spirit, besides 
possessing wonderful pursuasive power. He was able to sway his audi- 
ence with the simple gospel story, eloquently delivered and with his log- 
ical reasoning bring his hearers to quick decisions for Christ. A single 
incident of this meeting will suffice to illustrate the character of the 
man and his message. As already intimated, the religious complexion 
of the people of the community was not friendly to Shortridge or the 
message he brought, and many were violently opposed to him in doc- 
trine and belief. One of these, Joseph Davidson, was especially bitter in 
denunciation of the man, and at first flatly refused to hear him preach, 
but finally at the urgent request of his friend and neighbor, Calahan F. 
Spessard, he went to the meeting, though in no mood to hear what was 
said much less accept the teaching. The meetings were held in a grove 
on a gently sloping hill-side, the preacher being located at the lower side 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 267 

of the slope ; slabs supported on logs served as seats for the people, the 
people, the leafy boughs of the forest trees being the only roof. David- 
son took a seat on the very back row, fartherest from the speaker. After 
the preacher was fairly started on his sermon, Davidson was observed to 
move forward a bench or two and as his interest grew he moved forward 
seat after seat until at last, before the sermon was ended, he was sitting 
on the very first row of slabs, with wide-open mouth, gazing intently up 
into the face of the preacher, oblivious of all about him or how he came 
to that position. He never before heard the old, old story of Christ and 
his salvation so simply and forcefully told, and he was convinced on the 
spot. As soon as the invitation was given he immediately sprang to his 
feet, grabbed the preacher's hand in ecstacy of joy and gave himself over 
perfectly to the service of Christ. Following the Shortridge meetings 
evangelistic services were held by a preacher by the name of Cory and 
still later by Moses E. Lard, of revered memory, at the Thompson place. 
The period of developement was initiated by Hiram Warriner, who 
shepherded the flock for many years. He was also a man peculiarly 
fitted for the work he was called upon to perform ; a man of iron nerve, 
of considerable natural ability, though unlettered and unlearned ; he 
possessed a loveable and loving disposition and was devoted to the cause 
he espoused; an unselfish lover of the truth, he knew the Book perfectly 
and how to use it to the glory of God. He preached Christ, the Saviour 
of Men, as a business and farmed to pay expenses. Th6 period of de- 
velopment, without a meeting house, and in fact with no real church or- 
ganization, had its peculiarities of service. The brethren met more or 
less regularly, for prayer, exhortation and observance of the Lord's Sup- 
per, in groves, or in dwellings of the people and frequently in a large 
barn on the Chris Bartley farm. On these occasions as often as possible 
Warriner would come and preach to the people. Their communion was 
purely democratic, and deep piety characterized their every day life ; 
every disciple was a student of the word and knew His Book. Nothing 
but a "Thus sayeth the Lord" was accepted in any question of faith or 
doctrine. 

Hiram Warriner is entitled to credit in a large measure for the prog- 
ress of the church during this period ; his pious and godly walk and 
conversation stamped its imprint indelibly upon the lives and character 
of the people and moulded a generation of moral heroes, and we today 
are reaping the fruits of his labors. 

The period of organized work began about the year 1863, when, 
under the direction and leadership of Jasper H. Coffey, the first regular 
pastor, this church and congregation was formally organized, at the 



268 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Smith school house which was located a, few miles southeast of town, 
where they continued to worship some years. lAmong the charter mem- 
bers were Benjamin Sampson and George Hopkins, the first elders, and 
their wives, Kelse Gulp and wife, Jacob M. Stephens and wife, Calahan 
F, Spessard and wife, Lewis B. Sampson and wife, James Lainhart and 
wife, George Smith and wife, and a number of others. 

The records of this time are lost and we know but little of the strug- 
gles of the brethren during those troublous times of and immediately 
after the war, but the church continued its organization under the lead- 
ership of Brother Coffey and others. After a few years the place of 
meeting was moved to the old frame school house which stood on lot 3 
block 16, the present site of the Presbyterian church, in Albany. 

In May, 1869, the congregation purchased lot 6 block 21 (at the 
northwest corner of Jackson and Van Buren Streets), Albany, and 
erected thereon their first church building. That building was destroyed 
July 13, 1883, by a wind storm, which also wrecked the county court 
house and a number of other buildings. A new house was erected on the 
same site in 1884, and remained in use until 1915. The church was in- 
corporated under the laws of the State of Missouri, by decree of the cir- 
cuit court of Gentry County, Sept. 13, 1887, under the name of "The 
Christian Church of Albany, Mo." Its business affairs are in the care 
of a board composed of its elders and deacons, all of whom are chosen 
by the congregation. 

During the pastorate of George W. Maxwell, in June, 1914, the 
church purchased the north half of block 1, in the City of Albany, on 
which they erected a new, modern church edifice, and equipped it thor- 
oughly for the purpose of a modern church plant. The building, with- 
out furniture, cost about $15,000.00. The dedication services were held 
Sunday, March 28, 1915, under the direction of George L. Snively, dedi- 
cator. 

The church parsonage, a splendid two story frame building of ten 
rooms, located on North Hundley Street, one block north of the church 
building, was purchased Sept. 27, 1920, at a cost of $4,000.00. 

Presbyterian Church. — The First Presbyterian Church of Albany, 
Mo., was organized on May 30, 1857, by a committee composed of Rev. 
Ralph Harris and Rev. J. N. Young, ministers, and S. Edmiston, elder, 
with seven members namely: A. G. McConkey, Mary McConkey, Mar- 
garet Miller, Harriet Rannels, Caroline S. Rannels, Sarah M. Rannels 
and Mary J. Young and A. G. McConkey was elected elder. Additions 
to the membership up to the date of the reunion with the Cumberland 
Presbyterian Church were about 250, but deaths, removals and other 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 269 

causes depleted the body to less than 40 at the date of the reunion in 
June, 1905. 

Regular preaching services were conducted at intervals up to the 
last mentioned date at stated salaries, to-wit: Rev. John N. Young, C. 
M. McClain, N. H. Smith, Duncan McRuer, M. L. Anderson, John Hus- 
ton, W. A. Cravens, A. M. Tunner, T. M. Hillman, M. J. McLeod, J. C. 
Hanna, Arthur B. Herr, F. W. Grossman, C. C. Mclntire, Archibald B. 
Wright, E. H. Bull and others. Ruling Elders serving before the re-union 
were A. G. McConkey, J. H. White, J. W. Virden, James W. Owens, S. 
F. Lucas, Thomas J. Smith, J. C. Power, C. M. Harrison, C. M. Gordon, 
Robert A. Patterson and Robert M. McCammon. 

A plan of co-operation of the Presbyterian Church with the Cum- 
berland Presbyterian in Albany, Mo., was adopted in July, 1904, and a 
union of the churches was effected in June, 1905, in advance of the ac- 
tion of the General Assemblies, and Rev. M. B. Irvin accepted a call as 
pastor of the united church. July 11, 1907, following the resignation of 
all officers of both churches, the united church assembled as members of 
the Presbyterian Church, U. S. A., and in a congregational meeting 
elected the following officers, to-wit: For eldership, R. M. McCommon, 
John Newman, R. J. N, Dorsey, J. P. McCommon, and H. M. Wayman; 
for deacons, Ben L, Peery, and F. M. Millen, and for trustees, W. F. Dal- 
bey, John Newman, R. M. McCommon, and Ben L. Peery. 

The Cumberland Presbyterian Church was organized March 12, 
1884, by Rev. J. H. Tharp and others with 54 members and on March 22 
following, six elders were eletced, to-wit: C. O. Patton, M. Cunningham, 
R. J. N. Dorsey, D. P. Wayman, H. M. Wayman, and Wallace Hubbard. 
At one time about 150 members were enrolled with many active mem- 
bers in all departments of church work. The C. P. Church was supplied 
during the term from its organization to the time of its reunion with the 
Presbyterian Church, U. S. A., with the following named ministers: J. 
H. Tharp, J. H. Norman, C. E. Hays, S. T. Divinia, M. Low, E. M. Wright, 
W. A. Woozencraft, George Woozencraft, R. J. Beard, M. B. Irvin, and 
others at intervals. Pastors employed since the union of the churches: 
M. B. Irvin, George A. Mitchell, A. M. Reynolds and J. W. Mays, the 
present pastor. The present elders are : J. P. McCammon, John New- 
man, George P. Adams, M. P. Whaley, R. M. Funk, R. M. McCammon, 
Clerk of Session at the time of his death, Jan. 23, 1922. 

Methodist Episcopal Church and Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South. — These two churches served the community in Albany until 1916. 
In 1917, under Rev. C. I. Hoy, a tentative arrangement of union was put 
on trial. After two years' progress this arrangement was rendered per- 



270 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

manent by the formal withdrawal of the Methodist Episcopal church 
from this field. 

The united church, M. E. S., is going forward very successfully. 

There follows a list of pastors since 1879: C. W. Hurley, 1882; J. 
Y. Blakey, 1883; W. B. Johnsey, 1884; J. W. Keithley, 1885-86; C. W. 
Hurley, 1887; B. P. Searcy, 1888; W. A. Davis, 1889; G. M. Gibson, 
1890; J. A. Wailes, 1891; J. M. Settle, 1892; J. H. Ledbetter, 1893-94; 
David McAllen, 1895-96; C. B. Campbell; E. C. McVoy, 1897-98; W. H. 
Roper, 1899-1900; J. O. Edmonston, 1901; H. H. Johnson, 1902-03; J. 

A. Snarr, 1904-06; J. I. Sears, 1907-08; J. W. Budd, 1909-10; F. R. 
Poage, 1911; T. H. Swearingen, 1912-13; C. J. Chappell, 1914; G. C. 
Beery, 1915-16; C. I. Hoy, 1917; To be supplied, 1918-19; W. Ruther- 
ford, 1920-22. 

The First Baptist Church of Albany. — The organization as it now 
exists has little or no connection with the early Baptists in Albany who 
from loss of members and lack of interest were compelled to sell their 
church building in 1881. 

The present organization dates from June 17, 1891, when, under 
the leadership of Elder S. R. Dillon, the following named persons by 
mutual agreement constituted and organized the First Baptist Church 
of Albany: Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Kingsborough ; Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Albin; 
Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Dorsey; Mr. and Mrs. Jasper Cox; Mr. and Mrs. W. 

B. Caster; Mr. and Mrs. Bert Moullon; Mr. and Mrs. John Kingsbo- 
rough; Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Bray; Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Lockwood ; T. R. 
Bray, Chas. Lockwood, E. J. Morris, Mrs. J. B. Thomas, Mrs. Wheeler 
and Miss Wheeler. 

A lot was purchased and a suitable building was erected and dedi- 
cated in 1895. The membership at that time being 77. 

A number of pastors served the congregation during the 25 years 
following and despite many obstacles the church gained in numbers and 
influence. 

It having been decided that the work of the church could be better 
done in a larger building, in May, 1920, the building formerly occupied by 
the people of the M. E. Church was purchased from them. After this 
building had been remodeled to meet the present needs of the church, 
dedicatory services were held on October 1, 1921. The present pastor is 
E. F. Estes. 

Carnegie Library at Albany. — On Feb. 28, 1885, the Albany Library, 
successor to the Centennial Library, was formally opened to the public. 
After a program of music, and of addresses by leading citizens, a gen- 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 271 

erous fund was raised and placed in the hands of the secretary; 300 vol- 
umes of history, biography, travels and fiction were donated by the 
earlier association. With funds on hand and proper by-laws adopted, 
the prospects seemed fair for extended usefulness. Membership fees 
were a dollar each, and Tuesday and Saturday were borrowing days. 
Those not members could rent at 5c the volume. After a time, lack of 
interest apparently inherited from its predecessor, gradually overcame 
both management and patrons, and with scarcely life enough to make 
the transfer, the books, in 1890, were turned over to the public school li- 
brary. 

In 1904 the question was revived and the citizens decided to re- 
quest a donation from Mr. Carnegie, who previous to that date had made 
possible the erection of 10 free public libraries in the state. 

Correspondence secured the promise of $10,000 for the building 
conditioned on the presentation of a suitable site and a guarantee from 
the citizens to maintain a free public library in Albany at a minimum 
cost of $1,000 a year. 

The lot was duly presented and a special tax voted to produce the 
$1,000 annually. 

The contract was let for $9,071.00 to cover everything complete, 
except shelving for books. The fine building was completed in 1905 and 
is a permanent source of comfort and pride to the city. 
The following items are from state report for 1921 : 

Librarian — Miss Vera Erskine. 

Books added 1921, 136; total number, 4,692. 

Open 48 hours each week. Borrowers registered, 350. 

Total receipts, $1,438.87. 



CHAPTER X. 



CITIES AND TOWNS— CONTINUED. 



STANBERRY— KING CITY— GENTRYVILLE—McFALI.— FORD CITY— ALANTHUS— ISLAND 
CITY— DARLINGTON- -BERLIN— GENTRY— EVON A— OTHER TOWNS. 

Stanberry. — Stanberry was organized as a village, in February 
1880, with five trustees: W. H. Reynolds, President; M. F. Brown, 
Clerk; L. G. Sweat, L. M. Chilton, James Brown; George P. Rush, City 
Attorney; W. A. Forcade, Treasurer; George L. Shelly, Marshal; Isaac 
Meek, Collector; A. C. Frisbie, Assessor. 

In May, 1881, the town was organized into a city of the fourth class: 
W. H. Reynolds, Mayor; J. S. Weaver, D. T. Miller, E. Fisher, A, P. Am- 
brose, S. B. Hinkley, J. B. Sawhill, Z. F. Kestler, F. A. Weimer, Alder- 
men; George P. Rush, City Attorney; W. A. Forcade, Treasurer; V. T. 
Williams, Clerk; W. F. Miller, Collector; J. F. Smith, Marshal; Isaac 
Meek, Street Commissioner; L. M. Chilton, City Physician. 

The land upon which the original town was located was owned by 
R. E. Morand and William Harkrider, each of whom were living on the 
land when the town was laid out. Harkrider's house stood where Alan- 
thus Avenue intersects Main Street. Morand's residence occupied the 
present site of the Wabash House, and was torn down to make room for 
that building. The pioneer merchants of the town were Messimer, Gavin 
& Co., who built a small box house on the south side of the railroad, 
where they kept a general stock. Several buildings were commenced 
within a few days of each other, but Kimball & Forcade, druggists, en- 
closed and got into their business house, probably, before any other per- 
son on the north side of the railroad. Smith Brothers and Houston, and 
D. T. Miller's were the first exclusive dry goods stores in the town. Wea- 
ver & Fry built the first house for groceries, on the north side of the 
railroad, and at the same time erected an elevator. L. G. Sweat erected 
the first hotel. James Brown the second hotel. Bunker & Reynolds were 
the first hardware merchants. Fred Mauer was the first shoemaker. 
Shackelford was the first blacksmith. W. W. Brooks was the first phy- 




M. W. View of Public Scliool, Staoberry, Mo« 



"^^^»s>3S?^j:^ 



PUBLIC SCHOOL BUILDLXGS. STAXBERRY 




VIEW OF FIRST STREET. STANBERRY 






i«TOR LENOX AND 

.Se^oundations^ 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 273 

sician. Ed. E. Aleshire was the first attorney. Frank Albright was the 
first saloon keeper. The first marriage that occurred in the town was 
solemnized between Henry Newell and Mary Morand. The first child 
born was a son of F. M. Linn. 

Stanberry has maintained herself with steadfast and permanent 
progress. For nearly 25 years the Stanberry Normal School continued 
to be a leading factor in the education of Northwest Missouri ; for years 
it was under the efficient management of Prof. Charles Morris and later 
under Prof. John Taylor of Springfield, Mo. 

Large numbers of youth from Gentry County and adjoining counties 
attended. The yearly roll usually included from 300 to 400, but on 
account of temporary lapses of similar near by institutions, the attend- 
ance some years was nearly 500. The second fire, in 1906, proved the 
death of this admirable school. 

There is now a state normal school at Maryville, and the county 
and city schools have so far advanced, that much of the work once so 
well undertaken by Stanberry Normal is now achieved in the various 
high schools of the county. Yet still we say, "all honor to the old 
Normal." 

Of the churches of 1882, one, the Presbyterian, after varying strug- 
gles, has been disbanded. The others have kept pace with the needs 
and opportunities of the city and cummunity. The Methodist, Baptist 
and Christian, Advent and Catholic are all in active work. Each in its 
own substantial home. 

The Advent Publishing House is established in Stanberry, impor- 
tant and valuable among the city's assets. 

Stanberry has a population of 1864, census of 1920, and a splendid 
farming county is tributary to its business activity. The city is the larg- 
est in the county and its public interests are well advertised in its two 
weekly papers, "The Owl Headlight," and "The Stanberry Herald." 
Also the official organ of the Advent Church is published here. 

The Wabash railroad shops are located here and employ about 
150 men. This point is also a freight division and many railroad men 
make this their headquarters. 

The city has three banks. The Farmers and Merchants Bank, The 
Commercial Bank, and The Gentry Trust Company, and all are strong 
financial institutions. 

The business of Stanberry is carried by five grocery stores, three 
dry goods stores, three clothing stores, three drug stores, two hardware 
stores, two hotels, and three restaurants, the Commercial Cable Manu- 



274 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

facturing Company, with several traveling salesmen, one elevator, and 
one meal and feed mill. 

Wm. F. Sager is mayor; C. A. Greenlee, City Clerk, Seth M. Hink- 
ley, City Treasurer, With board of eight aldermen. 

The Chamber of Commerce of Stanberry was organized May 4th, 
1921. This organization succeeds the Commercial Club, which usually 
had about 40 members. The Chamber of Commerce already has 80 
members. A board of eight directors with the following officers: Vic- 
tor Field, president; Cleo Gregg, vice-president; A. E. Tibbetts, treas- 
urer; F. A. Flader, secretary. 

This body continues and enlarges upon the aims and efforts of the 
old club and its zeal is already manifest in good roads, park improve- 
ment and community welfare. All roads leading into the city have been 
given special attention. Seven miles of gravel road have already been 
built, which is one of the finest stretches of road in the state. 

One of their achievements is a three acre free auto camping ground, 
located one block off the Jefferson Highway. There is natural shade, 
and city water is already in service. Ovens are provided for cooking 
and fuel is at hand. A double bath room and lavoratories are promised. 
All manner of tourists avail themselves and enjoy this open air hos- 
pitality. 

The band is another success, greatly aided and encouraged by 
the Chamber of Commerce in engaging the full time of an instructor and 
paying the cost of lessons for every boy who can own an instrument. 
The band gives a free park concert every week during the season. For- 
est Park, fronting the business district, is the pride of the city, and justly 
so with its carpet of blue grass and splendid shade trees in variety. 

Stanberry has one of the fine high schools of Northwest Missouri, 
with 135 pupils. The graded school is also of like high order and has an 
enrollment of 330 pupils. 

Fraternities are organized and often become permanent elements 
in the general advance. Societies are formed with special aims, pursue 
their ways, attain their purposes, and in time yield to other unions with 
other aims. In all these Stanberry has had, and still has a fair share. 
The leading fratenities are: Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons Lodge 
N, 109, with nearly 200 members; Eastern Star Chapter; Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows with nearly 100 members; Daughters of Re- 
bekah; Knights of Pythias Lodge; Rathbone Sisters; Modern Woodmen 
of America, and Woodmen of the World. 

Fraternities in common with all things temporal suffer their ups and 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 275 

downs. But the present standing of Stanberry's various orders is satis- 
factory evidence of the desire for mutual and reciprocal fellowship 
among her citizens. Each citizen, both men and women, find the place 
and the opportunity to manifest a personal interest in community wel- 
fare, and in social enlargment. 

In the various activities called into being by the World War, and 
which are properly treated as history belonging to the county as a whole 
— Stanberrj'- had a worthy part. The city went over the top in the Y. M. 
C. A. drive, in the Red Cross work, and in the placing of United States 
securities up to the war's end. 

Just out of Stanberry to the east, is the old home of the famous pio- 
neer pure blood stockman, L, E. Shattuck, and his unrivaled Merino 
sheep, more fully set forth in the chapter on agriculture.. 

The Baptists erected their house of worship in 1880, and until June, 
1882, it was the only house of worship in the town. The church was 
organized with the following and other members: James Stockton and 
wife, T. J. Stockton, Jr., and wife. Christian Buchanan, Daniel Allen 
and wife, Levi Long and wife, G. B. Cooper and wife, Oliver Long and 
wife, Thomas H. Swearingen, wife and two sons, O. Swearingen and 
wife, P. W. Stockton and wife. The first pastor was Israel Christy. 

The M. E. Church effected its organization in April, 1880, with the 
following members: A. D. Hawes and wife, Solomon Hartzell and wife, 
M. A. Dunseth and wife, Dr. B. N. Bond and wife, J. C. Millory and wife, 
Jacob Burris and wife, O. P. Kutzner and wife, Mrs. N. A. Morris, Miss 
Lizzie Morris. Rev. J. R. Sassen was present at the organization of the 
church, and was the first pastor. 

The Presbyterians perfected an organization in the winter of 1880. 
Among others on that occasion were Mrs. A. P. Ambrose, A. R. Fye, L. 
A. Kimball, W. F. Miller and wife, and C. F. Gardner. 

The Christian Church was organized in 1880, with 61 members, 
now disbanded. The first preacher who labored for the congregation at 
this place was Elder J. H. Coffey. 

The Catholics erected a house of worship in 1880. Rev. Robert E. 
Graham is the present pastor. 

King City — King City, near the south line of the county on the Bur- 
lington railroad is one of the three cities of the county, and notable above 
its fellows for at least three things: blue grass seed, pure bred seed corn, 
and poultry products. It has a Commercial Club of which F. A. Hobson 
is president and T. H. McElroy is secretary. It has two newspapers, The 
King City Chronicle and The Tri-County News. It has an American 



276 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Legion Post. It has a first class high school. It has four churches, each 
in its own home of brick, the Presbyterian, Methodist, Baptist, and 
Christian. It has three banks, with aggregate capital and surplus of 
nearly a quarter million dollars, First National Bank and Trust Com- 
pany, Citizens National Bank, and Farmers Trust Company. It takes 
nearly forty business houses to handle the city's activity. 

King City is one of the greatest centers for the collection and dis- 
tribution of blue grass seed in the nation. This industry brings much 
outside business to the county, and carries with it a considerable trade 
in other seeds as well. A large number of our farmers participate. 

It is also true of poultry and dairy products, that a large volume of 
business originates here. Everything is favorable. The climate is ideal 
for poultry, and the conditions are splendid for the dairy man. The pro- 
duction is high, and the enterprise of King City, both wholesale) and 
retail sees to it that the business shall center there. King City enjoys the 
reputation of making things agreeable for business transactions. 

As might be expected, the usual orders, fraternities, and social 
groups, flourish in King City. A fine public spirit prevails, and benevo- 
lence is an active virtue. 

The churches are earnest in purpose, and faithful in performance. 
Each in its own sphere doing a worthy share of the work that delivers 
the world from evil. The Presbyterian Church of King City, is the 
largest of the denomination in the county. Dr. E. E. Stringfield is pas- 
tor. They have six elders and five decon-trustees, and a membership of 
284. The congregation is finely organized for Sabbath School work, 
young people's work and missionary work. In 1868 the Cumberland 
Church was organized in King City. The first pastor was P. H. Crider, 
In 1872 the Presbyterian U. S. A. was organized. The first pastor, J. 
W. Morrison. In July 1906, the two churches were united, both pastors 
resigning. Rev. Geo. E. Newell became the first pastor of the United 
Church. • . 

Their present commodious $18,000.00 church home was dedicated 
June 14th, 1914. 

Jefferson Highway passes through the city, and Jackson Township 
has voted $85,000.00 bonds for road improvement. 

King City was laid out in July, 1869, and plat filed November 1, 
1869, by John Pittsenbarger, on section 32, township 61, range 32. 

Kate Carter's first Addition made October 14, 1879; Kate Carter's 
Second Addition made June 7, 1880; Trotter's Addition made Anril 
19. 1880, . 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 277 

Closely identified with the history of King City, is the old pioneer, 
John Pittsenbarger. He pitched his tent upon the original town site, in 
the spring of 1856, emigrating from Clinton County, Indiana. He pur- 
chased the quarter section upon which the town is located. John Millen 
lived five miles north, Joel Taylor six miles south, and John McDaniel 
three miles west. These were his nearest neighbors. In 1858, a post 
office was applied for, and the name "Petersburg" was chosen, but Post- 
master General King replied that there was another name similar to that 
in the state, and the matter of selecting a name being left with him, he 
called it King City, after himself. Mr. Pittsenbarger was the first post- 
master. At that time there were but a few persons to receive mail, the 
country surrounding being six or seven feet high in wild grass and 
abounding in wild game. 

Pittsenbarger was the first blacksmith, A G. Barton, first saddler, 
J. N. Taylor, first livery stable keeper, and Bela M. Hughes kept the 
first drug store and was the first physician. 

The next settler to build a house where the town now stands was 
James McDaniel, who came from DeKalb County, Missouri, in 1859. He 
built a small house for a grocery store. McDaniel went to Indiana dur- 
ing the war. The third building was erected by Abner Clark, from 
Iowa, about the year 1860 — general merchandise. Clark was in the 
Union army, and settled in Ohio after the war. 

Brett and Bundle were among the early settlers of the place, and 
put up a house for groceries. Bundle afterwards went to St. Joseph, and 
Brett was killed about 1866. Brett kept in connection with his grocery, 
a house of entertainment. About noon one day, during 1866, three 
strange, rough-looking men, from Grand River, stopped for dinner, and 
while eating one of them remarked that Brett was no better than a 
horse thief. An orphan boy that Brett was raising was in the dining 
room at the time, and hearing what the stranger said, went immediately 
and repeated it to Brett, who took his revolver and requested the stran- 
ger (Cogdell was his name) to take it back or apologize. Codgell at 
once drew his revolver, and both commenced discharging their weapons, 
Brett being finally killed and Cogdell having his finger shot off. 

King City made but little, if any, advancement until the fall of 
1879 and the spring of 1880, just after the completion of the St. Joseph 
and Des Moines Railroad. The building of this road gave the town a 
new impetus, and it has been steadily increasing in population and 
importance ever since. 

King City was incorporated in May, 1881, under the village act, 
with G. P. Bigelow as president of the board, the names of the remainder 



278 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

or the board being W. H. Alexander, C. P. Stowe, M. E. Brown, and 
James McCarty. E. C. Shepard, Clerk; W. J. Woodside, marshal;. 
George Ward, treasurer. 

Gentryville.^Gentryville, the largest town in the county without a 
railroad was laid out August 2, 1848, on the southwest quarter of section 
36, township 62, range 31, by Charles Gay. About the same time, Rob- 
ert Givauden filed his plat of an addition to the town. 

Whedbee filed his plat of an addition, February 6, 187X 

Taylor filed his plat of an addition, February 17, 1874. 

Crane filed his plat of his first addition, January 1, 1870. 

Crane filed his plat of second addition, February 26, 1872. 

Frisbie filed his plat of an addition, March 20, 1871. 

The town is handsomely located on the south bank of Grand River, 
upon an elevation gently rising towards the east and south. The river, 
at this point, after flowing in a westward direction by the principal busi- 
ness portion of the town, makes an abrupt turn to the south, continuing 
on its course for several hundred yards, when it again deflects in a south- 
westward direction. The river is from 60 to 100 feet in width and 
abounds in a variety of fishes. Its banks are still covered with much of 
the native forest, whose quiet and cooling shades are enjoyed by the 
inhabitants of the little town. Gentryville has a population of 200. 

William Weese, from Tennessee, built the first house, a log cabin, 
about the year 1838, on the original town site. The next building was 
erected by Gay and Hunter, and the third building was put up by Robert 
Boggs, a carpenter, who came from Pennsylvania, among the early set- 
tlers. Boggs, from 1856 to 1862, was one of the county judges of Gen- 
try County; he moved to St. Joseph, Mo., in 1864. He was a nephew of 
Governor Boggs, of Missouri. The first business house was erected by 
Francis B. Robidoux, in 1843. Robidoux, was the son of Joseph Robi- 
doux, of St. Joseph ; he dealt in general merchandise and was succeeded 
by another Frenchman. 

John Hunt, from Kentucky, was the early "village blacksmith," the 
Rev. E. W. Dunegan being the next, in 1848. 

The first minister who proclaimed the word of God in the new set- 
tlement was Reverend Melise, of the M. E. Church ; this was about the 
year 1841 — services being held at the residence of a man named Milton 
Foster. 

The pioneer physician of the town was Dr. Uncle, from Jackson 
County, Missouri, who located there in 1842. After remaining one or 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 279 

' two years he went to California. Dr. L. C. Whedbee came in 1844, and 
resided in Gentryville till 1858, when he moved to Texas. 

The Rev. Mr. Cline, from Buchanan County, Missouri,, organized 
the first church (Baptist) in Gentryville, Oct. 26, 1850, at the school 
house. Among those who were present at its formation were I. N. Car- 
son, O. B. Ferguson, Elder T. R. Ferguson, James Fuller, N. Mothersead 
and E. W. Dunegan. 

T. R. Ferguson was the first pastor, and was succeeded by Elder 
Benjamin Wheeler, Isaac Christie, N. M. Allen, E. W. Dunegan and 
others. Elder Dunegan has labored more or less in the pulpit of this 
church. 

A house of worship was built by the Missionary Baptists in 1857. 

The M. E. Church, M. E. Church, South, and Christian denomina- 
tions each have an organization. 

Elder Samuel Trice, from Clinton County, Missouri, was one of the 
earliest ministers of the Christian denomination at Gentryville, Hiram 
Warnier being the first. 

The first school was taught in 1849 by A. G. Whitton, who was 
succeeded by David Cranor. 

L. C. Whedbee kept the first hotel. 

Gentryville Lodge, No. 125, of A. F. & A. M., was organized in 
November, 1849, and worked for a while under dispensation from the 
Grand Lodge till it obtained a charter, in 1851. It is the oldest lodge 
in Gentry County, and, indeed, in the Grand River country. From it 
has been organized, in part, the following lodges: Athens Lodge, of 
this county ; Bethany Lodge, Harrison County ; Rochester Lodge, An- 
drew County; Pattonsburg Lodge, Daviess County; Maysville Lodge, 
DeKalb County; Havana Lodge, Gentry County, and Berlin Lodge, 
Gentry County. The first officers were as follows: N. P. Thompson, 
W. M.; D. C. Conway, S. W. ; William Raines, J. W. ; J. R. Conway, S. 
D.; W. A. Blackwood, J. D.; John Hunt, Tyler. 

Although not a national or state holiday, the 3rd of August is as 
well established and as highly regarded as the 4th of July. For over 
forty years it has been the date of the Annual County Picnic at Gentry- 
ville. 

In 1889 after years of experience, articles of incorporation were 
granted to the Gentryville Picnic Company. 

McFall — McFall was laid out by the Western Improvement Com- 
pany in the fall of 1879, the plat of the town being filed on the 8th of 
October. It is located on the southeast quarter of section 1, township 



280 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

61, range 30, on the Wabash Railroad. Hamilton & Phillips, of Beth- 
any, Harrison County, Missouri, built the first house in the town. F. M. 
Brown, from Daviess County, Missouri, furnished the lumber, having 
at that time just established himself in the lumber business at McFall. 
Several buildings were commenced at or about the same time. Among 
these was an office built by Mr. Brown. 

The town of McFall received its name from John McFall, Sr., who 
owned the land, where this town is located. He settled here about 
1843 and later went to Phoenix, Arizona, where he died in 1893. 

McFall is a thriving town of 447 population. All business found 
in the average town is here represented. The town is noted for its 
good schools and its progressive and enterprising spirit of its citizens. 

Ford City. — Ford City is located on the Burlington railroad in 
Jackson Township. It has a bank and a number of enterprising busi- 
ness houses. The population is 185. 

Alanthus. — Alanthus is located in Wilson Township and has a pop- 
ulation of 104. The nearest railroad is the Wabash at Stanberry, about 
six miles distant. 

Island City. — Island City, another inland village is located in Jack- 
son Township, about six miles south and a little west of Stanberry. It is 
about the same distance northwest of Ford City. 

Darlington. — Charles G. Comstock, Esq., filed the plat of Darling- 
ton, March 31, 1879, locating the town site on section four, township 62, 
range 31. A. H. Bennett laid the foundation for the first residence in 
the town. John Livingston built the next house in April, 1879 which 
was used for a restaurant. Horace J. Bennett was the first black- 
smith, and George B. Marshall was the first shoemaker. John Living- 
ston sold the first goods. T. J. Welford was the first doctor. 

Darlington is located at the intersection of the Wabash and Bur- 
lington railroads and has a population of 311, census of 1920. It is an 
important shipping and trading point. 

Berlin. — On May 1, 1874, Samuel Robertson filed the plat of Ber- 
lin, locating the town on the southeast quarter of section 26, township 
61, range 31. Peter Cline, who had been in business (general merchan- 
dise) at Buhlville, as soon as the new town of Berlin was founded, 
moved his goods and house to that place and opened the first business 
house in Berlin. Samuel Levy and others soon followed. Berlin is 
located in the midst of a fine farming country, one mile north of the 
DeKalb County line. The population is 69. 

Gentry. — The town of Gentry is located on the Burlington railroad, 
on sections 19 and 20, Bogle Township. It is a progressive town located 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 281 

in the center of a rich agricultural district and has a population of 217. 

Evona. — Evona is located on the Wabash railroad three and one 
half miles south of Albany. In the early days when the Wabash rail- 
road was built, this was a town of more importance, but now its busi- 
ness interest is represented by one store. The town was laid out in 
1879. The first house was built by Richard L. Smith and used for a 
hotel. Baker and Hatfield, Barton and Hamilton and William Donil- 
son were early merchants here. 

A number of other small towns in the county have ceased to be 
of any importance. 



CHAPTER XI. 



AGRICULTURE AND ALLIED INDUSTRY. 



FAVORABLE SOIL AND CLIMATE— DIVERSITY OF PRODUCTS— CORN EXHIBITS— POUL- 
TRY SHOW— COMPARISON OF 1902 CROP— LIVE STOCK AND OTHER PRODUCTS- 
DOMESTIC ANIMALS— WORLD'S FAIR WINNERS— STOCK BREEDERS— POULTRY 
EXPERTS— FINE GRASSES — CALF AND PIG SHOW — HORSES — "IF GENTRY 
COUNTY WT:RE MY NATIVE LAND." 

Nature in a large measure decrees what the majority pursuits of 
the population shall be. The physical features are of lasting impor- 
tance. Gentry County is fortunate in its diversity of surface and nat- 
ural features, not all prairie, not all timber, not all level or gently undu- 
lating, not all broken and hilly. It is historically asserted that the Gar- 
den of Eden might have been located in Harrison County. It is to be re- 
gretted that it was not so located, since our first parents, upon their 
exile, following the Star of Empire in its westward course would have 
found themselves immediately in Gentry County. 

The soil and climate, in garden, orchard and farm, produce a mul- 
titude of things that delight the housewife, sustain the workers, and 
add to the pleasure and comfort of all ages and conditions and in 
many articles the surplus becomes a staple commodity of commerce. As 
a land of milk and honey. Gentry County qualified from the earliest 
times. It is far more. It is a land of apples, pears and peaches ; a land of 
cherries and small fruits; a land of kitchen gardens; a land of rhubarb, 
horse radish, and piccalilli. There is scarcely any limit except the 
will of the gardener and the good pleasure of the cook, scarcely any 
break in the round of production of things pleasing to the eye, and de- 
licious to the palate. Parsnips are ready the minute the frost is out. 
Lettuce and young onions follow. Then comes the pieplant. Green 
peas are early. New potatoes and cream compete with young beets and 
butter. Strawberries are earliest of fruits, then the beans and early 
sweet corn. Tomatoes help to fill out the summer; apple sauce ditto. 
The autumn brings squash, sweet potatoes and pumpkins. Vary these 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 283 

with milk, cream, butter, fresh eggs and young fries, buckwheat cakes 
and honey. This is "good old summer time" in Gentry County. 

We here present a complete report of the Gentry County Corn and 
Poultry Show for 1921. From the Albany Ledger of November 24, 1921. 

"Exhibitors and visitors alike at the Gentry Country Corn and 
Poultry Show held in Albany last week unite in declaring it to be the 
biggest and best exhibition yet given by the association. Especially 
was the display of poultry a surprise to the average visitor, as few of 
them realized birds of the quality shown are being raised in this county. 
The show was so successful that doubtless greater efforts will be put 
into future ones and have them bigger and better than the one this 
year. 

"In the corn judging contests by pupils of the public schools of the 
county and some high schools in adjoining county interest was shown. 
In the high school contests, Bethany, Maysville, New Hampton and 
Albany were each represented by two teams of four members. In the 
corn judging, Bethany carried off first honors, and in the stock judging 
Albany won first place. The grades of all teams ran close. Saturday 
was rural school day, and thirty-s^ven boys representing the various 
schools of the county were present to judge. Gentry County carried 
off first prize. 

"In the corn exhibits the following prizes were awarded: Boy's 
and Girls' Classes. — Best single white ear — 1st, Clayton Saunders, Al- 
bany; 2d, Homer Williams, Albany. Best single ear yellow corn — 1st, 
Marshall Collier, Ford City; 2d, Carlos Spaht, Albany. Sweepstakes, 
single — Marshall Colllier. Best 10 ears of white corn — 1st, Clayton 
Saunders; 2d, Homer Williams; 3d, Wayne Rainy, King City; 4th, 
Frank Morris, Lone Star; 5th Curtis Broderick, Stanberry. Best 10 
ears yellow corn — 1st, Roy Barnes, Albany; 2d, Glen Allenbrand, Dar- 
lington; 3d, Cleo Blodgett, Albany; 4th, Carlos Spaht; 5th, Will Welch, 
Albany. Sweepstakes 10 ears — Clayton Saunders. Sweepstakes single 
ear — Marshall Collier. 

"Men's Classes. — Best single ear white com — 1st, Clayton Saun- 
ders; 2d, Wayne Rainy. Best single ear yellow corn — 1st, H. R. Collier, 
Ford City; 2d, Billy Johnson, Darlington. Sweepstakes single ear — 
Clayton Saunders. Best 10 ears yellow corn — 1st, E. N. Clark, Darling- 
ton ; 2d, Ross Allenbrand, Albany; 3d, Billy Johnson; 4th, Jesse John- 
son; 5th, J. W. Blodgett. Best 10 ears white corn — 1st, Clayton Saun- 
ders; 2d, Wayne Rainey; 3d, E. N. Clark; 4th, L. H. Williams; 5th, 
Jesse Johnson. Grand champion single ear — Marshall Collier. Grand 
champion 10 ears — Clayton Saunders. 



284 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

"The poultry exhibit was the largest ever on display at a local 
show in this county. The wire cooping in which 385 birds were placed 
was so arranged that it made an attractive and convenient exhibit for 
the large crowds that viewed the display during the day and evenings 
in which the hall was open to the public. 

"Not only did the local people take an interest in the fine exhibit 
but there were visitors from every adjoining county and some from a 
greater distance. 

"There were 34 exhibitors and 26 breeds of birds, as follows: 
Barred Plymouth Rocks — John Welch, Albany, 2nd pen; 2nd on cock. 
W. L. Brown, King City, 1st pen; 1st cock, 1st, 2nd and 3rd cockerel; 
1st, 2nd, 3rd pullet; 3rd hen. Mrs. A. L. Perry, Albany, 3rd on pen. 
Earl Summa, Gentry, 3rd cock; 1st, 2nd hen. Other exhibitors were 
J. W. Kerlin, Albany; Dewey Staton, Darlington; Paul and Leone 
Guess, Albany. 

"White Rocks — Mrs. S. R. Giles, Albany, 1st, and 3rd cockerel ; 
and 3rd hen. Mrs. O. C. Hankins, Albany, 2nd cockerel; 2nd pullet. 
Mrs. Carl Gillespie, Albany, 1st hen. 

"Buff Orphingtons — W. C. Campbell, Grant City, 1st pen; 1st 
cockerel ; 1st and 2nd pullet. Mrs. G. W. Lainhart, Albany, 3rd cock- 
erel. Mrs. H. A. Miller, Darlington, 3rd pullet. 

"Dark Brahmas — Dr. W. B. McCoy, Gentryville, 1st, 2nd, 3rd, old 
pen; 1st, 2nd, 3rd young pen; 1st, 2nd, 3rd, hen; 1st, 2nd, 3rd pullet. 

"Black Langshans — Mrs. Carl Gillespie, Albany, 1st pen; 2nd 
cock. Mrs. G. W. Lainhart, Albany, 1st pen. C. J. Yarrington, Albany, 
1st cock; 1st, 2nd, 3rd cockerel. 

"Silver laced Wyandottes — Mrs. Jennie Degginger, Albany; 1st, 
2nd pullet; 1st cockerel. Roy Felts, Darlington, 1st, 2nd cock; 1st 
and 2nd hen; 3rd pullet. 

Mottled Javas — Clarence Baldock, Albany, 1st cock; 2nd pen. 

"Black Minorcas — Steve Cassity, Darlington, 1st and 2nd pen. 

"Anaconas — J. H. Wolf, Albany, 3rd pullet. 
1st, 2nd, 3rd cockerel; 1st, 2nd, 3rd hen; 1st, 2nd pullet. 

"White Wyandottes — Mrs. Carl Gillispie, Albany; 1st pen; 1st 
cockerel; 1st pullet; 1st, 2nd, 3rd hen; 3rd cock. Mrs. Eugene Larmer, 
Albany, 3rd cockerel; 3rd pullet. Mrs. Ross Allenbrand, Gentry; 2nd 
pen, 2nd pullet. Earl Summa, Gentry, 1st, 2nd cock; 2nd cockerel. 

"Single Comb White Leghorns — Mrs. Carl Gillispie, Albany, 2nd 
cockerel, 2nd and 3rd hen. W. C. Brown, Bethany, 1st cockerel, 1st 
hen; 1st pullet. 

"Buff Leghorns — T. E. Magee, Albany, 1st, 2nd pullet. 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 285 

"Rose comb Rhode Island Reds — Mrs. G. W. Chenoweth, Albany, 
1st cock. Mrs. Emma Gulp, Albany, 1st, 2nd cockerel; 1st, 2nd pullet. 

"Single Comb Rhode Island Reds — Mrs. Grey Gill, Albany, 1st 
cock; 1st, 2nd, 3rd cockerel; 1st hen; 1st, 2nd pullet; 2nd pen. Earl 
Summa, Gentry, 3rd cock; 2nd and 3rd hen. James S. Stecker, Win- 
ston, 1st pen ; 2nd cock ; 3rd pullet. Other exhibitors in this class were 
Volley Siddens, Albany; R. R. French, King City. 

"Rose Comb White Leghorns — Earl Summa, Gentry, 1st, 2nd, 3rd 
cock; 1st, 2nd, 3rd cockerel; 1st, 2nd, 3rd hen; 1st, 2nd, 3rd pullet. 

"Dark Cornish — Earl Summa, 1st, 2nd, 3rd cockerel; 1st, 2nd 3rd 
hen; 1st, 2nd, 3rd pullet. 

"Black Breasted Red Game — Earl Summa, 1st cock; 1st, 2nd ckl.; 
1st, 2nd, 3rd hen ; 1st and 2nd pullet. 

"Bantams — Dr. W. B, McCoy, Gentryville, 1st cockerel ; 1st pullet 
on Dark Brahams. Harlen Giles, Albany, 1st cock; 1st hen; 1st cock- 
erel, on Black Cochins. Roy Felts, Darlington; 2nd cock; 2nd hen on 
black Cochins. James Hacker, 1st cock; 1st and 2nd hen on Golden 
Seabrights. Roy Felts, 1st, 2nd, 3rd on White Cochin, Black Tail Jap- 
anese, Buff Cochin, Millfleur, Japanese Silken. 

A brief analysis of this report easily reveals its historic value. Such 
a show presupposes so much of past endeavors and implies so much of 
present interest . 

Twenty-six breeds of pure bred poultry attest the progress of this 
great industry throughout the country. It has taken labor, intelligence, 
and above all, years of time, to make such an exhibition possible. It is 
a sort of declaration that poultry products are of primary importance in 
our list of resources. Such success and diversity is only posiible in a 
region where eggs and chickens have been a large item in the farm 
income for generations. 

A patch of corn was the first farm crop produced by white men 
in the county. From that far summer of 1834 to the present time, corn 
has ever been a leader. The splendid Exhibition of 1921 manifests the 
constant interest in this great product. Highly significant is the fact 
that High School pupils, both boys and girls, from adjacent counties 
united with like pupils of our own county in the judging contests. 
Where such a crop is concerned, but little is left to chance. The crop 
begins with the selection of the ears for seed. Preparation of the soil 
is carefully planned ; perfected planters are used, and the best style of 
cultivator is sought for. Intelligent care and regard for weather con- 
ditions are considered well worth while, until the crop is made. Back 
of the individual crop is the system of rotation largely followed as the 



286 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 



result of multiplied experimentation. The farmers of the county wel- 
come and profit by all that science and agricultural colleges have thus 
far demonstrated. 



GENTRY COUNTY'S 1902 CROP. 





Acres 


Product 


Value 


Corn 


98,793 


4,149,306 


$1,306,030 


Wheat 


1,515 


30,300 


17,425 


Oats 


5,940 


196,020 


50,965 


Hay 


45,210 


76,855 


384,275 


Forage 


7,735 


10,315 


51,575 


Broom Corn 


60 


32,000 


910 


Clover Seed 




80 

6,670 


440 


Grass Seed 




10,340 


Tobacco 


8 


7,200 


720 


Potatoes 


819 


98,280 


23,590 


Vegetables 


890 




45,360 


* ^"^ ^^) ^"^ «^^>'V r^^ A ^^ t^^ 






$1,891,630 




LIVE STOCK AND PRODUCTS. 




Kind 




Number 


Value 


Cattle 




45,460 


$1,477,450 


Horses 




13,173 


878,200 


Mules 




1,375 


103,125 


Asses and Jennets 




98 


9,800 


Sheep 




18,710 


62,365 


Swine 




69,027 


690,270 


Chickens 




173,199 




Turkeys 




6,420 




Geese 




4,328 




Ducks 




3,028 


156,940 


Swarms of Bees 




3,435 


10,575 


Honey 




114,500 


14,315 


Wool 




86,200 


14,365 


Milk 


3,097,068 




Butter 




599,430 


201,495 


Eggs 


1 


,004,460 


125,560 


Total 




$3,744,460 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 



287 





1919 Number 


Corn, Bushels 


1,834,558 


Ooats 


240,658 


Wheat 


403,576 


Hay and Forage 




Potatoes 


13,741 


Vegetables 




Fruits and Nuts 






Number 


♦Cattle 


27,345 


Horses 


11,218 


Mules 


2,541 


Sheep 


29,730 


Swine 


41,112 


Chickens 


310,608 


Other Poultry 


8,120 


Dairy Products total value 


Poultry Products total value 


Wool 





Value 



Total all crops 



1,140,024 

164,296 

143,825 

Value 
1,701,350 
838,938 
352,953 
379,073 
532,123 

328,775 

308,097 

695,018 

84,257 



$5,344,754 



All Animals 



$4,140,592 



*Does not include city and town animals. 



Analysis of these tables shows some radical changes for the 17-year 
period. Among the crops — Corn and Irish potatoes have greatly dimin- 
ished in volume. Wheat from almost nothing has risen to third place in 
acreage. Oats have doubled in acreage. Vegetables have tripled in 
value. Hay and forage have practically held their own in acreage while 
vastly increasing in value. 

Among domestic animals — Cattle have diminished 40 per cent in 
number while slightly increasing in net value. Swine have decreased in 
both number and value about 25 per cent. The slight decrease in horses 
is overcome by the increase in value of mules. Sheep have increased 40 
per cent in number and 500 per cent in value. Chickens have increased 
80 per cent in number and over 100 per cent in value. Poultry products 
have increased in value about 150 per cent. Dairy products have in- 
creased over 50 per cent in value. Sheep, wheat and poultry have 
greatly advanced in volume. 

The assessed valuation of the county is now approximately $35,- 
000,000.00 — more than doubling in the last twenty years* period. 

An item of current history is taken from the Albany Ledger, Dec. 



288 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

1, 1921 : "Of all the big turkeys that were sold in this vicinity for the 
Thanksgiving trade, the largest so far reported is that which Frank 
Monger, from north of town, sold to W. A. Grace. The bird weighed 36 
pounds and brought 35 cents a pound, the total being $12.60. Some 
bird! Some price! 

These clippings speak for themselves. The King City article will 
show how our corn growers fared at the International Corn Show in 
1921. August 23, 1921. From the King City Chronicle — "At the State 
Fair now on at Sedalia, Gentry County became famous by winning prac- 
tically all the yellow corn blue ribbons, and being awarded two grand 
champion prizes. The thanks of the county is due to Messrs. Alva Mann, 
John Potter and Joe W. Boley, and others for producing the corn that 
won the prizes and has made this county famous. The report of the win- 
nings came in too late to give very extended comment, but we will give 
the winnings as they were reported to the Chronicle, by John Potter, 
for which he has our special thanks: Bushel Yellow Corn — Alva Mann, 
1st; also Grand Champion on bushel. John Potter, 2nd; and Joe W. Bo- 
ley, 3rd. Ten Ear Yellow — John Potter, 1st; also Champion on ten ears. 
Sanford Shilder, 3rd ; Alva Mann, 5th. Single ear, yellow, men's class — 
John Potter, 1st; also Grand Champion on single ear. L. H. Williams, 
3rd; Joe W. Boley, 4th; Joe L, Boley, 5th. Ten ears yellow, young men, 
over 16 and under 20 — Pearl Mann, 1st; Bessie Potter, 2nd. Single ear, 
yellow — Bessie Potter, 1st. Ten ears, yellow, young men under 16 — 
Hervert Potter, 1st; Francis Boley, 2nd. Second ear, yellow — Frances 
Boley, 1st; Herbert Potter, 5th. Ten ears, other than white or yellow — 
Francis Boley, 3rd. Single ear, other than white or yellow — Walter 
Pryor, 1st; also Champion. Ten ears popcorn — Alva Mann, 1st." 

Albany Capital, January 26, 1922 — "Those live corn specialists 
over in the south part of Gentry County just about swept the board on 
prizes at the Missouri State Corn Show at Columbia, during Farmers 
Week. Alva Mann and Joe Boley returned from the big meeting at Co- 
lumbia, last week, and reported the following corn prizes captured for 
Gentry County, in competition against the whole United States : On Bu- 
shel Yellow Corn — Joe W. Boley, 1st; Alva Mann, 2nd; John Potter 3rd. 
On 10 Ears Yellow Corn (men's class) — John Potter, 1st; Joseph L. Bo- 
ley, 2nd ; Pearl Mann, 3rd ; Joe W. Boley, 4th ; Walter Prior, 5th ; San- 
ford Shidler, 7th. On 10 Ears Yellow (boy's class) — Herbert Potter, 
1st; Francis Boley, 2nd; Dale Rainey, 5th; Wayne Mann, 7th. On 
Single Ear Yellow (men's class) — Joe W. Boley, 2nd; Sanford Shidler, 
3rd; Walter Prior, 6th. Single Ear Yellow (boy's class) — Frances Bo- 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 289 

ley, 2nd. On 10 Ears White (men's class) — Wayne Rainey, 5th. Cham- 
pion 10 Ears Yellow (boy's class) — Herbert Potter. Sweepstakes 10 
Ears Yellow (men's class) — John Potter. In addition to winning the 
cash premiums and other prizes that went with the ribbons in all the 
above awards, the boys put Gentry County still more thoroughly on the 
map as the place where the best corn in the state is grown, and they are 
entitled to a lot of credit for the remarkable showing which they made 
in this new contest against the best corn in the land. 

Feb. 2, 1922 — In attempting to give a list of those who won corn 
prizes, at the recent state show at Columbia, The Capital last week 
omitted two of the Gentry County boys who carried away prizes: Dale 
Rainey won first in the Boys' Class on 10 ears White corn, and Wayne 
Rainey won first in the boys' class on 10 ears White com, and Wayne 
Rainey took second prize (boys' class) on 10 ears of Calico corn. 

As far back as 1893 Gentry County began to make exhibition his- 
tory at the Columbian Exposition in Chicago. Missouri captured 400 
premiums, of which Gentry County won 75. Among them four firsts. Al- 
most a fifth of the state winnings came to our County. The Albany 
Ledger of Oct. 31, 1983, puts it thus: "Citizens of Gentry County, are 
you not proud of the fact that with the world as competitor our county 
took four first premiums at the World's Fair, or, it captured every pre- 
mium it contested for. L, E. Shattuck took first premium on Merino 
sheep and first on largest fleece of wool produced. C. G. Comstock, first 
premium in Jack Show, and a Stanberry man first premium in book- 
keeper's contest. With these honors won at Chicago our citizens can go 
out through the wide world and say, 'I am a resident of the county that 
took more premiums at the World's Fair, than any other county on the 
map. 

Mr. L. E. Shattuck, of near Stanberry, before his early death in 
1894, had done much pioneer work in bringing the improvement of cat- 
tle, sheep and hogs to the attention of farmers and breeders. His Merino 
flock from the early '80's became a national asset of the highest order. 
He also brought in some of the very first pure bred short horn cattle and 
Berkshire hogs. The blue ribbon flock he started so long ago is still go- 
ing strong at the old stand. 

C. G. Comstock was an early enthusiast for better mules and Here- 
ford cattle. Other early breeders were James Castor, Keef Judd and 
Calvin Spessard. 

The following list, for 1922, furnished by Mr. Saunders, County 
Agent, shows how the interest in pure bred stock has grown : 



290 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Poland China Breeders — A. B. Durbin & Son, King City, Mo.; E. 
G. Fisher, King City, Mo.; L. C. Loest, King City, Mo.; A. T. Robertson, 
Albany; Wm. Miller, Stanberry; Wm. Ketchum, Stanberry. 

Duroc Jersey Breeders — W. A. Melton, Albany; Carl Gillespie, Al- 
bany; John Parman, Albany; J. H. Degginger, Albany; L. A. Saunders, 
Albany; Dan Gibson, Jr., New Hampton; Orlin Stephens, Gentry. 

Shorthorn Cattle — Charles S. Allen, Stanberry; Frank Allen, Stan- 
berry; Melvin Gregg, Stanberry; A. T. Stockton, Stanberry; D. C. 
Thomas, Stanberry; W. A. Melton, Albany; J. H. Degginger, Albany. 

Aberdeen Angus Cattle — L. C. Loest, King City; A. T. Robertson, 
Albany; Robert Larmer, Stanberry; Dr. R. R. Dunshee, Stanberry. 

Hereford Cattle — Carl Gillespie, Albany; J. M. Slagle, Ravenwood. 

Jersey Cattle Breeders — John Doyle, Albany; Mrs. Mary Culver, 
King City. 

Holstein Cattle — Gust Spaht, Albany; Casper Gantz, King City; 
Orlin Stephens, Gentry. 

Feb. 17, 1921. "With Poultry Experts — Mr. and Mrs. Mose Green's 
Shelternook Farm, north of Albany, is gaining wide reputation with 
poultry breeders over the United States. The Shelternook Dark Brown 
Leghorns have won just about all the priz'es in the big shows at Kansas 
City and other places, in competition with the best birds in America, 
and the success of Mr. and Mrs. Green has attracted the attention of 
poultry growers throughout the land, and has also reached government 
officials in such a way that they want Shelternook methods to become 
of value to soldiers who are taking up the poultry branch of vocational 
training. 

"Last Sunday J. H. Wolfe arrived in Albany, and has gone out to 
the Green home to spend a year studying the Dark Brown Leghorn 
birds and the extensive manner in which they are being produced at 
Shelternook. Mr. Wolfe's home was at Sedalia, Mo., prior to his call to 
service in the world war. He sustained health disabilities in the army 
and was sent at government expense the past year to the Kansas State 
Agricultural College at Manhattan, Kan. He wanted to specialize in 
poultry, and so the government has now sent him to spend the coming 
year studying methods at the Green farm, north of Albany, as it is rec- 
ognized that there is no better authority on Dark Brown Leghorns in 
the United States than Mr. and Mrs. Green, whose birds from Shelter- 
nook have swept the ribbons and prizes wherever they have been placed 
on exhibition the last few years. 

Fine Grasses for Fair — Capital, July 28, 1904 — "J. P. McCammon, 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 291 

Ed. S. Gibbany and W. F. Sager, the committee appointed by the county 
court, last Saturday forwarded to St. Louis Gentry County's last install- 
ment of grasses to be entered in the World's Fair contest. In the con- 
signment sent last Saturday were some as fine grasses as were ever 
gathered in Gentry County, or, probably, in any county in the United 
States. One bunch of red clover, grown by John Dale on Sampson Creek, 
measured 82 inches in length. Two bunches of the bluegrass measured 
67 inches in length — one bunch having been grown by R. T. Canaday 
and the other by Frank Hicks. Frank Seamands entered a bunch of al- 
falfa over 6 feet in height. A bunch of timothy 6 feet 4 inches in height 
was furnished by S. R. Williams and there were several other bunches 
a close second. In addition to the foregoing, there were numerous other 
bunches of grass that spoke eloquently of the richness of Gentry County 
soil, and it was the opinion of all who saw them that this county ought 
certainly to capture some prizes on grasses at the Fair." 

Stanberry Democrat, Oct. 30, 1903 : ''We are informed that Gentry 
County was "in it" at the Kansas City stock show. C. Folgate won first 
prize with one of his fine Duroc-Jersey hogs. He sold this prize winner 
hog for $300. This was the highest price paid for any hog during the 
show. 

Profit in Cattle — Albany Capital, March 9, 1922: "J. M. Slagle, 
the Hereford cattle man, was down from the northwest corner of the 
county last Saturday, and called to place advertising of a couple of ani- 
mals he had for sale. Mr. Slagle returned last Thursday from the 
Round-Up sale at Kansas City, in which sale he marketed two yearling 
Herefords for $570. In the spring of 1917 Mr. Slagle bought a Hereford 
cow from a down-state herd. This cow has since brought him five calves. 
He has sold four of them for $1,260, and still has the cow and one calf 
left. J. M. feels absolutely confident that there is still a good profit in 
the game for the farmers and breeders who raise and feed good live- 
stock, and who pay proper attention to the rotation of crops and the up- 
keep of their farms. The appended complete report of a recent "Pig 
and Calf Show," illustrates present activity. 

Tri-County Calf and Pig Show — Albany Ledger, Sept. 29, 1921: 
"Probably the most interesting community affair ever held in King City, 
was the calf and pig club show of last week. Thirty-one boys and four 
girls brought out 144 pigs and 10 baby beeves. The boys and girls had 
spent almost one year of consistent effort and their labors were amply 
rewarded in the large cash premiums and the satisfaction of having ac- 
complished something worth while. Everyone is interested in the boys 



292 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

and girls, and there was intense interest all through the show. Nothing 
has been quite so satisfactory as the club work in this community, and 
it will be continued from year to year. 

The Commercial Club of King City is to be highly commended not 
only for the large amount of cash and the ideal accommodations which 
they so freely gave, but for the personal interest which every business 
man of King City took in the show. 

The quality of the animals shown was so high that although there 
were eleven places in some of the classes, yet many animals worthy of a 
first place in some shows had to go without a ribbon. Carl Gillespie, of 
Albany, and Harry Messick, of Bolckow, did an excellent and satisfac- 
tory job of judging. 

In the class for best boar, Theron Sweat, of McFall, took first on 
probably the most outstanding pig in the show. In the class for the 
best barrow, Cary Berry, of King City, took first on an excellent indi- 
vidual. In the class for best gilt, William Danbury, of King City, took 
first. This was certainly a great class, there being 41 competing. The 
best litter of four pigs was exhibited by Theron Sweat. 

In the baby beef class an excellent array greeted the judges. First 
place went to Lucille Loest, daughter of L. C. Loest, of King City, on pre- 
sumably the best show heifer ever exhibited in Gentry County. Mr. 
Loest is a breeder of excellent Aberdeen-Angus cattle and this heifer, 
while not a pure bred heifer, shows the value of the use of high class 
pure bred sires of the correct type. Miss Loest not only won the $30 
cash prize contributed by the Commercial Club but also $25 in cash and 
a gold wrist watch valued at $25, contributed by the Aberdeen-Angus 
Breeders Association of Chicago, making a total of $80. She will show 
this calf at St. Joseph in the baby beef show October 3, 4, 5, where she 
confidently hopes to take first place. Charlotte Loest's calf was placed 
2nd; Thelma Cummings', 3rd; Glenn Boone's, 4th; Loren Holeman's 
5th; Ralph Justice's 6th; Fred Justice's, 7th; Donald Martin's, 8th; 
George Dierenfeldt's, 9th; Carl Loest's, 10th. All of these calves will 
go to the St. Joseph show next week, also Forest Slagle and Wilma 
Harkrider, north of Alanthus, will send two choice Hereford calves. 
Clayton Saunders, of Albany, will also take one Hereford calf. Five of 
the best calves sent from this county will have all of their expenses paid 
by the Stock Yard Company. And all expense of the boys and girls who 
exhibit the calves will also be paid. ' 

Many new members have already signed up for the work next 
year in the Tri-County club at King City, and there will, without doubt, 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 293 

be at least three times as many enrolled for 1922 as we had this year. 
There is no work that is so far-reaching and so satisfactory in every 
way as the boy and girl club work, and Stanberry and Albany and other 
communities in the county should take up this work for next year. 

"L. A. SAUNDERS, County Agricultural Agent." 

Horses — Horse breeding has been an important industry from early 
times. Thirty years ago there were weekly horse sales in the county 
seat, well advertised and attended. The farm type of today is much more 
blocky, and more powerful. The automotive development of the past 
dozen years has not greatly disturbed horse production in the county, 
except to increase the interest in mules. 

The second great farm product of the county is hay and grass, as 
follows: Timothy and clover mixed, 18,000 acres; blue grass, for seed, 
13,000 acres; timothy alone, 6,000 acres; alfalfa, 2,000 acres; clover 
alone, 1,500 acres. The annual production of blue grass seed exceeds 
150 tons. The figures given are official, and accounts for about three- 
fifths of the county acreage. The large balance is in some form of pas- 
ture, and the proceeds appear in stock and dairy income. Given time, 
and almost any of our land will become set with blue grass. Perhaps no 
other natural characteristic is so great an asset. Blue grass is "a thing 
of beauty and a pasture forever," almost. 

The annual wheat crop is nearly a half million bushels. 

Animals not reckoned in above estimates, owned in towns: Horses, 
500; milk cows, 500; young cattle, 500; swine, 1,000. 

Vegetables and fruits imply small acreage. The county's income 
from these sources average a third of a million yearly. 

Gentry county in common with northwest Missouri is very free from 
cattle and horse plagues. While swine are not so exempt, hog cholera 
has never been frequent or malignant. 

In conclusion it may be said that Gentry county has met and en- 
dured the slump of 1920-21 with admirable courage and patience. In 
this time of stress, poultry products and dairy products have saved many 
of our people from hardships and defeat. 

If Gentry Were My Native Land. 

It would induce a steadfast pride. 
And I would never need to hide. 
When those of any country side. 
Were boasting what their own supplied. 
If Gentry were my native land. 



294 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

I might, marooned, be far away. 
Compelled indefinitely to stay. 
Some elsewhere active part to play. 
Yet would my heart return for aye. 
If Gentry were my native land. 

I would myself discussion raise. 
And Gentry County I would praise, 
And count the gifts she brings and lays 
Before her children, harvest days. 
If Gentry were my native land. 

And I would praise her gallant youth, 
And make it always plain — forsooth 
I was but telling half the truth, 
. And call my elsewhere home a — booth. 
If Gentry were my native land. 



CHAPTER XII. 



CIVIL WAR PERIOD 



OPINIONS DIVIDED— POPULATION MADE UP OF NORTHERNERS AND SOUTHERNERS- 
DEVELOPMENT RETARDED— FEDERAL CONTROL MAINTAINED. 

The period from 1860 to 1865 in Gentry County deserves histor- 
ical mention in that it greatly affected social relations, and greatly re- 
tarded material development. As has been seen, the earliest settlers 
were largely from Tennessee, Virginia, and Kentucky. They brought 
with them the convictions prevalent in the states from which they 
came. These convictions could not be set aside in a day — at the result 
of a national election. 

Possibly by 1860 an almost equal number from Pennsylvania, Ohio 
and other northern localities had become citizens of the county. 

The result was inevitable. Gentry County in many respects was 
a border county. With two sets of utterly opposed convictions contend- 
ing for supremacy. When the issue was forced upon the people, 
friends were separated, and households sometimes divided. It is far 
from the present purpose to single out any individual — to accuse or to 
justify any action or any policy pursued. It is enough to speak of the 
general effect. A divided people cannot be a happy people, neither 
can they be prosperous and progressive. There was little of the tragic 
and heroic, much that was irksome and disquieting in the continual 
conflict of convictions. Social life and community interests were 
greatly hampered. Agriculture and all industry suffered accordingly. 
Instead of a generous surplus, the county ceased to fully supply its own 
needs for both man and beast. 

The situation was aggravated by several dry, or semi-dry seasons. 
Gentry County citizens sometimes gathered up empty sacks and went 
"a-buying." 

Federal control was maintained without serious opposition and all 
classes welcomed peace when it came. Most of the wounds were 
quickly healed. The scars received less and less notice. In a few years 
a united people were forging ahead. 



r« 



CHAPTER XIII. 



RAILROADS AND HIGHWAYS. 



AGITATION FOR RAILWAYS BEGINS— FIRST ROAD IN THE COUNTY— THE WABASH- 
LEON, MOUNT AYER AND SOUTHWESTERN— STATIONS IN THE COUNTY— HIGH- 
WAYS— JEFFERSON HIGHWAY— HARD SURFACE ROADS. 

Agitation for railways began with the first recovery after the Civil 
War. Elections were held and bonds voted. But the earlier projects 
failed and the bonds could not be used. 

The first road into the county was the St. Joseph and Des Moines 
railroad. This line, which is a branch of the Chicago, Burlington and 
Quincy Railroad, was completed from St. Joseph to Albany in Septem- 
ber 1879. The citizens of Gentry County donated, in money and mate- 
rial towards the building of this road through the county, about the sum 
of $20,000.00, and in addition thereto, the depot grounds and right of 
way, the latter costing about $1,000.00. This road was formerly called 
the "Narrow Gauge." 

Council Bluffs and Omaha Division of the Wabash, St. Louis and 
Pacific Railroad, now known as the Wabash Railroad, was completed in 
the fall of 1879, and passes through the county centrally, giving direct 
connections with St. Louis, Kansas City, Omaha, and Council Bluffs. 
The land owners along the line of the road donated the right of way, 
excepting a few tracts, which cost the company about $3,000. 

The Leon, Mount Ayr and Southwestern Railroad, which is a branch 
of the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad, was finished to Al- 
bany in September, 1881. The people of Albany donated the right of 
way from Bethany, Harrison County, Missouri, to Albany, which cost 
them about $8,000.00; they also donated the depot grounds at Albany. 
This road forms a connection at Albany with the St. Joseph and Des 
Moines Railroad, which was purchased of the original owners and build- 
ers, by the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad Company, in the 
latter part of 1880, making a continuous line from St. Joseph to Chicago. 

The St. Joseph and Des Moines Railroad has four depots in the 



» .. 



HISTORY OP DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 297 

county, at the following places: Albany, Darlington, Millen, and King 
City. The Wabash, St, Louis and Pacific, at McFall, Evona, McCurry 
and Stanberry. 

In 1906-07 the Grant City Chicago, Burlington & Quincy extension 
was built from the north line of the county to Albany Junction, two 
miles southwest of Albany. 

Highways. — Roads and bridges of Gentry County are under town- 
ship supervision, except important river bridges and their approaches, 
which are installed and maintained by the county court. 

The major part of the surface of the county has good natural drain- 
age, which simplifies the building and maintaining of the common 
graded highway. Gentry County has between two or three hundred 
miles of such roads with needed bridges. The county bridges are good 
and well kept and the various townships average well in building and 
maintaining their local bridges. The county has a fairly sufficient sys- 
tem of highway service, well distributed. 

During the hard road agitation of 1919-20, the Jefferson Highway 
was mapped through the county, entering on the south at King City; 
thence north through Stanberry; thence east through Albany; thence 
northeast to the county line. This gave townships the following mile- 
age : Jackson Township, 8.58; Cooper Township, 8.17; Huggins Town- 
ship, 4.35, and Athens Township, 10.46. In support of this project Jack- 
son Township voted $85,000.00 bonds. Cooper, $85,000.00 and Athens, 
$100,000.00. 

The first contract for a completed hard surface road was let Apr. 
11, 1921, to the E. S. Kelley Construction Company of Eureka Springs, 
Ark., for six miles of finished road in Cooper Township for $82,020.00. 

On this project the grading and bridging are complete, and over 
four miles of hard surface have been finished. The material used is 
sand and grit. Jackson Township has completed the grading and bridg- 
ing of the entire 8.58 miles. 

In the early summer of 1921, Athens Township let the contract for 
the completion of that part beginning just north of Albany, east to the 
county line, 6.26 miles. This section has been completed- The material 
used is excellent gravel from local pits; a material that can hardly 
be excelled. It is an admirable mix of 20 to 30 sizes, with proper pro- 
portion of small stuff. Close packing and adhesive under traffic — the 
next thing to cement. While this particular gravel is new to road serv- 
ice, there is reason to believe that it will not grind into dust to any ex- 
tent, during dry summer heat. 



affiS 



298 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Long dry spells and windy days are the worst enemies of gravel 
roads. Crude oil is the best protection, but the better the gravel the less 
the crude oil required. In a matter as far reaching as hard surface 
roads, it is natural to hope that first experiments should prove encour- 
aging. Every strip of successful road hastens the building of other 
strips. 

An improved road from the county seat to Evona is under way, 
much of the grading being already complete, and the financing for hard 
surface is up for discussion. 

Land owners are more and more taking the view that money spent 
for good roads is not a tax, but that it is money spent for permanent im- 
improvement. In other words it is an investment. The same is true of 
drainage, and is perhaps more apparent, since worthless land is often 
reclaimed and given a value much beyond the cost of draining. The 
principle is the same; good roads make good land still more valuable. 

Gentry County never had any great proportion of swamp land. 
Nevertheless, a large drainage undertaking is now nearing completion. 
It has to do with straightening the river courses. It begins near the 
north line of the county, and embraces the three forks of Grand River, 
east, middle and west forks and follows the main river as far as Gentry- 
ville in the southeast of the county. The total cost of the improvement 
will be nearly $200,000.00. 

The assessment of benefits is worthy of most careful consideration. 
The benefits of drainage are largely local and direct, while in the mat- 
ter of hard roads, the benefits are both direct and general. The gen- 
eral benefits increase with the number of miles connected. A single 
strip of four miles is scarcely a general benefit, but a well planned sys- 
tem of roads for the whole county will develop a widespread general 
benefit. It will raise the average level of land values in all localities. 
The remotest farm in the county will be benefited. Once these princi- 
ples are understood and equitably applied, assessments cease to be a 
bugbear. 



CHAPTER XIV. 



SCHOOLS. 



PUBLIC SCHOOLS— TEACHERS INSTITUTE— HIGHER STANDARDS— HEALTH WORK IN 
SCHOOLS — TEACHERS ASSOCIATION — CONOLIDATION — PALMER COLLEGE — 
NORTHWEST MISSOURI COLLEGE— CENTRAL CHRISTIAN COLLEGE. 

Public Schools — The chapter on the public schools of the county 
should prove interesting for the good reason that history is now "a mak- 
ing." 

Earle C. Duncan is county superintendent of public instruction. 
The office became effective in 1909 when George L. Grey became the 
first superintendent. Charles Allen was next in office, followed by Eg- 
bert Jennings, whose term was filled out by his sister, Miss Gretchen 
Jennings, which brings us to 1919 when Mr. Duncan took office. 

By the year 1886, the high school had become pretty well differ- 
entiated from the school of all grades. The annual Teachers' Institute 
of three or four weeks of instruction, lectures or class work, had become 
established. These Institutes closed with two days of examinations. For 
a time attendance was optional, but was later made obligatory upon all 
who wished to teach. This system continued under efficient commission- 
ers until about 1900. The commissioner was chairman of the board of 
examiners, assisted by one appointee of the state, and another of the 
county. 

In 1901 the Teachers' Institute was dropped, and three examining 
periods were set for each year. A variety of conditions were imposed on 
candidates for certificates. In certain branches teachers were allowed 
permanent credits of record, exempting them from further examina- 
tions in these specified lines. Summer schools under state management 
took the place of the county institute, and though attendance was not 
obligatory, the inducement of "approved grades" maintained a good at- 
tendance. 

The office of county superintendent is one of wider responsibility 
than the former office of commissioner. The outgrowth of a general for- 
ward movement which began to manifest itself about 1910, 



300 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

In 1911 and 1912 the general level of teachers' salaries was raised 
about $5.00 a month for each year. More money should mean better 
teachers, and it so proved. In 1911, there were ten teachers with nor- 
mal diploma certificates. In 1921 there were 34 such teachers. During 
this ten-year period the trail of the third grade certificate has been con- 
stantly downward. The trail of "approved schools" during the same 
period started with two for the county, advanced to six in 1917; to 16 
in 1920; to 23 in 1921 and to 31 in 1922. Thus keeping pace with 
teacher qualifications. 

Another chart showing the steady upward trend in instructive ad- 
vancement, shows that in 1911, 35 teachers had had four years high 
chool training; in 1916, 52 teachers; in 1919, 120 teachers. 

The quotation below is from the 1921 Missouri public schools re- 
port. It proves that Gentry County is thoroughly alive : "Several exten- 
sion courses will be held for Gentry County teachers again this year. 
The State Teachers College, Maryville, held two in the county last year. 
We are having some meetings to discuss better methods and I am send- 
ing out some lesson plans. We are also making arrangements with the 
State Teachers' College, Maryville, for a survey of the county. We have 
a bunch of real teachers in the rural schools this year. Eighty of our 
teachers were in summer school last summer." — E. C. Duncan, Supt. 

"Better Schools" in Gentry County, quoted from State Report 1921 ; 
"The Gentry County Plan began at the August meeting, held in Albany, 
Mo., in 1921. The teachers in attendance were asked to write a list 
of improvements worth while and needed in the schools of the county. 
The results of the questionnaire were tabulated and divided into major 
and minor groups, and a plan of approval worked out." The groups as 
tabulated and divided, relate largely to physical conditions, the produc- 
tion of better environment. When a school has attained three of the 
major requirements and two of the minor, the superintendent issues a 
certificate of standing as a "Better School." It has been a decided suc- 
cess. Up to March 25, 1922, sixty schools of the county have won the 
certificate. 

The total expenditures for the county school system in 1910 were 
$67,000.00; in 1913, $75,000.00; in 1916, $115,000.00; in 1921, 
$175,000.00. 

The following from the 1921 state report belongs to Gentry County, 
and is self explanatory. "We have been selected by the Southwest Divi- 
sion of the Red Cross as a demonstration county for health work. We 
are furnishing the schools with a project each month. The project for 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 301 

November is to build two pieces of playground equipment. Other pro- 
jects will be posters for the care of the teeth; posters on the school 
lunch; short talks (for 'oral expression), by the pupils on health play 
and health booklets. The county nurse and the Red Cross secretary are 
assisting in this work. Earle C. Duncan, Sup't. Gentry County." 

During the winter of 1922 a general poster contest was staged in 
Albany, over 300 posters were on the exhibition, representing a multi- 
tude of ideas relating to the individual self-care of the pupil. 

Gentry County people are proud of their schools and wide awake 
to the advantages they offer. The enrollment in the high schools of 
the county jumped this year from 500 to 600, and there are more mem- 
bers of the freshman class this fall than there were eighth grade grad- 
uates this spring. 

The Gentry County Teachers have more than a 100 per cent enroll- 
ment in the Missouri State Teachers Association. There are only 136 
teachers in the county, while there are 151 members of the state assoc- 
iation. The explanation is that a number of students of Palmer College 
have become members of the association and several school board mem- 
bers have also joined. It is the third consecutive year that their enroll- 
ment has been more than 100 per cent. 

The county has 71 rural schools, almost half of which are approved. 
There are seven high schools, at least one of them easily accessible to 
students in every township, except two. 

One of the high schools is a consolidated school, strictly rural, 
which, opened this year with an enrollment of fifty. It is known 
as Consolidated School Number 1. It is almost equidistant from Al- 
bany, King City, Pattonsburg and Maysville, having a rural territory 
with a radius of about 15 miles. The nearest railroad is at McFall, six 
miles away. 

The school is being conducted now in what will later become the 
"teacherage." The patrons have voted bonds and have $20,500 with 
which they will build a modern building on ten acres of Gentry County's 
prettiest land. When the building is completed, the teacher will occupy 
the residence where classes are now being held. 

Consolidated District Number 1 is the largest strictly rural high 
school in Northwest Missouri. It now offers a three year course, which 
will be extended next year to four years. It will then be a fully ac- 
credited first class high school. 

When the new building is completed the smaller schools will be 
closed and the pupils there will be transported to the central schools in 



302 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

wagons. Two other schools in the county already transport their pupils. 
Four wagons are used at Darlington and six at McFall. 

McFall also has a consolidated school and is also building a new 
building, which will be completed about Dec. 1st. That the transpor- 
tation of rural pupils is not an excessive burden to the taxpayer was 
demonstrated at this school last year, when the school levy was only 
$1.30, which was lower than the levy of any other first class high school 
in the county. 

That the boys and girls of the farmer are beginning to appreciatp 
the opportunity offered them for a high school education is demon- 
strated in the enrollment figures. There were 226 eighth grade grad- 
uates this spring and 227 enrolled as freshmen in the various high 
schools this fall. 

During 1921 two enthusiastic track meets were held. The first 
was at King City, and the second at Albany. The next one is to be held 
at Stanberry. The stimulating effect of these events is already mani- 
fest. Youth is eager for endeavor, and delights in achievement. 

Palmer College. — As one of the early institutions of learning of the 
State of Iowa, what is now Palmer College had its beginning under the 
organization of Revs. Josiah P. Watson and D. M. Lines. The institu- 
tion, first located at LeGrand, Iowa, was granted a charter, in April, 
1865, under the name of The Le Grand Christian Institute, and began 
operating in October of that year. In appreciation of a gift of $30,000, 
from the Hon. F. A. Palmer, of New York, toward the first endowment 
fund started by the college, the institution was renamed Palmer College, 
in 1897. 

In June, 1912, the college was moved to Albany, Mo., and the in- 
terests of Kansas Christian College, of Lincoln, Kan., consolidated with 
it. By conditional donation from the Albany Chamber of Commerce 
the college came into possession of the plant of the former Northwest 
Missouri College. The building was partially remodeled, the campus 
considerably enlarged, a fine girls' dormitory erected and a president's 
home secured, bringing the total value of the plant and its equipment 
up to about $225,000.00. The campus proper, includes 14 acres. The 
institution has dormitory accomodations for 64 students in modernly 
equipped dormitories. The larger number of students either live in the 
community or board in the town. The college is also equipped with 
gymnasium, swimming pool, athletic field and tennis courts. 

During the World War, the faculty and student body were so de- 
pleted by the demands of the country that the work of the institution 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 303 

had to be temporarily suspended. It was reopened in 1919 under the 
presidency of Dr. F. G. Coffin, of Albany, New York. 

The college is under the direction of a Board of 15 trustees, elected 
by the Western Christian Convention and presided over by a faculty of 
18 instructors. In addition to the regular college year, two summer 
schools are maintained. One is a school of religious education for 
which specialized instructors are imported from different sections of 
the country. The other is a summer school for teachers, offering an eight 
week's course of specialized instruction. 

The student eni-ollment in the various departments, not exclusive 
of duplicates, is 232 (year 1922). This number does not include the 
enrollments of either of the summer schools. 

Courses are offered in collegiate work, academy, domestic science, 
commerce, science, piano, orchestral instruments, voice, expression, arL, 
Bible, etc. The courses are coordinated with the University of Missouri 
and all work done in the institution fully accredited by the university. 
Teachers' certificates are granted upon satisfactory completion of 
courses. 

The maintenance of the school is secured through tuition, gifts, and 
endowment. While the trustees are elected by the Western Christian 
Convention, the trritorial. official body of the Christian Church (not 
Disciples), the college is non-sectarian. Instructors are employed and 
students admitted without regard to church affiliations. The city of 
Albany cooperates in promoting the interests of the school. 

Northwest Missouri College. — This institution was founded .under 
the fostering care of the M. E. Church, South, in 1891. 

It was made possible through the benevolence and enterprise of 
Albany's leading citizens, who provided a splendid campus of nine 
acres, and secured subscriptions up to ten thousand dollars for immedi- 
ate construction. 

Within two years under Prof. W. H. Pritchett, Northwest Missouri 
College was successfully launched. Its aims were of the best. The 
instruction given, and the care devoted to the welfare of students were 
always high type work, and for years, the generation of that period 
availed itself of the splendid privileges thus provided. 

The college continued with varying activity until 1909, and was 
much appreciated. 

Early in its experience it became evident that there must be a very 
substantial guarantee committee. At first the guarantors were numer- 
ous and the burden grew and the committee diminished. It was finally 



304 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

proven that Northwest Missouri College could no longer continue. The 
guarantee committee paid interest and other expenses necessary to 
keep the debt afloat out of their own funds. 

By reason of removals and for other good reasons the responsible 
members became fewer. From 1909 onward it was a question what to 
do with the property and how to meet the debt. Several propositions 
came up to turn the property to other uses and salvage what was pos- 
sible. Some took the position that the property represented large origi- 
nal donations that were given for education, and therefore the property 
should be held for that purpose. It was a continual personal expense to 
these few, but they paid and held on. 

There was rejoicing when in 1912 their persistence was rewarded 
and they were able to turn over sufficient property to induce and justify 
the opening of Palmer College. 

Central Christian College — Central Christian College was the out- 
growth of a liberal offer from three citizens of Albany. Dr. G. W. 
Stapleton, Dr. M. M. Campbell, and T. N. Rigney, to the educational 
hopes of the Christian Church. For college purposes, they offered 
to donate a tract of land situated in the South of Albany at the terminus 
of Park Street, and also a one-fifth interest in 100 acres lying adjoining 
the original plat of the city and nearly surrounding the college site. 

This generous gift was gratefully accepted by the representatives 
of the church in convention assembled, and a committee at once 
appointed to collect necessary funds for the building. The citizens of 
Albany made liberal donations, thus making it possible to incorporate 
and begin preparations for building. 

Central Christian College was incorporated in April, 1892, and 
the contract for the building was given to Hawk Brothers of Albany. 
The brick work was done by Meek Bricklaying and Contract Company 
of Chillicothe, Mo. 

On Aug. 10, 1892, the cornerstone was laid with impressive cere- 
monies, conducted by F. V. Loos of Liberty, Mo., assisted by J. A. Will- 
iams of King City, Mo., and other leading ministers. In November of 
the same year the College was opened and on January 8, 1893 the build- 
ing was dedicated to the cause of Christian education. The first presi- 
dent was Prof. E. J. Gantz, and during the first year 169 students were 
enrolled in the collegiate and normal departments. 

During the ten years' existence of the college, scores of educated 
young men and young women went forth from its doors better fitted to 



'\™.i ';"!*, "SI 




■# f 



aa.a>i>Mi>^d^ 



PALMER COLLEGE, ALBANY 




* ^•.*? - 



e of Park, Stenberry, Mo. 



VIEW FROM SOUTH SIDE OF PARK, STANBERRY 



THE NEW YORK 
PUBLir TIP.TIARY 



ASTiiK. LENOX AND 

TILKI'N FOUNDATIONS 

R L 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 3D5 

take up life's duties. Thus is a measure were repaid those who contributed 
largely to its support. 

In 1903 the building was purchased by the city and converted into 
a ward school, and now it is also used by students in the vocational agri- 
cultural and home economics classes of the high school. 



CHAPTER XV. 



LODGES, SOCIETIES AND CLUBS. 



MASONIC LODGES— THE EASTERN STAR— INDEPENDENT ORDER OF ODD FELLOWS- 
WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN TEMPERANCE UNION— CIVIC CLUB— LADIES LITERARY 
CLUB— DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION— P. E. O.— CHAMBER OF 
COMMERCE. 

Masonic Lodges. — Many changes have occurred during forty years. 
Better roads and auto cars have had much to do in the change of social 
centers, small communities are no longer isolated. New and more con- 
venient groupings come about by natural selection. The fact of wor- 
thy note is this: The fraternal spirit is continuous, a constant element 
in civilization, an evidence of life and vigor and an indication of true 
prosperity. 

The Masonic order was first in point of time, dating back to early 
pioneer days. It led the way, and has grown as the population has in- 
creased. Its history is well known, its position established. 

The Masonic fraternity, with eight lodges and over 600 members in 
the county, has from the beginning held a well defined place in the 
social and intellectual growth of Gentry County citizenship. 

Since 1849 when Gentryville Lodge No. 125 was organized, many 
efforts at different points have been put forth, all of them serving a good 
purpose, but not all of them permanent. 

The present lodges are as follows: Athens No. 127, 147 members, 
Albany; Alanthus No. 252, 45 members, Wilson Township; Jacoby No. 
447, 47 members, Darlington; Berlin No. 378, 48 members, Miller Town- 
ship; Ancient Craft No. 377, 106 members. King City; Havana No. 21, 
31 members, McFall; Gentryville No. 125, 51 members, Gentryville; 
Stanberry No. 109, 180 members, Stanberry. 

The Eastern Star. — The Order has five flourishing chapters in Gen- 
try County. At Gentryville, Stanberry, King City, Darlington, and at 
Albany. 

The Albany chapter now has 182 members. Officers as follows: 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 307 

W. P., Mr, Allen Bare; W. M., Mrs. Pearl Barger; A. M., Mrs. Slate 
Bassler; Sec'y., Mrs. Pearl Bare. 

Albany Chapter, Order or the Eastern Star, was organized and re- 
ceived charter dated Aug. 11, 1875, and in which was named as officers, 
Henrietta Daniels, Worthy Matron ; John T. Daniels, Worthy Patron ; 
and Sarah Jane McCammon, Associate Matron. The charter list shows 
at organization the names of 20 sisters and 25 brothers, who after a time 
failed to meet and charter surrendered. 

The Order of the Eastern Star was again organized at Albany, with 
charter dated April 30, 1894, as Esther Chapter, No. 13, O. E. S., and 
naming in the charter as officers: Mrs. Sarah E. Eader, W. M.; Joshua 
B. Thomas, W. P.; Miss Bash McCammon, A. M., and the following 
named were selected to complete the organization as follows, to-wit: 
Alice Larkin, Cond. ; Lillian Lainhart, A. Cond. ; Mary McCammon, Sec, ; 
Etha Reid, Treas. ; Lou E. Clark, Adah ; Emma Roberts, Ruth ; Gail Sulli- 
van, Esther; Sallie Cassity, Martha; Lillie E. Case, Electa; Matilda Luns- 
ford, Warder; and had a membership of 14 sisters and 14 brothers, a 
total of 28. 

The following have been duly elected and served as presiding of- 
ficers : 

1895 — Miss Bash McCammon, W. M.; Joshua B. Thomas, W, P. 

1896 — Mrs. Alice Larkin, W. M. ; Chas. V. Larmer, W. P. 

1897— Mrs. Lou E. Clark, W. M.; J. E. Sims, W. P. 

1898— Mrs. Lillian Lainhart, W. M.; Sam W. Clark, W. P. 

1899 — Mrs. Kate Larmer, W, M.; F. P. Marsteller, W. P. 

1900 — Mrs. Emma Roberts, W, M, ; Wm. T. Lunsford, W. P. 

1901 — Mrs. Joie Thomas, W. M.; Geo. A. Howell, W. P. 

1902 — The present officers are: Mrs. Lou Moore, W. M.; Miss Be- 
atrice Thomas, A. M. ; Marvin O. Mothersead, W. P. 

The chapter now has a membership of 71 sisters and brothers and 
is in a flourishing condition socially and financially and has ever been 
noted for its charity. 

Independent Order of Odd Fellows. — Next in order of time came 
the L O. O. F. fraternity — an average of 10 years later, meeting* the 
same needs, having the same general purpose, and affording optional 
affiliations to the individual. Thus inducing a spirit of friendly rivalry 
to the benefit of all concerned. 

The Odd Fellows are now prosperously organized in the following 
centers : Albany, Stanberry, King City, McFall, Darlington, Island City. 

The Rebekahs, Auxiliary, have lodges at Albany, Stanberry, King 
City and McFall. 



308 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Women's Christian Temperance Union. — While the earliest facts 
are not available, the W. C. T, U. is known to have been well organized 
and in active work in Gentry County as early as 1890. It is the nature of 
such work that its activity should vary as demands for special efforts 
and opportunities presented themselves. 

However, the ladies of Gentry County have proven their persever- 
ance and versatility. When blocked from direct temperance work, they 
took up cognate work, such as "Child Welfare," "Women in Industry," 
"Sabbath Observance," "Health and Morality," and "Scientific Tem- 
perance Instruction," thus helping always to create that nation wide 
public sentiment which finally resulted in prohibition. 

It is interesting to note that the W. C. T. U. ladies were making 
comfort bags for the sailors of our own navy long before the World 
War, popularized such work. 

From 1904 and onward, the whole county quickly became organ- 
ized and an ever increasing activity has been manifested. 

The World War brought prohibition and for a time merged the 
work of the W. C. T. U. in the general struggle. But "Those Women" 
did not quit. The enforcement of law is as important as getting the 
law. Education must be maintained. Child welfare, health and moral- 
ity, still invite the attention and reward the efforts of this great society. 
In reviewing thirty years of work in Gentry County, one feels it has 
been worth while to have counted one in the ranks of such a union. 

The appended clipping discloses present activity. 

Gentry County has not, throughout its history, been a greatly saloon 
ridden county. And yet temperance has always been a vital issue. The 
W. C. T. U. has ever been fighting, or rallying for the next conflict. The 
organization has been noted for three things : 

First, giving aid and comfort in every local option or special cam- 
paign. 

Second, keeping the educational features of temperance at the 
front. 

Third, giving cordial assistance to any and all civic efforts in the 
interests of community welfare. 

It is now vigorously active — striving to make national prohibition 
effective and permanent. 

The Civic Club of Albany. — As it is generally known, the Civic 
Club is an organization to work for the improvement of the town, in any 
way it can help. It is composed of women who are interested in the wel- 
fare of Albany and who are willing to give of their time and energy 
in accomplishing things. The club has a creditable membership but the 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 309 

officers are anxious to enlist the co-operation of all women. The club 
has recently been made a member of the State Federation of Women's 
clubs. The members have made a slogan, "Keep-a-Goin' " for the com- 
ing year. 

Among some of the accomplishments of the club might be men- 
tioned the following: They have looked after several classes of charity, 
have sent flowers and other things to the sick and shut-ins; gave gold 
medal to girl winner in athletics last spring; erected and kept in condi- 
tion flower boxes at court house and planted flower beds in court house 
yard ; erected big signs advertising "Albany — Home of Palmer College," 
furnished rest and lunch rooms for women ; brought some fine iron seats 
for the court house yard; helped in general clean-up days; served two 
dinners for community meet at Palmer college work day, sent two dona- 
tions to Near East Relief fund. Other things might be mentioned. 

The following are the present officers of the civic club : president, 
Mrs. D. O. Kent; 1st vice-president, Mrs. J. N. Barger; 2nd vice-presi- 
dent, Mrs. Gus Stevens; recording sec'y., Mrs. C. E. Ernst; correspond- 
ing sec'y-, Mrs. J. H. Degginger; treasurer, Mrs. E. A. Kent. 

The Ladies Literary Club. — The Ladies Literary Club, formerly 
called the ''Married Ladies Tea Club" was organized in October 1892, 
with the following named ladies as charter members: Mrs. J. W. Whit- 
ten, Mrs. T. H. Lainhart, Mrs. Carrie Cranor, Mrs. R. S. Floyd, Mrs. Ma- 
mie Hubbard, Mrs. Ida Wood Stevens, Mrs. C. V. Larmer, Mrs. Flora 
Humphrey, Mrs. Dora Crockett, Mrs. J. H. Markley, Mrs. Mary J. Doyle. 

Its objtct is the cultivation of intellectual, artistic and social life of 
its members and to promote public welfare. 

In 1902, the club joined the Federation of Women's Clubs. 

This club has been interested in philanthropy, and in the advance- 
ment of higher education. Prizes for essays on specified subjects have 
been awarded to students. Child welfare and health reforms have also 
been promoted. 

The Ladies' Literary Club was largely instrumental in securing the 
Carnegie Library for Albany. Besides procuring some books, the pic- 
tures and other works of art were placed in the library building by ladies 
of the Literary Club. 

The present officers are: Miss Elma Hendley, president; Mrs. Lon 
E. Clark, secretary; Miss Emily Stapleton, corresponding secretary; 
Mrs. Nannie Mothersead, treasurer. 

Virginia Daughters Chapter D. A. R. — This organization, as is well 
known, is devoted to patriotic and historical purposes. The Albany 



310 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

chapter was founded in December 1912, receiving from the national so- 
ciety the number 1193. 

The revolutionary ancestors of the charter members of this chap- 
ter were, with but few exceptions, residents of Virginia. Therefore, 
"Virginia Daughters" was adopted as the chapter name. The following 
is a list of the charter members : Mrs. Anna Bell Stapleton ; Mrs. Mary 
J. Doyle; Mrs. Jno. E. O'Hara; Mrs. Leora Peery; Mrs. Luella Graham; 
Mrs. Celesti Smith ; Mrs. David Ella Patton ; Mrs. Norcissa Dawson Wil- 
hite, deceased; Mrs. Kate Dawson Hotaling; Mrs. Leona S. Austin; Mrs. 
Grace P. Forbis ; Mrs. Narcissa Holdin ; Mrs. Winifred Doyle Adams, 
deceased; Mrs. Neva Green Etter; Miss Nancy E. Peery; Miss Elma 
Hundley; Miss Geneva E. Peery; Miss Lulu Hundley; Miss Lucy L. 
Peery; Miss Ada Bell Stapleton; Miss Sara Emily Stapleton; Miss Mary 
McCammon; Miss Louise Trent Peery; Miss Margaret Anne Stapleton. 

During the World War, Virginia Daughters were zealous in all 
the special activities known as "United War Works." The chapter gave 
efficient, untiring managers to several county departments. One thou- 
sand dollars was given to Red Cross and Y. M. C. A. work. A French 
orphan was adopted and contributions were given for the restoration 
of Tiltoloy, a French village and contributions made to the $100,000.00 
3rd Liberty Loan subscribed by the national society. 

Also individual members bought $25,000.00 Liberty bonds, and 
adopted three French orphans. 

The service flag of the Virginia Daughters contains nine stars of 
blue, and one of gold, the latter in memory of Lieut. Geo. Donald 
Holden who was fatally wounded in battle. 

P. E. O. — The P. E. O. Sisterhood was organized in 1869 by seven 
college girls. It is national in its scope and has ever stood for progress, 
education and opportunity. As a culture society, it embraces self-im- 
provement in various forms. 

Chapter P. Stanberry, Mo., organized Jan. 24, 1901, was the first 
P. E. O. Society in Gentry County and during the years since then the 
society has been a source of inspiration to its members. 

Chapter A. N., Albany, was organized in November, 1905. Charter 
members were Mesdames G. W. Doyle, J. W. Peery, Wm. O'Hara, 
R. L. Whaley, T. H. Hunt, T. S. Bishop, W. P. Stapleton, W. C. Hol- 
man, W. M. Wilson, Misses Nannie Peery, Flora McCammon, Ada 
Stapleton, Mary McCammon and M. V. Stewart. 

Christian education is one of the cardinal principles of the P. E. O. 
Sisterhood and the chapters of Gentry County have given largely to an 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 311 

Educational Fund of the society and chapter, and has contributed to the 
fund for the equipment of Palmer College. 

During the World War the ladies of the P. E. O. joined with the 
Red Cross and other organizations in the different lines of war work. 

Chapter D. E., King City, was organized May 29, 1919, with 13 
charter members. Political honors have been bestowed upon two mem- 
bers. Mrs. Anna S. McKnight is chairman of the Women's State Demo- 
cratic Committee and Mrs. Ida B. Parsons is a member of the State 
Executive Committee. Mrs. Mary E. Stringfield a charter member of 
chapter A Unionville, the first P. E. O. chapter organized in the state 
is now a member of chapter D. E. King City. 

Albany Chamber of Commerce. — The Albany Chamber of Com- 
merce was organized Feb. 8, 1921, with a membership (original) of 
thirty-five progressive and representative business men. In a rather 
intensive campaign a few weeks later the membership was increased to 
82 members, and later additions swelled the number to over a hundred. 

In the year 1921 there were really no things of great magnitude 
accomplished. However several projects were put over that were of 
some consequence. Among those things that tended to help Albany and 
the community and make it a better place in which to live were : A cash 
donation was made to Palmer College to the amount of $2,000; an ath- 
letic field which cost approximately $800 was completed^ a temporary 
sidewalk from the D. D. Kingsborough property west to Clark Street 
on the way to the Burlington Station was completed ; in the annual Clean- 
up Day the Chamber of Commerce worked in co-ordination with the 
Civic Club to make that worth-while project a success; eight of the lead- 
ing roads out of Albany were marked within a radius of ten miles; sev- 
eral large signs were put up on the main highways advertising "Albany 
— The Home of Palmer College" ; a tourist camp ground, with all con- 
veniences for mortorists passing through our city, was located on the 
South school campus ; a movement for the re-opening of the Wabash Sta- 
tion at Evona was agitated by the Chamber of Commerce ; v/e helped 
Palmer College provide for their guests at commencement time and the 
ten-day School of Religious Education; we worked in conjunction with 
the high school in promoting good sportsmanship in athletics by giving 
several gold medals to the high-point winners in track meets last spring; 
the organization made up about a thousand dollars for the maintenance 
of the best band in this section of the state ; rooms and enertainment were 
provided for the boys and girls from other towns who entered the song 
and declamatory contests held in the Palmer College Auditorium last 



312 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

spring ; three most successful Community Days for the grading and finish- 
ing of the College Athletic Field were held ; cash prizes in the Junior 
Red Cross were offered by the Chamber; a committee was sent to Jeffer- 
son City recently to look into the matter of rock roads for Gentry County. 



CHAPTER XVI. 



WORLD WAR. 



GENTRY COUNTY RESPONDS— TWENTY-NINE GOLD STARS— A TJST OF EX-SERVICE 
MEN FROM GENTRY COITNTY— NECROLOGY— RED CROSS AND OTHER ORGANI- 
ZATIONS— BOND SALES. 

Gentry County furnished nearly 700 men for military service in the 
World War. Of this number fully one-third volunteered before the se- 
lective draft became effective. 

This spontaneous offering for foreign service was due in part to the 
earnest, inspiring words of President Wilson, but perhaps for the greater 
part to the innate sense of right and justice which is the inestimable pos- 
session of our citizenship. It was due also, in lesser part, to reaction 
from the intense German propaganda. American youth despise the 
sneak. 

During the years of the war before the entrance of America, Ger- 
man methods had become known and despised by all nations. In our 
nation where general information is so widely distributed, the impulse 
to fight is not born of prejudice or of blind hate. It springs from knowl- 
edge — from a settled conviction that the fighting ought to be under- 
taken and produces an intense determination that it shall be fought 
through to final victory. 

It was this intelligence, this conviction and this determination that 
made the A. E. F. the swiftest and deadliest fighting engine ever as- 
sembled. The highly trained, but less intelligent German masses crum- 
bled before it. 

Gentry County had her part. Of the millions engaged, the average 
death rate was two per cent, but Gentry County has four gold stars to 
the hundred. 

The roster of our soldiers is practically complete, as nearly so as it 
can be given. Likewise the tribute to each of the 29 who gave "the last 
full measure of devotion" is as nearly accurate as painstaking care can 
make it. 



314 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 



A permanent and appropriate monument is projected to preserve 
their hallowed memory. 

The following is a list of ex-service men from Gentry County : 



Courtney Alexander 
Jasper Adams 
John A. Atkins 
Harry L. Adams 
Jos. Thos. Arnold 
Leslie V.Allen 
Clarence W. Adams 
Lena Chas. Allenbrand 
Thurman Allen 
Joseph Archer 
Chas. V. Adams 
Emert Akes 
Elbert Adams 
Wm. E. Arnold 
Wm, L. Asher 
Harry Armstrong 
Oscar D. Adams 
Ed.CarlAllis 
Roscoe Akes 
Thos. Alsburry 
Clinton Allen 
Olizie Anderson 

GoldaA.Burk 

Leo Ballard 

Cleo A.Baldock 

Orville Baxter 

Jas. Harold Besinger 

Chas. H. Bechtel 

Wm.Boley 

Jas. Walter Boner 

Leroy C. Bush 

Leonard Burton 

Marion E. Brant 

Andra Black 

RollieBoulting 

Jennings B.Botts 

Arthur C. Bull 



Amos S. Burton 
Eli V. Baxter 
John E. Bounds 
Wm. Edwin Boatright 
Elmo B. Baird 
Samuel Brock 
Orva Ray Barns 
Geo. L. Babb 
Fred Berry 
VenaR. Birbeck 
Wm. Clifford Berry 
Bryant Boulting 
Jas. C.Bunnell 
Herbert A. Brown 
James B. Burroughs 
Graven Bratcher 
Thos. H. Butt 
Harley Goss Beets 
Arthur Eberts Baber 
Floyd Bagnell 
Sam. W. Baxter 
Geo. D.Bowman 
John H. Bremer 
A.S.Bliesh 
Joe Baird 
Thos. A. Burton 
Chas. C. Bishop 
Henry W. Beachler 
Robert O. Brewer, 
Jas. Doak Berry 
Guy Baker 
Chas. M. Bulla 
P. S. W. Burgin 
Dale Brown 
Cleo Barber 
Clyde Black 
Bert. S. Barber 
Arch Burkhart 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 



315 



Henry Bell 
Jasper Bryant 
Jas. C. Batson 
Robt. Birbeck 
H. Victor Berry 
G. Cleo Bowser 
Ward Boston 
Chester Burks 
Lloyd Britton 
Walter Bottorf 
Chas. E. Bentely 
Wm. Lewis Bare 

Wm. Whitton Crockett 
John Childers, Jr. 
Ray N. Canaday 
Orval Cooper 
Elza Collier 
Theo. Caster 
Oscar E, Cook 
Jas. E. Caster 
Fred Chalders 
Lloyd Cook 
Jos. M. Crouse 
Leslie Caster 
Claude Carter 
Hubbard Cotton 
Floyd Campbell 
Jack Childers 
Wm. E. Colville 
Russell Jay Cameron 
Geo. Chowning 
Jas. Jefferson Clark 
Ira Walter Cook 
Wm. K. Callow 
Otho A. Crawford 
Owen Cousins 
Crawford Curtis 
Jas. M. Chittim 
Dewitt Campbell 
Roy Chapman 



Chas. Campbell 
Leonard Cookley 
Herschel Cooper 
Weedson Canaday 
W. H. Carter 
Paul Consoliver 
Clyde Chadwick 
Homer Cure 
Oliver Crockett 
Harold E. Conrad 
Homer Cure 
Chas. A. Cobb 
David D. Cranor 
John D. Cottrill 
Lewis Chittim 
Dan Consoliver 
Lloyd Cox 
C. L. Cummins 
Albert L. Christian 
John H. Carpenter 
John M. Chittim 

Orin Denny 

Geo. R. Dye 

Olizie E. David 

Gibbon Durbin 

Carl E. Davis 

Sam. B. Dresback 

O. Burl Duckworth 

Ed. B. Derks 

Roy R. Dunshee 

J. H. Degginger 

Roy Duncan 

Jesse Waynd David 

Roy David 

John Dowie 

Benj. E. Despain 

John S. Dills 

Tracy E. Dale 

Wm. Callie Davidison 

Volley Dorsey 



316 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 



Earle Duncan 
Ottis T. Dills 
Jno. Elvis Dalbey 
Jno. R. Doyle 
Wilbur F. Duncan 
George Duckworth 
Luther DeMoss 
H. G. Dakan 
H. Cliff Doolin 
Chas. Geo. Davis 
Frank M. David 

Paul England 
Floyd Evans 
Cleo Evans 
Harry T. Elder 
Emmett Evans 
Delno Eslinger 
Tony T. Elliot 
Ross W. Edmondson 
Thos. Ora Eads 
Jas. C. Edmonds 
Clem Evans 
Leslie Elam 
Frederick Elder 
Lee Etter 
Morris D. Elder 
Paul Elder 
Paul Evans 

Thos. B. Freed 
Olen Frizzell 
Jos. E. Farthing 
Clarence Frederick 
Sam F. Fountain 
Levi Fisher 
Geo. Fite 
Cleo J. Flowers 
Clyde C. Fore 
Claude Frans 
J. P. Ferguson 



Melvin Floyd 
Otta S. Farthing 
Van J. Faden 
Wm. Tell Freed 
Geo. Ferrell 
Roy Funderburk 
Oda B. Fuller 
Shawnon Fore 

Harry Gordon 
Homer Gillespie 
Frank Gordon 
Ed. C. Griffith 
Henry Gall 
Glenn Gilleland 
Solon Groom 
Harvey Gillet 
Jesse Good 
Wade Good 
Paul Gibbany 
A. M. Gannaway 
Morris Green 
Orval Green 
Wm. E. Gladstone 
Leslie Gray 
Howard Gill 
Jos. C. Gilbert 
Norwood Giles 
Rusell Gill 
Elmer Gage 
Walter Griffey 
Lee Gilbert 
Roy E. Good 
Chas. F. George 
Lee M. Graham 
Albert Garmon 
Jesse O. Grace 
Claud Green 
Roy Good 
Albert Guerin 
Geo. Gall 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 



317 



Dale Gray 
Geo. Golder 
Fielding Graham 
Jas. Thos. Gillespie 
Jesse E. Grace 
Jno. Guy Gibson 
Lester C. Gartin 
Robt. E. Giles 
Allen Goodman 
Ivil Giles 
Clyde D. Green 
James Gregory 
Cleo Gregg 
Geo. J. Gladeston 
Geo. Griffey 
Huse Glasco 
John L. Grantham 
Robt. L. Grantham 
Paul Gregory 

B. Hyten 
Orval Hall 
Y. W. Harrod 
Phillip Henderson 
Mark A. Hopkins 
Leonard Harrod 
David E. Harden 
Donald Holden 
Wm. Guy Harden 
Oliver Hutchcraft 
Clarence Hughs 
Clinton Houstin 
Daniel Haack 
Pearl Hawthorne 
Bert W. Hill 
Roy L. Hall 
Wm. Hanley 
Edgar M. Hall 
W. W. Heckinlively 
Paul Harvey 
Geo. W. Hall 



E. R. Hardwick 
Jno. Howery 
Geo. B. Hartman 
C. F. Heintz 
C. S. Hopper 
Thos. J. Handly 
G. F. Heckinlively 
Leo Moots Henderson 
Claude Hazelwood 
Walter H. Hyatt 
Jno. E. Higginbotham 
Earl Hathaway 
Wm. F. Heaton 
Frank Hamilton 

C. L Hay 
Luther Hager 
Thos. C. Holden 
Ed. W. Henderson 
Verno Casper Humphery 
Ray Hartman 

Hugh Hinore 
Geo. F. Howell 
Chas. M. Hulet 
Ernest Hardin 
Chas. L. Hulet 
J. M. Harden 
Lester Lee-Hawthorne 
Roy S. Hinkley 
Wm. E. Hulet 
A. Newton Hull 

Hobart Ireland 

Clyde Jongon 
Clifford E. Jones 
Clifford Jones 

D. F. Jameson 
Roy Jennings 
C. H. Jenkins 
J. A. Johnson 
H. B. Justice 



318 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 



A. F. James 

F. H. Jameson 
Fred James 
Fred Jameson 
S. E. Johnson 
Glenn Jolly 

Roy Newton Jolly 
Stephen Jones 
William Jones 
Clyde Jonagon 
Jas. E. Jennings 
Del Jenkins 

James S. Knisley 
Bryon Knisley 
Fred E. Kemp 
Harry Kelley 
Eldon Kingsborough 
Clyde Kinman 
Geo. Kingsborough 
Ferris Keyes 
Wm. F. Kier 

G. B. Kosman 
Roy J. Kirk 
Robert Kier 
Owen Kurtright 
Walter L. Kier 
Benj. Kyger 
Fitzburgh Kerfoot 

B. Joe. Kelly 
Henry Kirk 

Ray B. Lykins 
Harry S. Lupf er 
Lykins Elmer 
Ralph Leonard 
L. E. Lewis 
Fred Lynch 
Wm. R. Lovall 
A. G. Lewis 
T. Earl Longstreth 



J. F. Lajoie 

Milton Levy 

Emery Lykins 

Paul Liggett 

Lowell Lawrence Livergood 

Delno Lawter 

Forrest Larmer 

Leon Lane 

A. M. Leonard 

Sam. E. Logsdon 

W. J. Lainhart 

Reece Liggett 

Albert Lynch 

Robt. E. Lee 

Hallie Leith 

Chas. O. Lane 

Elmer Lane 

Wm. C. Lane 

James Lemaster 

Chas. A. Lindley 

Sam. M. Levy 

Chas. L. Lawrence 

Harold Lamb 

Edward Lindsay 

Jacob Miller 
Geo. Murray 
Porter Mothersead 
Jno. Milstead 
C. R. Miller 
Benj. Martin 
G. A. Manring 
E. H. Morrison 
L. E. Miles 
Jas. R. Mullholland 
J. W. Mendenhall 
A. Madera 
W. E. Mitchell 
Robt. H. Malson 
Robt. B. Martin 
Fred L. Miller 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 



319 



Merritt Miller 
C. R. Miller 
Jno. W. Matney 
Otsa Misemer 
L. S. Myers 
Alva Martin 
Jno. Miller 
J. D. Miller 
W. R. Millan 
Robt. Miller 
Herschel G. Myrick 
Arch J. Murphy 
Roy E. Malson 
Wade Moody 
Jay Walter Malson 
Wm. O. Myers 
Leon Mayer 
Carl V. Miles 
Fred Meyers 
Ray E. Murphy 
Raymond Malson 
Alva Moberly 
Raymond Martin 
Evert G. Morrison 
Adolph Mayer 
Ray S. Moran 
Malcolm Moody 



W. E. McCampbell 
Jas. Edgar McCary 
Earl McNesse 
Clifford McElvain 
Ray McQuire 
Chas. R. McDaniel 
Jas. McConkey 

Buford Newman 
H. E. Newcomer 
Walter Neidig 
Orville F. Norton 
Roy Noonan 
Charles Newell 
Chas. E. Needles 
Geo. Norris 
Ed. G. Neal 
Emmett Roy Noble 
Jno. Newman 

Wm. O'Neal 
Jos. Oshel 
Jno. P. Osborn 
Walter E. Osborn 
Jno. Joseph O'Malley 
Gartha R. Osborn 
O. A. O'Bannion 



Otto McDaniel 
Chas. McCarty 
Wm. H. McCarty 
Chas. R. McCarty 
Melvin McGinley 
Rob't McVey 
Reuben McCampbell 
Emery McCampbell 
Chas. McConkey 
Clyde McMillen 
Sam McDowell 
Alfred McVay 
Wm. Glenn McQuire 



Erna G. Peery 
Jno. Jopplewell 
Benj. Prior 
O. C. Parker 
Otto Patterson 
Clarence Poe 
Thos. Patton 
John M. Pennebaker 
Orville S. Parman 
Rufus Peery 
Herschel Price 
Roy E. Peasley 
Bud O. Phinney 



320 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 



Marvin Price 
Wm. Pittsenbarger 
James L. Pierce 
James Park 
Jas. Harvy Pence 
Jno. Piper 
Jas. Pierce 
Wm. Patee 
Benj. L. Peery 
Walter Patton 
Willard Persinger 
Virgil Patton 
Lorin W. Price 
Kern C. Pike 
James Mike Price 
Estell Pulisfer 
Lloyd Patton 
Clarence Peery 
Thos. Peery 
Homer Phillipps 

Jno. F. Quigley 
Edgar F. Quigley 
Walter Quigley 

F. S. Rodgers 
V. C. Rogers 
T. W. Rigney 
Wm. Robinson 
T. Rainey 
H. L. Ross 
Jno. A. Rigney 
Wayne Rainey 
Orville N. Rust 
Melvin Ruch 
Homer Robertson 
V. H. Rigney 
Homer Rouse 
James Rader 
Lewis F. Ray 
Oscar F. Riley 



Cecil Rice 

Wm. E. Ripley 

Silvan Reed 

Woodson Rhodes 

Orville Ragland 

F. Rowlett 

O. Royston 

Chas. Runyan 

W. H. Royston 

Grant Ross 

Herbert Dwithe Reams 

Brady Ross 

Clifford Rucker 

D. W. Ragland 

J. E. Rucker 

Shelton L. Rose 

Norest Riley 

Roscoe Rice 

Thos. Robison 

Henry Ross 

Marion C. Roark 

Clifford Ross 

Sheldon Rose 

Graver C. Rogers 

W. R. Rudkin 

Roy M. Riche 

L. Marion Rose 

H. Royston 

Cecil Royston 

L Robertson 

Clif . Rucker 

Myron Rybolt 

Ollie Redmond 

Jerry Royston 

Jas. Caster 

Harvey Romesburg 

L. P. Richmond 

R. F. Runyan 

R. B. Scott 
Paul Stokes 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 



321 



Leonard Stam 
Jas. Lowery Smith 
Jno. R. Smith 
Wm. Lv Stokes 
Chas. G. Sharp 
Harry Sampson 
Wm. G. Stevenson 
Lloyd Marion Summa 
Evert Salsman 
Geo. V. Smith 
Orvey Smith 
Fred C. Sharp 
Chas. E. Stam 
W. Stephenson 
J. L. Scarborough 
Olin Steiman 
A. R. Sill 
L. S. Storer 
G. S. Shanabarger 
R. M. Sinks 
G. A. Sealey 
A. C. Stegman 
Altice Searcy 
Curtis Shelby 
Russell H. Stegman 
W. M. Smith 
Jas. V. Seals 
A. K. Smith. Jr. 
G. V. Smith 
Lester H. Smith 
Geo. Spiking 
Clyde E. Shearer 
Jas. W. Stephens 
Reece Homer Smith 
Boyd Smith 
Wm. Lloyd Smith 
Lee Smith 
Raymond Sager 
Homer Ray Summa 
Walter K. Smith 
Charles A. Shrike 



Jack Stapleton 
Guy O. Smith 
Gartha E. Smith 
Sanford G. Shilder 
John B. Scott 
R. L Sharp 
Wm. H. Siddens 
Orby Searcy 
W. B. Sampson 
Fielding Stapleton 
Albert Steinman 

L. E. Turner 
Luther Taylor 
Wm. H. Terry 
E. L. Toombs 
C. L. Turner 
Jno. G. Twist 
Bessell H. Trailkill 
Benj. R. Treasure 
Jno. C. Townsend 
Arthur Tibbetts 
Newton Rolla Tunks 
Wm. M. Todd 
Claude Tennant 
Claude Tunnell 
Arelious Taff 
P. E. Turner 
John Tatum 
E. Lee Tipton 
Chas. B. Tresaure 
Cecil P. Townsend 
Ray Trapp 
Wm. Thompson 
Ira O. Taylor 

John F. Uhlig 

Geo. Vaughn 
Arlis B. Vogt 
Carl Vanhoozier 



322 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 



Frank D. Veal 

Frank Woods 
Fred Willett 
Jasper Weese 
William Willis 
Harry Whitmore 
Wm. R. Williams 
Andrew Weese 
Belden Wilson 
W. C. Wright 
Leander Weese 
Barney Weese 
Manuel Wheeler 
Chas. A. Waldo 
A. K. Wilson 
Orville Wright 
S. Jno. Wagers 
Paul B. Wilson 
Gordon A. Ward 
Max W. Williams 
Ernest R. Walker 
Glenn D. Washburn 
Earl Walker 
Enisley J. Wyatt 
Garvin Whitley 
Ottie Wall 
Ralph Weaver 
Arthur Ward 

Thje following is a list of 
service during the World War 
Elbert Lewis Adams 
Harwood Canaday 
Jesse Wayne David 
Ray David (Nodaway Co 
Frank Wilbur Duncan 
Roy P. Duncan 
Roy P. Duncan 
John Dowie 
Claude Frans 



Peery Wright 
E. A. Wood 
Errett Williams 
J. F. Wilson 
Orval Ward 
C. G. Woolen 

E. E. Wilson 

F. S. Whited 
Geo. E. Wooding 
L. E. Weaver 
Cecil Wilson 
Thos. H. Walker 
Lloyd L. Welck 
Shattuck Wilson 
Arthur E. Walker 
Wm. H. Wall 
Wm. Dale Wayman 

Alva Yarrington 
J. E. Yarnell 
Miles Yount 
Edgar Yount 
Raymond Yeater 
Claude Young 

Frank Zentz 
Sam Zumwalt 
Clif. Zumwalt 

Necrology. 

men from Gentry County, who died in the 

Donald F. Holden 
Wm. Earl Hulet 
Harry T. Elder 
.) David Ed. Hardin 

William Hutchcraft 
B. Hyten 
Harold Lamb 
Hallie Leith 
James LeMaster 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 323 

Porter Mothershead Raymond Sager 

John Joseph O'Malley Clifford Zumwalt 

James R. Park Edward T. Lindsay 

James Rader Cecil A. Rice 

Homer Rouse John Matney 

Clarence D. Tunnell John Gyer 
Guy Oren Smith 

Red Cross and Other Societies in the World War — The response of 
any people to patriotic demands in time of war is a good standard by 
which to measure their true worth. The World War called for three 
things: Men, money and relief work. 

Volunteer relief work began with the war. The W. C. T. U. waited 
for no call except the needs of the soldiers. So with many smaller socie- 
ties. They went at once to the work of relief. Almost every community 
had examples of this activity. All over the county people wanted to help. 

The call for a Y. M. C. A. drive to raise $5,000.00 for war work 
was apportioned out to the various subdivisions of the county and was 
quickly over-subscribed. The response came promptly from all parts of 
the county. 

When all these activities were merged, and placed officially in 
charge of the Red Cross. The scope of the work was not at once under- 
stood. It took some time to realize the need of complete organization 
and proper co-ordination. 

With Victor Twist as president. Rep. J. W. Mays, secretary and 
Mrs. Mary O'Mally at the head of the Woman's Department, the Red 
Cross soon came into fullest efficiency. Co-operation became universal. 
Thirteen branches were scattered over the county. The membership rose 
to 5,000. Almost every citizen, man or woman, offered something — 
wanted a part. 

As well as money, many men and women devoted all possible spare 
time to some form of relief work. Albany held a sale with proceeds of 
$3,000.00. King City's sale produced $4,000.00. Some $10,000 were 
turned into the general treasury. 

There follows a list of Red Cross branches in Gentry County: Al- 
bany branches, Stanberry, King City, McFall, Darlington, Lone Star, Si- 
loam, Gentryville, Gentry, Willow Row, Pleasant Valley, Huggins and 
Ford City. 

The following is a list of articles shipped : Hospital bed shirts, 
3,347; wash cloths, 1,201; handkerchiefs, 1,499; sweaters, 1,217; band- 
ages, 9,843; helmets, 246; wristlets, 461; gun wipes, 111,765; socks. 



324 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

2,336; pajamas, 1,532; napkins, 656; gauze compresses, 19,843; under 
garments, 1,479; miscellaneous, 901. 

Such volume and variety of results, spread over the county, re- 
quired a vast amount of supervision in almost endless detail. This part 
of the work was in addition to money given or garments made. It was 
cheerfully volunteered and faithfully carried through — an abiding tes- 
timony to the unfailing spirit of sympathy and effective helpfulness so 
general throughout the whole of the county. 

When the war closed and its immediate consequences had been ar- 
ranged for. Gentry County citizens did not suffer the Red Cross work to 
lapse. With G. M. Peery, as chairman of the County Chapter and Miss 
Elma Hundley as secretary, the work of the Red Cross has been made 
permanent. 

Miss Gladys Blume, R. N., has been engaged as Public Health 
Nurse and is now in her third year, salary and expenses are paid by the 
Red Cross organization. 

Miss Plume's position is thus defined : The Gentry County Chapter 
of American Red Cross has secured the services of a Red Cross Public 
Health Nurse. 

Duties — (1) To give skilled nursing care through short visits to the 
patient. (2) Actual demonstrations at the bedside. (3) Instruction in 
the care of the patient and in those laws of hygiene necessary to the pro- 
tection of the family and community. (4) Visiting and examining school 
children. (5) Teaching classes in "Home Hygiene and Care of the Sick." 

The nurse does not stay in the home of the patient, but spends one 
or two hours a day in the home, giving whatever care may be indicated 
or whatever treatment may have been ordered by the doctor and teach- 
ing the family how to care for the patient until her next visit. She always 
works under the direction of a physician. 

In general the organization throughout the county is a continua- 
tion from the war period. The interest continues. In two of the south- 
west district conventions Gentry County has had the largest delegation 
in attendance from any county, except the county in which St. Joseph is 
located. 

The work is largely among the children of the graded schools, and 
makes for better citizens. And the county is earnest in its support. 

The efficient work which has been done by Gentry Red Cross Chap- 
ter the past year has attracted the attention of the officers of the South- 
west Division, at St. Louis, as well as of those at eastern headquarters, 
and as a result this county has been given the distinction of being made 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 325 

one of two counties in Missouri for the demonstration of Junior Red 
Cross work. 

Bond Sales — The banks of the county cheerfully undertook the 
placing of United States securities. They responded to every call, and 
during the war period an aggregate of about $2,000,000 was sold in the 
county. The people met the various calls with a commendable spirit of 
determination to see things through in matters financial. 

To this should be added the many thousands in small items han- 
dled by the post-offices. The total number of contributors cannot be 
known, but the response was very general, and in many cases, generous 
beyond the means of small investors, who, once the war was over, they 
were compelled to part with their stamps and small bonds at a heavy 
discount, but to their lasting honor let it be said that when the need was 
greatest, they more than did their share. 



CHAPTER XVII. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 



COUNTY COimT JUDGES— PROBATE JUDGES— CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT— CLERKS 
OF COUNTY COURTS— CIRCUIT AND COUNTY ATTORNEYS— SHERIFFS— COLLEC- 
TORS— ASSESSORS— TREASURERS— JUDGES OF THE CIRCUIT COURT— REPRE- 
SENTATIVES— COUNTY SURVEYORS— SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENTS— CORONERS- 
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATORS. 

County Court Judges. 

Michael Maltsberger, William Steel, Samuel Collins, appointed in 
1845. 

Michael Maltsberger, John C. Williams, William A, Childers, 
elected for four years. 

In 1849 Joseph Hawkins was appointed by the governor to fill va- 
cancy occasioned by the resignation of Michael Maltsberger. 

Joseph Hawkins, Phillip Messimer, P. R, Cadle, elected in 1850. 

James M. Howell, Peter Price, Adam Black, elected in 1854. 

By virtue of an act of the legislature of 1854 and 1855 three justices 
of the county court were reuired to be elected at the general election in 
1856, one to hold the office for six years, one for four years and the other 
for two yars, at which election Enoch Liggett, Robert Boggs and J. G. 
Wright were elected, in 1856. 

In 1860 Enoch Liggett, Robert Boggs and J. G. Wright composed 
the county court. 

Enoch Ligget, Jesse Gay and Jacob Jones, in 1862. 

Enoch Ligget, Jacob Jones and George W. Needels, in 1864. 

George W. Needels, Jacob Jones, John J. Ross, in 1866. 

J. T. Brown, John Huggins, Charles Lowery, in 1868. 

John Huggins, Thomas J. Brown, John Hall, in 1870. 

Thomas J, Brown, John Hall, John P. Lilley, in 1872. 

John Hall, John P. Lilley, Elisha Cameron, in 1874. 

Dimmon Dorsey was elected, but died before entering upon the 
duties of the office, and Cameron was appointed to fill the vacancy. 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 327 

Logan Peery, John P. Lilley, Jacob Kessler, in 1876. 
Samuel Jordan, R. H. Davidson, Albert J. Clark, in 1878. 
Thomas J. Stockton, James H. Campbell, Samuel Jordan, in 1880. 
Thomas J. Stockton, J. H. Campbell, J. E. McGuire, in 1883. 
K. McKenney, J. H. Mitchell, E. M. McLeod, in 1885. 
K. McKenney, E. O'Malley, L. C. Norman, in 1887. 

F. C. Norman, A. N. Vance, Ambrose Jennings, in 1893. 

A. L, Garrett, H. R. Jameson, Wm.. M. Pryor, in 1895. 
W. F. Conley, H. R. Jameson, Wm. M. Pryor, in 1897. 
W. F. Conley, A. C. Gartin, F. J. Howell, in 1899. 

W. F. Conley, A. C. Gartin, J. S. Hazen, in 1901. 
Eli Robertson, T. T. Pratt, John Madera, in 1903. 
Eli Robertson, T. N. Rigney, George Rose, in 1907. 
Eli Robertson, T. N. Rigney, B. M. Ross, in 1909. 

B. M. Ross, J. M. Parnam, J. S. Hazen, in 1911. 

B. M. Ross, J. M. Parnam, S. H. Dresbach, in 1913. 
T. N. Rigney, D. L. Bratcher, S. H. Drisbach, in 1915. 
T. N. Rigney, D. L. Bratcher, Geo. W. Rose, in 1917. 
T. N. Rigney, Orville Brown, Geo. W. Rose, in 1919. 
T. N. Rigney, Orville Brown, Lester Hawthorne, in 1921. 

Probate Judges. 

George W. Lewis, elected in 1849, and in 1855, re-'elected for the 
term of six years. 

James M. Howell, elected in August, 1861, for six years, but after- 
wards resigned, and Charles G. Comstock was appointed to fill the va- 
cancy in May, 1862. 

H. M. Rice, elected in November, 1862, who held the ofRce until 
June, 1866, when he resigned, and Isaac P. Caldwell was appointed to 
fill the vacancy. 

Calvin B. Hinkley, elected in November, 1868. 

Caleb S. Canaday, elected in November, 1872. 

Joseph B. Kingsborough, elected in November, 1876. 

William G. Williams elected in 1880. 

W. B. Mastin elected in 1883. 

J. W. Sullinger, elected in 1885. 

Jasper Cox, elected in 1895. 

J. T. S.De Bord, elected in 1903. 

J. A. Judd, elected in 1907. 

G. P. Adams, elected in 1915. 



328 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Clerks of the Circuit Court. 

Elijah P. Powell; Robert E. Dougherty; James O. George; A. G. 
Whitton; Charles G. Comstock; James West; Archibald B, Ross; Joshua 

B. Thomas; J. B. Thomas, 1882; J. S. Williams, 1893; D. S. Flowers, 
1895; H. J. Peery, 1903; J. S. Hawthorn, 1911; Ed E. Birge, 1915 to 
present time. 

Clerks of the County Court. 
George W. Birch ; Calvin B. Hartwell, appointed to fill vacancy ; A. 
G. Whitton; James R. Cunningham; William B, Castor; Bart H. Wat- 
kins; John T. Daniel; William B. Whitley; G. T. Patton, 1883; J. F. 
Wood, 1893; R. B. Coffey, 1895-97; C. M. McNeese, 1899-1903; Wm. E. 
Teel, 1907-13; C. H. Mothershead, 1915-21. 

Circuit and County Attorneys. 

Isaac N. Jones; Lawrence Archer; James Craig; Jonathan M. Bas- 
sett; William G. Lewis, two terms; Thomas H. Collins; B. K. Davies; 
Thomas Collins. 

The legislature at its session of 1870-1871 abolished the ofRce of 
circuit attorney and substituted in its place the office of prosecuting at- 
torney of each county. 

Charles H. Goodman was the first elected under the present law 
and held the office two terms. Joseph L. McCullough was elected in 
1876 and served two terms. Ebenezer H. Wood, George W. Lewis, Wil- 
liam M. Albin, Charles G. Comstock, Isaac P. Caldwell, Charles O. Pat- 
ton and Wallace Hubbard; J. W. Witten, 1883; J. H. McCarty, 1885; 
S. H. Benson, 1887; Wm. F. Dalby, 1893; J. A. Showen, 1897; S. H. 
Benson, 1901; C. E. Gibboney, 1907; J. B. Wayman, 1909; E. C. Lock- 
wood, 1913 ; D. D. Reeves, 1915 ; F. J. McCaslin, 1917 ; C. E. Ernst, 1919, 
to the present time. 

Sheriffs. 

James M. Howell; Elisha Cameron; George W. Birch; Thomas 
Kier; William B. Shoemaker; H. M. Rice; Frank Barkley; James B. 
Scott; Elisha Cameron; Henton Gibbany; James H. Gillispie ; John 
Thompson, 1883; Wm. S. Jennings, 1885; Joseph A. Ross, 1887; B. B. 
Harrison, 1889; J. A. Ross, 1893; G. W. Reed, 1895; P. H. Buckley, 
1899; J. T. Jennings, 1903; W. G. Carmack, 1907; J. A. Ross, 1913; C. 

C. Fee, 1917; Dale Brown, 1921. 

Collectors. 

Robert M. Cammon, 1872, re-elected in 1874; Francis M. Setzer, 
1876, re-elected in 1878, and also in 1880; J. F. Liggett, 1882; H. M. 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 329 

Wayman; M. O. Mothershead ; Hugh Stevenson; M. O. Mothershead, 
1893; T. W. Kelley, 1895; D. W. Barrett, 1897; I. G. Patton, 1901. Of- 
fice merged. 

Assessors of County. 
John Huggins, Levi Yates, James A. Crawford, A. Garard, Joseph 
B. Kingsborough, James B. Scott, L. G. Jenkins, E. B. Crissey, Clinton B. 
Hash, T. Y. Grantham and Charles D. Blodgett; W. M. Harris; Ed. E. 
Ennis; M. O. Mothershead; J. D. Felly, 1893; L. P. James, 1895; Wm. 
N. Bently, 1901. Office merged. 

Treasurers of County. 

John B. Hundley, William G. Williams, James C. Carter, Mordecai 
M. Embree, James W. Owen, Logan H. Peery, Harvey M. Cranor, 
Charles Embree, and C. B. Harris; R. W. Crockett; D. F. Robertson; Hi- 
ram De Priest, 1893; T. S. Gillespie, 1895; Alex Owings, 1899; J. T. 
Brooks, 1903 ; J. S. Clark, 1907 ; F. E. Blue, 1913 ; Orville Parman, 1921. 

Judges of the Circuit Court. 

Solomon L. Leonard; W. B, Almond; Elijah H. Norton; James Mc- 
Ferren; William Heme; Jonas P. Clark; Isaac C. Parker; Bennett Pike; 
Samuel A. Richardson; John C. Howell; C. H. S. Goodman, 1882; Cy- 
rus A. Anthony, 1893; Gallatin Craig, 1899; William C. Ellison, 1907; 
John M. Dawson, 1917. 

Members House of Representatives. 

William G. Williams, 1846; Richard Roberts, 1848; Joab Neal, 
1850; Daniel Conway, 1852; Nathaniel Mothersead, 1854; William M. 
Albin, 1856; James R. Conway, 1858; Reuben Shultz, 1860; James R. 
Conway, 1862; David Cranor, 1864; Hudson M. Rice, 1866; Charles C. 
Byrne, 1868; Phillip M. Adams, 1870; Enoch Liggett, 1872; James L. 
McCullough, 1874; David C. Ganaway, 1876; Thomas A. McKinney, A. 
B. Ross, 1880; Anderson C. Smith, 1883; Frank A. Weimar, 1885; John 
T. Liggett, 1889 ; Oliver P. Russ, 1891 ; Edwin E. Ennis, 1893 ; James W. 
Sullinger, 1895 ; David F. Ftizgerald, 1897 ; Henry P. Tandy, 1901 ; Sam- 
uel T. Earixson, 1903 ; John A. Dale, 1907 ; John H. Burgin, 1911 ; J. W. 
McKnight, 1913; Drank Jones, 1917; W. S. Hardin, 1921. 

County Surveyors. 

John Plasters; Thomas Keith; James L. Plasters; A. Garard; Pier- 
pont H. B. Moulton; Fred N. Henton; George T. Kenyon; G. Butler; S. 
G. Clark, 1893-1901; W. A. Hunton, 1901-1909; J. B. H. Ray, 1915; C. 
N. Dewin, 1921 to present time. 



330 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

School Superintendents. 

John H. Whedbee, 1857; David McGaughey, 1860-'62; W. B. Cas- 
tor, 1864; N. Thomas Rogers, 1866; John B. Twist, 1868-72; L. C. Tay- 
lor, 1873; W. B. Whitely, 1875-'77; John H. Sampson, appointed 1878; 
George Pomeroy, 1879-'80; C. B. Hinkley, 1881-'83; J. H. Markley, 
1897; W. D. Crosswhite, 1899; G. L. Gray, 1909; C. H. Allen, 1911; 
Egbert Jennings, 1915; Gretchen Jennings, 1917; E. C. Duncan, 1919, 
to present time. 

Coroner. 

C. B. Hinkley; J. S. Hathaway; L. H. Peery; J. L. McCullough; R. 
P. Duncan; T, A. Daugherty; L. E, Miller; L. H. Peery; R. P. Duncan, 
1893; T. A. Daugherty, 1895; L. E. Miller, 1897; J. D. Halstead, 1899; 
L. H. Peery, 1901; T. E. Graham, 1903; J. N. Barger, 1907 to 1915; A. 
M. Ganaway, 1917; G. W. Whitley, 1919; S. O. Harding, 1921. 

Public Administrator. 

R. L. Whaley; Horace Peery; Wallace Hubbard, 1884 to 1903; C. 
H. S. Goodman, 1907 to 1911 ; W. H.-Haas, 1913 to 1915 ; R. M. McCam- 
mon, 1918, to present time. 



THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC mnxKY 



TILOEN KOCN-OATiONS 





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^:;^22^<^t:i;^^^^ 



PART III. 

Biographical. 



Hon Joshua W. Alexander, attorney at Gallatin, Daviess County, has 
had the honor of distinctive public service for his community and for the 
state during a period of 46 years. His long period of public life has covered 
the epoch making years of America public policies. Admitted to the bar in 
Missouri, in 1875, he began practicing in Gallatin, and he next year was 
elected public administrator of Daviess County. This position he held with 
credit until 1882. That year he became a member of the Gallatin Board of 
Education, serving first as the president, and later as the secretary. He 
remained on the board for 21 years, and his high ideals of the duty of the 
state in relation to the educational facilities for its future citizens have 
been instrumental in molding the public school policies of Gallatin. 

In 1882, Mr. Alexander was elected to the office of representative of 
Daviess County, and served in the Missouri General Assembly through 
some eventful years. He was the chairman of the committee on appropria- 
tions in the 33rd General Assembly, and was a leader in the enactment of 
legislation enforcing the provisions of the constitution of 1875 to correct 
abuses and prevent unjust discrimination and extortion in the rates of 
freight and passenger tariffs, and establishing reasonable maximum rates 
of charges for the transportation of passengers and freight on the rail- 
roads in the state. 

For two successive terms, Judge Alexander served as the mayor of 
Gallatin. In 1894 he was appointed a member of the Board of Managers 
of the Missouri State Hospital No. 2 at St. Joseph by Gov. W. J. Stone, and 
served for a number of years. In the meantime he had continued his prac- 
tice of law with increasing success, and because of his well established 
ability, in January, 1901, he was appointed by Gov. L. V. Stephens, judge 
of the 7th Judicial Circuit to fill out the unexpired term of Judge E. J. 
Broaddus, who had been elected judge of the Kansas City Court of Appeals 
in November, 1900. In 1904 Judge Alexander was reelected judge for a 
term of six years, but in 1906, without being a candidate, he was nominated 
as representative in the Congress of the U. S. from the Third Congressional 
District, and the following November he was elected to that office. In 
February 1907 he resigned from the bench to assume his new duties in 



332 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY vHOUNTIES 

Washington, and he continued in active service there during the 60th, 61st, 
62nd, 63rd, 64th, 65th, and 66th Congress up to Dec. 15, 1919. 

Judge Alexander's services to the nation have been well known. He 
was the chairman of the Committee on the Merchant Marine and Fisheries 
in the 62nd, 63rd, 64th, and 65th, Congresses. One of the important pieces 
of work done after the Democrats gained control of the House in the 62nd 
Congress conducted by Judge Alexander was the "Investigation of the 
Shipping Combinations" under House Resolution No. 587. His work in 
connection with that investigation, his report to the House and the bills 
introduced by him to carry out the recommendations of the committee, are 
among his greatest achievements during the period of his congressional 
service. Following the sinking of the steamship, Titanic, in April, 1912, 
Judge Alexander introduced the joint resolution, which became a law in 
June, 1912, authorizing the President of the United States to call or partic- 
ipate in an international conference on the subject of Greater Safety of 
Life at Sea. The Conference was called by Great Britian, and President 
Wilson appointed Judge Alexander the Chairman of the United States 
Commissioners to this conference which met in London from Nov. 12, 1913 
to Jan. 20, 1914. Participating in the conference were 14 nations, besides 
Canada, Australia and New Zealand. . All the great maritime nations were 
represented in the conference. The Convention upon which the Conference 
agreed, was ratified by the United States Senate, and Judge Alexander was 
personally congratulated by President Wilson for the distinguished service 
which he had rendered the United States government in the Conference. 

Judge Alexander's ability and his intense desire to accomplish the 
things which he felt were essential to the prosperity and welfare of the 
government, kept him active in Congress. In, 1914, shortly after the 
World War began he introduced into Congress the Bill creating the War 
Risk Insurance Bureau in the Treasury Department. The aim of this legis- 
lation was to insure merchant vessels, their freight money and cargoes 
against war risks. The bill became a law in August, 1914. Later and to 
meet conditions as they arose during the war, Judge Alexander introduced 
bills, which became laws, extending the Act Creating the Bureau of War 
Risk Insurance, to protect the officers and seamen on U.S. Merchant vessels, 
against the risks of navigation in the war zone. He is also author of what 
is known as the Shipping Act of 1916 ; this Act created the United States 
Shipping Board and under its provisions the United States Emergency 
Fleet Corporation was incorporated, and both organizations rendered great 
service in building up our merchant marine to meet the imparative needs 
of the World War, as well as to meet the requirements of our foreign com- 
merce in the time of peace. 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 333 

In September, 1917, Judge Alexander introduced the bill further 
amending the Act creating the Bureau of War Risk Insurance, which be- 
came a law Oct. 6, 1917, known as the Soldiers and Sailors Insurance Act ; 
all of these bills were war measures, and were put through Congress with 
expedition, and were some of the many accomplishments of the Wilson Ad- 
ministration. 

Judge Alexander took a prominent part in framing the Radio Act of 
1912, and in all legislation enacted by the Congress regulating wireless 
communication, and requiring vessels carrying passengers to be equipped 
with wireless apparatus. 

On Dec. 15, 1919, Judge Alexander's loyal arduous, and able service 
to the Country and the Administration was rewarded by his appointment 
to a seat in the Cabinet of President Woodrow Wilson, as Secretary of Com- 
merce, succeeding Hon. William C. Redfield of New York. He served in the 
Cabinet of President Wilson until March 4, 1921, going out of office with the 
Wilson Administration. The great honor of a seat in President Wilson's 
Cabinet came to Judge Alexander unsought on his part, but met with 
universal approval. 

Judge Alexander always refers to his service in Congress as represen- 
tative of the Third Congressional District with great satisfaction. He had 
a fine constituency and did his utmost to reward their loyalty to him by 
efficient servcie. 

The above brief review of Judge Alexander's service to his community, 
his state and his country, is only a brief summary of the labors of a man of 
great ability, high ideals and eminent fitness for public service, and of the 
power he possessed to carry to a successful sonsummation the policies and 
ideals in which he believed. But back of Judge Alexander lies several gen- 
erations of fine family stock. The Alexanders are Scotch-Irish ancestry; 
and during the days of the American Revolution, they emigrated to Amer- 
ica and settled in a rugged section of Southwestern Pa. They were Pres- 
byterians in religious faith. Both of Judge Alexander's paternal grand- 
parents were born and reared in Washington County, Pa. They were mar- 
ried in that county in 1796 and soon thereafter moved to Mercer County, 
Pa., where they were among the very first settlers ; there they improved a 
farm and, there the Alexanders early became identified with all the stirring 
events and romance of early pioneer life in western Pennsylvania. 

Thomas W. Alexander, father of Judge Alexander, was born and rear- 
ed on a farm in Mercer County, Pa., and later learned the carpenter's trade 
at which he worked in Pitbtsurg and later in Cincinnatti, Ohio. He mar- 
ried Jane Robinson in the latter city. She was a woman of fine intellect and 
esteemed for her many womanly virtues. She was born in England and 



334 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

was brought to the United States in her infancy. The only child born to 
this union was Joshua W., the subject of this sketch. He was born in Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio, Jan. 22, 1852. Four years later his father went to Minnesota 
because of ill health. There he was joined the following year by his wife 
and little son. Thomas W. Alexander died in Minnesota, Oct. 12, 1859, and 
the following spring his widow and son came to Canton, Mo., to live, but 
soon returned to Cincinnati, Ohio, where Judge Alexander spent three 
years in the public schools, and in 1863 he and his mother returned to 
Canton, Mo. After his graduation from the public school in Canton, Judge 
Alexander entered Christian University there in 1868, He graduated from 
the university with a degree of A. B. in 1872. In June of the next year he 
came to Gallatin, to visit three former classmates, W. N., James A. and 
George W. Richardson, sons of Judge Samuel A. Richardson. Judge Alex- 
ander was then 21 years old and had planned to study law and fit himself 
for the legal profession. He planned to go to California and after teaching 
school for a time to fit himself for the law. But Judge Richardson prevail- 
ed upon him to remain in Gallatin and study law in the latter's office. The 
families later became more intimately connected through the marriage of 
Judge Alexander to a daughter of Judge Richardson. From the time of 
his admission to the bar in 1875 Judge Alexander's success was assured, 
and his career has amply proven the keen foresight of Judge Richardson, 
when he insisted upon the young, untried but promising man remaining in 
the state, which he has served so faithfully In February, 1876, Judge 
Alexander was married to Roe Ann Richardson, daughter of Judge Samuel 
A. Richardson. Mrs. Alexander is an ideal wife and mother, and has dis- 
charged all the duties of her station in life with good taste, rare tact and 
judgment. Judge and Mrs. Alexander are the parents of 12 children, 
four of whom died in infancy ; of the others, Samuel T. the oldest son, was 
educated in the public schools of Gallatin and the University of Missouri, 
and for several years was grain inspector at St. Louis under the State Rail- 
road and Warehouse Commission, resigned and engaged in business at Col- 
umbia, Mo., from which he was later compelled to retire on account of 
a sudden breakdown in health, and died Dec. 24, 1915. He married Miss 
Eulalie Campbell, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Campbell of Columbia, and 
is survived by his wife and two sons ; a daughter, Julia Jane, educated in 
the public school of Gallatin and at Grand River College in that city. She 
is now a widow, her husband Dr. N. R. Jenner one of the leading physicians 
of Washington, D. C, having died April 14, 1921 ; Francis, who was edu- 
cated in the public school at Gallatin, and at Grand River College, and a 
student for three and one half years in the St. Louis School of Fine Art, 
is the wife of Arthur G. Ficklin one of the leading farmers of Gentry 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 335 

County; George Forrest, graduate of High School of Gallatin and of the 
State University of Msisouri in 1904, with the degree of L. D., removed 
to Portland, Ore., in 1912, engaged in the practice of law, appoined United 
States Marshall for the state of Oregon in September, 1917, serving until 
Oct. 1, 1921, when he resumed the practice of law at Portland, Ore. He is 
married, his wife (Nee Lola Mae Surface) and four children, two sons and 
two daughters grace his home ; Rowena attended the public schools at Gal- 
latin and William Wood College at Fulton, Mo., makes her home with her 
parents ; Preston Carter, graduated from both academic and law depart- 
ments of the University of Missouri, practiced law for a time with his 
brother George F., in Portland, Ore., later returned to Missouri and on 
July 23, 1918, after our entry into the World War, enlisted in the U. S. 
Army and was assigned to 9th Co. 164th Dept. Brigade July 25, and trans- 
ferred to Field Hospital Company No. 238 (Sanitary Train) August 5, 
1918, was discharged from service Jan. 23, 1919, and is now serving in the 
office of the Solicitor of Internal Revenue, Washington, D. C. ; Walter Rich- 
ardson, a brief sketch of whose life appears later; and Lawrence Wood- 
ward, graduated from the Gallatin High School, entered the United States 
Naval Academy at Annapolis, Md., in 1918 as a Midshipman, resigned in 
September, 1919, after the World War, and entered the University of Mis- 
souri. During the greater part of the seasons of 1920 and 1921 he served 
as deck officer on vessels of the United States engaged in the coast survey 
off the coasts of Florida and Alaska. 

Walter Richardson Alexander was educated in the Public School at 
Gallatin, was a student in the University of Missouri for two years and 
completed his academic and law courses at George WasTiington University, 
Washington, D, C, and was admitted to the bar in the latter city. He 
served as Secretary of the United States Commissioners to the Interna- 
tional Conference on Safety of Life at Sea at' London, England in 1913 and 
1914. In February, 1917 he entered the legal department of the United 
States Shipping Board and was serving in that capacity February 1, 1918 
when he enlisted in the U. S. Army Aviation Corps in the World War. He 
was called into active service June 1, 1918, and went immediately into 
active training and qualified as an observer with the rank of second lieu- 
tenant. On Feb. 1, 1919, he was transferred to the reserve, with the rank 
of second lieutenant Aviation Section Signal Reserve Corps, U. S. Army, 
and ten days later resumed his position with the U. S. Shipping Board. 
On December 21, 1920, while preparing to make a flight in an army air- 
plane at Boiling Field, Anacostia, D. C, Lieutenant Alexander was struck 
on the head by the propellar of the machine and killed instantly. He was 
accounted one of the brilliant young men in his profession and had entered 



336 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

upon a useful career, and met tragic death in the hne of duty. The Sec- 
retary of War and the U. S. Shipping Board presented Judge Alexander 
with testimonials of the fine character and services rendered by their son. 

Judge Alexander has been an active member of the Christian church 
from his youth. In June, 1917, his alma mater, Christian University, con- 
ferred upon him the degree of Master of Arts in recognition of his public 
services. In the annals of Missouri the name of Judge Alexander will live 
as representing the finest, highest type of citizen the state has produced. 
It is with more than ordinary pride that the state points to such men. 
Such a life and service to state and nation should be an inspiration to the 
youth of our land, and proves what may be achieved by devotion to a laud- 
able ambition to make for oneself a name worthy to be remembered. 

Homer Feurt, the eflfiicient and well known president of the Farmers 
Exchange Bank at Gallatin, has filled all of the offices from bookkeeper 
to president in the bank, and hence is thoroughly conversant with every 
detail of the business of the institution. For this reason he is one of the 
most valuable officers, as well as one of the most competent financiers 
of the county. 

Homer Feurt was born on Nov. 1, 1876, at Jameson, the son of T. 
A. and Mary E. (Prewett) Feurt, to whom three children were born: 
Ora, the wife of N. R. Barnett, living near Gallatin ; Cort, a farmer near 
Jameson; and Homer, the subject of this review. T. A. Feurt and his 
wife now live on a farm near Jameson. 

Homer Feurt was reared on a farm, and attended the rural schools 
in his boyhood. Later he was a student in Grand River College, and in 
1899 became engaged in work in the Farmers Exchange Bank at Galla- 
tin. He worked in the bank before and after school hours, and was 
steadily promoted, until he reached his present position to which he was 
elected in February, 1915. Mr. Feurt has land holdings of 280 acres, 
most of which is in Daviess County, and the remainder in Colorado. 

On June 3, 1909, Mr. Feurt was married to Numa F. Netherton, 
who was born near Bancroft, the daughter of Moses G. and Almira C. 
(Brown) Netherton. Mr. and Mrs. Netherton were both born in Daviess 
County, and are both now dead. Mr. and Mrs. Feurt have three chil- 
dren: Thomas N., Robert G., and Frances C. 

Mr. Feurt is a Democrat, and is identified with the Christian Church 
in which he is a deacon. He is a member of the Masonic Lodge and the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows Lodge. In 1918, Mr. Feurt was 
elected to the office of mayor of Gallatin, and served with distinction for 
two years. He has been a member of the Board of Education of Galla- 
tin for six years, and is now the vice president of that body. Mr. Feurt 



HISTORY OP DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 337 

is a man of keen and alert intellect, a broad and intense understanding 
of financial affairs, and possessing a high degree of civic pride. He is 
an asset to his community. 

Dr. R. V. Thompson, well known business man of Daviess County 
and the efficient cashier of the Farmers Exchange Bank at Gallatin, is a 
native of New York, where he was born, Feb. 27, 1864, the son of Rich- 
ard and Hester (Booth) Thompson. His father was of English parent- 
age, and spent all of his life in New York, where he was a miller by 
trade, and where he died in 1868. Mrs. Thompson, a native of New 
York, brought her family of ten children to Livingston County, after the 
death of her husband. She bought a small tract of unimproved land, 
which was later improved by her children, and on this farm she spent 
the remainder of her life. She died in 1898. 

R. V. Thompson, the ninth child born to his parents, attended the 
schools of Livingston County, and later was a student in the old Avalon 
College at Avalon, an educational institution under the management of 
the United Brethern Church. This college was later moved to Trenton, 
about 1891. Dr. Thompson began the study of medicine under the tute- 
lage of Dr. T. W. Foster, and studied with him for two years. He then 
went to St. Louis, where he graduated at the Missouri Medical College 
March 5, 1889. He began practicing his profession at Jamesport, and in 
1892, and later took a post graduate course in Chicago at the Chicago 
Polyclinic. After completing his work there he returned to Jamesport, 
and was actively engaged in his profession until 1897, when he accepted 
a position as cashier of the Farmers and Merchants Bank of Jamesport. 
Two years later he resigned this place, and resumed the practice of med- 
icine. At the end of three years, he again accepted a position as cashier 
in the bank, which place he retained until he was elected president of 
the bank in 1909. Two years later the Farmers and Merchants Bank of 
Jamesport was consolidated with the First National Bank at that place, 
and the institution has since been known as the Commercial Bank of 
Jamesport. In 1915 Dr. Thompson came to Gallatin as the cashier of 
the Farmers Exchange Bank, and has filled that office in a highly compe- 
tent manner ever since. 

Dr. Thompson was married on Feb. 11, 1891, to Jennie Nickell, a 
daughter of Rev. yV. N. Nickell. Rev. Nickell has been identified with 
the Missouri Presbytery throughout a long career as a Presbyterian min- 
ister. He is now in charge of the church at Lowry City. Dr. and Mrs. 
Thompson have three children: Blanche, married to J. Frank Smith of 
Colorado; Victor, living in Colorado; and Mary Frances. 

Dr. Thompson is a Democrat, and is a member of the Knights of 



338 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUI^TIES 

Pythias Lodge. He served as coroner of Daviess County for two terms, 
and was the mayor of Jamesport for one term. For a period of 17 years 
he was a member of the Board of Education at Jamesport and was the 
treasurer of that organization. In his professional associations, Dr. 
Thompson is a member of the Daviess County Medical Society, the 
Grand River Medical Society, the North Missouri Medical Society, and 
the Missouri State Medical Association. He is one of the highly es- 
teemed and influential citizens of Daviess County, a man who in busi- 
ness, in his official capacity in his community, and as a private individ- 
ual, manifests a keen and intense appreciation of all that pertains to the 
welfare of the town and its citizens. 

Joseph McElvain, esteemed throughout his community as one of 
the rising young business men, is the assistant cashier of the Farmers 
Exchange Bank at Gallatin. He was born on a farm in Allen Township, 
Worth County, Feb. 25, 1886, the son of Cyrus and Ottie (Beaver) Mc- 
Elvain. 

Cyrus McElvain was born in Perry County, 111., in 1848, the son of 
Judge Andrew J. and Deborah (Combs) McElvain. When Cyrus McEl- 
vain was six years old, his parents moved to Worth County, Missouri, 
and settled in a part of that county which was then incorporated in Gen- 
try County. They made the trip from Dlinois to Missouri in wagons, and, 
because of a delay in receiving their relinquishment rights to the land, 
which they took up, the family was forced to live in the wagons for a 
time after they reached Missouri. They camped by the roadside, and 
lived in the open, no uncommon experience for the pioneers of that day. 
Judge McElvain had spent his life in Illinois, where he was bom; and 
his wife, a native of Tennessee, had come with her parents to Illinois in 
1835, so both of them were familiar with the hardships of the newly set- 
tled middle west. To their union five children were born, Cyrus, the 
father of Joseph McElvain, being the second. Judge McElvain served in 
the legislature for two terms, and was one of the prominent men of his 
day in northwest Missouri. 

Cyrus McElvain was reared on a farm and farmed land in Worth 
County until 1875 when he moved to Fremont County, Iowa. He located 
on a farm there and remained in Iowa until 1881, when he returned to 
Worth County. In 1870 he married Olive M. Beaver, born in Crawford 
County, Ohio, the daughter of Samuel and Mary (Emery) Beaver, early 
settlers of Worth County. To the union of Cyrus and Olive M. (Beaver) 
McElvain the following children were born : Maisie, the wife of W. Spill- 
man, a hardware merchant of Grant City; Willard ; Stella, married to 
Peter Bram, in the hardware business at Denver; Fred; Bessie; Josie, 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 339 

the wife of E. Martin of Allendale ; Andrew ; Joseph, the subject of this 
review ; Edna, married to Fred Williams, who is in the mercantile busi- 
ness at Denver; Alpha; and Millie. Mrs. McElvain died, Nov. 7, 1921, 
at the age of 69 years, and Mr. McElvain still lives on his farm in Worth 
County. He is a Republican, and is a member of the Baptist Church. 

Joseph McElvain was reared on the farm. He attended the rural 
schools and later was a student in Northwest Missouri College at Al- 
bany. He began his work in the banking business as a clerk in the Bank 
of Albany. He was afterwards made the assistant cashier in that bank; 
but resigned that position in September, 1911, to come to Gallatin, 
where he was made the assistant cashier of the Farmers Exchange Bank. 
During the year 1911, Mr. McElvain built an all modern bungalow in 
Gallatin, which has been his home ever since. 

On Dec. 24, 1908, Mr. McElvain was married to Alpha Harrison, 
born in Albany, the daughter of Alex and Mary (Hilton) Harrison. Mr. 
Harrison was a produce and coal dealer. Both he and his wife are dead. 
Mr. and Mrs. McElvain have one son, Donald, born on Jan. 27, 1913. 

Joseph McElvain is a Republican, and is identified with the Bap- 
tist Church. He is a member of the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. 
He is an alert business man, and a citizen of high civic ideals. 

A. J. Place, representative business man of Daviess County, is the 
cashier of the First National Bank at Gallatin. He was bom in Sheridan 
Township in this county on March 10, 1872, the son of W. H. and Mar- 
garet C. (McBrayer) Place. 

W. H. Place was born in Daviess County, Missouri, in August, 1851. 
In his early life he taught school, and later became a farmer. He at- 
tended the rural schools of Daviess County and taught here for more 
than 20 years. He was a Bible student of ability, and was accounted one 
of the best read men on the subject of Jewish and Ancient History in the 
community. He was a staunch adherent of the Christian Church, and 
was a Republican. His father, Peleg Place, was a native of Ohio, who 
came to Daviess County in pioneer days. W. H. Place filled some of the 
offices of his township, where he was held in high esteem. In 1870 he 
married Margaret C. McBrayer, born in Sheridan Township in 1853, 
the daughter of A. J. and Nancy (McCrary) McBrayer. They were na- 
tives of South Carolina and were among the first to begin farming in 
Daviess County. W. H. Place died in 1913 and Mrs. Place died in 1915. 
Their remains are buried in Brown Cemetery. Their children were: A. 
J., the subject of this review; Osta, married R. T. Scott and lives on a 
farm near Winston ; P. M. engaged in the mercantile business at Jules- 
burg, Col. ; and Delia, married to W. J. Gann, a merchant at Gallatin. 



340 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

A. J. Place was reared on a farm; attended first the rural schools 
of Daviess County; and later was a student in Kidder Institute at Kid- 
der. In 1892 he entered the produce business at Gallatin, and has been 
connected with various merchantile pursuits since that time. In Janu- 
ary, 1907, he was made the assistant cashier of the First National Bank, 
and in 1912 became the cashier of that institution, which position he has 
filled in a competent and thoroughly efficient way ever since. 

Mr. Place married Sarah A. Whitt on Dec. 23, 1893. She was born 
in Monroe Township, the^ daughter of H. A. and Sarah (Place) Whitt, 
both now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Place have nine children: Marion, in 
the mercantile business at Cameron ; Ollus, a merchant at Gallatin ; Ros- 
coe N., connected with a bank at Sterling, Col. ; Otis K., a resident of 
Pocatello, Idaho; Russell, clerking in Gallatin; Osta Irene, a student in 
Central College at Lexington ; and Charles and Lewis, both in the Galla- 
tin High School; and Robert, a student in the grammar school. 

Mr. Place is a Republican and a member of the Christian Church. 
He belongs to the Masons and the Yeoman Lodges. He is an able officer 
in the bank, a man of marked business acumen, and an excellent citizen. 

Miss Hallie Burton, the capable and progressive county superin- 
tendent of public schools of Daviess County, has her office in the court- 
house at Gallatin. Miss Burton is thoroughly competent to handle the 
school situation of the county as she was born and reared in Gallatin, 
and has been an integral part of the school system of this part of the 
state, both as a student in college and later as a teacher. 

Miss Burton is the daughter of Dr. J. W. and Eliza C. (Woodward) 
Burton, the former a native of Lawrence County, Indiana, where he was 
born, Nov. 29, 1842. His parents were Eli and Mahala (Conley) Bur- 
ton, both natives of North Carolina. Eli Burton went to Indiana when 
he reached manhood, and settled on a farm. He and his wife reared a 
family of nine children. Dr. John W. Burton attended the rural schools 
in Indiana, and then entered the University of Michigan from which in- 
stitution he received the degree of LL. B. In 1861 he enlisted for service 
in the Civil War, and became a private in the 50th Regiment, Indiana 
Volunteer Infantry. He served for three years, and was mustered out 
as a corporal. He participated in the battles and skirmishes in Tennes- 
see, Kentucky and Arkansas, including the battles of Mumfordville, 
Camden, and the assault on Little Rock. 

In March, 1865, Dr. Burton returned to Indiana, where he began to 
read law at Bedford with A. B. Carlton. In 1866 he entered the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, and in the spring of 1868 he came to Carrollton, 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 341 

Mo., where he was admitted to the bar. He later became interested in 
dentistry, and took up that study. In 1872 he moved to Gallatin, where 
he became a well known dentist. His clientage included patients from 
Gentry, Harrison, Grundy, Caldwell, and Livingston Counties, in all of 
which places he was recognized as a progressive and scientific dentist. 

Dr. Burton married Eliza Catherine Woodward on Nov. 29, 1882. 
She was born near Cainsville, April 23, 1859, and was a prominent 
teacher in the county before her marriage. She was a daughter of John 
and Julia Anna (Kennedy) Woodward. Elder John Woodward was 
born in Jennings County, Indiana, Jan. 11, 1821, and lived there until 
ten years of age when the family moved to Decatur County where he 
lived 15 or 16 years. He professed religion and was married to Miss 
Julia Ann Kennedy. In 1847 he and wife emigrated to Harrison County, 
Missouri, and settled on the land adjoining Cainsville. In December, 
1847 he and his wife united with the Baptist Church by letter. Shortly 
afterward he was licensed to preach and was ordained. In May, 1840, 
and most of the time up to his death he was actively engaged in the 
ministry. He died Dec. 17, 1898. He preached almost 60 years; he was 
a charter member of the Masonic Lodge and was Worshipful Master 
for 12 or 15 years. He was an active worker in Temperance. He was 
chaplain of the 3rd Regiment, M. S. M. during the Civil War. Julia Ann 
Kennedy was born in Delaware County, N. Y., and came to Indiana 
when but a child. She was born Aug. 27, 1820, and died Feb. 16, 1893. 

To Dr. Burton and wife the following children were born: Hallie, 
the subject of this review; Anna, died in 1914; Jay, died in 1907; and 
Isom now connected with the street railway company in Los Angeles, 
Calif. Mrs. Burton died at her home in Gallatin on April 9, 1917. Dr. 
Burton is now a resident of Texarkana, Ark. 

Hallie Burton grew up in Gallatin, and after completing her school 
work there, became a student in Chillicothe Normal, Grand River Col- 
lege at Gallatin, and the Missouri State University. She holds a Life 
State Certificate and has had a varied and interesting teaching experi- 
ence which has kept her in close touch with the vital issues of the pub- 
lic schools. She taught at Gallatin for five years; at Jameson one year; 
a year at Coffey and five years in the rural schools. She has handled 
the work in every grade from the 1st to the 12th, and is therefore thor- 
oughly conversant with the needs and standards for each grade. 

Miss Burton is the first woman ever elected to a county office by 
Daviess County. In April, 1915, she was elected to the position of 
county superintendent of public schools, and in 1919 she was re-elected 
to the same position. This record is conclusive proof of the support 



342 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

which Miss Burton has from the county. She has made an excellent of- 
ficial, and under her expert direction the schools of the county have 
made marked progress. No part of the county history shows more con- 
clusively the calibre of the citizens than does the part dealing with the 
attitude toward providing educational facilities for the children of the 
community. Miss Burton as the leader, and the men and women of the 
county as her able assistants have co-operated in building up the schools 
of Daviess County. 

John Musselman, well known in Daviess County as a farmer, a 
hardware merchant at Gallatin, and who served as the mayor of Galla- 
tin, is a native of the county. He was born in Grand River Township, 
four miles east of Jameson. His parents were Amos and Amanda A. 
(Drummond) Musselman, who lived for a short time on the farm where 
their son, John, was born on June 29, 1863. 

Amos Musselman was born in Paulding County, Ohio, in 1834. He 
came to Daviess County in 1858, where he taught school for a time, and 
later became a boot and shoe maker at Jamesport. He moved to a farm 
five miles northeast of Gallatin a short time afterwards, and in 1861 be- 
gan farming. Mr. Musselman was the owner of 320 acres of land, and 
was one of the successful farmers of his township. He was a Republican, 
and served as the justice of the peace in Grand River Township. He was 
married in Daviess County to Amanda A. Drummond, born near James- 
port in 1842 and to their union the following children were born: Cyrus, 
a retired farmer living at Gallatin; John, the subject of this review; 
Ella, married to J. R. Foster of Jamesport; Celia, the wife of Samuel 
Grant of Jamesport; Homer, an oil dealer at Gallatin ; and Robert, farm- 
ing in Grand River Township. Mrs. Musselman died in 1911, and Mr. 
Musselman died in 1921. Their remains are buried in the Masonic Cem- 
etery at Jamesport. 

John Musselman was reared on the farm and attended the rural 
schools. He farmed in Grand River Township, where he was the owner 
of 283 acres of land. He and his brother, Robert, now operate a farm in 
partnership. In December, 1908, Mr. Musselman moved to Gallatin, 
and the next year he bought a hardware store in partnership with J. A.' 
Mann. This business relation was maintained for four years, when Mr. 
Musselman traded the stock to S. B. Scott for a farm near Altamont. 
Mr. Musselman and Mr. Mann operated the farm for more than three 
years, when they again bought the hardware stock from Mr. Scott. 
They continued to operate the store until June, 1921, when Mr. Mann 
sold out to John N. Brown. The firm is now known as Musselman and 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 343 

Brown Hardware and Implements Company, and does a thriving busi- 
ness. The store is located on the north side of the Square, and is onQ of 
the well established enterprises of the town. 

On Dec. 24, 1896, Mr. Musselman was married to Arminta King, 
who was born, reared, and married in Springfield, 111. She was the 
daughter of W. and Dulcenia (Barnett) King; the former of whom died 
many years ago, and the latter died at the home of Mrs. Musselman on 
July 28, 1921, at the age of 91 years. Mr. and Mrs. Musselman are rear- 
ing a niece of Mr. Musselman's, Frances. 

Mr. Musselman is a Republican, and is a member of the Masonic 
Lodge. In the spring of 1920 he was elected to the office of mayor of 
Gallatin, and made a competent and progressive official for one term. A 
fire wagon was installed, the debt on it paid off, 800 feet of water main 
has been laid, an ordinance prohibiting the parking of cars any place ex- 
cept the middle of the street has been passed, and a sewer survey, look- 
ing toward a complete modern sewage system, has been completed. Mr. 
Musselman is now serving on the committee in charge of the draining of 
the Muddy Creek. He is a man of high civic ideals, capable and practi- 
cal in all of his work, a citizen of whom his town is justly proud. 

D. Luther Lowrie, the assistant postmaster at Gallatin, was born, 
reared, and educated in this community. His parents were H. C. and 
Nannie (Sharrah) Lowrie, to whose union four children, were born as 
follows: Walter C, Glenrock, Wyo. ; Grace, the wife of Elmer Kirk- 
patrick of Hamburg, Iowa ; Joseph H., a rural mail carrier at Gallatin ; 
and D. Luther, the subject of this sketch, born at Gallatin, June 20, 
1899. 

H. C. Lowrie was born in Pennsylvania, Feb. 28, 1857. He came to 
Gallatin in his youth and was a meat merchant for a few years, later ac- 
cepting a position as a traveling salesman for a packing house, and 
working out of Kansas City, Mo., where he now lives. His wife, Nan- 
nie A. (Sharrah) Lowrie, was born in Daviess County on Jan. 2, 1861. 
She lived on a farm until she was eight years old, when her parents died, 
and she went to live with David Boggs and wife at Gallatin. Mr. Boggs 
was a furniture dealer, a carpenter, and an expert cabinet maker. He 
made a great deal of the furniture, which was sold from his store. Mrs. 
Lowrie is a member of the Baptist Church, and now makes her home at 
Gallatin. 

D. Luther Lowrie graduated from the Gallatin High School in 1917, 
and then went to clerk in Fitterer and Sons grocery store. He later 
clerked in a jewelry store for Frank Wynne, and remained in that posi- 



344 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

tion until July, 1918, when he took the civil service examinations, and 
was given a temporary appointment as rural route carrier on Route No. 
5, while his brother, the regular incumbent, was in service in the World 
War. In March, 1919, Mr. Lowrie was made assistant postmaster at Gal- 
latin, and has since capably filled that position. 

Mr, Lowrie was married on Jan. 25, 1920, to Goldie Mae Railsback, 
born in Daviess County, the daughter of Richard T, and Viola (McGar- 
vin) Railsback, Mr. Railsback died in September, 1918, and Mrs. Rails- 
back now ilves on her farm eight miles east of Gallatin. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Lowrie one child has been born, a son, Richard Edwin. 

Mr. Lowrie is a Democrat, and is a member of the Baptist church. 
He is an energetic and capable young man, who has the esteem of the 
entire community. 

Colonel Boyd Dudley and his son, Boyd Dudley, Jr., are members of 
a family that has been connected with the history of the United States 
since the very early colonial days. The Dudley family has been an asset 
to every community where its members have settled. While Mr. Dudley 
was never in the military service, he has, for more than a quarter of a cen- 
tury, been called, and known as Colonel Dudley. He has been an integral 
part of the development of Daviess County ; and Boyd Dudley, Jr., although 
he no longer lives in the state, is a Missouri trained man, one whom the 
state is proud to claim as a son. 

William Dudley, an ancestor of Colonel Boyd Dudley, was born in Rich- 
mond, Surrey, England, in 1600. He migrated to the American Colonies, 
and died in Connectciut in 1683. A son, William, was born at sea in 1639. 
One of William Dudley's sons, Samuel, was born in Connecticut, in 1712, 
and was the father of another Samuel Dudley, also born in Connecticut, in 
1763. He was one of the seven children born to his parents, and was the 
grandfather of Colonel Boyd Dudley. Samuel Dudley enlisted for service 
in the Colonial Army during the Revolutionary War, when he was but 13 
years old. He had a great fondness for the sea, and after his six years of 
service for the country, wanted to become a sailor. But his mother in- 
duced him to go to West Virginia, and locate on a farm, and there he mar- 
ried and reared a family. One of his sons was Alpheus H. Dudley. 

Alpheus H. Dudley was born in Marion County, W. Va., Jan. 31, 
1827. He entered the mercantile business at Reevesville in West Virginia, 
but in 1866 he came to Missouri, making the trip by steamboat down the 
Ohio River to Cincinnati, thence to Chillicothe, and from there by wagon 
across the country to Daviess County. He bought 120 acres of land near 
Bancroft in Lincoln Township, and became a successful farmer, but lived 
only a short time after settling in his new home. He died on April 4, 1868, 



THt NEW YORK 
PUBLIC LIBUARY 



ASn'OR, LExNOX AND 

TILUliN FOLNUATIONS 

B L 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 345 

and his remains were buried in the Hill Cemetery. In 1855 Alpheus H. 
Dudley married Martha McDougal. She was born in Marion County, W. 
Va., March 22, 1835, the daughter of John F. McDougal. Mr. McDougal 
lived near Bancroft in Daviess County, for many years, and later lived at 
Gillman, Harrison County, where he died at the age of 96 years. His son, 
Henry C. McDougal, was a judge of the probate court of Daviess County, 
in the seventies. To the union of Alpheus H. and Martha (McDougal Dud- 
ley the following children were born : Paul, died in infancy ; Boyd, the sub- 
ject of this sketch; May, living in Carthage; and Fannie, the widow of T. 
E. McCluskey, now living with her daughter, Mrs, E. D. Hart of Califor- 
nia. After the death of her husband, Mrs. Dudley married Dr. R. L. Green 
and to this union two children were born: Oscar, now living at Carthage; 
and Walter a resident of New Mexico. Mrs. Green is living in Chicago. 

Colonel Boyd Dudley was bom in Marion County, W. Va., near the 
town of Reevesville, June 8, 1859. His father was a Confederate and his 
mother's people were aligned on the Federal side during the Civil War 
strife. Colonel Dudley attended the schools of West Virginia and later in 
Daviess County until 1874, when he went to Gallatin to live with his uncle 
Judge H. C. McDougal. He did the household chores, and took care of the 
Judge's office in return for his board, clothing, and the privilege of going 
to school. He completed what would now be the eighth grade, and then, 
being without financial resources, he went to work in the office of the 
probate judge as a clerk. In 1877 he began the study of law in the office 
of Shanklin, Lowe and McDougal. In that office the young student per- 
fonned all the tasks that fell to the lot of law students of that day. He 
swept the floor, washed the windows, chopped wood, made fires, did what 
writing he could, and saw that the ink wells on the desks of the firm mem- 
bers were never dry. 

In 1880, Colonel Boyd Dudley, in company with George B, Rush 
was admitted to the bar, and on the day of his admission he was 
appointed by the court to act as the lawyer for the defense, a custom in 
those days. The newly made barrister had what looked like a difficult 
case. He was called upon to defend a negro, who had ripped open the 
pocket of a drunken laborer, while the laborer lay asleep in the woods north 
of Gallatin. The negro removed the money from the sleeping man's 
pocket, and proceeded to spend it at the only saloon in the town. The case 
of the state being complete, the negro was convicted and sentenced to two 
years in the penitentiary. But his counsel was not satisfied to let his case 
rest with an adverse decision. The word "feloniously" had been omitted 
from the indictment and the charge stood as petit larceny. A motion to 
quash was overrulled, but Colonel Dudley appealed the case to the Supreme 



346 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Court at his own expense, got a stay of execution, obtained a reversal of 
the case, and on retrial, the prisoner was discharged for want of evidence. 
This is typical of Colonel Dudley's determination and tenacity. 

Colonel Dudley spent two years in New Mexico and Arizona, but the 
lure of the Grand River Valley was strong, and he returned to Gallatin in 
1884. For several years he was engaged in the abstract and loan busi- 
ness at Gallatin, and for a time he was the secretary and manager of the 
local Building and Loan Association. He later became the president of the 
State League of Local Building and Loan Associations. He was the 
author of the first law relating to the supervision and control of local build- 
ing and loan associations by the state of Missouri, and the passing of the 
law was due largely to Colonel Dudley's untiring efforts. At one time he 
was a member of the Republican State Central Committee of Missouri, and 
during the Spanish-American War, he acted as the president of the Mis- 
souri State League of Republican Clubs, and during the days of the Span- 
ish-American War, he tendered his services to President McKinley, offering 
to raise a regiment for service in the war. 

Colonel Dudley has spent a life filled with vital experiences. In his 
early life he was associated with the late Milt Ewing in business affairs. 
Later he was a friend of John F. Jordan, for m.any years the editor of the 
Jamesport Gazette, and later connected with the loan and abstract business 
at Gallatin. Colonel Dudley's first law partner was W. D. Hamilton, a man 
who had studied law with Senator George Vest. This partnership, form- 
ed about the time of the trial of the famous James brothers, continued until 
the death of Mr. Hamilton in 1913. Coloned Dudley then became a part- 
ner in the firm of Dudley and Selby. This partnership was dissolved on 
Jan. 1, 1921, and Colonel Dudley now has his son-in-law, Charles D. Bran- 
aom, as partner in the office. 

Colonel Dudley was married to Anna Chapdu, a sister of Mrs. H. C. 
McDougal, and to this union one child was born. The child died in infancy, 
and shortly after Mrs. Dudley died. On June 9, 1896, Colonel Dudley mar- 
ried Belle J. Holmes of Hamilton, the daughter of B. F. and Julia (Gee) 
Holmes. Mr. and Mrs. Holmes were natives of New York, and were early 
settlers of Caldwell County, Mo., where they lived on a farm. They are 
both now dead. Mrs. Dudley is a granddaughter of Benjamin Tillinghast 
of New York, and is a lineal descendant of Captain Miles Standish of the 
Mayflower. By this last marriage Colonel Dudley has two children : Boyd, 
Jr., a sketch of whose life follows; and Katherine, who was a student at 
Central College at Lexington for a year, and who later attended Randolph 
Macon College at Lynchburg, Va., and the State University of Missouri, 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 347 

and is now married to Charles D. Brandom of Gallatin. She is a member 
of the Theta Upsilon Gamma and the Pi Beta Phi sororities, Regent of the 
Gallatin Chapter of the D. A. R., a member of the Mayflower Society and 
is State Recording Secretary of the Colonial Dames of the Seventeenth 
Century. 

Colonel Dudley has never sought office. He has served as t^-p n^esi- 
dent of the Board of Education, and as the president of the Board of Con- 
trol for the State Industrial School for Girls at Chillicothe. He is a mem- 
ber of the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and the Woodmen of the World lodges. His father was an 
Episcopalian, his mother a Methodist, and Colonel Dudley identified him- 
self with the Presbyterian church. Several years ago, however, during a 
church trial of intense community interest, Colonel Dudley led the counsel 
for the reactionaries on the subject of the use of the organ in church. 
Since that time, he has insisted in a joking way that he leans toward "the 
fundamental apostolic faith." He takes an intense and active interest in 
all public questions, and maintains his membership in the Missouri Histor- 
ical Society and in the Society of the American Academy of Social Science. 
He is a man of ready and keen perceptions, an alert mind, wide in his 
sympathies, and a citizen of the highest civic pride. 

Boyd Dudley, Jr., was reared in Gallatin, where he graduated from 
the high school. He became a student in the Missouri State University 
School of Mines at Rolla, and completed the four year course there in 
three years. After his graduation he became the assistant instructor in 
metallurgy at Rolla, and remained in that position for three years. At the 
end of that time he went to Boston, where he took the Master's Degree 
from the Boston Institute of Technology. He then spent a summer at 
Nashua, N. H., as superintendent of one of the plants of the John-Man- 
ville Company. The next year he went to the University of Pennsylvania 
as ^assistant professor of metallurgy. 

When the United States entered the World War, Mr. Dudley at once 
went into active service with the rank of captain in the Ordinance Depart- 
ment. During the early part of the war his work was the organization 
of the Inspection Division of Factories in New York and Pennsylvania in 
connection with making munitions. He was later transferred to what was 
known as "Waterveleit Arsenal" on the Hudson River near Albany. There 
he was made the superintendent of heavy artillery, in charge of the depart- 
ment that made the eight inch field Howitzers. Shortly aftrwards, Mr. 
Dudley was promoted to the rank of major, and was transferred to the 
Sea Coast Division. He was made Superintendent of the Sea Coast Artil- 
lery, and was in charge of the manufacturing of the great 16 inch 



348 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

calibre guns used in coast defense. Major Dudley held this position as a 
civilian for a year after he was discharged from the army. 

Major Dudley was married at Gallatin while he was teaching in Rolla, 
to Madge Netherton. Mrs. Dudley is a daughter of James N. Netherton, 
a former resident of Gallatin, and county clerk of Daviess County for a 
number of years. Major and Mrs. Dudley have two children, Boyd Dudley, 
III, and William, and now live in Syracuse, N. Y., where he is in charge 
of the plant of the American Piano Company. He is a man of marked 
ability, whose unusual degree of successful achievement is due to his innate 
capacity, his excellent training, and his determination. He is an able 
member of his family, which has stood for order and progress for nine gen- 
erations in the United States. 

John N. Brown, a member of the firm of Musselman and Brown 
Hardware Company, and the city clerk of Gallatin, was born in Salem 
Township in this county on Feb. 8, 1874. His parents were Napoleon B., 
and Sarah J. (Harbard) Brown. 

Napoleon B. Brown was born in Virginia, June 6, 1833. He came to 
Daviess County with his parents in 1853. They settled near Pattons- 
burg, where Napoleon Brown became the holder of 400 acres of land. 
He operated this land successfully until his retirement from the active 
work on the farm. He moved to Gallatin in 1886, when he was elected 
to the office of treasurer of Daviess County. He took the office in 1887, 
and held it for the next eight years, making a reliable and highly re- 
spected official. He was a Democrat.. Mr. Brown was an extensive 
stock dealer, buying and selling stock all over the northwest part of the 
state. Long before the railroads ran through this part of Missouri, Mr. 
Brown would drive his stock to the docks of the Missouri River for ship- 
ment. He was one of the first group of directors of the Farmers Ex- 
change Bank of Gallatin, and in 1902 was elected judge of the county 
court, which office he held until his death on May 26, 1903. He was a 
man of great versatility and of marked intellectual ability. He had only 
a common school education, but his life was a success. He was a veteran 
of the Civil War, in which he served as a captain in the Missouri State 
Militia. 

In 1859 Napoleon Brown was married to Sarah J. Harbard, born 
near Heyworth, 111., in 1843. To this union the following children were 
born: Mary C, the widow of W. Carpenter of Salem Township; Anna 
E., the widow of George Keown of Liberal, Kan.; Alice, the wife of A. 
L. McNeely of Washington Township ; Lucy, married to E. O. DeVoss of 
Hutchinson, Kan.; Josephine B., the wife of J. K. Kitch, of Guymon, 
Okla.; John N., the subject of this review; Charles E., a resident of 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 349 

Hutchinson, Kan.; Ross M., also living at Hutchinson, Kan.; Dollie I., 
now the wife of C. Duclon, of Hutchinson, Kan. ; and G. C, who was the 
third child born, and now lives in Calif. Mr. and Mrs. Brown were both 
members of the Christian Church. Mrs. Brown died on Sept. 9, 1917, 
and the remains of both Mr. and Mrs. Brown are buried in Brown Ceme- 
tery at Gallatin. 

John N. Brown grew up on the farm and attended the public schools 
of Coffey and Gallatin. In 1890 he went to Liberal, Kan.; where he en- 
gaged in the lumber and hardware business for the next 22 years. In 
1912 he returned to Gallatin, and in June, 1921, he entered into partner- 
ship with John Musselman in the hardware business. This is one of the 
well established commercial enterprises of Gallatin, and the firm con- 
ducts a good business. 

Mr. Brown was married in 1896 and to this one daughter was born: 
Maretta, M., born in 1900, and married in 1919 to George Carlson of San 
Francisco, Calif. 

Mr. Brown is a Democrat. He was elected to the ofRce of city clerk 
of Gallatin in 1920, and has made a competent official. He is a public 
spirited citizen and holds the high regard of all who know him. 

J. H. Tate, manager and salesman for the Ford automobiles and 
Fordson tractors at Gallatin, has conducted the Ford Agency and garage 
in partnership with D. C. McVay since March 22, 1917. Their present 
building was completed on Aug. 1, 1920. The structure, built at a cost 
of $50,000, is located a half block north of the Square on North Main St., 
and has a frontage of 130 feet with a show room, two driveways, and a 
storage room 90x120 feet. There is also a large basement. The building 
is constructed of brick, is well ventilated, is equipped with a rest room 
for ladies, and has windows reinforced with steel sashes. The show 
room has a trass floor, and the repair shop, at the west side of the office, 
has battery and welding service. Mr. Tate and his partner are to be 
congratulated on their achievement of a modern and efficiently managed 
garage. 

J. H. Tate is a native of Grundy County; he was born on Nov. 20, 
1885, the son of C. L. and Nancy (Parberry) Tate. C. L. Tate was born 
in Andrew County on Nov. 17, 1859, and has been a successful farmer 
all of his life. To his union with Nancy (Parberry) Tate three children 
were born of whom two are now living : J. H., the subject of this review ; 
and Harley F., now a resident of Ft. Collins, Col. Mrs. Tate died in 1889 
at the age of 24 years, and Mr. Tate later married Frances Harvey. To 
this union two children were born : the older child is deceased ; and the 



350 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

younger, a daughter, Annie, is now married to Bernice Harris of Tren- 
ton. 

J. H. Tate attended the rural schools, and later was a student in the 
Jamesport High School. He assisted his father on the farm until 1905, 
when he began operating a farm for himself. He bought and improved 
1100 acres of land in Grundy County, which he later sold, and in 1908 
he moved to Trenton and became interested in the transfer business. 
Two years later he bought a grocery stock in Trenton, and conducted a 
grocery store for the next two years. He then accepted a position with 
the National Biscuit Company, and traveled out of St. Joseph until 1917. 
That year he and D. C. McVay became interested in the automobile bus- 
iness, in connection with which they conducted the Ford Agency at 
Trenton, with Mr. McVay in charge. The plans of Mr. Tate and Mr. 
McVay include the erection of a building at Trenton similar to the re- 
cently completed structure at Gallatin. 

J. H. Tate was married on March 5, 1905, to Hallie Mae Brown, a 
native of Grundy County, the daughter of Elias and Laura (Pernell) 
Brown. Both Mr. and Mrs. Brown were born in Missouri, and both are 
now living on their farm, six miles south of Trenton. Mr, and Mrs. Tate 
were the parents of three children : Jule, at home ; Thelma, died in in- 
fancy; and Hubert, at home. 

Mr. Tate is a Democrat. He is an adherent of the Baptist Church, 
and belongs to the Masonic Lodge. In 1921 he was elected the secretary 
of the newly organized Chamber of Commerce at Gallatin and on April 
4, 1922, Mr. Tate was elected Mayor of Gallatin. Mr. Tate is an ener- 
getic and ambitious business man, and a citizen who holds the high re- 
gard of the entire community. 

Charles L. Knauer, is a well known business man of Gallatin, Da- 
viess County. He is a native of Ohio, born in Springboro, an inland vil- 
lage of Warren County, April 6, 1862. 

Andrew Knauer, the father of Charles L. Knauer, was born in Ba- 
varia, Germany, but left his native land when he was 19 years old, and 
came to the United States. He located in New York City and worked at 
his trade, that of a tailor, for eight years. Later he went to Springboro, 
Ohio, and operated a store. In 1866, he came to Gallatin and opened a 
merchant tailor store, which he operated successfully until his death on 
April 4, 1901. He was born on July 17, 1824, and most of his long life 
was spent in the country of his adoption, where he readily adapted him- 
self to the commercial conditions. As the founder of the mercantile en- 
terprise which is now owned and conducted by his son, the subject of 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 351 

this sketch. Andrew Knauer became an integral part of the town. He 
was a man of sane, clear judgment, and succeeded in establishing an en- 
terprise that would last over many years. 

Andrew Knauer married Charlotte Elbert, born in Hesse, Darm- 
stadt, Germany, and to this union seven children were born, three of 
whom died in Ohio, and two died at Gallatin, Mo. C. L. Knauer was the 
fourth child born to his parents. One sister, Mrs. Julia Drummond, now 
lives in Gallatin. She is a widow. Mrs. Knauer died in 1896. Her re- 
mains and those of her husband are buried in Lile Cemetery. They were 
excellent members of the community. Mr. Knauer took part in the town 
affairs and served on the city council. He was a Democrat, and was a 
charter member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows Lodge. 

Charles L. Knauer was four years old when his parents came to 
Daviess County. He attended the school at Gallatin, and worked for 
and with his father in the store, where he learned the trade of a tailor 
under the tutelage of his father. In 1883 he was made a partner in the 
store, and in 1901 he became the sole owner of the business; however, 
he continues to operate under the old firm name of A. Knauer and Son. 
Mr. Knauer carries a complete line of men's ready made clothing, han- 
dling the Clothcraft and Block Company garments and gents furnish- 
ings. He also carries samples for tailor made clothing, and an excellent 
line of shoes. 

Mr. Knauer was married on Oct. 16, 1888, to CarHe A. Haynes, 
born in Lebanon, Tenn., the daughter of J. L. Haynes. Mr. Haynes lived 
at Gallatin for a number of years. Mr. and Mrs. Knauer have two chil- 
dren : Harry L., an assistant in his father's store ; and Elizabeth, at home. 

Mr. Knauer is a Democrat and is a member of the Presbyterian 
Church in which he has been the Sunday School Superintendent for 33 
years. He is the president of the Y. M. C. A., which position he has held 
for 30 years. Mr. Knauer gave the lot where the new Y. M. C. A. build- 
ing now stands, and has been a member of the State Committee of the 
Y. M. C. A. In 1890 he was elected to membership in the city council and 
served for two terms. In April, 1921, he was again elected to the coun- 
cil, and was a member of the Board of Education for many years, acting 
as treasurer for that body. In 1921 Mr. Knauer became the vice presi- 
dent of the Gallatin Trust Company, in which capacity he is still serv- 
ing. By inheritance, training, and natural ability, Mr. Knauer is a pro- 
gressive and wide-awake business man. His high ideals for the develop- 
ment of the community may be seen from his active participation in the 
work of the Y. M. C. A. He is one of the far sighted and excellent citi- 
zens of Gallatin. 



352 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Hon. Alexander M. Dockery. — There has hardly been a man, woman 
or child in northwest Missouri who has not been familiar by constant repi- 
tion with the name of Alexander M. Dockery, whose career of public ser- 
vice has kept him almost constantly active in district, state and national 
affairs through an entire generation. For 16 years, Mr. Dockery repre- 
sented the Third District in Congress, and during the Democratic Adminis- 
tration of President Wilson held the post of third assistant postmaster 
general. 

His active public service has obscured the fact, except in his home 
town of Gallatin and among his more intimate friends, that Mr. Dockery 
began his career as a physician, and besides several other degrees is en- 
titled to the letters, M. D. 

Governor Dockery, as he is known to all his friends, was born in 
Daviess County, Feb. 11, 1845. His parents were Rev. WilHs E. and 
Sarah E. (McHaney) Dockery, his father having been a distinguished 
minister of the Methodist Episcopal church, South. Mr. Dockery, who is 
the only survivor of three children was educated in Macon Academy, Macon, 
Mo., and in 1863 entered the St. Louis Medical College, and was graduated 
in March, 1865, with the degree of M. D. He later attended lectures at 
Bellevue College in New York, and the Jefferson Medical College at Phila- 
delphia and began his first practice at Linneus, Mo., and from 1867 to 
1874 practiced at Chillicothe. He was recognized as a skillful physician. 

In March, 1874, having abandoned the medical practice, for other lines 
of endeavor, Mr, Dockery removed to Gallatin and became associated with 
Thomas B. Yates in the establishment of the Farmers Exchange Bank, 
an institution which has had a solid career for nearly 50 years. He served 
as its cashier until 1882. Prior to his election to Congress, Mr. Dockery 
served as County Physician of Livingston County from 1870 to 1874, was 
president of the Board of Education at Chillicothe in 1870-72, was a mem- 
ber of the board of curators of the University of Missouri from 1872 to 
1882, and at Gallatin was a member of the city council 1878-81, and mayor 
during 1881-83. 

From 1878 until his election to Congress Mr. Dockery was chairman of 
the Democratic Congressional Committee of the Tenth District, 1880 was 
chairman of the Congressional Convention at Brunswick, and in 1882, at 
the conveniton at Cameron was nominated for representative in Congress. 
Altogether there were six men in the field for the nomination, and it was 
one of the most exciting conventions held in that district for many years. 
The deciding ballot was the 28th. The opposition had been unable to unite, 
since Mr. Dockery was the second choice in all the counties. His election 
from the Third District came in November, 1882, and he continued as 




HON. ALEXANDER M. DOCKERY 



r 



uY 



ATIONS 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 353 

representative in Congress from March 4, 1883, to March 4, 1899. In the 
successive conventions Mr. Dockery was renominated without opposition. 
During his career in Congress Mr. Dockery was a member of the Committee 
on Claims, Committee on Accounts, Committee on Post Offices and Post 
Roads four years, and for the last ten years of his service in the house was 
a member of the Committe on Appropriations and had charge of the Dis- 
trict of Columbia and the Legislative, Executive and Judicial Appropria- 
tion bills. From 1893 to 1895 he was chairman of what is known as the 
"Dockery Commission," which, among other notable achievements, de- 
vised the present accounting system of the national treasury. This system 
has been in successful operation since Oct. 1, 1894. During the World 
Fair at Chicago, he was chairman of a special committee appointed by the 
House to investigate and simplify methods of business. This committee's 
elaborate report served as a basis for the work of organization of the 
Louisana Purchase Exposition at St. Louis. While a member of the Com- 
mittee on Post Offices and Post Roads, Mr. Dockery was instrumental in 
securing the installation of the second fast mail train service in the United 
States, from New York to Kansas City by way of St. Louis. In 1886, Mr. 
Dockery was chosen permanent chairman of the Democratic State Con- 
vention at St. Louis. 

At the conclusion of the eighth term Mr. Dockery declined a renom- 
ination in order to enter the race for governor in 1900. He was nominated 
by acclamation in June of that year, the nomination speech being made 
by Hon. W. S. Cowherd of Kansas City. In the following November he was 
elected Governor of Missouri against his opponent, Joseph Flory, of Mo- 
berly. Taking his oath as governor, Jan 14, 1901, Mr. Dockery was chief 
executive of his native state four years. After retiring from the gover- 
nor's chair in 1905 he continued active in Democratic politics, being chair- 
man of the state convention in 1906, and in 1912 was elected treasurer of 
the Democratic State Committee and reelected in 1914. At the begin- 
ning of President Wilson's administration, Mr. Dockery was appointed 
Third Assistant Postmaster General, his appointment being confirmed by 
the Senate, March 13, 1913, and he entered upon his duties March 17th. 
As Third Assistant Postmaster General he had supervision and control of 
all the extensive fiscal affairs of the postal service, including the postal 
saving system. 

In 1906 Governor Dockery was awarded the degree of LL. D. by the 
University of Missouri. In the interval between his term as governor 
and his recent promotion to the Postoffice Department, Governor Dockery 
proved himself a citizen of force and influence in his home city of Gallatin. 
He served as a member and president of the board of education from 1906 



354 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

to 1912, was president of the Gallatin Commercial Club from its organiza- 
tion in 1908 to 1914, and was president of the Daviess County Chautauqua 
Association since its organization in 1909. He was also chairman of the 
building committee which supervised construction of the new court house, 
and of the committee which supervised construction of the new Gallatin 
school house. Of his local activities, Governor Dockery probably takes 
most pride in his work as ex-officio road overseer in his county, a service 
which he has performed gratuitously but none the less effectively at var- 
ious times during the past 30 years. 

Governor Dockery was married April 14, 1869, to Miss Mary E. Bird, 
daughter of Greenup Bird. All of the seven children of their marriage 
died in infancy. His wife died at the Executive Mansion, Jefferson City, 
January, 1903. 

Governor Dockery has some interesting fraternal relations. In 1880 
he was elected Eminent Commander of Kadosh Commandery No. 21, 
Knights Templar, at Cameron; in 1881 was elected Grand Master of Mis- 
souri Masons; in May 1883, was chosen Grand High Priest of the Royal 
Arch Masons of Missouri, and since 1886 he has been a member of the 
Board of Directors of the Masonic Home of Missouri, being chairman of the 
Executive Committee the greater part of the time. In May, 1910, he was 
elected Grand Master of the Missouri Odd Fellows, and this gives him the 
unusual distinction of being the onlj^ person in the state who has been 
Grand Master of both Missouri Masons and Missouri Odd Fellows. Begin- 
ning May, 1909, he served 12 years as president of the Odd Fellows Home 
Board at Liberty. 

Governor Dockery has been a liberal contributor and supporter to the 
cause of the Y. M. C. A., and is now serving as a director. In July, 1906, 
Mr, Dockery donated the original land for the City Park which is now 
known as "Dockery Park," which now contains 14 acres, located in the 
northeast part of Gallatin. The Governor is very proud of his work in 
building up and beautifying this park, which is a valuable asset to the city. 
He has been president of the Park Board since its organization. 

The people of Missouri have honored Governor Dockery with their con- 
fidence and respect, and have found him worthy. They have trusted in his 
honesty and integrity, and have always found him true. 

W. Glen Smith, a partner in the granite and marble works of Galla- 
tin, is a native of Daviess County, born in Jackson Township, Oct. 29, 
1881. His parents were Burns R. and Susan Estella (Sharon) Smith. 

Burns R. Smith was born at Watertown, N. Y., Sept. 8, 1844, and 
was reared on a farm. In 1861 he moved to Fountain County, Indiana, 
where he enlisted for service in the Civil War in Company I, 150th Vol- 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 355 

unteer Infantry. He served until the close of the war, and went back to 
Indiana and married Susan Estella Sharon, born in Indiana, April 14, 
1847. In 1879 they came to Daviess County, and bought a farm in Jack- 
son Township. Mr. Smith improved the land, and became a well known 
man in the community. He was a Republican, and a member of the 
Grand Army of the Republic. He was a very active adherent of the Bap- 
tist Church, and helped to organize that denomination in the county. 
He was one of the promoters of the Daviess County Sunday School As- 
sociation, and served as the president of that body for many years. Mr, 
Smith died at his home on April 4, 1915, and his remains are buried in 
Brown Cemetery. His widow now lives at Gallatin. Their children 
were: Myrta E., now the wife of Samuel Nichols of Jackson Township; 
and W. Glen, the subject of this sketch. 

W. Glen Smith was reared on the farm, where he remained until 
he was 22 years old. He attended the public school of Gallatin, and in 
1900 he graduated from River College. In 1899 he taught in what is 
known as the Red School in Lincoln Township. He continued to teach 
and farm for three years. He then became interested in the grocery bus- 
iness at Gallatin, but sold his interest in that enterprise in 1913, and en- 
tered the monument business with E. R. Achuff. This business is located 
on the north side of the Square, where the same business has been con- 
ducted for 45 consecutive years. Mr. Achuff and Mr. Smith employ four 
assistants, two of them first class cutters. The business has grown 
greatly. This is the only marble and granite shop in Daviess County; a 
wide range of territory is therefore handled through this shop. 

W. Glen Smith was married on Feb. 21, 1904, to lola Hale, daugh- 
ter of A. B. and Katherine (Adams) Hale, both descendants of pioneer 
families in Clinton County. Both Mr. and Mrs. Hale were born in Clin- 
ton County, as was their daughter, Mrs. Smith. They now live on a farm 
in Clinton County. Mr. and Mrs. Smith have one daughter, Mabel. Mrs. 
Smith was a prominent teacher in Daviess County before her marriage. 

Mr. Smith is a Republican, and is identified with the Baptist 
Church. He is the Sunday School Superintendent of that church. He is 
a member of the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, and the Yoeman Lodges. He was elected to the 
office of police judge of Gallatin on the Independent ticket, and when 
the Gallatin Commercial Club was reorganized in 1921, Mr. Smith was 
made the president. His work in connection with monuments has pro- 
vided him with much valuable data on family lineages in the county. Mr. 
Smith is an energetic and ambitious man, a citizen who is an asset to the 
community, and a man held in high esteem. 



356 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Dr. M. A, Smith, a physician and surgeon of Gallatin, is well known 
throughout the community, both as a successful man in his profession, 
and as a veteran of the World War. Dr. Smith was one of the men who 
renounced his practice at home and gave his services to the country dur- 
ing the time of need. The names of such men will always be held in high 
esteem, and it is fitting that due tribute be paid to them in this work. 

The Smith family were originally of Virginia stock. They came to' 
Missouri in the early pioneer days, and settled in Clay County, later mov- 
ing to De Kalb County. I. V. Smith, father of Dr. Smith, was born in De 
Kalb County, Dec. 26, 1842. He farmed during his youth, enlisted for 
service in the Conferedate Army during the Civil War, and served in 
Company E, 3rd Missouri. He was severely wounded at the Battle of 
Vicksburg. He returned to De Kalb County, and taught school for a 
while. He was serving as the county judge of De Kalb County, when he 
decided to move to Nebraska. In 1872 he located at Bloomington, Neb., 
and in 1874 he went to a farm in Franklin County, Neb. At various times 
during his life, Mr. Smith conducted a hardware store, ran a grain ele- 
vator, and for 15 years, he bought grain at Bloomington, Neb. 

Mr. Smith married Tibitha J. Ashby, born on Jan. 3, 1854, near 
Edinburg, Mo. To this union six children were born, four of whom are 
now living. Mr. and Mrs. Smith came to Gallatin several years ago, and 
Mrs. Smith died there in 1910. She was a member of the Methodist 
Church, South, as is her husband. Mr. Smith now makes his home with 
his son. Dr. Smith. 

Dr. Smith, the fourth child born to his parents, was born in Frank- 
lin County, Neb., Oct. 16, 1877. He was reared in Nebraska and at- 
tended the Bloomington High School from which he graduated in 1897. 
In 1898 he entered Central Medical College at St. Joseph, and graduated 
from that institution with the degree of Doctor of Medicine on March 1, 
1900. He served as intern in the St. Joseph's Hospital during the year 
1899-1900. In 1900 Dr. Smith located at Gallatin, and at once estab- 
lished an excellent practice in his profession. He acted as both the city 
and the county physician from 1901 to 1905. During the year 1903 he 
took a post graduate course in his work in Chicago, 111. ; and in 1909 he 
took post graduate work in New York City. 

In June, 1916, Dr. Smith was commissioned first lieutenant. Medi- 
cal Reserve Corps, and was called into service on Sept. 15, 1917. He re- 
ported at Officers Training Camp at Fort Riley, Kan., and remained in 
training until December, 1917. He was placed on temporary duty at 
the Headquarters Base Hospital at Fort Riley until February, '1918, 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 357 

when he was assigned permanently to Evacuation Hospital No. 16, and 
commissioned a captain. Dr. Smith was instrumental in perfecting the 
organization of that hospital. His work was arduous, as, in addition to 
acting as the adjutant, he found it necessary to do also the work of a 
quarter master. He was relieved from the duty of those two positions 
at his own request, since his desire was to work overseas as a medical 
officer. After a short stop at Camp Meade, Md., the hospital force em- 
barked on Aug. 28, 1918, and arrived at Brest Sept. 7, 1918. After a 
period of preliminary training, the force was sent to the Argonne Sec- 
tor, landing at the hospital center near Neuf Chateau. Dr. Smith was 
sent back to the United States Central Laboratory at Dijon for special 
instruction. 

From Dijon Dr. Smith returned to duty with Evacuation Hospital, 
No. 16, and also with Base Hospital, No. 18. He remained with this hos- 
pital throughout the Argonne offensive, and was in that sector until Feb- 
ruary, 1919, when he was sent to the Army of Occupation. He served 
at Trieves and Coblenz, after April 1st, was in charge of the United 
States Hospital at Eherinbretestein. Dr. Smith left Coblenz, on June 14, 
1919, and arrived in the United States on July 5. He was discharged 
from service at Camp Dix, N. J., on July 7, arrived at his home on July 
10, 1919, and at once resumed his practice at Gallatin. 

Dr. Smith was married, Oct. 20, 1903, to Anna E. Fulkerson, born 
near Trenton, the daughter of P. G. and Eliza (Carnes) Fulkerson. Mr. 
and Mrs. Fulkerson were both born in Grundy County. Dr. and Mrs. 
Smith had one son, Marshall A., now living at home. Mrs. Smith died, 
Feb. 6, 1908, at the age of 26 years. On Oct. 28, 1915, Dr. Smith was 
married to Jessie B. McCue. She was born near Gallatin, the daughter 
of R. M. and Elizabeth (Rodgers) McCue. Mr. and Mrs. McCue now live 
at Gallatin. To the union of Dr. and Jessie B. (McCue) Smith two chil- 
dren have been born: Elizabeth Jane, and Mary Margaret. 

Dr. Smith is a Democrat, and is a member of the Methodist Church. 
He belongs to the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, the Royal Arch, 
Chapter, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and the Modern Wood- 
men of American Lodges. He assisted in the organization of the Ameri- 
can Legion, Post Wallace McAfee, No. 68, at Gallatin, and acted as the 
post commander for two years. He maintains membership in the Da- 
viess County, the Missouri State and the American Medical Associations. 
For the past 20 years he has acted as the secretary of the Daviess County 
Medical Association, and in 1908 he was elected vice-president of the 
Missouri State Medical Association. 



358 HISTORY OP DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Dr. Smith is a progressive man in his profession, a citizen of great 
public spirit, and a man known to his community for his high ideals of 
civic pride and public service. 

C. J. Stout, a business man of Gallatin, is a native of the town. He 
was born on April 5, 1889, the son of J. D. and Jennie (Brooks) Stout. 

J. D. Stout was born, Nov. 7, 1854, in Green County, Illinois. His 
father, W. W, Stout, was a native of Pennsylvania, born in Pittsburg in 
1826. He was a school teacher, and came to Daviess County in 1860. He 
was educated in Springfield, 111. He located in Colfax Township in Da- 
viess County, and became a farmer, teaching school through the winter. 
In 1882 he was elected to the office of assessor of Daviess County on the 
Democratic ticket. Two years prior to that time he had been elected the 
county superintendent of public schools. He was a leader in the school 
work of the county, and did much to develop the educational possibili- 
ties of Daviess County. He married Martha E. Short, a native of Green 
County, Illinois, born in 1836. To this union six children were born, of 
whom three are still living: Hugh H., a carpenter at Gallatin; C. A., liv- 
ing in Kansas City; and J. D., of Gallatin. W. W. Stout died on Jan. 11, 
1884. His remains and those of the children, who are deceased, are 
buried in Black Cemetery near Winston. Mrs. Stout died in August, 
1919, and her remains are buried in Brown Cemetery at Gallatin. 

J. D. Stout was reared near Gallatin on a farm. In 1871 he attended 
school at Gallatin and graduated there in 1875. The next year he taught 
school in Daviess County, and then went back to Illinois, where he taught 
for a year. He returned to Gallatin in 1879, and in 1886 he began work 
as a clerk in a general merchandise store. He retained that same posi- 
tion for 12 years, and at the end of that time, accepted a clerkship with 
the Etter Store Company. He worked with that firm for 15 years, and in 
1917 began clerking in the shoe department of the Knauer and Son 
Clothing Store. He was married in Illinois on Oct. 23, 1879, to Jennie 
Brooks, who was born on Jan. 24, 1861. 

J. D. Stout is an affable and efficient clerk, and a man well liked in 
the community. He recalls the trying early days in the county very 
vividly. Among his interesting reminisinces is this story. He was sent 
by his father to get a load of wood from the timber. The wagon was 
loaded, and the small boy was driving the yoke of oxen very carefully. 
But taking the downward slope of a hill the wagon upset, spilling off 
both the wood and the boy. The oxen hastened out of the road into a 
field, and it took the appearance of the father of the boy, to restore or- 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 359 

der. He found the oxen grazing peacefully some distance away, and a 
much frightened boy sitting disconsolately in the road. 

To the union of J, D. and Jennie (Brooks) Stout nine children were 
born, all of whom are living. They are : Willa, the wife of T. J. Nether- 
ton, a Baptist minister in Oklahoma City, Okla. ; Albert, living at Ochil- 
tree, Tex.; Minnie, a resident of Ft. Dodge, Iowa; C. J., the subject of 
this sketch ; Elsie, married to L. E. Lynch, of Gallatin ; Ruth, the wife of 
T. O. Manion of Iowa; Kathryn, married to H. R. Galpin, of Gallatin; 
Mildred, the wife of Roy Nichols of Gallatin; and Jewell, a student in 
the Gallatin High School. 

C. J. Stout grew up at Gallatin, and attended the Gallatin High 
School. He worked at the watch-making trade at Liberty for two years, 
and then apprenticed himself to David Herzog and learned the tailor's 
trade. In the fall of 1912 he opened a shop at Gallatin. He carries a line 
of tailoring material, and does cleaning and dyeing. Mr. Stout has built 
up an excellent business in the years he has been at Gallatin, and his 
shop is one of the popular places for his line of work. 

On Nov. 8, 1890, Mr. Stout married Lena Winburn. She was born 
on Nov. 8, 1890, in the south part of Daviess County, the daughter of J. 
C. and Eliza (Finnell) Winburn. They were natives of Kentucky, and 
early settlers of Daviess County. Mr. Winburn enlisted in the Federal 
Army in Kentucky, while his brothers and other relatives fought on the 
Confederate side. He died in Amoret, Mo., in 1920, at the age of 79 
years. His widow now lives at Amoret, 

C. J. Stout is a Democrat. He is a Thirty-Second Degree Mason, and 
a member of the Shrine, Ararat Temple in Kansas City, Mo. He also be- 
longs to the Gallatin Commercial Club. He served on the city council of 
Gallatin from 1919 to 1921, the period during which the automobile fire 
truck was bought by the town. Mr. Stout is a man of enterprise and bus- 
iness ability. 

W. C. Link, a popular and successful dentist of Gallatin, is a native 
Missourian. He was born on Jan. 22, 1885, at New Bloomfield, the son 
of R. H. and Louise (Bryan) Link. 

R. H. Link was born in Calloway County on August 1, 1856. His 
parents were natives of New Bradford, Va., and were among the adven- 
turous and courageous Southerners who came to Missouri when the land 
was new. They made the long, hard trip by wagons, and took up land 
in Missouri. Until quite recently, R. H. Link owned the farm, where he 
was born. He now lives on land seven miles away from the homestead. 
His wife, Louise (Bryan) Link, was born in Kentucky, and is a distant 



360 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

cousin to William J. Bryan. Mr. and Mrs. Link have six children, all liv- 
ing. 

W. C. Link was reared on his father's farm, and attended the pub- 
lic school of New Bloomfield. In 1911 he entered the Dental College of 
St. Louis University, and graduated in 1914. He located at Ashland for 
a time, but later went to New Franklin. In 1917 he came to Gallatin 
and located in the Farmers Exchange Bank Building. There has been a 
dental office at his location for past 65 years. Dr. Link has established 
an excellent practice. He makes a specialty of extracting teeth, and has 
a wide practice in that line of his work. 

Dr. Link is a Democrat in his political views. He is identified with 
the Christian Church and belongs to the Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons Lodge. He is an able man in his profession, a citizen of progres- 
sive ideals and a man highly esteemed in the community of Gallatin and 
the surrounding country. 

Judge Oliver Otto Mettle, a well known attorney at Gallatin, since 
1900, when he was admitted to the bar in Missouri, is a native of Gallatin. 
He was born on Dec. 3, 1878, his parents being Jacob and Catherine (Berg) 
Mettle. 

Jacob Mettle was born in Gernmny at Hesse in Hamburg, Aug. 12, 
1845, and was brought to the United States in his infancy by his parents, 
who settled in Frankiln County, Ohio. In 1863 Jacob Mettle came to Har- 
rison, Ohio, and learned the shoemaker's trade, and in 1866 he moved to 
Cincinnati, Ohio, and worked at his trade until 1872. That year he came 
to Gallatin, He worked in Amos Poe's shop until 1875, when he opened a 
business for himself. He afterwards moved to a farm, which he operated 
during the last 13 years of his life. Jacob Mettle married Catherine Berg, 
born in Frankiln County, Ind., Aug. 12, 1869, and to their union the follow- 
ing children were born: Edward, born in Cincinnati, Ohio, now living at 
Gallatin; an infant, deceased; Minnie L., the wife of E. D. Fitzgerald of 
Manhattan, Kans. ; Oliver O., the subject of this review; J. Fred, now a res- 
ident of Oklahoma City, Okla. ; Harry H., a painter at Gallatin; Addie E., 
married Everett Keck, a farmer in Liberty Township, Daviess County ; and 
Omer L., of New Castle, Wyo., a veteran of the World War. He enlisted 
at Kansas City, was sent to Jefferson Barracks, and later to two other 
camps in the south. He was sent overseas as a motor mechanic in the 
air service, and was in Europe when the armistice was signed. 

Jacob Mettle died on his farm on March 5, 1917, and his widow now 
lives with her daughter, Mrs. Keck. Jacob Mettle was a man of indomi- 
nable perserverance. He suffered many reverses during his life, but was 




OLIVER U. MKTTl E 



THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC LIBUARY 



ASTilU. LENOX AND 

TILDEN FOUNDATIONS 

B L 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 361 

successful in spite of them. While he was in business on the east side of the 
square, the building and his stock burned. Mr. Mettle had no insurance, 
but with sturdy pluck, he started out again. He made boots for many of 
the old settlers around Gallatin. He took the raw leather, and constructed 
the boots or shoes from it. He had no educational advantages, but he 
possessed the natural ability that made it impossible for him to fail. He 
was of the true stalwart, courageous type. His remains are buried in the 
old Brown Cemetery. He was a Republican in his political views, and was 
a member of the Lutheran church. 

Oliver 0. Mettle was reared in Gallatin and attended the public school 
there. He studied law for four years in the office of Hicklin & Hicklin, 
and was admitted to the bar in Missouri in 1900. He at once began the 
practice of his profession at Gallatin. He served as the city attorney dur- 
ing the years 1916 and 1917 under Mayor Penn Love, and is now acting in 
the same capacity under Mayor Musselman. In 1918 Oliver 0. Mettle was 
elected to the office of probate judge for a term of four years, and at present 
holds that office. 

Judge Mettle was married June 12, 1900, to Flora B. Toler, born in 
Delevan, Minn., and reared in London Mills, 111. She was the daughter of 
W. A. and Hester (Farrell) Toler, natives of Ohio. Her father was a well 
known merchant in his town. Both of her parents are now dead. Judge 
and Mrs. Mettle were the parents of six children : Angelo, deceased ; Oliver 
0., Jr. ; Dorothy D. ; Robert D. ; Harold A. ; and an infant, deceased. All of 
the children are at home. 

Mrs. Mettle holds the position of probate clerk in her husband's office. 
Judge Mettle is a man who is highly esteemed in the community. He is 
a reliable and substantial citizen of Gallatin. 

G. G. Murray, a registered pharmacist, and the owner and proprie- 
tor of the Murray Drug Company at Gallatin, is a native Missourian. He 
was born at Jamesport, Sept. 20, 1878, the son of Michael and Ella 
(Barnes) Murray. 

Michael Murray was born in County Mayo, Ireland, Nov. 18, 18b9. 
His parents were John and Rose (Monahan) Murray. They migrated to 
Canada, bringing their son, Michael with them, in 1840. They located at 
Quebec, but two years later moved to Belmont County, Ohio. Michael 
Murray was educated in the Catholic College at Wheeling, W. Va., then 
worked as a farm hand until June, 1861, when he enlisted for service in 
the Civil War. He was placed in Company A, 25th Ohio Volunteer In- 
fantry, and participated in the following battles and engagements; Mt. 
Summit, Va., Sept. 12, 1861; Greenbrier, Oct. 3; Alleghaney, Dec. 13; 



362 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

McDowell, May 8, 1862; Cross Keys, June 9; Slaughter Net, Aug. 9; 
Second Battle of Bull Run, Aug. 29 ; Chantilly, Sept. 1 ; Fredericksburg, 
Dec. 13; Gettysburg, July 2, 1862; the engagement at Strasburg, Va., 
June 1, 1861; at Woodstock the next day; and that same month at Ft. 
Jackson, and at Harrisburg, Va., where the famous Confederate cavalry 
commander, Ashby, was killed. 

During the Battle of Gettysburg, Michael Murray was wounded, 
and was taken to the hospital at Germantown, Pa., where he remained 
for two months. In June, 1862, he was made the second lieutenant of 
his company, and in February, 1864, was promoted to the position of 
first lieutenant. In November, 1864, he was again promoted to the posi- 
tion of captain of Company E of the same regiment. During September, 
1864, he was engaged in the assault on Ft. Wagner on Morris Island off 
Charleston, S. Car., and was in the seige of Sumpter, crossing Ashley 
River, and the taking possession of the town on Feb. 17, 1865. The last 
battle in which Mr. Murray took part was that at Red Hill, S. Car., 
April 25, 1865. There his regiment received notice of General Lee's sur- 
render, and was ordered to occupy Charleston until June, 1866. Mr. 
Murray was mustered out of service that same month at Columbus, Ohio, 
after a period of active service of five years and some months. 

In 1866 Mr. Murray invested in mining property in Christian and 
Berry Counties, Missouri, but three months later, he returned to Wash- 
ington, Ohio. He became interested in a mercantile business there, and 
conducted it until December, 1867, when he came back to Missouri, and 
entered the drug business at Jamesport on Jan. 1, 1868. He sold that 
business in 1872, and entered the general mercantile business in the 
same town. He operated the enterprise successfully for several years. 
In August, 1880, he bought 15 acres of land and engaged in farming and 
fruit growing, raising apples, peaches, plums, and cherries. 

Michael Murray was married in Grundy County on May 2, 1869, to 
Lydia E. Barnes. She was born in Monroe County, Ohio, Jan. 9, 1849. 
To this union five children were born: E. C, a salesman at St. Louis; J. 
B., died on March 30, 1918, at Silver City, N. M., and his remains are 
buried at Jamesport, Mo. ; Olive, the wife of A. R. Alexander, the post- 
master at Plattsburg; G. G., the subject of this sketch ; and Lenore, mar- 
ried to S. E. Arnold, a farmer at Jamesport. Michael Murray was a 
staunch Republican. He was a member of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, and the Masonic Lodges at Gallatin. He died on April 24, 
1919, and his remains are buried at Jamesport. His widow continues to 
live on the home place at Jamesport. 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 363 

G. G. Murray was reared at Jamesport, and graduated from the 
public school there. He became a salesman for the Armour Packing 
Company, working out of Kansas City, Mo. Later he accepted a position 
with the J. H. Hood Company and worked out of Louisville, Ky. In 1900 
he located at Jamesport, and conducted a drug business there until 
1908. That year he consolidated his business with the Dr. O. F. Clag- 
gett Drug Company at Jamesport, and the two partners conducted the 
new business together for a year. In 1909 they bought a drug store at 
Gallatin, retaining the ownership of the store at Jamesport for a time. 
They later disposed of the Jamesport store. In 1913 Mr. Murray bought 
Dr. Claggett's interest in the Gallatin store, and it is now conducted 
under the title, Murray Drug Company. It is one of the thriving stores 
of the community. 

G. G. Murray was married on Oct. 21, 1913, to Bess Carter, a native 
of Warrensburg. She graduated from the Central Missouri State Teach- 
ers College at Warrensburg, and taught Latin in the Gallatin High 
School for the two years prior to her marriage. Mr. and Mrs, Murray 
have one child, Madeline. 

Mr. Murray is a Republican, and is a member of the Masons, the 
Elks, and the Yeoman Lodges. Mr. Murray is one of the alert and pro- 
gressive business men of the county. He is a man highly esteemed in his 
community. 

During the World War Mr. Murray's services as County Chairman 
of The Liberty Loan Organization for the Third and Fourth Loans were 
such as to make him the recipient of highly complimentary personal let- 
ters from Hon. W. G. McAdoo, United States Treasurer, as well as from 
the State Chairman. Neglecting his private business and at considerable 
sacrifice, he devoted several months to this work and so organized Da- 
viess County that its citizens gave expression to their loyalty by going 
over the top in these loan campaigns in a manner not surpassed by any 
county in the state. 

A. F. Seller, the superintendent and secretary of the Knauer and 
Seller Rock Company, and the owner and operater of a plumbing shop 
at Gallatin, Daviess County, was born at Boonville, Aug. 26, 1868. His 
parents were Alois and Anna Seller. 

Alois Seller was born in the Alps in Switzerland. He worked at the 
trade of a weaver in his native land, and after coming to the United 
States, worked at various occupations. Shortly after the close of the 
Civil War, he located at Boonville, Mo. He later returned to Switzerland 
taking with him his son, A. F. Seller, who was ill. The boy received 



364 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

treatment at the hands of a Swiss physician, and after his recovery, was 
brought back to Missouri, by his father. In 1886 the father went back to 
his native land and died there. His wife died when her son, A. F., was 
nine years old. After the death of his parents, A. F. Seller began to 
shift for himself. 

He worked on a farm owned by John Wessing in Cooper County. 
In return for such work as he did, he was given his board and clothes, 
and was allowed to attend the district school for three months of each 
year. The school building was a log cabin, and Mr. Seller recalls the 
fact that for a part of the time, the only member of his class besides him- 
self, was a little girl. He remained with Mr. Wessing for four years, and 
then worked as a farm hand for five years. In 1884 he went to Boon- 
ville, where he worked for three years and a month as an apprentice 
learning the tinning and plumbing trade. The hours were long in those 
days. Work began in the morning at five o'clock, and frequently con- 
tinued until 11 o'clock at night. The first year, Mr. Seller received in 
payment for his work, $25.00; the second year, $40.00; and the third 
year, $60.00. 

Mr. Seller remained in Boonville until 1889, when he went to St. 
Joseph, where he worked at his trade until 1896. That year he came to 
Gallatin and opened a repair shop. He has established a thriving busi- 
ness, owns property, and has recently become interested in the Knauer 
and Seller Rock Company. 

A. F. Seller was married the first time to Zettie Shephard in 1889. 
To this union the following children were born : Harry, now living in 
Kansas City, Mo. ; Anna, the wife of J. O. Reed of Kansas City, Kan. ; 
Lillian, married to Frank A. Williams of Miami, Fla. ; an infant, de- 
ceased ; and William M., a sketch of whose life is given in a later para- 
graph. Mr. Seller was married the second time on Dec. 4, 1915, to Grace 
Lee Williams, a native of Missouri. 

William M. Seller was born on May 18, 1896, at St. Joseph, Mo. He 
was a member of Company K, 3rd Missouri Militia, and was the corporal 
of the company. He served on the Mexican Border. When the regiment 
enlisted for service during the World War, he was made sergeant of 
Company K, 140th Infantry, 35th Division. The regiment went overseas, 
and Sergeant Seller was killed on Sept. 29, 1918, at Exermont in the Ar- 
gonne Forest. His remains are buried in France. His name stands among 
those of the honored dead of the state who gave their lives at the time 
of the country's greatest need. 

A. F. Seller is a Democrat. He served as an alderman for two terms. 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 365 

He was the chief of the fire department for 20 years. He is a member of 
the Presbyterian Church, and belongs to the following lodges: the 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, the Woodmen of the World, and the Yeoman. As a city official, 
he was thoroughly competent, and efficient; as a citizen, he is interested 
in all that pertains to civic welfare ; and as a business man, he is ener- 
getic and reliable. 

Daniel M. Fisher, a minister in the Christian Church and the deputy 
county recorder of Daviess County, has his home at Gallatin. He is a na- 
tive of Ohio, where he was born on July 16, 1859, in Ross County, three 
miles west of Bainbridge. His parents were Daniel and Mary A. (Dan- 
nar) Fisher. 

Daniel Fisher was born in Botetourt County, Virginia. He went to 
Ohio when he was 21 years old, and operated a farm there until the out- 
break of the Civil War. He enlisted for service in Company C, 176th 
Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and took part in many of the important bat- 
tles of the war. He died while in service at Nashville, Tenn. He mar- 
ried Mary A. Dannar, born in Gallia County, Ohio, in January, 1833. 
Her parents were Michael and Sarah (Vance) Dannar, both natives of 
North Carolina. Michael Dannar died in Ohio, and his widow died in 
Daviess County. The Dannar family came to Daviess County before the 
Civil War. Daniel Fisher's father, Jacob Fisher, was a, native of Vir- 
ginia, and died there. After his death, his widow, Eva (Moomaw) 
Fisher, took her three children to Ohio, and in 1869, she came with her 
son's widow, Mary A. (Dannar) Fisher, and her son's children to Mis- 
souri. They settled in De Kalb County, where the grandmother died. In 
1879 the remainder of the family came to Daviess County. Mary A. 
(Dannar) Fisher died at Pattonsburg in 1904. She was the mother of 
seven children, four of whom are still living. One son, David, lives in 
Jefferson Township, Daviess County; and another is Daniel M., the sub- 
ject of this sketch. 

Daniel M. Fisher attended the Normal College at Stanberry, and 
graduated from the commercial and teachers courses in 1879. He 
taught for 15 consecutive years in the schools in Daviess County; and 
for four years held the position of principal of the school at Pattonsburg. 
He completed 20 years in the service of the schools by acting as principal 
of the school at Altamont. In 1902, the postmaster at Altamont resigned, 
and Mr. Fisher was tendered the position, which he accepted. He re- 
mained in that position for 13 years, then took up insurance work, and 
was made the justice of the peace at Altamont, In 1919 he came to Gal- 



366 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

latin, and was appointed the deputy county recorder, which place he 
has filled most acceptably ever since. He began preaching in 1915, and 
has been the acting minister in De Kalb County, at Altamont, and in Da- 
viess County, always with marked success. 

Daniel M. Fisher was married to Sarah B. Deering, Dec. 24, 1876. 
She was born in Daviess County, the daughter of J. R. and Samantha 
(Stapp) Deering, both now dead. Mr. and Mrs. Deering came to Da- 
viess County in the forties, and located on a farm in Marion Township. 
Mrs. Fisher is the second oldest of the five children born to her parents, 
four of whom are now living. Mr. and Mrs. Fisher have three daugh- 
ters: Ora, H., the wife of Fred Robinson of Gallatin; LuVerne, married 
to D. T. Browne, of Altamont; and Pauline, the wife of J. B. McKaskey, 
of Altamont. Mr. Browne and Mr. McKaskey are partners in a mercan- 
tile establishment at Altamont. 

Mr. Fisher is a Republican, and is a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, of which lodge he is the district deputy grand 
master. He has been elected the representative to the Grand Lodge for 
1922-1923. Mr. Fisher is an excellent citizen, a man of keen intelligence, 
and one who holds the respect of the entire community. 

Arthur M. Stephens, the capable and energetic manager of the 
Farmers' Store at Gallatin, is well and favorably known throughout the 
community. He has lived in and around Gallatin for years, and has been 
connected with various mercantile enterprises in the county. 

Mr. Stephens was born in Sangamon County, Illinois, March 26, 
1876, the son of Sanford E. and Fannie (Ficklin) Stephens. Both Mr. 
and Mrs. Stephens were born near Covington, Ky., and came to Illinois 
in their youth. They settled in Missouri in 1874, and bought land in the 
eastern part of Daviess County, later returning to Illinois. They after- 
wards came back to Daviess County, and after making two more trips 
back in Illinois, they settled permanently in Daviess County, They both 
died on the farm in this county, and their remains are buried in Lock 
Spring Cemetery. They were the parents of seven children, three of 
whom are still living: Luther, farming in Livingston County; Benjamin, 
living in Livingston County; and Arthur M., the youngest child, the sub- 
ject of this review. 

Arthur M. Stephens was reared in Daviess County. At the age of 13 
years, he began clerking in a store at Lock Spring. He afterwards 
clerked in various stores, thoroughly mastering the phase of the mer- 
cantile business that involved the successful management of a store. He 
conducted a store at Lock Spring for S. N. Norris, who is the owner of 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 367 

the Farmers' Store at Gallatin. In 1905, Mr. Stephens came to Gallatin, 
where he clerked for Mr. Norris. In 1916 he was made the manager of 
the store, and has conducted it with unvarying success ever since. The 
store building covers a space 65x120 feet, and has a balcony 50 feet 
wide. The firm carries dry goods, ladies ready to wear garments, shoes, 
and men's clothing. They handle the Hart, Schaffner and Marx brand 
of clothing for men. The business is constantly growing, and shows the 
effect of Mr. Stephens' competent management. 

Mr. Stephens was married to Florence McClure on Oct. 12, 1918. 
She was born in Indiana and is the daughter of Charles and Mary Mc- 
Clure, former residents of Daviess County. 

Mr. Stephens is a Democrat, and is a member of the Masons and 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows Lodges, holding his membership 
in the former at Gallatin, and in the latter at Lock Spring. He is a relia- 
ble man, and has the respect of the entire town. 

R. L. Etter, Sr., manager of the W. H. Etter Dry Goods Company of 
Gallatin, is a member of a family that has been connected with mercan- 
tile pursuits in Missouri for many years. Mr. Etter has been an integral 
part of the mercantile development of Missouri in several parts of the 
state, and has been intimately associated with all phases of the business 
world since his early youth. The training he received has been of ines- 
timable value to him in recent years, since he has been operating a busi- 
ness. 

Mr. Etter was oorn on Dec. 11, 1863, at St. Louis, the son of C. A. 
and Sarah (Allen) Etter. C. A. Etter was born in Marietta, Pa., and his 
wife was a native of St. Louis County, Missouri. They are both now 
dead. They were early settlers of St. Louis, and had their residence near 
the river. C. A. Etter started a dry goods store in St. Louis, and for 30 
years, he conducted it with marked success. He retired from active busi- 
ness several years before his death. Mr. and Mrs. Etter were the parents 
of 11 children, four of whom are now living: Charles, of San Antonio, 
Tex.; Coleman, in the W. H. Etter store at Gallatin; Belle, now Mrs. Ar- 
thur Klug of St. Louis; and R. L., the youngest child, and the subject of 
this review. 

R. L. Etter was reared in St. Louis, and graduated from the public 
schools in that city. He and his brother, M. F. Etter, became interested 
in the dry goods business, and operated stores in several towns in Mis- 
souri. In 1882, they opened a store at Pattonsburg, which they sold in 
1886. Mr. Etter then came to Gallatin, where his oldest brother had 
founded the present Etter store. This store, founded by W. H. Etter 



368 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

more than 40 years ago, is one of the thriving enterprises of Gallatin. It 
is located in a building with a frontage of 60 feet, and is 125 feet deep. 
The two floors are given over to the housing of the complete stock of 
dry goods, shoes, carpets, men's clothing, ladies' ready to wear, and mil- 
linery, which the firm carries. The W. H. Etter Dry Goods Company was 
incorporated ten years after it was first organized. R. L. Etter is one of 
the stockholders. The founder, W. H. Etter, died in 1915, but the com- 
pany has continued the use of the original name. 

R. L. Etter was married the first time to Elizabeth McDonald, and 
to that union two children were born: Golden, a successful teacher in 
Tulsa, Okla. ; and Robert, connected with the office of the Democrat at 
Gallatin. Mr. Etter was married the second time to Neva Green, a native 
of Chillicothe, Livingston County. 

Mr. Etter is a Democrat, and a member of the Methodist Church. 
He is an alert business man, and is accounted one of the substantial cit- 
izens of Gallatin. 

Charles Hemry, a prominent business man of Daviess County, is the 
president of the First National Bank at Gallatin. Mr. Hemry is a member 
of a pioneer family of the county, and has spent all of his life in and near 
Gallatin, where he has established an enviable reputation as an efficient, 
careful, and successful financier. He was born May 20, 1870, in Monroe 
Township. 

George Hemry, grandfather of Charles Hemry, came from Ohio to 
Missouri, and settled in Daviess County in 1842. He entered land in 
Monroe Township, and made extensive improvements for his time. After 
a lapse of two years, he returned to Ohio to settle up the Hemry estate. 
He returned to Missouri shortly after, and died at Brunswick, where his 
remains are buried. His son, Thomas, the father of Charles Hemry, was 
born in Carroll County, Ohio, Dec. 9, 1830. He was reared in Daviess 
County ; received his education in the rural schools ; and became a prom- 
inent farmer and stockman in the county. He was a man of great energy 
and ambition, conservative and careful in his dealings. At his death on 
Jan. 31, 1903, he was the owner of 1500 acres of land, and his estate was 
valued at $100,000. He married Sarah Payne, born in Bourbon County, 
Ky., Dec. 10, 1834, the daughter of Henry Payne. Henry Payne and his 
family came to Missouri and settled in Daviess County in 1846. They lo- 
cated on a farm in Monroe Township where they lived for many years. 
Mr. Payne died in Iowa. To the union of Thomas and Sarah (Payne) 
Hemry six children were born: Martin, now living in Gallatin; Augusta, 
at Gallatin; Charles, the subject of this sketch; and Stella (Hemry) Hunt, 




CHARLES HEMRY 



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HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 369 

the assistant cashier of the First National Bank. Mrs. Hemry died Nov. 
2, 1914. Both her remains and those of her husband are buried in Brown 
Cemetery. 

Charles Hemry was reared on the farm, attended the rural schools 
in his boyhood, and later became a student in Kidder Institute at Kidder, 
He studied in Gem City Business College for a while, and then became 
manager of the home farm, which he now owns. In July, 1894, he came to 
Gallatin and entered the banking business, in which he remained until 
1900, when he returned to the farm. In 1909 he was made the president 
of the First National Bank and has filled that position with credit ever 
since. In 1916 Mr. Hemry erected a house in Gallatin which is all modern 
and is accounted one of the best residences in the town. He is an exten- 
sive land owner, holding 687 acres in Daviess County and 1600 acres in 
Western Kansas. 

Mr, Hemry was married Dec. 19, 1909, to Adah Macy, a native of 
Daviess County, the daughter of W. C. and Mary (Nichols) Macy. Mrs. 
Hemry died Feb. 16, 1922, and is buried in Brown Cemetery, She left one 
daughter, Mary Charlene; a daughter, Dorothy, is deceased. W. C. Macy 
was born in Daviess County, the son of Captain Macy of Civil War fame, 
and one of the early settlers of the county. Mr. Macy died July 20, 1921, 
at the age of 73 years. He and his wife were the parents of six daughters 
and one son. At the time of his death, Mr. and Mrs. Macy had retired from 
their farm. 

Charles Hemry is a Republican in politics, and is a member of the 
Baptist church. He belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He 
is one of the alert and keen minded business men of Daviss County, and a 
man of marked civic pride for his town. The Hemry family has been an 
asset to Daviess County since the days when the grandfather of the present 
subject first settled here. 

Frank A. Woodruff, one of the best known and most popular hotel 
men of northwest Missouri, is the owner and proprietor of the Woodruff 
Hotel at Gallatin. Mr. Woodruff is a man of varied business interests; 
he owns 169 acres of land in the county, and owns and manages the larg- 
est pear orchard in the state. He is a native of Daviess County, born at 
the southwest corner of the city limits of Gallatin, Dec. 3, 1865. His par- 
ents were Joab and Paulina (Fisher) Woodruff. 

The Woodruff name has been known in the United States since the 
days of the American Revolution. Joab Woodruff, the paternal grand- 
father of Frank A. Woodruff, was a native of Pennsylvania. He married 
Sophia Dumhan, and they moved to Indiana. Their son, Joab, the father 



370 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

of Frank A. Woodruff, was born near Nineneh, Johnson County, Indi- 
ana, Oct. 25, 1825. He learned the trade of a wagon maker and followed 
that trade for a time. He also farmed. In 1856 he came to Missouri and 
located in Daviess County, where he owned a section of land in Union 
and Liberty Townships. He was a successful farmer, and a fancier of 
high grade stock. His home was an open house to all of his neighbors, 
and was a meeting place for people from all parts of the county when 
anything of importance called them to Gallatin. Mr. Woodruff was 
known throughout the community for his spirit of hospitality. 

Joab Woodruff married Pauline Fisher on Nov. 29, 1846. She was 
born in Middletown, Ohio, May 14, 1825. To their union the following 
children were born : Jamsy, the wife of T. P. New, living six miles east 
of Gallatin; Mary, the widow of T. P. McGuire of Los Angeles; Gillie, 
married L. F. Hill, they are both dead, and their remains are buried in 
Colorado ; John W., whose farm at Eugene, Ore., was selected as the 
model chicken farm of Oregon; H(alleck, living near Gallatin; and 
Frank A., the subject of this review. Mr. Woodruff died on June 17, 
1882, and Mrs. Woodruff died on Feb. 25, 1901. The remains of both 
are buried in Brown Cemetery at Gallatin. 

Joab Woodruff was a Republican, He enlisted for service in the 
Civil War, and in 1862, was commissioned captain of Company I by Gov- 
ernor H. R. Gamble. He was assigned to No. 33rd, Regulars, Missouri 
State Militia; and in 1863 was detailed captain of Company A, 4th Pro- 
visional Regiment of the Enrolled Militia, stationed first at Rochester, 
and later at Savannah and St. Joseph. He remained in that service until 
the close of the war. In 1866 he was commissioned first lieutenant by 
Gov. T. C. Fletcher, and was made the enrolling officer for Daviess 
County. He held that position for a year. He was one of the best known 
men of his time in Daviess County, where he was held in high esteem. 

Frank A. Woodruff was reared on the farm, and attended the pub- 
lic school until he was 14 years of age. He looked after his father's 
farming interests, and farmed for himself until 1901. He became heir to 
80 acres of land in 1892, which he at once converted into an orchard. 
The land lies just a mile west of Gallatin, so Mr. Woodruff has an ex- 
cellent shipping point. At the time that Mr. Woodruff set out his or- 
chard, there was not a Commercial pear orchard to be found in the com- 
munity, but he established the industry on so subtsantial a basis that 
others have followed his lead. In 1919 Missouri raised more pears than 
any other state ; Daviess County produced half the pears of the state 
that year; and more than half of the Daviess County crop was raised in 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 371 

Mr. Woodruff's orchard. That year he shipped 17 car loads of pears, 
and in 1914 he shipped 23 car loads. 

In 1901, Mr. Woodruff started in the hotel business at Gallatin, us- 
ing a building on the site of the present Farmers' Store. That building 
was burned, and in 1911, Mr. Woodruff bought the present hotel build- 
ing. He is operating one of the most successful hotels in this part of the 
state. The success is largely due to the hospitable attitude maintained 
by both Mr. and Mrs. Woodruff toward their guests. Mr. Woodruff al- 
ways employs from 12 to 15 assistants in the hotel, and during the pick- 
ing season of the pear orchard, he employs 50 people. He supplies the 
town with ice during the summer season. 

Frank A. Woodruff was married on Oct. 4, 1885, to Sarah M, Hen- 
derson, born on Feb. 6, 1865, on a farm four and one-half miles west of 
Gallatin. Her father, G. W. Henderson, was born in Clay County, March 
11, 1834. When he was two years old, his parents moved to Gentry 
County, where his father was the first white man to build a log cabin in 
that county. In 1840 he moved his family to Daviess County, and there 
George W. Henderson grew up. G. W. Henderson was a farmer and 
grain broker. In 1874 he was elected to the position of county judge, 
which position he held for three years. He was acting as the county 
treasurer at the time of his death on July 29, 1893. He married Matilda 
McBrayer, Dec. 29, 1859. She was a native of Daviess County, and died 
Sept. 24, 1878. To her union with G. W. Henderson four children were 
born: John A., deceased; W. E., deceased; Sarah M., the wife of Frank 
A. Woodruff; and Eleanor J. 

To the union of Frank A. and Sarah M, (Henderson) Woodruff two 
children were born: Frankie, born Dec. 18, 1893, graduated from the 
Gallatin High School, married on Jan. 15, 1914, to Roy Talbert of Galla- 
tin; and John, born Feb. 4, 1906, in the hotel, where he has been reared, 
now a student in the Gallatin High School. Mr. and Mrs. Woodruff have 
one grandchild, Eleanor Frances Talbert, born on Dec. 28, 1914. 

Mr. Woodruff is a Republican, and is a member of the Modern 
Woodmen of America Lodge. His recollections of his youth on the farm 
are very interesting. He was very fond of pets as a boy, and his list of 
pet animals which he kept as a boy, includes 50 Shetland ponies, 40 
deer, an elk, an antelope, a golden eagle, 12 foxes, six wolves, and 500 
squirrels, which he kept in a huge cage at one time. Mr. and Mrs. Wood- 
ruff are excellent citizens and are held in high esteem, not only in Galla- 
tin, but by all the travelers, who have been guests in the hotel. 



372 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Dr. P. L. Gardner, since June, 1918, a practicing physician and sur- 
geon at Gallatin, is one of the progressive and widely known physicians 
of the county. He is a native of Missouri, having been born at Trenton, 
June 12, 1882. His parents are C. L. and Mary J. (Law) Gardner. 

C. L. Gardner was born near Palmyra, and is now a retired railroad 
man. He started as an engine wiper in his boyhood, was later made a 
fireman at Trenton, and then became an engineer on the Rock Island 
Railway, which position he held until 1901, when he retired from active 
service. Mary J. (Law) Gardner was born in England, and came to the 
United States about 1878. She went to Trenton, Mo., where she and her 
husband now live. Mrs. Gardner is a member of the Episcopal Church. 
Mr. and Mrs. Gardner had three children born to their union : Albert, 
deceased; P. L., the subject of this review; and John T., living at Tren- 
ton, and holding a position as traveling salesman for the Sharp and 
Dohne Company of Baltimore, Md. 

Dr. Gardner graduated from the Trenton High School, and in 1901, 
entered Missouri State University and studied medicine there for one 
year. In 1902 he went to University Medical College at Kansas City, 
Mo., and graduated from that institution in 1905. He began to practice 
his profession at Waldon, and remained, there until 1909, when he lo- 
cated at Gilman City. In April, 1918, he went to Chicago, and took a 
post graduate course and in June, 1918, he located at Gallatin, where he 
has established a large practice. He was a volunteer for medical service 
during the World War, but was not called into active duty. 

Dr. Gardner was married, April 19, 1905, to Jessie Ethel Ratliff. 
Mrs. Gardner was born at Trenton, the daughter of J. Newton and So- 
phronia (Drinkard) Ratliff, and graduated from the Trenton High 
School. Her father was a native of Illinois and her mother was born in 
Grundy County, Mo. Mr. Ratliff a partner in the Ratliff Commission 
Company of Kansas City, Mo., and was one of the well known and popu- 
lar business men of northwest Missouri. He died in 1920, and his widow 
now lives at Trenton. Dr. Gardner and his wife have two children ; C. 
Newton, and P. L., Jr. 

Dr. Gardner is a Democrat, and is a Royal Arch Mason. He is a 
member of the Daviess County Medical Society, the Missouri State Med- 
ical Association, and the American Medical Association. He is at present 
the deputy state commissioner of health and the United States public 
health officer for Daviess County. Dr. Gardner is the owner of 80 acres 
of land in Liberty Township, and keeps the place well improved. He is 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 373 

a man of progressive ideas in his profession, and a citizen of whom the 
community is proud. 

B. E. Croy, holding the position of second assistant postmaster in 
the postoffice at Gallatin, was born on Dec. 4, 1875, near Jameson. His 
parents were John and Nancy Jane (Walls) Croy. They were the par- 
ents of five children. Mr. and Mrs. Croy have now retired from the 
duties of their farm, and are living at Jameson. 

B. E. Croy was reared on the farm, and attended the Jameson High 
School. He later became interested in farming, and remained with his 
father on the latter's farm until 1897. That year he bought a farm of 60 
acres, which he operated and improved. He traded his land for a flour 
mill at Jameson, and entered into partnership with T. A. Walls. They 
operated the mill during the years 1909 and 1910, when Mr. Croy bought 
Mr. Walls' interest in the enterprise. A little later he traded the mill for 
183 acres of land in Liberty Township. During the year 1915-1916 he 
operated his father's land, but the next year, moved to his own farm. 
He improved that land, and continued to farm it until 1919, when he 
moved to Gallatin. In September, 1920, he was appointed by the Civil 
Service Commission as a clerk in the Gallatin Postoffice, where he has 
made a competent and obliging official ever since. 

Mr. Croy was married on Oct. 6, 1898 to Neva Byrd. She was born 
in Grundy County, Dec. 7, 1876. the daughter of Redmond and Ella 
(Currin) Byrd, both natives of Kentucky. Mrs. Byrd is dead, and Mr. 
Byrd now lives at Jameson. Mrs. Croy died on July 6, 1921. To her 
union with B. E. Croy three children were born: Alvin E., a resident of 
La Junta, Col.; Helen Marie; and James C, both at home. 

Mr. Croy is a Democrat, and is a member of the Baptist Church. 
He belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America, the Modern Brother- 
hood of America and the Mutual Benefit Association Lodges. He is a re- 
liable man, and a highly esteemed member of the community. 

H. E. Patton, manager of the Fuller Lumber Company at Gallatin, 
has spent practically all of his life in and near Gallatin. He is a native 
of Daviess County, where he was born at Jamesport on April 17, 1882. 

G. M. Patton, the father of H. E. Patton, was born in Alderson, Va., 
Sept, 30, 1849. He followed the trade of a carpenter and contractor. In 
1872 he came to Missouri, and located at Jamesport in Daviess County, 
where he worked as a carpenter until 1902, when he came to Gallatin. 
He married Isabelle Caraway, who was born in Daviess County, Sept. 
17, 1852, and to this union two children were born: Harry E., the sub- 
ject of this sketch ; and Kipper, married to R. L. Saunders of Gatesville, 



374 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Tex. Mrs. Patton died on March 1, 1917, and Mr. Patton now lives with 
his son at Gallatin. Mrs. Patton was a member of the Presbyterian 
Church, and Mr. Patton is identified with the Baptist Church. 

Harry E. Patton was reared at Jamesport, and graduated from the 
school at that place in 1900. He entered Grand River College at Galla- 
tin, where he was a student for a time, later attending the Normal Col- 
lege at Chillicothe. In 1908 he went to St. Joseph, and was placed in 
charge of the shoe department of the Battreall and Whittingham Shoe 
Company. The next year he farmed near Blake, and in 1913 he returned 
to Gallatin and worked as a carpenter. In 1917, he accepted a position 
as bookkeeper at the First National Bank, which position he gave up in 
1918 in order to become the manager of the Fuller Lumber Yard at Gal- 
latin. 

Mr. Patton was married to Henrietta Kivett on April 30, 1910. Mrs. 
Patton is the daughter of Newton and Mary (Johnson) Kivett, both na- 
tives of Missouri. Mr. Kivett is dead, and his widow now lives at Galla- 
tin. Mr. and Mrs. Patton have two children ; Deen and Genevieve. 

Mr. Patton is a member of the Christian Church, and is a Democrat. 
He belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America Lodge. He is well 
known throughout Daviess County, and is an efficient and energetic 
man. He is proving successful in his work as manager of the Fuller Lum- 
ber Yard. 

Lee R. Pierce, the county treasurer of Daviess County and a well 
known auctioneer of Gallatin, where he makes his home, was born in 
Rooks County, Kan., Nov. 29, 1893. H,is parents are Fred L. and Addie 
(Brant) Pierce. 

Fred L. Pierce was born in Tippecanoe County, Indiana, Jan. 29, 
1871. He moved to Kansas in his youth, and became a farmer in that 
state. In 1895 he came to Daviess County, and bought a farm in Monroe 
Township two years later. He now owns 200 acres of well improvel 
land, and is a breeder of high grade stock specializing in Spotted Po- 
land China hogs. His wife, Addie (Brant) Pierce, was born in Ohio, 
Sept. 30, 1872. To her union with Fred L. Pierce the following children 
were born: Lee R., the subject of this review; Lloyd, Walter, Mary, 
Ollie, Mildred, Bessie, and John. 

Lee R. Pierce was reared on his father's farm, and attended the 
district schools of Monroe Township. After he completed his school 
work, he worked on the farm for his father. In 1912, he began crying 
farm sales, and liked that work so well that he entered the Missouri Auc- 
tion School at Trenton for special training. He has been a successful and 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 375 

popular auctioneer. He served as the assessor of Union Township for 
two years, and in 1920, he was elected county treasurer for Daviess 
County. 

Lee R. Pierce was married on Aug. 20, 1918, to Gay Green, Mrs. 
Pierce was born in Monroe Township in Daviess County. Her parents 
were W. H. and Mina Green, both now dead. Mr. and Mrs. Pierce have 
no children. 

Mr. Pierce is a Republican. He is a worthy young man, energetic 
and ambitious, and is well lined in the town. 

Clinton L. Payne, a retired farmer of Daviess County, now living at 
Gallatin, is a native of Illinois, was born in Madison County on Jan. 3, 
1859. His parents were Henry and Delia L. (Shephard) Payne. 

Henry Payne was born in New Haven, Conn., and was reared on a 
farm. In 1844 he came to Illinois, and located on a farm in Madison. 
County, where he died in 1879 at the age of 61 years. His wife was also 
born in New Haven, Conn, She died at Trinidad, Col., in 1899, at the age 
of 78 years. Mr. and Mrs. Payne were the parents of five children, of 
whom only one, Clinton L., now survives, 

Clinton L. Payne grew up on a farm in Illinois. He was a student in 
Johnson's Commercial College in St. Louis, and graduated from that in- 
stitution in 1880. He returned to Illinois, after his graduation, but in 
1883 he came to Missouri. He bought 100 acres of land in Washington 
Township, Daviess County, and improved it. He added to his land hold- 
ings as he could, until he now owns 424 acres, divided into two well im- 
proved farms. Mr. Payne has always been a stock breeder, and has 
shipped a great deal of stock from Daviess County. In 1920, Mr. Payne 
retired from the farm, went to Gallatin, and built one of the best resi- 
dences in the town on East Grand Street, He is a shareholder and a di- 
rector in the First National Bank of Gallatin. 

Mr. Payne was married on Sept. 2, 1885, to Alice M. Reed. Mrs. 
Payne vv^as born in Washington Township, Daviess County. Her parents 
were N. E. Reed, a native of Delaware; and Rachel (Mayo) Reed, born 
in Illinois. They are both dead. Mr. and Mrs. Payne have two children : 
Harley, married Geraldine Daniels, has one child, Harley, Jr., and lives 
on one of Mr, Payne's farms ; and Leland, married Arthur Daniels, and 
lives on Mr, Payne's farm. 

Mr. Payne has always been a highly respected citizen of Daviess 
County, where he is held to be one of the substantial and reliable men of 
his community. The Payne family is an asset to the county. 



376 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Leonard M. Hosman, the capable and progressive superintendent of 
public schools at Gallatin, has spent his life in school work. He is thoroly 
familiar with the various phases and needs of the educational work of 
Missouri, having been an integral part of the school system for years. He 
has been a student in the rural schools, the town systems, the State Teach- 
ers College, and the University. Both as a student and as an instructor, 
he has shown a keen appreciation of the problems that confront the schools. 
He is, by virtue of his capacity and training, the type of man who can and 
does accomplish much for Missouri schools. 

Leonard M, Hosman was born in Sheridan Township, Daviess County, 
Dec. 19, 1891. His parents are S. G. and Alice E. (McCrary) Hosman. 
Leonard Hosman's paternal grandparents were James and Kathena (Wood) 
Hosman, natives of Kentucky. They came to Missouri, and settled in 
Daviess County in 1840, where they settled on a farm and reared seven 
sons. James Hosman was a slave holder, the owner of race horses and 
always had Kentucky whiskey in his home. He was one of the intrepid 
men who, because he enjoyed venturing into new and untried land, was a 
strong factor in building up this part of Missouri. 

S. G. Hosman, a son of James and the father of Leonard M., was born 
in Daviess County, Feb. 20, 1862. He was reared on a farm within a mile 
of his present home in Daviess County, and has always been a farmer. 
He holds 120 acres of well improved land in Sheridan Township, and is 
a well known breeder of Poland China hogs, and Aberdeen Angus cattle. 
He has exhibited his stock at various fairs. Mr. Hosman has always been 
a fancier of high grade horses and mules. He has made an improvement 
in Reed Yellow Dent corn, w*hich has proved successful. He has for years 
been a man of prominence in the community and has for been connected 
with the progressive school movements of his district. He is a staunch 
Democrat, a member of the Presbyterian church, and belongs to the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows lodge. 

S. G. Hosman was married to Alice E. McCrary. She was born in 
Sheridan Township Nov. 14, 1863, the daughter of F. M. and Martha 
(McBrayer) McCrary. They were natives of North Carolina, and came to 
Daviess County in 1825, making the trip overland. Mrs. Hosman's father, 
F. M. McCrary, was born during the trip. To S. G. and Alice E. (McCrary) 
Hosman the following children were born: Leonard E., the subject of this 
sketch ; Floyd, a farmer in Sheridan Township ; Joseph, living at home ; 
Carrie, the wife of Virgil Walker of Sheridan Township; Alta, at home; 
and Pearl, at home. 

Leonard Hosman was reared on a farm, and attended the Swisher 
District School. He graduated from the Hamilton High School in 1911, 




LEONARD M. IJOSMAN 



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HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 377 

and then taught in the Cope District, west of Gallatin, for two years, spend- 
ing the spring and summer in the Northwest Missouri State Teachers Col- 
lege at Marysville. In 1913 he was elected principal of the Pattonsburg 
High School, and the next year was tendered the position of superintendent 
there. He retained that position until 1914, when he left Pattonsburg in 
order to accept a position at Gallatin. Since 1917 he has been superinten- 
dent of schools at Gallatin, and has had the cooperation of the entire com. 
munity in building up an excellent school system. Mr. Hosman graduated 
from the Northwest Missouri State Teachers College in 1915, and during 
1920 and 1921, he was a student in Kansas State University at Lawrence 
Kansas. Mr. Hosman has always maintained a keen interest in farming 
and during the World War, he spent two summers working on the farm. 
He owns 163 acres of land in Marion and Benton Townships in Daviess 
County, and successfully oversees the operations of his holdings, 

Leonard M. Hosman was married on Aug. 5, 1916, to Eunice E. Eliott 
born in the southern part of Gentry County, the daughter of H. F. and 
Alva (Brotherton) Elliott. Mr. and Mrs. Elliott are now living at Pattons- 
burg, where Mr. Elliott does general farming. 

Mr. Hosman is a Democrat, and is a member of the Methodist church 
in which he is a steward. He belongs to the Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and the Yoeman lodges. 
He is a man of energy, vision and ambition, an invaluable asset to the 
community. 

Nathaniel G. Cruzen, a well known and successful attorney who is 
engaged in the practice of his profession at Gallatin, is a native of Da- 
viess County and a member of one of the pioneer families of this part of 
the state. He was born at Jamesport, Aug. 1, 1871, a son of Nathaniel 
G. and Mary Faulkner (Gillilan) Cruzen. 

Nathaniel G. Cruzen, the father, was a veteran of the Civil War 
anl during his lifetime was identified with Daviess County. He was born 
in Jefferson County, Virginia, Oct. 14, 1826, and his parents were Rich- 
ard R. and Aurelia W. (North) Cruzen, the former a native of Loudoun 
County, Virginia, who for 30 years was inspector of the National Arm- 
ory at Harper's Ferry, and the latter a native of Fairfax County, Vir- 
ginia. Nathaniel G. Cruzen, Sr., attended school at Harper's Ferry and 
worked in the armory under his father there until he was 20 years old. 
In 1846 he came to Missouri and settled in Saline County. He remained 
there until 1849 when gold was discovered in California when he went 
to the Pacific Coast. He was engaged in mining in California for four 
years and returned to Saline County where he was engaged in the peace- 



378 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

ful pursuit of farming until the Civil War broke out. In December. 1861, 
he enlisted in the Confederate Army in Company A, commanded by F. 
S. Robertson. His first engagement was at Kirkpatrick's mill, near Knob- 
noster, Dec. 19, 1861, where the whole Confederate army was captured. 
Mr. Cruzen was confined in the Graitot Street Prison at St. Louis for 
three months when he was transferred to the prison at Alton, 111., and 
six months later was exchanged. He was then mustered into Musser's Bat- 
talion which was later consolidated with the Infantry. He remained in 
the army until the close of the war when he surrendered at Shreveport, 
La. He then returned to Missouri and engaged in the mercantile busi- 
ness at Mt. Hope, Lafayette County, until March, 1869, when he came 
to Daviess County which was his home until the time of his death, July 
1, 1903. Gallatin had been his home since 1883 and at the time of his 
death he was engaged in the loan and abstract business. 

Nathaniel G. Cruzen, Sr., was first married to Nancy E. Jordin, a 
native of Greenbrier County, West Virginia, who died July 23, 1856. In 
December, 1860, Mr. Cruzen married Mrs. Mary Faulkner, a daughter 
of James Gillilan, a native of Pocahontas County, Virginia, and one of 
the early settlers of Daviess County. He was the founder of the town of 
Jamesport in whose honor it was named. To Nathaniel G. Cruzen's sec- 
ond marriage seven children were born of whom the following are liv- 
ing: Bettie L., married Charles A. Savage, Kansas City; Nathaniel G., 
the subject of this sketch; Harry L., Rock Island, 111.; and Earl M., 
Walla Walla, Wash. The mother of these children resides in Kansas 
City with her daughter. 

Nathaniel G. Cruzen, whose name introduces this review was edu- 
cated in the public schools of Jamesport and Gallatin and Wentworth 
Military Academy at Lexington, Mo. He entered the Kansas City law 
school in 1895 and was graduated from that institution in 1897 and was 
admitted to the bar of Missouri in 1897. He held a clerkship in the Kan- 
sas City post office from 1891 to 1901, taking his law course at night 
school during the same period. In 1901 Mr. Cruzen returned to Galla- 
tin and engaged in the practice of law. He was in partnership with R. J. 
Britton for a time and they conducted the abstract and loan business in 
addition to the law. In 1911 Mr. Cruzen became associated with E. D. 
Mann. Mr. Cruzen is a capable lawyer and has been identified with 
many of the important cases of Daviess County. He was appointed spe- 
cial prosecutor in the celebrated Tarwater case, which attracted state- 
wide attention and was carried to the Supreme Court which confirmed 
the conviction of the lower Court and the contention of the Prosecutor. 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 379 

Mr. Cruzen was married June 26, 1896, to Miss Mary Edna Gear- 
heart, a native of Denver, who was reared and educated in Kansas City 
and Gallatin. She is a very capable woman and a talented writer. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Cruzen have been born two children: Richard H., a gradu- 
ate of the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis, Md., and is now 
holding a commission as ensign on the U. S. S. Claxton, with the Pacific 
fleet; and Mary N., who was educated at the Central Female College, 
Lexington, Mo., Kansas State Agricultuarl College and the Chicago Uni- 
versity, is now a teacher of Dometsic Science at Liberty, Mo. 

Mr. Cruzen is a Democrat and has held the office of County Collec- 
tor. He is a stockholder in the Farmers Exchange Bank of Gallatin and 
is a member of the Masonic Lodge. 

Frank A. Fitterer, a grocery merchant of Gallatin, Daviess County, 
is a member of a well known Missouri family. He was born at Trenton 
on Nov. 15, 1873, and is the oldest son of Enos and Mary (Artman) 
Fitterer, sketches of whose lives appear elsewhere in this volume. 

Frank A. Fitterer grew up in Daviess County and attended the 
school at Gallatin, from which he graduated in 1892. He became a firm 
member of the M. E. Fitterer and Sons Mercantile Company, and has re- 
tained his interest in the store ever since. 

Mr. Fitterer was married on Oct, 7, 1896, to Maud Clingan. Mrs. 
Fitterer was born at Gallatin, the daughter of Edward and Lillie (Clou- 
das) Clingan, Mrs. Clingan, now deceased, was a native of Quincy, 111.; 
and Mr. Clingan, born at Gallatin, now lives with his children. Mr. and 
Mrs. Fitterer have one son, Frank Clingan Fitterer. He graduated from 
the Gallatin High School, was a student in William Jewell College at 
Liberty, and later studied in Missouri State University, and also served 
as a member of the S. A. T. C, in the same college. He married Norris 
Tomlinson, and to this union one son was born. Jack Clingan Fitterer. 
Mr. Fitterer is now clerking in the Knauer store. 

Frank A. Fitterer is a member of the Presbyterian Church and is an 
elder in that organization. By inheritance and training Mr, Fitterer is 
well fitted to handle mercatnile work in a successful manner. He is one 
of the well established business men of the community, where the Fit- 
terer family has always been considered an asset to the town. 

Enos Fitterer, deceased, was born at Baden, Germany, on July 28, 
1835. In 1846 his parents came to the United States and settled on a 
farm in Butler County, Ohio. Ten years later, in 1856, Enos Fitterer 
went to Hamilton, Ohio, and learned the trade of a baker. After spend- 



380 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

ing 15 months at Hamilton, he went to Carthage, 111., and entered the 
bakery business for himself. 

Mr. Fitterer left his business in 1861 and enlisted for service in the 
Civil War. He was placed in Company B, 32nd Illinois Volunteer Infan- 
try ; and took part in the following battles and skirmishes, Pittsburg 
Landing, Hatchie River, and Sherman's March to the Sea. He was mus- 
tered out of service at Leavenworth, Kan., in September, 1865, and re- 
ceived his discharge at Springfield, 111. 

From Springfield, 111., Mr. Fitterer came to Missouri and located at 
Trenton, where he entered into a partnership with C. A. Hoffman. They 
opened a grocery store and bakery under the firm name of Hoffman 
and Fitterer, which they conducted until 1867, when Mr. Hoffman re- 
tired from the business. In 1873, Mr. Fitterer and his brother, John, be- 
came partners in the same enterprise using the firm name of Fitterer 
and Brother. That same year they sold the store to Hyde and Crandall. 
In 1877, Mr. Fitterer moved to Gallatin, and entered the grocery and 
bakery business, which he conducted until his death on Feb. 18, 1884. 

Enos Fitterer was married on Sept. 23, 1868, to Mary Artman. She 
was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, May 20, 1852. She died on April 19, 1908. 
To her union with Enos Fitterer two children were born: Frank A., and 
Oscar L., sketches of whose lives appear in this volume. After the death 
of her husband, Mrs. Fitterer continued to operate the store. She was a 
woman of keen business ability, and of wide sympathy. She was a de- 
vout member of the Baptist Church, as was her husband also, and sup- 
ported it, both spiritually and financially with the greatest loyalty. She 
was a woman much given to deeds of charity, but never felt that she de- 
served praise for her kindnesses. 

The firm name of M. E. Fitterer and Sons has been used since 1877. 
The long record of 45 continuous years of successful business is unusual. 
It has established the Fitterer name among the well known mercantile 
firms of the county. The two sons of Enos Fittterer now conduct the bus- 
iness. They have achieved the same success that their father had. The 
store is one of the best equipped in Daviess County. The firm carries a 
complete line of groceries and queensware, and operate a bakery in con- 
nection with the business. Enos Fitterer founded the business along safe 
business lines. He was a man of unusual discernment, great energy, and 
with high ideals of integrity and civic pride. 

Oscar L. Fitterer, merchant at Gallatin, has been well and favor- 
ably known in the county all of his life. He is a member of a family that 
has been prominent in the mercantile business in Daviess County for 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 381 

many years, and is himself a partner in the M. E. Fitterer's Sons grocery 
store and bakery. He was born at Gallatin on May 22, 1883, the son of 
Enos and Mary (Artman) Fitterer, sketches of whose lives appear in 
this volume. 

Oscar L. Fitterer was educated in the Gallatin public schools and 
graduated from Grand River College with the degree of Master of 
Accounts. He did his special work in his chosen field under the tutelage 
of B. F. Sprayer. After graduation from college, Mr. Fitterer became 
a clerk in the store owned by his mother and brother. After the death 
of his mother, he became a partner in the store. He and his brother 
F. A., now conduct the business, which is one of the highly successful 
enterprises of Daviess County. 

Mr. Fitterer was married to Maud Oxford on Nov. 11, 1908. Mrs. 
Fitterer was born at Cainsville, the daughter of M. F. and Sarah Jane 
(Chambers) Oxford. Mr. Oxford is an attorney at Cainsville. Mrs. 
Fitterer is an active member of the Baptist church, and for the past 
three years, has acted as the president of the Ladies' Aid Society of the 
church. She is a woman of marked executive ability and tact, and has 
made a thoroughly competent officer. She is a member of the Order of 
the Eastern Star, and has filled practically all of the offices in that lodge. 

Oscar L. Fitterer is a member of the Baptist church. He is a Royal 
Arch Mason and the Chapter lodge at Gallatin ; and is a Knights Tem- 
plar and a member of the Moila Shrine at St. Joseph. He is accounted 
one of the progressive and reliable business men of Gallatin, and is one 
of the highly regarded citizens of Daviess County. 

R. M. McCue, retired, substantial citizen of Daviess County is the 
owner of 400 acres of well improved land in Grand River Township, 
Daviess County. He was born in Nicholas County, Va., Feb. 19, 1844, 
the son of David and Martha (McNeil) McCue. 

David McCue was born in Pocahontas County, Va., in February, 
1802, and came to Missouri in 1844, where he became engaged in farm- 
inf in Jackson Township, Daviess County. During the Civil War, Mr. 
McCue served in the army. He later sold out his farm and moved to 
Chariton County, Mo. For a short time he lived in Oklahoma. Mr. Mc- 
Cue died Sept. 12, 1892, on his son's farm in Daviess County. To David 
and Martha (McNeil) McCue 18 children were born, as follows: Paul, 
deceased; Isaac, deceased; Elizabeth, died in infancy; Franklin, de- 
ceased; Rachael, the widow of A. L. Martin, Oklahoma; David, de- 
ceased; James, deceased; John, deceased; William, deceased; Charles, 
deceased; Hannah, the widow of A. L. Holland, Gallatin; George, Okla- 



382 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

homa; R. M., the subject of this sketch; Mathew, Shelby County; Abra- 
ham, deceased; Virginia, twin sister of Abraham; Mary, deceased, was 
the wife of Alfred Clark; Martha, deceased, was the wife of Wm. Mc- 
Cartney. Fifteen of the children grew to maturity, and eight of the sons 
served during the Civil War in the Confederate army. 

Martha (McNeil) McCue, the mother of R. M. McCue, was born in 
Greenbrier County, Virginia, in 1810, and died on May 13, 1854. The 
following is quoted from remarks concerning the life of Mrs. McCue by 
Mrs. N. G. Cruzen, written in the Northwest History of Missouri: "Mar- 
tha (McNeil) McCue, the mother of this very large family of 18 chil- 
dren underwent many trials and much privation in the rearing of her 
family. Can you imagine such a great mother love as she possessed? 
She brought up her family in a log cabin, shut in by the great wilderness 
of the prairie land. Beside the enormous task of mothering her children, 
Mrs. McCue even wove the material for their clothing. She carded the 
wool by hand, spun it on a big wheel, reeled it on a count wheel, dyed, 
wove, cut and made the garments for her entire family. She did this 
work by the light of a tallow candle. She communed in silent prayer 
with her God and touched each touseled head, fastened each little shoe, 
and bent to kiss each childish hurt. She was indeed a wonderful mo- 
ther." 

R. M. McCue was reared on his father's farm and received his edu- 
cation in the Oxford District school. He began farming on rented land, 
but in 1875 he purchased a farm in Bates County. Five years later, Mr. 
McCue returned to Daviess County, where he purchased a farm in 
Grandriver Township. He made extensive improvements and kept add- 
ing to his land holdings until he now owns 400 acres of land. He was 
one of the successful farmers of Daviess County, and is widely known. 

In September, 1862, Mr. McCue enlisted in Arkansas under the 
command of General Joe Shelby, and served throughout the Civil War. 
He then returned to Daviess County. In 1890 he retired from farming 
and since that time has lived in Gallatin, where he owns a fine residence. 

On Dec. 2, 1877, Mr. McCue was married to Elizabeth Rodgers, a 
daughter of T. F. and Tabitha (McClung) Rodgers, now deceased, na- 
tives of Virginia. Mrs. McCue was born Feb. 2, 1858, in Warren County, 
111. To R. M. and Elizabeth (Rodgers) McCue four children were born, 
as follows: Virgil R., dentist, St. Joseph; Jessie, the wife of Dr. M. A. 
Smith, Gallatin ; Irma Roena, the wife of J. L. Campbell, professor. Lib- 
erty; Vada June, the wife of Dr. L. F. Graham, dentist, Cameron; Vir- 
gil R. McCue was educated in the Gallatin schools and Western Dental 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 383 

College at Kansas City. He began his practice in 1901 at Pattonsburg, 
where he remained until 1912, when he was appointed by Governor 
Major on the parole board for two years. He then resigned and was ap- 
pointed on the State Dental Board, on which he served for four years. 
He still holds this office. In 1914 Dr. McCue went to Cameron, where he 
practiced until 1920, when he removed to St. Joseph. He now has his 
business in St. Joseph, and has been unusually successful in his work. 
He is well known in Daviess County and has many friends. Jessie McCue 
Smith was educated in the Lexington Central College for Women, from 
which she is a graduate. She taught school until her marriage. Her sis- 
ters, Irma and Vada, are also graduates of the same school. Mr. McCue 
has four grand children: Virginia McCue; Bettie J. Smith; Mary M. 
Smith ; and Mary C. Campbell. 

Mr. McCue is a Democrat, and is a member of the Methodist 
Church, as also was his father. David McCue was a great student of the 
Bible. Mr. McCue attributes his great success in life to hard work, per- 
severance, and good management. He is an interesting and intelligent 
man and a substantial and reliable citizen. He merits the high esteem 
in which he is held in the community. 

George C. Goodbar, the son of a pioneer farmer of Daviess County, 
and himself a retired farmer, now lives at Gallatin. He was born in 
Grand River Township, Daviess County, on Oct. 29, 1857, the son of 
Joseph and Jeannette (Drummond) Goodbar. 

Joseph Goodbar was born in Rockbridge County, Virginia, Jan. 15, 
1815. He came to Missouri in 1843, and bought land in Daviess County 
about three miles from the present site of Pattonsburg. Five years later, 
he moved to Grand River Township, where he preempted land on the 
prairie. He farmed there all of his life. His wife was a native of Mon- 
roe County West Virginia, where she was born in September, 1819. The 
children of Joseph and Jeannette (Drummond) Goodbar were: Mary 
A., married J. O. Miller and is now dead; J. M., deceased; R. H., living 
on the home place in Grand River Township; Missouri A., and a sister, 
twins, the former married to G. K. Nickell, and the latter died in in- 
fancy; Martha E., the wife of T. K. Hayes of Grand River Township ; Jo- 
sephine, the widow of J. Reed living in northern New Mexico ; Laura A., 
the wife of A. C. Smith of Gallatin; George C, the subject of this re- 
view; J. v., living at Excelsior Springs; Joseph U., on a farm in Grand 
River Township; and Ada N., dead, was the wife of D, N. Hesler. Mrs. 
Goodbar died in 1894, and Mr. Goodbar died on March 4, 1889. Their 
remains are buried in Bethel Cemetery. They were both members of the 
Methodist Church. 



384 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

George C. Goodbar was reared on a farm, and attended the rural 
schools. He began farming when he was only a boy. At the age of 10 
years, he was using the old fashioned single shovel plow. He bought a 
part of the home place upon which he made improvements. He added 
to his land and now owns 120 acres in Grand River Township. In 1899, 
he and his brother, J. C. Goodbar, began breeding Shorthorn cattle. 
They shipped their stock through a commission company at Omaha, 
Neb., and became well known as breeders and shippers. In 1915, Mr. 
Goodbar sold his herd of pure bred cattle to Joe Mann. Mr. Goodbar re- 
mained on his farm until December, 1919, when he moved to Gallatin. 

George C. Goodbar was married to Sarah (Poage) Ballard. Mrs. 
Goodbar was born in Union Township, the daughter of Samuel and 
Sarah (Allen) Poage. They were early settlers of Daviess County, who 
came to Missouri from Virginia. 

Mr. Goodbar is a Republican, and held the office of a member of 
the township board in Grand River Township for two terms. He is a 
member of the Presbyterian Church. He is one of the substantial citi- 
zens of the county, a man who is reliable and highly respected. 

Wood H. Han\ilton, who is now living retired, was a prominent mer- 
chant of Gallatin, Mo., for many years. He was born in Randolph County, 
Mo., June 15, 1849, the son of Dr. John Benjamin and Coroline (Sanders) 
Hamilton, natives of Kentucky. 

The Hamilton family is of Scotch Irish descent. For many years. Dr. 
Hamilton was a practicing physician in Kentucky. In 1836 he with his 
wife moved to Randolph County, Mo., having made the trip from Kentucky 
to Missouri in a covered wagon drawn by six horses. He brought several 
negro slaves with him. Upon his arrival in Missouri, Dr. Hamilton pur- 
chased a great deal of unimproved land which the negroes worked for him. 
He sold out his farm in 1850, removing to Gallatin, Mo., where he purchas- 
ed business property and land near Gallatin. Two year later, Dr. Hamilton 
died at the age of 57 years. His wife then moved on a farm a mile west of 
Gallatin, with her five sons, where she lived until her death, March 17, 
1903, at the age of 91 years. 

Wood H. Hamilton was educated in the public schools of Gallatin, and 
was reared on a farm. He remained with his mother until his marriage in 
1870. He carried on farming until 1873, when he held a hve stock sale, 
which netted him $625.00. With this money Mr. Hamilton came to Galla- 
tin, and became engaged in the harness and saddlery business. Although 
being inexperienced along this line of work, he soon became an expert in 
making harness and saddles. His business grew steadily until at one time 
he had seven men engaged to assist him. In 1901 Mr. Hamilton sold out 



THE NEW YORK 



NtiX AND 

. .iLNHAliilNS 
R L 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 385 

his business, after which he made many investments in property. He has 
owned about 12 of the business buildings on the square in Gallatin, among 
them being the Woodruff Hotel, the Odd Fellows Building, which was burn- 
ed in the spring of 1922. Mr. Hamilton owns a very fine residence in Gall- 
atin where he makes his home. 

On Dec. 22, 1870, Mr. Hamilton was married to Amanda McGee, the 
daughter of Major McGee, a prominent pioneer of Gallatin. To Wood H. 
and Amanda (McGee) Hamilton seven children have been born, as follows : 
Minnie, deceased ; Winnie, the wife of R. J. McCue, San Francisco, and they 
have one son, J. Dennison McCue, 22 years old; Elsie, the wife of Fred 
Carson, Kansas City, Mo., and they have two sons, Ralph and Robert ; Lela, 
the wife of Carl Roswell, Chicago, 111. ; Coleman, married to Minnie Whitt, 
living at Holton, Kansas ; Lewis B., born in 1899. He enlisted during the 
World War on July 23, 1917, at Trenton, and was sent to Camp Doniphan, 
Okla., for training. On April 25th, 1918, he sailed for overseas with the 
139th Infantry, 35th Division, and on May 24th, 1918, was made corporal 
of Headquarters Company of the 139th Infantry. He was in the follow- 
ing battles ; Wessling Sector, July 20th to Sept. 1, 1918 ; St. Mihiel, Dec. 16 
to September; Argonne Offiensive, from Sept. 26 to Oct. 2, 1918; in this 
battle all of the commissioned officers were killed, among them being Major 
W. D. Stepp, a well known attorney of Trenton. After the battle the 
sergeants were made leaders of the companies. Mr. Hamilton was also 
engaged in the Verdun Sector from Oct. 24th until Nov. 6, 1918. During 
one battle he was struck by a piece of shrapnel on the hand, which knocked 
a pair of pliers from his hands. His company left France on April 3, 1919, 
and landed in this country April 25, 1919. He was discharged on May 9, 
1919, at Camp Funston, Kans. He returned to Gallatin, Mo., where he 
was appointed assistant cashier of the First National Bank of Gallatin, 
which position he held from August, 1919, until April 15, 1921. Mr. Ham- 
ilton then became engaged in looking after his father's interests. He was 
married on June 29, 1920, to Merle Harris of Clifton Hill, and they reside 
in Gallatin. 

Wood H. Hamilton was a stockholder in the First National Bank of 
Gallatin, and after 40 years of connection with this bank, sold his interests. 
In politics he is a Democrat. He has held the office of either mayor or 
councilman of Gallatin since 1894, and is one of the leaders in public affairs 
of his community. He is a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, the Modern Woodmen of America, and the Knights of Phythias. 
He belongs to the Christian church. Mr. Hamilton is one of Daviess 
County's most highly respected and substantial citizens and he stands 
high in the esteem of his community. 



386 HISTORY OP DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

W. E. Blackburn, a well known retired farmer of Gallatin, was born 
Aug. 25, 1857, in Cass County, Indiana, a son of Robert and Cecelia Ann 
(King) Blackburn, natives of Butler County, Ohio. 

Robert Blackburn was born in 1815 and was a farmer during his 
entire life. He died in 1871 in Miami County, Indiana, where he is 
buried. Mr. Blackburn was married twice, his first wife being a Miss 
Venamon. Five children were born to this union, one of whom is now 
living; Daniel Blackburn, who came to Missouri in 1869 and settled in 
Daviess County, where he now resides in Union Township. 

Mr. Blackburn then married Cecelia Ann King, a native of Ohio, 
and to this union five children were born : A daughter, died in infancy ; 
W. E. Blackburn, the subject of this sketch; Robert Oscar, deceased; L. 
K., Gallatin; Charles H., deceased. After Mr. Blackburn's death in 1871, 
Mrs. Blackburn married David W. Vaughn, and they were the parents 
of four children, as follows: Adelbert, Union Township; Albert E., 
Union Township ; Eugene, living with his father and two brothers ; Osta 
Isabelle, wife of A. L. Dunnington, Union Township. Mrs. Vaughn died 
in 1911. 

W. E. Blackburn was reared on a farm in Miami County, Indiana, 
and came to Missouri in November, 1881. He worked as a farm hand 
for one year and then returned to Indiana. In 1883 he returned to Da- 
viess County, and settled on a farm south of Gallatin. He farmed here 
until 1908, when he moved four miles northeast of Gallatin, and in 1919 
he moved to Gallatin, where he is living retired. Mr. Blackburn was 
educated in a log cabin and took a normal course, teaching two terms of 
school, which he gave up for farming. 

Mr. Blackburn has been married three times. His first wife was 
Virginia L. Wood, a native of Daviess County. Six children were born to 
them as follows: Pearl, wife of Harry Lewis, Chicago, 111.; Jewell C, 
died in infancy ; Frances, wife of C. H. Bryant, Winston ; Virgil Homer, 
Chicago, 111. ; Laura J., wife of W. E. Sawyer, Tampa, Fla. ; Forrest W., 
at home. 

After the death of his first wife Mr. Blackburn was married to 
Hattie Wynne. No chilrden were born to this union. Mr. Blackburn's 
third marriage in 1915 was to Jennie Baldwin, a native of Daviess 
County. They have no children. 

Mr. Blackburn is a Democrat, and held township offices and also 
served on the County Court for two years from the south district. He is a 
member of the Methodist Church. 

When Mr. Blackburn began farming as a renter he had $300.00 in 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 387 

cash. He now owns 170 acres of land in Union Township, 40 acers in 
Grand River Township, 10 acres just east of the city limits of Gallatin, 
and one acre on which he now lives in Gallatin. All of Mr. Blackburn's 
farms are well improved and he always owned high grade stock. He is 
one of the enterprising citizens of the county, and widely known. He 
was elected on the city council in 1922. 

D. Harfield Davis, deceased, was a prominent merchant of Gallatin, 
for many years. He was born in Clark County, Virginia, one mile from 
the famous Lord Fairfax estate near the city of Winchester, on April 26, 
1836. He was the son of Baalis and Eliza (Timberlake) Davis, natives 
of Virginia. 

Baalis Davis was a merchant in Virginia and in 1855 removed to 
St. Louis, Mo., with his son, D. Harfield, the subject of this sketch. They 
went up the Missouri River by boat as far as the old port of Waverly, 
and from there they made the trip to Gallatin by horse and wagon. 
After their arrival in Gallatin, they became engaged in the drug busi- 
ness, which they followed until the times of their deaths. During the 
Civil War, D. Harfield Davis served as treasurer of Daviess County. At 
one time he had $46,000.00 in his keeping. A report reached him that 
bushwhackers were liable to raid the town at any time, and fearing this 
might take place, hid the money in the county jail until the danger was 
past. Mr. Davis received his first commission as postmaster of Gallatin, 
from President Buchanan, in 1856. He also held this office during Pres- 
ident Lincoln's administration and during part of President Grant's. He 
was a member of the first common council of Gallatin, on which board 
he served for many years, as well as the school board. 

In 1869, Mr. Davis purchased the local newspaper, then known as 
the "Torchlight," which he later changed to the "Gallatin Democrat." 
He conducted the paper for several years, when he sold it and became 
engaged again in the drug business, which was known under the name 
of the D. H. Davis Drug Company, until his death. This company is still 
in business under that name, and is one of the most reliable and substan- 
tial drug firms in Daviess County. 

Mr. Davis was married in 1859 to America Osborn, a native of Cov- 
ington, Ind., who came to Missouri with her father, Jesse Osborne who 
was one of the prominent pioneers of Gallatin. Mrs. D. H. Davis died in 
April, 1905. Mr. Davis died July 31, 1917, at Gallatin, and they are 
buried in Brown Cemetery. To D. Harfield and America (Osborn) Da- 
vis the following living children were born: Madora, the wife of Robert 



388 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES. 

A. Crozier, Los Angeles, Calif.; Frank M., Gallatin; and Virginia S., 
Gallatin. 

Frank Davis was born Jan. 12, 1863, and was reared and educated 
in Gallatin. He clerked in his father's store when a young man. Since 
his father's death, he has carried on the drug business and is a registered 
pharmacist. The store is incorporated and Mr. Davis with his two ne- 
phews own and conduct the business. 

On Nov. 6, 1889, Frank Davis was married to Josephine A. Bottom, 
a native of Breckenridge, Mo., and daughter of Dr. M. and Lavinia (Har- 
rison) Bottom. Dr. Bottom was a practicing physician at Breckenridge 
until his death, and was the oldest graduate of the old Richmond, Va., 
School of Medicine. His widow now lives in Breckenridge. To Frank 
and Josephine (Bottom) one child has been born, Leora M., born Oct. 
26, 1891. She is the wife of Dr. W. Dalton Davis, who is stationed at 
Fort Lyons, Colo., with the navy. He is a specialist in the tubercular de- 
partment, Mrs. W. Dalton Davis is a graduate of Gallatin High School 
and the University of Missouri, having the Bachelor of Arts and Sciences 
degrees. 

Frank Davis is a Democrat, as also was his father. He is a member 
of the Presbyterian Church and one of the substantial citizens of Galla- 
tin. The Davis family has been prominent in Daviess County for years, 
where the name stands for integrity, for uprightness and good citizen- 
ship. 

W. C. Pogue, a prominent retired farmer of Gallatin, and owner of 640 
acres of land in Grand River Township, was born March 22, 1860, in Mason 
County, Ky., the son of William T., and SaUie Pickett (Shanklin) Pogue. 

William T. Pogue was born in Greenup County, Ky., and came to 
Missouri in the early forties, where he purchased a great deal of land at 
75 cents per acre. His brother, George Pogue, was a lawyer at Gallatin, 
also became a large land owner. W. T. Pogue never made his home in 
Missouri, as he became ill while here and sent for his son, George H., to 
come to Missouri and take care of his affairs. Mr. Pogue returned to Ken- 
tucky where he died, in 1881. At the time of his death he owned a great 
deal of cattle and a sawmill in Missouri, besides his land. Sallie (Pickett) 
Pogue was born in Mason County, Ky., where she also died. To W. T. and 
Sallie (Pickett) Pogue six children were born, of whom three are now 
living, as follows: George H., Jamesport; Sallie P., the wife of James C. 
Darnell, deceased, Mason County, Ky., and W. C, the subject of this sketch. 

W. C. Pogue was the youngest of six children, and was reared on the 
farm in Kentucky, which is still in possession of the Pogue family. They 
have owned it for more than 150 years. He was educated in the Kalamont 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 389 

School at Flemingsburg, Ky. After completing his education, Mr. Pogue 
returned to the farm, where he lived until he removed to Daviess County, 
on January 31, 1883. He settled on a farm there owned by his father in 
Grand River Township. Mr. Pogue was very successful in general farm- 
ing and was a well known breeder of Schropshire sheep. He handled more 
sheep than most of the Missouri farmers. His farm was extensively im- 
proved and has a modern home on it. In October, 1916, Mr. Pogue retired 
and moved to Gallatin, where he now owns a fine residence three blocks 
east of the Square. 

On Oct. 30, 1889, Mr. Pogue was married to Marguerite Barnett, a 
native of Grand River Township, born June 7, 1868. She is the daughter 
of R. M. and Mary M. (Drummond) Barnett. To W. C. and Marguerite 
(Barnett) Pogue four children have been born, as follows: R. Grady, Chilli- 
cothe; Robert J., with father; Mary G., born Aug. 26, 1901, living at home; 
Willetta, born Oct. 22, 1904, living at home. R. Grady Pogue served in the 
World's War, enlisting in August, 1917. He entered the officers' training 
camp at Fort Sheridan, 111., and three months later was commissioned and 
sent to a training camp at Clintonville, Wis., and later to Rock Island, 111., 
arsenal. He was also stationed at the Peoria, 111., Tank Training School, 
and left Camp Custer for overseas in August, 1918. He was captain in 
the 330 Heavy Field Artillery. Mr. Pogue was stationed on ordinance duty 
most of the time. He returned to this country in May, 1919. Mr. Pogue 
was married to Myrtle C. Davis, on June 13, 1914. They have no children. 
Robert T. Pogue was born Aug. 25, 1883, and is married to Edna R. Penis- 
ton, of Daviess County. 

Mr. Pogue is president of the Gallatin High School Board, which office 
he has held since 1918. He is a Democrat and a member of the Presby- 
terian church, being an elder. Mr. Pogue is one of the substantial citi- 
zens of Daviess County, standing high in the esteem of his community. 

C. H. Everly, a well known and prosperous retired farmer of Gallatin, 
was born in Marion Township, Dec. 1, 1858, a son of Wm. W. and Hannah 
(Whitt) Everly. 

Wm. W. Everly was born in Logan, Hocking County, Ohio, in 1825, and 
in 1839 he came to Daviess County, locating on a farm in Grand River 
Township. During the Civil War Mr. Everly served in the State Guards. 
He died Sept. 7, 1869, on a farm in Grand River Township, now owned by 
his son, C. H. Everly. Mr. and Mrs. Everly were the parents of five child- 
ren. Mrs. Everly, the mother of C. H. Everly, died many years ago, and 
Wm. W. Everly then married a widow, Mrs. Brown. They were the par- 
ents of three daughters. 

C. H. Everly was 11 years of age when his father died. He was edu- 



390 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

cated in the district schools, his first school being in a log cabin. In 1878 
he attended the state university. He then purchased 160 acres of prairie 
land in Lincoln Township, where he made improvements and sold it the 
following year. After this he bought the old home place in Grand River 
Township, making extensive improvements. The nine room residence on 
that farm burned in February, 1920. 

Feb. 22, 1882, Mr. Everly was married to Mary E. Ashbrook, a native 
of Jamesport Township, Daviess County, and daughter of David and 
Pauline (Hill) Ashbrook. Mr. and Mrs. Everly were the parents of five 
children, one of whom is now living, William F. He resides on a farm in 
Grand River Township. He married Alma B. Martin, of Iowa. They have 
one child, Helen Elizabeth. 

Mr. Everly says he remembers when his father ran a saw and grist 
mill and used oxen to do his work around the mill. The farm-hands used 
oxen to plow corn and Mr. Everly when a boy used to ride the oxen. 

Mr. Everly, at the time he retired, was very successful as a cattle feed- 
er. He owns 467 acres of land in Grand River Township, which is well im- 
proved. 

Mr. Everly is a Republican and a member of the Masonic Lodge. He 
is a member of the Baptist church, having attended since he was 16 years 
old. Mr. Everly was one of the organizers of the Gallatin Trust Company, 
being director and vice-president for some time. He is a public spirited 
and substantial citizen, and stands high in the community. 

Peter P. Doak, deceased, was a prominent farmer of Union Township 
for many years. He^was born in Sullivan County, Mo., Feb. 28, 1848. 

Mr. Doak was reared on a farm and received his education in the 
district schools. He came to Daviess County about 1878, and began teach- 
ing school and preaching in the Methodist church. In 1884, he purchased 
a farm in Union Township, where he made extensive improvements, and 
lived until the date of his death in 1919. 

Sept. 11, 1879, Mr. Doak was married to Lucretia Parker, a native of 
Kentucky, who came to Missouri when she was one year old. She is the 
daughter of James M. and Eliza (Lewis) Parker. Mrs. Parker now resides 
in Union Township, her husband having died in 1910. 

To the union of Peter P. and Lucretia Parker Doak six children were 
born: Harry A,, Union Township; LeRoy, deceased; Olin E., Monroe 
Township; Novia, Monroe Township; Edgar, living with his mother; and 
a daughter that died in infancy. 

Mr. Doak was elected probate judge of Daviess County, on the Demo- 
cratic ticket in 1906, and held that oflfice for eight years. Mrs. Doak owns 
120 acres of land in Daviess County. Mr. Doak was a man of energy, 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 391 

strong purpose and industry. In his business affairs he was ever upright 
and fair and in his work as a citizen he was the upholder of high standards. 

Harry A. Doak, a well-to-do farmer and stockman of Union Township, 
was born July 12, 1880, in Sheridan Township, Daviess County, a son of 
Rev, Peter P. and Lucretia (Parker) Doak. 

Harry Doak was educated in the district schools and Grand River 
College at Gallatin. He then taught school for eight years, and was on 
rural route No. 6, out of Gallatin, from 1906 to 1917. In 1910 he purchased 
his present farm. 

Mr. Doak was married September, 1910, to Sarah Tarwater, a daughter 
of James P. and Josephine (Worley) Tarwater, now residing at Gallatin. 
Mrs. Doak was born in Monroe Township, and was educated in the district 
schools and the Maryville Normal School. She taught school for three 
years. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Doak five children have been born, as follows : Justin, 
Lowell, Helen, Kenneth ; and Thomas E. 

Mr. Doak now owns the farm originally owned by John L. Lewis. He 
owns 162 acres of land in Union Township. His farm is known as "Alfalfa 
Ridge Stock Farm." He has 30 acres in alfalfa which produces three to 
four crops annually running from two and a half to four tons to the acre 
the year. Mr. Doak is also a stock feeder. In 1917 Mr. Doak built a 
cattle and hay barn which has a capacity of 100 tons, and is one of the 
largest barns in Union Township. 

Mr. Doak is a Democrat and a member of the Methodist church. He 
ranks as one of the leading and prosperous citizens of Union Township. 

D. A. Blackburn, a well known farmer and stockman of Union Town- 
ship, was born Jan. 4, 1875, in California, a son of Daniel and Mary 
(Holmes) Blackburn. 

Daniel Blackburn was born in Indiana, Feb. 2, 1846. He enlisted 
in the Civil War, after which he came to Daviess County. He later went 
to California, where he made his home for some time, returning to Daviess 
County in 1877, where he purchased land. He now owns 450 acres of land 
in Union Township and 80 acres in Monroe Township. 

Daniel Blackburn and wife were the parents of seven children, as 
follows: Blanch, the wife of Chas. Heckman, Denver, Colo.; D. A., the 
subject of this sketch; Ora, the wife of George A. Jones, Julesburg, Colo.; 
Cora, the wife of John L. Lewis, a farmer living near Gallatin ; Mrs. Jones 
and Mrs. Lewis are twin sisters; Vergia, the wife of M. J. Lankford, 
Gallatin ; Lewis, residing in Union Township ; Alma, deceased. 

Daniel Blackburn was elected twice to the office of judge in the south 
district, and was serving his third term as presiding judge when he suffered 



392 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

a stroke of paralysis, which left him unable to read, write or speak. Mr. 
Blackburn now lives in Gallatin. His wife was a native of St. Louis, and 
was born in 1842. Mr. Blackburn came from Indiana to Missouri, he 
came by rail to Hamilton, and then took a stage coach to a point 14 miles 
northeast. He stayed over night in a farm house that now stands on his 
land. He is a Republican and a member of the Grand Army of the 
Republic. 

D. A. Blackburn was reared on his father's farm and received his edu- 
cation in the district schools. He began farming when a very young man 
and now rents his father's farm. 

July 31, 1912, Mr. Blackburn was married to Maud Beck, a native of 
Marion Township, Daviess County, and a daughter of Henry and Ella 
(Roberts) Beck. Mr. and Mrs. Beck were natives of Ohio and Missouri 
and are now living near Jameson. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Blackburn four children have been born, as follows: 
Doris, Evelyn, Melba, and Marvin, all of whom are living at home. 

Mr. Blackburn is a Republican and widely and favorably known in 
Daviess County. 

W. C. Macy, deceased, widely known in Daviess County, was born 
July 24, 1849, near Edinburg, Mo., the son of Seth and Malinda (Adkinson) 
Macy, natives of South Carolina and Sugar Creek, Mo. 

W. C. Macy was a farmer and came to Daviess County when young 
man, in 1865. He settled in Union Township. He carried on farming 
during his entire life and became wealthy, at one time owning over 500 
acres of land. He owned and conducted the marble works at Gallatin for 
a time. In 1900 he moved to Gallatin, where he lived retired until his 
death, July 20, 1921. 

On Dec. 4, 1873, Mr. Macy was married to Mary E. Nichols, a native 
of Licking County, Ohio, and a daughter of Samuel and Hannah (Wick- 
ham) Nichols, natives of Licking County, who moved to Daviess County, 
in 1854. Mrs. Macy was born Dec. 25, 1853, and is now residing in 
Gallatin. 

To W. C. Macy and wife, seven children were born, as follows: Ollie 
E., the wife of Ezra Hamilton, Jackson Township, Daviess County ; Pearly, 
Hanston, Kans., a rancher; Maggie B., the wife of Moren Knight, Jackson 
Township, Daviess County; Ada N., deceased, was the wife of Charles 
Hemry; Ida M., the wife of Everette McClaskey, Fresno, Calif.; Charity, 
the wife of Homer Meade, Trenton ; Lena, the wife of Claude Cousins, St. 
Joseph. 

Mr. Macy was a Republican and served in the office of public adminis- 
trator for four years. He also held other minor offices and while on the 




W. C. MACY 



Tin; NEW Y(JKK 

prT>TTr lib::ary 



ASTOn. LENoX AND 

TILHEN FOI'.NDATIONS 

B L 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 393 

farm served on the district school board. In general farming and stock 
raising, Mr. Macy was very successful. He was a member of the Indepen- 
dent Order of Odd Fellows. He is buried in Brown Cemetery at Gallatin. 
Mr. Macy was an estimable and upright citizen who deservedly stood high 
in Daviess County. 

J. Sam Harlow, a successful farmer and stockman of Monroe Town- 
ship, was born Oct. 8, 1854, in Shelby County, Ky., a son of James and 
Hulda Jane (Nichols) Harlow. 

James Harlow was born in Kentucky, Feb. 16, 1824. He came to 
Daviess County in 1867, locating on a farm in Monroe Township. His 
wife was reared by her grandparents in Kentucky, her parents having 
died when she was a very small child. She was educated in the schools of 
Kentucky, later teaching in Shelby County, Ky. Mr. Harlow died April 18, 
1882, in Monroe Township. He owned at the time of his death 300 acres 
of land. He was one of the dependable farmers of Monroe Township. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harlow were the parents of eight children, as follows: 
J. W., Gallatin; J. Sam, the subject of this sketch; Linsley, Montgomery 
County, Kans. ; E. J., Monroe Township, J. P., Chillicothe; Wilmar G., 
Monroe Township ; the other two children died in infancy. 

J. Sam Harlow was brought up on a farm and has always followed 
farming. He was 12 years of age when his parents moved from Kentucky 
to Daviess County. En route, they stopped at Livingston County, for a 
short time. 

Mr. Harlow farmed on his father's land until the age of 21 years, 
when he rented land for himself. He later bought 40 acres of land in 
Monroe Township, which he improved and later sold. He then purchased 
a farm in Jackson Township and five years later he purchased one in 
Liberty Township. In 1911 he bought the farm where he now resides 
which is well improved. 

March 2, 1875, Mr. Harlow was married to Lucy A. Shistine, a native 
of Kentucky, born Aug. 18, 1851. She is the daughter of George and 
Virginia (Mann) Shistine, natives of Kentucky who came to Missouri 
before the Civil War. They settled in Livingston County, where they 
owned a farm. Mr. Shistine died there and his wife died in Kansas. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harlow are the parents of six children: Retta C, the 
wife of Willard Folley, Princeton; Luetta, the wife of Wood Parker, 
Liberty Township ; Otta E., Union Township ; Frank, Bourbon County, 
Kans. ; Floyd, Grand River Township ; and Carl, living at home. 

Mr. Harlow is a Democrat and a member of the Baptist church. He 
is also a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He owns 
144 acres of land in Monroe Township, on which he is successfully engaged 



394 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

in farming and stock raising. M. Harlow is a public spirited and pro- 
gressive citizen and his family are prominent and well liked throughout 
the township and county. 

E. J. Harlow, a prominent farmer and breeder of Monroe Township, 
was born Nov. 26, 1860, Shelby County, Ky., a son of James and Hulda 
(Nichols) Harlow. 

James Harlow was a native of Kentucky, born Feb. 16, 1824. He 
moved to Daviess County in 1867, locating on a farm in Monroe Township. 
His wife, Hulda Nichols, was born Nov. 30, 1828, near Kokomo, Ind., and 
was reared by her grandparents in Kentucky, her parents having died 
when she was a very young child. She was educated in Kentucky, later 
teaching school in Shelby County, Ky. Mr. Harlow died April 18, 1882, 
in Monroe Township. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harlow were the parents of eight children, as follows: 
J. W., Gallatin; J. Sam, Monroe Township; Linsley, Montgomery County, 
Kans.; E. J., the subject of this sketch; J. P. Chillicothe; Wilmer G., 
Monroe Township ; and two children who died in infancy. 

E. J. Harlow came to Daviess County with his parents when he was 
six years old. He was educated in the district schools, and has been a 
farmer all his life. He, with his wife, inherited 200 acres of land, and 
have made their home there since their marriage. Mr. Harlow has made 
extensive improvements on the land, which is one of the best improved 
farms in Monroe Township. He uses acetylene lights. Mr. Harlow has 
been a breeder of Hereford Cattle and Percheron horses and jacks. 

E. J. Harlow was married Jan. 23, 1881, to Mary A. Wilson, a daughter 
of McClain and Abbie (Green) Wilson, natives of Tennessee and Kentucky, 
who first settled in Ray County, Mo., and later came to Daviess County. 
Mrs. Harlow was born on the farm where she now lives and which she 
inherited. To Mr. and Mrs. Harlow six children have been born: George 
Willard, a stock shipper, Hamilton; Earl, at home; Virgil, at home. The 
two younger children are graduates of the Quincy and Kidder Schools ; the 
three other children are deceased. 

Mr. Harlow is a Democrat. He is a stock holder in the Gallatin Flour 
Mill, and a director of the North Missouri Fair Association of Hamilton. 
He is the owner of 746 acres of land in Monroe Township. Mr. Harlow 
has made a success of stock raising and is one of the reliable and progres- 
sive citizens of the county, energetic and far-sighted in his methods of 
business and dependable in his dealings. 

Floyd S. Tuggle, a prosperous farmer, stockman, legislator, and busi- 
ness man of Union Township, Daviess County, was born in Caldwell County, 
Feb. 17, 1885, a son of James and Victoria A. (Smith) Tuggle. 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 395 

James Tuggle was born in Daviess County, in 1853, the son of Judge 
John A. and Marie (Hemry) Tuggle. Judge John A. Tuggle was born in 
Kentucky, on July 5, 1807. His parents moved to Knox County, 
Ky., where he was reared and educated. In 1839, he removed to Daviess 
County, where he became engaged in farming in Monroe Township. He 
was a large landholder. Judge Tuggle was elected judge of Daviess 
County for two terms. To Judge John A. and Marie (Hemry) Tuggle six 
children were born, as follows : George ; Sarah ; James, father of the sub- 
ject of this sketch ; Virginia ; Thomas R. ; and Puss B. The Hemry family 
was one of the prominent pioneer families of Daviess County. James 
Tuggle moved to the northern part of Caldwell County after his marriage, 
where he farmed until 1889, after which he purchased his present farm in 
Union Township, now owned by his widow, Victoria A. Tuggle; the farm 
is located two miles southwest of Gallatin. James Tuggle made extensive 
improvements on his land and became well-to-do. being a widely known 
breeder of Hereford cattle. For many years, Mr, Tuggle was president 
of the First National Bank of Gallatin. He was a Royal Arch Mason and 
belonged to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He was a Democrat. 
Victoria A. (Smith) Tuggle was born in Ray County, Mo., and is now 
living in Gallatin. Mr. Tuggle died April 19, 1909. To James and Vic- 
toria A. (Smith) Tuggle only one child was born, Floyd S., the subject of 
this sketch. 

Floyd S. Tuggle was reared in a home of comfort and refinement and 
attended the Grand River Academy at Gallatin, and in 1902 entered the 
University of Missouri, from which he was graduated in 1906 with the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts. After completing his education, Mr. Tuggle 
lived for several months in Idaho, but on account of his father's poor 
health he returned to Missouri to take charge of his father's land, where he 
has since remained. Mr. Tuggle has been very succssful as a breeder of 
pure bred Shorthorn cattle. He is the owner of 560 acres of well improved 
land in Jackson Township, Daviess County, and operates 1050 acres. The 
farm in Union Township, where he resides, is known as "Clover Lawn Stock 
Farm," and is one of the very modern and attractive farms of Daviess 
County. 

In 1911 Mr. Tuggle was married to Miss Grace Anderson of Idaho. 
She died April 18, 1913, leaving a son, James A. Tuggle. In 1916, Mr. 
Tuggle was married to Helen Weiser, a native of Daviess County, and a 
daughter of Fred and Flora N. (Parks) Weiser, also natives of Daviess 
County. Mr. Weiser now lives in Gallatin. To. Mr. and Mrs. Tuggle has 
been born one child, Jane Ann, born in February, 1920. 

Mr. Tuggle is a member of the Baptist church, and is a Mason. He 



396 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

is a director of the First National Bank of Gallatin, and of the Young 
Men's Christian Association. He is also a member of the Gallatin Com- 
mercial Club. Mr. Tuggle has been interested in Democratic politics and 
economic questions, upon which he is well informed. In 1910 he was 
elected to the state legislature and served during four sessions. He has 
served on the Appropriations Committee, the Committee on Roads and 
Highways, the Committee on Education, and was chairman on the Com- 
mittee on Agriculture. During the World War Mr, Tuggle was County 
Food Administrator and was chairman of the Counsel of Defense. 

Because of his efficiency in office and his interest in public affairs, Mr. 
Tuggle is ranked among the substantial citizens of Daviess County. He 
merits the esteem in which he is held in his community. 

E. T. Lankford, a successful farmer and stockman of Monroe Town- 
ship, Daviess County, and owner of 200 acres of well improved land, was 
born Nov. 25, 1877, in Daviess County, a son of E. S. and Cyntha J. (Cox) 
Lankford. 

E. T. Lankford grew up on the farm. He received his education in 
the public schools of Monroe Township, and also attended Grand River 
College. For 25 years he was associated with his father in general farm- 
ing and stock raising. He later became heir to about 80 acres of land. He 
at present owns a very fine farm, well improved. 

Mr. Lankford was married Oct. 20, 1907, to Alma A. Morris, a daugh- 
ter of Washington and Anna (Lydick) Morris. Mr. Lankford was born 
near Gallatin. Mrs. Morris now resides with her daughter, Mrs. Lank- 
ford. Mr. and Mrs. Lankford have no children. 

Mr. Lankford is a Democrat, and has held the offices of clerk and 
assessor. He is a member of the Baptist church, and an energetic man 
who stands well in the esteem of his neighbors and fellow citizens. 

E. S. Lankford, deceased, was a prominent farmer of Monroe Town- 
ship, Daviess County, At the time of his death he owned 240 acres of 
well improved land, Mr, Lankford was born July 3, 1851, in Monroe 
Township. His parents were Thomas and Rebecca (Barnes) Lankford, 
who were the parents of four children, four of whom are now living: 
Rebecca Roswell, Hamilton; Lee Ann, the wife of Benjamin Cox, Hamilton; 
Wiley, Graham and Thomas, Wathena, Kans. Thomas Lankford was born 
in Kentucky and came to Missouri when a very young man, settling in 
Monroe Township, where he died. His wife was also a native of Kentucky. 

E. S. Lankford grew up on a farm and was engaged in farming and 
stockraising during his entire life. He was educated in the district schools. 
When a young man he became heir to some land, and later purchased part 
of the home place in 1875, During his early life he was a cattle feeder. 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 397 

Mr. Lankford was married April 16, 1870, to Cynthia J. Cox, a native 
of Monroe Township, born Feb. 22, 1853. She >vas the daughter of 
Edward and Marinda (Osborn) Cox, natives of Daviess and Jacksan 
Counties. Mr. Cox was a soldier during the Civil War, and died from ill- 
ness contracted while in the army. Mr. and Mrs. Cox were the parents 
of seven children, of whom Mrs. Lankford was the second oldest. 

To E. S. Lankford and wife six children were born: Lucy, deceased, 
was the wife of Harry Muller; Willard, Caldwell County; Carrie, living 
with her mother on the old home place; Edward T., Monroe Township; 
Marion, Gallatin ; and a child who died in infancy. 

E. S. Lankford was a Democrat, and held many township offices. In 
1892 he was elected sheriff of Daviess County, which office he held until 
1894. In 1910 he was elected judge of the southern district of the county, 
and held that office for six years. He helped organize and was a stock- 
holder in the Farmers Mutual Insurance Company. 

Mrs. Lankford is a member of the Baptist church and lives in Monroe 
Township where she owns 80 acres of land. 

Mr, Lankford died March 24, 1921. He was a man of integrity, a 
believer in progressive methods in his work and always ready to support 
the best interests of his community. 

H. C. Scott, the capable and well known deputy state oil inspector of 
Gallatin, was born in Harrison Township, Grundy County, May 31, 1870, 
a son of Charles W., and Sallie (Thornbrough) Scott. 

Charles W. Scott was born in Daviess County, three miles southeast 
of Gallatin, Aug. 2, 1833. He was the son of John and Miss (Meeks) 
Scott, natives of Virginia, who came to Daviess County in 1833. They 
made the trip with oxen and settled on a farm after their arrival. After 
one year they removed to Grundy County, near Edinburg. In 1850 John 
Scott with his son, Charles W., started across the plains with a party to the 
gold fields. On the trip John Scott died from cholera. His wife died in 
1840. Charles W. Scott, father of the subject of this sketch, went on with 
the trip after his fathers' death. He returned to Grundy County in 1853. 
During the trip he made about $3,000, which was considered a great deal 
of money at that time. In 1861 he again made the trip across the plains 
with his wife. They returned to Missouri in 1864. They remained in 
Grundy County until their deaths. At the time of his death, December, 
1918, Mr. Scott owned 420 acres of land, including the 100 acres he entered 
from Government many years ago, which he had sold and later purchased 
again. During the Civil War he served for ten months in the State 
Guards. Mrs. Scott was born in Alabama, Jan. 22, 1837, and died in 1911. 



398 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

She was about a year old when her parents moved to Grundy County. Mr. 
Scott was a Republican and a member of the Methodist church. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Scott were the parents of nine children, 
seven of whom are now living, as follows: Caura, deceased, was the wife 
of George Drummond; Flora, the wife of Charles Bowman, Brimson; 
Hannah, deceased, was the wife of J. P. Lynch; Lottie, the wife of L. 
W. Shaw, Grundy County; Charles S., Oklahoma; Thomas J., Phoenix, 
Ariz.; B. E., Trenton; Portor, Brimton; H. C, the subject of this sketch. 

H. C. Scott was reared on his father's farm and received his education 
in the district schools and the Trenton High School. In 1893 he came to 
Gallatin, and became engaged in the mercantile business. In 1904 he 
rented a farm in Union Township, and while engaged in farming he was 
nominated on the Republican ticket for county recorder, but was defeated. 
Mr. Scott gave up farming in 1906, and was engaged in the Farmers Store 
as a clerk. In 1910 he was appointed deputy oil inspector under Gover- 
nor Hadley's administration. He served in this capacity for six months, 
after which he clerked in the farmers store at Gallatin. Jan. 1, 1917 he 
resigned and took up farming, buying 77 acres of land in Sheridan Town- 
ship, which he sold in 1919. While farming he was nominated and elected 
circuit clerk of Daviess County, which office he held until Aug. 16, 1821. 
After resigning this office he was appointed deputy state oil inspector, 
which office he now holds. His son, Wilson Scott, was appointed by 
Governor Hyde to fill the unexpired term of his father. 

July 2, 1898, Mr. Scott was married to Lulu T. Frazier, a daughter of 
Dr. James C. and Laura (Wilson) Frazier, natives of Randolph County, 
and Kentucky. Mrs. Scott was born in Bedford, Mo., July 4, 1879. Dr. 
Frazier was a prominent physician at Gallatin for a number of years, 
having come to Missouri in 1888. He died in 1912, and his widow is now 
living with her children. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Scott eight children have been born, as follows: 
Wilson, county circuit clerk of Daviess County, a graduate of the high 
school at Gallatin, and was a student at Missouri University for two years ; 
Huella, the wife of Gilmer Barnett, Gallatin ; Anna Laura, at home, a 
teacher in the district schools ; Elsie, at home ; James, at home, Frances, at 
home; Katherine, at home; and Robert, at home. 

Mr. Scott is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, and has 
an extensive acquaintance throughout the county. 

Archibald S. Youtsey, Jr., and Eben Estes Youtsey, brothers and 
prominent farmers and stockmen of Union Township, Daviess County, are 
both natives of Missouri. They were the sons of Archibald S. and Marie 
Elizabeth (George) Youtsey. Archibald S. Youtsey, Jr., was born on 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 399 

Dec. 10, 1869, and Eben Estes Youtsey was born on March 29, 1873. They 
were both born in Union Township, Daviess County, on the farm where they 
now reside. 

Archibald Smith Youtsey, Sr., was born in Campbell County, Ky., 
Dec. 10, 1816, the son of Adam Youtsey and Katherine (Smith) Youtsey. 
Adam Youtsey was born Feb. 16, 1783, and died Sept. 16, 1821. His wife 
was the daughter of Ebenezer Smith, who was born Feb.. 16, 1750, and 
died Feb. 20, 1833. The Youtsey family first appeared in this country in 
Maryland, then in Virginia, Kentucky and Ohio. In the winter of 1834, 
Archibald Smith Youtsey went to Indiana, where he remained until the fall 
of 1838, when he removed to Missouri, settling in Daviess County, in a log 
cabin, where he became engaged in farming and stock raising, and taught 
one of the first schools in Union Township. Mr. Youtsey was one of the 
prominent and successful farmers of Daviess County, and at his death, in 
1887, was a large land holder. Archibald S. Youtsey, Sr., made two trips 
from Daviess County, to Cincinnati, Ohio, on horseback, the first one being 
in 1838, and the other in 1840. 

On June 4, 1850, Archibald S. Youtsey, Sr., was married to Marie 
Elizabeth George, a native of Kentucky, born Feb. 9, 1834. She was the 
daughter of Chandler Lee George, a native of Virginia, and Mary Ann 
George, who was also a native of Virginia. Chandler Lee George was 
born in 1804 and died in 1881. His wife was born in 1814 and died in 1873. 
To Archibald Smith and Marie Elizabeth (George) Youtsey, 14 children 
were born, as follows: Mary R. W., born March 31, 1851; Obediaha S., 
born May 24, 1852 ; Adam F., born Jan. 1, 1854 ; Medora E., born Jan. 8, 
1856, died Aug., 7, 1885; Elizabeth M., born Jan. 29, 1858, died in 1906; 
Phena L., born May 27, 1859 ; Edward T., born Aug. 4, 1861 ; Nannie E., 
born May 14, 1868, died in 1897 ; Archibald S. Jr., born Dec. 10, 1869 ; Eben 
Estes, born March 29, 1873; Edith W., born July 11, 1876; Christina T., 
born Aug. 19, 1879, died Sept. 7, 1880. Mrs. Youtsey died in 1914. 

A. S. and E. E. Youtsey, the subjects of this sketch, were educated 
in the district schools, and have lived all their lives in Union Township. 
They operate the old home farm of 160 acres, which is one of the well 
improved and fine farms in Daviess County. The three Youtsey brothers, 
A. S., E. E., and E. T. are now operating together 1400 acres of land in 
Daviess County. The farming is all done by modern methods, except the 
tractor. 

Messrs. Youtsey are both Democrats and members of the Christian 
church. They are unmarried. They are highly respected and among the 
most substantial citizens of Daviess County. The Youtsey family ranks 
among the leading representative people of Missouri. 



400 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

J. W. Allsup, deceased, was a pioneer citizen of Daviess County, born 
Dec. 15, 1840, in Jackson County, Ind. He was educated in the district 
schools of Indiana and studied to be a surevyor. 

In 1862 Mr. Allsup enlisted for service in the Civil War at Indianapolis, 
Ind., and served in Company G, 17th Indiana Volunteer Infantry. He en- 
listed with 22 young men from his school district and he and another com- 
rade were the only survivors. He was in many battles and skirmishes and 
carried the flag into Atlanta, Ga., when that city was taken. He was 
wounded, being shot through the wrist, and at another time, his horse fell 
from a bridge, crushing his hip, which bothered him during the remainder 
of his life. 

After serving four years in the army Mr. Allsup taught school in In- 
diana for one year; he then moved to Moultrie County, 111., where he lived 
until 1882. He then came to Daviess County, Mo., and located on a farm, 
where he resided until his death, Nov. 20, 1916. His farm was known as 
the Covington Farm. At the time of his death, Mr. Allsup owned 200 
acres of well improved land in Monroe Township. 

Jan 25, 1866, Mr. Allsup was married to Mary Elizabeth Megahey, a 
native of Kentucky, born Dec. 11, 1845. She died March 10, 1878. Mr. 
and Mrs. Allsup were the parents of nine children, of whom four are 
deceased. Those living are : Electra, now a widow living in Monroe Town- 
ship, on a part of the old home place; L. G., Des Moines, la.; Pearl, resid- 
ing on the home farm ; John W., Jr., Camden County, Mo. ; Eva May, resid- 
ing on the home farm. 

Pearl and Eva May Allsup live together on the home farm in Monroe 
Township, and own 160 acres of land. Miss Pearl Allsup taught school for 
one year in District No. 89, Monroe Township. They are both very enter- 
prising and progressive women, and are widely known in Daviess County. 

Mr. Allsup was a staunch Republican and a member of the Grand 
Army of the Republic. He was well educated, and one of the successful 
and prominent men of Monroe Township. 

J. F. Dunnington, a leading farmer and stockman of Monroe Town- 
ship, and owner of 205 acres of well improved land, was born Oct. 18, 1848, 
in Harrison Township, Daviess County, a son of William P. and Elizabeth 
(Osborn) Dunnington. 

William P. Dunnington was a native of Maryland, born in 1817. When 
a very young man he left home and settled in Virginia, later going to 
Kentucky. He then came to Daviess County, where he located in Harrison 
Township on the farm where he died April 11, 1894. He was the son of 
James and Sarah (Payne) Osborne. Elizabeth (Osborn) Dunnington was 
born in Clay County, Mo., in 1822, a daughter of William and Sarah 




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HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 401 

(Grooms) Osborn. Mr. and Mrs. Osborn were among the pioneers of 
Daviess County, who braved the attacks of the Indians and Mormons in 
the early days. It was also common to see bears throughout this part of 
the country then. Mrs. Dunnington died in 1874. 

To William P. and Elizabeth (Osborn) Dunnington were born ten 
children, seven of whom are now living: J. F., the subject of this sketch; 
Coleman, Harrison Township ; Mark, Harrison Township ; Amanda, Har- 
rison Township; Joseph S. and Richard H., living in the state of Wash- 
ington. 

J. F. Dunnington grew to manhood on his father's farm. In 1876 he 
purchased his present farm, moving from Harrison Township, in 1878. 
His farm is modern in every respect, and he has been very successful in 
general farming and stock raising. 

On Dec. 27, 1874, Mr. Dunnington was married to Johanna Worley, 
a daughter of Daniel Worley. Mrs. Dunnington was born in Williams 
County, Ohio, Feb. 13, 1852. Mr. Worley came to Missouri after the 
Civil War. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dunnington were the parents of ten children, as follows : 
Albert, Union Township ; William, Pueblo, Colo. ; Lena, the wife of William 
O'Toole, Alamosa, Colo. ; Charles, Cameron ; Elmer, deceased ; Frank, Colo- 
rado; Vernice, the wife of Charles Franks, Sheridan Township; Bernice, 
the wife of Harry Temple, Montana; Mary, the wife of Kenneth Clark. 
Lawrence, Kans. ; Thomas, living at home. Vernice and Bernice are 
twins. Mrs. Dunnington died Aug. 14, 1914. 

Mr. Dunnington is a Republican and takes an active interest in local 
affairs, having served on the school board, district No. 88, ever since he 
came to Monroe Township. He is a reliable man in his community who has 
attained success by hard work and perseverence. 

Milton Trosper, a prominent farmer and stockman of Monroe Town- 
ship, was born in Caldwell County, May 25, 1858, a son of Benjamin and 
Mary C. (Groves) Trosper. 

Benjamin Trosper was born Dec. 1, 1828, in Kentucky. During the 
Civil War he was a soldier in the Confederate Army. When a very young 
man he came to Caldwell County, where he engaged in farming and stock 
raising during his entire life. He died in 1868. Benjamin and Mary C. 
(Groves) Trosper were the parents of eight children. Later Mrs. Trosper 
married Louis Brooks, and is now residing in Creigmont, Idaho. Four 
children were born to this union. 

Milton Trosper was educated in the district schools and has followed 
farming and stock raising all his life. He purchased his present farm in 
1902 and has made extensive improvements. He now owns 401 acres, and 



402 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

is widely known as a breeder and feeder of Duroc Jersey hogs and Short- 
horn cattle. 

Mr. Trosper was married the first time to Sarah J. Lankf ord, who was 
born in Daviess County, Aug. 7, 1855. She died in 1912. To Milton and 
Sarah J. (Lankf ord) Trosper four children were born: Thomas B., de- 
ceased; Martin, Caldwell County; Grace, the wife of Benjamin Rogers, 
Caldwell County ; Fay, the wife of Orva Brewer, Caldwell County. 

Mr. Trosper was married the second time to Fannie (Gebhard) Buell, 
March 29, 1915. She was born in Union County, Pa., Sept. 27, 1881, and 
moved to Kansas when she was four months old with her parents. She 
was reared in Brown County, and was married the first time to George 
Buell. To George and Fannie (Gebhard) Buell two children were born: 
Georgia married Virgil Wynne, Gallatin, and LeVeta living with her 
mother. Mrs. Trosper moved to Daviess County in 1914. 

Milton Trosper is a Democrat and a stockholder in the Nettleton Bank 
of Nettleton, Mo., and also the Farmers Mercantile and Trade Company. 
He is a member of the Methodist church and is recognized as a dependable 
citizen of Daviess County. 

Fred L. Pierce, a successful farmer and stockman of Monroe Town- 
ship, and owner of 200 acres of well improved land, was born Jan. 29, 1871, 
in Tippecanoe County, Ind., a son of Richard Carter and Sarah Ann (Lee) 
Pierce. 

Richard C. Pierce was born in Ohio, Aug. 17, 1828. He was a physi- 
cian and surgeon and preached in the Methodist church for more than 60 
years. In 1883 he went west and settled at Iowa Point, Kans., where he 
practice medicine. He later moved to Leona, Kan., and in 1892, engaged 
in the drug business at Atchison, Kans. After several years Mr. Pierce 
came to Gallatin to make his home with his children. He also lived in 
Breckenridge for 10 or 12 years. He died at Gallatin March 13, 1913. 
Mrs. Pierce was born Aug. 12, 1829, in West Virginia, and died March 24, 
1915. She was a cousin of Robert E. Lee of Confederate fame. Mr. and 
Mrs. Pierce are buried at Gallatin, Richard Pierce's father was William 
Pierce, a native of Ohio. He died at the age of 90 years in Indiana, the 
result of an accident, a tree falling on him. 

To Richard Carter and Sarah Ann (Lee) Pierce ten children were 
born, as follows: Wiley W., deceased; Isaac D., Gallatin; Ed S., Gallatin; 
Flora, deceased, was the wife of Loren Patterson; Hattie, deceased, was 
the wife of John Patterson ; Charles C, Stephens, Ark. ; Geo. W., Dallas, 
Texas; Lewis J., Indianapolis, Ind. ; and Fred L., the subject of this sketch, 
and one son who died in infancy. Isaac and Ed Pierce are both blind. 

Fred L. Pierce was reared on a farm in Indiana and received his educa- 



HISTORY OP DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 403 

tion in the district schools and Leona, Kans., High School. For ten years 
he worked as a farm hand, and in December, 1896, he came to Missouri with 
his wife and two children. They made the trip in a covered wagon with a 
team of horses and Mr. Pierce had but 90 cents. They settled in Gallatin, 
and he worked at hauling wood to town. The following spring he rented 
land in Liberty Township where he carried on farming. He purchased 
his present farm in 1899, on which he has made extensive improvements. 
He is a well known breeder of Poland China hogs, and a fancier of fine 
stock, especially mules. 

Mr. Pierce was married Jan. 30, 1893, to Addie Brant, a daughter of 
William and Sarah (Schaen) Brant, natives of Germany, who settled in 
Ohio in 1846 and later, in 1881, came to Kansas. Mr. and Mrs. Brant were 
the parents of seven children, of whom Mrs. Pierce was the youngest ; she 
was born Sept. 30, 1872, in Seneca County, Ohio. To Fred L. and Addie 
(Brant) Pierce eight children were born, as follows : Lee R. ; Lloyd F. ; 
Walter H. ; Mary M. ; Olive B. ; Mildred R. ; Bessie P. ; John M. ; all of the 
children are living at home, except Lee R., who lives in Gallatin, and are 
very well educated. 

Mr. Pierce is a Republican and has clerked more sales than any other 
man in the county. He is a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and the Modern Woodmen of America. He is an energetic man 
who stands well in the esteem of his neighbors and fellow citizens. 

Seth Macy, a progressive and enterprising farmer and stockman of 
Monroe Township, was born July 12, 1886, in Union Township, Daviess 
County, a son of Perry and Ollie (Critten) Macy, who now reside in Union 
Township. 

Mr. Seth Macy was educated in the district schools and the Kidder 
Institute, Kidder, Mo. After finishing his education he engaged in farm- 
ing. During one winter he and his father fed 1800 sheep, as they were 
engaged in stock raising. 

In March 1915, Mr. Macy was married to Mattie Weldon, of Harrison 
Township, a daughter of J. H. and Amanda (Ramsbottom) Weldon. Mr. 
and Mrs. Weldon are now retired and are living in Gallatin. Mrs. Macy is 
a graduate of the public schools of Gallatin. 

Mr. and Mrs. Macy are the parents of two children, Mary Elizabeth 
and James Weldon. 

When Mr. Macy married he settled on the home farm for one year, 
and then moved to his present farm. In 1918 he erected a modern bun- 
galow. He handles and feeds a great many cattle. Mr. Macy now operates 
540 acres of land. He also owns 160 acres of well improved land in Union 
Township. The farm on which he resides with his family contains 80 



404 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

acres. He is a stockholder of the Farmers Mercantile Company of Gallatin. 

Mr. Macy is a member of the Methodist Church and the Ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons. He is a Democrat and one of the substantial citi- 
zens of Monroe Township and Daviess County. 

Perry Macy, a prominent and successful farmer and stockman of 
Union Township, was born Oct. 25, 1865, on the farm where he still resides. 
He is a son of Seth and Malinda (Atkinson) Macy. 

Seth Macy was born in Indiana and later came to Grundy County, 
Mo., where he lived for a while, later buying his present farm. At the 
time of his death he was a large property owner. Upon his father's 
death, Perry Macy became heir to 565 acres of land and has since that time 
acquired 171 acres. He has 75 acres of heavy timber. 

Mr. and Mrs. Seth Macy were the parents of four children; W. C, 
deceased ; Samantha, deceased, was the wife of James Critten of Jackson 
Township; Naoma F., deceased, was the wife of C. K. Gwinn; and Perry 
Macy, the subject of this sketch. 

Perry Macy was married to Ollie E. Critten, a native of Daviess 
County. Mr. and Mrs. Macy were the parents of the following children: 
Seth, Monroe Township, whose sketch appears in this volume; Ina, 
deceased, was married to W. C. Wynne ; Icy, educated in Lexington, Center 
College; Randolph, Macon College in Virginia, also a graduate of Chicago 
University and a graduate of Yale, with Ph. D. degree and a degree at 
Boulder, Colo., now teacher of Chemistry in Berkley, Calif. ; and Robert 
at home. 

Mr. Macy is a Democrat and has served on the township board. He 
is a member of the Methodist church. He has been a director in the Gall- 
atin Co-operative store for three years. Mr. Macy does general farming 
and is a well known breeder of Aberdeen cattle. He is a good farmer and 
stockman and successful manager. 

William Ramsbottom, deceased, who was a prominent citizen of 
Daviess County, was born March 17, 1845, in Liberty Township, this 
county, the son of Obadiah and Matildia (Hemery) Ramsbottom, natives 
of England and Ohio, and among the first settlers of Daviess County. 

Obadiah Ramsbottom was born in Yorkshire, near Leeds, England, 
March 3, 1814. His father was a manufacturer of clothing and when 
Obadiah Ramsbottom finished school he went in business with his father. 
In 1840 he came to this country and settled in New York City for a short 
time,, later coming to Daviess County, where he settled on a farm near 
Gallatin, remaining there until 1865. He then moved to Harrison Town- 
ship, where he owned a well improved farm of 480 acres, at the time of his 
death. 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 405 

Mr. Ramsbottom was married Jan. 15, 1844, to Matilda Hemery, a 
native of Ohio. She was born March 17, 1822. Ten children were born 
to this union, as follows: William, the subject of this sketch; John, de- 
ceased; Julia Ann, now Mrs. E. M. Folley, Jr., Monroe Township; Sarah 
Jane, deceased; Angeline, deceased; Thomas, Monroe Township; Amanda, 
now Mrs. J. H. Weldon, Gallatin ; Ruth, Gallatin ; Charles Pittsburg, Pa. 

William Ramsbottom was a farmer during his entire life. He served 
in the Missouri State Militia for three months, Co., C, 33 Reg. In 1886 he 
moved to Baner County, Neb., and became engaged in stock raising and 
farming. Later, in 1898 he moved to Columbus County, and there lived 
until 1909, when he returned to Gallatin, and in 1920 he returned to his 
farm in Harrison Township, where he died, Jan. 19, 1921. At the time of 
his death he owned 222 acres of land. 

Mr. Ramsbottom was a Republican, and a member of the Baptist 
church, being deacon of his church for 40 years. He helped to organize 
a church in Nebraska, and also helped to build one in North Carolina. Mr. 
Ramsbottom was one of the substantial members of the church at Gallatin, 
and at his death was member of the Lick Fork church. 

William Ramsbottom was married Sept. 3, 1888, to Abbie Lowe, a 
native of DeKalb County, born Mar. 15, 1870. She was the daughter of 
Wm. and Martha Ray Lowe, natives of England and Missouri. 

William Ramsbottom and wife were the parents of four children ; 
Ethel, a graduate of Grand River College, and the Southern Baptist Train- 
ing School at Louisville, Ky. She is a missionary worker and has been 
stationed in China for the past two years, in Tsinan Shantung Province; 
James H., born in Baner County, Neb., July 7, 1892. He is a graduate of 
William Jewell College, Liberty, and one of the first seven men to leave in 
the draft during the World War, was sent to Camp Funston, and stationed 
there until May, 1919, with Co. C, 356 Inf., 89th Division, was in active ser- 
vice overseas, taking part in the St. Milhiel, and the Meuse-Argonne drives, 
and during the Meuse-Argonne drive he was shot through the chest, Nov. 
3, 1918, and remained in a hospital until his discharge April 19, 1919, when 
he returned home, and is now associated with his family in general farm- 
ing, and during the war he was promoted from corporal to sergeant ; John 
Ray, a high school teacher at Lock Springs, is a graduate of William 
Jewell College, Liberty; Marguerite Ruth, teacher in the home district 
school, is a graduate of Grand River College, and student for two years at 
Stephens College. She was born in Columbus County, N. C. 

The Ramsbottom family are well known and highly respected through- 
out the country. At the time of his death Mr. Ramsbottom had many 



406 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

friends and was known as a hospitable and genial citizen, whose purse 
strings were always unloosed to the needy. 

J. H. Weldon, a retired farmer and owner of 1800 acres of land in 
Daviess and Livingston Counties, was born Feb. 28, 1858, in Harrison 
Township, Daviess County, a son of J. B. and Elizabeth (Gillilan) Weldon. 

J. B. Weldon was born in Kentucky and went west in 1849, crossing 
the plains and mountains with oxen. He returned by water around Cape 
Horn, and settled in Harrison Township, where he took up farming and 
stock raising. At the time of his death he was the owner of several hun- 
dred acres of land in Daviess County. He died at the age of 30 years. Mr. 
and Mrs. Weldon were the parents of three children; Benedict, who died 
in infancy; J. H., the subject of this sketch; Charity A., wife of J. G. 
Lawson, Harrison Township. 

Mrs. J. B. Weldon then married Humphries Weldon, a brother of J. 
B. Weldon, her former husband, and to this union two children were born: 
Mary L., deceased; Ella E., wife of T. T. Hale, Monroe Township. Mrs. 
Weldon was married the third time to G. W. Gillilan, and one daughter 
was born to this union, Cora, wife of Abe Higgins, Gilman City. 

J. H. Weldon was reared on a farm and attended the district schools. 
Jan. 2, 1883, Mr. Weldon was married to Amenda Ramsbottom, a daughter 
of Obediah and Matilda (Hemry) Ramsbottom, both deceased. Mr. and 
Mrs. Ramsbottom were among the early settlers of Daviess County. Mr. 
and Mrs. Weldon are the parents of three children, as follows: Matilda E., 
wife of Seth Macy, Monroe Township, Mr. and Mrs. Macy have two child- 
ren, Mary E. and James W. ; Floyd J., Harrison Township, husband of 
Mary G. Seay. They have two children, Chas. F. and James C. ; Loyd C, 
Harrison Township, husband of Helen Hamilton. They have one child, 
Lloyd H. 

Mr. Weldon moved to Gallatin in 1907. He now is the owner of five 
farms in Daviess County, all of which are well improved. He is also a 
stock feeder. Mr. Weldon is a stockholder of the Farmers Exchange Bank, 
and was collector of Harrison Township for a time. At present he is look- 
ing after his farming interests, which are many. 

Mr. Weldon is identified with the Democratic party and is a member 
of the Masonic lodge. He is a citizen who can always be depended upon, 
and one who has been successful because of his energy and perserverance. 

Lloyd C. Weldon, a well known farmer and stockman of Harrison 
Township, was born Nov. 26, 1894, at Breckenridge, Mo., a son of James 
H. and Amanda (Ramsbottom) Weldon. He is a twin brother of Floyd 
J. Weldon, and they operate about 800 acres of land together in Harrison 
Township. 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 407 

Mr. Weldon was educated in the same schools with his brother, being 
a graduate of high school and Park College at Parkville, Mo. He also 
attended the University of Missouri. 

April 29, 1920, Mr. Weldon was married to Helen Clark Hamilton, 
born in Parkville, a daughter of A. C. and Katie M. (Clark) Hamilton, 
natives of Cleveland, Ohio, and Salisbury, Mo. Mr. and Mrs. Hamilton 
were among the early settlers of Piatt County, and now reside at Park- 
ville. Mrs. Weldon was educated in Park College. 

Mr. and Mrs. Weldon have one child, Lloyd Hamilton. Lloyd C. was 
inducted into service in the World War on Sept. 19, 1917. He trained at 
Camp Funston and also one month at Newport News, Va., before sailing 
for overseas April 6, 1918. He was with Headquarters Company, 4th In- 
fantry Regiment, 3rd Division. He took part in the following battles: 
Champagne, Marne, Meuse-Argonne and St. Milheil. He was known as a 
runner on the front lines and was later made Regimental Clerk at head- 
quarters. He was discharged from service Aug. 30, 1919, as a corporal. 
He then returned home and began farming the home property again with 
his brother, Floyd. 

Mr. Weldon is a Democrat and a member of the Baptist church and his 
wife is a member of the Presbyterian church. He is a member of the 
Masonic lodge. Like his brother, Floyd, Mr. Weldon is progressive, and 
they both have an extensive acquaintance in Harrison Township. 

Floyd J. Weldon, a prominent farmer and stockman of Harrison Town- 
ship, Daviess County, was born Nov. 26, 1894, in Breckenridge, Mo., a son 
of James H. and Amanda (Ramsbottom) Weldon. 

Mr. Weldon was educated in the public schools and is a graduate of 
Park College at Parkville. He also attended the University of Missouri 
for two years. During the summers he farmed on his fathers' land. 

In 1917 Mr. Weldon began farming with his brother Lloyd on the home 
farm. Oct. 15, 1918, he was married to Mary G. Seay, a daughter of 
George E. and Barbara Ellen (Grace) Seay, natives of Livingston County, 
Mo. Mrs. Weldon was born at Chillicothe. Mrs. Seay died Jan. 10, 1919, 
at the age of 44 years. Mr. Seay now resides at Chillicothe, and is a grain 
inspector. 

Mr. and Mrs. Weldon are the parents of two children : Charles Frank- 
lin and James Seay. 

Mr. Weldon is a Democrat and a member of the Baptist church. He 
is also a member of the Masonic lodge. Mr. Weldon is a reliable young man 
and highly esteemed in his community. 



408 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

W. P. Townsend, a retired farmer, and owner of 76 acres of land in 
Harrison Township, was born July 9, 1834, in Claibourne County, Tenn., 
a son of George and Elizabeth (Long) Townsend, who were natives of 
England and Holland, respectively. 

On March 31, 1855, W. P. Townsend was married to Telitha Lay, who 
was born in Green County, Tenn., Feb. 4, 1839. She died Sept. 4, 1906. 
To this union 11 children were born, as follows: John N., Monroe Township; 
Mary, deceased was the wife of John W. Wantland; William, deceased; 
Joseph, Denver, Colo. ; George A., Kansas City ; Levi M., Harrison Town- 
ship; Clinton W., Bakersfield, Cal., who served and was wounded in the 
Spanish American War, a member of Company H., 20th Kansas Regiment; 
Forrest, deceased ; James A., Marion, Kans. ; Luther M., living with his 
father; Charlie, Kansas City, Mo., who enlisted in the World War and 
served with Company F, 12th Engineers, and was gassed. Mr. Townsend 
has 33 grandchildren and 37 great grandchildren. 

W. P. Townsend was reared in Tennessee, and in 1857, he with his 
wife and one child walked from Tennesse to Clay County, 111., making the 
long trip in a little over a month. After arriving in Illinois, Mr. Townsend 
began working as a farm hand, and later became the owner of 80 acres of 
land there. 

He enlisted in the Civil War at Greenville, 111., on Aug. 7, 1862, and was 
assigned to Company F, 130 Regiment Illinois Infantry, His first battle 
was at Port Gibson ; then followed Magnolia Hills ; Champion Hills ; Jack- 
son, Miss. ; Black River Bottom ; Black River Bridge and a number of skir- 
mishes until the Siege of Vicksburg. He was taken prisoner April 6, 

1864, at Sabin Cross Roads and was in a Confederate prison 13 months and 
20 days. He was twice wounded, at Vicksburg and Sabin Cross Roads. 

He was discharged June 17, 1865, and mustered out of service July 6. 

1865. He then returned to Illinois and in 1867, went to Marion County, 
where he farmed until 1878, when he came to Harrison Township, Daviess 
County, where he has since made his home. 

In 1860 Mr. Townsend made a trip from Illinois to Daviess County, 
driving oxen and was on the road from April 7th to May 7th. On the 
return trip he stopped along the way and hunted, as the country was full 
of game. Joseph I. Early and his wife returned to Illinois with Mr. and 
Mrs. Townsend. 

Mr. Townsend is a Republican and a member of the G. A. R. He was 
commissioner of highways in Illinois and has served on the school board in 
Illinois and Harrison Township. He is a member of the Baptist church. 
Mr. Townsend is a self educated man, never having attended school in his 
life. He learned to read and write while in the army. 



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HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 409 

Benedict W. Patrick, a prominent farmer and stockman of Harrison 
Township, Daviess County, is a native of Missouri. He was born in Living- 
ston County, July 28, 1874, a son of John and Ann (Weldon) Patrick, both 
also natives of Missouri. 

John Patrick was born in Livingston County in 1831 and was killed in 
Texas in 1875. His wife died in May, 1920 at the age of 74 years. They 
were the parents af three children as follows: Lucy, married Fred Walker 
and they live in Harrison Township ; Lena, married William Kline, Walsen- 
burg, Colo. ; and Benedict W., the subject of this sketch. 

Benedict W. Patrick was reared on a farm in Harrison Township and 
attended the district school. When a young man be bought 40 acres of 
land which was the small beginning of his present large holdings. He 
bought more land from time to time until he is now the owner of 500 acres. 

Mr. Patrick's splendid residence is one of the attractive hom,es of 
Daviess County. He started its construction in 1921, and without doubt it 
is one of the finest modern farm residences in the state. The house has 
ten rooms and basement, a complete water system, with hot and cold run- 
ning water, both hard and soft water being supplied. The hard water is 
pumped from a 14 foot well which is located one-fourth mile west of the 
house, by an electric pump which is operated by a motor which is located 
in the basement. The house is built of pressed faced brick, lined with 
hollow tile and the design of the building is of the Colonial architecture 
type. It presents a magnificient appearance. The place Js located four 
and one-half miles north of Breckenridge which is the nearest shipping 
point. 

Mr. Patrick was married on Dec. 17, 1897 to Miss Edith Bennett, a 
daughter of R. F. and Frances (Maddox) Bennett, natives of Daviess 
and Caldwell Counties, respectively. To Mr. and Mrs. Patrick have been 
born two children as follows: Frances who was educated in Breckenridge 
High School, Central College, at Lexington, Mo., and the University of 
Missouri at Columbia; and John, who is at home. 

Mr. Patrick is one of Daviess County's successful men and attributes 
no small amount of whatever success that has come to him to able co-opera- 
tion and assistance of his capable wife. He is a Democrat and says that he 
is the only man in the county who has always voted the ticket straight. 
He is one of the dependable men of Daviess County . 

G. W. Ridinger, prominent farmer and breeder of Harrison Township, 
was born in Brown County, 111., March 23, 1861, a son of James F. and 
Diana (Vance) Ridinger. James F. Ridinger, father of the subject of this 
sketch, was born in Ohio, Nov. 15, 1824. He enlisted in the Civil War 
from Scuyler County, 111., becoming a member of Co. H, 56 Vol. Inf., and 



410 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

served throughout the war. He was with Sherman on his famous march 
to the sea, and in the review at Washington, D. C. In 1866 he came to 
Caldwell County, Mo., and began farming. In 1883 he purchased the farm 
now owned by G. W. Ridinger, and resided there until the time of his death, 
Oct. 5, 1907. His wife was born in Ohio, in 1830, and died April 3, 1898. 
They are both buried in Lick Fork Cemetery in Harrison Township. They 
were members of the Baptist church, and were the parents of eight chil- 
dren, two of whom are deceased. 

G. W. Ridinger has a twin brother in Monroe Township. Mr. Ridinger 
began farming for himself when eighteen years of age. He was educated 
in Caldwell County at Breckenridge, Mo., and then went west where he 
got his start as a cattle man. 1886 he returned home and began farming 
across the road from where he now resides, and in 1900 he bought out 
the heirs on his father's farm and has had charge of it since that time. 
He began breeding Percheron horses in 1898 and eight years later he 
started breeding Jacks and Jennietts. He has been very successful in this 
field of work, and also as a breeder of Jersey cattle, Duroc Jersey hogs, 
and brown leghorn chickens. Mr. Ridinger has had all of his stock on ex- 
hibition at various fairs and is very well known throughout the country. 

July 4, 1885, Mr. Ridinger married Lillie Belle Grove. She is a 
daughter of Abraham and Cathrine (Frank) Grove, native of Licking 
County, Ohio, and Virginia. Abraham Grove was born May 10, 1830, and 
died in 1913. Mrs. Grove was born Aug. 21, 1825, and died Nov. 7, 1908. 
They are also buried in Lick Fork Cemetery, Harrison Township. ■ 

To Mr. and Mrs. Ridinger have been born two children, both deceased ; 
Una, who died at the age of one and one-half years ; and the other in 
infancy. Mr. Ridinger is a Democrat, and has held the offices of tax col- 
lector, road overseer, constable, and is now road overseer. He is a member 
of the Baptist church. 

In October, 1902, Mr. and Mrs. Ridinger took a daughter to rear, 
Ethel Scott, now the wife of Joe Evans, living on a farm in Caldwell County. 
In July, 1917, they took a boy, Rabe Weaver, from an orphan home in St. 
Louis, but two years later his mother took him. Then in August, 1920, 
Mr. and Mrs. Ridinger took another boy from the same orphan home, 
Raymond Cooper, born May 23, 1910. 

Mr. Ridinger is the owner of 140 acres of land and his wife also has 
80 acres of land in Harrison Township. 

I. L. Wade, well known bank cashier of Lock Springs, was born March 
18, 1860, in Clinton County, 111., a son of John and Martha M. (Yingst) 
Wade. John Wade was a native of Cumberland County, Pa., and at the 
age of 11 years his parents moved to Illinois and settled in Clinton County. 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 411 

He was born and reared a farmer but in his early life was a carpenter. 
He died in November, 1907, and his widow came to Missouri and located at 
Lock Springs in 1914. She died in 1920. Six children were born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Wade, four of whom are living. 

I. L. Wade, the subject of this sketch, was reared on a farm and edu- 
cated in the district schools, and also studied telegraphy for one year in 
St. Louis school. He served as a telegrapher for the Wabash Railroad 
from 1888 until 1899 at Sampsel, Lock Springs, and Pattonsburg. He had 
charge of the Lock Springs station for about eight years, beginning in 1889. 
In 1889 he resigned from this line of work and went into the mercantile 
business at Lock Springs, and was postmaster for a time in 1902, The 
following year he sold out his business and took Representative Frank 
Lawrence's place as cashier of the Lock Springs Bank, which position he 
still holds. 

In October, 1901, Mr. Wade married Margaret M. Brookshier, who was 
born in Livingston County, about two miles east of Lock Springs, the 
daughter of Thomas B. and Elizabeth (Brooks) Brookshier, natives of 
Missouri and Virginia. Mrs. Wade was brought up on her father's farm. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Wade five children were born, as follows: Raymond B., 
Kansas City, who enlisted in the World War in Illinois and was stationed 
at several camps in Texas, but did not see active service; Clarence C, 
Ogden, Utah, who enlisted in the World War and was stationed at Fort 
Sheridan and later at Camp Grant, where he was in the Officer's Training 
Camp. He was attached to the Hospital Corps, but did not see active ser- 
vice; Ashley B., Columbia University. He also enlisted in the World War 
from Gallatin, and was later sent to the Officer's Training Camp at Camp 
Taylor, from where he was discharged a second lieutenant; Isaac Neil, 
deceased ; and Esther May, who resides with her parents. 

Mr. Wade is a Republican and a member of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and the Masons. Mr. and Mrs. Wade are members of the 
Methodist church. Mr. Wade has an excellent standing in the community 
and is a reliable citizen. 

The Bank of Lock Springs was established Aug. 9, 1895, with a capital 
stock of $10,000.00, by I. J. Meade, from Pattonsburg. Mr. Meade now 
resides in Lawrence, Kan., where he is vice president of the Lawrence 
National Bank. 

When the Bank of Lock Springs was organized the stock holders were 
mostly of Daviess and Livingston Counties. 

The officers for 1922 are as follows: B. F. Ware, president Lock 



412 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Springs; Peter Johnson, vice president, Livingston County; I. L. Wade, 
cashier, Lock Springs. 

The Bank of Lock Springs is capitalized at $10,000. 

George B. Houston, a prominent farmer and stockman of Jackson 
Township, was born May 30, 1857, in Jackson Township, a quarter 
of a mile south of where he now lives. He is a son of Nathaniel and Rachael 
(Minnick) Houston, natives of Washington County, Va., who were among 
the early settlers of Jackson Township, in 1849. 

Nathaniel Houston served in the Civil War as a Confederate and was 
engaged in the Wilson Creek Battle near Springfield. After settling in 
Daviess County he took up farming and at one time conducted a general 
mercandise store at Lock Springs. He died in 1905 at the age of 81 years 
and his wife died in 1907, being 83 years of age. Mr. Houston was a Dem- 
ocrat and a ruling elder of the Presbyterian church. He and his wife are 
buried in the Lock Springs Cemetery. 

Nathaniel Houston and wife were the parents of six children, four of 
whom are now living, as follows : Esther Tye, Livingston County ; George 
B., the subject of this sketch; Chas., Livingston County; Mollie, Dugan, 
New Mexico. 

George B. Houston, was reared on the places where he now resides, 
and helped to clear off the timber, and tells of using oxen to break up the 
land. He later bought out the heirs to the farm. On Oct., 26, 1882, Mr. 
Houston was married to Elizabeth Hickey, a daughter of John and 
Elizabeth Hickey, born in Washington County, Va. Mr. and Mrs. Houston 
have no children. 

Mrs. Houston's father, John Hickey died in the army in Virginia and 
his widow with three daughters came to Livingston County, Mo. Mrs. 
Hickey died Jan. 20, 1922, at her home three miles east of Lock Springs, 
at the age of 91 years. 

Nathaniel Houston, being one of the pioneer settlers of Jackson Town- 
ship, used to trap wild game, using a rail pen. 

Geo. B. Houston is a Democrat and an elder of the Presbyterian church. 
His farm contains 234 acres of land, and his methods of farming and stock 
raising have made him one of the well known and successful farmers of 
Jackson Township. 

T. A. Martin, a well known retired farmer and veteran of the Civil 
War, who lives in Gallatin, was born Nov. 9, 1842, in Belmont County, 
Ohio, a son of Robert and Sarah A. (McBride) Martin, natives of Pennsyl- 
vania. Mr. and Mrs. Martin moved from Pennsylvania to Ohio and later 
to Indiana. They were the parents of two children, of whom T. A. Martin 
is the only survivor. 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 413 

T. A. Martin was reared on a farm and was engaged in farming until 
the Civil War. He enlisted in 1862 at Lafayette, Ind., in Company G, 72 
Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry. In June, 1863, his regiment was 
mounted in the brigade, which was known as the Wilder Brigade and the 
14th Army Corps, commanded by Colonel Johnson. The advance to 
Hoover's Gap was the first skirmish of any consequence. The next battles 
Mr. Martin was engaged in was Chickamauga, and Murfreesboro. In 1864 
they started south and were engaged in another battle. They were ordered 
back to join the brigade south of Nashville. After being in the Atlanta 
campaign for 18 days they were ordered to watch Hood, and later ordered 
to turn their horses over to Kilpatrick. The brigade was then ordered 
back to Louisville, to receive new mounts. Six weeks later they joined 
the Wilson command at Nashville in March, 1865. 69,000 men were mobil- 
ized to start south. They crossed the Tennessee River and were engaged 
in a battle at Selma, Ala., where they captured 2000 men. After marching 
through Montgomery, Ala., to Columbus, Ga., they took part in a battle 
there. Just 14 miles outside of Macon, Ga., they met a courier, who in- 
formed them that an armistic between Sherman and Johnson had taken 
place. Lee surrendered on April 9th, and his brigade did not hear of the 
armistice until April 22, 1865. Mr. Martin was mustered out of service at 
Indianapolis, Ind., July 6, 1865. 

Mr. Martin then engaged in farming, and worked in a saw mill. He 
also taught school in Indiana. In 1868 he removed to Daviess County, Mo., 
where he taught school, four miles west of Gallatin. After living in Lib- 
erty Township, for some time, Mr. Martin sold his land there and returned 
to Indiana. Later, however, he again returned to Liberty Township, where 
he purchased more land and improved it. He farmed there for 40 years, 
selling out in 1909. He then moved to Gallatin, where he has since resided. 
Mr. Martin was a widely known breeder of Shorthorn cattle. He held 
private sales, and usually sold his cattle to shippers. 

Oct. 5, 1869, Mr. Martin was married in Boone County, Ind., to Nancy 
J. Rude, native of Indiana. Mrs. Martin's father, Isaac Rude, made his 
home with his daughter, Mrs. Martin, for several years before his death. 
To T. A. Martin and Nancy J. Rude Martin nine children have been born, 
as follows : Bertha, the wife of John Speaker, Pomona, Calif. ; Eva, the wife 
of John Everman, Gallatin; Addie, the wife of George Tedric, Altamont; 
Thomas, was killed by Hghtning ; Thaddus, engaged in the lumber business 
at Gallatin ; Hugh, carpenter, Gallatin ; Ora A., Utah, served three years in 
the Phillipine Islands as a soldier; Chauncey, Liberty Township; Charles 
C, engaged in the Automobile business in Gallatin. Chauncey and Charles 



414 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Martin are twins. Mr. Martin has nine grand children and three great 
grand children. 

Mr. Martin is a Republican and a member of the Christian church. 
He attributes his success in life to hard work, and his ability to save. His 
greatest asset in life is, he says, his wife. Mr. Martin is well and favorably 
known in Daviess County. 

George H. Peniston, a successful farmer and stockman of Union Town- 
ship, was born Aug. 23, 1883, on the farm where he now resides. He is a 
son of George. W. and Mary A. (Preston) Peniston. 

George W. Peniston was born in Jackson Township in 1851. He was 
a farmer during his entire life. His wife was the daughter of Thomas A. 
and Martha A. (Mark) Preston, natives of Virginia and Lafayette County, 
Ohio. They were married Aug, 9, 1853, in Livingston County, Mo., and 
later returned to Daviess County where they spent their lives. Mr. and 
Mrs. Peniston were the parents of five children: Jessie, wife of J. B. Drum- 
mond, Chillicothe, Mo. ; Mattie P., wife of Sam Wynne, Grand River Town- 
ship; George H., the subject of this sketch; Thomas J., Union Township; 
Mary Frances, clerk in the Farmers Exchange Bank, Gallatin. Mr. Penis- 
ton died Aug. 26, 1889, and his wife died Sept. 25, 1912. They are both 
buried in Centenary Cemetery in Union Township. Mr. Peniston was a 
member of the Methodist church, 

George H. Peniston became heir to part of his father's farm and later 
he and his brother Theo, purchased the remainder. George H. Peniston 
was married Sept. 12, 1906, to Anna S. Sneed, who was born Jan, 3, 1887, 
in Jamesport Township, a daughter of James E, and Mary H, (McCue) 
Sneed, James E, Sneed was born Sept. 3, 1863, in Livingston County, and 
his wife was born Oct. 12, 1865, in Hancock County, 111. She died March, 
1920, at her home near Pawnee City, Okla., where Mr. Sneed still resides. 
Mr. and Mrs. Sneed moved to Oklahoma in 1906. They were the parents 
of 12 children, nine of whom are hving. Mrs. Peniston was the oldest 
child. 

Mr. and Mrs. Peniston are the parents of one child, George Irwin, who 
was born Sept. 30, 1911. 

Mrs. Peniston has been a Sunday School teacher since she was 11 years 
old, and is a very active church worker. Mr. Peniston has also been active 
in church work having been Suday School superintendent. Their son be- 
came a member of the Baptist church Aug. 2, 1920. Mr. Peniston has been 
a deacon of the Baptist church since 1912. He is a member of the Brother- 
hood of American Yoeman and is a Democrat. 

Mr. Peniston owns 80 acres of land in Union Township, and is one of 
the progressive and enterprising citizens of this county. He is a member 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 415 

of the Carlow Consolidated School Board District No. 2, and has been pres- 
ident since 1920. 

Mark T.nlen, a substantial farmer and stockman of Union Township, 
Daviess County, and owner of 316 acres of well improved land, was born 
Sept. 12, 1867, in Adair County, Iowa, the son of James W. and Elizabeth 
(Polen) Tolen. 

James W. Tolen was born in Hendricks County, Ind., and came to 
Missouri in 1869, locating in Grand River Township, Daviess County. He 
died in Monroe Township, in May, 1902, at the age of 59 years. Elizabeth 
(Polen) Tolen was born in Hendricks County, Ind., and is now living in 
Carlow, Mo. She is 77 years of age. 

To James W. Tolen and wife, eight children were born, of whom five 
are now living: Mary E., wife of F. G. Fulton, Union Township; Mark, 
the subject of this sketch ; Frank, Jackson Township ; Clarence O., Jack- 
son Township ; Charlie L., Jackson Township. 

Mark E. Tolen grew up on his father's farm and received his education 
in the district schools. At the age 21 years he began for himself, rent- 
ing land. He later became heir to some land, and purchased his present 
farm about 30 years ago. He is a well known breeder and feeder of 
hogs and mules. 

June 28, 1894, Mr. Tolen was married to Mildred Youtsey, a native 
of Grand River Township, and a daughter of John and Samantha (Brown) 
Youtsey, natives of Indiana and Daviess County. Mr. and Mrs. Youtsey 
are among the pioneers of Daviess County. To Mr. and Mrs. Tolen five 
children have been born, as follows : Edna, at home ; Bryan, who was in the 
navy during the World War and stationed at Brest, France, now living at 
home ; Etta Marie, the wife of Vernon E, Chapman, Gallatin ; Velma, at 
home ; and Mark Y., at home. 

Mr. Tolen is a Democrat and a member of the Church of Christ. He 
is public spirited and enterprising and one of the leading citizens of Union 
Township. 

B. F. Ware, a progressive farmer and owner of 155 acres of land in 
Jackson Township, was born Sept. 18, 1869, in Livingston County, a son of 
Alexandria and Mildred Ann (Callahan) Ware. 

Alexandria Ware was a native of Kentucky, and one of the pioneer 
settlers of Missouri. He crossed the plains in 1849, seeking gold. His 
first wife was a Miss Boone, and to that union 13 children were born, all 
of whom are now deceased. His second wife, Mildred Ann (Callahan) 
Ware, was born in Campbell County, Ky. This was her second marriage, 
having been married the first time to J. L. Hise. By her first marriage 
three children were born, two of whom are now living ; A, W. Hise, Chariton 



416 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

County ; and J. L. Hise, of Jackson Township. To Alexandria and Mildred 
Ann (Calahan) Ware three children were born, two of whom are now liv- 
ing: John T., Jackson Township ; and B. F., the subject of this sketch. Mr. 
Ware died in 1899, at the age of 83 years, and Mrs. Ware died in 1905, at 
the age of 72 years. 

B. F. Ware attended the district school and was reared on the farm. 
He remained at home for a number of years with his parents, purchasing 
the home place after the death of his father. After making extensive im- 
provements he sold the farm and then bought his home in Jackson Town- 
ship, three miles north of Lock Springs. His residence in in Lock Springs. 

Mr. Ware is president of the bank of Lock Springs, having been elected 
to that office Feb. 2, 1922. He had served as vice-president for a number 
of years. 

Mr. Ware was married to Sarah E. Rupe, now deceased. To this union 
seven children were born, of whom three are now living ; Nellie F., Nona E., 
and Benjamin F., all living with their father. 

Mr. Ware is a Democrat and has served in the offices of township 
trustee and treasurer. He is a member of the Methodist church and 
Modern Woodmen of America. Mr. Ware is favorably known throughout 
Daviess County as a man of enterprise and ability. In Lock Springs, also, 
he is esteemed as a progressive business man. 

James B. Bennett, who is the owner of 190 acres of land in Harrison 
Township, is one of the well known farmers and stockmen of this county. 
He was born in Harrison Township, Daviess County, one and one-half miles 
southwest of his present farm, on Aug. 16, 1856, and is a son of Fisher R. 
and Elizabeth (England) Bennett. 

F. R. Bennett was married the first time in April, 1844, to Miss Sophia 
A. Trosper, and to that union two children were born: Sophia A., and 
Nicholas T., both deceased. Mr. Bennett's second wife, the mother of 
James B. Bennett, was born in Carroll County, Mo., about 1845, and died 
in 1920. Two children were born to this union : W. P., and Daviess County, 
and James B., the subject of this sketch. 

F. R. Bennett was born in Kentucky about 1813, and died in 1879. He 
was reared a farmer but for some time after starting out for himself, he 
followed flat boating on the Mississippi River. He came to Daviess County, 
in 1842. He crossed the plains to the gold fields riding a mule the entire 
distance, and had nothing to eat during the trip except parched corn which 
he had to' share with the mule. The mule acted as a good body guard on the 
trip against the Indians, snorting when they would approach. 

James B. Bennett was reared on a farm, and attended the district 
school. The school house was furnished with split elm benches, and he 




J. B. BENNETT 



I 



THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC -LIBr.ARY 



ASTOR. LENOX AND 
TILUEN FOUNDATIONS ' 
1 L/ 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 417 

worked as a farm laborer in early life. In August, 1874, he married Sarah 
Jane McCrarey. She was born in Daviess County, in 1854, and died in 
1896. Three children were born to them, as follows: James M., deceased; 
Newton B., deceased; and Mary E., was married three times and is now 
deceased. She had one child, Hartrell Bennett, who lives in Caldwell 
County, Mo. 

When Mr. Bennett was married he only had $10 and he rented land 
for 12 years. He then, in 1886, bought 80 acres of land in Jackson Town- 
ship. He improved this and sold it in 1920. In 1890 he bought the farm 
where he has made his home since that time. He is very active and has 
always gotten up at four o'clock in the morning the year around, and says 
he has worked many nights doing chores. He has cleared off heavy timber 
from all his land. 

Mr. Bennett carries on general farming and raises Shorthorn cattle 
and Poland China hogs. He is recognized as one of the substantial and 
well known farmers of Harrison Township. He is a Democrat and a mem- 
ber of the Methodist church. 

J. Forrest Brown, the efficient and well known cashier of the People's 
Bank of Carlow, Mo., was born May 22, 1899, at Jamesport, the son of J. 
Mack and Delia (Andre) Brown, who now reside in Jamesport, Mo. 

J. Forrest Brown was reared on a farm. He was educated in the dis- 
trict schools, and attended the State Teachers College at Maryville. He 
then took a position with the Standard American Jewelry Company of 
Detroit, Mich. In November, 1920, Mr. Brown came to Carlow, and the 
following month became cashier of the People's Bank of Carlow. 

Mr. Brown was married Aug. 23, 1921, to Verna Williams, who was 
born in Oilman City, a daughter of LaFayette and Delcina Williams. She 
was educated in the high school at Oilman City and attended Cedar Valley 
Seminary, Osage, Iowa. 

Mr. Brown enlisted in the Students Army Training Corps, but was 
never called into active service during the World War. He enlisted at 
Maryville. 

Mr. Brown is a Democrat and an enterprising young man of his com- 
munnity. 

The Peoples Bank of Carlow was organized in July, 1919, by S. L. 
Gibson, now of the Chillicothe Trust Company, president; Ivo W. Livley, 
now cashier of the Bank of Jamesport, Jamesport. 

The first officers of the Peoples Bank of Carlow were: S. L. Oibson, 
president; J. C. Oxford, vice-president; and Flavel P. Oirdner, cashier. 
The bank was organized with a capital stock of $10,000. 

The Peoples Bank of Carlow has enjoyed a very rapid growth, due in 



418 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

no small part, to the integrity and efficiency of its officers. It is now a 
members of the Missouri Bankers Association. The bank's stockholders 
consist of the present officers and the progressive farmers of Carlow dis- 
trict. 

The present officers are: Robert J. Murphy, president, Chillicothe; S. 
W. Blakely, vice president, Carlow; and J. Forrest Brown, cashier. 

S. W. Blakely, a prominent farmer and stockman of Jackson Township, 
Daviess County, was born March 31, 1889, on a farm in Jackson Township, 
where he now resides. He is the son of M. P. and Elizabeth (Hooper) 
Blakely. 

M. P. Blakely was born in Daviess County, on the farm where he now 
lives with his son, Feb. 25, 1841. During the Civil War he enlisted from 
Daviess County, in the Confederate Army and served during the entire 
war. At the end of the war Mr. Blakely worked as a laborer in Sangamon 
County, 111. He then returned to Missouri, and purchased his present 
farm in Jackson Township from the heirs. M. P. Blakely was the son of 
Pleasant and Nancy (Girdner) Blakely, natives of Whitley County, Ky., 
who came to Daviess County in 1834, and located on the present Blakely 
farm. They were the parents of nine children, two of their sons having 
served in the Civil War. Pleasant Blakely preempted the land from the 
government at $1.25 per acre, securing in return three sheepskin land 
grants. 

Elizabeth (Hooper) Blakely was born in Clinton County, July 10, 
1855,, a daughter of Jacob and Sarah (St. John) Hooper, natives of Ken- 
tucky and Tennessee, who came to Clinton County. M. P. and Elizabeth 
(Hooper) Blakely had but one child, S. W., the subject of this sketch. 

S. W. Blakely was reared on his father's farm in Jackson Township, 
and received his education in the district schools. In 1920 he became heir 
to the old home farm where he is now engaged successfully in farming and 
stock raising. He is a well known breeder of Poland China hogs. 

Mr. Blakely was inducted into military service during the World War 
on Sept. 18, 1917. He was stationed at Camp Funston, Kans., for nine 
months. He was then sent to New York and sailed for overseas June 28, 
1919, in the 89th Division, 314 Military Police Company. Mr. Blakely took 
part in the St. Mihiel Battle and the Meuse-Argonne Drive. After the 
armistice he was assigned to the Army of Occupation, and was stationed 
in Germany for some time. He sailed for France March 13, 1919, and 
was mustered out of service June 13, 1919, at Camp Funston, Kans. ^ 

In December, 1921, Mr. Blakely was elected president of the Peoples 
Bank of Carlow, Mo. He is a member of the Presbyterian church and of 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 419 

the American Legion. Mr. Blakely is a Democrat and one of Daviess 
County's most enterprising and substantial citizens. He is unmarried. 

James Critten, who is now living retired in Jackson Township, is a 
Cilvil War veteran and one of the early pioneer settlers of Daviess County. 
He was born March 26, 1840, in Putman County, Ohio, a son of Isaac and 
Mary (Nichols) Critten. 

Isaac Critten was born in Licking County, Ohio, March 20, 1814. He 
was a farmer during his entire life. In 1855 he moved to Daviess County, 
locating on a farm in Jackson Township. In 1900 he retired and moved 
to Gallatin, where he died in August, 1901. Mary (Nichols) Critten was 
born in Licking County, Ohio, Sept. 18, 1818, and died in 1902. They 
were members of the Presbyterian church and are buried in Centenary 
Cemetery in Union Township. To Isaac and Marry (Nichols) Critten ten 
children were born, of whom four are now living: Catherine, widow of 
S. M. Carter, Chetopa, Kans. ; Phoebe, the wife of J. R. Adkins, Mission, 
Tex. ; Emily, wife of W. T. Tribbey, Jackson Township ; and James, the sub- 
ject of this sketch. 

James Critten came to Missouri when very young with his parents 
and was educated in the district schools. He worked on his father's farm 
until the Civil War, when he enlisted in Company B, 1st Cavalry, Missouri 
State Militia. During the war he was stationed in Kansas, Arkansas and 
Missouri. Mr. Critten served three years under Colonel J. H. B. McFerran 
and was engaged in the battles of Kirksville, Little Blue and near Fort 
Scott, Kans. He also took part in the raid with Shelby at Jefferson City, 
and had several skirmishes with bushwackers. 

At the close of the Civil War Mr. Critten settled on his present farm 
of 170 acres in Jackson Township, where he was engaged in general farm- 
ing. He was a well known stock feeded. When Mr. Critten purchased his 
land it was all unbroken prairie. 

On Sept. 13, 1868, Mr. Critten was married to Samantha Macy, daugh- 
ter of Seth and Marinda (Adkinson) Macy. Mrs. Critten was born Feb. 
2, 1852, in Daviess County. She died in 1917. Mr. and Mrs. Macy were 
natives of North Carolina and South Carolina. They are both deceased. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Critten three children were born, one of whom is now 
living. Otto E., Jackson Township. 

Mr. Critten is a Republican and has served as a justice of the peace 
several times. He is a member of the Presbyterian church and is one of 
the substantial and highly respected pioneer citizens of Daviess County. 

Judge W. E. Naylor, deceased, was a prominent farmer and business 
man of Jackson Township. He was born May 30, 1868, in Daviess County, 
a son of F. M. and Sarah A. (West) Naylor. 



420 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

F. M. Naylor was born in Bath County, Ky., Oct. 11, 1829, a son of 
Ignatius and Susan (Kerns) Naylor. Ignatius Naylor was a carpenter by 
trade. He died Feb. 10, 1875, in Platte County, Mo. F. M. Naylor died in 
1900, and his wife died Oct. 15, 1908. To F. M. and Sarah A. (West) 
Naylor nine children were born, one of whom is now living: Mrs. Howard 
Pogue, Gallatin. 

Judge W. E. Naylor was reared on a farm and received his education 
in the district school and attended school two years at Jamesport. He then 
became engaged in farming in Jackson Township. Later he purchased his 
father's farm and lived there until his death Feb. 14, 1918. At the time 
of his death he owned 336 acres of land, 160 acres in Jackson Township 
and 176 acres in Kansas. 

Oct. 6, 1887, Judge Naylor was married to Mary Lee Sandidge, a 
daughter of Dabney and Rebecca (Hill) Sandidge. Mr. and Mrs. Sandidge 
were the parents of two children : Mrs. Naylor and Ruie A. Faulkner, now 
living in Harrison, Ark. Both Mr. and Mrs. Sandidge are now deceased. 
Mrs. Naylor was born two and one-half miles southeast of Jamesport, and 
received her education in the district schools. Tq Judge and Mrs. Naylor 
four children were born, as follows : Glenn, was killed by an acetylene gas 
explosion in 1915 ; Frankie, the wife of W. H. Etter, living near Jamesport ; 
Ross, living with his mother; Katherine, the wife of Corwin Miller, 
Gallatin. 

In 1918 Mrs. Naylor sold the old home farm and purchased 95 acres of 
land west of the former home in Jackson Township. She has erected a 
new home and made other improvements. 

Judge Naylor was a Democrat. He was elected county judge, which 
office he had held for two years. He was a member of the Christian church 
and was a deacon at the church at Carlow. In all the phases of his life, 
as a business man, as a citizen, and in his capacity as a judge. Judge Naylor 
was industrious and sincere. He merited the high regard in which he was 
held by the community. He is buried in Brown Cemetery, Gallatin. 

J. B. Drummond, Sr., a prominent farmer and stockman of Jackson 
Township, was born Feb. 4, 1851, in Union Township, Daviess County, a 
son of Joshua L. and Mary (Rhea) Drummond. 

Joshua L. Drummond was born June 20, 1818, in Monroe County, Va. 
He removed to Missouri in the early forties, locating on a farm in Union 
Township. He came to Missouri with his mother and step-father, J. B. 
Foster, who settled in Grand River Township, which was then known as 
Awbury Grove. Mary (Rhea) Drummond was born in Greenbrier County, 
Va., March 26, 1825. She died in Texas, Nov. 13, 1837. Joshua Drum- 
mond died Oct. 9, 1859, and is buried in the old Jordin Cemetery in Jackson 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 421 

Township. To Mr. and Mrs. Drummond six children were born, three of 
whom are now living: J. B., the subject of this sketch; Susan, the wife of 
William Douthit, Fayette County ; Elizabeth C, the wife of Warren Mur- 
ray, Gallatin. 

J. B. Drummond was reared on a farm and educated in the district 
schools. He learned the blacksmith trade, which he worked at for about 
15 years in Odessa, Jamesport and Carlow. He later owned a grocery 
and hardware store at Carlow, which was burned Sept. 14, 1909, Mr. 
Drummond then became engaged in farming and stock raising. He is a 
breeder of standard bred trotting horses. In the early days Mr. Drum- 
mond tells of using oxen to break up the prairie land. He has been very 
successful in his work and owns 138 acres of well improved land at the 
southeastern part of Carlow. 

Mr. Drummond was married, first, Oct. 13, 1899, to Iva Bashford, a 
daughter of David and Sarah (Hodd) Bashford. She was born in Jack- 
son Township. To J. B. and Iva (Bashford) Drummond two children were 
born: one died in infancy, and William L., employed with the Morris Pack- 
ing Company, St. Joseph. Mrs. Drummond died April 7, 1919. 

Dec. 19, 1920, Mr. Drummond was married to Frances (Tulley) Poe, 
a native of Hamilton County, Ind. 

Mr. Drummond is an independent voter. He is a stockholder in the 
Peoples Bank of Carlow. Mr. Drummond is a reliable citizen who is highly 
esteemed by his fellow citizens in Jackson Township. 

W. F. Burge, a prosperous farmer and stockman of Jackson Township, 
was born Feb. 17, 1876, in Daviess County, a son of George D. and Nannie 
E. (Knight) Burge. 

George Burge was born in Patrick County, Va., April 28, 1844, and 
came to Jackson Township, Daviess County, with his father in 1851. Here 
he followed farming until 1908 when he moved to Oklahoma where he now 
lives at ElReno. His wife, Nannie E. Knight was born in Daviess County, 
and died in August, 1876. To this union was born one child, W. F., the sub- 
ject of this sketch. George D. Burge was later married to Martha J. 
Faulkner, a native of Daviess County, and to this union six children were 
born. 

W. F. Burge was reared on his father's farm and received his education 
in the district school and high school of Gallatin. At 20 years of age he 
purchased 40 acres of land, on which he has since resided. He has added 
to his original land holdings until he now owns 200 acres in Jackson Town- 
ship. He also operates his father's farm of 280 acres, which is an exclusive 
stock farm. Mr. Burge specialized in registered Poland China hogs and 



I 



422 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

also is a breeder of mules and sheep, in wRich work he has been very 
successful. 

On April 2, 1896, W. F. Burge was married to Pearl E. Jenkins, a 
daughter of W. E. and Caroline (Drummond) Jenkins, now living in James- 
part. Mrs. Jenkins was born in Daviess County. To Mr. and Mrs. Burge 
have been born 13 children, as follows : Carrie F., teacher at ElReno, Okla. ; 
Nina M., the wife of F. H. McMahan, living near Jamesport; Wilma R., 
teacher in Monroe Township district school ; James Raymond, Jamesport ; 
and Fred F., Woody A., Garland L., Margaret, William F., Jr., Jesse W., 
Betty L., all living at home. The other two children died in infancy. All 
of the Burge children are very well educated. 

Mr. Burge is a Democrat and a member of the Presbyterian church. 
He is an energetic man who stands well in the esteem of his neighbors and 
fellow citizens. 

J. M. Snider, a well known farmer and stockman of Jackson Township, 
and owner of 388 acres of land, was born Aug. 5, 1846, in Pike County, Ohio, 
in the village of Cynthann, the son of Samuel and Martha (Vanzant) 
Snider. 

Samuel Snider was born in Greenbrier County, Va. When a child he 
floated down the Ohio River with his parents in a boat which they had built 
themselves. They brought all of their furniture, live stock and clothing 
with them. During the day they floated with the current. They settled 
in Highland County, Ohio, where Mr. Snider was reared. He removed to 
Daviess County, Mo., in 1868, and settled in Jackson Township, where he 
lived until his death, March 15, 1886, aged 65 years. Martha (Vanzant) 
Snider was born Jan. 14, 1824, in Greenbrier County, Va., and died in 
Daviess County, Mo., Jan 15, 1876. They were both buried in Clear Creek 
Cemetery, Jackson Township. To Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Snider six children 
were born, of whom Stella L, is the youngest. She is the wife of E. J. 
Snyder, Los Angeles, Calif. 

J, M. Snider was reared on a farm in Highland County, Ohio, and 
remained there until September, 1864, when he enlisted in the National 
Guard of Ohio. He served 63 days, when he was sent to Georgia and held 
in the Reserve Guards there. Mr. Snider lived in Ohio until 1868 when he 
removed to Missouri with his parents. His father was a carpenter by 
trade. Upon their arrival in Missouri they became engaged in farming, 
where they remained until Mrs. Snider's death, after which J. M. Snider 
went to Colorado, where he lived one year. He then returned to Missouri, 
married, and settled on the home place, which his father deeded to him in 
1880. Mr. Snider has made extensive improvements on the farm, and has 
been very successful in general farming and stock raising. 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 423 

On Dec. 17, 1876, Mr, Snider was married to Phena L. Youtsey, a 
daughter of Archibald and EHzabeth (George) Youtsey. Mrs. Snider 
was born in 1858, in Daviess County. To Mr. and Mrs. Snider four child- 
ren have been born, as follows : Clauda M., the wife of William E. Jenkms, 
Jackson Township; Emma C, at home; Samuel A., at home, and Mahlon 
E., also at home. 

In politics Mr. Snider is a Republican. He is a citizen who stands 
well in his community, both for his enterprising disposition and for his high 
standards of welfare. 

Joseph M. Cox, a substantial farmer and stockman of Jackson Town- 
ship, and owner of 258 acres of land in Jackson Township and 58 acres in 
Livingston County, was born Feb. 25, 1853, across the road from where he 
now lives in Jackson Township, a son of Levi P. and Elizabeth (Stamper) 
Cox. 

Levi P. Cox, Sr., was born Jan. 20, 1817, in Williamsburg, Ky., and 
came to Missouri the summer of 1840, settling on what is now known as 
part of the old L. P. Cox farm in Jackson Township. Mr. Cox was married 
Sept. 30, 1841, to Elizabeth Stamper. To Mr. and Mrs. Cox eight children 
were born, as follows : Larkin J., born Aug. 12, 1843, was shot during the 
Civil War in the Battle of Corinth, Miss. He died of his wounds; Lucy M., 
deceased, was the wife of Reuben Ketron ; Emily, deceased, was the wife 
of L F. Minnick ; Nathan T., Gainsville, Texas ; Maria A., deceased ; Joseph 
M., the subject of this sketch; Jess Cox, deceased; Levi P.; Breckenridge ; 
and John S., deceased. 

Levi P. Cox died Jan. 20, 1886, at the age of 69 years, and his wife 
died May 18, 1864, at the age of 38 years. They both are buried in Clear 
Creek Cemetery. 

Joseph M. Cox was reared on his father's farm and received his 
education in the public schools and the high school at Breckenridge. He 
later taught school for two terms. At his father's death, Mr. Cox inherited 
200 acres of land in Jackson Township, upon which he has made many im- 
provements. He carries on general farming and stock raising and has been 
very successful. 

On Nov. 10, 1877, Mr. Cox was married to Mattie Tye, a daughter of 
Joshua and Elizabeth (Miller) Tye, natives of Kentucky and early settlers 
of Missouri. Mrs. Cox was born in Livingston County. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Cox eight children have been born, as follows : Charlie, Jackson Township ; 
Joshua, St. Joseph ; Effie, the wife of Fred B. Hurd, San Jose, Calif. ; Levi 
Chester, deceased; Ernie, Oklahoma; Mabel, principal of Lock Springs 
high school ; Manona, a bookkeepei m Kansas City ; John, at home. 

Mr. Cox is a stockholder in the Farmers Co-operative Mercantile Com- 



424 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

pany of Lock Springs, and was one of the organizers of the Lock Springs 
Bank. He was its first vice president. He is a Democrat and a member 
of the Methodist church. He has been a trustee for 20 years. He is re- 
liable and an efficient member of the community. 

C. E. Ernst, the prosecuting attorney of Gentry County, is a member 
of an old and well known pioneer family of the county. For three genera- 
tions the Ernst name has been connected with the development of Gentry 
County and the members of the family have been people of worth and 
merit in civic affairs. 

C. E. Ernst was born in Mound City, June 23, 1871, the son of Rev. 
James Henry and Martha J. (McCurry) Ernst. Rev. Ernst was a native 
of Gentry County, where his father and uncle, Godfrey and Andrew Ernst, 
built the first frame house ever erected in their neighborhood. This house 
is on the Ernst farm six miles southeast of Albany. It was a favorite 
stopping place for travellers taking the route to the Pattonsburg Mills and 
to the Gentryville Mills in the old frontier days. The old house is thus of 
historical interest, not only in the story of the Ernst family, but also in 
connection with the trade growth of the county. At this house Godfrey 
Ernst died, and here, in 1871, his son, James Henry, also died. The re- 
mains of both are buried in the Ernst burying ground on the farm. This 
place is still used at a public graveyard. Rev. James Henry Ernst was a 
minister in the Methodist church to which he devoted years of earnest and 
tireless work. C. E. Ernest, the subject of this sketch, was the only child 
of the union of Rev. J. H. and Martha J. (McCurry) Ernst. 

Martha J. (McCurry) Ernst was the daughter of James McCurry, who 
came from Green County, Tenn., with his father-in-law, William Duke, in 
1868. They settled near Albany where they spent the remainder of their 
lives. They both died several years ago and their remains are buried in 
the City Cemetery at Albany. After the death of Rev. James Henry Ernst 
his widow married John M. Canaday, a son of Caleb Canaday, who was at 
one time probate judge of Gentry County. John M. Canaday is now dead 
his widow lives with her son, C. E. Ernst. She is 76 years old. 

C. E. Ernst was educated in the public school of Albany and later at- 
tended Christian College at Albany. He then read law with W. F. Dalbey 
and was admitted to the bar in December, 1900, and has since practiced suc- 
cessfully. When former Governor Hadley was in office, he appointed Mr. 
Ernst the circuit clerk and recorder of deeds of Gentry County to fill out 
the unexpired term of Horace J. Peery. This was in April, 1910, and Mr. 
Ernst held the office for two years, working under Don Hawthorne. Mr. 
Ernst's success and popularity as an official of the county is shown by the 




C. E. KRNST 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 425 

fact that his county elected him to fill the office of prosecuting attorney 
in 1918 and reelected him in 1920. 

C. E. Ernst was married in 1901, to Alice Sparks, a daughter of Col- 
W. P. Sparks of Grant City. Mrs. Ernst was born and reared in Grant 
City. To this union of C. E. and Alice (Sparks) Ernst two children have 
been born : Charles, a graduate of the Albany High School, now a student 
at Palmer College, and interested in electrical engineering; and Ernestine 
also a graduate of Albany High School, and at present student at Palmer 
College from which she was graduated in music in 1922. 

Mr. Ernst is a member of the Baptist church and is identified with the 
following lodges: the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows of which he is a Past Grand Master, the Yoeman, and 
the Woodmen of the World. Mr. Ernst is very fond of good horses and 
keeps four standard bred horses at his home. He uses them both for driv- 
ing and riding. He is a citizen of whom his community is proud. As a 
private citizen, he has been interested in the advancement of the town and 
the county, and as a public official he has been efficient, just and considerate. 

W. T. McClure, a prominent banker of Jamesport, was born Nov. 13, 
1879, in Jamesport Township, a son of Jonathan and Mary L. (Hamilton) 
McClure. 

Jonathan McClure was born in Ohio. Before the Civil War he came 
to Grundy County, Mo., with his father and they started a flour mill on 
Hickory Creek. They had moved to Grundy County, Mo., from Van 
Buren County, Iowa. During the- Civil War, Mr. McClure enlisted as a 
soldier from Missouri and served on the Union side. After the war he 
traded a horse for 160 acres of land in Jamesport Township, where he 
moved and made his home until his death, Feb. 5, 1917. At the time of 
his death he owned 640 acres of land. He helped organize the Commercial 
Bank of Jamesport, which was first known as the Farmers and Merchants 
Bank. He was a stock holder and director until his death. Mr. McClure 
was a member of the Methodist Church and a member of the Masonic lodge, 
being a charter member of No. 564 Jamesport. He was a progressive citi- 
zen who devoted much of his time and energy to public welfare. Mrs. 
McClure was born in Daviess County, and is now living on the old home 
farm near Jamesport. 

To Jonathan and Mary L. (Hamilton) McClure seven children were 
born, as follows : Arthur, living with his mother ; Alice, the wife of James 
W. Parker, Jamesport Township ; Rose, the wife of Thomas Hamilton, 
Long Beach, Calif.; Nellie, the wife of R. D. McCray, Lincoln Township; 
Pinke, the wife of R. M. Cole, Lincoln Township; W. T., the subject of this 
sketch ; Harry, Jamesport Township. 



426 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

W. T. McClure was reared on a farm and received his education in the 
district schools and the Kirksville Normal School. After finishing school 
he taught in the district schools for about eight years. He was then en- 
gaged in farming for a number of years. Aug. 9, 1908, Mr. McClure be- 
came the bookkeeper in what was then known as the Farmers and Mer- 
chants Bank at Jamesport. An May 30, 1911, the bank consolidated with 
the First National Bank, and was then known as the Commercial Bank of 
Jamesport. For a short time, Mr. McClure was assistant cashier of the 
bank, and in September, 1912, he became cashier. On Jan. 1, 1920, he was 
elected president, which office he now holds. 

On Jan. 9, 1916, Mr. McClure was married to Roberta Doty, a native 
of Daviess County, and daughter of William and Elizabeth Doty, both of 
whom are now deceased. 

Mr. McClure is a Republican and a member of the Masonic lodge in all 
its branches. He is well and favorably known in Jamesport and takes an 
active interest in the affairs of his community. 

The Commercial Bank of Jamesport, Mo., was organized in 1911 by the 
consolidation of the Farmers and Merchants Bank and the First National 
Bank. It has a capital of $80,000 and a surplus of $14,500. 

The present officers of the Commercial Bank are as follows: W. T. 
McClure, president; George Pogue, vice-president; C. A. Lewis, cashier; 
Kathleen Reed, assistant cashier; Mabel Martin, assistant cashier; C. R. 
May, assistant cashier. 

The Commercial Bank of Jamesport is a member of the Missouri Asso- 
ciation and the American Association of Banks. It is located on the main 
thoroughfare of Jamesport and is modernly equipped in every respect. 

The stockholders of the Commercial Bank are made up of citizens of 
Jamesport Township. The bank is well known throughout the state and is 
in high standing due to the efficiency of its officers. 

Ivo W. Lively, the competent and well known cashier of the Bank of 
Jamesport, was born in Monroe, La., the son of Chapman H., and Ella 
(Humble) Lively, natives of Louisana. 

Chapman H. Lively was born in 1863, and was a plantation owner 
during his life. He owned land in Louisana where he raised cotton, having 
many negroes working the plantation. He died in Monroe, La., in 1915, at 
the age of 52 years. Mrs. Lively is now living in Monroe, La. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Lively four children were born, as follows: Ivo W., subject of this 
sketch ; E. H., San Francisco, Calif. ; Edith, the wife of August Swayze, 
Monroe, La. ; the fourth child died in infancy. 

Ivo W. Lively was reared in Monroe, La., being educated in the public 
schools there and later attending the business college at Chillicothe, Mo. 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 427 

When 18 years of age he was engaged as a messenger boy in the Ouachita 
National Bank, at Monroe, La. In two years he became bookkeeper in the 
same bank. In 1906, he went to Kansas City, where he was engaged as 
a bookkeeper in the Commerce Trust Company, later becoming teller. Six 
years later, Mr. Lively removed to Las Vegas, N. M., where he became the 
assistant secretary of the Peoples Bank and Trust Company. In 1914 he 
went to Santa Fe, N. M., where he became cashier of the Santa Fe Bank. 
He remained there until 1916, when he came to Jamesport and organized 
the Bank of Jamesport. 

Mr. Lively was married Nov. 4, 1907, to Dorothy Stephenson, a native 
of Marceline. To this union one son has been born, Ivo W., Jr. 

Mr. Lively is a Democrat. He is a member of the Baptist church and 
the Knights of Phythias. Mr. Lively is a good business man who possesses 
both capability and courtesy. He is well known in Daviess County, and 
merits the esteem with which he is held in his community. 

The Bank of Jamesport, Jamesport, Mo., was organized in 1916 by 
Ivo W. Lively, with a capital stock of $10,000, which was increased in three 
years to $15,000. 

While is it numerically the third bank in the town, it is truly the first in 
point of community spirit and development. Mr. Lively convinced his 
associates from the beginning that it was to be their bank, and they were 
to be, therefore, one body of boosters. They caught the spirit immediately 
and a really marvelous growth has resulted. One feature, inaugurated by 
Mr. Lively was the annual stockholders' banquet, the first being held in 
1919, at the time of the summer divident payment. This was such a suc- 
cess that all were heartily in favor of the plan for each year to follow. 

The oflficers of the Bank of Jamesport are: I. C. Hill, farmer of Jackson 
Township, president ; W. L. Arnold, merchant of Jamesport, vice-president ; 
Ivo W. Lively, cashier; Miss Roberta Goodvin, assistant cashier; Lois 
Rayburn, second assistant cashier. 

The deposits at present are $134,495.63, the total resources are 
$191,851.00. The stockholders of the bank are mainly farmers of James- 
port and vicinity. 

The phenomenal growth of the bank of Jamesport is due in no small 
degree to co-operation, and the stockholders are to be congratulated upon 
having for their leader a man of Mr. Lively's business foresight. 

Ralph Wiles, the popular and efficient postmaster of Jamesport, is a 
native of Jamesport Township, Daviess County, born Sept. 11, 1894. 

Ralph was reared on his grandparents' farm. His grandparents are 
Thomas and Georgianna (Haines) Wiles. Mr. Wiles is now retired, living 
in Jamesport. Ralph Wiles was educated in the public schools and the high 



428 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

school of Jamesport. He then attended the Gem City Business College at 
Quincy, 111. After completing his education, Mr. Wiles worked as a farm 
hand until the outbreak of the World War. He enlisted in December, 1917, 
and was sent to Fort Sill, Okla. He was stationed there until his discharge, 
being a member of Headquarters Company, 9th Field Artillery. On March 
29, 1919, Mr. Wiles was mustered out of service and returned home, where 
he engaged in farming until Sept. 16, 1921, when he was appointed post- 
master at Jamesport. 

Mr. Wiles is a member of the Masonic lodge and India Temple Shrine 
at Oklahoma City, and the Consistory at Guthrie, Okla. He also belongs 
to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Eastern Star and Rebeccas. He 
is a member of the Methodist church. In politics Mr. Wiles is a Repub- 
lican. He is unmarried. He is one of Daviess County's public spirited 
and enterprising young citizens. 

J. L. McCue, a successful and widely known business man of James- 
port, was born Oct. 1, 1855, in Grundy County, a son of Isaac M. and 
Martha J. (Livingston) McCue. 

Isaac M. McCue was born in Greenbrier County, Va., April 6, 1830, and 
came to Missouri in 1844. He was a farmer during his entire life. He 
died July 3, 1905, in Jamesport. In politics Mr. McCue was a staunch 
Democrat and a member of the Methodist church. His wife was a daugh- 
ter of Dr. James and Eliza R. (Tootle) Livingston, natives of Ohio. After 
removing to Grundy County in 1838, Dr. Livingston practiced medicine 
from his farm, which was located on the Daviess, Grundy and Livingston 
County lines. To Isaac M. and Martha J. (Livingston) McCue three child- 
ren were born, as follows: J. L., the subject of this sketch; Milton T., 
deceased ; and P. S., Jackson Township, Daviess County. 

Shortly after J. L. McCue was born his parents moved to Daviess 
County, and settled on a farm, where he grew up. He attended the dis- 
trict schools and the state university. After completing his education, he 
taught school for a number of years. In 1881 he came to Jamesport, where 
he was engaged in the general merchandise business with his brother, 
P. S. McCue, under the firm name of McCue Brothers. After one year 
Mr. McCue bought out his brothers' interest and took James Guerin, an 
uncle, into partnership. In 1887 Mr. McCue sold out his interest to Mr. 
Guerin, after which he taught school for four years. 

Following the failure of the Citizens Bank in Jamesport, Mr. McCue 
purchased the building and improved it with a fine large building, cover- 
ing three lots. The building is modern in every respect and Mr. McCue 
carries a full line of dry goods, ready to wear garments, shoes, etc. From 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 429 

1894 until 1904 Mr. McCue led a retired life and in 1905 he was appointed 
county assessor by Joseph W. Folk. In 1906 he again became engaged 
in the general merchandise business with Hazelip Witten. In a few 
months Mr. McCue became the sole owner. In 1919 he took into partner- 
ship his son, Robert E., and the firm is now known as J. L. McCue & Son. 

Mr. McCue was married the first time to Emma I. McClung in 1883. 
She was the daughter of John F., and Miriam (Bowen) McClung, natives 
of Jamesport Township, Daviess County. Mrs. McCue was born in James- 
port Township. To this union two children were born: Mabel L., the wife 
of S. W. Reed, Trenton, Mo. ; and Robert E., married to Bessie I. McCray, 
a native of Daviess County. Robert E. McCue was born Nov. 24, 1885, in 
Jamesport, and received his education in the public schools of Jamesport, 
the Methodist school at Fayette, and the state university. He studied 
law for two and one-half years. He enlisted in the World War in Decem- 
ber, 1917, and was sent to Fort George Wright. Ten days latfer he went 
to Waco, Texas, where he trained in the aviation service for four months. 
He also was stationed at Fort Omaha four months, and sailed for overseas 
in November, 1918, a few days before the armistice was signed. He re- 
turned home in May, 1919, and became engaged with his father in the dry 
goods business. 

Mr. McCue was married the second time to Joan Chenoweth on April 
7, 1910. She is a daughter of Joseph S. and Sarah Ann (Forshea) Cheno- 
weth, natives of Ohio and Indiana. They are both deceased. Mr. Cheno- 
weth was a carpenter by trade and one of the early settlers of Jamesport. 

Mr. McCue is a Democrat and a member of the Methodist church. He 
is one of the prominent and progressive men of Jamesport, where his name 
has always stood for enterprise, industry and integrity. 

A. H. Warren, a well known and enterprising druggist of Jamesport, 
was born March 15, 1859, in Jackson Township, Daviess County, a son of 
John W. and Jane (Cathcart) Warren. 

John W. Warren was born in Lancaster, Pa., Jan. 24, 1825. He came 
to Missouri from Ohio, and during his life was engaged in farming, plaster- 
ing and as a machinist. During the Civil War he enlisted in the Missouri 
State Militia. He was a Democrat and had held the offices of constable 
and township collector. He died Sept. 24, 1913, in Jamesport. Mrs. War- 
ren was born in North Carolina, Aug. 10 1815, and died in 1909. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Warren four children were born, of whom two are now living: 
Martha, the widow of Andrew Harrah, Jamesport; and A. H., the subject 
of this sketch. John A., deceased, was a commission merchant in St. 
Louis. 



430 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

A. H. Warren was reared in Jamesport, and received his education in 
the public schools there. In 1876 he was engaged as a drug clerk and was 
a registered pharmacist under the old law. He engaged in the drug busi- 
ness in 1884 in partnership with L. A. Phillips. At that time Mr. Warren 
was also postmaster, which office he filled for four years under President 
Cleveland's administration. During that period, Mr. Warren sold out his 
interest in the drug business. Later, in 1888, he again went into the drug 
business in Jamesport, where he has been since engaged, with the excep- 
tion of two and one-half years, which he spent in St. Louis. He carries 
a full line of drugs, paints, wall paper, druggists sundries, toilet articles, 
glass, etc., and has a very successful business. 

On Oct. 31, 1884, Mr. Warren was married to Sarah R. Hawley, a 
native of Janesville, Wis. They have no children. 

Mr. Warren is a Democrat and a member of the Knights of Pythias. 
He is well and favorably known in Jamesport, and takes a commendable 
interest in the affairs of his town. 

W. L. Arnold, a prominent business man of Jamesport, was born May 
16, 1868, in Carroll County, 111., the son of John and Hanna (Strickler) 
Arnold. 

John Arnold was born in Chambersburg, Pa., and was a farmer during 
his entire life. He came to Daviess County, in 1882, locating on a farm one 
and a quarter miles east of Jamesport. Since 1902, Mr. Arnold has resided 
in Horton County, Texas, and is now 92 years old. His wife was also a 
native of Pennsylvania. She died in 1914 at the age of 82 years. To John 
and Hanna (Strickler) Arnold 12 children were born, one of whom is now 
deceased. 

W. L. Arnold was reared on a farm and educated in the public schools 
and the Jamesport High School, from which he was graduated in 1888. 
For a short time Mr. Arnold taught school and in 1891, he engaged in the 
mercantile business at Kansas City, Mo. Six years later he started in the 
grocery business at Jamesport, in partnership with his brothers, S. E. and 
C. L. Arnold. In October, 1920, W. L. Arnold with his two sons became 
the owners of the business. It is one of the high grade grocery stores in 
the county, and Mr. Arnold has been very successful in his business. He 
was one of the organizers of the Jamesport Bank, now holding the office of 
vice president of same. 

On Feb. 16, 1898, Mr. Arnold was married to Minnie L. Hutchison, a 
native of Jamesport, and daughter of Charles and Anna (Lindsey) Hutch- 
ison, both deceased. Charles M. Hutchison was born in Carey County, Ky., 
Oct. 15, 1837, and was the son of Judge Thomas Hutchison, a native of 
Virginia. His mother's maiden name was Polly Ann Tate, a native of 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 431 

Lincoln County, Ky. Charles M. Hutchison was three years of age when 
his parents moved to Missouri and settled in Livingston County, where he 
was reared and educated. He began life as a school teacher at the age 
of 23 years and followed that profession for 13 years. He came to James- 
port in 1870, and began merchandising which business he followed for 23 
years. In 1873 he was elected assessor and collector of Jamesport, for 
three years. He also served in the capacity of postmaster of Jamesport. 
He was married in Daviess County, Dec. 31, 1869, to Annie Lindsey, a 
daughter of James and Rebecca Lindsey, natives of Virginia. Mrs. Hutch- 
ison was born in Mechanicsville, Iowa, Oct. 18, 1846. To this union five 
children were born, four of whom are now living, as follows: W. T.,; Mrs. 
Minnie L. Arnold, Jamesport; Mrs. Etta Hart; Mabel Hutchison, Chicago, 
111. Mr. Hutchison died Dec. 21, 1893, following a stroke of paralysis. 
After the death of Mr. Hutchison, his wife was appointed postmistress, 
and assisted by her two daughters she carried on this work for eight years. 
Mrs. Hutchison died in Gallatin, June 3, 1907, where she and her daughter, 
Mabel, had moved with her son, W. T., when he was appointed sheriff of 
Daviess County. 

To W. L. and Minnie L. (Hutchison) Arnold three children have been 
born, as follows: L. H., in business with his father; J. T., also in business 
with his father; and Frances, at home. 

Mr. Arnold is an independent Republican. He is a member of the 
Church of Christ, and of the Modern Woodmen of America. Mr. Arnold 
is an enterprising citizen of Daviess County, and stands high in his com- 
munity. 

James Guerin, a progressive business man and merchant of Jamesport, 
was born in St. Louis, Oct. 23, 1894, the son of Simon and Mary (Kane) 
Guerin. 

Both Simon and Mary (Kane) Guerin were natives of Ireland. Mr. 
Guerin was a weaver by trade. After his death in Ireland, Mrs. Guerin 
came to this country and settled in St. Louis, where she died. They were 
the parents of seven children, all of whom are deceased except James, the 
subject of this sketch. 

James Guerin was reared in St. Louis, and at the very young age of 
12 years he was engaged as a painter. He later clerked in his brother 
Michael's store at Roanoke, Mo., after which he went into partnership with 
him in the general merchandise business at Forrest Green. In 1882, Mr. 
Guerin removed to Jamesport, and became engaged in the merchandise 
business, where he has since remained. 

On July 7, 1869, Mr. Gurin was married to Sarah J. (Livingston), a 
native of Grundy County. They have no children. Mrs. Guerin is the 



432 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

daughter of Dr. James, and Elizabeth R. (Tootle) Livingston, Dr. James 
Livingston was born in Ohio. He practiced medicine in Grundy, Livingston 
and Daviess Counties in 1847-49-50. He was the first representative of 
Grundy County after its organization. 

Mr. Guerin was one of the organizers of the Commercial Bank of 
Jamesport, and is now a director. He is a Democrat, and has served in the 
offices of mayor, township trustee, and also school director for 20 years. 
He is a member of the Knights of Pythias. Mr. Guerin is a progressive 
man who can always be relied upon to aid in anything for the public wel- 
fare or the community improvement. 

Walter Cox, the proprietor of the Albany Garage at Albany and the 
authorized salesman of Ford automobiles and repairs, was born at Grant 
City, Oct. 16, 1884, the son of Enoch and Rebecca Cox. 

Enoch Cox and his wife are both natives of Worth County. They are 
now living at Grant City, but Mr. Cox continues to operate his farm in 
Worth County. 

Walter Cox graduated from the Grant City High School and later 
accepted a position as bookkeeper in the First National Bank at Grant 
City. He remained in this place for three years, but resigned in 1911 to 
to open a garage there. He managed his new business with acumen and 
industry and at the end of three years sold the garage and came to Albany 
where he bought the garage belonging to Carmack & Son. Mr. Cox has 
enlarged the garage by the addition of a shop 30x70 feet and has installed 
a steam heating plant for the entire building. The Albany Garage now 
occupies two buildings, one 50x110 feet facing Clay Street, and the other 
30x120 feet fronting on Hundley Street. Both these buildings as well as 
the one on the corner of Clay and Hundley Streets are owned by Mr. 
Cox. Mr. Cox keeps a force of six men at work in his shops and here he 
does all kinds of automobile repair work and some electrical work. He 
features the Ford automobiles and Fordson tractors and has established 
and extensive and rapidly growing business. 

Walter Cox was married Feb. 10, 1916 to Ellyn Ebersole, a graduate 
of the Grant City High School. Her parents were Abraham and Isabell 
Ebersole, early settlers of Gentry County, and both now dead. Mr. and 
Mrs. Cox have one son, George, born Nov. 21, 1916. 

Walter Cox is one of the capable and farsighted young business men 
of the county. His sale record of more than 500 cars in three years is an 
indication of his enterprise and his progressive methods. 

T. E. Hamilton, an enterprising and practical farmer and breeder of 
Jackson Township, Daviess County, was born Jan. 25, 1870, in Union Town- 
ship, Daviess County, a son of H. D. and Elizabeth R. (Hill) Hamilton. 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 433 

H. D. Hamilton was born in Bedford County, Tenn., Nov. 12, 1824. 
During his entire life he was a farmer. In 1834 he came to Union Town- 
ship, Daviess County, and in 1849 he crossed the plains. While West he 
met with considerable success and returned to Missouri in 1852. At one 
time Mr. Hamilton owned 520 acres of land in Daviess County. H. D. 
Hamilton was the son of William and Holly (Tucker) Hamilton, who came 
to Grundy County, in the early days, and where H. D. Hamilton lived until 
the age of 21 years. The wife of H. D. Hamilton was born in Greenbrier 
County, Va., in September, 1832. She died June 9, 1896, and both she and 
Mr. Hamilton are buried in Hill Cemetery, west of Jamesport. Mr. Hamil- 
ton died March 21, 1916. He was a Democrat and a member of the Metho- 
dist church. To H. D, and Elizabeth R. (Hill) Hamilton ten children were 
born, of whom four are now living, as follows: Anna, the wife of J. T. 
Doty, Miller County, Mo.; T. E., the subject of this sketch; Alta M., the 
wife of E. G. Knight, Jackson Township, ; Henry, the oldest, a teacher of 
the Carlow consolidated schools. 

T. E. Hamilton was reared on his father's farm and received his edu- 
cation in the district schools. He began fanning for himself when 23 years 
old, renting land for one year. In 1894 he purchased 40 acres of land and 
since that time has added to his holdings, now owning 203 acres. In 1921 
he erected his fine modern home, which contains electric lights, hot air 
heat, running water and bath. The house is built of cement and stucco. 
Mr. Hamilton began breeding, Aberdeen Angus Cattle in J916. He also 
breeds high grade Jersey cattle. Besides breeding cattle Mr. Hamilton 
is a grain farmer and raises a great deal of clover. He has been very suc- 
cessful and is one of the prosperous farmers of Daviess County. 

On Jan. 25, 1893, Mr. Hamilton was married to Ollie Macy, a native 
of Jackson Township, and a daughter of W. C. and Mary (Nichols) Macy. 
To this union six children have been born, as follows: Eva, a graduate 
of Gallatin High School, now living at home; Armond, at home; Nuburn, 
at home ; Doris, deceased ; Marshall, at home ; and Aleene, at home. 

Mr. Hamilton is a Democrat and a member of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church, being an 
elder. Mr. Hamilton stands well in his community, both for his enterpris- 
ing disposition and for his high standards of civic welfare. 

L. C. Marlow, a successful merchant of Jamesport, was born Jan. 19, 
1857, in Livingston County, the son of W. H. and Amanda (Hutchinson) 
Marlow. 

W. H. Marlow was born in Kentucky in 1834. He came to Missouri 
many years ago, and settled on a farm in Jackson Township, Livingston 
County. In making the trip from Kentucky, Mr. Marlow drove a team of 



434 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

oxen. During the Civil War he served under General Price in the Con- 
federate Army. Mr. Marlow became a successful farmer of Livingston 
County and at one time was the owner of 1000 acres of land. After many 
years of farming he retired and resided in Chillicothe, until his death in 
June, 1911. Mr. Marlow was one of the organizers of the Citizens Bank of 
Jamesport, which is now extinct. He also organized many other banks, 
Mrs. Marlow was born in Kentucky in 1840. She died Jan. 27, 1921. To W. 
H. and Amanda (Hutchison) Marlow three children were born, as follows:^ 
L. C, the subject of this sketch; Belle, the wife of Barton Hosman, Colo- 
rado Springs, Colo. ; Benjamin, residing on the old home farm in Livingston 
County. 

L. C. Marlow was reared on a farm and received his education in the 
district schools. When a young man he became engaged in farming, later 
becoming heir to some land. He now owns 300 acres of well improved land 
in Jackson Township, Livingston County, upon which he has made exten- 
sive improvements. It is one of the finest farms in Livingston County. 

In 1914 Mr. Marlow left the farm and became engaged in the hardware 
and implement business at Jamesport, in partnership with J. W. Harris, 
who died soon after. Mr. Marlow purchased his interest and then went 
into partnership with A. L. Jenkins, and the firm name is now known as 
Marlow and Jenkins. Mr. Marlow is a stockholder in the Commercial Bank 
of Jamesport and in the First National Bank of Chillicothe, also the Peoples 
Exchange Bank of Jamesport. 

In 1882 L. C. Marlow was married for the first time to Jennie Ramsey, 
a native of Jackson Township, Livingston County, and a daughter of James 
and Linnie (Wingo) Ramsey, natives of Virginia and early settlers of Liv- 
ingston County. To L. C. and Linnie (Wingo) Ramsey four children were 
born, as follows: Howard, a first-class carpenter and contractor of James- 
port ; Fay, deceased, was the wife of Robert Murphy ; Edith, the wife of 
Virgil Dixon now at Trenton ; Darrell, carpenter, Jamesport. Mrs. Marlow 
died Jan 4, 1915. On July 2, 1916, Mr. Marlow was married to Ida (May) 
McClung, widow of H. F. McClung, and sister of Mrs. John L. Leopard, of 
Gallatin. Mrs. Marlow is the daughter of Gabe and Martha (Giddens) 
May, natives of Kentucky and early settlers of Daviess County. Mr. May 
is now deceased and his widow lives in Gallatin. By her first marriage, 
Mrs. Marlow had one son, Robert Earl McClung, now residing in Kansas 
City. Mrs. Marlow is a well educated woman, having taught school in 
Daviess County, for about 11 years. 

Mr. Marlow tells of his father being engaged as a freighter across the 
plains in 1860 from Fort Leavenworth, Kan., to a Colorado fort for the 
government. 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 435 

Mr. Marlow is a Democrat, and has served on the township board at 
different times and one term on the Jamesporr"city board. He is a Royal 
Arch Mason. Mr. Marlow has the esteem of the residents of Jamesport, as 
well as those of the surrounding territory and stands high in the com- 
munity. 

James M. Drummond, a well known retired hotel man of Jamesport, 
was born June 3, 1853, in Union Township, Daviess County, the son of J. 
P. and Sydney (Nickell) Drummond. 

J. P. Drummond was born in Monroe County, W. Va., Sept. 25, 1813. 
He was the son of George and Easter (Boyd) Drummond, natives of Vir- 
ginia. On June 14, 1836, J. P. Drummond was married to Sydney Nickell, 
a native of Monroe County, Va. In 1839 Mr. Drummond left Virginia and 
settled in Daviess County, where he purchased 160 acres of land in Jackson 
Township, and carried on general farming for a number of years. To J. 
P. and Sydney (Nickell) Drummond the following children were born: 
Margaret N. Mann; Elizabeth E. Baldwin; Amanda J. Musselman; Mary 
Barnett ; George W. and Andrew J., twins ; William N. ; John K. ; Caroline 
Jenkins; James M., the subject of this sketch; Charles R. Mrs. Drum- 
mond died in 1858. On July 14, 1859, Mr. Drummond was married for the 
second time to Maria F. Mann. J. P. Drummond died Aug. 2, 1898. 

James M. Drummond was reared on his father's farm in Jackson 
Township, Daviess County, and attended the district schools. He then 
carried on farming until 1885, when he moved to Jamesport, where he 
conducted a livery and feed barn, and 1886 returned to the farm. In 1887 
he again removed to Jamesport, and was in the Hvery business until 1896, 
when he engaged in the hotel business. In 1910 Mr. Drummond moved to 
Fayette, Mo., to educate his daughter. He remained there two years, then 
returning to Jamesport. He was in the hotel business for a few years, his 
father erected a two story hotel at Jamesport, in 1894. In connection with 
the hotel, Mr. Drummond also conducted a livery and feed barn, which he 
sold in 1903. He is a stockholder in the Farmers Elevator. 

On Oct. 21, 1886, Mr. Drummond was married to Inez Thurlow, a 
daughter of David M. and Minta (Mullens) Thurlow. Mrs. Drummond 
was born near Chillicothe. Mr. and Mrs. Thurlow are natives of Sullivan 
County. To James M. and Inez (Thurlow) Drummond one child has been 
born, Beulah, now the wife of D. J. Rossa, Browning, 111. They have 
three children: Irma; James E., and Howard W. Roosa. 

Mr. Drummond now owns part of the old home farm of 120 acres in 
Jamesport Township. He is a Democrat, and in 1886 served in the office 
of mayor of Jamesport, and also served as trustee. He is a member of 
the Methodist church, and of the Knights of Pythias lodge. Mr. Drum- 



436 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

mond has met with success in his business because of his energy, industry, 
and business foresight. 

J. William DeVorss, a prominent and successful merchant of James- 
port, was born March 14, 1872, in Jamesport Township, Daviess County, 
the son of F. M., also known as Marion, and Mary (Lucas) DeVorss. 

F. M. DeVorss was born in Jamesport Township, Dec. 15, 1851. He 
was a farmer in his early life, and later came to Jamesport, in 1882, and 
built the present hotel building, which he conducted for 25 years. He 
died in Jamesport, Sept. 6, 1918. His parents were John and Martha 
(Wiggleworth) DeVorss, natives of Virginia. John DeVorss was born in 
1820, and died in 1900, in Jamesport. When a very small child he came 
to Missouri with his parents and settled in St. Joseph. They drove oxen 
here from Virginia, and were among the pioneer settlers of Daviess County, 
having settled in Jamesport Township, in the early forties. Mary (Lucas) 
DeVorss was born in Grundy County, Oct. 9, 1852, and died Feb. 12, 1914. 
Both Mr. and Mrs. DeVorss are buried in the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows Cemetery at Jamesport. Mrs. DeVorss was the daughter of 
James and Margaret (Estes) Lucas, natives of Kentucky and early settlers 
of Grundy County where they both died. To F. M. and Mary (Lucas) 
DeVorss five children were born, as follows: J. Wm., the subject of this 
sketch; John M., Nampa, Idaho; Charles 0., Wichita, Kans. ; George W., 
engaged in the grocery business at Jamesport; Henry, Denver, Colorado. 
Charles and George DeVorss are twins. 

J. William DeVorss was reared in Jamesport, and was educated in the 
public schools there, from which he was graduated in 1890. In 1893 he 
traveled on the road and later became engaged in the grocery business at 
Trenton. Three years later, Mr. DeVorss sold out his share and became en- 
gaged in farming in Macon County, on his father-in-law's farm. Then in 
1900 he returned to Jamesport, and opened a racket store. He now owns 
a variety store in Jamesport, and has a very profitable business. Mr. 
DeVorss is a stockholder and director in the Bank of Jamesport, and owns 
a fine residence and several business buildings in Jamesport. 

On Dec. 20, 1893, Mr. DeVorss was married to Sarah E. Taylor, a 
daughter of James H., and Elizabeth (Simms) Taylor, natives of Tennessee 
and Kentucky, and later of Macon County. Mrs. DeVorss was born June 
25, 1873, in Macon County. She was a teacher of music before her mar- 
riage. To this union three children have been born, as follows: Earl, 
Trenton ; Claude, deceased ; and Ruth, at home. 

Mr. DeVorss is a Democrat, and has served in the oflfices of city mar- 
shal, school director, city collector, and on the park board. He is member 
of the Methodist church and belongs to the Knights of Phythias, Modern 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 437 

Woodmen of America and the Yoeman lodge. Mr. DeVorss is prominent 
in business affairs of Jamesport, and because of his interest in pubHc affairs 
he is ranked among the substantial citizens of the county. 

James W. Long, a well known retired farmer of Gallatin, was born 
Feb. 5, 1859, in Shelby County, the son of Joseph and Sallie (Whaley) 
Long. 

Joseph Long was born in Washington County, Md., Oct. 9, 1816. In 
about 1848 he came to visit an uncle in Marion County. He returned to 
Maryland, and six years later came back to Missouri, and married. He 
then lived in Maryland until 1855, when he returned to Missouri and settled 
on a farm in Shelby County. In March, 1864, Mr. Long removed to a farm 
five miles east of Paris, Mo., where he died the same year, on September 
25. Sallie (Whaley) Long was born in Marion County, June 11, 1824. 
After Mr. Long's death she married the second time to S. W. Pugh, on 
Jan. 9, 1872. They removed to Grand River Township, Daviess County, 
where James W. Long was reared. SaUie (Whaley) Long Pugh died on 
June 8, 1904. Both of James W. Long's parents are buried in the Marion 
County Home Cemetery. 

James W. Long continued to farm the original family farm for 40 
years after the death of his step-father in 1876, and he with his mother 
purchased the land. Later, in 1880, Mr. Long bought out his mother's 
share, made extensive improvements, set out a ten acre orchard, and 
became one of the largest fruit growers in the county. He made many 
exhibits at the street fairs in Gallatin, and Trenton, of his apples and 
always won premiums on his entries. In 1915, Mr. Long sold his farm 
and moved to Gallatin, where he now resides. He now has a small orchard 
and owns ten acres within the city limits. 

Mr. Long was married for the first time, Feb. 10, 1880, to Martha A. 
Mills, born Feb. 24, 1848, in Grand River Township. She died March 7, 
1899. To this union three children were born, all of whom are now 
deceased. Mr. Long was married the second time on Nov. 5, 1901 to 
Rhoda Smith, a native of Grand River Township, and daughter of Ephriam 
and Mary (Smith) Smith. No children were born to this union. James 
W. Long was one of seven children, all of whom are now deceased with the 
exception of a sister, Elizabeth, the wife of S. P. Mills, Jameson. In the 
spring of 1887, Mr. Long took to raise a son S. W. Harris, who died April, 
1907, at Colorado Springs, Colo. Mr. Long gave him an education. He 
is buried on Mr. Long's lot in Grand River Cemetery. 

Mr. Long breeds pure bred chickens, Single Comb Buff Orphingtons 
and Plymouth Rocks. He also breeds Jersey Cows. Mr. Long became a 
member of the Baptist church in Grand River Township, April 1876, and 



438 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

later the Jameson church, where he now belongs. He is a Democrat, Both 
Mr. and Mrs. Long are well known and highly respected citizens of Daviess 
County. 

V. H. Scrivner, a well known retired farmer of Daviess County, was 
born in Estell County, Ky., July 4, 1841, the son of John and Hulda (Tudor) 
Scrivner. 

John Scrivner was born in Estell County, Ky., and was a farmer 
during his life. He settled in Clay County, Mo., for a time, but returned 
to Kentucky after the death of his first wife. To John and Hulda (Tudor) 
Scrivner three children were born, two of whom are now living; V. H., the 
subject of this sketch; and Hulda, the wife of Clifton Oldham, Long 
Beach, Calif. After his wife's death, Mr. Scrivner married Leu Ann 
Williams, and five children were born to this union, of whom one is now liv- 
ing, Susan, the wife of Leslie Oliver, Richmond, Ky. Mr. Scrivner died 
in Kentucky. 

V. H. Scrivner was reared in Kentucky, and in 1875 came to Daviess 
County, locating on a farm near Winston. There he carried on farming 
for 17 years, later moving to Smith County, Kans., where he remained for 
19 years. He then moved to southern Nebraska, and in 1918, came to 
Gallatin, where he now lives retired. During the Civil War, Mr. Scrivner 
enlisted in Company C, 8th Regiment Kentucky Volunteer Infantry, and 
served for three years and four months. He was the 7th man to climb 
Lookout Mountain during the battle that was fought "above the clouds". 
The 8th Regiment remained there for eight days. 

Mr. Scrivner was married the first time in 1867 to Dorothy Webb, a 
native of Kentucky. Ten children were born to this union, as follows: 
Laura, the wife of Charles Barrett, Red Cloud, Neb.; Mattie, the wife of 
Jesse Sappe, deceased ; Albert, Eckley, Colo. ; Edith, the wife of Sam Mount- 
ford, Red Cloud, Neb. ; Frances, deceased ; Oscar, Haigler, Neb. ; William 
J., Tulsa, Okla. ; Valley, deceased; C. M., Red Cloud, Neb.; Susan, the 
widow of Walter Mays, Red Cloud, Neb. Mrs. Scrivner died in Nebraska 
Oct. 8, 1917. 

Mr. Scrivner was married the second time to Phoebe A. (Witt) widow 
of Henry White. To Henry White and Phoebe A. (Witt) the following 
children were born: W. H. White, Excelsior Springs; Jeramiah Ann, the 
wife of Frank Ray, Oilman City; George N. White, Liberty Township; 
Daviess County; Ota B., deceased; Hallack H. White, Excelsior Springs. 
After Mr, White's death Mrs. White later married Judge Frank Ewing, 
and to this union one child was born, Maud H., the wife of T. J. Collins, of 
Grundy County, now deceased. After the death of her first husband Mrs. 
White removed to Gallatin, where she remained a widow four years, when 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 439 

she married Judge Ewing. She had been a widow for 22 years when she 
married Mr. Scrivner on July 15, 1918. • 

Mr. Scrivner is a Republican and has served as constable and collector 
for 11 years, and was deputy sheriff under James H. Witt. In 1890 he was 
one of the census enumerators. He also served as justice of the peace for 
four years in Kansas, and was nominated in 1888 for sheriff but was de- 
feated. Mr. Scrivner was nominated in Nebraska for judge and in 1922 
was nominated for police judge of Gallatin. He was educated in the 
Estell County, Ky., district schools. 

Mr. Scrivner is a member of the Christian church, the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, and the Grand Army of the Republic. He is the 
owner of five and a half acres of well improved land on the edge of Red 
Cloud, Nebr., and also owns a fine residence in Gallatin. Mr. Scrivner has 
always been a progressive citizen with high standards of civic pride and 
stands high in his community. He has owned a good deal of property, 
both farms and city and has been very successful in his undertakings. 

M. N. Knight, a leading farmer and stockman of Jackson Township, 
Daviess County, and owner of 180 acres of well improved land, was born 
Aug. 9, 1874, in Union Township, Daviess County, the son of James and 
Sarah (Peniston) Knight. 

James Knight was a native of Virginia, born Jan. 8, 1843. During 
the Civil War he was a soldier. He came to Daviess County, after the 
war and settled in Union Township, where he farmed the remainder of his 
life, owning at his death, June 21, 1889, 120 acres of well improved land. 
Sarah (Peniston) Knight was a native of Livingston County. She died in 
1883. To Mr. and Mrs. Knight seven children were born, as follows : Oma, 
the wife of George Jones, Jamesport; Verona, deceased, was the wife of 
George Ginder; V. E., Union Township; M. N., the subject of this sketch; 
Jesse, Bates County ; Elizabeth, the wife of Eugene Roeark, Sedalia ; Mary, 
deceased was the wife of Robert Williams. 

M. N. Knight was reared on his father's farm and received his educa- 
tion in the district schools. He began farming for himself, renting land 
when very young. In 1915, Mr. Knight purchased his present farm in 
Jackson Township, where he has made extensive improvements. He has 
been very successful in general farming and stock raising. 

On Oct. 4, 1896, Mr. Knight was marrid to Maggie B. Macy, a daughter 
of W. C. and Mary (Nichols) Macy, natives of Union Township. Mr. Macy 
died July 20, 1921, and Mrs. Macy is now residing in Gallatin. Mrs. Knight 
was born Jan. 7, 1879, in Jackson Township, Daviess County. To M. N. 
and Maggie (Macy) Knight one child was born, Macy, born Feb. 9, 1898, 
now employed at Cameron. 



440 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Mr. Knight is a Democrat, and served in the office of county judge in 
1919 and 1920, in the southern district. He is a member of the Methodist 
church and of the Modern Woodman of America. Mr. Knight is one of the 
rehable and progressive citizens of the county, energetic and far sighted 
in his methods of business and dependable in his deahngs. 

T. R. Shockley, a qualified embalmer and a member of the firm of the 
Shockley & Stapleton Furniture and Undertaking Establishment, was born 
in Bogle Township, Gentry County, July 22, 1868, the- son of L. L. and 
Calrissa (Schooler) Shockley. 

L. L. Shockley was born in Gasconade County, Mo., Dec. 21, 1826, and 
came to Gentry County, Aug. 31, 1846. He entered 160 acres of land in 
Bogle Township and improved it. He married first, a Miss Burgess and 
to this union seven children were born, three of whom died in infancy, and 
the remaining four are as follows : Minerva, later Mrs. Jackson, died at 
Hopkins, in Nodaway County, in 1903 ; Martha, married Mr. Korn, and 
died in Bogle Township in 1915; Victoria, now Mrs. Ray of Colorado; and 
Nevada, now Mrs. Korn of Grant City. 

• Mr. Shockley was married the second time in Worth County in 1867 to 
Clarissa Scholer and to this union one child, T. R., the subject of this 
review, was born. Mrs. Shockley died on the home place in April, 1876, 
and her remains are buried in the cemetery at the Old Brick Church. 
Lunsford L. L. Shockley was married the third time to Mrs. Elizabeth 
Green in 1880. She died in 1896. Mr. Shockley died Dec. 5, 1899 and his 
remains are buried in the New Friendship Cemetery. 

T. R. Shockley attended the public schools. His first teacher was 
Robert M. Ross who taught the Shockley school which was located on 
the Shockley farm. Mr. Shockley farmed the home place, later becoming 
owner of 84 acres of it. In 1901 he bought 80 acres more, and in 1907 he 
sold the first part of his holdings, later selling the remainder. He moved 
to Albany in 1906 and in 1908, he formed a partnership with Edward E. 
Stapleton and bought the Holden Furniture and Undertaking Establish- 
ment. In 1911 Mr. Shockley became sole owner of the establishment and 
since then he has conducted same as an up to date furniture and under- 
taking business. A year later Mr. Shockley became an embalmer. 

T. R. Shockley was married Feb. 22, 1900 to Mattie E. Quigley, a 
daughter of James and Eliza (Malsom) Quigley of Athens Township. Mrs. 
Shockley was born in Gentry County and attended the Eureka school 
which was located on her father's farm. She later was a student at the 
Stanberry Normal School and qualified herself to teach. The death of her 
stepmother however necessitated her remaining at home. 

T. R. Shockley is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 




I.. L. SHOCKI.EY 



THE NliW YORK 
PUBLIC lib:: ART 



ASTUK, Lb.MIX A.ND 

TILDEN FOUNDATIONS 

B L 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 441 

and the Woodmen of the World. He is an able and industrious business 
man, one who is qualified to make the success which has marked his en- 
terprises. Mr. Shockley tells some interesting things relating to the his- 
tory of his father, Lunsford L. L. Shockley, who was an astute business 
man and had many adventures. He enlisted for service in the Mexican 
War and was sent to St. Louis where he remained stationed for several 
weeks, but was never sent to the scene of the struggle. Years later he 
enlisted for service in the Civil War on the Confederate side and served 
three months under General Sterling Price. Mr. Shockley was unable to 
read or w,rite but he was very apt in figuring out the amount due him on 
stock, making all of his calculations "in his head" but with absolute 
accuracy. 

J. W. Tolbert, a progressive and enterprising farmer and stockman of 
Union Township, Daviess County, was born Sept. 18, 1858, in Monroe 
County, W. Va., the son of Charles Alex and Mary (Meadows) Tolbert. 

Charles Alex Tolbert was born in Virginia, where he farmed until his 
death. His wife was a native of West Virginia and died there. They were 
the parents of nine children, one of whom is deceased. J. W. Tolbert, the 
subject of this sketch, was reared on his father's farm in Virginia, and 
educated in the pubhc schools. He was the only member of the Tolbert 
family to come to Missouri. In 1873 he came to Vernon County, and the 
following year to Daviess County, where he rented land for a few years, 
later buying a farm of 70 acres south of his present farni. Mr. Tolbert 
purchased his present farm in 1902, where he has made extensive improve- 
ments. 

J. W. Tolbert was married Aug. 5, 1880, to Ada Poage, who was born on 
the farm where she now resides, Sept. 24, 1863, the daughter of Samuel 
D. B. and Sallie (Allen) Poage, natives of Greenbrier County, W. Va. Mr. 
and Mrs. Poage were the parents of nine children, two of whom are 
deceased. They came to Missouri in 1855, locating on the farm now owned 
by J. W. Tolbert. Mr. Pogue was one of the prosperous farmers of the 
county. Both he and his wife are deceased. 

To J. W. and Ada (Poage) Tolbert seven children have been born, as 
follows : Bessie, the wife of Forrest Poage, Grand River Township ; Gar- 
nett. Grand River Township; Bert, Union Township; Sidney, Concordia, 
Kans.; Samuel, Trenton; Roy, Gallatin; Winifred, a stenographer, grad- 
uated from Gem City Business College, Quincy, 111., on Dec. 23, 1921. 

Mr. Tolbert is a Democrat. Twenty-five years ago he served as road 
commissioner for a term of two years. He is a member of the Methodist 
church and of the Modern Woodmen of America. Mr. Tolbert owns 133 



442 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

acres of well improved land in Union Township, and is a substantial citizen 
of his community. 

E. A. Croy, a substantial farmer and stockman of Union Township, 
Daviess County, and owner of 123 acres of land, was born Dec. 13, 1863, 
in Madison County, Iowa, the son of Sampson and Susan (Railsback) Croy. 

Sampson Croy was born in Montgomery County, and carried on general 
farming during his life. He removed to Iowa and later, in 1865, came to 
Daviess County, locating on a farm in Grand River Township. Two years 
later Mr. Croy moved to the farm now occupied by his son, E. A. Croy. 
Mr. Croy died there in 1898. Mrs. Croy was a native of Kentucky. She 
died in Western Kansas. To Sampson and Susan (Railsback) Croy three 
children were born, as follows: Malen, residing in western Kansas; E. A., 
the subject of this sketch; and Mary, deceased, was the wife of D. H. 
Sherrard. 

E. A. Croy was reared in Union Township, Daviess County, and attend- 
ed the district schools.He began farming on rented land, at the age of 22 
years. In 1888 Mr. Croy purchased a farm in Grand River Township, 
which he improved. He removed to the old farm place in Union Township 
in 1893. He has made extensive improvements and now carries high grade 
stock. Mr. Croy purchased the farm two years after taking possession of 
it. 

On March 11, 1888, Mr. Croy was married to Ida Hays, a native of 
Jamesport, born Dec. 27, 1869, the daughter of John and Caroline (Everly) 
Hays. Mr. and Mrs. Hays were natives of Iowa and Missouri. To E. A. 
and Ida (Hays) Croy eight children were born, as follows: Lillie M., the 
wife of Virgil Jenkins, Grand River Township; Fleet E., Grand River 
Township; Synthia,, the wife of E. D. Brown, Grand River Township; 
Naomi Fay, teacher in the home district ; Mary A., teacher in the district 
schools; Dorothy, deceased; Glenn H., attending high school; Olive, at 
home. 

Mr. Croy is a Democrat and a member of the Baptist church. He is 
a stockholder of the Farmers Co-operative Store, at Gallatin. Mr. Croy 
is a reliable citizen, industrious and enterprising. He merits the esteem 
with which he is held in the community. 

James Franklin Johnson, deceased, was a well known farmer and land 
owner of Union Township, Daviess County, was born Dec. 5, 1837, in Rap- 
pahannock County, Va., the son of David and Fannie (Huff) Johnson, 
natives of Virginia. Mr. and Mrs. David Johnson were natives of Green 
County, Ohio, who came to Daviess County, before the Civil War. 

James Franklin Johnson, enlisted during the Civil War in the 2nd 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 443 

Ohio Artillery, and served the last two years of the war. He then came 
to Daviess County, where his parents had settled in Union Township, and 
there he remained the rest of his life. 

Mr. Johnson was married in 1866 in Ohio, to Mary J. Johnson, a 
native of Rappahannock County, Va., born Aug. 5, 1835. She died on 
Oct. 28, 1915. To this union seven children were born as follows: Turner, 
deceased; Quint, Sioux City, Iowa; Melvin, bachelor, living on the home 
place; Frances, at home; Eugene, bachelor, living on the home place. 
The other children died in infancy. 

James Franklin Johnson was one of the organizers of the First Nat- 
ional Bank of Gallatin. At the time of his death, March 31, 1906, he 
owned 500 acres of land in Union Township. His hobby was the purchas- 
ing of land. After his death his property was divided among his children. 
In politics he was a Democrat. 

Melvin Johnson was born in Union Township, Daviess County, Oct. 
12, 1871. He was educated a quarter of a mile from the home farm. Mr. 
Johnson now owns 450 acres of land in Union Township. He served on 
the township board for eight years and is well and favorably known in 
Daviess County. 

Eugene Johnson was born in Union Township, Aug. 6, 1876. He was 
educated in the district schools and has been engaged in farming during 
his entire life. He owns 633 acres of land in Union and Grand River 
Township, being the place where "Adam's Grave" is located. Every year 
the Mormons visit this grave. 

Frances Johnson is unmarried and keeps house for her two brothers. 
She was born Nov. 2, 1873, in Union Township. She owns the home place 
and 130 acres of land. 

James Franklin Johnson was a Democrat. He was a man of integrity 
and industry. He was one of the reliable and substantial men of his 
community. 

H. C. McMahan, a successful farmer and stockman of Jackson Town- 
ship, Daviess County, and owner of 225 acres of well improved land, was 
born Jan 3, 1867, in Jamesport Township, the son of J. F. and Sarah 
(Mann) MaMahan. 

J. F. McMahan was born in Union Township, Daviess County, July 1, 
1835. He carried on general farmer during his life and lived on several 
different farms in Daviess County. He lived in Jamesport for 28 years, 
where he was engaged in the grocery business. J. F. McMahan was the 
son of James McMahan an early settler of Missouri. Mrs. J. F. McMahan 
was born in Virginia, March 2, 1835, and she now lives in Jamesport. Mr. 



444 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES . 

McMahan died June 17, 1919, and is buried in the Jamesport Cemetery. 
To J. F. and Sarah (Mann) McMahan three children were born, as follows: 
Lydia, deceased, was the wife of J. H. Edwards ; Mollie, the wife of L. R. 
Smith, Jamesport; and H. C, the youngest, subject of this sketch. 

H. C. McMahan was reared on the farm and educated in the district 
schools. At the age of 21 years he rented land, later in 1890 purchasing 
160 acres, upon which he now carries on general framing and stock raising. 
Mr. McMahan is a prominent breeder of Duroc Jersey hogs. 

On April 21, 1891, Mr. McMahan was married to Olivia Wetzel, a 
native of Clinton County, Pa., and a daughter of Reuben and Matilda (Poor- 
man) Wetzel. Mr. and Mrs. Wetzel were natives of Pennsylvania who 
came to Daviess County in 1870, locating on a farm in Jackson Township. 
They are both now deceased. 

To H. C. and Olivia (Wetzel) McMahan five children have been born, 
as follows: Fern, farming the home place; Hubert, Colorado; Mildred, a 
teacher ; Julian, Nebraska ; Gertrude, the wife of E. F. Bedford, Hale, Mo. ; 
and Howard, living at home. 

Mr. McMahan is a Democrat and a member of the Methodist church. 
He is a stockholder of the Peoples Bank of Jamesport, of which he was an 
organizer. Mr. McMahan is an energetic man who stands well in the 
esteem of his neighbors and fellow citizens. 

W. T. Brown, a prominent and successful stock buyer of Jamesport, 
and owner of 240 acres of land in Jamesport Township, was born Aug. 29, 
1853, in Grand River Township, the son of Moses and Elizabeth (Wiles) 
Brown. 

Moses Brown was a native of Indiana, and removed to Daviess County, 
about 1838, where he was engaged in farming during his entire life. He 
served in the office of county judge for two terms. He made his home in 
Gallatin for a number of years prior to his death, which occurred when he 
was 71 years of age. His wife was born in South Carolina, and died when 
about 72 years old. Both Mr. and Mrs. Brown are buried in Brown Ceme- 
tery, Gallatin. To Moses and Elizabeth (Wiles) Brown 13 children were 
born, of whom four are now living as follows: W. T., the subject of this 
sketch; A. C, Cheyenne County, Kans. ; A. T. Altamont; and Missouri 
the wife of D. D. Dean, Winston. 

W. T. Brown grew up on his father's farm in Daviess County. He was 
engaged in farming after his marriage in Lincoln Township, for about 
20 years, after which, in about 1897, he removed to Jamesport, where he 
purchased 240 acres of land adjoining the city limits on the north. Here 
Mr. Brown has since been engaged in buying and shipping stock to all parts 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 445 

of the country. He has been very successful in his work and is widely 
known. 

On Feb. 22, 1873, Mr. Brown was married to Susan Croy, a native of 
Grand River Township, and a daughter of Alex and Sophia (Railsback) 
Croy. To this union one child was born, Mary, the wife of D. T. Reed, 
Jamesport Township, Daviess County. Mr. and Mrs. Reed have two child- 
ren, Hugh and Clinton Reed. 

Mr. Brown is a Republican and has served as a justice of the peace in 
Lincoln Township. He is a stockholder of the Commercial Bank of James- 
port. Mr. Brown is a member of the Baptist church of which he is a 
deacon. He is a substantial and reliable citizen who has made a success in 
life by virtue of his energy, his progressive ideals and his enterprising 
methods. 

Daniel Landes, a prominent citizen of Jamesport, who departed this 
life May 10, 1922, was born Feb. 2, 1852, in Grand River Township, the son 
of Levi and Mary (Wiles) Landes. 

Levi Landes was born in Henry County, Ind., and came to Daviess 
County in the early days when it was but a wilderness. He got his land 
in Grand River from the government and carried on general farming until 
his death. Mrs. Landes was also a native of Henry County. They were 
the parents of twelve children, four of whom are now deceased. 

Daniel Landes was reared on a farm and began for himself at the 
age of 22 years, purchasing his land on time payments. ' He was unable 
to build a house at first, so lived in a small building 16x16 feet which he 
built. Mr. Landis owned 40 acres of land then, and by adding to it from 
time to time he owned 255 acres of well improved land in Grand River 
Township. 1897 he erected a two story house containing eight rooms, 
and also a large barn. Mr. Landes was a well known feeder of cattle for 
20 years, and was very successful in his work. 

Mr. Landes was married three times, the first time being to Martha 
E. Kemp, now deceased. To this union five children were born, two of 
whom are now living ; Flora Belle, the wife of Albert Terry, Gault ; Neuma, 
the wife of William Courtney, Ewing. 

Mr. Landes was married the second time to Sallie Hyett. No children 
were born to this union. The third marriage of Mr. Landes was to 
Martha E. Beeler, a native of Sullivan County, a daughter of Noah and 
Mary Ann (Jones) Beeler. Mr. and Mrs. Beeler were natives of Virginia 
and Alabama, who came to Sullivan County, in the early days. They re- 
moved to Daviess County in 1857, and located near Pattonsburg, where 
Mrs. Landes lived until about 22 years ago, when she removed to James- 



446 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

port, where she and her father lived. She clerked in J. P. Malon's store 
until her marriage, Oct. 11, 1905. No children have been born to this 
union. 

Mr. Landes was a stockholder in the Bank of Jameson, at Jameson, 
of which he was an organizer. He was a Republican and a member of the 
Baptist church. Mr. Landes' success in life was due to hard work, good 
management, and the ability to overcome the many reverses he encountered 
in his work. He was a highly esteemed citizen of his community. 

John W. McClaskey, a well known retired farmer and merchant of 
Gallatin, was born Oct. 4, 1951, near Aubery Grove, Jamesport Township, 
the son of Albert and Martha (Roger) McClaskey. 

Albert McClaskey was born in Indiana, Jan. 11, 1826. He owned a 
grist and saw mill in Gallatin, and later one in Aubery Grove, and one in 
Livingston County. In 1854 Mr. McClaskey went to California, in search 
of gold. He died there a year later. Mrs. McClaskey was born in Ken- 
tucky, March 8, 1828. After the death of Mr. McClaskey she was married 
to Lathan Goben, and to that union one child was born, Elijah Goben, living 
in Oklahoma. To Albert and Martha (Koger) McClaskey three children 
were born, as follows : Eliza, the wife of Joseph Lee, Gallatin ; John W., the 
subject of this sketch; James M., Union Township, Daviess County. Mrs. 
Goben, the mother of John W. McClaskey, died Nov. 30, 1905. 

John W. McClaskey was reared in Daviess County, on a farm. In 
1886 he moved to Gallatin, where he became engaged in the lumber busi- 
ness. Later he was in the produce business at Tipton, and in 1888 he re- 
turned to Gallatin, where he became engaged in the shipping of live stock 
to the eastern markets. Then in 1893, Mr. McClaskey went into the trans- 
fer business until 1910, when he conducted a grain and seed business for 
four years. He then retired in 1915, after which he did a great deal of 
traveling about the country. In 1916, Mr. McClaskey built an all modern 
bungalow in the eastern section of Gallatin. It is built of native stone 
and is one of the attractive residences of the city. 

On Aug. 22, 1876, Mr. McClaskey was married the first time to Alice 
V. Smith, a native of Spencer, Va. They were married at Mt. Ayr, Iowa, 
and to this union four children were born, of whom two are now living; 
Forrest, the wife of C. E. Harris, Phoenix, Ariz. ; and E. C, Fresno, Calif. 
Mrs. Alice (Smith) McClaskey died Sept. 20, 1888. 

Mr. McClaskey was married the second time to Lucy Fannie (Estes) 
Smith, on Jan. 23, 1909. She was the widow of George Smith. Mrs. 
McClaskey was born in Rappahannock County, Va., and her parents were 
pioneer settlers of Daviess County. To Mr. and Mrs. McClaskey two 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 447 

children were born, as follows : Martha Yates, at home ; and Harry Newton, 
deceased. 

A brother of Mr. McClaskey, James M., narrowly escaped losing his 
life when a baby. While he was playing on the floor of the house, and 
his mother busy with her work, a large hog walked in through the door, 
grabbed the baby and ran off with it. Mrs. McClaskey was able to rescue 
it before any harm was done. 

In politics Mr. McClaskey is a Democrat. In 1914 he was elected 
mayor of Gallatin, which office he held for a term of two years. At that 
time the power house was moved to higher ground. During his adminis- 
tration, Mr. McClaskey had a hard time fighting bootleggers. He was also 
mayor of Spencer, W. Va., from 1877 until 1878, where he was employed 
as a clerk in a dry goods store. 

Mr. McClaskey is a member of the Masonic lodge and of the Baptist 
church. He is well and favorably known in Gallatin, and takes an interest 
in the affairs of his town. 

Novia Doak, a successful farmer and stockman of Monroe Township, 
was born Nov. 26, 1886, in Union Township, a son of Rev. Peter P. and 
Lucretia (Parker) Doak. 

Peter P. Doak was born in Sullivan County, Feb. 28, 1848. In 1880 
he married Lucretia Parker, a native of Kentucky, and daughter of James 
M. and Eliza (Lewis) Parker. Mr. and Mrs. Doak were the parents of six 
children, as follows: Harry, Union Township; Novia, the subject of this 
sketch ; Edgar, living with his mother, and a daughter who died in infancy. 
Mr. Doak died in 1919. 

Novia Doak was educated in the district schools and attended the 
public schools at Gallatin. He was reared on a farm and remained on the 
home farm until he was 21 years old, when he began farming with his 
brother Olin E. They owned 157 acres of land. In 1912 he sold his share 
to his brother Olin, and purchased his present farm from 0. R. Whitt. It 
had been improved by John New of California. Mr. Doak has made ex- 
tensive improvements on the farm, having erected a cement silo 14x35 
feet. 

April 26, 1908, Mr. Doak was married to Mary E. Bonnett, a daughter 
of P. M. and Jeanette (Fittspatrick) Bonnett, natives of Iowa. Mr. and 
Mrs. Bonnett lived in Daviess County, for about ten years. Mr. Bonnett 
died several years ago and his widow now resides in Washington, D. C. 
Mrs. Doak was born in Carroll County. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Doak three children have been born; Zella Irene, at 
home; Novena Edith, at home; and Edna Christina, deceased. 



448 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Mr, Doak owns 95 acres of land and is a well known breeder of Short- 
horn cattle. He is also a feeder of hogs and cattle, and breeder of Rhode 
Island Red chickens. 

Mr. Doak is a Democrat and served on the township board. He was 
justice of the peace for four years, and is now constable and collector of 
Monroe Township. He is a member of the Methodist church, and is also 
a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Modern Wood- 
men of America. Mr. Doak has been unusually successful and is consid- 
ered one of Monroe Township's most efficient citizens. 

Sam C. Killam, successful manager of the insurance work for 12 
companies and the president of the Albany Chamber of Commerce, was 
born in Morgan County, 111., Nov. 5, 1880, the son of Thomas H. and Lida 
C. (Clark) Killam. 

Thomas H. Killam and Lida C. Clark were married in Illinois and came 
to Harrison County, Mo., in 1882, where they bought a farm in Washington 
Township, and where they continued to live until the fall of 1898, when 
they moved to Grant City. There Mr. Killam went into the grain and 
stock business which he continued to conduct until the spring of 1902, 
when he came to Albany and bought the Graves Hardware store. He re- 
mained the in the hardware business until 1909. He is now located in 
Duluth, Minn. To the union of Thomas H., and Lida C. (Clark) Killam 
the following children were born: Samuel C, the subject of this review; 
Edith L., a teacher in Duluth, Minn.; Lawrence T., a resident of McMinn- 
ville, Ore. ; and John W., now working for the United States Steel Corpor- 
ation in Duluth, Minn. 

Samuel C. Killam graduated from the Grant City High School in 1901, 
and then spent one year as a student in William Jewell College at Liberty. 
He later entered the hardware business with his father and remained in 
this work until 1909. The next three years he was with E. K. Williams. 
In 1914 he engaged in the furniture business at Mt. Ayr, Iowa. In the 
spring of 1916, Mr. Killam went into the insurance business and opened his 
present office, where he handles the work in connection with fire, tornado, 
hail, and automobile insurance. From August, 1918, until July, 1921, Mr. 
Killam clerked in the Gentry County Bank. 

The Chamber of Commerce of Albany was organized on Feb. 8, 1921, 
as an outgrowth of the former Commercial Club. At the first meeting 
of the new organization there were 30 men present, at the second meeting, 
two weeks later, there were 75 men present. The membership of the 
organization is now 267 and the work of the members is already felt as a 
strong integrating force in the town. Mr. Killam was elected president of 




SAM C. KIl.LAM 



t 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 449 

the new club and was reelected for 1922. Mr. Killam has proved himself 
admirably fitted to the position. In April, 1922, Mr. Killam was appointed 
acting postmaster of Albany. 

Sam C. Killam was married June 7, 1911, to Linnie N. Lainhart, a 
daughter of Robert P. and Melcenia (Sampson) Lainhart. Mr. Lainhart 
was a grocer in Albany for almost 35 years. He retired from active busi- 
ness life a few years before his death which occurred in February, 1920. 
His remains are buried in Highland Cemetery. His widow now lives at 
Albany. Mr. and Mrs. Killam have one daughter, Merilee. 

Mr, Killam is a member of Athens Lodge No. 127, Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons and the Royal Arch Chapter at Albany, also the Josephus 
Council Albany Commandry, and the Order of the Eastern Star. He is 
a past officer in all of these lodges except the Council. He belongs also to 
the Yoeman Lodge and to the Knights of Constantine at St. Joseph. Mr. 
Killam is the chairman of the Republican Central Committee of Gentry 
County and has held this position for the past four years. He is a pro- 
gressive man, one who manifests foresight in his business affairs and high 
ideals in the community in his political views, and in his direction of the 
work of the Albany Chamber of Commerce. He is a member of the Chris- 
tian church, being an active worker in that church, and is now a deacon. 

W. R. Handy, who operates a real estate, farm loans and abstract 
office in Gallatin, was born near Horse Cave, Ky., Jan. 18, 1865. His 
parents were David W. and Mary (Cook) Handy to whom eight children 
were born. Six of them are still living: J. B., a merchant and banker at 
Coffey ; A. H., in the mercantile business in Kansas City ; Ida, married A. H. 
Thompson of Sioux City, Iowa; W. R., the subject of this review; Ollie, the 
Wife of J. P. Stanley of Topeka, Kans. ; and C. P., a resident of Rocky Ford, 
Colorado. 

David W. Handy was born in Virginia in 1830. He married Mary 
Cook in Kentucky. She was born in Pennsylvania. They came to Daviess 
County in the late spring of 1865, and for 12 years lived on a farm. At 
the end of that time they moved to Coffey, where Mr. Handy engaged in 
the mercantile business. He was a successful man, and at one time owned 
790 acres of land adjoining the site of Coffey. He was one of the well 
known stock feeders of the community, and a man highly esteemed 
throughout the county. His wife died at Coffey in 1910, at the age of 76 
years, and he died at the same town in 1914. The remains of both are 
buried in the Masonic Cemetery there. They were members of the Baptist 
church, and Mr. Handy was a Democrat in his political views. 

W. R. Handy grew up at Coffey and attended the schools there. In 



450 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

1883 he entered Grand River College at Edinburg, and remained for a 
year taking the commercial course. He then became a student in the Gem 
City Business College at Quincy, 111., and then became connected with his 
fathers' business. He conducted a store for his father and G. B. Duke, at 
McFall in 1886. The next year he went back to Coffey, where he again 
entered the mercantile business, and remained in it until Fbruary, 1889, 
when he accepted a position as clerk for Irving Brothers. In 1891, he 
with J. H. Townsend, W. T. Osborn, C. A. Stout, J: H. Gilchrist became the 
organizers of the Gallatin Dry Goods and Grocery Company, and Mr. Handy 
was placed in charge of the dry goods department, and was also the sec- 
retary of the company. In 1892 he was forced to resign from his work 
because of his health, and a year later he became associated with S. D. 
Stephens in the real estate and loan business. In 1896 this enterprise was 
incorporated as the Stephens Farm Loan Company, and in 1914, the firm 
went into the hands of a receiver. Following this Mr. Handy began mak- 
ing loans for himself, and has now established an excellent business. 

Mr. Handy was married on Sept. 5, 1889 to Lillian Dugger, born in 
Madison County, 111., in April, 1869, the daughter of Cornelius Dugger. 
Mr. Dugger spent all of his life in Illinois, where he died, Mr. and Mrs. 
Handy had six children born to their union: Vada I., married to Charles 
Blizzard of St. Joseph ; Dean E., Beggs, Okla. ; Glenn D., living at Rocky 
Ford, Colo. ; Giles K., a resident of St. Joseph ; and Dorothy and Mary, 
both at home. 

Mr. Handy was elected mayor of Gallatin in 1902 and held that office 
until 1906. A few years before that time he was appointed a member of 
the advisory committee to put water and lights in the city. He served as 
chairman of the central county committee and was the congressional com- 
mitteeman for the Third District for his political party. During the 
World War, Mr. Handy served on the Council of Defense, the Food Admin- 
istration Board, Agricultural Extension, and was the sale director for the 
Third and Fourth Liberty Loans for Daviess County. He also had charge 
of all overseas Christmas packages for the soldiers. In 1916 he was asked 
by the council to take the city clerkship and was assigned to the work of 
helping plan the rebuilding and extension of the old water plant. He 
also served on the building committee for the Y. M. C. A. building. On 
March 15, 1921, Mr. Handy was presented with a silver medal from the 
Home Insurance Company of New York City, in recognition of 25 years 
of continuous service with that company, during which time he had been 
their fire adjustor for his district. 

Mr. Handy is a Democrat and is identified with the Baptist church. 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 451 

He is a member of the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, the Modern 
Woodmen of America, the Woodmen of the World and the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. He is one of the well known men of the county, a 
reliable and substantial citizen who has always manifested keen discerning 
interest in everything that pertains to the improvement and growth of his 
community. 

W. T. Cooper, deceased, was one of the well known men of Gallatin, 
and of the northwestern part of Missouri. He was born at Gallatin Dec. 
8, 1857, the son of John and Maria (Trotter) Cooper. 

John Cooper and his wife were early settlers of Daviess County. He 
was born on April 8, 1825. He was a well known farmer and stockman. 
During the Civil War he enlisted for service and was assigned to Company 
M. 4th Regiment, Missouri Militia. When the rush to Oklahoma began, 
Mr. Cooper went west, and staked a claim on the present site of the town 
of Enid. He improved this land, and later moved to Hennesy, Okla., 
where he engaged in the grocery business. He died at Hennesy, April 8, 
1889. His wife, Marie (Trotter) Cooper, was born. May 12, 1834, and died 
in August, 1908. Two of the children born to John Cooper and his wife 
grew to maturity: W. T., the subject of this review; and Nannie, married 
G. P. Rush, and is now dead. 

W. T. Cooper was reared at Gallatin, and attended the Gallatin school. 
Early in his life he became interested in mercantile pursuits. He clerked 
in Etter's store, and later became interested in the jewelry business. He 
disposed of his interest in the jewelry store and became a traveling sales- 
man for the Tom Ray Cutlery Company of Kansas City. He continued in 
that work for 15 years, and then accepted a similar position with the 
Quincy Stove Company of Quincy, 111. He remained in that work until his 
death, June 18, 1921. 

W. T. Cooper was married. May 28, 1885, to Leona Casey at Gallatin. 
Mrs. Cooper was born at Richmond, Feb. 18, 1865, the daughter of Thomas 
and Martha (Mann) Casey. Both Mr. and Mrs. Casey died when their 
dughter was 13 years old, and the little girl was taken to Gallatin, where 
she grew up in the homes of her uncle, E. M. Mann, and her aunt, Mrs. 
Belle Sheets. Mrs. Cooper attended the school at Gallatin, and later was 
a student in Christian College at Columbia. To the union of W. T. and 
Leona (Casey) Cooper the following children were born: Maybelle, married 
Dr. W. L. Howard, a member of the faculty of the Horticulture department 
of Berkeley College, and spent the summer of 1921 in Europe ; Mattie, the 
wife of J. M. Evvard, an instructor in the Animal Husbandry Department 
of the Agricultural College at Ames, Iowa; T. E., a physician, a sketch of 



452 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

whose life appears in a later paragraph; and Nannie Rush, a successful 
teacher at Pattonsburg. Mrs. Cooper has the following grandchildren: 
Thomas, Robert, Edwin and Walter, Jr., Howard ; Margaret, John C, and 
Martha J. Evvard ; and Clarence Casey Cooper. 

W. T. Cooper was a Democrat, and a member of the Methodist church 
to the support of which he always contributed most liberally. He belonged 
to the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons and the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows lodges. At the time of his death, he was the oldest member 
of the latter lodge in Gallatin. He was a firm believer in good educational 
advantages, and it was his plan for all his children to receive' college 
degrees. For 13 consecutive terms, one of his children, and part of the 
time two of them, were students in the Missouri state university. Mr. 
Cooper always felt, however, that an investment in an education meant 
more for his children, than any accumulation of property could ever mean 
later on. He was a man whose friends were numbered by the scores. His 
business called him into many towns, and various parts of the state. 
Wherever he went he made staunch friends. As a business man, he was 
alert and energetic, and his customers always had the greatest respect for 
his judgment. As a citizen, he held ideals of civic progress and believed 
most thoroughly in city government. He was the kind of man whose 
presence in the community is an asset, and whose death is a real loss. 

Thomas E. Cooper, a progressive physician and surgeon of Gallatin, 
was born Nov. 6, 1890, the son of W. T. Cooper, the subject of this sketch. 
Dr. Cooper grew up in Gallatin and in 1908, he entered the Missouri State 
University. He graduated with the degree of Bachelor or Arts in 1912; 
entered the Medical College of St. Louis University at St. Louis, and in 
1914 received the degree of Doctor of Medicine there. For the next three 
and one-half years he was an intern in the St. Louis City Hospital, where 
he received training that was both practical and scientific. 

In January, 1918, Dr. Cooper received a commission as a medical 
officer for service in the World War. He served in several camps, and was 
then sent overseas with No. 227 Aero Squadron. In July, 1919, he was 
discharged from service, and returned to Gallatin, where he began the 
practice of his profession. He attained the rank of captain before receiv- 
ing his discharge. 

Dr. Cooper was married in August, 1916, to Flora Kreis, and to this 
union one child, Clarence Casey, was born. Mrs. Cooper died in October, 
1917, at the age of 22 years. On March 20, 1921, Dr. Cooper was married 
to Alleyne Yates, a daughter of Howard and Lulu Yates of Gallatin. 

Dr. Cooper is a Democrat, a member of the Methodist church and 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 453 

belongs to the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. He is a young man of 
keen intellectual and professional ability, and has established an excellent 
practice in Gallatin. 

The Cooper family is one of the well and favorably known families of 
Daviess County. 

Shannon Adkison, a prominent farmer and stockman of Monroe 
Township, was born June 6, 1868, in Madison County, Ky., a son of Thomas 
and Nancy Belle (Broaddus) Adkison. 

Thomas Adkison was born Dec. 24, 1832, in Kentucky. He was a 
farmer during his entire life. In 1879 he came to Missouri from Moultrie 
County, 111., and settled on a farm in Clinton County. In 1884 he moved 
to Daviess County. During the Civil War, he enlisted in Company G, 
United States First Kentucky, Volunteer Cavalry. He enlisted Aug. 20, 
1861, and was discharged Dec. 31, 1864. Mr. Adkison was a Republican 
and a member of the Baptist church at Gallatin. His wife, Nancy Belle 
Broaddus was born in Madison County, Ky., Oct. 10, 1846, and died July 
2, 1920. Mr. Adkison died Dec. 19, 1921, at the home of his son in Monroe 
Township. 

Thomas Adkison and wife were the parents of six children: Cora, the 
wife of George Rea, Clinton County; Shannon, the subject of this sketch; 
Mary, the wife of W. P. Stone, Drumright, Okla. ; Lukette, Lathrop ; Anna, 
deceased ; Bertha, deceased, was the wife of J. W. Allsup. 

Shannon Adkison was reared on a farm in Daviess County, and was 
educated in the district schools of Monroe Township. When he became of 
age he rented a farm from his father. In 1892 Mr. Adkison was married 
to Emma Lynch, a native of Monroe Township, and a daughter of Thomas 
and Mary A. (Moore) Lynch, natives of Ohio. Mrs. Adkison taught 
school several years before her marriage. 

In 1902 Mr. Adkison purchased the Taylor farm in Section 8, Monroe 
Township. He improved it and sold it in 1910. He then purchased a 
farm in Sheridan Township, after which he again moved to Union Town- 
ship. After owning several farms, Mr. Adkison bought the farm which 
he now occupies in Monroe Township. In 1913 he built a modern residence. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Adkison ten children have been born, two of whom 
died in infancy. The others are as follows: Thomas R., Monroe Town- 
ship; Robert, deceased, was inducted into service during the World War, 
and assigned to Company D, 138th Infantry, 35th Division, sailed for 
overseas May 3, 1918, and was killed in the Battle of the Argonne Forest, 
Sept. 27, 1918, and his body was buried in Brown Cemetery at Gallatin, 
Aug. 14, 1921; Rosa, the wife of Samuel D. Halcomb, Union Township; 



454 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Ross, Monroe Township ; Mary, teacher in Union Township ; Reva, at home; 
Frances, at home ; Rayburn, at home. 

Mr. Adkison is a Repubhcan, He owns 150 acres of land in Monroe 
Township, which is well improved. Mr. Adkison has put much energy, 
thought and time into his business of farming and stockraising, and merits 
the marked success which he has made. 

Levi P. Cox, one of Caldwell County's efficient farmers, and owner of 
930 acres of land in Harrison and Jacksan Tow'nships, was born Dec. 23, 
1857, a son of Levi P. Cox, Sr.. and Elizabeth (Stamper) Cox. 

Levi P. Cox, Sr., was born Jan. 20, 1817, in Williamsburg, Ky., and 
came to Missouri the summer of 1840, settling on what is known as part of 
the old L. P. Cox farm in Jackson Township. Mr. Cox was married Sept. 
30, 1841, to Elizabeth Stamper. To Mr. and Mrs. Cox eight children were 
born, as follows : Larkin J., Born Aug. 12, 1843, was shot during the battle 
of Corinth, Miss., which caused his death Nov. 1, 1862, aged 19 years; 
Lucy M., was born Sept. 26, 1844, married Reuben Ketron, Edinburg, and 
she died at the age of 26 years; Emily Cox, born Nov. 22, 1845, was the 
wife of I. T. Minnick, now deceased, and she is now living in St. Joseph, 
Mo. ; Nathan T. Cox, born Nov. 12, 1847, now living in Gainesville, Texas, 
and the owner of 500 acres of land there on which he raises wheat, oats, 
etc.; Maria A. Cox, born April 11, 1851, died Sept. 24, 1864, at the age of 
13 years ; Joseph M. Cox, born Feb. 25, 1853, living on his farm in Jackson 
Township ; Jess Cox, born April 6, 1860, died in infancy ; Levi P., the sub- 
ject of this sketch; John S. Cox, born May 13, 1861, died March 22, 1905, 
aged 43 years, at his home in Breckenridge, Mo. 

Levi P. Cox, Sr., died Jan. 20, 1886, at the age of 69 years, and his 
wife died May 18, 1864, at the age of 38 years. Mr. Cox died at Brecken- 
ridge, and his wife in Jackson Township, Daviess County. 

Levi P. Cox, Jr., was six years old at the time of his mother's death. 
He was reared on his father's farm, and received his education in the dis- 
trict schools and the high school of Breckenridge. After completing his 
education, Mr. Cox began farming in Jackson Township. In 1896 he 
moved to Breckenridge, where he has since resided. 

Mr. Cox was married for the first time Sept. 10, 1879, to Sarah F. 
Mauzey, of Piatt County. To this union five daughters were born, as fol- 
lows: Mollie E., the wife of G. B. Grumbine of Oklahoma City, Okla., was 
born Sept. 27, 1880, and has four children : Lucy J., Born Sept. 3, 1882, is 
the wife of F. N. Campbell of Cameron, and they have two children ; Minnie 
May, born Nov. 15, 1884, married F. L. Runkle, of Denver, Colo., and died 
Dec. 11, 1918, at the age of 34 years, leaving three small children; Clarrisa 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 455 

D., was born Aug. 27, 1888, and was the wife of John H. Benney, of Breck- 
enridge, and died June 21, 1915, at the age of 26 years, leaving a small 
daughter; Mattie Lee, a twin sister of Clarissa, now the wife of Richard 
M. Hicks, living on the old homestead, Daviess County, and they have three 
children. Mrs. Cox died June 22, 1894, at the age of 34 years. 

Mr. Cox was married the second time to Mary Bell Wood, of Macon, 
July 1, 1896. To this union one son was born who died in infancy, and a 
daughter, Vivian I. Cox, now the wife of Jess B. McClure of Kansas 
City. Mrs. McClure was born Aug. 5, 1899. They have one daughter. 
Mrs. Cox died March 15, 1911, at the age of 53 years. 

Mr. Cox was married Nov. 26, 1914 to Mrs. Laura A. Brogan, of Macon, 
and they now reside in Breckenridge, where he erected a modern residence. 

Mr. Cox is a Democrat and a member of the Methodist church. He is 
also a member of the Masonic Lodge, Modern Woodmen of America, 
Eastern Star, Yoeman lodge, and the Knights and Ladies of Security. He 
has served on the Breckenridge School Board and also on the council. Mr. 
Cox has been successful because of his energy and perserverance. He is 
one of the dependable citizens of Caldwell County and is widely and favor- 
ably known. 

Dr. J. T. Nugent, a successful physician and surgeon of Winston, Mo., 
was born May 31, 1884, on a farm in Audrian County, the son of George and 
Melissa (McGee) Nugent. 

George Nugent was born near Frankfort, Ky., and his wife was born 
near Greencastle, Va. They were the parents of four children, of whom 
two are now living: William, hardware merchant of St. Joseph; and Dr. 
J. T., the subject of this sketch. 

Dr. J. T. Nugent was reared in Monroe County, and lived with an aunt 
Mrs. Tom Adams, his mother having died when he was three months old. 
He was graduated from the Paris, Mo., high school and spent two years at 
the state university in the medical department. He then attended the 
Washington University of St. Louis, from which he was graduated in June 
1919, with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. Dr. Nugent was then 
appointed house physician of the Martha Parsons Hospital, where he re- 
mained for one year. He then practiced at Centralia, where he remained 
until May, 1921. At that time Dr. Nugent began practicing medicine and 
surgery in Jamesport, where he established a good practice, and remained 
there until June, 1922, when he began practice at Winston. 

On June 24, 1913, Dr. Nugent was married to Anna Harris, a native 
of Audrian County. While growing up in practically the same neighbor- 
hood with Dr. Nugent, they did not become acquainted with each other 



456 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

until a year before their marriage. Mrs. Nugent is a graduate of Columbia 
College and taught school for two years. She is the daughter of Robert 
G. and Mary E. (Proctor) Harris, natives of Boone County. Mr. Harris 
is now deceased and his widow resides in Centralia. 

To Dr. J. T. and Anna (Harris) Nugent one child has been born 
Thomas Harris Nugent, born June 17, 1914. 

Dr. Nugent is a Democrat in politics. He belongs to the Masonic lodge 
and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He is a member of the Chris- 
tian church, and of the Knights of Phythias. Dr. Nugent is a substantial 
citizen of Daviess County and a progressive man in his profession. 

John Francis Green, deceased, was born in Gentry County in the house 
where his widow now lives, July 20, 1868. His parents were John and 
Sarah J. Green, the latter now living at Albany at the age of 79 years. 

John Green, the father of John Francis Green, was born in Richland 
County, Ohio, Sept. 5, 1822, the son of William Green, native of Massa- 
chusetts, and Martha (Stanton) Green, born in Connecticut. John Green 
came to Gentry County in 1849, and that same year was employed by the 
government to work on the western plains. In the spring of 1850 he went 
to California where he remained for three years engaged in mining. At 
the end of that time he returned to Gentry County, where he lived until 
his death, Jan. 2, 1882. His remains are buried in the Carter Cemetery. 
He was a large land holder, owning at the time of his death, 705 acres. On 
Dec. 8, 1864, John Green married Sarah J. Glendenning, and to this union 
the following children were born : Wliliam H., a farmer in Bogle Township ; 
John Francis, the subject of this sketch; Edwin P., of Athens Township; 
Clara A., deceased ; and EfRe, now Mrs. Abarr of Bogle Township, 

John Francis Green attended the rural schools of Gentry County, 
and followed farming all of his life. At the time of his death, he owned 
264 acres of land, and was a man of prominence in his lines of work. He 
died, Sept. 7, 1915, and his remains are buried in the Highland Cemetery. 
His son, John Ervin, now runs the home farm. 

John Francis Green was married Jan. 10, 1892 to Phoebe E. Burgess, 
a daughter of Thomas E. and Nancy J. (Mahoney) Burgess. Thomas E. 
Burgess was born in Gascanade County, Jan 23, 1838, and died in Gentry 
County, June 9, 1915. His remains are buried in Grand View Cemetery. 
He served in the Union Army for three years and nine months during the 
Civil War. His wife was born in Ripley County, Ind., March 28, 1844, was 
married in Bogle Township in 1866, and lived in Gentry County ever since. 
Her children were: Orlando Ransom, deceased; Phoebe, now Mrs. Green; 
Emma, the wife of J. W. Siddens; Cora, the wife of George Goode, of 
Merino, Col. ; G. E., a resident of Albany ; Flora, married to Charles Redd, 



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HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 457 

and living on the Burgess farm in Bogle Township ; Perry, living in Boone, 
Col. ; and Almina, the wife of W. DeWitt of California. 

To the union of John Francis and Phoebe E. (Burgess) Green the fol- 
lowing children were born : John Erwin, born Nov. 17, 1892 ; Vesta, living 
at home ; and Verna J., died at the age of three years. 

In 1912 the members of the Green family held a family reunion at the 
home of John Francis Green, and more than 100 were present. Among the 
cherished possessions of Mrs. Green is the collection of photographs made 
on the day of the Green reunion. The guests were all descendents of 
either William, Daniel, John, Julia or Caroline Green. 

John Francis Green was a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows at Albany. He was a man esteemed in his community for his 
integrity, and spirit of cooperation in all civic affairs. 

George B. Koch, a prominent business man and president of the 
Peoples Exchange Bank of Jamesport, was born in Clinton County, Mo., 
Oct. 22, 1885, a son of J. A. and Mary (Ward) Koch. 

J. A. Koch was a native of Pennsylvania and mary Ward Koch a native 
of Illinois. To this union was born three children, the eldest of whom died 
in infancy, Geo. B., being the second child. 

George B. Koch was reared on the farm and attending the country 
schools, and in 1901 entered William Jewell College at Liberty, where he 
was graduated in 1906, the youngest member of his class with the degree 
A. B. After graduation he prepared for business life in the Gem City 
Business College at Quincy, 111., and entered the First National Bank and 
Trust Company, King City, Mo., in 1908 as junior clerk. He left that in- 
stitution in 1911 to organize the Peoples Exchange Bank of Jamesport, of 
which he is now president, and actively engaged in its management. In 
1920 he again became interested in the First National Bank and Trust 
Company of King City, as one of the largest stockholders in that pioneer 
financial institution of Gentry County, and was elected vice-president, 
which position he now holds. 

On July 27, 1910, Mr. Koch was married to Anna Claxton, a native of 
Andrew County, and to this union have been born two children, twins, 
Geo. B. Jr., and Mary Ann, on Oct. 23, 1914. 

Mr. Koch is president of the Board of Trustees of the M. E. church at 
Jamesport, and in 1922 was Worshipful Master of Jamesport Lodge No. 
564, A. F. & A. M., and Chancellor Commander of Banner Lodge No. 88, 
Knights of Phythias, at Jamesport. He is also a 32nd Degree Mason and 
Knight Templar and a Shriner, as well as a member of the Odd Fellows, 
Easter Star, Phythian Sisters, Modern Woodmen and Yoemen fraternities. 



458 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

and of the last he has served as state treasurer. Pohtically he is a 
Democrat. 

Mr. Koch is well known throughout his section as a good banker and 
a live wire in anything that tends to the welfare and upbuilding of the 
community in which he lives. 

The Peoples Exchange Bank of Jamesport, Mo., was organized by 
George B. Koch, on Dec. 15, 1911. The first officers were Judge John W. 
Thompson, president, H. L. Faulkner, vice-president; Geo. B. Koch, cashier; 
and Myrtle C. Davis, assistant cashier. In 1917 Geo. B. Koch was elected 
president and J. Ed Tye, cashier, and continue to the present time. 

The stockholders are among the most substantial citizens of James- 
port and vicinity. The bank occupies one of the handsomest banking 
houses in northwest Missouri, being erected in 1914, at a cost of $15,000. 
It is strictly modern throughout and is built of brick and concrete with 
terra cotta columns and trim on the exterior and the interior is finished in 
Circasian Walnut. 

The bank has made a steady continuous growth from the date of its 
organization. Its resources now exceed $200,000 and has a surjlus and 
undivided profit account of $12,500. 

Geo. B. Koch, as president and J. Ed Tye as cashier are the active 
managers of the bank and under the guidance the bank has established an 
enviable reputation as a sound, conservative financial institution, and as 
such it has upon its books the names of the most substantial, influential 
and progressive citizens of the community. 

The bank is a member of the American Bankers' Association, and 
the Missouri Bankers' Association and President Koch has served the Mis- 
souri Association on several committees. During the World War the bank 
was most liberal in supporting the Liberty Bond and Red Cross work and 
owned more U. S. Bonds than any other in the county. The U. S. Treasury 
Department presented them with a special certificate expressing apprecia- 
tion for the loyal support accorded the government in the Liberty Loan 
drives, by the bank. 

P. S. McCue, a prosperous farmer and stockman of Jackson Township, 
Daviess County, better known to his many friends as "Jeff," was born July 
24, 1861, in Jackson Township, the son of Isaac M. and Martha J. (Living- 
ston) McCue. 

Isaac M. McCue was born in Greenbrier County, Va., April 6, 1830, 
and came to Daviess County in 1844. He was a farmer during his entire 
life. He died July 1, 1904, in Jamesport. Mr. McCue was a staunch Dem- 
ocrat and a member of the Methodist church. His wife was a daughter of 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 459 

Dr. James and Eliza R. (Tootle) Livingston, natives of Ohio. After re- 
moving to Grundy County, in 1838, Dr. Livingston practiced medicine from 
his farm which was located on the Daviess, Grundy and Livingston County 
lines. To Isaac M. and Martha J. (Livingston) McCue three children were 
born, as follows : J. L., Jamesport ; Milton J., deceased ; and P. S., the sub- 
ject of this sketch. 

P. S. McCue was reared on his father's farm and was educated in the 
schools of Jamesport. He engaged in farming at the age of 28 years, pur- 
chasing a farm in Grundy County. In 1891 he bought 80 acres of land 
in Jackson Township, Daviess County, improved it, and his son Paul, is 
now farming it. Mr. McCue now owns 440 acres in Daviess County, and is 
a well known breeder of Shorthorn cattle and Spotted Poland China hogs. 

On Dec. 19, 1889, Mr. McCue was married to Fannie Peery, a native 
of Livingston County, born July 30, 1873. She was the daughter of John 
H. and Elizabeth (Crews) Perry, also natives of Livingston County. To 
P. S. and Fannie (Peery) McCue one child was born, Paul, the husband of 
Manta Davis, a native of Gallatin. They have two children, Mary Jane 
and Martha McCue. 

Mr. McCue is a Democrat. He is a progressive citizen, as well as an 
energetic farmer and stockman, and an asset to the citizenship of Daviess 
County. 

Charles E. Hays, a prominent farmer and stockman of Jamesport 
Township, Daviess County, was born Dec. 23, 1877, in Jamesport Town- 
ship, the son of John B., and Carrie (Everly) Hays. 

John B. Hays was born in Iowa, June 25, 1845. He was a well known 
farmer of Daviess County. He enlisted during the Civil War and served in 
the Militia and later in the Missouri State Cavalry. He was discharged 
July 7, 1865, at Benton Barracks. He then engaged in farming in James- 
port Township, where he owned 80 acres of land. To John B., and Carrie 
(Everly) Hays six children were born, as follows: Ida, the wife of E. A. 
Croy, Union Township; EfRe, the widow of George Harding, Des Moines, 
Iowa; Charles E., the subject of this sketch; Virgil, living with his mother 
in Jamesport Township; Dora, also living with her mother; and Walter, 
deceased. Mr. Hays died Sept. 1, 1883. His wife is now living on her 
farm of 120 acres in Jamesport Township. 

Charles E. Hays was reared on the farm and received his education in 
the district schools. When a young man he and his brother Virgil farmed 
their mother's land. Charles E. Hays now resides on his wife's farm of 
185 acres in Jamesport Township, and is widely known as a successful 
breeder of Percheron horses and jacks for the past nine years. 



460 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

On Jan. 31, 1897, Mr. Hays was married to Mary Lee Gillilan, a native 
of Jamesport Township, and a daughter of John D. and Angeline (Thomp- 
son) Gillilan, natives of Nicholas County, Va., and Grundy County. John 
D. Gillilan came to Daviess County in 1837 with his parents from Ross 
County, Ohio. His parents were Nathan and Ann (Dunlap) Gillilan, who 
lived and died in Jamesport Township. John D. Gillilan was nine years 
old when he came to Missouri. He grew up on the farm and attended 
school in a log cabin and attended school three months out of each year. 
An uncle, Robert Williams, taught school and later became a judge. Mr. 
Gillilan became very prosperous and at the time of his death, in 1895, was 
the owner of 940 acres of land. Mr. and Mrs. Gillilan were the parents of 
three children, as follows: Nathan, St. Joseph; James, living with C. E. 
Hays ; and Mrs. Hays. Mrs. Gillilan was born in Grundy County, the 
daughter of Dow and Nancy (Oats) Thompson, natives of Kentucky and 
early settlers of Missouri. Mrs. GiUilan died in 1904, at the age of 63 
years. 

To Charles E., and Mary Lee (Gillilan) Hays two children were born, 
one of whom died in infancy. The oldest child, Pearl, is a graduate of James- 
port high school and living at home. 

Mr. Hays is a Republican. He is a member of the Baptist church and 
of the Masonic lodge and the Eastern Star. Mr. Hays has been successful 
because of his thorough understanding of farm problems and of the energy 
and determination he has brought to the handling of the situations he has 
met. 

John B. Hays, deceased was a prominent farmer in Daviess County for 
many years. He was a native of Worth County, Mo., born June 25, 1845. 

Mr. Hays carried on farming during his entire life, and came to Daviess 
County when a very young man. During the Civil War he enlisted at Gall- 
atin, serving in the Militia for three months, and furnished his own horse. 
On Feb. 6, 1864, Mr. Hays reenlisted in the Missouri State Cavalry, Com- 
pany B. He was discharged July 7, 1865, at Benton Barracks. He then 
engaged in farming in Jamesport Township, where he owned 80 acres of 
land. 

On March 25, 1869, Mr. Hays was married to Carrie Everly, the 
daughter of William and Hanna (Whitt) Everly. Mrs. Hays was born 
Dec. 27, 1849, in the section now known as Lincoln Township. To John B. 
and Carrie (Everly) Hays six children were born, as follows: Ida, the 
wife of E. A. Croy, Union Township ; Effie, the widow of George Harding, 
Des Moines, Iowa; Charles E., Jamesport; Virgil, living with his mother in 
Jamesport Township ; Dora, living with her mother ; Walter, deceased. 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 461 

Mr. Hays died on Sept. 1, 1883. His wife is now living on her farm of 
120 acres in Jamesport Township. In politics Mr. Hays was a Republican 
and he was a member of the Baptist church. Mr. Hays merited the high 
regard in which he was held by the community. He was industrious, 
earnest and sincere in all phases of his life. 

John R. McCoy, a substantial farmer and stockman of Jamesport 
Township, Daviess County, was born in Washington Township, on Dec. 30, 
1860, the son of Jesse and Lodema (Goodvin) McCoy. 

Jesse McCoy was a native of Pike County, 111., and came to Daviess 
County, in about 1858. He died when John R., the subject of this sketch 
was about 15 months old. During his life he was a farmer, and was but 
36 years old at the time of his death. To Jesse and Lodema (Goodvin) 
McCoy six children were born, of whom two are now living: John R., and 
Sarah Sprague, the latter now living in Kansas. Mrs. McCoy was a native 
of Pike County, 111., and some time after her husband's death she married 
Daniel Miller. To this union three children were born, one of whom is now 
living, Mattie, the widow of W. T. Day, Whitehall, 111. Mrs. Miller died in 
August, 1920, at the age of 89 years. 

When Jesse McCoy started west from Illinois he settled in Kansas. In 
making the trip he drove a team of oxen. He lived in Kansas a short time, 
then coming to Bates County, Mo., and later to Washington Township, 
Daviess County, where he had several friends, whom he had known in 
Illinois. During the Civil War he enlisted as a cook in the Missouri State 
Militia. Shortly after his enlistment he became ill and was sent home, 
where he died soon after from pneumonia and fever. 

John R. McCoy has always been a farmer. He became heir to 40 
acres of land in Washington Township, which he later sold. He has car- 
ried on farming and stock raising in Jamesport Township since 1883. At 
one time he worked as a farm hand, earning $10 to $15 a month. In 1907 
Mr. McCoy removed to his present farm, which was settled by William 
Ashbrook, an uncle of Mr. McCoy's wife. Mr. and Mrs. McCoy now own 
240 acres of well improved land, and Mr. McCoy is one of the well known 
and successful stockmen of his community. 

On Jan. 16, 1883, Mr. McCoy was married to Hulda DeVorss, a daugh- 
ter of John and Martha (Ashbrook) DeVorss, natives of Pickaway and 
Logan Counties, Ohio, and pioneer settlers of Daviess County, Mrs. 
McCoy was born in Daviess County. Mr. DeVorss at one time owned land 
in the heart of St. Joseph. 

To John R. and Hulda (DeVorss) McCoy two children have been born, 
as follows: Lois, the wife of C. E. Cook, Jamesport; and Mattie, the wife 



462 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

of Ray Hayes, Jamesport. Mr. McCoy has three grandchildren: Carol 
and Marvin Hays and Martha Cook. 

In politics Mr. McCoy is a Republican and is a member of the Masonic 
lodge of Jamesport. He is an enterprising and progressive citizen and is 
widely and favorably know in Daviess County. 

M. P. Whaley, the cashier of the First National Bank of Albany, is 
a member of a family that has been prominent in Gentry County for many 
years an that has been a strong factor in the rapid development of the 
community. M. P. Whaley was born in Albany, the son of R. L, and Mar- 
garet (Clelland) Whaley. 

R. L. Whaley was born in Georgia, May 30, 1846 and came to Albany in 
1874 where he practiced law until 1904 when he became the president of the 
newly organized First National Bank. He operated a lumber business in 
connection with this law practice and was successful in both enterprises. 
Although seventy-five years of age, Mr. Whaley is still an active man of 
business. Mr. Whaley was married at Albany in 1880 to Margaret Clelland, 
a daughter of Peter Clelland of Scotland where both he and his wife died. 
His daughter came to the United States with her brothers and sisters who 
settled northwest of New Hampton in Harrison County, Mo. To the union 
of R. L. and Margaret (Clelland) Whaley the following children were born: 
M. P., the subject of this sketch ; 0. T., operating the Whaley Milling Com- 
pany of Albany ; and L. J., the able assistant cashier of the First National 
Bank, married Ollie Ross of Albany; Margaret (Clelland) Whaley died in 
August, 1900, and her remains are buried in Highland Cemetery. 

In 1901, Mr. Whaley was married the second time to Marguerite Gib- 
son and to this union one child, Martha, was born, now a student in Palmer 
College. Mrs. Whaley's father, John Gibson, was born in Ayrshire, Scot- 
land, Sept. 7, 1831 and came to the United State in 1860 where he started 
farming and stock raising near Portage, Wis. He came to Missouri in 
1868 and settled on a farm of 1100 acres, six miles east of Albany. He 
married Agnes Clelland in Wisconsin in 1862. To this union five children 
were born: Agnes, married to James Gibson and lives six miles northeast 
of Albany; Mary, married William Main, now deceased; Marguerite, a 
graduate of Edinburg College, and later a student at Glasgow College; 
Daniel, born in Wisconsin in 1867, a farmer and stockraiser of Gentry 
County, married Beatrice Carson in 1895 to which union three children 
were born, Grace, John G., of Hutchinson, Kan., and Doris, married to 
Thomas C. Holden of Albany, a sketch of whose life appears in this volume. 

M. P. Whaley was educated in the schools of Albany and holds a 
diploma from the Northwest Missouri College at Albany. He also has 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 463 

a diploma admitting him to the practice of law from Cumberland Univer- 
sity. Mr, Whaley has been connected with banking ever since he left 
school. He started as the assistant cashier in 1909. This position he has 
filled in a highly efficient manner ever since. Members of his family have 
been active in the management of the First National Bank since its organ- 
ization and an interest in business, as well as a strong commercial ability 
are family characteristics. 

The First National Bank of Albany was organized, April 7, 1904 with 
a capital stock of $30,000 and with the following officers: R. L. Whaley, 
President; V. R. Twist, Vice President; B. F. Hardin, Cashier; and John 
W. Pierce, Roy F. Forbis, Levi Todd and W. Woodward, Directors in ad- 
dition to the regular officers. The present home of the institution, a one 
story brick building on the southwest corner of the Square, is owned by 
the bank. The present capital stock in $30,000 ; the surplus, $10,000 ; un- 
divided profits, $15,000; and deposits, $193,000. The present group of 
officers are: R. L. Whaley, President; H. W. Bare, Vice President, M. P. 
Whaley, Cashier ; L. J. Whaley, Assistant Cashier ; and Miss Fern Craven, 
Bookkeeper. The first three officers named above are directors as are also : 
W. H. Green, A. C. Sampson, John Spessard, and V. R. Twist. The bank 
is one of the stable and well known institutions of the county and has been 
a strong factor in the financial development of the county. 

M. P. Whaley is a member of the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, 
a Noble of the Shrine, a Knight Templar, and a Thirty-second Degree 
Mason. He has served as the mayor of Albany for two years, 1910 and 1911. 
Mr. Whaley is a worthy member of his community. 

Orville S. Parman, veteran of the World War and the treasurer of 
Gentry County, is a native of this county where his father and grandfather 
both lived. He was born in Athens Township, Nov. 15, 1892, the son of 
John M. and Linnie B. (Thompson) Parman. 

John M. Parman was born in Gentry County in 1860, the son of Joseph 
Parman, an early settler of the county who died while in the service of the 
Confederate Arm during the Civil War. John M. Parman is a farmer and 
stockman of the county. He resides in Athens Township. To his union 
with Linnie B. (Thompson) Parman six children were born: Myrtle, died 
at the age of three years ; Orville S., the subject of this review ; Irwin, died 
in infancy ; Opal, died at the age of 20 years ; Garnett, living at home ; and 
Ruby, also living at home. 

Orville S. Parman was educated in the public schools. He graduated 
from the Albany High School in the class of 1914. He served as deputy 



464 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

county clerk under Mr. Mothersead until February, 1918, when he enlisted 
for service in the World War. He enlisted at Albany and was at Head- 
quarters Company, 354th Infantry. He went overseas on June 4, 1918 
and participated in the battles of St. Mihiel and the Meuse Argonne. He 
was at the front for more than two and one half months and returned to 
the United States on Jan. 4, 1919. He was mustered out of service at 
Camp Funston on March 1, 1919. 

On March 18, 1919, Mr. Parman was married to Bessie Abington of 
Albany, the daughter of E. P. Abington. Her mother is dead. To the 
union of Orville S. and Bessie (Abington) Parman one child, Anna Lee, 
has been born. 

In November, 1920, Mr. Parman made the race for the office of county 
treasurer and was elected by a plurality of 400 votes. He is an efficient 
officer, capable and just in his dealings. The county is proud of such young 
men who with honorable war records in their past, are ready to take up 
civic duties and serve the community with the same energy with which 
they served the country during the world strife. Mr. Parman is a member 
of the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons Lodge at Albany. 

Jesse T. Hunter, who for the past 33 years has lived on his present 
farm located in Howard Township near Denver, Gentry County, was born 
one mile east of Lone Star, Oct. 6, 1856. 

Mr. Hunter's father, James Hunter, was born in Tennessee, Nov. 2, 
1820. He settled in Harrison County, Mo., before the Civil War, and 
bought 240 acres of land three miles northwest of Martinsville. He was 
a member of the Christian church, and ffiled the office of trustee in Dallas 
Township for some time. He married Elizabeth Grace, born in Ray County 
in 1832, and to this union the following children were born: John, now 
living on the home place; W. A., living in Dallas Township, Harrison 
County ; Marion Y., deceased ; Jesse T., the subject of this review ; Dorinda, 
now Mrs. VanHoozer of New Hampton; A. N., a resident of Albany; S. P., 
of Lebanon, Mo.; and A. J., living in California. James Hunter died in 
1907 at the age of 87 years, and Elizabeth (Grace) Hunter died in 1894, 
at the age of 62 years. The remains of both are buried in the Lone Star 
Cemetery. 

J. T. Hunter attended the rural schools of the county, and has been a 
farmer and stock raiser all of his life. He owns 111 acres in his home 
farm, and 40 acres of the Hunter home place in Harrison County. He does 
general farming, but recently has been renting out part of his land. For 
25 years, Mr. Hunter has been interested in poultry raising. He keeps 
pure bred Light Brown Leghorn Single Comb fowls, usually having between 
300 and 400. He ships eggs for setting, and sells cockerels. Mr. Hunter 






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HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 465 

has exhibited some of his pens at various fairs. In 1920 he exhibited at 
Bethany, and took three first premiums, two seconds and one third. 

J. T. Hunter was married in 1878, to Rachel F. Stephenson, born in 
Gentry County, the daughter of Wilham and Lucinda (Smith) Stephen- 
son, the former born in Kentucky, April 13, 1813, and the latter born in 
Alabama, April 13, 1834. They are both now dead; Mr. Stephenson died 
March 10, 1882, and his widow died Feb. 22, 1907. The remains of both 
are buried in Groom Cemetery. Their children were: Almira, later Mrs. 
Wilson, now dead; John deceased; Sina E., now Mrs. Grable of Fort Worth, 
Tex., Terry, James H., and Albay, all deceased ; George on the home place ; 
Rachel F., now Mrs. Hunter W. H., hving in Worth County ; Margaret, now 
Mrs. Gibson of Worth County; and Evaline, now Mrs. Stewart of Idaho. 
By a former marriage of William Stephenson to Anna Whitson, he had one 
daughter, Mary, now Mrs. Whitson of Gower. 

Mr, and Mrs. Hunter have three children: J. W., born April 14, 1879, 
educated in this county and living in Howard Township when he was acci- 
dently killed by the bursting of a fly-wheel while sawing wood, April 16, 
1901 ; he was married to Melinda Everts who now lives in St. Joseph ; 
Fannie, born June 21, 1881, married E. B. Mounts, and lives in Harrison 
County on the Hunter farm; she has two children. Hunter B., and Galie 
Jessahne ; and Jessie Edna, born Jan 17, 1889, died on Oct. 4, 1904, at the 
age of 16 years. 

Mr. Hunter is now serving his seond term on the, township board of 
Howard Township, and is especially interested in the project of good roads 
for his community. He is a member of the Christian church, and a relia- 
ble and substantial man. 

Charles H. Mothersead, the efficient county clerk of Gentry County, 
was born near McFall in this county, Dec. 13, 1878, the son of M. 0. and 
Nancy M. (Elliott) Mothersead. 

M. O. Mothersead was born on a farm adjoining the birth place of 
his son, Charles H., Jan. 27, 1850. His father, Charles Decatur Mothersead, 
was a native of Kentucky who came to Missouri in the days when the state 
was a part of the frontier country and entered land northwest of McFall. 
He remained on the farm which he took up there until his death. His re- 
mains are buried in Busby Cemetery. M. O. Mothersead lived near McFall 
until 1891 when he was elected to the office of county collector. He moved 
to Albany and remained there while he served two terms as collector. He 
later accepted the position of cashier of the Bank of Albany and was hold- 
ing that position at the time of his death on Oct. 1, 1918. His remains 
are buried in Highland Cemetery at Albany. He was a man highly esteem- 
ed in the community. His widow, born Aug. 21, 1854, is now living at 



466 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Albany. To the union of M. 0. and Nancy M. (Elliott) Mothersead five 
children were born: O. B., married to Mamie Spears who was a student at 
Christian College, has been a resident of Hobart, Okla., for a number of 
years and is the Assistant State Bank Examiner of Oklahoma; Minnie, 
wife of J. E. Stone, a merchant of Perry, Okla.; C. H., the subject of this 
review; Benjamin F., died Aug. 24, 1921, was a merchant at Carthage, and 
was married to Myrtle Conard; and D. E., married to a Johnson County 
girl whom he met while attending the State Teachers College at Warrens- 
burg, and now living at Warrensburg where he is the assistant superinten- 
dent of public schools. 

C. H. Mothersead was educated in the public school of Albany and 
graduated from the Albany High School in 1896. He later attended Chris- 
tian College from which institution he graduated in the commercial course. 
For the six years following his graduation he taught school in Gentry 
County and at Martinville, Harrison County. He resigned at Martinville 
to accept the position of assistant cashier in the Bank of Albany which 
place he retained until he was elected clerk of Gentry County in 1914. 
In 1918 his county again called him to fill the same office and he is now 
serving his seventh year in the official capacity of county clerk. 

Mr. Mothersead was married Aug. 6, 1902 to Frances Delle Roundtree 
of Albany, a native of Harrison County, and a daughter of J. L. and Emma 
(Baldwin) Roundtree. Mrs. Roundtree died at Martinsville and Mr. 
Roundtree now lives in Idaho. To their union two children were born ; Mrs. 
Mothersead, and Ernest D., living at Albany. To the union of Charles H. 
and Frances Delle (Roundtree) Mothersead four children have been born: 
Marian, a junior in high school, and Frances, Lois, and John, all students 
in the grammer school. 

Mr. Mothersead is a member of the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons 
lodge, and of the Blue Lodge Chapter and Commandery. His great grand- 
father was a soldier in the Confederate arm and was killed in the Battle 
of Pea Ridge. His remains are buried on the battlefield. Mr. Mothersead's 
family through several generations have been firm in their stand for the 
things they considered right and Mr. Mothersead is a man who carries on 
the family traditions and ideals of civic justice. 

George P. Adams, attorney-at-law at Albany, and the probate judge 
of Gentry County, is a native of this county. He was born at King City, 
June 26, 1875, the son of Philip M. and Hattie A. (Winchester) Adams. 
His parents were both members of families whose names were well known 
in this part of Missouri. 

Philip M. Adams was born in Park County, Ind., in 1841, and came 
to Missouri with a brother, James Adams, in 1869. They settled in Gentry 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 467 

County where they bought a farm near Island City. PhiHp M. Adams was 
an attorney and practiced law in the county afterwards locating at King 
City. He represented the county in the State Legislatures of 1870 and 
1871, serving Gentry County efficiently and satisfactorily. He was a vet- 
eran of the Civil War in which he served as a member of Company B, 115th 
Indiana Volunteer Infantry. He was in service for three years and later 
kept up his connection with his former comrades as a member of the Grand 
Army of the Republic, Post at King City. 

Philip M. Adams was married in 1872 at King City to Hattie A. Win- 
chester. She was born in Connecticut in 1852, the daughter of Edwin G. 
and Laura P. (Davis) Winchester. Her parents came to Missouri in 1856 
and settled near King City. They both died at this home farm and their 
remains are buried in the King City Cemetery. To the union of Philip M. 
and Hattie A. (Winchester) Adams the following children were born: two 
infants deceased; George P., the subject of this sketch; and Maud, now the 
wife of Paul M. Culver, a farmer and stockman of Plattsburg. Philip M. 
Adams died in 1889 and his widow now lives in Colorado Springs, Colo. 

George P. Adams was educated in the public schools of King City, 
later attending the Northwest Missouri College at Albany for two years. 
He completed his college work in Missouri State University from which 
he graduated in the class of 1898. For the three years following his grad- 
uation from the University, he ran the Mountain Grove Journal with 
marked success. In 1902 he went into the hardware business at King City 
and remained in this work until 1914. In the fall of that year he was 
elected to the office of probate judge of the county on the republican ticket. 
He was admitted to the bar on Dec. 31, 1917 and was re-elected probate 
judge in 1918. He is now serving his seventh year in that capacity. That 
his service has been upright and acceptable to the county is shown by his 
reelection. On Jan. 1, 1922, Mr. Adams became a partner in the insurance 
business with Mr. Sam C. Killam. 

On Dec. 10, 1902, Mr. Adams was married to Leta Vincent, a native 
of Marshaltown, Iowa, and the daughter of 0. K. and Sophia (Arnold) 
Vincent, both of whom died at Mountain Grove where their remains are 
buried. Mrs, Adams was educated in Iowa and Missouri. She studied 
music for some time at Drury College in Springfield. To her union with 
George P. Adams three daughters were born : Ruth, Harriett, and Dorothy. 
Ruth and Harriett are both students in the Albany High School. 

Mr. Adams is a member of the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons 
and of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows lodges. As a private citizen 
and in his official capacity, Mr. Adams is a man of integrity, enterprise, and 
high ideals. He has served his county in the office to which his fellow 



468 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

citizens called him with honesty and fairness, meriting and receiving the 
good will of his community. Mr, Adams and family are members of the 
Presbyterian church, and Mr. Adams is an elder. 

Dale S. Flowers, cashier of the Gentry County Bank, a past officer of 
Gentry County, and the vice president of the Missouri Bankers Association, 
was born in Henry County, Iowa, Nov. 9, 1867, the son of William A. and 
Elizabeth (Stockton) Flowers. 

William A. Flowers was born in Ohio and settled near the present site 
of Stanberry in Gentry County in 1871. He became a prominent farmer 
and stockman there. He served in the Missouri State Militia under Cap- 
tain Comstock and was a leader in public affairs until his death at Stan- 
berry. His widow, a native of Platte County, still lives at Stanberry at the 
age of 78 years. Besides their son, Dale S., the subject of this review, Mr. 
and Mrs. Flowers had a daughter, now Mrs. Samuel M. Jordan of Keytes- 
ville. 

Samuel M. Jordan was born in Gentry County and was the first man 
ever appointed to the position of county farm agent in the United States. 
He held this position at Sedalia in Pettis County and so successfully was 
the experiment made by Mr. Jordan that the plan of county agent work 
has now spread to every state in the union. Much of the popularity of this 
rural movement is due to the initial effort of Mr. Jordan. Mr. Jordan is 
now the head of the State Agricultural Department where he is doing work 
that is proving invaluable to the state. He is a brother to Minnie (Jordan) 
Flowers, wife of Dale S. Flowers. The other Jordan children are: James 
H., Louis P., and John M., all living in Los Angeles, Calif. 

Dale S. Flowers was educated in the public schools of Stanberry and 
the Stanberry Normal. He was a clerk in the postofRce at Stanberry and 
then for three years was a clerk in the railroad mail service. He then ac- 
cepted the position of deputy county clerk of Gentry County and remained 
in this work for four years when he was elected circuit clerk and recorder 
of the county for two successive terms, serving in all eight years in that 
capacity. On Jan. 1, 1903 he accepted a position with the Gentry County 
Bank, and has been an efficient and popular member of the official force of 
that institution ever since. 

The Gentry County Bank has one of the most interesting histories 
among financial institutions in this part of the state. It had its beginnings 
in the work of Charles G. Comstock who came from Albany, New York in 
1859. He located in Albany in this county and became the pioneer banker 
of the community, operating a bank by himself from January, 1870 to July 
of the same year, when the Exchange Bank of Comstock and Millen was 
established by C. G. Comstock and M. L. Millen. This firm continued to do 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 469 

business until July 24, 1876 when it was succeeded by the Gentry County 
Bank, organized with a capital stock of $100,000, thirty per cent of which 
was paid in at the time of organization. The amount of capital stock was 
afterwards reduced to $20,000 in order to comply with the banking laws of 
the state. The officers of the bank in 1881 were: H. L, Peery, President; 
and M. L. Millen, Cashier ; with L. H. Peery, C. G. Comstock, G. S. Hundley, 
M. M. Campbell, J. H. Degginger, R. M. McCammon, W. C. Porter, R. L. 
Wheley, and M. L. Millen, Directors. The bank had a surplus of $9,000 at 
that time and was located at the present site on the corner of Polk and 
Wood streets at the southeast side of the Public Square. 

The bank has proved itself to be a safe institution and since the date 
of its establishment has made a remarkable growth. It is in the hands of 
men of business acumen and commermial ability and is influential in the 
county. The present capital stock is $50,000 ; the surplus and undivided 
profits, $71,000; and the deposits on June 30, 1921, $323,614.32 with no 
bills payable nor money borrowed in any form. The present officers are: 
C. N. Comstock, President ; James O'Mara, Vice President ; Dale S. Flowers, 
Cashier; J. D. Smith, Assistant Cashier; and C. N. Comstock, Dale S. 
Flowers, James O'Mara, G. W. Reed, I. G. Patton, J. H. Degginger, and E. 
Ray Murphy, Directors. C. N. Comstock, J. H. Degginger, and E. Ray 
Murphy are all sons of men who were connected with the development of 
this bank. 

Dale S. Flowers was married on May 4, 1890, to Minnie Jordan, a 
daughter of Samuel and Ann (Puterbough) Jordan. To this union the 
following children were born: Aletha, married to Wallace Applegate of 
Keytesville ; Bernice, the wife of J. H, Degginger of Albany ; and Cleo J., 
a bookkeeper in the Gentry County Bank. 

Mr. Flowers is one of the leading citizens of the community, a man 
who, as a county officer was unprejudiced and efficient, as an officer in the 
bank is competent and reliable, and as a citizen of Albany and Gentry 
County is deservedly held in high esteem. 

James D. Smith, the assistant cashier of the Gentry County Bank and 
a well known citizen of Albany, is a native of this county. He was born 
at Albany, Sept. 23, 1871, the son of Milton and Mary (Lainhart) Smith, 
both now deceased. 

Milton Smith was born in Athens Township in Gentry County. His 
wife, Mary (Lainhart) Smith, was born in Kentucky, the daughter of Wil- 
liam and Nancy (Smith) Lainhart who came to Gentry County when their 
daughter was but a small child and settled on a farm in Athens Township. 
They both died on this farm and their remains are buried in the Bulla 
Cemetery. About 1875, Milton Smith went to Utah where he engaged in 



470 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

the mining business and where he died. His widow later married William 
T. Madden and to this union two sons were born : H. T., now living at Al- 
bany ; and John L., of Manhattan, Kan., who is a veteran of the World War; 
he served in the 35th Division. Mrs. Madden died in 1915 and her remains 
are buried in Highland Cemetery. 

James D. Smith was educated in the rural schools, later attending the 
Albany High School from which he graduated. He then entered the Stan- 
berry Normal and was enrolled for a while in the Northwest Missouri Col- 
lege at Albany. He taught one term of school at the Burton District in 
Harrison County, then entered a bank at New Hampton where he remained 
for a short time. In October, 1895, he began work as the bookkeeper in 
the Gentry County Bank at Albany and has been the assistant cashier of 
that institution for the past eighteen years. 

James D. Smith was married on March 29, 1896 to Rosa E. Dillon. 
Her parents were Reverend S. R. Dillon, a Baptist minister, and Joicy M. 
(Dotson) Dillon. They are both now living. Mrs. Smith was born near 
Lone Star and grew up in Gentry County. To the union of James D. and 
Rosa E, (Dillon) Smith two daughters were born: Grace, now the wife 
of C. 0. Lane, a carpenter of Albany; and Mae Pauline, a student in the 
Albany High School. 

All of the Smith family belong to the Baptist church. Mr. Smith's 
long service of 26 years with the Gentry County Bank attests to his busi- 
ness integrity and his efficiency. His careful work and his commercial 
acumen have been invaluable assets to the institution with which he has 
been so long connected. 

H. W. Bare, the well known senior member of the firm of H. W. Bare 
and Son of Albany, was born in Jefferson County, Ind., Feb. 18, 1847, the 
son of David and Margaret (Jones) Bare. 

David Bare was the son of Henry Bare, a native of Pennsylvania who 
moved to Jefferson County, Ind., where he died. David Bare died in the 
same county in August, 1847. His wife, Margaret (Jones) Bare was a 
daughter of John W. and Nancy Jones of Jefferson County, Ind. Mrs. Bare 
and her parents moved to Kentucky when her son, H. W. Bare, was only 
an infant and there Mrs. Bare contracted a second marriage with Israel 
Umenseter and to this union two children were born: Nancy, now Mrs. 
Varble living in Oldham County, Ky.; and David, dead, who married in 
Kentucky but left no children. Margaret (Bare) Umenseter died in Ken- 
tucky in 1896. Her father, John Wesley Jones was a Methodist minister 
in Oldham County. His wife was Nancy Saunders who was reared near 
Lexington. They were the parents of 14 children. They died in Oldham 
County at the age of 84 years. 

H. W. Bare was educated in public and private schools but the out- 



HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 471 

break of the Civil War interferred with his school work. He made his own 
way in the world ever since he was a lad of 14 years. He worked on a farm 
drove cattle, and then learned the carpenter trade in Indiana where he 
lived for a while. He came to Gentry County in September, 1868 and work- 
ed as a contractor and carpenter for several years. In December, 1883, he 
opened the H. W. Bare, Furniture and Undertaking business. The firm 
has remained in business for 38 years. The present location, which has 
housed the business since 1898, is a building 40x90 feet with a storage 
basement the same size. Here the company carries a complete line of 
furniture and undertaking. Mr. Bare had done embalming since the open- 
ing of his commercial enterprise but in August, 1895, there was granted 
to him the first state embalmer's license ever issued in Gentry County. 

H. W. Bare was married on Oct. 6, 1866 in Trimble County, Kentucky 
to Julia A. Rouner, a daughter of Jackson and Nancy (Sampson) Rouner, 
both natives of Kentucky who later came to Gentry County and died here. 
Their remains are buried in the Brick Church Cemetery. To H. W. and 
Julia A. (Rouner) Bare the following children were born: Margaret, the 
wife of George Smith of McFall ; Katy Belle, wife of John Murphy of War- 
rensburg; Lavena, married to Francis M. Bray of Chillicothe; Ida, living 
at home ; John W., married to Alma Sheets and living at Woodbine, Iowa ; 
Hattie, wife of T. L. Collins, of St. Joseph ; Charles E., in the furniture 
and undertaking business at New Hampton ; Allen T., a member of the 
firm of H. W. Bare and Son, married first in July, 1906 to Clara Higdon who 
died in October, 1919 leaving four children, Henry, Maurice, Julia, and 
Lovett, married the second time in April, 1920 to Pearl Putman, the 
widow of Bart Putman; Gussie, wife of J. E. Ruhl, a physician at St. 
Joseph; Thurman, died in 1892 at the age of four years; and Lewis W., 
a resident of Albany, married to Elma Allen of Albany and with one child, 
Catherine Louise. 

Lewis W. Bare is a veteran of the World War. He enlisted for service 
at St. Louis on July 15, 1918 and went to Fort Houston, Texas, then to 
Camp Merritt, N. J., and overseas in November, 1918. He left the United 
States on Nov. 12, the day after the armistice was signed, landed at Brest, 
and was sent to Bordeaux. He was placed in motor service in southern 
France and remained until Oct. 6, 1919 when he started home. He was 
mustered out of service at Camp Dodge, Iowa, Oct. 18, 1918 having been in 
service more than 15 months. Mr. Bare is a member of the American 
Legion at Albany. 

Both H. W. Bare and his son, Allen T. Bare, are members of the 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, Royal Arch, the Council, and the Com- 
mandery. They are enterprising and far sighted business men who have 



472 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

achieved commercial success by virtue of hard work and integrity. H. W. 
Bare has been known as a successful business man in the county for many 
years. He is one of the men who have made their own way in the world, 
whose assets were pluck, courage, and ambition. Mr. Bare is an exponent 
of all these traits. 

Levi Todd, deceased, was born in Madison County, Ky., April 26, 1836. 
His wife, Nancy (Vaughn) Todd, was born in the same county, Aug. 26, 
1839. They came to Missouri in 1869, and bought 300 acres of land in 
Bogle Township, Gentry County, from Judge Lewis, for $10,00 an acre. 
Of the old Todd farm, 212 acres are still owned by John L., and Mary E. 
Todd, children of Levi Todd and his wife. 

Levi Todd became a prominet farmer and stockman. He helped 
organize the New Friendship church in 1889, and gave the land that is 
now the cemetery of that church. When Mr. and Mrs. Todd came to their 
farm in Gentry County, they found only a cabin of two rooms on it. This 
they used as a dwelling for many years, and is was the birthplace of most 
of their children. The old cabin was torn down about 10 years ago. The 
present residence was built about 34 years ago, and the barn was erected 
in 1877. Levi Todd died on his farm on April 14, 1908, and Mrs. Todd died 
on April 4, 1914. The remains of both are buried in the New Friendship 
Cemetery. 

To the union of Levi and Nancy (Vaughn) Todd the following child- 
ren were born: Celia, now the wife of J. W. Dills of Bogle Township ; Mary, 
Barbara, born on April 2, 1870, and died in infancy ; Florence, the wife of 
A. B. Pierce of Huggins Township; Mary E., known to her family as Betty, 
now keeping house for her brother, John L. ; John L., born May 10, 1877, 
now living on the home place ; and Levi, born Aug. 16, 1881, died in infancy. 

John L., and Mary E. Todd were both educated in the Shockley 
School, where James Hinton was their first teacher. They now own most 
of the original land holdings of their father, and operate the farm in a suc- 
cessful way. The place is well improved, and John L. Todd raises cattle in 
addition to the work of general farming. His sister keeps house. 

Both John L. and Mary Todd are known throughout their community 
as energetic, ambitious and successful people. They both inherited from 
their parents the same spirit of courageous independence, and industry, 
and like their parents they have developed business success, and civic pride. 

Emert Akes, the popular circuit clerk and ex-officio recorder of Gentry 
County, was born near McFall on Feb. 3, 1890. He is the son of A. B. and 
Matilda Jane (Osborn) Akes. Mr. Akes was formerly a merchant at 
McFall and he and his wife now Hve at Stanberry. Their children are: 
Ellis, a resident of Manitau, Okla. ; Permilia, now the wife of W. E. Teel 
of Stanberry; and Ernest, the subject of tKis review. 






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HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 473 

Emert Akes was educated in McFall and is a graduate of the McFall 
High School. He later attended the Gem City Business College at Quincy, 
111. After leaving Quincy, he served as the deputy county clerk of Gentry 
County under W. E. Teel. He held this position for four years at the end 
of which time he accepted a position with E. M. Harbor in the Internal 
Revenue Collector's office at Kansas City. While he was working in Kansas 
City, the United States entered the World War and Mr. Akes enlisted for 
service in the army on July 6, 1918. He was sent to Camp McArthur, 
Texas for training and was placed in Company B, 64th Infantry, 7th Divi- 
sion. Mr. Akes sailed for overseas Aug. 13, 1918. He was in the Pruve- 
nelle Sector of the Moselle River from Oct. 10, to Nov. 11, 1918 and then 
was with his division until March 20, 1919 when he was transferred to the 
central records office at Bourges, France. He remained there until Aug. 6, 
1919 when he left for Brest. He sailed for the United States from there 
and arrived in New York July 23, 1919, and was mustered out of service 
at Camp Taylor in Kentucky, Sept. 4, 1919. Since his return home, Mr. 
Akes has been an efficient officer of the county. 

Emert Akes was married on May 9, 1920 to Bonnie Opal Peery, a 
daughter of Thomas L. and Fannie (Cook) Peery of Albany. Mrs Akes 
was born and reared in Missouri. She graduated from the Albany High 
School and later was a student at Stephens College at Columbia. 

Mr. Akes is a member and past commander of the Donald Holden Post, 
No. 106, of the American Legion at Albany. Mr. Akes is a young man of 
whom the county is justly proud. His service was given to the country 
in its most trying days and since his return to this county, he has served 
in an official capacity with the same readiness and in the same capable 
way that he served when he was needed in the army. 

Andrew C. Gartin, a resident of Albany, who for four years was the 
judge of the county court for the South District, was born in Buchanan 
County, March 20, 1844, the son of Nathaniel and Clamentina B. (Steel) 
Gartin. 

Nathanial Gartin was born in Kentucky, the son of Griffy Gartin 
who was a native of Kentucky, born in 1808. Nathaniel Gartin came to 
Missouri when he was a young man. He settled first in Cooper County, 
later in Buchanan County, and came to Gentry County in 1854 where he 
entered land around Darlington. He owned at one time more than 2000 
acres of land. He died at Gentryville, June 22, 1882, at the age of 74 
years. His wife also died at Gentryville. Their children were: Mary 
Jane, married Mr. Graves and died in Buchanan County; Frances, later 
Mrs. Morgan, who died in California ; Cynthia, died when a young woman 
in Buchanan County; W. P., died in Gentry County; Tippie, married Mr. 



474 HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES 

Gist and is dead; Didamia, later Mrs. Jameson, dead; William, died in 
Washington; Andrew C, the subject of this sketch; Lindsey J., died in 
Gentry County; John R., a resident of Darlington; N. K., living in Port- 
land, Ore. ; Miranda, now Mrs. Clark of Gentry County ; James G., living 
at Darlington ; and Marion P., a resident of Los Angeles, Cal. 

Andrew C. Gartin was educated in the public and subscription schools. 
He came to Gentry County in 1867 and bought 150 acres of land to which 
he added later until he owned 440 acres. He has since sold all but 200 
acres which constitutes his home place 12 mil