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Full text of "History of Dearborn county, Indiana : her people, industries and institutions, with biographical sketches of representative citizens and genealogical records of old families"

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1628694 

fISYNOLDS HISTORICAL 
<li»^EALOGY COLLECTIOfcl 



-" ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 

3 1833 02322 3206 



HISTORY 

OF 



DEARBORN COUNTY 



INDIANA 



HER PEOPLE, INDUSTRIES AND INSTITUTIONS 

VmL.^ : ^,... ■". ■■■, . ■.;.:■: 

ARCHIBALD SJrjAW 

Editor . : • . • 



With Biographical Skctciies of P^epresentritive Citizens anv 
Genealogical Records ol Old Families 



ILLUSTRATED 
/C 

1915 
F. BOWEN cS: COMPANY, Inc. 

Indianapolis, Indiana 



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1628694 



DEAKBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. ^T^J 

seven. John A. Cole was a member of the Catholic church, but his widow is a 
member c>f the jMethodi.sL chinch. Of their eight children, jc^lm, the eldest. 
is deceased; Jeremiah lives in Portland. Oregon: Chailes }I. li\ es in Seati:e. 
Washington: Laura J. is the widow of Dr. H. \V. Swales, of Ilarrisim, Ohio; 
George C. is the subject of this sketch: Leonard X. resides in. ^larvsville. K.in- 
sas, and two died young. 

Dietrich Kohl, whi) married a Miss Muhle, was tlie paternal gr;mdiallKr 
of George C. Cole, who lived in Oetlie, in the |)i"o\'in.ce of Oldenburg, Ger- 
many, where he died at the age of fifty-nine. He and his w ife were tiie parems 
of eight children, Anthony, Frederick, Joseph, Henry. John A.. Charles and 
two ^vho died in infancy. The mother of these cliildren was well advanced in 
years at the time of her death. Professor Cole's maternal grandpai'ents, Jatnes 
M. and Elizabeth (Cohee) r)0at;rian, the former a native of flamiiton, 
Ohio, and the latter of Delaware, were early settlers in Dearborn county 
and reared a large familw t'.ieir children ha\ing been named as follow : fanies. 
John. Pel:ecca, Jeremiah, (k-orge hi., ALark. Eliza. A'ai'ian and I\Ianrice. 
James AI. Boatman, a farmer and general merchant, lived to be si.xty-nine 
years old, his widow sur\'i\ ing him for some years, her death occurring at the 
age of se\'ent\-nine. (Jne of their sons. Jeremi;i!i, was killeiJ in tlie ser\ice 
of his country durin.g the Civil War. 

Reared on his father's farm in Dearborn county, George C. Cole attended 
tlie district schools oi Logan township and there he was trained and educated 
in the rudiments of history, geography, arilhmelic. English gramm:.'.r, reatiing, 
writing- and spelling. In his home he recei\"cd what was of mucii greater 
value, splenditl character training from his fatlier anij mother. Ear!\ in life 
he learned to know that there is little reward without effort and no great com- 
pensation without industry. Always a studious young man, alter finishing the 
course in the district schouls he attended tlie National Normal L'niversitv at 
Lebanon, Ohio ; the Central Normal College at Danville, Indiana ; the Ni.'rthern 
Indiana Normal School at \alparaiso, Indiana, and the Lndiana .Staie Normal 
School at Terre Haute, ha\ing graduated from the latter institution with the 
class of 1902. His career as a teacher, which covered a period of about seven- 
teen years, began in i8go, when he was eighteen years old. After teacliing 
in the country schools for six years, he v.-as appointed, in iSqtj, to a position in 
the eigh.th grade in Lawrenceburg, where he taugh.t until 1S98, at which time 
he was appointed to the principalsliip oi the Lawrenceburg high school, which 
position he held until his election as county superimenileut. 

Two years after his election as count\- superintendent, or on June [, 1909, 



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5^8 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. ■. " ' 

Professor Cole was niarricrl to Tillie Lorciiz, who was liorn at Piscalaway, 
Mar viand, the daughter ni Charles A. and Afary Loren/, t1ic fomicr of wh.m 
was a native of nortliern Austria, of (k-rninn d.escent. and the latter a ua.iive 
of Baden. Gernianv. Charles A. I,orcnz was accidentally killed in a saw-mill 
at Piscatawav, Maryland, in igi4. His widow, the mother of Mrs. Cole, is 
still living-. Thev had nine children, three of wh'im died in early life. Those 
who lived to maturitv were Mar}', Charles. .\nna, Joseph, Theresa, and Ralph. 
]Mrs. Cole is a devout member of the Catholic church. }dr, and IMrs. Cole 
have one child, i\lary Rel;iecca. 

Prof. George C. Cole is a memher of Pawrenceburg Lodge No. 4, Free 
and Accepted ^lasons, and is high priest of Pawrenceburg chapter No. 56, 
Rova! Arch Masons. He is an ardent Democrat and for years has been more 
or less identified with the leadership of the party in this section. Professor 
Cole eniovs high standing as an educator in southern Pidiana. He is a pr(.«Tii- 
nent member of the C(jimt_\ .Superintendents" Association of Indiana, and is one 
of the leading citizens of this community. 



•■.■-- ■ MISS GEORGPANA SUTTON. 

Every enlightened community is proud of its noble men and women, of 
whom Dearborn coimty has had in the i)ast. and has today, a gciidl}" number. 
Among the noljle women of a day now past in this county there is none more 
worthy of mention than Miss Georgiana K. Sutton, decea>ed. the daughter 
of the late Dr. George Sutton. This good \\oman was IxTrn and reared in 
Aurora, and was always loyal to the ti:)wn of her birth and tlie fner.ds 
with whom she grew up from childhood. She lived not alone fur herself, bur 
for others, and among the good deeds of her life, which were many, she Ije- 
queathed to her h<ime t(3\vn the l)cauiiful public library, which now stands a 
perpetual monument to her memory; haying made provision for the same prior 
to her death, by her last will and testament, setting aside th.e sum i;>f ten 
thousand dollars for this i)iu'pose, as a memorial in loving remembrance of 
her distinguished father and her beloved mother. According to her earnest 
wish, this building ^\•as erected under the -.uriien-isi'.Ti of her brother. Dr. IP H. 
Sutton, who presented the completed buihiing to the city of Aurora on Octoljer 
13, J914, with appropriate remarks, in conformity to the plans outlined by his 
generous sister, the donor. 



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539 



In the Dearborn InJcpciuicnf of Tliursday, Jamiarv 20, i')io, apjicared tlie 
fill lowing- Ijeautiful trilnite Id ]\fif> Sutton's wrjrth aiul cliar;icttrr. in the an- 
nouncement of !icr death !)_v her friend, Mrs. M. V.. Culiln wlm had knnwn her 
fur many _\ears : 

"The death rif ]\Iiss Geen-j^iana Sutlrjn was lliat of a \erv ele\cr \\'nnian. 
known and lo\ed for lier forceful personatii\- and lirilliavit ■attainments. Few 
women prohalilv comhined more strikin.qh- than did }iliss Suttun thc>se (juali- 
ties which, make e\"eryone. young- and old. respect, admire and eniow Slie \vas 
ever gracious, ever courteous, and e\"er considerate, a jrure t\'pc of gentle 
;\oman. Possessed of superior quahties of mind, her greatest pleasures were 
those things which cuUivate the intellect. She was a lo\'er of books and was a 
great reader all her life, and while not a musician, she w'as a lo\'or of music and 
knew and enjoyed the best, ne\-er missing an opjiortunity to hear the famous 
artists and the classical music in our own and other lands. She gave freely 
of her happy experiences and many there are w ho will remember her descrip- 
tion of the Passion Pkiy at Oberammergau, which she attended some years 
agu. She \vas a traveller, knowing her own lan:i well and having made many 
trips abroad, visiting nearly e\'ery country in the world. 

"While she ^\as an enthusiastic tra\'eller ami enjo\'ed to the utmost her 
joume}'s, a strong characteristic in her nature was always made manifest on 
her return — her loyalty to her home cit\". She was always glad to return and 
always declared she never found in all of her travels more beautiful scenery 
than from our own surrounding hills. Such was her devotion to her home and 
its cherished surrriundings that it seemed to hurt her that anyone should ever 
want to leave Aurora, ne\"er to return. Highlv cultm'ed, with the innate 
charm of gentleness and refinement, she was the noble d,anghter of her hon- 
ored father, the late Dr. George Sutton, wdiom she revered with a de\'Otion 
above all things else. 

"Miss Sutton was the president of the Aurora Woman's T\esearch Club 
and also the Orphans' Club for several }'ears. She was a most excellent presi'I- 
ing officer, always being just, impartial, yet fimi. She was beloved by the 
members of both organizations, who were filled with regret wdien she gave w]') 
the offices, thougii always continuing in active membership. Miss. Sutton will 
be missed, for slie was so interested in exeiything. so genial, that her absence 
will be felt, there will be a void that can never be filled. 

"^liss Sutton's trip to the Orient last year, though most enjoyable to 
her, was very trving and she came home worn out and exhausted. In lier 
last illness she imagined herself preparing for a journey, little realizing the 



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540 DEARBORN COL'XTV, IXOIAXA. : •' ' 

long journey into eternity. While Miss Gcorgiana Sutton has passed into the 
deep valley her memoiy still lives in the hearts of her friesids, and with all in. 
this community, which has liccn her life-long home. 

"Miss Sutton was Lorn in Aurcira. Se|)tember T2, 1842. the nnh- d.n'.ghter 
of the late Dr. George Sutton. She died at her home in this citv, January 
iS, 1910. A life with few riffles in its stream, and filled with all the aitri- 
butes that. cheer and inspire. 

'Deadi sh>xdd come gently to one of gentle mould like thee. 

As light winds, wandering through groves of hit^nm. 

Detach the delicate blossoms from tlie trees. 

Close thy sweet eyes calmly, and witlirmt jiain. ' ''•■ '"' ■■■■■ 

And we \\ ill trust in God to see thee yet again.' 

-M. E. C." 



DR. JESSE LEROY :McELd^OY. 

The name heading this sketch belongs to one of the well known phvsi- 
cians of Aurora, this comity, a man of fine intellect. ^vI^o is well informed along 
the lines of his chosen profei>ion. lie has dem.:instrated that he is skilled, 
thorough, and careful in all departments of his profession, and has estab- 
lished himself in a practice that speaks well for the regard in which he is held 
in the community. Doctor McElrr^y takes the deepest possil'le interest in all 
the cases that come under his ob.servatiun. the poor receiving th.e same un- 
selfish care as do those of his wealthier patients. 

Dr. Jesse Lero\- McElroy. physician and surgeon, of Aun.ira. Indiana, is 
a son of Welcome R. and Mary M. (Rarnett) }ilcElroy. He was born on 
October iS, 1S84. at Cireencastle. Putnam county, Indiana, and was reared and 
secured his education at Reelsville, this state, graduating from the high 
school of that place in 19C0, after which he entered DePauw Universil}-, tak- 
ing a three-years course. He then eiitered the Indiana Medical Culloge at In- 
dianapolis, and was graduated from that institution in 1907, after wliich lie 
served as interne at the Indianapolis city dispensary- for se^'eral months. He 
then located at Darlington, Indiana, where he practiced for a peric)d of i?ne 
year, but, not b^ing entirely satisfied with the location, moved his office 
to Aurora, where he still continues to practice. Politically. Dr. ?^lcElrov is 
a Democrat. Pie is a member of the [Methodist church, and a member of 
Aurora Lodge Xo. 51, Eree and Accepted Masons. 



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DEARUORX COUNTY, IXDIAXA. 54 I 

Welcome R. IMcElroy, father of Doctor. AIcElroy, is a son of. W'illiain 
and IMartha (Charlott) McElroy, ami was horn on Alay 26. 1S41, in Putnam 
county, Indiana. lie was reared at Reelsville, near Greencastlc, where he was 
trained in the occupation of farming-, and was later eng'agcd in the mercan- 
tile husiness ahuut twenty years. In iSOi he enlisted in Company .\. Twenty- 
ninth Regiment, Iowa \'olunteer Infantry, serxing until Alarcii 12. 18O3. when 
he was discharged on account of illness. In 1865 Welcome R. ^IcPdroy was 
married to Mary M. Barnett, daughter of David and Elleri Harnett, and he 
then established himself in a general-merchandise business at Reelsx'ille. Me 
was also interested in the breeding of fine horses, and in 1S80, took a premium 
over thirteen other exhibitors. He made his own way in the world, and never 
had a dollar given him, except a pension of four dollars a month. \\'elcome 
R. ]\IcElroy gives his support to the Democratic party, and is a member 
of the old predestinarian Baptist chu.rch. He was church trustee and deacon, 
and is still active in church work. He is ;i member C)f the ^Masonic fraternity. 
His wife died in 1S96, of pncumom'a. They were the parents of eight children, 
Cora. Paul F.. Frank D., Alartha C, Ralph E., Jesse L., and two who died in 
infan.cy. Cora ^ilcElroy became the wife of Perry ]McCullough, of Terre 
Haute. Indiana; Paul Ii\es at Clayton, Indiana; Alartha C. was the wife of 
David Skelton, of Greencastlc, and is now deceased; Frank D. lives at Ham- 
mond. Indiana, and Ralph is a resident of Kokomo, Indiana. 

The paternal grandfather of Doctor }iicElroy was William ^^IcElroy, a 
native of Pennsylvania and a shoemaker by trade. He married }*Iartha Char- 
lott and he and his wife came to Indiana in 1837, settling in [Madison, township, 
Putnam count}', where they sjient the rest of their lives, Mr. [McElruy d_\ing in 
1S70, aged seventy-eight yc'.rs, and his widdw in 1S75, aged seventy-nine 
years. They were the parents of the following children: Stephen. Henr}-, 
Welcome R., all of whom were Union soldiers during the Ci\"il \A'ar: James. 
Mary, Rachel and Charlotte. Doctor ^McElroy's maternal grandi)arents were 
David M. and Ellen Barnett, early settlers in Putnam county, where they 
owned large tracts of land during the Civil War, and where Mr. Banictt cn- 
ducted a general merchandise store, in the town of Reelsville, for about forty 
years. His son-in-law. Welcome R. McElroy, succeeded him in the business, 
which he carried on in connection with his farming ilnterests. !\Ir. Burnett and 
his wife lived to a good old age, the former dying at the age of ninety-frmr. 
and the latter at the age of seventy-eight. Shortly before their death, they 
moved to Hoosierville, Indiana, and thence to Janes\'ille, Illimiis, v.here tlicy 
died. To them three children were born, [Nlary, Maria and a daughter who 
died in infancv. 



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DEARBORN' COl'XTY, IXDIAXA. 



On January i8, tqoq, Dr. Jesse Lerciy IMcinroy was united in marriage 
to Ruby J. Caniphell. who was l_)orn on August 15, t88q, at Darlington, Monl- 
oijniery canity, Tndiana, the daugliter of Thomas ]\I. and Ehzaln-th ( ILjlling;- 
worlh) Campbell. Her religious s^'mpati^ies arc ■with the Methrxlist church. Tii 
Dr. and !Mrs. ^IcFdrov one child has been boni, a daughter. W'ilhelmina. 

Thomas M. and .Elizaljeth ( Hollingsworth) Campbell are nat'ves of 
Indiana, and still reside in Darlington. They are the parents of four children, 
Mrs. Catherine \\'alkup, Zola, Rub)- J. (Mrs. ?\IcElroy) and Lawrence. 



ALBERT SPAXAGEL. 



Among the prominent younger citizens of Lawrenceburg-, who ha\e en- 
joyed a successful career in business and who have been honored with positions 
of political trust and responsibility, no one, perhaps, has surpassed Albert Spau- 
agel, the present postmaster of the city of Lawrenceburg. For many years Mr. 
Spanagel has been prominent in the Democratic councils of Lawrenceburg and 
Dearborn county, and after an exciting contest in 1914, received the apiwint- 
ment as postmaster of Lawrenceburg over a large field of applicants and con- 
testants for this Iionor. The award is well deserxed and the honor is well 
bestowed, since IMr. Spanagel has behiml him an efficient and honorable record 
in tlie lawrenceburg city council. Beginning life in a modest way he has 
risen gradually to a position of profound respect and esteem among his fel- 
low townsmen and the people of Dearborn county generally. 

Albert Spanagel was born in Lawrenceburg, June 20, 1S73, the son of 
John L. and Louisa (INIeyers) Spanagel, nati\es of the province of Baden, 
Gennany, who had eight sons and one daughter. John I^. Spanagel spent 
practically his entire life in this cnuntr}'. having come to America at the age 
of fifteen, after he had conipleted his education in the schools of his nati\"e 
land. He made the voyage to America with some relatives, who located in 
New York City, and there he was afterwards engaged in the shoe business. 
Subseciuently he removed to Newark, Xew Jersey, and was there engaged in 
the shoe business for some eight years. He came to Dearborn county in 1869, 
after locating in Lawrenceburg. engaged in the shoe business there for many 
years. In fact, he was active in business until within five years of his death. 
He was a \\elbkno'.\n citizen and one of the >>l(btime residents of this count}'. 
He passed away in Jul\', 1914. at the age of eighty-three }ears. His wife 



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DEAR1!0RX COUNTY, IXPIANA. 543 

died in 1902, at the age of sixty-seven. She was a niemher of the Lutheran 
churcli, akhough her husband was a memher of the Cathuhc chureh. John 
L. Spanagel had two l)rothers, John J. and Adam. 

Of the nine children of Jolm L. and Louisa ( Meyers) Spanagel. Charles 
li\'es at Lawrcnceljurg-; John, at Cincinnati; Jacob, at Law rencebui'g : Allien, 
tlie subject of this sketch; Frank b'ves at Seymour, Indiana; Wilham died at 
the age of twenty-one; August died at tlie age of twenty-four, and LLarry 
died in infancy. There was one daughter. 

All^ert Spanagel's paternal grandparents nc\er came to thi^> coniUry. His 
maternal grandparents, however, came to America and settled in Newark. 
New Jersey. Mr. Spanagel's motlier was their only child. After the death of 
his maternal grandmother his grandfather married a second time and was 
the father of se\-eral children by the second marriage. 

Albert Spanagel was educated in the pjublic schools of Lawrencelmrg and 
at the age of sixteen years began clerking in various stores. Subsequent! v 
learning the barber's trade, he was thus engaged for twehe vears. A!>jut 
191 1 he engaged in the men's furnishing business, and was so engaged at the 
time of his appointment as postmaster, June 4, 1914. Mr. Spanagel's com- 
mission extends for a period of four years and his term uill expire in June, 
191S. 

On September 12, 1902. Albert Spanagel was married to Jeanette Eminer- 
son, daughter of William Emmerson, to which union four children ha\e been 
bom, George L., Emmerson G., Elizabeth and Harry B. George L.. the eldest 
child, died at the age of three years. 

^Irs. Spanagel was born at Patriot. Indiana. Her mother haxing died 
when she was three years old, she was denied the close companionsbiii and wise 
counsel of a loving mother. Her father is still living. Mrs. Spanagel was 
one of ten children, the others being Mary. Emma, Isabel, Grace, Carrie, 
Frank, William. Hally and Thomas, the latter of whom is deceased. ]Mrs. 
Spanagel's paternal grandfather, William Emmerson, who married a Miss 
Hally. was a well-known citizen of this state. Their children were Charlotte, 
Cynthia, Emma, Hattie, "Dick" and William. 

As heretofore noted. Mr. Spanagel is a Democrat in politics, and served 
in the Lawrenccburg city o nincil for a period of four years. He is a member 
of the Fraternal Order of Eagles and is an active and enthusiastic member 
of the Lutheran church. 3.1rs. Spanagel is a member of die Methodist church. 

Mr. and iVIrs. Spanagel have a host of friends in the city of Lawrence- 
burg. Mr. Spanagel is known as a hale fellow, well met ; a man (U' most cardial 



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DEARBOKX COUXTV, IXniAXA. 



manners and agreeable personality. In Dearborn eounty politics he is a man 
of more than local prominence and influence and is considered an in\aluable 
counselor in the deliberations f)f a party whicli. tor the most part, lias been 
dominant in this section of the state. 



■ •■■'■'• ERNEST W. SWARTflOUT. 

Prominent in various leading enterprises of Aurora stands the name of 
Ernest W. Swarthout. Being a man of broad business experience, capable 
and progressive, as well as possessing unusual executive ability, his opinion 
is highly appreciated in matters pertaining to the welfare of his city. He is 
a man with ideas frequently ahead of the times, and never permits himself to 
get into a rut by clinging to out-of-date methods in anything and, as president 
of the People's Telephone Association, and secretan.^ and manager of the 
Southern Indiana Telephone Company, of Aurora, has kept fully abreast of 
the receiit wonderful advances in that line of endeavor. 

Ernest W. Swarthout was born at Haydcn, Jennings county, Indiana, 
on ]\Iay 14. 1866, a son of Porter and Elizabeth (Walton) Swarth.out. IP's 
education was secured in the little city of his birth, where he grew up. after 
which he secured employment with the old Ohio & Mississippi Railroad, with 
which contpan}- he was engaged as a telegraph operator for some ten vears. 
which position he gave up to go to Aurora to take charge of the telegraph 
office at that place. In 1S99 ^^^- Swarthout organized the People's Telephone 
Company, and later, the S':'uthcrn Im.liana Telephone Company, and has been 
with these companies e\'er since. Fraternally, he is a member of Chosen 
Friends Lodge Xo. 13. Independent Qrder of Odd Fellows, of Aurora, and 
of the ]\Ioclern Woodmen of America. Politically, lie is a stanch Republican. 

Porter Swarthout was a native of New York state, and was a boy when 
his parents came to Indiana, locating at Haydcn. at which place he grew to 
manhood and followed the \'arious professions of farmer, merchant and lawyer. 
in addition to which he operated a large stone quarry. He was enthusiastic 
over the progress of his liome town, in which he was appointed prosecutor, 
and likewise officiated in \-arious other offices. He married Elizabeth Wal- 
ton, also a native of New York, and to this union the following children were 
born : James Monroe, Edwin, Ernest, Herbert, Cecil, Harriet, and Lydia. 

On July 15, 1891, Ernest W. Swarthout was -united in marriage to Alice 



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DEAREORX COUNTY, INDIANA. 545 

M. Piatt, daughter of William H. and Sarah J. (Palmer) Piatt, who was 
born on May 29, 1869, in Illinois, Ijut reared and educated at .Kurora, Indiana. 
Her religious sympathies are with the Presbyterian church. To this union 
has been born one son, Walton Palmer. 

William PI. Piatt, father of [Mrs. Swarthout, was born in December, 
1843. in Manchester township, and his wife Avas born in the same township, 
.April 4, 1844, and died on January 14, 18S4. yh. Piatt enlisted in Company 
K, Twenty-sixth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, August 11, 1861, 
and was mustered out in 1862, on account of Ijeing disabled. He was married 
on February 29, 1S63. to Sarah J. Palmer, which union was Iilc.^scd with 
the following children: Harry W., born on August 29, 1865; Alice M., !May 
29, 1869; Herbert L., September 4, 1S73, who died on [March 14, 1877, and 
Frank M., October 16, 1S75. 

Ernest W. Swarthout is an enterprising and public-spirited business man, 
who takes a sincere interest in doing all in his power to further the progress 
of Aurora. He is a member of the board of governors of the Ohio Valley- 
Motor Club; a member of the board of directors of the Aurora Commercial 
Club; a member of the Aurora Chautauqua Association and president of the 
Aurora Tennis Association. 



JOHX F. PIORXBERGER. ,. ■ ., . .; 

Each generation necessarily builds upon the foundation laid by preceding 
generations. According to the firmness of the foundation, the superstructure 
will be substantial, or not. The future, of course, must be tlie judge of what 
character of foundation has been laid for the social, moral and commercial 
edifice being erected by tlie citizens of Dearborn county. However, from what 
the present historian notes of the high character, the determination of purpose 
and the exalted standards of conduct maintained bv the leaders of thought 
and action in this section of the state in their work of carrying on the labors 
of those who wrought so wisely and securely in the past, it hardly can l^e 
doubted that the superstructure of the coming civilization of this region will 
be all that the present generation may hope for those who shall come after. 
It is partly the purpose of this volume to preserve for the future some account 
of the lives and the labors of those who now are doing so well their part in 
bearing aloft the torch of civilization in this region and it therefore is fitting 

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546 DEAKDORN COUNTV, INDIAXA. 

and proper that brief biographies be here presented of those who are and win, 
have been leaders in this noble work. As such a purpose would be but incom- 
pletely carried out without the introduction of a biographical sketch of the 
gentleman whose name forms the caption of this modest review, it is a pleasure 
for the biographer here to present for the consideration of the future iiis- 
torian a Ijricf resume of the life's history of John F. Hornberger. one of the 
oldest and best-known merchants in the city of Lawrenceburg. 

John F. Plornberger v.as born in Lawrenceburg, Indiana, January 14, 
1845, the son of John and Catherine (Loge) Hornberger, both of whom were 
natives of Germany, to whom were born four children who grew to maturity, 
namely: jNIarie (deceased), who was the wife of Valentine Koehler; John 
F., the immediate subject of this sketch ; Henry, deceased, and Richard, who 
died shortly after attaining his majority. 

John Hornberger, father of John F., was born in [Nlinnfeld, kingdom of 
Bavaria, Germany, August iG, 1S17, the son of George Nicholas and Anna 
M. (Forster) Plornberger, natives, respectively, of Steinweiler and Minnfeld, 
Bavaria, the former of whom was lx)rn on October 24, 178S, the son of Nich- 
olas and Margaret (Fiever) Hornberger, and the latter on January 7, 1797, 
the daughter of John and ]^Iargaret Forster, the forbears of both having for 
many generations been Bavarians. In 1831 George N. Hornberger imini- 
grated to America with his family, consisting then of his wife and foiu" chil- 
dren, another child having been born to this \\'orthy couple after their 
arrival in this country. The Flornbergers landed in New York in June 
or Jtily of I S3 1, and on August 8, following, arrived in Cincinnati, 
in which city they made their home for six years, Air. Hornberger, 
for a time after locating there, follinving his trade of cabinetmaker, he lieing 
a skilled workman in that line, but later engaged in the hotel business. In 
1837 he came to Dearborn county and established a permanent home in Law- 
renceburg, where he quickly became one of the most influential men in the 
town. He took a prominent part in the affairs of the rapidly growing village 
and left his distinctive impress upon all he touched. He was quick to perceive 
the ultimate values hidden in the wilderness surrounding the town and en- 
tered from the government one thousand acres of land in Dearborn and b'ranlc- 
lin counties, on much of wliich he realized handsomely in after years, as the 
community developed; his family being left in ver-\' comfi^rtable circumstances 
at the time of his death on ]\Iarch 19, 18G5. He left five children, Jolm. Mrs. 
Anna M. Hauck (mother of Judge Hauck), Mrs. Mary C. Schulze, Airs. 
Elizabeth Wiedelstadt and Airs. Caroline Hitzfeld. 



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DEARBORN' COIXTY, INDIAXA. 547 

Toliii HornbergtT, who liecaine one of the foremost citizens of Lawvencc- 
burg, was fourteen years <if age when his parents immigrated to America and 
he grew to nianliO'Kl in the city oi Cincinnati and was married there. May 14, 
1837, to Catherine Lege, shortly thereafter moving to Lawrenceburg. where 
he spent the remainder of his life. Catherine Loge was a native of Steinweiler. 
Coudel, Germany, and was a daughter of John and Anna M. (Odenl)ach) 
Loge, tiie former of whom was a son of Jolin and Alary Loge and tlie latter, 
a daughter of Carl and Catherine Odenbach. John Loge brought his family, 
consisting of his wife and three children, Catherine. John and Bernhardt, to 
America in the twenties of the last century and died at Lawrenceburg in 1843, 
his widow, surviving liis death more than twenty years, her death occiu'ring 
in 1865. LTpoii arriving in Lawrenceburg John Hornberger engaged with 
his father in the hotel and grocery business and also, for some time during 
the early portion of his residence in that town, engaged, at intervals, in flat- 
boat transportation, his line of boats doing a thriving business. Tie also 
engaged in contract w-ork, with particular reference to street work, his effect- 
ive service on the streets of Lawrenceburg still being a matter of distinct 
recollection among the older residents of Lawrenceburg. In 1853 he manu- 
factured about one million bricks and in the winter of 1855-6 engaged in 
the rendering business. Extending his general contracting business, he em- 
ployed a large force of men and filled heavy contracts on railroad and other 
engineering works, continuing that business until 1S74. being one of tlie best 
known contractors in that line of work in this section of the country. While 
thus busily engaged in pushing his private enterprises, John Hornberger was 
not idle to the welfare of the public and took a large part in the civic affairs 
of the rapidly-growing city. In 1S59 he was elected township assessor of real 
estate, to which office he was re-elected in 1864. He sat in the cit}- council 
for sixteen consecutive years, from the year 1859, and was one of the fore- 
most factors in the development of the city's best interests. He was a stanch 
Democrat and for many years was one of the most forceful counsellors of 
that party in Dearborn county. For eighteen years he ofliciated as controller 
and manager of the Greendale cemetery and was for sometime a director 
of the Lawrenceburg Gas Company. He was a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, having joined the society in 1839, and lived to be the 
oldest member of the lodge at LawTcnceburg. Though not a member of 
any church, he attended and was a contributor to the good works of the 
Lutheran church, of which his wife was a devoted and active member, and 
both were earnest participants in all the good works of the community, no 



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548 ' DEARRORX COUXTY, INDIANA. 

couple ill the city being held in higher regard than they, or more popular in 
the general esteem of the townspeople. John Hornbergcr died in the year 
1S8S, at the age i:)f se\-enty-t\\'n years, his widow sur.vi\-ing him brieth', her 
death occurring tliirty days later, of paralysis, she then being about seventy 
years of age. The funerals of tlicse two excellent old people were said to 
have been the largest ever held in the city of Lawrcnceburg, there having 
■been a general outpouring oi the people of the town and countryside to pay 
a tribute of general respect to the departed. 

John F. Hornberger, now the sole survivor of the family of John Horn- 
bergcr, was born and reared in Lawrenceburg, in which city his whole life, 
covering a period of sexent}- years, has been spent. He was educated in the 
local schools and upon reaching young manhood began writing in the offices 
of the court house, present!}- being made deputy county recorder. Following 
this term of public service. ]\lr. Hornberger made a trip to Knoxville, Tennes- 
see, but did not locate in that city ; shortly returning to Lawrenceburg. where 
he learned the jeweler's trade, and presently opened a jewelry store in the 
city, which business he has since continued without interruption, a period of 
forty-six years ; a most honorable and quite successful business career. Shortly 
after starting in business for himself in Lawrenceburg, Mr. Hornberger was 
elected city treasurer, which office he held for four years, still maintaining 
his jewelry business, howe\er. 

On December 22, 1869, John F. Hornberger was united in marriage with 

Buenavista McCright, who was born in Lawrenceburg in 1847, the daughter 

of Joseph B. and Xancy ( [Major) McCright, natives of Pennsylvania and 

. early settlers in Lawrenceburg, and who died on April 13, 1905, at the age of 

fifty-eight years. 

Josejih B. AlcCright was born in fiercer county, Pennsylvania, ]\Iarch 
• 25, 1819, the son of Charles and Mary McCright. On August 19, 1S39, he 
married Nancy H. Major, to which union seven children were born, Eliza- 
beth, JNlary, Charles, Buenavista, Squire and two who died in early ymuh. 
The jMcCrights came to Dearborn coun.ty in 1S44. settling in Lawrenceburg, 
where ^Ir. ]\lcCright and his wife si)ent the rest of their lives, becoming 
prominent and influential in the social and civic affairs of the community. 
She died on December 24. 18S4, at the age of sixty-seven years, seven months 
and seven days, and he died on April 24, 1899, at the -age of eighty years and 
one month, leaving sixteen grandchildren and twelve great-grandchildren. 

To John F. and Buenavista (McCright) Hornberger were born five 
children, Catherine, Xancy, George and John (twins) and Verona. Catherine 



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DEARBORN COr.\TV. INDIAXA. • 549 

married Hiram Guard, of Lawrcnceliury', to which union one cliild, has been 
Ijiirn, Crclchen. The Guards have a pleasant home in I.awrenceburg and it 
is with them that ]\Ir. llornberger makes his hotne. Nancy married J. I. 
W'ingate. of Petersburg, Kentucky, to wln'ch union has been Ijorn one son, 
Heniy Clay. George, who married Anna Schincman, h\'es in Cinciim.ali. 
John met his death by accidental drowning, at the age of nine, while swim- 
ming in the Ohio river. Verona married Harvev Green, of East Li\er|)<i'il. 
Ohio, to which union was born one daughter. Ciretchen. ■Mrs. Ilornberger 
was a faithful and active member of the ^Methodist cluuxh and her children 
were brought up in the faith of that communion. 

Mr. Hornberger is a Democrat and for many years took an active inter- 
est in the political affairs of the county, but in later years has somewhat re- 
tired from participation in the councils of his party. His onl\- office-holding 
experience was that gained in the county recorder's office in his early man- 
hood, mention of which is made ab'^ve, he having' preferred to give his time 
and attention to his business affairs rather than to lead in civic affairs. This, 
how'ever, has not prevented his earnest participation in all movements having 
as their object the betterment of local conditions in all lines, and there has 
been no more public-spirited citizen' in Lawrenceburg these many years than 
he, his sage counsel and advice often having proved of value to the party 
leaders in this county. JNIr. Hornberger is a member of Union Lodge No. 
8, Indcpen.dent Order of Odd Fellow s, and of Dearborn Lodge No. 49, ivnights 
of Pythias, in tlie affairs of both of which orders he for many years has taken 
an active interest. 

Kindly in manner and speech, considerate in all his rclati'^ns with his 
fellow men; just in his dealings, a lover of all mankind, 'Sir. Hornberger is 
one of the most popular and most highly esteemed men in the city of Law- 
renceburg, where he is honored and respected by all. 



\\TLLL\M LEWIS HOSKINS. r-,. , . .,.,. 

One of the business men of this community wliose industry, energy and 
ability have given impetus to the commercial life of Aurora is the man whose 
name appears at the head of this sketch. While not a native of that town, 
or even of the county, 'Mr. Hoskins has identified himself with the business 
interests of the town, during his residence of ten years, to such an extent 



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550 DKAUBORX COC.NTY, INDIANA. 

that his influence as a merchant and mnnufacturer has heen stron,e;-lv feh. 
Mr. Hoskins is secretary, treasurer and t;eneral manager of the W}Mnond 
Coof)eraye Compan}- of .Vurrira, Indiana. He was born in Washington county, 
Kentucky, April 19, 1871. tlie son of llugli and Elizabeth ( Snepp) IToskins, 
both natixes of Kentucky. Hugh Iloskin's fatlier died in Sh.elby conntv, 
Indiana, iri tiie earl}- thirties, while his mother died about 1S40. Their chil- 
dren were Elisha. Josiah, Hugh, Enos, Sarah and Isrdjel. Both were twice 
married. Hugh Moskins was only a lad when, with his ]iarcnts, he said good- 
bye to his childhood hi:ime in the Si')Uthland, and entered ii[)on the new life in 
the Hoosier state, Shelby county being the place chosen, and there he grew to 
manhood. After engagang for some years in the tobacco and livery business 
in Edinburg, Johnson count}-, he n-io\-ed on a farm, where he added to his 
regular labors contracting and building. At the age of seventy-six yca.rs. he 
died in Shelby count}- in the }-ear iSijy. lie was a member of the Christian, 
or Disciplo' church; his wit'e, an adherent of the English Euthcran church. 
Mrs. Hoskins was a native of Ohio, her maternal graridmother, Catharine 
(Neibel)' Snepp, ha-^'ing been a nali\e (jf i\Icintgomer\- conntv, that state. 
whose husband. John Snep]), was born in Germany. Tlie latter -was a farmer, 
and lived to a ripe old age. Their children, six in nun-ibcr, were Williaan, 
Elizabeth, Alaria, Jo.^eph, David and Jane. 

To Hugh rmd Elizal'eth (Snepp) Hoskins nine children were born, 
namel}', Catherin.e, wife of Daniel Oaks of Chicago; John S., of Bartholomew 
county, Indiana: Sarah, who married A\'illiam AA'eil, of St. Louis, [Missouri: 
Alice, wife of James !Moran, of New York City; Emma (deceased), who was 
the wife of Clement Hnbbell: David J., of Elmhurst, Illinois; Josiah H., of 
Aurora, Indiana: I\Iargaret. wife of John Barnes, of Texhoma, Oklahoma. 
and William E.. the subject of this sketch. The mother of these children dic;I 
in 1876, at the age of forty-two years. 

At the close of his school days on the home farm in Shelby couj-it}-, Will- 
iam E. Eloskins took up his residence in Cincinnati, where he also atteridcd 
school. He then became a clerk in a drug store in Cincinnati, and while there, 
devoted his spare time to the study of phannacy. In 1S90, he changed his 
occupation to that of a traveling man. being employed by a wholesale shoe 
house, and followed that business for six years. Returning again to the drug 
business, he worked in the office of a wholesale drug company at Chicago. 
In 1905 he left that city and went to Aurora, this county, to assunie the man- 
agement of the Aurora Eurniture Company. After holding that position for 
a period of nine years, he became manager of the Wymond Cooperage Com- 



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DEARbORX COtXTV, IXDIAXA. 55I 

pany atthe time of its organization in 191 1, a position he has held ever since, 
and which has occupied his entire time. This is an incorporated company, 
being capitahzcd at one hundred thousand dollars, and employs about sixty 
persons. It manufactures a high grade of barrels and markets its product 
in all parts of the United States. Besides managing this enterprise. ]\lr. 
Hoskins is a stockholder and director in the Aurora Furnitui'e Company and 
is vice-president of the In.dianapolis Furniture Company, of Aurora. 

On June 21, 1S93, W'illiatn L. Hoskins was united in marriage to Ella 
A. Smitli, who was born in Aurora on December 26, 1873. Pier mother, who 
before her marriage was Elizabeth Dennerline, also was born in Aurora. 
Her father died when she was only twelve or thirteen years of age. The 
mother is still living. Grandfather Smith was a Methodist minister in Ne- 
braska. Grandmother Deimerline was a Von Dressendoerfcr, the modier of 
two children, Elizabeth and George. Although not having lived in Cincin- 
nati for some time, !Mr. and JNIrs. Hoskins are members of the Baptist church 
in that city. They are both acti\"e in the social life of the community and are 
held in the highest esteem by their many friends. 

JMr. Eloskins, besides being a director of the Commercial Club of Aurora, 
is a member of the Dearborn Club, the Country Club and of Yeatman Lodge 
No. 162, Free and Accepted INIasons. In his political affiliations, he is a 
Democrat, and has shown vital and practical interest in the welfare of his 
party. 

By his genial nature, his ready sympathy with all movements tending- to 
advance the city's prosperity, and his generosity, Mr. Hoskins has made many 
friends, who repose in him the utmost confidence. 



HENRY HARMON FOLKE. 

Henry Harmon Folke, farmer of Lawrenceburg township, son of John 
Dietrich Folke and Anna (Schwers) Folke, was born on March 12. 1S79, in 
Manchester township. He was educated in the German and public schools 
of the county, and lived at the place of his birth until his marriage to .\nna 
D. Hiller, February 18, 1009. and then moved to his present location, which 
he rented, for one year, and then bought. The farm contains one hundred 
and forty acres and is well improved. It is located about three and one-half 
miles west of Lawrenceburg. His parents came from Hanover, Germany, 
when young and settled in Manchester township, where the father still resides. 
His mother died in the vear 188^. His father married, secondly, [Margaret 



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DliAREOKN COrNTV, INDIANA. 



Brandt, of Ripley county. To the first marriage were born three children, 
Henry Harmon, John and Aaron; and to the second, one child, Margaret. 
Aaron married Alma llillman on April 30. 1914, and has one child. Marcella. 

Anna D. Hiller was born on November 2, 1879, in what was then [Miller 
township, now Lawrenceburg township, and is a daughter of John and I)ur 
othy (EUinghausen) Hiller. She attended the public and German sch.nds. 
Her parents came from Hanover, (lermany. aljout 1S65. and were married '>n 
August 26, 1866. r^Ir. Hiller was a farmer all his life, first as a renter, then 
bought a farm of one hundred and forty-eight acres, which is now the home 
of his son-in-law, Henrv H. Folke. John Hiller died in Xovember, 1910. 
and his wife died in [March, 1905. They were the parents of eight children, 
namely: Henry, of Jackson county, [Missouri; Albert, of Hampton. T<iwa; 
Mrs. [Margaret Diefenbaugh; Frederick, of Hampton, Iowa; [Mrs. [Mary 
Engleking. of Newkirk, Oklahoma: George, of Hampton, Iowa; [Mrs. Anna 
D. Folke: John F. Hiller, Tipton, Indiana. 

Henrv Hiller has three children, Caroline. Frieda and Alma. Frederick 
has three children, Rudolph, Letha and Lavlin. George has two children. 
Lyle and Wayne. John has one child. Dorothy. [Mrs. [Margaret Diefen- 
baugh has eight children. Albert, Vrcd, Louis. Mary, Flarry. Arthur. Ar.na 
and George. [Mrs. [Mary Engleking has one child, Herman. 

[Mr. and [Mrs. Henry H. Folke have two children, Irma. born on Jan- 
uary -1, 1910: and Alvin, June 23, 1912. The family are members of the 
Lutheran church, and take an active part in all good works in the community. 



i :.. ■:-':_ ARCFIIBALD SHAW. 

Having lived in Dearborn county for forty-one years, all of which time 
has been spent in the city of Lawrenceburg, and being interested in local 
history, Archibald Shaw is peculiarly well equipped to supervise the preparation 
of this history. Aside from Mr. Shaw's wide acciuaintance throughout Dear- 
born county, he is well acquainted with sources from which the history- of 
this section is drawn, and has made a long and patient study of the Dearborn 
county annals. [Moreover, Mr. Shaw received a splendid education early in 
life, and from the professional standpoint is well prepared to act as editor of 
this volume. Archibald Shaw has held many positions of trust and responsi- 
bility in Lawrenceburg and Dearborn count}-, and to all of them he has gi'.-en 
the conscientious attention and service they have appeared to demand. [Mr. 
Shaw is well acquainted with the business growth and progress of Dearborn 



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DEARDORX COUNTY, INDIANA. 553 

county, since lie himself tor some years was personally iilentified with the 
business life of the cit)' of Lawrenceburg. 

As Mr. Shaw has said in his announcement to the pei^jile of Dearborn 
cou,nt\'. "It has been aliout thirty years since an authentic hi^tur} of Dearl.Kiru 
county has been pulilishecl. Since that date the county has made wonderful 
progress along all lines of endeavor, and it will be the purjiose of the editor 
and publishers of the proposed work to chronicle fully and faithfully all 
important historical events, from the earliest coming of the white men to this 
section down to the present time." 

Archibald Shaw is a natixe of Switzerland county, Indiana, where lie 
was born on August 8, 1847. His parents were William and Linda ( Runs) 
Shaw. William Shaw was a native of Paisley, Scotland, and }.Irs. Linda 
(Rous) Shaw was a native of Little Horton, now a part of BradfL>rd, York- 
shire, England. William Shaw came to America with his parents in 18 16. 
and landed at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Not long afterward his I'alher 
crossed the mountains to Pittsburgh and bought a flat-boat and floated dov.n 
the Ohio river with his family. They settled in Switzerland county. Indiana, 
and li: ed there many years. Archibald was the eleventh of twelve children 
born to his parents. 

AL-. .Shaw was reared on his father's farm near \'evay, and attended the 
country schools. Later he attended tlie high school, and was graduated from 
DePauw University, when it was known as Asl.iury Uni\'ersity, \vith l1ie class 
of 1S72. In college 'Sir. Shaw was prominent in the Phi Kappa Psi college 
fraternity, \vhere he is an honored alumnus, not only of DePauw Lni\'crsitv, 
but of this great Greek letter society. 

After leaving college Air. Shaw was married and farmed for five or six 
years. He then moved to Lawrenceburg and engaged in the grocery business 
for about six years. Later he was express agent for the Adams Express Com- 
pany for four years. ^^Ir. Shaw served as postmaster-of Lawrenceburg f<ir 
eight vears, and was a school trustee for one term. It is obxinus. th.ercfore, 
that he has been connected with the important phases of the life of Dearh<jrn 
county. He is acquainted at first hand with its business, with its political 
life, and especially with its agricultural life. His rather wide and extensive 
connection with the fraternal societies of Dearborn county has given to him 
further advantages in pi-eparation of this volume. Not the least of Mr. 
Shaw's interests is his connection with the educational life of Lawrence) lurg. 
He has therefore been able to give due care and consideration to all the 
phases of the community's progress and prosperity. 

Archibald Shaw was married on July 31, 1S73, to Hannah V. Fitch, 



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554 DEARBORX COUNTY, IXDIAXA. •' 

daughter of De Witt C. and Leah (Hayes) Fitch. Air. and Mrs. Shaw 
have iiad eight children, four of whom are deceased, as follow: Ida C, died 
at the age of sixteen; Cora. T.eah. died at age uf twenty-two; DeW'itt C, dierl 
at the age of fifteen, en' appendicitis, and W'ilHani De Witt died in iufancv; 
Harris F. is a law clerk in the land office in Cocur D'Alene, Idaho: Edward 
R. is a bookkeeper; John A. is a civil engineer, and is now living at ?\Ianila. 
Pliilippine Islands; and I'-lla ]\I. is a school teacher. 

Mr. and ilrs. Shaw are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
He belongs to the Masonic fraternity, the Knights of Pythias and the Royal 
Arcanum, aside from his membership in the Phi Kappa Psi college fraternity. 
For twelve years j\Ir. Shaw served as chairman of the county central com- 
mittee of Dearborn county, and is one of the foremost Republicans of this 
section. Flaving. as heretofore noted, li\ed in Dearborn county for upwards 
of forty-one years, Archibald Shaw is well equipped to act as editor of the his- 
tory of Dear1)':irn cuunty. Personally, Air. Shaw is popular with all classes of 
people and he and his wife are popular socialh- in the cit\- of Lawrencebtirg. 
He is a worthy citizen whose interests in preserving the historical lore of thi? 
county is to be commended by all the citizens of Dearborn county. 



WILLIAM G. GLOVER. 



W'illiam G. Glover, editor and proprietor of tlie Laierencchiirg Press, 
which he has owned, edited and published since 191 1, is one of the well-known 
citizens of Dearborn county. Air. Glover was fortunate in being able to ob- 
tain a splendid education and this has been of no small assistance to him in 
editing and publishing a first-class newspaper. During his ownership and 
management the Press has gained in circulation and influence in Deari.iorn 
county, and today is recognized as the leading Republican organ of south- 
eastern Indiana, no weekly newspaper in this section of the state being better 
edited than the Press. 

William G. Glover was born on September 24, i88i,.in Switzerland 
county, Indiana, the son of William and Anna R. (Long) Glover, the former 
of whom was a native of Ohio, and the latter of Indiana. William Glover, Sr.. 
was a mere lad when he came with his parents to Indiana. They located 
in Switzerland county, and there he grew to manhood. He was a farmer and 
contractor and his family was reared in that county. He passed away at 
Aloores Hill in 1886, at the age of fifty-two }'ears, and his widow is still living 
at Moores Hill, ^^'illiam Glover was a soldier in tlie L^nion army during the 
Civil War, serving from the beginning to the end in Company E, Fiftieth 



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DEARBORN COUXTV, IXDIAXA. 555 

Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, in which he was a prixatc. He wa^ a 
niemljer of the ^Methodist church, of which his widow also is a member. The_\ 
were the parents of four cliildren, Grace G., the widow of Charles S. McKr.wn ; 
Albert H., who lives near Greenfield. Hancock county, Indiana; Catherine J., 
the wife of W. E. Pennington, of Moores Hill. Indiana, and William G., of 
Lawrenceburg. 

Mr. Glover's paternal grandparents emigrated from Virginia Ui Ohio, 
spending their last da^'s in Cincinnati. His maternal grandparents were na- 
tives of Pennsylvania, Grandfather William Long having been a Methodist 
preacher, one of the pioneer circuit riders in Ohio and Indiana, an influential 
man in his day and generation, and was exceptionally well educated and well 
informed for those times. V\'hile Gran<llather Long lived to the great age of 
eighty-nine, his first wiie died while still a comparati\-ely young woman. 
There were only four children boni to that union, ]\Irs. Mary E. Williams, 
1 Mrs. Elizabeth Jonte, !Mrs. Caroline Wicks, and ]\Irs. Anna R. Glover. After 
the death of his first wife. Rev. William Long married again and by this 
second marriage had several children. 

^\'illiam G. Glover's elementary education was received in the public 
schools of Moores Hill, and he supplemented the same by a course in jMoores 
Hill College, from which institution he was graduated with the class of 1905. 
After teaching school for four years, he took a post-graduate course in Chi- 
cago University, and also in Indiana University. In 191 1 he purchased the 
Lazvrciiccburg Press, and at once 1>ecame editor and publisher of that news- 
paper, a Republican weekly established more than sixty years ago, and which 
has always enjoyed an exceptionally fine reputation in this section of Indiana. 
On June 21, 1913, William G. Glover was married to Clara B. Smith, 
daughter of William and Sarah (Albright) Smith, to uhich union has been 
i born one son, Theodore Alfred. Mrs. Glover was born in Ripley county. In- 
-, diana, her parents, wdio were also natives of Indiana, residing on a farm 
\ near Milan, in that county. ^Irs. Glover has two sisters, 2\Iimiie and Bertie. 

]\Ir. and ]\Ir5. Glover are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and 

Mr. Glover is an enthusiastic and ardent advocate of Republican principles, 

as the editor of the Lai^roiceburg Press exerting a wide influence in this 

section of the state. Although the fiAirth congressional district, in which 

1 Mr. Glover lives, is strongly Democratic, yet the Press, even during the brief 

■] period of his ownership and management, has done something to reduce this 

I substantial majority. ]Mr. Glover has his enemies, as well as his friends, but 

^ the former are comparati\ely few, he being one of the most pnpular citizens 

of Dearborn county. Politically, his growing power and influence are being 

closely watched by the leaders of the opposing party in this section of Indiana. 



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556 DKARBORN COL'XTV, INDIANA. 

MICHAEL EDWARD ^L-VLOXEY. 

Micliael Edward Ahdoiiey, the present postmaster at Aurora, this county, 
was horn on September J3, 1S77, at Aurora, son ot Michael and Mary (^Tav- 
lin) Alaloney. both natives of Ireland. He has always lived at Aurora, where 
lie attended the parochial and public schools, as well as the high school. When 
about fourteen years of age he began working at odd jolis, and his first real 
position was when he engaged liis services as collector for the Sargent Coal 
Company, remaining with that concern two years. He next served as clerk 
in the general store of Chambers, Steven^ & Company, where he remained 
for five years, after wdiich he was one year with the John H. Elibbens Dry 
Goods Company in Cincinnati. He then served as a molder's apprentice in the 
plant of the Addyston Pipe and Foundry Company, of Addyston, Ohi'j, and 
was there about ten years. ^Ir. Maloney was then elected city clerk of Au- 
rora, in Vvhich public capacity he served three and one-Iialf years, resigTiing 
on August I, 1913, to accept the appointment of postmaster of Aurora, which 
office he took on September 3. 1913. and which he still holds. While in the of- 
fice of the city clerk, after seven ballots, he was defeated by one vote for mayor 
to fill the vacanc_\' caused by the resignation of Willard B. Stier. Politically, 
Mr. ^Nlaloney is a stanch Democrat, for many years active in the councils 
of his party, and was chairman of the local Democratic ccimmittee for si-K 
years, resigning that position when he took charge of the postot'fice. He is 
a member of the Catholic church, and is an acti\'e member of the Knights of 
Columbus. 

Mr. Maloney's father, }ilichael Malone\-, came to America with his parents 
when a boy of five years. The family settled at Aurora, where ^Michael Ma- 
loney grew to manhood, and where he still resides. When a young man, he 
began his first work in the Xathan Stedman foundrj-, and remained there man}" 
years. He also conducted a saloon for some time. Ever active in the piilitical 
life of the community he was several times elected to positions of public trust 
and responsibility and served successively as city clerk, city treasurer, town- 
ship trustee, and county treasurer, serxing two terms in each office. He is 
now living in retirement. Both he and his wife are members of the Catholic 
church and their children were reared in that faitli. These children, six in 
number, are as follow: John F., who is engaged in the insurance business; 
Henry A. ; Elizabeth, who is a teacher in the jvublic schools of Aurora ; Michael 
Edward, the subject of this biographical sketcli : Mary Alice, who is at home, 
and William. 



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Mr. Maloncy's paternal grandparents, }*Iichael and Katherine f^Iurphy) 
Alaloney, also natives of Ireland, died at Anrora, aged about eighiy-li\"c years, 
leaving the following" children: INIichael, Ann, John, .\nlhnnv and Richard. 
His maternal grandparents. John and Elizabeth (McGinnis) Tavlin, also 
natives of Ireland, came to America at an early day. settling at Cold Springs, 
Indiana, where INlr. Tavlin engaged in farming, and was one of the pioneers 
who helped to build the old Ohio & ^Mississippi railroad. Idiev died at Cold 
.Springs, both past eighty vears of age. Their children were as follow: 
James, Ann, ?vlan", Ellen, Michael and others who are not now a matter of 
record. 

On September 23, 1913. Michael Edward iMaloney was united in mar- 
riage to Ella W'ilhelmina Mayer, daughter of George and Alary INIayer. She 
was bora on June 20, 18S1, at Aurora, and was educated in St. John's Lutheran 
school and is a member of the Lutheran church. To this union has been 
born one son, Edward iNIayer ]\Ialoney, barn on July 20, 1914. ]\Irs. IMalo- 
ney's parents, both now deceased, were natives of Germany, \\ho came to 
America when about twenty-one years of age. They met here and were 
married at Aurora. I\Ir. Ma)-er, who was a well-known jeueler, died in 18S1, 
about two months before Mrs. Maloney was born, and his widow died in 
January, 1913. They were the parents of the following children: William, 
Conray, Mary (who married Gatch L. Baker), Ella Wilhelniina and two or 
three who died young. IMrs. INIaloney's maternal grandparents came from 
Germany to this country at an earh' day and located at Cold Springs, where 
they spent the rest of their lives. They were the parents of two children, 
Henry and Mary. 

Michael Edward Alalone}', in filling the position of postmaster at Aurora, 
is following out the principles which have always been marked characteristics 
in all business transactions with which he has been connected, namely, giving 
his untiring and sincere attention to the business in hand, and is serving tlie 
people to the best of his ability. ■, u,-- 

: Tio-,, V 



LEW W. HILL. 



Lew W. Hill, the cashier of the Dearlx)rn National Bank at Lawrence- 
burg, who has been associated with the political, commercial and financial 
life of the city of Lawrenceburg and Dearborn county since he was a young 
man, is a well-known citizen of this countv. Mr. Hill has been connected 



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55S DEAREORX C()U XTY, INDIANA. 

with the hanking intLM'ests of the city of Lawrencchurg for ahout ten years, 
and during that time his energy, liis wise foresight and his genial personal 
relations with the oftlcers, directors and patrons of the institution with which 
he has hcen connected ha^■e had much to do with the growing deposits of the 
bank and its e\er-increasing patronage. Although he lives in Am-ora. practi- 
cally all of his business life, except the very earlv years, has been identified 
with tlie business life of Lawrencchurg. Mr. Hill has inade a gratifying suc- 
cess of his business and today is numbered among the honored and respected 
citizens of Dearborn county. The only son of Mr. and ]\'Irs. Hill enjoys the 
distinction of having sprung from stock which was foremost in the service 
of their country during the tning days of the Civil War. The father of Lew 
W. Hill and the father of Mrs. Hill were both soldiers in that war. 

Lew W. Hill was born at Aurora, this county, on August 15, 1862, s-^in 
of Abram and ^Minerva (Kerr) Hill, natives, respectively, of \'irginia and 
North Carolina. During a period of nearly three-quarters of a century, his 
parents lived near one of the historic streams of this section, three miles from 
Aurora, having located in Dearborn county earlv in life. Abram Hill \\-as 
a farmer and merchant. His later years were spent in the vicinit^• of Aurora, 
where he looked after the management of two large farms, and where he 
was engaged in the coal business and in operating- a wharf boat on the river. 
He had served valiantly, during the Civil \\'ar, in the Seventh Regiment, Lii- 
diana Volunteer Infantry, in which he had risen from the rank of first lieu- 
tenant to that of captain by meritorious service. The periiid of his service 
extended practically throughout tb.e Civil War. He died in IQ03. at the ripe 
old age of eighty-five. His widow is still living and is ninety-two years old. 
Of their nine cliildren only one, Alice, who married Riley \A'. Cu-rtis. is de- 
ceased. She was the fifth in the family. The living children are as follow: 
.'\manda, the widow of William Seidler, of Fairmoimt, West \'irgiuia: Adam 
K., of Aurora; Wilton V., of Mound, Texas; Harvey B., of Aurora; Altha. 
the widow of Enos ButBngton, of Aurora; Elizabeth, of Aurora; Lew W.. the 
subject of this sketch, and Jennie, the wife of William T. Boone, of Seattle, 
Washington. 

The parents of Abram Hill. Eli and Mary Hill, were picjueers in Dea''- 
bom count}-, ha\-ing come to this state from \"irginia. They li\-ed to advanced 
ages and in the meantime had reared a family of six children, John, Williaiii, 
Abram, ^^Irs. Elizabeth Wood, Mrs. IMelinda Osborn and Ira C. Eli Hill 
was a farmer Ijy occupation. Walter Kerr, who was the maternal grand- 
father of Lew \\'. Hill, and whose wife was Betsey Kerr, was likewise a pioneer 
in Dearborn county, and he also was a farmer. He was prominent in the 



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DEARBORN- COUXTV, INDIANA. 559 

poliiical life of Dearborn county durintj his day and generation and served 
as sheriff of Dearborn county at a time when the personal jieril of such an 
oftice was vastly greater than at the present time. He and his wife bolli had 
come to Indiana from North Carolina. The Kerr family has been noted for 
its longevity, \\'alter Kerr having lived to be one hundred and two years 
old, and his v/ife having lived to the ripe old age of ninety. Of the Kerr 
faniilv of nine children, Charles, the eldest, died the death of a true patriot, 
having been killed in action on one of the hard-fought battlefields of the 
Civil War. The other children were Mahlon P.., William ]\I., David R., i\Irs. 
Catherine A\'orley. of Iowa, }i[rs. Betsey Terhune, Mrs. Alary zVim Elder, 
Mrs. Minerva Hill and Airs. Jane Ketcham. 

Aurora has been the life-long home of Lew W. Hill. It was there that 
he was reared to manhood, and there he received his education, at least his 
elementary training. His business interests, however, for the most part have 
always been identified with the city of Lawrenceburg. After Mr. Hill had 
completed the prcscri!">cd educational course in tlie Aurora public schools he 
attended the Southern Business College, at Louisville, Kentucky, and after 
remaining there for sometime, began his active career as a clerk on a steam- 
boat, plying between Cincinnati and New Orleans, serving in that position for 
a period of eight years. Twelve years of Mr. Hill's life were spent in the 
revenue service of the United States government. After he liad resigned his 
position as clerk on the steamboat he was stationed at Lawrenceburg as deputy 
United States intemal revenue collector, and served in that capacity for four 
years, after which time he served for eight years in the capacity of cashier in 
the revenue office at Lawrenceburg, resigning that position to become cashier 
of the Dearborn National Bank, at the time of its organization in 1905, and 
has been continuouslv connected with that bank since that date. The Dear- 
born National Bank is one of the strong financial institutions in the city of 
Lawrenceburg and to Air. Hill is due much of the credit for its growth. 

On October 23, 1S89. Lew W. Hill was married to Ella C. Hubbartt, 
daughter of Asa B. and Palace (Harbaugh) Hubbartt. The one child, a 
son, Harley H., who has been born to this union, is assistant cashier of the 
First National Bank of Aurora, and is one of the best-known and most pop- 
ular young men of Dearborn county. 

Mrs. Hill's father, Asa B. Hubbartt, served during practically the entire 
period of the Civil \\'ar as a Union soldier, giving four of the best years 
of his life to the cause of his country. He died in 1902 at the age of sixty- 
five. His widow lives with her daughter, Airs. Hill, in Aurora. Richard 
Hubbartt, the paternal grandfather of Airs. Hill, was a native of Virginia, and 






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560 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

an earl}- settler in Dearborn county, wlio lived to a venerable age. His seven 
children were Thomas R., William, Arminus, Hiram, Rebecca, Rjarker and 
Mrs. Lida ]\liller. Jacob Harbaugh, who married Betsy Ilnrrel, and who 
was the maternal grandfather of !Mrs. Hill, was an earl\- settler in Dearborn 
connty, ha\ing come to this state from Pennsylvania. Both v»erc loiig past 
the meridian of life at the time of their death. He passed away during the 
eighties and she was nearly ninety years i>ld at the time ot her death. They 
were the parents of six children. }vlrs. John Cheek, ]Mrs. Ida West, Fran'-; 
HarliauL^h, George. ]\Irs. Palace Hubbartt and two or three others who died 
before reaching maturity. 

Although 'Sh'. Hill is first and foremost a banker, he and his brother, 
Adam K. Hill, own two farms near Aurora, and, incidentally, he devotes some 
of his time to looking after the management of these farms. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hill are members of the ]\Iethodist Episcopal church in 
Aurora and acti\"e in the affairs of that congregation. Mr. Hill is a member 
of the }ilodern \\'oodmen of America. He has always been a Republican, and 
during the past few years, when the Republican party has been more or less 
divided, he has been identified with the conservative, or so-called "standpat," 
wing of the partv. 

Lew W. Hill is a capable, courageous and well-rounded Ijanker and a 
successful farmer, but more than all that, a good citizen, especially for the 
reason that he has always taken an earnest part in the best interests socially, 
politically and morally of the county where his life has been spent and where 
his friends are leg^ion. 



GEORGE F. BUSSE. 



Xo class of farmers ranks higher in the state of Indiana than those of 
Dearborn county, standing at the head of which we find the name of George 
F. Busse, wdiose ancestors emigrated from Germany at an early day, and 
whose labors hav^ profited the community in whicli he lives, as well as him- 
self and his family. He is of a quiet, retiring disposition, and is looked upon 
as one of the most substantial men in the agricultural district. 

George F. Busse was born on March 15, 1S68, in Hogan township, on the 
farm w'here his brother John now lives. He is a son of Flenry Christian and. 
Angeline (Gesell) Busse, a biography of whom is presented elsewhere in this 
volume. Mr. Busse was reared on his father's farm in Hogan township. He 
was five years old when his parents moved into the new brick house built 



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DEARBOKX COUNTY, INDIANA. . 561 

from tlie brick made by his father on the place. Mr. Busse has been a farmer 
from the time of his marriage, and now owns a fine fann of one hundred and 
one acres, on which there is an exceptionally comfortable house, a good bam 
with a substantial stone foundation, and the whole place is substantially im- 
proved and well cared for. He divides his attention between general fanning 
and stock raising, and is one of the most progressive citizens of the community. 

George F. Busse was married on April 21, 1S93, to Mary Reinking, 
daughter of Henry and Mary (Wolber) Reinking. She was born in Miller 
township, Dearborn county. To Mr. and ]Mrs. George F. Busse has been born 
one daughter, Laura Louise. They have two other children whom they took 
to bring up, as their only other child, Albert, died in early infancy. Mr. Busse 
and his wife have long been members of the Lutheran church. 

Henry Reinldng, father of Mrs. George F. Busse, was born in Prussia, 
coming to America with his parents when but five years old. He has followed 
farming all his life near Lawrcnceburg. and now makes his home with ;i son 
in Manchester township. His wife, Mary (\\'olber) Reinking, was a native 
of Franklin county, Lidiana. Her death occurred on September 15, 190S. 

The paternal grandparents of Mrs. Busse were Ernest and Wilhelmina 
Reinking, natives of Prussia, who were early settlers in Manchester town- 
ship, moving later over on the state road near Lawrcnceburg, where they spent 
their last days. 

Mr. Busse has many warm friends in Dearborn county, where his name is 
so well and prominently known. 



PHHHP C. BRAUN. 



The Braun family has been identified with the financial life of the city 
of Lawrcnceburg for nearly sixty years. Peter Braun was cashier of one of 
the Lawrcnceburg banks continuously from 1S55 to 1905. His son, Philip 
C., began his career as a banker in 1S90, when he was appointed assistant 
cashier of the old People's National Bank. LIpou the consolidation of the 
Citizen's National Bank with the People's National Bank in 1905, Philip C. 
Braun became cashier of the consolidated banks, and still holds that position. 
It is a coincidence that his father, Peter Braun, retired from active life in 
1905, the same year in which Philip C. was appointed to his present position. 
Xaturally the Braun family is well known in this section of Indiana. 

Philip C. Braun was born in Lawrenceburg, Indiana, on October 15, 

(36) 



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562 DEARHORX COUNTY, IXDIAXA. 

1868, son of Peter and Sarah K. ( Bn.wiieller ) i'.iann. natives, re<i>e(:lively. 
of Nassau, Gerniany, and Pennsylvania, and the jjarents <>f fr>nr chihU'en: 
Elizabeth B., widow of William J. Manning-, or Wasliington, D. C. : l-'annie 
W. (deceased), wln) was the wife of F. H. Shedd ; William F., of Pitts- 
hnrgh. Pennsylvania, and Phili]' C, nf Lawreneeburg. 

Peter Braun, who was born on May iS. 1S26. was edncated in Germany 
and came to America at the age of eighteen, landing- in New ^'ork City. He 
worked on a farm near that cit_\- for little niorc than a year, and then came 
to Indiana, lijcating at Lawrcricehnrg-, where he took a cnntract for furnishing 
wood for the engines on the old Ohio & ^Mississippi railroad. He had seven 
stations between Lawreneeburg and \"inccnncs and operated saws run by Ixv/^c 
power. In 1856 he, in comjian}- with William Probasco, established the Peo- 
ple's Bank at La\\rcnceljnrg. under the proiirietorshi[) of William Prr)')asco, 
Braun tS: Company. As heretotVire noted, Peter Braun was in the banking- 
business continuously from iS-,6 m 1005, a period of forty-nine years, lie 
was cashier all of that time, and at the time of his retirement was the olrjest 
cashier in the state of Indiana. .\t one time he had been connected w itii a 
branch liank of the state of Indiiana, and he was also connecte<l \vith th,e ^M 
City National Bank at Lawreneeljurg. ha\'ing- been cashier of that institution. 
Both he and his wife are still li\-ing-, he at the age of eighty-nine years, and she 
at the age of se\-ent}--four. Peter Braun was reared as a Lutlieran, but }\Irs. 
Braun is a Presbyterian and her husband w-as a trustee of that churcli for 
man}- years. 

Peter Braun's parents were natives of Germany and died there. Flis 
father was a farmer and mayrir of the village of Nister. Peter hin-iself was 
one of a good-sized family, among tlie other children being William, Philip 
and Christian. Mrs. liraun's fcUher was Frederick Browneller. who married 
a Miss Kuhns. fioth natives of Pennsyh'ania. Frederick Bniwneller was en- 
gaged in the tanning business with former Governi:)r Durbiii's father on the 
present site of the saw works of George H. Bishop 1!^ Company at Lawrenee- 
burg. Both he and his wife died in Evansville. They had two children, 
Sarah R. and To'm K. 

Philip C. Braun was reared in Lawreneeburg. and has lived there all his 
life. He attended the public schools and then went to Cincinnati, where he 
was a clerk for the Pullman Car Ciimpany until 1S90, leaving that position 
to become assistant cashier of ihe People's National Bank at Lawreneeburg, 
and when the Citizen's Xati^nal Bank was consolidated with the Peiiple's 
National Bank he became cashier of the consolidated institutions, a p(-isition 
which he now occupies. 



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DEARBORN' COL' \ TV, IXDIAXA. 563 

On October i6, 1895, Philip C. Draun was niarried to Grace A. Wytnond. 
the voungest daughter of \\"illiani W. and Laura 1\ (Harthny) W'ymond, 
tleceased, and to this uni'in four chiUh'cn have been born. T'hihp \\ ., lv<ilicrt 
M.. John F. and Sarah F. 

Mr. and Mrs. Braun are nieml)crs of the Presbyterian churcli, lie being 
a trustee of the church, having succeeded his father in liiis posilidn. Mr. 
Braun is a member of Lawrenceburg Lodge Xo. 4, Free and .Vccepted Ma>ons, 
and is treasurer of the lodge. He also is a member of Dearborn Lodge Xo. 
49, Knights of Pythias. Politically, he is a Republican. Pie is a member 
of the board of school trustees of the city of Lawrenceburg, having served 
in that position since 1905. 

Mrs. Braun \vas born in Lawrenceburg on April i, 1877. Tier father 
was a wholesale grocer in Cmcinnati. associated with her grandfather. Mrs. 
Braun was one of three children born to her parents, she having a sister, 
Laura F., and a brother, l^dwin P. ^Nlrs. Braun's paternal grandfather was 
John Wymond, the seventh son of his parents, who were natives of England. 
i\Irs. Braun's maternal grandfather was Myron IL Harding, among whose 
children were Dora, Hector, Hollie and Laura F. 

Bankers who are broad-minded and puljlic-spirited are able to do very 
much for the city and county where they live. The Braun family liavc been 
well known, not only for their generosity, but for their public spirit and keen 
interest in public enterprises and worthy movements. Philip C. Braun in every 
wav is carrying on the worthy public duties so well discharged for nirun- years 
bv his father, and enjoys the confidence and respect of the entire community. 



i'*<i:' •^■^'■' ■' ;- ■ ■ CHARLES A. DOWNEY. ' ■' 

Charles A. Downey, now a well-known railway postal clerk, livir.g at Au- 
rora, this county, was born on July 26, 1S68, in Ohio county, this state, a son 
of Erastus S. and Elizabeth (Cloud) Downey. When his parents came to 
Aurora he was a small lad of eight years. There he attended the [luiilic 
schools, and when througli school kept bouks for liis father for several years, 
after which he followed various pursuits, until he was employed in the rad- 
way mail service, where he has remained for the past t\venty-f<jur _\e;'.rs or 
more. Politically, Mr. Downey has always been an ardent Republican, and 
he and his wife are earnest members of the Baptist cluu'cli. 



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56-1. DEARBORX COUXTV. IXOIAXA. 

Erastus S. Dowiiev was l)nrn in Ohio cfi'Linty, wliere lie was reared cm a 
farm. He later learned the cabinet-ir.aker's trade, and was at one time super- 
intendcnt of the Ohio c.mnty jioor farm. In 1S76. Mr. Downey moved to An- 
rora, where he was engaged in the hardware business and in the sale of farm 
implements until his death, which necnrred in July, lyio, caused by a stroke of 
paralysis, he then being seventy-one years of age. His widow, who also is a 
native qf Ohio county, sui-\dves him, at the age of seventy-four }-ears. They 
were th.e parents of two children. Cora, who became the wife of Thomas 
Haines, and is now a widow, and Charles A. Downey. A'Irs. Elizabeth 
(Cloud) Downey is an ardent member of the Baptist church. E^astns S. 
Downev was a son of George and Betsey (Van Dusen") Downey, the former 
born in Cincinnati, early pioneers in Ohio county, where George Downey fol- 
lowed farming, and where he died well advanced in years. The}- were the 
parents of the following children: Erastus S., King, Susanna, Belle, .\del- 
more E., Ernma and Eliza. George Downey was the sou of James Downe\-, a 
native of Ireland. The maternal grandparents of Mr. Downey, Daniel a!id 
Elizabeth (Drake) Cloud, were natives of Indiana, and followed farming in 
Ohio county, where th.ey died well advanced in years. Their children \vere 
Daniel. Benjamin. Elizabeth. Henry, Lida, Edward and William. 

On Jt'lv 1 1, 1895, Charles A. Downey was united in marriage to Ella Snv- 
der, who was born at Columbus. Indiana, on April iS, 1S73. daughicr of Rob- 
ert and Caroline ( Slienk) Snyder, to which union have been born six children, 
Elizabeth. Lucille, Frank. Alvira. Carlotta and William, all of whom are living 
save EHzabeth, the eldest, who died when ten years old. 

Robert and Caroline (Shenk) Snyder w^ere natives of Indiana, ^h. Sny- 
der was a photographer, and \A-hen the Civil War broke out he enlisted as a 
private in the Union army, serving three years. They are both now dead,. 
They were the parents of four children, Robert, Ella, Frank, and one who died 
early in life. Robert Snyder was the son of the Rev. William W. Snyder, a 
Methodist minister. Both he and his wife, Catharine Elizabeth, were natives 
of Indiana, and both lived to advanced ages. They were the parents of six 
children, Robert, Flettie, Jennie, William, Edmund and Frank. Mrs. Downey's 
Grandfather Shenk and his wife, Elizabeth, were both natives of Indiana, and 
lived at Wilmington. 

Charles A. Downey has always discharged his duties with satisfaction to 
the postal authorities, and is an active and energetic citizen, standing high in 
the esteem of all who know him. ,, i. :, ,;',,;> 1 ' 



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1628694 

DEARBORN' COUNTY, INDIANA. ■ 565 

GEORGE W. JOHNSTON. 

Descending from one of tlie oldest and best families of Dearljorn county, 
the gentleman whose name introduces this sketch has always been one of the 
most successful and public-spirited citizens of the rural district, never allow- 
ing politics to interfere with good administration, and ha^ done his share, as 
a county commissioner, in serving the public in an official capacity. Mr. 
Johnston is wonderfully well informed on the history of the county, and one 
could be entertained indefinitely with the incidents with which he personally 
has been associated. 

George W. Johnston was born at what is known as Johnston's [Mill, about 
five miles from Aurora, this county, on February 25, 1839, a son of George 
and Catherine (Kearney) Johnston. He grew to manhood on liis father's 
farm, helping at the mill in his younger days. His education was obtained 
at the common and graded schools at Wright's Corners. During the Civil 
War, Mr. Johnston went to Indianapolis and drilled a company, of which he 
was first lieutenant, but was never called out to service. In 1863, he started 
to farm for himself, but after the first year, went back to the old home farm, 
taking entire charge for a time, and moving, in 1866, to where he now resules, 
in Center township, at the line of Hogan township, and has for a number of 
years been cultivating a fine tract of one hundred acres. In earlier life, Mr 
Johnston took an active interest in politics, and in 188S was elected on the 
Democratic ticket to the office of county commissioner, to which office he was 
re-elected, serving in all si.K years, and held various local offices for a period 
of twenty-five years, among these being that of township assessor, to which 
he was elected over his protest. 

Mr. Johnston's father, George Johnston, was born on IMay 23, 1790, in 
Frederick countv, \^irginia. He was a well-educated man, having a scholarly 
knowledge of the subjects of geometry and trigonometry, as well as having 
a good general knowledge. He married Catherine Kearney, who was born 
near Lexington, Kentucky, and to this union were born ten children, William, 
Henry, Nancy, Joseph, Robert, James, Elizabeth, Nora, Lucy and George 
W. The senior George Johnston was the son of David and Elizabeth (Kyle) 
Johnston, the former of whom died in Virginia in 1796, leaving a wife and 
the following children: John, David, George, Joseph, Nancy, who married 
a Mr, Griffin in Virginia ; Rosanna, who became the wife of John Griffin, and 
Margaret, who married a Mr. Mills. In iSio Elizabeth Johnston, with her 
four sons and daughter, ■Margaret, came west across the mountains, and after 



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crossing- the Ohio river at W'lieehng, proceeded o\erland to Hamilton, where 
George, father of the subject of this sketch, taught school for several months. 
Later the faniih' went to V'inccnnes. where George became priwate secretary 
to Gii\'. William IIenr_\- Harrison. Sliortly before the battle of Tippecam.ie 
the faniil}' nio\e<l tu Kentuekw having been warned to get out because of t!ie 
danger frojii Indians. In 1S13 lhe\- again crossed the Ohio ri\'er and lived for 
a time at a town called Salem, hitei' moving' to .Middletown, Kentucky. In 
181 5 tlie}' returned to Indiana an.rl made a permanent settlement in Dearborn 
comUw John, the eldest son, had previously entered go\-ernment land north- 
west of Aurora, along the line of Hogan and Center townships. He had a 
large tract of land, and set out a fine apple orchard, and also had a large 
sugar camp, his farming being on a much larger scale than A\a^ usual in ilioso 
davs. The other lirothcrs, Da\'id, George and Joseph,, settled in Alanchester 
township, on north Hogan creek, at a time when the country was almost un- 
inhaliitable, on account of swam]is, brush and a generalh' rough country, l.ini 
they chopped and dug out a hrane and later established the noted Johnston's 
Mill, making a success of a business that later became widely known. George 
and Joseph married sisters, and David remained single, making his home with 
his married brothers. George afterward sold out his share, and he and Joseph 
built a mill in the southwestern part of Manchester township, which is still 
standing. 

On ]\Iay 14, 1S63, George \\'. Johnston, was united in marriage with 
Mary Jane F.ainum, who was born in Hogan township, this county, dauglitrr 
of Ci.inwa}- and Sarah (Deshiell) P.ainum, and to this union six children 
have been hijrn, l-'rank, Ella, Robert, Oda, Maurice and Jessie. Frank John- 
ston is parole officer for the Indiana Reform Schoiil for Bo}s, at PlainfieM. 
He married Mattie Grubbs, by whom he has had three children, Lorene, 
Loren and Donald. Robert Johnston, a biographical sketch of whom will 
be found in another part of this volume, is in the hardware and implemer.t 
business at Aurora. [Maurice J(jhnst<>n. a well-known farmer of tliis counry, 
married Xellie Weislcigel, e>f IndianaiJDlis, and has r.ine daughter, Catherine. 
Ada Johnston became the wife of William Memlell, a grocer, and resides 
at Indianaiiolis. She has two sons, Jose[)h and William. Jessie Johnst'.n 
became the wife oi C. A. White, and niC'ved to Indianapolis, but later settled 
at Aurora, where she died in 1899, leaving two daughters, Florence and 
Lillian. Miss Ella Johnst(5n taught school for a number of years, but since 
her sister's death has remained at home, caring for her sister Jessie's two 
daughters, who are now attending high school. She has in her possession 



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se\-eral books of problems, wriUen by her grandfatlier, George Johnston, in 
a very fine hand, under date of 1813. and also has a letter written in Xo- 
veniber, 1812. to her aunt in \'inceunes. fruni a young man in Danville, ken- 
tuck}-, who had previously ridden un horseljack all the way to Vincennes to 
see the, then, voung lady. In addition U< the above prized ancient articles, she 
has in her cohcction a letter written by Jolin Washiugiun, a cousin of George 
Washington, to one of the Johnston family, after he became the husband of 
Nancy lohnston. a sister of David Johnston, of Virginia, her great-grand- 
father. 

The esteem in which Mr. Johnston is held by the citizens of Center town- 
ship is fully attested by the great number of loyal friends, who never fail to 
sive him a cordial social call, when in his locality. , 



GEORGE FOSTER SMITH, M. D. 

Fortunatelv there is no caste system in this country, which requires the 
bov to take the same jjlace in society occupied Iw his father and his grand- 
father. This is a democracy, and here the individual is the arbiter of his 
own fortimes. Among those who by their own efforts have attained a posi- 
tion of responsibility and rendered praiseworthy service in this cominunity 
is George Foster Smith, the subject of this biograjjliy. 

Dr. George Foster Smith, a well-known physician and surgeon of Law- 
renceburg, Indiana, is not descended directly from a line of physicians, but 
on the maternal side of his family he had an uncle who was a physician. On 
his paternal side he is descended from substantial stock that came from old 
Virginia, and on his mother's side he is descended from ecjually substantial 
stock, which came from the state of ^Massachusetts. Since coming to Law- 
renceburg, some ten years ago, Doctor Smith lias attained an enviable position, 
not only as a practicing physician and surgeon, but as a man and as a citizen. 
As coroner of Dearborn county, as township physician, and president of the 
Lawrenceburg citv board of health. Dr. Smith h.Ts filled positions in line with 
his professional activities. He is well known in this section and enjoys a 
large and lucrative practice. 

Dr. George Foster Stuith is a native of Kentucky, having been born in 
Boone county on February 2, 1S75. His father, Robert Smith, was six years 
old when his parents, Fleary and Xancy (Batten) Smith, came from Madison 



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county, Virginia, to Boone county, Kentucky. Coming from \''irgini;i to I 

Kentucky in a covered wagon, Robert Smith grew to manhood in that state | 

and was a well-known farmer, a prominent member of the Baptist church, and j 

a substantial citizen. He died early in life in 1SS4. His wife, Amanda Foster, I 

a native of Kentucky, who survived him more than twenty years, was a 
devout Baptist. Robert and Amanda Smith were the parents of two children: 
George F., and Julia, wife of Otto Rector, of Boone county, Kentucky. 
Amanda (Foster) Smith married, secondly, Benjamin Hensley, wlio now 
Hves on the old homestead in Boone county, which has been in the family 
for more than one hundred years. Doctor Smith's mother is deceased, having 
passed away at the age of forty-nine years. 

Henr}- .Smith, a blacksmith by trade, and his wife, who before her 
marriage was Nancy Batten, both of Madison county, Virginia, and early 
settlers in Boone county, Kentucky, lived to advanced ages, and reared a 
family of nine children, as follow: John, William, Lystra, Whitfield, Fayette, 
Sarah Ann, Mary EHza, Laura and Elivira. Others died early in hfe. }>Irs. 
Nancv (Batten) Smith v.as ninety years old at the time of her death. The 
Foster family, the maternal ancestors of Doctor Smith, came west from ^Nfassa- 
chusetts. Charles and America (Payne)' Foster, the maternal grandparents 
of Doctor Smith, and farmers by occupation, were early settlers in I'oone 
county, Kentucky, where they died in middle life, after having two children, 
Amanda, who is Doctor Smith's mother, and Alfred, who was educated in 
medicine and who became a physician. 

Born and reared on his father's farm in Kentucky and educated in the 
district schools of Boone county, and in the Lawrenceburg high school. George 
Foster Smith has been a resident of Dearborn county for eighteen years, 
eight j-ears of which were spent at Weisburg, and ten years at Lawrenceburg. 
After completing the course in the Lawrenceburg high school. Doctor Smith 
entered the ]\riami Medical College at Cincinnati, in 1S94, and was graduated 
on April i, 1S97, after which he began practicing at Weisburg, removing to 
Lawrenceburg. Indiana, in 1905. His prominence as a physician and surgeon 
in Dearborn is attested by the fact that although a resident of Dearborn a 
comparatively short time, and a resident of Lawrenceburg for only ten years, 
he has served as county coroner for tAvo terms, as president of the Dearborn 
County Medical Society for one term, and is at present the township physician 
and president of the Lawrenceburg city board of health. He was the surg-eon 
for the Shutt Improvement Company when they reconstructed the Big T^our 
railroad from Sunman to Lawrenceburg Junction. He is an active member 






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of the Indiana State and the American ^Medical associations, aside from liis 
.membership in the Dearborn County Medical Society. 

George Foster Smith was married on June 30, 1897, to Etta Mriody, 
daughter of John and \Mary (Ilotts) bloody, who were natives of Kentuc!<y 
and who are now deceased. Mrs. Smith and her eight brothers and sisters, 
I^aura, AHce, Emma, Hattie, ^\nna, William, John and Eugenia, were born 
in Boone county, Kentucky. Dr. and Mrs. Smith have had two children, 
Amy and Ruth. 

Mrs. Smith's paternal grandparents, also natives of Kentucky, died in 
the .<50uthern part of that state. Her maternal grandfather, Richard Botts, 
who married a Miss Ryle, was the father of three children, Xewton. Jasper 
and Mary. They were also natives of Kentucky. 

Dr. George Foster Smith and wife are members of tlie Baptist church at 
Lawrenceburg. They are regular attendants at the services of this church, 
and are liberal contributors to its support. They likewise take an active inter- 
est in the affairs of the congregation. Doctor Smith is a member of Sunman 
Lodge No. 590, Free and Accepted IMasons, the Knights of Pythias, the ]Mod- 
ern Woodmen of America, and the Fraternal Order of Eagles. He is a 
Democrat. 

A man of scholarly attainments, of democratic tastes and manners, of 
earnest and sincere purpose in life. Doctor Smith has won for himself a place 
in the hearts of his fellow townsmen and the people of Dearborn county. His 
election to two terms as coroner of Dearborn county, his presidcnc}- of the 
city board of health and to other positions of professional responsibility are 
evidence, not only of the confidence placed in his professional attainments 
by the people of his adopted city, but also the warm feeling of friendship be- 
stowed upon him by the leading men of Lawrenceburg and Dearborn county. 
Doctor Smith is a capable physician, a warm friend and a gQod citizen. 



iwc AT;,=>r.':,v':,„ ROBERT L. JOHNSTON. :.,. :,?;. 

From his first initiation into the business world of Dearborn county, 
Robert L. Johnston has displayed a marked degree of executive ability, which 
has continued to increase with his wide scope of experience, until now. he 
is one of the most progressive and successful merchants in Aurora, where 
he conducts, in partnership with Paul A. Smith, a remunerative and up-to- 



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5/0 DEARBORiV COUNTY^ INDIANA. 

date hardware establislinient. \\'ith a gond education and careful trainiii:^' 
in liis vouthtul ilays, he started out in life \vell prepared to "conquer an\- 
foe," and has met with llie success in his Imsiness career tliat his energ'etic 
and enterprising- course so well merits. 

Robert L. Johnston was liorn on Januar_\- 13, 1S72, about two miles 
northwest of Auri:>ra, on Xorth Hogan creek, Cer.ter township, this county; 
a son of Gei^rge W. and ]\Iarv ]. (I.jainum) Johnston, prominent residents 
of that vicinity. His education \^'as secured at the district schools and tlie 
Xormal University at Lebanon, Ohio, and at the age of twenty-two, he went 
to Wcisburg, where he taughl one term of winter school, after which he to'ik 
over the management of a retail lumber yard at Xewtown ( l.awrenceburgj, 
and was thus engaged for a period of four years, at the end of which time he 
formed a partnership with T. J. Cobb and Henry A. Bobrink, under the firm 
name of the John Cobb Chair Company, which arrangement was continued 
from 1900 to 1909. when the firm was dissolved, Mr. Johnston selling his inter- 
est. He then formed a partnership with Paul A. Smith, under the firm name of 
Johnston & Smitli. dealers in hardware and farm implements, of which they 
carr}- a large stock. Politicalh-, yir. Johnston is a Democrat, and his religiijus 
views are th(ise of the Baptist cinuxh, he being clerk of the congregation with 
which he is associated. He has also done considerable singing in the church 
choir, and is very fond of music. Fraternally, ]Mr. Johnston belongs to the 
Improved Order of Red I\Ien, and is a member of the Commercial Club. In 
1905 Mr. Johnston was elected clerk of the city of Aurora, taking his otTice 
in September, 1906, and served until May 20, 1907. On the resignation of 
JMayor Louis E. Beinkamp, ]\Ir. Johnston filled out the unexpired term, as 
mayor of Aurora, vacating this office on January i, 1910. 

In a biographical sketch of George \\'. and Mary J. (Bainum) Johnston, 
presented elsewhere in this volume, is set out in detail the genealogy of the 
Johnston family. Robert L. Johnston's paternal grandparents, George and 
Catherine (Kearney) Johnston, nati\'es of \'irginia, were among the early 
settlers in Dearbcrn county, coming here in 1S15. George Johnston, witii 
two other brothers, cleared a farm and started the first mill on Llogan creek. 
Mr. Johnston's maternal grandfather was Conway Bainum, a farmer of Ho- 
gan township, this county, who was born on August 9, 1S09. in Virginia. 
He followed farming, and made fref|uent flatljoat trips to Xew Orleans with 
produce, and at odd times cut cordwood and sold it to boats along the river. 
In addition to his otiier sources of income, Mr. Bainum built a lime kiln. He 
developed a fine farm in Hogan township, where he reared his family, and 



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DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. • 5^1 

where he died at tlie age of eighty-nine }ears. His parents were William and 
Elizabeth (Bryan) Bainuni, natixcs o\ Wilmington, l)cla\\are, the former 
liaxing been l.iorn on }'\-l)ruary _'0. 17'>5- ^'ml the latter in October. 1790. 
Cc-tnuay Bainum was niariaed on April ii, 1832. to Sarah Deshiell, who \\as 
born on b^ebrnary 10, 1812, in Alaryland, and ti^ this nnion there were boi'n 
fonr children, ^frs. Elizabeth Canfield. .Mfrtd IB, Mary J. (mother of the 
snbject of this sketch) and Charles W. Mrs. B.ainnni died on October 15, 
186S, and Air. Bainnm married, secondly, on October 21, iHOq. 3>Irs. Harriet 
(Hayes) Swing, who was born on P"el)rnary 2j. 1834, near D^lhi, Kentucky. 
As a leading- citizen of Am-ora, Robert L. Johnston is eminently entitled 
to representation in a work of snch valne as the history of Dearborn ci.anity. 
He has not only given the most thoughtful attention to his business, l)ut has 
invariably shown liis acti\'e interest in all good works in the city of Aurt)ra 
and is held in high esteem bv all who know him. 



JOHN BE STIER. 

John BE Stier, undertaker and li\-eryman, .Vnrora, Bidiana, was born 
in that city, September 13, 1866, and is a son of John P. and Erances ( Sted- 
man) Stier. Ble was reared and educated in his home town, where he 
graduated from high school in the class of 1884. After leaving school he 
engaged his services as a furniture carver, and later as a designer, and for 
twelve years traveled for the firm by whom he was employed, H. H. Wigger^ 
& Sons Company, mannfacturers of mantels and hardwood furniture, of 
Cincinnati, Ohio. In 1894, Mr. Stier organized the firm of Sanks & Stier, 
furniture merchants and undertakers, of Aurora, of which he was a member. 
and in 1897 he resigned his position and became sole owner of the new com- 
pany, until 1912. when he disposed of his interest in the furniture business, 
and has since de\'oted his entire time and atteniion to the undertaking and 
livery business. 

John P. Stier was born and reared at Natchez, Alississippi, \vhere he fol- 
lowed various pursuits for a time, and then came to Aurora, where he engaged 
in general merchandise, and for the last twenty years of his life was a book- 
keeper. He was a lieutenant in the Confederate army during the Civil War, 
serving in a ]Mississippi regiment. He was a member of the Baptist church. 
His death occurred in 1S87, at the age of forty-five years. His wife. Frances- 



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57- DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. ' -^ 

(Stedimn) Stier, \vas born in May, 1S44, and is a native of Indiana. Sii.e 
survi\x^s her husband at the age of seventy-one \cars. This union was b!e>L 
with four children, as follow: John H., of Aurora; ^^^i]lard P., of Omaha, 
Nebraska ; Ethel, who is the wife of Frank Clark, of Aurora ; and one who 
died in infancy. 

The paternal grandparents were John H. Stier, a native of Germany, and 
his wife, Mary (Schwarts) Stier, a native of Iowa. They were early settlers 
at Natchez, Mississippi, where they died well along in years. Mr. Stier fol- 
lowed the vocation of a hotel keeper. There were two children to this union. 
John and Julius. Mr. Stier was married a second time, to Caroline Schwartz, 
a sister of his first wife, by whom he had the following children: Julia, Xora 
and Virgie. 

John H. Stier was married in September, 1894, to ]\Iarv Kassebaum. 
daughter of Fred W. and Merther (Vandevcr) Kassebaum, and four chil- 
dren have been born to this union, namely: Donald, Rachel, ^larjorie ami 
Eleanor. Donald Stier is attending Purdue University. Rachel is a graduate 
of the yVurora high school and is now attending Butler College, at Indianapo- 
lis. 

Mrs. Stier was born at Indianapolis, in i.S/i. Her father was born in 
Germany, and her mother was a native of Indiana. They were both residents 
of Aurora for twenty-seven } ears, and tlieir children were : Louis, Xannie. 
Callie, Mary. Bert, Ernest. Jesse. Frederick and Drewerv. 

John H. Stier docs a ^■er^- larg-e undertaking business. ha\'ing buried to 
date nearly eighteen hundred persons and his painstaking efforts and com- 
mendable methods in all his business ventures are largely responsible for 
his present success. 

]\Ir. Stier and his wife are members of the Methodist church. Air. Stier 
belongs to Aurora Lodge No. 5 1 . Free and Accepted Masons ; Aurora Chap- 
ter No. 13, Royal Arch Masons: Chosen Friends .Lodge No. 13, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows ; Bethlehem Encampment. Tribe No. 229, Improved 
Order of Red Men: Union Lodge No. 34, Knights of Pythias, and served 
for two years as grand regent of the Rciyal Arcanum of the state of Indiana. 
Originally, Mr. Stier was a Democrat, but is now giving his support to the 
Republican party. He served as Sunday school superintendent for several 
years, and was on the official board of the church. He was president of the 
Dearborn Club of Aurora, in 19 14, and is a member of the Aurora Commer- 
cial Club. 



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DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA.' 573 

JOSEPH LEONARD AXBY, D V. S. . . ^ 

Although the parents of Dr. Joseph Leonard Axby were natives of 
Indiana, he is of English descent on his paternal side, both of his paternal 
grandparents having been born in Devonshire, England. On his maternal 
side he is of Pennsylvania-Dutch descent. Two generations of the .Vxln- 
family already have been pron-;inent in the political and civic life of Dearliorn 
county. Dr. Axby's father was a well-kriown citizen and held many riffices 
of trust and responsibility in Dear1)orn county. Doctor Axljy himself has 
filled no inconsiderable niche in the political and official life of Lawrenceburg. 
As a veterinary surgeon he has during the period of nearly fifteen years 
cnjovcd a large practice in this section of the state. In fact he is regarded 
as one of the foremost veterinary surgeons in southern Indiana, though Ins 
practice is not confined to the state of Indiana alone. An evidence of h'S 
professional equipment was liis long service as a lecturer in the Cincinnati 
\'eterinary College. A farmer by proxy. Doctor Axby has given his be^c 
tlmught and attention to the profession into which he came from educational 
work. 

Joseph Leonard Axby was born on July 28, 1876, in ^Miller township, 
Dearljorn county, Indiana, and was reared on his father's farm in ]\Iilier town- 
ship. He attended the district schools and completed his education at the 
National Normal University, at Lebanon, Ohio, and the Southern Indiana 
Normal School, now extinct, at ^Mitchell, Indiana. After a successful career 
as a school teacher, which profession he followed for six years, he entered 
the Chicago Veterinary College, at Chicago, Illinois, and was graduated with 
the class of 1903. Beginning the practice of his profession immediately after 
graduation he located in Lawrenceburg and has lived in this city and prac- 
tised his profession ever since. During the period of 1903 to 191 1 he was 
a lecturer in the Cincinnati Veterinary College, Dr. Joseph Leonard Axby 
belongs to the Indiana, Ohio and National Veterinary societies, and for many 
years has been a prominent member of these organizations. 

Among the successful farmers of Dearborn county, who by reason of 
efficient service and genial relations with the public arose to positions of 
prominence in the political life of Dearborn county, was John Axby, who 
married Melissa Grubbs, and who was the father of Dr. Joseph Leonard Axby. 
After having been reared on the farm in Dearborn county, John Axby began 
fanning on his own account, owning a sixty-acre farm in ^vliller township, 
which he very greatly improved and where he reared his children. Being a 



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:i74 DEARBORN' COUNTY, INDIANA. 

good judge of horses and mules he became an extensi\-e dealer, and this busi- 
ness brought him into contact with a gre.al many people. His popularity 
grew from year to year, and after serving- two terms as township assessor of 
Miller township, he was elected a member of the board of county eomiuis- 
sioners of Dearborn county, ant! subsequently was elected sheriff, which 
office he held for two terms. Afterwards he removed to the farm, and passed 
away the day after having reached his sixty-fifdi year, November 4. 19 14. 
Eiglit years previously his loyal and devoted wife, ^Nlrs. INIelissa (Gruliljs) 
Axl.)}- had passed away at the age of fift}--three. ■ Her death occurred on 
February 22, 1906. It is a matter of interest that their two children, both 
sons, are now veterinai'}- surgeons. Dv. William .V. Axby is a veterinary 
surgeon, located at Harrisiin. Ohio: Dr. Joseph L. is the subject of this 
sketch. The parents were beVih members of the ?^Iethodist church. 

Idle cholera epidemic of 1849 took away many men and women in the 
prime of life and among the victims of this dread plague was Joseph Axliy, 
the foiuider of the Axby famil}- in America and the paternal grandfather of 
the subject of this re\'iew. Ilaxdng come to this countr\- to engage in farm- 
ing, he arri\-ed in the spring of 1S49. and died in the frdl of the same year. 
His wife, Mary Axby, lived to be seventy-five years r)ld, and was married, 
secondly, to William Brown, by whom she had no children. John Axby, the 
Doctor's father, was the only child born to the first union. 

The Grubbs family, from which Doctor Axby is descended on his ma- 
ternal side, came from renns_\I\ania, and are believed originally to have 
come from Ilolland. Allen Grublis, the maternal grandfather, and his wife, 
a Miss Beule, nati\es of Penns\l\ania, were pioneers in Dearl.wrn countv. In- 
diana, where he owned and operated a little farm and where he was a cooper. 
Although he died in Dearborn count}-, and his wife in Rush county, binh 
were buried in Dearborn. The}- li\-ed to rear a family of six children : Me- 
lissa, Susan, Joseph, John, Eva and Nettie, and to see them grow to niaii- 
hood and womanhood and establish homes of their own. Allen Grul.ibs hail 
been married formerly and by the previous marriage had one son, Josliua. 

Joseph Leonard Axby was married on September 12, 1906, to Dollie 
J. Watts, daughter of Warren and }vlardia (Parson-) Watts, and they have 
one daughter, ]\Iary Elizabeth. 

ilrs. Axby"s father is still living. Her mother passed away in June, 
1914, at the age of fifty-three years. Mrs. Axby has one brother, All)ert. 

DcKtor Axb}- is a menilier of the >.Iethodist churcli and ]\Irs. Axbv is a 
member of the Christian church. He belongs to Lawrenceburg Lodge No. 



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DEARBORN COUNTY^ INDIANA. 5/5 

4, l'"rce and Acce;nei:I ^^lastms; Lawreiicclmry Cluiptcr of Rnyal Arch ^Tasons; 
Aurora Comniaiulery Xo. 17. Kiiiglits Templar; and to the ^[odeni ^\'oodmcll 
of America. .V Democrat in pi.ihtics, Doctor .\xhy ser\-cd a term of four 
years, 1910 to 1914, as mayor of Lawrencehurg. He resides at 131 Ehn 
street, Lawrencehurg. 

Possessed of a lucratix'c and cnjriyable ))rofcssion, a substantial competence 
to insure all the comforts and nv>st id' the luxuries which a man might crave, 
the liouor and respect of his fellow townsmen and the confidence of the 
public generally. Dr. Joseph Leonard Axb}' is well and favorably situated to 
enjov life. Xaturallx' possessed of an optimistic temperament and a friendly, 
apivroachable manner, lie is a sterling t^■pe of the aggressive, shrewd and far- 
seeing American. He is a worthy rcprcsentati\e of a family whi'>se name is 
hiohl\- honored in this section. 



FRAXK AXDRF.W SCHIPPER. ' ' ' 

Having grown up at Aurora, Indiana, tlic place has become familiar in- 
deed to him whose name starts this sketcli, and no place holds such tender 
memories of fishing-pole da}S. or has offered better inducements in his more 
ad\-anced }ears. From his b<.>}'hood to the present time. Mr. Schip]'.er has 
never left the friendly little city that served as his birthplace. It has done 
its duty, in supplying him with an education necessary for a successful business 
career, and remaining faithfid through all his more mature years, after his 
entrance into the business world. 

Frank Andrew Schipper, shoe merchant, Aurora, Indiana, is a son of Bern- 
hard and Catherine Schumm Schip[ier, and was born on September J7, 1848, 
at Aurora, Indiana, where he has always lived. He attended the parochial 
scliools of the town. At the age of thirteen, during the Ci\'il War, he began 
to learn the shoemaker's trade, which he has followed ever since. About 1885, 
he formed a partnership with John Xeff. and they opened a shoe store under 
the firm name of X'eff & Schipper, whicii was later dissolved, and since 1893 
Mr. Schipper has conducted a .shoe business alone, and is now one of the 
oldest merchants in Aurora. He was th.e organizer of two military bands, 
and a ladies' orchestra composed of eighteen members ; at the present time 
he leads a quartette. He is an exceptionally fine clarinet plaver. and a natural- 
born musician. Mr. Schipper is a Republican. In addition to his shoe 



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5/6 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Store, Mr. Schipper is proprietor of the Lange Maciiine Works, Avhich is now- 
being' i"un b)- tln'ee of his sons. 

Bernhard Scliipper was a nati\'e of Bavaria, Germany, where he was 
reared and received a good common-school education, and came to America 
with his mother when a lad, his father having died in Germany. They set- 
tled at North Bend, and in 1846 came to Aurora, where he grew to man- 
hood and v.'hcre he engaged in burning lime and stone-C|uarrying. He died 
here at the age of seventy years. His wife. Catherine (Schumm) Schipper, 
also a natiw of Bavaria, survived him six months, and died at the age of 
scventv-tluee. 1 he\' were both members of the Catholic cliurch, and had the 
following children: Catherine, widow of John Gerhardt ?\lartin; John ( d.e- 
ceased) : Mary, who became the wife of George W'eitner, and lives at the old 
home place in Aurora; Frank A., of Aurora; Benjamin, Elizabeth, Emma, 
William, and Rose, who is nov/ the wife of Jacob Pfiester, all of whom reside 
in Aurora, Indiana. 

Frank Andrew Schipper was married in April, 1871, to Emma Doerr, 
daughter of Nicholas and Christina (Martin) Doerr. She was born on 
August 28, 185 1, in Carrollton, Kentucky, of German parentage. ^Ir. 
Schipper and his wife are attentive members of the Catholic church. They 
have had twelve children, namely ; Agatha. Alexander, Gustav, Adam, Paul-, 
ine, Harry, Frank, Irene. George, ^^'alter, Everett and Alfred. 

Agatha Schipper is married to Gustav Stoll. Alexander is a machinist in 
Lange ^Machine A\'orks and married Lillian Cox, by whom he has two children, 
Alexander and Thelma. Gustav is following the trade of a machinist, and 
married Lulu Zimmennan, by whom he has three children, Helen, Harold 
and Frank. Adam was united in marriage with May Adler, and they reside 
at Turlock, California, where ]Mr. Schipper is employed as a machinist. 
Pauline is married to Harry Hogan, and is the mother of three cliildren, 
Beatrice, Dorothy and Timothy; Harry is married to Clarissa Kinzer, by 
whom he has had one child, Donald, and they reside at Hamilton, Ohio, 
where ]Mr. Schipper is a successful jeweler. Frank. Avho clerks in his father's 
store, married Mary Agnes Green, and they have two children, Georgia 
Frances and Mary Agnes. Irene became the wife of William Ullrich, to 
which union have been born tw'O children, Wilfred and Justina. George 
is also a machinist, and married Cornelia Spanagel. Walter died at the age of 
eleven years. Everett died when eighteen years old. Alfred is following the 
vocation of a pilot on the Ohio river, and lives at his father's home in Aurora. 

The parents of jNIrs. Frank A. Schipper were natives of Germany, her 









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DEARBORN' COUNTY, INDIANA. 5/7 

fatl'.er from Alsace-Lorraine, raid her mother froin Saxon',-. Tliey were early 
settlers in Kentucky, and for many years residents of Aurora, Indiana, where 
ll'.ey died, \vell along in years. To this union were born the following chil- 
dren : William, jNIan,-, Emma, Frank. Augusta, Charles, John and Theodore. 
Mr. Schipper has arrived now at the age where he can look back over his 
mistakes and his successes, and feel that he has few regrets. lie is one of the 
best-known residents of Aurora, where he has many warm friends. 



ROBERT P. WILSON. 



The biograjjhy of the gentleman ^\•hl:Ise name initiates this sketch will 
be of especial interest to his descendants, since it so clearly sets forth the re- 
.sourceful character of one of the most successful citizens of Moores Hill. 
Although beginning in a modest way, Mr. ^^'ilson, through his own efforts, 
industry and determination, has gained that success which many are seeking, 
but which few attain, thus permitting him to live a life of cjuiet retiremen.t, 
with all the comforts and luxuries to make up for the long years of strenu- 
ous attention to business. 

Robert P. \^'ilson, retired dentist, Moores Hill, Indiana, was born on 
February 5, 1S3S, near old [Milan, in Ripley county, Indiana, and is a son 
of Golf M. and Amanda ]\I. (Johnson) AVilson. Pie was educated in the public 
school of Ripley county, after which he took a course in dentistry with a 
practicing dentist, following this vocation nearly all his life, although not 
gis'ing his entire time to his dental practice. Pie divided his time between 
his profession and teaching- school for a period of some twenty years. ]Mr. 
Wilson went to the Civil W'ar in Company D, Thirty-seventh Regiment, In- 
diana Volunteer Infantry, under General Rosecrans, participating in the 
battles of Stone's River, Missionary Ridge, Pumpkin Vine Creek, Lookoui 
Mountain, and others, being severely wounded at Stone's River. He has 
always been an extremely active and busy man, conducting, in addition to 
his school work and dental practice, a successful farm near Moores Hill. ]Mr. 
Wilson has always been a loyal supporter of the Prohibition party. Pie is 
a member of the Baptist church, of which he is a licensed preacher, and was 
pastor of the Hogan Hill and other churches. His fraternal alliance is with 
the Grand Army of the Republic. 

Golf M. Wilson, father of the subject of this sketch, was born on 

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578 DEAKBOKX COl'XTY, INDIANA. 

October 2Q. iSii. in ]\Iainc. and when two years of ai;e, came r)verl:i.nd by i 
wagon witli hi? parents, who settled in Ripley county. He lived the Ixdancc 
of his life in Ripley county. d}ing on September 23. 1839, while still quite 
young. His wife. Amanda AI. (Johnson) U'ilson, was born on March i_j, 
1820, in Ripley county, Indiana. They were united in marriage on April 
9, 1S37, and were the parents of two children. Robert P. and Golf. 

After the death of her husband, Mrs. ^^"ilson was married to Reuben 
G. Wilson, February 20, 1843, *o which union two children were b.)rn, 
namely: Clarence, born on July 30. 1S54: and Cornelia, December IQ. 1842. 
Clarence Wilson was married to Carrie D. Buchanan, and is now li\-ing in. 
Dearborn county. Cornelia became the wife of George E. Parsons, ^.fr^y 
24, 1S60, a' physician of Ripley county. They were the parents of three chil- 
dren, all of whom died young. 

The paternal grandfather was Ami Wilson, a nati\e of Maine, and was 
married there, prior to coming to Ripley county, where he entered land from 
the government near Old Milan, following the vocation of a farmer until 
his death, which occurred when he was seventy-eight years old. His wife 
was also a native of Maine, where she was reared and married. This unii'U 
was blessed with the following children: (iolf. Olicd. Eliza. Agnes. James, 
Mary Jane and Thomas. Ami Wilson had four brothers and two sisters, 
Ira, Artis, Obecl, who had three srms; 01i\'er, John AI. and Obed. Oh\er was 
superintendent of schools in Cincinnati at an early day ; Obed marrici 
Sara Johnson, and the} lived in Ripley county, Indiana, and were the parents 
of the following children: [Martha Ann, Daley, Thomas E., Charlie, luiima 
and Alice. 

Eliza Wilson, the third child of Ami Wilson, was united in marriage 
with Seth .Smith, a Methodist Episcopal preacher, and lived at Shelbyvilie, 
Indiana. Their children were, Sara Eliza, ]\[artha and John D. Agnes W'd- 
son became the wife- of John Tucker, a prosperous farmer of Ripley ciiunty, 
and had several children. James was married to Anne Harding, and made 
his home in Ripley count}-. Aviary Jane became the wife of Benjamin Slack'. 
of Ripley county. Thomas was united in marriage witli Levina EoA\Idr}-, 
and resides in Ripley county. They have had the following children : Will- 
iam, Charles, Byron and one who died young. 

Robert P. Wilson was united in marriage, in 1856, with Clementine 
(Cochran") Wilson, of Dearborn county, who was born on May 21, 1841, 
near Cincinnati, Ohio, by whom he had nine children, as follow: Edgar (de- 
ceased), Ida (deceased), Horace, Lynn. Carrie (deceased), Stella, Clarence, 



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DEARBORN COUiXTY, INDIANA. 579 

ilenrv and Charles. Horai-e was married to Hattie Gi\an, and !i\-cs al (iary. 
Indiana, w lui'e lie is preaching in a Baptist chiu-ch. They ha\e f')nr children, 
i\iibert. Clenrentine. Russell and an infant. Lyini was niari'ied to lidnh 
Owens. 1)\- whom he has had ten children, namely: Grace, ]\Iatthew, James, 
Lee, Emmett, Evan. Walter, luhcl, Evalyn and Hazel. Stella became the 
wife of Joe ]\Ioran, and is living at Cedar Ealls, Iowa. Thev ha\e no chil- 
dren. Clarence was married to Alice Garigus, and is residing at .Aurora, 
Indiana, where he is in the banking business. They have three children, 
Xonna, Esther and lielen. Hemy was uniteil in marriage with ^Nlattie 
Sims, and is living at Parkersburg, Iowa. This union has been blessed with 
three children, Lorain, Horace and Claudius. Charles was married tti M^rta 
Drain, and is living at Dumont, Iowa, where he is employed by the govern- 
ment as a mail carrier. They have one child, Xeva. 

■Mr. Wilson's first wife, Clementine (Cochran) \\"ilson, died on March 
29, 187S, at the age of thirty-si.x years, and ^Nlr. Wilson was marrieil, sec- 
ondl}', on August 7, 187S, to Lucretia Shockley, who li\cd but a short time 
after her marriage. Mr. \\'il.son was married, thirdly, on July 27, iSSo. to 
Margarette E. Dennison, daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth Zwickel, natives 
of Germany, who was born on November 6, 1846, at Lawrenceburg, to which 
union four children were born, as follow: Frank R., liorn on August 31, 
18S1, near Moores Hill: Clyde E., October 31, 1883. near ]Moores Hill: Je_;se 
J., August 7, 1881. near Milan: and E. Myrtle. Ajjril 2. 1S90, near Moores 
Hill, Indiana. Frank R. is a lawyer and resides at Mimcie, Indiana. He 
was married to Leora Heaton, by whom he has had two children, ^vlarjory 
and Herchal. Clyde E. is married and makes his home at Parkersburg. 
Iowa. Jesse J. is married to Lydia Ruble, and is following agriculture near 
Moores Hill. E. ]\Iyrtle became the wife of Grover Manlief, and resides on 
a farm near Moores Hill. They have two children, Ruth and Weldon. 

Robert P. Wilson is one of the best-known citizens in and around Moore.s 
Hill, where his friends numljer as many as his list of acquaintances. 



CLAY J. MILLER. 



In the life of an earnest, industrious man, there are always lessons which 
might well be followed along the highway of endeavor. \ot that there are 
striking incidents in the e.xperience of a farmer's life, but the qualities neces- 



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580 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

sary for the accomplishment of the desired end stand out as prominently in 
the rural districts as they do in the crowded cities. 

Clay J. Miller, a farmer in Caesar Creek township, was born on .\ugust 
14, 1872, a son of John R. and Margarette (Tholke) ?ililler. He was edu- 
cated in the district schools of the township in which he has always lived. 
After leaving school he assisted his father on the farm, at whose death he took 
over the management of the place for his mother. Mr. T^liller has always 
given his earnest support to the Republican party. He and his family are all 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

John R. ]Miller was bom on March 16, 1S37, in Ohio county, Indiana, 
and received his education there. He was married on March 21, 1S61, to 
Margarette Tholke, daughter of Frederick and Sophia Tholke. She came 
to the United States with her parents at the age of eight years, settling at 
Cincinnati, where she was educated. After their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. 
Miller moved to Clinton, Iowa, where they lived for five years on a farm of 
one hundred and sixty acres, which they sold and came to Ohio county, 
and lived there one year, when they moved to Hartford, Indiana. They again 
sold out, and moved to Caesar Creek township, w^here they have lived ever 
since. Mr. ^Miller died in January, 1897. To this couple were born five 
children, Sophia, Laura, John, Emma, and Clay. 

Sophia Miller became the wife of William Fisser, and is living in Cresar 
Creek township, and they have two children, John and ^Maggie. Laura is mar- 
ried to Charles Hunger, and resides in Ripley county, and is the mother of 
two children, Robert and Elsie. John was united in marriage with !\Iaggie 
King, and lives at Lockland, Ohio, and to this union have been born nine 
children. Clay, Clyde, Goldie, Gladys, Vanden, Emma, Robert, Orvil ami 
Ralph. 

Henr\- I\Iiller, the paternal grandfather, was born in Pennsylvania. 
He died on January 23. 18S9. in Ohio county, Indiana, at c^uite an advanced 
age. 

The maternal grandparents were Frederick and Sophia Tholke, natives 
of Germany, who immigrated to America and settled at Cincinnati, and later 
purchased a farm in Ohio county, Imiiana, where they remained until their 
death. They had three children, Margarette, Frederick and Henry. 

Clay J. Miller was united in marriage on April i, 1900, with Lida Rump, 
daughter of Charles and Lizzie (Burman) Rump. She was born on March 
28, 18S0, in Ripley county, and received her education there. Three children 

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DEAKBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 58 1 

!i,-i\e been born to this union, namely: John, bom on June 27, 1901 ; Alaggic, 
May 4, 1904; Willard, ^lay 25, 1907. 

Mr. ATillcr is one of the wide-awake farmers of Cajsar Creek townshiji. 
and has the respect of the entire community. 



HARRY E. FISHER. 



With the sound habits of pioneer thrift instilled in his make-up, [Mr. 
b'ishcr has taken good care that these valuable aids have lost none of their force 
through any fault of his. Starting out in young manhood, he so impressed 
tiiose with -whom he came in contact with his determination to win for himself 
a name, that his efforts met with good returns from the very beginning; 
since which time fortune has continued to smile upon him, not, perhaps, with- 
out some of life's clouds, which only added plea.sure to the sunshine. His 
success is a source of pleasure and satisfaction to both himself and his friends. 

Harry E. Fisher, of Lawrencelmrg, was born on IMay 7, 1869, at Foster^ 
Kentucky, fie is a son of \\'illiam S. and Laura (Downing) Fisher. His 
early education was secured at the district schools, after which he assisted his 
father on the farm, ttntil grov,n, when he became ambitious for a more pre- 
tentious line of employn.icnt, and went to Covington. Kentucky, where he 
applied for a position as agent for the Metropolitan Life Lisurance Company, 
which he secured, and one year later was promoted to the office of assistant 
superintendent, and ten years later was still further promoted to the position 
of superintendent at Lawrenceburg. Mr. Fisher is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and belongs to L^nion Lodge No. 8, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, and Dearborn Lodge No. 49, Knights of Pythias. 

William S. Fisher was born and reared in Bracken county, Kentucky, 
where he engaged in farming. He was interested in all questions concerning 
the welfare of his county, and proved his loyalty by serving one term as 
county sheriff, and was then appointed United States storekeeper-ganger, in 
which capacit}- he serv-ed for four years. He then returned to his farm and 
resumed his agricultural pursuits. His wife, Laura (Downing) Fisher, was 
also a native of Kentucky. ^She died in 1910, aged sixty-two years, and yir. 
Fisher now resides with his daughter, in Pensacola, North Carolina. To 
this couple were born four children, as follow: Frederick, deceased: Harry 
E.. of Lawrenceburg. Indiana: Charles, of Colorado: \\'inifred, who is now 
the wife of Rush Alexander, of Pensacola, North Carolina. 



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582 DEARKOKN (.'OLWTV. IXUIAXA. 

The paternal grandfatlier was James A. Fisher, a nati\'e of Kentucky 
and a pioneer farmer of 13racken county, who cleared a site for a home in 
the dense wood- wiiere he l)uilt a log cabin, and where he later had a \vcll- 
improved tract of land. He belonged to the Methodist church, and was a 
meni])er of the Free and Acccjited Masons aiul the lnde[)endcnt Order i.if Odil 
Fellows. He ne\-er drank lir|uor. imr tasterl tol.iacco. His life came to an 
end in iQio. at the age of eighty-nine years. His wife, Rebecca (Daw- 
son) iMsher, flied two years pric;)r, aged about se\enty-seven years. Their 
children were: William S., Mary (]\[arkley), }ilattie (Duncan), J. Gates, 
George B., Lessie, and Edwartl, deceased. 

The maternal grandfather was Charles Downing. He and his wife were 
natives of Kentucky, and farmers. ]\Irs. Downing died in middle life, and 
Mr. Downing" well advanced in years. Their children were; Laura, Liju, 
Emma, Mattie and Charles E. 

Harry E. Fisher was united in marriage on November 10, 1S92, wirh 
Minnie ^L Mefford, daughter of John and :Mary C. (Hobbs) :N[eflord. 
She was liorn at Leno.xburg. Kentucky, and died on July 10, 1904. Mrs. 
Fisher was an earnest member of the ^lethodist church, and the mother of 
two children, Elwood and Altha Irene. Elwood is a graduate of the Law- 
rencelnn-g high school, an.d has also taken a course in chemistry. He is now 
employed by the Industrial Appliance Company, Chicago, Illinois. Altha 
Irene is also a graduate of the Lawrenceburg- high school. She has consid- 
erable musical talent, and leads the orchestra in the Church of Christ, at 
Lawrenceburg. She is the wife of William Kemp, of Aurora. Indiana. 

John and i\Iary C. (Hobbs) Mefford were both born in Kentucky. Mr. 
Mefford is deceased, but his wife still survives him. They had the following 
children: Denipsey, ^linnie ]\I.. Josie Riley and Burns. 

The paternal grandfather of Mrs. Minnie M. h'isher was John IMefford. 
whose \vife was Patsey Mefford, natives fif Kentucky, and fanners. Their 
children were John and William. 

The maternal grandfather of Mrs. Minnie ]\T. Fisher was John Hobbs. 
who died at the age of ninety-four years. He was married four tim.es. 

On December 12, 1906, Harry E. Fisher was married, secondly, to Jean 
Berkshire, daughter of John W. and Fannie (Walton) Berkshire. She was 
born at Petersburg. B(jone county, Kentucky. 

John W. and Fannie (Walton) Berkshire, parents of ^Mrs. Jean Fishe'-, 
were nati\'es of Petersburg, Kentucky, where thev were verv prominent. 
Mr. Berkshire was a member of the state Senate of Kentuckv. and had 



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DEARBORN COl'NTV, IXDIAXA. 583 

fiiniicrl}' served as representative two terms. He owned a larg^e and profitable 
mercantile establishment, and was also a tobacco dealer. He died in Law- 
rcnccburg, from a stroke of paralysis, in ]\larch, 1914, ag-ed seventy years, 
leaving a widow ami six children, whose names are: Frank, John, Jean, 
Maude, William and Bernard. 

Mr. l-'isher is one of the best-known and most highly respected citizens 
of Lawrenceburg, in which town he takes considerable personal pride. 



EDWARD GREENHAM. 



Following is a short sketch of the career of Edward Greeiiham, a farmer 
of Manchester township, Dearborn county, Indiana, and a descendant of 
one of the first families in this section. 

Eilward Greenham was born on December 4, 1S3S, in ^lanchester town- 
ship, a son of Sebastian and ^Vlary TBarrows) Greenham. FTis father was 
born on September 15, 1840, in this same township, and was educated in the 
early subscription schools. He was raised on a farm, making his home with 
his grandparents. Pie married ^lary Barrows and took his bride to his grand- 
parents' home and they continued to live there until the death of the older 
couple about a year later. At that time, Sebastian took complete charge 
of the homestead of eighty acres and has continued to make his home there 
through succeeding years. There were eleven children in the family, all born 
and reared imder the same roof, of whom the immediate subject of this sketch 
is the eldest. The second child was Douglas, a farmer near Manchester. He 
married Amanda Tyrell and they have one child. Ivy. McClellan married 
Belle Rising'er and he is a merchant in ^Manchester and the father of three 
children : Pearl. Fern and I.cla. Grant is deceased. He owned and cultivated, 
up to the time of his death, a large plantation in Mississippi. He left a widow, 
who was Anna Hargitt, and ten children. These were. Bertha, Whitfield 
(deceased), John. ]Man,-, Frieda, George. Sophia, Mercer, Roger and Ches- 
ter. Thomas married Clara Ruble and lives on a farm near ^Moores Hill, 
this county. They have two children. Wilmer and 'Minnie AI. Anna is 
the wife of John Gabler. a carpenter living in Aurora, this state, and the 
nvither of three children. Iva. Molton and Parker. John has never married 
and is in the creamery business at Versailles. Riplev coimty. Clint married 
Efina Manlief and is a farmer near Manchester. Thev have two children. 



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Evelvn and Dorothy. Ciaude married Xcllie Russell and is a farnier and th': 
father of two children, Ruth and Erma. Wilmer and Lillie remain at home 
with the father. 

Edward Grcenham received his education in the district school near his 
home and continued to live with his parents until ihe time of his marria.ije 
to Carrie Sims, September 11, 1S81. At that time he rented a farm from 
Frank Reynolds, where he lived a year as a renter and then purchased tl'e 
place and has since given his attention to general farming. 

Carrie Sims was a daughter of Andrew J. and ^Margaret (Ellis) Sims 
and was born in Manchester township, September 3, 1856. She was educated 
in the public schools of her home district. There is one child to this union, 
Bernice E., who has been a teacher in the jN'Ianchester township schools for 
the past twelve years. 

In politics Mr. Greenham is a Democrat and served his party as road 
supervisor for twelve years, with satisfaction to all. Since March i, 1914, he 
has been superintendent of the Dearborn county infirmary, located in M;;n- 
chester township. The famih' are members of the Christian Union church. 
Mr. Greenham holds his frat-.-rnal affiliation with the Independent Order cf 
Odd Fellows, having successively filled all the chairs in his local lodge, ilr. 
Greenham enjoys in a large measure the sincere regard and confidence as 
well as the good will of all who know him, and is numbered among the goofl 
citizens of his locality. 



'.: GEORGE SUTTON, M. D. 

The foot-prints that some men leave behind them serve as guides along 
the pathway, which those coming after may follow with impunity. It is 
the lack of continuity and thoroughness that is responsible for so many fail- 
ures in life, and unless that wliich one undertakes is given the proper amount 
of interest and attention, it is useless to hope for the desired success. Dr. 
George Sutton, whose name introduces this biographical sketch, and who has 
passed to the "great beyond," gave the best there was in him to his life 
work, the truth of which statement is substantiated by the degree of promi- 
nence to which he arose, and the high order of skill he attained in his calling. 

George Sutton was born on June iG, 1812, in London, England, the son 
of George and Elizabeth (Ives) Sutton, with whom he came to America in 
1819, locating at Cincinnati, Ohio, from which city they removed to the 



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DFAKCORN COrXTY, INDIANA. ' 585 

W'liitewater valle}- in Franklin county. Indiana. After he had spent several 
years at Miami Uni\crsity, Geor<;;e Sutton began the study of medicine in 
Cincinnati, under the instruction of Prof. John Eberle, and afterwards under 
that of Prof. S. D. Gross, a distinguished authority on medicine. After at- 
tending three full courses of lectures at the ^ledical College of Ohio, lie v,:is 
graduated from that institution in 1S36. From this sterling old college two 
of his sons ha\'e since received diplomas. Locating at Aurora, this count \-, 
Dr. George Sutton practiced his profession there for fifty years, buikling 
up a large and profitable business. Doctor Sutton was a close and observant 
student, and all his writings are replete with original and valuable ideas. He 
contributed largely to both medical and scientific literature, his articles ha\-ing 
been extensively copied in various journals of the countr}-. In the winter 
and spring of 1S43 he wrote a series of- papers on epidemic ers-sipelas, popu- 
larly known as "black tongue," a disease then prevalent in Aurora and the sur- 
rounding country, which pap'crs were published in full in "Copland's Medical 
Dictionary," and "Xumerly on Erysipelas," both standard English works. 
Doctor Sutton gave much attention to microscopic study, and made valu3J)lc 
discoveries in regard to trichina and trichinosis, showing that ivowi three to 
ten per cent, of the hogs in southeastern Indiana are affected with trichina, 
and that the disease may assume \-arious forms hitherto unnoticed by the pro- 
fession. "His method of reducing dislocations of the hip joint," says Pro- 
fessor Pooley, of Columbus, Ohio, "is a beautiful, original and practical piece 
of surgery, and one sure to 'be adopted by the profession." In 1867 Dr. George 
Sutton was elected president of the Indiana State Medical Society, an honor 
highly aj^preciated by him, because he was not present at that meeting and had 
not suggested the office. In 1877 '^^ ^^'^^^ chosen president of the board of 
trustees of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Indiana, and ser\'ed in 
that capacity for several years, delivering the annual address to the graduating 
classes. As president of the Rocky Mountain Medical Association he de- 
livered a masterly address before that body at its meeting in Xew Orleans on 
May 6, 1885. Although engaged in active practice in the different branches 
of his profession, he devoted a portion *of his time to geology, meteorology 
and archaeology, directing his special attention to the antiquities of the neigh- 
borhood. He made a collection of fossils and geological specimens, forming 
a cabinet of many thousand specimens, unsurpassed by any other of the kind 
in this section of Indiana, Among the subjects upon which Doctor Sutton 
had written are here mentioned, 'cholera, erysipelas, trichina, scarlatina, jila- 
centa, praevia, parasites, dislocation of the hip joint, epidemics of southern 



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586 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Indiana, hug- cliolera. glacial deposits, formation of storms and causes of tb.c 
great floods in the Ohio valley. Doctor Sutt<.)n was a man remarkable for 
independence of tliought and action, and enjuxed the confidence (if h.is fel- 
lowmen for o\er half a century. He took an active part in \vhate\er was 
for the good of the city: was elected mayor of Aurora for three successive 
terms; was a memlier of the hoard of school trustees for more than sixteen 
years, being instrumental in the establishment of the graded school systen; 
and the erecticju of the handsome school building in the southern part of the 
city. 

On June 7, 1S3S. Dr. George Sutton was married to Sarah P'olbre, !o 
which uni(in fi\e children were born, four sons and one daughter, of which 
number only one. Dr. Harle\- H. Sutton, is now li\'ing. At the time of his 
death. Doctor Sutton was a member of the International ]\Iedical Congress, 
the American Medical Association, the Indiana State Medical Association, 
the Dearborn County Medical Society, which he helped to found, and which 
is now one of the foremost in the state ; the American Association for the 
Advancement of Science, the Archaeological Association of Indiana, the Nat- 
ural History Society of Cincinnati and the Natural History Society of Dear- 
born county, being president of the latter, and an honorary member of numer- 
ous societies of similar character. 



AMOS w. snis. 



One of the successful and well-known farmers of ^lanchester township. 
Dearborn county, Indiana, is Amos W. Sims, the subject of this biiography. 

Amos W. Sims was born in the township where he resides, near Hogan 
Hill, on I'ebruary 12, 1S5Q, a son of William and Catherine (Ellis) Sims. 
William Sims was a native of the Emerald Isle, born in County Antrim on 
April 6. 1S29, a son of Robert and Rose ( Mackey) Sims. When a child of 
two years, his parents immigrated to the United States and first located in 
Ohio. The father was a brick mason by trade and upon first coming to this 
country he worked at that occupation. XiDt being satisfied with their li^cation 
in Ohio, they came to Indiana and permanently settled in Manchester town- 
ship, Dearboi'n count}', where he took up farming. His original holdings were 
not large. t)ut he prospered in his undertaking and added to his farm from 
time to time Ipy purchasing adjoining land, so that at the time of his death. 



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at a ripe old age, he was possessed of over two hundred acres of fine farniiny 
land. He continued to work at his trade in addition to niana;::ing liis farm. 
and there are some buildings still standing- in the vicinity of his home which 
bear witness to the care and thoroughness of his work. William Sims grew 
to manhood in this county, and when a youth allended district sclmol Xo. 
lo, of Manchester township. W'hcn quite young he began assisting his 
father with the farm work and as he grew older he also worked under his 
father at his trade, and until the time of his marriage lie was his father's 
helper in whatever he undertook. William Sims was married to Catherine 
Ellis on Mav 9. 1S51, and from that time on followed the trade of brick 
mason until his death on ]March 8, 189S. William was the eldest of a family 
of nine children, the others being Andrew, James, John, Robert, I'^rank, Rose 
(Mrs. MclNlullen). Jane (Mrs. Morton), and Mary, of Kansas City, Missouri. 

Catherine Ellis was a daughter of David Ellis and wife, and was born 
in Manchester township, this county, where her parents were among tl;e 
early settlers. She was educated in the early schools near her home and 
remained under the parental roof until the time of her marriage. Her death 
occurred in 1895. 

Amos W. Sims is one of a family of twelve children, being the second 
child in order of birth. INlary ( ]Mrs. ]\Iorton) is the eldest. The others are, 
Alelvina ( ?ilrs. Hall), Jolin, IMattie ( 3.1rs, Wilson), William 0., and si.x 
who died in infancy. Amos W. Sims attended the same district school to 
which his father had gone in the earl\- days of the county and still known as 
district No. 10. After his school days were over, he worked iov his father 
a part of the time and at other times hired out by the month to farmers in the 
neighborhood. After liis marriage, he rented the farm where he now li\es 
and remained there for two years, moving from there to Wrights Corner. 
where he rented a farm of one hundred and ten acres and remained five years. 
He succeeded well in his work and l>y that time was able to purchase the farr.i 
where he has since lived and) which at that time was owned by his father-iiv 
law, William D. FIuls. 

On February 4, 1891, Amos W. Sims was united in marriage with 
Eva Huls, daughter of William D. and Aurilla (Greene) Huls. both of 
whom are descended from old families in this section, and living in Man- 
chester to\Vnship at the time of Eva's birth. Eva received her education 
in the same school Amos W. Sinrs attended and remained at home until the 
time of her marriage. From early girlhood she has been a faithful member 
of the Baptist churcli and has continuously had charge of a class in the Simday 
school ever since. 



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5S8 DEARBORN COUNTY^ INDIANA. 

William ] ). Huls, father of Mrs. Sims, was born in Hamilton count}-, 
Ohio, on May 26, 1S21, and came to ^lanchcster townslii]^, this county, with 
his parents in 1,828, during- the early pioneer days of this section, and many 
hardships and privations fell to their lot in the new homo. He received his 
education in tlie early subscription schools of pioneer times and worked wit!i 
the father, assisting him in clearing the land and getting it ready for culti- 
vation. He was married on December 24, 1S43, to Aurilla Greene ami brought 
his bride to his father's house. There they continued to reside and at tlie 
time of the father's death, took charge of the farm and continued to manage 
it during the remainder of his life. William D. Huls died on October 35, 
1893. Aurilla Greene, his wife, was born on February 18, 1829, near where 
the town of Manchester, Indiana, now is, and continued to reside there until 
the time of her marriage to \A'illiam D. Huls. She was the mother of eight 
children, the youngest being Eva, wife of the immediate subject of this sketch. 
The others are: Laura (deceased), who was Mrs. Bratten ; Henry, residing 
in California; Emmalissa (deceased), who was ^Irs. MclMullen; Emral, of 
Cincinnati ; Sarah, deceased ; ^larius and Plubius, twins, the former deceased 
and the latter oi Cincinnati. 

Williani D. Huls was a son of William D. Huls, Sr., and Fathia Smith, 
his wife. \\'hcn the senior Williani Huls came here in the year 1828 he 
secured a tract of one hundred and sixty acres of government land in ]\Ian- 
chester townsln'p, for which he paid one dollar and twenty-five cents per acre. 
He was able to clear part of this and tilled the land so prepared for cultivation 
until the latter years of his life, when his son took charge of the farm. Will- 
iam Huls, Sr., died about 1859, and was the first- person laid to rest in Hogan 
Hill cemetery. Fathia (Smith) Huls came from Ohio to this section with 
her husband in 1S28 and proved a most faithful and helpful wife to hiui 
throughout the years which were filled with heavy burdens for her in rearing 
and raising her family in a new territory. She was the mother of five chil- 
dren: Pamelia (Mrs. Riggle). James, Edmond, William D., Jr., and Henry. 
Henry was preparing himself for the ministry and had been licensed to preach 
in what is known now as the Hogan Hill Baptist church, but died at tlie 
early age of t\venty-one years, before taking charge of the work. 

Amos \A'. Sims is known as one of the leading farmers of his community 
and throughout the years of his life in this section he has ahvays been ac- 
corded the respect of those who know him. Honest and sincere in all he 
undertakes, he is eminently entitled to the esteem in which he is held. He is 
a faithful member of the Baptist church and in accordance with his convictions 



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DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 589 

on the liquor question he votes the Prohibition ticket. He is a man of sterhng 
character, one who gives an air of substantiahty to any community and he 
gladly renders any service which count~^ for the betlerment of any j^hase of 
the life of the section in which he dwells. 



HENRY H. ELLTNGHAUSEN. 

A beautiful country home is one of the most pleasing sights upon which 
the eye could possiblv rest in a day's tra^•el through the rural district, and the 
residence of Henry H. Ellinghausen is one that not only presents an attractive 
exterior, but it suggests that the interior receives the same care and attention, 
and gives a general impression of peace, quiet and happiness beneath its roof. 

Henry H. Ellinghausen is a son of Henry and Sophia (Schrader) Elling- 
hausen, and was born on April 13, i860, in jNIanchester township. Here he 
received a good public school education. Before his marriage he bought out 
the other heirs of his father's estate of one hundred and sixty acres of land, 
and through good management, he continued to add to this tract, until he 
now owns about five hundred and eighty-five acres, a possession upon which 
any man might look with pride. Mr. Ellinghausen devotes his time and at- 
tention to general farming and stock-raising, in addition to which he conducts 
a good-paying dairy business. He believes strongly in the Democratic poli- 
cies, and has sensed as superintendent of the Dearborn county poor farm for 
the past ten years, and is also one of the directors of the Kyle Creamery 
Company. During the years when toll roads were owned in this locality, "Mr. 
Ellinghausen was president and director' of the Manchester Turnpike Com- 
pany. 

Henry Ellinghausen, Sr.. was born in 181 7, in Germany, where he at- 
tended school, and grew to young manhood, and served for a short time vr, I 
the German army. When twenty-three years of age he came to the United ; 
States with his parents, landing at Baltimore, and coming directly to Dear- j 
born county. They settled in I^Ianchester township, bu\ing forty acres oi 1 
timber land, where a place had to be cleared before they could build a log j 
cabin. Mr. Ellinghausen soon united his fortunes "for better or for worse" j 
with those of Sophia Schrader, and immediatelv set up a new housekeeping 1 
establishment in the new log cabin, which he had helped to build. After ; 
finding this farm too small for his requirements, I\Ir. Ellinghausen sold out. | 



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500 • DEAUr.ORN' COL'XTV, IXDIANA. 

and bou,i4"lit a tract of one hundred and fifteen acres, and in 1864 again sold 
and HKived to K\le. Indiana, where lie bun.i^ht (me luindred and sixty acTes, 
which he euUiwited until his death, which occurred on Decemljer 18, 1875. 
He was a Iwyal Democrat and a member of tlie Lutheran chiu'cli, of uhicli 
lie was one of its official l^oard members. His wife, Sophia Schrader, was also 
a native of Germany, where she received her education, coming to America 
with her parents a short time before her marriage. Mr. and ]\irs. lillinghausen 
were the parents of the following children : Albert, Sophia, ]\Iary (deceased), 
Henry H.. and Alartha. 

Henry tl. Fdlinghausen was married April 13, 1898, to ^lar}' Fillenworih, 
who was born in 1864, in Manchester townsliip, and whose death occurrk-d 
on July 2, 1912. She was a daughter of Jacob and Catharine Fillenw<jrth. 
This union has been blessed with one child, Selah, who is now a student at 
Kyle. Indiana. They also have an adopted child, Elsie ElHnghausen, whian 
they took into their home while she was very young.. She is now the wife 
of Julius Lange, a farmer in Manchester township, to whom she was married 
on December 24. 1914. 

Jacob and Catharine Fillenwortli, parents of Mrs. Ellinghatisen, were 
of good pioneer stock in this section, where they built a good foundation 
for the futvn-e welfare of their descendants. 



CLAUDE D. GRFEXHA^L 

Claude D. Greenham, son of Sebastian and Mary (Barrows) Green- 
ham, was born in Manchester township, .April 11, 1875, where he was reared 
and educated. After his marriage, he established himself on a fifty-six-acre 
tract at Holnian Ridge, in Manchester township, which he had previously 
purchased, and which he cultivated in connection with one hundred and 
twent}'-se\'cn acres belonging to James Murdock. In 1914 Mr. Greenham 
added to his possessions by the purchase of a six-acre tract, containing a good 
house and barn. He is a Democrat in politics, a member of the Christian 
Union church, and his fraternal interests are with the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. 

For the history of Sebastian and Mary (Barrows) Greenham, parents 
of Claude D.. the reader is referred to the sketch of Edward Greenham, pre- 
sented elsewhere in this volume. 



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DEARIIORN COUNTY. IXIUAXA. 591 

Claude D. Grccnham was married on February j^. 1901, to Xellie 
Russell, daughter of William aud Jane (Walker) Russell. She was l)iirn in 
.Manchester township, where she was educated. Mrs. Greenham was left .an 
orphan at the tender age of five years, when she went tn li\e with an aunt 
in Kansas, and two years later was adopted by James and .\nna Murdink, of 
Manchester townshiji, with wlixm she li\-ed until her marriage. INlrs. Green- 
ham is a direct descendant nf the I'.all faniil}', who came to .\merica in llie 
"Mavflower." Mr. and ]Mrs. Greenham have had two cliiUlren, Ruth l-diza- 
belh and Irma Mildred. 

William Russell, father of Airs. Greenham, was born on December 2-^, 
1846, in Manchester township, where he attended the public schools, lie 
was married on May 19, 1S69, to Jane Walker, and immediately went to 
housekeeping on a farm ])re\iously purchased, and after cultivating the same 
for several years he disposed of it and bought another place near Cold 
S])rings. Indiana. Remaining here a few years he again sold out and ninxed 
his family to Illinois, where he bought a farm wdiich he cidtivated until his 
death. August 2j. 1903. Mr. Russell was a Democrat. He was a member 
of the Presbyterian church. Air. Russell was allied with the Masonic ijrdei'. in 
which he was a past master. His wife, Jane (Walker) Russell, was a daugh- 
ter of Alexander and Elizabeth ( Turner) \\'alker. She was born in Sparta 
township, and remained at home until her marriage. To Mr. and Airs. 
Russell were born four children, Robert, Xellie, Mary, who died aged eighteen 
months, and \\'illiam, also deceased. Robert Russell and his wife, Sarah 
(\''incent) Russell, reside on a fruit plantation in .Arkansas, of which he is 
overseer. They ha\'e four children, Ivan, bloyd, Paul and X(jel. 

Mr. Russel! could trace his lineage back to General Russell, who fought 
under William of Orange. 



EDWARD COOPER, D. V. S. 



There are individual- in nearly every community who, by reason of pro- 
nounced ability and force of character, rise abo\-e the heads of their fellows 
and command the esteem of their fellow men. Characterized by perseverance 
and a directing spirit, two virtues that never fail, such men always make 
their presence felt and the vigor of their strong personality serves as a stimulus 
to the yoimg and rising generation. To this energetic and enterprising class 



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592 DEARBORN* COUNTY, IXDIAXA. 

the subject of this review properly beiong-s. Having- never been seized with 
the roaming- desire that has led many of Dearborn county's best voung men 
to other fields of endeavor and other states, Doctor Cooper has devoted his 
energies to enterprises at home and that he has succeeded well is proven bv 
his present position in the business life of Dearborn county. 

Edward Cooper was born in JNIiller township, Dearborn county, Indiana, 
May 31, 1S63, a son of John and Ruth Ann (Darling) Cooper. John Cooper 
was a native of England, having first seen the light of day in Lincolnshire, 
January 18. 1S14. He received a good education in his native land and 
worked for his father on the family homestead until 1832, when, together 
with a sister, he inimigrated to the I'nited States. They landed in New 
York, wliere they resideil for some time and where John learned the cooper's 
trade. He worked at that in New ^'ork City for a few years and then came 
westward, locating at Cheviot, Ohio. At that point he secured employment 
on a large stock farm, and being somewhat versed in the care of live stock. 
he soon became manager of the establishment and remained there for several 
years. He purchased in that locality a tract of land, which is now the presei'.t 
site of a portion of the city of Cincinnati. While living there he married 
and became the father of two children, later losing his entire family through 
death. He then disposed of his holdings at Cheviot and came to this state, 
locating in Ripley county, where he purchased a farm of eighty acres. He 
lived there but a short time and remo\-ed to Miller township, this county, 
where he was joined in marriage with Ruth Ann Darliiig, January i, 1845. 

Shortly after his marriage John Cooper purchased a farm of one hundred 
acres from his father-in-law. He farmed this tract and raised some li-\e 
stock and in addition to those duties he kept tavern for traveling stock men, 
and often kept in his pens and field's over night thousands of various heads 
of cattle. In those days there was no shipping by railroad as is now done, 
and all stock intended for Cincinnati market and points farther down the river 
had to be driven to their destination. Often great distances were covered 
in this way. and a place which offered shelter and protection for both man 
and beast was n-iuch prized and well patronized. In this way John Cooper 
formed an extremely wide acquaintance and was probably as well or better 
known than any other man in this section. To his original farm of one 
hundred acres he added an additional fifty-six acres on the east and later 
another fifty acres on the north. Here he lived at the time of his death, Jan- 
uary 6, 1903. , 

Ruth Ann Darling, who became the wife of John Cooper, was a native 



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DEARBORN' COUXTY, INDIANA. ■ ' . 593 

of this county, born on September 9, 1825. She received her education in 
llie early subscription schools of the county and remained with her parenis 
until the time of her marriage. To her were born nine children, as follow: 
William, the eldest, was born on May 14, 1S45, and is now a farmer near 
Oxford, this state. His wife before her marriage was Isabelle AlclNIullen and 
to them has been born a family of four children, Grace, Herbert, Laura and 
Pauline. Thomas was born on May 22, 1S47, and lives near Boswell, Ben- 
ton county, this state, \\'herc he is engaged in general farming and stock- 
raising business. His wife was Sallie Hazleby, and they are the parents of 
seven children. Charles, William, Etta, Walter, Flora, Artliur and Edith. 
Sarah was born in 1849 and now lives at Robinson, Illinois. Jairies R. was 
born on October 12, 1851, and is located in Bell county, Texas, where he 
is engaged in agriculture. His wife was Ella Blasdell and they have a family 
of ten cliildren, Carrie, Ora, Sadie, Florence, Blanche, James ; and four de- 
ceased, Fannie, John. Scott and an infant. John W. was born on October 
27. 1853, and married Ella Jackson. He also lives in Benton county, where 
he is engaged in farming and is the father of four children. The eldest, 
Edna, is dead, and those living are Ethel, Floyd and Pearl. ^lalthew was 
born on December 13. 1855, and married for his first wife Jennie Hayes, 
who bore him one daughter, Bessie. After her death he married Adeline 
Courtney and by that marriage he has a son, Bert. Matthew is a general 
stock farmer in Benton count}', this state, and is also known as the owner 
of a good line of race horses. David, who was born on January 13, 1857, 
died when young, on ]\Iarch 22, 1865. The next in the family is Edward, 
the immediate subject of this sketch, born on May 31, 1863. Lucy is the 
widow of Frank Bodine and the mother of three children, Bern, Harry and 
Darrell. Harr^-, the youngest of the family, born on May 19, 1871, also 
resides at Boswell, Benton county, where he is in the butcher business. He 
married Mary Myers and has two children, Lelia and Flelen. 

When a boy, Edward Cooper attended the common schools of his home 
district and aided his father in the work of the farm and tavern until the 
time of his marriage to Mildred Boswell, December 16, 1885. They were 
married at Parish Grove, Benton county, this state, and for four years they 
rented and farmed a tract of one hundred and twenty acres. They then sold 
out their belongings and moved to Manchester, this state, purchasing seventy- 
si.x acres of land there in 1890. He was engaged in general farming for 
a few years and then began specializing in the horse and stock business. 
About 1905 he added to his original tract of land, buving seventv-two acres 

(38) 






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594 DKAKBORX COUXTV, IXDIAXA. . - 

(in the north, and from thai time to 1909 he practiced as a non-g^raduaie 
veterinary physician. On Scpteniljer 20, 1909, he entered the Indiana \'ete! i- 
nar_\' College, at Indianapolis, and took the complete course, being graduated 
from that institution on April 12, 1912, and since that time he has practiced 
his profession in additii^n to managing the work of his farm. 

Doctor Cooper is uniformly successful in treating his dumb patient;, 
having a natural understanding of and aptitude for handling those of tb.c 
equine race. He has se\'eral fine stallions in his stables, among them being 
a Shire stallion. No. 10306, atul "Kappa," Xo. 77044, the latter being a pure- 
breed Percheron. He also owns "Little Dan," one of the best road horses 
ever owned in this count}-, and in previous }-ears has owned man}- stallions 
equally as good as those now occupying his stalls. 

Mrs. Cooper was born in Parish Grove, this state, on February 4, 1-^65, 
and being orphaned when a child, she made her home with her uaicle. IleiT}- 
Robertson, until the tim.e of her marriage. Doctor and ^Nlrs. Cooper ha^■e 
two sons, .Ernest and Roy, both at home. 

Doctor Cooper is a man of decided con\-ictions on all the questioiis of 
"the da}- and gives earnest support to all movements ha\-iug as their ultimate 
object the betterment of \he social, moral, educational or material life of the 
community. The result is that he enjijys in a large measure the sincere regard 
and esteem of a wide circle of friends and acquaintances throughout th.e 
county. 

His religious membership he holds with the ^lethodist Episcopal church, 
to which he gives liberall}- of his means, and his fraternal affiliation is held 
with the Free and Accepted ^Masons. 



GEORGE F. DIEFEXBAUGH. ;. • 

The foundation for the present prosperity of the Hoosier state was laid 
many years ago by those who cleared the land and made it ready for culti- 
vation, and among these early citizens of the state there was no class which 
contributed more rapidly to the growth and development of the common- 
wealth than those men and women who came here from the German empire. 
The predominating trait of their nation is frugality and this, coupled with 
integrit}- and an honest desire to succeed, played no small part in opening up 
this section to the advance of civilization. Of this excellent class of citizens. 
the immediate subject of this sketch is a worthv descendant. 



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DEARISORN COLW TV, IXDIAXA. 595 

Gcorgu F. Dietenliaugli was hurn in Cincinnati, Ohii.i, June 15, 1S63, 
being a son ol Ailam ami ]^lizal)Cth ( W'endcl ) Dicfenbaugli, being the tb.irJ 
child in their familv oS twelve children. The others arc: William, deceased; 
Anna, now ?ilrs. Amni ; Henry, of Xebiaska: Kate, was ]\Irs. Link, now- 
deceased; Elizabeth, now Mrs. Adams; John, of Ohio; Martha, nnw .Mrs. 
b'.ode; Ed., of Milan, Rii)le_\- count), this state; John Wdliani, of Cincinnati; 
and two who died in infanc}'. 

Adam Diefenbaugh was born in Germany in 1S32, and when a child of 
two years was brought to this country by his parents. The voyage was 
made in a sail boat, many weeks being consumed in the passage, and the 
family finally touched the shores of the new land at Xew Orle:ms. They 
h.ad the Hoosier state in mind as their destination, and filling themselves 
out with a team of oxen and a covered wagon, they accotnplished the dis- 
tance between this county and New Orleans entirely in this manner. Upoa 
reaching Lawrenceburg after their arduous journey, they located on a farm 
which thev rented, north of the then small town of Lawrenceburg, and there 
they remained but one year. Their next move was to a farm near Harmon 
Station known now as the i'ligel place, and there the family remained for 
six vears. at which time they came to JManchestcr township and settled per- 
manently on a laim near Hogan creek. Adam Diefenbaugh remained under 
the parental roof until the time of his marriage to EHzabeth Wendel, in 185S, 
and continued to work on the homestead with the father until the time of 
the latter's death in 1S71, when he took complete charge of the farm of 
eighty acres, buying out the interests of the other heirs. There he continued 
for the balance of his life, passing away on April 7, 1894. 

Adam Diefenbaugh held his religious membership in the Lutheran 
church, being an active member of the same. For many years he was a 
member of the official board and did much t(.i advance the cause of the society. 
In politics he was a Democrat, although not devoting much titne to this ques- 
tion, although he was a man who took great interest in all questions which 
affected the welfare of the community in wdiich he had chosen to make his 
home. He was a son of Michael Diefenbaughj w1k> was born in Germany in 
1801, receiving an excellent education in his youth and also serving his time 
in the German army. After returning hnme from the army, he turned his at- 
tention to farming, and remained in his native land until thirty-three years of 
age, at which time he immigrated to tliis countn-. His wife died the year 
after he reached Dearborn county and he ne\er remarried. He first se- 
cured from the government a tract of land containing forty acres and the 






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596 DEARBOKN CO^.^\■TY, IXDIAXA. 

next year secured an addilional forty, for all of which he paid one dullar and 
twenty-five cents per acre. Six years later he added the Fogel place to his 
farm, and continued to farm the entire tract, with the aid of his son Adam, 
until the time of his death. 

Elizabeth (W'endel) Diefenbaugh was born in Germany, in 1833. She 
received a good education in her native land and when fifteen years of age 
was brought to this countr)- by lier parents. They located first in Cincinnati 
and lived in that city for three years, when they decided to try farm life and 
settled in Riplev county, remaining there for the balance of their lives. Eliza- 
I^eth remained with her parents until the time of her marriage to Adam 
Diefenbaugh. 

George F. Diefenbaugh was but an infant when his parents came from 
Cincinnati to ^lanchester township, Dearborn county. He grew to manhood 
here, receiving his education at district school Xo. 11, near his home, and 
remained with the father until 1SS7, when with the desire to see something of 
the country he went to Xebraska. and for one year lived the life of a cowboy. 
Soon after his return home, he was united in marriage with [Marguerite 
Hiller, daughter of John and Dora (Ellingliausen) Hillcr, the ceremony 
being performed on February 21. 1889. ]Mr. Diefenbaugh and his bride set- 
tled on a farm of eightv acres which they rented from Enoch Xowlin. and 
remained there three years. They next rented a farm of three hundred 
and forty acres from F. i\Ie}er and lived there until the house was destro}'ed 
by fire one year later. They next went to York township, where for seven 
years they lived on a farm of one hundred and forty acres owned by Thi^mas 
Emerson. By that time the family homestead was in need of someone to take 
charge of it, and for the next two years Air. Diefenbaugh rented this farm 
from his mother. The place was then purchased by a brother and for auijt'ner 
year Mr. Diefenbaugh continued to be a renter and then purchased the old 
family homestead for his own. This contained eighty acres and after living 
thereon for another six years, subject purchased a farm adjoining- of the 
same size. This makes him one hundred and sixty acres in his homestead. 

Mrs. Diefenbaugh"s parents, John and Dora (Elhnghausen) Hiller. 
were both born in Germany and while they were acquainted in their native 
land, their marriage did nijt take place until they were settled in Lawrence- 
burg. He settled first on a tract of land which he rented and farmed for fi\c 
years and thtn purchased the Xowlin farm of one hundred and forty-five 
acres, where bodi he and his wife passed the remainder of their days. Both 
were devout members of the Lutheran church and ^Ir. Hiller served bnth as a 



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DEAKBORN COU.XTV, INDIANA. ■ 597 

deacon and elder for several years. There were eight chiUlren in this famil_y, 
Mrs. Uiefenbaugh being the third in order of birth. Tlu- eldest was Henry, 
who is a fanner living in the state of IMissonri; Albert, who farms in Iowa; 
as do also Fred and George; r^Iary is j\irs. Engelking, and lives in Okla- 
homa; John resides at Tipton, Indiana; and .Anna is ;\Irs. Fonlkc. of Law- 
renceburg township, this county. 

George F. Diefenbaugh is a man of quiet and unassuming disposition, 
genial and friendly in his relations with others, and he has for many years 
enjoyed a wide acquaintance and large prestige throughout the community 
where he lives. In politics he votes the Republican ticket, and holds his reli- 
gious membership with the Lutheran church, being an official member of that 
body. To IMr. and Mrs. Diefenbaugh have been born a family of eight 
children, of whom Albert is the eldest. ?le is located on a farm near Sheldon, 
Illinois. Louis died at the age of sixteen and one-half years. The other 
children, Fred, ^lary, Harry, Arthur, Anna and George, remain at home with 
the parents. 



JAMES ^lURDOCK. 



The decade from 1S40 to 1S50 witnessed the arrival in this countrv of 
many desirable immigrants from the United Kingdom of Great Britain and 
Ireland, who were quick to see the opportunities in this new land and had 
the strength and courage to transform their hopes into realities. Among 
them was James IMurdock, the subject of this biography. 

James Murdock is a son of William and Anna (McGookin) ]\Iurdock, 
and was born on June 2^. 1S36, in Ireland, where he attended school for 
several years. Coming to America with his parents, when but eleven years 
old, in 1847, he completed the course in the country school, and remained 
with his parents on the farm until the time of his marriage, when he com- 
menced housekeeping at Aurora. Indiana, where he was employed in a 
foundrv' about four years. Leaving that place, lie went to Missouri and rented 
a farm, and not liking the climate, he removed in a short time to Sullivan. 
Indiana, where he bought eighty-twii acres of land, and cultivated it for 
fourteen years. Tiring of this location, he sold and moved to Manchester 
township, Dearborn county, where he did general farming until satisfied with 
his accumulation of wealth. He rented his farm to Claude Greenham, and 
is living a life of retirement, which he enjoys to the fullest extent. His 









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558 DEAKUORN COUXTV, INDIANA. 

straightforwai'il method of dealing with his fellow men has won the respect 
and confidence of the citizens of the township, and he is a man who has 
always been interested in cjueslions concerning the welfare and benefit of 
the public. ■Mr. .\liu-doek has always jjcen a true Democrat. At present he 
is a director of the Moores Hill State Bank. 

William and Anna (Gookin) Murdock were both natives of Ireland. 
The former was born in 1796, and was educated in the land of his nati\itv. 
After his marriage he cultivated a farm for several years, about tweh-e miles 
from Belfast, Ireland. He brought his family to the I'nited States in 1S47, 
and landed at New Orleans, after a voyage of ten weeks and three da}-?. 
They came up the !Mississi]ipi river and then up the Ohio river to Aurora, 
Indiana, and rented a farm in Sparta to\Miship, where they remained but a 
short time, and then rented sixty acres in Manchester township. Thev lived 
on this place three years, and after a number of later moves, finally settled in 
Sullivan county, jMissoui'i, in 1S56, where he bought sixty acres, on which 
he lived and died a few years later. His wife, Anna (!McGookin) ^vlur- 
dock, lived with her parents until her marriage, and came to America with 
her husband and children, of whom she was the mother of eight, John, George. 
William, James, Isabel, Jane, ^latilda and Jennie. 

John ]^Lurdock died on their \'oyage to the United States, and was 
buried in the Gulf of ]\Iexico; George died on a farm in ^lissouri ; William 
was a school teacher in ^^lissouri, where he also died; James, the subject of 
this sketch : Isabel, the wife of Samuel !McKinstrey, died in ]\Ianchester town- 
ship ; Jane became the second wife of Samuel Steele, of Sullivan coimty, 
Missouri, where she died, leaving twelve children, including four sets of 
twins; ]\Iatilda is the wife of James Bo}dand, and is now living on a farm 
in Sullivan county, Missouri, and they have three children, Samson, .\nna 
and Edna. Jennie, the first wife of Samuel Steele, died in Aurora, in 1S49. 
leaving no children. 

James [Murdoch was married on November 1,3, 1862. to Anna Russell, 
daughter of James A. and Elizabeth (Barclay) Russell. !\Irs. ]\Iurdock was 
a native of Ireland., but came to America with her parents when cjuite \oung, 
remaining with them until lier marriage. 'Mr. au'l Mrs. [Murdoch have ne\er 
been blessed with any children of their own, and longing for childish voices 
to brighten their lonely hours, adopted four children : Samuel [McKinstrey. 
Anna McKinstrey, David Johnston and Nellie Russell. Samuel AIcKinstrey 
died in Colorado at the age of twenty-five; Anna [McKinstrey became the 
wife of Hugh Withered, a farmer in ^lanchester township. They have two 



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DEARBORN COirXTV, IXPIAXA. JQf) 

chilrlrcn, Beiijainiii and Rayinond. David Johnston is a prosperous pli}sieia;i 
at ^loores Hill, Indiana. Xfllic became the wife of Clande Greenham, whose 
sketch is presented elsewhere in this book. 

James A. and Elizabeth (Barclay) Russell, the parents of Mrs. Mur- 
dock. were natives of Irelaiifl, where the former was educated and afterward 
learned the stone mason's trade, which he folh^wed for a number of years 
before coming to America, lie arrived at I'hiladelphia about 1844, and came 
directly to Aurora, Indiana, buying a small farm near Hogan creek, where 
he lived until death called him hence. JMr. Russell continued to follow the 
stone mason's trade in this country, and assisted in building many of the finest 
houses in this section of the county. In politics he was a Democrat, and in 
religion a memlier of the Presbyterian church at Sparta, which church he 
helped to build, and served as its first elder. He died on Alarch i, 1855, 
shortly before the church Avas finished, leaving a widow and eight children. 
His wife, Elizabeth, was a daughter of James and Amelia Barclay. She was 
born and educated in Ireland, and lived with her parents in that country 
until her marriage. This union was blest with eight children, Anna, John, 
Robert, Hilary, William. Hugh, Elizabeth. Sarah J. John Russell went to 
war in the Seventh Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, was taken pris- 
oner and died in Andersonville prison; Robert went to war in the Sixteenth 
Re,giment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and lost his life at Vicksburg. 

After an active and useful life, James ^Nlurdock is justly entitled to the 
peace and quiet which he is now enjoying. 



■ PROF. ROBERT WALLACE LUSK. 

There is perhaps no calling more fraught with potential possibilities for 
the future than that of an instructor of youth. While young children are 
sent to school primarily to secure the rudiments of an education, oftentimes 
the knowledge gained from books is the least part of the training, for a high- 
minded and far-seeing teacher can instill info the tender minds under his care 
the seeds of an honorable ambition which with the unfolding of the life of the 
pupil may expand into a wonderful and far-reaching benefit to humanity. Tb.e 
man whose name heads this sketch, while young in years, is possessed of the 
worthy ambition to so influence the lives of the young under his care as toj 
throw all his influence on the side of the better things of life. 



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600 DEARBOKN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Roliert Wallace Lusk was born in Manchester townsln'p. I^carborn conn 
ty, April 4, 1S89, a son of Luther and Emma (Van Scyoc) Lusk. His father 
was born in Dayton, Kentucky, June 15, i860, and owing- to the death of liis 
mother when he was a small child, Liither was taken into the home of Mrs. 
Phyllis Alexander, of this township, and there carefully reared. He received 
his education in the schools near his home and worked on the farm for ]\Irs. 
Alexander until the time of his marriage to Emma Van Scyoc, February 4, 
1885. After his marriage, he purchased from Mrs. Alexander her farm of one 
hundred and twelve acres, and there he has since lived and reared liis family. 
Luther Lusk is a member of the Universalist church, devoting much time and 
means to the cause of the local society which he serves in an official capa- 
city. In politics he is a stanch supporter of the principles of the Republican 
party and holds his fraternal affiliation with the ancient order of Free and 
Accepted Masons. Emma Van Scyoc, his wife, was born in ]\Lanchester 
township and received her education in the public school near here home. She 
remained with her parents until the time of her marriage to Luther Lusk, 
to whom she has borne two children, Alton G., and Robert Wallace, the 
immediate subject of this sketch. Alton G. married Ethel Davenport,, and is 
a farmer near Soutli Bend, this state. Previous to going there, he taught 
school in this township for four years and has many friends among those 
with whom he labored. He is a member of the Universalist church and also 
of the order of Free and Accepted Masons. 

Robert Wallace Lusk received his elementary education in the schools near 
his home, later attending high school and the Normal College at Danville, 
this state, taking his teacher's training at the same institution. After returning 
to his home he taught one term at district school No. 14, of Manchester town- 
ship, and has now been principal of high school No. 6, at Manchester, for the 
past two terms. 

In Januaiy, 1914, Robert Wallace Lusk was united in marriage with Fern 
Greenliam, and to their union has been born one son, Paul Enloe. Mrs. 
Lusk is a daughter of McClellan and Belle Greenham and was born at Man- 
chester, being one of a family of three children, namely : Pearl, Lela and 
Fern. 

Professor Lusk is a member of the L'niversalist church, as are the other 
members of his family. He holds his fraternal affiliation in the ancient order 
of Free and Accepted ^tlasons, through Burns Lodge No. 55, of which body he 
is serving as secretary at the present time. Professor Lusk is most anxious 
to advance the welfare of his community along all possible lines, and any move- 



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DEARBORX COUNT V, INDIANA. Coi 

meiit having as its ultimate aim the betterment of the social, moral, educational 
or material life of the locality, finds in him a most earnest advocate. He 
has proved himself faithful to e\ery trust imposed in him antl in \-ie\v of his 
accomphshments Avhile still so young- a man, he bids fair to do still greater 
tilings in the future as the years bring greater opportunities and add to him 
their dignity and experience. 



WILLIAM F. BUSSE. 



No class of our adopted citizens has been more successful in America than 
that of German lineage. Their courage and energy have done much to insjiire 
many of our native-born sons and daughters with energy and ambition, with- 
out which progress and success are at a standstill. The skillful maimer in 
which Mr. Busse, whose sketch is here written, has managed and increased 
his splendid farming interests, has established an example which generations to 
come would do well to follo\\-. Simple as it appears to one looking on, it takes 
an expert to make a financial success of farming. Most anyone can make a liv- 
ing, but a man makes a serious mistake in neglecting to see to it that he puts 
enough aside for the proverbial "rainy day," and the subject of this biography 
was one of the few who not only provided for the wet weather, but saw to it 
that even the storms could beat their strength out without materially affect- 
ing his comfort, or give him any concern regarding his financial soundness. 

William F. Busse was one of the wealthiest and most influential farmers 
of Dearborn county. He was born on January 31, 186 1, in ^lanchester town- 
ship, but received his education in Hogan township. His parents were Henry 
C. and Angeline (Ges.sel) Busse. After leaving school he assisted his father 
on the farm until his marriage, when he set up a housekeeping establishment 
of his own in Hogan township, on a ten-acre tract, which he cultivated for 
about nine years, and then bought a more profitable farm of one hundred and 
ninety-six acres in Manchester township. Here he carried on a general farm 
and dairy business, and, about ten years since, he bought the old Busse home- 
stead, which he rented out to a good advantage. Mr. Busse filled several of 
the township offices, ser\-ing faithfully as township trustee for four years. 
He was a Democrat in politics. A firm believer in the religion of Christ, he 
was an attentive member of the Lutheran church, to which he was a liberal 
contributor, and of which he was an official board member. 






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602 DFARP.ORX CDLXTV, IXDIAXA. 

Hemy C. Busse, father of William V., was a native of Prussia, where 
he was born on September 23. 1834, and where he received a g-nod English and \ 

German edncation. He Avas a son of Rev. Cliristian and Durrithea ( Po.iO I 

Bnsse. Mr. Bnsse came to America with his parents, when but nine vears I 

of age, remaining with 'them until his marriage, wlien he bought land and 5 

started farming" on a tract of one hundred and fifty-four acres, in 1861. He 1 

continued to add to his acres until he owned over three hundred, and con- 
tinued to do general farming until a few years prior to his death, when he 
moved to Aurora, Indiana, wlicre he spent his remaining years, dving on 
August 2, 1914. He was a quiet, industrious citizen, and everything about 
his place indicated taste and tln-ift. Mr. Busse and his entire family were 
members of the Lutheran church, of which he filled the office of trustee for 
sixteen years. 

Henry C. Busse was united in marriage, April 27, 1S54, to Miss Anjel- 
ica Gessel, a native of Germany, who was born on March 22, 1833, by whom 
he had nine children, namely: Henry P., born on June 27. 1856; Caroline, 
December 4, 1S58 ; William F., January 31, 1S61 ; John, March 27, 1868; 
Louisa ; Anna. ]\Iay 16. 1870; George; Abalona, June 20. 1S72 ; ^latilda, Janu- 
ary 4. 1S75. Henry P. is a farmer at \\'ilmington, Luliana, and is married 
to Louisa Oehlman, by whom he has had six children. Arena, Frederick, 
Bertha, Henry, Lydia, and Christopher. Caroline is the wife of Henry L 
Meyers, and lives on a farm near Lawrenceburg, Lidiana. She is the mother 
of five children. Henry. Anna. Louis. Echvard and George. John P. mar- 
ried Anna Reinking, who died, leaving three children, Edna. Walter and 
Elizabeth. This family lives in Hogan township, on a farm. Louisa became 
the wife of Theodore Droege. a prosperous grocer, of Aurora, Indiana, and is 
the mother of two children, Sona and August. George was united in marriage 
with ]Mary Reinking, and is doing general farming in Hogan township. 
Only one child has been born to this union, but they have adopted two other 
children. Anna is the wife of John Peters, a farmer, near Aurora, Lidiana, 
and is the mother of one child, Martha. 

The paternal grandfatlier of our subject was Christian Busse, who was 
born on November 11, 1806, in Prussia, and was married in that country. 
December 27, 1826. They came to America in October, 1S44. locating in 
Mancliester township. In i8_i6 he was ordained as a Lutheran EvangelicrJ 
minister, his first pastorate being St. Stephen's church. Manchester town- 
ship, where he preached for twenty-eight years. Llis wife. Dorothv (Poos) 
Busse, was also a native of Prussia, and was born on March 10. 1806. 



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DEARBORN' COUXTV. IXDIAXA. 603 

They were the parents of four children as follow: Doriith}', horn in 1S27, 
and died in 1S31 : Christina. February 24. 1832. died June 24, 1850: Jijhanna, 
now Mrs. Henry En,£;'clk!ng'e, and Henry C. Christian llusse was one of the 
founders of tlie Lutheran church in Deaiborn county. 

William F. Busse \\as married to .\nna Bidner. b\- whom he has had 
eight children, namely: Emma. Ida and Alma, twins, Herman, Edwin, Diiro- 
tln', Miimie and Gusta. Emma is now the wife of Henr\' Rcinking, and lives 
on a farm in [Manchester township; to this couple have been born two chil- 
dren, Evelyn and Esther. Ida lieeame the wife of Walter Renter, a veterinary 
surgeon, and lives in Cincinnati. She is the mother of two girls, Laverne and 
Martha; Alma is married to George P. Steinmetz. a successful lawyer of 
Indianapi ■!i<;, where she lives with her husband and one boy, Orsa George. 
Flennan is at home, assisting his father on the farm. Edwin is working in 
Illinois. Dorothy is also at home. Minnie and Gusta are both attending 
the Manchester township schools. 

Mrs. Busse was born on October iS, i860, in [Manchester township, and 
is a daughter of Peter and Dora (Fillanworth) Bidner. For the genealogi- 
cal record of the Bidner family the reader is referred to the sketch of Peter 
Bidner, presented elsew here in this book. 

Mr. Busse is one of the leading and active citizens of the township, and 
is highly respected by all who know him. 



ADOLPHUS W. BENNETT. ,•;:,, • , 

One of the well-known and prosperous farmers of [Manchester township, 
Dearborn county, is Adolphus W. Bennett, who ably manages the farm on 
which he is comfortabh' situated. 

Adolphus W. Bennett was born on Januar}- 22, 1855. at Wright's Corner, 
Indiana, and is the son of John and Phoebe (Duncan) Bennett. He re- 
ceived a g'ood common-school education in [Manchester township, and be- 
ing interested in the subject of agriculture, took charge of his father's farm. 
After his marriage, [Mr. Bennett commenced housekeeping on the place, in 
order that he might look after the wants of his father, as well as th.e in- 
terests of the farm, which later became his own property. This farm con- 
sisted of fifty acres, to which Mr. Bennett has since added thirty acres nv>vc, 
and has done a general farming and stock-raising business, in which he 



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fj04 DEARBOUX COl'NTV, INDIAMA. 

lias been rewarded with more tlian ordinary success. He is a stanch Repuhli- 

can, although lie has never sought public office. Plis religious views are Avilh | 

the l"'ree Baptist church. ]^Ir. I'ennctt is a member of the Free and Accepted 2 

Masons, and was master of [Manchester Lodge No. 503, for three years, and is I 

now serving his third term as worshipful master of Burns Lodge Xo. 55. '? 

John Bennett, father of our subject, was born on September 30, 1S23, in | 

W'arren county, Ohio, where he received a good public-school education. | 

He was married to Phoebe Duncan, October 25, 1848, shortly after coming to | 

Dearborn county. She was born on October 25, 1823, in Manchester town- 1 

ship, and met her husband while on a visit to Ohio. Mr. and Airs. Bennett 1 

started to housekeeping" on a rented farm consisting of forty acres, and in tuo | 

years' time were enabled to buy a place of their own. They located at Wright's 1 

Corner, where [Sir. Bennett opened a slioe store, which he conducted, in addi- | 

tion to liis farm, a fifty-acre tract, between which he di\'ided his time and at- | 

tention until his death, which occurred on March 25, 1893. Mr. Bennett was i 

a strong believer in the Republican policies, and was a member of the Free | 

Baptist church, of which he was a deacon for several years prior to his death. I 

Mrs. John Bennett was a daughter of William and Phoebe Duncan, pioneers | 

of this section. She died on September 3, 1901. Their children were: Adol- | 

piius, Hattie, who died in 18S7, and five who died in infancy. j 

Adolphus W. Bennett was married on December 10. 18S9, to Luella | 

Darling, who was born in Dearborn county, where she was educated, and j 
where she lived until her marriage. 3.1r. and Mrs. Bennett have had two 
children, Roy and Ivan, both of wb.om are at home. Mr. Bennett has al- 
ways been a devoted husband, and a kind and considerate parent, and has the 
respect of all who know him. 



JOHN C. HALL. 



The subject of this biography is a man in whom the citizens of his town- 
ship have the utmost confidence. He is descended from good old pioneer stock, 
whose children and grandchildren continue to make their homes where the 
first log cabins were built in the days when deer, wild turkey and prairie 
chicken were plentiful in this county. 

John C. Hall is a son of Joseph and Ann (Collier) Hall, and was born 
on January 13, 1848, at Cincinnati, where he started his education. His 



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DEARBORN' COUNTY, IXDIAXA. 605 

parents moved to ^lan(■he^te^ township, where lie continued at school until his 
education was finished. Immediately after his inarri;i,qe, Mr. llaU hei^an ihe 
Hfe of a farmer on a sixty-acre tract, whicli was only partially cleared, hut 
in a short time he had the entire place in a tillable condition and cultivated it 
for twenty-six years, when he was appointed to the office of superintendent of 
the Dearborn county poor farm, sei"ving- in this capacity for three years, and 
then left it in charg'e of his eldest son. jVftcr giving up the supen'ision of the 
poor farm, Mr. Hall secured possession of his father's old homestead, buy- 
ing out the interest of the other heirs, since which time he has been a general 
farmer. ]Mr. Hall has always been an acti\e, energetic man, and has de\T)ted 
a portion of his time and talent to handling stock, which has always brought 
him a good living outside of his farming interest. In politics, he is a loyal 
Republican. 

Joseph Hall was born in 1823, in Dearborn county, \vhere he attended 
school and received as good an education as the facilities afforded in those 
days. Shortly before his marriage, Mr. Hall purchased an interest in a furni- 
ture store in Cincinnati, in -which he was very successful for about fifteen 
years, when he disp<jsed of his interest and niox'ed to Manchester township, m 
1861. Here, he invested in a tract of land, coxxn'ing two hundred and forty 
acres, a portion of which was in timber, but he set to work and soon had 
enough cleared for his needs, and then improved the place with good build- 
ings and did general farming for many years. Seeing a good opening, he 
left his son in charge of his farm, and went into the grocer}- business in 
Lawrenceburg, following this until his death, which occurred on December 
21, 1881. Mr. Hall's wife, Ann (Collier) Hall, was born near Tanner'? 
creek. She was educated in the town.ship schools and remained at home un- 
til her marriage. Their family consisted of eight children, John C, Albert 
R., Elizabeth Emily, William H., Annie J., Mary F., Clara L., and 01i\er Al. 
William H. is married to Elvira Dunn, and is doing general farming at 
Muncie, Indiana. They have three children, Freeland A., Mary, and Ray- 
mond. Mary F. is the wife of Thomas Vaughn, and lives on a farm in 
Manchester township. They have had one child, Ethel. Albert R. was 
united in marriage with Alice Elliot, and moved to Kansas, where he is d"- 
ing general farming. They have three children, Blanche, Nora and ]\Iar- 
garet, Anna J. is the wife of I-ee Elliot, and lives on a farm in Manchester 
township. She is the mother of one child. Alma. Oliver M. was married to 
Ella Martin. He di\'ides his time between the practice of law and stock- 
raising, in Idaho. To this couple have been Wjtu three chiWren, Carl, Mildred 
and Harold. 



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6o6 DHAKEORX COTXTV, INDIANA. 

Tlic pntcrnal grandfalhcr of John C. Hall was Joseph Hall. Sr., who 
came with his family from Ohio to [Manchester township at a very early date, 
and lived here long crioitg-h to see its forests disappear to make nxmi for the 
more profitable ptirsuits of agriculture. His wife was l*'annie Hall. 

John C. Hall was married on l"ebruar\" ii. 1869, to Alary L. Collier, 
daughter of Ralph and 'Slv.ry D. Collier. She was born on June 9. 1848, in 
jManchester township, where she rccei\-ed a good education in th.e public 
schools. They have had three children, as follow: Herbert C. who died in 
1906; Edgar A. and Edith L. Herbert C. was a general farmer, in connection 
with which he also conducted quite an extensive business in lumber. His wife 
was Kate Jolly. They have two children, Delores B. and Theron D. Edgar 
was married to Blanche Kelly, and is assisting his father on the home place. 
The)' have one child, Vera F. Edith L. is the wife of T. J. Alartin, a veteri- 
nary surgeon, and lives at Aurora, Indiana. They have one child, Cra^'ton J. 
Ralph Collier, father of Airs. Hall, was born in Pittsburgh. Pennsylvania. 
October 7. 1S19, and is of English lineage. His parents were John and Jane 
(Hodgson)' Collier, and he v.as an infant when his parents came to Dearborn 
count}-, where he was reared and where he enjoyed the best educational ad- 
vantages afforded ir: those days. Finishing school, he began teaching under 
the old regime when subscription schools were in vogiie. Flis wife. Alary, 
was a daughter of Reuben and Betsey L. (Goodwin) True, to whom he was 
married on October 8, 1S40, when he began farming on a tract of one hun- 
dred acres of excellent, well-improved land. Their family consisted of ten 
children, as follow: George G., who moved to Missouri: Jr)hn T., Williaui 
G., R. Frank. S. P. Chase, Clara J., Mary L., Sebra E., Harriet B. S. and 
Susie E. Ralph Collier was a Republican, and a member of the Alethodist 
Protestant church, with which he was connected about forty years. 

The paternal grandfather of Airs. Hall was John Collier, a native of 
England, born in 1775 and was the only son of John Collier, who lived and 
died in England. In 1817, while still single, he visited America on a pros- 
pecting tour, returning home the same year. In 1819 he was married to 
Jane Hodgson, and accompanied by two sisters. Airs. Ann Flansell and Airs. 
Jane Cornforth, again crossed the water, and came to Dearborn county. Air. 
Collier died at his home on Tanners creek, in 184S. aged seventy-two years. 
His wife died in 1S58, in h.er seventy-first year. They had two children. 

The position occupied by Air. Hall is an evidence of his character and 
popularit}- as a reprcsentati\e citizen — a truly good man. 



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DEARllORX COrXTY. IXDIAXA. , 607 

ELIJAH FULLER. '■ ' ' ■ .. „, / :; , , = , .,. 

The SUCCC--S of a mar. in anv \-ocatiiin in life 'Icpends ui)iin the force of 
character, and the business confidence which he is able in send forUi. yh. 
I'uller. wdiose name heads this sketch, heheved that liis native state affnr<le'l 
liim ab many opportunities as could be found elsewhere, and with that th.ou;:;ht 
in \ iew he set to ^vork with the determination of carving- for himself a future 
and a fortune, and has ahva}'s l)een alive to his business interests, neglecting- 
U'lthing- of importance, keeping always \\-ell within the lines of straightforward 
methods. 

Elijah Fuller, farmer, Sparta township. Dearborn county, was born on 
Xuvember lo, 1835, a son of Elijah Fuller, Sr., and Azubah (Gloyd) Indler. 
Ho was educated in the common schools of Sparta townshif*, where he v/as 
horn. After leaving school, he assisted his father in agriadtural pursuit^, 
and when his father died, he took over the farm, running it entirely alone. 
Mr. Fuller has always given his luyal support to the Republican party. Fie is 
a member of the FVeslnterian c!uu-ch. IMr. Fuller has alwa^'s been greatly 
interested in all n-)atters con.cerning the welfare and ad\ancment of his town- 
ship. 

Elijah F'uller, Sr., was a- farmer, and was born on ]\Iay ic), 1783, in the 
stale of Xew York. Flis wife, Azubah (Gloyd) Fuller, was born on Decem- 
ber II, 179S. Their marriage took place on June 15, 1823, in Dearborn 
county. ]\Irs. Fuller was a native of ^lassachussetts. ]Mr. F'uller came to 
Dearborn county, where he followed agriculture and engaged in saw-millin.g. 
He later bought a boat-load of corn and took it to New Orleans, but the 
trip proved an utter failure, necessitating his return withrmt a cent. He after- 
wards saved enough to make a new start, and b.uilt the first saw-mill in 
Sparta township, which was run by water-power, and later built two n-iore, 
on Hogan creek, which he sold, and then bought a fine tract of one hundred 
and sixty acres of timber land on the hill, which he cleared and farmed nntil 
his death, which occurred on August 8, 1858. Mr. Fuller was a W'lug. He 
was a member of the old South Sparta Free Will P.aptist church, whicli he and 
Mr. Oathiiudt built, ?ilr. Fuller practically keeping up the church. His \vife, 
Azubah (Gloyd) I'uller, was a daughter of Asa Gloyd, and lived in ?vlassa- 
chussetts until twent}--three 3'ears of age. coming o^-erland with her parents 
until they reached the Ohio river, and cnue down the river ivom Pittsburgh 
to Cincinnati b}- boat. To this union were bon-i six children. An-ianda, Eliza, 
Truman. ]vlartha, Emily and Elijah. Mv. Fuller had one child. Sarah, by his 
first wife. 



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6o8 DEARBORX COXXTV, IXDIAXA. 

Amanfl;i I'\il!er liccame the wife of Frederiek Snyder, and li\ed in Sparta 
township. They Iiad cme child, who died young. Ehza i.s the wife of lleiija- 
min Hartley, and lived at Moores Hill. They had one child, Frank, who died 
in the army of the Civil War. Martha became the wife of James Daughters, 
and lived in Sparta township. Their one child died in infancy. Emily mar- 
ried John M. I.arahee, and lives in Jennings eoimtw !Mr. Larabee is nrivi" 
deceased. He was a soldier in the Civil War. Thev had three children, Wal- 
lace, Minnie and Hugh. 

Asa Gloyd. the maternal grandfather, was a Revolutionarv soldier. in a 
Massachussells regiment. He came we5.t witli his family and died in Dearborn 
county, when quite old. He had a large farnily of children, Xoalt, Turner, 
Sara (Williamson), Nancy, Xaomi, Abigail, and others. Xoah married a 
Aliss Johnson, bv whom he had a number of children, John, Benjanrin, Will- 
iam, James, and Jane. Sara became the w^ife of Da^•^d Williamson, and is now 
(Jeceased. Mr. \\'^illiamson was again married and lives south of Dillsboro. 
He has had one child by the second marriage, Sarah, and by his first wife 
he had two children, John and Henry. Nancy was the wife of Rufus Hol- 
comb, and li\-ed in Sparta township, but both are now deceased. They had a 
large famil}', Daniel, Eithel, Euther, Eli, Turner, Rufus. Huldah, Nancy, 
Elizabeth, Evdia Lucinda. and one who died in infancv. Naomi became the 
wife of Elisha Ilrown, and lived in Sparta township. They had two chiMren, 
Man.' and Ezra. Abigail married John .Vilccn, and lived in Sparta township. 
They had one child, Narcissa. 

Elijah Fuller was united in marriage on December 5, 185S. with Mary 
Jane Noble, daughter of Jonathan and Elizabeth (Dashiell) Noble. She was 
born on Seplemljer 23, 183(1, '^^ WMlmington, Dearborn county, Indiana. To 
Mr. and ]\Irs. Fuller were born four children, Ella, John, Elizalieth and 
Anna. Ella was born on August 29, 1S59, and becam.e the wife of George 
Craven. They live in Kansas on a farm, and have four children, Elma, "V'iola, 
Berlin, and Bennett. John was born on April 15, 1S62, and was married to 
Harriet Craven, by whom he has one child, I\or. They reside at }>Iilan, In- 
diana, where Mr. Fuller is engaged in the livery business. Elizabeth was 
born on December 13, 1864, and died on July 13, 1904. Anna was born on 
June 8, 1867, and was married to Benjamin B. ^lulford, on April 19, 1S91. 
Mr. Mulford first attended the common school, and later entered ^loores 
Hill College. They lived on a farm at Cold Springs for several years, and 
then mo\-ed to Norwood, Ohio, where he became paymaster of the Globe- 
Wernicke Company, returning later to the old homestead. They have two 



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DEARBORX COUXTV, INDIANA. • 609 

ctiiiJrcii, Clarence E., and Idclle. ]\Ir. Mullord is a Democrat. He is a niem- 
lier of the Presbyterian church. He belongs to the Independent Order of Odd 
l-'clk>\vs and the Knights of Pythias. 

Elijah Fuller possesses the qualities which not only gain friendship and 
rcs])ect. but hold them after being once gained, and he enjoys the confidence 
and esteem of all who know him. 



MRS. NANCY L. VAN DOLAH. 

Mrs. Nancy (Larrabee) Van Dolah, whose name introduces this sketch, 
is a woman whose biography it is a pleasure to add to those of the many 
other worthy citizens of Sparta to\A-nship. Pier life has been one of exem- 
plary ])rinciples. and she has done well her part in carrying out the duties en- 
tailed upon wifehood and motherhood, and has trained her children to be re- 
spected citizens of the community in which they live. 

Nancy Larrabee was born September 28. 1858, in Ripley county, a daugh- 
ter of Richard D. and Alary C. (Stockwell) Larr.abee. She was educated in 
Ripley cotuity, and after arriving at the age of thirteeen years she earned 
her own living until she was married. 

Richard D. Larrabee was born on Novemljer 24, 1830, in Dcarl^orn 
county, Indiana, li\irig in Ripley county later and now li\ing in NeJjraska. 
His wife, Mary C. (Stock\\ein Larrabee, was born in Ripley county, In- 
diana, in 1837, and lived there all her life. To this union three children were 
born, Nancy L., Maiy A., and one who died in infancy. Aviary A. l)ecame 
the wife of Charles E. Shockley, and lived in Ripley county. 

Nancy Larrabee was united in marriage with James Van Dolah, son of 
James, Sr., and Frances (Hall) Van Dolah. He was torn on January 
23, 1848, at Dillsboro, and was educated in Sparta township, Dearboai 
county, where he was reared ])y Benjamin Alulford. living with him until his 
marriage. He died on November 13. U)04, aged fifty-six years. After his 
marriage, he moved to Delaware, Ripley county, where they lived for two 
years, and then bought forty acres in Sp.irta township, Dearborn county, to 
which he later added fifteen acres more, dividing his attention between general 
farming and fruit raising, being the first successful fruit farmer in the town- 
ship. Politically, 3,Ir. Van Dolah was an independent voter. He was a mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian church, of which he was an elder and one of the 

(39) 



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6lO DEARBORN COL'XTV, IXDIAXA. 

organizers of the church in Sparta township. James and Xancy Van Dolah 
had two children, Mary Frances and Maggie May. Mary Frances became the 
wife of C. B. RawHns, and is living on the old homestead. They ha\'e two 
children, Charles and Alarion Francis, both going to school. Maggie May 
died when young. 

Mrs. Nancy L. Van Dolah is a good Christian woman, and dceplv sym- 
pathizes with those in distress and sickness, and is ever ready to lend a helping 
hand when it is within her power to do so. 



BENJAMIN FRANKLIN BLOO.AI. 

One of this county's experts on the subject of scientific agriculture is 
Benjamin F. Bloom, who was born near Peoria, Illinois, February iS, iS^o. 
He is the son of A. J. and Caroline ( Roof) 151oom, the former of whom w as 
born in Ohio, January i, 1833. x-\. J. Bloom lived in Ohio until his eigh.t- 
eenth year, when he came alone to Indiana, first stopping at Aurora, then 
going on to Hogan township, where he found employment, and from that 
time until his marriage worked by the month in the farming districts. ,\fter 
his marriage to Caroline Roof, in 1857 he removed to Illinois and lived there 
four years, and then returned to this state. He bought forty-nine acres 
in Sparta township. In 1877 he bought seventy-seven acres v/hich com- 
prise the land where he now lives. ]\lr. Bloom, Sr., is a general farmer, a 
Reptiblican, and a member of the INIethodist Episcopal church. 

The mother of the subject of this sketch was born in this county, in 1836, 
and has lived here since. The children of Air. and Airs. A. J. Elo.Mn are 
Benjamin E., Samuel L., Edward and Harvey G. Samuel L. went to Cali- 
fornia to live a number of years ago. Harvey G. married Gertrude Zeise, an. I 
they live in Oxford, Indiana. 

Caroline Roof was the daughter of Samuel and Olimphia (Kazine) 
Roof, the former of whc>m was a farmer and native of Pennsyhania, after- 
wards making his home in Virginia. Olimphia Kazine and her parents came to 
this state at a time when Cincinnati numbered only seven houses and .\urora 
two, and settled in this county. Mr, Kazine has the distinction of having 
helped to build the first road in the center of the county in Sparta township. 
Sarnuel Roof, like many others of his time, responded to the call to arms and 
served throughout the Revolutionary War and served in PIull's army in the 
War of 18 12. 



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DEARBORN COIXTV, IXDIAXA. 6ll 

On Januan,- 4, 18S2, Benjamin ]■". Rlooni was married to Sarah C. I'riteh- 
ard, a native of Hogan township, who was I>orn on September 28, 1S59. Her 
sehooh'ng took place in the cnunty of her nativity. Her father ^\•as Levin 
Pritchard. and her mother Catherine (Glass) Pritchard. Levin Pritchard was 
horn in the state of Delaware, and came to Indiana while still a young man. 
He became a farmer, and this continued to be his occupation the remainder 
of his life. Six children were born to Levin and Catherine (Glass) Pritchard. 
as follow : John S. married Susan Livingston, and lives near Wilmington, 
their only child being a son, Ralph ; Rebecca Ann married John Slater, of 
Sparta township, and her two children are named Ella and Warren ; James 
R. married Ella F. Baker, of this township: Elizabeth married Jasper M. 
Slater, of Lawrenceburg, and to them two children have teen born, Ora M. 
and Clayton J. ; Sarah C. was the fifth child, and the sixth child died in 
infancy- 
Mr. and ]\Irs. Benjamin F. Bloom are the parents of three children, 
namely: Stanley W., born on December 1 1, 18S2, and married to Alma Cham- 
ber, is now farming near \\'ilmington, they have one child, Dorothy Kather- 
ine: Holley, July 9, 18S5; and Irwin Waldo, July 9, 18S9. 

After their marriage. ]\Ir. and Mrs. Bloom lived on a little farm in 
Sparta township, tliis land luu'ing been purchased by them. In 1903. they 
bought two hundred and fifty acres, moved onto the new place, and later added 
fifteen acres to this. 

Mr. Bloom has given his entire time and attention to agricultural ac- 
tivities, and has always been an honorable, industrious man. He is an inde- 
pendent voter, and is a member of the Presbyterian church. Mr. Bloom has 
made many improvements on his present place. He has erected a new barn 
and silo and is contemplating erecting a new residence. 



WILLIAM L. ABRAHAM. ■•:, . '■; . 

Prominent among the prosperous and thriving business men of ]\Ioores 
Hill is William L. Abraham. ]vlr. Abraham has built up a very successful and 
important business, and now owns the best equipped livery and undertaking 
establishment in Sparta township. 

William L. Abraham was born on August 4, 1864, at Dillsboro, Clay 
township, and is a son of Lewis and Elizabeth (Gould) Abraham. He re- 



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6l2 ' IJEARBORX COUNTY, INDIAXA. 

ceived his early education in the public schools, coming- to Sparta township 
when quite young. In 1900 he mo\'ed near Sunman. and in 1904 bought a liv- 
ery and undertaking business from Jesse French which he conducts' in partner- 
ship with W. H. Ulrich, under the firm name of Abraham & Ulrich. Mr. 
Abraham has always given his support to the Democratic party, and his fra- 
ternal membership is with the Masonic Order. 

Lewis Abraham, father of the subject of this sketch, was born in 1826, 
at Dillsboro and lived tlicre until 1866, where he followed the cooper's trade. 
Becoming dissatisfied with tliis line of v.'urk, he bought sixty-five acres of land 
near Moores Hill and li\ed there until 1900, when he moved to Ripley county 
on a farm. He remained there si.x years, and then moved to !Moores Hill, 
where he died in September, 1906. His wife, Elizabeth (Gould) Abraham. 
was born on Januar}- 13, 1835, in Dearborn county, where she was educated 
and grew to young womanhood. She was a daughter of Levi Gould, whose 
wife was a IMiss Keith, natives of Switzerland comity. jMr. Gould was a pio- 
neer preacher of the Free Baptist church. He went overland to California, 
where he died. 

George Abraham, the paternal grandfather, was a native of England, 
and settled in Dearborn county, Indiana, in 1818. He followed farming all his 
life, and lived in Dearborn county until his death. 

William L. Abraham, tlirough his straightforward and business-like meth- 
ods of transacting business, has won the confidence of the community in which 
he lives, which reputation, has resulted in his present prosperous business. 



MRS. ERMIXA C. SMITFI. 

Mrs. Ermina C. Smith, whose name introduces this biographical sketch, 
is a woman of good education and possesses many fine qualities, taking^ great 
pride in her \'irginia ancestry, who came west in pioneer days by oxen team. 
Mrs. Smith has performed well her {>art in the progress of the worUl, and 
reared a fine family of children, who have grown to be citizens of honor in 
the various communities in which they reside. 

Ermina IMcGee was born on March 14, 1842. at Cincinnati, Ohio, and is 
a daughter of William and Margarette ( Wisby) McGee. She was educated in 
the public schools of Cincinnati, and lived there with her parents until licr 
marriage. 

William and Margarette (Wisby) McGee were both born in Virginia. 
The former was born in June, 1800, and after marriage, moved his family by 



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DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 613 

oxen team to Cincinnati, -where he enf:;agcd in the saddlery liusiness for a 
period of forty years, and then Ixiught a farm on the Redchnq- pike, near 
Cincinnnati, where he followed farming'." I.aier he was a building contractor 
until his death, which occurred in 1880, Avhcn he was eighty-nine years of age. 
Pic was a Republican, and to'>k part in affairs of puiilic interest. He served as 
school trustee in Hamilton comity, Ohio, for many years, lie was a member 
of the Universalist church, of which he \\'as an officer. Mr. AIcGee had but 
one brother. John ^NIcGee, who was a brick-mason by trade, and lived in 
Kansas. 

Margarette (W'isby) ]\IcGee, the wife of William McGee, was born in 
1805, in \''irginia, \\diere her parents were i>ioneer settlers. Mr. and IMrs. 
]\IcGee were the parents of eleven children, as follow: JNlary Jane, Semiramis. 
Zcmia, Philamelea, William L., Edwin, Ermina C., Minerva H., Francis M., 
Walter Scott, and one who died young. Mary became the wife of John 
Rapcr, and had eleven children. Semiramis married William A. Barnes, and 
after his death, married Dr. J. Pettijohn, who also died, and she was mar- 
ried, thirdly, to a Mr. Knapp. Edwin is married and lives in Seattle, Wash- 
ington, and has three children. Francis M., who married Catherine Stout, lives 
at Cincinnati and they have three children. 

Errhina C. McGee was united in marriage on March 14, 1865, with 
Orson Smith, son of Jonathan Anthony and Liicinda (Babcock) Smith. 
He was born in the state of Xew York on October 4, 1837. and came west 
overland, settling near Versailles, Ripley county, Indiana, \vhere he was edu- 
cated. Mr. McGee served as a privatfe in the Civil W^ar from 1861 to 1865, 
and was twice wounded. He bought a farm of eighty acres in Ripley county, 
which he traded for property at Wright's Corner, and again sold and moved 
to Sparta township, living there seventeen years. His next move was to a 
fann near Moores Hill, wiiere he died on ]March 15, 1901, aged si.xty-three 
years. Mr. Smith was a life-long Republican. He was a member of the 
Universalist church, and belonged to the Grand .\rmy of the Republic. After 
his death, Mrs. Smith sold the farm. This union was blessed with five chil- 
dren, namely: Alaude E., Grace E., Phila M., Ethel V.. and one who died in in- 
fancy. }ifaude E. became the wife of Francis A. Cole, a barber, and is now liv- 
ing at Mansfield, Alissouri. They had four children. Hazel, ^Nlerl, Earl, and 
one who died young. Phila M. married Charles M. Givan, a carpenter, and is 
living at Anderson, Indiana. Ethel V. is the wife of W'illiam Steinmctz, and 
resides at Indianapolis, where her husband is in railroad work. Grace E. be- 
came the wife of Irving P. Givan, a son of George M. and Anna ( Jaquith) 



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6l4 DEARBORN COUXTV. IXDIAXA. 

Givan, and this union has been l:)lessecl witli three children: Clyde, bocn on 
IMarch ii, 1S97: Roy, February 2, 1901 ; and Gilbert J., November 30, 1902. 

Jonathan Anthony and Lucinda (Babcock) Smith, father of Orson Smith, 
were natives of New York state, and came west in early pioneer days, settling 
on a farm in Ripley county, where they spent their remaining days, and were 
quite old when they died. Their children were, Washington, Orson, Susan L., 
Simon, and Columbus, who died young. \\'ashington was married to Ellen 
Ludwic, and lives in Illinois. They have three children. Susan L. married 
the Rev. Elisha Caldwell, and lives at Washington. Indiana. Simon mar- 
ried IMartha Helmich, and they have ten children. Elmer, Everet, Howard, 
Luvilla, Orson, Herbert, Eelva, Vivian, and two who died in infancy. 

Mrs. Ermina C. Smith has many friends in Sparta township, and slie is 
interested in all the good works of this commtmitv. 



LLEWELLYN E. DAVIES. 

Llewellyn E. Davies. la\v_\-er, x\urora, Indiana, was born on January 5. 
1SS5, in ^lason county, \\'est Virginia, and is a son of Samuel E. and 
Nellie I. (Wilson) Davies. He has lived at Aurora since he was a small 
lad of seven or eight years. He was graduated from the Aurora high school, 
and then entered the Cincinnati Law School, from which he was graduated 
in 1906, being admitted to the bar during that year. INIr. Davies at once 
began practicing his profession at Aurora ; at first in partnership with William 
S. Llolman, Jr.. under the firm name of 'Holman &- Davies. which arrangement 
was continued from 1906 until 1909, when Mr. Davies formed a new i^arl- 
nership with Frank B. Shutts, which lasted up to January i, 191 1. Since 
that time he has been practicing alone. Mr. Davies is a staunch Republican. 
and is a member of the First Baptist church of Aurora. 

The Rev. Samuel E. Davies. and his wife, Nellie I. (Wilson) Davies. 
parents of the subject of tliis biography, are natives of Virginia and Ohio. 
respectively. Mr. Davies was a graduate of Dennison L'niversity at Gran- 
ville. Ohio, and of Chicago University. He has been a Baptist preacher from 
young manhood, and is at present pastor of the First Baptist church, at 
Brazil, Indiana. Mrs. Davies died in 1S94, aged thirty-four years, leaving 
three children: Llewellyn E., of Aurora; Gladys G., a teacher in the high 
school at Muskogee, Oklahoma: and Larene B., a teacher in the high school 
at Orleans. Indiana. 

The paternal grandfather was Daniel Davies, and his wife was ]Mary 
(Davies) Davies. They were natives of Wales, and were early settlers in 



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DEARBORX COUNTY, INDIANA. 615 

Mason county, West \'irgiiiia, where they died at past middle aj^e, Icaviiii^ 
a good-sized family of children, as follow : Benjamin, Daniel, James, Samuel, 
William, John, Thomas and Mary. 

The history of the maternal grandparents is lost. 

Mr. Davies holds the confidence and respect of the entire community in 
which he practices his profession and makes his home. ' ■ ; . , ,: 



JAMES H. SHUTTS. . ^ . , . . ., 

A list of the representative citizens of Dillsboro, Clay township. Dearborn 
county, Indiana, would be incomplete were there failure to make mention of 
James H. Shutts, one of the older citizens and the immediate subject of this 
sketch. 2\Ir. Shutts deserves special mention owing to the fact that he was one 
of the faithful sons of the Union in the dark days when the integrity of our 
nation was threatened, and was among those who laid his all upon the altar of 
his country's need. 

James H. Shutts is a native of this country, having been born on Decem- 
ber 29, 1843, a son of Minard and Emily (Hinds) Shutts. Minard Shutts 
was a son of Isaac who is thought was born in New York, where he is known 
to have lived for a time at least, and who w'ith his wife and family later became 
pioneers in the wilds of Ohio. In the latter years of his life he came to In- 
diana, where he died at a very advanced age. 

The birthplace of ]\Iinard Shutts is not definitely known. He may have 
been born while the family lived in New York, but it is thought he first saw the 
light of day in Ohio. When a young man he mastered the cooper trade and 
when twenty-four years of age purchased his first farm, a tract of sixty acres, 
located near where Cold Spring station now stands. That land he retained 
for three years, w'hen he sold it and purchased a fanri of sixty-one acres, west 
of Dillsboro, where he passed the remainder of his life. His death occurred 
in 1862, when forty-five years of age. Emily Hinds, mother of the immediate 
subject of this sketch, was born in Ohio and died in Dillsboro when eighty- 
seven years of age. 

James H. Shutts was one of a family of ihree boys, being the eldest. 
The others were William and Isaac. William was one of Uncle Sam's Indian 
fighters in the West during the years when the red man, strongly resenting 
the encroachments of his white brother, caused such terror among the settlers 
on the frontier. William and James were both in the Civil War, James en- 
listing when but seventeen years old in Company F, Thirty-seventh Regi- 



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6l6 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

inent, Indiana ^'oluntec^ Iiitantr}-. He scrx'ed tlirce years and two iriont'n^ and 
during that time was in some of die important engagements of the war. 
among tliem being Stone Ri\'er, ]\esaca. Chickamauga and others. After his 
time of enhstment liad CNpired, he returned to his home and took up tlie coop- 
er's trade, which he mastered and which he foUowed for fully twenty-five 
years. \\'ear_\-ing of his trade, he opened up a grocery store in Dillsboro. which 
he operated for three years, when he retired from the acti\e affairs of life. 

In September, 1865, James H. Shutts was united in marriage with Jane 
Pearson, daughter of Abraham and Sarah (i'erlee) Pearson, of Dearboni 
county. Air. Pear.son, was born on boardship en route from England, when his 
parents were immigrating to this country and ]\Irs. Pearson was born in Dela ■ 
' ware, Ohio, coming to this country when a }-oung woman. 

Mr. Shutts is a member of the Alethodist Episcopal church and is a 
stanch supporter of the Republican party, serving as justice of the peace 
at the present time. He holds his fraternal affiliation with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows and the Grand Army of the Republic through William 
Spear Post, No. 89, at Dillsboro. Mr. and Mrs. Shutts have never had any 
children. , . , . . ■ 



•/" ■ ■ WILLIA?^! H. MEXDELL. ,._.- 

Among the well-known citizens of other counties in the great Iloosier 
state who were born and reared in Dearborn county, Indiana, is William 
H. Mendell, a prosperous business man of Indianapolis, who for more than 
twenty years has conducted a grocery in the capital city of the Hoosier 
state. By both birth and marriage he is connected with two of the substantial 
families of Dearborn county, families which have had a conspicuous part 
in the developments of private enterprise in Dearborn county. Although not 
now a resident of Dearborn county, Mr. and Mrs. Mendell are attached to this 
splendid county by the warmest ties of affection and family home. 

William H. 3.fendell, a native of ^^lanchester township. Dearborn coimty, 
Indiana, was born on March 24, 1871. He is the son of Willard and Martha 
(Stevenson) Mendell, both of whom were born in the Hoosier state, the 
former in Ohio county and the later in Dearborn county. Thoy were married 
in Dearborn county and had as the fruit of their marriage nine children, 
of whom William H. was the fifth of the family. Both of his parents are now 
deceased. Thev were members of the Methodist Episcopal church and Will- 
ard Mendell was identified with the Republican party. He was n carpenter by 
trade. Seven of the Mendell children are still living. 



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DKAKIIORX COUNTY, IXLUAXA. 617 

William 11. Mendel! receix-ed his ed.ucation at Wrights Corner in Dear- 
horn CLiunty, Indiana, near which he remained until iwenty-one years uld. Jnst 
after reaching his majnrity, he went to INIorristnw^i, Inrliana, and there 
in partnership with his hmlher, Joseph A, Alendell. engaged in the grocery 
husincss for six months. From ?\[orristown, Mr. Mendell went to Indianapolis 
and established a grocery at the corner of IMicliigan and We^t Streets, After 
having' engaged in business at this location for eight years, Mr. Mendell sold 
out and in iqoi established a grocery at the corner of California street and 
Indiana avenue. He carries a stock worth approximately twenty-five hundr.Hl 
dollars and for a number of years has enjoyed a large and lucrative patronag-e. 
Mr. Mendell not only carries a complete and up-to-dale line of groceries, Init 
he likewise carries a complete line of meats. 

On September 30. 1900, William H. INIendell was married at Wrights 
Corner, Dearborn county, Indiana, to Ada C. Johnston, a daughter of George 
W^ashington and Mollie (Bainum) Johnston, the former of whom is the 
son of George Johnston, whose liiography appears elsewhere in this volume. 
George W. Johnston is one of the pioneers of Dearborn county, and has been 
engaged in farming and stock raising all liis life. ]\Ir. and ^Irs. George W. 
Johnston now resides on a farm near Aurora, in Dearborn county. 

Mr. and Mrs. William H. IMendell are the parents of two children, Joseph 
Emery and William H., Jr., both of whom live at home with their parents. 
Mr. and Mrs. ]\Iendell are affiliated with the Methodist church. ]\lr. Men- 
dell is a Republican in ])olitics, and a member of the Knights of I'ylhias. The 
Mendells reside at 1802 Schumtann avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana. 



MRS. EMMA SMALL. 



The subject of this biography and her husband were both born in this 
county, and have done well their part in bringing about the present high 
standard of living in this commimity. 

Mrs. Emma Small, wife of Elias Small, deceased, was born on November 
26, 1853, in W'ashington township, near Taber Ridge, and is a ilaughter of 
David D. and Catherine (Clark) Durham. She resides at Wilmington. Hogan 
township. Dearborn county, Indiana, where she and Mr. Small made their 
home for many years. The place is improved with one of the most beautiful 
brick residences in the township, and in addition to which, Mrs. Small owns 
two farms, of V\-hich she is sole manager. 

Of her parents, David D. and Catherine (Clark) Durham, Mrs. Small 



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6l8 DEARBORN COUNTY. INDIANA. 

remembers but little, as she was quite young- at the time nf their death. Her 
father was boni in \'irginia, and her mother in Connecticut, and were among 
the very early settlers of the village of Wilmington, Hogan township. Her 
father was a very fine wood worker, being employed by the Baltimore & Ohio 
Railroad Compan}' as a coach builder, which business he followed for many 
years. 

The grandparents of Mrs. Small were natives of Connecticut, and were 
early settlers in Hogan township, where they were farmers. They had a small 
family of children. 

Emma Durham was married on August 25, 1872, to Elias Small, son of 
Fred. Harrison \\'., and Catherine Small. In his early days Fred. H. W. 
Small operated fruit boats on the Ohio river, and in later life, he followed 
farming in Hogan township until his death. Elias Small -was born on July 
30, 1850, in Hogan township, Dearborn county, where he was educated in 
the common schools. After leaving school he commenced farming, which oc- 
cupation he followed all his life and in which he was veiy successful. He 
was a thrifty and energetic worker and with able co-operation of his wife 
soon accumulated good farm lands. To this union four children were born, 
David, Joseph, Addic and Harry, all now married. Addie, became 
the wife of Ralph Prichard; David is married to Edna Conger; Joseph was 
united in marriage with Katherine Radspinner; Harry married Gertrude 
Abdon and li^'es in Dearborn county. 

Mr. Small died on ;\Iay 20, ic;i2, and his demise was deeply regretted 
by his many friends, among v\'hom he was held in high esteem. 



'■■ JOHN FREDERICK HOMANN. 

Born in Germany, and reared in America. Mr. Homann has blended his 
thrifty German instincts with the progress and push of his adopted country, 
the result of which is a highly satisfactory combination from a business stand- 
point. Prosperity and good fortune have followed his everj' venture. He has 
always been a public-spirited man, taking a deep interest in e\'erything that 
has stood for the best in his home town, and is now rewarded with one of 
its principal offices, that of postmaster, which he is amply qualified to fill. 

John Frederick Homann. postmaster. Cold Springs, Sparta township, 
was born on December 20, 1848, at Flanover, Germany, near Celle, and is a 
son of John Frederick and Fredreeka (Wrede) Homann. He was educated 
in Germanv. and when fourteen vears of age began to learn the shoemaking 



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DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 6lQ 

trade, completing his apprenticeship in 1S70, when he came to America, land- 
ing at New York City on May 7, 1S70, and went direct to Chicago. He re- 
mained there for a short time, and t'.ien made a tour of Illinois, Michigan, Ten- 
nessee, Mississippi and Arkansas, and in the spring of 1S71, settled at Cin- 
cinnati and engaged in the shocmaking trade. In 1875 he came to Cold 
Springs and purchased the general store of Henry Wilkining, which he 
successfully conducted until 1913. Mr. Homann was appointed postmaster of 
Cold Springs, and has held the office for the past thirty-three years. 

John Frederick Homann, Sr., father of our subject, was born in 1826, 
in Hanover, Germany, and his wife, Fredreeka fWrede) Flomann. was also a 
native of Hanover, where they lived all their lives. They were prosperous 
people, owning a large farm. Mr. Homann died in 1875, 'iged fifty-one 
years, and his wife was fifty-five years old when she died, in 1881. They had 
two children, John Frederick, subject of this sketch, and Caroline, who mar- 
ried Henry Jager, and lived in Wensen. Germany. She has one daughter, 
Henrietta, who is also married and living in Germany, the mother of three 
children. John Frederick Homann, Sr.. had two sisters, Caroline and 
Louisa. 

The history of the maternal grandfather is lost. 

John Frederick Homann was united in marriage on August 13, 1874, 
with Emma Schilling, daughter of August and Dorothy ( Ideker) Schilling. 
She was born on August 24, 1855, near Cincinnati. Ohio, and was educated 
in Dearborn county, Indiana, and lived with her parents until her marriage. 
Their children are as follows: John Frederick, George A., Augusta E., Char- 
lotte M. ; and two adopted children, Fay F. and IMarie D. 

John Frederick Homann. the third, w-as married to Alice Harwood. and 
resides at Washington, Indiana, where he is a successful dentist. They have 
two children, Frederick and Virginia. George A. was married to Cora 
Trietch, and is living near Dillsboro on a farm. Thev have three children, 
Arthur F., Charlotte A., and Leonard. Augusta E. became the wife of Rev. 
Theodore Henkel, of the Lutheran church, and resides at Hillards, Ohio. 
They have four children, Paul, Richard, Kurt, and Alfred. Charlotte 'M. is 
the wife of the Rev. William F. Henkel. of the Lutheran church, and is living 
at Ashland, Kentucky. This union has been blessed with two children, Luther 
and Vera. Fay Manleif became the wife of Harry Smith, and resides at Cold 
Springs. They have one daughter, Louise. Marv Richardson is living at 
home. 

August and Dorothy Schilling, parents of Mrs. John Frederick Homann, 



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620 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

were natives of IIano\-cr. Germany. The former was born on Decemljcr 
g, 1825, and the latter on January 5, 1829. Afr. Schillinc;- immigrated to 
.America in 1S40, lanthng' at Xew Orleans, cuniing soon after to Cincinr.ati, 
Ohio. He was married at Delhi, TTamiltcn county, Ohio, June 2t,. 1834, to 
Dorothy Ideker, who came to America with her sisters when a young woman. 
They settled at Delhi, v.herc they followed farming, and later moved to 
Dearborn county, Indiana. They were the parents of five children, Emma, 
August, John, Dora and Henry. Mrs. Schilling died in 1896, aged sixty-thi'ee 
years. Mr. Schilling died in 1S85, aged fifty-nine years. 

Mr. and Airs. Plomann occu])y a positit.m of high esteem in the com- 
munity in which they reside and where they made many sincere friends. Air. 
Ilomann took a leading part in tlie establishment of the Lutheran cluirch at 
Cold Springs, which was built in 1893, and helped to secure the funds for its 
erection. Rev. R. Eirich was the first pastor, yir. Homann served for many 
years as secretary of this church. 



WILLIAAI TRABOR TURNER. 

Among the enterprising and progressive farmers of Sparta township. 
Dearborn county, Indiana, is \\'il!iam Trabor Turner, who for a number of 
years has been engaged in agricultural pursuits. He belongs to a class of men 
who furnish a fine exainple of steadfast perseverance and a stroiig illustratiijn 
of what may be accomplished by the individual who makes up his mind to do 
liis share of the pulling, when necessit}- places liini in the harness of human 
endea\-or. 

William Trabor Turner, farmer, of Sparta, township, Deari)orn county, 
Indiana, was born where he now lives, January 19. 1859. He is a son of Will- 
iam and Catherine (Lippard) Turner. He w^as erlucated at the district schools, 
and later followed agriculture, under the instruction, of his father, and after 
the death of his father, he took the farm over, bought sixty-five acres more, 
making ninety-five acres in all. Air. Turner has given his life-long- support to 
the Republican party. He is a member of the chapter. Royal .\rch Alasons. 

William Turner was born near Alanchester, England, in iSio, and came 
to the United States when ten years of age with his parents, who located at 
Cincinnati and who later came to Sparta township and snon after took one 
hundred and sixtv acres from the government, at a cost of one dollar and 



\( \\: 



I , r. .- , t 



-)!'ij. -r./A- hwa 



DEARBORN COUXTV. IXDIAXA. 621 

(wcntv-five cents an acre, to wliich they later added forty acres more. Mr. 
Turner lived here uith liis parents until their death, and then went itito 
the g-eneral store business at Chesterville, Indiana, and at the end of eij^lit 
years, sold out and bought part of the old farm, where he lived until his 
death, which occurred in February. iSSo. He was quite a traveler, and 
made two trips back to England. }*Ir. Turner always ti;io]< an actis'e interest 
in public enterprises, and was well informed on all topics of the time, lb- al- 
ways gave his loyal support to the Republican party. He was an earnest mem- 
ber of the Episcopal church. His fraternal membership was with the Ma.-Mjnic 
lodge. 

Catherine Lippard was born in August, 1S27, at Hamilton, Ohio, and. 
when young- moved to Ripley county, Indiana, and was educated in Wash- 
ington township, where she lived until her marriage to William Turner. 
This union was blessed with three children: William, and two who died in 
infancy. Catherine Lipjiard ^\•as the second wife of William Turner, his first 
wife being- Rebecca Xoble, by whom he had two children : Sara, who died 
aged twelve years, and JMan* I\I., who was bom on October 17, 1856, at 
Chester\-ille, Sparta township. Mary ]M. was educated and lived at Chester- 
ville until her marriage to John H. Stockwell, of Ripley county, who was a 
school teacher in early life, but was later employed by the Altinan Threshing 
^lachine Company, as general manager of Indiana, Illinois, Ohio, and part of 
Kentucky, for fifteen years with headquarters at Indianapolis. [Nlr. Stock- 
well died in 1900, aged forty-two years. 

William Turner, the paternal grandfather, was born in Englanrl, and 
brought his family to America. His children were : William, Mary Ami. Sam- 
uel, Betsey, John and Sarah. Mary Ann, now deceased, was married to 
Thomas Obder, and lived at Chesterfield, Indiana. They had three children, 
John, Mary, and one who died in infancy. Samuel, now deceased, was mar- 
ried to Nancy Huntingtim, and lived in Sparta township on a farm. They 
had five children, George, Cora, Addie, Clara and Stanley. Betsey Turner 
became the wife of Alexander Walker, lived in Sparta township, where her 
husband followed agriculture, and both are deceased. They liad six chil- 
dren, Jane, Mary, ^^'illiam, George, Elizabeth and Ella. John married Anne 
Noble; he was a farmer of Sparta township. Their children were seven in 
number, Sara, Frank, William S., Harry, Fannie. Edward and Herbert. Sarah 
became the wife of Frank Elrod and moved to Ripley county, where they 
followed farming. They had four children, John. George, Amy and one 
other. 



'U''' .-■-li.:.: 



622 DEARBORN' COUNTY, INDIANA. 

William Tralxir Turner was married on December 31, 1885, to Effie 
Chance, daughter of Hiram and Eliza (Thompson) Chance. She was born 
in 1864, in Sparta township, and lived there until her marriage. 

Mr. Turner has won the confidence and esteem of the entire community 
in which he lives by his pleasing address and his industrious habits. 



AIRS. LAURA EWAN KRUSE. 

Among the leaders in the social life of this township is a woman whose 
ability to make and retain friends is far above the average. Gifted with 
those qualities of mind and heart which endear her to those who know her, 
the subject of this sketch has, from early womanhood, been prominent in the 
community; a contributing cause being the fact that for several generations, 
her ancestoi"S have been among the best-known of the residents of this township 
and county. 

Mrs. Laura Ewan Kruse. the sul>ject of this sketch, was born in Sparta 
on April 3, 1S51. Slic is the daughter of Charles and Ann Augusta (King) 
Ewan, the former l,>eing a native of Victor, Ontario county. Xew York, 
born on April 9, iSio, and the latter, born on October 2, 1818, in Law- 
renceburg, Indiana. 

Samuel Ewan, paternal grandfather of Airs. Kruse, was a native of Xew 
York, where he made his home until the year 1822, when he migrated to 
Sparta townsliip and took up government land, where he lived until his death. 
W'hen his country' called. Samuel Ewan shouldered his musket, and served 
in the War of 1S12 until its close. He was a Whig, and adhered to the tenets 
of the Alethodist Episcopal church. As a man and as a farmer, lie was an 
important citizen in his time, and was highly respected by all who knew hiir). 
His wife, Alercy (Sprague) Ewan, was born in Rhode Island, and lived there 
until she was a young woman. After her marriage to J. Hawley, of New 
York, she moved to that state. By this marriage she had one child, Asenelh. 
Her first husband did not live long, and after his death, she again married, her 
second husband being Samuel Ewan, by whom she had eight children. These 
were; Mary, Charles (father of the subject of this sketch), Elizal^eth, Levi, 
Mercy, Jane, Rebecca and John. Charles Ewan was about twelve years old 
when he came west \vith his parents, and locating near Cold Spring, they 
settled on government land. Flere the young man lived with his parents 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 623 

until 1839, when on August 22, he was married to Ann King, tiie mother of 
Mrs. Kruse, and they purchased a farm adjoining that of iier father, Hving 
there a few years. They then bought a farm near by, and remained on his 
wife's farm until the father's death, on August 10, 1S85, their residence here 
having begun in 1850. Charles Ewan died at the age of seventy-five, after 
having been a farmer all of his life. It was his custom to load a flatboat uitii 
hay every winter, and take it to New Orleans to sell. He was strong in his 
Republicanism, and in his loyalty to the Odd Fellows lodge, of which he 
was a member. 

Ann Augusta (King) Ewan was the daughter of Phineas Lonsbarv and 
Clarissa H. (Thompson) King, l^oth of whom were born in I'oughkeepsie, 
New York, were married and came to Indiana, settling in this township on 
government land. Ann Augusta was educated in the Sparta schools, and at- 
tended school in Richmond, Indiana. She was a well-read woman. She was 
married on Augxist 22, 1839. to Charles Ewan. To this union were born seven 
children, namely: Ezra H. and Columbus E., both deceased; N. Bonaparte; 
Rosaline; Laura Helen, the subject of this sketch; Alice, and John deceased. 
N. Boneparte was married to ^lary Bell, who lives in ^.loores Hill. They 
had four children, Caroline E., Laura Leigh (]\Irs. McClure), ^ilarv- Myrtle, 
and Charles Carver, deceased. Rosaline was born on May 7, 1846, and was 
married to Carver Jones on January 18, 1S70, in Geneva, New York. The 
Kings lived in Sparta until their death. Phineas King and Clarissa (Thomp- 
son) King were the parents of seven children, Amanda, Ann Augusta, Elmira. 
Isaac, John Dean, Henry and Milo Caleb. 

Mrs. Kruse spent her girlhood days on the farm of her parents. There 
she was married to George \Y. Kruse, who was born on Februar}- 22, 1856, 
at Cold Springs. They have always lived on the old homestead. 

The present home of Mr. and Airs. Kruse is the center of much of the 
social life of the community, for Mrs. Kruse especially is fond of enter- 
taining, and many friends frequently accept her hospitality. 



■ ' ' WILLIAM R. W'HITEFORD. 

As a man whose interests, while centering in the agricultural industry, are 
not limited to it, William R. Whiteford, farmer and politician, is one whose 
name deserves special mention in a publication of this kind, one of the func- 



,r.:\ .:uu,l 



VAi.i.U// 



0^4 DEARBORN COUXTV, INDIANA. 

ticms of which is to pay tribute to tliose whose lives merit honor and respect. 
yir. W'hiteford is a nati\ e of Sparta town.ship, having been born here on Feb- 
ruary 28. 1869, and is the son of Robert and Jane (Cunningiiam) W'hiteford. 

Robert \Miiteford. born in County Antrim, Ireland, April ij, 183 -, 
crossed the ocean with his parents when he was a mere lad, and came with 
them to Dearborn county, settling near Laughery. In those dava it was not 
easy fur those who did not possess land to make a living for themsel\'es and 
theii" families, and Rubert was still only a youth when he was required to earn 
his way through the world by his own efforts. He had quick success, how- 
ever, for soon after his marriage, he bought seventy-two acres of land in th.is 
township, where he still resides. In political affiliations he is a Democrat. 
Jane Cunningham, who became the mother ijf the subject of this sketch, was a 
native of the same Irish county a^ her husband, and also came to this countrv 
in her youth, settling in this county near Laughery creek. ^Ir. and Mrs. 
W'hiteford became the parents of six children, as follow : Luella, Elizabeth, 
Anna (deceased), William, Jennie and Mulvina. Elizabeth married Era:il: 
INIcMahan, a prosperous farmer of Brown county, Kansas. Their children are 
Imes and Gertrude. Jennie married Isaac Smith, of Hogan township, and is 
the mother of Edna, Crlad^'s, Mildred and Elizabeth. 

William R. W'hiteford, after his schooling in this township was com- 
pleted, continued farming with his father until his marriage, on December 6, 
1893, to Anna C. Hoppmire, daughter of Ernest and Christina ( ^vleyers) 
Hoppmire. After their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. W'hiteford moved to their 
own farm of seventy-two acres, where they have led a busy, happy and useful 
life. Mr. W'hiteford is a good farmer, studies the business from a scientific 
point of view, and his success gives proof of the efficiency of his methods. 

Ernest Hoppmire, father of Mrs. Whiteford, was the son of Anton E. and 
Anna ilaria Hoppmire, and canie to America when a young man, taking up 
his home in Xew York City. He was born in Prussia, on November 7, 18.^7. 
He remained only a few years in Xew York, and then migrated to Indiana, 
where he purchased a farm in IManchester township, Dearborn county, and 
lived there until 1872. Moving to Hogan township, they continued farming 
on three hundred acres, and lived there until the death of Mr. Hoppmire, which 
occurred on March 29, 1907, at the age of seventy-nine years. He was a 
Democrat, and a member of the Lutheran church. Christina, his wife, was a 
native of Olfte Oberlubbe, Germany, being born on April 7, 1834. She died 
on the home farm on November 27, 1907, aged seventy-four years. 

The children born to Air. and Mrs. Ernest Hoppmire were eleven in num- 



i ■■••I; 



■..K 



M'-' 



DEARBURX COUNTY, INDIANA. " 625 

l)cr, these being Caroline, Louisa, l-"redcrick, Hcnr}-, William, Anna (Mrs. 
Whiteford), Ernest, and four who passed away in early childhood. Caroline 
is now Mrs. Lewis \Mse, of Aurora, Lidiana. Louisa married William Kim- 
ball, who lives in Hogan township. Their daughter is Edna P. Sheeter. Fred- 
erick is the husband of Viola Ragsdale, of ^lanchester, Lidiana, and their chil- 
dren are named Lulu, George and Frank. Henry is the husband of Frances 
Smith, living on the homestead in Ilogan township. Their onlv son is named 
Willis. William married Lillian Ragsdale, of Hogan township, and their chil- 
dren are Walter and Mabel. Ernest was united in marriage to Amy Roof, 
of Flogan township, \vliere they still reside, and they are the parents of a 
(laughter. Madonna. Anna was born on October 6, 1871, on a farm in Hogan 
township. Her only son is named Lawrence M., he being born in Sparta 
on ]\[ay 11, 1897. 

William R. Whiteford has taken for many years a deep interest in politics, 
and has found time to serve in public office. He is nov/ a trustee, having been 
elected in November, 1914, for a term of four years. Being brought up in a 
home in which the political affiliation was with the Democratic party, may ac- 
count for his present membership in that party. Mr. Whiteford is an Odd Fel- 
low, lieing a past grand in that order. He is interested, too, in church work, 
and is a deacon in the Presbyterian church. It is because of his interest in 
public affairs, as well as in the farming industry, that Mr. W'hiteford has be- 
come so widely and so favorably known in his community, where he has the 
esteem of friends, neighbors and acquaintances alike. 



CHARLES H. NIEMAN. 

After trying his hand at farming and various other pursuits, Charles 
H. Xieman has discovered that his particular talents lie in the direction of the 
leading business of the age, that of the automobile, and is very successfully 
conducting a salesroom and garage at Aurora. Mr. Nieman has worked 
his own way up, step by step, and the man who possesses such sterling quali- 
ties is a credit to any city fortunate enough to have him for a- resident. 

Charles H. Xieman was born on ]^Iarch 5, 1868, in Aurora, Indiana, and 
IS a son of John Frederick and Clara (Eylar) Nieman. His education was ob- 
tained at the country and parochial schools. At the age of seven years his 
parents moved to a farm in Randolph township, Ohio countv, where he 

(40) 






iK'j: I'l. t -f. 



626 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

remained until twenty-two years old, when he learned the buttcr-niakiii;; 
business, and C(3ndueted a creamery in Aurora for two years, after whioii 
he engaged in the ice business for a period of three years, changing fn.ini 
that to the grocery, and later opened a hardware store and handled farm 
machinery for about thirteen years, and after one or two other changes, 
finally went into partnersliip with J. C. I.inkmeyer in the automobile and 
garage business, in which he is still interested. Mr. Xieman is an ardeiit 
Republican, and he is a member of the Lutheran church. 

John Frederick Nicman was a natiye of Germany, where he was reared 
and educated. He came to America in 1S63, and located first at Rising Sun 
where he was employed on a farm for a short time, and then moyed to 
Aurora and apprenticed himself in the cabinet-maker's and carpenter's trades, 
serving three years without pay in learning. He died in Aurora in 1902. 
In addition to his trades, ]Mr. Nieman was the owner of a small chair factory 
at Aurora, in which he employed a number of workmen. ]Mr. and ^^Irs. 
Nieman -were members of the Lutheran church, and were the parents of 
twelve children, as follows : Ernest, who resides in Texas ; Florentina, de- 
ceased, who was the wife of Henry Schumacher; Hem-y, deceased; Charles 
H., of Aurora, Indiana; Frederick, who resides at Paducah, Kentucky; Clara. 
the wife of John C. Linkmeyer, partner of our subject; W'ilhelmina, \\ho 
became the wife of Henry Hollman, of Seymour, Indiana ; Eliza, who died 
unmarried, and fijur who died young. 

The paternal grandparents of our subject died in Gennan}-. They 
had three children, John Frederick and two others. 

The histoiy of the maternal grandparents is lost, except that they 
were natives of Germany and died there, leaving four children, Clara ( ilrs. 
Nieman), and three others. 

Charles H. Nieman was married on February 18. 1897, to Magdalena 
Linkmeyer, daughter of John F. Linkmeyer, whose wife was a Miss Hilker. 
There is one son to this union, Stanle}- L. }ilrs. Nieman was born in Ciesar 
Creek township in August. 1S68. 

John F. Linkmeyer, father of Mrs. Nieman, was born in Germany, and 
is still living on the home place. His wife died in 1875, and he was again 
married. By his first wife ]Mr. Linkmeyer had three children, Theodore. 
Magdalena and John C. His second wife was Anna Bocksicker, and to that 
union six children were born, Mary, ^linnie, Clara, Catharine, Norma and 
Harry. 

Mr. and Mrs. Nieman have many warm friends in Aurora, and Mr. Nie- 
man has built up a prosperous business in the city and surrounding territory. 



: DEARBORN COrXTV, INDIANA. ' 627 

OSCAR LOTSHAW and HAXXAH LOTSMAW. 

At the time when Oscar Liitsliaw began hi? agricultural career, fanning 
was carried on under ver}- different and more difficult meth'ids than it is 
toda_y. and more hours were necessary in securing the same resuhs. Mr. 
J^otshaNV has noted the various ciianges and im[irovemenls, and is mr)'.e 
capable of appreciating these adwantages than those who have filled their 
allotted time and passed on. or those who have grown to maturity later, 
having had no personal experience with pioneer methods. 

Oscar Lotshaw \vas born on -\Iay 5. 1854, in Ripley county. Indiana, 
and is a son of David and ]\Iary Ann (Bell) Lotshaw. At the age of two 
months he came with his parents to Cold Springs, where he was educated, 
living at home until eighteen years of age, and then worked out by the month 
for several years. Later he rented two fanns in Dearborn county, wiiicl) 
he so successfully managed that he v.-as enabled in a short time to buy a 
farm of twenty-eight acres near Arran. but which he soon sold, reserving 
three acres for himself. 

Da\'id Lotshaw was born in Pennsylvania, and came to Ripley county, 
Iniliana, at the age of twenty-three years, and here was united in marriage 
with Mary Ann Bell, daughter of John B. and Harriet Bell. She was born 
in Ireland, and caine to the United States when eleven years old, with ht-r 
parents, who settled in Ripley county, and lived there until they died. They 
were the parents of six children, Oscar, Ellen M., Mahaley, John B., Andrew 
and Elizabeth. ]\Ir. Lotshaw moved from Ripley county to Cold Sprin.gs, 
Dearborn county, where he had lived eight years prior to the commencement 
of the Civil War. He enlisted in the Eighty-third Regiment, Indiana Vol- 
unteer Infantry, and died from an injury received while at ]\Iulligan Bend, 
Louisiana, and lies buried there. He was a son of George W. Lotshaw. 

George \V. Lotshaw, the paternal grandfather, was born and reared 
in Pennsylvania. 

John B. and Llarriett Bell, the maternal grandparents, were born and 
reared in Ireland, coming to the L'nited States at middle age. and settling in 
Ripley county, whefe they lived to an advanced age, and are buried there. 

Oscar Lotshaw was united in marriage with Susan Peterman. daughter 
of William and Lucinda Peterman. She was born on July 4. 1S55. in Ripley 
county, where she was reared, and lived until her death, which occurred in 
1S94. This union was blest with the following children: William W., John 
W., Benjamin B., David, Andrew, Bessie Ann and Oscar. Mr. Lotshaw 



Kn.: :■ r-"-!)-)' 



fv.-:. ! ,,;. 



6^8 • ' DEARBORX COU!XTV, IXTHAXA. 

I 

was married, scccndlv, iti Switxerland ciuinty, to Ca??ie Leonora ^vlcadi.', a f 
native of that county, Dy wnom he had fi\'e children, tiarry, Xora, Mamie, ! 
Francis anri Loa. Crissie L. (Meade) Lotshaw died in 1904, and one year ! 

later, Air. Lotshaw was married to Alice Webb, of Dearliorn county, by | 
whom he had two children, \\'allace and Fay. Alice (Webb) Lotshaw died | 
in a sh'^rt time, and Mr. Lotsliaw took unto himself a fourth wife. AJ.rs. 
Hannah (Shaffer) Collins, widow of Irlenry Collins, a daughter of John 
and Elizabeth (Sells') Shaffer. .She was married to Henry Collins in 1890, 
bv whom she had one daughter, b'Jla -Collins, who became the wife of Oscar 
Rhuble, and resides at .Ab^ores Hill, To Oscar and blannah Lotshaw ha\'e 
been born three children, Emma J., Alamic L. and Ida H. 

John and Llizabeth (Sells) Shaffer were natives of Pennsylvania, and 
came to Dearborn count-e tw(_^ ^ears after their marriage, in pioneer da}"s. 

Mrs. Hannah Lotshav.- is a woman of great force of charact^'r, and is 
well kuMwn throughout Sparta township, and both she and Mr. Lotshaw 
have the respect of the community in which they reside. 



• . ■ HARRY ANDREWS KING, D. D. ■ ' 

Indiana has long been noted for high efficiency in its school system. It 
is said that the schools have reduced the illiteracy of the state until it now rep- 
resents but six-tenths of one per cent, of those ranging between the ages of 
ten and twenty. The state has shown in recent years a progressive spirit and 
materially strengthened its school system by providing uniform textbooks: by 
enacting" a teachers' minimum wage law; by passing a compulsory educatiim 
law, and. by maintaining the high efficienc}' of its teachers and instructors. 

Harry Andrews King was born on Octobar 27, 1867, at Kansas City, 
Missouri, and is a son of David C. and Sarah L. (Andrews) King. He at- 
tended the public schools at Alarshall, Illinois, graduating from the liigh school 
in 1SS5, after which he became bookkeeper in the office of the Kansas City, 
Fort Scott & Memphis Railroad. In 1893, Mr. King moved to Baldwin, Kan- 
sas, and entered the Baker University as a freshman, graduating in T897, and 
later entered the ministry of the Alethodist Episcopal church, .his first paste'ratc 
being at Belton, Missomi. He remained there one year and then went to Kan- 
sas City, in the same state, where he had charge of the Kansas Avenue and. 
Oakley churches for three years. In the fall of 1901 he resigned that pastorate 



1 I-. Ii:,', •-.( 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 629 

to enter the Boston Uni\er?it_\ School nf Theology, and w as pastier of l^s^lcston 
Square ^Methodist Episco])al clunch in Boston at the same time, servin;^' three 
years, while attending the theological schi'ol, from which he was graduated in 
lOO-i, with the degree of Di.'Ctor of Sacred Theology. ha\iug already re- 
ceived the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Baker L'niversity, and in 1900 h^; 
received from the same university the honorary degree of Doctor of Di\init\. 
In 1904 Doctor King was called to the pastorate of the ]\Iethodist Episcoprd 
church at Kents Hill, [Maine, serving one year, and then received his second 
call to the Oakley Metliodist Episcopal church at Kansas City, in 1905: In 
1907 he was elected educational secretary of Baker University, at Baldwin. 
Kansas, serving two years. On September i, 1909, Doctor King was elected 
president of -Moores Hill College, Moores Hill, Indiana, serving until Novem- 
ber, 19 1 5, wdien he resigned, to accept the presidency of Clark University, at 
Atlanta, Georgia. In 1903 Doctor King made a bicycle tour of England, 
Scotland and the continent, and in 1905 he and his wife spent two montlis in 
Ireland, Wales, England, Scotland, France, Switzerland and Italy. 

David C. King, father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Tennes- 
see, September 19, 1S37. in a moving wagon, while the family was en route to 
Illinois from Virginia, He is a son of Valentine and Deborah Ann (Um- 
barger) King. His parents settled at ^lar.shall, Clark county, Illinois, where 
he was educated, attending the [Marshall College (now (liscontinued), where 
he was preparing for the ministry, but he was called to serve in the Civil War, 
going as lieutenant-colonel of Company F. Seventy-ninth Regiment. Illinois 
Volunteer Infantry. He was twice wountled, and was in practically all the 
battles of the Army of the Cumberland, twenty-five or more. In 1865, David 
C. King was married to Sarah L. Andrews, daughter of Rev. Dean and Louisa 
fShaw) Andrews. They moved to Kansas City, where Mr. King engaged in 
Uisiness as merchant and building contractor, which he followed until about 
1890, when he retired from business. In 1910, because of poor health, he 
moved to Long Beach, California, where he died on May 19, 1915. [Mr. King 
was a member of the Methodist Ei)iscopal church, and for years wa-s an officer 
in the Grand Army of the Republic. Sara L. (Andrews) King was born in 
1844, at Marshall, Illinois, where she received her early education, graduatmg 
from the Terre Haute Seminary (now discontinued). She died in April, [868. 
They were the parents of but one child, Elarry Andrews King. 

The paternal grandfather was Valentine King, and his wife was Deb- 
orah Ann (Umbarger) King. The former was born in 1837, near Wythe- 






jt:. -li^i 



I,,'.:! 



630 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

ville, \\'}"the count}", Virginia. They c.inie b}- wagon to ^lar.^hall. Illinois, in 
1S37, and were tlie parents of six children, David C, Harvey, Lvman, Slrod- 
der, Louisa and Emma. 

The maternal grandfather was the Rev. Dean Andrews, who was born in 
1808, at Fryeburg. Alaine. He was a minister and a graduate of PSowdoin 
College, Maine. He was the founder of the Congregational church, and 
also founder of JManshall College, both located at Marshall, Illinois. This 
college was celebrated for having turned out a number of prominent Illinois 
men. The Rev. Dean .\ndrews died in 1S72, aged sixty-four vears. His 
wife, Louisa (Shaw) Andrews, was born in the country, near ^Marshall, 
Illinois. Their children were Albert, Simon, Sarah and Mary. Rev. Dean 
Andrews was married, secondly, to ^Miss Mc^Iillen, of Rockville, Indiana. 
By this marriage there Avere three children, Fannie M., \\'illiam 3,1. (de- 
ceased), and [Margaret (also deceased). 

Harry Andrews King was united in marriage September i, 1891, with 
Susie A. Newgent, daughter of Col. A. G. and Susan (Bullene) Newgent. 
She was born on June 13, 1874, at Kansas City, Missouri, and received her 
education at Kansas City and Independence. Missouri. To this union lune 
been born four children, as follow: Marie S., born on October 15, 1S93; 
Susie N.. November 19, 1895: }ilartha, November 24, 1900, and died on 
November 9, 1901; Sarah Elizalieth, September 17, 1906. 

Col. A. G. Newgent, father of Mrs. King, was born in Clark coimt\-, 
Indiana, and his wife. Susan (Bullene) Newgent, was a native of New York 
state. 

Doctor King has reached a high rank in his profession, and through 
the good work accomplished in this community came to be highly esteemed. 



WELDON E. HOWREY. 

Weldon E. Howrey. a farmer of Manchester township. Dearborn county, 
Indiana, was born in the same township where he now resides, August 23. 
1859, a son of Daniel and Elizabeth (Gass) Howrey. Daniel Howrey was 
born in Germany. August 17, 1827, and was brought to this country by his 
parents when a small boy. They came directly to this section and settled 
on a farm near Hogan Hill in [Manchester township, and in the early schools 
of that district Daniel received his education. He worked with his father 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 63I 

Oil the family homestead, for tlic land had to be put into proper conditirm 
for cultivation, and the removal of the forests meant an immense amount 
of labor. Ik- remained with his father until the time of his marria.^c to 
Elizabeth Gass, January 3, 1850, when he started out in life for himself l)v 
renting a fami north of Hogan Hill, near his parents, which land he after- 
ward purchased. 

After farming" near Hogan liill for a few years, Daniel Huwre\- dis- 
posed of his holdings there and mo\'cd to Douglas count}-, Illinois, where he 
purchased a farm of one hundred and sixty acres and continued to live there 
until the death of his wife. He then sold out and went to Oregon, where lie 
made his home until the time of his death, about thirty years later. He 
never remarried, and the last three months of his life he lived with E/ra 
Dixon, an old-time friend, dying in that home on March 24, igoi. He was a 
man who was universally liked and respected, and was a faithful member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church. In politics he was a Democrat, although 
never taking any particular interest in political matters. 

Elizabeth (Gass) Howre\', mother of the immediate subject of tliis 
sketch, and wife of Daniel Howrey, was a daughter of Anthony Gass, and 
was born in Manchester township, March 23, 1S30. She received her edu- 
cation in the early schools of her home district and remained with her parents 
until the time of her marriage. Both her parents were born in Germany and 
directly after their marriage they immigrated to America. They came di- 
rectly to this township, and here passed the remainder of their li\es. There 
were five children in their family, the eldest of whom was Joseph. Elizabeth 
was the second child in order of birth. Then followed Muzella (Mrs. 
Wilson), late of Ripley county, and Mary and [Martha, who died \oung. 
Joseph is still living in Louisville, Kentucky, where he is a cigar-maker. 

Weldon E. Howrey is the third child of his parents, there being four 
children in the family. The eldest was Henry E., who died young. ]\Iartha 
A. is the wife of a Mr. Langley, a retired farmer of Illinois. She is the 
mother of five children, Otto, (deceased), Oiler, Cora, Nellie and Albert. 
Marion E. is in the tile business in Fountain county, this state. He has been 
twice married, his first wife being JNIary Cox, by whom he had one child, 
Clarence E. His second wife was Anna Cuppy, and there are no children to 
that marriage 

When quite a young boy, Weldon E. Howrey went wdth his parents 
to Douglas county, Illinois, and was but seven years old at the time of the 
death of his mother. After his father sold out and started west, Weldon 



!.i'. -.;.■: -■;■ • • .' ,-^l^ 



632 DEAUliOU.V COUNTY, INDIANA. 

was sent back to this county and was taken into t!ie h(ime of Andrew Sims, 
where he Hved for about two and one-half years. He then made his home 
W'ith Wilham ^[orton, at Jvlanchester, for a short time and for the followini>- 
eight years hved with \V. Rumsc)- and worked lor him on his farm, iiis 
first independent business venture was the rental of a farm of one hundred 
and twenty acres, which he tended for a year previous to the time of his 
marriage, November 10, 18S1, to Anna I. Walser. They first went to house- 
keeping in Alanchester and then for one year they lived on the Ellis farm 
of eighty acres, and then for the following three years they lived on the 
Rumsey farm of one hundred and forty acres. Their next move was to 
Union Ridge, this county, where they rented and farmed a tract of fifty 
acres, remaining there two years. From Union Ridge they went to near 
Kyle Station, where tlie_\- lived for a number of years on a farm of one hun- 
dred and twenty-four acres and then in 1901 they again moved to [Manchester, 
purchasing a farm containing eighty acres. The place was at that time in 
a badly run-down condition and they have made considerable improxement 
in it. There was on .the farm an old brick dw^elling which subject has re- 
modeled and made a fine modern home out of it. The land, too. has been 
put in excellent condition and altogether the farm is one of the most up-to- 
date in the community. 

Anna Walser was born in [Manchester township, a daughter of Benjamin 
P. and Amanda (Jackson) Walser. She was educated in the common 
schools of that township and remained under the parental roof until the 
time of her marriage. Benjamin P. Walser, her father, was a son of James 
and Mary (Bailey) \\'alser. and was born in Manchester township on April 
21, 1835. tlis education was rather limited, owing to the restricted oppor- 
tunities of that day in this section, and from early boyhood he assisted his 
father in clearing and farming the home place. Pie remained at home until 
the time of his marriage to Amanda Jackson, May 15, 1856, and shortly 
afterward they started to housekeeping on a farm which he rented near 
his father's home. They remained there but a short time when he purchased 
one hundred acres near Plyle, this township, and later added a tract of sev- 
enty acres. Benjamin Walser's first wife did not live very long, passing 
away on May 22, 1S65. In the nine years of their married life she bore 
him five children, as follow: Charles, who married Lora Tibbetts, is deput}' 
auditor of Dearborn comity, and they are the parents of three children, 
Frances, Robert and Herbert, the latter deceased. Mary became the wife of a 
Mr. Rumsey and is the mother of three children, Florence (Mrs. Cross 1^ 



.<.H';:'l 



'AL ...ir. 



:,t ■^■^^ 



:u. A :-.:i. /-'J-;:';./! •I.' 



DEARKURN COUNTY, INDIANA. 633 

Walter and Lucile (Mrs. Welsh). John is a farmer of jMaiicheslci- lownsln]!, 
Anna is the wife of the sul)ject of this biography. Americas D., the young'f st 
child of the family, married Ida Aiulrcws and lives in Lawrenceburg-, wliere 
he is connected with the United States revenue service. He is the father of 
two children, Hobart and Howard. Benjamin W'alser later remarried, his 
second wife being Anna Alaria Case, with whom he was united in marriage 
on September 2."/, iS66, and by whom he jjecame the father of one child, 
Nancy (Mrs. Schooley). Benjamin Walser was a prominent man in this 
community in his day, being considered among the most influential citizens 
of his time. He was a strong advocate of the principles of the Republican 
part\' and for one term ser\-ed as county commissioner. 

To Weldon E. Howrey and wife have been born four children : ]\Iollie. 
wife of Roy Fansler, a railroader living in Shelby county, this state, and 
mother of one child, Weldon Wesley; Hazel G., the youngest of the family, 
died on February lo. 1914, age twenty years; Ernest W. remains at home 
with the parents ; Hattie, the eldest of the family, is the wife of Thomas 
Edwards, a section foreman on the Big Four railroad, resides at Indianapolis, 
and is the mother of three children, Estelle, Floyd W. and Imogene. 

Air. Howrey is considered one of the best citizens of his township, wh.o 
is al\\a}-s readv to ad\-ance the public interests whenever possible. For four 
years he served as township trustee, being elected on the Democratic ticket, 
and is counted among the active workers of that party in this section. He 
holds his fraternal aftiliation with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
and is a past grand of that order. He is also a member of the Modern 
Woodmen of America and in the workings of both order he takes a deep 
and intelligent interest. In ever)- phase of life he is eminently deserving 
of the high esteem in which he is held bv all who know him. 



CAPT. ABRAM HILL. 



Tt is seldom, indeed, that the publishers are given the privilege of re- 
cording the life of a man who has serv^ed his country so well as has Capt. 
Abram Hill, and who has been survived by a wife who in her ninety-first 
year, is so keen and alert mentally that she retains her old-time knowledge of, 
and interest in, the world in which she lives. Those who have had long 
acquaintance with the family marvel at the retentive memon.*, as well as 



;:; lo 



^..: ,.. f'... ... ,1 



.r -ji;^ f'i'^f 



634 DEARBORN COUNTY, IMUAXA. 

the physical and mental acti\-ity of a woman upon whose head tlie snows of 
manv winters have fallen, and they remember with keen satisfaction the 
service she rendered her countr\- when she gave her beloved husbanfl, kissinij 
the young soldier good-b}', when she knew not whether she might exer see 
him again. ' It is nut strange, therefore, that their children desire not onl_\ 
to commemorate the worthy life of their departed father, but to place a laurel 
wreath upon the brow of the dear mother who still brightens their lives b;.' 
her presence. Capt. Abram Hill was a Hoosier by birth, having been born 
near Lawrenceburg, in the township of the same name, in Dearborn county, 
Indiana, on November 10. 1S23. He died at the age of eighty-one years 
and four months, ^larch iS, 1905. 

Back in the days of 1815. when wild animals roamed what are now 
the streets of Indiana cities, the sturdy parents of Abram Hill came from 
Virginia, and built their rude cabin in this county, undaunted by the dangers 
that surrounded them. Eli and Elizabeth (Hamilton) Hill were among the 
first to pre-empt govcrnrwent land in this part of the state, and into the task 
of clearing and cultivating it they put all the fervor of their youthful enthusi- 
asm and hope. Their farm was in Lawrenceburg township, and here the_\' 
died, after they had lived long and useful lives. Like most all pioneers, they 
had a large family of children, these being by name: John, Ira, Eh, Elizabeti:, 
Wood, Susan Wood, Melinda Osborn, Daniel, Abram (the subject of this 
biography), ~\Iary Ann Kerr, and William. 

A\'ith the exception of the few years during which he served in the 
Civil War, the life of Abram Hill was spent in Dearborn coimty, the place 
of his nativity. His boyhood was not different from that of other farmers" 
boys ; much of his time was spent in fishing, hunting" and swimming, and 
some time in the field, for there was plenty of work in clearing away the 
forest wilderness. Grown to manhood he was a farmer until his removal 
to Aurora in 1S76. when he became a coal merchant, continuing in this 
business along with other commercial enterprises until the time of his death. 
Soon after his residence in town j\lr. Hill purchased the wharf landing and 
wharf boat, and conducted the business at first in his own name, afterwards 
associating with him his two sons, Adam K. and Han,-ey E., who carried on 
the business after their father's death, for the first three or four years under 
the old name of A. Hill S: Sons. They then consohdated the firm with the 
Sunnyside Distilling Company, at the same time organizing the Pittsburg 
Coal Company, incorporated, which company retains its name and is under 
the management of Adam and Harvev B. Hill and H. T. Howe. 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 635 

When the call to arms was heard, and tlic country's youth responded, 
Abrani Hill was among the first to offer his services, enlisting in Company 
I\, Twenty-sixtli Regiment, Indiana \'olunteer Infantry, in which he served 
lor one vear, at the end of which he resigned and returned home in onler 
to recruit a cavalry company, assisted by Captain Wright. This being accom- 
plished, in 1863 he reiurned lo the front as First Lieutenant of Comjiany D, 
Seventh Indiana Cavalry, and served two years and four months. Althiiuj;h 
taking part in many battles and skirmishes, the young officer was never 
wounded. However, he narrowly escaped injury and probable death, when, 
on oue occasion, his horse was shot from under him. At the close of the 
war, having served with honor, he was mustered out, and again took up the 
thread of business activities where he had left them. Besides the oM lines, 
he fed stock at the distilleries of Lawrenceburg, Aurora and Cincinnati, dealt 
extensively in real estate, and at the same time, managed three farais. 

On March 26, 1846, Abram Hill was united in marriage with ]\Iinerva 
Kerr, daughter of \^'alter and Elizabeth (Russell)' Kerr. ]\Irs. Hill has been 
and still is such a remarkable woman, that she rightfully occupies a large 
.'ihare in the present family history. Having always been fond of reading, 
Mrs. Hill has not allowed the years to lessen her interest in affairs, and she 
is considered one of the best-read women of her vicinity. In spite of her 
ninetv-one years, she reads without glasses. She was born in a log cabin 
near .'Vurora on September 3, 1S24. When a young girl, Mrs. Hill attended 
the old-fashioned "subscription schools,"" having to walk a distance of three 
miles, and then sat on a slab bench in the days when thc_\- had to "toe the 
mark" and "spell down." She was only fifteen years of age wlien, with 
others of the neighborhood, she joined the ]\Iethodist Episcopal church, ex 
which denomination she has continued to be an active member for seventy- 
si.x years. 

The father of Mrs. Hill was born and reared in North Carolina, and 
migrated to this state in 1816, he and his wife having married near Aurora, 
although the latter was a native of Elizabethtown, Ohio. They began house- 
keeping in H^ogan township where ]Mr. Kerr was a farmer, and at various 
times held a number of public offices, having been deputy sheriff for main- 
years. Both Mr. and Mrs. Kerr were remarkably long lived, he passing away 
in 1901, at the age of one hundred and one and a half years, and his wife 
living to be ninety years old. her death occurring in 1S93. Mr. Kerr was 
unusually active, considering his age, even up to the time of his death. A 
family of ten children were born to Mr. and JMrs. Kerr : Mary Ann became 



636 DEARBORX COUNTY, IXDIAXA. 

the wife of Elijah Elder, and lived tu the ripe old age of cighty-fnur : Minerva 
is now past ninety-one: ^ilahlon Pr. died at tiie age of eighty-fonr ; Catherine 
married a ^Jr. W'orley : Rachel was a A[rs. Laird, and died in loof); Xanc. 
Jane is the widow of William Ketcham ; Elizaheth. Mrs. William Terlmne, 
passed away in 1903; \Mlliam lives on Salem Ridge; Charles died in the Civil 
War at \^icksburg, a few days after the surrender of that city, having taken 
part in the siege ; David is now a resident of Greensburg, Indiana. 

William Kerr, the paternal grandfather of Mrs. Abram Hill, lived to Ijc 
eighty-four years of age. His wife was Lydia McClain. who at the time 
of her death was living in North Carolina. They. had the usual large familv 
so common to pioneers, in this case consisting of eight children: Jane (Mrs. 
Brown), Mary Ann (Mrs. ^McHridc). Catherine (.Mrs. Shutts), David. Wal- 
ter, Aiken, John and Xancy. William Kerr, who was of Irish descent, had 
the distinction of being a soldier in the Revolutionarv \\'ar. The grand- 
father of ]Mrs. Hill on the mother's side of the family was William Russell, 
his wife's Christian name being Mary. The former was an Englishman 
by birth, and it is quite certain that his wife was a native of Xew York, as 
they were married in that state, coming to Cincinnati when that citv was 
still a village. Ideating at first on the Licking river, thev afterwards re- 
moved to Ehzabethtown, Ohio, where they lived until their death, both 
being comparatively young at the time they passed from earth. Their chil- 
dren were: Maiy f^^Irs. Simondson), ^Martha (Mrs. Thompson), Elizabeth 
(Mrs. Kerr), Joseph, who lost his life in the War of 1S12 ; ^Moses. who passed 
away in infancy: and William, who was never married and who died at 
seventy. 

Abram and Minerva (Kerr) Hill were the parents of nine children, as 
follow : Amanda. Adam K., Milton V.. Llarvey B., Alice, Alta, Elizaberh, 
Lew W., and Jennie E. Amanda, the first-born, is the widow of William 
Seidler, of Aurora. Indiana, and the mother of Otto E. and Russell W. Adam 
K., of Aurora, married Ella Worley, and they are the parents of a daughter, 
Grace, the wife of C. J. Dils. ^lilton V.. of ^lound, Texas, of which t^iwi-i 
he is postmaster and general merchant, became the husband of Sophronia 
Sargent, and the father of f(^ur children, Walter (deceased), x\bram H., 
Gertrude (wife of Eletcher Dils) and James. Harvey B., of Aurora, married 
Alary L. Conger, who died leaving a son, Edwin, a leading writer on the Xc7^ 
York Sioi. and a man prominent in the newspaper world. The second ^^•ife of 
Harvey B. Hill was .\lma Hart, who also passed away. One of her children 
is named Harold, and the other. Gale, the wife of a Air. Taylor, of Et. Smith. 



DEARBORN COrXTV, INDIANA. G^~,/ 

Ark'T'^'^s. Harvey B. Hill married, thirdly, Cornelia Parrish. Four children 
were bom to this union, Louise, I'lionias, Estella and Robert. .Mice, wife 
.if Rilev W. Curtis, is deceased, and her three children surxdve her. The\' 
are Lola, the wife of W'illiani Ketcham, 'Sine, who married James H. Lwbanl:, 
of Lawrenceburg, and Carl Curtis, a farmer living near Aur(_)ra. .\Ua was 
1,'fl a widi.nv by the death of her husband, Enos iJuftnigtiin, of .Aurora. Eniil, 
lier son, lives at home with his mother; Alinerva, one of her children, grew 
tn be a young woman, and passed away ; the other daughter, Elizabeth, is 
living at home. Elizabeth lives with her mother. Lew \\'.. of Aurora, has 
one son who is assistant cashier of the First National Bank of Aurora. Jennie 
E., \vife of ^^'illiam Boone, of Seattle, Washington, is the youngest of the 
children born to ]Mr. and Mrs. Hill, and is the mother of two children, 
Marcia Leona, who is Mrs. Henry Fox, of Seattle, and Clyde, of the same 
city. 

^\'bile Captain Hill deserves all praise for having done the work of a 
man in caring for his large family, it must not be forgotten that he had the 
ready and sympathetic co-operation of his noble wife, whose only ambition was 
to be a good wife and mother. But even with the many and trying cares which 
are the lot of a mother, this energetic woman found time for the cultivation 
of her mind, and perhaps it is for this reason that her mental faculties are so 
remarkable today. She is an authority on the early history of the county, 
as her memory enables her to recall with vividness and accuracy e\-cnts ami 
incidents of many years ago, and is an interesting conversationalist, retaining 
much that she has read. Such a wife was a real helpmate. 

Among the activities in which both Captain and Mrs. Hill were most 
interested were the affairs connected with their religious life, for during 
their many years of membership in the Methodist Episcopal church, they ditl 
much to build it up both materially &nd spiritually, for they were leaders. 
Captain Hill held many offices in the church, thus attesting his value to it 
and to the community. He was also a prominent ]\Iason. Like his father 
before him he was a Whig, and then a Republican of the old-fashioned 
"stand-pat" variety. 

The family from which Lew- W. Hill has sprung has been for se\eral 
generations one of the sort out of wdiich the best type of American citizenship 
IS made. Ancestors such as his are not a memory. They are an inspiration. 
And among these stands out most clearly the stanch patriotism of his father, 
and the true idealism of his mother. 



63S DEARBORN COUXTV, INDIANA. 

CHARLES F. LUKE. 

To describe iiitelligentlv tlie life and career of an acti\'e and successfr.l 
man is a difficult undertaking in a limited space, as it is necessary to toiicli 
briefly on the important instances of general interest, as well as dates and 
names, places of birth, marriage and death, for the benefit of those inteiested 
in ancestral research work. For the benefit of descendants, this impnrtant 
matter should receive the most careful attention. 

Charles F. Luke, farmer, Cresar Creek township, was born on February 
16, 1858, in the township where he now resides. He is a son of Frederick 
and Flora (Lothmann) Luke. He was educated at Farmers Retreat, and 
after leaving school, he followed agriculture under the instruction of his 
father, until his marriage, \\hcn he bought eighty acres of land from his 
father, to which he later added ninety acres, and at another time eighty 
acres, making in all two hundred and fifty acres of good, rich farm land, and 
as time went on, he purchased the old \Volf farm, containing one hundred and 
seventy acres. Mr. Luke later sold one hundred and fifty-five acres to his 
son, and he still resides on a splendid farm of two hundred and sevent}- acres. 
Mr. Luke has always been a stanch Republican, taking part in public affairs. 
serving for four years as township trustee. He is a member of the Lutheran 
church, of which he has officiated as trustee and treasurer. 

Frederick William Luke A\"as born in Hanover, German}-, as was also 
his wife, Flora (Ix>thmann) Luke. They settled in Ctesar Creek township 
at an early day, renting for a time, and then bought a farm of forty acres in 
section 35 at a cost of eight hundred dollars, to which they later added 
forty acres, making' in all, eighty acres, on \\hich they lived until their 
death. Mr. Luke died at the age of eighty-one }ears, in 1894. He belonged 
to the Lutheran church. His wife. Flora (Lothmann) Luke was born in 
1819, in Hanover, Gennan_\", and died in 1901. aged eighty-two years. To 
this union were born ten children, \^'ilHam, John, Carrie, Elizabeth (de- 
ceased), Emma ("deceased), Charles, Rosa, Hannah, Amelia and one who 
died in infancy. 

William Luke was killed in the Civil War, at Port Republic, in 1862. 
John was married to Man,- ^lelcher, and is living at Cleveland, Ohio. They 
have two children, Frank and Ollie. Carrie became the -^vife of William 
Hildebrand, and is living at Cleveland, Ohio. Rosa is the wife of Williar;-! 
Renner. of Aurora, who is a cooper by trade. They had five children. Edna. 
Alvin, Norma, Lawrence and one who died in infancy. Hannah became the 



-■'.'.rA 



, 1 1 ; 1 



DEAIUiOKX COUNTY, INDIANA. 6^:;9 

i 

uifc of Fred. Hcidcniann, ai;f! is li\-ing" at Seymour, Indiana. Tliey ha\e ! 

three cliildrcn, lima, Edwin and Irene. .-Vmelia i.=; married to John Vinup, of j 

.\urnra. They had one child, Jean, who died. j 

Charles F. Lnke wa.s nniled in marriac^e on Octohcr 15, 1883, with Carrie I 

\'inup, daughter of Flenry and iNlary (Oaiman) Vinup. She was horn on { 

l'\'l)ruar\' u, iSfii, in Pike township. Ohio county, and was educated in that 
countv. on Bear creek, wliere she lived until b.er marriage, 'ilns union h:is 
been blest with seven children, T']dward, Lydia, Amelia, Daniel, William, Wal- 
ter and one who died in infancy. 

Edward Luke was married to Amelia Kenniger, and is living in Ca-sar 
Creek township. They have four children, Lucille, ^Marvin, Arnold and 
Aleda. Lvdia is the \vifc of Flenry Ruhlmann, and lixes at Dillsboro. 
Amelia became the wife of Theodore Westmeier, and is living at Farmers 
Retreat. 

Henn- Vinup, father of 3i[rs. Charles F. Luke, was born on March jo, 
1827, in Prussia, Germany, ami died in 1905, in Ohio county, Lidiana, aged 
seventy-eight years. His wife, ;\lary (Oatman) Vinup, was also a native 
of Prussia, German\-, her birth occurring on October 15, 1S39. They were 
married in Ohio county, Indiana, November i, 1857, and lived there until 
their death. Mrs. Vinup died in 19 10, aged seventy-one years. They were 
the parents of eight children, Henry, Carrie, William, Annie, John, George, 
Sophia and Lucinda. 

Charles F. Luke is one of the genial and accommodating citizens of 
Ca-sar Creek township, where he is well known for his honorable and indus- 
trious life. 



JOSEPH C. SAL'\LL. 

The Small family has been honorably and influentially represented in 
Hcarborn county almost ever since the days of the beginning of the estab- 
lishment of social order hereabout. The first of the name in this county 
was Eliezer Small, a Virginian, who, with his wife and family of small chil- 
dren, immigrated to Indiana, shortly after the opening of this region to 
general settlement, and established a home on what is known as Ebenczer 
ridge, in ^Tanchester township, this county. At that time wolves still were 
plentiful in that part of the countv and this pioneer family met with many diffi- 
culties in making their home in the then wilderness. Eliezer Small was a 



'. ! ;• 






640 ■ DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

mail Of much force of character, possessing the true pioneer spirit, and h.i- 
wife was a mosi competent helpmeet; it being- undoubted that this worthy 
couple did very much toward bringing about proper social and ce<inoniic 
conditions in the earl_\- days of that now well-established district. They weie 
influential in all good works thereabout and their memor}' is held in hig'.i 
regard in that part of Dearborn county to this day. Eliczer Small and 
his \\;fe. with the diligent assistance of their growing childixm. cleared 
their homestead farm and created a home in the wilderness which radiated 
good influences far and wide in that region. Both of these earnest pioneers 
lived to good old ages and their deeds are not forgotten. They were the 
parents of six children, William H., Henry, Perry, America, Elizabeth and 
Phad^e Ann. 

William II. Small was but a lad when his parents emigrated from \^ir- 
ginia and settled in the wilds of Manchester township, in this county, con- 
sequently he had practically all his rearing- in Dearborn county. He grew 
to manhood on the Ebenezer ridge homestead farm and in the early part of 
his life followed farming, also becoming one of the first general dealers in 
hay and produce in that part of the county. In 1S64 he moved to \\'ilmington. 
the first county seat of Dearborn county, continuing, howe\'er, to keep uj) 
his extensive farming operations ; at the same time being largely interested 
in the grain business. He later erected a large warehouse in Aurora, this 
county, and Avas engaged in the grain business in that city up to within ten 
years of the time of his death. 

\\'illiam PI. Small n-iarried Elizabeth Clements, who was born in the 
state of [Maryland, daughter of Charles Clements and wife, early settlers 
of this county, the latter of whom died in her young womanhood, lea\ing 
three small children. John, Charles and Elizabeth. To this union five 
children were born, of whom the subject of this sketch is now the only sm-- 
vivor, namely: Joseph C, the well-known banker and niantifacturer of 
Aurora, this county: Emily, who was the wife of John Wolcott; Charles H., 
Elias C. and one who died in infancy. William PI. Small died in iSSS, at 
the age of seventy-eight years, his widow surviving him some years, she 
being- se\ ent_\-six years of age at the time of her death. Mr. and ]\Irs. 
Small were earnest and devout members of the ^Methodist church, and their 
children were reared in that faith. 

Joseph C. Small, son of William H. and Elizabeth (Clements) .Small, 
was born on the old Small homestead in Manchester township, D'^arborn 
county. Indiana, on November 28, 1844, and practically his whole life has 






hi- ■ -Al: 



'•'..- \ ,'■,., :•', -,,■ 



DEARBURX COINTV, INDIANA. 64I 

liecii spent in this county, though for a few years in his young manhood 
ho was engaged hi business in lUinois and in Cincinnati. Since the year 
!8(')'), however, he has been continuously engaged in business in Aurora, this 
counl\', and few men in the county have built up a better or more substantial 
t.usiness reputation than he. Joseph C. Small lived on the paternal farm 
nitil he was thirteen years of age, receiving his elemcntar\- education in the 
district schools of Manchester townsliij). lie then was placed in a private 
school at Wilmington and, after finishing tlie course prescribed in that ex- 
cellent school, received a thorough business education in Bar'dett's Commer- 
cial School at Cincinnati. During the period of the Civil War his services were 
engaged by a river traffic company and for two years or more he was in 
charge of that company's tow barges on the Ohio. He then went to Ouincy, 
Illinois, where for a little more than one year he was engaged in the hay and 
grain business, at the end of which time he went to Cincinhati, where for 
several vears he was quite successfully engaged in the grocery business. In 
1S69 Mr. Small returned to Dearborn county, locating in Aurora, where he 
took charge of the John C. Cobb Chair Company's affairs, being thus en- 
gaged for some years, at the end of which time he was elected secretary and 
treasurer of the Aurora Gas Company, a position which he occupied for 
more than twenty years; his duties as practical manager and superintendent 
of the gas company's affairs being performed with the utmost regard for 
good faith, both in his relations with the company and with the public. ]\Ir. 
Small's able services then were engaged by the company operating the Aurora 
tool works and until 1913 he had practical charge of this extensive plant, 
his duties as secretary, treasurer and general manager gi\'ing him general 
control of this companv's affairs, during which time the industry expanded 
and flourished. His investments were largely confined to real estate and lie 
became a landowner, one of his farms, in Newton county, Indiana, covering 
ten thousand five hundred acres of fine prairie land, and another, in Mason 
county, Illinois, covering two thousand four hundred acres. 

Mr. Small retired from tlie tool works and on September 29, 1913, was 
appointed receiver of the affairs of the Royer Wheel Company, of Aurora, a 
position which he still occupies, under direction of the court. The Ro>cr 
\\ heel Company, which was incorporated about twenty-five years ago, with 
a capitalization of three hundred thousand dollars, is engaged in the manu- 
facture of all kinds of wheels for vehicles, its product being sold in all parts 
of the United States, as well as in many foreign countries. The concern 
employes on an average of about one hundred and fifty men, this factory 

(41) 

i 



;•!.■•■ I.. ! 



I :■; ):■ l\r-- 



',,h ■,:<.■ 



642 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

being regarded as one of Dearborn county's most valuable industrial insti- 
tutions, yir. Small was one of the organizers of the Dearborn National 
Bank, of T.a\vrenccl)urg, being a stock-bolder in tliat sound old financial insti- 
tution, and alsn is a director of the I'irst National Bank, of Ain'ora. to whicii 
latter excellent institution he gives much of his personal attention. 

On November 27, 1869, Joseph C. Small was um'ted in marriage to Leali 
Elizabeth Cordry, who was born in Wilmington, this county, daughter of 
James and Leah (Collins) Cordry, natives of Delaware, who came to this 
county many years ago, locating in Wilmington when that promising village 
was the county seat of Dearborn count)-, and both died there well along in 
years. They were influential and useful citizens of Wilmington and the 
parents of five children, all daughters, Mary, DoUie, Sarah, Elizabeth ami 
Alice. To Joseph C. and Leah Elizabeth (Cordry) Small two children have 
been born. Bertha C, and one daughter who died in infancv. 

]\Ir. Small is a stanch Republican and for many years has taken a pail 
in the political affairs of Dearborn county. He has been a delegate to Repub- 
lican state conventions on numerous occasions and a factor in such meetings 
of the leading men of the party in Lidiana. INIrs. Small and her daughter 
are earnest and active members of the ?vIethodist church, the familv being 
active in all good v\orks hereabout, and all are held in the highest esteem 
in their very large circle of friends and acquaintances. Mr. Small for many 
years has given his best endeavors to the upbuilding of the commercial, in- 
dustrial and financial interests of Dearborn countv. 



. , JOHN M. JACKSON, ^L D. 

Being self-reliant, and equipped with a good education, together with 
a firm determination to reach the top, Doctor Jackson has won his wav from 
the life of a farmer boy to his present well-established and successful business 
in Aurora, wdiere he is not only well known as being an able and skillful prac- 
titioner, but where he is considered an authority in many of the branches 
of his profession, and through his fraternal alliances, as well as through his 
professional successes, he is one of the most popular men in the city of Aurora. 

John M. Jackson was born on February 9, 1S81, at the little village of 
Pleasantville, Sullivan county, Indiana, and is a son of Jefferson G. and Re- 
becca (Carbin) Jackson. He grew to young manhood on his father's farm 



lO :>:--. I I '•).'- iC 



DEARDORX COUN'TV, INDIANA. 643 

ill Sullivan county, Indiana, where he attended the district scIkjoIs, graduating 
fidni the rieasantville higli scIiumI in the spring of 1900, and then entered 
Marion Sims Medical College. St. Louis, spending one year there, after which 
he spent three years in the ^iledical College of Indiana, graduating April 19, 
i()Ov He then spent one year in the hospital at Vincennes, after which he 
! icaied at Lyons. Indiana, remaining there six and one-half years, and came 
til Aurora on February 3, 1913. since \\hicli time he has built up a lucralixe 
[ir;ictice. Doctor Jackson gives his support to the Republican part\'. He 
helnngs to Aurora Lodge No. 51, Free and Accepted ?.lasons, and is a past 
master of Lyons Lodge Xo. 63-I : he is a member of Lyons Lodge Xo. 647, 
bidependent Order of Odd Fellows, in which he is past grand, and also served 
as district deputy grand master, and is a member of the Rebekahs, as is also 
his wife. They are both members of the Eastern Star at Lyons. lie is a 
member of the County }*ledical Society and the State }iledical Society, and was 
vjrgeon for the Indianapolis and \'incennes division of the ^'anda!ia railroad 
for five years during his stay at Lyons. 

Jefferson G. Jackson, father of the immediate subject of this biography, 
s'. as ix>rn in Kentucl:v, ami came to Indiana when a boy, growing to manhood 
ill Sullivan county, wliere he always followed agricultural pursuits, owning 
a small farm in the hills of Sullivan county. lie went to the Civil War in 
Company C, Fift3'-ninth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantiy, and partici- 
jtated in many of the hard-fought battles under General Sherman. He was 
■ill through the battles of Atlanta, Vieksburg and Chattanooga, and was with 
Sherman on the march to the sea and was at the Grand Review at ^Vashing- 
'"U. D. C. He was a private, and served some time as a sharp-shooter. Fle is 
nnw living in retirement in Sullivan county on the old home farm, at the age 
"1 seveny-five years. Flis wife, Rebecca (Corbin) Jackson, also a native of 
Kentucky, died in 1900, aged fifty-five years. They were both !Missionar\- 
I'aplists, and \er}' strong in their faith. To this union were born fi\-e chil- 
dren, namely: Elza A., who died in infancy; Mary Margujrite. deceased, who 
'•••as the wife of Ji. B. Lind ; Vi'iley .\., of Greene county. Indiana; Amand;i A.. 
•'ho died in infancy; and John M., of Aurora. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject was John T. Jackson, and his 
'•■'ife was Mary L. (Pirtle) Jackson, natives of Kentucky, and pioneers in 
^'•illivan county, Indiana, where Mr. Jackson died at the age of seventv-eight, 
•ind his wife at the age of ninety-three years. They were the parents of six 
•.hilrlrcn, namely: William, John II., James, Jefferson G.. riarriet and Eliza- 
'.-•th. 



644 UKAKBORN COl'XTV, INDIANA. 

The maternal grandparents were ^NTartin Corbin and his wife, natives 
of Kentucky, and early settlers in Sullivan count)-, Indiana. Mr. Corbin died 
in Kansas, at the age of eighty-eight, and his wife died in Kentuckv, aged 
about thirty-six. They had three children, Rebecca, Fdizabeth and John, 

John jM. Jackson was imited in marriage on September 7, 1904, with 
Daisy C. O'llaver, daughter of Thomas B. and Sarah (Pluffman) O'Haver. 
She was born in Greene county, Indiana, and Avas reared in Sullivan county, 
where she was educated, graduating from the Pleasantville high school. She 
later attended the Normal College at Danville, Indiana, and taught school 
for some years. This union was blessed with three children, Robert jNL, 
Dorothy L. and J. Kenneth. Dorothy died when three years of age. ^Mrs. 
Jackson is a loyal member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Thomas B. and Sarah (Huffman) O'Haver, parents of Mrs. Daisy 
Jackson, were born in Indiana. Her mother died on August 31, 1904. Her 
father is still living. Their children were Myrtle, Roscoe C. and Daisv C. 

The paternal grandfather of Mrs. Daisy Jackson was Pleasant O'Haver, 
for whom the town of Pleasantville was named. He and wife had ten chil- 
dren, as follow: ^Villiam P., Charles, Stanley, Frank, Thomas B., Grace, 
Louisa, Martha, John and Serilda. 

The maternal grandfather was Isaac Huffman, whose wife was Clarissa 
Huffman. To this union four children were born, onl}- one of whom lived 
to maturity, the mother of Mrs. Daisy C. Jackson. 

Doctor Jackson is a man of admirable character, and all through his 
honorable career his transactions with his fellow men have been above criti- 
cism. , , . , 



CflARLES R. BISHOP. 



Perhaps no other single factor has been so largely instrumental in putting 
the city of Lawrenceburg "on the map" as that great, progressive and thriving 
industrial concern, the Bishop saw and tool manufacturing plant, the product 
of which is known all over the country wherever tools of the description 
manufactured in this plant are used. The great advance made by this plant 
during the years that Charles R. Bishop was at the head of the concern and 
in active management of the same is conclusive evidence of 3»Ir. Bishop's ex- 
traordinary ability as a business manager and promoter of industry. Prior 
to May I, 1914, at which time j\Ir. Bishop retired from the active cares of 



. >r!! 



) .! ■{■r^'. OJ 



DKARCORX COUNTY, INDIANA. 645 

business, turr.iiig the maiiag-enient of the p;reat factory over to his son, Charles 
E., and Frank Gould, ilr. Bishop had full control of the factory and to hini, 
therefore, very properly may he .£,M\-en full credit for the creatiDn of one uf 
the largest concerns nf its kind in the central states. Beginning, at the tender 
age of thirteen years, to make his \\ay in the world, witliMUt a cent of cap- 
ital to hack him and with fcv, if an}-. heli)ful outsiile influences to give him a 
friendly push along the wav to fiirtuue, ]\[r. Bishop. l)v sheer force of energv 
and enterprise has risen to a post of commanding intluencc in the commercial 
and industrial affairs of this section, and no work assuming to present a faidi- 
ful reflection of the events of the times in Dearborn county would be com- 
plete without a comprehensive reference to his career as a "captain of indus- 
tr\-." It is with pleasure, therefore, that the present biographer assumes the 
task of setting out here the following- brief and modest re\-ie\\ of the life and 
the labors of the gentleman whose name the reader notes at the head of this 
biographical sketch. 

Charles R. Bishop was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, the "Queen City of 
the West," the son of John and INlary Ann ('R_\der) Bishop, both of whom 
were natives of England, the former a native of Devonshire and the latter of 
Ivent, who, at an carl}- date, came to America and located in Cincinnati, and 
who were the parents of three children, Charles R., the immediate subject of 
this sketch; Emily I., widow of Thomas Croxton, a resident of DiUsboro, this 
county; and George H. (deceased), a one-time well-known resident of Cin- 
cinnati. 

John Bishop, ujjon arriving in America, first located in Cincinnati, but 
later moved to Dearborn county, Indiana, where he engaged in farming, 
buying a farm of one hundred and sixty acres in the Dillsboro neightorhood, 
on which he spent the remainder of his life. He prospered in his farming 
venture and later bought another farn-i of one hundred and twenty-eig-ht acres. 
His widow survived his death, her death not occurring until some years later. 
John Bishop was the son of Joseph and Rachel Bishop, the former of whom 
was a capitalist and owned a larg-e estate in England, who were the parents 
of diree children, John, Joseph and Rel^ecca. Mr. Bishop's maternal grand- 
parents, Thomas and Isabel (Instep) Ryder, lived to ripe old ages. Thomas 
Ryder was a minister of the established church of England, four of whose 
children came to the United States, Mary An.n, Henry, George and Charles. 

Charles R. Bishop remaii-ied on the paternal farm near Dillsboro until he 
was thirteen years of age, at which time he decided that the life of the farm 
was not the life for him and struck out for the citv. Arri\-ing in Cincinnati, 



646. DKARIiORX COUXTV, IXDIAXA. 

tlie city of his !)irth. lie fiir a time worked in a cooper shop, but later took 
to carriage blacksmithing ami served an ajjprenticeship at this latter trade. 
His health beginning to decline, he was advised to get out into the open and, 
pursuant to this advice, secured a position as brakeman and fireman on the 
Ohio & Mississippi railroad, faithful ser\ice in this capacity soon bringing 
to him jiromiition, he being given a run as a freight conductor on the same 
road, this run being between Cincinnati and Seymour, Indiana. Further pro- 
motion presently gave him a run as a passenger conductor on the same road, 
this run being- between Cincinnati and St. Louis, and in this capacity he serve.! 
for many jears. Not content with this apparent slow advancement in the 
railroad service in this section, ^Ir. Bishop went west and was made division 
superintendent of one of the growing roads in the west, later being promoted 
to the position of district superintendent, which }X)sition he presentlv re- 
signed to take the position of general manager of the saw and tool-making 
plant at Lawrenceburg. Indiana, a concern in which he had been heavily in- 
terested from its foundation, and in which he still is interested, though living 
a life of quiet retirement in his fine home at Cincinnati, having turned his 
active interest in the business over to his son, Charles E., and Frank Gould. 

The great plant owned and controlled by the Bishop Saw and Tool INIanu- 
facturing Company, at Lawrenceburg, Indiana, manufactures all kinds of 
saws, together with tools of nearly every description and has established an 
enviable reputation in nearly every state in the L^nion. The motto of this 
company is "Quality, not Quantity," and the output of the plant susiains the 
motto in every respect, the quality of the product of the factory ha\ing made 
friends among the users of these tools all over the countiy. The Bishop saw 
and tool manufacturing plant is one of Lawrenceburg's chief industries and 
keeps several hundred men employed the year round, a fact upon which the 
members of the company very properly pride themselves somewhat. In the 
full sense of that much-abused term, 'Mr. Bishop rightly may be styled a self- 
made man, as solely upon his own initiative has his success been founded. 
Starting in life as a youth of tender years, with a very limited education and 
without a penny in his pockets, by industry and close application to business 
and by judicious management, he developed this extensive industry until it 
has become known far and wide as one of the leading industries of its kind 
in the country-. 

On November 12, 1S76, Charles R. Bishop was rmited in marriage with 
Amelia J. Doeneka, who was born in Hartford, Connecticut, the daughter 
of August and Elizabeth (W'olbert) Doeneka, natives of Germany, both of 



'■■^ DEARDORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 647 

whom are now dead, who were the parents of five children. Ameha, Louisa, 
Carohne, Joseph and Thomas. Augaist Doeneka was colonel of a Kansas 
regiment during the Civil War and was drowned while in the service. 

To Charles R. and Amelia J. (Doeneka) Bishop four children were l)orn, 
Benlah, Viola and Pearl (iwins^, and Charles E. Beulah married A. W. 
Frank, of Cincinnati, to which union one child has been born, Bett}sue. \'iola 
died at the tender age of four years. I'earl married Harry K. Prudden, of 
Harrison, Ohio. Charles E., who is unmarried, is in association with Frank 
Gould, now at the head of the Bishop saw and tool works and is gi\'ing full 
promise of following faithfully in the footsteps of his competent father as 
a manager and business promoter. He is a graduate of Cincinnati Technical 
School at Cinciimati, and of Nelson's Business College. 

Mrs. Bishop is a member of the Presyterian church, of which church 
Mr. Bishop is an attendant and warm supporter. He is a member of Hope- 
well Lodge No. 87. Free and Accepted ^ilasons. of Dillsboro, Indiana ; of 
Aurora Chapter No. 17, Royal Arch Masons; Aurora Commandery, Knights 
Templar, and of the Indianapolis Consistory, Scottish Rite ^Masons. His son, 
Charles E., also is a thirty-second degree Mason and is a member of the 
Cincinnati Temple, Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. 

Mr. Bishop not only has made a large success of his own business, but at 
the same time has taken a large interest in the general commercial and indus- 
trial progress of Lawrenceburg and for years has been recognized as one of the 
most public-spirited and influential men in that city, he ever doing liis part 
toward the development of the city's best interest in every direction. Needless 
to say, he is a man who is regarded with the highest esteem on the part of all 
who know him and there have been few more popular residents of Dearborn 
count V than he. 



PHILIP H. ALIO. 



Philip H. Alig, general farmer and stock raiser, was bom on August 24, 
1882, at St. Leon, Kelso township, and is a son of Philip and Magdalena 
(Wilhelm) Alig. Fie has always been an enthusiastic farmer, and after 
his marriage he rented a tract of one hundred and sixty acres from his father. 
which he cultivated for two years very successfully and then purchased the 
place outright. Having been satisfied with his land investment. Mr. Alig 
has never moved from the place on which he originally settled when he first 
went to housekeeping. He is one of the honored and respected citizens of 



648 DEARBORN COl'XTV, INDIANA. 

the township, in which he has held sc\"eral of its offices, among thcni being- 
those of, town marsh;',!, to which he was elected in 190S, serving two ^■ears. 
and in 1913 he was elected to the offices of clerk and town treasurer of St. 
Leon, winning out by a large majorit}-. He is a strong bclie\er in the Demo- 
cratic policies, and a member of the Catholic church at St. Leon. 

I'hilip Alig, Sr., was born at Cincinnati, Ohio, and came to St. Leon with 
his parents when but two years old. Here he was reared and received a good 
common school education, and the inducements offered in his home town 
have always been sufficient to prevent him seeking new fields of endeavor. 
To the original tract of thirty acres, purchased when he first ventured out on 
his own responsibility, he has added piece by piece, until he now owns a splen- 
did farm of four hundred acres, all of which he put under cultivation, ilr. 
Alig has always been a stanch Democrat, and held some of tlic township 
offices, one of wliich was that of town trustee, which he filled for twenty 
years. He is a devout m.ember of the Catholic church, to which he contributes 
liberally each year. His wife, Magdalena (Wilhelm) Alig. was born in 
Franlslin county, where she was reared and educated. They lia\e had ten 
children, !Mary (]\Irs. \A'erner), George, Philip H., Anna (Airs. Frcy). John. 
William, Otilda (Mrs. \A'illielm), and three \\ho died young. 

Philip H. Alig was married to Josephine Schuman, who was born on 
July 16, 1S90, the daughter of Joseph A. and Alice (Metzler) Sclui- 
man, a sketch of whom is presented elsewhere in this book. Mr. and ]\Irs. 
Alig have had two children, Joseph and Marcella. Mr. Alig and liis wife 
have many warm friends in the township, in which he has always taken a 
great personal interest in questions of general interest and benefit r)f the 
public. 



CARROLL L. STEVENS. 

The late Carn,ill L. Ste\"ens, for years one of the best-known and most 
influential citizens of Aurora, this county, was born on November 10, 1S80, a 
son of Charles Carroll and Suzanne (Fogelmann) Stevens, of Scottish de- 
scent. His birthplace was Aurora, Indiana, and there he was reared and 
received his elementary education. Upon com^pleting the public-school course, 
he entered Moore's Hill College, after which he attended Culver Aililitary 
Academy. Mr. Stevens \-\-as an. earnest member of the Alethodist church, of 
which his widow, ■who survives him, is also a member. At the time of his 
death, which occurred on September 4, 1913, at the age of thirty-two years 



•I'.:''. 



::-■:.< 




CAitKor.i. I.. s'ii:\i:x> 



DEAKBOKN COUNTY, INDIANA. 649 

:uk1 ten months, his widow and sons became liis si'.cccssors in liis store, which 
lias been cstabHshed o\-er sc\ent_\ -five years, duiinp; all i<i which time it has 
been in the Steven- I'amil). Mr. Stevens was allied with the Anmra ("om- 
niercial Chilj, and the Dearborn Chili, ami was ahvav'S greatly interested iri 
the welfare of his home cit)-. 

Charles Carroll Stevens, father of the late Carroll I... Stevens. \vas born 
in Indiana, being reared and educated at Aurora, where he was a merchant 
for a great many years. His death occurred on December 6, 1906. while mi 
a trip ti) hlorida for his health, at the age of fift}--six vcars. and his widnw, 
who was a native of Ohio, died on April 30, 1014, aged sixty years. They 
were both members of the }\[ethodist church. The only child born to their 
union was Carrol! L, Stevens, the suliject of this memoir, Charles C, StCN'ens 
was the son of William I'rank Ste\-ens, a native of Pennsyh-ania, wIk) came 
to Dearborn county when a mere lad, and after growing to manhood furmed 
a partner.ship with Josiah Chambers, establishing the firm of Chainliers, Ste- 
vens & Company in Aurora, where they handled a large and attractive line 
of merchandise, this store being C)nc of the oldest in the state. At the death 
of Charles C, Stevens, his son became his successor, whose son also, in turn, 
succeeded him, William F. Stevens married ]\Iary Scott, by whom he h.ad 
three children. Charles Carroll. Mrs, Ida ]\laltby, and ^^frs, Al)igail Cole, 
Suzanne I'^3gelmann was the daughter of William h^tgelmann, who li\-ed 
for a t'lne at Cincinnati. Ohio, and later moved to Loveland. in the same state, 
where he and his wife both died, the former at the age of seventy-nine, and 
the latter at the age of sixty-nine. They were the parents of the foll(.nving 
children: Mrs. Martha Townsend, Mrs. Lydia ^Morrow, Airs. Louise Will- 
iamson. Mrs. Stizanne Stevens and William. 

Carroll L. Stevens was married on January 15, 1003, to Marie Coutant, 
daughter and only child of Melvin Ransom and Lizetta (Melson) Coutant, 
She was born on December 24, 1881, at ]\IcComb City, Mississippi, and was 
.graduated from the high school at Springfield, Illinois. To this union two 
children, sons, were bom. Charles Carroll and Melvin Ransom. 

Melvin Ransom Coutant. father of Airs. Carroll L. Stevens, was born 
at Lawrenceburg, this couiUy. His wife died on January 29, 1900. and lie 
now makes his home at Kingston, New York, where he is master mechanic 
of the Ulster & Delaware railroad. Alelvin R. Coutant is the son of Man- 
rice and Mary Elizabeth Coutant, both natives of Nev.- York state, the former 
of French descent. Maurice Coutant, as a young man. was located at Coch- 
ran, Indiana, where he occupied the position of master mechanic in the shops 
of the Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern Raihvav. At the time of his death 



■■]r. ::t.-Mm! 



.Tt= ■ / ■; 



650 DEARBORN COL'NTY, INDIANA. 

he was sevent\'-se\"cn years old. His widow sur\ i\es him. and now makc> 
her home at Decatur. Illinois. They were the parents of four children. ]\kl- 
vin R.. William. Cleorge Edward and Ida. 

The maternal grandfather of Mrs. Carroll L. Stevens was Benjamip. 
P. Melson. whose widow is still living", at the age of ninety }'ears. lie was 
a nati\-e of ?\Iar}-land, of English lineage, and ]\Irs. IMelson was born in this 
coimty. Eenjamin P. INIelson was an early settler in Dearborn countv. where 
he followed the vocation of a merchant tailor. He died at the age of eighty- 
three vears. He and his wife were the parents of five children, Maurice 
Henr)'. David, Carl. Ella and Lizetla. L'pr)n the death of .Mrs. Suzanne 
Stevens, widow of Charles C. Ste\-ens. who, together with her son, the late 
Carroll L. Stevens, owned the large store which so long had been in the Ste- 
vens famil)-, r^lrs. Carroll L. Stevens assumed the management of the store, 
which .she and her son, Charles C. Stevens, now own and operate. 



HENRY WERNER. 



The gentleman whose name heads this sketch is one of the most prosper- 
ous and highly-respected citizens of Kelso township. Being well educated, he 
has afforded valuable assistance to the Democratic party, of whose policies ho 
has alwavs been a stanch advocate, throughout all of which he has clung to the 
more quiet life of a farmer, in preference to a home in the city. Springing 
from German stock, ^Ir. Werner inherits the cjualities of thrift and economy 
that have been prominent characteristics for generations back, and which will 
doubtless be prominent for generations to come, as time appears to have made 
no inroad on their efficiency. 

Hcnn- Werner, township assessor and farmer, was born on July 16, 1S70. 
in Kelso township, where he was also reared rmd educated. He is a son of 
Alichacl and !Magdalena (Hahn) \A'erner. His father ga^'e him a good edu- 
cation at the public schools of St. Leon, and after leaving school, lie assisted 
his father on the farm until he was married, when he took entire charge of the 
place, and managed it until in 1907, when he bought it outright, since which 
time he has continued as a general farmer. Since arriving at manhood, Mr. 
Werner has always been deeply in the policies of the Democratic party, to 
which he has given his earnest support, and in igoo was elected to the offices 
of clerk and treasurer of St. Leon, in v.hich he served a five-year term. In 
1914 he ran on the Democratic ticket for the office of assessor of Kelso town- 
ship, and was the successful candidate, the temi of office being four years. 



I.. .. 



j -'..y'.' .. ■r';,'^f ■ ,.;ij 



DEARBORN COUNTV, IXUIAXA. ■ 65 1 

lie was the first man in St. I.eon ever re-elected to a township or cour.ty 
office, and in general has been alive to the best interests of the conininnity in 
which he resides. 

Michael ^\'erner was born in Germany, in 1S21. bnt was fillcfl \vith a 
desire to see more of the world, and while still a yonng man he gathered his 
heli^ngings and de[)arted for the United States, selecting Cincinnati ;ls a ])lace 
of abode. He was a cabinet-makei' by trade, and followed this vocation until 
about 1875, when he bought one hundred and fourteen acres of wooded land 
in Kelso township. Dearborn county, near St. Leon, and having already 
selected his life partner, he set to work with a will and soon cleared enough 
land for his immediate needs, continuing as a general farmer until his death, 
in 1807. He was a loyal Democrat, and an attentive member of the Catholic 
church, to which he contributed freely. His wife. [Nlagdalena (Hahn) Wer- 
ner, was also a native of Germany. She was born in June, 1829, and died on 
April 19, 1907. She came to America with her parents, wdio settled in Kelso 
township. Mr. and Mrs. \\'^erner were blest with eleven children, namely. 
Katherine. Charlie. Emma, Louise, Adam, George, Joseph, Henry, Lena, aiui 
two who died in infancy. 

Henry Werner was married on September 9, 1891, to Mary Alig, who 
was born on April 19, 1872, in Kelso township. She is a daughter of Philip 
and iN'tagdalena (Wilhelm) Alig. A history of the Alig family is presented 
elsewhere in this work. To Mr. and Mrs. \\'erner have been born nine chil- 
dren, Ida (deceased). Helen, John, Oscar (deceased), George Lewis (de- 
ceased), Edw-ard (deceased) and Albert. Those now living are all at home 
W'ith their parents. 

Mr. Werner, besides being a successful farmer, holds a high rank in thf 
citizenship of his communitv, and merits the confidence which he now enjoys 



JOHN A. ANDRES. 



With a splendid education before starting his business career. Mr. Andres 
was fitted to "conquer any foe," and for eighteen years fitted others for the 
same strenuous business of foe-conquering, at the end of which time, he felt the 
need of a complete change to give him a much-needed rest. Being wise enough 
to know that resting did not mean merely doing nothing, he interested himself 
in a store doing a general merchandise business, in which he has also been very 
successful, and in all questions pertaining to the benefit of the citizens of 
his county, he has given his sincere support, believing it the duty of each one 



1 I'TiiZ 



6^2 DEARBORX COUNTY, INDIANA. 

to do his share in such matlers, whenever possil^le. INIr. Andres has been 
especially fortunate in lK?ing situated so he could follow his inclination and de- 
sires along' these lines. 

John A. Anilres, townsliio trustee and merchant, was born at Kelso. Kelso 
township, Dearborn county, Novemlier 19, 1874, and is a son of John and 
Rosina (Ilannnierle) Andres. He was educated in the parochial sclux^ls of 
Kelso, and Moores Hill College, finishing in 1894, after which he attended the 
Central Normal College, at Danville, Indiana, and being thus qualified, he at 
once began teaching school, in which line he continued for eighteen years. He 
finally felt the need of a change, both mentally and pliA'sically, and in 1914, 
when he was elected on the Democratic ticket, by a large majority, to the office 
of trustee, calling for a four-year term, he gave up his school work, and is now 
dividing his time between his official position of trustee, and a general store, 
in which he has been successfully interested since 1901. 

John Andres, Sr., was b<3rn in Rhenish Bavaria, Germany, ^lay 20, 1846, 
and died on February 29, 191 2. at Kelso, Dearborn count}-. At the age of 
twelve years, he came with his motlier to America, settling in Kelso township, 
where he spent his entire life. At an early age. ]\[r. Andres learned the wagon- 
maker's trade, and later became an undertaker, in which business he continued 
for forty years. After taking- instructions as an undertaker under Phillip 
Huber, he became expert enoug"h to manufacture his own coffins, and in ad- 
dition to his wagon-manufaccuring plant and his undertakipig establishment, 
in the former of which he was associated with John Probst, he w;is alsri inter- 
ested in a good-paying blacksmith shop, of which 'Sir. Probst was the man.ager. 
Another special line of manufacture, in which Mr. Andres was especially in- 
terested, was that of grain cradles, and in 1SS2, he still fiu-ther increase<l 
his source of income by opening a general store at Kelso, which he conducted 
until his death, in 1912. Notwithstanding the fact that he spent the most 
of his time and attention looking after his business in the village. Mr. Andres 
did not lose sight of the value and importance of owning a farm, and bouglu 
fifty acres of good, tillable land in Kelso township. He was trustee of Kelso 
township for a five-year tenn. His political beliefs .were with the Democratic 
party. His wife, Rosina (Hannmerle) Andres, was Ijorn in 1850, in Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio. She died in 1887, aged thirty-seven years. Mr. and Mrs. 
Andres were the parents of ten children, as follow : George, Joseph, 
John, Katherine. !Mar\-, Jacob. Balser, and three, who died young. George 
Andres was married to !Mar\- Tallnn. and is now living at Marion. Ohi<i. 
where he is employed as master mechanic by the Huber Manufacturing Com- 



vA. 



DEARBOKX COUXTY, INDIANA. 653 

panv. To this union have been born seven children. Rose, Cyral, Sarali 
George, Bertrand. Ang^ela and Robert, who died in infancy. Joscjih Andres 
was married to Catherine Ennis, and is a successful undertaker in Kelsn. 
Thcv have three children. }>Iary, Stella and Edith. 

The paternal grandfather of J'lhn A. Andres had the distinction of 
fighting under Napoleon. He died before his family left Ikivaria, the land 
of his nativity. 

John A. Andres ^vas united in marriage. June 5, 1901. with Cecelia 
Merkl, who was born in Kelso, Kelso town.ship, October 10, iSSi. and is a 
daughter of John and Elizal>eth (Walsman) ISIerkl. Mrs, Andres was reared 
and educated in Kelso, and both she and her husband are de\nui memliers 
of St. John's Catholic church. Five children have come to bless this union, 
namelv : Alma. Corinne, Leo, Virgil and Martha, three of whom are now 
attending school. 

Through his official position of township trustee and his honest method 
of transacting business, Mr. Andres is recognized as one of the best and mo^t 
able citizens of Kelso township. 



• i: " LOUIS FREDERICK FISCHVOGT. 

Louis Frederick Fischvogt, one of the leading farmers of Oay township. 
Dearborn county, Indiana, was born of German parentage in Cincinnati, 
Ohio, on July 4. iSz,2. being a son of John Henry and ]\Iargaret Soiihia 
(Corwes) Fischvogt, h^th of whom were natives of Hanover, in Germany- 
John Henry Fischvogt was born on April i, 1815, and immigrated to the 
United States in 1S48. He located first in Cincinnati and turned to the car- 
penter trade as his means of livelihood. He had learned the trade in hi-^ 
native land, but after coming here he again apprenticed himself for three 
years and in that tiine mastered the English language and American ways. 
He followed his trade in Cincinnati for some fifteen years and then came to 
Dearborn county w^here he purchased a farm on ]Mud Lick branch. ab(jiit 
one and one-half miles south of the then small town of Dillsboro. This farm 
contained fifty acres and he paid the sum of fourteen hundred and fifty d(>l- 
lars for it. However, he did not take up his residence thereon for the next 
two years, remaining in Cincinnati at his trade in the meantime. In i860 
he settled on his farm and remained there for the balance of his life. His 






•1 s..:'! :■:■:■> 



)! Mj' ■■■ :-l 



rl-i It -:o; ;•■ 



'>1 *•()!• -:-:/:- 



654 DliARIiORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

death occurred on July 16, 1877, at the age of sixty-t^vo \-ears. 'Slv. Fisch- 
vogt was a faithful member of the (lerman LiUherau church, scr\iug his 
local society as trustee for a nuniher of years. ile was a warm adherent of 
the principles of the Republican party and took a keen interest in the manage- 
ment of its affairs. John Henry Fischvogt was a son of Henry Fisch\'Ogt:, 
who witli his wife never left their native land. However, all of their four 
children (John Henry, Frederick, Louis and Sophia) came to the United 
States and here passed the remainder of their lives. 

IMargaret Sojiliia (Corwes) Fisclivogt. mother of the immediate subject 
of this sketch, was born in Flanover, Germany, in 1821, and in 1S47 -'"-' 
came alone to thi« countr\', settling in Cincinnati \\ ith friends. She worked 
out for a year and at that time met 'Mv. Fischvogt and was soon married, 
their wedding being celebrated in January of 1849. To their uniun were 
born eight children, namely: Henry, Louis, Frederick, Eliza (deceased), 
George (deceased), Frederick (deceased), Charles, Sophia (deceased), and. 
William. Henr}' married W ilhelmina Prnss and is living in Riplev countw 
He is the father of six children, Amelia, Anna, William, Tlieodorc, Emn':i 
and Ida. Charles married Minnie Stadtlaudcr and lives in Ohio couniy, 
this state, south of the tri\vn of Milttm. ?Te has tlu-ee children, Louis, Charles 
and Martha (deceased). W'ihiam married Emma Konig and lives at ]\b_iupt 
Healthy, Ohio. Lie is the father of seven children, Lillie. Edwin, Grace, 
Leslie. Cora, Jnhn and Emma. Margaret Sophia (Corwes) Fisch\-OQt was 
a daughter of Gerhard Corwes, who spent his entire life in his natixe land^ 
Her brother anil sifters \vere : Henry, Harr}-, George. ]\fargarct. Soplu'a, 
Louisa and Dorothy. 

Louis Frederick Fisch\'ogt rccei\'ed liis elementary education in the 
public schools of Cincinnati and also in Green township, IIamiIt(Mi county. 
He later attended the German schools at Farmers Retreat and South Dills- 
boro, this county. After completing his studies, he took up farm \vork on the 
family homestead near Dillsboro and remained there until 1873, when he 
took up farm work in various parts of Dearborn county. In 18S9 he started 
a huckster route, which he operated four years, living in Dillsboro two years 
of the time. Fie abandoned that enterprise an.d returned to the farm in 
Clay township belonging to his wife and in i8qS removed to his own farm 
which he had Ijor.ght fr^nn one of tlie heirs. In 1901 the family returned 
to hi"; wife's farm, where they still reside. 

On .August 16, 1877, Louis Frederick Fischvogt was united in marriage 
with Anna M. Louisa Plumer, born in Cincinnati on October 14, 1S56, a 



1 ;!i -■:,vi 






DKAKliORX COrXTY, IiXllIAXA. 655 

daughter of John W. and .\nn_it.' Mary (Lnhrsenl I'liuncr. John W. I'lumcr 
was born in Hanover, Germany, in 1S15, and died in lyor. at the advanced 
age of eighty-six years. Annie Ahiry Luhrsen was born in Oldenburg. 
Germany, and died in April of iS(38. when but thirty-two }-ears old. Upmi 
coining to this country she settler! in Cincinnati, where her marriage tnnk 
place. To John W'. PKuner and wife were born four children, Anna .\I. 
Louisa, Anna Louisa (deceased), John Henry, and John Christian (deceased). 
John Henry Plumer, who is a carpenter and farmer living in Dearborn countv, 
married Elnora M. Hocker and has six children, John (deceased), Emma, 
William, Sophia Elizabeth, Harry and Clara Elizabeth. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Fischvogt ha-\-e been born four children, nan.ielx-. 
John Henry William, Anna ALargarct Soph.ia, Carl Louis Henry and Carl 
George Louis. William, the eldest son, married Amelia Sandmian and li\"cs 
in Tipton county. He has four children, Dorothy Louisa, Aviary Elizabeth. 
Anna Leonora and Louis William flcnry. Anna Margaret Sophia became 
the wife of John Tepker, living in Hamilton, Butler county, Ohio. He is 
a blacksmith by trade and they have three children. Helena Dorothea, Erwin 
Louis William and Howard William Carl. 

The Fischvogt family has always been considered aniong the represeiUa- 
tive citizens of this commimity, the head of the family having always been 
known as a man of sterling qualities of character and entitled to the high, 
degree of respect which he enjoys. jNIr. Fischvogt is a member of the Lu- 
theran church of Dillsl.)oro, as is also his wife. His political support is given 
to the Republican party. He is keenly alive to the political questions of the 
hour and, while never seeking office for himself, is known to be a man of 
influence in his party's ranks. 



CHARLES A. OFF. 



Charles A. Opp, whose name commences this sketch has, by associating 
his interests with the various institutions of his home citv, arrived at a point 
of affluence that ought to satisfy the ambitions of more than the average 
individual, and no doubt, were he urged for an answer, he would admit that 
Fate has been most generous in dealing out her prizes. Tn these times of 
competition and trust-juggling, the man is fortunate who can earn from h's 
business investment a fair living, and when success such as Mr. Opp is en- 
joying rewards one's efforts, that man is especially favored. 



/ :r :■■ , ■,i,-.".'. 



656 DEAKKORX COUNTY, IXDIAXA. 

Cliarles A. Opi^, coal dealer, Aurora, Indiana, is a son of Anth(3ny and 
Mary (Heffclmire) Opp, and was born on January 16, 1S66, at Farnu-rs 
Retreat, Cresar Creek township, Dearborn county, Indiana, and was reare! 
on his father's farm. He attended the district schools and then took a course 
at a business college in Cincinnati, after which he became a commercial 
traveler, and at the end of nine years he associated himself with his brother, 
Frank ^l., in a g'eneral store at Farmers Retreat for a period of eight years, 
and then conducted it alone until 1904, when he came to Aurora and estai> 
lished himself in the coal business, in which he is still interested. In politics 
Mr. Opp's views are in line with the Republican principles, and his religious 
views are in accord with those of the Methodist church. }ilr. Opp is a 
director of the Aurora State Bank. 

Anthony Opp was born at Hessen Damistadt, and his wife was a native 
of Bremen, Germany. They were reared and educated in the land of their 
birth, coming to .America in 1849. They were early settlers in Cresar Creel: 
township, where Mr. Opp became engaged in merchandising, and also op- 
erated one of the first cooper shops in the township, and later conducted 
a blacksmith and shoe shop. FIc and his three brothers were men of such influ- 
ence that their neighborhood was called Opp town. He died there on the 
home place in 1S99, at the age of eighty years. Mr. Opp was very fond of 
travel, having made three trips to Germany, and was all through South 
Africa, but became t'loroughly Americanized and enthusiastic for the inter- 
ests of this country. 

He and his wife were members of the German ^lethodist church, and 
he was postmaster at Farmers Retreat for over thirty years. 

The paternal grandparents were Abraham Opp, and his wife, Elizabeth 
Opp, both natives of Germany. They immigrated to America at an early 
day and settled at Fanners Retreat, wdiere they died at an old age. They 
had eight children : John, Frederick, Jacob, Anthony, George, Catherine, 
Rebecca and Elizabeth. Their son Anthony was thrice married, his first wife 
being a Miss Dexhcimer, of Lawrenceburg, Indiana. To this union one 
son was bom, Philip, now- a resident of Portland, Oregon. Plis second wife 
was Mary (Heffclmire) Schmolsmire, widow of Casper Schmolsmire. To 
this union were born six children, namely: John F., of Cincinnati; Elizabeth, 
the.W'idow- of Isaac Shutts, of Seymour, Indiana; Sarah C, who married 
J. M. Pate, passed away during the fall of 1904; Frank M.. of Cincinnati, 
Ohio: Lydia K., wife of Christian Lubbe, of Aurora: and Charles A., of 
Aurora. His third wife was Mrs. Frederick Heffclmire. 



1 ^^'^:^^'.'' .; '^Mi .->:!,' ^i.,v 



< r; .;.i_iii/.A 



DEARBORN COUXTV, INDIANA. 657 

Mrs. Mary E. Opp was twice married, her first husband Iicing Casper 
Schmolsniire. Mr. Schmolsmire passed away during- the cholera epidemic 
of 18.-19. To this union three children were born, Mary, Henry and Louise. 
The only surviving child at this writing is Louise, wife of Martin ^^fat- 
ting, of Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Charles A. Opp was united in marriage June 6, 1S95, with Mary E. 
]3enton, daughter of John H. and Martha (Cole) Denton, of Aurora. Indiana. 
There is one son to this unicJn. Denton Y., who is now in high school. !Mrs. 
Opp was born in Aurora, December 9, 1S65. 

The parents of Mrs. Charles A. Opp came from one of the eastern states, 
and were early settlers in Aurora, \\here her father was postmaster for eight 
vears. He died in 1893, '"''^ her mother is still living. They were the par- 
ents of three children, Mary, Nellie and Cora. 

After his many years' experience in a commercial life Mr. Opp knows 
just how to meet the demands of his many customers. 



HERiMAN H. LEIVE. 



An Italian writer has said, "It is not by sleeping, but by working, waking 
and laboring continually, that proficiency is attained and reputation ac- 
quired." a sentiment that may apply truthfully to every self-made man. 
A splendid strength of character is his who, forced to confront obstacles early 
in the struggle of life, removes them one by one from his path to success, and 
finally finds himself a conqueror who not only has kept his own self-respect, 
but has won the esteem of his fellow men. This is what Herman H. Lei^e 
has done, and his life has thereby become an inspiration to the younger 
generation who are beginning to tread the same difficult path. Mr. Leive's 
first difficulty was overcome when he mastered the language and customs 
which he found in America, the new country to which he migrated when a 
lad of seventeen. It was then that he came with his parents, John Elenry and 
Cicrtrude (Obermueller) Leive, from Germany, where he was born on Sep- 
tember 3, 1842, in Oldendorf by Melle. 

During the Napoleonic War. the paternal grandfather of Herman H. 
Leive drove a team for the government. His occupation was farming, in 
which task he was helped by his good wife who, before her marriage, was 
Clara Bishop. To this union one child was born, a son, John Henrv. 

(42) 



■!■:■;: A 



n :icr:i'j' .■.!j/{' 



65S DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

The maternal grandfatlicr Oliennucllcr was a miller ami farmer. He and 
his wife were natives of German)', and lived to be quite aged. Their chil- 
dren were three in number, Henry, Gertrude and William, of whom the first- 
named was ijudfather to the subject of this sketch. 

To John Henry and Gertrude (Obermueller) Leive were born twcb.e 
children, namely: Henr_\' \\'., of South Webster, Scioto comity, Ohio; \\'iil- 
iam, deceased: Louisa, ^Irs. \\'illiam Sherman, deceased; Herman H., of 
Aurora, Intliana ; John Christian, of Cincinnati, Ohin ; Charles. decease<l; 
Catherine, who married Barney Lecker, of Cincinnati; Henry, deceased, whn 
was for several years an Aurora jeweler; August, a retired farmer of Aurora, 
and three who passed away in early childhood. 

John Henry Leive came to America with his mother, wife, and children 
in i860, first living in Cincinnati, afterwards purchasing a farm in Dear- 
born county, Indiana. This land which he proceeded to improve consisted 
of eighty acres in Center township, and here he lived until after the death 
of his wife in 1S73, whicli occurred in her fifty-eighth year. He spent the vear 
beginning 1876 in the old country, and returning to America, bought a tract 
of good land near Brockville, Salina count)', Kansas. But because of illness, 
his son Hemian brought him liack to Aurora, and he died at the home of 
his daughter in Cincinnati, in 1898. at the ripe old age of eighty-two. Both 
he and his wife were adherents to the Lutheran faith. 

When only a lad of seventeen Herman H. Twelve began his battle with 
life's realities by becoming an apprentice of the cabinet-maker and wood- 
carver's trade, in Cincinnati. His ne.xt ventures were in the grocerv and 
furnitiu'e business, and after some experience in these lines of trade, he 
moved to Batesville, in the year 1S66, at the time when there was in tlie town 
only one factory. It appears that business affairs did not run as smoothly as 
he had expected, and in a few months he returned to Cincinnati, and from 
there went to Louisville to open up a grocery store wnth his brother-in-law, 
William Sherman, at the same time working at his carving trade. After the 
death of his mother he returned to Aurora, which has been his home ever 
since. His first position there was with the Aurora Chair Factory, whose 
proprietor was John Cobb. He preferred, however, to have a business of 
his own, and in 1878 formed a partnership with Henry Wolka and John Fran^, 
who established together the Cochran Furniture Company, at Cochran, now 
a part of Aurora. One year later he and Mr. Franz bought out the interest 
of Mr. Wolke, and the firm became the Cochran Chair Company. Subse- 
quently, in 1879, August Steinkamp and Clemens Post were added to the 



;!i!.ji> 



DEARBORN COl'NTV. IXDIAXA. 659 

partnership, but this arrangement lasted tor only a vear, at the eml of 
vviiich, Mr. Post sold out, and Frederick Schmntte was adfled to the firm. 
In 1901 Mr. Lei\-e retired from active business, when William E. Stari; 
and ilarrv Schniutte became the sole owners, and devoted their entire time 
to the manufacture of chairs of all descriptiuns, selling- these in everv part 
of the United States. About one hundred and twenty emplovees vvcrc re- 
quired in the establishment. \\'hile ]\Ir. Leive still retains stock in the 
company, he gives his time to other business interests, being vice-president 
and treasurer of the Aurora Tool Works, a stock-holder m the Wvnu.'nd 
Cooperage Company, and in the Indianapolis Furniture Company of Aurora, 
as well as in the Aurora State Bank. 

Margaret Schwaka, of Cincinnati, became the wife of Herman FL 
Leive on December 3. 1863. To this union seven children were born, two 
of \\'hom passed away in infanc}', as fi.illow : Anna married John Ritter, ot 
Cochran, and is the mother of six children, Walter, Edna, Herman, Flildah, 
Anna and Harry; Mary married Henry Poehlmann, of Cochran, and of this 
union three children, Lucille, Lelah and Emma, were born; Carrie becaiv;e 
the wife of John Hang, a merchant tailor of Aurora, their children bein.g 
1-oretta. Esther and Alvin ; Amelia is at home; Matilda Ijecame the wife 
of William Sieffermann, also a merchant tailor of Aurora. Besides being 
an ideal wife and mother, ]Mrs. Leive has been of invaluable assistance to 
her husband in the social life which his prominence in the communitv at- 
tracted, and their home has been one of the popular gathering places for 
their friends. Both Mr. and Airs. Leive are members of the German Evan- 
gelical church, having identified themselves with it "when it was first estab- 
lished in 1S74. 

For over fifty years Air. Leive has been a prominent member of the 
Indei)endent Order of Odd Fellows, also belonging to the Encampment. Re- 
publicanism in this county has had a strong ally in the subject of tliis sketch, 
and for one term he was a member of the town council of Cochran. Not all 
of Mr. Leive's attention has been given to business and politics for, being 
a lover of music, he has been a singer, possessing a splendid tenor voice, and 
has done much for the community in bringing to it good music, this being 
made possible through his activity in the Saengerbund; of which organization 
he is at present treasurer. 

Herman H. Leive has risen above the common-place, and by business 
ability, foresight and an unusual amount of energy, has passed from the oli- 
scure life of a German youth in a strange land, to a place of prominence in a 



66o DEARBORN COUXTY, INDIANA. 

larg'e American coniniunit\'. thus showing the possession of innate abihty and 
integ'rity. He has been true to his ideals, and in his own success, has contrib- 
uted to the commercial activity of his town in which he is a recognized leader. 



TOTIN A. EOBRIXK. 



Thackeray, in introducing to "the gentle reader" one of the most inter- 
esting of his manv f.'unilies of story folk, observes, in one of his inimitable 
asides : "You may not like my friends ; very few people do like strangers to 
whom they are presented with an outrageous flourish of praise on the part of 
the introducer. But don't you acknowledge that the sight of an honest man, 
with an honest, Icn'ing wife by his side, and surrounded by loving and obedient 
children, presents something very sweet and affecting to }'OU? If you are 
made acquainted with such a person, and see the eager kindness of the fond 
faces round about him, and that pleasant confidence and affection which 
beams from his own, do you mean to say you are not touched and gratified?" 

It does not require an overly inclusive acquaintance in Dearborn county 
to make positi\'e the statement that there are many families in this favored sec- 
tion which might very properly be introduced in just such a fashion as the 
above, and it is a pleasure on the part of the present biographer to call the 
reader's attention, at this point, to just such a family as the great n(j\elist 
might have had in mind when he penned the above introduction, the family 
of the gentleman whose name heads this brief biographical review, John A. 
Bobrink, a well-known and popular grocer of the Greendale section of Law- 
renceliurg and the present efficient treasurer of Dearborn county, Indiana. 

John A. Bobrink was bom in Lawrenceb^urg township, this county, on 
February 22, 1867. the son of Henrj'- and Anna ( Niehaus) Bobrink, natives 
of Germany, to whom three sons and five daughters were born : John A., 
treasurer of Dearborn county: Henry, who lives in Lawrenceburg; Louis, 
who lives in Greensburg, Indiana; Alaggie, the wife of Enoch Hilderman, of 
North Vernon, Indiana; ]Mary deceased; Sophia, a teacher in the public schools 
of Lawrenceburg; Anna, the wife of jNIartin Linkmeyer, of Lawrenceburg 
townshijj, and Alice, the wife of A. J. Blackburn, of Tampa. Florida. 

Henry Bobrink was the only son of Albert Bobrink and grew to }Oung 
manlmod in his native land, receiving there the careful tuition prescribed b}' 
the German regulations. In 1866, shortlv following his marriage with .Anna 









tifiJ 



DEARBORN COl'NTV. INDIANA. 66 I 

Nielinus. the daughter of Albert Xieliaus, he came to America, pnicccilini;- im- 
mediately to Dearliorn C'>iint\-, hiihaiia. where he settled on a farm in Millar 
township, where he reared hi-^ family and where for fi:)rty years he enL;aged in 
farming', dairying and stock raiding. His wife died in 18S4. at tlie age of 
fortv-fonr rears, and he is nin\ living, at the age of seventy-two, in comfi:irtahle 
retirement on his fine farm of two hundred acres (the old William Marshall 
farm), in Lawrenceburg township. In his native days Henry Bobrink was 
a man of large influence in the neighborhood in which he lived and there are 
few men in the county today who have a wider acquaintance or a UKjre de- 
voted circle of friends than he. 

John A. Bobrink was reared on t!ie paternal farm in Lawrenceburg 
township, attending the district scliools of that township and the Lawrence- 
burg high school. For fourteen years he dro\e a milk wagon in the interest 
of his father's daily and for the past twenty-fi\'e years has been eng-aged 
in the grocer}- business in the Grccndale section of Lawrenceburg, in which 
business he has been quite successful, the scrupulous care and attention which 
he from the very start of this enterprise gave to the wants of his customers 
having made his store one of the most popular in the citw 

While thus engaged in business. >lr. Boljrink never neglected his duty as 
a citi;ren and was active in the political affairs of the city and count}', his in- 
terest in good government forcing him to the front. Li 19 14 he was nominated 
by the Democrats of Dearborn county for the office of county treasurer, was 
successful in the ensuing election and is no\v serving- \'ery efficientlv as treas- 
urer of the county, his fitness for this office being a matter of general recogni- 
tion throughout the county. This extension of his activities has not interfered 
with the business of his grocery, however, the store being continued at the 
same old stand, as for man}- years. 

On September 4, 1901, John A. Bobrink was united in marriage with Mar- 
garet Ulrich, who was born in Lawrenceburg, Indiana, the daughter of Chris- 
topher and Christina (Lommcl) Ulrich, natives of Germany and early set- 
tlers in Lawrenceburg. Mrs. Bobrink's father and mother both are dead. 
They were the parents of a number of children, four of whom li\-ed to ma- 
turity; Margaret, who married ]\[r. Bobrink; Frederick, of Lawrenceburg; 
Louise, the wife of Prof. Farl T. Gold, suj^erintendent of the Cincinnati, 
(Ohio) public schools; and I'reda. who is a teacher in the public -^chnuls 
of Lawrenceburg. ]\Irs. Bobrink's paternal grandfather came to America 
after the death of his wife in Germany and died in Lawrenceburg. He was 
the father of Christina, Mrs. Kate Hriefer, of Cincinnati, Charles and Chris- 



662 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

topher. Her maternal grandfalher, Peter Lommel, was a well-known resident 
of Lawrenceliurg- in an earlier day. He and his wife came to this coiintr)- fol- 
lowing- their marriage in Germany aiKl reared a large family in thJs county. 

To John A. and ^ilargaret (Ulrich) Robrink three children have been 
torn, Irma Mary. John Henry and Charles Louis. ]\Jr. and !Mrs. Bobrink are 
members of tlic Zion Evangelical churcli and are raising their children 
in the faith of that church. Yir. Bobrink is a member of Dearborn Lodge Xo. 
49, Knights of Pythias, and is an active participant in the affairs of that lodge. 

Mr. and !Mrs. Bobrink take a proper interest in the social affairs of the 
community and are deservedly popular in a large circle of social acquaint- 
ances, their friends according- them the confidence and respect to which they 
are so justly entitled. Mr. Bobrink is a man of large public spirit and is doing 
well his part in the promotion of the best interests of the city and county, of 
which he is so prominent and influential a citizen. His counsel and ad\ice on 
matters of public import are mucli souglit and on more than one occasion 
have proved of value to the community, his sound business judgment and 
political acumen gi\'ing much weight to his suggestions in affairs relating to 
the common weal. 



frf:derick schmutte. 

The gentleman whose biography is here presented has always followed 
the principle of doing whatever fell to his share, in the best possible manner 
of which he was capable, ^nd has instilled into the minds of his children the 
same sound, sensible views. 

Frederick Schmutte, president of the People's Building and Loan Com- 
pany, of West Aurora, Indiana, was born on February 7, 1847, in Hanover, 
Germany, and is a son of Frederick and Sophia (Fracking) Schmutte. He 

was reared and educated in the land of his birth, coming to America in Octo- 
ber, 1866, at the age of nineteen years, and engaged his services on a farm 
in Jackson county, Indiana, near Seymour, receiving one hundred and eighty 
dollars a year, including board. At the end of the first year, he went to 
Cincinnati and did teaming for a short time, after which he went into a cigar 
facton,'. during which employment he was married, and on March 15, 1882. 
he brought his wife and two children to Cochran, now West Aurora, Indiana, 



,(■■ .; .!■;;!■. :'l h 



DEAKBOKN COUNTY, INDIANA. 663 

where they ha\-c since resided. At this place Atr. .'-!chnuille entered into part- 
nership with Herman Leive, John Fi'anz and Angiist Sleinkanip, continuing 
for twenty-five years in the n\annfacture of chairs and rockers. 'I'iic factrir\- 
was then sold out to \\'illiani E. Stark and Harry Schmulte, and has since 
been continued inider the name of the Cochran Chair Company. Air. 
Schnuitte is a Rcjniblican, antl has demonstrated his loyalty hv serving one 
term as a memljer of the comnir)n council of Cochran. He ser\ed as presi- 
dent of the fire department for a number of years, and is at present a director 
in the following institutions: First National Bank, of Aurora; Dearborn Na- 
tional Bank, of Lawrenceburg ; the Aurora Tool Works, and is also a director 
on the executive committee of the River View Cemetery Association. AFr. 
Schniutte belongs to Almania Lodge No. 334, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. Both he and his wife are attentive members of the Evangelical 
Protestant church, on which board he officiates as president. 

Frederick Schmutte, father of the subject of this sketch, was a nati\'e oi 
Germany, where he served as a soldier in the regular army. He died in Wach- 
enfeldt, ag"ed over sixty years. He was a public-spirited man, and held various 
town offices. His wife, Sophia (Fracking) Schmutte, was also a native of 
Germany, and they were both members of the Lutheran church. Airs. 
Schmutte died while still a young woman, and Frederick Schmutte is the only 
one of their children now living. 

Both the names and history of the paternal grandparents are lost. They 
were farmers, and had four children, Frederick, Henry. Lena and Sophia. 

The history of the maternal grandparents is also lost, except that they 
were natives of Germany, where they lived and died. 

Frederick Schmutte was married on August 24, 1S71, to Dora Steinkamp. 
daughter of Henry and Wilhelmina (Biermann) Steinkamp. She was born 
on February 15, 1845, '" Enkter, Llanover, Germany. This union has been 
blessed with two children, Minnie and Harry. Alinnie is the wife of Paul 
Smith. They reside at Aurora, and have two children, Irvin and Kenneth. 
Harr)' is the cashier of the First National Bank of Aurora, and is married 
to Lilly Oerster. 

Heni^' and Wilhelmina (Biermann) Steinkamp were natives of Germany, 
the fomier dying there in 1S62, aged fifty-two years. His widow came to 
America in 1867, and died at Cincinnati, Alarch 3, 1905, aged ninety-one years 
and over. To this union were born eight children, as follow: Mary, William, 
Anna, Louis, Dora, Louisa, Henry and August. 

Mr. Schmutte, through his svstematic methods and straightforward deal- 



-; n 'K; 



rf., . r-f-^' 






664 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

ings with his customers, has placed himself in a position of high esteem with 
the citizens of the community in which he lives. He lives retired although he 
assists in directing the concerns in which he is interested. He is still active in 
body and mind and is a highly intelligent and interesting gentleman who has 
contributed greatly toward tlie advancement of this community and its people. 



,.,,.. , i , . . W. J. NELIKOAI. . \ ■ 

While the professional man makes his great and precious gift to his 
time, it must be recognized also that the American business man, by reason 
of his ability to organize, also is a benefactor. Especiall}- is that man to be 
credited who is fair in his commercial transactions, honest in his purpose, and 
unselfish in his desire to contribute to the general good, as well as to build up 
his own individual fortune. The gentleman mentioned at the head of this bio- 
graphical sketch is one who recognizes such obligation, and therefore it is wiih 
satisfaction that the present publishers include him among those who have been 
a real benefit to the community in which they have made their homes. \\'. J. 
Neukom is secretary and treasurer of the Indianapolis Chair and Furniture 
Company, of Aurora, and a native of Indianapolis, having been born there on 
May 8, 1872. 

\V. J. Xeukom is a son of Frank and Verona fEerner) Neukom, natives 
of Switzerland, who established their home in this country, and to whom eight 
children were born. These were: William J., of z^urora ; Frank, of Denver, 
Colorado ; George, deceased ; Grace, who married Edward Podmore, of Ander- 
son, Indiana; John and Walter, of Indianapolis; Sadie, wife of Thomas B. 
Campbell, of Indianapolis, and Robert, of Denver, Colorado. 

The paternal grandfather of Mr. Neukom was Henry Neukom, and he 
and his wife, Barbara, lived to a ripe old age, their deaths taking place at Ful- 
ton, Missouri. Their children were Conrad, Melchior, Frederick, William. 
Jacob, John and Barbara. 

The maternal grandfather was Rudolph Berner, his wife being Barbara 
(Conrad) Berner. The latter died while still a young woman, on shipboard 
coming to America. Mr. Berner, who was a silk weaver by trade, and later, 
kept a saloon, died in Indianapolis, at the age of eighty-si.K. He was survived 
by Verona, Barbara, Jacob, Samuel. Wilhelmina and John. 

Frank Neukom came to this country when a lad with his parents, who 



f.io 



;;ij .n. 



(V. , .'-.f;.;/: >lnr,-. i 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. ' 665 

settled in Fulton. [Missouri, where he had lived three year.s when the Civil 
War broke out. As a private, sen'ing under General Siegel, lie was in inan\- 
battles, his service covering three enlistments, and a period (jf tour }ears and 
four months. He was enrolled in the Third Regiment, Missouri Volunteer 
Infantry. The war over, Mr. Xeukom made his li\"elihood in the baker's trade, 
later beconu'ng proprietor of a first-class boarding liouse and saloon in Indi- 
anapolis. This was the old Chicago House, which he managed for man\- 
years. When he gave this up. he again became a baker. In iQoo, when he had 
reached his fifty-eighth milestone he passed away, his wife who had shared 
all his J03-S and sorrows, having preceded him by six v'ears, when she was 
forty-three. Both were at one time members cif the Lutheran church, but in 
later years they ^\•ere adherents of the ^Methodist Episcopal denomination. Air. 
Neukom belonged to the Grand Army of the Republic, and was a Republican 
all of his life. 

The subject of this sketch began his business career as "bell-bov" at the 
Spencer House, having gone through the public schools of Indianapolis. 
Shifting about for employment, he found work at the old Indianapolis Chair 
Factory, and although that was thirty years ago, he has maintained connec- 
tions with the firm ever since. Coming to Aurora, ]\lr. Neukom organized a 
company composed of Edward Schulz, Clarence B. Wilson, John Ullrich. 
W^illiam L. Hoskins and himself, for the manufacture of chairs, and in this 
enterprise has been engaged ever since. The factory, which occupies a floor 
space of fifty-five thousand square feet, employs one hundred persons, and 
sells its products in all parts of the United States. 

On May i8, 1898, W. J. Neukom married Cornelia Taylor, daughter of 
Alexander and Jean (Forrester) Taylor, of Indianapolis, in which city she 
was horn, on ^larch 6, 1S74. IMrs. Neukom's parents were natives of Scot- 
land,, the occupation of the father being the grain and fruit business. Both 
parents are now dead. i\Irs. Neukom's brothers and sisters are Mary, ^lar- 
garet, William, Alexander, Jennie, Annie and Edward. The daughter born 
to Mr. and Mrs. W. ]. Neukom is Jean Forrester Neukom. 

Mr. and Mrs. Neukom have entered largely into the social life of the 
vicinitv, and also have contributed much to the usefulness of the Presbyterian 
church, to which thev belong. Mrs. Neukom is domestic in her tastes, and a-^ 
a home-maker she has achieved the same degree of success that her husband 
has achieved in business. 

Mr. Neukom is a man of many interests. He belongs to Marion Lodg'? 
No. 35, Free and Accepted Masons; to Keystone Chapter No. 6, Royal Arch 



rr>,. I -■■</ 



^\\i 



'I .'.--■' ..'.■ I 



■ \'yy'<. ■s, 



666 DEARBORX COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Masons : also to the Knights of l^ythias. IndianapoHs Lodge No. 56 : and to 
the Maccabees. As a Repubhcan poh'tician, he is known not only in Aurora. 
but in Indianapolis, where at one time, he was president of the cily council. 
Alen possessing the sterling characteristics which are evinced by the life 
and work of the subject of tb.is biography are of distinct value to the com- 
munity fortunate enough to have their citizenship. Having won for himself a 
conspicuous place among the leaders of men, Mr. Neukom has still been true 
to his ideals, and has thus enlianced the value of his example to the younger 
generation. 



TOHX L. XOLTE. 



John L. Xolte, the subject of this sketch, like the most of the country- 
men of his ancestors, began life in the business that presented the best induce- 
ments, namely, farming. Being forced to take charge of the farm at his 
father's death, he earlv learned the successful methods of agriculture, and was 
well qualified for his chosen vocation, of which he could not have made a 
better selection. 

John L. Xolte, county commissioner, Dillsboro, Caesar Creek township. 
Dearborn county, Indiana, was born in that township, Novem]>er 17, 1871, 
and is a son of Christian and Mary (Willman) Nolte. He was educated at 
the district and parochial schools, and remained on the farm, following agri- 
culture, under the instruction of his father. When John L. was nineteen years 
old, in 1S91, his father died, and he was thrown upon his own responsibility 
in managing the farm. His mother died in 1S96, and he bought out the heirs 
to the one-hundred-acre fann. ^Iv. X'olte has always been an ardent su])- 
porter of the Democratic party, and in 1912 was elected to the office of county 
commissioner from this section, being re-elected in 1914. He is an earnest 
member of the Lutheran church of Farmers Retreat, and to which he con- 
tributes liberally. ]Mr. N'olte is also president of the Farmers' Telephone Com- 
pany, with headquarters at Friendship, Indiana, and is a director of the Ger- 
man -Mutual Fire Insurance Company, covering this section of the country, 
and of which his father was an organizer. Mr. Nolte was also township chair- 
man of the Democratic party in Caesar Creek township for six years. 

Christian Nolte, father of the immediate subject of this sketch, was born 
on November 12, 1833, in Hanover, Germany, and came to the United States 
with his parents when but five years old. He was a son of Charles Nolte, and 



I. - .:pl', 



•■\-.,' :-:■] 



DEARBORX COUNTY, IXWAXA. 667 

his early education was secured in Caesar Creek township, after which he as- 
sisted his father in agricultural pursuits until His marriage. ]Mr. Xolte was a 
slanch Democrat, and served as road supervisor for many years, bcino- later 
elected trustee, in which office he served two terms. His death occurred on 
May 23. 1S91, aged fifty-eight years. His wife, ^Fary (Willman) Xctlie, was 
born in Hanover, German}-, coming to the United States with her ])rothers 
and sisters at the ag'e of twelve years. They settled on Bear creek, Switzer- 
land county. There were two sisters and three brothers, b'rederick. Henry, 
Florence, William and ^Nlary. Mary A\'illman was educated in Switzerland 
countv. To ■Mr. and 3.1rs. Christian Xolte were born nine children, I'retlerick, 
Elizabeth, Louisa, William, Henry, Mar}', ^finnie, John, and Henry, who died 
in infanc}". Frederick was married to Annie Fleiderman, and li\'es at Aurora. 
They have two children, Clara and Marie. Louisa became the wife oi John 
Windhorst, and lives at Seymour, Indiana. She is the mother of three chil- 
dren. Alma, ILarry and one deceased. William died single at the age of thirty- 
nine years. Henry was married to Carrie Shicle, and is living in X^ebraska. 
The}- have a large family. Minnie is the wife of Benjamin Rueter, and resides 
in Scott county, Illinois. They have six children, ^lartin, Irvin, Harvey, 
Ehner, Jessie, and ^Matilda, who is deceased. 

Charles X^'olte, the paternal grandfather, was born in Hanover, Germany. 
He came to the United States and settled in Caesar Creek township, a Httle 
southeast of Farmers Retreat, on a farm of one hundred acres, in 1844, where 
he spent the remainder of his life. 

The maternal grandparents were nati\-es of Hanover, Gern-iany, and died 
in that country. 

John L. Xolte \\-as united in marriage on X'ovember 9, 1898, with ]Miss 
Amelia Miller, daughter of Rudolf and ]\Iary (Honsmeyer) Miller. She was 
born on October 6, 1S75, in Pike township, Ohio county, where she was edu- 
cated and lived until her marriage. To this union have been born four chil- 
dren, Edith, Clifford, Xorma and Gilbert; the three younger of whom are 
going to school. 

Rudolf jMiller, father of Mrs. John L. Xolte, is a native of Hanover, 
Germany, and came to the I'nited States when seven years of age, with hi.; 
parents, Henry and ]\Iinnie (Huhlmire) Miller. His wife, Mar\- (Hons- 
meyer) Miller, was a daughter of Fred Honsmeyer. Mr. and Mrs. Miller 
were the parents of nine children, John. George, Louisa, Christian (deceased), 
Edward (deceased), Theodore, and Christina (deceased). John was married 
to Anna Offencamp, and lives in Caesar Creek township. They have three 



r*rt:,- 



1:.j .. I ,, 



668 DEARBORX COUNTY, INDIANA. 

children, Alfred. ]\I_vrtle and W'iliner. Georo-e was married to AuKdia Wicli- 
man, and lives in Johnson township, Ripley county, Indiana. Thev have one 
child — Mabel. Louisa became the wife of William Eushnian, and resides in 
Washington townsliiii, Ripley county. Theodore is emplovetl in I'ike towi;- 
ship, Ohio count}", Indiana. 

Henry and ]\Iinnie (Huhlmire) ATiller, paternal £;-randparents of Mrs. 
John L. Xolte. were natives of Germany, and were earlv settlers at Cincinnati, 
moving- later to I'ike township, Ohio county, Indiana. 

John L. Nolte resides on a splendid farm of one hundred and seventy- 
two acres, wiiere he has won for himself a place in the front rank among the 
farmers of the countv, and where he has manv warm and admiring- friends. 



TOHN F. >.IEYER. 



The love of freedom, so dominant a passion in the breasts of all people 
. of the Teutonic division of the human race, has given to America man\- of 
this nation's best and most patriotic citizens. One of the best-known and 
most influential residents of Dearborn county, the gentleman whose name the 
biographer takes pleasure in calling- to the attention of the reader at this point, 
is the son of a German immigrant who fled from his native coiuitry at the age 
of nineteen to escape the oppressions uiider which his people were groaning at 
ihat tin-ie incident to the perpetual wars which were Ijeing v.aged in that coun- 
try, and \\-ho. with no outside influence, but spurred on constantly b_\- his in- 
flomitable energ\- and per^e\-erance, to which was joined the spirit C)f tlu'ift for 
which his countrymen are so noted, became one of the largest and \\ealthiest 
landowners in Dearborn county, and a man of wide influence in the section 
of the county in which he lived. 

John F. !Meyer was born on a farm in Miller to\vnship, this county, ad- 
joining the farm on which he now makes his residence, December 24, 1S54. the 
son of John F. and Mary ( Ba.sker) Meyer, both natives of Hanover, Ger- 
many. 

The senir)r John F. ]vleyer was the son of Flenry Meyer, a small farmer 
in Hanover. Oppressed by the sense of dependence under which the German 
people were suffering at that time by reason of the militaristic passion of the 
governing classes. John F. Meyer borrowed enough money to insure his pas- 
sage to America and. at the age of nineteen, came to this country, seeking 



' : '-"i.^ . ..f .'i.i-. 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 669 

freedom and a larger opportunity than any he reasonably could ever hope for 
in the Fatherland. Upon arriving in this country, he presently made his way 
to this county and, in company with John Garnier. beg;ui working for Colonel 
Ferris for the munificent wage of seven dollars a month. At the time he ar- 
rived in this county he could not speak the English language, but he quickly 
acquired not only the speech, but the customs and the manners of his doptcd 
cour.tr}'. Realizing the better advantages which awaited anyone of thrift and 
industr}^ on this side of the water, John F. Meyer presently borrow ed einiugh 
money to bring his parents to this side, and Henry [Nleyer and his wife joined 
their son in this county, remaining here the remainder of their lives, dying 
on the farm home which John F. Meyer was not long in establishing after he 
found himself on the upward course of things in this county. Ilenry ]\Ieyer 
was eighty years of age at the time of his death. Th.e death of his wife had 
occurred some years previously. Both these old ]icople were highly respected 
by their neighbors in IMiller township during the time of their residence there. 
John F. Aleyer, Sr., married ilary Basker, the daughter of Frederick and 
Sophia Basker, who also were immigrants from Flanover, who lived to ripe 
old ages in this county, the latter living to be eighty-eight years of age, and 
who had but two children, both daughters, ]\Iary and Dora. Spurred to 
greater endeavors by his marriage, John F. Meyer, Sr., presently bought a 
farm of two hundred acres, a part of the Roland tract in ]\Iiller township, and 
began farming on an extensive scale. He prospered and from time to time 
added to his original holdings until he owned thirteen hundred acres of as fine 
land as was embraced within the confines of Dearborn county. He lived en 
the original farm for many years, but late in life moved over onto the Law- 
renceburg and Indianapolis state road, where he died, in April, 1900, at the 
age of seventy-two years. His widow survived him nine years, her death not 
occurring until the year 1909, she then being seventy-four years of age, the 
home in -which this faithful and devoted old couple passed their last days still 
being known as "Three-lNIile House." The senior ^Meyers were devoted mem- 
bers of the Lutheran church and reared their children in the faith of that 
church. They were the parents of eight children, to each of whom th.e}- gave 
deeds for good-sized farms when the children were ready to start out for them- 
selves. These children were: Anna (deceased), who married Leonard Ran- 
dall, a Dearborn county farmer; John F., the immediate subject of this sketch; 
Henry J.; William; Dora, who married Henry Kaiser, a farmer in Ohio 
county, this state; Frederick W., who owns two hundred and forty-five acres 
in this county; George, of Lawrenceburg township, who at one time owned, 



570 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

but later sold the old homestead; and Alary, who died unmarried, in iS9<). 
The senior John F. Meyer and his wife were prominent in all good works in 
their community and were generous contributors to all worthy causes. Their 
devotion to the Lutheran church was pronounced, and they helped to build sev- 
eral churches and school houses. 

John ]■". Meyer, Jr., was reared on the paternal farm, in what then was 
a jwrtion of Miller townsliip, recci\"ing his education in the district schools of 
his neighborhood. He rcmain.ed at home until his marriage, at the age of 
twenty-three years, when he worked at farming on rented land, and on his 
father's death became the owner of one hundred and foity-five acres of the 
home farm. To this farm he lias since added, imtil he now owns a fine farm 
of three hundred and forty-five acres of fine land in Lawrenceburg township, 
and is regarded as one of the nK)st substantial and influential residents of this 
county. 

On February 4. 1877, Jolm F. INIeyer was united in marriage with ]\lar- 
garet Behlmer, who was born in Riple_\- county. Indiana, January 27, 1S37, 
the daughter of Court and Adeline ('Studebach) Behlmer. natives of Hanover, 
Germ.any, and early settlers in Ripley county, the former of whom died at the 
age of sevent}--five, and the latter at the age of sixty-two, and who were the 
parents of six children, Albert, Alargaret, z\nna, Henry, Lena and Dorn. 
Court Behlmer was one of five children born to his parents, the others being- 
Henry, Diederick, Albert Jlnd ^Margaret. His wife, Adeline Studebach, was 
the only child of her parents who grew to maturity. 

To John F. and }i[argaret (Behlmer) Meyer haA'e been born four chil- 
dren, as follow : Charles F., who married Elsie Schweps. and is farming one 
of his father's farms; Lena Adeline, who married J. J. Ott, and also lives on 
the paternal farm ; Clara Mary Dora and Margaret Anna, br.)th of whom are 
at home with their parents. ]\[r. and Mrs. Meyer are members of the Luth- 
eran church, and their children have been reared in the faith of that church. 
the family being active workers in the same. 

Mr. ]Meyer is a Democrat and for years has taken an active interest in the 
political affairs of the county. For thirteen years he was super\'isor of roads 
in his home township, and for two terms served the public very acceptably as 
a member of the county council, his sound business judgment and far-seeing 
knowledge of the needs of the people proving of much value to the public 
while he was serving in that capacity, yir. Meyer is a public-spirited citizen, 
and ever has been one of the foremost promoters of all measures for the bet- 
terment of local conditions. Fie is a man of large influence in the community 
and is held in the very highest regard by all who know him. 



.f 3Tb 



DEARBOKX COl'XTV. IXDIAXA. 6/1 

-MISS FA'A r,AYLY. 

Miss E^■a I'layh- is one of the bright, intelleclual woniiiii of Dearborn 
countv, Indiana, possessing great exeruti\'e ability throughout tier life work. 
Always equal to emergencies, and ne\-er at a Idss for the right word for tbo,-,o 
in trouble and distress, always kind and con-^iderate of those serving her, and 
gentle and sympathetic toward the sick, and at home wherever fate has de- 
creed she should be. 

Miss Eva Bayly, Cold Springs, Dearliorn count}', Indiana, was born on 
July 26, 1844, at [Nloores Hill, and is a daughter of James and Anna E. Wills 
Piayly. She was educated at ]\Ifiores Hill College, after which she taught school 
in her home town for three }'ears, and later at the Union school, near Cold 
Springs, and one year at the Mulford scliool. At the death of her father. 
Miss Bayly took over the farm, and after disposing of a portion of it, she now 
has forty-one acres, which she continues to manage, and for a change from 
farm duties, does sewing for her friends. She is an earnest Christian woman, 
having" joined the ]\IethocHst E]3iscopal church when tweU'e vears of age. and 
is interested in all church enterprises. 

James Bayly, father of the immediate subject of this sketch, was born 
on February 8. 1S20, at Wilmington. Indiana. mo\-ing to Cold Springs with 
his jjarents when quite young, remaining with them until his marriage, and 
. then bought a part of his fiither's farm, as well as se\'enty-three acres adjoin- 
ing. In 1852 ]Mr. Bayly had the gold fever, and went to California with a 
party, remaining there two years. On the return trip the boat sank, and he 
nearly lost his life as well as the most of his gc)ld. He fi^llowed farming ail 
his life, and died on April Q, 1873. aged fifty-three )ears. 'Sh. Bnyly was 
always a loyal Republican. He was a member of the [Methodist Episcopal 
church. His parents were Obadiah and ^Margarette (Branm^n) Ba}dy. His 
wife. Anna E, (Wills) Bayly, was born on July 24, 1S22. at Lexington. 
Kentucky, and moved with her parents to Dearborn county, whcir quite 
young, and was married here. She died on November 2, igi2, aged ninety 
years. Mr. and Mrs. Bayly were the parents of four children, Maggie, Eva, 
Zachary and Marcellus. 

Obadiah and ]Margarette fBrannon) Bayly, the paternal grandparents, 
were natives, the former of England, and the latter of Pennsylvania. When 
Mr. Bayly emigrated from England he settled on a farm at Cold Springs 
which he had entered, from the government. They were the jjarents of r.inc 
children, Theopholis, Obadiah. George. Thomas. James, Valeria, Lititia, \'ic- 
toria and Mary. 



672 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Miss Eva Bavly is highh" esteemed ami well beloved for her beaulifnl 
character and Christian spirit, and many citizens of the township have tender 
memories of her patience in imparting- knowledge in da}'s gone liy. 



CHARLES L. VOSTIEf:L. 

One of the most prominent stock raisers of Dearborn county, and a man 
who has a large circle of friends because he deserves them, is Charles Leonidas 
Voshell, of Sparta township. Mr. Voshell has given so many years to the 
occupation of stock raising and trading that in this community he is con- 
sidered an authority on the subject, and his advice and opinion is often sought 
by others in the same line of work. Mr. Voshell was born in Sparta, of this 
state, on April 14, 1S65. He is the son of George Cornelius and Mahala Jane 
(Johnson) Voshell, the former being a native of Petersburg, Boone county. 
Kentucky. He was born on November 18, 1S33. and lived in his home 
county until he v,as married. 

After his marriage, George C. Voshell removed to Sparta township, 
and purchased a farm consisting of eighty acres, and besides carrying on 
general agricultural pursuits, he traded in farms until he made his home in a 
village not far from Sparta, where he and his family lived f(3r several years. 
But often their thoughts would wander longingly back to the old place in 
Kentucky, where a happy- childhood had endeared every foot of ground, and 
finally the family returned to the old homestead in Boone county, Kentucky, 
where they lived for eight vears. At the end of this time, the land was 
ecjualh- divided among the heirs, and after the death of his wife, Mr. Voshell 
made his home with his son, until his second marriage. His second wife 
being Dorotha (Beckett) [McConnell. The newly married couple removed to 
Aurora. Indiana. Mr. Voshell is a Democrat. 

Mahala Jane Johnson, who afterward became the wife of George C. 
Voshell, was born in Sparta township, where she lived until her marriage. 
She is the daughter of John D. and Sarah (Brvmiblay) Johnson. The children 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Voshell were si.\ in number, these being, Harr\-, Frank, 
Elizabeth, Dana, Charles L. and Anna, who passed away in infancy. Harry 
married ]\Iamie Stalder. and is li\-ing in Indianapolis, where he is a member 
of the fire department. They have three children, Bernice, Helen and Dorothy. 
Frank became the husband of Eliza Lowes, and they have since occupied a 



I...r: 1. ,,:!,,: 






.nc/. 



DEARBORN CUCXTV, INDIANA. 673 

farm in Belleview-. Booiic county, Kentuck}-. Tiicir only child is a son nanicd 
Leroy. Elizabeth is the wife of James White, ami their home is the old 
Voshell homestead in Petersburg, Kentucky. They are the parents of four 
children, William, Alice, George, who is deceased, and an infant also deceased. 

The subject of the present biographical sketch was educated in Boone 
county, Kentucky, and after school days were over, was a valuable helper of his 
father on the farm, until his marriage. After his marriage, ho and his wife 
\\-ent to live on the old home place in Kentucky, remaining there for eight 
years. Events then shaped themselves so that their best interests were served 
by a residence in this county, and returning",, they have resided there ever 
since. Mr. Voshell purchased a fine tract of land consisting of one hundred 
and fifty acres, attended to its cultivation, and engaged in the business of 
stock raising. Later he added seventy-four acres, this giving him in all tv.o 
hundred and twenty-four acres. 

On October 4, 1887, Charles L. Voshell married Ida May Canfield. 
daughter of Holman and Hannah (Shuter) Canfield. Holman Canfield was 
born in ^Manchester township on August 29, 1S41, and later moved to Hogan 
township, and was married in 1S64. and bought a farm in Sparta township, 
where he engaged in general farming the remainder of his life, which was a 
useful one and one which gained the respect of all who knew him. Holman 
Canfield was an ardent Republican, a member of the Baptist church, and a 
Mason. He died on Januaiy 31, 1905, at the age of sixty- four. Hannah 
(Shuter) Canfield. his wife, was born in Manchester township, living there 
until her marriage. The date of her birth is January 10, 1846. The children 
born of this union were : Ida May, George W., Or\ille. Eugene and Cora 
Etta. The eldest son, George W., married Ella Slater, and took up their home 
in Frankton, Indiana. Their children are, Ethel and Rov. Orville E. married 
Alaggie Mendel, and is living now in Sparta township. Their only daughter 
is named Flossie. Cora Etta is the wife of Louis Pritchard, also living in 
Sparta. They are the parents of two children, Leslie and Mable. 

Holman Canfield was the son of Cyrus and ilary (Richardson) Canfield, 
the former of whom was born in 1818, and died in 1892. Cyrus Canfield was 
the son of Noyes Canfield, born in 1818, and Fanny (Taylor) Canfield. 
Noyes Canfield's father was Phineas Canfield, son of John Canfield, and his 
mother was Amy Newton. 

Ida M. Canfield was born in Sparta township on November 3, 1S64. and 
was educated in the common schools of that county. She was a dutiful daugh- 
ter, and during her lifetime at home, which was until her marriage, she did 

(43) 



6/4 ■ DEARHORX COUXTV, INDIANA. 

much to lighten the burdens of her parents, who hved the strenuous life inci- 
dent to those engaged in farm work. 

The children born to IMr. and Mrs. Charles L. VoshcU are as follow : 
jMahala. horn on October .[. iSSS; Purncll, May i8, 1897; Beatrice, December 
27, igoo; and two children who died at the age of ten }-cars. Mahala mar- 
ried Clarence \Miitefield, and lives in Sparta. They ha\-c two children, Charle-, 
and Jennie. 

^Ir. \'oshell is a Democrat, and is so much of a Democrat that one does 
not have to know him very long before finding out this fact. Politics is a 
very vital part of his life and he gives much time to its study and discussimi. 
Mr. Voshcll is a member of the Baptist church, and an enthusiastic and earnest 
member. He is also connected with the Odd Fellows lodge and the lodge of 
Modern Woodmen. 

Mr. Voshell is well known in the communit}- in ^\■hich he li\-es. He takes 
an actixe part in the subjects that interest him, and in the organizatiims 
which represent these subjects, and is sparing neither of time nor thought ncir 
money where he feels that these can be profitably used to pmmote the welfare 
of the community. 



FRANK BITTNER. 



North New Alsace lies in the southwestern corner of Kelso township, a 
few miles north of the Big Four railroad, the first settler in which is though.t 
to have been Anthony W'alliezer, a native of France, who came to this countrv 
in 1833. George Voglegesang. a native of Bavaria, settled here quite earh,-, 
and was the first village smith, thus starting the business that later grew to 
be of considerable importance at this point. Among those who soon followed 
in the footsteps of Anthony Walliezer were, John Decker, who openefl a 
grocery store, and James Cannon, who did a successful dry-goods trade. The 
first postoftice was opened in 1840, with John B. Kessler as postmaster, and 
it was not long ere the township was \\-ell represented by churches and 
schools. 

Frank Bittner is a son of Frank, Sr., and Mary (Numever) Bittnci", 
and a native of North New Alsace, Kelso township, Dearborn countv. He 
was born on September i, 1849, and attended the common schools of New 
Alsace. In ^Sf>q he went to Missouri, learned the carpenter's trade, and in 1871 
went to Indianapolis and worked at trade and got married. In about 18S0 



.';./.,[..: 



1 V 1 •'.'; I 






..;(.;•., hr! ..: 



DEARBORX COUNTY, IXDtANA. 6/5 

went lack to fiinninq- in Kel-;o township, and bought fift_\'-t\vo acres near 
ilie ukl liuiiicstcad in Ivel^n tnwnship, \\licre he has since niadc his lionie. He 
has gi\cn his supp-ua to the T'enmcratic jiarty, and has held a nunil)er vi th'j 
township ohices, was elected assessor in i88(), serving a four-year term, wlieu 
he was re-elected, and served ten years, in all. In 1900 he was elected town^ 
s!n'[) trustee, aiid in 1914 was elected to the office of count}- commissioner for 
district No. 2. hy a large majority, in which capacity he served a three-year 
term. 

I'^rank Bittner, Sr., was born in Bavaria, Ck'rman}-, in 1S21, and at the 
age of twenty-five, in 1846, came to the United States, settling in Dearborn 
county. He bouglit eighty acres of land in section 21, Kelso township, to 
\vhich he later added fifty-five acres more, and lived on the place until his 
death, in 18S8, at the age of sixiy-five _\ears. His attention was divided be- 
tvi'een general farming and sti-ck-raising'. ^Ir. Bittner \vas a strong supporter 
of the Demcicratic policies, but was modest, and ne\er sought public office. In 
religion he was a loyal member of St. Paul's cliurch, at Xew Alsace. r\Irs. 
P.ittner was born in 1824, in Jutvaria, and died in 1911. To this union were 
liorn nine children, Mary. Michael, Frank, }tlartin, George, John, Joseph, 
i'Vederick and Lewis. ]\Iary, now deceased, married Henr\- W'olfort, and they 
had six children. Frederick married ]\Jary Feller, and is a merchant in Ripley 
county. Lewis lives at Cincir.nati. 

Frank Bittner was united in marriage with Elizabeth Cook, daughter of 
Henry and Katharina CcKjk. She was born in Decatiu- count}', Indiana, in 
1855, 3nd li\'ed there until her marriage. I\Ir. and ■Mrs. Bittner are the par- 
ents of eleven children, namely: Frank, Katharine, Anna, Louis, John, liliza- 
beth, William. Mary, Henry, Robert and Leo. 

Frank Bittner, eldest son of the subject of this sketch, was married 
to Louisa W'ilke, and is now- li\ing at Cincinnati. Katharine is the \\ife of 
Martin Knue\-en, and is li\ing in Kelso tow-i-iship. Thev have five child.ren. 
John, Robert, Clara, Frieda and Francis. Anna is married to Peter Flausser, 
aiid is living on a ranch in Colorado. Louis married Amelia Schetzel, and 
is living in Ohio. They have two children, Frank and Flarry. John Bittner 
was married to Gertrude Parnell. and is superintendent in a rubber estai)- 
lishment at Akron, Ohio. They have one child, Paul. Mary is marrierl to 
Leo Roth, a contractor at Reading, Ohio. 

Frank Bittner is one of the most prominent men in the community iri 
which he lives, and is well liked by all who have the privilege of knowing him. 



676 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

HENRY HERMAN KNIPPENEERG. 

Heniy Herman Knippenherg, a well-known farmer of Lawrenccburg 
township. Dearborn county, Indiana, was born on April 23, 1S66, in Wilming- 
ton. Dearborn county, Indiana, the son of Herman and Elizabeth (Seiker) 
Knippenberg. 

The Kiiippcnbergs have been prominent in Dearborn county for more 
than half a century. Herman Knippenberg, who was born in Germany and 
who served the required period in the German ami)-, learned the stone mason's 
trade early in life, and after coming to America, about i860, settled in Cin- 
cinnati, where he worked in a pork-packing house. Later he worked as a 
farm hand near Aurora lUitil his marriage, which took place about 1865. He 
then rented a farm in Dearborn county and later purchased sixty acres in 
Manchester township, where he lived for eleven years. The remainder of his 
life was spent upon a farm on the Aurora road, in Lawrenceburg township, 
until his death on March 2. rgoS. ]\Irs. Knippenberg was the daughter nf 
Casper Seiker, who came to this country from Germany with his wife imme- 
diately after their marriage, and settled in Dearborn county, where he worked 
as a farm hand. He purchased sixt\- acres of land near Aurora and lived there 
for some time. Subsequently, he moved to Aurora and lived in that town until 
his wife's death in 18S0. The last years of his life were spent among his 
children. He died in 1895. 

After attending the district schools of Dearborn county and completing 
his education. Henry Knippenberg began working on neighboring farms as 
a farm hand. Subsequently he became a renter. During late years he has been 
very prosperous and is living on a farm of seventy-five acres owned by Jere- 
miah Hunter. 

Heiu'y H. Knippenberg was married on ^larch i, 1891, to Laura Hunter, 
who was born on July 10, 1861, in Dearborn county. After attending the 
public schools, she lived at home until her marriage. Mrs. Knippenberg is 
the daughter of Peter and Phoebe Hunter, the former a native of Pittsburgh. 
Pennsylvania, and the latter of Dearborn county. They had seven children : 
Jeremiah, William, John, and Laura, all of whom are living; and three 
daughters, deceased. Mrs. Knippenberg's father was a farmer all of his life, 
and at the time of his death owned a small farm of about eight acres. This 
eight acres is now owned by Mrs. Henry Knippenberg, Jeremiah and William 
Hunter, but is included in the farm owned by Jeremiah Hunter. 



'^^ " DEARBORN COUNTY, IXDIAXA, 677 

To Mr. and ]Mrs. l\nii)peiiberg have bet'ii born two cliikh'cn : luner^-, 
who is a city mail carrier in tlie Lawrenceburg postoflice : and Everett, wlio 
is a shipping clerk for the Rossville distilleiy. 

Not only is Mr. Knippenberg a well-known farmer in this count\-, but 
he is a man who takes a worthy interest in public questions and is considered 
bv his neighbors as a well-informed man. He is a man of genial personaliiv 
and is popular in the community where he has li\-ed many years. Ilis standing 
in this communitv is the best testimonial to his worth and merit. 



THOMAS JOHNSTON. 



Among the retired, successful citizens of Dearborn county is found 
Thomas Johnston, around whose family is centered a great deal of early 
history. Since the coming of the three Johnston brothers, David, George 
and Joseph, from \^irginia to this county, they and their descendants have 
been first in many of the progressive improvements for the benefit of the 
general public. From the \'er}' beginning of their residence here, they have 
accomplished difficult things, setting an example for those of a less venture- 
some disposition. Coming to a country of woods and wilderness, they found 
it necessan,- to cut out a road by which to reach their land, and soon afterward 
they erected the first grist-mill in this section of the country, 

Thomas Johnston was born on January i, 1828, in ^Manchester township, 
and is a son of Joseph and ]\Iary (Karney) Johnston. He grew up about the 
mill, and his early history is pretty well associated with that of the mill. His 
life has always been one of great activity, and the wealth which he accjuired, 
and which enabled him now to enjoy life, is the result of the prurience and 
good management exercised in his early business career. In 1855 he be- 
came county treasurer, serving two and one-half years, and is probably the only 
one now living who held office here so long ago, at which time he was only 
twenty-seven years of age. He always had great executive ability, and dur- 
ing the latter life of the old mill, although much younger than his two brothers, 
he was head miller and manager, but the dust proved very annoying to him, 
necessitating a change to outdoor work, and resulted in his taking up the life 
of a farmer, although not confined exclusively to this line of work. His 
attention was directed to real estate to some extent, and he was public spirited 



678' DEAKBCKN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

enough to serve in some of the township offices. Alx)Ut iSSo Mr. Johnston 
was on two committees to go over the bdoks of pulihc officials. 

Joseph Johnston, father of the subject of this sketch, was born on March 
22, 1793. in Frederick comity, A'irginia, and was a son of Da\id and Ehzalietli 
(Kyle) Johnston. He inimigrate(.l to Ohio in 1810. wlien about sixteen years 
of age. in compau}' w ith his mother and t\\o brothers, David and George, 
his father having died in A'irginia. In 1S12 the}- went to Vincennes, Indiatia, 
fording creeks and rivers, or Ijuilding rafts where streams were too deep to 
ford. At this time the war with the Indians was threatening, just before 
the battle of Tippecanoe, so acting under the advice of General Harrison they 
spent only one season there. From \'incennes they moved to Dearborn county. 

When ]\Irs. Johnston and her sons came to this county they settled on 
\\''ilson creek, near Aurora. In 1S15 they moved to a site on North Ilogan 
creek where Joseph Johnston and his two brothers built a grist-mill run by 
water power. They ground wheat, corn and buckwheat for the pioneer 
settlers of that region. In 1845 Joseph Johnston bought his brothers' in- 
terests and became the sole owner of the mill. He continued in the btisiness 
until his death in 1873, when his sons took charge of the mill. The mill had 
been overhauled and enlarged, and valuable improvements of the most ap- 
proved tN-pe were put in from time to time. In 1S82, at a time when milling 
was being revolutionized, the mill burned down, and as the future was \'ery un- 
certain they did not rebuild. At present, there is very little to mark the place, 
except the old brick smoke stack. The old mill served a territoiT from North 
Bend to Ripley C(5unty, and awav south, having at times nearl_\- a week's 
grinding ahead. Customers from a distance would be housed and their horses 
fed, which, although eating up the profits, served as an acU'ertisement. In ad- 
dition to his mill, Joseph Johnston owned about two hundred acres of land 
which had been entered from the government in the name of an elder brother, 
David. ^Ir. Johnston's wife, Mary ( Karney)' Johnston, was a native of Ken- 
tucky. To this imion were born the following children: John, George, 
Thomas, David, Columbus, James and Joseph. David died in 1876; James 
died in 1S58; Columbus was in the Flouse of Representatives and also in 
the State Senate two or three times. 

Thomas Johnston, the immediate suliject of this sketch, was married 
in September, 1867, to Abigail Heustis, daughter of Elias and Sarah (Ellis) 
Heustis. She \vas bom in Februarv', 1843. in ^lanchester township, Dear- 
born county. To this union were born four children. Joseph E. died in 
infancy. Anna Marj- died at the age of twenty-four years, when just finishing 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. ■ 6/9 

college at Moorcs Hill at the head of her class. She was graduated from the 
Lawrenceburg high school, at the head of her class. The two children now liv- 
ing arc Robert C. and David T. Robert C. was born on December 25, 1868. 
and lives with his father in the eastern part of Hogan township. He is married 
to Liiella Barkley. and has four children, Robert Preston, Stanley Maurice, 
Harold J-, and Laird Barkle\'; David was born on June 11, 1S76. He is im- 
married and is also at home with his father and mother. 

Elizabeth (Kyle) Johnston, the paternal grandmother, died on August 21, 
1S19, aged eighty-three years. She was a daughter of Joseph Kyle, a native 
of Ireland, and a son of Robert and Margaret Kyle. 

Elias Heustis, father of Mrs. Thomas Johnston, was a native of New 
York state, and located in "Manchester township about i8iS, and his wife, 
Sarah (Ellis) Heustis, was a native of Massachusetts. ]\Ii-. Heustis was a 
tavern-keeper along the much traveled road where he settled, and entertained 
many drovers and travelers. 

It would be a difficult matter to find one more entitled to the comforts of 
a retired life than Thomas Johnston, who numbers among his sincere and earn- 
est friends an enviable list of the representative citizens of Dearborn county. 



HENRY DIETRICH BOCKHORST. 

There is something lacking in the man who can ride past a beautiful fieUl 
of golden wheat, a fine apple or peach orchard, or a drove of fine Holstein- 
Friesian cattle and not have a desire to be the possessor of a farm. The sub- 
ject of this biography is among those earnest folk who know from experience 
not only the attractive side of farm life, but the hardships and disappointments 
which accompany it. 

Henry Dietrich Bockhorst. farmer, son of Henry and Mary (Elling- 
hausen) Bockhorst, was born on January 6, 1865, in Lawrenceburg township. 
He attended district school No. 6, and in 1885 was united in marriage to 
Alvena Leffler, who died in iSgi. Two children were born to this union: 
Clara, now Mrs. Green, of Hogan township ; and Ora, who lives with his 
uncle. William Bockhorst. His second wife was Marv- Smith, to whom lie 
was married on )ilarch 10. 1903. They have three children, Alton, Herbert 
and Robert. The last two were twins. 



_I ..,.,i( 



680 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. ^ 

Henry Bockhorst \v^.s born in Germany and came to America wlien qu'le 
young, settling at Spades. Ripley county, and was a farmer all his life. His 
wife also came from Germany at an early age, and after marriage located 
in Lawrenceburg township. They bought one hundred and forty-seven acres 
of land from his wife's father, and lived on the place the remainder i:>l their 
lives. This farm now belongs to Henry Dietrich Bi_^ckliorst, he ha\"ing i)ur- 
chased it from the heirs. There were ten children in this family : ^vlrs. 
Henr}- Lcfller, Sophia, Mrs. Alice Engleking, William, John, Louis, Henry 
and three who are dead. ^Irs. Henry Leftler has had si.xteen children, eight 
of whom are li\"ing, namely: William, John, Harry. Louis, Luella. Luzena, 
Mar\' and Lena. ]Mrs. Alice Engleking has four children. Harry, Estell. Will- 
iam and another. Louis has three children, Rhoda, Harry and Omar. 

Mrs. Henry Dietrich Bockhorst is a daughter of George and ^fargaret 
(Bolke) Smith. She was born in Hogan township. December 6, 1S72. and 
secured her education in the public schools. She is a member of the Lutheran 
church. Ller parents were born in Germany, and came tn America when 
very young, settling in Ripley county. After marriage her father moved to 
Aurora, Indiana, where he was engaged in farming. Lie later went to Hogan 
town.ship, where he rented a farm, and after living on it a number of years 
moved to Dillsboro, Indiana, where he bought a truck farm, which he sold 
in 1904 and went to Dinuba, California, where he has since resided. He 
served three years in the army. His wife, ^Margaret, died in 1895. He was 
married, secondly, to Alice Hehe, at Dillsboro. There were seven children 
by the first marriage, as follow : Harvey, John, who married and has three 
children, Carl, Russell and Clayton. Louis is married and has one child. Ray- 
mond ; Frank is married and has one child, Lorene ; Edward has one child. 
Hazel; Charles has four children; and Airs. Bockhoist. By the second mar- 
riage there were three children, Rudolph, Lois and Harriet. 



. ALBERT TRAVAXYAX GRIDLEY. 

Albert Travanyan Gridley, former county surveyor and civil engineer 
of Dearborn county, an educator of many years' standing in the county, a 
gallant soldier of the Civil War and a citizen who is fully representative of 
the best life of the commimit}- in which well nigh his whole life has been 
spent, was born on a farm three miles east of Cleves, Hamilton county, Ohio. 
on September 6, 1S47, the son of Francis Asbury and Caroline Elizabeth 



■ : . r , . , ...if! v,J 



-r-..' „ :' (! 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 68l 

I Duvain nridley, hotli of whom were natixcs of Ohio, the fcirmer born in 
Hamilton county and the latter in ]\Inskingum coiiiUy. 

]-"rancis Asbury Clridley was burn at Eeljire, Ohio, the smi of Re\-ili:i and 
L,ouisa (Pease) Gridley. natives of Xew York state and early settlers of 
Hamilton county, Ohio, where the_\- li\ed for many years and where their 
famil}- was rearetl. Revilo Gridley died at Rockport. Indiana, and his wife 
died at Ca])e Ciirardean, Alissouri, both being well alung in years when death 
overtook them. They were the parents of thirteen children, some of whom 
died in infancy or in early youth, but seven of wdiom lived to niaturit\- and 
to make their impiess upon the respective communities in which the\- lived, 
these being, beside the father of the immediate subject of this sketch, Cyprian, 
Chester, Mary, Sybil, Ethan and Henry. 

Francis A. Gridley was reared on the paternal farm in Hamilton coiiiily, 
Ohio,' receiving such education as the neighborhood schools affordcil, to 
which was supplemented the careful instructions received from his educated 
and intelligent parents. He became a proficient carpenter and the exercise 
of this vocation took hip-i, from time to time, to various places of residence. 
For a time he lived in Cincinnati, but his several moves ne\'er toeik him farther 
than thirty miles from the town of Cleves. He married Caroline Elizabeth 
Duvall, of Alukingum county, Ohio, the daughter of John anfl I'risciha 
(Standiford) Duvall. the former of whom was a native of Virginia and the 
latter of Maryland. John Duvall, who emigrated from Virginia to ]\Ius- 
kingum county. Ohio, with his parents in the da}-s of his early youth, was 
reared as a farmer of the pioneer period and died there well ad\anced in 
years. His wife lived to the great age of ninety-one years. John Du\'all was 
a soldier of the War of 1S12 and he and his wife were the parents of six 
children, Caroline E. Tolbert, who died unmarried, Priscilla Amanda, Xelson 
M., Harriet and Louisa. 

To Francis Asbury- and Caroline Elizabeth (Duvall) Gridley were born 
seven children: Albert T., the subject of this sketch; Ida, the wife of W'iH- 
iam D. Holliday, of Erookville, Indiana; Willie C, \vho died in the year 
191 1 ; Clara ]\I. (deceased), who was the wife of Charles Roberts, and three 
who died in infancy. In 1882 the Gridleys moved to Aurora, this count\-, 
where Francis A. Gridley died in 1903, at the age of eighty-five years. His 
widow still is living there at the advanced age of ninety years. 

Albert T. Gridley 's early youth was spent in Hamilton county. Olii'), 
and he attended the public schools at Cincinnati, beginning early to make 
his own wav bv doing such work as his hands found to do. When the Civil 



; 1 I'lfr ;■., • 



ll" ■\f}' 



I • ' :'1[I . ■ i':'",i;li i ' (y;3' 



,f--,--;: 



682 DEARBORX COl'NTV, INDIANA. 

War broke uut his youthful heart was fired with patriotic zeal to aid the cause 
of tlie Union, but the war was drawing to a close before he found an opportu- 
nity to enlist, his tender years being- a handicap to his ambition to be a soldier. 
At the age of seventeen, liowever, he succeeded in enlisting in Company I.. 
Thirteenth Regiment. Ohio \^oIunteer Cavalry, but was assigned to Com- 
pany M. of the same regiment, in which company he served as first sergean.t 
.for a period of fi\'e months, being mustered out on Julv 4, 1S65. I'pon his 
return to the peaceful pursuits of life, x'oung Mr. tlridlev engaged in teaching 
school and for se\'enteen \ears followed this profession, meanwhile quahf\ing 
himself for the practical work of surveying' and civil engineering. In 1SS2 
Mr. Gridley was elected county surveyor of Dearborn county and for twenty 
years was retained by the people in this position of responsibility, in that time 
performing a great and permanent ser\ice for the county. Since his retire- 
ment from the public office of surveyor, ]\Ir. Gridley has devoted his time and 
talents to such civil engineering work of a local character as lie may be called 
upon to ,perf<_irm, his fine technical and practical knowledge of the require- 
ments of such work bringing his services in much demand. 'Sir. Gridley has 
been the city engineer of the city of Aurora for thirty-three years continuoush' 
and had charge of the construction of the first brick streets laid in that city. 
Mr. Gridle}- has given considerable attention to the study of economics, and 
is the author of an interesting book, entitled "Man — Neighbor — Brother," 
which has attracted considerable attention in thoughtful circles. In 1900 h.c 
compiled and published an atlas of Dearborn county, wdiich has proved a very 
valuable wijrk and which has stood as an authoritati\e work of reference in 
this county ever since. 

On ]\Iarch 25. 1S75, Albert T. Gridley was united in marriage to Anna 
Mary Jenkins, lovingly known to her friends as "Minnie," who was the 
daughter of Samuel Jenkins, of hVanklin county, Indiana. To this union two 
children were born, both of whom died in infancy. Mrs. Gridley died on 
March 25, 1879, at the early age of twenty-two years, and in 1885, Mr. Grid- 
ley married, secondly, Ilora ^'vlaud Johnson, daughter of Thomas Johnson. 
to which union there has been no issue. 

^Ir. Gridley has a large and interesting following of friends and is very 
popular with his large circle of acquaintances. He takes a proper share of re- 
sponsibility in the good works of the community and no man in Aurora is held 
in higher regard that he. Mr. Gridley is a Democrat and his long experience 
in pubhc affairs and his sound judgment on matters of public policy give 
to his voice considerable weight in the councils of his party in Dearbo'-n 



if.ii; :■! \> •■:•;■» JJIi 



r' 1' ■ ■ .- 



DEARBORN COUXTV, IXDIAXA. , 683 

county nncl in tlie cit}- of .\urora. Pie is a good cilizen. in all that tb.ii^ niucli- 
alnised term implies, and very rightly is held in the highest esteem throughout 
the cou!it\ . nut only in social and political circles, but in business circles, hi.-i 
advice on matters of business policy often being sought and accci)tcd. white 
his earh' experience as a teacher has given a value to his suggestiijns along 
educational lines which even to this day is found profitable to the school au- 
thorities of the city and county. His, indeed, has been a well-rounded life. 
Possessed of the liighest ci\ic and political ideals, he has kept clear tlie \ision 
vhich inspires higher ideals of government and now, in the calm and pleasant 
evening of his life, as sage counsellor and friend, he still is doing nobly his 
work in his home community, his life being an inspiration to the youth wh" 
are seeking only those tilings \\hich are of good report. 



REV. MARTIN ANDRES. 

It is with peculiar pleasure that a writer approaches the task of recording 
something of the life and work of a man who has gi-\-en himself in the service 
of humanity, for it is certain that such a life and work have left an ineradicable 
impress upon the lives which it has touched. In reviewing even briefly the 
career of Rev. Martin Andres, the beloved priest of St. J'^seph's church, at St. 
Leon, one is reminded of the words of an American •who said: "Great hearts 
there are also among men: th.ey carry a volume of manhood: their presence 
is sunshine: their coming changes our climate: they oil tlie bearings of life: 
their shadow always falls behind them: tliey make right living easy. Blessed 
are the happiness-makers. They represent the best forces in civilization. 
They are to the heart and home what the honeysuckle is to the door over 
\\hich it clings. These embodied gospels interpret Christianit}'." 

It will be of interest to preface this biographical sketch with a statement 
concerning the predecessors of the present priest in charge of St. Joseph's. Tii 
1841 the Rev. Joseph Ferneding, of New Alsace, built a log church, placing 
it under the patronage of St. Joseph. After his departure, the church ami 
young congre,gation were attended succe-^sivelv by Rev. Michael O'Rourke, 
of Dover, Indiana: Rev. William Engeln, of St. Peters: Rev. Martin Stalil, 
of New Alsace, and Rev. Andrew Bennett, of Dover, until 1853. The Rev. 
Aeg. Moeshall was the first resident pastor, from March till November, 1853. 
The next is Rev. Arnold Pinkers, in 1854, succeeded by the Rev. Henry 



G84 DEARBORN COUNTY^ INDIANA. 

Koeriiig in 1S55, remaining until the beginning of i860. Under his auspices, 
the present church was begiui in 1S59. The cluuxh is of brick, one hundred 
and twenty by fifty-six feet. Rev. L. Schneider came in i860, remaining 
but six months. The Rev. Anthony Scheideler took charge in November, 
i860. He completed the church, built a new school and erected a parsonage. 
On July 28, 1874, Rev. John Gabriel arrived at St. Joseph's and remained 
until 1897, when Rev. A. Feigcn took charge. He built the present splendid 
new parsonage at the cost of four thousatul dollars. Rc\'. A. Feigen died "u 
April 28, 1902, and was buried in St. Joseph's cemetery on ^lay i, 1902. His 
successor was Reverend Andres. 

Martin Andres was born at New Orleans, January 28, 1855, and is the 
son of Sebastian and Gertrude (Sebastian) Andres. Sebastian Andres was 
born in Rhenish Bavaria, Germany, where he lived until he was thirty years 
old. After his marriage, which took place in his native country, he came to 
America, and settled in New Orleans, but remained there only six months. 
He then, with his family, migrated to Fli^yd county, Indiana, where, ha\'ing 
purchased eighty acres of good farm land, he began the culti\-ation of tb.e 
ground which furnished his livelihood the remainder of his life. He later 
added one hundred and forty acres. At the age of sixty-eight vears he passed 
away in the year 1892. He was a Democrat, and ? member of the St. Mary's 
church, of Floyd county. Gertrude Andres lived in Germany at the time of 
her marriage. She was a devout Catholic, bringing up her children in ac- 
cordance with the tenets of that church. Besides Martin Andres there were 
five children, namely: Elizabeth, William, Teressa, Nicholas and Peter. 

Alartin Andres had in early childhood and youth the environment and 
training necessary to prepare him for the priesthood, for the religious at- 
mosphere of the home was supplemented by denominational schools. Coming 
to Floyd county with his parents, he first attended the parochial schools located 
near his home at Floyd Knobs, until 1872. Next his studies were continued 
at St. Meinrad's Seminary, in Spencer county, Indiana, and he was ordained 
on June 11, 1881, by Rt. Rev. Francis Silas Chatard, D. D., bishop of Indi- 
anapolis. At that time he was appointed to a charge in Frenchtown, Indiana, 
at St. Bernard's church, where he remained until July, 1888. when he was 
transferred to Haymond, Franklin county, Indiana, the church being St. 
Mary's of the Rocks. Here he ser\ed until June, 1902, when he was sent to 
be the pastor of St. Joseph's church, at St. Leon, where he is living at pres- 
ent. Father Andres has since his pastorate here built up the material welfare, 
as well as the spiritual life of the parish. 






■( >,tj 



auJ 



■i! il-iT^nic.. ^ftl . •; i!l'V^ ifi 



DEARBORN COL'XTY, INDIANA. • 685 

Rev. Martin Andres is a man of marked mental attainments, as well as 
of forceful character, and as he goes aljout among- his jKviple, has won their 
refpcct, their admiration and their love. 



DAXIEL E. McKINZIE. 



Prominent for many years in the councils of the Democratic partv in 
Dearhorn count}-, and popular alike among- the leaders and the ranlc and file of 
that party, as well as with the people of the county generally, Daniel E. Mc- 
Kinzie, the present sheriff of Dearborn county, is making a splendid record 
in the office of which he took charge on January i, 1915. Dearborn county 
is well known among its sister commonwealths of Indiana for its standi 
Democracy, and Mr. Mclvinzie, undaunted by his defeat by a narrow margin 
of ninety-eight votes at the fiist primary in which he participated, received, 
in his second canvass, a plurality of seven hundred and thirty-six votes and 
was triumphantly elected, at the general election in 1914, by a plurality of 
nine hundred and seventy-six. 

Daniel E. McKinzie is one of a family of seven sons born to Daniel E. 
and Tabitha (Giffin) AIcKinzie. Of these sons, Joseph is deceased; Jacob lives 
at Aurora; Samuel is deceased; Clarence lives at Cincinnati; Daniel E., Jr., is 
the subject of this sketch: Charles and Harry live at Aurora. Daniel E. 
McICinzie, Jr., was born on the old Doc Swayles farm in Logan township., 
this county, on !March 27, 1863. His father, who was reared near Dover, 
Indiana, and who was a laborer and farmer, removed from Petersburg, 
Kentucky, to Aurora, this county, in 1871, and lived there until his death in 
1889. he then being- sixt}--fi\e years of age. His widow, who is still living, 
at the age of eighty-five, is a member of the Methodist church, 

Mr. McKinzie's paternal grandfather also was Daniel E. McKinzie, and 
his maternal grandfather was Samuel Giffin. The latter was a nati\-e of 
Indiana and lived in Dearborn county and died at .\urora. He was the 
father of seven children, as follow: Kate, Tabitha, Sarah, Charles, Samuel, 
David and John. 

When David E. McKinzie was seven years old his parents moved from 
Petersburg, Kentucky, to Aurora, and the latter city continued to be his home 
until Januar}' i, 1915, when he moved to Lawrenccbm-g and took charge 
of the office of sheriff. Sheriff ?iIcKinzie was first engaged in the ice business 



.3 i>V.V. 






686 ■ DEARBORN COUXTV, INDIANA. 

at Aurora, subsequently heini^ engaged in the restaurant business iov a period 
of seven vears, at the end of which time he engaged in the h\ery business and 
still owns a !i\ery Ijarn in .Aurora, liaxing o[)erated tliis barn for a [icriod of 
six years before his election as sheriff. He prospered in \.\u> business and 
became, during his residence in Aurora, a well-known citizen, not only of 
Aurora, but of all Dearborn count}'. 

Daniel E. IMcKenzic married Ella Co.x, daughter of Ilirani and Xancy 
(Kerr) Cox, and Iierself a native of Indiana, whose father died in 1S90. at 
the age of sixtv-se\en vears, after ha\'ing reared seven children, the other 
six being Elias, James, Jacob. John, Paul and Emma. ^Irs. Hiram Cox is 
still living and is now past eighty-five years of age. Hiram Cox was a flat- 
boatman during the Civil War, and a pilot on one of the Federal gun br)ats. 
performing distinguished service in behalf of the Unirm. He was one ui 
three children born to his parents, the others being Jacob and James, ]\Irs. . 
Pliram Cox was one of se\'eral children, among others being Xancy, Aron, 
James and l\Jary. 

To 'Mr. and ?klrs. ^IcKinzie have been born one son and one daughter, 
Paul and Pearl. Paul AicKinzie is now deputy sheriff of Dearborn county 
and is unmarried. Pearl died at the age of eight months. 

Sheriff McKinzie is a member of the Royal Arcanum. His son, Paul, 
belongs to the Knights of Pythias and is also a member of the Royal Arcanum. 
Since going to Lawrenceburg, the ]\IcKiiizie family have become popular 
socially in that city, where they maintain a comfortable and refined home. 
Already the recipient of a high honor from the Democracy of Dearborn county. 
Sheriff iIcKinzie"s friends predict for him even greater honors in a public 
wav. 



CHARLES MOS.AIEIER. 



When the election for township assessor was held in this township in 
1914, the man elected to fill the office by an overwhelming majorit}- was 
Charles Mosmeier. the subject of this sketch. Long residence in the neigii- 
borhood contributed to the cause of the election, but this particular selection 
was the result of personal popularity and public confidence in the man. 

Charles Abjsmeier was born in .-\dams township, Ripley county, Alarch 
2. 1S65, and is the son of John Alosmeier and Katherine (Christian) AIos- 
ineier. The former is still li\-ing, a hale and hearty man of eightv-one vears. 



■■•'.1. 



EEARBORX COUXTY, IXDIAXA. 687 

Like many other thrift}- early settlers of this seetion of the country, John 
Mosmeier was lx)rn in Germany, the date heing- April 30, 1834. I'.eing- s^nie- 
what adventurous in his taste*, he early sought his fortune in the new world, 
coming to America when a lad of nineteen. Landing at Xew Yoik, he trav- 
eled overland to Cincinnati, and later li\-cd in Ripley county, where he hegan 
the new life ou fort}- acres in Adams township. It was ahuut this time that 
his marriage occurred, soon ;ifter which he purchased forty acres adjoining 
his jilace. later adding another forty, and then twenty more, so that he now 
has one hundred and forty acres. Besides farming, Mv. Alosmeier has heen 
interested in politics, being- a Democrat, and is a prominent member of the 
Lutheran chiu'ch at Penn Town, ki|-jlev countv. He has a brother and sister, 
Michael :md Elizabeth, both li\-ing in the I'nited States. Katheriue (Chris- 
tian) Mosmeier, mother of the subject of this sketch, was a woman o\ such 
beautiful character that her memory is hallowed by all who knew her. She 
was born in Franklin county, in 1841, ai-id li\-ed w-ilh her parents until her 
marriage to John [Mosmeier, ha\-ing received her education in the local schools. 
In the building up of his material success, Airs. ^Mosmeier co-operated with her 
husband, and until her death, August 17, 190:2, she w-as a loyal and devoted 
w-ife. Hers was a life of unusual unselfishness. She was ever ready to forget 
self in ministering to the needs of others. She was a devoted wife and mother, 
and for her fan-iily and its i:appiness, no sacrifice w-as too gi-eat. It was 
characteristic that during her last illness, w-hich lasted nearly a year, she fre- 
quently spoke of the kindness of those who ministered t(5 her needs, and 
although she was a great sufferer, she bore her sufferings patiently and with- 
out complaint. 

The children born to John and Katharine Mosmeier were six in number: 
John, Charlie, Michael. \\'illian-i, Frank, and one who died an infant. John 
died at the age of tw-ent_\", }\Iichael w-hen a child of two, and William passed 
aw-ay at the age of thirty-four. Frank married Reca Guinter, born in Ri]ile\- 
county, Adams township, and their children are Harvey, Harris and Godfreil. 

After his schooling- -\vas completed, the subject of this sketch continued his 
farm work on the home place, helping his father until twenty-one years of 
age. On April 12. 18S8. the ceremony w-hich united Charles Mosmeier in mar- 
riage to Louise Clemence was performed, his bride having been born on April 
6, 1868, in Ripley county. She was educated in the local schools, and lived 
at home until her marriage. Mrs. Mosmeier's parents, George and Eliza- 
beth (Ale) Clemence, were both natives of Germany, but came to Ripley 
county, and were married there. Their children, otiier than Mrs. Mosmeier, 



'It ' 



■ I 



688 . DEARBORN COUXTV, INDIAXA. 

were Fred, deceased, George, John, Henry, Carrie, died an infant, and Lonise. 
George married ]\Iary Ilornbcrger, who Hves in Lawrenccville, Indiana, and 
is the mother of nine children, Emma, John, Edward, Ida, Albert, l,illiaii, 
Gertrude, Clara and Harry. John married Maggie Conrad, living in \\'illarn, 
Minnesota, two of their children being Harry and Lula. Henry, husband of 
Louise Gutapfel, is residing in Sunman, Indiana. 

iNIr. and j\Irs. Mosmeier continued to live in Ripley county f(jr three years, 
after which they purchased eighty acres in Dearborn county, tW'O miles south- 
east of Lawrenccville, their present home. In 1909 Mr. Mosmeier bought an 
additional eighty acres in Ripley county adjoining his home, and improved this 
land until it became one of tlie best farms in the county. Besides farming. 
Mr. Mosmeier owns and operates a corn shredder, and is interested in the 
Farmers National Bank of Sunman. 

Mr. and Mrs. INIosmeier are the parents of three children, namely: Clara, 
born on Alarch 15, 1889, is the wife of Fred Tegler, a farmer of Ripley 
county; Lewis, August 14, 1S94, and Esther, November 6, 1903. 

Mr. Mosmeier is known throughout the neighborhood for his strong 
Democratic principles. He has been more or less active in the party in which 
he has many warm fr'ends and admirers. Both he and Mrs. Mosmeier are 
well known and well liked in the communitv in which thev live. 



HENRY H. RULLMANN. 

Henr}' H. Rullmann, flour miller. Aurora, Indiana, is a son of Ernest 
H. and Louisa (Westerfeld) Rullmann. and was born on October 23, i86r, 
in Dearborn county, three miles west of Dillsboro, and was reared on his 
father's farm in Clay township. His education was obtained at the district 
and German Lutheran scliools, and after finishing school, he remained at 
home until nineteen years of age, when he learned the miller's trade, which 
he has since followed, covering a period of thirty-four years. He was first 
employed by Droege & Doenselman, remaining with them five years, being 
later engaged by Langtree. McGuire & Company, in the same mill. In 1891. 
Mr. Rullman organized the Star Milling Company, of which he was manager 
until 1897, when he sold his interest. He then did some prospecting for a 
new site, visiting different locations, but soon made up his mind, and at once 
set to work on the erection of the Acme Flour Mill, of which he and his 
brothers and A. H. Ebel are the proprietors, and of which he is the manager. 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 6S9 

Tlic responsibility and care necessitated by his undertakings told upon his 
Iicalth. and he was finally compelled to take a rest, covering a period of twenty- 
one months, when he went to Colorado, where he spent six months in an en- 
deavor to rcciqierate his health. ]\Ir. Rullmann is an independent Democrat, 
and was elected councilman on the Citizen's ticket, and is serving his first 
term. He is a director of the Wymond Cooperage Company, in which he 
owns considerable stock, and is also a director in the Commercial Clulj. 

Ernest H. Rullmatm, father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Ger- 
many, coming to America with his parents when but four years old. They 
settled on a farm near Dillsboro, where he spent his entire life, until about a 
year before his death, when he moved to Dillsboro, retiring from work. Dur- 
ing his farm life he accumulated considerable wealth, and owned a .splendid 
tract of land in Clay township, the most of which was cleared by himself an'l 
his brothers. Mr. Rullmann died in Dillsboro, in 1900, aged sixty-two years. 
His wife, Louisa (Westerfeld) Rullmann, was also a native of Germany, and 
came to the United States at the age of fourteen years. They were married 
in Clay township, and were the parents of eight children: Henry H., of 
Aurora; Louis H., who resides at Louisville, Kentucky; William H., Herman 
H., and Charles E., all reside at Aurora, Indiana; Anna, who became the wife 
of William F. Ivnollman, of Aurora, and two who died young. Mrs. Rull- 
mann died in 1910, aged about sixty-eight years. They were both members 
of the Lutheran church. 

The paternal grandfather was Herman H. Rullmann, whose wife was 
Maria Elizabeth (Bussman) Rullmann, both natives of Germany, and both 
dying in Clay township. Dearborn county, Mr. Rullmann at the age of ninety- 
one years, and his wife some years younger. To this union were born four 
children, Henry H., Ernest H., Margaret and Catherine. 

The maternal grandfather was William Westerfeld, and his wife was 
Angeline (Meyers) Westerfeld, natives of Germany, where they both died. 
To this union were born two children, Louisa and Elizabeth. Mr. Wester- 
feld -was twice married, and by his second v.-ife had three children, Minnie, 
Anna and Louisa. 

Henr>- H. Rullmann was married on August 23, 1883, to Minnie K. 
Rosse, born near Farmers Retreat, Dearborn county, and is a daughter of 
Henry and Catherine Bosse, by whom he has had six children, namely : 
Vina, William, Pauline, Walter, Alvin and Harry. Vina is a stenographer in 
the employ of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, where she has been for the 
past ten vears ; William is married to Ida Vinup, and is also etnployed as a 

(44) 



•d h 



690 DEAREORX COU.\T>-, IXDIAXA. 

Stenographer; Pauline lives at home; Walter is clerking in the office of the 
Baltimore & Ohio Railway, at Aurora; Alvin and Harry are in high school. 

Henry and Catherine Bosse, parenl? of Mrs. Rullmann, were horn in 
Germany, and are both dead. They had a family of four children, Sophin, 
Minnie K., Hannah and Helena. .Mr. Biisse was married twice, his first wife 
being a Miss Droege. They had seven children, Frederick, Henry, William, 
Garrett, Herman, Elizabeth and Mary. 

Mr. Rullman has. with the exception of the six months spent in Colorado, 
always. lived in Dearborn county, throughout which he has a large acquain- 
tance. He has been eminently successful, and has the confidence and respeci 
of cvenbody. In his manner, he is quiet and modest, and believes a man 
should show his character through his works, rather than through his words. 



AMBROSE E. STARK. 



The following brief sketch of the life of Ambrose E. Stark will scarcely 
do justice to his character, or the ability with which he has handled the op- 
portunities as th.ey have come to him thus far in life. Being well educated, 
and having the inherent cjualifications. he was fully equipped to take up the 
work in earlv life to whicli he has ever since given his undivided time and at- 
tention, and in which he has met with remarkable success. The Cochran 
Chair Company, of Aurora, with which he is connected, is one of the nuist 
prosperous concerns of its kind in the surrounding country. 

Ambrose E. Stark, vice-president of the Cochran Chair Company, Au- 
rora, Indiana, was born on February 27, 1871, at Versailles, Ripley county, 
where his parents settled when he was five years old, and where he was edu- 
cated in the public schools, as far as facilities and conditions permitted, lin- 
ishing the course in the public schools of Cochran, Indiana. After leavinc; 
school, he went to w^ork in the Cochran Chair Factory, in 18S5, with which 
institution he has been associated ever since, with the exception of two years 
spent at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. The first twelve years of his connection with 
his present business, Mr. Stark spent in the capacity of an employe, but since 
1907, he has officiated as vice-president of the company, his brother, William 
E., being the president, and Miss B. M. Smith occupies the position of secre- 
tary. The hist<5ry of this company dates from 1879, when it was organized, 
but it w^as not formed into a stock company until 1899. They now employ a 



1 ;i' ■•i'>o- 



■„ • DEARBORN CtJUNTV, INDIANA. • 69I 

force of one hundred and twenty-five people in the niauut'acture of finely 
finished chairs of even description, their gdnds being sold in all i)arts c,i the 
I'nited States. 'Mr. Stark is a firm believer in the Republican principle^, and, 
he is associated \vith Aurora Lodge No. 51. Free and Accepted ]\lasi)ns. ami 
is the present master of the lodge. 

Silas and Margaret E.. (Johnson) Stark, parents of the subject of llrs 
skeirh, were natives of Ripley county, Indiana, where the}' li\ed on a farm. 
In 1S73 ^Ir. Stark immigrated to IVttis county, ^^lissouri, niak-ing the trip 
by wagon, with his wife and fi\e children. lie settled on a farm, two miles 
from Green Ridge, in that st;ite, and li\-ed there until his death, h"ebruar\- 22, 
1875, aged thirt}-fonr years. His wife sur\ived him, and retm-neil \\itli her 
children to Riple_\- count}-, Indiana, in ]\Iarch of the same year, liut decided, in 
September, 1S77, to make Versailles her place of residence. After a few }ears 
here, Mrs. Stark again moved, in September, 1883, to Cochran, Indiana, 
where her son, A\'illiani, was employed in the store of Frederick Opperman, 
and her sons, Lytle and Ambrose, found emplo}nient with the Cochran Chair 
Company. She died at the home of her son, William, at Cincinnati, August 
31, 1914, at the age of sixty-nine years and past. Mrs. Stark and her family 
were all earnest members of the Methodist churcli. 

The paternal grandfather was Elijah Stark, \\hose wife was Margaret 
(Johnson) Stark. Fie was born in Virginia, and his wife was a native of 
Kentucky. They moved to Riplc}' county, Indiana, in 1S37, where he en- 
gaged in general farming". Prior to his marriage Mr. Stark was a carpenter 
by trade, but abandoned that work for the life of a farmer, of which he was 
one of the most prominent in Ripley county. Fle gave his generous support 
in all questions for the benefit and progress of his countv, in which he occu- 
pied some of the prominent offices, among which were those of county clerk, 
for two terms, and one term as county treasurer, in which position he was 
officiating when Alorgan went through that part of the county on his raid. In 
1SS5 ^Ir. Stark moved, with his wife and daughter, Anna, to Grant City, 
\\'orth county, ^Missouri, \\here he died, aged eighty-seven years, and his wife 
at the age of eighty-five years. They were the parents (jf the following chil- 
dren: James. \\'illiam, Flenry, Silas, Anna, Wilson, Calvin, Emery, and sev- 
eral who died in infancy. 

The maternal grandfather was William Johnson, a native of Schenectad}', 
Xew York, and his wife was Margaret E. (Shook) Johnson, who died at the 
•'ige of fifty-two years. He was a painter by trade, and followed that line all 
his life. Mr. Johnson went to the Civil War in Kilpatrick's Cavalry, and died 



■) !.;.il.: 



/ :.i;:i ,i;;':iii' 



692 DEAKBOKX COUXTV, IXDIAXA. 

in 1878. To this union were born six dauglitcrs : Margaret, Eliza, \\'ik';-, 
Fannie, !N[ati!fla and Jennie. 

Ambrose E. Stark was married on June 24, iSg6, to Lotiise Kerr, daugh- 
ter of Mahlon B. and Ehzabetli (Bruce) Kerr. lie and his wife are mem- 
bers of tlie Methodist Ei)iscopal church of Aurora, of which he is church 
steward, in ad(h'ti'in to his office of district stewardship, and his membership 
on the state board of tlie Inthana Sunday School Association. 

The parents of ]Mrs. Ambrose E. Stark were born in Dearborn county, 
and both died at Aurora, Indiana. Her father reached the ripe old age of 
eighty-seven vears. P'ive children were born to this miion, Walter, Julia, 
Emeline, Rachel and Louise. • 

The paternal grandfather of Mrs. Stark was Walter Kerr, who was born 
on April 23. 1799, at Guilford, North Carolina, and was a son of William 
and Elizabeth Kerr. His wife was Elizabeth Russell, who was born on June 
14, 1803, on the Licking river, Campbell count)-, Kentucky, and to whom lie 
was united in marriage on September 13, 182 1. Ten children were born {■'< 
this couple, as follow: Mary A., ]Minerva, Mahlon B.. Catharine, Rachel. 
Nancy J., Elizabeth, William. Charles and David. Minerva married a 3.1r. 
Hill, and resides at Aurora. Elizabeth is now Mrs. Terhune, of Rush county. 

The maternal gi'andfather of Mrs. Stark was named Bruce. He and his 
wife were pioneers of Dearborn county, where they cleared and improved a 
farm and reared their children, and where Mr. Bruce died, well advanced in 
years, as did also his wife. They w'ere the parents of a large family of 
children. 



EDGAR U. BAILEY. 



We cannot but admire the pluck and determination of a man who, in 
spite of long odds, keeps hammering away at a proposition until he overcomes 
all difficulties and clears for himself a pathway to a successful career. Mr. 
Bailey belongs to this class, and is deserving of praise and congratulations in 
making a second attempt at a business which, on first trial, failed to result as 
profitably as he had anticipated. 

Edgar U. Bailey, grocer, Aurora, Indiana, was born on January 13, 1869, 
in Ohio county, Indiana, and is a son of William G. and Eliza (]\lclienry) 
Bailey. He was reared in Switzerland county, and received a good education 
in the district schools. After leaving school he assisted his father on the 



DEARBORN COUXTV, INDIANA. • 693 

laiiu. until the time of lii? marriage, when lie engaged in farming on liis own 
responsibility, which he followed up to 1907, and then moved tn .Aumra, where 
lie went into the grocery l^usir.ess. X'ot finding business as he liad aniiciiiated, 
he returned to his farm, after a trial of four years, and resumed his agri- 
cultural pursuits for a short time, when he again, in 191.3, n.'turned to Aurora 
.and eng'aged in the grocery Ijusiness a second time, which business he still 
follows, under the firm name of Tlic Bailey Grocery Company, w ith unusu- 
ally successful results. Mr. Baile\- is a stanch believer in tlie Republican 
policies, and never fails to cast his vote on election day. He is an attentive 
and prominent member of the Baptist church, in which he occupies the office 
of treasurer. He belongs to Chosen Friends Lodge Xo. 13, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. 

William G. Bailey, the father of Edgar U., was a native of Indiana, and 
was reared in Dearborn and Ohio counties. He followed farming in Unicai 
township, Ohio count_\-, Indiana, and served three years in Company C, 
Eighty-third Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, as a private in the Civil 
War, at the end of which time he resumed farming. He owned a comfortable 
farm of forty acres in Ohio county. He died in Xovember, 191 1, aged si.xty- 
seven years. His wife. Eliza (-JcHenry) Bailey, is also a native of Indiana, 
and is the mother of four children: Edgar C, of Aurora; Anna E., wife 
of Charles Smith, of Ohio county: Elmer H., also of Ohio county ; and 
Nellie, who lives at home. Mrs. Bailey is now seventy-five years of age. and 
is an earnest member of the Metliodist Episcopal church. 

The paternal grandfather was Philander Bailey, and his wife was 
Elizabeth (Wethers) Bailey, both natives of Pennsylvania. They settled 
at an early day in Ohio county, Indiana, wdiere they both died, the former 
aged about fifty years, and the latter at seventy-five years. They became the 
parents of the following children ; Samuel, William G., George, who died 
in infancy, Rosanna, Matilda and ]\Iaggie. 

The maternal grandfather was Hugh ^IcHenry, and his wife was Mary 
(Stone) McHenry. The former was of Scotch descent, and a native of 
Pennsylvania, where he followed the vocation of a fanner, ^frs. McHem-y 
was also a native of Pennsylvania, but of German lineage. They migrated 
west at an early day, and settled in Switzerland county. Mr. IVIcFIenry died 
at the advanced age of eighty-seven, and his wife some years younger. They 
had the following children: Isaac, James, Irvin, Joseph, Sarah, Eliza and 
Mary. 

Edgar U. Bailey was married on Decemlx-r 24, 1893, to Elizabeth W. 



."••rl 



r.n 



694 DEARBORN COUNTY^ INDIANA. 

Cotield, daughter of Walker W. and Elizabeth (Ray) Cofielrl. She was 
born in Ohio county, near Hartford, January 20, 1S73. There arc five 
children to this union, namely: 01i\'e E., William Orville, Mildred E., Irene 
Ra_\- and l-^hvard ]\IcIIenry. ]Mrs. Bailey and two of her children are mem- 
bers of the Alethodi.st church. 

Walker W. Cofield, lath.er of Mrs. Bailey, was born in Kcntncky, and 
his wife, Elizabeth (Ray) Cofield, was a native of Ohio count}-, Indiana, 
and both are now deceased. They had three children, Elizabeth and two 
who died young. 

The paternal grandfather of ^Irs. Bailey was Robert Cofield, and his 
wife was Amanda (Wallingford) Cofield. natives of Kentucky. They moved 
to Ohio county at an early day. where he died when past middle life, and 
she when over eightv vears of age. Thev had a large famil}', as follow: 
Robert, John, Walker. .Stephen, David, Lida, Caroline, Elizabeth and 
Margaret. 

The maternal grandfather of ]Mrs. Bailey was John Ray, and his wife 
was Elizabeth (Monroe) Ray. He was a native of Pennsylvania. They 
were early settlers in Ohio county, and were the parents of the following 
children : Elizabeth, Jane, and Caroline, who died young. 

Mr. Bailey and his wife have a large circle of friends, and well deserve 
the lucrative business which they now enjoy. 



NATHAN STEDMAN. 



The name starting this sketch belongs to a descendant of good old 
Revolutionary stock, and is in every sense of the word entitled to be called 
an American. Mr. Stedman has been fortunate in more ways than having 
been born an American. His father established a plant at Rising Sun, Indiana, 
for a general foundry and machine business, which was later moved to 
Aurora, Indiana, where he trained his son in all the impi.irtant details of a 
business that was destined to become a factor in the industries of the town. 
The son came in as partner in his father's business in 1S67, and was fully 
qualified at the death of his father to take over the entire management of 
the business, in which he became even more successful than his father had 
been before him. 

Nathan Stedman, retired manufacturer, of Aurora, Indiana, was born 



'^'i r.i;. 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 695 

at Cincinnati, Ohio, July ii, 183S, and is a son of Nathan R. and Sarah 
(Ecldcn) Stedman. He grew to maturity at Aurora, from a lad of eleven 
years, and has lived there since 1849. His parents gave him a gockl education 
in the public and select schools, after which he went to school at Wilmington, 
to which place he was obliged to ualk. He then s])ent two years at college, 
and vhcn through, went to work in his father's foundry, where he s[)ent 
fitt\' years of his life. .At the death of his father, he succeeded to the business, 
and conducted it with the assistance of his sons, W. R. and (leorge M. Sted- 
man, until his retirement from acti\'e \\ork, when he turned it over to his 
second son, George, who afterwards sold it. Mr. Stedman has afliliated with 
the Masonic order fi:>r man_\- years, and was for a time a member of the 
Knights Templar. In politics he is an independent voter. 

Nathan R. Stedman was born in New Jersey, in 1814. and when quite 
young went to Connecticut, where he learned the molder's trade, after w hich, 
in 1S37, he went to Cincinnati, and a little later, to Rising Sun. where he 
started his first foundry, in partnership with Col. Pinkney James. In 1849 
Mr. Stedman moved his family and his foundry tn Aurora, where he o;in- 
tinued in business up to the time of his death, in 'Sbiy. 1884, aged sevent-y 
_\ears. His wife, Sarah (Belden) Stedman, \\as a native of Connecticut. 
She died about 1847. They were the parents of five children, namely: 
Nathan, of Aurora; Harriet, widow of A. G. Wilson, of Pueblo, Colorado; 
Abigail, deceased, who was the wife of James D. Parker; Sophia, who is 
now Mrs. J. W. Christie, of Norwood, Ohio; Frances, widow of John P. 
Stier, of Aurora, Indiana. Mr. Stedman was married, secondly, to Louisa 
Caldwell, by whom he had five children: Lucy, Seth, Hazen, Charles and 
John. Lucy became the wiie of Torrence Hurst, of Streator, Illinois, and 
is now dead; Seth, deceased: Hazen lives at Natchez, ]\Hss. ; John is a resi- 
dent of Hamilton, Ohio. The third wife of Nathan R. Stedman was ]\Irs. 
Sarah Jane Langley, whose maiden name was Stage, and by whom he had 
one child, Mary, who lives at Columbus, Ohio. She was married twice, her 
last husband being a Mr. Candler. 

The paternal grandfather was Nathan Stedman, whose wife was Belinda 
Stebbins. They were both natives of Connecticut, and both dier in the 
East. Mr. Stedman followed various pursuits, and was a soldier in one of the 
early wars. They were the parents of five children, namely : John \V., 
James, Nathan R., Hazen and Rachel. Grandfather Stebbins was a native 
of Massachusetts or Connecticut, where he followed farming all his life, 
except the time spent as a soldier in the Revolutionary War. 



696 DEARBORIN' COUM'Vj INDIANA. 

Nathan Stcclnian. the immediate subject of thii sketch, was unilec! in 
marriage on March 24, 1S59, with Elvira Smith, tlaughter of WilHam imd 
Rachel (Tcagarclen) Smith, and was born on February 9, 1S40. at Ang'ustn, 
Kentucky. To this union have been born four children, namely : Sarah 
R., William R., George Isl., and Vira Grace. Sarah R. became the wife of 
Charles C. Coimor, and is now deceased. She was the mother of two chil- 
dren, Ellen and Ruth L. \Villiam R. is now living in retirement, after a 
successful business career. His wife, Anna (Noble) Stedman, died several 
years since, leaving no children. George yi. became successful and has re- 
tired from an active business life. He was united in marriage with Jeannette 
Benedict, by whom he has two children, Nathan P. and Louise E. Vira 
Grace became the wife of Pinckney Flowers, and has two children, William 
H. and another. 

The parents of Mrs. Nathan Stedman were natives of Kentucky, nmi 
lived on a farm in P>racken county. They were the parents of the following 
children: Eliza, Jeremiah, George, Elizabeth, Elvira, Robert A. and some 
who died young. 

Nathan Stedman has led an exemplar)' life, and is one of the most 
highly-respected citizens of Aurora. 



MARC L. BOND, ^l. D. 



Marc L. Bond, of Aurora, Indiana, was born on ^larch 12, 1S59, in the 
same block in which he is now practicing medicine. He is a son of Richard 
and Eliza fBevan) Bond. After attending the public schools, he was gradu- 
ated from theAurora high school in 1S72, and then entered the Ohio ^ledical 
College, at Cincinnati, from which he graduated in 18S0. His shingle made 
its debut in Louisville, Kentucky, where he practiced for a period of four 
years, and then returned to his home town, where he established a practice 
in which he has become eminently successful. Doctor Bond is a member 
of Union Lodge No. 34, Knights of Pythias, and belongs to the countv and 
state medical societies, and the American Medical Association. 

Dr. Richard Bond was a native of Virginia. He was born on >.[arch 
22. -1822. in Wood county, and was the seventh son of Lewis and Lydia 
(John) Bond. In his eighteenth year he entered the New Gcne^;a Seminary. 
in Pennsylvania, and in 1S43 he began reading medicine with Dr. James 



J ■,::.]r: 






..'.ffifvj-. .-"•; '1 ' rn 



DEARF.ORN COUXTV, INDIANA. . 697 

Stevenson, of Greensboro, Pennsylvania, and in 1846 settled in Ripley countv. 
and in July, 1S48. mo\'cd to Aurora, where he hecanie well knnwn as a 
])h}sician of great skill and ability, and where bis goud judgment and effi- 
cient co-operation in the interest of his community placeil him in a pnsition 
of enviable prominence. He continued the practice of medicine in the county 
until the time of his death, which occurred while on a visit to his brother 
and .sister in Virginia, in 1904, at the age of eighty-four years. He was 
married on April i, 1847, to Eliza Bcvan, only daughter of Thomas and 
Elizabeth }3evan, who was born on June 11, 1829, and died in 190S. Doctor 
Bond and his wife were both earnest members of the Baptist church, and he 
was for several )ears jiastor in charge of the churches at Wilmington, Rising 
Sun and Aunjra, during which time he continued to practice medicine. Doc- 
tor Bond served as surgeon through the entire period of the Civil War. 
resuming his practice when peace was declared. Doctor Bond and his wife 
were the parents of six children, namely: Flora B. married John A. Conwell, 
and resides at Cincinnati ; Charles R. was scalded to death at the age of 
three years; Harry is deceased; Fannie died at the age of eighteen; Marc 
L., of Aurora; Elizabeth is the wife of Crawford S. Wymond, and resides 
at Louisville. Kentucky. 

Lewis Bond, the ]iaternal grandfather of our subject, was a farmer 
and a Baptist minister, and his wife, L)"dia (John) Bond, was of Welsh 
ancestry, and was born in Fayette county, Pennsylvania. Mr, Bond was over 
ninety years old at his death, and was killed by being thrown from a horse. 
His wife also lived to the age of ninety years. 

The maternal grandfather was Thomas Bcvan, whose wife was Eliza- 
beth Bevan, both natives of Ohio, and were very early settlers in Dearborn 
county. Mr. Bevan established his little family on a farm in Center township, 
about two and one-half miles from Aurora, which he cleared and improved, 
and where he reared his family. Like the paternal grandfather, he also 
met with a tragic death, in being killed by a horse, when about forty years 
old. yivs. Bevan siirvived her husband, and lived to the 'ripe old age of 
eighty years. They were the parents of three children, John, Thomas and 
Eliza, 

Dr. Marc L. Bond was united in marriage in 1894 with Lida Truelock. 
daughter of James Truelock and wife. Mrs. Bond was born on January i. 
1859, at Aurora, Indiana, where she was reared and educated. She is a 
uoman of culture and refinement, and has a large circle of admiring friends. 



• dT 



-..-■A ■'■'■:■:.. I i; ■.'.It 35(. 



-■ ■•' -"jfj 



698 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Doctor Bond is one of the most successful physicians of Aurora and 
ricinitv, and he and his wife enjoy the confidence and high esteem of the 
people living here. 



JOHN McCULLOl'GH. 



There is ahvavs considerable interest in accomplishing anything- on a 
large scale, and in the manufacture of drugs, in which the subject of this 
sketch is especially interested, there is a fascination not to be found in many 
other lines. While the profit to be gained is the most important feature, it 
is extremelv gratifying when one is able to combine both profit and pleasure 
in his daily employment. 

John ]\IcCullough, wholesale druggist, Lawrenceburg, Indiana, is a son 
of John C. and Louise F. CKoons) McCullough, and was born on December 
24, 1875, in that city, which is still his home. Here he attended the public 
schools. After his father's death, Mr. ^IcCullough and his brother, Edwin 
C, who attended Hanover College, and later was graduated from the Cin- 
cinnati College of Pharmacy, continued the business, with himself as president 
and treasurer, and his brother, William T., as vice-president, and Louise F. 
McCuhough as secretary. Mr. ]McCullough is a stanch Democrat, and is 
demonstrating his interest by sendng as a member of the city council. He 
belongs to Lawrenceburg J^odge Xo. 4, Free and Accepted ]\Iasons, Law- 
renceburg Chapter Xo. 56. Royal Arch ^iLisons, and also belongs to the 
Scottish Rite and is a member of Mystic Shrine, Murat Temple, Indianapolis. 

John C. McCullough is a native of Pennsylvania, where he was reared 
on a farm in \\'ashington county, and came west about 1865, settling at 
Osgood, Ripley county, Indiana, engaging in the dnig business. In 1874 he 
came to Lawrenceburg and established a store in X'ewtown, I-^-\vrenceburg, 
which he conducted until 188S, when he was appointed deputy internal revenue 
collector, under the administration of President Cleveland, which office he 
held about three years, and then resigned on account of ill health. He was 
then engaged in the drug business at Warsaw for a period of one year, when 
he returned to Lawrenceburg. establishing himself in Oldtown, where he 
conducted a wholesale business on a small scale. Seeing possibilities in a 
larger establishment, he again sold out and went into exclusive jobbing and 
manufacturing of drugs, which he continued until his death. He incorporated 
the business, in 1901, under the firm name of The McCullough Dmg Com- 



1 : 1 



DEARBORN COUNTy, INDIANA. ' 699 

pciny, with a capital str>ck o'f ten tliousand dollars, which was later iiicreasc:! 
to fifty thcmsand dullars, associating with him his sons, Edwin C, and John. 
Mr. ]\IcCnl!oug"h died in Septemher, 1906, aged fifty-six vears. Me and his 
wife. Louise F. (Koons) McCullough. h^th became members of the Fiist 
T'resbyterian church, in v.liich he was an elder. He was a Democrat, and 
g-:o-e his support by ser\'ing" as city clerk for two terms. His fraternal alli- 
ances were with the Lawrenceburg L-odge Xo. 4. T'^rec antl .\ccepted Masons. 
Mr, and Mrs. !McCullough had the following chikJren : Edwin C. T'''hn. of 
Lawrenceburg: "William T.. of Lidianapolis; and Harry, of Lawrencebmg. 

The paternal grandfather was John AlcCullough, and his \vife was 
Agnes P.. (Morrison) ^rcCullough, natives of Scotland. !\fr. McCullough 
died when a yoimg man, and his wife hvtd to be aljout ninet}- years of age. 
The}' liad four children: \\'illiam B.. !Mary, Martha and John C. 

The maternal grandfather was Charles T. Koons. and his wife was 
Sojihia S. Koone, nati\'es of Germany, who came at an earlv date to America, 
settling in Ripley county, Indiana, where ]Mr., Koons officiated as paymaster 
and auditor for the old Ohio & Alississippi Railway. He afterward moved 
to Lawrenceburg. and from there to Cincinnati, wdiere he died while still quite 
young. His widow still survives him at the age of eighty-nine years. They 
were the parents of a large family of children: Charles T.. Elerman W., 
Walter, Louise F., Sophia S. and others. 

John McCullough is a man of sterling qualities, and occupies a position 
of high standing as a citizen in his community. 



' ■ LOUIS WILLARD COBB. 

Louis ^^'illard Cobb, son of the late O. P. Cobb, was born in Aurc^ra, 
Indiana, .A^pril 29, 1S47, and died on December 29, 1912. All of his life, with 
the exception of the years he was away at school, and in pursuance of pro- 
fessional studies, was spent in Aurora. He attended the celebrated Chick- 
ering Institute at Cincinnati, where he made a brilliant record as a student, 
A unique feature of his graduation was the delivery of his commencement 
oration in Latin. Later he entered Yale College and was for two years a 
student at that institution. Here, as formerly, his grade as a student was of 
the highest rank, and the training he received here furnished the foundation 



•fl' ■;. 



• u: { 



].■':!., .M't-.i isau'" 



700 , DEARRORX COCNTV, INDIANA. 

for the hig-hcst culture and qualified him for the most exact educational tests 
of the times. It is no di.sparag-ement to others to say that Mr. Cohb was one 
of the best equipped men in his fund of knowledge and in the accurac\- nf 
it, in the community. He was a master in the use of English, in both its 
spoken and written form, as all who knew him and his writings can well 
attest. 

In early life it was !Mr. Cobb's ambition to become a lawyer. With this 
in view, he took up the study of law and for a time was a student under 
T. D. Lincoln, in the latter's office, in Cincinnati. But after some time, con- 
cluding that the field of journalism afforded the best opportunit^- hn" the 
accomplishment of the most successful constructive work m the civic, moral 
and social betterment of the people, he gave up the law and took up the latter 
profession. 

His career as an editor and publisher began in April. 1873, when he 
bought the Dearborn Independent, at Aurora, Indiana. In that occupation 
he continued his life work with the same paper, until the time of his death, 
December 2C). 1912, lacking four months of coinpleting his fortieth vear of 
service in his chosen vocation. 

Mr. Cobb was a man of strong convictions and high ideals. He stood 
for the right in all civic and public affairs, and had the best interests of the 
people at heart. This sentiment is evinced in the line appearing continuf>usly 
below the name of his paper, "Devoted to our own locality, we labor for its 
interests." So far as the policy of his paper was concerned, it can be said that 
in all matters of local interest it stood as a fearless cliampion of the rights 
and sacred interests of the community at large, regardless of the fear or 
favor of anyone. And so strict was he in the observance of this policy, that 
it was maintained throughout his life at the cost of serioiis financial los^ and 
personal hardships. 

It was a matter of great pride to Mr. Cobb, and a thing of far more 
importance than it might at first seem, that he was the first newspaper :nan 
in the state to ojien the columns of his paper for the full publication of kical 
church news. This was a concessi(jn to the churches which was quickly 
followed by other papers throughout the state, and so general has become 
this practice that a jiaper without a church column is now the exception and 
not the rule. 

Louis W'illard C(.ibb was the second son of the late O. V. and Caroline 
(Foulk) Cobb, and through his father was a descendant of the noted Re\-olu- 
tionarv War hero, William Crawford. Louis ^\''illard Cobb was married on 






■> ■■■ , ,.^vl ,i-i,, 



DEARBORN COUNTY^ INDIANA. 70 1 

September 30, 1S75. to Mary Emma McCreary, \\lu>, with three cliildrer:, 
Inez S., Frank Mac and L. W'illard, Jr., survi\e him. Since his death b.is 
widow, Mrs. Mar}' E. Cobb, and his daughter, Inez S., have continued the 
pubhcation of the paper to which his hfe and interests had all been devoted. 



JOSEPH RUSSELL HOl'STON, A. M. 

The biog'raphy of a man of fine education and character serves as a 
photograph for future generations, and gives cause for regret in not having 
had the pleasure of a personal acquaintance. It provides food for thought 
for his descendants, and serves as the whip that urges them on to accomplisii 
the best of which they are capable, and fit themselves to take their place in 
human affairs. 

Joseph Russell Houston, superintendent of city schools, Aurora, Indiana, 
is a son of William and Jennie (Russell) Houston, and was born 
on Febniary 29, 1S64, at Sparta, Indiana, and was reared on his father's 
farm. His early education was obtained at the district school, and he later 
was graduated from ^Nfoores Elill College in 1893, with the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts, and two years later with the degree of Master of Arts. He began 
teaching when twenty }-ears old, and has followed that vocation ever since. 
He was principal of the Cochran public schools four years, and was then ap- 
pointed superintendent of the Aurora public schools, which position he has 
held for the past nineteen vears. Professor Houston is a loyal Democrat, and 
a member of the Baptist church. He belongs to Dearborn Lodge, Knights of 
Pythias, and the Modem Woodmen of America. 

William Houston, father of the immediate subject of this sketch, was 
born in County Antrim, Ireland, and came to America when but twelve years 
old, with his parents, who settled in Sparta tow^nship. Dearborn county, In- 
diana, where he grew to manhood. His wife, Jennie (Russell) Houston, 
was eight years old when she came to America with her parents. After his 
marriage Mr. Houston rented farms for several years, and then bought a 
small tract on the Lawrenceburg and Aurora road, where they spent tlie 
remainder of their lives, Mr. Houston dying in May, 1913, and his wife in 
January of the same year, aged eighty-one and seventy-five years, respect- 
ively. Both were members of the Presbyterian church. To this union vere 
born ten children, namely: i\!artha, Mary, Joseph R., Sarah^ William, 



y02 DEARBORN' COUNTV, IXDIAXA. 

Sanmel, Hattio. Frederick and two who died in infanc}'. Martha is Ihx- 
wife of W. J. French, and resides at [Nloores Hill, Indiana ; ^lary is now 
Mrs. Edward Adkins, and is also a resident of Moores Hill; Joseph R. n:alces 
his home at Aurora; Sarah became the wife of Henry Bohrink, of Lawrence- 
burg; A\'illiam !i\-es in Lawrenceburg township; Samuel is in busiriess at 
Brownstown. Indiana; Hattie lives with her br(^t]ier \\"illian), and Frederick 
lives at Brownstown. 

The paternal grandfather \\-as Samuel Houston, anil his wife was ~\h\\ 
Houston. They settled in Sparta township in pioneer days, where they 
followed farming, and spent the remainder of their lives, dying at a good 
old age. They had a large family of children ; Hugh, John, William, 
Thomas, Samuel, James. Martha, Mary, James, ^Margaret, and others. 

The maternal grandfather was William Russell. Both he and his wife 
were natives of Ireland, of Scotcli-Irish descent, and were early settlers in 
Sparta township. Dearborn county. Mr. Russell was a prominent member in 
the Sparta Presbyterian church. He died aged about fifty years, and his 
wife lived to an old age. To this union were birn five children; Jennie, 
John, William, Martha and Joseph. 

Joseph Russell Houston was married on August ii, 1897. to Dai-y 
Holliday, daughter of William and Louisa (Gridley) Holliday. Mrs. 
Houston was born on January 23, 1875, at Wynn, Indiana. She is an earnest 
member of the Presbyterian church. 

William Holliday, father of Mrs. Daisy Houston, was born in Indiaria, 
and his wife, Louisa (Gridley) H(.)lliday, was a native of Ohio. They were 
early settlers in Franklin county, where Mr. Flolliday was engaged as a 
wagon maker, being located at Brookville. He was a soldier in the Ci'.il 
War, serving in Compan}' I, One Hundred and l-'orty-sixth Regiment, Indiana 
Volunteer Infantry, ser\ing eij^ht months at the close of the war. His death 
occurred January 7, 1003, aged fifty-two years. His wife is still living. 
Their children were ; Edward, Nellie, Daisy, Mary, William and Frank. 

The paternal grandfather of Mrs. Houston was Samuel Holliday, and 
his wife was Mary ( Isgreeg) Holliday, natives of Pennsylvania and Mary- 
land, respectively. Mr. Holliday was a wagon maker by trade. He and 
his wife lived to an ath^anced age, and had the following children ; Squire, 
Elizabeth, Hester, Jane, ilartin and William. 

The maternal grandfather of Mrs. Houston was Francis Gridley, who 
married Caroline Du Vail, both natives of Ohio. Mr. Gridley followed farm- 
ing all his life, and died at the age of eighty-five years. His wife still 



/It 



/v;'/ - ,/ -An; : 



'[olA ^-V 



DEARBORN COUXTV, INDIANA. 703 

survives liim at the age of ninety years, Inle and hearty. To this union 
were born the following children: .\lberl, Louisa, Ella, Clarissa, U'illiani 
C. and IMary. 

Profe^.-^or Houstor! has the satisfaction of knowing that he is one of the 
most \alual)Ie servants of the public, and that his work will remain a marker 
Ki h.is nieniory, kmg rears after his usefidncss lias ceased. 



GEORGE \Y. SA\\'DON. 



Prominent among th.e names worthy of honorable mention is that <.>f 
George W. Sawdc'U, whose ancestors, like hundreds of others, felt the call ■ 
of the new world, and also like hundreds of others, were preparetl to take 
their chance for success in the tide of emigration, the flow of which has lost 
none of its h;irce as time has advanced. The father of the immediate, subject 
of this sketch came from England, that "tight little isle" that has contributed 
such a large number of desirable citizens to this country. 

Georg'e W. Sawdon, farmer. \\'ashington township. Dearborn count}-, 
was horn on ]\Iay 7, 1846. on his father's farm in the township w^here he now 
resides. He is a son of William and PLinnah (Cornforth) Saw don. Tie 
was graduated from the public schools and remained at home until 186 J, 
when he enlisted in the L'nion army in the Civil War. serving about six 
months, during which time he participated in many skirmishes. Pie was 
mustered in August 19. and \\'as captured by Kirby Smith, at Richmond, 
September i, of that year, during some heavy fighting, and was in a uu.mber 
of other engagements, after which he returned, and was paroled in camp 
at Indianapolis. Immediately after the war, he returned home and entered 
school at Oberlin, Ohio, after which he completed his education at Cincinnati, 
Ohio, .\fter his marriage ]\Ir. Sawdon inherited a splendid farm from his 
father, and at once began the \ocation of an agriculturist, \vhich he has since 
followed. He has been a member of the Grange since 1873, and was repre- 
sentative at the state Grange on several occasions, and has held the offices of 
steward, overseer and chaplain Air. Sawdon is a blaster ]Mason, w hich order 
he joined in 1873, and in 1884 he became a Royal Arch Mason. Pie has 
always been a public-spirited man, and from 1874 to 1879 was township 
trustee. 

William Sawdon, father of our subject, was born on December 24. 



:l-j h 



704 DEARBORX COIXTV, INDIANA. 

iSii. in '^'orksliire. England, and was a son of William and Ami (Boddy'i 
Sawdon, and was brought to America by an uncle, who reared and educated 
him. He was a bound apprentice to a shoemaker in England and worked 
at his trade in Cincinnati. He came to what is known as Sawdon Ridge, 
Miller township, Dearborn county, after the flood of 1832, and lived there 
until his death. ]\Ir. Sawdon was married on .March 4, 1835, to Hannah 
Cornforth, daughter of Robert and Jane Cornforth, natives of England, and 
came to America in tlie early thirties. To this union were born eight children, 
as follow: Thomas H., Robert C, Sarah J., JMartha A., Alary E., George 
W., Hattie E. and Emma H. Mrs. William Sawdon was born on April 27, 
181 5, in England, and died on December 29, 1S74, in Dearborn county. Mr. 
Sawdon w-as married, secondly, March 26, 1876, to Airs. Eliza Ann Shoup, 
who was born on Jtdy 15, 1S26, near Wilmington, Indiana, and was the 
mother of three children b}' her first husband, Edward, Thomas and James 
Shoup. Air. Sawdon was eighty-four years old at the time of his death. 

\\'illiam Sawdon, Sr., the paternal grandfather, was born on Alarch 
21, 1786, in Yorkshire, England. His wife, Ann (Boddy) Sawdon, was 
also a native of England, and on account of her poor health, they started 
for America, but she died in June, 1S30, while on the voyage, and was buried 
at seat. Air. Sawdon settled in Dearborn county, and was married to Alary 
Liddle, who was bom on October 16, 1807. On the fann where they lived 
was a block house for protection from Indians. The first school house in this 
part of the county was near the block house. There were five families living 
on the place. An Indian trail passed through the farm. He died on No- 
vember 27, 1870. 

George \\'. Sawdon was united in marriage, in 1S70, with Annie Aliller, 
daughter of William B. and Sarah A. ("Gullet) Aliller. She was born on 
July 26, 1846, near Dillsboro, Indiana. They have four children, R. x\din, 
Charles Otto, Will Aliller and Laura Alay. 

Mrs. Sawdon has three sisters and fi\'e brothers: C. B. Miller, Doctor 
Miller, of Alontana ; J. G. Aliller, a retired manufacturer, of Ft. Smith, 
Arkansas ; Jennie, who died in infancy ; Alary, deceased ; Emma, who became 
the wife of H. Schmolsmire, and has had two children, Florence and Annetta, 
both graduates of DePauw University. Florence is married and Annetta is 
teaching school at Oklahoma. 

Air. and Airs. Sawdon are among the leading farmers of \\'ashington 
township, and are highly esteemed by their neighbors and acquaintances. 



n1 ■ ' [ 



Jo6 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

With tlie exception of a few years spent in Cincinnati, and six years' 
residence in Ashvilic, XiTth Carolina, Afrs. Emma Borgerding has lived in 
Aurora, the place of her birth. Here it was that she attended the pubuc 
schools. Her marriage to her first husband, August Sunderbruch, took place 
on June 3, 18S5, and he passed away on August 11, 1896, when only thirty- 
tv.-Q years of age. Mr. Sunderbruch. who \vas a comi>etcnt gardener, was a 
native of Lawrenceburg. his parents living on what was known as the Ludlow 
hill. ]\Ir5. Borgerding was married to Bernard H. Borgerding, of Newport, 
Kentucky, Octoljcr 3, I9(.)0. Mr. Borgerding was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, 
where he was for many Acars a shoe dealer. It_was in 1902 that he came 
to Aurora, which became his home until his death on September 15, 191 1, he 
being at the time forty-two years of age. 

Since the death of her husband Mrs. Borgerding has continued the 
business which he started not long before his demise. In connection wifli 
the restaurant Mrs. Borgerding has built up a splendid trade in the line of 
confectionery, ice cream, and soda fountain, her attractive store being one 
of the popular places where the young people like to gather, especially on 
warm summer evenings. 

Mrs. Borgerding has the qualities which go to make up a successful 
business woman, and in this capacity, as well as in her home life, she has 
won a large number of friends and acquaintances. She is a deyoted member 
of the Lutheran church, this being the church of her parents, and althougki 
her life is a busy one, ]\Irs. Borgerding finds time to devote to the welfare 
of her denomination. 



HKXRY F. LAUMAN. 



Since the soil is the ultimate source of wealth, it may not be inappropriate 
to consider him who cultiyates it as a public benefactor. It is by his toil tliat 
the nations of the earth live, and though his life may for the most part be 
unvaried bv incident, it is not unimportant to the world at large as well as 
to the more intimate surroundings. Henry F. Lauman, who was born in 
this township on March 29, 1854, has followed the vocation of farming all 
of his life, as did his father before him, with the possible exception of a 
few years. 

Heury Lauman's father, Adam Lauman, was born in Germany on 
August 17, 182S, and after his marriage to Mary (Angel) Lauman, left his 



I'l ;. r. ... 






v' 'i-.y^v 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 707 

iialive land for the new world ^^■hen he was only twenty-five years (if a,t;e. 
I lis birthplace was Hanover, Germany. 1'here did not seem to be an\ cipen- 
iug in the line in which he was best versed in the vicinity of Cincinnati to 
which he first came, and for two years he became a laborer. lie then began 
a more independent career hv becoming' the proprietor of twenty acres in 
this tiiwn-hip, which he immediately liegan to cultivate, later adding an 
additional twenty acres. This property was near Cold Springs, and here 
he lived and labored until iSIarch 28, 1914, the date of his death, at which 
time he was eight3'-six years of age. Mr. I.^uman was a Democrat and a 
member of the Lutheran church. His wife, Mary Angel, was born in Ger- 
many. She came to this country- with her husband, but did not li\e long- 
afterwards. Her three children were. Mary, Henry and one child who passed 
away in infancy. ]Mary Lauman was born in Germany, came to the I'niied 
States and married George Ma}-er, ^vho lived in Aurora. Their children 
were, Ella. ^laurice. William. Colonel, and one child \\-ho died in infanc\ 
After the death of his first wife, Adam Lauman married Louise Aufterniasch, 
also a native of Germany, who came to Sparta while still a young won:an. 
Henry F. Lauman attended school at Sparta, and later assisted his father on 
the farm until he married, in 1884, his bride being Catherine Zeigcnbiiie. 
who was born in Clay township on x-\ugust 22, 1855. She was the daughter 
of Christian and Sophia (Deitrich) Zeigenbine, both natives of Germany, 
who came to this country after their marriage. Their seven children were. 
Charlie, ^lary, Minnie, Catherine, and three who died while ([uite young. 
Mary became the wife of Henry Licking, who lives cm a farm in Clay town- 
ship. Their children are, Edward, ]\Iaggie, Laura, Sarah and Catherine. 
Minnie married Christian Licking, of Ccxsar Creek township, is the mother 
of six children, Louis, Cora, William. We.stly, ^label and Herbert. 

Henry F. Lauman attended school at Sparta, and later assisted his lather 
on the farm until he married, in 1884,- his bride being Catherin Zeigcnliine. 
eighty acres at different times, making his land consist of one hutidred and 
twenty acres in all. P.esides his farming enterprises, 'Mw Lauman is a suc- 
cessful stock raiser, and has sold large quantities of live-stock. 

The three children born to Mr. and Mrs. Lauman are, Anna, hVederick 
and Flora. The first daughter, who has achieved distinction as a nurse, was 
bom on Februarv 24, 1S80. Anna Lauman now has charge of the Lutheran 
Hospital at Ft. Wayne, Lidiana, having graduated froin Moores Hill College, 
taught school and later graduated from the Lutheran Hospital in Ft. Wayne, 
after which she did post-graduate work in Philadelphia. Miss Lautiian is 



70S DEARBORX COUNTY, INDIANA. 

very popular in Ikt chosen profession in which she has made sig'nal success. 
Her l)rother Frederick was born on I^Iarch 20, iSSS, in this township. After 
attending the local schools he took a course 'at IMoores Hill College, and later 
spent a winter studying in the animal huslxuidry de])artnient of Purdue 
University, at Lafayette, Indiana. The youngest daughter, Fkira, wins was 
born on February _'6. i8qi, in this township, is li\'ing with her {)arents. She 
has been a student of Moores Flill College and also took the course in do- 
mestic science at Purtlue University. 

yir. and Mrs. Launian believe in young people being tluM'oughly 
ecjuipped for their work in the world, and therefore ha\"e gi\'cn very careful 
attention to the education of their children, all of -whom have been given rare 
opportunities for training in both practical and theoretical branches. These 
parents may justly be proud of the attainments already accomplished by their 
gifted children. 

Mr. and ^Nlrs. Lainnan are active in the religious affairs of their com- 
munity, both lieing members of the Lutheran church of Cold Springs. 

Mr. Lauman is a stanch Democrat, and a man much interested in politics 
and the questions of the day. He is noted for his honor as a business man. 
his devotion to his home and its interests, and his loyalty as a friend, neighl^or 
and citizen. 



TPIOMAS BEXTOX COTTJXGHAM. 

Much credit must be gi\tn to those farmers who for a number of years 
have worked steadilv away at their chosen field of endeavor, giving their 
best thought and energy to the difficult problems of agricultural life, and 
who at the same time ha\"e not been blind to the various needs of their com- 
munity, but have made themselves felt as an influence for good among their 
fellows. Dearborn county has reason to be proud of the many true me!i 
she has produced, among whom is Thomas Benton Cottingham, a well-known 
farmer of IMiller township. 

T. B. Cottingham was born at Logan Cross Roads, Dearborn county, 
Indiana, on .\pril 3. 1846. He is the son of Thomas and Sarah ]\Iills 
(Stohmes) Cottingham, natives of Yorkshire, England, and Ohio, respect- 
ively. 

Thomas Cottingham. Sr., was born in Yorkshire. England, in 1810. and 
at an early age emigrated with his parents to America. They settled near 



■ ■ Ir .: 



>■; ■■ . 1 



DEARBORN' COrNTV, INDIANA. 709 

P.altiinoro, IVrarvland. A short time after the death of the father, Thomas 
Ciittinpliam. Sr., came with his mother to Cincinnati. Here he received tlie 
ru(h'ments of a common-schodl education and learned tlic Ijlack-^milh's trade 
iiy a]iprenticeship. Later removing to Dearborn county and settling on a farm 
at Logan Cross Roads, he huilt a shoji and followed his tnide as a blacksmith. 
The farm where he located was oljtained from Alfnrd Stohmes. his liinlher- 
indaw, for whom he assumed certain financial obligations. Thomas Cot- 
tingham was married to Sarah ]Mills Stohmes, a native of Delhi, Ohio, born 
in 1S15. To this union were horn nine children, as follow: Eliza, Charlotte, 
deceased: Alonzo. Sarali Amelia, Jacob, deceased; Thomas B., the subject 
of this sketch: Matilda, decea-ed : Louisa, deceased; and one child who died 
in infancy. The mother of these children, Sarah Mills (Stohmes) Cot- 
tingham, died on the farm, in Harrison township, in 1850, at the earl\- agi' 
of thirt\-fi\e years. The father, Thomas Cottingham, Sr., after operating 
his ninet_\-acre farm in Harrison towii>liip and following his blacksmith's 
trade for a number of years, spent the last fifteen years of his life with a 
daughter, Mrs. Lidflle. of Bright, Indiana. He died at the ripe old age of 
nearly eightv-seven vears. He was an active Democrat, having served as 
trustee of Harrison township one term. 

T. B. Cottingham, the subject of this sketch, grew up in Harrison town- 
ship. Dearborn county, Lidirna, and received a common-school education 
in the district township schools. He remained on the Inime farm until eighteen 
years of age, when he w<jrked out at different places for himself. Reared 
a farmer, he chose his vocation as such, and, with the exception of three O'" 
four vears in which he was engaged in the general mercantile business at 
Bright, Luliana. in partnershij:) with W. S. h'agalev, he has followed farming 
all his life. After his marriage, in 1874, he continued in the mercantile 
business for about a year, and then sold his interest and bought a farm of 
sevent}-five acres in Miller township. After living here for about six years 
he sold the fami and bought his present farm of one hundred and sixty 
acres, to whicli he nioxed in 1S81, and where he has continued to reside. Mr. 
Cottingham has a tjeautifnl farm, kcjjt in excellent shape, and, located on 
high ground, his place commands a magnificent view of the surroun.ding 
country. 

On June 24, 1874, T. E. Cottingham was married to Louisa Langtlale, a 
native of Miller township. Dearborn conntv, Indiana, who was born on 
January 29. 1844. She was the daughter of Robert Hill and ^Llrtha ( Colvin) 
Langdale. To this happy union were born three children, Stanley L., de- 



-,, , :1 



-i^' 



7IO DEARBORX COUNTY, INDIANA. 

ceased ; Howard and Edna A. Howard niarried Elizaljctli Reiick and 
operates the home farm. They have three children, Atjnes, Clayton anrl 
Albert S. Edna married J. D. ^Nloore, and lives at Charleston, West V'ir- 
g'inia, and they have three children. Rossebell, Louisa and Thomas Benton. 
Mrs. Lonisa (Langdale) Cottinghani died, May i, 1911, a loving wife and 
devoted mother and lo\ed by all who knew her. 

Mr. Cottingliam, as was his beloved wife, is an ardent member of the 
Christian church. He has been an elder in the church at Bright, Indiana, 
since its organization, and has always taken an active interest in its work. 
Mr. Cottingliam is not affiliated with any lodges, and, although an active 
Democrat, he has not held public office. T. B. Cottingliam, who is now 
practically retired, is a fair type of the prosperous and progressive farmer. 
He is a companionable man of cheery disposition, genteel and sociable. A 
man who stands for what he thinks is right and just, he is favorably known 
and looked upon as an honorable citizen. 



MARTHA AND MARY E. REES. 

In their comfortable farm home, located on the crest of a gently-sloping 
hill, overlooking the beautiful Ohio valley, live "Martha and Mary E. Rees 
worthv representatives of one of the pir.neer families of Lawrenceburg tow'ii- 
ship. The Alisses Rees have done well their part in advancing the best inter- 
ests of this neighborhood, and have a host of friends hereabout. 

Mary and Martha Rees, daugliters of Amos and INIary (Daniel) Rees. 
were born and reared in Dearborn county, near Lawrenceburg. Their 
mother died while they were still young, and they were reared by 
their father's sister, Martha Rees. They still live at the old homestead, which 
embraces two hundred and forty acres of land in Lawrenceburg township. 
In addition to this tliev o\vn another farm of about twenty-nine acres in the 
same township. Thev are devoted members of the Methodist Episcopal church 
of Lawrenceburg, and take an active part in the church work. 

Amos Rees, the father, was born in Dearborn county in 1815, and spent 
his entire life on farms in Lawrenceburg township. His death occurred in 
November, 1886. His wife was Mary Daniel, born in 1816. She belonged 
to the Methodist church. Her parents were William and Rebecca Daniel. 
They came from Virginia at an early day, and lived for some time near Dills- 
boro, Indiana. 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. ' 71I 

The jjatornal grand father was David Rees, a Quaker, wlio came fro.n 
llcrkeley county, Virginia, to Indiana in 1S07. He had previously made a 
Irip in 1803. He h'ved to he ahout forty years old. His wife was Susanna 
Daniel. Ity whom he had the following children: Jacob, John, Amos, Martha, 
Davitl, Rezin. and one wIili died in infancy. After her husband's death, ]\Irs. 
.Susanna Roes was married a second time, to Joshua Sanks, and they were 
the parents of two sons, Samuel B. and \\'illiam F., both deceaseil. 



' ■ • ■ GEORGE HEXRY MEYER. 

Among the well-known and successful citizens of Lawrenceburg town- 
ship, Dearborn countv, is George Henrv ^.leyer. who is descended from one 
of the pioneer families of this neighborliood. 

George Henry ?i[eyer. son of John Frederick and Alary Sophia (Erasky) 
Meyer, was born on September 27, 1870, in what was then Miller township, 
now Eawrenceburg to\vnshi]'>. He has li\"ed at his present address six years. 
He formerly owned a fine farm of one hundred and thirty-seven acres, which 
he improved and for which he was offered a good round sum. He accepted 
this offer and then bought another splendid farm of good size, which he 
also sold to an advantage. Becoming dissatisfied with farm life, Mr. Meyer 
made up his mind to get into something more to his liking, and his principal 
occupation at present is that of running a threshing machine outfit. Fie was 
appointed road supervisor, and served for two terms, ending in 1914. Mr 
Meyer is an ardent member of the Lutheran church. 

John Frederick Meyer was born near Hanover. Ciermany, about 1821, 
and died in 1900. He came to America when he was eighteen years of age, 
and selected Dearborn county as his place of abode, where the most of his 
life was s])ent. His chief occupation was farming, in which he was very 
successful. In Dearborn county he owned about seven hunrlred and eighty 
acres of land, and in Ohio county he owned one hundred and twenty acres 
more, nearly one thousand acres in all. His eight children were as follow : 
Henry J., John F., William, Fred W., George H., Mrs. Dora Kaiser, of 
Aurora, Indiana: Mrs. Anna Randall, deceased: and Mary, deceased. 

The paternal grandfather was John Henry Meyer, who was born near 
Hanover, Germany, in 1801, where he grew to manhood and was married. 



q ^M- 



;. 1 '" 'ij" 



;i, !.:r,:-^f I '-.^ 



uH 



712 • DEAREOKX C'JL'XTV, IXDIANA. 

His occupation was that of a trader. After hearing" the s])lcn(H<l reports from 
America lie decided to pack up his belongings and bring his familj- here. 
They settled in Dearborn comity, where they resided for a time, and later 
mo\ed to Spencer cou!it\-, where his wife died, and then he went to Ripley 
comity and made his home for a time with his daughter, Mrs. Anna Bahlmer, 
au'l llien went to the hiime of his sou, Ji^hn F., in Dearborn county, where 
he spent the last years of his life. He was about eighty years old wdien he 
died. They were the ]Kirents of the following chiklren : Jolm Frederick 
Aieyer (called Frederick), ]\Irs. Anna Bahlmer and John ]Meyer. 

On April 25, 1S95, George Henry ^Nleycr was united in marriage with 
Rosa Marguerite IClizahelh Wnlher. dau.ghtcr of Frederick W'olber and Mary 
(Piutt) W'olber. She was born on January i, 1872, in Lawrenceburg town- 
ship, where slie grew up and received her early education at the German aiul 
district 'schools. She is a member of the German Lutheran church. To Mr. 
and. Mrs. ^feyer have been born two children. Louise Mary, now seventeen 
years old. and a son ',\ho died in infancy. 

Frederick W'olber, father of ]\Irs. Me^er, \vas born in Clay townsliip, 
February 20, 1850. Flis wife was bi>rn on April 13, 1848. at Sunman, Indi- 
ana. Tiiey were the parents of seven children, namely: Mrs. Ivatie INbilter, 
Mrs. -Mary Cramer, Anna, ]\L"s. Clara Alolter, Henry, 3.1rs. Rosa Meyer, and 
one uhij died in infancy. The paternal grandparents of ]slrs. Meyer came 
from Germanv, probabh' near Hanover. 



ELLA JAXE (BRUMBLAY) JOHNSTON. 

Mrs. Ella Jane ( Brimiblay ) Johnston, widow of Columbus Johnston, is 
one of the best-known and well-beloved citizens of Sparta township, this 
county, where she has long resided, and is now tra\-eling life's path without 
the companionship of the husband who so carefully guarded her from all 
hardships and cares during their many years spent together. Being well 
educated, and springing from a good family, she made a suitable and intelli- 
gent life-partner for her husband, who was held in high estimation in his 
community, because of liis high character for honesty and integrity. 

Ella Jane Brumbiay ^vas born in Sparta township. Dearborn county. 
Indiana, on June 2^. 1852, daughter of Da\is M. and Sara Catherine (Givan) 
Brumbla}-. She recei\ed her early education in the pul.)lic schools and later 
attended ^loores Hill College, living at home until her marriage. 



^^^^^^*^^ 



§^- 



'■*.& 



'\ 












^;'?S 



i^tfeatei lifeifitfi <■ ;',-ia>L-}fe;„ 



^ 



COLU.MBUS JOHXSTOX 



DEAKBORX COL'XTY, IXPIANA. 7I3 

Davis M. P>mml)la}- was born on ]\Iay 6, i8jS, in Sparta township, oi> 
taiin'ng- his education' at the district schools and tanght scliool for two 
\ears. He remained on tlie farm and cared for his father until the latter's 
death, and then took over the farm, spending the rest of his life there, lie 
was a son r>f John and Elizabeth ( McGee) Brumblay, and was united in niar- 
ri.ige on May 4. 184S, to Sara Catherine Gi\-an, who was born on Dccemlier 
16, 1829, in Sjiarta township, daughter of Gilbert T. and Sara (Merrill) 
(iivan They li\"ed on the old (ii\-an liome place until the death of Mr. Gi\-an 
on June 22. IQ03. To this union were bitrn se\'en children, six of whom died 
in infancy, Davis "SI. being the onh' one wlio greu' to maturity. 

John and Elizabeth (McGee) Brumblav were both natives of ^Maryland 
and belonged to the Society of h'riends. They came overland to Indiana 1)\' 
the wagon trail, when middle aged, and settled in 'Sparta townsiu'p. this 
county, entering land from the government, on which they spent the rest if 
their lives, John Brumbla}' dying at the age of se\'enty-two years, and his 
wife at qtiite an advanced age. Their children were: John. Da\'is, Ami;!, 
Sarali, Elizabeth and Mar}-. John Brumblay married Aima Truet, and li\-ed 
in Sparta township. They were the p.arents of elc\'en children, George I\.. 
Albert, J<ilui, Frank. Gatcli. Charlie, Elizabeth, ]\tary Jane, Haltie, Maggie, 
and one who died in infancy. Anna Brumblay became the wife of. IvDliert 
Givan, and li\ed in Dearborn countw She dieil and he remarried and by the 
second marriage had seven children, George, Joseph, Matilda, ]!elle, ]\Iol!ie. 
Aria and Hattie. Sarah Brumblay married John D. Johnson and lived in 
Dearborn county. Their cb.ildren were Joseph, Benjamin, Wesley, Frank, 
I'urnell. William, .Vnna, Mahaley and two who died in infancy. Elizabeth 
Brumblay married John Hines, who died, whereupon site married, secondly. 
Berry Miller, of Aurora, diis county, and had two children. Perry and Frank- 
lyn, tlie latter dying in infancy. ^lary Bnunblay married John Ilines au<! 
lived in Ripley county. They were the parents of Elizabeth, Mary Ann, John, 
James, Alfred, Emma and Frank. 

Gilbert T. Givan was born on July 31, 17S9, in Worcester county, Mary- 
land, and his marriage took place on December 2, 1813, in Accomac county, 
\'irginia. His wife was Sarah C. Merrill, daughter of George and Charlotte 
Merrill, born on September 6, 1795, in Accomac county, Virginia. Mr. 
Givan died on February 8. 1S62. and his wife died on July 28, 1861. They 
were the parents of twelve children, Margaret M., Albert G., John W.. Robert 
H., Elizabeth A.. ]\Iaria J., George !\I., Sarah R., Adoniran J., Peter M., .A.!- 
fred B. and Sandford G. 



fVo I.-, 



Ihifn,^ 



714 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

On January 4, 1S70, Ella Jane P.runiblay was married to Columbus 
Johnston, son of Joseph and Mary (Karney) Johnston. lie was born Jan- 
uary 7, 1S34, in Manchester to\vnshii». Dearborn county, where lie attendeii 
the pulilic schools, receiving the !)est education afforded in those days, an.l 
later educated himself. Mr. Johnston was a stanch Democrat and .^^crved 
this district as representative for two terms in the state Legislature and as 
state senator four years. He was a member of the Knights of Pythias and 
of the Masonic Order and was at all times a public-spirited citizen. 

To Columbus and Ella Jane (Bruniblay) Johnston were born two children, 
Edgar F. and Florence, the latter of whom died in infancy. Edgar Johnston 
was born in Sparta township, this county, in 1874. and was married to Ele;ie 
Friedlev, of Madison. Indiana. They reside at South Bend, Indiana, and have 
had five children, ITiedley, William (deceased), Frederick, Mary and Rob- 
ert. ]Mrs. Johnston also has an adopted daughter, whoin she reared. Edna 
Haq)er, who married Lownes Runner, of ]\lilan. liuliana. and lias two chil- 
dren. George II. and Gladys FZ. 

]Mrs. Johnston numbers among her friends the entire community in 
which she resides. 



GEORGE AUGUST DIETRICH. 

George August Dietrich, a well-known farmer and dairyman of Law- 
renceburg township. Dearborn county. Indiana, who has been a resident or 
Dearborn county all his life thus far, was born on October 3, 1877, in Law- 
renceburg, Indiana, the son of August and Louise (Flaspel) Dietrich. The 
father was a well-known cabinetmaker of Lawrenceburg, \vho, after coming 
to this country from Switzerland, first settled in Pittsburgh, and later moved 
to Cincinnati, and still later to Lawrenceburg. After coming to this city he 
was married to Louise Haspel, in Lawrenceburg, and made this city his home 
the balance of his life. There were si.x: children born to August and Louise 
(Haspel) Dietrich, as follow: Mrs. Matilda Poehlman, Albert, George, Ar- 
thur, August and Carl. Mrs. Poehlman has had five children, Louzetta. 
Flarrv, Calanthia, and two deceased. Albert has three children, Chester, Don- 
ald and Isabelle. George has three children, Florine, Louise and Edwin. 
Arthur has three children. Harold, Robert and Ruth. 

Mr. Dietrich's mother, Mrs. Louise (Haspel) Dietrich, who was born in 



M 



DEARBORN COUXTV, INDIANA. 715 

ricnnaiiy, came to America when eight years old and settled first at Cinciii- 
nati, and later at Lawrenceburg'. Her parents, who were William antl Louise 
llas[icl, both died at Lawrenceburg. Mrs. Dietrich is still living at Lawrence- 
burg, a member of the St Emanuels church and of the Uebekah lodge. Her 
husband died in 1SS4. 

George August Dietrich, who attended the jjublic and high sclmols of 
Lawrenceburg, Indiana, afterward learned the machinist's trade, and fnllowed 
this trade fourteen years. For several years he has maintained a dairy in 
Lawrenceburg townshijo, and supplies a large anmunt cif dairy j.rmlncts to pt-n- 
[ile living in Lawrenceburg. Mr. Dietrich has one of the most ni'idern dairies 
to be found in Dearbr>rn count}-, and during late }-ears has built uj) a large 
])atronage in the dairy business. His dairy is equipped with all the modern 
conveniences and devices for furnishing pure milk and btitter to his patrons. 

George August Dietrich was married on Noveml)er 7, 1901, at the age of 
twenty-five, to Mollie Edith I'aker, daughter of Z. Taylor and ]\Iollie (Mu!- 
lin) Baker. To this happy union ha\-e been born three children, I'doriue Xow- 
lin, Edith Louise and Edwin Baker, all of whom arc li\-ing at home with their 
parents. Mrs. Dietrich was born on August 4, i88i, in Lidianapolis, Indian.'., 
and was brought to Lawrenceburg, Indiana, when three months old, by hei 
parents. Here she attended the public schools, and afterwards, completed he. 
education by three years' study in the academy at Oldenburg, Luliana. Her 
father, who was born and reared at Manchester. Indiana, was a distiller and 
\vh(.ilesale liquor dealer in Indianapcjlis for eight years. Coming to Man- 
chester in iSSi, he lived here until his fleath, March 26, 1887. Mrs. Dietrich's 
mother, who was born in Ireland, and who came to Pennsylvania when a mere 
girl, removed to Indianapolis after her marriage and there died, Xovemb.J' 
18, i88i. She was the mother of three children, ^Irs. Flora Belle Morton. 
Birchard Hayes and Mrs. Mollie Edith Dietrich. ]Mrs. ^Morton has had two 
children, ]Mrs. Jewell Wade Smith, and William, deceased. 

The maternal grandparents were William Holmes and !Margaret (Coll- 
ier) Baker, lioth of whom were natives of Dearborn county, where they 
lived all their lives. He died at the age of seventy-five and his wife at the 
age of seventy-three. The maternal great-grandmother, Mrs. William Collier, 
lived in Lawrenceburg and died here when past one hundred years of age. 

George August Dietrich is a Republican in politics, and served as trus- 
tee of Greendale four vears, 1900 to 1904. He belongs to the Improved Order 
of Red Men, and the Knights of Pythias. He is also a memljer of St. 
Emanuel's Lutheran church. Mrs. Dietrich is a member of the Presbyterian 
church. 



7l6 DEARBORN" COl'NTV, INDIANA. 

Not only has ^[^. Dietricli made inan_\- friends in a business way in Law 
renceburg" and Lawrenceburg- township where lie hves, but he is popular per 
sonally as a man of more than avera,f^e ability and of genial pleasing' person 
ity. Me is possessed of an exeeedingly active interest in the comfort and 
happiness of his neighbors, and is knr)wn as a good citizen. 



al- 



THOAIAS M. MILLER. 



Thomas AI. ]\Iiller, fanner, ilairyman and evangelist, who is one of the 
best-known citizens of Lawrenceburg township, TJearborn county, Indiana. 
with the exception of two years, has lived on the old homestead farm all his 
life. lie has done considerable evangelistic work thrimghout the southern 
part of Indiana, and is especially well-known as a powerful and successful 
preacher. 

Thomas 3^1. }vliller was born on April 24, 187 1, on the homestead fann 
where he now lives. After completing the prescribed course in puljlic schools 
of Lawrenceburg he attended !Moores Hill College for some time, and this 
training has admirably fitted him, not only for farming, but for the ministry, 
to which a considerable portion of his life has been devoted. 

Thomas AI. ?vliller is tl:e son of Job and Rachel Miller, the former of 
whom was Ijorn on June 2, 1S32, in Ilardentown, DearbDrn count}-, Indiana. 
and who died on March 4, 1912. A farmer by occupation he also operated a 
flour-mill, located on the present site of the Greendale distillery. He owned 
•a section of land in Lawrenceburg tiiwnship, and here he lived during his en- 
tire life. His wife, Rachel ( Whipple) Miller, was one of a family of thirteen 
children. The others were Isaac, Job, Thomas M., Airs. Carrie Halverstadt, 
all of whom are living, Airs. Abigail Suit and Airs. Harriett Fitzpatrick, de- 
ceased, besides se\en who died without leaving families. Of these children, 
Isaac married Lulu Knowles and they had one child, Isaac. Airs. Carrie Hal- 
verstadt has four clhldren,, .Anthony, Rie, Rachel and Opal. Airs. Abigail Suit 
had four children, Airs. Carrie Alartin, Anthony, and two deceased. Airs. 
Harriett Fitzpatrick had three children, Thomas, Charles and Job. Job Alil- 
ler's father was Job Aliller, Sr., who married Sarah Morrison. He was a 
native of Pennsylvania who came to Dearborn county when the land was 
covered with timber, settling on a government claim, part of which is in the 
hands of the present generation. He was a farmer all his "life, and quite 






r. ■ I ■.»]-''»■>, ,':i!/;--riofi 



I ..i;i -iii 



DEAREORX COUNTY, INDIANA. 7I7 

successful. He was married twice. The seccind wife. Sarah Morrison, was 
the grandmother of Thomas 'M.. the subject of this sketch. Her parents came 
from Pennsylvania. They were higldy cultured people and quite well-to-do 
for their day and generation. Mrs. Sarah (Morrison) Miller's father and 
mother- are deceased. 

On February 3, 1893, Thomas W. Miller was married to Alice T. Hayes, 
the daughter of Omer and ]\!inerva Hayes, the former of wh')m was the son 
of Jacob and Leah Hayes, early settlers in Dearborn county. Mrs. ]\liller was 
l)orn and reared in Dearborn county ami educated in the puldic schools. She 
was one of a family of seven children. The others are Charles, George, 
Mrs. IMargaret \\'eisenbach, Walter, Mrs. Cora Whiteford and Thomas. 
Charles married [Matilda Walters, and they had one child, Paul. Walter 
married JMay Barrows, and they ha\-e three chihlren, Jennie, Odettic and 
Katherine. r^Irs. Cora \Miitefori,l has three children lixing, Ruth, Lucille 
and Edna, and two are deceased. Thomas has one child, Alice. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 'SI. [Miller have Ijeen born four children. 
Harriett, Thomas, Arnold and Ruth. Harriett is a school teacher in Harden- 
town, and Thomas is a student in the last \ear of high schii(jl. 

The [Miller family is popular in Lawrenceburg township, where Mr. [Mil- 
ler owns a farm of a hundred and fifty acres, and a dairy with forty cattle. 
Guided by a keen and predominant religious impulse, [Mr. Miller has 
l)een of great service in promoting religious living in the ct:)mmunity where 
he lives. He is a man who believes strongly in the efficacy of the Christian 
gospel and is one of its able and ardent exponents. 



EDWARD C. CLEMENZ. 

Every community must have its enterprising, far-sighted tmsiness men, 
for upon them depends much of its material prosperity. The man whose 
name appears at the head of this biographical record has long been a resident 
of this county, having taken upon himself the business interests of his father 
when the latter died. He was born in Ripley county, near Penntown. on 
July 17, 1882, and is the son of George, Jr., and [Mary (Hornberger) Clem- 
enz. 

Among those earnest, hopeful young poeple who in the earh^ days sought 
the shores of America, were George Clemenz, Sr., and his wife, Lizzie (Ale) 



'K:I ■..: 



i;').--in',j ■•-• --.^ .^'•^ 1''' I 



7l8 DEAKliOKN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Clemenz, having been married a short time before the journc}- from their 
native Germany. They finally decided to make their home in Ripley coun- 
ty, where they lived until the death of the husband and father which took [)lace 
in iStSS. George Clemenz became a well-known farmer although his holdings 
included only eightv acres. Their children \\ere six in number, these being 
Frcil, John, George. Henry, Louisa (Mrs. Mosnieier) and Carolina. In 
lviplc\' countv this family of children were born and brougdit up. Until his 
marriage. George lived with his parents, but soon after his wedding day. he 
rented a farm in the same county, living there until he and his wife removed 
to Lawrenceburg, Indiana, which was about the year 1893. In this year, he 
changed his occupation from that of farmer to saloon keeper, in which busi- 
ness he remained until his death. He was a Democrat, and an influential 
committeeman in tliat party. He and his wife were members of the Blue 
Creek Lutheran cluirch. Mary ( Hornberger) Clemenz, mother of the suli- 
ject, was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, and attended school there, remo\ing later 
to Ripley county with her parents. It was here that she met and married 
George Clemenz. In her girlhood home, there were nine brothers and sis- 
ters, as follow: Emma married George Roehme, a contractor of Terre Haute, 
Lidiana, and the\- ha\e se\en children. Esther, Julia, luigene. Hellen, Ethel, 
Paul and Ruth; John, who married Susan Huber, is a farmer of Louisville, 
and they became the parents of Grace, Francis, Pauline and Goldie ; Ida, now 
deceased, married George Hill, a railroad man of Cleves, Ohio; Gertrude 
married Edward Heibeck, a carpenter of Terre Haute; Edward, Albert Clara, 
Lillian and Harry are single. 

Edward C. Clemenz is now owner and manager of a saloon and harness 
shop, and is very well-known in this community, tie was educated in the 
county of his birth, and in Lawrenccville, Indiana, having completed the 
course in the graded schools. At his father's death, it became necessary for 
him to earn the main part of the living for his younger brothers and sisters, 
and it was then that he began the management of the business that he still 
retains. In 1895, he bought a harness and saddlery shop in Lawrenceville, 
and since that time has been prosperous in his undertaking. He also operates 
a threshing machine, hiring the workmen, and contracting for most of the 
threshin,g that is done in the northern part of Jackson township, ]Mr. Clemenz 
is proud of his blooded horses in which he takes a great interest. He is also 
the owner of several Percherons, including "Duke" 5122 and a registered jack, 
"Black Joe" 206SS, Mr. Clemenz is an enthusiast in matters relating to 



DEARBORN COUNTV, INDIANA. 7X9 

horses and horse racing^, and sucli an expert has he become in jud.t;ins'. that 
liis opinions are always respected by his associates. Like his father, he is a 
Democrat and a Lutheran, and contributes Hberally of his means to the party 
and cliurch of his adoption. >.■ ,.•■., 



.;,'>.. ,.. . JOHN HORXBERGER. , ■_ 

The gentleman whose name heads this sketch belongs to one of the old- 
est and best-known families of Dearborn county, Indiana, and he, person- 
ally, is one of the foremost citizens of Jackson township, as well as being one 
of the wealthiest farmers in Dearborn county. His success came through, put- 
ling his entire thoughts and best efforts into the work which he very wisely 
selected as a vocation, when starting out to shift for himself, on arriving at 
the age of young manhood; and from the splendid results, and the fine 
farm which stands as a monument to his ability, it would be safe to sav he is 
well satisfied with his selection. 

John Hornberger was born on August 28, 1849, and is a son of Jacob and 
Rachel (Klein) Hornberger. He was educated in the district schuols. .inil 
remained on the farm until twenty-one years of age. He was then married, 
and bought for himself eighty acres of good farm land, near the old home- 
stead, to which he later added eighty acres more, dividing his time and at- 
tention between general farming and stock raising, and also did threshing 
for over forty years. He was probably the first in the business in his section 
of the county, using horse power at first, and later changing- to steam. ]\Ir. 
Hornberger is a Democrat, and has officiated in some of the township offices. 
holding among others, that of township trustee from 1889 to 1894. He is 
a member of the Methodist Episcopal church at Lawrenceville, Lidiana. 

Eor the history of Jacob and Rachel (Klein) Hornberger, the reader is 
referred to the sketch of William Hornberger presented elsewhere in this 
VI ilume. 

John Hornberger was united in marriage on May 9, 1870, with Anna 
Suphia Kretzmeier, daughter of Henry and Dorothy (Lomeier) Kretzmeier, 
natives of Germany, and pioneer farmers near New Alsace, Jackson township. 
^Irs. Hornberger was born in Jackson township, near New Alsace, Feliruary 
-o, 1S54, where she was educated. IMr. and Airs. Hornberger have had six 
children, as follow : Emma, married Henrv Westerman, and lives in Ripley 
county on a farm; John married x\nna Huber, is farming in Jackson township. 



.!!oi T j;.';;.i^^ 



720 DEARBORN COUXTV, INDIANA. 

and they have three children. Raymond, Sophia, and Henry; Minnie, married 
Philij:) Berg, lives in Jackson township on a farm, and is the mother of two 
children, In-in and Esther; Edward married Anna Probst, is also a farnier 
in Jackson township, and three children have blessed this union, Paul. Ilelen. 
and Mildred; Lydia married Albert Huber. who is a farmer in Jackson town- 
ship; and one child who died in infancy. 

Mr. Hornberger is now living' a retired life on his fine farm of one hun- 
dren and sixty acres, where he enjoys the high esteem of the citizens of his 
community. 



HENRY FABER. 



The parents of the immediate subject of this biography set up their 
cabin home in what is now Jackson township when it was an unbroken wilder- 
ness, and at a time when Indians were their neighbors. Deer antl other 
wild animals made their way through the forest close to the primiti\c home 
of George Allen Falier and his wife, Mary Elizabeth, the parents of Henrv 
Faber, whose name appears al)Ove. Tlie latter was born in Jackson town- 
ship on November 26, 1848, twenty years after his parents, leaving their 
home in Muhlberg, Germany, had sought the shores of America. 

George Faber was born in 1795, and when still a young man first made 
his home in Pittsburgh after landing in New York. In Pittsburgh he learned 
the glass-blower's trade, and worked at it for awhile. After living for two 
years in Cincinnati, he came to this county, buying eighty acres of government 
land at one dollar and twenty-five cents an aci-e, on June 15. 1833. The 
land was a trackless forest except fi.ir the foot-prints of wild ain'mals and In- 
.dians, but he went to work w'ith a will, and with his faithful wife attending 
to the home and its daily needs, he cleared and cultivated the farm which he 
afterwards handed down to his children. His death occurred in 1858. He 
was a Republican and a devout member of the Lutheran church. ]Mrs. Faber's 
maiden name was Ansttenstd, and she was still a girl of fourteen years when 
her parents brought her to America. Her marriage took place in Pittsburgh, 
in 1829. To this union nine children were born, the names and dates of birth 
being as follow: George .\dams, born on December 30. 1S30; Jacob. October 
II, 1833; Mary, February 21, 1835; Elizabeth, July 18, 1837; Martin. .March 



: /, i' .■-■■>^!-y -3(1.! 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 72 1 

21, 1S39; John J., Dcccmher 15, 1841 ; Peter, July 11, 1843; \\'illi;im, April 
17, 1847: Henry, Xoveniber 26, 1S48. One of the brothers, John J. Faber, 
g-avc his life for his countn,-, for he died as a result of having- his leg shot 
off at the battle of Murfreesboro, December 31, 1862. This was after 
a year and a half of service in the army, he having- enlisted as a private in the 
Thirt^v'-second Regiment. Indiana Volunteer Infantry, Comi)any Xinc, in Au- 
gust, 1861. This was known as the "German Regiment," and he was under 
Captain Schwartz, the enrollment taking place at Lawrenceburg. 

The subject of this sketch was educated at Lawrenceburg in the con-i- 
mon schools. After the death of his father, he managed the farm for his 
mother until she too was taken, her death occurring on October 25, 1S87. 
He then bought out the other heirs and has followed the farmer's life frnm 
then until the present. 

On April 25, 1872, Henry Faber w-as united in marriage to Louisa 
Knerr, daughter of George and Margarette (Fink) Knerr, the latter 
of whom is still living at the age of eighty-two. Both were nati\es of France. 
Mrs. Faber's birthdate is July 10, 1S53. and she was educated in Jacksnn 
township, the place of her birth. Nine children have blessed this union, as fol- 
low : George William was born on September 19, 1872; John Jacob, October 
14, 1874, and died on Alay i, 1901 ; Jacob, June 21, 1877, and died on 
March 22, 1879; Albert Henry, April i, 1879, died on May 29, 1888; Emma 
Mary, October 30, 188 1 ; Jacob Henn-, March 29, 1884, Lucy Margaretta, 
June 7, 1887, died on March 8, 1S89; Mary Margaretta, March i, 1890, died 
on June 14, 1891 ; Benjamin Charlie, September 9, 1892. died on Augaist 19, 
1896. The eldest son, George, married Jay Keppler. He is an employee of the 
street car company at La Salle, Illinois. Their daughter is Ruth Emrdine. 
Emma Mary is Mrs. \\'alter E. [Miller, of Sunmrm, Indiana, and the mother 
of two children, Ida Louisa and Howard Henry. Jacob Henry is farming 
on the old homestead, and is the husband of Ada Brumpter, their only child 
being Mary Louisa. 

Henr}' Faber is one of the most enthusiastic Republicans in the county. 
The esteem in which he is held is made evident by the fact that he has been 
township committeeman of Jackson township a number of times. Like his 
father, he too, is a Lutheran, and much interested in the welfare of the 
church. 

As a descendant from parents who were pioneers in the state, Mr. Faber 
lays claim to special respect, as ^s'ell as by reason of his own merits as a 
man and as a loyal citizen. '. ' 

(46) ■ '■: . . ■, " ' , ' '■ 



![.,.■ ■- ■ I \ 



722 DliAREOKX COUNTY, INDIANA. 

WILLIAM HORXBERGER. 

William Honilierger has passed through that interesting and absorbing 
occuijation of building up a business, and is now enjoA'ing tlie fruits of his 
strenuous, busy life, which not only all'>w him the necessaries, but the luxuries, 
to which lie is well entitled. The fine tract of over one hundred acres of 
good, rich land, all in a fine state of cultivation, now owned by Mr. Horn- 
berger, is evidence of his industry and good management. 

William Hornberger was born on May 2, 1863, and is a son of Jacob 
and Rachel (Klein) Hornberger. lie was educated at the public schools of 
the district, and remained at home until the time of his marriage, when he 
bought a tract of one hundred and four acres of fine land belonging to the 
old liomestead. which he still farms, and in 1915, Mr. Hornberger bought a 
home at Lawrenceville, Indiana, consisting of five acres, and in addition to 
his farm and town home, he owns considerable stock in the I'\armers' National 
Bank, at Sunman. In connection with his farming interests he has carried 
on a custom business in siirghum molasses, covering a territory of ten miles 
each way, and during his thirty-two years in this branch, has produced over 
fifty-five thousand gallons of molasses. JNIr. Hornberger has always been a 
stanch Republican, and in 1914 was elected to the office of township trustee 
for a four-year term, winning over his opponent by a large majority. 

Jacob Hornberger, father of the sul)ject of this sketch, was born on 
August 28, 18 1 6, at Steinweiler, Rheinpfalz. German v, and on arriving at 
'the age of young manhood, came to the United States in 1837, landing at , 
New York, from whence he came directly to Lawrenceburg. Mr. Horn- 
berger here followed the carpenter's trade for a few years, and in 1842. he 
moved his family to Jackson township, where he bought eighty acres of land, 
to which he later added one hundred and four acres more. He died on April 
24, 1904. His wife, Rachel (Klein) Hornberger, was bom on March 6. 
182 1, at Minden Rheinbaiern, Germany, and came to the L^nited States in 
1832 with hei- parents, who settled at Cincinnati, Ohio, and later moved to 
Jackson township. Dearborn county. She was educated' in Gennany and 
Cincinnati, remaining with her parents until her marriage, November 23, 
1843. This union was blessed with seven children, Jacob, Michael, John, 
Peter, Frank, Emma and William. The parents of Mrs. Jacob Hornberger 
were Peter and Katherine (Hey) Klein. 

W'illiam Hornberger was united in marriage on April 3, 1SS4, with 
Katherine M. Holzl>erger, daughter of Michael and Julia Ann (Adams) 
Holzberger. She was born in Ripley county, Indiana, September 3, 1S63, 



■jd .".ni i;;..<:;i 



DEARBORN COUXTY, INDIANA. 723 

and attended the township schools, remaining with her parents initil her 
marriage. This union has been blessed with four children, Clara, married 
Marrv Weiderman, and is living at Ridgeway, Iowa, on a farm; they have 
two children, Mildred and Vern; P^arl. married Augusta Heilbeck, and follows 
fanning in Tackson township; they have one child, Avilla ; Ada, married 
Peter Probst, is living in Jackson township on a farm, and is the mother of 
two children, Arnold and Walter; Sarah lives at home. 

Michael Holzberger, father of Mrs. William Ilornberger, was born at 
Diespeck, Neustadt, Baiern, May 8, 1833, and his wife, Julia (Adams) 
Holzberger, was born on ]March 27, 1842, at Williamsburg, Pennsylvania. 
They resided for many years in Jackson township, ?^Ir. Holzberger dying on 
Tune 3. 1891, aged fifty-eight years, and his wife died on August 24, 1907. 
aged sixty-five years. 

The Homberger family are members of the German Methodist Episcopal 
church, at Lawrenceville. 'Sir. Hornberger is well known throughout the 
county, and has a wide range of customers for his molasses trade, which has 
proved a successful and remunerative business — the result of honest business 
principles, — and his fine farm of one hundred and two acres is one of the best 
in the county. 



CHARLES L. VAN OSDOL, D. D. S. 

No man in tlie medical profession, in this neighborhood, has given more 
careful studv or been more successful than the gentleman whose name intro- 
duces this sketch, and no one is more entitled to enjoy the fruits of his efforts 
and sincere interest in a subject of such vital interest to humanity at large. 

Charles L. Van Osdol was born on May 12, 1S54, in Cass township. 
Ohio county, Indiana, near New Plope. His parents were Nathan A. and 
Elizabeth (Crowley) Van Osdol. He was reared on his father's farm in 
Ohio county, where he was sent to the district school, and, after leaving 
school, he assisted his father on the farm until he was twenty-two years of 
age. He learned the carpenter trade and followed it, in connection with 
farming, until he earned enough to pay his way through college. He was 
graduated from the Miami Medical College. Cincinnati, in 1885, and imme- 
diately began practicing medicine at Allensville, Switzerland county, where 
he formed a partnership with his brother, Dr. John W. Van Osdol, and after 
a period of over twelve years he moved, in 1890, to Dillsboro, Indiana, and 



1 . .:;:u..n.r;! 



I /•' t 'J i ■ 



724 llEARIiORX COUNTY, IXDIAXA. 

began tlie practice of dentistry, wliich he followed for twenty-five years. He 
had previously passed an examination before the Indiana State Board, in 
1S89. This branch has been more to his hking, and he has given it the same 
careful attention that lie g'a\'e to his work as a physician and surgeon. In 
191 1 Dr. Van Osdol moved to Aurora, still retaining his office at Dillslioro, 
and continued to practice in both places until December, 1914, when he sold 
his office at the latter place, since which time his entire attention has been 
devoted to his jiractice at the Aurora office, where he enjoys a large and 
profitable practice. Dr. A'an Osdol is a Republican, and he belongs to Chap- 
man Lodge No. 78, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and the Aurora 
encampment, and is also a member of the State and National Dental As- 
sociations. 

Nathan A. Van Osdol, father of the subject of this sketch, was a native 
of Pennsylvania and was born in Fayette county, Mav .'25, 1813. He was 
a son of Benjamin and Rebecca Van Osdol, and came to Indiana with his 
parents in 18 16, settling in Ohio comity. For se\eral years during his early 
life he did flatboating, going as far as New Orleans, and later bought gov- 
ernment land, and from that time until his death, made farming his principal 
business. Tradition has it that he started out in life, at the age of si.xteen 
years, with a capital consisting of one calf, the sale of which brought him the 
magnificent sum of one dollar. During the winter season, when the river 
business was dull, he employed his time at coopering, and by thrift and in- 
dustry, he eventually became the owner of one hundred and si.xty acres of 
valuable land, which he cleared and improved. He was a veritable pioneer, 
and ended his days on the home farm, where he had reared his family. He 
was seventy-four years old at the time of his death, his wife, surviving him 
eight years. She died at the age of seventy-six years. Nathan A. Van Osdol 
was united in marriage on June 30, 1836, to Elizabeth Crowley, a daughter of 
James and Elizabeth Crowley. Air. and ]Mrs. Van Osdol were active members 
of the New Hope Methodist Episcopal cli*urch, and were the parents of twelve 
children, as follow: Melissa became the wife of Peter Richmond, of New- 
Hope, Ohio county; Boston \V. moved to Greensburg, Indiana; John W . 
became a successful practicing physician at Allensville, Indiana, for thirty 
years; William Wesley is a resident of Rising Sun, Indiana; Charles L., of 
Aurora; Mary Iilizal>eth became the wife of Andrew J. Sedam, and is now 
deceased ; Benjamin Franklin is living at Bascom, Ohio county ; Margaret 
Ann, who grew to maturity and died single; Nancy Jane, w^ho died young; 
David A., Nathan Allen and Clara, all of \s'hom died in infancy. 



- DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. ' 725 

The paternal grandfather was Benjamin Van Osdol, of Ilolhmd Dutch 
ancestry, and was a native of Pennsylvania, and hrought him l"amil\- down the 
river in a flathoat, in 1816, landing at Rising Sun, Indiana, wliere lie followed 
the trade of cabinetmaker, in which line he was a finished w<>rknnn. His 
wife, Rebecca Van Osdol. was also a native of Penns^dwania. They lioth 
ended their days on the home farm of their son, Nathan A. \'an Osdi T ']'o 
this couple were bc^rn four children, John, Xalhan .Mien, Jane .\. and Mary 
Sutton. 

James Crowlev, the maternal grandfather, was born in \'irginia, and was 
drowned from a raft in 18 17, while on his way to Ohio county, Indiana, with 
his family. His wiflow. Elizabeth Crowley, came on with her children and 
settled at Rising Sim. Their children were, \'an S., Margaret Jane, Mary 
Ann and Elizabeth. Being still a young woman, Mrs. Crowley was married, 
secondly, to Da\id Hufford, and settled in Ohio county, near Dillsboro, where 
she died, February 6, 1868, aged seventy-seven years. 

Charles L. Van Osdol was married on May i, 187S, to Sadie A. Flem- 
ming, daughter of Robert and Susanna ( Harbert) Elemming, wlm was born 
on Februaiy 26. 1S54, in Ohio county, and died on ]\Iarch 22. 1898, aged 
forty-four years. Doctor and Mrs. \'an Osdol have had three children, 
Ernest F., Harry yi. and Robert C. Ernest was graduated from the Indiana 
Dental College, of Indianapolis, and is now practicing at Warsaw, Indiana. 
He was married to Pearl Wheeler, by whom he has one sim, Cortes Dean ; 
Robert C. was graduated from the Ohio Dental College, of Cincinnati, and 
is established in a good-paying office at Tiffin, Ohio. His wife was Ilildal 
Kattenhorn. 

RolK'rt and Susanna (Harbert) Elemming, parents of Mrs. A'an Osdol, 
were natives of Indiana, the former dying at Aberdeen, Indiana, and the latter 
at Dillsboro. Their children were, John W., Sadie A., and Lydia. 

The maternal grandfather of ?klrs. Sadie Van Osdol was Caleb Harliert, 
whose wife was Sarah (Downey) Harbert, to whom were burn the following 
children : Susanna, Emma, Malissa, ]\Iary and Sophia. 

Dr. Charles L. \^an Osdol was married, secondly, on October 9, 1901. 
to Alta M. Hainia, daughter of David A. and Mary J. (Barricklow) Hanna, 
of Union township. Two children have been born to this union, Leo Donald 
and Marie Elizabeth. Dr. and Mrs. \'an Osdol arc earnest members of the j 
Methodist Episcopal church, of Aurora, Indiana. 

David A. and Mary J. (Barricklow) Hanna were born and reared in i 
Ohio county, Indiana, and now reside at Rising Sun, Indiana, where tl'.ey j 
are enjoying a peaceful, retired life on a farm. : 



;-., :b;ulj 



726 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

The paternal g^rand father of Mrs. Alta IM. Yzn Osdol was William 
Hanna, and his wife was Rebecca (Higbee) Hanna, natives of Indiana. Their 
children were, David, Charles, Josie, Ruth and Annabell, who died young. 

The maternal grandfather of }i[rs. Alta M. Van Osdol was Hiram Bar- 
ricklow, who was bom in 1S29. in Ohio county, and was a son of John 
Barricklow, born in 1800, whose father was Daniel I'.arricklow, a native of 
Pennsvlvania. Hiram Barracklow was twice married, first, to Sarah A. Pate, 
daughter of \\^illiam T. Pate, by whom he had the following children : Re- 
becca became the wife of Stephen Hastings; Mary J., mother of Mrs. Van 
Osdol: William Taylor was married to Agnes Fisher, January 30, 18S1, 
daughter of John and Agnes G. (Flannigan) Fisher; George G. married 
Laura Turner: Anna M. became the wife of Lawrence Turner. 

Doctor \'an Osdol, through his ability as a dentist, has won for himself 
a successful practice in the community, and he and his wife have a large circle 
of warm friends, whose society they \'ery frequently \m\e the pleasure of 
enjoying. 



FRED GRELLE. 



The following is a brief sketch of the career of a plain, honest man of 
affairs, who by close application to the path he had marked out in life for 
himself, has succeeded not only along material lines, but in the better things 
of life also, being held in high esteem not only by those with whom he has 
business dealings, but also those who know him only in a social way. Mr. 
Grelle has long since proven that he is possessed of an untiring energy and 
indomitable will, and he stands to the younger generation as an example of 
what can be accomplished by an}- young man who will bring the best of his 
ability to his task. 

Fred Grelle is a native of Ccesar Creek township, Dearborn county, hav- 
ing first seen the light of day within its borders on Christmas day of the 
year i860. He is a son of Henry and Sophia (Froelich) Grelle, b(jth natives 
of the German empire. Flenry was born in the year 1825 and came to this 
country when a young man. He remained for a time in Cincinnati, where 
he had friends, and later came to Dearborn county to engage in farming. Fie 
purcliased forty acres in Csesar Creek township and when that was paid for 
bought twenty acres additional, and later on added a tract of sixty acres. He 






i li : -•TIT?/ ' to !!'"'■' R '' 



DEARKORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 727 

ga\'e his attention to general farming and the raising of a small amount of 
live stock, and was gratifyingly successful in liis undertaking. He died in 
]i)o.|. at the age of seventy-nine years. Sophia Froelich, his wife, was Ijnrr. 
in 1829. and upon coming to America located in Cincinnati, wlierc she met 
and married Mr. Grelle. Her death occurred on ]\Iarch 25, 1914, at the 
age of eighty-fi^■e years. She was the mother of twelve children, namely: 
Margaret, Louisa, Cynthia, John, George, Fred, Anna, William, Louis, Car- 
oline, Henry and Gei'rge. Of this family, George, Louis, Caroline, Henry, 
George and Margaret have passed into the great beyond. !vlargaret married 
Henry Droege and lived at Laporte, Lidiana. She was the mother of four 
children, Theodore, Louisa, Emma and Lena. Louise became the wife of 
\\'i!Iiam Ilunche, living at Laporte, this state, and they also had a family 
of four, Emma, Martha, Edward, and Sophia, who died when a small infant. 
John married Lizzie Niederbaumer and they live at Seymour, this state. 
There are eight children in their family. Lulu, Clara, William, Augusta, Alma, 
Dorothy, Esther and Ruth, who died when a little child. Anna married 
Ernest Peters and they live in Elmwood Place, Ohio, where they are rearing 
their three children, William, Amelia (deceased) and Lulu. William married 
Annie Huseman and they are engaged in farming in Dearborn county. They 
have four children: Jesse, Amelia, Edward and Esther. 

Fred Grelle received his education in the school at Farmers Retreat, 
and then for a few years after his studies were over he assisted his father 
in the Vv'ork of the home farm. In 1887 he made his first independent busi- 
ness venture, this being the purchase of forty acres of land in Cjesar Creek 
township. In 1906 he purchased one hundred and twenty acres adjoining 
and again in 191 3 he purchased twelve acres, making one hundred and seventy- 
four acres, all of which he has converted into an up-to-date stock farm and he 
has met with more than ordinarv success. In the year 1900 he purchased a 
complete threshing outfit and for the following fifteen years he operated that 
throughout this community. 

On May 23, 18S9, Fred Grelle was married to Louisa Huseman, born in 
Rijjley county, December 23, 1864, a daughter of William and ^lary (Weacii- 
man ) Huseman. ^lary Weachman had been previously married to William 
Oesting, by -whom she became the mother of three children, Henry, Jolm and 
Louise. Henry and John are deceased. After the death of ]Mr. Oesting his 
widow married Mr. Huseman. Both Mrs. Grelle's parents were born in Ger- 
many, and immigrated when young to this country, locating in Cincinnati, 
where both worked for a few years. After their marriage thev came to Firown 



1 ' i-'''r. :f< '.■ ■ fl n 



■di -I 



-r.d 



728 DEARBORN COUXTV, INDIANA. 

to-\vn,>hip, this county, wliere they remained for some time. To William and 
Mary Iliiseman were burn .se\-en children, Henry. Mary (deceased), Amelia. 
William (deceased), Louisa. Anna (deceased) and Anna 3ilary. Henry mar- 
ried Rieke Forncamp and liecame the father of four children, Bertha. .Mlic, 
William (deceased), and an irfant who died early in life. The family li\e> ni 
Ripley county, where they are engaged in farming'. Amelia became the wife 
of Frank llenclien and the mother of five children, Gustof, Elmer, ClaMcn, 
Edna and Hilda. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Grelle are the parents of seven children: Clara, horn 
on March 23, 1S90; Harry, July 10, 1892 ; Walter, October 2^, 1894; Charles, 
May 14, 1897; Alfred. January 29. 1900; Howard, January 10, 1904; and 
Martin, October 25, \Q)OCj. 

Fred Grelle is one of those broad-minded men who not only are alerl to 
their own best interests, but who also desire to serve their community whene\er 
possible. Fie is one of the staunch Republicans of his communit}- and for tihr- 
teen years has moct efficiently served his party as superintendent of road 
work. He has also been a member of the township school board for a number 
of years, and is keenh- interested in all that concerns the educational advan- 
tages for the youih of the ti-iw nship. He and his familv are devout members 
of the Lutheran church, giving generously of their means and time toward the 
work of the local organization. 



ALBERT V. DIETZ. 



Being a man of excellent character and business qualifications, the suli- 
ject of this biography is in every way worthy of the responsible position 
which he occupies as cashier in the German Ainerican Bank, of Lawrenceburg. 
Being present at the organization of the bank, he has had the pleasure of 
watching it g.row, until he now feels almost a paternal interest in its welfare. 

Albert V. Dietz is a son of John and Mary (Bauman) Dietz, and was 
born on July 8, 1866, at Brookville, Indiana, where he attended the parochial 
and public schools, going from there to the Central Normal, at Danville, and 
later entered the State Normal School, at Terre Flaute, working his way 
through. Fie then became clerk in the L'nited States revenue service, at I^aw- 
renceburg. and f(jr twenty years has been a resident here. In 1905, when 
the German American Bank was organized, he became its cashier, which 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. "J 2<.) 

position he still holds. This bank was organized wiih a cajjital stock of 
twenty-five thoiisanrl dullars. Mr. Dietz is a Democrat, and is a nicnilier of 
the Catholic chnrcli. His fraternal membership is with the Knights of 
Columbns. 

John l^ietz was a native of Germany, where he was reared and received 
his edncatic)n. lie ser\ed an apprenticeshi[) of five ^ears witli a wholesale 
and retail merchant, and was afterward employed as clerk in the same estab- 
lishment for ten years. Coming to America in 1850, he located at Brook- 
ville, where he engaged in merchandising. He died there in 1884. aged sixty- 
six years. His wife, ?\Iary (Baiunan) Dietz, was a nati\e of Ohio. She 
died in 1S94, aged fifty-nine years. The)- were both members of the Catholic 
church, and were the parents of eight children, namely : Thercssa became 
the wife of Philip Hartman, of Brookville; Frank also resides at Brookville; 
Catherine died \\hen two }-ears of age; John and Elizabeth reside at Brook- 
ville: .Vlbcrt A'., of Lawrencebnrg; Irene was married to b'rank Tulle}-; ^\'ill- 
iam C. makes his home at Greenville, Ohio. 

The paternal granilpareiits died in CIerman\- when lohii was an infant. 
They were farmers, and were the parents of three sons and four daughters, 
all of whom came to this country and died here. 

The maternal grandparents were Fedalia Bauman and wife, natives of 
Germany. They came to America and were early settlers at Brookville, when 
the w-ohes were in the forest, and spent their remaining years here. Air. 
Bauman died aged eight}--two years, and his wife died at the age of seventy- 
six. To this union Avere bom five children, Alary, Anthony, Catherine, 
Theressa and Julia. 

Albert V. Dietz was married on Septenibcr 17, 1S95, to AFarv Sattler, 
daughter of Joseph and Agnes (Graff) Sattler. Airs. Dietz was born at 
Cedar Grove, F"ranklin county, Indiaria, To Air. and Airs. Dietz were Xwxw 
four children, Agnes, Gertrude, Elizabeth and Albert. Agnes died aged 
eight years, and Albert died in infancy. 

The father of Airs, Dietz was a native of Austria, and his wife of Cedar 
Grove, Indiana. She died in 1894. Air. Sattler was a pri\-ate in the Ci\'il 
War, and is still living. There were ten children born to this union, as follow : 
Alary, Peter, Anna, Joseph, Bernardina, Philip, John, George, Frank and 
Edward. 

The paternal grandparents of Airs. Dietz were natives of Austria, w-here 
they died. 

Air. Dietz enjoys the respect, friendship and confidence of a large number 
of people, both in the immediate and surrounding territory. 



730 DEARBORN COfNTV, INDIANA. 

CHARLES EDGAR TORBET. 

Education and progress have formed the outUnes along whicli the sub- 
ject of this sketch, a well-known and influential man in school work, has 
traveled all his life. I\Tr. Torbet has made an earnest and sincere study of his 
profession, and advocates and follows the principles of perpetual research 
work. He has never reached the jjoint of feeling that there is nothing more to 
be gained by study, wherein lies the secret of his great value in educational 
work. 

Charles Edgar Torbet was born on July 22, 1871, near Shreve, Holmes 
county, Ohio, and is a son of James and Laura (Becker) Torbet. He was 
educated at the public schools of his district, the high school at Frederick- 
town, and the college at Delaware, Ohio, graduating in 1897, after which 
he was professor of Latin and Greek at West Famiington, Ohio, Western 
Reserve Seminary, remaining three }ears. and then took a post-graduate 
course at the Ohio Wesleyan University, of Delaware, Ohio, coming in Sep- 
tember. 1901, to Moores Hill College as professor of English and history. 
Professor Torbet is a stanch Republican, to which party he has given his 
loyal support, and shown public spirit by holding some of the local offices. 
He has been secretarT,- of the school board for the past three years, and he is 
a member of the ^lethodist Episcopal church, of which he has been recording 
steward for a number of years. Professor Torbet is greatly interested in 
church work, and has for many years been a teacher in Sunday school work. 
He belongs to Delta Tau Delta, of the Ohio Wesleyan University Chapter 
Mu. 

James Torbet, father of the subject of this sketch, was born on Decem- 
ber 16, 1S47, in Holmes county, Ohio, where he attended the public schools, 
of that locality, and was engaged in teaching for five years. He remained on 
his father's farm until two years after his marriage, when he entered the 
ministry of the Methodist Episcopal church, in the North Ohio conference, in 
1S73, where he spent the greater portion of his ministerial hfe, two years 
of which were spent in the Northwest Iowa conference. Mr. Torbet retired in 
iqn, after thirty-eight years of active service, and is now living at Shelby, 
Ohio. He is an independent voter. His wife. Laura ( Becker) Torbet, was born 
in 1846, in Fostoria, Ohio, where she was educated in the public schools. Mr. 
and Mrs. Torbet were the parents of five children, Charles Edgar, Howard L.. 
John E., Robert D., and Mary K. Howard L. Torbet was married to Edith 
Patterson, of Adelphi, Ohio, and is pastor of the Park Avenue Congregational 






-.0 -M 



:..t,': ■■. :vj ,;((■ 



DEARBORN COUNTY, liNDIANA. 



731 



cluuch, Cleveland, Ohio. They have one child, Alice. John Torbet died wlien 
twelve and Robert at six years of age. Mary is teaching school at Niobrara, 
Nebraska. 

The paternal grandfather was Robert Allen Torbet, and his wife was 
Keziah (Scott) Torbet. They were natives of Pennsylvania, 'and came to 
Ohio about 1832, settling in Holmes county, on a fine tract of land covering 
eighty acres, where they lived until their death. Mr. Torbet added to his acres 
until he owned one luuidred and sixty, and followed farming all his life. He 
was a Whig, and at its organization became identified with the Republican 
party and was quite prominent and active in a public way. He was a "Squire," 
and wrote many wills and settled many estates for his neighbors, and was 
one of the pioneer school teachers in northern Ohio until long after his mar- 
riage. Mr. Torbet was a member of the ]\lethodist Episcopal church. His 
wife, Keziah (Scott) Torbet, was a native of Holmes county, Ohio, where 
she was married. They were the parents of ten children, David. Elizabeth, 
James, Eleanor, Hiram, Albert, Alargarette, Walter, Robert S., and one who 
died in infancy. 

Charles Edgar Torbet was united in marriage, October 29, 1903. to Maude 
Bainter, daughter of Charles A. and Mary Ellen (Davis) Bainter. She 
was born on March 19, 1874. This union has- been blessed with two children : 
Virginia, born on November 20, 1905; and Esther, June 6, 190S. 

Charles A. and Mary Ellen (Davis) Bainter, parents of ^Irs. Charles E. 
Torbet, were both natives of Muskingum county, Ohio, but lived the greater 
portion of their lives at ]\It. V'ernon, Knox county, Ohio. 

Professor Torbet is well liked, and through his fearless method of thwart- 
ing discouraging situations in bringing his work to a high standard, lie has 
the admiration of all with whom he is associated. 



WILLIAM H. GREENE. 



Among the older agriculturists of Clay township. Dearborn county, 
Indiana, is the subject of this brief biographical sketch. For more than half 
a century Mr. Greene has conducted the business of his farm and in that time 
has seen methods of tilling the soil and harvesting crops make some radical 
changes. In that time, too, he has seen the status of the fanner change from 
what was once considered a most humble calling to what is now regarded as 



732 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

the most independent and ele\'ating- life a man can lead. ]Mr. Greene has nni 
been slow to take advantage of these changes as they came about and has 
always been regarded as one of the most up-to-date farmers of his communiu-. 

William H. Greene is a native of the Blue Grass state, born in Boone 
count}-, on February 27, 1S33, a son of John C. and Sallie S. (Green) 
Greene. Jinhn C. was also iKirn in Bivjue count}-, the. date of his birth being 
February 21, 1S02. He recei\ed his education in the subscription schools of 
his native county and. when a yji-Uig man mastered the art of the flour miller. 
He followed his trade for many years and in 1S46 retired from that life, |)ur- 
chasing a farm on which he lived until his death, in August of 1858, at the 
age of fifty-six years. John C. Greene was a son of William and Marv 
(Cochran) Greene, both of whom were born in the state of Virginia, where 
they grew to maturity and were married. In the early clays of the state of 
Kentucky they came into that state, locating near Lexington, afterward remov- 
ing to Boone county where they engaged in farming for the balance of their 
lives. In early life, William Greene had followed flat-boating un the waters 
of the Ohio. He lived to be quite an old man, his death occurring in 1849. 
W^illiam Greene and wife were the parents of a large famil}-, some of them be- 
ing Edward, John C., Ruben C., Sylvester, [Morton B., EUina and ^lary. 

Sallie S. Green, mother of the immediate subject, was born in the state 
of Connecticut and in her youth received a excellent education, She attended 
a convent near her home, later finishing her studies in the high schools of 
Hartford and Xew Haven, termed "academies" in those days. It was her am- 
bition to be an instructor to the children on the frontier and in 1820 she 
journeyed to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and from that point took passage on 
a family boat for pjoone county, Kentucky. There she f<3und a fertile field 
for her efforts as school teacher and there too she met and married John C. 
Greene. To their union were born six children, namely: Joseph and John, 
deceased; Alartha, Elizabeth, William H. and George. Martha married John 
Ross and makes her home in Missouri. She is the mother of three children, 
only one of them. Verner. surviving. Elizabedi became the wife of Henry 
Klenkenbeard and has three daughters, ^Marguerite. Louella and Elizabeth. 
George enlisted for ser^vice in the Ci\il War, and wliile at the front receive;! 
the wound which resulted in his death. 

William H. Greene received his education in the schools of Boone 
county, Kentucky, receiving also valuable instruction from his excellent 
mother, and wlien twenty-three years of age engaged in the tanning business 
at Montgomery, Indiana, in company with his uncle, Matthew Greene. There 



DEARr30RX COfXTY, INDIANA. • 733 

he remained for five years, when he returned to his childhood home in Ken- 
tucky and passed the following- six years. In l(S64 in company witii his 
brother, Joseph, William Greene purchased a tract of one hundred and fitty- 
fi\-e acres in Cla}- township, Dearborn county, Indiana, and on that farm he 
still remains, his brother Joseph having passed from this life some vears since. 

\\'illirmi II. Greene was married on November lo, 1858, to Susan Dur- 
ham, a daughter of John and ^lary (Fields)' Durham, originalh- of Kentucky 
but later of INIontgomery county, this state. Susan Durham was one of a 
family of five chililren, being the third child in order of birth. The others 
are Henry C., John, ]\Iary F., and James W. John married Lee ,\nn Tucker 
and resides near Indianapolis. Fie has five children, Omer, Frank, John, 
Harry and Mar)-. ^lary F. became the wife of G. Hall Adams, and re- 
sides in Flendricks county, this state. James W. married Elvira Cowan and 
lives in Iowa. They are the parents of two children. 

To \\'illiam H. Greene and wife. were born four children, two sons and 
two daughters, Joseph H., Minnie May, Sallie S. and Harry D. INIinnie 
May became the wife of Hansel Gray and makes her home in Tennessee. 
Joseph C. resides in Dillsboro. Sallie S. remains with her |)arents. Har''\ 
D. makes his home in Indianapolis where he is employed in the state capitol 
in the office of the secretary of state. 

The William H. Greene family is one of the representative families of 
this district, honorable, upright and excellent people in every res|)ect. P>oth 
Mr. and ]\Irs. Green can trace their ancestry back to Colonial times, !\Irs. 
Greene being the great-granddaughter of a soldier of the Revolutionary War 
and Mr. Greene tracing back to Gen. Nathaniel Greene, of South Carolina, 
a general in the Revolutionary War. yir. Greene has ever enjoyed the respect 
and esteem of those who know him for his friendly manner, his business ability, 
his interest in public affairs and his upright living and he is regarded by all as 
one of the substantial and worthy citizens of the community in wdiich he 
lives. 



'. CHARLES M. BOWERS. 

The true glory of a city lies in the character of its citizens, and the true 
character of the gentleman whose name introduces this sketch stands out iti 
the searchlight of public opinion with a background of honor and stability of 
^vhich any man might well be proud. Well supplied with a good stock of 






I '.'vi'i> 






■■■ :fT) 



734 DEARBORN COUNTV, INDIANA. 

high ideals for a foundation, -which have always been followed up with a full 
share of energy and ambition, Mr. Bowers has not found the road to success 
filled with as many obstacles as he would have done had he started out in life 
unequipped with these splendid qualities. 

Charles M. Bowers, insurance and investments. Aloores Hill, Indiana. 
was born on No\-ember iS, iS^o. in the city whci'e he resides. He is a son 
of Andrew James and Margaretie (Shockley) Bowers. ]N'Ir. Bowers was 
educated at Moores Hill College, after which he was for several years man- 
ager of a drug store of which his father was proprietor, and later accepted 
a position as special agent and adjuster for a fire insurance company, contin- 
uing in the work for ten years, ending- in 1897. ^^^^ territory covered the 
central states. He left this work to take charge of the district management 
of the ^Mutual Life Insurance Company, of New York, covering the southeast 
portion of Indiana, remaining with this company until 1905, and during which 
time he organized the first independent telephone company in this section, 
which is still in operation. He is the proprietor of the Alilan mill and elevator. 
of Milan, Indiana, one of the foremost interests of that thriving town. Mr. 
Bowers, with his associates, organized the State Bank of Milan, and also the 
Dillsboro State Bank, and later organized the ]Mo(,m"cs Hill State P.ank, all I'f 
which institutions have proven most useful and successful. In both of the last 
named banks he is a director. [Mr. Bowers is a Democrat, of which, party 
he has always been a loyal advocate, and is one of the board of trustees of 
Moores Hill College. 

Andrew James Bowers, father of the subject of this sketch, was born 
on August 25. 182S, at Moores Hill, and was a son of Henry James and 
Rizpath ( Morgan) Bowers. His education was obtained at College Hill, 
Ohio. He was a graduate of IMiami [Medical College, and the Ohio Medical 
College, and later he associated himself with his father in the practice of 
medicine. In politics Doctor Bowers was an ardent Democrat, and in 1882 
w^as elected to the Indiana Legislature, and re-elected three times, b}- a large 
majority in each instance. In his profession he was always w'ell in the lead, 
a prominent member of the County, State and National [Medical Associations. 
Marvelous discoveries entirely changed methods of practice in his time, but 
being a vigilant student. Doctor Bowers was among the first to take advantage 
of every forward step in both medicine and surgery. He was a member of 
the Baptist church and was one of the charter members of the Moores Hiil 
congregation. His wife was Margarette Shockley, of splendid Marylan-l 
pioneer parentage. 



n ■,,-;,^ 



■iyr^'nfi:-'] T)-.tiiL';r; 



DEAKBORX COUNTY, INDIANA. 735 

Henn- James and Rizpath (Morgan) Bowers were tlic paternal grand- 
parents of Charles M. Bowers, and natives of Marblehead, Massachusetts, and 
Pennsylvania, respectively. They were born about 1800. Henry James 
Bowers was a physician. He came to Lawrenceburg in 1823, and associated 
iiimself with the then prominent pioneer practitioner, Doctor Percival, and in 
1827 located at IMoorcs Hill. His patients scattered at long distances in the 
then wilderness, were visited at first principally on foot, there being then no 
roads worthy of the name. On securing a good saddle horse later, he rode 
overland to Massachusetts and brought his father, the Rev. James Bowers, 
an Episcopal minister, his mother and t\\-o sisters, Mary and Julia, west 
with him. The trip was made in the winter time, principally by sleigh to 
Pittsburgh, and thence do\\ n the Ohio liy primitive boat ser\-ice to Lawrence- 
burg. iJr. Henry J. Bowers was active in organizing Moores Hill College, 
and the college records show that he w^as secretary of the first meeting, held 
in 1S54. to perfect the organization. Doctor Bowers' influence was used to 
ad\antage in securing the present location of the Baltimore & Ohio South- 
western Railroad (then the Ohio & Mississippi) tlirough this locality, and of 
which company he was an original stockholder. Dr. Henry J. Bowers' resi- 
dence on the eminence just west of Moores Hill station is still standing, ari'l 
at the time the railroad was built was reputed to be the finest dwelling along 
the line between Cincinnati and St. Louis. The confidence he enjrjyed of 
his neighbors and citizens of this locahty is shown by the record he made 
as their representative in the state Legislature on fi\e occasions, three times 
as a member of the House of Representatives and twice in the state Senate. 
He was also a member of the constitutional conventir)n. elected each time to 
represent the Democratic party. His son. Marmion H. Bowers, was editor 
and publisher of one of the first papers in Dearborn county, the Aurora S/^cc- 
tator. Marmion Bowers later went to Texas, where he became prominent in 
the legal profession and was a member of the state Senate at the time of his 
early death in 1871. Had he lived he would have in all probability suc- 
ceeded to the LTnited States Senate, for he was in direct line for this pro- 
motion. 

The daughters of the Rev. James Bowers were the first teachers in the 
public schools in Dearborn county, away back about 1829. Mary Bowers later 
married Zebulon Pike Wardell, a nephew of General Pike, the famous ex- 
plorer to whose memor}^ the famous Colorado snow-capped peak stands as a 
monument. Mr. and Mrs. W^ardell went to Louisiana, w'here a prosperous 
banking business was engaged in prior to the Civil War. IMrs. Wardell met 



736 • DEAREORX COUNTY, INDIANA. 

a tragic dealli at the advanced age of eighty-se\'cn years, wlien tlie stcjini- 
boat, "Oliver Bierne," was destrii\ed by fire on the [Mississippi river, near 
Vicksbnrg, in Octol.icr. 1891. Siie \vas a passenger en route from St. Louis 
to New Orleans, \\'hcre she had been going' ever\" fall to spend the winter. 
Mrs. W'ardell had retained her faculties wonderfull}- and. her wide-awake in- 
terest in the current literature of the da_\-, together with almost incessant tra'>-- 
el.made her a chamrlng companidu and associate. Tall, straight anrl of queen- 
ly bearing, an interested and shrewd oljserver, few persons since time began 
ever saw more marvelous changes than this remarkable woman who taught 
the first public school in Dearborn county. "Down in Cincinnati, where they 
burn spermaceti candles" was a popular saying current in her early days. 

Charles ]\I. Bowers was married on October 7, 1884, to Flora A. Crozier. 
daughter of the Hon. John Crozier and Angeline (AA'ilson) Crozier, an old 
family prominent in Dearljorn count}-. To this union were born two children, 
Millard A. and Florence A., both of whom have been educated at }i[oores Hill 
College. 

[Millard A. Bo\\ers, of the firm of C. M. Bowers & Son, is the active 
manager of the "Crystal Springs" farms in both Dearborn and Ripley coun- 
ties. A herd of royally-bred Holstein-Friesian cattle is one of the features of 
these productive properties. 

Like the past three generations briefly sketched above, the present repre- 
sentatives of this old and honorable family are always foremost in every good 
work to unselfishly promote the public weal. 



■ ■ JAMES LOFTUS. 

The gentleman whose name introduces this sketch springs from the 
class of our pioneer citizens who were not too proud to do the work which 
first came to their hands. It is from this class that our substantial families 
have been built up in America, and James Loftus may well be proud to call 
himself a descendant of such. 

James Loftus was born on ]May 23, 1857, in Dearborn county, and is a 
son of John and Elizabeth (Phoena) Loftus. Lie received his early education 
in the public schools, and later attended ]Moores Hill College. After leaving 
school, he went to Minnesota for a short time, and returned to take charge 
of his father's farm, remaining there until eight years after his marriage, 



.,;■ pr--'' ' 'r--''.4 



'ir. ;,y.L 






It .Svfil./ . !fl ^O 



DEARBOKX COUNTY, INDIANA. 737 

\\hen he bouglit a tract of one hundred acres, which he improved with 
o-ood liuildings, including- a blacksmith shop, which he still operates. He later 
bought sixty acres more, and now has one of the finest farms in the town- 
sliiiJ. Mr. Loftus has always given his support to the Republican party, and is 
a member of the Ivlethodist Episcopal church. He belongs to the Knights of 
I'ythias, of which he is past grand chancellor. 

John Loftus was born in 1S27, in Ireland, and at the age of twenty-one 
years came to the United Stales, landing at New Orleans in May, 1848, and 
from there he went to Cincinnati and engaged his ser\ ices as a coachman for 
a short time, and then came to .Aurora, where he followed the same vocation 
until 1865, when he bought one hundred and fifty-five acres of land in Sparta 
township, on which he lived until his death, in Septembier, 1903, at the age of 
sevent_\'-s).K years. !Mr. Loftus was a Democrat, and he belonged to the Cath- 
olic church. His parents were William and Catherine (Collins) Loftus. His 
wife, Elizabeth (Phoena) Loftus, was born in Dublin, Ireland, and came to 
America as a young woman, settling at Aurora, where she was married. They 
were the parents of four children, John. Jan)es, Thomas, and Patrick. Mrs. 
Loftus had one son by her first Inisband, Michael H. Pleffrein. John Loftus 
was married to Hattie Crosby, and lives at Versailles, Indiana. They ha\-e 
three children, Grace, Joseph and ]\lartin. Thomas was married to Ada 
James, and makes his home at Lexington, Indiana, where he is one of the 
wealthiest citizens. Patrick married Nettie Scribner, and mrived to Hamilton, 
Ohio. They have had four children. Raymond, Inez, Arthur, and one who 
died early in life. ^lichael PI. Hciffrein is married and lives at Denver, Colo- 
rado. 

William and Catherine (Collins) Loftus were natives of Ireland. They 
came to America and settled at Cincinnati, where they died, leaving six 
children, Patrick. Americus, Tliomas, William, ]\Iary, and John. 

James Loftus was united in marriage on February 23, 1S88, to ]\Iary 
Sliuman, daughter of John and Alartha Ann (Thompson) Shuman. She 
was born on September 27. 1861, near Dillsboro. and when young, was em- 
ployed in the home of W. S. Tyier, of Dillsboro, until her marriage. To 
this union were born four children, as follow : Leroy, born on December 6, 
1888, at Dillsboro; Edna E., September 17, 1891, died when seventeen years 
old; Albert J., July 20, 1S93; Lester D., September 20, 1903, and died on 
October 3, 1903. 

John Shmiian, father of Mrs. James Loftus, was born at Aurora, and 
his wife, Martha Ann (Thompson) Shuman, was a native of Chesterville. Mr. 
Shuman lived in Sparta township all of his life, where he farmed during the 
(47) 



"I ■- . -J : ! . r 






■.■.■.i-\ . ^ .(■ 



738 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA.. 

sumnier months, and taught sclmol in the winter. Air. and Mrs. Shunian 
were the parents of fnc children, namely: .Vlbert J., who married Anna A. 
Wheeler, i.s living- at Dillsboro, anil has tv.'o children, Cordis S. and Ernest; 
I^ura E., who became the wife of William Peck, lives at Price Hill, Cincin- 
nati, and has five children, P.ertha AI., Armor S., Charles W., Clarabelle, and 
Raymond. 

Mr. L'>ftus is a prosperous and well-respected citizen of the community 
in which he li\'es. ?Iis thrifty and industrious habits have set an excellent ex- 
ample for many of his tovvusmen. 



LOUIS M. EOULK. 



Loin's ]\L Foulk was born on April 23, 1829, in Ohio, and was a son of 
Aaron and Xancy (Smith) Foulk. He was reared in Lidiana, and Iowa, and 
received his schooling principallx in Iowa. He grew up as a farmer boy, and 
when a young man, returned frcrni Iowa to Aurora, and engaged in the grocery 
commission, and pork-packing business for a number of years. 

Aaron and Xancy ( Smitli) Foulk, parents of the immediate subject of tiiis 
sketch were nati\es of Ohio. They were farmers and early settlers in Dctr- 
bom county. They li^•ed on H(>lmans Hill, in Center township, and were both 
members of the Baptist church. r^Irs. Foulk died while still a young woman, 
leaving four children, Esau, Caroline, Xancy and Louis. Mr. Foulk was 
afterward married to Eliza Holman, and this union was blessed with four 
children also, Lucinda, Elizabeth, Holman and Richard. Aaron Foulk and 
his wife moved to Pella, Iowa, where Mrs. Foulk died. Mr. Foulk returned 
to AiuDra, and died here when middle aged. 

The maternal grandfather Smith and his wife lived and died in Ohio, and 
their history is lost. 

Louis AT. Foulk was united in marriage, X'ovember 26. 1S56, with Alta 
M. Squibb, daughter of Robert and Eliza (Cummins) Squibb. She was born 
on April 20. 1S36, on Laughery_ creek. Dearborn county, Indiana. This 
union has been blessed with six children, Myra, Robert, George, Rosa, Louis 
and Fannie. ]\Iyra Foulk became the wife of W. V. A\'ebber, who died Decem- 
ber 2, 1914. She resides at Aurora and has two children, Louis, and Will- 
iam. Roljert died in infancy. George was a bookkeeper, and died single, 
in 1902. Rosa was married to Frank Holman and lived at York, Alabama. 
She died at Aurora while on a visit, leaving four children, Fannie, Marie, ^ilar- 



DEARBORN COUXTV, IXDIAXA, 739 

jorie, Frank L. and Robert. Louis is single, and is a iiartner of W. P. S(|uil)b 
& Company, distillers, of Lawrenceburg. Fannie is at home with her mother. 

Robert and Eliza Squilib, parents of Mrs. Louis M. Foulk, were natives 
of Cayuga, Xew York, and early settlers in Ohio c<junty, Lidiana. moving 
later to Aurora. In 1846 they made a trip down the Ohio ri\-er to Cairo. Illi- 
nois, which place did not please them as a permanent hcimo and thev returned 
immediately to Aurora, where Mr. Squibl) lost his life in an accident l)y the 
bursting of a cannon at the celebration of the opening of the Ohio & Missis- 
sipppi railway. }lis wife survi\-ed him and died about 1890, aged eighty-one 
years. The\' were the parents of three children. William P., George W. and 
Alta M. 

The paternal grandfather of ]\Irs. Foulk was Enoch Squibb, and his wife 
was Ja-ne (Packington) Squibb, both natives of Xew York state, and early 
settlers in Ohio county, Indiana, where they died. Their children were, Xa- 
thaniel, \A"illiam. Rachel, Ednnnul, George, and Jatie. 

The maternal grandfather of ]vlrs. Finilk was Gideon Cummins, and his 
wife was Eunice (Ellis) Cummins, both natives of Xew York state, and pio- 
neers in Ohio county, Indiana. ]Mr. Cummins died in Ripley county at an old 
age. They had four children, Josiah, Gideon, Eliza and Effie. 

Louis M. Foulk died on February 12, 1S89, aged sixty years. His wife 
still survives him. They both united with the Baptist church. 



MRS. AXXA SMITH COXAWAY. 

The following is a short biograph.ical sketch oi one of the worthv women 
of Dillsboro, Dearborn county, Indiana. ]\Irs. Anna Smith Conaway, daughter 
of X'athan Smith and widow of Robert Conaway, combining something of 
the genealogy of the two families mentioned. 

Anna Smith was a native of Dillsbon.i, born on December 10, 1854, a 
daughter of X'athan and Sarah (Powell) Smith. When a young man Xa- 
than Smith came ti"* Dill^lloro, where he passed the remaining rears of his 
life. He was engaged in a stcjck trading business in which he was faif'ly 
successful. Fie died in 1861 when in middle age, having for many years 
been a faithful member of the Presbyterian church. Sarah I^jwell, m^ither 
of the immediate subject of this sketch, was Imrn at Rising Sun. in 1820, 
and became the mother of six children. nainel_\- : Harriet. Emily. Henry (who 
died at the front during the Civil War), Rebecca, Anna and John, Harriet; 



740 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

married Jolin M. Hoover, of Dillsboro, to whom were born three children, 
Minnie, Frank and Ada ]May: the two eldest of whom died in childhood and 
Ada Afay became the wife of Will Stewart, of Goodland, Indiana. Emily 
married James Abbott, of Dillsboro, and to that union were bOrn four chil- 
dren, Oran, Lois. Charles and Roy ; Lois is married, being the wife of Robert 
Thair, of Cincinnati, and the mother of one child. Duret. Rebecca married 
Scott Misner and became the mother of three children; Maggie, Lawrence 
and Ethel; of whom [Maggie became the wife of Will Shisler and has twri 
children, Dorcas and Lawrence ; Lawrence chose Vina McGranihan as his 
wife, and Ethel married Carl Decker, and is the mother of four children, 
Charles, Chester. Elizabeth and another. John married Alice Smith, of 
Dillsbiiro, and their marriage is without issue. 

Anna Smith became the wife of Robert Gonaway, a son of Hamilton and 
Harriet ^Lemons) Conaway, the former of whom was boni in Laugliery, 
this county, where he passed his entire life. He read law when a young man 
and ga^'e more or less time to his profession in addition to his duties as a 
farmer. He lived to be past seventy years of age. Robert Conaway was 
bom in Laughery on January i6, 184S, and passed his entire life in that com- 
munity. He gave his attention to farming, stock raising and shipping live 
stock, and was one of the highly respected and successful men of that section. 
A faithful member of the Presbyterian church and one of the stanch sup- 
porters of the Deiuocratic party, he was a man of much good influence in 
the community. His death occurred on July 7, 1909, leaving, besides his 
widow, five children, namely: Elizabeth, Hamilton, Eliza, Harriet and Hany. 
Elizabeth became the wife of J. AI. ]McKim, of Coles Comer. Hamilton, who 
has been married, now lives at home with his mother. Eliza is the \\\ie of 
Joseph Ake ^ilunster, of Indianapolis, and the mother of three children, 
Elizabeth, Dorothy and Marie. Harriett became the wife of Edward Licking 
of Cincinnati, and has one child, Estal. Mr. Licking is connected with the 
internal revenue service at Cincinnati. Harry, the youngest of the family, 
remains at home with the mother. 

Mrs. Conaway is regarded as one of the excellent women of the com- 
munity, and quietl}' discharges her duties and responsibilities in a most 
efficient manner. For forty years she lived on the family homestead and 
since the death of her husband has taken up her residence in Dillsboro, where 
she found a warm welcome from a large circle of friends. 

\\'oman's life is lived within the home circle, where there is rarely anv- 
thing of a spectacular nature to record, but there are constantly being made 



DKARBORX COUNTY, INDIANA. 74I 

Upon lier fortitude and strength of character such demands as fall tri man's 
l(-)t in the outer world, so when it can be said of a woman that she has ahlv dis- 
charged her duties as wife and mother, much has been said and much credit 
and praise are hers. 



CHARLES R. LIEBERMAN. ' 

The biographer' with pleasure calls attention to a few of the salient 
points in the career of Charles R. Lieberman, well-known retail meat mer- 
chant of Dillsboro, Clay township. Dearborn county, Indiana. Mr. Liclicr- 
nian is a Swiss by birth, ha\'ing first seen the light of day in the rcpuMic 
of Switzerland on .-Viiril 7, 1S66. He is one of two sons of Joseph ¥. and 
Odela (Geiscr) Lieberman, the other being Erancis Joseph. Both parents 
were Swiss natives and passed their entire lives in their own country. Joseph 
F. operated a large flour-mill beside a turbulent little mountain stream 
which had been handed down to him b\' his parents, Ferdinand and Julia (von 
Hess) Lieberman. 

Charles R. Lieberman came to this countrv when still a voung man and 
pursued his education in the city of Cincinnati. After a short time in the 
I'nited States, he returned to his native land and there finished his education. 
\vhcreupon he again came tn Cincinnati and secured employment in one of 
Iier leading packing houses. He followed this line of work in many of the 
larger cities of the country and later purchased an interest in a packing estab- 
lishment located at Springfield, Ohio. After a time he again went to Cin- 
cinnati and engaged in the retail butcher supply business and in 1905 came 
to Dillsboro and opened u[> a retail meat market shop in the Aiasonic building. 
He is now located at the '"flatiron" corner, where he has been for some years. 

Charles H. Lieberman was married in 1900, to Sophia Xiester. a daugh- 
ter of A. F. and ^Nfaria (Ehlers) Xiester, of Dillsboro. the former the well- 
known harness anrl shoe dealer. To Mr. and Mrs. Liel.K;rman ha\-e been 
born two children. Otto C. and Olga, both of whom are attending school in 
Dillsboro. 

Air. Liebemian holds his fraternal affiliations with the ancient order of 
f'ree and Accepted Masons, and also with the Knights of Pythias, through 
tlie local lodges in Dillsboro. His political support he gives to the Republican 
l>arty and while not a seeker after office for himself, he is known as one of 
the influential men of the party in this section an<i his approval is earnestly 
sought by those who care for the honor of public office. Mr. Lieberman is 



V f . ! .-.. 



' ■ lo 15; 



'(• L, n -.r. 



742 



DEARBORN COUXTY, IXDIAXA. 



a man of agTOcahle ]>erri')iiality and a most interesting conversationalist. IK- 
has crossed the ocean seven times and has traveled all over Europe from the 
]\Iediterranean to the iiorth of Sweden, and lieing a clcsc observer of affairs 
and an excellent student of human nature, his society is found most delight- 
ful by those interested in places and men outside of tlieir own coimtry. Snce 
coming to this community, Air. Liclierman has won the friendship of the 
best people throughout tliis section and their high regard he retains liy vir- 
tue of his sterling riualities of heart and mind. He is wide awake to the best 
interests of his adopted home and any plan for the advancement of com- 
munity interests finds in him a warm supporter. 



ROBERT H. CHANCE. 



It is especially fitting that the following biographical sketch should appear 
in a volume of the character of the one in hand for two reasons; first, be- 
cause the Chance family is one of the very oldest in this section and has been 
identified with local affairs since its earliest histor}- ; and, second, because the 
immediate subject of this sketch was one of the faithful sons of the Union who 
donned the blue in the dark days of the sixties and helped preserve the integ- 
rity of the nation. 

Robert H. Chance was born in Sparta township. Dearborn county, In- 
diana, on February 26, 18-J4, being a son of Robert and Anna M. (Champion) 
Chance. Robert in his turn was a son of John and Polly Chance, who were 
boni in Pennsylvania, where they grew up and married, and later brought their 
family into the wilderness which is now the great and beautiful state of In- 
diana. They secured from the government a tract of one hundred and 
sixty acres of land, -which they in time cleared, and on which their family 
was reared. In spite of the many years of hardship as pjioneers in a new land, 
both li\-ed to a good old age. John Chance was a Whig, and he took an 
active part in the early affairs of this section. There were twelve children in 
their family, one dying in infancy. The others were: Tom, Jesse, Robert, 
Parry, Jackson-, John, Pliram, Mary, Hettie, Lucinda and Lizzie. 

Robert Chance was born in Pennsylvania and upon the family coming 
westward, he stopped in Cincinnati at a time when there were but four or five 
log houses in the little river settlement. Pie then came to Sparta township, 
where his education was obtained in the early subscription schools of the 
neighborhood, and in that township he spent the remainder of his life, passing 



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DF.ARBORX COUNTY, INDIANA. 743 

away wlien eiglity-tive years of age. Robert Chance was a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, .\fter tlie formation n[ the Reinil)hcan party he 
became one of its stanch supporter,s. His wife. Anna M. Champion, w;is l)Orn 
in tlie state of New Jersey and was bmuglit to Dearborn county in earl\- cliibh 
hood by her parents. 

Robert H. Chance, immediate suliject of this sketch, was one of a family 
of nine children, namely: ^laiy Jane, Wesley, Phoebe, Catherine, Robert H., 
Joseph, Isabelle, Leven I', and Frank. Robert remained at h.onie with his par- 
ents, receiving his education in the early schools of Sparta township and when 
but seventeen years of age, fired with patriotism over the causes which threat- 
ened to disrupt the Nation, he enlisted for service with Companv .\, Se\'enth 
Regiment, Indiana A'olunteer Infantr_\-, and for the ne.xt three years was in 
many of the hardest fought battles of the war. He was at Winchester, .Antie- 
tam, Fredericksbiu-g. Chancellorsville, the A\'ilderness, Petersburg, Gettysburg, 
Slaughter ^Mountain, besides many lesser engagements and skinnishes. He 
served as a non-commissioned officer through the greater part of his enlist- 
ment. 

x^fter the expiration of his term cif service, Robert H. Chance returned to 
his home and purchased a tract of forty acres of land in Sparta township for 
which he paid nine hundred dollars. There he resided for three years, when 
he traded it for a seventy-acre tract nearby, which he farmed two years and 
then sold, buying one hundred and twenty-four acres in Sparta township, 
which he farmed for twelve years, at that time retiring from the active affairs 
of life. 

Robert PI. Chance's marriage occurred on September 23, 1S66, wh.en he 
was united in matrimony with Sadie ]\I. Baker, daughter of E. W. and Mar- 
garet A. (Hennigan) Baker of Washington township, this county. Mr. Baker 
was born and passed his entire life in Dearborn count}-, being engaged in agri- 
culture during all his active years. He passed away in 1903, at the advanced 
age of eighty-four years. Mrs. Baker also lived to a ripe old age, her death 
occurring on December 13, 1907, when in her eighty-third \ear. Thev were 
the parents of ten children, namely: Angeline, Harlow, Sadie, Louis, Ella, 
Mary, Dolly, Hattie, Ulla and Carrie. Sadie (Mrs. Cliance) received her edu- 
cation in the schools of Washington township. Dearborn county, and has passed 
her entire life here. To ]Mr. and ]\Irs. Chance ha\-e been horn three children, 
Cora, Ida and Alta. Cora is the wife of George W. Turner, of Sparta town- 
ship, and is the mother of two children, Robert and Grace. Ida is Mrs. W. 
Eckstein and has one child, Frieda. Alta, the youngest of the family, re- 
mains with the parents. 



744 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Mr. Chance holds his religious membership with the Presbyterian church 
of Dillsboro and his fraternal affiliation witli tlic ancient order of Free and 
Accepted Alasons, the Knights of Pythias, and William Spear Post, No. 89, 
Grand Army of the Republic, at Dillsboro. In politics, he is a firm supporter 
of the Republican party, keenly interested in all affairs pertaining thereto. 
Jkli". Chance is a man of progressive tendencies and enterprising spirit, who has 
a host of friends in the community where he has passed almost his entire 
life. 



GEORGE H. LEWIS. 



The Lewis family came to this country from \\'ales. The fath.er of George 
H. Lewis died soon after reaching this country. He had two brothers 
Richard and Charles, who served in the Civil War. Richard was killed 
in the ser\-ice and Charles died in Andersonvillc prison. Although born in 
Wales, George H. Lewis learned the miller's trade at London, Canada, having 
migrated to that country with his mother after the death of his father. Mr. 
Lewis has been engaged in the milling business all his life, and has never lo^t 
a day's time, except on account of sickness. Mr. Lewis was engaged in th:- 
milling business at several places in Canada, in Ohio and in Pennsylvania 
before finallv locating- at Lawrenceburg, this county. Pie is now the vice- 
president and general manager of the Lawrenceburg Roller Mills Company. 

George H. Lewis was born in Oswestry, Wales, on ]\[arch 23, 1S66. the 
son of George and Rebecca (Thomas) Leuis, both natives of Wales. They 
had two sons and two daughters. One son, George, died in infancy and one 
daughter, Sarah, died at the age of five years. Elizabeth, the other daughter, 
married \\'illiam Watson, of Oil Springs, Ontario, Canada, and George H. 
is the subject of this sketch. 

The elder Lewis was reared in a railroad office at Oswestry, Wales, and 
followed railroading for some years. He came- to America in 1S68, and lo- 
cated near Rockford, Illinois, dying soon after locating there of typhoid 
fever. His widow sun-dved him for many years and died in 1S97, at the age 
of sixty-three. They were members of the Methodist church, and he was a 
Methodist lay preacher and rode a circuit. 

George H. Lewis's paternal grandfather and his wife died in Wales. 
They had three sons and one daughter who came to America, two of these 
sons, Richard and Charles, having served in the Civil War, as noted above. 
]\Ir. Lewis's maternal grandparents spent all their lives in Wales, the grand- 



-■ T^-^'i 




GEOKCK H. I.KWIS 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 745 

fatlicr having been a coiilractor. He died at tlie age of about sixty and hii 
wife at the age of sixty-three. They were the parents of the following chil- 
dren: i\Iary, Sarah, John. Andrew, George, Stephen and Rebecca. 

George H. Lewis was reared until he was five years old in Cleveland, 
Ohio. He then went to Canada with his mother and sister and there grevv' 
ti) nianhiiod in London. He attended the public schools in London, Canada, 
and li\ed on a farm near that city until sixteen years of age, when he began 
to learn the miller's trade. From London he removed to Park Hill, Canada, 
and after being there a short time removed to Strattero}-, thence returned 
to Cleveland, Ohio. After being there some years, engaged with the National 
Milling Company, Mr. Lewis removed to Pittsljurgh, where he was engaged 
in the milling business for seven years. From Pittsburgh he went to Akron, 
Ohio, and then returned to Pittsburgh for a year. On September 20, 1900, 
Mr. Lewis moved to Lawrenceburg, this county, and became superintendent 
of the manufacturing department of the Lawrenceburg Roller Mills Company. 
Later he was made secretary and manager of this company and was then 
elected vice-president and general manager of the concern, which responsible 
jiosition he now holds. In the meantime he had bought out the interest of 
Mr. Pdaney. of Boston. 

The Lawrenceburg Roller Mills Company was organized in 1896 and 
was incorporated the following year with a capital of sc^■enty-five thousand 
dollars, this capital later beir.g increased to one hundred thousand dollari. 
The present officers of the company are B. J. Rothwell, of Boston, president : 
Ci. H. Lewis, vice-president; L. S. Brown, of Boston, treasurer. The capacity 
of the mill is eighteen hundred barrels a day. and the storage capacity for 
grain is five hundred and fifty thousand bushels. Tiie company ships its 
gf'ods to all parts of the world, except the Orient, and does business in all 
European ports and in South America, also carrying on a large domestic trade 
in the East and Southeast. The company employs sixty-five people, the 
earnings of these people feeding about two hundred and fifty mouths in th.c 
cit_\ of Lawrenceburg. The annual pay roll is about fifty thousand dollars 
a year. 

On December 17, 1S88, George IL Lewis was married to Xeftie Schone- 
myer. who was born on October 28, 1866, daughter of Frederick Ernest and 
Elizabeth Schonemyer. One son, born to this union, died in 1911, at the 
age of twenty-one. He attended Purdue L'niversity for three years, and then 
associated himself with the Bullock Electric .Company, of Cincinnati, later 
becoming associated with the Western Electric Company, near Chicago. 
Mrs. Nettie Lewis died in 1895, at the age of twenty-nine, and on June 7, 



I'.-, 



•..1/ 1 



746 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

1905, Air. Lewis married, secoiully. Edna J. Gi\an. who was born in I'eler ;• 
burg. Kentucky, daughter of Sanford and EHzalieth (Riddell) Givan, nati\'ei 
of that state. Sanford divan was postnijister of Aurora, this county, and lat;.-,- 
became connected with t!ie Ohiii Loan Association, as api)raiser. He is de- 
ceased, but his widow is still living. They were the parents of three children, 
Florence, J'aul and Edna J. 

Mrs. Lewis is a member of the Christian church, and Air. Lewis is a 
member of the Methodist church. He belongs to McKinley Lodge Xo. 31 8, 
Free and Accepted Alasons. and is a Rei)ublican in politics. lie was vice- 
president of the Cincinnati Chamber of Commerce for two years. During t!ie 
flood of 1913 he was treasurer of the flood committee for relief at Lawrence- 
burg, lie was also appointed special- rei)resentati\-e of the Red Cross wiih 
power to act. 

Mr. Lewis is an expert miller, understanding thoroughly not only tlie 
manufacturing end of the business, but the business end as well, having fol- 
lowed the business since he was a boy si.xteen years old. It may proper!)- 
be said that the remarkable success of the Lawrenceburg Roller Alills Com- 
pany diu-ing the jjast fifteen years is due largel}- to Air. Lewis's efforts. He 
not only believes in his business, but is a born optimist, enthusiastically devoted 
to e\ery phase and every detail of the enterprise with which he is so prom- 
inently connected. 

Mr. Lewis's onlv living sister, Mrs. Eli/:abeth Watson, has a pleasant 
family of children, Alay, Xettie. Frank, Edsie and George. 



, • EAIILY ELIZABETH (HUBBARTT) WALKER. 

It is with pleasure the biographer calls attention to a short sketch of the 
life of Airs. Emily b'lizabeth W^alkcr, one of the worthy and respected matrons 
of Clay ti:)wnship. Dearborn count}', Indiana, combining a brief history of her 
own and her husband's people. 

Mrs. Walker is a native of Dearborn county, born on December 8, 1841, 
a daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth (Jones) Hubbartt, the former also a 
native of this county and the latter born at Alilford, Ohio, in August of 
182 1. Thomas Hubbartt first saw the Hght of day in i8j2 and received his 
educaton in the early schools of his native county. After his school days 
were over, he turned his attention to farming and gave his acti\'e years to that 
occupation in addition to following the carpenter trade. Flis entire life was 



DEAKJIORX COLNTV, IXDIA.NA. 747 

passed in Dearborn county. To Thotnas IliiljbarU and wife \v;is born a family 
of nine cliildrcn. namely; Emily, George, Jolin. X'ancv, Louisa. I'Vaucis, ■ 
James, ^Morion, and one child who died in infancy. 

Mrs. Wall^er's paternal grandjDarents were James and Xancy Ilubliartt 
both of wlmm were natives of Xorlli Carolina and eai'Iv in their married life 
they came into Dearborn count}-, locating- near ?vJount 'J'afjor. They later ni' ived 
to the little settlement on White ri\er in the central ijortimi of the state, where 
the city of Indianapolis now stands, but called at that lime Xew I'urchase. 
There they lived the remainder of their lives. James attaining the unusual age 
of one hundred and seven years. They were the parents of se\-en children : 
Charles, Solomon, Janies, George. Betsey, Jane and Thomas. 

Emily Elizabeth Walker received her education in the common schools 
of Sparta township, near her childhor)d home and remained with her parents 
until the time of her marriage on January 23, 1S62, to Thon.ias James Walker, 
son of Rdbert and Theodosia (Cook) Walker. Roljcrt Walker was a nati\-e 
of Ireland and immigrated to this country when a yoinig man and finally- 
drifted to Dearborn county, locatiiig on a farm near [Mount Tabor, lie later 
remo\-ed to Wilmington and still later took up his residence on a farni on 
Hogan creek, where he passed his remaining da}-s. His death occin-red in Au- 
gust of 1865, at the age of eighty-four years. Theodosia. his wife, was born 
at I^wrenceburg. receiving her education in the schools of that town. To them 
were born iiine children; S}-l\'ester, John, William, Thomas, Jane, Eliza, ^la- 
tilda, Catherine and Sarah. 

Thomas James Walker was born on December _|, 1831, while his parents 
were living in [Mount Tabor and he received his edtication in the schools near 
his home. Inimediately after completing his education he went to the Ohio 
ri\-er and for the following ten years worked on boats plying its waters. He 
then returned home and farmed the family homestead until the time of his 
marriage, when he purchased fifty-two acres in Clay township and settled 
down there. He later purchased one hundred and fifty-five acres adjoining 
which he farmed for some time, later on disposing of frjrt_\- acres, but retain- 
ing and managing the balance. In addition to his farm home, he owns a 
house and three lots in Dillsboro and has in the course of his labors accjuired 
a pleasing competency. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walker are the parents of thirteen children, namely : Alice, 
Anna, Olive, George, John, Gilbert, Carrie, May, Evcritt, Lee, Walter, Kate, 
and Xora, who died when young. Alice, the eldest, became the wife of John 
Jewett and the mother of six children, Thomas. Cecil, Emma, Charles, John 
and Walker. Anna married Columbus Rowland and had five children, Ethel, 



^>.. ..■:':'. -tl 






748 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Harry Bessie and two dead. Olive became the wife of Thomas Radley. 
George married Nellie Siiicoe. John chose Daisy Gray as his wife. Carrie 
married Harry AIcKnight and has one child, Esther. Everitt married Nellie 
Everitt. W'alter married Bessie Siemental and has three children, Carroll, 
Adeline and Tilford. 

Airs. Walker is a devout member of the Methodist Episcopal church and 
in that faith has reared her excellent family. This family is regarded as one of 
the best families of the community, the various members being held in high 
esteem throughout this section. Air. Walker gives his support to the Demo- 
cratic party and is interested in all questions of public welfare. He is ac- 
counted as most properly as among the substantial citizens of this community. 



HEXRV PIEPER. 



In the respect that is accorded to men who have fought their own wav 
to success through unfavorable environment, we find an unconscious recog- 
nition of the intrinsic worth of the character which, cannot only endure so 
rough a test, but gain new strength through the discipline. The gentleman 
whose name appears above was not favored in his early life with inherited 
wealth or the influence of successful friends, but in spite of this, he has 
attained a comfortable station in life, making his influence felt for the good 
of the community life of Dillsboro, where he has long resided. Because of 
his honorable career and because also he is numbered among those patriotic 
sons of the North, who assisted in saving the Union's integrity in the dark- 
days of the si.xties. he- is eminently worthy of a place in this book. 

Henr>", Pieper, the subject of this sketch, was born in Hanover, Germany, 
on January 20, 1839, son of Francis H. arid Anna Alary (Schnitker) Pieper. 
Francis H. \vas also a native of Hanover, born there in 1797. He was fox 
many years a farmer and carpenter in his native land and then immigrated to 
America when the subject of this sketch was a small child. He located first 
in Cincinnati, where he worked at his trade and then, in 1845, he came to 
Dearborn county and secured work on a farm. He managed in this way 
for a few years and then, in 1851, he moved to Switzerland county and 
bought a farm of forty acres, costing him two hundred dollars. This was 
practically unimproved, the only effort in that line being the little log house 
on the tract. In 1866 he moved to Farmers Retreat, Caesar Creek township. 
purchasing at that place a farm of one hundred and four acres, which cost 



DEARBORN COUISTY, INDIANA. ■ 749 

liini twenty-seven hinidred dollars. He carried on general farming and lived 
there a number of years. He passed away in the spring of 1S79, at the age 
of eighty-two }-ears. He was a devout member of the I.ulheran church, and 
after the birth of the Republican party in 1856 he endorsed its principles 
for the balance of his life. There were four children in his family," Henry, 
the immediate subject of this sketch, being the third child in order i.if Ijirth. 
The eldest was Caroline Olrs. Opp). now deceased. She v.as the m<;ither of 
twel\-e children, W'illiaiu, ^lary (deceased), Amelia (deceased"), Lizzie, 
George, Frank, Fred. Anna. Carrie (deceased) ; all these grew to maturity. 
There were three who died in infancy, Charley, Henry and Eliza. }*[innie. 
now deceased, the second daughter of the family, is the wife of Henry \A'ort- 
man and the mother of nine children, Elizabeth, William, John, George, 
Catherine, Loui.sa. Carrie, Mary and Henry. Fred, the younge-^t of tlie 
family, died at Dillsboro on April 8, 1914, leaving his widow and ten children, 
Frank, Minnie, Anna, William (deceased), Carrie, John, Dora, Agnes, Jes- 
sie and Alfred. 

The mother of Henry Pieper, Anna Mary Schnitker, was born in Han- 
over, Germany, in the year iSoo, and died in the spring of 18S2. Both of 
her parents remained in their native land and died there when about sixt}'- 
five years of age. There were but two children in their family, Anna M. and 
a brother, Casper Henry Schnitker, who also remained in Germany all his 
life, where he was a farmer. 

Henry Pieper was but a small child when he was brought to this country 
by his parents and after they located in this country, he attended the early 
schools near his home. In 1861, when just of age, he made his first business 
venture. This was the purchase of a farm of forty acres located in Switzer- 
land county, for which he paid the sum of si.x hundred dollars. It was partly 
cleared and he set ab'.uit clearing the balance and putting the entire tract into 
an excellent state of cultivation, \^'hen he had succeeded in doing this, he 
purchased a tract of forty acres adjoining, for which he paid eleven hun- 
dred dollars. That was almost entirely cleared and he fanned this land until 
1876, when he disposed of it and moved to Ripley county. There he pur- 
chased a farm of one hundred and twenty acres, for which he paid twenty- 
four hundred dollars, and this he retained until 1909. In 1882 he added 
forty additional acres to his original holdings in Ripley county, the latter 
tract costing him one thousand dollars and at that time he began to be inter- 
ested in the raising of fancy live stock. 

He retired from the exacting duties of a farmer in 1895 '^''''i moved 
to Dillsboro and there the following year, in company with his son, Henry 



750 DEARBORN' COL'XTV, INDIANA. 

Smith, he opened up the hardware business, which they still run. He 
has from the first succeeded well in this undertaking;" and all who e\'er knew 
him have the utmost confidence in him. 

Henry Pieper was united in marriage with Louisa Brocksieker, Lorn in 
Ripley county, a daughter of Henry and Anna ^lary fBurman) Brocksieker, 
both of \vh(un were Imrn in Germany. Thev came to tliis countr\- in 1843 
and located in this county, wliere fi^ir a number of years the_\- farmed and 
where both died. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Piejier were born two children, Anna ^Iar\- and I'red- 
erick. who died in infancy. Anna Mary was burn on April :ig. 1S67, and 
received her education in the public schools of Ripley county. She was 
uniterl in marriage with Henr}- Smith on IMarch 10, 1S87. 

J. Henry Smith was born in Ripley county on April iS, 1861, a son of 
John F. and Louisa (Lousa) Smith, Ixith of wlKmi were natives of the Ger- 
man empire. To Henry and Auna Mary (Pie])er) Smith was born one son, 
Harry LVederick, wlm first saw the light of day on March 2\. 1888, and 
recei\'ecl his education in the schools of Ripley and Dearborn cf)unties. 

Special mention is du.e Mr. Piejier in \iew of the fact that, alth(~)ugh not 
a native-born son of our countr\', he pro\-ed himself as loyal as anv when the 
integxity of the Nation was at stake, and served tliree years with the "'bo-.s in 
blue." Pie enlisted early in the beginning of hostilities, being a private in 
Company A, Seventh Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantrv, and was in 
some of the heaviest engagements of the war. .\mong them were the bat- 
tles of A\'inchester (Virginia), Fnrt Repuldic, Bull Run, South Mountain 
(Maryland), Antietam. Fredericksburg, Mine Run, the Wilderness, and 
others. He was especially fortunate to see so much active service am! escape 
without serious wounds. In prilitics ?»Ir. Pieper is a stanch Republican and 
lias rdways been active in those ranks. While living in Switzerland county 
he served as township assessor for four years (from 186S to 1872) and in 
Ripley county he was a county commissioner (from 1S81 to 1S84) and since 
becoming a resident of Dillsboro, he has been a member of the cit\- co'uicil. 
His religious membership is held in the Lutheran church, of which he is a 
faithful member, and his fraternal affiliation is with the Knights of Pvt'iias 
and the Grand Amiy of the Republic through the local organizations at 
Dillsboro. Mr. I'ieper is a most. agreeable con\'ersationalist. He has tra\tled 
extensively throughout the United States and is also cimsideraljle of a reader 
and stuf'ent of human nature. He is a man of strong personal qualities and 
easi!}- makes friends and retains them. He has earned for himself a place 
of prominence among the enterprising men of the county. 



DEARBORN COUXTY, INDIANA. 75^. \ 

JAMES N. HOOPER. '. ' , ' , 

James N. Hooper, senior member of the firm of J. N. Hooper iS: S<ui, 
dealers in hardware, etc., of Dillsboro, Dearborn county, Indiana, needs no 
introduction to the residents of this count}- in general as he is among its most 
respected and Ijest-known citizens. However, there may be some interesting 
point of genealog-v, or some struggle or accomplishment not generalK- kinnvn 
and which will add to the high respect and confidence in wh.ich he is held. 
therefore, it is hoped that in perusing the following lines. <kHlicatctl to the 
subject of this re\ie\v. some new idea may present itself even ti^ thc/se who 
know and like him best. 

James N. Hooper is a native of the Hoosier state, born in Hamilton 
county, November 26. 1858. being a son of William and Miramla (C'.iance) 
Hooper. William Hoojjer was born in Ru^h county, this state, (jn August 4, 
1837, and divided his tiijie between conducting the work of his farm home 
and preaching for the church of his choice, that branch (if the Piaptist ch.urch 
known as the Primitive Baptists. \\'illiam Hooper was a man of slrong con- 
victions and because of the love he held for his church and the appeal it made 
to him, he went from otic pi;)int to another thnjughout Indiana and llliimi^, 
preaching as he went. His liome church was tliat societv kmiwn as the 
"Antioch" church in Poone county, and that he made his headf|uarters. He 
never recei^■ed anv salary- for his services, that being against his principles, 
and supported himself and family by the lalwr of his own hands and gifts 
received from admiring friends in the church. He died in Feljruary, 1913. 
at the age of seveiity-five years. He had fought a good fight, being willing 
to live in a way of which most men would rapidly tire, because his con- 
victions prompted him tn do so. For many }ears lie was an earnest ad\-o- 
cate of the principk-s of th.e Democratic part}-, although having \-ery little 
time to devote to that question. 

William Hooper was a son of James Hooper, whose wife was a >.[iss 
Baker, both born near Fayetteville, Xnrth Carolina, where they were farmers. 
The}' left their nati\e state, going into Tennessee, where tliey reniained but 
a short time, when they came on to the Hoosier state, settling first in Rush 
county. From there they went to Hamilton county, then to Boone county, 
and finally located in A\'ilson county, Kansas, where he died in 1906. a \ery 
old man. The entire journey from their home in Xorth Carolina to this state 
was accomplished by a slow-going ox team and he also drove the entire 
distance to Kansas, however employing horses on that journe}-. He too was 
a Democrat, although taking no [larticular interest in politics. James Hooper 



.- i ,;-;M ::■ ;i '■ -J "rs:' 



752 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

was thrice married. By his first wife he had fcmr children, W'ilhani, Martha, 
James K. and Nancy. By the seci.uid wife he became tlie father of two daugh- 
ters, Adella and Ella. By the third wife he had three children, Anna, George 
and Charles. 

Miranda Chance, mother of the immediate subject of this sketch, was a 
daughter of Jonathan and Hannah (Clearwater) Chance, both natives of 
Ohio, who came early in tlieir married life to tins state and settled near Eagle- 
town, where for many years they were farmers and where both passed the re- 
mainder of their days. They were the parents of four daughters and two 
sons, Jonathan and Ellis. 

The subject of this sketch is one of a family of nine children, two of 
whom died in earl_\- infancy. The others are Alice, ]\Iaggie, William X., 
Ernest Burdett, Izora Ellen, John J. James X. was the eldest of this family. 
He received his early edncation in the common schools of Hamilton and Boone 
counties, this state, and in the winter of 1879-S0 he had charge of a rural 
school in the latter count}-. The following: year he attended Moores Hill Col- 
lege, taking the normal course at that institution and from that time on until 
the winter of 1893 ^^^ made it his custom to teach school in the winter and in 
the vacation periods to follow iiis trade, that of a carpenter. In 1S95 he took 
up his residence on a farm and from that time on to 1909 he gave his atten- 
tion to agricultural work. He moved to Dillsboro in 1909 and purchased 
the hardware business owned b)- H. H. Brow, which he still operates in part- 
nership with his son. 

James N. Hooper was married on August 9. 1S82, to Clara B. Wright, 
and they staiied to housekeeping in Cochran, this county. ^Irs. Blooper is 
a daughter of Henry F. Wright and Caroline (Buffington) W^right, the 
former a native of this countv, born in Washington township. His father 
was a farmer and after living for a short time on another farm in the vicinity 
he returned to the old homestead. There were thirteen children born to the 
parents of Henry F. Wright, as follow: John, Emeline, George, Henry F., 
Comfort, David, Charity, Marguerite, Benjamin and others who died in 
infancy. 

Henry F. Wright, who died at the age of thirty-eight years while a* 
the front during the Civil W'ar, was a man actively concerned in all the best 
interests of his home community He was well educated and was first a 
teacher in the school of Cochran, was active in the building of the old Ohio 
& Mississippi railroad and was interested in public affairs general!}'. In 
politics he was a Democrat. acti\'e in the ranks of his party in local affairs 
and his religious membership he held with the Methodist Episcopal church. 



•)' .;, .• ,!■ 



■1 .-..'.'] 



DEARBORN" COUNTY, IXDTAXA. j:,J, 

He was active in church circles and aided in huilding- the churcli of that 
denioniiialion at Aurora. His death occurreil in Septeniher, 1864, at Meni- 
]ihis, 'I'enncssce. He enli.-ted in the hcginning of the war, being coniniissii med 
hentenant, was huer ad\-anced to a captaincy and for a few nn^nths pre\iiins 
to his death lie served \vilh the rank of major. He was first w itli the Third 
and later widi the Sexxnth Indiana Cavah'y, Army of the l^otomac, and 
•served with distinction throughout his ser\'icc. He was a son of Tra and 
EHzabeth TCarpenter) Wright, natives of New York and among the earliest 
pioneers of this cijunty. Ira Wright was a man prominent in the develop- 
ment of this section. 

Henry F. Wright was the father of seven children, of whom Mrs. 
Hooper is the youngest. The others are : Harriet, now Mrs. Trister. of Lin- 
coln. Nebraska, the mother of fi\-e children : Josiah C, the father of ''exxn 
children: Henrietta was the wife of a ]Mr. Fullerton, 1)oth deceased, and the 
parents of one son, Charles F. ; James B. and Amos ]\T. are both deceased : 
and Emma. 

Caroline Buffington was born in this county on North Hogan creek, 
near Aurora, on August 4, 1828. She was the daughter of Steven and Nancy 
(Flake) Bulfingtc>n, the former also born on North Flogan creek. l>eing one 
of the first children born in this section. The family lived in one of the 
pioneer block hou.ses, employed by the early settlers as a protection against 
ruifriendly Indians. As was the custom in those early days, thev tilled the 
soil and cleared all the land possible. There were in that famil\' six sons 
and one daughter and all passed their lives near North Hogan creek, 'ihe 
Flake family were also pioneers of the same time, coming from the same local- 
ity There were four children in the Flake family. 

James N. Hooper has for many years been active in the ranks of the 
Democratic party and has the distinction of being the first Democratic trus- 
tee ever elected to any office in \\'ashington township. He sen-ed as town- 
ship trustee for four years, and in 1914 was elected cit_\- treasurer of Dillslj'jro. 
He has filled other minor offices with his part}", such as committeema.n. 

James N. and Clara (Wright) Flooper are the parents of one child, a 
son, Orris R., who was born near Cochran, May 5, 1885. Orris R. received 
his elementary education in the schools of Cochran and later went to Aurora 
for high school work. He was a student at IMoores Hill College for a time, 
where he took normal training, finishing his studies there in 1905. The fol- 
lowing two years he taught at the "Ebenezer" school near Aurora, givmg 
instruction in all grades from primary to the end of the common branches. 

148) 



.:;■. /; . r~r:\> U-:.: / 



754 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

In 1907 he came to Dillsljoi'u and lor tlirte years acted as principal of the 
school here and also instructor in certain branches. About 1910 he became 
associated with his father in the hardware business, as hereinbefore stated, 
and in- 1914 received the appnintnient to the postmastership of Dillsboro, hav- 
ing successful!}- passed the civil service examination co\ering sucli office. 

Orris R. Hooper was married on August i, 1905. to Alma F. Robbins. 
daughter of John T. and Ella R. (Trister) Robbins, the former bnrn in 
Rockport, this state, October 24. 1S59, and the latter born near Cochran, thi--- 
state, November 25, 1859. They were imited in marriage on Februar}- 2, 
18S1. For many years ?ilr. Rubbins did teaming- and later was engaged in 
the lumber and carpentering business at Aurora. He some time since remo\ erl 
to Ludlow, Kentucky, where he still resides. 

To Orris R. Hooper and wife have been born three sons, James Thomas. 
Orris Ray and John Wesley, all of whom are in school at Dillsboro. Orris R. 
Hooper is counted among the leading citizens of his town, where every 
movement for the public welfare finds in him a most earnest advocate, fie 
owns property there and is in e\ery wa\ identified with the progress oi the 
place. He is a member of the ^lethodist Episcopal church, to the sun]:)ort of 
which he contributes liberally, and his fraternal affiliation is held with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows through Dillsboro Lodge No. 78. 

James N. Hooper and his son are representatives of the best type of 
Americans, the men who do things. Br>th are pleasant and agreeable to meet 
and are held high in the esteem of their fellow citizens and a wide circle of 
friends. 



ERNST H. HUESEMAN. 

Among the thrifty and industrious farmers of Caesar Creek township. 
Ernst H. Hueseman is entitled to his full share of honor and praise as a 
worthy and respected citizen, and, although a young man, he is working with 
a determination that admits of no failure. He is a man of ability, and is 
cheerful in the enjoyment of his well-earned comforts. 

Ernst H. Hueseman, farn^er, Dillsboro, Ca;sar Creek township. Dearborn 
county, was born in the township where he resides, September 20, 1S82, and 
is a son of Ernst H. and Caroline (Prante) Hueseman. He receivccl his 
education at Farmers Retreat, and after leaving school remained on the farm 
and assisted his father until the time of his marriage, when he bought his 
father's farm and started in for himself in agricultural pursuits. Mr. Huese- 



. 1 ^ii r.i ,.'i 



;Mt. fp'i.'.i I'j.hK! 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 755 

mail has always given his loyal support to the Democratic party, and he is 
a member of the Lutheran cliurch. 

Ernst II. Huesetnan, father of the subject of this sketch, was bom on 
February 4, 1S38, in Germany, and came to the United States with his parents, 
who settled in Caesar Creek township, where he was married. He linught a 
fine farm of ciglity acres, and followed agriculture. He later bought eighty 
acres more on Laughery creek, and later bought ninety acres in Oliio county, 
to which he added twenty acres more adjoining in Qtsar Creek township. His 
wife was Caroline (Prante) Hueseman, by whom he had eleven chiklren : 
Elizabeth (deceased), Emma, Louise, Minnie, ]\lary, Sophia, Henrv. Anna, 
William, Ernst and John (deceased). 

Ernst H. Hueseman was united in marriage on February 23, 1905, with 
Alma Fischvogt. daughter of George and Caroline (Buschman) Fischvogl. 
of Ohio county. She was born in Pike township, Ohio county, Indiana, No- 
vember 19, 18S3, and received her education there, living in Pike township 
until her marriage. Three children have been bom to this union : Laurena, 
born in 190S: Lulie, 191 1 ; Xorma, 1914. }klrs. Hueseman is an earnest mem- 
ber of the Lutheran church. 

George and Carc>line ( Buschman) Fischvngt. parents of Mrs. Ernst H. 
Hueseman. were nati\-es of Pike township, Ohio county. Indiana, and li\-ed 
there all tlieir li\es. Their cliildren were three in number. Alma, TIarry and 
William. 

Ernst H. Hueseman is regarded as an extremely energetic farmer, to 
which occupation he gives his best attention. Fie and his wife have many warm 
and sincere friends in the township. 



J. H. TRENNEPOHL. 

Many helpful lessons can be learned from the biography of one who 
keeps abreast of the times, as has the subject of the following sketch. The 
trouble with many who follow agricultural pursuits is that they allr>w them- 
selves to get into a rut, and lose sight of the importance of keeping in touch 
with \\hat is going on in the world. Mr. Trennepohl has rendered his natur- 
ally strenuous vocation far more interesting, and lessened his labors by his inter- 
est in what others were accomplishing and how they did it, and by always be- 
ing willing to profit by anything and everything of value in his line of work. 
He is public-spirited and progressive, taking a sincere interest in the welfare of 
the community in which he resides. 

John Henry Trennepohl was born on March 6, 1868, in Ripley county. 



7S6 • DEARBORN' COUNTY, INDIANA. 

and is a son of Frederick and I\Iary (Brandt) Trcnnepohl. He grew to man- 
hood on tlie home farm, and at an early date left Ripley county and engaged 
his .services in Center township for one year, after which he was employed 
by Henry P. Eusse for a period of ten years at Wilmington, during which 
time he saved enougli to buy a good farm in Hogan township, consisting of 
one hundred and thirl}'-four acres. Through hard \vork and honest dealings, 
his credit was of the best, and by his own industr}' and good character, he 
succeeded where others had failed, who had started out with better prospects 
than he. After living on his farm about six years, he sold it to J. W. Clem- 
ents, and bought another tract of ninety-three acres, located on the Aloores 
Hill and Aurora pike. The only improvements on this place consisted of a 
barn and an old shop building. The barn was remodeled, and many new and 
valuable improvements were put on the place, inckuling an attracti\-e and com- 
fortable new house, a silo added to the barn, corn crili, etc., and Air. Trcn- 
nepohl now has one of the most attractive homes in the township. He has 
continued to add to his acreage until he now owns one hundred and eight acres, 
all in a good state of cultivation, with the exception of a portion whicli has 
been left for a woods pasture. He has held various township offices, and is 
at present superintendent of the ^Moores Hill and Aurora pike ; has served as 
a director of the Farmers Co-operative Telephone Company, and was elected 
in 1914 a member of the Hogan township advisory board. 

Frederick Trennepohl was born in German}-, and came to this cc^nntry 
with his parents when quite small. The}- located in Rijiley county, where 
he grew up and was educated. ]\Ir. Trennepohl was an ardent niember of the 
Lutheran church. His death occurred iNIarch 6, 1883. Mr. Trennepohl was 
united in marriage \\-ith iMary Erandt. daughter of Henry and Adeline ( Heit- 
man) Brandt. She was born on .\ugust 2. 1S45, in Ripley county, Indiana, 
and died in the same county, in 19 10. She survived her husband many years, 
and was again married, to John Harves, living the remainder of her life in 
Ripley count}-. Frederick and iMar}- f Brandt") Tiennepohl were the parents 
of seven children : John Henry, Frederick. John D , Christ, Harmon : Annie, 
wife of George Bauman: and Maggie, who became the wife of Adolph 
Herbst. By her second marriage, ]Mrs. Trennepohl (iMrs. Harves) was the 
mother of two children, Edward and Lulu, who is the wife of Frank Drandt. 

John Henry Trennepohl was united in marriage on .April 2S. 1897, witli 
Adeline Annie Peters, daughter of Frederick and Annie (Aleyer) Peters. 
She was born on November 23, 1870. in Hogan township, Dearlxirn county. 
They have three children, Fred John Henry, Alma Mary and I^ura Anna 
Elizabeth. The entire familv belons: to the Lutheran church at Aurora. 



,.-; !(:. 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. -J ^-J 

I'Vederick Peters, father of Mrs. Trenncpohl, was born in Ccrniany, ami 
his wife, Annie (Meyer) Peters, is a nati\e of Ripley county. ]\Ir. Peters 
ha? followed agriculture for a grea-t many years, and is now living a retireil 
life in West Aurora. Indiana. 

Through his up-to-date methods. Mr. Trenn.'pohl has Ijrought his fine 
farm to ? perfect state of cultivation, thus gi\'ing him the rei)Ulation of being 
a thoroughly successful and prosperous farmer. 



. :MRS. ELIZABETH CAN FIELD. 

Mrs. Elizabeth (Bainum) Canfield, whose name introduces this sketch, 
comes from early pioneer ancestiy, and has personally been a witness to 
the wonderful changes wrought by human hands since the fi->rests were filled 
with wild beasts and Indians. Her parents and grandparents were all well 
educated and people of unusual refinement. They were zealous church work- 
ers, and were amcmg the most progressixx people of th(ise times. 

Elizabeth Bainum was born in 1833, in Hogan townshij). and is a daugh- 
ter of Conway and Sarah (Deshicll) Bainum. She lived with her parents until 
the death of her mother, when she made her home with her brother and sister 
until the time of her marriage. 

Conway Bainum, father of ]\Irs. Canfield, was born on August 9, 1809. in 
West Virginia, and was a son of William and Elizabeth (Bryan) liainum. 
He was one year old when his parents settled in Hogan township, in 1810. 
Here he grew to manhood, and was married on April 11. 1833, to Sarah 
Dcshiell, who was born on February 10, 18 12, in [Maryland, and was a daugh- 
ter of Charles Deshiell. She came west with her parents at an earl_\- day. 
Air. Bainum was engaged at farming in the summer, and carried on a flat- 
boat trade during the winter. He lived for a time between .\in-ora and \^\\- 
mington. In 1840 he moved on the Hogan pike, south of North Hogan 
creek, at the east edge of Hogan township, at which place he bought a farm 
of about one luuulred and thirty-fi\e acres. li\-ing lure until he passed to the 
"great beyond." Air. Bainum always followed farming, giving a jjortion of 
his attention to the raising r)f live stock. Air. and Airs. Bainum were the 
parents of four children, Elizabeth. Alfred, Alary J. and Charles. Alfred 
Bainum was a farmer, but is now retired, spending a great deal of his time 
in travel. He has a son who is engaged in the banking business at X'incennes, 



i sji .;- '•■■I.' !i ! 



758 DEARBORN COL-XTV, INDIANA. 

Indiana; Conway Bainuni died in 1S9S, and his widow died in 1S6S. They 
were both united with the IMethodist church. 

Ehzaheth Bainuin was united in marriage in 1S90, with Alfred Canfield, 
who was Ixirn in Ilogan township. Dcarljorn county, in 1822, and was a son 
of Noyes Canfield. He followed the vocation of a fanner all his life, and 
previous to his marriage with our subject, he had been married and had five 
children by his first wife. After liis second marriage, he lived in Iowa for a 
time, and then mo\'ed to Hogan township, where he bought a small farm near 
the home of his father-in-law, and about a year prior to the death of Mrs. 
Canfield's father, they moved in with him and cared for him until he died. 
Mr. Canfield died in 1904. His religinus mcniljership was with the Methodist 
church, of wliich [Mrs. Canfield is also a member. 

\\"illiam aiid Elizabeth Bainum, paternal grandparents of ]\Irs. Canfield. 
were natives of Wilmington, Delaware. The former was born on February 
29, 1765, and the latter in October, 1790. They came to this county in iSio, 
where ]\Ir. Bainum followed fanning all his life. It is supposed they got their 
land from the government. 

The maternal grandparents of !Mrs. Canfield were Charles Deshiell and 
wife, who came from Mar_\-land at an early day, locating just east of Moores 
Hill, \\iierc tliey bought a farm, which is now a jiart of iloores Hill. They 
lived here until quite old, when tliey sold out and moved to Illinois. IMr. 
Deshiell was a man of good education, and at one time had taught school. 

Mrs. Canfield continues to reside on the farm where her father lived and 
died. She is one of the best known citizens of the township, where she has 
many loyal friends among- the young people as well as among those of more 
mature years. 



MARTIN V. BRUCE. 



One of the most interesting citizens of Hogan townsliip is the subject 
of this sketch, having gone through the most thrilling and exciting battles 
of our Civil War. His account of his experiences is of unusual interest, and 
it is a matter of deep regret that limited space prevents a more complete review 
of them. Although amply qualified for filling a position of high honor, he 
declined the commission as captain, being satisfied with the duties already 
under his charge. 

Martin V. Bruce was born on February 18, 1841, in Hogan townsliip. 
Dearborn county, where he now resides, his birthplace being a log cabin 



') , f ' 



jj'T ' "'CI ■} . Jl. .■;. 



■' ■idi'iO'ri/: 



I ' ,' '.-iS- VO 



DEARBORN COUNTY^ INDIANA. 75Q 

iiist east of where he now lives. He is a son of W'iUiaiii and Lovey (Dur- 
linm) Eruce. After attending the pubhc schools of the district and com- 
pleting his edncation, Mr. Bruce followed farming on the home place nntil 
March 5, 1862, when he enlisted in Company B, Third Indiana Cavalry, and 
the sen'ice he saw was sufficient to satisfy the most ambitious in the line of 
wais nnd battles, participating in sinme. fifty or more of the mo.-.t important 
(if the latter. His regiment was nmler command of General Cu.ster and C,cn. 
George H. Chapman, serving in Pennsylvania, ^Maryland and Virginia, in the 
Army of the Potomac. He was in the battles of Gettysburg. Anlietam. the 
Wilderness, I'etersburg and others. \\'hile at Antietam he was engaged in 
a hand-to-hand struggle with a southern major-general, and being hard 
pressed, on account of his foes having cut off the hand-guard at the hill of 
his saber, Mr. Bruce drew his pistol, which «as empty, and pointing it. de- 
manded that his foe surrender. The general dropped his sword and gave 
up, and Mr. Bruce brought him into camp with his horse and sword, the 
latter of which he has alwavs retained as a trophy. Soon after this he was 
promoted to the rank of sergeant, and a little later was virtually put in com- 
mand of the company, but would not take commission as captain. W'hile at 
South ^Mountain, he was taken prisi.mer, and although the weather was at 
freezing point, his shoes and socks were taken from him, and he was placed 
on a pony behind a southern soldier, who rode along in the night and went 
to sleep and snored while riding-. Mr. Bruce saw his chance and slipped off 
into the bushes, escaping barefooted over the frozen ground to a negro cabin, 
where he secured food and a guide to go along, traveling by night and .-deep- 
ing by day until he reached Fredericksburg. From a darkey he met en route, 
he secured a pair of shoes. He was honorably discharged on March 28. 1865, 
after \\hich he returned home. 

]\Tr. Bruce resumed the occupation of farming in the southwest corner 
of Hogan township, where he remained nearly twenty-five years, when he 
sold his property and bought one hundred and sixty acres in the northwest 
corner of the same township, a little north of ]Mt. Sinai, where b.e li^•ecl for 
eighteen years. After disposing of this second tract ^Ir. Bruce bought a 
small place of forty acres on the Aurora and Moores Hill pike, where he has 
since resided, his children having- all married. He is a Democrat, and his re- 
ligious n-lember^hip is with the ]\Iethodist church. Pie belongs to Dearborn 
Lodge No. 536, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, at Wilmington. Indiana, 
and Bethlehem Encampment No. 3, Aurora, and in the Grand Army of the 
Republic, belongs to John A. Platter Post No. 82, at Aurora. He has been 



;^!-> .ui[ 



760 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

through all the chairs in the Odd Fellows, and was a member of the grand 
lodge at Indianapolis. 

William Bruce, father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Hogan 
township, September 10, 1S04, and was a son of Amor Bruce. He grew 
up on land entered by his father on Xorth Hogan creek, and spent his entire 
life on a farm at tliis place. During the winter seasons William Bruce spent 
his time in flatboating to Xew Orleans, and for a time was justice of the 
peace. His death occurred on August 6, 187S, lea\'ing a competency for his 
entire famih'. His wife, I.o\'ey (llurham) Bruce, to whom he was married 
on December 25, 1S25, was born on July 25, 1809, in \'irginia, and was a 
daughter of John and Catharine (Conaway) Durham, natives uf Delaware. 
Mrs. Bruce died on January 18, 1892, in Hogan township. She was but five 
years old when her parents moved to Lawrenceburg, and in 1S19 they 
moved to Mount Tabor, wliere she juined the Alount Tabor ]\Iethodist church, 
which was originally built of logs. At the time of their marriage Mr. Bruce 
and his wife located a short distance west of \\'ilmington, where they spent 
the remainder of their li\es. Mr. and Mrs. William Bruce were the parents 
of twelve chililren, two of wh(_mi died yijung: Catharine, Jolin W., Sini'm 
B., Martin \'., William F., James C, ]\Ieli.ssa, Isabelle, Mary ]\I., Bolivar, 
Sophrona and one other. 

Martin V. Bruce was married on April 11, 1867, to Cornelia J. Givan, 
daughter of William H. and Jane (Ferris) Givan, who was born in ]\Ian- 
chester township. To this union were born four children, Eugene, Jennie 
L., Arthur ]\L and Alma. Eugene is now a member of the Indianapolis 
police force. He was married to Christina Amdor, and has two children, 
Raleigh and Gladys. Jennie L. is the wife of Tilden Smith and resides at 
Indianapolis. ^Ir. Smith weighs about three hundred and twenty pounds, 
and is also a member of the Indianapolis police force, being located on one 
of the down-town corners. Mr. and }vlrs. Smith have two children, Thelma 
and Ralph. Arthur M. is principal of a business college, at Birmingham, 
Alabama. Alma became tlie wife of George Morris, and lived at Aurora. 
She died on Februarj- 15, 1915, leaving three children, Ruth, Warren and 
Glen. 

William H. Givan, father of Airs. ISIartin V. Bruce, was born on April 
22, 1S20, in INIaryland, and died on June 7. 1896, aged se\'enty-si.x years. 
He was a brother of Judge Xoah S. Givan, a biography of whom is presented 
elsewhere in this volume, to which the reader is referred for the genealixgy 
of the Givan family. Air. Givan followed fanning all his life in Alanchester 
township, where he officiated as justice of the peace for sixteen years, and 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. ' 761 

never held a trial, al\va_\s settling cases out of cciurt. He was a natural peace- 
maker and an ardent friend of the (icmians. wlm trusted him imi)licitl_\'. 
accepting his advice and judgment gladly. William 11. Cii\an was united 
in marriage, October 19, 1843, with Jane M. Ferris, daughter of Sylvester 
and Rhoda (King) Ferris, of Ilolman, }vlanchester township. They were 
the parents of the following children: Cornelia Jane, Laura, Rhoda, Con- 
nelley and Saraii Al. 

Joshua Givan, the paternal grandfather of Mrs. Bruce, was born on 
July 2, 1788, in Maryland, and died on January 31, 1874. Pie was united 
in marriage, in 181 1, \vith Hyirietta Davis, who died on June 14, 1876, aged 
almost eighty -one years. ■Mr. Givan cast his first vote for President for 
James ^ladison at his second election, and his last vote was for Horace 
Greeley, in 1872. To the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Givan the following chil- 
dren were born: George, William FL, Alartha, Xoali S., Robert and Marv 
A. They were anient members of the Baptist church, with which denomina- 
tion they had been identified for sixty years. 

Martin V. Bruce is a gentleman of broad and generous views, and has 
earned a reputation as an enterprising and progressive agriculturist. 



HENRY F. SCHUMACHER. 

Another indication of the thrift and industry of our German citizens 
and their descendants is the history of Henry F. Schumacher anrl his emigrant 
father. In times of failure and disappointment th.ey have d<jggedly adh.ered 
to their purpose, brushing aside obstacles and renew^ing their attack each time 
with renewed force until success rewarded their efforts. 

Henr\- F. Schumacher was boni on Xovember 13. 1857, near Hartfurd. 
Dearborn county, and is a snn of John C. and Caroline ( Moerker ) Schu- 
macher. He grew up and followed farming about one and one-half miles 
northwest of Aurora, where he now resides, and wdiere his father made his 
home for twenty-two jears, the home place being registered under the name 
of "Horse Shoe Bend." Air. Schumacher has always been devoted to farm 
life, living thirty-one years on one place. He is an ardent Republican, and his 
■ membership is with the Lutheran church. 

John C. Schumacher, father of the subject of this sketch, was horn D.'cem- 
ber 4, 1830, at Flarbenfeldt, near Essen, in Germany, coming to America at 
the age of twenty-one years. When he arrived, all his earthly possessions 



A ;.;..■ 



1 :id<f.o 



762 ■ DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

were carried on his bade from the wharf, and he ^vas seven dollars and fift\' 
cents in debt. Engaging^ his services on a farm, he worked until he had sa\ed 
enough to start tip on a farm for himself. Mr. Schumacher was married twice, 
his first wife being Caroline Moerker, who was reared near Coles Corner 
in Ohio count}-, Indiana, and was of German parentage. Her death occurred 
where her son, Henry, was a very small child, leaving two children. Henry J 
and Sophia. Mr. Schumacher's second wife was Anna Hartker, a native of 
Germany, born near Essen, tn which union eleven children were biirn. 

Henrv' E. Schumacher was united in marriage in 1883, with Florence 
Nieman, daughter of John Frederick and Clara (Eilert) Nieman, natives of 
Gemiany, where ]Mrs. Schumacher was born. She was a balie in arms when 
her parents came to America. Thev settled at Aurora, residing there for a 
number of years, and finally mo\-e(l to Ohio count}-, and engaged in farn-iing 
until well advanced in years, when they moved to Aurora, where ]^Ir. Nieman 
died. Mrs. Xieman survives her husband, and still makes her home at Aurora. 
I\Irs. Schumacher died in 1910, leaving eight children, as follow : Lulu Anne, 
Walter, David. Carl, Bertha, Henry ].. Jr., Arthur and Leona. Lulu Anne is 
the wife of Albert Petchen, and resides at Aurora. She is die mother of two 
children, Marjorie and Albert Ray. Walter is in California. David was mar- 
ried to Blanche Almlraugh. and resides at Corona. California. Carl also makes 
his home at Corona. California. Bertha became the wife of Frank Shuter, and 
now lives on the home place with her father, her husband taking full manage- 
n-ient of the farm. Henr}' F. lives near home with his uncle Frederick. 
Arthur is attending .schiKjl, as is also Leona. both at home. ^Ir. Schumacher 
is one of the most highly respected citizens in the township, where he is also 
one of the most prosperous. 



GEORGE A. RIGGS. 



Considerable interest centers around the subject of the following sketch, 
since he has die distinction of having seen the ninth President of the United 
States, W'illiani Henry Harrison, and was an eye witness to the "rain of 
stars," the wonderful event of those never-to-be-forgotten times. He has 
seen all the changes in transportation methods, from ox-teams and flatln'ats 
to the later steamboat and steam car, as well as the present day auto-truck 
and parcel post systems. 'Sir. Riggs possesses a wonderful wealth of interest- 
ing incidents of early days. 

George A. Riggs was born on January 4, 1828, on the outskirts of 



'■) /.J 






:,':•■.■ 'i:.i • . if ;■ 






■■; -.iP 



DEARBORN COUNTY^ INDIANA. 763 

Aurora, Indiana, on the road leading to Wilmington, in a log cabin on the 
farm now owned by George Parks. His parents were John H. and Azuba 
(Richardson) Riggs. The early part of his life was divided between fanning 
and flatboating to New Orleans, hauling produce of every description, some 
of which was exchanged for deer heads and hams. He remembers hel]Mng 
to kill a deer at Cave-in-Rock, where he went out in a "skiff" and caught the 
deer while in the water, by grabbing it by the tail and holding it, with its 
head in the water until nearly drowned, and then cut its throat. ^Ir. Riggs 
distinctly remembers hearing the early settlers tell of the famous "black 
Friday," when the earth was covered with darkness during the whole day, 
necessitating the use of lanterns, and during the same year the weather was 
so cold the crops were frozen, leaving scarcely enough for actual needs, and 
in some instances not enough, as a body of men had to be sent to Tennessee 
for seed corn for the following crops. 

Mr. Riggs began his farm life on a branch of North Hogan creek, later 
called Goose run, where he l.iought fort}'-eight acres at a cost of eight hun- 
dred dollars, but was \'ery unsuccessful the first year, selling only seventy 
dollars' worth of produce. Prices were \-ery low : oats bringing only twenty 
cents a bushel, potatoes as low as ten cents a bushel on several occasions. 
However, in due course of time, conditions improved, and he added one hun- 
dred acres to his farm, which he still further increased by buying out the 
heirs of an estate of one hundred acres. !Mr. Riggs has always followed 
farming, and has devoted some of his attention to sheep-raising, having 
nothing but the finest stock. He has always been extremely unselfish, and 
ever ready to assist his worthy neighbors by giving his advice on jjroper busi- 
ness methods. He has been a Republican from die birth of the party, and 
ceased to vote only when his eyesight failed him. lie had the pleasure of vot- 
ing for fifteen presidents of the United States, out of which his party won 
eleven victories. About 1893 ^Ir. Riggs retired from farming and moved to 
Wilmington, where he has since resided. In 1S92 he was nominated, over his 
protest, to the office of county commissioner, but was not elected, owing to 
the Democratic landslide all over the United States. He and his wife joined 
the Baptist church in 1854, of which he is still a member. He was unfor- 
tunate enough to lose his eyesight aliout twenty years ago, and, although 
eighty-seven years of age, he speaks with a strc^ng, clear voice, and is won- 
ilerfully jovial and cheerful. 

Air. Riggs was a member of the old Dearborn County Agricultural So- 
ciety, in which he was a director from Hogan township for several years, and 
for twenty-seven years in succession was gate-keeper at the Aurora fair, his 



764 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

services being- retained ljecau.se of his acquaintance witii all the stocklmldci-s. 
Mr. Riggs also remembers the flood of 1832, and tlie "rain of stars" in 
November, 1833. when the meteors fell so thickly they liglited up the wlvilc 
countrv'. 

John H. Riggs, father of the subject of this sketch, was bom on Ajiril 
14, -1804, in Philadelphia, F'ennsylvania, and came {0 Indiana in 1S14.. with 
his mother, who located near Aurora, where he lived nearly all his life. Fur 
a time he lived on Xordi Hogan creek, in Manchester tmvnship, and spent 
considerable time on the Kanawha river, in \'irginia, in his \uuth. lie wa^x 
a Whig, in tlie strongest sense of the word, but was never an office seeker. 
He was a member of the Baptist church. His wife, Azubah (Richardson) 
Riggs, to whom he was married on September 2y, 1826. was born on De- 
cember 20, 1809. They were the parents of tweh'e children. Mrs. Riggs 
died on September 13, 1863. and Mr. Iviggs was married, secondly. March 
19, i8r)4, tu Frances Herljert, l.iorn in Loudoun county, Virginia, December 
30, 18 II. daughter of John Herbert, wlio came from W'ales when young and 
Settled in Airginia. 

The paternal grandfather was John H. Riggs, Sr.. who was born at 
Liverpool, England, and came to America when a young man, taking charge 
of the American end of a trading company, in which he was interested. The 
family had been well-to-do but during the Napoleonic wars their shops were 
taken, lea\ing them ver)' poor, and John H., being the eldest of four children, 
was compelled to work and help support the family. After coming to .Vmerica 
Mr. Riggs was married to Sarah Howard, who was liorn at Philadelphia. 
He died in 1810, and his wife died in iSiS. 

George A. Riggs was marrietl in 1848, to Elizabeth Elder, daughter nf 
Charles and Jemima Elder. She was born on Ludlow Ridge, above Law- 
renceburg. To this union were born eight children, as follow: Charles 
Henry, John L., Sarah, Jemima, Emma, William Duncan, and two who died 
in infancy. Charles Henr\' Riggs lives in Nevada, Missouri ; John L. resides 
at Eayless, Pike county, Fllinois; Sarah became the wife of Jacob Abdon, 
deceased, and since the death of her husband has kept house for her faUier ; 
Jemima is the wife of Joseph Givan, of Milan, Ripley county, Indiana, who 
has served in the capacity of railroad inspector, and was also associated in 
the revenue service; Emma is at hrmie ; William I.'uncan Riggs is a traveling 
salesman, and makes his headquarters at Pittsburgh, Penns}-lvania. 

George A. Riggs has a miniature painting of his father, showing a fine 
looking young man of aristocratic apiiearance. In the early days General 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. •" 765 

Harrison and his troops marched past wlicrc ]Mr. Kigi;'s now hs'cs, on his way 
10 \'iiicennes. He hved one season near Lafayette, on the trail that leads to 
Tippecanoe battlefield. A visit with Mr. Riggs is well worth while, lie is 
never at a loss for an interesting story of early days. INIr. Riggs has a fine 
f.irni of one hundred and seven acres. 



HENRY CHRISTIAN BUSSE. 

Henry Christian Busse was a son of a prominent minister of the Lutheran 
church, and was another illustraticm of the thrift and industry of our adopted 
citizens. He verv- wisely chose the vocation of a farmer, and when his father 
grew too old to preach he cared for him until his death, cheerfully gratifying 
his every wish, in an earnest endeavor to repay him for his kindness and 
interest all along his early years, when the advice and experience of an older 
mind w^ere of the utmost value. 

Heniy Christian Busse was born in Preis INIinden, Prussia, September 
23. 1S34, and was a son of Christian and Dorothea (Poos) Busse. He was 
abixit nine vears old when his parents came to America. They located in 
Manchester township, where Mr. Busse recei\'ed a good English and German 
education, being reared on a farm on tlie^ south side of North Llogan creek, 
near the center of Hogan township. He was a good manager on a farm, and 
accumulated great wealth, adding to his farm until he owned o\'er three lum- 
drcd acres, all of which was in a fine state of cultivation. Mr. Busse was an 
eamest member of the Lutheran church. His death occurred in August, 1914. 

Christian Busse, father of the immediate subject of this sketch, was born 
on November 11, 1806, in Prussia, and his wife, Dorothea (Poos) Busse, 
also a native of Prussia, was born on March 10, 1S06. Their marriage took 
place on December 2"/, 1826, to which union four children were 1)orn. namely: 
Dorothea, born in 1827, died in 1831; Christina. February 24, 1832. died 
June 24, 1850: Johanna, who became the wife of Henry Engelkinge : and 
Henry Christian. Mr. Busse came to America in October. 1844, locating in 
Manchester township, where he preached for about twenty-eight years, in 
addition to which he taught school from 1846 to i860. He was a ver\' suc- 
cessful minister and helped to build up a good-sized congregation during 
his labors. ^Irs. Busse died on January 29, 1877, after which he made his 
home with his son, Henrj- Christian. The church in which he preached was 
known as the "Busse"' church. The Rev. Christian Busse resigned in old 



766 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

age and moved to Plum Point school, in Hogan township, prior to making 
his home with his son. 

Henry Christian Busse was united in marriage on April 27, 1S54, with 
Angelica Gesell. a nati\'e of Germany, who was born on March 22. 1833, in 
Hesse-Darmstadt, and came with her parents to .America. They settled in 
Franklin county, nr-nr Brookville, where she lived until her marriage. ]\Ir. 
Busse died in August, 1914, and his wife preceded him in 1898. They were 
the parents of nine children, as follow: Henry P., born on June 27, 1S56; 
Caroline, December 4, 1858; William, January 31, 1S61 ; John, March 27, 
1863; Louisa, December 12, 1865; George, March 15, 1868; Anna, May 16. 
1870; Abalona, June 20, 1872; ]\latilda, January 4, 1875. The entire family 
are members of the Lutheran church, of which ]\Ir. Busse was one of the 
trustees for over sixteen j-ears. 

Henry P. Busse was married, in 1879, to Louise Oehlmann, and resides 
near Aurora, Lidiana. Caroline became the wife of Plenry J. ■Meyer, who 
lives near Lawrenceburg, and who recently became county commissioner. 
William resides on the Manchester pike, one mile below Wrights Corner. 
John is living on part of the old home place on North Hogan creek. Louise 
was married to Theodore Droge, and lives at Aurora. Annie became the wife 
of John Peters, who lives on the Xorth Llogan pike, on the eastern edge of 
Hogan township. George also lives on part of the old home place, in Plogan 
township. Abalona and ]\Iatilda are unmarried, and are living in West 
Aurora. 

Henry- Christian Busse was a thoughtful, industrious farmer, and an 
evidence of thrift and good taste were about everything on his place. 



EDWARD DOBER. 



More than forty years of honorable business connection with a com- 
munity like that of Lawrenceburg, this county, a connection x\\vjx\ which never 
a stain has been cast and which never has been involved in a transaction of a 
dubious character certainly creates a record of which anyone well might 
be proud. This is a record held by Edward Dober, the well-known clothier 
and merchant tailor, of Lawrenceburg, one of the oldest and most highly 
respected business men in the county seat of Dearborn county, and the biog- 
rapher finds much pleasure in presenting here a brief outline of the life of 
this honored merchant, for the information of the present generation, as well 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. . 767 

as for the consideration of tlie future historian of tliis comninuity, upon whom 
shall rest the duty of making a faithful transcript and reflection of the present 
lime for the information of future generations from such materials as shall 
be created now for his ultimate consideration. 

Edward Dober was born in the town of Onsbach, province of Baden, 
Germany, July 2, 1851, the son of Joseph and Henricka (Weber) Dober, both 
of wliom also were natives of Eadcn and who were the parents of eight cliil- 
dren, namely; Edward, the immediate subject of this biographical sketch; 
Franz, deceased; Joseph, of Renchen, Germany; Paul, of Huntington, West 
Virginia; Theresa, the wife of William Gardner, of Yorkville, Indiana; j\lar- 
tin, of Huntington, \Vest \'irginia, and Fridolin and Ignatz, who died in 
youth. 

Joseph Dober was a village councilman and farmer, of Onsbach, Ger- 
many, where he died in the year 1880, at the age of sixty-five, his wife having 
preceded him to the grave in 1S74, she then being forty-eight years of age. 
Roth were devoted members of the Catholic church, in the faith of which 
they reared their children. Joseph Dober's father died a comparati\"ely' }-oung 
man and his Christian name is lost to his American descendants, as is also 
that of his wife. They were the parents of four children, Joseph, Leo, ^lary 
and Margaret. Air. Dober's maternal grandfather was Joseph Weber, a 
farmer and also a dealer in wdieat and wood, who died from the effects of 
an injury recei\ed, when past middle age, while hauling logs. He married a 
Baer, who bore him seven children and lived to old age, these children being 
Mag, Henricka, Veronica, Theresa, Frederick, Paul and Ephr(.isina. 

Edward Dober was reared in Germanv and was educated under the 
excellent school system of his native country. He learned the tailor's trade, 
under the careful tutelage of a master workman iii that craft, and in 1873 
determined to test his fortune on this side of the" Atlantic. Coming to 
America, he proceeded to Lawrenceburg, Indiana, where for a time he worked 
at his trade as a journeyman tailor, rapidly acquirmg a knowledge of Amer- 
ican manners and methods, and in 1876 formed a partnership with Herman 
Klepper to conduct a merchant-tailoring business in the same town. This 
partnership continued until 1879, '" which year yir. Dol)er sold his interest 
to his partner and made a trip back to his old home in Germany, the state of 
his health at that time being such as to demand a temporary cessation from 
the cares of active business. Quickly recuperating his health, Air. Dober 
presently returned to Lawrenceburg and, in 1883, opened a store of his own 
in that city, and ever since has continued in the clothing and merchant-tailor- 



u'-'!^r. , . 1 



; ' '. f) 



'.v.h \'i:v i'l'li I" 



768 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

ing- business there, with a measure of success \vhich has not only placed him 
.among the most substantial citizens of Dearborn county, but which has been 
very gratifying to his many friends hereabout. The character and extent of 
the lousiness carried on by Mr. Dober need no encomiastic description here, 
Mr. Dober and his store being too well known in this county to require any- 
thing of that sort. It is Ijut projier to sax". however, that straightforward 
methods and a scrupulous regard tor the needs of his patrons have borne their 
just fruitage in the case of Mr. Dober and he is higli up in the list of well-to-do 
merchants of Lawrenceburg. 

On July 21, 1875, Edward Doljer was united in marriage to Catherine 
Gardner, dangliter C)f Anthony and ^largaret (L.ampert) Gardner, to which 
vniion two children were born, ¥j\a and Matilda, the latter of whom died in 
infancy. Eda married Patrick Stephen lirady, who died on January 13, 1915, 
leaving one son, Edward Henr\-, to comfort the widow. ^Irs. Catherine 
Dober died on September 20, 1S80, at the early age of twent\-six years, and 
Mr. Dober, on April 26, 18S1, married, secondly. Mary Josephine ^lorgan, 
who was born at Xew Alsace, Indiana, August 28. 1854, the daughter of 
Frederick and Elizabeth (Borgerding) Morgan, both natives of Gennany. 

Frederick Morgan was brought to this country irom the .\lsace-Lorraine 
district by his widowed mother, who came to America with her several 
young children, at a time when the youngest, Frederick, was a babe in arms, 
he being then l)ut six m(jnths of age. Tlie family located in Cincinnati, in 
which cit}- Frederick Alorgan grew to manhood, learning the shoemaker's 
trade, at which he worked for a time in Cincinnati and, about the year 1S81, 
moved to Lawrenceburg, where he opened a shoe store, continuing in busi- 
ness there the remainder of his life, his death occurring in 191 1, he then being 
eighty-three years of age. His widow is still living, at the advanced age of 
■eighty-three. She .also came to America with her parents when she was 
but six months of age and grew to womanhood in the village of New Alsace. 
She has been a resident of Lawrenceburg since 1S81 and is held in the highest 
esteem by a large circle of friends. The paternal grandfather of Mrs. Dober 
•died in the Alsace-Lorraine country, after which his widow came to this 
country, locating in Xew Alsace. Indiana, where she spent the remainder of 
her hfe, her two children, Frederick and Agnes, surviving her. The maternal 
grandfather of Mrs. Dober w^as Henry Borgerding. who married Mary 
Hermmes. Henry Borgerding's father ( Mrs. Dober's maternal great-grand- 
father) was Henry Schulte, but he having married, high above his station, 
Marj- Von Borgerding, a young woman of noble birth and large wealth, he 



•i .\) 



VIA 



..)i, . \k ■^•f.-il 
>i).A ..I i.ivifn 






;.;'■ i: .'jii : -f^nu. ; iic / vi»;i/. 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 769 

toolc hur surname and afterwards was known as Ilenrv Rorg-crding, that 
being the custom in those days in that country. The Borgerdings came to 
America in the year iS^^i and located in New .Alsace, this state, where Ixjth 
died and where their remains were laid to rest in the local cemetery. Mrs. 
Dcjber"s maternal great-grandfather \vas Karl Ilcrmmes, a doughty soldier 
who settled in Dinklage, Holdorf, Germany, where he was a man of great 
influence. 

To Edward and ^lar}' Josephine (Morgan) Dober have been born ten 
children : Frederick Joseph. Edward Paul, Henrique Elizabeth, Jo.sephine 
Cecelia. ]Mary Theresa, Frank Joseph, Bonaventura Amelia, Agnes Louise, 
Hildegarde Marguerite and Anna Theresa. Frederick Joseph Dober is in 
business for himself in Richmond, Indiana. He married Rose Ella Dean and 
to this union three children have been born, Julianna Frebon.ia, Rose Ella 
and Frederick Dean. Edward Paul Dober is cashier of the Greendale Dis- 
tillery Company, at Lawrenceburg. Henrique Elizabeth is at home. Josephine 
Cecelia married Edward William Burke and lives at Delhi, Ohio. Mary Ther- 
esa married I^ouis E. Henderson and lives at .-Vurora, this county. Frank Jo- 
seph Driber is in the employ of his father in the store at Lawrenceburg. Bona- 
ventura .\melia is a teacher in the public schools of Lawrenceburg. Agnes 
Louise and Hildegarde Marguerite are students iu the Lawrenceburg high 
school and Anna Theresa is a student in the Catholic parochial school. 

Mr. and j\Irs. Dober are dex'oted adherents of the Catholic church, and 
their children have been brought up in the faith of the mother church. Mrs. 
Dober is a member of the Ladies' Catholic Order of Foresters, and Air. Dober 
is a member of the Knights of St. John. He is a Democrat and takes a good 
citizen's part in local politics, being earnestly interested in all movements 
looking to the advancement of the community's welfare in a civic as well as 
in a social and moral way. Being one of the oldest business men in the city, 
in point of continuous service, he naturally has a dignified and honorable place 
in the estimation of his business associates in Lawrenceburg, and none there 
is held in higher repute than he. F'ublic spirited in matters of the common 
weal, enterprising and energetic in the prosecution of his private business, 
affable and genial in his intercourse with his fellow-men, Mr. Doljer is a 
friend of all and, in consequence, all are friendly to him, it being safe to say 
that there is no more popular citizen in lawrenceburg than he. It is but 
proper, therefore, in the making of a work of this character, dealing with the 
historical and biographical things of this county, that his name should be 
included in the list of the men who have made history hereabout. 

(49) 



•j''i I 



7/0 DEARBORN COUNTY^ IXDIANA. 

LEWIS H. HELMUTH. 

The following is a sketch of a plain, honest man of affairs, who b\- 
correct methods and a strict regard for the interests of his patrons, has made 
his inflnence felt in the business circles of Lawrcnceburg, and during the 
thirl V vears he has served his fellow-townsmen, has won for himself a most 
enviable reputation. 

Lewis H. ITelmuth is a native of Lawrenceburg, this county, born th.erc 
on Januarv 29. 1S48, son of. Henry and Mary (Sartwell) Helmuth. die 
former of whom was a native of Germany, born in Bremen, province of Han- 
over, where he remained until sixteen years of age, at wlu'cli time he im- 
grated to America and located in the city of Philadelphia. Xot being satis 
fied, however, with the opportunities which presented themselves there, he 
decided to start out for Cincinnati, and walked the entire distance between the 
two cities. He remained in Cincimiati but a short tiu'ic. presentl}' moving to 
Lawrenceburg, where he lived for over sixty-six years. ?Ie died in iSc)fi. 
past eighty years of age. Li 1852 Hem'}- Helmuth opened up the grucery 
business, which is continued at the present time by his son. Lewis H. The 
parents of Henry Helmuth never came to this country, but passed their entire 
lives in their native land. They were the parents of Frederick. ^largavet. 
Paul. Harmon. Jane. William. Caroline and Henry. 

Mary Sartwell's grandparents. Justus and Dorothy (De^vloss) .Sart- 
well. were of French birth and came to this countr}- at the time tiie .great 
General LaFayette brought his soldiers o\er from France. They settled fir-t 
in Virginia and then when Lidiana Territon- was first being opened up, they 
came as pioneers and located in Dearborn county, where their descendants 
have since lived and where Air. Helmuth's mother was born. Justus Sartweli 
was a brickmaker and bunted the brick used in the construction of the first 
brick house in Lawrenceburg. Pie and his wife were people of strong men- 
tality and left a fine family of children, namely: John. Justus, Xorman, Dan- 
iel, Olive. Luc\'. Ann. James and Alary. Mr. Helmuth's mother died in I'o'tS 
at the age of seventy-one years. Both she and her husband were charter mem- 
bers of the Baptist church of Lawrenceburg, and acti\"e and consistent work- 
ers in the same. They had a family of nine children, five of whom li\'erl to 
maturity, namely: Margaret (deceased), who was tlie wife of Hugh Thomp- 
son: Henr\- Oren (deceased) : Ellen (deceased), who was the wife of D. G. 
Justice, and Lewis H. and William C:, both of Lawrenceburg.. 

Lewis H. Helmuth has passed his entire life in Lawrenceburg. Pie 
received his education in the public schools, and when quite young began- 



f . . > . i: :. • ii i' ::f 



/(-.•irt,i-i I- 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. //I 

assisting- liis father in the grocery and continued thus engaged luitil the father 
sold the business. After remaining out of the store for a year, he bought 
hack the old business, and for the past thirty years has continued to run it 
himself. 

On IMay 22, 1877, Lewis H. Helmuth was united in marriage lo Cek-s- 
tine Haffner, daughter of Jacob and IMagdalinc (Traub) TIaffuer. bolli nat- 
i\es of Germanw The Haffners lived for a time in C'incinnati, in which city 
Mrs. Helmuth first saw the light of day, and later came tn I.awrencehurg. 
where both passed the remainder of their lives. ?\Irs. Ilelmuth's paternal 
grandparents, Valentine and Elizabeth Traub, had also immigrated to this 
country and lived for many years in I.awrencebnrg, being amimg the earl}- pio- 
neers of this section. 

]\[r. Helmuth is well known and unixxrsally respected throughout La'\-- 
renceburg and \-icinity, which is a high tribute; for it is said that one of Ihe 
highest honors which can come to a man is a long continued and honorable 
residence in any section. In politics, he is a Repulilican, and Mrs. Ilehr.uth 
is a member of the Presbyterian church, which ]\Ir. Helmuth also attends. 
Mr. PIcImuth has ah^■ays been considered one of tlie substantial citizens of 
Lawrencebnrg, glad to do wliatever lay within his power to promote the wel- 
fare of the communitv. 



EDWARD KUHN. 



The attention of the reader is now called to a short sketch of the career 
of Edward Kuhn, one of the leading business men of Dillsboro, Dearborn 
county, and one of the prominent workers of the Democratic party in this 
section. Edward Kulm, who was born in Petersburg. Kentucky, on October 
' I, 1S71, has been a resident of Dillsboro practically all his life, having been 
brought here by his parents at the tender age of four months. He received 
his education in tlie schords of th.is city and on his fifteenth birthday began 
his business career by accepting a clerkship in the general store owned and 
operated by John X. Calvert. There he remained for nine years, giving 
faithful service to his employer and laying up valuable business experience 
for his own future use. \\licn twenty-four years of age, he embarked in his 
first independent business venture by opening a little grocery store in the 
Kamping building, on North street. This business was launched in a small 
room, eighteen by thirty feet, but there Mr. Kuhn remained for fifteen years, 
prospering more and more each year. In 1910 he erected the Kuhn building 



772 DEARBOKN COUNTY^ INDIANA. 

on the opposite street from his old site and in the new bnilding opened up 
the only exclusive grocery store in the city. This Ijusiness is conducted in 
a manner highly pleasing to its many patrons and equally gratifying to its 
worthy proprietor. ]Mr. Kuhn long since gave evidence of such attributes 
as place him in the fore rank of the business men of this section and, in addi- 
tion to those characteristics which have won and retained for him the business 
confidence and esteem of his associates and patrons, he has a pleasing person- 
ality and genial manner which have won for him the sincere liking of a large 
circle of friends. 

Mr. Kuhn is a son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Spencer) Kuhn, the former 
a native of the German em])ire, born on July 2, 1830, who was brought to 
this country by his uncle wb.en a child of eight years. The family settled 
in Baltimore. Mar}land, and there }-oung Jacol) received his education. \\'hen 
a young man he decided to come further west where there were people of his 
nationality in the farming sections, and so located for a time in Ripley county, 
where he was employed in farm work. ^Vhile li\-ing in that countr\' 
he was united in marriage with Elizabteh Spencer, a native of that county, 
bom on March 16, 1838. She was a posthumous child, her father having 
been drowned some time before her birth. She received lier education in the 
common schools of her native county and was throughout her life regarded 
as a most excellent woman. She was a most consistent Christian, a faithful 
member of the Lutheran church and a most active member in all that pertained 
to the well-being of the local society. She was one of those women whose 
comforting and helpful presence was always to be found in the sick room of 
any about her, and who never failed to give encouragement and help to those 
needing some wise counsel. After being widowed she passed most of her time 
with her son, Edward, the immediate subject of this sketch, and lived to be 
sixty-seven years of age, passing away on February 6, 1905. 

After marriage, Jacob and Elizabeth (Spencer)' Kuhn removed to Pe- 
tersburg, Kentucky, where he was employed on the farm of Joseph Jenkins, 
remaining there until 1S72, when they returned to this section, locating in 
Clay township, Dearborn county, where they took possession of the farm 
of J. W. Gaff. After operating that homestead for about ten years Jacob's 
health failed and he was obliged to give up such heavy work, and removed 
to Dillsboro, where he lived for a number of years. 

Jacob Kuhn still holds a warm place in the memory- of many of the 
older citizens of Dillsboro, for he was one of the representative men of this 
section. He was a faithful member of the German Lutheran church and a 
charter member of the local society known as Saint Peters. He was largely 



'!• 11, If ;. i;- ■,. 



" .i. ■ •' f ■ '; :!::■'/ 



DEARBORN COUNTY/ INDIANA. 773 

active in the building- of the church edifice in 187O. besides making lilxral 
donations of money, he hauled much of. the construction material. His po- 
litical interests were with the Democratic party, and he was known as one 
of its must stanch supporters. He will be remembered by many as pro- 
prietor of the "Chestnut Grove" dairy, and made considerable of a reputation 
for himself in the manufacture of cheese. Jacob Kuhn was interested in all 
matters pertaining to public welfare and had left the impress of his life on 
many of the affairs throughout this section. He alone of his immediate 
family was in this country, for his sister Mary, who together with himself 
had been brought over by an uncle, did not survive many years after making 
her home in the new world. 

Edward Kuhn is the youngest of a family of five children, the others 
being Louis, Anna, Jacob and John W. Louis Kulm died in iS'jJ, leaxiug 
a widow, who was l^illie Steurer, and four children. Of these Albert died 
in infancy: \\'ilHam ( \\'ho died in 1907) married ^lary Clriere, of Rising 
Sun. and had one child, Leona : Alma became the wife of Adolph Schr<irer, 
of Aurora, this state, and has one daughter. Norma: Edna remains at home 
with the mother. 

Anna Kuhn became the wife of William Bushhorn, of Dillslioro, a 
farmer, and is the mother of six sons, as follow: John W. is a dentist, lo- 
cated at Piqua, Ohio, where he married Gertrude Seits : E-lward H. married 
Clara Reinhart and they li\'ed on a farn^. in Ripley count}- : they have one 
son, Plarold : Louis .\. has been twice married, his second wife was Martha 
Lowe, of Aloores Hill, this county, and his first wife was Lillian Fox, who 
bore him two children, .-Mvin and I'ertha : Albert H. married Agnes Lowe, 
of Moores Hill, and is the father (_)f one son. Willis: Charles W. and Walter 
K. remain unmarried. Anna (Kuhn) Bushhorn, mother of this interesting 
family of sons, died at the age of fifty-five years on February 7, 1915. 

Jacob Kuhn, Jr., was united in marriage widi Marv- Steurer and to their 
union was born one child, Amelia, who died when twenty years of age. 
Jacob, Jr., also died when y<-jung, his death occurring from typhoid fever 
on Xo\-ember 28, 1S85. John W. Kuhii, who was a traveling salesi-nan and 
a most promising young man, died unn-iarried on April 6, 1886. 

Edward Kuhn is a men-iber of the ]\rethodist Episcopal church, being a 
faithful adherent of that society. His fraternal affiliation is held with the 
ancient order of Freemasonry, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the 
Knights of Pythias and the Red Men, all through the local lodges at Dills- 
boro. In politics he gi\-es his most efficient support to the Democratic party 
and is considered one of its leaders in this section. He has had the honor 



■ ■: ■:■■•:'- .1 '■',■' 
•I ^ '( Tijkm' ; 



■Hi... .-:rr,( ■ 



774 DEARBORN COUNTY^ INDIANA. 

of being sent as delegate to five of the Democratic state conventions and has 
three times been sent as delegate to congressional conventions. In view of 
his activities in the political field, he has made himself one of the best-known 
and most highly-respected men of this section. While not seeking public 
office for himself, he has been of greatest assistance in administering the 
party's affairs in this section. 

On October 20, 1S95, Edward Kuhn \vas married to Agnes Pearson, 
of Dillsboro, daughter of John and EHzabeth (Abbott) Pearson, the former 
known as one of the leading carpenters of this community. Mrs. Kuhn has 
passed her entire life in the town of Dillsboro, having attended its schools 
and was one of the efficient meniliers of the Methodist Episcopal church and 
a worthy wife of the subject of this sketch. Airs. Kuhn died on March 
12, 1915. 



CHARLES EBERHART. 



In the front rank of Lawrenceburg's most highly respected citizens is 
Charles Ebcrhnrt, assistant postmaster, \vho comes from one of the old fam- 
ilies of the community and has passed his entire life within the borders of 
that city. 

Charles Eberhart was bom on August 22, 1S69, a son of Henr\- and 
Catherine (Petri) Eberhart, both natives of the city of Pirmasens, in the 
palatinate of Bavaria. Henry Eberhart was well educated when a young 
man and for some time was a traveling- salesman for a shoe firm in his 
native land. He came to America in 1S54, landinj^- at Xew Orleans, whence 
he made his way to Lawrenceburg by boat on the Mississippi anrl Ohio rivers. 
The first employment he secured in this section was in the stone quarrv of 
Kosmos Erederick, \\here hi remained but a short time. Then for several 
years he was with the old Gaff distillery and later served several years f:s 
engineer for the distillery of \\'. I'. Squibb. From 1876 until the time of 
his death he was employed at the James Walsh Company distillerv. His 
death occurred on April 6, 1904, in his seventy-first year and his wife died 
in 1S95, at the age of sixty-five years. Both Air. and Airs. Henry Eberhart 
were devout members of the Lutheran church. Henry Eberhart's parents, 
Henry and Alargaret Eberhart. ne\-cr came to this countrv, but passed their 
entire lives in their native land. There were in their family but three children, 
Gottfried, Henry and a daughter, Elizabeth. Air. El>erhart's maternal grand- 
parents were George and Elizabeth Petri, and they also remained their entire 



■|t:ow r. 
f.n Ki 



(■'-Iv'' 






il:i ' ;i ! ' ' . 



! . ir;!!':-!./ j 



'UI;;7/ --,.,.! 



DEARBORN COUNTY^ INDIANA. 7/5 

li\c^ in the Fatherland. There were three daughters in their famil_\' : Cath- 
erine CMr. Eherliart's mcither), Sehna and EHzabeth. 

Charles Eberhart is one of a family of ten children, eight sons and two 
daughters, namely: Henry, of Greensburg", this state; George, deceaS'^d , 
Louis, of Lawrenceburg; h>;ic?t. of Cincinnati; Elizabeth, of Lawrenceburg; 
T'"rcd, who married: John and Carrie, who died unmarried, and \\'illiam and 
Charles, also of Lawrenceburg. 

Charles Eberhart recei\xd his education in Lawrencel,nn-g. partly at the 
pubhc schools and partly at tlie parochial school. At the early age of fnur- 
tcen he secured employment at the James Walsh Company cooperage plant, 
and worked there for ten consecutive years, leaving there to enter the Oliin 
Valley coffin factor}' as a machine hand, where he remained until 1896. wlicn 
he was appointed assistant postmaster of Lawrenceburg. in which position he 
has since remained. 

On X'ovember 15, 1895, Charles Eberhart was united in marriage to 
Katherinc Kunz, who was born in Lawrenceburg. daughter of George and 
Elizabeth (Kitzmann) Kunz, the latter of whom died in 1906, at the age of 
fiftv-nine vcars. and the former of whom still li\es in Lawrenceburg, one of 
its prominent citizens. ^Mrs. Eberhart is one of a family of seven children, 
namely: Katherine. Malinda, Agnes, Edward (deceased), Mayme, Alma and 
Georgie. George Kunz is the son of Michael and Katherine (Bartholomew) 
Kunz, both natives of Mutterstadt, Germany, where they passed their entire 
lives. r^Irs. Eberhart's mother was Elizabeth Ritzmann, daughter of Adam 
and Christine (Rupp) Ritzmann, who were among the earliest settlers of 
Lawrenceburg. They were fr.rmers and both lived to a ripe old age. There 
were eight children in their family, namely: Elizabetli, Aviary, Kate. Anna. 
Carrie, Christina, ^lelinda and William F. 

To Charles and Katherine (Kunz) Eberhart have been born three 
children. Elizabeth. Edward and Paul. Both Mr. and ^Irs. Eberhart arc 
members of Zion Evangelical church and yir. Eberhart holds fraternal affil- 
iation with the Independent Order of Odd Eellows, through the local lodge 
Xo. 8. In politics he is a Republican, one of the stanch supporters of the 
party, r^lr. Eberhart is one of those sterling characters who fully appreciates 
his duty as a citizen and while through life he has given the best of his his en- 
deavors to provide for those entrusted to his care, he has at the same time 
ever been mindful of any service he could render to promote the good of the 
community. He is a genial and agreeable man, anrl is held in high esteem 
by a large circle of friends and acquaintances. 



"Jjb DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

HARLEY H. SUTTON, ]\I. D. 

DesceiKlinj^ from a fainih- of distinguished physician?, Harley M. Sutton, 
of Aurora, this county, whose name introduces this sketcli, comes honestly by 
his love of the study and practice i)f medicine along- scientific lines, in which 
his success has equalled that oi his ancestors, as will he seen by a peiiisal of 
this biographical sketch, which shows his untiring interest, froin the time of 
his early student days to his present enviable position as a diagnostician. 

Harley H. Sutton was born on December 24, 1852, in the city of his 
present success, the son of George and Sarah ( h'olbre ) Sutton. His rudi- 
mentary education was received in liis home town, where he was graduated 
from the high school in 1S70, under Professor Clark, after which he entered 
the Indiana State L'nixcr^ity at r.loominglon, taking a special course, cov- 
ering a period of two }-ears. In 1873 he began the study of medicine under 
his father, rendering the latter valuable service during the first year, in th.e 
microscopical examinalirms rif pi.)rk. He entered the Medical College of 
Ohio, at Cincinnati, in 1874. +rom which instituticni he was graduated in tlie 
spring of 1876, at the end of which year he attended the Jefferson [Medical 
College at Philadelphia, from ^^•hich institution he was graduated the follow- 
ing spring, his thesis being ''The reduction of the dislocation of the hip joint 
'by means of a fulcrum placed in the groin." setting forth a new method for 
the reduction of the dislocation of the hip joint, as discovered l>y his father, 
citing a case of three-months standing, under the observation of Prof. William 
Pancoast, which reduction was made under the care of Dr. George Sutt'^n 
at Bleckley hospital, in Philadelphia. Before deciding upon a location for 
permanent practice. Doctor Sutton was called upon to take the place of his 
brother. Dr. W. E. Sutton, then associated with his father,- who was taken 
seriously ill, and never regained his health, dying in 1878. Dr. Harley H 
Sutton continued in practice with his father until the father's death, which 
occurred in 1886, leaving him in sole charge of their large and profitable 
practice. Pie has selected the branches of his profession in which he is most 
interested, and is noted for the careful and painstaking interest he takes i:i 
his cases. 

Doctor Sutton is a strong believer in home institutions, feeling that 
larger organizations do not render the same benefit, and in this connection 
he has been largely instrumental in promoting the success of the Dearborn 
County Medical Society. He has received many honors as representative of 
the society in both the state and national associations, having filled all offices 
of the society. Doctor Sutton is a member of the American Medical Asso- 



•1 •;.,.•;.(,: 



:! Jr. 



,!i;.'.! 



DEARBORN COUNTY^ INDIANA. J-Jf 

ciatinn, the Indiana State Medical Society, the Indiana Fourth District Med- 
ical Society, and is president of the Dearborn County Society for the Preven- 
tion of Tuberculosis. He was for an extended period, health ofiicer of Aurora. 
In 1896 he took a post-graduate course in the New York Polyclinic Hospital, 
and for fifteen years has been surgeon for the Big Four Railway Company. 
}Ie is a director and vice-president of the Aurora Coffin Company, a director 
(if the River \'ie\v Cemetery Association, and a member of the board of 
directors of the Aurora Public Library, as well as being allied witli various 
other organizations. Fie has contributed generously to various pul)lications, 
on different subjects, but principally on tliat of his profession. IJ)octor Sut- 
ton resides at the old homestead in the southern portion of Aurora, on which 
he lias spent a great deal of money in impro\-enients, thus making it, in con- 
nection with its own natural surroundings, one of the most attractive homes 
on the Ohio river. In addition to his other alliances, Doctor Sutton was 
president of the Indiana Fourth District Medical Society in the year 190S, 
and is at present a member of the Indiana state board of health, which posi- 
tion is highly prized by him. He occupied the chair of the committee repre- 
senting tlie state of Indiana at the international congress of hygiene anrh 
demography, at \A'ashington, D. C, in 1912. 

The reader is referred to a liiographical sketch of the late Dr. George Sut- 
ton, presented elsewhere in this \T)lume. for additional details regarding the Sut- 
ton genealogy. Dr. Harley H. Sutton's paternal grandparents were George and 
I'^lizabeth fives) Sutton. George Sutton was born in London, England, and 
Elizabeth Ives was born in Camberwell, England. They caiue to America 
in 1819, and spent one year at Cincinnati, after which they moved to a farm 
in the A\'hitewater valley, near Xew Trenton, in I-"ranklin county, Indiruui. 
Mr. Sutton died in Canada, and his wife died on the home place, aged thirty- 
nine years. Their children were as follow: George, ^Irs. Ann Gibbons. 
Mrs. Elizabeth Beresford, ^Irs. Charlotte Murdock, and Mrs. Caroline Back- 
man. 

The maternal grandparents were Charles and Phoebe (Monroe) F^jlbre. 
\\ho settled at an early day in Dearborn county, Indiana, where she died at 
an advanced old age. Charles Folbre died in 1858 at Lindon. St. Francis 
county, .Arkansas. To this union were born the following children : Barna- 
bas, Thomas, Charles, Samuel, Mrs. Sarah Sutton, Durbin, Mrs. Clarissa 
Lathrop and two others v.ho died very young. 

On October 5, 1887, Dr. Harley FI. Sutton was united in marriage to 
Mary Duchemin, who was born at Cincinnati on April 10, 1859, ilaughter 
of William R. and Emma (Lambe) Duchemin, to which union have been 



>r. .-. I.. ' !■ M " 



7/8 DEARBORN COUNTY^ INDIANA. 

born two daughters and one son. Georyc, the latter of whom is the only one 
now livinsj. He is a graduate of the Indiana State University. W'illiarii 
Duchemin was a nati\'c of France, and his wife, Emma Lambe, was born in 
England. They lived for a time at Cincinnati, moving from that city to 
Aurora. ^Iv. Duchemin died in 1S84, but his widow still survives him at 
the age of seven-sexen years. Their children were Mrs. Mary Sutton, ]\Irs 
J. J. Backman, Elizabeth Duchemin, and some who died young. 

The paternal grandfather of ]\Irs. Sutton was Peter Duchemin, a French- 
man, \\h() married Luc}- Davis. They settled at Cincinnati, where the wife 
died, and ]\Ir. Duchemin afterward moved to Aurora, this county, where lie 
died at the house of his si>n, William. They were the parents of two children, 
- — John and William Duchemin. The maternal grandparents of Mrs. Sutton 
Avere Jeremiah and Hannah (Turner) Lambe, both natives of England, wiio 
came to America and settled at Newport, Kentucky, where they both died. 
They were the parents of the following children : Mrs. Ellen Hyatt, ]Mrs. 
Emma Duchemin, ?^Irs. Jessie Evans, Hannah, Mrs. Alice Terry and two sons, 
William and FIcnry. 

Doctor Sutton takes great interest in the growing of fine fruit, and is 
justly proud of his prize-winning apples and peaches. 



CHARLES O. KE:\[P. 



The business interests of Lawrenceburg, the county seat of Dearborn 
county, ;i.re well represented by a careful, prudent and conservative class of 
merchants, who gi\'e to the commercial life of the city a character for sub- 
stantial worth that adds no little to the fine credit which the historic old town 
€njoys in commercial and financial circles throughout the central states. 
Among these business men few are better or more favorably known than 
Charles O. Kemp, of the firin (jf C. O. Kemp & Son, dealers in hardware and 
implements, and it is a pleasure for the biographer here to set out briefly in 
this connection a few of the salient points in the life of this representati\e 
business man and enterprising citizen. 

Charles O. Kemp was born in Switzerland county, Lidiana, April 22, 1S57, 
the son of ^\'illiam C. and Content L. (Hasting) Kemp, both natives of Ohio 
•county, Indiana. William C. Kemp was a son of John Kemp, a native of 
Pennsylvania, of English descent, and an early settler in Ohio county, Indiana. 
He was the father of the following children : George, Ezra, William C, 



,v-r;A 



I . , . I f'- ■, ii^'i 



■i:u-\ -■ \ i' 



DEARBORN COUXTY, INDIANA. 779 

Sallie, Susan and ■Vlaiy. John Kemp lix'ed to a ripe old ag'c, being- fiir man\- 
\ears regarded as among- tl:e most influential farmers of his coinitT. It was 
in Ohio county that William C. Kemp greu" to maiiliDod. and where lie laid 
the foimdation for the successful career which marked liis life. He was 
reared to the life of a farmer and also learned the cooper's tratle, which latter 
vocation, during- a part of his life, he followed with considerable success. 
During the Civil \\'ar period Mr. Kemp carried the mail, in addition to his 
other activities. Farming- was his principle vocation, liowever, and he event- 
ually became a large land holder. Mr. Kemp married Ouitent L lla-ting;, 
daug-hter of Charles and Fanny ( Athern) Hasting-, nati\es of l^enn'^\l\'ania, 
and early settlers in Ohio county. Indiana, who were the jjarents of Charles. 
Content, Mollie, Jai-nes, Taylor, Fanny, Harriet, Emma and Margaret. The 
Hasting family was one of the best known families in Ohio countv, and the 
parents of the above children were held in high repute in the ueighborhnod in 
which they resided and where they li^'ed to a good old age. 

To William C. and Content L. (Hasting) Kenip eleven children were 
born: Laura (deceased), who was the wife of PT B. Sparks; John, de- 
ceased: ^lollie J., the wife of M. D. Fisk, of Ohio county, Indiana: 01i\e 
deceascfl ; James ^L, who resirles at Indianapolis, Imliana; Charles O.. who 
resides at Aurora, Indiana: Henry, of Indianapolis: [Margaret, the wife of 
William Wade, of this county; Edward, of Ohio county: Lucian, of Illinois, 
and one who died in infancy. The mother of these children died in 1887. at 
the age of sixty-four years, the famil}- at that time living near Rising Sun. 
Following his wife's death, Mr. Kemp came to Dearborn county, and the rest 
of his life was spent here, he n-iaking his home alternately with his several 
'children who lived in this county, his death occurring in 1910, he being then 
eighty-seven \ears of age. Mrs. Kemp was a faithful and devoted mi.mljer of 
the Presbyterian church, which church i\Ir. Keirip also attended. He was a 
good man. faithful in the discharge of all the duties of life, and was regarded 
a= an influential citizen. 

Charles O. Kemp's early youth was spent in Sw-itzerland county, he re- 
maining there until he was eleven years of age, at which time his parents 
moved to Ohio county, where he grew to manhood on the farn-i. Plis elemen- 
tary education was received in the district schools of his home neighborhood, 
to which he added further instruction in the schools of Rising Sun and Aurora, 
supplementing this with a course of one year in \\'abash College, at Craw- 
fordsville, Indiana, after which he married and, renting a farm frorr. his 
father, started upon his successful career as a farmer, rei-naining thus occu- 
pied for about thirty years. Coming into possession of the home farm, he 



/So DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

remained there until 1907, in wliich year he retired from tlie farm and moved 
into the town of Aurora, where, for several years, lie follmved various pur- 
suits. In June. 19 14. he bought a new stock of goods and established a hard- 
ware and implement business in Lawrenceburg, associating with him in this 
venture his son, \\'illiam C, under the firm stj-le of C. O. Kemp & Son. and 
has already built up a large trade, which gives every evidence of growing to 
much larger proportions, the popularity of this new firm having been quickly 
established in the county seat and throughout the communit\-, which it serves 
in tlie line which it so effectively represents hereabout. 

On December 7, 1876. Charles O. Kemp was united in marriage to Cora 
Gerhard, who was born in Hartford, Ohio county. Indiana, the daugh.ter of 
Jonathan B. and Catherine (]\Ierriman) Gerhard, both of whom. also, were 
natives of that count}", and who were the parents of three children. Inez, Cora 
and Aaron. Both ?^Ir. and Mrs. Gerhard, who were among the best known 
and most influential people in their neighborhood, long have been deceased. 
Jonathan E. Gerhard was the sim of William Gerhard, one of the early set- 
tlers of Ohio count)', who died there well along in years. He was a prom- 
inent farmer, and among his childien who lived to impress their personalities 
upon tliat community were Dr. Jerome Gerhard, Jonathan B.. Reese and ^\'ill- 
iam. Mrs. Kemp's maternal grandparents, the ^ilerrimans, were early settlers 
in Ohio ct-iunt}'. who lived there to an old age, and whi> were the parcits of 
five children, Susan, Catherine, ]\Iollie, Robert and Jane. 

To Charles O. and Cora (Gerhard) Kemp eight children have beer, born, 
namely: Jonathan, who died at the age of nineteen years; Inez, who is a 
teacher in the public schools of this county; IaiIu C, a teacher in the public, 
schools at Dillsboro, Indiana; Katheryn, a stenographer and secretarv at Indi- 
ana State University, at Bloomington ; William C, who is in partnership with 
his father in the store in Lawrenceburg; M(jllie, who is attending the high 
school at Aurora ; Clyde, who died in his tenth year, and one wh'i died in 
infancy. 

Th('>ugh engaged in business in Lawrenceburg. Mr. Kemp continues to 
make his home in Aurora, where he has one of the pleasantest homes in that 
town, and where he and his family are held in the highest regard. They are 
members of the Methodist church, in the various beneficences of which they 
are actively interested, and are likewise concerned in all the good works of 
that community. Mr. Kemp still owns the, old lK)me farm, and is very well 
circumstanced as regards this world's goods. He is a Republican, and for 
years has taken a wann interest in the political affairs of his home county 
though never having been included in the office-seeking class, his concern 



.11 ., 1■>(::^.■f^ 






DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 78 1 

hclug rather to insist upon good government than to he among those upon 
wliose shoulders tlie duties of government are hud. He is a man of quiet 
and modest demeanor, known for his strict integrity of character and very 
jiroperly has the respect and confidence of his friends and all those v.ilh whom 
he has husincss or social dealings. 



ADAM K. HILL. 



Few names are hetter known in general business circles in this part of 
the state than is the ()ne the reader notes ahove. Prominent in the business, 
social and ci\'il affairs of his home town, ]\[r. Hill for many years has been 
regarded as one of the leaders of the community life of Aurora, and is re- 
garded highly in general business circles throughout the whole of Dearborn 
county. .\s the head of the well-known firm of A. Hill & Sons, dealers in 
coal and salt, also for forty years proprietor of the wharf-boat at Avirora, ^Nlr. 
Hill for many years has taken an active part in the affairs of his home towr, 
and his business associates give him their unreserved confidence. He for- 
merlv was a ineniber of the Aurora city council, and in tliis capacitv per- 
formed most excellent public service. He also for years was the ^•ice■ presi- 
dent and treasurer of the Dearborn County Agricultural .\ssociation. during 
which time he was indefatigable in promoting the best interests of the agri- 
cultural section oi the county, his services in this connection still bcii;g re- 
membered with gratitude by all who were connected with him in that useful" 
old association. A member of one of Dearborn county's oldest and liest- 
known families. Mr. Hill e\er has had the interests of his native county \ery 
dearly at heart, and ne\er has spared himself in furthering these interests 
in all good and proper ways, in consequence of which he deservedly occupies 
a very high position in the general esteem hereabout. 

Adam K. Hill was born on the old Kerr homestead in Hogan township. 
Dearborn county, Indiana,' on December 27, 184S, son of Abram and Minerva 
(Kerr) Hill, both members of old and influential families in this county, 
for further details^.of which excellent families the reader is respectfully re- 
ferred to the biographical sketch relating to the late Abram Hill, presented 
elsewhere in this volume. 

Though born on the old Kerr homestead, Adam K. Hill was reared prin- 
cipally on his father's farm in Manchester township, attending the district 
schools of that neighborhood, in which he received an excellent elementary 



''^ . 'i r;..: I 



' .■%.'>! .''- i:::;'ii )r ;■ ' . !"> ,:,. • 



7S2 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

education, -vxhich he sufiplenieiited by a course of three ycArs in Moires 
Hill College, thus laying- a substantial foundation for a business career. L^pon 
completing his studies, Mr. Hill engaged in the live-stock business v.-ith his 
father, continuing thus occupied until his marriage, two years later, .-.iter 
which he moved onto his father's farm and fi^r some time was successfn.ll\- 
engaged in farming. He then became interested in the crial business with 
his father and located at Aurora, where he ever since has been actively identi- 
fied with the business interests of that thriving city. His father had acquired 
large wharfage rights at Ainxtra, and for nearly forty years the firm of 
A. Hill & Sons has owned the wharf-boat there, few names being better 
known up and down the river than theirs. In later years j\Ir. Hill also en- 
gaged in the salt and general drayage business and has been largely interested 
in other flourishing enterprises in and about Aurora. He is president of ihc 
Pittsburgh Coal Company, of .-Vurora, and he and his brother. Lew \V. Hill, 
are proprietors of Cheeks Hill, one of the beautiful mounds on the north side 
of Aurora, abutting Sunnyside, containing thirty acres of most valuable home 
sites. Mr. Hill has given considerable attention to public affairs, and in 18S8 
and 18S9 served his ward very acceptably in the Aurora city council. For 
several years he was vice-president and treasurer of the Dearborn County 
Agricultural Association, and is now a meniber of the executive board of the 
River View Cemetery Association. 

On February 8, 1872, Adam K. Hill was united in marriage to Ella S. 
Wcrley, who was born in Center township, this county, daugther of Francis 
and Jane (Sanks) W'orley, a well-known and influential family of that town- 
ship, she being the fourth daughter of the family. ^Ir. and ■Sirs. W'orley came 
to this county at an early day and located in Center townsliip. where fur 
many years Mr. Worley was successfully engaged in farming. Fie died at 
the age of eighty }-ears, his wife having died some years i)re\iously. They 
were the parents of eight children, namely : Elizabeth, the wife of John 
Wood; Martha, now deceased, who was the wife of George Vahn, of Boone 
county, Kentucky: Jennie, wife of John S. Cole, of Aurora, this county; 
Ella, who married ]\Ir. Hill; Lillie, wife of Robert Griffin, of this county; 
Fannie, who died unmarried, and William and Frances. 

To Adam K. and Ella S. (Worley) Hill one child has l>een born, Grace, 
who married Clifford J. Dils, of Aurora, to which union two children have 
been born, Eleanor M. and Donald C. Mr. and Mrs. Hill are members of 
the Methodist church and ever have been active in the good works of their 
home community, being regarded as among the leaders in all measures de- 
signed to promote the general welfare. Mr. Hill is a member of Aurora 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. ' ySj 

Lodg^e No. 51, Free and Acce[)ted ■Masons, and is much interested in the affairs 
,)i that order. Though now ncaring the three-score-and-ten mark in the jour- 
ney of hfe, Mr. Hill retains all his wonted interest in his extensive business 
affairs, as well as in the general interests of the public, and is still regarded 
as one of the most active and efficient members of the business community 
of Dearborn county; a man fully entitled to and receiving, in full measure^ 
the confidence and respect of his business associates generally. 



ALBERT G. SilERROD. 



Prominent among the well-known citizens of Lawrenceburg, and a meiu- 
ber of one of its oldest families, is Albert G. Sherrod, stationary engineer for 
the Bauer Cooperage Compmy. He was born in Lawrenceburg on Feljrr.ary 
22, 1849. a son of James M. and ^Lary (Allison) Sherrod. b'.>th natives of 
this state. James M. Shernul was a son of John and Sarah (Green) Slierrod, 
the former a nati\e of France and the latter of Ireland, \\\v> were am^jug the 
earliest pioneers of Dearborn count}', thev having come here in 1815 lohn 
Sherrod was a sliip carpenter b}' trade and died here at the age of lifty-si.x 
years. His widow survived him for many years, passing away at the ad- 
vanced age of eighty-three. They were the parents of thirteen children, six 
of whom lived to maturit}". James ^I., Mary. Martha, Laura, George and 
Calvin. 

James M. Sherrod was reared in I^awrenceburg, recei\ing his edncntiin 
there, and when of suitable age was apprenticed to the carpenter's tra^le. He 
finished out his time and followed that trade for a number of \ears. aftei 
which he took up engineering and millwright work and erected a number of 
mills throughout Indiana, Ohin and Kentucky, .nid for a number of years 
operated a stationar)- engine. His death occurred m Cincinnati in 1890, when 
in his sevent}'-third year, his widow passing away one year later, at the age 
of seventy-one. He was a man prominent in the affairs of tliis community, 
had served as councilman at Lawrenceburg for a number of years and v.as 
also active in military circles, having received a commission as captain in the 
old state militia. ^Nlary Allison was a daughter of John and Margaret 
(You.ng) Allison, both natives of Scotland and pioneers in this county, the 
former of whom was a veteran of the \\'ar of 1812 and died in mid-life, as 
did his wife also. There were three children in their familv : Jane, Mary 
(mother of Albert G. Sherrod) and James Y. 

Albert G. Sherrod is one of a familv of six sons, three of whom lived' 



784 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

to maturity, the other two being' Eflwanl K.. of Pittsl_)urgh. renns\-l\ania. 
and John, of Cincinnati, all being- stationary engineers, as was their father 
before them. Mr. Shcrrod's entire life has been s])ent in Lawrencebnrg, v. ith 
the exception of four }-ears when he was eniploxed in Cincinnati. He received 
his education in the public schools of Lawrenceburg. and at tiie age of thirteen 
began to learn stationary engineering- in the engine room of the old I'ni ju 
factory. After mastering his chosen vocation he served in that capacity- in 
the Lewis and Eichellierger flour-mill for two years, in the Union factor\- 
for nine years, with the Miami Valley Furniture Company for eight years 
and the four years spent in Cincinnati were passed in the engine room of the 
John Walker Bre\\'ing Company. After returning to Lawrenceburg. he was 
with the Garnier Brewing Company for seven Acars and b\- that time tlie 
constniction of the Lawrenceburg electric plant was under way. He took 
an important part in the erection of the machinerv for that plant and served 
as its superintendent for seven years. Si.x vears ago he entered the engine 
room of the Bauer Cot>perage Ci.nnpany and has been with that concern ever 
since. 

On December 24. 1874. .Mbert G. Shcrrod was united in marriage to 
Eva Knapp, a daughter of Ezekiel Knapp, to which union two children have 
been born, daughters. May and Xell, the fi^rmer of whom is a teacher in liie 
public schools of Lawrenceburg and the latter, instructor of art in INLoores 
Hill College. 

Mrs. Sherrod was born near Guilford on August 2fi. 1845, her parents 
Ijeing among the early settlers of this county, having come here from Xew 
York state. They spent the remainder of their lives in this county, both 
dying well along in years. They were the parents of nine chiblren, Lucv, 
Albert, Joseph, Xancy, Mary, Rhoda, Eva, Jennie and Julie. 

]Mr. Shcrrod is affiliated with the ancient 'jrder of Free and Accepted 
Masons, through Lawrenceburg Lodge Xo. 4, and politically lie is a Repub- 
lican, who takes an active interest in the party's affairs. He served foi si.x 
years as a member of the school board and for the same length of time was 
engineer for the fire department. This was a volunteer dc])artnient and dur- 
ing that time he was employed regtdarly elsewhere. The Sherrod family 
home is at Xo. 215 ^lain street, ]\rr. Sherrod owning the resirlence, which his 
father erected in 1S47. It is not given to every man to live his entire life 
among dear and familiar surroundings and perhaps the highest tribute which 
can be paid any man is that which may be truthfully said of Mr. Sherrod. that 
he is held in the very highest esteem by old and young alike, and has Ijecn 
so regarded throughout his entire life. 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. ■ 7S5 

■ ' EDWARD G. LOMMEL. 

Edward G. Lommel. the superintendent of the James S: Meyer Bu;:^s:y 
Company, of Lawrencehurg, this county, belongs to one of the old and highlv 
respected families of Dearborn county. His father was one of the organizers, 
in fact, almost personally affected the organization of .the Lawrcnceburg Fur- 
niture Manufacturing Company, one of the large industries of this county foi 
many years, with which the elder Lommel \\as connected until his death. The 
Lommel family came from Germany and Edward G. Lommel is the secc^nd 
generation of the family living in this country^ his father having established 
the family in America. Edward G. Lommel has been a school teacher, a civil 
engineer, the superintendent of a lumber company and has worked at various 
times for different concerns. He began his active business career with the 
James & Aleyer Buggy Con.ipany. as traffic manager, and is now superiiiten- 
dent of the concern. Lender normal conditions, this compan^-'s output is >ix 
thousand jolis annually and its goods are sold all over the world. "Sir Lom- 
mel's position, therefore, is a very responsible one. 

Edward G. Lommel was born on February 19, 1879, in Lawrenceburg. 
Indiana, son of Christian and ^lagdelena (Kirsch) Lommel, both natives of 
Germany, the former of whom was born in 1834 and the latter in 1S51. 

Edward G. Lommel was reared in Lawrenceburg and has lived there all 
of his life. He attended the public schools of Lawrenceburg and was gradu- 
ated from the high school with the class of 1S9S. After that he taught school 
for one year and was then employed as a civil engineer in one of the dep?rt- 
ments of the United States government service, after which he taught for 
two more years and then became superintendent of the Lawrenceburg Lumber 
Company, which position he held for one year. In 1901 he went to work 
for A. D. Cook in his office and remained with him for five }ears. After that 
he worked for the Fairbanks-^Morse Company in Cincinnati. Returning from 
Cincinnati, he took a place with the James & Aleyer Buggy Company, and 
has gradually risen from traffic manager to superintendent, the position which 
he now holds. 

On September 14. 1904. Edward G. Lommel was married to Leora Webb 
Walker, who was born in Lawrenceburg in 18S1, the daughter of James and 
Clara (Pierce) Walker, the former a native of Harrison, Ohio, and the latver 
of Lawrenceburg, this county, who are now living in Lawrenceburg. Of their 
children, only two are now living", Mrs. Lommel and Grace. 

Edward G. Lommel is one of eight children born to his parents, four 
(50) 



:i )-'; ,';: ■■■ 



■I,;. ; (:■• ' 



786 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

sons and four daughters, namely: Louise, who is a teacher of music in Law- 
renccburg; Charles H., who died in igo6, and who was formerly cashier in 
the Peoples Bank and before that was employed with his father in the manu- 
facture of luriiiture, but at the time of his death was cashier in a baTik at 
Aurora; Katherine, who is the wife of Rev. B. F. W'ulfmann, of .Springfield, 
Ohio: .\melia, who died in earl}- cliildhnod: Henry L., who is superintendent 
of the box factory of George H. Bishop & Company : Edward G., the imme- 
diate subject of this sketch: Tina, who is the wife of Lewis A. Lee. of Ham- 
mond. Indiana: and Arthur F., a druggist in Lawrenceburg. 

The father of Edward G. Lrmimel was reared in Germany and remained 
there until he was seventeen years old. He received a good comnn.^n school 
education in his native country and in 1851 came to America and located on 
a farm. Later he moved to Lawrenceburg and learned the carriage maker's 
trade, finallv becoming superintendent of the Heifer Carriage Conipiuiy, 
\\hich i;osition he held for some years, fie also bought cattle for a time. In 
1868 he organized the Lawrenceburg Furniture Manufacturing Compan\'. 
one of the largest industries in that city, and was connected with that enter- 
prise until his death on September 22, 1899, at the age of sixty-five years. 
His widow still survives. She is a member of Zion Evangelical church, her 
husband also having been a member of that church, and during their active 
careers were leaders in the church. Christian Ixunmel belonged to the 
Ancient Order of Druids. He was a member of the city council for twelve or 
thirteen years and was also a member of the school board for a numljer of years. 
He was never defeated for any office. He took a very active interest in the 
welfare of his adopted cit}- and was a man of proved integrity of character. 

Christian Lommel was a son of Henry and Christina (Briar) Lommel. 
the former of whom was born in 1807 and died in 1884 and the latter born 
in 1806, died in 1877, both spending their last days in Lawrenceburg. Flenry 
Lommel began life as a farmer and even after coming to America followed 
that occupation. Later in life he became a grocer in Lawrenceburg. He and 
his wife were the parents of two daughters and three sons: Christian, Alinnie. 
Nettie, Louis, who died as a soldier during the Ci\'il War, and Charles. 
Magdelena Kirsch was the daughter of John and IMargaretha CBeckuian) 
Kirsch, nati\es of Germany, the former born in 1804 and died in 1883 : the 
latter born in 180S and died in 1886. John Kirsch was a well-to-do German 
farmer and after coming to America owned a large \ineyard. He and his 
wife were the parents of the following children : John, George, Jacob, Valen- 
tine, Magdelena, Katherine and lienry, the latter of whom died on the battle- 
field in the Civil War. 



;.M.;i;l 






DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 787 

Edward G. Lfminiel, tlierefore, is descended from German ancestors on 
both sides of his faniil_\- and he himself p.issesses the sterhng- traits of cliar- 
acter which belong to that people. Mrs. Lommel is a member of the J'rcs- 
bvterian chnrch. but Mr. Lommel is a member of the Zion Evangelical church. 
He is a member of Union Lodge Xo. 8, Independent Order of Odd t''elluws, 
and is. a Democrat. 



■ . . JOSEPH PHILIP FEIST. 

Joseph P. Feist, bookkeeper for the TJauer Cooperage Conipan_\'. of Law- 
reiiceburg, has been a resident of that cit}- for forty-nine years, and lias seen 
the city of Lawrenceburg grow from a straggling village to a thriving ciiy, 
where the hum of industrv ma\- be heard on everv hand. Air. Feist's i)ater'ird 
ancestry is German and his wife's ancestry on both sides extends l.ack to 
the l-"athcrland. Born in Lawrencelnirg Joseph P. Feist received a gO')d edu- 
cati(>n. not only in the public and parochial schools of his home town, but 
aLo in a business college, wliere he jirepared for his profession. ¥iv: many 
years lie was engaged in railroad work, but during the past fifteen years i;as 
held his present jjosition as bookkeeper for the Bauer Cooperage Comp.mw 

Jacob Philip Feist was born in LawTenceburg. Indiana, on October 13, 
1866, the son of John P.. and Mary Anna { Lipps) Feist, the former a native of 
Baden, German}', and the latter a native of Madison, Indiana. John l'. I-'eist 
was reared and educated in Germanw and was a truck gardener in die old 
country. Coming to America in 184S, he located first in Cincinnati and in 
the early sixties came to this count}-, locating at Lawreiiceluirg. In 1867 he 
became superintendent of the Greendale cemetery, and held that position until 
188S. since which time he has lived retired among his children. He is nov»- 
residing near Greensburg, Indiana, with his two daughters and a son-in-law. 
A Union soldier during the Civil \\'ar, in which he serx'ed two years :is a pri- 
vate, John B. Feist has a splendid military record. He served several terms 
as councilman of Greendale. To John B. and Mary Anna (Lipps) Feist 
were born the following children: Andrew J., the present superintendent of 
the Greendale cemetery: John, a farmer south of Greensburg, Indiana; Joseph 
P.. of Lawrenceburg; Rosa !M., who is unmarried and lives at Green>l;iurg; 
}'"rank E., deceased, and Cora E.. wife of Harry G. Eoese, who lives five miles 
north of Greensburg. , 

The paternal grandfather of Joseph Philip Feist, Paul Feist, spent his 
entire life in Germany, dving in his native land. The maternal grandfather. 



yiSH DEARBORiN'^ COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Ferdinand Lipps, ^\as a pioneer in ]\Iadison. Indiana, and died in tliat cit\'. 
He lived to rear a family of eight children, Mary, Kate, Maggie, Barbara, 
Rachel, Theresa, Mathias and John. 

Joseph 1'. Feist was reared in Lawrenceburg, and there attended 'he pub- 
lic and parochial schools. Later he entered the Cincinnati Business College 
at Cincinnati, and upon completing the course prescribed by that institution, 
took up office work at T^awrenceburg Junction, in the offices of tlie Big Four 
railroad, and was in the employ of that company continuously from i8S8 
until 1901, a period of thirteen years, at the end of which time he accepted 
a position with the Bauer Cooperage Company, which position he now holds. 

On October 29, 1S93, Joseph P. Feist was married to Clara Speiser, who 
was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, July 4, 1S67. daughter of Blasius and Barbara 
(Kreher) Speiser, to which union four daughters have been bom, Lorena, 
Martha, Frieda and Catherine. Mr.-;. Feist's parents came from the province 
of FlohenzoIIern, Germany. Having come to America in 1S66, thev located 
in Cincinnati, where the father was a cabinetmaker, and where he lived for 
six or seven years. He Located in Lawrenceburg, with his family, in 1S73, 
and died in Lawrenceburg in 1892. His widow died in June, 19 13. at the 
age of seventy. Before coming to this country Blasius Speiser served his 
time in the German army. He and his wife were brought up as Catholics, 
and were the parents of three children: Clara, wife of ^h. Feist; Charlie, of 
Aurora, this count}', and Frank, of Lawrenceburg. After locating in Law- 
renceburg. Blasius Speiser was a director in the Lawrenceburg Building Asso- 
ciation. Fraternall}", he was a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. Mrs. Feist's paternal grandfather died in Germany in middle life. 
His wife, Catherine Speiser, lived to a very old age. They had only two 
children, Blasius. ]\Irs. Feist's father, and another son, who was a prominent 
soldier in the German}' army. The maternal grandparents of ^Irs. Feist were 
Gregor and Philomina (Hipp) Kreher, who lived and died in Germany, 
Gregor Kreher having been a wealthy farmer, who held various public offices. 
He was known as a man of benevolent disposition, and gave liberallv to the 
poor. Only three of their children, Barbara, Marie ^Magdalene and Anna, 
grcAV to maturity, the remainder dying young. Mrs. Feist was reared in Law- 
renceburg. and has lived there since 1873, having lived to see wonderful 
development in all phases of life in Dearborn county. 

Mr. Feist was reared as a Catholic, but is not now identified witli that 
church. ]\Irs. Feist is a member of the Zion Evangelical church. Fraternally. 
Mr. Feist is a member of Lawrenceburg Lodge No. 4, Free and Accepted 
Masons, and also of Morning Star Lodge No. 16, Independent Order of Odd 



I .•' ...'I 



in'.( 



'f-' " li.njJ.rtrr-; -^rl] /■■T 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. /So 

Fellows, of Petersburg, Iventucky. He is a Democrat in politics. In a busi- 
ness way Mr. Feist is a director in the Progressive P.uilding and Loan Asso- 
ciation, of Lawrenceburg. 

Some men are known in the conmninity in \\ liich they live, not so much 
for the great amount of money they accumulate or the \\ calth thc}- acquire, 
Imt for their intelligence and native powers of leadership: for their f^rnial 
personal maimers and their progressive spirit. 'V man of this character is 
h-iseph Philip Feist, who is highly respected and honored by all the people of 
Dearborn county for his personal worth, his splendid moral character and his 
buo\-ant spirit. 



ORVILLE SULLIVAN JAOUITH, M. D. 

Dr. Orville Sulli\'an Jaquith, physician and surgeon of Lawrenceburg, 
this county, comes from a family which has an interesting history. He has 
one sister who married a physician, two sisters who are professional nurses 
and a brother who is a pharmacist. Dr. Jaquith was well educated for the 
medical profession, having had the advantage of the veiy best medical col- 
leges in this country. His father and mother were ardent advocates of edu- 
cation and gave all their children every advantage ■ for obtaining the very 
best possible training. Having received a good classical education. Doctor 
Jaquith then took up the preliminary training for the medical profession and 
after being graduated from a college of proved standing, was able to do 
some three years' post-graduate work. This training has admirably fitted him 
for his profession and is responsible, no doubt, for his large success as a prac- 
ticing physician since locating in Lawrenceliurg about twenty years ago. 

Born at Wright's Corner, Indiana, on September 27, 1S72, Doctor 
Jaquith is the son of Edwin L. and Ann Eliza ( Howerton ) Jaquilii. also 
natives of Indiana, who were the parents of eight children, namely: Cora, who 
lives in Indianapolis: Clementine, wdio is the wife of J. B. House, of Indianola, 
Mississippi; Iva, the wife of Dr. J. \V. House, of Indianapolis; Nellie, a pro- 
fessional nurse in Indianapolis; Dr. Orville S., of Lawrenceburg; Frank E., 
a pharmacist of ]\Iemphis, Tennessee ; Elizabeth, a professional nurse in In- 
dianapolis and Leoline, a music teacher in Indianapolis, a graduate of the 
conservator} of music at that place. 

Edwin L. Jaquith, who was the son of Sullivan and Lucy Jaquith, na- 
tives of France, was reared at Wright's Corner, Indiana, his parents having 
been early settlers of that place. He was a farmer there, the owner of two 



-frn) n 



.1; -■ .'iiijp'.l i 



790 DEARBORX COUNTY, INDIANA. 

hundred acres of land, and there he reared his family. After some of the 
children had grown to maturity, he rented out his farm and moved to Hills- 
dale, Michigan, in order that some of the children might have the advantage of 
the educational opportunities which Hillsdale College offered. After living 
in Hillsdale for some time, the family came to this cnunty, locating at Law- 
renccburg. v.here Dr. Orville S. Jaquith was already engaged in the practice 
of medicine. The father died in Lawrenceburg at the age of si.xty-seven. 
His widow, who before her marriage was Ann Eliza Howerton, is still living 
and makes her liome with her daughters in Indianapolis. Edwin L. Jaquith 
was a member of the Freewill Baptist church and his widow is a member of 
the same church. The grandparents of Doctor Jaquith, as heretofore stated, 
were nati\'es of France and rather early settlers at Wright's Corner, Indiana, 
where Sulli\'an Jaquith was a farmer and where he also conducted a general 
store. He reared a family of six children, namely: Edwin L., Ella, who 
married H. D. McMullen. of Aurora, Indiana: Sena, limma, Anna and 
Fannie. Mrs. Ann Eliza Jaquith, Doctor Jaquith's mother, is of English 
descent, and is one of a family of six children, the others being Aviary, Albert, 
George, Frank and Laurinda. 

Reared on his father's farm at Wright's Corner, Indiana, Orville S. 
Jaquith attended the district schools and subsequently the Lawrenceburg high 
school. After finishing high school, he entered ]\liami Medical College at 
Cincinnati, Ohio, and was graduated there with the class of 1897; later taking 
a post-graduate course in Rush ^ledical College and the Chicago Polyclinic 
Medical College, altogether spending three years at these latter two institu- 
tions. \\'ith the exceptiijn of the time he has spent in the Chicago institutions. 
Doctor Jac|uith has practiced medicine in Lawrenceburg ever since 1897. 

On June 15, 1900. Dr. Orville S. Jaquith was married to 3>Iaud Rinaman, 
the daug'hter of A'ictor and Lucy (Kinney) Rinaman, to which union five 
children have been born, ^lildred, Maurine, Edwin, Frances and Cornelius, 
the latter of whom died shortly after birth. ]Mrs. Jaquith was born at 
Lawrenceburg. Indiana, her father being a native of Ohio and her mother 
of New- Jersey. Her father died in 19 13 and her mother died in 1883. They 
were the parents of three children, ^Irs. Jaquith and two who died in infancy. 

Although the Jaquiths have long been itlentified with the Baptist church. 
Doctor Jaquith and wife are now members of the Church of Christ in 
Lawrenceliurg, of which Doctor Jaquith is an elder and also a teacher of the 
men's Bible class. He takes no considerable part in politics, but always votes 
in support of the Prohibition principles and the Prohibition candidates, being 
a bitter foe of the liquor traffic and the licensed saloon. . , . 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 79I 

Dr. Orville Sullivan Jarjuith is a wmlhy son of far-seeing parents, who 
made every sacrifice to give their sons and daughters the hest availahle edu- 
cational advantages. He is strongly attached to the ]iractice of medicine 
and has made a success which is a wortliy tribute to the nieniury of his de- 
parted father. Successful and respected in Dearljorn comity as a physician 
and surge>.in. Doctor Jaquith is also popular as a citizen and influential in the 
civic life of the county and city where he has so long lived. Doctor and ?ilrs. 
Jacpiith are also popular socially in Lawrenceburg and enjoy the warm es- 
teem of manv friends. ... 



JUDGE. WARREN N. HAUCK. 

Warren X. Hauck. judge of the circuit court of the seventh judicial cir- 
cuit of Indiana, comprising Dearborn and Ohio counties, is descended from 
two of the oldest families of Dearborn county. He was the son of John 
Jacob Hauck, who was mayor of the city of Lawrenceburg for many years, 
and was ver_\- pnjminent in tlie pulitical and civic life of tliis county. He 
did much toward the early fortuing of the city of Lawrencelnirg and was very 
active iti both the business and religious interests of that city. He was a 
man of great integrity and intellect; kind and charitable in his cottimunity, 
firm and just in all his decisiuns. Judge Hauck's ftither was a niciuljer of 
the home guards during the Civil War, and, as a lieutenant of a home com- 
pany, helped ward off the attack of Morgan's raiders. He made several 
trips to Europe on account of failing health, and after a long illness passed 
away on February 2, 1880. 

Judge Hauck's motlier was a woman of strong character, loved by all 
that knew her. She was \er)- actix'e in religious work and was a most de- 
\'oted wife and mother. She was responsible for the Ijeautiful home life in 
which Judge Hauck was reared. She greatly mourned the loss of her de- 
\otcd husliand, and after twenty-two years of widowhood, on Ajjril 16, 1902, 
in her eighty-third year, joined him in eternal rest. Both were devout 
Presbyterians. To them were born nine children. The first, a boy v.ho died 
in infancy; John, who now resides in Indianapolis; Jacob, deceased, who 
li\ed in Greenfield, Indiana; Caroline, widow of Daniel H. Aliller, of Law- 
renceburg; Henrietta 'SI., who resides with Judge Hauck; George F., de- 
ceased, who resided at Greenfield. Iiuliana ; Mary, who died in her eighteenth 
year; Emina C, widow of Walter V. Denton, of Aurora, Indiana, and lastly, 
\\'arren X., the subject of this sketch. 



X •■,.ll'-- 






792 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

The paternal grandparents of Judge Haiick lived in Billigheim, Germany, 
where his grandfather was nia\or fur twenty years. He was a grain dealer 
and operated a fioitring-mi!l. After being twice married, he died well ad- 
vanced in years. George X. and Anna M. (Forbter) Hornberger. tlie ma- 
ternal grandparents of Judge Hauck, were natives of Bavaria, Germany, and 
came to America in 183 1. They lived in Cincinnati imtil 1S37, then moved 
to Lawrenceburg, this county, and lived there the remainder of their lives. 
He was a prominent man in the political history of Lawrenceburg, where he 
operated a hotel for many years. George N. Hornberger was for many years 
a soldier in the French army and fought in the battle of Waterloo under 
Napoleon. 

Warren N. Hauck was born in Lawrenceburg on June 6. i860. As a 
boy he attended the public schools there, graduating with the class of 1878. 
He then went to Nelson's Business College at Cincinnati, during iSSo and 
1881, graduating there in the fall of the latter year. Immediately after- 
wards he entered Cincinnati Law School and was graduated with the class 
of 1884. In the meanitime he was also attending the ^vIcMicken, or Cincin- 
nati University, where he pursued a special course of instruction. 

In May, 1SS4, \\'arren N. Hauck was elected city attorney and served in 
that capacity about eighteen years, or until 1913. In 1885 he was appointed 
county attorney and held that office until 1908. practicing law most of the 
time while he held these offices. In 1908 he was elected a representative to 
tlie Indiana General Assembly for Dearborn county, and after serving two 
years, in 1910 was elected as joint-senator from Dearborn, Franklin and 
Ohio counties for a term of four years. While in the Legislature he intro- 
duced many bills which were enacted into laws, and which are upon the stat- 
ute books today. He was chairman of the committee on banks and trust 
companies for two sessions in the Indiana Senate and was a prominent and 
leading member of the judiciary committees in both houses of the Indiana 
General Assembly when a member. He also served as chairman of the 
Democratic senatorial caucus in 1913. He resigned as senator on ^lay 10. 
1913, to accept the appointment of judge of the seventh judicial circuit of 
Indiana, the appointment being made necessary by the vacancy created by the 
resignation of Judge George E. Downey, who became comptroller of the 
treasury of the United States. Judge Hauck was nominated and elected 
circuit judge of Dearborn and Ohio counties by the Democratic party for a 
full term of six years in November, 1914, and is now filling his first elec- 
tive term. 

No man in this section of Indiana, perhaps, has been the recipient of 



I '! (J 'K 



iriO 



.fliijT OJtl 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 795 

more frequent or greater honors than Judge Hauck. From a good beginning 
he has gradually risen to his present honorable position on the bench and it 
may be said, in all fairness, that his progress is the result of true merit, and 
that his reward has come through faithful and sincere service. 

As one of the leading Democrats of Dearborn county. Judge Hauck has 
been called upon frequently to serve as a delegate to judicial, congressional 
and state conventions. Judge Hauck served three campaigns as chairman of 
the Dearborn county Democratic central committee in 1900, 1902 and 1904 
and his infUience and support, naturally, are much sought after by candidates. 
The people of Dearborn county, especially the Democratic rank and file, be- 
lieve firmly in Judge Hauck's counsel and depend upon him for guidance. 
He is a stockholder in the Peoples National Bank, the German American Bank, 
the Lawrenceburg Gas Company, the Ohio Valley Coffin Company, and is a 
director of the Greendale cemetery. 

Judge Hauck is a worthy son of ancestors who, in their day and genera- 
tion, also served with distinction and honor in many public capacities. He 
is a man of dignified presence and of agreeable and pleasing personality, 
\cry modest, plain and unassuming in every way. 



ARTHUR THO^IAS FAGALY, M. D. 

The physician comes into the home at a time when the family is beset 
bv sorrow and distress. All look to the physician to save the life of the 
afflicted one vet a little longer, and, even when his skill and his art have failed, 
he is a good comforter in tli>" time of sorrow. The physician, who, in liis dady 
practice, is going and coming among the sick, always conscious of the noble 
ser\-ice it is possible for him to perform, is perhaps the greatest servant of 
all mankind. The physician's equipment consists, not only in science and skill, 
but in that peculiar personality which the profession develops. Dr. Arthur 
Thomas Fagaly, one of the well-known physicians of Lawrenceburg, this 
county, and one of the most skillful surgeons in this section of the state, is 
far more than a physician and surgeon. Even though Doctor Fagaly has 
scarcely reached the prime of life, by his kindly personality he has firmly es- 
tablished himself in scores of homes in Lawrenceburg and Dearborn count}'. 
Out of his care of the treatment of disease and his sympathetic regard for 
the conditions under which his labors are performed, he has built up a large 



:ii .UI'J 



794 DEARKORX COUNTY, INDIANA. 

practice in this section of Indiana and tlioroughly merits the esteem of the 
pubh'c. 

Born in HamiUon county, Oliio. ten miles from Cincinnati, on September 
8, iS/O. Arthur Thomas Fagaly moved with his parents, Wilham S. and 
Matilda \". { Cottingham) l'"agaly, to Bright, Indiana, when one year old. 
There he lived until thirteen years of age, attending the public schools and 
acquiring the rudiments of the splendid education and intellectual ecjuipment 
■which he later was to accpiire, nut only in the schools and colleges of the 
country, but in the scliool of experience. Having attended the schools of I.aw- 
renceburg, this county, until 1SS3. when he was fifteen years old, he further 
pursued his etlucation in W'ashingliin, D. C, by attending the night schoril of 
that city, pa\ing his expenses Ijv ser\ice as a page in the national House (jf Rep- 
resentatives for one year, and in the L'nited States patent office for two years. 
two years, after which he began the study of niedicine in Lawrence- 
burg. Fi\'e years later, in 1S93, he recei\'ed his diploma and the degree 
of Doctor of Aledicine fr.jm the Miami ^Medical College, and immedi- 
ately thereafter began the practice of medicine at Moundville, Missouri, 
remaining there for one year, at the end of which time he located at Man- 
chester, Indiana, where he remained for two years, following which he re- 
turned to Lawrenceburg, in 1896, and there established the office and prac- 
tice which he has since maintained. Doctor Fagalv is a member of the Dear- 
born County ^Medical Societx" and the Indiana State Medical .Vssociation and 
is prominent in both organizations. Year by \'ear his practice has grown, 
and although, as heretofore noted, he is a comparative!}- young man, he never- 
theless has been engaged in the practice of his profession in the city of 
Lawrenceburg for almost twenty years, and is nriw well established in this 
county. 

Dr. Arthur Thomas I"agal\'s father, who was a native of Hamilton 
county, Ohio, and was reared a farmer in that county, during his earl\- man- 
hood combined the occupation of farmer and the profession of school teacher, 
working on the farm during the summers and teaching in the winters; l;iter. 
for a period, being engaged in the general mercantile business at Bright, tliis 
county. In 1883 he was appointed deputy county auditor and ser\ed in that 
public capacity for eight years, after which he was engaged in the grocer}' 
business until 1906, in which year he was elected county auditor and for eight 
years very efficienth- administered the affairs of that important oflice. Mr. 
Faga!}- is now living retired in the city of Lawrenceburg. Mrs. Fagaly. 
mother of Doctor Fagaly, was born in Dearborn county, daughter of Thomas 
and Eliza (Stoms) Cottingham, early settlers of this county, who came from 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 795 

"Maryland wlien f|uitc young. Her paternal g-randfatlier, I'^rancis Nelson, 
wa'i a kinsman of Lord Xelson, llie hero of Trafalg;ir. Mrs. h'ag'aly passed 
away on October jo. 1912, at the age of sixty-four. She was the mother of 
si.K children, as follow: Dr. Arthur Thomas Fagal_\, of Lawrcnceburg; Roy, 
of North Bend, Ohio; }ilabe1, who married Ezra P. Hayes, of Lawrencehurg: 
riuy N., of Burnside, Kentucky; Carey, of Lawrencehurg. and Edward ]\I., of 
Cincinnati. 

The Fagaly family, whnse name originally was spelled \'oegele, ami 
which is of German origin, was founded in this count)- b}- George T'agaly, the 
paternal great-grandfather of Doctor 3*1. Fagaly. Born and reared in Ger- 
many, he settled in ^Maryland u[)on his arrival in America and there he spent 
the remainder of his life. His widow, Rosahe, came West with her family 
and settled at Cincinnati, in that now populous city's village da}-s, where ^he 
became the owner of ten acres of land on the site of wliat is now the corner 
of Fifth and Mound streets. Later the family removed to the c<juntry and 
there she died. John Fagaly, one of the sons of George and Rosalie h^agaly. 
married ]Mary T. Stuart, a native of this county, and was the grandfather 
of Doctor Fagalw jolm Fagah' was born in ]!\laryland and earlv was a 
meat packer. Later he became a farmer in tlamilton county. Ohio, and 
died in 1863. at the age of fifty-six years. Flis wife, win; was a daughter of 
William and ^lary (Tate)' Stuart, died in 1S90. at the age of eighty. She 
was tlie mother of eleven children, seven of whom grew to maturity, as fol- 
low : George W., James H.. Rosalie E., Francis M.. John L.. Flizaljelh and 
William S. William Stuart, after serving \aliantly as a soldier in the War 
of 1S12, married ]Man- Tate, daughter of Doctor Tate, who was a surgeon in 
the patriot army during the Revolutionary War, and l^ecame a pioneer in 
Dearljorn county. His wife lived to be one hundred and four years of age 
and was accidentally burned to death. 

On ^Larch 22, 1S94, one year after Doctor Fagaly's graduation from the 
medical college and two years before he established himself in the practice of 
medicine at Lawrencehurg, he was married to Tillie L. Oester, daughter of 
Nicholas and Eliza ( Loheide) Oester, to which union has been born one son, 
William J. Mrs. Fagaly, who was born at Aurora, this county, is the daugh- 
ter of native-born German parents, who are now both deceased, but who lived 
to rear a family of eight children, namely : Mary, Louise, W'illiam, Charles, 
Emma, Lena, Tillie and Lilly. 

Doctor Fagaly belongs to Lawrencebiirg Lodge No. 4, Free and Accepted 
Masons, as does also his father, W^illiam S. Fagaly, who also belongs to Chap- 
ter No. 56, Royal Arch ^lasons. The Fagaly family is well known in this 



796 DEARBORN COUNTY^ INDIANA. 

section and Doctor Fagaly, at the Iieginning of his career, had the responsi- 
bility of sustaining the high reputation and honoral^le standing of a worthy 
fatlier. It is not too much to say tliat he has worthily fulfilled this respon- 
sibility, not only as a physician and surgeon, but as a citizen of Dearborn 
county. 



JOSEPH SCHLEICHER. 

The attention of the reader is now directed to a short biographical sketch 
of Joseph Schleicher, well-known grocer of Lawrenceburg, this county, whose 
business bears the firm style of Schleicher Brothers. The family is an old 
one in the history of Lawrenceburg, and one which has taken a leading part 
in community affairs. Joseph Schleicher's father was one of the earliest and 
most progressive manufacturers of this district and over a goody stretch of 
years did much to enhance the commercial interests of the city. 

Joseph Schleicher was born in Grccndale. this county, on August i, i^^J. 
a son of Adam and Louise (Meier) Schleicher, both natives of the Geriii.ui 
empire, the former of whom came from Saxeweimer and the latter from Han- 
over. They were the parents of three sons and nine daughters, eight of the 
children living to maturity. These were Louise (deceased), who was the 
wife of Charles Kepper: Sarah and Alice, both unmarried, and the latter a 
teacher in the public schools of Denver, Colorado; Charles, of [Mobile. Alabama, 
and Emma, wife of Doctor J. D. Terrill, of the same city. There was als'j 
Adelia, who died uinnarried at the age of twenty-three years, and George, 
who for many years was a partner in the grocery business with his brriilier 
Joseph, the immediate subject of this sketch. Georg'e died on Deccmljcr 10, 
1914, leaving his widow, who was Anna Matilda Israel, before her marrir'ge, 
and three daughters, Elizabeth, Margaret and Mary, all of whom renriir. 
unmarried and are teachers in the public schools of Anderson, this state. 
George Schleicher was four years the senior of Joseph, and their partnership 
continued uninterruptedly over a period of thirty-three years. His widow 
is a daughter of Charles and Anna Elizabeth (Niklaus) Israel, her father a 
native of Germany and her mother of Switzerland. Both spent their last 
days in Lawrenceburg. the father dying at the age of eightv-four and the 
mother at the age of eighty-seven. There were in their famih' but three 
children. ^Irs. George Schleicher and two brothers, botii of whom died nn 
married. 

Adam Schleicher recei\-ed an excellent education in his youth and re- 



;.J 



■•■.■,b ■ 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 797 

mained in his native land until he was twenty-eiglit years of ag;e. He ini- 
grated to America in 1S48, landing- in Xew York City, where he worked for 
.a short time, later residing for a while in Xew Orleans and Cincinnati. It 
was in the year 1S50 that he arri\ed in Lawrenccburg and located per- 
manently. Together with several other enterprising citizens he organi.^ed 
tiie old Miami Valley Furniture Company. A large factory was erect^-d and 
Mr. Schleicher was actively engaged in the manufacture of furniture from 
1868 to 1890, when he retired and sold the building to the James-Meyer 
Buggy Company. Mr. Scheicher passed away in Lawrcnceburg in 180S, at 
the age of seventy-eight and his widow still survives at the advanced age of 
eighty-six Both were reared in the Lutheran faith, but upon coming to 
America they allied themselves with the Methodist Episcopal church, ])r<r.-in.g 
faithful and devout members of the same. Adam Schleicher's parents were 
Justine and Elizabeth (Stutz) Schleicher, for whom he sent after ha\ing lie- 
come well established in this country. They reached Lawrcnceburg in 1S54 
and lived the balance of their lives in that city, both dying at a good old age. 
He was a machinist and builder and was successful in his labors. Their 
children were: Adam, Joseph, George, Christian, ^^'illiam, Henry and Eliza- 
beth. 

Joseph Schleicher's maternal grandparents were AVilliam and Evangeline 
(Banker) Meier, both natives of Germany, the former of whom immigrated 
to America in 1837, the latter following him two years later. For a short 
time they remained residents of Cincinnati, but tiring of city life, they came 
to Dearborn countv and found a suitable location in Clay township, where 
they lived out the remainder of their allotted days. They had been farn-iers 
in the old country and were successful in their venture in the new land. Will- 
iam Meier passed from life at the advanced age of eight)'-six years and his 
wife at the age of seventy-five, having been born in 1807. To them were 
born the following children: Louise, mother of Joseph Schleicher; Sophia, 
Catherine, Henry, Christian, John, Edward and Andrew. 

Joseph Schleicher has passed his entire life in Lawrcnceburg. Fie re- 
ceived his education in the public schools of that city, attending at the time 
Prof. John C. Ridpath was superintendent, and after his school days were 
over went to work in the factory of the !Miami Valley Furniture Company as 
a cabinetmaker, continuing thus engaged from 1873 to 18S2, in which latter 
year he formed a partnership with his brother. George, and the two embarked 
in the grocer}' business, remaining thus connected until the death of the latter, 
a period of thirty-three years, as above stated. Mr. Schleicher has never 
niarried, and he lives with his sister, Sarah, and his aged mother in the old 



liJ- . ■ ■ ■! - J/iJ 



;! '.■' ■) 



79S DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

family homestead. In politics, he gives his support to the Reiaiblican party, 
and, religiouslv, he is a German Methodist. The Schleicher famil\- lias 
always been considered one of the foremost in the city of Lawrencebiirg'. 
standing for all that makes upright and honored manhood and advancing the 
welfare of the community whencxer possible. 



.'■•' ■ WILLIAM H. KIMBALL. ••. • 

The subject of tin's sketch is descended from good old Xew England 
ancestry, who settled at .Aurora when that city was very small, and he has 
been well rewnrded for his loyalty and interest in the place of liis birth. Me 
has prospered beyond the average, and at a little past middle age is enabled 
to retire from an active life and enjoy his remaining days in quiet and cuni- 
fort. 

William H. Kimball was born on November 12, 1856. in the same town- 
ship where he now resides, and is a son of Ira and Catharine f Bruce) Kim- 
ball. He grew up on tlie same farm entered by his father from the govern- 
ment, and on which he lived \uitil about fort\' \'ears old. yir. Kimball has 
followed farming all his life. He is a member of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellou'S, both suliordiuate lodge and encampment. 

Ira Kimljall, father of the immediate subject of this sketch, was born lai 
June 21, 1807, at Concord, Xew Hampshire, and came to Aurora with his 
parents, Timothy and Elizabeth Kimball, aljout 1826. They settled on the 
Aurora and ^loores Hill pike in Hogan township, remaining there mitil tli.^\- 
died. Ira Kimball and his sister each entered government land, and Ira settled 
on the farm where James \Y. Clements now resides. When they first went to 
housekeeping, thev had no furniture, and their beds were made of dvv leaves 
raked up on the ground in a little log cabin the first winter. They soon 
became more prosperous, and built a better house, and it was on that same 
farm that Ira Kimball established his home amid pioneer conditions. Jlis 
was the last tract of government land in Dearborn county. ]\Ir. Kimliall w.'is 
a carpenter by trade, and he and his father used to go south during the wir.tor 
and do carpenter work, returning in the summer. His wife, Catherine 
(Bruce) Kimball, was born in Hogan township, and was a sister of Martin 
Bruce, whose sketch, on another page of this volume, tells of her parentage. 
She was the mother of five children. 

W'illiam H. Kimball was united in marriage in November, 1886, with 



- DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 799 

T-ouisa Hoiijiinire. daughter of Ernest and Catherine (Meyers) Hoppniire. 
Slic was born in Manchester townsliip, Dearborn county. 

Ernest and Catlierine (JMe^'ers) Hoppniire, parents of ^Irs. W'ilUam M. 
Kimljall, were natives of Germany. They at first h\XHl in Manchester town- 
sln'p, and later mo\"ed to Ilogan townsh.ij), where they spent the remainder 
of their h\'es. 

Mr. Kimball is one of the liest known residents of Hogan lownsh.ip. hav- 
ing lived there all his life, and has man\" loyal friends throughout the com- 
munity. He at present makes his home with Mr. William Shuter. 



JOHN F. HOUS:\IYER. 



No people that go to make up our cosmopolitan population have better 
habits of life than those who came originally from Germany. The descend- 
ants of those people are distinguished for their thrift and honesty and these 
two qualities alone in the inhabitants of any country, will in the end m.ike 
that country great. When these two cjualities are coupled with sound judg- 
ment, the result is a man whose life is well-balanced and who meets the va- 
rious issues of life squarely and conquers the obstacles that arise in his path. 
Of this class of men John F. Housmyer, the immediate subject of this sketch, 
may safely be said to be one. 

John F. ILjusmyer is a native of the Hoosier state, born in Ohio couni_\-, 
April 13, 1856, a son of Christian K. and Louisa (^Vlarsh) Housmyer, both 
nf \vhom were nati\'es of Hanover, Germany. Christian was born in 182^, 
and when fifteen years of age immigrated to America. He had recei\ed his 
education in his native lanil, so the years of his life here were entirel)' devote<l. 
to labor. For a short time he remained in Baltimore, Ivlaryland, later coming 
to this section where were many of his people. He settled in Cresar Creek 
township on the Hayes Brancli and lived there for ten years. When twenty- 
five years of age he was united in marriage with Louisa (3.1arsh) Niebaum, 
who had come to this country from Germany when a mere girl. She became 
the wife of Mr. Xiebaum, who died soon after their marriage, and she then 
became the wife oi Christian K. Housmyer. 

To Christian Housmyer and wife were born four children. Henry, Eliza- 
beth. Mary and John F. Flenry chose Grace Schuffitt for his wife; Elizabeth 
became the wife or Henry Ehlers and the mother of nine children, John, 
Charles, Louis, Ernest, Fred, Henry, Mary, Laura and Harry, Mary became 



800 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

the wife of Henry Housmyer, who died within a few years, when she married 
for her second husband Charles Landvernieyer. 

The paternal grandparents were Christopher and Amelia (Housmyer) 
Housmyer, botli born in Germany where they remained until near middle 
age, when they immigrated to the b'nited States and settled in Dearljorn coun- 
ty, where they obtained eighty acres of government land at a cost of one 
dollar and fifty cents per acre, and on that farm they lived their remaining 
days. The}- were the parents of four children, Fred, Louisa, Christian and 
Mary. Fred chose Louisa Blanke for his wife and she bore him a family of 
riine children, Elizabeth, Lena, Henr}-, William, Mary, John. Einma. Sophia 
and ^laggie. Louisa married John Cline and became the mother of seven 
children. Elizabeth, Lena. Hcniy, Mary, ^Minnie, William and Fred. ^lary 
became Mrs. Garrett Westmeyer and had seven children, Louisa, Elizabeth, 
Henry, Christ. Emma, Sophia and Minnie. 

John F. Flousmyer receiveil his educatirm in the district schools of Ohio 
county, and by the time his studies were over he had been educated in both 
German and English. Then for a few years he assisted his father in the 
work of the farm home, in this way mastering the secrets of successful hus- 
bandry- and when twenty-two years of age he made his first purchase of land. 
This was a farm of one hundred and thirty acres, costing thirty-five hundred 
dollars. He lived there for three years, when he sold it and purchased a 
tract of one hundred and sixteen acres near Dillsboro, in Clay township. He 
later purchased thirty-six additional acres and on that land has continued to 
make his home. He carries on. general farming, giving considerable atten- 
tion to the raising of live stock, which he finds a lucrative side line. 

John F. Housmyer was married on March 14, 1878, to Amelia Sieker- 
man, daughter of Flenry and Clara (Flehe) Siekerman, both of whom were 
•natives of Germany and came when young to this countr}', where they met and 
were married. They located in Ripley county, where th.ey farmed for a 
■number of years. Mr. Siekerman's death occurred on September 6, 1905, 
at the advanced age of ninety-cme years. There were six children in their 
family : George, Amelia. Charles. Theodore, Lewis and Etlward. George 
married Elvina Xintrup and had seven children, Albert, Otto, Earl, 
Elnora, Theodore, Stella and Emma. Theodore married ]\Iary Nintrup 
and had two children, Pearl and Clyde. Louis married Flossie Faulver and 
had two children, Mabel and Ralph. Edward married Lula Prusse and had 
two children, Alabel and Clermont. Amelia Siekerman was born on October 
27, 1861, in Ripley county, and received her education in its district schools. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Housmyer have been born four children, Charles, Lula, 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 8o I 

Clara and Eva. Charles married Miriam Spicknal and they lived at Farmers 
Retreat. They have one son, Leonard. Lulu became the wife of I'red Fis.sc. 
of Versailles, Ripley county. Clara married George Longkamp. Eva re- 
mains at home with her parents. 

Mr. Housniyer is a public-spirited man who takes a keen interest in j^ub- 
lic affairs, particularl}- pertaining' to his own community. He is a stanch 
suppoiter of the Republican party and has filled with efficiency and satisfac- 
tion to all the position of road supervisor for two terms and that of town- 
ship trustee of Clay township for si.x; years. He is a faithful member of the 
Lutheran church, giving liberally of his means toward its support and giving 
also much of his time toward the furtherance of its interests. He has served 
his local church in an official capacity and his influence counts for good in 
whatever question is at issue. During his long and industrious career he has 
not only gained the confidence of those with whom he has transacted busi- 
ness, but as a man of force of character, upright and honest in his dealings 
with his fellow-men, he has "-ained the esteem of all who know him. 



CLAREXXE ]\I. SHOCKLEY. 

Conspicuous among the leading and enterprising citizens of Moores Hill, 
Indiana, stands Clarence M. Shockley, whose entire life has been interwoven 
with the history of Ripley and Dearborn counties, in both of which he has been 
greatly interested in all matters of atlvantage and advancement of pul>lic 
interest. He has wielded a force beyond that of the average citizen, because 
of his strong belief in the fact that it is the man who makes the town, and 
not the town who makes the man. 

Clarence ]\L Shockley was born April 6, 1S78, at ]\Iilan, Ind., and a son 
of Elijah and Lydia (Shockley) Shockley. He was educated at the graded 
schools of Ripley county, and at Moores Hill College. After leaving school 
he taught in the public schools of Ripley county for four years, and in 1901 
became the editor of the Riplc\ County Journal, which was published at Os- 
good, in Ripley county. This was the official Democratic organ, and he 
edited it for a period of fi\e years, and in 1906 gave up the management to 
take the position of cashier in the Moores Hill State Bank, in which he is also 
a stockholder, and which position he still holds. Mr. Shockley has always 
.given his earnest support to the Democratic party. He is a member of the 
school board of Moores Hill, a trustee of Moores Hill College, and is a 

(51) 



802 DEARBORN COUXTY, INDIANA. 

member of the [Methodist Episcopal church, of wliich he is church treasurer. 
Pie belongs to the Masons and the Independent Order of Foresters. 

Elijah Shockley was born on March 24, 1B32, at Milan, Indiana, and 
recei\'ed his education in that section of the comity. After leaving school he 
assisted his father on the farm. Later he started out in life for himself and 
bou.eht sevent}-nine acres, to which he later arkled fifty acres more, and has 
farmed all his life. He is still living, hale and hearty, at the age of eighty- 
three years. He has been a life-liiug Deni'jcrat, attending the countv councils, 
and has always been interested in all public endeavors in behalf of good 
roads. He is a ]Mason. His wife, Lydia (Shockley) Shockley, was born 
on November 6, 1838, at ]\Iilan, Indiana, and is a daughter of George and 
Eliza (GoldenJ Shockley. She was educated at Milan, and li\'ed there all 
her life. This uni(.>n has been blessed with seven children, Everett, Edwin, 
Leona, Addie, Clarence ]M., Lillian and one who died in infaiicy. Everett 
was married to Anna Laws, and is living at Milan. They have had one 
child, T'"rank. Mrs. Shockle}- died, and Mr. Sliockley married, secondly, 
Emma Gre\', a widow. They have one adopted girl, Pauline. Edwin mar- 
ried Alice r.rewington, and is living at Fort Worth, Texas, where he is en- 
gaged in the teleplione and telegraph liusiness. They ha\'e two children. 
Hazel Goldah and Myrle. Leona became the wife of Le\i B. Lewi? and is 
living near Milan on a farm. They have one child, Ethel INIay. Addie is 
the wife of John X. Ward, who is a druggist at Indianapolis. They have 
two children, Clarence X. and Beulah. Lillian became the wife of Clarence 
E. Laws, and lives near ]\lilan. They ha\e one child, Alene. 

The paternal grandfather was A\'illiam Xoble Shockle\-, and his wife 
was Elizabeth (Livingston) Shockley. The former was born in Maryland 
and came to Ripley county when past' middle age. taking land from the 
government, on which he li\ed and died. He was a stanch Democrat, and a 
member of the Baptist church, and his fraternal alliance was with the Masonic 
order. His wife, Elizabeth (Livingston) Shockley, was also a native of 
Maryland, where she was married. She died in Ripley county, Indiana, as 
did also her husband. They were die parents of twelve children. George, 
Theodore, Sarah (Mrs. Chatfield), Susan (Mrs. Spaulding), Lulu (Mrs. 
Hathaway), ^Margarette (Airs. Bowers). William, Elijah, and four who died 
in infancy. 

The paternal great-grandfather of Clarence M. Shockley was Elijah 
Shocklc}-, uhu was a son of Benjamin Sh'jckley. of Revolutionary fame. 
Benjamin Shockley emigrated from England to Alaryland during Colonial 



' DEARBORX COUNTY, INDIANA. 803 

times. He lived and died in [Maryland, as did also his son, lilijah. The 
Shockleys were ardent supporters of the Revolutionary cause. 

The maternal grandfather of our subject was George Shnckle\-, and 
his wife was Eliza (Golden) Shocklcy, who was a native of New Jersey. 
They came west and died in Ripley county, Indiana, leaving eight children. 
Calvin, Lydia, William, John, Anna, Dallas and two who died in inf;incy. 

Clarence ^l. Shockley was united in marriage on April 25, 1900. with 
Melissa ]\I. Bell, daughter of James W. and Elizabeth (Roland) Bell. She 
was born on A]'>ril 17, 18S.2. near Elrod, Ripley county, Indiana, where she 
was educated and lived urUil her marriage. This union has been blessed with 
two children, Leroy A\'allace, born on Jainiary 23, 1901, and Evelyn Maude, 
April 26, 1904. 

James and Elizabeth ( Roland) Bell were both natives of Riplev count}-, 
where [Mr. Bell followed the carpenter's trade. 

Mr. Shocklev, through bis jierseverance and well-applied energy, has 
won the confidence and high esteem both of his associates in business and 
his fellow townsmen, and is well fitted for the high position which he occupies 
in the Moores tlill State Bank. ■ ■ 



PROF. ANDREW J. BIGNEY. 

Great credit is due to the members of tiie teaching profession in Dearborn 
county, and especially to those associated with [Moores Hill College, whose 
influence is so far-reaching. These men have the responsibility <_if the char- 
acter-building and the future of the students, who are to occU[iy their indi- 
vidual places in society, and it is doubtful whether the public fidly realizes 
that the burden resting upon the shoulders of the heads of successful colleges 
is not a light one. 

Andrew Johnson Eigney was born on February 15, 1S64, on a farm oue 
and one-half nr'lcs north of Moores Hill, and is a son of Lemuel rind Sar.ah 
(Vandoren) Eigney. Fie was educated at the district schools of Dearb'jrn 
county, and was also a graduate of [Moores Hill College in iSSS, after which 
he attended Johns Flopkins University, of Baltimore, from 1892 to 1894. 
and then took up a course of studies at the marine laboratories of Oal; Bluff. 
[Martha's Vineyard, an island off the coast of [V[assachusetts, and at Woods 
Flole, [Massachusetts, at intei-vals during the period from 1902 to 191 1, the 
latter place being located seventy miles south of Boston, and were both gov- 
ernment laboratories. After graduating he entered the facultv of [Mr'.re's 



804 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Hill College, in the deparlnieut of science, and at the end of the fourth year, 
in 1893, he became assistant in the department of biology at the Johns Hop- 
kins University, of Baltimore, and in 1894, he returned to Moores Hill, where 
he gave instruction in biology anfl geology, and in 1901 he was made vice- 
president of Moores Hill College, which office he held until November, 191 5. 
when he became president. Air. Bigney is greatl_\- interested in religious 
matters, and is a member of the ]vlcthodist Episcopal church, in which he 
holds the office of trustee on the official board, and has officiated as Sunday 
school superintendent for the past twenty years. In 190S Professor Bigney 
represented his church at the general conference at Baltimore. 

Lemuel and Sarah ( \'an<liiren) Bigney, parents of the immediate sub- 
ject of this sketch, were natives of Xova Scotia and Xew Jersey, respectively 
The former was l)orn on P'ebruary 22, 1826, in Xova Scotia, and was edu- 
cated in the district schools, coming to Boston at the age of thirteen, after 
which he came west to Moores Hill by wagon. He remained on tiie fnrm 
and assisted his father until his father's death, when he bought the old 
homestead and lived on it until 1894, when he retired and moved to ]\Ioores 
Hill, Indiana, living there until his death, which occurred on September 11, 
1900. at the age of seventy-four \ears. Mr. Bigney was a Dem(icrat. He 
participated in the Mexican War. under General Scott, being located at Mex- 
ico City, and was the one who first raised the American flag over tliat city. 
His parents were Peter and Margarette Bigney.' His wife, .Sarah ( Vandoren ) 
Bigney, was born on Xovember 13, 1831, in Somerset county. Xew Jersey, 
where she was reared, coming to Franklin, near Cincinnati, Ohio, and was 
married on April 25, 1855. Lemuel and Sarah Bigney were the pa^-ents 01 
eleven children: Verado W., ?iIarion E.. Windfield S., Andrew J., Etta ^l.. 
Clara B., Jacob V., and four who died in infancy. 

Verado \V. Bigney was married to Minnie Wolf, and lives at Sunman, 
Indiana, where he owns a drug" store. They had three children, Walter, 
Lynn and Merwin, the latter being killed in an accident in 19 15. Marion E. 
was united in marriage with Rose Tanner, and is living at Moores Hill. They 
have two children, Harry and Edna. Winfield S. was married to Zcila 
Brewington, and lives at Moores Hill on a farm. They have two children, 
Leslie and Altra. Etta M. is the wife of George M. Smith, and is living at 
Evansville, Indiana, where Mr. Smith is district superintendent of the E\ans- 
ville Methodist Episcopal church. They have had two children, Combie and 
one who died in infancy. They also have an adopted child, Iva. Clara B. 
became the wife of Dr. David E. Johnston, a prominent physician, and li\-es at 



yii r jii, viiii-.rjT! 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. ' 805 

IMoores Hill. They have one child, Anna. Jacob V. wa.s married to Mat- 
tie Laws, and is living on the old homestead. They have two children, 
l'~d\in and Eula Belle. 

The paternal grandparents were Peter and Margaret Bigney. Peter 
Bigney was born on Prince Edward Island, and immigrated to the United 
States, settling near !Moorcs Ilill, on eighty acres of land, where he lived un- 
til his death, about 1850. The farm on which he settled was virgin forest 
and. had to be cleared before it could be put under cultivation. His wife, 
Margaret Bigney, was also a nati\e of Prince Edward Island, and was mar- 
ried there aliout the }ear iSoo. They were the parents of nine children: 
James, Peter, Eemuel, Rosel, Belle T., one who was drowned while coming 
to the United States, and three who died in infancy, 

Andrew J. Bigney was united in marriage on September 2, iSg6, with 
Carrie Ewan, daughter of Napoleon Bonaparte Ewan and Mary (Bill)' Ewan. 
She was born nn May 29. 1869. five miles east of IMoores Hill. She is an 
earnest member (.>f the ^vlethodist Episcopal church, and a good Christian 
woman. No children have come to bless this iuii(in. 

Napoleon Bn'iiriparte Ew.'tn, fatlier of ^.Irs. Bignev, was born near Ab.iores 
Hill, on a farm, April 2},. 1S44. He divided his attention between farming 
and school teaching, and lived in "Sparta township all his life. His wife, 
^Nlarv (Bill) Ewan. was a nati\'c of .Msace-Lorraine, Germanw She was born 
on Xnvemlier 20, 1843, contiiig to America while }oung. Her parents set- 
tled first in Ohin. coming later to Dearborn comity. The_\- had four children. 
Carrie, Laura, Mary and Charles, deceased. Laura Ewan became the wite 
of Charles McClure, and is living at Starkville, Colorado, where her husband 
is a practicing physician. Thev have three children. ]Mary Ellen. Alfred 
Marce and Ilarlin Ewan. 

Prof. Andrew J. Bigne^■ has taught two-thirds of all the graduates of 
Moores Hill College, instructing three luindred and eleven out of four hun- 
dred and fifty-one graduates and in addition about four thousand umler- 
graduates and. with his life devoted to the noble work of teaching, he is 
wielding a force to be felt throughout future generations. His connectiun with 
Moores Hill College covers a period of twenty-five years, with the exception 
of two years. Aside from his duties as president of the college, he de- 
dcv(ites some time to delivering lectures in teachers' county institutes, and 
also lectures at high sch01.1l ccimmencements, and his services are in great 
demaiul and his ability as a lecturer on educational and religious topics gen- 
erallv recosnized. 



8o6 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

JA:\1ES FREDERICK TREOX, M. D. 

Although modest and retiring in manner. Dr. James Frederick Treon, 
still a young man, is one of the most successful men in his profession. Tlie 
skill and composure with which he handles his cases, do much toward winning 
the confidence of his patients, without which a physician is greatly handi- 
capped in the progress of his work. His reputation as one well informed in 
his profession has reached in e\ery direction, far beyond the limits of his 
home town, and he is well established in a valuable practice. Coming from 
a family of physicians for generations back, he naturally takes to his pro- 
fession with an interest, the result of which can only be of benefit to those 
requiring his services. 

James Frederick Treon was born on June 30, iSSo, in Aurora, Indiana, 
where he now resides. He'is a son of Frederick and America Cerella (Lamb) 
Treon. He was reared at Aurora, and was graduated from the high school 
of that place, in i8Sg, after which he entered the Medical College of Ohio, 
graduating in 1903. His office for general practice was immediately es- 
tablished at Aurora. Indiana, where he has since remained. He and his wife 
are earnest members of the Presbyterian church, in which he officiates as an 
elder. Dr. Treon is a Democrat, and is a member of, and officer in various 
societies, namely: Aurora Lodge No. 51, Free and Accepted Masons: Aurora 
Chapter No. 13, I\oyal Arch Masons: Aurora Commandery No. 17. Knights 
Templar: Alurat Temple. Noble=. of the ^Mystic Shrine: Harmony Lodge 
No. 69, Knights of Pythias. He is a member of the Coimty ]\Iedical So- 
ciety, as well as being secretary of the city board of health, and is a United 
States pension examiner. 

Frederick Treon, lather of the subject of this sketch, was born on Au- 
gust 12, 1S55, in Shelby county, Indiana, where lie received a common-school 
education, graduating from the Franklin Academy, after which he completed 
a special course in geometry, trigonometry, and civil and mechanical engi- 
neering with Hasklin & Barker, at ]^Iichigan City, and later took a course 
in the study of drugs, and in 1877 he entered the Ohio Medical College, from 
which institution he was graduated and received his diploma on March i, 
1879, when he immediately entered into a professional partnership with Dr. 
James Lamb, his father-in-law, at Aurora, and remained there until he en- 
tered the Indian service, under Cleveland's administration, with headquarters 
in South Dakota. For a number of years. Doctor Treon retained his resi- 
dence and voted at Aurora, but for the past several years he has been prac- 
ticing at Chamberlain, South Dakota, where he now makes his permanent 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 867 

residence, and where he liolds the office of president of the Stale ^fedical So- 
ciolv, and is vice-president of the Railway Sin-geons' Association. Doctor 
Tret III was married on May 29, 1S78, to America Cerella Lanil), daughter of 
Dr. James and Sarali A. Lamti, her hirth occurring- on April 30, I'S.i". 
Their onl}-'clii!d \\'as James Frederick. Dr. Frederick 'IVeon has always 
hcen a loyal and active memher of the Democratic party, and is past eminent 
grand commander of the Grand Commandery, Knights Templar, of S'luih 
Dakota, and is also a thirty-second-degree. Scottish Rite Mason. 

The paternal grandfather. .Vndrew Treon, was born on .-Vpril 27, 1804, 
in Lebanon count}', Pennsylvania, in the same house where his father was 
born. Andrew Treon first studied medicine under Dr. John Treon, of !\[iam- 
isburg, Ohio, who continued his practice for a period of about sixty-six years. 

Dr. Andrew Treon was twice married, his second wife being Lydia 
Steinberger. She was bom on ]May 6, 1822, in Bartholomew countv, In- 
diana. Dr. Andi'ew Treon and his wife were early settlers near Shelb)\'ille, 
Indiana, where they lived to a good old age. Their children were: Frederick, 
Elizabeth Lytic, Rebecca, and Kiser, who died young. 

The maternal grandfather was Dr. James Laml), who was born on Feb- 
ruary 15, 1818, on Oil Creek, \'enango county. Pennsylvania, and was a son 
of David H. and Margaret (Kidd) Lamb. He was married in November, 
184 1, to Sarah A. Carnine, of Switzerland county, Indiana. Both his grand- 
mothers were of Scotch-L"ish descent. His parents mo\'cd from Pennsyl- 
vania to Jefferson county, Lidiana, in 1827. Doctor Lamb settled in Dear- 
born county, in 1866, where he practiced medicine up to the time of his death, 
which occiu'red in 1894, at the age of seventy-six years. Doctor Lamb cast 
his first vote for General FTarrison in 1S40. Fie and his wife were earnest 
members of .the Presbyterian church. Mrs. Lamb died aged about sixty- 
fi\e years. They had five children ; A.merica CercUa, Elvina, Lamartine K., 
Kossuth, and one who died young. 

Dr. James Frederick Treon was united in marriage, June 19, 1907, with 
Margaret C. Coleman, daughter of Joseph S. and Abagail E. (Burgess) 
Coleman. ^Irs. Treon was born on September 5, 1884, at Huntington, In- 
diana, and is the mother of three children, Joseph F., Kathryn E. and Flen- 
rietta C. 

Joseph S. and Abagail (Burgess) Coleman, parents of Mrs. Treon, were 
born near Ft. Wayne, Indiana, and have lived at Aurora for the past fif- 
teen years. Mr. Coleman is a manufacturer of wheels and spokes. 

Dr. Treon and wife have a large number of warm personal friends, and 
their home is the scene of much cordial hospitality. 



8c8 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

GEORGE JOHXSTOX. 

No history of Dearborn county would be complete without specific men- 
tion of George Johnston, one of the county's most fiMceful pioneers, a scIimI- 
arly man and a true ■"gentleman of the old schnnl." who exeried a ver\' wide 
influence for <;0(jd in the fLirni;.iti\e da\s i>f tlh^ eniiiniunit}'. George loh.n- 
ston had ser\-ecl as pri\ate secretary to Gen. William Henr) flarrison, g<jv- 
ernor of Iniliana Terrib ir_\-. at V'inceimes. during the truuhlr.us davs of i^^ii 
ami 1812, when America wa.- fighting its seci:ind war fcir independence against 
Englan.d, and had thus taken his place amr)iig the great hisl<.ir}' makers nf 
that i>eriud. When later he came {o this count)-, his quiet forcefuhiess of 
character made him a natm'al social leader and it is undoubted that he exerted 
a very beneficial influence duruig the earls days of the community. Thoiigh 
it is not km.iun that George Johnston ever attended a se.->S!on of schiiol a 
single day in hi^ lite, he was b_\- natiu'e a profound student and, bv sedul'ius 
and ccinscientious application, became a singidarK" scliolarh man for' hi. -^ day 
and generation, whrilly self-taught ; therefore, when he entereil ui;on his 
careL-r a^ a teacher of tlte yoiuh oi this section h.e wa-^ jierforming a most 
valuable ser\-ice to the new ci:immttnity. a ser\ice whicii did not end with his 
death, but goes on and on. being reflected to this day in the cultural life of 
Dearborn county. For tliis reas(_in. it is especially fitting that in this volume 
of the liistor}- i_if Dearborn county there should be jiresentcd the following 
brief memorial of this gallant old pioneer. 

George Johnston was Vv^vn near the city of Winchester, \'irginia, on ]Mav 
23. 1790, the third son of David and Elizabeth (Kyle) Johnston, tlte former 
of whom died in ijyifi. Thus bereft of a father at the tender age of ^ix, 
George Johnston grew up singularly self-reliant .tiid \ery early began helping 
his brothers and his widowed mother to "get along." As a lio\- he worlced in 
the L'ewis Xea! flour-mill, near the Johnston hoine. and also learned the shoe- 
maker's trade, at which he worked for some time in \'irginia. There is no 
evidence in the family pa[)ers, or in the traditions of the familv. that George 
Johnston ever .-ittended school anywhere, yet he early acquired an excellent 
education. His mother taught him to read and his eager and receptive mind 
needed no such si)ur as the cold formalities of a schoid room to lead him on 
in the paths of learning. In mathematics, particularly, he excelled, though in 
all the general branches of learning he acquired, by reading, a good work- 
ing knowledge. 

In 1S09, George Johnston then being nineteen years of age, the Widow 



^awytt'^^i;yi*^^'g.y?y?;^^asj^^^^j7T<f^ 



fe' 





iaiasi:jta<^fii'-.ia-'iiv^faat;tfc^^jfc^'i-».^to>u 




(IKOUdi: .TOIIXSTOX 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 809 

Johnston and her three sons left Virginia, seeking;- to mai<e a new home for 
tliemselves in the then Far West. They crossed the Ohio river at what is 
now Wheeling and proceeded by raft down the Ohio to what is now Hamil- 
ton, Ohio, where the family spent a winter, George Johnston employing In's 
time b}' teaching school while there. In the spring uf iSio tlie family started 
westward thrt>ngh the wilderncs.s, en route to Ft. X'inceiines. where it was 
thought safety could lie secured against the threatening attacks of Indians. 
During tlicir stay at \'incennes, George Jt)hnslon attracted the attention of 
General Harrison, then goverui.ir of Indirma TerritDry, and the go\ernor 
attached him to his staff as pri\atc secretary, a position which he held until 
after the War of 1S12, after which the Johnston family went to Kentucky, 
remaining for a time in the vicinity of Louisx'ille, after which they again 
crossed the river and came o\er intc) Indiana and in 18:5 settled on Flogan 
creek', about six miles from tlie Ohicj ri\er, in what is now Dearljorn county, 
and there established their permanent Ivme. George Johnston and lii> 
brotiier, Joseph, erected a water-power mill on Hogan creek and became suc- 
cessful millers, for )ears doing the l.>ulk of the milling for the pioneers of that 
neighborhood. 

In the year 1S21 George Johnston was united in marriage at the hi_ime 
of Thomas Kyle, to Katherine Kearney and to Uiis union ten children were 
born, of whom George W. Johnston, the last born of this large familv, is 
the only one now li\-ing and he ^til! makes his home in this county, not far 
from the old Johnston home place. Presentl}- George Johnston gave up the 
milling business and thereafter, for years, devoted himself to teaching. He 
was a scholarlv gentleman and was bighlv gifte.j as a teaclier, possessing a 
directness of style singularly well adapted for the duties of his high calling, 
and, in molding and directing the niinds of the youth whose privilege it 
was to sit at his feet, gave a direction and iinpetus to learning in this com- 
munity that is still reflected in the cultural and social life of this entire sec- 
tion of the state. ]\Ir. Johnston was regarded as a remarkable madicmati- 
cian ; far ahead of his tiine, his neighbors admiringly were wont to say, and 
there is still preser\"cd in the family, cherished as a priceless relic of the past, 
a considerable fi-agment of his interesting mathematical conclusions, worked 
out as early as 181 2. 

George Johnston died on December 31, 186 1, and a contemporaneous 
neighborly comment accompanying a biographical and ol)ituary comment on 
liis death, published at that time, is authority for the statement that "a quiet, 
modest, good man has left a noble record." 



8lO DEARBORN COUNTY^ INDIANA. 

PERRY CAXFIELD. 

It is always a great pleasure to write the biographical sketch of one of 
French descent, as the citizens of this country should ne\-er allow themselves 
to forget that it was largely to the children of friendly France that America 
owes lu-r freedom. They willingly cast tlieir lot with the struggling American 
colonies and their descendants ha-\-e kept the faith of the early fathers, by 
doing their slnre in the building up of a country destined to become a ])ov.er 
in the affairs of the world. 

Perrv Canfield. farmer, Hogan township. Dearborn county. Ind'a.ia, 
was born on April 24. 1S66, near A\'ilmington, in the township where he now 
resides. He is a son of Wesley and Joseph (Baker) Canfield. He gre\\' up 
on the home farm, where he attended the public schools of tlie district, gradu- 
ating from Moores Hill College, and at once began teaching school, dividing 
the time as follows : five }-ears in Dearborn county, one year in Jennings 
county, one year in Ohio county, and eight years in the cit}' schools of Co\-- 
ington, Kentucky, where his work was all of a supervisorv character, and 
while at Co\ingtiin, he ti>ok a post-graduate course at the L"ni\'ersitv of Cin- 
cinnati, specializing in the philosopln- of education. Having earned the mcnev 
for his own education, he thus developed a strong sense of responsiltility arid 
self-reliance, which proved extremely valuable in after life. In 1912 ]\Ir. 
Canfield ga\e up teaching and. remo\-ed tD Wilmingtrm, where he own.ed a 
farm, on whicli was a large brick residence. After going to the farm, h.e 
thoroughly remodeled his house, putting in expensive improvements, such as 
a hot water system of heating, an acetylene gas plant for lighting pr.rposes, 
fire-proof asbestos roof, and all that goes to make up a modern residence. In 
191 1 he erected another residence on his farm for his tenant, which is also 
a good, substantial home. His tract of land covers one hundred and t\vt:-ty- 
six acres on the outskirts of Wilmington, where he is engaged in the dairy 
business, with a herd of seventeen Jersey cattle. In 1893, and again in i395, 
Air. Canfield's name was seriously considered for sujwrintendent iif schriols. 
He belonged to the Free and Accepted Alasons and Knights of Pythias. Both 
he and his wife are members of the Methodist church. 

Wesley Canfield, father of the subject of this sketch, was born near Wil- 
mington, Dearborn county, and was a son of Edwin and Elizabeth (Vincent) 
Canfield. Prior to the Civil \\'ar. Mr. Canfield was employed in the raih'oad 
shops at Cochran. He enlisted during the Civil War in Company T, Eighty- 
third Regiment. Indiana Volunteer Infaiitry, and was in the service about four 
years. After the war was ended, he returned to agricidtural pursuits in Ho- 



I ,■ ■1,1 



DEARBORN COUXXy, INDIANA. 8ll 

|j;-an township, but later moved into r\lancliester town.shiii and lived tliere 
until late in life. While here. b,c retired from acti\e work and nv. >ved to 
Sparta, where he interested himself in churcli affairs, altln luqli not a niem- 
l)er. 'Sh. Canfield's death oecurred in the spring- of 1911. His wife, Josephine 
( llaker) Canfield, was born in Hoq-an township. Dearborn eountw .and wa.s 
the twelfth child of Thomas and Rachel fPowell) Baker. W'e-.lev and Ti>- 
scphine (Baker) Canfield were the parents of the following- cliildren : .\nna 
Eli.^a, wife of W. C. Prichard, of Sparta: Perry, of Hogan township; Pdwin 
P.. of Sparta: and Robert S.. also of Sparta. 

Edwin and Eliza ( A^incent ) Canfield, paternal gran.dparents of our sub- 
ject, were natiscsof Dcarbi:>rn countv. 

The Canfield family has been traced back to 1350 in France and Ent^- 
land. where the nan-ie was originally spelled Cam de Philo, and descended 
from James de Philo. a French Hug^ienot, a French citizen of Normai-idy. who 
was given a grant of land on the river Cam in Yorkshire. Ei-ig-land. As e;trly 
as 1639 the name was knowi-i in Xew Hax'en, Connecticut, as Camphilo. and 
in 16S0 at Milford the spelling was Camfield. and again, in 1720. the name 
was Canfield. Thomas Canfield. of ^.[ilford. Ci->nnecticut, who li\e 1 frnm 
1680 to 1730, was the father of John Canfield and others, and J(ihn was the 
father of I'hineas. who was liorn in 1753 and married Amv Xewtun, of Dui'- 
ham. Connecticut. They were the parents of eight children, the fonrtii <-.f 
whom was Xoyse. born in 17S2. in the state of Xew Yorl;, and died i:i P^vir- 
born countv in 1S60. His wife was l"ani-iy T\'ler, a relati\-e of President 
Tyler. They moved from Xew York to \"irginia, and at the end of one year 
can-ie down the ri\-er on a raft nearly all the way, locating on section 2^. in 
Hogan township, near X'orth Hogan Creek, where he entered land frmri the 
government. PTe securefl eninlo}-ment across the river in Kentucky, and was 
obliged to leave his wife alone in their home until Saturday night of each 
week, when he returned with provisions sufficient for the fullowing week, 
and frequently during his absence the Pidians would c ime antl tal-:e it all. 
leaving her \\-ithout food. The}- were friendly Pidians :uid did nnt miilest 
her, thanking her for the food, w-liich she gave without protest. After tw-o 
years spent in this way. ^Ir. Canfield built a home on the hilltop, and nM\ ed 
there in order to avoid the chills and fever, the bottom lands being damp and 
malarial. 

X'oyse Canfield participated in the War of 1812. and was a faimer all 
his life, owning several farms where he first settled. To Xo\-se and Fanny 
(Tyler) Canfield w-ere born nine children: Edwin, born in 1S05. died in 1885: 
hdi^a. 1808. became the wife of Alcin Kerr: William, 1810. died in 1885; 



8l2 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Newton, 1S13, was married to Susanne Baker; ]\Iary, 1S16, died in 1891. 
married James Chisman ; Cyrus. i8i8, died in 1S92, married IMaPt' Ricliard- 
son : Alfred, 1822: ?Iemy. 1825. married Charlotte Chisman; Benjamin, 
1827, married a Miss Johnsim. From Noyse Canfield descended most oi 
the Canficlds in his part of De:irhr)rn count}', wlicre they were good suJjstan- 
tial farmers. 

Josephine (Baker) Canfield, mother of Perry Canfield, was horn in 
ITogan to\\nship. Dearborn county, and was the twelfth child of Thomas and 
Rachel (Powell) Baker. Her death occurred in the spring of 1914. 

Thomas Baker, the maternal grandfather, was born on October 24, 17S1). 
near Salisbury, ^Maryland, coming to Dearborn county with his parents in 
1800. He was married in iSii to Rachel Powell, daughter of Nathan and 
Sarah Powell, who settled in Hogan township at an early clay. The paren.ts 
of Thomas Baker pre-empted land from the government during the time of 
Thomas Jcffers'm. Air. Baker followed farming all his life, and wa- a 
soldier in the W'dv of 1S12. To this union were born twelve children, only 
two of whom survi\e: Airs. Angclinc Bruce, of Hogan township, who was 
born, on April 3, 1824; and Xelson T. Baker, now residing in Illinois, who 
was born on ]\[arch 24, 1827. 

Perry Canfield was united in marriage in i8';4, with Ida Spicknall. 
daughter of Leonard and Rachel (Sellers) Spicknall. She was born just 
west of Wilmington. 

Leonard Spicknall. father of Mrs. Perr_\' Canfield. was born on Novem- 
ber 9, 1S28, in the house where he mjw lives, west of W'ilniington. in Hogan 
township. Here he grew up. and on December 19, 1849. '^^'^^ united in mar- 
riage with Rachel Sellers, who was btirn on Decemlier 5, 1S26, in Hogan 
townphip, on the farm where Adam Bruce now resides. Her parents were 
Benjamin and Elizalieth (Bruce) Sellers. After his marriage. Air. Spicknall 
moved ti) Van Buren crjunty in soutlieastern Iowa, where he lived about se\'en 
years, and in the spring of 1863, feturned to Dearborn count v. He served 
as trustee of Hogan township for a. period co\'ering thirteen }ears, in all. 
In 1914 Mr. Spicknall sold his one hundred and si.xty acre farm and now 
resides at Wilmington. The_\ have had eight children : Rosanna Elizabeth, 
deceased, was the wife of Thomas Ward, and left three children; Marv Eliza 
became the wife of Nathaniel Dresser, died in July, 1879. leaving two soiis: 
Sarah Catherine, the wife of David E. Clements, who resides near the old 
Spi(;knall home; William, who is at present trustee of Hi igan township, ,-ind 
lives on a portion of the old home place ; Clara keeps house for her fatlier , 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 813 

Thomas L. is a farmer in Hogan township: Ida became the wife of the sub- 
ject of this sketch; and Alice, who was a twin of Clara, died in infancy. 

Leonard Spicknall belongs to the ^lasonic Lodge. He and wife were 
nienil)ers of the ]\Iethodist Episcopal church. Mrs. Spicknall died on i-'eb- 
niary lo, 1S85. 

Thomas Spicknall. the paternal grandfalher of Mr.s. Perrv Canfiekl, was 
born in Virginia. June 2. iSoi. and died on December 31. 1873 '^'^"^ '^'^ wife, 
Elizabeth Williams, daughter of ^\'illiam and Lovc)- Williams, was burn on 
February 25, 1802, in Cornwall, England, and died about 1887. Thev were 
married on INIa}' 21, 1826, and were the parents of nine children. Thev came 
to America, spending the first two years at Washington City, where Mrs. 
Spicknall died, after which Mr. Spicknall brought his children west in 1820, 
settling at Lawrenceburg. from where they later moved to Ilogan town>hip. 
Thomas Spicknall was a son of Leonard Spicknall, Sr., who lived anfl farmed 
on the farm later owned by his son, Thomas. He died in 1873. 

Benjamin Sellers, the maternal grandfather of INIrs. Canfield. was born 
and reared near Elizabethtown, and Elizabeth (Bruce) Sellers, his wife, was 
born in Dearborn count}-, and was a daughter of Anicr and Catherine 
(Flake) Bruce. 

The name of Perry Canfield stands for all that is of the best in his com- 
munity, and ever\-thing about his home indicates thrift and enterprise. He is 
an active and highl}-res|)ected citizen. 



IRA A. SCRITTURE. 



The subject of education should alwa}-s be a matter of deep interest to 
all thinking people, and those who are willing to devote their time and energv' 
to imparting knowledge to others receive but a small portion of the appre- 
ciation and credit to which they are justly entitled. 

Ira A. Scripture was born on December i. 1865, near W^estport, De- 
catur count}', Indiana, and is a son of Alfred Marion and Mary E. (Mitchell) 
Scripture. His education was received at the district schools of Decatur 
county, the high school, Hartsville College, Hope Normal, and he was grad- 
uated from Moores Hill College in the class of 1902. In 1887 he began 
teaching school at Gainesville, Decatur county, in connection with farming, 
and in 1893 he went to W^estport, where he was principal in the city school 
for three years. In 1896 he went to Dillsboro, and was superintendent of the 
Dillsboro school until 1899, going from there to Moores Hill, where he taught 



8l4 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

in tlie normal Lle[)artniciU ami to<.jk college work at the same time. On ]Ma\ 
4, 1903, Mr. Scripture bought a one-half interest of F. C. Noble in the hard- 
ware Imsiness, and they conducted the business under the firm name of Xoble 
& Scripture. In 1903 i\Ir. Noble disposed of his interest to George C. ]\Iiller, 
and in 1906 Mr. Miller sold out to J. Frank Turner. In 190S ]\lr. Scripture 
bought the interest of his partner, and tlie business is now known as Scripture 
& Sons. ]\Ir. Scripture has always gi\-en his support to the Denmcratic 
party, and in 1904 was elected township trustee for a four-year term. He 
carried the first gra\el road election returns which made the first free road 
in the count}" under the taxes of the people, securing a twentv-ninc thousand 
five hundred dollar bond issue to cover same. This was the start of the good 
roads of Dearborn county. He was a member of the town board and city 
council, serving until 1914. Mr. Scripture is a member of the [Methodist 
Episcopal church. 

Alfred ^ilarion Scripture, father of the immediate subject of this sketch, 
was born on ?^Iay t,o. 1S37, in Decatur county. Indiana, where he was edu- 
cated and grew to manhood on his father's farm, and then bought si.xtv acres 
of his father's farm, to which he later added thirty-fi\-e acres nKjre, and be- 
came the ow ner of a fine tract of one hundred and ninety-five acres in all, 
where he' carried on general farming. He was always an active and loyal 
Democrat, holding some of the local offices. He belonged to the church 
of the United Brethren, in which he was a cliurch officer. Flis death oc- 
curred in 1S91. at the age of fifty- four years. ^Iv. Scripture was a son of 
John and Isabelle (Holmes) Scripture. His wife, ^lary E. (Mitchell) Scrip- 
ture, was born on December 2, 184S, in Illinois, and came to Decatur count v 
at the age of twelve years with her widowed mother. ]\Ir. and [Mrs. Scripture 
were the parents of ten children, Leonard E., Ira A., Isom E., Elmer L., Brad- 
ford J., Alvin P., Lanrlos H., Lerta, Emma Netta and Fred P. 

The paternal grandfather was John Scripture, and his wife was Isabelle 
(Holmes) Scripture. The former was a native of New York state, coming 
west by ox-team when twelve years of age, with his uncle, who took up .gov- 
ernment land to the amount of one hundred and sixt\- acres, at a cost of one 
dollar anrl twenty-five cents an acre. He lived near Westport all !iis lite, 
dying at the age of sixty-one years. His wife, Isabelle (Holmes) Scripture, 
was born in Decatur county, where she lived all her life. 

Ira A. Scripture was married on February 7. 18.89. ''■" Decatur couiitv, to 
Emma Taylor, daughter of Isaac H. and Amelia A. ( McConnell ) Tavlor. She 
was born on Jul\- iS, 1866, in Decatur county. This miion has been blessed 
with three children, Ina, born on March 22, 1S91, is the wife of James B. Wirt, 



, (i) -I ,'!* (l')r7; 



DEAKKORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 815 

a traveling salesman of Dccatni' county: Martin Luther and \\'illiani Cngh- 
lon Duffy. 

Isaac H. Taylr)r, father of Mrs. Ira A. Scripture, was born in Pennsxl- 
vania and came to Decatur county when quite small, with his parents, where he 
followed farming all his life, dying at the age of seventy years. His wife, 
Amelia (AlcConncU) Taylor, was born in Decatur county, },larch 8, 1841, and 
lived there all her life. They were the parents of seven children, Emma. 
George, John. James, ]\Iary. Gertrude and Hugh. 

Mr. Scripture and his \\\ie move in the best society of the township, 
where they have the respect and high esteem of all who know them. 



:\IORRIS D. OLCOTT. 

The gentleman whose name introduces this sketch, although born anti 
reared as a farmer boy. has turned out to be one of the most prosperous and 
successful citizens of Moores Hill. Indiana. He was careful to fit himself 
with a good education, and herein lies a great part of the secret of his success. 

Morris D. Olcott was born on December 24, 1866, at Chesterville, In- 
diana, and is a son of C. L. and Adelia (Record) Olcott. Mr. Olcott was 
first a pupil at the public schools at Woodbury, and later attended ]\Ioores 
Hill College. After leaving here he entered Purdue University, and after 
graduating he follnwed farming under the instruction of his father until 
1907. when he saw possibilities in a feed and seed store at the thriving little 
citv of }iIoores Hill, and accordingly established himself in business, the 
outcome of which has been highly satisfactory. Through his own efforts 
Mr. Olcott has, in addition to his investment in the business already men- 
tioned, been enabled to acquire considerable valuable real estate in the city of 
Indianapolis, as well as in his home city, ^Moores Hill. He is a strong believer 
in the Prohibiiion principles, to which party he gi\-es his lo) al support. He 
is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Olcott is a public- 
si)irited man, and takes a deep interest in all endeavors toward bettering the 
condition of the community in general, being especially interested in Epworth 
League work, serving as treasurer for a good many years. 

C. L. Olcott, father of the subject of this sketch, was born on Feln-uary 
2y, 1841, in Dearborn county, and is a son of William and Alary (King) 
Olcott. He was educated at the district schools, after which he remained on 
the home farm until the death of his father, and then bought the farm, con- 



8l6 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

sisting of three liutidred and eigliteen acres, following agriculture until iqoj, 
when he moved to Moores Hill, where he still resides. His wife. Adelia 
(Record) Olcott. was born at Chestervillc, Indiana, July i/, 1844, living- 
there until 1907, when she came to Moores Hill. This union was blest with 
three children, Morris, Stella, deceased, and Hattie, also deceased. 

The paternal grandparents were William and Mary ( King) Olcott. 
The foimer was born in Connecticut, and came to Dearborn county when 
quite young. i^Irs. Olcott was a native of Dearborn county, Indiana. 

Mr. Olcott is an industrious worker, and through his perseverance and 
good management has placed himself in a position of independence, and he 
occupies a position of high esteem in the city of Aloores Hill. 



... .: - JOHN HENRY NOLTE. 

Among the enterprising citizens of Caesar Creek township, Dearborn 
county, Indiana, none stands in higher esteem than the man whose name 
forms the caption of this article. Descended from sterling German ancestry-, 
he has embodied within himself their leading characteristics in such manner 
as to make of him a man in every sense of the word in the estimation of those 
who have known him long and well. 

John Henr\- Nolte was born in Cla\' township. Dearborn count}", on 
December 3, 1S79, a son of Charles and ]Mary (Schriefer) Nolte, the fonner 
born in C;esar Creek township on August 24, 1S54. and the latter born in 
this state, on June 16, 1854. Charles Noble worked on a farm all his life 
and never owned but the one tract of land, on which he passed his active 
years and where death overtook him. That was his farm of two hundred and 
thirty-six acres located in Clay township. His death occurred on June 6, 
1899, when forty-five years of age. All his life he had been a devout member 
of the Lutheran church, serving his local organization as trUstee for a num- 
ber of years, and in other official capacities. He was a Democrat, although 
taking no particular interest in politics. ^Irs. Mary Nolte is still living. 

The paternal grandparents were John Henry and Margaret (Rullman) 
Kolte, both born in Hanover, Germany, the former on September 16, 1829. and 
the latter on November 2^,, 1833. John Henry Nolte came to this country 
when a young man and located on a farm in Caesar Creek township, where 
he passed the remainder of his days, tlis death occurred on December 19, 
1882, when fifty-three years old. Margaret Rullman, wife of John Heni7 



. ^ ! ''» 



;, V.;„: 



.:■. ■.■•.<,<l 

■■ ■ ■■r.b 






' ,■; DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. Si/ 

Xiilte, was brought to this country by her parents when she was a httle girl 
of ten years. They located in Qesar Creek township, and in the schools near 
her home she received her education. There she met and married Mr. Nolte. 
She was a daughter of Harmon and Alary (Bushman) Ruhlman and was one 
of a family of fi\e children, the others being Henry, Ernest, William and 
Catherine. John Henry and Margaret XoUc had a family of three children, 
Charles, Louisa and W'illiam. all born and reared in Dearborn county. 

John Henry Nolte is one of a family of four chiklren, being the eldest 
of the family. The other members are Edward, Laura and W'eslc}'. John 
Hem-y Nolte received his education in the common schools of Clay townsliip, 
and remained with his father until the latter's death, assisting him with the 
work of the homestead. After his lather's death he took over the farm of his 
grandmother Nolte. 

John Henry Nolte was married on January 6, 1904, to Catherine Anna 
Stocver, daughter of John P. and Sophia (Lange) Stoever, residents of Cin- 
cinnati. Catherine was l)orn in Washington township, this county, on starch 
20, 1883. To this union has been born one child, a son, Wesley Christo- 
pher, born August 2, 1907. Hoth ]Mr. and iMrs. Nolte are members of the 
Lutheran, church. His political support is gi\-en the Democratic party. Air. 
Nolte is a man of progressive tendencies and enterprising spirit and enjoys 
the sincere regard of the entire community in which he lives. 



LOUIS E. RUHLMAN. 



Dependent ^■cry largely upon his own resources from youth, Louis B. 
Ruhlman, successful fanner of Clay township, Dearborn county, Indiana, has 
attained no insignificant success, and though he has, like most men of affairs, 
encountered obstacles and met with reverses, he has shown himself resource- 
ful and full of energ}-, and has succeeded well in his undertaking. Ilis 
tenacity and fortitude are due. no doubt, in a large measure to the worthy 
traits inherited from his sterling ancestors, the example of whose well-regu- 
lated lives he has sought to follow in all the relations of life. 

Louis B. Ruhlman was born in Clay township on July 8, 1869, a son 
of Henry H. and Eliza (Dulweaver) Ruhlman, both natives of Germany; 
the former was born in 1838. When a chikl Henry was brought to this 
country by his parents, who settled in Clay township, and in die schools near 
his home he recei\'ed his education. He assisted his father with the work 

(52) 



8l8 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

of the farm home until such time as he made the purchase of a farm on his 
own account, this being located in Clay township, and on which he remained 
but a short time when he disposed of it and b<_)Ught another in Claw town- 
ship, on Hayes branch. That farm contained fifty-nine acres, and there he 
continued to live until 1S95, when he muved to a farm near Dillsljoro, con- 
taininq- one hundred and five acres, and there passed the remainder of his 
life, his death occurring in June ijf 1903, when he was sixty-five years old. 
Henry Ruhlman was a devuut memlier of the Lutheran church, and his po- 
litical support was given the Democratic party. In all things he was an hon- 
est and upright man who had a great many friends who highly esteemed him. 

Henry Ruhlman was one of a family of f(.iur children, the others being- 
Charles, Fred and [Minnie. These all came to this country with the parents 
about the }ear 1S43, and settled in Dearborn county. 

Eliza (Dulweavcr) Ruhlman, mother of the immediate subject of this 
sketch, was a daughter of Bernard Dulweavcr and was born in Germany, 
coming to this country with her parents, who first settled in Cincinnati and 
later came to Dearborn c^iunty, locating on a farm in Cresar Creek township, 
where thev passed the remainder of their lives. There were but two children 
in the Dulweaver family, the other child, a son, met his death during the 
Civil War, from star\ation while a prisoner in Anderson\ille. 

Henr\- and Eliza Ruhlman were the parents of four children, .\nna, 
Louis, William, ami i>ne child who die<l in infancy. Anna became the wife 
of \\'il!iam Cline and li\es in Cincinnati. William married Ellen Xelson and 
lives in Sparta township. They ha\'e five children, Clifford and Allen, de- 
ceased ; Harry, Ernest and Bertha. Eliza Ivuhlman's death occurred the same 
month as that of her husband, in June of 1903. 

Louis B. Ruhlman received his education in the schools of Clay town- 
ship and after completing his studies assisted his father in the work of the 
farm home for a short time. He was filled with an ambition to see something 
of the world and first went t<j Kansas, where for a year he followed his occu- 
pation of a farmer. He then came back east, locating in Chicago, where he 
worked as a lineman for the Western Unirjn Telegraph Company, out of 
Chicago. He went from there to Cincinnati, where he was connected with 
the Cincinnati Telephone Company, remaining with them three years, when 
he received such injuries as made necessary a change in his manner of labor. 
He reverted to his original life as a farmer and came back to this section, 
where he purchased the old homestead of his father, near Dillsboro. He 
began his farming in a small way and gradually paid off the purchase price 
of the place. When he had it clear he purchased an additional tract of fifty- 



.C.) 



•..u.r ^^ I ■:: 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. ' 819 

nine acres, later on disposing of four; and on the balance he has continued to 
make his home. Air. Ruhhnan has long- since demonstrated the fact that he 
is possessed of more than ordinary business abihty, for he manages his inter- 
ests very well indeed. He is a large stockholder in the Dillsboro Sanatorium, 
being also one of its original incorporators, and much of the success of that 
institution is due to his foresight and business ability. 

Louis B. Ruhlman was married on April 12, 1905, to Ella R. Johnson, 
a daughter of t\*illiam and Ella ( Risinger) Johnson, born on March 8, 1872, 
in Napoleon, Ripley county, in which town she also was educated. William 
Johnson was born in Batesvillc, Indiana, February 6, 1842, and was engaged 
in agricultural work all his life. After marriage he lived for a time at Na- 
poleon and after selling his farm tiiere. moved to Osgood, Indiana, where he 
remained two years, coming \o Dillsboro in 1910. A\'illiam and Ella (Ris- 
inger) Johnson uere the parents of four children, Svlvia, who died young, 
.Mma, Harry and Ella R! .\lma became the wife of G. William Niebrugge 
and lives in Dillsl.ioro. They have three children, Ella Ruth. Flovd and Lester 
Charles. Harry married Barljara Crane and li\'es in Osoood. 

To Louis ] ;. Ruhlman and wife have been born two daughters : S_\l\'ia 
E., born on July 21. 1908, and Goldie A., November 2, 1910. Mr. Ruhlman 
is a man who takes a keen interest i'a all matters pertaining to the welfare 
of the community, and is a strong supporter of the principles of the Demo- 
cratic party. He UK.ist efficiently served Clay township as assessor for four 
years and takes much interest in the affairs of his party in other than local 
matters. His fraternal affiliation is held with the Knights of Pythias and 
he is a past chancellor of his local lodge. He is a faithful member of the 
Presbyterian church, giving generoush' of his means toward the support of 
the local organization. In all the affairs of life, Mr. Ruhlman has shown 
himself a man who stands "foursi:[uare to every wind that blows." and he is, 
therefore, eminently entitled to mention in a volume of the character of the 
one in hand. 



HENRY GE.AR. 



Among the older citizens of Clay township. Dearborn county, Indiana, 
none stands higher in the esteem of his fellow citizens than the gentleman 
whose name forms the caption of this sketch. Henrj' Gear has long been 
engaged in agricultural pursuits in this section and the years of his residence 
here have but strengthened the feelincr of honor and respect on the part of 



I 

820 ■ DEARBORN' COUNTY, INDIANA. 

his fellow men, owing to the worthy life he has led and the examjile of in- 
dustry and frugality he has set the younger generation. 

Henry Gear is a native of Gennany, having been Ijorn in Deepholtz, 
Hanover, on November i, 1S33. a son of Frederick and Hannali { Finke) 
Gear. F^rederick Gear was born on January 2. 181 1, and Hannah Finke on 
September iS, of the same year. In the year 1845, with their young family, 
they immigrated to the United States, coming directly to Dearborn county, 
where they found many of their naticniality. They secured a tract of eighty 
acres in Cla\- township, near Dillsboro, paying seven hundred dollars for their 
homestead. There the family was reared and the old folks passed their re- 
maining days. Frederick Gear departed this life on April 4, 18S0, and his 
j wife lived until December 31, 189S. 

I' Henry, the immediate subject of this sketch, was the eldest of their family 

l of six children, the others being Frederick. William, Mary, Lizzie and Louisa. 
{■ William, JMar\' and Lizzie are deceased. Frederick chose Barbara Steple 
i as his wife and she has borne him five children. Will, Fred, Laura, Ruth 
I and Lulu. \\'illiam married Mary ]\Iiller and died childless. Mary became 

• the wife of Fred Gartemman and has three children. Flarry, Kate and Laura. 

• The famil)- lives on a farm in Ripley county. Lizzie became the wife of 
i' William Kamman and has one son. Horace, junior. I^ouisa is the wife of 
|. Henrv' Reinhardt and has four daughters, Clara, Rose. Lulu and Augusta. 

Henry Gear attended the schools of his native home when a young boy 

I and after coming to this country, attended the common schools of Clay town- 

1 ship. When seventeen years old he started out in life for himself, beincr em- 

I ploved at farm work among the neighboring farmers at the rate of nine dr)l- 

,ir lars per month and board. Fie labored in that manner for three years and then 

,j went to Aiu'ora. Indiana, where he secured emjjloyment in the staliles of tlie 

'|, James Gaff Distilling Company, and soon became foreman of that division of 

i their labor. There he remained until 18S4. when he returned to Clay town- 

'.[ ship and purchased the old homestead from the mother for fifteen hundred 

;[ dollars, and on that spot rich in association for him, he has since made his 

I home. Mr. Gear devotes his land to agriculture such as is carried on in this 

I section and is accounted one of the thorough farmers of his community. 

I On Se]5tember 10, 1S63. Henry Gear was married to Anna Rupker. a 

• daughter of Henry and Anna (Hefflemeier) Rupker, both natives of Ger- 
I many. The parents were married in the fatherland and brought their young 
I family to this country, .^nna being eight years old at the time the long jour- 
j ney was made. They found their location in Ripley county and there passed 

the remainder of their lives. There were three other children in the fanul}. 



'.I.\ 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. S2I 

Eliza, Henry and Louisa. To Mr. and Mrs. Henry Gear were born three 
daugliters. Magijic, Anna and Louisa. Anna became the wife of William 
Nintrup. a farmer of Dearborn county. Louisa married J. H. Sclmeider, 
of Cochran, this county, and. is the mother of one daughter, \'iola. Maggie 
li\'es in Clay township. 

Mr. Gear is a faithful member of the German Lutheran church and has 
the distinction of having filled all the offices in that society. He takes a 
keen interest in its welfare and spares himself no pains to further its advance- 
ment. He oives his support to the Democratic party, standing alwavs for 
what concerns the greatest good to the greatest number. Mr. Gear has nianv 
interesting stories to relate concerning the conditions throughout this sec- 
tion when they first took up their residence here, and he enjoys telling of his 
part in the work of getting the old Ohio & Mississippi railroad (now the 
l*>altimore & Ohio Southwestern) in shape to handle passengers. It was of 
course a momentous day when the road was really put in operation and Mr. 
Gear had the privilege of hauling the first load of wood to the station in Coch- 
ran. ]\Ir. Gear is a man of sterling character, scrupulouslv honest in all the 
relations of life and is held in the highest esteem hx a laro-e circle of friends. 



' ■ . WILLL\M SIEKERMAN. 

Among the citizens of Dearborn county who have won a pleasing de- 
gree of success in their chosen field of endeavor is William Siekerman, the 
respected subject of this short' biographical sketch. Air. Siekerman gives 
much attention to agricultural pursuits and in this line is regarded as among 
the best farmers of the community. He is, however, perhaps best known 
as a plasterer and bricklayer of considerable ability and has the distinction 
of having plastered and laid the bricks for nearlv all the buildings in Clay 
township and rendered the same service in connection with more than eighty 
of the buildings of Dillsboro. 

Mr. Siekerman is a native of Dearborn county, having been born on 
January i, 1857, a son of Garrett Henry and Eliza (Leavcrcamp) Sieker- 
man, she being the second wife of Henry. Henry Siekerman was bom in 
Germany on ^^larch 17, 1815, and immigrated to America when quite a V(uuig 
m.an. Lie came to this section in the early pioneer davs, being among the 
first wiiite settlers. At that time there were no roads, only Indian paths. 
and the primeval forests still stood throughout this section of the state. 



S22 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Henry Siekcrman grew fond of his home in tlic wilderness and as the first 
onrush of the tide of civilization reached this part of the country, he \\as 
eager to secure for his adopted home all possible benefits. His first farm 
consisted of eighty acres, for which he paid the government tlie sum of fif- 
ty cents per a^re. He passed his remaining ^-ears in Dearl)orn county and 
as better dwellings than the first primitive cabins began to be erected, he re- 
verted to his old trade of plasterer and all of the earlier buildings through 
this community gave evidence of his ability in that line. Mr. Siekerman's 
first wife came with him from Germany, but died shortly after reaching the 
United States, leaving him with one daughter, Etta. His second wife was 
Eliza Lcavercamp, who bore him two sons, \\'illiam. the immediate subject 
of this sketch, and Henry. By his third wife he had six children: George, 
Amelia, Charles, Theodore, Lewis and Edward, all of whom are living. 
Henry Siekerman, brother of William, married Louisa Smalle and bv her 
had seven children : Sam. I'rank, Eva, John, Lyda, Walter and Clarence. 
Her,ry"s death occurred in 1892. 

William Siekerman received his education in the common schools of 
Ripley county anrl at an early age took up farm work. He continued at this 
for a few years and then learned the plasterer and bricklayer's trade and 
has combined his two lines of endea\or ever since. In 1SS5 he purchased 
a fanri in Clay township consisting of thirty-si.\ acres and to this he added 
twenty-five acres at one time and forty-one acres at another time, making 
his present holdings one hundred and two acres in all, this land well testi- 
fying to his ability as a farmer. 

^Ir. Siekennan's marriage took place in 1S84, when on November 25 
of that year he was united in wedlock with Clarabelle Worley, daughter of 
Robert and Caroline (Fowler) Worley, the former a native of the state of 
Kentucky and the latter born in Dearborn county. Robert Worlev passed 
the greater portion of his young manhood in the state of Ohio and for many 
years operated a steamboat on the waters of the Ohio ri\'er. Robert \\'or- 
ley and wife had the following children : Alice, Florence, Harry, Clarabelle, 
Annie and Fannie. Harry married Lizzie Steward and has two children, 
Eva and Vera. Annie became the wife of Harry K. Evans and thev lia\-e had 
the misfortune to lose the entire family of three children. 

To William Siekerman and wife have been born three children, two of 
whom died in infancy, but one daughter. Clara, remaining. This daughter 
became the wife of Harry Linkmeier and resides on a farm in this county. 
William Siekerman has all his life been a faithful member of the Lutheran 






:1!. // 



DEARBORX COUXTY, INDIANA. 823 

diurch and lives his life in accordance with its teachings. His political snp- 
]]nrt he gives to the Democratic party, hcing especially interested in its af- 
fairs as relate to local matters. In all the relations of life Air. Sickerman 
has proved himself a man among men and because of his sterling personal 
qualities and stanch intcgrit}-, he is deserving of the confidence which has 
been placed in him by his fellow men. 



CIIRISTIAX GOTTLIEB HARSCH. 

Christian Gottlieb Harsch, concrete contractor, of Lawrenceburg, this 
county, is a son of Gottlieb and Elizaljeth (Schaeffer) Harsch. and was born 
on December 22, 185 1, at Cincinnati. Ohio. He was not two years old when 
his parents moved to this county in 1853, l<_)cating at Lawrenceburg, where 
he has since reijiained. He attended the public schools and the German 
parochial school and after leaving school did everything in the \vay of odd 
jobs, from driving a team for fifteen cents a day to railroading, ha\ing been 
employed in the bridge department for several years, after which he learned 
the plasterer's trade, which he followed for sixteen years, later going into 
business as a concrete contractor and for years past has been awarded contracts 
for most of the sidewalks of Lawrenceburg. Politically, 'Sir. Harsch is a stanch 
Republican, to which party he has gi\en his earnest support, and shown his 
liiyalty by ser\'ing in some of the city offices. He was city marshal for two 
terms and was treasurer of the fire department for twenty-seven years. Fra- 
ternally, he is a member of Dearborn Lodge No. 4, Knights of Pythias, 
Mr. Harsch owns a good home at 226 ]Mary Street, and is an attentive mem- 
ber of Zion Evangelical church. 

Gottlieb and Elizabeth (Schaeffer) Harsch, were born in Wurtemburg. 
German}-, yir. Harsch was reared and educated in Germany and came to 
America about 1849, locating at Cincinnati, where he was employed in a pork- 
-l)acking establishment, and where he died in 1S51. To him and his wife were 
born two children, Anna, who died in infancy, and Christian G., the subject 
I't this sketch. After the death of her husband, Airs, blarsch married 
Matthias Hanselman and became the nii_")ther of four more children, name- 
!>■ : Mar\' and Alatthias, both living in Lawrenceburg; Louis, wlio makes 
his home at Hamilton, Ohio, and one who died in infancy. Christian G. 
Harsch's paternal grandparents died in Germany, both having lived to be 
past ninety years of age. Among their children were Christian, Louisa and 



824 DEARBORN' COUXTV, INDIANA. 

Gottlieb. !Mr. Ilarsch's maternal grandparents aUo died in Germany, where 
they were farmers, and had a large family. 

Christian Griltlicb Ilarsch was united in marriage on January 25, 1S74, 
to Julia Brunson, who was born at ]\Iilford, Ohio, on May 22, 1852, daugh- 
ter of James and Eliza (Varguson) Brunson, to which union five children 
have been born. Anna. Christian; Cora, Mae and George. Anna became 
the wife of Ben R. IMacElvain. of Lawrencelmrg, and is the mother of four 
children. Ford, Bernice, }ilerline and Inez ; Christian is employed as an 
automobile trimmer at Detroit, Michigan. He married Inez Tebbs, to which 
union two children have been born, Lois and Clifford; Cora died in her third 
year; Mae became the wife of Richard Fieler, and is the mother of <ine 
daughter, Catherine Elizabeth l-"ieler; George is associated with his father 
in the manufacture of concrete, and lives at home. His fraternal affiliations 
are with the Knights of Pythias. Mrs. Harsch is a member of the Meiho- 
dist church. Her father, James Brunson, was a nati\e of New Jersey. lie 
died in 1855, aged thirt\-fi\"e years, leaving four children, Samuel, Mary. 
Julia and James. His widow survived him and married secondly, ^Martin 
Knapp, a soldier in the Mexican War, by whom she had two children, Emuia 
and Alice. Mr. Knapp was dmwned in 1S61. 

The paternal grandparents of ]\Irs. Harsch were James and Julia Brun- 
son, who lived to be quite old, and were the parents of the following cb.il- 
dren: Mrs. Julia Harmon, Mrs. ]\Iary Usterhouse, Den and James. The ma- 
ternal grandfather of ]\Irs. Harsch died when a young man. His wife was 
Catharine Varguson, by whom he had nine children, Charles, Lucinda, Han- 
nah, George, Eliza, and others whose names the biographer was unable to 
obtain. 

Having led an active business life, Mr. Harsch is a man of wise general 
information and is highly esteemed by all who know him. 



• , ■ REV. JOHN WILLIA:^! DASHIELL, D. D. 

As the sands of life trickle through the glass of time and record the 
history of those who have performed their duty and accomplished things 
of importance, the subject of this biography, the Rev. John William Dashiell. 
may rest content in the thought that he has left nothing undone that has 
been within his power in making t1ie lives of his fellow men happier au'i 
better through his interest and unselfish labor. 



■ r A 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 825 

Rev. John William Da'^hiell was born on October 8, 1S44, at Monres 
Hill, Indiana. Me is a son of John Thonia.s Dashiell and h'dizabcth (M.int- 
gomerv) ]')ashiell. He was educated at ^loores Hill Collej^e. graduating- in 
1871, receiving the degree of Bachelor of Surgery. In iSjj he receised the 
degree of Bachelor of .Arts, and in 1R75 the degree of IMa.stcr uf .\rts. He has 
also received the honary degree of Doctor of I)i\-inity. In 1S71 he was junior 
preacher on tiie Melroy circuit, (if which he later had entire charge. John 
William Dashiell went to the Civil War on August 8, 1862, in Company 
A, Eighty-third Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and was dis- 
charged in February, 1863, disabled. He re-enlisted in Compan\' D, 
Seventh Indiana Cavalry. August 6. 1863, and was discharged May 3, 1865. 
While in the cavalrv he participated in many battles chiefly directed 
against Gen. Bedford Forest, the greatest Confederate cavalry leader. During 
this campaign INIr. Dashiell fought in west Tennessee, j\Iis>issii)pi, Louisiana, 
Arkansas anti Kentucky, fighting all the way and engaged most r)f the time. 
He participated in the battles of Chickasaw and Arkansas Post, where seven 
thousand prisoners were captured. He preached for forty-three years, in 
the Methodist church, was retired in 1914, and is now enjoying a much- 
needed rest from active work. He is a Republican, and a member of the 
Free and Accepted ^Masons, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, San- 
dusky Lodge Xo. 856, the Grand Army of the Repitblic, and is commander 
of Adams Post No. 254. 

John Thomas Dashiell was born on September 30, 1S17, in Queen Anne 
countv, Maryland, and when young came with his parents to Sparta township, 
attending, school in the first school building in Sparta township, located near 
the present site of the Moores Flill postoffice. His parents later moved to 
Moores Hill where, from lack of educational facilities, he received the most 
of his education through study at home. He learned the cooper's trade and 
went into partnership in that business, losing all he had in one year, through 
the irregular business methods of his partner. Tw"0 years later he went into 
business alone, taking freight and produce to New Orleans, during which time 
he was stricken with typhoid fever and was ill for seven months, again lobing 
all he had. This second entire loss so completely discouraged him that it 
was only through the efforts and kindness of his friend, John C. Moore, 
that he was again started on the road to success. Three years later he liought 
the farm belonging' to his wife's parents, located in Ripley county, where he 
lived until he died, December 12. 1899. In politics Mr. Dashiell was a Re- 
publican, and in 1861 was sent to the Legislature from Ripley county, by the 
largest vote of any office on that ticket. He also served many times as 



826 DEARBORN' COUNTY. INDIANA. 

township trustee. He was a nienibcr nf the Methodist Episcopal church. 
His wife, Ehzabeth (Montgomery) Dashiell, was a daughter of Joseph and 
Jane (Sproul) Montgonier)-, and was born on September _'!^, iSjo, in Ripley 
county, Inihana. To this union were liorn four children, ]\[ary Jane, Xoah 
Davis, Sarah Amelia and John William. 

John Dashiell, the paternal grandfather, was born on February 27, 1786, 
in Worcester county, ^Maryland, and was iniitcd in marriage on July 6, 1S09, 
with Amelia Duncan. They came to Sparta township in 1S18, and slept 
under sheets spread on poles until their one-room log caliin was completed, 
which occasion was celebrated by John Dashiell taking down the family liible 
and dedicating his new home. He later m'i\ed to ^lomence, Illinois, return- 
ing in 1S63 to ;\Ioores Hill, where he bought his son's old home in Aloores 
Hill, and lived on it until his death. ]Mr. Dashiell was a Methodist minister, 
known in those days as a "local preacher." He folloAyed agriculture for a 
living, di\'iding his attention with that and liye stock. He was originally a 
A\'hig, but later became a Republican. His parents were John and Sara 
Dashiell. 

John and Sara Dashiell were the paternal great-grandparents, the former 
having been born on April 17, 1751, and died on December 15, 18 16. Sara 
Dashiell was born on June 11. 1751. and died on Xovember i, 1S43. '"' 'i*-'!" 
ninety-third year. Amelia (Duncan) Dashiell was born on February 17, 
1794, in Worcester cfiunty, ^Maryland. She was a daughter of Thomas and 
Fannie Duncan. John and .Amelia (Duncan) Dashiell were the parents of 
eleven children, namcl_\- : Sallie O., Elizabeth, Emaline. John Thomas, b^an- 
nie C, Mary, Charles R., William 'Si., Drusilla, Amelia J. and one who died 
in infancy. 

John William Dashiell was married on Xovember 19, 1872, to Fannie 
Myers, daughter of Peter and Rachel Myers, of Jef fersonville, Indiana. She 
was born on December 21, 1852, and was educated at Jef fersonville and 
Moores Hill, getting the degrees of Bachelor of Surgery and Master of Arts. 
She was a very fine musician. This union was blest with twelve children, as 
follow: Thomas Myers. Emma Amelia, Xewton Haynian. Edward, Eawrence 
Basil, Rachel, Fannie, Edith. John Frederick. Stanley, Leland Elder and Mary 
Locke. Thomas Myers was born on Septemi^er 30, 1873, was married to Marie 
Boyle on June 21, 1899, in Chicago, Illinois, and lives at Los Angeles. Califor- 
nia. Emma Amelia was born on December 7, 1874. X'ewton Haynum was 
born on September 6, 1876. married Rhoda K. Adams on June 12, 1900, in In- 
dianapolis. They li\'ed at Minneapolis and haye two children, Joseph Adam- 
and Xe\rton Hayman, Jr. Edward was bom on May i, 1878. La\yrence 



DEARBORX COUNTY, INDIANA. ' 827 

liasil was born on February 9, 18S0, married Anna W'right, of Pittsburgli, 
in [gog. Raebel was born on April 19, 1RS2, married J. D. Sediner on 
Xiivember 4, 1913, and lives at Hope, Indiana. Fannie was Iwrn on Septem- 
ber 25, i!SS3, married O. X. Orebaugh on June 12, 1914, and lives at Louis- 
ville, Kentucky. Editli was born on x-\ugust iS, 18S5. John Frederick was 
born on April 30, iSSS, was united in marriage on September 17, 1912. with 
Svlvia Knowles. ble is professor of philosophy at ^Minnesota Unixersity. 
Stanley was born on January 11, 1890, died in 1898, at Aurora. Leland 
I'dder was born on June 9, 1S91. !Mary Locke was born on February 24. 
1894. Mrs. Fannie Dashiell died on March 20, 1910. 

The immigrant ancestors of the Rev. John William Dashiell landed in 
Maryland in 165 1. They were French people and could trace their ancestiy 
back to families of great prominence, and the subject of this sketch has lost 
none of the aristocratic bearing long associated with his ancestry. 



, ■- ,■ GEORGE L. P. SQUIBB. 

The Scjuibb name in Dearborn county is conspicuously associated with 
the distilling firm of W. P. Squibb & Company. 

George L. P. Squibb, the present secretary of this company, was jiorn at 
.Aurora, Indiana, on November 13, 1869, spending his \outh and attending 
the public schools there until his family removed to Lawrenceburg, Indiana, 
in March, 1884, where he continued his education in the public schools of 
Lawrenceburg until 1885 when he commenced working, at the age of fifteen 
years, at the distillery owned and operated b}- his father and uncle : so to speak, 
"growing up" with the business, and has continued with it ever since. 

On May 17, 1900, George L. P. Squibb was united in marriage to Mina 
Louis Brand, the daughter of John and jMargaret Cook Brand and niece of 
A. D. Cook, of Lawrenceburg, to which union five children have been 
bom, Francis P., Margaret C, Ella Louise, Alta Virginia and George R. 
Mrs. Squibb was born at Lawrenceburg, but spent the early years of her 
life at Louisville, Kentucky, where she received her education. Her parents, 
lioth of whom are now deceased, had come to the L'nited States from ( jermany 
•'It an earlv age. 

Mr. and Mrs. Squibb are members of the Episcopal church and Mr. 
Squibb is at present ser\-ing his third term as school trustee of the town of 
Greendale, which, though a separate cor[)oration, is virtually a part of Law- 
renceburg-. 



828 DEARBORX COUXTV, INDIANA. 

JESSE RUETER. 

Clay township. Dearborn county, Indiana, can well point with pride to 
the quality of her young- manhood, fur she can number among her citizens 
many young men wlio came from some of the older families here, wh<i 
are filled with the worthy ambition of filling useful places in the world and 
have been, or are being, especially fitted for the line they have chosen to fol- 
low. An especially gratifying fact lies in the number who have elected to 
remain in their native community and for this reason the history of Dear- 
born county bids fair to be much greater in the future than it has in the past, 
pleasing as that has been. Among the young men who have chosen tlie pro- 
fessional field for tlieir endeavors, the name of Jesse John Henry Rueter, 
who has fitted himself for the calling of a veterinary surgeon, stands promi- 
nent. 

Jesse Rueter was born in Clay township on }vlay 13, 1S93, ^o" of -'^'-'"' 
gust and [Minnie ( Kuhlmier) Rueter, both natives of Switzerland county, 
this state. AugTJSt Rueter was born on July 6, 1862, a son of Bernard and 
Catherine (Buchstetter) Rueter. both of wdiom immigrated to this countiy 
from Germany. They came when in middle-life and settled in Cfesar Creek 
township, Dearborn county, \\here for a number of years thev gave them- 
selves to arduous agricultural labors. In later life thev retired from such 
active labors and removed to Farmers Retreat, where they passed their de- 
clining years in peace and plenty. They were the parents of nine children: 
Anna, Carrie, Henry, Harmon, August, Fred, Benjamin, George and Will- 
iam. Bernard Renter passed away when eighty-seven yeats of age and 
Catherine died previously. This excellent couple won many warm friends 
after becoming residents of this community, and in memory are held in high 
esteem by many who knew them best. 

August Rueter received his education in the school at Farmers Retreat 
and after completing his education, he took up farm work, working out by 
the month among the farmers of his community. Fie did this for four vears, 
when he went out west and remained until 1891, when lie returned to this 
section and was married. He bought a fami of ninety acres located about 
two miles south of Dillsboro and there lived until the time of his death on Oc- 
tober 2;^. 1911. August Rueter married Minnie Kuhlmier, a young woman 
who had been born near his birthplace on Bear Creek, in Ohio county. When 
five years of age. her parents moved to Farmers Retreat, and there she re- 
ceived her education, and later they took up their residence in .-Vurora, where 
she was married on ^^larch 8, 1891. August Rueter was a ,']evout member 



' i 



■ Ili< i 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. S29 

of tlie Lutlieran church and was one of llie charter nicnil)ers of Trinit)- Luth- 
eran church, at Dillsboro, serving that society as a trustee for a number of 
vears. His pohtical support he gave to the Democratic partv. heing inter- 
ested in its welfare. ^Ir. Rueter was a man who was interested generally in 
all matters which concerned tlie public welfare of his comniuuitv and na- 
tion, keeping well posted on current- events and throwing his influence al- 
ways on the side of the right. He was a strong, clean man who counted the 
best citizens of his commum'ty as his friends. 

Jesse Rueter is one of a family of six children, being the second child of 
the family in order of birth. The eldest is Carl and then after Jesse came 
I'Vank, Anna, Dora and Paul. Both Carl and Anna died when children. 

Jesse Rueter received his elementary education in the common schools 
of Clay township, later attending the German schools at Dillsboro and Tar- 
niers Retreat. He was a good student all through his younger years and 
for special training in his chosen profession, he matriculated in the London 
Veterinary College, graduating therefrom in 1914, at which time he returned 
home. Jesse Rueter is a young man of excellent parts, who bids fair to win 
success in life. He has had the advantage of good training all his life and is 
therefore, fitted above some others, to cope with the affairs of life. As the 
years bring him greater opportunity and experience, it is safe to say he will 
take advantage of every possible good means, and advance rung by rung up 
the ladder of success. 



BEN R. I\L\cELVAIN. 



One of the most resourceful, and consequently one of the most success- 
ful men of Dearborn county, is the gentleman whose sketch is here presented. 
Leing a true son of Indiana, he has never wandered about fri_^m state to state. 
He knew that opportunities awaited him within the limits of this state and 
set himself to work to meet them giving to each due consideration, until now 
he finds himself filling the vocation in life for which he is no doubt best 
fitted, and in which he has been quite successful 

Ben R. ilacElvain, sales manager and cashier of the Lawrenceburg 
Roller Mill Company, at Lawrenceljurg, this county, is a son of Edgar P. 
and Henrietta (Frey) MacElvain, and was born on June i, 1S72, at Seymour, 
Indiana, where he attended the public schools. At the age of eighteen years 
he became a telegraph operator, and at the age of twenty-three, went to L;nv- 
renceburg. where he married and settled down, being employed by the Baiti- 



: Di-dl 



830 DEARBOKX COUNTY, INDIANA. 

more & Ohio Railroad Company. When twenty-nine years of age, he entered 
the employ of the company, witli which he i.s now engaged and has been thns 
engaged for the past fourteen years, first as bookkeeper, and then for the past 
ten years, as sales manager and cashier. Mr. MacElvain is a strong believer 
in Democratic policies, and has always given his vote to that party. lie is a 
memljer of the Presbyterian church, to which he is a generous contributtir, 
and liis fraternal alliances are as follow: Lawrenceburg Lodge Xo. 4. Free 
and Accepted ^Masons; Lawrenceburg Chapter No. 59, Royal Arch ?\lasons, 
Aurora cominandery. Knights Templar, Indiana Consistory. Scottish Rite 
iNIasons at Indianapolis, and to Murat Temple, Ancient Arabic Order, No- 
bles of the Mystic Shrine, at Indianapolis. 

Edgar P. MacElvain. father of Ben R. ]\IacElvain, was a native of Cin- 
cinnati, where he was reared and educated. After growing to manhood 
there he became a locomotive engineer on the old Ohio & Mississippi rail- 
road, which vocation he followed for many years, dying at Cincinnati, at the 
age of seventy-five }-ears. His wife, Henrietta ( Frey) IMacF^hain, was 
born at Seymour, Indiana. They were the parents of two children, Ren R. 
and Anna, the latter of whom became the wife of A. N. Rineliart, of St. Paul, 
Minnesota. Mrs. AlacEhain survives her husband, and is living with her 
daughter in St. Paul. PjOih 'Sir. McEKain and his wife at an earlv date 
became members of the Presbyterian church. Grandfather MacElvain. who 
married Minerva Mc^tlanaman, wa^. an early settler of Cincinnati, where 
he and his wife lived to a round old age. Among the children of this ex- 
cellent old couple were Edgar P., Alonzo, Charles, Belle and Josie. 

On June i. 1895, Dr. Ben R. MacElvain was united in marriage to .\nna 
Harscli, whn was born at Lawrenceliurg on October 35, 1874. daughter of 
Christian and Julia (Brunson) Harsch, to which union were born t!ie follow- 
ing children : Ford. Bemice, Merline, Inez and Esther. F'ord was graduated 
from the Lawrenceburg high school and is mnv an art student in Cincinnati. 
The other children are all in schnol, with the exception of Esther, who died at 
the age of three years. 

Christian and Julia ( Brunson) Harsch, parents of Mrs. MacEhain. are 
natives of Cincinnati and ]\Iilford, Ohio, respectively, and now reside at Law- 
renceburg. The_\- have four children, Anna, Christian. George and ]May. 
Christian Harsch, Sr., is the son of Gottlieb and Elizabeth ( Schaeffer) 
Harsch. both natives of German}', and both now dead, who reared a large 
family of children. Julia (Brunson) MacElvain is the daughter of James 
and Eliza (Varguson) Brunson, natives of New Jersey and Pennsylvania, 
respectively, whose children were INIary, Julia and James. L'pon the death 



:>y:i: vil* 



DEARBORN COUXTY, INDIANA. S3 1 

of her husband, Mrs. Brunsnn married secondly, Marlin Knapp, to which union 
were born two children, Emma and Alice. 

Ben R. MacElvain by his fine executive qualities and careful attention 
to business details, as well as by his consideration for the interests of those 
with whom he is associated, has won for himself an cn\-iable jmsition and is 
cme of the substantial citizens of Lawrenccburg. 



WILLIAM P. SQUIBB. 

The Squibb family has been prominently identified witli the business 
and commercial life of Dearborn counts' for more than three-((uartcrs of a 
century and within that period has contributed materially to the growth and 
prosperity of the coimty. The father of William P. Squibb, was Roliert 
Packingham Squibb, who was well known in his day and generation and an 
influential and highly respected citizen. He lost his life in an explosion 
which occiu'red on the occasion of the celeliration. liy tlie pec_ii)le of Aurora, 
of the running of the first train over the old Ohio & Mississippi railroad, 
when it was first built to Aurora. 

William Pinckney Squibb was torn on Laughcry creek, Ohio county, 
Indiana, on January 15. 1S31, the son of Ro]>ert Packingham and Eliza 
(Cummings) Squibb, to whom were born two other children, Aha M.. who 
was married to Louis ^I. Foulk, and George ^\'. Squibb. 

On December 25, 1S60. he was united in marriage to }>Iary Prances 
Plunmier, the daughter of Samuel and Mary Posey Plummer and sister of 
Scwell and Sidney Plummer, and to tliem were born ten chiUlrcn : ^NI.u-}- .\., 
who married A. E. Geisert : Alta E., who died after slie had attained young 
womanhood; Robert L., Ella R., George L. P., Elorence I.., whr> married 
J. P. Carter; William P., who died in infancy; Xatlianiel E., Horace G. 
and Samuel T., who died at the age of nineteen. All of these who are living- 
reside in Lawrenccburg, except Mrs. Carter, who lixes at Cincinnaii. Mrs. 
William P. Squibb died in 1888 in her forty-fifth year. 

After having been reared on a farm and, by the death of his father, 
thrown on his own resources at a veiy early age. William P. Squibb, a per- 
son of powerful personality, great determinatiijn and much brain power, 
started in business in a small way at Aurora, Indiana, when but se\'enteen 
years of age, being joined some }-ears later by his younger brother, George 
W. Sr|uibb. forming the firm of W. P. Squibb & Company and doing a whole- 



S32 ' DEARBORN COl.'XTY, INDIANA. 

sale liquor and rectifying- business at Aurora, this county. V>\ hard applica- 
tion and sound business ]>rinci[)les, the brothers prospered and in 1869, starter! 
the present distillinc^ business at Lawrenceburg, this county, continuing- 
tog'cther, with their descendants until after over fifty years of steadfast and 
congenial association, the death of George ^V. Squibb occurred in February, 
1913, in his seventy-fifth year, ^^'illia^l P. Squibb survived his brother 
by only eight months, dying on October 15, 1913, in his eighty-third year. 

In 1905, the two brothers had taken into partnership, Robert, George, 
Nathaniel and Horace, sons of William P. Squibb and Thomas and Alex- 
ander, sons of George W". Squibb and Louis H. Foulk, son of Alta Foulk, 
all of whom had been associated with the business since their boyhood davs 
and assisted materially in building it up. After the death of George \Y. 
Squibb, in l^'ebruary. 1913. a corporation was formed to carry on the busi- 
■ness under the same name, \V. P. Sc[uibl_) & Companv, the present acti\-e 
members of the same being Robert. George, Nathaniel and Horace Squibb 
and Louis H. h'oulk. 

Several \-ery large and sulistantial warehouses had been erected by the 
firm in the course of years, in which to properly store and mature their prod- 
uct, the present t.jt'al storage capacity being about sixty thousand barrels of 
whiskey, and in 19 15 the corjioration completed and started to operate a new 
reinforced concrete and brick distillery and elevator, equipped wit!' the most 
approved and economical apparatus for the handling of grain and the con- 
version of the same into the high-grade whiskey for which the companv 
enjoys an enviable reputation in the chaiuiels of their trade throughout the 
United States, so that the small beginning made by William P. Scjuibb in 
1S4S is today one of the leading and substantial institutions of Dearborn 
count^■. 



WILLL\2\I RUBLE. 



William M. Ruble was born and reared to the life of a farmer, but 
like many another ambitious citizen, the lure of the city proved too strong, 
and the quiet neighborhood was abandoned for the rnore exciting atmosphere 
of the state capital. This move proving the other extreme, another change 
was made, and the happy medium was found in the growing town of Aurora. 
which he has since been satisfied to retain as his voting place, and where he 
is ever ready and anxious to please his many customers, in both his paint 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 833 

and wall-paper business, and in his barber shop, the latter of which is equip- 
ped with the latest and most up-to-date appointments. 

William Rulile, now the well-known township trustee, barber, paint 
and wall-paper dealer, of Aurora, this county, son of William }vl. :ind Ilannah 
(McCune) Rulile, was burn on July 14, 1873, at Dillsboro. Indiana, where 
111- was reared anil educated. At the age of nineteen he \vent to work on 
his father's farm, remaining there several years, at the end of which time 
his parents decided upon a change, moving to Indianapolis, but this still did 
not seem to be their liking and in 1892 the family moved to Aurora, which 
has since been their home. ^Ir. Ruble first engaged his services in a brick 
}ard, but soon after learned the l_)ar].;er trade, which he has followed e\'er 
since, and for the past seventeen years, has owned his own shop. Politicallv, 
j\Ir. Ruble is a strong believer in Democratic policies, and has shown his 
public spirit by serving as township trustee, to which office he was elected m 
November, 1914, and which he now holds. Religiously, he is a mcml.ier of 
the Baptist church, and his fraternal alliances are with the 'Independent Or- 
der of Odd Fellows, the Improved Order of Red iMen and the Fraternal Or- 
der of Eagles. 

William M. Ruble, father of the subject of this biographical sketch, was 
born in Butler county. Ohio, and lived there until seven years of age, when 
his parents moved to Dillsboro. and later to Aurora, Indiana. Mr. Ruble \vas 
a cooper by trade, and during the Civil War enlisted in the One Hundreil 
and Forty-sixth Regiment. Indiana \'olunteer Infantry, serving a little o\er 
seven months as a pri\ate. After the war, he moved to Ohio count}, this 
state, and soon after his marriage settled at Dillsboro. where he followed the 
cooper's trade for several years, when he moved to a ten-acre farm in Clay 
township, remaining there about twenty years. William M. Ruble was 
married three times. His first wife died in Ohio county, leaving no children, 
second wife, Hannah (McCune) Ruble, mother of William Ruble, was a 
native of Dillsboro, Dearborn county, and died in 1876, while still a young 
woman. Two children were born to this uniiju. William, of Aurora, and 
John, of Petersburg. Kentucky. William }J. Ruble's third wife was Zerikla 
(iray, but no children ha\-e been born to tliis union. Both are earnest members 
of the Methodist churcii. INIr. Ruble belongs to John A. Platter Post. Grand 
Army of the Republic, and is a Democrat. 

W illiam Ruble's paternal grandfather w-as Leander Ruble, a native of 
Permsylvania, and one of the early settlers of Aurora, where he was engaged 
both as a carpenter and a cooper. He was a soldier in the I'nion army during 
the Civil W^ar, and died in Libbv prison. Plis wife, Julia Ann ( Smith 1 

(33) 



I ••. • i. 



834 DKAKBORX CDL'.NTV, INDIANA. 

Ruble, died during the war. They were tiie parents of fi\e children, Ellen. 
Sarah E., William AL, Mary Jane and Emma. Air. Ruble's maternal grand- 
parents. John and Lorinda (Beck) ?\IcCnne, were both natives of Indiana 
and earlv settlers at I^illsboro. Mr. IMcCune was a justice of the peace, and 
an attorney-atdaw, and was also a preacher of the Universalist faith. He 
died at the age of eiglu_\-fiiur, and his wife when past middle age. They 
were the p^raents of four children, .Margaret, Elizabeth, Hannah and Cornelius. 

William Ruble was mavried to Lydia Henry, who was born in 1S73, 
daughter of Aaron and Sarah (Powell) Henry, and to this union have been 
born three children, Lee Elarold, Arnold Cilenn and Shirley. Aaron Henry, 
the father of Mrs. Ru,ble, is a native of Indiana, as is also his wife. They 
row reside at Aurora, wliere 'Sir. Ilenrv is a park policeman. He ser\ed 
during the Ci\il \\'ar in ihe Ele\enth Regiment, Kentuck)- Volunteer In- 
fantry. To him and his wife were bcirn nine children. Susie, Laura, Annie, 
Lydia, Mar)-, James, Walter, Jesse and Albert. The paternal grandfather 
of ~Mrs. Ruble Vvas Aaron Henrw Sr. He and his wife were nati\es c>f 
Dearborn county, Indiana, and both lived to old age, leaving three children, 
Jesse, Aaron and Lydia. ]>Irs. Ruble's Grandfather Lowell was also a native 
of Dearborn county. 

Mr. Ruble, by perseverance and good management, has added to his 
possessions, and now stands in line as one of the useful and substantial citi- 
zens of Aurora. 



-.;,..; ;, '■ ,,, ^ , . . JOHNE. \TNUP. 

The gentleman whose name is noted above has been a resident of Au- 
rora, where he is a well-known general merchant, long enough to become a 
part of the force tliat makes the wheels of the city go 'round. Everv man 
thus contributing toward the making of history is entitled to his full share 
of recognition in the biographical records of the count^■. 

John I''. \'inup was born on September 22, 1868, in Ohio county. Indiana, 
a son of Henry and ]\Iary (Oatman) Viiuip. He was educated in the dis- 
trict and parochial schools and remained at home on the farm tmtil grown, 
when he was employed b\ the month at farm work until he was about twer.tv- 
seven years of age. Believing he would like a commercial life, he bought a 
general store at Bear Branch, in Ohio county, and in about seven vears dis- 
posed of it, in 190 1, and moved tt) Aurora, where he bought tlie obi Mavi)in 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 835 

dry goods and general mercliandise store, whicli was tlien owned !iv William 
Sti\er, and moved to his present location, continuing- in the husiness to the 
present time, covering a period of over fourteen years. He has built up a 
large and prosperous business and employs several clerks. Mr. X^inuji is a 
Republican and both he and his v/ife are members of the Lutheran church. 

Henry and ]\Iary (Oatman) Yinup were natives of GernKun-. Mr. 
Vinup was reared and educated in his home town, and came to .\mcric,-i w ith 
his parents when eighteen years of age, and located in Ohio connt\-, where 
he engaged in farming, and became the owner f)f one hundred and sixty 
acres of land, where he reared his family. He died on tlie home farm in 
1903, aged seventy-six years, seven months and nine days. His widow died 
in 1910, aged about seventy years. They were both members of the Lutheran 
church, and were the parents of eight children, namely : Henry, who make his 
home in Ohio county: Caroline, who married Charles Luke, of Ca?sar Creek 
township, this cminty: William, who li\es in the same township: Anna, who 
married \\'illiam Laker, of Clay township; John F., the immediate subject 
of this sketch : Sophia, the wife of Herman Berner, of Clay township: George, 
who lives on the home place in Ohio county, and Lucinda, the wife of Fred 
Ohlmanseak, of C;esar Creek township, this county. 

Mr. \'inup's paternal grandfather was a teacher and farmer. His wife 
died in Germany and he died in Ohio county, Indiana. Thev were the parents 
of the following children : Andrew, Henry, William and Catherine, the latter 
of whom is the onlv one now li\'ing. Grandfather Vinup was twice married 
and had two children b}- the second marriage, Charles and Jelta, both now 
deceased. Mr. Vinup's maternal grandparents, Frank and Mary Oatman, 
came from Germany and were among the early settlers of Ohio count\ , where 
he followed farming and where he spent his last da}s, dying at the age of 
eighty-five. They were the parents of the following children; Mar_\-, Will- 
iam, Henr}-, Margaret, Louisa and Fmma. 

John F. \^inup was married to Amelia C. Luke, to which union one 
sou has been born, Eugene, who died at the age of five years. Mrs. X'inup 
was born on July 8. iSoj, in Cffisar Creek township, this county. The 
parents of Mrs. Vinup \\ere early settlers in Dearborn county, aiul died on 
the home farm in Crcsar Creek to\vnship. They were the parents (-)f the fol- 
lowing children: William, who was killed in battle during the C\\i\ War: 
Caroline, John, Charles, Rosa, Hannah and Amelia. 

J<.ihn r". \'inup occupies a position of high esteem in the estimation of 
the citizens of his home town and is alwa}'S courteous and an:\ious to plea^e 
the public in every possible way. 



836 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

EDWARD HOLTHAUSE. 

After various vicissitudes and misfortunes, the plucky man to whom 
the name at the head of the following biographical sketch belongs, has estab- 
lished himself in a prosperous and remunerative business, to the success of 
which he is thoroughly entitled. His undertaking and livery establishment, 
at Aurora, this county, is one of the best-equipped and most up-t(^-date in 
this communit}', where he has an extensive circle of friends and is well known 
throughout an area extending to a distance far beyond the precincts of his 
home town. His courteous attention tn the wants of his customers has dnne 
much towards insuring the successful business which aimually comes his way. 

Edward Holthause was \x<Tn on X<ivember .|. 1858, at Covington. 
Kentucky, a son of Benjamin and Elizabeth (>ilauntcl) Holthause. He 
was reared and educated at Covington, attending the parochial schools, after 
which he entered Nelson's Business College. Upon finishing school, he 
learned the upholstering trade, and later the molding trade, which he fol- 
lowed until ]\Iarch 26, 1S81, at which time he went into business for himself, 
starting a small upholstering and repairing business, making mattresses, 
etc., in Lawrenceburg, this county. In 18S2 Mr. Holthause lost everything' 
he had in the flood of that }-ear. necessitating a new start in business. In 
1883 he located at Aurora, engaging in the furniture and undertaking busi- 
ness, which he later discontinued and mo\'ed to Washington, Indiana, where 
he was engaged for more than four years in the same line. Selling out there, 
he moved to Cincinnati and engaged in a livery and undertaking business 
which in nineteen months he sold and then returned to Aurora, where he has 
since followed the same vocation. Mr. Holthause introduced the first rubber- 
tired bugg}' and surrey into Dearborn county, also the first white hearse and 
funeral car and amliulrmce fitted w ith rubber tires, and claims to have had one 
of the first gasoline automobiles in Dearborn county. He was one of the 
first embalmers in the state of Indiana, having graduated from the Clark 
School of Embalming, at Indianapolis, in 18S7. Professor Clark told him 
at that time that he was the youngest man on his roll in the state. IMr. Holt- 
hause passed the state board examinations for embalming in both Indiana 
and Kentucky. In 1885 and 1S86 he was assistant superintendent of the 
Aurora Valley Eurniture Company, which position he abandoned to go into 
the furniture business for himself. bu\ing out Matthew Herring. Politically, 
Mr. Holthause is a Dennocrat. and has shown his public spirit by serving on 
the township advisory board for several years, of which board he is now 
president. He and his wife are members of the Catholic church. He belongs 



l-i-l • . I.->.-.r! '-r 



DEAKBORN COUNTV, INDIANA. 837 

to St. Joseph's Society, and lias always taken an active interest in ttic \\elfare 
of Aurora, liaving disphned his pubhc spirit b}- estabhsliing a city morgue 
and an emergency hospital 

Benjamin Hohhause, father of Edward Hohhause, was born at 
Bentheini. Germany, where he attended schnol until fourteen years of age, 
and then came to America with his parents, who settled at Covington, Ken- 
tucky, where he grew to manhood. He was a molder by trade, which he 
followed until his death, which occtu'recl at Co\'ington, in 1896. lie was a 
teamster during the Civil ^\'ar, and dri;>ve a six-mule team tc") a commissary 
wagon, hauling provisions and ammunition. Elizabeth (Mauntcl) Hohhause. 
his wife, was also a native of Germany, her birth occurring at Ossenljrcck. 
At an early day ]\Ir. Holthause and his wife became members of the Catholic 
church. She siu'vives him, and is now seventy-nine \'ears of age. Thev were 
the parents of the following children, Edward, of Aurora; Sarah, who mar- 
ried Clement Hembrock. of Covington, Kentucky; Anna and iMary. both 
single, who mak'e their home in Covington, Kentucky, and five others, who 
died young. Mrs. Holthause came with her parents to America wdien bt;t ten 
years old, and settled at Cincinnati, where she grew to womanhood and was 
married. Air. Holthausc's paternal grandparents were "Benjamin and Char- 
lotte Holthause. the former a shoemaker by trade. Both died at Co\ington 
at ripe old ages. The}- were the parents of three children, Benjamin, Anthony 
and a daughter, Anna. Mr. Holthause's maternal grandfather, Louis [Maun- 
tel, followed teaming at Cincinnati, where he owned a number of teams. 
Both he and his wife died there, he at the age of ninety-four, and she at' 
ninety-eight. Among their childreri were John. Elizabeth and Frank. 

Edward Holthause was niarried on November 5, 18S0, to Belle Biasing, 
born at Lawrenceburg, daug'hter of Eawrcnce and Barbara Biasing, who dicl 
twii years after her marriage, at the age of twenty- three. One son was born 
to that union. Edward, Jr., who is following the undertaking business at 
Lincoln. Nebraska. 

Lawrence Biasing, father of Airs. Belle Holthause, was a native of 
Germany, 'and her mother was born in Hardintown, Dearborn county, In- 
diana, JMarch 6, 1S34, and died on August 7, 1914. at Lawrenceburg, aged 
eighty years, five mcMiths and one day. He and his wife were the parents 
of two daughters and two sons, Belle, Lawrence. Charles and Lucy, the two 
latter being the only ones now- living. 

On May 25. 18S5. Edward Holthau>e married, secondly. Maggie Car- 
roll, daughter of Patrick and Maiw rDumeen) Carroll, to which union two 
children were born, John and Millie, both of whrnn died of diphtheria, the 



838 DEARRORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

former at the age of five years and the latter at the age of three years. 
Patrick Carroll, father of !Mrs. Maggie Holthause, was born in Ireland and 
came to America, locating at Chattanoog-a, Tennessee, \\here he died, .\tlcr 
the death of her husband I\Irs, Carroll, who also was a native of Ireland, 
moved to Aurora, about 1S70, with her two chiMren, Fr;uik and Maggie. 
She was married there to INIartin Cochran, who died aged seventy }-ear^ 
There were no children born to this union. ]Mrs. Cochran died in 1905, at 
the age of sixty years. 

Mr. Holthause is ver_\' popular in a social way, being a member of the 
City Business ]\Ien's Club, and i)f the Automobile Club, and is chairman nf 
the good roads committee of the Ohio \'alley 3.totor Club. He is a thor- 
oughly enterprising and successful business man and enjoys the respect and 
confidence of all his business associates. 



GEORGE DEMAS. 



The biographer is pleased to include in this volume the sketch of a man 
who belongs to the type of foreign-l;orn citizens that this country should de- 
light to honor. Bereft of a mother's tender care at the age of six, and in 
other ways handicapped, ]\Ir. Demas earl}^ decided that he would win in the 
battle of life, and so steadily has he held to his purpose that now in his young 
manhood, he has realized his ambition, and has become an .\merican citizen 
respected by those countrymen with whom lie has made his adopted home, 
Mr. Demas, who owns a large and attractive ice cream parlor and confection- 
ery store in .-\urora, this count}', was liorn in the city of Trekkala, state of 
Thessaly, Greece, August 20, 1S81, 

George Demas and his brother, James, a confectioner of Seymour, In- 
diana, were the only children of Nicholas and Rena (Spanos) Demas, natives 
of Trekkala. Greece. Both parents died at a comparati\'ely earh- age, the 
father being forty-eight, and the mother only twent\--si.x, when they left iheir 
sons to the mercy of the world and their own brave hearts. They died in 
Trekkala, he in 1S96, and she in 1SS7, and were buried with the ceremonies 
of their church, the Greek Orthodox Catholic. The father's father was James 
Demas, and he and his wife became the parents of Nicholas and A^asclcke. 
The latter married Athanese Vowondas, and is now a widow in Trekkala. 
Unfortunately, the family history of the subject's mother, a brave industrious 
little woman, is lost. But many of her estimable traits of character, it is said, 
survi\-e in her children. ■• 



>'M 



DEARBORN COUNTY. INDIANA. 839 

George Denias spent his bo}hood in classic old Greece, receiving his edu- 
cation in Trekkala. a cit}- of twenty-five tliousand inhahitants. A lad of six 
when his mother was taken, he grew ti5 young manhood in his nati\'e city, 
;uid was onlv twent\-two _\"ears of age, ^vhen b^■ his own efforts, he managed 
1(1 cross the ocean and land in New York with scarcely anything ni'ire than 
\,n\)r and faith iu himself as his capital. On the night of his arrival in .Amer- 
ica, January 2, 1903. George Demas departed for Dayton, Ohio, where for- 
tunately, he met some friends. Putting to them the very practical question 
as to what vocation it would be best for him to follow in the new country, 
he was advised to become a confectioner, and he was sent to Columbus. Oliio. 
to work for the firm of Zaharako Brothers. From this time on, until he 
finalh- settled in .Aurora, his life was somewhat \aried as to residences, but 
each change of place was made for the purpose of bettering his materird con- 
dition. Having worked two years for the above-mentioned firm, Air. Demas 
went into business in partnership with his brother in Columbus, Indiana, a 
partnership which lasted for five years. Removing to Connersville, Indiana, 
George Demas started in a business enterprise for himself, remaining in that 
town for eighteen months. The two following years, he had a store in Wa- 
bash, Indiana, and then spent a similar period of the time in New Albany, 
Indiana, from which place he went to Louisville, Kentucky, where he re- 
mained one }'ear, at the end of which time he went to Brazil, Indiana, where 
he remained for a short time, and in 1913, liicated at Aurora, where he opened 
a most attractive ice-cream parlor and confectionery shop. There he has 
exercised all of his knowledge and skill in the manufacture of sweets, and 
so successful has he been that his well-kept establishment is acknowledged 
to be the center of an enviable trade. 

George Demas has not lived alone all of these years, for on October 14, 
1910, Alary Athanaseade became his bride. Airs. Demas is the daughter of 
-Anthony and Klyo (Alavros) Athanaseade, and was born in V'olo, Greece, 
in 1885. Her father died there in February, 1915. at the age of eighty-one 
years. The motlier. who is now fifty years of age, is still living. The five 
children born to this couple are Mary, Arestaer, Demetra, Athanase and Jones. 
During all of his mature life, the father was a wholesale grocer. Air. and 
Airs. Demas. are members of the Greek Catholic church, and Air. Demas, who 
since coming to this country has become .somewhat interested in our politics, 
votes the Democratic ticket. 

Although at first unfamiliar with our language and customs. Air. Demas 
has overcome this handicap, and by his industry, ambition and persrjnal char- 
acteristics has won not only success, but the respect of the citizens of his adop- 



1 



840 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

ted home. He is a wide awake biisine.'^s man, and has contributed something 
to the commercial interests of tlie town in which lie has chosen to make his 
home. Both Mr. and ^Jrs. Demas have many friends and are held in high 
esteem by all who know them. 



WI].L.\RD :d. DEAN. 



To do justice to the bi'.'graphical sketch of a successful professional man is 
a difficult task in the sjjace allutted in a volume of this nature, for no doubt 
there would be sufficient in.teresting data in the experience of a man holding 
the p'lsitiyn of prosecuting attorney to fill more than a volume of this size; 
but when it is pointed out that a man has made a success of any undertaking in 
life, it speaks volumes; for in these days of competition and scientific training, 
the m.an who climbs to the top possesses a force beyond the average. 

W'illard yi. Dean, for many years a prominent and well-known attrirne\- 
at-law at .\urora, this county, and nuw prosecuting- attornev fur the se\enth 
judicial circuit of Indiana, cumprising the counties of Dcarljurn and Ohio, 
was born un October 4, 1S70, ai Cochran, now a part of Aurora, a son of John 
and Cecelia ( Dobel) Dean. He attended the public schools of Cochran, and 
later went to St. Mar_\''s parochial school at Aurora. His first emi)loyment 
^vas in the capacity of a machinist but continued thus engaged frir a 
short time only, his inclination being in the direction of the law. and he 
scion entered the ^McDonald Law School .at Cincinnati from which he was 
graduated in 1904, being admitted to the bar the same vear. He also took' 
a course in the law department of the Michigan Universitv at Ann .\rbor, 
^Michigan, \^■here he performed regular wi.irk in the literarv departn.ient. Mr. 
Dean established his law offices at Aurora in 1906, and built up a very suc- 
cessful legal practice. He lield the position of cit\- attornev for three 
years, and in 1914, was elected to the office of prosecuting attornev for the 
seventh judicial circuit, resigning as city attorney on December 31, 1914, and 
at once entered upon his duties as prosecuting attorney. On January i, 1915, 
r^Ir. Dean associated with him his brother, John Dean, Jr., under the firm 
name of Dean & Dean. John Dean, Jr., is a graduate of the Aurora high 
school, and also attended the parochial school at Aurora. He was graduated 
from the Indiana University, at EIo(.imington, in iQii, after which he \vas 
engaged in the sale of law bor.ks, traveling from place to place for a period 
of two years, at the end of which time he took a post-graduate course at Cin- 
cinnati, just prior to entering into partnership v.-ith his brother, W'illard. 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 84 1 

He was elected city attorney in January. 19 15. Mr. Dean and liis brother 
are still bachelors, and both belong to the Catholic church. They are mem- 
bers of the Knights of Columbus, the Dearborn County Bar Association and 
the Aurora Commercial Club. 

John Dean, father of Willard M. Dean, was a native of Pennsylvania, 
and came to this county as a small boy locating at Cochran where he was 
employed as a machinist in the old Stedman foundry and machine works for 
many years. His wife, Cecelia (Dobel) Dean, was born in County ]vIayo, 
Ireland. Their children were eight in number, namely: James V., of Kansas 
City, Missouri; Silas D.. of Aurora. Indiana; Willard M.. the subject of this 
sketch: Anna M.. a teacher in the public schools of Aurora; Cecelia yi., a 
teacher in the academy at Asheville, North Carolina; Rosella G.. who mar- 
ried Fred J. Dober. of Richmond, Indiana; John, Jr., law partner of his 
brother Willard, and Theodosia R. 

The senior John Dean was the son of Peter and Bridget ( Cochran) Dean, 
natives of County ^layo. Ireland, who came to xA.merica about 1840, locating in 
Pennsylvania, whence they came to Indiana, locating at Wilmington, from 
which point they moved to Aurora, atid finally settled at Cochran. Peter Dean 
was drowned when comparati\-ely a young man and his widow lived to the 
age of seventv-eight vears. She died at Cincinnati and was buried in River 
View cemeterv- by the side of her husband. They were the parents of three 
children, John, 3.1ary, the wife of Patrick Feeley. and ]\[ichael. 

Mr. Dean's mother was the daughter of James and r\[ary (McGrath) 
Dobel, natives of the County Mayo. Ireland, and early settlers in Dearborn 
county. Tames Dobel was a contractor and stone mason, who lived to be 
eighty-seven years old. his wife living to the age ijf seventy-nine. Tlxy 
were the parents of six children, Patrick. Anthony. Cecelia. Luke. ]Mary and 
Julia. 

The well-known law firm of Dean & Dean, is doing a thriving legal 
practice, and bids fair to become one of the most successful law finns in Dear- 
born county, the members of this progressive firm being very popular du-ough- 
out this section of the state, their practice bringing them in connection with 
affairs bevond the confines of their home county. Both are Democrats ard 
are earnestly interested in the political affairs of their home county. Willard 
M. Dean is secretary of the Democratic central committee and his counsels in 
the delilxirations of the party managers in this county receive much weight. 
He is public spirited and enterprising, taking a warm interest in all matters per- 
taining to the advancemeiU of the better affairs of this county and enjoys 
the confidence and esteem of the entire communitv. 



,.;., ■■:■; fr 



S42 DEARr.ORX COUNTY, INDIANA. 

FRANK HEFFEI3IIRE. 

Frank Heffelmire has spent the greater portion of his hie in Caesar Creek 
township, where he has successfully followed agriculture, and through his 
sound and progressive business methods, has made for himself a name that 
stands at the head as an enterprising and representative citizen. His farm 
is one of the most attractive places in the township, and consists of almost 
two hundred acres. 

Frank Heffelmire was born on August i. 1S64, in the township where 
he now resides. He is a son of Frederick and Caroline (Tiepper) Heffel- 
mire. His education was obtained in C;csar Creek township and Farmers 
Retreat, and after school he remained on the farm for two years, assisting 
his father. At the age of twenty-one years he became interested in seeing 
other parts of the country and took a trip to Nebraska where he remained 
two years, returning to Caesar Creek and bought the old homestead, con- 
sisting of eightv acres, which he later sold and bought another tract of ninety- 
two acres, to which he added one hundred acres more, and is still lix'ing on 
the place. ]Mr. Heffelmire has always given his ardent support to the Demo- 
cratic party. He is a member of the Lutheran church, of which all the other 
members of his family are also members. 

Frederick and Carolina (Piepper) Heffelmire. parents of Frank Heffel- 
mire, \\'ere natives of Germany. They immigrated to .\merica and came to 
Indiana, settling in Csesar Creek township. Dearborn county, where ]Mr. 
Heffelmire bought eighty acres of land, on which he lived until his death, 
which occurred in 1SS7, at sixty-nine years of age. Mr. Heffelmire was mar- 
ried twice, his first wife Ijeing Mary ( Calkmier) Heffelmire. by wh< im he 
had three children : John, Louisa and Julia. By his second wife, Caroline 
(Piepper) Heffelmire, he had twelve children: Hein-y, Eliza, ^lary, William, 
Amelia, Elizabeth, George, Frank, Fred, Anna, Caroline and Charlie. Eliza 
and Henry died in infancy. Caroline (Piepper) Fleffelmire died in 1013. 
aged eightv-two years, after \\hich his widow. Caroline, \\as married to 
Antex Opp, and lived at Farmers Retreat. 

Frank Heffelmire was united in marriage on December 4, 1890, to Anna 
Linkmeyer, daughter of Christian and ]\Iinnie (Coleman) Linkmeyer. She 
was born on March 4, 1866, in Cx-sar Creek township, and received her edu- 
cation in the district schools. To this union five children were born, Clifford, 
Elmer, Herbert, Lawrence and Alina. 

Christian and ^Minnie (Coleman) Linkmeyer, parents of ]Mrs. Frank 



\ J -■ .-,T| 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 843 

lleffelniire, were early setllers in Cxsar Creek townsliip, aucl livcil there un- 
til tlicir death. Mr. Liiikmeyer cl_\'ing in 1910, aged seventy-three }ears. 

Mr. Hcffelmire i.s a gentleman whose dailv life has been upright, and 
whose in.dustrious habits have set a good example for his children, as wx-ll 
as others, who are willing to learn from those who have had practical ex- 
perience in hotli agriculture and the important business of being a gocjcl and 
desirable citizen. ' ,,- 



FRANK M. COX. 



The name at the head of this sketch is that of a man who is a fine ex- 
ample of the progressiv'C instinct and determination of the present generati'm 
His pathway has not all the way been strewn with flowers, lie has had 
his full share of thorns and "rainy days," but he struggled witli the tlmrns 
and, with the knowledge that all things must come to an end, he i)LM-se\'ered 
until the sunshine dro\'e the clouds away, and is' now well established as a 
representative merch.ant ijf Aurora, where he is highly respected for his fine 
character and the interest he takes in the welfare of his city. 

Frank Ak Cox was born on October 26. 1S59, at Bellevue (now Cram's 
Post Office), Kentucky, son of Thomas and }\larietta (Carson) Cox. When. 
he was three years old, his parents moved to Petersburg, Kentucky, where he 
attended the public .scliools until thirteen years of age, and then engaged 
his services on a farm b}- the month, covering a period of four }-ear3. after 
which he was employed in a distillery at Petersburg, remaining thus engaged 
until twenty-one years old, when he began clerking in a general store, after 
a time going into the grocery business for himself. Fie later sold his grocery 
and, in July, 1S95, located in Aurora, where he entered the emplo}- of \\ . \\\ 
Lamar, remaining thus engaged a number of )'ears. at the end of which time 
he purchased the general store of R. J. Gardiner, and is now doing a verv- 
successful business, being one of the prosperous merchants of Aumra. Mr. 
Cox is a Democrat, to which party he has always given his loyal support. 
While in Petersburg he was president of the board of trustees one term, and 
since locating in Aurora served as councilman for two years, during which 
time many improvements were made in the way of street paving, cement 
sidewalks, waterworks, and the rebuilding of the R(\val wheel works, wliich 
had burned. Mr. Cox is a member of Harmony Lodge No. 69, Knights of 
Pythias, of which he is a charter member, and also is a member of Walla 
Walla Tribe No. 229, Improved Order of Red Men, and of the Modern 
Woodmen of America, in the latter of which orders he has been verv active. 



844 IIEAKI'.ORX COLXTV. INDIANA. 

Mr. Cox is a large stockholder in the Fortuiie Mining- Company, whose mine 
is located near Prescott, Arizona. 

Thomas Cox, lather of P'rank M. Cox. was a native of Virginia, where 
he was reared on a farm. He moved to Kentucky and followed various pur- 
suits, but was a miller by trade. He died in Petersburg, Kentucky, in 1S93, 
aged sixty-three years. His wife, Marietta (^^ Carson) Cox, was also a native 
of Virginia. She survived her husband and died in 1910, aged seventy-six 
years. The_\- were earl\- settlers at l^ellevue, Kentucky, and were members 
of the Christian church. Th.ev were the parents of five children, as follow: 
Frank M., of Aurora; \A'illiam, deceased; .Vllen S., of Indiatiapolis; Charles, 
of P^etersburg, and Anna, who is the wife of Levi Spencer, a commission 
merchant in Chicago. Thomas Co.\ had a brother, John, and his wife was 
one of four children born to her parents, the others being Marion, .\nn ''.ud 
Arminta. 

Frank 'M. Cox was united in marriage on June 7, 18S5, tn Lill_\' IJ. Mc- 
Guffin, who was born on April 2, 1865, at Rising Sun, Indiana, daughter of 
Shannon and Harriet (Stcgner) ^IcGuffin, to which union two daughters 
have been born, Ethel and Frances. Ethel, who was graduated from the 
Aurora high school, married PMwin ^\'. Randall, of Chicago, and has one 
son, Marcus ; Frances clerks in her father's store. Mr. Cox is a member of 
the Christian church and ]\Irs. Cox and her daughters are members of the 
Presbyterian church. 

Shannon McGuffin, father of !Mrs. Cox, was a native of Pennsylvania 
and his wife of Indiana. They were early settlers in Ohio county, Indiana, 
and were the parents of seven children, namely: Ouella, Jerome, ^Nlary, 
Lilly P>., Perry, Nellie and Richard. 

Mr. Cox is one of the enterprising citizens of Aurora, where he has 
a large circle of \varm and admiring friends, and he and his wife are held 
in the highest esteem by all. 



LOUIS D. STOLE. 



Dealing out honest measure and honest meat in return for honest money 
has always been the pivot on which the success of Louis D. Stoll's business 
has turned. He not only holds his old customers, but. by reason of the 
reputation already established, he is constanth- adding new ones. In treating 
one's fellow men as one would be treated, the average citizen is bound to 
get his innings in the long nui, and tlie square deals given by Mr. St'^ll all 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 845 

along' life's pathway are now bringing him compound interest in his present 
line of business. 

Louis D. Stoll, proprietor of tlie Stoll meat market, at Aumra. tliis 
county, is a son of Leonhart and Caroline ( Sauter) Stoll. He was l.iorn 
on No\-ember 2, 1859, at Covington, Kentucky, where he attended the pa- 
rochial and ])ublic schools, going later to St. Xavicr's College, at Cinciun<ili. 
after which he went to work in the liutchcring estaljlishnient of his brother- 
in-law, Peter Fiinck, at Covington, where he remained fo'" one year, at the 
end of which time, in 1878, he mo\'ed to Aurora, where he entered into 
partnership with his father in the butchering business, which arrangement 
was continued, with the exception of about three years, until his father's 
death, in January. 1915, since which time he and his l)r(.)tliers, August and 
William, have been partners in business under the firm name of the Stoll 
Meat Company, incorporated with a capital stoclc df three thousand dollars. 
The}- have a strictly first-cla^s meat market, with modern improvements, and 
do an extensive business. Politically, ]\Ir. Stoll is a Republican, and his 
religious belief lies with the Lutheran church. Pie is also one of the direc- 
tors of the Aurora State Bank. 

Leonliart Stoll. father of Louis D. Stoll, was born on September 10, 
182S. in Aluhlhausen, Alsace, his mother dying when he was but three clays 
old. At the age of thirteen he left home, going to Paris, then to Havre, and 
later immigrating to America, landing at New Orleans, going from thence 
to Louisville, Kentuck}-, and from there to Covingtun, Kentucky. He was 
married to Karoline Sauter in 1S54, and this happy union was blessed with 
eighteen children, ten of whom are still living to testify to the goodness and 
nobility of their highly honored parents. Fifty-one years of happy wedded 
life was granted this g>:iod man and his wife. They celelirated their golden 
wedding anniversary in ioo_|, and Mrs. Stoll died in the following _\ear. 

In 187S Leonhart Stoll and family moved to Aurora, and there, for 
nearly thirty-se\'en years, he lived a life above reproach; reared his children 
to noble men and women and comlucted so wisely his business, that his name 
stood for the very liest in his line, success crowning his cnnscienlinus efforts. 
Few men h.ad more friends than Mr. Stoll and few are there blessed with so 
noble a line of descendants; ten children, forty-two grandchildren and twelve 
gieat-grandchildren being left to mourn their loss. At the venerable age of 
eighty-si.x years, four months and eightecTi fla_\s. Leonhart Stull rests in 
peace. The following obituary notice from a local paper is appropriate at 
this place : . ■ 



■ll-AU ,.:f, ['•• 1. 



'.J. a. ■ yi: ' {n;, 



846 ' DEAKUOKX COVSTY, INIHANA. 

"Leonhart Stoll, one of our most highl\- respected citizens, rlied nt Ins 
home on Park avenue, Friday, January ^9, 1915, after a l)rief illness. He 
had been apparently in the best of health, but on Wednesday, complained 
of not feeling well, when a pii}-sician was summoned and the difficnltx" 
thought to be overcome, but at half-past nine b'riday morning, the life work 
of Leonhart Stoll was finished, and his S()ul passed to the "great bescmd." " 
Mr. Stoll was buried in Ri\er \"iew cemeier)-. The children of Leonhart 
and Karoline (Sauter) Stoll, now li\-ing, are as follow: Catherine, Louis 
D., Josephine, Caroline, Flora, August, Bcrnardena, Anna, ^largaret and 
\\^illiam, the other eight having died while young. Catherine is the wife 
of Peter Funck, and resides at Aurora; Louis D., the subject of this sketch, 
also lives at Aurora; Josephine became the wife of John Pelgan and re>ides 
at San b^rancisco, California; Caroline is now ?\Irs. Robert Dean, of Indianaj)- 
olis ; Flora married Joseph .Maffe_\-, of Kiplc_\" county, Indiana; August, as- >- 
ciated with his jirotber, Louis, in business, also makes his hoiue at ,\urora; 
Bernardena is ]Mrs. Theodore Loerr, of Lidianapolis ; Aima is the wife of 
Frederick Schmitz, of Covington, Kentucky; Margaret is the widow of Harry 
Siemantel, of Aurora, and William, also of Aurora, is associated in business 
with his brothers, Louis D. and August. The modier of these children w;as 
the daughter of Andreas and Bernardena (Lieberman) Sauter, natives of 
Germany and early settlers at Covington, Kentucky, wdiere they died well ad- 
vanced in years. They were blessed with seven children, namely: Caroline, 
August Benjamin. ]^Iary, Flrira. Pemielia and Bernardine. 

Louis G. Stoll was united in marriage on November 24, iSSo, to Sarah 
Evansberg, who was born on b'ebruar\- 7, 1859. at Covington, Kentucky, 
daughter of Jacob and Christina ( Huttenlocher) Evansberg", to which union 
have been born two children, A\'alter and John C. Walter died when three 
years old and John C. is engaged in the meat busin.ess at Oak Creek, Colorado. 
He was united in marriage to Jennie Wintersohl, by whom he has had one 
child — John. Mrs. Stoll is an earnest member of the Lutheran church. 

Jacob and Cliristina (Huttenlocher) Evansberg, parents of ]\h's. Stoll. 
were natives of Germany, and early settlers at Covington, Kentucky, botii 
of whom are now deceased, the former dying in 1915, aged eighty-three 
years. They were the parents of the following children ; William, Caroline. 
Mollie, }iIarA , John, Frederick, Michael and Emma. 

Louis G. Stoll commands the respect and esteem of the communitv in 
which he resides, and in point of progressiveness and keen business judgment, 
has few superiors. 



■:'t'' DEARBORN' COUNTY, INDIANA. ' 8^7 

..-..::.,. EDWARD SCHL'LZ. . 

Having- tried varimis comljinations in his nati\c cit_\', and not hcinc; en- 
tirely satisfied with the field offered for the display of his qualifications, 
F.flward Schiilz al)andoned th.e state of his Ijirth and selected th" grijwiny 
and jirosperous little city of Ain-<_)ra, which has returned him gin id interest 
on his imestnient, and he now stands at the head in his particular line nf 
husiness. owning one of the hest-equipjied merchant-tailoring and men's 
eliitliing- establishments in Aurora, where he is always prejjared to meet the- 
wants of his large and loyal list of customers. 

Edward Schulz is a son of Robert and Josephine (Licln'nger) Schulz, 
and was born on I^'ebruary 21, 1S61, at Cincinnati, Ohio, where he was reared 
and attended the public schools. After leaving school, his first emplovnient 
was in a grocerv store, where he remained two years on a weekly salarv of 
one dollar and fifty cents. He then was engaged with Meyers & Demicli. in 
the furnishing goods business in Cincinnati, after which he was with H. & 
G. Eeder in the same line for about eight years, and then tcok charge of th.e 
wholesale establishment of Bell, iMiller & Company, now "d'he h'air," at 
the corner of Sixth and Race streets. After a period of service with that 
concern lasting about six years, iMr. Schul.7 severed his association with that 
firm and in iS8g moved to Aurora, where he and his brother, William, en- 
gagc'l in the clothing and furnishing business together for two vears, at the 
end of which time he bought his brother's interest and, in 1894. toiik his 
brother, Otto, in with him. In 1S96 Otto went to Columbus. Indiana, since 
which time Edward Schulz has been conducting the business alone. He has 
a fine store, and carries a large stock of goods, engaging' in a general mer- 
chant-tailoring line, handling a fine line of men's clothing. He is a th(.ir- 
oughly up-to-date haberdasher, employing a number of clerks. In addition 
to the foregoing ]Mr. Schulz is president of the \A'ymond Cooperage Com- 
pany, of Aurora, a director of the Indianapolis Chair and Furniture Company, 
of Aurora, and a stockholder in the Aurora Creamery Company. He is a 
Republican and his fraternal alliances are with Aurora Lodge Xo. 51. b'ree 
and Accepted Masons: Aurora Chapter No. 13, Royal Arch Masons; .Vurora 
Commander}- Xo. 17. Knights Templar; Harmony Lodge Xo. 69, Knights of 
I'ythias; Walla Walla Tribe Xo. 229, Improved Order of Red Men, and the 
Royal Arcanum, and is also a member of the Aurora Comn-iercial Club. 

Robert and Josephine ( Lichinger) Schulz. parents of Edward Schulz. 
were natives of Germany. Robert Schulz w-as reared and educated in the 
land of his birth and came to America when a young man, locating in Cin- 



I -,! V: ! -I 



84S DEARBORN COUXTYj INDIANA. 

cinnati, where he followed the trade of a machinist, dying there is 1SS5, at^ed 
fifty-seven years. His wife survived him and died in 1903, aged sixtv-eight 
years. The}- were both nieniljcrs of the Evangelical church. Being an 
expert mechanic, Mr. Schulz was employed on the construction of the gov- 
ernment monitiMs during tlie Civil War. To this couple were horn the fol- 
lowing children: Amelia (^ deceased), who was the wife of .Vlexander 
Demick; Edward, who lives at Aurora; Otto, of Cincinnati, Ohio; William, 
and one who tlied in infancy. Robert Schulz's father was a member of the 
lesser nobility in German)- and was known as Von Schulz. lie and his wife 
died in Germany, where he was an (jffice hokler. llie\- were the parents of 
two children. Robert and Emil. ^Ir. Schulz's maternal grar.dfather dieil while 
crossing the water and was buried at sea. His widow came to .\merica with 
her children and settled at Cincinnati, where she died. Tlieir children were 
five in nunil>er, namely: Josephine, v.ho married i'iobert Schulz; Catherine, 
Gerstel, who is now I\lrs. Ulrich, and two others, one of whom was drowned 
in the Ohio river when thirteen years old, and the other died from home- 
sickness at Cincinnati. 

Edward Schulz was married on November 24. iSSS. to Rosa Good, 
daughter of T'"ihn and Elizabeth Gond, to which union the following children 
-were born: Edward, a clerk in liis father's store; Arthur, also a clerk in his 
father's store, married 'Slay Reed, of Cincinnati, and has one child, Joseph 
Arthur; Rosa, who married Walter Rea, of West .Vurora. and has one child, 
.Donald, and Amelia, -vvho married Edgar Hizer, of Center township, this 
county, and has one child, Aldemore. 

Edward Schulz is a puljlic-si)irited and emeri)rising business man of 
x-\urora, and always takes an active interest in the welfare and progress of the 
citv in which he lives. 



EDWARD BLAKE LAMAR. 

In contributing materially to the advancement of his home cit}', Edward 
Blake Lamar has accomplished results of a lasting qualitv, where others have 
made sad failures. He made up his mind early in life that the vocation of a 
merchant was suited to his particular qualifications, possibly because of the 
business already establi.shed by his father, in whose employ his most valuable 
training was secured. At any rate, he decided wisely, since he has built 
up a valuable shoe trade, and is one of Aurora's most successful shoe mer- 
chants. 



DEARBORN COUXTY, INDIANA. 849 

Edward Blake Lamar was horn on July 22, 1852, at Maysville, Mason 
county, Kentucky, a son of William W. and Elizabeth E. (Blake) Lan;ar, 
natives of Ahar^'land. His education was secured first at a pnvate school at 
Maysville, and later at the public schools at Newport, Kentucky, after which 
he attended Beach Grove Academy under Professor Richardson, who also 
taught r,en. U. S. Grant and James C. Blaine. After leaving school Air. Lamar 
liegan clerking in his father's store at Aurora, going' from there to St. Louis, 
and later to San Francisco. Returning to St. Louis he was married there and 
then went to Council Bluffs, Iowa, with his wife, and associated himself with 
Henry Eiseman in the dry goods Inisincss. 'Sir. Lamar's mother died while 
he was at Council Bluffs, and he returned to Aurora to attend the funeral, and 
shortly afterward moved there, and has been in the shoe business in tliat citv 
for the past twenty-five years. Politically he has always been a loval Demo- 
crat. 

William W. Lamar was a flatboatman and traded on tl'ic river between 
Cincinnati and New Orleans, and for a time li\ed and traded among the Choc- 
taw Lidians at Jackson, ^Mississippi. He was married in Maryland and came 
West, settling at ^Maysville, Kentuck}', where ncarh- all his children were 
born. He moved to Aurora in 1865 and conducted a prosperous business for 
years. His death occurred there at t!ie age of ninety-one years, blis wife 
died at the age of seventy-three years. She was a member of the Christian 
church. 3.[r. Lamar \vas a warm personal friend of General Jackson, whose 
acquaintance he made while in ^Mississippi, and was one of Jackson's seconds 
when the latter fought his historic duel. To William W. and Elizabeth 
(Blake) Lamar were born twelve children, as folhjw : Elizabeth Eleanora, 
deceased, who was the wife of William Brewington; Josephine, who married 
James A. Greer, of Covington, Kentucky: Catharine, wh(.i bc.ame the \\ife 
of Merrill Burlingame, (.)f St. Louis, Missiiuri : Sallie, who married l-'rank M. 
Munson, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Williani E., deceased; John Howard, 
deceased: Edward B., of Aurora, the immediate subject of this sketch: ILiriT 
B., of Terra Haute, Indiana; Bessie, the wife of Buckner Goodman, of Mays- 
ville, Kentucky, and three others who died young. 

]Mr. Lamar's maternal grandfather was Edward U. Blake, a direct de- 
scendant of Admiral Blake of the English navv, and was entitled to display the 
coat-of-arms of the Blake family. He and his wife, who was a Horsey, were 
natives of Alaryland, ]Mrs. Blake having been a relative of President Wash- 
ington's wife, Martha \\'ashington. These grandparents came west and set- 
tled at Lebanon, Ohio, where the\- both died at advanced ages, both li\ ing to be 

(54) 



850 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

past ninety. INIr. Blake was a well educated man. He and his wife were !hc 
parents of three children; Elizabeth E., Sarah, and Alary Ann. 

Edward Blake Lamar was tmited in marriage (..n April 19, 1884. to Marie 
Heffern, who was born in 1862, in St. Louis, Missouri, of Irish lineage. 
Her parents died in St. Louis. To Mr. and ]\Irs. Lamar have been 
born five children, namely; William W"., who resides at St. Louis, and 
is married; Carroll, who died in Council Bluffs, when thirteen years of age; 
Harry H., who is tra\'eling for the Liggett iS: iMyers Tobacco Compan;,-, of 
St. Louis, is married and resides at Cincimiati ; Elizabeth Eleanor, a graduate 
of the Aurora high school, is librarian in the Aurora public lifiran-, and Ed- 
ward B., Jr., a stenotypist in the real estate office of the Big Four Railroad 
Company at Cincinnati, v,ho is married. 

Mr. Lamar is one of the best known and most successful shoe dealers of 
Aurora. He receives a large trade from the surrounding territory, where his 
name is equally as well-known, and is held in high repute throughout this en- 
tire section of the state. 



\\TLLL\M H. LEIVE. 



Now and then an individual is found who started out on his life's work 
with the pathway. practically cleared for him, thus enabling him to escape the 
drudgery of wading through obstacles and climbing to the top single-handed 
and unaided. With his father well established in the watchmaker's trade, Will- 
iam H. Leive, watchmaker and jeweler, of Aurora, was far-sighted enough 
to grasp his opportunity at the proper moment, when he had tlie advice and as- 
sistance of an older and more experienced head, which has resulted in liis 
present well-established business. 

William H. Leive was born in Aurora, this county, on .\ugust 26. 1874, 
a son of William and Sophia (Resing) Leive. He attended the German pa- 
rochial school at Aurora until fourteen years of age, and then a short time at 
the public school, after which he commenced to learn the- watchmaker's trade 
in the old Opera House building, in 1889, and a few years before his father's 
death relieved him at the work bench, his father having pre\'iously taken him 
into partnership and when his father died, lie, in partnership with his lirother, 
Charles, continued this business as their father's successors, under the old 
firm name of William Lei\-e & Sons, hi 1913 Cliarles died, and William H. 
Leive has continued to run the business alone. Air. Leive is a stanch Reiiubli- 
can, and in addition to his jewelry business, he is financial!}- interesteil in the 



DEARBORN COUXTY, INDIANA. 85 1 

Indianajjolis Fui'iiiture Company, of Aurora, and is also a stockholder in the 
Wymond Cooperage Company, and the Aurora State Bank. 

William Lei\-c, father of the subject of this sketch, was a native of Han- 
over, Germany, where he received an elementary education. He catnc to 
America with his parents at the age of thirteen years, settling first at Cin- 
cinnati, and they were early pic^neers in Dearborn CQunl_\-. Indiana. He grew 
to manhood near Aurora, and then went to Cincinnati and leanicd the watch- 
maker's trade, and in 1S61 established a business at Aurora, in which he con- 
tinued up to the time of his death, which (occurred in iqio, at the age of 
se\'enty-two years, leaving a well-established and good paying l)usiness. His 
wife was born at Cincinnati, Ohio, and survi\es him at the age of sixty-se\en 
vears. They were the parents of three children, namely: Charles, deceased; 
Alvina, who became tlie wife of Archibald Rudell. and William H., of Aurora, 
Indiana. 

The paternal grandfatiier was John Henry Leive, and his wife was Ger- 
trude (Obermuller) Leive. ]\Ir. Leive died at the home of his daughter in Cin- 
cinnati, and his wife died in Dearborn county at an ad\'anced old age, leaving 
the following children; Henry, the first; Henry, the second; William, Herman 
H., .Vugust, Christian, Charles. Catheri'ie and Louise. 

The maternal grandparen.ts \\'ere Henry Resing and wife, natives 
of Gennau}-. who settled first at Cincinnati, and later moved to Ripley 
county, near Friendship, and finally went to Westmoreland, Kansas, and they 
died in Topeka, Kansas, well atb'ancetl in }ears. Their children were as fol- 
low : Sophia, flarry, Louis, Louise, Tillie, Amelia, Emma and Tvlargaret. 

William H. Lei\e makes his home witli his mother, to whom he is a de- 
voted son, taking great pleasure in pro\'iding for her every need. 



HENRY P. BUSSE. 

Among the beautiful rural homes of Hogan township, Dearliorn coun- 
ty, none is more attracti\e or better care<l for than that of Henry V. Busse. 
Mr. Busse fully appreciates his good fortune in having his efforts rewarded 
w ith favors beyond the average, and has shown his good faith by doing his 
part in handling his holdings to the best of his ability, neglecting nothing that 
would tend toward furthering the value of the same. And, ntit only has he 
done the best within his povver for his own personal interest, but he has also 
b-een publically interested and helped in ever}- possible way toward the welfare 
of his township. 



852 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Henry P. Basse \vas born on June 27, 1S56, and is a son of Christian 
Busse. He was reared Ironi early childiiood in Hoqan township, where he 
received his early ediuation. After his marriage, Mr. Rus,'>e liegan farming 
for himself on a portion of the old home farm, remaining there se\'en years, 
when he bought a farm on the southeastern edge of Wilmington, overlooking 
the ■valley of South Hogan creek, and giving a fine view of Aurora and many 
miles beyond. He now owns a splendid tract of one hundred and thirty-eight 
acres of fine farm land, on which he has made many improvements, remodeling 
and adding new buildings. He now has a good home, substantial barn, and 
other necessary outbuildings, which render his place one of the most beautiful 
country homes for many miles around. Mr. Busse is a Democrat. He is a 
member of the Lutheran church. 

A biographical sketch of Christian Busse, father of Blenry P.. is presented 
elsewhere in this volume, to which the reader is referred for the genealogical 
record of tlie family. 

Plenry P. Busse was united in marriage, in 1S79, with Louise Oehlmann, 
daughter of Harmon and Hannah (Poos) Oehlmann. She was born on April 
19, 1S5S. at St. Leon, Dearboi'u count)-, Indiana, and received her educatirm at 
the district schools. Air. and ]Mrs. Busse have had six children ; Irene, Fred- 
erick, Henry. Bertha, Lydia and Christian. Irene became the wife of ?Ienry 
Weisemaim and lives in Washington township, near Wilmington. The}- have 
three children, Carl, 1-^red and Ruth. Frederick was married to Cora Gassell 
and lives in ^Manitoba, Canada, where he follows farming. They have two chil- 
dren. Ruth and Freda. Henry lives at home. Bertha also resides at home. 
Lydia became the wife of George Straisinger and resides at Aurora. Cliristian 
is at home. 

Harmon Oehlmann. father of Airs. Henry P. Busse. was born in Han- 
over, Gennany, and when he came to America settled at Cincinnati, where he 
was married to Hannah Poos, a native of Prussia. Fie settled on a farm at St. 
Leon, where he followed agriculture until his death, which occurred while Mrs. 
Busse was a very young child. His widow afterward left the farm to her eldest 
son and bought a farm in Manchester tov.-nship where she lived with her second 
son until his marriage. She then came to North Hogan road where she kept 
a toll-gate for a number of years, and after giving this up. she made her home 
with Henry P. Busse and his wife until her death, which occurred in 1907. 

Mr. Busse has always been a kind-hearted man, and a loyal and devoted 
son to his mother, and can count many sincere friends in the township where 
he resides. 



■ '■:-;n -.ir, i ■■■ 



DEARBORN COUXTV, INDIANA. . S53 

JACOB HORNBACH. 

Although of German lineage, the subject of this sketi-h was burn in 
Ohio, and came with his father to York township, Dearborn county, Itn liana, 
while still a small lad. Jacob Hornbach is one of the most successful farmers 
in his township, and stands well in the estimation of his friends and all with 
whom he has either social or business dealing's. 

Jacob Hcn'nbach was born on March 25, 1S50, in Ohio, a son of Andrew 
and Frances (Kirchkopli) Hornbach. lie "attended the townshij) schools, 
and when through school, he assisted his father on the farm until he was mar- 
ried, after which he went to housekeeping near Vork\'ille. renting seN'enty-fivc 
acres of land, which he cultivated for several years, and then bought ninety 
acres from his father, to which he later, in 1906, added sevent\'-eight acres 
more. He is one of the prosperous and prominent citizens of the township, 
and has held some of the township of^ces, among which was that of road 
supervisor, in which capacity he served for eight years. He is a stanch 
Democrat, and an ardent member of the Catholic cliurch. 

Andrew and Frances (Kirchkopli) Hornbach were born and educated in 
Germany, and were farmers. Coining to America, they settled in Ohio, \vhere 
they bought a farm of eighty acres. Andrew Hornbach farmed here for a 
short time, and then sold out and settled in York township, buving eighty 
acres, to which, as his prosperity permitted, he continued to add, until he 
owned a half-section at the time of his death. Mr. iiornljach was an earnest 
and attentive member of the Catholic church, and a never-failing voter of the 
Democratic ticket. His wife, Frances (Kirchkoph)' Hornbach, received 
a good education in the land of her birth, and was a young woman when 
she came to the United States with her husband. To this couple were burn 
thirteen children, Albert, Lena, ,\lo\ie, Louisa, Charles, John, Jacob. George, 
Michael, Mary, and three who died in infancy. 

Albert Hornbach was married to Sophia CBehm), and is a thriving 
faiTner in York township. Lena lives in Dearborn county. Aknis is the 
proprietor of a flourishing grocery in Middletown, Ohio, and has si.K cliib 
dren. Charles, John. Frank. Theodore. Carrie and Adolph deceased. I^ouisa 
is the wife of' John Krieger. and lived on a farm in York township. Charles 
is a general farmer, dealing in hay. grain, cattle, etc.. in York township. 
His wife was Rosie Kueble. John resides at [Middletown. Ohio. George was 
married Helen Ege, and is also a farmer in York township. Michael was 
united in marriage with Elizabeth Stcinmetz. IMary became tlie wife of Philip 
Fuchs. a farmer of York township. 



854 DEARBORN COUNTYj INDIANA. 

Jacob Hombach was married tM ^lary W'idolff, who was born Januar\- 
4, 1861, in York township, where she received a good education. She be- 
came the HK^ther of eiglit chikh'cn, namely : August, Minnie, Tonv, Gertrude, 
Frances, Marie, Ilenr}- and Eleanora, the latter two of whom died in youth. 
These children are all living at home, with the exception of Frances, who is the 
wife of John liartmaii, and resides on a farm in Decatur county. Thev 
have one child, ^Nlary Martina. 



HARRY STFWART BURLINGAME 

The subject of the following sketch is a gentleman of good education, 
and splendid cxecuti\-e aliility. and in every wa>- capable of managing and add- 
ing to the property inherited at the death of his mother. He has always taken 
a sincere interest in the welfare of his township, and is one of the best known 
and most popular men in the community in which he resides. 

Hany Stewart Burlingame was liorn on July 21, 1865, and is a son of 
Benjamin F. and Doroth}- (Churchill) Burlingame. His earl}- education was 
received in the district schools of Sparta township, and he later entered Moores 
Hill College, and after leaving school, he took charge of his mother's farm and 
managed it until her death. He inherited from his mother a fine farm of 
forty acres, to which he added three acres later on. I"or the past twenty-six 
years, Mr. Burlingame has taught school, twent}-five years of which time 
have been spent in Dearborn county, and of the latter period, has been three 
years principal of the DillsJDOro high school, ^[r. Burlingame is a Demo- 
crat, and has always been a ^vl:n-ker in tlie ranks nf the part\-. His church /.r.eni- 
bership is with the Presbyterian congregatii^n. He is a past chancellor in tiie 
Ivnights of Pythias, and past master in the ]\Iasonic lodge. 

Benjamin Franklin BurHngame, father of Harr}' S., -was born on Decem- 
ber 23, 1809, in Xew York state, living there until 1840, when he came to 
Indiana and settled in Posey county, but later, in 1S45, moved to Wilmington, 
where he opened a wagon shop in the old ci>urt house, which huilding is still 
standing. In iS^;- Mr. Burlingame srjld his shop and bought a farm of one 
hundred and si.vty acres in Sparta township, where he resided until his death. 
which occurred Xovember 25, 18S2. He was a loyal Democrat and gave his 
support by serving as county commissioner for two or three years, and alwa}'S 
attended the conventions of the party. He was a Mason, a Granger of Sparta 
township and a charter member of the latter, in wliich they advocated the 
methods of better farmmg. 



DEARPORX COUNTY, IXPIAXA. 855 

On Afarch 28. 1S33. Benjamin F. Burlingame was married to Adaline 
Merrell. a native of Xew York state, who was born on OctoLier 6, 1817. She 
died on February 8, 1857, leaving surviving her husl>and and four sons, Ben- 
jamin F., Jr., SoloniiMi Merrell, Dwight U. and Andrew J. Benjamin F.. Ji., 
was married to Elizabeth Rogers, of Wilmington, and died at Jeffersonville, 
Indiana. They had six children, ^linnie, I'aul. Frank, Rogers, Elizabeth 
and Benjamin. Soloman Alerrell was married to Kate Lamar, of Aurora, and 
(h'ed at St. Louis. They had seven children, Harry, Anna Lnuise. Charles. 
Dudley. Xora, Howard and Ella. Dwight H. was married to .\nna Stabler, 
of Wilmington, and they have one child, Clara. .Vndrew J. was married to 
Emma Aldridge, of Wilmington, and died at St. James, [Missituri. They had 
two children, Eduard and William, Dwight H. Burlingame was a member 
of the Twentv-sixth Regiment, Indiana \'olunteer Lifantry, serving full time 
as a pri\-atc in tlie Civil War: Andrew J. Burlingame seiwed as a private in the 
Eighteenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, during liie entire C'vil 
War. Benja.min F. Burlingame, Jr., was regimental quartermaster o( the Sev- 
enth Regiment, Lidiana Volunteer Infantry, sen-ing first in the three mouths' 
sei-\ice in West Virginia. 

After the death of his first wife, Benjamin F. Burlingame was married 
secondly, to Dorotha Churchill, of Sparta township. She was born on the 
same farm where Harry Stewart Burlingame now lives, April \f), 1826. To 
this uniiin were born four children, Mary, Harry S., Caroline W., and one 
who died in infancy. Mary died young. Caroline became the wife oi 
Joseph E. Allen, of Sparta township, and is living at ^Nlilan, Ripley county. 
They have five children, Onema, Waldron E., Arthur, Hilda and Xorman. 
all living. 

Dnrotha (Churcliill) Burlingame was a daughter of Joscjih and Mary 
(Hennegin) Churchill. Joseph Churchill, father of Mrs. Plenjamin Frank- 
lin Burlingame, was born in Vermont, where he grew to manhood. He 
came to Indiana and settled cm the same farm on which Harry Stewart 
Burlingame now resides, taking five hundred acres from the govennnent, .at a 
cost of one dollar and twenty-five cents an acre. He lived here all his life, 
I)Ut deeded much of the land to his children, having left only t\V(^ hundred and 
ii.'rty acres when he died. Mr. Churchill was a V\'hig. ami took part in all 
Icjcal politics. He and his family were all members of the Baptist church. 
His wife, Mary (Hennegin) Churchill, was born in centra' Xew ^'Mrk. 
and when quite young came with her parents to Indiana, settling in Hogan 
tiwvnsbip, near Wilmington, on the farm now owned liy .\ndre\v J. Bloom, 



856 DEARBORN' COUNTY. INDIANA. 

which they took from the government. They were the parents of eleven 
children, Eveline, Charles, Dorotha, Vcrmm, Burke, Harrietle, Rhoda, Ann, 
Jeanette, Alta and John. 

Harry Stewart Burlingame was united in marriage on September 22. 
1886. with ^linnie Houston, daughter of John and Margarette (Beatty) 
Houston. She was born on ^lay 29, 1S65, in Sparta township, where she 
lived until her marriage. This union has lieen blessed with two cliildren : 
Frank S., born on January 27. 18S9 ; and Olive D., November iS, 1S90. 

Mr. Burlingame is a gentleman of exceptional education, and is well in- 
formed on all matters of public interest going on throughout the world. His 
school work has received the approval of all concerned, and hi': many warm 
friends are the best evidence of the high esteem in which he is held in the com- 
munity. ■ ■ 



THO:^IAS EDWARD TERRU.L. 

Although still in his \"outh, the indications are very flattering for the 
futuie business success of the subject of this sketch. The attention and 
thoroughness which he has devoted to the business of securing an education 
will prove to be of inestimable value as a corner-stone, on which to build his 
fortune in life. Thomas Edward Terrill is one of the most i)opular teachers in 
Manchester township. Dearborn county, Indiana. 

Thomas Edward Terrill was born on July i, 1S95, near Petersburg, 
Boone county, Kentucky, and is a son of Simeon Edward and Mary CGrant) 
Terrill. His first years at school were spent in the public schools of MisMiuri. 
and from there he went to Manchester township, where he attended the 
township schools for six years, going then to Aurora, Indiana, high scbj^ol, 
covering a period of three years, graduating at the Lamar, Colorado, high 
school, and completed his education at iMoores Hill College, Moores Hill. 
Indiana, where he has been a teacher for the past two years. 

Simeon Edward Terrill, father of the subject of this sketch, was born 
on March 29, 1850, near Petersburg, Boone county. Kentucky. His parents 
gave him a good education in the public schools of Boone countv, after which 
they sent him to high school, at Aurora. After leaving school, Simeon Ter- 
rill assisted his father. Capt. George ^\'. Terrill, on the farm, until he took 
unto himself a wife, when he commenced housekeeping on a farm of one 
hundred and twent}- acres in Boone county. Kentuck}'. He remained on this 
farm about eight years, during which time he had accumulated enoueh to 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. ' ^ 857 

buv a farm of one hundred and forty acres in the southern part of Pioone 
count}', Kentucky, to which he soon added forty acres adjoining his nwn 
farm. Air. Tcrrill farmed this tract of land twenty-one years. Me was 
offered a good price for his place, and was wise enough U> recognize a bar- 
gain when lie saw one. lie sold out, and moved back to the home iilacc. near 
Petersburg, where he became a rural route mail carrier, in which capaciu he 
served about ten years. Becoming dissatisfied with this work. 'Sir. Tcrrill 
moved his family to Alissouri, where he farmed for three }'ears, and then re- 
turned to ^Manchester township, where he bought eighty acres, which he culti- 
vated until shnrtl}' before his death, which occurred in May, i(;i2, at the 
home of his dar.ghter, ]\[rs. E. K. iMorris, at Chillicothe, ^Missouri. 

On October 25, 1S70, Simeon Edward TerriU was married to Mary 
I'Vances Grant, who was bora near Petersburg, and is a daughter of Will- 
iam and Jane (Willys) Grant. Her earl}- education was secured at public 
schools of Boone count}-, and later at a college at Ghent, Kentucky, where she 
was a ver}- attentive student. She is a direct descendant of Daniel Fiooue's 
famil}-, than which none has e\-er been n-iore prominent in the history of Ken- 
tucky. She still sur\-ives her husband. To iMr. and ;\Irs. Terrill were biirn si.x 
children, as follow: Simeon Ruford. Ethel Sue, James Grant. Robert Lindsay, 
Mary Alice, and Thomas Edward. Simeon Buford was united in marriage 
with Jennie Randell, and is now cultivating a farm in ^Manchester township. 
Ethel Sue is the wife of E. K. IMorris, a prosperous fanuer in iMissouri. 
They have one child. Alice May. James Grant was i-narried to Ida Ambcrg, 
and is now residing at Cincinnati, where he is emplo}-ed b\- the Ohin 1^-ust 
Company. They have had two children, Mary E. and James Gordon, Ivolicrt 
Lindsay is conducting a farm in ]\Ianc!iester township. ]\lar}- Alice was edu- 
cated in the public schools of Kentucky and Alanchester township, going later 
to the high school at Aurora, Indiana, after which she attended schoul at La- 
mar, Colorado, one year, finishing at }iIoores Llill College, where she has been 
teaching- for the past three years. 

The Terrill famil}- comes from good old Kentucky stock, and has al- 
ways believed in taking every possible advantage leading up to a good educa- 
tion, the result of which is shown in the number of professional and able mem- 
bers it has produced, and of which the subject of this sketch pron-iises much 
in bearing out its reputation, Thomas Edw-ard Terrill does not believe that 
rest, after a long, strenuous term of school, means simply driing nothing. He 
is a l(j\-er of nature, and employs his \-acation seasons on the home place, 
spending most of his time out of doors. 



858 DEAKllORX COUNTY. INPIAXA. ■ ' ' 

PRESTOX II. CONAWAY. 

Preston H. Conaway. farmer and highly respected citizen of Clay town- 
ship, Dearborn connty. Indiana, was born in the township where he now li\cs 
on Alarch 25, 185(1, son of Simon B. and Hannah (Harper) Conaway, the 
former a native of Clay tnwnship. and the latter born in Fayette county. 
Pennsylvania. August 29, 1830. 

Simon B. Conawa}-. fatlior of the imiucdiate subject nf this sketch, was 
born on September 4, 1824. and recei\ed his education in the schools of his 
native township, also at Wilmington and later at Hartford, this county. 
After his school days were over, he assisted his father in the work of the 
farm hume. becoming unusally skilled in the practice of successful husbandry. 
Upon the death of his father, the homestead fell to his share and he continued 
to manage it for the rest of his active years. His death occurred on ]March 
20, 1907. \\hen eighty-two years of age. Simon B. Conaway was the son of 
Robert and Edith (Weathers) Conaway. 

Hannah Harper. m<jther of Preston H. Conaway, was a daughter of 
Henry and ?ilatilda ( Swearingen ) Harper, the former of whom was boni 
on September 14. 1800. in. Greene county, Pennsyh'ania. and the latter. Ihtu 
on November 24. 1803, in Fayette county, Pennsylvania. The Flarpers came. 
to Adams county. Ohio, in 1S35, and remained there until 1S42. when they 
came to Indiana, lucating in Riplev count}", where lienrv died, on .Vugust 3. 
1844. His widow. ^Matilda, lived to be quite an old lady, passing awav when 
in the eighties. They were the parents of a family of twelve children, namely : 
Thomas. Rebecca, Jane, Samuel, Hannah, Louisa, Sarah Ann, George, Allen, 
James, John. Hem-y, and one who died in infancy. 

Thomas Harper married a Miss Pendergrass and had a familv of five 
"children, Louisa ( ]\Irs. Pryun), Matilda, Ann. Etuma and Addie. Re- 
becca Jane married James Huckstaff and had a large family. Samuel married 
Sarah Robison and had a family of eight children, two of them l>eing John and 
Malinda. Li^uisa became the ^vife of Charles XettletcMi and lived in ^Minnesota, 
where they reared a large family. Sarah Ann became the wife of Cal\-in Shook 
and had one daughter. Alice. .Vllen married Lessie White, of \'ersailies. li'iv- 
ly county, and had the following children. James. Enimett. Charles and Anna. 
James chose Julia Fall as his wife and they reared a family. John married 
Belle Pr\-or and 'he}- reared a fatnil_\- of fi\-e children. Ira. XeLon. Clay. 
Hcnvard ami Laura. Henry married ]\[ar\- O'X'eal and liad three children: 
Lizzie. X'ora and IToward. Hannah, mother of the immediate subject of this 
sketch, was born in Favette county, Pennsvlvania, and located with her par- 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 859 

ents in Ripley county, where slie was married on September 24. 1850. and 
died on Xovember 3, 1882. 

Preston II. Conaway was one of a family of two cliildren, the 
other being his brother. HaniiUon A. Preston, who received his t-duca- 
tinu at the Xixon school house, in Clay township, assisting his father with 
the work of the farm home during' vacation times. After finishing school, his 
entire time was sper.t on the homestead, which he inherited upon the death 
of his father. 

On December 22, 1881, Preston H. Conaway was married to Miss .Mice 
y\. Sale, daughter of Fleetwood H. and iNIary C. {[Morrison) Sale, the former 
of whom was born in Owen county, Kentucky, May 17, 1S2S, and died at 
Dillsboro, Indiana. January 14. 1007. ^lary C. [Morrison, his wife, was born 
at Cincinnati. Ohin, October 5, 1S37, and died on 3*Iarch 17, 1856. 

Dr. Fleetwood H. Sale, father of ]\Irs. Preston H. Conaway, was one 
of the oldest practicing plnsicians in Dearborn count)'. Me also served as a 
surgeon in the Civil \\'ar from April, 1862, to March, 1864. He resigned, but 
in November, 1864. he returned and served until 1865. His father was also 
a soldier and noted pioneer, having served in the War of 1812, enlisting from 
Kentucky. [Mrs. Preston H. Conaway was l)orn in Dillsboro, Xo\-ember 27, 
•1854. and recei\'ed her education in the schools of Dillsborn, later taking more 
advanced studies at Moores Hill College. To Mr. and Mrs. Conaway has been 
born one son, Fleetwood R., wh'jse birth occurred at Aunira on January 6. 
1900. Fleetwood B. remains at home on the farm. He has just completed 
the eighth grade course in the district school. 

Mr. Conaway is a man who goes cjuietly about his own affairs and who 
by his consistent manner of living has won the confidence and respect of 
those about him. His political support he gives to the Democratic party, al- 
though taking no more than a quiet interest in political affairs. The Conaway s 
are numbered among the older families of the county. They belong to the 
Methodist church. 



GFORGE NII-AIEYER 



In the days of his youth, the subject of this biographical sketch was un- 
able to secure the necessary education for a successful business career: as in 
those (lavs Indiana did not have her present splendid ])ublic schools created In- 
law of the commonwealth, a clause in the first constituti(jn stating: "It -hall 
be the dutv of the General Assembly, as soon as circumstances will perni'.t, to 



SGO DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. ' 

pro\i(lc by law for a general system of education, ascending in reofiilar ^ei'a- 
dation from township schools to a state university, wherein tuition shall be 
gratis and cqualh' open to all." Since whicli time Indiana has l.'ng l^ejn w idelv 
reputed for its public school sjstem, and the higli efficiency of its schools. 

George Niemeyer was born on July 25, 1S62, at Cincinnati, Ohio, and 
is a son of Henry and Louisa (Ellerbrook) Xiemeyer. The education he re- 
ceived in Clay township was of a limited nature, as he was obliged to help 
his father on the farm until twenty-one years of age, when he decided to do 
some investigating as to a desirable location. He went to To()eka, Kansas, 
but after remaining there one year, he returned to Clay township, and at the 
death of his father took over the fann, to which he later added two tracts. 
one of ninet}- acres, and one of ninety-six acres, which he still operates, doing 
general farming'. Mr. Nieme\er realizes tlie necessity of proper schooling, 
and is sending all his children through school, and in order to keep his f-nnily 
together, he purcliased ninety-six acres more, so he could keep them em- 
ployed at home. He has always been a public-spiiited man, and interested in 
all enterprises pertaining to the welfare of his township, and especially in good 
roads, many of the g'ood roads i'n Clay township being due to the energy dis- 
played by him; He was road supeiwisor for thirteen years, and is now town- 
ship assessor, ha\'ing been elected on the Republican ticket. ]Mr. Niemeyer is 
well liked by all. and as an evidence of his kind and thoughtful disposition. 
one hired man. Reason Johnson, has remained in his services for twenty- 
three years. 

Mr. Xiemeyer has tra\'eled extensively in the United States. In 18S7. 
he was called to the deathbed of his brother in Kansas, and while in that sec- 
tion visited many of the important cities in the central West. In 1909 he ac- 
companied a party through the southern Gulf states, visiting all the prominent 
cities en route. The greater portion of his life has been spent where he now 
resides, and he is the oldest living resident of the township. He belongs to 
the Improved Order of Red ]\Ien. past sachem ; and Knights of Pythias, of 
which he is past chancellor commander. 

Henry X'iemexer. father of George Niemeyer. was born in 18 16, in Ger- 
many, coming to the United States as a young man. He settled at Cincinnati, 
where he was married, and followed the tinner's trade several years. In 1874, 
he bought a farm of ninety acres in Clay township, and lived there until his 
death, which occurred on December 8, 1884. aged sixty-eight years. "Sir 
Niemeyer was a Republican, and belonged to the I.utheran church. His wife. 
Louisa (Ellerbrook) N'ieme_\er, was born in German}', and came to America 
with her parents, John and Charlotte Ellerbrook, when quite _\oung. }ilr. and 



■ ;.;...[ -y. 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 86l 

Mrs. Xieme_\er were married at Cincinnati, and were the parents iif six chil- 
dren, Aineha, George. Harr}', Matilda, and two who died in infancy. Amelia 
hecamc the wife of Emest Ruhlrnan and is living- in Clay tnwushii). They 
have four children, Henry. Theodos, Clara and Harry, flarry is deceased. 
Matilda is the wife of Ernest Boulthop and is living at Eawrencehurg. She 
is the mother of three children, Elmer and two others, one of whom died 
young. 

The maternal grandfather was John Ellerbrook, and his wife \vas Char- 
lotte Ellerbrook, both natives of Germany, who came to America at nn earl_\- 
day. setthng at Cincinnati, and later bought a farm in Chi}- townshin, con- 
sisting of ninetv acres, and was the same farm which Henr\' Xieme\er Iriuglit 
in 1S74. After ■celling the farm they made their hom.e with Henry Xiemeyer 
until they died, at an ad\'anced age. 

Georg'e Xiemeyer was united in marriage on October 26, 180-. \\'ith 
Jennie Joh.nsnn, daughter of Jacob and X'ancy flleadl}') Johnson. She 
was born in ^lissouri. and when six months old. owing to the death 'of her 
mother, came to Clay township, and was reared by Hezekiah ^Martin, a;vl 
was educated in the district schools of that township. ]Mr. and Mrs. X'ieme\cr 
have had six children, Hariy. Albert, Ahna, Laura, Dora and John, all living 
at home. 

Mr. Xiemeyer is one of the most industrious and highly respecte<l citi- 
zens of Clav township, where he is bringing up his familv c'f children to he in 
telligent and useful citizens. 



CHARLES H. BERKER:MEIER. 

Agriculture is the oldest vocation and as a usual thing men of honoraMe 
and human impulses, as well as those of energy and thrift, have been patrons 
of husbandry. The free outdoor life of the farm has a decided tendency to 
foster and develop that independence of mind and self-reliance which charac- 
terize true manhood and no greater blessing can liefall a boy than to be 
reared in close touch with nature in the healthful, life-inspiring labor of t!ie 
fields. It has ahvays been from the fruitful soil that the moral bone and sinew 
of the country have sprrmg, and the majority of the nation's scholars and 
distinguished men of letters were bom on the farm and were indebted to its 
early influence for the inspiration which resulted in their mature attainments. 
The subject of this sketch is a true son of the soil and one who has succeeded 
well in his chosen vocation. 



862 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Charles H. Eerkernieier was born on January i8, 1850, in IIan':>vfr. 
Gennany, a son of I'rank and Elizabeth ( Berkermeier) Berkermeier, b'Jtli 
of whom were horn and reared in Germany. In -868 Frank Berkermeier 
brought his family to .America, with the exception of Ilannah and William, 
the two eldest of the faniil\-, who remained in the Fatherland. He settled on 
a farm of eiglu_\' acres in Switzerland ciiunty. this state, and there passed 
the remainder oi his life, d_\ing at the age of seventy-seven years. While he 
gave his attention to farming in this country, he was by trade a maker of 
wooden shoes, a commodity which is not greath- known in this country except 
aiTiong those of German and Dutch birth. 

Frank and Elizabeth Berkermeier were the parents of seven children, 
Flannaii, William, Louise. Charles H., Elizabeth, Ernest and a child who died 
in infancy. Ernest married hdora Grive and had a large family, among the 
children being Emma, Lizzie, Carl and flenry. Louise was twice married, her 
first husband being Fred Berner, by whr>m she had fi\'e children, Lizzie, Anna, 
Lena, Henry and Flarmon. After Air. Berner's death, she became the wife of 
Henry Rah. Elizabeth became tlie wife of Casper Strader and the mother of 
three children, Lena, Elizabeth and John. 

Charles H. Berkermeier was eighteen years of age when his family im- 
migrated to this country and he immediatel_\- took up the \\ork of the farm 
home purchased in S\\itzerland county, having recei\ed his educatii>n in his 
nati\e land. In 1S72 he purchased for himself a tract of land containing eigiity 
acres, which he farmed until 1<)13 when he disposed of it and mi^ved tn a farm 
of one hundred and twenty-four acres in Clav township, this countv, whicli l;ie- 
longed to his wife, where he has since resided. Air. Flerkermeier carries on 
general farming, such as is practiced throughout this section, and in addi- 
tion gives some attention to the raising of live stock, being uniformly success- 
ful in his endeavors, for he brings to the task in hand always the most careful 
thought and energetic performance. 

In June, 1876, Charles H. Berkermeier was united in marriage witli Alary 
Binning, a daughter of Henry and Katherine (Licking) Binning, both of 
whom were born in Germany, and were farmers in Su itzerland count}'. Airs. 
Mary Berkermeier died in 1910, at the age of fifty-three years, leaving her 
husband and seven children: Amelia, Elizabeth, Alinnie, Clara, Harry, Edith 
and Amanda. Amelia married John FI. Smith, of Aurora, Indiana, and has 
three sons, Carl. Russell and Clayton. Elizabeth became the wife of Fred 
Thomas and li\es on a farm in Switzerland county. There are three children 
in their family, Edith, Hilda and Charles. Alinnie married Flarry Ampt and 
lives in Aurora. They have three children, Lester, Alabel and Florence. Clara 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 863 

became the wife of John 'I'iiomas and has two chilih-eii, Laura and Irene. They 
Uve at Cross Plains, Indiana. Harry married Allie Cutter, and Hves in 
Sv itzerland countv. Edith married Harmon Sandbrink. Amanda mar- 
ried ]A\ke Fishvogt. 

^[r. Berkermeier married for the second time on .\pril 9, 1913, bcint;- 
united in wedlock with Bllizabeth ( Stute) Berner, daughter of William and 
Charlotte (Busching) Stute, natives of Gcrmanv who settled on Laughery 
creek in Ripley coimty. 

The Berkermeier family is considered one of the representative families 
of the community, the name having always stood for all that is honest and 
upright. ]\lr. Berkermeier is a member of the Lutheran church, serving his 
organization as an officer for a number of years. He gives his support to the 
Democratic party and although not a seeker after office, is always intevesteil m 
seeing the party's affairs properly administered. Mr. Berkermeier has led a 
well regulated and wholesome life and is justly entitled to the high degree of 
respect which he is accorded by those who know him. 



MRS. ^lARGAHKTHA BENNETT. 

In the following sketch mention is made of some of the older and highly 
respected citizens of Clay township. Dearborn county. Indiana, the immediate 
subject being Margaretha ( Licking) Bennett, w idow of the late Joseph 
.\. Bennett, one of the representative citizens of this section, a man well liked 
by all. 

-Margaretha Licking was born in this county at Fanners Retreat, on Sep- 
tember 9, 1874, a daughter of Flenry and Mary Christinia (Zeigenbein) Lick-_ 
ing, the former born also at Famiers Retreat. Cresar Creek township, and the 
latter a native of the citv of Cincinnati. Henrj- Licking was born on January 
,ii. 18 ;o, and received his education in the common schools of his home dis- 
trict. He assisted his father in the work of the homestead and when thirty- 
five years old, after the death of h.is father, he purchased one hundred and 
thirty acres of the home place from the other heirs. He remained on that 
place until 1896. wlien ho disp«)sed of it and purchased a farm of one hundred 
and thirty-three acres near Dillsboro, in Clay township. There he made his 
lioine and conducted the business of his farm until the year 1909, when he re- 
tired from active service and passed away on April 4, 1914. at the age of six- 
ty-four years. Henry Licking was a faithful member of the Methodist Epis- 



■y,i .ii 



S64 < DEARBORX COUNTY, INDIANA. 

copal church, filling various offices of the local society through a span of 
years. His political support was given to the Democratic party, in the affair^ 
of which he showed a commendable interest. He was a member of the an- 
cient order of Free and Accepted Mason and took a keen interest in the work- 
ing of that society. 

Henry Licking was a son of Fred and Mary Clara (Libbert) Licking, 
both of whom were natives of Germany. They came to this country when 
young, coming directly to friends in Caesar Creek township, and there they 
were married. They bought a fann in that locality which they operated, and 
Fred Licking also ran a blacksmith shop, drawing his patronage for that 
class of work from over a wide area. His death occurred in January of 1875, 
when he was in middle age. Fred Licking and wife were the parents of fifteen 
children, many of whom still sur\-ive. 

INIary Christina Zeigenlicin, mother of ■Mrs. Margaretha Bennett, was 
born in Cincinnati, ijn October 18, 1850. a daughter of Christian and Sophia 
Margaretha ( Deirech ) Zeigenbein, both born in Germany. Roth were brought 
to this country by their respective parents when children and grew up together 
in Cincinnati, where they were married. j\'Ir. Zeigenbein learned the trade of 
plasterer, at which he worked for a number of years, and when in middle age 
he decided to leave the city and live the life of a farmer for the balance of his 
days. He came to Clay township, this county, where he purchased a farm of 
eighty acres and made his home for the next fourteen years. He then dis- 
posed of ills original farm and purchased a tract of like size in Sparta town- 
ship, where he h\-ed until death. He died when fifty-four years of age. 
There were eight children in their familv, namely: }ilary, \\'ilhelniin,-i, Cith- 
erine, Charles, and four who died in infancy. ]Mary was a child when her 
people came to this county, and she was educated in the common schools of 
. Clay township, remaining at home until the time of her marriage, January 
18, 1872, to Henry Licking. 

Margaretha Licking, now Ivlrs. Bennett, was one of a family of six chil- 
dren, the others being, Laura, Edward, Sarah, Catherine and Rosa, who 
died when a child. Edward married Harriett Conaway and has one son, 
Estal. Sarah, became the wife of Robert Borders, of }ililan, Ripley county. 

Margaretha Licking received her elementary education in the school at 
Farmers Retreat, later attending college at Moores Hill. For special intro- 
duction in normal work, she went to Winona, this state, being greatly bene- 
fited by her studies there. On November iS, 1906, she was united in marriage 
with Joseph A. Bennett, son of Edward and Catherine (Huddartt) Bennett. 

Joseph A. Bennett was born in Dillsboro and was one of a family of eight 



DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 865 

children, his birth occurring on July iS, 1865. He received his education in 
the schools of Dillsboro, and during vacations and all spare time, assisted his 
father in the work of the farm home. For a while he was railroad black- 
smith at Dillsboro. and later gave up that occupation for the life of a farmer, 
operating the farm of one hundred acres located near Dillslmro, belonging 
to liis wife. ]\[r. I'.onnett's death occurred on January iS. n;i5. when fifty 
years of age. He was a man held in high esteem by all who knew him, public 
spirited and deeply concerned in all that related to the best interests of his 
community and country. He left his widow and one child, Paul Esmond 
Bennett. ]Mr. Bennett's fraternal affiliation was held with the Knights of 
Pythias, in the working's of which order he' took an appreciable interest. 
His jiohtical support was given the Republican party. He led a quiet, well 
regidated and Imne^t life and was worthv the degree of confidence whicli 
he in-^pired in all who knew him. Mrs. Bennett was a worthy helpmeet for 
such an excellent man and is held in high esteem throughout the 
communitv. 



ROBERT LEWIS BRO\\'N. 

Among those persons who by \-irtue of their strong personal qualities 
have won their way to a high standing in the estimation of their fellow citizens 
and ha\-e by the manner of their living proven that they are men of honcir 
and good parts, the subject of this sketch is entitled to mention in a volume 
of the character of the one in hand. 

Robert Lewis Brown was born near Dillsboro, Dearborn county. Lnliana. 
December 2S. 1S52, a son of John and Elizabeth McDowell, both natives 
of the state of \'irginia. John McDowell and wife came to Dearborn 
county, where they rernained but a short time, returning to their native state 
of Virginia. Their Httle son was but six weeks old at the time they left 
Indiana, and he was given into the care of his uncle, William Brown, who 
reared him as his o\\ n son and whose name he took-. Robert Lewis recei\'ed 
his education in the schools of Clay tov/nship, and after leaving school, as- 
sisted his uncle in the work of the farm home. William Bnnvn departed 
this life on October 11, 18S9, at which time the farm of sixty-seven acres 
descended to his foster son, Robert Lewis Brown. Roliert Lewis has c<in- 
tinuetl to make his home on the place, carrying on general farming together 
with some raising of live stock. 

Robert Lewis Brown was married on Februarv 2^. 187J. to Alice Bruce, 

(55) 



1 






866 ■'■' DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

a daughter of Torrance and Tamar (Pate) Bruce, of Clay township, and the 
parent? of a family of twelve children. These were I'hocbe, Francis, Rachael. 
Mary Ann, Annie, Nancy, Alice, William, Simeon, Clarence, Charles and 
one which died in infanc}-. William married .Mary Howard and had a family 
of four children, Frances. .-Mice, Allen ami Slanle\', the first two named being 
deceased. Simeon married a ]\Jis3 Warner and became the father of two chil- 
dren, Clarence married Matlie Lockshaw and has fdur children, John. Will- 
iam, Louis, and Alinnie, deceased. Charles married Sophia Shurman and 
had one son by her, \\'illiam. l.'iion her death he married Cora Bright and 
by her had two children, Fvalph and Hattie. Phoebe became the wife of Will- 
iam Greene and the mother of two children, Torrance and James. Frances 
married a Mr. Pate. Racluicl became the \\\ie of Thomas Windsor and 
raised a large family. Belle, .\nna, James, h'ilbert and Lottie. Mary .V'ui 
married Allen Miles. .Vnnie married Henry I'owell and reared a large fam- 
ily, David, Rachael, Laura, ^ilnrton, William, Mary and Fannie Xancy be- 
came the wife of Robert Murra}- and had two chiMren, Hiram and Calvin. 
Alice, wife of the immediate sul>ject of this sketch, was born on February 25, 
1853, on the family homestead near Dillsbi.iro, and received her education 
in the schools of Sparta township. 

To Robert Lewis and Alice (Bruce) Brown has been born one son. Will- 
iam C, who was born on the family homestead in Clay tn\\nshi|.i, Decemlier 
I, 1872. On January 25. 1911, William C. Brown was united in marriage 
with Delia Wan Osdol. a daugliter of William and ]\[ary E. (Chase) Van Os- 
dol, the former of whom was born in Ohio county, and the later was born 
in Switzerland county, this state, October 5, 1866. Delia Van Osdol v>as born 
on March 14, 1891, in Clay township, William Br(iwn and wife ;u'e members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. In politics he votes an independent ticket, 
choosing his men rather than endorsing any party ticket. His fraternal af- 
filiation is held with the Red ]\Ien of .\nierica, having served his local society 
as sachem. 

The Brown family has ever been considered among the representative 
families i>f this section, standing for all that is most worth while in life. 
Robert Lewis Brown is a faithful member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, and has been an officer in the same for a number of years. His po- 
litical support is given to the Democratic party, and while not a seeker after 
office, he shows a commendable interest in his party's affairs. By a life of 
consistent action and thought, Mr, Brown has well earned the high standing 
which he now enjoys in the community. 






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DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 867 

ALBERT HEXRY ISIATHTAS. ' ' ' 

Ever}' community pnints with priije to it? energetic and efficient young 
men. and it may well do so. for in them rests the hope of its future well-I)eing. 
It is well when a youth can deliniteK- (lecide along what line his future course 
shall he and so plan his studies and reading that when his opportunit\- comes, 
he can firmly plant his feet in the path he has decided upon. It is especially 
gratifying when a young man can fiillow in the footsteps of some older mem- 
ber of his family and in the present instance the young man to a short sketch 
of whose career the reader is now directed is following the same lines laid 
down by his maternal grandfather many years ago, but under vastly different 
conditions. Albert Henry Mathias. the efficient young funeral director of 
Cla_\- township, Dearborn cotmty, has been especially trained in his chosen 
field of endea\-or and in addition to his education along professional lines, 
he is by nature most excellently ecjuipped for tlie delicate duties devoh'uig 
upon him and his sympathetic manner and forget fulness of sell render him 
of great assistance to those who need his services in an hour of grief and 
S'jrrow. 

Albert Henry ]\tathias was Isorn in Cochran. Dearborn county, In- 
Indiana, November i, 18S7, a son of William and Maggie ( Whittenburg) 
Alathias. William Mathias was born in Chesterville, Indiana, July 12, 1858, 
and received his education in the schools of Cochran. At the earlv age oi 
fifteen years he went into the Cochran chair factor}-, where he [)assed his 
working hours for the lialance of his life. The explosion of a boiler in that 
factory on November 26, 1888. caused th.e death of Mr. ^Mathias at the early 
age of thirty years. 

William Mathias was a son of Henry and Lena (Crngell) iVIathias, 
Iioth natives of Germany. Henry immigrated to the United States while still 
a young man. locating in this county at Chesterville on a farm. There he 
remained for four years, when he moved ot Cochran and secured cmplo}nient 
wiih the Ohio iS; Mississippi Railroad Company, where he remained for 
the balance of his life, passing away when an old . man on May 16, 1S90- 
He was one of the good and substantial citizens of Cochran in his da}- and 
gave his assistance to whatever counted for the good of the community. He 
was a faithful member of the Methodist Episcopal church, ser\ing his local 
society for many wears as one of its officers. In politics he w as a Republican, 
and while not seeking office for himself was always anxious to see the right 
man put in the right place. Lena Crugell. his wife, came to this country 
\Nhen a voung girl of sixteen years and was soon thereafter married, bearing; 



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868 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. '■■■-■ 

her husband nine children, namely : William, Simon, Frederick, Ellsworth, 
Anna, Lena, Henry, Mary, and one child who died in infancy. Lena (Cru- 
gell) Mathias is still living- at an advanced age, hale and hearty, in Kansas 
Cit}-, Missouri. 

Maggie ( Whitienburg ) ]\Iathias, mother of the immediate subject of this 
sketch, was born in Cla}' township, Dearborn county, January lo, i860, and 
received her education in the district schools of her native township. She was 
married to William ALithias, at Dillsboro, September i, 1886, and has but 
the one child. }ilrs. ?slathias is a daughter of Henry and Anna (Finkc) 
Whittenburg, both of whom were born in Hanover, Germany, Henry's birth 
occurring on July 17, 1825. When twenty-two years of age he immigrated 
to the United States and settled first in Cincinnati, where he, for six years, 
worked at his trade of cabinet-maker. He then decided to come into Dear- 
born county where were others from his home locality, and so he purchased 
a tract of twelve acres in Clay townsh.ip. On this he erected a small log hut 
of one Yi>om and there lived and farmed his land. Being expert in his 
trade, he formed fine tables, chairs and other pieces of furniture frcjm the 
trees found on his own land, and, then to meet the needs of a rural community, 
he began making caskets in which the dead were laid to rest. These he 
fashioned from fine walnut timber, selling them for from four to six dollars 
and gradually as the community became more thickly settled, the duties of 
funeral director devrjjved upon him and he fitted himself for his work as best 
he could. He, however, continued to make caskets until forced by the infirmi- 
tives of age to give up that part of his labors. He was earlv left an orphan 
through the death of both parents and came to this country a lonel_\- youth 
but the years have wrought him many filial ties and he is still living at the 
age of ninety years, a fine old man. Anna Finke, his wife, was brought to 
Cincinnati by her parents, and there she met and married ]Mr. Whittenburg. 
To their union were born seven children : Anna, Charles, Christian, Maggie, 
Sophia (who died young), Mary and Carrie. Anna became the wife of 
Ezra ]McCrackcn. of Missouri, and there are three children in that fainib'. 
Wilbur, Ida and Albert. Charles married Louisa Chamburg, who bi.ire him 
eight children. Anna, John. William, Henn.-, Mary. Clara, Jerry and ]\Iaggie. 
all living in Iowa. Christian married ^Laggie Brent and has five children. 
Adaline, Laura. Plenry, George and Leona. Mary became the wife of Henry 
Ravenstein and has three children : Carrie. Arthur and Robert, all living at 
Bradford. Ohio. Carrie became the wife of George Woodruff, of Eaton. 
Ohio. She is the mother of two children, Ethel and Lla. 

Albert Henry Mathias received his elementary education in the public 



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DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 869 

schools of Dillsljoro anrl for s]>ecial training in his cliosen field of endeavor, 
entered the Cincinnati College of Embalming, from \vhich institution he was 
"graduated in tlic year 191 3. This was the year of the disastrous floods along 
the Ohio river and young ]\Iatliias was sent by the city of Cincinnati to the 
flooded districts of Ohio to render his services to the communities where 
many lives had been lost by drowning. After discharging the duties duis 
thrust upon him, he returned to his home and took up the work begun by his 
grandfather. In 1914 he purchased the undertaking business of the Xiebrugge 
company and maintains his office at Dillsboro. 

Mr .Mathias is a devout member of the Lutheran church. In politics 
he votes an independent ticket, choosing his men rather than endorsing any 
partv ticket. He is a voung man of high ideals, sociable and of plea^^ing ad- 
dress and b}' virtue of his sterling qualities he will win his way along the best 
paths of life. 



EXOCH HEADLEV 



Among the well known citizens of Clay township, Dearborn county, 
Indiana, is the respected subject of this sketch, nov.' living in Dillsboro, where 
he has made his home for the past few years. 

Enoch Headley comes from one of the old and highly esteemed families 
of this comniunit\- and is a native of Dearborn count}', ha\ing been b'lrn on 
April 16, 1S47, >" C;esar Creek to\Miship, a son of James and Elizabeth 
(Cousins) Headley. The former was a native of the city of London, I'.ngland, 
and immigrated to America when a young man. He located first in Baltimore, 
Maryland, where, however, he remained for a short time only. He then came 
westward and for the balance of his life was engaged in farming, being located 
on the farm which he .purchased in Ciesar Creek township. This was a tract 
of forty acres, for which he paid one dollar and twenty-five cents per acre. 
His death occurred when he was thirty-nine years of age. He was a faithful 
member of the ^lethodist F.piscopal church and did much to further the cause 
c»f that society in the earl\- days of this section. In politics he was a strmch 
supporter of the X^'hig party. Elizabetn (Cousins) Headley, his wife, was a 
native of the state of Ohio, born in 1S30, and when a child was brought to 
Cresar Creek township by her parents. There she met and married James 
Headley while still a young girl. Their marriage took place in 1846, and to 
their union were born three children, Enoch being the eldest, followed by 
two girls, Rebecca Ann and Elizabeth. Rebecca Ann became the wife of 
Philip Helms, of Dillsboro, and the mother of four children, Vina, Lucy, 



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8/0 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Stanley and Florence. Elizabeth married Crist Ceiving", by whom she became 
the mother of two chililren, Katie (deceased) and Louisa, .\fter Mr. Ceil- 
ing's death, she became tlic wife of Isaac W'aldon. by whom she became the 
mother of si.x children, Ilarve}', Louis. Charles, Earl, Clara and Ik'ujamin, 
the latter two being deceased. 

Enoch Headley recei\ed his education in the common schools of Crcsar 
Creek and Clay townships and was emplo\ed in farm work until the time of 
his enlistment in the army during the Civil War. On February 5, 1SG5, he 
volunteered as a pri\ate in Company I, One Hundred and Forty-sixth Regi- 
ment, Lidiana \'olunleer Infantry, serving until the close of hostilities. After 
the close of the war, he returned home and was engaged in farming. He pur- 
chased eighteen acres of the old homestead, which he farmed for two vcars and 
then sold. For a few vears he then rented farms throughout the tr:>wnship, 
finally going to the fann of an uncle and aunt, where he remained for some 
time. 

In 1869 Enoch Headley was united in marriage with Clarissa Flelms, 
daughter of Alfred and Eliza (Jones) Flelms, of Clay township. Dearborn 
count}'. To this union \\cre burn fi\'e children, Lcira Ellen, ]\taggie Mhn , Ada 
C, Melvin Eldo and Etta. The death of Mrs. Headley in 18S4 left him 
with this }'oung and growing famil}-, the youngest child being Ijut f:_nir 
weeks of age. These all, however, have grown to maturity and have taken 
their places in the world. I,f>ra Ellen is the wife of \\'il!i;un Ent, of Ripley 
county, and the mother of a son and daughter, Harold and Margaret Beatrice. 
Maggie IMay married Frederick Billinghearst and is the mother of seven chil- 
dren, Daniel, Fred, Melvin, Elmer, Frank, Dorothy and one deceased. Ada 
C. became the wife of Gus Cline, of Cincinnati, and has one child, John. }vlel- 
vin married Anna Dearing and is the father of five children, Thelma May 
(deceased). Alma May, \'iola, IMelvin Eldo, Jr., and Thelma Ruth. Etta 
became the wife of William Schillinger and resides in Peoria, Illinois. In 1898 
Enoch Headley married, secondly, Ida B. ('Gloyd) Gilman, widow of F. 
Gilman. Air. and Mrs. Headley are the parents of a daughter, Edna, who is 
now attending school. 

In 1900 Mr. Headley took the United States mail route lietween Cross 
Plains and Dillsboro, carrying it for eight months, when he gave it up to go 
on a fifty-four acre farm which he had purchased. That, however, he re- 
^tained but a short time when he sold it and moved to his wife's farm in Cresar 
Creek township. In 1907 he purchased a farm of forty acres near h^armers 
Retreat, which he cleared and fanned for seven years and then sold it, pur- 
chasing property in Dillsboro, where he has since resided. 



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' ' '■ DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 87I 

I\Ir. Headley is a member of the Methodist Episccjpal church. He holds 
his fraternal affiliation with the Knights of Pj'thias and I'o^t Xo. 189, (Irand 
.\rniy of the Republic, at Dill^boro. In politics he is a Republican and lias 
ser\'cd his party as road supervisor for two years. Throughout the yeru"s of 
his life in this section, Mr. Headley has always retained the confidence and 
good will of his large circle of friends. 



WILLIAM SHUTER. 



Xo class of citizenship in America is more solid or substantial than that 
to which the subject of this sketch belongs. Those who, by their own efforts, 
have built up for themselves and their families, a successful, remunerative 
business, form the bone and and sinew oi our communities, and are deserving 
of admiration and appreciation. William SluUer, of Hogan township. Dear- 
born county, has achieved success as a farmer and has established a gi.iod rei>u- 
tation in this community. 

William Shuter was born on February 5, 1841, in Manchester township, 
this county, and is a son of Henry and Sophia (Poos) Shuter. After his 
marriage, William Shuter followed farming on a rented place in Hogan town- 
ship, and five _\ears later, in 1869, bought a tract of one hundred and 
forty acres in the northwest part of Hogan township, where he has since 
made his home. He has since added to his possessions by the purchase of the 
Huffman farm on the Aurora and ]\Ioores Hill pike, and again bought a 
farm of twenty-five acres, now owning, in all, two hundred and fifty-five 
acres, in addition to \vhich he at one time owned the old home place of one 
hundred and forty-seven acres, which he deeded to his son, Oliver. IMr. Shuter 
has improved his place with valuable buildings, including a substantial, at- 
tractive house, good barn and other outbuildings, and now has one of the 
most prosperous-looking homes in the townsiiip. His attentinn has been di- 
vided between general farming and stock raising. Mr. Shuter is a member of 
the Baptist church. He had held some of the townsiiip offices, among them 
being that of township trustee, in which capacity he served over five years, 
beginning about 1900. 

Henry Shuter, father of William Shuter, w^as born in Hanover. Ger- 
many, January 26. 1812, and was a son of Frederick and Mary Shuter. He 
came to America in his youth with his parents, who settled in Jackson town- 
ship, Dearborn county, in 1834. As a young man, Henry Shuter employed 



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872 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

his time on a farm, altliough liis first emplnynicnt in America was tiiat of a 
hod-carrier, at Cincinnati, Ohio, after wiiich he began farming- for himself 
in Manchester township, where he became the owner of several \aluable farms, 
owning abont three hundred acres, and was also the owner of several good 
farms in Illimais. He was a life-long farmer, and started at the bottom of the 
ladder and, unaideil, earned all he possessed. At the beginning his only as- 
sets were thrift, cccjnomy and gorxl management. Henry Shuter was a 
Democrat until 1S52. and in 1856 began voting for the Republican party. 

On January 14. 1840, Henry Shuter was united in marriage with Sophia 
Poos, daughter of Henry and Christina Poos, who was born on June 7, 1S18, 
in Meslingen, Prussia. Henry and Sophia ( Poos} Shuter were the parents 
of seven children, two of x^hom died in Germany: Arminda, who liecame the 
wife of John Rumsey and resided in r^Iancliester township until her death; 
William, of Hogan township; Henry, who is li\ing in the northern part of Cen- 
ter township; Haimah became the wife of Holman Canfield, wdio is now 
deceased, and resides in Sparta township with her children; Eliza is the wife 
of George Ragsdale, and lives in Manchester township. 

The paternal grandparents were Frederick and Mary Shuter, natives ot 
Hanover, Germany, and were the parents of two children, IIem"y and bred- 
erick. After the death of his wife, Frederick Shuter was married, secondly to 
^Margaret Imhoff. and came to America with his family, landing at Baltimore 
in 18,^0, coming in 1832 to Cincinnati, and in 1834 settled in Jackson town- 
ship, Dearborn county, Indiana, where they spent the remainder of their li\'es. 
This last union was ble^S(.d w itli two children, William and Sophia. Mr. 
Shuter was killed by a fall from a load of wheat. He and his wife were earnest 
members of the Lutheran church. 

The maternal grandparents were Henry and Christina Poos, natives of 
Prussia, who immigrated to America and settled in Riplej' county, Indiana, 
where they spent the remainder of their lives. They were the parents of 
eight children, iwo of which died in Germany, the onl} mies whose names are 
known being I'rederick. Henry. Sophia and tlannah. 

William Shuter was united in marriage in 1864, with Amanda Canfield, 
daughter of Cyrus and i^.Iary (Richardson) Canfield. Amanda Canfield was 
bom in Manchester township. Dearborn ci'unty. She was a member of the 
Methodist church. Mrs. Amanda (Canfield) Shuter died on March 24, 191 1, 
leaving surviving her husband and si.K children, namely: Oliver P., who mar- 
ried Emma Weseman, and resides in Manchester township on the old home 
farm, and has three children. Raymond, Leslie and Oliver Ellsworth; Edith, 
who is the wife of William Abdon, and lives on the Huffman farm, has three 



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DEARBORX COL' NT V, INDIANA. 873 

children, Myrtle, Clyde and Earl; Juhn lives near Wilmington, on the Moores 
Hill and Aurora pike, is married to Lydia Clans, and has one son, F.ldridge ; 
Flora E. became the wife of ^Martin J. W'eis, and lives on a farm south of her 
father's home and is the mother of two children, AX'illard and Edward ; Will- 
iam II. lives at \\'estwood, near Cincinnati, Ohio, where he is engaged in 
truck farming, he is married to Kate Rei\'ers; Harry Raymond, who has 
charge of the home farm, was married to Edna P. Kimball, and they have two 
children, Louisa and Harriett. 

Cyrus and ]^[ary (Richardson) Canfield, parents of ]\Irs. William Shuter. 
spent a great deal of their lives in Hogan township. Mr. Canfield spent the 
most of his life in t!ie stone house, where his son, Clarion Canfield, now lives. 
Two rooms of this old house were built probably one hundred or more years 
ago. There is a large fireplace, \\'here they used to roll in big back-logs, too 
large to carry. The old house is still strong and durable. ]Mar\- (Richardson) 
Canfield was born in New York, about 1817, and was a daughter of Alfred 
Richardson and his wife. She was a little child when lier parents moved to 
Hogan township. 

An ancestral record of the Canfield family, going back many ccntiu"ies, 
is given on another page in tliis history. 

Air. Shuter has, through his great force of character and determination, 
won many loyal friends in Hogan township. 



HORACE G. SOUIBB. 



Among the well-knoun business men of Lawrenceburg, Indiana, is the 
subject of this biographical sketch, who is a native of this county and meml,er 
of a family which is well represented hereabout. 

Horace G. Squibb is a son of William P. and Mary Frances ( Plummer) 
Squibb, and was born on August 25, 18S0. at Aurora, Indiana. Ijut moved from 
that little city, when but eight years of age. and settled in Lawrenceburg. where 
he has since resided. Here he secured his education at the ptiblic schools. At 
the age of fifteen, he was employed in his father's distillery, in which he 
eventually became a partner, and is now conducting the business in cimnection 
with his brothers, Robert, George and Nathaniel, and his cousin. Louis Foulk. 
under the firm name of W. P. Squibb & Company. Mr. Squibb is very domes- 
tic in his habits, and thoroughly enjoys his home and family. When not en- 
gaged at his distillery, he is generally to be found at his home, which he con- 



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8/4 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

siders the best place on earth. In the distillery, he is superintendent of the 
cattle department, and is a line judge of cattle, having had an extended ex- 
perience in this line. 

For a fuller history of William P. and Mary Frances (Plummer) Squibb, 
the reader is referred to the sketch of George L. P. Squibb, presented elsewhere 
in this volume. 

Horace G. Squibb was united in marriage on October 21, 1908, with Edna 
Mae Weist, daughter of William D. and Lillian ( Geisert) \\'eist, to which 
luiion has l;een born one son, Howard Da\id Squibb. ^Irs. Squibb was born 
at Mount Auburn, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

William D. Weist, father of Mrs. Sijuibb, was born and reared in the state 
of New York, coming to Cincinnati when a yourig man. where he learned 

I' the tailor's trade, which he followed all his life. To William D. and Lillian 

I (Geisert) Weist have been born three children, Lillian Viola, William D., 

[; Jr. and Edna. 

The maternal grandfather of Mrs. Squibb was \\illiam Geisert, whose 
wife was iNlary Geisert, natives of Germany. They came to America and 

I settled in Dearborn county about the time of the Civil War, and both died here 

''' at an advanced age. Their children were Anna, Albert, Edward, Flora, 

[■ Lillian and Amelia. 

' Horace G. Squibb, through his genial temperament, makes many friend^. 

and there is accorded to him the fullest measure of popular confidence and 
esteem throughout the community. 



JACOB M. BAUER. 



Jacob M. Bauer, of the Bauer Cooperage Company, of Lawrenceburg, 
Indiana, is one of the best-known citizens of this section of the state. Mr. 
Bauer is also well known in Cincinnati, where he is prominently identified with 
the business and commercial hfe of the Queen City. It was in Cincinnati that 
Mr. Bauer was born, and it was here that his father was engaged in the hotel 
business for many years. Jacob M. Bauer received his education in the pub- 
lic schools of Cincinnati, and was graduated from the high school there nearly 
forty years ago. Educated for the law, a profession which Mr. Bauer did not 
find to his liking, he turned his attention imtnediately to business, and after 
a short experience in a Cincinnati mercantile house, he engaged in the coop- 
erage business with his brother, John G. Very shortly afterwards they came 



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DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 875 

to Lawrenccburg, and were prominent factors in tlie organization ot tlie com- 
pany of which they now have the complete contml. Mr. r)auer has l)cen 
W(jn(lcrfully snccessful in business and his fimi not onlv gi\"es eni[ili )\ nicnt to 
more than two hundred persons, but has large holdings in Kentucky, where tlie 
raw material for manufacture is prepared. The coniiiaiu' lias a large and 
prosperous trade throughout this section of the country, and .Mr, I'.auer's keen 
business foresight has been no inconsiderable factor in the grow tit oi t'i:> 
great business. In politics Jacob M. Bauer has long occupied a conspicui.us 
place. Not only has he been an acti\'e and influential counselK)r in the laiik--, 
of the Republican party, but for many years he was a close friend and coun- 
sellor of United States Senator Beveridge in this section of the state, 

Jacob ^[, Bauer was born in Cincinnati. Ohio, February 12, 1858. lie is 
a son of Jacob and Katherine (Schmidt) Bauer, the former of whom was a 
native of Wurlemburg, and the latter of liavaria, Germany, Jacob M. Bauer 
was one of four children. His brother, John B., lives in Cincinnati. Catlierine 
is the wife of E. H. Ringel, of Cleveland. Ohio, lunma died in infanc}-. 

]\[r. Bauer was reared in Cincinnati, and was graduated from the high 
school there in i87ri. He then studied law under Judge Straub, but not liking 
the law, he became associated \vith the mercantile house of Jeffras, Seely 
& Company, and remained with the firm until ]88o. He then engaged in 
business with his brother. John G., at Cincinnati, and tliere thev established a 
cooperage plant. They came to Lawrenccburg in 1882. and consi.4idated with 
the Walsh interests, org-anizing the company known as the Bauer Cooperage 
Compaii}-, which was incorporated with a capital stock of one hundred thousand 
dollars. This organization remained intact until 1895, when John G. and Jaco]> 
M. Bauer bought out the \\'alsh interests, and have continued the bu-^iness 
ever since, a period of twenty years. The factory has a capacity ni ele\"en 
hundred whiskey barrels a day. The trade of the company extentls over the 
middle and eastern states. The Bauer Cooperage Company is the origiriator 
of the famous Bauer se\'en-hoop barrel. 

Jacol> yi. Bauer was married on June 10, 1885, to Ex'angeline I:Ia}es, the 
daughter 'if Ezra and Laura (Morgan) Hayes, and to this 'union four chil- 
dren have been born, Laura Hortense, Catherine Evangeline, Ezra H. and Inez. 
Laura H. was graduated from the Bartholomew Ely School, of Cincinnati, 
and her sister Catherine also was graduated from the same institution. Laura 
H. is the wife of Clifford S. Diehl, and they live in Lawrenccburg. They are 
the parents of one son, Robert Bauer. Catherine is the wife of John E. Luhr- 
man, and they have two children, ]'".vangeline Mary and John Jacob. Ezra 
H. died at the age of four years, and Inez died in infancy. 



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8/6 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

jNIr. Bauer's father was reared and educated in Germany. He came to 
this cuuntr}' and located in Cincinnati, Ohio, in pioneer times, and there he 
engaged in the liotel husiness. lie diet! in that city in 1885, at the age of fift_\'- 
seven. His widow still survi\'es him and lives in Cleveland, and is now aged 
eighty years. Jactib Eauer was a member of the Lutheran church, and his 
wife is a member of the same denomination. 

'Sir. Bauer's paternal grandfather was Christian Bauer, who died in Ger- 
manv at a very advanced age. Among his children were ]\Iichael Gottlieb. 
William. Jacid) and Emma. Mr. Bauer's maternal grandfather was a farmer 
in Germany, and among his children were Catherine, Barbara, Emma, Mary 
and George. 

Mrs. Jacob M. Bauer was born in Greendale, near Lawrenceburg, 
Indiana. Her parents were natives of Dearborn county, and her father is still 
living at the age of eighty-eight. Her mother died at the age of forty-five. 
They were the parents of the following children : Laura, ^Matilda, Xannie, 
Evangeline, Theresa, Ezra, Arthur and Joseph. ^Ls. Bauer's paternal grand- 
father. Joseph Hayes, was one of the pioneers of this section and one of three 
brothers whn \\-ere prominent in the early life of Dearborn county. Joseph 
Hayes married a Mis^ Biliingsley, and both were natives of Pennsylvania. 
Mrs. Joseph Hayes' ancestors were of Revolutionary stock. ?^Irs. Bauer's ma- 
ternal grandfather married a }iliss Glasgow, of Scotch descent, and he and 
his wife were earlv settlers in Dearborn count}'. 

Jacob M. Bauer is a Republicm in politics and for several years was a 
member of the Republican state central committee of Lidiana, serving from 
the Fourth Congressional District. He was one of the ardent supporters of 
Senator Beveridge's org-anization, and was a delegate to several conventions, 
among them being the conventions which nominated President Roosevelt 
and President Taft. }vlr. Bauer is still regarded as an influential factor in the 
councils of his party in this section of the state, and is a man who is freely 
consulted by Rei)ul:licans li\ing in other sections of the state. Mrs. Bauer 
is a member of the I'resbyterian church. Mr. Bauer is a member of the 
Lutheran church. Mr. Bauer is a thirty-second degree, Scottish Rite ^^lason, 
and belongs to Lawrenceburg Lodge No. 4, Free and Accepted Masons: Law- 
renceburg Chapter. Royal Arch Alasons ; Aurora Commandery, Knights Tem- 
plar, and ^Lu-at Temple, Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. Fie is also a member 
of Dearborn Lodge No. 49, Knights of Pythias. 

Jacob M.' Bauer is a director of the Peoples National Bank, of Lawrence- 
burg, and is also well known in the financial and commercial life of Cincinnati, 



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DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. S/y 

\\herc he is a member of the Business Glen's Club, the Oueeti Cit_\- CUib, and 
the Chamber of Commerce. 

When the history of the present generation in Dearborn count v, Indiana, 
is written, no man will stand out more prominently in the histoiy of this county 
tlian Jacob M. Bauer. 



^ '■■■'■■- CAPT. HANSEN DOWDEN MOORE. 

Capt. Hansen Dowden ^^loore belongs to an interesting and aristocratic 
Maryland family, whose descendants have lost none of the family pride. 'Jdiev 
have also retained that keen foresight so prominent throughout the generations, 
and have always {>ossessed great fierce of cliaractcr and managericd ab;!it_\-. 
The record of Captain ^loore in the Civil War speaks well for his ability to 
meet any and all emergencies, and he has never been at a loss for good judg- 
ment in doing the proper thing at the proper time. 

Hansen Dowen -Moore \va? burn on February 2. 1838, at Moores Hilk 
Indiana, and is the son of John Collins and Indiana Rutii (Dnwueii) 
r^Ioore. His early education was obtained at the public schools at iloores Hill, 
after which he entered ]\Ioores Hill College, but was compelled to leave here 
before he finished, because of the ill health of his father. He assisted his father 
in the store until the breaking out of the Civil War, and in 1S62, he organized 
a company, of which he was made captain, serving in Company K, Sixty- 
eighth Regiment, Indiana \"olunteer Infantry, for three years. Some of the 
battles in which he participated being those of Chickamauga and Missionary 
Ridge, in the latter of which he was severely wounded, and others, being dis- 
charged at the close of the war in 1S65. After the war. Captain Moore re- 
turned to Moores Hill and went into partnership with his Iimtlier, taking river 
his father's business, which was conducted under the firm name of J. C. 
Moore's Sons. This arrangement continued for ten years, when Hansen 
Dowden Moore took over the entire business and conducted it until 1905, when 
he sold the stock, buildings and all, to }tIoi,n-es Hill College, moving back to 
the old homestead, where he still resides. Captain M'jore has always given 
his loyal sup[)ort to the Republican party. He was a niember of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, of which he was an officer, holding the offices of treasiu"er 
and trustee for a number of years. He belonged \.o the Independent Order of 
Odd Eellows. 

John Collins Moore, father of the subject of this sketch, was boru on 
February 8, iSio, near Salisbury, Marjdand, and when eight years of age 



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878 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

came with his {)arents to I^'iwrenceljurg', settling;- here tor a time, ami later 
•moving to Moores Hill, where they entered a qiiarteT section of land from 
the govei-nment in 1S18. Mr. }>Ioore was educated in his home town, anrl 
at the age of seventeen, went io I.av.-rencehm-g to learn the harness-nriker's 
trade, and later learned the wood-worker's trade at Wilmington, when the 
city was the eom^.ty seat, .\fter learning his trades, he returned to Moores 
Hill and houglit fifty acres of his father's farm, and after his marriage, he 
Iniilt a comfortable home and opened a saddle and harness business, in connec- 
tion with which he operated a general store, and afterwards started a cooperage 
factory, a large plant in which he employed forty or fifty people. John Collins 
Moore was originally a ^\'hig. and later became a Repulilican. He was a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church, in which he trxik an active and 
prominent interest, being treasurer and trustee. His fraternal meutr)er>liii) was 
with the Indei^endent Order of Odd ]""ellows. His wife. Indiana Ruth (Dow- 
den) ?^[oore, daughter of Samuel H. and Soiihia ( IMcCracken ) Dowden, was 
born on January 16. 181 1, near Lawrenceburg, Indiana. ;\Ir. and ^Irs. 
Moore were married on December 23. 1S34, in Dearborn county. ^Ir. Moore 
died on June 4. 187 1, and his wife sur\'i\-ed him t(j a good old age. She 
was a woman of fine intellect, and a devoted Christian, having joined the 
jMethodist Episcopal church at an early age. Their children were : Hansen 
Dowden. Isaac S., America S.. Helena J., ?3enjamin P., William J., John W., 
Virgil Mc, and INfary Thompsi.Mi. 

The paternal gran.dparents were Adam and Judith (Smith) Aloore. na- 
tives of ^Maryland. ^Ir. Moore was a man of good sense, geneial infonnation 
and strong moral convictions, always havhig his own opinion in questions of 
religion and politics. Their children were: Isaac, John, Levi Smith, Elizabeth. 
JMars'. Xancy and Harriett. 

The maternal grandparents were Samuel H. and Sophia ( McCracken) 
Dowden. natives of Virginia, where they were united in marriage, immigrat- 
ing in 1810, settling in Dearborn county. 

Capt. Hansen Dowden ^loore was married on AL\y 8. 1868, to Jane Susan 
Davies, daughter of \\'illiam and Ann (Jenkins) Davies. She was born on 
a farm near Guilford, Indiana. November 14. 1838, and received her educati()n 
at Guilford and I^awrenceburg, and later taught school at Dover, Indiana. 
To this union were born two children, Ruth and Mary E. Ruth was born on 
]May 15. 1870, and became the wife of J. ^V. Setters, of Pueblo, Colorado, who 
is a ranchman. Mary E. was born on Januarv 18. 1873, and is married to 
Claude 15. Thomas. They are living at Moores Hill, where Mr. Thomas offi- 
ciates as postmaster. 



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William Davies. father of ]\Irs. ^loore. was burn (ni April 20, 17S8, in Car- 
marthenshire. \^"ales. His wife. Anna (Jenkins) Davies. was horn on August 
I, 1793, a.t Glamorganshire, Wales. They were married April jr.. 1X14, in 
Wales, etmiii'.y t(j the L'nited States in 1816, lan.din.E; at Xew Vurk Cil>'. eoming 
later to Cincinnati, and after a residence there oi funr years, entered land frmn 
the government and settled near Gnilford. clearing the forest away, anil living 
there until their death. Mrs. Davies died on .April 19. 18^)7. and William 
Davies died on June 12, 18G8. They were the parents of ten children, naniel}' : 
George \\'.. John !•'., Alary Ann, Elizaheth, Helen, Thomas. Wilham, David, 
Jane S., and (me who died voung. 

Through his sterling integrity, and his gcx^d judgment, Captain Afoore's 
life has been a financial success, and as a citizen and neighbor he is highly 
esteemed wherever his name is known. ' 



REV. JOHN FLOREXTIXR SOXDERMAXX. 

The earlv settlers of Dearborn ci^unty, Indiana, very sliurtly after social 
order had been established in this section, organized churches where th.ey 
might worship and develop their spiritual life. These churches ha\-e Ijeen 
loyally sustained by the descendants of the pioneers; and it is to the pastor of 
one of them, the Re\-. John Florentine Simdermann, of St. Lawrence's Catho- 
lic church, that this biographical sketch relates. 

John Florentine Sondermami was born near Attendnm, Westphalia, Ger- 
many. December 2. 1884. and is a siin of Theodore and Mary Catherine 
(Theile) Sondermami. natives of Westphalia. Germany. They had eight 
children, as follow: John Florentine, Frank, deceased; Joseph, who died in in- 
fancy : Alary, a Sister of Providence at St. Alarys of the Woods. \'igo 
count}-; Anna, who died when nine years old; Augr.st, of Jasper, Du r>ois 
countv, Indiana; Aleinrad, who died while a tin- 'logical student at Saint 
Aleinrad Abbey, in Spencer county, Indiana; and one who died in infancy. 

Theodore Sondennann \\-as reared and educated in German}-, and vvas 
a farmer and horticulturist. He came to America fir.-t in 1846, to look- at the 
country, with which he was well pleased, and returned to Germany to make 
arrangements to return to this countrv at once. Ffe returned and brought hi'- 
wife and first born child, settling, first at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where 
they lived a year or two, and later moved to Allegheny Cit}', where he was 
in the grocery business. When he came to America the second time, he and 



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88o DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

his wife and son embarked at Havre, France, July r6, 1847, and after n 
journey of thirty-eigiil daxs on the saihng vessel, "St. Nicholas," landed in Xcw 
York City, August 23. 1S47. They went to Pittsburgh, where they arrived 
on September S, the same )-ear. They lived there imtil ^larch, 1848, when 
they returnefl to .Vllegheny Cit_\-. where he engaged in the grocer)- business 
until December, 1852. He then came west to Du Bois ci>unty, Indiana, and 
settled in what was then Hall township, and ilevel^ped a farm there. He 
bought a large tract of land and li\ed tliere so-me years. He was elected countv 
assessor and served two terms, utitil the fall of 1885, when he was elected 
county treasurer of Du Bois county, and at the end of his second term as 
treasurer he was elected county auditor. At the expiration of the term he 
removed to Mount \'ernon, Posey county, Indiana, and established a hardware 
store there. He was in that business about foiu" }ears after ^\•hich he returned 
to Jasper, Du Bois county, to spend the rest of his life. He died there at the 
age of eightv-seven }'cars. Blis wife died at the age of seventy years. Both 
were members of the Cathcilic church. Pie belonged to the '"iK^me guards'' at 
the time of the Morgan raid duriiig the Civil War. 

The paternal grandfather was Francis Xavier Sondermann. His wife 
was Mary Theresa (Kranz) Sondermann, natives of Germany. He was a 
teacher, and occupied a position similar to that of tmr cminty superintendent 
of schools. Fie was also a large farmer and horticulturist. They died in Ger- 
man}'. He was born in 1774. and died in 1830. His wife was l>orn in 1777 and 
died in 1836. They had a family of four children. Ami Mary, IMary Josepha, 
Mary ^Magdalene and Theodi.ire. The maternal grand fatlier was I'rank 
Theije. a farmer, whose wife was ^Margaret Bulle. They were natives of West- 
phalia, where the_\- both died, he at past middle age, and she at eighty-four. He 
was born in 1779, and died in 1850. She was born in 17S7 and died in 1872. 
They were the parents of the following children : Hem'y. Anthony, bVancis 
Joseph. John Joseph, ]\Iagdalene, Man,- Catherine, Rachel and Louisa. 

Mary, the fourth child of Theodore and Catherine Sondermann, is now 
Sister Mary Albertine. a Sister of Providence at St. Marys of the Woods. 
Vigo county, Indiana. She is an artist of a superior . 'rder, and her paint- 
ings are to be seen in n-ian_\- puldic iristitutions. among them, lieing one of Sena- 
tor David Turpie, in the state house in India'iap<ilis. She .also pain.ted a lion, 
on which she recei\ed first prize at the World's Fair in Chicago, in 1893. 

The Catholic congregation in Lawrenceburg was organized in 1840, 
consisting at the time of fifteen families, among which George Huschart. Peter 
VVerst, John Kirnmel, Jacob ^Meier, Louis Cransart, Anthony Schwartz and 
Michael Lang were prominent. Divine services were held at first in a house 
in Xewtown (a part of Lawrenceburg), then, in the following \-car, in the 



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DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. ■ SSl 

house 01 George Huschart, and at tinies also in tliat of Michael Lang. The 
coruer-.stone of the first church was laid in 1S41, on \Valniit street, (tne square 
.south cif the present church. It was huilt (^f stone, sixty hy fiMtv feet, hut was 
not ciint;ileted until 1S47. when it was hlessed. Rev. Joseph l^'ernediny, of 
Xcw .\lsace, attended the place from 1840 to 1841 ; Rev. F. 0'l\ourke. of 
Dover, from 184 1 to 1844, when he returned to Irelar.d ; Rev. Andrew 
Dennett, of Dover, from 1844 to 1850: Rev. i\I. Stahl, of Xcw Alsace, during- 
the first part of 1S50; Rev. A. Carius, of iladison, daring the latter part of 
1850; The l-'ranciscan Fatlier.s, Re\s. G. L'ntherdiener, Sigismund and Anselm 
Koch, of Cincinnati ( St. John's cluuxh). had charge from 1851 tn i^^(). Re\-. 
Ignace Klein, of St. Xichnlas, Pipe Creek, from 1S50 to 1866. 

On January 6. 1S66, l-lev. Clement Scheve became the first resident pas- 
tor of Fawrencehurg. The present beautiful St. Lawrence's church was erected 
in t866 on Walnut street, one square north of the old church. The church 
is of brick, one hundred and twenty by fifty feet, wdth a large basement of 
stone, at first used for school purposes, but since converted into a chapel and 
meeting-room for societies. Father Scheve also built a parsonage in 18G7, 
a spacicius two-story brick building, and in 1869 a large three-story school 
house o.f brick, with a baseinent of stone. The school is the property of the 
Sisters of St. Francis. Father Scheve w^as born on October 4, 1828, in Lusche, 
Oldenburg, and immigrated to America in 1848. and was ordained on March 
19, 1839. Loss of health compelled him to resign his charge in Lawrencebm-g 
in August, 1870. when he went to Minnesota and dicvl there in tlic spring of 
1S75. Rev. Julius J. Duddenhausen was appointed jiastor of St. Lawrence's 011 
October i, 1870, and successfully administered to the needs of the congregation 
until ]May 15, 1875, when he was transferred to Hoh- Trinit_\- church, at E\-ans- 
ville. 

Rev. John Florentine Sondermann, the present pastijr, took charge on 
May 15. 1875. He studied at St. I\Ieinrad, and was ordained there by bishop 
de St. Palais as priest. September 22. 1868. His first mission was 'Sh. \'er- 
non, Posey county, of which he was the first resident priest, until 3.1ay 15, 
1874, when he replaced Father Viehaus during his absence at St. Mary's 
church, Evansville, until October of the same year. Xe\t, he became pastor of 
St. Joseph's, \'anderburgh county, until May, i'875, when he was transferre<l 
to Lawrenceburg. where he has continued as pastor to the present time, a 
period of forty years. It is needless to say that he is strongly entrenched in tlie 
hearts and affections of his church membership and the citizens of Lawrence- 

(56) 



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882 DEARBOUN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

burg", and ho eulogy of words can better attest liis worth as a priest and a 
citizen than liiis enviable record of his, having niinistereil for so many ye.ar^ 
continuously to one congregation. This is an evidence of faithfulness and 
efficiency. The church now has a membersliip of o\er two hundred and 
fifty families, and the school varies, but usually has about two hundred pupils 
of both sexes. ...... ,,.,,,. 



FREDERICK SLATER. 



The career of Frederick Slater, of ]Moores Hill, Dearborn county, Indiana, 
whose name introduces tliis sketch, has been a long and busy one, and is a 
recortl of industry and courage tliat could be emulated very profitably by 
many of the younger generation. 

Frederick Slater was born on October 6, 182S, in Hanover, Germany, and 
is a son of Fi'ederick and Matilda ( Repe) Slater, and came with his parents to 
America in 1838, and settled in Kentucky. He grew to manhood, and was 
educated in the public schools of Alexandria, and assi^ted his father in agri- 
cultural pursuits until twenty-rine years of age when he came to Aurora, 
Indiana, and clerked in. a store, returning to Kentucky in a sl¥3rt time. In 1S52 
he went to California on a gold prospecting tuur. While there he develnpetl 
valuable pr<;)perties, and in 1856. he returned to Kentucky and assisted his 
father in pa\-ing (iff the farm debt. .Vfter his marriage Mr. Slater bought a 
gTocer}- store at Aurt'ra, which lie sold at the end of three years, and b' niglit 
another. In 1862. he organized Company E, Ele\'enth Kentucky Ca\alry, and 
ser\-ed as captain, being promoted to major in 1S63, in which ca[):icit\ he 
served twelve months, and was then promoted to lieutenant-colonel nf the 
same regiment, which he commanded until the close of the Civil War. Fle was 
engaged in a skirmish at Hartswell, Tennessee, where he was captured, but was 
released after a few weeks. He also participated in many other battles of 
prominence, thirty-si.x in all. After the close of the war, he went to Sparta, 
Indiana, where be conducted a general store for thirty years, during which 
time he was appointed postmaster, in which capacity he served for twenty-eight 
years. ]\Ir. Slater has always been an active and interested member of the 
Republican party, serving as county commissioner for a period of six years, and 
as trustee of Moores Hill four years. He is an earnest member of the Baptist 
church. He is a member of the Masonic order, and the Grand Army of the 
Republic. 

Frederick Slater, Sr., was born in 1801, in Hanover, Germany. He 
brought his family to America in 1S35, settling at Pittsburgh, and later 






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DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. S83 

nitncd to Cincinnati, where he remained a sliort tin:e, and t1ien nrnved to 
Lawrence county, Ohio, remaining there five years. He then moved to Alex- 
andria, Kentucky, and bought a farm of one hundred and sixty acres and lived 
tiierc until his death, which occurred in 187S, at the age of seventy-seven years. 
He was a strong believer in Democratic principles. I lis wife, Matilda (Rcpe) 
Slater, \\-as bnm in 1797, in Hanover, Germany, and died in 1874, aged seven- 
tv-seven years. Tiiey were the parents of five children. Henry, Frederick, 
Matilda, Emily, and John, all of whom are in the United States. 

I'Vederick Slater was united in marriage on June 23, 1856, with Sarah 
.Ann Corbit, who was born in 1832, in Pennsylvania, and died on August 4, 
1888, leaving six chiMren. William H., Frederick .\., James (deceased), Law- 
rence (deceased), Emily and Sada. 

William H. Slater was married to Kate Johnson, and lives at Scotts- 
burg, Indiana. They have ihe children, Gertrude, Anna, William, L-a and 
Edith. Frederick A. is married to Alice Givan, and resides at Pendleton, 
Indiana. This union has been blessed with four children, Milton, Albert, Lulu 
and Xaoma. Emily became the wife of William Heustis. and resides at Cov- 
ington. Kentucky. She is the mother of four children, Ira, Sada, Emily and 
Merril. Sada is the wife of Fred. Churchill, and resides at Springfield. Ohio. 
The)- are the ])arents of three children. Fern, Vira and Donald. 

Frederick Slater was married, secondly, December 23, 1890, -to Sarah 
Stewart Harrison, daughler of John and Alary (La\vrence) Harrison. She 
was born in 1842, in Cincinnati, and was educated in that city. 

John and Mary (Lawrence) Llarrison, parents of Sarah (Harrison) 
Slater, w-ere bom and reared in England, coming to America in 1829, and set- 
tling at Cincinnati, where Mr. Harrison was engaged in the foundry supply 
liusiness. John and Alary (Lawrence) Harrison were married in 1828. at 
St. John's church, Wakefield. England, and on their arri\-al in America, lauded 
at New York, and from that point came overland by wagon to Ohio, being- 
one month en route to Cincinnati. They w^ere members of the English Episco- 
I>al churclr Air. Harrison died at the age of fifty-six years, and his wife. 
Alary, died aged eigthy-tw-o years. They were tlie parents of eight children: 
William, Eliz;dieth, .Anna. Alary, John, Sarah, Alartha and James. 

The paternal grandparents of Alary ( Law-rence ) Harrison w-ere William 
and Alargarette ( Alaulton ) Harrison, natives of England, where they both 
died. 

In 1895 Air. Slater built an attracti\-e and comfortable house at Aloores 
Hill, where he and his wife have formed a host of friends and acquaintances, 
and w here they are honored and highly esteemed. 



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884 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

CLIFFORD J, DILS. 

Clifford J. Dils is a true son of Indiana, having liccn born in Dearborn 
county, received his education and later learning the agricultural methods of 
that state, it proved to lie the magnet that drew him back within her limits, 
after testing the opportunities which he had imagined might be more advan- 
tageous in a neighliorin.g state. He not only abainloncd the new state, but 
the business of farming, trying slill another state and a new line of Inisiness, in 
which he felt better satisfied for several years, but the call of DearVjorn county 
proving too strong for him, he returned and settled permanently in Aurora, 
which inove, in view of his business success, has been a thoroughlv satis- 
factory one. 

Clifford J. Diis was born in Manchester township. Dearborn county, 
October 20, 1S74, and is a son of John' and Louise (House) Dils. He was 
reared on his father's farm, and his education was secured at the district 
schools. When he arrived at the age of young manhood he went tu Illinois 
and engaged his services for two years on a farm, after which he went to 
Cincinnati, where he was employed on the railroad for twcKe years. He 
saved his money while here, and had enough to enable him to go into the hay 
and grain business at Aurora, in partnership with his brother, Hugh H., 
and in five years bought the entire interest, and has since been running the 
business alone. ]Mr. Dils has been a Republican. He is a member of the 
Baptist church, of which he is a regular attendant. 

John Dils, father of Clifford J., was born on ]\Iarch 44, 1845, '" Man- 
chester township. Dearborn county, Indiana. His wife, Louise (House) 
Dils, was also a nati\e of Dearborn count}-. Mr. Dils was a farmer in Man- 
chester township, and spent his remaining years here. W'hen he died he owned 
over two hundred acres of land. His death occurred on April i, 1909, at the 
age of sixty-four years. His wife survives him. and is living at Aurora, aged 
sixtj-seven years. 'Sir. and IMrs. Dils have been life-long members of the Bap- 
tist church, as ha\'e also their children, who were six in number, as follow : 
Hugh H., of Gary, Indiana: William, who resides at Aurora; Clifford J., of 
Aurora; Fletcher, who is still on the old home place; John, a druggist in In- 
dianapolis; and Floyd, who resides at Lawrenceburg. 

The paternal grandfather was William Dils, and his wife was Ann (Alor- 
gan) Dils. They were natives of the New England states, and uere of Eng- 
lish lineage. They were pioneers in Dearborn county, and the towns of Dills- 
boro was named for the family, who originallv spelled the name "Dills." Mr. 
Dils was a farmer all his life, and died in Manchester township at an old 



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DKAREORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 885 

age. They had the following children : Judson, William, Hattie. Carrie, Til- 
lie, Mrs. Louise Kerr, Mollie Harvey, Elizabeth, Frankland and John. 

The maternal grandfather was William House, and his wife was .Mary 
Ann (Wilson) House. They came from London, Enghuul. in 1S2S, and were 
pioneers in Dearborn county, emig'rating from Cincinnati, where Mr. Honsi, 
followed the carpenter's trade for a short time. He later followed farming. 
He lived to a good old age. and was killed by the falling of a tree. Their chil- 
dren were as follow: John, William, George. Lizzie, Mary and Louise. 

Clifford J. Dils was married on October 20. 1901, to Grace Greenwdi.d 
Hill, daughter of Adam and Ella ( Worley) Hill. She was burn on July 15. 
1874, on a farm near Aurora, and has always been a member of the ]\Ietho'li>i 
church. This union has been blessed with two children, Eleanor Claude and 
Donald Clifford. 

For the history of the parents of Mrs. Clifford J. Dils the rearler is re- 
ferred to tile sketch of .Adam K. Hill, presented elsewhere in this volume. 

Through hard work and good business manag'ement. Mr. Dils stands a- 
one of the leading and representaii\'e business men of .Am-ora, where he h'i< 
established a good-paying hay and grain business. 



JOHN PROBST. 

John Probst, a native of Dearborn county, Indiana, born on Octfil.ier 
5, 1842, farmer and blacksmith by occupation, has served twenty years a- 
justice of the peace in this county and is, therefore, well kuf^wn to all the citi- 
zens of the county. jMr. Probst has a long and honoralile military record. ha\ -. 
ing enlisted in 1862, in Company H. Eight)'-third Regiment, Indiana \"olun- 
teer Infantry, in which he served for about three vears as a pri\'ate. He 
participated in many hard-fought battles of the Civil War and. at the siege 
and surrender of Vicksburg. his regiment made two charges on tiie entrench- 
ments about that city. He also served in the battles of Missionary Ridge. 
Arkansas Post, Kenesaw IMountain, luka and in many minor engagements. 
Dearborn county has been his home for seventy-three years except for the 
period he spent as a soldier in the Union army. 

John Probst's parents. Ji;>hn and Julia (Pleisler) Probst, were natives oi 
Bavaria. Germany, the former of whom, after being reared and educated in 
Germanv, came to America at the age of twenty-one, in 1S3J, and Iricated fir-t 
at Cincinnati, Ohio, where he li\'ed for a few \ears. On coming tcj Dearborn 









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886 DEARBORN COUiS'TY, INDIANA. 

county, Indiana, he .settled on a farm of forty acres, a part of the tract of 
land purchased by his father, and here he reared his family. He died in 
185S, at the acfe of fi:irty-se\en years, and his wife died four \cars prcviousl\-. 
at the age of thirty-six. Both were devout nK-mliers of the Lutheran church. 
They reared a family of seven children: John, the subject of this sketch; 
Michael, of Montg-omery county, Illinois; Louisa, the widow of John Mettel, 
of Connersville, Indiana; Elizabeth, the widow of Philip Berk, of Cedar Grove, 
Franklin county, Indiana; [Nlary. who is the widow of David Raster, of Indi- 
anapolis; Nicholas, of ]\Iiller township, and Catherine, who is the widow of 
Michael Haag, of Greendale. 

Tlie paternal grandparents of Mr. Probst were John George and !Mar- 
garet (Xeus) Probst, who came to America in 1S35 and. after landing at 
New Orleans, came up the ^lississippi and Ohio ri\'ers to Cincinnati, whence 
they came to Dearborn county, Indiana, .\fter buying a farm of one hun- 
dred and sixty acres in Kelso township, they engaged in farming. Both died 
on the home farm, the grandfather at the age of eighty-six and the grand- 
mother at the age of seventy-eight or seventy-nine. They had four children, 
John, Jr., Gerirge. Elizabeth and Jacob. 

The maternal grandfather of Mr. Probst was John Heisler. whose wife 
died in Germany. After her death he came to America in company with 
John Probst and, being a coijper by trade, worked at this trade in Cincinnati 
for a number of }-ears, dying there at a \ery advanced age. Of his children 
Mrs. Julia Probst was the only one who came to this country. 

Born in Kelso township. Dearborn county, Indiana, and reared to man- 
hood on his father's farm, John Probst began learning the blacksmith's trade 
at the age of sixteen years, since which time he has made his own way in 
the world. Pie followed his trade until his enlistment in the L'nion army at 
the beginning of the Civil War. After the war he returned home and, bemg 
discharged at Indianapolis, resumed blacksmithing in Kelso township. There, 
until 186S, he operated a blacksmith shop and a saw-mill. During this time 
he was elected ju.-tice of the jieace and was also appointed t(3wnship trustee. 
Coming to I^awrenceburg, Indiana, in 1S86, after his election as county 
treasurer, he lived here for four years during his term in this office. Mr. 
Probst was in his day one of the most capable treasurers in the history of 
Dearborn count}-. He made an honorable and efficient record in this office, 
and at the end of his first term was triumphantly elected to the second, an 
evidence not only of his efficiency in the office, but of a good will which he 
enjoys from the people of Dearborn county. In the meantime he had pur- 
chased the home at 208 W'est High street, Lawrenceburg, Indiana, and here 



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DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA.. 88/ 

he has continued to hve since that time. Immediately after returning from 
the oflice of county treasurer he began farming in Lawrenceburg township, 
just west of the corporation hne and farmed until 1907, when he rented the 
farm, comprising now about sixty-two acres. During that time, huwe\er. he 
had been elected justice of the peace, in which office he has now served for 
twenty years. 

In February, 1868, John Ih'obst was married t<i Amelia I'^ender, the 
daughter of Jacob Fender. ]Mrs. Probst died in i86g, at the age of about 
twenty years. Born in Franklin count}-, she was the daughter of Cierman par- 
ents, both of whom died in Franklin county, Indiana. Jacob Fender and wife 
had si.K children, Edmund, Jacob, Amelia, Catherine, Elizabeth, and one who 
died in infancy. At her death Mrs. .Amelia Probst left one son, Edwin John 
Jacob. In August, 1869. John Probst was married to Christina E. Puissard, 
the daughter of Martin and Elizabeth (Fender) Bussard. ]\Irs. Christina 
I'robst died on ^larch 16, 191 1. at the age of sixty-one, leaving no children. 
She was a native of Franklin county, Indiana. 

A lifekmg member of the German Lutheran church, John Probst has been 
an acti\'e member in this dennniination. Both of his wi\es were members 
of the Lutheran church. He is a member of L'nion Lodge No. 8, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, and also of the encampment. Fie has belonged to this 
lodge since 1886. He also belongs to Robert Huff Post No. 89, Grand Army 
of the Republic, and has been quartermaster for many years. In politics he 
is identified with the Democratic party. 

By diligent and unceasing industry ^Ir. Probst has been able to acquire 
a substantial competence. Althougli liis life has been devoted to many enter- 
prises, he is recognized as a. man of no mean business ability, an interesting 
conversationalist, a broad-nn'nded. intelligent citizen. 



ADAM BRUCE. 



Having tra\eled considerably througli his own country and with an ex- 
tended trip abroad, visiting all the principal European countries, .\ilam 
Ilruce, whose name introduces this sketch, is a successful farmer who has 
l)rrifited by his obser\-ation nt the experiences of others. He has a large 
fund of general information, is keenlv alive to the aihantage of conducting 
in's fine farm along the most approved lines, and takes a deep interest in the 
newest methods of producing goods of the highest quality. He is a breeder 



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888 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

of fine stock and true lover of outdtK>r sport, having always been a fine 
marksman. 

Adam Bruce was born on March 9. 1852, on Short Ridge, in Hogan 
township, this county, on the old Aleck place. His parents were John and 
Jane (Ross) Bruce. He was reared in the community in which he now re 
sides, and has followed farming. In the fall of 1S79 ]Mr. Bruce moxed to 
Kansas, where he spent two and one-half years in agricultural pursuits, at 
the end of which time he returned and resumed farming in his old home neigh- 
borhood. Here ]\Ir. Bruce has a fine farm of r)ne hundred and seventy-eight 
acres. In 18S8 he went on a tour through Europe, visiting Hamburg, Ger- 
many ; and from there went to Laving Station, in Denmark, where his brother- 
in-law, Air. Dam. at one time made his home. From there he returned to 
Hamburg and crossed to Havre, France ; and thence to Southampton, Eng- 
land, and on to London, Liverpool, to Belfast, Ireland; and to Glasgow, 
Scotland: the latter being the pnint from which liis grandfather startei.l for 
America. From Glasgijw Mr. Bruce went to Larne, Ireland, and after a short 
stay there returned home. Mr. Bruce is a Republican. He is a member oi the 
Methodist church and a member of the Knights of Pythias. With a number 
of friends and neighbors he furn.ied tlie North Hogan Gun Club, which has 
always been a source of great pleasure, and where he has made splendid 
scores, breaking sixty-two out of sixty-three balls, and e\'en though out of 
practice at present, can make eighteen out of twenty-fi\e, and has always 
owned fine guns. ^Ir. Bruce is engaged in the dairy business, with a herd 
of about thirty cattle, princij^ally Jerseys. He owns a pure-bred Jersey bull. 
and has recentl}' purchased am.ither of even better record, with a view to 
building up a herd of excellent stock. 

John Bruce, father of Adam Bruce, was born on November 17, 1806. on 
North Hogan creek, near where .Adam Bruce now lives. After gTOwing to 
manhood he started in with a forty-acre farm on Short Ridge, and was later 
presented by his father with eighty acres more, tu which he continued to add 
until he owned about three hundred acres. He was a fanner, trader and 
flatboat pilot, making twenty-three trips to New Orleans. Lie led an lionest 
and successful life, and his word is said to have been as good as his bond. He 
was united in marriage on .\[>v\\ 25. 1841, with Jane Ross, daughter of Amos 
L. and Eleanor (Shumaker) Ross. She was born on Julv 26, 1S20. Mr. 
John Bruce dieil on N':)vembcr 10, 1870, and his wife in 1890. To this union 
were born eight children, as fidLnv: Louisa, born (.m Jul_\- 2, 1842, die<l on 
January 4. 1883: became the wife of William Chisman; John, Jr., November 
29, 1843, ^^^'^ <^*" -^pril 24, 1846; Amos, December 3, 1845, died on August 






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DEAKliORX COUXTY, INDIANA. SSq 

8, 1847: Amur L., Xovemlier 8, 1847, and resides on Hog;m creek, in Iloj^aii 
townsln'i); .Vdani, of Ilogaii township; Sarah E., Octdlier 23, 1854, is now the 
wife of Frank C. Dam and H\es at Homesteatl, Lawreneebnro-; Landy H., 
Aj.iril 24. 1857, and resides near Midxane. Kansas; Calvin R., April 25, 1861, 
li\ed at Blaekwell, Oklalnjuia. and <Jied on Xo\ ember 15, 19 14. 

Ihe paternal grandparents were Amur and Catharine r.ruce ; he a nati\e 
of Scotland and his wife a native of Germany, wIkj settled in America in the 
last decade of the eighteenth century. They Ii\ed in Xew V(irk state fur a 
time, but later came to Dearliorn count}', and were among the first pioneers 
in ♦heir part of the county, lie entered land from the government and lived 
amon.g the Indians in the da)-s of log cabins, lie later built a l)rick-kiln and 
made the brick for a good brick dwelling, to which he mox'ed his fannly. 
Adam Bruce is now living in the same dwelling. He increased his acreage 
until he owned about nine Iiuiulrefl acres. ^Ir. Bruce was a lover of nature 
and enjoyed hi^ wikl sin'roundings in pii.incer da}S, wlien the panther and 
wild cat were plentiful, as were also the wild titrkeys and deer. He had a 
large family of ciiildren. 

Adam Bruce was married on 3ilarch f'>. 1892, to X^ora Sellers, daughter 
of Thomas and Mary ( Gi\"an ) Sellers. She was born on March 10. i86c), on 
the ridge north of Wilmington, in Hogan township, and has always been an 
earnest niemlier of the Methijdist church. To this union lia\e been born three 
children: Robert E., born on December 10, 1892; Elvin Eeroy, January 12. 
1895; Irma Eoral. January 2j. i8q8, all of whom are still at home. 

The parents of Airs. Adam Bruce were Thi')mas and Aviary ( Civan) 
Sellers, early members of the Hogan Hill Ba[)tist church, and Wilmingtcu 
Methodist Episcopal church, the fomier being a son of Benjamin Sellers, a 
pioneer settler in Hogan township, where he followed agriculture and carried 
on the trade of a gunsmith. Thomas Sellers lived about one and one-half 
mile w-est of Wilmington, and was a life-long farmer. Mrs. Mary (Givan) 
Sellers was a sister of Judge Xoah S. Givan, whose biography is presented 
elsewhere in this volume. 



...<■':-'■ MRS. AMEEIA EEEEXBROOK STEUVER. 

Devoting all her best energies to the duties which devuh'e upon her as 
wife, mother and home-maker, giving the best years of her life to this sacred 
calling, there is not much to record of the life of die average woman bevond 



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S90 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

the pleasing fact that she filled her place faithfully and well. The essential 
work of woman is spoken of as lowlx- when the truth is that the well-being- 
of any community or nation depends, primarily, upon the character and 
ability of the mothers and home-makers. No man can put his uncpialified 
best into any undertaking unless his home is all that the word implies, and 
no young man is properly fitted to wage a successful fight with the \\orld 
and its trials and temptations unless he has been blessed with a good mother. 
So when it is said of the immediate subject of this sketch that she well fills 
her woman's place in the world, much h;is been said and full praise given. 

.\melia Ellerbruok was l.)orn in Cincinnati. Ohio, being a daughter of 
George F. and Louisa ( \'on Scggern) Ellerbrook. Her birtli occiu'red on 
June 7, 1S63, and she is of German descent, her grandparents having come 
from the Fatherland, l.uuisa \'on Scggem was also born in Cincinnati, her 
birth occurring on August 17, 1S41. She was a daughter of FTerman \'on Seg- 
gern and Catherine Kruese. his wife, both of whom were natives of Hanover, 
Germany. Harmon was bi.irn on December 17. 1812, and came to this country 
when a young man. He eventually settled in Cincinnati and there passed 
the remainder of his life, liaving been engaged during all the years of his resi- 
dence there in the retail drug business in the capacity of clerk. His death 
occurred in 1S84, when in tlie seventy-third year of his age. He came of a 
small family, there being but twu nther children, both sisters, neither one of 
which ever left their native land. Harmon von Seggern was married in Cin- 
cinnati, to Catherine Kruese. She was brought to this country when rpiite 
young by her parents and was one of a family of nine children, having four 
sisters and four brothers. One of her sisters, INIrs. Elizabeth Kruese Stephens, 
is still residing at Sunman, this county, at quite an advanced age. Catherine 
died rather early in life, passing away in 1850. at the age of thirty-three 
years. 

George F. Ellerbrook was born in Hanover, Germany, January 28, 1S37, 
and came to Cincinnati when a youth of fifteen. He had received the founda- 
tion for a good education in his native city and before coming to this coun- 
trv had ma,stered some of the secrets of the cabinet-maker's trade, .\fter 
taking up his residence in Cincinnati, he turned to this trade as his means of 
support, and worked steadily at it until 1S75, when with his wife and family 
he moved to Dillsboro and was there engaged in the huckster business until the 
time of his retirement from active affairs. • George F. Ellerbrook was one 
of the substantial men of Dillsboro, being one of its citizens who had great 
faith in the future of the town. Any movement which had for its object the 
advancement of any phase of community life, found in him a most willing sup- 



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DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. Sgi 

pcirter. In politics he was a Republican and was a faithful nicniljcr of the 
Lutheran cluu'ch, ser\ing his local societ\' as trtistec for a nunihcr of \cars. 
Cicorge 1''. and Louisa I'lilerbrook were married in Cincinnati in i860, and to 
their union were born eiglit children, three of whom died in infancy. Amelia, 
the immediate subject of this sketch, is the eldest of the family living. ;nid then 
follow George, Albert, Louisa and Alma. 

George Ellerbrook chose Emma Siefert as his wife and their union has 
been blessed witli four daughters, Dorothy, Helen, Gladys and Esther. Albert 
iriarried Carrie Siefert and is the father of two children, Elixabcth and 
I'Mward. Louisa became the wife of Louis Wolf, ni Cincinnati, and has two 
sons, Lester and Paul. .Mma remains at home, caring for the mother who 
is now enjo}'ing the peace and quiet of a ripe old age. Gc'irge F. Ellerbrook's 
death occurred on October 10, 1908, at the age of se\'enty-one years and be 
was laid to rest in Oakdale cemetery, Dillsboro. His sons, George and Albert, 
are still carrying on the huckster business which their fatlier started so many 
^•ears ago, covering consideralile territory thriDughout this section in following 
their affairs, having long since W(,ui the confidence and esteem of their many 
patrons. 

Aiuelia Ellerbrook recei\-ed her elementary education in the common 
schools of Cincinnati, later attending the schools of Dillsboro, after being 
brought here b}- her parents. On October 25, i8S^^,, when twenty years of age, 
she was united in marriage with John C. Steuver, of Dillslioro. who was born 
in Cincinnati, August S, 1858. John C. Steuver is a son of William F. and 
Maria (Schroder) Steu\er, both of whom were born in Hanover, German}-. 
William F. Steuver came to this country wlien a young man, locating among 
old friends at Cincinnati, and there for a numlier of years he was employed in 
various ways. He was united in marriage in Cincinnati with Maria Schroder, 
who came to this country when a young woman, and to their union was born 
a family of six children : William, John, Matilda, Charles, Mary and PMward. 
In 1872 ^Ir. Steu\'er brotight his family to Dillsboro and opened up a general 
store, later gt'iug into the proditce business with his son. Dtu'ing the years 
of his residence here he came to b.e highlv respected 1>_\- a large circle of friends 
and his loss was felt when death removed him in 1890, at the age of sixty-three 
years. 

John C. Steuver receix'ed his education in the schools of Cincinnati and 
came to this section with his parents in 1872. He learned the cabinet-making 
business by the time he was eighteen, but gave up following that trade to en- 
gage in the huckstering business with his father, and this he followed alone 
after the death of his parent. John C. Steuver was a Republican in politics, 



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S<i.J2 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

one of the faithful members of the party in this section and gave \akiable ser- 
vice to Clay township as trustee for a numlier of years. He was interested in 
all enterprises for the ad\'ancement of pui)lic interests and was a prominent 
member of the Lutheran church, serving the local society as trustee and treas- 
urer for }-ears. His fraternal affiliation \\'a-< held with the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows in the local society of Dill>boro. Xo cliildren were ever born 
to Air. and Mrs. Steu\er, Init they adopted and reared a daughter whi,i is now 
Mrs. Agatha I'alnicr, wife of John Pahner, of Dillsboro. 

Such well-balanced, useful lives lend their influence to an}' community 
and make for the st;ibilit\" and glorv of a nation. 



CLIFFORD S. DIFHL. 



Although still a voung man, the subject of this sketch is a fine example 
of business thrift and enterprise. Coming from good old Pennsylvania-I3utch 
ancestry, and possessing a s[)lendid education, he is equipi)ed in a maimer 
that augurs success. From his early youth, he has shown a \enturesome, 
speculative spirit, and has never been handicapped by that fear of failure 
that hangs over many. Starting out well informed on matters of general 
interest, Air. Diehl has forged ahead until now he finds himself at the head 
of a thoroughly established and reniunerati\e business. 

Clifford S. Diehl was born on April 29, 1SS3, at Cincinnati, Ohio, and 
is a son of Thomas and Caroline (Alyers) Diehl. At the age of nine years, 
he started to school at Cincinnati, going later to Xew York City, where he 
graduated from high schocil, after which he entered Cornell University, and 
was graduated in. 1907, when he returnetl to Lawrencelnirg, where his fatlier 
had established a plant for tlie manufacture of fireworks, .\fter his father's 
death, Air. Diehl became president of the company, where they now employ 
about sixty people, with offices at Nowdin avenue. Greendale, Lawrenceburg. 
His residence is at 516 Ridge avenue. Air. Diehl is a loyal supporter oi the 
Republican prilicies, and is affiliated with Lawrenceburg Lodge Xo. 4, Free 
and .Vccepted Alasons. 

Thomas Diehl, father of Clifford S., was a native of Pennsylvania, and 
his wife, Caroline (Alyers) Diehl, a native of Ohio. Air. Diehl was reare<l 
at Reading. Pennsylvania, where he learned the plumber's trade, and after- 
wards, about 1875. mo\'ed to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he lived umi! 1S90, 
when he moved his family to Xew A'ork City and became the president of 



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DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 893 

the Consolidated I'irewcu-ks Company of Ameriea. He later, in 1901, estalj- 
lished an independent business in Lawrencebur^ and ninved back tn Cincin- 
nati in 1907, and died there in 1911, aged sixty-two years, flis wife ^till 
survives him. Mr. Diehl was a drummer boy in tbe Civil War. They had 
two children, Clifford S. and Helen Alice, who li\es at Cincinnati. 

The paternal grandfather Diehl and his wife were natives df Penns\l- 
vania, and were of German lineage. Both lived to a ri]je old age, and left 
the following children : Ho\vard, Samuel, Harry, Mar\-, 'I'homas and 
Amanda. 

The maternal grandfather was John r^Iyers, and his wife was Mary 
(Crowdcr) iM}-ers. 'Jlie}- were natives of German.y, who came tn the United 
States at an early day, settling at Cincinnati, Ohio, where th.ey Ix ith died well 
advanced in years, leaving the following children: Albert, .Mice, John, .\lvin, 
Laura, Bertha, Rose and Caroline. 

Clifford S. Diehl was married on April 26, 191 1, to Laura Bauer, daugh- 
ter of Jacob and Evangeline (Hayes) Bauer. She was born in Greendale, 
I.awTenceburg, Indiana. One son has been born to this union, Robert Bauer 
Diehl. For the history of the parents of ]Mrs. Laura Diehl, the reader is 
referred t'j the sketch of Jacob Bauer, presented elsewhere in this volume. 



FREDERICK HEIBECK. ■ 

As the son of Frederick Heibeck and ]vlargaretta (Luntz) Heibeck, the 
subject of this sketch has inherited tbe thrifty, industrious characteristic of the 
Gemian race, and these traits of character have made them assets to the Amer- 
ican commonwealth. 

Frederick Heib.eck was born in Jackson township. Dearborn county, Octo- 
ber 15, 1857, his parents ha\"ing married in Germany, and settled when they 
first came to this country, in Aiu'ora, Indiana. The father was born in the 
year 181 7. After draying for a few years, the senior Frederick Heibeck pur- 
chased a general store in Lawrenceville which he managed for two years, 
then traded his shop for seventy-six acres southeast of Lawrenceville. Later, 
selling fifteen acres, he lived on the remaining sixty-one acres until his death 
which occurred on August 18, 1S63, when he was a comparatively young man 
forty-six years of age. He was a prominent member of the Methodist Episco- 
pal church. 

Margaretta (Luntz) Heibeck was born on January 5, 1830, at Reinhart- 






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894 DEARBOKN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

shofen, Baiern, Germany, and educated there. She met and married her lius- 
band in Germany. To tliem were born six children, Anna, Frederick, John. 
Margarette, and two whd died in infancy. After the death of her husband, 
Mrs. Heibeck married ^Nlathew Steiger, and to them were h>orn three children, 
Mary. Anthone and Katherine. The mother of these children lived to be 
seventy years of age, passing a\vay on ^larch 24, 1900. 

After h.is education in the pnljlic schools of this county, Frederick Heibeck 
looked after matters on the farm for his mother until his twenty-first year, 
then beginning his independent life by doing miscellaneous farm work for the 
following three years in Decatur county. In 1881, on March 15. Frederick 
Heibeck was united in marriage to Lena Discjue, daughter of John and Lena 
(Steinhauser) Discjue. He then rented a small fann near Lawrenceville. 
where he farmed for three years, then improved his material condition by rent- 
ing a larger piece of land, remaining there for seven years. Buying seventy- 
tW'O acres near Sunman, in this township, he started life on the farm which has 
been his home until the present. Sixty-one acres were later added to the 
original ground, and again a strip of twelve and one-half acres adjoining was 
added to his rural posse-^sions, this totalling a property of one hundred and 
forty-five acres. 

On April 10. 1S96, Airs. Lena Heibeck passed away, at the age of thir- 
ty-fi\-e. Fler father was borti and reared in this country, while her mother was 
a native of Germany, but came to this country when young. Lena was born 
in i86r. in Lawrenceville. which continued to be her hi^me until her marriage. 

The nine children b^rn to Mr. and Airs. Heibeck were. Charles. Pearl. 
Edward. Alice. Elma. Augusta. W'eslc}-, Lucinda and Alalinda. Pearl be- 
came the wife of John Edwards, a trimmer, of Indianapolis, and became the 
mother of three children. Dortha, Mable and Alelvin. Edward married Ger- 
trude Clemenz. a carpenter of Terre Haute. Indiana. Augusta is Mrs. Earl 
Hornberger. her iiusband being a farmer in this township. They ha\e a 
daughter named Arvilla. Lucinda is now Mrs. Clarence Eichacker, her hus- 
band being a farmer of Bates ville. 

Frederick Heibeck was twice married. After the death of his first wife. 
he married Mary Michel, daughter of Matthias and Mary (Albers) Michel, 
the former being born in Switzerland in 18 19, He came :n the United States 
in 1850, and settled in Batesville. where he lived until his death at seventy- 
nine years of age. 

Mary Michel was born in Batesville. February 14, 187 1, was educated in 
the town schools until her thirteenth year, w hen she began to be self-support- 
ing bv working out, and continued thus until her marriage to Adam Plainer, 



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DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 895 

of Lawrenccville. Mr. Hafner was a skillful wood carver. At the time of 
his marriage to Mary Michel, he was the father of two children, Virila (de- 
ceased) and Chester. Mr. Hafner died on Augu.st 13, iSc/-t. at the at^e of 
twenty-seven. Then Alary (Michel) Hafner married Frederick Heibcck, and 
to this couple four children were born, Emma, Irene, Alvin and Harvey. 

Among the Republicans of the county, h'rederick Heibcck is well-known, 
for he is an enthusiastic supporter of tlie princiiiks of that party. He is a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal church, and has served on its board of directors. 
Mr. Heibeck is respected by all who know him, for he is known to be a man of 
strict moral principles, of kindly disposition, of strong character, and of 
integrity. 



:je:. ■; ' ', ., Wn.LlAM S. CALHOUN. 

The man who puts into any enterprise or undertaking the best that is in 
him is almost sure to win out and when such a man encounters obstacles and 
difficulties, they but whet his determination and bring out traits of character 
which might h:i\e gone unde\cloped but fi ir adversity. It is especially pleas- 
ing to the biographer to point to a man who is succeeding in his own particu- 
lar line of endea\or and the attention of the reader is directed to a short 
sketch of the man \\hose name heads this paragraph. 

William S. Calhoun is a native of this county, having been born in Wash- 
ington township, on February 24. 1877, a son of Simc'in B. and Emma 
(Wright) Calhoun. His father was also born in this count}', receiving his 
education in the public schools of Washington township and during the earlier 
portion of his life he hved the life of a farmer. In 1884 Simeon B. Calhoun 
left the farm and became a contractor and builder, which business he still fol- 
lows at his home in Aurora. Fie is considered among the leading citizens of 
his town, being a man of upright character and interested in the welfare uf his 
city. He is a tnember of the Presbyterian church, to tlie support of which he 
contributes generously of his means. He is a member of the ancient order 
of Free Masonry. He owns property in Aurora and is a director of the 
Peoples Building and Loan Company, of Cochran, this county. 

Simeon B. Calhoun is a son of William Calhoun and wife, who were 
among the earlv settlers of this county. They lived here for many years and 
had the privilege of seeing something of the onward march of civilization in 
the great improvements in this region over the days of the pioneer. 

William S. Calhoun received his education in the schools of his home 



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8(j6 DKAREORN' COUNTY, INDIANA. 

district and remained in his hrmie neigliljorhood working out among" the var- 
ious farmers until he was twenty-two years of age. At that age he joined Uic 
L'nited States navy and went into training on the United States steamshi[) 
"Hartford." From tliere he went to the battleship "Indiana." and later to the 
cruiser ".Vtlanta." IJe spent two and one-half \ears along the coasts of South 
America, touching at practical!)' every port of that continent. After fulfilling 
his enlistment of four years, he relumed to Aurora, an.d there followed the car- 
pentering trade for a year. However, he did not find the pursuit of that trade 
to his liking, and, in 1904, he came to Dillsboro and opened up a furniture 
store. His orig'inal place of business was a small room about sixteen by forty 
feet and his business has so grown that it now occupies two floors of a build- 
ing twent_\"-two bv one hundred and thirty feet, and h.c also owns the building. 
He has succeeded admirably in this undertaking, but the result is not to be won- 
dered at, when' it is considered that he brings to his enterprise sincerity, 
undoubted integrit_v and an earnest desire to please his patrons. 

In 1906 William S. Calhoun was united in wedlock with Nellie Gilliland. 
daughter of Xewton and Jennie (Shields) Gilliland, both of Ripley county, 
where Airs. Calhoun was also born. She received her education in this county 
and remained with her parents until the time of her marriage. William S. 
and Xellie ( Gilliland) Calhoun are the parents of one son, Francis W'., born 
Novcml)er 19, 1898. 

W'illirun S. Calhoun is a member of the Presbyterian church, in the work 
of which he takes a commendable interest. His fraternal affiliation is held with 
the ancient order of Free Masonn-, in the work of wdiich he has attained to 
the chapter degree. He is also a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, and in politics he votes the Republican ticket. Mr. Calhoun is a man 
of strong personal qualities, easily makes friends, and also retains them. L'nited 
in his composition are man\' elements of a provident, practical nature which are 
winning for him the success which he desires. 



';•»':'.•■'■''•■■ JOSEPH GROFF. :> -i'-^ /^ ^ 

In the golden sayings of Epictetus there is no nobler utterance than this : 
"What wouldst thou be found doing when overtaken by Death ? If I might 
choose, I would be found doing some deed of true humanity, of wide import, 
beneficent and noble. But if I may not be found engaged in aught so lofty, 
let me hope at least for this — what none may hinder, wliat is surely in my 



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DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. S97 

power — that I may he found raising- up in myself that which had fallen : learn- 
ing" to deal more wisely with the things of sense; working out my own tran- 
quihl_\\ and thus reiidering that whicji is due to every relation of life.* * * ][f 
l^eath thus finds me thus employed, it is enough if 1 can stretch forth my 
hands to God and say, 'The faculties which 1 received at Th}- hands for appre- 
hending this Thine administration, 1 have not neglected, As far as in me lay, 
1 have done Thee no dishonor. Behold how I have used the senses, the pri- 
mar}" conceptions which Thou gavest me. Have I e\'er laid anything to Thy 
charge ? Have I ever murmured at aught that came to pass, or wished it other- 
wise? Have I in anything transgressed the relations of life? For that Thou 
didst beget me. I thank Thee for that Thou hast gi\en ; for the time during 
which I have usefl the things that were Thine, it suffices me. Take them back 
and place them where Ihcm wilt! They were all Thine, and Thou gavest 
them me.' — If a man depart thus minded, is it not enough? What life is fairer 
or more noble, what end happier than his ?" 

The abo\-e beautiful and tranquilizing thought is suggested to the biog- 
rapher by a review of the life of the late Joseph Groff, for many years one of 
the best-known manufacturers and well-beloved citizens of Lawrenceburg, a 
man who was known and respected throughout the bounds of Dearborn county 
as few of his contemporaries were, a man who reflected honor upon his gen- 
eration and \\ho left, at his passing, a pleasant memory, ever to be cherished 
b}" his descendants. A work of the ciiaracter contemplated b_\- this vohune 
is peculiarly adapted to memorial utterance, and it is fitting that a brief biog- 
raphy of the former well-kno\Mi citizen of this commonwealth, whose name 
is noted above, should be presented here for the information and instniction 
of coming generations. 

The late Joseph Groff was born in New Jensey on August 6, 1813. and 
died in Lawrenceburg, Indiana, in ^lay, 1890. He was a son of Henry and 
Rebecca (Inness) Groff. the former of whom was a native of New Jersey, of 
Dutch descent, and the latter of whom also was born in New Jersey, of Scot- 
tish descent. The Groffs were of Quaker stock and Henry Groff's father was 
the founder of the family in this country. The Inness family bar! its origin 
ni Inverness, Scotland, the founder of the family in this ci'.)untry having settled 
at Asbury, New Jersey, ui)on his arrival in America and from that point the 
family became widely scattered, the Innesses being well and worthily repre- 
sented in various parts of the country. 

Henry Groff was brought up as a hatter and founded and for years 
operated a hat factory at Aslmry, New Jersey, from which point he and his 
familv later immigrated to Ohio, locating at Elizabethtown, where he and 

'^57) 



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898 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

his wife spent the remainder o{ their clays, she tlying- at the age of thirty-four 
and lie at tlie age of fifty. They were the parents of seven children, James, 
Robert, Jcise{)h, William, Theodore, Sarah and Alar}-. 

Joseph Groff was hut a l>oy when his parents immigrated to Ohio and he 
grew to manhood at Elizaliethtown, learning from his father the details of hat 
manufacturing, acquiring at the same time an excellent education in the schools 
of that town, which was largelv supplemented by the instructions he received 
from his mother, who was a woman of superior intelligence and of a degree 
of education far in advance oi the average woman of that period, that being 
before the da}'s of schools for the higher education of women. It was in the 
town of l'~Iizabcthto\vn that Joseph Groff married Deliah, daughter of Zach- 
ariah and Mary (T^ridej Xowdin, and in 1S34 came with his bride to Dearborn 
count}', Indiana, locatin.g at I.aw renceburg, where he started a hat factorv ant! 
in the business section of the then rapidly growing village opened a hat store, 
which for many years was one of the best known business lnouses in the city. 
j\Ir. Groff was a man of much activity and in connection with his hat business 
operated a fleet of flatboats in the New Orleans trade. He was a large buyer 
of furs, of which there was an apparently inexhaustible suppl_\- in this region 
in tliat da}-, the greater part of his fur supplies being consumed in the manu- 
facture of hats, which he turned into a profitable trade, the product of his fac- 
tory being in wide demand. He was a \ery successful business man and pos- 
sessed great influence not onl}- in the thrixing city of Lawrenceliurg, but 
tluMUghout the whole countryside. He and his wife were ^lethodists, in the 
various beneficences of which the}- w-ere among the most acti\-e factors in their 
day and generation, as well as being earnest pron-ioters of all the good w-orks 
of the communit}-. Mr. Griiff was one of the first men in Law-renceliurg to 
discern the possibilities of the beautiful Greendale section of the cit\- and was 
the first to build a modern dwelling house on the Ridge, wherein he made his 
home during the rest of his life. This beautiful home at 141 Ridge avenue 
is now- occupied by his son. William, and his daughters, Mary and Cordelia. 

Joseph Groff ditd in }vlay. 1S99, in the eighty-sixth year of his age, and 
his widow^ sur\ived until the }-ear 1910, she ])eing- ninet}--fi\-e years of age at 
the time of her death. This \-encrable and worthy coujile were the parents of 
eight children, four dying in infancy. Those living are Mary. Cordelia, Will- 
iam and George. The J^Iisses Mary and Cordelia Groff were graduated from 
the Springfield h^emale Sen-iinary. at Springfield, Ohio, after which Miss INIary 
taught school for two }ears and Miss Cordelia ser\-ed as a teacher for a num- 
ber of years. These two women are among the leaders in the gentle circles 
of their home city and preside charmingly in their hospitable home. William 



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Ciroff owns a farm near Indianapolis and a farm near Knightstown. Indiana, 
though making his hnnie in Lawrencebui'g. In CMunectinn with the upei'alirjn 
of his farms, he is widely known as a successful trader and man of affairs 
in the city. He was twice married, but bulh cif his wives were withi.nit issue 
and he is living \vith his sisters in the old liroff home, (jeorge C'iroff, \\hi.> 
died in igio. was a farmer and was living on a fa.rm at the time of his death. 
He married Sarah Dobell, to which union there were Ijorn se\en children, 
Eva, Edna, Harry, Clarence, George, Cora, and one who died in infancy. 

'J^he memor}- of the late Joseph Groff is a precious legacy to the com- 
munity in which he s<j long lived and labored and in which the intluence of 
himself and that i^f his gentle wife was exerted with such beneficent re>-ults 
and his name will loirg be held in reverent remembrance throughout this 
county. He, indeed, had rendered "that which is due to every relation of 
life," his good deeds having erected for him a monument more durable than 
stone. 



GEORGE KUNZ. 



Among the active and thrifty business men of Lawrenceliurg, George 
Kunz is worthy of special mention in this \-olume. Starting empty-handed, 
but with a brave heart and undaunted courage he has. by his own industry 
and good management, become associated with, and is uuw at the head nf 
a number of the leading industries of the town. He is honored and respected 
by his business associates and the citizens in genei'al, both as a successful 
business man and a citizen. Alwavs public-spirited and enterprising, he has 
at heart the welfare of the community, and thus he has won the high esteem 
of an admiring and aiipreciative public. He has reared a family, of whom 
he is justl}- proud, and is entitled to recognition as a man who has accom- 
plished things. He has been a resident of Lawrencehurg practically for forty- 
six years, and when in a reminiscent mood, can tell manv interesting stories 
of the haiipenings that go to make up a g'lod history of the city ^luring his 
king residence and eventful career. He h.as been a Aaluable citizen in the 
industrial development of Lawrencehurg, and many of the children now- 
growing up will remember him for his genial and social ciualities, and the 
many good things he has done. 

George Kunz was born on August 15, 1S40, in Mutterstadt, r.a\aria. 
Germany, and is a son of Michael and Catherine (Bartholomew) Kunz. He 
was reared and educated in the common schools of Germanv, from which 



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country he came on May 2, 1S69, to America, landing at New York Citv on 
May 15. Three days after landing, he started west, settling at Lawrence- 
burg, where, with the exception of one }-ear, he has since lived. He began 
his first work by assisting in putting the streets of Law renceburg in g(X)d 
condition, and later spent a >hort time on a farm, going from there to Omaha, 
Nebraska, but sijon returned to Lawrenceburg and went to work in a cooper 
shop. In 1872 he was em[)lo_\ed in a spoke factory, where he remained two 
years, and then went to wurk in the Ohio \^alley Coffin Factory, working 
there continuously for nineteen years, at the end of which time he formed 
a partnership with his lirotlier-in-law, William F. Ritzman, and established 
a bottling factoiw, whicli pni\-ed a verv successful investment. Mr. Kiniz 
disposed of his interest in his brother-in-law in 1900, in order that he might 
devote more of his time to the coal and lumber business, in which he was 
also interested. He is now president of the People's Coal Company, aiul of 
the Lawrenceburg Lumber Company, general superintendent, secretary and 
treasurer of the Lawrenceburg Gas Company, president of the Lawrenceburg 
Water Company, president of the Dearborn County Agricultural Societ}-, 
and is at present receiver for the James }ileyer Buggy Company. ^Ir. Kunz 
is a Republican, and his fraternal affiliations are with Lawrenceburg Lodge 
No. 4, Free and Accepted [Masons ; Lawrenceburg Chapter No. 56, Royal 
Arch Masons; the consistorv', Scottish Rite Alasons ; L'nion Lodge N'j. f>. 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows : and the Society of Eagles. He 
was a memlier of the city council for ten years, representing the third v/ard. 

IMichael and Catherine (Bartholomew) Kunz were natives of Bavaria, 
the former serving in the War of 1848, in that country, after which he became 
an officer of a railroad. He died in 1872, aged seventj^-one' years, and his 
wife died in 1882, aged seventy-seven years. In religion, ^Ir. Kunz was a 
Catholic, and his wife was a n'lcmber of the Lutheran church. To this union 
were born seven children, namely: Christian, of Mutterstadt; Elizabeth, who 
lives at Spcier, German^y : Catherine, ^laria and Jacob also reside at Mutter- 
stadt: George is a resident of Lawrenceburg, Indiana: Peter lives at Nor- 
wood, Ohio. 

The paternal grandfather was Michael Kunz, Sr., a native of Germany, 
where he held the position of government overseer of road construction. His 
wife, Elizabeth ( Bartholomew) Kunz, was also a native of Germany, where 
they both lived and died. They were the parents of three children, [Michael. 
Peter and Carohne. 

The maternal grandfather was George Bartholomew, a native of Ger- 
manv, and a farmer. His wife, Anna (Wendel) Bartholomew, was also 



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born ill Gennaii_v, and both died in the land of their birth. They had four 
children, Adam, Andrew, Catherine and Ijarbara. 

George Kunz was united in marriage on October 31, 1872, witli I-^liza- 
beth Ritzman, daughter of Adam and Albertina (Rupp) Ritzman. She was 
born on March 10, 1847, <^f T.awrenceburg, Indiana, and died in 1906. Her 
religious sympathies were with the Zion Evangelical church. She was the 
mother of eight children, as follow : Catherine, INIclinda, Caroline, Agues, 
George. Mamie. Alma and Georgia. Catherine became the wife of Charles 
Eberhart, and is the nnjther of three children, Elizabeth, Edward and I'aul. 
Melinda is housel-ieeper for her father. Caroline died at the age of se\'en 
years. Agnes is married to Anthony }\Ieischeider. They reside at W'aba.sh, 
Indiana, and ha\e one child, George Kunz. George was drowned in tiie 
Ohio river when seventeen }ears of age. ]\Iamie and Alma are at liome. 
Georgia is married to Elmer Harry, bookkeeper for the People's Coal Com- 
pany. They ha\e one daughter. Elizabeth. 

Adam and Albertina (Rupp) Ritzman, the parents of Mrs. Kunz, were 
natives of Germany, and came to America in 1847, locating at Lawrenceburg, 
where "SI v. Ritzman engaged in general farming, and where he spent the 
remainder of his life, d\'ing at the age of si.Kty-si.x; } ears. His wife dieil in 
18S1. Their family consisted of se\-en children, as follow: Elizabeth, ?i[aria, 
Catherine, Anna, Caroline, William F. and ]\Ielina. 

Mr. Kunz has contributed his full sliare to the commercial life of t'le 
city, and is justly entitled to the high regard in which he is held. 



HARRY LAXGDALE XOWLIN. , 

One of the country's greatest manufacturers, a man who has received 
more than passing note by reason of the methods he employs in securing 
ungruding and efficient service on the part of his small army of employes, 
and whose clrise personal relati<ms with the men who have helped to make 
the product of lu's great factory a househrjld word throughout the country 
is a matter of common knowdedge, ttpon being asked : ''What do you call a 
man?" quickly answered, "One who stands four square to the world in refer- 
ence to the functions that sh.ould be absolutely right, with regard to himself, 
those who are dependent upon him, and society in general." Upon being 
asked to extend his definition so as to cover the process of "making a mian," 
this manufacturer declared that he made men "by the application of horse 



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902 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

sense." This, of course, tnit emphasizes. l,)y ci^iviiig- personal authority to !ho 
utteraucc, the trutli lliat is not only self-evident, hut widely accepted. It 
invariabl}- is found that tlie men who really stand four square to the world 
in all the relations of life are the men who are poss'^ssecl of a large portion 
of what commoidy has crmic to be known as "horse sense." upon the 
proper exercise of \\'hich thev base the success which, without exception, 
follows their efforts. IdappiK-. there are many such men in Dearborn county, 
among the best kno\vn of whom, perhaps, is Harry Langdale Xowlin, retired 
farmer and enterprising insurance secretary of Lawrenceburg, this county. 

Harry Langdale Xo\\lin was born in ]\Iiller township. Dearborn county, 
Indiana. February 12. 1S60, the son of Enoch P>. and Jane H. (Langdale) 
Nowlin, the former of whom was born on the farm in Miller township, on 
which he spent his entire life, an.d the latter, born in Cincinnati, Ohio, Init 
who came to this county with her parents when a small child, rmd grew 
to womanhood here. 

Enoch B. Xowlin was a thrifty and successful farmer as well as one of 
the most progressive and influential men in the section of the county in 
which he spent his wdiole life. H^e o\vncd about five hundred acres of fine 
huul in .Miller townsliip. as well as lands in Kansas and \Msconsin. and at 
the time of his death in the year 1900 was accounted cjuite well-to-do. IrLs 
father, Jeremiah Xowlin, a native of Kentucky, was one of the pi(^neers of 
^Tiller township, this count}', \vh,ere he married Pamelia Blasdel. who was 
born in that township, a member of one of the earlier pioneer families of 
the county. He was of Irish descent and she of English descent. They 
foimded in this county one of the most substantial families of the county and 
were accounted as among the leading residents of the community in which 
tb,e\' lived and labored, being among the fiiremiist and most honored pioneers 
of that region. It is undoubted thai tlieir influence in that community did 
very much 'toward bringing about proper conditions of social and economic 
life in the fonnative ])eriod of the now prosperous and established farming 
region, and tlie fifth generation of their descendants in tliis community find 
conditions of li\ ing immeasurably easier for their having stri\"en, "blazing 
the way." Jeremiah X'owdin died at the age of si.xty-fi\e. his widow sur- 
viving him a few years, her death not occurring until she was past seventy 
years of age. They were the parents of Enoch B., Ferris J., Ambrose E. 
and Jacob Z. X'owdin, besides two or three children who died in infancy. 

Robert H. Langdale, maternal grandfather of ]\Ir. X'owdin. was a native 
of England, who came to this country, locating at Cincinnati. Oliio. where 
he engaged in the grocery business and where he married ]\Iary Corbin, the 



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[)air later mo\ing to this county, settling- in }^[illL■^ t(j\vnshii). wliei'f they 
were accounted among- the substantial residents of that part of the ci;>uiit\-, 
being- held in the \er\- highest regard in that section of the county. lie li\od 
to be abijul seventy rears of age. and she died several rears previous. They 
reared their family in the wars of sterling- citizenship. Five of their childien 
grew to maturit}' anrl to useful manhnod and won-innhoi-)d, Jai-ic TL, Alartha, 
Frances, Robert 11. and Louisa, the first named ot whiim was the mother 
of ]\lr. Xcnvlin. 

Enoch V). Xowlin, who married Jane H. I^^angdale. lived to be si.\t\-- 
eight years of age, his death occurring in the }-ear 1900. His wife died in 
1S35, at the age of fifty. They were earnestly devoted to the best interests 
of tlie community in which they li\-ed and were an-iong the leaders in all good 
worlds tliereal)0ut. The}- were devoted mcml-)ers of the Presbyterian church 
and actixel}- interested in the \arious local lieneficences of that church. Mr. 
Xowlin was a men-iber of the "home guard" during the Civil War. Ho 
w-as a Republican and took an active interest in politics, though not an office 
seeker. Ehioch B. and Jane H. (Langdale) Xi.>\\lin were parents of four 
children, two sons and two daughters, llarrv L., of Lawrenceburg, the im- 
iiiediate .subject of this sketch; ]\Iarv, wh<3 died at the age of five }'ears; 
Robert Teremiah, present trustee of [Miller townshij), who lives on the old 
X^owlin farm in that township, and Ama, who died daring her young won-ian- 
hood. 

Harry L. Xowlin grew to manhood on the paternal farm in Miller 
township, being reared witli the highest reg-ard for the principles of gnnd 
citizenship. He attended the district school in his licmie neighborhood, tlie 
course of instruction there lieing- supplemented l;y courses in the iiormal 
schiiols at Ladoga and at Danville, this state. For on.e season he taught 
school, after which he turned his attention to practical farming, l.ieginning his 
successful career in this line of endeavor upon a siriall tract of land which 
he rented. He prospered at this renture and later bought a farm of one 
hundred and sixt}- acres in Miller tow-nship to which he gradually added until 
at one time he owned a farm of four huridred and ten acres, all of which 
w-as under a high state of cultirati(in, the most of which he still owns. In 
the spring of 1908 Mr. Xow-lin retired from the farni and mored to r^biores 
Hill, remaining- there imtil 1913. in which year he mo\-ed to Lawrenceburg. 
re-purchasing a home at 20 Oakey arenue, -which some years before he had 
built and occupied for a time, later selling the same, and wiiich is now- his 
home. Upon mo\-ing to LawTenceburg, Mr. Xowlin engaged in the insurance 



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business ami has built up an extensive business in the way of fire and tor- 
nado insurance. 

On Christmas Day, in the year 1SS2, Harry L. Xowlin was united in 
marriage with L.ana ALartha Smith, who was bom near the village of Guil- 
ford, in Miller township. Dearborn count}-, Indiana, February 12, iSGi, the 
daughter of David E. and ^lartha C. (Grubbs) Smith, both of whom were 
natives of the same tOAxnship. 

David E. Smith was the son of William and Ann (Ewbank) Smith, 
natives of England and early settlers in Dearborn county, who died in Miller 
township, both being well past middle age at the time of the passing. They 
were the parents of six children, four sons and two daughters, John, George, 
Thomas, David, Elizabeth and Ann. Martha C. Gn.;bbs, who married David 
E. Smith, was the daughter of John and Jane (Cassidy) Grubby. nati\es of 
Pennsylvania and pioneers in Dearborn county, the former of whom li\'etl to 
a green old age and the latter of whom died in middle life, and who were the 
parents of nine cliildrcn : ^Irs. ^lartha C. Smith, ilrs. Mary Jane Haddock, 
Mrs. Honor Kirkpatrick, Mrs. Susan McClure, Hugh, John, William, Rich- 
ard and Hansel. 

To David E. and Martha C. (Grubbs) Smith were born thirteen chil- 
dren : Mrs. Jane Ann Whittaker, \\'ill John, Mrs. Elizabeth Julley, Mrs. 
Mary Lounsbury, Honor Davis. Robert Henry, Jonathan G.. Jarius D. and 
Lana 'M. (twins), George IM., ^Irs. Evelyn C. Hansell, Scott M. and Ira. 
The father of these children died in 1872, at the age of fifty-three years, and 
the mother died on December 11, 191 1, at the advanced age of eighi^'-frjur 
years. 

To Harry Langdale and Lana ^Martha (Smith) Xowlin five children 
have been born: Archey E., Jennie Gertrude, Ama L., Elma L. and ]\Iartha 
Belle. Archey E. X'owlin is managing a part of the home farm. He mar- 
ried Elizabeth Huddleston, and to this union three children have been b<irn : 
Hubert A., Elizabeth Lenore and Frances Ama. Jennie Gertrude married 
Milton L. Taylor, of Indianapolis, to which miion one child has been born. 
a son, Harry jMilton. Ama L. is emplo_\ed in her father's insurance office. 
Elma L. died at the early age of sixteen years. ^Martha Belle is a student 
in the Greendale public school at Lawrenceburg. 

Mr. and ^Irs. Xowlin are members of the Presbyterian church, as are 
all their children, and are deeply interested in the good works of their home 
community. ]Mr. X'owlin is a member of Guilford Lodge X'o. 90, Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, in the affairs of which order he takes a 



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DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. ,905 

liearty interest. He is a Republican, and for years has been a strong factor 
in the political life of the county. During his residence at Moores Hill he 
was for nearly five years a member of the school board there and for two 
years served on the town board, while some years ago he served for a period 
of two years on the town board of Greendale. 

The Nowlins are cultured and refined people, and being members of two 
of the oldest families in the county, are fully representative of the best life 
of the community in which they reside and in whicli they are so deservedly 
popular, and in which they are held in such high respect by all who know 
them. Mr. Nowlin takes an active interest in the business life of Law- 
renceburg and is warmly concerned in all the measures designed to promote 
the best interests of the citv and countv. 



HENRY HODELL. 



If unceasing industry is the price of success, and after all it is the deter- 
mining factor, Henry Hodell, "the secretary-treasurer of the Ohio Valley 
Coffin Company, of Lawrenceburg. Indiana, has well earned the large meas- 
ure of success which fortune has meted out to him. Mr. Hodell is not only 
one of the oldest living citizens of Dearborn county, but he is likewise one of 
the most popular business men living in the city of Lawrenceburg. Having 
learned early in life the cabinet-maker's trade, ]Mr. Hodell was well equipped 
to become one of the executive otficers of one of Lawrenceburg's thriving 
industrial enterprises, since cabinet-making is the basis of the productive 
department of this industn,-. Mr. Hodell has been connected with tlie Ohio 
Valley Coffin Company for more than a quarter of a century, and it is a 
remarkable fact that during this period he has been absent from his work 
only one week, a brief respite which he enjoyed in 1893, when he attended 
the World's Columbian Exposition at Chicago. The institution with which 
he lias been connected has prospered through his remarkable perseverance 
and prodigious and unceasing industry. 

Henry Hodell was born of German parentage. His father, George 
Hodell, and his mother, who, before her marriage, was Barbara Catherine 
P)Urk, having been natives of Alsace, Germany. Of their family of six chil- 
dren, Henry Hodell was the youngest. The other five children were Caro- 
line, who married Rudolph \\'alter, of Lawrenceburg: George, deceased: 
Frederick, who lives at Anderson. Indiana ; Catherine, deceased, who was 
the wife of Philip J. Emmert; Margaret, who died at the age of fourteen 



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years. Mr. Ilodell's father, wlio was reared and educated in Germany, and 
\\!io was a millwright by trade, was twenty-one years old the day the vessel 
iipnn which he came to America arrived in the port of New York City. 
Aftei working for a time in Puffalo, Xcw York and Cincinnati. Ohii^. lie 
came to Lawrenccburg, Indiana, in company with Joliann C. Ilanck, in 1S36, 
and here worked as a millwright and a carpenter. In the meantime, however, 
he had also learned the machinist's trade, and devoted some time to this 
trade. Subsequently he took employment in one of tlie Lawrenccburg furni- 
ture factories and spent most of his time in this factory until his death, in 
18S0, at which time he was sixty-eight }ears old. Four years previouslv, in 
1876, his wife, Mrs. George Ilodell, had died at the age of si.xty-eight. .They 
were both members of the Methodist church and among the leaders in the 
local congregation. 

]\Ir. Hodcll's paternal grandfather, who was the proprietor of a large 
paper-mill in Germany, died in his native land, after rearing a large family. 
The maternal grandfather of Plenrv Ilodell also died in Germany. He had 
been a prominent man in his nati\'e town and had served in the capacitv of 
burgomaster. Only two of his children, Barbara Catherine, who was Mr. 
Hodell's mother, and a ?vlrs. Rces. ever came to America. 

Having been born in the city of Lawrenccburg, Henry Hodell was 
reared to manhood here, and this city has always been his home. Here he 
recei\'ed his education in the public schools, and here he learned the cabinet- 
maker's trade, following it for a period of appro.ximately twelve years, after 
which he engaged in the service of tlie L'nitcd States government and seri-ed 
as a storekeeper for somewhat more than three years. His experiences in the 
offices of the Kentucky Central railroad, at Covington. Kentucky, where 
he worked until February i, 1889, after quitting the revenue service, has 
also ser\ed him well as an executive officer of the Ohio Valley Coffin Com- 
pany, from the fact that the transportation of its products is no small factor 
in the efficiency of the business. The Ohio Valley Coffin Company, estab- 
lished some forty-three years ago. in 1872, with a capital of thirty thousand 
dollars, has grown to a capitalization of eighty-seven thousand, four hundred 
and fiftv dnllars, and it now employs about forty-five men and does an annual 
business of from 'Mie hundred thousand to one hundred and twenty-five 
thousand dollars. Mr. Hodell served as secretary of the company until June, 
1910, when at a meeting of the board of directors he was also charged with 
the duties of treasurer of the institution, and is now both secretary and treas- 
urer. 

Henry Hodell was married on November 2, 1 871, to Anna Stockman, 



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DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 9O7 

(hiughter of Omar T. and Julia (Soycz) Stncknian, ami in this ha]ii)\' unidn 
three children ha\e been horn. Julia Soyez, Ilattic Tlelle and Henry Lmiis. 
C)n!_\- two of th.c children are now li\'ing', Julia Soyez hax-in^- died in infancy. 
ITatiie P.elle married Eug-ene Booth, and they have had two children, VAl/.- 
aljeth Jane and ]\[arian Hodell. Mr. and ^.Irs. Doiith live at Xor\M)od. Ohio. 
Henry Louis i-~ connected with the Central Union Life Li?urance Cotn]);iny, 
He married Ethel Carter, and thc\' have had two children, IL^nrv Loni^, |r., 
and George Richard. 

Mrs. Hodell's father, Omar T. Stockman, who was a skillful hni.k- 
keeper and accountant, wa? born in Lawrenceburo-, and passed awav some 
years ago at the age of eight}'-t\vo. Her UK.ither, who was born at Marietta, 
Ohio, died at the age of se^•enty-two. Their three children, .\iuia, now [Mrs. 
Hodell, Hattie and Belle, all were born in Lawrencebnrg. Benjamin Stock- 
man, ]NL-s. Llodell's jjaternal grandfather, who married Elizabeth Line lid. 
operated a saw-mill in Lawrenceburg and died in the prinie <if life in this 
cit}'. He was a nati\e of Indiana, as was also his wife, and they were b. th 
pioneers in Dearborn county. Mrs. Stockman died at the age of eight\'-5ix 
years. Their children were: Oliver. Omar, George, Benjamin, Henr}'. 
Lucy, and others who died early in life. Louis Sovez, ^Irs. Llodell's mater- 
nal grandfather. nati\-e of the Rhtims region in Prance, was an early SLltler 
and a well-k-nown merchant at [Marietta. Ohiix He and his wife died at 
[Marietta. Ohio, many years after ha\-ing- passed the meridian of life. Their 
children were Augaistus. LLiratio, Adolphus. ALu'ia. Julia, Harriet. Elizabeth 
and Belle. 

Mr. and [Mrs. [Henry Hodell are members of the [Methodist church, and 
he is one of the trustees of the church at Lawrenceburg. [Mr. Hodell belongs 
to Lawrenceburg Lodge Xo. 4. Free and Accepted [Masons, and T..a\vrence- 
burg Chapter Xo. 56. Royal Arch [Masons. He is also a member of Lnion 
Lodge No. 8, Lidependent Order of Odd I'ellows. During his entire life he 
has been identified with the Republican party. 

Prominent as he is in the business, religious and fraternal life of the 
city of Lawrenceburg. Henry PPidell is well entitled to a large share of the 
credit which belongs to those men who ha\e made Uiwrenceburg and Dear- 
born county a desirable place in which to live. Mr. FTridell is jjossessed of a 
genial personality, is charitable in his relatiofis with his fellows and a highly 
esteemed citizen of this section of Indiana. He and his good wife are popu- 
lar socially in the city of Lawrenceburg. They have won a substantial com- 
petence and the salient facts in their lives are worthy of being perpetuated 
in the biographical annals of Dearborn county. 



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908 DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA. 

■"'''''''■' ' NATHANIEL E. SQUIBB. '''' ' ' ■■"''-"■' 

In the financial and commercial life of Lawrenccburg and Deaiiiorn 
county few men are better known, and none is more Iiighly respected and 
admired than Nathaniel E. Scjuibb, the vice-president of the W. P. Squibb 
iX: Company, distillers, of Lawrenceburg, Indiana. Nathaniel E. Squibb is a 
comparatively young man, but his youth has not interfered with his rapid 
progress in business. He has seized every opportunity and has made the 
most of the business achieved in association ^vith bis brothers and with his 
late father. Nathaniel E. Squibb is acquainted with every detail of this 
business. Like his elder brothers, he "grew up" in the distilling business. 
He has been prominently connected with the sales department of the busi- 
ness which, after all, is the determining factor in the success of any enter- 
prise. Aside from his connection with the firm which bears the name of his 
father, hi; name is identified with other commercial enterprises of Dearborn 
county and for man}' years he has been regarded as one of the worthy, indus- 
trious and well-equipped young men of this section of Indiana. 

Nathaniel E. Squibb was born in Dearborn county, at Aurora, Jantiary 
5, 1S78. His parents, William P. and Frances (Plummer) Squibb, were 
natixes of Dearborn county and had ten children as follow: ^lary A., tlie 
wife of A. F. Geisert. of Lawrenccburg, Indiana : Aha P., who died after 
she had reached }'oung \vomanhr.od ; Robert L., who li\'es in Lawrenceljurg; 
Ella R.. who is unmarried: George L. P.: Florence L.. the wife of J. P. Car- 
ter, of Cincinnati; Nathaniel E., the subject cif this sketch: Horace G.. and 
Samuel T.. who died at the age of nineteen years. 

\\"!lliam P. Squibb, the father of Nathaniel E.. was reared in Dearbi^rn 
county, and when a \'ery young man engaged in the grocer}' and liquor busi- 
ness at Aurijra. Subsequently, he was a rectifier and wholesale dealer in 
liquor, and in 1869. forty-six years ago, he engaged in the distilling business 
at Lawrenceburg. He was associated in this business with his brother, 
George AA'. Their business grew constantlv from vear to vcar and necessi- 
tated the building of additional warehouses. Fcir several \ears the firm has 
used five L'nited States bonded warehouses. After the death of George 
Sfiuibb, more than two years ago, the distilling business in which he and the 
late William P. Squibb had been partners for more than fifty }ears was reor- 
ganized as the William P. Squibb & Company. Nathaniel E.. George L. P., 
Robert and Horace were taken into their father's business. A cousin, Louis 
H. Foulk, had become connected with the firm some ten years previously. 
The present capitalization is three hundred thousand dollars. William P. 



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UEAKBORX COUNTY, INDIANA. QOt) 

Squibb died on October 15, 191 3, after having- almost completed his eighty- 
third }'ear. After this his sons succeeded him directly in the business. .Mrs. 
William P. Squibb died twenty-five years l.iefore her husband. She passed 
awa}- in 188S, in her forty-fifth year. 

.A.t least four generations of the Squibb family, including- this generation, 
of which Nathaniel E.. the subject of this sketch, is a representative, have lived 
in Dearborn county. Mr. Scjuibb's paternal grandfather, Robert Squibb, 
\\-as a native of this county. He married Eliza Cumn-iins, \vhosc ancestors 
came from Penns_\lvania. Robert Squibb was killed by an explosion which 
occurred when the running of the first train over the first railroad built into 
.A-iu'ora was being celebrated. His wiflow li\ed to he a very old ladv. She 
was the mother of three children, William P., George W. and INIrs. Alta 
M. Foulk. ^ilrs. Foulk is the mother of Louis II. Fonik, who is associated with 
the Scjuibb brothers at the present time in tlie management of the William 
P. Squibb & Company. 

Nathaniel E. Squibb was only si.x years old when his parents moved 
from Aurora to Greendale (Lawrenceburg), Dearborn county. Fie was 
educated in the public schools of Lawrenceburg and lost no time between 
the period when he finished school and the period when he went to work 
for his father in the distillery. Fie b