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Full text of "History of Dearborn, Ohio and Switzerland Counties, Indiana : From their earliest settlement, containing a history of the counties, their cities, townships, towns, villages, schools, and churches ... biographies : ... history of the North-west territory, the state of Indiana, and the Indians"

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1490244 



GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



CL- 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



HISTORY 

OF 

DEARBORN.'OHIO AND SWITZERLAND 

COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

FROM THEIR EARLIEST SETTLEMENT. 



COITTAINIITG 



A HISTORY OF THE COUNTIES; THEIR CITIES, TOWNSHIPS, TOWNS, VILLAGE: 

SCHOOLS, AND CHURCHES; REMINISCENCES, EXTRACTS, ETC.; LOCAL 

STATISTICS; PORTRAITS OF EARLT SETTLERS AND PROMINENT 

MEN; BIOGRAPHIES; PRELIMINARY CHAPTERS ON THE 

HISTORY OF THE NORTH-WEST TERRITORY, THE 

STATE OF INDIANA, AND THE INDIANS. 



ILLUSTBATED. 



CHICAGO: 

WEAKLEY, HABRAMAK & CO., PUBLISHERS. 

1885. 



1490244 

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 



REV. LUCIEN ALDEN, a Presbyterian clergyman, and a gentle- 
man of high scholasticjaccornplishments, removed from Boston to Aurora, 
and oponod the seminary established through the efforts of Judge Hol- 
rnan, in 1826. In 1S28 Mr. Alden removed to Kising Sun, and took 
charge of the seminary at that place, which had just been completed. 
He conducted the institution with marked success for two years, when, 
in the fall of 1830, he returned to Boston, from which city ho had been 
sent to this part of the country as a missionary, and wore back a full suit 
of blue jeans, woven by Mrs. Judge Holman, on the old hand-loom. 
During his sojourn in this section of the country, Mr. Alden preached at 
Aurora, Rising Sun, Hartford, Dillsborongh, and other points, as oppor- 
tunity was afforded him. After returning to Boston, he was pastor of a 
church there many years. 

HARTZELL ABBOTT, farmer, Clay Township, was born in Dear- 
born County, Ind., July 6, 1835. His parents, William L. and Eliza- 
beth (Naylor) Abbott, were both natives of New Jersey, where they mar- 
ried, and from thence, in 181G, immigrated to Dearborn County, Ind., 
where they resided until their deaths, which occurred, the mother August 
1, 1854, and the father July 4, 1800. They were the parents of seven 
children, viz.: Elias, Henry H, Enoch, William N, Mary, Eliza A., and 
Hartzell, our subject. He, the youngest member of the family, was 
married at Lawrenceburgh, Ind., August 15, 1861, to Nora A., daughter 
of James and Nora (O'Conner) Johnson. She was born in this county, 
January 26, 1843. After Mr. Abbott's marriage he settled on his present 
farm, his father's old homestead, where he has since resided. He owns 
1G5 acres of line land, and his wife owns forty acres. They have had 
born to them five children, viz: Frank L., Sheridan S., James S., Will- 
iam N. (de eased), and Deruas H. Mr. Abbott is a member of the order 
of Odd Fellows, and also of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

HARRISON ABBOTT, farmer, Washington Township, resides on 
Section 9, and has a line body of land, all under a good state of cultiva- 
tion. He was born in New Jersey, April 21, 1S14. His parents. Will 



606 IHSTOKY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

intn .',1 Elizabeth (Naylor) Abbott, wero born in Now Jersey, and 
movi I I ■ this county in LS1G, whoro ho '.van engaged in farming up to 
his death, July 1, LSCO, being seventy-two years, seven months and 
eightei days old. Th< mother died August I, 1854, at the age of sixty- 
one years. Mr. Harrison Abbott was married December 29,1839, to 
Mis> Mary Smith, a nativo of Washington Township, who was born 
August I'. 1 , 1821. By this union seven children were born, viz.: Enoch, 
Eufus, Sarah A., William, ltafo, Hartsell, and Marietta. Mr. and Mrs. 
Abbott are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. During his life 
Mr. Abo itt has followed the occupation of a farmer, in which industry 
he has creditably succeeded. As a citizen he has been no less fortunate 
in gaining the esteem of his fellow men. 

J. II. ABBOTT, fanner, Clay Township, was born in Dearborn 
County, Ind., March 10, 1839. He is one of four children, burn to Elias 
and Nancy (McComas) Abbott. His father was a son of William L. 
Abbott, a native of New Jersey, where ho married Elizabeth Naylor, and 
from thence in an early day, immigrated to Dearborn County, Ind., where 
he afterward resided until his death. They were the parents of seven 
children, viz.: Harrison, Enoch, William N., Mary, Eliza A., Hartzell, 
and Elias, the father of our subject, the eldest member of tho family. 
He was born in New Jersey, February 3, 1812, and came with his parents 
to this county when a small boy. He and tho above Nancy McComas, 
were united in marriage in this county, and afterward settled on the 
same farm on which our subject now lives. She was born September 8, 
1815. In 1S67 they moved to Dillsborough where he died January 28, 
1869. His widow still survives, and resides at Dillsborough. Their chil- 
dren wero Mary A., James H. , Elizabeth A., and Sarah F. J. H, our 
subject, enlisted in the servk e August 11, 1862, in Company B, Eighty- 
third Regiment Indiana Volunteers, and served until June, 1S65, at 
which time he was discharged, and returned to Dearborn County where 
he was married December 24, 1S66, to Emma L., daughter of Nathan, 
and Sarah (Powell) Smith. She was born in Clay Township, this county, 
October '22, 1846. After our subject's marriage, he first settled at Dills- 
borough where he clerked in John M. Hoover's store until November, 
1868, at which time he purchased an interest in the store, which they 
continued together until the spring of 1871, when he sold out his inter- 
est in the store and moved on the farm where he at present lives, and 
has since resided. They have had born to them three children, namely: 
Orrin M., L. A., and Charley E. Mr. Abbott is a line man; is a mem- 
ber of the G. A. R., also the Masonic Order and Odd Fellows. 

LEONA RD AD KINS, retired, Sparta Township, was born in Worcester 
County. Md., February 1G, 1812. Tho parents, from whom he descended, 



Biooiuri K A I. SKETCHES. 607 

wore Willi u L'. ami Ebby (McGoo) Adl i both natives of W" 
County, Mil. The former wn a son of X-' in A and Elizabeth (] . 
Ailkins. v.. ere also nati 1 of Maryli I. He and the above Ebb] 
Mc Gee wen united in marriage in Word lor County, Mil., and there 
resided until their deaths. Their child] i wore as follows: Maria, 
Leonard, • I anus. Sarah, William R., Sai I, and Hannah. Leonard, 
our subji red to ; i ille, Mi o., Ky., in 1838, where he 

learned the mason trade, which he has pursued during the greater part 
of his life. In the spring of 1S43, he moved to Moore's Hill, and has 
resided there principally ever since. He wi - united in marriage August 
23, lo'-bi, to Mary Davis, who was born in this township December 14, 
1821, and was a daughter of Spencer and Elizabeth Davis. After Mr. 
Adkins's marriage he settled at Moore's Hill, and has resided there the 
greater part of the time. He formerly dealt quite extensively in real 
estate. He is an excellent man, and is highly esteemed by all who 
know him. Himself and wife are members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church. They have had born to them nine children, viz. ; Ma- 
ria P. (deceased), Elizabeth, Laura A. (deceased), James M., William 
S., Charles R., Flora B., Edward S., and Abraham L. 

WILLIAM S. ADKINS, dealer in meats, Sparta Township, is 
one of the most wide-awake and accommodating young men of the 
place; born at Moore's Hill, Dearborn Co, Inch, May 30, 1854. 
He is one of seven children born to Leonard and Mary (Davis) Adkins, 
of Moore's Hill, whose sketch appears above. He was educated in the 
district schools and at Moore's Hill College. He first opened a meat mar- 
ket in 1876, which he continued for a short time only, and afterward 
turned his attention.to farming. In 187S, he again engaged in selling 
meats, which business he has since followed. He is doing an extensive 
business here, and is also carrying on a meat market in partnership with 
his brother, at Osgood. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. In 1880-81, 
he held the office of marshal of Moore's Hill, and at present is a mem- 
ber of the town board. He i~. a genial young fellow. 

ADAM ADLER, farmer Sparta Township, was born in Germany, 
March 2'1, 1813. He was the second of eight children, born to Andrew 
and Barbara Adler, who were also natives i .f Germany, where they resided 
during their lives. Our Bubject was married in Germany in 1846, to 
Catherine Tronsier,and in the same year immigrated to the United States, 
landing at New York City in November of that year. Ho shortly after- 
ward came to Cincinnati, Ohio, and in 1853 moved to Dearborn County, 
Ind. , settling on the same farm on which he now lives, which ho had 
purchased in 1849. He own.- sixty acres of good land, which is well 
improved. Himself and wife have had born to them live children, viz.: 



608 HISTORY 01' DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

Thomai er (dece . iholas, Catherine, and Henry. Mr. Adler 

ai ■' . are members i E the Catholic Church. 

JAMES AIKEN, a farmer of Manchester Township, and a native of 
this coi - born Novi mb 'i 15, 1822, is a son of John and Mary (John- 
i.i-'. aativesof F< a agh County, Ireland. The maternal grand- 

fathi Johnston, with bis wife and part of his family, immigrated 

to America in 1818, lauding at New York, (bonce came to Pittsburgh, 
where be built a family boat and came down the Ohio River to Cincin- 
nati, where he left his family aud walked to Manchester, this county, 
and stop] I with Daniel Plummer, an early settler, and a Methodist 
minister. Soon after, he entered eighty acres of land in Section 3, this 
township, where be erected a log-cabin opening out right in the woods, 
into which be moved with his family, and commenced the work of mak- 
ing a farm. He was then sixty yearn of age, yet be performed much 
hard pioneer work. He lost his wife by death, in 1839. He died in 
1848, aged ninety years. There were two of bis sons, Jarret and Charles, 
who came to this county soon after their father, the former died at 
Louisville, and the latter settled in New Orleans, where be resided till 
the war of the Rebellion, since which, nothing has been beard of 
him. Mr. John Aiken came to America in 1821, was married at Phila- 
delphia, and in the fall of the same year came to Indiana, and settled 
with his father-in-law, James Johnston, on Section 3, living in their 
house until he built a log house near where Mr. James Aikens' present 
residence stands. Hero he resided until bis death, July 2, 1SG0, aged 
sixty-five years. His widow died April 2, 1865, aged seventy-one years. 
They bad two sons, and two daughters: James, Marvin Irvin, who, in April, 
1859, went to California, wdiere be resided, the last known of bim; Eliza- 
beth Ann, wife of Nathaniel Lewis, who resides in McDonald County, 
Mo., and Mary Jane, who died young. James Aiken, the eldest of his 
father's family, has never removed from tho old homo place where he 
was born and raised, having resided here sixty-two years. He was mar- 
ried May 11, 1865, to Miss Eliza Strain, daughter of Robert and Mary 
Strain, natives of Ireland, be being of Scotch descent; they lived and 
died in their nv.' ive land. Mrs. Aiken has one sister, Mary, wife of 
William R. McConnel, residing in Dearborn County. Mr. Aiken and 
wife, have six children: Robert James, Mary E., Jennie, Aggie, Hattie, 
and William Marvin. Mr. Aiken has devoted bis life to farming and 
stock raising, and by industry and close application to business, has been 
very successful. He now owns 220 acres of land, with good new build- 
ings, which he has erected, with other improvements. His farm now 
embraces all the land that was in possession of his ancestors. It is a 
pleasant fanner's home. Mr. Aiken is one of the prominent, reliable and 
honored farmers of Manchester Township. 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 609 

ALVIN J. ALDEN, . I ickson Township, is a nativo of Jack- 

son Township, born Janui ij IG, 1823; is a son of Isaac an.! Rutb (..Mor- 
gan) Allien, he a native of N w Hampshire, and she of Now York. In 

the spring of 1S17 Mr. Alden, then a young single man, with his cousin, 
Samuel Alden, left their hon is and native Slate, anil came fo Cincinnati, 
and soon after to Dearb u y, Cud. Alvin entered seventy-five acres 

of lie' irthwest quarter of Section 23, and Samuel the southwest quar- 
ter of the same section. They erected a small cabin near the line 
between their hinds, where they lived together and kept bachelors' hall. 
At that timo the country was all one dense forest, the nearest neighbor 
being three miles distant, and to get to them and back without losing 
their course, they made a blazed path through the woods. These were 
probably the first settlers in Jackson Township. Mr. Alden, during the 
first two or three years, returned to Cincinnati daring the winter season 
where ho could procure employment and earn some money to carry on 
his improvements during the summer season upon his land. Subse- 
quently he erected another log-cabin on his land, and in 1822 he married 
and located in his new home, where he resided until his death, June 5, 
1844, in his forty, ninth year. His death occurred very suddenly, as follows: 
He had killed a calf, and in the act of dressing it he made a stroke with 
his knife which passed through the hide and entered his own body, 
severing the femoral artery, and he died in a few minutes from loss of 
blood. His widow still survives, and resides with her daughter in 
Missouri, aged eighty years. They had twelve children, ten now living: 
Alvin J., George and Warren (twins), the former — George — resides in 
Illinois; Lydia, now the widow Wade, resides in California; Samuel J., 
also in California; Mary, wife of Jesse Ehler, residing in Missouri; 
Jonathan, residing in Kansas; Caroline, wife of John Tangman, of Rip- 
ley County; Eliza, wife of George Jeter, residing in Missouri, and Isaac, 
uow at the Black Hills. Of those deceasod, Phineas was scalded to 
death by falling into a kettle of hot water, when about four years of ago, 
and Louisa, twin sister of Eliza, who grew to womanhood, married John 
T. Jackson, removed to Missouri, where she died in the spring of 1 884. 
Alvin J. Alden, the eldest child of his parents, born and reared here, 
was fully acquainted with the early scenes of this county. December 
5, 1847, Mr. Alden was rnarri.-l to Miss Sarah J. Catchall, born Novem- 
ber 27, 1827, a daughter of Thomas and Sarah (MeKinly) Cutchall, na- 
tives of Pennsylvania, who became early settlers of Franklin County, 
Ind., where he died in May, 1832 or 1833. She bt ill survives, and re- 
Bides in Jackson Township, aged eighty-five years. They had four chil- 
dren, three now living: Ann. now the widow Homer, residing in Ripley 
County; Sarah Jane, and Rachel, now wife of William Ehlex\ Mr. 



610 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

Alden and wife have had seven children, four now survive: Alice, now 
the wife of Willi im H. Woods, residing in Chicago. 111., Ruth E., wife 

of William Ah n nils. Orpha I. and Carrie E. The three deceased, Mary 
L., Samuel E., and Ida E., all died within four weeks' time, in May and 
June of 1800, of diphtheria. Mr. Alden has passed his entire life in 
Jackson Township, a period of sixty-two years, has given his principal 
attention to farming, and has lived at his present place of residence 
thirty-six years. Ho has served in the State Legislature three terms; 
was first elected in 1848, then in 1854, and again in 1878, serving 
to the general satisfaction of his constituents. In 1803 ho was elected 
to the office of recorder of Dearborn County, and served four years. 

JA?*!ES AMDOR, fanner, Manchester Township, is a native of 
Dearborn County, bom November 17, 1854; is a son of Bennett and 
Saphronia (Manley) Amdor. He is a native of Saxony, Germany, and 
she, of Hamilton, Ohio. In 1837 Mr. Amdor, then nineteen years of 
age, immigrated to America with his parents, Michael and Mary S. 
Amdor, and two sisters, Christiana and Anestina. They landed at Balti- 
more, thence came to Pittsburgh, and to Lawrenceburgh and settled on 
the farm where James Amdor and his mother now reside, and here 
Michael Amdor and wife died. Subsequently Bennett Amdor married 
and settled on the homo place where he resided till his death September 
28, 1SS3, aged sixty-rive years. He was the father of nine children — six 
now living: Nancy Caroline, wife of Elwin Day, residing in Adams 
County, Iowa; Mary S., now the widow of Samuel Day; Edward R. ; 
Franklin P., now a practicing physician; Rhoda J., wife of Valentine 
Vogel, and James, all of whom reside in Iowa, but the latter, James, 
who is the youngest child, and the subject of this sketch, who grew to 
manhood, and remained with his father until his death, since which ho has 
taken charge of the farm which contains 160 acres of land with good 
buildings and improvements, and is a very pretty home and farmer's 
residence. Mr. Amdor was united in marriage February 6, 1879, with 
Miss Mary inegaid, born in Manchester Township August 30, 1862, a 
daughter of John and Mary Winegard, natives of Germany, who came 
to America while young with their parents, who settled in Ripley and 
Dearborn Counties; here they grew to maturity, married and settled in 
the western part of this township on the place where they still reside. 
They have had eleven children — nine now living: Mary, Jane (wife of 
Frederick Killman), Sarah, "William, Sophia, Emma, Maggie, Edith and 
Arthur. Mr. Amdor and wife have four children: John Bennett. Rhoda 
Jane, Bertha May and Charles Edwards. 

JAMES A. ANGEVINE, of York Township, and one of the old res- 
idents of this county, was born in New York City, in 1814. His parents. 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 613 

James and Susan (Montfort) Angevine, wevo both horn in the same city. 
His grandfather, John Angevine, was a native of Franco, and came to 
America prior to the Revolution, in which he participated as a soldier. 
Ho reared a family of twelve children — eleven daughters and one6on — the 
latter being the youngest of the family. He was a shoe-maker by trade, 
and in 1818, came to this county with his son James, with whom he re- 
sided till his death, in 1831. His wife survived two years, passing 
away in 1S33. James Angevine, the father of our subject, James A., 
grew to maturity in New York, and in his earlier years was a sailor. It 
is said that he passed through many disasters during his seafaring life. 
He iinally abandoned the water, and with a capital of §500, engaged in 
the grocery business, meeting with excellent success. At the age of 
twenty -three, he married his first wife, who died eleven years later, 
childless. At thirty-six, ho married Susan Montfort, whose parents were 
from Pennsylvania, and whose ancestors wore from Holland. Of the 
twelve children born to them, eleven grew to maturity. The deceased 
was an infant. On moving to this county in 1818, he purchased 1,100 
acres of land in York Township, where he afterward engaged in farming, 
till old age compelled him to retire. His wife died July 2, 1869. In his 
ninety-third year he was taken by his relatives aud others, to La Salle 
County, 111., where he died July 10, 1874. November 9, 1862, Mr. and 
Mrs. Angevine, celebrated the fiftieth anniversary of their marriage, 
and there were present the entire family — sons, daughters, sons-in-law, 
daughters-in-law, and grandchildren, twenty-one of the latter, and 
thirty-five in all. Ho was a man of unblemisl ed character, and all his 
life was devoted to the best interests of his family and the community. 
James A. Angevine, whose name introduces this sketch, grew up in the 
quiet walks of rural life. Ho resided with his parents till 1S44, when 
he married Miss Mary A. Davis, and established a home of his own. 
Her parents were William and Ann (Jenkins) Davis, who were natives of 
Morganshire, Wales. They were married April 20, 1814, and in 181G 
immigrated to the United States. They located for a short time, in New 
York, and then moved to Hamilton County, Ohio, where their oldest 
daughter, Mrs. Angevine, was born, in 1821. In the following year 
they settled in this county, where they purchased land, and resided till 
their death, the mother passing away April 19, 1S(J7 the father June 
13, 18G8. They reared a family of ten children, nine still living, name- 
ly: George, Jo! Thomas, Griffith, David, Mary A., Elizabeth, Helen 
and Jennie. After his marriage, Mr. Angevine rented land for a time 
and by hard labor, aided by an industrious wife, gradually worked his 
way up to the front rank. In 1850 he purchased his present farm of 
ninety acres, on which he has since conducted a prosperous fanning 



G12 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

business. On the death of his father, in 1874, he inherited 120 acres, 
and, besides these two tracts, owns another of forty acres in this town- 
ship. 

THOMAS T. ANNIS, farmer and ox county commissioner, Lawrence- 
burgh City, is n native of this county, born in 1836. His parents, Thomas 
and Rhoda i Fairbanks) Annii . were natives of the Genesee Valley, N. Y., 
and Green River Valley, Mass. His grandfather, Annis, was soldier in 
the revolution and died in the locality of his birth — the valley of the 
Genesee. His grandfather, Fairbanks, was a native of Massachusetts, and 
married there, but subsequently moved to the Genesee. In 1822 the two 
families immigrated to this county, the country having been inspected two 
years previous by Thomas Anuis and two brothers-in-law, Sheldon and 
Lucius Fairbai s. Their tour was made by wagons over the mountains 
to Pittsburgh where they constructed their own flat-boats, and from which 
point they floated down the Ohio to Lawrenceburgh. On their way they 
fell in company with the Buell family which afterward became quite 
prominent in this locality. Thomas Annis remained with his family in 
Lawrence! argil about one year. He had learned the carpenter's trade in 
the East under the old seven-year apprenticeship rule and this trade he 
followed the fortunes of for about twenty-live years. His first, purchase 
of land was made in 1824, when he obtained eighty acres which he paid 
for by ship -carpentering in Cincinnati, Ohio. He subsequently added to 
this tract, till he owned about 255 acres, besides some town property in 
Lawrenceburgh and Aurora and some western land. He reared a family 
of four children who grew to maturity: David, Thomas T., Clarissa 
(wife of Ferris Blasdel), and Cordelia, wife of E.Butterfield. He was an 
industrious and euergetic citizen and did much work in his line, erecting 
bay-presses, houses, barns, mills, etc. He built the frame work of the old 
mill between Elm and Short Streets; Lawrenceburgh, the site of which 
is now marked only by the stone foundation. His death occurred in 
1874 his widow survived till January, 1881. Thomas T. Annis, the sub- 
ject proper of this notice, grew to maturity on his father's farm, and was 
there chiefly employed till he was thirty-one years of age. In 1870 he 
married Mary Heustis, a daughter of Elias Houstis, who is elsewhere 
mentioned in this work. After his marriage he resided on the home- 
stead one year, when he purchased the Buell farm in this township. 
Here he resided till 1882, engaged in agricultural pursuits, then moved 
to Lawrenceburgh which is now his place of abode. He was elected to 
the office of commissioner in the fall of 1SS2, which he is still holding, 
his term of servioe not having expired yet. He, with his brother, owns 
several tracts of land in Iowa, Kansas and Dakota, and his good manage- 
ment of his business affairs generally has not been without its reward. 



BIOGRAPHICAL KETCH US. * » 1 -$ 

DAVID A. ANNIS, farmer, Lawrencehnrgb Township, one of its 
most substantial residents, was born in Dearborn County, in 1829. Heisa 
son of Thomas Aunis, and grew to maturity on bis father s farm. }lo 
was educated in the common schools, and from his youth up has made 
farming bis chief occupation. He married, in 18(5*2, Mary Pearson, a 
native of this county, and daughter of Joseph and Emilino (Ayresj Dear- 
son, natives of Hamilton County, Ohio. Llei mother was horn and reared 
in Cincinnati till grown, then moved to College Hill, nine miles from 
the eily, on a farm. Her parent.-, resided in this county for a time, and 
then returned to Ohio. Air. and Mrs. Anuis have had live children born 
to them: Ralph W., Harry. Louie. Elvin, and Mary Belle. Two are 
deceased. After bis marriage Mr. Annis began business for himself on 
the old homestead, to which be has made some additions by purchase. 
He has always devoted most of bis attention to general agriculture, in which 
he has been quite successful, now owning an excellent farm in this county, 
besides a largo tract in Pratt County, Kas. He is regarded as one of the 
best farmers of the township, and in every respect an exemplary citizen; 
and having resided in the county of bis birth all his life, is well worthy 
of taking a creditable position in its history. 

MASON W. ANDERSON, of Rising Sun, one of the proprietors of 
the Anderson & Mclienry Omnibus Line, was born in Boone County, 
Ky., September 28, 1827. His parents were Henry and Mildred (Cor- 
nelius) Anderson, the latter born in Kentucky. Mr. Anderson, left an 
orphan in childhood, was reared chiefly by an uncle, in Boone County, 
where he resided till about twenty years of age. At eighteen he begau 
the butcher's trade in Covington, in which place he continued the same 
about lifteon years. He was married, in September, 1849, to Emma 
Newman, of this county, a native of Philadelphia, and daughter of Tim- 
othy Newman, who came into this locality about 1837. After his mar- 
riage he began the butchering business in Rising Sun, continuing til! 
1861, He then clerked for four years for H. S. Espey, and subsequently 
took up the cleaver again for a short time. He still does some "ham 
trimming" for shippers of pork, of Rising Sun, being quite an adept 
at that business. In 1807 Mr. Anderson started, on a limited scale, the 
Aurora & Rising Sun Omnibus Line, which has developed in efficiency 
till almost an equal to steam railway as a means of passenger transporta- 
tion. This line, started with much opposition, Mr. Anderson has contin- 
ued from the beginning, never having missed but one trip from the first 
to the present. In 1875 the Aurora & Rising Sun Turnpike was con- 
structed by a company composed of W. B. Sinks, Dr. H. T. Williams, 
and Mr. Anderson, at a cost of about S10, 000, this being i no of the 
most important improvements of the county. Air. Anderson has been a 



614 HisToiu oj i) :.\i:nouN \ nu i counties. 

member ■ f lie I. O. 0. F. f< r thirty live . and, with Mrs. Anderson, 

a member of the Met! copal < Lurch. He is a man of jovial 

disposition, and relates many amusinj its of his bus lino expe 

rience, which "our limited pace Eorbi I us 1" repeat." 

CHARLES F. ARING, of Lawrem burgh, one of the members of 
the Rodenberg Distilli p; y, \\ urn in Ohio in the year 1860, 

and has i idod most of hi'- life in a sin: :alled Chiviott where lie 

received hi- education. In 1880 he invest' '■ in the Rodenberg Distillery, 
in which institution he has since beei , loyed. Ho was married, in 

1882, to V.- Emma Braudstettmer, and they have one child — Estell . 
Mr. Aring is a young man of sterling qualities and bids fair to succeed 
in all his business enterprises. The establishment with which he is con- 
nected was built at a cost of some SI 5,000 by himself, Frederick and 
Christ. Rodenberg, and has a capacity of 320 bushels of grain per 
day, employing eight persons. Considering his ago it is creditable to Mr. 
Aring's honor and abilities that ho sustai is an interest in an enterprise 
of such proportions. 

HENRY C. ASSCHE, farmer, of Jackson Township, was bom Juno 
15, 1850, in New Orleans, on the old battle ground of the war of 1812; 
is a son of Christian and Louizette (Ileemann) Assche, natives of Ger- 
many. In IS 12 Mr. Assche left his native land for London, England, 
where be spout three years in a sugar refinery, thence he immigrated to 
New York City; remaining there but a short time ho went to Charleston 
S. C, where he joined the Militia Guards and served with them until in 
1847, when he came to New Orleans and there went to work at his former 
trade in the Battle Ground Sugar Refinery, where he continued until the 
business was closed by the war of the Rebellion and tho capture of the 
city by tho Federal troops. Then he entered upon tho mercantile 
trade, in which he continued until 1867 when he sold his stock of goods 
and removed to Dearborn County, Ind., and purchased the property now 
owned by D. Brinkmier, in Jackson Township. In 18G9, having sold tho 
above property, he purchase! (he farm of eighty-two acres where he now 
resides. Mr. Assche is now an invalid from rheumatism, contracted by 
overheating his blood while working in the -agar refining business, and 
is sometimes confined to his bed for several months, and at times suffers 
excruciating pains, Ho was married in LS49 and became the father of 
three children, one onk- now living — Henry C. Mr. Assche was a Union 
man during the late war, but was compelled to serve in the Confederate 
Home Guards, and after the capture of New Orleans by the Federals ho 
was drafted info service by the Government, but on account of his rheu- 
matic affection was exempted. Henry C, the only surviving child of his 
father, received a good commercial education at New Orleans, and at fifteen 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. G15 

years n r ge entered into the employ of 11 o Atlantic & Mississippi Steam- 
ship < y. with whom lie continued till they closed up in bankruptcy. 
In I i ame to his 1 I , whor I lias since resided, assisting on 
the farm ■ d teaching sch i il. He has taught school every winter since 
L8G9 titicipato • » ling in tit*- profession. He was married, 
Jan.' . L877, to Caroline Schweitzer, born in Cincinnati, October G, 
1850, liter of Henr I Christen lehwoitzer, natives of Germanj'. 
They came to Ohio in 1848, and to Dearborn County, Ind., in 
L859, he died A.;... 9, L882, of cancer of the stomach. They 
had E Idren: Cai I Benry, William and Emma. Mr. Assehe 
and wife have four children: Henry, William. Louizette and Emma. 

NOAH L. BABBS, of Rising Sun, and one of the oldest residents 
of the place, was born in Hampshire County, Va., November 13, 1794. 
His parents were John and Rebecca (Lane) Babbs, natives of Virginia 
and Maryland respectively, and of English ami Irish descent. In 1803 
hi moved from Virginia to Cincinnati. Hero the family re- 

sided until 1819, when they removed to the vicinity of Rising Sun and 
purchased forty acres of hind, whore the paronts passed the remainder of 
their lives, the father dying at the remarkable ago of one hundred and 
three ye irs. Our subject grew to mauhood on the farm of his parents, 
remaining until nineteen years of ago. During the war of 1812 he 
was in New Orleans, and saw Jackson after ho had won that battle which 
has almost immortalized him. Returning North, Mr. Babbs went to 
Ohio, and during the building of the Miami Canal, he worked on it as 
one of the bosses. Next he purchased a tract of land several miles back 
of the Ohio River, north of Cincinnati, and followed gardening for 
thirty odd years. In 1S71 he again purchased property in Rising Sun, 
where ho lias since resided, living a retired life, though by proxy deal- 
ing some in real estate. Mr. Babbs first married Nancy Smith, who 
died one year later. (He then married Kittie Ann Pharos, who died in 
1832, there having been born to the union, five children, viz. : Charles 
P., William, Emoline, John and Susan. His third wife was Amey 
(Tucker) Rawlson; one child was born to them — Virginia. His fourth 
marriage occurred in 1868, to Mrs. Catharine Hyner. Mr. Babbs is a 
member of the Christian Church. -'' 

ANDREW J. BARRICKLOW, of Randolph Township, was born in 
Ohio County in 1825. His parents, John and Mary A. (Emmerson) 
B« icl ere natives of Pennsylvania and Massachusetts, respectively. 

His father was a son of Daniel and Judith Barricklow who was 
born, reared and married in Pennsylvania, and immigrated to this county 
about 1808 or 1S09, coming via the Ohio River in a little (loaf -boat. He 
purchased land here, some of which is still in possession of the family. Ho 



one of whom is now livi 


og. viz.: 


ma, <>f Union T. i\\ , liip 


Tho 


Honr , Farriugton, Josi 


■ph ami 


ght or nine years of age ' 


.vhen he 


aturity and inarrii d, n ar 


!ng four 



616 HlSTOr.V OF PEAUBOUN AXD OHIO COUNTIES. 

roared a I if oi ;hf children, only 

Merri). ih k vii David Ha 

deceai ■ I . • rd, Ci n mrod, John, 

Sallie. i fathi r was but i 

came to this ■ imtj and In i ■ ■ grew to 1 
children: ' udi a. I., Daniel, Iliram and John, all still living in the 
count)-. He was a farmer by oo upation, and was quite prosperous, leaving 
a creditable competence at his death, which occurred about 1873. His 
widow is till living in her seventy-ninth year, though in a helpless 
' . ; . I for by her sun, Andrew, at his home. 

Andrew J. Barricklow grew up on the farm in this township. Being of 
a studious turn of mind he acquired a good education in the common 
i-chools and 1 \ self-help at the fireside, and in 1847 began the profession 
of teachie b be continued to follow up to 1870, teaching twenty- 

eight win: . Jfe obtained a portion of his father's estate, the 

father and sons working together till th. hitter were all married, when 
the property •>• i divided. Since that time Mr. Barricklow has given his 
chief attention to farming. He now owns 223 acres. Mr. Barrick- 
low was married, in 1849, to Nancy Oglevee, of this county, daughter of 
John and Margaret (Marnock) Oglevee, her father, a native of Ireland, 
and her mother, born in Pennsylvania. They were early settlers of this 
county, and later moved to Ripley County, Ind., where they died. Mr. and 
Mrs. Barricklow have but one child living, namely — Hiram. Man A., 
a daughter of rare musical attainments as well as other accomplishments, 
die"! at the age of about twenty. two years. Hiram was married, in 1S76, 
to Elizabeth Corson, daughter of Albert Corson, and they have two chil- 
dren: Jackson A. and Mary A. Mr. Barricklow is an enthusiastic 
Democrat and takes some interest in local politics. He has served two 
terms as township trustee since 1875. During the war Mr. Barricklow 
was commissioned lieutenant of tho "Bough and Beady Rines." and was 
subsequently made captain of the same. The company was regularly 
drilled and met Morgan at old Vernon, capturing twenty-nine men and 
several horses. Mr. Barricklow has always been a lover of out-door 
sports, and has quite a local reputation as a modern Nimrod; is said to 
have killed the last wild deer in this locality. In early years, with his 
father and brothers, he caught forty wild turkeys at a single trap. 
He has been connected with the Methodist Episcopal Church about 
thirty-five years, and during that time has officiated for many years as 
class-collector, steward and superintendent of the Sunday-school. 

JOHN \Y. BARRICKLOW, brother to the above, was born in Ohio 
County in 1831. He grew up on the homestead, which was divided 
among the children of tho family, as stated above. He was married, in 



BIOGH M'MR'AL SKETCHES. 617 

I! 57, ti ■■ ; Ann Ri ' ti 1 on, daughter -if Joseph P. Richard 
early sottl i f this county. Thi ai o\\ I uitfnl in the birth of sis 
children, Ihivo still living: Zoah E., ivifo of William Hastings; John 
and James. March 5, 1872, Mrs. Barricklow clo|i rted this life, death 
ensuing ■ "spotted fever." In 1ST;! Mr. 11 rricklow was united in 
n irriage \vi u Jane Nelson, a daughter of TI una: Nelson, native of 
County •] ;!,. Ireland. Mr. Barricklow is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, and one of the thrifty farmers of (his township, 
having alwaj • given hisattention to agricultural pursuits. 

HIRAM BARRICKLOW, Rising Sun, on: of tho representative men 
of Ohio County, was bom in tho same in 1829. He is a son of Ji 
ricklow.who was born in 1800, and who came to this county with his father) 
Daniel Barricklow, from Pennsylvania in 1815. Our subject grew up on 
his father's farm in Union Township, and obtained the rudiments of an 
education in the common schools. He began bu iness operations for him- 
self about 1S57, inheriting a small portion from his father's estate. He 
first purchased a farm valued at about $2,000, and by his able manage- 
ment of business affairs he has increased his realty in this county to 205 
acres, besides owning some valuable town property in Rising Sun, and 
some Western land. For twenty years Mr. Barricklow has done quite an 
extensive business in dealing in stock, and also in real estate and securi- 
ties, being generally successful in his^business enterprises. He served 
for some time as trustee of Union Township, and was three years com- 
missioner of the county. Mr. Barricklow was first married to Sarah A. 
Pate, daughter of William T. Pate, and they had five children: Rebecca, 
wife of Stephen Hastings; Mary J., wife of David Hanna; William T., 
who married Agnes Fisher; George G., who married Laura Turn'''-; and 
Anna M., wife of Lawronce Turner. Mrs. Barricklow departed this life 
in 18 — , and Mr. Barricklow has since been united in marriage to Lizzie 
Bate, a native of the county and a most excellent lady. Mr. Barricklow 
ranks among the most thrifty business men of Ohio County. 

WILLIAM H. BAINBR1DGE, Lawrenceburgh, judge incum- 
bent of the Seventh Judicial Circuit Court, and an able mem- 
ber of the Dearborn County bar, is a descendant of the old English 
stock of Bainbridges, of which his second cousin. Com. Bain- 
bridge, of Tripoli fame, is perhaps the most conspicuous member. He 
is a sou of P. W., and Catharine (Palmer) Bainbridgo, and was born 
in the State of Pennsylvania, June 5, 1829. His father was a native of 
Maryland, and his mother was reared in Stark County, Ohio, her parents 
both living to the advanced age of over ninety years. His paternal an- 
cestors were a hardy and intelligent class of people, though his parents 
died when he was in childhood, and he was reared by a family by the 



018 HISTORY OF DKAKBOKN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

nr.ni>. of Goodo, from the ago of six to Ihirti en years, at which time air. 
Goodo died This porio ! of Judge Bainbridgo's lifo was passed on the 
farm. Ho obtained the rudiments of an education during the winter 
terms of tho district schools, and with (his us a basis, by close applica 
tion to his books during every momonl of i : i, be acquired a 

thorough genera] knowledgo such as is rarely attained outside of a regu- 
lar collegiate course, of which latter advantage ho was never able to 
avail himself. Sir. Bainbridge resided in Warron County, Ohio, till 
nineteen years of age. He then spou ! i ,-ears in Rushvillo, In!., 
moving to Shelbyville, Ind., in 1851. Here he began the study of law 
with Judge, Cyrus Wright, an able lawy that c mty, and in the 

meantime was als i engaged in editing a political paper called th ' 
and whichho says is theonly act of his life, in a political way, that he has 
any reason to regret; that he undertook the enterprise without due con- 
sideration, but soon saw the error of his position as the editor of a "Na- 
tive American,'' or "Know-nothing" paper, and true to his convictions 
of right, abandoned tho whole thing as soon as he could ] 
of his press and office. From the fall of 1855 to the spring of 185S, 
Judge Bai ibridge spent most of his time in tho State of Ohio, i 
mostly in reading, returning to Indiana in the spring of 1858, and lo- 
cating at Martinsville. While at this point he was engaged to edit the 
Martinsville Monitor, the Democratic paper of Morgan County, which he 
did with credit to himself and satisfaction of his party and friends. Jn 
the fall of 1859 he removed to Nashville, Iud. , where ho continued the 
practice of his profession till in January, 1804, when he was appointed 
county recorder over ten other applicants, the regular official having 
been removed by death. In the fall of the same year he was elected 
clerk of tho circuit court of that county, on the Democratic ticket, and 
he tilled that office and practiced his profession till I860, when he canw 
to Lawronceburgh, where he has ever since resided, giving his entire 
attention to his professional business. He served live years as city at- 
torney for Lawrenceburgh, and, in the fall of 1884, was elected to the 
office of judge of tho Seventh Judicial Circuit of Indiana, comprising 
the counties of Dearborn, and Ohio, the duties of which office he as- 
sumed October '22 , 1885. On that date, the Lawrenceburgh correspond- 
ent to the Cincinnati Enquirer referred to his character and abilities in 
the following complimentary terms: "This morning Judge Given retires 
from the circuit court bench, and Hon. William H. Bainbridge dons 
the judicial ermine, and for the next sis years will preside over the 
counties of Dearborn and Ohio, as sole judge. Judge Bainbridge goes 
upon the bench with a mind possessed of superior legal attainments, 
having for nearly thirty years, been an active and leading practitioner 



D10GH Vl'llIPAL SKK'I ill's, G19 

in all the courts. Always a close and ha 1 student, as well as a deep 
thinker and a forcible speaker, ho made his mail a- am attorney, and 
those win) know his abilities as a jurist, predict for him a high place 
among the judges of the land. A man (if faultless character, pure mo- 
tives and the strictest sense of justice and right, fair minded and impar- 
tial; the litigants in bis court will never bo able to even reflect against 
his honest) or judicial fairne * in administering the law. Having ex- 
perienced the hardship! of poverty in hi- youth, and being compelled 
through misfortune early in life not only to earn his own living, but 
under the most adverse circumstances acquire by his own exertions an 
education, he is in every respect a self made man, and. although but 
fif ty -three y are of age, has filled a number of important positions, bo 
ing elected at different times, recorder and clerk, of Brown County, Ind. 
For thirty years he has been a wheel horse in the ranks of Democ- 
racy, and in every campaign and upon every stump 1 is voice has been 
lifted fearlessly and eloquently advocating Democratic principles. At 
different localities lie has edited Democratic papers, while at the same 
time keeping up with his legal business, thus evincing the tireless en- 
ergy of the man." Judge Bainbridge was married in 1855, to Lucre- 
tia A. Wright, of Quaker extraction, a daughter of Joshua Wright, a 
man of fine mental attainments, and niece of Rev. George VY. Maley, a 
former prominent Methodist minister of Cincinnati. Mr. and Mrs. 
Bainbridge, are parents of five children, Maley, Cora and Lulu, living. 
An interesting little son of five years, and an infant daughter are de- 
ceased. Miss Cora Bainbridge is a young lady of rare musical attain- 
ments, and devotes some timo in giving instructions in that most civiliz- 
ing of all arts, and is now in Europe prosecuting her musical studies. 
In manners Judge Bainbridge is affable; in principle, firm and decisive; 
in business, active and energetic; in heart generous and kind. He is a 
firm believer in the religion of Christ, ho and his entire family being 
members of the Presbyterian Church. 

CONWAY BAINUM, farmer, Hogan Township, is a native of West 
Virginia, born Ai ;ust 9, 1809. His parents William, and Elizabeth 
(Bryan) Bainum were born in Wilmington, Delaware; father February 
20, 17G5, mother in October, 1790. They came to this county in 1810, 
where he farmed all his life. Conway was educated at Wilmington. His 
father built the first cabin on the ridge between the two Hogan creeks. 
His parents were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church; father- 
was an official member and his house was a home for the preachers. The 
first quarterly meeting in this locality, was held in his house. lie was a 
zealous worker in the church. Mr. Conway Bainum was married April 
11, 1832, to Sarah Deshiel!, who was hum in Maryland, February 10. 



G20 UISTOKY Of MCAIIHOKN AND i [HO CUCNTUW. 

1812. By this union four children: Elizabeth, Alfred H., Mary J. 
and Charles W. The wife died October 15, ] fcJGS. October 21, 1809, 
he married Mrs. Harriet (Hayes) Swing. She was burn near Delhi, Ky., 
February 27, 1834. The entire family belong to the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. Mr. Bainum is an ae(i. >, energetic, well-preserved 
man, and bids fair to endure (be frosts of many more winters before 
passing to his reward. 

J. W. BAINUM, farmer, Clay Township, was born in Hogan Town- 
ship, Dearborn County, Ind., September 15, L851. His parents, William 
and Aloveda (Williams) Bainum, were natives of Indiana and England. 
The former was born in Dearborn County, Ind., in the year 1S10, and 
the latter in Cornwallshire, England, in the year 1815. They were mar- 
ried in Dearborn County, Ind., and afterward settled on a farm in 
Hogan Township, where they still reside. They were the parents of 
nine children: Elizabeth, Benjamin, Martha, Mary, Louisa, James W., 
Vienna, Agnes, and one infant daughter (the eldest, of the family), 
who died in infancy unnamed. J. W., our subject, was united in 
marriage at Aurora, Ind., October 15, I '9, to Harriet, daughter of John 
and Catherine (Lindsay) Spidell. She was born in Hogan Township, 
this county, August 27, 1851. After our subject's marriage he first set- 
tled at Wilmington, where he resided until March, 1881, at which time 
he moved to Clay Township and settled on the farm where he now lives 
and has since resided. He owns 155 acres of fine laud. 

THOMAS L. BAKER, farmer, Hogan Township, owns eighty acres 
in Section 2G, which is well improved and under a good state of cultiva- 
tion. He was born on the same section in April, 1840, and received a 
fair education. His father, Thomas Baker, was born in Virginia in 
1790; mother, Rachel (Powell) Baker, in Pennsylvania, December 20, 
1797. They came to Indiana in an early day and located in Hogan 
Township, where he farmed all his life, although he was a shoe-maker by- 
trade. The father died iu 1853. The mother is still living, and enjoy- 
ing good health in the town of Wilmington. Thomas L. enlisted in the 
war, in 1861, in Company D, Third Indiana Cavalry, and served three 
years and two months. He was wounded in the arm at White Oak 
Swamps in Virginia, which renders that member almost useless. With 
the exception of his army experience, ho has followed farming all his 
life. Since the war ho has been compelled to farm mostly by proxy on 
account of his crippled arm. Ho is an active, energetic man, and 
devotes a portion of his time and talent to handling stock, at which he is 
able to secure a good living outside of his farming interest. Mr. Baker 
was married, November 15, lSGii, to Miss Celesiia Canfield, a native of 
Hogan Township, and four children were born to them: Mittie, Ada, 



BIOGUArillCAL SKETCHES, dill 

Gatch L. and Irena. Tli imilj is endi od with considerable natural 
musical talent, which i cultivated ■ >i pari of tboir general edu- 

cation. 

COL. ;: D. BANIST1 ... Lawren li. at present inspector of 

Indian agencies, ha?; beei a resident of Dearborn County for the 
past twelve years. He came to La 1 reneeburgh in 1873 and for 
several years was engaged as manager of tbe Walsh Distillery. 
He was prominent in the revival of the Dearborn County Agricultural 
Society of which be was president three yoars, and is notable for his 
ability in the management of business details. He is an active worker 
as a Democrat in politics, and was a delegate to the National Demo- 
cratic Convention hold at Chicago in 1884, and also a member of tbe 
notifying committee to inform Grover Cleveland of his nomination to 
the presidency. In 1885, Col. Banister was appointed, by President 
Cleveland, inspector of Indian agencies and be is now engaged in tbe 
discharge of tbe duties of this office. 

JOSEPH BARTHOLOME, Lawrenceburgh, one of the oldest land- 
lords of this city, was born in Germany in 1819. He immigrated to 
America in 1830 with his step father and mothor, and thereafter spent 
several years in different parts of the country, locating in Lawrenceburgh 
in 1840. He was employed as a laborer till 1848. when he assumed 
charge of the Bartholome House, the proprietor of which be continued 
to be for about thirty-three years. In 1877 be retired, placing the house 
in charge of bis son-in-law, Frank Weikle. Mr. Bartholome was mar- 
ried January 23, 1843, to Anna Mary Josephine Scholle, and fourteen 
children have blessed their union, twelve of whom are still Jiving: 
Simon, Joseph, Reiuhold, William, Albort, Edward, Frank, Margaret, 
Josephine, Augusta, Mary and Ida, Mr. and Mrs. Bartholome are mem- 
bers of the church. They have labored hard to maintain their children 
and gain the competency which they are now enjoying in their declining 
years. 

JAMES S. BARNS, retired minister, Rising Sun, was born in Marion 
County, W. Va., May 0, 1812. His parents were William and Jane (Gra- 
ham) Barns, natives of Maryland and West Virginia, respectively, and of 
English, Welsh and Irish extraction. They were married in Marion County, 
W. Va.. where they remained until about 1817, at which time they 
moved to Madison County, Ohio, and from thenco, in the following 
j T ear, to Wayne County, Ohio, and in 1830 to Crown County, Ohio, where 
he died in 1833, at tbe age of fifty-five years. His wife moved to Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio, in 1S40, and there died in 1843, at the age of fifty-five 
years. He was a physician by profession, and a local minister of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. Their famiiy consisted of Thomas F., 



oo 






John \V., Rebecca A., Phobe S., Frances S., William A., Rachel S., 
Th( S., Reason M, d James S., our subject, the third member 

of the family. He was e I in ited in the district schools of the vicinity 
where ho was raised, and in them acquired quite a thorough education. 
Hut after reaching the y< an of maturity, ho turned his attention to mill- 
ing, fan ing and tradi He was united in marriage, in Clermont 
County, Ohio, September 11. 18)38, to Miss Lydia A., daughter of Elijah, 
and Nancy (Champion) Applegate. She was born in Clermont County. 
Ohio, August ?>, 1819. After Mr. Bains' marriage, he settled in Brown 
County, Ohio, where he en ;aged in milling, and in 18-11 moved to Ciu- 
cinnafi, Ohio, and engaged in the grocery trade. In 1815 he removed 
to Switzerland County, Ind., and purchased a farm and engaged in farm- 
ing, and shortly afterward ... , licensed to preach, as a local minister, in 
that county, and in 1849 was admitted in the Indiana Conference as a 
traveling minister, a calling pursued till 1862, in this State, and was 
then sent to southern Illinois, and in 1875 was transferred back to 
the Southeastern Indiana Conference, and then settled at Moore's Hill 
Ind., where he resided until the spring of 1SS5, at which time he re- 
moved to Rising Sun, whore he at present resides. Mr. and Mrs. Barns 
have had boru to them five children, viz.: Carroll O, Maria B., Olive E., 
Florence A., and Emma M. ; of whom the latter two only are living. 

JAMES H. BALDWIN, Sparta Township, retired, was born in 
Franklin County, Ohio, September 8, 1814. His parents, Samuel and 
Flora (Woodruff) Baldwin, were both natives of Connecticut and of Eng- 
lish extraction, and were born as follow;,: the former in 1777, and the 
latter in 1780. They were married at Avon, Conn., in 1799, and after- 
ward settled at Branford, where they remained until 1814, at which time 
they.in company with several other families, immigrated to Worthington, 
Franklin Co., Ohio, and from thence, iu 1827, to Cincinnati, Ohio, where 
they remained until their deaths. He died in 1840, and his widow 
in 1 8' : 2. They were the parents of thirteen children, viz.: Almon, 
Sarah, Joseph, Serene, Emily, Libauius, Serenna, Arden W., James H., 
Nancy M , Samuel D., Lysander and Abel. James II., our subject, was 
educated at Cincinnati, Ohio. He was a student in the first public 
school of the city, which was taught by Thomas Jennings of this county. 
He completed a classic course in the old college building of Cincinnati, 
Ohio, after which he engaged iu painting for some lime, and also read- 
ing medicine. He then led the Eclectic Medical College of Cincin- 
nati, Ohio, after which he (raveled for a few years, returning to Cincin- 
nati again in 1838, resuming' the study of medicine, which he com- 
pleted, but has never engaged in practice. He was united in marriage 
at Cincinnati, Ohio, Mav 13, 1847, to Rhoda L., daughter of John and 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 623 

Huldah (Townsond) Spencer. She was bora in Switzerland County, Ind., 
February 1, IS23. Her father was bor.n at Providence, It. I., in 1775, 
ami her mother in Duchess County, N. Y., in 1770. They were married 
in New York, an from thence in a very early Jay moved to Pennsyl- 
vania, ami from there to Cincinnati, Ohio, and in 1819, to Switzerland 
County, Ind. They were the parents of twelve children, viz.: Millicent, 
John W., Daniel, Miriam, Ahnira, Miranda, Lawnton, Huldah, Eli, 
Emily, Peter L., and Rhoda L. In 18G5 Mr. Baldwin moved to Dear- 
born County, Ind., purchased and settled on the same property where 
he now resides, and has since remained. They have had born to them 
three children, viz.: Samuel S., Henrietta L., and Jeannette D. Mr. 
Baldwin is a man of good general information, and is highly esteemed by 
all who know him. 

CHARLES BAUER, carpenter, Aurora, a native of Germany, born 
in Wurtemberg, March 9, 1825. His parents Christian and Catharine 
Bauer, were born in Wurtemberg, the former in 18(10 and the latter in 
1802. The father died in 1820 and the mother in 1809. Charles came 
to America in 18-17, located in Ponghkeepsie, N. Y., where he remained 
even years and followed carpentering. In 1S54 ho moved to Aurora, 
and carried on a sash and door factory for eighteen years. In 1S72 he 
sold out and engaged in house building and contracting. He built 
the Catholic Church, priest's house, schoolhouso, Indiana House, brew- 
ery and several other buildings. He was a stockholder in the brewery 
when first built. He was married, January 6, 1850, to Miss Catharine 
Schultzheis, who was born in Wurtemberg, June 9, 1820. Himself and 
wife are the parents of several children, namely : Mary F., born Novem- 
ber 21, 1850, died March 0, 1807; Louisa C, Therissa, Harriet, Emily, 
Carrie and Charles. In 18G5 Mr. Bauer was elected councilman from 
Second Ward, and served eighteen years. He is a member of Chosen 
Friends Lodge No. 13, I. O. O. F. ; also the Druids, and Druid En- 
campment and the Lutheran Church. 

JOHN G. BAUER, of Lawrenceburgh, president and secretary of 
the Bauer Cooperage Company, was born in Cincinnati in 1850, and his 
parents are still residents of that city. His father is Jacob Bauer who 
is well known in business circles there but now retired. Mr. Bauer 
passed his early years in his native ci in whose public schools he was 
educated, supplimenting this by a course of study in the Cincinnati 
Business College. Up to 1882 he was engaged in the coopering bus- 
iness in Cincinnati, coming to Lawrenceburgh at the above date and 
since remaining in the establishment with which ho is now connected, a 
sketch of which is given elsewhere in this volume. Mr. Bauer was mar- 
ried in 1881 to Anna DeBenath, a native of France and a daughter of 







resident ol 




m ti, u 


i 


. 


lil 










Mr. Baclui 






n 



624 UISTWKY OF DKAIUl 

An.. • I i.nna D ' . ith, Liei 

nati. I is in i 

alii ; i ite I of (lie on 

'I. ,1 BACHMAN. In IS!;, Mr. BaeliTi n came to Aurora nud 
lie distilling I V. Gaff, and 1 

mi ill the firm in 1S62. Ho w; uarkablo for 1 energ\ 

No transaction in the com] : ■ ivhicb he 

was eng; -1 esc p I his observation . Quid; in perception, punctual in 
atti nil 

lorto ik. He was a warn: I ' : in I an 1 generous 

I assisted much in giving life and activity to the busi i I 
Aurora, Tic died January 11. 1ST!, at the age of sixty years. 

G 'RGEW.BAKE ip, was born in Dearborn 

County, Iud., January 19. 1818. His , i the old aud highly es 

: — Thomas and Rachel (Powellj Baker, nativi s of Virginia 

and Pennsylvania, respectively. The former was a son of John Baker, an 
old Revolutionary soldier, who emigrated from Virginia to Dearborn 
County, Ind., about the year 1S01, settling near Wilmington, where he 
resided until his death. IIo was the father of sis children, viz.: 
Thomas, John, Elizabeth, George, William and Sarah. Thomas (the 
father of our subject, the eldest member of the family) came with his 
parents to this county in 1801, where he and the above Rachel Powell 
were united in marriage in about 1812, after which they settled near 
Wilmington, and there remained, with the exception of a few years in 
Ripley County, until their deaths. He died Jubj 11, 1853. His widow 
still survives, and resides at Wilmington. They were the parents of 
twelve children, namely: Elizabeth (deceased), Susan, George W., 
Sarah J., Angeline, Nelson T., Huldah A. (deceased), John E., William, 
James M., Thomas L. and Josephine. George W., our subject, was 
married in Hogan Township, this county, February 11, 1841, to 
ret A., daughter of Peter and Margaret (Higbee) Hannegan. Si i was 
born in this county February 3, 1823. After our subject's marriage, he 
first settled in Hogan Township, this county, and in the fall of 1842 
moved to Ohio County, where he remained about four years, and from 
thence removed to Dearborn County, where ho has since resided. In 
1867 he purchased his present farm, and in the following year moved 
on it, where he has since resided. Ho owns i ighty acres of fine land, 
which is well improved, a part of which is located in Sparta Township, 
and a part in Clay Township. They have had born to them elevi 
dren, viz.: Martha A., Harlan P., Thomas E Za la M., Lewis 

W. (deceased), Ella F., Mary A, D Hie < . Sa tie E., George M. and 
Carrie E.* Mr. Baker is a fine man, and highly esteemed by all who 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 625 

know him He ami wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. 

HORACE BASSETT, see page 1 19. 

D. B. BEATY, Sparta Township, Ian, mi- and doalor in agricultural 
implemen ! ' ty, Ind., February It, 

L842. His parents w< and Mary A. (Herron) Beaty, natives 

of Pennsylvania and Ohio respectively. The former was a son of Hugh 
Beaty, a native of Ireland, and from thenco, in an early day, immigrated 
with his paren i to the State of Pennsylvania, where he married Margaret 
Smith, a native of Pennsylvania, and afterward settled in Lancaster 
County, where they resided until about the year 1815, at which time 
they immigrated to what is now Randolph Township, Ohio Co., Iud., enter- 
ing land and afterward resided thereuntil death. They were the parents 
of eight children, viz.: Jane, Rosanna, John, George, Mary, Margaret, 
Nancy and William, the father of our subject. He was born in Lancaster 
County, Penn., in the year 1805, and came with his parents to Ohio 
County, Ind., in 1815, where he and the above Mary A. Herron, were 
united in marriage and afterward purchased a farm in Randolph Town- 
ship and remained there until 1855, when ho removed to Dearborn 
County, Ind., and from thence, in 1S59, to Harrison County, Ind. , where 
he afterward resided until death, which occurred in Jul}', 1S65. The 
following spring of 1860, his widow removed to Aurora, Ind., where she 
resided until 1881, when she went to live with her daughter at Johnson 
City, Mo., where she still resides. Ten children were born to them, 
viz.: Hugh S., John H., Lydia, David B., Elisha G., William E., Mar- 
garet J., Mary E., Jesse T. and an infant son, who died in infancy and 
unnamed. D. B., our subject, in I860 began the tinner's trade, but 
continued the business only about two years, when ho and his brother 
purchased the harness shop of I. T. Campbell, of Aurora, Ind., which 
they continued together for about one year, when our subject purchased 
his brother's interest and carried on the business himself until 1872, at 
which time he sold out and in the following spring turned his attention 
to agricultural pursuits, which he has since continued. He was united 
in marriage, near Aurora, Ind., December 19, 1S72, to Nancy M., 
daughter of Edward T. and Elizabeth (Dowden) Hubbartt. She was 
born in Doarborn County, Ind., December 4, 1S50. Three children bless 
their union, viz.: Carrie M., Walter E. and Edith L. In the spring, 
of 1885, Mr. Beaty purchased a> farm in Section 9, Sparta Township, 
where he removed and has sinco resided. He owns ninety-five acres of 
fine land, which is well improved and under a high state of cultivation. 
He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and he is 
also a member of the order of Odd Fellows. 



626 IIISTOKY OF DEARBOKN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

GEORGE BECKENHOLDT, Lawrcncolmrgh, of the tin,, of 
George Beckenholdt & Co., coal dealers, was born in Dearborn County in 
1 8 IS. His father, John Beckenholdt, immigrated to this country from 
Germany about 1830, and was for some tin-,' engaged in farming in this 
county. About 1845 he built the Beckenholdt Brewery in "Newtown" 
and for many years did quite an extensive brewing business in tbat 
city. He died in I860. Georgo Beckenholdt grew up on the farm 
and received the ordinary common school education. He continued his 
agricultural pursuits up to 1877, when ho removed to Lawrenceburgh. 
In 1881 he began operations in the coal and produce business, in which 
ho is still engaged. Mr. Beckenholdt is a reliable business man and an 
enthusiastic, Democrat, Mrs. Beckenholdt was Miss Mary Harrey. 

WILLIAM P. BECKETT, farmer, Washington Township, was born 
in this township, June 14, 1So3, and completed his education at Moore's 
Hill College. His father, Joe S. Beckett was born in England. October 
8, 1816, and came to America in 1841. His mother, Mary (Abbott) 
Beckett, was born in Clay Township in 1824. They were married in 
September, 1843. Mr. William P. Beckett, was married in March, 1S74, 
to Miss Lydia A. Herron, a native of this township, born August 20, 
1852, and two children were born to them: Stella December 10, 
1874, and Gracie, February 12, 1879, died December 3, 1881. The 
mother died April 20, 1883, and he married Miss Mollie A. Herron, 
March 2G, 18S4, who was born January 14, 18G2. The happy couple 
are favorably located and surrounded with all the necessary comforts of 
life. Mr. Beckett is secretary of the Mount Tabor Cemetery Association, 
and belongs to Dillsborough Lodge, F. & A. M. He is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, and was elected steward in Mount Tabor 
Church in 1878, which position he has since filled acceptably. 

J OE S. BECKETT, farmer, Clay Township, was born at Wakefield, 
Yorkshire, England, October 8, 1810. His parents, William P. and 
Mary (Harrison) Beckett, were also natives of Yorkshire, England, where 
they married and from thence, in 1841, immigrated to the United States, 
landing at New York City, and from there came to Cincinnati. Ohio, 
and shortly afterward to Dearborn County, Ind. They were the parents 
of eighteen children, viz.: Samuel, William. Joe S., George, Elizabeth, 
Mary, Emma, Ellen, John, Alfred, Annie, Arthur, Hannah M., and five 
who died in infancy. Joe S., our subject, spent the greater part of 
his early life, while in England, in the mercantile business, and in 
18-11 immigrated with his parents to this county, where he was united in 
marriage, September 14. 1843, with Mary, daughter of William I.., and 
Elizabeth (Nay lor) Abbott. She was burn in Dearborn County, Ind., 
June 27, 1824. After Mr. Beckett's marriage he first settled on his 



IW ; U'HICAL SKI-TCIIES. OZ I 

father's farm, and in the following year purchased a farm in Washington 
Township, where ho moved in January, IS45, and resided until April, 
1871, when he moved on his present farm, which ho had purchased pre- 
viously, and on which he has since resided. He owns at present 017^ 
acres of tine land, which ii woll improvod and under a high state of 
cultivation. They have had burn to them Beven children, viz.: liotnnald 
A., Mary E., Eli/.a A. (decoasod), Dorathy, William 1'., John 1£. and Joo W. 
ALEXANDER BECKMAN, of Lawrenceburgh, junior member 
of the Jinn of George Beckenholdt & Co., coal dealers, is a na- 
tive of Germany, born in 1825. His father died in Germany, and in 
1832, Mr. Beckman with his mother immigrated to America, landing at 
Baltimore, from which point they came by wagon over the Alleghany 
Mountains to Cincinnati, which city they reached June 10, of the 
above year. He resided in Cincinnati (in "the bloody Fourth Ward"), 
till 1848, in which year he came to Lawrenceburgh. In this latter city, 
for about thirty years he acted as proprietor of the wharf-boat, and also 
did a flat boating business during that time. In 1SS0 he engaged in the 
coal business and has since been thus employed. In Juno, 1862, he 
organized Con ir.ny E., Sixteenth Indiana, and was commissioned cap- 
tain of the sai i. Ho did active duty in the field till December, 1SG3, 
when he resig .ed his commission, having been captured by Gen. Bragg, 
at the battle of Mumfordsvillo. Mr. Beckman was one of the prime 
movers in the Miami Valley furniture enterprise and has always taken 
an active interest in the welfare of the city, He served eight years as 
township trustee. He was married, November 28, .1847, to Catharine M. 
Berte, and they have eight children living: William H., George W., 
Alice E. , Emma, Jeannette, Maggie, Myron H. and Laura. 

ROBERT A. BELL, packer in the Aurora Furniture Factory, 
Aurora, was born in Evansville, Ind., January 3, 1854, where he 
received a good common school education. His parents. Joseph G. 
and Jane E. (Campbell) Bell, wore both natives of Indiana. Robert 
served an apprenticeship at engineering, alter which, in 1872, he located 
in Aurora, and has since worked for the Aurora Furniture Company. He 
was married, December 10, 1876, to Miss Flora L. Wood, who was bom 
in Sparta March 5, 1856. By this union two children, Clarence A. and 
Harry H., have been born. Mr. Bell is an industrious and peaceable; cit- 
izen, and labors diligently to promote the best interest lofhis employers. 

ABIJAH BENNETT, of Rising Sim. a native of Fairfield County. 
Conn., died in the place of his adoption February 7. 1846, aged seventy- 
eight years. Mr. Bennett settled in Rising Sun in 1S17, by the citizens 
of which place he was at several different times entrusted with impor- 
tant civil stations, which ho performed to their satisfaction. lie was 
universally esteemed by all who knew him. 



628 HISTORY OF IUvARHOUN AND OHIO COUNTUW. 

EDWARD BENNETT, f: niier, Clay T .-, , hip, was born in Yorkshire 
England, Ji Ij 25, 1827. Hi parents were J > epb and Charlotte (Otley) 
Ben i both natives of Yorkshire, England. The former was a son of 
Edward Bennott, also a nativi of STorl hire England, whore ho was 
born aboui the year 1768, and was married, in 1794, to Fanny Brooke, 
who was also a native of Yorkshire, Enghi i 1. and was born aboui the 
year 1763. Ho was a cloth manufacturer, and after his marriage located 
at Marl >iiry, where he carried on a large manufacturing establishment, and 
where he re ided until his death, which occurred in September, 1841, and 
that of his widow* in October, 1S51. Their chil Iron wore Mary, Fanny. John, 
Edward, Susan, Abraham, Hannah, "William and Joseph. The father of 
our subject was the eldest, member of l\n- family. He was born at 

Horbury, England, February 8, 1793, and was th married about the 

year IMS to Charlotte Otley, who was born also at Horbury, England, 
in October, 1795. In 1S42 Mr. Bennett immigrated to the United 
States, and in the following year moved his family over, and located in 
Dearborn O inty, where he afterward resided until his death, which 
occurred September 22, 1860, followed by his widow November 2, 1873, at 
Cincinnati, Ohio, where she. was living with her daughter. They were 
the parents of five children, viz.: John B., George, Sarah A., Martha, 
and Edward, our subject. He immigrated to Dearborn County, Ind., in 
company with his father in 1842, where he was married, Sept ember 25, 
1851, to Catherine Huddart, who was born at Cincinnati, Ohio, August 
18, 1831. After our subject's marriage he settled on a part of the same 
tract of land on which he now lives, which had been purchased by his 
father in 1843. In 1SG9 he sold his land there, and purchased from his 
brother the adjoining farm, on which he now lives. They have had born 
to them ten children, viz.: William H., Charles E., Thomas B., Mar- 
tha, George \V. (deceas 1), Albert (deceased), Joseph, Julian, James 
(deceased) and Harry. 

THOMAS A. BENNETT, of Rising Sun, and sheriff of Ohio County 
and a native of Ohio, was born in 1856. Ho is a son of John W. and 
Mary E. (Stanley) Bennett, who were natives of Virginia. His parents 
were married in the latter Stale, moved to Ohio and later to Ohio county, 
where his father died in 18G4 and where his mother is still living There 
are four children in the family: James W., Thomas A., Laura and Will- 
iam E. The subject of this sketch, Thomas A., grew to maturity in Ohio 
county, and was educated in the public schools of Rising Sun. After 
abandoning his educational pursuits, and for a time before, he was em- 
ployed by Martin & Sullivan in the Rising Sun Tanyard, in all about 
three years. He nest engaged with R. H. Gould, proprietor of the 
Gould Livery and Feed Stable, Rising Sun, in whoso employ he remained 



aboul [i . IS: ; ' wu eh :tc I to tl ofli 

sheriff : >unt> . thai .to the pre - 1 1 i his ollie.ial 

duties I me I hi . attention, ami in (heir dischfir«?rt he has 

Cn h: Bennett foi i 

barren . ' celibi m the 3d o thai month was joii e ! in mar- 

riage ti : ora (ioi IHsin ; 

Si" ■ ; HE] i( of the National Haul: of Rising Sun. 

Ind.. is a native of Gn( ru ■■;. County, Ohio, where ho was born in 1884. 
His parents, Henry ai i wer, were natives of Pennsyl- 

vania. The} moved to Ni -; Albany, hid. , from Wheeling, Ya., about 
1850, am I rom theri . the abject oi this ski ' i 

Vevay in 1853, having spent two years previous as clerk of a steam- 
boa the Wabash R iver. Ho begai e] ' in a store at 
i ; t\ of age, and soon after established him- 
self in business by buyii g oul his employer, having as a partner in the 
transaction Mr. L. Bledsoe, with whom he continued in business in gen- 
eral mi t; lising at Fl in ace, Ind., for twenty-eight years. During 
the late war the firm did in flat-boating produce, 
and of late Mr. Beymi ime attention to the hay and grain 
trade. In 1872 he took stock in the National Bank of Rising Sun, whirl) 
he still has invested, ; i i lary, 1S85, has officiated as president 
of that institution. Mr. Beymer was married, March 1, 1857, to Caro- 
line Harris, daughter of Jain!' R. Harris, an old and esteemed r 
of Switzerland County. They have one child, Lettio R., wife of A. P. 
Twineham, of Princeton. Gibsou Co., Ind., an attorney at law and mem- 
ber of the Siate Legislature from that county. Mr. Beymer is a mem- 
ber of the Masonic fraternity and a man of excellent character as a cit- 
izen. In 1884 he was a prominent candidate for representative to the 
State Legislature, but was defeated by a small majority. 

PETER BIDNER, farmer, Manchester Township, was horn in Ger- 
many, April 25, 1834, is a son of John Bidner, a native of Germany, 
who with his family im a < .• . ' to America in the springof 1810, land- 
ing at Baltin i re, then came to Pittsburgh, then to Cincinnati and Ham- 
ilton, Ohio, and soon after to Dearborn County, Ind., and purchased 
eighty acres of land, being a part of the southwest quarter of Section 
29 and a part of the south : [uarter of Section 30, Manchester Town- 
ship. Hero his wife died. After residing here two or three years lie 
sold his land, and returned to Hamilton, Ohio, where lie married Barbara 
Wise. Aftorresiding there two or three years he returned to this town- 
ship and purchased eighty acres, the north half of the southwest quarter 
of Section "JO, and subsequently the south eighty acres, thus owning the 
full quarter section. Here h spent most of his life. About two years 



630 



pi ior to hi d :;i ! i lio roin 


■1 to his sou John's 


phlC. 


■ .,n 


Soctio 


ii 30, 


whore ho died in Do 


, 1867, ag ,1 dj ev, 


n ye 


ars 


Ho wi 


is the 


Pal hei : lireo sons who si 


n i-ivod and are still li' 


,. 


all 


married 


and 


residents of Mai 


iwnship— John, Petei 


and 


Mi, 


:ha, 1. 


Peter 


Bidner, our subject, \vn ■ m 


: May '2. IS3S, tc 


i Doi 


•a r 


illanwai 


■th, a 


daughter of Jacob Fillanw; 


irth, a native of Germ; 


my, 


but 


who ca 


me to 


America and became quite a 


n early settler of Maucl 


leste 


r To 


wuship. 


By 



this mai-riage Mr. Bidnorwas the father of six children, five now living: 
John J.; Anna K., now the wife of William Busse; Mary K. ; Elizabeth 
and Emma M. Mrs. Bidner died November 27, ISSO, aged fort} yeai 
Mr. Bidner has mado farming his business through life, and by his 
industry and good management he has been financially successful and is 
now one of the prominent farmers of Manchester Township. He owns 
250 acres of land well improved, and property in Lawrenceburgh. 

GEORG E M. BILL, farmer, Sparta Township, is a native of Germam . 
where he was born October 12, IS I 1. His parents, Philip G. and Barbara 
Bill, were also natives of Germany, where they resided until their deaths. 
They wore the parents of four children, viz.: Christian. Lawrence, Bar- 
bara, and George M., our subject, the eld t member of the family. He 
was married, in Germany, Nov, her 5, 1832, to Caroline Marcey, who 
was born in Germany, June KJ, 1807. In 1844, Mr. Bill and family 
immigrated to the United States, landing at New York City in Juno of 
that year; from thence they moved to Stark County, Ohio, arid in the 
spring of 1845 they removi d to Dearborn County, Ind., settling in Sparta 
Township, where he has sine,, resided. He owns 210 acres of fine laud, 
the greater part of which he has improved himself. He lost his wife by 
death, June 10, 1869, having had by her live children, viz.: Caroline 
(deceased), George M. (deceased), Charles, Solomon (deceased) and Mary. 
Mr. Bill was again married, at Lawrenceburgh, Ind., November 3, 1874, to 
Rosanna Mendel, widow of John Mendel, deceased, and daughter of David 
and Susanna (Poe) Wilson. She was born in Ohio, March 18, 1824. 
Mr. Bill is a highly respected man. He is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. 

JAMES B1LLINGSLEY, of Ohio County, died August 30, 1873. 
He was born at what was de ignated as Old Redstone Port (now Browns- 
ville), Penn., in the spring of 17711. while the parents were o 
their journey from Virginia, to the Northwest Territory. After a voyage 
of two weeks the family 1; led at Cincinnati, Ohio, and located on the 
site of the present town ,.1 Reading, where they cleared up a farm and 
tilled it, operating for a period of seven years, in connection with farm- 
ing, a saw-mill. In 1803, the family removed to what was then Dear- 
born County, and our subject since that period, until death, resided in 
tho counties of Dearborn and Ohio. 



ISLOGIUl'HICAL SlvKTCIIES. (Vol 

OTHA BILLINGSLEY, farmer, Center Township, resides on Soc 
tion 29, and possesses 300 acres of land, w;i h n in Dearborn County. 
Ind., in February, 1829, when be received n ■ am on school ed 
He bas been a farmer i I his lif< . Ho was tuarried, September 10, IS5S. 
to Miss Priscilla J. MelTord, n aativo of Kenti :1 . who was born in Wv. 
port, December 10, 1S37. Eleven children li been born to IL 
riage, namely: Elizabeth, George, Rebecca . I ry J., Eliza B., Will- 
iam, James, Emily, Otha, Inez, Joseph. Mrs. Bi Hi ngsley's father, James 
P. Mefford, was burn in 1S0S, and was killed in California, in ' i, 
while blasting a mine. Mr. Billingsb'v's i'ai'u ■: . John, was born in Red 
Stone, Va., in February, 1790, and as was vciy common in bis day. 
received no education, The mother, Elizabeth Stitt, died June G, 1SGG. 
They raised seven children: James. Thomas, Otha, Mary. Nancy, Eliz- 
abeth, Emily 1*. Four have passed beyond the river: Thomas, Man. 
Nancy and Elizabeth. Father Billingsley flat boated in early life, and 
walked from New Orleans to this county. The balance of his life has 
been devoted to farming, at which he has been successful. 

JOHN BLACK, superintendent Iron and Nail Company, Aurora 
City, was born in Allegheny County, Penn., February 2, 1840. His 
father Thomas, was born in Allegheny County, Ponn., and mother, 
Susan Fredly, was born in Germany. The father was a farmer. 
John not being favorably impressed with the idea of tilling the soil, 
left the farm in 1846 and began working in the nut and bolt works at 
which he continued for nine years. In April, 1861, he enlisted in Com- 
pany A, Twelfth Regiment Pennsylvania Infantry, and served three 
months as corporal. September 15, 1861, here-enlisted in C 
K, One Hundred and Seventh Regiment Pennsylvania Infantry, ana was 
appointed sergeant, serving in that capacity three years. He received a 
flesh wound at Malvern Hill. After returning home he learned the 
machinist, trade, and worked at it for eight and a half years. In 1873 
he went to Covington, Ky. , as foreman in nut and bolt works, thence 
to Aurora, Ind.. in 1875, and officiated as foreman in O.P. Cobb & Co's. 
mill. In 1878 ho was promoted to the office of superintendent of the 
nail works, which position he has since held. Mr. Black was married 
in 18G7, to Miss Catharine Rolland. a native of Canada. Unto them 
have been born sis children: Anna, John, Charles, Roy, Jessie and 
Glenn. Our subject is a member of Aurora Lodge No. 51, Aurora 
Chapter No. 13, and Aurora Commander} No. 17, and the A. O. U. W. of 
Pittsburgh, Penn. His wife is a member of the Pr< ;byterian Church. 
Mr. Black invented the cylinder nail picker in 1880, which is now in 
use at Cobbs' nail-mill. He is, now perfecting a system to remove the 
carbon from steel rails, which will enable them to make nails from the 



032 ins roil r 01 ■ .. viiroun ami omu wh'.n vu:a. 

same b. n il ring i 1 i't and | li iblo to the. rolls, Mr. 131 icl; is 

truly li lin lie has ill n . uploted an emery wheel. 

RO . .■. i 15, of the (in . : Bn iuvi iti i of an I 

manufacturers of revi cylinder i fines, hi lc1<^um Eagle 

Hotel, Auru . . Cnd., w >r_) in Cin Ohio, wai bom in Ripley 

County, Iucl., Januan I, IS54. Hi i : b ing was upon the farm, 

but his e.d tod in coll . after which he taught school 

for two winters. In 1S76, hi i iga : !i n thru hers and engines 

in Kent itcI at which 1 !■!;• . He thon read medicine 

under Dr. U'illian if Vei ' End., and attend; noctures 

at Mian i iical Coll Cincinnati, Ohio; not liking the 

he abandoned the practic i. In the fall of 1878, he began traveling for 
Aultman, Taylor & Co., of Mansfield, Ohio, remaining with that firm 
until in 1 began traveling ! ' i ■ : & Co., Mount 

Vernon, Ohio, with whom he remained until November, 1SS3, at which 
time he 1m ited in Aurora to develop the invention of the present firm. 
His fat]', r, ,: '. Blair, was born in Clermont County, Ohio, Janu- 

ary IS, 1S14. His mother, Elizabeth (Fisher) Blair, was born in Rising 
Sun, Ind., in 1820. They were married in 1837; the father came to 
Indiana in 1818. He followed the river for years and has farmed all 
through life. He raised sis children. The parents are members of the 
Christian Church, and are an exemplary couple. Our subject is a mem- 
ber of Friendship Lodge No. G8, F. & A. M., Milan Chapter, No. 32, 
at Moore's Hill, and Aurora Commandery No. 17, Aurora, Ind. He at- 
tended the conclave at San Francisco in 18S3, withRaper Commandery, 
which was a great treat. Mr. Blair is a shrewd and thorough young 
business man, with genial and affable manners that endear him to his 
many friends and acquaintances and make him a popular gentleman. 

SHERWOOD F. BLASDEL, farmer, Miller Township, and b 
of the same, was born in Dearborn County, December 8, 1848. He is 
a son of John F. and Mary J. (Hampson) Blasdel, the former born in 
this county in 1S21. son of Enoch Blasdel, the latter, a native of West 
Virginia, but who came to thiscounty in an early day with her people. 
John F. was educated in the Cambridge Academy, and after his marriage, 
taught school a few years, though his chief occupation from his youth 
up was ,' rming. He ri children: John C. (now of Chicago), 

Mary S., Sherwood F., William II., Ambrose, Jennie, Pamelia and 
Albert, nearly all of whom are school teachers. After abandoning the 
school work, Mr. B. purchased land in Kelso Township, where he resided 
till 18G2, when he entered the service of the government as a member of 
the Eighty-third Indiana Regimont. He served about seven months and 
died in the spring of 1SG3, of typhoid fever, contracted while acting as 



lilOGRAI'IUCAl, KKKl'CIIICS. G3J3 

hospital steward. His remains wore broi hi homo ami interred in the 
Pella Cemetery i n the an • \ rtion of land on which ho was bo i 
reared Mrs. Blasdel, died in Fob] I 1, in her sixty -first year. 

Sherwood Blasdel, with the rest of the family, wai brought up on the 
farm and was educated in the con in -< lr ols, Ue was married in IS78 
to Elizabeth Kirkwood, a daughto] of IE I McGahan) Kirk- 

wood, her mother and herself both nati of this count}'. Sii 
mai Blasdel has been farming and trading, owning a fan i of 

foi't \ acres. Ke served his first term as township assessor in the spring 
of IS s o, which is sufficient evidence of hi good judgment in n Iters 
of business as well as his ch larit\ as a citizen. Mr. 

and Mrs. Blasdel have two children, Nora and Arthur. 

CHARLES 13. BLASDEL. of Lawrenceburgh Township, a member 
of one of the oldest families of this county was born in Miller Town- 
ship, April B), 1846. He is a son of Franklin T. Blasdel, of the old 
Blasdel family, which was prominent in the early settlement of the 
county, and is elsewhere referred to in bis work. Our subject was 
reared on the farm and educated in the township and district ■ ' 
with the advantage of two years in the public schools of Lawrenceburgh. 
In the fall of 1862 he entered the war, enlisting in Company H, Eighty- 
third Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and serving almost thn e years. He 
took part in some of the most important battles of the war among which 
were the siege of Vicksburg, and the engagements of Sherman on his 
famous march to the sea- On his retirement from the service Mr. B. taught 
school five terms, and in 1S75 purchased fifty acres of land, which he has 
since been engaged in cultivating. He was married, October 4, 1870, to 
Mary E. Lemiug, daughter of Lorenze D. Leming, of Miller Township, 
an old resident of the county. They have six children: Flora E., Mabel 
A., Emma G., Quincy E., Franklin T. and Charles D. Mr. Blasdel is 
a member of the G. A. R., and Baptist Church, and is an industrious, re- 
liable citizen in every particular. 

DANIEL BOHL, farmer, Kelso Township, Dearborn County, was 
born in the county and township July 31, 1839. His parents, Mathias 
and Margaret (Hare) Bold, were both natives of Germany, and from 
thence, in 1830, immigrated to Cincinnati, Ohio, where they resided 
until 1835, in which year they moved to Dearborn County, Ind. Our 
subject is the only member of sis children born to them. He was united 
in marriage with Miss Margaret Gilmann in 1861, and afterward settled 
on the farm where he at present lives. She was born in Germany August 
S, 1834. They have had born to them seven children: Annie M., Mary 
D. (deceased), Mary, Elizabeth (deceased), Catherine and Peter, and one 
that died in infancy. Mr. Bold and family are members of the Lutheran 
Church. 



634 UISTOin OF DKAKBOUN N'D OHIO CdUNTIHS. 

KICK' ' ' C. BOND, Jr. D., i ; inn an.] surg m Aurora, 
was bori I Co W. Va., M; i •] 22, 1822. He is 1 

enth son of I \isarid Lydia (John) Bond. His father was a farmer, 
and Bapti te ■ . I of Eng] lescont, and > ■ I bis early 

life in '!'];■ was oi ici ii v. and was born in 

Fayette < 's lucation wn received under 

his moth at ins! , which ini] 

mind that love of truth which has marked all his subsequent career. At 
the age of »igli 'on, he wai >nt to New ''" aeva Seminary, Penn., where 
he remai ! ' i yi ars, ] jsci L litorar : i f.n 18 13, 

ho begai i licin. with Dr. J St venson, of Greei 

Penn., ai leted the . with 1))-. Nicklin, of Virginia. He had 

early applied himself to the studj of the Bible, and was always).'. I I 
as a pious, and worthy young man; and when twenty yean old 
baptized ty hi : thor, : I into the church. When about thirty- 

two, he wi : wit! th mviction, that he was called to pn 

Gospel, and after consultation and prayer, submitted himself to the 
church for ordination. He was for several years pastor in charge of the 
churches at Wilmington, Rising San and Aurora, Ind. , practicing 
medicine at the same time. Becoming convinced that the duties of one 
profession were ample for a man of the largest capacity, he reluctantly 
gave up his pai torates. In 1846 he settled in Ripley County, Ind., and 
located in Aurora, in July, 1848, whi re he has since been engaged 
in successful practice. By his skill in the treatment of cholera during 
the great epidemic of 1849, he saved many lives, and gained a wide rep- 
utation. In 1857 ho attended lectures at the Miami Medical College, 
Cincinnati, Ohio, from which ho graduated with honor. In 1878 he 
received the ad eundem degree from the Medical College of Ohio. He is 
a member of the Miami Medical Association, Dearborn County Medical 
Society, and of the State Medical Association. He was chosen to deliver 
the oration at (hi. annual reunion, of the Miami Alumni Association, at 
Cincinnati, in 1876, and acquitted himself with distinction. He is past 
president idcnt, of the Dearborn Medical Society, and past 

vice-president of the Miami Alumni Association. In 1801 he was 
appointed ■ ■ of the Fifteenth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and 

served with it in the battles of Cheat Mountain, Laurel Hill, Rich Mountain, 
Green Brier, and in the cai paign of Wi I Virginia. Later was attached 
to theArmj of the Cumberland, and served at the battle of Shiloh,and the 
siege of Corinih. In Juno, 1863, his In ith failed, and he was obliged 
to resign and return home, where after recovering in a measure, resumed 
practice. lie has served several terms as a member of the city council, 
and has been an active member of the board of health for a number of 



B10GK U'llICATi SKIiTi I l)->o 

years. His good judgment and ofTici i] all i 

J u him |)0\vi i ■ c immunity On April. 

1. I SIT, ht was i d\ daughter of 

Bev: Cinei born June 1 1, 1S2'J; 

boon bo r/loi Mrs. John A. Conwell; 

re] lb B M cL., read 

Ohio ledical College. 

in March, 1882. Dr. Bond's professional reputation is of tl 
highc ! order; ' tig character and sympathetic hearl 

calm i I [i icls room, is 1 physician, am 

• ! .' y and pi ineiple, hi ■ >von for him the lovo ; 

confidence of all who come in contact with him, either socially, or in bis 
capacity of medical adviser. In 1S5-1 ho fori) i pari ship with Sam- 
uel L. Jones he having] urchased the drug store of 1'. B. Vail and John 
Bevin. The firm esi ed until 185(5, when Mr. Jones was elected county 
clerk, at which time Dr. Bond purchased his partner's interest in the 
drag stove, and continued to do a prosperous bu iiness up to 1857, when on 
account of not having time to superintend the same sold out, and has 
since devoted his entire time and talent to his profession. The Doctor is 
a member of Aurora Lodge No. 51, F. & A. I.I., and of Aurora, 
Chapter No. 13. 

JACOB BOURQUEIN, farmer, Harrison Township, was bom in Ger- 
many in 1831. He grow to manhood in his native country, and in 1851 
immigrated to the United States and spent three years in Ohio 
and thence to Dearborn County. He purchased forty acres of land 
in Miller Township, which he sold a few years later, and in 
April, 1873, purchased his present, farm of ninety-five acres on 
which lie has since resided. He does a general farming business and 
dev il ! line attention to the cultivation of grapes and other small 
fruits. Mr. Bourquein was married, in 1854, to Margaret Weist, a 
daughter of John Weist, who immigrated to America about 1853. They 
have eight children : Lizzie, wife of Jacob Kolb; Rosa, George, John, 
Jacob, Kate, Mary and Bona. The family is highly respected. 
DR. HENRY J. BOWERS, see page 173. 

HON. A. J. BOWERS, M. D., physician and surgeon, Mooro's 
Hill, Inl.. was born in that village Augn I IT. 1827. His par- 
ents were the old and highly (teemed pioneers, Dr. Henry J. and 
Rizpah (Morgan) Bowers, natives of Massachusetts and Pennsylvania, 
respectively. The former was a son of Rev. James D. Bowers, a 
native of Maine, and from thence immigrated to Mi 
a very early day. Hi was edu ited at the Harvard University, and 



QSb Hlsh'i: I) [(I! IKN \V:> 'i!l , 

:. united in marring 
Mi .. i I] Ricl i native . i <:■.■ saehnseUa. In ab ml (ho 

year I 3 I >v. Jaun immi H o State of Ohio, locatin ; 

near < ii ■ iti, whore ho re idi I - il 'h. which occurred in 

March, ' . . : H 

good mforn ul of m >ral convict iom , alwa\ s 

d ionsi .1 or religions significance. 

He \ I 13 any ] ears prevh ms ti > his 

de: inistor in pal . After his death, his widow 

's Hill, Ind hi '!'■' .■ he i ed this life in is 19. Thej 

were of n, i 1., Julia A., Augustus, 

father of mil ibject, the eldest member of 
the f ami I I u April, LS01, was ■educated at 

Cainbrid; I ...'' ' dicine, completing his 

studies in ' tl immigrated to Lawrenci 

Ind., wher< ho began thi pr :tice of medicine. lie was united in niar- 
riageal I :ebui , .1 I22, to the above Rizpah Morgi 

was born in Pennsylvai 15 [n aboui 1824, Dr. 13owev.--, 

Sr., moved to Moore's Hill, Ind., where he resumed his practice, which 
h continued until the time of his death. He was a scientific and 
practical physician, and an enterprising citizen, was highly esteemed by 
all who knew him, and during his life held many offices of honor and 
trust. He was three times elected t > the Legislature, in 1840-41-42; 
in 1842-4^ was elected to the Senate, and in 1852, was a mi 
the constitutional convention. He departed life, January 23, I860, to 
the regret of all, his wife having died February 23, 1865; nine children 
were born to them, wL" tows: LydiaA. (deceased), was 

born July 15, 1823; Elisabeth C. (deceased), was born August 15, 1S24; 
James I). (deceased), was born July 18, 1826, and Andrew J., our subject; 
MarinionH. (dec ised), was born April 22, 1829; Mary J. (deceased), was 
born August 4, It il; Rizp V .vasborn April 13, 1833; Cath- 

erine (deceased), was born Ai . I 11, I 15, and Josiah A., born July 8, 
1S42. Our subject was educated at Farmer's College, College Hili,Ohio,and 
inl848, began the si !y of medicine with his father, under whose instruc- 
tion he remained about five years, during which time he did some prac- 
tice. Ho was united in ;e ai M lore's Hill, Ind., April 17, 1851, 
to Margaret A., daughter of William N. and Elizabeth (Livii 
SL kley; she wasborn n County, Ind., February 7, 1828. In 
the winter of 1853-54, he attended the Miami Medical College of Cincin- 
nati, Ohio, where ho graduated; and in the winter of 1857 -5S, attended 
the Ohio Medical College, of Cincinnati, Ohio, where ho graduated with 
high honors, March 2, 1S58. He then returned to Moore's Hill and 



l\ Will" 


,'A1, SI 


ct; 


',l„s. 




03 


iclicim 


•. Will 


. i 




since 


successfully pin 












iiic ami ■ 










ounty 


Medical Society 








- 


.1' the 


American Medi 



r.i 

reBii i aetiee of 

sued. ! 

I'li;. sici is a in'' 

[nclij tl : 

cal Ass' '.■:. i li I to 1 Legi lature in 1882, He is 

a man of good general information, ami in politics a Di 

His wife died Nov,-;;,' ; 27, L8T5. : , >■ Doctor and wife bad seven 

children I to them, viz.: Lydin \., born February 22, 1852, 

and died Jami . 1855; Milliard N., born November 25, 1853, 

and di, : ; Uenr \., born October 9, 1856, i ,! 

died Feb) I, :■ •'.. born \ ign I 12, L858, and died F< b- 

ruary 22, I : ' ! ; Carrie, born September '_'. 1803, and dii d Juno 1 I. 1880; 

Eddie, born November 0, L8G5, and died August 1S06, and Charles M., 

the only oni now living, born Noveml ir 18, 1800. Hi 

at the Moore's Hill College, and has since turned his attention to the 

drug trade, and is also re< Li < eu licino. He is doing business in his 

father': ' tidal M< e'l Hill, Ind., and hasa fine and well-ar-ranged 

stock of drugs, medicines, stationery, tobaccos, cigars, fancy articles, 

etc., in which ho is commanding an extensive trade. He is an obliging 

gentleman, and is one of tbe most wide-awake and enterprising young 

business men of (he place well understanding his vocation. Howa 

in marriage at Moore's Hill, lud., October 7, 1884, to Miss Flora A., 

daughter of John and Angeline (Wilson) Crozier. She was born in 

Dearborn County, Ind., September, 27 

CHARLES BOWTON, anol Leading agriculturist of Miller Town- 
ship, was I) o in Essex County, England, in 1S23. His parents, Mark 
and Mary (Nash) Bowton, immigrated to this country in 1833, being six 
weeks and font- days on the voyage. They landed at New York and came 
via Lake Erie and Erie Canal to Cincinnati, where they resided oneyear, 
the father being a cabijjet-maker by trade. In the following year they 
removed to Miller Township, where Mr. Bowton purchased land on which 
the family afterward resided. Mr. Bowton was engaged at his trade in 
Lawrenccburgh, and was there attacked by cholera during the rage of 
that disease, and died from its effects September 19, 1834. His widow 
survived fill April 18, 1871. Charles Bowton grew into manhood on the 
farm, begiui ing operations for himself at the age of eighteen with only 
his willing hi ads for a fortune. He worked for several years by the day 
or month for different farm in his neighborhood, and after his mar- 
riage to Nancy Craig in 1844, he rented land of his father-in-law, James 
Craig, for a time. He then purchased fifty acres which he paid for in 
two years, much to the surprise of many of his friends who knew of his 
humble beginning. Si e that time prosperity has seemed to smile upon 



638 BORN AN'l) OHIO COUNTIES. 

him and success has cro I Ho has continued in fann- 

ing and ' to his original purchase fill he now owns 

about (=80 acres, LGO of wl he Stato lino between Indiana 

and Illinois. Through tho gi il his naino and a bank failure 

Mr. BowtoD has met with heavy lo ■■ , amo inting in the aggregato to 
near the value of bis proseni estate. Mrs. Bowton was a daughter of 
James and Jan i (Irvin) Craij and by this wife were born five children, 
all living; namely: Jam'.'-: Mary J., widow of Allen Grubbs; Sarah and 
Lizzie, the latter now the wife of William Harper. Mrs. Bowton de- 
parted this ii : June 24, 1SS4, after a long period of suffering from 
rheumatism and paralysis. Mr. Bowton is, in the truest sense, a self- 
made man. Beginning poor ho has gradually worked his way into the 
front rank of the fanners of this come;- , ev srj stop of Lis advai 
being won by hard labor and the cli nent of business affairs. 

He has surmounted all tie- :.1_>. -lacles of an active business lif is pro 
vided with a bountiful supply of the world's best gift-., and though some- 
what broken in health is still full of energy and enterprise. 

GEORGE E. BRADFORD, baker and confectioner, Rising Sun, was 
born in Switzerland Count}', Ind., in 1853. His parents were Ji 
Harriet (Pocock) Bradford. His father was a farmer and in the spring of 
1805 moved to Rising Sun, where he died two years later. His mother 
departed this life in 1858. Mr. Bradford was brought up on the farm, 
and was there engaged till about seventeen years of age, receiving his 
education chiefly in the public schools of Rising Sun. Ho spent a few 
years in nomadic pursuits, and in February, 188-4, purchased the con- 
fectionery establishment of S.W. Lostutter, which he has since conducted, 
carrying a nice stock of goods and doing a good business. Mr. Bradford 
married Miss L. A. Hemphill, daughter of William Hemphill, in 1S78, 
and they have one child — Jessii . 

ALBERT N. BRADLEY, painter, foreman Ohio & Mississippi 
shops, Cochran, was born in New London, Huron Co., Ohio, 
November 23, 1845. Ho received a limited education. His parents, 
David and Mary (Merrifield) Bradley, wore born in New York. They 
immigrated to Ohio in 1840, and he followed carpentering. The subject 
of our sketch enlisted in Company D, Twenty-fifth Ohio Volunteer 
Infantry, and was transferred, in April, 1802, to the Twelfth Ohio 
Independent Battery, Tving his country four years, three mouths 
and ten days. He participated in thirteen battles, the warmi t of 
which wore Second Bull Run, Cheat Mountain, Green Brier, Alle- 
gheny. Fredericksburg]), Slaughter Mountain, and White Sulphur 
Springs. After returning home he went to Michigan, where ho 
received instruction in painting. May 11, 1807, he returned to 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETi <>..'. I 

Ohio, • ivas in Ella A. Gregory. To them have 

bom ! . :■: David A Fred, Maud A., Sadie and Willie. jlMr. Br; llej 
went to Blooniington, 111., in 1871, and worked for tho Chicago & 
Alton Railroad for ti i ( ,s: thence to Pana, in 1872, and 

worked until 1S7-1 ' :ompany. At thifc date the Ohio & 

Misi up ad, and he has worked for them over 

in Hi . 1876, tin Ohio i Missiseipj i officers transferred him to 

the Cochran shops wh, ee worked. Mr. Bradley is a i 

of E F. & A. M., Aurora Chapter No. 13, Aurora 

Co No. 17, ai r. A. R. Post No. 

PETER BRAUN, Lawrencohurgh, cashier of the People's Na- 
tional Bank, is a native of Germany, and was born in 1826. His 
parents wen Johann and Nettie Catharine (Gceble) Braun, who 
passed their tire lives in Germany. Our subject passed the years 
of his minority in his native con \, rei living there a common school 
education. In 1848 he immigrated to tho United States, but returned to 
Europe in the followin md time to this country 

in 1851. Ho was employed awhile in the furniture store of Brown & 
Tate as clerk; spent ab ; in the Branch Bank; three years in the 

grocery business and contracting on the Ohio & Mississippi Railroad; kept 
books one year for Dunlevy & Fowler, of Cincinnati; cashier of the First 
National Bank of Lawrenceburgh from 1863 to 1874, and superintendent 
of foundry at Evansville, End., for Frederick Browneler till 1875. In 
the latter year, with William Probasco, he established the bank with 
which he has ever since been connected. Mr. Braun was married, in 
1860, to Sarah R. Browneler, daughter of Frederick Brownelor, of Cin- 
cinnati, and their four children are Lizzie K., Fannie W., "Williain F. 
and Phillip C. Mr. Braun is a member of the I. O. O. F., and a man of 
excellent character and business qualifications. 

EGIDIUS BRAUNAGEL, Aurora, proprietor of saloon, billiard 
parlor and summer garden, was born in Baden Baden, Germany, August 
81, 1822. He came to America in 1849, locating in Ripley County, Ind., 
where he farm; . In 1850 located in Aurora, and followed engineering, 
for live years. In 1856 he engaged in draying, and continued at that 
until I860, when he opened a si loon and run one pool table. After 
operating f< r three years he put in four tables, and in 1880 opened the 
garden. Mr. Braunagel was married, December 11, 1851, to -Miss Eva 
B. Siemantel, who was born in Bavaria August 6, 1834. Her parents, 
John and Anna K. Siemantel, were born in Bavaria, the father in 1785, 
and the mother in 1797. They were married in 1815, aid can," to 
America in 1816. He was a farmer and stock dealer, and died February 
8, 1847; the mother died June 9, 1870. To the marriage have been 



040 UlSTOin 01 ■ ■ 01 ' ' "!' OHIO COUNTIES. 

Iwrii tb tfa\ '.), 1853, diodNi 

,boi l- 17, 1S55; Michael G., boru May 25, 

L8D7; J ', ,., 859; Ai n March IT). 1801; 

born Ji ■' I L! 03, .' LO, 1 V., born December !, 

1872. is a meml C the ord< t- if Druids, and his wife and 

childr. u ! Li : 

ELENORA (LaM I >N, Aurora, widow of William 

Bin bori ■ ti, ■ ■ ;nst 0, 1S30, and was edu- 

cated at t.l ' • lej lolli oo city, where she gn 

in 185 t, Cai illy i ■- to hold her membership with the 

Alumni. Her father, William W. LaMar, was born near Salisbury, 
Md.. December 8, 1 I 1. (Blake) LaM . .. 

born in Salisbury, Md., Augi 20, 1810 They were married August 
27, 1835, ' Idren, eight of whom arc now living. 

fl; ly: d to 1 [., 30, 1806. Miss Elenora La- 

to Willi; i : " swington, a native of Wil- 
mington, Dearborn Co., Ind., where he was born, August 10, 1830. 
Seven children were born to the marriage, namely: Charles IT., born 
July 17, 1858, died Deconib 3, 1800; Ella S., born October 2, I860, 
now Mrs. F. Clark; Elizabeth L., born July 13, 1803; Levina A., born 
July 28, 1805, died May 15, 18G9; William H., born December II, t807; 
Elenora, boru March 12, 1870; Frank, born April 1-1, 1872. Mr. Brew- 
ington engaged in business in Wilmington when twenty-one years old, 
and continued for seven year-,. In LS5S he moved on a farm, where he 
remained until 1870, at which time he opened a general store iu Aurora. 
He also speculated in real estate, and was very successful in all his 
operation.-, leaving his family a competency at his death, which occurred 
February 14, 1878. Ho was an active, energetic business man, a kind 
father, and an affectionate husband. Mrs. Brewington is an active 
•woiker and member of the Christian Church. 

FRANCIS C. BRIDDELL, proprietor of livery, sale and feed stable, 
Aurora, was born in Aurora, February 4, 1852, where he received the 
best education the pi blic schools afforded. At the age of seventeen he 
engaged in his present business. For several years ho has acted as assist- 
ant bookkeeper and collector for the Aurora Gas Company. He was 
married, Ocl ■'. >r 16, L877, to Miss Carrii L. Hitzfeld, who was born in 
La wren- ■ burgh, Ind. To the marri; a b irn York L. Briddell, 

January 10, 1880. Mr. Briddell has a tine stable, in size 106x53 feet, 
which will accommodate fifty head of horses. He has done a fair bus- 
iness from tl ■■ start and pr pered in life. His residence is iu Walker 
Town, an addition to the city proper Further particulars as to ances- 
tors will be found el- 



1190244 

KAl'IirOAL <1CET> I 041 

i CK, ,1 ■ llist, \.Ur. : . .ffii - u\,.:- (). |>. 

Cobb A- i 's. i,: rdwj ■ c irncr of Second in Streets. Dr. 

Bro as born i cobu b ad roccivoJ his education in the 

il of that cit; pre© ptors in Li - profo ;ion wei 

Samuel E. Hai r\ mai r. P, Uli ey, of ] com 

pleted hi course in Ci . fi, Ohio, gradu; I ': 8, 1 V M. with 

1 i :i the Ohi i I > of Dontal Surgery I mm ■ liat< ly tb » e 

after, he local in Aurora, and by thoroughness in the treatment of 
in building up a lucrative practice. His 
I applianci - an I mod 
meat h i work with neal i I dis] itch. II" has 

d ■ I be; ' istion of doubt, that h [led, i 

iful in all departments of his profession, and is warra 
looking forward to a bright and prosperous future, which he ric 

m account of bis cl appli to bi 

and moral character. The Doctor is a member of Union Lod 
S, I. O. 0. F., of Lawi . ai d ol the County Medical ' 

also of the Methodist Episc pal Church. His parents, John G. a 
D. (Hass) Brodbeck, were born in Germany, the father being a i 
maker. 

WILLIAM BROWN, farmer, Clay Township, was born in Mont- 
gomery County, Ya., June 28, 1811. His parents, George and Mary 
(Raburn) Brown were al if Virginia, and were born, th< 

in Culpepper County, in 1 1 12, and the latter in Montgomery County, in 
17'.'2. They were married in Montgomery County, where she died in 
about 18 '>: and in 1837 he moved to Ohio County, Iud., and lati 
his home with our subject, where he died in 1859. He was a soldier in 
the war of 1812; was the father of nine children, viz.: Margaret, James, 
George, William, Joseph, Elizabeth. Nancy, John and Mary. William, 
our subject, came with his father to Ohio County, Iud., in 1837, where 
he turned his ati ming and improving land. He was married 

in Dearborn County, in 1842, to Martha A. Boston, after which he 
settled at Milton wl. re he resided about two yeai's, when he rented 
a farm in Dearborn County, where he moved, and in 1852 he purchased 
and moved on his pre.:-':!; farm, where he has since resided. He lost his 
wife by death, July 7, 1S81. They have raised to maturity two orphan 
children. Mr. Brown is a fine man, and is highly esteemed by all who 
know him. He owns sixty- seven acres of land. 

JAMES T. BROWN, see page 153. 

ROBERT D. BROWN attorney, Hogan Township. For forty-three 
years Mr. Brown has residedin I: e town of Wilmington; he was born in 
Otsego County, N. Y., April 13, 1S14. His parents, Robert D. n 



042 IlISTOin OK DKAllliOnN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

(Bartlett) 1 ... I 1'orls Stal . the father died in lSITand 

tlie mother I ■ y 4, 1! ft au orphan immigrated 

to Ohio in th spring of ! I once to Indiana in 1S37, after 1 

wife (Man li to whom In svas married in New Haven, 

Ohio, in 1S35 After li in the i ! and enterjirising 

town of 'i married Mary Hubbard Harwood, 

and unto them i ! a J3., Fcbri f ' 20, IS 39, who is to- 

day one of Indiana's most successful legal practitioners and an 
active worker in local , Mrs. Bj iwn died December 10 

1839. In 1S4 1 Mr. Brown ried Mrs. Oreua Chnrchill. Unto them 

were born twi el en: d Latham B. This wife died in 1847. 

Not boil, I I lone Mr. Brown was mar- 

ried, in L84S, to Elizabel Is, hi i pi : Ipinate, who has been to 

him a faithful and valuable counselor. Mr. Brown read law in Wil- 
mington, and was admitted to the bar in Lawrenceburgh in 1802. He 
was elected magistrate in 15 L-3, and served for seventeen years. In 
1861-02 h. was State 1 I was gaugi r under Andrew Johnson 

for five months, which was the most lucrative position of his life. He is 
and has been for some time, president of the board of managers of the 
Knightstown Soldiers' and Orphans' Homt and Asylum for feeble ! 

people. Mr. Brown is a member of Wilmington Lodge No. 158, F. & 
A. M., and was the first mason in the town. Ho is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, and a Democrat. 

OAPT. GEORGE W. BROWNE, late of Aurora, was born in Law- 
rence County, 111., February 28, 1831. His father, Aaron Browne, was 
born in New York City in 1793. His mother Elizabeth (Wilcox) Browne, 
was born in Virginia in W)'!. His father came to Indiana in 1823 and 
located at Vincennes, where ho followed milling and farming. He was a 
lieutenant iu the war with the Indians, and died April 3, 1858, the 
mother died in 1850. In 1852 Capt. Browne run a liat-boat for Glass & 
Brown of Metropolis, 111., and followed the river up to 1859. He then be- 
gan working in the blacksmith department of the Ohio & Mississippi 
shops at Vincennes. Ho enlisted as private in Company M, First Heavy 
Artillery,aud servi d untilJanuary 10, 1806. He then took charge of a hotel 
at Cairo, 111., where bo remai . ' five yean . From there he went to Me- 
tropolis, and engaged in dair\ and sawmill bu incss, continuing up to 
1874, since which he has ki hotel in Martinsville, aud Greensburgh, 
Ind. ; Cincinnati, Ohio; Rising Sun, lnd., and in Aurora. Mr. Browne 
was married, March 15, 1855, to Miss Emily C. Sellers, who was born in 
Logansport, lnd., January 3, 1837. To the marriage the following 
named children have been born: Geore E., Fannie A., and Charles S. 
The latter, a promising yum,-' man, dii L at ;ton C. H., Ohio, in 

November, 18S5, aged s< ventei a years. 



J. p ' 






Scn 






in ' 


■ !>.,■ 




1811. T 


ii ■■! August 




i F 


" 




di ime ho s Li 







itches, nr, 

ip, i : ' ' upon 

n ( Fahrand) !h nxi . wore born 

' [SOS, mother February. 12, 

tnd rai^d a fai h - ! 

iroduce for himself . Ho was 
an active worker in the 
aff I up most of his land and 

left r his c! I scho >1 tru ii 

I ' id both ] is wife were memb . of the 

Met ipal I him with a stewardship for 

years. I March 13, 1874. Mr. 

John F. : i ■ >",' : h l pany F, Third Indiana 

^ ; in the civil war. The 

above nai broth engaged in agricultural 

pui 

' d Township, was bom there 

July 14. 1828, his educati ial advau g s being very limited. His 
father, Charles Bruce, was born in Gallatin County, Ivy., March 20, 
1798; his mother, Phebe Mclntire, in Kentucky in 1794. They were 
married in 1819, and raised a family of nine children: Thomas M., 
Anna.. Henry, Nancy, Jonathan B., Jane, Nelson T., Benjamin li. and 
Davis \V. Mr. Bruce I e years and served the people 

as i for sevei I; He ' been a farmer all his life, and 

owns the first land he entered, which is well improved and under good 
state of cultivation. His wife died in 1ST-", and was a member of the 
Christian Union Church; Mr. Bruce also. Mr. Charles Bruce has been 
a powerful man in his clay; hi d me much hard work; had many a fight 
and never was whipped. In politics he has always voted the Democratic 
ticket. Mr. Jonathan : ' ■ was married October 29, 1851, to Mrs. 

Angeline (Baker) Gl 3he was born ia Ripley County, Ind., April 3. 

1825 It vo cl il y her first husband — John M. Glass, who 

was born November 25, 1845, and was killed on the railroad in 1855. 
Mr. Bruce has followed fi rmiug all his life, and has never united with 
.'i ■ nizati ch, hi motto being to do unto others as 

he othe i him under like circumstances. Mrs. 

Bruce liar one child, Ji an, ! \ her first husband. Ella. F., a daughter by 
hei i band, afancy. 

JANE (ROSS) BRICK, Aurora, is the widow of John Bruce, and 
was born July 20, 1820. Her father, Amos L. Ross, was horn near 
Lei i Ohio, in L794, and died March 28, 1SG6. Hor mother, 

Eleanor (Shumaker) Lloss, was born in Ohio, March 25, IT'.tT, and died 



D - id li \va: b m April 


12, IS:}'). 


medicine, ami 




Mr,. L5j ried, Apri 


1 25, 1811, 


ppy lli.i..:. had eighl childre 


u : Louisa. 


. Jr., born No 


,'■ :. : V 29, 


.:-,, born D , tuber 3, II 




bor 8, .1 1 alara, born Mar. 


b 9, 1852; 



644 HISTORY OK 1' 

i.11 r U! i ISO-I Uw HI 

ud resid rid, Lll., \ 

sin ! by thei 
born Jul; 1.2, died Jai 

I 24, IS4G; 
! , IMi: tu L . born N 
Sarah E., born October 23, 1854; Laudy IL, born April 24, IS57; Cal- 
vin [I., bi ra April 25, ] a farmor, tr: 
flat-boal i liree trip to New Orleans. In early 
uool He ■■.■•;- nc •• sfnl and 
l ii m 1 ever made. He 
died Nove ah 10, INTO. 

AMOK L. I iij the son of John and Jane 

(Ross) 1 ' bove. Ainor received s good 

common scbool education, and has. been a farmor. and stock raiser and 

Ler all liii lifo. He sv; rried i 0, 18S3, to Miss Lizzie 

.Myers, who ,vas born in Hamilton County, Ohio, April 3, 185G. Unto 
them has been given one child— James Blaine, born October 4. 18S4. 
Amor L. Bruce was born No\ uber 8, 1847. He takes delight in 
squeezing the ' lice from the cane and producing the best sorghum 
molasses in tl — imparts. His present turn of mind toward future 
development se mis to be for trading in steel;, at which he Ins been very 
successful. He is like his father — honest and upright in all hi:- i 
operations. He belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church, and bis 
devoted wife is a member of the German Lutheran Church. 

BOLIVER BRUCE, farmer, Hogan Township, Section 23, owns a 
comfortable Lome. Mr. Bruce was born in Hogan Township, August 
7. 1833, and received a fair education. He is the son of William 
Bruce, whose sketch will be found elsewhere. On the 14th of February, 
1869, Mr. Bruce was married to Miss Sarah J. Hiner, a native of Indiana, 
who was bom Si ptember 10, 1847, and there were born io them two chil- 
dren—Floyd II., born April 30, 1870; Wilber B., born February 20, 
1883. Mr. Brace, is a member of Wilmington Lodge No. 336, 1. O. O. F. 
His wife's : >nts. John A. and Eliza (Garrison) Hiner, were born in 
Indiana, the father, September 1\ I ' thi mother, February 21, 
1826. Mr. Hiner enlisted in August, 1801 in Karris* Cavalry, and was 
killed June 2G, 18G3, in a skirmish before Gettysburg. Tire mother 
died Juno 13, 1849, being a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

LOYEY (DURHAM) BRUCE, Hogan Township, was born iu Vir- 
ginia, July 22, 18d9, and was educated in f co union schools. Her par- 
ents John and Catharine (Conaway) Durham, were born iu Delaw: and 



VI* H W. 



i; :. 



camo to this St; I ■ 

moved to W ashin ton t'ownshi] horC 

Liovolnl onary war. ' J 

tu William J 

10, 1804. By the ha] p\ union ti Catharine, John \V., 

Williauj 1'., ■! belle, Mary ] 

and £liza. Mr. Bruce was a farmer all bis life He was justice of the 
p i ■■■. He and his wife, joined the MethodJ 

Church. She united with tbe church when years of i 

L tlii life ! a ;us1 0. ; ' IS ' vn ,, a com] 
entire family. 

NICHOLAS BRUM, farmer, Kelso Township, was 1 i France 

June 1 i. 1820. His pan na (Graf) Brum, were 

also natives of France, and fn ■ 

County. Ind., settling in York Township, where they resided until their 
deaths. They were the parents of seven children —Peter, Mag 
Louisa, Catherine, John, Jacob, and Nicholas. Cur subject ci 
bis parents to Ibis county in 1831, and Was here married, May J 8, 1850, 
to Margaret Miller, and afterward moved to Cincinnati, Ohio, where ho 
Sve years, and from thence removed to Dearborn County, 
Indiana, and has sine;' i ided Ee pu ed his present farm in 

Kelso Township in 1858, consisting of ninety-eight acres of tine land, 
which he has improved. They have had born to then Iren, viz. : 

Nicholas (deceased), Adam (deceased), Nicholas, Sarah (dec 
Charles, William, and Jacob (d 

JOHN BUCHANAN, newsdealer and confectioner, Aurora, (place 
of business if th" | ....=.t< >[Ilc<^ building, where all the delicacies of the 
sea on can be found, was born in Ohio County, March 4, 1827, and 
received a common school education. His father was born in North 
Carolina, June 7, 1780. The mother, Anna (Sturman) Buchanan, was 
born in Virginia, July 1(3, 178-4. They were- married February 12, 
ISO]. Id early life the father wa a miller, but awhile before his death, 
which occurred April 24, 1828, ho was engaged in farming. Mr. John 
Buchanan was, a farmer until 1ST'-;, when be followed gardening for three 
years. In 1S81 he moved to Aurora and opened up a genera! : 
which be conducted up to .March, 1884, at which time he added his 
present business and has prospered even better than be hoped for. He 
was married, November 4, 1856, to Mi ; 1 ibella Gregory, a native of 
Bising Sun. To them have been bum Mark, April IG, 1853, died 
February 29, 1860; Jennie, September, 23, 1860, died December 21, 
1875; Frank, July 29, 1863. Our subject was appointed county super- 
intendent by the countj commi: ' uors of Ohio County, after which he 
was elected, and served in that pacity for five years. 



IllSTOKY OF hEAIMl I HUM i' 

.11 »<■ el ai i •!■ i I ■:■ Town- 

in is a son of Pi- 

' of Fj . 

: ■ u 1 f . (i ve eh i 1 di 

; tl 

. ; the fall of 1821 

- : , ■ ' 

quarter of - I nsb.ip.nri : : 

life. S ■ loared, 

which \ iimenccd fheii 

work. T] doi m the Whiter 

mi I id. Subsequently he purchased 

more lau ' I death he hi : 

fi After Mr. Buchert had purchased his laud 

and moved n to it wi > had ... 1 the i y lie 

had in tl and no 

then all in the ■ vhich would discourage most 

the present day. JHit (he result of Lis life proved him equal to the 
undertaking. The first plow he had he brought on his back from Cin- 
cinnati; also the first grindstone he brought in the same way. He died 
in February, 1854, : rife survived ] 

died September 24, 1871 . . thi e \ The; were] 

eleven children. Allgi nd had families; six now 

living: Frances, now widow Miller; Joseph; ( atharine, wife of Frank 
Sinderberger, residing in Cincinnati; Elizabeth, wife of M. T ! 
residing at Los Angeles. Cal. ; Caroline, wife of Charles Schott, living in 
Shelby County, Ind., and Morton, also in Shelby County. The latter 
married and resided in Jackson Township until the spring of 18S3, 
when he removed to Shelby Comity. In 1880 he was elected township 
trustee and had served three years. After he moved away his brother 
Joseph. I to serve the balance of the unexpired term. 

Those <■ wi Mary, who married Joseph Brandt; Anna, 

who ma] Lawrei ort, John and Terris. the latter married John 

ldoux. ' the el ;. on ig I ed steam boi I 

Cincini few 0] alye ar quently he settled in 

Iowa, m; rid I . I jr. In 18- ' ' 

tempti im ai - Turkey River, when about the middL 

stream was seeu to sink and was drowned, it is believed from crai 
he was known to be an excellent swimmer. John, the other son di ; 

married an 1 had one child, Anna, who survivi d and is now the wife of 
Simon Zinser; John was a stove mo! r hj trade. He was elected 
county coi i ■ in the fall oi 1882, and was serving in that office 



mo .1'iiicAL sKmcm 047 

at (ho t, .licil Mai INSl, - , ■ ] i: l.i f- 

: h child of his father, an 

in the I ion] ; 

pi 1T« rem .■!:.■ ild of runuii M 

i cat id of the 

G, 1859, . .lino ] born \ I 

. : , he a native i be of 

They came 1 America in LS33. They had .■ m . hi : .w living: 

Caroliu i li; Cath; rife ol I . . is; ] . 

of Christi lehook, and Anna, wil I The one de 

ceased, ' I ' Ur. Buehi ft 1 I 

I . I Louisa E., wife of < 
II. Koenig; Frank J., J> . ie A., Richard L., Martha L and ' ' 
S. In the spring of LS59 Er. Buohert pin I 

which was i\ large building, part log and part frame. Hero in ; 
ship with J ',': -M-'.h [ and groe tv. Soon after 

Mr. Bucherl b night fcl e and continued the busi- 

ness till LS7G, when he closed out hi .ck, erected his present 

large and commodious brick house in which he lias continued t 
business i . the present day. In 185G Mr. Buchert made a (rip to Cali- 
fornia and returned in pure! 

Mr. Bucl tli very little capital. Now he owns 111 

acres of. land and ha ; one of the best and largest brick hon 
Township, with other good improve) ult of industry : 

carefully conduct, d bu : 

GEORGE P. BUELL, of Lawrenceburgh, was born in Scipio, Cayuga 
County, X. Y.. iu L801. He moved to Indiana in 1S20 with his father, 
Judge .Salmon Buell, who had come We t to invi t the remnant of a for- 
tune. Judge Buoll's large family scattered through the Western Si 
Ohio and Indiana; Barnum and Salmon D. Baell iu Marietta, and George 
P. and Almira Dunn at Lawrenceburgh. Our Bubjoct, in 1820, in con- 
nection will, his brother-in-law, Luther Geer, who had been a wealthy 
merchant of Utica, N. I"., brought a lai ' Is to the village of 

Lawrenc ■/■■. n and emba ' in busin s. At this time very little 
attention | although the country 

al ni the pi: of his i ■ larly a lapted for that f ■ tun 

of agriculture, s ' b v, owing to the di 

getting !' While p irk here was only bringing from SI to 

$1.50 per barrel, it commanded the high price in New York City of from 
S10 to '1 1 per barrel. Mr. Baell at once, onhis arrival, began purchas- 
ing all the h ; in the sun liu« had I iu ;h1 >rc ! aD 1 



packed h 


by iinpn in 


i 


'•' ' 


the i i * i 


, llial la'.,'. 


thai i'er 


(inii tra 


: 




lis." 'I 


1 cnterprin 1 i 


jM'OVI 1 . 


' 


and then 


1 




induced tb 



;n a\I' OHIO nu;.\Tli:s. 

: lo New ( )rl 

. b .■ id I , : I 
ripened up the wa} :m I led in 

ibrhpi ■! of ' P I 
, W. I .' , b\ ' 
. business al L; 

! j 

sively in tl ; - I I For : if years ] ■ ' 

was the ci ; E trade in p rk packing and shipping to 

distant n ling and preced ' - at Cin- 

cinnati. En tl I continued for :n y joai : 

different ti iciatod liim as Robei I Buchanan and 

ami ircial Bank of Cincin- 

nati. To Mi Buell, James ". and Geo. SX. Lane each were indebted 
for their start in b m their first start in business, the 

latter of whom, ii y I in duo i of the m my kind 

received at Mr. Bindl' i had for 

the man, and respnei for bis y, b the . cts connected 

with the beginning of the Wi itcrn pork trade, giving credit to him to 
whom it justly belongs. Sir. Buell was twice marred. His first wife 
was Ann Lan >. who died in 1844, after they had lived happily togethi r 
for twenty 3 He, being left with seven little children, in 1845, 

married Mary St. Clair, who with all the love of aunt and mother, madi 
him happy by her solicitude for his children. II ! urred in 

1859. After thi first wife Sir. Buell embraced religion, and 

ever after led the life of a Christian. Next to his family Sir. Buell was 
devoted to his country, which he hived as only a patriot could love. As 
a part of that country he had loved Indiana. From the time of its 
adoption until his death he dot ted hims If to her interests. \Vith her 
1 and his riper years, and with this people were 
his feelings and his "home," to him truly "the dearest spot on earth." 
He had wati hi d his adopti 1 St; te from hi infi ncy to her maturity, and 
it was the ini ire I be felt in her welfare that induced him to take the 
part in politii i which he often did, with influence; for he was far-seeing 
aud energetic. Though he filled a seat in the State Senate for several 
years, to the credit of his const ituents, yet ho was not a partisan fn ''< 
love or desire of office. Through bitter experience in early life, and 
great industry in later years, Sir. Buell am; ' a hand ime competency 
His death occurred at Lawrenceburgh Dec. 31, L862. Says a 
writer: "The year 1802 will lona be remembered for the sad 



record it n 


in the t) ' 


1 


rapidly m 


y hi 


1 1 . ' 


the heart: 




to bio. ; 


poculiarlj 


t] 




attention.; 


ivatli v.:. 


of hoi 



liliWl. SKI 64!) 

iti i u f thii coi i 
,i,l numberless as hav, boon 
ing tins terrible ye; r, how 
[] call 
.'ill its mo ml 

J862. Ai i and on i last day of the same, the only 

remainin; oi the on, largo and i , ru, 

Buoll of Uticn Lake, N. V., , ; ir d, and luring the year, con 
with its ti ' . ■ ■ el, d the i umc road. Lieut. 

Julius Oct ,i Buell, ; m oi rge P. Buell, Esq., of Law - 

renceburg G, ISG2 at 1 >env, r, ' ol., aged twenty 

years; George P. Bu, if '■'. Barnum Buell of Lowell, 

Ohio, who fell fr, a boat I ,e Ohio River oppo ite Oin i ti and 
drowned, Januan 1862 irtj live years; Cadot James P 

Jr., only son of Gen. I Priscilla H. Drake, who was Priscilla 

H. Buell, youngest daughter and only remaining member of a family of 
twelve, of Judge Salmon Bu, 11: young Drako died in Tennessee, after a 
lingering illness, in Fel nil ■ !8G2, aged twenty-two years; Don Carlos 
Curtis, son of William F. Ci lia A. Curtis, formerly Amelia 

A. Buell, grandd lighter of Jud ietta, Ohio, June 

7, 1862, aged fourteen years; Captain Frank Buell, wh > closod his bright 
career' in August, 1802, on tlie field of battle, while protecting the retreat 
of Pope's army, aged twenty-six years; P. Barnum Buell died December 
5, 1802, at Lowell, Ohio, aged sixty si : orge P. Buell died De- 

cember 31, 1' ,2, at L; , ',, Ind., aged sixty-one years." 

JOHN 'BUFFINGTON, of Dearborn County, was one of the early 
settlers of this section of the country, and for more than forty years 
maintained his place among her must prominent and influential citizens. 
His history, as it is connected with the most thrilling incidents of 
Westei , life and involves all the varied interests of a protrai , I and 
useful life, merits a mo • extended notice than can here be given it. 
His birth occurred in Vi ch 7, 1 784, and he removed to tl 

in 1797. He spent several - - with the settlers of North Bend and on 
the Miami, after which h( moved to Dearborn County and entered laud 
on North Hogan Creek, vvl opei la farm and upon which, with 

the exception of a few vi ■ : I resided u til his death, which occurred 
March 10, 1852. Mr. i- pi anted hin self in the wilds of Indiana., 

endured all the perils, pj ivi m . and toils of a pioneer life, cleared up a 
beautiful farm, raised and educated a large and respectable family, and 
lived long to enjoy the fruits of industry and the labor of his hi 
to repose in the happy consciousness of a virtuous and honorable career. 



G50 UISTOI D OHIO COl'XTIKS. 

, . , tin I. I . Toy i iip, n i. in W il- 

mi b] b and llat-bo.it pilot. 

Hi • T hip November IT, ISIS. Hi 

Fo bori fo uuty in 

ig piloted 

1 Lontueky 
lier ps 
\ ■ , hi! In ,. the father dying in 1 S -T. (he 

a ■ married July I, 1832, (o Miss 

: .,; ! April 4, 1820. 

B; tl .vereborn: William H., Oscar D. and John. 

Tb infancy. Mr. Buffiugton began as river pilot 

in tb if I continued as such until 1S79, I 

to chi 

ially i hi 

in well pre ,'ed and ] • Itb He y ed Dearl 

I 5, and Wilmington Lo . F. & A. 

M., in 1SG0. His ami er of the Methodist Ep 

Church. 

\ I LIAM H. BTJNGER, Randolph Township, one of (he thrifty 
i hio < as born in Hanover, Germany, in 1832. He 

remained in ry till eighteen years of age, and i 

educ I In LS49 he immigrated to America, leaving his parent . !'■ '< 
' Catharine 13 ' • led at Now Orleans, and 

from that poini c: to Rising Sun in the same year. H 

ward spent one year in Illinois, and tbon returned to thi: 
he has since resided. He married, in 1855, Flora Stegerui Her, daught r 
of Fr« lerick Stegemiller, and native of Hanover, Germany, and they 
have six i hildren: John W., George H., Frederick, William, Wesley and 
Flora A. After his marriage Mr. Bunger rented land till 1801, when lie 
pure] 1 a farm of sixty-tight acres, on which he resided thirteen year-, 
increasing it by purch: ai i . acres, which he still owns. In 1874 

1 pri ■ i i' i ; sn ;, adding forty -sevi 

later purchase. He hi - a nfined his attention exclusively to farming and 
at icl xept \ ,. ; d in constructing two miles of turn- 

pike. ;'■. I in >u and good management, assisted by an exem- 

plary ti ' I iup of sober, reliable children. Mr. Bunger has gained 

a hand 1 is still prospering. The family is associ- 

ated with ' Baptis ( !hurch. 

JOSEPH H. BURKAM, capitalist and lumber dealer. L 
burgh, was born in Dearborn County in LS3S. He is a son of 
Burkam, who came, to Dearborn Cormtv about LS'JO. Elzie ('<. was a 



promin. n 




.f ivn!. 


I.] 


(,) tli 


p. city in 






the St;: 


bad 


1 ■,' 


1 



[-L 






of t! 


10 1, 


■ 


sin h until IS ,'u Ho 


' 




and whs 


. of Cliicn 


1 i. 


In ISOo 




V l'l 


■sided, a 


opb H. Bnrli 


u. 




of tho city ( 


,f L 


awrenco- 


County. ! ! 


, 






the 





lic.\l ni-;s. 6.V1 

aU fo] 

. n ; 

I 

: ' city ot i'orl; 

wealth: banker of that cit 
the promin rit ai 1 most i mi im . i 

ly lifi I in Deai 

educated i 

bnsines , be was a in 

ber. In ISO] Mr. Bur] - to tl 

dency of ttn branch of the Bank of State loc ted bere, in whi 
he rem; : ' I ; Bank was 

organized thai year (15 I tab! ont exten ive lumber 

yards of tho Burkam Lumbi i >mp; i bicb ti be has 1 

: in this business in c 1 estate 

has also carried on farming ( ol. Burkham was a i 

of the first board of directors of the : loburgl ' I ink, and. 

in 1872, was one of the principals in the Lawrein- ing Com- 

pany, controlled and managed by Elzie G. and J. H. Burkham. He has 
also taken a deep interest in tho manufacturing bn lines of Lawrence- 
burgh; was active in the establishment of the woolen-mills of the city, 
and invested a large amount of capital in the enterprise; he also tools 
an active part in Laving the Miami Stove Works located at Lai 
burgh. During tho war he was a strong Unionist, and as colonel of a reg- 
iment of the Indiana Legion, in command of several companies di ! 
good service in repelling Mi in their invasion of south- 

eastern Indiana. Col. Burkam was marriedi I 60 i Miss'Kato Collins, 
whoso death occurred in 1881, leaving four roue and a daughter, namely: 
William F., Frank M., Joseph TL, Ezie and Kate C. 

FKANCIS BUSALD, merchant, Jacksoi Township. This gentleman 
and prominent business man of Jackson Township was born in Germany, 
September 24, 1824, is a sou of Martin and Catharine Busald, m '■ 
Germany, but who, in the spring of 1840, imn igr ited to America, landing 
at New York, from whence the; it ati, thence to Lawrence- 

burgh, arriving at the latter place about ; - 1st of September of tho 
same year. Mr. Bu ild then settled on a pii ce of routed land in Jackson 
Township. He' died in 1858, aged fifty-sis years. His wife who sur- 
vived him, subsequently purchased sixty acres of land in Ripley ' 
Ind, but finally sold her farm and removi I St Peter's, in Franklin 
County, Ind., where she died aged si ears. Thev wei i the 



05:2 insToin op in 

ifo ol 
William Hoini . ■ • uci 

: | i 

now iv ide in Frai 

of bi-, fat] i>r, bus : ' ivor since 

tbc nr ■ ' : ■ f Forh Live years. While 

young bo 1 

'■' ' : : ■ 

lot in Lav -ice' ilia For §300, and > r sold il for $40 >. He (ben 

i 1850 bo tr eled this 
farm for tbe store prop ■ still continues 

conducting aeral i ' in 1 

bero twenty aim be hi bad n lai I trade, having 

won the confld i of the community by the honest and uj 
of his tri I by his ind ; pli sation to busine n 

be ha i accn i He owns a good 

farm, of 170 acres, ad 

ted a line and commodi i b; comfort- 

ably situated to enjoj tbe balance of his live in peace and plenty. On 
January 23, 1849, be was united in i Margaret Meis- 

ter, a natiye of Germany, by whom he has bad thirteen children, nine 
now living, viz.: Frank; Margaret, wife of Adam Sabm; Catbari 
of Simon Whipple; Barbari I ' ivif E 

Peter Schnoit; John; Josephine; Caroline, wife of Frank Duell, and 
I 

HENRY C. BUSSE, farmer, Hogan Township, was born in Prussia, 
September 23, 183 l, and n ceived a good English and German od 
1 lis parents, Rev. Christian and Dorothea (Poos) Bu se, were born in 
Prussia, bis father. November 11, 1800, mother, March 10, 1800. They 
were married Di ember 27, 1820, and were parents of four children: 
Dorothea, born in L827, died in 1831; Cb istena, born February 2 . 
died June 24, 1850; Johanna, now Mrs. Henry Engelkinge, and Henry 
C. Father Busse was a farmer in early lift. He immigrated to America 
in October, 1844, and came to this county; located in Manchester Town- 
ship. In 1840 be was ordained as a Lutheran Evangelical minister. His 
first pastorate was St. Stephen's Church, in Manchester Township, where 
he preached for twenty-eight year:-. In addition to his ministerial duties, 
be tae r " chool from 1S40 to 1809. Success crowned his even effort as 
a minister, and he received many into the church during his labors. 
Since 1874 be has led a retired life. His wife died January 3, 1877. 
He now makes his homo with his son, Henry C, who cheerfully gratifies 
his every desire. Mr. Henry C. Busse was married, April 27, LS54, to 



BIOG ! I'l IIES. 0.73 

of ' who wsi bom " 

riino ehil Iron were b 
1850; Caroline, born Dec >i ib -r 4, I a tary 81, 

I! 61; John, I ! , ibor 12, 18(35; 

George, born March la, 1 bom May 10, 1870; V\ .' 

June 20. IS January I, 187.1. Tho entire fainih 

to the Lul has be tees in the 

church for tl [e a :i1 izen, ami 

everythin I I and thrift. 

EPHR MM Bl T r J Ell Lester r l hip, was 

born in i' nty, Me., Januavj 11,1 I 

Rhoda (T ! The paternal grand- 

parents were Ephraira and Zip rfield, who lived and died in 

the State of Maine.. The maternal grandparents John and Prudence 
Tufts ren di ma in 1837, an I • ettled in Washington T<- 

this county, wh e thej resided 'until Mr. Ingols Butter - 

field removed with his family from Maine to Indiana, in the spring of 
1S37, and settled in iVashin p; on the "James Walker 

farm," in the southoasl quarter of Set : : m 2, \ here he resided until 
1852. He removed to Manchester Township and purchased Hie farm 
where his son, the deject of this biography now live-,. Here he 
located and remained a resident until his death, July 28, 1807, 
aged sixty-seven years. His wife still survives and resides with 
her daughter in Champaign County, 111. They were pare 
'six children, three now living: Ephraiin, Sarah T., now the widow 
of Anthony Chase, and resides in Illinois, and Manly T., residing 
at Fort Madison, Iowa, but, is at present in Arizona, serving as sec- 
retary of the Mineral Mountain Mining Company. Of those deceased, 
two died in infancy and Augusta M., who married John M. Palmer, 
and died March 17, 1884 Mr. Buttorfield was one of the active, prom- 
inent men of this county and community and held several of the impor- 
tant offices of his township, and received the nomination as a candidate 
for several county offices, showing his popularity among his political 
friends; but as he belonged to the minority party of'this county, first as 
a Whig and then an uncompromising Republican, he, of course failed to 
bo elected. In his early life in .Maine he was commissioned as a captain 
in the militia of that Stale, which office he resigned on his removal to 
Indiana. Ephraini Butterlield, our subject, was six years of age when 
they came to this county; grew to manhood familiar with the sc 
early life here; was married August 7, 1S56, to Cordelia Annie, born in 
this county, February 28, 1834, a daughter of Thomas and Khoda (Fair- 
banks) Annis Bv this union they have had seven children. Three 



G54 ui.sroitv i i co 

dii d in I A., now iii coiu- 

I . ■ ' 

.■•'■■ ' a century and 

1 I . ■ 1 slock mis; i iugh lifo. Hia 

; I ilf ,l mile : I] 

Con ■ • iprovcd, being pi ided with go I 

a neat, p] me and i. idence. Mr. Bnttorheld is giving 

especial attenti 

the first farmers to introduce thorn in 1' . He is one of 

the I I is held in high 

throughout hi 1 I extei ded circle of acquaint! . 

: 
born in Ripley County, Ind.. is a son of Will 

Maria Cairns, natives of New Jersey, settling in this county in 
! I 11 quarter of Section 31, Jacl ip, upon 

which he 1 ttlers. Sub. 

he relinquished one half of his land, and after residing on the other 
hi ' sold it, and removed into Ripley Coun 

Ivaniaburg, where he resided till 1828. Hero turned to this county 
and settled on the southeast quarter of Section 30. In 1831 he traded 
his land for land in Section 31, where his son, our subject, now resides, 
and here I remainder of his life. He died May '.' 

aged sixty years. He was twice married. His first wifo di 1 in LS27, 
bi ■ i 1 n» had four children, three grew to maturity: Harri 
ried Joseph Regan, and resides in Franklin County, Ind.; Elizabeth, 
married Joseph Meister, is now deceased, and John. His second wife 

s. Mary Engel. She died March 25, ISOS, age,! nearly eighty - 
eight years. Mr. Cairns was a painter by trade, which occupation b fol- 
lowed several years in his native State. After settling in Indiana he gave 
his attention principally to farming, also doing some work as a mason. 
at which, in laying brick and stone, he was a proficient workman. He 
was a member of the Lutheran Church for many years. Joint Cairns, 
Esq., was the young< d child of the family, an ! here grew to manhood. 
October 12, 1843, he was united in marriage with Jane Anderson, born 
in L821, a daughter of Claudius and Jane Anderson, native of County 
Tyrone, Ireland, becoming settlors of tins county in 1831, when they 
resided till death. He died January 11, 1ST4, aged eighty- thi 
His widow died January 25, 1SS1, age 1 eighty year.-. They had ten 
children, six now living: Jane, Sarah, William B., George, John and 
Robert. Squire Cairns and wife have had eight children, four of whom 
survive: Man Ann, wifo of Henry Kretzmeir; Jan"; Caroline, wifo of 
Edward O'Brien, aud Robert. Mr. Cairns taught school seven; 



i. He : 

.: 
ice 1 . [j confidcm h i 

rnship ( ru itee, : ad other 
, Mr. Cairns 

mm, se till it ) 
br: - up go I u'li 

the Lutheran Church 

i 

I ' I B ne of the ol 

native re E Ohi bor 1S23 near Rising 

pan ijah and ' alkin, the forn 

live of I ter i tchess County, N. Y. His 

father I'm in 1 : lity till grown to maturity, and then 

took up hi be married, and in 1819 
with hi>- tarte 

down tb> Using an. He firsl set tied i 

tion of land ov bj dj ling the town, and afterward 

purchased land in the neighl agricultural pur- 
suits all the remainder of his life, being an industrious fanner addicted 

to no 1 11 ,H ' ilyof nine children: Sidney (dei 

Emiline. widow of He ■'<■-; Zoda, widow of Daniel 

Thorn, Rising Sun; C i rarland, Madison, Ind. ; 

David L., a thrift; ' Cou ty, 111.; Benjamin C, Rising 
Sun; Mary Ann, deceased wife of Uriah Freeman, of Illinois, and 

Richard (deceased) formerly a farmer of Pope County, 111., his widow 

now a resident of Rising Sun. The father of these die 1 in LSG7, in this 

county, thi era! way at the advanced age of eighty - 
three years. Benjamin C. Calkin, whose name introduces this sketch, 

passed I ' ye: rm with his parents, being constantly 

employi : al 1 seventeenth year. He then began his 

. whi tly wh i his failing health and i 
coinpelli to reti ine boui IS73. He dealt in prod- 
uce, shippii ; the* rkets, and in general met with fail 
success. Ful at tis busim -. by economy and a great 

' - to retire with : 

of I tal his days. Mr. 

Calkin was married, ij I A.nn Ryle, daughter of Larki 

of Boo Coi y, Ky., and I i They are I 

hers of th d have the 
community. 



I 

b i lii parent ,'■) 

■ . ' ;■ about I7SD !,i 
! , ,y wtw I (1 

Our subject is no 
onl; i '. ' in 1S32, in 

hi ■■: seveiity-thii : 

lescout. In F< bra; ry. ■ 

tno\ i y. , to 1 

: 

Call early a the farm ei < 

i : " up I be 

i : hi I ■ uiecl full 

: ■•■' [.he civil war. 
b, but 1 a- were of porli an I : 
Orle From that city he o 

;.i'tiv.'!_\ ri'g. ' ■■■! in !>:i : ■ , but ha i lived in quii I retirement in the 
town, which has bee i hi ; [n his busi 

'■ 
in life ; i i -. and with not a do] ' ! 

assi a hand ic; for bis support 

in hi.s <i- riming y ;irs. Mr. Callahan was married, April lii. I 

' ter of Paul and Eliza 

Swift, : atives of the same State, the family moving to (bis county about 
1820. Her fal hei by trade, d < >ndu< ted t] 

Hardinsburgh fo I ye irs. There were six children in the family, 

Mrs. C. now beiii the only one surviving. Mr. and Mr-. I 
two children, both of whom died in infancy, but they have reared 
ten ai but one. Their names are as 

follows: Henry Swi "t, N illi 

Cynthi A. Callahan, 1 i argi i el Freri h, \ c i Fre li, JoIid 
Auna L The first five named of \ ] : 

(excej i ! These children Mr. ; 

C [ at maturity have givi 

assistance in fonudin th Ives. Mr. Callahan is one of 

II" 1 mosi hi. hlj . gh. He was for more 

than two y yi 

CI : ■ I and Mrs. C. have been activi ' c forty- 

seven years. 



BlOflKAl'HICAL I li ■' 

JOHN X. CALVERT, inorchsmt, Cln\ Township, dealer in ■ 
merchai ■ ' ' of Macon Com ty, \r ., 

where ho was horn Octoboi 2 i . 1 5 1 [lis parents, Jol 
(Sandor: I • ■ i bi <\ b aal ivos ■ ■ ■■ I I h forinoi born in 

Cumberland County, June 9, 1701; LI 

23, I MT.. Tb y were i h ! ; 8, I! 37, and 

shortly afl i 1 to Dearborn County, [nd.; thcnco to Macon 

County. Mo., and subsequently returned to Dearborn C unty, Ind., 
where she still resides. They wen the parents of six children, viz. : 
Lowery, James, Mary J., Lydia K., Fannie, and John '■' 

id at Aurora, End I about fourteen years of age, 

went in the store of T. and J. \V. Gaff, of Aurora, as a clerk, with 
whom he • ', then worked for Jesse Youi 

year in the haj b : ; after 1 cl i John X. Milb 

jewelry store at Aurora; for Samuol Triswell store; for Wil- 

liam Leive in a jewelry store; and in li 19, weul to Dillsborough, Ind., 
and began business for himself, which he ha i continued. Be 

arried near Dillsborough, December 5, 1872, to Annie I 
who was born in this county, April 21, LSi a daughter of 

Elias and Sarah (Evans) Leasure. Mr. Cah '■ I born to him four 

children, viz.: Lucy, (deceased) John •' ' ■• and Benjamin. 

CHALES R. CAMPBELL, Miller Township, \ born in Franklin 
County, Penn., August 3, 1815, and in Antrim Township, on the fork of 
icocheague Creek, grew to tl >! n years. In 1S31 his 

parents, Allen K. and Esther R. (Berryhill) Campbell, with their seven 
children, came to Ohio and stopped near Fort Harrison about ten 
months, and in the spring of 1832 came to this locality and pu 
land on Georgetown Ridge. He subsequently sold out and moved to the 
present site of Guilford, where he died February 20, 1S37. His widow 
died in December, 1805. They reared seven children, four now living. 
Our subject remained with his parents till INo-i, and then began 1 
on the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers, continuing (ill 1849, in which busi- 
ness he was fairly successful. He then engaged in railroading for a 
time, and in 1857, in partnership with James TL Skatts, erected the 
store building in Guilford, now occupied by R iberi Hargitt and took up 
merchandising, which he continued till 1803-64 with excellent succe . 
After that Mr. Campbell purchased a farm, which he cultivated till 1884, 
wheu he sold out and purchased his present home. He was i 
February 26, 1846, o Catharine Ev, bank, of this county, .laughter of 
Thomas Ewbank, an *arly English settler of Dearborn County. They 
had eight children, four of whom are still living: Thomas D., 
station agent and telegraph operator, Boylston, Ind.; Mary, wife of 





I 1 


















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. 


im 






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OHIO COIJN'I 

[.; 

..: lil] ::i heme. Mr. 

I man, aii d lie 

■' •■ faith i 

rjil 

I ity of Aurora, • s I orn near Aurora 

Se] i ' ■ 1 1 

v., Juno 7, 1S13. His 
mol b : jton March 28, 

The fathor w: a 
oiai I LS70, since then, to L8S1, 

■i painting and 
h L that trade. Tii / ho enlisted in '.' 

; his counl i'y until 

Ma; '. . 

i; this union one 
cbilil — : ' ' 1 1 lied February I ' 

He m; LS7i k< >vas born January 

1, [84 I. I v tlii marriage one child, Perry (\, v, .born. In 1881 Mr. 
Canfield was Third Ward, and ],, 

been re-elected. H< is Post Commander of John A. Piatt Post No. S2, 
i lected in 18S4. He is also a member of Dearborn Lodge 

No. 442, F. & A. M., and the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

ISAAC a native of Delaware and a sold 

blxi I olution, settled arlyday. He had married an English 

lady of i ber of the famous 

Bi family of England. His patriotic devotion to the cause of 

Independence had reduced him from affluence to poverty, and forever 
e | bed wife from her English kindred. His exposure 

in the service- of his country had impaired his health and ultimately 
pi . [ii b ae West, hoping to improve the future of 

'■' land boat, conlai ing his wife, children 

and «.,, i iods, afl ■ . journey !'■ . Pittsburgh, at the mouth 

. . '., in 1812. He lived more tl i qmi ; ■: of a century in 

a humt on] Hill. While able to walk to the school - 

lion sight of h c I il for 

I hi q to his room, where he 
in 7 pu] matin Het urvived his wife 

many years, and died in lS:! ( .t. A literar; 

claimed?) ie of the ror] of imagination of our day, is foundi 
sively i tunes. Thi venerable patriot, scholar 

and ( brie i; n gentleman was theorac] I diborhood, beloved and 

• <■ i I; only an extended history wi e to his memory. 



.... Oh', 

JOSIAI-] Oil \ ii \.uron ' 

. tie, I : 

■ , 'est to tr\ hi I at 

I, Ohio, tlo ! 

:. : . T. M. 

- : He united, : 

i with tl | t was the] teruu d 

Briuistoue Gornor. On the 7tli ted 

o Howard. I ■ employed by J 

1 ■ the farm , an d < 

fall, for four or i 
boa ! >uring ouo trip . 

" ' ' ' 

his growi crops and farm prod 

!■•' ir Cheviot, Ohio, and 1 ' ■ At this 

time hi family co i - : - i o\v Mrs. F. 

buried three children. In I 1 I to AVilmin; 

There he bought out the store of T. John Taylor i i 
1S40 he sc ' rds, to whom he had sold hi 

and moved to Aurora. He was now worth about §1, '.', ealth was 

so poor that he thought it was prol aid soon die. 

seated a I eding at the lungs had reduced him con- 

He rallied in health, and buying a new stock of goods, ho entered upon 
a career of great prosperity. His cognomen of e: | 
during the years 1811 to 1844, when he owned, together with Mr. Will- 
iam Glenn, an interosl r "Fashion," a packet running from 
Cincinnati to Madison; Mr. Glenn was captain, Mr. Levi Ste\ 
clerk and occasionally Mr. Chamber;; acted as captain. About 1844 or 
1845 he itered into partnership with Levi Stevens, the name of the hrm 
being J. Chambers & Co. In 18ol it was changed to Chambers, Stevens 
& Co., taking John Chambers and W. F. .Stevens into the firm. Soon 
after the death of John Chambers, which occurred June 21, 185G, Frank 
Wymond bought an interest and became a member of the firm. The 
firm entered into the wholesale trade at Cincinnati in 1857, Mr. T] 
Shotwell becoming a member in 1S5S. Josiah Chambers was a man of 
very decided chj acter, the most prominent feature being .:, | 
to Christ and next to business; a man of single aim, nam 
whatever he undertook; naturally a gentleman, kind, prudent, patient, 
full of tact; he conducted all his affairs on religious business principles, 
unswerving integrity and candor; a man of great energy and i 
industry, it seemed almost impossible to discourage him; he i 
right and righteous counsels and adhered to (hem rigidly and wit] 



Cl I OF 1 

,■;.,. 
'■ ' ' 

and to this 
pressnn His 

W. E. CHAJ IlLAIN, Hill, Ind., was 

bom in . : ■- Hi; 

I ',.'.', ; E 1 

and Kentucky, 

No^ ibor 8, 1824, son of 

1 
■in 1SS2. 
: [ B., the i of 

. 
his uncle I bul y, Ohio, and ■ 

I at the Kii ! s: IS went x- 

Coui in.!., wh ire he ei 

years, and was the: e m; rried i »1 

Moore, an 

ter of Alexander and R! >da Q In 1S51 Mi-. Cha 

m Co., Ind., wi he I in 

and selling goods, anil in 1853 ivi I to preach in the 

Methodist Epis< ipal Church o pli united with th 

a ] '• 'i ' into th Ilea tern Indii 

. in which he served 
medicine, and in 1861 1 p ' 

since pursued. In 1802 he moved to Man< : rborn Co. , Ind. , 

and in 1881 to Moore's Hill, where les. He is at ; 

member of the Baptist Church, in which he i I mini; ter, hav- 

ing united with them in 1883, and was ordained February 14, 1885. He 
was united in marriage, Septei iber 24, 1 73, to Cyn hia I. Davis, a 
daughter of Isaac, and Narcissa (Akens) Davis. In October, 1883, Mr. 
Chamberlain moved to Moore's Hill and established his present busi- 
ness, which ho has since pun I ; v.l enter- 
prising citizen, a 1 is highly res] ' community. Mr. and 
Mrs. Chamberlain are tl chil viz.: William E 
C. (deceased), Charles W., Clara E. (di L George C. (de> 

JAMES CLARK, Randolph Township, oi ■ of the typi 
Ohio County, was born in Virg ia in J° '0. Ho i i rt Clark, 

who came to this part of tho country with hi her, Isaac Cl ■' 

was in identally drowned in tl >n Cincinnati a 

ing Sun, leaving a wif and : ' 

B I ' and he 







. 




horn 


11.. Oil 




and locate 






in LSI 1. settl d in this 











I 

: 

owned by Wi ; J 1 with his 

[) of 1 

ent farm, which now- comprises 130 : :er sinc< 

resided. Tin I 

abonl 1816, and the ! ■ lives, was bi 

by Mr. Dixou aboul £81 7— IS. Mr. i in farm 

i i g. I ' 

daughter of John and led in ibis 

county a stated above, an ly, his eldesi d; 

Tamsou (who 
child bom in Cincinnati. Hei s soldier of the Re> 

.-, . 

Fort Wa lity was yet a wilder- 

ness. To Mr. and Mrs !1 . wife of 

Tackson; William D.: Ellon: U ■ of John T. J 

residents mnty, Kas., and Sarah J., don ased wife of Will- 

iam L. Mod o. Mrs. Clark departed this life April 6, 1881, in her 
seventy-fourth year, having been marrii d almi ! lift} ye; re. M] 
is still living, and foroneof bis; ■ ' He 

distinctly when the wolves, • ■ bickl 

which ho has done his 
ness. 

GEORGE W. CI ARK, farmer, Manchester Township, bor 
1 ;i, March 5th, 1824, isasonof Jedde and Mary (Barker) Clark, 

natives:.: [., who, in 1822, immigrate] to Ohio, and .settled 

in Hamilton County, near Cincinnati, where fchoy resided till the fall of 
1824, when they removed to Indiana and settledin I p on laud 

now owned by H. Elinghouse on Section 4. where he resided till his 
death in 1850, aged seventy two yes mrvived him, and died 

at her son's (George W. Clark), in 1876, aged lit; is years. They 
had twelve children, five now surviving: Catharii v id. Dur- 

ham, residing at Seymour. Ind. ; Keti h Jane, wife of Mr. Bowen, re- 
siding in Iowa; George W.; Williai i A., residing at Moore's Hill; and 
Phebe Emily, ii'o of John E. Boen, residing in Butler C 
Mr. Clark was a ship carpi ut by trade, and followi d that bu iness in 
Cincinnati, where ho helped to build the first steam-boat that ever went 
down the Ohio River. After settling his family on the farm above men- 
tioned he still continued at his trade in Cincinnati, walking from Ins 
.horn'' in Manch innati in the morning, and tb , 





1 


. 


] 


1 


., [ i 




ago. bo return 




' 








' ' I Hcl 




. 



GG2 hist-.. 

: half .' 

the genera] 

,: 

Eor '■ G 

1 

1 

(A-i ho a f Lou mont. 

I 

In I October 

31, of th 

Mr. Wi : Celanktou Wicks, 

I 

his farm land. H 

fathi i- i l' twelve child aov. living: G-ilb irt, 

port, Iowa; Albert, residing in Shelb ■. ■ 

Shelby C 

Luriuda. Mr. Clark and vife hi \ i had Fabius M.. a 

resident of Topeka, Kj 

Mr. Clark is a carp le, whii h 

i ■ - llowed I years. He 

pure! I ■ | I ' i i ] I 

more land by p ' " - I ■ en cted new 

and commodion rith other im] •■ 

pleasant Can ti r's hoi te. Mr. Clark has been a member of the Mi 
1 1 was, with her | 

si Church, but since their dea sin has united 
with her husl Epi 

WILLIAM J. CLEMENTS, farmer, Sparta Township, was born near 
Bal ' .1' 2S. His pari nts were Chai ! 

Rachel* in England and Maryland. He was tnarri ! 

in Span I, to Emeline, daughter of Abraham 

and Eli :al eth Carbaugh, ] o was born in tl 29, 1^8^. 

In March, L801, Mr. ( I moved on his farm which he had pur- 

cl . and i has since resided i i o 

acres of . They have had bori 

viz.: Elizabeth L., Charl i EL, Zadie D., Emma F., Miunii I 

THE COVINGTO: The brotl 

< i ' frrmi Si inn n et County . Md., and ■ 

Bo ! then ■ 'ii llk.cIj 



moar.Ariiit'AL sketi 003 

a call on thi i Konl 

war witb tl I a norths i Ohio 

joined tho I I out at I », and served several 

lis, a p 

return Iron 

I 
Eroin Mary] . in 1816. ] 

i 
Hartford. Roberl I u 

I ■ , , |j 

i : . I • I Street, b 

m Lot No. 57, sami Co di 

• 

.arid 
the . : 

after the deatL as ono of the . worl 

i a noted 
ionable watering pla< C 

ington married Polly '■• - : 

bad al in t] lived 

ird. In 1 
and went to the 
tention of renn 

ivington, taki 

and died. Befi re he c 

a misfortune, hi I of a fever, ; id died. Tin 

decided to ould be old 

enough to take chargt afi 

ily reini ved to 

S. F. Covington, now residing at Cincinnati, and John B. Coving- 
ton, of Fusing Sun. are L'j Covington, and the 
only children, except om in earlj 

F.Covington, who has won considerable di • Cincinnati, Ohio, 

is a native of Rising Sun. Hi early boyhood and maim >dwer 
in the village, as were I r yeai receivi the 1 

the excellent schools which R-i i ig Sun was fortunate in havii 
completed his education at Miami University, located in the (own of 
Oxford, Ohio. In early life he was employed as a clerk in solqo of the 
village stores, for a time was clerk on a stearal d pub- 

lished a weekly newsp; \ ■ Isu 

the Madison Courier. As editor of the Blade he played a 



1)1! I IIISTO 

I ■■ ; tVcti the.l : l.orn Count 

■ : ' . ,■ ! 

.) 

I tlio ] • itivc di trict, I 

' Uiio. in the State ] 
msttftl I While a re ;■ 

be was for a ti i ho Ohio le, au.l 

I 
the growth ,vhich n 

, ■ _ | 

this the ci th 1 , id i: pi ! 

I 

eountn . t in it, as I leral his- 

I . I He mar- 

ried 1 . J ' : : 

. 

■ i , : : , . • ! • 
I ' 

At the 

■ 
1 
■ ' . . ufj ntr) t. was wo mded in ; 

ae r Dallas, Ga., oj oil g in 

line of battle, and Lie the line 

when ho was si 
breast, passed 

column. The- md inevitably fatal, the only 

hopowai 

1 i iade a raid in 1 ' coul 

home til] the 30th. i . distance 

i i . .-. miles, to Kin;;.sioii. where he put I th for Ohatta 

nooga. Wliih . between Dalto and ] Lst 

Jtim . he die* 1. The del il wh ich h; ' 

instruction:? of (Job Wilder, in event of death on the sva' horn I bod_\ 
embal ad broughl on to Nashville, where ,' 

'.'.,.. i '■ 

and interred on the 9th inst. B. C b [vising 

Si n, March 28, L845, so that ho had but a short time . inci 
his twentieth year. He first enterod the service July 4, 1S61, ai ..■ I 
into West Virginia with Col. (now Gi i irnanding 

the Seventeenth. He afterward returned home, but rejoined the regi- 
ment, then under Col. Wilder, September, 1862, and was with Col. 



! ■ 
render of that ' 

time with Col, 
I 

I 

I I I ' 

|, , 

. ■ ; ■ . 

i 
Spun elf. 

rebel 

b this hi . ; ; : '. 

j ■ ■ • 

" , 

fate, Dm 

j 
of the roj f of cannoi 

isl d he was able to be with his regimen i. B 
d 

of a nob! : 

at ] 

attended his J lie inwl 

■■ : i ■ ■ I I hi rill be 

cherish' d by those wl 

in, both ' . ' nan: 's court, b 

which wi re in i 

motion of Judge itab] ial to his chars 

commi pon 

of the !■■ 

WIL] enior member i 

Sons plow i , 

L857. He is a i , Indiana, I grandson 

of .!■ 

I county in LS2 >. His gri 

farmer all his life, and lied about 1SS0, at 
one years, his wido .v ■ two and : , 

Hi-^ fat her, Will i ' " born ii [823, and 1 > i ly 1 if" i n 

the farm. He married Mary McGuiBn, an.' ■ 



. .. (Jlore 

M . 

I 
; li . I man; pn! | ' i. i d 

■ 

and d 
■ 
implon • ■ 

1 

; . . • ■ 

Tin y 

pri , and 

luiioii is 

i - | 

began hi .and 

been i 

blic-spi 
after tin 

Bros., 01 I ■■ ;i rk pack- 

ing quite extensively, where also 

house. During the war 0. P.Cobb was appointed by the United States 
Governi iragi for it. which reqi ■ 

erablc i ■• ' I econd bay m irl I 

in the We itate Co ;: ; s served in different caps 

the \< and whii To fa 

cilitate fcl of ; ad i nifc times invented and bad 

patent : - ' ei-y Eor different i ■ ■ 

LOUIS S\\ COBB, i o-D 'torn h 

s bom in the city of Aurora, April 29, 1847, of parents 
Qlh ■ P. and Caroline S. (Foulk) Cobb, mention of whom is mad : 
when- in ibis volume. Our subject in his early boyhood received the 
benefit of the excellent public schools of his native town, and \ . 
sequentlj sent to Chickering ' bool of some unto in Cincin- 

nati, Ohio. He next entered Yale Col] nd pursued a com 





1 




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1 ■ • , 








1 : 




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: 





! . ., i ■ 

! 

I 

y and " 

Cobb 
possesses o | iartii ' 

I bulrt in ml 1 
them. 

; 

with Mi: ' 

IS54, and to hi i .. ■ ' en 1. t-n Hi 

., Fran] ai I M. Mr. C. 1 

t\\ ice ch as alumni a 

(,!'■.' ! W. O '■• :' I in C ■• '■■ ;' ■ •• Ky., in 

i ■ It ma;- 1 : : fan was 

the original builder of the Ohio 

building of which he ofl bri] i Cincinnati to 

St. Loui ■•. By his on the road wi ition from 

bi men. lie pur< ' M| acres of land along the line of the 

road and adjacent to it, and I : I tamed them after 

his friends. The town i Eter him. 

JOHN W. CO FIE] ip, born in Critl 

County, ivy., June] - is a son of Robert ; 

ford) Cofield, he a native of North Carolina, and she of K i 
I rried in Kentucky, and in the spring of 1835, rei 

Indiana, in Union Township, Ohio County, on the place 

where Je: ;e Cooper now lives, whei'e lie died, March 8, 1850, in the 
fiftieth yeai of his- age. Hi widow i ill rives, and resides on the 
home pi: ipor. In early life Mr. 

Cofield I ' ' : I entered upon farming, 

which business he followed the balai I e. He was a man of 

industri ■ l>i i . ; <■ < I of a high i aracter, and i most ex- 

cellent citizen. He ai I - tg I bers of the Blofhodist 

Episcopal ( !hur< h. in •■ manj years, 

the futher of nine children-, all now livi iz.: JohnW., R< 

- (now the wife of J. Billing ' ' : . ' 

abeth (twins, the form ie wife of Ji per, tin I the wife 

of L. J. W .Stephen, ] li/.a (wife of Jo 

Joim W., the eld ;re .v ti i man! • !. and April 



Hi' . ' . i IKS. 

married Ik CI , R : | 

R i . i 

, ! I being 

1 
■' . ' . . : 

Hi si Garner. ; he married I 

He died at I, in the 

forly-fifi h ago, bavi 

led by a larg m 

dore Kessinger; Clan of Mr. Le 

. ife, be bad tli living: Lydi 

A., wife of William Crookcr. Mr. ; ' I and wife bavi 

Rob ri E. ; William R.; ; 
Lewis F. Is; Flattie S., i 

E. Elliott; Stephen K., ' I 1., John D., Jesse F., Harry 

D., and Maggie; Atlanta, d 
started in life poor, but has been 

175 acres, with good buil lings and i B 

of the offices of bis t real estate a] | aii 

county commissioner three years, and is director on thi of 

ricnlture. He has been a war Democrat, a 
in his county. He and wife, have bi 

cup;:! Churcli inri;;, years. He is a charter member of Laughery Lodge 
No. 246, I. 0. O. F., and hai 
campment. 

OAPT.JOHNR.GC id stock deal , Wi - Town- 

ship, is a nati\ Wilmington, Di 

Co., Ind., March 16, 1824; his parenl I Eliza! 

Cole, were born in V, Vmnty, Va., tin f; thi in L797, and 

the mother in 1S01. They came to Indiana, in 1S15, and wore married 
in 1S19; be was ' , his life 

was engaged in farming. He wai also a local pr< i Letbodist 

i! 1 Church, and < ; I ary 1S54; bis wid 

Method! ;l Epis : pal ; !l nr< h over sisl and resid 

her son Samuel D. (' ' on 14, and is an active, ii 

old lady. In 1842, Mr. John R. Colo, engaged in business wi hi G. 
Herron, in Hartford, and continued up to 1840 ' hi 

been a farmer, ■: I and dealer. He was married ' 13, 

1848, to Miss Sarah E. Pugsl . I John I 

native of Ohio County. Ind., born in Union Township, M: ■ 







111. 




.1: 


j 13, ' i-l 


Mi 


JV.nnie i I only a 




D 


loc 


ia(cd ai ; iii the fortiL 


'Li! 


i 



; So, uour S., 
, 15, LSC.O; J: hn S., n 
hort film 
lanks. Ho and ' 

•'. ■ funr 

to Miss Abbie, daughter of Will F. an, 

of tketirmof Chai ■ ■ . . lealei 

; I [o is als. :mi invi il ■;■. ami has p 

i ' ■.':■■'■ I : 

and stock journi 

I I I ' 1 is si Idoin 

nf agricultural implore lisplayed in his abil- 

ity to judge of the respective parts 
horse. To him. 

the improvement of the stock of hor 
age, he evinced 

quite young, pli I in of tl 

which he i : until the death of this noted animal. .Mr. I ! 

at different time as most tended to improve thi 

ity of the stock in hi 1 -- native county. A.ru 

res entative i of such f rth Kontuckys, ' >rovi .- 

era, Blue Bulls, Stock Bridge Chief, Abdallahs and Denmarks. Mr. Cole 
was township trn y< are. B m il of tl 

Legion for four ; held sible position of ca] I 

company. Ho is a member of Ha No. 151, F. & A. M., 

and, with his wife, a mernb ! of the Methodist Episcopal Church 
Colo's parents, John and Mary (Smith) Pugsley, were natives of Duchess 
County. N. Y., the father born in 1775, mother in 1784 Thoy w< 
ried in 1S12, and immigrated to Ohio County, in IS'l.). The father died 
in 1840; he was an esteemed neighbor, an amiable and intelligent gentle 
man, and acl nowledged to be one of the best citizens of Ohio County. 
The mother died at her son-in-law's, Mr. J. M. Stewart, near I 
Montgomery Co., Mo., March 25, L871. 

HIRAM J. COLE, farmer, Clay Township, was born in that town- 
ship, Dearborn Co., Ind., January 1, 1830. His parent; wei 
T. and Ann ( Wini ro) Colo, natives of Pennsylvania and Ohio, respect- 
ively; former born in Greene County, Penn., October 20, 1806, the lat- 
ter in Warren County, Ohi >, \pril ■ !. LS09. David and Poll} C I 
Adam and Mary Wintro wev' the grandparents. The parents were 
married in Warren County. Ohio, and I . in about the year IS31, 

moved to Dearborn County, Ind., and purchased and settled on ; 



(.. I < i n;y o \ onto 

Ear ibj ' .. : i 

'■' ■ ' !' G., HarvcM L\. 

Marv L., ' I. V. illiam i! . 

E. J r., our 

at] nil .' ■■ part of bis life. 

i 1 . I I I i in the di 

and then attended for ■ lill Col . after which 

he turned rs, ami w 

urnl I a • . 

Boone Co I '..(■> Mar- 

■ ■ 
1 ; ' un \ ''._-. . Janua •; IS43. Aft 

Verona, Ky., where he remained until 1SG-J 
farming and I !. From the) year h< 

Dearborn ■ he re- 

mained al i removed to ] Count; I 

then until D 18S3, at which time he removed to 1' 

County, Ind., an ' I . his father's fai : -, which he at 

present owi children, viz. : DoraD. (di. ■■_■■ 

A. (deceased), and Nora E. 

CAPT. JO] B. CO] ' 

of Ohio County, was born in Bloomington, 111.. September 27, II 16. 
His parent . j K. Cynthia (Wi 

Lous Island and Dutchess County, X. Y., respectively. The two 
came West in an early day. the lati ■ I L3, and located in 

Dearborn County, where the marriage of the above occurred. They 
resided in Wilmington till 1835, when they moved to Illinois, wl 
Coles died in 184.5. While in this county he was engaged in u 
dising, but in Illinois followed agricultural pursuits. Our subject was 
a lad of nine years, when his father died. He soon sifter returned to 
this count; I I] 1857, when h 

removed to Bloomington. In 1860 ! study of law, with the 

firm of Sweat & Oiiii.(no\v of Chicago), continuii g his reading with this 
firm about eight months. He then enlisted in the Eighth Missouri In- 
fantry as privi 1 i . four years, pi 

heaviest battle- of the war. including that of Fort Henry. Shiloh and 
all the import; it during Sherman's march to the sea. He 

ri ived a severe wound in the left calf at the battle of Vicksburg and 
served his last year in the | r's department. February 4, 

1863, he was promoted from the ran] li id on the 

24th of sai ■ wa mad captain. He was presont at the grand 



I in tho fall of 1 

[i 

bar i uf his pro 

Col 

D. 11 one of Hi 

: I, ■ Ly. Uyntl Mar 

I 

,. 
i i tii [ ] i t; i I ■ - 

citizen I 

r I . . : ;■. .' 

' . I ... 

(Ho a) Collier. Hi loan Colli 

native of, and lived and lii I in Ei . i 

niinisti i i conl ; Lesley. John 

in E 
1775. In 1817 he :• prospi tour to A mi rii ■ I 

year, tl 
i aarri by two i 

Hansell and Mrs. families, with a num- 

borof o therpen 

in Dearborn County in the autumn of 1819. By way of contra 
fa li for travel bet's 1 1 now, it nun be Btated thi 

John Collier came to tl ; . in 1S17, he walked v\>r the moun- 

tain ith i Eellow-travel 

burgh, to Lawrenceburgh. On his return to Engl; 

di from Tanner's Creek, Dearl irn Count; . John 

Collier died at his home on ] ' in 1810, agi 

years. Jane Collier die i ■ ty -first year of her ; ;>-. Two 

sons and titers Ann II. Hall and Mary J. Chamberlin), still 

survive. Ralph < an infant in his mother's arms when he came 

to Dearborn County, ai I nly such educational advantages as the 

country at that time afforded. By his own exertions principally 1 
himself to teach, and wi pular as a teacher. He taught under the 

old /•( gime, wh n sul hool in vo Ei 

daughter of Reuben and . i (Gi in) True, natives oi 

who the f( tl . on which Mr. Collier now 

resid . October 8, 18-1 

E excellent land, 
well improved. Ralph an I Mary D. illier are the parents of ton living 
children, namely: Gi of Missouri; J C 

William G., R. Fran] . e, Cli J., Mary L., Sebra E., 



(ITl 1 IIIS'I 

B. S 

Clm bich ! bm ■ rh ;■ r*. ! 

: . 

il. CO] • [)1 : ' in r ui 

i ))• of the .1 
■ < !i« ' ■ F. O 

lacl i . hi Col 

Oh 

: ! ■ ' . 

tal in look his From 1S7G to 

1878 ho 
ind 

j ello cpide I on d 

alSSl 

'" ' V ' 
b Po I parti hip with Dr [. H, 
continui I tl th of the latter, in lS8o. He is an 

of the Ai erican Public Health \ ■ Indiana State 

Medical Society, al Dearborn County 

Medical I, ii I fiss C. E. 

Myriclc. of Edward N. Myrick, and they 

have two i. and Mary E. 

G B. COLT, .-'i. , engi . ' . ras born ia 

Covingtoi y, Se] ' 9, 

Frances (Mills) Colt, nath 
ively. The f; ; ' quite 

faring life Prior to 1830 he bad become a si ■ . i ■ ■ a, and was 

plying on the : >hi > Ri . . He was married to Miss Mills Lit Cincinnati, 
and not long thereafter they romo L to at Lyre L tiding, in 

Switzerla liiisl 

captain i " ml iats,p] ing at diJ 'enl time the ri rers ' >hio, Upper 
Missis I i -'land. His death occurred at St. 

Louis, Mo., while enga >d in the river trade 

were b bis unit 

Iud., in i l\ ■ I I i I : B. Colt, rrow up in the ;iU of 

Louisville (to which place the f ami 1; removed 

of his father), whe L ! L ■ - i ■ « e.arh ' _;i i : . ■■ ■ r j 1 1 .^ . , n.< 

bar] • to ' " ! ' ; ■• '" - b b ' I 

Loui iville ai I New Or! He folio 

a number • years, md then and ther r i : • ■ ill 



: 









- 



1I1STI \' (IK 

H I Wished si 

b Las ev< since been able to 
bold an ' " I I 

[n Aprii. 1 

a branch store at CI 
nuto, lv: at 

in this plac< to tbi 
■ ■ '. ladies' wra] : ud shoes, hats, i 

ith uu annual trade of 837,000 to 
ride, point to bis busi 
li indeed Besides his mercant ' I 

- 
Sun, valued at §G, 000, and six town 
lots in Attica, agrowi - aty, Kas. Oiu 

! iur; of this county , 

and a daughter of Th I (D Her Fatb i . a 

bricklayer by trade, sub ■■ i ; y i'v. : ■ ■■! in the grocery busi 
this plac ■. s rved as sheriff of the county several years, and also as one 
of the associate judgos of the . ' court of Indiana. He died in 

1S64, his widow still surviving. Mr. and Mrs. Colthar have : 
child — JcBsie. Mr. Colthar h: ; mercantile establishment in 

thv city, and doubtless fully merits the extensive and lucrative I 
which he has founded. 

JOHN COLUMBIA, Lawrenceburgh, now one of the oldest res- 
idents of that city, was born in Fayette County, Penn., I 
20, 1799. His parents, William and Sus' una (Jones) Columbia, came 
from Pennsylvania with their children in 1800, and located in Hamilton 
County, above Cincinnati, where they resided many years, and where his 
father died. Here our subject passed the years of his minority. At, the 
ago of twenty he married Sarah Chambers, of York State, daughter of 
James and Lydia Chambers, and soon after he came to this count)' and 
purchased eighty acres of Government land, beginning work ou his own 
resources. In October, 1824, Mrs. Columbia died, leaving two children, 
one of whom is still living — Julia Amu, wife of Jacob Miller, of Sparta 
To\ ip. March 31, 1825, Mr. Columbia was married to Sarah 
daughter of William Sh id, of York State, and six children were born 
to them, two now living: Rebecca (Radspinner) and George C. Mr. 
Columbia added fifty acres to his original purchasi . now owning 130 
acres of good land. In 1843 he was elected county commissioner for a 
term of three years; served as justice of the peace fifteen years, and as 
township trustee for several years, being one of the old and ve 
landmarks of Sparta Township, Mr. Columbia's second companion 



b 

benl of Dearborn i. IJ the farm 

. ' ■ I Li i el Ito bis regi- 

I i i the war. 

He ri ■'. I mod 1 1 ■ nm and 

LS72, serving three years, ] 

re-el I to I r. i was marrii 1, in 

1877, to Nottie Churchill, daughter of Jnlii ■ [they] 

one child living—] 

In politics Mj . C ■ : I 

: I 

' , COXA WAY, . ; Township, an old and 

esteemed meer of Dearborn County, was born in Clay To 
De I , His paronts, Robert and E li . 

way, n e both nati\ Virginia, the Eormer a son of John and Liaehol 

Conaway, who were natives of Ireland and Wales, from where they immi- 
grated to the United States in a very early day, and settled in Virginia. 
Their children were John, Daniel, J, obert, the 

latter, the father of our subject. He, when a young man. em 
from Virginia to and 

wore united in marriage, and from thence came in a very earlj 
Dearborn County. Ind.,whoi itil death. They 

were the parents of eight children, viz. : Rhoda, Preston, Harriet. Hamil- 
ton, Parthena, Robert, James and Simon B. Hamilton, our (subject, 
was brought up an a farmer, but in later years turned his attention to 
the mercantile business at Ghiionsviile, this county, which he pursued 
for a number of years, beginning as early as IS- >'."), during which time, 
an- 1 also afterward, hi held the office of justice oE peace for about four- 
teen years. About LS55 he began the practice of law, which he has 
continued more or less since. He also has engaged in flat-boating on 
the Ohio and Mississip; Rivers during a number of years of his 
younger life, beginning as early as 1832. He and Miss Harriet Lemon 
were united in marriage in Clay Township, this county, aboul 
They had born to them two children, viz. : Eliza and Robert. This wife 
died about 1856, and he subsequently married Elizabeth E. Harp ir, t>y 
whom ho had horn to him four children, viz.: Jehu S., Charles. Ralph 
P. and Alhaina E. Mr. Conaway is a man of exc chan iter, and 



676 II1ST0 1 ■ fUN'l [ES. 

: i >cted by all - Ko : him. Ho owns 100 acres of fine 

lai I . 

acr< 

• ! " . '■ 
Ohi. ] ■'. IS:}."). He in tli • 

ol to J (Wilson) C 

: occupation until 

1800, i i o • ■ id 

ra i marric 1 at Guioi 
ville I he was di-s and 

D I I ' . by whom Lie h 

\. and mil- wli i 
' of Griiionsvillo office in 

1872, v. ! lias sii ■■ hold. 

in L862, aged 
thi Ho native i ' re, i .ved to 

Aur .i . i I'.', ei th. building at the comer of First and Main 

Streets, said to be the first m. est blished in Aurora, and 

in ii h. kepi the po >ifice for eight years. His house was the resorl of 
politicians and others, and his estimable lady, a daughter of Charles Ta- 
ti'iu of Cincinni ! at of n fined hospitality. For 

a quarter of a century before his death, Mr. Conwell was a resident of 
Napoleon. Esther Conwell, the wife of our subject, was born in Dela- 
ware in 1797, and died at Aurora in 1882. 

A. D. COOK, proprietor of the Lawrenceburgh Machine Shop, Law- 
renceburgh, was born in Germany in 1850. He came to America, with 
his parents, when a child, and grew up in the town which has over since 
been his home. He was educated in the Lawrenceburgh public schools, 
and in his youth learned the tinner's trade in which he continued exclu- 
sively, till about 1SS2. He then began operations as a machinist and 
has gradually increased his business fill the present time. In 1881 he 
invented "Cook's Patent Well Strainer" and began the manufacture 
of th ■ same, and the article, which is of uuqu. stionable merit, is gradu- 
ally coming into general use. In 188-1 he b ' out a pateni fori 
to b ivi ill and th with others he is manu- 

facturing in larg tnti ; His estal nt is making fail 

r. - ! i is ' ■■ I, in the near future, to I i of th" import- 

ant institutions of Lawrenceburgh. He manufactures pumps of superior 
quality, also tubular well fixtur -, and doe? all kinds of repairing, oper- 
ating about fifteen workmen. The simps occupy three large rooms on 
Walnut Street, and are receiving a liberal patronage. Mr. Go ' wi 
married in November, 1882, 1" Miss \.nna Hassner, who was born and 
reared in this community — a dauglilei of T. now 



BlOCiliAI'llICAL SKETCIIKS. In I 

of Versailles, lad In Uio business interests u£ Lawrenceburgh, Mr. 

Cook takes qi i to a prom i pi; , n u with his euorg.\ aud bu 1 

tact will, in. doubt, soon be the |>eor of auj of his i ot.emp >raries. Ho is 
chiof of, the tiro department and takes a keou interest in the general wel- 
fare of his adopte 1 to 

F. W. COOK (also written Koch), Lawrenceburgh, one of the 
older business men of that city (now retired), is a native of Bremen, 
Germany, born April 30, 1S1G. Hi; parents, Frederick Willii 
Margaret Coo . were highly connected in the old country, some of his 
relatives po I i fortunes. He learned the tinner's trade, 

in hie native country, and followed the same there until 1S51, when ho 
immigrated to the United States to seek his fortuno in "tho land of 
Uncle Sam." He landed at New Orleans, where he resided not quite 
one year, working at his trade for a Frenchman, who defrauded him of 
most of hi> earnings. He then weni . for himself, at Carle 

ton, La., but about one year later sold out and moved to Lawrenceburgh, 
where he has ever since resided. He conducted a successful hardware 
and tinware business up to 1877, when he tinned the stock over to tho 
management of his sou, and retired from act' v..' bu ine ••, life. Mr. Cook 
was married in his native count:'}' to Anna Bottier, by whom ho had six 
children, live of whom are still living: John, August, Henry, William, 
and Margaret, Mrs. Cook was a daughter of Henry Bottier, a farmer in 
Germany. She and Mr. Cook have always labored hard and honestly, 
and are wholly entitled to the comfortable circumstances in which their 
life long labors have placed them. 

JOHN F. COOK, dry goods merchant, Lawrenceburgh, was born in 
Germany, in 1847, son of F. W. Cook (or Koch). He was brought to this 
country by his parents, and educated in the Lawrenceburgh schools. In 
lS()7,he began the clothing business, which, in connection with dry goods, 
he has over since continued, except one year, in the hardware trade. In 
1808, he married Anna E.Vogel, daughter of George P. Vogol, and they 
have two children — Frederick J., aud Elsie. Mr. Cook carries an elegant 
stock of dry goods, dress goods, velvetiues, etc., and enjoys a full share 
of the general patronage. 

W. F. COOK, Lawrenceburgh, dealer in hardware, stover-, tin 
ware, galvanized cornice, etc., was born in Lawrenceburgh in IS60, and 
grew to maturity in his native city in whose public schools he was edu- 
cated. "When about fourteen years of age he began learning the tinner's 
trade, and in this capacity he was employed till lS82,when he assumed 
charge of the entire business. He carries a full stock valued at §3,000 
to §4,000, and has a liberal share of the general patronage in his line 
He is a young man of good business qualifications and is bound to suc- 
ceed. 



(>,* II! L'OltY OF Dl'ARHOHN V> 1' OHIO mUNTIl-X 

,! iCOB COOPER, Randol] li r J | sou of John an I Mary 

(Kulp) Coopor, wi Ohi C iml\ in 1S51. His parents were both 

nativi of Indiana, his father of Ohio County. His grandfather, Corne- 
lius Kulp, setth lity in a very early day, i >min<j from Penn- 
sylvania prior to 1S20. His Fill i ' a fanner and followed that 
pursuit all his life. He pu es of land i Fter his marriage 
and resided on the same for a shorl period when he removed to I >\\ 
About one year later he died in i ,'hile here trausactin 
business pertaining to hh pro] y, H ividow who subse 
quently married Jam is still living : i a widow, 
her second hush . ■ ■ ied in the late war. By the first marriage 
six children were born: Charles, Nai y, Wini racob, Flora andMary. 
the latter deceased. After the fi Lh the family returned to this 
county, where oui ibje I Jai il ( ioper, ha since resided. For a time 
he worked for wages and made bis home with his mother. He tb 
quentl; rented land J yeai - I in March, 1883. was appointed 
superintendent of the Ohio County Infirmary, which institution he ha9 
since had charge of, conducting I i ?ery satisfactory manner. 
He is tirra in his discipline yet kind in its exercise, and under his 
chargi the inmal bavi littli m to complain. Mr. Cooper was mar- 
ried in 1870 to Sarah Fuller, of this county, daughter of Saini 
Catharine (Kittle) Fuller, old and < I ■' leoo of thi same. By 
this union were born four children: John W., Pearl, Grace, and Hattie. 
Mr. Coop ber of the I. 0. O. F.. and a man of sterling quali- 
ties as a citizen. 

THOMAS W. COTTINGHAM, merchant and blacksmith, Wil- 
mington, was born *ncar Moore's Hill, in Sparta Township, March 24, 
1S: : -;S. His pan nts, Caleb T., and Jane (Mitchellj Cotfingham, were na- 
tives of Maryland, his father born in 1805, mother in 1812. They 
were married December 25. 1835, and raised sewn children. Their par- 
ents moved to this Slate in 1823. Mr. and Mrs. Cottingham were mem- 
bers of the Baptist Church. He was a farmer, and was killed by a falling 
limb November 2, 1SG7, the mother died in 1877. Mr. Thomas W. Cot- 
tingham, was raised on a farm until eighteen years of ago, at which time 
he wen! to blacksmith trade and stalled in business in 1870. Ho mar- 
ried Mil - Lucy Li i >vi r, April 20, 1865. She was born in Dillsborough, 
October 1(1, 1845. By this union were born three children: Anna T., 
Minnie S. (born November 17. 1867, died June 20, 1S84). and Ord 11. 
Minnie S., was the wife of Edward M. Congor, and Mr. O, is raising his 
grandchild, Edna P. Congor, who was born June I, 18S4. Mr. Cotting- 
ham has been a resident of Wilmington since February 25, 1867. He 
is a member of Dearborn Lodg i No. 536, 1. O. O. F. The i ntiro family 



belong to Mm Methodist Episcopal Church. He was elected township 
trustee i I 

JAMKS L>. CO! hi ■•-. Ohio a Wis issip flail 

road shops, Am , is a of J h <m in Philadelphia 

May 29j 1835 where ; he n i I m school education. Hi par 

ents, Jam.', ami Jane (Moore) Coulter, wro uatives of Ireland; 
mer wa I ber 21, lT'.JI the la Oi h ■■• 10, 179(5. The % > came 

to America in 1821, and located in Philadelphia, \vh •;•■ ho worked at his 
trade, bricklayer "and itil his death, which occurred June 

24, 1846, and the mother followed Augu I 10, I860. James P. learned 
house carpentering when (if teen year.- old, and followed the i e ! . ; 
livelihood up to " 13 ,vhen ho entered the Chicago & Alton I 
shops as carpenter, working one and a half years in that capacity, then 
was placed in charge of part of the work as gang foreman. In 1873 he 
took charge of the ear department on the Springfield & Illinois South 
eastern Railroad, serving there for three years and nine montl 
the Ohio &, Mississippi purchased the road; then was transferred to 
Aurora, Ind., and given charge of tho main road and branches, G90 
miles in all. December 9, l v 'V!. Mr. Coulter was married to Mi 
arine A. Roan, who was born : nville, Stark C <.. Ohio, Octo 

ber 29, 1834. They are the parents of the following named children: 
Emma J. M., Ida E., Mary A., George P. and Ella M. C. Ho is a mem- 
ber of Aurora Lodge No. 51, F. & A. M. ; Aurora Chapter No. 13; 
Aurora Commandery No. 17, and of the Indiana Consistory, at Indiana- 
polis, and of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

WILLIAM H. CRAIG. M. D., Rising Sun. is a native of Boyle 
County, Ky., and son of William and Sarah J. (Handley) Craig, the. 
former a native of Rockcastle County. Ky.; the latti c of New Jersey. 
He was born February 5, 1829. Before William H. was born, his 
father died. His mother remarried id died in Oakland, Cal., in July, 
18S4, at the age of seventy- eight years. Dr. Craig's early years were 
spent in school at Hanover College, Indi: ta, and Center College, Dan- 
ville, Ky. On giving up his literary studies, he begun the study of modi 
cine with Dr. William Palding, of Danville, Ky., with whom he remained 
two years. He then entered the Jefferson Medical College, of Phila- 
delphia, where he spent two years, graduating in 1857. After two years 
in Mexico he went to California, in 1S59, and began the practice of his 
profession in the Sacramento County Hospital, where ho remaini 1 four 
years, when lie removed to San Francisco, where he continue 1 practice 
till 1860. At this time he went to South Am irica on a mining 
tion in the United States of Columbia and Ecquador, being gone threo 
years. April 1, 1869, he lauded in Sow York, and in June of the same 



o8(i msTi'iii ii!' DEAUiwu: i '. ! " ' ror.vn 

yeai ■ to Stn iford, Kv„ where he n m; inod abonl Lwo years, 

spending a short time latei at !V,. rsburg. ' I 1872 he located in 

Rising ! e In is al pr< sent • ugagi I in Li pi I ice, i 

among the best practitioners of the place I Craig w; married iu 
Di - .'>, to Mary A. Carson, d ui; litei - id ■ \\ illii id Car on, 

of Roeli ■ Lie County, Ky. Three chikh ■ v born to lb 

whom died iu infancy. Mrs. Craig passed away .March 1.9, 1872. 
The Doctor is a man of rare gi : i ami pie, and posse ■ 

siderablo professional skill, His brother, G i ' "• Craig fdeco.'i id 

since .1880), was one of the most prominent lawyers of New i'orl City. 

THOMAS E. C1UIG, M.. D., physicii ter, was born in 

Glenville County, Canada, March 24, ' of John and Margaret. 

Craig, he a native of the north part of Ireland, and she of Canada. Mr. 
John Craig was born in 1802, and immigrated to Canada with his parents 
about 1820, where he subsequently married and settled as a farmer, as 
one of the pioneers, the country there being mostly a wilderness, very 
sparsely settled, and 1 "re he resided until near the close of his life. In 
1871 he sold his farm and visited his son, Dr. T. E. Craig, of Dearborn 
County, Ind., and in the fall of (lie same year went to Cass County, 
Mo., where several of his children were then living, where he died in 
October, 1872. His widow still survives and resides with her sen. They 
had nine children, live now surviving — Thomas E. ; Elizabeth, wife of 
Dr. Cunningham, of Los Angeles, Cal. ; Samuel E., a resident of Oregon; 
John A., a resident of Missouri and William H., a resident of Holden, 
Mo. Dr. Thomas E. Craig, the subject of this sketch, after completing 
his studies in the common schools, entered the grammar school of Kempt- 
ville, where be entered upon a course of study preparatory to entering 
college. From this sclrool he entered Victoria College at Coburg, where 
he spent two years; them he entered the medical department of Toronto 
University, at Toronto where he spent four years, graduating in 1804. 
In January, 1865, he came to this county and formed a partnership with 
Dr. W. H. Terrell, for the practice of his profession at Mam iter. 
This partnership was dissolved in the fall of the same year, Dr. Terrell 
moving away. Dr. Craig continuing his practice here. Dr. Craig was 
united in marriage, July 20, 1866, with Miss Hattie McMullen, daughter 
of John and Mary Ann McMullen. By this union they have two sous: 
Carlton Sims, bom February 22, 1869, and J. Moray, March 2, 1874. 

DANIEL 11. CltOZIER, farmer, Hogan Township, resides upon Sec- 
tion 20, the old home, where he was born June 10, 1855. His parents, 
John and Angeline (Wilson) Crozier, were bom in Miller Township; 
father January 10, 1809. He was a farmer and flat-boatman. They 
raised a family of twelve children. He served as representative one 



LsioaiuriucAL sketches. 681 

term. All through life he was a hard working man. and was highly re- 
spected by al! who know him. lie died January 2, 18S2, and hi; wife 
April 17. 1881- -Universalists in faith. .Mr. Daniel H.Crozier was mar- 
ried April 9, 1879, to Miss Agues L. Bainum, daughter of Mr. William 
Bainuni, who was bom Ma) 15, IS57. By (his union four children: 
Blanche L., Gracie A., Franklin J)., Ethel Ik Mr. Crozier is a member 
of Dearborn Lodge Xo. 530, i. 0. 0. F., and Wilmington Lodge Xo. 158, 
F. & A. M. Mrs. Crozier is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

MARGARET (ELDEB) CBOZIEK, Hogan Township, reside, upon 
Section 23, and owns 100 acres. She is the widow of David D. Crozier, 
to whom she was married December 15, 1874, and by whom she had four 
children: Edna, Alma, Maud and Carrie. Her husband was a farmer, 
and a member of "Wilmington Lodge Xo. 158, F. & A. M. He died July 
11, 1883. Mrs. Crozier's parents, L. G. and Jane (Record) Elder, were 
natives of Maryland. Her father was born in 1S00, and died in Novem- 
ber, 1870; her mother died in November 1878. They were both mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

DAVID V. CULLEY, see page 180. 

THOMAS CUBITS, of Confer Township, was born near Yorkshire, 
England, in 1792, and immigrated to this country in 1810; removed to 
Dearborn County in 1824, and settled in Center Township on the farm 
that his son, Joseph D. Curtis, subsequently lived on. He was a man of 
extraordinary gifts. Early in life he connected himself with the Baptist 
Church, and in the year 1820 was ordained to the work of the ministry, 
and continued to labor until the time of his death, which occurred in 
1843. He was a man possessed of great power as a pulpit orator, and 
there are many citizens of the present day who will remember his power; 
a man who will over be remembered for his many acts of charity, and 
for all his labors in the church. He never made any charge or roceived 
any recompense, and no man in his day possessed more power and influ- 
ence for good with the early pioneers, who had learned to honor him for 
the many noble traits of his character. 

JOSEPH D. CURTIS, farmer, Center Township, was born in the 
same on Section 17, January 9, 1826. His parents were Thomas 
and Elizabeth (Adams) Curtis, the former being for years one of 
the most prominent and talented ministers in the Baptist Church in the 
West. A sketch of him will be found above. The mother was born 
July 18, 1790, and the marriage was celebrated in New York State in 
1816. She died May 31, 1S73. Our subject was married October 18, 
1849, to Miss Armida Rise, who was born on Hogau Creek in Manches- 
ter Township. November 9, 1831. By this union four children have 
been born, namely: Cell H., born October 13, 1S50, nowJn Indianapo- 



682 UISTOUY OF DEAUBOKN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

lis: E. It, born October 15, 13D2, now in Atlanta; Henry \V.,born Sep- 
tember 20, 1356, now in Kansas City; Mamie C., born March 1, IS65, 
now Mrs R. E. Ohaffin, at Chester, Ohio. Mr. Curtis united with the 
Baptist' Church in 1849, and bis ostimable wife in ISIS. They have 

been consistent inbers ever iuco. He i one of the church trustees. 

Ho has been school trustee and reporter for the agricultural dopartmont 
at Washington City Cor years. He has a fine body of land, consisting of 
14S acres all under good state of cultivation. 

FRANK C. DAM, farmer, Hogan Township, was born in the 
eastern part of Denmark February 13, 1855, where be received a four 
years' collegiate course at Horsens College. His parents, Peter J., and 
Wilhelmina (Gysloff) Dam, were born in Denmark, father December 9, 
1821, mother January 25, 1827. They were married April 24, 1851. and 
raised eight children, the mother of whom died August 7, 1881. Mr. 
F. C. Dam came to America April 4, 1874, and located near Paris, 
111., where he farmed until the spring of 1876, at which time he moved 
to Hogan Township. He was married, December 28. 1870, to Miss 
Sarah E. Bruce, a native of Hogan Township, born October 23, 1851. 
and of this union one child wi. born — Peter B. --October 7, 1877. Mr. 
Dam is an industrious, quiet, law abiding citizen, and is making valu- 
able changes upon his premises in tho way of improvement. 

JAMES DANIEL, retired, Clay Township, an old and highly esteemed 
pioneer of Dearborn County, was born in Frederick County, Va., May 7. 
1806. His parents, William and Rebecca (Ellis) Daniel, were both natives 
of Virginia, and from thence in about 1813, immigrated to Dearborn 
County, Ind., where they afterward resided until death. The former 
was three times married and was the father of twelve children, viz.: 
John, Thomas, James, Elizabeth, William, Mary, Joseph. George K., 
Tamson, Johnson, Susanna and Rachel. James, our subject, came with 
his parents to this county in 1813, and has since resided here. When 
about sixteen years of age he turned his attention to the stone-mason 
trade, which ho has engaged in more or less during his whole life. He 
was married in this county, February 14, 1S28, to Paulina Morris, by 
whom he had eleven children, viz.: Nathaniel G., John W., David M., 
William H., Sarah F., George R., James, Jesse, Phebe J., Robert and 
Joseph. His wife was born in Tennessee, September 16, 1809. After 
his marriage he settled near Lawrenceburgh, Ind.. where ho resided 
about ten years, and from thence remove! to Ohio County, Ind., and af- 
terward made several other moves, and in 185(1, purchased and settled 
on his present farm. He lost his wife by death, Juno 25. 1S72. caused 
by a toam of horses running off and throwing her out of the wagon. Mr. 
Daniel is highly esteemed by all who know him. Ho is a member of 
tho Methodist Episcopal Church. 



i; \i 



AI. SKKTCIIK8. 6$3 



OAPT. JOHN DANIELS was one of the earliest settlers of Dearborn 
County. II- was born on (he Brandywine, near Chad's Ford,Ohoster Co., 
Penn., November 23, 1777. His mother saw the British cross the Ford, 
and witnessed the progress of the battle (ill the smoke of the pieces oh. 
scured the armies from view. lie grew up in his native county, subse- 
quently moved to Virginia and there married Mary Baldwin, by whom he 
had seven children, five of whom are living: Belinda, Maria, William A., 
Sarah A. and Mary. In .run-. 1812, ho came with the family to Indiana 
and located in this county, where he resided ti'l his death, August 26, 
1872. In 18 In he was commissioned captain of a company of militia 
by Gov. Posey, and the title continued in full recognition by bis friends 
till his death. Mrs. Daniels passed away in 18.70. Capt. Daniels was a 
carpenter by trade and followed that pursuit till his farming business 
became so extensive as to demand bis entire attention. He accumulated 
considerable property and died at the advanced ago of ninety-five years. 

DR. A. P. DAUGHTERS, physician and surgeon, Moore's Hill, was 
born near that village August 12, 1831. His. parents, James and Sarah 
(Phillips) Daughters, were natives of Delaware. The former was 
a son of Hudson Daughters, a native of England, and was born about 
the year 1760. About 1774 ho and one of his brothers were stolen from 
their home and brought to the United States. The former afterward 
settled in Susses County, Del., whore he was united in marriage, and 
afterward remained until death, which occurred in IS 10. He was the 
father of eight children, viz.: Samuel, Hiram, Gillis, Randolph, White- 
field, Elizabeth, Tobitha and James, the father of our subject,tho second 
member of the family. He was born in Susses County, Del., December 
21, 1788. When about nineteen years of age he began sailing on the 
seas, which he followed for niuo years, and in nearly every capacity from 
a common sailor to a soa captain. After he retired from the sea he again 
located in Susses County, Del, and was there united in marriago Janu- 
asy 21, 1818, to Sarah, daughter of Joseph and Sarah Phillips; she was 
also born in Susses County, Del, August 11, 1797. In 1820 Mr. 
Daughters and his family immigrated to Dearborn County, Ind., first 
locating at Lawrenceburgh for a few months, and from thence in the 
same fall settled on land in Sparta Township, where he afterward re- 
mained until death. He was among the early pioneers of Dearborn 
County, and well understood the hardships and inconveniences of a fron- 
tier life. Ho labored hard to subdue the forest and cultivate the laud, 
which was then an almost unbroken wilderness. Ho was an en- 
terprising and accommodating citizen, and was respected by all who 
knew him. He died February 17, IS 13, his widow surviving until Octo- 
ber 6, 1878. They were both dev„ted members of the Baptist Church; 



684 UlSTOItV OF DEARBORN AND OHIO cou.Vl'lIX 

wore the parents of seven children, iiamoh : Ketarah A., James, Eliza- 
beth, Franklin, William T., Sarah R aud ludrow P., our subject, be- 
ing; the fifth member of the family. Ho was educated a( Asluiry 
University, of Greoncastle, Iud , after which he engaged in teaching 
school for some time, and in the spring of 1 io I began the study of mod 
icine, William H. Terrill, M. D., of Moore's Hill, Iud., being his pre- 
ceptor. Iu the samo fall he attended the Miami .Medical Gollego of Cm 
cinnati, Ohio, taking the fall and spring course, and afterward resum- 
ing his studies. In the fall of 1857 ho began the practice of medicine 
at Moore's Hill. November 29, 18(30, he was united in marriage to 
Altha A., daughter of Morton and Dorcas (Eaton) Justis; she was born 
iu Dearborn County, Iud., July 4, 1842. In 1861 Dr. Daughters entered 
the war, enlisting in May in Company A, Eighteenth Indiana Infantry. 
He was made first lieutenant, and October 10 of the same year was 
promoted to assistant, surgeon, iu which capacity he served until December 
(3, 18(52, at which tiule ho was promoted to surgeon, and served in this 
capacity until after the close of the siege of Vicksburg, when he re- 
signed on account of poor health and returned to Moore's Hill. After 
the restoration of his health he resumed his practice, which he has since 
pursued. May 14. 1881, Mrs. Daughters departed this life. Their 
nine children, were: Perry M. (deceased), Frank H. (deceased), De- 
borah J., Peter B., Andrew N., Sarah 13., James E., Eugene P. and Anna 
P. Dr. Daughters is a highly respected citizen, and is regarded as a 
skillful and scientific physician. Ho is a member of the Masonic order, 
also of the I. O. O. F., and a man of ripe experience aud general in- 
formation. Iu politics ho is a Republican. 

HARRISON DAWSON, farmer, Miller Township, one of the oldest 
native residents of Dearborn County, was born in the houso in which ho 
now resides, in the year 1813. He is a son of John and Susan (Jacksou) 
Dawson, his father being the first settler on Tanner's Creek. Ho was 
born on the eastern shore of Maryland, where there is still a large family 
of the desceudnnts, the Jacksons also coming from Maryland. Ho was 
reared in Loudon County, Va. , aud when a young man immigrated to 
Tennessee and from there to Georgetown, Ky. , where he married and 
immediately after came to this locality in 1799, making the trip on horse- 
back and bringing his effects by that, method of transportation. He en- 
tered all the land in the vicinity of "Georgetown," this county, which 
was afterward settled by the Jacksons and a few other families. He 
also entered other tracts in later years and owned at the time of his 
death about 2,000 acres, his business having been confined chiefly to 
dealing in real estate. He died in April, IMS, leaving eight chil- 
dren, only two of whom survive, Harrison anil Huldah Johnston, the 



BIOGH VPI11CAI, sKi'.lviii'.s. GSf> 

latter now a resident of Ft. Wayne, Ind. He was twice married, hisfirsl 
wife doparted this life in 1 822. His second was Rachel Blackwell (m-e 
Downing). ilo was a man of great power of endurance, force of char- 
acter and intellect, and was possessed of a large fund of information, 
considering his educational facilities. He first settled at "Cambridge" 
(now Pella), and afterward kept a hotel, having a government lease, on 
which he lived about seven years prior to his moving to the Guilford 
neighborhood in 1806, in which year he built the house still standing, 
in which our subject was born, as stated abovo. He was residing at 
"Cambridge" when Kibbie, the French emigrant passed through this 
county from Cincinnati to Vincennes. Reuben Dawson, his eldest sun, 
studied law, and in 1832 went to Ft. Wayne as clerk to his brother-in- 
law, Spencer, who was appointed receiver of public money at that point 
by President Jackson. He subsequently became judge of the circuit court 
for the District of Ft. Wayne, and died in that locality in the fall of 
1848. A younger son, John Dawson, also became a lawyer and in 1SG2 
was appointed Governor of Utah Territory, officiating as such till his 
opposition to the Mormom Church made it necessary for him to flee the 
country. Ho subsequently became editor of the Ft. Wayne Timet; and 
died in 1879. Harrison Dawson, the pioneer whose name begins this 
sketch was reared to maturity in the vicinity of "Cambridge," working 
on the farm with his father till twenty-one years of age, and receiving 
his education in the "Cambridge Academy." Ho was married in 1833 to 
Charlotte J. Dowdcn, daughter of Samuel H. Dowdon, and by this wife he 
has eight children living: John H.; Susanna, wife of Thomas Hall; Thomas 
J.; Hannah A., wife of R. H. Smith; Ruth, wife of Theodore Smith; 
William H. . Ella G., wife of Charles Jenkins, and Huldah J., wife of 
Wylie Liddle. After his marriage Mr. Dawson settled down on the farm 
and began operations for himself, having always conducted a general 
farming business in which he has been very successful. He inherited 
one-eighth of his father's estate, purchased the shares of the other heirs, 
and now owns 250 acres of laud, thus being well provided for in his late 
years. A part of his residence was built in 1806, its walls containing 
the port holes which were made to render service in defense against the 
Indians of that day. On the farm was also erected a government block- 
house which was intended for a similar purpose. Mr. aud Mrs. Dawson 
have shared the trials as well as the joys of life together for more than 
fifty years, and are now enjoying, so far as health and age will permit, 
the reward of their long period of industrious sacrifice. 

THOMAS DAVIS, farmer, Washington Township, resides on his 
farm of eighty-one acres in Section 10, aud also owns seventy acres in 
.Section 3. His premises are well improved, and land under a good state 



686 HISTORY OF DKARNORN AND 1)1110 COUNTIES. 

of cultivation H.G is one of tho active, leading farmers of the township, 
and was b u a Kent County, Del., March 29, 1816. His parents, 
Thomas ind J evicy (GullottJ Davis, wen born in Delaware, where his 
father folio rod farming up I i his death. In 183-1 bis mother with tho 
children moved lo this county, where she died March 1, 1860, in her 
eighty bird year. In LS30 Mr. Davis began flat-boating, at which he 
continued up to 1851), since then has bei u a farmer. He was married, 
April 18, LS'44, to Miss Temperance Wheeler, who was born June 29, 
1S27, and by (his union were born thirteen children: Elizabeth, Thomas, 
John W., Mary, Wilson W., Levicy, William, Joseph, Julia, Anna, Mar- 
garet and Emma T. One died in infancy. Mr. Davis has always en- 
deavored i ,.-, ,. ■■.;• >urage every laudable enterprise. He and his wife are 
now enjoying the fruit of a well spent life. 

WILLIAM T. DAY, undertaker, Aurora, office on Main between 
Second and Importing Streets, is a native of Ohio, born in Delhi Town- 
ship, Hamilton County (near Cincinnati ), June 20, 1820, and obtained a 
very limited education. His father, John Day, was born in Red Stone, 
Penn., and his mother, Ruth (Terry) Day, was born in Ohio. His father 
came to Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1812, and followed farming. "William T. 
Day came to Aurora, Ind. , in the fall of 1S51, and began carpentering. 
He was married, December 18, 185S, to Miss Mary Mophamore, a native 
of Pennsylvania. To them have been born nine children: William D., 
George, Ida, Callie, Harry, Charlie, Jennie, Blanche and Eddie. Mr. 
Day continued carpentering up to 1873, when he engaged in his present 
business. He attends promptly to all calls in his line, making use of one 
of the best embalming processes. He is a quiet, unassuming citizen. 

CHARLES DECKER, superintendent and manager of the Ohio Val- 
ley Coffin Manufactory, Lawrenceburgh, was born in Germany, in the 
year 1S10, and is a son of Diedrich Decker, who is a native of the same 
country, and also a resident. In 1856 Mr. Decker bade adieu to " father- 
land,"' and immigrated to Canada, where he learned tho cabinet-maker's 
trade, remaining, there till 1803, when he came to Lawrenceburgh. He 
was hero employed in a furniture factory till 1872, when he purchased 
an interest in the Ohio Valley Coffin Factory, and began work in the 
same at the bench, which he has since continued, to a greater or less 
extent. In 1874 the company manifested its appreciation of his honor 
and ability by making him superintendent and manager of the estab- 
lishment, which position his efficiency has since warranted his holding. 
Mr. Decker was married, in 1866, to Mary Brauer, by whom ho has four 
children— George, Katie, Emma, and Charles. He is a live, energetic 
business man, and an important factor in the enterprise with which he is 
connected. 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. bXl 

SAMUEL DICKINSON, Lawrenceburgh, .mo of the older residents 
of Dearborn County, was born in 1832. His father, Townsond Dickin- 
son, camo from Onondaga, N. Y. , and settled in this county in IS 1 
or ISIS, and resided hero till his death, in 18G3. His mother. Sophia 
(Sterns) Dickinson, was also a native of Now York, and died when our 
subject, was a child. Mr. Dickinson grew up on the farm, but learned 
the carpenter trade with his father when quite young, and followed this 
occupation for several years. Tn 1S73 he camo to Lawrenceburgh, and 
began business as an undertaker, or funeral director, and this he lias 
since continued very successfully. In 1883 his stock of goods was des- 
troyedjjor ^damaged by the flood of that year, and since that time he has 
not kept the usual supply on hand, although giving his attention to the 
regular management of the business. Mr. Dickinson was married, in 
January, 1857, to Catherine E. Marsh, a native of Union County, Ind., 
daughter of Abraham and Hannah (Suman) Marsh, both natives of 
England. Her father died at Wichita, Kas., in 1S7S; her mother was 
accidentally killed by a railroad train, September 11, 1SS0. Of the 
five children born to Mr. and Mrs. Dickinson, but two are living — 
Anna and Mabel. The deceased are Townsend, Helen and Katie. Mr. 
Dickinson is now serving as township trustee, holding the office for a 
second term. He is an affable gentleman, a live business man, an ear- 
nest political worker of the Democratic persuasion, and is held in high 
esteem by the citizens of his community. 

GEN. JAMES DILL, see page 148. 

EDWIN B. DOBELL, manufacturer, Lawrenceburgh, was born in 
Staplehurst, Kent County, England, in 1818 — forty-eight miles from 
London. He is a son of Joseph Dobell, who was born, lived and died 
in England. His grandmother was named Hyde — a sister to the two 
Hyde brothers, who left the immense fortune in England. In 1829 Mr. 
Dobell immigrated to this country with an uncle and aunt, and came 
down the Ohio in a boat constructed by themselves. He resided with his 
uncle during his minority, who educated him in the Granville (Ohio) 
College. His uncle conducted a furniture store, with whom he worked 
eleven years. In 1840 he was married (October 5), to Harriet Luck, a 
resident of Cincinnati, daughter of William Luck, who kept a hotel on 
Sycamore Street, opposite the National Theatre. After his marriagoMr. 
Dobell began business for himself. He learned the carpenter's trade 
and worked at the same for some time. He then purchased some lum- 
ber and began the manufacture of furniture in a small way. His business 
gradually and rapidly increased till ho became the proprietor of two ex- 
tensive factories. In 1863 one of these was destroyed by fire, resulting 
in a loss of §30,000, and in 1804 he came to Lawrenceburgh, where he 



G8S HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

purchased the Lawrenceburgh factory of J. H. Burkain, and proceeded to 
business again. In INT.". this factory was destroyed by tho flames by 
which Mr. Dobell incurred a second loss of about 830,000. Tho insti- 
tution "was again rebuilt and refurnished, and he continued the business 
till the fall of 1884, when : passed out of his hands. Mr. DobelPs in- 
terests suffered largely by the recent Hood-, and with his declining years 
the business of his manufactory also became reduced, forcing him to an 
assignment at the date above given. In his time ho has done an exten- 
sive business. In his ol I age he counts his total losses by fire, Hood and 
securities, at not less than §165,000. He boars his reverses with forti- 
tude, however, and even in the ruins of a fortune which was earned by 
honest industry, he still preserves the equanimity of mind and tho gen- 
tleness of spirit which have characterized him in every relation and con- 
dition of life. 

EDWARD DOBER merchant tailor, Lawrenceburgh, one of the 
most enterprising business men of that city, is a native of Germa- 
ny, horn in 1851. Ho was educated in his native country and there 
learned his trade, tailoring. In 1S72 he immigrated to America and 
came to Lawrenceburgh, where ho was employed by tho firm of Coch & 
Klepper till 187S, when ho purchased Coch's interest and became a part 
ner in tho establishment, continuing two years. He then withdrew from 
the firm and returned to Germany to restore his failing health, but came 
back in the same year and worked in the employ of Klepper till July. 
1884, when he established himself in business at No. 36 Walnut Street, 
where he still remains. By fair dealing and first-class work he has 
gained a liberal patronage, which a continuation of his houorable policy 
is sure to increase. Mr. Dober was married in 1874, to Catharine Gard- 
ner, who died in 18S0, leaving one child, Eda, born in 1876. In May, 
1881, he was wedded to Josephine Morgan and they have two children: 
Frederick and Edward. Mr, and Mrs. Dober are members of the Cath- 
olic Church. 

HAZELETT E. DODD of Rising Sun, is a son of David and Lutitia 
(Hazelett) Dodd, both natives of Ireland ; the former coming to America 
in 179S. Their marriage occurred in the city of Pittsburgh, and nest 
they settled at Limestone. Ivy. (now Maysville). In 1811 or 1812, the 
family removed to Cincinnati, Ohio, and in 1823 to Rising Sun, the 
father dying in Kentucky. Our subject was born in Pittsburgh, Penn., 
June 19, 1808. Ho received but a limited education and learned the 
tanning business partly in Cincinnati and partly at Rising Suu. For six 
years from 1S2S, Mr. Dodd was engaged in carrying on a tannery at Cross 
Plains in Ripley County, he then returned to Rising Sun and for two 
years carried on a store aboard a flat-boat on tho river ; he next located 



MOUUAPIIICAL SKETCHES. 680 

at Rising Sun and up to L8-I '. Qat-boating was bis principal occupation, 
in tho meantime he was i ng;; ;i d in building a number of bouses in tho 
village which contributed I i the spread and growth of the place. From 
1845 to.lSG8, Mr. Dodd was i ae of tho most active of tho business men 
of Rising Sum. during whicb period he carried on an extensive dry goods 
and grocery store on what is known as the Gibson Corner. In the fall 
of 1852 ho was elected to the Statu Legislature, serving in the session of 
1853, was made chairman of the important committee of ways and 
means. In politics our subject is a Democrat, and for twenty years or 
more was chairman of the central committee of Ohio County. He has 
been closely identified with the internal improvements of tho county and 
tho general growth of the city of Rising Sun. Mr. Dodd has been three 
times married, his lirst wife was Miss Elizabeth Hart, whom ho married, 
in 1831, and by whom he had one child, William. His second wife. 
was Anna Belle Boyd, the marriage occurring in 1845. Two children 
were born to this union, both now dead. In 1S53 he was married to his 
present wife, Cornelia A. Craft, to which union five children have been 
born. In 1866 Mr. Dodd retired from active business. 

HENRY DOERFLIN, blacksmith, St. Leon, was born in Lancaster 
County, Penn., July 15, 1835. His parents, John and Lucy Doerliin, 
were both natives of Germany, and from thence immigrated to the Uni- 
ted States in about 1833. settling first in Pennsylvania. From there they 
removed to St. Peters, Franklin Co., Ind. , where he died, she after- 
ward moving to St. Leon, where she also passed away. Their children were 
Mary Ann, Henry, Joseph. John, Michael, Adam, Elizabeth and Mary. 
Henry, our subject, the second member of the family, came with his 
parents to Franklin County, Ind., and in 1851 to St. Leon, and began 
the blacksmith trade. In 1857 he opened up a shop for himself, and 
has since continued the same, with the exception of a few years. He 
was married in St. Leon, Ind., in 1859, to Mary Wilhelm, by whom he 
has had born to him ten children, viz.: Henry J., Elizabeth, Jacob, 
Michael (deceased), Alfred, Isabelle, John, George, Caroline and Hugo. 
Mr. Doertlin and family are members of tho Catholic Church. He is a 
gentleman in character, and is well respected by all who know him. 

JOHN H. DONSELMANN., miller and farmer, Clay Township, is a 
native of Hanover, Germany, where he was born November 20, 1827. 
His parents John D. and Margaret S. Donselmaun were natives of the 
same place, and immigrated to Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1847, where they 
afterward resided until death. The mother diod in the year 1S51, at 
the age of fifty-two years; the father, in 1853, at tho ago of fifty five 
years. They were the parents of three children, viz.: Caroline, Eliza- 
beth, and John II. The latter, the eldest member of the family, and the 



G'.KI HISTORY OF DKARHOUN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

only sou, came with bis parents to Cincinnati, Obio, in 1847, w In •< he in 
partnership with his father, carried on a tailoring establishing for a 
number of years. He was married at Cincinnati, March 13, to 

SophiaJClinkarmann, who was also born in Hanover, Germany, September 
4, 1.830. In 1854 Mr. Douselmann moved to Dearborn County, [ml., and 
purchased and settled on the same farm whore ho at present resides, and 
has engaged in farming and milling since. He owns seventy acres of 
land, on which stands the large and commodious flouring and saw-mill, 
known as Donselmann's Mills, and where bo also resides. lb also owns, 
in partnership witb his son in-law, Herman Droge, the Aurora l'l uring 
Mills. He has bad born to him eight children, viz.: John JL (do- 
ceased), Anna M., Margaret (deceased), Margaret C, Frederick (d ed), 
William F., Emma C. and Marmon G. Mr. Donselmann is a member of 
the Lutheran Church. 

JOHN DORMAN, farmer/Manchoster Township, son of Elijah and 
Elizabeth (Shockley) Dorman, who immigrated to Sparta Township, 
Dearborn Co., Ind., in tbe twenties, from near Salisbury. Worcester 
Co., Md., lives on the same farm he moved to when married, in L832, in 
Manchester Township, Dearborn Co., Ind. His wife was Jane Truitt, a 
daughter of Riley and Elizabeth Truitt, who immigrated with his wife 
and her widowed mother from near Salisbury, Worcester Co., Md., in 
1818, and settled in the unbroken wilderness near the spot now occupied 
by the village of Sparta, Dearborn Co., Ind. Jano (Truitt) Dorman 
remembers many of the stirring incidents of that early period. John 
Dorman and wife reared a family of four sons and one daughter. The 
sous are Frank R., John S., H. J. and Charles W. ; the daughter, Amer- 
ica A. Frank R. Dorman, the eldest son, was educated at Asbury (since 
Depauw) University, Greencastle, Ind., and at the Indiana State Univer- 
sity at Bloomington, holding diplomas and degrees from both uni- 
versities; has held many positions of trust through the preference of 
his fellow citizens; served^several years as township trustee, and sheriff 
of Dearborn County two terms; is at present engaged in merchan- 
dising in the city of Lawrenceburgh, where he stands deservedly 
high for enterprise and integrity. His grandfather, referred to above, 
was the first white man known to have died in Sparta Township, and bis 
funeral was preached by Daniel Plummer, a pioneer preacher of fine 
ability, who spent his life in the county. John S. Dormau. the third 
son, is a flourishing merchant in the city of Lawrenceburgh, where he is 
held in high esteem for his sterling qualities. He was educated at 
Moore's Hill College H. J. Dorman, the second son, was educated at 
what was, in its prime, the first educational institution in the county, 
the Wilmington Academy, and afterward studied medicine with Dr. S- 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. G!»l 

B. Ckamb uiain; graduated in the Chicago Medical School, and prac- 
ticed medicine in half of the States and Territories, until broken in 
health ho returned to the farm whore he was born. Charles \V. Dor- 
man was educated at Moore's Hill Colloge; learned the mercantile busi- 
ness with his brother, and now has a government position in the railway 
postal service. John Dorman and his estimable lady, Jane (Truitt) 
Dorman, celebrated their golden wedding in February, 1883, and every 
child ever born to thorn sal down to dinner with them that day, after 
fifty years of married life. None of their children or grandchildren 
ever having died up to that time. 

J. S. DORMAN, the popular dry goods and clothing dealer of Law- 
renceburgh, is a native of Dearborn County. Ho is a sou of John S. Dor- 
man, of Manchester Township, one of the oldest and most esteemed 
residents of this county. He was educated in the district schools and 
at Moore's Hill College, wielding the pedagogic wand occasionally in the 
meantime. In 1S73 he came to Lawrenceburgh and opened up a dry 
goods store in partnership with his brother, Frank Dorman, with whom 
ho continued in business till 1879. He then became sole proprietor of 
the establishment, and now has one of the leading mercantile houses of 
Lawrenceburgh. Ho is located on the corner of High and Short Streets, 
and carried a full stock of dry goods, notions, clothing, etc., valued at 
$10,000 to $15,000. In 18S2 the original building was destroyed by 
fire, and the present substantial brick structure has since been erected. 
Mr. Dorman was married, in 1878, to Mrs. Nancy (Hayes) Guard, 
daughter of Isaac Hayes, her father, an old and esteemod resident of 
this county. Mr. D. is one of the most gonial and substantial merchants 
of tho town, and well merits the large and lucrative patronage which his 
fair dealing and other sterling qualities as a business man and citizen 
have secured to him. Mr. Dorman is a member of the I. O. O. F., and 
also of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

DANIEL DORREL, of Rising Sun, one of the older residents and 
substantialjfarmers of Ohio County, was born in Clermont County, Ohio, 
in 1815. His parents, William and Mary (Light) Dorrel, were natives 
of Pennsylvania, and Clermont County, Ohio, respectively; his grand- 
father, Jacob Light, having laid out tho town of New Richmond, in the 
latter county. His father came West to Ohio, when a young man, and 
married in Clermont County, and in 1819, came to Doarborn County, 
Ind., settling seven miles west of Rising Sun. He there purchased 
land and reared a family of twelve children, who grew to maturity and 
married, a thirteenth dying at seventeen years of age. The father died 
in 1851; the mother about 1859. Daniel Dorrel, whose name introduces 
this sketch, was reared on the farm, and resided with his parents till 



692 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

twenty-three years of ago, when he began operations on his own rospon 
nihility. For many years he was a keeper of fine breeding horses and 
did much in his line to improve the stock of Ohio County ano! vicinity. 
Later, he dealt in real estate, buying and soiling several small tracts, being 
fairly successful in his deals. Up to the ago of nearly forty years, Mr. 
Dorrel's household was in charge of two maiden sisters, but in March, 
1855, he married Rebecca Rand, of Dearborn County, Ind., daughter of 
Cordor and Mary (Keffer) Rand, the former a native of Ohio, born in 
1800, the latter, a native of Virginia, horn in 1S08. Her grandfather, 
Thomas Rand, settled in this county with his family, in 1811, locating 
on Laughery Creek. He served in the war of the Revolution, and it is 
believed in the war of 1812, also. Mrs. Dorrel's parents were married 
November 15, 1827. Her father died October 28, 1882, her mother Jan- 
uary 3, 1879. Mr. and Mrs. Don-el have four children living: Mary- 
Ann, wife of Ed P. Gleason; Eugene, who married Anna B. Collins; 
Josephine S. R., and "William R. , who are still at home. Mr. Dorrel 
has been chiefly engaged in farming, but spent live years in the butcher- 
ing business, and seven years in dairy. He has now practically retired 
from active labor, and with Mrs. Dorrel is enjoying the comforts obtained 
by their earlier years of industry. 

JACOB DORREL, of Ohio County was born at New Richmond, Ohio, 
in 1801, and came with his father William Dorrel, to Ohio County in 
1820. They settled on what was subsequently called the Dorrel home- 
stead, near the old Richardson farm, where they lived for some time in 
a log hut, without floor, door, windows or chinking, covered with brush, 
doing their cooking out of doors, by a log heap. Their meat they pro- 
cured in the woods, and bread from corn which they bought in Ken- 
tucky and had ground at Lawrenceburgh. Our subject was married to 
Polly Alexander, and in 1830 removed to Johnston County, this State, 
where he accumulated considerable wealth and raised a family of four- 
teen children, twelve of whom reached man and womanhood and he lived 
to see them married. His death occurred in 1S81. 

DANIEL DORREL, stock dealer, Washington Township, was born 
in Ohio County, November 11, 1840, where he received a common 
school education. His father was born in Dayton, Ohio, July 12, 
1813; mother, Rebecca (Dowman) Dorrel, in West Virginia, March 
4, 1811. The father was a farmer and raised a family of nine 
children: Cyrus, William, Isabella, Daniel, Polly, Samuel, Rebecca, 
Peter and Isaac. The mother died August 22, 18S2. She lived to see 
twenty-threo out of twenty-five of her grandchildren grow up, and 
the two who failed to survive her died in infancy. Daniel has alwavs 
dealt in stock. He came to this -county in 1875. He was married, 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. <>! l: '> 

Novomber 22, 1803, to -Miss Nancy Bilker, who was born in £ 
land County, Ind., May 8, ISIS. By this union there ar< two 
bright children: Arnold \V., horn December 31, 1866, Hello, born Janu- 
ary 8, 1870. Mr. Dorrel is a very successful farmer and enjoys an ex- 
cellent reputation for citizenship. 

VIRGIL DOWDEN, Guilford, a native of Dearborn Con 
born in 1813, on the site of what is now the Groendale Cemetery. His 
fathor, Samuel H. Dowden, came to this county from Hampshire County, 
Va., in 1810. He was of English descent, the family having Ion been 
residents of that part of Virginia. His mother was Sophia McCracken, 
of Irish parentage. His father entered laud (160 acres), on which tract 
one of the old government block-houses was stationed. He was el gaged 
chiefly in agricultural pursuits and reared a family of nine children by 
his first wife and three by his second, whose maiden name was Ann Eliza 
Holton. The first wife died at Westport, Decatur Co.. Ind., in 1842, 
whither Mr. Dowden had moved in 1841. He departed this life in 1855. 
Like most other farmer's boys, Virgil Dowden worked with his parents 
on the farm till grown to maturity, in fact till his twenty-fourth or 
twenty-fifth year. He then began business on his own resources and 
judgment, farming and trading, and thus he has since successfully con- 
tinued for a period of near fifty years. In 1838 he purchased a portion 
of the home farm, and in 1840 the remainder, but subsequently sold out 
though ho still owns a portion of the old farm. His real estate comprises 
about 210 acres, most of which, if not all, he has earned by hard labor. 
Mr. Dowden was married in 183S, to Margaret Jackson, a daughter of 
Ezekiel Jackson, one of the earliest settlers of this county. Their three 
living children are Amos, Jane and Fannie, the latter now the wife of 
James H. Hayes. Ezekiel Jackson came to this locality with his father 
about 1798 or 1800, from Maryland. There were three brothers, and 
each had quite a large family. Mr. Dowden has always been a hard 
worker and is rewarded for his labor by a handsome competency for his 
closing years. For forty-six years he has had the society of the wife of 
his youth and their prospects for a "golden wedding" seem fair. He is 
serving a second term as justice of the peace, is a member of the Masonic 
fraternity, and a true representative of one of the real pioneer families, a 
class of citizens fast passing from^the scenes of their early trials. 

" MAJOli " DOWDEN, saddler and harness- maker of Lawrenceburgh, 
is one of the best known citizens of that city and Dearborn County. He 
was born near Lawrenceburgh, and in his early years learned the saddler's 
trade, which has been the chief occupation of his life. By industry 
and a well regulated economy he |has amassed a comfortable fortune, 
in the management of which he judiciously holds an eye on the 



694 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

future. The " Major '' has always been an acute observer ami a close. 
intelligent reader, notiug carefully the drift of events through which he 
has passed; and within the court of his own mind he has developed a 
philosophy that rivals that of ilio Greek stoics. He discusses general 
topics with much ease and cleverness, and though rather eccentric and 
of an acetic cast of mind the "Major" yet possesses a vein of socia- 
bility and good cheer quite Falstaffian in its robustness, and which is 
seldom equalled even by those who are possessed of a less stern ex- 
terior. Mr. Dowden retains a large proportion of the youthful vigor 
which so characterized his earlier years. He is a man of sterling worth 
of character and in the community in which he moves is held in high 
esteem as a citizen. Ho is a brother of Virgil Dowden. 

DANIEL T. DOWNEY, attorney at law, Aurora, is the son of 
Judge Alexander C. Downey, of Rising Sun, a sketch of whom appears 
below. Our subject is a native of Ohio County, born at Rising Sun on 
the 4th of November, 1850. He attended the public schools of his na- 
tive village, and completed his education at Asbury "University at Green- 
castle, this State (now DePauw University), from which institution he 
was graduated in 1870. After his graduation he read law under the in- 
struction of his father, and was admitted to the bar in 1S71, since which 
time he has been engaged in the practice of his profession. He is a 
young man of lino intellect, and possesses a good knowledge of the law. 
His wife was Miss Caroline Backman. Two children have been born to 
the marriage, namely: Carrie and Mary. Mr. Downey is identified with 
the orders of F. & A. M., and the K. of P. 

JOHN DOWNED, of Rising Sun, was a native of Hagerstown, Md.. 
born August 12, 17S6. While a child his parents removed to Washing- 
ton County, Penn., and subsequently to Hamilton County, Ohio, where 
September 7, 1807, he was married to her who has since been his com- 
panion. Soon after his marriage he became identified with the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church. In 1818 ho settled on a farm ten miles back 
of the village of Rising Sun, where ,he resided the greater part of his 
life until about 1850. "As a Christian his character was marked for its 
uniformity. Never demonstrative— always unpretending, the consistent 
steadiness of his life still gave him a large influence for good wherever 
he was known. His brethren appreciated his worth, and consequently, 
until disqualified by the disabilities of age, ho constantly hold official 
relations in the church. At an earlier period his house was open to re- 
ceive the 'weary itinerant,' and often as a place of preaching. 'In this 
way' says his son, 'he enjoyed the society of those sainted men, Cummins, 
Strange, Goddard, Wright, Wiley, Jones and others.' As a citizen he held 
the confidence and esteem of his fellow citizens." 



ALEXANDER C. DOWNEY, Rising Sun, .loan of DePimw Uni- 
versity, and ox-judge of fcbo Supremo Court of Indiana., was born in 
Hamilton County, Ohio, September \'\ IS17. His parents wore .John 
and Susannah (Selwood) Downey, tbe former born August 12, 1780, the 
latter October 28, 1791. Tbeycamoto Dearborn County in 1818, andhore 
our sul j et grew to manbood. tie attended the common schools of that 
period and obtained tbe rudiments of an education which he supple- 
mented by a course of study at Wilmington Seminary, under the able in- 
struction of Trof. Lawrence. In his earlier years bo was engaged in the 
various occupations of farming, coopering and flat-boating, but these 
he abandoned for tbe study of law under the tutelage of James T. Brown, 
and in 1S41 was admitted to the bar. Ho practiced in partnership with 
Amos Lane for a time, also with Theodore Gazlay, moving to Rising 
Sun after the organization of Ohio County, in 1844. In August, 1850, 
Mr. Downey was appointed judge of the circuit court by Gov. Wright, 
and in the following winter was elected to the same office by the State 
Legislature under the old constitution, and by popular vote in 1852, serv- 
ing till 1S58-- the district first comprising the counties of Ohio, Switzer- 
land, Jefferson and Jen.ings to which were subsequently added Ripley 
and Brown Counties. In 1S51 Judge Downey organized the law school 
at Asbury University continuing in charge of the samo till 1858, the 
annual terms continuing from November till February. In tbe fall of 
1862 be was elected to tbe State Senate on tbe Union ticket and voted 
for tbe resolution adopting the thirteenth amendment. He served as 
senator till 1SGG. Was appointed one of three commissioners constitut- 
ing a board of control of a house of refuge for the correction and re- 
formation of juvenile offenders by Gov. Baker in 1807, and also rendered 
valuable service in advice as to the management of tbe same, serving 
till 1870, in which year be was elected to the Supreme Court of Indiana 
serving six years and declining a renomi nation in 1870. In 1S61 Judge 
Downey joined the Indiana Legion as private and was soon after pro- 
moted to brigadier-general by Gov. Morton. He recoivod the degree of 
LL. D. by tbe Asbmy University in 1 85S and by the Indiana University in 
1871. A member of tbe Methodist Episcopal Church; for many years he 
has officiated as trustee of Asbury University and president of tbe joint 
board of trustees and visitors. Judge Downey was married April 19, 
1840 to Sophia J. Tapley, daughter of Daniel and Susan (Chandler) 
Tapley, the former a native of Dauvers, Mass. Their eight children are 
named as foUows: Samuel R., Daniel T., Harry S., Alexander C, George 
E., John C, Anna W. and Frank M. Of these Alexander C. and John 
C. are deceased. Tbe three oldest living were educated to the law and 
are now engaged in tbe practice of that profession. As a member of 



69C HISTORY OF DEARDORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

tho Masonic fraternity Judge Downey ranks among tho most prominent 
of tho State. The above is a brief summary of tbo life work of a man 
who is foremost among tbo citizens of southeastern Indiana, and whose 
long official career is sufficient evidence of the merit of his character 
both as a citizen and public servant. 

THOMAS DOWNTON, farmer. Spar! a Township, is a native of 
Wales, and was born near Pontapool, October 27, 1827. His parents, 
James and Martha (Edwards) Downton, wore both natives of England, 
the former born in 1790, and the latter in 1707. They immigrated to 
Wales, where they were united in marriage and remained until about 
the year 1850, at which time, they immigrated to the United States, first 
settling at Cincinnati, Ohio, a short time, and from thence removing to 
Covington. Ky., where be died in 1856. His widow still survives and 
resides at Covington. Their children were Charles, Mary A.. John, 
Thomas. James, William, Susan, Priscilla and Martha. Thomas, our 
subject, when a young man turned his attention to mechanical work. 
He learned the rolling-mill trade in Wales, where he engaged in the 
business until 1848, at which time he immigrated to the United States, 
locating at Pittsburgh, Penn., whore he worked at his trade about one 
year, and from thence in 1849 he came to Cincinnati, Ohio, and worked 
at his trade in the Globe Rolling-mills for about twenty-six years. Ho 
then moved to Ilipley County, Ind., and purchased a farm which he 
turned his attention to and resided upon until 18S0, at which time he 
moved to Dearborn County, purchasing and settling on his present farm, 
where he has since resided. He owns a fine farm of ninety-one acres, 
which is well improved and under a high state of cultivation, with a 
beautiful and commodious residence just outside the limits of Moore's 
Hill. Mr. Downton is a man of considerable general information, 
and is highly esteemed by all who know him. He is a man of extraor- 
dinary business capacity, a fine mechanic and an enterprising citizen. 
In politics he is a Republican. He has been four times married (the 
three former wives all deceased), and has had born to him two children: 
Josephine and Carrie 0. 

ENOCH DRAKE, of Rising Sun, said to bo the first white child 
born in what is now Ohio County, was born August 28, 1803. His par- 
ents were Robert and Mary ( Pickett) Drake, natives of North Carolina 
and Maryland respectively. An account of their settlement in this county 
is given elsewhere in this work. Tho father died in Switzerland County 
in 1844, his wife having preceded him three years. Our subject grow 
up on the farm of his father and in 1829 married Sallie Huston, also a 
native of this county, born in 1810, a daughter of Christopher and 
Mary Crawford, and granddaughter of Col. Crawford of Wyandot fame. 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 697 

With the exception of the decade between 183G and 1846, Mr. Drake 
has lived in this county through his long life, residing in Switzerland 
County during the interval. To the union of Mr. and .Mrs. Drake have 
been born eleven children, of whom (ho following named five are living: 
Melissa, Delilah, Sarah. Belle, and Allen. Since 1846 Mr. Drake has 
resided in Rising Sun engaged as a wagon-maker. 

LAWRENCE DUESCHLE, who was once one of the former 
business men of Lawrenceburgh, was born in Germany in April, 1814- 
He grew to maturity in his native country, was educated in its schools, and 
there learned the carpenter's trade, which he followed for several years. In 
the year 1850 he immigrated to America to better his fortune in the freo 
land of the United States. He located first in Cincinnati, where for eight 
years he conducted successfully a business in groceries. He then came 
to Lawrenceburgh, and established himself in the grocery and baking 
business, which he continued till his death in 1S74. Ho married 
Maria Shopper, and she still survives him. Their seven children are John, 
George, Joseph, William, Lena, Minnie and Carrie. George was a 
soldier of the civil war, a member of Company D, Thirty-second Indiana 
Volunteer Infantry, spending about three years in the service, in which 
he died in 1805. John, the ehlest son, was born in Germany in 1S37, 
and came to America with his parents at the age of fourteen years. He 
learned the baker's trade in Cincinnati, and was there engaged in the 
same eight years, when he came to Lawrenceburgh. He began business 
here with his father, but since 1876 he has benn sole proprietor of the 
establishment which he conducts. He carries a full stock of groceries, 
provisions, cigars, tobaccos and liquors, and also does a baking business 
in connection with the other trade, having fair patronage. Mr. Dueschle 
was married, in 1868, to Dora Kastner, by whom he has six children- 
William, Carrie, Ettie, Carl, Cecilia and Lena. Mrs. L. Dueschle 
carries a full line of millinery and dry goods, and is also doing a pros- 
perous business. The family is well respected, and well merits the high 
standing it has always sustained in the community. 

EBENEZER DUMONT, see page 155. 

JUDGE ISAAC DUNN, Lawrenceburgh, one of the earliest pioneers 
of the Miami country, and one of the most successful merchants of Law- 
renceburgh, was born in New Jersey, September 25, 17S2, and immigrated 
to the]Western country with his parents, Capt. Hugh Dunn and wife, and 
three brothers and one sister. Their family boat, after being tired into 
by the Indians, and partly wrecked in a storm, arrived at Columbia, 
December 15, 17SS, just twenty-seven days after the first settlement had 
been made between the Miamis by Benjamin Stites. After a sojourn of 
five years at Columbia, in March, 1793, their household goods were put 



698 HISTORY OF DEARBOKN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

onboard of two canoes lashed together, and tlio family removed to the 
mouth of the Great Miami, whore they found Joseph Hayes and others 
at a well fortified station, ('apt. Dunn locate. 1 his station and block- 
house <on the northwesl side of the hill just north of the month of the 
Great Miami. At thissti ti m, besides Capt. Dunn's family, the persons 
now remembered were Joseph Kitchel, Joseph Randolph, Isaac Mills. 
Benjamin Cox and Thomas Walters. In the spring of 1790, Cap!. Dunn 
removed to the west .side of the Great Miami and settled near where 
Elizabethtown now is. He had been a Revolutionary soldier, and lost 
his property by the depreciation of the continental currency. He died 
in 1804, and his wife died in 1810. Judge Isaac Dunn was truly a self- 
made man; having no opportunities for a scholastic education ho became 
a fair scholar, read much, was a good scribe and a ready reckoner. In 
1804 he was married to Miss Francos Piatt, daughter of Capt. Jacob 
Piatt, of Boone County, Ky. She died in 18-40. In 1800 he commenced 
the mercantile business in Lawrenceburgh, with John R. Beaty and 
Stephen Ludlow. In a few years Beaty removed to Brookville, and 
Dunn & Ludlow continued the business at Lawroneebnrg until 1819. 
In 1812 he was appointed by the governor a judge of the court of Dear- 
born County, and served in that capacity until 1817. He was also 
elected an associate judge under the State Government, and served in 
that office for over sixteen years. He was elected a member of the fourth 
Territorial Legislature, and served as Speaker of the House in that body. 
In 1S20 he became president of the Branch of the Farmers and 
Mechanics Bank, of Indiana. In company with others he started, at New 
Lawrenceburgh, the first woolen factory in the State. He made several 
trips to New Orleans, sometimes coming home on foot through Indian 
nations. He made' several trips to Philadelphia on horseback, to pur- 
chase goods for his store. He was commissioned postmaster of Law- 
renceburgh in 1813, and held that position for sixteen years. In 184:5 
he was married to his second wife, Mrs. Harriet Hunter, widow of Maj. 
James \Y. Hunter. He joined the Methodist Church in 1811. In 
politics ho was an old line Whig, and afterward a Republican. Finally, 
after a long, active and useful life, he died, July 17, 1870, in the eighty- 
eighth year of his age. 

GEORGE H. DUNN, see page 153. 

GERSHOM DUNN, farmer, Manchester, born in Hamilton Coun- 
ty, Ohio, August 4, 1809, is a son of Micajah and Sarah (Torrence) 
Dunn, ho a native of New Jersey and she of Pennsylvania. About. 1700 
they were among the early settlers at Columbia, Ohio; were united in 
marriage about 1799, and settled west of Cincinnati, six miles north of 
the Ohio River. About 1S13 they removed to Dearborn County, Ind. , 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES, uU9 

and settled on land upon whir!, tho village of Guilford now stands, 
there being but three or four other families in that vicinity. The block- 
houses were still there for the "protection of the settlers agaiDst tho Indi- 
ans. About 1823 Mr. Dunn purchased tho northwest quarter of Sec- 
tion 19, in Manchester Township, upon which he settled with his family, 
where ho resided till his death January 12, 1844, aged seventy-five 
years. His wife died September 1, 1849. They had nine children: 
Mercy, Nancy, Elizabeth, Samuel, Gershom, Letitia, Mary Jane, John 
and William. Of these Letitia and William residing in Nebraska, and 
Gershom, our subject, are all that now survive. Mr. Dunn and wife 
were active members of the Methodist Episcopal Church for many 
years. The subject of this sketch was raised from infancy to manhood 
familiar with pioneer life. June 20, 1833, he was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Jane Freeland, daughter of John and Mary Freeland, 
natives of New York, but who became early settlors of Hamilton County, 
Ohio, and then of this county. By this union they have had eleven 
children, ten now living: George H., Mary Eliza, Samuel, Hannah Ann, 
Micajah, Sarah Jane, William Henry, Elizabeth, Elvira P. and Amos M. 
Of these Micajah is a merchant in Lawrenceburgh, and William Henry 
a physician in Wilmington. Samuel, Micajah and John served their 
country in the war of the Rebellion, the latter losing his life by disease 
contracted in the service. Mr. Dunn has spent a long and active busi- 
ness life, making farming the base of his operations. He has also 
dealt largely in stock, and for a period of fifteen years or more, com- 
mencing in 1832, did quite an extensive boating business on the river. 
In all his business he has been very successful; has raised and educated 
a large family of children; has a fine home, and farm of 225 acres, and 
a sufficient competency for life. He and wife are active members of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church, and for forty years he has been a prom- 
inent member of the Masonic fraternity, Lodge No. 503, and one who 
has given freely of his means and influence to all moral and Christian 
causes of his neighborhood and community. 

WILLIAM H. DDNN, M. D., physician and surgeon, Wilmington, 
a native of Dearborn County, was born in Manchester Township, April 
29, 1847. In education he received an irregular course, selecting that 
which would be most beneficial in his chosen profession. The Doctor 
was raised upon a farm, but not being satisfied with that occupation, he 
began reading medicino under Drs. Gatch aud Miller, of Lawrence- 
burgh, after which with Dr. T. M. Kyle, under whom all preparatory steps 
were completed. ^He attonded lectures at Ohio Medical College, and 
graduated in the spring of 1874. Immediately thereafter ho began the 
practice of medicino in Decatur County, continuing up to 1879, when he 



700 HISTOIiY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

located in Wilmington, whore ho has since pursuod tho oven tenor of his 
way. establishing a good patronage. The Doctor was married, September 
16, 1874, to Miss Vaverella J. Ludlow, who was born in Springfield, 
Ohio. December 22, 1855. Throe children have been born to thorn: 
Lamoftc, born July 14, 1875, died May IG, IS80; Carrie, horn March 6, 
1881; Ferrel, born Octolvr 2(3, 1882. Tho Doctor is a member of Wil- 
mington Lodge No. 15S, F. & A. M., and with Mrs. Dunn is a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

COL. J. \V. EGELSTON, retired, Clay Township, was born in 
Steuben County, N. Y., May 28, 1802. His parents were Samuel and 
Hannah (Tripp) Egelston, natives of New York and Pennsylvania respect- 
ively. The former was a son of Amos Egelston, who in an early day 
settled in Steuben County, N. Y. , where he resided until his death. Ho 
was a Revolutionary soldier, and for many years previous to his death 
was a minister of the Baptist Church. Ho was the father of nine chil- 
dren, viz.: Benjamin, Abbie, Phebe, Ephraim, Deborah, Amos, Joseph, 
Jonathan and Samuel. He and Hannah Tripp were united in marri ige in 
Pennsylvania, and subsequently settled in Steuben County, N. Y. , where 
they resided until the spring of 1814, at which time they immigrated to 
what is now Kenton County, Ky., where he died in the following year, 
leaving a family of eleven children, viz. : Hannah, Lydia, Benjamin, Jacob 
W., Charles, William, Silas, Sarah, Amos, Mary and Clarissa. His widow 
subsequently married John Clement, and had by him three children, viz. : 
Joseph, Albert and Mahlon. Col. J. W. Egelston went with his par- 
ents to Kenton County, Ky., and after his father's death was bound oat 
to a farmer by the name of Scott, for §25 per year. In about 1820 he 
began as an apprentice to the carpenter trade, which he completed, and 
engaged in the occupation for a number of years afterward. In October, 
1824, he came to Dearborn County, Ind., where he was united in mar- 
riage, October 24, 1824, to Desire Corbin, a widow. In 1825 he and 
I. Bisbee, erected a flouring and saw-mill, on what is known as 
Laughery Creek, near Milton, which they continued to operate two or 
three years, after which Mr. Egelston again worked at his trade, and in 
1830 purchased a farm in Clay Township (the same farm on which he 
now lives), where he moved and began tho improvements, also working ai 
his trade. In about 1S34 he moved to Dillsborough, engaged in mer- 
cantile business, and also carried on a blacksmith shop. In 1S3S he re- 
moved back on his farm, where ho has since resided. His wife died 
June 29, 1855, having borne him three children, viz.: Hiram W., 
John Q. , and Charles B. April 25, 1858, our subject married Fanny 
Martin, a native of Clormont County, Ohio, where she was born, April 
24, 1830, to which marriage wore born three children, viz.: Harry C, Cas- 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 701 

sius C., and Jessie W. In LS27 Mr. Egelston was commissioned by 
Gov. Ray as colonel of the State militia, and in 1838 he was elected to 
the State Legislature from Dearborn County. In 1802 he entered the 
war, enlisting August 11. as captain of Company B, Eighty-third Reg- 
iment Indiana Volunteers, and as such served until April, 1863, when he 
was promoted to the rank of major, and as such served until May 17, ISO 1, 
when he resigned and returned home. lu 1872 he was commissioned as 
government store -keeper, which he held three years, after which he was 
put on the retired list. Col. Egelston is deserving of more than a pass- 
ing notice. He came to the West when the country was in its primitive 
state. He was not college-bred, neither had he riches, but being dis- 
posed to do, he improved his time and talents, was industrious, and so 
lived as to have left his impress upon the community in which he has 
moved, and which to-day points with pride to his worth as a citizen, 
friend and neighbor. He has long been identified with the people of 
Dearborn County and with her growth and progress. He helj^ed in 
clearing away her forests, building up her institutions of learning, her 
churches, and his name is connected with her various internal improve- 
ments. He has occupied civil positions of honor and trust, and enjoyed 
the full confidence of the people in his official relations. Col. Egelston 
is a patriot. His love of country was so groat as to leave home and 
loved ones for the tented field, when his hair was silvered by the frosts 
of three-score winters. He was a good soldier, served his country faith- 
fully, has]been a good citizen, a kind friend and neighbor, and a useful 
man. He was a strong anti-slaver} - man. and since the organization of 
the Republican party has been in this line of politics. He is modest 
and unassuming. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church and of 
the Masonic order. 

WILLIAM H. ELLIOTT, coal dealer, Rising Sun, is a native of 
Ohio County, born in 1840. His parents, George and Catharine (Welsh) 
Elliott, were among the first settlers of this locality, his father locating 
here about 181S with his father, Robert Elliott. The latter pmchased 
government land here, but soon after died, and the sons paid for the land 
and retained it, the old homestead eventually falling to George, the 
father of our subject. William H grew to maturity on the farm, sharing 
the limited advantages of education then afforded by the district schools. 
He continued agricultural pursuits up to 18S1 when he removed to Ris- 
ing Sun and began dealing in coal. He has held several different tracts 
of land, and now owns a farm of 108 acres in Randolph Township. Mr. 
Elliott was married, in 1803, to Clara Hamilton, of Ohio County, daughter 
of Charles E. Hamilton, an old and esteemed resident of this vicinity. 
In 1879 his wife died, and Mr. Elliott married Josephine Silvy, of 



702 HISTORY OF DEAKBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

Ohio County, daughter of Louis and Eliza (Furgosou) Si Ivy, now resi- 
dents of Rising Sun, also early settlers iu this locality. By this latter 
union three children wore born: Robert, Ada and an infant; the first de- 
ceased.- Mr. Elliott is a member of tin.' I. O. O. F., and is serving as 
city councilman, iu which capacity he ha: officiated for several years. 

A. M. ELLIOTT, deal in agricultural implements, wagons ami 
buggies, corner of Second and Judiciary Streets, Aurora, was born in 
Ohio County, January 12, 1S4S, where he enjoyed common school 
privilege. His father, John H., was born in Ireland, and his mother 
Elizabeth (Shannon) Elliott., m West Virginia. Mr. Elliott was raised 
on a farm and farmed up to 1S75, at which time ho was appointed* sheriff 
of Ohio County and served for two years. In 1877 ho came to Aurora 
and engaged in his present business, and in 1881 opeued a butcher shop, 
on the corner of Third and Judiciary Streets. He was married, Septem- 
ber 7, 1871, to Miss Anna B. Downey, a native of Ohio County, who was 
born June 20, 1850. To them have been born five children, namely: 
Daniel O., June 5, 1872; Harry E., born February 9, 1S77; Nolly M., 
born June 20, 1878; Ruf us G., born October 9, 1879; Edwin O, April 
7, 1884. His wife belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

P. J. EMMERT, proprietor of one of the leading mercantile estab- 
lishments of Lawrenceburgh, is a native of Bavaria, Germany, where he 
was born in 1841. When about five years of age he immigrated with 
his parents to the United States, and resided with them in Maryland and 
Delaware till about 1854, when they came to Lawrenceburgh, in which 
place he began selling goods, in his thirteenth or fourteenth year. 
He has ever since continued in the mercantile business, and has now sold 
goods longer than any other merchant of the place. His store occupies the 
corner of High and Short Streets, whore he keeps an immense stock of dry 
goods, notions, carpets, boots and shoes, clothing, gents' furnishing goods, 
etc., and is doing a large business. He is a cautious, energetic business man, 
and fully merits the extensivo patronage which his fair dealing through 
a long period of years has won for him. He began operations in 1869, 
by buying out the firm of Lewis & Moore, the former at one time one of 
the foremost business men of Lawrenceburgh. Mr. Emmort was married, 
in 1865, to Miss C. Hodel, who died about one year later. He subse- 
quently married Miss Mary M. Dueschlo, by whom ho has one son — 
Edward, aged thirteen years. 

HUGH S. ESPEY, one of the leading business men of Rising Sun, 
was born in the same, in 1822. His parents, Hugh and Agnes (Gaut) 
Espey, were natives of Pennsylvania, where they wore married, and came 
down the river, in 1816, to this locality, and for several years his father 
was engaged in milling, about three and one-half miles back of town, 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCIIKS. 703 

operating oDe of tlie first grain-mills in that vicinity. He also did some 
farming, and filtered and bought laud in Ohio County. After practically 
retiring from business he moved back to Rising Sun, where ho resided 
for about twenty years before his death, which occurred in 1870. Mrs. 
Espey 'died [ about 1SGS. Hugh S. , the subject of this Hketch, re- 
mained at the mill and on the farm till eighteen years of age. He then 
began flat-boating, making his first trip in 1840, and for ten years he 
followed the river trade exclusively. He then established himself in the 
mercantile business, in which, with his sons, ho has since been more or 
less extensively engaged. In the produce line ho has done a considera- 
ble business in pork packing, dealing iu hay, potatoes, flour, etc., and 
this branch of trade, as well as the merchandising in retail groceries, 
provisions, etc., he still continues. Mr. Espey has been connected with 
the Rising Sun Bank, a9 director, since its organization, and was two 
years vice-president of the same. In 1S04 ho was elected treasurer of 
Ohio County, and in 18G8 was re-elected to the same office. He has 
served as city treasurer, in the council, and has always taken an active 
interest in the business affairs of the town. Mr. Espey was married, in 
1853, to Abigail L. Haines, a daughter of Joshua Haines, who, with his 
twin brother, Dr. Haines, came here from New England in 1816. Her 
father erected a store on the Ashman corner, and for many years did an 
extensive dry goods business, remaining a resident of Rising Sun till his 
death. Mrs. Espey was born in 1832, and was married in the same 
house, at the age of twenty-one years. They have reared eight children: 
Frank F., Louise H, Hugh S., J. Haines, John R., Abigail May, Eu- 
gene S., and James (i. Mr. and Mrs. Espey, with others of the family, 
are members of the Presbyterian Church. Mr. Espey has been identi- 
fied with the F. & A. M. since 1844. 

H. S. ESPEY, Jr., Rising Sun, was born in that city in 1858, 
and is a son of Hugh S. and Abigail L. (Haines) Espey. He grew up in the 
town of his birth, in whose schools he was educated, receiving additional 
instruction to the extent of junior year in Wabash College. In the fall 
of 1879 he became a partner in his father's produce business having 
spent two years previously as a clerk. He was married, January 23, 1884, 
to Mary H. Humphrey, of Patroit, Ind., daughter of Cornelius H. and 
Jane A. Humphrey, old residents of Switzerland County, her father, de- 
ceased since 1872, her mother still surviving. The firm of H. S. Espey 
& Son does a thriving business in groceries, provisions, etc., also an ex- 
tensive business in pork packing and produce generally. The firm is one 
of the most substantial in Rising Sun. 

MARTIN C. EWBANK, Miller Township, one of the oldest farmers 
of Dearborn County, was born in Yorkshire, England, in November, 



704 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

1804. He is a son of John and Ann (Chapman) Ewbank, both of English 
parentage. In 1806 John Ewbank loft his native country for America 
on a prospecting tour, leaving his family behind till he should determine 
the chances for their belter support in the new country. He landed in 
New Jersey, where he began work immediately as an overseer of a farm 
belonging- to one of his countrymen, and in the following year he sent 
for his wife and children who joined him in Now Jersey, where they re- 
sided till the autumn of 1811, when they migrated westward and 
located in Dearborn County. Here he entered land on which he 
resided till his death in 1832, his wife surviving till 1848. Until the 
death of his father, Martin C. Ewbank resided on the farm with his par- 
ents. In 1820 he married Rebecca Clark, a daughter of George Clark, 
who was a native of Ireland and immigrated to America in his earlier 
years and located in Virginia, where be reared his family, subsequently 
moving to this State. By this wife, who died in 1S3S, two children were 
born: Sarah and Margaret. October 12, 1841, Mr. Ewbank was again 
married, this time to Mary Hunt, daughter of Robert Hunt, and five 
children resulted from this union: Matilda, Francis, Robert J., Martin L., 
and Sarah, all now living with homes in different parts of the United 
States. January 19, 1852, his second wife departed this life, and in 
August, 1854, Mr. Ewbank was joined in marriage to his present wife, 
whose maiden name was Hannah Liddle, daughter of Stephen Liddle, 
one of the earliest settlers of Miller Township. Five children were born 
to this union: Findlay, Ida, Russel, Raper and Florence. On the death 
of his father, in 1832, Mr. Ewbank came into possession of a portion of 
the old homestead, which he has since cultivated, making somo addition 
by later purchases. He now owns 140 acres of valuable land from which 
he derives a comfortable support in his declining years. Mr. Ewbank 
has always engaged in farming, in which occupation he has been moder- 
ately successful, though he has met with some reverses. He is remarkably 
strong aud active for one of his age, the writer finding him in the woods 
on a cold December day busily engaged in chopping, perched upon a log 
more than two feet in diameter, which he had twice severed by the well 
directed and vigorous blows of his as. Mi - , and Mrs. Ewbank are both 
members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and this organization Mr. 
Ewbank has been associated with during most of his life. 

JOHN W. FACEMIRE, ex- treasurer of Ohio County, Rising Sun, is 
a native of Switzerland County, born in 1843. His parents were Abra- 
ham and Ludisa (Kilgore) Facemire, the former a native of Ohio, the 
latter of Indiana. His father was of German descent and a farmer by 
occupation. He was accidentally killed in 1853 in a paper-mill in Jeffer- 
son County. His mother died when Mr. Facemire was a child. He 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 705 

spent his earlier years on the farm, and at tho age of eighteen 
enlisted in Company C, Eighty-third Indiana Volunteers, and entered the 
service in which ho remained about thirteen months, participating in 
some of the heavier bailies and several skirmishes. He was wounded 
at the battle of Vicksburg in tho left elbow, which resulted in the ampu- 
tation of the arm and three month's confinement in the hospital. Return- 
ing homo lie taught school several terms, and, in 1809, married Miss 
Mary Kelly, who died in 1873, leaving two children: Nathan and 
Perry, the former deceased at three years of age. Mrs. Facemire was 
a native of Switzerland County, and daughter of Henry and Elizabeth 
{Miller) Kelly, natives of Indiana and Kentucky, respectively. In 1874 
Mr. Facemire was elected recorder of Ohio County and served four 
years; was elected city treasurer of Rising Sun in 1880, serving two 
years; and elected treasurer of Ohio County in 1SS2, always discharging 
tho duties of his trust with efficiency and integrity. He is a member of 
the G. A. R. and I. 0. O. F., and in politics a Democrat. Mr. Face- 
mire was married, in 1881, to Mattie Crouch, daughter of Jobeph and 
Elizabeth (O'Neal) Crouch, and they have one child— Guy. Mrs. Face- 
mire was born in Switzerland County. 

JOHN H FANGMANN, farmer, Kelso Township, is a native of 
Dearborn County, Ind., born in the same, March 25, 1844 His 
parents were John B. and Annie M. C. (Busch) Fangmann, both natives 
of Oldeuburgh, Germany, and were born — the former, October 31, 1795, 
and the latter, December 8, 1809. They were united in marriage in 
Germany, and from thence, in the spring of 1832, immigrated to tho 
United States, settling on the same farm where our subject now lives, 
and there they resided until their deaths, which occurred — the father, 
October 28, 1877, and the mother, November 23, 1881. Fifteen chil- 
dren were born to the union, viz. : Catherine, Elizabeth, Dora, Mary, 
Bernedine, Magdalena, Frances, Annie, Agnes, John H., Bernard, 
Lewis, Christena, William and Christena E. John H, our subject, 
the eldest, son, was educated at New Alsace. He was married in Kelso 
Township, this county, February 5, 1867, to Theresia L. Lange, who 
was born at Cincinnati, Ohio, April 16, 1849, and was a daughter of 
Charles H. and Mary A. (Keller) Lange. After his marriage he settled 
on his present farm, where he has since resided. They have had born to 
them sis children, viz.: Mary A. C. , Caroline B., Charles W., Annie J., 
Bernard H., Charles H. Mr. Fangmann is a highly esteemed young 
man, and a man of good general information. He was elected trustee 
of Kelso Township in 1SS0, and re-elected in 1882. Himself and fam- 
ily are members of tho Catholic Church. 

43 



706 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

JOHN FEIST, county commissioner, York Township, was born in 
Cincinnati in 1834. His parents, John and Barbara (Lemmel) Feist, 
were both natives of Germany, and came to America while yet unmar- 
ried, in 1832. His father was born in 1804. his mother in 1S05; the for- 
mer in Baden, the latter in Bavaria. On immigrating to America the 
father landed at New York the mother at New Orleans, and they met in 
Cincinnati about one year later, and in July, 1833, were married. In 
1834, they moved to Dearborn County, and located in York Township, 
where Mr. Feist purchased forty acres of Government land on which he 
resided about five years, after which he purchased another tract of eighty 
acres which served as his homestead about twenty-five years. He then 
moved to Yorkville, whore, in 1870, his life peacefully closed. His wid- 
ow is stiJl living in her seventy-sixth year. In his earlier years Mr. 
Feist was a stone cutter by trade, but his health failed and he adopted 
farming as a pursuit. On the farm John Feist grew to maturity, shar- 
ing but limited advantages of schooling in his youth. At the aye of 
nineteen years he married Frances Miller, a native of this township, and 
daughter of Joseph and Mary A. (Schultzer) Miller, both natives of Ba- 
varia, who immigrated to America in 1832. After his marriage, in 1853, 
Mr. Feist continued his work in various places for some time, and then 
engaged in brick-making, gradually working his way up. He first pur- 
chased a lot of two acres, then another of forty, then eighty, and so on 
with gradual gain till he now owns ninety-sis acres of valuable land well 
improved in buildings and cultivation. He has since bought and sold 
another farm of forty-five acres. His first tax receipt was for 14 cents, 
and this has gradually increased till it now approximates the sum of 
$50. He has always taken an active interest in politics, never having 
missed a vote since casting his first one in 1855, always giving his influ- 
ence in favor of the Democratic party. As an evidence of his popular- 
ity, and the esteem in which he is held as a citizen, it will be noted that 
he has served as township assessor eight years, and as township trustee 
eleven years. In March, 1884, he was appointed to fill the vacancy in 
the office of county commissioner, caused by tho death of John Buchert, 
and in the fall of the same year was elected to fill the unexpired term of 
one year. In public as well as private life Mr. Feist is a man of un- 
blemished reputation, which gives to him the credit of always doing his 
conscientious duty both as citizen and public servant. Mr. and Mrs. Feist 
have three children: Paul, Clara and Theodore. The eldest son is now 
a resident of Hastings, Neb. 

PIERRE FEKMIER, physician, Jackson Township, was born in 
Bavaria, Germany, March 25, 1825, is a son of Philip and Magdalina 
(Martin) Fermier, natives of Bavaria, he being a descendant of the Hu- 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 707 

guenots. They lived and died in their native land, reaching the ad 
vanced ages of one hundred and one and one hundred and three years, 
respectively. Their children, seven in number, all grow to maturity; 
three now survive: Henry, now a resident of Pennsylvania; Christena, 
now widow Klein, residing in Philadelphia, and Dr. Pierre. Of those 
deceased, two died in their native country, and two: Charles and Jack- 
son, came to America. The former died in Philadelphia and the latter in 
Mobile, Ala. One remarkable incident connected with this family is the 
fact that the three sous who came to America, all in different years, yet 
all came over in the same vessel — the "St. Nicholas." Charles had, how- 
ever, contracted to oome in another vessel, but when it came to sail ho 
refused to go aboard of her, believing her to be unsafe, which proved 
true, as she was lost on the voyage. Dr. Formier came to America in 
1849, a young, single man. He had received a very liberal education in 
Germany, first taking a thorough classical Course at Kaiser's Lautern, 
and at Zweibruecken, thence graduating at the University of Munich. In 
1849 he was engaged as the first examining physician for the army of 
the Revolution, he being a strong Republican, from powerful convictions 
brought upon him by the laws and customs of that kingdom — Bavaria — 
in being compelled to make obeisance to an infant babe, the future heir 
to the throne. Immediately upon the completion of the above duties as 
examining physician, the Doctor came to America, landing in New York, 
from whence he went to Boston and entered upon the practice of his pro- 
fession. Remaining there but a few months, he came to Indiaua and 
settled in Jackson Township; where he has had a large and successful 
practice for thirty-five years, and is now, by appointment of the commis- 
sioners, the attending physician for the paupers of Jackson Township. 
The Doctor was united in marriage April 2, 1857, with Miss Elizabeth 
Elher, born September 11, 1834, a daughter of Thomas and Catharine 
(Fastnacht) Ehler, natives of Pennsylvania. In 1817 Mr. Ehler 
settled in Dearborn County, entering eighty acres of land on the 
southwest quarter of Section 1, Jackson Township, being, it is 
believed, the second settler in this township. His nearest neighbor 
was in Manchester Township, one and a half miles distant, and the 
nearest mill for grinding, twelve miles, on the Whitewater, with only 
a blazed path leading to it through the unbroken forest. Hero Mr. 
Ehler performed much hard work opening out his farm, and here he re- 
sided through life. His wife died about 1863, aged sixty-three years. 
He died in 1S77, aged seventy-nine years. They were parents of eight 
children; all grew to maturity, six now living: Rosanna, wife of Will- 
iam O'Brien, residing in Ripley County, Iud. ; William; Jesse, residing 
in Missouri; Elizabeth; Catharino, wife of John Alden, residing in 



708 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

Kansas, and Jane, wife of George Need, residing in California. Mr. Ehler 
was one of the founders of the St. John's Lutheran Church, formerly 
known as the Engel Church, of which ho and his wife were active mem- 
bers through life, and they were interred in their burying ground by the' 
church. By this union the Doctor has seven children: Mary, wife of 
Aaron Keller, of Lawrenceburgh; Cordelia. Pierre G., George, Emile 
(the last three are now iu college at Valparaiso, Ind.), Alma anil Rich- 
ard. Dr. Ferrnior was the first regular physician ever located in Jack- 
son Township, and although there have been other physicians located 
here in practice since, yet be is the only one who has remained perma- 
nently. He has a largo practice, and holds the confidence of tho people. 

DR. EZRA FERRIS, see page 107. 

WILLIAM T. FERRIS, of Lawrenceburgh, died in that city, Au- 
gust 1, 1883, aged seventy years. He was a son of Dr. Ezra Ferris, one 
of the prominent and usiful citizens of tho same city, whose sketch will 
be found elsewhere in this work. Our subject commenced business for 
himself at Hartford before ho had reached his majority, but after three 
or four years, he returned to Lawrencehurgh, and for a number of years 
was engaged in the wholesale grocery business with John Wymond, the 
firm being Wymond & Ferris, which met with groat bucccss. He was 
next in business in Cincinnati, then for a time farmed, and for many 
years prior to his death, he was connected with the revenue service. He 
passed a long life of usefulness and died leaving a name unsullied. 

CHARLES E. FERRIS, druggist, of Lawrenceburgh, is a native of 
Dearborn County, born in 1850. His father was John Ferris, and his 
grandfather, Dr. Ezra Ferris, one of the pioneers of the West, and a 
man of prominence and great worth in the early settlement at Lawrence- 
burgh, a sketch of whom appears in the medical chapter of this volume. 
Our subject grew up in Lawrenceburgh, and received his education in 
the public schools of the place. In 1809 he began olerking in the drug 
store, then the property of his father, and has since continued in the 
same business, the store having boon first established by Dr. Ezra Ferris 
early in the present century, and since carried on in the Ferris name, 
having descended from father to son and to grandson, and now carried 
on by the Ferris Bros , who are gonial and affable gentlemen. 

GERHARD FETTE, proprietor of the Now Alsace Flouring mills, 
Kelso Township, was born at New Alsace, Ind , October 6, 1811 His 
parents were Frank and Mary A. (Volmering) Fette, both natives of Ger- 
many, where they were born, the father January 0, 1811, and tho mother 
September 29, 1812. They were united in marriage in Germany, and 
from thenco, in 1839, immigrated to the United States, landing at Balti- 
more, from which city they came to Cincinnati, and about one year later 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 700 

moved to Now Alsace, Dearborn County, where tho father worked at his 
trade, ho being a blacksmith. Iu 1840 he moved to Oldenburg, Franklin 
County, this State, and in 1852 moved to Now Alsace, whore ho after- 
ward resided until death, which occurred June 11, 1877. His wife still 
survives, and rosides at New Alsaco. They wore tho parents of seven 
children: Henry (deceased), Gerhard, Annie, Agnos (deceased), Elizabeth, 
Mary and Rosa. Gerhard, our subject, the second member of the 
family, loarnod the blacksmith trade and carriage-making with his 
father when a young man, and afterward engaged in the business for a 
number of years. Ho was united in marriage at New Alsace Novornber 
28, 1805, to Elizabeth Klee, who was born at Cincinnati, Ohio, Septem- 
ber 1, 1840, and was a daughter of Nicholas and Margaret (Hartig) Klee. 
After his marriage he first settled at Weisburg, this county, where ho 
carried onblacksmithing. In 1872 he moved to Washington, Daviess Co., 
Ind., and from thence, in 1874, to Weisburg, and in 1878 to Ripley 
County, Ind., and purchased a mill and engaged in milling two years, 
then moved his mill to New Alsace and erected the building where it 
now stands. He is doing an extensive business at present. He is an 
estimable man, and is well respected by all who know him. They have 
had born to them ton children: George T., Nicholes H. , Frank J., An- 
drew E., John H, Mary C, Dora M., Margaret M., Martin I., Anthony 
A Mr. Fotte and family are members of the Catholic Church. 

MICHAEL FICHTER, Lawrencoburgh, the oldest shoe maker in 
business in the town, was born in Straasburg, France (now Germany), 
in 1820, and learned his trade in his native country. He continued his 
trade in that country till 1847, when ho immigrated to the United States, 
coming direct to Lawrenceburgh. He first engaged hero with one Har- 
baugh, with whom ho was employed till 1S54, when he opened up 
a shop of his own. Since that time Mr. Fichter has conducted a fairly 
successful business in tho boot and shoe line in Lawrenceburgh. He is 
now located at No. 80 High Street, which building he owns, and keeps 
on hand a good stock of custom made and eastern goods valued at about 
$1,000. Mi-. Fichter was married, in 1852, to Sophia Wagner, who was 
born in Baden, Germany, and who immigrated to this country in 1840. 
Their children are Henry, Mary (Mrs. Garner), Sarah, Alice, Lily, John, 
Emma and Charles, tho eldest son being a workman on a passenger train 
between Cincinnati and Vincennes. John Fichter is a printer by trade, 
at present employed in the office of tho Lawrenceburgh Register. The 
family is associated with the German Methodist Church. Mr. Fichter's 
business room is a part of the first brick tavern which was built in Law- 
renceburgh in 1818. 

DR. DAVID FISHER, see page 109. 



710 HISTORY OF DEA.RBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

NELSON FISK, a leading farmer of Randolph Township, was born 
in New York State, in 1814. His parents were William and Christina 
(PfieftVr) Fink, natives of Connecticut and New York, respectively, and 
were married in the latter State. His mother's people resided on the 
Delaware River, her father keeping a hotel, in which occupation he ac- 
cumulated considerable wealth. In 1817 Mr. Fisk migrated with his 
family from New York State, coming down the Ohio River to Cincinnati 
and soon after Ohio County, where ho purchased a quarter section of land 
on which ho remained till his death. At the age of forty-five Mrs. Fisk 
returned to hor old homo on the Delaware, to secure her portion of the 
estate, going all tho way alono on horseback and carrying home with her 
$1,500 in gold. She lived to be ninety-six years old and was noted even 
to hor last days for her fastidious tastes. Of their twelve children but 
five are living: Samuel, Nathaniel, Hiram, Amy (wife of John Mc- 
Closky) and Nelson. The latter, who is the subject of this notice, was 
brought up on the farm, in which occupation he has ever since engaged. 
In 1839 he married Francina Baker, daughter of Joshua Baker, and in 
1855 his wife passed away, leaving seven children — five still living: 
Samuel, Brow, Mahlon D., Silas B., Lana (wife of David L. Wade). In 
1862 Mr. Fisk was married to Julia A., daughter of William Hanna. 
Her father was born in Delaware in 1804, moved to Pennsylvania when 
about eight years old with his father, Samuel Hanna, who, in 1813, 
migrated to Ohio County and died in 1859, having been a farmer 
all his life. William Hanna died in 1881. By his last marriage 
Mr. Fisk has three children living, namely: Malvin W., Lizzie and 
Arthur. In his business pursuits Mr. Fisk has been blessed with ample 
success. He owns an excellent farm and has provided each of his 
children at maturity with a desirable inheritance. He has always fol- 
lowed tho occupation of a farmer. The family is associated with the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. 

SAMUEL FISK, son of Nelson Fisk.was born in Ohio County in 1840. 
He was roared on the farm, and in the pursuit of agriculture he has ever 
since engaged. At the age of twenty-six years he married Eliza Lostuter 
and they have two children: John N. and Fannie. After his marriage, 
Mr. Fisk began farming on his own responsibility, owning a line farm 
in this township, which he sold in 1884. Ho also did considerable busi- 
ness dealing in stock. Mr. F. is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church and has always had tho reputation of being one of the thriftiost 
young farmers of Randolph township. 
SNELSON D. FOLBRE, see page 183. 

"AGNES G. (FLANNIGAN) FISHER, farmer, Union Township, was 
born in Cable County, W. Va., October 3, 1837. Her father, John Flan- 



BIOGKAl'IlICAL SKETCHES. 711 

nigan, was born near Clarksburgh, Va., in 1812; mother, Agnes B. 
Ross, noar Glasgow, Scotland, August. 15, 1S13. Her parents wore mar- 
ried in August, 1830, hihI raised three 'liidren: Agnes G, Eliza G. 
and James V. It. They moved to Ohio County, Ind. , in 1844, and her 
father'died (ho same year. Agnes G. Flannigan was married to John 
Fisher March 23, 1802: he was born in Randolph Township, Ohio Co.. 
Ind., June 28, 1816. By their union were born five children: Aggie H.. 
bornDecember 28, 1862; John J. A., July 28, 1864; Minnie B., born No- 
vember 17, 1866 (died October 16, 1807); Fannie E., March 2, 1869; Cora 
L., February 3, 1872. Her husband farmed all his life and was very 
successful. He was a stockholder in and president of the Hartford & 
Rising Sun Turnpike Company; was school director several times, and 
an active, consistent member of the Christian Church. He died April 3, 
1881, and left quite a landed estate, which the widow has managed very 
successfully ever since. She possesses wonderful financiering ability, 
and is a close figurer in all her management Their eldest daughter, 
Aggie H, was married January 30, 1881, to Mr. Taylor AV. Barricklow. 
"Unto them has been given one child, Aggie L. , born January 11, 1S82. 
Mrs. Fisher is a faithful and esamplary member of the Christian Church. 
• HARRY FISK, postmaster, City of Aurora, is a native of Kenton 
County, Ivy. , born March 11, 1840, and received a common school edu- 
cation in Cincinnati, Ohio. His father, AVilliam B. Fisk, was born in 
Maine in 1803, and his mother, Cynthia Stevens, was born in Kentucky. 
The former was a carpenter, and the family moved to Cincinnati, Ohio, 
in 1843, where they remained until 1S5S, at which time they moved to 
Indianapolis, thence to Kansas in 1870, where the father died in 1872. In 
1855 Harry Fisk engaged in carriage painting, and continued at his 
trade up to 1861. At this period of life he enlisted in the Union Army, 
in the three months' service, as a private soldier. At the expiration of 
this term of service he enlisted in Company A, Seventh Regiment Indi- 
ana Volunteers for three years. He was taken prisoner at the battle of 
Port Republic, and escaped after six weeks' incarceration in prison at 
Lynchburgh, and returned to his regiment. Immediately thereafter he 
was commissioned second lieutenant. On the 8th of May, 1804, he was 
wounded in one limb at Spcttsylvania Court House. His army experi- 
ence as a private soldier and officer was enviable, having participated in 
many important battles. In L860 he, with three brothers, started a car- 
riage factory in Aurora, all being mechanics, took charge of separate 
branches and worked faithfully, which enabled them to surmount all 
obstacles and prosper in the enterprise. In 1SS3 Harry withdrew from 
the firm, and accepted the office of postmaster at Aurora, which position 
he is now holding. He wa3 married, November 15, 1864, to Miss 



712 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

Ludici Crowley, a native of Missouri, who was bora December 13, 1S49. 
By the union five children have been born, namely: George W., Frank, 
Harry, Kaio and Anna. His ostimable wife is a member of the Baptist 
Church-. In 1808 he was appointed United States Ganger and served for 
two years. He was a membor of the city council from the Third Ward 
from 1870 to 1880, and officiated as treasurer of the Agricultural Society 
from 1873 to 1883. He is a member of Dearborn Lodge No. 442, F. 
& A. M. From [ 1880 to 1883 he filled the important office of deputy 
collector, and is a quiet, law-abiding citizen. 

GEORGE B. FITCH, attorney, Lawrenceburgh, is a native of the 
city in which ho now resides, and in which tho greater portion of his 
life has been passed. His birth occurred in 1823. His parents were 
Harris and Hannah (Biggs) Fitch, natives of New York and Virginia, 
respectively, though the latter was raised in the State of Kentucky. 
Harris Fitch settled in Dearborn County in 1817. He was an active 
business man, engaged in various pursuits, as merchant, landlord and 
river trader. He was the father of eight children, some of whom be 
came men of some prominence in business circles. The father, perhaps, 
waB better known as a landlord, having for many years kept the "Fitch 
House," which continues to be one of tho hotels of Lawrenceburgh, and 
bears the name of its past proprietor. Our subject in his earlier 'life 
was engaged in cleihing and as a business man. He read law with 
Theodore Gazlay, then an attorney of Dearborn County, and was ad- 
mitted to the bar in about 1850, since which time he has pursued that 
profession. In 1854 Mr. Fitch was united in marriage with Miss Annie 
Burkam, a daughter of E. G. Burkam, elsewhere mentioned in this vol- 
ume; three children have been born to the union, namely: Mary B. , 
Jeannett and Laura. 

WESLEY FLEMING, farmer, Clay Township, is a native of Ham- 
ilton County, Ohio, where he was born June 28, 1827. His parents 
were Rev. William J. and Amelia (Rickards) Fleming, both natives of 
Delaware. The former was a son of Jacob and Charlotte (Johnson) 
Fleming, who were also natives of Delaware, where she died. They 
were the parents of five children, viz. : William J., John, Cynthia, Mary, 
and James. After the death of Mrs. Fleming, Mr. Fleming married Mary 
Gullett,and, in about the year 1822, immigrated to Hamilton County, 
Ohio, and from thence, in about 1828, to Dearborn County, Ind., where 
they resided until their deaths. They had born to them five children, 
viz.: Robert, Rebecca, Jacob, Elizabeth and Louisa. William J., the 
father of our subject, was born in Kent County, Del, January 23, 1800. 
Ho came with his parents to Hamilton County, Ohio, in 1822, where he 
and Amelia Rickards were united in marriage, August 25, 1825. She 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 713 

was born in Kent County, Del., August 20, 1S0S, and was a daughter of 
Leven and Rebecca (Riggs) Rickards, both natives of Delaware. After 
Mr. Fleming's marriage he first settled in Hamilton County, Ohio, 
whore he resided until March, 182S, at which time they moved to Dear- 
born County, Ind., settling in Clay Township, where he purchased land 
and resided until his death, which occurred June 9, 1877. His wife 
still survives, and at present resides at Dillsborough. He was 
a thorough Bible scholar, and for many years previous to his death was 
a minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church, in which church he was a 
devoted and zealous member from his sixteenth year. They were the 
parents of three children, viz. : Eliza, Sarah A., and Wesley. He spent a 
part of his early life at tho carpenter's trade, and of late years has de- 
voted his entire attention to agricultural pursuits. He was married in 
Ohio County, Ind., May 26, 1856, to Martha J., daughter of James and 
Sarah M (Gullett) Westcott. She was born in Hamilton County, Ohio, 
February 17, 1835. After Mr. Fleming's marriage he first settled in 
Ohio County, whore he resided until 1858, in which year he moved to 
Dearborn County and purchased and settled on a farm in Clay Township, 
Section 17, which he improved. He subsequently purchased and settled 
on his father's old homestead in Section 8, where he at present resides. 
He owns 143 acres of fine land, which is well improved and under a 
high state of cultivation. They have had born to them four children, 
viz.: Lillias A., Olive A. (deceased), Tillis S., and Amelia 0. He is a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and in politics a Republican. 
JOSEPH FOLZENLOGEL, farmer, Kelso Township, is a native of 
Germany, and was born at Alsace, in March, 1824. His parents, Nich- 
olas and Mary (Grusenmier) Folzenlogel, were both natives of Ger- 
many. They were the parents of ten children, viz.: Martin, Mary A, 
Dora, Catherine, Nicholas, Joseph, Magdalena, Michael, Frances and 
Elizabeth. Joseph immigrated to the United States in 1849, first set- 
tling at Now York City, whero he engaged in cabinet-making, following 
it about four years. From thence he went to Illinois, where he worked 
at the carpenter trade one year. He then went to Cincinnati, Ohio, 
and worked at the carpenter trade about two years. From thence he went 
to Kansas, where he also engaged in the same, and from thence, in 1858, 
he came to Dearborn County, Ind., and purchased and settled on his 
present farm. May 4, 1858, he married Magdalena Sibler, by whom 
he has had born to him eleven children, viz.: Mary A., Frances, Mag- 
dalena, Joseph, Elizabeth, Caroline, Catherine, Annie, Edward, George 
and Dora B. (deceased). Mr. Folzenlogel and family are members of 
the Catholic Church. 



714 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

ROBERT II. FOWLER, of Lawrenceburgh, one of the few surviv- 
ing pioneers and venerable men of the city and county, is a son "f Henry 
and Ann (King) Fowler, natives of Prince Williams County, Va., and of 
Fairfax County, Va. , respectively, of French and Scotch descont, was 
born at Charlestown, near Harper's Ferry, Va., October 9, 1803. His 
father, was a cooper by trade, and in IS 10 settled on Wilson's Creek, in 
Lawrencoburgh Township, where his* death occurred June 22,1815. 
The mother died in 1858, aged eighty-three years. Our subject was the 
eldest of sis children, and, through necessity, began the battle of life 
young and with little education, having gone to school probablj not 
more than nine months in all. Until the age of twenty years he re- 
mained on the farm with his mother, and assisted in raising the younger 
members of the family. For twenty years he followed flat-boating on 
the Ohio River, being engaged as a pilot the greater part of the time. 
In the meantime, October 12, 182G, he was united in marriage with 
Miss Mary Ann Butterfield, a Virginian by birth. To this union were 
born three daughters, viz.: Emily M., Caroline S. and Margaret J., all 
of whom are now living. Since leaving the river trade Mr. Fowler has 
farmed until recent years, when he removed to Lawrenceburgh, where he 
is now spending the evening of his life in a comfortable home with a 
daughter; Mrs. Emily Gray. The death of his wife occurred at Law- 
rencoburgh, January 19, 1883. Mr. Fowlor cast his first vote in 1824, 
for John Quincy Adams, for President of the United States, and has 
ever since sustained the doctrines advocated by the old Whig party until 
the organization of the Republican party, when he became identified 
with that party, and has since acted with it. All of the family were 
Baptists, our subject having been identified with that church since 1839. 
Mr. Fowler is well preserved in mind and body for one of his years, and 
the writer is indebted to him for many facts contained in this volume, and 
will over refer with pleasure to the friendly calls exchanged during its 
preparation. 

JAMES B. FOX, Harrison Township, one of the well to do farmers of 
this township and a veteran of the Mexican war, was born in Hamilton 
County, Ohio, in 1830. His parents, Jacob and Rebecca (Polan) Fox, 
are both natives of New Jersey, and of Gorman and English descent, 
respectively. His mother was born September 19, 1801, and is still liv- 
ing, well preserved for one of her years. Her grandfather was a com- 
missioned officer in command of a naval vessel in the Revolution and was 
lost in battle. Her relatives all reside in New Jersey, and there she 
grew to womanhood. During the war of 1 SI 2, she was an eye witness 
of the engagement between the naval vessels " Wasp" and " Frolic," 
which scene she still vividly recalls. Her father died while she was yet 



BIOGIIAI'IIICAL SKETCHES. 715 

a child, and she was reared by her mother with three other sisters, only 
two of whom are now living. In her twenty-second year she married 
Jacob Fox, who was a soldier of the war of 1812, and a blacksmith by 
trade. . It is worthy of nolo that both Mr. and Mrs. Fox wore born in 
the same house and in their youth playmates. In 1825 the family which 
then included four children emigrated westward, going by wagon to 
Pittsburgh, thence by steamboat to Cincinnati. They located in Hamil- 
ton County, Ohio, where they resided some five years and then moved to 
this county. Here the father gave up his trade and engaged in keeping 
hotel at the old country stand where his widow still resides. He died 
here in September, 1845, and the business was conducted for many years 
after by Mrs. Fox. Before his death Mr. Fox had purchased 160 acres 
of land, and this homestead is still in the possession of the family. In 
his day Jacob Fox was a prominent member of the F. & A. M., attaining 
the "royal arch" degree, and his acquaintanceship extended over the 
greater portion of southeastern Indiana. James B. Fox, the subject 
proper of this notice, remained under the paternal roof till his seven- 
teenth year when he enlisted in the war against Mexico, in which he par- 
ticipated in six general battles -four under Taylor and two under Scott. 
He was a member of Company C, Third Artillery, Bagg's Battery, and 
fired the first cannon between the American and Mexican Armies at Palo 
Alto, May 8, 1846. He took part in the engagement at Resaca do laPalma, 
Monterey, Bouna. Vista, Tampico and Sierra Gorda; all are famous in 
the history of our country. After the close of the war he was for some 
time employed as mail carrier between Santa Fe and Fort Leavenworth, 
and in the Southwest he remained about two years. In October, 
1851, he was commissioned by Burnside to carry a government dispatch 
to Fort Leavenworth, and the distance of 800 miles he covered on horse- 
back in eleven days. In the following January he went with a govern- 
ment train into Texas, and in June returned to his present home, where 
he has since remained, engaged in the quiet pursuit of agriculture. Mr. 
Fox is now fifty-five years old, a genial bachelor, free from family care, 
and ho has voted for every Democratic President since the campaign of 
Franklin Pierce. 

MARTIN V. FOX, Harrison Township, one of the best farmers of 
the same, was born in Hamilton County, Ohio, near Cincinnati, in 
1832, and is a son of Jacob and Rebecca (Polan) Fox, natives of Salem 
County, N. J., near the Delaware. Mr. Fox grew up on the farm with 
his parents and has always engaged in agricultural pursuits. He pur- 
chased his present farm of 100 acres in 1865, and since that time has 
never moved his effects but once. Ho was married, in November, 1805, to 
Cornelia Griffith of Hamilton County, Ohio, and daughter of David and 



716 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

Eliza (Lawrence) Griffith, her father of Ohio, her mother from Mas- 
sachusetts. Benjamin Griffith, her grandfather, was one of the earliest 
settlers of Hamilton County, and is said to have taught the lirst school 
of that, county in a flat-boat which was made fast to a tree by a grape- 
vine. Her parents remained residonts of Hamilton County. Her father 
died fn 1S44; her mother in 1881. Mr. and Mrs. Fox. have six children: 
Henry, Adna, Martin V., Walter, Carrie and Eddie. They are 
rewarded for their industry by a liberal share of the comforts of life in 
the way of a comfortable home, and they enjoy the esteem of a large cir- 
cle of friends. 

PHILIP FREIBERGER, retired, Aurora, is a native of Germany, 
born in Bavaria, March 28, 1823, where he received a common school 
education. His parents, John and Catharine (Schemlin) Freiberger were 
natives of Bavaria, the father was born in 1790, and died in 1838; the 
mother was born in 1801, and died in 1849. Philip came to America 
in 1846, and located in Somerset County, Penn., where he worked at the 
carpenter's trade, and manufactured cigars. He was married, August 18, 
1846, to Miss Mary Harring at Chambersburgh, Penn. ; she was born Sep- 
tember 23, 1825. Eight children have been born to the marriage, namely: 
Elizabeth, born February 24, 1847; Caroline, born January 18, 1849; 
John, born October 13, 1850; Philip, born July 22, 1852, died February 
10, 1861; Mary A., born August 20, 1854; Andy, born July -22, 1858; 
Lillie, born June 2, 1861; George, born June 5, 1863. Michael Harring, 
the father of Mrs. Freiberger, was born in 1790 and her mother, Catharine 
(Kruitzer) Harring was born in 1800. They came to America in 1846. 
Philip came to Aurora, Ind., in 1847, and followed carpentering, and 
various branches of business. He is a member of the Druids and Ger- 
man Reformed Church. 

CAPT. JOHN I. FRENCH, of Rising Sun, died in that village in 
1874, at the ripe old age of four score and six years less four months. In 
1817 he removed from New York State, and settled on the ridge near Law- 
renceburgh, and in 1830 he moved to what is now Ohio County. He 
was a soldier of the war of 1812. In 1870 it was stated that he was the 
oldest Mason in the State, having been connected with the order sixty- 
one years. He was made a Mason in New York City. 

REUEL W. FUGITT, county recorder of Ohio County, Ind., was 
born in Jefferson County, Ind., May 25, 1842, grew to manhood on 
a farm, and in 1S61 enlisted in Company F, Twenty-second Indiana In- 
fantry. He served till June, 1S65, when he was honorably discharged, 
having taken part in some of the strongest battles of the war. Among 
these were the the battles of Pea Ridge, Corinth, Perryville, Stone River, 
Jackson and many minor engagements; was wounded at Perryville and 



BIOGRAI'inCAL SKETCHES. 717 

also at Stone River, though not Beriously. Returning homo Mr. Fugitt 
engaged in -aw-niilliug in Ripley County until 186S, when ho removed 
to Ohio County and followed agricultural pursuits until elected to the 
recorder's office in 1882, which he still holds. Was married in 1S72 to 
Miss Nora Trader, of Ohio County, daughter of Isaac Trader. By this 
union have 1>oen born four children: Mary E., Susan, Elmira and John. 
Mr. Fugitt is a member of the G. A. R., Benjamin North Post, also of the 
F. & A. M. and I. O. O. F. 

ELIJAH FULLER, farmer, Sparta Township, was born in Dear- 
born County, Inch, November 10, 1S35. His parents, Elijah and Azubah 
(Gloyd) Fuller, wore natives of Now York and Massachusetts respect- 
ively, and were born, the former May 19, 1783, and the latter December 
11, 1798. They were married in Dearborn Couuty, Ind., June 15, 1823, 
and settled in Sparta Township, where he engaged in saw-milling and 
farming, and where they resided until their deaths, which occurred, the 
mother August 5, 1854, and the father August 8, 1858. They were 
the parents of six children, viz. : Amanda, Eliza, Truman, Martha, 
Emily and Elijah. The lattor was united in marriage in Sparta Town- 
ship, December 5, 1858, with Mary J., daughter of Jonathan and Eliza- 
beth Noble. She was born in Dearborn County, Ind., September 23, 

1839. After our subject's marriage he settled on the old homestead 
where he has since resided. He owns ninty-seven acres of land, has a 
family of four children, namely: Ella F., born August 29, 1859; John 
M., born April 15, 1862; Elizabeth P., born December 13, 1865; Anna 
B., born June 6,1867. Mr. Fuller is a gentleman and he and his family 
highly esteemed. 

THOMAS & J. W. GAFF, of Aurora, the latter locating here in 

1840, and the former soon after, have been conspicuous characters in 
Aurora's history. Thomas was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1S08, and 
with his parents James and Margaret immigrated to America in 1811. 
J. W., was born in Springfield, N. J., in 1816, and both were here edu- 
cated, Thomas first learning the trade of his father, paper-making, and 
both that of distilling, which business they engaged in together in the 
city of Philadelphia, and in 1843 located in Aurora in the same business, 
establishing the widely known firm of T. & J. W. Gaff & Co. These 
men by their extensive improvements, industry and enterprise did much 
for the advancement of the town. They were the first to undertake the 
construction of turnpikes and to establish daily communication by steam- 
boat between Aurora and Cincinnati. Thomas was one of the original 
stockholders and directors of the Ohiocfc Mississippi Railroad. Their en- 
terprises wore various— farming, mining, foundry and machine works, 
mercantile business, banking, etc. Thomas was president of the First Na- 



718 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

tional Bank; vice-president of the Gas Light & Coke Company ; he was a 
man of remarkable executive ability, and was considered one of the boat 
financiers in the country. Daring the war ho strongly supported the cause 
of the. Union. His death occurred in the city of Cincinnati within the 
past year. James W. was a man eminently fitted for business and at the 
time of his death, which occurred in Cincinnati in 1879, ho was engaged 
in thirty-two distinct firms and lines of business, and was possessed of 
great wealth. He was extremely industrious and very careful about de- 
tails, giving to them the minutest attention. He held various offices 
in the county, among them Stato Senator, member of school board and 
president of the agricultural society. He was a generous and benevo- 
lent man. Ho removed to Cincinnati before the late war. 

JOHN H. GAFF, of Lawrenceburgh (brother of Thomas and J. 
W.), was born in Springfield, N. J., September 13, 1820. He received 
a common school education, and in 1835 was apprenticed to learn the 
jeweler's trade with a Mr. Ackerman in New York City, with whom he 
remained six years, then he spent four years in the City of Mexico. In 
1845 he returned to the United States and settled in Aurora, and en- 
gaged with his brothers in the distilling business, and while a resident 
of that place served two terms as mayor of Aurora. In 1S64, with his 
family, Mr. Gaff removed to Lawrenceburgh, where he resided until his 
death in 1879. On his removal to Lawrenceburgh he continued in busi- 
ness with his brothers and Mr. Anson Marshall, and on the withdrawal of 
the latter a new firm was organized, consisting of John H. Graff and 
Charles L. Howe, under the firm name of John H Graff & Co. Mr. 
Graff was actively identified with all of the interests of Lawrenceburgh. 
Ho was for some some years a member of the board of education of the 
city. 

GEORGE W. GALLOWAY, farmer, Sparta Township, is a native 
of Jennings County, Ind., born August 20, 1834. His parents, Elihue 
and Mary (Elliott) Galloway, were natives of Maryland and Kentucky, 
respectively. They were married in Kentucky, and in 1817 immigrated 
to Jennings County, Ind., whore he died in June, 1803, at the age of 
seventy-three, and she moved to Dearborn County in 1870 and remained 
until her death. They were the parents of twelve children, namely: 
William, Sarah A., Samuel, Martha, John, Elisha, Joseph, Elijah, 
Ephraim, George W., Robert and Harriet. George W. was married in 
Jennings County, Ind., May 23, 1867, to Rosealtha M., daughter of 
Benjamin H. and Nancy A. (Robinson) Myers. She was born at Law- 
renceburgh December 31, 1S51 After this marriage Mr. Galloway set- 
tled in Jennings County and remained until 1S71, in which year he 
moved to Dearborn County, purchasing and settling on his present farm. 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. . 719 

He owns ninety-two acres of fine land. They have had born to them 
four children, viz. : James H., Samuel G, Zina B. and Inez P. Mr. 
Galloway and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He 
is also a member of the Masonic order. 

JOHN W. GAREY, baker, dealer in staple and fanc} r groceries, and 
proprietor of news stand, Rising Sun, was born in New York State in 
1829, and came in 1835 with his parents, Charles G. and TJnis (Spald- 
ing) Garoy, to Switzerland County, Intl., where the latter resided till 
' their respective deaths, his father October 14. 1S74, in his seventy-ninth 

year, his mother August 21, 1SS1, in her eighty-third year. His parents 
were farmers and in the occupations peculiar to that line of work Mr. 
Garey's earlier years were spent. In 1S46 he went to Cincinnati and 
learned the baker's trade, which he has ever since continued. In 1852 
he went from Cincinnati to Dayton, Ohio, and from that point to Rising 
Sun in 1857, where since which time he has carried on a successful trade 
in his line. He carries a full stock of groceries and provisions, keeps a 
bakery in full blast, acts as special agent for the sale of the Cincinnati 
Enquirer, Commercial Gazette, Times and Post, and does a thriving busi- 
ness. Mr. Garey was married, in 1852, to Elizabeth A. Reynolds, of near 
Hamilton, Ohio, and they have threo children living: Frank O., baker, 
"Wellington, Kas.; Ida M., wife of Rev. W. T. Jolly, Ashland, Ky. ; 
Hugh T., who is still at home. Mr. Garey served two years in the city 
council and four years as city treasurer. Ho is a member of the I. O. 
O. F., F. & A. M., and Baptist Church, of which latter society Mrs. 
Garey is also a member. 

JOHN B. GARN1ER, brewer, City of Lawrenceburgh, was born in 
France in 1817. His early life was passed on a farm. He immigrated 
to this country, and in 1840, located in the city of Lawrenceburgh, where 
he began the brewing business, which he has since continued, although 
at times otherwise engaged. In 1860, in connection with a brother, 
August Gamier, he established his present extensive brewery, a sketch of 
which appears in the history of Lawrenceburgh. In 1848 Mr. Garnier 
was united in marriage to Mary Diffner, a native of Bavaria, and by the 
marriage there were born two children — a son and daughter — named 
John and Anna. Mr. Garnier is one of the capitalists of Lawrenceburgh, 
and one among her leading and influential citizens. He is a Democrat 
in politics, and wields a strong influence in his party in Dearborn 
County. 

JAMES M. GARRIGUS, farmer, Manchester Township, born in 
New Jorsey, November 25, 1815, is a son of James and Elizabeth 
(Godden) Garrigus, natives of New Jersey. The paternal grandfather, 
Jacob Garrigus, was also a native of New Jersey, and a soldier in the 



720 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

war of the Revolution. Ho lived and died in bis native State. The 
maternal grandfather, Joseph Godden, ilso died in Now Jersey, his na- 
tive Statu. The subject of this sketch, the oldest surviving sou of his 
parents, left his homo and native Slate in the fall of 1839, coining to 
"Wheeling, Va., by stage; thenco by Springfield, Ohio, to Cincinnati; 
thence by boat to Lawreneeburgh, Inch, and then on foot to his sister's, 
Mrs. John Jackson, now Mrs. Samuel Conger, in Manchester Township, 
this county. In the spring of 1841 his father and family came, and 
purchased eighty acres of the northwest quarter of Section 24, this 
township, where he remained till his death, four or five years later. His 
wife survived many years, aud died at hoi son James' i-esidenco. They 
had soven children, the eldest, Jacob, died iu his native State; Amza 
settled in Mississippi, where he still resides. Those who came to this 
county, are Mabel G., James M., Joseph, Elmer, and Israel; the latter 
died in Illinois, Joseph now resides at Trenton, 111., and Elmer in Bar- 
ton County, Kas. Mr. James M. Garrigus after his arrival taught school 
several winters in the old pioneer log schoolhouses. Soon after his 
father purchased and settled on his land, Mr. Garrigus bought the 
eighty acre-j adjoining his father's on tho oast. After the death of his 
parents, Mr. Garrigus became owner of the entire quarter section, 
where he has resided to the present time. He has erected new and com- 
modious buildings, and made other improvements constituting a pleas- 
ant home and residence. May 30, 1844, he married Miss Harriet Tuttle, 
born in 182G, a daughter of Lewis and Theodosia (Conger) Tuttle, na- 
tives of New Jersey, but became early settlers of this county, and died, 
leaving Harriet, a young -child, who was raised by her uncle, Samuel 
Conger. By this union they have had six children, five now survive: 
Amza; James E., now an attorney residing at Greeley, Col.; Israel 
Dayton; Fannie M. , wife of Charles Carpenter, residing in Knox County, 
Ind , and Hattie E. The one deceased, Jacob Henry, was in the war of 
the Rebellion, in Company C, Seventh Indiana Calvary. He was under 
Col. Shanks in Missouri, and while out on a foraging expedition it is 
believed was shot by guerrillas, as he never returned and nothing has 
ever been heard of him. Ho was under eighteen years of age when he 
enlisted; was a brave soldier whose young life was sacrificed in the de- 
fense of his country. 

LEWIS D. GARRISON, farmer, Lawreneeburgh Township, was 
born in the same in 1838. His parents were Marvel and Sarah (Groves) 
Garrison, who died while he was a child. At the ago of fourteen he 
found employment with Hazel Suit, with whom he remained for some 
time. He then went to Iowa and while there enlisted in Company C, 
Fourth Iowa Cavalry, and spent about four years in the service of his 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 721 

country. After the close of the war ho returned to this county and, in 
18GG, was married to Mrs. Priscilla (Hayes) Suit, daughter of Joseph 
Hayes, one of the first settlers of the county. He has since resided 
chiefly in this locality, engaged iu farming, in which pursuit he has been 
quite snccessful. He is a member of the F. & A. M., K. T. degree, 
and also of the I. O. O. F. Mr. and Mrs. Garrison have but one child, 
Lewis, born June 17, 1870. By her former husband Mrs. G .rrison had 
eight children — five living: William, Joseph, Nancy, Calvin and Sarah 
J., the latter now wife of Irvin Miller. 

SUMNER C. GASKILL, farmer, Randolph Township, was born in 
New Hampshire in 1825. His parents were David and Mary (Eaton) 
Gaskill, the former a native of Essex County, Vt., the latter of Wooster 
County, Mass. His father grew to manhood in his native State, from 
which, after his marriage, he removed to New Hampshire and in 1835 
immigrated to Ohio county, where he purchased land and remained till 
his death in May, 1855. George Gaskill, brother to David, settled in 
Ohio County as early as 1818 and was a physician of some note, having 
acted as surgeon in the war of 1812. A sister, who married Jonas Men- 
dell, also settled in Ohio County, about 1833. David and Mary (Eaton) 
Gaskill reared a family of six children, only two of whom are now livin": 
Sumner C. and Marietta Boyle, now a resident of Jefferson County, Ind. 
The mother died in 1864 at the advanced age of eighty-seven years. 
Sumner Gaskill was ten years old when he came to Ohio County. He had 
obtained the rudiments of an education in the New England schools, and 
subsequently shared the advantages of a sister and brother who were 
well educated, both becoming teachers. Mr. Gaskill himself subsequent- 
ly took up the profession and taught seventeen terms, twelve of which 
were taught in two districts — six consecutive terms in the district in 
which he lives. During the summer seasons he engaged in agricultural 
pursuits, and in 1850 he purchased fifty acres of land, which he sold 
about four years later to Ohio County, after which he purchased his pres- 
ent home of ninety acres, on which he has since resided. Mr. Gaskill 
was married, in 1S62, to Sarah J. Gregory, of Rising Sun, daughter of 
Joseph Gregory, one of the old residents of this county. They have no 
children. Mr. Gaskill is a member of the Masonic fraternity and one of 
the progressive citizens of his county. 

JAMES D. GATCH, M. D., Lawrenceburgh, son of Lewis and Ma- 
riah (Newton) Gatch, was born March 5, 1831, at Milford, Clermont Co., 
Ohio. His father was born and raised at Baltimore, Md., and his moth- 
er, at Cape May, N. J. They immigrated to the above named place in 
1809. Having settled at so early a date in the West, they did much to 
develop the industry and intelligence of their section. Both were well 



722 HISTORY OF DEAHBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

educated, and more particularly Mrs. Gatch, as she had been educated in 
the schools of Philadelphia, giving her superior advantages over many 
of that, early day. She, as well as her husband, was a person of much 
dignity Active participants in the Mothodist Episcopal Church, their 
home vv'as the home of the pioneer preachers. Rev. Nicholas Gatch 
attended the first conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church 
held in America at Baltimore, in 1775, before the declaration of Inde- 
pendence. And for over 100 continuous years there has been a Gatch 
minister in some one of the families of that name. Dr. Gatch was 
raised upon a farm, received an academic education, after which he en- 
gaged in teaching in the city school of his native place, and made a lino 
reputation as an instructor. In 1S51 he entered the office of Dr. L. A. 
Hendricks, Sr., where he read medicine during his course of studies 
until he graduated at the Miami Medical College in 1854. He had pre- 
viously attended a course of lectures at the Medical Institute of Cincin- 
nati in 1852, and a course of lectures at the Medical College of Ohio in 
1852-53. He was presented with a diploma from the latter in 1858, and 
immediately commenced the practice of his profession in Dearborn County, 
Ind., and met with good success. At the breaking out of the Rebellion 
he offered his services, and was commissioned first assistant surgeon, 
August 19, 1862, to the Sixteenth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, 
Col. T. J. Lucas, commanding. He was actively engaged as medical 
officer in charge of the regiment (the same month) at the disastrous battle 
of Richmond, Ky., where the gallant Sixteenth suffered a loss of 175 in 
killed and wounded. He was assigned to one of the operating boards, 
which honor he had conferred upon him in every battle in which he was 
engaged. He remained at Richmond, Ky. , until October 12, most of the 
time in charge of the Smith Hospital. In November, 1S62, the command 
was ordered to the Department of the Mississippi, and he was engaged in 
the battles of Yazoo River, Arkansas Post, Grand Gulf, and the siege of 
Vicksburg, and by direct orders from Gen. Grant, through Maj. 
Holstein, established a general hospital at the Ion plantation on the 
Mississippi River, near New Carthage, La., whore he received the sick of 
the Thirteenth, Fifteenth and Seventeenth Army Corps, together with the 
wounded at the engagements of Grand Gulf and Port Gibson, in all 
1,010, in twenty- four hours, and all of them comfortably provided for. 
Dr. Gatch is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and has been 
since 1856, and a member of the Masonic order; is a member and ex- 
vice-president ofj the Indiana State Medical Society; member and ex- 
president of the Dearborn County Medical Society; member of the 
American Public Health Association; member of the Tri-State Medical 
Society of Indiana, Illinois and Kentucky; honorary member of the 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 723 

Sanitaiy Council of the Mississippi Valley; member and secretary of tho 
Board of Health of Lawrenceburgh, Ind. Ho lias performed many sur 
gical operations, some of them very difficult. His contributions to 
medicsd science, although not numerous, have been able and were well 
received Ho took a lively and influential interest in tho formation of 
the State Board of Health, and contributed some articles touching upon 
the subject, one on sanitary science, read at Tri-State Medical Society 
meeting at Evansville, Ind, November, 1879, and one upon harmony 
and associated action in connection with State medicine read before the 
State Medical Society in May 1880; theso papers were highly endorsed, 
and it was said did much good in assisting to accomplish tho desired 
result. He has twice married, first in May, 1856, to Annie E. Cordry, 
daughter of Abel Cordry, Cincinnati, Ohio, to whom was born one son, 
Enoch L., an excellent young man, and successfully engaged in farming. 
His second marriage was to Fannie M. Lozior. April 25, 1861, the accom- 
plished daughter of the Hon. George M. Lozier, of Wright's Corner, Dear- 
born County, Ind , to whom one son has been born, George L., a young 
man of sterling qualities, who at this time is married and employed in 
the county treasurer's office. The maternal grandfather of Mrs. Gatch, 
Jacob Blasdel, was one of the indefatigable pioneers of the county, ever 
ready and willing to advance tho moral and intellectual interests of his 
community. He gave the first temperance lecture that was delivered in 
the State of Indiana. Her father, G. M. Lozier, has been all through 
his life one of the active and pushing men in church matters, school or 
anything that would promote the welfare of society. He has held posi- 
tions of prominence aud trust, also has represented his county in the 
State Legislature. The subject of this sketch, Dr. Gatch, has been twice 
elected to the treasurer's office of his county, which he has filled and is 
filling with marked energy and ability; he is also engaged in the practice 
of his profession in which he has a fine reputation, and from his present 
appearance, we should think, has many years of usefulness, of happi- 
ness and prosperity before him. 

ENOCH L. GATCH, farmer and stock dealer, Washington Town- 
ship, was born in Dillsborough, July 1, 1858, and is a son of James D. 
Gatch. Enoch L. was reared by his aunt, Harriet E. (Gatch) Lindsay, 
who has cared for him with a mother's interest, from the time he was 
eleven days old. She was born in Clermont County, Ohio, May IS, 1826. 
Miss Harriet E. Gatch was married September 25, 1849, to Enoch M. 
Lindsay, who was born in Henry County, Ky., May 22, 1811. They lo- 
cated in Washington Township, December 1, 1849, where ho followed 
farming, very successfully. Unto them was born a son, James L., who 
died in infancy. Mrs. Lindsay united with the Methodist Episcopal 



724 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

Church when quite young. After they had moved to this State, she ob- 
tained a church letter boaring date December 3, 1850, which certified 
"that Harriet Lindsay had been an acceptable member of tho Methodist 
Episcopal Church, in Milford Circuit, East Cincinnati, Ohio Annual 
Conference," duly signed. When she presented tho certificate to the 
Aurora Methodist Episcopal Church, in the spring of 1851, she was re- 
fused admission, because she would not say that " she was sorry that her 
husband was not a member of the church." This refusal has kept her 
outside tho church ever since, but has not brokeu her faith in God. As 
for Mr. Lindsay, ho w T as a good man, with an abiding faith in the future 
life, and believed tho best preparation for the unknown to morrow to 
consist in performing to the best of his ability the duties of to-day. 
This philosophy sufficed during health, and did not fail him even when 
passing into the shadows of death, October 15, 1S78. Mr. Lindsay com- 
manded universal respect, as in all the transactions of liEe he was 
actuated and governed by a sense of porsoual honor, and of the rights of 
others. He loved his home better than any spot on earth. Mr. E. L. 
Gatch was married October 6, 1881, to Miss Luella Mason, who was born 
in Hogan Township, November 25, 1859. Her father, Mathew B. Mason, 
was born in Rochester, N. Y., June 10, 1829; her mother, Emily (Spi- 
dell) Mason, in Hogan Township, September 20, 1838. They were mar- 
ried Juno 11, 185G, and raised four children. The mother died Septem- 
ber 28, 1875. 

GEORGE B. GIBSON, dealer in hardware, stoves and farming im- 
plements, Rising Sun, was born in Ohio county in 1831. His father, 
John I. Gibson, was born February 28, 1797, and his mother, Jane 
Beaty, June 13, 1795. His grandfather, James Gibson, was a native of 
Virginia, and his grandmother, Sallie Ireland, was born at sea. His 
father came to this locality with his parents, James and Sallie (Ireland) 
Gibson, in 1814, from Georgetown, Ky., and his mother's people came 
from Pennsylvania in a very early day. John I. and Jane (Beaty) Gib- 
Bon were married December 15, 1815, and were residents of Ohio County 
till their deaths, Mr. Gibson dying in 1852, and Mrs. Gibson in 1850. 
George B., the subject of our notice, was reared on a farm, and followed 
that occupation till thirty-seven years of age. He then abandoned the 
farm and moved to Rising Sun, in order to give his children greater ad- 
vantages of education, and after some time spent in the produce busi- 
ness, in 1872 purchased tho stock of hardware owned by James Reister, 
and embarkod in that business, which he has since continued, greatly 
increasing his stock. He has the only hardware emporium of the town, 
and carries a stock valued at $10,000, besides a large line of farming 
implements, for the sale of which he acts as agent. Mr. Gibson was 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. (-■> 

married, in 18S0, to Elizabeth Stopher, a daughter of William Stopher, an 
old resident of Ohio County, and thoy have sis children: William, Charles, 

Matthias S., Hugh, John and Harry. [.. Mr. Gibsou is a member of the 
I. 0. O. P. aud F. & A. M., and a Democrat, 

. THOMAS H. GIBSON, Miller Township, a member of one of the 
old families of Dearborn County, was born here in 1838. He 
grew to maturity a farmer, remaining with his parents, John and Ann 
(Hargitt) Gibson, till his twenty-sixth year. In 1804 he went to Cin- 
cinnati, where, with his three brothers, George H., John B. and Dennis 
W. Gibson, he engaged in the wholesale hat, trade. Here he conducted 
a successful business until July, 1SS3, when he withdrew from the firm 
and retired. Ho is interested somewhat in Florida orange culture, and 
still retains his farm in this township, but is Dot paying especial atten- 
tion to agricultural pursuits. Mr. Gibson was married, in I860, to Anna 
Ewbank, 'native of this county and daughter of William Ewbank, one of 
the early settlers. Three children are the result of this union: Clara D., 
Thomas B. and George D. The family is identified with the Presby- 
terian Church, of which Mr. Gibson is quite an energetic member. 

HENRY GIEGOLDT, saloonist, Aurora, proprietor of the National 
House, corner Third and Judiciary Streets, is a native of the city and 
born April 1, 1853. He was the recipient of a common school education. 
His father was born in Baden, Germany, April 28, 1817, and his mother 
Margaret (Hammerer) Geigoldt was born in Schwarzenbach, Germany, 
February 18, 1821. The parents immigrated to America in 1832, and 
located in Aurora, where the father followed butchering up to the time 
of his death, April 25, 1876. Henry was raised to the business of his 
father, and followed the same up to 1881, when he engaged in his 
present occupation. He was married, in 1877, to Miss Christena 
Strasinger, a native of Ripley County, this State, who was born May 20, 
1853. To this union have been born five children: William, born Octo- 
ber 29, 1877; Charles, born May 10, 1879; Tilda, born August 25, 1880; 
Joseph, born February 2, 1881 (died April 12, 18S3); Albert, born Feb- 
ruary 2, 1882. Mr. Giegoldt is a member of the I. O. O. F., Druids 
and K. of P., and of the German Lutheran Church. 

DR ROBERT GILLESPIE, see page 174. 

FREDERICK GINTER, dealer in general merchandise and pro- 
prietor of hotel, Dillsborough, is a native i>f Prussia, Germany, born 
near Berlin, October 12, 1828. His parents were Henry G. and Louisa 
(Ladd) Ginter, also natives of Prussia, Germany, where they were born, 
the father in 1800, and the mother in 1797. They were also married in 
Prussia and settled near Berlin, where they resided until the spring of 1833, 
at which time ho and wife and one child immigrated to the United States, 



720 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

leaving our subject and his older brother behind with their grandparents 
and uncle. Mr. Gi'nter landed at Baltimore, Md. , and shortly after 
located near the city, where they remained about one year and engaged 
in fishing, from thence he came to Cincinnati, Ohio, and from there, 
shortly afterward, settled at Cleves, where ho carried on merchant tailor- 
ing and remained there for a number of years. In 1837 Mr. G. sent for 
the balance of his family, two sons, who emigrated in that year in company 
with their grandfather and uncle, landing at Baltimore, and from thence 
came to Pittsburgh over the mountains by wagon, and thence, to Cincinnati, 
Ohio, and on to Cleves, where the parents resided. In 1841 they moved to 
Dearborn County, Ind., locating in Cesar Creek Township, where the 
father purchased land and remained until 1840, then removed to Cleves, 
and died in that village. Their children were Henry, Frederick, Will- 
iam, Lewis, John and Charles. Frederick remained with his parents 
until seventeen years of ago, when he wont to Cincinnati, Ohio, and be- 
gan the shoe-making trade, which ho completed and followed there 
until 1S54, in which year he came to Dillsborough, and worked for Will- 
iam Lemon about six months, and in 1855, ho and his brother, William, 
purchased the shop of Lemon, and they carried on the business together 
until 1850, when our subject purchased his brother's interest and ran 
the business himself. Mr. G. was married, November 20, 1857, to 
Martha E. Morris, widow of Daniel Morris, and daughter of William 
Farsith. She was born January 1, 1830. They had born to them two 
daughters, Iva and Laura. The wife died April 22, 1803, and he was 
again married, September 19, 1800, to Jane E. Rowland, who was born 
July 22, 1840. They had eight children: Grace, Amy, Susan R. , 
Frank R. (deceased), Fred L., Maud, Glenn E. (deceased) and Blanche. 
In 1804 Mr. Gintor, in partnership with his brother, purchased the store 
, of G. V. Denton and soon thereafter a stock of goods from Samuel Wy- 
mond, of Dillsborough, consolidated the two and carried on a large mer- 
cantile business together until 1800, when our subject purchased his 
brother's interest and has since carried on the business himself. He is 
one of the most enterprising and wide-awake business men of the place- 
and has done much toward improving the town. He is a man of good 
general information. In politics he is a Democrat and is highly esteemed 
by all who know him. He is a member of the order of Odd Fellows. 

JOSHUA GIVAN, of Manchester Township, was born in Maryland 
July 2, 1788, and departed this life January 31, 1874. He was married, 
in 1811, to Miss Henrietta Davis, who died June 14, 1S76, aged nearly 
eighty-one years. Mr. Givan moved to this county in the spring of 
1825, and purchased a farm in Manchester Township, on which he lived 
until his death, retiring some years prior from active life, owing to his 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKF.TCHES. 727 

advanced age, and resided with a son, George. His recollection went 
back vividly fo the early history of the country He recollected the fierce 
political contest that occurred during the administration of Jefferson, 
and the excitement it occasioned at the time, as well as the incidents of 
the waf of 1812. He cast his first vote for President for James Madi- 
son, the second time he was elected President and the last vote he gave 
for a candidate for President was Horace Greeley, in 1872. When he 
came to this county he interested himself in educational matters, and the 
first schoolhouee that was erected in the neighborhood in which he set- 
tled was built on his land, and mainly through his influence and exer- 
tions. Having but a limited education himself, ho was desirous that his 
own children, as well as those of his neighbors, should have a better 
advantage than ho had in his early life, if possible. He was ever a friend 
to the unfortunate, and ready to assist those who needed assistance. Mr. 
Givan was of a domestic turn of mind. He rarely ever left home unless 
business called him away, and then he staid no longer than business 
required. He was a member of the Baptist Church, and when there was 
no church building in the neighborhood in which to hold meeting, he 
often had preaching at his house, and he would go around and invite his 
neighbors to come with their families, saying that if they did not agree 
with all the preacher might say it would do them no harm to attend wor- 
ship. His object and aim in life was to benefit bis fellow-men, to do 
good in the community in which he lived. Honest in all his dealings, 
charitable in his giving, and religious in his every day life, he died 
in a ripe old age, honored and respected by all who knew him. To the 
marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Givan six children, who grew to the age of 
maturity, were born, namely: George, William L. H, Martha, Noah 
S., Robert and Mary A. The parents were active members of the Hogan 
Hill Baptist Church. They were pillars in the church, and among its 
main supporters. Both had been identified with that denomination for 
sixty years. 

GEORGE GIVAN, farmer, Manchester Township, born in Maryland, 
December 1 1816, is a son of Joshua and'Henrietta Givan, mention of 
whom is made in the preceding sketch. Mr. George Givan was in his 
ninth year when his father settled in Dearborn County. Here he grew to 
manhood, fully acquainted with pioneer life; was married February 16, 
1840, to Sabrina Jane Hall, daughter of Daniel and Sabrina (Knocks) 
Hall, natives of Maine, who settled in what was then Dearborn County, 
now Ohio County, Ind., about 1818, and spent their entire lives in Ohio 
and Dearborn Counties. She died on the place now owned by Lewis 
Drake, April 8, 1836, aged forty-two years. He died at Mr. George 
Givan's June 2, 1853, aged sixty-five years. They had nine children, 



728 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

six now living, viz. : Hozokiah, Sabrina, Daty M., Laura, 'Lydia and 
Daniel K. By this union Mr. Givan has bad' nine children, six 
now survive: Noah M. , Melissa H., Sanford E. Joshua J. Martha 
A. and Sampson Douglass. Of those deceased two died young, and the 
other, John W., died in the army in the service of his country in the 
war of the Rebellion, near Brownsville, Tex., January 19, 1804, from 
disease contracted in the service, and his remains were buried there. 
Mr. Givan has now resided here sixty years upon the purchase his father 
made, of which he now owns a half section of land, being the south half 
of Section 26, this township. He has adhered to the old maxim, 
"a rolling stone' gathers no moss," and in his case it has proved 
well, as he now has a fine body of land, a good home and an ample com- 
petency. He served as a justice of the peace eight years, from 1S55 to 
1863. He and wife are active members of the Hogan Hill Baptist 
Church; have been identified with that denomination forty-two years. 

WILLIAM L. H. GIVAN, farmer, Manchester Township, was born in 
Maryland April 22, 1820, a son of Joshua and Henrietta (Davis) Givan, 
whose sketch has been given above. William L. H. grew to manhood under 
the austere influences of a pioneer life, a true helper of his father in his 
arduous labors, obtaining but a limited education in the rude schoolhouses 
of that day. He was united in marriage October 19, 1843, with Jane M. 
Ferris, daughter of Sylvester and Rhoda (King) Ferris, natives of New 
York, who settled in this county in 1838. By this union they had seven 
children, six now survive: Cornelia, Laura, Heman, George, Rhoda 
and Connolly. Mr. Givan has continued a resident upon land of his 
father's first purchase, where he has erected good buildings and improve- 
ments, constituting a pleasant home. He, like his father before him, is 
an active member and supporter of the Baptist Church, having been a 
member since 1842. He lost his wife by death July 20, 1862. She was 
a devoted Christian, and an earnest worker in the church, having united 
with it prior to her marriage. 

NOAH S. GIVAN, Lawrenceburgh, ex-judge of the Seventh Judicial 
District, was born in Dearborn County, September 30, 1833. He is 
a son of Joshua and Henrietta (Davis) Givan. The early years of our 
subject were passed on a farm, sharing the advantages of the common 
schools. He entered Franklin College at the age of twenty years, and 
spent three years in study at that institution. He then took a two years' 
course in the State University at Bloomington, Ind., graduating in 1858. 
He studied law with Judge Buskirk, attended the law school at Bloom- 
ington, Ind., and in 1S59 was admitted to the bar, beginning the practice 
of his profession at Washington, Daviess Co., Ind. Five years later he 
removed to Lawrenceburgh, where he has ever since resided and con- 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. (ZV 

ducted hie practice. He served two years as prosecuting attorney, and 
in 18G2 was elected to the State Legislature on the Democratic ticket. 
Resuming bis practice he continued the same till 1S72, wbon ho was 
again chosen representative, serving two years. In 1874 his abilities 
and faithfulness were further complimonted by bis being elected State 
Senator from Dearborn and Franklin Counties for a term of four years. 
He left the Senate only to be elected to the position of judge of the 
Seventh Judicial District, in which position be discharged his duties 
with marked ability and satisfaction to the people. Inl87G Mr. Givan 
was nominated for elector on the Tilden national ticket. Ho has served 
as councilman and school trustee, and for several years officiated as 
county examiner. Judge Givan is a man of integrity and honor, and 
bis long career in public life is sufficient evidence of his merits and pop- 
ularity as a citizen. He was married, October 17, 1866, to Mary Mar- 
tin, and they have four children: Martin J., Retta A., Maggie J. and 
Frank M. 

GEORGE M. GIYAN, farmer, Sparta Township, was born in that 
township June 19, 1S27. His parents, Gilbert T. and Sarah C. (Mer 
rill) Givan, were natives of Maryland and Virginia, respectively. The 
former was a son of Robert and Catherine (Duncan) Givan, who were 
both natives of Maryland, and were born, the former March 12, 1760> 
and the latter September 3, 1763. They were married in Maryland, 
January 6, 1781, and had born to them six children, namely: Hetty, 
Sallie, Margaret, Gilbert T., Elizabeth and Matilda. The mother died 
July 13, 1795, and the father was again married, October 28, 1795, to 
Rosey Rnrton, by whom he had one child— Nancy. This wife died May 
5, 1797, and he subsequently married Ruth Robinson. She died April 
12, 1817, and be again married, January ^28, 1818, Priscilla Cotting- 
bam, and in 1828 started for Indiana, and died April 26, 1828, .while en 
route, about ninety miles from Baltimore, Md. His wife came on 
through to Indiana, in company with John Burbage and family, and 
died in Dearborn County January 8, 1S29. Gilbert T., the father of 
our subject, was born in Worcester County, Md., July 31, 1789, and was 
married in Accomac County, Va., December 2, 1813, to Sarah C. Mer- 
rill, who was born in Accomac County, Va., September 6, 1795, and 
was a daughter of George and Charlotte Men-ill. After their marriage 
they settled in Worcester County, Md., where they remained until April, 
1818, at which time they immigrated to Dearborn County, Ind. , where he 
entered eighty acres of land in Sparta Township, which he improved 
and resided on until his death, February 8, 1862. His wife died July 
28, 1861. They were the parents of twelve children, viz.: Margaret 
M. , Albert G., John W., Robert' H. Elizabeth A., Maria J., George M. 



730 HISTORV OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

Sarah R., Adoniran J., IVter M., Alfred B. and Sanford G. George M. 
was married in Dearborn Count}-, January 6, 1848, to Ann E. , daughter 
of Nathaniel T. and Harriot L, (Sage) Jaquith. She was born in Man- 
chester Township February !25, 1830. In 1850 ho moved on his father's 
old homestead, of which be purchased sixty-five acres in 1863, and has 
since resided there. He and his wife are members of the Baptist 
Church. Their children are John F., Mary B., Sanford E. , Harriot J., 
Sarah E., Eva A., Charles ML, Ella J., Harry R., Irving P.. Cora A. 

CHARLES E. GLASS, railroad police, Aurora, is a native of Ohio, 
born in Cincinnati, February 2, 1850, and received a common school 
education. His father, Michael Glass, was born in Pennsylvania near 
Mifflin December 28, 1816, and his mother, Mary L. (Kissinger; Glass, 
in Cincinnati, Ohio, September 17, 1820. Mr. Glass moved to Aurora 
in 1857, and has worked at coopering all his life. Charles learned the 
cooper trade and worked at it eighteen years. He was married, Novem- 
ber 8, 1870, to Miss Florence It. North, who was born in Pennsylvania in 
1852. Throe children have been born to this marriage: Charles L.. 
Oliver and Flora M. The wife died January 5, 1880, and he married. 
May 16, 1880, Miss Laura Lukins, who was born in Rockport, N. Y., 
December 12, 1854. Two children have been born to the last marriage: 
Anna and Harry. Mr. Glass was appointed by the mayor and council 
in 1882 to the police force, and served two years. In June, 1884, he 
received his present position by appointment, and has met with good 
success during his entire term of office. He is a member of Chosen 
Friends Lodge No. 13, I. O. O. P., and Bethlehem Encampment No. 3, 
I. O. O. F. 

ALEXANDER E. GLENN, see page 184. 

JACOB GOENAWEIN, dealer in and manufacturer of boots and 
shoes, Aurora, is a native of Germany, born in the kingdom of Wurtem- 
berg January 19, 1843, where he received a common school education. 
His parents, Goutlib and Rosena (Dane), were born in the same province, 
the former in 1819, and the latter in 1822. The father was a contractor 
and builder, and died in 1862. Jacob came to America in October, 
1857, and located in Brooklyn, N. Y., where he learned the shoe-maker 
trade. He enlisted April 16, 1861, in Company E, United States Heavy 
Artillery, with Pattison, under Gen. McClellan. Subsequently the or- 
ganization was fitted out as flying artillery, and he served as such until 
April 16, 1864, whon he was discharged. He then worked in the Gov 
ernment employ at the Washington Arsenal for fourteen months, covering 
saddle trees. In the fall of 1865 he removed to Cincinnati, Ohio, where 
he worked at shoe-*naking. Thence he went to Paducah, Ky., St. Louis, 
Mo., Booneville and St. Joseph, Mo., and back to Cincinnati, Ohio, 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 731 

working journeyman work all the time. In the fall of 1866 he located 
in Cochran, Ind., and followed his trade up to July, 1S81, when he be- 
gan business in Aurora and settled permanently. Mr. Goenawoin was 
married, April 14, 1 807, to Miss Louisa B. Spicer, who was born in Car- 
rollton, Ohio, November 25, 1847. Seven children have been born to 
the marriage, namely: Rosa, Arthur, May, Louisa, Ruth, Jacob and 
Carl C. Mr. Goenawein is a member of Aurora Lodge No. 51, F. & 
A. M., of Chosen Friends Lodge No. 13, I. 0. O. F., and of the G. A. R. 
Mr. Goonawein is also extensively engaged in the bee business, producing 
several thousand pounds of honey annually. 

WILLIAM GOLDSON, of Rising Sun, died in that village October 
3, 1884, in the ninety -fourth year of his age. He was born in the State 
of New York, and from there removed to Philadelphia, thence to Gin 
cinnati and to Rising Sun upward of a half-century ago. He was a 
patriot of the war of 1812. On coming to the village of Rising Sun, • 
he, being an engineer, served as such in the cotton and woolen factories, 
distillery and flour-mills of the place and also served as engineer on the 
Rising Sun steam-boats. 

GEORGE A. GOLDING, farmer, Sparta Township, was born in 
Dearborn County, Ind., March 10, 1833. His parents, George and Jane 
(Jackson) Golding, were natives of Kentucky, and of Irish and German 
extraction. The former was born December 28, 1791,. and the latter 
March 5, 1792. They were married in Kentucky, and in 1814 removed 
to Dearborn County, Ind., settling on Hogan Creek, in Hogan Township, 
where he entered land and there resided until their deaths. He died 
February 14, 1848, and his wife March 4, 1857. They were the parents 
of eight children, viz.: Nancy, William, Sarah, Jackson S., John, 
George A., Sarah J. and Rachel. George A. was married in Dearborn 
County May 13, 1855, to Barbara A. Howard, who was born in Dearborn 
County August 5, 1837, and was a daughter of Benjamin and Sarah 
(Thornton) Howard, naures of Virginia and Kentucky, respectively. 
The former was born in 1801 and the latter in 1802. They immigrated 
to Dearborn County in a very early day, where they were married and 
resided until their deaths, which occurred, the mother in 1871 and the 
father in 1876. They were the parents of seven children: George. 
Elizabeth, James, Samuel L., Barbara A., Benjamin and John. After 
the marriage of George A. he settled on his father's old homestead in 
Hogan Township, where he resided a number of years. In 1861 he en- 
tered the war of the Rebellion, enlisting in August, 1861, in Company 
D, Third Regiment Indiana Cavalry as a private. He was subsequently 
made corporal. He was taken prisoner near Fredericksburg, Va., 
while on a scout, and was confined in Libby and Belle Island prisons for 



732 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

three mouths. Ho was honorably discharged at, Indianapolis, Ind., Sep- 
tember, 1864, and from thence returned home, and in December, 180(5, 
purchased and settled on his present farm in Section 29, where he has 
since resided. He owns 102 acres of lino land, which is well improved 
and under a high state of cultivation, lie is an excellent man and is 
highly esteemed by all win. know him. Ho and wife are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. He is also a member of tho G. A. R. 

It. H. GOULD, proprietor of tho Gould Livery and Feed Stable, Law- 
rencoburgh, was born in Ohio County, Int., in 1841. His father, Ben- 
jamin Gould, is a resilient of Rising Sun. His grandfather was one of 
the early settlors of Manchester Township, and used to walk from that 
locality to Cincinnati, where he was employed in ship- building. Mr. 
Gould grew to maturity in his native county, from which in 1S02 he en- 
listed in Company E, Sixty eighth Indiana under Capt. Alexander Beck- 
man, and served three years in the United States service, receiving an 
honorable discharge in 1805. He participated in some of the principal 
battles of the war, and at Chickamauga was wounded in the thigh. He 
engaged for some time in the livery business at Rising Sun, locating in 
Lawrenceburgh in 1882, purchasing the talker stock of the stable 
which he is now conducting. Mr. Gould was married, in September, 
1872, to Mahala Stevens, daughter of Charles Stevens, one of the early 
settlers of Switzerland County, and thoy have two children: Charles and 
Ella. Mr. Gould is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and active in 
his attention to his business. 

LOUIS GRAF, gunsmith and dealer in guns, ammunition, 
cutlery, hardware, sewing machine supplies, etc., Aurora. He was 
born in Baden, Germany, January 10, 1800, j^where he received a 
good education. His parents, Charles and Magdalena (Palmer) Graf, 
were natives of Baden; the father was born December 10, 1810, and the 
mother, in September, 1833. Louis came to America, May 19, 1880, 
and located in New York, whore he worked in a machine shop. In 1881, 
he came to Cincinnati, Ohio, and worked in different places up to July 
1, 1883, when he located in Aurora, and opened his present business. He 
was married, April 7, 188b to Miss Barbara Robinstine, who was born 
in Aurora May 7, 1854. Three children have been born to them, namely: 
Enoch and Barbara, and an infant (deceased). His wife died November 
19, 18S4. Husband and wife belonged t< I be German Baptist Church. 
She died in th9 faith of a blessed immortality. 

JOHN GRAY, of Lawrenceburgh, died in that city in 1854; his 
fathor's family, immigrated to Dearborn County near the close of the last 
century, but after a short residence he removed to Kentucky with his father, 
where he resided several years and returned to Lawrenceburgh, in 1804, 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 733 

to receive the benefit of a school then taught in the neighborhood At 
an early period Mr. Gray engaged in mercantile pursuits with John H. 
aDd Bonjaruin Piatt, and after they had been driven by fire from their 
business at Lawrenceburgh, he accompanied Mr. John H. Piatt to Cin- 
cinnati, ' and there engaged with him in business. Subsequently he 
returned to Lawrenceburgh. where he continued in mercantile business 
for many years. Honesty was a marked trait of his life. He at one time 
represented Dearborn County in the Legislature. 

MILTON GREGG, see page 180. 

ELIJAH N. GREEK, farmer and dairyman, Washington Township, 
native of Pennsylvania, was born in Alleghany County, September 30, 
1822, where he received a liberal education. His parents, George and 
Susannah (Newlin) Greer, were born in the same county, father in 1784 
and mother in 1794; they moved to this county in 1841. His father was 
color bearer in a cavalry battalion, under den. Harrison, in the war of 
1S12, and was wounded in the arm at Mississinnowa. He died in 1876, 
mother died in 1870. Mr. Elijah N. Greer was married September 
7, 1848, to Miss Elizabeth Wheeler, a native of Dearborn County, Ind., 
and three children born to them were Levi, William and John. Mrs. 
Greer died in March, 1861. Mr. Greer engaged in the dairy business, 
and began the delivery of milk in Aurora September 7, 18S4. He has 
a herd of seventeen fine cows, and proposes to increase the number as 
rapidly as the demand will justify. Mr. Greer has been a great friend 
to education, has given his children its full benefit, regardless of 
expense, and is proud of the investment 

EDWARD H. GREEN, attorney at law, Aurora, was born at Aurora 
March 1, 1837, and is the youngest son of Stephen and Martha J. Green. 
His father was a native of Kentucky and removed to Indiana at an early 
period; he was for many years treasurer of the city of Aurora, and held 
various official positions for a great part of his life; having never but 
once been defeated when a candidate. Edward H. Green took the 
scientific course of study at Franklin College, Indiana, under Presi- 
dent Silas Bailey. He then read law in the office of Judges Holman and 
Haynes, and commenced the practice in Aurora. In 1861 he enlisted for 
one year in Company I, Sixteenth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and was 
appointed 'orderly sergeant. He was with his regiment in Virginia and 
Maryland, and for a time was located at Harper's Ferry. His regiment 
was mustered out in June, 1862, and Mr. Green immediately assisted in 
raising a company of cavalry which was tendered to Gov. Morton, 
but was refused unless it should be used in tilling out depleted companies 
of regiments already in the field. The company was then accepted by 
the governor of Kentucky, armed with Spencer carbines and assigned to 



734 HISTORY OF DEAItBOKN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

the Eleventh Kentucky Cavalry as Company E. Sergt. Green was 
commissioned second lieutenant of cavalry volunteers, and afterward 
captain. He was with Burnsido at the siege of Kuoxville, with Sherman 
at Atlanta and its approaches, and was engaged at Resaca.Dalton, Dallas, 
Big Savannah and Kenesaw Mountain. His company, for a time, formed 
the escort of Maj.-Gon. J. F. Reynolds. After the battle of Stone River, 
he pursued Morgan through Kentucky, Indiana and Ohio, and assisted in 
his capture. Upon the close of the war ho resumed the practice of law. 
In 1866-07 he served as representative in the Legislature. In 1877 he 
was elected mayor of his native city, Aurora, aDd re-elected in 1879. He 
has engaged in the practice of the law most of the time since the close of 
the war. Capt. Green is a public speaker of acknowledged ability, clear, 
logical and forcible in Lis delivery. In 1862 he was married to Miss 
Lizzie Shirley, of Jeffersonville, Ind. 

JOSIAH C. GREEN, dealer in groceries and provisions, on the cor- 
ner of the Washington & Aurora Turnpike, Cochran was born in 
Aurora, March 2, 1851, whore he received a common school edu- 
cation. From 1868 to 1881 he worked at carpentering in the Cochran Car 
Shops. In October, 1881, he opened up his (present business and has 
succeeded in building up'a satisfactory trade. He was married, June 26, 
1873, to Miss Sarah E. Rhein, who was born in Wilmington, Del., Octo- 
ber 24, 1854. He and his estimable wife belong to the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church. He is a member of Aurora Lodge No. 51, F. & A. M., 
Aurora Chapter No. 13, and Aurora Commandory No. 17. 

GEORGE S. GREEN, engineer at the Ohio & Mississippi Car 
Shops, Cochran, was born in Aurora, February 13, 1854, of parents 
William and Elizabeth (Gullett) Green, born, the former on South Hogan 
Creek, Dearborn County, August 12, 1817, and the latter in Hamilton 
County, Ohio, November 12, 1823. William Green was a stone mason 
by trade. For fourteen years he served as coroner of the county. He 
was a Mason and a Knight Templar and in 1847 filled the office of W. 
M. His death occurred October 15, 1871. Both William and wife were 
identified with the Methodist Episcopal Church, the latter still survives. 
Our subject learned the painting trade, serving three years, and in 1873 
began work, as a laborer, at the rolling-mill in Aurora. In 1876 he be- 
gan as engineer at the same mill, in which capacity he served for over 
four years, when he began his present relation with the car shops. On 
the 19th of April, 1876, he was married to Miss Agnes McConnell, a 
daughter of AVilliam R. McConnell. Her birth occurred October 23, 
1854. Three children have been born to the marriage, viz. : William 
F., Carrie and Mary. The parents are members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church. Mr. Green is now serving by appointment as school 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 735 

trustee. For the year 18S3 he was treasurer of the village of Cochran. 
He is a member of Lodge No. 51, F. & A. M., Aurora Chapter No. 13 
and Aurora Commandery No. 17. He is a temperate and industrious man. 
FIELDING W. GRIMSLEY, farmer, Sparta Township, was born in 
Jackson'CountyJnd., April 7,1835. His parents were the old and highly es- 
teemed pioneers, James and Eunice (Heaton) Grinisley.natives of Kentucky 
and New York, respectively. The former was a son of Silas Grimsley, a 
native of Culpepper County, Ya. , where ho was born in the year 1792. 
His father, James Grimsley, was also a native of Virginia, and from 
thence, in a very early day immigrated to Boone County, Ky., where he 
resided until his death. He was shot and killed by the Indians at 
Petersburg, Ky. He was the father of five children, viz.: Feilding, 
Nelson, Elizabeth, Polly and Silas, the latter being the grandfather of 
our subject He immigrated with his parents to Boone County, Ky., and 
was there married, in about the year 1812, to Jane Moore, a native of 
Ireland, where she was born in 1796. In about the year 1816 Mr. 
Grimsley and family immigrated from Kentucky to Ripley County, Ind., 
where he resided until his death. They were the parents of seven 
children, viz. : Elizabeth, Joseph, Sarah, "Winlock, Roxy A., Nancy and 
James. The latter, the eldest member of the family, was born in 
Boone County, Ky., June 10, 1814, and came with his parents to Ripley 
County, Ind., when about two years of age. He was united in marriage 
in Ripley County, in about 1834, to the above Eunice Heaton, a daugh- 
ter of Titus and Phebe (Blaxley) Heaton. She was born in Green 
County, N. Y., June 20, 1818, and came with her parents to Dearborn 
County, Ind., when about three years of age. After Mr. Grimsley's 
marriage he first settled in Ripley County, where he resided about one 
year when he moved to Jackson County, Ind., and, in 1837, removed to 
Ripley County. The following year he moved to Boone County, Ky., 
and in 1840 back to Ripley County, and in 1844 to Dearborn County, 
where he purchased land and resided until 1853, when he wont to Her- 
mann, Mo., for the purpose of purchasing land, and there died December 
10, of that year, his wife still survives, and ; resides on the old home- 
stead in Dearborn County, They were the parents of ten children, viz. : 
Nelson R., Joseph, James, Cynthia A., Mary E., Susan J., John M. , 
Edward, Eben and Fielding Yv\, the latter was the eldest of the chil- 
dren. He was educated at Moore's Hill College, and for many years 
turned his attention to teaching. Ho was united in marriage in Boone 
County, Ky., October 13, 1861, to Amelia E., daughter of Alfred J. N. 
and Mary A. (Harrison) Piatt. She was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, March 
27, 1843. In 1864 Mr. Grimsley moved to Dearborn County, Ind., and 
settled on his present farm, which he had purchased the year previous. 



736 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

In 1804 he entered the United States sorvico, enlisting, October 4, in the 
Twenty-second Regiment Indiana Volunteers, and served until May 
18, 1805. He had born to him four children, viz. : Annie L. (deceased), 
William G., Flora B. and Fielding W. Mr. Griinsley is identified with 
the order of Odd Fellows and is a respected citizen. 

JOSEPH GROFF, Lawrenceburgh, was born in Now Jersey in 1813. 
In 1820 his parents moved West and located in Elizabethtown, Ohio, 
where he resided with them till 1834, in which year his father died, his 
mother having passed away about 1820. In early years Mr. Groff at- 
tended the schools of the village above mentioned, and in the same vil- 
lage began the hatting business which he conducted there till 1834. He 
then removed to Lawrenceburgh, where he continued the hatter's trade 
till 1847, manufacturing all kinds of hatB — wool, silk and fur. Ho had 
begun boating on the Ohio prior to that time, and did quite a successful 
business in the produce trade. He was also engaged in pork [lacking 
for a time, shipping to New York. About 1800 Mr. Groff having given 
up flat boating and packing, purchased 016 acres of good land near An- 
derson, Madison Co., Ind., and has since been devoting his attention 
chiefly to agricultural pursuits. He has always been alive to his busi- 
ness interests; was one of the first stockholders of the I. & C. R. R., 
and has always been foremost in the enterprises of the city of whose 
council he was formerly a member. Mr. Groff was married, in 1834, to 
Delilah Nowlin, a representative of one of the oldest and most esteemed 
families of this county. Eight children were born to them, four of 
whom are still living, viz.: Mary, Cordelia, William and George. Mr. 
and Mrs. Groff may be regarded as pioneers. They are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church and highly respected as citizens in their 
community. 

OTHO W. GRUBBS, Miller Township, is a native of Dearborn 
County, born in 1834, and a descendant of one of the early settlers 
hera His parents were Richard and Susan (White) Grubbs, the former 
deceased, but the latter still living near Bright, this county. Mr. 
Grubbs, whose name heads this sketch, grew to maturity on a farm, 
and having but a limited advantage of schools. In 1855 he married 
Margaret McCracken, a native of this county and daughter of Robert 
and Lucy (Carberry) McCracken, also early settlers in this county — es- 
pecially her mother's people. After his marriage Mr. Grubbs spent 
about five years in assisting his'fatber in paying for a farm of which he 
subsequently received sixty acres as his share, and this tract he has since 
resided upon and cultivated, meeting with such a degree of success as to 
enable him to add forty- two acres more to his original tract. Except 
about three years occupied in operating a portable saw-mill, Mr. Grubbs 



BIOOHANIICAL SKETCHES. 737 

has always given his attention to farming. He is a member of the 
I. O. O. P., a man of liberality and enterprise, and self-made in the 
truest. sense. Assisted by an excellent wife, they have worked their way 
from the humblest sort of a log cabin to a well appointed home supplied 
with all the necessaries of life. Their ten children who are all living 
are Mary E., wife of Samuel Hunkhouser; Susan, wife of William Cor- 
san; Owen W. ; Anna W., wife of George W. Truitt; Alice, Mattie, 
Joseph P., Cortes, Carrie and Iowa. 

DAVID GUARD, Lawrencebnrgh Township, was born in Dearborn 
County June 20, 1820. He was a son of Ezra and Polly Guard, the 
former bora in 1786, the latter in 1791, and who were among the first 
settlers of the county. He grew up on the farm and continued in agri- 
cultural pursuits during his life. He married, in 1S4S, Miss Nancy 
Miller, daughter of Mahlon B. and grand -daughter of Thomas Miller, 
the pioneer settler of this locality, and after his marriage continued his 
farming business on land inherited from his father. They reared four 
children who are still living: Simeon, Joseph, Sherman and Isadora, the 
latter now the wife of "Warren Bennett. Mr. Guard died in March, 1S67, 
leaving behind him many friends who will long cherish his memory. 
Mrs. Guard subsequently married Louis Hayes, born in the county in 
1837, and son of Van Hayes, who died in 1848. He resided about four 
years at " Georgetown," where he took up his abode with Abiah Hayes, 
with whom he remained till twenty-five years of age. In 1862 he enlisted 
in Company H, One Hundred and Twenty- third Indiana Volunteer 
Infantry, and served in the war aboufl three years, participating in some 
of the most important battles. Receiving an honorable discharge he 
returned home and since his marriage has been engaged in farming. 

DANIEL M. GUARD, Lawrenceburgh, sheriff of Dearborn County, 
and native of the same, was born in 1840. He is a son of Timothy and 
Rebecca (Hayes) Guard, the former a native of Dearborn County, the 
latter of Hamilton County, Ohio. His father was a son of Ezra Guard, 
and his mother a daughter of Enoch Hayes, both of old and distinguished 
families of the county. Our subject spent his early years on a farm, 
receiving a common school education with one "quarter " at College Hill. 
In 1859 he was married to Ruth M. Miller, a daughter of Mahlon B. 
Miller, and they reared one child, Eliza E., now wife of Jacob H. Miller. 
Mrs. Guard died in 1862, and in 1863 Mr. Guard married Eliza H. Mil- 
ler, daughter of Enoch H. Miller, one of the old residents of the county. 
Seven children have been born to them: Sallie, Hiram, Anthony and 
Enoch, and three others deceased. Mr. Guard has been engaged chiefly 
in agricultural pursuits. He served about five years as township assessor, 
and in the fall of 18S4 was elected sheriff of Dearborn County, in which 



738 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

capacity he is still officiating. He is a strong Democrat and lias always 
taken an active part in local politics. 

CHARLES GULLETT, farmer, Washington Township, was born in 
Delaware, July 28, 1810. where he received a fair education. His par- 
ents, Robert and Sarah (Morrison) Gullett, were natives of Delaware, 
where his mother died. His father came to this State in 1828. His sec- 
ond wife was Rebecca Gullett, with whom he lived until his death March 
28, 1843. His second wife died May 2, 1870, in her eighty-fifth year. 
Mr. Charles Gullett was married, February 11, 1830, to Miss Anna Smith, 
a native of the township, born March 0, 1818. To them were born five 
children: Mary E., born November 29, 1836; Sarah E., born April 11, 
1842; Rebecca, born June 12, 1845; Minnie, born January 29, 1S48; 
Robert, born June 12, 1850. Mr. Gullett has been a hard working 
farmer all his life, and in his old age is enjoying good health. He and 
his excellent wife belong to the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Gul- 
lett's father was in the war of 1812, but was discharged in a short, time. 
The old gentleman was a farmer all through life, and a consistent mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

A. R. GULLETT, farmer, Clay Township, was born in Hamilton 
County, Ohio, August 14, 1819. His parents were Robert and Rebecca 
(Riggs) Gullett, natives of Delaware, where they were married, and in 
an early day immigrated to Hamilton County, Ohio, settling on Mill 
Creek, which is now within the limits of Cincinnati. In 1827 they 
moved to Dearborn County, Ind., where they resided until their deaths. 
They were the parents of eight children, viz.: Mary, Charles, Sarah, 
Anna, Abraham R., Ruth, Elizabeth and Robert. A. R. came with his 
parents to this county in 1827, where he was married, March 11, 1846, 
to Miss Susan Columbia, who was born in this county, June 14, 1826, 
and is a daughter of John and Sarah Columbia. After Mr. Gullett's 
marriage he settled on the same farm where he now lives and has resided 
principally since. His wife died July 30, 1878. To their marriage were 
born seven children, viz.: George R., John C, William L., Charles W., 
Thomas P., Anna E. and Sarah R. Mr. Gullett is a member of the 
Methdist Episcopal Church. 

JOHN GUTZWILLER, farmer, Kelso Township, is one of sis 
children born to John and Anna Gutzwiller, who were natives of Switz- 
erland. Our subject is also a native of Switzerland, where he was born, 
June 21, 1816, and from thence, in 1S32, immigrated to DearbornTCounty, 
Ind., settling in Kelso Township, where he has since resided. He was 
married in this township, June 10, 1S45, to Helena Winter, and had by 
her eight children: Jonn, Jacob (deceased), Joseph, Martin, Rosie, 
Christena (deceased), Mary E. (deceased), and Caroline (deceased). His 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 739 

wife died June 29, 185S. He was again married, June 4, 1801, to Mrs. 
Mary Frohliger, by whom he had one child, Mar)' L. Mr. Gutzwiller is 
a good citizen and has a respected family. They are all members of the 
Catholic Church, and are highly esteemed by all who know them. 

JOSHUA HAINES, of Rising Sun, was born in the State of New 
Hampshire, December 30, 1785, and there resided until twenty years of 
age, when lie removed to Salem, Mass. , and there he resided seven years, 
and, in 1816, settled in Rising Suu. In 1821 he was united in mar- 
riage to Louisa Smith, who survived him. During his residence in Ris- 
ing Sun up to about 1851, "ho was one of the leading and most substan- 
tial merchants of that place. As a business man he was of uncompromis- 
ing integrity; he was foremost among the citizens of Rising Sun in efforts 
to promote the public interest, and particularly so in the advancement of 
education and correct moral doportment." 

DR. MATHIAS HAINES, see page 170. 

ABRAHAM B. HAINES, M. D., physician and surgeon, Aurora, is 
a native of Indiana, born in Rising Sun, November 29, 1S23. His 
father was Mathias Haines, a skillful physician, who in 181G located at 
Rising Sun, a sketch of whom appears in the medical chapter of this 
work. The wife of Mathias Haines was Elizabeth (Brown) Haines, a 
native of New York City. Our subject received the benefit of the then 
excellent schools of his native village, and then was sent to Miami Uni- 
versity, at Oxford, Ohio, where he completed his education. He read 
medicine under his father, and attonded lectures at the Ohio Medical 
College one year, then was one year in the medical department of the 
Western Reserve College, graduating in March, 1846. In April, 1846, 
he located in Aurora and began the practice, devoting his entire time 
and ability to his chosen profession. He was married, in October, 1847, 
to Miss Julia P. Loring, who was born in Ohio County, Ind., November 
9, 1824, by which union three children, Mathias L., Thomas H. and 
Mary have been born. Dr. Haines was appointed, in July, 1862, sur- 
geon of the Ninteenth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served as such 
until the close of the war, after which he returned to Aurora and re- 
sumed the practice of medicine and surgery, in his quiet way, without 
any ostentation whatever. He has received his full share of practice, 
which his skill and ability justly merits. He is a member or the Dear- 
born County Medical Society, and of the State Medical Society. He is 
a member of the Presbyterian Church, in which he was made an elder in 
1848. The Doctor is an exemplary Christian gentleman and a worthy 
citizen. 

DANIEL T. HALL, justice of the peace, an old and esteemed na- 
tive resident of Rising Sun, was born in 1828. His father, Gilbert 



740 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

Hall, and his mother, Rachel Chandler, wore both born in Accomac Coun- 
ty., Va., where they grew to maturity and married, removing with their 
three children from that State to Maysville, Ky., in 1814. In 1S1T> they 
came to Rising Sun, where they resided till their respective deaths in 
1835 a'nd 1852. Daniel T. Hall, our subject, has nearly always resided 
in Rising'Sun. When a boy he learned the shoe-making trade here, and 
this has been his life occupation, except during a few years of ill health 
which prevented the pursuance of his trade. He was married, in 1849, 
to Miss Louisa Campbell, a native of Ohio and daughter of Thomas and 
Catherine (Seward) Campbell. Seven children were born to them, six 
of whom are still living: Thomas, George B., Eliza, Kate, Rachel and 
Ruth. The deceased was Fanny. In 1884 Mr. Hall was elected justice 
of the peace and ho is now officiating in that capacity. He is among the 
oldest native residents of Rising Sun, in the esteem of whose citizens 
he holds a creditable place. 

GEORGE B. HALL, Rising Sun, clerk of court, Ohio County, was 
born in Rising Sun in 1S56, son of Daniel T. Hall, who is mentioned 
above. So far his life has been passed in his native town, in whose pub- 
lic schools he was educated, and in the vicinity of which he was engaged 
in teaching for about six years. At the age of fifteen he suffered the 
misfortune of losing his left arm by accident while engaged in work 
about a saw-mill, and this has since prevented his performing manual 
labor of the heavier sort. In 1878 Mr. Hall was elected recorder of 
Ohio County, resigning this office in 1880 to accept the more remunera- 
tive office of clerk of courts, to which he had been elected in that year. 
In this latter capacity he is still officiating, having been re-elected in 
1S82. He has discharged the duties of his office with credit to himself 
and satisfaction to his constituents, thus placing his reputation as a pub- 
lic servant in an enviable light. Mr. Hall was married August 8, 1880, 
to Elizabeth Cooper, native of Ohio County and daughter of Eli and Mar- 
garet (Marker) Cooper, old residents of the same. They have two chil- 
dren: Vera V. and Ouida. Mr. H is a member of the I. O. O. F., and 
in politics a Republican.. 

D. B. HALL, editor and proprietor of the Rising Sun Local, 
is a native of Ohio County, and was born in Rising Sun in 1844. 
His parents were Washington and Cassandra (Cornelius) Hall, his 
father a native of Rising Sun, his mother born elsewhere in the 
State. His father was a carpenter by trade, and spent his entire life in 
his native town. Banner Hall, as he is most popularly known, passed his 
youth in common with other boys in and about his native town, in whose 
schools he was given a fair education. At the age of fifteen he began 
work at the printing trade in the old Visitor office, in which he remained 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 741 

fill the .opening of the war, when he enlisted iu the Sixteenth Indiana 
Regiment as a member of the regimental hand for one year, serving 
about eight months, being discharged at the expiration of his time. In 
1863 ha enlisted in the Fourth Indiana Cavalry, and served fifteen 
months, being discharged on account of sickness. He returned home, 
and with John Lemon established the Hoosier Paper, but 6oon after sold 
out to his partner, and in August, 1864, enlisted again in the service, 
this time as musician on Admiral Lee's flagship "Blackhawk," serving till 
the close of the war. On his last return to Rising Sun he was employed on 
the home papers and the Cincinnati Commercial till 1879, when he estab- 
lished the Local as elsewhere stated. Mr. Hall was married, in 1807, to 
Miss Ella Clore, of Rising Sun, daughter of Reuben Clore, who was for 
many years a prominent river trader. They have three children: Hay- 
den, Reuben and Halstead. Mr. Hall is a member of the F. &A. M., the 
G. A. R. and Methodist Episcopal Church, Mrs. Hall also being a mem- 
ber of the latter society. In the management of his paper ho has 
achieved a creditable success both as editor and publisher. 

H. D. HANOVER, general roadmastor of the Ohio & Mississippi 
Railroad, with headquarters at Aurora, Ind., was born in Wilmington, 
Conn., in 1836, and is the son of Charles and Candace (Clough) Han- 
over. The father was born in Baltimore, Md., April 3, 1797, the mother 
in Belchertown, Mass., September 1, 1801. The parents were married 
March 20, 1817; the father died November 8, 1861, and mother August 
21, 1871. Mr. H. D. Hanover's early life was spent in Wilmington, 
where he acquired a common school education, and as is customary with 
boys he could be found at the station forming the acquaintance of fire- 
men and engineers, one of whom he persuaded to secure for him a place 
as fireman. In 1853 his career as a railroad man began in the capacity 
of fireman on the old Western Road (now the Boston & Albany) under 
Wilson Eddy, master mechanic, first firing the engine "Alabama" for 
one year at $1 per day between Springfield and Worcester. He was com- 
pelled to give up his position on account of being too young to endure 
the hard labor. In 1854 he went to the N. L. W. & P. Railroad as fire- 
man and brakeman, where he remained for two years, after which he 
came to the conclusion that ho would like to bo a track man, and went to 
work on section at Stafford Springs, Conn., and worked for three 
years. In 185S he was persuaded to go West under promise of a position 
as section foreman, which he accepted, and started for Wisconsin and 
landed at Zanesville, which was the terminus of the Illinois & Wisconsin 
Railroad, later the Chicago, St. Paul & Fond du Lac, and now the 
great system of the Chicago & Northwestern Railway, where he was put 
on a section at Spopiere under Clark Lipe, roadmaster, remaining ono 



742 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AN!) OHIO COUNTIES. 

year, after which ho returned East and remained eight months, thonce 
"West, and was given a section at Woodstock, 111.; from there he went to 
Chicago. Mr. Hanover was soon changed to a section at Milton Junction, 
"Wis., and remained there on section, extra gang track laying, and con- 
ductor on gravel train until 1800, when ho branched out to see if he 
could not better his condition, and chanced to meet an acquaintance, who 
interceded for him, and through his kind assistance ho obtained a situa- 
tion as conductor on a construction train on a division of the Ohio & 
Mississippi Railroad, which position was held for sis months Then 
Mr. Hanover was promoted to division roailmaster on the Western Divis- 
ion, thence Eastern Division, officiating in that capacity for fourteen 
years. In December, 1880, he was promoted to general roadmaster, hav 
ing G29 miles of the Ohio & Mississippi Railroad under his supervision. 
the duties of which office are being faithfully discharged at present, mak- 
ing nearly twenty years' service with the Ohio & Mississippi Railroad, 
and during all this term of service he has not lost one day's time, and 
has the good will and hearty support of his subordinates. By constant 
care and faithfulness to his employers all these meritorious promotions 
have boon made as a reward for valuable services rendered. Mr. Han- 
over has had over thirty years' actual experience in the track department, 
and is recognized as being thoroughly competent and duly qualified for 
the duties of his responsible position. No reference is needed or further 
evidence required proving the sterling worth and great public benefit of 
such representative men. The smoothness with which the affairs of the 
Ohio & Mississippi Railroad move along (so far as they come under the 
management of Mr. Hanover) is proof positive that he is the right man 
in the right place, and under his able supervision the business interests 
of the Ohio & Mississippi cannot but go forward to prosperity. Mr. 
Hanover was married, April 29, 1859, to Miss Margaret Hamilton. He 
has taken all the degrees in Masonry, and is a member of the Indiana 
Consistory at Indianapolis. 

DR. MYRON H. HARDING, see page 174. 

SAMUEL HARRIS settled in Aurora in 1821, emigrating from near 
Leeds, England. He had been for many years a clergyman of the Church 
of England. After settling in Aurora he became a member and then 
pastor of the Aurora Baptist Church. He was a man of great learning. 
His library was for many years the most extensive and valuable one in 
the State, and especially rich in theological works, which were presented 
after his death, by his son W. T. Harris, to the Hamilton Theological 
Seminary. Rev. Samuel Harris died in 1832. 

WILLIAM TELL HARRIS, was an Englishman by birth, and son of 
Rev. Samuel Harris: a gentleman of refined social qualities, great learn- 



BIOGRAPHICAL .SKETCHES. 743 

ing, and an author of Borne nob. Mr. Harris was an eccentric man in 
many respects, but that eccentricity never led him to wound the feelings 
of the most sensitive — always the polite and dignified gentleman, friendly 
to all, but familiar with none. He was born in London in 1796, and at 
an early age was graduated from the University of Oxford. At the end 
of his collogiate course he was indentured to an apothecary, and serving 
a full apprenticeship received a diploma as a physician. In 1817 he 
came to America and spent a year in traveling through the West, mostly 
on foot, returning to England the following spring. Shortly after, ac- 
companying his father's family, ho immigrated to this country, and the 
family took up their residence in Aurora, and for forty-five years, our 
subjoct was a prominent citizen of Aurora. "Punctual in his engage- 
ments, precise in bis business matters and guarded in his expressions." 
The following extract from a memorial of him by Geo. W. Lane, shows 
that he was "not only giftod in his memory of local facts, but was un- 
surpassed in a much higher sense:" "In 1843 Gov. Whitcomb with a 
friend visited Aurora. I proposed to them a call on Mr. Harris. They 
consented, and after an introduction, the Governor noticed the extensive 
library which adorned the room, and walking up to its heavily laden 
shelves with all the cheer and familiarity of a child with its toys, spoke 
of their value. Mr. Harris replied, ' These are my household gods, heir- 
looms of an ancient descent, with the additions of each generation.' 
Gov. Whitcomb responded, 'I envy you your pleasure in your retire- 
ment, with this ancient lore for your companions;' and placing his hand 
on a book, continued, ' this would be my favorite pastime. Do you re- 
member where the author says ?' quoting from a passage of thril- 
ling beauty. 'Certainly,' said Mr. Hai*ris, 'but that does not equal 
,' and he repeated some eloquent sentences. Gov. Whitcomb re- 
plied, 'You quote from ,' naming the author and the period, with 

the remark that he had not beou attracted by their beauty until repeated 
by him. Mr. Harris, with a formal bow, 'Thank you, sir.' And thus 
they continued to quote, the other naming the author and the period, 
and mentioning some circumstances connected with it, until Mr. Harris 
told an interesting story which a remark of Whitcomb had called to 
mind. Whitcomb was silent; he did not know the author or the period 
in history referred to. His face became rigid as marble, and he stood a 
statue of surprise. Mr. Harris, seeing this, came to his relief with a 
cheerful remark in a foreign tongue. Whitcomb was himself again, and 
came at him with a flash of his black eye as if it said, ' now I will have 
my revenge,' and replied in another language Mr. Harris, receiving 
the charge in all the self-confidence of a prophet who knew the result, 
replied in still another. Whitcomb answered in yet another language, 



744 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

and how often it was repeated I do not remember, but I well recollect 
that the two silent spectators were astonished. But it was Mr. Harris's 
time to reply; he did so in pleasant accents. Whitcomb again was 
silent; Jjo understood it not. The btatue resumed its position, and it is 
not for mo to say how long it would have remained had not a remark 
about books of ancient date galvanized it to life again. Now, it was 
well known that Whitcomb had one of the best selected libraries in the 
State, and had reason to be proud of it. Ho referred to a valuable book 
of a certain edition; Mr. Harris had the same of an older date, and thus 
the unequal war was resumed, until Indiana's most learned governor be- 
gan to show signs of a drooping crest, when, as if reminded by a new 
thought, he triumphantly referred to an old copy of the Bible that, at 
great expense, he had sent a special messenger to some distant country 
to purchase for him. Mr. Harris let him tell his story, as if loath to de- 
prive him of his well-earned laurels, then slowly took from a shelf a 
strange- looking book and remarked: ' Governor, had you called on me, I 
could have shown you a copy of much older date,' and turning its leaves 
read some familiar passages. One glanco at its pages satisfied Whit- 
comb — it was a sealed book to him." 

ROBERT A. HARRIS, North's Landing, a native of Switzerland 
County, Ind., was born in 1828, and is a son of Jacob and Gertrude 
(Scott) Harris, who came into Switzerland County with their parents 
about 1S16. His parents married in Switzerland County, purchased land 
there, and reared their family, his father being a farmer and dealing con- 
siderably in real estate; he died in 1885, aged eighty-three years. They 
reared eight children; all of whom are still living. Robert A., whose 
name appears at the head of this notice, grew up in his native county 
and resided there till April, 18S1. He has always given his attention 
chiefly to farming and stock dealing, but has also done considerable bus- 
iness in the produce trade, in which he is now engaged. In 1853 Mr. 
Harris was married to Elvira Palmer, a native of Switzerland County, 
and daughter of George and Phoebe Palmer, and three children were 
born to them: Jennie, Jacob and Effie B. In April, 1880, Mrs. Harris 
passed away, and Mr. H. has since been united in marriage with Jemima 
Hayes, of Ohio County, and daughter of Jesse Hayes. Mr. Harris is one 
of the most substantial citizens and business men of the county. 

ORVILLE J. HARRIS, farmer, Randolph Township, son of Jacob 
R. Harris, is a native of Switzerland County, Ind., born in 1841. 
He grew up on the farm and remained with his parents until twenty-five 
years of age. In 1865 he married Miss Kate Hobbs, of Gallatin County, 
Ky., daughter of Emory Hobbs, and after his marriage removed to Boone 
County, Ivy., where he resided till 1881, when he came to his present 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 745 

farm near Rising Sun. Ho has always engaged in farming, in which 
pursuit he has been quite successful. Mr. and Mrs. Harris have two 
children: Harry and Bonnie. 

ROBERT HARGITT, merchant, Guilford, one of the older 
residents of Dearborn County, was born in Miller Township in 1826. 
His father, Thomas Hargitt, located in the same township in 1814. He 
was a native of Yorkshire, England, and is still living in his eighty- 
seventh year. He married Ann Mason when about twenty-three years of 
age, and located on land deeded to him by his grandfather, Thomas Har- 
gitt, and has since chiefly resided in the same locality. From early man- 
hood he was engaged in the local ministry, until his advanced age com- 
pelled him to retire from that field of labor. His wife passed away many 
years ago. Robert Hargitt, whose name begins this notice, passed his 
early years on the farm, and received the ordinary common school edu- 
cation of those days. In 1851 he married Eliza Fuller, a native of this 
county, and they have three children living: Allio (wife of John Eagle), 
Harry M. and Dolly. After his marriage Mr. Hargitt took up agricult- 
ural pursuits, which he followed till 18G2, when he, with his brother, 
George W. Hargitt, purchased the stock of general merchandise owned by 
Daniel Chitister, at Guilford, and engaged in mercantile business in that 
village. In this pursuit he has since continued, except during two years 
spent in the West, and his efforts have met with fine success. His stock 
of goods is valued at about S3, 000, and he enjoys a fine country trade. 
For fifteen years Mr. Hargitt acted as agent for the American Express 
Company at Guilford. He spent about twenty years, more or less, 
engaged in the local ministry of the Methodist Episcopal Church, but 
has given up work in that capacity. He was for many years a member 
of the I. O. O. F., but at length asked and received a card from that 
organization. 

GEORGE W. HARGITT, York Township, is a native of Miller 
Township, born in 1832. He resided in his native neighborhood till 
1855, and was employed on the farm under the ordinary parental 
guidance. At twenty-one years of age he learned the carpenter's trade, 
which he followed about three years and then removed to Illinois, where 
he operated one year in the lumber business. He then returned to this 
county, and has ever since been a resident of the same. He worked at 
his trade up to 1803, when he purchased, in partnership with his brother, 
Robert Hargitt, a stock of general merchandise of Daniel Chitister, and 
began his morcantilejpursuit at Guilford, where he has continued the same 
about eighteen months. He then withdrew from the firm, and invested 
in a portable saw-mill, which he operated till 1872. In 1874 he pur- 
chased his present farm of forty-seven acres, on which he has resided 



746 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

since 18713, chiefly engaged in agricultural pursuits, but occasionally 
working at Lis trade. Mr. Hargitt was married, January 26, 1854, to 
Jane M. Hansel, a native of this county and daughter of William Han- 
sel, one of the early settlers of this county. Their live children living 
are William T., Mercer F., AnuaM., Bertha K. and Emma A. The two 
sons are now engaged in raising cattle in western Kansas. Mr. and Mrs. 
Hargitt are members of the Methodist Protestant Church, and are well 
provided with the comforts of life as a reward for their industry. Mr. 
Hargitt has not been an aspirant to office, but has affiliated with the 
Republican party on all questions of national issue. His only part in 
the late war was a slight skirmish during Morgan's raid, the incidents 
of which are to him the source of more amusement than terror. In all 
his dealings with his fellow men Mr. Hargitt has never resorted to any 
litigation whatever, which is perhaps as good a recommendation for his 
citizenship as could bo given. 

SHADRACH HATHAWAY, of Rising Sun. This truly aged and 
venerable citizen is a native of the State of Massachusetts, born at 
New Bedford, January 19, 17U4. His father was a tanner, and at the 
age of eleven years, young Shadrach commenced, under his father's 
guidance, that trade in connection with the making up of the leather 
into shoes, which occupation he pursued until his twentieth year, spend- 
ing a portion of the falls and winters in traveling through the State of 
Georgia, working at his trade and purchasing hides and peltries for his 
father's tannery. In the summer of 1814, he removed to the West, stop- 
ping for some months in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he continued his occu- 
pation as a shoe-maker. While at this point he made the acquaintance 
of John James, the proprietor of the then recently laid out village of 
Rising Sun, and of him bargained for a lot on the corner of Front and 
Fourth Streets, paying for the same $100. On the 16th of February, 1815, 
Mr. Hathaway removed to the new village, being then in his twenty- 
second year, removed a two-story log house on his lot, and in it opened 
a shoe shop, and carried on his business for five years. He next 
embarked in the business of general merchandising as a partner with 
Caleb A. Craft, the firm occupying the Craft Building on the upper end 
of Front Street, which yet stands as a landmark of bygone days. In 
this old building was kept the postoffice, and also a hotel or " inn " by 
Mr. Craft. The partnership of Craft & Hathaway lasted but about one 
year, when Mr. Hathaway returned to his shoe shop in the old log cabin 
and followed his trade for another year; then in connection with Daniel 
Wicks, a brother-in-law, and their families, they went East by wagons 
to visit their old home. While in New York City Mr. Hathaway pur- 
chased a stock of goods, which was conveyed by wagons to the city of 



BIOORAI'IIICAL SKETCHES. 747 

Pittsburgh, and from thence by boat to Rising Sun. The goods were 
placed in his former place of business, on the corner of Fourth and .Main 
Streets, and, in connection with goneral merchandising, he followed his 
trade. About 1823 a partnership was formed, consisting of our subject 
and Mr. A. Moore, their place of business being on Front Street, 
between Second and Main Streets. Not long subsequent to this Mr. 
Hathaway again returned to his first love and removed back to the old 
log house, continuing his old line of business until 1S27. This year he 
orected on that site the large and commodious brick busiuess house 
and residence, which still stands as a monument to his enterprise and 
public spirit. In this building for twenty years he carried on quite an 
extensive goneral store. In 1S49, convinced that the business of the 
village was moving farther down town, he purchased the Decoursey 
property on Main Street, and built the large business house now occu- 
pied by the store of William Colter; he horo removed his stock of goods, 
greatly increasing the same, and for years did a very successful busi- 
ness, and carried one of the most extensive stock of goods in southeast- 
ern Indiana. Owing to the business depression at the close of the war 
and financial troubles generally, Mr. Hathaway, with many others, had 
to succumb to the pressure. Since that period he has not engaged in 
active businoss, though now can be seen at almost any time seated on 
his shoe bench, which was made for him by the late Prince Athearn in 
Cincinnati in 1814. Our subject has been one of Rising Sun's most 
active, enterprising and public spirited citizens. HiB name is coupled 
with all movements that have had for their object the building up of the 
city, and the best interests of her citizens — giving his aid, through a 
longer identity to one place than is often recorded, to all steps 
taken in the direction of progress and development of the county and 
the improvement of its citizens, morally, religiously and intellectually. 
He is the last of his time; the associates of his early years have all passed 
away, and alone he stands venerable and grand, like the old oak of the 
forest — a fit representative of his time. Though burdended with cares 
of only eight years less'than the seldom attained five score, our venera- 
ble friend is cheerful and enjoys good health. He is in the possession 
of all his faculties to a remarkable degree. The following letter was 
written to Mr. Hathaway by Hon. S. F Covington, of Cincinnati, on 
the ninetieth anniversary of his birth: 

Cincinnati, Ohio, January 18, 1S84. 

Dear Sir: Please accept my congratulations on the occasion of the celebration 
of your ninetieth birthday, and permit me to express the hope that you may cele- 
brate many more, retaining your present vigorous mental and bodily health. 

Forty-six years ago I was in your employ as a clerk in your store. I learned 
then to respect and honor you; and in all the intervening years, because of your 



748 ' HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

many acts of kindness and friendship to me, that feeling, mingled with gratitude, 
lias grown stronger and stronger. 

As a testimonial of friendship, I send you by your daughter, Mrs. Wiswell, a 
cane, which I trust may serve in aiding to support your steps for many years to 
come. ' Respectfully yours, 

S. F. Covington. 

JOHN J. HAUCK, Lawrenceburgh, was born in Germany in 1810. 
He was reared to early manhood in his native country, immigrating to 
the United States at the age of sixteen years. He located in Cincinnati 
and was there engaged four years in the baker's trade, which he learned 
of his father in the old country. In 1830 he married Anna M. Horn- 
berger and in the. same year came to Lawrenceburgh, and opened up a 
bakery and confectionery, which he conducted for several years. He en- 
tered the hardware trade subsequently and also carried a stock of dry 
goods, conducting these lines of business from 1843 to 1859, when his 
failing health compelled him to retire from active business. Mr. Hauck 
served in the city council for several years, and in 1873 was elected 
mayor of Lawrenceburgh, holding the office for a period of six years, 
and discharging his duties fearlessly and creditably. In 1880 his health 
failed entirely, and he departed this life February 2d of that year. He 
was an enterprising business man, and always made his influence felt in 
the progressive measures relating to the city. He was one of the found- 
ers of the Miami Valley Furniture Factory, and to his energy its ulti- 
mate success was largely due. Mr. Hauck was the father of eight chil- 
dren, seven of whom are still living, namely: John, John J., Caroline 
M., Henrietta M., George F., Emma C. and Warren N. Two of the sonB 
are grocers, located at Greenville, Ind., and a third at Indianapolis, Ind. 
In 1847 Mr. Hauck, with George Ross' assistance, built the first Reformed 
Church in Lawrenceburgh. Ho was a member of the Reformed society 
for eleven years, but subsequently joined the Presbyterians. Both as busi- 
ness man and citizen Mr. Hauck occupied an enviable position in the 
esteem of his associates. Warren N. Hauck, son of John J. Hauck, and city 
attorney for Lawrencoburgh, was bom in the said city in 1800. He grew to 
maturity in the town of his birth, and was educated in its public schools, 
graduating in 1878. In 1880-81 he took a course in the Nelson Business 
College, Cincinnati, and in the fall of the latter year entered the Cincin- 
nati Law School, graduating in 1883. He entored upon the practice of 
his profession in Cincinnati and continued the same in that city one 
year, when he came to Lawronceburgh, May, 1884. Previous to this 
he had in 1882-83 attended for a time the McMichen University of Cin- 
cinnati. In the spring of 1884 he was elected to the office of city attor- 
ney of Lawrenceburgh, to fill tho unexpired term of A. W. Ganes, who 
had tendered his resignation, and in this position he is now employed. 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 749 

He is a young man of excellent character, and with the qualities of mind 
and heart calculated to secure for him success of the highest order. 

ABIAH HAYES was horn December 18, 1780, in Washington 
County, Penn., where he continued to reside until near his twentieth 
year, when he removed to the Big Bottom, where his grandfather (Joseph 
Hayes), and four of his uncles, had settled some years previously. He 
located in the valley of the Big Miami, not far from where Thomas Mil- 
ler, Sr., first settled. Here he invested all his money in the purchase 
of two and one-tenth acres of land, whereon he reared his log-cabin. This 
two and one tenth acres formed the nucleus of his future fortune. With 
untiring energy and perseverance, which he possessed in a high degree, 
he made thirty-three trading voyages to New Orleans, and sixteen times 
returned home on foot, through the Indian nations, and once he went 
around by sea with his cargo, which he disposed of at Norfolk, Va., Alex- 
andria and Georgetown, D. C, returning home by Washington and 
Brownsville, paying a visit to the place of his nativity and burial place 
of his father, thence from Pittsburgh, by the Ohio River home. Thus, 
at the age of fifty five years, he had become the richest man in Dearborn 
County. He was cool and collected, never suffering himself to be car- 
ried away by passion, he seemed to meditate much, and converse spar- 
ingly and never was taken at a nonplus. During the war of 1812 Mr. 
Hayes belonged to what was called the Rangers, served one trip around 
by Brookville, Pipe Creek, and the head of Tanner's Creek. Seeing no 
enemy they returned home. Maj. McHenry was the captain; Mr. Hayes 
hired a substitute to finish his term of service, thus bidding adieu to the 
profession of arms. Mr. Hayes raised a large family, seven of whom 
lived to womanhood and manhood and were married. But three of them sur- 
vive him — two sons and one daughter. About eight years since he lost his 
wife, the companion of his youth. Some four or five weeks passed, he 
■complained of a pain in the side of his face, which was supposed to be a 
boil; it grew worse and broke. On Monday the 19th Samuel Morrison 
and Henry Hardin visited him; he conversed freely and sensibly with them, 
recounting the reminiscences of the past as vividly as though they bad 
just transpired; ho retained the full enjoyment of his mental faculties to 
the last. He was taken with a congestive chill on Monday the 26th (hav- 
ing had two chills previously), which terminated his pilgrimage on earth. 
He died at the residence of his son, Abiah Hayes, Jr., in the vicinity of 
Hardinsburg, July 27, 1858, in the seventy-eighth year of his age. His 
funeral sermon was preached by Rev. E. D. Long, attended by two other 
clergyman, at the Bellevue Methodist Episcopal Church, to a very large 
audience, among whom were to be seen pioneers Judge Isaac Dunn, who has 
been in tho Miami Valley over sixty-nine years; Job Miller and his sis- 

. / 



750 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

ter-in law Sarah Miller, over sixty -eight years; Bailey Guard, sixty-seven 
years; Thomas Miller, Joseph Hayes, Walter Hayes, Jesso Hunt, Thomas 
Hunt, over sixty years; Jonathan Blasdall, Elizabeth Blasdall, JohnCull- 
ahan, fifty -five years, and Samuel Morrison, a native of the county of Dear- 
born, born in 1 790. Thus another of our number has been called away. Peace 
be to his sleeping dust. He has felled the last oak, reared the last log-cabin, 
plowed his last furrow, his corn is laid by, his harvest is passed, he 
sleeps his last sleep. 

JACOB HAYES was born in Chester County, Penu., Jan. 8, 1791, and 
immigrated with his parents to Dearborn County in 1S04. They settled 
in the "Big Bottom," on land owned by Joseph Hayes, Jr., and Thomas 
Miller, Sr. Here, at the age of thirteen years, ho began the labor of 
felling the trees of this grand old forest, and clearing up the land for 
cultivation; this business, alternately with farming, he pursued diligently 
until he became of age. He now, without any education, without means 
or influence, commenced his career and struggles through life. His first 
trip to New Orleans was as a hand, with his cousin, Job Miller, who 
made his first trip in 1812. Jacob Hayes traveled by land three times, 
the whole distance, through the Indian nations that embraced the dense 
wilderness that lay between here and there. In the summer of 1813 
business of a private nature called him back to Chester County,, the scenes 
of his early childhood, traveling .'the whole distance on horseback, and 
at a time too when the roads were new and bad, and no bridges; but this 
was thought nothing of "in the clays when we were pioneers, fifty years 
ago." He was a very active and prominent trader on the river, from 1820 to 
1848, having from two to five flat-boats loaded with produce on the river at 
onetime. He was prominent in establishing the Lawrenceburgh Insurance 
Company, and was a large stockholder, both in it and in the Lawrence- 
burgh Branch of the State Bank. "When the pioneers of our county 
drop off one by one, and especially those who have spent a long life of 
usefulness, in rearing the first log-cabins, clearing away this immense 
forest, making ' the wilderness to blossom as the rose,' and in changing 
it from the home of roaming savage tribes, to the abode of civil and religious 
liberty, their histories should be written. The history of Jacob Hayes is 
the history of the times in which he lived among us, and also the history 
of the county. Go back seventy years and you r jwill see the little family 
boat of Solomon and Mary Hayes, with their five children, descending 
the Ohio River and landing at Lawrenceburgh. Seventy years of his 
life have been spent here among us, within four miles of Lawrenceburgh. 
Should these thiDgs not be noted? Ho has done his work, he has finished 
his course, and what his head and hands have failed to do, his money has 
done." Our subject was married three times, having by each of his first 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 751 

two wives two children, and six by his third wife. He left three daugh- 
ters and four sons living, and three dead, twenty-one grand, and two great- 
grandchildren. By his industry and frugality he amassed quite a for- 
tune, estimated at §80,000 which he leaves to his widow and seven 
childrep. By his kind and obliging nature, and under the guise of friend- 
ship he has suffered a loss of §20,000 within the last three years. His boat- 
ing expeditions and extensive farming operations made him a good 
judge of human nature; he was a man above mediocrity, and had he received 
the advantages of an early education, and the opportunity occurred for 
bringing out his active mind and talents, he would have made his mark 
in the world. In addition to this he had been blind for eighteen years 
previous to his death, which occurred February 25, 1874, his fun- 
eral sermo) ?as preached by Rev. S. Tincher; services in the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, attended by a large congregation, among whom were the 
following pioneers and children of pioneers; John Callahan, Reuben Jack- 
son, William Dils, Norval Sparks, David Nevitt, Joseph Groff, A. F. Gage, 
Joseph Stevens, Alexander Guard, John Ferris, J. C. Craig. Dr. M. H. 
Harding, E. Crosby and Mr Roberts. 

EDWARD HAYES, farmer, Lawreneeburgh Township, was born 
October 11, 1837, near where he now resides, his parents being Jacob 
and Leah (Hayes) Hayes. His father settled in this county in 1793, and 
lived to the age of eighty-three years. Mr. Hayes was reared on a farm, 
and remained with his parents till about thirty-five years of ago. He inher- 
ited a considerable tract of land from his father's estate, and by his own 
exertion has since made additions to this, till he now owns about 400 
acres. He was married, in 1859, to Jane E. Nield, daughter of James 
and Hannah (Whiteley) Nield, both natives of England. Their children 
are Edward, born in 1864; Silas V., born in 1867, and Joseph, born in 
1869. Mr. Hayes is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and 
one of the many thrifty farmers of Dearborn County. 

GEORGE HAYES, a thrifty farmer of Lawreneeburgh Township, 
was born here in 1832 Ho is a son of Jacob Hayes, with whom he 
remained on the farm till about thirty years of age, sharing the advan- 
tages of the common schools. He learned the wagon trade, and this, in 
connection with the manufacture of a patent corn-drill, which he invented 
himself, he was for some time engaged in. As early as the age of four- 
teen years he made a trip to New Orleans with his father, who did an 
extensive flat-boating business at that time, carrying stock and produce 
to that city. On his first trip their cargo consisted of 196 head of cat- 
tle and a number of hogs. Mr. Hayes was married, in 1859, to Martha 
A. Bales, a native of Hancock County, Ind., daughter of Abijah and 
Amelia Bales, and they have three children: Jacob, Leah and Isaac. Mr. 



752 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

Hayes owns nearly 500 acres of land, and is an industrious and energetic 
farmer. 

J. W. HAYMAN, merchant, Moore's Hill, an old and highly 
respected citizen of that village, was horn in Worcester County, Md., 
July 31, 1816. His parents, Levin and Martha CWalston) Haymau, 
were both natives of Maryland, where they resided during their entire 
lives. They were the parents of ten children, viz.: Robert R., Jacob 
H., Levin P., Edward W., Leah C, Susan R.. Ann M., Rufus M., Maha- 
ls C and Jesse W., our subject, being the sixth member of the family. 
He was educated in Maryland, and when about sixteen years of age began 
learning the carpenter's trade, which he completed, and also the cabinet- 
making and millwright trade, and afterward engaged in the same for a 
number of years. In April, 1S3S, he came to Moore's Hill, Ind., and was here 
married, November 29, 1839, to Fannie C, daughter of John aud Amelia 
(Duncan) Dashiell, born in Dearborn County, Ind., July 16,' 
1820. Soon after Mr. Hayman's marriage he located at Dillsborough, 
where he engaged in milling a short time, after which he removed to 
Wilmington, where he remained until 1S40, at which time he moved back 
to Moore's Hill, where he has since resided. After moving there in 1840, 
he engaged in teaching school for some time, teaching the first public 
school at that place. He subsequently opened up a store there, and has 
since engaged in merchandising. In February, 1863, he was apjiointed 
postmaster at Moore's Hill, and still retains tho office. Mr. Haymau is 
respected by all who know him. He and wife are members of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church. They were the parents of seven children, 
namely: Thomas L. (died in the war), Luther T, John E., Alice M., 
George H., Ernest O., Milna D. (deceased). 

D. H. HELMS, farmer, Clay Township, was born in the same 
September 21, 1838. He is one of twelve children born to the old and 
highly esteemed pioneers oE that locality, Alfred and Eliza W. (Jones) 
Helms. The former was born in Lincoln County, N. C, in the year 
1816, and the latter in Clennont County, Ohio, in the same year. They 
were married in Dearborn County in 1837, after which they settled on a 
farm on the banks of what is known as " Hayes Branch," Clay Township, 
where they have since resided. They have had born to them twelve chil- 
dren, viz.: John W., David H., William H, Andrew, Philip, Mary J., 
Isaac T., Clarissa, Levi, Charles B., Albert S. and one who died in 
infancy. D H, our subject, was brought up as a farmer. He received 
a good common school oducation, and after reaching the years of matur- 
ity, left the ' ' land of steady habits," and turned the greater part of his 
attention to teaching school, beginning the profession as early as 1858. 
He has taught 149 months of school, all in Dearborn County, with the 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 753 

exception of three terms. In 1802 bo entered tbo war, enlisting August 
11, in Company B, Eighty-third Indiana Volunteers, as a private, 
and in August, 1SG3, was made orderly sergeant, and May, 1805, 
he recejved the commissi ou of second lieutenant, in which capacity 
he served until his discharge, June 2, 1SG5. After his discharge he 
returned to Dearborn County and resumed his school work and also farm_ 
ing. In October, 180a, he purchased the farm on which he now resides. 
He was married at Lawrenceburgb, October 17, 1807, to Jane T., daugh- 
ter of William C. and Sarah (Spangler) Johnson. She was born in 
Cesar Creek Township, Dearborn Co., May 18, 1S40. The following 
spring, after his marriage, Mr. Helms moved on his farm, where he has 
since resided. They have had born to them nine children, viz. : Light- 
burn, John F., Lewis (deceased), Benjamin (deceased), Arthur L. 
(deceased), Charles, Orville D., Annie SI. and Victor H. Mr. Helms is 
a member of the G. A. R. and an esteemed citizen of the township. 

H. R. HELSfOTH, of Lawrenceburgb, is a native of Bremen, Ger- 
many. Ho was born in 1815, September 4, and at the age of fourteen 
years immigrated to America. He remained east of the mountains till 1S32, 
and then came to Cincinnati, where he resided uutil ,1837. -He learned 
the cooper trade, and pursued that occupation for several years, and for 
a few months conducted a distillery at Rising Sun, but gave up the lat- 
ter business from conscientious scruples. In 1837 he located in Law- 
renceburgb, where he has ever since resided. His father died in 1845. 
In 1850 Sir. Helmuth opened up a dry goods and grocery store in Law- 
renceburgb, [and has ever since engaged in mercantile business. He 
closed out the stock of dry goods several years ago, and has since dealt 
only in staple and fancy groceries, carrying one of the neatest and best 
selected stocks in his line in the city. His son, William Helmuth, or 
"Will," as he is popularly termed, has recently been admitted to the 
firm, which is now known as H. R. Helmuth & Son. They are doing a 
prosperous business, which is the result of a strict attention to the same, 
together with the pluck and energy which they have exercised in carry- 
ing it forward. H. R. Helmuth was married, in 1839, to Mary Sartwell, 
a native of Lawrenceburgb. and daughter of Justice and Dorsie Sartwell, 
her parents being among the earliest settlers of Dearborn County. Her 
mother's people were from Pennsylvania, and her father's from New Eng- 
land. This union resulted in the birth of four children, who are now 
living, viz. . Slaggie J.. widow of Hugh Thompson; Louis; Ella, wife of 
D. G. Justice, and William. The latter, who is now a partner in tho 
business, as stated above, was born in Lawrenceburgb, and educated in 
its schools, and in that city his entire life has been passed. He 
was married, October 11, 1SS3, to Sliss Anna Dewers, of Aurora, Ind 



7o4 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

a daughter of Henry Dowers, of that city. Mr. Helmutb is a young 
man of energy and good business qualifications, and tbese qualities, 
coupled with uffable and obliging manners, are sure to gain for him that 
success in bis business which nature has so well fitted him to achieve. 
The family generally is one of the most highly esteemed in the commu- 
nity. 

JAMES Q. HELPHENSTINE, piano and organ dealer, Wilmington, 
is a native of Ohio, and was born in Madison County December 27, 
1837. His father, "William, was born in Pennsylvania in 1801, and was 
drowned at Memphis, Term., in 18-48. His mother, Mary (Powell) Helphen 
stine, was born in Virginia in 1S15, and died in July, 1SG2. James Q. came 
to Wilmington in 1840, and worked upon a farm until 1S55; then engaged 
in butchering, continuing up to 1803. He was married, December 24, 
1803, to Miss Eliza A. Shank. She was born in Marion County, Ind., 
August 18, 1S38, and one child, Belle, now Mrs. Johnson, was born to 
them. In 1864 Mr. H. moved to Ohio, kept hotel, was city weighmaster, 
and bought hay for the Government. He returned to Wilmington, May 
11, 1800, and butchered up to 1S0S; tnen went into the sewing machine 
business. January 11, 1871, he engaged in his present business, and 
has succeeded very well in the undertaking. His estimable wife was 
appointed postmistress at Wilmington in 1882. The entire family belong 
to the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

WILLIAM HEMPHILL, one of the foremost citizens of Rising 
Sun, was born in Huntington County, Penn., in 1820. His parents, 
James and Catharine (Moore) Hemphill, were natives of Pennsylvania 
and of Irish extraction. The family moved from Pennsylvania in 1821, 
and located at Cincinnati, where they resided till 1834, when they came 
to this locality, locating back of Rising Sun, where the father did shoe- 
making and kept a country store. While in Cincinnati he was engaged 
in the grocery business. He subsequently moved to Rising Sun, where 
he died in 1874, aged seventy-nine years. His widow is still surviving, 
in her ninety third year. William Hemphill, whose name begins this 
notice, grew up under "the parent roof-tree," and in his earlier life 
worked four or five years on the bench. In 1845 he married Polly Ann 
Richardson, daughter of Joseph P. and Polly Ann (Kefler) Richardson, 
who settled in Ohio County in 1817. Mrs. H. was born in Ohio County, 
'but her parents were natives of Virginia. After his marriage Mr. 
Hemphill purchased land in Switzerland County aDd began farming. 
He made two or three changes of location, and in 1850 purchased his 
farm of 100 acres, which he still owns, near Rising Sun, and on which 
he resided till about 1875, when he purchased a home in town. He has 
since given up agricultural pursuits, and turned his attention to the prod- 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 755 

uce trade, making an annual trip to Now Orleans and other points of 
Southern market He made his first trip in 1841. Mr. and Mrs. Hemp- 
hill have seven children: Rebecca. J., wife of William Lostutter; Davis 
County, Ky. ; Mary, wife of Charles W. Croft; Joseph P. ; James S. ; 
Lucy 4-i wife of George E. Bradford; Fanny B., wife of S. M. Seward, 
and Grant. One son, William T., is deceased. Mr. Hemphill is a 
member of the Masonic fraternity and of the Universalist Church. He 
served about ton years as commissioner of the county, refusing a further 
continuance in the office. His father also served several years in the 
same capacity. 

JOSEPH P. HEMPHILL,, auditor of Ohio County, a resident of 
Rising Sun, was born in Ohio County in 1853. He is a son of William 
Hemphill, whose sketch appears above. Joseph P. grew up in his na- 
tive county, assisted his father on the farm, and received his education 
in the schools of Rising Sun. In November, 1879, he was elected to 
the office of county auditor, and in 1882 was re-elected to the same 
office, the duties of which be is still performing with credit to himself 
and to the satisfaction of the county in general. He is an affable gen- 
tleman and an obliging and courteous officer. Mr. Hemphill was mar- 
ried, December 31, 1879, to Miss Joanna Fisher, a daughter of John 
Fisher (deceased), of Ohio County. He is identified with the order of 
F. & A. M. and the I. O. O. F., and votes in the interest of the Repub- 
lican party. 

W. C. HENRY, M. D., physician and surgeon, Aurora, was born in 
Wayne County, Ohio, February 1, 1841, and is of Scotch-Irish extraction; 
his ancestors settled in the United States early in the history of the country. 
During his boyhood he attended the public school, where he acquired a 
knowledge of the usual English branches, including the higher mathemat- 
ics, and also studied Greek and Latin, besides paying some attention to ele- 
mentary anatomy, with a view to entering the medical profession. At the 
age of twenty-one he left school and enlisted for three years as a private in 
Company A, One Hundred and Twentieth Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He 
was soon promoted to the rank of sergeant, and participated in Grant's 
campaign against Vicksburg and its approaches, until after the fall of 
the place in 1863. While in the army,his health having become impaired, 
he was sent home on sick leave, at the expiration of which ho reported at 
Indianapolis, and was detailed to hospital duty, in which he was engaged 
during the remainder of his term of service. While thus employed ho 
gave special attention to his duties, with the view of making the profes- 
sion of medicine his vocation in life, and on leaving the service imme- 
diately entered the Vermilion Institute at Hayesville, Ohio. Thore ho 
pursued a preparatory course for two years, after which he studied rnedi- 



7f)G HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

cine with Drs. Baker and Barrett, of Wooster, Ohio. Subsequently be 
attended two courses of lectures at the Miami Medical College, Cincinnati, 
Ohio, where ho graduated in 1870. He first practiced at Tipton, Mo., 
about eighteen months, and then removed to Aurora, Ind., where ho has 
since been one of the most successful physicians. His course of study 
included special instruction on treatment, of diseases of the eyo and ear, 
under Dr. E. Williams, and he has since given much attention to this 
branch of the profession. During the prevalence of the epidemic in the 
State in 1874, Dr. Henry contributed a valuable paper on trichinae to 
local journals, which attracted much attention at the time and was 
favorably commented on by the profession generally. Immediately after 
his graduation in 1870 he married Miss Kate Lindsay, daughter of John 
F. Lindsay, contractor and builder of Cincinnati, Ohio. Dr. Henry 
enjoys the confidence and esteem of the public as a skillful and pains- 
taking physician. He is an active member of Dearborn County Medical 
Society and of the Indiana State Medical Society, having been for the 
past five years secretary of the former body. He is also city physician 
of Aurora, surgeon, by appointment, of the eastern division of the Ohio 
& Mississippi Railroad, and has been for two years member of the city 
council, in which he takes an active and prominent place. In politics 
Dr. Henry is a Democrat. He is a member of Dearborn Lodge No. 442, 
F. & A. M. ; Aurora Chapter No. 13, and Aurora Commandery No. 17, K. 
T., also K. of H. , in which he is dictator of his lodge. He is an active 
member and elder in the Presbyterian Church. 

ELISHA G. HERRON, farmer, Washington Township, was bom in 
Lancaster County, Penn., August 19, 1815, and received a partial educa- 
tion in Clermont Academy, completing his studies in Cincinnati, Ohio. His 
parents, David and Lydia (Griswold) Herron, wore also born in same coun- 
ty in Pennsylvania, the father in 1788, the mother, 1790. They were mar- 
ried in 181 2, and raised five children, three of whom are alive. They moved 
to Rising Sun, Ind., in February, 1834, where he followed farming until 
his death, which was in 1846; mother died in 1857. They were members 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church; father a class leader all his life. 
Mr. E. G. Herron was raised on a farm. Ho taught school in early life, 
and began clerking in Rising Sun. In April, 1840, ho engaged in busi- 
ness in Hartford and continued until 1849, at which time he sold out 
and located upon the farm where he has resided ever since. His consort 
departed this life April 1, 1854, and he was married June 1, 1856, to 
Aminta W'ilson, who was born in this township February 21, 1832. 
Their four children are Emma, John W., Mary A. and Maggie F. He 
was appointed clerk by the commissioners and was elected township 
trustee, when the services of three men were required to look after the 



ISIOGKAIMIKUL SKETCHES. (Oi 

business. He has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church for 
fifty six years. His wifo and children are also members of that. Bociety. 

ALBERT HEUCK, farmer, Kelso Township, was bom in Bavaria, 
Germany, June 0, 1817. His parents were Herman H. and Kosanna 
(Grane) Heuck, natives of Germany and France. They were the parents 
of six children: William, Henriette, Justine, Babbete, Adalino and 
Albert, our subject, the next to the youngest member of the family He 
immigrated to Dearborn County, Ind., in 183',), and shortly afterward 
went to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he worked in a store. In 1842 he 
returned to Dearborn County, and was hero married, December 23, 
1842, to Elizabeth Probst, who was born in Germany, January 17, 1826, 
and was a daughter of John G. and Margaret (Nuss) Probst. After his 
marriage ho engaged in farming one year, and then removed to Cincin- 
nati. Ohio, where he again worked in a store for some time, and 
subsequently removed to Dearborn County, and from hero to Harding 
County, 111.; returned later and' settled on his present farm, where he 
has since resided. He has had born to him eighteen children, viz. : 
Louisa (deceased), Amelia, Karl W. (deceased), Josephine, Catherine, 
Magdaleua F., Adaline, Emma, Louisa, Elizabeth (deceased), William 
E., Wilhelmina (deceased), John A., Rosina, George L. (deceased), 
Charles H., Ludwig H. (deceased), and George P. (deceased). Mr. 
Heuck was elected trustee of Kelso Township in 185G, and held the office 
two years, after which he was again elected in 1860, and held the office 
for a number of years afterward. 

THOMAS HIBBERT, foreman freigh't department Ohio & 
Mississippi shops, Cochran, is a native of England, born in county 
of Lancashire August 9, 1829, and received a very limited educa- 
tion. His father. Joseph, was born ia 1796, and mother, Nannie 
Hardman, were also of English birth. They came to America in 
July, 1854, and located at Taunton, Mass., where ho followed the 
trade of a hatter up to his death in 1874. Thomas worked in 
a cotton-mill at Taunton until 1S55, then went to Philadelphia, where he 
worked in Diston Saw Works. In 1856 he returned to Massachusetts, 
and worked in woolen-mills at North Deighton until July, 1857, at 
which date he removed to Aurora, Ind., and began working for the Ohio 
& Mississippi Railroad as a carpenter on car work. In 1862 he was 
promoted to foreman of shops in freight department, which position he 
has since filled with entire satisfaction to the company. He was 
married, August 8, 1852, to Miss Sarah Schofield. She was born in 
Feilsworth, England, September 10, 1828. Seven children have been 
born to them: Stamford, born December 5, 1853, died July, 1854; Emma, 
born March 17, 1856; Melanctham, i born March 25, 1858, died August 14, 



758 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

1859; Angelo, bora March 21, 1860; Agnes, bora August 14, 1803 
(deceased); Edith, bora August 2, 1804; Corn, bora August 21, 1809. 
He is a Master Mason, and member of Aurora Lodge No. 51. Also a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

CAPT. JOHN C. HIBBITS, insurance agent, Lawrenceburgh, is a 
native of Dearborn County, bom on the homestead farm in Lawrence- 
burgh Township, July 18, 1834. His parents wore John and Susan 
(Ridinger) Hibbits, of Welsh and Scotch-German extraction. James 
Hibbits was born in Delaware, and in 1804 came as far West as Cincin- 
nati on a trading expedition from Pittsburgh, then a single man. He 
subsequently married Susan Ridinger who was a native of Ohio. In 1814 
or 1815, James aud family located in Dearborn County, stopping for a 
year or two near the hamlet of Hardinsburgh (often called Hardintown), 
then settled on a tract of land in Section 8, of the Kees purchase, where 
he resided the rest of his life, occupied principally as a farmer, though 
by trade he was a cooper. He was a man of intelligence, and a respected 
and esteem ed citizen. His death occurred on the homestead in 18G3. 
His widow survived him a number of years and died in Cincinnati, Ohio, 
in 1879. John C. grew up on the farm, received such schooling as the 
country uchools of his neighborhood afforded; then he was 6ent to Moore's 
Hill College where he completed his education, and was for a number of 
years engaged in teaching in the counties of Jefferson and Dearborn. 
August, 1801, he enlisted as a private soldier in Company F, Thirty-fifth 
Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served throughout the entire 
struggle, having been with the army in the Department of the Cumber- 
land, and participating in all of the engagements of his regiment, begin- 
ning with Stone River and closing with the fall of ' Atlanta, and also 
taking part in the battles of Franklin and Nashville, Tenn., in all of 
which he bore an honorable part, and rose to the rank of captain. He 
was promoted to second lieutenant and captain, commanding Companies 
A, F. and D. of his regiment, and led the assault at Lookout Moun- 
tain, being in command of the three companies. He received several 
slight wounds. On his return from the United States service, Capt. 
Hibbits accepted the agency at Lawrenceburgh of the Merchant Union 
Express, and later of the American and Adams Express Companies, the 
business of which he conducted until 1879. Since which time he has 
been engaged in a general insurance business. May 23, 1878, he was 
united in marriage with Mrs. A. G. Broadwell. Capt. Hibbits is a 
member of the Episcopal Church, is identified with the G. A.R., and 
with the Masonic order. In polities he is a Republican. 

EPHRAIM J. HIGBEE, Randolph Towuship, one of the represen- 
tative farmers of Ohio County, was born here in 1824. He is a son of 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. i b\> 

William and Rebecca (Jacobs) Higbeo, natives of Now York ami Ohio 
respectively. His father carne West from New York, married in Ohio, 
and in 1823 located in Union Township, Ohio County, where ho purchased 
land and resided until his death, about 1875. Ephraim Higbeo, the 
subject of this sketch, grow upon the farm, and has always engaged in 
agricultural pursuits. He was married in 1850 to Ann Kemp, daughter 
of John Kemp, and by this union two children were born, Mary and 
Charley. The mother died in 1878, and in 1880 Mr. Higbeewas married 
to Susan Lot ton nee Kemp, sister of his first wife. After his marriage Mr. 
H. began business on his own responsibility. Ho obtained some property 
from his fatbor's estate aud this ho has gradually increased by dint of 
hard labor, industry and economy, till he now owns 290 acres of valuable 
land. Mr. and Mrs. Higbee are members of the Christian Church, and 
are held in high esteem by the people of their community. 

ADAM K. HILL, farmer and wharf boatman, Aurora, was born in 
Manchester Township, December 27, 1848,. and completed his education 
at Moore's Hill College. His father, Abram Hill, was born in Lawronce- 
bm - gh Township, November 10, 1821, where he received a common 
school education, and farmed for a livelihood. He was married, Feb- 
ruary 20, 1846, to Miss Manerva Kerr. She was born in Hogan Town- 
ship, September 3, 1824, and to them were born nine children: Amanda, 
October 13, 1847; Adam K., December 27, 1848; Milton V., December 
22, 1850; Harry B., September 30, 1852; .Alice, February 25, 1856; 
Altha, November 20, 185S; Mary E., December 27, 1860; Lewis W., 
August 10, 1862; Jennie, July 8,1807. In 1801 Mr. Hill enlisted in 
Company K, Twenty-sixth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served one 
year as first lieutenant; after which he re-enlisted in 1SG2, in the Seventh 
Cavalry, and served nineteen months as first Lieutenant, and was pro- 
moted to captain, and served eleven months in that capacity. In 1864 
he received a slight flesh wound in the wrist, but participated in nine- 
teen severe fights with his regiment, without another scratch. In 1874 
he took charge of the wharf-boat in Aurora. The business increased so, 
that in 1S77 be was compelled to move to the city, which would enable 
him to handle the business more successfully. He is a member of Wil- 
mington Lodge No. 158, F. & A. M., and the G. A. R. His estima- 
ble wife is a faithful member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Our 
subject was raised a farmer, and was married February, 1S72, to Miss 
Ella S. Worley, daughter of Francis Worley. She was born September 
27, 1851, in Center Township, aud to them has been born one child, 
Gracie G. (July 15, 1874). Mr. Hill is a member of Dearborn Lodge No. 
442, F. & A. M. He has been in the stock trade for many years with 
his father, and is connected with the wharf-boat interests, buying hay 



7G0 HISTORY OF DEARBOKX AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

and grain ami running delivery. The firm lias facilities, which enable 
them to deliver merchandise promptly in any part of the city. In 1884 
Mr. A. K. Hill was chairman of the county Republican Central Commit- 
tee, and has always been an active, working Republican. 

EDWIN A. HILLMAN, merchant, Lawrenceburgh, is a native of 
Birmingham, England, born in 1842. His father, John Hillman, was a 
locomotive builder in England, married there AnnRubotom and in 1851, 
immigrated to the United States. The family located at Metamora, Ind., 
where Mr. Hillman engaged in the milling and mercantile business. In 
1867 he moved to Lawrenceburgh where he resided till his death in 1881. 
Mrs. Hillman passed away in 1876. E. A. Hillman was about nine years 
of age when he arrived in America. He grew to manhood with his par- 
ents at Metamora, and in 1862 enlisted in Company C, Sixth Indiana Vol- 
unteer Infantry, and entered the war, serving about three years, taking 
part in the battles of Chickamauga. Mission Ridge, Nashville and other 
minor engagements, and receiving an honorable discharge in June, I860. 
After the war he returned to Metamora from which point he moved to 
Lawrenceburgh in 1867, and engaged in various lines of business till 
1872, when he began the glassware and queensware trade in which he is 
now engaged. In his business enterprises Mr. Hillman has been quite 
successful. He was married, in 1868, to Roselia M. Ransom, daughter 
of Daniel Ransom, of York State, and they have four children: Anna, 
Mary, Edwin and Emma. The two eldest daughters with Mr. and Mrs. 
Hillman, are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Hill- 
man is a member of the G. A. R. and a reliable business man. 

REIZEN HINDS, farmer, Sparta Township, was born in Hamilton 
County, Ohio, January 29, 1818. His parents were Benjamin and Eliza- 
beth (Hash) Hinds, natives of Maryland and Pennsylvania, respectively. 
They were united in marriage in "Washington County, Penn., and from 
thence, about 1812, moved to Ohio, settling near what is known as Seven- 
Mile, where he purchased land and remained until after the close of the 
war of 1812, and then moved to Hamilton County, Ohio, where he 
remained until 1825, at which time he moved to Dearborn County, Ind., 
entering land and settling in Sparta Township, Section 14, where he 
afterward resided until death. He was among the early settlers in that 
vicinity, and well understood the hardships and inconveniences of a pioneer 
life. Ho was highly respected by all who knew him. He died August 
5, 1835, mourned by many friends. He was twice married and was the 
father of thirteen children, viz.: Elizabeth, Ann, Mary, James, Sarah, 
John, Henry, Reizen, Emily, Jane and three who died in infancy. 
Reizen, our subject, was married in Sparta Township December 3, 1837, 
to Mary, daughter of Eben and Sarah (Streeter) Heaton. She was born 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 7(>1 

in Dearborn County September 29, 1S19. After his marriage ho settled 
on the same farm on which ho now lives, and has since resided. He ha* 
had born to him thirteen children, viz.: Benjamin, Sarah E., Harriet L., 
Mary J. (deceased), Julia, Rachel A. (deceased), Melissa M., William F., 
Emma E., Margaret A., Thomas J., Charles E. and Flora B. Mr. Hinds 
and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and he is also 
a member of the Masonic order. He held the office of township trustee 
in 1844-45. 

C. A. H. HITZFELD, cabinet-maker, Lawrenceburgh City, was born 
in Bremen, Germany, September 30, 1819 He is a son of Jiirgen H. 
Hitzfeld, and was reared to maturity in his native country, where he 
learned the cabinet trade. In 1S40 he immigrated to America to view 
the prospects, and three years later returned to Germany, coming again 
to this country with his parents about two yeax-s later. The family lo- 
cated at Fort Wayne, where Mr. Hitzfeld resided till 1850, when he 
moved to Cincinnati. One year later he came to Lawrenceburgh and hei'e 
he has since been employed, chiefly in the carpenter's trade. From 1855 
to 1860 was engaged in factory work; built the German Methodist Church 
and Lutheran Church, and many other edifices in Lawrenceburgh. In 
1849 Mr. Hitzfeld married Caroline Hornberger, daughter of Nicholas 
Hornberger, and four- of their seven children are living; Mary, Caroline, 
Louisa A. and George N. Mrs. Hitzfeld passed away in the winter of 
1884-S5, deeply mourned by many friends. Mr. Hitzfeld has been a 
member of the German Methodist Church for fifty years, and is one of 
Lawrenceburgh' s most worthy citizens. 

LOUIS HLTZFIELD, proprietor of the Hitzfield Hotel, Lawrence- 
burgh, was born in Germany in 1833. He resided in his nativo country 
till 1S45, having been reared by his grandfather, his mother having died 
while he was an infant and his father soon after immigrating to this 
country. Mr. Hitzfield sailed for America in 1845, and located first at 
Fort Wayne, Ind., where the majority of the family still reside. At the 
age of fourteen he left home to carve out a fortune for himself, and 
about two years later "brought up" in Cincinnati. He spent about three 
years in the two cities alternately, chiefly engaged in attending store, 
and in 1857 located in Lawrenceburgh. In 1S61 he joined the United 
States Army and pushed westward to California, remaining in the region 
of the Territories till 1S04. Ho then returned to Cincinnati, clerked a 
few months in a wholesale grocery store, spent a few months in Memphis, 
aud in February, 1S65, returned to Lawrenceburgh and assumed charge 
of the Hitzfield House, which he has since conducted. Mr. Hitzfield 
was married, in 1S65, to Miss Kate Wilke, daughter of John Wilke, a 
substantial business man of Aurora at that time. Of their nine children 



762 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

six are still living: Carrie, Anna, Louis, Albert, Charles TV. and an 
infant. The "Hitzfield Honso" enjoys a liberal patronage, both regular 
and transient, its success being largely duo to the able assistance rendered 
its proprietor by his estimable wife and eldest daughter, Carrie. 

CHARLES H. HOFF, farmer, Jackson Township, born in Cincin- 
nati, July 24, 1836, is a son of Michael and Catharine Hoff, natives of 
Bavaria, Germany. Michael Hoff immigrated to America while a 
young man; arriving at Cincinnati he reniained'there some time and 
worked at his trade, that of a shoe-maker. About 1S35 he°married, and 
about 1837 he purchased land in Dearborn County, Ind., near Lawrenee- 
ville, where he settled and resided through life. Ho died March 25, 
1882, aged sixty-seven years. His widow still survives and resides on the 
old home place. They were parents of eleven children, nine now sur- 
vive: Charles H, John H., Mary E. (wife of George Schlicht), Michael, 
Mary (wife of John Gutapple), George, Valentine, Louisa (wife of Will- 
iam Blasdol) and John. Mr. Hoff was quite a prominent citizen and 
well-known throughout Dearborn County. He filled some of the most 
prominent offices of his township, serving as trustee several years. At 
the time of his death he was serving in his second term as county com- 
missioner. Under his administration of the office several important 
works were constructed, of which were the building of the bridge across 
Tanner's Creek at Guilford and the erection of the county asylum, 
each of which evinces creditable management and careful attention 
of the commissioners in charge. Mr. Charles H Hoff, the subject of 
this sketch, and the eldest child of Michael Hoff, has been a resident of 
Jackson Township forty-eight years. He was married, September 6, 
1857, to Harriet B-olsey, a daughter of George and Harriet Bolsey, na- 
tives of Germany, who became settlers of this county, and died here of 
cholera during the prevalence of that epidemic in 1849. They had seven 
children, six now living: Caroline (wife of Henry Coppfa, who resides 
in Cincinnati), Harriet, George, Elizabeth (wife of Charles Mayer, who 
resides in Cincinnati). Lewis and Henry. Mr. Hoff and wife have had 
fourteen children, twelve now living: Catharine (wife of Frederick 
Huber), Mena (wife of C. S. Spraguo), Lewis, Lizzie, Charles, Anna. 
Henry, Louisa, Ida, Albert, Perley and Lydia. Mr. Hoff has made 
farming his business through life; has a good farm of eighty acres with 
good buildings and improvements, and is well known as one of the 
prominent and reliable citizens of Jackson Township. 

GEOKGE HODEL, president of the Miami Valley Furniture Manu- 
facturing Company, Lawrenceburgh, was born in 1S40. At the age of 
nineteen years he went to Cincinnati, where he was employed in the 
banking house of E. G. Burkani till April of 1861, when he enlisted in 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 763 

the Eighth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry and entered the war, 
serving about four years — one year as hospital steward — taking part in 
some of the most important battles. Ho then returned home and soon 
after assisted in establishing the furniture factory with which he has 
since been connected. He was also one of the incorporators of the Ohio 
Valley Coffin Company, and has been in the city council for many years. 
Ho ranks among the first of the citizens and business men of Lawrence- 
burgh. Mr. Hodel was married, in 1807, to Miss Mary E. Shumaker, by 
whom he has three children: Anna C, Charles W. and George F. 

JUDGE JESSE L. HOLMAN, see page 152. 

HON. WILLIAM S. HOLMAN, attorney at law, Aurora, is a native 
of Dearborn County and was born, September 0, 1S22, at his father's 
homestead, Voraestau, on the Ohio River hills near Aurora. He was 
the son of Judge Jesse L. and Elizabeth (Mastorson) Holman. He was 
educated in the common schools of his neighborhood and at Franklin 
College, Ind., where he studied two years. "When he was twenty years 
of age his father died, and this prevented his completing the college 
course. He studied law, and when of age was admitted to the bar, and 
at once began the practice of his profession in his native county. In 
the same year in which he was admitted to practice, 1843, he was elected 
probate judge of Dearborn County. In 1849 he was chosen prosecuting 
attorney, and in 1850 was elected senatorial delegate from Dearborn 
County in the constitutional convention. In 1851 he was elected a re- 
presentative in the first Legislature under the new constitution; and, al- 
though one of the youngest members of the House, was made chairman 
of the judiciary committee. He supported most of the measures of re- 
form which were incorporated into the revised statutes, and secured the 
passage of the bill which extended the township system to the several 
counties of the State. In 1852 he was elected common pleas judge, and 
served until 185G. During his incumbency he received a commission as 
circuit judge, but hold the office of common pleas judge until the end 
of his term. In 1858 he was first elected to Congress from the Fourth 
District, and in 185'J took his seat in the Thirty-sixth Congress. He 
has been elected to Congress eleven times, being a member of the Thirty - 
sixth, Thirty-sevonth, Thirty-eighth, Fortieth, Forty-first, Forty second, 
Forty-third, Forty-fourth, Forty-seventh, Forty-eighth and Forty-ninth 
Congresses, and has served as a representative for a longer period than 
any other Western man. He has always acted with the Democratic party. 
During the war he was a Union Democrat and supported the war meas- 
ures of Mr. Lincoln's administration and voted for all the appropriations 
mado for the suppression of the Rebellion. He brought forward many 
of the measures which became laws, touching the increase of pay and 



764 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

the bounties of the Union soldiers. Judge Holtnan earnestly opposed 
the subsidy system from the public resources, either in bonds, hinds or 
money, to promote private enterprises; and it has been claimed for him 
that the series of resolutions on that subject which he succeeded in 
carrying through the? house, broke down — for the time at least — the en- 
tire system of subsidies. He has opposed all forms of class legislation. 
He was an earnest advocate of the homestead policy, and opposed any 
other method of disposing of the public lands except as bounties to the 
soldiers of the Union army. Ho introduced and carried through the 
measures which relieved the commerce of the Ohio River from the op 
pressive tax imposed on it at the Louisville & Portland Canal. He 
has generally been a member of the committees on war claims, com- 
merce and appropriations. At the last session of the Forty- fourth Con- 
gress, he was chairman of the committeo on appropriations, and also of 
the committee on public buildings and grounds. Ho was chairman of 
the committee appointed by the Forty-eighth Congress to inquire into 
Indian affairs. Judge Holman was a formidable candidate for the United 
States Senate in 1875, and for governor in 1876 and 1880, and was the 
favorite of the New York Sim for the Democratic nomination for presi- 
dent in 1884. As a lawyer he stands in the front rank of his profes- 
sion. Before reaching his majority he was married to Miss Abigail 
Knapp, a young lady of excellent education and refinement. "When not 
absent on public duties, with strong attachment for the place of his 
birth, he resides at Veraestau, engaging in the delightful employments 
of rural life, and being still in the enjoyment of vigorous health. His 
home is situated on a breezy and romantic eminence overlooking the 
Ohio, and commanding a viow of wonderful beauty stretching away for 
many miles. 

JAMES HOLMES, Randolph Township, one of the leading farmers 
and stock dealers of Ohio County, was born in Harrison County, Ky., in 
1822, the youngest of six children, four of whom are now living, viz. : 
Polly, wife of Absalom Adams, married in Harrison County, 'Ky., in 1827, 
and moved to Laughery in 1828; William, born in 181U, married to Celia 
Ricketts in 1832, and moved to Woodford County and purchased land, 
clearing up three different farms, and working up from poverty to a for- 
tune, accidentally killed in 1876 by a load of lumber falling upon him, 
was a firm Democrat, and noted for his liberality (sent one son to the 
war, and he was killed at the battle of Kenesaw Mountain); Sarah, wife 
of Morgan Robinson, married in 1833, husband died in 1880; Nancy, 
wife of William Burns (who died in September, 1853), and is now a res- 
ident of Bellovue, Ky; Robert, who married Margaret Moreland in 
1840, and died of cholera in 1S49. James Holmes, the fathor of the 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 765 

above named children, was born in Virginia. His father, of Irish 
descent, moved to Kentucky when a young man, and there married 
Prudence Klampet, a native of Delaware, and in 1824 moved to Ohio, 
in which ataie they resided four years, in Clermont County. They came 
to Dearborn < ' >unty in 182S, whore Mr. Holmes purchased 120 acres of 
land on either side of Laughory Creek, when, in March, 1829, death 
took him from his toil. His widow survived till September, 1879, dying 
at the ago of ninety- four and a half years. James Holmes, the subject 
of this sketch, grew up in the woods on the farm, residing with his 
mother till January, 1849, when he married Charity Ann Myers, a native 
of Ohio, and daughter of Joel and Lydia (Hand) Myers. He began very 
poor, and worked hard to make a start in business. He chopped cord- 
wood at 35 cents per cord, and by the greatest economy and labor saved 
from his earnings $500 in ten years, and bought fifty acres of land- 
Since that time his advancement has been more rapid, and he has added 
to his origin::! purchase at intervals till he now owns 300 acres. He ha9 
done some flat-boating ami has dealt extensively in stock and produce, 
buying in every part of the country for many miles around Mr. and 
Mrs. Holmes have had ten children, two deceased; the oldest, Lauretta, 
at fourteen years of age, and Mary, the third daughter, who died in 1S75 
at the ago of twenty years. The living are Prudence (wife of John 
McQuary, Switzerland County), Emma J. (wife of Edwin Tinker, this 
township), Belle, Anna (wife of Joseph Pate), Elizabeth, Rubert, George 
and James A. Mr. Holmes takes an active part in local politics, and is 
a Democrat of tho most pronounced order. As a citizen his character 
is above reproach, and his naturally social nature has won to him a large 
circle of personal friends. 

JOHN F. HOMANN, merchant and postmaster, Sparta Township, 
was born in the couuty of Meinersen, Hanover, Germany, December 20, 
1848. His parents, John F. and Frederick (Wrede)Homann, were both 
natives of Germany, former born in 1824, the latter, in 1826. They 
resided in Germany their entire lifetime, the former dying in 1875, the 
latter in 1881. They were the paronts of two children, viz.: Carolino, 
and John F . our subject, the oldest. He was educated in Germany, and 
whoD about fourteen years of age, began tho shoe-making trade, which 
he completed, and in 1870 immigrated to tho United States, landing at 
Now York City May 7, of that year; from thence ho came immediately 
to Chicago, 111., and after traveling through Illinois, Michigan, Tennes- 
see, Mississippi and Arkansas, in the spring of 1S71, landed at Cincin- 
nati, Ohio. Ho worked at his trade there for about four years, and was 
there married, October 13, 1874. to Emma Schilling. She was born near 
Cincinnati, Ohio, August 24, 1855, and was a daughter of August and 



766 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

Dorothea (Ideker) Schilling, who immigrated to Dearborn County in the 
year 1861, In 1877 Mr. Homann moved to Cold Spring, and in the 
same year purchased the store of Henry Wilkening, which he has since 
conducted with vigor and success, and is now doing a large business in 
general merchandise. June 2, 1S84, he was appointed postmaster of 
this place, which office he at present holds. Mr. Homann is a good cit- 
izen, and a member of the Lutheran Church. He is the father of four 
children, namely: John F., George A., Augusta E. and Charlotte M. 

ANDREW D. HOPPING, farmer, Centre Township, resides on 
Section 5, possessing 160 acres of land, on which he was born August 29, 
1817. He attended school in a log schoolhouse, and received only a lim- 
ited education. His father, Ephraim Hopping, was born in New Jersey, 
August. 29, 1775, and his mother was born in the same State April 29, 
1778. They came to Indiana in the fall of 1816, and in the spring of 
1817 to this locality. The father was a tailor by trade, but followed 
farming. He was a member of the first school board in Aurora. He 
died October 22, 184S. The mother slipped and fell, and broke her hip, 
which caused her death October 29, 1870. She never lost a tooth from 
childhood, and ail were perfect, except one, at her death. Mr. Hopping 
was married, October 10, 1848, to Miss Jane N. Greer, who was born in 
"Westmoreland County, Penn., July 24, 1826. They have been blessed 
with eleven children, namely: Mary F., Lewis, George, James, Laura, 
Harvey, Elizabeth (born April 15, 1864, died June 28, 1882), Jesse, Net- 
tie, John and Edward. His wife is a member of the Presbyterian Church. 

JOHN HORNBERGER, one of the foremost citizens of Lawrence- 
burgh, is a native of Bavaria, Germany, where his forefathers for many 
generations had lived and died. He was born at 5 o'clock P. M., August 
16, 1817, according to the old record which he still has in his possession. 
His parents, George N. and Anna M. (Forster) Hornberger, natives of 
Steinweiler and Minnfeld, Bavaria, respectively, the former born Octo- 
ber 24, 1788; the latter January 7, 1797. Their parents were Nicholas 
and Margaret (Fiever) Hornberger and Jacob and Margaret Forster. His 
grandfather died in Steinweiler. March 19, 1865, his father passed away 
being then a resident of this county, having immigrated with his family 
in 1831. There were six children, four born in Germany: John, Anna 
M. (Mrs. Hauck), Mary 0. (Mrs. Schulze), Elizabeth (Mrs. Widelstadt). 
Mary C. and George N. were born in Cincinnati, Ohio. The family landed 
in New York in June or July, 1831, and reached Cincinnati August 8, the 
same year. Here they resided till 1837, the father following the cabinet 
trade for a time and also conducting a hotel in the city. They then 
moved to Lawrenceburgh, where Mr. Hornberger died as stated above, 
after having entered about 1,000 acres of government land in Dearborn and 



BIOGIUrniCAL SKETCHES. 707 

Franklin Counties. John Hornberger, the subject of this sketch grow 
to manhood in Cincinnati, being about fourteen years of age when he 
came to America. He came to Lawrenceburgh with his parents in 1837, 
having first married in the city Mary E. Loge, May 14, of that year. 
She was a native of Steinweiler, County Condel, Germany, and daughter 
of John and Anna M. (Odenbach) Loge. Her father died in this country 
in 1873, her mother in 1805. Her grandparents were John and Mary 
Loge and Car] and Catharine Odenbach. On locating in Lawrenceburgh 
Mr. H. engaged in the hotel business, which he continued with marked 
success till November, 1S51, a period of fifteen years. He then estab- 
lished himself in the wholesale and retail grocery and liquor trade and 
continued this till 1868, doing a prosperous business. From 1846 to 
1858 he was also engaged at intervals in flat-boating produce on the 
Ohio River, and in this occupation he was also largely successful, his 
most profitable trip being made in 1855, the net proceeds of the same 
amounting to more than $3,000. In 1853 Mr. Hornberger manufact- 
ured about 1,000,000 bricks in connection with his other business opera- 
tions, and in the winter of 1855-56 was engaged in the rendering busi- 
ness at Cincinnati. From 1860 to 1865 he did a large business in con- 
tracting and filling, operating as many as forty men and twenty-five 
carts in his railroad and other engineering constructions. His last work 
in this line was done in 1874. Besides his business operations Mr. 
Hornberger has been largely identified with the official interests of 
Lawrenceburgh and vicinity. In 1859 he was elected township assessor 
of real estate and re-elected to the same office in 1864. Was elected to 
the Lawrenceburgh city council in 1859, and so faithful was he in the 
discharge of his duties in this capacity that he was sustained in this 
position by his constituents for sixteen consecutive years, and is now a 
member of the same body. He officiated as controller and manager of 
the Greendale Cemetery for about eighteen years, and was for some time 
director of the Lawrenceburgh Gas Company. In all his official trans- 
actions he has discharged his duty with faithfulness and integrity, and 
in both capacities of citizen and public servant he has fully merited 
the esteem and honor which attaches to his name. Mr. and Mrs. Horn- 
berger were married May 15, 1837, and eight children have blessed their 
union, namely: Mary Louise, born July 23, 1842, now the wife of 
Valentine J. Koehler; John "William, December 17, 1843; John F., 
January 14, 1845; Caroline, April 8, 1847; George N., November 2, 
1848; Henry, February 9, 1850; Richard W., July 18, 1851; Mary C, 
September 30, 1853.- Five of these children are deceased, viz.: John 
William, Caroline, George N., Mary C. and Richard W. In politics 
Mr. Hornberger is a stanch Democrat and firm in the faith of the prin- 



768 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

ciples of his party. Ho is a member of the I. 0. O. F. having joined 
the society in 1S39 and now the oldest member of the Lawrenceburgh 
lodge. He has practically retired from active business, his chief employ 
ment now being to look after the property which by a long life of in- 
dustry he has been able to accumulate, and he may therefore be aptly 
termed a landlord. 

JOHN F. HORNBERGER, tho popular jeweler of Lawrenceburgh 
was born in tho same city in 1845, and is a son of John Hornberger, 
whose notice appears above. He was educated in the public schools of 
his native town, and for several years was eugagcd in the various county 
offices as clerk or deputy. At the age of twenty-one years he began the 
jeweler's trade with John Goessler, of Newport, Ky., with whom he 
remained about two years. • He then went to Cincinnati for a time, 
opening his shop in Lawrenceburgh in 1SG9. His establishment is locat- 
ed at No. 71 High Street, where he carries a stock of general jewelry 
valued at about §5,000. He does all kinds of work peculiar to the trade, 
and has a liberal patronage. Mr. Hornberger was married, in 1869, to 
Buena Vista McCright, of Lawrenceburgh, daughter of Joseph and 
Nancy McCright, well known residents of tho place, and they have four 
children: Katie, Nanna, George and John. Mr. Hornberger is a mem- 
ber of the K. of P., and one of the live business men of the town. 

ROBERT HUDDLESTON. one of the truly representative citizens of 
Miller Township, was born in Yorkshire, England, in 1820. His parents 
were Robert and Mary (Ward) Huddleston, both natives of England, 
where his mother died. His father and four children immigrated to 
America in 1831, and located in this township, where the father pur- 
chased land and resided till his death, which occurrod soon after. The 
children, thus left in their early years without paternal guidance, 
engaged in work among the farmers of the community till grown to 
maturity, when the old homestead being divided, they established them- 
selves in homes of their own. Robert Huddleston, the subject of this 
notice, was married at the age of twenty-two years to Mary J. Ewbank, 
native of this county, and daughter of Thomas Ewbank, an early set- 
tler of English birth. Her father was born in 1793, and emigrated 
from England with his parents iu 1807, settling in New Jersey. In 1811 
the family moved to Indiana Territory, and settled on Tanner's Creek, 
in this county. In his twenty-fourth year (1817) Thomas Ewbank 
married Elizabeth Anderson, a native of New Jersey, and they began 
house-keeping in tho same place in which Mr. Ewbank closed bis earthly 
career November 26, 1857. In his sixteenth year he joined the Method- 
ist Episcopal Church, and his walk thereafter was that of the conscien 
tious Christian. He also assisted in organizing the Methodist Protest- 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. TOO 

ant Church, in this count). .1 the time of the division between the 
Methodist Episcopal Church and the Methodist Protestant denomina- 
tions, and was warmly attached to the cause of religion. After his mar- 
riage Robert Huddloston took possession of his portion of the home 
farm, erected a cabin on the same in the winter of 1842-43, and with a 
very small outfit of furniture (which included a new cook stove, then a 
great curiosity to the whole neighborhood, and the first in the commu- 
nity), began housekeeping and farming in real pioneer style. The old 
cabin is still standing as a monument, to the early sacrifices endured 
withiu its humble walls; but its day of usefulness has long since gone 
by, and it has given place to a comfortable brick residence of modern 
dosign. A life of industry has rewarded Mr. and Mrs. Huddleston with 
a fair portion of worldly comforts, and their union has been blessed by 
eight children, seven of whom are now living: Sarah C, wife of M. B. 
Wood; T. Henry; Carrie G., wife of John Kuntz; Martin V. who mar- 
ried Mary J. Hansel; John F., who married Ella Cook; Ida M., wife of 
Dora Hansel, and Anna B.who is still at home. It is worthy of note that 
Mr: Huddleston owned the second wagon made at the Guilford shop and 
the first iron toothed harrow used in the community. Mr. and Mrs. H. 
were formerly members of the Methodist Protestant Church but are now 
associated with the Methodist Episcopal society, with which they have 
been connected many years. 

HENRY HUDDLESTON, merchant, Guilford, of the firm of Rob- 
ertson & Huddleston, born in Dearborn County in 1847, is a son 
of Robert Huddleston, and grew to maturity on the farm with his par- 
ents. At Indianapolis he learned the art of telegraphy, which he en- 
gaged in about two years, in Ohio, and then, after a few months at home 
for recuperating his health, went to Fort Gibson, Ind. T., where he was 
employed three years as operator and express agent. Failing in health, 
he returned home in 1876, and after a long period of suffering from spi- 
nal affection, in baffling which he displayed great pluck and tenacity, his 
health was so far restored as to permit him to resume work of a light na- 
ture, and in 1884 he purchased a half interest in the Robertson store, of 
Guilford, and has since engaged in mercantile pursuits. He married 
Emma Sparks in 1871, and they have two children: Mertie and Alico. 

ELIJAH HUFFMAN, farmer, Hogan Township, resides upon Sec- 
tion 21. He was born one mile west of Aurora, July 26, 1818. His 
education was very limited. His father, Conrad, was born on the south 
branch of the Potomac River, Virginia, in 1770. His mother. Elizabeth 
(Carbaugh) Huffman, was born in Harrison County, Ky. . in June, 1798. 
His father was a farmer, and came here iu 1803, and nearly every year 
he built boats and took h'"s crops South. He was a scout in the war of 



770 HISTORY 01- DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

1812, under Gen, Dill, and died June 30, 1802; his mother died 
July 17. 1884. Mr. Huffman was married May 5, 1830, to Miss Rachel 
Burlington. She was born in Dearborn County, January 29, 181 8, and 
to their union six children were born: Andrew J., William B., Daniel, 
Mary A., E. Homer and Nancy J. Andrew J. served three years in 
Company I, Eighty-third Indiana Volunteers. William B., enlisted in 
the Sixteenth Indiana Volunteers, served ninety days, then went into the 
gunboat service, and served over two years. E. Homer served three months 
in the Ninety-first regiment, then went into the gunboat service and 
served until the close of the war. Mr. Huffman was congressional town- 
ship trustee from August, 1830, to 1S45, and justice of the peace from 1845 
to 1854. He was elected State Senator in 1800, and resigned to defeat 
the Fifteenth Amendment; after which ho was reelected by a larger 
majority than before, showing that he was fully indorsed by his constit- 
uents, who honored him with the office for six years. Again Mr. Huff- 
man resigned his seat and returned home, feeling that he had accom- 
plished all the good he could for his friends and neighbors. He has 
always been a warm friend to education, and has served as school direc- 
tor for many years. He was county assessor, by election, for two years. 
He was the originator of the Grange Mutual Fire Insurauce Company, 
framed all the papers, and was the first secretary, holding that position 
for four years, and is now vice-president of the organization. He 
also has an interest in the Grange Supply Store, at Cincinnati, Ohio. 
He cleared most of his present farm, and built all his own buildings, as 
well as many other permanent improvements in the neighborhood. He 
is a member of Wilmington Lodge No. 158, F. & A. M. Both he and 
Mrs. Huffman are members of the Christian Union Church. Mr. and 
Mrs. Huffman are a well preserved old couple, and enjoy life, having 
plenty to meet their every want whilst serving out their pilgrimage here 
below. 

BENJAMIN F. HUNDLEY, proprietor of the Hundley livery and 
feed stable, Rising Sun, was born in Ripley County, Ind., in 1854, son of 
Thomas and Sarah (Mendell) Hundley. He grew to manhood in his na- 
tive county and was there engaged in agricultural pursuits during all the 
earlier portion of his life. He was employed as clerk in a general store 
at Elrod postoffice about two years, and except that time was engaged in 
farming, receiving the essentials of an education in the common schools. 
In the fall of 1883 he came to Rising Sun and purchased the livery 
stock of R. H. Gould, and since that date has continued in the livery 
business, meeting with merited success. Mr. Hundley was married in 
September, 1874, to Miss Esther A. Johnson, daughter of Reizin and 
Esther (Van Dolahj Johnson, her father a native of Ohio, her mother of 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 771 

Dearborn County, Ind. Her father was one of tbo old and esteemed 
residents of Ripley County — at once a tanner, farmer and merchant. 
Mr. H. is a member of the I. O. O. F. and encampment, and is an active, 
energetic citizen, well adapted to his business. 

JESSE HUNT, of Lawrenceburgh, was born in the State of New 
Jersey in the year 1787, and immigrated west with his father's family in 
the year 1806, and located at Elizabethtown, Ohio. Ho moved to this 
city in the year 1817, and rented the Homer Hotel, and in less than a 
year bought it. In 1819 he removed the old log building, and erected 
the three-story building on the corner. It was the first three-story brick 
building erected in the city, and is said to have been the first in the 
State. He continued to keep hotel up to 1818, with a few years of inter- 
mission during that time. He was a man of extraordinary energy and 
mechanical genius. He invented and used the first hay press that was 
ever used in the United States, and was the pioneer of the hay trade to 
the Southern market. In the year 1823 he erected his first hay press on 
the lot where Epstien's store is. It was a wooden screw, and his first 
bales pressed weighed from two to three hundred pounds, and were tied 
with withes. His trial trip down was composed of thirty tons. The 
next year he improved and reconstructed his press, and conceived the 
idea of using hoops and nailing them, for the bales. He pursued that 
business for nearly five years, when he retired from it, and confined him- 
self entirely to the management of his hotel, and the improvement of 
his property in the city. At the organization of the branch of the State 
bank at Lawrenceburgh, he was appointed one of the State directors of 
said. bank, and continued in that position for over twelve years, and for 
a number of years was president of the board of town trustees. He al- 
ways took a great interest in the improvement of the city, and aided in 
every effort to advance its prosperity. Prompt in all his business en- 
gagements with his fellow men, he possessed enough common sense to 
act the part of an honest man in all his private and public trusts. He 
died in April, 1873, at the advanced age of eighty-six years, respected 
by all who knew him. 

MAJ. JAMES W. HUNTER, Lawrenceburgh, waB the son of Rob- 
ert and Letitia (Walker) Hunter, and was born in Harrisburg, Penn., 
December 16, 1796. When a small boy his parents moved to Wellsburg, 
Va., near Wheeling, where they lived ami died. On a visit to Steuben- 
ville, Ohio, during a revival of rolig, in the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, in that city, James Hunter became acquainted with Miss Har- 
riet Protzman to whom he was afterward married, August 31, 1815, 
Thomas Shaw having married Sophia Protzman, a sister of Harriet; 
Hunter and Shaw concluded to start out into the world together. They 



772 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

constructed a flat-boat and gathered together their little stock of house- 
hold goods, loaded them on the boat at Stenbenville, and with the two 

young brides and their mother they launched their boat upon the waters 
of life and the beautiful Ohio, and floated down the stream until they 
came to Cincinnati. Here they landed, but remained but a short time, 
when^they started out into the country to seel; a home. They stopped at 
Brookville, Ind., and after remaining there but a few months came to 
Lawrenceburgh, some time in the year 1817. where they each located, 
lived, raised a family and died within a year or two of each other, hon- 
ored and respected by all who knew them. James Hunter was a carpen- 
ter by trade, and though he was a skilled draftsman and an architect of 
reputation in the community where he lived, he gave up his trade in 
early life and sought other channels in which ho was enabled to secure a 
competency, and leave his family in comfortable circumstances. During 
the latter part of John Quincy Adams' administration, and after the 
election of Gen. Jackson to the Presidency, Judge Isaac Dunn, who 
was then postmaster at, Lawrenceburgh, appointed Maj. Hunter his 
deputy, and on Jackson's inauguration to the Presidency Maj. Hunter, 
who had been a warm supporter of Gen. Jackson, was appointed post- 
master, a position he held until his death, September 14, 1835, and 
which was continued by his widow until the close of Gen. Jackson's 
last administration. During the period he was postmaster he was also 
mail agent for this section of the country, and his house was the head- 
quarters of the mail lines and stage coaches for southeastern Indiana. 
He was a man of an affable and genial nature, and exceedingly popular, 
though he never held any State office other than justice of the peace. 
During the latter part of his life, when his health had been impaired by 
disease, he accepted the office of magistrate, which he also held until his 
death. He had a great fondness for military tactics, and for many years 
made it a study, and when the organization of the militia of the State 
was in force, during the vigorous part of his life, he was an active par- 
ticipant in all of its drills, encampments and displays, and was the lead- 
ing spirit in its movements in southern Iudiana. On the 12th day of 
December, 1825, he was commissioned a major of ^the Fifty fifth Regi- 
ment of Militia of the State of Indiana by James B. Ray, then gover- 
nor of the State, a position he held until his resignation July 2, 1831. 
He died in the prime of life, only thirty-eight years of ago, leaving a 
widow and six children, five of whom lived to mature age, honored and 
respected; the youngest died in infancy. Isaac W. Hunter, the eldest, 
who died in Lawrenceburgh in 18(31, was a business man, and at one 
time was sheriff of Marion County; and he also represented that county 
in the State Legislature. Dr. Lazarus N. Hunter, who died in Texas in 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 773 

I860, was :, prominent ami successful physician of Missouri; Dr. Will- 
iam D. If Hunter, whose biography can bo found in this work, has 
attained to considerable distinction. James J. Hunter was a farmer well 
and favorably known in Dearborn County, whore he lived and died, and 
Mrs. Harriet J. O'Brien, th i only daughter, widow of the Hon. Corne- 
lius O'Brien, is still living in Lawrenceburgh, highly esteemed by her 
many friends. The /widow, now Mrs. Isaac Dunn, is also living, nearly 
the last of the noble pioneers that have given character to the commu- 
nity in which thoy have spent their eventful lives, and in the future will 
be kindly remembered by coming generations. No man has ever lived 
in Lawrenceburgh who left a better name or whose character shone out 
more brightly in its influence on society than his. He lived and died a 
noble Christian man, aud the few that now remember him, speak of him 
as a man perfect in life, and call him to mind with none but pleasing 
recollections. Ex-Gov. Albert Gr. Porter, of Indiana, in writing to Mr. 
F. E. Weakley, in regard to a notice of the death of Maj. Hunter, in a 
letter dated October 17, 1885, says: "I have not been able to find any 
other notice of Maj. Hunter in the Palladium. I am surprised, as Maj. 
Hunter, at the time of his death, was postmaster, and had long been one 
of the most prominent, useful and estimable men in Lawrenceburgh. I 
was a boy when ho died, but I remember him distinctly, because he was 
a man whom boys liked. His name should be long preserved on account 
of his many lino qualities." 

W. D. H. HUNTER, United States revenue collector, Sixth Indiana 
District, born in the city of Lawrenceburgh January 8, 1830, is a 
son of James W. (whose biography appears above) and Harriott Hunter. 
Dr. Hunter obtained the rudiments of an education in the best schools of 
Lawrenceburgh, which was before the days of public schools, and at the 
age of eighteen entered Asbury University, at Greencastle, Ind., taking 
a scientific course. In the spring of 1851 he moved to Mexico, Mo., 
where he engaged in the study of medicine with an elder brother, subse- 
quently, attending lectures at the Ohio Medical College, Cincinnati. 
Returning to Missouri he began the practice of his profession, which he 
continued but a brief period when ho entered the drug business, owing 
to the unpleasant features connected with the medical practice of that 
locality. He remained a resident of Mexico till 1S71, and became one of 
the leading citizens of that part of the State, and during his residence 
there occupied many positions of honor and trust at the hands of an ap- 
preciative people. He was several times mayor of Mexico; was a long 
time member of the city council and served one term as clerk of the 
county court. He was appointed postmaster of Mexico Wy President Pierce; 
was nominated to represent the counties of Audrain, Lincoln and Pike 



774 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

in the constitutional convention called to consider the position of Missouri 
in rolation to the Civil war, but declined; in 1804 was elected repre- 
sentative of Audrain County to fho State Legislature, taking a prominent 
part in the deliberations of the House; in 1866 was appointed assessor of 
internal revenue for the Fourth District of Missouri by President 
Johnson; was made representative of the Ninth Congressional District 
of Missouri in^the National Democratic Convention of 18GS, and was a 
member of the committee on permanent organization of that body, and 
in the meantime was fourteen years editor of the Mexico Ledger. During 
his term of service in the Legislature Dr. Hunter officiated as chairman of 
some of the most important committees, and his public career generally 
has been commended. He was a member of the State board of managers 
of the Missouri State Insurance Company, and was president of the local 
board for Audrain County; also director of the life association America 
of St. Louis. In 1871 he came to Lawreuceburgh to assume tho man- 
agement of his mother's estate left to her control by tho death of her late 
husband, Judge Isaac Dunn, and since that time has been a resident of his, 
native town. He purchased the Lawreuceburgh Register, the official 
paper of Dearborn County in 1877, and this journal he has since ably 
edited, assisted in its management by his son-in-law, W. H. O'Brien. 
In the journalistic field his reputation is also something more than local. 
He has officiated as president of the southeastern Indiana Editorial As- 
sociation and vice-president of the southern Indiana Editors' Association, 
and was also president of the State Democratic Editorial Association. In 
the State politics of Indiana, Dr. Hunter has also been recognized. At 
tho Democratic State convention of Indiana, held at Indianapolis June 
9, 18S0, he was chosen a member of tho State central committee for the 
Fourth Congressional District to serve two years, and in 1884 was chosen 
one of the electors at large for the State of Indiana in the national 
election of that year. In public enterprises Dr. Hunter is always in the 
foremost rank, having taken an active part in the locating of the North 
Missouri Railroad (now known as the Kansas City & Northern Railroad) 
as early as 1854, and was for some time director of the company. He was 
also among the first projectors of the Louisiana & Missouri River Railroad, 
now tho western extension of the Chicago & Alton Railroad, of which he 
was also a director and took an active part in raising subscriptions to its 
stock. In 1885 was appointed collector of internal revenue for the Sixth 
District of Indiana by President Cleveland, and in this capacity he is 
now officiating in connection with his editorial work. The Doctor was 
first married, November 21, 1854, to Lucy J. White, of Audrain County, 
Mo., who lived but a few months after her marriage. October 15, 
1857, he was married to his present wife, Miss Fannie A. Cauthorn, 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 775 

daughter of Ross and Sarah Cauthorn, of Esses Comity, Va. Their two 
children are Hattie, now the wife of William H. O'Brien, and Bessie. 

Dr. Hunter is a member of fcho Methodist Episcopal Church, and also of 
the Masonic fraternity, and is in every respect au honorable gentleman, 
and exemplary citizen. 

JOHN D. HUNTER, Rising Sun, one of the thrifty farmers of Ohio 
County, was born iu Butler County, Ohio, in 1SIU. He is a sou of John 
and Tamson (Dixon) Hunter, and his early years were passed with his 
parents in farm labor, attending the common schools to a limited extent. 
He was married at the age of twenty-eight years to Miss Christiana 
Griswold, a native of Pennsylvania and daughter of Thomas and Mar- 
garet (Corson) Griswold. Her parents married in Beaver County, Ponn., 
came to Ohio, and later to OhioCouuty, about 1833. They both died in 
Rising Sun. After his marriage Mr. Hunter began the work of gaiuing 
a competency, and this was done byfollowing agricultural pursuits. He 
soon made a purchase of fifty acres of land, and his success was such that 
in ten years he was worth as many thousand dollars. He has continued 
farming from the first, and has added to his original purchaso till he 
now owns 350 acres, which he still oversees, two of his sons being 
engaged in the farming business. He ranks among the most prosperous 
farmers of the county, and having always been punctual in meeting his 
obligations enjoys the confidence of a large circle of business men. Mr. 
and Mrs. Hunter have four children: Thomas, Elmer, Charles and 
Margaret, the daughter, now the wife of William Higboe, a carriage 
dealer and manufacturer of Newcastle, Ind. Thomas married Lizzie 
Gibson, daughter of Hugh Gibson, and Elmer married Jennie Miles, 
daughter of Jonas Miles. Mr. and Mrs. Hunter are mombers of the 
Christian Church, and worthy citizens, having the full esteem of their 
community. 

ALEXANDER HUNTER, Randolph Township, son of John Hunter, 
one of the early settlers of Ohio County, was born in Switzerland 
County, Ind., in 1822. His father was a native of Leland, born Feb- 
ruary 9, 1788, and was brought to this country by his parents while an 
infant. His mother, whoso maiden name was Tamson Dixon, was born 
in Ohio, and died at about seventy years of age. His father, who 
located near the Switzerland County line in 1822, died at the age of 
seventy five, having been a farmer all his life. He served many years as 
a justice of the peace and was a strong Democrat, and for many years a 
member of the Baptist Church, but later of the Christian denomination. 
Our subject worked on the farm with his parents till twenty-one years of 
age. He then worked three years for his father at a salary of $100 per 
year, after which he purchased 100 acres of land. Ho has always fol- 



I <0 H1ST0KV OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

lowed agricultural pursuits; has owned sevoral different tracts, and now 
has a farm of K>0 acres of "rood land, besides being otherwise comforta- 
bly provided^for. Mr. Hunter was married, in 1852, to Mary J. Rogers, 
a native ot Ohio County and daughter of Parker Rogers, and their union 
haH beeh blest by three children: Annn Belle, wife of George Oxley, 
Adair" County, Mo.; Ida II., wife of William Powell, residents of 
Switzerland County, Ind., and John P., a resilient of Kansas. Mr. and 
Mrs. Hunter are members of the Baptist Church. 

GEORGE HUSCHART, of the firm of George Huschart & Co., mar- 
ble dealers, Lawrenceburgh City, is a native of Bavaria, born May 11, 
1819. He immigrated to America in 1888 with his parents, his father 
entering Congress land in ihis county. He lived on the farm till eight- 
een years of age, and then took up the trade of marble cutting, in which 
he has since been engaged. Mr. Huschart was married, in 1841, to Mar- 
garet Lang. Their children are George.fH., Michael M., Frank M. , 
Henry A., Margaret, Frances, Mary, Lana M. and Clara. These are 
engaged as follows: Michael M., in the marble business, Lawrenceburgh; 
Frank M., salesman for Roth & Myer, Cincinnati, Ohio; George H., 
commission merchant, Baltimore; FranceB, wife of John P. Georgen, 
Chicago; Mary, a sister in the convent, Fort Wayne; Lana, wife of 
Marks Koiffer, Camden, N. J. Mr. Huschart is one of Lawrenceburgh's 
most worthy citizens. Ho began the marble business with one TJmpstead 
in 1840. The tirm deals in the best foreign and domestic marble, statu- 
ary, tombstones and granite monuments, freestone building work, etc., 
doing a nourishing business. 

CHRISTOPHER HUSTON, of Ohio County, died June 1, 1845, 
aged seventy live years. He was one of the early settlers of the "West, 
having come to the vicinitj' of Rising Sun about the year 1S00. Ho was 
a man universally esteemed, and although his health, for some time pre- 
-vious to his death, had been t such as to 'prevent him from ming- 
ling much with his fellow men, there are many who do and will long 
remember him as one of "God's noblest work, an honest man." 

JOHN ISHER'WOOD,. Lawrenceburgh, grocer, and president of the 
Lawrenceburgh Gas Company, is a native of Lancashire, England, born 
in 1820. He grew into manhood in his native country, being chiefly 
engaged there in the cotton business. In October, 1848, he immigrated 
to America, his objective point being Boston, where he was employed to 
set up the machinery of the Atlantic Cotton Mills, of Lawrence, Mass. 
Ho next removed to Cincinnati, where he was engaged in the Arknos 
Locomotive Shops, till about 1858 or 1859, when he located in Lawrence- 
burgh, where, excepting about two years in grocery business at Indianap- 
olis, he has since remained, chiefly engaged in the grocery and produce 



BIOGKArillCAL SKETCHES. i < t 

trade. Be Las had charge of the gas works since 1877, and has held 
stock in the institution for about seventeen years. Ho has been promi- 
nently identified with the business interests of the city, and has given 
aid to most of its enterprises tending toward its improvement. Mr. Ish- 
erwood wan married, in England, December 25, 1827, to Miss Diana Ken- 
yon, a daughter of James Kenyon, and they have two sons: James W. 
and Thomas W., both at present engaged in the gas works, the former 
superintendent of the same. Mr. Isherwood is a member of the I. 0. O. 
F., and though well along in years, is still one of the most active business 
men of the town in which he resides. Both he and Mrs. Isherwood are 
active members of tho Presbyterian Church. 

JOSEPH A. JACKSON, farmer, Miller Township, was bom in 
Dearborn County in 1823, and is among its oldest native residents. His 
parents were John H. and Rachel (Parker) Jackson, his father also a 
native of this county. Our subject grew to maturity in this township, 
his parents both having died when he was a child, not two years of age. 
He grew up under the care of his grandparents till sixteen years of age, 
and then began the battle of life for himself, finding employment 
wherever he could. For about ten or twelve years he followed the Ohio 
River flat boating, and after abandoning that pursuit began farming, 
having purchased some land in the meantime. He married, in 1857, 
Miss Hester Tebow, a native of Hamilton County, Ohio, whore she was 
reared to twonty-four f years of age. This union has resulted in a family 
of eight children, six of whom are living: Uriah, Olive, Amos, Clara 
B., Harvey and Allen G. Thurman. Since his first purchase, by con- 
stant labor and economical management of business affairs Mr. Jack- 
son has increased his possessions till he now owns 347 acres of land, 
which is under a fair state of improvement. He has always been a hard 
worker, and the competency, which by the assistance of his estimable 
wife he has been able to accumulate, is nothing more than the just reward 
for their combined labor and sacrifices. Mr. Jackson is not an active 
political worker, but in all State and national elections casts his vote in 
favor of Democratic principles. 

COL. PIMKNEY JAMES, Rising Sun, was bred to the law, but not 
liking the practice, soon abandoned it after being admitted. The train- 
ing, and his acquaintance with the law were afterward of great service 
to him in his active mercantile and manufacturing business life. The 
inclination of Col. James' mind was to mechanism, and it might be said 
of him that he was a natural mechanic. In an emigrant's guide, pub- 
lished in 1817, mention is made of Rising Sun, in which it is stated that 
it " has a floating mill anchored abreast of the town." This mill was 
constructed by Col. James, the power being derived from the swift cur- 



778 HISTORY OF DEAKBOKN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

rent in the river in front of the town. A few of the older inhabitants 
will probably remember the saw-mill that once stood on Arnold's Creek, 
a short distance back of town. That was built by Col. James. Some 
time previous to 1830, Col. James built tho flouring-mill at the place 
now called Milton. It was for many years known as "James' Mill," and 
had a reputation for good work that brought customers from many miles 
distant. This mill was at first an exclusively water power mill, but its 
business grew to such proportions that steam machinery had to be placed 
in it to provide against tho contingency of a scarcity of water. He was 
one of the proprietors of I he steam flouring-mill erected at the southeast 
corner of Front and Second Streets. In 1S33 he erected and put in 
operation the cotton factory near the bank of the river, above Fifth 
Street. The business was so successful that in a few years he more than 
doubled its capacity. About 1S43 he built the large brick cotton factory 
on the west side of Market Street, between Fifth aud Sixth Streets, and 
which was destroyed by lire in 1819. Col. James established the first 
steamboat packet line between Rising Sun and Cincinnati in 1834, and 
maintained it uninterruptedly for some ten years. Several unsuccessful 
efforts to establish a steam packet between the two places had proven 
failures. His first boat was the " Dolphin," which made the round trip 
daily, except Sunday, between the two places. The "Dolphin " was built 
in 1834, at James' Mill, on Laughrey Creek, and brought out on the 
spring flood of that year. Her architect was Prince Athearn, who had 
worked as an apprentice on the famed United States frigate " Constitu- 
tion." The steamboat "Renown," of which Col. James was one of the 
owners, was built at the same place in the winter of 1835-30 under the 
same superintendence, and floated to the river also on the spring flood. 
The " Renown " was a large boat for the period and intended for the Cin- 
cinnati and New Orleans or the Cincinnati and St. Louis trade. In 1838 
Col. James built the "Herald,'' and extended his trade to Warsaw, Ky., 
making triweekly round trips. She was a larger and better boat than 
the " Dolphin." The " Herald" ran but a few months. She was burned and 
sunk some ten miles below Cincinnati, on a downward trip, without any 
loss of life. The work of enlarging the " Dolphin" was nearly finished 
when the " Herald " burned. It was hurried to completion and she was put 
in as a Rising Sun and Cincinnati packet. The next spring, 1839, the 
" Indiana " was built at Rising Sun, and put in as a packet the succeeding 
fall, and continued in the trade until 1843, when she was sold to the 
trade between Maysville and Cincinnati. In 1838 Col. James estab- 
lished an iron foundry at Rising Sun, under the management of Mr. N. 
R. Stedman, recently deceased at Aurora, chiefly for the making of cook- 
ing stoves, and which they shipped to all parts of the countrv. The 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. UV 

foundry also did a considerable business iu making cotton-press screws. 
During all these years, and with steamboat and manufacturing interests 
to look after, Col. James was largely and almost all the time engaged in 
merchandising and shipping. He was a man of wonderful energy and 
enterprise and of great industry. As extensive and varied as was bis 
business, he always bold it under bis own control and directed the man- 
agement of it. Col. James was a public spirited citizen, and in that 
respect a public man. He was foremost in every enterprise calculated to 
improve or benefit tbo town, but he had an aversion to holding public 
offices. He was several times a member of the State Legislature, but 
accepted the place only when he could serve in tbo interest of some 
important local matter, and was generally supported for that purpose by 
both political parties. He was several times urged to become a candidate 
for Congress, but always refused. He was a man of fine natural ability, 
well educated, a fluent and forcible speaker, and if be had so chosen, 
could have been a power at the bar or in the State and national legisla- 
tive halls. He was born in Frederick County, Md., May 6, 1794, and 
died December 25, 1851. "Col. James was long known as one of our 
most active business men. The deceased was one of the proprietors of 
the city in which be died, and was industriously engaged for a lifetime 
in building up and increasing the trade of Rising Sun. The community 
will sustain a loss in the death of this distinguished individual that we 
fear will not soon be replaced." 

DR. BASIL JAMES, see page 173. 

CAPT. HENRY JAMES, a pioneer citizen of southeastern Indiana, 
died at Rising Sun, Dec. 2,1880, in his eighty-fourth year. He has been 
long identified with the growth and prosperity of Rising Run, his father, 
John James, being its founder. Capt. Henry James was the father of 
Dr. L. A. James, of Cincinnati. Capt. James, until within a few years 
past, had been identified with some of the prominent and active business 
interests of that section, having been engaged in merchandising, milling 
' and as owner of steamboats, and having, by his intelligent business 
management, added largely to the prosperity of the vicinity of his homo. 
He and bis brother, Col. Pinkney James, now near thirty years deceased, 
and his brother, Dr. B. James, who died some three or four years ago, 
were well known to the early settlers of Cincinnati, as well as this vicin- 
ity, having been educated in the schools there, and later as they entered 
upon active business, to the merchants of thirty years ago. 

EDWIN L. JAQUITH, farmer, a native of Manchester Township, 
born May 6, 1837, is a son of G. Sullivan and Lucy (Grant) Jaquith, 
natives of the State of New York. The paternal grandparents, Reuben 
.and Lucy Jaquith, natives of the same State, about 1S20 removed to 



780 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

Indiana and settled in Manchester Township, a short distance north of 
Wright's Corners, where they resided until their death. Mr. G. Sullivan 
Jaquith was but a hoy when brought lo this county; here he grew to 
manhood, and subsequently married and spent his life in this township. 
He died February 5, 1878, aged sixty-eight years. His widow still sur- 
vives, aged sixty-eight years and resides with her daughter at Aurora. 
They had eleven children, six now living: Edwin L. ; Phebe Ellen, now 
the wife of Hugh D. McMullen, of Aurora; Oyrena H, wife of William 
H. Kyle; Mary Emma, wife of John Emmerson; Anna P., wifeof Frank 
Strieker, residing in Ohio, and Fanny T., wife of George W. Martin, 
also residing in Ohio. Mr. Jaquith engaged in farming several years, 
but subsequently entered upon the mercantile trade at Wright's Corners, 
in which he was engaged for twenty years. He started in life without 
means, but by industry and good management in business, he became 
quite wealthy, owning 250 acres of laud, his store and other property, 
enabling him to enjoy all the comforts and conveniences of life. He and 
wife were active members of the Providence Free Will Baptist Church, 
of which they were among the constituent members and in which he 
served as deacon many years. Our subject, the eldest surviving child, 
has spent his entire life upon the farm where he was raised, engaged in 
agricultural pursuits. He was married March 1, 1860, to Miss Ann E. 
Howerton, born January 21, 1S3U, a daughter of Jeremiah and Elizabeth 
Howerton, ho a native of Virginia and she of Cincinnati, Ohio. Mr. 
Howerton, while a young, single man, came to this county, was married 
at Lawrenceburgh and soon after settled in this township on a farm half 
a mile west of Wright's Corners, and spent his life in this neighborhood. 
He was engaged many years, especially in the winter seasons, in boating 
on the river to New Orleans. By this business and farming in summer, 
conducted with energy and care, he accumulated an ample com- 
petency, leaving to his children property sufficient for a good start in 
life. He and wife were early members of the Free Will Baptist Church. 
He died May 5, 1802, aged fifty-six years. His widow still survives, 
aged seventy years. Of their eleven children seven are living: Omer, a 
resident of Kansas; Mary Jane, wife of Henry Mason; Ann E. ; Frank 
D., living in Nebraska; Lorinda, wife of Samuel Darling, of Indianapolis; 
Albert E. and George F. Mr. Jaquith and wife have eight children: 
Cora Estella, Clemiutme A, Iva Pearl, Nellie Gertrude, Orville, Sulli- 
van Frank Edwin, Libbio May and Leoline. 

MAJ. JAMES JELLEY,' Sr., of Rising Sun, was born July 1, 
1768, was married in Fayette County, Penn., and in the year 1813 
removed to the site of Rising Sun. He was a tanner by trade, and for 
years was engaged in the tanning business in his adopted village. He 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 781 

was a member of the convention that framed the State Constitution in 1816. 
In 1S22 Maj. Jolley was a representative from Dearborn County in the 
State Legislature. For many years he was brigade major in the State 
militia, cpmprising the counties of Jefferson, Switzerland and Dearborn. 
He was the first probate judge of Ohio County, serving from 1844 to 
1851. His wife, Isabella, was one of the original members of the first 
Presbyterian Church organized in Rising Sun, with which denomination 
she had been identified sixtj- years. Her death occurred November 12, 
1855, aged sixty seven years. Maj. Jelley died February 6, 1S64, hav- 
ing been a Freemason for upward of half a century. 

CHARLES S. JELLEY. attorney at law, Aurora, son of Hugh 
Jelley and grandson of Maj. Samuel Jelley, late of Rising Sun, was 
born in the vicinity of Rising Sun, Ind. , May 16, 1849. He attended 
the public schools of that village from which he was graduated in 1S64, 
and two years later was graduated from Hopkins Grammar School at 
New Haven, Conn., after which he entered Asbury, now Depauw Uni- 
versity, at Greencastle, Ind., where he pursued his studies two years, 
then went East and entered Yale College, from which institution he was 
graduated in 1871. He read law. at Wilmington, Ohio, and was there 
admitted to the bar, May 16. 1872, in which place he began the practice 
of law, and continued until March 1, 1874. He then removed to Aurora, 
Dearborn County, Ind., where he has since resided and been engaged 
in active practice. On the 11th of November, 1875, he was married, at 
Wilmington, Ohio, to Miss Lizzie Hughes, a daughter of Judge Hughes. 
Mr. Jelley is a scholarly young man of fine intellect and promising in 
his profession. He has served as city attorney of Aurora for seven years. 

THOMAS JENNINGS, farmer, Sparta Township, an old and highly 
esteemed citizen of Dearborn County, was born in Indiana County, 
Penn., October 25, 1807. His father, Isaac Jennings, was a native of 
Cecil County, Md., and was born in 1766. He was one of four children, 
viz. : Thomas, James, Isaac and Deborah, born to Isaac and Sarah 
(Dick) Jennings. He was united in marriage in Cecil County, Md., in 
1788, to Elizabeth, daughter of David and Elizabeth (Thompson) Camp- 
boll, who was born in Ireland in. the year 1766. Shortly after their 
marriage they located in Westmoreland County, Penn., after which the 
county was divided, and they resided in Indiana County until 1820, at 
which time they moved to Butler County, Ohio, and in 1825 to Hamilton 
County, where he died in 1828, and she in 1829. Their children were 
David, Deborah, Sarah, Isaac, Elizabeth, Ann, James, Susan and 
Thomas, our subject, the youngest member of the family. He came 
with his parents to Ohio in 1820, where he was educated, and afterward 
engaged in teaching school for a number of years, beginning as early as 



782 IIISTOKY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

1826. He taught tho first free school that was taught in Cincinnati, 
Ohio. In 1830 ho engaged in the dairy business, which ho continued 
for some time, and August 13, 1833, was united in marriage to Emelino 
L. S. Jones, and in 1835 moved to Wilmington, Dearborn Co., Ind., 
where* he engaged in the merchandise businoss for about five years. 
His wife died in 1836, and he was subsequently married to Catherine 
Quarry. In 1840 he removed to Cincinnati, Ohio, and resumed tho 
dairy business, and in 1S57 removed to Dearborn County, purchased and 
settled on his present farm, where he has since resided. He had born 
to him seven children, viz. : Thomas W. (deceased, by first wife), and 
Samuel G., Rebecca A., Thomas A., Isaac (deceased), Sarah L. and 
Susan. Mr. Jennings is a worthy citizen and highly esteemed by all. 
He and wife are identified with tho Methodist Episcopal Church, of 
which ho has been a devoted and zealous member since 1829. He owns 
a pleasant homo and farm of 110 acres. 

THOMAS JOHNSTON, retired miller, Manchester Township, was 
born January 1, 182S, a son of Joseph and Mary (Karney) Johnston, he 
a native of Virginia and she of Kentucky, About 1810 three brothers, 
David, George and Joseph Johnston, with their mother, Elizabeth John- 
ston, emigrated from Virginia to Ohio, where they spent a short time, 
thence in 1812 they moved westward through Indiana till they reached 
Vincennes, whore they stopped and raised one crop; thence removed into 
Kentucky, near Louisville, and spent one season, and in 181-1 came to 
Dearborn County, Ind , locating on land near Aurora, known as the Reese 
land, where they raised one crop, and during this time they entered 
from Government 240 acres of land on North Hogan Creek, in Section 
10, Manchester Township. This country was then all in the woods with 
few roads. They cut out a new road from the block-house by which to 
reach their land and location. In 1815 they moved to their new home, 
where they had already erected a log house. This location had been 
selected by them, not for its beauty or value for farming purposes, but 
as an eligiblo site for milling purposes, and they immediately commenced 
digging a race, and making other preparations for the erection of a 
grist-mill, subsequently employing a millwright from Hamilton, Ohio. 
This mill, which was at first erected with a single run of buhrs, was 
ultimately increased to four run of buhrs, and was one of the earliest and 
most important mills in this section of the country. This mill continued 
to be run by the Johnston family for nearly sixty-six years, until in 
December, 1882, tho mill was destroyed by Ere. In 1843 Joseph pur- 
chased the interest of his brother George, and continued to run tho mill 
till his death in October, 1873, aged eighty-one years. From that time 
till the mill was burned it was run by the sons. Mr. Johnston's life was 



B10GKAHIICAL SKETCHES. 783 

one of great activity, mnl all hi.-, business conducted with prudence ami 
good management, ami as a result he became wealthy, having accumu- 
lated a large competency. He was the father of nine children — seven 
sons and two daughters — five now living: John. George, Thomas, Colum- 
bus and Joseph M., all of whom live upon the old home place but 
George, who resides one-fourth of a mile ibove on Hogati Creek. 
Thomas Johnston, tho subject of this sketch, was married, in September, 
1867, to Miss Abigail Heustis, a daughter of Eiias and Sarah Heustis, 
he a native of New York and she of Massachusetts, who were among the 
early settlers of Manchester Township. By this union they have had 
four children: Robert Cavo, Anna Mary, David Thomas and Joseph E. 
(twins); the latter died aged three months. Mr. Johnston filled the office 
of county treasurer by appointment from May till November, 1855, 
thence by election from that date till November. 1857. 

COLUMBUS JOHNSTON, miller, Manchester Township, is a son 
of Joseph and Mary Johnston, whose history appears in biographical 
sketch of Thomas Johnston. Ho was born January 7, 1834, on his 
father's place on North Hogan Creek, where he grow to manhood, 
brought up to the milling business in his father's mill, receiving a good 
common education, such as tho district school of their neighborhood 
afforded. After arriving at his majority he continued his labors with his 
father and brothers in conducting the milling business, which had been 
for many years and still continued to be conducted by them, with no 
special partnership or company organized, but all working together as 
one family in friendly unison upon the confidence and honor each placed 
in the other, all property and its income being enjoyed in common by all, 
which exhibited the unusual feature of family honor and confidence 
worthy of imitation. In 1874 Mr. Johnston was elected to the Legisla- 
ture, serving in the session of 1875, and re-elected in 187G, serving in 
the session of 1877, his services giving general satisfaction to his con- 
stituents. In 1882 he was elected as senator; has served two years, with 
two years more to serve. Mr. Johnston is also held in such high estima- 
tion in his community, upon the principle of his honesty and integrity, 
that he is entrusted with much public business for others; is now serving 
as guardian for a large estate which takes considerable time and atten- 
tion. In all of Mr. Johnston's business relations, whether for himself, 
for others, or in his official capacity for his constituents, he carries for- 
ward his work in an unassuming yet prompt and straightforward manner 
that wins the confidence of all with whom he has dealings. Mr. John- 
ston was united in marriage, January 4, 1870, with Miss Ella J. Brum- 
blay, a daughter of Davis M. and Sarah C. (Givan) Brumblay, natives of 
this county. By this union they have had two children, one now living, 



784 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

Edgar F.. born May 23, U 74; Florence (deceased). Mr. J. is a member 
of Burs Lodge, No. 55, F & A. M. Is a Democrat in politics. 

ADAM JOHNSON, baker and confectioner, Aurora, was born in 
Bavaria", January 7, 1821, where he received a common education. His 
father. Adam, was born in Bavaria in 1795, and died in 1848; his 
mother Catherine (Kuentzer) Johnson, was born in Bavaria in 1790, and 
died in 1S37. The subject of our sketch came to America in 1840, land- 
ing in New York, and worked in the water-works for three months. 
Thence lie went to Philadelphia where he began the baker trade, at which 
he worked for six month; . then moved to the country, and followed 
weaving until in 1848, when he moved to Aurora, Ind., and has followed 
baking ever since. He was married, August 12, 1850, to Mrs. Eliza N. 
(Steuzart) Oassner; she was born iu Hamilton County, Ohio, May 31, 
1828, and had two children by her first marriage, Sophia and Francis J.: 
by her union with Mr. Johnson, six children: Eliza B., Albert, Phoeba, 
Christ, Addie and Abbie have been born. Mr. Johnson runs a delivery 
wagon and delivers bread to all parts of the city. In connection with 
his bakery he has, during the season, an oyster saloon. 

J.W.JOHNSON, farmer, Sparta Township. was born in the same, May 
31,1835. His parents were the old and highly esteemed pioneers, John D. 
and Sarah iBrumblay) Johnson, who, with their parents, emigrated from 
Maryland to Dearborn County in a very early day. The former was a 
son of Benjamin Johnson, a native of Worcester County, Md., and was 
born February 1, 1778. He, also, married in the same county, a Miss 
Sarah Dashiel, a native of the same county, born August 22, 1777. In 
1817 thoy immigrated to Dearborn County, Ind., settling in Sparta 
Township, where they resided until about 1848, at which time they re- 
moved to Jackson, Iowa, where he died August 30, 1852, she surviving him 
about two years. They had born to them eight children, namely: Will- 
iam P., Anna, Margaret, Samuel, Edward K. , Elizabeth, Benjamin and 
John D. the father of our subject and the eldest member of the family. 
He was born in Worcester County, Md., in 1808, and came with his 
parents, in 1817, to Dearborn County, where he learned the stone 
cutting trade, which he afterward engaged in for a number of years. 
He and Sarah Brumblay were united in marriage in Sparta Township, 
October 23, 1828. She was born in Worcester County, Md., April 29. 
1809, and was a daughter of John and Elizabeth (McGee) Brumblay, who 
immigrated to this county from Worcester County, Md., in 1817. They 
were both natives of that county, the former born January 15, 1781; the 
latter, September 23, 1787. They were parents of six children, viz.: 
Sarah, Mary, Elizabeth, John, Anna and David M. On immigrating to 
Dearborn County, Mr. Brumblay settled in Sparta Township on a farm, 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 785 

whero ho died July 31, 1853, his widow, October 11, 1854. After Mr. 
Johnson's marriage he settled on a farm in Sparta Township, Section 12, 
where ho remained until about 1836, at which time he removed to Wil- 
mington*, hut subsequently removed to Sparta Township and purchased a 
farm in Section IS, where ho settled and afterward resided until his 
death, which occurred in January, 187S. Me held a number of offices 
of trust, was twice elected to the Legislature and once to the constitutional 
convention. His widow survived him three years and died March 12,1881. 
They had born to them twelve children, viz.: Sarah E. (deceased), Mar- 
garet (decea ed), Francis M., John W., Joseph S., Benjamin F. , Mahala 
J., Mary J. (deceased), Edward P., Charles J., "William C. and Anna. 
J. W., our subject, attendod the district schools and received a fair edu- 
cation, and afterward completed his education at the Franklin College. 
He was united in marriage, October 2, 1856, to Henrietta, daughter of 
Noah and Sarah (Montgomery) Davis, and a native of Hogan Township, 
born October 30, 1S3G. After his marriage he settled on a farm in Sparta 
Township, where he remained sis years, when he sold it and purchased 
and moved on his present farm, where he has since resided. Mr. John- 
son is an energetic aud extensive farmer. He is a member of the Bap- 
tist Church, also, a member of the Odd Fellows order. He began teach- 
ing school in 185G, aud has since taught sixteen terms, ten in Sparta 
Township. He held the office of justice of the peace from 1878 to 1S84. 
Has raised six orphan children but is the father of none. 

CHARLES W. JOHNSON, harness- maker, Moore's Hill, was born in 
Hamilton County, Ohio, May 28, 1836; his parents, William P. and 
Maria L. (Olmsted) Johnson, were natives of Maryland and Indiana 
respectively, the former being a son of Benjamin and Sarah (Dashiel) 
Johnson, whose skotch appears elsewhere. Our subject's mother died 
when he was about one year old, and he was afterward brought up and 
educated by his grandparents, John S. and Hattie Olmsted, with whom 
he remained until he reached the years of maturity, and with whom he 
moved to Switzerland County, Ind., in 1843. He devoted the greater 
part of his early life to farming, and in 1861, entered the war, enlisting 
July 22 of that year in Company C, Third Indiana Cavalry, and served 
iD the rank of a non-commissioned officer until the battle of Upperville, Va. 
Here he was wounded, July 22, 1863, shot by a musket ball in the right 
thigh, which resulted in tho amputation of his limb, eight inches from 
the body. This disabled him from further service and he was taken to 
the hospital, whore he remained until his discharge, March 7, 1864. Mr. 
Johnson was a brave soldier, and participated in all the engagements of 
his regiment, until tha date of his wound, passing through thirteen 
general engagements and thirty two skirmishes. After his discharge in 



786 HISroB.1' OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

1804, bo returned to Switzerland County, Iud., and the same year was 
elected assessor e of the township in which he resided, which oilice he 
held for four years. He was united in marriage in Switzerland County, 
March 7, 1SG5, to Matilda L., daughter of Jordan and Susan (Cole) 
"Wainscott. She was born in Switzerland County, Iud., May 17, 1840. 
In 18GU, Mr. Johnson was elected real estate appraiser of Switzerland 
County, and, in 1870, took the census of that county. In 1871 he began 
his present trade at Bennington, that county, which ho pursued there 
for about ten years, and during the greater part of the time, he held tho 
office of township trustee. In September, 1881, he moved to Moore's 
Hill, Ind., for the purpose of educating his children, of whom the 
two eldest are now students of Moore's Hill College; he also re- 
sumed the harness trade on moving there. His children are John W., 
Flora C. , Margaret P. and Lillian G. Mr. Johnson is one of the most 
sociable and accomodating business men of Moore's Hill, and is highly 
respected. He is a man well informed on general topics, and in politics 
is a Republican. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
also a member of the I. O . O. F., and G. A. II. 

REV. JAMES JONES of Rising Sun, a philanthropist patriot, a 
Christian, and last but not least, a devout and effective minister of the 
Gospel, was born in Herefordshire, England March 22,1790,and came with 
his parentsto.the United States in 1803, and settled in the city of Balti- 
more. In 1807, the family moved to Milford, Ohio. In 1810 under tho 
preaching of Rev. Jesse Justice, he united with the Methodist Episcopal 
Church at a camp meeting near Milford; in 1811 he was licensed to 
exhort, and six year later (1817), was licensed to preach. He removed 
the Kline year to Rising Sun, Ind., where he found a small class of four- 
teen members which had been organized by Rev. John Strange. In 1820 he 
was received into the Ohio Conference, and appointed to "Whitewater Cir- 
cuit. The next year he was sent to Madison Circuit. The two succeed- 
ing years he traveled Oxford Circuit. His next appointment was on the 
Lawrenceburgh Circuit, and then was stationed at the Rising Sun charge. 
For eight years following his ministry at Rising Sun, he was out of the 
work, and was occupied as a carpenter, that being his trade. He went 
to New Orleans during the winters, worked at his trade and preached on 
the deck of flat-boats, on the wharves, levies and in churches. During all 
this time he never lost the itinerant fire, and, in October, 1834, he joined 
the Indiana Conference, and was appointed to Yevay Circuit for two 
years. In 1830-37, he traveled Lawrenceburgh Circuit, with an increase 
of nearly 700 members; next work was Brookville Circuit, in 1838-39; 
and next was the Yevay Circuit again; next was Wilmington Circuit 
two years; in 1844 was appointed to Rising Sun District, and in 1845 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 787 

was stationed at Jefferson ville; in 18 46-4:7, to Patriot Circuit, and in 18 18 
to Blizabethtown Circuit, whore in a protracted mooting he received his 
first paralytic, stroke, from which he never fully recovered. In 1 S 4-9 ho 
was sent to Vernon Circuit; and in 1850, he received his last station at 
North Madison, and closed his twenty second year of active labor in the 
church; from 1851 ho sustained a superannuated relation to the confer- 
ence, till the day of his death which occurred in Rising Sun, November 
7, 1856. Mr. Jones served in the war of 1812, under Harrison. "He 
manifested by his conduct in life, that he meant to fulfill all of the char- 
acteristics of a good man, and ho did accomplish them all to the letter. He 
possessed all of the qualities of head and heart eminently calculated to 
fit him for usefulness in the age in which he lived, and the circumstan- 
ces that surrounded him.'' 

JOHN H. JONES, of Rising Sun, is a son of Rev. James Jones, 
and is a native of Milford, Ohio, born August 20, 1814 In 1817 his 
parents settled in the village of Rising Sun, the family being composed 
of the parents and two or three children, of whom our subject was the 
eldest. The latter when very small, obtained employment in the little 
woolen factory of the village operated by John and Harvey Aikens. He 
received but a limited education owing to the circumstances surrounding 
him. In 1828 Mr. Jones began clerking for Mr. Shadrach Hathaway, a 
merchant of the village, who, after a trial of four weeks, bargained 
with the father of our subject for the latter's services for one year, agree- 
ing to pay for the same $25, and one quarter's schooling in the seminary. 
This was accepted and ended Mr. Jones school days. For the succeed- 
ing seven years Mr. J. remained with Mr. Hathaway, and subsequently 
clerked for Moses Turner. Next he bought some stock in the stoamboat 
"Alpha," built in the village, and was her clerk for a period. He sub- 
sequently clerked for different persons in Rising Sun, and in 1846. in 
connection with Capt. D. J. Rabb, went into the grocery and general 
produce trade, which firm did an extensive business for about five 
years, when they sold to the Espeys. One year later, Mr. Jones again 
engaged in the same vocation and continued until after the late war. 
Since that time he has given up the more active and heavy pursuits, and 
been employed in agencies and a general real estate line. Mr. Jones has 
been the kind husband of four wives, the first being Miss Precepta C. 
Bailey, of Cincinnati; the second was Miss Jane Murray; the third, 
Mrs. Sarah Guard, and the present one was Ruth Gullitt. He is the 
father of seven children, only two of whom survive. Mr. Jones has 
long been identified with the interests of Rising Sun and ever active in 
taking part in all movements looking to the development of the place. 
Ho has long been active in trying to get a railroad to the city, and is yet 



788 history or DEARBORN AND OHIO counties. 

untiring and hopeful. Ho has served the people in various offices to 
their satisfaction and to his own credit; has been one of the leading 
spirits in church work, having been since youth identified with the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church. He is a respected and esteemed citizen. 

OSCAR JONES, dealer in staple and fancy groceries, Rising Sun, 
was born in the same square on which his store is located, in 1854. He 
grew up in his native town and obtained a limited education in its pub- 
lic schools. In his fourteenth year he began operations in flat-boating, 
trading in produce, and in this business he continued about nine years. 
He then established himself in the grocery business, purchasing his first 
stock from Mr. Hewitt. He has gradually increased his stock and trade, 
and now ranks among the most prosperous grocers of Rising Sun. Mr. 
Jones was married, May 19, 1875, to Mary E. Hamilton, r of Ohio county, 
and "daughter of John E. Hamilton. He is a member of the I. O. O F. 
and encampment, having been twice to the grand lodge, and with Mrs. 
Jones, is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

ORIN JUDD, Miller JTownship, was born in Dearborn County in 
1831. His father, Orin Judd, was a native of New York, born in 1790, 
came to this locality at twenty-one years of age, purchased land and 
married Nancy A. Gibson, by whom eight children wore born: Erastus, 
Charlotte, Mary A., Job, Louise, Orin, Nancy E. and Harriet, the two 
eldest now deceased, the others living in various parts of the West. The 
father died in December, 1848; the mother in September, 1843. Our 
subject grew up on the farm and has ever since engaged in agricultural 
pursuits. After his father's death he took charge of the estate, of which 
he subsequently inherited fifty acres. In 1852 ho sold his interest in the 
homostead and purchased his present farm of ninety-four acres, where he 
has since residod. He was married, April 11, 1851, to Mary J. Cook, of 
this county, daughter of George and Priscilla (Ewbank) Cook, natives 
of England, and among the first settlers of this locality. Her father is 
still living in his eighty-fifth year. Her mother died August 31, 1879. 
Mr. and Mrs. Judd have five children: George, Morris, Anna, Josie and 
Emma. The family is associated with the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
of which Mr. Judd has occasionally officiated as local minister for the 
past twenty-five years. Besides his property in this county Mr. Judd 
owns a farm of eighty acres in Livingston County, 111., on which Mor- 
ris, the youngest son, resides. He married Sarah B. Hawk, of this coan- 
ty, in February, 1883. George A. married Jennie Shaw, of this county, 
in February, 1879, and now resides in McLean County, 111. Anna was 
married in February, 1880, to Whitfield Nowlin, and resides in this 
township. Josie was married in October, 1884, to Leonard Blasdel, and 
also lives in this township. 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 789 

EDWAKD E. JUSTIS, (armor, Sparta Township, was born near 
Moore's Hill, June 29, LS37. His parents wore Martin and Dorcas T. 
(Eaton) Justis, natives of Delaware and Virginia, respectively, the former 
born in Delaware, December 1, 1788, and from thence immigrated with 
his parents, John and Susan (Turner) Jnstis, to Pittsburg, Penn., in a 
very early day. From Pittsburg they removed to Columbia, Hamilton 
Co., Ohio, whore he learned the shoe-making and tanning trade, which he 
afterward engaged in for a number of years. He was united in marriage 
in Union County, Ind., November 7, 1817, to the above Dorcas T.Eaton, 
who was born in Virginia, March 29, 1799, and was a daughter of AYill- 
iam and Margaret (Gossom) Eaton, natives of Virginia. In March, 
1821, Mr. Justis moved to Dearborn County, Ind., settling on a quarter 
section of land in Sparta Township, a part of which is now within the 
limits of Moore's Hill. After erecting a small log-cabin and opening 
out a few acres of ground, he in company with his brother, prepared a 
tan-yard, on which they built a shop, and for many years afterward en- 
gaged in tanning and shoe- making, supplying the pioneer neighbors with 
'boots and shoes. He subsequently retired from his trade, and turned 
his attention to farming. Later he erected a pleasant and commodi- 
ous residence, in which he resided until his death, December 24, 1872. 
His widow succeeded him in death, February 23, 18S3. Eighteen children 
were born to them, who were named as follows: William, John, Thomas, 
Nancy, Sarah, Margaret, Jesse T., Squire, Mary H., Sanna S., Samuel 
N., Elizabeth, Permelia D., Harriet, Edward E., Deborah, Louisiana 
and Altha G. Mr. Justis was a man of many good qualities. His wife, 
an exceedingly intelligent and amiable lady, was loved by everybody. 
They were among the early pioneers of this vicinity, and well under- 
stood the hardships and inconveniences of a pioneer life. 

HEEMAN H. KAMPING, merchant, Dillsborough, is a native of 
Germany, born August 14, 1840. His parents, John H. and Margaret 
E. (Orthmann) Kamping, were both natives of Germany, where they 
resided until death. They were the parents of rive children, of whom 
our subject was the youngest, He, when about fifteen years of age, 
turned his attention to the tailor's trade, which he completed and has en- 
gaged in more or less since. In 1864 he immigrated to the United 
States, landing in October of that year at New York City, and a few 
days later came to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he remained until the follow- 
ing spring, at which time he came to Dillsborough, where he has since 
resided. In 1868 he opened a general mercantile store, which he has 
since continued, and also does merchant tailoring. He married at Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio, October 8, 1S68, Emma E. Struve, by whom he has had 
born to him seven children, viz.: Anna M. E., William H, Henry H, 



700 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

Amelia St., Lula I., Emma S. and one infant daughter who is not yet 
named. 

FREDERICK W. KASSEBAUM, marble dealer, Aurora, was born 
in Hanover, Germany, Oetobor 29, 1843. His parents, Frederick AY. 
and Mary E. (Prasseu) Kassebaum were natives of Hanover, Germany, 
the father was born August 25, 1S()9, and tho mother February 23, 1811. 
The former was a landscape gardener. Tho family immigrated to America 
in 1845, locating in Cincinnati, Ohio. In 1850 thoy moved to Switzer- 
land County, Ind., and followed farming up to 1858, thence to Indian- 
apolis, where the father is now leading a retired lifo; the mother died 
July 8, 1856. In the fall of 1850 Mr. Kassebaum commonced his trade 
in Cincinnati, Ohio. After learning the same he worked journey work 
in Vevay, Ind., up to July 4, 1861, at which time he enlisted in Company 
A, Third Regiment Indiana Cavalry, serving twenty months as private. 
He was wounded near Portville, Md., in the shoulder and head. In 
18G3 he went to Indianapolis, and worked for Ware & Co., with which 
firm he remained until January, 1865, when he located in Switzerland 
County, engaging in the marble business, continuing for eleven years, 
after which he sold out and moved to Indianapolis and engaged in the 
grocery business. In 1879 he came to Aurora and began business in this 
city. He was married, October 29, 1866, to Miss Martha H. Vandevier. 
who was born in Switzerland County, February 18, 1849. Eight chil- 
dren have been born to tho marriage, namely: John L., AnnaE., Carrie 
J., Mary B., Earnest Albert F., Jessie and Fred W. Mr. Kassebaum 
was deputy collector of internal revenue for six months. He is presi- 
dent of the school board. He belongs to the I. O. O. F. and encamp- 
ment, K. of H., G. A. R. and Aurora Lodge No. 51 F. & A. M. His 
wife iB a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

JOHN PHILIP KASTNER, baker and ice dealer, Aurora, was born 
in Bavaria, November 19, 1819, where he received a common school 
education. His father, Godfrey, was born in Bavaria in 1790 and died 
in 1860; his mother, Savilla Miller, was born in the same province in 1795 
and died in 1865. John Philip came to America in 1S39 and worked in 
Cincinnati, Ohio, for four years. He then came to Aurora and engaged in 
the grocery and bakery business with a brother. In 1846 ho sold out and 
went to Germany, returned in 1847 and worked for his brother. He was 
married March 15, 1848, to Miss Mary Huekory, who was born iu Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio, in 1834. Unto them have been given eight children: Dor- 
othea, Mary, Andy, Louisa, Matilda, Igeua, Gustavo and Edward.- Mr. 
Kastner started in the ice business in 1854, and is the oldest business 
man of German extraction in the city. He was school trustee in 1864, 
and is a member of the Pioneer Society of Cincinnati, Ohio. His wife 
and daughter are members of the Catholic Church. 



r.Kici: Ai'iiuwi 



701 



GEORGE H. KEENEY. Rising Sun, county surveyor, undertaker 
and produce dealer, is a native of Switzerland County, Ind., born in 1818. 
He is a son of Hiram 13. and Delilah (Humphrey) Koeney, his father a 
native of New York, his mother of Switzerland County, Ind. His 
father, Hiram B. Keeney, born in New York in 1820, came to Switzer- 
land County with his parents in 1835. Ho farmed with his brothor. 
William, for several years ami then purchased the farm, where his widow 
now lives, on which he resided until his death in lSGP). He owned 170 
acres of good land. Mr. Keeney married Delilah Humphrey in 1815. 
She was a daughter of Stephen Humphrey, of an old family in 
Switzerland County. Mr. Keeney was a member of the F. & A. M. and 
one of the most thrifty farmers and esteemed citizens of the county in 
which he lived. He had four children: Laura, wife of P. North; George 
H., hosier, who married Lena Cunningham; and Jacob, who married 
Mollie < Moore. At the time of his death. Mr. Keeney was holding the 
office of surveyor of Switzerland County. George H., our subject, grew 
up on the farm, where he remained till his father's death. He was 
educated in the public schools of the county and subsequently taught 
several terms. He acquired a knowledge of surveying and civil engineer- 
ing and has since done considerable work in that line. He served as dep- 
uty surveyor in Switzerland County from 1869 to 18S0, when he located 
in Rising Sun. He was appointed surveyor of Ghio County in 1883 and 
has since served by election as regular surveyor. From 1S73 to 1877 he 
was employed in the United States revenue service. In connection with 
his official work as surveyor and engineer, Mr. Keeney does undertaking 
and officiates as a funeral director, besides doing quite an extensive produce 
business in partnership with Simon Beymer, president of the Rising Sun 
National Bank, under the firm name of Keeney & Beymer. Mr. Keeney 
was married in 1S73 to Miss Mary Shafer, of Aurora, Ind., daughter of 
Andrew Shafer, and they have five children: Burke, Bayard, Hale, Mabel 
and Denver. Mr. Keeney is a member of the F. & A. M., Patriot, Ind., 
and of the Univorsalist Church, clerk of the latter society. 

WILLIAM C. KEMP, Randolph Township, one of the foremost 
farmers of Ohio County, was born in the same in 1823. He is a son of 
John and Huldah (Lampkin) Kemp, the former a native of England, the 
latter of New York. His father came to Dearborn County about 1800-07 
and entered land there, for a time keeping "bachelor's hall." He be- 
came one of the prominent farmers and died in 18G5, his wife passing 
away a few years previous to that date. William C, whose name heads 
this notice, spent his early years in assisting his parents on the farm in 
Ohio County where he has nearly ever since resided. He was educated in 
the public schools of his day and learned the coopering trade also, which 



792 HISTORY OF DKARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

he continued to work at for some time in connection with his fanning. In 
1840, Mr. Kemp purchased I OS acres of land in .Switzerland County a* 
$1,400, this lieing Ins first investment in real estate. Heresided several 
years at different times in Switzerland County, but finally located per- 
manently in Randolph Township. He has dealt to a considerable extent 
in real estate and now owns about 800 acres of choice land which ho has 
obtained by hard labor, good management and economy combined. Mr. 
Kemp was married in 1841) io Content L. Hastings, daughter of James 
Hasting>, one of the pioneer settlers of this county. She is a grand- 
daughter also of Prince Athearn who assisted in laying the keel of the old 
warship "Constitution," and afterward built several river steamboats at 
Rising Sun. To Mr. and Mrs. Kemp were born eight children, all liv- 
ing and all married but one, their names being as follows: James, 
Charles, Harry, Edward, Lucian, Laura (wife of Henry Sparks), Mollie 
(wife of Mahlon Fisk) and Maggie (wife of William Wade). Mr. Kemp 
ranks among the most successful farmers of the county and his reputation 
as a citizen is no less enviable. 

SAMUEL M. KENNEDY, farmer, Manchester Township, born in 
Franklin County, Penn., July 6, 1S13, is a son of John and Elizabeth 
(McMath) Kennedy, he, a native of South Carolina and she of Pennsyl- 
vania. Mr. John Kennedy had one brother, William, who was in the 
battle of Tippecanoe and many others, and at the close of that war, enlist- 
ed in the regular army in which he served through life. He also had one 
sister, Eleanor, who married William Mackey, and lived and died in 
Franklin County, Fenn. Mr. John Kennedy came to Pennsylvania, when 
a young man, married and resided there until 1830, when he immigrated 
with his family to Indiana and settled in Dearborn County on land now 
owned by James McMullen in Section 32, Manchester Township, where 
he died in the summer of 1850, aged seventy-two years. His wife died 
in 1848, aged sixty-four years. They had ten children: John, Margaret, 
Eliza, Mary, Samuel M. , William, Robert, Nancy, James and Catharine, 
of whom five now survive: Eliza, now widow Bair, residing in Pennsyl- 
vania, with her son, Samuel M. ; Robert, now a resident of Illinois; Nancy, 
wife of James McMullen, and James. Mr. Samuel M. Kennedy grew to 
manhood in his native state. In 1840 he came to this county, where in 
1842, he married Miss Harriet Ellingwood, by whom he had three chil- 
dren, Elizabeth, wife of Sylvanus Palmer, now a resident of Burling- 
ton, Ky. ; Nancy, now widow Pratt, holding a position in the Soldiers' 
Orphan Home at Knightstown, Ind., and John B., a teacher in the 
High School at Batesville, Ind., also a partner in the Coffin Manufac- 
tory of the same place. Mrs. Kennedy died in 184G. March 4, 1849, 
Mr. KenneJy married for his second wife, Margaret Barton, a daughter 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. ivd 

of William ami Jane Barton, natives of Ireland, who Bottled in Dear- 
born County in ISIS. I>y this union they have three children: William, 
Harriot ami Samuel. Mr. Kennedy baa now boon a rosidont of this 
county .forty-five yours, owns a good farm of 100 acres with good 
buildings and improvements, constituting a pleasant farmer's homo. Ho 
was elected county surveyor in 1S52, since which be has served several 
terms by reelection. And of him in this capacity it is said that he sel- 
dom made an error, being one of the most correct surveyors the county 
ever had. He has served as clerk and trustee of his township besides 
tilling other minor offices, and is recognized as one of the best citizon6 of 
Manchester Township. 

WALTER KEKU, farmer, Hogan Township, was born in Gilford 
County, N. C, April 23, 1790, and received no education save what ho 
gathered up in life himself. His father, William, was born in North 
Carolina, June 2, 1756; his mother, Elizabeth, in Ireland in 1757. They 
wore married in 17S4. The mother died in 1S14, and the father moved 
to this county in 1810 with his children. He was in the Revolutionary- 
war. All through life he was a farmer. He and his wife were members 
of the Presbyterian Church. He died January 1. 1843. Mr. Walter 
Kerr was married September 13, 1821, to Miss Elizabeth Russell, who 
was born on Licking River in Campbell County, Ky., June 14, 1803. 
Ton children were born to them: Mary A., Minerva, MahlonB., Catharine, 
Rachel, Nancy J.. Elizabeth, William, Charles and David. In 1801 
Charles enlisted in Company K, Eighteenth Indiana Volunteers as a 
private soldier, and died at Vicksburg in July, 1864, from sickness and 
exposure. Mr. Kerr was constable from 1S34 to 1836 and deputy sheriff 
from 1836 to 1S40. Ho flat-boated for twenty years and speculated in 
bay, oats, corn, cattle, hogs, apples, and potatoes and was on the 
"McGregor" when it blew up February 22, 1830. He had an arm broken, 
was blown into the river, and saved his life by clinging to broken frag- 
ments of tho boat. He improved his farm, educated his children, and 
did all the work himself, and has lived in his present house since 1840. 
He was a Democrat up to Buchanan's time, but since a Republican. He 
was a member of tho Know-nothing, and S. of T. lodges; joined 
the Methodist Episcopal Church when thirty-nine years old; was 
class leader for many years, and has filled other responsible positions in 
the church. His amiable help meet goes hand in hand with him in every 
undertaking. She has also been an active member in the Methodist 
Episcopal Church for years. 

JAMES and AARON KERR, farmers, reside in Hogan Township. 
They are natives of Dearborn County, Ind. James was born May 14 
1837; Aaron, Mav 16, 1833, and both are well educated. Their father 



704 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

was horn in North Carolina, November 29, 1705; their mother, Sarah 
(Peters) Kerr, in Dearborn County. Ind., Juno 9, 1802. They were 
married September 10, 1820, and raised oi^ht children. The father came 
to this county in 1810 and followed farming all his Jifo. The mother and 
her people were driven twice by the Indians into the block-house, near 
Spidells, which was their only secure refuge. The father died Septem. 
ber 29, 1874; the mother ilied August 25, 1SS4. The old pioneer couple 
endured the hardships and privations incident to frontier life from 
choice, that their children might enjoy the fruits of their labor. 

H. G. KIDD, the jovial dealer in stoves, tinware and house- furnish- 
ing goods, Lawrenceburgh, was born in Cincinnati in 1839, and resided 
there till six years of age. His father died about 1843, and the family 
subsequently resided in several different localities. He learned the tin- 
ner's trade about 1855 at St. Mary's, Ohio, whore he resided about eight 
years, and after that time was engaged in various towns — Covington, 
Louisville, Lima, Ohio; Evansville, Ind., and others — till 1S60, when 
he located in Lawrenceburgh, working four years with a Mr. Sheldon. 
In 1864 he began business for himself, and has since continued as sole 
proprietor of the establishment. His store-room at No. 73 High Street, 
is well filled with a full line of goods valued at S3, 500 to §4,000, and 
his patronage is in keeping with the inducements offered by his complete 
stock and close attention to business. Mr. Kidd was married, in 1S62, 
to Maggie T. Hoter, who came to Dearborn County with her parents in 
1847. Her father was a cooper by trade, and conducted that business 
for a time in Lawrenceburgh, but his shops were destroyed by floods. 
He subsequently entered the war, and is now at Dayton. Her mother 
passed away in 1860. Mr. Kidd is a member of the I. O. O. F., G. 
T., K. of L., Methodist Episcopal Church, and a good fellow on general 
principles. 

THOMAS KILNER, farmer, resides in Hogan Township, and owns 
the old homestead in Section 33. He is a native of Massachusetts, and 
was born in Boston, July 19, 1825. His parents, Thomas and Marion 
(Thorn) Kilner, were born in England. His father was an actor, and 
after his arrival in this country, traveled through the East, and played 
with Booth, Forrest, and other celebrated characters. He was on the 
stage when Forrest made his first appearance. He retired from the stage. 
in 1825, and in 1839 located upon eighty acres of land in Section 33, 
Hogan Township, Ind., and raised a family of thirteen children, two of 
whom survive — Thomas and a sister, Mrs. Marion E. Squibb, widow of 
Edmond Squibb (deceased). His father was a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church; mother, a Baptist. Thomas farmed and taught school 
up to 1862, at which time he enlisted in Company E, Sixteenth Indiana 



BIOQHAPIIICAL SKETCHES. CJ.) 

Infantry, nnder Col. Lucas. August 30, 1862, he lost u log, and was 
discharged on account thereof in October, 1802, and returned home, a 
cripple for life. In a short time, after his arrival at homo, he was 
elected,township trustee, and in 1805 was elected county treasurer and 
served two terms with honor to himself, and entire satisfaction to his 
constituents. He was married to Miss Mary E. Armstrong, a native of 
Delaware, and by this union sis children were born: Edmund, J. Will- 
iam, Arthur F. , Edwin, Mary E. and Ada May. Since his wife's death 
Mr. Kilner has been endeavoring to keep his children together, and 
educate them for usefulness in life. Mr. Kilner is a leading and active 
citizen, and is highly respected by all who know him. 

WARREN KINCAID, retired, Dillsborough, one of the old and 
highly esteemed pioneers of Dearborn County, was born in Greene 
County, N. Y., June 12, 1804. His parents were Samuel and Marion 
(Stewart) Kiucaid, natives of New York, the former born in 1768; the 
latter in 1775. After their marriage they settled in Greene County, and 
remained until 1808, in which year they immigrated to Ashtabula County, 
Ohio, and from thonce, in 1817, to Dearborn County, Ind., where Mrs. 
K. died in 1855. He subsequently made his home with his son, Warren, 
in Ripley County, Ind., where he died in 1865. They were among the 
first settlers of Dearborn County. They were both members of the Bap- 
tist Church, and were highly respected by all who knew them. They 
were the parents of eleven children, viz.: Didamah, Alexander, 
Anna, Elizabeth, Warren, Amanda, George, Samuel, William, Maria, 
and Stewart. Warren, our subject, came with his parents to this county 
in 1817, and has over since resided in this and Ripley County. He was 
married at Lawrenceburgh, Iud., August 7, 1827, to Lucinda, daughter of 
Joshua and Hannah (Sweet) Peck. She was a native of New York, where 
she was born, June 9, 1811. After his marriage ho first settled at Law- 
renceburgh and engaged in boating on the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers, 
and also fanning part of the time. In 1839 he purchased a farm in 
Ripley County, where he moved and turned his attention wholly to farm- 
ing until 1807, in which year ho sold his farm and moved to Dills - 
borough, Ind., where he has since resided and enjoyed a retired life. He 
lost his wife January 2, 1879. She was the tender mother of ten chil- 
dren, viz.: William V.; George, deceased; Amanda, deceased; Hannah; 
Lewis, deceased; Susan W.; Helleu T. ; Mary, deceased; Oscar, deceased; 
and Anna T. Mr. Kincaid has done much hard labor in his time, and in 
his early days was subjected to all the trials and hardships incident to 
pioneer life. 

SOLOMON KITTLE, of Ohio County, was born in Wood County, 
Va., in September, 1793. At the ago of eighteen he moved to Ohio, and 



TSJb HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND oino COUNTIES. 

iu 181-4 came to Ohio County, where ho lias lived ever since. His wife was 
born iu Kentucky in the year 1793. When he eamo to Indiana he landed 
at the month of Laughory Creek and rowod their boa! up that stream to 
Hanover Lan lint;. He had thirteen children, seventy-six grandchildren, 
a majority of whom arc still living. Mr. Kittle was living in 1870. 

FREDERICK KLEINHANS, foreman of the Lawrenceburgh Furni 
tare Factory, is a native of Germany, born in 1S35. He spent his early 
years in his native country, where ho was educated and learned the trade 
of carriage manufacturer. In L856 he immigrated to the United States, 
and located at once iu Lawrenceburgh, where, for sis years, he followed 
the business of mill-wrighting, after which he began work at the furni- 
ture trade which he has since continued. Mr. Kleiuhans was married, iu 
1859, to Miss Martha Ekil, who came from Germany to this country in 
1858. They have seven children living: Mina, Anna, Rosa, Tillie. 
Freddie, Hermauu and Charley. Louise is deceased. Mr. Kleinhans 
is an industrious worker, and well qualified no doubt for the discharge 
of the duties devolving upon him in his position. 

HERMAN KLEPPER, the leading merchant tailor of Lawrence- 
burgh, is a native of Germany, born May 29, 1841. He grew to maturity 
in his native country, loarnod his trade there, and was there engaged in 
its pursuit till 1864, when he immigrated to the United States, locating 
at Lawrenceburgh, but subsequently spending three years in Cincinnati. 
He began business in 1808, and has since continued, meeting with fair 
success. The firm was originally Cook & Klepper, but was dissolvod as 
such in April, 1876, since which time Mr. Klepper has been sole proprietor 
of the establishment. Ho is located at No. S 1 High Street, and carries a 
tine line of goods valued at about $5,000, consisting of fine cloths, 
gent's furnishings, hats, caps, etc., enjoying a well merited trade. Mr. 
Klepper was married, to Rebecca Hartre, who is also a native of 
Germany, and by whom he has four children: Ella, Honry, Carl and 
George. He is a member of the Druid's society, and is highly esteemed 
as a citizen. 

LEONARD KLINGELHOFFER, carpenter, contractor and archi- 
tect, Aurora, shop, corner of George and Morrison Streets, is a native of 
Dearborn County, Ind. , born on King's Ridge, August 12, 1850, where 
he received a common school education. His parents, Charles and 
Barbara (Kiushire) Klingelhoffer, wore born near Hamburg, Germany, 
and came to America in 1S34, locating in Arkansas, thence to Cincinnati, 
Ohio. In 1S47 they settled in Lawrenceburgh, aud followed farming 
up to 1852, at which time they located in Aurora, and the father led 
a retired life up to his death. Leonard came to Aurora, in 1804, and 
followed carpentering up to 1875, at which time he branched out for 



ISIOORAI'Ilk'AI, SKETCHES. 707 

himself, anil Las been successful in all his undertakings. He was mar- 
ried, November 9, 1S71, to Miss Emma Campfield, who was born in 
Dearborn County, October 14, 1852. To thorn have been born three chil 
dren Jessie, Maggie and Lida. Mr. Klingelhoffer is a member of the 
following secret organizations: Druids, I. O. C). F. , K. P. and K. of H. 
His wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

CORNELIUS KLXJMP, blacksmith, New Alsace, was born in Jack 
son Township, September 29, 1 830, son of Morris and Catherine (Gep- 
hard) Klump, who wore natives of Germany; the former born in 1803. 
the latter in 1813. They were married at Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1833, 
and moved to Dearborn County in 1835. They were the parents of 
eleven children, viz. : Elizabeth, Catherine, Michael, Helena, John, 
Lewis, Josephine, Clara, and two which died in infancy. Cornelius, 
our subject, the next to the eldest member of the family, learned the 
blacksmith trade with his father, which trade he has since followed. 
He was married at New Alsace, in January, 1800, to Margarot Niters, 
by whom he has had born to him seven children, viz. : Frank, Lewis, 
Mary, Catherine, Rosio, John and Michael. 

JOHN B. KNEEVEN, farmer, Kelso Township, was born in 
Hamilton County. Ohio, November 22, 1841. His parents, John H. and 
Susanna Kneevan, wore both natives of Hanover, Germany, the former 
born October 22, 1801, the latter, April 2, 180S. They were married at 
Cincinnati, Ohio, February, 1840, and resided in Hamilton County five 
years, when they moved to Dearborn County, Ind., and purchased 
and settled on the same farm where our subject now lives and where the 
father died March 12, 1881, the mother still surviving. They were the 
parents of four children, viz. : Mary, Margaret, Benjamin O. and John B., 
our subject, the second member of the family. He was married, October 
17, 1805, to Thrase Klanka, who was born in Hanover, Germany, May 
13, 1840. They have had eight children, namely: Herman (deceased), 
Mary, Martin, 'Carry, Albert (deceased), Heury, Benjamin (deceased), and 
Catherine. Mr. Kneeven and family are members of the Catholic 
Churoh. 

JOHN C. KNIGHT, iron worker, Aurora, was born in London, Eng- 
land, January 28, 1837, where his educational advantages were very 
limited. His parents, Charles and Sarah (Rosetter) Knight, were drowned 
when John was but a mere child, and he possesses no trace of their 
genealogy. Mr. Knight started out as a sailor when very young, and 
during his boyhood days visited China, East India and other foreign 
countries. He finally landed in Amoricain 1850 at port of New Orleans, 
thence he went to New York, where he enlisted in the navy on the Unit- 
ed States frigate "Niagara'' which was engaged in laying United States 



708 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

telegraph, remaining nino months. lie next went on the Paraguay ex- 
pedition underAdmiral Shubrick on United States ship "Caldeonia," and 
was absent nine months. He then enlisted in the navy for three 
years, on tho United States frigate "Sabine,'' spent over two years on the 
Gulf station. In February, 1862, he shipped again at Boston on the 
United States steamer "San Jaeinta," Gulf squadron. In fifteen 
months he was sent to New York, disabled, and was sent to hospital and 
discharged. One year after he passed an examination and went into 
gunboat service under Porter and served until the close of the war; 
after which he located in Newport, Ky. , where he remained until 
1870, when ho carue to Aurora, and secured work in the rolling-mill. 
Mr. Knight was married, October 17, 1864, to Miss Sarah Boden, 
daughter of Major Boden, of Kentucky ; she was born Juno 7, 1844. By 
this marriage six children have been born, namely: Blanche, Charles W., 
Marion, Jane, Willie and Alta. Mr. Knight belongs to Chosen Friends 
Lodge No. 13, I. 0. O. F. and the G. A. R. 

R. T. KNOWLES, cooper, Dillsborough, was born at Chesterville, 
Dearborn Co., Ind., March 31, 183S. His parents were "William and 
Henrietta (Moore) Knowles, natives of Sussex County, Del., father born 
August 23, 1804, the mother October 12, 1814. They were married 
in Sussex County, October 24, 1832, and from thence immigrated to 
Dearborn County, Ind., in 1S35, where he resided until 1873, in which 
year he moved to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he died March 29, 1873. His 
widow still survives and lives among her children. They were the par- 
ents of twelve children, namely: William deceased; Daniel E. ; 
Robert T. ; William F., deceased; Sarah J., deceased; Amanda, 
deceased; Emeline, deceased; Isabelle, deceased; Leucretia, de- 
ceased; Luck, deceased; Martha W. and Charley. He was previously 
married to a sister of his last wife and had by her four children, 
viz.: Elizabeth, Mary, Catherine and David. R. T. , our sub- 
ject, when about fifteen years of age, began tho cooper trade, and has 
engaged in the same principally since. He enlisted in September, 1861, 
in Company F, Thirty-seventh Indiana Volunteers, and served until 
August, 1862, when he was discharged on account of disability and re- 
turned home. He was married at Dillsborough, in 1859, to a Miss 
Hickman, by whom he had one 'child, Albert V. November 12, 1870, 
he was again married to Phebe Osborn, by whom he had one child, 
Walter L. In December, 1883, he opened up a cooper shop at Dills- 
borough, which he is at present carrying on quite extensively. 

VALENTINE J. KOEHLER, Lawrenceburgh, book-keeper and 
cashier, was born in Munchberg, kingdom of Bavaria, July 23, 1842, of 
parents Carl G. and Barbara (Huth) Koehler The father held many 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 79!) 

positions of honor and trust, among which was the captaincy of land- 
wehr in Munchberg. He was a business man, the proprietor of a soap 
and candle factory. Valentino J. received a collegiate education, after 
which he served an apprenticeship of three years in the mercantile busi- 
ness in his native city. He immigrated to this country in I860, landing 
at New York in April of that year, and in a few days came to join 
friends and acquaintances in Aurora, Ind. Shortly after his arrival in 
Dearborn County he began clerking for John Hornberger, who was in 
the grocery business and an extensive contractor, engaged in filling up the 
streets of the city of Lawrenceburgh. In August, 1861, Mr. Koehler 
enlisted as a private in Company D, Thirty-second Regiment Indiana 
Volunteers. Ho was subsequently promoted to sergeant, quartermaster- 
sergeant of the regiment, second lieutenant of Company A, Thirty- 
second Regiment Indiana Volunteers, first lieutenant and aid-de-camp to 
Gen. August AVillich, in the Department, of the Cumberland, having 
served in all three years and three months, and having participated in 
the battles of Shiloh, Corinth, Stone River, Liberty Gap, Chickamauga, 
Missionary Ridge, and other engagements in which the Army of the Cum- 
berland took part. On the 22d of May, 1864, Capt. Koehler received a 
slight wound in the head, and was hit with a spent ball on the right side 
of the collar bone, he was also wounded in front of Atlanta on the 2'2d 
of July, 1864, by the explosion of a shell which killed his horse from 
under him, and by which the Captain sustained a broken leg. Capt. 
Koehler was tendered the lieutenant-colonelcy of his regiment, but de- 
clined it. He was honorably discharged in November, 1864, and for a 
period of live years was engaged in business in Knoxville, Tenn. He 
then returned to Lawrenceburgh and from 1S69 to 1875 he was employed 
in the United States revenue service. In 1875 he resigned his position 
and accepted a position in the distillery of John H. Gaff & Co. of 
Lawrenceburgh, and remained in that company's employ until February, 
1878, when he became connected in a like capacity with the distillery of 
James W. Gaff & Co., which firm, in 1880, merged into the Mill Creek 
Distilling Company, cf Cincinnati, and with which he is now em- 
ployed as cashier and book-keeper. Capt, Koehler retains his residence at 
Lawrenceburgh, where he is a citizen of influence and high standing. 
In 1866 he was married to Miss M. Louise Hornberger, a daughter of 
John Hornberger and a native of Lawrenceburgh, born on the same day 
of the month and year as was her husband — July 23, 1842. Three 
childreuhave been born to the marriage: John H, Carl R, and Louisa. 
Capt. Koehler cast his first vote for President Lincoln and has since 
voted the Republican ticket. 

LOUIS KOHLERMANN, proprietor of livery and feed stable and 



SOU HISTORY OF DEARBORN -AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

undertaker, Lawrenceburgh, is a native of Germany, born in 1823. His 
father was steward to the emperor of Hesse Darmstadt in whose employ 
his life was chiefly spent, following his sovereign in the wars of Hun- 
gary. Mr. Kohlermann grew to maturity in his native country, where he 
was educated and at the age of fifteen learned the brass turner's trade. 
He pursued this vocation till twenty-one years of age, in Germany; he 
then immigrated to America and for eleven years followed the same occu- 
pation with Cornelius Becker & Co., of Philadelphia, then the largest 
chandelier manufacturing establishment in the United States. Mr. 
Kohlerraan then removed to Putnam County, Ohio, where he resided two 
years, when he removed to Lawrenceburgh about 185S. He was em- 
ployed at common labor till 1805, when he began the livery business, 
admitting his son as partner iu 1884. Mr. Kohlermann was married in 
Philadelphia about 1845 to Miss Elizabeth Rexroth, a native of Germany 
and who immigrated to Trinidad, S. A., from which place she afterward 
came north. They have four children living: Charles, Rudolph, Mary, 
and Emma. The family has the esteem of a large circle of friends. 

BERNARD RUNE, farmer, Kelso Township, a native of Hanover, 
Germany, born December 30, 1823. His parents, Theodore and Mary 
(Theders) Kune,' were also natives of Hanover, where they married, and 
from whence, in 1849, they immigrated to the United States, landing at 
New Orleans, and from thence came to Cincinnati, Ohio, and in March. 
1852, to Dearborn County, where they both died in 1859. Bernard, our 
subject, one of six children born to them, immigrated to the United States 
in 1846. Ho first landed at Galveston, Tex., and from thence, about 
two weeks later, came to New Orleans, La. From there he came to Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio, where he was united in marriage, January 6, 1S50, to Dora 
M. , daughter of John B. and Annie M. C. (Busch) Fangmann; she 
was born in Oldenburgh, Germany, September 30, 1830. In March, 1852, 
Mr. Kune moved to Dearborn County, Ind., and settled on his present 
farm, which he had purchased in 1851, and where he has since resided. 
Mrs. K. departed this life January 30, 1870, and in February, 1S71, Mr. 
Kune married Annie Martin (widow of Frank Martin), daughter 
of Bernard and Magdalena (Koch) Kramer. She was born in Hano- 
ver, Germany, July 11, 1822. Mr. Kune and family, consisting of six 
living children, viz.: Frank, Christena, Louisa, John, Philemena, and 
Joseph, are members of the Catholic Church. 

THOMAS KYLE, of Dearborn County, was the son of John Kyle, a 
Revolutionary soldier, who served under Gen. Washington, and assisted 
in storming the British redoubts at Yorktown, and witnessed the sur- 
render of Gen. Cornwallis. He died August 31, 1845, aged eighty-nine 
years. He was born near Winchester, Va., March 24, 1785, where he 



rsTOGRATinCAT, SKETCHES. 801 

spent the early part of his life. In the your 1300 he, together with his 
father and a company of friends, started to (he then far off West. In 
their rude country wagons they embarked on their long journey, crossing 
the mountains coming to Pittsburgh; thence to Cincinnati, and from 
there through an unbroken forest to Vincennes, on the Wabash. So 
great wero the porils from the Indiana, that Gen. Harrison advised the 
party to return to Kentucky, and to protect them sent seventy-five armed 
men. They reached Kentucky in safety. But Mr. Kyle chose to 
cast his lot with the pale face, and joined Gen. Harrison's command as 
a soldier, and took part in the battle of Tippecanoe, November 7, 1811, 
where he had three horses killed after the treaty of peace with Tecum- 
seh, at Vincennes. He returned in the following year to Dearborn 
County, and entered a section of land in Town 6, Range 2 west, in a 
dense and unbroken forest. He immediately set to work to clear a farm. 
In the year IS] 5 he married Elizabeth Kerney, of Kentucky. There 
were born to" them two sons and four daughters. They began the hard- 
ships of a pioneer life with but a few neighbors to enjoy their friendship 
or hospitality. The nights were made hideous by the howling of wolves; 
wild game abounded in plenty and furnished the new emigrants plenty 
of meat. Bread stuff was scarce and mills far back in Chio. They 
raised their family to man and womanhood, and gave each as good an 
education as possible in those times. About the year 1849 consump- 
tion made its appearance in the family, unbidden by any heriditary 
tendencies, and, strange to say, in the short space of six years, they had 
passed to that far off country. Thus, in old age, he and his beloved 
wife were left to enjoy the comforts of a snug little fortune, which they, 
by industry, had accumulated. On the 14th day of October, 1858, his 
beloved wife died, leaving him alone. Two years after he married Mrs. 
Mary Burkdoll, a lady of refinement, with whom ho lived pleasantly 
until his death, which occurred on the old homestead, January 6, 1801, 
aged seventy-five years, ten months and twelve days. His eldest son, 
John, w as married to Margaret Harrison, July 30, 1842. He bought a 
farm near the old homestead , and settled on it. He was a man univer- 
sally beloved by all who knew him, taking an active interest in the 
improvement of society, especially public schools. His education was 
limited to the branches taught in the public schools, which created in 
him a great desire for a higher education for his children. Honest and 
industrious, he had accumulated considerable property. Four sons were 
born to them, namely: T. M., W. H. , L. B. and J. J., the youngest 
dying in infancy. L. B., the next youngest, was afflicted in early life 
from disease of the hip joint, and was compelled to go on crutches 
through life. He gained a good education, and was thoroughly active to 



802 HISTORY OK DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

whatever interested society, but disease blighted his prospects. Ho 
died April 10, 1ST'.). John suffered like his brother and sisters from 
that blighting consumption, although everything in the way of medicine 
and travel could do availed nothing, and at the early age of thirty. six 
years he closed his eventful life. William Kyle, his second son, was 
born in Manchester Township, April 2, 1821, and was married to Melissa 
Milburn on the 28th of August, 1844. One daughter was the result 
of this marriage. The daughter died before, she arrived at the age of 
twenty-one. He departed this life on the 6th of January, 1850. Mar- 
garet, his eldest daughter, was united in marriage with Thomas Harri- 
son, September 8, 1844. Two daughters were born to them. She died 
on the same day as her brother William, and side by side they were 
consigned to their last resting place in the family cemetery. Rebecca, 
his second daughter, was married to George Mental. Four children con- 
stituted their family — two sons and two daughters. She died from 
consumption on the 30th of April, 1854. Jane and Elizabeth, although 
full of life and promise, fell early victims to consumption, the former 
dying at the age of thirty-three, the latter at the age of thirty. Dr. T. 
M. Kyle, eldest son of John and Margaret Kyle, was born in Manches- 
ter Township on the 30th of April, 1842. Although deprived of the bene- 
fits of a father's advice at the age of twelve years, his dutiful mother 
thoroughly ^mastered her situation, and that of her family gave early 
character to the life of her son. He was kind and dutiful, assisting his 
mother in carrying on the interest of the farm. He, in early life, mani- 
fested great desire for knowledge, attending the district schools during 
the winter until fifteen years of age, when he entered college for three 
years. He made rapid advancement in all the branches of science. He 
taught two terms in the public schools of the township. But his early 
love for the science of medicine made it possible for him to enter as a 
student the office of Dr. Chamberlain. He read with him but a few 
months, and went to Cincinnati, entered the Ohio Medical College as a 
matriculant during the session of 1864-65. During the noxt year he 
engaged in the drug business at Vincennes; but in the autumn entered 
the Miami Medical College, where he took two courses, and graduated 
in that institution; moved to Manchester; bought the property of his 
preceptor, and began the practice of his chosen profession, in the sight 
of whore he spent his childhood days. Ho was married to Miss Anna 
Johnson, youngest daughter of Hon. J. D. Johnson, of Sparta, Septem- 
ber 27, 1866. Miss Johnson was a young lady of refinement and cul- 
ture, and added great promise to the Doctor's success. Her father had 
served the people of this county in the Legislature, and was a member of 
the constitutional convention who framed our present constitution. He- 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 803 

was a gentleman of influence, ami took great interest in the success of Lis 
children. The Doctor has built up a large and lucrative practice. Ho 
takes great delight in tlio practice of surgery, and makes a specialty of 
treatment of all forms of malignant diseases and tumors. He has per- 
formed some of the most difficult operations, one in particular which ho 
claims is the first of the kind on record. He is a member of the Dear- 
born County Medical Society, Indiana State Society, Mitchell District 
Society, American Association of the United States. Ho is in no way 
inclined to office seeking, but rather follow his chosen profession. He, 
like all his ancestors, is Democratic. He is a strong believer in the doc- 
trines taught by the Methodist Church, an ardent lover of Free Masonry, 
and thrice elected Master. Besides his active professional duties he has 
time to devote to the Sabbath-school work, and his public speaking is 
done in the interest of the Sabbath-school work. Four children bless 
their home: John J., Maggie F., Jennie M. and Claudia B. John J., 
born May 27, 1868, is a young man of line promise, and is on his fourth 
and last year in college. The girls are bright, and bid fair to be useful. 
They are great lovers of home. The Doctor and his good wife try to 
make their home so attractive that their children prefer it to the 
homes of others. "W. H. Kyle, second son of John Kyle, was born in 
Manchester Township, August 28, 1845. He received his education in 
the common schools. He attended commercial college at Indianopolis, 
and graduated in the year 1863. He was married to Miss Serena Jacpiith, 
May 19, 1867. He immediately engaged in trade with the South, ship- 
ping hay and produce, which was the chief export from Dearborn County. 
He continued in that business until 1879, when he was elected county 
treasurer, which position he tilled for two terms. During his adminis- 
tration the county debt was funded, and an exact amount of the indebted- 
ness of the county was ascertained. And when his time had expired the 
county papers joined in saying that William Kyle had filled the office to 
the entire satisfaction of the people of the county. After his term of 
office he removed to his native township, and is engaged in agriculture 
and stock raising. He has three sons and four daughters. Frankie, 
the eldest son, is taking a commercial course at Lebanon, Ohio, from 
which he expects to graduate at the close of the college year. 

JAMES LAMB, M. D,, physician and surgeon, Aurora, office cor- 
ner of Main and Second Streets, over O. P. Cobb & Co. 's store, was 
born on Oil Creek, Venango County, Bonn., February 15, 1818, and was 
the eldest son of the thirteen children of David H. and Margaret (Kidd) 
Lamb. His paternal ancestors emigrated from the north of Ireland be- 
fore the Revolutionary war, and Gen. John Lamb was the first collector 
of the port of New York under Washington. Both his grandmothers 



804 HISTORY OP DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

were of Scotch-Irish descent. In 1827 his parents moved fo Jefferson 
County, Ind. A( the age of fifteen he became a clerk in a dry goods 
bouse in tbe village of Canaan, and after one year's experience was sent 
with Mu. Goodrich on a coasting trading boat down the Ohio River. 
Although among other duties, he was obliged to sell intoxicating liquors, 
ho never indulged in their use. After disposing of his goods and boat 
he entered the employment of (wo brothers who were extensive operators. 
He took charge of their store, and all the moDey received in their ex- 
tended business passed through bis hands. His employers offered to 
educate him at the Catholic institution at Beardstown, Ky., but, owing to 
severe and continued sickness, he was compelled to reject their kind of- 
fer and return home. His educational advantages were very limited. 
After mastering Pike's and Smiley's arithmetics he wished to procure a 
grammar, and in order to do so, took corn on horseback nine miles to 
Madison, where he sold it at 20 cents per bushel. Then purchased 
Kirkham's grammar, and by close application mastered it. At the age 
of nineteen he began teaching school, which he continued for twelve 
years, spending his leisure time in stud}'. In 1S45 he began the study 
of medicine, reciting to Dr. John Home, of Moorefield. He afterward 
studied with Drs. Eastman and Tevis, both gentlemen of culture and 
ability. He began the practice in May, 1849, just previous to the great 
cholera epidemic of that year, and treated many cases successfully. 
Feeling a desire for a more thorough medical education, he took a course 
of lectures at the ' medical department of the University of Michigan, 
graduating in 1853. He resumed the practice in the spring of 1856 at 
Allensville, Switzerland Co., Ind. In 1858, in company with Dr. Butz 
(since deceased), opened a preparatory college of medicine, supplying it 
with a very valuable anatomical museum and laboratory, at a cost of 
$1,600. They had six students at the breaking out of the war, five of 
whom, including a brother of Dr. Lamb, entered the army, and either 
were killed on the field, or died of disease or wounds. Dr. Lamb was a 
warm friend of the Dnion in the late civil war, and was only prevented 
from enlisting by the care of his family and aged parents. He had four 
brothers in the army, two escaped unhurt. In 1862 Dr. Lamb was a 
delegate to the United States General Assembly at Cincinnati, and also to 
Philadelphia in 1870, and was a member of the judiciary committee, 
composed of the ablest churchmen of America and Europe. He assisted 
in reorganizing the Dearborn County Medical Society, which now num- 
bers about fifty members. He has contributed many papers to this 
society, and is always ready to defend the honor and integrity of the 
profession. In November, 1841, Dr. Lamb married AJiss Sarah A. Car- 
nine, of Switzerland County, Ind. By the marriage four children were 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 805 

born, two of whom survive. The son, Lamartine K., is a graduate of the 
Ohio Medical College, and has a good practice in Tolona, 111. The 
daughter, America C, who completed lior musical education under Prof. 
Andre,,of Cincinnati, Ohio, is the wife of Frederick Treon, M. D., who is 
also a graduate of the Ohio Medical College, and in practice with his 
father-in-law at Aurora. Dr. Lamb cast his first vote for Gen. Harrison 
in 1S40. Both he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian 
Church, he having united with it when twenty-four years old, and she in 
early youth, and is a member of the Masonic fraternity. 

HUDSON G. LAMKIN, carpenter, Aurora, is a native of Dearborn 
County, born January 31, 1841, and received a common school education. 
His parents, Thomas and Eliza A. (Graves) Lamkin, were both born in 
Dearborn County, the father May 15, 1S17, and the mother May 10, 
18J 7. The father was steam-boat mate for thirty-rive years. He was 
wharf master from 1846 to 1S56, and served for one and a half years as 
corporal in the Eleventh Kentucky Cavalry during the Rebellion, and 
was discharged on account of disability. His death occurred in March, 
1873. The mother died in March, 1884. For several years Hudson 
G. Lamkin followed draying, after which he began the carpenter trade. 
He enlisted July 12, 1861, in Company D, Third Indiana Cavalry as a 
private, serving three years aud two months. In November, 1863, he was 
promoted to brigade wagon master, and was mustered out as such. He 
was married December 12, 1864, to Miss Rebecca J. Bowman, who was 
born in Ohio County, August 26, 1843. By the union eight children 
havo been born, namely: Gladys I.; William T., born May 1, 1867, 
died in infancy; Hattie; Emma; Grier, born October, 1875, died May, 
1876; George; Elias, born May, 1880, died May, 18S2, and Susie. Mr. 
Lamkin is a member of the K. of P. Lodge No. 34, of which he is past 
grand representative, also of the G. A. E. Post No. 82, of whicli he is 
now adjutant. 

AMOS LANE, see page 150. 

MRS. MARY LANE. In 1S04 Amos Lane was married at Ogdens- 
burgh, N. Y., to Mrs. Mary Howes, a daughter of John Foote, a soldier 
of the Revolution; they moved West in 1808. While living in Kentucky, 
opposite Lawrenceburgh, and afterward at Burlington, Ky., Mrs. Lane 
taught a school, which at one time numbered seventy pupils. Mrs. Lane 
was a remarkable woman. Her attainments in education and literature 
were considerably above those of most women of her time. She wrote 
well both in prose and poetry; accomplished in her manners, she pos- 
sessed fine conversational powers. Her figure was largo and her mien 
always dignified and stately, but the tenderness of her spirit made her 
genial and kind to every one about her. The mother of six children and 



80G HISTORY OP DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

never rich, Mrs. Lauo dovoted her efforts to so raise hor family, (hat 
they might occupy positions of honor and respectability. Hor husband 
became a distinguished lawyer, a loading politician and a member of 
Congress; hor oldest son graduated wiih honor at West Point, and died in 
the service of his country; another son represented in Congress the dis- 
trict in which ho was born, and died a member of tho United States Sen- 
ate, and the remaining and only living sou has occupied many houorablc 
and responsible position of public trust. Her three daughters became 
the wives of Arthur St. Clair, Esq., Judge Huntington and Hon. George 
P. Buell; all of them ladies of lino accomplishments, inheriting from 
thoir mother many of hor best traits. Mrs. Mary Lane died at the resi- 
dence of hor son-in law, George P. Buell, near Lawrenceburgh, Decem- 
ber 27, 1854, aged seventy- seven years. 

JOHN FOOTE LANE, eldest son of Amos and Mary Lane, was born 
at Tousoytown. Ky. , opposite Lawreucoburgh, December 24, 1S10. He 
entered "\\ est Point at the age of thirteen years, and graduated with 
honor when seventeen. Col. J. F. Lane died in Florida, in 1836, at the 
early age of twenty-six. 

COL. JAMES H. LANE was born in Lawrenceburgh, in 1814. He 
was a merchant at Lawrenceburgh, and afterward studied law. He was 
colonel of the Third Indiania Regiment, in the Mexican War, and after- 
ward of the Fifth Regiment. His gallantry at Buona Vista reflected 
great credit on his native State. He was lieutenant governor of Indiana 
from 1849 to 1853. He represented his district in Congress, from 1853- 
1855. He was elected as a Democrat, imd in Congress voted for the 
Kansas, Neb., bill. He subsequently wont to Kansas, and there became 
noted as a leader of the Free-State party. When he wont to Kansas, he 
had no expectation of leaving tho Democratic party; ho desired by a con- 
servative course to make Kansas a free State and a Democratic State, but 
when he got there, ho found that no man could occupy a middle ground, 
much less a conservative position. He was compelled to choose between 
the pro-slavery causo and the Republican party; he became a Republican 
more from necessity than choice, and when once inside of that party he 
remained. Gen. James H. Lane was as brave a man as over faced an 
enemy, as those associated with him will cheerfully testify, and as String- 
fellow and Atchinson found to their cost. He was elected to the United 
States Senate Irom Kansas, and was serving his second term in that body 
when he ended his life by suicide. While in Mexico, he contracted 
from (drinking poisoned) water a diarrhoea, which became chronic and 
affliced him to tho grave, and no doubt produced that aberration of mind 
which was apparent on a number of occasions for several years before his 
death, and which prevented him from gaining high rank in the civil 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 807 

war. "Ho was a man of restless ambition, unconquerable energy and 
imperious will. For his services in repelling ' the border ruffians' of 
Kansas, and preserving that beautiful country from tho curse of slavery, 
he deserved well of bis country, and will occupy a prominent and honor- 
able position in the history of the great struggle between freedom and 
bondage." Ho sbot himself in tho mouth and died Sunday afternoon, 
July 1, 1800, near Lawrence, Kas. James H. Lane was married in IS 11 
to Miss Mary Baldridge, a grand-daughter of Geu. Arthur St. Clair. Of 
their children three are living at this time: Lieut. James H. Lano, late 
of the regular army; Thomas Davies Lane and Mrs. Annie E. Johnson. 
GEO. W. LANE, second son of Amo3 and Mary Lane, was born 
at Burlington, Ky., in a log-cabin on the outskirts of that village, 
November 7, 181 2. When he was two years of age, his parents came to 
Lawrenceburgh, and since that time George W. has had his residence in 
Dearborn County. He now resides west of Aurora, in au old fashioned, 
comfortable and substantial brick house, on au elevation commanding a 
beautiful view of the valley of South Hogan Creek and distant hills. In 
early life he engaged in the mercantile business at Lawrenceburgh. While 
at that place, he erected the large brick business house on High Street, 
adjoining the Ferris drug store. In 1834 he was one of the first direct- 
ors of the old Lawrenceburgh & Indianapolis Railroad Company. In 
December, 1835, he removed to Aurora, and while there devoted his time 
largely to building up the material and educational interests of that pros- 
perous city. At the time Mr. Lane removed to Aurora, nearly all the 
business of that part of the county was transacted at Wilmington. Owing 
to the expenses and difficulty of crossing the different streams emptying 
into tho Ohio, above and below Aurora, there was little travel by land on 
the river road through the town. In 1830 he built a bridge across the 
mouth of Hogan Creek, which opened the way of communication and 
travel through Aurora to Lawrenceburgh. While in the Legislature Mr. 
Lane obtained charters authorizing the construction of turnpike roads 
from Aurora to Dillsboro, to Hart's Mill and to Moore's Hill, the last via 
Wilmington; those were soon after constructed and were of great conven- 
ience to Aurora. While in the Legislature Mr. Lano aided in obtaining 
the charter for the Ohio & Mississippi Railroad, and on the organization 
of the company for its construction, ho was made one of tho first direct- 
ors. In 1850 he became the owner and publisher of the Lawrenceburgh 
Register. In 1841 he was elected the first auditor of Dearborn County 
and held that office for four years. He was elected a representative in 
the Legislature in 1847, and again in 1856. He was superintendent of 
the United States Mint at Denver, and also assistant treasurer of the 
United States, which position bo held for eight years. As a public offi- ' 



80S HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

cer it is believed tliat Lis fidelity to the interests of the public and his 
integrity have never been questioned even by his political opponents. 
Educated in the school of Andrew Jackson, in politics, he is, as was his 
father, a Democrat, but is not a narrow partisan and has the respect and 
esteem of men of all parties. In Dearborn County, especially, where he 
has been so long and so well known, he is highly esteemed, not only as 
a good man, but also as a man of ability. He has long taken a deep 
interest in every thing relating to the pioneer times and early history of 
Dearborn County and southeast Indiana. He collected and preserved 
the valuable historical papers of Dr. Ezra Ferris. He has written many 
interesting and important sketches of local history, some of which have 
been published in the Aurora, Lawrenceburgh and Cincinnati newspapers, 
and he has furnished important contributions to this volume. Mr. Lane 
is now living in the peaceful retirement of his rural home, more than 
three-score and ton, yet his interest in current events is unabated. He 
is a man of medium stature with animated eyes, and in personal appear- 
ance is said to strongly resemble his distinguished father. He is the 
last of his father's family, which once held a high position in the aristoc- 
racy of intellect and intelligence in the {old county of Dearborn; the 
rest are all gone, and the old family mansion in Lawrenceburgh, in which 
the father and mother entertained Gen. Jackson, looks as if it too would 
soon go to the dust with those who once inhabited it, Geo. W. Lane 
was married to Miss Sally Maria Buell, a daughter of Salmon D. Buell, 
of Marietta, Ohio, and sister of Gen. Don Carlos Buell. Nine children 
were born to them, two of whom, Mary E. and Buell' L., died young; 
seven are living viz.; Amos, Anna, George B. , Mary Eliza, Gertrude B. , 
Julia and Jane Alma. 

JOHN LANIUS, of Bising Sun, died on the 9th of April, 1S4G, aged 
seventy-three years. He emigrated from Reisterstown, Md., in 1812, 
and settled in Circlevillo, Ohio, where he remained until 1818, when he 
removed to Bising Sun where he continued to reside until his death, at 
which time he was serving as the village postmaster. Mr. Lanius was 
remarkable for habits of industry, veracity and integrity in all his deal- 
ings with his fellow men. He lived with the widowed relict then left to 
mourn his loss, fifty-two years in the strictest harmony. He was a mem- 
ber of the United Brethren Church. The writer of this notice has 
known Mr. Lanius for more than thirty years, and he verily believes 
that but few men have lived so many years and left as many examples 
worthy of imitation, as a citizen, a neighbor, a patriot and a Christian. 

K. G. LANGSDALE, M. D. , a popular druggist and pharmacist, 
Rising Sun, is a native of Kentucky, born in 1851. He was educated 
at Moore's Hill College, and for seven years was engaged in teaching 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 809 

"the young idea how to shoot. " In 1879 he entered the Ohio Medical 
College, of Cincinnati, nnd took a thorough course in the study of medi- 
cine, graduating March 4, 1881. He then sold out- his interest, in the 
drug business at Florence, Ind., and located in the same year in Rising 
Sun. In January, 1882, he purchased a stock of drugs of B. F. 
Buchanan, and, since that date, has done a good business in the drug 
line, keeping a full 'stock of goods peculiar to the trade. Dr. Langsdale 
began the study of medicine with Drs. Fairburst & Mantle, of Yincennes, 
Ind., and later, with Dr. J. M. W. Langsdale, of Florence, Ind. He 
now confines his professional services to city practice exclusively. In the 
fall of 1885 Dr. Langsdale was married to Miss Carrie Enochs, one of 
the most pi i possessing young ladies of Rising Sun. 

GEORGE H. LANKFORD. river trader, Aurora, is a native of 
Maryland, born in Somerset County, November 29, 183-!. His educa- 
tion was very limited. His parents, Littleton and Adaline (Townsend) 
Lankford, were born in Maryland, the father in 1800 and the mother in 
1802. They raised a family of six children. The parents were members 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church, in which the father was an officer for 
years. He died in 1853, and the mother in 1858. George H, in early 
life, left the farm and served a four years' apprenticeship at bricklaying, 
and received as compensation for his services in addition to the knowl- 
edge acquired, one pair of boots. He came to Indiana in 1855, and fol- 
lowed his trade, and boarded for fourteen years at the Eagle Hotel in 
Aurora. September 4, 1865, he was married to Miss Adaline Pusey,who 
was born in Maryland, January 15, 1835. Mr. Lankford began operat- 
ing on the river in 1859, and has followed flat boating and steam-boating 
over since. He was in the Government service for three years as pilot, 
and ran the blockade, at Vicksburg, in perfect safety, without even a 
scratch. He holds a license as pilot from Cincinnati to New Orleans. 
For the last few years he has been spending his winters south. Mr. 
Lankford is a worthy member of Aurora Lodge No. 442, F. & A. M., 
Aurora Chapter No. 13, Aurora Council and Aurora Commandry No. 17, 
K. T. His estimable wife is a member of the Presbyterian Church. 

JAMES E. LARIMER, editor of the Lawrenceburgh Press, the 
Republican organ of Dearborn County, is a descendant of a large family 
of that name who were pioneers of Fairfield County, Ohio; his father, 
James Larimer, having been born and reared there. The family subse- 
quently moved to Elkhart County, Ind., where James E. was born in 
1840. The death of his father broke up his home when he was seven 
years of age, and thereafter he knocked about with the ordinary expe- 
rience of a homeless orphan, finally picking up the trade of blacksmith. 
Thouf'h of unbroken Democratic stock he was an abolitionist from the 



810 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

first. When the war began ho laid down the hammer and joined the first 
company Ohio sent into the conflict, Company A, First Regiment Ohio 
Volunteer Infantry. He was in the first battle of Bull Run, 
three days -after his time had expired. It was his company that first de- 
veloped the enemy, and hi^ regiment that caused the retreat and protected 
the panic-stricken mob from the Black Horse Cavalry. At the close of 
the three months' service ho spent all his money to enlist men for three 
years, and when sent home on recruiting service in 1802, he spent all his 
wages up to that time enlisting men. He re-enlisted as a veteran in 
1863, and was mustered out July 20, 1S65, having been in many of the 
engagements participated in by the Fourteenth Corps between "Wildcat" 
in 1861 and the surrender of Johnston in 1865; and the only per- 
sonal matter ho takes any pride in is the fact that he did faithfully what 
one man could do in the war for the Union. At the close of the war Mr. 
Larimer was united in marriage with Miss Rhoda Ward, daughter of 
William S. Ward, ex-commissioner, and one of the most highly esteemed 
citizens of Dearborn County. Laura, their only child, is now ton years 
of age. In 1866 and again in 1884 he was Republican nominee for 
representative to the State Legislature, which fact attests to the confidence 
placed in him by his party. In 1869 ho entered the internal revenue 
service as ganger, and served fiftoeu years, ranking among the most effi- 
cient officers in the service. His best friends were among his fellow 
officers and the men with whom he had to do officially. In 1878 he 
purchased the Press office, which, with his wife, a valuable assistant, he 
has since ably and successfully conducted,, being thoroughly devoted to 
his party, always active in its support, and fearless almost to a fault in 
opposing what ho thinks to be wrong. Besides his newspaper work, Mr. 
Larimer has also given some attention to the manufacturing interests of 
Lawronceburgh. He holds some stock in the Ohio Valley Coffin Company, 
to the succoss of which he has contributed his full share. A mind serious 
and philosophic, firm and conscientious in his convictions, he is woll cal- 
culated for usefulness as a balance-wheel of public sentiment in the field 
of labor which he has chosen. 

JOSEPH LARKINS, foreman molder, Ohio & Mississippi shops, 
Cochran, is a native of Hamilton County, Ohio, born in Cincinnati 
April 19. 1850. He obtained a common school education. His parents, 
Joseph and Elizabeth (McGnire) Larkins, were born in Ireland. They 
came to America in 1847, locating in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he fol- 
lowed brick-making, building, contracting and farming. The subject of 
this sketch worked on the farm until 1865, when he learned plumbing 
and gas fitting, at which he worked for two years; then clerked in a 
grocery for five years. In 1S72 engaged in business for himself; in 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. <S 11 

1873 sold out and came on thoOhio & Mississippi Road; in 1874 went to 
I.C. & St. L. Road, worked for three years inmolder's department; August 
26, 1877, returned to Aurora and worked as freight hand for Ohio & 
Mississippi Railroad; December 14, 1878, was transferred to molder's 
department, and in 1881 was promoted to foreman, which positiou lie 
has held ever since. He was married, May 18, 1870, to Miss Nellie Dews, 
-a native of Aurora. To them have been born two children: Anna and 
Robert. 

WILLIAM G. LAYCOCK, retired carpenter, Hogan Township, 
resides in Wilmington. He was born in Clermont County, Ohio, April 
3, 1802. His parents, Nathan and Ann (Gregory) Laycock's record has 
been lost, but the father's nativity was Pennsylvania, and tho mother's, 
Maryland. They wore married and moved to Kentucky in 1790, and in 
two years thereafter to Ohio, where they raised a family of thirteen chil- 
dren. He was in tho war of 1812, under Gen. Harrison, in cavalry 
department, and furnished his own equipments. Tho parents were both 
members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. "William G. Laycock 
learned the tanner's trade in boyhood Having left home when only 
fifteen years of age, he knows almost nothing about his ancestors. He 
was married, February 17, 1822, to Miss Nancy Higbee, who was born in 
1806. There were born of this union seven children: James, Nathan, 
William, Eliza, Francis, Charles and Ann M. The mother died August 
25, 1846. He remarried, October 3, 1847, Mrs. Ann (Dreper) Tufts, 
who was born in Temple, Franklin Co., Me., July 13, 1810. She came 
to Indiana in 1S36. They have one child, Olive E. Mr. Laycock 
came to Indiana in 1846, and has resided here ever since. Ho has 
framed many a house and .barn, and done much hard work in his day. 
He is a member of Wilmington Lodge No. 158, F. & A. M., and 
Aurora Chapter No. 13, also Aurora Council. He and his wife belong to 
the Methodist I' iscopal Church, of which he was steward and trustee 
when tho church was built, and be has always taken an active part in 
religious matters. 

CHARLES LEIBECKE, druggist, Aurora, on Second Street, where 
can always be found pure drugs, paints, oils, varnishes and glass, surgi- 
cal instruments and surgeon's supplies, and all standard pharmaceutical 
preparations, was born in Germany, August 25, 1846, whore he l-eceived 
a collegiate education, taking a special course in chemistry and phar- 
macy. He clerkod four years in his native land, and came to America 
in 1864; landed in New York and enlisted in Company A, Forty-fifth 
Regiment Now York Infantry, and served until the close of the war. In 
the fall of 1865 he began clerking in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he re- 
mained up to the spring of 1S72, at which time he came to Aurora, and 



812 HISTORY OF DUAR150HN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

opened up his present business. Ho was married, December t. 1ST:!, to 
Mis9 Christona W oilman, who was horn in Cincinnati, Ohio, December 
10, 1848. To them have been horn three children: Harry, Charley and 
Mamio. ( The members of the family are identified whh the Catholic 
Church'. 

WILLIAM LEIVE, watch-maker and dealer in jewelry, silverware, 
books, stationery, wall and window paper, pianos, organs, etc., Aurora, 
was horn in the Province of Hanover, January 13, 1838, whore he re. 
ceived a common school education. His father, John Leive, was horn in 
Hanover, Germany, July 7, 1817, and his mother, Anna C. G. Ober- 
muoller, was horn in the same province in 1816. They came to America 
in 1S60 and. located in Cincinnati, Ohio. In Germany, the father of 
our subject, followed engineering, and in this country farming. The 
mother died January 13, 1S73. Mr. Leive came to Aurora in the spring 
of 1861 and worked for a Mr. Milburn, with whom ho learned his trade. 
In 1865 he began business for himself, and gradually worked up from 
nothing to his present truly enviable position in life. He was married, 
October 24, 1867, to Sophia F. Resing, a native of Ohio. She was born 
in Cincinnati, January 24, 1847. To the marriage three children have 
been born: Charles H., December 6, 186S; Alvina M., August 26. 
1872, and William H, August 15, 1874. Mr. Leive and family are 
members of the Evangelical Lutheran Church. 

JAMES LIDDLE, one of the leading farmers of Miller Township, 
was born in Dearborn County in 1824. His father, Steven Liddle, was 
a native of Yorkshire, England, born in 1780, and came to this county in 
1819, bringing his father with him. The family was of Scotch and En- 
glish parentage, the ancestors having been residents of those countries 
through time immemorial. Steven Liddle was a local minister of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, and had considerable reputation in a local 
sense, as a laborer in that capacity. He purchasod land in Miller Town- 
ship, and did quite a farming business in connection with his ministerial 
work. He was twice married, his first wife having been Isabel le Clark, 
who died in England, leaving one child — Elizabeth. His second wife 
was Sarah Thompson, by whom he had nine children. He died June 
27, 1851. James Liddle, whose name begins this notice, grew to matu- 
rity in his father's home, and was early inured to the toils and trials of 
farm life. He married, in 1S48, Miss Sarah J. Ewbank, daughter of Mar- 
tin C. Ewbank, and they have reared sis children: Charles, Howard. 
Ella. Anna, Marian and Laura. Aftor his marriage he began operations 
on his own responsibility, making his start in a very humble manner in- 
deed. His first purchase of land was made about 1852, and consisted of 
112 acres. By industry, perseverance and good management he has 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 813 

added at intervals to his original possessions till ho now owns -ISO acres, 
and with his son, 600 acres of valuable land. He has always dealt quite 
extensively in stock, and the rank lie is now able to take among other 
farmers of the county is sufficient evidence of his general success. The 
family is associated with the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

LEANDER LINDSAY, farmer and dairyman. Washington Township, 
was born in Gallatin County, Ky., December 23, 1843, and completed his 
education at Georgetown College. His father, Charles, was born in Dear- 
born County. Ind., January 27, 1S07, and immigrated to Kentucky when 
quite yottng, where he followed farming and school teaching. The 
mother, Minerva Williams, was born in Scott County, Ky. They were 
married in 1837, and l'aised a family of five children. His father was 
sheriff for four year* in Gallatin County, Ky.. and made a prompt and 
efficient officer. Mr. Leander Lindsay began farming in Center Town- 
ship in 1S55, and located in Washington Township, where ho now resides, 
in 1872. He was married, April 12, 1870, to Miss Harriet J. Dils, who 
was born in Centre Township, Dearborn Co., Ind., January 22, 1843. 
Five children resulted: William L., born February 24, 1871, died March 
5, 1872; Mary, born February 9, 1873; Paul, born May 11, 1878; Gracio, 
born March 16, 1882. Mr. Lindsay is a member of Pleasant View 
Grange No. 237. He and his wife are members of the Baptist Church. 
He has a fine herd of Alderny cows, and splendid facilities for taking 
care of the milk. He churns by horse-power, and makes a specialty of 
furnishing his patrons with good butter and rich buttermilk. He was 
raised a farmer, but has found his present employment more lucrative 
than tilling the soil, hence he devotes his time and talent to the butter 
and buttermilk business, which he began in 1877. 

JOHN F. LINDSAY, retired, Aurora, was born in Dearborn County, 
Ind., May 16, 1823, and received an ordinary English education. His 
father, Thomas Lindsay, was born in Kentucky in 1793, and came to 
Aurora in 1811, and followed carpentering up to 1829, when he returned 
to Kentucky, where he lived until his deatb, in 1870. The mother, Eliz- 
abeth (Fulton) Lindsay, was born in Pennsylvania, and came here, in 
1798, with her father, Judge Samuel Fulton, son of a Revolutionary soldier, 
who was one of the first associate judges of Ohio County, Ind. , and served 
for many years as justice of the peace. John F. , at the ago of ten years, 
began the carpenter trade, and followed it up to 1882. He was married, 
September 3, 1845, to Lucinda Powers; she was born in Boone County, 
Ky., July 21, 1824. Mr. Lindsay moved to Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1852, 
and remained until 1870; th n returned to his native playgrounds, and 
now resides on the place wl he was born. Ho owns twenty-three acres 
of land within the city limii , and has opened a stone quarry upon tho 



814 II1ST0KY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

same, and superintends the business himself. His wife is a member of 
the Baptist Church, and he of the Universalis! Church. Mr. Lindsay is 
a well-preserved, elderly gentleman, and bids fair for many years of 
usefulness to his family and friends. 

THOMAS 0. LINDSAY, attorney, real estate and insurance agent, 
Aurora, office on Main Street in Dr. Henry's block. Mr. Lindsay was 
born in Rising Sun, Ind., October 17, 1849, and completed his education 
in the public schools at Cincinnati, Ohio. His father, John F., was born 
in Aurora, Ind., May 10, 1823; mother, Lucinda (Lowers) Lindsay, was 
born in East Bend, Boone Co., Ky., July 21, LS24. In 1805 Thomas 0. 
began the carpenter trade, which he followed for years, and became a 
very successful architect. In 1870 he came to Aurora as contractor and 
builder, and lias built over 180 houses, including the Opera House, all of 
which stand as monuments to his skill and ability as an architect and 
builder. Mr. Lindsay abandoned manual labor in 1881, and engaged 
in his present business. He was admitted to the bar in 1882. He was 
married, in 1877, to Miss Vina Cunningham; she was born in Wilming- 
ton January 17, 1854. To them was born one child — Lillian. He is a 
member of Aurora Lodge No. 51, F. & A. M., and Chosen Friends 
Lodge No. 13, I. O. O. F. ; also Harmony Lodge No. 09, K. of P. 

JOB LITTLE, farmer, Sparta Township, was born in the same, 
March 20, 1828. His parents, Elias and Rebecca (Mulford) Little, were 
both natives of Ohio, and migrated from thoDc - to Dearborn County in 
a very early day, settling on the same farm on which our subject now 
lives. They were among the early pioneers of this county, and at the 
time the settlement was made the county was almost an unbroken wilder- 
ness. The father died in 1809, his wife having died in 1829. He was 
afterward married to Mrs. Nancy Hubbard, who died about 1843, and he 
then married Betsy Shodd, who still survives. He was the father of 
twenty-one children, namely: Mulford, Ephraim, William, Archibald, 
Julia, Phebe, Mary, Martha, Esther and Job, by his first wife; Jackson, 
Rebecca, Myer, Sarah, Amos, Elias and David by second wife, and 
George, John, Ann and Elizabeth by third wife. Our subject purchased 
the old homestead after his father's death, where he has always resided. 
He was married in Sparta Township, in 1850, to Elizabeth Lind- 
say, by whom he had born to him two children, viz.: Elias W. and 
Esther J., the latter deceased. Mrs. Little died in 1854, and in tho 
same year he married Harriet Lindsay, a sister of the first wife, by whom 
he has had nine children, viz. : James F., Sarah F., Archibald, Ebben 
B., George B., William A., Charles S., Oscar E. and Fladilla M. 

CHARLES LODS, farmer, Kelso Township, was born in France 
January 15, 1825. His parents were John P. and Mary Lods, both 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 815 

natives of Franco, when' they married and from where, in 1827, they 
immigrated to the United States. Landing at New York City; from there 
to Cincinnati, Ohio, they came by flat-boat, the mother dying on the 
way, the father came immediately to Dearborn County, settling in Logan 
Township, where he purchased land and was married to Margaret 
Christopher. In 1S37 he moved to Kelso Township, purchasing the 
farm and settling where our subject now lives, and where ho resided 
until death. Ho was the father of eight children, viz.: Susan, Cather- 
ine, Joseph, Elizabeth, Rosauna, James, Charles and Louisa. Charles, 
our subject, came with his father to this township, where he was united 
in marriage, May 1G, 1850, to Isabelle Hudson, who was born at Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio, March 3, 1824, a daughter of Christopher and Ann Hud- 
son. After his marriage be settled on the old homestead, whore he at 
present lives and has resided principally since. He was elected township 
assessor of Kelso Township in 1S55, and in 1860 was elected to the State 
Legislature. In 1872 he was elected treasurer of Dearborn County, 
which office lie held two terms. Mr. and Mrs. Lods are parents of five 
children, viz.: Louisa (deceased), born March 2, 1851; Elizabeth, born 
September 8, 1853; Catherine, born October 15, 1855; Charles J., born 
September 29, 1802; Josephine, born April 26, 1866. Mr. Lods owns 
240 acres of fine land, well improved. He holds a high rank in the cit- 
izenship of his township, and in both his legislative and official career 
he has merited the esteem and confidence of all interested. 

CHRIST LOMMEL, Lawrenceburgh, the able superintendent and 
treasurer of the Lawrenceburgh Furniture Manufacturing Company, was 
born in Germany, in 1834, and grew up to early manhood in his native 
country. In 1S51 he immigrated to the United States, and soon after 
located at Lawrenceburgh. He was variously employed till 1808, when 
he began operations with the above named company, with which ho has 
since been connected. Mr. Lommell is among the foremost citizens of 
Lawrenceburgh, both in civil affairs and business enterprise, having for 
some time represented one of the wards in the city council, of which he 
is at present a membor. He was married, in 186S, to Miss Lena Kirsch, 
by whom he has seven children living, namely: Louise, Charles, Katie, 
Henry, Edward, Tina and Arthur. Amelia is deceased. Mr. Lommel is 
a member of the DruicTs society, and a gentleman of excellent standing 
as a citizen. 

NLMROD LOTTOX, grocer, Lawrenceburgh, born in Ohio County, 
Ind., in 1S37, is a son of William and Julia (Jenkins) Lotton. He grew 
to maturity in his native locality, in whose schools he obtained the rudi- 
ments of an education. He resided on a farm till 1866, when he removed 
to Lawrenceburgh, and engaged in the cooperage business, operating 



81(5 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

from fifteen to twenty workmen. In 1873 the panic brought on reverses 
which compelled him to curtail his business, and lie engaged in the 
manufacture of beer casks till lS"s - 2, when he embarked in the grocery 

business, in which he still continues. Mr. Lotton was married, July 29, 
1800, to Luella G. Swopo, who was reared in Lawreneeburgh, and three 
years teacher in the public schools. Her father was James Swope, a 
merchant of Lawreneeburgh for twenty five years. Mr. and Mrs. Lotton 
have two children: Iola G. and William. Mr. Lotton was four years a 
member of the city council, and is generally regarded as an enterprising 
business man. 

BENJAMIN F. LOTTON, Rising Sun, dealer in groceries and 
provisions, was born in Ohio County in 1854. He is a son of William 
and Lucy (Mendell) Lotton, both natives of the same county. He grew 
up on the farm with his parents, remaining under the care of the pater- 
nal roof till twenty-three years of age. He obtained a good practical 
education in the common schools, and at Moore's Hill College, with a 
short term at Lebanon, Ohio, Normal School, and subsequently taught 
eight terms. For about four years he was engaged during the summer 
seasons in running a wholesale and retail dry goods and notion wagon. 
In November, 18S3, he established himself in the grocery and provision 
trade in Rising Sun, whore he has since conducted a profitable business, 
making a specialty of goods in job lots. 

JOHN LOFTUS, farmer, of Sparta Township, was born in Ireland 
in May, 1827. His parents, William and Catherine (Collins) Loftus, 
were also natives of Ireland, and were the parents of six children, viz. : 
Patrick, America, Thomas, William, Mary, and John, our subject, the 
second member of the family. He immigrated to the United States in 
1848, landing at New Orleans in May of that year. Shortly afterward 
he came to Cincinnati, Ohio, and from thence to Aurora, Ind., where 
he was married to Betsy Hoffrein, by whom he has reared four sons, viz. : 
Michael, John, James and Thomas. In about 1SG5 Mr. Loftus pur- 
chased and moved on his present farm, where he has since resided. He 
owns 140 acres of fine land, well improved, and is regarded as one of 
the thrifty agriculturists of the township. 

HENRY LONGCAMP, farmer of Clay Township, is a native of 
Germany, born May 14, 1S43. His parents, Frederick and Mary 
(Sheibuuib) Longcamp, were also natives of Germany, and immigrated 
to Dearborn County in the year 1S43, settling in Cesar Creek Township, 
where he died in February, 18S1, his widow subsequently moving to Ris- 
ing Sun, Ind., where she now resides. Their children were Frederick, 
Mary, Henry, Eliza, Louisa, Minnie, William and Rosona. Henry, our 
subject, enlisted in the war August 14, 1SG2, in Company E, Eleventh 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 817 

Kentucky Cavalry, as a private, and served until July 15, 1805, at which 
time he was discharged and returned home, where he was married, March 
14, 1807, to Catherine Rullmau, who was born in Dearborn County 
June 28, 1810. Shortly after his marriage ho purchased and settled oa 
the farm where ho now lives, and where he has since resided. He owns 
ninety-six and a half acres of line land. Mr. and Mrs. L. are parents of 
three children: Henry W., deceased; John H. and Annie M. 

GEORGE C. LONGENECKER, farmer and grain dealer, Harri- 
son Township, was born in this township January 12, 1SG1. His parents, 
Solomon and Mary (McManaman) Longenecker, were natives of Adams 
County, Penn. , and this county respectively. His paternal grandpar- 
ents came to this county with their children about 1845— 4G, his father 
being then a small boy, though he became a prominent farmer, owning 
512 acres of land. He was also engaged in the lumber business for a 
time, and in all his enterprises was quite successful. Ho reared four chil- 
dren: Rebecca H, Solomon, Mary E. M. and George C He died 
September 13, 1884. His wife still survives and resides at Metamora, 
Ind., with her son and two daughters. George C. , our subject, grew to the 
age of seventeen on the old homestead, where he now temporarily resides. 
In 1877 he moved to Metamora with his parents, and was then married, 
May 27, 1884, to Hattie L. McGuire, of that place, daughter of Dr. 
William W. and Angeline (Martindale) McGuire. Since his marriage Mr. 
Longenecker has been engaged in this township in farming and buying 
grain and stock at Longenecker Station. He is a young man of energy, 
good character, and good business qualifications. 

OTHO LOWE, an energetic farmer, Lawrenceburgh Township, was 
born in Dearborn County in 1844. He grew to maturity on the farm, was 
educated in the common schools, and in 1863 married Mary S. Guard, 
and began business on his own responsibilities. He rented land a few 
seasons and in 1879 made a purchase to which he has since added till he 
now owns about 238 acres, ranging in value from $40 to $100 per acre. 
In 1870 Mr. Lowe was married to Bartha Wamsley, daughter of Moses 
B. Wamsley, Hamilton County, Ohio, his first wife having passed away 
previously, leaving three children: William, Lucy and Anna. Mr. Lowe 
is regarded as one of the most substantial farmers of Dearborn County. 
He is a lineal descendant of one of the earliest settlers. He is a member 
of the I. O. O. F. and holds a ranking position in tho citizenship of his 
community. 

FREDERICK F. LUCAS. Among the pioneers of Lawrence- 
burgh, Dearborn Co., Ind., was Frederick F. Lucas, a Frenchman of 
education and culture, a watchmaker and jeweler by occupation, a native 
of Rennes, France, and son of (ex-notary public) John Baptiste aud 



818 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

Elizabeth Lucas (nee St. Clare), two families of distinction in that city 
occupying official positions in the Government, church and army. To 
thetn were horn seven children — three sons and four daughters— namely : 
John IJaptiste, Frederick Francis, Charles August, Johanna Elizabeth, 
Mario Angelique, Anna Mario and Marie Josephine. At the age of 
eighteen years Frederick enlisted in the French Army, under Napoleon, 
and followed the fortunes of that illustrious leader through the last 
scenes of his warfare. He was one of the sufferers of the terrible scourge, 
the small-pox, which so weakened the army, and fought at the battle of 
Waterloo. After Napoleon's defeat, political differences caused him. 
with many others, to immigrate to the United States, arriving at Baltimore 
about 1817, where he remained some time and learned the trade of watch- 
maker. From there he removed to Marietta, Ohio, then to Cincinnati, 
and from there to Lawrenceburgh, Ind., in the year 1820 where he set- 
tled for life. In 1824 he married Letitia Nethery, a granddaughter of 
Maj. Walter Craig, of Wilmington, Del., who was an officer of tbo Revo- 
lution and for meritorious services rendered at the battle of Brandywinei 
was awarded a large tract of land, to which she is an heir. To Frederick 
and Letitia Lucas were born five children — three sons and two daughters. 
The two youngest sons died in childhood. The daughters, Mrs. Laura 
M. Cheek and Mrs. Josephine A. Dumont, are still living. 

GEN. THOMAS J. LUCAS, postmaster at Lawrenceburgh and native 
of that city, was born in 182G. His parents, Frederick F. and Letitia 
(Nethery) Lucas, are mentioned in the above sketch. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools of Lawrenceburgh, in which city also he learned 
the jeweler's trade with his father, and for many years he conducted that 
business. His father, born and reared during the period of the greatest 
military excitement of France, and directly under the influence of the 
genius of the great Napoleon, of whom he was a great admirer, trans- 
mitted to his son, in no mean degree, the tastes and talents of the soldier. 
At the early age of seveteen years he enlisted as drummer boy in the 
Mexican war, joining Company C, Fourth Regiment Indiana Volun- 
teers, commanded by Willis A. Gorman and was soon promoted to sec- 
ond lieutenant, acting at one time as assistant commissary and later in the 
service as adjutant. He served the first year of the war under Gen. 
Taylor and subsequently under Gen. Scott, and participated in several 
spirited engagements. In the month of August, 1847, he was landed at 
Vera Cruz and marched to the City of Mexico in pursuit of Santa Anna. 
He fought in the battles of Broken Bridge, Ccrro Gordo, Wamantla, 
Eclisco, Pueblo and various other minor engagements. After the close 
of the war he returned to his home and former occupation in Lawrence 
burgh. In 1818 he married Miss Ann E. Munson, who has since borne 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 819 

him five children — throo sons and two daughters)— the latter only now liv- 
ing: Mrs. Emma, wife of Frederick Kinsinger, of Cincinnati, and Miss 
Florouco F., who is still at homo. Mrs. Lucas was a daughter of Ira 
Munsoiij a pioneer of Hamilton County, Ohio. Her parents came orig- 
inally from New Jersey, entered land in Hamilton County, losing five 
of their children by death from disease during the first year of their set- 
tlement there. Gen. Lucas continued the jewelry business in Lawrence- 
burgh till 1S61, April IS, of which year, .on the event of the fall of 
Sumter, ho began the organization of a company for military service. 
From this time until mustered out, January 15, 1806, ho did efficient 
service for the Government, being almost constantly iu the field, and over 
ready to do his whole duty in whatever department assigned him. Tho 
following editorial, talcen from tho Lawrenceburgh Press of September 
24, 18S5, is a brief but concise summary of his military record during 
the late war and will give the reader a fair idea of his military capacity 
and of the extent of the invaluable services rendered his country during 
those tremendous times: "A man more modest with respect to his military 
servicos never drew a sword. Few even in his own county know that he 
was the most distinguished officer it produced, and at least equaled any man 
of his state. This was partly because of his reluctance to parade his rank 
and his work, but more because that part in which his capacity was 
proved and he earned the notice of his commanders, was in the far South, 
and overshadowed by the nearer and greater operations of Sherman and 
Grant. Pages of newspapers made us familiar with the Atlanta and the 
Richmond campaigns, whore a line got in about tho details of Banks' and 
Canby's operations. We knew the Red Rivor campaign was a failure for 
which Banks was responsible, but we never heard of the Custer of that 
bootless but bloody inarch. * * * * 

A strong Democratic partisan when the war begun, he was not 
deceived or misled, as to his duty, an instant. He went for the flag, and 
made no constitutional quibble. He helped organize two companies here, 
raised a third, was elected captain, joined the Sixteenth Indiana, and 
because of his qualifications was appointed lieutenant-colonel. In the 
battle of Ball's Bluff, made as a diversion to cover another move, he cov- 
ered the retreat acro.s the Potomac with 1,100 men, and retired in the 
last boat. His capacity here made him a colonel, and he was sent home 
to reorganize his one year regiment into a three years one. Before it was 
fairly see oned ho met Kirby Smith's invading army at Richmond, Ky. , 
and though defeated as the little force was certain to bo, the Sixteenth, 
on account of confidence in its commander, met the brunt of the fight in 
trying to delay Smith's advance, to give time for our forces to gather, 
and in the first of three fights in one day, lost 200 killed and 



820 HISTOIiY OF DBARBOUN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

wounded. Reorganizing again aftor the wounded were well and the 
capturod exchanged, he went to Gran I and fought in all the operations 
about Vicksburg, generally in advance on account of the good discipline 
and drill of his command. Ho was wounded three times in charges on 
tho works of Vicksburg, but never left the front. After the surrender ho 
was sent to New Orleans and put in command of a brigade of cavalry, 
aud did the cavalry service for Franklin's operations in the Teche coun- 
try. While the work was of a skirmishing character, it was wide spread 
and deveolped his military instinct. In the winter of 1803-64 and spring 
of 1SG4, in the Red River campaign, he commanded two brigades of 
cavalry and two batteries, in the advance, fighting every day. Many of 
these engagements were small cavalry battles, and they always ended 
in the enemy being swe.pt from the field by the skill and dash of his 
forces. After Banks met the rebel army at Pleasant Hill and waa 
defeated, rather by his own fears than by the enemy, and ordered the 
withdrawal, Lucas covered the retreat of the demoralized forces, and to 
turn and charge tho pursuing and jubilant enemy was of almost hourly 
occurrence. At Alexandria Banks was driven into the works, but the 
same force that drove him in was repulsed and driven off the field by 
Lucas' pluck and his skill in handling his division. Indeed a historian 
of this campaign, in the St. Louis Globe -Democrat, declares that but for 
Lucas' courage and capacity with cavalry, Banks' army would have been 
ruined if not captured. From Alexandria to the Mississippi Lucas had 
the advance, to clear the way of the enemy that had surrounded Banks. 
After this campaign he was commissioned a brigadier- general on the 
recommendation of officers who had seen his fitness for cavalry work 
With a division of cavalry he entered upon the campaign of Mobile, and 
his rapidity and strategy so confused the enemy that he thoroughly invested 
Fort Blakely and was about to charge it when Gen. Steele's infantry 
arrived. After the fall of Blakely, Lucas was brovetted major-general 
'for meritorious conduct,' and sent to intercept the expected retreat of 
the Mobile forces; and at an engagement at Claiborne two rebel regi- 
ments were utterly annihilated. Seventy-five of tho prisoners captured 
had sabre wounds, showing the sort of fighting that, was done. Being 
chief of an independent command reporting direct to Canby and receiv- 
ing orders direct from him, Lucas raided western Florida, southern 
Georgia, and Alabama, destroying railroads, munitions of war, and cap- 
turing or routing the troops that tried to protect them. Being in middle 
Mississippi when hostilities ceased, he marched west to Vicksburg, 
mustered out his command, whose time was expired, aud was himself 
ordered to New Orleans to await the issue of the threatened complica- 
tions with the French in Mexico: aud not until that threatened cloud 



passed was b 


p ordered to be mustered out, January 15, iSfiO. Sheridan, 


who WJIB on 


tbe Mexican frontier, bad beard of hirn, ami had indicated 


to Canby tb 


a( In' was' tbe suit of man be might want." Since tin. close 


of tbe war. ' 


ivbich diminished rather than increased his fortunes, Gen. 


Lucas has 1'. 


en variously employed. Four years bo was engaged in the 


United Stat. 


s revenue service. In 18S.1 be was appointed postmaster 



at Lawrenceburgb, and the business of that office he has since faithfully 
attended to. Though an ardent Democrat prior to 1881, he has since 
that date affiliated with tbe Republican party. 

STEPHEN LUDLOW, Lawrenceburgb, was r an early pioneer of 
Dearborn County. He was born at Long Hill, Morris Co. . N. J., May 
5, 1778. He emigrated West with his parents in 1789, and settled in 
Columbia. His father, John Ludlow, was the first sheriff in Hamilton 
County, Ohio, appointed in 1700. Mr. Ludlow, in tbe seventeenth year 
of bis age. entered upon the duties of assistant United States surveyor 
with bis uncle, Isaac Ludlow, and upon his death continued with bis 
uncle, William Ludlow, and served in this capacity for the period 
of twelve years, surveying in tbe Western wilderness. On the 
dissolution of partnership between Isaac Dunn and John R. Beaty 
in 1808, be entered into a partnership with Isaac Dunn in the 
mercantile business, and continued it until 1819; during that period be 
made several trips to New Orleans, and walked back through the Indian 
nations that were between here and there, and several trips East to buy 
goods. He -vas married to Miss Porter, daughter of John Porter, Esq. 
After her decease be married Miss Leah Ann Bell. He was appointed 
one of tbe commissioners by the Legislature of Indiana in 1S20, to make 
a selection of tbe four sections granted by Congress to the State for a 
seat of government. The commissioners met at tbe junction of Fall 
Creek and White River in June, 182(1, and after an examination of the 
country made their selection of the present site of Indianapolis, June 7, 
1S20. Mr. Ludlow was a stout, robust man, above tbe medium size. By 
his untiring energy, perseverance and economy, he became one of tbe 
wealthiest men of tbe county, a useful citizen, a good neighbor, kind and 
affectionate husband and father. He died March 22, 1855, lamented by 
all who know him. 

JOHN E. LYNN, farmer, Washington Township, was born in the 
same, Dearborn Co., Ind., July 28, 1842 He attended common 
school and completed his education at Farmer's College in Ohio. Ho 
is also a competent and well qualified book-keeper, having graduated 
February 22, 18(31, in Bacon's Commercial College. In early life ho 
kept books in Cincinnati, Ohio, clerked on steamboats, and settled down 
to farming in 1876. Mr. Lynn was married, August 31, 1875, to Miss 



OZZ HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

Kate Hannah, who was born in Ohio County, Ind., March 8, 1853. 
Their three children are Mabel V., born September 2, 1876; Jessie It.. 
born June 10, 1878; Julia F., born June 16, 18S0. Mrs. Lynn's father, 
William I. Hannah, was born in Delaware, March 18, 1804, and her 
mother, Maribah (Barricklow) Hannah, was bora in Pennsylvania Sep- 
tember '24, 1SU. They were married February 26, 1826, and raised four 
sons and four daughters. The father was a cooper by trade, but followed 
farming up to his death, September 4, 1881. His parents were members 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Lynn's father was born on 
Arnold's Creek, Ohio County, and died April 2, 1868. His mother, Eliz- 
abeth (Walker) Lynn, was born in Washington Township. Mr. Lynn is 
an I. O. O. F., and member of Hartford Lodge No. 151, F. & A. M. 
He was elected W. M. of Hartford Lodge in December, 18S2, and re- 
elected each following year up to the present, which proves his good 
qualities as a presiding officer, and that he -is duly appreciated by 
the brethren. He is truly a self-made man. Mrs. Lynn is a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

ROBERT LYTLE, foreman in blacksmith shops of the Ohio & Miss- 
issippi Railroad, Cochran, is a native of Ireland, and was born in 
County, Tyrone, April 17, 1847, and received only a common education. 
His parents, Joseph and Elizabeth (Mills) Lytle, were born in same 
locality. The father came to America in 1S47, and mother in 1849, 
locating in Aurora, Ind. The former was a linen weaver by trade, and 
died March 29, 1855. The mother resides in Aurora, and is enjoying 
good health, being now about seventy years of age. The subject of our 
sketch has always worked hard, and never sought preferment. He lived 
econc cally, and gave nearly every dollar of his hard earnings to his 
good mother up to the date of his marriage. In 1860 he began as a 
laborer at T. & J. \V. Gaff's Mill, and in 1S64 commenced the black- 
smith trade under William McClelland. In June, 1864, he changed to 
Steadman's Foundry and worked until 1865; then engaged with the 
Ohio & Mississippi Railroad Company at the Cochran shops to complete his 
trade. In 1876 he was promoted to foreman of the blacksmith shops, 
and has hold the position ever since. Mr. Lytle was married, May 4, 
1880, to Miss Lizzie Treon. She was born in Bartholemew County, 
Ind., April 2, 1860. By the union, one child — Jennie T. — has been 
born. Mr. Lytle is a member of Dearborn Lodge No. 442, F. & A. M. , 
Aurora Chapter No. 13, Chosen Friends Lodge No. 13, I. O. O. F., 
Aurora Commandery No. 17, and the Presbyterian Church. 
DANIEL S. MAJOR, see page 154. 

JUDGE SOLOMON MANWARRING, late of Dearborn County, 
died in Logan Township February, 1836, in the sixty-fifth year of his 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES., 823 

ago. He < migrated from the State of Delaware to this county in ISO;?, 
and about IS] he was appointed one of tho members of the Legisla 
tive Council of Indiana Territory, in which capacity ho served until the 
change of g rerument, with tho universal approbation of his immediate 
constituents and the Territory generally. In 1812 Judge Manwarring 
was elected a member of the convention for Dearborn County, which 
framed the State constitution. After the change of government ho was 
elected an associate judge of the Dearborn Circuit Court for two suc- 
cessive periods of seven years each, which position he filled with 
punctuality and to the universal satisfaction of those who placed hiin in 
that position. " Judge Manwarring was hospitable, charitable, and 
invariably kind to all his acquaintances, punctual and honest in all 
his dealings, sincere in his friendships; he may be truly pronounced one 
amongst the 'noblest works of God ' —an honest man." Ho died univer- 
sally regretted by all who knew him. 

CHARLES MARMET, York Township, was born in Hamin. Prov- 
ince of Westphalia, Prussia, Novomber 1, 1821. He received a good 
education in his native .country and in 1S5Q sailed for America, landing 
in New York, August 15, of that year. He came direct to Cincin- 
nati, where after clerking about two years in a commission house, he es- 
tablished himself in the commission business in 1852, in partnership 
with his brother, Florence. The business of the firm was soon extended 
to New Orleans, where ho spent the greater part of his time till the 
beginning of the civil war, when he returned to Cincinnati and retired 
from tho commission business to the farm near Yorkville, where his 
widow now resides. Ho was married August 18, 1S63, to Eosa Ege, a 
daughter of Joseph Ego, one of the old and esteemed residents of York- 
ville. Her father was born in Alsace, France, in 1813, and is a son of 
John and Barbara (Ober) Ege. He married, in 1839, Magdalena Heim- 
burger, daughter of John G. Heimburgor, and in 1S33 immigrated to 
America, came to Indiana and located where he has since resided. In 
1862 Mr. Marmet purchased the farm where Mrs. Marmot now lives, 
and here he made his home till his death in 1881. They had seven 
children, four of whom died in infancy. The living are Florence, Wil- 
helmina and Matilda. Mr. Marmot was an enterprising farmer, a mem- 
ber of the Catholic Church and left behind him a large circle of friends. 

CHARLES H. MARSH, foreman machinist, Ohio & Mississippi 
shops,Cochran Township,is a native of Dearborn County ,Ind. ,born Decem- 
ber 0, 1845, and received a good common school education. His parents, 
Zachariah and Mary (Decker) Marsh, wore natives of Ohio, and New 
York. Ho followed the river as mate and captain. Charles went to his 
trade in 1S64, in the [Ohio & Mississippi shojis at Cochran. In June, 



824 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

1883, he was promoted to foreman, and Las worked in the same shop 
since 1804. He was married May 22, 1879, to Miss Alice A. Forsytho, 
a native of Illinois, and to themjhas beeu born one son, Carl \\\, 
March 2, 1SS0. Mr. Marsh served nine months in Company H, Ninety- 
first Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry. He is a member of Aurora 
Lodge No. 51, F. & A.M., also Aurora Chapter No. 13. His estimable 
wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

HENRY A'. MARSHALL, farmer, was born in Sparta Township. 
December 3, 1822. His parents were Samuel and Lydia (Cook) Mar- 
shall, natives of England aud New York, the former an only child born 
to Samuel and Mary Marshall, of ! union, England. He was born in 
Loudon, May 29, 1789. His parents died when he was very young, and 
he was brought up by his uncle and aunt, and when about eleven years 
of age he immigrated to the United States, landing at New York City, 
where ho afterward engaged in the mercantile trade, and he was there 
united in marriage to the above Lydia Cook, who was born in August, 
1790. In 1818 they immigrated to Dearborn County, Ind., settling on 
a quarter section of land in Sparta Township, where they afterward 
resided until death. They were the parents of eight children, viz.: 
Joseph, Samuel, George, Henry V., Harriet, Jane, James and Charlotte. 
H. V., our subject, was married in Sparta Township, March, 1S44, to 
Jane Hodshier, by whom he had nine children, viz. : Augusta, Hattie, 
Charles L. (deceased), Cordelia, Clark, Eva M. , Seward L. Morton and 
Clarence. Mrs. Marshall died in August, 1879, and in Juno, 1883, Mr. 
M. married Mrs. Anna S. Parks, widow of John Parks, deceased, and 
to them were born two sons: Howard and Thomas. In 1852, Mr. Mar- 
shall went in company with sixteen other men from Chesterville to 
California, where he remained about twenty-five months and engaged in 
trading, after which ho returned to this county. He owns 160 acres of 
land. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and a straight- 
forward citizen. 

CHARLES MARTIN, proprietor of billiard hall and the Germania 
Assembly Rooms on Second Street, Aurora, was born in Bavaria, Germany, 
July 23, 1847, where he received a common school education. His father 
was born in Bavaria in 1823, and died in 1877. His mother, Magdalena 
(Riedinger) Martin, was born in Bavaria, and died in 1851. The father 
was a book-binder and printer. Mr. Martin came to America in 18r>3, and 
located in Poughkeepsie, N. Y., where he worked at cigar-making up to 
1873. He was then appointed to the free delivery department of United 
States mail service in Poughkeepsie, at which ho continued until May, 1S74, 
when he engaged in the manufacture of cigaiVfor himself, continuing 
eighteen months. He next came to Aurora, where he engaged in 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 82f> 

the same business. In 187G he l>egnu his present business, at which he 
has since continued He was married February 12, 1873. to Miss Louisa 
Bauer, daughter of Charles Bauer, who was born April 6, 1852. Five 
children have been born to them, namely: Lizzie IL, Charles ('•., Will 
.iam, Gus and Edna. Mr. Martin is a member of the K. of P. and Druid 
organizations. 

PHILLIP L. MATHETJS, of Lawrenceburgh, was born December 2, 
1829, at Klingonnriinster, near Landau, in Rhenish Bavaria, Germany, 
and was the youngest .son of Wendel Matheus and his third wife, 
Katharina F. Conradi; her father, George M. Conradi, was em- 
ployed as surveyor and geometrical engineer to lay out the frontier 
line of France and Germany, between Alsace and Rhenish Bavaria. 
Our subject was educated at the village school and the college at 
Bergzabern, a few miles from Rome, leaving school at fourteen to 
clerk in a store in the latter city. After three years of hard work- 
here he obtained a situation in the city of Manheim, on the Rhine. 
While in the latter city Mr. Matheus took sufficient part in the political 
revolution of 1S47-4S-4 ( J to make it necessary for him to floe the eouu- 
ry, as did such men as Hecker, Struve, Blind and others, some of whom 
were his playmates in boyhood. Accordingly he left the "Yaterland," 
April 16, 1850, immigrated to the United States, and in June of the 
same year located in Lawrenceburgh. Hero ho has since resided, except 
four years (1857-61), in Boonville, Mo., engaged in merchandising. He 
has been employed as salesman in a number of different establishments, 
built the "Rossville Exchange," and for a time operated the old brewery 
— always industrious and true to the interests of his employers. From 
September, 1S62, to 1866, he served as assistant revenue assessor for 
Dearborn County, and in the latter year was elected city treasurer of 
Lawrenceburgh, serving eleven years and declining further service, at 
the same time acting as city civil enginoer. In 1S63 was Independent 
candidate for county auditor, and though defeated, polled a large vote; 
in 1869 he was appointed by Gov. Porter to sell the Omer Ton sey estate; 
in 1873 was chosen cashier of the Lawrenceburgh National Bank, and 
served three years without being asked for a bond, "and carried the bank 
through the panic of 'black Friday' without trouble or loss." In the fall 
of 1S73 Mr. Matheus took stock in the Dearborn Furniture Company, 
which finally led him into an investment with the McLean Chair Com- 
pany. The failure of the latter enterprise, caused by the floods of 1SS2- 
83-84, and the general depression of business, turned him back to the 
insurance, European steam passage and exchange agency business, in 
which he is now engaged in connection with the Matheus & Minick Fil- 
ler Company, manufacturers of wood tillers, wood stains, etc. Mr. 



820 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

Ma theus was first married, in 1855, to Margaret Hauck, daughter of 
Johannes Hauck, a teacher in the Gorman schools, and their children 
were Eniil F., who was born April 30, 1850, and died in 1875, having 
spent two years in school in Germany, and later assisting his father as 
clerk in the bank; Louisa M., who died at two years of age; Gustavo G., 
born in Boonvillc, Mo., in 1860, married Anna Kleinhans; Louis L., born 
in Lawrenceburgh in 1802; Charles W., horn in 1804; Matilda M.,1809; 
Albert G. , born in 1S73, and died in infancy. The cherished mother of 
these children passed away June 10, 1S73, in her forty-third year. After 
being ten years a widower, April 12, 1883, Mr. Matheus was married to 
Miss Mina Hertle, who was born at Bergzabern in 1842, niece of Dr. 
Daniel Hertle, of German literary fame, and an estimable wife of ex- 
perience and decision. In this country Mr. Matheus had on brother 
and two sisters: Fritz, Kathariua and Henrietta, the latter only living. 
His mother immigrated hero in 1S5G aud was buried in the old cemetery 
at Lawrenceburgh iu 1800. In the formation of societies Mr. Matheus 
has been quite prominent, having assisted in organizing the first singing 
society in 1852; the Turn Yerein in 1S53; Columbia Grove of Druids, 
1853; Fortuna Lodge, I. O. O. F., 1SG7; the German Building Company. 
1809; was director in the gas eoropany, aud is one of the incorporators 
of Greendalo Cemetery. He is a member of the German Pioneer Soci- 
ety of Cincinnati. 

JAMES D. McADAMS, farmer, of Cass Township, a native of Ohio 
County, born in Cass Township, March 12, 1S20, is a son of Sooter and 
Ann (Downey) McAdams, natives of Pennsylvania, who came to Ohio 
when children in an early day with their parents, and settled at Colum- 
bia, where they grew to maturity, he being apprenticed to learn the 
shoe making trade at Lebanon, Ohio. They were married in Ohio, and 
iu 1819 removed to Indiana, and settled in Hartford, Union Township, 
but soon after removed into Cass Township, and settled in the Downey 
neighborhood, where they resided several years; thence returned to 
Union Township, where in August, 1854, Mrs. McAdams died, aged 
fifty-five. Ho died in 1S74, aged eighty-two years. He had followed his 
trade, that of a shoe-maker, the greater portion of his life; had pro 
cured a small yet comfortable home, but a few years prior to his death, 
suffered a severe loss by the burning of his house, upon which he had no 
insurance. He served as a soldier in the war of 1S12, aud was one of 
the number who volunteered to enter Canada, and make aggressive war- 
fare there, and, as a reward at the close of the war, received a discharge 
giving special credit for that daring feat, of which his descendants may 
well feel proud. He was twice married, and the father of twenty-three 
children. By the above, his lirst wife, he had eighteen children; sixteen 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 82 j 

grow to near maturity; seven now survive, viz.: Elizabeth, now widow 
of Walter Suits; .James D.; Catharine; Susanna, wife of Lyman Smith; 
Sooter; Mary, wife of John .Vko, and Walter S. By his second wife, 
Elizabath Mnlford, he had live children. James D. McAdams, the sub- 
ject of (Lis biography, was the first child born to his parents after they 
settled in Ohio County, and here grew to manhood, brought up to his 
father's trade, which business he followed several years; then he 
entered upon farming and has spent his entire life in Ohio County. 
The farm where he now lives he purchased in 1SG7. It consists of 190 
acres with good improvements. December 31, 1843, he was united 
in marriage with Elizabeth Downey," 3 born in New Richmond, Ohio, 
April 1G, 1826, a daughter of Amos and Mary (Sargeant) Downey, she 
being their only child. By this union they have had five daughters, 
three now living: Mary Ann, wife of Samuel Scott; Fannie A., wife of 
John B. Cowles, and Susanna, wife of William T. Wilbur. Mr. Mc- 
Adams is one of the prominent and well to do farmers of Cass Town- 
ship. Starting in life a poor boy, by his industry and good manage- 
ment, with the help of a frugal wife, he has accumulated a comfortable 
fortune. 

GEORGE McAROY, druggist and pharmacist, Rising Sun, Tnd., 
was born in Franklin, Warren County, Ohio, in 1835. His parents were 
George and Sarah (Bowne) McAroy; both were natives of Monmouth 
County, N. J. His father was a physician, born in the town of Cran- 
berry in 1790, and a graduate of the College of Physicians and Surgeons 
of Philadelphia, Penn., and served as assistant surgeon during the war 
of 1812, with Great Britain, and stationed at Trenton, N. J., with a 
corps of physicians and surgeons. The family' came to Franklin, Ohio, 
iii 1820, where the parents died. Our subject grew to the age of seven- 
teen years in his native town, and then went to Cincinnati, where he 
learned the drug business, which he has ever since conducted. In 1856 
he went east to Philadelphia and New York, where he remained one 
year; came to Rising Sun in 1857. In the latter place Mr. McAroy has 
since carried on a successful business, which he has gradually gained by- 
carefulness and efficiency in his semi-professional business. His establish- 
ment is complete in every particular, and is kept in order and style in a 
manner equal to a first-class city drug store. Mr. McAroy also owns a 
one half interest in the large drug house of H. J. Marshall & Co., 
Aurora, Ind. ; his interests are represented by his son, Will B. McAroy. 
Mr. McAroy was married in 1858 to Eliza J. Best, daughter of Samuel 
and Sarah (Green) Best, one of the old families of Ohio County. His 
grandfather. Samuel Best, emigrated from London, England, in a very 
early day, and on arriving in this country located in Cincinnati, where 



828 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

he was associated in business with Nicholas Longwortb and other pio- 
neers of that city. To. Mr. and Mi's. McAroy have been bom nine chil- 
dren: Nellie, Bella H., William B., George, Harry, Sarah B„ Charlos, 
Margaret R. and Yetta. Mr. M. is a member of the I. O. O. F., and one 

of the most wide-awake citizens of Rising Sun. His dwelling house, 
which is located on High Street, in one of the pleasant parts of the 
town, is characterized by the good taste and neatness peculiar to his 
business establishment, being provided with a line conservatory and 
other arrangements of elegance and convenience. 

NEWTON McCLAIX, proprietor of St. Charles Hotel, Aurora. 
On the 20th of April, 1SS5, Mr. McClain took charge of, and assumed 
all the duties as landlord, of the above house. He has been engaged in 
the hotel business since 1S74, first at Versailles, next at Osgood. With 
his past experience, the traveling public will be carefully looked after, 
and their every want supplied. Mr. McClain was born in Ripley County, 
Inch, October 29, 1836, and received a common school education. His 
parents, John and Jane (McCormick) McClain were born in Virginia, 
and immigrated to this State in early life. Newton McClain was mar- 
ried, August 27, 1856, to Miss Eunice M. Crandell, a native of Dearborn 
County. By the union four children have been born, namely: Anna B., 
Elizaboth, Agnes and Charles. Mr. McClain left the farm, in 1852, and 
engaged in milling at Friendship, where he continued up to 18*74. He 
is a member of Friendship Lodge No. 30, F. & A. M. , and has also 
taken chapter degrees. 

ROBERT A. McCONNELL, merchant, Aurora, was born in Belfast, 
Ireland, June 3, 1851. His parents wero William R and Mary (Strain) 
McConnell, mention of whom is made below, our subject completed his 
education at Bloomington, this State, and taught school from 186S to 
1871, then accepted a position as book-keeper and cashier for Gaff, Lozier 
& Co., which he held with pleasure to himself, and to the entire satisfac- 
tion of his employers until 1879, when he engaged in business for him- 
self, carrying a stock of general merchandise. In May, 18S2, he formed 
a partnership with George A. McAvoy, and opened an extensive clothing 
house in Lawrenceburgh, which Mr. McAvoy superintends. Both 
stores are doing a successful and prosperous business, which the firm 
justly merits. Mr. McConnell was married, June 3, 1872, to Miss Ella 
F. Trester (daughter of Capt. Martin Trester), who was born in Dearborn 
County, Ind., December 20, 1855. By their marriage two children: 
Laura F. and Mabel M. have been born. Mr. McConuell is a member of 
Aurora Lodge No. 442, F. & A. M., Aurora Chapter No. 13 and 
Aurora Commandry No. 17. He and his estimable wife belong to the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, of which he is one of the trustees. His 



BI0GKAPII1CAL SKETCHES. &_!» 

place of business is in Mi tcb el's block on Second Street, and upon his 
shelves, run 1 , counters, can be found a full assortment of imported, and 
domestic piece goods, and goods from bis bouse are always guaranteed 
to give satisfaction, as represented. In addition to bis other business, 
be represent- fire and life insurance in the best companies of this and 
foreign countries. 

WILLIAM R. McCONNELL, real estate agent and collector, Aurora, 
was born in Belfast, Ireland, September 16, 1821, where be received a 
common school education. His parents, James and Agnes (Kennedy) 
McConnell were natives of Ireland, died years ago. Our subject came to 
America in 1 844, and located in Lawrenceburgh with Daniel Majors, 
where be remained until the spring of 1846, at which time lie returned 
to his fatherland, and was married, May 19, 1S4G, to Miss Mary Strain, 
a native of Belfast, who was born June 20, 1822. Eight, children were 
born to the marriage, namely: James R., Robert A., Mary J., Agnes, 
John, Thomas, Carrie and 'William E. Father McConnell returned to 
Lawrenceburgh, in 1850, with bis family, and farmed up to 1S05, when 
they moved to Aurora, and be endeavored to earn a livelihood in an easier 
manner. For seven years he served the people of Aurora as constable. 
He has also served as assessor, and during 1884-85, as deputy. Him- 
self and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church. They are 
highly respected citizens. 

WILLIAM McCONNELL, farmer, Washington Township, was born 
in Allegheny County, Penn., February 20, 1831, and immigrated to this 
county with his parents, April 20, 1S39, and received his education at 
Farmers College. Cincinnati. His parents, Maj. John McConnell and 
Martha Robinson, were natives of Fayette County, Penn., his father 
born in 1797. After his wife's death, the Major married Miss Elizabeth 
Robbins, a native of Allegheny County, Penn., born in 1801. She died 
March 21, 1843, and he March 20, 1864. Both were members of the 
Presbyterian Church. Mr. William McConnell was married October 27, 
1809, to Miss Dorothea Beckett, a native of this township, born July 10, 
1849, and daughter of Joe S. Beckett. Mr. McConnell owns 154 acres 
of valuable land, which he is engaged in cultivating, having followed 
agricultural pursuits chiefly during his life. He is comfortably situated 
and seems to enjoy the fruits of his industry. Both he and Mrs. McCon- 
nell are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

JOHN C. McCULLOUOH, druggist and at present stamp deputy in 
the Sixth Indiana District revenue office, Lawrenceburgh, is a native of 
Washington County, Penn., born in 1850. At the age of live years be 
removed with bis parents to Ohio, and resided in Belmont and Morrow 
Counties up to 1SG7. He then came to Indiana, where he has since been 



830 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

chiefly engaged in the drag business at Osgood and Lawrenceburgh, 
having boon now eleven years iu the latter place. .Air. McCuIIough was 
educated in the common schools and at the Ohio Central College, ;it 
Iberia. * He has served four years as clerk of the city of LawrencebunWi, 
and in July, 1885, was appointed stamp deputy in the revenue office un 
der Dr. Hunter at Lawrenceburgh, now discharging the duties of that 
position. Mr. McCuIIough was married, in 1872, to Louisa Koons, of 
Vincennes, Ind., daughter of Charles T. Koons, a prominent official of 
the Ohio & Mississippi Railroad. They laave three children: Edwin C, 
John and William. Mr. McCuIIough is an elder and active member of 
the Presbyterian Church, is district president of the Sunday-school 
union, and a member of the Masonic order. 

MARTIN McDERMOTT, tie inspector for the Ohio & Mis- 
sissippi Railroad, with headquarters at Aurora, Center Township, 
was born at White Park, Ireland, November 1, 1852. He com- 
pleted his education by graduating from Christian Brothers' Semi- 
nary. In 1S72 he came to America, and located in Boston. Iu the fall 
of same year he moved to Aurora, where he worked as common laborer 
for awhile, then as section boss, next as gang foreman, and in 1880 was 
promoted to his present responsible position, which he has held for the 
entire road ever since. By being patient and thorough, coming up step 
by step, successfully'mastering every undertaking, he has achieved a rep- 
utation in railroad circles,*and justly merits his present position. Octo- 
ber 20, 1875, ho wa9 married to Miss Anna E. Baunon, who was born in 
Cochran, Ind., May 20, 1S5-L Unto them have been born throe children, 
namely: Thomas, born September 1, 1870; James, born March 12, 1879; 
Mary, born February 21, 1882. The family are members of the Catho- 
lic Church. He is a member of St. Patrick's Benevolent Society. 

ENOCH] McELFRESH, Hardintown, Lawrenceburgh Township, was 
born in Dearborn County in 1841. He is a son of Samuel McElfresh, who 
located in this county about 1835, and grew to maturity on the farm with 
his parents. In 1803 he married Eliza Miller, daughter of Mahlon and 
Eliza (Hayes) Miller, and began operations as a farmer on his own re- 
sources. He has since engaged in agricultural pursuits and has met 
with fair success, now owning sixty acres of good land. Mrs. Eliza Mc- 
Elfresh passed away in June, 1800, and in December, 1807, Mr. Mc. 
was married to Jane Marquett, a native of this county and daughter of 
Jacob and Priscilla (Miller) Marquett. They have five children: Sam- 
uel, Eliza M.. Joseph, Helen B. and Mary. Four others are deceased. 
Mr. McElfresh is a member of the I. O. O. F. and a citizeu in good 
standing in his community. 

SAMUEL McELFRESH, secretary and treasurer of the Ohio Valley 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 831 

Coffin Company, of Lawrenceburgh, was born near this place January 22, 
1844 His parents, Samuel an.! Abigail McElfresh, were natives of 
Kentucky and this county respectively, his grandfather, Job McElfresh, 
being ono of the first to settle in (his locality. His father died of lock- 
jaw in i 87<5, his mother still surviving. Mr. McElfresh passed his early 
years on the farm and obtained a fair education in the common schools, 
supplementing this by taking a course in the commercial college, of Cin- 
cinnati. In 18G5 ho came to Lawrenceburgh and engaged as clerk and 
book-keeper in a grocery establishment in which he continued three 
years, then purchased the store in partnership with a Mr. Beckman and 
remained in the business one year as proprietor. He was next employed 
in the Eossville Distillery as book-keeper at the same time, having an inter- 
est in the cattle fed at the establishment. He operated in this manner 
two years, then began buying grain for the distillery, following this 
work about four years, when lie took stock in the Ohio Valley Coffin 
Factory, with which he has been connected since 1875. Mr. McElfresh 
was married in September, 1808, to Helen Hollister, of Lawrenceburgh, 
daughter of Russel and Alvira Hollister, who are still residents of the 
place. Their two children are Harry J. and George II. Mr. McElfresh 
is a man of sterling qualities both as a citizen and business man, and 
he has doubtless contributed a full share to the success of the manufac- 
turing establishment with which he is identilied. 

CAPT. JOHN McGUIRE, superintendent of the Aurora Distilling 
Company, Aurora, was born in Ohio County, Ind., September 16, 1810, 
where he received a good common school education. His father, 
John Q. McGuire, was born in Dearborn County, Ind., September 25, 
1819, and his mother, Margaret (Cole) McGuire, was born in Ohio 
County, Ind., near Rising Sun, September 30, 1822. They were mar- 
ried in 1839. The father was a prosperous farmer and resided in Ohio 
County the latter part of his life. The mother died June 11, 1885. 
Capt. McGuire was raised on a farm and at the ago of sixteen wont 
to Missouri, where he remained for six years, after which he returned 
to Ohio County, where he farmed and traded up to 1872. In 1872 he 
was elected sheriff of Ohio County, and served two years. March 18, 
1873, he moved to Aurora and took charge of the Aurora Distilling Com- 
pany as its superintendent, which position he has since held. In 1883 
the Captain took an interest in the business, and has been vice-president 
in addition to superintendent since that date. He was married, Feb- 
ruary 14, 1863, to Miss Margaret Grace, a native of Ohio County, Ind. 
(daughter of Capt. John W. Grace). By the marriage the following 
children have been born: Harry, born June 14, 1864; Everett, born 
November IS, I860, and Grace, born October 14, 1872. His wife died 



832 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

July 30, [875, and ho was married, December 10, 1877, to Miss Sue 
Grace, also a native of Ohio County, Ind. This union has been blessed 
with one child, Penman, born January 2, 1881. Capt. McGuire all 
through»life has been an active, enterprising business man, and by his 
own industry and correct business management has secured a compe- 
tency as a reward for his labors. He is the true typo of an honest man 
and worthy citizen. All his investments have proved successful, and of 
great benefit to the community in which he has resided. He has always 
taken a great interest in agricultural pursuits and has been president of 
the Dearborn County Agricultural Society for the last three years. The 
society has prospered under his careful and energetic management. He 
is a member of Hartford Lodge No. 151, F. & A. M. 

MICHAEL McGUIRE, Pike Township, treasurer of Ohio County. 
was born in Dearborn County, Ind., in 1841, and is a son of James Mc- 
Guire, who was born in the same county. The latter, his father, was 
a son of Maj. James McGuire, elsewhere mentioned in this work, and was a 
farmer by occupation, living his entire lifetime, except three years in Iowa, 
fi'om 1855 to 1S58. After the formation of Ohio County, in 1844, he 
moved into the same and here he died. Ho married Sarah Reser, 
daughter of Michael Reser, and they reared six children to matur- 
ity: Susanna, Michael, Margaret, James, Ada and John R. Mrs. 
McGuire was born near Frankfort, Ey. Michael McGuire, whose 
name introduces this sketch, grew to maturity on the farm. In 
1801 he enlisted in Company C, Thirty -seventh Indiana, and served 
three years, taking part in many of the most important battles, among 
which were Stone River, Chickamauga, and others in the Atlanta cam- 
paign. He left the army at Jonesboro, his time of service expiring, and 
received his discharge in 1804. Returning home Mr. McGuire engaged 
about three years in saw-milling and farming, engaging in the latter oc- 
cupation exclusively after that time to the present, except during his 
official career. In 1880 he was elected to the office of sheriff, re-elected 
in 1882, and in 1884 to the treasurer's office, which he now holds. His 
farm in Pike Township comprises 172 acres, and he is regarded as one of 
the substantial farmers of Ohio County. His official career is sufficient 
evidence of his standing as a citizen and his record as a public servant. 
Mr. McGuire was married, in 18GG, to Missouri A. Burgess, an accom- 
plished daughter of John G. Burgess, a native of Virginia and a resident 
of Dearborn County. Their only son and child is Newton J. Mr. Mc- 
Guire is a member of the F. & A. M., I. O. O. F. and G. A. R. 

WILLIAM J. McHENRY, lumber dealer, Aurora, office on Main 
between Importing and Second Streets, was born at Martin's Ferry, 
Belmont Co., Ohio, November 5, 18^'J, and obtained a common school 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 833 

education. His fathor, Basil X. McHenry, was born in Wheeling, W. 
Va., February IS, 1814, and his mother, Olive G. (Wells) McHenry, was 
born in 1,821. His parents wero married May 18, 1837; mother died in 
1S7P>, and the father is retired. William J. followed (ho river as flat- 
boatman fur a few years, ami in 1863 enlisted in the Ninety-first Indiana 
Volunteer Infantry, served one year, (lien entered gunboat service, and 
remained until the close of the war, after which he returned to Aurora, 
and, in 1S66, engaged in the lumber business, at which he has continued 
ever since. He was married, October 13, 1867, to Miss Carrie A. Gresey, 
who was born in Lawrencobiirgb, Ind. , June 10, 1 841). By the union 
two children, Charles B. and William J.. Jr., have been born. Mr. Mc- 
Henry is a member of the K. of H., and his wife of the Baptist Church. 

TIMOTHY McHENRY, of Rising Sun, one of the proprietors of the 
Anderson and McHenry Omnibus Line, was born in Switzerland County, 
Ind., in 1849. He is a son of Joseph and Jane McHenry, both natives 
of Ohio, and with his parents he worked on the farm till twenty-one 
years of age, obtaining a practical education in the common schools. 
He worked at farming for wages after his maturity, continuing in this 
manner till 1879, when ho purchased a half-interest in the Anderson Bus 
Line, with which he has since been connected. In 1S8'2 he established a 
livery and feed stable, of which he is sole proprietor, and which ho is still 
keeping in operation to a good advantage, having a first-class outfit in 
horses and vehicles. Mr. McHenry is a reliable citizen, and the start he 
has gained in the business world has been made by discreet management 
and the hard labor of his own hands. 

JOSEPH McHENRY, of Rising Sun, son of Joseph and Jane 
McHenry, was born in Switzerland Co., Ind., in 1856. He was reared 
on the farm and remained with his parents, engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits, till his father's death, July 12, 1882. The family then moved to 
Rising Sun, where they now reside, and Mr. McHenry engaged with the 
firm of Anderson & McHenry, in whose employ he has since been 
retained. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and a 
young man of sterling qualities as a citizen. Mr. McHenry obtained 
the rudiments of an education in the common schools, and he has always 
sustained a reputation for industry and good habits generally. 

C. A. McINTYRE, jeweler, of Rising Sun, was born in the Dominion 
of Canada in 1S62. Ho is a son of J. A. Mclntyro, a furniture dealer 
of Aurora, in which latter city he grew from childhood to maturity. 
His early years were spent in attending the Aurora public schools and 
assisting his father in the furniture business, in which he still controls 
an interest. He learned the jeweler's trade, and in 1884 located in 
Rising Sun for the purpose of doing a general business in that line. 



834 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

Mr. Mclntyre was married in 1S83 to Miss Lulu Miller, of Rising Sun, 
daughter of William \V. Miller, now a residontof Wellington, Kas. Her 
father »\vas twelve years engaged in the manufacture of cigars at Rising 
Sun. Mr. Mclntyre is a young man of a genial disposition, and has 
every promise of a successful future in his business enterprise. 

JAMES McKINNY, Lawronceburgh Township; a native resident 
of the county, was born here in Arpil, 1822. He is a son of Col. 
James McKinny, who settled in Hardintown about 1806 or 1807, and 
became a prominent business man. He kept a largo general store (part 
of the time two stores), packed pork, fanned and did a large business 
generally. He died in 1838. Our subject grew to maturity in his 
native county, where lie has over since resided, except rive years which 
he passed in Piqua, Ohio (from 1S38 to 1S43). He was educated in the 
district schools, and in early life did some trading in connection with 
his farm work, which was his chief occupation, He was married, in 
March, 1853, to Elizabeth Hayes, daughter of Mahlon and Sarah (Mil- 
ler) Hayes, who were natives of Dearborn County, and consequently 
among the first of the native-born citizens of the same. After his 
marriage Mr. McKinny continued his agricultural pursuits, and his 
labors have been rewarded by success. He owns at present about 300 
acres of excellent farming land, well improved, and is otherwise well 
provided with the comforts of life. He belongs to that class of careful, 
economical farmers, whose untiring industry and perseverance have dur- 
ing the past half century converted the swamps and forest lands of the 
better portio of the United States into fertile fields of bountiful har- 
vests and ga is of blooming flowers, and who as a class are fast dis- 
appearing fn .: the field of action. Mr. and Mrs. McKinny have eight 
children living: Thomas, Mahlon, Katie (wife of Isaac Stevens), Dan- 
iel, Calvin, James, Pearl and Abigail. Three others are deceased. 
They are members of the Methodist Church, and the family takes rank 
among the first of the county. 

SAMUEL McMULLEN, merchant, Manchester, is a son of Hugh and 
Nancy (McMath) McMullen, natives of Ireland. They came to Amoriea 
when young, and were married in Pennsylvania, where they resided until 
the fall of 1817, when they removed to Indiana and settled in Dearborn 
County. Further reference to their settlement is made in the history of 
York and Manchester Townships. Samuel McMullen was born in Frank- 
lin County, Penn., June 21, 1803, and was but a lad of fourteen when he 
came with his parents to Dearborn County. Here he assisted his father 
in rearing the little cabin in the primeval forest, and here his long life 
has been passed and witnessed the wonderful change in advancement 
and progress almost incredulous to behold. He assisted his fat' er in 



BlOGIiAl'HICAL SKETCHES. 835 

opening up a farm, ami remained with him until the ago of twenty-three 
yea: March 9, 1820, lie was married to Nancy Dunn, a daughter of 
Micajah and Sarah Dunn, and t.o their marriage were born eight chil- 
dren, three of whom still survive. Mrs. McMullen died January 8, 
1SS0, dged seventy-seven years. Mr. McMullen was married, August 
19, 1S83, to Mrs. Adda Dressel. Our subject is now one of the oldest 
living pioneers of Dearborn County, where nearly three score years and 
ten of his life have been passed — man's allotted time. His life has 
mainly been passed in farming. Since 1851 he has been engaged in 
mercantile pursuits. He was appointed postmaster by President Lin- 
coln, and with the exception of a short time under the Johnson adminis- 
tration, he has since held the office until the present administration of 
President Cleveland, on the incoming of which he tendered his resigna- 
tion. He has been identified with the Methodist Episcopal Church for 
over half a century. , 

HON. HUGH D. McMULLEN, attorney at law, Aurora, was born in 
Manchester Township, Dearborn Co., Ind., December 11, 183G, of par- 
ents Samuel and Nancy (Dunn) McMullen, a sketch, of whom appears 
above. Our subject was reared on a farm and followed agricultural pur- 
suits until 1S60. He received, in his early boyhood, such educational 
advantages as the neighborhood schools afforded, then entered the State 
University, from which institution he was graduated in 1862. During 
the years 1S60 and 1861 he was engaged in teaching in the vicinity of 
Greensburgh, this State, and in the State of Kentucky, the proceeds of 
which enabled him to pursue his college course. 'While in college Mr. 
McMullen began reading law, which was subsequently followed up, and 
in 1864 he was admitted to the bar. In 1863 he was elected surveyor of 
Dearborn County, and re-elected in 1864. In 186S he was elected pros- 
ecuting attorney for the court of common pleas of the district composed 
of the counties of Dearborn, Ohio, Switzerland and Jefferson, which 
office he filled for two years with marked ability and to the satisfaction 
of his constituents. Since 187S he has been the attorney for the county 
In 1882 he was elected from Dearborn County to the State Legislature, 
and was re-elected as a representative in the fall of 1SS4, and at tho 
last session of the General Assembly his name was prominently urged for 
the speakership of the house. Mr. McMullen is in every sense a self- 
made man, and stands deservedly high in his profession, aud the several 
civil positions with which he has been honored have been so adminis- 
tered as to reflect credit to himself and to his constituents, having per- 
formed the duties with ability and good judgment. Juno 25, 1862, he 
was married to Miss Ella Jaquith, a native of Indiana, and to the mar- 
riage sis children have been born, namely: Harry R., William, Cassius 



830 H1ST0KY OF DKAKI50RN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

W., Stanloj II., Arthur P.. and Ned C. He anil his wife are identified 
with the Methodist Episcopal Church. Ho is identified with the College 
Greek fraternity, Sigma Chi; is a membor <>f Dearborn Lodge No. 442, 
F. & A. AT, of Lawreneoburgh Chapter, and of 11m- K. o£ P. 

SANFORD MENDEL, farmer, Sparta Township, was born in Man- 
chester Township, September 12, 1826. His parents, George and Mar- 
garet (Huffman) Mendel, were natives <>f Virginia, the former horn in 
17S5, the latter in 1794. Thuy were united in marriage in Virginia, and 
in 18.10 immigrated (o Dearborn County, settling in Hogan Township on 
what is known as North Hogan Creole. In ISPS they removed to Ripley 
County, but returned to Dearborn County subsequently, and purchased 
a farm in Manchester Township, where the father died in 1801, the 
mother in 1SS0. Their children were thirteen in number, our subject 
being the sixth. He spent several years of his early life in boating on 
the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers, arid was married in Manchester Town- 
ship, this county, February 21, 1S01, to Lovina Heustis, who was born 
in Manchester Township, December 12, 1833, and was a daughter of 
Elias and Sarah (Ellis) Heustis. After his marriage Mr. Mendel pur- 
chased and settled on the same farm on which he now lives. Mr. and 
Mrs. M. aro parents of four children, viz.: Ella J., Louisa C. , Sarah A. 
and Margaret M. 

ADOLPII H. MERKEL, grocer, notary public and insurance agent. 
Aurora, was born in Saxony July 3, 1820, where he received a collegiate 
education. His father, John T. , was born in the same kingdom Febru- 
ary 28, 1790, and died March 25, 1S22. His mother, Johanna L. 
Merkel, was born in Saxony November 22, 1780, and died in 1S03. 
The parents were married November 22, 1814. The grandfather, Chris- 
tian Merkel, was born in Germany September 1, 1705, and died in Janu- 
ary, 1840. The grandmother, Johanna (Eilitz) Merkel, was born in Ger- 
many, and died there March 11, 1807. The grandparents were married 
January 12, 1780. Adolph was a surveyor and farm overseer in Ger- 
many. He came to America June 17, 1849, locating in Cincinnati, Ohio, 
where he remained up to October 18, 1849; thence he came to Aurora, 
Ind., where he has since resided, and been variously employed. He 
was married, January 2-1, 1854, to Miss Catharine M. Steiger, who was 
born in Bavaria, November 14, 1835, and to their marriage have boon 
born six children: Louisa, Emily (born November 2, 1850, died January 
January 2, 1805), Kate, Amelia M., Anna R. P. and Bertie E. E. Mr. 
Merkel is a member of the I. O. O. F. and encampment; also the Dru- 
ids and Druid Chapter, and German Reformed Church. His place of 
business is on the corner of 4th and Front Streets. 

MORRIS MERRILL died December 31, 1S72, in the ninety- fourth 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 8:.i 

year of bis age. Ho was bom in Rensselaer County, N. Y., August 13, 
1779; was married in IS07, to Ithoda Robbins; was converted to God 
in 1S11, and joined the Moth >dist Episcopal Church. In 1814 be volun- 
teered in the war of 1812 15, and was honorably discharged at the close 
of the war. He joined the Masonic order in 1813, in the Farmer's Lodge, 
Oneida County, N. Y. I Le left New York in 1823, and settlod in Rising 
Sun; was one of (he first commissioners of Ohio County; also filled 
other offices. " He died a good man, venerated and respected by all who 
knew him.'' 

NOAH MILLER, a Revolutionary soldier, died in Randolph Town- 
ship, September 12, 1838, aged eighty-one yeai , was born on the Scotch 
Plains, N. J., in 1750; was about twenty years of age when war between 
Great Britain and the United States commenced. He was among the 
first to take up arms in defense of his country, and was continually on 
the scout until the battle of Long Island. On the day that battle was 
fought about 200 persons had collected together about nine miles from 
the battle ground to hear a Presbyterian minister preach. The preacher 
urged them to fight for their freedom. During the sermon nearly the 
whole assembly stood upon one rock, and the roaring of the cannon at 
Long Island was so distinctly heard as to make it difficult to hear what 
■the preacher said. The next day Mr. Miller and about twenty others 
went and enlisted in the Jersey line, and continued to serve in the reg- 
ular army until the close of the war. He was in a groat many skirmishes, 
and was in the hard- fought battle of Monmouth in New Jersey, and suf- 
fered very severely in the engagement. In 1800 Mr. Miller removed to 
Fayette County, Penn., where he resided until 1815, when he removed 
to Dearborn County. He was a member of the Presbyterian Church; 
latterly was a strong advocate of the temperance cause. " He left behind 
him an unsullied reputation for morality and honesty. He died as he 
had lived, an honest man." 

CHARLES B. MILLER, M. D., Lawrenceburgh, is a native of 
Dearborn County, born September 15, 1840. He is a son of "William B. 
and Sarah A. (Gullett) Miller. His father settled early in Sparta Town- 
ship, and has for many years been there engaged in the milling business, 
which he continues to the present time. Dr. Miller grew up as a miller 
by occupation as well as name. He received a common school education, 
and subsequently took a course of instruction at Moore's Hill College, 
after which h' engaged in teaching, first in the district schools, and later 
as assistant in the high school of Rising Sun. In April, 1861, ho 
entered the United States service for three months in Company E, Sev- 
enth Indiana Volunteers. He had begun the study of medicine with Dr. 
J. D. Gatch, and in the winter and spring following attended lectures 



838 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

at the Ohio Medical College. In Vugust, ISG2, he assisted in organizing 
Company E, of the Sixteenth Indiana, and ton days after the regiment 
was mustered into service he was wounded severely in the node, breast 
and right shoulder in the battle of Richmond, Ky., August 30. 18G2. 
However, in less than live weeks, he had so far recovered as to be at 
Indianapolis doing double duty, drilling his company and attending the 
sick. He remained with his regiment till the battle of Arkansas Tost, 
after which he was dotai led for duty as assistant surgeon on hospital boats 
until May 1, 18G3, when ho was promoted to assistant surgeon of the 
United States Army in which ho served till May, 1S63, on duty in the 
general hospitals in the vicinity of and at Vicksburg. While acting as 
surgeon he performed nearly, or quite, every variety of operation inci- 
dent to the war, and with gratifying success. Returning home he located 
in Lawrenceburgh, in August, 1805, where he resumed his practice, and 
has since' remained. In March. 1SGG, he married Helen Wymond, of 
Aurora, daughter of James Wymond, who for many years was prominent 
in the cooperage business in that city. Their only child and son is Will 
W. In 1872 Dr. Miller formed a partnership with his former preceptor, 
Dr. Gatch, with whom he has since continued, the firm having a large 
practice. He is a member of the Dearborn County Medical Society, the 
Indiana State Medical Society, and the American Medical Association. 
The doctor takes an active interest in educational matters, and has served 
twelve consecutive years as a member of the Lawrenceburgh School 
Board He is a member of the I. O. O. F. and of the Grand Lodge; 
also a member of the Royal Arcanum, of which he has officiated as 
Grand Regent of the State. Both he and Mrs. Miller are members of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

JOHN C. MILLER, farmer, Sparta Township, was born in Orange 
County, N. T., November 22, 1827. His parents, Ira B. and Caroline 
(McKinney) Miller, were natives of Orange County, N. Y. , the former 
born in 180G, the latter in 1816. They were also married there, and in 
1829 moved to Susquehanna County, Penn., whore she died in 1841. He 
subsequently moved to Wayne County, N. Y. , and there died in 1864. 
Their children were Joseph, Sarah J., Nicholas, Lovina E., Maria, 
George and John C our subject, the second member of the family. He 
wont with his parents to Pennsylvania and in 1847, to Wayne County, 
where he engaged in bridge building, having learned the trade 
previously. About one and a half years later, he went to Chemung 
County, N. Y., whore he engaged in the same work until 185:), on the 
New York & Erie Railroad. Ho then came to Aurora, Ind., and en- 
gaged in same work on the Ohio & Mississippi Railroad until 1S54, at 
which time he located at Cold Springs and took charge of a section on 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 830 

the Ohio & Mississippi Railroad for about two yoars. Ho was united in 
marriage in Sparta Township, April 5, 1855, to Emma J., daughter of 
Elisha and Lucinda Jones. She was horn in this township August 30, 
1837. In 1856 Mr. Miller purchased and moved on (ho farm where ho 
at present lives, and has since engaged in farming aud carpentering. 
Ho was elected trustee of Sparta Township, in L8.82, which office ho 
at present holds. Mr. Miller is a momber of tho Masonic order, also 
of tho K. of P. His children are Ira B., Mary L. and Lillio M. 

D. II. MILLER, proprietor of livery and food stable, Lawrence- 
burgh, is a native of the county, born in 1842, and hero his entire life 
has boon spent. Ho passed his earlier years on tho farm with his par- 
ents, Thomas and Emeline (Wilson) Miller, continuing his agricultural 
pursuits till 1869, when he began operations in the livery business which 
he still continues. He was married in May, 18GG, to Miss Garoliue 
Hauck, daughter of Jacob and Johanna (Hornberger) Hauck, aud they 
have six children living: Johan E. F., Emory F., Ira L., Scott, Pearl 
and an infant. Mr. Miller is a member of the F. & A. M. and the K. 
of L. and keeps a full lino of first class stock in his adopted vocation, 
doing a full share of tho livery business of the place. 

JOB MILLER, Hardinsburgh, ono of tho most prominent farmers 
of Lawrenceburgh Township, and a descendant of one of the pioneer 
families was born in Dearborn County, in Juno, 188-3. He is a son of 
Job and Elizabeth (Hayes) Miller, who came here with their parents in a 
very early day. His grandfather, Thomas Miller, was one of 'the first, 
settlers of the county, coming here with his father-in-law Capt. Joseph 
Hayes, a Revolutionary soldier in 1791. He entered considerable land 
in this county, built the stone house now occupied by Otho Lowe, and 
continued farming on an extensive scale till his death. Job Miller, Sr., 
the father of our subject, came to this county with his parents in an 
early day as stated above. He married Elizabeth Hayes and began farm- 
ing, in which occupation he was highly successful, besides doing a large 
business in stock and river traffic. He bought 100 acres of land, which 
by the help of his older sons, he cleared up, and reared a family of eight 
children by his first wife (who was a daughter of Enoch Hayes), and three 
by his second wife, Sarah Morrison, to whom he was married about 1831; 
his first wife died in 1829. He died in 1SG5, leaving his children a 
handsome inheritance. Job Miller, Jr., tho subject of this sketch, grow 
to manhood on the farm with his parents. He married in 1851, Rachel 
Whipple, daughter of Willardand Nancy Whipple, who were also early 
settlers of this county. He inherited a moderate fortune from his father's 
estate, and to this he has since made a creditable addition, almost doub- 
ling his original possessions. He has always engaged in farming, except 



840 niSTOKY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

two years speni in operating aflouring-ruill, and lias been general!}' suc- 
cessful, now owning about $450 acres of land valued at $80 to $100 per 
acre. Mr. and Mrs. Miller have seven children living: Abbie, Harriot, 
Isaac, Job, Thomas, Charles R. and Carrie; six others are deceased, Mr. 
Miller is fully entitled to a place in the front rank among the farmers of 
the county. 

OLIVER H. MILLER, Rising Sun, ex-auditor and ex-clerk of Ohio 
County, is a native of the same, born in LS33. His parents, Raines and 
Eliza (McArdle) Miller, were both natives of the county also, and his 
grandfather, Beverly Miller, was one of the first settlers of Ohio County. 
His father was a merchant at Millersburgh for many years, aud in honor 
of him the village received its name. He died in Rising Sun about 1878, 
Lis wife having passed away about 1836. Oliver H., our subject, spent 
Lis early years in school and attending his father's store, remaining in 
the latter till 1850. In that year he was elected auditor of the county, 
and in this and the office of the clerk of court, alternately, he served 
twenty consecutive years. Ho was next employed as deputy auditor of 
Dearborn County for one year, served from 1881 to 1883 as mayor of 
Rising Sun, and since the former date has been engaged more or less in 
merchandising. He is now employed as book-keeper for the firm of 
William Colter. Mr.Millor was married, in 1854, to Melissa Lemon, of 
Ohio County, daughter of James and Catharine (Larr) Lemon, and they 
have two children living: Ella M., wife of P. P. Stultz, superintendent 
of the Mount Vernon (Ind.) public schools, and Ettie. Mr. Miller is a 
member of the Masonic fraternity, and his long continuance in the offi- 
cial service of the county, fully attests to tho esteem with which he is 
regarded by its citizens. 

JAMES R. MILLER, carpenter and stair builder, Aurora, is a native 
of Dearborn County, born in Washington Township December IS, 1846, 
whero he received common school education. His father was born in 
New-House, England, March 4, 1811, and came to America in 1820, 
locating in this county where he farmed until his death. Tho mother, 
Malinda C. (Nolo) Miller, was born in Lexington, Ky., in 1820. The 
subject of our sketch was reared on a farm and followed the plow until 
1865, when he choso his present vocation and has pursued it faithfully 
and successfully ever since, working during tho last eight years for Mr. 
L. Klingelhoffer. In 1865 ho enlisted in Company I, Ono Hundred and 
Thirty-fourth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, serving four months 
without having received a scratch. He was married, January 7, 1809, 
to Miss Eliza A. Hubbard, and to them a son was born, Everett H. Mr. 
Miller is an active member of Dearborn Lodge No. 412, P. & A. M. 
His wife is a member of the Methodist, Episcopal Church. Our subject 
is always ready to assist an unfortunate and needy brother. 



BIOGKAI'IIICAL SKETCHES. 84] 

JACOB MILLER, farmer, Sparta Township, one of the old and highly 
esteemed pioneers of Dearborn County, was burn near Wheeling, W. Va., 
February 22, 1820. His parents wort' Jacob and Margaret (Bluruo) 
Miller, both natives of Switzerland, former born March 9, 177S; the 
latter Optober 12, 1772. They were also married in Switzerland, and in 
1817 immigrated to the United .Status, settling in Virginia, and from 
thence, a few years later, removed to Belmont County, Ohio, and in 1835 
to Dearborn County, Ind., where the mother died September 25, 1838; 
the father May 22, 1860. They wore the parents of eight children, of 
whom our subject was the youngest. He came with his parents to Dear- 
born County in 1835, and has since resided there. He was married in 
Sparta Township November 7, 1841, to Julia A., daughter of John and 
Sarah (Chambers) Columbia. She was born in Hogan Township Juno 
7, 1821. After this marriage he settled on a farm in Section 5, Sparta 
Township, which he had purchased previously, improving the farm and 
remaining on it for about eight years. He subsequently purchased and 
settled on his present farm, where he has since resided. Ho owns 200 
acres of tine land in Sparta Township and sixty in Clay Township, which 
is well improved. Mr. and Mrs. Miller are parents of twelve children, 
viz.: John W. (deceased), Mary Anu E., Andrew J. (deceased), Susan R. 
(deceased), George L. (deceased), Sarah J. (deceased), Hannah A. 
(deceased), Matilda C, Amelia F., George C, Charles M. and Flora J. 

HENRY CLAY MILLER, farmer, Washington Township. Tho subject 
of this sketch is odo of the loading enterprising farmers of Washington 
Township. He has taken pride in storing his mind with useful informa- 
tion, and has a fine collection of Indian relics and fossil remains; all his 
specimens are perfect and valuable. He was born September 9, 1S50, 
and received a common school education. His father, Henry Miller, was 
born in Beaver County, Penn., in 1809; his mother, Catharine (McGuire) 
Miller, in Cesar Creek Township February IS, 1812. Mr. Henry C. 
Miller was married September 7, 1875, to Miss Jennie Squibb, who was 
born in Randolph Township, Ohio County, September 15, 1S59. Mr. 
Miller has farmed all his life, and moved upon present farm March 7, 
1883. He is a member of Hartford Lodge No. 151, F. & A. M., Aurora 
Chapter No. 13 and Aurora Council. He and his estimable wife are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

F. H. MINNEMAN, farmer, and agent for agricultural implements, 
Jackson Township. Among the enterprising and active men of Jack- 
sou Township is F. H. Minneman, who was horn in Franklin County, 
Ind., March 12, 1844, a son of Frederick and . Minnie (Beckman) 
Minnoman, natives of Germany. Ho came to America while a young 
man, and remained in Cincinnati for several years. Subsecpuontly ho 



842 HISTORY OF Dl VttBORN AM' OHIO COUN'TIKS. 

entered eighty acres of laud in Franklin County, Ind., married and 
settled up iu the same, Flo is still a rosident of that county, lias 
raised a largo faun';', giving oach child 81, 000 as a start in life, and 
still owns a line fai and homo with an ample competency, which ho ac- 
cumulated by his industry and good management. He is the father of 
twelve children, nine now survive: F. H, our subject, Lewis, Christian, 
Just, Susan (wife of Herman Wulber), Angelus (now a minister residing 
at Jackson, Ohio), Elwina (wife of William Butt). Rufine (wife of A. 
Gosell), and David. Mr. Minneman, the subject of this sketch, at eighteen 
years of age started in life for himself. At twenty, he took a courso of 
study in the high school at Springfield, Ind. Then for several 
years he was engaged in teaching school in Ripley County. Subsequent- 
ly he purchased a farm near St. Nicholas and engaged in farming. 
There he was elected a justice of the peace, in which ho served three 
years, until he sold his farm and removed to Dearborn County. Mr. 
Minneman, although owning and residing upon a good farm which he 
superintends, his leading business is selling agricultural implements. 
He has now been engaged iu this line of business ten or twelve years, 
has established a good trade, and is well and favorably known over a 
large scope of country, and possesses the general confidence of the farm- 
ing community. Mr. Minneman was united in marriage, April 10, 1866, 
with Miss Louisa Wulber, daughter of Henry and Mary Wulber, natives 
of Hanover, Germany, but now residents of Ripley Coimty, Ind. 
They had ten children, four now living: John, Catharine, Louisa and 
Herman. Mr. Minneman and wife have had fourteen children, seven 
now living: G-usta Adolf, Ida, Ira, Alpha, Alfred Hugo, Addison and 
Ora. 

ISAAC MILES died at his residence in Clay Township, Dearborn 
Co., Ind., October 4, 1881. The deceased was bom in Woodford 
County, Ky., October 20, 1S04, and at the time of his death was 
seventy.six years, eleven months and nine days old. At the age of twenty - 
two he mustered with a battalion of Kentucky militia in the city of Lex- 
ington, called out in honor of Gen. LaFayette, then in the city, on 
his second visit to the United States after the close of the Revolution- 
ary war. Col. Dudley, commanding, announced that Gen. LaFayette 
had a present to make to each soldier of the command, and beginning 
at the head of the battalion his hand was presented and shaken by the 
entire soldiery. The present 'he recoived on that occasion ho treasured 
as one of the richest mementoes of his life. He came to Indiana in 
1S28, and the same year was married to Elizabeth Miles, in Jefferson 
County, near Madison, and followed the occupation of farming about 
six years. At the expiration of that time he moved to Versailles. Ripley 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 843 

Comity, where bo engaged into mercantile pursuits. In 1839 he took up 
his residence in Dillsboro, and reopened thosal of merchandise. The 
law of this State at that time actod as a bolster to economy and humau 
integrity, and goods were sold on credit to nearly every applicant for 
time. But a strange freak of legislative wisdom -truck the State Legisla- 
ture, and it passed an exemption act. The Legislature cancelled in a 
singloaet the majority of the people's obligatio is. This sudden revolu- 
tion swept like a bosom of destruction the business enterprises of the cit 
izens of the State. He was loft in debt and made penniless, but possess- 
ing an indomitable will and great muscular strength, he collected a four- 
horse team, and through rain, snow, sleet, ice and mucT, by day and night, 
he wont forth until the clouds of adversity gave way to sunshine of mea- 
ger prosperity. He then began the cancellation of his own indebted- 
ness, and in a few years every creditor was honorably paid. Without 
the advantages of education he began the study of elementary principles 
of law, and was admitted to the bar of the Common Pleas Court of Dear- 
born County, in 1844 He moved to Aurora iu 1847, and for many years 
was engaged in the mercantile and hotel pursuits, and occasionally prac- 
ticed law. In 1865 he moved to his farm, near Dillsboro, where he 
remained away from the active scenes of life till his death. His mother's 
lessons of morality, engrafted early in life, took root in his mind and 
grew with his youth, and strengthened with his strength, and shed their 
refulgence through and at the sunset of his life. Ho accepted the Bap- 
tist faith, and was united to the church and baptized in 1830. He lived 
and died in the unswerving belief that the Bible is a Divine revelation 
to man, and that it gives abundant evidences of the immortality of the 
soul. Being disciplined in the severe school of the vicissitudes of life 
and the fickleness of fortune, economy became his beacon in the after- 
noon of life. He felt it a duty, he said, he owed to his God, to his coun 
try, and to his follow man, to attend the memorial services of President 
Garfield. 

FKANCIS M. and ALLEN W. MILES, of Clay Township, were 
born at Versailles, Ripley Co., Ind., September 28, 1831 and February 
27, 1835, respectively. Their parents were the old and highly esteemed 
pioneers, Isaac and Elizabeth Miles, referred to above. They were the 
parents of six children, namely: Joseph D., born April 18, 1830; Francis 
M., born September 28, 1831; Evan C, born July 20, 1833; Allen \Y.. 
born February 27, 1835; Samuel \\\, born January 2, 1S37; Sarah E., 
born September 14, 1844. Allen \V. was educated in the graded schools 
of Aurora and the Franklin College, of Johnson County, Ind. ; also in 
Memphis. Tennessee, where he afterward engaged some time in book- 
keeping. He subsequently came to Dearborn County, and was united in 



SI I 



marriage in Cl.i) 


Townshj 


p, January 7, ISGS, t< 


Mar 


• A. Bruce, ( 


vvhicb ho settled 


vith hisl.i 


i .n the old horn 


•stea< 


, a part of wl 


he now owns. F) 


mcis M., 


□ about nineteo 


i yea 


■s of age, Ion 


the printer's tradi 


. which h 


engaged in off i 


rid oi 


fur a numbe 



years. • He entered theservice in 1802, enlisting in August, in Company 
F, Seventy-ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and aerved until the close 
of the war, being discharged June 9, 18(53. Ho was married in Jennings 
County, Ind., November 14, 1871, to Chloo A. Tierce, who died Febru 
ary 11, 1872. He was married in Hamilton County, Ohio. April 13, 
1877, to Mary Powell, who died in November, 1SS2, Mr. Miles is a 
member of tho G. A. R. and an excellent citizen. He now resides upon 
the old bomesteai . a part of which he owns. 

ROBERT T. MOORE, see page 187. 

L. S. MOORE, farmer, Sparta Township, was born in the same, June 22, 
1S19. His parents were tho pioneers, Adam and Judith (Smith) Moore, 
who emigrated from Maryland to Dearborn County in 1818, and settled 
near where Moore's Hill is located, from him (he beautiful little town 
receiving its name. Ho and a Mr. Stevens were the parties who located 
and laid out the town, the former being tho first postmaster of tho place. 
He also owned the first mill in tho vicinity. He was a man highly 
esteemed by all who know him, was a minister of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church for a number of years previous to his death. He was 
the father of ton children, viz. : Isaac, William, Betsy, John O, Har- 
riet, Mary, Levin S., Nancy, Benjamin and Jane. L. S., our subject, 
was united in marriage in Sparta Township, July 5, 1844, to Anna 
Dowdon, and afterward settled on the same farm where he at present 
lives, and whore ho has since resided. His wife died October 28, 1853, 
leaving six children, namely: Otho W., Mary, Sophia, Benjamin S., 
Isaac T. and John C. He was again married April 24, 1855, to Mary 
R. Sparks, a daughter of Hamlet and Elizabeth (Chisman) Sparks, by 
whom he has six children: Anna, George, Josephine, Harriet, Char.'es 
(deceased), and Carrie. Mr. Moore is a member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church and also a member of the I. O. O. E. and one of the most 
intelligent wideawake citizens of his community. 

INDIANA R. MOORE, Sparta Township (wife of John C. Moore, 
deceased), and one of the oldest pioneers of Dearborn County now liv 
ing, was born near Lawrenceburg, Dearborn Co., Ind., January 16, 1S11. 
Her parents, Samuel H. and Sophia (McCrackin) Dowden, were both 
natives of Virginia, where they were united in marriage and from which 
State, in the year 1810, they immigrated to what was known then as the 
far-off West wilderness, Indiana Territory. They settled in Dearborn 
County in 1810, resided there until about 1842, at which time they re- 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 8-15 

moved to Decatur County, Ind. There Mrs. Moore died shortly after- 
ward. He subsequently married a Miss Molten, by whom he had three 
children, viz.: Francis M., Henry H. and Lncinda E. By bis first wife 
lie had eleven children, viz.: Michael A., Indiana It.. Virgil Mo., Char- 
lotte J.,' John H., OthoW., Anna G., Isaac T., Thomas, Emily and 
Sarah. Indiana R., our subject, and Mr. John C. Moore were united in 
marriage in Dearborn County, December 23, 1834. He was a native of 
Maryland and was born February 8, 1810. His parents Adam and Judith 
(Smith) Moore wore natives of Maryland, where they married. In 1818 
they immigrated to DearbornCJo. , Ind., settling in Sparta Township, and 
afterward entered the land which now is occupied by the beautiful little 
village of Moore's Hill and its suburbs. Here he toiled and labored 
hard to earn a home and accumulate a competency, in which he succeed- 
ed, and here he remained until death. He was a man of good sense, 
general information and strong moral convictions, always decided and 
positive on all questions of political or reli us significance. He was a 
thorough Bible scholar, and for many year- previous to his death was a 
minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church. John G, referred to 
above, when a young man, learned the saddler's trade, which he 
engaged in for a number of years, but subsequently turned his attention 
to merchandize and coopering business which ho continued till his death 
Jane 4, 1871. He was an enterprising man, exceedingly skillful in busi- 
ness, and was highly esteemed by all who knew him. He was one of the 
founders of Moore's Hill College, and for many years previous to his death 
was a devoted and zealous member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 
His widow, the subject of our sketch, a highly esteemed and amiable 
lady, resides in the old and commodious mansion within the limits of 
Moore's Hill, where she enjoys a quiet and retired life. She is a devoted 
Christian and has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church for 
a number of years- She is a lady of unusual intellect and her faculties 
are well preserved for one of her age. 'Her eight children are Isaac S., 
Hanson D., America S., Helena J., Benjamin F., John \V., Virgil Mc. and 
Mary T. 

ANDREW MORGAN, of Lawrenceburgh, was born in New Jersey, 
in 178'J, and in early life removed with his parents to Pennsylvania. In 
1815 he came to Lawrencoburgh and made his home with Eli Guard. 
On the establishment of the first postoflice at Lawrenceburgh, in 1S04, 
Mr. Morgan mailed the first letter that ever passed through the office — 
one he had written to his parents. From ISO! to 1S10 Mr. Morgan was 
on the river the greater part of the time, aud in 1810 made his first trip 
to New Orleans. From 1810 until 1820 he was engaged in commerce 
on the Ohio River. By means of pirogues, flat and keel boats, he navi- 



846 HISTORY OF DEARHORN AND OHIO COUNTIKS. 

gate.! the Ohio lliveraud Kanawha from Pittsburgh, Kanawha Salt Works 
to Cincinnati, Lawrencoburgh, Louisville. Now Orleans and St. Louie 
and other points, and for a considerable timo he did must of the salt 
trade between the Kanawha and Cincinnati, in which business he was 
successful and accumulated quite a fortune. He had lint little educa- 
tion, was a man of natural talent, of untiring energy and perseverance, 
and of sound judgment. His death occurred at Lawrencoburgh in 1SG5. 
ARMATAGE MORGAN, Harrison Township, one of the old settlers 
of Dearborn County, was burn in Montgomery County, Penn., in 1816. 
His parents, Enoch and Margaret (Moi ) Morgan, were also natives of 
Pennsylvania, and were there married. In ISIS the family left their 
home near Philadelphia to seek a home in the West. They came by 
wagons over the mountains to Pittsburg, and from there by a keel-boat 
down the Ohio River to Cincinnati. The next, move was to Harrison, 
whero Enoch Morgan and his brother, together, entered 160 acres, which 
they subsequently divided, after selling twenty acres to a third brother, 
a blacksmith by trade, and who, when he first came to this county, 
plied his trade for some time with an iron wedge driven into a block of 
wood to serve for an anvil. On the farm above referred to Mr. and 
Mrs. Morgan re ided till their deaths, and here our subject grew" into 
manhood, working for his parents till twenty-two years of age. He 
then purchased a farm of 1 20 acres of Robert Cassidy, for whom he 
labored live years as payment for the same. In his thirtieth year 
(February 5, 1840), he married Hannah Lynas. a native of this county, 
and daughter of Joseph and Sarah (White) Lynas; her father, a native 
of England and an old Revolutionary soldier. Her parents were early 
settlers of this county. This union has been blessed by six children, 
three of whom are still living: Joseph, Jennie and George W. The 
two sons are both farmers; the daughter, a teacher in the Harri- 
son high school. After his marriage, in 18-40, Mr. Morgan settled on his 
present farm, and, for about six years, lived in an old log-cabin of the 
regular pioneer sort, when he moved in a whoelbarrow to the comfortable 
residence which has since sheltered his family. By dint of hard labor, 
industry and economy, assisted by a faithful and persevering wife, Mr. 
Morgan has provided well for the frosts of old ago, and is now enjoying 
the fruits of his earlier labors. For many years Mr. Morgan was quite 
extensively engaged in the culture of small fruit, and at one time had 
twenty-nine different species of the cherry on his premises, and other 
fruits accordingly. It is worthy of note that the family seems doomed 
to accidents, several members having thus lost their lives. The father 
was drowned in a canal; his brother Edward was killed by striking a tree 
while riding rapidly by it on horseback; a third, Benjamin, was killed 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCIIKS. 817 

iu falling down a stairway, and a brothor-in-law uf our subject was 
killed by a falling tree, Mr. Morgan's family are associated with the 
Christian Church, of winch he has been a worthy member for more than 
half a century. 

EPHRAIM MORRISON.* Samuel Morrison my grandfather had 
one daughter and six sous, five of -whom were in the Revolutionary war. 
My father, Ephraim Morrison, was born in Bucks County, Penn., June 
5, 17")S, and served as a private soldier in the Revolutionary war, and 
was wounded in the battle of Brandywine, September 11, 1777, and 
narrowly escaped the massacre of Paoli, where fifty- three soldiers were 
massacred in cold blood by the British, September 20, 1777. These 
fifty-three soldiers were so badly wounded in the battle of Brandywine. 
that they could not help themselves from being placed in a barn as a 
hospital near Paoli. The English slipped up a narrow valley in the 
night and brutally murdered the fifty-three disabled soldiers. The 
family after the Revolutionary war, removed to the west branch of the 
Susquehanna River and settled just below the mouth of Pine Creek. 
Here Mercy Morrison (grandmother) died October 30, 1798, and Samuel 
Morrison (grandfather) died May 5, 1S01, aged one hundred years and 
four months. Ephraim Morrison was married to Mrs. Nancy Hottick 
(whose maiden name was Forster) July 1, 17S7. Here Samuel, Jr. and 
Ephraim Morrison bought land, but failed to pay for it as they were 
ruined by the depreciation of the co tinontal money, which they had 
received for their services in the army. They resolved to immigrate to 
the West and began their journey iu 1794 aud came as far as Pittsburgh, 
where they remained during the year 1795, to await the result of the 
Greenville treaty of August 3, 1795. Ephraim Morrison embarked 
with several other families in a keel-boat for the Western country, on the 
1st of February. It was said to be mild and delightful weather. They 
tarried a day at Marietta; thence to the Stites and Gano settlement at 
Columbia, at the mouth of the Little Miami River, where they tarried 
two days; thence to Cincinnati, where father met with JoolWilliams, 
who ' he knew in Pennsylvania. Next they stopped at North Bend to see 
Judge John Cleves Sy mines; thence to the mouth of the Great Miami 
River, where there was a station that had been established by Capt. 
Joseph Hayes and associates, consisting of some eight or ten families. 
They then proceeded to Tanner's Station (now Petersburg), where they 
arrived on the 9th of February. Here father concluded to stop, on 
account of mother's sickness. The other immigrants went on to the 
falls of the Ohio. Here was John Tanner, John Watts (both Baptist 
ministers) a Mr. Voden, Mr. Ends, Daniel Moseby, William Caldwell, a 

*J}y Samuel Morrison. 



848 HISTORY OF DEARUORN AM' OHIO COUNTIES. 

Mr. Kirtly, Mr. Lshby, Maj. Israol Sobree. Oapl William Sebroo (broth 
era of Mrs. Frances Watts); Mr. Alloway livoil ;u -I about one mile ab ivo 
the station. On the river ban!:, just below the mouth of Hogan Creek, 
there stood an Indian hut about sixteen feel - [iiare, without floor or 
roof; father and my eldest brother repaired it and moved into it ou Val 

entine's day (February 14.) 179(3. Here, it was said, there were thr r 

four acres of ground that had been cleared off by the Indians; about the 
same in mber of acres above the creek. Here father met Adam Flake, 
who told me that lie settled on South Hogan Creek in January, 1796, 
about a month previous to father's settlement. He often told me that 
he and my father were the two first families that ventured northwest of 
the Ohio River. There were great numbers of Indians encamped in the 
vicinity. Among their chiefs were Black Hoof, an old man, Blue Jacket 
and Capt. Bill, a very largo Indian. With tli ■ Indians here was the 
notorious Simon Girty. The Indians were of the tribe called Shawneese. 
In the latter part of 1796, Blue Jacket borrowed a saddle of father to 
accompany Simon Girty to Detroit. He came back faithfully and re- 
turned the saddle, but Girty never came back, that I know of, though 
he had a son. who was reared mostly in Dearborn County, and went by 
the name of Simon Peters, and was married in Dearborn County, thence 
removed to Marion County, where he ended his days, leaving a family. 
Mr. Adam Flake informed me of the families as they came. In 1798. 
Ebenezer Foot (step-father of the Peterses and Mahala Butler), David 
Butler and step. sons, John Jonathan and Johiel Buffington, George and 
Henry Grove, George Glenn, Aimer Gray and family, three sons and 
one daughter, to wit: Abner, John and Moses Gray, who settled just 
above the mouth of Laughery Creek; Daniel, Robert and James Conaway ; 
Francis and Nicholas Cheek and their families; James, Henry and Amur 
Bruce and families. 

Ephraim Morrison assisted Col. Benjamin Chambers in surveying 
the public land of Dearborn County; ho carrying the hind end of the 
chain and keeping tally of site trees, brooks, quality of soil and timber. 
Col. Chambers was a first cousin to Mrs. Ephraim Morrison. The sur- 
veys were commenced by Israel Ludlow, October 11, 1798, who began 
the first meridian line from the center of the mouth of the Great Miami 
River. The variation of the compass was ascertained to be 5° 10' east 
of the true north. The surveys were all completed within the years 
from 1798 to 1805 inclusive. To these surveys there is no base line, the 
townships number north from the Ohio River, and the ranges are num- 
bered west from the first meridian lino. 

The land was not yet surveyed, and of course no claims could be 
perfected. Father sold his improvements below the mouth of Hogan 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 840 

Creel; to old Ebenezor Foot, and, in 1799, moved about ten miles north, 
into what was afterward Hamilton County, Ohio, for the purpose of 
taking a contract of ;;<•+( i ■ ■- out timber, and toassista man by the name 
of Smith to build a grisl mill ou Whitewater River. Ho settle,! in a 
neighborhood where Mr. Smith and Mr. Bonham lived. Hero he and 
his family remained one year, and while here he killed a very large 
buck elk. My eldest brother, who accompanied father in his hunting 
expeditions, said that he once counted seventeen elks in a drove before 
they mixed up so that he could not count any more. He said that there 
were at least thirty elks in the drove. Deer also went in droves. The 
early settlers made a rule that they would not kill a female elk or deer, 
therefore only the bucks were killed, the does being left to breed. It 
was said that the Indians originated this custom. This is why the 
dressed leather from deer skins is called "'buckskin." Pathe built a 
double log-cabin, stable and sheep house on a tract of land he had chosen 
to be his future home. It was situated ou fractional Section 22, Town- 
ship 5, of Range 1 west. He made his improvements on the west 
bank of Tanner's Creek, which meandered nearly through the cen- 
ter of the section. Here the Indians had cleared up some ten or twelve 
acres of land, and on one edge of it stood a mound of mussel or clam 
shells eight feet high. Blue Jacket told my father, in the presence of 
my eldest brother, that the Indians made a feast of roasted clams every 
twelve moons, in remembrance of the great Manitou, who ruled the 
fishes and the clams. 

At this place my father and brothers cleared up and put under fence 
thirty acres of land. Our sheep had to be housed every night on ac- 
count of the wolves. A bear came into our door yard and took a hog that 
would weigh fifty pounds, stood on its hind legs squeezing the hog in 
its hug and biting it. On hearing the hog squeal father took down his 
rifle and shot and killed tho bear. 

The land sales took place at Cincinnati. April, 1801, and father at- 
tended them. Fractional Section 22 contained 511.81 acres, and father 
had money enough to enter half of it, 255.90 acres, which lay on the 
west side of the creek, on which were all his improvements, the creok 
divided it about equally. Gen. James Finley, the land officer, told father 
that the treasury board had ordered him to sell nothing less than a 
whole section, and that all fractional sections must be sold with the 
whole section to the rear of and adjoining them. Section 21 and fractional 
Sections 22 and 23 containing in all 1,183.77 acres by tho maps, and 
1,197.22 acres by the tract books (true contents 1,181.13 acres), at §2 
per acre amounted to 52,307.54. The whole 1,1*3.77 acres was bid off 
by Charles Wilkins, who paid on it §598.61. Father returned home 



850 HISTOin OF DEARliOKN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

with a broken ami subdued spirit, to flunk that all of his hard labor and 
that of his sous was lost. That year (ISO!) they raised an excellent 
crop of corn, a patch of (lax and a patch of cotton. Will. i ns charged 
father for the rent of his own improvements. Father then resolved to 
leave the Territory as soon as he could make arrangements and hear from 
his brother Samuel, who had settled somewhere in Ohio. Father was 
forced to pay rent on his own improvements and support a family of 
nine persons, when all that they wore and ate had to lie made within the 
family circle. Each family then had to live as an independent nation 
of people. They carded, spun and wove all their wool and cotton, 
dressed, spun and wove their linen; tanned and made their own leather 
and shoes; dressed and made their own buckskin, which was used much 
for pantaloons, moccasins and sack coats for boys and men. Mother died 
December IS, 1803, leaving father with a family of sis children to pro- 
vide and care for. In the summer of 1801, father and my two eldest 
brothers got out the timber and built the first jail in Lawrenceburgh. 
It was built of logs a foot square and notched at the corners, so that the 
logs fit close together; the two floors, above and below, were laid with 
logs a foot square and close together. Two windows, one ou each side 
of the door ; each window was one foot perpendicular by two feet hori- 
zontal, each filled with iron gratings. The door was made, of three-inch 
oak plank, tho battons were of bar iron, three inches broad by one inch 
thi< which also formed a part of the hinges. 

On the organization of Dearborn County, March 7, 1803, Gov. Will- 
iam Henry Harrison offered to Ephraim Morrison the appointment of 
judge of the court of general quarter sessions of the peace and common 
pleas, which said position he declined, because he had lost his land and 
home. In November, 1S04, father made a sale and sold all his loose prop- 
erty, including cattle, sheep and hogs, reserving a yoke of oxen, wagon 
and mare, and began his journey to OhioDocember 1, of that year. On 
the third day we reached Hamilton, and on the sixth Dayton, and on the 
7th of December, our new home on Mad River, in Clark County, Ohio. 
This home we occupied one year, one month and twenty-six days, when 
father died (February 2, A. D. 1S0G), of an injury received at a house 
raising. He was five feet ten inches in height, weight 175 pounds, 
brown hair and blue eyes. He never aspired to office, or to be a leader 
in po!' ics or religion, though a member of the Presbyterian Church; 
he was a man of worth and skill, and should not be forgotten, or pass 
into oblivion unnoticed. For a life of modest toil and persevering in- 
dustry in tho period he lived in, was of great value to the country; be- 
sides his service in the Eevolutionary war, for naught, as the continen- 
tal money, with which he was paid proved worthless. 



B10QHAPH1CAL ;Ki;T(l!i:s. 851 

Ephraim Morrison and sons cleared up and put under cultivation 
sixty acres of land. bniH two good double log-cabins, made plows, 
looms with their equipments, hand-mills, etc., during their eight years 
residence in Dearborn County. Ho left the enmity because he had to be 
a tenant on bis own labor and improvements, the United States Govern- 
ment requiring him to pay $2 per acre for 1,183.77 acres or none, when 
it sold land east of the Great Miami to Judge John Cloves Symmes for 
665 cents per acre, and at the same time agreeing with him to receive 
soldier warrants, which were selling at 5 shillings on the pound, for the 
pay of one entire range of townships, extending from the Great to the 
Little Miami River, amounting to 8(1,0-10 acres and costing S13, 440. 
Father was a remarkably stout and strong man. Nicholas Check told me 
that father carried on his shoulders 800 bushels of corn (in the ear) 
and put it into a keel boat in one day. Cheek said that they had two 
bed ticks that would hold about six bushels of corn each. They filled 
one, Cheek and another man helping to put it on father's shoulders, who 
then carried it to the boat whore two other men took and emptied it, 
giving father the empty bed tick and he took it to Cheek and partner who 
had another bed tick tilled, and they put it on father's shoulders, who 
took it to the boat, and so on until the boat was loaded. 

Among other things Ephraim Morrison was a groat hunter, Mr. 
Isaac Mills staid one winter with him, and the two men did nothing but 
hunt and kill bears for their skins. It was said that they killed twenty 
bears besides keeping the family in deer meat. There was a deer lick 
not far from the mouth of Hogan Creek where father would go whenever 
it was necessary to supply the family with meat. At one time when he 
went to the lick he saw a large panther crouched on a loaning tree, that 
bent over the lick, watching also for deer. He did not see it until he 
was too close to risk a shot, he thought if he did not kill it, in a couple 
of bounds it would be upon him. He looked it in the face, slowly 
moving backward, until he felt himself safe in trying to scare it away 
without risking a shot, which he did by breaking a limb and throwing 
toward it, it leaped off and ran away. On the side of the hill just be- 
low the I st little brook below Aurora, father shot a boar, it fell down, 
kicked and at last lay still, he reloaded his gun, went up to tho bear and 
gave it a poke with his gun;_tbo bear sprang to its feot and pursued him 
for some distance, after giving up the pursuit he wheeled and gave it a 
second shot, down it tumbled, kicking and quivering as before; thinking 
it dead for certain this time he punched it again, when it sprang to its 
feet and gave him a much closer chase than before, he was obliged to 
drop his gun and save himself by running over a deep ravine ou a slim 
pole that lay over it. Ho succeeded in getting around to his gun and by 
a third shot killed the bear. 



852 HISTORY OK DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

Gen. James Dill, clerk of tho court in Doarborn County, told mo that 
my father, Ephraim Morrison, saved his life once, with that of three 
others. I asked him how. He replied that Mr. Morrison was bringing 
a pirogue load of stone from the Kentucky shore, (here were in the 
pirogue with him only three men as hands, who could swim: myself and 
three others as passengers, who could not swim. As we left the Ken- 
tucky shore the wind aroseand by the time we reached the middle of the 
river the wind became a gale, the pirogue began to till with water, those 
that could swim, wand ! to leave the pirogue and let those who could 
not swim drown. But Mr. Morrison took command and would not allow 
any to leave, and commanded that even man should apply himself to 
the oars with all his might, and by so doing they could run the pirogue 
into shallow water before it would sink. They did as lie commanded, 
and never did men labor and row for life as they did. We reached shoal 
water before sinking, where the water was but three feet deep. AVe all 
had to wade out with grateful hearts that we were saved. 

GEORGE C. MULLEN. Aurora, clork in the office of Aurora Dis- 
tilling Company, is a native of Marble Head, Mass., born September 
22, 1855. His parents, James and Mary (Connell) Mullen, were born in 
Ireland, and came to America in 1840. The father was a con tractor, and 
came to Aurora in 1SG5. After concluding to locate in Aurora he wrote 
for his family, and went to Cincinnati to meet them, where he fell from 
the steamer "St. Charles," and was drowned. The mother came on to 
Aurora, and by the assistance of George (then a mere boy), kept the fam- 
ily together, and raised them by hard labor and strict economy. George 
was industrious, and gave all his earnings to his kind mother, without 
which she could not have kept the family. His first work was watching 
hogs from the corn at the distillery. In 1868 he met with a misfortune, 
which resulted in a stiff knee joint. The skill and ability of the faculty 
at the Indianapolis Institute could not save his limb. He returned to 
Aurora in 1871, and was taken in the office of the distilling company as 
office boy. In 1875 for good behavior, accuracy and rapidity in figures, 
he was promoted to paying and receiving clerk, which position he has 
since held. His position is one of groat responsibility, as many thou- 
sands of dolhn a pass through his hands every year. Mr. Mullen was mar 
ried October 15, 1879, to Miss Anna McGraw, a native of Aurora, who 
was born August 4, 1856. By the happy marriage four children have 
been born, namely: James, born January 26, 1880; Alary, born June 
29, 1882; Sarah, born August 17, 1883, and Kate, December 23, 1884. 
Mr. Mullen and his family belong to the Catholic Church. Ho is a mem- 
ber and secretary of the Catholic Knights of America, Branch No. 115; 
al belongs to the Irish Catholic Benevolent Union No. 292, in which 





BLOGUAPHICAL SKUTCIIKS. So 


he has QIlp. 


I all tho offices. Ho was chos -n as trusteo in the Catholi 


Church in i 


S79, again in 1880, 18S3 and 1884, i ud is secretary of Ih 


board of 1 


, ees at the present; is secretary of the Mutual Loa 


Association 


is truly a-self made man, haviug worked himself up 1 



an enviable position in the estimation of businessmen, who bave always 
reposed full confidence in him as an honest and faithful man. He is 
and always has been a true Democrat, and has labored zealously for the 
advancement of the party. 

ARCHIE C. MURDOCK, grocer (corner of Main and Third Streets), 
Aurora, was born in Warsaw, Ky., October 9, 18G3, and received a com- 
mon school education. His father, Christopher C, was burn in Harrison 
County, Ky., July 29, 1821. His mother, .Mary J. (Winters) Murdoch. 
was born in Rising Run, I ml. , May 12, 182G. They were married Sep- 
tember 6, L842, and raised seven children: Janette, Olpha (born May 2, 
.1847, and died October 7, 1864), George, Ira, John, Charles (born Novem- 
ber 22, 1854, and died March 23, 18G2), and Archie C. The latter began 
life by clerking for Win. Coulter, a dry goods merchant at Rising Sun, 
with whom he remained for six years. He came to Aurora in April, 
1883, and engaged in his present business. He was married December 
4, 1884, to Miss Ella M. C. Coulter (daughter of J. P. Coulter). She 
was born March 3, 1800. He is a member of the Christian Church and 
his wife of the Methodist Episcopal Church. At the store of our sub- 
ject can be found choice groceries, and in season oysters, vegetables and 
fruits. 

JAMES MURDOCK, farmer, Manchester, born in County Antrim, 
Ireland, is a son of William and Ann Murdock, natives of Ireland, who 
immigrated to America and settled in Dearborn County in 1847, and re- 
sided here several years, thence removed to Missouri, where Mrs. Mur- 
dock died January 25, 1869. He died in 1876. They had born to them 
nine children, live now living: Ann Jane, now Widow Steele, residing 
in Sullivan County, Iud. ; George and William, now residents of Sulli- 
van County, Mo.; Matilda, wife of James Boreland, also residing in Sul- 
livan County, Mo., and James, the subject of this sketch, who married 
Ann Russell. She was born in County Antrim, Ireland, November 27, 
1837, a daughter of James A. and Elizabeth Russell, natives of the 
same locality, who came to America in 1844 and settled in Dearborn 
County, where Mr. Russell died March 15, 1855, aged forty years. Mrs. 
Russell still survives and resides ou the old home place. They had oight 
children, five now living: Ann, William. Hugh, Elizabeth and Sarah 
Jane. Of those deceased, John and Robert died in the war of the Re- 
bellion; John dying in Andersonville prison and Robert at Yicksburg, 
from the effects of wounds received in battle. Mr. Murdock and wife 



to Indiana and reside 


about 


v. ISS1, tbey located < 


,n the 


mrehasod the wi liter pr 


ivious. 


good improvements. 





854 IUSTOHY OF im:.\i:i'.(h;n 

spent one yoai in Missouri, then cam 
fourteen yi tr in Sullivan County. In July. 
place where they now live. This [arm they 
It consists of 127 acres of go 1 land with 

JOHN A. SEES, proprietor of Union Hotel, Aurora, is a native of 
Bavaria, born November 'J, IS29. His father, Thomas Nees, was bom 
in Germany, died in IS42. His mother who was also a native of Ger- 
many, died in IS46. Mr. John A. Neos came to America in 1S4-7, locating 
in Clermont County, Ohio, where he taught school, in 1867 he located in 
Aurora, and engaged in the grocery business. In 1877 he built his 
present hotel, and has run the same ever since. Mr. Nees was married, 
May 31. 1852, I- Miss Amelia Koch, who was born in Ohio, August IS, 
1835. Eleven children: Amelia, Thomas, Hellen, William, John, 
Frank, Josephine, Emma, George, Henry and Anna havo been born to 
the marriage. Mr. Nees has a large and commodious hotel, with livery 
stable connected, which enables him to accommodate man and beast 
with the best the city affords. He belongs to the Catholic Church, and 
has been the organist for thirteen years. 

DAVID NEVITT, of Lawrenceburgh Township, was born in Ohio 
County, W. Va., in 1795; at an early age ho was apprenticed to a hatter, 
which trade he learned, and in 1816 came to Lawrenceburgh, where by 
the aid of Abram Roland he carried on the trade. Subsequently he en- 
gaged in produce, and did an extensive business in the pork line. 
While carrying on this business he opened and cleared up a farm, to 
which ho moved in 1836, yet continued his business in Lawrenceburgh. 
His death occurred in 1878. 

WILLIAM NENTRUP, farmer, Clay Township, was born in Han- 
over, Germany, March 1, 1835. His parents, Joseph and Hannah 
Nentrup, were, also natives of Hanover, Germany, and immigrated to the 
United States in 1852, landing at New Orleans, and from thence up the 
Mississippi and Ohio Rivers to Aurora, Ind. , locating in Clay Township, 
Dearborn County, whore they subsequently resided. The mother died 
in I860. The husband still survives, and resides at Dillsborough. They 
were the parents of two children: Henry and William. The latter 
came to Dearborn County, in 1852, with his parents, and has since re- 
sided here. In 1S5 ( -I he purchased his present "arm, and in October, I860, 
was married to Louisa Linkmeier, after which he settled on his farm, 
where he has since resided. They have had born to them one sun, Henry 
W. Our subject owns eighty acres of fine land. The family is identified 
with the Lutheran Church. 

HENRY NEWTON, of Lawrenceburgh, was a native of the State of 
Vermont. In his early youth he resided near the city of Erie, Penu., 



BIOGR M'lIH'AI. SKETCHES. 800 

and assisted in getting out timber for tho purpose of building United 
States vessels, to be used in the war of 1SP_'-15, and wbich were used 
by Commodore Perry at his victory on Lake Erie. Mr. Newton joined 
the army and marched to Detroit to the relief nf Hull. He lived in the 
vicinity of Lawrenceburgh upward of sixty years. His death occurred 
in 1881, aged nin 'ty-one years. 

R. D. NEWTON, farmer, Clay Township, was born near Rising 
Sun, Ohio County, Ind.., September 16, 1821. His parents, George and 
Lucretia (Drake) Newton, were natives of Massachusetts and Virginia, 
respectively, and from thence immigrated to Ohio County in an 
early day, whore they were married. They were the parents of Diana, 
Asa, Deli la and Robert D. Newton. The latter was brought up a farmer, 
and when about twenty years of age began working at tho carpenter's 
trade, which ho followed for about three years only, when he turned his 
attention to coopering, which he engaged in for a number of years. He 
was married in Dearborn County November 18, 1852, to Mary Headly, 
and settled at Patriot, Switzerland County, where he remained about 
eight years, after which ho moved to Dearborn County, and purchased 
and settled on the same farm where he now lives and has since resided. 
He has fifty-four acres of woll improved land. 

E. H. NIEBAUM, of the lirm of McCrarey & Niobaum, dealers in 
dry goods, boots and shoes, hats and caps, carpets, cloaks and fancy 
goods, located in the opera house building, Aurora, was born in Hano- 
ver, Germany, December 21, 1839. His parents, John F. and Louisa 
(Marsh) Niobaum, were both natives of Hanover, and came to America in 
18-15 and located at Farmer's Retreat, in Dearborn County, Ind. Here 
•our subject received the ordinary training given by the schools of the 
neighborhood. Ho resided on a farm until 1859, when he came to 
this place and began clerking for Chambers, Stevens & Co., with which 
firm ho remained until January, 1870. November 11, 18G2 he was 
married to Clara E. Rieman, a native of Hanover, Germany, burn on 
Christmas day, 1S43. To the marriage have been born Frank W., 
Charles H. and Willie E. Mr. Niebaum is an active member of 'St. 
John's Evangelical Lutheran Church. 

Among the loading firms of the city representing tho dry goods 
trade, we mention that of McCrarey &. Niebaum. This firm was organ- 
ized in January, 1876, and at once took rank as one of the ruling houses. 
In a few months after opening up, it was found to be necessary to re- 
move to more commodious quarters, in order to meet the wants of a rap 
idly developing trade. That their extensive trade may be promptly 
served, they require the aid of six hands in their various departments 
No reference is needed or further evidence required, proving the sterling 



S5G HISTORY OF DEAU130KN AND OHIO COUNTIKS. 

commi rcial worth and great public benefit of such n presentative men to 
the general trade oE both city and surrounding country. 

HENRY NIEBKUGGE, proprietor liven and sale stable, Dillsbor 
ough, is # a native of Hanover, Germany, where ho was born April 1, 1827. 
His parents, Herman and Maria (Nentrup) Niebrugge, were also natives 
of Germany, where they resided until their deaths. They were the 
parents of six children, namely: Bernard, Minnie, Catherine, 'William, 
Frederick and Henry. The latter, the eldest member of the family, 
immigrated to the United Stales in 1845, landing at New York City, 
where he remained one year and engaged in the carpenter trade (having 
learned the trade in Germany). In 1840 he came to Cincinnati, Ohio, 
where he was married, January 3, 1800, to Honriette Schwenkmyer, who 
was born in Prussia, Germany, November 11, 1829. In June, 1850, 
Mr. Niebrugge moved to Dearborn County, Ind., where he purchased 
and settled on a farm in Section 23, Clay Township, and engaged in 
farming, remaining until 1S65, in which year he sold his farm, and pur- 
chased the coopering establishment of Samuel Wymond at Hillsborough, 
which he operated until 1S78, also engaging in the mercantile business. 
In 1881 he opened a livery, feed and sale stable at Hillsborough, which 
business he now follows and is prospering in. They have had born to 
them ten children, viz.: Aaron H., Bernard H., Charles F., Honriette 
M., William G., Liz/.ie K., Annie M., Mary, Gustie L. and Louisa M. 
Mr. Niebrugge is a member of the I. O. O. F., also of the Masonic 
order, and himself and wife are members of the Lutheran Church. 

JOHN H. NOBLE, carpenter, Sparta Township, was born at Che- 
viot, Hamilton Co., Ohio, March '29, 1834. The parents, from whom 
he descended, were Jonathan and Elizabeth (Dashiell) Noble, natives of 
Maryland, and were born near Salisbury, Wicomico County, the former 
in 1S07, and the latter in 1812. Mr. Noble was, by occupation, a car- 
penter and house builder. He emigrated from Maryland to Cincinnati, 
Ohio, in 1832, where he worked at his trade, and soon thereafter came 
to Dearborn County, Ind. Here he and Miss Dashiell were united in 
marriage in March. 1833, after which they moved to Cincinnati, Ohio, 
and remained until 1S34. when they removed to Dearborn County, Ind., 
locating near Moore's Hill, where they remained for a short time, and 
from thence removed to Wilmington, Ind., and in 1843 returned to Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio, where she died in 1843, and in 1844 he returned to Aurora. 
He was again married, at Aurora, in 1S44, to Isabella Hiatt, and in 
1849 moved to Petersburg, Ky., where ho remained until 1S51, at 
which time he returned to Dearborn County, Ind., where he died in 
March, 1857. He was a man of good moral character, was a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church, and also a member of the Masonic 



EJUXlUAlMIICAL SKETCHES. o.n 

order, was a skillful mechanic, and was highly esteemed by all who 
knew him. He Lad bom to him by his final wife: John H., Amelia A., 
Mary J. and Elizabeth; and James R., William V. and (Sarah M. by his 
second wife. John II. , our subject, was the eldest of the children. He 
was editcated in the public schools of Aurora, and in 1851 began boating 
on the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers, which he followed until 1855, when 
he engaged in the carpenter trade, which he has pursued, mere or less, 
since. He is a skillful and scientific workman, and is one of the 
most enterprising and accommodating citizens of Moore's Hill. He 
was united in marriage at Moore's Hill. June 4, 1857, to Louis- 
iana, daughter of Morton and Darcus T. (Eaton) Justis. She was 
born near Moore's Hill. August, 1840. After Mr. Noble's mar- 
riage he settled at Moore's Hill, where he has since resided, with the 
exception of one year, when he lived at Aurora. In 18(51 he en- 
tered the war, enlisting, August 5, in the Eighteenth Regiment Indi- 
ana Volunteers as a musician, in which capacity he served until Decem- 
ber 25, 1801, at which time he was discharged; and in September, IStU, 
he re-enlisted in the United States Navy as a musician and served 
until May, 1865, when he was discharged, and returned to Moi re's 
Hill, where ho has since resided. He has had born to him eleven 
children, namely: Lilian M., John M., Henry E., Eva J., George P. 
(deceased), Charles A., Daisy, Etta, Maud, Ned and Glenn B. Mr. 
Noble owns tine property in Moore's Hill, where he resides. He is a 
member of the I. O. O. F., also of the G. A. R. He is a man who 
is highly respected by all, and has hold many offices of trust in the 
county, and at present is a member of the board of trustees of the pub- 
lic schools of Moore's Hill. 

CHARLES C. NOLTE, farmer, Clay Township, was born in Cesar 
Creek Township. Dearborn Co., Ind., August 24, 1854. His parents, 
Johu H. and Margaret (liullman) Nolte, were natives of Germany, and 
from thence in an early day immigrated to the United States, locating in 
Dearborn County, where, they married, and settled in Cesar Creek 
Township, where they resided until 1850, in which year they purchased 
and settled on the same farm, on which our subject now lives, which they 
improved, and on which they lived until 1S79, when they removed to 
Cesar Creek Township, where he died December 19, 1SS2, at the age of 
fifty-three years. His widow still survives. Their children were Louisa, 
William and Charles C, the latter the eldest member of the family. He 
was married, in Dearborn County, January 9, 1879, to Mary S. Schriefer, 
who was born in Spencer County, Ind., June 16, 1851, and was a daugh- 
ter of Ernest and Sena Schriefer. After Mr. Nolte's marriage he settled 
on the farm where he now lives and has since resided. Ho owns 232 



858 UISTOKY OF DKAUPOUN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

acres of fin... laud. Has bad born to him three children, viz.: John II., 
Herman E. and Laura M. Mr. Nolte and family are members of the 
Lutheran Church. 

NAPM \X .. NORTH, merchant, Randolph Township, a descendant 
of ono of the first settlers of this locality, wa- b irn in Ohio County, near 
the site of bis present store-room at North's Landing, in 1835. He is a 
son of Levi and Rachael (Rude) North, natives of Connecticut. His 
parents died when he was but ten years old, and he was thus left in his 
boyhood to take care of himself. II.' obtained the rudiments of an edu- 
cation in the common schools and spent a short time in the Greencastle 
schools. When about sixteen years old he began clerking in the store, of 
which he is now proprietor, and continued in that capacity till his twenty- 
first year, when the property fell to him by the division of the family 
estate. He then followed stor.. boating about three years, and in L8G0, 
established himself as proprietor of the store of which he has since been 
owner and manager. He carries a full line of general merchandise, his 
stock valued at about 82,000, and has a fair patronage. He is also deal- 
ing quite extensively in produce in partnership with R. A. Harris. Mr. 
North was married ; n 1859 to America J. Searcy, a native of Switzerland 
County, daughter of Moses and Mary (Jones) Searcy, early settlers in 
that locality. Four children were bom to this union: Ira L., Benjamin 
C, Fannie M. and Moses F. Mr. North is a member of the F. & A. M., 
and one of the live business men of the county. He has served as post- 
master at North's Landing since 1S65. 

SILAS NOWLIN, farmer. Miller Township, is another of the ven- 
erable pioneers of Dearborn County. He was bora in Garnett County, 
Ky., in 1809. His parents were Zachariah and Mary E. (Pride) Nowlin, 
natives of Virginia and Kentucky, respectively, and came over into this 
locality in 1818. His father died in 1.824; his mother in 1847. Our 
subject grew from boyhood to manhood in this county. He worked by 
the month, and at flat-boating for some years, and in this way made his 
start in the business world. In 1835 he was able to purchase 140 acres. 
and in the following yi s bought eighty acres more, and thus by indus- 
try and shrewd business management he continued to add to his posses- 
sions, till he owned about 800 acres in this comity, besides a considerable 
tract in Illinois. He continued his river traffic for several years after 
purchasing his first land, making his last trip in 1849. Since that time 
he has devoted his time and attention exclusively to farming and stock- 
raising. Mr. Nowlin was married in June, 1835, to Eleanor C. Blasdel, 
born in Dearborn County, a daughter of Jonathan Blasdel, one of 
Dearborn's earliest settlers. Seven children were born to them, four of 
whom are now living: Nancy E., Mary E., Elijah P>. and Jonathan B. 



BIOGI! WIIICAL SKETCHES. 8;>9 

Thoinotherof this group passed away in July, 1 840, and in September, 
1849, Mr. Nowlin was married to his present wife, whoso maiden name 
was Martha J. Hargitt, a daughter of Thomas Hargitt, one of the early 
settlers of this county, and now one of the oldest men within its limits. 
Seven children are living as n result of this marriage: Emma, Jeremiah 
T., Charles W., Silas W.. Anna J., Everett and Robert S. Mr. Nowlin 
has labored long and hard to build up his property interests and provide 
for his latter days, but his too generous nature has boen imposed upon 
much to his disadvantage, losing him a large portion of his former pos 
sessions. However, ho is still in control of a good farm, and it is hoped 
may yet be aisle to retain a comfortable allowance for his declining years. 

ENOCH B. NOWLIN, a leading farmer of Miller Township, was 
born in the 1 same in the year 1832. He is a son of Jeremiah Nowlin. 
who came to this country wit' his mother, three brothers and two sisters, 
in 1818. He grew up on the farm with his father and obtained the edu- 
cation then afforded by the common schools, beginning business opera- 
tions on his own responsibility at twenty-two years of age. About two 
years later he purchased a tract of land in Kansas, but his agricultural 
enterprises have been confined chiefly to this county. He now owns 
about, 500 acres of land in this township, besides his Kansas property, 
which fact attests to his ability and success in the management of busi- 
ness affairs. He assisted in constructing the Lawrenceburg & Guil- 
ford Turnpike, and has generally been alive to the best interests of that 
portion of the public domain of which he is a resident. Mr. Nowlin 
was married, in 1859, to Jane H. Langdale, a native of Cincinnati and 
daughter of Robert H. Langdale, who moved to Dearborn County soou 
after her birth. Of the four children born to them three are yet living. 
viz. : Harry, Robert J. and Anna. Mrs. Nowlin departed this life in July, 
1884, after twenty-five years of wedded life spent in faithful service as 
a wife and mother. A daughter, Mary P., is also numbered among the 
deceased. Harry Nowlin, the eldest son, was married in 1SS2 to Lana 
Smith, daughter of David Smith, who was of one of the old and 
esteemed families of the county, now deceased. They have one child, 
Archie, born in October, 18S4. In politics, Mr. Nowlin has not taken 
a very active part, though he is warmly devoted to the interests and the 
principles of the Republican party. 

FERRIS J. NOWLIN, Miller Township, one of the representative 
farmers of this township, and a member of an old and esteemed family, 
was born in May, 1839. His early years were passed on the farm with 
his parents with whom he remained till he reached his majority, attend- 
ing (lie district schools and the schools of Manchester, this county. In 
18G2 he enlisted in Company H, Eighty-third Illinois Volunteer Infantry, 



ObU IllSTOUV" OF DEAKBOKN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

and .entered the service in which he continued aboul six months, 
being most of the time incapacitated by sickness in the South, in Sep 
tenibor, 1S02, Mr. Nowlin was married to Elsio J. Voshell, of this comity, 
daughter of Obidiah and Ann Voshell. Iior parents are both deceased; 
her mothor died in M I. h< r father, who was bom in 1802, diod April 0, 
1878. Soon after their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Nowlin established (hem- 
selves in a home of their own and since April 1, 1864, have been 
installed in their present quarters. Mr. N. has devoted his attention 
chiefly to fanning and stock raising, and though having met some heavy 
reverses, he is still doing quite an extensive business, owning about 300 
acres of land. He has : ; o I en alh to public interests as well as 
private. Was one of the prii ipal movers in the construction of the 
Lawrenceburgh & Guilford Turnpike, owns considerable stock in the 
road and has been its superintendent since it was built. He has been 
treasurer of tho company since its formation, and was superintendent of 
the construction of the Salt Fork bridge in 1883. Mr. and Mrs. Nowlin 
have six children living: Pemma, Max A., Louis M., Emma J., Otto and 
Clyde. 

AMBROSE E. NOWLIN, farmer, stock dealer and general trader, 
Lawrenceburgh, is a native of Dearborn County, and was burn in 1843, 
son of Jeremiah Nowlin. He grow up a fanner boy and received a 
common school education w : ith the advantage of a two years' course of 
study in the Miami University, of Oxford, Ohio, in 186:' and 1864. On 
reaching his majority Mr. Nowlin began business operations for himself. 
He taught three terms of school, when, becoming convinced that that 
occupation was not his forte, he began farming and stock dealing, which 
he has ever since continued with marked success. Mr. Nowlin was 
married in August, 1870, to Miss Flora B. Baker, daughter of William 
H. Baker, of Manchester Township, Dearborn County, and two children 
have been born of this union: Oakey B. arid Margaret P. In former 
years Mr. Nowlin rented land of his father, but on the death of the 
latter' he received his portion of the general estate, which the heirs 
divided among themselves without the aid of court, lawyer or adminis- 
trator. In 18S0 he purchased his farm of eighty acres near Greendale 
and has since resided there. About the same year he purchased a farm on 
Tanner's Creek. Mr. Nowlin takes an active interest in local polities 
and has served two years as chairman of the Republican Central Commit- 
tee of Dearborn County. He is one of the seven stockholders of the 
People's National Bank, a director of the same, and as a citizen, a repre- 
sentative man in the best sense of the term. 

HON. CORNELIUS O'BRIEN, Lawrenceburgh. who, during his 
lifetime, became one of the leading citizens of Dearborn County, was a 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKKTCIIKP. Si* 1 

Dative of Ireland, bora in Cn.11a.ii. Kilkenny County, October 10, 1818, 
Hia yonth was passed in Iii native Erin, from which ho immigrated 
to the United States in 18135 HO, and located in Dearborn County where 
he ever after resided. From earh youth ho was thrown upon his own 
res iiirces, and thus in the fullo I tense he may be considered as having 
bom the architect of his own fortune. For a number of years after his 
location at Lawrenceburgh, he filled the position of deputy in the clerk's 
and treasurer's office in the county, and in 18-17 was elected to the latter 
office by a largo majority. In 1850, before the expiration of his term 
as treasurer, he was elected to fill a vacancy in the clerk's office, being 
re-elected in 1852. In 1856 Mr. O'Brien was chosen delegate to the 
Democratic National Convention at Cincinnati from the Fourth Con- 
gressional District. In 1858 he was elected State .Senator from Dearborn 
County, and during his entire official career he discharged the duties of 
the trusts reposed in him with complete satisfaction to the people he 
represented. At the Democratic State Convention in January, 1800, he 
received the nomination for clerk of the supreme court, which nomina- 
tion was heartily approved by the party throughout the State, though lie 
was defeated through general causes affecting the democracy of the whole 
State in that year, and not from any personal considerations. During 
his services as county treasurer and clerk he fitted himself for the prac- 
tice of law, which ho subsequently engaged in with marked success, 
establishing for himself a most creditable reputation in that profession. 
Beginning life unaided he became an eminently practical and useful 
man, his course through life being marked by consistency and integrity. 
After leaving the State Senate Mr. O'Brien took charge of the auditor's 
office and served out Elias T. Crosby's term. He married Harriet J. 
Hunter, April 14, 1852, and died February 2, 1869. 

WILLIAM H. O'BRIEN, editor of the Lawrencebnrgh Register, 
was born in Lawrenceburgh in 1855, and is a son of Cornelius and 
Harriet (Hunter) O'Brien, referred to above. He grew to maturity in his 
native town, sharing the advantages of its public schools, and subse- 
quently finishing the sophomore year at the Asbury (now Depauw) Uni- 
versity, in 1S74. After about one year's service as assistant deputy 
clerk of Dearborn County ho formed a partnership, in 1877, with Dr. 
William D. H. Hunter, and purchased the Lawrenceburgh Register, 
which he has aided in conducting ever since. In 1SS5, by the appoint- 
ment of Dr. Hunter to the United States revenue collectorship of the 
Sixth Indiana District, Mr. O'Brien succeeded to the chief editorship of 
the Register. In the same year he was elected mayor of Lawrenceburgh 
City, and entered upon the duties of that office, discharging the same in 
a manner entirely satisfactory to all interested. He was married, Mav 



Villi, im D. II. Hun 


er, 


lie. Mr. O'Brien 


las 


tl Society for the ] 


ast 


1 interests of the o 


,in- 



862 IllSTOKY OK DKAKBORN AND OHIO COU 

9, 1882, to Miss Haltio Hunter, daughter of D 
and they havo two children: Cornelius and J 
been secretary of the Dearborn County Agricul 
few years, and in general has been alive to the 
munity 1n which he resides. 

FREDERICK OPPERMAN, merchant, Cochran, is a native of 
France, bom in Alsace, November 10, IS It, where he received a collegi- 
ate education. His parents. John B. and Fredericka (Gonzer) Opperman, 
were horn in France; father in 1812, mother, 1S07. Father was a sad- 
dler and harness maker, mother died in IS 10, ai d in 1852 the surviving 
members of the family immigrated to America and located at Harrison. 
Ohio, where the father died in 1873. Frederick farmed and taught 
school up to 1SG5, at which time he engaged in general merchandising 
at New Haven, Ohio, continuing up to 1S77, then moved to Cochran and 
opened up his present businesi , in which has met with merited success. 
He was married December 26, 1872, to Miss Mary E. Scoble; she was 
born in Cincinnati, Ohio, June 0, 1S45. Two children — Ella S. and 
Katie M. — have been born to them. His business demands two spacious 
rooms, 20x50, and he employs four clerks. The entire family belong to 
the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

WILLIAM F. ORCHARD, foreman tin department Ohio & Missis- 
sippi Shops, Cochran, is a native of New York, born in Clay County 
December 24, 1852, and received a common school education. His 
parents, James and Matilda (Barnes) Orchard, were born in England. 
They came to America in 1S50, and located in New York, where ho 
worked as a machinist. William came to Indiana in 1863, locating in 
Aurora, where he served a regular apprenticeship at his trade, beginning 
in December, 1804, with the Ohio & Mississippi Company. He was 
married, April 27, 1871, to Miss Mary F. Ferrin, a native of Boston, 
Mass. She was born October 11, 1853. They have been blessed with 
three children: Matilda, Mamie and Willie. Mr. Orchard is a sober, 
industrious man, and commands the respect and esteem of the commun- 
ity in which he resid s. 

SIMEON S. OVERHOLT, principal of the, Rising Sun Public 
Schools, was born in Bucks County, Penn., in 1830. He grew to maturity 
in his native county, where he obtained his education, chiefly by s If 
exertion, and later supplemented his stock of information by instruction 
in the Upland Normal School. He began teachin early in life, and has 
ever since continued in the profession. He servei nine years as super- 
intendent of the Bucks County, Penn. , schools, and since the expiration of 
his term of service in that capacity has been engaged in graded schools 
elsewhere. In lS72he came to Ohio, in the schools of which State he was 



lJlCHiRAPHICAL SKETCH KS. 



employed eight years, throe years of which 


time ho was I , ( 


sated at II.-, r 


rison, and the same period as principal of tl 


ie schools at Boi 


id Hill, Ohio. 


In the fall of ISM' Mr. Overboil took 


chargo of the 


Rising Sun 


schools, which he lias sine.' conducted with 


efficiency, being 


■ a teacher of 



cnlture^and large experience. Mr. Overholl was married, in ISG2, to 
Martha C. Smith, of Bucks County, Penn., and three children have been 
born to them, only ouo of whom is now living, namely: Hasseltine C. 

WILLIAM L. OWNBY, morchant, Kising Sim, was born in \V. Va. 
in 1839. His father, James L.. and his mother, Mary J. (Matthews), wi re 
also natives of the same Stale. In IS 11 his parents located in Lawrence- 
burgh, where Lis father was for a time e ; aged in distilling, in partner- 
ship with Marshall & Sheph d, in the earlier buildings of the Walsh Dis- 
tillery at that place. In 1S->1 he removed with his family to Mattoon, 
111., where he engaged in farming, and where his widow is still living, 
he himself having died there in 1870. William L., the subject, of our 
sketch, grew to manhood under the care of his parents and was chiefly 
educated in the Lawrenceburgh schools. He spent some time on the farm 
iu Illinois and then learned the blacksmith's trade, which he continued 
till 18S1, when he was appointed postmaster at Fisher, 111. In the 
spring of 1881 he came to Rising Sun, and with his brother in law. 
Ira Powell, purchased a stock of dry goods, carpets, etc., of William 
Colter, and has since been merchandising. The firm carries a laro-e stock 
and does an extensive business. Mr. Ownby was married, in 1872, to 
Sarah J. Powell, daughter of James A. Powell, an early resident of this 
place, and later of Illinois. They have one child, Hazlett, a lad rive 
y( s of age. 

LYTLE W. PARKS, farmer and stock dealer, of Hogan Township. 
Prominent among the names worthy of honorable mention, is that of L. 
W. Parks, a native of Lawrenceburgh, born January 6, 1S24. He was 
educated at Wilmington Seminary, and resided upon the farm from 1S32 
to manhood. In 1S44 he went on the river as produce dealer, and con- 
tinued until 1859, since which time he has been a farmer. He was mar- 
ried, April 9, 1854, to Miss Mary J. Bruce, who was born in Hogan Town- 
ship August 21, 1824. Their live children were James, who died in 
infancy; Laura, no. • Mrs. Lewis Bailey; Myra, now Mrs. Joseph Todd; 
Joseph and Lewis. Mr. Parks was in the Mexican war in 1847-48 under 
Gens. Joseph Lane and Winlield S. Scott, participating in the battles of 
Tisco and Wamantla, and helped raise the Beige of Pueblo, and took 
part in other slight skirmishes. During the Rebellion, he was captain 
of the Hogan Township Militia, and with his little force succeeded in 
keeping Kirby Smith from invading the township, Mr. Parks was school 
director several times, and has always been a strong advocate of thorough 



864 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES 

education, Ho and his estimable lady belong to the Mothodist Episco- 
pal Church. 

JOSEPH G. PARKS, farmer, of Hogan Township, was born in Law- 
renceburgh December 25, 1828. His fattier, John, was born in Pcnnsyl 
vania in 1790; his mother, Margaret Kitchel, in Iudiaua in 171)0. 
Father Parks came to Indiana in 1815, and located in Lawrenc 
where he followed carpentering up to 1832, the year of the flood, at 
which time he moved to Hogan Township, where he died in LSGSpnothcr 
died in 1876, Mr. Parks built the first schoolhouse in Hogan Town 
ship. He was an earnest worker in the cause of education, and served 
as school director for many years. The old pioneer couple were both 
faithful members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Joseph Gr. 
Parks was married, November 13, 1849, to Miss Yliva Bruce, who was 
born in Hogan Township November 13, 1829, on the present homestead, 
and was the fifteenth child of Amor Bruce, who made a handsome fortune 
upon the home farm. He raised twelve of the fifteen children, and 
gave each one eighty acres of land and same cash. Ry their union Mr. 
and Mrs. Parks were blessed with three children: John A, born August 
18, 1850; Aaron P., born December 25, 1856: Joseph Gr., born January 
27, 1868. John A. loft the farm, read law. and was admitted to the bar 
in October. 1875. Ho has prospered in life, and secured a competency, 
which will enable him to pass his pilgrimage in ease and affluence. 
Aaron F. attended school at Lebanon. Ohio, and Moore's Hill, Iud., 
after which he taught several years, and traded considerable. In 
the spring of 18S2 he engaged in the drug business at Aurora, and made 
many friends; but his health failed, and he was compelled to dispose of 
the business and travel for his health. The fell destroyer had too firm a 
hold upon him, and realizing the fact, he started from Kel ley, N. M., in 
a buggy for home July 21, 1S84, and drove to Tuunelton, Ind., a dis- 
tance of over 1,500 miles. On account of being so very weak he took 
the train at Tuunelton and arrived in Aurora November 6, 1884, and died 
at the residence of his brother. John A. Parks, the following day. The 
youngest of the family is at home with his parents, to minister to them 
in their old age. Mr. and Mrs. Parks are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. 

R. H. PARRY, Lawrenceburgh, a retired dry goods merchant of 
that city, was born in the city of Pittsburgh, Penn., in the year 1813. 
His father was a native of Wales, and came to the United States about 
1793. He located in Pittsburgh, and was there engaged in building and 
contracting, erecting the first court house in that city. He married Sarah 
Cadwalider, a daughter of Gen. John Cadwalider, and there were bom 
to them eleven children, only four of whom are now living: Sarah, 



BIOGRA! i'\l. SKETCHES. >*<<■') 

widow of Enoch J). John, Olarksvillo, Tonn.; Rocs H. ; Mary I'., 
widow ol John Dilworth, Pittsburgh, LVnn., ami Thomas J., Con- 
nersville, [ml. Henry Parry, the father, died in Pittsburgh, Peuu., 
October 1, 17, aged ei< litj dx years; iiis wife who was born on the 
easterd she., of Maryland, March 3, 1777, died April 27, 1842. In 
L830 U. H I arry came ■■ ■ ' I i Cincinnati, and with bis brother, Will- 
iam, established himself in the dry goo 1 : business under the firm name of 
William & E. II. Parry. Here they conducted a profitable business (ill 
1843, in July of which year our subject, E. II. Parry, came to Lawrence- 
burgh, and with another brother, 0. Parry, continued the same line of 
merchandising, under the firm name of R. H. & O. Parry, till 1873, 
when they sold out and retired. The firm did a flourishing business, 
and was regarded as one of the leading and most substantial mercantile 
establishments of the town. E. II. Parrj was married, September 1, 
1853, to Mary P. Piatt, a daughter of Abraham Piatt, of Boone County, 
Ky., and granddaughter of Col. Jacob Piatt, the veteran of the devolu- 
tion and the ancestor of the distinguished family now bearing his name 
throughout the West. Her father was a farmer and died at his home in 
Kentucky; her mother is still living. Her grandfather located in Boone 
County, Ky. , in 1795, and in 1804 built the stone mansion opposite 
Lawrenceburgh, known as "Federal Hall," where he died in his eighty- 
eighth year. His son, Johu H. Piatt, was the first banker of Cincinnati 
— established the first private bank west of the Allegheny Mountains — 
and was known as a "millionaire of 1812." He aided tho United States 
Government during the war of 1812 by furnishing supplies to tho Amer- 
ican Army, and after having rendered invaluable assistance as a commis- 
sariat, was thrown into prison for some technical violation of the law, 
and died a prisoner for debt within the prison bounds of the city of 
Washington, February 12, 1822; all this while the government owed him 
more than $100,000. Mrs. Parry passed away in 1865, leaving two chil- 
dren: Bees H., "now an at' rney at law, Des Moines, Iowa, and Mary P., 
wife of Benjamin W. Vaudergrift, an extensive oil dealer of the Stand- 
ard Oil Company, of Pittsburgh. Since 1873 Mr. Parry has not been ac- 
tively engaged in business more than to look after the interests of his 
property, but is passing his latter days in quiet retirement in the town 
of Lawrenceburgh, which has been his homo for more than thirty years. 
HENBY S. PATE, farmer, Bising Sun, was born August 2, 1811, 
and is a sou of George Pate. Ho was one of the two children brought 
over the mountains by wagon from Virginia. He resided with his 
parents on the old homestead on the Laughery till tho fall of 1S50, He 
was married, in 1832, to Rebecca D. Johnson, daughter of Eoswell and 
Mary (Barnelt) Johnson, early settlers of Ohio County (1814-15), from 



866 HISTORY OF DEAKBOHN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

Virginia. Bythiswifoworobomfourclnl.il ry, Sarah A., Will- 

iam H., Gooi o W., all dec II. After his mar 

riage Mr. I\ > b night a farm of 200 acn adjoinii g his father's, and be- 
gan the im rovement of the same, remaining till lSHO, in th 
time addii .: eighty acres, all of which be sold al the above dal 
then pure] i on the "Miller Ridge" 2G0 acr rtiicb be sold and left 
in 187 t. He did considerable flat-boating while on the Laughery, and 
has since dealt more or less in stock, with fair success in all hi- busine s 
enterprises. He is now living in retirement, oujoying the fruits of hi.- 
life-long ti rm of labor. His wife, who had shared his joys and sorrows 
for about fifty-two years, passed away November 30, 1884. Mr. Pate 
has always ranked among the most substantial bu iiness men (if thecoun- 
ty. and is a fair type of the pioneer and thrifty agriculturists of his 
time. He and Mrs. Tate were both members of the Methodist Episco- 
pal Church. 

PETER S. PATE, of Rising Sun, has long been known as one of 
the most prominent and successful business men of Ohio Comity, in 
which he was born in 1825. The Pate family were early settlers on 
Laughery Creek. Jeremiah Pate, the grandfather of our subject, came 
from Montgomery County, Va., with his wife Elizabeth, in 1813. He 
entered a quarter section of land, being a farmer by occupation; they 
reared ten children; Jeremiah died about 1824, and Elizabeth passed 
away about ten years later. George Pate, their eldest son, and father of 
the older stock of the family , now living in Ohio County, was born in 
Virginia, in March, 17S7; married there Sarah P., daughter of Thomas 
Watterson, who was born in July, 1791, and came to Ohio County with 
his two children and his parents as stated above. He also entered land 
about eleven miles west of Rising Sun on Laughery Creek, and here he 
wa6 chiefly engaged in farming till his death, which occurred in Rising 
Sun about 1852. He did some flat-boating from Laughery Creek, and 



... 

- " "c 

■ - 



BIOOHAHIICAI, si; ET( iiks. 8(57 

portion of his father's estate af the latti r's death, but his start iu busi- 
ness was made by his own earnings, his first payment on land being 
made by the sale of his first corn crop al 8100. Mr. Pate has been chii By 
engaged in farming, but during the war dealt some in horses. He has 
also dealt considerably in other stock — cattle and hogs— doing consid- 
erable shipping. By industry and good management he has occumulat 
ed real estate to the amount of I, ISO acres, and a comfortable fortune in 
other property. Ho took quite an amount of stuck in the Rising Sim 
National Lank at the time of its incorporation, and this he has since in 
creased. He was chosen vice president of the bank in 1884, and is 
still serving in that capacity. Mr. Pate served as trustee of Pike Town- 
ship for many years, and during the war officiated as its enrolling officer. 
He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and the M. E. Church to 
which latter society he has liberally contributed. Mrs. Pate died May 
14, 1870, after nearly twenty-five years of faithful duty as a wife and 
mother. In point of liberality, progn . siveness and keen business judg- 
ment Mr. Pate has few superiors. 

JACKSON J. PATE, Randolph Township, son of William T. Pate, 
was born in Ohio County in 1842. He grew to maturity on the farm and 
obtained a practical education iu the common schools, remaining with 
his parents till 1861, when he enlisted in Company C, Seventh Indiana 
Infantry, and entered the late war. He served three years, and took 
part in some of the most important engagements, among which wero 
Gettysburg, Antietam, Winchester and others. Jn 1864 Mr. Pate 
received his discharge and returned home, and in the same year was 
married to Sarah Miller, daughter of Benjamin Miller, an old resident 
of Ohio County. Her people came originally from Virginia, and settled 
in this county in a very early day, her father subsequently removing to 
Missouri, where he still resides. Her mother is deceased. After his 
marriage Mr. Pate moved to his present farm, where he has ever since 
engaged in agricultural pursuits. He owns 300 acres of good land, and 
is regarded as one of the thrifty farmers of the county, dealing consider- 
ably in stock. Mr. and Mrs. Pate have two children: Louella and Will- 
iam T. Mr. Pate is a member of the G. A. R., and politically is a Dem- 
ocrat. 

J. C. PENNINGTON, lumber dealer, Moore's Hill, was born at 
New Paris, Preble Co., Ohio, May 5, 1S30. The ancestry of the Penn- 
ington family in the United States dates back to 1082, in which year 
Edward Pennington emigrated with William Penn from England to the 
State of Pennsylvania. He located at Philadelphia, where he died 
in 1701. He was united in marriage, in 1699, to Sarah Jennings, 
daughter of Samuel Jennings, the Quaker governor of New Jersey, by 



whom he had on n. Isaac, from whom tho !'■•;■: 


^lons of Philadelphia 


desconded. Mi m, Daniel, settled in Maryl 


! , re ho raised a 


large family. Ai ios, Lis Mm. settled in Hunting 


County, Penn., and 


froi i th earl} day, immigrat ' 1 


i, Belmont Co.. 


Ohi.., whore h< die I. He left four sons, viz.: D; 


. Jo lui.-i, James, and 


John, tho Iattoi (he father of our subject, win 


as born in Huntingdon 


County, Penn., October 19, 1797, and iinmigra 


tod with his parents to 



Belmont. County, Ohio, where ho married, in 1820, Elizabeth Th< 
and in 1826 moved to Richmond, 1ml. He subsequently moved to New 
Paris, Ohio, whi i he n m ined some time, and after various other moves 
in 18-1 1, he located in Ripley County, Ind., where .Mrs. P. died Docembei 
13, 1847. He survived her until March 20, 1856, and died at the 
residence of our subject, in Ripley County. He was the father of eight 
children, viz.- Eli, Ellon, Mary, Deborah 3VL, Joel C, Bryce C, William 
C|.,and Isaac C. J. C, our subject, was married in Ripley County, Ind., 
September 24, 1831, to Catherine, daughter of John and Catherine 
(Risinger) Dorsh, who was born in Pennsylvania, September 27, 1830. 
In January, 1852, Mr. Pennington purchased a farm in Riple} County, 
where he moved and engaged in fanning till September, 1873, at which 
time he moved to Moore's Hill, where lie now resides. His wife died 
November 30, 1867. Their eight children wore: Medora D. (deceased), 
John C, Ella M. (deceased). Joel E. , Laura TL, Mary L„ Charles M, 
(deceased), and Martha A. (deceased). Mr. Pennington was again married 
at Moore's Hill, March 12, 1871, to Elizabeth F., daughter of Morton 
and Dorcas T. (Eaton) Justis, who was born in Dearborn County. Novem- 
ber 7, 1832. They have one child, Walter E. Mr. Pennington is a 
member of the Masonic order r- 1 is highly esteemed as a citizen. 

ABEL C. PEPPER, of Rising Sun, was born in Virginia in 
1793. Ho was a soldier in the war of 1812. having been for one year a 
jirivato in Capt. William Garrard's troop of Volunteer Light Dragoons. 
He immigrated to Indiana Territory in 1815, settling in that part of 
Dearborn County that subsequently became Ohio County, and soon after- 
ward became one of her leading citizens. He had a taste for military 
affairs, and had been in the Territory but a short time when he became a 
militia captain. He subsequently was promoted to the office of colonel, 
and advanced to that of brigadier-general, though generally known under 
tho title of colonel. He served as one of tho county commissioner, of 
Dearborn County, also as sheriff, and for several terms represented her 
people in the State Legislature. In 1828 he was a candidate for lieuten- 
ant-governor, but was defeated by Milton Stapp a few hundred votes. 
In 1829 Col. Popper was appointed sub-Indian agent at Fort Wayne, by 
Gen. Jackson; he was afterward promoted to the office of Indian a "•out, and 



mouiui'inc vii skktv.imx r>o;i 

the .1 [I I i removal of the [mliansiu Indiana Miehig m 

[1] \ T isconsii : jning tbeofficoin ISM. Subsequently ho was 

elected n sinking fund commissioner, and in 1845 was appointed by 
President Polk United States marshal for in, liana, which office bo bold 
until 1841). In 1850 ho represented the counties of Ohio and Switzer- 
land in tbi constitutional convention, and look an active pari in its 
proa Ho served on the committees of election franchises, appor- 

tion: ' and represent tion, banks and banking, arrangement and 
phrasi >' : . and of the militia, being chairman of the latter. In the 
convention he took a decided stand against a State bank and made a 
speech in support of his own resolution, in which he declared him 
favor of free banks and opposed io a State bank. He was a devoted 
member of the Masonic fraternity, becoming a member in IS 10. He 
afterward served as grand master and grand high prie t of the order in 
the State, and was one of the brightest and most zealous Masons ever 
within the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of Indiana. Col. Pepper, for 
a time, applied himself to the study of medicine, and later read law and 
was admitted to the bar at Rising Sun, but, we believe, never practiced. 
He abandoned, too, the study of medicine. The Colonel was occupied, 
when not in public life, as a merchant. He was slighty above medium 
height, spare and sinewy, of easy and pleasing address. He was urbane 
and dignified in his intercourse with bis fellow men, and was particularly 
polite to ladies. He was a useful and patriotic citizen. His death 
occurred at his home in Rising Sun, March 20, 1860. 

CAPT. JAMES 11. PEPPER, formerly of Rising Sun, was born in 
that city in 1821, and received a thorough education in the village 
schools and in Cincinnati, Ohio, being educated for the law, which was 
distasteful to him, and the profession was abandoned and he engaged in 
flat-boating. In 1842 he became the cleric on a steam-boat belonging to 
Col. P. James, which plied between Rising Sun and Cincinnati. In 
1844 he was chosen the first clerk of the new county of Ohio, serving 
three years. He re-engaged in merchandising on the river, and in 1855 
began steam-boating in the Cincinnati and Memphis trade, soon earning 
the promotion to captain. Previous to the war he left the river for a 
brief period to take the management of the Memphis. He was one of 
the incorporators of the Globe Insurance Company, of Cincinnati. Ohio. 
He built and owned some of the finest boats ever built at Cincinnati, 
Ohio. Latterly he commanded the great steamers "J. M. White" and 
"James Howard," in the Now Orleans and Vicksburgh trade. "He was 
a man of noble instincts and generous impulses. 11" was warm in his 
attachments and sincere in his friendships. In matters of business he 
was the very soul of honor and integrity- 'a all of his dealings lie was 



lAUDOUN AND 



open and fair and frank, and whatov 


er he gained in 


business, was gained 


in an honorable way. As ;; steanibi 


>at commander, 


ho stood at the top 


of his profession." * * ; He died 


in 1881, in Co 


lorado, where ho Lad 


gone for the benefit of health. 







DR. JABEZ PERCEVAL, e v page 1G5. 
JAMES N. PERKINS, cashier of the National Dank, Rising Sun. 
was born in Boone County, Ky., in 1849. His parents, James and 
Mildred (Calvert) Perkins were natives of the same county, and are now 
residents of Rising Sun. Mr. Perkins passed the early part of Lis life 
in Lis native county. He came to Rising Hun at the age of nineteen 
years, and began clerking in a dry g( d's store, in which vocation ho 
was chiefly employed till 1S72, when he was given the position which 
he still holds as cashier of the Rising Sun Dank. He is said to have been 
the youngest cashier in the State of Indiana at the time of his assuming 
the duties of his position, being then twenty-three years old. Mr. 
Perkins was married, in 1872, to Harriet Spencer, of Rising Sun. daugh- 
ter of John W. Spencer. Her father was the first mayor of Rising 
Sun, and her mother afterward officiated as postmistress. Mr. and Mrs. 
Perkins have five children: Alice, Hugh, Joshua, Harold and James. 
Mr. Perkins' long term of service in the employ of the bank is the best 
evidence we can cite as to his sterling integrity as an official, and his 
character as a citizen. 

DEMAS PERLEE, farmer and blacksmith, Dillsborough, was 
born in Clay Township, April 17, 1828. His parents, Peter and Eliz- 
abeth (Woodruff) Perlee, were natives of Ohio, the former a son of 
Benjamin Perlee, a native of New Jersey, and Mary (Peterson) Perlee. 
His parents moved to Hamilton County, Ohio, where his father died. 
Peter, the father of our subject, was born in Hamilton County, Ohio, 
June 10, 1800, and was there married to Elizabeth Woodruff, who was 
born April 14, 1S03. In 1825 Mr. Perlee moved to Dearborn County, 
settling in Clay Township, where he resided till his death. May 14, 1883. 
His wi r ' still survives and resides on the old homestead. They were the 
parents of nine children, viz. : John. Benjamin (dead), Demas, William, 
David, Elizabeth W., Mary, Martha and Peter. Demas, our subject, 
began as an apprentice at the blacksmith trade when about seventeen 
years of age, at Lawreneebnrg, and this has since been his chief 
occupation. In 1850 he moved to Dillsborough, where he opened up a 
blacksmith, plow and wagon-shop, which he has since conducted. He 
also owns a small farm near Dillsborough. Ho was married in Novem- 
ber, 1853, to Rebecca A., daughter of Silas and Maria (Butter worth) 
Wheaton, by whom he has had born to him nine children, viz. : Ida M., 
Frank, Emma, Lizz: Nellie, Bertha, Edith, Bonnie W. and George W. 



Mr. Purl- o enlisted .Yugu : 1 i. IS02, in Company B, Eighty-third ludi 
ana Vol oor Infantry, as a private, and in 180-J he was promoted to 
sergeant, which raul; ho served in until Jam.' 2, 1300, at which time ho 
was discharged, and returned to DiUsbon u ;b, and resumed bis trade, 
whicb, bo has since engaged in. Mr. Perleo i i a highly ostoemod citizen. 
He is a member of the G. A. R. and of the Odd Follows, and be nod 
wife are members of the Presbytorian Church. 

JOHN PETSCHER, saloonist, Aurora, wa b >rn in Baden, Ger 
November 28, 1833, wberobeol tained a common school education. He 
immigrated to America in lSo-i, locating in Lawrencoburgb, where be 
for twenty years followed making malt in a b ewory. He was married, 
Juno 28, 1857, to Miss Catbarino Oswalt, who was horn in Baden, Ger- 
many, February 15, 1S36, the fruits of their marriage being four chil- 
dren: Minnie, John, William and Louisa. In 1S7-1 Mr. Petscher moved 
to Aurora and worked one year in the distillery; after which he engaged 
in his present business. After many years' experience in the manufact- 
ure of fine beverages, Mr. Petscher knows just how to meet the demands 
of his many customers. 

RICHARD PLATT, farmer, Manchester Township, born on Long 
Island, N. Y. , September 14, 1816, is a son of Gilbert and Keziah 
(Purdy) Piatt, natives of the same locality. Gilbert Piatt, still in his 
youth during the war of 1812, rendered assistance to the army in remov- 
ing cannon and stores in the vicinity of Plattsburg, N. Y. In ISIS he, 
with his family, immigrated to Indiana, and entered the southeast 
quarter of Section IS in Manchester Township, where bo opened out 
right in the woods, " not a stick amiss," erected a log cabin, and com- 
menced the life of a pioneer, and here ho remained through life. He 
died February 16, 1S67, in the ninety-fourth year of his age. Mr. Piatt 
was thrice married. His last wife, Margaret Millikin, survived him sev- 
eral years. Ho was the father of eight children, three now living: Richard, 
Seth and Peter. He was a man of powerful constitution, and performed 
a great amount of hard labor in opening out bis farm from tho woods, 
and lived to see live of bis children settled near him and doing well. 
Smith Piatt, one of bis oldest sons, spent his life in this township and 
died at the advanced age of eighty years. He was a prominent farmer 
and a leading citizen of the county. He sorved two terms as county 
commissioner and was highly esteemed. His son, Oliver, served in the 
war of the Rebellion in Company E, Sixteenth Regiment Indiana Vol- 
unteer Infantry. He enlisted for three years, and served till the close 
of the war. He now re-ides in Decatur County, Iud. Peter, one of the 
surviving sons of Gilbert Piatt, and now a resident of Nebraska, also 
served in the late war in Company C, Seventh Indiana Cavalry. Enlist- 



OCi HISTOllY OF DKAHDOUN \N'l> i 

ing as a private ho was promoted from time t time till lie was captain 
of the company. His son. !' iin.lv, a 1 i in Company 13, 

Sixteenth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infnntn three years He was 
severely wounded in the Red River can aigu in a battle in Arkansas. 
and being unfit for further dut} was sent home, [Jo is now a resident of 
Nebraska. Richard Piatt, a child of two yei i ' go, when his parents 
settled in this, then m country, grew to m ood familiar with pio 
neer life. He was married, September 24, 15 10. to Rliz; both Cotton, s 
daughter of Judge A. J. Cotton, by whom he had two children: Lewis 
M. and Elizabeth D. K., now the wife of David 'Moan, residing in 
Nebraska. Mrs. Piatt died February 10, LS43 aged twenty years. 
August 6, 1843, Mr. Piatt married for his second wife, Emiline Clark, a 
daughter of Josiah E. and Elizabeth Clark, he a native of New York, 
and she of New Hampshire, and who settled in this county in 1S37. By 
this union they had eight children, seven now surviving: Isaac Sylves- 
ter, now a resident of Nebrask: ; Phebe E., wife of Dr. S. E. Givan, 
residing in Ripley County, Ind. ; Franklin P.; -James M., a resident of 
Nebraska; Omer M., alto in Nebraska; Pnrdy P. and Cory E. The 
eldest son, Lewis M., was in the war of the Rebellion, enlisting in 
August, 1862, in Company E, Sixteenth Regiment Indiana Volunteer 
Infantry, and serving till the close of the war. Mr. Piatt has now been 
a resident of this township sixty sis years, and upon the farm where he 
now lives, forty-one years. Besides his possessions hero he also owns a 
half section of land in Nebraska, besides what he has given his children. 
Thus Mr. Piatt's life has been a financial success, and as a citizen and a 
neighbor he is held in high esteem. 

SETH PLATT, farmer, Manchester Township, was born in the same 
November 24, 1818, is a son of Gilbert and Keziah Piatt. He 
grew to manhood fully acquainted with pioneer life. February 27, 
1842, he was united in marriage with Rebecca Southard, bom June 27, 
1815, a daughter of Benjamin and Temperance Southard, natives of 
Long Island, N. Y. They came to Indiana and settled in Kelso Town- 
ship, among the earliest settlers of that locality, and spent their lives 
there and in Logan Township, being residents of the latter township at 
the time of their deaths. They were parents of seven children, all of 
whom grew to maturity. Four are now living: Isaac, Jane. Martha (now 
the widow of Charles Jolly, residing in Iowa), ad Rebecca. By this 
union Mr. Piatt has had eight children, one died in infancy, sever. 
grew to maturity, live now survive: "William, a resident of Aurora: 
Isaac, a resident of Kansas; Charles Sumner; Eva, wife of James 
Vaughn, and Mary Belle, wife of Benjamin Manliff. Of these William 
enlisted in Company K, Twenty-sixth Regiment Indiana Volunteer 



BIOUH U'HirAI, SKKTCHKS. 8 I 3 

Infantry, in I Co] Wheat ly, in the war of (ho Rebellion, and in the 
early cam] the un les, and became 

incapaeit ;ei tosome i 

he started to return to 1 bul usidered unfit for duty 

and sent bach again, and sul I Of those deceased 

Benjamin enlisted in the Eighty-third Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infan- 
try, was engaged in the firsl battle ai Vicksburg, and subsequently taken 
sick with typhoid pneumonia, and sent to the hospital at Memphis, 
where he died M;.n-h *J.~>. 1 i ' • n mains being sent home and interred in 
the old Plati Cemetery. Mr. Piatt has now b sn a resident of Manches- 
ter Township sixty-six years, and believes he is the oldesl native now 
residing there. Although owning and residing on a good farm his prin- 
cipal business is contracting and building brick and stone work, and 
many seboolhouses and other building., are evidences of his skill and 
faithfulness as a workman. The Baptist Church, at Aurora, was erected 
by Mr. Piatt, and the Dearb rn asylum, just recently completed, is a 
tine structure, and the commissioners, in accenting the building from Mr. 
Piatt's hands, gave him a high recommendation for the honesty of his 
workmanship. 

WILLIAM H. PLATT, brick mason, Aurora, is a native of Dear 
born County, burn in Manchester Township, December 8, 1842. His 
parents were Seth and Rebecca (Southard) Piatt, sketches of whom appear 
above. 'William has been a brick mason all his life, and came to Aurora 
in 187G. He enlisted in Company K, Twenty- sixth Regiment, Indiana 
Volunteer Infantry, August 11, 1861, and was mustered out in 1862, on 
account of being disabled by rupture and disease. He was married 
February 29, 1863, to Miss Sarah J. Palmer, who was born in Manchester 
Township, Dearborn Co., Ind., April 1, 1844. The following children 
have been bom to the marriage: Harry W., born August 29, 1S65; Alice 
M., born May 29, 1869; Herbert L., born September 1, 1873, died March 
14, 1S77; Prank M., born October 16, 1875. The wife died January 14, 
1884. Her parents, John and Amanda (Dorsey) Palmer, were born in 
Cleves, Ohio, the former April 11, 1819 and the latter February 6, L818. 
They were married September 12. 1839. Mr. Piatt is a member of 
Aurora Lodge No. 51, F. & A. M.; Chosen Friends' Lodge No. 13. I. O. 
O. F. ; Encampment No. 3; Daughters of Rebecca No. 63, and of the G. 
A. R. 

DANIEL PLATT, mechanic and township trustee, Manchester Town- 
ship, bom in the same, January 26, 1850, is a son of Peter and Susan 
(Millikin) Piatt, also natives of Dearborn County, he being theyoungest 
surviving son of Gilbert and Keziah Piatt. Peter Piatt, the father of our 
subject,grew to manhood, married and lived in Manchester Township till in 



874 HISTORY OF DEAIUJORN AND OHIO COUNTIKS. 

1ST:!, when ho removed I Nebraska. Ho was a stone niason and plas- 
terer by trad .which hi in :s ho followed during his residence in this 
coiinty, but since his Rott! -wont in Nebraska he has followed agricultural 
pursuits. Tkoy are pareni of eight children: Purdy, Sarah Jane, now 
the wife of Clark Wick - \ fred; Daniel; Victoria, wife of Ennis Lester; 
John; Emma, wife of Ora L\ ster; and Enni » K., all of whom are residents 
of Nebraska except Daniel. He was married, March 2, 1878, to Miss 
Jennie Bodino, a native of this county, born March 30, lSr>3, a daughter 
of Francis A. and Harriot (Wicks) Bodino. They havo live children: 
Mary, now the widow of Sa ford Burton; Catharine; Jennie; Hottie, wife 
of J. L. Freeland, and Francis. Mr. Piatt learned the trade of his 
father, which he has followed as his principal business. He is now serv- 
ing as trustee of Manchester Township, having been elect d to that office 
in April, 1884 

ALBERT POHL, resident piano tuner and salesman with William 
Lieve & Bio.. Aurora, is a native of Prussia, born in the Province of 
Saxony, September 17, ISi'J, wherohereceivedacollegiatocouv.se. His 
parents, Charles F. and Dorothea (Traffehn) Pohl, were natives of Prus- 
sia, the former was born in 1801, and the latter in 1809; the father died 
in Frankfort on the Main, iu July, 1868, and the mother died in the 
city of Berlin, in December, 1870. Albert came to America, July 18, 
1870, and located in New York, where ho remained one year, and in 1871, 
he came to Aurora, where he was married, April 10, 1874, to Miss Kate 
S. Siemantel. She was born in Wisconsin, October 28, 1853. Her par- 
ents. George and Catharine (Lochner) Siemantel, wore born iu Bavaria, 
the father in Obernzenn, March 17, 1S26, and tho mother November 2, 
1820. Her grandparents, John and Catharine (Stahl) Siemantel, were 
born in Bavaria, the former in 1782, and tho latter in 1792; grandfather 
died in 1817, grandmother in 1870. To the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. 
Pohl have been born five children: Oscar H, Anna, Charles, Kate ..; 1 
Albert. 

CAPT. THOMAS PORTER, of Lawrenceburgh, was born in Lan- 
caster County, Perm., July 31, 17S9. In his youth he went from there 
to Oliphant's Iron Works iu Fayette County in that State, where he was 
for several years employed as a clerk. On the breaking out of the war of 
1812, he enlisted in Capt. James A. McClelland's company of Ball's reg 
iment of Pennsylvania Volunteers, continuing in the war one year. He 
was badly wounded in the thigh at an engagement on the Mississinewa 
River in this State (then a Territory) December 19, 1812, his horse being 
killed from under him, the camp having been surprised before daylight 
by an attack of hostile Indians, lie was borne from'the battleground to 
Dayton, Ohio, on a litter, thence to a hospital at Lebanon, Ohio, in a 



DIOGR U'llICAL SKETCH KS. 8(5 

spring ho joined bis comp and inarched to Port Meigs, where he par- 
ticipated in tho fir at sic s again slightly wounded by a cannon 
ball, whicH killed a second horse for bun. while in the act of marching. 
He continued in the servii n til theolo e of tin* campaign participating 
in all tbe engagement i dron and terminating with the battle 
of the Thames, after which hi was discharged. Tbe wound broke out 
afresh a few years aftei slling him to walk- wit) crutches, and 
it gave him much pain at intervals during the remainder of his life. In 
1814 he received an appointment in the regular army as ensign Sixteenth 
United States Infantry, and remained in that service for several years. 
Having resigned from that army, he came to the West to join his father's 
family, which bad removed from Pennsylvania to Doone County, Ky. He 
took up his residence soon after at Lawrenceburgh, and was for several 
years cashier of tbe branch at Lawrenceburgh of the Farmers and 
Mechanics Bank of Indiana Ho resigned this office, and for about a 
year was engaged with a Mr. Amos Beesou, in carrying on a tannery and 
dry goods store at Elizabothtown, Ohio. Thence he returned to Law- 
renceburgh and was in 1830 elected recorder of Dearborn County. He 
was offer* 1 by President Jackson the appointment of receiver of public 
moneys at Fort Wayne. Tho office was then a lucrative one, but as the 
journey to that place then had to be made on horseback, he declined the 
appointment because his wound was too painful to enable him to make 
the journey. While serving as recorder of Dearborn County, his father- 
in-law, Mr. Moses Tousey, who owned a large farm and the ferry oppo- 
site Lawrenceburgh, died, and purchasing the interests of the heirs, Capt. 
Porter resigned the office of recorder and removed to Kentucky. Before 
he purchased the farm and ferry, a common " flat " and a skiff only had 
been employed as tho ferry, but Capt. Porter promptly purchased a fine 
horse-ferry-boat, and made the crossing of the river so prompt and con- 
venient as greatly to increase the trade of Lawrenceburgh. His boys, 
Oliphaiit and Albert, were drafted into service as ferrymen and ran the 
boat a long while. In 1839 11 is. Porter died, and Capt, Porter, after 
this bereavement, soon determined to relinquish farming, and not long 
afterward returned to Lawrenceburgh. He was subsequently engaged in 
the business of pork-packing with Col. James H. Lane for two or three 
se;- ns, but tho greater part of the time after his removal from Kei I i ;ky . 
he was not in active employment. He died, at the residence of his sister, 
Mrs. Thompson, on the Gth of February, 1854. Capt, Porter was twice 
married. His first wife was a daughter of Thomas Tousey, and a sister 
of Oliver Tousey; bis second wife was a daughter of Moses Tousey, and 
a sister of Omer and George Tousey. Capt. Porter was the father of 



870 rilSTOUl 01' i'i: VU1WUN AND OHIO CO : I . 

px-Go\ Mbert G. Porter, of Indianapolis, whoso youth was p: 
!,;■■, u-gh. 

WILLIAM II. POWELL, Randolph Township, was born in Mary- 
land in December, 1S00. Hocatne here from Ohio with his parents when 
;i sin; : ' ■ . id in what is now Switzerland County, and 

■ •■■}. September 24, LS35, to Lucinda North, a daughter of Levi 
North. He followed farming, and also did an extensive milling, mer- 
chandising and distilling business. Six of his seven children are still 
living: Rosanna, John II., George W., Mary E., Marcus L. and William 
J. The deceased was Sarah J. The father died in I860. George W. 
and Marcus L. grew up on the old homestead, and are still there, owning 
four shares in the estate. They were educated in the common schools, 
and have been chiefly engaged in farming, though having done some 
trading on the river. Recently have been dealing to a considerable extent 
in tobaceo buying and shipping to the Cincinnati market. George W. 
was married, November 21, 1877, to Cynthia A. Lostutter, daughter of 
David Lostutter, who died in 1878. Marcus L. was married, October 13, 
1880, to Mary A. Dibble, daughter of George and Margaret Dibble, and 
they have one sou — Louis L. The Powell brothers are stirring business 
men, and own 1S2 acres of land. 

HIRAM .F. POWELL, fanner, Hogan Township, was born in Dear- 
born County July 5, 1S24. His father, James, wa.s born in Washington 
County, Penn., in 1789, and came to this State in 1801. He returned to 
his native Slate, and again came to Indiana and located in Dearborn 
County, upon North Hogan Creel; in 1807, and purchased one section of 
land at 82. 25 per acre. He farmed and flat-boated before steamboats ran 
on the river. He was in the war of 1S12 under Capt. Sargent, Mr. 
Hiram F. Powell started as engineer on the Ohio River, and followed the 
river for twenty-two years. He was married, November 21, 1804, to 
Mrs. Sarah E. Davis, who was born in Dearborn County in 1840. Their 
three children are Jedediah, Mary J. and Lewis; the latter deceased. 
Mr. Powell was justice for several years, and also served as deputy sheriff. 
He belongs to Dearborn Lodge No. 536, I. O. O. F., and Farmers' Insur- 
ance Company. He and his wife are in ubers of the Methodist Episco- 
pal Church. 

IRA POWELL, of Rising Sun, wa.s born in that city in 1S58. His 
parents, James A. and Martha (Dodd) Powell, were native- of Pennsyl- 
vania and Lexington, Ky., respectively, and resided in Ohio County till 
1801, engaged in farming. In 1861 he removed to Mattoon, 111., where 
he purchased land and carried on a successful farming business till his 
death, which occurred in 1879. His widow is still living, now a resident 
of Rising Sun. Mr. Powell was reared on the farm, and followed that 



BlUGH U'lIU IL SKKTCJIE.S. 01 I 

occupation till ; came I i Rising Sun in the fall of 1880. He was 
employed loiter till 11 ii ; of 1SS4, when 

he purchi and began merchandising for him- 

self as rekwt' boro. 

C. M. PRICHARD, Lawrenceburgh, secretary of the Miami Valley 
Furniture uri pan; svai born Ohio in 1843. Ho 

spent his >\.i '; ; ■■ n jn his native State, where up to 1870 he was chiefly 
engaged in tel i iffercnt point . At the latter date lie came 

to Lawn i I toot stock in the above named furniture 1 factory, 

with which ho ] < i coi id having I oen secretary of the 

company iuce 1873 Mr. Prichard wa: married, in 1867, to Elizabeth 
Channell, of Newark, O., and they have three children, Mabel, Grace 
and Chauning. 

LEVIN 1). PRICHAED, farmer, Hogan Township. Mr. Pochard 
resides with Mr. F. C. A. Dam, upon Section 23, Hogan Town- 
ship. He was born in Dearborn County, February 6, I860, and 
received a common schi ■ ' His parents were Jau> and Mar- 

garet (Parker) Prichard, both of whom died when he was a mere lad, and 
he has had to look out for himself ever since. He has been truly suc- 
cessful in forming correct habits, and is an industrious, energetic young 
man. Sis years of Lis life were spent in Kansas, farming, and with that 
exception he has resided in Dearborn County. Mr. Prichard has care- 
fully saved his earnings, and his frug, 1 habits in the past Lave secured 
to him a comfortable share of the necessaries of life. 

WILLIAM PEOBASCO, president of the People's National Bank, 
Lawrenceburgh, was born ia°New Jersey in 1821. Ho remained in the 
East till 1846, when, without means or assistance, he crossed the moun- 
tains and came AY est to this county. He served an apprenticeship as 
mill-wright and for many years was engaged in the milling businoss — 
eight years at Harrison, Ohio. He subsequently went to Lawrenceburgh 
and engaged in the distillingSbusiness about four years, after which he 
began the banking business with Peter Braun, in the People's Bank, 
which was established in 1S75 and reorganized about a few years later 
as the People's National Bank. Mr. Probasco was married, in 1855, to 
Miss R. E. Morgan. 

JOHN PROBST, of the firm of Probst & Doyle, saw-milling, black- 
smithing and de; lers in all kinds of lumber, Dover, was born in Kelso 
Township, Octobei 12, 1842. His parents were the highly esteemed 
pioneers John and Julia (Heisler) Probst, natives of Germany. The 
former was a son of John G. and Margaret (Nuce) Probst, who were also 
natives of Germany, and from thence in 183o immigrated to the United 
States, landing at New Orleans; thencec: mi to ( incinnati, Ohio, and in the 



878 HISTORY OF I'l VRliORN AND OHIO OM'NTIl.s. 

same year to Dearborn County, I nil., piu'ebasing land and settling in Kelso 
Township, where they resided until death. They were the paroj i of 
four children, viz.: George, Elizabeth, Jacob and John. Tbo latter im 
migrated to the United SI in 1832, firs! settling at Cincinnati, whore, 

he learned the baker's trade which he followed a few years, and in 1 S3'.), 
came'to Dearborn County, Intl., and settled i n a pari of his father's old 
home tead. whe e he resi ! until his death. lie and Julia Heisler 
were married in Dearborn County, and here r wided during (heir lifetime. 
She died in December, 1854, and ho in March, 1S5S. Their children 
were: John, Michael. Louisa, Elizabeth, Mary. Nicholas, Catherine and 
an infant (deceased). John, our subject, when fifteen years of age, 
began as an apprentice at the blacksmith trade, which ho completed and 
engaged in for a number of years. In August, 1802, he enlisted in the 
United States service in Company II, Eighty-third Regiment Indiana 
Volunteers, was mustered in the service September 4, 1X02, and served 
as a private until June '2. 1805, when he was discharged and returned 
home; after which he went to Cincinnati, Ohio, and resumed his trade. 
In 1X00 he returned to Dover, and in partnership with John Andres, 
opened a blacks) ith and wagon-making shop which they carried on until 
1870, since which time Mr. Probst has continued the business ah mo 
until 1874, when Thomas Doyle entered a business partnership with 
him, and since which they have conducted their present business. Our 
subject was married in Franklin County, this State, April MO, L868, to 
Amelia Fender, daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth (Mettel) Fender. To 
the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Probst, one child. John E., was born. 
Mrs. Probst died March 7, 1869, and July 28, of the same year, Mr. P. 
was married i.o Elizabeth Bussard. For eight years, beginning in 1S70, 
our subject held the office of justice of the peac He is at present the 
trustee of Kelso Township. 

GEORGE C. PROBST, secretary of the Aurora Valley Furniture Com- 
pany, is a native of Ripley County, Ind., born April 19, 1859. His 
parents were Fred and Elizabeth (Weachman) Probst, of foreign birth. 
George C. received the benefits of graded schools of his native county, and 
in 1X70 he became connected with the Aurora Valley Furniture Company, 
and in 1881 he took charge of the books of the company. He is a 
young man of good business capacity, and of enterprise and public 
spirit. The history of this manufactory, with which Mr. Probst is con- 
nected, will be found among the industries of Aurora. 

DAVID G. RABB died of consumption at Maple Grove, near Ris- 
ing Sun, Ohio Co., Indiana, October 7, 1X74, aged sixty-two years 
and two months. He was born in Staunton, Va. , but moved with 
his parents to Dearborn County, Indiana, in 1810; thus having been 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 8 (V 

for half a century identified witb and actively interested in the affair? of 
this rogioi E atry. '. larlj i elve years the disease 

which evonl ;. caui made b attack on his system, in 

an aggra >vw oi ''• vhieb I d his voice as to ever 

after unfit bim for any public us of it. His early education was obtained 
from the* schools of Hardintown and Lawreuceburgh. [n 1828 be 
went to Cincinnati, spi- n. t . i . \ ears at the Cincinnati English and 
Mathematical Academy, the) under the charge of Mr. Winright, liut 
afterward known as "Woodward College." His health becoming again 
seriously impaired, he join >d the American Fur Company, and spent six 
months witb them in the Rocky Mountains and among the head- waters of 
the Missouri, gaining thus a practical knowled go of the country, which 
was of great, service to him in after year-, when a prisoner of the Con- 
federate Army. Afterward he was for a while engaged in mercantile 
pursuits in Cincinnati; then returning to the home of his father, who 
was a wagon- maker by trade, and worked with him for some months. Find- 
ing active out d needful for his health, lie made choice of 
farming for his life employment, purchased land below Laughery Creek, 
in what is now Ohio County, and with §400, obtained from his 
father, commenced clearing and farming quite an extensive tract 
of land. At the age of twenty-one he married Miss Abigail Scoggin, 
of Hamilton County, Ohio, and made his home at the Laughery 
Island farm, now owned by Mr. Thomas Pate. Here ho buried his first 
child, George, at the ago of one year, from consumption, his wife dying 
soon after from the same disease. Subsequently he marrried Miss Mar- 
garet H. Jelloy, of Rising Sun. To the last years of his life, .Mr. Rabb 
was actively engaged in extensive farming and fiat-boating, meeting 
with the vicissitudes of loss and gain incident to such pursuits, but ac- 
cumulating sufficient property to enable himself and numerous family 
to enjoy all needed advantages of education and refined society. In 
1817 he purchased and moved upon the farm known as "Maple Grove 
Farm," naturally one of the most beautiful locations for a home, on the 
Ohio River, between Cincinnati and Louisville. Here his second wife 
died from consumption, leaving six children, three of whom have since 
died from the same disease. In 1856 he married Miss Rachel A. Fitch, 
of Bedford, Massachusetts, who. with five children, survives him. Im- 
mediately on his removing to Rising Sun, by his active interest in public 
■ affairs and liberal aid to all pertaining to the religious, intellectual and 
social wants of the community , he became so influential a citizen that 
his death was indeed a public loss. For some years he was engaged in 
the dry goods business in Eising Sun, with Mr. J. H. Jones. For many 
years previous to the late war he was a member and acting officer of the 



880 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

State Board of Agriculture, often contributing to tbc columns of the 
Indiana Farmer. With all the nobler qualities of manhood the charac- 
ter of Mr. Babb abounded. A man of great benevolence— but caring not 
to rnakfc bis charities public — in him the needy always found a friend. 
He was alive to, and ready to aid materially in, all new industries which 
promised good to the public. Politically he was a Republican, and the 
same hatred of slavery which led his parents to leave Virginia manifest- 
ed itself in his early identifying himself with the anti-slavery cause, and 
the numerous colored people who gathered at his funeral to take a fare- 
well look at his form, testified to the fact, that in his death they had lost 
one of their firmest friends. His patriotism caused him ever to actively 
engage in the maintenance of his country's rights. For a time he acted 
as a scout in the Black Hawk war. During the Mexican war he raised 
a company of artillery, and received his commission as captain, but, on 
arriving at Indianapolis, the peaceful adjustment, of difficulties rendered 
their services needless, and they were disbanded. Immediately on the 
call for troops in the late war, he was ready.for action, but did not enter 
service until August 5, 1861, when he received his commission as cap- 
tain of Second Indiana Battery, and went into camp at Indianapolis. 
He was soon removed to St. Louis, attached to Gen. Fremont's staff, 
and with him made the famous hundred days' march through Missouri. 
From the hardships there endured, and subsequent exposures, he never 
fully recovered. Returning from St. Louis, where he had accompanied 
Fremont, to his command, stationed at Fort Leavenworth, Kas., he 
was, with two other officers, on November 24, taken prisoner from the 
cars at Weston, Mo., by Si. Gordon's guerrilla band. After suffer- 
ing many hardships, insults and frequent threats of death, he was 
paroled by Gen. Price, to remain within the limits of Fort Leavenworth. 
Gordon's band being dissatisfied with this, he made his escape with great 
difficulty, most of the way on foot, to the fort, his former knowledge of 
the country doing him great service. From there he was transferred to 
the camp of paroled prisoners, Camp Chase, at Columbus, Ohio, of 
which he had command four mouths. Here he received surgeon's certi- 
ficate for discharge, and arrangements were made for an oxchange with a 
rebel officer, on Kelly's Island, Lake Erie; but he having made his escape, 
it was never effected. Mr. Rabb was a member of the Presbyterian 
Church. 

JOHN E. RANDALL, farmer, Washington Township, is a native of 
Dearborn County, and was born October 1, 1828. His father, George, 
was born in Kent Count}', England, March 3, 1796. His mother was 
Rhoda (Ewbank) Randall. They were married September 2, 1827, 
and came to this county about 1S22. In early life George Randall 



BIOGRAPHICAL RKETi II 8 V '1 

preached, latterly farmed. Ho died April 22, 18G9; the mother also 
deceased. Mr. John E. Randall has lived in the county all his life, and 
followed farming and stock raising exclusively. Ho was married, Janu- 
ary 1, 1850, In Miss Anna E. Wilson, a native of the county, who was 
born March 17. 1837. There were born to them two children: Thomas E. 
and 'William J. Mrs. R. died inDecembor, 1838. Mr. Randall was hon- 
ored wit! ho offic of township treasurer, and is a member of Hartford 
Lodge No. 151, F. & A. M. Mr. Randall is a quiet and highly 
respected citizen. His course through life is truly commendabh , and 
worthy of emulation. 

MATHIAS RATZ, farmer, Kelso Township, is a native of Germany, 
born September 21, 1823. He was the youngest of two children born to 
Valentine and Matilda Ratz. Ho immigrated to Cincinnati, Ohio, in 
1846, where he was married, May 6, 1850, to Margaret Miller, and in 
1855 moved to Dearborn County. In ISG'J ho purchased and settled on 
his present farm, where he has since resided. He owns 100 acres of tine 
land, which is well improved. Their children were Margaret (deceased), 
John, Joseph, Robert, Conrad (deceased), Mathew, Annie and Nicholas. 
Mr. Ratz id family are members )f the Catholic Church. 

THOMAS RECORD, retired, Sparta Township, one of the oldest 
pioneers of Dearborn County now living, and an honorable and highly 
esteemed citizen, was born near Wilmington November 6, 1810. His 
parents were William and Margaret (Lillis) Record, natives of England 
and Ireland. The former was one of three children born to John and 
Mary Record, also natives of England. He, in an early day, immigrated 
to the Dnited States, and was married, at Philadelphia, to Mrs. Margaret 
Vaneck, wife of ('apt. Vaneek, and daughter of a Mr. Lillis, who immi- 
grated from Ireland to the United States in an early day. In about the 
year 180S Mr. Record removed to Pittsburgh, and thence in a short time 
to Cincinnati, and from there came down the Ohio River to Aurora in a 
little family boat, in company with David O. Boardman and others. 
Shortly after his arrival Mr. Record entered 100 acres of wild land, about 
one mile north of where Wiltningti i now stands, on North Hogan Creek, 
where he labored in clearing off the forests and cultivating the land, and 
resided until his death. Ho was a man of strong mind, of good general 
information, and was respected by all who knew him. They were the 
parents of Jane and Thomas Record. The latter was married, in Dear- 
born County, July 10, 1832, to Hannah M. Sanders, who was born in 
New York, October 6, 1814 Apart of Mr. Record's early life was spent 
in flat-boating on the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers. In 1835 he settled 
in Sparta Township, on what is known as King's Ridge, where he has 
since resided. His wife died September 25, 1871. Seven chillren, viz.: 



Willian 




,d), Jo! 


,!, I'. 




'.OH d)w 


>robor 


Q 10 ll 


itul 


d uuber 


Of 111. 


■ Mot! 



882 HISTOR1 n D1 VRHOliN AND OHIO COl -i 

Goorge ' ■ i ,i : I), John I'., Lemuel E. 

!: \ 

Our sabj 
copal Cb 

FREDERICK RECT M. D., physician and surgeon, Aurora, 

is a native of Germany Bavaria, May 29, 1830, where he com- 

pleted hi II ■':■■ e ci 1853. His parents, Frederick and Chris- 

tena (Peters) Rectanus, were born in Germany, the father in [813, and 
the mother in 1819; the f; bi died in Germany in IS|£7, and the mother 
resides at present in Loui ville, Ky. The Doctor came to America in 
1856 and located in St. Louis, Mo., where he clerked in a \vl 
grocery. In the spring of 1858 he moved to Louisville, Ky., where he 
read medicine with R. J. Breckenridge, Jr., surgeon of the Marine Hos- 
pital, and attended lectures at the Louisville University, graduating in 
March, 1801. Immediateb thereafter he entered the army as assistant 
surgeon of the Second Kentu y Regiment, serving in that capacity for 
four years and one month. In the spring of 1806 ho located in Aurora, 
and has been very successful in all his undertakings, and built up a very 
satisfactory and lucrative practice. Dr. Rectanus was married, December 
19, 1864, to Miss Charlotte L. Langley, anativeof this city, and who was 
born upon the premises where they now reside, in September, 1840. By 
the marriage they have raised one child, Frankli The Doctor was 
elected mayor of the city of Aurora in the spring ot , 870, and re elected 
in 1S72. He discharged the duties of the office faithfully and honestly, 
and to tho entire satisfaction of his constituents. In 1880 he was elected 
township trustee and served four years, after which he retired from the 
political field. He is a member of the Druids and Druid Chapter, I. O. 
O. F, Auror; L Ige No. 51, F. & A. M., and the G. A. R. 

DAVID REES, of Lawrenceburgh Township, was born near Chester, 
Penn., in 1706, and removed with his father's family to Berkley County, 
Va., in the year 1775. In the year 1794 he proceeded on horseback on 
a prospecting tour, with no companion but his trusty rifle. He pi '. 
through southwestern Virginia, Tennessee, Kentucky, through the Cum- 
berland Gap. to Louisville. Ky., crossing the river he proceeded through 
tho State of Indiana to Cincinnati. Ho returned to Berli ey, Va.; the 
entire route traveled was ail unbroken wilderness, inhabited by the 
Indians and wild animals. In 1804 he returned to the West and pur- 
chased the fine tract of bottom land, now owned by his descendants, and 
in the year 1807, removed to it with his family. He was a man of 
indomitable courage and energy, of that type of men of moral honesty 
and integrity, that laid the deep foundation of good goverj 
which the benefits are realized by his descendants of this day. Chari 



B10GR UMUOAL SKJ ri :' ' 883 

tabic and humane, ho po iessod the power <>r wielding an influence ' 

among his follow men, I ; I -fall. Ho died in the year 

1820, and by acts and d I bohind him a reme I at will 

survive the dosti ' time. 

REZIN Ki:!' Cownsl ip, was b in in Dear- 

born c nnty, No' ' His Cj thi r, David [tees, wasouoof the 

aarlj ettlers of the county, and is mentioned above. The family came 
originally fn m below Philadelphia, being Quakers and n !' i 
the Eevolutionaj i I a Virginia. David Rees died 

and Mrs. Rees, whose maiden name was Susana Daniel, afl 
her firs! husband, married in 1825, Joshua Sank i, and died in 1S5G. David 
Reas accumulated I perty, being a farmer and mill 

his children grew to maturity, this was divided among them, our subject 
receiving his share with the rest, a portion being the old farm on which 
he was born. He subsequently followed farming till disease compelled 
him to give up active labor. He was married in 1849, to Mari Daniel, 
daughter of John Daniel, who settled in this county in 1812, and by this 
union there was born one son, Ralph W., a young man of sterling qual- 
ities. This s< i was married in 1S7S, (o Emma Stratton, of Aurora, and 
they have two children: R. Hulmau and Loren Stratton. In his business 
enterprises, Mr. Rees has been quite successful, having accumulated a 

.comfortable fortune, though his severe affliction in the latter years of 
his life prevents him from enjoying the fruits of his early toil. 

PHILIP RENOK, of Harrison Township, was born in Germany, 
November 1, 1811, and is a son of John and Margaret (Devine) Renck, 
who immigrated to America in 1838. His father died in 1802 at eight} - 
four years of age. Philip emigrated in 1836. He was a farmer in 
the old country and has always followed that pursuit in this. He was 
married in 1830 to Elizabeth Kuhn who was born in Germany, and sailed 
for America on the same ship in which Mr. Renck came over. On arriv- 
ing in this country Mr. Renck worked one year in a Cincinnati foundry 
and one year in a tannery in the same city. He then moved to this 
township and with his brother-in-law, V. Hey, purchased SO acres of 
land, 43 of which Mr. Eenck now' owns. He has since added 4<> acres 
more, which he assigned to his son, and ,120 acres more, which is now 
owned by John Renck, of Logan Township. Mr. and Mrs. Renck have 
four children living: Mary, wife of Charles Reichenbach; Fraiu 
of John Lutz; John and Michael. Two children died in childhood. 
Mrs. Renck died in April 1884 Michael Renck, with whom his father 
now lives, was born in 1847. He grew up in this vicinity and has al- 
ways been a farmer, also operatinga steam thresher the past ten seasons. 
He was married May 27, 1873, to .Mary Schaick, daughter of Lawrei.e 



14 



:v ill' hi:\:;iMi: 



Sckaick, and tho.v hud fourehildrou: Gmma, Albert, Elizabeth ami Cl.ir.i. 
Johu diod in childhood. 

WILLIAM RICKETTS, had; Jrivor, Rising Sun, was born in 
Ohio County, August 19, 1810, sou of Shadrach and Eliza (Lambort) 
Ricketts, his parents bora and reared in I ho same county. William 
i/nw up on tin farm and followed agricultural pui nil (ill t won ty years 
of age. En May, 1808, ho began driving for the Anderson Omnibus 
Line ami in this occupation he has since continued, having boon in the 
service seventeen years. Mr. Ricketts was married April 5, 1S75, to 
Addie, daughter of Willis Griffey, and they have four children: Lulie, 
Flora, Emma and Cort. 

JOHN H. RIGG, farmer, Hogan Township, resides on Section 13 and 
owns ninety-four acres; is a nativoof Pennsylvania and was born in Phila- 
delphia, April 14, 1804. His father was born in Liverpool, Ei 
and came to America when a young man. The mother, Sarah (Howard) 
Ri fg, was born in Philadelphia. The father was a shipping merchant 
and died in 1810. The mother died in 1818. Mr. John H. Rigg came 
t" Indiana in 1814, and has lived within two miles of his present home 
over since. He was married September 27, 1820, toAzubah Rich 
She was born December 20, 1809, and they have had twelve children 
born to them, ten of whom grew to maturity. William was killed in 
battle, at Prairie Grove, Mo. Mrs. Rigg diod September 13, 1863, 
and Mr. Rigg remarried March 19, 1804, Miss Frances Herbert, born in 
Loudon County, Va. , December 30, 1811, daughter of John Herbert, who 
came from Wales when quite young and settled in Virginia. He was in 
the war of 1812. Mr. Rigg has twenty-four grand children, and six- 
teen great-grandchildren, scattered over the West and South. He never 
was sworn as a witness, nor was ho ever on a regular jury. Has farmed 
all his life. He cleared his farm with his own ax, and has led a quiet, 
ind istrious life, li^ has been a membor of the Baptist Church for over 
forty years. His estimable wife belongs to the same society. Ho is a 
member of Wilmington Lodge No. 158, F. & A. M. 

EPHRAIM ROBBINS, of Ohio County, died in the vicinity of Ris- 
ing Sun, Juno 16, 1844, aged eighty-four years. He was a native of 
Connecticut, and a soldier in the Revolution. He was engaged in several 
skirmishes and was wounded in one in Rhode Island. He was an exem- 
plary man in all his conduct through life, and has been a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church for the last fifty two years. He was buried 
with the honors of war, the funeral procession boingvery large, attended 
by some 600 or 700 persons. 

JUDGE OMAR F. ROBERTS, attorney at law, Aurora, was born 
in Manchester Township. Dearborn Count; . June 17, 1834, son of Rev. 



;i:.\i-ilif.',i. sk 



19 



Daniel and Abigail (Goodwin) Roberts, both natives of Durham, Me. 
Vinson B lfiitb< r of Judge lb herb . vvu nm ol Lbo [>ion< er 

settlers of the town of Durham, Me., and • « m d and cultivated a farm 
one milo west of Durham's Corners. Rev. D 

in the' war of 1812, and served at Tori land, Me Hoc 0W1 tin IMS, 

and in 1820 settb ester, Deal 

the most eloquent and useful of the ministers of 11"' Christian 
Church in the West, and during his long continued labors, organ 
ized over 200 churches, and baptized 14. ward of 2,000 converts. 
Omar F. was brought up on a farm, win re be attended the a 
schools and at the ago of eighteen entered the Lawrenceburgb [1 
where he remained three years. When twenty years of age ! 
menced the study of law in the office of Holman & Haynes. He there 
continued two years, when be entered the law department of the uni- 
versity at Bloomington, where he graduab 1, and was admitted to the bar 
at Lawrenceburgb — March, 1S57. He commenced the practice of law 
at Versailles, but in December, 1859, opened an office in Aurora. In 
L860 he was elected a representative in the Legislature and was re-elect- 
ed in 1862. In 1865 be was elected in anticipation of a called session 
of the Legislature, to fill an unexpired term in the house. In 1873 he 
was appointed by Gov. Hendricks judge of the .Seventh Circuit, and in 
October of the same year was elected to the same office, and served six 
years from the date of bis commission, October 21, 1ST:!. In May, 1876, 
he was a delegate in the National Democratic Convention at St. Louis. 
During the civil war Judge Roberts was a war Democrat, andintro 
into the Legislature a joint resolution tendering to the General Govt 1- 
ment all the aid necessary both in men and means to put down the Rol i 
lion, which was unanimously adopted. In the Legislature he advocated 
the removal of restrictions upon the admission of testimony in courts of 
justice, and as a judge his most prominent characteristic was his dislike 
of legal technicalities which would tend to defeat the ends of justice. 
Judge Roberts, after a long struggle with poverty and ill health, has 
reached an honorable position in his profession. On Christmas day, L800, 
he was married to Miss Eliza J. Elden; she died July 23, 1870. He 
again married, bis second wife being Miss Mary Mel ferny, of Aurora. 

GEORGE M. ROBERTS, attorney, Lawrenceburgh, is one of the 
leading members of the Dearborn County bar. He is a native of Ripley 
County, Ind. , and was bom in 1843. His boyhood was spent in his na- 
tive county and his youth in Illinois. He was educated at Knox Col- 
lege, Galesburg, 111., and studied law at the Albany Law School in New 
York, graduating from the same in 1865, in which year he began 
practice at Omaha, Neb., where he continued the same with creditable 



'- U IIISTOKY OK Dr.AIiliOUN AM' i U I'IKS 

; July, 1 ■ •' I I ivor of thocity. 

From M.\ \ Oel : •. ISIH, be served in tin 

lieutenant of Coin] One Hundred aud Thirty seventh Cllit: \ > I 
,. In 1870 he located in Lawrenceburgb, wh >re bo bas 
sinco cond ■ ■ ' ative pracl a h 

in 1S79 v.; - i lei i - I mayor of tbal city, serving till 1SSD. He has taken 
an act i vo iub rosl in tbe businos ■ nrogre -- of 1 raw rone 'burgh, and In 'Ids 
stock in both the Miami Valloj Furuituro Facton aud tbe Ohio Valley 
Coffin Fad ry, a director in tbe mat oi tbe latter. In 18S0 

Ur. Ri ' erl inarri' I Kate Harding, daughter of Willi; 
Cincinnati, and they have one - Frank. 

GEORGE EOBEItTSO: ,< ivas born in Frederick County 

Md., December 8, 1800, His father died, leaving him an infant, to be 
reared by an i unt. His mother, of Irish descent, married Samuel Right, 
a Kentuckia i, and moved to Dearborn County, after spending ■ 
in Ohio and Kentucky. Mr. R to manhood in Canton, Ohio, 

and there married Nancy McBee in 1821. He resided in Starke County 
about sixteen years engaged in Bhoe-making. In 1837 he moved with 
his family, to Dearborn County and located in Yorkville, where he re- 
sided till 18D3, when he sold oul his inti a sts in that village and moved 
to Guilford. There he conducted a country store and officiated as post- 
master till age compelled him to retire from active servico, and he turned 
the business over to his son,Clemenl W. By bis fir: I wife Mr. Robertson 
had eight children, four of whom died in childhood. By his second 
wife, Phcebe Tit ker nee Brower, to whom he was married in 1838, ti n 
children wore born, seven still living: Clement W., Mary J. (wife of 
William Lazen by), Elizabeth Ann (wife of JohnN. Brooks), Charles I)., 
Harriot A., Alvin B. and Harry B. Mrs. Robertson was horn in New 
York in 1815 and came to Dearborn County about three years later with 
her parents, Abraham and Elizabeth Brower,who settled on York Ridge. 
Mr. Robertson is now in his eighty-sixth year, and the shadow which 
lengthens in the setting sun of life is stretching into the Beyond. He 
has always been an earnesl Republican, and, with his aged wife, is a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

CLEMENT W. ROBERTSON, merchant. Guilford, was bom in 
Dearborn County in ISMS, aud is a sou of Georgo Robertson, who 
is referred to above. He grew to maturity in the locality in which he 
now resides, and his early years were spent in day labor and as cb I; in 
his father's store. In I860 he emigrated South and b ti I ai lashville ] 
Tonn., from which point he was employed as sleeping car conductor on 
different routes through the Southern Slat.-,. In 1SG8 he returned to 
Dearbi am County and engaged in (he mo va utile bu ini - at Guilford, and 



;iih;i; \r 



x | 



this ho hag since co acted with fair Mice-- . In February, 1SS4, Henry 
HuJ lloston was admitl id ;i a partner in i ! business, and the firm has 
since been known as Robert . Hue! on. They carry a stock of 

g< lioral merchandise val 10 oi • country 

ti to. Mr. R. was married in 1 SO L to : H. Mulliner, a native of 

New York, daughter of John Mulliner, and the; have two children '• 
13. and Charles H. Mrs. Robertson's par. nl svero natives of New Yuri: 
City, her mother's namo Si; an Bostwick, and they wore of Scotch anil 
Wolsb anceshy, respectively. Her father was a farmer and owned the 
land on which the city of Rochester is built. He is said 1" have sold 
the first lot from tho tract for buildin ; p | Ho died in 1842, his 

wife surviving till December 25, 1879. They reared a family of sis 
children, four of whom are still living. Mrs. P. J. Tibbets, Mrs. Har- 
riet Fuller, John R., Miss Maria Mulliner and Mrs. Robertson. Mr. 
Robert on is a member of the Masonic fraternity, a genial business man 
and a good citizen. 

LeROY ROBERTS, tinner, Dillsborough, was bom at Lawrence- 
burgh, Dearborn Co., Ind., March 8, 1811. lie was one of four children 
born to John and Rachel (Ricketts) Roberts, natives of this State. Tho 
former was a sou of Aaron and Matilda Roberts, who settled in Dear- 
born County, in a very early day, and from hore moved to Ashland County, 
Ohio, where they resided the remainder of their lives. They were tho 
parents of seven children, viz. : Ezekiel, Lewis, Sarah, Hannah, Harvey, 
Amanda and John. The latter was born near Guilford, Dearborn County, 
this State, December 12, 1816, and moved with his parents to Ashland 
County, Chio, and when about eighteen years of age ho went to Ashland 
and began as an apprentice at the tinners' trade, which he completed, and 
subsequently followed the greater part of his life. He returned to 
Dearborn County and resumed his trade at Lawrenceburgh, and was 
there married, August 20, 1840, to Rachel Ricketts, a native of Switzer- 
land County, this State, where she was born, May 20, 1823. In 1847 Mr. 
Roberts moved to Batavia, Ohio, where he worked at his trade until 1850, 
then removed to Aurora, where his wife died December 29, 1851. 
He was married, August 4, 1853, to Deliah Ricketts, an aunt of his first 
wife. In 1856 he moved to Dillsborough, when' he opened a tin 
shop, and in 1867 he removed to Friendship, and there died October 
15, 1878. His children were Harvey, LeRoy, Buena A', and an infant 
daughter. Our subject learned tho tinner's trade with his father, and has 
been engaged in the business the greater part of his life. In August, 1S6L 
he enlisted in Company F, Thirty seventh Regiment Indiana Volunteers 
as a private, and served until October 27, 1864, at which time ho was 
dischai ;ed and returned to Dillsborough, where he resumed his trade, 



8S8 ' l i'i :■ ' ' ' DUN VNU l 

ami in ',:■ I SOT, he ' .., i >, \\ hicli ho has i 

chicled. : fried 01 ber 24. - tleleu, 

daughter V er. She wa: born in 

Scotland, [u March, I! <i h and William 13. Suits purchased the Dills- 
borough 8 di inga largo and exten- 
sive busin« He has Lad born to him four children, viz.: John L., 
George ■ eel ' u 0. B. 

HANNA s T IAH ROLLIKS, of Ohio County, a soldier of the Revolu- 
tionary wi l", died iii U mdolpL Cownahi] ■;. 1880, aged i 
five year . Littlo is tin the de :ea; ed until his 
sixteenth; triotic M freedom, he entered the 
Revolution: iry army in the ''Jersey line,'' i i tly afterward at- 
tached to tii" music as a lifer. This was about 1777. He was promoted 
to fife-major, and served his country faithfully to the end of t] 
partaliing i privations and hardships of the army during the 
struggle for independence, and was at the surrender of Cornwallis at 
Yorktown. At the end of the war he retired t< private life as an hum- 
ble citizen of that republic which ho assist, 1 ej establish. His charac- 
ter was that of an honest man and a patriot, universally beloved by all 
who knew him. His patriotism nevor failed him, and although : : 
ernment made ample provision, by which; > recen d a pen- 
sion, he refused to make application for thai I] debt of gratitude un- 
til at a very late di te, and then he yielded to the ur. ent solicitations of 
his friends and neighbors. He was a zeal . of the Baptist 
Church. "The church has lo lament one of its fathers ; his neighbors 
have to lament a good counselor and kind friend, and all lament him as 
a friend to liberty." 

WILLIAM M. ROWLAJN D, merchant, Dillsborongh, was born in Clay 
Township, Dearborn County. September 10, 1843. His parents, John P. 
and Sarah R. (McComas) Rowland, were natives of Ohio. The former 
was a son of Philip and Rebecca (Perlee) Rowland, natives of New 
Jersey, who removed to Hamilton County. Ohio, in an early day, 
where they were married and resided until the year 1821, at which 
time they moved to Dearborn County, where they resided the 
remainder of their lives. They were the parents of Mary A., John 
P., Martha, Sarah, Peter, Perlee, Rebecca, Elizabeth and Lucretia. 
John P. was born in Hamilton County, Ohio. March 24, 1810, and came 
with his parents to this county in 1821, where he and Sarah 11., daugh- 
ter of Daniel and Susanna (Justis) McComas were married June 20, I 839. 
.She was born in Pickaway County. Ohio, April 20, 1819. Her par 
moved to Dearborn County in 1822. After Mr. Rowland's marriage he 
settled in this township, where he resided until 1804, in which 



ATI! 



88U 



n Comity, 111., wl His wife 

I ,. : (j r J □ wore Jane E., Mary F., William 

M., Su Philip M., Alice 11., Lucy I'., Luen tia E. 

and Alancin C. Oiu i i ought up a farmer until his sixteenth 

year, at i c to ;an the blai 

tri cli ,. .. : : Perloc En .. whii h ' until the breaking 

out of the war. September 'JO. 1SG1, hi enli ted in Coinps nj F, Thirtj - 
seventh Regiment Indiana Voh i m private, in whii 

i atcd iii all the bat tl i aits of the 

command until the battle of Stone River, December 31, 1S02, in which 
battle he was wounded by a musket ball, which •• ' ii his left 

arm, thereby ca am] ation of the arm close to the shoulder. Ho 

was disc after which ho returned to Dei 

County. Being disqualified for following his trade or any other man- 
ual labor, be prepared ■ himself for school teaching, attending first a pre- 
paratory school at tii He thou attended Moore's 
Hill College, and on moving to Hancock County, 111., with his parents, 
he completed his education in the graded schools of Augusta, that State. 
He then taught school, and in 1867 returned to Dearborn Count), 
where he was employed in teaching. July 18, 1867, he was married to 
Josephine, daughter of Samuel and Orpha (Courtney ) Martin. She was 
born in Ohio County, Octol I 23, 1848. Shortly after his mar- 
riage he removed to Hancock County, 111., where he taught one term of 
school, and in 1S6S removed to Dearborn County again, where he i 
his profession. In J; uary, 1871, he purchased the drug store of Jo- 
seph Easier, at Dillsh igh, which business he carried on until 1 883, when 
he sold out, and in November, 1884, opened a general merchaudi: 
in the same village, in which business he is now engaged, and has an 
extei ive trade. He also owns a tine farm in Clay Township, which he 
purchased in 1870. Mr. Rowland was appointed postmaster of Dills- 
borough in September, 1871, which office he held until July, 1883, when 
he resigned. He assessed Clay Township in 1870-71. He is a good 
citizen, and is highly esteemed by the community. He is a member of 
the I. O. O. F. and the G. A. R., and of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 
The children of Mr. and Mrs. Rowland are Walter M., Frank W., Ber- 
tie S. and Horace W. 

FREDERICK W. RTJHLMAN, farmer, Clay Township, was born 
in Germany in April, 18:33. and in 1841 immigrated with his parents, 
Barnet and Ella Ruhlman, to the United States, and located in Dear- 
born County, this State, where he has since resided. January 8, 1857, 
he was married to Katie Bahma and settled on the farm where he now 
resides. To the marriage have been born Minnie, Elizabeth, Mary 



890 Ill.STOl II N VXD OHIO I i 

John an 1 Am Flio hers of the Lutheran Church. 

Mr. II. owns n fan i of I"" aero of w< II imj roved land. 

AMER W. RUMSEY, far. 
I ' I '.'••' iiiuiiirv 1G, 18 10; i- .•■ son i if Joli n and : ! 

I i ; native of Wales and she of 
daughter of / C of the fr. John ] 

came to America p I;', his father, W; ; Itn iy, I ttled in Deal 
bum County, on ! 

Watkin Rumsey died. John Rumsey, who was b 
when (li led 1 - to I. full 

life; married Miss Bruce and settled on land in Section 8, 
wh ■ e his Ei th i si tiled, and there he resided through life. He o] ned 
out his farm from the le goo I iniproven I I anie the 

owner of between 500 and 000 acres of land, beside considerable 
land in Iowa and Kansas. Starting out in life a poor uiau, 
by his own industry, energy ' ■ 

land-holder, and died possessed of an ample competency. He dii 
ruary 11, 1^7' ; . t; years, and his remains now rest in Hogan 

Hill Cemetery. His wife still survives and resid the! - place, 

now aged seventy years. They had ten children, C o now living: Cath- 
arine, Amer, Susan. John and George J''., all residents of this township. 
Amer Rumsey was married Februar; I! I! i Rhoda F. Ell 

February 13, 1844, daughter of David and Lavina Ellis, he a native of 
Maine and she of New York, bi -oming settlers of Dearborn County 
aboutl829. Mr. Ellis was twice married and was the father of fourteen 
children, seven now living: Catharine, Benjamin (now living in Ne- 
braska), Margaret, Abby, Rhoda, [da i Ld lella. By this union (Mr. 
Rumsey has three children: Lillie A., Hattie and Frank Floyd. In 
1864 Mr. Rumsey purchased and. located upon tlm place where he now 
resides. The farm consists of 125 acres of land, with good improve- 
ments. He and wife are members of the Christian Union Church, with 
wl u they have been identifii d for twenty years. 

JOHN W. RUMSEY, farmer, Manchester Township, is a son of John 
and Rosanna Rumsey. whose histor given in 

sketch of Amer Rumsey. The stibjeel of (Lis sketch was born on tl i 
old Rumsey piece, in Manchester Township, Januan 10, I 
to manhood, b night up to labor on his father's farm; was married De 
ceniber 21, 18TG to Arminda J. Shutor, daughter of Benry and Sophia 
Shuter, whose history appears in the sketch of Henry Shutor. B} this 
marriage Mr. Rumsey had one child, Alma P., born February 1, 1879. 
Mrs. Rurnsey died March 13, 1879. in the twenty-fifth yi 
and her remains rest in the '■ . ; r 5, IS82, Mr. 



ii : i vi k i-: n 



Slil 



Rumsey married for his i cond wife Miss Man- D. Walser, born I 
ber ::i", 185'.), daughter of Denjamin and Amanda (Jackson) Walser, 
natives of !>■ u C His father, James W. Walser, settled in 

this county, on Hogan Cro k, in 1812, one of the true pioneers. Benja 
min Walser b; I ' iago had six children, four now living: 

Charles L., Mary D., Ann;, I. and \merieus D. Mrs. Walser died in 
1865. In 1860 Mr. Walser married for his second wife, Anna M. Case, 
daughter of Geo ■■ W < By her he has one child, Nancy W. Mr. 

Rnmsey by thi marri . ■ In : one child. Florence A., born September 14, 
1883. Mr. i: I i d a resident of Manchester 

Township, and made farming his occupation. He located upon his 
present place in 1877, where he has n good farm of ninety acres, with 
good improvements. He is a member of the Christian Union Church, 
and his wife of the Methodist Church. 

FRED H. RUSHER, saloonist, Aurora, was bom in Germany, 
March 6, 1846. His parents, John and Louisa Rusher, were born in 
Germany, and came to America in IS 17, locating in New Orleans, thence 
to Cincinnati. Ohio, where the father died in 1847. The fathi was a 
tombstone cutter. His mother and family moved to Dearborn County in 
185S, where they followed farming. Fred H. enlisted in 1803 under 
Dele Brown in Company G, One Hundred and Twenty third Indiana 
Regiment and served twenty-three months. During his term of service. 
he contracted the rheumatism and heart disease, which have ever since 
been an annoyance to him. Ho was discharged with his regiment. Mr. 
Rusher was married October 1, 1874, to Miss Mary A. Tibbetts, who was 
born in Dillsbon ugh, October 3, 1852. By the union four children 
have been born: Jellett, Maggie, Arthur and Fred. Our subject fol- 
lowed contracting as carpenter and builder up to the time of engaging 
in his present business. He is a member of the G. A. R. and K. of 1'. 
lodges. 

JOHN H. RUSSE, deputy cleric, Lawrenceburgh, was born at Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio. July 14, 1849. His education was acquired by attend- 
ance at the public schools of Cincinnati, Ohio, until the age of fourteen, 
when he was forced to battle with the world in the great struggle for a 
livelihood. He learned the business of cigar-making and followed the 
trade for twelve years or longer through its various branches, and for a 
year or more was engaged in the leaf tobacco trade. In September. 1S68, 
came to Lawrenceburgh. July 14, 1870, he was married to .Marx- 
Eliza Ransom, of Lawrenceburgh, Ind., and two children, a boy and a 
girl, are the results of said union: John and Mary J. In October. 1S78, 
he was appointed deputy clerk of Dearborn Circuit Com I \\ Inch ] 
he still occupies. He was admitted to the bar of Dearborn Circuit Court 



892 iNi> Ohio n> 

in L879. lie is a very pro niu ml he K. o 

F. II. SALE, M. I' , | ugh, Ind., is ;i 

0\i Co ty, Ivy., born Ma\ I r, I82S. His parents were 

:.. i ! al s ui lives of Virginia and 

of Robert Sale, a native of 
, Robert and Jane Sale were ni lives of Wales 
and Holland, j i hey immigrated i i th I dted 

a verj early day, settling in Virginia, where tli afterw: i re ided until 

in Virginia to Jennie Hoard, 
and in L7D3 iinmigrati County, Kj-., and from thence, in 1812, 

ward resided until his death. They 
ats of six children, viz.: Elizabeth, Lucy, William. James 
H., Gincie, and Fleetwood Sale was bom in Culpepper 

Count,, Va., March 5, 1793. When about three months old his ; 
moved to Kentucky, where ho was brought up as a farmer. He enlisted 
at the breaking out of the war of ltS 1 12 and served during the entire war 
under Col. Hai li . married, in 1817, to Elizabeth T. Elliston, 

who was born in Owen County, Ky., January 1, L801, and was one of 
eight children born to John and Nai Uliston, natives of Vir- 

ginia, and who immigrated to Kentucky in 1793. After Mr. Sale 
riage ho settled in Owen County, where he owned an extensive plantation, 
and remained until 1832, in which year he moved to Gallatin County, 
and while on a visit in Dearborn County, died November 23, 1854. His 
widow still survives. Their children were Jai .• H., Allen, Susan A., 
Eliza, Fleetwood H., Lucy H., Artamissa L. , Emma G. , Robert W. and 
James H. Dr. F. II. Sale was educated al Warsaw, Ky., and in 1844 
began reading medicine with a Dr. McClure of that place, under whose 
instructions he remained until 1849, at which time he attended lectin'. -, 
at the Louisville University, and in the spring of 18o0 ..he located at 
Wilmington, Ind., where he began the practice of his profession. In the 
following July he located at Elrod, Ind., where ho was married, May 15, 
1851, to Mary C, daughter of James G. H. and Eli/a (Pool) Morrison. 
She was born at Cincinnati, Ohio. October 5, 1837. In February, L854, 
Dr. Sale moved to Dillsborough, where he resumed his practice, and has 
since resided. 1 1 i s- wife died March 5, L856, leaving one child, Alice M. 
In the winter of 185G-57, he attended the Ohio Medical College, of 
Cincinnati, graduating in February of the latter year. He was married, 
November 28, 1857, to Mary V. Johnson, of Ripley, Ohio, a daughter of 
Marion and Mary (Osborn) Johnson. Dr. Sale is a highly e 
citizen, and is regarded as a reliable physician and surgeon. lb- was 
in the United States service as an assistant surgeon from April, 



892 II KY OF DIIAIU I I U II ' 1'IKS. 

in 1879. II.' is awry promim ul mi u I ei !'. hi thi • SI i 

for t\ o yeai last ] ,.,.,,,. (} ran | i„„i . 

F. 11. SALE, M. I> . : » ;h, [ml., 

born May 17, I : ■:' ■. I [is parents were 
Ja oes I I Lou) Sal >, u; th uia and 

Kontuc 1 y, r of Hi bei I Sale, a m 

Vh'ginia, bo I ; • ■ ; were natives of Wales 

and Hoi I Tbey immigrated to the United St; 

a voi-} earl} day, settling in Virginia, where they afterward residod until 
their deaths. Rol nai icd in Vii ;iuia to Jennie Hoard, 

and in 1793 iinmigrati County, Ky., and from thence, in 1812, 

to Owen County, Ky., where be afterward re ided until his death. They 

ents of six children, viz. : Elizabeth, Lucy, William, Jam 
H., Gim '•. James H. Sale was born in Culpepper 

County, Ya., March 5, 1793. When about three mouths old his parents 
moved to Kentucky, where hu was brought up as a farmer. He enlisted 
at the breaking out of the war of 1812 and served during the entire war 
under Col. Hamilton. He was married, in t S IT, to Elizabeth T. Elliston, 
who was born in Owen County, Ky., January 1, 1801, and was one of 
eight children born to John and Nancy (Sneed) Elliston, natives of Vir- 
ginia, and who immigrated to Kentucky in 1793. After Mr. Sale's m r- 
riage he settled in Owen County, where be owned an extensive plantation, 
and remained until 18o'_ ; , in which year he moved to Gallatin County, 
and while on a visit in Dearborn County, died November 23, 1854. His 
widow still survives. Their children were Jane 11., Allen, Susan A., 
Eliza, Fleetwood H., Lucy II, Artamissa L., Emma G., Robert W. and 
James H. Dr. F. II. Sale was educated at 'Warsaw, Ky. , and in 1844 
began reading medicine with a Dr. McCluve of that place, under whose 
instructions he remained until 1849, at which time he attended lecture ■ 
at the Louisville University, and in the spring of '1850 4 he located at 
Wilmington, Ind., where he began the practice of his profession. In the 
following July he located at Elrod, Ind., where he was married. May 15, 
1851, to Mary C. , daughter of James G. H. and Eliza (Pool I Morrison. 
She was born at Cincinnati, Ohio, October 5, 1837. In February, 1854, 
Dr. Sale moved to Dillsborough, where he resumed his practice, and has 
since resided. His wife died March 5, L856, leaving one child, Alice M. 
In the winter of 1850-57, he attended the Ohio Medical Colli of 
Cincinnati, graduating in February of the latter year. He was married, 
November 28, 1857, to Mary V. Johnson, of Ripley, Ohio, a daughter of 
Marion and Mary (Osborn) Johnson. Dr. Sale is a highly e: 
citizen, and is regarded as a reliable physician and surgeon. He was 
in the United States service as an assistant surgeon from April, 



jll,i tb 


officii 


•ill pros 


idont of 


ing Co 


pany. 


Ho w 


'as born 


roforeno 


w lift; 




■nrs of a 



nntil March, 1804, when ho rosigu I; but in November, 1804, be 
turned and served until Juno, I! 05. 

CONRAD SANDEI! 
Lawrem I ;b Furniture Mmufacti 

II;:. , i >r, v rmauy, in 1833, and is il 
He grew (o maturity, and was educated in his native count y, where he 
also learned the trade of a tailor, in which occupation he was engaged 
till after his I to the United States in 1853. On reaching 

tiiis country he located in the city of Cincinnati, where for four ; 
followed the fortunes of the tail >riu ' ■■■■■ in , Etor vhich he le 
the art of scroll sawing, which ho continm '1 a: ii busine til] 1800 
he came I i Lav r< a< eburgh. In 1801 he enlisted in the service of the 
Government, and served faithfully till 1804, participating in some of the 
heaviest battles of the war, am. my which wore that of Mnmfordsville, 
Murfreesboro and others. He was a member of Company D, Thirty- 
second Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and did efficient service 
till he was taken prisoner at the battle of Murfreesboro, and confined in 
Libby prison, from which, after two weeks, he was liberated on parole 
and not returned to active service. On his return to Lawrenceburg, Mr. 
Sander began work in the furniture factory of E. B. Dobell, with whom 
he was engaged till 1S09, when he purchased stock in the establishment 
with which hehas sine,- been connected. In 1871 ho was chosen president 
of the company, and this position he has since held, having served two 
years previous a secretary of the same. Mr. Sander was married, in 
1859, to Phillipena Scholly, a native of Germany and resilient of Cin- 
cinnati. Five children have been born to them, viz. : Lena, Henry, 
Joseph, Louie and Herman. Mr. Sander is a member of the G. A. R., 
and one of the live, energetic business men of the city. 

THOMAS JEREMIAH SAR( ENT, Aurora, whose parents were of 
English birth, was born in eastern Pennsylvania, in 1741, and when 
America's great struggle for liberty began, he fell into the ranks under 
Gen. "Washington, and served through the entire war; was severely wounded 
in the battle of Brandywine, but recovered, however, and was, at the 
close of the war, united in wedlock with Miss Armadilla Enochs, of 
Pennsylvania, in which State they resided until their removal to the old 
fort in Virginia, near v.-li re the present city of Parkersburg is now situ- 
ated in Wood County, W. Va. . and cultivated the laud on which, that 
city is built. \lo helped to build the block-house at Marietta, Ohio, and 
built the first log house at the mouth of the Licking River; spent the 
remainder of his life in what is now "Wood County, W. Va,, farming. 
He died at the advanced aye of ninety-nine, his wife having departed 
this life August, 1824. They were the parents of ten children. The 



fourth child, Ik-i 


i-j Enoo 


1789. Ho. like 


lis Lath 


Mary Steele Ji 


■ 15, 18 


.Iron: Abraham 1 


Inoch, L 



UUJOKN AM) OHIO COIJNTIKS. 

was born in LVnnsylvy 
: a farmer t.brou ;b life; wa m; rried to 
md to them were horn the following chil- 
li Hamilton, David [I ' itzallou, 
John Brown, William Henry, J ph b\, Th as Tavenor, M.irj Eliza- 
beth, George K ckhold and Lucinda M. Oscar !•'. died at Mow Orleans; 
John B., died at Sao [arch 19, 1851; William It., died 
.May 10, ISIS, Joseph IT., died in Wood County, W. \'a., in 1838; Mary 
E., the eldest sister, and a bright : .1 promising girl, was, after a short 
illness, called to that far away home, May 11, 1850, while nearing the 
close of her schooldaj Femal i, Ohio; 
Lucinda M. an, 1 . George It. died .it the homo of their father, Pleasant 
View, Jackson Co., W. Va., the latter, who served in the late war, never 
having recovered from cold contracted in the army. Henry Enoch Sar- 
gent, who was three times married, di 1 at the residence of his sou Li in 
uel, Walnut Hills, Cincinnati, after several months of painful illness. The 
first wife and mother, Man (Steele) Sargent, departed thii life Decern 
ber 31, 1837. The second, nee Miss Eliza Barnes, died at Pleasant View, 
W. Va. The third still survives. But four of this large family nov 
remain: Judge T. T. Sargent, of Hutchinson, Minn.; Rev. David 
H. Sargent, of Lebanon, Ohio; Lemuel H, Sargent, formerly of 
Cincinnati, and Abram E. Sargent, the eldest son, who was born 
July 10, 1814. He grew to manhood on the farm of ins father, 
in Jackson County, W. Va., assisting in all labor common to this partic- 
ular occupation, obtaining his education from the common sch - 1 of 
that day. Being full of energy, and having a desire for a change in 
business, removed to Kanawha County, where he engaged in the mercan- 
tile business for a number of years, also figured extensively in the salt 
business of that day, being employed for a number of months locating 
wells in the State of Michigan, also engaged in steam floating in connec- 
tion with this business, until the purchase of the foundry and machine 
shops at Salines, Va., now .Maiden, W. Va., where he manufactured until 
the year 1853, when he removed to Mason County, W. Va., and pur- 
chased the foundry at We Columbia, and engaged in this and the coal 
business until 1874, when the entire structure, with all of its valuable 
contents, was destroyed by fire. The iron business of the Ohio Valley 
being depressed at this time, and Mr. S. being well advanced in years, 
never rebuilt, but continued in the coal business; was also postmaster at 
West Columbia one term, having resigned to remove to his present home 
in Aurora. U>ram E. Sargent and Amelia Fiances Payne, were married 
at Salines, Kanawha Co., W. Va., January 17, 1813, and they were the 
parents of the following children: William Henry, Mary Dillon, John 





[I lI, SKI 


n in". 




* 


!95 






10, Francos. ( 


:.. ,!■,, 


>, Abrah 


■ ". 


V 


nsed), Til 


Oman Walter, 


Lnci. 


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ine 




gent was 1 


.orn April ' . 


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in Sbou 


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and I,!;: 


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I p 

(decfl 

and Am 

d ly, Va., i 

Payne, I 

MeDaniel, ■■■ . re marrio i !ity, W. Va . Vpril 3, [S07, and the 

names rs: Lemuel II.. bin 1'.. Blancbe and 

William. M '. < I in ; in the South, where 

I * al tbe old home in 

Mason City, \V. Va. H tho "II e Bonbam" and "L. If. Sar- 

gent" an nil bury and Davis Bend. Mary Dillon, 

the eldi . ' n ; : . er, and Barnard, of Maryland, wero married 

June IT. 1ST), and now reside al Westerville, Obio, tbe names of their 
children being Lawrence L. ai 1 ! rnest S. Thomas W.,tbe youngest son 
left scb ' i of id I several ye engaged witb 

bis father irj the i^vl lar-.o -.. In 1N77 he located in Aurora, a id began 
doing business for himself. He commenced in a limited way, but by 
industry and on I V ■' ' ; ' '■• ive business in the coal 

line, and also deals largely in i alt,his sales reaching annually to upward 
of 300,000 bushels of coal and 200,000 barrels of salt. Sine. 18S0, in 
connection with his trade at Aurora, he has had branches at Ghent and 
at Warsaw, Ky. 

JAMES SATEE, Harrison Town: hip, an enterprising young farmer, 
was born in Hamilton Comity. Ohio, in 1S5G. He is a son of Thomas 
and Mary (Pottinger) Sab ■, both natives of (be same county; his father, 
a farmer, and still living, his mother is deceased. Mr. Safer g ,. I 
maturity in his native county, and was educated in the common schools, 
subsequently spending three years af the Ohio Wesleyan University. He 
was married, in 1878, to Elizabeth Crocker, of Des Moines County, Iowa, 
and in the same year began business on the farm, where he has resided 
ever since, engaged in agricultural pursuits. He has three children: 
Arthur, Ma^ and Francis. He owns with his grandmother 355 acres of 
good land, is a Democrat, and takes a lively interest in local politics. 

WILLIAM SAWDON, farmer, Washington Township. Prominent 
among the names worthy of honorable mention, is that of William 
Sawdou, .■' native of i r o land, born December 24, 1811. His 

parents. William and Martha (Boddy) Sawdon, were natives i f Engl 
father born March 21, 1780. On account of his mother's poor health, 
his parents started for America, but in June, 1830, while on the voyage, 
she died, and was buried in the bosom of the ocean. The father located 
in Dearborn County in 11 i i; rried Mi - Mary Liddle, a I 

born October 10, 1S07. He farmed all bis life, and died Nov mb 21 



8% HISTORY i ; I1SS. 

LS70. Mr. \\ illiam Sawdon , no > n will, an nnclo, who 

raised, and educated lie know I.ul little of lii p .1 

learned th< sho ' < 1 came to Dearborn 

County : : I of 183-2 i nd lias o comity i 

He was married, Mar, h 1, II 35, I i Hani . 

Robi rt i ■'. ■ Hi fath r die usl IS. LS35, in Lis 

(ifty-ninth year; lier i ! . \. ml ■ r ! . i Brio, ag 

years. Mr and eight cl mas EL, Robe i 

C., Sarah J., Martha A., Marj E., George W., [Tattle E. and Emma H 

Mrs. Sawdoi pril 27,1815, b :.. 

I December '2'.', 1874 Mr. Sawcl n I U rcb 20, 1870, 

Mrs. Eliza Ann Shoup, who was born near ' July 15, 1826, 

and had by her first marriage three chil Edward, Thomas and 

Janus. Mr. Sawdon was a justice for eight years, also townshi] 

tee for a period. He is a member of Plea ant View Grange No. 237. 

He and his wife belong to M ipal Church, of 

which he was steward for twenty years, and i leadei al present. He 

has always been a friend to any public improvement, and ever willing to 

exl d the hand of charity in , '■ His life has been one that 

is well worthy of emulation. Bis son, George, was a member of Col. 

Lucas' regiment in the late war. 

GEORGE SCHABEL, tinner, Moore's Hill, Ind., was born in Wur- 
temberg, Go; nany, March 26, 1836. His parents, 'John E, and Elizab >th 
(Gabler) Schabel, were natives of Germany, where the} resided during 
their entire lives, the Eormor born in 1804, the latter in 1809. Their 
children were^Jol E., Mary, George and Charlie T. The father died 
in 18-10, and the mother subsequently married Lewis Schweble, by 
whom she had one child, Lewis. George, our subject, learned the tin- 
ner's trade in Germany when quite a small boy, and has since engaged 
in the same. In 1854 he immigrated to the United States, landing at 
New York City, and from thence came immediately to Cincinnati, where 
he worked at his trade until 1856, at which time he came to Lawrence- 
burg. He was there united in marrii 22, 1851), to Margaret 
Strattner, a daughter i f,Ge irge M. and Eli I i Strattner. She was 
born in Germany, March 30, 1843. In 1860 Mr. Schabel located in 
Moore's Hill and opened ' : ' presenl busines . which he has since pur- 
sued, and is doing an extensive business. i ; <' has seven children, 
namely: Mary M., Elizabeth, .Margaret, Caroline, Charles G., Clara J. 
and Bertha M. Mr. Schabel is a highly respected citizen. He is a 
member of the Masi nic order and the I. O. O. F. and also of the V. A. 
O. D. 



LAWRENCE SOHAIOH, Hurrison Towi • born in 1 S-J:'.. 

He is a .. itive of Gernia iy ami was there omployo 1 in a wine .lair)' till 
IS tO, when in' immigrate I I > '■ a irica ami located in Cincinnati. Fie was 
working in and about Ciucinu ti about two years when be caino to this 
township acres of land, to which he has since added 

sixty acres more at different intervals. Eie married Sophia Haino in 1849 
and they have six children: Elias; Elizabeth, wife of Frederick Kohl- 
man; Kate, wife of Henry Benninger; Mary, wife of Michael Uenck; 
Louise, wife of Henrj Valtz, and John. -Mrs. Schaich was born in 
Germany and itninigrat 1'to America in ISi-S. The family is well 
• pecti I and well provided with fin' necessaries of life as a result of 
i: ■ !. . \ E bard labi n - . 

AUGUST SCHILLING, farmer, Sparta Township, was bom in 
Hanover, Germany, Decern] t 9, 1825. In L849 he immigrated to the 
United States, landing at New Orleans, La., and soon after came 
to Cincinnati, Ohio. He was united in marriage in Hamilton County, 
Ohio, June 23, L854, to Dora Idekor, who was also born in H 
Germany, January 5, 1829. After their marriage thej settled in Delhi 
Township, Hamilton Co., Ohio, where he engaged in farming and resided 
until 185S, in which year they removed to Dearborn County, purchased 
and settled on the farm where he at present lives. He owns ninety acres 
of fine land. He has five children, viz.: Emma, August, John, Dora 
and Henry. Mr. Schilling is a good citizen and the family i.s well 
respected. He and wife are members of the Lutheran Church. 

BERNARD SCHIPPER, contractor, and dealer in lime and stone, Au- 
rora, was bom in Bavaria, January 19, 1822, where he received a common 
school education. His parents, George and Catharine (Kluever) Schip- 
per, were natives of Bavaria. The mother was born in 1795 and died 
September 24, 1342. Bernard came to America October IS, 183S, and 
located in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he remained until the spring of 1839; 
thence he went to Cleves, Ohio, where he worked on the canal and 
farmed up to the spring of 1848, when he located permanently in Aurora, 
engaging in teaming and quarrying stone, which he followed Lrp to 1871, 
when he began taking contracts in building houses and streets, succeed- 
ing admirably up to 1877, at which time he was taken sick on account of 
exposure and excessive labor, and has since been an invalid. He mar- 
ried Miss Mary C. Schumui, January 23, 1844. She was born in Bavaria, 
February 4, LS20. The following children have bee,, born to them: 
Catharine, John M., Mary A, Frank. Bernard, Elizabeth, Amelia. Will- 
iam and Rosalia. They are members of the Catholic Church- Mr. 
Schipper was one of the active and liberal members in building up the 
church. He donated a lot to the church; was president of the board of 



IIISTOKV OF lilCAlUHIltN AM) OHIO CoUN L'IKS. 

trustees and building lal i ' ■■ [01 !..' in tli i i ansc. Ho 

acted as one of the tru «te foi 

REV. Ji UIN .1. SOI I Mi; .lie pri st, Aurora. ,vaf born in 

Cincinni Jo ■ ph College in 

Kentm k; hn ■• j ... [eiurad ( pei ■ '■ lounty, 

where he ; ■ Inated and i the priesthood, being 

ordained priest in 1877. His firs! parish was al Mount Vernon, Posej 
Co., this State, when : util June 5, 1SS2, at which time he 

came to Auror . cliarge of this parish, laboring ardently and 

faithfully to harmonize and I i church. His parents, John 

and Adaline (Wilnes) Schoentrup, were born in Hanover, Germany; the 
father was born April 14, i ther May 20, LS1S. They left 

their native land, immigrated to America h g in Cincinnati, 

Ohio, In 1854 the}' □ to] '• orn Comity, Ind., locating perman 

ently. In the fatherland and this country his vocation has been farm- 
ing for a liveliho' ■<!. 

ANTONY SCHOTT, farmer, York Township, was born in Germany! 
January 1, 1S38. His parents, Antony and Frances (Ott) Schott, who 
were both natives of Germany, rain-' to America in 1845. They located 
in Cincinnati, where they resided ten years, when tliCj purchased land 
in York Township, where they subsequently lived till their respective 
deaths; the mother March 11, 1870, the father in April, 1S7G. Antony 
Schott, the subject of this brief notice, was brought up to the years of 
maturity by his parents. At the age of thirty-three years he married 
Cecilia Feist, who was born and reared in this county, a daughter of 
George and Phillippa (Schoenetzer) Feist, who were natives of Germany. 
They have five children living: William, Frank, John, Henry and Ottil- 
lia. In 1872 Mr. Schott purchased his present farm of 105 acres, on 
which he has since resided, engaged in agricultural pursuits. The 
family is associated with the Catholic Church and Mr. Schott is a Dem- 
ocrat. 

ADOLPH A. SCHULZE, retired, Aurora, was bom in Saxony, Ger- 
many, August 16, 1818, where he received a common school education. 
His father, John G. Schulze, was bora in 1773 and died in 1837. His 
mother. Caroline (Waber) Schulze, was born in 1774 and died in 1837. 
The father followed farming all his life. Adolph came- to Aurora, Ind., 
in 1849, and followed carpentering up to IS.",;;. Then he started a cof- 
fee house and continued in that line of business up to 1S7S. He was 
married, February 10, 1853, to Mrs. Louisa Brixner, who was born in 
Wurtemberg, Germany, November 14, 1S20. Adolph, by eeonour an 1 
industry, has accumulated a competency, so that he can live in ease 
and comfort during his old age. He is a well preserved old gentleman 



iuogi: VIMIK ■ 

, r i life. !l. i of Dm I ( . . Reform. ! 

Church, of which lath 

ALBERT M. SCII1 I ■ ■ .-■ native 

of Hanover, Germ my. hori I, 11 :7. [lis fi (her, F 

■J. Schumacher, was horn >vor in 11 ml wi tin re united in 

marriage to Catherine Ehenvoiii al ,■ ' , ' 

in 1802. Aft. 
she died i'. Mn ch, IS33. [n 1837 he, '..ii 1 I ' ' ' , immigrated to 
the United States, and settl. d first at Phi lad dpi ! ore I . 

married C: I rii . L. to Count} 

Ohio, whore, e'purchn . I I farm. In March, 1831 

Dearl .rn C inty, Ind. , and pnrchi oh. lives, in 

Keli Toivi hip, S stion 27, and whero ho di ; . 1853. Albert 

M., our subject, was educated at Geffingei ; iver, Germany, 

! with his father to D , 183! in 1848-411 ho 

engagi ! in h latin ; on the ; >hio and Mississippi Rivers, after which ho 
returned to this county. He was hero married, December 26, 1849, to 
Elizabeth, daughter of George and Barbara (Kallenberger) Folanens, 
who was born June 3, 1832. After his marriage he settled where he 
now lives. Mrs. Schumacher died November 28, 1869, tin mother of 
eleven children, viz.: Frederick B., born February 16, 1851; K,i. 
December 3, 185 - :; Elizabeth ■.[.. June 15, 1854, died February 12, 
1855; Catherine F., December 11. 1855, died June 12, 18S2; All 
June IS, 1858; Adaline C, January 20, 1860; William H., November 
15, 1861; Fhilip, Mai h] >pb E., January 8, 1865; 

Elizabeth, October 19, 1866; George, Octob r 6, 1868. November 29, 
1870, Mr. Schumacher was again married, _to Catherine Deitz, who was 
born in Germany, October 11, 1844, a daughter of John and Annie E. 
(Huek) Deitz. To them were bom four children, viz.: Annie E., March 
25, 1871; George J., July 31, 1872, died October 11, 1872; Conrad A., 
bom July 13, 1873, and Charles F., October 27, 1881. 

JOHN SCHWARTZ, see page 157. 

FRED SCHWENDENMANN, tinner and dealer in stovi i and 
tinware, New Alsace, -was born in Baden, Germany, June 7. 1825. 
His parents, Zafere and Frances (Kramer) Schwendenmann, were also 
natives of Baden, where the former died in l v :!3, at the age of sixty-five 
years. The mother, with her children, immigrated to the United States 
in 1847, landing at New York City, and from thence came to Cincinnati. 
Ohio, where she died in 1849. Our subject was the eldest of nine chil- 
dren. He came to Cincinnati, Ohio, with his mother, where he 
at the tinner's trade, which he learned in Germany. He was married at 
Cincinnati, Ohio, May 11, 1852, to Annie M. Wingerter, who was born 



IT. J 


! 


1 1 ■ : ■■-. \\ '•.,':■ 


tod I.) tlio 


t, iu which .1 

' ing .it \, :; \1 ifo, >' llolV I] 

Imp and ."liiou bo rarrie ! oi 
ich ho sold out his groceries, now conducting a 


ico re idod 
i for some 



(] I ■ "■ 

United States 

! I • ■ ■ 

to D earl 

He first openi 

time, after whi 

intws in stoves and tinware. Mr. and Mrs. Schwendoumauu are parents 

of twelve child leased), Frank J., Louisa M., 

Mary T., Adam id tsed), John, Anthony, George, Susau M., Prod and 

Charl «s. Mr S n : ad famih are i icmbers of the I 

Church. 

EDWARD! Lawreneewbur ;h, was 

born in Germany in 1849. Tn 1856 hi rated to tl is country with his 

parents, who located in Lawrenceburgh, where he grew to maturity and was 
educated. At the I to Ci lati, \ hei b • learned 

the trade of baker, which he hi c,o ince November, 1883. ii* 1 

also learned thecabinet trade, which he pursued fortwelve years prior io 
his entering his present occupation. He occupies the corner of Walnut 
and Center Streets, carries a full line of fresh bread, confectionery! 
cigars and tobaccos, and do> ■■ ,■ ■ o' • business. Mr. Seekatz was 
mai ied in L880 to Sophia Gose, and they have two children : Harry and 
Albert. Mr. S. is a member of the I. 0. O. P. and R. A., and an ener 
getic busin 

FRAN;; F. SEIFERT, farmer, Clay Township, was born in Ger- 
many, March R, 1840. His parents, Frederick C. and Fredireka 
(Leopold) Seifert, were also natives of Germany, and immigrated 
to the CniteJ States in 1854, landing at Baltimore iu August of 
that year, and corning thence immediately to Dearborn County, set- 
tling in Sparta Township, where his father died in 1S70. His 
mother is still living. Their children were Ed aid F., Lewis H., 
Herman B., Frank F., Augusta, Anthony, Emma and Anna. Frank 
F., our subject, came with his parents to Dearborn County in 1854, 
where ho has since resided. He was married in Sparta Township Jan- 
uary 4, 1S66. to Catherine M. Zoa, by whom he has had two children, viz.: 
Harry F. and Alvin F. Mr. Seifert is a g id c ... i i . i ; I 
teemed by II who know him. He and .Mrs. Seifert are members of the 
German Methodist Church. 

SAMUEL SEWARD, who for many year- ha ■ I n one of the leading 

businessmen of Rising Sun, w: born near Now Philadelphia, Ohio, in 
1811. Elijah S Eathor, was born on the ea tern shore of Mary 

land; his mother, Star] le State, in which 



[ilOCJHAriUC.VI, SKKI'i 



they wore m ried, ami rroin which thej moved to Ohio about 1801. The 
family consisted of nine children, four of whom are now living : Samuel, 
Stephen, (Mrs. Noble) and Elizabeth (Airs. Blake). In 1825 

the family I I > Ohio County, where the father died on the old Brown 

farm in 1842. the mother surviving about twenty years. Our Bubjecl 
was fourteen years old when he came to the county, and ho remained 
with his parents on the farm till 1839. [n 1834 he began trading on 
(he rivor, and this traffic he continued successfully for more than twenty 
years, making his last trip in L858. About 1842 he began dealing in 
lumber and coal in Rising Sun, and this he also continued with equal 
success for a period of thirty years. He has now practically retired 
from business, except to Ic ik after the creditable fortune which, in a 
long lite of industry anil good management, he has accumulated. At the 
organization of the Rising Sun National Bank, Mr. S. took stock to the 
amount of §10,000. He was eight years president of the institution and 
has be* a director since it was founded, He served twenty years as 
trustee of the Union schools, and over thirty years as trustee of the 
Methodi: I : i 'Lurch. He was also president of the Rising Sun 

Insurance Company for more than twenty years, and has served many 
years in the city council. Mr. SeWurd was married, in 1844, to Susanna 
J. Jones, daughter of Rev. James J 

this locality. Their live children James, "William R., Morris J., S. 

Mills and J. Jones —the latter a pracin ing physician of Erie, Perm. Mr. 
Seward is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and also of the 
I. O. O. F. ; having joined the latter society in 1840. 

STEPHEN SEWARD, one among the older residents of Risi Sun. 
was born in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, in 1819. His parents were Elijah 
and Starling (Bright) Seward, natives of Queen Anne's County, Md., and 
of English parentage. The family located in Rising Sun in 1825, the 
father a farmer by occupation, in which vocation our subject, Stephen 
Seward, spent the earlier portion of his life. Before twenty years of age, 
however, he began flat- boating on the Ohio River, which ho continued 
successfully till 1859. f_e then engaged in saw-milling about six years 
and since that time has been variously employed. Mr. Seward wi 
ried, in 1^40, to Miss Elizabeth Dickinson, native of Ohio, daughter of 
Thomas and Elizabeth (Mason) ! ckins< :, both natives of England. Her 
father immigrated to America in 1818, h in 1817. They 

loi ted in EHzabethtown, Ohio, were married there in 1819, and in 1835 
moved to this locality. The father was a cabinet and wagon-maker and 
subsequently purchased land in Dearborn County, departing this life in 
1843; the mother died in 1845. Mr. and Mrs. Seward have five children 
living: Jennie, wife of J. Dalrymple; Matilda, Stephen, Sherman and 



902 Ills, v 0| Mi OHIO COUNTIES. 

Ren. Tl 1. Mr. Soward and his eldest son are 

[.0.0 I the family is associated with the Meth- 

odisl Episcopal Church b Mr. Soward has been a steward for 

ab ml thi i : erved tour years as a member of the 

Rising • iuncil. 

MORELS J. SEWARD, son of Samuel Seward, was born in Rising 
.Sun in I8i ! . !' ■ . the Rising Sun public schools and 

at Moore's Hill College, and in 1870 began business with Robert Jones, 
under the firm name of ' rard, dry goods. In 1878 Mr. Jones 

withdrew from the firm be bn iness was conducted four years under 

the firm name of M. J. Se at 1 & Co. Mr. Seward then withdrew from 
the emp] iyed as salesman only. 

He was married, in Novi ab r, 1871, to Emma Croft, of Rising Sun, 
1 - iba Croft, the former now decea ' ' 
the latter a resident o) [nd m polis. In L874 Mrs. Seward died. leaving 
one child —Bertha, and in 1877, Mr. Seward married Miss Fannie Kane, 
of Jeff sonville, Ind. Mr. Seward in a member of the I. O. O. F., and 
the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

SAMUEL M. SEWARD, dry goods dealer, was born July 3, 1859, 
and is a son of Samuel Seward, Sr. lie grow to maturity in Rising Sun, 
the place of his birth, ol , il education in the Rising Sun 

public schools, also tal I course of study at Columbus, 

Ohio. In 1873 with his brother, with whom he has 

since continued. He . in September, 1SS2, to Fannie Hemp 

hill, daughl -r of William Hemphill, a leading citizen of Rising Sun. 
He is a member of the I. O. O, F., and Methodist Episcopal Church, and 
a young man of considerable business energy are! enterprise. 

W. R. SEWARD, of the firm of W. R. Seward & Co.. was born- in 
Rising Sun in 1848. II" is a son of Samuel Seward, whose sketch 
appears above. He was e lue I id in the public schools of Rising Sun, and 
took a commercial course in Lebanon Normal also. He was employed in 
the coal and lumber busine •■ till 1873, when he began operations in tl e 
grocery an I provision trade, which ho has since continued. Ho married 
Miss Belle Gillespie, da Dr. Gillespie, in 1S72, and they have 

one child living — Earl M. Two others are deceased. Mr. Seward is one 
of the live business men of the m iber of the I. O. O. F., and of 

the Moth isl Episcopal Church. 

JULIUS SEVERIN, auditor of Dearborn County, and a leading 
manufacturer of Aurora. Ind., is a native of Prussia, where he was 
born in 1830. He grew to maturity in his native country, where he ob- 
tained the rudiments of an education in the common schools, after 
which, being of an energetic, studious turn of mind, he took a course of 



U'HICAI 



'1IKS. W:\ 



study in the PoJyieehnie In litnl ' [In, en, Prussia. While I 

worked as eoppt r-smith, and I er serving the required time, in ISHO, he 
immigrated to the Unit, d HI: , to el an i favorable field for the 
full range of his capacities. ■ ■■ I in (he various cities 

of Now York, Meriden, G in ' ton, N T orl ill . 7a., Clevel 
Ohio, for seven years, he loe din Aurora, which has since boon his 
place of res ideuce save durin ■ emporary engagement abroad. In ISoS 
he. established the Boiler , Wov] in Aurora and two years later 

built the efficient Gas Worl of that city. employed about 

eighteen months by the I i Patent Corupanj and in I.S02 

sented that firm at the World's Exposition at Loud England, for the 

purpose of exhibiting and explaining their machinery. In IS(>5 Mr. 
Si'verin e.-tabli- bed the G>] per & Sheot Iron Works in Ann':,' ad 
1873 was one of the nine mi u ' ho 1 uilt the A urora Rolling mills. He 
■still control- the Excelsior Iron i Coppei Works at Aurora, and, in con- 
nection with his sons,operati the same, manufacturing all kinds of iron 
roofing, buildings, chimneys, tanks etc., tc i pper work for distilleries 
and breweries. The enterprise, though in its infancy, is assuming pro- 
portions, and its projectors are building up an extensive trade, which 
extends throughout the Middle and Eastern Stairs, and are receiving 
business communications from foreign countries. Tbo Messrs. Severin 
are active and thorough going business men, and their enterprise ranks 
among the leading industrii s of Aurora. The office of the works is 
located on Main between Importiug and See. mi Streets. As a b 
man Mr. Severin' s usefulness, enterprise, energy and liberality ha\ 
greatly to his popularity as a citizen. Recognizing this the Democracy 
of Dearborn County in 1882 chose him their candidate Tor auditor and 
he. was elected by an overwhelming majority. The duties of this office 
he has discharged with signal ability, promptness and success, and in a 
manner entirely satisfactory to all the people interested. In 1S55 Mr. 
Severin married Catharine Horn, a native of Germany, and seven chil- 
dren re the fruit of this union-all living and well educated. Their 
names are: Lena, Emil, Eugeno, Louise, Julius, Hul dab and Louis. 
Louise is a graduate of the Staie Normal School and recoived the first 
teacher's license for three years granted in the county. The two sons, 
Emil and Eugene, are associated with their father in business. The 
family enjoys a high standing socially in the community, and from the 
fath< • down to the youngest son is no less fortunate in it-: range of in 
tellectuality and moral inllte nee. 

JOHN S. SHATTUCK, plasterer and contractor, Aurora, was born 
in Aurora September 2, 1821, and is represented as being the old 
native resident of this city. He recoived instruction in the common English 



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engi ;ed years; Lhen was reap- 

point* d g; b the I '■ ut, and si rv< d in Lhal cap; it\ up to 

August, I I unci bii ilder. His 

father, Asa Shattuck, was born in Middlesex County, Mass., July 8, 
1789; he ' ' d in Aun . . January 1. 1820. The mother, Pi 
(Hardin; Kiel as born in \'»-,\ York; mother died in 1833 and 

fatherdiedic 1807, hi d ig caused by a fall frorn a building. 

John S. Sbabuck was a I 8, 1817, to Miss Sarah A. Hill. She 

was born in Marion, Wayne Co., N. Y, April 2, 1825. To tin □ i 
children have been born, viz.: Charles S., infant son, Flora, Lelia, 
Carrie, John H., Permelia. Mr. Shattuck is n member of D 
Lodge No. I t2, F. & A. M.; Choi i q Frii nds Lodge No. 13, I. O. O. F., 
and the Baptist Church. 

WILLIAM SHAW" v.„ bora December IT,, 1S02, in the city of 
Paisley, Scotland. He 1 to tin United States with his parents 

in 1816, stopping ai Philadelphia, remaining there about five months, 
and then, coming to Pittsburgh in a butcher wagon, they proci cded down 
the Ohio River in a keel-boat to Vevay, and located upon a farm in 
Craig Township. William Shaw was married to Linda Rous, of Vevay, 
Ind., April 14, 1825; moved to Vevay in 1831, and for a number of 
years engaged in merchandi ing; i a hi purch; ed a good farm about 
two miles mirth of Vevay, upon which he moved with Lis family, where 
he resided till his death, August 25, 1873. [r. Shaw joined the Meth- 
odist Epi ' pal Church, at Vevay, in 1839, and became a most devout 
Christian. He was kind and agreeable in his intercourse with bis fell >w 
men; and contributed liberally of his means to all public enterp i es. 
Mrs. Linda Rous) Shaw wi i 1" rn December- 0, 1805, in Bradford, York- 
shire, England. She immigrated to the United States with hei 
and other m 'mbers of the family in 1S12, embarking at the city of Liv- 
erpool on the merchant vessel "Packet." The war of L812 bel 
land and the United States having been declared, the ve sel wa i detained 
at Liverpool about five weeks, when it was allowed to sail. On 
of its being an American vessel, and when within four dai 'sail 
York, it was captured by a Briti h frigate, and all i pri 

oners of war to Nova Scotia, where they were detained about five 



L'hoy .vwoliiw 

ii.» 11i.ii- way immol : i 

' 

. | ,•] !.. ill. 

I ; June 9, IS] I. 
■ 

joined 
the Mel 

Vevay, in 1830, and has : Iw ays I 
spirit, as nianife led upon all i>& She. 

i Vevay, 

A. SHAW, of Liiwri h, son of "Willi; i Shaw, was bora in 

Swi I ounty, Ind., in 1847, and his early years were speni in 

that locality. He was given the rail i in i i t: of an education in the coin 
inon schools of Switzerland County, and subsequently sj 
in stud} I in fan ■■ 

ing in his nati to] encebui ^h, where 

he con< !n< I el ion with the i 

operations of the farm. In 1S82 he began the grocery business under 
the firm name of Fitch & Shaw, purchasing the interest of his partner in 
September, 1884. He occupies the corner of High and Short Streets, 
and carries a stock vali good business. 

Mr. Shaw was married, in 1873, to Hannah V. Fitch, daughter of 
De Witt C. Fitch, who is well known in this county, and by this union 
there were born four children: Ida C, Cora L.. Harris F. and Edwi rd U. 

HORACE SHAW, with E. S. D i in agricultural imple- 

ments, Aurora (residence in Fusing Sun), is a native of Ohio, born in 
Mount Pleasant, Hamilton County, July 22, 

emic education. His father was born in Massachusetts, Au; 
1802. His mother, Susan (Janks) Shaw, was born in Providence, 
R. I., in 1806, and died in 1844. His father was a jeweler, and he 
moved to Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1833. January 1. LSG4, tl 
our si, etch moved to Ohio County, Ind., and engi I in general mer- 
chandise, conti uing up to 1871, at which time he svent We I 

i i . ed for four years; th e he v. tit to New York as 

in Brooks' Locomotive Works. In 1S77 he return 1 to R and 

entered the field as a commercial traveler, continuing as such up to 
1881, when h • enga ;ed with Mr. E. S. J (owney. Mr. Shaw was married, 
! Miss Elizabeth Whitlock, who was bora in Rising 

Sun, November 28, 1810. One child, Julia, was horn to the marriage. 
Mr. Shaw belongs to Friendship Lodge No. G, I'. \ A. M., Rising Sun, 
and his estimable wife is a member of the Presbyterian Church. 



HOO LIISTOI5Y OF :>! VKBol! i IND OHIO COI S'l 

GEOli tE B. SHELDON', of Lawi-onn .burgh, was li iru in ; 
1812, in ih < oily of I'hii Iolphi :, ami re aovod Lb li ' 's famih 

when (juil i iti, Ohio, li- li<i rue I the I 

In they, i : . I bnrgli and worked for a 3d 

In 18-10 ho < : mi High Street, in a 

building know salt Warohon uuud the busi- 

ness until bin d 27 tb of March, ISG5. Air. 

Sheldon ■ of on busii b bis ' to 

benefit our y. Ho was foremost in eve y j ' that would be 

benefici il c . mnity. Early in Hfo be con 

the Methodist ' burch, and no person ever lab 

cereh/ to live and act in acco lance with the teachings of Christianity. 
Kind and gen irons, charitable to a fault, ho was often imposed on by 
designing rho knew bis confiding nature. In his business 

ii''. ' tions he was the soul of honor, and (bo word of Gri 
don possessed an intrin lie valu •, more precious than g >ld, ami when he 
was called to cease his lab - ;,our city sustaine 1 the loss of an hi a 
enterprising citizon,Christiauity one of its brightest lights, the poor 
suffering a stead!' 

WILLIAM SHOLEY, Rising Sun, manufacturer of cigars and dealer 
in cigars and tobii ;os, was born in Prussia in 1S50. lit- pa; 

childhood and youth in his m ining there till sixteen 

years of age. In 1860 he emigrated to the United States, and 
in Ohio County. He followed f rming up to 1874, when lie began the 
manufacture of cigars, which he has continued to the present time, 
having learned the trade himself in Prussia. His establishment is 
j Bar the corner of Main and Walnut Streets, Rising Sun. and he manu- 
factures 7«", 000 to 100,000 cigars per year. Mr. Sholey was marrh I, in 
1884, to Julia L. Jaraes, daughter of Edwin James, of Aurora. 

ABRAHAMP. SHUTTS,t I andsh lealer and postn 

is a native of New York, born July 9, 18-11, where he received a common 

school education. His parents, John and Ada (Hitchcock) Shutts, wore 

born in York State, the former, in L801; latter, August 25, 1.S05. In 

1842 they emigrated to Dearborn County, Ind., where he followed 

farming. Abraham farmed up to 1861, at which time he enlisted in 

Company F, Thirty-seventh Indiana Volunteer Inf ng Ihroe 

years. After returning home he learni 1 his trade, and has woi 

ever since. He married Miss Amanda J. Barker, November 18, 1879; 

she was bom in Dearborn County, Ind., August 8, 1845. To tin 

been born four children: Frank, Blanche, Maud and Earl. He was 

appointed postmaster in July. 1878, and officiated as city troasun 

1880 and ISM. He is also'a member of CI ' Lod^e, No. 13 



moan vrmcAL sketches. t>iH 

I. O. O. F., and . fthe Me Episcop [Church. Ho is an active busi ■ 

ness man ■ ad faithful public official. 

HENRY SHUTER, act • Township, born in Hanover, 

Germany, January 20, 1812, is a son of Frederick anil Mi y Shuter, 
natives of Hanover, Ge ' were] ats of two children: Henry 

and Frederick. Mrs. Sliuter died, aud ho ub erjuently married Margaret 
Imli. iff, and in 1830, with his family, immigrated to America, landing at 
Baltimore, where they remained till 1S32, when they came to Cincin 
uati. In 1834 they re liana and I in Jael n Township, 

Dearborn County, where the} resided till death. By his last wif< Lr. 
Shuter had two children: William and Sophia. Of the four children, 
Frederick and Sophia ai I. Will i les on the home place 

in Jackson Township. Mr. Shuter came to his death very suddenly by 
falling from a load of wheat. He was an industrious farmer, a good cil : 
zen, and one of the early settlors of that neighborhood. He and wife 
wi members of the Lutheran Church. Henry Shuter remained in 
Cincinnati about two years after his father moved to Jackson Township, 
after which he worked out for various farmers for a time. January 14, 
IS 10, hi married Sophia Poos, who was born in Meslingen, Prussia, June 
7, ISIS, a daughter of Henry and Christena Poos, natives of Prussia, but 
who came to America in L839 and settled in Ripley County, Ind. (whore 
two of their children had previously settled), and there remained till death. 
They had three sons and live daughters, of whom two daughters died in 
Germany; the others came to Indiana, four of whom now survive: Freder- 
ick, H ny, Sophia and Hannah. Mr. Shuter and wife have had seven chil- 
dren, four now surviving: William, Henry, Hannah and Eliza. John 
and L;:He died in infancy; Arminda, who married John Rumsey, and 
had o child, Alma, is also deceased. Mr. Shuter resides upon the 
place where he settled after marriage, which he had previously pur- 
chased, and where he now has a lioe farm of 220 acres. He also owns 
another farm near Wright's Corners of U0 acres, besides having given 
his ( Idrer other landi • ' y. He also owns 400 acres in Illinois. 

All 01 this property they have accumulated by industry and economy. 
They are worthy members of the Baptist Cliurch, in which faith th y 
have reared their children, all of whom hav< united with the church. 

SIMON SIEMANTEL, gi r and saloonist, Aurora, is a native of 
middle Bavaria, was born July 5, 1828, and received a common school 
education. His parents, John and Catharine (Stahl) Siemantel, were 
bom in Bavaria, the former in 1782 and the latter in 1705. They came 
to America July 3, 1840, landing in Baltimore, thence to Lawrenceburgh 
July 1 1, 1840, where they settled on a farm. The father died in 1847, 
and the mother in 1873. Simon was raised on a farm, but in 1847 





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lo tin radi >■''•< ho won 

n .! I'or four \ ■■ 

Sun, where hi [i 

purchased the old Meth idisl Church on (ho 

I irted it into a mil] 

At this date] II ami 

married, Jannary 8, 18.V2, to Mi 
Bavaria, February 25, 1831. By the 
born, viz.: John (born February 5, 1853. died April 3, 1878), Anna [£., 
Margaret (born in I' 30, ber, 1857), Margaret K., Lizzie, 

Simon (died in infancy), Simon K.. Ci Charles W. and 

Albert. Mr. Siemantel was elected in 18(52 from the First Ward as 
councilman and tion for four y H ■ 

township trust I in LSG9. He was one of the 

incorpor; stors of River View Cemetery, organize 1 h 

He has bei '• : for years with the L 0. O. F., and is a member 

of the Ancient Order of Druids, of which order he was made grand mas- 
ter in : 53. 

JOJ N a d PETER SINGER, Harrison Towuship, two good- 
natured bachelors of that locality, were both born in Germany, the 
former, February 12, 1830, the latl ..''■ L3, 1833. Throughout 

their lives their two paths have been in fchesanii line. The} immigrated 
to America with their parents, Peter and Mary (Hahii) Singer, in 1841, 
and located on the farm where the two sons now reside. Their father 
died ' bey grew to maturity under the guid- 

ance of their widowed mother, who died, ..'.', 1, and 
alone indeed, the home of the family becoming the "hall of the bachelor." 
They have always followed agricultural pursuits and now own the old 
homestead of 115 acres. Since the death of their faithful moth 
whose care they were nurtured from infancy to manhood, they have lived 
in that state of blessed singleness which all poor un 

no gentle hands of the , o sew buttons, darn socks, wash linen 

and stew hash. Th r, y propo e I i ■ ange their mode of living soon as 
circumstances determine, and it is hoped the future may bring them the 
happiness which they merit. 

COL. FREDERICK SLATER, merchant and postmaster, i 
was born in Hanover, Germany, Oct I His pa ents, Frederick 

and Matilda (1; ipe) Slater, were also natives of Germ ay, and, in 1835, 
immigrated to the United States, landing at Pittsburgh, Penn., in Novem- 
ber of that year. They then removed to Cincinnati, and to Lawronci 
Ohio, and in 1840 to Alexandria, Campbell Co., Ky., where the mother 
died in 1ST?., at the age i even so; and the 



; inc.M 



Ti,,. ; , |] |o tin child 

viz: ll.Miy !!.. ' 

came with his | I ho 

until Ic ['J, af winch ti Li n 1 clerked in 1 

Fred Hrfck 

l\y.. and ei ga; J in I '■' imr he wonl to El 

Dorado Com '< rnia, and eng; ■ ' : until i"- : ''''>. wl 

returned to Campbell County. There he united in marriage, June 25, 

. ilh Sarah A., daughter of Robert and Elizabeth (Will 
who was born in Philadelphia County, Penu., Align i 23, 1833. In Sep- 
tembi r, 1S5G, Mr. Slat' r moved to Auroi : I | ion 

y and engaged ' ire until 

18(51, at which time ho was elected may . 

r< ted the office of may ir and ei listing in 

E I I airy as a private and after the organ- 

ization of the & | icitj he served 

in until June 1863, at which time he was promoted to major and in 
December, 1S64, to lieutenant-colon I, wl k hi rved in until the 

clo si [ the war. He was discharged at Louisville, Ky., July 14, 1805, aftor 
which he retn 'nod to Aurora, Ind., and in S. ptembi c of the sai te year 
moved to Sparta, when | at lives, and o] I h 

ness, which he hi > ] ued. In 187 ; lected i 

of Dearborn County, which office he held until 18 later is a 

highly res] : - in, and an enterprisinj 'dating business 

man. He is a member of the ler. He and Mrs. Slater are 

parents of six children, viz. : "William II., Frederick A., James C. (d ic 
Emily M., Law) ; and Sarah A. 

E.EMMET SLATER, Lawrnceburgh, attorney at law, and prose- 
cutor for Dearborn and Ohio Counties, was bo in Yorkville, Dearborn 
County, in 1848. He is a sou of Richard D. Slater, who was many 
years an influential citizen of Dearborn County, and the years of 
his minority were chiefly spent in hi native village. He i 
the ordinary common school education and subsequently taught 
five winter tern,-, engaging in the study of in dicine in the meantime 
about two years. Conscious that he had not yet found tl ' 

for operation, he aband i ly and to ik up (he law, first 

by privai : the tutel of J and last 

with Judge Bail I ' ' I to 1 bar April 12. 1! 69. I! • 

entered immediately uj | icfice of hi- profession, continuing 

about one year, win u h deputy si of D 

County, in which c pacity he official d four years. His official duties 
havings ' bandoned 



010 I i ■ ■ ■ ■ i tliS. 

the I f factory on rath or ai 

extensi . uumj \ ukmen. In 187S ho 

retnrm > > . • 

pi i •. and formed a 

partnei I Judge Atkinson. ntinued till the latter 

a i iti led hi practice 
individual!; . Mi-Yin 185 

: i I : re < lectod I" the samo 

office, I I four years and appointment by R. L. 

Davis, b - ■■- fn I -To < tited and pul lislied th ■ 

' '. a lively cam] and during 1 

papei lar cast. He has held a 

position on the i oi > Cincinnati Enquirer for the pasl 

seven yi ars as local c pondent and is a ready and effective writer. 

In his earlier yi irs Mr. Slater spenl . ministry, and in 

all the V! of te ■'■ r, proacl ■:•. doctor, lawyer and journa- 

list he 1 id a en ' entirely commensurato with 

the time and atton e fields of labor. Mr. 

Slater was inarriod, in 1873, to Mary Miller, daughter of Thomas and 
Emeline (Wils< . Miller, and grand Miller, one of 

the original set :ounty. They have two children, Everett E. 

an • :■■ ■■; Mr. Slater is a member of the F. & A M., I. 0. O. F., 

Royal Arcanum and K. of P., and advocate of Democratic 

principles. He is a shrewd politician and, ' official, 

has alv. i .'.1 ;- : ■' ivith satisfaction to the people. 

FRANK A. SLATER, general foreman of O. &. M. shops, Cochran, 
is a native of Prussia and was born September 20, 1837. He received a 
good common school education. His father, Charles, was born in north- 
ern Prui His mother, Caroline Schonert, was born in the 
same province in 1TUS. They" came to America in 1846, locating in 
Nanmburg, Lewis Co., N. Y., where he followed farming and weaving 
up to his death in 1862; mother died in 1S72. Frank in early manhood 
learned cabinet making and piano building. In 1850 he returned to 
Europe., After his return to America he worked at 
various pi in; until March 3, L865, at which date he located permanently 
at Aurora, [nd . with the Ohio & Mi issippi Railroad Company, starting 
in at cabi !. June, 36! tv; - p imoted to foreman of the 
cabinet tie •'- which position was held until April, 1871. At this 
date the company promoted him to general foromi n and draughtsman, on 
account of faithfulness and close application in guarding their interests. 
His labor in his present position began January. 1871, at which time he 
took up and completed all drafting for the shops. His indomitable 



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energj iiud natural ti : 

most protl iont of tho ] 

away Eron oi off dub 

neither ban ho l.n • ponded 

vision over 180 hands, on an avi 

to Hiss Mary Co 

and to ilieiu have 1 n on born thr< 

1800; Susan, 1 

8,1803 

the thirty-second di gn o in the latter order. 

ELIAS SMALL, farmer, Hogau Township, rosidi upon Section 
'J! and owi • 130 aei lie was burn in tho township, July 30, 

1850, and received a eoi led tion. He has farmed all his 

life. Mr. Small was married August 24, 1ST'-', to Miss Emma Durham. 
She was born in Hoga Township, December 27, L85T>, and they have 
three children: Harry. David and Addie. Mr. Small is au active young 
man and is tho son of William 11. Small, an old pioneer farmer of Dear- 
born County, who by industry and economy lias laid up a comp 
and is enjoying his journey homeward as the sands of life gently How 
out through the glass of time. 

CHRISTOPHER SMITH, farmer. York Town ' I in 1821, 

on the farm on which bo still resides. Ho is a son of John Smith, one 
of the early settlors here, and with whom he resided till his parents' 
death. He inherited the old homestead of 160 a< e . on which he is 
now located, and where lueted a fairly successful agricultural 

business for many years. He was married about 1 I h Dedas, a 

native of Butler County, Ohio, and daughter of Isaac and Eliza Di das, 
and by this unii v, re b :ii four children: AY. A.: Eliza J., wife of 
Lewis Rollin; Calvin H. and George H., tho two elder sons residing 
in Illinois at the present time. Mr. Smith is regarded as one of the 
representative farmers of the township, and is entirely worthy of a place 
in the annals of the count}". He has always resided on tl 
and is ever ready to encourage such enterprises as tend to advance the 
interests of the county and community in whir 1 1 I 

WILLIAM J. SMITH, farmer, Miller Township, was born in this 
county in 1847, near where he now resides. He received a common 
scho 1 education and was early inured to the labors of tho farm to 
which he has since devoted his attention. He was married, in 1870, to 
Adaline Hansel, a native of this county and daughter of Robert Hansel 
an early settler and prominent fanner of this township. They !■ 
children: Arthur and Alma. In the same year of his marriage Mr. 
Smith purchased seventy-five a r< of land which he has since ! n en 



[nil in 

[nl . i f Mil lor Town 

; I . | to the : i ill which 1 

serving. He ' and publics] Re] blicjiu in 

poj 

I : fmd 

Mitchel's hi ■'.. ivi' the bo in i 

' iiuprovc-d tbo 1 

advantages affi i dod hj i ■ I ■ ■ ■ ' ■ ' 

of whom was of an ol 
family and the latter of 'W I 

! in IS L3. I! erj i ioderi tc ■ 

stances, Edwin assisted ' ' After ho had attained 

his eighl ■ 

two years, during which tim 

with a vii lieim Ee 1 travel 

in the lif ■ iMne-s and tin i w time with a relative 

who was a mer hant. In 1S52 he located in Cleveland, Ohio 

1 : 

it did notagree '.villi him hi; retired. He then to 1 a thorough course in a 
commercial ci liege and attended two courses of lectun 
law, after which he located in Canton, Ohio, and engaged in :■ 
from ISo? to 1870. He had nearly all his life been a student of the 
science of mi after the old school, and had intended I" prepare 

himself for that form of prac ' I i ne interested in I 

pathy. At this j are in life he purchased Dr. Pulte's hooks and a 
case of medicines and in due tim ■ ' ting himself and 

friend-'. Being favorably impressed with '•'■ i ul be gave up ti ach 
ing and enter- 1 Pulte's Modical Coll anati. In addition to 

rse he gave special attention to gynecology and diseases 
of the ye and ear, and reeeivod a sp i: I di] in the fori i branch. 

Hi ■ . duated in May, 1S77, and was awarded the prize for his thesis on 
the eye and ear. In July, 1877, he located in Aurora, Ind., and began 
thepractice. Heir; strong faith in the virtui of electricity, the appli- 

1 which he con nt of certain 

diseases. His lab-oral and di isai ' I ith every appli- 

ance of modern excellence, and his library is one of the i 
to be fcaed in tin city His good jud toward 

those holding different o tions from his own have won him honor 
friendship. II i I bis prof e ion and built up a lucrative 

practice. He is a member of the Hamilton County Pulte Ass> 
the State Medical Association, ant the t Aiii '• . 

opatliy. He has been a member of She Ba] :h (of which his 



ihogi! \i-inr \ i. sKi.i DIH 

a nu .ii , at Canton, < >hio, and 

lias of tl ml of the Sal) 

I ■ : :ilui;-.l to I!. 

join 

tio 

of Qn abury, Warn n Co., X. V. ' I I 

an in ! . Jr. In IS i7 ! 

.: ill ami Jane 
X. Y.. she d I iry 1. IS77. Dr. Sniil 

E 
Haraliu, of Harvi Co ■. ■ Cambridge, Mass. 

wiiykisox SMi i iidout i " Wi = 

Ti ■-' . ! '-■ 1 ' i - [i ; parents, I :.,';■ ] > a id 

Easter (H I raised in North 

immigrated to this State and Township ia 1S13. Th ■ p 
all the hai dship 

for their family, which consisted of twelve children. The mother was a 
devo ' member of thi [ethi pal Church. Mr. Wilkison 

Smith\ a marrii o Miss Julia Ann Powell, who \ 

in lie. Township in 1S14. By this union were three children: Hiram, 
Sarah, James. Mrs. S. died in 1843, a. oar subject re-married Juno 
22, 1841 . : C. Duvall, who i ylvania, March 

15. 1826. B\ this union three children: J y, Mary. He 

i, and served his constituents for eighteen 3 
..a Every thiii; I i 

prise. He is an active and highly resp 

GEORGE A. SMFl of Clay Township, was born in Dear 

born C is one of ten children bom 

ers, William and Mar; .. natives 

of Yor', May 25, 17S7, and immi 

to the in 1817. In 1 in irborn County, 

be 1 until death. He and Mary Britton were 

miited in marriage in - . tip, June 27, 1819. She was born 

May 'J!, 1803, and immigrated with her pai nits from England to the 
United States in ISIS, locating in Dearborn County in the same year. 
After Mr. Smith's marriage he amo farm, on whi 

here July 24, IS02. Mrs. S. still si 
and resid on ;'■• • ie farm. Their children were: Mari 
Tl . d .■ ed: Sarah; Samuel, dei A.; Jane;( 

de 1 I; Jame di ased, and two died in infai '■■. . Gi 



91-1 IIISTOKY (II il'.VI'll'S, 

Hum; riecl er ami two sisl 

old homi 

WILJ ' . I ! [utl., of Hi- firm of 

i; ,hi •■ tho ehl of i", .■■ I I I'm 

Mary (B; horn ity. The former 

son of 'A illi ■ .1 Ci 

County in H b u Jnue I'.'. If 17, aud u hen a youi 

r'itb his father, whii 
gaged iu i 

.- 13, I. S3 She wii bom J ami 
of H 11 ' \ /i.'r Mr. 

Suit's m;i he p Ti hip, 

in farming until 1844. in which year be moved to Bellevuo, Ky. Here 
he en;;;: I 1 ilil I" ilS, 

then removed I »earbom C '■ ttled upon his farm in Clay 

Towns], ; , intil 1849, at which ti ' loDills- 

borougb, and m . ! until 185), he 

traded his slur.- for a rarm in this township, and tli I until his 

death March, 20 

They were the parent < '.I' ci^hl child) a, viz.: William B., born 
10, 1841; Rebecca, March 17, 1844; i E.,Febru: y 7, 1847; 

Esther A., July 17. 1849; Samuel W., Juue 16, 1851; Walter C, De- 
cemb r 31, 1850; Sarah E., 20 1853; Mary A.. December 20, 

1860, and Artii D I r 9, 1S03. William B., the subject of this 

sketch, was educated in (ho district schools, and after reaching maturity 
engaged in carpenter work until the breaking out of the Avar. He en- 
listed A i 2, in Company B, Eighty-third Indian;: Volunteers 
as a private and served until his honorable dischai ! 1805. Ho 
participated in all the engagements of bis c unpany, and wan wounded 
at the battle of Vicksbnrgh, May 19, 1803, in the right side by a musket 
ball, whii I m for a short time. After hi ' 
to Dearborn County, where he was united in marriage, September 0, 
1866, to Agnes B., daughter of George and Margaret (Elder) Proctor, 
who was born in Lnn land, March 23, IS39. Her parents 
were both natives of Lanarkshire, Sc they were married, 
and from whence they emigrated to the United Stairs in 1819, : 
first in West Virginia, moving to Dearborn County in 1801. The; had 
born to them eighl children, viz: Agnes B., M,n a ' -. Mary 
E. , Hellen, John, George and Mary E. After out lib 
settled on his father's farm in (his township, and engaged in farming 
until 1 SSI, in which year he moved to Dill 
with his brother-in-law, Leroy Rol Dillsborougli 













i 
















111.' 






a 


A. i; 



ordci Has had 
bom to ] ' ' 

rnly 17, J 

rud< 

RA] i n; ' i I 

tip is one of tl I ■■. bildreu 1 
William its, who . 

lina, the former bora ■' y IS, F91 Lpril 17, 17U1 

1 
born ' iunti , where they r< led until t] 

r's March 17. 18S1. I 
were: Marl ; \V illiam, Alfred, Wal- 

ter, Ri [] Ralph, our sul I in this 

county, : Lhur, bj whom he h; 

children, viz.: William G., Emma A., Arabell, Mary E., Adalii 
F. and Hattie M. Mr. Suit- h; i always e ed in 

among the most exemplary E his township. 

JOHN SNYDER, manager of the Walnut Street Mill I 
burgh, is a native of Yirgini . ' I 25. He resided in his native 

county till fifteen _ died, and 

removed to] ; Ky., with his mother, locating in the 

borhood of Worthington, where fchey resided seven years. They then 
moved to Rip! y C I from there in 18G8 to Ohio Comity. In 

[884 he loc. 1 in Lawrenceburgh, when he engaged in the rnill- 
1 I his boyhood, being 

air o a mill-wi b; 1 \i hat is known fci - mi] 

lj used in mill-stones through- 
out the country. He commanded a 1 , of militia, home s 
during the rebellion, an I has always 1 aeth citizen. 
Mr. Snyder was married, in 1846, to Martha Stewart, a daughter of 
Wilson Stewart, of Ripley Count}', Ind., and they had four children: 
Mary E., William, Paris F. and John L. Mrs. Snyder passed away in 
1854, and in 1855 Mr. Snyder was united in marriage with Harriet Hart, 
of Hamilton, Ohio, They have six children living and three 
daughters. Mr. Snyder has been a member of the F. & A. M. since 
1853, and both he and . d 1 are members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church. 

JUDGE ELIJAH SrARKS, see page 149. 

DAYID E. SPAR! I ticeburgh, was born in that city 

in L82S, and grew to maturity in that place. His grandfather, Elijah 



91G HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

Sparks, was a native of Fredericksburg, Ya., was married there, and in 
a very early day came West with his family, locating at Bank Lick, Ky.. 
near Covington. He was quite prominent as a Methodist minister, cir- 
cuit rider,'and also became a Territorial judge. He located with his fam- 
ily at Lawrenceburgh about 1S00, and died about 1815, while on his 
journey back to Virginia, which trip he was making on horseback. His 
wife was Elizabeth Weaver, sister of Capt. John ^YeaveI• I who was for 
some time in command of troops at block-house stations along the river. 
Norval Sparks, the father of David E. Sparks, was the youngest son of 
the family; six years of age when they came to Lawrenceburgh. Ho was 
born at Bank Lick, Ky., in 1800. He grew to maturity in this county, 
and while a youth engaged as clerk in the mercantile house of George P. 
Buell, one of the first merchants of Lawrenceburgh. Ho subsequently 
spent about two years at Connersville, Ind., but after that time remained 
a resident of Lawrenceburgh till his death. About 1822-23 he engaged 
in the dry goods trade, and continued in the same till 1838, when he 
failed in the general business crash, which swept the country at that 
time. His brother-in-law had established the grocery and seed business 
about the 6ame time, and died in 1838. Norval Sparks then took charge 
of his deceased brother-in law's store, and conducted the same till his 
death in 1877, having been a resident of Lawrenceburgh seventy-one 
years. His wife was Jane Johnston, of Schenectady, N. Y., and they 
reared four children: Margaret J., David E., Ann E. and John \V. 
Four others died in childhood. Mrs. Sparks passed away in 1855. 
David E. Sparks, whose name introduces this sketch, began business for 
himself in 1857, under the' firin title, David E. Sparks & Co., having 
been employed as clerk in a store for several years previous. He was 
succeeded by his partner, John Hunt, in I860, and entered the service of 
the Government, enlisting, in 1861, in the Seventh Indiana Volunteer 
Infantrj', and serving till 18G5. He enlisted as private, but was pro- 
moted to lieutenant, serving in the quartermaster's department. He sub- 
sequently raised a company called Cincinnati National Guards, and was 
commissioned captain of the same, which was afterward consolidated 
with the Thirteenth Kentucky, under command of Capt. Mark Monday. 
He served as master of transportation, and was subsequently employ od 
in the United States railway service at Nashville. From 1805 to 1870 
he was engaged in the wholesale drug business at Evansvillo, Ind. From 
1870 to 1877 he was employed by the Shilito firm, of Cincinnati, since 
which time he has been engaged at Lawrenceburgh. Mr. Sparks was 
married, in 1803, at Nashville, Tenn., to Miss Josephine Beckel, of Phil- 
adelphia, daughter of Prof. J. C. Beckel, a music publisher and teacher 
for many years in that city, where ho still resides. Her mother was 
Charlotte Eicholz, of an esteemed family of that locality. 



I " '. . ;i,i '. I. . , i'il 

JOHN W. : . in 

I ' 

public schools. His i , I 1 

i when in » iool. in 

his fattier' 
the qn i tei ulster's department I 

o f Vi cl e re 1 1 

home soi n ; :' ; t this, 

tinned Mil LSCG; ■ II 

latter date J 

LEONARD SP] 
: I owns 100 acn : of land. He was bon 

1 1 : I . ' ■ e eived n fair educatii in in tl 

1 . was horn in Virginia, June 2, 1801, 

mother, Elizabeth (Williams) Spicknall, i. Cornwall, [Si ;] ' Fel 
ary 25, li 

a family of nine children. Tho father camo to th 18, and 

was a ha) ■ . 11 ] life. and 

i ] ; | | : I ' '■■. h pai ' ce< I. 

Leonard has bei ?; a i ; I 

18 19, to Mi; Eta ihi ! •' lers, a native o 

born December 5, 1826. By this union eighf children were born : Ro- 
sanna, Mary E ■ b C, William, Clara, Alice 

(died in infancy), Thomas L. and Ida. \\ p; ; Febru- 

ary 10, 1885. Mr. Spicknall was township trustee for seven and one- 
half years. He belongs to Wilmingi ' No, 158, F. & A. M. and 

the Grange No. 477. 

JACOB SPIELMAN, of Hartford, is a nati of W'esl land 

. Ponn., born No .. 22, 180 '. ■ p died wh in he was 

young, aud he removed to L ■ ;h with a con 

Bushtield, early i fh > ■ ry. Aftei remaining at Lawrence - 

burgh five or sis yi us, Mr. S. weni oui on ' '.:, ami for sis. 

or eight years was engaged in farm labor with Robert Con away, with 
whom he made his home. While with Mr. I 

to the South w; h flat-boats- one to New Orleans and one to Natchez, see 
■ ■ I I ; i ■ place, [n 1831 oitod in 

i MoAdams, of Ohio County, '.nd to theunkm 
were bom two s in: i I two lai '. [ i >r his marriage Mr. S. sei 

tied en a farm a! the mouth of South Fi . '■; Crock, and for yc; rs atti ' I 
mill at Mi ton. i 18-15 Mrs Spielman died, and in 1847 Mr. Spielm 
married to a Mrs. Chessman, awidow. Two years later h 
Sai- of Iowa, where h ided, and ; I a f arm pri 

















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MS IIISTOKY Ol 

I 

: 

. and fn] 

: 
p 

I 1. 
FRED 

i i if six el born 1o Henry and Sophia 

SprekerkoiT. In the spring of IS (8 be inn 
lauding at Nov. Orleans, La., where 

about sis 

in Hamilton County. He wi 

1857, to > born in Geru ber 8, 1S33. In 

the fall of 1859 Mr. Sprekerl li ' m County and settled 

in Sparta Tov [ | 1 fi ran, : ud 

has since resided. In September, 180 . ! • I the war, ei listing in 

Company C, Thirty-seventh Indiana, and served until Se] 
was taken prisoner at I Stone River, and for some time was 

an inmate of the horrible Libby Prison. & rge he returned 

was immediat ly emplo; etion hand on the Ohio & 

Mississippi Railroad, and in 1871 was promoted to for 
tion, whi fr. Spiel rhoff is a man highly 

a member of the G. A. 
R., I. O. O. F. and Masonic order. Mr. aid Mrs. Sprekerhoff are the 
parents of ton children, viz.: Fred, Dora. Henry, Ida, John (de> 
William, Mary, Emma, Anna and Frank. 

JESSE s; I | man, Aurora, was born in Sparta Town- 

ship, Dearborn Co., Ind., Decei l 20, 1 i 

school education. His father, Hugh, was born in Pennsylvania in 1S12, 
and died in 1 

Stage, was born in Maryland, June IT, 1S04. Je? ;e folli : o 
up to 1849, then vent to flat-boating, whicl i ■ up to 1851. 

He then wenl to Cincinnati, clerked in a whole al I 

until 1857, when he returned to Aurora and flat-b 301. At 

which time he ei lisl d in Com] ny C legi ■ . ! 

unteers and year. Here-enlisted 



l;; .. 



!»r 



Regiment, Indiana ^ erl ; , 

wa.s in < ; - I! I I ifantr; 

ad v ..... : ' nr. Ti. 

1 ! ! ' 

L coi 

I 

. • ' l-o No. 4 12, Chu Mo. 13, 

I. 0. O. I 

JO ' 

p y i born in Scott ' /ember 2i 

: , P a j I ! H 

,. - I Irauhtim) 

Stapp, . ... in 17SG. Tli i f il 

., bis I in 1S20, iu Madi- 

son. The mot] lied lisou in 1S5S, after whic 

father moved to Swi 
Stapp began clerking at rip- . 
Then he < ' y store fo 

seven y> i I I ■ ' 

who was born i: I ' ' : 

have been born to the ■ 

1846, di 'd Julj I I E.i Abraham H.; C ' \ .; Susan 

B.; Eli .. 1853, died March 3, IS5G. Mr. Stapp 

moved to this count; I [for 

which tii farmer. He and wil 

Chui cb ai '. i 

DAVID H. STAPP, atto b >rn in Ripley 

County, Ind., Augusl I on a Earm. In 1867 he 

entered Hanover College iu thi i Stai >, when he took a collegiate com 
graduating in 1S72. I : eafter ho read law with A. D. 

Vanosdi I at Mad I Imitted to the bar at Madison in 1872. 

He wi of 

at which he 1 I y, and began ill in Doar- 

b N : .. " ■ 

Merit, p native 
her 19, 1S52. By the union me child, Plun b ' ti: to them 

. Stapp is a young mau of public spirit and eul 
identified with the erec i ' building b; ..' 

city hi ' As 

B U 2 . F. & A 



VZV iiisro . , 'i, in: \i; : ■ \ > oin ri 

. CIL> ill . . niul a son 

of Joseph i 

County, I Loo I v, il on : .. >■ id 

ing in i ; ol ■'■'■■ 

distri Is o) hi 

after whi 'h he v.,.- 
I : i iours being p 

reading la w school Oincinnati, from 

which institution b 

the bar, ' 12, ] • i.i study w il ! 

divan, oi 

Iowa, '.'.!: | bo returned to Law- 

;e II. Roberts, which 
still exii good al y, and a hard student, 

and bids fair fc n 

NATHAN R. STEDMAN, of ' wa I ' in 1814. 

In early life he went to b 

Iry. In 1 3 -J 7 he i loved to ion there- 

after to Rising Sun, Ind., where with Col. Pinkney James 
he started ill.' first foundry in fchi ; . I of the country. Upon thi 
of Sir. James, W. Ii. Larndiu i into partnership, bu 

spring of 1849 his ii 

and the foundry was removed to Aurora. Mr. Stedman's was a long, 
busy and eventful life. wi ms to the ' and nndemon 

strative in the bestowal of charity. " He has left behind him the 
in l d and undimn In ible life fi I o J How, full 

of patient industry, nonorabl i , its, noble d< Is 

in benevolence and charity, and all that goes to p the full meas- 

ure of a n iccurred in 1884, 

HKXKY SI i ill-wright, Harrison Township, oneoi the Lep 

resentative men of the county, ■■ ■ ■ born in Bavaria in 1S32, sou of 
Henry ai (Rising both of Bavaria, who married in then- 

native country, and iin . H-nea in 1840 with tl 

dren: John, Peter, Barbara, Jo | John C, Fienrj and Sixs; i The; 
Ii ated in Kelso Township, whi bet died I (57, the mother in 

11 >5. At the a;: to Iowa, and li ai ued 

the wagon tradi itForl I Iheretui ud after two years 

drifted back into the milling bi bich ed i bii 

who was a milli ■ in i u iy. He and his brothers, John C. and J isep] 
started the St. Leon Mill, which they operated togethwr for soi i 
John still owning it. In 18(51 Mr. Si tiger bought the Weaver Mill on 
the canal, one mile above the site o£ his present re iden . but i 









; ml tin. mil 


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. , Anna, 

I 

trious, energetic citize i ; 

being elected on ti nily is i 

^vi t ji the ' !atbol I " 

JOSEPH STENG ER, ' native oi 

, His ] I ' : Del Eva 

(Reisin i Stonger, 

18, 179 , the 1 Um\ id 

States in 1840 and located 

chased land, and wher He died i.pri] 24, 

1868. an ' LSGT>. Twel eel their 

anion, fi ■ 1 ■ : 

witb their p; subject, wi trri«d at 

St Leon, Ind., : to was born 

in Germany Dec '■ liter his 

of his father, ou which mtil : went to 

Braysville, Ind, . ' I his brother pure till, 

which was shortly aft troyed by flood In May, 1 

removed to St. Leon and purchased tit ' in which he has i 

!. 1884, 
having been the mother of eleven children, viz.: J hn H , I atharine, 
Peter, Chi ! 3, Frank Uice, Hejiry, Jo eph, Victoria 

and Mary P.. 

JOHN C. STEN< ' .ill and saw-i ill, 

dealer in all kinds of lumber St. Leon, Ind ativi of 

Germany, horn Fi brui ly 1, ] 1 

to Henr; i : 

born County in 1840. the I I u uith trad in ' 

F years. In to Chi- 





i.l worl 


1 




1 yoai ion he loeah 1 


Leon, ei 




c 




1 


July : 




i 




di! Iiu< L'llt, v. : 


Ger 








1 uii and Mai 



in 
•■I 

saw-mill at St. Loon, : id in 
ineo business. He 

,-iz.: Willi ed), Joh> 

A., Eli Louisa, J | ; . I i Emma and 

(di . i_. are members of the CJ 

C and highly esteemed as a eiti- 

ze Recogui in , his merit the p pie of the i 

He hold the office of trustee of I ■ ! 
Townshii - intil 1870, and in 181 

sioner. . - >rn County. 

JES . 

William and Ma 
art, natives of Pennsylvania. The pi LI 

was a native Ireland, ... I >ejieved i uu n 

immigi wh re he died. William Si 

re four of his child d, and in 

1829 remo ; down the river in a small family 

boat, landing at the mouth of Laughery Creek, and settling ii I i 
Township, Ohio County. Soon after the family removed into Ripley 
County, where Mr. S. pi and and I till his death 

two yei g killed at a house-raising by the rolling of 

which threw him from nrvived him about two 

years. One- child was horn to them after thej came to Indiana, thus 
leavin; at their deaths live small children, rl i ight up by rela- 

tives and acquaintam all living, are 

Joseph A. , Sarah, wife of Mr. Crouse, who resides in W., 

John and Maria, wife of Ezra Hastings. Jesse W. was about four years 
of age when brought to Ohio County, and: after the death of his | 
was reared to manhood by Levi Scranton, tin if Union Town- 

ship. > B 

daughter of SI , tings. He was a native of Mi 

soli , and New York. They wei in Ohi i 

County i aged 

se^ ■ at* fivi Eis widow 

They had eight children, live now living: Ezra; Louisa; Sarah, 
Robert Colield; Stephen M., and Eliza, now widow o Tl 
lum. Mr. Hastings and wife were members of the Christian I 
Mr. and I have had five chi] : Ei av now living: Ruth, 





Mr. 


Ill 


! all 


' he i |n«i 




! iu life with 1 « 








: ... 




' "' ■ '< "' : 





Slow: 

in 0! io i 'oni (y. xco],l I 

dow hi 

1 ' *' i ■ ■ 

members of the < 
ISA.'; 
\A ie Aurora J 

: I atin Ooi ut\ . tvy., A] i il 25, 
1850. H . i . 

Louisa Cfirr, in Horn-} County. Ky. [n 1! r: rted out to 

thai trade for six years. In I SOS 1 
to Kan-. 

where hi on the river. Octo 1879, be came 

to Aurora, and began worki Iry. He continued up t ■ " 

at whicb time be 1 and 1 been with 

them ever since. He was married July 5, 1875, to Miss Clara A. Robin- 
son, of Florence,' Switzerland C>>.. Ind., who was born April 'jr., 

i . I ; oy J. and 

Pearl. Mr. Stodghill is a member of the Lodge of I. O.O. F. at 
Patriot. Ind. 

WILLIAM STOPHER, Randolpl | on. of he old 

dents of Ohio Con 

ruarj 5, L810. His parents, Mathi; far; (Black) Stophi . 

natives of Virginia and Ma resj fchor moving lo 

Penneylv: iwing to maturity in bis native State- In earlier 

years Mar; Black had moved from Maryb ■ 
and there she and Mr. Stopher were married. In ISIS they 
came with their iiMr.ii to Rising Sun, and Mr. Stopher took a 
lease of land for five years, after whicb he purchased a tract of bis own 
which, by the aid of bis son-, he cultivated till his death, which occurred 
between bis seventy fifth and eightieth year. His widow lived to the 
remarkabli age of mor ■ oi hundred years. Of their ten cl 
si till living, our sub \ at, "William Sto] the oldest. lie 

was eight ie to Ohio County. The vers of bis 

minority were] l the guidance of his parents. 

lie the : bali n : :^ time for a pej i I i years in fiat-boat- 

ing, maki r several trips to the Crescent City. He then turned his 
attention to farming exclusively till his failing strengtb c 
to retire from active bu r. Mr. Stopher was married, when 



.. 






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I)] 










both (Me 










natives <>f \ irgiuia. 


1 




: 




. 


' 










n 


• 







I " I ' ' ' 

I 

; , 

i 7, and Mr. S. i ; 

George B. < 

: ' ■ . 

and is cheer! 

S. SI : : 

; . ■ 

ye 

: ■ a boy on 1 ' I ' | I . ' 

Pit! burgh and AYheeling. After tvn 

Pacific coast, and for aboi 

with fair success. H ben returned 

Emma Adler in Feb 'uary, i J 1 

dence and business. He began tbi adding a 

stock of boots and two years 1 that 

present lias, kept one of the lead 

giving hi mtion to Lis bn ' ! 

is a daughter of Henry Adler, a prominent i 

uty yeai-s, now a resident of Cinciui They ] 

Rosa. Mr. Strasburger has 1 l I a meml 

Masonic fraternity, and affilial h the Republi 

ELDEE WILLIAM P. STRATTON, see page 185. 

W. II. SULLIVAN, M.D.,Ri ing Sun, is a native of Mason County, 
Ky., born in 1822. His parents. Austin and ' rim : 

were both born in the same State. His mother died in 1855 iu her 
eighty- fourth ye v. In Lis early days his Ci : : farmer, and later 

in life turned his attention to buildiDg flat-! 
of men. Dr. Sullivan grew to maturity oe tl Ee was 

in the Transylvania University at 1 tod in the 

medical department of that institution, March •'>, 1848. He i 
ately entered uj ice of his profession, locating h R 

during the first year of his practice. Havii 
here for almosl Dr. S. has built up a consid 



: i . hilly iu the 

in lS.j 
To] 

Dr. Sullivan owns a 
II his time 
sion. S : : ; 

Methodi b Episcopal ( Sullivan is also ; 

n 

St'TTOX, M. D., ph; ' / 'ora, was 

1 ! I i ; . 1 812. J ! : ' ; parents wer ■ ' 

I States in 
1819. The fori born in ! . 1788. 

They spei t the winter I ' ' 

in the s] ' I to i 

valley of the " I I Liu County, Ind. The fate 

subject was of a literary turn of mi ' of a good library 

lis n ry and powers His death 

occurred in 1850. The mother receivi ! i I tioi at one of the 

fashion a 1 : 

I , k. The Doctor has now a 

piece of her needle wort representing an Eli'}'; It is up- 

ward of ■ i i ' : parlor and is i a master- 

I 1827. 

' [Forded— 

the day of the old log-cabin 

and bee. I ! in abun- 

dance tl ' of I ; -;• . In 182S he was sent to 

Miami University to acquire a kn : 
In the winter of 1832 with family removed to the city of 

■ !i. Ohio, where in the following sui - 

of medicine under Dr. Jesse Smith, which, however, was of i 
duration, as his preceptor died suddenly of cholera, then pre 
the city as an epidemic L,i' -■ :i!/»i'\ 1 •• 1.. •; ■,:,■ ;; pupil of Prof. John 
Eberle. i of pri el ires given to a small 

class by Prof. S. D. Gross, now of Philadelphia. During the winter 
young Sutton attended lecture; at the Coll 

spent ruostof his timi in the spring and fall in the dissecting ro in [n 
the sprii 1835 : 

r< i. i nd for this'pur] <i look 

cursion with gun and ! ' I I 

Canal to St. Mary's, down tin y's River iu a flai boat to Fori 

Wayne, the Hn : ! ■ I .■ ; all canoe 



92(3 I r i . r I'd AXL> OHIO ClU'XTI 

I i-mony. From Huntington to 
I ■! • i • V! i an almost unbroken foi 

I bo aft i ghtat La< Irovo, 

ab • ih-s cli I at flood height, and 

t 1 I side ol tho river hung down in the 

swii taking i lo keep in the middle of the stream thau 

to " ; on just before 

he rci l as ho ti 

.ting to land. By the flashes of lightning and the wall of 
trei he kept in the middle of the stream 

i he head 
of au i. i ' from turning he pushed his paddle 

I, a on its i and an umbrella 

ght he pushed away the drift- 
wood that had lodged again ! the cam >, swung out into the river and 
resumed his jonri py. I ■ short time at Peru, and visited the 

Indian village, as the natives at t.L ,-e. On 

this solitary voyage of sevoral hundred miL the '■.-.. 

wild turkeys and wild gei , and saw o 

night ap] bank of the river, 

made a temporary shelter and his camp until morning, then 

'urney. Invigoi 
he returned f i Cincinnati i of abi ut two 

sunned hie stu lies. 

1 it the i [ College a ftei 

having at ! I of 1 title of his thesis 

being "The Relations I and the Vital Principle." In 

the spring of 1836 Dv. Sutton commenced the practice of his pro 
at Aurora. Ind. Ho s < '■. I an oxi :nsive pri 

hat time a large amou it of sickness on the low malarial bottom lauds 
in the neighborhood of Aurora. June 7, 1838, he «r married to 
Miss Sarah Folbre, of Aurora, and by tho union four sons and one daugh- 
ter were born, out of which number one daughter and one son 
Mrs. Sutton died in 1868. In the winter of 1S3S, Dr. Sutto 
fail g ti ■ aination of a case in which ho felt 

much interest d, wrot of articles on the "Ii 

1 i !■ the Public." The e , pel wen published 

in the Dearborn Democrat during (ho months of December, January and 
February, and were his first literary efforts for publication. In 1839 the 
cii i • . r Aurora celebrated the Fourth of July in grand style, and on 
: >r. Suti in ■. one E the orators of the day, and 

an address to an audience of many thousands. In "MO i ■ p 



Imrricaii .7, 1 ' nc . Vol. i 

: - ' | 

' In the winter i f 184:3. epidemic > r 

known by the pop of . 

also : 

Neighboring phyi icia , 

death of on - ' I pin ician 

in Wilmington, i\ lii.l I 

attack ai ' I not. n . 

•o for Dr. 

in the fall of 
1S43 he publish on • in the 

;: . ■ .. iukh! by 

1 1 e said: 

or v have bad 
several i , * It 

attacks the muco 

the gland of. the throat, kin erysipel: the lungs 

and thoracic '. iscera, the ul 

fever, as t] I p] [so , lied the 

epidemic." 

At thi time 1 il I advanced vi< vs. The 

paper inn Prom il w< i pub 

lished in u ed sal jour id also i 

it was reprinte 1 in full in] 

Sutton has been close!, identified with the formation and growth of the 
Dearborn Count} Mi die: 1 Society, wl 

prosperous county inedi ' - in the State. In the spring i 

he issue : circul , in ] >earboru 

joining counties, and the fix'si .;. funned 

in Dearborn County was organized at his residenc in Aurora on the- first 
Monday in June, IS44. At this tim 

tiee, and gave much attention to surg B j frequently sell eti d to 

deliver;- ■.-, and took an active part in the temperance 

in iv ■:,.. at. In the summer of IS L9 < bob j a mi its ap] 
Aurora in its n\ 

day ; and whiie attending > d with 

ease himself. This wa: ab iut '-1 o'i >ck in the mor ng. He 1, 
up during the whole night, and for a number in suceessh n his re t had 
been broken. The epidemic was most violent in that portion of the town 
in which he resided. More than half of hii ! >rs died. 

His whole familv wen.' '-trie 1 ;. :■■■'■..... after another. His el I 



928 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

died aftor only a few hoars' illness, and his youngest son sank into col- 
lapse so low that his recovery was despaired of for nearly twenty-four 
hours. Dr. Sutton partially recovered from the attack, and although 
feeble and emaciated, again assisted, as far as he was able, in the treat- 
ment of the sick. The distress and anxiety of the citizens of Aurora at 
this time can scarcely bo realized, for, in the midst of the pestilence, 
the destruction of the town by tire seemed at one time to be almost in- 
evitable. 

On the 23d of July, while Dr. Sutton was rendering all the assist- 
ance that he could in his feeble health, at the bedside of a patient in the 
collapse stage of cholera, the alarm of fire was given, and he was hur- 
riedly called from this patient to attend oue of the citizens who had 
received fatal injuries and burns at the conflagration. The flames for a 
time were uncontrolable, and the destruction of property was great. A 
large planing. mill, distillery, corn-house and a number of other build- 
ings were destroyed. Seeing the difficulty citizens occasionally had in 
procuring a physician to attend immediately on the sick, Dr. Sutton, 
while convalescing from his illness, issued in pamphlet form for gratui- 
tous circulation: "A Summary of the Symptoms and Treatment of Asiatic 
Cholera, - ' intendod for a guide in the treatment of the disease until a 
physician could be procured. In 1852 he delivered a Fourth of July 
oration at Aurora "On the Danger of Dissolution of the Union from the 
Question of Slavery," which oration was published in the newspapers 
and in pamphlet form. The danger of civil war, which occurred nine 
years afterward, was forcibly predicted. This year he joined the Indiana 
State Medical Society, and was apjiointed chairman of a committee to 
report on the "medical history of cholera in Indiana." He issued a 
circular, which he sent to physicians throughout the State. It coutained 
a series of questions with blank spaces for answers. Ho succeeded in 
obtaining answers and communications from forty-six physicians, show- 
ing the extent to which the epidemic had prevailed in thirty-eight 
counties. A number of these communications were from the most em- 
inent practitioners in the Slate, and the report, it is believed, contains 
the largest amount of trustworthy information concerning the prevalence 
of Asiatic cholera within the State of Indiana that has yet been published. 
The report was presented to the State Medical Society at its meeting in 
May, 1853, and is published in its transactions. In that report he 
advocated the view that cholera was an infectious disease, and was dif- 
fused over the globe by human agency. He also advanced the idea that 
cholera, like other diseases, presents different grades of severity; and 
that the choleraic diarrhoea, which at that time was regarded as a pre- 
monitory system only, was in reality a mild form of the disease. He 



divid 


■:[ Cl 


. 


dysoi 






form, 







920 

: 

' : 
tln> ci a 

Vomiting and inii;'Jii.;. bluon 

disease may 1 

po ' t it i 

ner of its diffusio 
ical Society.) He also 

'...■. 
attentioi 

[row 

; .. . BV.iO- 

that rep ■ . terminated 

fatally, the ev: , I invol 

bed; eo [uenl bod and . 

death of this patient the straw in 

this bed ■.. - em] 

Now, if we i at fi emanated a p 

capabl i of ] ' I , if the town, w lich 

infected is just that poi Prom this place, 

most likely to p ' 

t; rough several 

■ r. . i eh a fatal case 1 

I comes a source of infection —first from the lext from 

the bed i also from th f) 

watery a] , generally emptied on thegi 

He beli red thai cholera could be s] ;h the community 

from I by this pain 

or cho! aic diarrhea, while the ] cloth 

although laboring under an infectious diarrhoea would scarcely be aware 
that he was an 11. It i 1 irno in mind that thi >. 

formed in 1849, to account for the introd preval 

at Aurora. Th y i ; I 1 I i th< prof* ion in May,lS5! . 

of the Indian , State Society. It is believed that in thi 
is found the fuM warnhi ; of da •, .' arising from cl ... nations, 

and i-"iise- I'^i/ily ihe danger of throwing th | ad. Dr. 

Snow, of Lou Ion, one year arte d , ■ theon 

that cholera poi: (nations, but tha his po 

must be swallowed, either in drinlcin * -. lo produce its 

spi effect. Dr. Sutton's report is full of original observatio 

is su ;estive in the I.'. ' 1 to the at a 





■ 




0(1 


' 


it tb;it time, it, 


1 ■ 


: 


1 " o' 




f. ' 


ssion. ! 






• 












:,, i, Ye: 


1 




1 I' lllClll- 


■ 








' ! tO 11: 






; ! 











9150 UN' AN'!> OHIO 

Clark, Hill 

ii blii 

11 than] of tbo 
oeiety v -,,.'■ [o and 

on the medical history ol 
the spriDj 

■ ■■ . ' . 

; till: di I] . ■ 

both of Lb rials ] Thi ; oar : ■ 

I is pub- 
lish L in tl '. : 
epizootic km >v a by the J rog-ch 

onlj in Dearborn Count; . he Stati . also in Ohio 

and Kent 1 over 

by hundreds and thousands. But littL thattime 

of the nature of this i .oase. Some writers thought it was a sj 
cholera r<.s;-i,,Mii in which it took its name, and d 

ed upon an "epidemic influence;'' others, tl from crowding 

■ • distilli ries. Soim 
the slop fed to hi tbo bed but none 

at that Lime r in recti 

i >:■. Sutton ies of experiments; 1 d the disease to be 

highly ii;i' lited, that this infection bad a latent 

I ing twenty days, and that an attacl exempt 1 the 

Hi ! ■ I evidence to show that the 

disease c item From the 

b was not a disease 
i in tissue bore evidence 
of inflamn ntor i U i to tl ci delusion that "thii 

appears to be intermediate between the specific eruptive disea ai I 
erysipelas, pa - ing >> the i . : having its exact re- 

■■'■■■ is subject." 

The first i published in the Cine 

1 '. Li 57. It a eoj I into i ral agricultural papers. 
A. more extended series of expe iu audi publishod 

in (1 e Mn\ (ISoS), mi .' orth Arm riean co-C . rgl al Re- 

vi< w. Quotations were given h ricul and m 

and a length} review was printed in ihe /5'< ' • ami Journal 



o:;i 

I! ,s, ,.. •" , | |, 

edited '. 'rof. B. W . U I L'i if. Richard 

"] ! , we thi Min ■ oft'i 

ace i ■ 

I ! cription. 

are L 

for on 

pen of : Lurora, D L Dr. Sutton 

Ui 

I will n I 

I in full all the i 

origin,] r." In concluding 

a very lengthy 
fore, beforo our epidn 

; to off .Sui 

lies." Twenty- 
odd years have passed i 
' I the correctness i nclusions then arrived at. The 

■ still prevail: 
markable known to have occurred npo llio on millions 

of swine have died from the to our country 

almost incalculable. When the history of this epizootic com i 
written, it will be found thai the researches of Dr. Sutton were the first 
that unraveled the d gave the prop- 

er direction for further investigation. Having had much ex| 
with scarlatina in its n il form, he publi : ; 3 in the North 

American e r dico-* , ••. : ' ;, hi i 

lions on the diversity of 

: 1. AYhi the sj stem is 
■suddenly prosl i t of the disease, as if from a 

is system. 2. Where the violence 
of the di s din the brain, producing congestion or inflam- 

r.;ation of that organ. 3. Whi tho princi] 

of irriti lb ..- a violem i 

■!. Y\ diss; the throat and ;piratory 

passa . ', ims were occa- 

sionally aH distinct as those upon which 

mild, the • ' ties. Dr. Sutton was fond 

of the natural sciences, and, al hi I in the p 

his profe ion he i i i of his time to their study and inves- 

tigation. In IS.V.i he > ; ' i urse of loctun - ig ! r embrac- 



'■ I. with whii 

careful si I mi Those lectures wore d 

. ' . on] of 

[ml i ■■ cord 

: Lsyiioj c] as publish ' 

■ • ■ ■ ' 

' Septeui- 
: ' ■■• publi- 
cation to the .-1 ' 

tvhiei .;-"!. In 

18(52, a few .1. Term., 

aittee, visited 
the field 

pit d boa I ■ led and 

the field 1 pital at Now Alba I During 

t on 
eial coinpli ! Ohio & Mississi i : 

Liailro; ! and cei udi "• lished in tho 

Aurora Co, 

form that al tho nest election, he was I as a candid 

mayor, and, a] 17 to his own 

almost unanimi ■■■'_• twenty-four \ 1 I 

bei cast for 1 ; andidate. 

was el ion, tho last tirao i ithout op- 

position. I as the with the 

duties of his profession, [n 

the com in which 

he reit sral Lh . 53, wi I observations. 

(See Afed£< al and of 

[n August, 1 I into tl city of Aurora. 

The expe : I had hi I with this disea 

city council to '". tho board of health unlimited power to prevent its 
spread. Dr. S icy of sanitary 

measures, and tl e to " 

superinten as presid 1 ■" all the 

houses and I; and 

system of 1 

confined to icality, and only twelve\leaths occurred. Inl877he 

presented a report to the Indiana St:: te Medic hole 

iug its introdu : 1 to which it prevailed in Dearborn, 

Ohio, and Ripley Co : ions of Indiana 

: lical Society for 1867.) In 1868 he pre I re] 



toil, 




a 


■ 




1 






' 




: 1 li 




hyp 


n ■. fro 


[nil 


! 



■ i 

i 
I 

1 
■ 

■ ' 

| 
has f tical 

the Indian; 

e power which 
mind ha 

, by 
(See IV 
he attend at San 

1 
and was 

met© .■■ : ■ trip to 

Califon ndeni. In 1872 

he attended the mee-th America: of 1 J L J i.--. - 

delphiaj and 

log)* and epidi 11 , section, 

which are published i ! 

of the sai for .1873. urns American Medi- 

'' io he attended the meeting oi 

n 1 presided o 
section • t psycholo. m '. . jui 

American . .) Thia 

year he p -i ited to the Indi: i [edical Society, a 1 

on the n., . 1 topograph; eulars to 

a large u ph 1 

to tl ; : , itiea, the prevailing di 

Society for ] 73.) hi 
Angn , 1873, cl ... The 

Board i of presi 



93 1 HI: ." • >i ! D OHIO UlUNVlKS 

; I with tho os 

celleuf liVcts, > iniroduc- 

! city bj [>i . ■' 

Ho mul a i) 
tho obji , haye local I 

1 : 

all ilin i 
i , (i i ■■ ; u :■ or I In 1ST I 

hi 1 n 

infected with trichinre, He > . : ' Lai r of cases 

of ti ichi osis, ] . Ho publi b 

ii in Farmer and 

.contribi 

and Enqui lj, IS r4. He 

continued his invest igatiu , and in May, 1875, | 
trichinosis to the Indiana S In this roj 

i ; , i . | 

to ten [i"!' ceni o udiana wei 

trichinae, Lvar locali 

ties; and also thai ii w: highly probable was one 

of the -.■;■ ,' 

prevalent in our country. (Si I »f tho Indian;. 

Society for 1875; also extracts i pul Li 1 in the 

Lai ; On of Dece fiber, 1874, he 

a paper 1 i on " Tho 

Fulcrum as n aid to Manipulation in the r Disl 

to ii . 

well as its aid to manipulation without force in tho 
red of c foi January 

2 and 9, L875.) In tho A - ' tl.Re.pui ter for Jai 

1875, I,.- publi ;hed his i on of di 

of the hip- joint by manipulating the femui ■ Thi9 case 

had resisted tho usual method i > ■ ■'■'■,■{ \\v pur] 

1 by thii plan in a few moim tits. [n May, L87G, ho read a 
paper bef e tho Indi; na State Medic: l.S , cmn of reduc 

ing dislucatiuin of the hip-joint. [n pi ; I -■ 

to guide in the reduction of the <! : o d m of the 

hip-joinl h over a Eulci , 

i in tl | ii i ■ Qiiml of the 

American Practithn r for 1870. On ■ oi . case 

eight da] ' i nil had re isti bet reduction. On 



I '. i I • : I I ! 

tholSi.1i. 

'' .m II 

L . : .' 

i . 
establish : of 

•in the 
reducl I at th; I 

I i;. th(> 
; 

i 
I 

summer c Sutton publish. : 

of this ' 

Lancet \ 23d of Februi 

1875, he al Society o 

the fuleru I in inani] 

reduction of dislocation of the shoul rec of the 

but did n cas. 

rune .1878, D al of the Dear- 

born County Mod patient 

which th. ! i - nd had 

resisted all the l ■ ' 

ilia. From its 
i 
made to 

that no I. \.; Dr. Sutton 

was not present that day at 1 
i Aurora, on Thursday, June 27, and if r. 
this, at lea fc, would be a 1 

the society. The man lived about tnd on the 

Dr. II. C. Vin ., I by the pati and ! ; 

Dr. T. M. Kyi. Dr. V G.Henry, Dr. 11. C. 

l^nd and Dr. H. H. Sn 

10 days' durati aniicij 

chlorof , and, assi: led by 
fch m, Dr. Sutton i ion, by his ] 

of manipulating, in less than live minutes. Thr. 

by Dr. Yi 
with perfec : i . . o 



tion of tlm 




. 






. 








Of ill- i ■ il ) 
















presontoil br 








of Di 


'!':■ 




ny, Thoi 


' 


James 1\ D< 








;. w. 




>o tn 


msactions 


of the 
















' 


flushed 


a number of 












.f thi 






. 








■erica i 







li 








i in 


August, 187(1, In 




' 


on the 






County, 




, of g] 






i i s o t' t w< i 





and widi ; iod paper wi published in tho ] 

ion oi I87C and re\ iewed in Tourual 

of Scii i: iciber, 1ST 7, page 2o'.i, a in I als i ropublii hi d in full 

in the - > for 181 [n 1878 he read a paper 

before il; 

i at, 1 published in tho tr 

1S78, and also in pampl -tod the impor- 

tance of i I ' tistics on this subject, which has since been done. 

He kept a inet irnal for over thirty years, and furnished to 

ithsonian Instil Eor many 

Smi ian : S59 to LS73.) Dr. Sutton is an 

ident thinker; has been remarkable for his indefatigable energy, 
industry and love of science. Although engaged in a large practice in 
the different branches of his profes ion, he foi id time to di vote a portion 
of his attention tu y ■' ireology, and also to 

write for tho newspape f of subjects. Some of those 

articles wore his best productions. He has written on sanitary 
scarlatina, cholei i ' a series of artii ided school sys 

te ;. railroad obligations of Aurora, excursion to Niagara Falls, to Can- 
ada, to California, and other artii les too numerous to mention. He has 
been selected as orator for a large number of public c< 1> -i ■;•- ■' 
has deliven ,1 ai ch i and orations, many of which were published in 
pamphlet form. As president of the board of trustees of the college of 
physicians and surgeons of Indiana, he delivered an address to the grad- 
uating class of Indianapolis in LS77, and also in 1878, which was pub- 
lished in the Indianapolis papers. (See Sentinel and Indianapolis Jour- 
nal of February 22, 1878.) He has given much attention to the micro- 
scope, and has made valuable di: ioveries and suggestions on trichina:' 
and trichinosis, to which allusion has already been made. II" has made 
surgery a specialty, is an expert opi -iitor, and has had a largo surgical 
practice. Tho machine shops of the Ohio .'• '' h . ' ippi 1'ailway are 
situated near Aurora, and. as might be expected, many accidents occur 
at them, reqni) b . urgical aid. Much of this has fallen to his 



BIOi |{,\PH[C.\] ' I 037 

care, and porfori o vai ions. 1 [if 

iggesti 
sively re] 

L87G\ ! 

■■;'.'■ 

sopliica] j | hip 

b. i »r, G aipul niton's fnleri 

Dr. Su1 i is romai ee in th ight ; 

He ha : had the i tury and 

antl ; icrati vc I ! 

t, bei □ : le to acquire 
ample means to live comfortably in his old age. He has always taken a 
deep inti est in the Bid), ' I with the board of 

school tri I was instrumental 

erecting at Aurora one oJ liool I lildings in southeastern 

Indiana. He directed his attention ago to tiquitie; 

of his nc bborl Id ' ■ 

and ( arl hworks tl . I i:r:t ir »m the 

of improvement all trac be lost. He 

made collecti i i'. ' 

found in the neighbo I 

thousand speeh local ini irest. Ho has a line 

eqn torial l-eh :ope, five feet long, object glass, three 
inches, finely mi 1 observations, which he places at the 

disposal of the; f, momical class in the high school of Aurora. Sketches 
of his life have alreadj I publi lb; fountain Medical 

Association, and also in tin A Physicians of 

the United States." In the sketch of his life in the transactions of the 
Rocky Mountain Medical Association, Dr. Toner say:; that "all of bis 
papers have the rare merit of being original and practical.'" In L8S1, 
Dr. Sutton read a paper before the American Association for the Ad- 
vancers if of Si ience on the gold bearing drift of Indiana. In this 
paper he presents evidence to show thai this drift was brought from the 
northwest. The paper is published in the of the Associa- 

tion and also in pamphlet form. During the same year he was electi d a 
fellow of the American Association for the Advancement, of Science. Jn 
1883, after the great freshet in the Ohio River, he discussed in Iho 
Cincinnati Commercial, the laws governing our great continental storm9. 
A theory was advocated at that time that the removal of (lie for 
tho cause of our great floods in the Ohio River, He endeavored to show 
that the clearing of the forests had but a slight influence in producing 



938 nisroR\ .,.-,., tut counti 

our groi ' fro huts, bul (lint tl Hood depended upon groal oo 
storms which pr I dilution in tin amount of rainfall, and thai 

such li ■ ■ fed in all iifjoti ; nd over difi" 

the globe. (See Ci for Lpril L(>, 1! S3 i 

Bi i dia ia State Me lical Socioty 

cm para ib . , bii h is \ t the of 

also in pamp] I ' .■ p the paper in full 

were ropubl I j b paper he endeav- 

ors to gi 1 n ! 1 the different d 

produced by r rnicro-organi On the 7th of March, 1 ■!, as pi 

of the Bocietj of al IC liege, he delivi 

annual address at th (See minutes of the meeting of the 

aluum i for 1SS4.) Hi . | » ; to thi 

Medical Associi '■ . .. . read s section on State medi- 

cine. In this report he necessity of providing 

bettor county hospital acco • i p; r population in 

Indiana, and dirett> I alu.iiion to other reforms that should be made in 
our State. (See journal of I on, Vol. 

IV, page 217.) In LSS4, he was elected presid it of the Rocky 
Mountain Medical Association, and on Ma} 6, V >. he delivered the 
annual a. lire- 1 ociety al New Orleans. May 13, 1S85, 

he read a paper before the Indi ! ! cietj on the epidem- 

ics that have occurred in southeastern Indiana during the. las! fifty 
years, and also presented observations on the changes of type in some of 
our endemic malarial diseases. (See transactions of the Indiana State 
Medical Society for 1885.) He is an active member of the Dearborn 
County Medical Society and also a member of the Indiana Statu Medical 
Society, and of the American Medical Association, aud was a member of 
the International Medical Congress of 1876, ar a delegate from the 
Indiana State Medical Society. He is a member of the Cincinnati 
Society of Natural History, of the Archaeological Association of Indiana, 
and of the American Association for the advancement of science. He is 
an honorary member of the Ohio State Medical Society, California St ite 
Medical Society and also of several o ' 

FRANCIS SWALES, veterinary surgeon and fanner, Harrison Town- 
ship, is a native of England where he was born in 1823. He immigrated 
to the Dnited States with his parents, George and Mary (Wilson) S\ aL . 
in 1831, the family coming via New York and locating on the farm 
where Mr. Swales now resides and which the father purchased in the 
year of his immigration. George Swales was a man of extraordinary- 
attainments; being at once a physician and vetorinary surgeon and 
a chemist, having spent sven years in the i licine, five years 



in veil rio: 


r\ snrgi 




one of the 






cessful in 


lis practice in Hi 




111! 


e as a ]>1 


n 



i ■ in chemi I ry. 1 [c was coi i ' • I 
mer in Europo and v. ;i : equally suc- 
ry. In his lafor years : I 
and turned his attention n : 
le reputation for liif kill and learning. 
He reared nine cbildn i six now surviving: Sarah, wife of 

.!. i . Dr. Wilson 1 ' ry, wife of George W. Liobiu 

son; David W. aDd Cliri I - A, Mr. Swalesmel his death by drown- 
ing in I] i • ford that stream, -1 
1. 1832. body I nine days later near where tbo present 
Harrison bridge spans the river. Francis Swales, the subject of this 
sketch, ...■■. I i rnaturi farm with his parents and excepi ftve 
years has resided all hi I old hoi)K"-'("-:d. He began the study 
of . ' surgery quite young under his father's instruction and has 
ever since been a faithful and earnest student of the profession. As 
soon as of sufficient , warrant confidence he began the practice of 
his profession and since 1S31 has made it, a specialty. His services are 
in demand throughout a wide scope of territory and he is almo I i 
stantly employed. He treats both horses and cattle for all d 
peculiar to the species and is regarded as very successful in his pro- 
fessional work. In connection with his practice Mr. S\, ; 
found time to oversee the work on his farm which now & 
42S acres, on parts of which his two sons and two daughters now reside 
He began life in a very humble way, earning his first eighty acres of 
land by coopering and seme blacksmithing, and his entire pur 
which are now considerable, ma} r be said to have been earned by hard 
and continued labor both of head and hand. Mr. Swales was married 
in 1845, to Hannah Grubbs, a daughter of James Grubbs, who was one 
of the early settlers of the county and is still living. Mrs. Swales was 
born in this county, and died May 28, 1SS0, leaving four children, only 
three of whom are now living: David, Jane (wife of Edward Jackson) 
and James W. Mary Eveline, wife of William Haddock, recently 
passed away. Mr. Swale, is still in the practice of his profession and 
his large experience in treating maladies peculiar to horses and cattle 
render his sen - aluable to the stock owners of the surround- 
ing country. His son, William Swales, is also engaged in the same 
profession located at Bright, Dearborn County, and is said to be very pro- 
ficient. 

WILSON II. SWALES, M. D., Logan Township, born in York- 
shire. England, March 9, ISIS, is a son of George and Mary (Wilson) 
Swales, mentiom I abo^ . He was thirteen years of age when witb his 
father's family he arrived in Dearborn County. He had laid the foun 



:.. ; :. 


! and ; 




to Li 




ie 






cni 


1 




lie 


■ 






Cii i . 


.1 in 


! ! 



'.Md msTo 

i Dear 
d upon : 

ihysiciau 
Medical C!u I . 
Lad begun the 

pi" ticii i Col] id now returned home 

■■ took up i i profession which he has continued 

with u 1842 he was united in 

[ton County, 0] 
id Ann (^ Ciller) Pruden, natives 
i : of cholera in 1850, in Hamilton 

County, Ohii . Tli >j .. ■ of i ' hf children, four now surviv- 

ing: James, Ann, B Dr. Swales and wife h: 

ly si rvivo: John II., 

Gri I \\"iIso:i II., tL physician. Dr. Swales 

is a member of Harri '7. F. & V. M. with which he has 

been identified since 1S4G. As a citizen ho stands deservedly high in 

the esteem of the people of tli 

LINEAS SWIFT, Lawn Township, a thrifty farmer of 

Dearborn County, wa His father, Henry 

Swift, settled at the nioutb of Laugh ■ in a very early day and. 

died at the age of abo n Mr. Swift grew up in the 

county and was engaged in cod > c till t] | 'ing of 1864, when 

he enlisted in Company D, Sixty-second Indiana. Volunteer Infantry, 
serving one year in the late war. He received his discharge June 9, 
18G5, and returned to Hardintown. He had spent some time in corn 
weighing for .lames Gaff, the distiller, : nd on his return home was thus 
employed with Hiram Cox in the river trade, loading and weighing 
produce. He v> named in February, 1S0S, to Eliza Hayes, daughter 
of Isaac Hayes, and they have four children: Isaac, Bertha, Eva and 
John. Mr. and Mrs. Swift are both members of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, he being regarded as one of the most energriic farmers of the 

community, whi ■ •■• he has given his exclusive attention to for 

some time. 

JAMES li. SWOPE, ! i ;h, was born in Madison 

County., Ivy., in 1817. His parents died when he was eight years, old. 
He was married in 1843 in Clermont County. Ohio, to Sarah P. Perrine 
and but two of six children are now living: Louella C, wife of N. Lof- 
ton, and Sarah V., now Mrs. Wiley. In 1844 Mr. Swope came to Law- 
renceburgh, and this he has since made his home. From 1850 to 1858 
he was chiefly engaged in coopering, and from 1S58 to 1873 in the 





1 in near] 


a]] the city offic -: Wa 


. 


1 


: U. Iu (ho 


'■.'' 


■■' ! 


, 1 , 


Masi inic onl 


, iin.l 1.L 


, 


: 






1 


; 




11 10 


iSO< ] 




i 


i L | the r 


. 


occ 


.,,:,!!,; ■ rail in 








and tin rcafter lived for 




. 


' 



church. 

I ' ' Essex I 

Mass., in 1791. In 1815 lie removed to «' i icii aati, and on 
settled in Risi r 10, 1 r. Tapley was united in 

Acornac County, Va., 
and tl LI \v< dding, the 6 

ebratod in Liisi ng Sun. Sir. Tapley v of 

181G to the time of his death, which occn I in 1878. Mrs. Tapley 
died in 1 ' elected ma} 

of his : [i i puty sheriff under James B. Smith 

in 1845 ! . 

TOWNSEND J. TAYLOR, retired merchant, Aurora, was born in 
Cincinnati, Ohio, Septe L. ' education was obtained 

after arriving at mature age. His ] 

(Moore) Taylor, were natives of Virginia ai 1 Pennsylvania. The father 
came to Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1807, and died with cholera, May 7, 183"!. 
Townsend J. began clerking in 1832, for W. i . Gibbs in the salt 1 
ness. In 1833 he engaged with a Mr. Wooley in the dry goods bu i 
with whom ho remained until August 1834, when ho engaged in the dry 
goods and grocery business at Wilmington with a brother, Thomas J., 
with whom he continued until 1837, when ild oul to Jennings & 

Brewington. Immediately thereafter he bought out "William Glenn of 
Wilmington, and conducted the business for himself for a period of two 
years. On the removal of the county seat to Lawrenceburgh, ho moved 
to Aurora and there engaged in business with his brother, the partner- 
ship continuing until 1840, when Tow] ■ ithdrew, and purchased 
a lot on which Lo erected a bu im - 1)' a igaii i nj : g< d in busi- 
ness by himself, which he conducted very suce • fully up to If 54, when 
he began operating in real estate. For a time during the Mexican war 
ho acted as agent in purchasing ha} and bsequ mtly he had an 
interest in a store in Canton, Mo., which he disposed of in I 



Rod; 
r\ F 


port, Indiana, wl 
roiitably carried 


on during 


tore 


at Aurora, hut 


in year Iai -r he 


i) chi 


, , sou, win 


ICCi 




i-o i a v carried 


ou by tin 


I 0111 


' 


1 lur . abji cl was 



942 HISTORY of di:ari 

tbo satno year started n itoro in 

until 186-1, hi- busii 

In 1804 be oponcd an extern ive 

remi ivi 1 tbo :.■, • i ; to 11 oi 
Eully conducted Tl 

B. M. and John 13 Taylor, win 
married, • . i, i, to Miss Mary A. 13. ire, who was born in 

Mary): nd, Februar The\ hi tl Com i naim ly: Ben- 

jamin, born December I. 1837; William S., born March ID, 1840; Mary 
J., born May 2G, 18-14; Sarah K, born October IT), 1846, died Oc 
23, L851. The . died, March 10,1810, and Mr. Taylor was married, 
February 21, 1850, to Miss Harriot C. Dean, who was born in New Vork, 
January 27, 1826. Four children have been born to the union, namely: 
Townseud E., born June 18, 1851, died July 9, i851; John E., born 
August 17, lSal; James G., born October L9, 1S5S; Jesse D., born No- 
vember 16,1860. Mr. Taylor never wont into a saloon and asked for a 
drink He nevei I ed tol ace . u a played a game of 

cards, and has been at the head of a firm for over fifty years. He has 
never been sued for debt, lie is a member of Lodge No. 51, F. & A. M. , 
and has been identified with the Methodist Episcopal Church for nearly 
half a century. 

GEORGE W. TAYLOR, proprietor of livery, sale and feed stable, 
Aurora, was born in Jefferson County, N. Y., December 22, 1819. His 
parents, John and Marilda (Fitch) Taylor, were natives of New York, the 
former was born in 1788 and died in September, 1846. The mother was 
born in 179S and died in October, 1875. The family moved to Dear- 
born County in 1832, where the father farmed until his death. George 
"W. was raised on a farm. In 1856 he engaged in tbo livery business 
in Aurora, and has continued in livery and farming ever since. During 
the year 1870 he moved to town, since which time he ha3 been a citizen 
of the city. He was married, March 22, 1838, to Miss Nancy J. Mill- 
burn, -who was born July 26, 1821, and to the union five children were 
born, namely: Mary L. , Harriet E., John M., George W. and Ella. 
Join M. served three years in the Eighty-third Indiana Regiment as a 
private soldier. He went through with Gen. Sherman, and participated 
in many a hard fought battle. When Mr. Taylor first came her.', 
there were only twelve house- in this town-hip, six being all round-log 
one of which every stick was bnckeje, and wag located near where Sled- 
man's foundry is situated. Mr. Taylor's father, served all through the 
■war of 1812. He was a quiet, industrious, law abiding citizen, whoso 
good qualities, the son, George W. is endeavoring to emulate. Politi- 
cally he is a Republican, ever upholding his country, first, last and all 
tthe ime. 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKKTCIIKS. f 13 

MICHAEL TEANEY, city marshal, Aurora, was born in Aurora, 
Doarborn Com ty, Tnd., Align I 21, ISM. Tho country boing new he 
received only a limited education. His parents, A. and Margaret 
(Cox) Teaney, were born in L'enusylvania and immigrated to Indiana, 
locating in Aurora in 1810. The father followed farming foi a liveli- 
hood up (•; [ho time of hi death, which oci mred in 183'J. At tho ago 
of eleven rtichacl deserted the farm, and followed flat-boating up to 
1870. From 1870 to 1875 he acted as steward on several : teamers. In 
1875 he : the co iper trade, at which he worked for several years 

very successfully. He was elected councilman from tho First Ward in 
1875 and served for two years. In 1880 he ivas elected assessor, which 
office he filled for three years. In 1SS3 ho was elected marshal, and has 
since discharged th duties of that office faithfully. Mr. Teaney was 
married August 22, 1854, to Miss Mary Carbaugh, a native of this 
county. She died August C, 1S57. He married for his second wife 
(December 24, 1S59) Miss Elizabeth Christy, a native of Ohio, and to 
this union were born two children, namely: Alfaretta, now Mis. Dewey, 
and John W. Mr. Teaney enlisted in June, 1 SO I, in Company A, Eight- 
eenth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, as a private soldier and was mustered 
out as first lieutenant. In polities ho is a Democrat. 

MAJ. WARREN TEBBS, of Dearborn County, was born in 
Prince Williams County, Va., in 1791. While ijuite young, his father, 
Moses Tebbs, removed to North Carolina, where he resided until 1807, 
when he removed to the Territory of Indiana, coming by the way of 
Cumberland Gap, through Kentucky, and settling on Whitewater, in Har- 
rison Township. At that time game of all kinds was very plenty, and 
the male portion of the Tebbs family became expert hunters. When 
the Indian war broke out in 1811, Warren, with his brother Willoughby 
and most of the young men in the neighborhood, joined the Rangers 
and were stationed at the various block-houses. Warren made several 
expeditions out beyond the Wabash, near Fort Harrison (now Terre 
Haute), and while on one of these expeditions he contracted, from 
exposure, a disease from which he never fully recovered, and from the 
effect of which he complained during the remainder of his life. After 
the war he returned home, and in 1S15 was married to Elizabeth Ashby; 
she, too, having had some experience in frontier life, as she was born in 
the block-house across the river, in Petersburgh Ky., in 1795, about the 
time the Indians were stealing horses at the mouth of Tanner's Creek, 
on this side of the river. After their marriage (hey went (o live on tho 
farm in Logan Township, recently owned by James K. Pruden, where 
their eldest son, Alvin Grant (father of the Tebbs brothers, present resi- 
dent of Dearborn County) was born. He soon after moved to Harrison, 



!M-1 HISTOKY OF DHA.RDOKN A XI) OHIO COUNT1I - 

and kept tavern in the old stone building from about thin time until 
1822. Ho ■ iido several trips to New Orleans, trading on flat-boats, and 
on two trips he walked bad; through the Cherokee territory. He was a 
farmer from this timo on until IS35, and during this timo was elected 
and serVed two or three terms in the Indiana Legislature. A few years 
before he died he removed to Williamsport, Warren Co., End., where he 
died in I 

WARHEN TEBBS. Lawrenceburgh, clerk of Dearborn Conntj 
Court, was b >rn in 1841, son of Alvin G, and Maria (Snyder) Tel I 
grandson of Warren Tobbs, a sketch of whom appears above. Mr. 
Tebbs is a native of Dearborn County. He obtained a good educa- 
tion, and early in lite? engaged in merchandising, which lie has continued 
almost to the present time. Hi:, father and grandfather both served in 
the State Legislature, the former from 1846 to 1850, and in 1SC0 Mr. 
Tebbs was elected representative from Dearborn Comity, serving till 
1872, representing also the third generation of the family which hail 
been thus honored. In 187S ho was elected to the clerk's office, 
and in 1882 was re-elected to the same, the duties of which he is now 
engaged in discharging. As a civil officer he is held in high esteem, his 
conduct as such, we believe, having ever been above criticism. The fact 
of the trusts which have been reposed in him is the best evidence of his 
standing as a citizen. Mr. Tebbs was married, in 1872, to Elma S. Ley- 
man, of Attica, Fountain Co., Ind., daughter of Dr. W. L. and Rebecca 
(Turner) Leyman, her father an ex-member of the State Legislature and 
one of the first physicians of that county. Their two children are War- 
ren Leyman and Corinne Race. 

JESSE B. THOMAS, see page 1 40. 

TIMOTHY THOMAS, Harrison, one of the older residents of Dearbrn 
County, was born in Wales in 1815, and when about eleven months old 
was brought to this country by his parents, William and Eleanor (Davis) 
Thomas, who were also natives of Wales. His father was born about 
1785, and immigrated to this country in 1810, locating tirst at Pittsburgh 
and moving West to Butler Comity, Ohio, about nine months later. Here 
he was chiefly engaged in cloth dressing, which was his trade. Ho first 
rented a small establishment near Indian Creek, Butler County, and in 
1824 erected a small mill on Dry Fork, same county, continuing his 
operations there fill 1832, when he moved to Harrison, where he followed 
the same occupation, including wool-carding. In the meantime he pur- 
chased 10 ' acres of land in this township, and after four years' residence 
in Butler County, to which he had returned, he took up his abode on this 
farm and resided there till his death, about 1S07. He married Eleanor 
Davis in 1813. She was a daughter of Timothy Davis, was born about 



1788, and lived to the advanced a; 


y of eighty 


- n i ! i 


mra. Ihcy 


reared 


a family of (ivo cliildren, four 


of whom" 


are 


m.w living: 'J', 


mothy, 


Thomas 1).. Mary and Jemima M 


William . 


lied 


al the a..;- of i 


ivonty- 


four, and throe others died in in 


fancy. In 


his 


earlier years Ti 


mothy 


Thomas was engaged in the cardii 


igaud full, 




usinoss with his 


Father, 


with whom he remained (ill (went, 


y-one yoars 


of a 


f.v tie thru I'o 


1 In we. 1 


farming al» nit six years, after wl 


deli he spe 


ill a 


bout tori years 


in (ho 



carding and fulling business with his brother, Thomas l>., in D :;i ir 
County, End. Since that time he lias been constantly employed in agri- 
culture, and has resided about thirty-three years in Harrison Township. 
He was married, in 1843, to Mary E. Davis, of Decatur County, Intl., 
daughter of Jonathan Davis and Susanna (Baker) Davis. Twelve chil- 
dren have been bom to them, nine of whom are now living: William, 
Thomas D., Timothy, George, Susan 31. (wife of John T. Estell, Cin- 
cinnati), Eleanor (wife of S. K. Gold, Harrison). Maria, Ruth and Lulu. 
Part of the family is associated with the Christian Church. Mr. Thomas, 
though not a member of any religious organization, is a man of strict 
moral principles and a firm believer in the merits of the church. 

JOHN K. THOMPSON, Lawrenceburgh, one of the leading attorneys 
of Dearborn County, was born in the same iu 1830. His parents. I torus 
and Sarah (King) Thompson were natives of New York, and immigrated 
to this county in 1816, His father was a fanner and mechanic, and died 
in 1843. Five of the family are still living, John K., our subject, 
being the youngest. He was reared to the age of eighteen years on the 
farm, and obtained the rudiments of an education in the primitive com- 
mon schools of his time, subsequently taking a regular course of study 
at the Asbury University, Greencastle, Ind. He read law under his own 
tutilage for a time, and in 1855 entered the University of Albany, N. Y., 
where he received further instructions in the profession, taking the 
prescribed course, which he completed iu one year. He was admitted to 
the bar of the supreme court of New York, and in J 857, to the courts of 
this State. Since the above date he has been constantly engaged iu the 
practice of his profession in this and adjoining counties, with abil- 
ity and success. He enjoys an enviable reputation among the legal 
practitioners of this section of the State, and the rank of citizenship 
whicli he holds, is no less creditable. Mr. Thompson has officiated as 
membor of the board of trustees -of Moore's Eill College since it has 
been in active session, but has not taken a very active part in the polit- 
ical and official affairs of the county. Ho pleads guilty to having taught 
one term of district school, but claims to have been the recipient of full 
absolution for his guilt. Mr. Thompson was married, in 1858, to 
Mary Stevens, daughter of Rana C. Stevens, and sister of Levi E. and 



946 I1ISTOUY OF [JEAKliOUN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

William F. Stevon.s, the T ler of (ho wholesale dry goods linn of 

Chambers, S town i&Co., Cincinnati; the latter of Aurora. Mrs. Tin 
is deceased, having lefi no children of her own. Miss Flora Th< 
is an adopted daughter. 

F. H.'THUERMER, Randolph Township, professor of music and 
lately a Farmer, is a native of Saxony, Germany, born in 1810. Fie grew 
to maturil - n try, and was there educated in the Freiberg 

Seminary. After completing his education he engaged in teaching the 
arl of music in the graded schools of Germany, in which vocation he 
continued about ten yea I g one year in Belgium and Antwerp. 

Mr. Thuormer was a strong £ri< nd and advocate o£ the Union cause in 
Germany in 1843, and when the Revolution began he was imprisoned at 
Meisen, and subsequently sentenced to death. Tie remained in bonds 
from the first of 1849 to Christmas eve of 1850, when he made his 
escape bj strategy, ju6l prioi the appointed time for his execution. 
He made li is way to Belgium, and soon aTtor sent for his family, then 
consisting of a wife and two children, and with them immigrated to the 
United States, coming to Indiana and locating at Aurora. After a short 
residence at the latter place he moved to Cincinnati, returning again to 
Aurora, and from there to hi . present homo about ISol^. He was engaged 
in the musical profession about thirty years in this country, and has 
been very successful in its pursuit. He was for a time employed as prin- 
cipal of the musical department of Moore's Hill College, and a few 
months teacher in the orphan asylum at Mount Auburn, Cincinnati. 
In the old country he made the acquaintance of Richard Wagner, the 
celebrated musical composer, who was also an active worker in the Union 
cause during the German revolution. Mr. Thuermer now owns a farm 
of 230 acres, the fruits of his long term of earnest professional labor, 
and with a fair prospect for a comfortable living during the remainder 
of his life, he has retired from the field of active service. Ho was married, 
in 1S4'2, to Hedwig Schneider, and they have four children, two born in 
Germany: Arthur and Robert, and two, in this country: Camillo and 
Alma, the latter, a teacher of music. 

WILLIAM WIRT TILLEY, of Lawrenceburgh, was born in George- 
town, D. C, February 24, 1830. At an early age he came to Indiana, 
and entered Asbury University. After graduating, he studied law at 
Centreville. Wayne County. On the completion of his studies, he came 
to Lawrenceburgh, where he resided until his death. Shortly after 
establishing himself here, he married the wife who survives him, at 
Centreville. At his death Mr. Tillej left a widow and five children. 
Mr. Tilley was a man of tine education and unusual natural abilities, 
which enabled him to attain a very respectable position among tin- law- 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 9 IT 

yers of Dearborn County. His social qui Lilies wero not strongly devel- 
oped, and ho had but few intimate a. ( n nt-aiiec* Ho was, however, 
respected by all who knew him, and will long be remembered as one of 
the ablest young men of Dearborn County. Mis death occurred in Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio, tho result of injuries receivod in jumping from a train of 
cars. Tho remains were taken to Lawrei ceburgh and thero interred in 
Green Dale Cemetery. 

MARTIN TITTEL, contractor and builder, is one of the leading 
business men of Lawrenceburgh. He was born in Baden, Germany, in 
1826, and is a son of Joseph T. and Barbara (Kaikher) Tittel, who were 
also born in Baden. He was reared to maturity, educated, and learned his 
trade in his native country and was also engaged there about three years 
in a brewery, working at intervals. In 18-17 he immigrated to America 
to better his fortune. He landed at New York and then proceeded 
directly to Cincinnati, where ho was first employed by Mr. Sedam in 
what is now the prosperous suburb of Sedamsville. In the fall of tho 
same year he located in Lawrenceburgh, where he has ever since con- 
ducted his business. He has always engaged in tho mason's trade — ■ 
bricklaying, stonelaying and plastering — and has built nearly all of the 
important buildings of Lawrenceburgh, including the distilleries, facto- 
ries, business blocks and churches. Ho is without doubt the most exten- 
sive contractor in tho town and the many structures he has erected are 
the best evidence that his work is of the best quality throughout. Mr. 
Tittel learned his trade from his father and from tho same source 
imbibed his lessons of industry, which have been the groundwork of his 
success through life. He has bought and sold considerable property, 
and though having met with some reverses, still possesses a fair share of 
this world's goods, all of which he has honestly earned by strict atten- 
tion to his business interests. Mr. Tittle was married, in 1819, to 
Gugunda Bechtel, of Ripley County, Ind. She was a native of Ger- 
many, and her parents, on immigrating to this country, located at Pitts- 
burgh, where her father was many years employed in a foundry of that 
city. Mr. and Mrs. T. have five children living: Emily, wifo of Antony 
Lux; Josephine, wifo of August Geager; John, who married Elizabeth 
Fitterer; Frank A. and Louise. The family is highly esteemed, and Sir. 
Tittle, who has served the public as a councilman, is regarded as one of 
the leading spirits of the business affairs of Lawrenceburgh. 

JOSEPH TITTEL, contractor and builder, dealer in doors, sash, 
blinds, lumber, etc., Lawrenceburgh, was born in Baden, Germany, 
February 0, 1831. Ho learned the trade of carpenter and builder iu his 
native country, and inlS52 immigrated to the United Stales. He came 
directly to Lawrenceburgh, wbere he resided about two years, when he 



948 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

wont West, aud located at Leav< mvorth, Kas. Hero bo did a large bus 
iness in his line, and was cons . en< I i: ! 1851), when ho made a 
trip to Europe to visit the homo of his boyhood In 1800 ho returned 
to Lawren oburgh and married Christina Kaerror, whose parents, Paul 
and Christina Naorror (natives of Luttring. franco), wore long residents 
ofYorkvillo. After his marrii imcd with his wife to 

Leavenworth, Ka ., where he re umed his trade, and where their two 
eldest chikh en, J - ophine and Josi ph, were born. In 1804, ho roturnod 
to Lawrenceburgh, where he has since resided and conducted his busi- 
ness in the building line, operating from Four to lifteen workmen. The 
largo, number of buildings erected by bim in Lawrenceburgh and 
vicinity, strongly attest both his honesty as a contractor and bis efficien- 
cy as a workman. Mr. and Mrs. T. have eight children all living : Jo- 
sephine, Joseph, Carolina, Amelia, Charles, Ada, Augusta and Agata. 
The family is associated with the Catholic Church, and is wellre- 
spected. 

NATHANIEL TODD, farmer, Logan Township, was bom in County 
Antrim, Ireland, in 1819. Hisparents, Nathaniel and Margaret (McGeug- 
hen) Todd, were born in Ireland in 1785. They came to America in 1829, 
and located in Hogan Township, and raised a family of nine children: 
Jennie, born May 3, 1813; James, March 10, 1815; Eliza. May 2, 1817; 
Nathaniel; Agues, Feb, 27, 1819; John, March 25, 1823; Mary, February 
22. 1825; Samuel, April 15, 1827; Matilda, August 18, 1834; all of the 
children, except Matilda were born in Ireland. Mr. Nathaniel Todd is 
one of those mild, good-natured old bachelors that takes the world easy 
and frets about nothing, and is constantly adding to his earthly possess- 
ion by bis frugal habits of life. 

JOHN TOOHEY, proprietor of the Rising Sun Marble Works, was 
born in 1833. He is a native of Ireland and son of Michael and Bridget 
(Welsh) Toohey, also natives of Ireland where his mother still resides; 
his father having died about 181-1-45. Mr. Toohey immigrated to this 
country when a mere boy. He learned the stone cutting trade in Cin- 
cinnati, and in 1863 came to Rising Hun, where he has sinco continued 
in the marble business. He was married, in 1SG5, to Eliza McConnel (a 
native of Virginia, but reared in this locality), daughter of John and 
Harriot McConnell, and seven children are the result of this union: Will- 
iam, John. Frank, Anna, Mary, Lulu and George. Mr. Toohey keeps 
on band a good quality of marble and granite, and does work neatly and 
promptly on order. 

OLIVER B. TORBETT, see page 181. 

OMER TOUSEY was born in Greene County, N. Y., December 21, 
1800. His father immigrated to Kentucky in 1802 with his family, and 

r 



Ai'iih'Ai. ski.iv 



111 



purchasing n farm in Boone Comity, opposite Lawrenceburgh, settled 
upon it, and remained thereuntil his death, which occurred in 1832. His 
father, in early life, was not only a farmer, hut a prosperous merchant, 
and Qruor, when a mere child, was put into the store, and bofore he was 
fairly a youth had acquired that thorough knowledge of the dn go Is 
business which enabled him to cany il on with such success after he 
commenced business on his own account. Not a few of our old in- 
habitants remember " Tousoy Town, " once a flourishing village on the 
opposite side of the river, whose chimneys still stood not many years ago. 
Not a trace of the old village now remains. There his father conducted 
his then widely known store, and there young Omer took his first business 
lessons. In 1822 OmerTousey came to Lawrenceburgh, and started in busi- 
ness as a in'! chant on his own account. October 23, 1823, ho was married to 
Miss Lucinda Johnson, a daughter of Col. Carl Johnson, of Boone County, 
Ky., who still survives him. Mr. Tousoy continued in the dry goods 
business until ISol, and until his capital had so increased that ho found 
he could employ it otherwise more profitably. His success as a merchant 
was unbroken. No man had better credit. In those days Western mer- 
chants laid in their stocks in Philadelphia. Mr. Tousey used to make his 
annual journey to Philadelphia on horseback. Ho was twice president 
of the Lawrenceburgh branch of the State Bank of Indiana, and was 
placed in charge, years afterward, of the Lawrenceburgh branch of the 
Bank of the State of Indiana, in order to extricate it from embarrassments 
into which ir had fallen by injudicious management. In these positions, 
as in all others, in which he was ever placed he was equal to the exi- 
gency. The bank prospered under his wise direction. In 1839 Mi-. 
Tousey connected himself with the Methodist Episcopal Church, and 
from that time until his death ho was an efficient and zoalous member. 
His judgment, was so sound that his advice was sought on every important 
occasion, and his liberality to his church never failed. Mr. Tousey was 
remarkable for a sober and quiet dignity, yet he was entirely devoid of 
ostentation. His homo was the abode of hospitality, and he furnished it 
with every material comfort ; yet nothing was provided for mere display. 
His charities were large, but secret. Many poor people testified to them 
after his death, whom he had enjoined not to speak of them while he was 
living. His love of his kindred was great and enduring, and expressed 
itself in deeds rather than professions. He repeatedly enjoined that 
when he died his remains should be deposited in the private graveyard 
on the old farm of his father, where- reposed the remains of his father, 
mother and sisters. Mr. Tousey died March 28, 1868. He left no chil- 
dren. His estate was large, and after bestowing the bulk of it upon his 
widow and nearest kindred, he gave the remainder to remote kindred who 
were poor, and to faitb/Tfl domestics. 



950 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

FREDERICK TREON, 1 D., physician and surgeon, Aurora, was 
born in Shelby County, LI. tugnsl 12, LS55, ami received his educa- 
tion at Franklin Academy, after which ho engaged in the inachino shops 
as car builder with Hasklin & Barker, at Michigan City, where he com- 
pleted a special course in geo aetry, trigonometry, and civil andmockan- 
ical engineering. Not being contented with his occupation he began the 
study of anatomy under the personal supervision of Dr. J. Saddler, of 
Edinburg, Ind., with whom ho continued for nearly two years; in the 
meantime he clerked in a drug store, and acquired a knowledge of drugs 
and their effects. In the fall of 1S7G Mr. Treon came to Aurora, and 
began a more systematic -iu.h of medicine under Drs. J. and L. K. 
Lamb. In the fall of 1877 he entered the Ohio Medical College, and 
two years later he was graduated from the institution, receiving his di- 
ploma March 1, 1879, and at once entered into a professional partnership 
with his father-in-law, Dr. James Lamb, with whom he has since contin- 
ued. Dr. Troon is an active member of the Dearborn County Medical 
Society, and also the Indiana State Medical Society, by which latter 
connection he is made a member of the American Medical Association. 
The Doctor was united in marriage, May 29, 1S78, with Miss America C, 
daughter of Dr. James and Sarah A. Lamb; Mrs. Treon's birth occurring 
April 30, IS 17. To the marriage has been born a son — James F. (June 
29, 1880). Dr. Treon's father, Andrew Treon, M. D., was born in Leb- 
anon County, Penn., April 27, 1804, in the same house in which his 
father was born. His grandfather came from France near Paris, at an 
early date, and remained in Pennsylvania until his death. Dr. Andrew 
Treo: acquired his first knowledge of medicine from Dr. John Treon, 
who is still living at Miamisburg, Ohio, at the advanced age of ninety- 
five years. He was in the active practice of medicine sixty-six years, 
and accumulated a largo fortune. Dr. Andrew Troon was twice married; 
his second wife, Miss Lydia Steinberger (the mother of Dr. Frederick 
Treon), was born in Bartholomew County, Ind., May 6, 1822.' Her fa- 
ther, Frederick Steinberger, was born in Ohio. His parents came from 
Germany, and settled in Ohio at aD early day. Dr. Treon's mother was 
a neice of Dr. Steinberger, professor of surgery at Wurtemberg, Gor 
many. Dr. Frederick Troon has been very successful in the practice 
of medicine and surgery. Ho is a member of the K. of H. Lodge 
No. 1084, and the Presbyterian Church. He has always taken an active 
part in religious matters, and was elected assistant superintendent of 
the Sabbath-school in 1879, and superintendent in 18S0, which position 
he has held ever since, and has succeeded in building up a large and pros- 
perous Sabbath-school, with Ijlo scholars enrolled. 

CAPT. MARTIN TREST^R, farmer, Washington Township, is 



BI0GRAV1IICAL SKETCHES. ' I 1 "'! 

a native of Kentucky, born iiearMillorsburgh, May 27, 1800. Hisparonta 
were of German extraction and were born in I'onnsylvauia. )Iis father, 
William, was born near Northumberland in 17G1; mother, Elizabetli 
(Hesler) Trester, in 1701. The father was a farmer and mill-wright. 
Ho died in Kentucky in 1 i 1. Tho mother with nine sons and one 
daughl f, moved to Dearborn County in 1815. Sho invested the family 
fund in land and put the boys to work, cleared up the land, and raised the 
family successfully to economy and industry. Before her death, which 
occurred in 1838, she saw her family all c imfortably situated in life. 
Capt. Trester was married September 20, 1833, to Mary Ann Winkley, 
who was born April 0, 1S15. Eight children resulted: Emma M., Oliver 
H., Lewis M., Albert E., Milton L., Mary J., James M., Ella F. Oliver 
H. enlisted as a private soldier in the Third Indiana Cavalry for three 
years, and was killed at Antietam, September 14, 1SG2. Albert E. 
was in the Sixteenth Infantry under Gen. Hackelman, served one year, 
then enlisted in the Seventh Indiana Cavalry and served one year after 
the war closed under Gen. Custer. Milton L. was in the 100 days' ser- 
vice as a private soldier. In 1820 Capt. Trester began flat-boating as a 
hand. In 1828 ho branched out in the same business for himself and 
continued for fifteen years. • The balance of his life has been spent 
upon the farm. He was commander of the militia for years, and when 
the Black Hawk war caused a draft to be made, nearly all of his soldiers 
were cripples. One of the company offered the Captain a farm if he 
would not draft him. Peace being declared, all became exempt, and 
happiness reigned supreme in the militia camp. Capt. Trester was el- 
ected county commissioner in 1847 and served three years. He was 
school trustee for many years. When the township had three trustees he 
served as one for eight or ton years; he assessed the township ten years iu 
succession; afterward served as school director for six years. The Cap- 
tain cleared up his farm, and in early life built a good brick house to 
raise his family in. He has lived to see them all grown and comfortably 
settled in life. Now the old peoplo are left alone, with a big house and 
no family, except two grandchildren they have kindly taken to raise. 
Although well advanced in years, they have lost but little of the 
vigor and vivacity of their younger days, neither have they forgotten 
the sports of their youth. The Presbyterian Church is the society of 
their faith. Politically Capt, Trester has been a Republican since the 
war, before ho was a Democrat, and cast his first vote for Gen. Andrew 
Jackson. Mrs. Trester was born within a mile of her present home 
April 6, 1815, and has always lived within the locality Her parents 
settled on Holman's Ridge, south of Aurora, in 1813. Her father died 
in 1S33, her mother in 18^7. They had lour children, viz. : William, 
Joseph W., John L. and Mary Ann. 



9f)2 I11ST011Y OK DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

BENJAMIN F. TRESTER, Jr., architect, contractor and builder, 
shopg corner of Main .and Mill Streets, Auror; is a uativo of Washing- 
ton Township, Dearborn County, born May 7, [847. He is a graduate 
of the high school. His father, Edward II. . was born in Kentucky 
October 24, 1815. His mother, Sarah (Green) Trestor, was born in 
Dearborn County October 21, 1811). The parents wore married July 7, 
1830. Mother died October 21, 1881. Benjamin F. farmed up to 1800, 
at which time he commenced his trade. He located in Aurora iu 1873, 
and was married July 30, of that year, to Miss Hannah A. Winkley, a 
native of Dearborn County, born January 2<>, isr, 1. Mr. Trester was 
elected to the council from the Third Ward May 3, 1882, and re-elected 
May 7, 1884. He belongs to I. O. O. F. and encampment, to the K. of 
P., K. of H. and the Presbyterian Church. 

LEVI P. TRESTER, foreman woodworker Ohio & Mississippi Shops, 
Cochran, is a native of Dearborn County, and was born May 22, 1832. 
In his boyhood the country was new and he only received a limited 
schooling. His father, Samuel Trester, was born in Kontucky in 1808. 
The mother, Sophia (Briddle), was a native of Maryland. Sho died in 
1849. Levi learned the carpenter trade in 1854. He was married 
August 17, 1857, to Miss Virginia Christian, a native of Virginia. She 
was born May 7, 1838. Unto them were given two children: Nettie and 
Arka. In 1860 Mr. Trester abandoned the carpenter business and 
accepted a position in the Ohio & Mississippi Shops as machine hand. 
In 1874 was promoted to foreman of shops (known as saw shops). In 
1SG2 his patriotic heart became fired and he Hew to his country's rescue, 
by enlisting in Company E, Eleventh Kentucky Cavalry, and served 
faithfully for three years. He is a member of Aurora Lodge No. 51 F. 
& A. M.. also Aurora Chapter No. 13. 

CHARLES M. TUFTS, farmer, a resident and native of Washington 
Township, was born February 27, 1842. He was married, July 27, 1805, to 
Miss Maggie E. Howe, who was born near Marietta, Ohio, April 5, 1S42. 
They had five children: Maud, born October 7, 1800, died September 
10, 1807; Edwin G., born September 4, 1S67; Arthur D., bora March 
14, 1870; Willie L., born September 5, 1875; Guy B., born May 23, 
1877. Mr. Tufts has been an entrjtnrising farmer all through life, and 
has his broad fields under a good state of cultivation. His excellent 
residence, and good improvements generally, indicate thrift, of which we 
feel justified in making mention, as he is always prompt in lending a 
helping hand to every good work, that is calculated to promote and 
develop the interests at large of his neighborhood and county. He and 
his excellent wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

MOSES TURNER, of Randolph Township, was born iD Pennsyl- 



BIOGUAI'IIICAI, SKETCHES. 953 

vania in 1792, removed to Ohio when aboul twenty-five years of ago, 
whore he resided (several years, and ronioved to Rising Sun, Ind., 
whore he engaged in the milling business and subsoquontly in merchan- 
dising. ,In about 1 840 ho purchased a mill at Milton and moved to 
that place. In 1854 ho returned to Rising Sun and subsequently re- 
moved to a farm five mile ro the river where he resided twelve years 
In 1849 he was married to Miss Mary S. !3eckett, who died in 1862. 
He again returned to Rising Sun ami about 1870 lie purchased and 
remove, 1 to a farm one mile al >ve Rising Sun, where his death occurred 
July 28, 1879. Ho was identified with the Methodist Episcopal Church. 
"In his general character he was industrious and frugal. As a citizen 
and neighbor he was held in high esteem in the communities where he 
from time to time resided." 

W. S. TYIBR, farmer, a native and resident of Sparta Township, 
was born August 6, 1829. His parents, William and Gertrude (Davis) 
Tyier, wore natives of Maryland, there married, and in an early day 
immigrated to Dearborn County, Ind., settling on the same farm on 
which our subject now resides, where he died in 1848, at the ago of 
sixty-three years, and his widow in i860, at the ago of seventy-five 
years. They were the parents of five children, viz.; Eliza A., deceased; 
Johe T. ; Jane, deceased; William S. and Amelia M. William S. , our 
subject, spent the greater part of his young days in coopering and grain 
threshing, and at present devotes his time to raising stock, especially 
mules and horses. He was united in marriage in Clay Township, De- 
cember 31, 1848, to Martha E., daughter of Elliott and Sarah (Nelson) 
Wills, who was bom in Ripley County, Ind., September 16, 1830. After 
his marriage ho settled on his father's old homestead, his present farm, 
which he had purchased previously, and on which he erected a fine brick 
house at an expense of over $4,000. He owns a fine farm of 222 acres, 
under a high state of cultivation. He is a member of the I. O. O. E. , 
and, with his wife, of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. and Mrs. 
Tyier have roared five orphan children to maturity, though they are par- 
ents of none. 

LEONARD ULLRICH, cooper, Aurora, is a native of Germany, born 
in Bavaria, August 5, 1834, where ho obtained a common school educa 
lion. His father, Frederick A. Ullrich, was born in Bavaria in 1774, 
and died in June, 1853. His mother, Apollona (Priteh) Ullrich, was 
born in France in 1793, and died in February, 1853. Leonard came to 
America, November 27, 1853, landing in Now Orleans, where he remained 
until May, 1854; thence to Petersburg, Ky., where he remained until 
Juno 1S56; then moved to Lawrenceburgh, remaining one year, after 
which returned to Petersburg, Ky. In 1S61 he moved to Aurora, Ind., 



9">4 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

where he lias resided ever since. He followed coopering in all the 
meanderings of his life. He married .Miss Margaretta dies January 8, 
1854; Bhe was born in Bavaria July 19, 1832. To them have been 
born six children, all deceased, except Frank G: Jacob, born Feb- 
ruary'^, 1855, died May 16, 1855; Frank G, born July 2G, 1861; 
infant, deceased; Mary \ . born July 22, 1864, died July 29, 1864; John 
A., bom May 23, 1865, died October 9, 1883; Louie, born April 3, 18(17, 
died October 31, 1867. Mr. Ullrich and family belong to the Catholic 
Church. His father was working in Strasburg, at the cooper trade, 
when the first three men were beheaded by the Republican Government 
of 1793, and was there when the second execution took place of ten 
councilmen and the mayor. 

FRANK ULLRICH, cooper, Aurora, was born in Bavaria June 3, 
1828, where he obtained a common school education. He came to Amer- 
ica, January 15, 1854, and landed at New Orleans. In two months he 
went to Arkansas Post, where he worked on a farm for one year; thence 
to Norfolk River, and worked in a saw mill until 1850; then moved to 
Lawrenceburgh, Ind., where he remained one month; thence to Peters- 
burg, Ky., and worked in the distillery and learned the cooper trade. 
September 13, 1S01, he moved to Aurora, and has followed coopering 
ever since. Mr. Ullrich was married, in the fall of 1848, to Anna M. 
Kinscherf who was born in Bavaria January 20, 1824. Mr. and Mrs. 
Ullrich are the parents of four children, viz.: Frank J., Kate, Margar- 
etta and John: Frank J. was in Company G., One Hundred and Forty- 
fifth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served eight months. 
He died in the spring of 1884. They are all members of the Catholic 
Church. 

DR. JOEL P. ULREY, dentist, of Rising Sun, is a native of Leba- 
non, Warren Co., Ohio, born in May, 1817. His father, Daniel Ulrey. 
was a Peunsylvauian, and moved with his parents to the Northwest Terri- 
tory about 1800, having for a time stopped in Kentucky. They pur- 
chased a farm in what is now the heart of Cincinnati. The father later 
turned his attention to boating on the Ohio River. The parents of the 
Doctor died at Rising Sun, Ind.; the mother in I860 and the father in 
1879. Dr. Ulrey spent his early years in the vicinity of Cincinnati, and 
was educated in the schools of Lebanon. ,. In boyhood he worked about 
six years in printing offices at Lebanon and^Ciucinnati, and at the latter 
place he began the study of dentistry, which was at that time ^niggling 
for a place among the professions, and could not claim a college in its 
interest west of the Alloghauios. Dr. Ulrey rendered valuable assist 
ance in the establishment of tho Ohio College of Dental Surgery, and for 
his enterprise in that direction was awarded an honorary diploma by 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKKTCIIES. Vbo 

that institution. Ho has been in practice for Rlmost fifty years, forty of 
which he h is b< n located in Rising Sun, and in all that long period lias 
failed in his visits; at Aurora and Lawrenceburgh only five weeks on 
account of ill-health. Under his present arrang imonts (be Doctor passes 
Mondays tind Tuesdays at homo; Wednesdays and Saturdays at Aurora, 
and Thursdays and Fridays at Lawrencebnrgh, thus reaching a large 
number of patrons, among whom he has established an enviable reputa- 
tion. Dr. Ulrey's wife was Miss Sarah Igoe, a lady of French descent. 
CORNELIUS VAX HORN, York Township, was born in New York 
City May 15, 1806, and is a son of Cornelius and Eve (Yauzile) Van 
Horn, both natives of New Jersey. His great-grandfather, whose name 
was also Cornelius, came from Holland and located in New Jersey, near 
New York City, where he reared his family. His grandfather, Cornelius, 
and also his father, Cornelius, were born there, the former dying at the 
home of the latter, while our subject was but a child. The family on 
both sides were of Hollandese descent. Cornelius Van Horn, Sr., was 
a farmer and real estate dealer in New York and New Jersey, and 
resided in the East till 1817, when ho moved with his family to Dearborn 
County. They came by the usual route over the mountains by wagon to 
Pittsburgh, from which place, with two other families— headed by James 
Skates and Mr. Davison — they came by flat-boat to Cincinnati. Soon 
after Mr. Van Horn purchased land in York Township and camo into 
the woods to build up a home. In a period of less than two years he 
purchased six quarter sections, and he continued farming until his death, 
which occurred, January 15, 1835, his widow surviving till 1847. He 
was a great trader, and being endowed with large business capacity was 
generally successful in his enterprises. Cornelius Van Horn, whose 
name introduces this sketch, resided with his parents until his twenty- 
fourth year. He was married, July 18, 1830, to Lydia Ayres, who was 
born in Walnut Hills, Cincinnati, daughter of Samuel and Elizabeth 
(Myers) Ayres, natives of Virginia. Her father was a shoe-maker by trade, 
and for many years worked at that business, in which he was quite success- 
ful. He subsequently did quite a business in keel-boating on the Ohio, 
and was for some years afterward employed in the county offices of Ham- 
ilton County as deputy. In his later years, however, he did little but 
collect his rents and look after his properly interests. In the spring 
following his marriage Mr. Van Horn moved to the farm on which he 
has ever since resided. He inherited a quarter section from bra father, 
and by his industry he was able to add to his original possession till he 
owned 350 acres, from which he has since sold some small lots for the 
accommodation of his neighbors The union of Mr. and Mrs. Van Horn 
was fruitful in the birth of ten children, six now living: John, Samuel, 



9[)G HISTORY OF DEARBORN AM' OHIO COUNTIES. 

Mary, Angoline, Harrison and George. After a period of nearly fifty 
years of faithful duty as a wife ami mother, .Mrs. Van Horn passed 
away October 3J, 1879. As a reward for their long years of incessant 
toil Mr. and Mrs. Van Horn, in their old age, found thoniselves well pro- 
vided with the comforts of life, which only Mr. Van Horn now lives to 
enjoy, and upon him the shadows of old age are stealing; though he is 
well preserved in both body and mind for one of his years. Ho remem- 
bers many incidents of pioneer life, which he relates with vividness, so 
firmly are they impressed upon his memory. 

SAMUEL A. VAX HOltN, dealer in bay and grain, Lawrence- 
burgh, was born in York Township, Dearborn County, in 1833. He 
is a son of Cornelius Van Horn, one of the lirst settlers of York Town- 
ship, and his early life was passed on the farm with his parents. Ho 
was educated in the district schools at College Hill and Hartsville, and 
he remained on the homestead with his parents till thirty years of age. 
In 1805 he came to Lawrenceburgh and engaged in the hay and grain 
business, which he has since conducted, handling annually about 2,(100 
to 3,000 tons of hay, and wheat, oats and barley, 50,000 to 00,000 bush- 
els. Mr. Van Horn was married, in 1802, to Elizabeth Emerson, daugh- 
ter of "William and Elizabeth (Lockwood) Emerson, natives of England 
and residents of Miller Township, where her father still resides. Two 
children are living — Fannie Belle and Willie Ayres. Mr. Van Horn is 
a live business man and useful citizen. He has served many years as 
clerk of Greendalo and contributed liberally to the building of the Pres- 
byterian Church. 

NATHAN ALLEN VAN OSDOL, farmer, Cass Township, born in 
Fayette County, Penn., May 25, 1813, is a son of Benjamin and Bebecca 
Van Osdol, natives of Pennsylvania, who removed to Indiana in 181G, 
coming down the river in a flat-boat to Bising Sun, where they landed 
in the summer of that year and located about three miles west of Bising 
Sun. Mr. Van Osdol was a carpenter and niill-wright by trade, which 
occupation he followed the greater portion of his life. He was a true 
type of the pioneer— an honest, hard working man. They brought four 
children with them from Pennsylvania, of whom Nathan Allen was the 
youngest, and is the only one now living. Mr. Van Osdol died Septem- 
ber 12, 1848, aged seventy-one years. His widow died March 5, 18-14, 
aged sixty-live years. Nathan Allen, who was a child of three years of 
age when brought to this then wilderues, grew to manhood, fully 
acquainted with pioneer life, and has remained a citizen of Ohio County 
through his entire life. For several years, in his early hife, he followed 
boating on the river, then settled upon a farm, and has since made farm- 
ing his principal business. He started out in life, when sixteen years of 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. ifQI 

age, with n capital consisting of one calf, which be sold for 81. 
He worked by lb > month, I licb be was paid S3. 50, and the highest 

wages ho evor obtained was p r month. In the harvest field he could 
Eometimea gel 50 cents for reaping hard all day. Through all these 
experiences Mr. Van Osdol ha passed, and by industry and economy has 
accumulated a c potency, di w owning a farm of 155 acres, with good 
improvements. He was married June 30, 1S36; to Elizabeth Crowley, 
a daughter of James and Elizabeth Crowley, natives of Virginia. Mr. 
Crowley was drowned in the river, in his native State, in 1817. Subse- 
quently Mrs. Crowley married David JJn|ford, and in 1820 removed to 
Indiana and settled near Dillsborough, and there and in Ohio County 
spent the balance of her life. She died February G, 1SGS, aged seventy- 
seven years. By her firsi husband she bad one son and three daughters; 
two now survive, Van S. and Elizabeth. Mr. and Mrs. Van Osdol are 
parents of twelve children, seven now survive: Melissa, wife of Peter 
Richmond; Boston W., John, William "Wesley, Charles L., Mary Eliza- 
beth, wife of Andrew Sedam, and Benjamin Franklin. Of these John 
and Charles L are practicing physicians in Allensville, Switzerland Co., 
Ind. Of the. deceased, three died young, two grew to womanhood: 
Margaret Ann and Nancy Jane; the former died, aged twenty-seven 
years, the latter at nineteen years of age. Mr. Van Osdol and wifo have 
been active members of the New Hope Methodist Episcopal Church for 
forty-five years, in which he has been a pillar, doing much for the best 
interests of the society, 

LEWIS VAN WEDDING, farmer, Jackson Township, born in New 
Orleans, La., February 7, 1829, is a son of Jacob and Mary (Vogel) Van 
Wedding, ho a native of Brussels, Belgium, and she of Franco. Ho was 
a soldier in the army under Napoleon; was taken prisoner and carried 
to Ireland, but subsequently released. In 181 4 he immigrated to America, 
landing at New York City, where he remained some time and learned 
the business of refining sugar. Thence he removed to Now Orleans, 
where he engaged as foreman in a lai-ge sugar refining establishment. 
Subsequently he married, remaining a resident there until in the fall of 
1832; he removed to Indiana, where he had previously purchased land 
in Dearborn County, where he settled and remained until his death, in 
1858, aged seventy-eight years. His widow died, January 5, 18S0, aged 
seventy- eight years. They were parents of nine children, two now sur- 
viving: Lewis and Catharine, (he latter the wife of Franklin H. Bush. 
Of those deceased, there were three pair of twins. One daughter, Mary, 
died of cholera, in New Orleans, in 1S32. Lewis, the eldest child, who 
came to this county, grew to manhood, fully acquainted with pioneer 
life. His first schooling was obtained in a log .schoolhouse, four miles 



958 H1ST01U OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

distant, in Manchester. February 4, 1851, ho was united in marriage 
with Victoria Gutzwiller, born May 24, 1831, a daughter of Louis and 
Mary Gutzwiller, he a native of France and she of Switzerland. They 
wero married in Switzerland, and in 1832 became settlers of this county 
whero ho died, in 1S53, and she December 25, 18G3. Mr. Gutzwiller 
was also a soldier under Napoleon. They had ten children, five now 
living: Joseph, Philip, Victoria. John and George; the latter served 
in the war of the Rebellion, in Company E, Sixteenth Regiment Indiana 
Volunteer Infantry, until the war closed. Mr. Van Wedding and wife 
have four children: Jacob P.; Mary L., wife of Nicholas Lang; Louisa, 
wife of "William C. Lewis, and Elizabeth, wife of Clinton S. Ward. 
Mr. Van Wedding Las made farming his principal business, and has 
been a resident of Jackson Township more than half a century. He 
enlisted in tho war, in 1SG2, in Company E, Sixteenth Regiment Indiana 
Volunteer Infantry; was wounded at the battle of Richmond, Ky.; 
taken prisoner, paroled, and finally discharged on account of disability. 
He enlisted as a private and was promoted to second sergeant. He has 
held several offices of his township. Mr. Van Wedding is one of the 
leading men of Jackson Township. Reliable and careful in all his busi- 
ness transactions, he holds the confidence and respect of the peoplo of 
his community. 

H. C. VINCENT, M. D., Guilford, a physician of thirty-five years 
practice, was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1S2G. The paternal ancestors 
of his family were of English descent and may be traced back to the 
time of the invasion of Britain by the Romans. The modern lineage is 
traced from three brothers, Daniel, Samuel and a third whose name is 
unrecalled. Daniel and Samuel immigrated to this country in the early 
part of the seventeenth century and settled on Martha's Vineyard Island 
and from that point the descendants radiated, most of them moving 
Westward. Dr. Vincent seems to have descended from the lino founded 
by Daniel Vincent, a branch of whose posterity settled in the vicinity of 
Cincinnati about tho time that city adopted its present name. His pa- 
ternal ancestors in Massachusetts were all sailors, and after the death of 
his grandfather in that State his grandmother removed with her family 
to Ohio to prevent her sons from adopting a seafaring life. The 
family consisted of the following children: Jane, Thomas, Jere- 
miah, Bartlet, Elizabeth, Louise, Elias and Daniel; the latter and 
Louise aro now the only ones living and reside on the old home- 
stead near Cincinnati, each now being near ninety years of age. 
Among the list of descendants are some men of national reputation. 
Henry Vincent, the celebrated English lecturer and Dr. Vincent of 
Chatauqua fame, being examples. Jeremiah Vincent was sixteon years 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 959 

of age when ho arrived at Cincinnati with his mother with whom bo 
resided on a farm till he reached his majority. Ho then wont to work 
with bis brother-iu law, William Grossman, a carpenter and contractor, 
with whom be was engaged till about 1S25, wbon be married Elizabeth 
Golden aod soon after began bis career as pilot on a river steamboat 
plying between Cincinnati and New Orleans. About 1835 -30 be aban- 
doned the river and took ii] agricultural pursuits near Cincinnati, on 
land inherited by his wife, and here be closed his busy life in 1850. 
His wife was of Irish and Hollandese parentage, her mother's name being 
Von Vance. Her people were among the early settlers of Pennsylvania 
and her mother came to Cincinnati as early as 1796, and died there in 
1878, at the advanced ago of ninety-nine years and eleven months. 
Mrs. Jeremiah Vincent was born in Cincinnati, in 1806, and died in 
October, 1884. Dr. H. G. Vincent, whose name introduces this sketch, 
passed bis first nine years in Cincinnati. Ho then went to the farm four 
miles from the city with bis parents and was in this locality educated in 
the Carey Academy, beginning bis studies in 1844. Two years later he 
began the Btudy of medicine with Dr. Jacin Brevort, under whose direc- 
tion he continued his reading two years. In 1848 he entered Starling 
Medical College, Columbus, Ohio, and in tho following year began the 
practice of bis profession at Dover, this county, where he resided till 1856, 
except two years, 1851-552, which were spent in California. In 1856 he 
located at Yorkville where be continued bis practice till 1S61, when he re- 
moved to Guilford which has since been bis place of abode. Soon after 
locating at Guilford Dr. Vincent was commissioned assistant surgeon of 
the Eighty-third Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and entered the service. In 
February, 1SG3, bo was sent home wounded, but returned in tho follow- 
ing June and was present at the capture of Vicksburg and Jackson but 
was unable to join in the Atlanta campaign. In the winter of 18G4 he 
resigned his commission, returned home and has since been actively en- 
gaged in the practice of his profession in Dearborn County. In 1850 
he married Mary L. Ward, of this county, daughter of William S. Ward, 
and by this union there were born five children: Blanche, Charles, 
Edwin, Sherman and Edith. Charles is deceased, Blanche is now the 
wife of E. Chaplin, a most excellent gentleman, and resides at Guilford 
where her husband is engaged in merchandising. Dr. Vincont ranks 
among the leading physicians of the county and has an extensive prac- 
tice. He is a member of the F. & A. M. and is an active worker in tho 
interest of the Republican party. 

VINGENS FRANK, foreman in distillery, Aurora, was born in 
Baden, Germany, February 2, 1832, whore ho received a good common 
school oducation. His parents, Xavier and Rachel (Maurath) Frank, 



AGO HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

were born in tho same kingdom, tho father in 1801. Tho subject of our 
sketch came to America in 1S52, and located in Clinton, Ripley County, 
Ind., where bo remained about a year and a half; tbence ho wont to 
GreenSburgh on five months' probation, aftor which ho removod to Doca- 
tur C.uuuty, wbere ho farmed for three years. In February, 1S57, ho 
moved to Aurora, Ind., where an engagement was consummated with 
tho Aurora Distilling Company, iu whose employ ho has siuco remained 
as yeast-makor, having acquired tho reputation of producing more spirits 
from the grain tban any man in this country. Ho was married, Juno 
10, 18i")6, to Miss Margaret Snider, who was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, 
September 23, 1836. Eight children, Mary, William, Elizabeth, Carrie, 
Peter, Maggie, Catharine and Joseph have been born to them. Mr. 
Frank and family belong to tho Catholic Church. He has been trustee 
in the church for several years. At present he is one of tho directors in 
the Aurora Fair Association. Politically he has been a life-long Demo- 
crat. By industry and economy he has secured a competency. 

JAMES C. VINSON, farmer, Clay Township, was born in Dearborn 
County, Ind., September 16, 183S. His parents, Simeon and Ilebecca 
A. (Bruce) Vinson, were natives of Dearborn County. The former born 
October 4, 1811; tho latter, May 12, 1817. Thoy were married in Dear- 
born County, August 20, 1S37, and lirst settled in Washington Town- 
ship, where they resided until 1844, at which time they moved to their 
present residence. They had born to them nine children: Abigail, 
William C, Caroline, Mary, Alanson, B. C. , and three which died in 
infancy. James, C. began work for himself when about seventeen years 
of age, always engaging in farming. He was married in Hogan Town- 
ship, September 14; 1802, to America Carbaugh, who was born March 8, 
1838, and by whom he has had born to him live children, viz. : Delia C, 
William B., Herman D. (deceased), Simeon J. and Minnie E. After his 
marriage he settled on his father's farm, where he remained about four 
years; then he purchased and moved on a farm in Sparta Township, and 
resided until 1871, when ho purchased his present farm there. 

NICHOLAS VOGELGESANG, one of tho board of commissioners of 
Dearborn County, was born in Germany in 1S27. He is a son of George 
and Elizabeth Vogelgesang, with whom he immigrated to this country in 
1833. His parents first located in Hamilton. Ohio, where they resided 
two years, after which they removed to Kelso Township, this county. 
Here the father purchased land and resided till his death, which occurred 
in 1876. The mother is still surviving, in her eighty-fourth year. 
Nicholas Vogelgesang grew up with his parents, residing with them till 
twenty-two years of age. He learned the blacksmith trade with his 
father, and tho fortunes of this vocation he followed for about twenty 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 961 

years. Ho thou purchased a farm of ninety acres (ou which ho is still 
residing), and began operations in agricultural pursuits, which ho has 
eince continued. In all his business operations he has boon quite suc- 
cessful, and as_a reward for his industry and perseverance ho is provided 
with a comfortable share of wordly goods. Ho married, iu IS 17, Eliz- 
abeth Blattner, a native of Germany, and daughter of Sebastian Blattner, 
who has for many years been deceased. By this union six children were 
born who are still living: George, a resident of Cincinnati; Nicholas, 
Elizabeth, wife of Antony Orcheid, of Cincinnati; Frank, Mary and 
Joseph. In local polities, Mr. Vogelgosang has always taken some inter- 
est, and has served his township L in the offices of assessor, trustee, etc. 
As a further compliment to his charactar as a citizen and his judgment 
in public affairs, the people of the county in the fall of 1SS4 elected 
him to the responsible position of commissioner, the duties of which 
office he assumed in December, 1835. Mr. Vogelgesang has always been 
a firm adherent to the principles of the Democratic party, and loyal in 
its support. 

FREDERICK J. WALDO, Rising Sun, editor and publisher of 
the Rising Sun Recorder, was born in Switzerland County, Ind., 
in 1831, in which county his parents, Otis and Sarah (Smith) "Waldo, 
settled about 1816. His father died when Frederick J. was an infant, 
and his mother subsequently married Jacob Keefer, surviving till about 
1879. Mr. Waldo was reared to maturity in his native county, and edu- 
cated in the schools of Vevay. He began the printer's trade at the age 
of fourteen, and continued at the cases till 1853, when he purchased The 
Ohio Valley Gazelle in partnership with his brother, changed the name 
of the paper to the Vevay Reveille and continued its publication till 
1861; his brother continuing in the partnership but a few months. He 
nest spent about two and one- half years as postmaster at Vevay, receiv- 
ing his appointment in 1864. In 1S67 ho was appointed assistant as- 
sessor of internal revenue, for Division No. 4, of the Third Indiana 
District, serving in this capacity six years, having a silent interest in 
the newspaper business during part of that time. In 1873 he purchased 
the Rising Sun Recorder, which he has since been engaged in editing 
and publishing. The paper is pronounced in its discussion of all cred- 
itable enterprises and the public morals generally, and takes rank with 
the best country publications. Mr. Waldo was married December 22, 
1852, to Martha J. Eggleston, a native of Latonia Springs, Ky., aud 
daughter of Benjamin Eggleston, for many years a justice of the peace, 
of Covington, Ky. They have eight children: Emerson G. , John F., 
Mattie, Io, William W., Otis B., Sarah and Jessie. 



902 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

HENRI' WALKEE was born in what is now Dearborn County in 
1709. Hie parents were Benjamin and \nna Walker, among the first 
pioneers of the West. Our subject was ■ : e of the city's most Doted citi- 
zens, one who took an active part in even enterprise for the improvement 
of the city and the advancement of morality and religion. For iorty 
years he was identified with Aurora's history, coming hero in 1834, when 
it was but a village, with comparatively little business and less enter- 
prise; without bridges, and the two most important roads almost impas- 
sable to roach Manchester up the steep point, above Mr. L. Cheek's; the 
other, west, up the hill by Ji ?eph Tresters' and through Dr. Sutton's 
pasture field. To change these roads was of the utmost importance, and 
Mr. W. being elected to the Legislature the nest year, had laws passed 
relocating both these highways, and the Manchester Pike and Sunny6ido 
are the result on that route, while the turnpike to Wellsboro and Hart's 
Mill and the improvements on the other side followed as a consequence. 
Mr. Walker served as member of the State Legislature in 1835, as school 
commissioner in 1837 and from 1840 to 1843, and for a number of years 
as postmaster of Aurora. He became identified with the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church of Aurora in 1838. Mr. Walker was married to Miss Har- 
riet Bisbee December 11, 1822. Her father was a pioneer, and settled 
•with the very first on Laughery Creek. Mr. Walker's death occurred 
March 21, 1876. 

JOHN P. WALKER, farmer, Washington Township, was born in 
Lawrencoburgh Township February 22, 1816. His fathor, Robort 
Walker, was born in County Tyrone, Ireland, August 7, 1779, and came 
to Indiana in 1810 and followed farming. His mother, Theodosia 
(Cook) Walker, was born in Virginia February 3, 1793. They were mar- 
ried February 25, 1813, and raised a family of nine children: Matilda, 
John P., William, Sylvester, Nancy J., Catharine, Sarah and Thomas J. 
The i^arents were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, the 
father dying August 7, 1865, the mother March 22, 1843. The subject 
of this sketch was the second child, and in early life learned the saddle 
and harness trade, at which he worked for twenty-five years. Id early 
days he owned a shop in Wilmington, and made dray harness for the 
infant Aurora market. He also flat-boated some up to 1848. In 1848 
he moved to Washington Township, and has lived there ever since and 
followed farming almost exclusively. Mr. Walker was married, Novem- 
ber 10, 1837, to Miss Mary Smith, who was born in Washington Town- 
ship in Jaly, 1820. Their three children were Frances (now Mrs. B. 
Wethered), Irvin S. and Elizabeth A. Mr. Walker was appointed 
assessor twice, and filled the office of township trustee one term. He has 
been very successful in life, and in addition to his landed estate owns 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 963 

valuable town property and chattels. Ho is a member of Wilmington 
Lodge No 158, F. & A. M., A.i ora Chap or No. 13, and Aurora Council. 
In his charity he took an orphai boy, Louis Martin, to raise, whom ho 
treats as an own son. 

RUDOLPH WALTER, druggist and apothecary, Lawrenceburgh, 
was born in Germany in IS25, He obtained his education, literary and 
professional, in the schools of his native country, from which he emi- 
grated in 1852, locating for the first year in Cincinnati, then removing 
to Lawrenceburgh. He at once began the drug business, renting rooms 
from 1853 to I860, in whirl, year he erecl d the building he has since 
occupied. He carries a full stock of goods pertaining to the drug trade, 
and has a liberal patronage. Mr. Walter was married, in 1857, to Caro- 
line Hodel, born in Dearborn County, daughter of George Hodel, an 
they have four children: Charles A., Matilda, Flora M. and George R. 
Mr. Walter is president of the Union School Board, a position he has 
held for several years, and ranks among the first of the business men of 
Lawrenceburgh. 

PETER WALTHER, blacksmith, wagon-maker and implement dealer, 
Lawrenceburgh, was born in Alsace, France (now Germany), in 1831. He 
is a son of Michael Walther, who died in Alsace many years ago. Mr. 
Walther learned his trade in his native country, from which he emigrated 
in 1852 to the United States. He located first in Ripley County, Ind., 
whore he resided till 1857, when he removed to Lawrenceburgh, which 
has since been his home. He followed his trade in wagon-making ex- 
clusively till 1882, when he added farming implements, and in general 
has been fairly successful. Mr. Walther was married, in 1856, to Miss 
Caroline Fiko, by whom he had three children: George, Katie and Ma- 
tilda. Mr. Walther is a member of the I. 0. O. F., a hard worker and 
an exemplary citizen. His energy and industry fully entitle him to the 
success ho has achieved in his line of business. 

C. G. WALTER, M. D., Lawrenceburgh, is one of the oldest and 
most widely known physicians of Dearborn County. He was born in Ger- 
many in 1820, and was educated in the schools of his native country, in 
both literary and professional studies, under instructors at Berlin, Halle 
Rostock, graduating with the highest, honors. He immediately began 
the practice of his profession in the city of Berlin, where he continued 
with marked success up to 1852, when ho immigrated to the United 
States. Ho located in Cincinnati, on his arrival in this country, but 
remained there only two years, when he located (1854) in Lawrenceburgh. 
Here he has ever since conducted his practice, which has grown to exten- 
sive and profitable proportions. Dr. Walter makes the diseases of females 
and children a special study, and in all the years of his wide range of 



964 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNT1US. 

practice has lost but very few cases. His professional skill has gained 
for him something more than a local reputation and is recognized quite 
gouerally in southeastern Indiana. He is a member of the Indiana State 
Medical Society, with which organization ho has boon connected since 
1867; is the oldest member of the Dearborn County Medical Society; is 
president of the Lawrenceburgh Board of Health; and was formerly em- 
ployed here as physician for the Dearborn County Infirmary. Dr. Wal- 
ter was married, in 1850, to Lucy Knapp, a native of this county, and 
they have one child — Carrie G. The Doctor enjoys an enviable reputa- 
tion, which be has most fairly won by close application to the stiuly of 
his profession, together with a disposition to aid, for humanity's sake, 
all thoso who might avail themselves of his efficient services. In connec- 
tion with her household duties, Mrs. Walter, since 1875, has found time 
to conduct a dry goods establishment, carrying a stock ranging in value 
from SI, 500 to $2, 000, the same being the recipient of a very fair patron- 
age. In social as well as in professional and business circles, Dr. and 
Mrs. Walter are held in high esteem by a large circle of friends. 

JAMES N. WALTON, photographer, Aurora, was raised on a farm, 
and at the ago of eighteen commenced to take lessons in the art of pho • 
tography. By close application and hard study he became quite effi- 
cient in his chosen vocation. About the year 1861 he opened a small 
gallery in Rising Sun, afterward traveling through the country with 
William Davis in a portable photograph car. In the fall of 1862 he 
went with the Nineteenth Michigan Regiment as photographer, and on 
his return located in Aurora, Ind., Novomber 5, 1863, where he opened 
up a gallery, and continued until 1865, at which time he sold out and 
moved to Cincinnati, remaining there two years/then returning to Aurora, 
and opening up business, fully determined to become a permanent fixt- 
ure. His success in the practice of his chosen profession has been flat- 
tering in the extreme, and in artistic photography he has not a rival in 
the West. His work in all its details shows a perception of true artistic 
effects. His management of light and shadow is excellent, and the whole 
furnishes a composition most pleasing. While many photographers 
seem to possess a good mastery of the methods of manipulating, yet of- 
ten there is lacking what may bo termed " finish." Again, while the 
workmanship may be pronounced perfect, grace in position is often lack- 
ing, and an ungainly pose will often spoil the effect of an othorwise good 
work. Such faults are never to be found in the work of Mr. Walton. 
The most trifling detail is not omitted, and the result is a work showing 
harmony in its composition, beauty in its finish and truth in its outlines. 
His apartments are well fitted up and possess every facility for the con- 
venience of patrons; and in calling the attention of our readers to the 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 905 

high excellence of his work, wo are only paying a just tribute to bis offorts, 
which have brought him a patronage he richlj deserves. Mr. Wal- 
Ion was born in Ohio County, October, 31, 1842, and may he classed a 
self-made, man. By hard study at night ho acquired a common school 
education, his school privileges being limited, owing to the duties de- 
volving upon him, being the eldest of six children. On account of the 
failing health of his father he was obliged to assist his mother in the 
care of the family and the farm, at the tender age of seven years. Be- 
ing of English descent, and possessing that indomitable will so charac- 
teristic of the English people, in all of his undertakings ho has never 
known such a word as fail. During his boyhood days he was a great lov- 
er of the Sunday-school, and had read the Bible through before the age 
of nine years. At the age of seventeen he joined the Christian Church 
at Rising Sun under the preaching of Elder Tears, and has been a devot- 
ed member of the church up to he present time. It was through his 
exertions that the congregation of the Christian Church of Aurora was 
organized. Ho was elected elder in the church March 14, 1880, and 
trustee in 1882. He is a member of the K. of H. and has filled every 
ofiice wilhin the gift of the lodge. His father, Alfred A., was born in 
Rising Sun, April 10, 1816, and is said to have been the first male child 
born in that city. The mother, Elizabeth (Kompton) Walton, was born 
in Belmont County, Ohio, July 16, 1822. Mr. Walton was married, 
December 17, 1865, to Miss Fannie L. Plummer, who was born in Man- 
chester, Dearborn Co., Ind. She is a lady of artistic taste and culture, 
and by her' assistance in her husband's business, has very materially in- 
creased the high grade of his work. She is also a devoted member and 
organist of the Christian Church. To the marriage of Mr. and Mrs 
Walton one son, Clifford D. , has been born. 

ISAAC B. WARD, farmer, York Township, was born in Essex 
County, N. J., August 3, 1819. His father, William S. Ward, was a 
native of New York City, and his mother, Sarah Doyle, was born in 
Rhcinbeck, N. J., the latter in 1796. The ancestors of the family were 
a mixture of Scotch-Irish and the Amsterdam Dutch, the latter branch 
establishing themselves in this country at the time of the early settle- 
ment of New York. William S. Ward was a shoe-maker by trade, and 
early in life moved into New Jersey, where he married Sarah Doyle. 
Id the fall of 1822, with their three children, they moved by wagon to 
Wheeling, W. Va., and from thence to Cincinnati in a family boat, accom- 
panied by Mr. Kenedy's family. They took up their abode in the old 
Bonte house on York Ridge and in the following year Mr. Ward erected 
the first frame dwelling in that locality. He followed agricultural pur- 
suits chiefly during the rest of his life, though he did some work at his 



966 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

traoi for the neighborhood, and for many years kept tbo postoffice of 
that vicinity. As a citizen Mr. Ward was exceedingly popular. A con- 
firmed Whig in politics he was several times olectod commissioner, with 
one exception, being the only representative of that party ever elected 
to office in the county. lie reared a family of eleven children: Jane 
Ann (wifo of John Fagan), Isaac 13., William H. , Charles, Richard, 
Caroline (wife of Josiah Campbell), Mary E. (wife of Dr. Vincent), 
Sarah M. (widow of Frank Riddle). George W., Addie (wife of Samuel 
Motzger), and Rhoda A. (wife of J. E. Larimer). In 1857 Mr. Ward 
departed this life,' but his aged widow still survives and is at this time 
(November, 1835) making her annual visits to her relatives in Kansas. 
The mother of eleven children she has forty-nine grandchildren and 
thirty-nine great-grandchildren. Since the marriage of her youngest 
daughter, Mrs. R. A. Larimer, associate editor of the Lawrenceburgh 
Press, she has made her home with her. At the meeting of the pioneer 
association in the summer of 1885, Mrs. Ward received the gold specta- 
cles, a prize offered to the oldest person present. Isaac B. Ward, whose 
name introduces this sketch, grew to maturity on the farm with his 
parents in York Township. He learned the carpenter's trade and fol- 
lowed the fortunes of the same for about twenty years, then took up the 
horticultural and florist business, which he is still more or less engaged 
in. Ho purchased his present home in 1S57. Mr. Ward was married, 
in 1850, to Emma Taylor, a native of Cincinnati, daughter of Townsend 
Taylor, a hatter of that city, where her early years were passed. Their 
children living are Charles P., William F. and Edward K. Lizzie, the 
first born, is deceased. Mr. Ward is an intelligent reader and possesses 
a good stock of general information. He is a close observer and thinker, 
and ranks above the average intellectually. In his religions views he is 
decidedly liberal. 

REV. JUDGE JOHN WATTS, of Dearborn County, who lived a 
life of extensive usefulness both in church and state, was born in Cul- 
pepper County, Va,, March 22, 17G7. In December, 1788, he was unit- 
ed in marriage to Frances Libeau, both then members of the Baptist 
Church. She is an exemplary, pious woman. In 1789 they removed to 
Kentucky, then almost a wilderness, and the pioneers severely harassed 
by Indians. Judge Watts settled near Lexington, and was among the 
most active and enterprising in defending the infant settlements from 
the savage invaders. He was engaged in several skirmishes with the 
Indians, and was in Gen. Harmar's disastrous campaign. In 1796 he 
removed to Boone County, same State, and served for a number of years 
as associate judge of the circuit court of that county. Some time in 
1800 he engaged in the ministry of the Gospel. In 1816 ho became a 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 9ti7 

resident of Dearborn County, Lid., and two years he was elected n mem- 
ber of the Legislature. Tin- next year ho was appointed presiding judge 
of thc> Indiana Circuit in whicb lie resided. Subsequently he served the 
people of his county for six years in the Statu Senate, aud then retired 
from public office of a civil nature. Shortly after settling iu Dearborn 
County, Judge Watts collected a small church on Laughery Creek called 
the Bear Creek Church, which at first consisted of but seveu members. 
He also preached for several churches that grew up in that vicinity; was 
one of the delegates that framed the Laughery Association in 1818, and 
was chosen its moderator, which, with the exception of a few years until 
he removed out of its bounds in 1S34 remained. Though destitute of 
a classical education, Judge Watts possessed a strong, active and dis- 
criminating mind. His death occurred September 5, 1834. 

COL. JOHNSON WATTS, of Dearborn County, was born in Fayette 
County, Ivy., July 7, 1791. His parents were Judge John and Fannie 
(Sebreej Watts. Judge Watts was one of the pioneers of Kentucky and 
Indiana Territory, a man of ability and of groat usefulness as will be 
seen by the preceding sketch. His wife was an orphan girl, whose 
father's life was sacrificed in the war of the Revolution. She was raised 
to womanhood by Col. Robert Johnson, the father of Col. R. M. Johnson. 
Our subject's boyhood was passed amid frontier life along the Kentucky 
side of the Ohio River below the now village of Petersburg, to which 
place his father removed about 1709, having for several years previously 
resided at Petersburg. His playmates were Indian boys, and he became 
well skilled in the use of the bow and arrow. His early years were 
passed in assisting his father clear up a farm. At the age of seventeen 
years, he enlisted in his country's service, in the second war with Eng- 
land, under Capt. TJrial Sebree. He fought under Col. Lewis at French- 
town, near the rapids of the Maumee, January 13, and in that vicinity 
on the 22d, 1813, and "on the latter day received a wound by a musket 
ball in one leg, by which he was disabled, and resulted in his return 
home in the spring of 1813. Young Watts suffered from hunger, expos- 
ure and want of attention during the marches of that winter made neces- 
sary from the surrounding circumstances. After his return to his father's 
farm in the spring of 1813, he received three or four months' schooling 
which, with the exception of very little instruction before entering the 
service, was the extent of his educational advantages. November 3, IS 14, 
he was married to Miss Elizabeth. McClaiu, whose father resided on an 
adjoining farm. His father had purchased land on Laughery Creek in 
Dearborn County, and a portion of which was given to the son, who in 
1815 had built thereon a cabin to which he removed, and there bogan 
life for himself. His father erected a saw-mill, aud later established a 



988 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

tan- yard, ami in and about those in connection with farming, our subject 
was employed for some \ irs, subsequently purchasing tbe same, and in 
addition o]ierated a distillery. Soon after settling in Indiana, he was 
elected a colonel of militia, which office he held for live years. About 
1825 C6l. Watte began tint boating, having perhaps, made the first effort 
in starting boats from up Laughery Creek, which business he was 
engaged in for a number of years. In 1S32 he moved to Hartford, and 
was there for a time engaged in merchandising, having gone to that 
place more for the purpose of schooling his children, then eight in all 
— three sens and five daughters. Subsequently he purchased his father's 
farm on Laughery Creek, and moved upon it, and in connection with 
other business and his official duties, he was chiefly occupied during 
life. In 1825 Col. "Watts served as a representative from Dearborn 
County in the State Legislature, and from 1838 to 1843, in the State 
Senate. At the time of his election to the Senate in 1S37, the county 
was Democratic by from 300 to 400 majority, though Watts was a Henry 
Clay Whig. In 1850 Col. Watts, with William S. Holman and James 
D. Johnson, was chosen a memberof the constitutional convention, and in 
the same year he was made the Whig candidate for Congress in the 
Fourth District, but was defeated by sixty-seven votes only. Col. 
Watts on the breaking out of the civil war, was a supporter of the Union 
and of President Lincoln's administration, and, fired by the same 
patriotism as led him on to battle in 1813, when but a lad, he, although 
nearing man's allotted time on earth, offered his services to Gov. Mor- 
ton, but which on account of advanced years were declined. Col. AVatts 
was a man of considerable native ability, of good character and of un- 
questioned integrity. He closed a useful life, May 27, 1871. 

SQUIRE WATTS, son of Thomas Watts, was born in Ohio, 
January 22, 1803. About 1807 the family moved to Indiana, and 
located for a short time in the "bottoms" above Lawrenceburgh ; then 
moved up on Whitewater, where they took a lease for three years and 
then purchased a farm near Logan Cross Roads. Thomas Watts went to 
the West about 1822, and his son Squire remained in Dearborn County 
eve} since. He has followed farming most of his life, and did much 
hard work in clearing the forest and tilling the soil. About 1825 he 
came down from Logan Cross Roads and soon after purchased land in the 
vicinity of Lawrenceburgh, which has since been his home. He has 
been a thrifty farmer, and has divided considerable property among his 
children. He was married, in 1828, to Isabella Hayes, a native of this 
county, and daughter of Abiah Hayes. By this wife there are six chil- 
dren living: Thomas, Warren, Howard, Morgan, Anna and Ellen. 

S. M. WEAVER, M. D., Dillsborough, Ind., was born near Batavia, 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 9C9 

Ohio, February 24. 1834 His parents, Samuel and Catherine 
(Robinson) Weaver, were natives of Berkley County. \V. Va., and were 
of German, liish and Scotch extraction. L'hey were united in marriage 
in Clermont County, Ohio, and settled near Batavia, whore they resided 
until their respective deaths, the mother in 1859, nt sixty, tho father, in 
18G3, aged sixty-six. They were tho parents of twelve children, viz.: 
Charles H., William, Asenath, Sarah, Amanda, Elijah, Catherine M\, 
Rebecca, Samuel M., Margaret, Francis C and Elizabeth. S. M., our 
subject, received a common school education in the district schuols of 
Clermont County, Ohio, and then completed his education at what is 
known as Farmer's College, College Hill, Ohio, after which he turned 
his attention to teaching school, and at the same time reading medicine. 
In 1855 he went to Owensville, Ohio, where he turned his entire atten- 
tion to the study of medicine, Dr. B. Blythe, being his preceptor, 
under whose instructions he remained about two years, during which 
time he attended medical lectures at Cincinnati. In the winter of 
1855-50 he attended the Eclectic Medical Institute of Cincinnati, Ohio, 
after which he returned to Owensville and resumed his studies. In the 
fall of 1856 he returned to Cincinnati, Ohio, and entered the College 
of Medicine, of that place, where he graduated in the spring of 
1857, after which he returned to Owensville, and did some practice. In 
May, 1857, he went to Indianapolis and began the practice of medicine 
in partnership with Dr. J. N. Green. The following spring they dis- 
solved partnership, and Dr. Weaver located at Brownsburg, Ind., where 
he began practice independently, which he continued very successfully 
for several years. He was united in marriage at Dillsborough, Novem- 
ber 11, 1857. to Sallie A. F., daughter of George and Mary (Cleaver) 
Abraham, born at Dillsborough, April 21, 1830. After his marriage he 
settled at Brownsburg. where he resided until 18G3, in which year he 
moved to Dillsborough, where he resumed his practice, and has since 
resided. In December, 1864, he was commissioned assistant surgeon in 
the Rebellion, which rank he served in until tho close of the war. In 
January, 180(3, he was appointed postmaster at Dillsborough. In August, 
1867, he resigned and accepted the appointment of United States general 
inspector. In August, 1 868, the office was changed to United States gauger, 
to which he was recommissioned and served until December, 1868. He 
then resumed his practice at Dillsborough. In 1870 ho was elected trustee 
of Clay Township, which office he held two years, and in July, 1883, was 
appointed postmaster at Dillsborough, which ofiice he at present holds. 
Dr. Weaver is a thorough medical scholar, and a successful practitioner. 
He is a member of the G. A. R. and Masonic order, and with Mrs. 
Weaver a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. They have had 



970 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

born to them three children, viz.: May J., now Mrs. W. H. Haynes; 
Maggie (deceased), and Carrie G. 

WILLIAM WEBBER, salesman, Aurora, said to be the second old 
est native born citizen of that city, was born October 30, 1821, within 
the corporate limits of the city. Ho received instruction in the common 
branches and at the ago of fourteen, began the printing trade in Law- 
renceburgh. Subsequently he took charge of a newspaper in Aurora, for 
Mr. Lancaster. His next field of labor was Hat-boating, which ho continued 
for years, engaging for a time in the business for himself. He then 
traveled two years for Mr. Dean. In 1847 he engaged in the grocery 
business with his brother, continuing for years. In the winter of 1S57 
he engaged with Gaff & Co., and remained up to 1875. Then the duties 
and responsibilities of his present position assumed, with Chambers, 
Stevens & Co., looking after their interests, with fervency and zeal, ever 
laboring to promote the best interests of his employers. Under his hon- 
est and efficient management, all business is transacted in such a man- 
ner as to give entire satisfaction. His parents, Jonas and Sarah 
(White) Webber, were born in Massachusetts, and came to this town in 
1819. Mr. William Webber was married, July 14, 1852, to Miss Mary 
Jane Davis, who was born in Massachusetts April 12, 1831. To them 
have been born six children— Charles D., William V., George B., Harris 
W., Sallie, and Curtis C. Mr. Webber belongs to Chosen Friends Lodge 
No. 13,1. O. O. F. He and his estimable wife are members of the Baptist 
Church, and have always been identilied with church and Sunday-school 
work. 

FRANK WEUvLE, Lawrenceburgh, proprietor of the Bartholorne 
House, was born in Germany, 1849. He was brought to this country in 1853 
by his parents who now reside in Cincinnati. In 1S72 became to Lawrence- 
burgh, where ho was engaged in tho manufacture of cigars till 1877, when 
he took charge of his present house. May 28, 1874, he married Josephine 
Bartholorne, and they have three children: Theodore, Albert and Frank. 
Three others are deceased. Mr. W. is a member of the St. Lawrence 
Benevolent Society and the Liodertaf el Singing Society, also of the St. 
Boniface Catholic Life Insuranco\Association of Indiana. 

LOUE WEISS, saloonist, Aurora, is a nativeof Germany, born on the 
24th of September, 1845, of parents, Philip and Maggie Weiss, both na- 
tives of Germany. They immigrated to America in 1S54, and located 
in Ripley County, this State, ho being occupied as a farmer. The mother 
died in 1854. Our subject came to Aurora in 1863, and was employed 
as moldor in Stedman's Foundry. He embarked in his present busi- 
ness in the fall of 1882. His marriage occurred on the 27th of Septem- 
ber, 1S82, his wife being Caroline Huppmier, whoso birth occurred No- 
vember 27, 1859. 



BloaUAPIMCAL SKETCHES. 071 

CHRISTIAN WEIS, farmer ami lumber dealer, Weisburg, born in 
Franco, September 10, 1831, is a son of Philip and Margaret Weis, 
natives of France, who, in 1S32, immigrated to America, lauding at Now 
York.' In August of the same year located in Dearborn County, Ind., 
having purchased eighty acres in Jacks m Township, upon which thoy 
settled, and where they remained till their death. He died in 1805, 
aged fifty-eight years; his widow, February, 3, 1S81, aged eighty two 
years. They had three children — two now surviving: Christian and 
Philip. Mr. Weis, a fow years after locating here, erected a grist and 
saw-mill on the west branch of Tanner's Creek, which he operated till 
1854. This was the first mill for grinding in Jackson Township, and 
proved a great convenience to the neighborhood. In 1854 his sons 
erected a new steam-mill, their father leaving the business to be con- 
ducted by them. Mr. Weis had, from time to time, purchased more 
land until, at his death, ho owned 345 acres. In 1849 be commenced 
the distilling business, which he conducted very successfully until the 
war and the levying of heavy tax upon all liquors when he discontinued 
the business. He was an active, industrious man, and prosperity crowned 
his labors. Since Mr. Weis' death his sons have continued the milling 
business in connection with farming. In 1870 the 60ns dissolved part- 
nership, Philip continuing the milling business, and Christian giving 
his attention to dealing in lumber in connection with farming. In 1881 
the mill was removed to Weisburg, as a more convenient point and on 
the railroad. In 1854 Mr. Weis was united in marriage with Miss Mar- 
garet Krouse, a daughter of Peter and Margaret Krouse, natives of 
France. She died in her native country. Subsequently Mr. Krouse and 
two surviving daughters, Margaret and Elizabeth, came to America, and 
he died in Jackson Township. Elizabeth is now the wife of Philip 
Weis. By this marriage Christian Weis and wife have had sisj' children 
— five now living: Caroline, wife of E. T. Stohlman; Jacob, residing at 
Indianapolis; Margaret, wife of M. Sitz; Louisa and Lewis. 

RICHARD H. WELLS, Rising Sun, died in that city, October 15. 
18G3, in tho thirty-seventh yea^ of his age. In March, 1862, he entered 
the United States naval service, and was in command of the steam tug 
"Spiteful" at the siege of Island No. 10, and in the engagement at 
Fort St. Charles on White River, at which place, as at others, he ren- 
dered important services. For a year ( trior to his death he had been 
engaged as pilot on the United States steamer "Gen. Lyons," which posi- 
tion he hold at the time of his death. He was fervently attached to his 
country, and fought for and served her faithfully, and was buried with 
her glorious flag lightly o'er him. Ho has fought in his last fight, and 
piloted his bark into the serene and peaceful harbor of his father in 



972 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO CO UNI' IKS. 

heaven. His widow and two daughters are living at Eising Sun, a third 
daughter at Aurora, and ono in Cincinnati. 

HENRI' F. WENCKE, foreman of the Miami Valley Furniture Fac- 
tory, Lawrenceburgh, is a native of Hanover, Germany, born in 1821. 
Ho theretgrew to maturity, and received the tuition of the public schools. 
He also learned the cabinet trade, and was thus employed till 1S4S, in 
which year he sailed for America. Landing in New York, he came soon 
after to New Orleans, theuco to Cincinnati, and in 1851 to Lawrence- 
burgh, where he has since been employed in the cabinet business. In 
1808 he assisted in founding the Miami Valley Furniture Factory, and 
since that time has officiated as its foreman, with excellent success. Mr. 
Wencke was married, in 1850, to Magdaleua Kolbe, who, when three 
years of age, immigrated to this country with her parents. Of the nine 
children born to them six are still living: William, Matilda, George, 
Henry, Albert and Emma. Mr. and Mrs. W. are members of the Ger- 
man Methodist Church. 

JAMES AVERTS, farmer, Clay Township, was born in Preble 
County, Ohio, October 20, 1837. His parents were John C. and Eliza- 
beth J. (Weaver) Werts, both natives of Ohio, where they married, and 
from which place they moved to Dearborn County, Ind., in 1840. In 
1854 they removed to Ohio County, where they resided until 1808, in 
which year they moved to Brown County, Ind., where they now reside. 
They were the parents of twelve children, viz. : William, Maria, James, 
Susan, George W., Amanda, Charles, Arabelle, Isabelle, Thomas, Har- 
vey and Eliza. James grew to manhood with his parents. He entered 
the war in 1801, enlisting July 9th, in Company A, Eighteenth 
Indiana Volunteers, and served till August 20, 1804, at which time he 
was discharged and returned home. He was married at Lawrenceburgh 
November 9, 1805, to Mary Stevenson, daughter of Thomas and Eliza 
Stevenson, and native of Dearborn County. Since his marriage he has 
continued farming in Ohio and Dearborn Counties. He moved in 1879 
to his present farm, which he purchased in 1883. He owns eighty-three 
acres of land, which is well improved. He has had born to him eight 
children, viz. : Gelette V., Maggie} Millie, Emma, Minnie, John C, 
Clarence and Clyde. Mr. Werts is a member of the G. A. R., and 
highly esteemed as a citizen. 

JAMES M. WHEELER, grocer, Cochran, was born in Dearborn 
County, Ind., November 21, 1834, and recoived a common school educa- 
tion. His father, John Wheeler, was born in Virginia January 20, 
1790, and his mother, Margaret (Miller) Wheeler, was born in England 
January 30, 1815. His father was a farmer, and came to this county in 
1802. His mother died March 15, and his father March 25, 1843. 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 973 

James M. was raised on a farm and followed farming until 1840, when 
lie began clerking for a Mr. Hunter, in Chilli othe, 111., a dealer in gen- 
eral merchandise. In 1864 ho came to Aurora, and engaged with Will- 
iam Loivo. In 18G7 he engaged in the grocery business with Mr. 
Greer, continuing for throe years; then sold out to Appleton & Co., and 
opened a store in Cochran for himsolf. He was married in May, 1871, 
to Miss Selina H. Greer, who was born in Pennsylvania November 1, 
1837. She died in March, 1875, and April 16, 1878, he was married to 
Miss Margaret Newlan, who was born in Pennsylvania December 21, 
1851. He is a member of Doarborn Lodge No. 442, F. & A. M., 
Aurora Chapter No. 13, and Aurora Commandery No. 17; also of Chosen 
Friends Lodge No. 13, I. O. O. F., and Encampment. His wife belongs 
to the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

JAMES WHITE, Miller Township, on» of the first residents of 
Dearborn County, was born in New Jersey January 28, 1793. His par- 
ents, John and Abigail White, were natives of New Jersey, the former 
born January 13, 1763. the latter September 23, 1766. They were 
among the first two or three families who settled this side of the Miami 
River, their daughter Sallie believed to he the first white child born this 
side of that stream. They first located near Elizabeth town, in the " big 
bottoms," where they resided about three years, then moved to Miller 
Township, where the parents ended their days. James White grew to 
maturity a farmer, and married Mary Grubbs, by whom he reared nine 
children. Mrs. White died in 1855, and in 1S69 Mr. White was again 
married, his second wife being Mrs. Mary Bonham nee Van Dolah, 
daughter of Feter and Luciuda (Watson) Van Dolah, who came to this 
county in 1823. After his first marriage Mr. White moved with his fam- 
ily to Johnson County, Ind., whore he purchased a large forest farm 
and began the task of clearing it up, which he accomplished only by 
many years of hard labor. Ho subsequently sold the farm, and moved 
to Franklin, the county seat, and ten years later to this county, where 
he purchased the farm on which his widow now resides. He died in 
1877. Ho was a member of the Baptist Church, and held in high 
esteem by the citizens of the community in which he resided. John H. 
Bonham, son of Elijah and rMary (Van Dolah) Bonham, was born 
in this county in 1859, and has resided in this community on the 
farm, most, if not all, of his life. His father was born in this 
county, and his grandfather, Aaron Bonham, came here with his father, 
John Bonham, who was of the first few settlers of the county. In 1874 
John H. Bonham married Sarah A. Hargitt, a daughter of Thomas Har- 
gitt, another pioneer of this county, and they have three children: Amy 
B., Charles T. and Nora E. 



974 HISTORY OF DEARBOKN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

JOHN T. WHITLOCK, a resident and native of Rising Sun, dealer 
in groceries, hardware and agricultural implements, was horn in 1847. 
His parents were John T. and Susanna K. (Yonge) Whitlock, natives of 
New Jersey and New York City respectively. They were married in New 
York andj came to Rising Sun about 1830. His father was a cabinet- 
maker, and followed that business for about thirty years, serving two 
terms as treasurer of Ohio County. He died in 18S2, his •wife Laving 
departed this life in 1S77. The subject of this sketch was reared in the 
vicinity of Rising Sun, and educated in its public schools. He worked 
with his father in the cabinet trade till 1870, when ho established him- 
self in the business, which he has since continued. Mr. Whitlock was 
married in 1872 to Flora H. Brett, of Warsaw, Ky., who died in 1877, 
leaving one child, Harry. November 2G, 1884, he married Maggie B. 
Rabb, of Rising Sun, daughter of Capt. David G. Rabb (deceased), a 
former citizen of prominence in Ohio County. Mr. "Whitlock is a member 
of the I. O. O. F. and G. A. R ., and one of the leading merchants of 
Rising Sun. He served in the late war from August 2, 1802, to Febru- 
ary 28, 1SG3, being a member of the Fourth Indiana Cavalry. 

FREDERICK WIDAU, farmer, Logan Township, one of the most 
substantial farmers of the township, was born in the same in 1837. 
His parents were Christopher and Wilhelmina Widau, both natives of 
Germany, who immigrated to this country in 1832, purchasing land in 
this township in the same year. He died in 1870. Frederick Widau 
was reared on a farm and educated in the district schools. At the age 
of twenty four he married Caroline Yager, and rented land till about 
1864, when he purchased his present farm of 160 acres, which he has 
since improved and cultivated. Mr. and Mrs. Widau have seven chil- 
dren: Albert, John, Emma, August, Kate, Elizabeth and William. 
Mrs. W. is a daughter of Nicholas Yager, of Kelso township. The fam- 
ily is associated with the Lutheran Protestant Church. 

JOHN F. WILBER, of Rising Sun, was born in New York State, 
March 14, 1816. His parents moved to Indiana in 1823, and located 
near Rising Sun, and after renting land a few years, purchased a farm 
of John Tait, one of the earliest settlers of Ohio County where his father, 
Benjamin Wilber, died. Jonathan learned the blacksmith's trade with 
James Tait, in Rising Sun, and in January, 183y, married Mary Ann 
Jones. He followed his trade about twenty years in various places, and 
then bought a farm in Ohio. Later he moved back to Rising Sun, 
where he died April 30, 1884. 

DAVID S. WILBER, attorney at law, Rising Sun, is a native of 
Ohio County and son of Robert E. Wilber, one of the early settlers of 
this region. He spent his early years on the farm and obtained the 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 975 

rudiments of an education in tho district schools, subsequently talcing a 
partial course of study at Moore's Hill College. He was instructed in 
the law by Judgo Downey, and in 18S0 began the practice of his pro- 
fession *in Rising Sun, where he has since been located. For a time he 
was engaged in tho grocery business but abandoned mercantile pursuits 
to give his entire attention to his profession. In May, 18S3, he was 
elected to the mayorship of Itising Sun, and in May, 1885, was re-elected 
without opposition, his administration having been generally approved. 
Mr. Wilbur was married in 1SG7, to Mary French, a native of Miss- 
issippi, and daughter of John Q. French, her grandfather having settled 
in Ohio County about 1815. Mr. and Mrs. W. have four children: Liz- 
zie, Quincy, Emma and Robert. The family is associated with the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. 

ROBERT E. "VYILBER born in Duchess County, N. Y., June 21, 
1806, is a son of Robert and Mary (Smith) Wilber, also natives of New 
York, and who, in the fall of 1813, removed to Indiana, traveling over 
the mountains to Pittsburgh by wagon, thence by flat-boat to Roger 
Brown's, near Rising Sun. Their horses were sent overland through 
Ohio. Mr. Wilber remained on the river one year and raised one crop, 
then purchased 1G0 acres on Laughery Creek about one mile below Hart- 
ford, where he located with his family in the spring of 1815. Hero ho 
resided about twelve or fiftoen years when he purchased 160 acres about 
one mile above Hartford, where he resided till his death. Mr. Wilber 
was a man of much native ability, and during his residence in Duchess 
County, N. Y., he held the ofBce of deputy sheriff and also served as 
collector. Through all his business life he was noted for his honesty 
and uprightness. After he settled in Ohio County he was appointed a 
justice of the peace by the governor of this then Territory, and served 
until Indiana was organized as a State. His wife was a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church before they came to this State, and sub- 
sequently he united with that society. He was the father of seven 
children, all of whom grew to maturity, four now surviving: Eliza A. 
now widow of Benjamin Walker, residing at Madison; Allen B. ; Robert 
E. and Dewitt C. Robert E., the subject of th)s sketch, grew to man- 
hood fully acquainted with pioneer life. He was married, September 
30, 1841, to Elizabeth Newman, a native of England, and a daughter of 
Timothy and Frances Newman, natives of England. By this union they 
had six children, four now surviving: David S., Robert O, Ethan A. 
and William T. Mrs. Wilber died May 29, 1883, aged sixty-four years. 
In 1833 Mr. Wilber and his brother entered upon the general mercantile 
trade in Hartford, where they continued in business (except from 1S39 to 
1844) until during the war of the Rebellion, when they sold their stock. 



970 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AM) OHIO COUNTIES. 

In connection with their merchandising they have loaned a great deal of 
money, ;ind thus carried on quite a brokerage business. In all their 
transactions they have met with excellent success, having a wide reputa- 
tion as a business firm. 

JOHN WILDRIDGE, groceries, Aurora, of tho firm of Wildridge 
& Bufungton, was born in Harrison Township, Dearborn Co., Ind., No- 
vember 27, 1843, and obtained a cominon school education. His father 
was born in Berks County, Ponn., in 1807, and died in 1850. The 
mother, Eliza Bowman, was born in New Jersey, in 1814. Mr. Wild- 
ridge was brought to this county in 1810 by his parents, and followed 
farming up to his death. Ho was a peaceable, quiet citizen, and was re- 
spected by all who knew him. John was married, February 13, 18(37, to 
Miss Caroline Buffington, who was born in Center Township, February 
13, 1845. Four children are tho fruit of the marriage: Frank, born 
December 4, 1867; Edith, born November 2, 18GS, died November 4, 
1869; Daisie, born Juno 14, 1S73; Stella, born November 24, 1878. Mr. 
Wildridge has always kept himself aloof from all secret organizations. 
He is a careful, prudent business man and a respected citizen. 

JOSEPH WILHELM, farmer, Kelso Township, was born in Dear- 
born County, June 5, 1837. His parents, Jacob and Caroline (Fry) 
Wilhelm, were natives of France and Ohio respectively. The former 
was born in November, 1811, and immigrated to this county with his 
parents in 1831, where he and Caroline Fry were united in marriage in 
1835. She was born in Ohio in 1820. After their marriage they settled 
first in York Township, where they resided but a short time, thence mov- 
ing to Kelso Township, where Mrs. W. died in 1860. Elizabeth Young, 
a second wife, died in 1863, and in 1874 Mr. W. moved to Franklin 
County, Ind., where he at present resides. He had born to him seven 
children, viz.: Joseph, Charles, Mary, Catherine, John, Jacob and Caro- 
line. Joseph was married in Kelso Township, this county, April 23, 
1861, to Mary A. Blattner, daughter of John and Mary A. Blattner. 
She was born in Dearborn County, June 30, 1839. After his marriage 
he settled in St. Leon, where he worked at the carpenter's trade, which 
he learned when sixteen years of age. In 1868 he purchased and settled 
on his present farm, and engaged in farming, he and Mrs. Wilhelm, 
being parents of seven children, viz.: Mary A., A.una C. (deceased), Phile- 
mena L. , Edward A., Anna E. and Charles J. Mr. Wilhelm and family 
are members of the Catholic Church. He was elected to the office of 1 
township assessor in 1882, and is still serving in that capacity. 

CHARLES WILHELM, farmer, Kelso Township, was born in Dear- 
born County, March 14, 1S39. He is one of seven children, born 
to Jacob and Caroline (Frey) Wilhelm. He was united in marriage 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 977 

at St. Loon. Kelso Township, November 13, 18(10, to Magdalena Ren- 
tier, who was born in Dearborn Counly June 20, 1S42, a daughter of 
Peter and Covila (Hahn) Renner. After his marriage ho settled at St. 
Leon, and has since resided there. He owns 134 acres of land, and is 
the father of six children, viz. : Henry V., Magdalena, Charles J., 
Elizabeth, Albanner H and Caroline. Mr. Wilhelm and family are 
-members of the Catholic Church. 

DR. HUGH T. WILLIAMS, see page 174. 

WILLIAM W. WILLIAMS, attorney and mayor of Rising Sufi, was 
born in Switzerland County, in 1853, son of Thomas M. and Anna C. 
(Murray) Williams. He has chiefly resided in Ohio County. He was 
educated in the public schools of Rising Sun and at Greeucastle, Ind., 
his earlier years being spent in farming, clerking, etc. In 1875 he 
began the study of law under the tutalage of Judge A. C. Downey and 
in 1876 was appointed clerk of the court of Ohio County. In the fall of 
the same year he was elected to the same office and served four years. 
Since that time he has been engaged in the practice of his profession 
and in tho insurance business. Mr. Williams is a member of the F. & 
A. M. in which society he has held all the offices. 

MURRAY T. WILLIAMS, local editor of the Rising Sun Local, is 
a son of Thomas M. and Anna C. (Murray) Williams, his father a native 
of Hamilton County, Ohio, his mother of Ohio County, Ind. He was 
born in Greeucastle, Ind., August 30, 1858, and in the public 
schools of that place and of Rising Sun he was educated. In 
1872 he was employed as messenger in the Rising Sun bank, 
retaining that position four years. He was next engaged three 
years as deputy clerk of Ohio County, under his brother Will- 
iam Williams, and in 1879 accepted a position on the Rising Sun 
Local as local editor, which he surrendered in March, 1881, to 
assume the duties of deputy postmaster at Rising Sun. From May, 
1882, to October, 1SS3, ho was employed in the same capacity at Aurora, 
since which time he has been constantly engaged in "peDcil pushing" at 
his former post as local editor of the Local. Murray is a young man of 
sterling qualities, and with a brain no less fertile than his quill is 
facile, he never fails to present to his readers the local happenings in 
their most readable style. Notwithstanding his susceptibility to the 
tender sentiment, and the fact that he has already passed the twenty- 
seventh mile post of his life, he is still treading in the lonely walk of 
single infelicity. 

JAMES B. WILSON, farmer, was born in Ohio County, Ind., Sep- 
tember 2, 1834. His parents, Thomas and Matilda (Wethers) Wilson, 
were natives of Kentucky and Indiana, respectively, the former born in 



978 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

Trimble County, Ky., November 6, lSO^ ; the latter in Ohio County, 
Ind., November 3, 1S0G. They were married in Ohio County, 182S, and 
resided there during the greater part of their lives. The mother died 
August 27, 1837. Ho afterward lived with his children until his death, 
in February, 1879. He was the father of four children, viz. : Eliza, Ada- 
lino, James B. and Margaret. Jamos B. was married near Rising Sun, 
October 16, 18G2, to Rachel Barricklow, by whom he has had four chil- 
dren, viz.: John B., Robert P., Daniel C, and Mary A., deceased. Af- 
ter his marriage ho first settled at Milton, Ohio County, and in December 
18G5 settled on his present farm. 

GEORGE B. WILSON, farmer, Clay Township, was born at Wakefield, 
Yorkshire, England, April 18, 1820. His parents, James and Sarah H. 
(Spink) Wilson, were also natives of Yorkshire, where the father was born 
October 12, and the mother May 11, 1792. They were married April 
18, 181G, and resided in Yorkshire until their deaths. The father died 
July 23, 184G, and the mother August 22, 1S77. They were the parents 
of twelve children, viz.: James, William, Sarah H, Ann, Thomas, Mary, 
George B., Margaret, Henry, John, Robert P. and Alfred. George B., our 
subject, immigrated to the United States in 1850. Landing at New York 
City he came to Cincinnati, and to Dearborn County, Ind., where he has 
since resided. He was married in this township June 13, 185S, to Abi- 
gal, daughter of Simeon and Rebecca (Bruce) Vinson. She was born in 
this county August 2, 1840, one of six children, viz.: James, Abigal, 
William, Caroline, Mary and Clark. After Mr. Wilson's marriage he 
purchased the farm on which he now resides. He owns 143 acres of fine 
land. He has had born to him seven children, viz.: Anna (deceased), 
Mac, Ann, Roy, Alta, Ada, and one who died in infancy. '_ 

BENJAMIN WILSON, Jr., farmer, Washington Township, is a 
native of Kentucky, and was born May 20, 1804. His parents, Benja- 
min and Margaret (Armstrong) Wilson, were born in Pennsylvania, the 
father, February 15, 1771; mother, April 1771. They were married 
February 15, 1792, and moved to Kentucky in 1795, and to this town- 
ship in 1805. He was a farmer all his life. The mother died in April, 
1843; father, July 29, 1861. Mr. Benjamin Wilson, Jr., was married, 
May 17, 1832, to Miss Matilda Neal, a native of Kentucky, born August 
30, 1812, and by this union reared ten children: William W., Lewis, 
George, Jonathan, Perry, Eliza, Melville, Elias, Nathan and Ezra. Mr. 
Wilson assisted his father in clearing up a good portion of his present home 
farm, and he has done much hard work in his time. Before marriage he 
made several trips down the river, but since that date has farmed exclu- 
sively. He and his amiable wife belong to the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, of which he has been steward for years. 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 979* 

TOM WINEGARDNER, proprietor of bookstore and news stand, 

Lawrenceburgh, is a native of Pennsylvania, born at VVilliamsport, No- 
vember 10, 1846. His parents were Abram and Margaret (Williams) 
Winegarduer, natives of Pennsylvania, both of whom are deceased, and 
their remains rest in the cemetery at Williamsport. Abram Winegard- 
ner was for a period engaged as a merchant at Williamsport, and subse- 
quently became an extensive lumber dealer of that place. Our subject 
grew up in "his native town, and there received a fair education at Dick- 
inson Seminary. "When but a lad of fifteen years, fired by the patriotism 
of youth, he answered his country's call, and enlisted in Company I, 
One Hundred and Thirty-first Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry, and for 
nine months shared the fate of that command, participating in the bat- 
tles of Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, being discharged in August, 
1862. He subsequently re-enlisted for three months, serving in the 
Thirty-second Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and took part 
in the battle of Gettysburg. After the expiration of his term of service 
Mr. W. entered his father's store and was engaged in mercantile pursuits 
until twenty one years of age. He then went into the oil country, aud 
was for several years engaged in railroading. Subsequently he returned 
to his native place, and in 1876 came West, and for three years was a 
resident of Indianapolis. In October, 1879, he first came to Lawrence- 
burgh, being then, and for two years after, engaged in railroading. In 
the fall of 1881 he began his career as a business man of Lawrenceburgh, 
as the proprietor of a notion store. Through his energy, enterprise and 
genial ways, he has placed himself at the head of one of the best and 
most complete book stores and news stands of the city, where can also be 
found almost anything in the line of toys, wall paper, etc. Mr. W. is 
also agent for the Cincinnati Enquirer, and for the Adams Express Com 
pany. '"Tom," as he is familiarly called, is a most genial and affable 
gentleman, and popular with with the masses. He was married on the 
10th of March, 1880, to Miss Annie M. Frederick, of Carlisle, Penn. In 
politics Mr. W. is a Republican. 

FRANCIS WORLEY, farmer, Center Township, was born in High- 
land County, Ohio, December 25, 1810. His limited education was 
obtained in a log-schoolhouse, where the rays of light and sunshine were 
admitted through greased paper, instead of glass windows, as we enjoy 
in this age of progression. His father, Nathan Worley, was born in 
Pennsylvania, and his mother, Olive (Holt) Worley, in North Carolina. 
They moved to Ohio in 1808 and to this county in 1816, aDd the former 
was engaged in farming all his life. He was drafted in the war of 1812, 
went out, but was in no battles. His death occurred in 1830, and that 
of his mother in 1835. Francis Worley, in early life, farmed, then 



980 HISTOltV OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

<slerked for several parlies, and flat-boated for himself. He was on tbe 
"Caledonia" when her boilers exploded, and was blown up, and took 
a swim for sovoral hours down the river. After which he returned to 
his rirst love — farming — and has followed that vocation over since. He 
was married, May 10, 1832, to Miss Jane Dils, a native of Virginia. 
By the union two children —George H. and Mary -J. — were born. His 
wife died March 10, 1834. In 1837 he married Miss Nancy J. 
Sanks, a native of Dearborn County, and to them have been born eight 
children. Elizabeth, born January 14, 1841; William R., January 5, 
1843; Martha, November 18, 1844, Francis, February 18, 1847; Jennie, 
March 26, 1849; Ella, September 20, 1851; Fannie, May 26, 1854, and 
Lilla, May 28, 1854, twins. The wife died in 1858, and in 1863 he married 
Mrs. Elizabeth Watts McCoy, who died in 1875. June 27, 1877, he 
married Miss Anna E. Reihard, who was born in Louisville, Jefferson 
Co., Ky., March 26, 1828. Mr.Worley has served as township trustee for 
about twelve years, and was elected justice of the peace, but would not 
serve. He has been school director several times. He was one of the 
founders of the Horse Thief Association, and has tilled every position in 
the fair organization, acting as secretary for seven years. He has wit- 
nessed all the changes in this county, from a wilderness to its pres- 
ent improved condition. His estimable wife is a member of the Pres- 
byterian Church. 

HENRY R. WOOD, farmer, Manchester Township, born in Cler- 
mont County, Ohio, December 1, 1832, is a son of George and Thurzia 
(King) Wood, natives of New York, the maternal grandfather, Heman 
King was also a native of New York, but his father, Heman King, was a 
native of Connecticut. The grandfather, Heman King, came with his 
family to Ohio and settled in Clermont County in 1818. In 1828 he 
removed to Indiana and settled on the place now owned by Mr. Wood, 
where he resided till his death, July 16, 1850, in the eighty-sixth year 
of his age. He was a young lad during the Revolutionary war, but he 
helped to remove the troops from Saratoga to Yorktown prior to its sur- 
render. Mr. George Wood came to Clermont County while a young, 
single man, was married there, where he lived till 1847, when he 
removed to western Tennessee, where he died, June 24, 1884, aged 
eighty-six years. His wife died in July, 1834, aged thirty-five years. 
They had seven children, five now living: John K. (a resident of Ten- 
nessee), Hannah (wife of George W. Lewis), Laura, Emeline and Henry 
R. The last three are unmarried and reside upon the old King farm in 
Manchester Township. Mr Henry R. Wood, after the death of his 
mother, was reared to manhood by his uncle, John P. King. At Mr. 
King's death he came into 2>ossession of the home place, where he has 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 081 

since resided. This farm consists of 25 t acros of good land with good 
improvements. Mr. Wood and his sistov, Emeline, are members of the 
Hogan Hill Baptist. Church Laura is a member of the Methodist 
Church. 

HOSEA S. WOOD, farmer, Sparta Township, was born on the farm 
on which he now resides, July 28, 1S3C He is one of nine chil- 
dren born to Samuel B. and Nancy (Musgrove) Wood, who immi- 
grated to this county in a very early day. The former was a son 
of Daniel Wood, a native of Maine, and of English and French 
parentage. He emigrated from Maine to Saratoga County, N. Y., 
about 1790, and was there married to Mary Saulsbury, remaining in 
that locality till his death. They had born to them nine children 
namely : Samuel B., Winslo, Parserved, Jacob, Sarah, Mary, Cerefta, 
Lydia and Asenath. Samuel B. was born in Saratoga County, N. Y., 
August 13, 1793. In 1817 he immigrated to Dearborn Co., Ind., and 
entered the land on which our subject now lives. It required a strong 
heart and determined mind to eudure the toils and hardships of clearing 
up this forest farm, but he did his part without faltering, fighting the 
wolf at his cabin door. He labored dilligently to establish a home with 
its necessary comforts, and succeeded admirably. His death occurred 
September 23, 1858. He was united in marriage at Manchester, Septem- 
ber 3, 1820, to Nancy Musgrove, who was bom in West Virginia, Janu- 
ary 5, 1804, a daughter of Moses and Nancy (Hamilton) Musgrove. By 
this marriage there were nine children born viz. : Thomas S., Daniel 
H., Jacob H., Hezekiah N., Samuel J., Hosea S., George C. and two in- 
fants, deceased. Hosea S., our subject, was married in Kenton County, 
Ky., November 28, 1807, to Mary E., daughter of Joseph and Mary 
(Calvert) Rich. She was born in Kenton County, Ky., November 17, 184G, 
the youngest of thirteen children. After our subject's marriage he settled 
where he now resides. He owns a fine farm of 252 acres, well improved. 
The only child born to Mr. and Mrs. Wood, George T., is deceased. 
They raised an orphan boy, Charles W. Campbell, who grew up to be a 
very worthy young man, and died at the age of twenty six years. 

WILLIAM WOODS, farmer, "Union Township, was born in Pennsyl- 
vania, June 8, 1816, and is a son of John and Mary (Little) Woods, na- 
tives of Ireland, who came to America while in childhood, were reared 
in Pennsylvania, where the}' were married and resided till the spring of 
1817, when they removed to Indiana and settled in Ohio County, where 
Mr. Woods entered 100 acres of forest land, which he cleared up and on 
which his son William now lives. He died in 1837, ^aged fifty- four years. 
His widow survived until 1SG5 and died, aged seventy-seven years. They 
were parents of nine children, seven of whom grew to maturity and five 



"982 HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES. 

now surviving : Valentine C, James A., William, Joseph, ami Marga- 
ret, now the wife of Pryor Oxloy. "William AVoods grew to maturity 
on the farm with his parents. November 29, 1839, he married 
Lydia pownoy, a daughter of John and Susanna Downey. Ho was a 
native of Maryland and she of Pennsylvania. They were married in 
Ohio, and in ISIS settled in Ohio County, where they remained through 
life. He died in Rising Sun, July 19, 1803, aged seventy-nine years, 
she at her daughter's, Mrs. Woods, April 9, 1874, in the eighty-third 
year of her age. They had eleven children, nine of whom grow to ma- 
turity, five now surviving : Mary Ann, wife of.Daniol Kittle; Eliza, wife 
of Lewis French; Phebe, wife of James Works; Alexander C. and Lydia. 
Mr. Woods and wife have been blessed with six children, five of whom 
are still living: George A., John W., William D., Orpheus Alonzo and 
Robert E. Mr. Woods still resides upon the old home farm, where he 
was raised and where he has now been a resident for sixty-eight years. 
He now owns 190 acres of land well improved. He has reared his five 
sons and helped them to a start in life, by furnishing each with more 
than $2,000. He has never been a seek