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Full text of "History of Decatur County, Indiana : its people, industries and institutions"

^MUiti;>iidkyM. 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBB*RJ'... 



3 1833 00094 6712 



Gc 977.201 D35HA v. 2 
Harding, Lewis A. 
History of Decatur County 
Indiana 



HISTORY 

OF 



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M^i^ -^^^2^ 1 JL %J M.\ \^ V> %J i 



■ INDIANA . 

ITS PEOPLE, INDUSTRIES AND INSTITUTIONS 



Lh.WlS A. HAKUING 



Editor 

llembor The American Histurical Association, author. "The Prfliminary 

Diplomacy of the Spanish-American "War,"' a study in international 

law, "The Call ol' the Honr." "A Few dpoken Worrls," etc. 



With Biographical Sketches of Representative Citizens and 
Genealogical Records of Many of the Old Families 




AJa^:^ ^^'' 



ILLUSTRATED ''/v ^?' ^' - ^^ 



1915 r 

B. F. BOVVEN & COMPANY, Inc. 
Indianapolis, Indiana 



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I kv LIBRARY C-, j^ 



AOen County Public Libraiy 
Ft. Vayii«, indioaD 



16C5337 

DECATUR COUNTY^ INDIANA. 603 

JOSEPH PATTERSON. 

Of the many retired farmers living in Greensburg, Indiana, who have 
been successful in their life's vocation, mention must be made of Joseph 
Patterson, a native of County Antrim, Ireland, who was born on July 12, 
1839, the son of Roger and Mary Jane (Hall) Patterson. 

Roger Patterson, after immigrating to America, in 1845, to find a home 
for his family, located in Clinton township, Decatur county, Indiana, where 
he rented land for a short time, and, in 1847, the family, consisting of a wife 
and two sons, John and Joseph, joined the husband and father. Roger Pat- 
terson died when he was thirtj^-seven years old, in 1855, leaving a wife and 
two children, who, at that time, were living in Clinton township. John was 
killed in the second battle of Bull Run. The mother, who was married again 
to Michael Ryan, had "three children by the second marriage, Mrs. Sallie Meek, 
William and Mrs. Katie Lanham, all of whom are living at Greensburg, 
Indiana. The mother of these children died at an advanced age. 

During the Civil War, hogs sold for a considerable period for ten dol- 
lars a hundredweight, and it was during this time that the venerable Joseph 
Patterson purchased his farm of one hundred and sixty acres. He raised a 
great many hogs, and, being successful with them, was soon able to pay for 
his land. Beginning with nothing, he took advantage of the opportunities 
offered and soon made good, prior to which time he had rented and for 
several years in Clinton township. His farm is now well improved and very 
valuable. In 1905 Mr. Patterson moved to Greensburg. 

In September, 1857, when he was eighteen years old, Joseph Patterson 
was first married to Mary Bird, the daughter of William and Maria Bird, 
natives of Kentucky and Virginia, respectively, who moved to Decatur 
county, Indiana, in the late twenties. They reared a family of eight children : 
Harvey, who married Sarah Lowe; Mrs. Martha Anna Johnson; Benjamin, 
who married a Miss Small ; Henry, who married a Miss Davidson ; Edwin, 
who married Charlotte Powers; Harriett, the wife of William Sefton; Mary, 
the wife of a Mr. Patterson, and Minerva, who first married Jacob Hick- 
man and had four children, Luna, William, deceased; Martha, the wife of 
Charles S. Reed, Avho lives in \Vashington township, and Mrs. Ottawa 
Baumgarten, who lives in Greensburg. Mrs. Mary Patterson was born on 
July 31, 1839, and died on May i, 1908. Four years after her death, Mr. 
Patterson was again married to Minerva, the sister of his first wife, the 
marriage taking place on December 9, 1912. 



6o4 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

■ To Joseph and Mary (Bird) Patterson were born seven children, all of 
whom are stilling living, Mrs. Maria Jane Robison, who lives near Adams and 
has one child, Millicent; Harriet Elizabeth, who is the wife of J. L. Hamil- 
ton and has one child, Cora; Mrs. Nora Olive Ford, who lives at Greens- 
burg and has one child, Mary ; John William, of Clinton township, who mar- 
ried Lou Hazelrigg and has three sons, William, Van and Daniel; James, 
who married Margaret Goddard and lives on the old home place; Charles, 
of near Adams, who married Dessa Guthrie and has one child, Charles 
Guthrie, and Mrs. Ina Anderson, of Greensburg. Mr. Patterson died on 
May 19, 191 5, at the age of seventy-six years. 

Although Mr. Patterson was a Republican all of his life, in 1912 he 
voted the Democratic national ticket, supporting the Democratic candidate, 
now the President of this country, Woodrow Wilson. Mr. and Mrs. Pat- 
terson are members of the Methodist Episcopal church at Greensburg. 



WILLIAM M. McCOY. 



William M. McCoy, a retired farmer of Greensburg, Indiana, who 
removed from his farm one and one-half miles southeast of Greensburg, in 
September, 1914, to that city, was bom on January 16, 1832, in Washing- 
ton county, Indiana, and is the son of Alexander andiPrudence (Armstrong) 
McCoy, natives of Kentucky and Indiana, respectively, the former of whom 
was born on October 18, 1794, in Washington county, Pennsylvania, and 
the latter of whom was born on November 2, 1809, and who died, January 31. 
1857. Alexander McCoy, a representative of the third generation of the 
McCoy family in America, removed with his parents to Bourbon county, 
Kentucky, from Washington, Pennsyh'ania, when a small child, and there 
was reared, coming to Decatur county, Indiana, from Washington county, 
Indiana, December 25, 1833. He died on his farm near Kingston, June i, 
1877. He was married to Prudence Armstrong, January 4, 1831, in Wash- 
ington county, Indiana, where he was a charter member of the Kingston 
Presbyterian church, and at the celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of this 
church was the only surviving charter member. 

Alexander and Prudence (Armstrong) McCoy liad nine children, the 
names of whom follow in the order of their birth : William M. McCoy, the 
subject of this sketch, was the eldest child born to his parents and first saw 
the ligkt of day at Salem, in Washington county, Indiana; Leander Aretas, 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 605 

who was born on March 14, 1834, died on August 7, 1900; Sarepta, June 
2.0, 1836, married WiUiam FrankHn Cox, a soldier in the Civil War, and 
they lived at Montrose, Illinois, both are deceased ; Daniel Judson, August 
^, 1839, was killed in the battle of the Wilderness; James Burney, August 
8, 1839, a twin of Daniel Judson, died on October 17 of the same year; 
Philonadus, June 3, 1843, deceased, lived in Indianapolis, Indiana; Orpheus, 
January 8, 1846, died on March 3, 1904; Milissa, March 29, 1849, died on 
July 17, 1851; Cassius C, July 25, 1852, lives at Greensburg, Indiana. Two 
children, therefore, out of this family of nine, are still living. 

Alexander McCoy, who, for the purpose of this sketch, may be desig- 
nated Alexander II., was the son of Alexander McCoy I., the latter of whom 
was born in Scotland, in 1753, and who married Nancy Campbell, in 1780, 
•eight years after coming to this country. He and his wife had six children 
born in Pennsylvania, and five children born in Kentucky. Those born in 
Pennsylvania were John C. William, Daniel, Angus C, Margaret and Alex- 
ander. In 1794, the family removed to Bourbon county, Kentucky, and after 
their removal, there were born, Jane, Mary, George, James and Campbell. 

Alexander McCoy I. was the son of William McCoy, the founder of the 
family in America, who was born in Sutherlandshire, Scotland, in 1730, and 
emigrated to America, settling on the east shore of Maryland in 1772, and 
later removed to Wyoming Valley, Pennsylvania. His remains are buried at 
Ruddles Mills cemetery in Bourbon county, Kentucky. 

William Martin McCoy, the subject of this sketch, was married on 
November 2, 1871, to Mary Jane Jones, who was born on December 25, 
1844, in Cincinnati, and who is the daughter of Roland and Catherine 
(Hughes) Jones, natives of Wales, who came to this country from Card- 
ingshire before their marriage in 1840. They lived in Cincinnati, Ohio, 
where the father was a stationary engineer, and where he lived and died. 
He was born in 1820, and died in October, 1875. His wife, who. before her 
marriage, was Catherine Hughes, was born in 1822, and died in 1850. They 
had three children, John, of Bellevue, Kentucky ; Mrs. Mary Jane McCoy, 
and Mrs. Elizabeth Evans, of Hyde Park, Cincinnati. 

To Mr. and Mrs. William M. McCoy have been born three children, 
Minnie Prudence, Ralph Evans and Robert. Of these children Minnie was 
"born on October 10, 1872, and married Carl Hendrick, who was born on 
November 22, 1870. They had three children, Ralph, who was born on 
November 12, 1899; William Boland, December 11, 1901, and Rose Eualine, 
October 29, 1904, at Terre Haute, Indiana. They reside in IndianapoHs; 
IRalph Evans, who was born on June 20, 1878, lives on the home farm east 



6o6 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

of Greensburg. He married Daisy Barnes and they have one child, WiUiam 
Frederick; Robert, who was born on April i6, 1880, was a civil engineer 
until his death, October 30, 1914. 

After his marriage, Mr. INlcCoy settled at [McCoy Station, where he 
rented one hundred and forty acres of land for two years. At the end of 
this period he purchased one hundred and sixty acres near Kingston, and 
lived there for nearly two years, when he moved to another farm one and 
one-half miles southeast of Greensburg, consisting of ninety-six acres of 
well-improved land. In September, 1914, Mr. and Mrs. McCoy removed 
to Greensburg. 

William M. McCoy is a Republican in politics, and Mr. and Mrs. McCoy 
are both members of the Presbyterian church, as are the other members of 
their familv. They are well known and highly respected not only in Greens- 
burg, but in Decatur county. 



DAN S. PERRY. 



Among the strongest financial institutions in the city of Greensburg is 
the Greensburg National Bank, of which Dan S. Peri^y has been cashier for 
several years, having entered the bank in July, 1900, at its organization, as 
assistant cashier. The Greensburg National Bank began business with a 
capital stock of fifty thousand dollars, but on November 5, 1906, its capital 
was raised to seventy-five thousand dollars, and it now has a surplus of 
twenty-five thousand dollars, undivided profits of seven thousand dollars, 
and average deposits of three hundred thousand dollars. James M. Wood- 
fill has been, president since its organization. Mr. Perry, who was the original 
assistant cashier, succeeded J. B. Kitchum as cashier in 1904. The other 
ofiicers are Will H. Robbins, vice-president, and A. J. Lowe, assistant cashier. 
Messrs. Robbins, D. A. Myers, C. P. Miller, Oliver Deem, J. B. Kitchin 
and John H. Deniston constitute the board of directors. The correspondent 
banks are the Fifth-Third National, of Cincinnati; the Indiana National, of 
Indianapolis; the National Bank of Commerce, of New YorkCitv, and the 
Federal Reserve Bank, of Chicago, the Greensburg National being a mem- 
ber of the Federal Reserve Associated Banks. 

The popular and efficient cashier of the Greensburg National Bank is 
descended from an old family of this section, his grandfather, Dan S. Perry, 
having settled in ^^'ashington township, Decatur county, in 1824. Here 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 607 

he purchased land, and after clearing a small tract, erected a log cabin. Dan 
S. Perrv, who was a soldier in the War of 1812, and who had moved from 
the ancestral home in Virginia to the state of Kentucky, was the son of 
Frederick Perry, a member of the personal body-guard of General Wash- 
ington during the Revolutionary War. Dan S. Perry is, therefore, descended 
from Revolutionary ancestry and is himself of militant and patriotic stock. 
Born in July, 1873, on a farm in Decatur county, Dan S. is the son of 
Leonard and Cinderella (Boyce) Perry, the former a native of Kentucky, 
who had come with his father, Dan S. Perry, Sr., from Kentucky to Wash- 
ington township, Decatur county, in 1824, and the latter of whom was a 
native of Indiana, and reared in Decatur county. Leonard Periy, who lived 
on the ancestral farm for sixty years, was born in 1824, and died in Feb- 
ruary, 1909. His wife, who died in 1873, left a family of nine children, as 
follow: Dina P. Craig, of Greensburg; Will L. and Louisa, of Greensburg; 
Squire D., who lives on a farm east of Greensburg; George S., who lives 
on the old home place; Mrs. Chester Edkins, of Greensburg; Allen M. and 
Pierce, deceased, and Dan S., the subject of this sketch. 

Dan S. Perry during his youth and early manhood enjoyed the educa- 
tional advantages which the schools of Decatur county afforded. After hav- 
ing finished the course in the country schools, he attended Greensburg high 
school, and when eighteen years old became a student in one of the leading 
Cincinnati business colleges. After finishing the course in the business col- 
lege, he returned to Greensburg and studied law in the office of D. A. 
Miers for six years. Two years of this period he served as court stenog- 
rapher. Upon the organization of the Greensburg National Bank, in 1900, 
Mr. Perry became assistant cashier, and four years later succeeded to the 
office of cashier, a position which he has held ever since, a period of eleven 
years. 

Mr. Perry was married on November 30, 1893, to Elsie Russell, daugh- 
ter of Richard Russell, of Decatur county. Mr. and Mrs. Perry have had 
one son, Russell Myers, who is now twenty years old, and who is a student 
in the American School of Osteopathy at Kirksville, Missouri. 

A Republican in politics, Dan S. Perry has never been prominent in 
political work, although he has always maintained a keen interest in good 
government and in the election of capable men in public office. Fraternally, 
he is a member of the Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent and Protec- 
tive Order of Elks. 

As a banker, Dan S. Perry is regarded as a man with few peers and no 
superiors in Decatur county. The growth and present prosperous condition 



i6o8 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

of the Greensburg National Bank are due to the wise and efficient manage- 
ment of its board of directors and especially its officers. Mr. Perry has 
never been found wanting in any test which has been imposed upon him. He 
has safe-guarded the interests of the bank, and at the same time his cordial 
relations with the patrons of the bank have brought substantial increases in 
business year by year. Honorable and upright in all of the relations of 
life, private and public, he possesses the confidence of the people and enjoys 
their respect as a private citizen. 



JOSEPH W. GARRISON. 

The late Joseph W. Garrison, the son of David and Mary (Fugit) Gar- 
rison, was descended on his mother's side from the very first settlers of 
Decatur county, Indiana. His grandfather. Judge John Fugit, who was born 
in the mountains of Russell county, Virginia, in 1770, came ,in March, 1819, 
w^ith Guffy Griffiths and Elias Janett from Franklin county to Decatur county. 
Indiana, and settled one mile east of the present site of Clarksburg at the 
forks of the road. John Fugit, after his marriage, had moved to Floyd 
■county, Kentucky, from Virginia and from Floyd county, in 1808, to Hamil- 
ton county, Ohio. Two years later the family had moved to Cedar Grove, 
Franklin county, Indiana, where they lived until 181 8, when, owing to the 
hostility of the Indians, they were compelled to seek safety in the old fort 
eight miles west of Brookville. The next year they came on to Decatur 
■county, Indiana. 

The Fugit family was one of considerable achievements and note in the 
pioneer history of Decatur county, several members of the family having 
held important positions of trust and responsibility. Judge John Fugit, who 
had been a justice of the peace in Franklin county before his removal to 
Decatur county, or what was then called the "New Purchase," brought with 
him his commission and docket and acted as justice of the peace up to the 
time the county was organized, when he was elected one of the first associate 
justices of the circuit court. In 1825, the Fugits moved to Turner's Corner 
in Clay township, where they lived until 1839, when John Fugit moved to 
Milford, where he died in 1844. 

It was a daughter of John Fugit, J\Iary (Fugit) Garrison, the mother 
of the late Joseph W. Garrison, who was known, during her time, as "the 
washerwoman for all Decatur countv," there having been at this time onlv 




JOSEPH \v. GAi;r;is<».\. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 609 

three families in the whole county. The Fugits were noted not only for the 
important positions of trust and responsibility which they held in the early 
history of the county, but they were also noted for being the tallest family 
in this county, each member averaging over six feet in height. The children 
of David and Polly (Fugit) Garrison were John O. A., Silas W., James L. 
F., Isaac N., Joseph W., Jesse F., Benjamin F. and David G. 

Four children among the six sons and three daughters born to Judge 
John Fugit and wife, are: Mrs. Mary Garrison; Isaac W., of St. Paul, 
Minnesota; Mrs. Rachel McCallister, of Windfall; Mrs. Celia Wilson, of 
Boone county, Indiana, and James, of Greensburg. These children are 
deceased as are the remainder of the family. 

The late Joseph W. Garrison, who was born on January 19, 1838, and 
died in December, 1909, served three years in Company H, Thirty-seventh 
Indiana Volunteer Infantry. Among the severe battles in which he was 
engaged, were those of Stone's River, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Peach- 
tree Creek, Chattanooga, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Kenesaw 
Mountain and Picket Hill. He was also engaged in the Atlanta campaign 
and in many minor engagements. Becoming sick in the latter part of the 
war, he was assigned to the commissary department and was thus connected 
when he was mustered out of the service. 

On February 16, 1865, just after the close of the Civil War, Mr. Gar- 
rison was married to Martha E. Tanner, who was born on February 15, 
1840, and who recently celebrated her seventy-fifth birthday, the neighbors 
gathering at her home in large numbers. Mrs. Garrison was born in Wash- 
ington township and is the daughter of Simpson and Callie Mattie (McGan- 
non) Tanner, natives of Virginia and Kentucky, respectively, who came to 
Decatur county in 1835. Her father died in Greensburg, Indiana. They 
had several children: James Elza, Lucy Jane, Ira, Mary, Maria and Zach- 
ariah, twins ; Annabel and Laura Belle, twins ; Lucius, Achsa, Sara E. 
Simpson Tanner had been twice married. Mrs. Garrison's half-sister, Mrs. 
Sophia Deere, lives at Franklin, Indiana. 

After their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Garrison lived for one year on the 
Tanner farm and then on the David Garrison farm for two years, after which 
they rented Mr. Garrison's brother's farm for one year and then purchased 
a farm of their own in Washington township, where they lived for three 
years. Eventually, they sold their farm and purchased the one where Caleb 
Wright now lives, living here for several years, when they moved to Greens- 
;burg, where they lived for twenty-one years. The present farm was pur- 
(39) 



6lO DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

chased some time after 1900 and in December of 1902, Mr. and Mrs. Gar- 
rison moved to the farm. It comprises one hundred and twenty acres and is 
a beautiful country home, well-kept with splendid out-buildings and attractive 
grounds. 

The late Joseph W. Garrison was a Republican in politics. He never 
held office nor was much interested in this phase of political activity. He 
was a member of the Baptist church and assisted in the building" of the 
church. Fraternally, he was a member of Pap Thomas Post, No. 5, Grand 
Army of the Republic and of the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, and 
a charter members of the Eastern Star. Mrs. Garrison and daughter are char- 
ter members of the Eastern Star. JNIrs. Garrison is a charter member of the 
Greensburg chapter, Women's Relief Corps. She and daughter are also 
members of the Rebekahs at Greensburg. Mr. Garrison was a city council- 
man of Greensburg. E. F. Roszell was married on December 6, 1905, to 
Minnie Garrison, daughter of the subject of this sketch. Mr. Roszell has 
had charge of the farm for nine years. Mr. Rozell is a stand-pat Republican 
and a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 



EVERETT HAMILTON. 



The descendant of a famih' which was prominent in the state of Ken- 
tucky during the last half of the eighteenth century, Everett Hamilton, a 
retired farmer of Decatur county, who lives in a comfortable home at Greens- 
burg, Indiana, has been for nearly three-quarters of a century a prominent 
citizen of Decatur county. Given educational advantages, surpassing by far 
the privileges of most farmers of his day and generation, he was considered 
a leader in the political and educational life of Fugit township, where he 
owned a fine fann and where he spent practically all his life, until his 
removal to Greensburg. 

Born on October 16, 1841, on the old homestead farm near Kingston, in 
Decatur county, he is the son of Cyrus and Mary (McCoy) Hamilton, the 
former of whom was born in 1800 in Kentucky and who died in 1879. Com- 
ing to Decatur county, in 1821, with four brothers, James E., Cyrus, Thomas 
and Robert Marshall, he settled on a farm near Kingston in Decatur county. 
All of the four brothers, after coming to Decatur county from Kentucky, 
and all of whom were the sons of Robert Hamilton, occupied farms between 
Kingston and Greensburg. In time Cyrus Hamilton came to be a large 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 6l I 

landowner in Decatur county, and at one time owned as much as four hun- 
dred acres, which he had cleared and improved. He resided upon the farm 
until his death. His wife, Mary McCoy, who was a native of Kentucky, was 
born in 1799, and died in 188 1. They had six children, only three of whom 
are now living: William M. is deceased; Mrs. Melissa Nyce is deceased, and 
Orlando died in the spring of 191 4. Mrs. Cordelia Donnell lives near 
Clarksburg; Chester lives on a farm in Decatur county, the old homestead 
farm, and Everett Hamilton is the subject of this sketch. A prominent mem- 
ber of the Whig party and a free-soiler until its disintegration and the for- 
mation of the Republican party in 1854, Cyrus Hamilton was a prominent 
Abolitionist also, and one of the leading advocates in this section of the 
state of the Abolitionist cause. He was well known as a debater, especially 
on the subject of slavery, and a devout Presbyterian and member of the 
Kingston church, which he helped to build. 

Educated in the common schools of Fugit township, Decatur county, 
Indiana, and in the old Northwestern Christian University, now Butler Col- 
lege, of Indianapolis, where he spent one and one-half years, Everett Hamil- 
ton began farming for himself in 1864, at the age of twenty-three, near 
Kingston, in Decatur township, on eighty acres of land given to him by his 
father. At the same time he purchased eighty acres of land, on which he 
never lived, but which he farmed before his marriage. In 1866, he exchanged 
this farm for one hundred and sixty acres near Clarksburg, to which he 
moved, and which, in time, he increased to four hundred acres. This farm 
he cultivated until 191 1, when he removed to Greensburg, after ere,cting a 
modern residence on East Main street. During his life he was engaged in 
general farming and stock raising, and was considered to have made a 
splendid success of his life's vocation. 

In 1870, Mr. Hamilton was married to Mary Jane Hopkins, who was 
born in 1843, o^i a farm in Fugit township, who is the daughter of Preston 
E. and Eliza (Donnell) Hopkins, the former of whom, a native of Kentucky, 
came to Decatur county with his father at an early day. To this union three 
children were born : Paul, Edwin S. and Frank. Paul is engineer of track 
and roadway for the Big Four railroad, and has his office in Cincinnati ; 
Edwin S. is a farmer on the old homestead, and Frank is an attorney of 
Greensburg, Indiana. 

A Republican in politics, Everett Hamilton served as trustee of Fugit 
township for two terms, and also as a member of the board of county com- 
missioners for one term, from 1886 to 1889. Religiously, Mr. and j\Irs. 
Hamilton are members of the Kingston Presbyterian church, in which he 
served as trustee for many years. 



6l2 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Everett Hamilton is one of the best-known and most highly respected 
citizens of Decatur county. As a farmer and citizen of Fugit township he 
was well known and as a public official he was recognized as capable, earnest 
and scrupulously honest in all his relations. In his declining years he has 
the satisfaction of knowing that his three sons are following the footsteps 
of their father, and that they themselves are on the way to similarly honest 
and useful lives. 



WILLIAM C. PULSE. 



Any work purporting to give a review of the industrial and other con- 
ditions of Decatur county must, at the very outset, take into account the 
great plant built up and controlled by the enterprising firm of Pulse & 
Porter, general building contractors at Greensburg and Hope, Indiana. These 
two plants carry a weekly pay-roll that runs as high as six thousand dollars, 
and at times more than five hundred men are employed by the firm, which 
is generally recognized as being the most active and energetic firm of build- 
ing contractors in Indiana, its operations being easily the most extensive of 
any firm thus engaged in southern Indiana. This concern, which was organ- 
ized in the year 1888, by the association of William C. Pulse, William R. 
Porter and Alexander Porter, has grown until it now is not only the largest 
employer of men in the building trades in Indiana, but which maintains the 
heaviest retail stock of lumber and building material in the state of Indiana. 
In a biographical sketch relating to Alexander Porter, one of the members 
of this firm, presented elsewhere in this volume, reference is made to the 
many large building contracts executed by this companj^ and it will not be 
necessary to enter into that phase of the concerns's operations here, but it 
is fitting to set out here something regarding the general extent of the plant 
maintained by the company. In Greensburg, the company operates an exten- 
sive planing-mill and sash-door factory, manufacturing, so far as possible, all 
material entering into the building trades, with particular reference to special 
work, most of the stock work used in the extensive building operations of 
the. concern being bought outside. In addition to operating the factory at 
Greensburg, which utilizes the services of about fifty hands on an average, the 
firm maintains a general supply house at that place, carrying pretty much 
everything required in the building trades. The company has pleasant and 
well-equipped offices in connection with the retail building, the planing-mill 
and lumber yard being situated near the railroad. The Hope plant, which 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 613 

has one of the best-equipped and most modern sheds in Indiana, with a 
capacity of from thirty to forty carloads of building material, employs from 
fifteen to twenty men and has a saw-mill, a ten-ton ice plant and a complete 
double electric lighting system in connection therewith, using exhaust steam 
for heating purposes. This plant is maintained for both public and com- 
mercial uses and carries building material of every description. 

William C. Pulse was born in a farm home in the woods in Salt Creek 
township, Decatur county, Indiana, on September 30, 1859, the son of 
David G. and Rebecca (VanCleave) Pulse, both natives of Hamilton county, 
Ohio, who were born and reared near Cincinnati at a time when the now 
proud Queen City was but a village. The Pulses and the VanCleaves were 
among the prominent families of the Cincinnati neighborhood and were 
associates of the Tyler Davidsons, the Nicholas Longworths and others of 
the leading families of Cincinnati in that day. At that period the country 
around Cincinnati was an unbroken forest and Mr. Pulse's parents often 
recalled in later years the fact that there were but few houses in the neigh- 
borhood of their childhood homes and the wild deer still frequented the 
"licks" which were so common thereabout. It was customary for the fami- 
lies to go to market in big wagons, camping over night on the way. 

David G. Pulse, who was born in 1819, and who died in this county in 
March, 1889, was the son of a Virginian, of Pennsylvania-Dutch or High 
German extraction. He was united in marriage in Hamilton county, Ohio, 
to Rebecca VanCleave, and in that county the first three children of this union 
were born. About 1847, the Pulses moved to this county, buying a farm of 
about one hundred and twenty acres in Salt Creek township, hill and forest 
land, the forest being gradually cleared and the hills brought under cultiva- 
tion. David G. Pulse was a man of large influence in the community in which 
he made his home and he and his wife were regarded as among the leaders in 
that neighborhood. Both were persons of excellent education, and it is 
undoubted that their influence had very much to do with bringing about bet- 
ter social and economic conditions in that now well-established farming 
region. J\Ir. Pulse was a Democrat and his first vote was cast for James 
K. Polk for President. For many years he served the township as justice 
of the peace, and his judgments always were regarded as equitable by his 
neighbors. The Pulses were Methodists and were leaders of the meetings 
which were conducted by the "circuit riders" thereabout in those days. 

To David G. and Rebecca (VanCleave) Pulse were born five children: 
Olney E., who enlisted in Company E, One Hundred and Twenty-third 
Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, for service in behalf of the Union 



6l4 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

during the Civil War, and was killed in the battle of Kenesaw Mountain in 
June, 1864; John, who died in November, 1900; Oscar L., who now is living 
in Belle City, Missouri, to which place he moved in 1892; James C, who 
died in Paragould, Arkansas, in October, 1901, and William C, the imme- 
diate subject of this biographical sketch. In January, 1889, the Pulses retired 
from the farm and moved into the city of Greensburg, where Mr. Pulse died 
the following March, his widow continuing to make her residence there until 
the time of her death, twentj'-four years later, June 17, 1913. she then being 
eighty-nine years, six months and seventeen days old. 

William C. Pulse received his elementary education in the district school 
of his home neighborhood, which he supplemented with a course in Harts- 
ville College and a course in the university at Valparaiso, Indiana, lacking 
but half a year of finishing in the latter institution. In 1883, he resumed his 
studies, taking the regular scientific course. Air. Pulse earned his way 
through college by teaching school in Decatur county, having taught for 
nine years, in which profession he was very successful, his well-recognized 
qualifications giving him the choice of positions in the county. Between terms 
of teaching, Mr. Pulse farmed or operated a saw-mill until the year 1888, 
when he engaged in the contracting business. The history of the well-estab- 
lished firm of Pulse & Porter is the story of the success of Mr. Pulse since 
that time. 

On January 10, 1894, William C. Pulse was united in marriage to Ida 
E. Black, of Anderson, Indiana, a daughter of McFarland and Mary (Wood) 
Black, both of whom now are deceased, to which union two children were 
born, William McFarland, on August 17, 1895, died on August 17, 1896, and 
Mary Rebecca, January' 17, 1897, died on August 14, 1900. 

Mrs. Pulse is a member of the First Methodist church of Greensburg, 
and is active in its work. Mr. Pulse is a Republican and for years has 
been a leader in that party throughout this section of the state. In 1910, 
he was the party's candidate for joint senator for the district comprised of 
Bartholomew and Decatur counties, and was defeated in this Democratic 
district by a majority of but sixteen votes, the stress of his personal busi- 
ness preventing his close application to his campaign. He stands high in 
Masonry, having reached the thirty-second degree, and three times serving 
as the master of the Greensburg lodge of that order, of which lodge he was 
a trustee; a member of the grand lodge of Indiana and grand marshal of the 
Grand Lodge of Masons of Indiana : a thirty-second degree Mason, and a 
member of the Shriners at Alurat Temple in Indianapolis, and has taken 
everything in Masonry, both York and Scottish Rite. He also is a charter 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 615 

member and past exalted ruler of the Greensburg Lodge No. 475, Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks and past chancellor commander of Greensburg 
Lodge No. 188, Knights of Pythias. Mr. Pulse is one of the directors of 
the Sterling Fire Insurance Company, of Indianapolis, which has a paid-up 
capital of eight hundred and fifty thousand dollars, with assets of one mil- 
lion, six hundred thousand dollars, including surplus and reserves. For six 
years he was a member of the directorate of the Indiana Retail Lumber 
Dealers' Association, which association he served for two years as president 
and one year as vice-president. He is active in all movements having to do 
with the development of the best interests of his home community, both in 
material, moral and civic way and he and Mrs. Pulse also take an active inter- 
est in the social affairs of the city, none there being held in higher regard 
than they, where they own a beautiful home. Mr. and Mrs. Pulse live on 
Fast Washington street. 



WALTER B. CORY. 



How fitting and proper it is that here and there in the pages of this 
history there should be presented memorials to certain aforetime residents of 
this county who performed well their respective parts in the life of the com- 
munity, and then passed on, leaving behind them pleasant memories of work 
well done, duties faithfully performed; having bequeathed to those near and 
dear to them the priceless heritage of a good name. Among all these 
memorial tributes there is none better deserved than that which here is paid 
to the memory of the man whose name is noted above, Walter B. Cory, a 
one-time well-known young farmer of Washington township, whose home, 
situated about three miles west of Greensburg, was a great source of pleasure 
to him during his life. 

Walter B. Cory was born in Washington township, Decatur county, 
Indiana, the son of Joseph and Lenora (Deem) Cory, both natives of this 
-county, whose parents were among the earliest settlers thereabout. The 
genealogy of the Cory family, together with an extended biographical sketch 
of Joseph Cory, will be found on another page in this volume. Walter B. 
Cory was reared on the paternal farm, receiving such education as the district 
schools offered in the days of his boyhood, and two years in Greensburg 
high school and a business course at Danville, Indiana, and on February 6, 
1894, was united in marriage to Louisa Lynch, daughter of Benjamin and 
Sarah (Bentley) Lynch, the former of whom was born in Franklin county, 



6l6 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Indiana, in 1825, and died at his home in this county in 1902, the latter of 
whom was born in this county in 1834, and died in 1900. 

Benjamin Lynch came to this county from Frankhn county as a young 
man and here he was married. He opened a store at the hamlet of Letts, 
which he conducted quite successfully for some years. Later he bought a 
farm near the village of Adams, and, in addition to operating the same, 
engaged extensively in the business of stock buying. It was on this farm 
near Adams that Mrs. Cory was born. Benjamin Lynch was the son of 
Pierce Lynch, a native of Pennsylvania, who emigrated to Indiana in an 
early day, locating in Franklin county, where he spent the remainder of his 
life, coming to be one of the most influential residents of the community 
in which he lived. Benjamin Lynch retired from the fai^m when encroaching 
years made impossible his further active labors, moving into the town of 
Adams, where he died in 1902. His wife had preceded him to the grave by 
two years, her death having occurred in the year 1900. She was the daugh- 
ter of William and Sarah M. (Howe) Bentley, pioneers of this county. For 
additional details of the genealogy of the Bentleys, together with a history 
of that family in this county, the reader is referred to the sketch of Alex- 
ander Bentley, presented elsewhere in this volume. 

To Benjamin and Sarah (Bentley) Lynch four children were born, 
as follow: Mrs. Anna Wooley, who died at Lebanon, Indiana; Olive, who 
married Professor George L. Roberts, a member of the faculty of Purdue 
University, and lives at Lafayette, Indiana ; Perry, who lives in Oklahoma, 
and Louisa, the widow of Mr. Cory. 

For two years after their marriage, ?ilr. and !Mrs. Cory resided in the 
Lynch home near Adams, after which they engaged in farming on their 
own account, buying a fine tract of land about three miles west of Greens- 
burg. This farm recently was sold by Mrs. Cory, who since then has been 
making her home in Greensburg. In addition to operating his farm, Walter 
B. Cory also operated a threshing outfit and was one of the best known men 
in the county. 

To Walter B. and Louisa (Lynch) Cory two children were born, Cecil 
L. and Ernest J., both of whom are still at home with their mother, and the 
latter of whom is still in school. Mr. Cory was an earnest member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, as is his widow, and these children have been 
reared in the faith of that church. Mr. Cory's death in September, 1909, 
was a grievous blow to his famil)^ and was lamented also by his large circle 
of friends and acquaintances throughout the county the fact that he was 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 61/^ 

removed from the scene of earth's activities in the very prime of his vigorous 
manhood making his passing all the more to be regretted. 

Mr. Cory was a Republican and took a good citizen's part in the polit- 
ical affairs of the county though not what might be called a particularly 
active worker in politics. He, however, took an earnest interest in good 
government and was deeply interested in all measures designed to improve 
the general conditions of society. He was a good man and the community 
sustained a real loss when he was called awav. 



JOHX NICOLAS WALLINGFORD. 

John Nicholas Wallingford was one of the few men who have had the 
good fortune to step into a business already established. He escaped all 
that anxiety which usually attends the building up of a new enterprise, and 
even after tiring of the life of a merchant, fortune continued to smile upon 
him, holding open for him the door to a continued successful life, from a 
financial standpoint. His sterling qualities were recognized by the United 
States government, as he was rewarded with a very responsible position, the 
duties of which he performed with honest loyalty. 

John Nicholas Wallingford, deceased, a merchant of Greensburg, 
Indiana, was born on March 31, 1840, and died on August 13, 1907. He 
was a son of Hiram and Hannah (Morris) Wallingford. He succeeded 
his father in the dry goods business, upon his retirement, and continued the 
business until 1885, from which he also retired later on, and was for eight 
years in the employment of the government, serving four years as deputy 
internal reve«|iue collector, and then storekeeper ganger until his death. 

Hiram Wallingford was a native of Kentucky, and came to Rush county 
directly after the Civil War. He finally located in Greensburg, where he 
conducted a mercantile business, and where he spent the 'last years of his 
Hfe. His children were: Mary, Alicia, Eliza, John, Kate, Fannie and Will- 
iam. Mary became Mrs. Tully, and is now deceased; Alicia lives in Decatur 
county; Eliza, deceased; Kate became the wife of a Mr. Grove, and is now 
deceased, as is also Fannie; William lives at Farnham, Nebraska. 

John Nicholas Wallingford was twice married. First, about 1866, to 
Alice Foster, a native of Pennsylvania, who died about 1893, leaving three 
children : John Devol, who lives in Des Moines, Iowa ; William, who died at 
Des Moines, and Morris, also deceased. His second marriage took place on: 



.6l8 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

November 17, 1897, with Mary Louise Snodgrass, who was born in Ripley 
county, and is a daughter of WiUiam Harrison and Mary (Wood) Snod- 
grass, natives of Kentucky and Indiana, respectively. Mr. Wallingford 
was a Republican, and a member of the Christian church. Mrs. Walling- 
ford survives her husband. 

William Harrison Snodgrass, father of Mrs. Wallingford, was born in 
1818, and died in 1900, his wife, Mary, was born in 1823, and died in 1905. 
Mr. Snodgrass was a son of John Snodgrass, of Kentucky. He lived in 
Ripley county until 1884, and then came to Greensburg, where he retired 
from business, and where his last days were spent. Capt. William Harrison 
Snodgrass, of the Eighty-third Indiana, enlisted in Decatur county, and served 
throughout the Civil War. He was captain of Company A, and enlisted as 
second lieutenant, advanced to first lieutenant, then captain and brevet major. 
His children were: Josephine Callahan, who died in 1900; Emma Hatch, 
now a widow; Hester Dennison, deceased; Worth, deceased; Melissa Den- 
nison now living at Greensburg ; Mary Wallingford, and Dea Jenks, deceased. 
They were all members of the Christian church. 

John Snodgrass, paternal grandfather of Mrs. Wallingford, was a 
native of Kentucky, and located in Indiana, in 1821, where he bought gov- 
ernment land, the deeds to which were signed by John Ouincy Adams. 



LUTHER D. BRADEN. 



Luther D. Braden, the editor and publisher of the Standard, a family 
newspaper established at Greensburg, Indiana, in 1835, by John Thomson, 
is descended on his father's side from Irish ancestry, and one his mother's 
■side from English ancestry. 

Mr. Braden was born in Clay township, Decatur county, on November 
5, 1861, the son of Robert and Pamelia (Anderson) Braden. William Braden, 
the paternal grandfather, was a native of County Tyrone, in the north of 
Ireland. He emigrated to the United States in 1795, and after settling tem- 
porarily in Greensburg, Pennsylvania, removed to Scott county, Kentucky, 
and, in .1822, removed to Clarksburg, Decatur county, where he died in 
1825. He married Ufama Jackson, a native of Ireland, and they had nine 
children. Robert Braden, the father of Luther D., was born on July 11, 
3814, in Scott county, Kentucky, and was eight years old when brought to 
Decatur county, in 1822. In 1839 he located in Clay township, where he 



np\ww"H'ip '" V !*'!'«' www >iii 1 » wi\ \ \ \i \\wi 11 1 1 \\ « \\H \ p \ \ \ \ n m i\i\ m \\\i n n i \ 




LUTHER D. BRADEX. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 619 

became an extensive farmer. He was a man of very aggressive disposition, 
and a leader in the community where he hved. A charter member of the 
Milford Christian church, founded in 1842, and a Republican in politics, he 
died in 1887. In 1838 he had married Pamela Anderson, the daughter of 
Joseph Anderson, who laid out and named the town of Andersonville, 
Franklin county, Indiana. They had' four children: Joseph A., a veteran 
of the Civil War, a justice of the peace and an insurance and real estate 
dealer at Rossville, Illinois ; Jane, the widow of Thomas A. Shirk ; Jeremy 
A., a retired farmer, of Greensburg, and Luther D., the subject of this 
sketch. 

Born and reared in Clay township, Decatur county, Indiana, Luther D. 
Braden entered Hartsville College in 1878, and after spending four years 
in that institution, began teaching in 1882. In the meantime he studied in the 
Northern Indiana Normal at Valparaiso. From 1889 to 1891, he served as 
county superintendent of Decatur county, and from 1891 to 1893, ^^ was 
principal of St. Paul's school. 

In 1893, Mr. Braden came to Greensburg, and for one year was a mem- 
ber of the firm of J. C. Pulse & Company, wholesale grocers. In October 
of the following year, Mr. Braden purchased the Standard, the oldest paper 
in Decatur county, and one which was established in 1835 ^y John Thom- 
son, the grandfather of Mrs. Braden. It is a family newspaper. 

On December 17, 1890, Luther D. Braden was married to Ella Thomson, 
the daughter of Orville Thomson, of Greensburg. To this happy union has 
been born one child, Marie. 

Mr. Braden is a Republican in politics, and a very active worker in the 
Christian church, of which he is an elder. He is a member of the official 
board of the Greensburg congregation and was superintendent of the Sun- 
day school for seven years. Fraternally, he is a member of Greensburg 
Lodge No. 36, Free and Accepted Masons ; of Chapter No. 8, Royal Arch 
Masons, and Greensburg Council No. 74, Royal and Select Masters. He is 
also a member of the Knights of Pythias. 

As a man who exerts a silent and unostentatious influence for good, 
Luther D. Braden has no superior in Decatur county. Not only does he 
possess the confidence and esteem of his fellow townsmen, but of the people 
wherever he is known. He is an eminently worthy citizen of this great 
county. 

Mr. Braden has taken great interest in collecting early historical data 
of Decatur county, and his paper for the past twenty years has presented 
many valuable facts that otherwise might have been lost to posterity. Since 



520 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

the death of Orville Thomson, in 1910, he is general!)' conceded to be the 
best-informed person in the county on all matters pertaining to its general 
histor)'. 



WILLIAM F. SMILEY. 



William F. .Smiley, a retired farmer of Decatur county, who, after 
completing an educational course of training as was exceptional for his 
generation, began farming in Clay township, Decatur county, Indiana, on a 
farm of eighty acres presented to him by his father, increased the acreage 
from time to time until he now owns two hundred and forty acres and is 
regarded as one of the most successful farmers of the county. The Smiley 
family, which was established in Decatur county early in 1849, was founded 
here by \\'illiam Smiley, who became, during his career, as a farmer, one of 
the most prosperous and extensive landowners and stockmen in this section 
of the state. 

William F. Smiley, now a resident of Greensburg, Indiana, and a retired 
farmer of Decatur county, was born on November 21, 1848, in Butler 
county, Ohio, the son of William and Mary Ann (Kinney) Smiley, natives 
of Miflin county, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey, respectively, the former of 
whom was born in 1814 and died on June 6, 1893, and the latter of whom 
was born in 181 7 and died in 1906. William Smiley was the son of Patrick 
Smiley, a gentleman of Irish descent, who lived in Pennsylvania, from 
whence the son moved to Butler county, Ohio, and, after being married there, 
in 1835, came, when seventeen years old, to Decatur county, arriving in 
February, 1849. Settling in Clay township, he purchased land and became 
a prosperous farmer. Starting with eighty acres of land which was pur- 
chased with a capital of three hundred dollars, inherited by his wife, he 
returned for his family and drove through from Ohio to Decatur county 
with an ox team. From time to time he bought more land and owned, at the 
time of his death, one thousand acres. A large farmer and stockman, he 
was also an ardent Democrat and a member of the Primitive Methodist 
church. He and his wife had nine children, four of whom are deceased. 
Tlie names of the children, in the order of their birth, are as follow : Mrs. 
Parmelia Henry, deceased: Mrs. Caroline Sefton, the wife of Ed. Sefton, 
of Greensburg: George Washington, who died in 1907; Harvey, who died 
on January 8, 1915; Thomas K., a farmer near Hartsville, Indiana; Mary, 
who died on August 16, 1914: William F., the subject of this sketch; Sov- 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 621 

ereign P., a hotel proprietor in Texas; and j\Irs. ]Margaret Johnson, of 
Greensbnrg. 

Educated in Hartsville College, Mr. Smiley has always farmed. He 
began with a tract of eighty acres given to him byliis father and, after 
locating upon this farm, which is situated in Clay township, he built a new 
house and, upon his marriage, settled there, residing on the farm from 1878 
to 1897, after which he moved to Greensburg for one year and then moved 
to Burney, where he lived until 1911. He later returned to Greensburg and 
now resides in this city. In the meantime, Mr. Smiley has increased the 
acreage of his farm to two hundred and forty acres and has two sets of 
farm buildings. He is one of the most extensive raisers of cattle and hogs 
in the county. 

On October 29, 1878, William F. Smiley was married to Jennie Ewing, 
who was born on July 20, 1857, ™ Milford, Decatur county, Indiana, and 
who is the daughter of Joshua and Alice (Russell) Ewing, natives of Decatur 
county, the former of whom was born in -1833 and who died in March, 1891. 
Joshua Ewing, who was the son of Patrick Ewing, a native of Maryland, 
was one of a large family and was also one of triplets, born to his parents. 
The other two children born at the same time were Putman and Abraham. 

The Ewing family is of Scotch-Irish extraction, Patrick Ewing, the 
founder of the family in America, having immigrated from Ireland before 
the Revolution, a son, Putnam, being born on the voyage to America. Pat- 
rick Ewing settled at Elkton, Maryland, and became the father of four sons, 
Samuel, Joshua, Nathan and Putnam. The first three sons settled in A^ir- 
ginia. Putnam Ewing married Jennie McClelland, the daughter of a Doctor 
McClelland, of Maryland, and moved to Bourbon county. Kentucky, in 1806, 
settling in Bath county, where he died. Eleven children were born to Putnam 
and Jennie Ewing, Robert, Patrick, Joshua, Polly, Samuel, Jennie, James, 
Eliza, George, McClelland and Andrew Jackson. Of this family, Patrick, 
the immediate ancestor of Mrs. Smiley, was born in 1803 in Cecil county, 
Maryland, and was married to Lydia Morgan, September 5, 1827, who was a 
native of Montgomery county, Kentucky. Patrick and his wife, the former 
of whom was the captain of the militia during his residence in Kentucky, 
came to Decatur county in 1827 and settled in Clay township, where they 
reared a family of fifteen children, Sarah J., Mary, Eliza, Putnam, Abel, 
Joshua, Robert, Cortez, Samuel H., Lydia, James K., George M., Martha C, 
Morgan J. and Alice J. Of this family,* Sarah J. was first married to John 
■G. King, and after her death, he married her sister, Eliza; Mary married 
Jesse Howard. Of the three sons, Putnam, Abel and Joshua, triplets, Putnam 



622 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

married Mary DeArmond and after her death married Sarah A. Hackleman; 
Joshua married Alice Russell and they were the parents of IMrs. Smiley; 
Abel married Nancy J. G. Patton ; Robert married Sallie King ; Cortez, an 
attorney-at-law, married Elizabeth H. Matthews; Samuel H. married Mahala 
Braden ; Lydia married James W. Barclay ; James K. is referred to elsewhere 
in this volume: ]\Iartha C. is the wife of James C. Davis, and Alice J. is the 
wife of James M. Hiner. 

Alice Russell, who became the wife of Joshua Ewing and the mother 
of Mrs. William F. Smiley, was born in 1841, at Milford, the daughter of 
Robert Russell, a pioneer citizen of the county. She died in 1905. Of the 
seven children born to Joshua and Alice (Russell) Ewing, Jennie married 
the subject of this sketch; Mrs. Lydia Russell lives at Flat Rock, Indiana; 
Mrs. Hessie Arnold, who lives one-half mile from Burne}^ is the wife of a 
music dealer, and Mrs. Lucy Alley lives five miles south of Burney on a farm. 

Mr. and Mrs. William F. Smiley have had no children. Mr. Smiley 
is a Democrat. Mr. and Mrs. Smiley are members of the Methodist Episco- 
pal church. Mrs. Smiley is a member of the Department Club, the After- 
noon Lecture Course, the Art Circle and the Music Circle. Mr. Smiley is a 
member of Burney Lodge, Knights of Pythias. 



WILLLAAI C. WOODFILL. 

As the senior member of the firm of J. M. W^oodfiU's Sons, of Greens- 
burg, W^illiam C. Woodfill has contributed his quota to the progress and 
development of the town. If it were true that the commercial interests of a 
locality form the foundation upon which its other civic life rests, and around 
which its activities are built, then, the honest, upright merchant is an import- 
ant factor of that community. He helps largely in the formation of public 
sentiment, and his views and opinions are generally looked upon as being 
worthy of respect and consideration. William C. Woodfill has been, in this 
sense, conspicuous in the commercial affairs of Greensburg. He is a native 
of this town, having been born here on May 8, 1870, and is a son of James 
M. Woodfill, president of the Greensburg National Bank. 

The store now owned by W. C, C. M. and J. V. Woodfill was estab- 
lished by their grandfather, Gabriel Woodfill, in November, 1830, this being 
carried on in connection with a banking business made necessary because, at 
that time, there were no banks. It will thus be seen that the business instinct 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 623- 

has been strong in this family for several generations back, but it has also 
been connected with high moral principles and an ethical consciousness, for 
Greensburg's first banker assisted in building the First Methodist Episcopal 
church. We shall have occasion to refer more definitely to Mr. Woodfill's 
ancestry later on in this sketch. 

William C. Woodfill graduated from the Greensburg high school, and 
then took a course in a business school in Cincinnati. Returning, he began 
work in his father's store, then known by the firm name of Hittle & Christ- 
ian. As the sons in this family came of age, they were given an interest in 
the store, and William was no exception to the rule. From that time on, he 
has taken a keen interest in the management on good business principles of 
the oldest merchandise store in Greensburg, and as its leading merchant, has 
attained an enviable place in the community. 

On October 4, 1893, Mr. Woodfill married Miss Elizabeth Donnell, 
daughter of Seth Donnell, who is deceased. Her mother, Mrs. Donnell. still 
lives in Greensburg. To this union the following children were born : James 
Donnell, a student of Purdue University ; William Stewart, of Bowdoin Col- 
lege, Main ; Elizabeth and Margaret, both of whom are attending school at 
home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Woodfill have taken deep interest in educational matters,, 
and the former is at present a member of the city school board. Aside from 
his own business establishment, Mr. Woodfill has identified himself with 
other commercial activities of the town, and is now the president of the 
Greensburg Building and Loan Association. 

Mr. Woodfill is a Republican, and his personal influence has given 
strength to the local party. He is a member of the Odd Fellows lodge, the 
Knights of Pythias, the Free and Accepted Masons, and the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks. 

As the merchandise store founded by his ancestors has formed such an 
integral part of his life, a brief sketch of its history will not be inappropriate. 
The store now supplies the public with clothing and men's furnishings. It 
succeeded the firm of J. M. Woodfill & Sons in 1897, this having been the 
firm name from 1895. It was known as Woodfill & Byers from 1890 until 
189 s. as Christian & Woodfill from 1888 until 1890, which succeeded Hittle 
& Christian, who, in turn, succeeded John P. Hittle, founder of the original 
store. There was a close alliance between business and family relations, as 
J. H. Christian was a nephew of J. M. Woodfill, and son-in-law of John P. 
Hittle. 

Mr. Woodfill's strength of character, as well as his energy and marked 



■624 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

business ability, have been of signal value in the history of the community 
in which he and his family have lived for several generations. While build- 
ing up his commercial interests, he has not neglected those personal and 
civic duties which assume the form of obligations in the life of every man, 
for, like his distinguished ancestors, he has been public-spirited, and has 
placed the good of his town and county next to that of himself and his own 
family. It is such men that form the bone and sinew of any people. 



JOHN HENRY METZ. 



One of the splendid pioneer citizens still living in Decatur county, Indi- 
ana, and one of its wealthiest farmers, is John Henry Metz, of Fugit town- 
ship. His present condition of affluence is in bold contrast to his financial 
condition, when he arrived in this country more than sixty 3fears ago, after 
a long and tedious voyage on an immigrant ship with nine hundred others, 
when he had only twenty-five cents in his pocket at the time he landed in 
New York city. The story of his rise to fortune and success as a farmer, 
devoid of the romance and hardships which he suffered in pioneer times, 
is the story of the most rigid personal economy and consistent and increasing 
savings. His is a record to make the cheeks of the young men of the present 
generation, whose lives are being spent in wanton living, burn with shame, 
and his life ought to be an example to every young man of worthy and com- 
mendable ambitions, a command to follow, in the fundamentals at least, the 
career of this honorable and distinguished citizen. 

Born on July 10, 1832, at Frankfort-on-the-]\Iaine, in Prussia, John 
Henry Metz came to America in 1854. at the age of twenty-two and, after 
two years in Ohio, in 1856 came on to Decatur count)-. The son of Frederick 
and Elizabeth (Kolb) Metz, farmers by occupation, John H. Metz was reared 
on the farm in his native land. He left home, family and friends to seek 
his fortune in a new country with a single companion. The voyage to 
America, which required forty-six days, was made on the ship "Milhausen." 

On arriving in Decatur count}"-, Indiana, Mr. Metz was employed by 
James and, later, by William Bonner, for five dollars a month, and out of 
these earnings, he was able to save money and purchase his first land in Salt 
Creek township. Later, he bought forty acres and still another fortv and 
began to raise hogs. In fact, this has been the secret of his success and 
iortune. He also made great profits in the early days b}- growing wheat. 




JOHX H. METZ. 



16o5337 

DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 625 

For many years he has been accustomed to raise one hundred and fifty head 
of hogs a year, and to sell at least one carload of cattle every year. He now 
owns six hundred acres of land in Fugit and Salt Creek townships, upon 
which are located three sets of buildings. All of this land is either farmed 
or managed by members of his family. Not many years ago he remodeled 
his farm house and now has a handsome and comfortable residence, the equal 
of any to be found in Fugit township. 

Six years after coming to America and four years after arriving in 
Decatur county, John Henry Metz was married, February 14, i860, to Louise 
Huber, who was born in Franklin county, Indiana, July 16, 1836, and who 
was the daughter of Gottfried and Margaret (Zeigler) Huber, natives of 
■Germany. After rearing a large family of children, Mrs. Metz passed away 
■on July 10, 1895. Mr. and Mrs. Metz had eight children: Leona, George 
W., Mary Elizabeth, John H., Jr., Edward L., William G., Charles Frederick 
and Maude Louise, the latter dying in 191 2. Leona married Chester King 
and lives in Clinton township, near Williamstown ; they have six children, 
Mary Ehzabeth, the wife of Fred Caldwell; Florence, John H., Jr., Stella, 
Elendore and Edward. George W. married Catherine Ravenstein, of Cin- 
cinnati and is a merchant at Newpoint, where he was postmaster for sixteen 
years. Of his nine children, Amanda, married McClelland Wolfe and has 
two children; Neola Maurine died on March 30, 1915, age two years, and 
Orin Keith, lives in Delaware, Ohio; Elma Marie married Howard Starks 
and has two children, Bessie Metz and Audrey Louise; Christina, William 
M., Anna L., Margarette, Cora May, George H., Catherine. Mary Elizabeth 
is the housekeeper for her father. John H., Jr., lives at home. Edward L. 
married Louisa Moulton and has two children, Edward Albert and Temper- 
ance Louise. William G. married Luella Dravis. Fugit township. Charles 
Frederick is at home. 

Mr. Metz's sons are extensive breeders of Aberdeen Angus cattle and 
ordinarily have from eighty to one hundred head on the farm. A Republican 
in politics, John Henry Metz has never been active in the councils of his 
party, even though he is, and has always been, a leader in his community. 
He is a member of the Kingston Presbyterian church, as was his good wife 
during her life. John Henry Metz is a fine type of the German gentleman, 
who has attained success from the humble start which he had in this country. 
He is well-read, intelligent and hospitable and one of the few really old 
settlers left in Decatur county. He has reared a fine family of industrious 
sons and daughters and his home is decidedly one of the best in the state 
(40) 



626 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

of Indiana. That he is a good farmer and that his sons, who have taken 
. up his work, are also good farmers, is amply proved by the fact that in a dry 
year, 19 14, they raised from sixty to eighty bushels of corn per acre on their 
land. It is unfortunate that everj^ community cannot have witliin its bound- 
aries men of the same character, capacity and ability, as John Henry Metz. 



GUY E. KITCHIN. 



We can scarcely think a man thoroughly appreciates his privileges and, 
independence, when he arrives at the point of owning a valuable farm of 
three hundred and twenty acres of good farm land, in a well-settled district. 
It becomes such a habit with him, that he loses sight of the fact that he is 
indeed fortunate in these days of high-priced real estate. If he could but 
read the thoughts of the man bending over the books in a city office, with his, 
hands and feet practically chained to a desk, he would know that nothing but 
the acreage price keeps this man from freeing himself from his mental 
drudgery, and going forth, with a glad heart, to where he can get a fresh 
breath of air, and live an independent life. Nor is he alone in his thoughts. 
There are hundreds of thousands of men and women whose views would 
not vary a hair's breadth in this direction. 

Guy Kitchin, farmer, Fugit township, was born on October 7, 1882, 
in Fugit township, on their home farm. He is a son of Frank B. and Clara 
(Robbins) Kitchin. He first attended the public schools at Kingston, and 
when eighteen years of age, entered Purdue University, remaining there 
one year, 1 899-1 900, after which he returned home and farmed for a short 
time, and then went to Kansas and Oklahoma for his health in 1908. He 
remained in Oklahoma four years, and then returned to Decatur county in 
the fall of 1912. In politics, he has always voted the Republican ticket, 
and is a member of the Kingston Presbyterian church. Fraternally, he is a 
member of the Knights of Pythias. The fine farm, of three hundred 
and twenty acres, stands as a witness to his ability, as well as to his thrifty 
habits. 

Frank Benjamin Kitchin, father of our subject, was born and reared 
on the home farm in Decatur county, where he farmed until his removal to 
Indianapolis in the spring of 1912. He owns fi\e hundred acres in Fugit 
township, covering three well-improved farms. He does general farming, 
and is a breeder of Shorthorn cattle. To Frank Kitchin and his wife were 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 627 

born six children, as follow : Clyde, Guy, Coza, Grace, Thomas and Frank 
Barnard. Clyde lives in Rush county ; Coza lives in Indianapolis ; Grace is 
the wife of Harry Moore, and lives at Alexandria; Frank Barnard lives in 
Indianapolis. 

In December, 1908, Guy Kitchin was married to Joy Thompson, daugh- 
ter of Edgar Thompson, of Jennings county. They have one child, Edgar, 
born in November, 191 1. 

Guy Kitchin has lived on his present farm since 1911. The father 
bought this tract of land about 1887, known as the Donnell farm. Guy 
Kitchin buys cattle and feeds on an average about seventy-five head during 
the year. On his farm he raises diversified crops and feeds all the grain and 
hay he can produce. Aside from this he buys a good deal of grain and feeds 
to carry him through the season. 



WILLIAM SKEEN WOODFILL. 

The Woodfill family have been prominently identiiied with the history 
of Decatur county since 1830, when the first members of the family came 
to Greensburg. In everything which goes to make a community better in 
the essentials which advance civilization, the family have acted well their 
part. Succeeding generations of the Woodfills have been characterized by 
those sterling cjualities which marked the members of the family who have 
gone before them. 

The late William S. Woodfill was born in Jefferson county, Indiana, on 
November 16, 1S25, the son of Gabriel and Eleanor (Pullman) \\'oodfill. 
The famil)^ trace their ancestry back to Welsh and English progenitors and 
have found that the first members of the family located in Pennsylvania in 
the early colonial days. Reverend Gabriel, the great-grandfather of William 
S. Woodfill, emigrated from Pennsylvania to Kentucky and settled in Shelby 
county early in the history of that state. He was a pioneer in Methodism 
in Kentucky and upon locating in Jefferson county, Indiana, became one of 
the earliest Methodist ministers of the Hoosier state. He was a man of large 
influence in his community and his labors in the Master's vineyard proved of 
inestimable benefit to his widely scattered neighbors. 

Andrew Woodfill, the son of the good old Methodist circuit rider and 
the grandfather of William S. Woodfill, was born in Pennsylvania, but spent 
most of his life in the vicinity of Madison, Indiana. He entered government 
land in Jefferson county, married a IMiss Mitchell and reared a family of 



628 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

twelve children, eight of whom lived to maturity. The last of the children 
to die were Mrs. Ellen Greene, of Seattle, Washington; Mrs. Sarah Maish, 
of Illinois, and Mrs. James Woodfill, of Texas. 

Gabriel, one of the sons of Andrew, and the father of William S., was 
born in Shelby county, Kentucky, in 1800. Later he moved with his parents 
to Jefferson county, Indiana, but after reaching manhood returned to Ken- 
tucky, where he engaged in farming and merchandising. On November 16, 
1830, he located in Greensburg, Indiana, and immediately began to take a 
prominent part in the commercial and fraternal life of the town. In the 
same year he opened a store and the business which he established in Greens- 
burg, eighty-five years ago. is now in the hands of William W. Woodfill, at 
the corner of Washington street and Broadway, a grandson of the old pioneer 
merchant. Gabriel also carried on a banking business in connection with his 
store, and was easily the foremost man in the business life of the town. He 
was an ardent \Yhig and when the Republican party was organized he gave 
it the same hearty support. He was an earnest member of the Methodist 
church and was one of the organizers of the First Methodist church, and 
later of the Centenary church. He was twice married. His first marriage 
was with Eleanor Pullman, and to this union were born three children, . 
Andrew; William S., a life-long merchant of Greensburg, and Mary, who 
became the wife of Henry Christian. Upon the death of his first wife, 
Gabriel Woodfill married Elizabeth Van Pelt, a daughter of Joseph Van Pelt, 
and to this second union were also born three children, John, deceased ; 
James M. and Catherine, the deceased wife of Rev. James Crawford. 

William Skeen Woodfill was five years of age when the family came to 
Decatur county in 1830 and spent the remainder of his life in Greensburg. 
Receiving a good common-school education, he early in life began to work 
in his father's store, which, by the time he had reached manhood, was the 
leading mercantile establishment of the town. Later his father made him a 
partner, the firm being known as Woodfill & Son until January, 1863. On 
that date the father retired from active business cares and the firm was 
changed to Woodfill Brothers, the three brothers being William, John and 
James. This arrangement continued until February, 1869. when the death 
of John caused the firm to be changed to W. S. Woodfill & Company. In 
1882 the style of the firm was changed to J. M. Woodfill & Company, but 
this change lasted less than a year. On January i. 1884, James retired and 
from then until the death of William S., July 25, 1899, the firm was known 
as W. S. Woodfill & Sons. Since the year 1899 the firm has been known as 
W. W. \^'oodfil^s Sons, although W. \\'. ^^"oodfill is now the manager of 
the establishment. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 629 

The Greensburg Gas and Electric Company was organized by William 
S. Woodfill in 1875 ^^^ ^^ ^'^^ president of the company from the time of its 
organization until his death, in 1899. I" addition to his extensive commer- 
cial and industrial interests in Greensburg, he owned four valuable farms in 
Decatur county. 

On November 18, 1857, William S. Woodfill was married to Sarah A. 
Talbott, the daughter of H. H. Talbott, the first clerk of the Decatur county 
circuit court. To this union were born four children, Elizabeth, who became 
the wife of Rev. J. W. Turner, of Decatur county ; William Wirt, a merchant 
of Greensburg; Harry Talbott, superintendent of the Greensburg Gas and 
Electric Light Company, and Web, secretary-treasurer of the same company. 

The wife of W. S. Woodfill died on October 31, 1898. She represented 
the highest type of womanhood and her whole life was a benediction to those 
who came in contact with her. Devoted to her husband and children, she 
fulfilled, in the truest sense, the noblest mission of womanhood. 

William S. Woodfill was an earnest Republican, but never an office- 
seeker, his extensive business interests demanding all of his time and atten- 
tion. He was a charter member of Greensburg Lodge No. 102, Lidependent 
Order of Odd Fellows, organized in 1851, and lived to be the last survivor of 
the charter members of the lodge. He was also a member of the encamp- 
ment at Evansville, Indiana. For twenty years he was a member of the 
Centenary church of Greensburg and took an active part in furthering all 
worthy causes proposed by his church. 

Such, in brief, is the life of one of Greensburg's most influential citizens 
of the past century. His life was always above reproach and he never 
shirked his duty as a citizen of the commonwealth in order to avoid responsi- 
bility. Such men give stability to any community, and such a man, in the 
highest sense of the word, was William S. Woodfill. 



WALTER AND ROBERT SCOTT. 

The founder of the Scott family in Decatur county, Indiana, who was 
William H. Scott, was the son of Robert and Nancy Scott, of Butler county, 
Ohio, who were married in 1824. On the paternal side of the family the 
Scotts of Decatur county are descended from Scottish ancestry. William 
H. Scott came to Indiana before the Civil War and in 1865 was married to 
Emily L. Logan, and to them were born six children, of whom Walter and 
Robert are the subjects of this sketch. 



630 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Walter Scott, who owns eighty acres in Fugit township and who is 
also farming one hundred and sixty acres, was born on May 5, 1881, on the 
Scott homestead, located on the Donnell pike. He was educated in the 
Kingston schools and at Tarkio College, but has always been engaged in 
farming. For a number of years he was associated with his brother, Fred, 
in farming the Logan estate and, in the fall of 1907, purchased his present 
farm, which he has greatly improved, especially by the erection of a beautiful 
country house in 1910 and a large barn, forty-four by forty-eight feet. Mr. 
Scott was married on October 26, 1910, to Hazel Walker, who was born in 
Adams on June 7, 1887, the daughter of John Lee and Stella Walker, natives 
of Lidiana, who reside in Adams. To Mr. and Mrs. Walker Scott have been 
born two children, Harold Walker, on May 10, 1912, and Miriam Edith, 
February i, 1915. Politically, Mr. Scott is a Republican and is a member 
of the township advisory board. He and his wife are members of the 
Kingston Presbyterian church. 

Robert Scott is a well-known farmer of Fugit township, who owns 
eighty acres of land and who is farming another eighty acres belonging to 
Margaret J. Logan, was born on March 16, 1884, on the Donnell pike. Mr. 
Scott grew up as a farmer in Decatur county and was married on October 
16, 1908, to Anna Martha McCall, of New Concord, Ohio, a sister of Rev- 
erend McCall, and daughter of Marshall and Anna McCall. Mr. and Mrs. 
Scott have had two children, JNIarshall Logan, born on October 27, 1909, 
and Margaret Jane, December 14, 191 1. 

Of the father of these two successful farmers, it may be said that 
William E. Scott was born on March 3, 1839, in Ohio, and died, June 20, 
1885. His wife, who, before her marriage, was Emily L. Logan, was born 
on July 27, 1844, on the Logan homestead and died on the old farm, March 
20, 1913, in the same room where she had been born and where she was 
married. 

The late William H. Scott was a soldier in the Civil War, having 
served in Company K, Thirty-seventh Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infan- 
try, for three years. He was mustered out of service on October 27, 1864, 
after having served in many severe engagements, among which were the 
battles of Huntsville, Alabama, Chattanooga, Stone's Ri\-er, IMurfrees- 
borough, Chickamauga, Mission Ridge, Lookout Mountain and all of the 
battles of the Atlanta campaign. 

Of the six children born to William H. and Emily L. ("Logan) Scott, 
two are deceased, Edward Thomas, born in 1866, and Edith Margaret, in 
1868, both dying in infancy. The living children are Fred G., born in 1871, 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 63 1 

-who is a farmer in Decatur county; Xannie Lillian, in 1878, who is the wife 
of Samuel Goddard, of Cambridge, Massachusetts; Walter and Robert, the 
subjects of this sketch. 

Emily Logan was the daughter of John E. and Eliza (Kerrick) Logan, 
the former of whom was twice married, the first time to Hattie N. Anderson, 
a sister of "Uncle Billy" Anderson, who was born in i8'i2, in Kentucky, 
and who bore him three children, George Douglas, who died in infancy; 
Margaret J., in 1837, who resides with Mr. and Mrs. Robert Scott, and Mary 
Anderson, in 1839, and died in 1872, who was the wife of John W. Gillespie, 
a well-known merchant of Greensburg, now deceased. 

Margaret J. Logan, who was educated in the Springhill schools, received 
an academic education and taught school for twenty-four years. Her school 
was a famous one on account of the many skilled teachers who presided over 
it. She also taught for seven years at College Corner. Miss Logan, who is 
now "seventy-seven years young," is a bright and capable woman and is well 
known in this communit}'. 

The second wife of John E. Logan, who was born in 1812, and who 
died in 1899, was Eliza Kerrick. She was born in 1816 and died in 1893. 
Born near Lexington, Kentucky, John E. Logan was the son of George 
Logan, who was born in Pennsylvania about 1780 and whose wife, Mar- 
garet Robinson, was also born in Pennsylvania. George Logan and wife 
emigrated to Kentucky and their son, John E., after a time, left Kentucky 
and emigrated to White county, Illinois, from whence he came to Decatur 
county, Indiana, purchasing a farm in Fugit township in 1833. He bought 
one hundred and sixty acres of land for six hundred dollars, but eventually 
owned three hundred and twenty acres, which became the Logan homestead. 
By his second marriage, there were born six children, Mrs. Emily Scott, 
the mother of Walter and Robert Scott; Nancy Ann, born in 1847, died in 
1876; James H., in 1849, died in 1851 ; Lillian Esther, in 1852, died in 1889, 
who was the wife of Rev. J. A. Thomson, the president of Tarkio College; 
Charles E., in 1858, died in 1859, and Rev. William W., in i860, who now 
resides in Louisville, Kentucky, where he is pastor of a Presbyterian church. 

Of Robert Scott it may be said further that he was educated in the 
Kingston schools, the Clarksburg high school and Tarkio College, where he 
spent one year. He has been farming in this neighborhood since he quit 
school. In 19 1 3 he moved to his present farm and has established in this 
community an excellent reputation of a farmer and business man. Politi- 
cally, he is identified with the Republican party. He and his wife and family 
.are mernbers of the Springhill United Presbyterian church. 



632 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

JOHN H. ALEXANDER, lAI. D. 

It is an honor of no mean importance to have become, in point of years 
and service, the oldest physician in Decatur county, a distinction which 
belongs to John H. Alexander, M. D., a veteran of the Civil War, the son of 
a well-known pioneer physician of the Middle West who is descended, on his 
mother's side, from an old and distinguished English family which estab- 
lished itself in America during the early part of the eighteenth century. 
Having come to Indiana some time before the breaking out of the Civil War, 
he has practiced his profession continuously, in this state, at Milford and 
Greensburg, until within three years ago, when he practically quit the more 
active practice. 

John H. Alexander was born on November 7, 1828, at Palestine, Illinois, 
and is the son of Dr. John C. and Nancy (Wilson) Alexander, natives of 
Kentucky and Virginia, respectively. The former, who was born in Mont- 
gomery county, Kentucky, on August i, 1797, became a student at Transyl- 
vania University at Lexington, Kentucky, and began the practice of his pro- 
fession with his old preceptor. Doctor Walker, of Mt. Sterling, when twenty 
years of age. Locating in Palestine, Illinois, in 1822, eleven years later he 
was appointed registrar of the land office at Danville, Illinois,- and held that 
office until his death, August 7, 1841. A successful stump speaker, during 
General Jackson's two campaigns he traveled throughout the entire state of 
Illinois as a campaign orator and, as a reward for his services to the Demo- 
cratic party, was elected and served three terms as joint representative from 
Crawford, Clark and Lawrence counties in the Illinois General Assembly. 
As a delegate to one of the Illinois state conventions, he introduced Stephen 
A. Douglas, as a speaker, when the convention was being held at Vandalia. 
In fact, Dr. John C. Alexander was a stanch friend of Mr. Douglas. Pro- 
fessionally, he was regarded as a very successful man. His wife, who was 
Nancy Wilson before her marriage, was born in Harding countv, Virginia, on 
March 26, 1802, and died, January 24, 1884, at Cliffy, Illinois, at the resi- 
dence of her son. Dr. John H. She was the daughter of James Wilson, who 
was born in Hardin county, Virginia, in 1768, and who, on October i, 1815, 
left Virginia for Ohio. At Brownstown, in Fayette county, Pennsylvania, 
he bought a flat-boat for one hundred dollars and sent his goods and family 
down the river by boat, he and his wife taking the six horses overland. 
Arriving in Hamilton county, the latter part of the month, where James had 
purchased a farm on a stream known as Dry run, they established a home. 
Mrs. Nancy Alexander's father, James Wilson, was the son of Moses Wilson, 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 633- 

a native of the north of England, born near the Scottish Hne, who married 
Anna Blackburn. Their children were, Nancy, Mary Ann, Vastine, Benja- 
min, James Harvey, Elizabeth, Isaac Newton, Presley C, Jeretta and Marie. 
Dr. John C. Alexander and Nancy Wilson were married, August 27, 

1822, and were the parents of seven children, Angeline, born on May 10, 

1823, who married Rev. Erastus Thayer; John H., David Wesley, March 4, 
1830, died in September, 1863: James Wilson. Jr., May 12, 1837, died on 
January 2, 1854; Nancy Jane, October 16, 1832, who married Jacob Harness; 
William Fethian and Guy Smith, twins, at Danville, Illinois, December 4, 
1839. William F. died on October 7, 1847, and Guy Smith became a lawyer 
and, during the Civil War, was second lieutenant in Company F, Sixty-second 
Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry. Subsequently, he was promoted to 
first lieutenant, captain and major and was mustered out of the service as 
inspector-general, with the rank of lieutenant-colonel, November 30, 1865. 
At this time he was not twenty-one years old. 

Educated in the country schools of Illinois and at Danville, that state, 
after his father's death. Dr. John H. Alexander moved to Palestine, Illinois, 
where he attended the Parrish Academy and later the Ohio Medical College 
at Cincinnati. In th.ese times the schools were very crude, especially the 
buildings in which they were housed. He crossed the plains to California 
in 1850, by mule team, during the gold fever and spent eight years in the West. 
Locating in Decatur county, July 7, 1858, for the practice of his profession, 
four years later, on September z'j, 1862, he enlisted in the Twenty-seventh 
Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, under Col. Silas Colgrove, and was 
promoted to surgeon, July 15, 1864, having been commissioned assistant 
surgeon, September 2-], 1862. He was mustered out of service on November 
4, 1864. 

In December, i860. Doctor Alexander was married to Mary Tarking- 
ton, who was born on February 25, 1834, in Greensburg, Indiana, a daughter 
of Rev. Joseph Tarkingtcn, a well-known pioneer minister of the Methodist 
church. Mary Tarkington attended Mrs. Larabee's school for young ladies 
at Greencastle, Indiana, from 1848 to 185 1, in which latter year she gradu- 
ated. Mrs. Larabee was the wife of Prof. William Larabee of Asbury Col- . 
lege, now DePauw University. She is an aunt of the well-known Indiana 
author, Booth Tarkington. Dr. and Mrs. Alexander have had two children, 
John T., who lives in Greensburg, and Joseph H., a traveling drug salesman 
of Springfield, Illinois. John T., who also is a traveling salesman, married 
Claudia Hill. Joseph H. married Myrilla Anderson and they have one child- 
Margaret June. 



■634 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

A practicing ]ih}-sician in Decatur county ever since the close of the Civil 
War, Doctor Alexander ser\-ed fourteen 3'ears as secretary of the board of 
pension examiners. A Republican in politics, he served as secretary of the 
county board of health for over ten years. He was a member of the county 
and state medical societies and also a delegate to the American Medical 
Association in 1882. He was also in charge of the Odd Fellows' home for 
six and one-half years. Fraternally, he is a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, having joined that order in 1874, and is a charter 
member of 3iIilford Lodge. Doctor and }ilrs. Alexander are prominent 
members of the Alethodist Episcopal church at Greensburg, where the Doctor 
has lived in his present fine home since 1892. 



HUGH THO:\L\S }.IcCRACKEN. 

Hugh Thomas ]\IcCracken is one of the well4<nown, thrifty and suc- 
cessful farmers of historic old Fugit township, Decatur county, Indiana, 
who owns two hundred and forty-fi\"e acres of well-cultivated lad, well 
located, fertile and highly productive. He is, in the most exacting interpre- 
tation of the term, a twentieth century farmer, and one who, because he 
kno^vs how to farm, has always been satisfied to live in the country and to 
enjoy life in the open with his wife and children for his nearest and closest 
companions. Having built a comfortable home many years ago, the 'Slc- 
Cracken family is well situated to enjoy all the comforts and conveniences 
of country life, and they are among the most intelligent, up-to-date and 
progressive people of a township, which in pioneer times has furnished the 
bone and sinew that has made Decatur county famous in the Hoosier state. 

Hugh Thomas McCracken was born on November 22. 1843. 011 the farm 
where he now lives, the son of John James and Sarah Ann ^IcCracken, the 
former of whom was born on October 6, 1820, and who died in 1878. He 
was a son of James and Sally ( ]\Ieek) AlcCracken, and was brought to 
Decatur county, Indiana, by the parents when three years old. James 
McCracken, who was born on November 6, 1787, in Kentucky, who married 
Sally Meek, born in August, 1784, settled on land in the neighborhood of 
his grandson's farm, was a tanner by trade and learned to write by marking 
on leather. An elder in the Social Reformed Presbyterian church, he was 
well known during his day and generation. He and his wife had se\en 
children, Hugh T., born on December 19, 1810. died in infancy; Thomas, 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 635 

April 12, 1812, married Nancy Patton; Elizabeth, March 12, 1814, married 
Samuel L. Anderson; Martha, May 12, 1815, became the wife of John 
Kincaid; Sally Ann, .September 26, 1817, married Thomas Meek, October 4, 
1838. John J. was the father of Hugh Thomas McCracken; Adam R., May 
30, 1S24, and married Mary J. Rankin, March 13, 1851. 

Reared on the pioneer farm of his father, John J. McCracken event- 
ually settled on the farm and lived where James Maxwell now li\es. He was 
widely known, especially as one of the foremost Democrats of Decatur 
county, and as a member of the Social Reformed Presbyterian church. John 
J. and Sarah Ann IMcCracken had ten children, William David died in 1913; 
Hugh Thomas is the subject of this sketch; Martha is the wife of Samuel 
Stewart, of Rushville, Indiana; Mary died in youth; Benjamin B. lives in 
Rush county ; James, who was twice married, by his second marriage to 
Mary Spillman, had four children ; Newton Jasper lives in Shelbyville ; John 
Wilson and Gilbert Gordon live in Alabama; Mrs. Myrta Ann Foley lives in 
Greensburg. 

Educational facilities were considerably limited during the boyhood 
and youth of Hugh Thomas McCracken, and his education was confined to a 
limited attendance at Springhill and Mt. Carmel schools. As soon as he was 
old enough, he assisted his father with the farm work on the old homestead 
farm and when he was married moved into the old house standing on his 
farm. By purchasing his sister's interest, he received eighty acres of his 
father's land, which by diligence and careful management and long and 
arduous toil, he has increased to two hundred and forty-seven acres. He 
now owns practically all of the old home place. 

On October 27, 1864, Mr. McCracken was married to Martha L. Kin- 
caid, who was born on May 24, 1841, in Fugit township, and who is the 
daughter of John and Priscilla (Alexander) Kincaid, natives of Kentucky. 
The latter, who was reared in Rush county, Indiana, was the daughter of 
John Alexander, who was born in 1813, and who died in April, 1895. It 
was a son of John Kincaid who entered the Kincaid land in 182 1, and 
established a home in 1829. By his first marriage, John Kincaid had two 
children, Mrs. Martha L. McCracken, and Mary, deceased, the wife of 
David ]\Iartin, deceased ; another child. John Alexander, born to this first 
marriage, had died in infancy. The mother dying in 1844, John Kincaid 
was married, a second time, to Nancy Alexander, sister of his first wife, who 
bore him seven children, John Andrew, deceased ; Mrs. Priscilla Jane McCoy, 
■of Fugit township; Rhoda Margaret, deceased; John Andrew, who died at 



636 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

the age of t\vent3'-one ; William Jasper, of near Springhill : Gilbert Gordon, 
who lives on the home place, and Cyrus, deceased. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Hugh McCracken four children have been born, 
Cynthia Ann, the wife of Rufus Moore, who has four children, Lillian Ellen, 
Walter Thomas, Mary Ann: Ellen Moore married Thomas Kitchin, of 
Eugit township, and they have one son, John Robert; Sarah Helen married 
the Rev. Fred Schmunk, of Mooreiield ; Mary E. married Fern Power, who 
is now deceased, and who left one child, Ruth ; Wilma Orta married James 
Maxwell, and lives on the old homestead in Fugit township ; they have one 
son, William Thomas. 

Politically, Mr. McCracken is a prominent leader in the councils of the 
Democratic party in Decatur county, and especially in Fugit township, where 
he lives. Mr. and Mrs. McCracken and family are members of the United 
Presbyterian church at Springhill. 

The career of Hugh T. McCracken, it must be conceded, measures up 
well with the services of his distinguished ancestors, who were pioneers in 
this countv. since he has, with somewhat better opportunities than were 
enjoyed by his forefathers, established a comfortable home, and reared a 
family of children to equally honorable and useful lives. From the stand- 
point of service the enterprising thrifty cultivation of his farm in Fugit town- 
ship is sufficient to entitle him to honorable mention as a citizen of this great 
county. 



SA:MUEL L. JACKSON. 



One of the most picturesque farms and one of the most magnificent 
country homes to be found anywhere in Decatur county, is located in Wash- 
ington township, and comprises four hundred and eighty acres of fertile 
land, owned by ]\Ir. and Mrs. Samuel L. Jackson, well-known citizens of this 
county. With a thoroughly modern home and beautiful, well-kept grounds, 
shaded bv giant trees, especially neat and attractive driveways, this attractive 
farm bespeaks the intelligence, industry and fine appreciation of country 
life by its owners and proprietors. Descended from two of the very oldest 
families of Decatur county, they not only are among the most prosperous 
and influential people to be found anywhere in the county, but the family is 
living up to the ideals of the worthy progenitors, who during their day and 
generation were also leading citizens of the county. 

Samuel L. Jackson, who was born on February 2, 1846, at Cincinnati, 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 637 

Ohio, is the son of William and Amelia (Hillman) Jackson, natives of Vir- 
ginia and Maryland, respectively, the former of whom was born on October 
13, 1797, and who died in 1869, and the latter of whom was born on January 
31, 1805, and who died, March 6, 1882. They were married, July 19, 1823. 
Left an orphan at a tender age, William Jackson left his southern home, and- 
made his way to Cincinnati, where he arrived in 1831. Here for a time as a 
protege of Nicholas Longworth I, he worked at the tailor trade and also 
engaged in teaming. While living in Cincinnati, he met with an accident in 
which he lost his left leg below the knee. One of his boyhood ambitions 
having been to own a fann, in 1846 he settled on a tract of land in Fugit 
township, where he purchased one hundred and sixty acres, and two years 
later sold it and moved to a farm near Milford. Here he prospered beyond 
any expectations of his boyhood, and beyond any dreams or fancies of his 
early life, reaching a position of influence in the community, and passing 
away, June, 1869, at the age of seventy-two, rich in experience and rich in 
possessions of this world's goods. Of the thirteen children born to William 
and Amelia (Hillman) Jackson, only one, Samuel L., the subject of this 
sketch, and the youngest child of the family, is now living. The children, in 
the order of their birth, are as follow: Mrs. Sarah Ann (Porter) Alden, 
born on February 20, 1825; James Henry, April 26, 1827; William Thomas, 
October 3, 1828; Rebecca Frances, April 9, 1830; Henry Jackson, February 
II, 1832; Mary Elizabeth, October 3, 1832; Mrs. Christe Ann Woodward, 
June 30, 1835; Mrs. Amelia Priscilla Marlow, March 14, 1837; Mrs. Louisa 
Layton Clark, October 28, 1838: John White, April 7, 1840; Mrs. Mary 
Hester Porter, March 24, 1842; Henrietta, May 21, 1844, and Samuel Latta, 
February 2, 1846. 

That Samuel L. Jackson's progress and prosperity as a farmer are just 
rewards of his generous and unselfish kindness to a mother and children of a 
deceased sister, cannot be denied. Educated in the country schools, he lived 
with his mother until forty years old, and in 1886, the same year his sister, 
Mrs. Porter, died, he brought his mother and three sons of his departed 
sister to the farm, two miles west of Greensburg. 

Later on in the same year, September 9, 1886, Mr. Jackson was married 
to Mary Hamilton, the daughter of Robert Marshall and Mary (Morgan) 
-liamilton, who was born on October 8, 1848, and who at the time of their 
marriage was two years her husband's junior. After his marriage, Mr. 
Jackson moved to the farm owned by Robert Marshall Hamilton, the old 
home place. 

Robert Marshall Hamilton was born on November 17, 181 1, and died 



638 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

• 

on August 6, 1901. His wife, who, before her marriage, was Mary Morgan, 
was born in January, 181 1, and died, February 3, 1884. They were married, 
September 26, 1834. He* was the son of Robert Hamihon, who, in turn, 
was the son of WilHam Hamilton. Robert Marshall Hamilton, who was 
•born in Kentucky, came to Decatur county. Indiana, when twelve years old 
and lived in Washington township all his life. During his life he erected a 
large brick house on the Clarksburg turnpike in Washington township, and it 
is this house which has since been remodeled, until it is now one of the most 
beautiful and attractive farm homes in Decatur county. Of the five children 
born to Robert Marshall and ^lary (ilorgan) Hamilton only three are now 
living, Charles C. and Gerard are deceased ; Thomas Woodson, the eldest 
child, lives in Greensburg: Mrs. Sarah Rankin lives in Washington town- 
ship ; Mrs. Samuel L. Jackson is the other living child. A very energetic 
man, Robert ]\Iarshall Hamilton provided well for his family, educated his 
children and amassed a fortune, owning at the time of his death, thirteen 
hundred acres of land. First an Abolitionist, then a Republican and still 
later a Prohibitionist, he was a man of pronounced views. It is an interesting 
fact that his home was an important station of the underground railway, and 
that he sheltered many runaway slaves during his life, narrowly escaping 
trouble and damages on several occasions. A member of the Presbyterian 
church, in the latter part of his life he gave freely of his wealth to various 
educational institutions, and during his day and generation had, perhaps, 
more to do with the educational progress of this county than any other man. 

To Mr. and ISIrs. Samuel L. Jackson have been born three children, all 
of whom are living at home with their parents, Robert Hamilton, on January 
29, 1889; Louise, November 29, 1892, and Amelia, February 12, 1894. 
These children attended the district schools and finished their school work irt 
Purdue University and Oberlin College. 

All the members of the Jackson family are identified with the Kingston 
Presbyterian church. Mrs. Jackson is a member of the Independent Club, 
and her daughters of the Department Club and of the Kingston Progress 
Club. Robert Hamilton, the only son, is a member of the Knights of Pythias. 
Mr. Jackson joined the Greensburg Lodge of Odd Fellows No. 103, when 
twenty-one years of age, and has been a member all his life. Formerly a 
Republican in politics, he identified himself with the new Progressive party 
at its formation and has been active in its councils in Decatur county. All 
the members of the Jackson family are well known and prominent socially 
in Greensburg and Decatur county. They are among the most hospitable 
citizens to be found anvwhere in the county and well deserve the hish social 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 639- 

regard and esteem bestowed upon them by the people of this county. Highly 
educated, cultured and refined, the Jackson family has added much to the 
wholesome community spirit and life of Washington township. 



THOMAS J. KITCHIX. 



Like his brother, Guy Kitchin, whose sketch is found elsewhere in this- 
volume, Thomas J. Kitchin is one of the highly respected and influential 
citizens of Fugit township, and is deserving of all the good things that come 
to him in this life. He is a man who attends strictly to his own affairs, and 
believes in letting others have the same privileges that he requires for him- 
self. He is broad-minded, full of sympathy for those in distress, and is 
generous in doing his part, when charity calls upon him. 

Thomas J. Kitchin, of Fugit township, was born on September ii, 
1890, on the home place, and is a son of Frank Benjamin Kitchin. Thomas 
J. is a farmer, and is proud of his vocation, in which he takes the utmost 
interest. His education was obtained, first at the public schools of Kingston, 
after which he spent two years at the Greensburg high school, and later 
attended the Central Business College, at Indianapolis. He began farming 
on August I, 1912, on the one hundred and sixty acres of land belonging to 
his father, which he has improved with a new dwelling house, and a fine 
barn. He is a Republican, and a member of the United Presbyterian church 
at Springhill. 

Frank Benjamin Kitchin, father of subject, was a native of Decatur 
county, and lived there all his life, until his removal to Indianapolis. His 
present address is Indianapolis, where he is in the stock business. 

Thomas J. Kitchin was married on June 19, 1912, to Miss Lillian Ellen 
Moore, who was born in Fugit township. She is a daughter of Rufus and 
Anna (McCracken) Moore. Rufus Moore was born in Covington, Ken- 
tucky. He now lives in Fugit township. Mrs. Kitchin graduated from the 
Greensburg high schools in 1911, and attended Monmouth College at Mon- 
mouth, Illinois, for one year, at the end of which time she was married. Mr. 
and Mrs. Kitchin are members of the United Presbyterian church, where 
twelve families meet once a month for the purpose of discussing matters of 
general interest in the community in which they live. They have one son, 
John Robert Kitchin, born on April 30, 1913. 

Rufus Sanford Moore was born on January 24, 1866, at Covington,. 



640 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Kentucky, and is a son of Joseph W. and Mary Ann (Stevens) Moore. He 
was employed, when quite young, in a tin shop at Clarksburg, and later in a 
hank at Delphi, Indiana. After his marriage, he farmed for fifteen years in 
Rush county, and then came to Decatur county, and now resides on the 
McCracken farm. His wife is a daughter of Hugh McCracken, an old resi- 
dent of Fugit township. They were the parents of the following children : 
Lillian Ellen (Kitchin). born on February 11, 1891 ; Walter, who is now 
farming, and Marv Ann, who is at home. 



JASPER COBB. 

One of the well-known retired farmers of Decatur county, Indiana, and 
■one of the veterans of, our great Civil War, is Jasper Cobb, who was born 
•on August 5, 1847, in Washington township on a pioneer farm, and who 
is the son of Dyar and Elmira (Tremain) Cobb, the former of whom was 
born on August 6, 1807, died in 1900, and the latter of whom was born in 
1810, and who died in 1885. Dyar Cobb was a native of Greensburg, 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, and the son of Joshua Cobb, of Colonial 
ancestry and of Welsh descent. 

In 1 81 8 Joshua Cobb and family came down the Ohio river by boat, 
and, after remaining for two years in Dearborn county, on account of the 
•dry seasons, came on to Decatur county, where only two houses could be 
seen from the farm he entered, to which place, in the spring of 182 1, he 
brought his family. Here on the Michigan trail, in Marion township, Joshua 
Cobb pre-empted land, blazing his way through the forest from Napoleon 
in Ripley county. He put up a brick shack against a huge poplar log for his 
first home, and then felled logs and built a cabin. A large and vigorous 
man, he died in i860. His wife, who was a Miss Crawford before her mar- 
riage, died in 1864. His eight children, Willard, Dyar, John, Percy, Elke- 
tiah, Mrs. Maria Christy, Helen and Mrs. Martha Terhune, are all deceased, 
the last named dying in Illinois. 

When Dyar Cobb attained his majority he cleared a farm on the Michi- 
gan road, and there reared his family. The owner of three hundred acres 
•of land, he was prominent during his day and generation, but declined offi- 
cial preferment. He was a member of the Universalist church and a Repub- 
lican in politics, casting his first vote, however, for the. Whig candidates in 
1828. Early in life he had learned the brick-burning trade, and followed 




MU. AND MItS. JASPER COBB. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 64I 

this trade occasionally. Of the twelve children born to Dyar and Elmira 
(Tremain) Cobb, all but four died in youth or infancy. Mrs. Nancy Hazel- 
rigg, the eldest, died in 1905. Ainong the other children were: Mrs. O. C. 
Elder; Mrs. Martha Stewart, of Illinois; John, Nancy, Joshua, Harvey, 
Mary, Newton and Jasper. 

At the age of sixteen years, Jasper Cobb enlisted in Company A, One 
Hundred and Thirty-fourth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, in 1864, 
under Captain Joseph Drake and under Colonel Gavin, serving one hundred 
and twenty days. He enlisted, however, for only one hundred days. Mr. 
Cobb eventually came into possession of the old Cobb homestead of three 
hundred acres, but disposed of two hundred acres of the farm in 1906. He 
still has one hundred acres left. Until February 14, 1898, he was actively 
engaged in farming, and then removed to Greensburg. 

In March, 1873, Jasper Cobb was married to Ann Eliza Montgomery. 
They had one child, Robert, who died at the age of four and one-half years. 
Mrs. Cobb, the daughter of John G. H. and Sarah (Shadrick) Montgom- 
ery, the former of whom was born on August 14, 1819, in Kentucky, a 
farmer by occupation, and one who was well educated and a natural genius. 
Mrs. Montgomery was born on May 8, 1813. In 1849 John G. H. Mont- 
gomery purchased a small farm, one and one-half miles southeast of Greens- 
burg, and there established a home, increasing his acreage until he owned 
five farms. He is now deceased, having passed from this life in 1894. He 
and his wife reared a family of eight children. Of these children, Nancy 
Jane was born on November i, 1840, married N. S. Potter, and died on 
April 8, 1870; Sarah E., January 25, 1842, who married Leonard McCune, 
died on March 5, 1874; Mary F., in 1844, married J. C. St. John, of Greens- 
burg; Henry H.,in 1846, was a soldier in the One Hundred and Thirty- 
fourth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry. He lives in Zirich, Mon- 
tana; Robert W., in 1848, died in Oregon on October i, 191 1; Ann Eliza 
married Mr. Cobb and is a talented and gracious woman; John O., Septem- 
ber 26, 1853, ^i'^^s in Grants Pass, Oregon; George, in 1854, owns and 
operates a garage in Greensburg. 

Of Mrs. Cobb's remote ancestry, it may be said that her great-grand- 
father, Hugh Montgomery, was born in 1760, in Ireland, and settled in 
Pennsylvania, and that he and his brother William were soldiers in the Revo- 
lutionary War. William was lost. A half-brother, George, also disappeared. 
Hugh Montgomery married Eva Hartman in 1784, a native of Germany. 
They had thirteen children, among whom were Marj^, the wife of Alexan- 
(41) 



642 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

der Ganst; 'Sirs. Elizabeth Thompson; Thomas; Henr}'; ^Margaret; Wilham,- 
SalHe, and Hugh, Jr., the grandfather of Airs. Cobb, who was born on 
August 29, 1797. While on a visit to Kentucky, he fell in love with a dis- 
tant cousin, Elizabeth Montgomery, and married her, October 14, 18 18. 
They resided in Shelby county, Kentucky, until 1830, when they came to 
Indiana, settling two miles north of Greensburg. Here they purchased a 
farm one mile southeast of Greensburg. The wife died, December 4, 1859. 
When Hugh Montgomery was sixty-six years old he enlisted in the One 
Hundred and Thirty-fourth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, but was 
refused admission in the army on account of his age. He died, April 22, 
1872. His son, John G. H. Montgomery, the father of !Mrs. Cobb, who 
married Sarah Shadrick, died in 1898. 

Of Mrs. Cobb it may be said that she is a talented woman, and one 
who is well known in this section for her beautiful poem, the "Old Home- 
stead." She also is the author of that portion of the JNIontgomery genealogy 
which deals especially with the Montgomerys of Decatur county, Indiana. 
Mr. Cobb is a Republican, a member of the Baptist church and of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. He is also a member of Pap Thomas Post 
No. 5, Grand Army of the Republic, at Greensburg, Indiana. Mrs, Cobb is 
a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution, Lone Tree Chapter, 
of which she has been acti^■e as a charter member and she was the second 
treasurer of the chapter. 



THO:\IAS DUFFEY. 



Not very far from the city of Greensburg, Decatur county, Indiana, 
and located in Washington township, is a beautiful farm of two hundred and 
four acres, known as the Prairie View farm, and where the passerby may 
see, sitting well back from the much-traveled thoroughfare, a large frame 
barn, of modern construction, and an old-time brick house. Since February 
18, 1910, this has been the home of Mrs. Anna (Koors) Duffey and children. 
The buildings are set well within a wide and spacious lawn with numerous 
trees to break the monotony of the landscape and to furnish abundant shade 
during the hot days of an Indiana summer. 

This farm was purchased b}' the late Thomas Duffey three years before 
his death. During his life, Thomas Duffey was one of the best-known 
farmers and stockmen of Decatur county. He was born on October 10, 
1857, and died, September 2t,. 1907, having almost reached the half century 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 643 

mark. His parents, Patrick and Bridget Duffey, natives of Ireland, emi- 
grated to Decatur county, and settled on a farm, their son being reared here 
and educated in the schools of Decatur county, especially in the Milhausen 
neighborhood. At one time Patrick Duffey kept a grocery in Cincinnati, but 
later removed from Cincinnati to the Milhausen neighborhood, two miles 
from Milhausen, where the late Thomas Duffey was reared and where he 
was married. 

During his lifetime, Thomas Duffey owned several farms. He first 
purchased a farm of eighty acres in the Milhausen neighborhood, and after 
living there for eight years, removed to Milhausen and engaged in the live 
stock business for two years, when he moved to the McCoy farm, where he 
lived for eight years, finally purchasing the farm. He then bought the Hazel- 
rigg property, near Greensburg, and lived there from 1898 until 1907, the 
time of his death. In cultivating his various farms and from the live stock 
business he was able to save considerable money and was regarded as a very 
successful man. 

At the time of his death, the late Thomas Duffey left a widow and 
six children. His wife, Mrs. Anna (Koors) Duffey, to whom he was mar- 
ried, February 12, 1884, was born in Cincinnati on March 28, 1862, the 
daughter of Barney and Anna (Fernerding) Koors, natives of Germany. 
Mrs. Duffey's father, a cooper and mill-wright by trade, removed to Decatur 
county and settled in the Milhausen neighborhood in 1865, farming there for 
eight years. The mother died in 1873, ^"^ after her death, her husband 
operated a mill and a mercantile store in Milhausen, until the mill burned. 
He kept the store, however, until his death, December 20, 1907, when he 
was seventy-eight years old. 

Of the six children left by Thomas Duffey at the time of his death, 
the Rev. Charles Dnffey is the assistant pastor of St. Anthony's parish, at 
Indianapolis; Bernard, who was born on April 2, 1888, is managing the 
Prairie View farm; Alfred, October 25, 1890; Hilda, December 6, 1893, is 
at home with her mother; Clarence, February 12, 1896, died on June 18, 
1909; Robert, the youngest child, January 2, 1900. 

After removing to the Washington township farm in 1910, Mrs. Duffey 
and her sons erected a magnificent fine barn in 191 1, and in 1914 they erected 
a modern silo. The Prairie View farm is one of the best to be found in 
Decatur county — the best, not only from the standpoint of its general appear- 
ance, but from the standpoint of the fertility of the soil. In 1914 the forty 
acres of corn raised on the farm produced two thousand jDushels. Mrs. 
Duffey and her sons feed and sell seventy to one hundred and fifty head of 
hogs every year, and about a carload of cattle. Every bushel of grain raised 



644 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

on the farm is fed to live stock, and last year it was necessary to buy one 
thousand bushels to feed out the stock. One might search the length and 
breadth of Decatur county and still fail to find young men who are more 
progressive in their notions and methods of agriculture and more enterprising 
and thrifty than the sons of the late Thomas Duft'ey. At the time of his 
death, he was a member of the St. Mary's Catholic church, and Greensburg 
Council No. 1652, Knights of Columbus. In fact, the Duffey family are all 
members of the Catholic church, and loyal and devout in this faith. 

With earnest purpose and a sense of the responsibility, Mrs. Duffey and 
her children have taken up and carried forward the work of the deceased 
husband and father, a man who, by his industry, energy and good manage- 
ment, was able to provide well for his widow and children. A man of most 
loving disposition, his memory is revered not onh^ by the members of his 
immediate family, but by those who knew him as a successful farmer and 
stockman, and by those who had any relations with him in a business or 
social way. His passing was a distinct loss to the citizenship of this county. 



THOMAS H. STEVENSON. 

The late Thomas H. Stevenson, who was well known as a business man 
in Decatur county, Indiana, and who was a leader in the political circles of 
this county, was a man who, as far as he was able to do so, lived by the 
Golden Rule. 

The late Thomas H. Stevenson was born on August 11, 1854, the son 
of Thomas and Eliza (Abrams) Stevenson, and died on December 16, 1914. 
His father, the son of Scottish parents, lived and died in Dearborn county. 
In 1871 Thomas. H. came to Greensburg as deputy internal revenue col- 
lector under the late Will Cumback, and held this position for eleven years, 
or until 1882, when he resigned to enter the produce commission business 
in Cincinnati with Gilette Stevenson, who was a former revenue collector. 
After being in Cincinnati for three years, he returned to Greensburg in 
1885 and took charge of the Emmert Flouring Mill, relieving his father- 
in-law, the late John Emmert, whoses health had failed. After being in 
charge of this mill until it changed owners, he engaged in the brokerage 
business, his own health having failed. In this latter business he was very 
successful and at this time his widow and son own the old Wooley farm in 
Decatur county, a farm which consists of one hundred and sixty acres of 
well-improved and highly productive land. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 645 

On January 13, 1879, Thomas H. Stevenson was married to Elizabeth 
Emmert, who was born on July 10, 1855, in Lawrenceburg, Indiana, and 
who is the daughter of John and Catherine (Seitz) Emmert, natives of 
Mannheim, Germany, and Alsace-Lorraine, respectively. 

There were three eventful years in the career of John Emmert. In 
1845 he came to America with his parents and located at Trenton, New 
Jersey, and eight years later, in 1853, he located in Lawrenceburg, Indiana, 
where he married Catherine Seitz and thirteen years later, in 1866, he 
moved to Greensburg, Indiana, where most of his fortune was acquired. 
During his life at Greensburg, he built and operated the Garland mills. He 
was an excellent miller and understood not only the business phase of mill- 
ing, but the technical and manufacturing end as well. A Democrat in poli- 
tics and for some time a councilman in Greensburg, John Emmert was an 
influential man in Decatur county, public-spirited*, progressive, industrious 
and, in his later life, very wealthy. He was also prominent as a member of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Catherine Seitz had come to 
America with her parents when four years old in 1838, when they first 
located at Hamilton, Ohio, but her father, Christopher Seitz, later moved 
to Dearborn county, where he became a farmer. John Emmert died in 
1882, his wife surviving him many years and passing away in 1909. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H. Stevenson was born one son, Emmert 
C, who was born on May 21, 1891, and who was educated in the Greens- 
burg public schools, the Greensburg high school and Purdue University at 
Lafayette. After graduating from the electrical engineering department of 
Purdue University, he returned to his home in Decatur county and is now 
manager of the home farm. 

During his entire life, Mr. Stevenson was more or less actively identified 
with Republican politics in Decatur county and the fourth congressional dis- 
trict. During very late years, however, he was inclined toward the new 
Progressive party. In this section of the state, he was known as a far- 
seeing political leader and manager, although he personally never sought 
office, but he looked after the interest of his party in this section of the state 
and it was well known by state leaders that his pledges of support and 
promises of services could be depended upon absolutely. A member of the 
Greensburg lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, he was very 
prominent in this organization, and if any man who has lived in Decatur 
county within recent years has followed the Golden Rule as a model for 
the relationship of Hfe, it was the late Thomas H. Stevenson. 



646 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

JAMES A. MYERS. 

Of the many magnificent farms to be found on the widely traveled 
highway, a few miles southwest of Greensburg, is one of eighty acres owned 
by James A. Myers, one of the well-known farmers of Washington township. 

James A. Myers, who was born on July 22, i8'47, on Sand creek, in a 
log cabin in the wilderness, is the son of William H. and Elizabeth M. 
(Annie) Myers, the former of whom was born on August 6, 1824, and who 
died, August 8, 1904, and the latter of whom was born on June 29, 1827, 
died May i, 1900. Born in Kentucky, the late William H. Myers was a son 
of George and Margaret (Harmon) Myers, also natives of Kentucky, the 
former, who came to Decatur county about 1832, took up a tract of timber 
land on Sand Creek, and there cleared a place for a house and established a 
home. He died at the age of eighty-nine years. Reared in a pioneer settle- 
ment, the late William H. Myers lived with his father for many years after 
his marriage. In 1857 he sold the farm situated on Sand Creek and pur- 
chased the farm now known as the Davis homestead, near Horace, where 
he lived for several years, eventually selling out and removing to Kansas, 
where he lived for fifteen years. At the end of this period he returned to 
Decatur county and there died. 

William H. and Elizabeth (Annis) Myers had ten children, two of 
whom are deceased. Of their children, James A. is the subject of this sketch; 
George M. lives in Sand Creek township; John Thomas, born on October 21, 
1851, lives in Clay township, Decatur county; WiUiam R., July 24, 1854, 
died in infancy; Mrs. Alice B. Sanderson, July 21, 1857, died on September 
II, 1897, near Forest Hill; Eliza L., February 21, 1859, lives in Webb City, 
Missouri; Harvey M., October 18, 1861 ; Merritt E., November 25, 1864, lives 
in Oklahoma; Mrs. Ida M. Johnson, September 11, 1867, lives in Indianapo- 
lis, as does her sister, Mrs. Nancy N. Berry, born on September 26, 1871. 

Starting out in life for himself at the age of twenty-one, James A. 
Myers was married, October 21, 1868, to Martha E. Wynkoop, daughter of 
James and Barbara (Hedrick) Wynkoop, of Sand Creek township. Mrs. 
Myers was born on July 24, 1848, near Laurel, in Franklin county, Indiana. 
Mr. and Mrs. Myers have had two children, Jennie F., who was born on 
November 3, 1869, married William N. Gartin, the son of Zack Gartin, 
October 22, 1899, and Effie B., October 31, 1877, married Norman Eubanks, 
of Greensburg, and they have one child, Gilbert Dale, aged nineteen. 

Mr. and Mrs. Myers owned thirty-five acres of land in Clay township, 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 647 

where they hved until April, 1869 (after their marriage), when they removed 
to Sand Creek township and there lived until 1903. At that time they sold 
out and purchased a farm near Greensburg, comprising eighty acres of land, 
where they have now lived for twelve years. 

A Democrat in polities', Mr. Myers comes from a long line of ancestors 
who have been prominent Democrats in the respective communities where 
they have lived. Although a Democrat in national and perhaps state politics, 
Mr. Myers is not a hide-bound partisan and votes independently in local 
affairs. He served two terms as justice of the peace of Sand Creek town- 
ship. Mr. and Mrs. Myers are members of the Baptist church at Liberty. 
They are active workers in church affairs. Here in the neighborhood where 
they have lived these many years, they are highly respected citizens, honored 
for their quiet and unassuming manners, for their native intelligence and 
sympathic interest in the welfare of the community as a whole. Mr. Myers 
is a man of sterling integerity, scrupulous in all the dealings of life, and well 
known in different parts of Decatur county. 



FRANK C. STOUT. 



In selecting his life work, Frank C. Stout chose something that would 
give pleasure to his friends, as well as to himself. He might have had in 
mind, also, the fact that music, more than any other factor in life, has a 
charm, toned with sweetness, harmony and rhythm to a degree understood 
by everyone, and to a great measure helpful and uplifting not only to the 
toiler but to the artist as well. While the traditional writer has said that 
"music hath charms to soothe the savage breast," it might have added, "and 
draw all men together in a state of peace and happiness." However, the 
success with which Mr. Stout has met, is sufficient proof of his eiffciency as 
a piano tuner, and his ability as a musician, a combination which has brought 
him in good returns. 

Frank C. Stout, piano dealer and tuner, of Greensburg, Indiana, was 
born in that city, in June, 1878, the son of Wiley J. Stout. Subject was 
reared and educated in the public schools of Greensburg. In young manhood 
he studied medicine, thinking to follow that profession, but his artistic nature 
outweighed this desire and, about 1905, he began tuning pianos, and later 
opened salesrooms in Greensburg, where he handles a fine line of the French 
& Sons and Busch & Geits pianos, in which he does a thriving business. His 
store is one of the most attractive of its kind in the city. 



648 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Wiley J. Stout was born in Decatur county and died about 1895. He 
was a son of Harvey P. Stout (see Stout genealogy in the sketch of John F. 
Robbins, elsewhere in this volume). At an early age, Wiley J. Stout learned 
the carpenter trade, in which he became very skillful, and at which he worked 
all his life. He was united in marriage to Octavia Lloyd, who is also deceased. 
Frank C. Stout is their only child now living. He is a strong advocate of the 
principles of the Progressive party, is an exceptional musician, and is especially 
proficient on the piano. His host of admiring friends, who have done their 
part in aiding him to build up his business, speaks well for his popularity. 



JAMES CARTER McLAUGHLIN. 

The offspring of a pioneer family of Decatur county, Indiana, the late 
James Carter McLaughlin, a veteran of the Civil War and a well-known 
farmer and stockman of this county during his life, gained almost national 
fame as a breeder of trotting horses which were especially well known 
throughout the state of Indiana. Not only was he a successful farmer and 
stockman, but he was well known as a citizen and public-spirited man of 
affairs. He lived to rear a large family of children, who were given the very 
best educational advantages and who, now that he is gone, revere the memory 
of a loving and kind father. 

The late James Carter McLaughlin, proprietor of Ash Grove stock 
farm in Washington township, Decatur county, Indiana, and later of the old 
homestead farm of three hundred acres, was born on January 27, 1831, in 
Decatur county, and passed away, January 4, 1894, the son of George and 
Sarah (Carter) McLaughlin, who were born and married in Mason county, 
Kentucky, and who, after their marriage, in 1827, came the same year to 
Decatur county, where they entered government land. 

George and Sarah (Carter) McLaughlin, the former of whom was an 
intelligent and highly respected citizen, progressive in spirit and successful 
in business, were the parents of eight children, only four of whom grew to 
maturity. Of these children, James C. is the subject of this sketch ; Mary 
Frances, deceased, was born on February i, 1829, and married Zachariah T. 
Riley, April 13, 1853; Elizabeth Ann was the wife of Thomas M. Hamilton, 
deceased, who now lives on North East street, Greensburg, Indiana, and 
Casper Wooster died in the state of California. 

The father of these children was an ardent Republican during his life. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 649' 

He spent his declining years at the home of his son, the late J. C. McLaugh- 
lin. The father was born on September 24, 1802, and died, October 29, 
1885. His wife, Sarah (Carter) McLaughlin, was born on August 18', 1804, 
and died July 20, 1873. They were married. April 10, 1827. 

After living at home on his father's farm and performing the work 
ordinarily falling to the lot of the average country boy during the earlier 
years of the history of this county, James Carter McLaughlin enlisted in 
1861 in the Wilder battery, later the Independent battery, and served four 
years as a soldier in the Civil War. At the siege of Knoxville he was taken 
seriously ill and was unable to serve for some time. He was in many battles 
and sieges, including those at Somerset, Kentucky, and Harpers Ferry, 
where the battery was captured. James C. was later exchanged at India- 
napolis. Afterward the battery saw active service in Kentucky and Tennes- 
see, and was on the firing line until the close of the war. 

/Immediately after the close of the Civil War, Mr. McLaughlin was 
married, March 14, 1866, to Louisa Davidson, who was born on December 
25, 1839, in Decatur county, Indiana, and who is the daughter of Isaac and 
Jennie (Miller) Davidson, natives of Nicholas county, Kentucky, and Mon- 
roe county, Virginia, respectively. Isaac Davidson, who was born in 1802, 
and who died in July, 1S55. came to Decatur county, Indiana, when a young 
man, and worked for seven and one-half dollars a month. Coming here in 
1827, he eventually owned a fine farm in Clinton township. Mrs. Jennie 
(Miller) Davidson, who was born in 1809, and who died in 1905, at the age 
of ninety-six years, was the daughter of John Miller, who came to Decatur 
county in 18 14, and after settling near Clarksburg, was engaged in burning 
brick. He had come down the river on a flat-boat, and at the time he passed 
Cincinnati, it was a mere hamlet. His nearest neighbors at the time were 
seven miles away. Indians were very numerous in the country. At this 
time his daughter, Jennie Miller, was only five years old, and she had accom- 
panied him to this county. 

Isaac and Jennie (Miller) Davidson had eight children, Mary, who 
married Sol Sharp, died in i860; John, in 1833, resides on a farm near 
Hartville, Kansas; Elizabeth, who was born in 1835, became the wife of 
Henry Bird, deceased, and resides on Hendricks street, Greensburg: Mar- 
garet, in 1837, married Thomas Draper, who died in 1910, in Kansas; 
Louise, the widow of the late James Carter McLaughlin; Jane, February 2, 
1 84 1, always lived with her mother on Walnut street; Rhoda died at the age 
of twelve years, and Taylor died in his youth. 

To Mr. and Mrs. James Carter McLaughlin six children were born, all 



"650 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

-of whom are li\'ing, except one, Mary, who died at the age of thirty-eight 
■years. The names of the children are as follow: Blanche, Orion D., Mary, 
Delia, James Barton and Frances. Of these children, Blanche, a graduate of 
Indiana State University, lives on Lincoln street, Greensburg, Indiana; Orion 
D., a farmer, resides on East street. He owns three hundred and twenty 
acres of land ; Delia, a graduate of Purdue University, is the wife of W. H. 
Silver. They live at West Newton ; James Barton, who lives on th-e old 
homestead, is a graduate of Purdue University, and married Margaret Mil- 
ler. They have two children, James C. and William Graham ; and Frances, 
a graduate of Purdue University, is the wife of S. W. Shirk, a well-known 
farmer of this county. 

James Carter ]McLaughlin was a Republican, although he never took 
much interest in political affairs, while his good wife during her active life, 
was a devoted member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

As an enterprising man of business, a farmer and breeder, James 
Carter McLaughlin contributed materially to the progress and prosperity of 
Decatur county. He was a man necessarily of large vision, who could 
foresee large opportunities, and he possessed the executive skill, the capacity 
for details to carry out preconceived plans. He was the ver}' soul of honor, 
loving and kind in the home, cordial and genial in all the relations of life, 
private or public. 



WILLIAM SMILEY. 



Among the early settlers of pioneer days, in the second decade of the 
nineteenth century, with but few advantages, a sturdy native of the Key- 
stone state, whose ambition was to cut out of the concrete of life something 
more than a mere pittance and who, like many another lad, had but a few 
hundred dollars with which to make a start, drinking at the fountain of 
j)erspective, was William Smiley, a man of unusual thrift, whose unflagging 
courage and persistence led him through the many vicissitudes of life to a 
field of prosperity and plenty. With an ambition to see that his posterity 
were well provided for, he was a man of keen perception, wrought out of 
the fact, no doubt, that he was self-educated, broad-minded and a man of 
sound judgment. It is pleasing, indeed, under all conditions in life to see 
any of the younger generations forge to the front, and even more so when 
the freshness of youth knows no failure and recognizes no defeat. As 
:such an one, it is a pleasure to point to the life-work of William Smiley 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 65 1 

with a sense &f pride, as a man having utilized the opportunities as they 
came to him, molding them into a great success. 

William Smiley, was born in February, 1814, and migrated with his 
parents from Pennsylvania to Butler county, Ohio, where they settled on 
a farm on which he grew to manhood. He was married in Butler county 
and, in the year 1849, came to this county, locating on a farm in Clay town- 
ship. He became very prosperous, in time coming to own hundreds of 
acres of choice land in this county. Beginning life in Decatur county with 
a few hundred dollars as his capital, he managed his affairs so wisely and 
so prudently that he became one of the wealthiest men in tne county. To 
each of his children he gave farms, in addition to which his daughters 
received nice sums of money upon reaching eighteen years of age. Despite 
the fact that he continued giving away his property, he left an estate of 
about sixty thousand dollar^, an evidence of his ability as a financier. Mr. 
Smiley had few advantages in his youth and was a self-educated man, ac- 
quiring, by close observation and the constant exercise of his remarkable 
native talents, a fine general knowledge. He was an uncompromising Demo- 
crat and ever took an interest in the county's political affairs, long being 
recognized as one of the most active workers in his party in this county, 
a veritable "wheel-horse," in fact; his sound judgment and keen common 
sense giving large weight to his counsels in the deliberations of the party 
managers in Decatur county. He was a splendid horseman and it is still 
recalled that, on gala occasions, it was his wont to turn out, driving ten or 
a dozen horses in a team. In his later years he left the farm and moved to 
Greensburg, where his last days were passed in comfortable retirement, his 
death occurring on June 30,^1893, his widow surviving until July 8, 1896. 

To William and Mary A. (Kenny) Smiley were born ten children, as 
follow: Mrs. Permelia Henry, deceased; Mrs. Caroline Sefton, widow of 
Edward B. Sefton, of Greensburg; George W. and James M. (twins), the 
former of whom died in 1907, and the latter of whom died in infancy; Har- 
vey K., who died in January, 191 5; Thomas K., a well-known farmer of 
Clay township, this county; William F.. who resided in Greensburg; Mary, 
who died on August 17, 1914; S. P., who lives at El Campo (Texas) Hotel, 
and Margaret, widow of William A. Johnston. 

Mrs. Margaret L. Johnston was born on a farm in Clay township, 
Decatur county, Indiana, on January 18, 1857, the daughter of William and 
Mary A. (Kennedy) Smiley, pioneers of this county, the former of whom 
was a native of Pennsylvania and the latter a native of New Jersey. 



652 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Upon her marriage to William A. Johnston in 1877, Mrs. Johnston 
moved from the paternal farm to Greensburg, where she ever since has made 
her home. Air. Johnston was born in the town of Franklin, Johnson county, 
Indiana, on February i, 1854, and died in February, 1907. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Johnston three children were born, Cora S., at home; Walter married 
Elizabeth Bates in 1910 and lives at Greensburg; and Raymond K., ste- 
nographer with the Big Four Railroad Company at Indianapolis. 

Mrs. Johnston is held in the highest esteem in the social circles of 
Greensburg and is deeply interested in the general welfare of the entire 
community. She formerlv was an active member of several local clubs. 



NELSON M. TEAIPLETON. 

Nelson M. Templeton, a retired citizen of Greensburg, Indiana, and 
one of the prominent and well-known men of Decatur county, was born on 
October 22, 1845, on a farm in Franklin county, the son of John and Eliza- 
beth (Barnard) Templeton, natives of Pennsylvania, the former of whom 
died in September, 1899, and the latter of whom the daughter of David 
Barnard, of Pennsylvania, died on August 20, 1896. John Templeton was 
an early resident of Franklin county, the son of David Templeton, a pio- 
neer settler of southeastern Indiana. The Templetons built a cabin on the 
east fork of the White Water, in Franklin county, or on Templeton" s creek. 
In 1865 the family settled in Washington township, Decatur county, and here 
owned a good farm, comprising three hundred acres of well-improved land, 
located two miles south of Greensburg, which Is known to this day as the 
Templeton farm, where both parents died. John Templeton was a Re- 
publican and was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. Of the 
eight children born to John and Elizabeth (Barnard) Templeton, two are 
now deceased; Catherine is the wife of George Fiscus and resides one and 
one-half miles south of Greensburg, Decatur county; Nelson M. is the sub- 
ject of this sketch; James W^., who was born on December 22, 1847, died 
on May i, 1901, at the age of fifty-two years, and had married Frances 
Stout, daughter of Joab and Rebecca Stout, who bore him the following chil- 
dren. Flora, Ella, Grace, Harry and Elizabeth; Robert and Edward were 
twins, the former of whom is deceased, and the latter resides south of 
Greensburg; Laura is the widow of Grififith Gartin, deceased; John lives 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. '653 

west of Greensburg in the Emington neighborhood, and OHver married 
Ida Taylor, and is the proprietor of a machine shop. 

Upon leaving home at the age of twenty-seven years, Nelson M. Tem- 
pleton farmed near Adams for three years, and in 1875 moved to Letts 
Corner and purchased a farm, where he lived for ten years. Not liking this 
place, however, in 1885 he moved to Lebanon in Boone county, and pur- 
chased a partnership in a planing mill and builders' supply firm. In Sep- 
tember of the next year, he returned to St. Paul and from there moved 
to Clifty, or Milford, and from Clifty to Franklin, Johnson county, where 
he remained for six years, during which time he was engaged in the car- 
penter trade. After his mother's death he removed to the old place, where 
he lived for three years, and rented a farm east of Greensburg for three 
years, subsequently removing to that city. During one and one-half years' 
residence in Greensburg, he purchased a part of the home estate of eighty-one 
acres, erected a house and barn, and moved his family to the farm. In 
1909 he sold out and moved back to Greensburg. 

On November 21, 1873, Nelson M. Templeton was married to Rachel 
Stark, who was born on November 4, 1852, in Decatur county, Indiana, and 
who is the daughter of Aden Boone and Eliza (Wallace) Stark, natives 
of Oldenburg, Kentucky, and Rockbridge county, Virginia, respectively. The 
former was the son of Caleb Stark, who married Anna Boone, a cousin 
of Daniel Boone. Caleb Stark, in fact, was a follower of Daniel Boone, 
and the son of Capt. John Stark, a soldier in the Revolutionary army. Caleb 
Stark was a member of the Decatur county board of commissioners when 
the court house was built. A number of the famous characters in the 
"Hoosier Schoolmaster" were modeled on members of Caleb Stark's family. 

Aden Boone Stark, who was born on October 21, 18 15, in Olden 
county, Kentucky, moved with his father to Decatur county in 1825. He 
was married to Eliza Wallace, September 7, 1837, and by her had nine chil- 
dren, among whom are the following: Percis Jane, deceased, who was the 
wife of Joseph Braden; John Caleb, of Clifty, Decatur county; Mary Ann, 
the wife of Cyrus Moore, of Clifty; Hannah Elizabeth, deceased; Charles, 
deceased ; Mrs. Rachel Templeton ; William, a farmer in Bartholomew 
county; and two children who died in infanc}'. Aden Boone Stark died 
on April 19, 1890. In this connection it is worth while to mention the fact 
that five of the eleven children born to Caleb Stark were natives of Ken- 
tucky, their names being Aden, George, Willett,' Percis and Lovina. 

Mr. and ]\Irs. Nelson M. Templeton are members of the Baptist church. 
He is identified with the Republican party. A man well known in this sec- 



654 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

tion, he is highly honored and respected by all who have come in contact 
with him, and especially his fellow townsmen in the city of Greensburg. 
Nelson M. Templeton and wife have two children, Nellie, at home; 
and Perry William, a decorator at Indianapolis, who married Margaret 
Erhardt, and they have two children, Howard and Elizabeth. 



JAMES PORTER. 



Not many families in Decatur county have created a more distinct 
impression upon its affairs than has the well-known Porter family. This 
family has been represented in Decatur county since the early days of the 
settlement of this section of the state and wherever its members have been 
found, there they have been doing well those things toward which their 
energies were being directed. In the agricultural life, the industrial life, 
the religious life and the professional life of the community they have been 
active, the family having produced several notable leaders in these several 
departments of human endeavor. Prominent in good works, faithful in 
whatever service they were called upon to perform, either in public or 
private stations, the Porters have acquitted themselves in such fashion as 
to merit the continued confidence and esteem of the entire community, and 
it is a pleasure on the part of the biographer to bring to the attention of 
the reader at this point something regarding the beginnings of this family 
in Decatur county. For further details relatmg to the family, the reader is 
respectively referred to brief biographical sketches of the careers of Alex- 
ander Porter, the well-known contractor, and Dr. Edward A. Porter, broth- 
ers of the subject of this sketch, presented elsewhere in this volume. 

James Porter was born on the farm on which he still is living, three 
and one-half miles southwest of the city of Greensburg, in Washington 
township, Decatur county, Indiana, on March 7, 1871, a son of Matthew 
E. and Clarissa (McKinney) Porter, both members of pioneer families of 
this county. Matthew E. Porter was born in the year 1836, his birth 
occurring in a log cabin which still is standing on the east half of the farm 
now owned by James Porter. He was the only son of Alexander and 
Elizabeth (Elder) Porter, the latter of whom was a daughter of the venerated 
Rev. Nathan Elder, a pioneer minister of the Baptist faith who exerted so 
strong an influence for good in pioneer days in this section of the state. 
Rev. Nathan Elder, a nati\e of Kentucky, was a "circuit rider" of the old 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. . 655. 

school and his ministrations were extended far and near throughout this 
section of Indiana. He buih the first church in Union county, Indiana, and 
for many years preached the gospel with a devotion that made his name and 
his works widely known. 

Alexander Porter was born in Dearborn county, Indiana, in 1799, the 
son of a Virginian, who, with his wife, penetrated the wilderness of Indiana 
Territory in an early day in the settlement of this section of the same. Upon 
reaching manhood's estate, Alexander Porter married Elizabeth Elder, who 
was born in Kentucky in 181 3, and the pioneer couple went to housekeeping 
in the log cabin in which Alexander Porter was born, moving to this county 
in the year 1830 and establising a new home in the then wilderness of 
Washington township. To this couple but two children were born, Matthew 
E. and a girl child, the latter of whom died at the tender age of four years. 
Matthew E. Porter succeeded to the home farm and lived there all his life, 
during which time he made but one change in residence, that being when he 
mo\'ed from the original eighty acres entered by his father to the west half 
of what now constitutes the fine Porter farm of two hundred and fifty- 
seven acres, owned jointly b)- James, Alexander and William R., grandsons 
of the original entrant. This move was made in 1892 and Matthew Porter 
died in 1908. Matthew Porter was an industrious and progressive farmer 
and was quite successful in his operations, at his death leaving a fine estate. 
wh(jlly unencumbered. He and his wife were the parents of the following 
children: ]\lartha A., who married John McConnell and lives six miles 
south of Greensljurg; Alexander, of Greensburg, member of the well-known 
firm of Pulse & Porter, building contractors, further mention of whom is 
made in this volume; John, deceased; William R., of the firm of Pulse & 
Porter, who has charge of that firm's extensive plant at Hope, Indiana; 
Elizabeth, deceased; James, the immediate subject of this sketch; Andrew, 
who is living retired in the city of Greensburg, this county; Barton, who 
died just as he was entering upon what gave promise of being a singularly 
successful career as a lawyer, and Dr. Edward A., the well-known and 
popular physician, of Burney, this county, a biographical sketch of whom is 
presented elsewhere in this volume. 

James Porter was reared on the home farm and has made the same his 
home all his life. He is a progressive farmer, having early discovered the 
value of adopting up-to-date methods in the operation of his extensive farm- 
ing interests, and has prospered; now being recognized as one of the most 
substantial farmers in the county. His farm, which formerly was covered 



-656 . DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

with hard timber, walnut and maple predominating, is gently rolling and 
is under excellent cultivation. Mr. Porter gives much attention to the rais- 
ing of fine hogs and in this branch of agriculture has been quite successful, 
his hogs ever bringing "the top of the market." 

On July 20, 1899, James Porter was united in marriage to Mary L. 
Woodward, daughter of Isaac L. and Christina (Jackson) Woodward, mem- 
bers of prominent pioneer families of this county, and to this union two 
children have been born, Raymond G., who was born in 1903, and James 
Iver, who died in infancy. 

Mr. Porter is a Democrat and takes such part in the political affairs 
of the county as is becoming in all good citizens, but never has been included 
in the office-seeking class, preferring to devote his time and his talents to 
his own extensive farming interests, rather than to the public service. He 
is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and is warmly inter- 
ested in the affairs of his home lodge. He and Mrs. Porter are prominent 
in the good works of their neighborhood and are held in the highest regard 
bv all who know them. 



FRANK HAMILTON. 



For nearly a century the Hamilton family have been prominent in the 
civic and political life of Decatur county. The founder of the family in this 
county was Cyrus Hamilton, who was bom in Kentucky, July 4, 1800, and 
who was married, February 22, 1822, to Mary McCoy, having come to this 
county immediately after his marriage, and in this early day having become 
one of the prominent advocates of temperance and an opponent of slavery. 
Cyrus Hamilton was a prominent man in his day. Long before the issue of 
slavery was fought out on the bloody battlefields of the Civil War, he main- 
tained a station of the "underground railroad" at his Decatur county home, 
and assisted scores of slaves to escape north from their southern masters. 
Of Scotch-Irish descent, he inherited all the sturdy traits of this racial com- 
bination, and, although he never held office, he was prominent as a debater 
of public questions, well read and well informed, as well as being very popu- 
lar. During his life he was a member of the Sand Creek Presbyterian 
church and influential in that organization. 

Frank Hamilton, a well-known attorney of Greensburg, Indiana, and 
member of the firm of Osbora & Hamilton, who was born on April 2, 1883, 
in Fugit township. Decatur county, Indiana, is the grandson of the well- 




FE.^NK HAMILTON. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 657 

known Cyrus Hamilton and the son of Everett Hamilton, the youngest son 
of Cyrus Hamilton's family. Everett, who was born on October i6, 1841, 
and who received an excellent education in the Hartville (Indiana) schools 
and in Butler College at Indianapolis, at one time owned a fine farm of three 
hundred and sixty acres in Decatur county. He sold it some years ago and 
is now living retired in Greensburg. On November 10, 1870, he was mar- 
ried to Mary J. Hopkins, daughter of Preston E. Hopkins, of Fugit town- 
ship, by which marriage there were three sons born. Paul, the eldest son, 
was born on October 5, 1871, and is engineer of track and roadway for the 
Big Four railroad system and is stationed at Cincinnati; Edwin S., the sec- 
ond son, who was born on August 23, 1873, lives on the home farm in 
Fugit township ; Frank is the youngest member of the family. Everett Ham- 
ilton, the father of these children, has also been prominent as a citizen and 
farmer in Decatur county, having served as trustee of Fugit township at one 
time and having for many years been a prominent and influential member of 
the Kingston Presbyterian church. 

Reared on the Fugit township fami and educated in its common schools 
and later in the Clarksburg high school, where he spent three years, Frank 
Hamilton no doubt inherited from his father and his grandfather his strong 
tendency for a professional career. Although neither the father nor the 
grandfather may be said to have been professional men, yet in their rela- 
tions of life they exhibited a marked tendency in this direction. Having left 
the Clarksburg high school after spending three years there, Mr. Hamilton 
pursued his education in Butler College at Indianapolis, where his father had 
attended school, and later spent three years in Indiana University in Bloom- 
ington, Indiana. During the first year he was a student in the literary 
department of the university, and during the succeeding two years was a 
student in the law department. Later, however, he was graduated from the 
Indiana Law School at Indianapolis, with the class of 1905, and immediately 
began the practice of his profession in Greensburg. 

Upon receiving his degree from the Indiana Law School, Mr. Hamil- 
ton spent a year in the law ofifice of Tackett & Wilson, and from 1907 to 
19 1 2 was engaged in the practice of law with Judge James K. Ewing, the 
senior member of the firm of Ewing & Hamilton. In 1912 he became a 
member of the firm of Osborn, Hamilton & Harding. Later, however, Mr. 
Harding withdrew from the firm and for two years Mr. Hamilton has been 
associated with Mr. Osborn under the firm name of Osborn & Hamilton. 
Having been appointed deputy prosecuting attorney under the administra- 
(42) 



658 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

tion of Prosecutor Albert W. Phillips, of Columbus, Indiana, in 1907, for 
two years he had charge of all of the work of the prosecutor's office in 
Decatur county. In 19 12 he became county attorney. 

Within a short time after establishing himself at Greensburg in the 
practice of law, Air. Hamilton was married to Mary F. Isgrigg, of Greens- 
burg, daughter of W. H. Isgrigg. The marriage took place, December 14, 
1907. One son, William Everett, who was born on January 24, 1909, is the 
fruit of this marriage. 

A Republican in politics, Mr. Hamilton has been prominent in the coun- 
cils of the party in Decatur county for many years. During 1910 and 1912 
he was secretary of the Decatur County Republican Central Committee. Fra- 
ternally, he is a member of Clarksburg Lodge No. 124, Free and Accepted 
Masons, and is past chancellor commander of Greensburg Lodge No. 148, 
Knights of Pythias. He is also a member of the Grand Lodge of Indiana, 
deputy grand chancellor for the fifteenth district, during 191 3 and 191 4; 
past exalted ruler of Greensburg Lodge No. 475, Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, and a member of the Grand Lodge of Elks. 

It must be remembered that Frank Hamilton is a comparativelv young 
man, that he has no more than just begun his career as an attorney in 
Decatur county. Nevertheless, he is today well established in his profession 
and his firm enjoys a lucrative practice in this county, a condition for which 
Mr. Hamilton himself is in no small way responsible. He is not only learned 
in the law, a wise counselor and a successful practitioner in court, but he is 
a man of engaging personality and extremely popular in this countv. 



ADAM MEEK. 



While an investment in land does not pay the largest returns upon the 
money invested, it is, however, the safest investment which any man can 
make, and while few of the great fortunes have been made from farming, 
when one considers the risk entailed in speculative financial adventures, the 
soil remains as the ever present inducement to those who are satisfied with 
reasonable profit. Industrial and financial stocks may rise or fall in value, 
but the price of land in this country, generally speaking, has fluctuated in 
only one direction. Its value has constantly increased from the time our 
forefathers digged out the first stump and plowed the first furrow to the 
present period with no appreciable exception. It is refreshing to know that 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 659 

a considerable number of our citizens are willing to give the weight of their 
genius to the cultivation of the land and to accept the normal and steady 
profits which the ownership insures. Adam Meek, who began life with a 
tract of one hundred and sixty acres of land, started in life by making 
farming his vocation, and has ever since been engaged in it. He now owns 
a magniticent farm of three hundred and seventy-five acres, all in one tract, 
and has devoted his life energy toward increasing its production to the maxi- 
mum point. He is not only one of the most capable farmers of Decatur 
county, but he is one of its best citizens. 

Adam Meek was born on August 30, 1850, in Clinton township, 
Decatur county, Indiana, the son of John and Jane (Montgomery) Meek. 
John Meek, a well-known farmer and capitalist of Decatur county, of a 
past generation, was born in 1826, and passed away in 1908, at the age of 
eighty-two, after having lived in this county practically all his life. His 
wife, who before her marriage was Jane Montgomery, was born in 1827 
in Decatur county, and died in 1892. They had ten children, one of whom, 
the youngest, Lola Frances, is now deceased. In the order of their birth 
the children are as follow: Robert S., of Greensburg; Margaret, the wife 
of J. B. Robinson, of Greensburg; John T., of Greensburg; Martha Louise, 
the wife of Capt. John A. Meek, of Kansas; Adam, the subject of this 
sketch; Jethro C, of Greensburg; Mary, the wife of A. C. Brown, of Rush- 
ville; Theresa Lavina, the widow of Robert Innis, deceased, lived in Rush 
county, Indiana, and Mrs. Anna Pleak, of Greensburg. John T. Meek and 
wife spent a considerable part of their life in Rush county. 

Reared on a farm in Clinton township, the tirst recollection of Adam 
Meek dates back to the time when he was twelve years old and when he was 
engaged with his father in breaking up and plowing a new clearing. He 
was taken to the clearing by his father and shown by him how to hold the 
handles of the plow. In the meantime he was attending school at the old 
Foster subscription school about six months in every year. At the age of 
twenty-seven years he removed to a farm of one hundred and sixty acres in 
Clinton township, which his father had given to him and which was already 
improved. Additional improvements, however, were made, including the 
erection of a house, barn and other outbuildings. Here Adam Meek resided 
for fifteen years, and in 1892 removed to Greensburg, where he has since 
lived, and from which place he has been engaged in directing the cultiva- 
tion of the farm. Mr. Meek has always raised a large amount of live 
stock, including about one hundred head of hogs every year. 

On November 27, 1878, Adam Meek was married to Adelaide Patton, 



66o DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

the daughter of Nathaniel and EHzabeth (Duncan) Patton, and who was 
born on December 21, 1849, i" Washington township, Decatur county, Indi- 
ana. To this marriage has been born one child, Clifford Patton Meek, 
May I, 1882. He was married, October 18, 1904, to Ethel Braden, daugh- 
ter of Jeremy Braden, and she has been the mother of two children, Harold, 
born on July 8, 1906, and Majorie, on February 11, 1909. Clifford Patton 
was educated in Greensburg high school. He was in the hardware business 
for about ten years in Greensburg, but is now a traveling salesman. 

Mrs. Adam Meek's father, Nathaniel Patton II, was born on April 9, 
1810, in Adams county, Ohio, and was married, May 21, 1835, to Eliza- 
beth W. Duncan, who was born on April 2, 1813, and who died, January 
10, 1894. Nathaniel Patton II, died, November 24, 1888. He and his wife 
had nine children, William C, whose life history is recounted elsewhere in 
this volume; John S., who was born on October 23, 1838, died on Septem- 
ber 29, 1840; Mary E., September 18, 1840, was married, September 18, 
i860, to Alexander M. Stuart; he died on July 2, 1866, and Mrs. Stuart 
now lives in Greensburg; Eska J., April 5, 1842, married, January 26, 1864, 
to Robert S. Meek, who died on February 16, 1879; Melissa Ann, July 26, 
1844, married, June 18, 1895, to Robert S. Meek, after the death of her 
sister, Mr. Meek's first wife; Martha E., August 8, 1846, married, Septem- 
ber I, 1868, to Chalmers McDill, who died on July 16, 1879; Mrs. McDill 
lives in Indianapolis; Adelaide, December 21, 1849, the wife of Adam 
Meek, the subject of this sketch. 

Nathaniel Patton II, the father of Mrs. Adam Meek, was the son of 
Nathaniel Patton I, who was born on February 22, 1776, and who was mar- 
ried, August 3, 1797, to Polly Robinson, of Rockbridge county, Virginia. 
She was born on March 10, 1775, and died on January 5, 1847. He died 
on July 3, 1844, and both are buried at Springhill, in Decatur county. The 
0,ther members of the family of Nathaniel Patton I, and Polly (Robinson) 
Patton, were John S., Peggy, James R., Patsy, William, Polly, Nancy, J., 
Eliza, Samuel W., Rebecca B. and Mary A. 

The father of Nathaniel Patton I was John Patton, an emigrant from 
the north of Ireland. He married Martha Sharp (or Steele), the daughter 
of a Presbyterian minister from Glasgow, Scotland. Nathaniel Patton I, 
left Virginia in 1806, and emigrated to Adams county, Ohio, settling there 
in the early twenties, x^bout 18 14 he removed to Rush county, Indiana, 
not far from Springhill, and died in 1844. The founder of the Patton 
family in America, John Patton, is believed to have been born about 1754. 
He had eight brothers. 



DECATUR COUNTY^ INDIANA. 



Mr. and Mrs. Adam Meek are a genial and companionable couple, who 
have always enjoyed life in the fullest measure. He is affiliated with the 
Progressive party and he and his wife are members of the United Presby- 
terian church at Springhill. Liberal, enterprising and broad-minded, Adam 
Meek shows every evidence of the distinguished stock from which he is 
sprung. This may also be said of his good wife. 



WILLIAM GODDARD. 



Among the worthy farmers and good citizens of the last generation 
was William Goddard, who was born in 1820 in Kentucky and who died 
in April, 1897, ^ son of Thomas Goddard, a native of Kentucky, whose 
parents came from Virginia, originally. 

Reared in Kentucky and educated in the pioneer schools of that day, 
the late William Goddard was first married in Kentucky to Emily Hazel- 
wood, who died after his removal to Decatur county, Indiana. They had 
five children, of whom only one, Joseph, a carpenter in Indianapolis, is 
living. The deceased children are Thomas, who was a soldier in the Civil 
War; James Wesley, John and Mary. 

Before coming to Decatur county, Indiana, the late William Goddard 
taught school for many years in his native state, and was considered, for ■ 
a man of his generation, to be well educated and well informed. His 
breadth of information naturally made him a leader, not only in his native 
community in Kentucky, but also in Decatur county. 

After the death of the first Mrs. Goddard on December 6, 1866, William 
Goddard married as his second wife Mary Elizabeth McKinney, who was 
born in 1832 in Washington county, Indiana, the daughter of John and 
Margaret ( VanClevej McKinney, natives of Kentucky, who were early set- 
tlers in Washington county, and who, in 1837, removed to Decatur 
county, Indiana, settling in Washington township, where they owned a large 
farm, and became prosperous and well-to-do citizens. Altogether John and 
Margaret (VanCleave) McKinney had a family of eight children, James 
Alexander, who died at the age of seventy-seven ; Mrs. Sarah Porter, Will- 
iam Rankin and Mary Jane, all deceased; Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Goddard; 
Martha Lovina; Mrs. Rebecca Porter, and Mrs. Emma PuLse, the last three 
of whom are deceased. Mrs. Goddard, who also sur\'ives her husband, is 
the only member of her parents' family who is still living. 



662 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

By his second marriage to Mary Elizabeth McKinney, the late William 
Goddard was the father of five children, all of whom are living. Of these 
children, Samuel, who is an automobile salesman in Boston, Massachusetts, 
married Lillian Scott, and they have one child, Blanche; William R., who 
lives on the home farm, married Margaret Talbott, and they have three 
children. Miles, John William and .Dorothy; Margaret lives at home with 
her mother; Mrs. Lou Emmert, the wife of Leonard Emmert, lives four 
miles southeast of Greensburg, and they have three children, Louis, Mil- 
dred and Mary Catherine, and Mrs. Bertha Dowden lives in Greensburg 
and has one child, Margaret Ellen. 

Mr. and Mrs. Goddard lived on the farm of a hundred and sixty acres, 
located about two miles from the Greensburg corporation liniits, until Mr. 
Goddard's death, when Mrs. Goddard removed to Greensburg. William R., 
the second born of the family, lives on the home farm. A Republican 
in politics, the late William Goddard served for many 3'ears as a justice 
of the peace. Although Mrs. Goddard and the family are members of the 
Presbyterian church, Mr. Goddard was a member of the Methodist church, 
and for many years was prominently identified with the Odd Fellows lodge. 
]\Ir. Goddard, whose memory is revered by his loving widow, his children 
and the host of friends he left behind, was a hard-working, painstaking and 
successful farmer, who at the time of his death left his family well pro- 
vided for. He was highly respected in the community where he lived. 



GILBERT GORDON KINCAID. 

Gilbert Gordon Kincaid is among the best known farmers of Fugit 
township, and he is also one of its most extensive farmers, owning three 
hundred and seventy-five acres of good land which is in an excellent state 
of cultivation. He has a splendid country home, beautifully set in elaborate 
and well-kept grounds; the large white barn appearing in the background is 
the most striking evidence of Mr. Kincaid's thrift and prosperity. 

Born on November 6, 1857, on the farm where he now lives, Gilbert 
Gordon Kincaid is the son of John and Nancy Helen (Alexander) Kincaid, 
the former of whom was born in Kentucky in November, 1813, and who 
died in May, 1894. He was the son of John W. Kincaid, a native of 
Tennessee, who emigrated to Kentucky and who brought his family to 
Decatur county in 1831, shortly after the settlement of this county began. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 663 

He was preceded to Indiana, however, by his two sons, Joseph and Andrew, 
to Decatur county where he entered government land and eventually came 
to own a large tract of land in Fugit township. John W. Kincaid had mar- 
ried a Miss English. 

Gilbert Gordon Kincaid is the son of his father by the third marriage. 
The father was first married to Martha McCracken, no children having been 
born to this marriage. Later he married a Miss Alexander, a sister of his 
third wife. By this marriage there were two daughters, Mrs. Martha Helen 
McCracken and Mrs. Mary A. Martin. He then married Nancy Helen 
Alexander, to which third union there were six children, three of whom 
are deceased. The names of the children in the order of their birth, are as 
follow: Priscilla, who married Sutherland McCoy; Rhoda M., deceased; 
John, who died at the age of twenty; William, of Decatur county; Gilbert 
Gordon of this sketch, and Cyrus, deceased. 

It was the good fortune of John Kincaid, whose home was northwest 
of his son's place and who also owned a house north of his son's farm, that 
he prospered as a farmer and became the owner of several farms and 
extremely wealthy. A Democrat in politics, he always took an active interest 
in the councils of his part}^ and was regarded as one of its leaders in Decatur 
county. The family were always active in the Springhill Presbyterian 
church. 

Educated in the Clarksburg schools and the New Neighborhood school, 
Gilbert Gordon Kincaid farmed at home with his father for many years, 
residing with him and caring for him until his death. At different times his 
father gave him land, and he also purchased at various times tracts of land 
in the neighborhood where he lived, until now he owns, as heretofore stated, 
three hundred and seventy-five acres of land in Fugit township. Mr. Kin- 
caid has come to be an extensive breeder of mules, and ordinarily has from 
forty-five to fifty head on the farm where he also raises a great number of 
horses and cattle, and keeps only the very best grade of live stock. 

On November 9, 1898, some years after the death of his father, Gilbert 
Gordon Ivincaid was married to Grace McWilliams, daughter of Ephraim 
McWilliams. The marriage ceremony was solemnized at Mrs. Kincaid's 
grandmother's home, near Greensburg, the grandmother being Mrs. Sarah 
Meek. Four children have been bom to this marriage, one of whom, the 
eldest, Mary Helen, died at the age of ten years. Of the others, Helen 
Mildred, who wasfborn on February 9, 1904, is now eleven years old; John 
Alexander was born on May 20, 1909; William Gordon, Jr., was born on 
May 18, 1914. 



664 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

As a Democrat, Mr. Kincaid has always been interested in politics to 
some extent, but has never been a candidate for any office. Mr. and Mrs. 
Kincaid and family are members of the Springhill Presbyterian church. 
From any standpoint it must be admitted that he is a worthy son of one of 
the pioneer farmers of Decatur county, a worthy son of his noble mother, 
Nancy Helen (Alexander) Kincaid. As a farmer and citizen, he is living 
up to the worthy example set by his grandfather, John W. Kincaid, and his 
grandfather, John Alexander, who came from other states to found pioneer 
homes in the Hoosier wilderness. Any man who is industrious, economical 
and thrifty, good to his family and interested in public exterprises, deserves 
to be considered as a good citizen. Gilbert Kincaid is such a man. 



GLANTON G. WELSH. 



In the annals of Decatur county, no name stands out more prominently 
than that of the late Col. Merit C. Welsh, a veteran of two wars, a lawyer 
of ability, a faithful officer of the county in which nearly his whole life had 
been spent, and a man who had been found faithful to every trust. A fluent 
and eloquent speaker, Colonel Welsh was a powerful factor in the ci\'ic life 
of this county for many years, and the memory of his exceptional services 
to the public long will be fondly cherished. Colonel Welsh was a cousin of 
Edward Eggleston, through the Lowry connection, his mother having been 
a Lowry, and it is undoubted that the high character of the Colonel had much 
influence in shaping the lofty ideals of the genial and well-loved author of 
"The Hoosier Schoolmaster," "The Annals of a Quiet Neighborhood," and 
other works which have made so strong an impression upon American let- 
ters. It is related that Edward Eggleston was most devotedly attached to 
Colonel Welsh, holding the latter as his ideal of a man and a hero, and this 
affection found reflection in Eggleston's great story, "The Hoosier School- 
master," in the pages of which book the colonel is fondly mentioned. In 
attempting a biographical sketch of the gentleman whose name forms the 
caption of this sketch, Glanton G. Welsh, son of the late Colonel Welsh and 
for years the well-known assistant cashier of the Citizens National Bank of 
Greensburg, this county, the biographer is mindful of the obligation under 
which this community rests with relation to the memory of Colonel Welsh, 
and a brief summary of the salient points in ,the active life of that dis- 
tinguished soldier and brilliant lawyer will be incorporated in the same. 




COL. MERIT C. WELSH. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 665 

Glanton G. Welsh was born near the village of Milford, in Clay town- 
ship, this county, on July lo, 1867, son of Col. Merit C. and Elizabeth 
(Hanks) Welsh, the former of whom was born in Ripley county, this state, 
on May 22, 1825, a son of Oliver and Lucy H. (Lowry) Welsh, and the 
latter of whom was born in Owen county, Kentucky, on July 19, 183 1, a 
daughter of Sydney D. and Mary (Graves) Hanks, natives of Kentucky and 
pioneer settlers in this county. Sydney D. Hanks was born in Kentucky in 
1 793, son of Benjamin Hanks, a Virginian, who married a Dale in the lat- 
ter state and emigrated to Kentucky, where he became prominent in pioneer 
affairs. His family is the same as that from which Nancy Hanks, the 
mother of Abraham Lincoln, sprang. Sydney D. Hanks married Mary 
Graves, who was born in Woodford county, Kentucky, in 1796, her mother 
having been a Cave, and came to Decatur county in the early days of the 
settlement of this region, his death occurring at Milford, this county, in the 
year 1855, her death occurring on November 28, 1886, in Greensburg, 

Oliver Welsh was bom in the state of Maryland in 1794, his father a 
native of Ireland and his mother a native of Scotland. He married Lucy 
H. Lowry, who was born in Scott county, Kentucky, in 1800, the daughter 
of Samuel Lowry, a nati\e of Scotland, her mother having been a native 
of Ireland, who came to Indiana, locating first in Switzerland county, at a 
place near Vevay, the home of the Eggleston family. Shortly before the 
birth of Merit C, the Welshes moved to Ripley county, where they remained 
until 1828, in which year they came to Decatur county, locating jn the Mil- 
ford neighborhood, where they spent the rest of their lives, the death of 
Oliver Welsh occurring on June 16, 1840, his widow dying on June 6, 1832. 

Merit C. Welsh was born on a fami two and one-half miles east of the 
village of Napoleon, in Ripley county, on May 22, 1825, a son of Oliver 
and Lucy H. (Lowry) Welsh, and when three years of age came with his 
parents to this county, locating in the Milford vicinity, where he grew to 
manhood. His father died when he was fifteen years of age, and, having 
lost his mother when he was seven years old, he was left an orphan, indeed. 
While his opportunities for receiving an early education were limited to si.x 
months of actual schooling. Merit C. Welsh possessed an extraordinary 
mind ; was a clear antl direct thinker, far-seeing and broad-minded, and by 
the time he had attained his majority was a very well-informed man. He 
sedulously cultivated his remarkable native ability to recognize opportunities 
which men of lesser caliber would not have seen at all and early came to be 
recognized as a coming power for good in the community. 

At the outbreak of the Mexican War, Merit C. Welsh volunteered for 



•666 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

service and was attached to the regiment led by Col. Jim Lane. He served 
through that war, having been present at the battle of Buena Vista and other 
notable engagements of the campaign, in which Lane's regiment was engaged. 
At the close of the war, Merit C. returned to Milford, where he engaged in 
the grocery business, in which he was quite successful, becoming a very 
influential citizen and a leading factor in the early development of the com- 
munity in which he lived. . After three years spent in operating a grocery 
store at Milford, Mr. Welsh sold the store and engaged in the live-stock 
business, in which, for fifteen years, he was very successfulh^ employed. 
When Lincoln's first call was issued for volunteers to put down the rebellion 
in the Southern states. Merit C. Welsh was one of the first to tender his 
services, being attached to the Second Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infan- 
try, for the first ninety days' service. Before this regiment could be reor- 
ganized for the three years' service, Mr. Welsh was made captain of a com- 
pany which had been recruited in this county, most of the members of 
which had enlisted from the Milford neighborhood. This company was 
assigned to the Seventh Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, being desig- 
nated D company, and it was with this regiment that this distinguished sol- 
dier served for three thrilling and perilous years. At the Battle of the Wil- 
derness, Captain Welsh was made major of the Seventh Regiment, by pro- 
motion on the field. At a later moment in this same battle. Col. Ira G. 
Grover, commanding the Seventh Regiment, was put out of commission by 
reason of a serious wound received on the field, and Major Welsh, as the 
ranking officer, assumed command of the regiment, being thereafter recog- 
nized as colonel of the same. On September 20, 1864, the Seventh Regi- 
ment was mustered out of the service, its three years having expired, and 
Colonel Welsh, in March, 1865, was appointed colonel of the One Hundred 
and Forty-sixth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served until the 
close of the war in command of that regiment. It is a notable and singular 
fact that, although Colonel Welsh performed valorous service in both the 
Mexican and the Civil Wars, being in the very thick of many of the blood- 
iest engagements of those two wars, he never received a scratch on the field 
of battle. He was a fearless soldier and capable officer and was greatly loved 
and respected by the men under his command, all of whom were devotedly 
attached to him. For several years before his death. Colonel Welsh was the 
sole surviving field officer of the Seventh Regiment. 

Colonel Welsh was a lawyer of force and ability and was admitted to 
the bar of the Decatur circuit court about the year 1875. He was a pleasing 
and eloquent speaker and was known as a powerful pleader before the court. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 66/ 

In 1884 he was elected sheriff of Decatur county, and in that year moved to 
Greensburg, where he spent the rest of his life. Before the organization of 
the Republican party, Colonel Welsh was an ardent Whig, but upon the for- 
mation of the former party, gave his undivided' and unswerving allegiance 
thereto, and for many years was one of the leaders of the party in this 
county and throughout this section of the state. 

On October 19, 1848, Merit C. Welsh was united in marriage to Eliza- 
beth Hanks, of the family from which descended Nancy Hanks, mother of 
Abraham Lincoln, as set out above, and to this union there were born four 
children, namely : Ardry, who lives at Anderson, Indiana ; Glanton G., 
assistant cashier of the Citizens National Bank of Greensburg, the inmiediate 
subject of this biographical sketch; S. Dale, of Greensburg, and Mrs. Clara 
Martin, of Lawton, Oklahoma. The mother of these children died on 
December 15, 1910, after which time Colonel Welsh made his home with his 
son, Glanton G. Welsh, in Greensburg, until his death, February 17, 1913. 

Glanton G'. Welsh was reared in Adams, receiving his elementary edu- 
cation in the schools of that town, supplementing the same by a course in 
the Greensburg high school, from which he was graduated with the class of 
1889. Following his graduation, he taught school for ten years, at the end 
of which valuable term of public service he entered the Citizens National 
Bank at Greensburg and has been continuously connected with that sound 
old financial institution since 1899, during the past nine years of which time 
he has occupied the responsible position of assistant cashier. 

On December 28, 1892, Glanton G. Welsh was united in marriage to 
Alice McConnell, daughter of James M. and Elizabeth (Hardy) McCon- 
nell, both members of old families in this county, and to this union one child 
has been born, a daughter, Mabel Elizabeth, born on March 19, 1894. 

Mr. and Mrs. Welsh are members of the Baptist church and take an 
active part in all good works in Greensburg, being' regarded as among the 
leaders in all movements designed to elevate the social and cultural life of 
the community. Mr. Welsh is a Republican, one of the local leaders in that 
party. In 1892 he was elected city clerk of Greensburg and served in that 
important capacity until 1899, giving the city most excellent service. He is 
a member of the Knights of Pythias and of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, and takes a warm interest in the affairs of these two popular fra- 
ternal societies. Mr. Welsh is known as a progressive business man of sound 
judgment in financial and commercial matters and he is held in the highest 
regard in business circles in Greensburg and throughout the county. He and 
Mrs. Welsh take an interested part in the social affairs of the city and are 
'very popular in their large circle of friends. 



668 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

WILLIAM G. SMILEY. 

To have inspired sufficient confidence in the breast of shrewd men of 
affairs, who constitute directorates of banks, to insure one's election to the 
dignified and responsible position of president of a bank at the age of thirty- 
six years, is no small distinction. When, upon turning to the formal statis- 
tics covering banking affairs, one finds that there are but two other men in 
the United States who have been elected to a bank presidency at an earlier 
age, this distinction seems all the more notable. Upon the organization of the 
Burney State Bank, at Burney, in Clay township, this county, in the year 
1913, the directors of that now well-established and substantial financial 
institution, in their search for a president who would inspire the confidence 
of all, turned, as by common consent, to William G. Smiley, whose suc- 
cessful management of his own extensive personal affairs in that neigh- 
borhood had excited the admiration of older men in the community, and 
Air. Smiley was unanimously elevated to that position; a singularly happv 
choice on the part of the bank's directorate, which neither that body nor the 
citizens at large ever have had occasion to regret. Mr. Smiley is one of 
the large landowners of Decatur county and the enterprise and energy which 
he had displayed in the operation of his extensive farming interests gave 
assurrance that the same wise judgment and energy would be brought to 
bear upon the management of the affairs of the bank, and this conclusion 
on the part of the directors of the Burney State Bank has been amply veri- 
fied by time, the bank having been unusually successful for an institution 
so recently organized, there being now more than four hundred depositors 
patronizing the same, a list of pleased cttstomers that is constantly growing. 

William G. Smiley was born on the old Smiley homestead in Clay town- 
ship, Decatur county, Indiana, on January 20, 1877, son of George W. and 
Eliza (Blackmore) Smiley, both members of old and prominent families 
in this county. George W. Smiley, who died in 1907, was the son of William 
and Alary Ann ( Kenny ") Smiley, the former of whom was born in Pennsyl- 
vania on March 14, 1814, the son of Irish parents. L'pon arriving at man- 
hood, William Smiley mo\-ed to Butler county, Ohio, where he married 
Mary Ann Kenny, about the year 1836, and on January 7, 1849, came to 
Decatur county, locating in Clay township, on what is now known as the 
Smiley homestead, and by the exercise of energy and a display of enter- 
prise that made him one of the foremost men in his community, presently 
became one of the most extensive landowners in the countv, he being at one 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 669 

time the owner of nearly one thousand acres of land. As they advanced in 
years and as their children arrived at manhood and womanhood, William 
Smiley and his wife divided the home acres among the children and moved 
to Greensburg, where for nearly twenty years they lived in quiet retire- 
ment, his death occurring in 1893, she surviving him by three years, both 
dying at the age of seventy-nine. In a biographical sketch relating to Will- 
iam G. Smile3'"s uncle, T. K. Smiley, presented elsewhere in this volume, 
there are additional details regarding the genealogy of this interesting fam- 
ily, to which the reader is respectfully referred for further information. 

William G. Smiley was reared on the paternal farm, his father always 
having remained on the old Smiley homestead, and received his early school- 
ing in the excellent local schools. This he supplemented by a course in the 
Hartsville Normal College, which he further supplemented by a comprehen- 
sive course in a business college at Hope, this state. He entered upon the 
life of a farmer amply equipped to give to his vocation the most thoughtful 
attention and from the start he brought to bear upon his extensive opera- 
tions the most approved methods of modern agricultural schools. Mr. 
Smiley is the owner of seven hundred acres of fine land, three hundred 
acres of which lies east of the village of Burney and four hundred acres of 
which lies south of that town. He gives much attention to the raising of 
thoroughbred stock, horses, mules and hogs being his specialties, he paying 
little attention to the breeding of cattle. He annually ships about one 
hundred head of mules to Atlanta, Georgia, for the Southern market and 
usually ships from five to six hundred hogs each year. "Fred S.," bred on 
his farm, was the first horse bred in Decatur county to step a mile in 2 107^. 
"Burney Patch," also bred on Mr. Smiley's farm, has a record of 2:i2j4- 
Mr. Smiley also is an enthusiastic corn grower, giving particular attention 
to the raising of Yellow Dent and Volger's White corn and is locally noted 
for his fine crops. Since being elected to the presidency of the Burney 
State Bank, Mr. Smiley has given much attention to that rapidly growing 
institution and is now recognized as one of the foremost bankers of the 
county, his sound judgment and excellent executive ability giving to his 
conclusions regarding questions of conservative investment much weight 
among his business associates. 

At the age of thirty years, William G. Smiley was united in marriage 
to Martha Inez Ardery, daughter of William Ardery, who died on March 
II, 1913, leaving one child, a son seven months of age, since which time Mr. 
Smiley has made his home with his widowed mother in Burney. It is not 
too much to say that in the thirty-eight years of his life, Mr. Smiley has 



670 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

accomplished remarkable things in the way of successfully conducting the 
affairs under his immediate direction, and his associates very properly rank 
him among the leading men of affairs in Decatur county. He is a member 
of the Methodist church at Burney and is devoted to all good works affecting 
that neighborhood as well as to the best interests of the county at large and is 
held in the highest esteem in his large circle of friends and acquaintances. 



LINTON W. SANDS. 



Almost without exception the world is willing to do honor to those to 
whom honor is due. Men who have lived long and useful lives in a com- 
munity, who have borne their share of the public duties and who have dis- 
charged worthily their obligations as citizens in a free country, seldom go 
without their reward. The Republican party of Decatur county was not 
slow to recognize the superior merit and large personal worth of its present 
county auditor, Linton W. Sands, who during a long term as deputy auditor 
discharged capably the duties of that important office. Appointed deputy 
in 1904, he remained in this responsible position for eight years, and in 
19 1 2 he was elected auditor for a term of four years. 

Linton W. Sands was born in Fugit township, Decatur county, Indi- 
ana, and is the son of James P. and Eliza Ann (Williams) Sands, the for- 
mer of whom was one of the early settlers of Decatur county, having come 
here from Ripley county where he was a wagon maker. He settled at St. 
]\Iaurice in Fugit township, and later removed to Springhill, and the latter 
was a native of Ohio, who came to Indiana in pioneer times, living here with 
her aunt, her mother having died when she was a small child. 

In 1 861 James P. Sands enlisted in Wilder's Battery, and served 
throughout the war. Three weeks from the day, however, when he left 
home, he was taken prisoner at Harpers Ferry, but was soon paroled and, 
after a short furlough home, returned to his regiment with which he 
remained until the close of the war, when he was mustered out of service. 
He saw a great deal of hard service, but fortune seemed to smile upon him, 
and during the long war he was neither wounded nor in the hospital. His 
first duty was to carry ammunition for the cannon, but afterward he was 
promoted to the position of artificer. He was an intense patriot at heart, 
loyal to his country and loyal to his flag. At the close of the war he came 
home to Decatur countv and resumed his trade as a wagon maker. He was 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. ' 67I 

a well-known and highly respected citizen in this community. Shortly after 
coming back from the front, he moved his family to Fugit township, settling 
in Springhill, where he and his wife spent the remainder of their days. He 
was an ardent Republican, and he was also a member of the United Presby- 
terian church. Early in her life she was a school teacher and was engaged 
in teaching school while her husband was a soldier in the Civil War. She 
taught for twenty-five or thirty years altogether, and was a cultured and 
highly educated woman. Her father was a dairyman in Cincinnati, Ohio,^ 
during his prime, and owned the largest herd of dairy cattle in the state of 
Ohio. He was one of the wealthiest and most substantial citizens of Hamil- 
ton county. Ohio. Few men of his day and generation living in Hamilton 
county, Ohio, surpassed him in capacity for business or in business accom- 
plishments. To James P. and Eliza Ann Sands were born one daughter and 
one son, Mrs. Clara C. (Sands) Henry, the wife of James Henry, is a resi- 
dent of Fair Haven, Ohio, and Linton W. Sands, a resident of Greensburg, 
Indiana. 

Educated both in the common and high schools of Springhill, Linton 
W- Sands, after leaving the latter, became a telegraph operator at New Point 
in Decatur county, and when he had mastered telegraphy, took a position at 
that place in the railroad office there and remained for twenty-three years. 

Mr. Sands' wife before her marriage was Mrs. Anna E. (Wise), whose 
father was a soldier in the Civil War and was killed in the service. 

After quitting service in the railroad office in 1904, Mr. Sands came 
to Greensburg as deputy auditor and served eight years, or until 1912, when 
he was himself elected county auditor. He is still holding this office. Mr. 
Sands has been a stanch Republican all his life, and each campaign he has 
been on the firing line, and his personal efforts have had much to do with 
the success of the Republican party in Decatur county. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sands have two children, Mrs. Cora M. Clouds and Mrs. 
Grace M. Gray, the former of whom lives in Indianapolis, and the latter of 
whom lives on a farm in Decatur coiinty. 

Linton W. Sands is a member of the United Presbyterian church at 
Springhill, while Mrs. Sands is a member of the Baptist church at Rossburg. 
Mr. Sands is a liberal contributor to the support of religious enterprises, as 
well as all other public movements. His election to the important office he 
now holds is a forcible testimonial to his popularity as a citizen and his 
standing as an honorable, upright and conscientious man. He is a very 
worthy citizen of this great county. 



.672 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

ABRAM HENDRICKS TALBOTT. 

The history of the Talbott and Hendricks famihes is closely inter- 
twined with the political, social, agricultural and commercial development of 
Decatur county, Henry H. Talbott, the father of Abram Hendrick Talbott, 
having, as deputy clerk of Jefferson county, Indiana, come to Decatur county 
as one of the organizers. It was his wife, Eliza Hendricks, who was the 
daughter of Thomas Hendricks and the cousin of Governor Thomas A. Hen- 
dricks, whose father, Major John Hendricks, was a brother of Governor 
William Hendricks, the second governor of Indiana. Thus is the promi- 
nence of the two families, from which Abram Hendricks Talbott is descended, 
apparent. Himself a merchant for many years of Greensburg and Decatur 
county, he is one of the best known men in this section of the state. Although 
now retired, he was engaged in the drug business at Greensburg for a period 
from 1869 to 1912, during all this time being actively interested in the farm- 
ing development of Decatur county, in which county he purchased his first 
land in the year 1885, owning at the present time a splendid farm of two 
hundred and nineteen acres, two miles east of Greensburg. 

Abram H. Talbott was born on Ma}' 26, 1837, in the old home on the 
north side of the public square at Greensburg, and is the son of Henry H. 
and Eliza (Hendricks) Talbott, the forrner of whom was born on March 
25, 1800, in Kentucky and who died in 1872. 

The son of Richard C. and Drusilla (Grover) Talbott, who moved 
from Kentucky to Indiana and settled in Ripley county early in the nine- 
teenth century, Henry H. Talbott was reared by a relative and served as 
deputy clerk at Madison, Jefferson county, Indiana, for some time, acting 
in this capacity when he helped organize Decatur county, of which he was 
the first county clerk, serving for a period of thirty-seven years and eight 
months. He was also recorder of Decatur county for a period of twenty- 
eight years, or until the Legislature enacted a law prohibiting one man from 
holding two offices. Previous to the act of the Legislature he held both the 
office of county clerk and county recorder at the same time. For many 
years engaged in business as a partner with his father-in-law, Thomas Hen- 
dricks, he became well-to-do, and especially a large landowner. A Whig 
and a Republican in politics, he was also a member of the Centenary Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. During his life he was a prominent member of the 
IMasonic fraternity. His wife, who before her marriage was Eliza Hendricks, 
was born on September 4, 1802, at Greensburg, Pennsylvania, the daughter 
of Thomas Hendricks, who was an uncle of Governor and Vice-president 




ABKAM H. TAI.BOTT. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 673 

Thomas A. Hendricks. They were the sons of Major John Hendricks and 
grandsons of Abram Hendricks, a descendant of the Huguenots, who immi- 
grated to New Jersey and thence to Pennsylvania before the Revolutionary 
War. Abram Hendricks served four terms in the Pennsylvania General 
Assembly, first in 1792, and the last in 1798. Abram Hendricks was not 
only the father of Major John Hendricks, but he also was the father of Will- 
iam Hendricks, the second governor of Indiana, who preceded his brother 
in removal from Ohio to this state. Major John Hendricks, prior to 1829, 
resided with his family at Zanesville, Ohio. His wife, whose maiden name 
was Jane Thompson, and a niece were the only members of the Thompson 
family who came West. Shortly after their marriage. Major John Hen- 
dricks and wife moved to Muskingum, Ohio, where they lived for some time 
in a rude house, in which were born two sons, Abram and Thomas A. The 
next year, 1830, Major John Hendricks moved with his little family to 
Madison, Indiana. 

The first wife of Thomas Hendricks, the father of Mrs. Eliza Talbott, 
was a Miss Trimball, who died young. After her death, he married a Miss 
Paul. Thomas Hendricks was born in 1774 and died on March 31, 1835. 
He came down the Ohio river by flat-boat to Madison, and from there to 
Greensburg, bringing with him a load of iron and casting for trade and bar- 
ter. A successful merchant in the early days, he purchased and shipped live 
stock in great quantities, driving hogs and cattle to Madison, Cincinnati and 
Lawrenceburg and shipping from these points by boat. By his first marriage, 
Thomas Hendricks had four children : Mrs. Silas Stuart, Mrs. Jacob Stuart, 
Mrs. H. H. Talbott and Rachel. By the second marriage, there were two 
children, Eunice and Elizabeth, both deceased. 

To Henry H. and Eliza (Hendricks) Talbott were born eight children: 
Rachel, deceased; Sarah Ann, who married W. S. Woodfill, both now 
deceased; Drusilla G., who is now eighty-six years old and the mother of 
Cortez E. Moss and six other living sons, resides with her son on the farm; 
Abram H., the subject of this sketch; Richard C, in 183 1 and now deceased; 
Thomas H., January 13, 1835, died on May 26, 1836; Henry H., retired, 
who lives in Greensburg, and Mrs. Mary Eliza King, of Indianapolis. 

Reared in Greensburg, Indiana, Abram H. Talbott attended the local 
schools. For many years he assisted his father in the county clerk's office, 
and in 1861 engaged in the hardware business with his brothers, his father 
having set him up in this business, which was conducted under the firm name 
of Talbott & Sons. During a part of this time he also operated a dry goods 
-store in this city. Selling out both stores in 1867, he clerked for several 
(43) 



674 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

years in a drug store, and after saving enough money to purchase an inter- 
est in his uncle Abram Hendricks" store, he formed a partnership with his 
son Thomas, and three years after the partnership was formed bought out 
Thomas Hendricks and remained in business for thirty years. This store 
is now owned by Joe Moss. In 1912 he retired from business after a long 
and busy career, a career which had been crowned with unusual success. 

In 1880 Mr. Talbott was married to Clara Armington, the daughter of 
Dr. William Armington, an early physician of this county, who practiced 
here for many years, but who was a native of New York state. He died 
during the early part of the Civil War, at the age of fifty-two. Mrs. Tal- 
bott was born on June 13, 1847, and died on Febrviary 15, 19 14. 

A Republican in politics, Mr. Talbott has never been active in the coun- 
cils of any party. He recalls that the first courthouse built in Greensburg 
was a double log stiiicture with a driveway in the middle. It was built by 
Thomas Hendricks, his grandfather, during the early part of the nineteenth 
century. Abram H. Talbott has been a generous man during his entire life. 
He has always entertained great respect for the opinions of others, and if 
one differed from him in any subject he has always been kind, courteous and 
considerate, and has never engaged in needless debate nor fruitless contro- 
versies with those who held contrary opinions. Generous to a fault, he has 
never sought to deprive those with whom he- has come in contact from act- 
ing and thinking along their own lines and in their own way. He has been 
a just man and has never exacted in friendship or business more than he was 
willing to grant or allow. He has believed that the weakest arm is strong 
enough when it strikes with the sword of justice. 



EDWARD C. LOWE. 



Among the early settlers of Decatur county, Indiana, were James and 
Cyrus Hamilton, who came in 1822. The Donnells, McCoys, and Hopkms 
came in 1823. William Custer, who lived about a mile south of the old 
Lowe homestead at Kingston, Indiana, is supposed to have preceded Seth 
and Rebecca Lowe, the founders of the Lowe family in Decatur county, 
and from whom is sprung Edward C. Lowe, a prominent manufacturer of 
Greensburg, and the grandson of Seth and Rebecca Lowe. It may be said 
truly that this worthy representative of the third generation in Decatur 
county from the standpoint of industry, intelligence and citizenship is living 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 675 

up worthily to the example of his progenitors, who blazed the trail into this 
county, ar:d here established the ancestral home. 

Edward C. Lowe, who was born on May 6, 1866, at Kingston, is the 
son of Alfred and Isabelle (Quigley) Lowe, the former of whom was born 
on May 7, 1826, and who died on September 5, 1887, and the latter of 
whom was born on May 9, 1835, and who died on December 22, 1910. 
The latter was the daughter of Thomas and Catherine Quigley, who was 
left an orphan when a small child. Alfred Lowe was the son of Seth and 
Rebecca Lowe, the former of whom was born in Glenwood, Wilkes county, 
North Carolina, on December 22, 1787, and who died in Mills county, 
Iowa, in May, 1871, in his eighty-fourth year. Li 1879 he had moved with 
his father's family to Fayette county, Kentucky, not far from Lexington, 
and after living there for some years, had moved to Montgomery county, 
where, in 1810, he married Rebecca Ryan, who was born in Virginia, October 
22, 1790-, and who died on February 5, 1865, in her seventy-fifth year. They 
had seven children, Polly, Matilda, Jackson, George, Eliza, Franklin and 
Alfred. Eliza, born in 1819, died in her second year, and Franklin, the 
only survivor of this family, who was born in 1816, is now living in Carson, 
Iowa. 

Seth and Rebecca Lowe, having come to Indiana, and settled in Dear- 
born county, in 18 19, two years later removed to Kingston, Decatur county, 
and there entered land. On his trip to Decatur county, Seth Lowe was 
accompanied by two of his children, who after he had done some deaden- 
ing, went back to Dearborn county for the remainder of the family, leaving 
the children in the care of two men who were assisting him in the work. 

Among the first pioneers of this county to plant an orchard, was Seth 
Lowe and people came great distances to get apples from his orchard. He 
was truly a temperance man and never used tobacco or intoxicating bever- 
ages, and never used profane language. A public-spirited man, he was 
ardently favorable to public improvements, such as pikes and railroads, and 
gave his land upon which to build churches and schools. He was among 
the first citizens of the county to introduce improved breeds of stock, 
importing choice animals from other states. His worthy wife was remem- 
bered long after her death. The Lowe house became known far and 
near for the generous hospitality accorded strangers and men weary after a 
long day's ride in a wagon or on horseback found shelter from storm and 
darkness in the Lowe home. Although they were not members of any 
church, they believed in the kind of Christianity as set forth and practiced 



676 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

by the lowly Nazarene, and the Reverend Mr. Stogdel is said to have preached 
in the Lowe home. 

In an unbroken forest was performed the arduous toil upon which 
the family fortune was builded. Alfred Lowe was a farmer upon the old 
homestead until his father's death. He was crippled when twenty-one years 
old, while assisting in the construction of the Kingston church, while work- 
ing on the frame of the church, he fell and broke a leg. Later he spent one 
year in the West after the homestead was sold, accompanying Seth and 
Jackson, who were pioneers in the state of Iowa. He, however, went to 
Kansas, and after a time returned to Indiana, and lived in the village of 
Kingston until his death. Alfred and Isabelle (Quigley) Lowe had eight 
children, as follow: Theresa Jane Ardery, wife of David A. Ardery, of 
Washington township; Seth Samuel, of Greensburg; Charles, of Kansas, 
William Walter, deceased; Edward C, the subject of this sketch; Cather- 
ine Ella, wife of Thomas M. Hamilton, of Kingston; Marsh, of Greens- 
burg, and Arthur J., the assistant cashier of the Greensburg National Bank. 

Bom and reared in Decatur count)^ Indiana, and educated in the King- 
ston schools, Edward C. Lowe has had a most interesting career. After 
learning the blacksmith's trade early in life, he worked at the trade for one 
year in Greensburg, and then worked for the National Fireproofing Com- 
pany, of Jersey City, New Jersey, for one year, after which he worked six 
months in the Philadelphia car shops, and was engaged for four years in 
the restaurant business at Brooklyn, New York. Returning to Greensburg 
in 1907, he engaged in the shoe business for five years, and then established 
the Rex salt business, the product of which is now manufactured by the 
Styers Mercantile Company, organized in 1912, with a capital of ten thou- 
sand dollars. This company manufactures and sells stock and poultry 
remedies, as well as One Minute Brand insect powder. The company presi- 
dent is Lemuel P. Dobyns, and the secretary and manager is Edward C. 
Lowe, Fred Styers, who was originally a member of the firm, retired, the 
interest having been purchased by Mr. Lowe. The firm does a business of 
more than five thousand dollars annually, and has its own brick building. 

On May 18. 1902, Edward C. Lowe was married to Florence Heis- 
lier, of Philadelphia, the daughter of Mrs. Mar}' Heislier. To this happy 
marriage have been born two daughters and one son, Edna, Irma and ^^'ill- 
iam Alfred. 

Mr. Lowe is a Republican, as was his father before him. He is also 
a Presbyterian, which was the faith of his father, the latter having been, 
during practically all his life, a member of the Ivingston church. Edward 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 677 

C. Lowe is a member of the Knights of Pythias lodge at Greensbnrg, and 
also of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

When Edward C. Lowe's grandfather blazed his way through Decatur 
county over Flat Rock with two hired men, the country was all under water, 
and when he reached the high knoll in Fugit township, the present site of 
Kingston, the Indian camp-fires could be seen in the distance. Instead of 
the great trees and unbroken forest, there are now green pastures and fields 
of grain that feed the people in the uttermost parts of the earth. The 
wilderness of this pioneer country has been made to blossom as the rose. 
If the pioneers could have had the forward vision to see what nature has 
hidden in the air and earth, if Seth and Rebecca Lowe could have forseen 
the comfort and convenience of their children and grandchildren, it would 
have been to them like an Oriental dream. The life career of Edward C. 
Lowe is a worldly realization of the aims and ideals of his pioneer grand- 
parents in this county. 



CLIFFORD F. JONES. 



One of the enterprising younger industries of Greensburg, Indiana, 
is the Jones Lumber Company, which has built up a large trade in lumber, 
building material of all kinds and coal. This firm was organized by Clifford 
S. and Clifford F. Jones on February i, 19 lo, at which time it succeeded 
the Greensburg Lumber Company. Following the death of Clifford S. 
Jones, H. C. Kofoid became a partner in the enterprise. Mr. Kofoid sold 
out his interests on March 29, 191 5, to the Jones Lumber Company, who 
have a well-equipped plant which covers one and one-half acres and does 
an excellent business in Greensburg and Decatur county. 

Clifford F. Jones, the present head of the firm, who was born on Sep- 
tember 30, 1886, in Chicago, Illinois, is the son of Clifford S. and Delia 
(Flageole) Jones, natives of Canada and Illinois, respectively. The former 
was born in 1865 and died, August 18, 1912. Until 1897 he was engaged 
in the lumber business at Chicago, and in that year located at Stanford, 
Illinois, where he was engaged in the lumber business until February i, 
1910. At that time he located in Greensburg and engaged in the lumber 
business, first under the firm name of C. S. Jones Lumber Compauy, but 
upon his death, the change in the firm, heretofore referred to, was made. 
A very successful business man and highly respected in the various com- 
munities where he was engaged in business, he was a member of the Demo- 



678 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

cratic party, the Christian church, the Knights of Pythias and the Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks. His v^nfe, who before her marriage was 
Delia Flageole. was born in Illinois in 1864, and was of French descent. 
Clifford F. Jones was the only child born to this union. 

Educated in the public schools of Chicago and Stanford, Illinois, and 
especially in the Stanford high school and the Eureka College at Eureka, 
Illinois, Clifford F. Jones enjoyed exceptionally fine preparation for a busi- 
ness career. With the exception of two years, 1907- 1909, during which 
he was located in Colorado, and there engaged in operating a lumber yard, 
he was with his father continuously from the time he arrived at maturity 
until the father's death. 

Mr. Jones was married, July 10, 19 10, to Litta Woodson, a native and 
resident of Phillips, Nebraska. To this union have been born two children, 
Forbes and Gail. 

Clifford F. Jones is a member of the Christian church. He is a Demo- 
crat and is a member of the Knights of Pythias, the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks and the Fraternal Order of Eagles. 

Popular in Decatur county, Clifford F. Jones has made many friends, 
since moving to Greensburg with his father in 19 10. Not only has he 
established a reputation as one of the enterprising young business men of 
the city, but he is a man of so agreeable a personality that he has naturally 
attracted to himself friends in large numbers. 



GEORGE N. REED. 



Specific mention is made of man}^ of the worthy citizens of Decatur 
county within the pages of this book, citizens who have figured in the growth 
and development of the county and whose interests are identified with its 
progress. Hundreds of persons have contributed to the well-being of its 
various communities and among them should be mentioned George N. Reed, 
a successful farmer of Washington township. 

George N. Reed was born in St. Paul, Decatur county, Indiana, on 
November 9, 1873, the son of E. R. and Mary E. (Nefif) Reed, the former 
of whom was born near North Vernon, Indiana, and who is now sixty-seven 
years old and living retired in Adams. His father, Reasonable E. Reed, was 
an early settler of Indiana and a brick-mason by trade. Reasonable E. 
Reed was also one of the successful contractors of pioneer times in Decatur 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 679 

county and built' several of the best brick houses now standing in Greens- 
burg. He was a member of the Methodist church and a stanch Democrat 
throughout life. His son, E. R., the father of George N., also was a Demo- 
crat and a member of the Methodist church. Mary E. Neff was a native 
of Decatur county, born in old St. Omer, and died twenty-six years ago on 
a farm near her birthplace. Her father, William Nefif, was a native of 
Pennsylvania, and of German extraction. Her mother was of Irish extrac- 
tion and a devout Christian woman and noble character. At the time of his 
mother's death, George N. Reed was only fourteen years old, and one of a 
family of seven children. His mother was a woman of gentle disposition 
and a firm believer in principles of right living. Her memory has been long 
cherished by the family of children she left and she is honored today for the 
noble part she bore in the early trials of married life. 

George N. Reed lived in St. Paul until seven years of age when the 
family moved to a farm north of St. Paul, where they remained until he was 
thirteen, when the family moved back to St. Paul and, after remaining two 
or three years, moved to a farm north of St. Omer, living there until George 
N. Reed was nineteen years old. At this time he purchased a livery stable 
at Adams in partnership with his uncle, George T. Reed, and continued in 
this business for about two years, when he sold out his interest to his uncle 
and began working for C. E. Shields, buying grain and selling implements 
for three or four years. After this time Mr. Reed rented a farm near 
Adams known as the Griff Adkins farm and cultivated this for ten years. 

In 1909 Mr. Reed went to Oklahoma, where he purchased two hun- 
dred and forty acres of land in what was known as Comanche, but what is 
now known as Tillman county. He owned eighty acres of this tract two 
and one-half years and the remainder three and a half years. As a result 
of his speculation in Oklahoma real estate, he made a great deal of money 
and upon coming to Decatur county in 1909 purchased a farm east of 
Greensburg, known as the Henry Duncan farm of ninety-four acres. Later 
he sold this farm at a profit and bought the land where he now lives, about 
three-quarters of a mile from Adams, situated in Washington township. 

Before Mr. Reed rented the Adkins farm, he was married to Nora 
Wright, who was born in August, 1872, in Bartholomew county, and who is 
a member of the famous Wright family, the genealogy of which is given in 
the sketch of Caleb Stark Wright, found elsewhere in this volume. Mr. and 
Mrs. Reed were married on September 12, 1896. Mrs. Reed's father, John 
Wright, has been deceased for fifteen years and was seventy-five years old 
at the time of his death. He was born in Virginia and came to Decatur 



68o DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

county, Indiana, when twenty-five years old and engaged in farming, at 
which occupation he was very successful. He was a shrewd, capable busi- 
ness man and a student of public aiifairs and politics, a man who loved to 
read the Bible and who took a great interest in public movements. 

Mr. and Mrs. Reed have had four children, as follow: Florence, 
Francis William, Orliff, who died in infancy, and Arthur. Besides rearing 
their own children, Mr. and Mrs. Reed have reared Mr. Reed's sister's son 
from the age of four to the age of fourteen. This nephew was Henry C. 
Lowe, who died in Oklahoma. 

Mr. Reed for several years has made a specialty of raising hogs, corn 
and clover. His farm consists of level land. There is not a foot of waste 
in the entire tract. 

George N. Reed is a Republican. He has never aspired to office and 
has never been especially prominent in political affairs. He is a man, how- 
ever, who is well-respected by the people of his neighborhood. 



x\NDREW S. WILLEY. 



One of the "top-notch" farms of Decatur county is that of the late 
Louis Willey, pleasantly situated on the Michigan road, about two and one- 
half miles northwest of Greensburg, in Washington township. This farm 
of two hundred and thirty-five acres, all in one tract, was purchased by 
Louis Willey about half a century ago and is now being very successfully 
operated by his son, Andrew S. Willey, who remains on the old home place 
with his widowed mother, Mrs. Mary S. Willey. 

Louis Willey, who was born on February 25, 1826, died at his home 
in Washington township, this county, on July 23, 1911, was bom in Hamil- 
ton county, Ohio, the son of Horace and Anna (Tate) Willey, the former 
of whom was bom in Massachusetts on February 13, 1792, emigrated to 
Ohio as a young man, locating in Hamilton county, where he spent the 
remainder of his life. Horace and Anna (Tate) Willey were married, March 
7, 1822. His wife, who was Anna Tate, was born in Pennsylvania on June 
16, 1792. Horace Willey, a very substantial citizen of Hamilton county, 
Ohio, died on March 3, 1880. Louis Willey was a Whig until the organiza- 
tion of the Republican party in 1856, in which year he allied himself with 
the latter party and remained stanchly loyal to the principles of the same the 
rest of his life. During the last vear of the Civil War he enlisted in behalf 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 68l 

of the cause of the Union and served in the ranks of the One Hundred and 
Thirty-eighth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, until that regiment was 
mustered out of service at the close of the war. 

Louis Willey was reared on the paternal farm in Hamilton county, 
Ohio, and when a young man came to Decatur county. For a year he re- 
mained in the city of Greensburg, at the end of which time he settled on a 
tract of land in Washington township, which his family still owns and occu- 
pies. That was about fifty years ago, since which time the farm has been 
brought to a high state of cultivation, being one of the most productive and 
valuable farms, according to its acreage, in the county. It is unusually well 
improved, the farm house and outlying buildings being of a rich and sub- 
stantial character, everything about the place indicating thrift, industry and 
good management. The Willeys have their own gas well on the place and 
the fuel and light question is thus quite easily disposed of by them. Louis 
Willey was an excellent farmer and a successful stock raiser and became 
known as one of the most substantial and enterprising farmers of the county. 
His methods were progressive and were consequently attended by good 
results, the Willey farm being regarded as a model throughout that section 
of the community. The methods so successfully adopted by his father have 
been followed by Andrew S. Willey, who is now managing the place, every- 
thing about the farm being kept up in first-class condition. 

On April 26, 1863, Louis Willey was united in marriage to Mary Sefton, 
who was born on April 19, 1840, the daughter of William and Catherine 
(Shuck) Sefton, prominent residents of this county, the former of whom 
was born in 1805 and died on October 29, 1868, and the latter of whom was 
born on May 15, 1806, and died on October 15, 1869. William Sefton, who 
for years was familiarly known in this county as "Ohio Billie" Sefton, was 
born in Butler county, Ohio, his father having been a native of Ireland. 
William Sefton married Catherine Shuck, also a native of Butler county, 
and came to Decatur county, settling on a farm in Clinton township, the 
farm now owned by Samuel Shirk, where he and his wife spent the remain- 
der of their lives, becoming recognized as among the most influential of the 
pioneer residents of that neighborhood. They were the parents of nine 
children, namely: Henry T., who went to Colorado some years ago and 
died in 1914; Eliza Ellen, deceased; Elizabeth, deceased; Michael, deceased; 
Isaac, a well-known resident of Greensburg, this county; Edward, deceased; 
Mary, who married Louis Willey, still. living on the Willey farm; Sarah, 
who lives in Greensburg, and William W., retired, who lives in Kokomo,. 
Indiana. 



<682 . DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

To Louis and Mary (Sefton) Willey were born three children, as fol- 
low: WiUiam Henry, who died in infancy; Andrew S., born on September 
12, 1865, lives on the home place with his mother, and Frank ^V., born on 
June 30, 1869, who is a cement contractor, doing business in the city of 
Greensburg, this county, where he has achieved a pronounced success in 
business. He married Bert Douglas, October 15, 1903, to whom was born 
one daughter, Pauline, on January 21, 1905. 

Mrs. Willey is a member of the Methodist church and for many years 
has been regarded as among the leaders in all good works in the community 
in which she lives, being held in the highest regard by all within the circle of 
her acquaintance. She and her son have a very pleasant home, which is the 
■center of much genial hospitality, and they enjoy the highest esteem of all. 
As noted above, Andrew S. Willey is a progressive and enterprising farmer 
and is looked upon as one of the substantial citizens of the county, being 
held in the highest repute by all who know him. Mr. Willey's farm is called 
the Forest farm, owing to the great forest trees which still remain upon it. 



ERNEST D. POWER. 



No more attractive farm can be found in all Decatur county than the 
tract of one hundred and ninety acres in Fugit township, owned by Ernest 
D. Power, an enterprising young farmer and regarded as one of the 
most successful in that county. Not only efficient, industrious and progres- 
sive in agricultural methods, but the same things may be said of him as a 
■citizen, and this is not at all strange when we remember that personal habits 
and personal methods apply quite as much to one's rank and value as a 
citizen as they do to one's rank and value as a farmer, lawyer or business 
man. Of course, his father before him, who is now living retired, was a 
successful farmer, the son learning the fundamentals of correct farming 
from the father. His success in agriculture is due partially to the fact that 
he has been able to combine stock raising with crop raising and as a mule, 
liog and cattle raiser has no superior in this county. 

Ernest D. Power, farmer and stockman of Fugit township, Decatur 
county, Indiana, was born on November i, 1871, in Milroy, Rush county, 
Indiana, and is the son of George and Lurissa (Crawford) Power, natives 
•of Rush county, and now living retired. The father was the son of the 
late John Power, a native of Kentucky and an early settler in Rush county. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 683 

George and Lurissa (Crawford) Power have had three children, May, who 
Hves at home; Ray C, who is a farmer near Milroy, and Ernest D., the 
subject of this sketch. 

Immediately after finishing his education in the schools of Milroy, 
Indiana, Mr. Power purchased a farm in Rush county, in 1894, consisting 
of two hundred and five acres, and thirteen years later, in October, 1907, 
remo\^ed to Fugit township, Decatur county, purchasing his present farm at 
that time. He has been living in Decatur county, therefore, for about eight 
years, and has come to be well known in Fugit township, and in fact 
throughout all Decatur county, being related by marriage and otherwise to 
some of the oldest families in Decatur county. 

Mr. Power was first married, in 1895, to Mary McCracken, the daugh- 
ter of H. T. McCracken, an old settler of Fugit township. By this marriage 
he had one child, Ruth, aged fifteen years, who is a student in the Clarks- 
burg high school. Mrs. Power died in October, 1910, and in October, 1911, 
Mr. Power was married again to Leila Logan, the daughter of Nathan M. 
and Rebecca (Martin) Logfin, the former of whom was born on September 
27, 1857, in Decatur county, and the latter of whom was born on Decem- 
ber 29, i860, in Decatur county. 

Mrs. Power, who is the eldest child of her parents, was born on May 
31, 1882, and graduated from Monmouth College in 1908. She has been 
the mother of one daughter. Carmen Georgia, born on August 13, 1913. 

Of Mrs. Power's ancestry it may be said that her father, who owns a 
beautiful home of ninety acres of land in Fugit township, and one hundred 
and sixty acres of land in Jackson county, Oklahoma, was born in a brick 
house erected by his father, Joseph A. Logan, in 1855. Joseph A., who was 
born on January 9, 1821, and who was brought to Indiana, on horseback, 
at the age of six months, by his father and mother, Martin and Mary 
(Rankin) Logan, was married in 1842 to Mary Jane Straney, a native of 
Lexington, Kentucky, bom on May 12, 1824. She died on May 26, 1888. 
They had eight children, of whom all are deceased, except Nathan M., the 
father of Mrs. Power. The deceased children were as follow : Mrs. Nancy 
M. May, born on March 9, 1844, died in 1909; Mrs. Mary A. Cork, October 
14, 1845, died in 191 1; Mrs. Margaret F. Manlove, August 13, 1847, died 
on August 5, 1889; John H., November 8, 1849, is deceased; Leander, 
February 9, 1853, died in 1911; William R., August 20, 1855, died in 1857; 
Luna A., October 23, 1865, died on January 3, 1891. 

A hard worker and an industrious citizen, Joseph A. Logan resided on 
the farm, in the house he built in 1855, the greater part of his life, the only 



684 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

exceptions being short residences in Oxford and Rushville. In the latter 
years of his Hfe he hved with his children. He died in 1913 at the age of 
ninety-four years. His father, Martin, who was born in 1800, and who 
died on December 18, 1870, and his mother, who before her marriage was 
Mary Rankin, who was born in 1799, and who is now deceased, Hved on the 
farm, now included in the limits of Lexington, Kentucky, on the site now 
occupied by the college. In 1821 Martin Logan journeyed to Decatur 
county, Indiana, and settled on a government tract of one hundred and sixty 
acres at a time when wolves and panthers were plentiful. This farm is now 
occupied by Ezra Kirby. Martin Logan was one of the founders of the 
Richland United Presbyterian church. He had four children, Joseph A. ; 
Mrs. Jane McClurkin, deceased, of Iowa; Carrie, who married Hugh Logan 
and who is the mother of Mrs. C. M. Beale, the wife of Dr. C. M. Beale, 
and Dr. John Beale, a graduate of Oxford University, and for some time 
a student with Doctor Johnson at Clarksburg, and now residing in Kansas. 
Martin Logan at one time walked from his home in Decatur county to 
College Corner, Ohio, in one day. It was an interesting fact that the com- 
ing of the Martins, Kincaids and Logans to Decatur county was occasioned 
by the reports given by Uncle Billy Anderson, who returned from the battle 
of Tippecanoe to his home in Kentucky through Decatur county, and here 
saw the fine land, and told these Kentucky families about what he saw. 

Nathan M. Logan's wife, to whom he was married on May 24, 1881, 
and who before her marriage was Rebecca Martin, is the daughter of David 
and Mary (Kincaid) Martin, the former of whom was born in 1833, and 
who died in 1896, in Decatur county. David Martin was the son of David 
Martin, Sr., of Kentucky, who came to Fugit township in 1821. Mrs. 
Ernest D. Power, who, as heretofore stated, was the eldest child born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Nathan ^I. Logan, is one of three children. The others are 
Luther Martin, born in 1887, and who died on January 29, 1902; the third 
child, Mary, who was born on August 18, 1893, was graduated from Mon- 
mouth College in 191 5, the same institution as that attended by her sister. 

Both the Power family and the Logan family are members of the 
United Presbyterian church at Springhill. Nathan M. Logan, who has been 
a Republican and Prohibitionist is now identified with the Progressive party, 
and votes for the best man at the polls. Ernest D. Power is independent 
politically. No prettier nor more attractive spot can be found in Decatur 
county than the Fugit township farm of Ernest D. Power. Mr. Power is 
proud of this farm, as he has every right to be, and the people of Fugit 
township are also proud of it, as they also have a right to be. Not only do 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 685 

they point with pride to the beauty of this farm, but the people of this town- 
ship admire the rugged honesty, weh-rounded efficiency and genial person- 
ality of its owner and one of their foremost citizens. 



JOHN C. POWNER. 



John . C. Powner is entitled to rank among the conservative and hon- 
orable farmers of Washington township, Decatur county, Indiana, and owns 
a farm consisting of fifty-two acres, two miles southwest of Greensburg. 

Born in 1855 in Jackson township, Decatur county, Indiana, John C. 
Powner is a son of John H. and Jane (Wynkoop) Powner, the former of 
whom was born in Franklin county, Indiana, in 1824, the son of John C. 
Powner, Jr., who was born in 1788, probably in Pennsylvania, and who 
came from sturdy Pennsylvania-Dutch stock. The grandfather came to 
Franklin county, Indiana, in an early day, and in the early fifties came from 
Franklin to Decatur county, Indiana, with his son, John H. Powner. They 
settled in Jackson township, and engaged in the mercantile business in Sar- 
dinia for about two years. In 1853 they sold this store and rented a farm 
near Sardinia, but lived there only one year, after which they purchased one 
hundred and twenty acres north of Forest Hill, in Clay township, and here 
the elder Powner lived until his death, in May, 1905. 

John H. Powner, the father of John C, was one of the substantial 
citizens of Clay township, and a man who took great interest in his church. 
He was very successful in his business, liberal and broad-minded in his views, 
and a keen student of public affairs. He was a stanch and true Democrat, 
and not only was a Democrat politically, but was a Democrat in his per- 
sonal manners and habits, and known far and near for his generous hospi- 
tality. His wife, who before her marriage, was Jane Wynkoop, was born 
in Franklin county, Indiana, about 1834, and died in February, 1905. John 
H. Powner and wife were the parents of four children, Mrs. Mary (Black) 
Helde, a resident of Alabama; John C, the immediate subject of this 
review ; Dewitt Clinton, of Greensburg, and Mrs. Jennie M. Wilson, deceased. 

John C. Powner was born in 1855 in Jackson township, and lived at 
home with his parents until his marriage to Frances Eubanks in 1875. Mrs. 
Powner is a daughter of George and Catherine (Wright) Eubanks. who 
were natives of Virginia. George Eubanks first moved to Decatur county 
and afterward became a farmer in Clav countv, Indiana, where he died in 



686 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

1876. Mr. Eubanks died in Washington township at the home of a daughter, 
Nancy C. Templeton. ]\Ir. and Mrs. Eubanks were members of the Liberty 
Baptist church. They were the parents of four children. 

After his marriage, ]Mr. Powner hved on his father's farm until 1877, 
when he purchased fifty-two acres of land near the Liberty church, where 
he and his wife lived for four or five years, tilling the land at a profit, 
and purchasing what was known as the David Ward farm of eighty acres. 
After remaining on the latter farm for a period of five or six years, Air. 
Powner moved to a farm north of Greensburg, renting land for a short 
time, afterward moving to Greensburg, where he purchased property at 
Forest Hill. Still later the family moved to a farm owned by Mr. Powner's 
father, and in 1902 purchased the land where he is now living. 

John C. Powner is one of Decatur county's representative farmers and 
citizens. He is practically retired from farm life at the present time, but 
still takes an active interest in the operation of his farm, which he rents 
to others. He is a Democrat, but is more thoroughly a patriot than a parti- 
san, and is liberal and broad-minded in his views of men and things. He is a 
good farmer, a good neighbor and a good citizen. Mrs. Powner is a mem- 
ber of Liberty Baptist church. 



AARON L. LOGAN. 



The name of Aaron Logan stands out conspicuously among the resi- 
dents of Decatur county as that of a successful farmer and a valuable citizen. 
All of his undertakings have been actuated by noble motives and high 
resolves and are characterized by breadth of wisdom and strong individual- 
ity. His success represents only the result of utilizing his native talents. At 
the present time he owns a productive farm of two hundred and fourteen 
acres, three-quarters of a mile west of Greensburg, on Columbus pike. 

Aaron Logan was born in 1841, on the old Logan homestead, about one 
mile from Greensburg, west, and is the son of Samuel and Susannah 
(Howard) Logan, the former of whom was born in Greensburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, in 1795, and who came to Decatur county with Colonel Ireland from 
Ireland and Colonel Hendricks, and entered land one mile from Greensburg, 
now known, as the Logan farm. Susannah Howard was born on Paddies 
run in Ohio in 1805. Samuel Logan first came to Decatur county and 
entered land and then returned to Pennsylvania. On his way back to Indiana 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 687 

from Pennsylvania he stopped in Ohio and was married, and then finished 
his trip with his young bride. Here they hved the remainder of their hves, 
he dying in 1879. They were members of the Presbyterian church and he 
was a hfe-long Democrat, a man of strong character and high-minded con- 
viction. Accustomed to hunt bears in the region around Greensburg, Samuel 
Logan and Colonel Hendricks killed a bear on the spot where the Greens- 
burg waterworks is now situated. He and his wife started in life very poor, 
but Samuel Logan was a money-maker. He accumulated a considerable 
fortune. • On his way across the Alleghany mountains from Pennsylvania, 
having started with a wagon and one horse, he traded with various people 
along the way until, upon his arrival, he owned six horses. 

Samuel and Susannah ( Howard) Logan had nine children, James, 
John, Airs. Martha Anne Hitt, Mrs. Jane Deen and Mrs. Rachel Hobbs, are 
deceased; the latter was the wife of x\lvin L Hobbs, of Des Moines, Iowa; 
Mrs. Mary Hamilton, the wife of Morgan Hamilton, is also deceased. 
Those living are Samuel Logan, Jr., who lives at Letts in Clay township; 
Aaron, the subject of this sketch, and Frank, of Topeka, Kansas. 

Aaron Logan began life for himself after having reached his majority, 
and for about three years was engaged in cultivating the old home place. 
After this he purchased ninety-two acres of land out of what was known as 
the old Hillis farm, which is now owned by William Holcher. Later, how- 
ever, Mr. Logan sold that farm and purchased the land where he now lives. 
He has always made a good living for himself and family and has always 
enjoyed the best things of life. In fact, there are few people living in Wash- 
ington township who enjoy life more than Aaron Logan. He himself says 
that he gets more enjoyment out of what he can buy with a dollar than in 
keeping the dollar itself and for its own sake. 

Mr. Logan was married early in life to Susannah Simmons, who lived 
near Greensl:urg, and who is the daughter of Edward and Polly (Howard) 
Simmons, both natives of Ohio, and of Sco-tch-Irish descent. Mr. and Mrs. 
Logan have had two children, Walter Scott Logan, who died at the age of 
thirty-eight, was an engineer on the Big Four railroad for fifteen years, and 
Sherman married Cora Patten, who is deceased, and by her had one child, 
Clyde L.. born in 1901, who lives with his father. 

The Logan family have been Democrats for the most part for several 
generations, and Aaron Logan is no exception to the rule. He is in fact a 
loyal and faithful Democrat, interested in the welfare of his party. Mr. 
Logan is well known in Washington township, and has always enjoyed the 
confidence of his neighbors and fellow citizens. Mrs. Logan is a member of 
the Christian church. 



•688 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

CHARLES I. AINSWORTH. 

Decatur county has few institutions of which it is prouder than the Odd 
Fellows Home at Greensburg, Indiana. It happens that it was one of 
Greensburg's well-known citizens -who had a commendable and active part in 
the erection of this splendid home, and who for seven years was on the man- 
aging board of the home during the period of its construction. Charles I. 
Ainsworth, who is a member of Decatur Lodge No. 103, Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, and who has passed all the chairs in this fraternity, per- 
sonally superintended the erection of all but the first building, and it was 
his genius, coupled with his keen and abiding interest in the fraternity as a 
whole, that has resulted in the erection of the buildings which make up this 
splendid institution. In most every large community there are, in fact, men 
who are willing to devote their time and energy and genius to such worthy 
public enterprises, and these are the men who leave the mark of their indi- 
viduality upon the community where they have lived and labored. Mr. Ains- 
worth is a man of this type. 

Charles I. Ainsworth, whose paternal ancestry, three generations back, 
came from England, a veteran of our greatest war, a man who, as a school 
teacher and farmer, has had many interesting experiences in life, is a native 
of Kentucky. He was born in Nicholas county on August 5. 1843, the son 
of Tillman and Nancy (West) Ainsworth, the former of whom was born 
in Lexington, Kentucky, in 1815, came to Decatur county in 1855 and died 
in 1887. Upon coming to Washington township he rented land and engaged 
in operating a stone quarry two miles south of Greensburg, in which con- 
nection he also operated a grist-mill, and after being engaged in this busi- 
ness for fifteen years, in the fall of 1863 he moved to Illinois and engaged 
in the mercantile business at St. Elmo, where he died. He was the son of 
Charles Ainsworth. a native of England. His wife, Nancy West, w'ho was 
also born in Kentucky, in 1817, died two years before her husband, in 18S5. 
They had three children: Charles I., the subject of this sketch; Mary A., 
deceased, and Andrew M., who lives at Yuma, Arizona. 

It is to be remembered that Charles I. Ainsworth was only twenty years 
old at the time of his removal from Decatur county with his parents to St. 
Elmo, Illinois. In the meantime he had received such education as the schools 
of Washington township, Decatur county, afforded at that time. During 
this period the Civil War was being fought between the Northern and South- 
•ern states, and two years after going to Illinois, in February, 1865, Mr. 




CHARLES I. AIXSWOUTH. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 689 

Ainsworth enlisted in Company F, Seventh Illinois Cavalry, at St. Elmo, in 
that state. After serving three months, he was discharged, the war having 
come to a close. During the period of his enlistment he was on detached 
service and suffered from illness a considerable portion of the time. Return- 
ing from the seat of war, he located at Springfield, Illinois. 

After teaching in the Illinois public schools for some time, Mr. Ains- 
worth worked in a store in Vandalia for one year and then engaged in fann- 
ing one hundred and eighty acres for two years. He moved back to Decatur 
county and settled in Jackson township in the spring of 1867, where he pur- 
chased a farm of one hundred and sixty acres with the money he had received 
from the sale of his one-hundred-and-eighty farm in Illinois. After liv- 
ing two years in Jackson township, he purchased a farm two miles south of 
Greensburg in Washington township and resided on this farm of one hun- 
dred and seventy-six acres from 1870 to 191 1, a period of forty-one years. 
In 1911 Mr. Ainsworth moved to Greensburg and purchased splendid resi- 
dence property on North Michigan avenue, where he now lives. 

On September 13, 1865, after the close of the Civil War, Mr. Ains- 
worth was married to Rachel M. Kitchin, who was born on October 15, 1843, 
in Decatur county and who is the daughter of Thomas and Sarah L. (Boone) 
Kitchin, natives of Ohio and Kentucky, respectively. The former was a son 
of Joseph Kitchin, a native of Pennsylvania, who migrated to Ohio, coming 
thence to this county in an early day. Joseph Kitchin was a farmer and 
blacksmith and also a pioneer minister in the Methodist church. He was 
born in 1770 and, died in Decatur county in 1858. His children were: 
Thomas, John, Bryce, Sarah and Maria. Thomas Kitchin, who was born 
in Ohio in 1818, immigrated to Decatur county with his brothers in 1839. 
He spent a part of his life in that county and a part in Boone county, dying 
in 1904. His wife, who before her marriage was Sarah Luffborough Boone, 
was a daughter of Brumfield Boone, a native of Kentucky and a son of 
Thomas Boone, a soldier in the Revolutionary War. The children of 
Thomas and Sarah L. Kitchin were Mrs. Charles I. Ainsworth, Joseph B. 
and Frank B, On her mother's side Mrs. Ainsworth is a relative of Daniel 
Boone. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles I. Ainsworth have had eight children : Dr. 
Charles Bruce, a veterinary surgeon of Greensburg; Ira M., a rural mail 
carrier of Greensburg; Clara Ellen, who married Watson Gilmour and lives 
two miles east of Greensburg on a farm; Hattie Antoinette, the wife of Dr. 
C .B. Weaver, of Henry county; Jessie Pearl, the wife of Jacob Sherer, who 
(44) 



690 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

lives two miles east of Greensburg on a farm; Frank K., who lives on the 
home farm ; Mrs. Grace Edkins, who lives one-half mile south of Greens- 
burg, and Wayne T., who lives on the home farm. 

■ An independent Republican in pohtics, Charles I. Ainsworth has never 
been an office-seeker, and has served only in minor positions, having been 
a member of the township advisory board at one time. Mr. and Mrs. Ains- 
worth and family are members of the First Methodist Episcopal church at 
Greensburg, in which he is a tnistee. Fraternally, he is, as heretofore men- 
tioned, a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and in this 
order, largely because the Odd Fellows Home was erected at Greensburg, 
and because of the large part he had in its construction, he has devoted most 
of his interest and attention during recent years to this home. Mr. Ains- 
worth is also a member of the Free and Accepted Masons, Lodge No. 36, 
and of Pap Thomas Post, Grand Anny of the Republic, No. 75. Mr. and 
Mrs. Charles I. Ainsworth are held in high regard and esteem by the peo- 
ple of Greensburg and Decatur county. They have reared a large family to 
honorable and useful lives, but, more than this, Mr. Ainsworth has never 
found the cares of his private business so great that he could not take a 
worthy interest in commendable public enterprises. His greatest public 
work, perhaps, is the Greensburg Odd Fellows Home, which will stand as a 
monument to his memory long after he has departed this life. 



MILLARD A. HUDSON. 

Among the citizens of Washington township, Decatur county, Indiana, 
who have built up comfortable homes and surrounded themselves with val- 
uable personal and real property, few have attained a higher degree of suc- 
cess than Millard A. Hudson, who is the owner of one hundred and forty- 
one acres of land, two and one-half miles from Greensburg, on the old 
Michigan road, and in that section of Decatur county noted for the fertility 
of its soil. With few opportunities except what his own efforts were capable 
of mastering, and with many discouragements to overcome, he has made 
an exceptional success in life, and also has the gratification of knowing that 
the community where he resides has benefited by his presence and his coun- 
sels. 

INIillard A. Hudson, who was born at Napoleon, Decatur county, In- 
diana, in 1858, is a son of Charles W. and Nancy (Becraft) Hudson, the 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 69 1 

former of whom was born in Jefferson county, Indiana, in 1833, and who 
came to Decatur county in 1853, where he married, setthng on a farm near 
Napoleon, and remained for five or six years, and then moved to Greens- 
burg, where he engaged in the shoemaker trade until about three or four 
years prior to his death, when he removed to a farm which he had purchased 
from his savings, and where he lived with his son until his death in 1878. 
The grandfather of Mr. Hudson was born during the War of 1812, in 
Virginia, and died at the age of seventy-five years in Decatur county. Charles 
W. Hudson was a soldier in the Civil War, serving during the latter part 
of that great struggle as a member of the One Hundred and Thirty- fourth 
Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry. He was a stanch Republican in 
politics after the formation of that party, while before that time he was 
an ardent Whig and later in life a Democrat. He was a great student of 
philosophy. Air. Hudson attended the Christian church, and few men in 
his neighborhood knew as much about the Bible as he. Nevertheless, he 
was liberal in his views, broad-minded and charitable. 

At the beginning of his career, Millard A. Hudson was engaged in 
farming for five years for Zell Kirby, and afterward engaged in the busi- 
ness of photography in Greensburg, owning the leading gallery in the city. 
After conducting a successful business in this line for a number of years, 
his health failed, when on this account he was compelled to return to the 
farm. He then farmed on shares for Miss Kirby until her death, when 
he purchased the farm of one hundred and forty-one acres, where he is now 
living and where he makes a specialty of raising corn, cattle and hogs. He 
has on the farm a splendid vitrified tile silo, which, as much as anything, 
proves the progressive spirit with which he farms. When Mr. Hudson pur- 
chased the farm he paid eighty-seven dollars an acre for the land, incurring 
an indebtedness of ten thousand dollars, for which he was compelled to pay 
five and one-half per cent, interest. In less than ten years he has suc- 
ceeded in entirely discharging this indebtedness. So thoroughly did Mr. 
Hudson enjoy the esteem and confidence of the people of his community 
that he was able to borrow money on his own note without security. Now 
that the farm is paid for, Mr. Hudson intends to build a modern home, 
thoroughly equipped with every modern device and for every modern pro- 
cess in farming. 

Millard A. Hudson has never married. His sister Alice supervises the 
home and they are now living in happiness and comfort on the farm. Mr. 
Hudson is a fine type of citizen, and has made good in the face of adversity, 
as men who start with nothing and who, by their industry, economy and 



6g2 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

good management, gather up fortunes, deserve far more credit than those 
who are favored with inheritance or other aid. Millard A. Hudson deserves 
the very highest credit for his accomplishments and his achievements. He 
is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Greensburg, is a 
strong Prohibitionist and attends the Christian church at Greensburg. 



ISAAC W. WHITE. 



Isaac W. \Miite, a retired citizen and property owner who has lived 
in Greensburg for more than half a century, is one of the highly respected 
citizens of Decatur county. A veteran of the Civil War, he performed valiant 
service in behalf of the American Union. While he was successful in busi- 
ness, he perhaps did not accumulate as much property as some other men. 

Isaac W. White, who was born in Delaware county in 1842, is the 
son of John D. and Louisa (Earls) \\'hite, the former of whom was a 
native of Dearborn county, born in April, 1818, and the son of John \\liite, a 
native of Virginia, whose father was born in Ireland, and who came to 
America some time before the American Revolution. John D. White was 
a prosperous farmer of Delaware county, to which he moved in about 1867. 
and where he lived until his death in 1895. He accumulated considerable 
property and was a respected citizen. He was identified with the Demo- 
cratic party but, being a strong E^nion man, voted for Abraham Lincoln. 
After the war, however, he returned to his former party allegiance, and 
remained loyal until his death. He was a member of the Baptist church and a 
liberal-minded man. His wife, who before her marriage was Louisa Earls, 
was born in Kentucky, the daughter of a shipbuilder, who lived at Ealmouth, 
thirty miles above Cincinnati. He died of cholera at his home in 1832. 
The Earls were an old and prominent family of Kentucky, probably of 
English origin. It is said of Grandmother \\^hite that she molded bullets 
while the men shot the Indians. 

In Ma}-, 1862, Isaac W. \\^hite joined the Fiftj^-fourth Regiment, In- 
diana \'olunteer Infantry, and served three months. After his discharge, he 
joined the Fifty-fourth again and, after a year's service, joined the One 
Hundred and Thirt}-- fourth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantr\^ recruited 
at Greensburg and commanded by Colonel Gavin. He served until the end 
of the war and after his discharge, came home and worked in a grocery 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 693 

store for one year, after which he began working at his trade as a painter and 
interior decorator and enjoyed an extensive patronage. 

In August, 1865, Isaac W. White was united in marriage to Martha Ann 
Lloyd, daughter of Creath Lloyd, to which union one child was born, who 
died in infancy. Mrs. White died on September 8, 1866, and Mr. White 
married, secondly, Mary Johnson, daughter of Charles Johnson, a native of 
Kentucky and a highly-respected citizen of this county, to which union three 
children were born, namely: Laura B., wife of William Kiener, of Paducah, 
Kentucky ; Charles, a well-known resident of Greensburg, this county, and 
Lulu, who died young. The mother of these children died in 1875 and on 
January 22, 1878, Mr. White was united in marriage to Nannie J. Lloyd, a 
cousin of his first wife and the daughter of Carter and Nancy (Cooper) 
Lloyd, natives of North Carolina, to which union eight children were born, 
as follow: John D., who lives at Connersville, Indiana; Jesse C, also of 
Connersville ; Nellie, who married Albert Lacy, of Greensburg, this county; 
Isaac W., who is a soldier in the United States regular army, now stationed 
at Tientsin, China; Albert F., who lives at Greensburg; Mary, who married 
James Ray, of Greensburg; Thomas, deceased, and one who died in infancy. 

Mr. White is a well-respected citizen of Decatur county. He is a pro- 
gressive, broad-minded citizen and a member of the Grand Army of the 
Republic. 



JAMES N. ANNIS. 

Among the veterans of the Civil War and retired citizens now living in 
Greensburg, Indiana, is the venerable James N. Annis, who was born in 
Grant county, Kentucky, in 1844, the son of Charles and Permelia (Kidwell) 
Annis, the former of whom was a native of Virginia, born near Culpeper. 
He was a son of William Annis, also a native of Virginia and the Annis 
family were among the first settlers of that state, coming of English stock. 
Permelia Kidwell was a native of Kentucky and a daughiter of Leonard 
and Ann (Stafford) Kidwell, both of whom were born and reared in North 
Carolina. They also were probably of English origin and were an old family 
in the state of North Carolina. 

Charles Annis was brought by his parents from Virginia to Kentucky 
when he was about eight years old, where he grew to manhood and was 
married, living and dying in that state, in which he became a farmer and a 
stonemason. He was a Whig until 1856, when the Republican party was 



694 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

organized, and then became identified with this party, remaining loyal to it 
mitil his death in 1879. He and his wife had thirteen children, of whom 
J. N., the subject of this sketch, was the eighth and the only one now living. 

The venerable J. N. Annis grew to manhood in Kentucky and when 
the Civil War broke out, enlisted in Company G, Eighteenth Regiment, Ken- 
tucky A^olunteer Infantrj-, commanded by Col. W. A. W^arner, in which 
company and regiment he served until the close of the war. This regiment, 
which saw very hard service, was attached to the Army of the Cumberland 
under Generals Thomas and Rosencrans. The first battle in which it par- 
ticipated was at Richmond, Kentucky, on August 30, 1862. They then 
went to Fort Donelson but arrived too late for serious service in that battle. 
From Fort Donelson the regiment went to Carthage, Tennessee, and thence 
to Murfreesboro and Hoover's Gap, Tennessee, and were then engaged in 
various skirmishes with Bragg' s army. Through Tennessee the army marched 
to Georgia and engaged in the battle of Chickamauga, after which the regi- 
ment fell back to Chattanooga and there the}- were besieged by General 
Bragg's army and almost star\'ed out. Subsequently, the battle of Mission 
Ridge was fought and this, indeed, was a fierce engagement. Shortly after- 
ward, the regiment was attached to Sherman's army and marched with him 
from Atlanta to the sea. At the battle of Chickamauga, during a lull in 
the fighting, Air. Annis and two or three of his comrades were standing 
in line when a rebel sharpshooter stepped from behind a tree and fired at 
a distance of about four hundred yards. The bullet plowed up the dirt at 
]\Ir. Annis' feet. Instantly the sharpshooter was killed. Late in the war, 
Mr. Annis was taken sick with the measles and confined in the hospital 
only eight days. On April 4, 1865, he was mustered out of service at 
Goldsboro, North Carolina, when he proceeded to Washington, where he 
was paid oft' and discharged on April 14. 1865, the same day on which 
President Lincoln was assassinated. 

After the close of the Civil War, Mr. Annis returned to his Kentucky 
home and about a year later, on March 8. 1866, he was married to Nancy 
J. Powell, the daughter of James and Cynthia fBarnhill) Powell, and 
began life on the farm. He was engaged in farming in Kentucky until 1875, 
when he and his family came to Decatur county, Indiana, settling on a farm 
in Jackson township, where they lived for about fifteen years and then 
moved to a farm in Washington township, where they li-\-ed for two years. 
Subsequently, they lived in Clay township for five years. In 1897 they moved 
to Greensburg. where the familv is still living. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. , 695 

Mr. and Mrs. Annis are the parents of two children, 2^Irs. Mary 
Ketner, of Bartholomew county, and Charles, of Lafayette. 

]\lr. Annis identifies himself with the "Joe Cannon" Republicans. He 
is a patriotic citizen and greatly interested in political affairs, has always 
been prominent in the councils of his party and is on the firing line in most 
of its campaigns. Mr. and Mrs. Annis are members of the Christian church. 
He is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, the Royal Arch Masons, 
the Union Veterans' League and other societies. He is a highly respected 
citizen of t^is city and a man who is well known throughout Decatur county. 
Honorable and upright in all of the relations of life, he is highly respected. 



DANIEL DAVIS. 



Greensburg, Indiana, has the distinction of counting as one of her 
citizens the oldest living veteran of the Civil War in Indiana. This vener- 
able patriot and citizen is Daniel Davis, who is now living retired in this 
city, and who is now ninety years old. Born in 1825 in Hamilton county, 
Ohio, the venerable Daniel Davis is a son of Evan and Margaret Davis, the 
former of whom was a native of Wales and who came to America when a 
young man and settled in Cincinnati. Ohio. Later he came to Decatur county 
and settled on a farm. He was one of the first tanners in Decatur county 
and died in 1828. 

Daniel Davis began early in life to hustle for himself and from a very 
early age was compelled to depend upon his own efforts and his own 
resources. He was bound to a man by the name of Clark in Ripley county 
and, when twenty-one years old, did not have a single dollar. He began 
life for himself by working out on a farm for sixteen dollars a month in 
Ripley county. 

On May 25, 1850, Mr. Davis was married to Matilda Jennings, a 
daughter of John Jennings, a native of England, who settled in Ripley 
county. Mrs. Davis was born in 1826 and died in August in 1900. I\Ir. 
and Mrs. Davis had two children, Edward L., and William H., a clerk in 
the postoffice, both of Greensburg. 

In May, 1861, the venerable Daniel Davis enlisted in the Sixteenth 
Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, commanded by Col. P. A. Hackle- 
man and Major Wolf. Attached to the Army of Western Virginia, he 
served until 1863, when he was discharged for disabihties and came home. 



696 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Shortly after the end of the Civil War, in 1867, Air. Davis moved to 
Greensburg, Indiana, and engaged in the dairy business. A Republican in 
politics, he cast his first vote for John C. Fremont in 1856, and for many 
years was on the firing line of the political campaigns of this county. He 
has always been a drummer and has the oldest drum in the state of Indiana. 
He is a member of the Baptist church, the Grand Army of the Republic 
and of the Masonic lodge at Greensburg. He owns land in Florida, near 
Jacksonville, but has never looked after the land personally. He is still a 
man of vigorous mental poise and well preserved for his years.* For thirty 
years he has supplied the people of Decatur county with all kinds of plants 
and is well and familiarlv known as "Uncle Dan." 



JASON B. HUGHES. 



The late Jason B. Hughes, who represented the second generation of 
the Hughes family in America and who was a resident of Decatur county 
for more than a half century, was a Welshman by birth. His father, John 
Hughes, who was bom on March 15, 1795, in Aberystwith, Cardiganshire, 
South Wales, sailed from Carnarvon, North Wales, in 1817, to Baltimore, 
from which place he came to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and assisted in build- 
ing the first bridge over the Monongahela river. After a time John Hughes 
came on to Cincinnati and located on a farm near Miamitown, where he 
was married to Anna Jane Sefton in February, 1826. Six years later he 
came on to Decatur county, settling in Washington township, where he spent 
the remainder of his life. 

Jason B. Hughes, who is now deceased, was a native-born citizen of 
this great county, having been born on the old Hughes homestead on April 
2, 1844, which homestead had been established by his father, at McCoy Sta- 
tion, in Washington township, and here Jason B. Hughes lived from the 
time of his birth until his death, March 4, 1902. 

John Hughes, the father of Jason B., who lived a modest, quiet life far 
from the madding crowd's ignoble strife, was a pioneer in this section, 
having died at the age of ninety-three years, August 25, 1888. He was 
always possessed of a keen and intelligent mind and was known as a great 
reader, a man who maintained his faculties and energies in a high state of 
efficiency up to the time of his death. His early life had been filled with 
interesting experiences, which he liked very much to relate during his declin- 




JASON B. HUOHES. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 697' 

ing years. In the meantime, he had become very prosperous, owning three 
hundred and twenty acres of land, most of which he had cleared with his 
own hands. Noted for his kindly, charitable disposition, he is remembered 
today with pleasant feelings by those who knew him. He was a man who 
always inquired after his neighbors' welfare and assisted them in every pos- 
sible way to get on in the world. 

Of the seven children born to John and Anna Hughes, Jason B. was the 
youngest. The others were William, David, Sarah, Oscar, Thomas and 
Franklin. Oscar left two sons at the time of his death, Thomas and Chal- 
mer. Thomas also left two sons, Frank and John. 

Jason B. Hughes received his education in Decatur county. He received 
a portion of the old homestead farm, comjjrising eighty acres, at the time of 
his .father's death, and, before his own death, increased this farm to one 
hundred and seventy-two acres. He was known far and wide as the inventor 
of the American Com Shuck Compressor, an invention and device which 
enjoyed a phenomenal success. 

The late Jason B. Hughes was married on December 25, 1878, to Lou 
E. Stewart, who was born in Jefferson county, Indiana, on January 16, 
1855, the daughter of John W. and Keziah (McCullough) Stewart. Her 
mother was a widow, who had one child by a former marriage to James Mc- 
Laughlin, Maria, and who, by her second marriage, had one daughter, Mrs. 
Hughes. Her husband, John W. Stewart, was also twice married, and by 
his first marriage there were eleven children. He died in i860. The widow 
and daughter moved to Hartsville, where Mrs. Hughes was graduated from 
the Hartsville College. After her graduation, she and her mother moved 
to Greensburg, where the latter died, February i, 1900. at the age of eighty- 
one years. Mrs. Hughes and her sister are members of the Christian church. 
Maria McLaughlin married Robert Mitchell, who died on December 15, 1892. 

All the children of the venerable John Hughes, a pioneer of Decatur 
county, are now deceased. Among his grandchildren are Mrs. Lon Innis,. 
a farmer, of-Milroy, Indiana; Wilbur McCoy was postmaster for many years 
of Guthrie, Oklahoma; Frank McCoy, an attorney at Omaha, Nebraska, and 
the children of Sarah McCoy. 

The late Jason B. Hughes was not only a fine type of the intelligent, 
industrious and self-made citizen, but he was a man of strong religious 
instincts, and throughout his life a devout member of the Presbyterian 
church. He never took much part in politics, but always cast his vote for 
the Republican candidate and in behalf of Republican principles. At the 
time of his death he left, besides his family, a host of friends in Decatur 
countv to mourn his loss. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 



OLR'ER C. ELDER. 



Oliver C. Elder, a retired farmer of Greensburg, Indiana, is a veteran 
of the Civil War and one who has an exceptionally splendid military record, 
even though he is very modest in accepting this record, a man still sturd}- 
and strong for his age. On the first day gf the battle of the Wilderness, 
while serving as orderly sergeant, he took the place of the Heutenant in 
command. All of the commissioned officers of his company, having been 
killed, he retained command of the company until just before the battle of 
Petersburg. One of four brothers who served in the cause of the Union 
during the Civil War, he is the grandson on his paternal side of a soldier in 
the Revolutionary War. His brother, James, was captured and held as a 
Confederate prisoner in Andersonville, Florence, Salisbury and Charleston 
for a period of nine months. 

Oliver C. Elder, who is one of the highly respected older citizens of this 
county and a native of Washington township, was born on November 27, 
1843. o"c utile south and two miles east of Greensburg, the son of William 
M. and Sarah S. (Sellers) Elder, natives of Kentucky, who moved to 
Decatur county in 1826, shortly after it was open for settlement. Bom in 
January, 1802, William M. Elder entered one hundred and sixty acres of land 
in Decatur county, after coming here in 1826 and later purchased an eighty- 
acre tract from his brother. He had four brothers, I\Iatthew, James, Andrew 
and Robert. Leaving the farm in 1863, he moved to Greensburg because four 
of his sons were engaged in the service of their country in the Ci\'il ^^'ar 
and he had no assistance with which to operate the farm. Of his ten chil- 
dren, three died in infancy and seven lived to maturity. Five of these 
seven children, Mrs. Alary C. X'awter, Mrs. America Gray, Mrs. Sarah 
Taylor, George and Henr\^ are now deceased, and the living children are 
Oliver and James Marshall. The last four served in the Civil War. James 
Marshall resides at Highland Center, Iowa. The mother of these children 
having died in ]May, 1855, the father was married again to Eliza Ford and 
by this second marriage had two children, Mrs. Serena Hamilton, of Iowa, 
and Mrs. Zerura Griffey, of Indianapolis. The father died on April 8, 
1875. 

After living at home with his parents until the breaking out of the 
Civil War, when he was eighteen years old. Oliver C. Elder enlisted on 
August 25, 1861, in Company E, Seventh Regiment. Indiana Volunteer 
Infantry, under Col. E. B. Dumont and Capt. Ira Grover, serving until Sep- 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 699 

tember 20, 1864. He was in the principal battles of 1861-62 in western 
Virginia and Shenandoah Valley and the Army of the Potomac during 
1863-64. 

After the \var, Mr. Elder returned home and engaged in farming until 
1903, when he moved to Greensburg. Beginning with two tracts of land, 
comprising two hundred and forty acres and one hundred and fifty-four 
acres, Mr. Elder now owns two hundred and thirty acres in one tract and 
sixty acres in another. 

On January 28, 1868, four years after his return home from the army, 
Mr. Elder was married to Sophronia Cobb, the daughter of Dyer Cobb and 
a granddaughter of Joshua Cobb, one of the very first pioneers in ^Vashing- 
ton township, Decatur county, Joshua Cobb having settled in Decatur county 
in the fall of 1820 on the old IMichigan trail, married Almira Tremain, of 
New York state. 

Of the five children born to Mr. and Mrs. Elder, two are deceased. 
The three living children are. Orris Clifford, who lives on the home farm; 
Mrs. Edna Meek, the wife of Edmund L. ]\Ieek, of Clinton township, and 
Jessie A., who lives at home. 

Mr. Elder is a Republican. He and his wife and family are members 
of the Christian church. He is a member of Pap Thomas Post, Grand Army 
of the Republic, and of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 



SAM V. LITTELL. 



One of the established institvitions of Greensburg, Indiana, which has 
become famous throughout Decatur and adjoining counties, is the lunch 
room and grocery conducted by Samuel V. Littell. The fame of this 
historic old bakery, lunch room and grocery rests partly upon a famous pie, 
which was invented and baked here for a long time. The lunch room com- 
prises from eight to ten tables, and on gala days from fifteen hundred to 
two thousand people take their meals there. There is scarcely a man living 
in Greensburg or Decatur county Avho does not recall some interesting 
experience or incident connected with the Sam Littell grocery and lunch room. 
Thirty years ago the famous "Washington" pie was first made. This pie 
consisted of meat, bread, cakes, fruit, spices and New Orleans molasses, and 
was baked in huge pans. During the last few years, however, pie baking 
has been discontinued, the volume of the business having become so great 



700 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 



that it was necessary to either discontinue pie baking or enlarge the quarters 
of the store. 

Sam V. LitteU, weh-known restaurant keeper and grocer of Greensburg, 
was born in Ripley county in 1859, the son of Benjamin and Jane M. (Van- 
zandt) Littell. At the age of two years he was brought to Greensburg, 
Indiana), by his parents, where he grew up and was educated in the com- 
mon and high schools. 

At the end of his school days in 1876, Air. Littell began clerking in 
the grocery store of which he is now the owner and which was then owned 
by his brother, B. F. Littell. Here he served his apprenticeship, lasting 
about eight years, and learned the business. Later he purchased a half 
interest in the business with another brother, \\'illiam T. Littell. This 
arrangement continued for four years, when he sold out and entered the 
partnership with another brother, James S. Littell. This partnership con- 
tinued six years and was discontinued when Sam took over the entire business. 
It is now occupied exclusively by Sam V. Littell. He has been in business 
for himself for about twenty years, and has been very successful. His 
volume of business is equal or superior to that of any other grocery or 
lunch room in Decatur count}'. In point of years, he probably has been 
engaged in this business as long as any other man in Indiana. He entered 
the store, of which he is now the proprietor and sole owner, when sixteen 
years of age, and with the exception of eight months, when he was in the 
hospital, has never been out of this store. 

In years gone by the Littell grocery and lunch room has fed as high 
as two thousand people in a single day. Mr. Littell likes the business, and 
especially the lunch room. In the past he has probably fed more people than 
all the hotels and lunch rooms of Greensburg combined. 

In September, 1887, Sam V. Littell was married to Lida Howard, a 
daughter of Jesse and Mary (Ewing) Howard, the latter of whom was 
the daughter of Patrick Ewing, the founder of the famous Ewing family 
in this county, whose life and works are recounted el sew-here in this volume, 
and who has many descendants living in Decatur county today. Mr. and 
Mrs. Littell have had two children. Mar}-, who was born in 1888, and 
Howard, in 1892. 

Sam V. Littell has always been identified with the Republican party 
and has always taken a commendable interest in politics, especially as a good 
citizen. Fraternally, he is a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 7OI 

It will be maity long years before the life and career of Sam V. Littell 
will be forgotten by the people of Greensburg and Decatur county. Here 
in this city his place of business is one of the most famous and he has 
always enjoyed a large patronage and a profitable and successful trade because 
he knows the business and the wants and needs of the public. He has been 
honest and fair in all the relations of life, and no man living in this county 
is more popular than he. 



REUBEN SMALLEY. 



In the city of Greensburg, Indiana, lives a distinguished citizen and 
veteran of the Civil War, who toda}' carries a medal of honor for distin- 
guished services in several battles, which was presented to him by an act 
of Congress during Cleveland's administration. This valiant and brave 
soldier, a veteran of our greatest war, is Reuben Smalley, who was born 
in 1839 in Steuben county, New York, the son of Elias and Rozelphia 
(Hawkins) Smalley. 

Reuben Smalley was but about twenty-three years of age when, on 
August 15, 1862, he joined Company F, Eighty-third Regiment, Indiana 
Volunteer Infantry, and leaving his wife and two small children, answered 
his country's call for volunteers. After drilling for six weeks at Lawrence- 
burg, Indiana, this regiment joined Grant's army at Cairo, Illinois, and 
here boarded a steamboat and proceeded to Memphis, Tennessee. From 
Memphis they went to Azoo swamp in Mississippi, where they attacked the 
Confederate forces, having later taken eight thousand prisoners at Arkansas 
Pass. Immediately after this the Fifteenth Army Corps built the Butler canal. 
In the following spring they took part in the Vicksburg campaign. This 
fortress they surrounded on May 19, 1863, and it was in this siege that 
Mr. Smalley first distinguished himself. The siege of Vicksburg lasted from 
May 19, until July 4, and on May 22, Grant called for volunteers to lead 
the way into Vicksburg, where Mr. Smalley was promoted for gallantry. 
Mr. Smalley was one of the one hundred and fifty to volunteer. At Fort 
Pennington, he distinguished himself for bravery and wears the badge of 
honor for services in that battle, a medal of which he is very proud. 

After the surrender of Vicksburg, the army started to march to Jackson, 
Mississippi, and met General Joe Johnson's army at Black River, Mississippi, 
which they defeated and followed him into Jackson, where they defeated 
him again. Later they came back to Memphis, Tennessee, and from there 



702 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

marched to Chattanooga,, which march was marked by skirmishes with For- 
ester's cavalry. At Chattanooga Mr. Sraahey took part in the battle of Mis- 
sionary Ridge, at which time he was acting as first sergeant. After pursu- 
ing Johnson for some time, the army went into winter quarters and in the 
spring Grant's army joined Sherman's. Then followed the famous cam- 
paign of Sherman, with which eveiy one is familiar. 

Reuben Smalley was with his army throughout this campaign and 
marched with it from Atlanta to the sea. He was once taken prisoner, but, 
as he says, no one could hold him in those days, and as his captor had not 
taken the precaution to disarm him, he relates that after marching along 
quietly for about three hundred yards, he decided it was time to do some- 
thing and the time had come to determine whose hide was the tougher. In 
the struggle, his gun somehow came in contact with the rebel's head and — 
well, Reuben Smalley joined his command. He never missed being in any 
battle which it was possible to engage in. Fort McAllister was the last hard 
battle in which he was engaged. Finally he was present at the surrender 
of Johnson to Sherman, which was one of the incidents marking the close 
ot the war. 

Of ;\Ir. Smalley's parentage, it may be said that his father was a native 
of France who came to America, and, after arriving in this country, set- 
tled in Xew York state. He died when Reuben was a lad of three years. 
When he was seven years old, he came to Jennings county, Indiana, with an 
uncle, with whom he lived until seventeen, at which time he began the 
business of life for himself. Two years later, at the age of nineteen, he was 
married to Martha Ann Johnson, the daughter of Elijah and ISlancy (Bowley) 
Johnson, the former of whom was a native of Decatur county. Indiana, and 
the latter of whom was a native of A'ermont. ]\Iarried in Ripley county, 
July 23, 1859, [Mr. and ?ilrs. Reuben Smalley lived in that county until the 
beginning of the Civil War. 

After the war, :\Ir. Smalley came back to Ripley county and, after 
two years, he and his wife, his two children having died while he was fighting 
for the cause of his country, immigrated to Decatur county. Mr. Smalley 
has been employed on railroad construction work for several years as a sta- 
tionary engineer. He has been a shrewd business man and successful in life. 

An enthusiastic member of the Grand Army of the Republic. Reuben 
Smalley is a man of remarkable vitality and striking personality. He is 
well known and highly respected in this community and in surrounding 
counties. The medal of honor, which he wears for distinguished services 
and bravery at the siege of Vicksburg and elsewhere, is something of which 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 703-. 

he is extremely proud and for which he has every right to be. In 1914 he 
was elected constable on the Republican ticket' by a majority of three hun- 
dred and fifty-two votes. Several years ago he had been elected to the same 
office. Mr. and Mrs. Smalley are a pleasant couple. She is seventy-three 
and her husband is seventy-six. With the exception of occasional heart 
trouble, both are still vigorous in body and mind and take a keen delight 
in living. 



JOHN W. BECK. 

The art of photography has reached such a state of perfection that it 
would seem there is little to be desired. The work, although accompanied 
by a certain amount of uncertainty in each instance, up to a given point, 
gives the operator more solid enjoyment, than most any other we know of. 

John W. Beck, photographer, of Greensburg, Indiana, was born on 
March 30, 1865, in Jay county, Indiana, and is a son of Isaac and Millicent 
(Reeve) Beck. He was reared and educated in Columbiana and Mahoning 
counties, Ohio, including the schools at Canfield, Delaware, and Ohio Wes- 
leyan Universities. \\'hile attending the latter place, he was offered a 
position in Indiana, and came west, taught school for four years, and then 
became interested in photography at McKeesport, where he spent three years. 
He then came to Indiana, and has been here ever since. After living for a 
time at Osgood, Knightstown, Carthage and Kokomo, he permanently set- 
tled at Greensburg, where he has built up a prosperous business and a large 
circle of warm friends. His political views are along the independent line, 
and in religion, he is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. He 
began his career as a photographer in 1885, his present place of business 
having been established in 191 1, is known as Beck's studio. He has a fully 
ecjuipped place and is prepared to do all kinds of inside and outside pho- 
tography, of the highest quality. 

Isaac and Millicent (Reeve) Beck, parents of our subject, were pio- 
neers in Jay county, Ohio, settling there at a time when the ground was 
wet and mushy, and where the former died, in 1865. The mother then took 
her five children back to the old home in eastern Ohio, where she was reared. 
Her children were, Jonas Marion, Ellen, Anna May, Isaac Edwin and John 
W. They were Quakers, and wore the Quaker garb. Their ancestors 
were "Friends" for several generations back. 

John W. Beck was married, December 25, 1891, to Dollie Smith, of 
Decatur county. They have had two children, Adene and Serlett. 



y04 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

JAMES B. ROBISON. 

The late James B. Robison, of Greensburg, Indiana, not only was a 
successful farmer and stockman, but he was a prominent citizen of Decatur 
county, whose voice was respectfully heard in any council, because it was 
always raised in support of the right. While his most conspicuous service, 
perhaps, was performed as a member of the Indiana General Assembly, of 
which he was a member for two sessions, 1881 and 1889, yet his most impor- 
tant public service was performed in the community where he lived so long 
and where he was so well known. Broad-minded in his views, liberal in 
spirit, simple and kind-hearted in his charity, he was loved by the people of 
Decatur county, and today his memory is revered, not only by his widow 
and his two living children, but by the host of men and women who knew 
him, for his goodness of heart and for his unselfish generosity. 

The late James B. Robison was enterprising as a private citizen, it is 
true, but he was public-spirited, which is even more important. More men 
of his type and spirit are needed today. 

As a skillful farmer and a shrewd and far-seeing business man, espe- 
cially in the purchase and sale of live stock, the late James B. Robison had no 
superiors and few equals in Decatur county. Born on June 12, 1834, in 
Fugit township, and the son of Andrew and Polly (Donnell) Robison, he 
passed away quietly on his golden wedding anniversary, May 19, 19 13. His 
father, a native of Pennsylvania and a tanner by trade, came to Decatur 
county during the early twenties, and lived and died on his farm in Fugit 
township. After his death, his son, the late James B. Robison, took charge 
of the homestead farm when he was only nineteen years old. 

James B. Robison was married, May 19, 1863, to Margaret Aleek, who 
was born on December 25, 1844, and who is the daughter of John Meek, of 
the Springhill community, and the great-granddaughter of Thomas Meek, 
a pioneer in the state of Kentucky, whose descendants have lived to populate 
Decatur county with many of its mose enterprising citizens, its successful 
farmers, bankers and mechanics. Mr. and Mrs. Robison had three children : 
"William E., who was born in Fugit township on July 31, 1864, married 
Clara Taintor, December 31, 1887, in Sterling, Illinois, the daughter of 
George L. and Martha (Hughes) Taintor. They live on the old Robison 
homestead in Decatur county, and have three children, Mary, Margaret arid 
Mildred ; Stella, December 10, 1870, married Aha M. Reed, of Greensburg, 
January 21, 1891, and they now reside in Greensburg. They have one son. 




JA>IES P.. UOBISOX. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 705 

Rollin Reed; Clara J., November 25, 1875, was married, April 2, 1902, to 
George Davis, and on October 30, 1909, she died in Alberta, Canada. 

One of the largest farmers and one of the most extensive stockmen of 
Decatur county, in 1896 the late James B. Robison removed from the farm 
to Greensburg, leaving his son, William E., in charge of the homestead. 
Later, however, he bought a farm near Greensburg, and personally superin- 
tended it until the time of his death. 

The late James B. Robison was not only a member of the Indiana Gen- 
eral Assembly for two terms, but, from 1906 to 1912, he served as a mem- 
ber of the Greensburg city council. In this office he used his best talents 
and energies for the promotion of entei-prise, industry and wholesome living 
in this city. For more than a half century he was a well-recognized factor 
in all phases of life and was especially devout as a member of the Presby- 
terian church, having been an elder in the Kingston church from 1886 until 
the time of his death. To this church he not only gave his best personal 
services, but he also gave liberally of the means of which he was possessed, 
and which appeared without any apparent effort to grow from 3^ear to vear. 
He regarded himself as a steward merely of the fortune which had come 
into his hands, and dispensed it with a liberality of one gifted with a patri- 
cian heart. 



GEORGE W. SEFTON. 



George W. Sefton, a retired farmer of Greensburg, Indiana, is one of 
those men who, at the first call for volunteers at the breaking out of the 
Civil War, enlisted in Company E, Seventh Regiment, Indiana Volunteer 
Infantry, a reorganized regiment, and served for three years. In many hard- 
fought battles of the war, the only discomfiture he suffered, excepting the 
privations and hardships in the military service, was an attack of the measles. 
His brother, John, died of the measles while serving in the same regiment. 
Attached to the First Brigade of the First Division of the First and Fifth 
Army Corps, Mr. Sefton contracted rheumatism as early as January, 1862, 
and was confined in the hospital at Cumberland, Maryland, on account of 
measles. After his recovery, he brought his brother's body home and then 
rejoined his command at Winchester, Virginia. He was discharged at 
Indianapolis on September 20, 1864. During his services, he was engaged in 
the battles of Greenbrier. Winchester, Bull Run, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, 
(45) 



706 ' DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Spottsylvania, Cold Harbor, j\line Run, Wilderness, Campaign of 1864, 
Port Republic, Siege of Petersburg, Weldon Railroad, Antietam, South 
Mountain, Chancellorsville and many others. This is an honorable and 
valiant military record of which the subject of this sketch has reason to be 
very proud. 

George W. Sefton was born on October 10, 1841, in Clinton township, 
Decatur county, Indiana, the son of Henry and Sarah (Brown) Sefton, 
natives of Ohio and Fountain county, respectively. The former, who was 
born in 1808 and died in 1878, was the son of William Sefion, a native of 
Ireland, who came with his parents to Ohio, where he was reared. From 
Ohio he moved to Indiana and settled in Decatur county near Sandusky. 
Henry Sefton came with his parents and was reared in this county in the 
early twenties, and eventually settled in Clinton township, where he became 
a successful farmer. By his first wife, Sarah Brown, to whom he was mar- 
ried in 1848, he had six children, five of whom are now deceased. The only 
living child is George W., the subject of this sketch. The deceased children 
were: Preserve O. ; William; John, who died of measles in the army; 
Elizabeth and Jane. By his second marriage to Sarah Stine, Henry Sefton 
had two children, Airs. Rachel Wilkinson, of Sandusky, and Isaac Stine. 
who lives on the home farm in Clinton township. Until JNIarch, 1903, 
George W. Sefton was engaged in farming. He owns one hundred and sixty 
acres in Clinton township. 

Mr. Sefton has been married three times, the first time on October i, 
1866, to Julia Lanham, who was born in 1843 ^"cl ^^'ho was the daughter 
of Thomas and Elizabeth Lanham. She died- in 1869. leaving two children. 
Monnett O., born on September 5, 1867. who li\'es in Rush county, and 
Julia E., on June 27, 1869, who married John Frank Deem, of Adams town- 
ship. By his second marriage, April 25, 1871, to Elizabeth Brock, who died 
in -1875, there were two children, Mrs. Emma M. Brown, of Indianapolis, 
who was born on May 4, 1S72, and Mrs. Mary E. Walker, of Newpoint, 
on October 7, 1873. ^y his third marriage to Harriett Weed, September 
19, 1876, one child, Mrs. Stella Waters, of Indianapolis, was born on Sep- 
tember 18, 1878. 

Mrs. Harriett (Weed) Sefton was born on July 16, 1847. near Milroy 
in Rush county and is the daughter of Alvin and Jane Ann (Ross) Weed, 
natives of Kentucky, the former of whom was born in 1810 and died in 
1896, and the latter was born in 1814, died in 1886. .\lvin Weed was the 
son of a well-known pioneer citizen \\ho was drowned while traveling down 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 707 

the Ohio river in a flat-boat in 1812. Alvin Weed died in Howard county 
at the home of his son. His wife, who' before her marriage, was Jane Ann 
Ross, was the daughter of Alexander Ross, a native of Ireland. Alvin and 
Jane Ann Weed had a large family of children, as follow : James Hiram, 
deceased ; Eliza, deceased ; Robert Thomas, deceased ; Mrs. Lucinda Webster, 
of Hope, Indiana; Oliver, who died in infancy; Charles WiUiam, of Kokomo, 
Indiana; Mrs. Harriet Sefton, of Greensburg; Mrs. Mehssa Margaret Oil- 
man, of Howard county; Mary Frances, deceased; Mrs. Alice Root, of 
Indianapolis : Alonzo and John Lincoln, deceased. 

George W. Sefton cast his first vote for Abraham Lincoln and since 
that time has always voted the Republican ticket and upheld vigorously 
Republican principles and Republican candidates. Fraternally, he is a mem- 
ber of Pap Thomas Post No. 5, Grand Army of the Republic. Mrs. Sefton 
is a member of the Christian church. George W. Sefton is one of the 
honored and highly respected citizens of Greensburg and Decatur county 
and a man who is well known and well liked by his neighbors and fellow 
townsmen. 



HENRY THOMSON. 



Among the well-known citizens of Decatur county, Indiana, and among 
the veterans of the Civil War living in this county, is the venerable Henry 
Thomson, a retired farmer of Greensburg, Indiana, who was born on De- 
cember 16, 1840, in Washington township on a pioneer farm, and who is the 
son of William Henry and Eliza Jane (Hopkins) Thomson, the former of 
whom was born on January 11, 1803, and who died in August, 1840, and 
the latter of whom was born on March, 1809, in Kentucky, and who died, 
December 26, 1864. 

Henry Thomson had just reached his majority at the time of the 
breaking out of the Civil War, when he enlisted on September 5, 1861, in 
Company G, Seventh Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, serving until 
May 5, 1864, when he was wounded in the first day's battle of the Wilderness. 
Seriously wounded in the right leg, the effects of which are felt to this day, 
he was not dismissed until September 6, 1864. During his service as a 
soldier in the Civil War his principal engagements were those at Green 
Briar in 1861, Winchester in 1862, where he was wounded in the right 
shoulder, the second battle of Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg,' Virginia, 
Gettysburg, Manassas Gap and the Wilderness. In 19 10 Mr. Thomson and 



7o8 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

his good wife took an automobile trip over many of the battle scenes of the 
Civil War, taking along a complete camping outfit, and remaining away for 
several weeks. Starting on August 14, 1910, they did not return until 
September 11, and during this period visited nearly all of Mr. Thomson's 
old battlefields. 

The father of Henry Thomson died before his son Henry was born, and 
the latter was reared in the home of his grandfather Hopkins. His father, 
who was born in Kentucky, was the son of James Henry Thomson, who 
was born on April 2, 1778, and who in turn was the son of James and 
Mary (Henry) Thomson, the former of whom was born in 1731, and the 
latter of whom was born in 1736. They had three children, as follow: Will- 
iam Henry, who was born in 1743; Elizabeth Davis, in 1750; James Henry, 
the grandfather of the subject of this sketch, April 2, 1778, and who was 
married to Sarah Henry, in 1776. 

James Henry and Sarah (Henry) Thomson had eight children, as 
follow : Almira, who was born in 1800, and who married the Reverend 
Mr. Lowry, the first pastor of the Presbyterian church at Kingston; Will- 
iam Henry, January 11, 1803, the father of the subject of this sketch; 
John Davis, April 7, 1805, and who married Susanna Howe; James Henry, 
October 26, 1807, and who married Nancy x\nn McLeod; Alexander Brown, 
January 8, 1810, who first married Johanna S. Howe, September i, 1815, 
and for his second wife. Elizabeth R. Carson; Samuel Harrison, August 
26, 1813, was a professor at Hanover College for twenty-five years, and 
married Magdelena Sophronia Clifton; Preston Wallace, January 17, 1816; 
married Mary Ann Ashman; Mary Elizabeth, the last born, who first saw 
the light of day, June 2, 1818, married George F. Whitworth. 

William Henry, the father of Henry, was married to Eliza Jane Hop- 
kins, who was the daughter of John and Jane Hopkins, natives of Kentucky 
and early settlers in ^^^ashington township, Decatur county. John Hopkins 
became a judge of the appellate court, and was a man of ability and great 
power. It was Judge John Hopkins who practically reared Henry Thomson, 
the subject of this sketch. Judge Hopkins died in 1852, and his wife in 
1854, two years later. Mrs. Eliza Jane (Hopkins) Thomson died in 1864, 
on December 26. 

After the Civil War, Henry Thomson entered Hanover College, where 
he was a student for some time, but he later returned to the farm in Wash- 
ington township, and was actively engaged as a farmer until 1903, when, 
after a trip to the West, including the National Park, the Pacific coast. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 



709 



Oregon, the Pacific coast cities, New Alexico, Arizona, and the Grand Canon 
of Colorado, he and his wife settled at their present home in Greensburg, 
Indiana. The one-hundred-and-twenty-acre farm, with which he started life, 
in the meantime has been increased to one hundred and sixty acres. Mr. 
Thomson still owns this farm, which is well improved. 

On December 15, 1881, Mr. Thomson was married to Laura Alice Mc- 
Cracken, who was born on January .31, 1852, and who is the daughter of 
Adam and Mary Jane (Rankin) McCracken, natives of Kentucky. Adam 
was the son of James and Sallie (Meek) McCracken, and was born on May 
20, 1824, and died in 1901. His wife was the daughter of Adam and 
Hester (Logan) Rankin, natives of Kentucky, who settled at Springhill in 
Decatur county in the early twenties. Here they homesteaded a farm and it 
was here that the mother of Mrs. Thomson was reared. Adam McCracken 
and Mary Jane Rankin were married in 1851. The latter was born in 1827. 
Mrs. Thomson is one of three children born to her parents. The others 
were James Logan, who was born on January 9, 1858, and who lives at Wat- 
seka, Illinois, and Whilma, November 7, 1864, died, July 24, 1889. 

An ardent believer in temperance and in the suppression of the liquor 
traffic, Henry Thomson has been an active and influential member of the 
Prohibition party. Mr. and Mrs. Thomson are members of the Presbyterian 
church. Henry Thomson is a member of Pap Thomas Post, Grand Army 
of the Republic, at Greensburg, Indiana. 



JOHN WESLEY DEEM 

John Wesley Deem, a retired farmer and merchant of Greensburg, 
Indiana, whose active life dates back to the pioneer history of the Hoosier 
state, is a native of Preble county, Ohio, his birth having occurred on 
November 22, 1831. He is a son of Thomas and Sarah (Sayler) Deem, 
natives of Kentucky, whose family came originally from Virginia, and who 
removed from Kentucky to Ohio in an early day, and from that state to 
Indiana, settling in Decatur county in 1834, where they purchased land and 
Thomas Deem .became a large landowner, possessing at one time five hun- 
dred acres. He was born on May 30, 1796, and died on September 24, 
1853. His wife was born October 20, 1809, and died March 3, 1895. The 
Deem homestead, consisting of one hundred and sixty acres, was pur- 



yiO DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

chased from Ella and Elizabeth Warriner, December 3, 1834, for nine 
hundred dollars. The deed was recorded on September 24, 1835. 

Thomas and Sarah (Sayler) Deem were the parents of ten children, 
whose names in the order of their birth are as follow : Mrs. Mary Ann 
Heaton, who was born on December 10, 1826, died on March 6, 1915; 
Mrs. Eliza A. Stewart, April 11, 1828, died in December, 191 1; Mrs. 
Catharine Dailey, the widow of E. G. Dailey, of Greensburg; Mrs. Elizabeth 
Hoodlow, of Topeka, Kansas, in 1829; Mrs. Lenora Corey, November 22, 
1830, lives on the old homestead; John Wesley, the immediate subject of 
this review; Lemuel, in 1836, is now deceased; Oliver, in 1840, lives in 
Greensburg; William Henry, in 1S44, died in the service of his country 
during the Civil War. and Thomas Harvey, in 1847, ^i^^ i" 1864, and 
was also a soldier in the Civil War. 

After his father had purchased the homestead farm, John Wesley Deem 
assisted in clearing the land, and did his share toward the improvement and 
cultivation of the home farm. The family lived at this time in a hewed 
log house, and experienced all the privations and hardships, as well as the 
joys of true pioneer life in southern Indiana. When he was twenty-four 
years of age, in 1855, John W. Deem removed to Shelby county, Indiana, 
where he lived for two years. During this period he and his wife lived 
in a round log cabin which was notched, daubed and chinked with mud. 
It consisted of one room, eighteen by fifteen feet, with one window and a 
door on the opposite side from the window. The chimney was built of mud 
and sticks with mud jambs and a clapboard roof. It was a typical pioneer's 
cabin, the door having a wooden latch with a string on the outside, which 
could be locked by pulling the string on the inside. Mr. Deem sawed lum- 
ber at night during the winter season, by the use of the water-mill, four miles 
away, and in this way secured lumber enough to build a new house. His 
father had built what is believed to have been the first brick house in Decatur 
county. After two years' residence in Shelby county, Mr. Deem returned 
with his family to Decatur county, and here he engaged in the mercantile 
and grain business at Adams, where he remained for six years. He operated 
a saw-mill for a number of years and then moved to his farm in Adams 
township. At one time he was the owner of four hundred acres of land, 
but has sold the greater portion of this land and now has two hundred and 
fifty acres. In 1894 Mr. Deem retired from active farm life and moved 
to Greensburg. where he engaged in the hardware and implement business, 
in which he continued for a period of eighteen years. On account of the 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 7II 

poor health of Mrs. Deem, he retired from business at this time and cared 
for his wife until her death. 

John Wesley Deem was married on September 20, 1855, to Margaret 
Jane Logan, who was born on November 9, 1832, in Decatur county, the 
daughter of Samuel Logan and wife. Mrs. Deem died on September 28, 
1903. John W. Deem and wife were the parents of six children, Sarah 
Susanna, who was born on August 11, 1856, was married to Arthur Doggett, 
March 4, 1875, and died ten years later on October 17, 1885, leaving two 
children, Mrs. Sarah Alberta Brockelmeier and Otis; Samuel Logan, Febru- 
ary 15, 1858, married Flora King; Kate, March 25, i860, died on December 
20, 1865; William Henry Ellsworth, August 13, 1862, died August 22, 1863; 
Mary, October 13, 1864, married J. C. Bird, December 21, 1881, and on 
May 29, 1895, her death occurred, leaving two children, Mrs. Ethel Koester, 
who is a resident of Cincinnati, and has two children, Robert and one 
unnamed, and Harry Bird, a resident of Greensburg; John Franklin, who 
was born on March 29, 1871, lives on the home place. He married Julia 
E. Sefton, December 24, 1890. 

John Wesley Deem, during his lifetime, has been an ardent believer 
in Republican principles and has always voted the Republican ticket. He 
is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, but on account of defect 
in hearing, cannot enjoy attending. He is a member of the Masonic lodge, 
in which he is deeply interested. 



IRA CLARK. 



Of pioneer descent, the gentleman whose name is here noted, maintains 
in his own life and manner of living all the sterling traditions of a stalwart 
and vigorous race of God-fearing, home-loving, temperate and industrious 
forbears, men and women who wrought well during the early days of this 
section of the state and who, upon passing, bequeathed to their posterity the 
priceless legacy of a good name. Born and reared in this county, Mr. Clark 
has created at Greensburg, the county seat, a business which aids very 
materially in carrying the name of that pleasant city to distant parts of this 
country. The beautiful flowers which are cultivated in the famous green- 
houses of Ira Clark & Company at Greensburg are shipped to cities at far 
distant points, being one of the most delightful contributions this county 
makes to the commerce of the land. Roses and carnations are the special 



712 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

products of this well-known greenhouse and a wide territory is supplied' 
from the Clark houses, shipments of the standard and best varieties being 
made to points as far west as Denver, as far north as Toronto and as far 
south as Atlanta and New Mexico. In addition to these select varieties, Mr. 
Clark also cultivates a general line of florist's goods and has a place which 
is one of the show places of the town, carr3'ing on a business in which all the 
people in and about Greensburg take a very proper pride. Ira Clark & 
Company's greenhouses cover twelve thousand square feet of surface, com- 
prising eight large houses, hot water and steam heated, and are otherwise 
fullv equipped according to all modern requirements. 

Ira Clark was .born on a farm near the town of Clarksburg, this county, 
on June 5, 1870, the son of Hezekiah E. and Catherine J. (Miller) Clark, 
the former of whom was born in Pennsylvania in 1827 and died at his home 
in this county in 1896, and the latter of whom was born in Franklin county, 
this state, on June i, 1840, and is now residing in the city of Greensburg. 

Hezekiah E. Clark was the son of William Clark, who founded the town 
of Clarksville, Pennsylvania, in the year 181 7, and who, with his brother, 
gave a church to the town. Just ninety-eight years later, on February 14, 
1915, this historic old church was profusely decorated with flowers shipped 
from Greensburg by Ira and Nellie M. Clark, grandchildren of William 
Clark. \Villiam Clark and three brothers came to America from Scotland 
in the eighteenth century, one of the brothers locating in Pennsylvania, 
another in New Jersey and the other in South Carolina. William Clark 
later moved to Ohio, in which state his last days were passed. His son, 
Hezekiah E., came to Decatur county, Indiana, in 1854, settling in the village 
of Clarksburg, where he married Catherine J. Miller, who was born on June 
I, 1840, the daughter of Jacob and Rebecca (Lewis) Miller, and who now is 
residing in Greensburg. Jacob Miller, a native of Virginia, was the second 
person to settle in Fugit township, this county, and was one of the men who 
organized the township. He came to this county about the year 1821, fol- 
lowing a "blazed trail," and quickly established himself here, being one of 
the most potent forces in the creation of a social order in the then wilderness. 
His wife, Rebecca Lewis, was a cousin of "Davy" Crockett, she and the 
immortal hero of the Alamo having been reared children together. The Lewises 
and the Crocketts left Virginia together, but parted at Cinch mountain, the 
Crocketts going on into Tennessee and the Lewises coming to Indiana. 
Jacob Miller, who was born in the year 1800 and died in 1872, first settled 
on Salt creek, in Franklin county, this state, where he married Rebecca 
Lewis, later coming to this county and settling in Fugit township where he 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 713 

and his wife spent the remander of their Hves. Hezekiah Clark moved from 
Fugit township to Clinton township, this county, and died on the farm in 
that township, one of the most highly respected men in the county. Both 
the Clarks and the Millers were of a hardy, self-respecting, upright race, 
stanch Methodists and firm in the expression of the courage of their con- 
victions. The Millers entertained John Wesley when that great apostle of 
Methodism made his historic tour into Virginia. These two families were 
ardent temperance advocates and practiced what they preached, even in a 
day when the drinking of strong drinks was a common practice. In the 
old "log rolling" days, when it came time for Jacob Miller to invite his 
pioneer neighbors to such a fete, he declined to furnish whisky to the par- 
ticipants in the arduous labors of the day, notwithstanding the time-honored 
custom of the period; being so strictly temperate in his own habits that he 
would not consent to putting the intoxicating glass to his neighbors' lips. 

To Hezekiah E. and Catherine J. (Miller) Clark were born seven 
children, five sons and two daughters, namely : Jesse M., who died on April 
9, 1898; Tillman, who lives in Howard county, Indiana; Mrs. Clara Draper, 
who lives on a farm east of Greensburg, in this county; Emmet, a well- 
known farmer of Adams township, this county; Nellie M., who is' associated 
with her brother, Ira, in the florist's business in Greensburg; Ira, the imme- 
diate subject of this sketch, and A. Burl, who lives in the state of Oklahoma. 

Ira Clark received his early education in the schools of Sandusky, this 
county, and was graduated from the school at that place. To this course 
of schooling he added a course in the Central Normal School, at Danville, 
Indiana, from which he also was graduated, after which, for ten years, he 
taught in the schools of Sandusky and St. Paul, this county, being the assist- 
ant principal in the latter school. He then, in the year 1901, engaged in the 
florist's business in Greensburg, he and his partner conducting the business 
for a year under the firm style of Hedges & Clark, the concern in 1902 
becoming known as Clark & Company. The beginning of this business was 
on a comparatively small scale, but Mr. Clark later bought out the green- 
houses of Henry Bentlage, combining the two greenhouses under the present 
efficient management, and has been quite successful. 

In 1897 Ii"^ Clark was united in marriage to Carrie Bell-Vandament, a 
well-known and popular teacher in the Sandusky schools, the daughter of 
J. C. Bell, a prominent resident of that village. To this union two children 
have been born, Wayne, who now is sixteen years of age, and Lewis, now 
twelve years of age. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clark are members of the First Methodist Episcopal 



714 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

church and are active wprkers in the congregation to which they are attached, 
Mr. Clark being one of the church stewards. Following the example of his 
pioneer forbears, Mr. Clark is a strong temperance advocate and is one of 
the leaders in all the good works of the city in which he lives. In his poli- 
tical views he is quite independent, believing that it is the duty of a good 
citizen to support the ablest and most conscientious men for positions of 
public trust and responsibility, regardless of the party with which candi- 
dates for office are affiliated. He is a member of the Knights of Pythias 
and of the Odd Fellows and takes a warm interest in the affairs of these two 
popular fraternal orders. 

Mr. Clark is an energetic business man and public-spirited citizen who 
has the entire confidence of the community in which he lives and he and 
Mrs. Clark are held in the highest regard by all who have the pleasure of 
their acquaintance. 



CORNELIUS MESSLER. 

Cornelius Messier, a well-known retired citizen of Greensburg, Indiana, 
belongs to a family which served its country most valiantly during the trj-ing 
days of the Civil War. Four Messier brothers, of whom Cornelius was the 
second, hazarded their lives on the battlefields of the Civil War for the 
preservation of the American Union. It is doubtful whether there are any 
families in Decatur county, which can sho\\' a more patriotic record than 
this. A member of Company H, Third Indiana Cavalry, and in the service 
of his country nearly four years, a participant in at least twenty-five severe 
battles, including the battles of Corinth and Pittsburg Landing, Cornelius 
Messier was taken prisoner at Soloman's Grove, North Carolina, on JMarch 
10, and held until the latter part of 1865, a period of sixty days in all. Two 
brothers, James and John, were members of the One Hundredth Regiment, 
Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and one brother, Henrj^ was a soldier in the 
Eleventh Regiment, Indiana \^olunteer Infantry. This country is enthus- 
iastically and reverently proud of the splendid service which was per- 
formed by the heroes of 1861-65. It is not only proud of the service they 
performed during this troubled period, but it is likewise proud to number 
among its citizens in these days of peace the battle-scarred veterans of that 
war, among whom is Cornelius Messier. 

A resident of Greensburg, Indiana, Cornelius Messier lives in a com- 
fortable home, and was born on September 23, 1832, in Hamilton county. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 7$ 5 

Ohio, the son of John S. and Sabina Messier, the former of whom was a 
native of New Jersey, born on August 2, 1797, and who died on September 
30, 1840, the latter of whom was born on April 13, 1809, and died on 
June II, 1849. John S. Messier, who came west from Philadelphia, died 
in Union county, Indiana, and his wife passed away in Salt Creek town- 
ship, Decatur county. They had six children, William F., James, Cornelius, 
John R., Henry, and Mary A. 

When twelve years old, Cornelius Messier was employed to drive a team 
along the Old White Water canal, from Cmcinnati to Cleavestown, and 
thence by the way of the Wabash & Erie canal to Toledo, a distance of 
three hundred and eighty miles. In 1842 the family came to Decatur 
county, where Cornelius lived for one year, and then returned to the state 
of Ohio, and was engaged as a stage-driver in that state for a period of six- 
teen years. In the meantime he worked at various occupations, coming to 
Decatur county, Indiana, to live permanently in 1897. 

Mr. Messier has been twice married, the first time to Sarah A. Hannan, 
who was born on November 5, 1828, and 'who died on February 2, 1883. 
She was buried in Taswell county, Virginia. She was the mother of five 
children, three of whom, Mary A., John and Anna, the youngest, are now 
deceased. The two eldest, William, who was born, October 3, 1855, and 
James H., on June 8, 1859, live near Frankfort, and Hartford City, respec- 
tively. 

Many years after the death of Mrs. Sarah A. (Hannan) Messier, Mr. 
Messier was married again, April 21, 1898, the second time to Sarah Eliza- 
beth Bell, who was born on the Bell homestead on April 11, 1840, and who 
is the daughter of Henson S. and Ann (Marhn) Bell, natives of Woodford 
county, Kentucky, and Monmouth county. New Jersey, respectively, the 
former of whom was the son of Daniel and Nancy Bell. Henson S. Bell, 
who died on November 30, 1890, at the age of eighty-one years, was a mere 
boy when he came from Kentucky to Indiana. For some time he and his 
wife lived in Laurel, but they later moved to a farm, just before the death 
of his wife in 1841. In 1850 he removed to Oregon, driving overland, but 
returned in 1873, and lived on his farm until his death. In the meantime 
he had traveled over Oregon, Washington and California. He had two 
children, Nancy Jane, deceased, who was born in 1837, and who died in 
1856, and Mrs. Cornelius Messier. Daniel Bell, the father of Henson S. 
Bell, died on April 28, 1875, at the age of ninety-five years. His wife, Nancy 
Bell, died on February 8, 1883, at the age of ninety-five. They had come 
to Decatur county in 1822, and homesteaded on government land. On their 



7l6 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

trip to Decatur county they were accompanied by their son, Henson, the 
father of Mrs. Messier. Before returning home they planted a patch of 
corn, and upon coming back to Decatur county found out that the squirrels 
had eaten up the corn. The ten children born to Daniel and Nancy Bell, 
John, Louisa, Henson, George, Thomas, Mary, Nancy, Tarlton, James and 
Julia, are all deceased. 

Mr. and Mrs. Messier have a farm of eightA'-one acres in Fugit town- 
ship, the old Bell homestead, although they have for several years resided 
in Greensburg, where, in October, 1902, they bought a home. They are 
known as among the most delightful people living in the city of Greensburg. 
Mr. Messier is a man who has enjoyed a variety of experiences, and who 
is rich in anecdote of former times, a charming conversationalist, a genial, 
broad-minded citizen, who is revered by his fellow townsmen and honored 
by all with whom he has ever come in contact. Mrs. Messier is a woman of 
most gracious personality, refined and cultured, interested in all worthy 
public movements, and who for many years was a leader among her sex in 
this county. Eminently worthy as both Mr. and Mrs. Messier are, they 
well deserve the respect and esteem of the people of Greensburg and 
Decatur county. Mrs. Messier is now and has been a member of Mt. Carmel 
Methodist Episcopal church since 1855. 



HARRY H. MOUNT. 



Harry H. Mount, of Greensburg, Indiana, formerly a school teacher 
and banker, now a farmer, who owns two hundred and forty acres of land 
near the Shelby county line, is one of the best-known citizens of Decatur 
county. For several years he has been an extensive breeder of Aberdeen 
Angus cattle, and for the past two years has raised only registered cattle. 
His herd consists now of forty-four head, eight of which are registered 
stock. 

Air. Alount was born on December 28, 1875, 01^ ^ farm in Noble town- 
ship, Shelby county, Indiana, two miles west of Clifty, or Milford, the son 
of Thomas J. and Nancy (Thornburg) Mount, natives of Noble township, 
Shelby county, Indiana, the former of whom was born on August 24, 1846, 
and who died on October 10, 1910, and the latter of whom was born on 
July 6, 1844, and who died on September 2, 1894, many years before the 
death of her husband. The late Thomas J. Mount was the son of Matthias 



DECATUR COUNTY^ INDIANA. 717 

and Margaret (Marsh) Mount, natives of Kentucky, the former of whom 
was bom in 1823, and who died in 1893. Coming to Shelby county, Indiana, 
with his father when a mere lad, he eventually succeeded to the land his 
father entered from the government, and it is this land which is now held 
by the Mount family. His wife, who before her marriage was Margaret 
Marsh, was born in 1825, and died, three years before the death of her hus- 
band, in 1890. They had ten children, six of whom lived to maturity, 
Thomas J., was the father of Harry H. ; Mrs. Martha Hanks died on Feb- 
ruary 23, 1913; Amos died in March, 1894; Hannah is deceased; Sarah died 
in 1881; and Mrs. Emma Blackmore lives on the old home place. 

Thomas J. Mount, a successful farmer and stockman, removed to 
Greensburg in November, 1884, from which place he looked after his farm- 
ing interests, living there until 1908, when he returned to the farm, and there 
died. In 1896 he purchased a farm from Frank Butler on the Shelby and 
Decatur county line, a part of which was in Clay township, Decatur county, 
and a part of which was in Shelby county. He owned four hundred and 
fifty acres in all, and at one time was an extensive breeder of Poland China 
hogs. He exercised his right of franchise as a Republican. He and his 
family were members of the Methodist Episcopal church. The late Thomas 
J. and Nancy (Thornburg) Mount had only two children, Harry H., the 
subject of this sketch, and Mrs. Elmer E. Wooden, who lives in Greensburg. 
Mrs. Nancy (Thornburg) Mount was a native of Noble township, Shelby 
county, Indiana, and the daughter of Thomas and Maria (Berry) Thorn- 
burg, who were in turn natives of Pennsylvania, and Ohio, respectively. 
They migrated to Shelby county, Indiana, in the late thirties. 

Educated in the country schools of Decatur county and in the Greens- 
burg high school, Harry H. Mount attended the State University at Bloom- 
ington, Indiana, pursuing his studies in the scientific course. After teaching 
school for two years in Clay township at the Hiner and Brown schools, he 
resigned in 1899 to take a position as bookkeeper in the Third National Bank, 
and from December i, 1899, to May i, 19 12, a period of thirteen years, he 
was bookkeeper and teller at this institution. Since 1912 Mr. Mount has 
been devoting all of his attention in directing the work on his two-hundred- 
and-forty-acre farm on the Shelby county line. 

On June 7, 1905, Harry H. Mount was married to Daisy E. Gartin, of 

Hartford City, Indiana, who is the daughter of Griffith and Laura E. 

(Templeton) Gartin, formerly residents of Decatur county, Indiana. The 

father now lives in Muncie. • Mrs. Mount was born on September 27, 1876, 

■in Decatur county. Her father, who was born in this county on October 



7l8 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

26, 1854, is the son of Griffith Gartin, Sr., a native of A^irginia, and an 
early settler in Decatur county. Her mother, who before her marriage was 
Laura E. Templeton, was born on February 13, 1853, and died on June 25, 
1882, in Franklin county. She was the daughter of John Templeton, who 
came to Decatur county in an early day. Mrs. Mount is the only child born 
to her father's first marriage. 

A Republican in party politics, Harry H. Mount is a member of the 
Greensburg city council, and is giving efficient service to his fellow towns- 
men as a public official and an enterprising and public-spirited citizen. ]\lr. 
and Mrs. Mount are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. He is a 
member of the Knights of Pythias Lodge No. 148, at Greensburg, and for 
seven years has been keeper of records and seal. Mr. and Mrs. Mount live 
in a modern home, and both are well educated and highly refined. Mrs. 
Alount is treasurer of the Department Club at Greensburg, and both take 
an active part in the social life of the city. 



SA.MUEL H. STEWART. 

The Stewart family in Decatur county was founded by Adam L. Stew- 
art, a native of South Carolina, born in 181 1, and who died in 1896. From 
South Carolina, he immigrated with his father, James Stewart, to Ohio, and 
it was here that he was reared. From Ohio he came to Rush county about 
183.?, and one year later moved to Fugit township, Decatur county, Indiana, 
where he settled. Here he married Isabella Hood, the daughter of Samuel 
and Isabella (Lee) Hood, whose grandfather, John Carson, of Virginia, 
was a soldier in the American Revolution. Isabella Hood was born in Ken- 
tucky in 1816 and died in 1888. She was brought to Decatur county by her 
father, Samuel Hood, who came in 1827. In 1852 Adam L. and Isabella 
(Hood) Stewart moved to a farm in Clinton township, consisting of eighty 
acres and here they lived until their deaths. 

Samuel H. Stewart, who is one of eight children born to Adam L. and 
Isabella Stewart, and who is a prominent stock dealer and farmer of Greens- 
burg, now living retired, is the subject of this sketch. Samuel H. Stewart 
was born on January 26, 1837, in Fugit township. He was the eldest child 
born to his parents, the others being James, who died at the age of thirteen; 
Mrs. Sophia Weed, deceased; Eliza, who died in 1868; Mrs. Nancy Amanda 
Foley, a widow who lives in Greensburg; John, of Kansas City; Margaret, 
who died in April, 1914, and Mary, who died at the age of two years. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 7I9. 

Samuel H. Stewart, who responded to President Lincoln's first call for 
volunteers, enlisted in Company F, Seventh Regiment, Indiana Volunteer 
Infantry, in 1861 and served three months, being mustered out in July, 1861. 
He was in the first battle of the Civil War at Philippi, Virginia, and also 
served throughout the Cheat river campaign. 

On November 9, 1865, Mr. Stewart was married to Hannah Donnell, 
who was born on August 9, 1837, in Fugit township, and who is the daugh- 
ter of Samuel Addison and Mary (Lowe) Donnell, natives of Kentucky, 
the former of whom was born in 1808 and died in 1870 and the latter born 
in 1810 and died in 1858. Samuel Donnell, whose wife was Hannah Quiett 
of Kentucky, settled in Decatur county in 1823. He was the son of James 
Donnell, a native of Pennsylvania and a pioneer settler in Kentucky. James 
Donnell married Catherine Gibson, a native of Virginia. Six children were 
born to Samuel A. and Mary (Lowe) Donnell, as follow: Mrs. Hester Jane 
Rankin, of Greensburg; Luther, who died in Fugit township; Hannah; Seth, 
deceased; Thomas R., of Greensburg, and Mrs. Rebecca Angelina Miller, of 
Franklin, Indiana. The Donnell family is a very large one in this section of 
the country. Mrs. Mary (Lowej Donnell, the mother of these children, was 
a daughter of Seth and Rebecca (Ryan) Lowe, the latter of Virginia. He 
was the first settler in the Kingston neighborhood, the Hamiltons and Mc- 
Coys coming in 1823, he preceding them by two years. Although a member 
of the Baptist church, he attended the Presbyterian church and was a man 
of charitable and benevolent disposition. ' He reared several children beside 
his own family, and was known during his day and generation as a noble 
character. 

After 'Sir. and Mrs. Stewart were married, they settled in Clinton town- 
ship and in 1871 moved to Greensburg, where he engaged permanently in 
the live stock lousiness. This business, however, he had really begun in 
1855. During his life, Mr. Stewart has bought and sold thousands of cattle 
and hogs. In the early days he shipped from three to fifteen carloads of cat- 
tle and the same number of carloads of hogs, at one time. He shipped to 
Buffalo, Pittsburgh and Cincinnati, principally. Although Mr. Stewart has 
owned as high as two hundred and fifty acres of land, he now owns only 
sixty acres in Clinton township. His farm of two hundred acres which he 
owns, three miles south of Greensburg, he is now selling ofi: from time to 
time. After selling the farm, Mr. Stewart leased it for a period of twenty 
years. 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel H. Stewart have been the parents of four chil- 
dren, Mary, who is the wife of Charles J. Erdmann, of Greensburg; Edna.. 



-J2.0 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 



who is employed by the State Life Insurance Company, at Indianapolis; 
Anna, who is employed on the Grcensbitrg Review and who was formerly a 
school teacher, and Kate, who lives at home. 

An independent Republican in politics, Mr. Stewart is a great admirer 
of President Wilson. Religiously, he is a member of the Presbyterian 
church as is Mrs. Stewart also. Fraternally, he is a member of the Free and 
Accepted Masons and the Pap Thomas Post No. 5, Grand Army of the 
Republic. 



RE\\ JOHN ADAM URJCH. 

Decatur county has been the home and the scene of the labors of many 
men whose lives should serve as a lesson and an inspiration to those who 
follow them upon the stage of life's activities — men who have been of 
larger usefulness to the community than in clearing the wilderness or 
amassing great personal fortune. The honored and esteemed Rev. John 
Adam Urich, pastor of St. Mary's church at Millhousen in Marion town- 
ship for the past eleven years, is a man of well-rounded character, sincere, 
devoted and loyal. Standing as he does today at the head of one of the 
more important Catholic churches in Decatur county, it is fitting that a brief 
summary of his life and work be given in this volume. 

Born on February 16, 1863, at St. Joe, Vanderburg county, Indiana, he 
is the son of Bernard and Barbara (Wiedner) Urich, the former of whom 
was born January i, 1818, and who died on April 5, 1887, and the latter of 
whom was born in 1820 and died on June 27, 1909. Both were natives of 
Hambach, Bavaria, Gemiany, and were born, reared and married in their 
native land. With their children, Barbara, Mary and Peter, they came to 
America in 1854, locating in the Catholic settlement at St. Joe, near German 
township, Vanderburg county, Indiana, a distinct German emigrant neighbor- 
hood. The father became a well-to-do citizen, who owned one hundred 
and eighty acres of land and who died in good circumstances in his old 
home in Vanderburg county. A brother of his wife, having urged him to 
locate in America, he and his wife being of sickly natures, on their doctor's 
advice, came to Indiana. Thej' had seven children, of whom John Adam 
was the youngest. The other children were: Mrs. Barbara Nurenbern, of 
Vanderburg county; Mrs. Mary Pallet, of Evansville; Peter, who lives on 
the old home place ; Joseph, of Vanderburg county ; Mrs. Margaret Cztel- 
Mer, deceased: Regina Czteller, of Evansville. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 72 1 

After having studied at Tentopolis College in Illinois for two years, the 
Rev. John Adam Urich entered St. Meinrad College, in Spencer county, Indi- 
ana, where he remained for eight years, finishing the theological seminary 
course. He was ordained a priest by Bishop Francis S. Chatard, at Ferdi- 
nand, Indiana, on June 19, 1886, and was assigned the pastorate of St. 
Anne's church in Jennings county, where he remained until June 15, 1904, 
when he was placed in charge of St. Mary's church at Millhousen. 

During the Rev. John Adam Urich's pastorate of St. Mary's church 
all of the parish buildings, including the church, school house, the priest's 
house and the sisters' house, have been painted and reroofed. Three altars, 
costing two thousand dollars, have been purchased. The interior of the 
priest's house and the sisters' residence have been renovated, cement walks 
have been installed, school grounds have been graded, and a wire fence has 
been erected around the entire property. Gas lights have been installed 
inside and outside of the church and many other minor improvements have 
been made. There can be no doubt that the pastorate of the Rev. John 
Adam Urich has been a distinct success. This is a large parish and com- 
prises altogether one hundred and si.xty families. 

The Rev. Father Urich is not only successful in his pastoral duties, 
but he is an eloquent and forceful preacher, a man well learned in the his- 
toric foundation of Christianity and a man who is able to inspire his par- 
ishioners with love of the Christian church. 



GEORGE MENZIE. 



Probably there is no man in Decatur county who has a wider acquaint- 
ance in the county than the gentleman whose name the reader notes above. 
One of the most extensive buyers and shippers of live stock in this section "of 
Indiana, he is known to every farmer hereabout and is popular with them 
all. There is hardly a day in the year that George Menzie does not ship 
from his yards in Greensburg from one to four cars of cattle, his business 
aggregating more than five hundred cars annually. In the operation of this 
extensive business he distributes thousands of dollars throughout the county 
and is recognized as one of the most active and energetic men in this part of 
the state. No review of the activities of this county would be complete 
without a proper reference to Mr. Menzie's part therein, hence it is very 
fitting that the following biographv be set out here. 
(46) 



722 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

George JNIenzie was born in the city of Greensburg, Indiana, on Janu- 
ary 6, 1871, the son of John and Mary (Luther) [Nlenzie, the former of 
whom was a native of Switzerland and the latter of whom was born in 
Greensburg, this county, both of whom are still living, enjoying their latter 
days in quiet retirement at their pleasant home in the county seat. 

John Menzie was born in Switzerland on December 12, 1837, the son of 
Jacob and Verina (Snaille) Menzie, the former of whom was a shoemaker. 
During his early boyhood, John Menzie worked for his uncle in a saw-mill 
and at the age of sixteen years decided to seek his fortunes in the land of 
opportunities across the sea. Coming to America, he proceeded to Law- 
renceburg, Indiana, at which place his brother, Jacob, had located some years 
previously. Shortly after his arrival at Lawrenceburg he and his brother 
went to Chicago, with a view to possible permanent location there, but not 
finding things just to their liking, returned to Indiana. John went to Greens- 
burg, where for a short time he worked for Charles Zoller in a meat market, 
later taking occupation as a farm hand in the Springhill neighborhood, in 
this county. After two years of this form of experience, he returned to 
Greensburg and entered the butcher business,' working for Harvey Ander- 
son and George Menzie, presently becoming the sole owner of this business, 
in which he became quite prosperous, gradually enlarging the scope of the 
same to include general dealing in cattle and hogs, becoming an extensive 
shipper. His shop was located on the corner, which he then owned, but is 
now occupied by the I. O. O. F. building. In 1905 he turned the business 
over to his sons, John and George, since which time he has been retired 
from active business cares. 

At the outbreak of the Civil War John Menzie sold out his butcher shop 
and enlisted in Company F, Seventh Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry-. 
After three months of service, however, he was seized with a serious illness, 
which so incapacitated him that he was discharged. Returning to Greens- 
burg he found his invalidism did not properly respond to local treatment and 
took a trip to Europe, finding his health greatly improved thereby. Upon 
recovering his wonted health, Mr. Menzie returned to Greensburg and 
resumed the butcher business, success attending him from the very start. 

On September 29, 1861, John Menzie was united in marriage to INIarv 
Luther, who was born in Greensburg on October 8, 1844, the daughter of 
Caleb and Elizabeth (Nice) Luther, natives, respectively, of Massachusetts 
and Pennsylvania. Caleb Luther was a contractor and builder who located 
in Greensburg in the early days and was an active builder there for years. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 723 

In 1856 he bought a small farm near the city and there spent the rest of his 
life. His wife, Elizabeth Nice, was the first teacher in the old seminary in 
Greensburg, a woman who exerted a very wholesome influence upon the 
youth of that day in and about the county seat and whose memory still is 
kept green in this county. Mr. and Mrs. Luther were the parents of four 
children, Mrs. Abbie Whipple, who died in Iowa; Mrs. Frances Gilchrist, 
who also died in Iowa; Edward, who died in Leavenworth, Kansas, and 
Mrs. Menzie. To Mr. and Mrs. Menzie were born two sons, John and 
George, both of whom live at Greensburg. Two daughters died in infancy. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Menzie are members of the Presbyterian church and 
are held in the highest esteem in the city in which they live. Mr. Menzie is 
a Democrat and formerly took much interest in political affairs. He is a 
member of Pap Thomas Post No. 5, Grand Army of the Republic, and a 
member of the Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias and the Knights and 
Ladies of Honor lodges in Greensburg, in all of which he is very popular. 

George Menzie was educated in the local schools at Greensburg and 
at the age of fifteen went to Cincinnati where he remained for three years, 
learning the butcher business. At the end of this time he returned to Greens- 
burg and for one year worked for Charles Zoller, after which he and his 
brother, John, engaged in the butcher business for themselves, continuing 
this association for ten years, at the end of which time, in 1912, John' sold 
his interest to his brother, George, having conducted the business alone since 
that time, being the exclusive buyer and shipper of live stock in the city of 
Greensburg, his shipments amounting to as much as five hundred carloads 
of cattle and hogs annually. 

On December 25, 1892, George Menzie was united in marriage to Mollie 
Rader, daughter of Andrew and Elizabeth Rader, of Greensburg, and to 
this union one child has been born, a daughter, Elizabeth, on July 12, 1894, 
who is bookkeeper and stenographer for the Sal-Tone Company, of Greens- 
burg. 

Mr. Menzie is a Democrat and is particularly active in the lodge circles 
of the city in which he lives. He entered the Odd Fellows and Knights of 
Pythias lodges when he was twenty-one years of age; has passed through 
all the chairs in the encampment of the former order and is past chancellor 
commander of the local lodge of the latter order. He also is an active mem- 
ber of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and is a prime favorite 
in all these lodges. Mr. Menzie is a busy, energetic man, public-spirited and 
progressive and is regarded as one of the leaders in the busy life of his 
home city. 



724 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

JAMES B. LATHROP. 

James B. Lathrop, the president of the Citizens National Bank at 
Greensburg, Indiana, who is still active in business at the age of ninety 
years, has had a most interesting career as a pioneer citizen of Indiana. 
Born of patriotic stock, he represents the second generation of a family 
which has lived in Decatur county practically ever since the town of Greens- 
burg was laid out in 1822. For thirty-one years a minister of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church, he perhaps served as pastor of more cities in Indiana 
than any other living man. Few men, living or dead, have had more to do 
with Indiana Methodism than he, having served as pastor in fifteen or 
twenty Indiana cities, and having in less than twenty years after he began 
his career as a minister of the Gospel, became a presiding elder in the Meth- 
odist church. For many years, however, he has been retired from the min- 
istry, and has been engaged in business in the city of Greensburg. 

The Lathrop family had its original home during the fourteenth cen- 
tury in northeastern Yorkshire, England, in what was known at that time 
as Lothroppe College Rectory, a church and school. The founder of the 
family in America was the Rev. John Lathrop, a Congregational preacher, 
whose church in the city of London was raided under the Archbishop of the 
English church and all of the congregation, including the minister and 
sixtj'-six men, thrown into prison. The Rev. John Lathrop was released 
after having been kept in prison for five years, and took the first vessel for 
America, landing at Plymouth Rock, where he was greeted by forty of his 
old congregation. For four years he served as pastor of the church at 
Scituate in what is now Plymouth county, and was then appointed chaplain 
to the governor at Boston, where he spent the remainder of his life. He 
was accustomed to write the annual Thanksgiving proclamation for the 
governor of Massachusetts. 

The next member of the Lathrop family in line of descent from Rev. 
John Lathrop was Erastus Lathrop, a native of Connecticut, who moved to 
Canada, and whose property was confiscated by the crown during the War 
of 1812. He returned to this country and settled in Vermont, where he 
owned a fine farm on the St. Lawrence river. A brother of Erastus, Ezra 
by name, served during the War of 1812. Erastus himself was a captain 
in the home guards, a company which was called out at the battle of Lake 
Champlain. He was a well-known Baptist minister in his day and genera- 
tion. On his father's farm, located near the St. Lawrence river in Canada, 
Ezra Lathrop, the father of James B., was born in 1803. Ezra was a native 




i;i:V. JAMES H. LATIIUdP. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 725 

of Canada and was reared in that country. During the year of 1812 the 
family refused to take the oath of allegiance to the British crown. About 
1822, the year in which the town of Greensburg was laid out, Ezra Lathrop 
came west to Decatur county, Indiana, with his father. They selected one 
hundred and sixty acres of land adjoining the site of the county seat, and 
also another one hundred and sixty acres north of the present site of Greens- 
burg. Erastus, having returned home to bring back the family, died of 
typhoid fever. Ezra, the brother, came to Dearborn county, Indiana, in 
1817, and grew to manhood, the hired man having, in the meantime, made 
a camp out of the bark of a poplar tree. During the winter of 1812 they 
lived on the site of Webb Woodfill's present residence. They cleared ten 
acres of land and in the spring returned for the mother and her other 
children. 

Ezra Lathrop married Abi Potter, a member of the pioneer family of 
Huguenot descent, who fled from France, and who settled first in South 
Carolina, and later migrated to North Carolina. Nathaniel Potter, the 
father of Abi Potter, lived near where the battle of Cowpens was fought, 
and he had four brothers who were soldiers in the American Revolution. 
Subsecpiently he moved into Kentucky and from there moved to Decatur 
county, where he purchased several tracts of land. He gave each of his 
eight children eighty acres, and retained for his own use one hundred and 
sixty acres east of town. He was an important man in his day and genera- 
tion and was considered extremely wealthy. Ezra Lathrop inherited con- 
siderable land from his father. During the first few years of his residence 
in Decatur county he did odd jobs, and during the second year he got a 
contract with another man for the building of the brick school house in 
Fugit township. The partner, however, absconded with all the profits, and 
Ezra got nothing. Eventually, however, he became a successful contractor 
and a manufacturer of brick, building many houses in Greensburg. He 
served as justice of the peace, having jurisdiction over the entire county, 
and held this ofBce for a period of twenty years. A dry goods merchant, 
he also loaned money. The old home farm, adjacent to the town of Greens- 
burg, two miles north, and upon which a part of the present city of Greens- 
burg is built, he sold for two hundred and fifty dollars per acre. After 
having reared a family of two children to maturity, Ezra Lathrop died in 
1894. Six children, however, were born to himself and wife, four of them 
dying in infancy. Levi, one of the sons who grew to maturity, died m 
1884, and the other son is James B., the subject of this sketch, who was 
born on November 24, 1825, in a one-story brick house, which stood in the 



726 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

second square from the court house on East Washington street, and which 
Ezra Lathrop had buih probably in 1823. 

The venerable James B. Latlirop received an extraordinary education 
for his day and generation, having been instructed in the pioneer schools 
of Greensburg, and at Indiana University. Immediately after leaving col- 
lege he entered the ministry of the Methodist Episcopal church. Beginning 
in 1847, at the age of twent_y-two, he served almost continuously as pastor 
of some church for thirty-one years. He was first called upon to fill a 
vacancy on the Martinsville circuit. Later he was transferred to Greenville, 
having in the meantime eighteen appointments in school houses, homes and 
churches. At Vincennes, Indiana, he had a very hard field, but was able 
to establish two new churches. From Vincennes he was transferred to 
Point Commerce on the Wabash river. From Point Commerce he went to 
Franklin, Indiana, a very poor church, which had only fifty members as late 
as 1 85 1. Among other charges he was pastor of the church at Conner s- 
ville, Vevay, Madison, Brookville, Columbus, Rushville, Aurora and Adams. 
When he went to Adams, there were only sixteen members, and within two 
years during his pastorate the church had increased to one hundred mem- 
bers and a new building had been dedicated. The Greensburg church had 
the best village Sunday school in Decatur county. 

After a brief absence from the ministry, during which he was engaged 
in business with his brother at Greensburg, he returned to Connersville in 
the fall of 1864, and became presiding elder, a position which he held for 
two years, having jurisdiction over the Indianapolis district, and completing 
the balance of the six-year term on Moores Hill district, as the result of hav- 
ing traded districts with Elder Holliday, of Moores Hill. He was presiding 
elder of the Lawrenceburg and Moores Hill districts for six years each. 

At one time Reverend Lathrop was in charge of the Grace Methodist 
Episcopal church in Indianapolis, but on account of the death of his brother 
and the aged parents, he returned home and served as pastor within the 
Milroy circuit for four years. 

On the death of his brother in 1884. Mr. Lathrop became guardian 
for his children, and had charge of his deceased brother's estate. Subse- 
cjuently, he became guardian for two girls left fatherless, and ser\'ed in this 
capacity for five j'ears. The father having been a mill owner, Mr. Lathrop 
operated the mill for the children for one year, selling the mill to a com- 
pany. He operated the mill for the company for five years. He has been 
connected with the Citizens K'ational Bank of Greensburg for many years, 
and on his father's death became manager of his estate, assisted by Lewis 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 727 

E. Lathrop, which position he held until 1884, when he turned the estate, 
amounting to a hundred thousand dollars, over to his children. 

In this connection it may be said that Mr. Lathrop's career as a minis- 
ter ended with a final period of four years during which he was a junior 
preacher on the Milroy circuit. 

On November 28, 1848, James B. Lathrop was married to Mary C. 
Butler, who was born in Bloomington, Indiana, and who was the daughter 
of F. T. Butler. Mrs. Lathrop was born in 1830 and died in 1897. She 
was the mother of six children, two of whom died early in life. Levi died 
at the age of twelve years, and William died at the age of two years. The 
other children are Mrs. Ella Gavin, wife of Judge Gavin, of Indianapolis; 
Lizzie, who lives with her father; Harry, the secretary of the Business 
Men's Association of Greensburg, and Mrs. Margaret Shannon, wife of 
John Shannon, who lives one and one-half miles northwest of Greensburg. 

James B. Lathrop has been a life-long Republican. Fraternally, he 
is a member of the Free and Accepted Masons, and is a Knight Templar, 
being a member of the Baldwin Commandery at Shelbyville, Indiana. 

Possessed with a genius for public service, the influence of James B. 
Lathrop will live when he is gone. As his career is nearing a close he may 
enjoy the satisfaction of looking back on a life which has been spent in his 
Master's vineyard. Having carried the Christian Gospel to the people of 
this state at a time when it involved a greater sacrifice than at present, and 
having been a true servant, it is not too much to believe that his work will 
be approved by the One he has served in these well-known words, 

"Well done, thou good and faithful servant." 

Mr. Lathrop became a stockholder of the Citizens Bank at Greens- 
burg, Indiana, in 1873. He has served as president of the bank for sev- 
eral years. 



ANTHONY HABIG. 



Among the thriving businesses in Decatur county, Indiana, is that of 
the Habig Real Estate Agency, established in 1897 by Anthony Habig. This 
firm not only deals in farms and city properties in Indiana and Ohio, but 
also has a large loan business and deals in lands in Texas, Louisiana, Florida, 
Canada and Oklahoma. The company has handled a considerable acreage 
of land during its existence, Mr. Habig buying and selling thousands of acres 
principally upon the commission basis. 

Although Anthony Habig is not a native of this county, he has resided 



728 . DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

here now for twenty-five years and is naturally well known. He was bora 
in Cincinnati on December 5, 1870, the son of Joseph and Theresa Habig, 
natives of Cincinnati, who moved to Indiana in 1880 and located on a farm 
one mile east of Shelbyville. They later resided in Greensburg and he was 
engaged in the milling business until 1897, when they moved to Indianapolis, 
where they died in 1905. 

Mr. Habig has resided in Greensburg since 1890. From 1890 to 1897, 
he was employed in the office of the mill operated by his father. In the 
latter year he engaged in the real estate business and has been continuously 
engaged since that time. 

In 1 89 1 Mr. Habig was married to Ethel Fromer, of Greensburg and 
to them have been born two children. Marguerite and Velma. 

A Democrat in politics, Mr. Habig has never taken a special part in 
the councils of his party. He has never held office nor has he ever aspired to 
office, devoting his time almost exclusively to his own private business. 
Fraternally, Mr. Habig is a member of the Knights of Columbus and the 
Knights of St. John and is prominent in both organizations. The Habig 
family are all members of the Catholic church and are liberal contributors to 
its support. 

Anthony Habig is a man, who, in his dealings with the public, has 
established an enviable reputation for honorable and square dealings. In 
his business especially this is an important asset and it is responsible largely 
for the splendid clientage which he today enjoys. He also handles old 
line fire insurance, Hanover Fire Insurance Company, New York City; 
Aachen and Munich, New York City ; also has a rent-collecting depart- 
ment. 



BERNARD H. BLANKMAN. 

In the history of our country, the schoolroom has led directly to many 
positions of trust and responsibility, and many of our celebrated statesmen 
today are men who began their active careers in life as teachers in the pub- 
lic schools. Bernard H. Blankman, the present surveyor of Decatur county, 
Indiana, who began teaching at the age of eighteen, was engaged continu- 
ously in this profession for fourteen years. He is a man who is well known 
to the people of Decatur county, and Who, having given a satisfactory meas- 
ure of service during his first term as county surveyor, was triumphantly 
re-elected in the fall of 1914 to serve a second term. 




Mil. AXI* .MKS. l!Ei;XAltl> II. BLA.NKMAX. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 729 

Bernard H. Blankman, the county surveyor of Decatur county, was 
born on October 28, 1877, at Millhousen. Indiana, where he now resides. 
He is the son of Henry and Mary (Goldschmidt) Blankman, the former of 
whom was born on December 6, 1849, '" Cincinnati, and the latter of whom 
was born in 1857 in the same city. Nine children were born to Henry and 
Mary Blankman ; Bernard, the subject of this sketch ; Edward, Frank, 
August, William and Mrs. Clara Vaske, all of whom reside at Bigelow, 
Minnesota ; Mrs. Josephine Ruhl, who lives in Millhousen ; John and Theo- 
dore, who still live at home. 

Henry Blankman was the son of Bernard H. and Angela (Lueken) 
Blankman, both of whom were born in Germany, although not in the same 
state. They came to America when still young people, met and were mar- 
ried in Cincinnati, Ohio. They moved to Millhousen, Decatur county, when 
their son, Henry, was six year old. Mr. Blankman's maternal grandparents 
were John Bernard and Elizabeth (Brinkers) Goldschmidt, who were also 
born in Germany. They moved to Millhousen, Decatur county, when Mr. 
Blankman's mother was eleven years old. Henry Blankman and Mary 
Goldschmidt were married in Millhousen. 

Bernard H. Blankman attended the parochial school at Millhousen 
until fourteen years of age, and was then a student in the district school. 
No. 6, in Marion township, being graduated from the district school at the 
age of seventeen. Sybsequently, he attended the Central Nomial College 
at Danville, Indiana, during the summer of 1895, preparatory to teaching. 
He has learned surveying by home study and by practical work. Mr. Blank- 
man taught school for fourteen years, having begun at the, age of eighteen. 
He taught until 1913, when he assumed the duties of surveyor, having been 
elected to the office in November, 1912. This office was wholly unsought, 
as Mr. Blankman is in no sense of the word a politician. He gave such 
excellent service that he was re-elected in 1914. During the three years 
that he has held the office he has had no trouble and during this period has 
had charge of all land sui'veys, the building of macadamized roads and all 
bridges in Decatur county. Mr. Blankman has one hundred acres of land — 
well improved farm — which he rents out. He, however, still lives on his 
farm. 

On June 7, 1905, Mr. Blankman was married in Millhousen to Clara 
M. Hardebeck, who was born at Millhousen on December 4, 1885, and who- 
is the dauglrrer of Henry and Rebecca (Funke) Hardebeck, the former of 
whom was born near Marion, Indiana, on January 27, 1840, and who died 
on October 10, 191 3. The latter was born in Germany on Februaiy 2,, 



yoQ ' DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

1845. They were the parents of the following children: Mrs. Josephine 
Steltenpohl; Mrs. Mary Butz; Mrs. Cecelia Ronnebaum; Frances, at home; 
Theodore, a farmer of Marion township; Louis and Henry, also at home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Blankman have had five children: Cyril, who was born 
on December 14, 1907; Paul, August 20, 1909; Alvin, May 17, 1911 ; Laura, 
October 21, 1913, and Or^^al Theo, June 20, 1915. 

Fraternally, Mr. Blankman is a member of the Knights of St. John. 
He and his wife and family are members of the Catholic church and he is 
identified with the Democratic party. He owes his nomination and election 
as county sun'eyor to this party. 



HARRY EiMMERT. 



An enterprise of which the people of Greensburg are very proud, and 
one which finally passed under the control of local capitalists, is the Greens- 
burg Water Company, which supplies water to the citizens of Greensburg 
from thirty driven wells by the latest compressed air system. The Greens- 
burg Water Company, of which Harry Emmert is vice-president and gen- 
eral manager, has one of the finest plants in Indiana, and one which is en- 
tirely adec]uate for a much larger city. The new system, which was installed 
in 1915 after two years' work at a cost of forty thousand dollars, makes 
it possible to pump water to a radius of one and one-half miles. Although 
this company was organized in 188S by Samuel R. Bullock, a few years 
later it was owned by the Prudential Waaler Company, of Rochester, New 
York, and in 1901 passed to the control of residents of this city. For 
almost twenty years Harry Emmert has been the general manager of this 
plant, and its splendid success is so closely intertwined with his career as a 
business man, that it seems fitting here to emphasize its importance to the 
comfort and convenience of the city of Greensburg. The present president 
of the company is David A. Myers. Mr. Emmert is \'ice-president and gen- 
eral manager. James B. Kitchen is secretary and treasurer. These ofiicers 
with W. W. Woodfill and W^ H. Robbins comprise the board of directors. 
The company, which is capitalized at one hundred thousand dollars, employs 
ten people. 

Harry Emmert, who has been general manager of the Greensburg 
Water Company since 1896, was born on October 6, 1868, in Greensburg. 
but is the son of native-born German parents, John and Catherine (Seitz) 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 73 1 

Emmert. The former, who was born in Mannheim, Germany, came to this 
country a poor boy, and attended night school after coming here to obtain 
an education. Coming to Greensburg, Indiana, in 1866, he built the Gar- 
land mills, and operated these mills until his death. Before coming to 
Greensburg he had lived in Lawrenceburg, to which place he came in 1853. 
He not only was engaged in the milling business, but he was a miller by 
trade, as was his father before him, and no doubt his technical knowledge 
of the business was, in a large measure, responsible for his great success. 
During his life John Emmert was an influential man in Decatur county. A 
Democrat in politics, he served as councilman of Greensburg for a number 
of years, and was public-spirited, progressive, industrious and became very 
wealthy. A member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows for many 
years, he was prominent in that organization. There- were three eventful 
years .in the career of John Emmert. In 1845, when he came to America 
with his parents and located at Trenton, New Jersey; in 1853, when he 
located at Lawrenceburg, where he was married to Catherine Seitz, and 
in 1866, when he came to Greensburg, Indiana, where the most of his for- 
tune was acquired. His wife, who before her marriage was Catherine Seitz, 
was born in Alsace-Lorraine, and was brought to America with her parents 
when four years old, in 1838. They first located in Hamilton, Ohio, but 
her father, Christopher Seitz. later removed to Dearborn county, where he 
became a farmer. John Emmert died in 1882, while his wife survived him 
many years, dying in 1909. 

Harry Emmert grew up in the milling business of his father, having 
worked in his father's mill from the time he was a small lad. In the mean- 
time he received a liberal education in the public and high schools of Greens- 
burg, and when finishing high school was reasonably well equipped for a 
business career. At the age of twenty-eight he became manager of the 
Greensburg Water Company, and with the growth of this company he also 
has grown as a business man, having become, in the meantime, president of 
the Citizens Gas Supply Company, a fifteen thousand dollar corporation, 
president of the Sand Creek Gas Company, a five thousand dollar corpora- 
tion, which supplies natural gas to the Citizens Gas Supply Company, besides 
being extensively interested in other important local enterprises. 

Mr. Emmert has never married. He is a Democrat in politics and a 
member of the Presbyterian church. He is a member of the JMasonic lodge, 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and the Benevolent and Protective 
-Order of Elks. 

Water, as we all know, is a public utility and a public convenience and 



732 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

necessity, and the man who is responsible for furnishing pure, clean water 
to the people of a city, performs a greater ser^'ice than a man can perform 
in almost any other way. Air. Emmert is a skilled manager, and being sup- 
plied with the best equipment, he -naturally is in a position to maintain cordial 
relations with the public. In the city of Greensburg he is very popular.. 



NELSON AIOWREY. 



Decatur county has produced men who have risen to distinction in 
many different fields of endeavor, but it is safe to say that no man has made 
a more pronounced success of agriculture than Nelson Mowrey. Born in 
this county more than eighty years ago, he has made it his life-long resi- 
dence and has never cared to exchange it for any other home. Decatur 
county has been good enough for him. 

There is probably no other occupation which yields the certain returns 
that may come to the farmer, and the striking success which has attended 
the efforts of Mr. Mowrey are ample evidence that he has applied his ener- 
gies in such a way as to produce maximum results. Starting out in life 
with only a small competency he has labored to the end that he has accu- 
mulated more material wealth from the soil than any other farmer who has 
ever tilled the soil in the county. 

But it is not mere wealth which makes a man. If it were, there would 
be no outcry against the men of wealth in this country today. It is the 
use of the wealth once gained which marks the true American citizen, and 
it is in this particular that Mr. Alowrey stands high in the estimation of his 
fellow citizens. More than one church in the county can testify to his 
generosity; more than one congregation in the county today is doing the 
Master's work better and more efficiently because of the broad philanthro- 
pic spirit of Mr. Mowrey. The crowning act of Mr. Mowrey, however, 
which shows his worth as a public-spirited citizen was his gift to the city 
of Greensburg which made the magnificent new Young Men's Christian 
Association building a possibihty. This was erected in 191 5, solely through 
the munificence of Mr. Mowrey and will stand as a monument through 
many generations 3'et to come. Thus it may be seen why Air. Mowrey 
merits the title of the "Grand old man of Greensburg." 

Nelson Mowrey, the son of Joel and Priscilla ( King) Alowrey, was 
born on July 30, 1832, in Clay township, Decatur county, Indiana. His 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. y^iZ 

father, a native of Kentucky, was a thrift)^ citizen for his day and genera- 
tion and when he came from Kentucky to Decatur county in the early twen- 
ties, he at once set about to carve a place out of the primeval wilderness. 
Here he and his good wife lived until their death, he passing away in 1834, 
when Nelson was only two years of age. The mother was left with a fam- 
ily of four children, Nelson being the youngest. The other three children, 
John L., Malinda Jane and Thurza Ann, are deceased. Nelson was born 
in a log cabin which is still standing. His mother lived to a ripe old age, 
dying at the age of seventy-eight in 1880. 

Educational opportunities were exceedingly meager in the boyhood days 
of Mr. Mowrey. The old-fashioned log school house was still in vogue and 
the only school was what was known as the subscription school and was in 
session seldom more than three months in the year. It is a well-known fact 
that the long nine months' vacation often caused the youngsters of that day 
to forget practically all that they had learned in the short three months 
that they were permitted to attend during the winter season. Nevertheless, 
Mr. Mowrey got a good knowledge of the elements of the "Three R's" in 
such a school and this was supplemented by wide reading in later life so 
that he became a well-informed man. He continued to reside on the home 
farm with his mother and the other members of the family until he was 
twenty-four years of age, at which time he was given his share in the pater- 
nal estate, which amounted to fourteen hundred dollars, and with this small 
amount he started out to make his way alone in the world. It is not the 
purpose of this brief summary of Mr. Mowrey's life to follow his career 
in detail through the long years which have followed. Only the larger 
landmarks in his career will be noticed. 

On March i, 1857, Mr. Mowrey moved to a farm one and one-half 
miles south of the old home place and six miles west of Greensburg. This 
farm of eighty acres was soon increased by the purchase of one hundred 
and forty-five acres, and on this farm of two hundred and twenty-five acres, 
he lived until 1887. In the meantime he had been buying land in other 
parts of the county and in 1887 he moved on to one of his eighty-acre farms 
in Clay township. Year after year saw his acreage increase until he had 
accumulated twenty-eight hundred acres of land in the county. 

The acquisition of such an extensive estate could only come about by 
the closest application and the widest foresight. Much of the wealth of 
Mr. Mowrey has come about by the natural increase in the value of his 
land, much of which has increased several fold in value since he acquired it. 
Mr. Mowrey continued in the active management of his extensive farming 



734 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

interests until his marriage in the fall of 1907, since which time he has made 
his home in Greensburg. 

J\ir. Mowrey was married on October 2, 1907, to Carrie F. Seitz, who 
was born in Patriot, Indiana, a daughter of Michael and Sophia Seitz. 
Her parents were natives of Germany and first located in Switzerland 
county, Indiana, upon coming to this country. A few years later they set- 
tled in Dearborn county where they made their home the remainder of 
their lives. 

The career of Mr. 2iIowrey has been altogether too active as a farmer 
and financier to permit of any participation in politics. He has always been 
identified with the Republican party and given it his hearty support at all 
times. \\'hile he leans to the Christian church, yet he has been a generous 
contributor to all denominations. Fraternally, he has been a member of 
the Free and Accepted ]Masons at ]\Iilford for many years. 



WALTER W. BOXXER. 

The life of every man is influenced by two factors, heredity and envi- 
ronment, and no one can say which of these two factors has the most to do 
with determining the career of a man. Fortunate, indeed, is the man who 
has good blood in his veins, for undoubtedly, as the old adage says, "Blood 
will tell." However, there are too many exceptions to the stateinent that 
heredity counts for everything; too many men of the Lincoln type have 
risen to fame to believe that heredity accounts for all our eminent men. 
Environment must be given credit for many things and he who says that 
one or the other factor makes a man assumes a knowledge of men which 
the facts will not warrant. The career of Walter W. Bonner happily illus- 
trates a combination of heredity and environment and in his case both 
factors have united in such a manner as to make him a man of the highest 
type of American citizenship. 

Starting in life as a lawyer, Mr. Bonner soon left the profession to 
enter banking and has made this his life-long work. For more than thirty 
years he has been identified with the Third National Bank of Greensburg. 

\\'alter W. Bonner was born near Springhill, Decatur county, Indiana, 
on July 30, i860, a son of William H. and Narcissa E. (Elliott) Bonner. 
His father was born in Wilcox county, Alabama, a son of James and Mary 
P. (Foster) Bonner, who came with his parents to Decatur county in 1836. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. ^7,^ 

The father of James Bonner was a Scotch Presbyterian and left his home 
in the north of Ireland toward the end of the eighteenth century. He came 
to America and settled on a plantation near Anderson, South Carolina, not 
far from the historic old plantation which was destined in after years to 
become the home of John C. Calhoun, and there James Bonner was born. 
The latter was reared near' Abbeville, South Carolina, and there married 
Mary P. Foster, whose father, James Foster, was born in the north of Ire- 
land, and who became a farmer after his migration to South Carolina and 
in 1837 came to this county, settling on a farm in the Springhill neighbor- 
hood, where he spent the rest of his life. Two years after his marriage 
James Bonner moved to Wilcox county, Alabama, where he dwelt for six- 
teen years, owning and operating a large plantation, the work of which was 
performed by slaves. Coming to hate the institution of slavery, he sold his 
slaves in a body to his brother and, in the spring of 1836, came to this 
county, becoming a large farmer in Fugit township, where he died at the 
age of fifty-five. Mary, the wife, died in 1837, where he was married a 
second time. James Bonner was the father of six children, two daughters 
who died in early womanhood, James F., Dr. John I., William H., father 
of the immediate subject of this sketch, and Robert, who died in childhood. 

William H. Bonner was reared on the home farm near Springhill and 
was a farmer all his life. He became a man of large influence in the county 
and in 1868 was elected representative from this county to the state Legis- 
lature. He served one term in a manner very acceptable to his constituents, 
but declined a re-nomination. Hon. William H. Bonner for many years 
was one of the leaders of the Republican party in this part of the state and 
was influential in all good ways. He was a member of the United Presby- 
terian church and served for many years as a ruling elder of the local con- 
gregation. He was twice married, his first wife having been Elmira L. 
Hamilton, a sister of Thomas M. Hamilton. Upon her death, he married, 
secondly, Narcissa E. Elliott, to which union there were born two sons and 
one daughter, Henry E., a farmer of this county; Walter W., with whom' 
this biography directly treats, and Mary F. The Hon. William H. Bonner 
died on August 12, 1874. 

Walter W. Bonner was educated in the district schools of Fugit town- 
ship and in Indiana University at Bloomington. In the year 1881 he began 
studying law in the office of Miller & Gavin, in Greensburg, and in 1882 
was admitted to practice at the bar of the Decatur circuit court. He did 
not practice law very long, however, for when the Third National Bank 
was opened at Greensburg he entered that institution as a bookkeeper and 



736 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

in 1884 was promoted to the position of assistant cashier, being advanced 
to the responsible position of cashier on February 3, 1887, Avhich position 
he since has held, his services having proved most satisfactory' to the direc- 
tors of this excellent financial institution. 

On September 15, 1884, Walter W. Bonner was united in marriage 
to Libbie Donnell, of Springhill, to which union there was born one child, a 
daughter, Ruth, who married Homer G. Meek and has one child. Mar}' Lois. 

Mr. Bonner is one of the best-known and most successful financiers in 
this part of the state. To his excellent direction of affairs undoubtedly is 
due much of the strength of the sound financial institution with which he 
is connected and he has the utmost confidence of all business men through- 
out this part of the state. 



THOMAS KNOX SMILEY. 

Nearing the three-score-and-ten mark along the highway of life, calm 
and serene, at peace with the world and a lover of all mankind, there is one 
man in Decatur county to whom the incidental worries and vexations that 
at times beset most mortals mean very little, for his philosophy of life con- 
tains no room for the word "worry." • Living nearly half a century on the 
farm on which he still makes his home, he is known to everyone in the 
part of the county in which he resides, and, as he is a friend of all, all are 
friends to him, few persons thereabout having a wider personal popularity 
than he. Jovial, genial, sunny-tempered and full of the joy of living; pros- 
perous and well-circumstanced, possessed of a fine farm of two hundred 
and thirty-eight acres of choice land in Clay township, on which he lives a 
life of quiet ease, enjoying the evening of his life as he well deserves to 
enjoy it, T. K. Smiley, better known to his neighbors and friends as Knox 
Smiley, is regarded by many as a most fortunate man. A good citizen, a 
kind and generous neighbor, public-spirited and enterprising, Mr. Smiley 
has done his part in the advancement of the best interests of the commun- 
ity of which he so long has been a part, and it is a pleasure on the part of 
the biographer to here present a few of the salient points in his life. 

Thomas Knox Smiley was born in the state of Ohio on May 30, 1846, 
the son of William and Mary Ann (Kenny) Smiley, both of whom were 
of Irish descent. William Smiley's father emigrated from Ireland to this 
country and settled in Pennsylvania, where he reared a family and spent 
the remainder of his days. IMary Ann I-Cenny was born in New Jersey. 




THOMAS K. SMILEY. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 'J'Xi'J 

Her mother was a Boston woman, and from a nearby hill was an interested 
spectator of the battle of Bunker Hill, the presumption being that her hus- 
band, in common with most of the patriots of that city, was a participant in 
that historic struggle. Later the Kennys moved from New Jersey, to which 
latter state they had emigrated from Massachusetts, to Ohio, where the 
parents of Mrs. Smiley spent the rest of their lives. 

William Smiley was born in Pennsylvania on March 14, 1814, the son 
of Irish parents, and upon reaching manhood's estate moved to Ohio, where 
he married Mary Ann Kenny about the year 1838, and on January 9, 1849, 
came to Decatur county, settling in Clay township on what is now known 
as the Smiley homestead. He bought land at that time for ten dollars an 
acre that now is worth more than ten times that price. William Smiley was 
a man of strong character, a stanch and upright citizen and an excellent 
farmer. He was energetic and enterprising and speedily began to prosper, 
eventually becoming the owner of nine hundred or one thousand acres of 
land in Clay township and gaining the reputation of being one of the shrewd- 
est business men in that part of the county. He and his wife were members 
of the Methodist church and their children were reared in that faith. Mr. 
Smiley was an ardent Democrat and took an active interest in political affairs. 
In one election years ago he was the candidate of his party for the office 
of county commissioner from his district, and despite the fact that the 
county at that time returned an overwhelming Republican majority, he was 
defeated by but two votes, a circumstance which attested unmistakably his 
popularity throughout the county. As their children grew to manhood and 
womanhood, Mr. and Mrs. Smiley divided their large land holdings among 
them and for nearly twenty years lived a life of pleasant retirement in the 
city of Greensburg. Mr. Smiley died in Greensburg in June, 1893, ^t the 
age of seventy-nine years. His widow survived him just three years and 
she also died at the age of seventy-nine. They were a most estimable old 
couple and the memory of their wholesome lives and good deeds lives long 
after them. 

To William and Mary Ann (Kenny) Smiley were born the following 
children: Permelia, deceased, who was the wife of James L. Henry; Caro- 
line, who married Edward Sefton; George W., deceased, father of William 
G. Smiley, who died in 1907, on the old Smiley homestead and was a very 
successful farmer, being the owner of seven hundred acres of fine land; 
Harvey K. married a daughter of John E. Robbins and died in 1915; 
Thomas Knox, the immediate subject of this sketch; William P., who lives 
(47) 



738 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

in Greensbtirg, this county; Mary, who died in August, 1914; Sovereign 
Patrick, who lives in Texas, and Margaret, the widow of WilHam Johnson. 
Thomas Knox Smiley has always lived the life of a bachelor, and 
makes his home with Frank Jalop and wife on the old Smiley homestead, 
three and one-half miles southwest of the village of Burney, on the Greens- 
burg and Columbus road. He is a member of the Methodist church at 
Hartsville and was one of the charter members of the Knights of Pythias 
lodge at the same place. He is a Democrat and takes an earnest interest 
in political affairs, but has never sought office. He became the owner of a 
goodly farm in the distribution of the home acres, but to his share he has 
added one hundred and twenty acres, acquired by his own industry, and is 
very well circumstanced. Though still giving careful attention to the gen- 
eral details of his extensive farming operations, Mr. Smiley for the past 
ten years has lived practically retired from the active duties of the farm and 
is taking life easy. The good cheer which he brings into his intercourse with 
his neighbors, makes him a prime favorite in the neighborhood and no one 
thereabout is more popular than he. 



JAMES FRANCIS HAMILTON. 

A noted Hoosier historian has said, "There is but one end in life that 
is worth while, and that is to conquer adversity, pain, envy, regrets, ambi- 
tions, and the varied obstacles that are put in our path to develop our forti- 
tude, our courage and our brains." If this be true, the life of the man 
whose name appears above has been emmently worth while, for he has grad- 
uated from the "University of Hard Knocks." He knows the joys of suc- 
cess, the bitterness of misfortune, and has the mental poise to meet both 
like a man. When but a lad he was called upon to face disappointment, 
to give up his own education that he might help a bereaved father to care 
for six younger Ijrothers and sisters, but this he did without a murmur, 
and thus .perhaps were forged the elements of character which later con- 
tributed to his success as a man, and in relation to society. James 'Francis- 
Hamilton, the well-known merchant and undertaker of Westport, was born 
on August 17, 1869, in the town in which his past and present home is 
located. 

Mr. Hamilton's grandfather on the paternal side came from Kentucky 
to clear and enter the land which became the homestead of this noted family. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 



739 



This man, James F. Hamilton, was of the stalwart nature of which pioneers 
are made, and was an ancestor of whom any descendant might be proud. 
He was born in 1803, and passed away at the age of seventy years. It was 
in the early thirties when he and his bride, formerly Judah Owens, came 
to Decatur county, and began planning for the home that was destined to 
remain in the family for the next thirty-live years. This land was situated 
one and one-half miles northwest of Westport. The brave wife of this 
sturdy pioneer, who was a native of Virginia, was born on December 14, 
1799, and died on June 20, 1898. One of their children was George W., 
who later became the father of the subject of this brief biography. George 
was born on May 10, 1837, and died on July 29, 1899. His wife, Mary 
Jane Conwell, who was born on February 3, 1847, belonged to one of the 
most prominent families in the state. Her Western progenitors formed 
part of that brave band of pioneers whose courage and heroism in opening 
up a new and. rugged country has made it possible for us to live in peace 
and plenty. George, of course, was born on the farm of his parents, and 
after the meager school course then provided, he managed a store in Gay- 
norsville for four years beginning in 1869. He then became a salesman 
for the Singer Sewing Machine Company, engaging in this occupation until 
1883, when his health became broken and he retired. There were seven 
children, the eldest of whom was only a lad in short trousers. The children 
thus early deprived of a father's care were : James Francis, our subject ; 
Clara Maude, who died in September, 1895; Clem E., a farmer of Marion 
township; John C, of Greensburg; Charles L., who later became a railroad 
man with headquarters in Indianapolis; George C, employea in a furmiure 
store, and Mary V., who lives in Westport with her mother. 

After May 20, 1882, James had to assume duties heavy for the shoul- 
ders of thirteen summers, and there followed days of toil and nights of 
dull weariness that tested the courage of the manly little fellow. Fie 
attended school until his thirteenth year, and then was obliged to put his 
books on the shelf and to go on errands for a storekeeper, moving to West- 
port that he might be near his work. The qualities that afterward made 
him a prosperous merchant and bank official early began to assert them- 
selves, and his weekly earnings were soon a very substantial increase to the 
family budget which was to shelter, feed and clothe six little brothers and 
sisters. James remained an employee of the storekeeper until he went into 
business for himself, which happened when he was twenty-three years of 
age. Then he became a merchant in the flour and feed business, continuing 
this for five years. On January 20, 1897, he had an opportunity to buy 



740 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

out an undertaking establishment, which he did, adding to this, two months 
later, a furniture store. So rapidly did his business grow that new quarters 
became necessary, and on May 13, 19 14, ground was broken for a hand- 
some two-story brick structure, forty-two by seventy feet. While the whole 
building, including two floors and basement, is used for store purposes, 
it is so conveniently arranged that there are two separate departments for 
the furniture and undertaking business, respectively. The cost of the house 
was over twelve thousand dollars. Thorough in everything that he does, 
Mr. Hamilton has spared no pains in the construction and equipment of 
this handsome business block, which is one of the finest in southern Indiana. 
A private office, a casket display and dressing room comprise the under- 
taking department, which maintains two funeral wagons and an ambulance 
besides a splendid team which is owned and kept by Mr. Hamilton. The 
basement is appropriately built and arranged for the display of rugs and 
draperies, while the third floor is taken up with furniture. The building 
has a modern elevator, and its own electric light and water plant. The 
owner carries stock valued at ten thousand dollars. 

The wife of Mr. Hamilton was formerly Mary M. Link, a daughter 
of John Link, of Milhousen. The marriage occurred on November 22, 
1893. Their only daughter, Leona J., who is nineteen years of age, having 
been born on May 6, 1896, is a graduate of the Westport high school, being 
a member of the class of 1914. 

Mr. Hamilton is one of the "live wires" of Decatur county. He first 
plans out carefully a course of action, and, having determined upon what 
ought to be done, he does it. In business he is alert and progressive, as is 
evidenced by the fact that he believes in advertising, and spends large sums 
of money for this purpose. As an illustration of his energy and will-power 
may be cited the fact that when he was ready to build, a dwelling which 
stood in the way was unceremoniously removed, although it had stood 
firmly on one spot since 1838. 

No higher honor can be paid to a business man by any community 
than to make him president of its chamber of commerce. This mark of 
esteem has been bestowed upon Mr. Hamilton because of his merit. Besides 
being the head official of the Westport Chamber of Commerce, he is vice- 
president of the First National Bank of that town, and in this capacity has 
added influence to the community. 

As it seems impossible to classify a man before we know what he 
believes as to politics and religion, it may be of interest to note that Mr. 
Hamilton is an ardent Democrat, and a member of St. Denis's Catholic 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 74I 

church. He is also active in the Knights of Columbus, Council 1042. Here, 
as in business circles, his business acumen, as well as the qualities which 
go to make up the sort of man we respect, make him a leader. He becomes 
a power in whatever organization or movement to which he gives his name. 

In all of the activities of her husband Mrs. Hamilton has been per- 
haps a silent, but a potent partner. In the conflicts and problems of a 
strenuous life, it has been her pleasure to co-operate, and in making their 
home a real home to lighten the burdens and cares of the outside world into 
which every man is forced to go. 

It is impossible to close this summary of a man's life without paying 
to him a tribute not only for his character as an individual, but for his 
public service. It means much to a community to have within itself men 
who are stanch and true to their convictions as to right and wrong; men 
who, while building up their own fortunes, are not unmindful of the needs 
and misfortunes of others, and, most of all, men whose lives are guided by 
high moral principles and purposes. Such is the man we have endeavored 
to describe. 



SMITH B. BUSSELL. 



Smith B. Bussell belongs to that large colony of retired farmers of 
Decatur county now living in Greensburg and is himself the owner and pro- 
prietor of a highly productive farm of two hundred and sixty acres, sit- 
uated in Clay township near the Liberty church. It is only during his later 
years that he has been engaged in farming, his earlier years having been 
devoted largely to mechanical pursuits and especially to contract building, 
in which he was very successful. 

Smith B. Bussell was born on November 29, 1849, in Hamilton county, 
Ohio, the son of Moses and Eliza (Garrison) Bussell, natives of Florence, 
Kentucky, and Hamilton county, Ohio, respectively, the former of whom 
was born in 1800 and died in March, 1857, and the latter of whom was 
born in 1820 and died in 1864. Moses Bussell was the son of a native- 
born English gentleman, who settled in Virginia, the Bussell family having 
been related on the paternal side to the mother of General Washington. 
From Virginia the family moved to Kentucky, and here the parents of 
Smith B. Bussell lived and died. Eliza Garrison was the daughter of Jonas 
and Priscilla Garrison, early settlers in Hamilton county, Ohio. The great- 
grandfather of Mr. Bussell, Joseph Garrison, entered land where the court 



742 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

house now stands. Finding this land very wet and flat, he later moved to 
higher land. Moses and Eliza Bussell had a family of seven sons, three 
of whom, Joseph, the eldest; John, the third, and Thomas, the sixth, are 
deceased. The others are Erastus, of Wichita, Kansas; Smith B., the sub- 
ject of this sketch; George, who lives in Greensburg, and Ezra, who lives 
in Cleves, Hamilton county, Ohio. 

Being only eight years old at the time of his mother's death, Smith B. 
Bussell grew up among strangers and was compelled to shift for himself. 
Coming to Decatur county in 1870, having learned the mechanic's trade 
in Cincinnati, he worked as a builder until 1880, a period of ten years, and 
then engaged in general contract building until 1900, a period of twenty 
years, specializing during this period in the construction of foundations. 
For six years he was superintendent of the Greensburg Limestone Company. 
Since 1900 Mr. Bussell has been engaged in farming. In the meantime, he 
has invested his savings in farm real estate, and now owns two hundred 
and sixty acres near the Liberty church in Clay township, where general 
farming and stock raising are carried on. 

Mr. Bussell has been twice married, the first time in 1872, two years 
after coming to this county, to Alary Foster, of Greensburg, who was born 
in Gallipolis, Ohio, and who died in February, 191 1. She was the mother 
of three children, two of whom died in infancy. William, the first-born, 
died in April, 1912, about one year after his mother's death, at the age of 
thirty-nine, he having been born in 1873. -'^t the time of his death he was 
a member of the Decatur county board of commissioners and a large 
farmer. He left a widow, who before her marriage was Margaret Emmert, 
and one daughter, Helen Catherine. Harry and Louis, the other two chil- 
dren born to Smith B. and Mary Bussell, died at the age of four months 
and six weeks, respectively. In September, 1912. Mr. Bussell was married 
again to Gertrude Kerr, a native of Greensburg and the daughter of David 
R. Kerr. 

Mr. Bussell has always been actively attached to the principles of the 
Democratic party and its candidates. For sixteen years he served as a 
member of the Greensburg city council. He is a member of the Baptist 
church, while fraternally he is a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. Mr. Bussell is well known in this county and he commands the 
confidence and respect of his fellow townsmen and is universally liked not 
only in private, but in public life. His success in business was founded upon 
sterling integrity, a scrupulous code of right dealings with his associates. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 743 

WILLIAM G. UPDIKE. 

It is one of the primary purposes of this vohime to give fitting 
recognition to those representative men who, by their force of character, 
have aided in the advancement of the city or town or county in which they 
live, and by so doing, have made such place better and more attractive for 
the homes of others. Based upon this premise, the man whose name heads 
this article is entitled to consideration, for his life has been an integral part 
of the community, and his energies have been directed to those measures 
which make for the common good. It is the altruism of such men that 
advances civilization, and that helps to make life worth while for the masses. 
William G. Updike, who belongs to one of the oldest families in America, 
was born on April 29, 1850, in Franklin county, and came with his parents, 
to Decatur county when he was eleven years of age. 

As a successful farmer, a county commissioner and township trustee, 
Mr. Updike has filled an unusually prominent place in the community. He 
is the son of Elijah and Matilda (Gilbreath) Updike, the former having 
been born on August 4, 1818, and died on May 10, 1893. Peter Updike, 
father of Elijah and grandfather of William G., was a native of Pennsyl- 
vania, and early in the country's history, packed his household goods in 
wagons, and brought his family to the rough timber lands of Indiana, look- 
ing into the uncertain and dangerous future with faith in himself and in the 
God of his fathers. Nor was that faith disappointed, as the after years 
have proven. It was in Franklin county that Elijah began his life on earth, 
and when he had reached manhood, he married, and made his home on a 
farm two miles north of Westport. His wife, whose maiden name was 
jMatilda Gilbreath, was twice married, and was, at the time of her marriage 
to Elijah Updike, the widow of a Mr. Luse. She had a daughter, Nancy 
J. Luse, now deceased. Matilda Updike was the daughter of James Gil- 
breath, whose enterprising spirit and ambition brought him from bonnie 
Scotland to this country when he was still a young man. He had a reputa- 
tion in all the country round for his honesty and integrity, and his good 
business ability. His daughter, Matilda, was born in 1834, and passed 
away on July i, 1889. 

The farm on which Mr. and Mrs. Updike, Sr., settled in 1861, became 
their life-long home. Their children, four in number, were William G., the 
subject of this sketch; Mary Ann, wife of Isaac Shera, of Westport; Frank 
M., of Butler county, Ohio, and John Reiley, who died, when two years of 
age, in Franklin county. 



744 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

The father of this notable family believed that children should be- 
brought up with industrious habits, and practical training, and with the help 
of his faithful wife, taught them the principles of good farming, as well 
as their application. Thus it was that the first-born, William, came to love 
the farm, and made it his home for fifty years. After the death of the 
senior Updike, the homestead was divided, and one hundred acres became 
the share of William. These lands he continued to improve until his became 
one of the most prized farms in the county. As a country home, also, it 
was most attractive. 

On the 20th of December, 1883, Mr. Updike was united in marriage 
to Louisa Armstrong, daughter of Robert Armstrong, and a sister of F. D. 
Armstrong. Her birth date was on June 17, 1862, and the place, Sand 
Creek township. To these parents tv^ro children were born, Charles C, the 
eldest, is now a resident of St. Paul, Indiana, where he teaches in the high 
school. After graduating from the Letts Corner high school, he studied 
at the Terre Haute State Normal, showing in all of his work a high grade 
of scholarship, and a special adaptability to the teaching profession. Charles 
Updike was boi^n on February 23, 1885, and will graduate at Danville, 
Indiana, in the class of 191 5, and will teach at Milroy, Indiana, and Mabel, 
who is attending the Westport high school, was born on August 5, 1900. 

Farm work is rather strenuous for one in good health, and when there 
is any impairment of the physical organism, it may become a burden. Find- 
ing that his health was not equal to the duties of farm life, Mr. Updike 
left the countiy in 1912, and, with his devoted wife and family, took up 
their residence in a beautiful, modern home in Westport, later selling their 
farm. Since his removal, Mr. Updike has enjoyed comparative freedom 
from activity, and has given part, at least, of his time to those pursuits to 
which his tastes attracted him. 

Always interested in whatever would advance the well-being of his 
home town, Mr. Updike creditably filled the position of township trustee, 
serving for a term of five years. He then was elected to the office of county 
commissioner, his term expiring on January i, 1909. When his official 
duties were completed, there was general regret, for it was recognized that 
the affairs of the township and county had been handled in an admirable 
way, and that his duties had been discharged with honor and efficiency. 
Mr. Updike is a Republican. Both Mr. and Mrs. Updike are members of 
the Baptist church, and here as elsewhere, both have been not only nominal 
members of the organization, but adherents to the faith in reality, for they 
have contributed in many practical ways to the welfare of the church. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 745' 

Mrs. Updike, by her devotion to her home and family, has been a real 
inspiration to the efforts of husband and children, and has had a share in 
their success. Mr. Updike is a prominent member of the Free and Accepted 
Masons, and of the Knights of Pythias. 



W. T. .STOTT & COMPANY. 

The department store of VV. T. Stott & Company is one of the con- 
spicuous places in the business section of Westport, and since its establish- 
ment by the honored father of the present owners has added much to the 
commercial prestige of the town in which it is located. While the careers 
of both William T. and J. C. have been interesting, they may be better 
understood by a perusal of the life of their father, the late Capt. William 
T. Stott, than whom Westport has never had a more enterprising merchant 
nor a more loyal citizen. As a tradesman he was just, honorable and kind, 
and as a man his influence transcended the usual limitations, for he was 
called upon to serve his country, which he did with an honor and bravery 
Avell worthy of emulation. William Taylor Stott, Jr., was the second son 
born to Capt. W. T. Stott and his wife, Caroline Bennett. Captain Stott 
was born in October, 1840, in Jennings county, and died in August 8, 1912, 
in Greensburg, having lived a life of signal usefulness. He was the son 
of Christopher and Elizabeth (Daily) Stott, natives of Kentucky and Vir- 
ginia, respectively, who early came to Jennings county to make their future 
home. About the year 1846 they removed to Decatur county, where they 
began farm life in Sand Creek township. But this Avas interrupted later 
by the call to arms which took the young man into many battles, for he 
enlisted in Company B, Fifty-second Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, 
and served for four years, becoming captain of his company. He distin- 
guished himself in many battles and engagements. At the close of the 
Civil War, Captain Stott engaged in the drug business, continuing until 
about 1875, his store being in Westport. Then he was appointed deputy 
internal revenue collector, a position which he filled with credit for a num- 
ber of years. Elected sheriff of Decatur county in 1896, and re-elected two 
years later, he served in that capacity until the end of his term, and then 
bought out the well-known firm of Davis & Littell and took his sons into 
partnership with him. Captain Stott was by nature a politician, and took 
great interest in politics, being a Republican and a leader in his party. He 



746 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

•was honest and fair, and an advocate of clean political standards. A mem- 
ber of the Christian church, although he lived a busy life, he found time 
for worship, and he and his wife brought up their children to respect mat- 
ters pertaining to religion. An ardent patriot, he was prominent in the 
Grand Army of the Republic post, of which he not only was commander, 
but whose offices he filled at various times. He was also a member of the 
Westport Free and Accepted Masons, joining the Masonic lodge when he 
was only twenty-one years of age. 

Captain Stott's wife, who was before her marriage Caroline Bennett, 
was his helpmeet and inspiration in all matters of interest to him, and while 
he was active in the outward world of affairs, she looked after the home 
and the happiness of her family with devotion and true womanly unselfish- 
ness. She was born in 1845 and died in February, 1877. Her birthplace 
was in Decatur county. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Stott, Sr., were 
four in number, Charles A. became a farmer and lives in Sand Creek town- 
ship, one mile south of Westport ; the second son was William Taylor, born 
on May 20, 1870, to whom we shall again refer; Elizabeth is the wife of 
Jacob Binninger, of Greensburg; James Clarence, November 26, 1875, ^"^ 
was reared in Westport. He, like his father, is a Republican, a member 
of the Christian church and of the lodge of Free and Accepted Masons. 
He was married on July 17, 1895, to Mary Elizabeth Brown of Decatur 
.county, and to them were born seven childern. namely: Paul T., Chris- 
topher, Benjamin H., Gertrude and Gladys, twins, born in 1904, Dorothy 
and Verd. 

Since going into business with their father in 1902, both W. T. and 
J. C. Stott have put into practice those principles which cannot fail to bring 
success. Their large department store carries an immense stock of general 
merchandise to meet the demands of the trade, which has become especially 
heavy since the store has occupied the two-story brick block into which the 
goods were placed in 19 10. 

Much of the success of this firm is due to the energy and ability of 
its senior member, William T. Stott, who is considered one of the repre- 
sentative business men of Westport. He, like his father, is a man of sterling 
honesty, fair and just in his business relations, and equally fair and just 
as a friend. He has identified his interests with those of his native town, 
and has been one of the leading public-spirited men of the community. He 
is a Republican, a member of the Christian church and a prominent member 
of the Free and Accepted Masons. 

The ability of the members of the firm of W. T. Stott & Company 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 747 

has given them a distinctive place in the commercial life of the town in 
which they were born and reared, and the sons, who are now the owners. 
by their strict adherence to principle, and by their honorable, upright deal- 
ing, have been a decided impetus to the community to which their family 
has contributed in no small degree. 



FRANCIS M. ALLISON. 

When the family of Francis M. Allison, a well-known and prosperous 
retired farmer of Adams township, this county, gather about the hospitable 
board at his pleasant home in the village of St. Paul, there are fifty there 
assembled. He is the father of thirteen children, all of whom are living, 
well and strong, and who, with their respective wives and husbands and 
their children and grandchildren, constitute the even half hundred when 
gathered with their father, who also is a great-grandfather. This undoubt- 
edly is the largest collective family, all living and in good health, ever 
reared in Decatur county, a distinction of which Mr. Allison, naturally 
enough, is quite proud. The mother of these children died in 1908 and 
since 191 1 Mr. Alhson has been living somewhat retired in the village of 
St. Paul, though still giving close attention to the operation of his excellent 
farm. Both he and his wife were of excellent pioneer stock and their 
numerous progeny gives assurance to the future that this stock long will 
persist in this county, to the no small gain of the community at large. 

Francis M. Allison was born at old St. Omar, this county, on Novem- 
ber 16, 1847, the son of John and Elizabeth (Zeigler) Allison, the former 
of whom was born in March, 1913, and died in August, 1882, and the latter 
of whom was born in 1816 and died in December, 1881. John Allison was 
born in Washington county, Virginia, the son of Matthew Allison, who was 
born and reared in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, where he married, emigrat- 
ing thence to Virginia, later going to Knoxville, Tennessee; emigrating 
from that point in 1822 to Indiana, locating in Orange township. Rush 
county, on the banks of Big Flatrock. He also owned land over the county 
line, in Adams township, this county, which he sold in 1834. His wife, 
who was a Mrs. Cline, died in 1822. Elizabeth Zeigler was born in Butler 
county, Ohio, the daughter of Peter Zeigler, who came to Decatur county 
in 1819 or 1820. He first entered land on Michigan road in Washington 
township. On this tract he built a log cabin and proceeded to clear the 
timber away. Upon improving this tract he sold the same and then entered 



748 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

another tract just west of St. Omar, on which he spent the remainder of 
his life, his death occurring in 1874. His grandson, James W. AlHson, 
now owns the farm originally entered by Mr. Zeigler in this county in 1821. 

John Allison was reared on the paternal farm in Rush county and, 
upon finishing his schooling, taught school for three years. He bought a 
farm two miles west of St. Paul, which, in 1861, he sold, moving to the 
state of Iowa, where he remained until 1866, in which year he returned 
to Decatur county, locating in the village of St. Paul, where he spent the 
rest of his life. To his union with Elizabeth Zeigler there were born the 
following children : Charles, who was killed by an accident at the age of 
eleven years; Mrs. Salina Courtleyou, who was born on February 24, 1836, 
lives in Des Moines, Iowa; Francis M., the immediate subject of this sketch; 
Mrs. Alice McCain, of St. Paul, this county; James W., who lives at Essex,. 
Illinois; Mrs. Jessie Wilson, of St. Paul, this county, and Mrs. May Kurr, 
also of St. Paul. 

Francis M. Allison received his education in the district schools and 
was reared to the life of the farm. In 1871 he bought a farm of sixty- 
eight acres in Adams township and in 1874 bought a small farm on Flat- 
rock creek. From 1876 to 1882 he lived on a farm of eighty acres in 
Orange township. Rush county. In 1881 he bought the old William A. 
Pearce farm of two hundred and seventeen acres in Adams township, which 
was entered from the government in 1821, and in 1912 sold this farm to 
his brother, James W. Allison. For one year he then owned the old Jona- 
than Paul farm at the edge of the village of St. Paul, which he sold and in 
September, 1914, bought a farm of two hundred and two and one-half 
acres on Little Flatrock, which he still owns and which he is operating 
very successfully, though not occupying, he having made his home in St. 
Paul since the year 191 1. 

On October 5, 1870, Francis M. Allison was united in marriage to 
Mary A. Garrett, who was born in Orange township. Rush county, Indiana, 
on August I, 1848, the daughter of Wesley Garrett, who died on December 
5, 1908. To this union there were born thirteen children, as follow: Dr. 
Charles D., a physician of South Bloomington, Illinois, on August 10, 1871, 
was graduated from Indiana Medical College in 1896, married Mary Mina 
Apple, of Adams township, this county, and has four children, Nina, Mary, 
Charles and Caroline; Elizabeth, January 17, 1873, married Albert A. Green, 
of Colorado Springs, Colorado, and has two children. Earl and Helen; 
Mary, April 4, 1874, married Daniel Apple, a farmer living east of St. 
Omar, in this county, and has six children, Ethel (who married Livy 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 749 

Adams), George, Gladys, Charles, Forrest and Caroline; Katy, November 
2, 1876, married Otto Owen, of Reddick, Illinois, and has four children, 
Scott, Russell, Helen and Mary; Myrtle, September 2, 1878, married Otis 
Doggett, of Adams township; Dr. Francis M., July 13, 1880, a graduate 
of Indiana Medical College, practicing medicine at Gardner, Illinois, mar- 
ried Mayme AlHson and has one child, Francis; Anna, April 27, 1882, mar- 
ried Ernest Tevis, of Adams township and has one child, Francis; Fannie, 
September 25, 1883, married George Burtscher, of Chicago; Ernest W., 
who operates the home farm in Adams township. May 23, 1886, married 
Nellie Shelhorn and has two children, Mabel and Caryl; Dorthy, April 23, 
1888, married Cleve Archie, of Mt. Victory, Ohio, and has two children, 
James Francis and Robert Allison; Ethel, December 2, 1890, married Orba 
Land, of Adams township, and has one child, Carlos Allison; Bessie, Feb- 
ruary 17, 1892, married Walter Tonyes, of Richland township. Rush county, 
and has one child, Mary Elizabeth, and Marguerite, February 8, 1893, '^^lio 
is her father's housekeeper in their pleasant home in St. Paul. 

Mr. Allison is a friend of all churches and does his part toward the 
promotion of the best interests of his community. He is a stanch Demo- 
crat, as was his father before him, and is regarded as a leader in the ranks 
of that party in Jackson township. He was elected township trustee in 
1886 and was re-elected in 1888, his service in that connection having been 
of large benefit to the township. He is active in lodge work, being a mem- 
ber of the Masonic lodge at Waldron; of the Knights of Pythias lodge at 
St. Paul and of the lodge of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks 
at Greensburg, in all of which lodges he is very popular, his genial dispo- 
stiion making him friends wherever he goes. 



JACOB EMMERT. 

The conspicuous success which has come to the venerable Jacob 
Einmert, a retired farmer and miller of Clarksburg, Indiana, is by no means 
a matter of accident, since he has from the beginning of his career 
approached the problems of the farm and the problems of the milling busi- 
ness with the scientific insight of one who knows that the smaller the cost 
of operation the larger the profit. His methodical precision in mastering 
the details of business seems to have been a natural endowment. Personal 
rsuccesses frequently can be explained on no other hypothesis than that the 



750 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

individual is possessed of a superior ability. It is not difficult to explain the 
success of those men who were favored by inheritance or accidental good 
fortunate, but Jacob Emmert does not belong to this class of successful 
men, since he came to Clarksburg as a poor man and has become a wealthy 
citizen by his own individual and personal effort. 

Jacob Emmert was born seventy-six years ago, on April 19, 1839, in 
Bavaria, Germany, the son of Christopher and Elizabeth Emmert, who 
seven years after the birth of Jacob came to America and located on a farm 
in the state of Maryland. From Maryland they removed to Wilmington, 
Delaware, where Christopher worked in a mill. Eight years after coming 
to America they removed to Lawrenceburg, Indiana, and the father, who 
worked in a flour-mill, died in that city. ■ Although this part of Jacob 
Emmert's career may appear uneventful to the superficial observer, never- 
theless it probably was the most eventful period of his life, since about this 
time he was learning the business in which he was to become so prominent 
in later life. One of a family of eight children, it is quite natural that 
Jacob had to begin to shift for himself at an early age. Three of his 
brothers, Peter, John and Fred, and his two sisters, Elizabeth and Cath- 
erine, are deceased. He has one living brother, Philip, who has been a 
merchant in Lawrenceburg, Indiana, for sixty years. 

Leaving home at the age of sixteen years, in 1855, Mr. Emmert first 
operated a mill at Harrison, Ohio, for two years, and during the succeed- 
ing two years was engaged in operating another mill two miles north of 
Elizabethtown, Ohio. This was a water-mill. During the first two months 
of 1859 he was engaged in operating a steam-mill at Guilford, and for a 
short time later was at Greensburg. From Greensburg he re.noved to Dear- 
born county, and there operated a water-mill for John Emmert at Dills- 
boro for two years. In 1862 Mr. Emmert went to Fairland in Shelby 
county, Indiana, and was engaged in the milling . lousiness there for two 
years, when he returned to Greensburg, where he remained until the fall 
of 1869, at that time purchasing a mill which had been owned by a com- 
pany qf men who had failed. Purchasing the plant at an assignee's sale, for 
nearly fifty years he has been engaged in manufacturing flour, grinding 
grain and sawing lumber. The mill, which is operated for custom and 
local trade, is now run by Mr. Emmert's son, Clinton Buell Emmert. It is 
equipped with all the latest machinery and operated by a gas engine at a cost 
of five cents an hour. The roller processes are employed, and two well- 
known local brands of flour, the "White Loaf" and "Blue Ribbon," are 
manufactured. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 



751 



When Jacob Emmert came to Clarksburg he first purchased sixty-five 
acres of land for which he went into debt. Later he purchased one hun- 
dred and forty acres for credit and subsequently eighty acres additional. 
He now has one of the most fertile farms in Decatur county, and by crop 
rotation and intelligent farming he has developed the land to a very high 
state of productivity. Practically all of the land was very much run down 
at the time he purchased it. The previous owners had grown great quan- 
tities of corn year after year and had robbed the land of its fertility. By 
farming the land systematically and rotating his crops, Mr. Emmert has 
had a splendid success. He followed a three-year rotation plan until the 
wheat grew so tall that it was necessary to raise corn two years in succes- 
sion. Land which had grown thirty-five to forty bushels of corn to the 
acre, and yielded fifteen bushels of wheat, to the acre, under Mr. Emmert's 
care and management now produces from sixty to eighty bushels of com to 
the acre and from twenty to thirty bushels of wheat. At the present time 
he has two hundred and sixty-four acres of land which is operated for the 
most part by his son, John Leslie. The farm is equipped and well supplied 
with all necessary outbuildings. In 19 13 he fed sixty-nine head of cattle 
and two hundred head of hogs. He also sold fifty-four head of mules in 
the home market and sold his cattle in Buffalo, New York. At the present 
time he has forty-four head of cattle, si.xteen head of young mules and one 
hundred and fifty head of hogs. Mr. Emmert's neighbors, who have fol- 
lowed his methods in farming, have all prospered, and many owe much of 
their success to the example he has set in this community. 

On November ij, 1861, Jacob Emmert was married in Greensburg to 
Catherine Hauk, the daughter of William and Margaret Hauk. Born on 
October 3, 1841, Mrs. Emmert passed away in igoi, leaving a family of 
six children, five of whom are living. Of these children, Carrie is the wife 
of T-uther D. Hamilton and was born on October 12, 1862; Clinton Buell, 
who is now engaged in operating the Emmert mill, was born on July 14, 
1864, and on May 17, 1893, he was married to Allie Patterson; they have 
one child, James z\llen, who is a student at the Sweetwater military school ; 
Mrs. Sylvia Senior, April 12, 1867, has one child, Merhn; Elhson, March 
8, 1869, died on December 17, 1888; John Leslie, April 30, 1871, was mar- 
ried on November 2"], 1895, to Ada Thornton Dobyns. and they have one 
child, Mabel, and Ruby Leona, September 18, 1886, lives at home and is 
keeping house for her father. 

Jacob Emmert has been a life-long RepubHcan. Four years, from 
1888 to 1892, he served as trustee of Fugit township. A member of the 



752 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 



Presbyterian church, he has filled all the offices in the local congregation. 
Fraternally he is a member of Clarksburg Lodge No. 124, Free and Accepted 
Masons. He became a [Mason at Fairland in Shelby county, fifty-three 
years ago, transferring his membership from Fairland to Greensburg and 
from thence to Clarksburg. For ten years he served as treasurer of the 
Clarksburg lodge. 

Decatur county has few citizens \vho have been more industrious and 
more enterprising than the venerable Jacob Emmert. His acquaintance 
extends not only throughout Decatur county, but he is well known in all of 
the adioining counties, and occupies an envialDle place in the hearts of his 
neighbors and fellow townsmen. While he has lived an industrious and 
honest man, he has in many ways contributed to the happiness and comfort 
of the people with whom he has come in contact and is honored by them 
today as a kind and generous friend. 



WILLIAM M. ANGLE. 



In Fugit township, Decatur county, Indiana, where the venerable Will- 
iam Angle has lived for nearly sixty years, or since he was sixteen years 
old, he is known far and wide for his unaided and heroic struggle for per- 
sonal success. It is natural that he should be. well known in this township 
on account of his long residence, but he is especially well known on account 
of the large measure of success which fortune has visited on his eft'orts. 
Every one who is at all familiar with history knows that money is far 
easier to obtain now than it was a half century ago. Most every one knows 
further, that not one young man in fifty has a thousand dollars which he 
himself earned and saved at the time of reaching his majority. Yet, the ven- 
erable William Angle, who attained his majority early in 1861, had by that 
time saved out of his own earnings fifteen hundred dollars, which he had 
given to his father. No one is able to say that William IM. xAngle has 
neglected his personal or immediate duties in his rate for a fortune. Before 
his career as a farmer and financier had really begun he not only made a 
handsome gift of his earnings to his father, but he had cared for him in his 
declining years, when he was compelled to lean upon the stronger shoulders 
of his son, and, at his death, had paid all of the bills incurred during his 
last and fatal illness. More than an3fthing else, this noble act proved what 
manner of man \\'illiam M. Angle is. It shows that the successes of his 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 753 

■career were founded upon a just and fair realization of his nearest and 
dearest duties. It is no wonder, therefore, that he occupies a position 
among his neighbors and fellow citizens as a man who has worthily dis- 
charged his obligations in all the responsible relations of life. 

The venerable William M. Angle, retired farmer of Fugit township, 
Decatur county, Indiana, is a native of Laurel, Kentucky, having been born 
seventy- five years ago in February, 1840. His parents, William and Eby 
(Sutherlin) Angle, were both natives of southern states, the former of 
Tennessee and the latter of Kentucky. Believing that they would find 
g-reater opportunities in the newer land north of them, they emigrated in 
1856 to Indiana and settled east of Clarksburg, where they lived until their 
deaths. Several of their fourteen children died in infancy, leaving only eight 
who accompanied them to Indiana. Of these eight children, William, the 
subject of this sketch, and his sister, Priscilla, of Fairmount, Indiana, are 
now the only ones living. 

In the first three years of the last half of the nineteenth century, agri- 
cultural conditions did not compare with conditions today, especially from 
the standpoint of getting quick returns for one's labor. Nevertheless, Will- 
iam Angle, who began life on his own account when twenty years of age, 
rented land in Decatur county, and saved most of the money left after the 
expenses of farming were paid. During this period of his life he found it 
a pleasant task to care for his aged father and in giving his father fifteen 
hundred dollars which he earned before he was twenty-one years old. 

In 1870, when he was thirty years old, Mr. Angle purchased his first 
tract of land, paying one thousand dollars in cash and agreeing to pay 
twenty-eight hundred dollars additional as fast as he was able to make and 
save the money. In eight years he was able completely to relinquish the 
debt, so that by 1878 he was well started on the road to fortune. In Feb- 
ruary, 1909, he purchased a ninety-five-acre farm in Rush county, paying 
nine thousand dollars in cash for this land. His home farm in Fugit town- 
ship consists of fifty-three acres, so that he owns altogether one hundred 
and forty-nine acres in Decatur and Rush counties. Aside from this land, 
which is conservatively estimated to be worth fifteen thousand dollars, Mr. 
Angle owns five thousand dollars' worth of stocks and bonds, which are 
gilt-edge in every respect and which pay him handsome dividends and inter- 
est. It is fair to say that he is today worth not less than twenty thousand 
dollars, every cent of which he has made himself, and saved out of his own 
personal earnings. This is a splendid record and one of which he has every 
(48) 



754 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

reason to be proud. In fact, his neighbors in Fugit township and the people 
with whom he has come in contact during Hfe are Hkewise proud of him and 
his achievements. 

On March 17, 1875, when he was thirty-five years old, William Angle 
was married to Mary Ann Evans, who was bom on December 9, 1845, ^nd 
who is five years his junior. Mrs. Angle is a native of Franklin county 
and the daughter of James Evans, who married Lydia Weston. They also 
were natives of Franklin county, and the son and daughter of old families 
of this section of the state. Mr. and Mrs. Angle have no children. 

It could hardly be expected that William Angle, in view of his large 
success as a farmer and financier, and in view of his busy life, has ever 
been able to devote very much time to political affairs. However, he is a 
Republican in politics, but contents himself with voting the ticket of his 
party and leaving such matters as organization and the management of 
campaigns to others. Mr. and Mrs. Angle have long been members of the 
Presbyterian church, and are devout in this faith. 



THOMAS N. SHAW. 



Retirement from business does not necessarily indicate an inactive life. 
It often means that the mind released from strenuous business cares can 
turn its attention to other matters equally worth while, and often more 
important to the public good than the amassing of wealth. To be a repre- 
sentative farmer among other successful farmers, a man must possess many 
forceful traits of character, and the fact that he begins life as the son of 
a wealthy landowner does not, as in the present case, detract one iota from 
the credit due him as a financier. In these days of sharp competition, it is 
quite as difficult to retain a fortune as to make it, and therefore, while 
Thomas N. Shaw may be considered more than ordinarily fortunate, it 
would seem, nevertheless, that commendation is due. Nor has he been 
immindful of the needs of others. Thomas N. Shaw, retired farmer of 
Westport, was born on January 6, 1855, in Jackson township. 

Mr. Shaw's father, whose name also was Thomas, was brought up by 
his grandfather, for his own father died when the younger Thomas was an 
infant. The latter, who was Thomas N. Shaw's paternal grandfather, was 
born on December 3, 1789, and his wife, Sarah Shaw, was born on October 
5, 1792. Their children were as follow: Elizabeth C, born on July 15, 



DECATUR COUXTY, INDIANA. 755 

1814; John, February 23, 1816; Sarah, December i, 1817, and others, 
including Thomas, the father of Thomas N. The birth of the latter occurred 
on July 3, 1821, and he passed away in 1905. He was a native of Franklin 
county, going to Decatur county when only a young boy. In early man- 
hood, he married Margaret Ann Wilson, who was a native of Indiana, and 
died in November, 1904. Thomas Shaw, Sr., was the owner of a splendid 
farm in Jackson township, consisting of three hundred and eighty acres, 
and of one hundred and eighty acres in Sand Creek township, and was one 
of the large landowners of the entire county. Thomas N. Shaw had two 
brothers and two sisters, as follow: John S., who lives in Greensburg; 
Martha E. Swope, of Fowler, Indiana; Samuel S., deceased, was a farmer, 
and Mary E. Mclnwain, also dead. Thomas N. Shaw, Jr., was the young- 
est of his family. 

His boyhood home was at the northeast corner of the home section of 
Jackson township, while his own farm is in the southwest corner of the 
same section. In July, 1875, he was united in marriage to Louisa, daugh- 
ter of Eli and Catherine Risley Bake, a wealthy landowner of Decatur 
county. Besides Mrs. Shaw, their other children are, Lewis S., Amanda 
J., Clarissa, Cordelia, Olive P., Lorinda, Martha A., William H., Pearl, 
wife of Dr. Will E. Thomas, of Clarksburg, who became the parents of 
two children, Richard Shaw and Mary Louise. 

Upon their marriage, the father of Mr. Shaw presented him with one 
thousand dollafs, and his wife received a similar amount from her parents, 
and with this they purchased the land upon which they lived until 1912. 
The original tract consisted of ninety acres to which they later added sev- 
enty acres, which farm is so well equipped in every way that it easily attracts 
the attention of travelers, and is considered one of the finest in the county. 
It now contains a splendid house, which they built in 1884, although when 
the young people first moved in, they occupied a one-room log cabin. It 
was necessary to go in debt, but that encumbrance has Ipng ago been paid 
off. A large, two-story brick house replaces the primitive log cabin, and a 
spacious barn is modern in every respect. In 1912, the owner added to its 
attractiveness as well as to its intrinsic value by enclosing the grounds, 
within four hundred rods, with wire fencing, braced by substantial stone 
posts. In this year, also, the family removed to Westport, desiring this 
progressive little town as a place of residence. 

Mr. Shaw has always been interested in the affairs of the Republican 
party of which he has been a life-long member. He and his wife and 



756 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

daughter have a great many friends, and theirs is considered one of the 
important and hospitable home of the community. 

Relieved from active participation in the arduous labors of farm work, 
Mr. and Mrs. Shaw can enjoy a leisure deserved by reason of their years 
of service to their family, and it is hoped by their many friends that many 
more years will be spared to them, years that may be fruitful in both pleas- 
ure and achievement. 



DANIEL JEFFERSON BALLARD, M. D. 

For many years a practicing physician in the pleasant ' village of St. 
Paul, Decatur county, an honored veteran of the Civil War, active in church 
and lodge circles and a leader in the fast diminishing ranks of the Grand 
Army of the Republic in this part of the state, there are few men in this 
county who have a wider acquaintance or better friends than the venerable 
Doctor Ballard, whose name the reader notes above. Of fine old pioneer 
stock, Doctor Ballard ever has sought to maintain the best traditions of his 
sterling ancestry, and has been for many years regarded as a leader in that 
section of the county in which he has lived since boyhood. Doctor Ballard's 
wife, who is a daughter of the oldest man in Adams township, also is of 
stalwart pioneer stock and has been a most efficient factor in the develop- 
ment of the best interests of her home town. For many years she has been 
a registered pharmacist and has assisted her husband in the operation of 
a drug store at St. Paul. Previous to taking up pharmacy, Mrs. Ballard 
had been a school teacher, and in that capacity her influence was such as 
to leave a lasting impression upon the cultural life of her home vicinity. 

Daniel Jefferson Ballard, M. D., was born on a farm in Orange town- 
ship. Rush county, Indiana, not far over the line from Decatur county, 
on October 8, 1841, the son of Madison and Sarah Ann (Tevis) Ballard, 
the former of whom was born on March 13. 18 14, and died on March 15. 
1888, and the latter of whom was born on February 25, 1822, and died 
on January 18. 1883. 

Madison Ballard was born in Virginia, the son of Elijah Ballard, born 
in 1777, who came to Indiana in 1825, settling in Rush county, where he 
spent the remainder of his life. Madison Ballard became a well-known and 
influential farmer in Rush county, where he made his home until 1877. in 
which year he moved to St. Paul, this county, where his last days were 
spent. By his marriage to Sarah Ann Tevis six children were born, Daniel 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 757 

]., the subject of this sketch; Mrs. Catherine Raynes, who hves in IlHnois; 
John Durbin, who hves in ShelbyviUe, this state, and Mary Elizabeth, Sarah 
Helen and Mellender, the last three named of whom are deceased. 

Being the eldest of the family and it being necessary for him to aid 
in the work of the farm during the days of his youth, Daniel J. Ballard 
received httle schooling in his boyhood, his attendance being limited to about 
three months in a year during the winter seasons. He was not twenty 
years of age when the Civil War broke out, but on September i8. 1861, 
he enlisted in Company E, Thirty-seventh Regiment, Indiana Volunteer 
Infantry, for service in that great struggle between the states. In 1862 
he was transferred to the First Battalion, Pioneer Brigade of Engineers, in 
which service he was engaged for two years, and was discharged with his 
regiment on October 26, 1864. Though engaged in some of the fiercest 
battles of the war. Doctor Ballard never was wounded, though on numerous 
occasions bullets passed through his clothing. Among the notable battles 
in which he participated may be mentioned Stone's River, Chickamauga, 
Missionary Ridge, Peachtree Creek, Atlanta and Jonesboro. Doctor Ballard 
was discharged with the rank of corporal. 

At the close of the war Doctor Ballard determined to pursue the studies 
which he had been compelled to neglect in his boyhood, and he attended 
school at St. Paul and at ShelbyviUe, after which for a few years he taught 
school in St. Paul, beginning as primary teacher and ending as principal. 
Thus fortified, he took up the study of medicine and, after a period of pre- 
paratory reading, entered the Cincinnati College of Medicine and Surgery, 
from which institution he was graduated in February, 1876. He immedi- 
ately entered upon the practice of his profession in the village of St. Paul 
and for forty years has been thus' engaged, during the past twenty-one years 
of which time he also operated a drug store in the village. 

On September 18, 1867, Doctor Ballard was united in marriage to 
.\nna E. French, who was born in Liberty township, Shelby county, this 
state, on February 15, 1846, daughter of Joseph R. French, a native of 
that county, who was born in 1825, the son of Daniel French, who settled 
in Shelby county in 1820. Joseph R. French enjoys the distinction of being 
the oldest citizen of Adams township, this county. Since 1856 he has 
resided in the village of St. Paul, having always lived in the neighborhood, 
with the exception of four years spent at Moores Hill, when his son was 
attending the college at that point. Mr. French was a saddler during his 
active year, and in his old age turned his attention to the cultivation of 



758 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

raspberry slips aiid other hothouse plants, but is now retired. Mr. French's 
wife was Catherine Zeigler, a member of a pioneer family of this part of 
the state, who was born in 1824 and died in November, 1902. To their 
union five children were born, namely : Anna E., who married Doctor 
Ballard; Mrs. Sarah Elizabeth Plymate, who lives at Acton, this state; Mrs. 
Amy Celeste Derbyshire, of St. Petersburg, Florida; Harriet Jane, who 
died in girlhood, and William Henry Harrison. 

Anna E. French began teaching school when she was thirteen years 
of age and taught until she was twenty years of age, at which time, follow- 
ing her marriage to Doctor Ballard, she took up the study of chemistry, 
Avith particular reference to pharmacy, and for twenty years has been a 
registered pharmacist, being an invaluable aid to her husband in the opera- 
tion of the drug store at St. Paul. 

To Dr. Daniel J. and Anna E. (French) Ballard three children have 
been born, only one of whom is living, namely : Harry W., an artist, who 
resides in St. Paul, married Fannie Floyd and they have one child, a son, 
Jack Floyd; Daniel Arthur, who died on April 10, 1879, at the age of .two 
years and five months, and Joseph Clarence, who died in a St. Louis hos- 
pital on March 2, 1902, at the age of twenty-three years, three months and 
twenty-seven days. Joseph C. Ballard was graduated from Purdue Uni- 
versity and at the time of his death was engaged as a chemist in a steel 
plant at St. Louis. 

Doctor and Mrs. Ballard are members of the Methodist church and are 
active in the good works of the communit}^ in which the}' so long have 
labored. Doctor Ballard was a Republican until the 3'ear 1912, in which 
year he transferred his political allegiance to the Progressive party. He 
is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of 
P}d:hias lodges at St. Paul and a leader in the local post of the Grand Army 
of the Republic. Former!}' he took an active part in the affairs of the 
medical associations to which he was attached, but of late years is gradually 
relaxing some of his aforetime activities. He was a member of the Decatur 
County Medical Association and the Indiana State Medical Association, in 
the affairs of both of which societies he took an earnest interest. Mrs. Bal- 
lard also formerly was active in the work of the Pythian Sisters and of 
the Daughters of Rebekah, having filled all the chairs in the local lodges 
of those orders and served as delegate to the grand lodges of the same. 
Doctor and Mrs. Ballard, by reason of their useful lives in and about St. 
Paul, are held in the highest esteem thereabouts, being regarded with the 
greatest respect by the entire community. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 759 

CYRUS D. HARWOOD. 

Cyrus D. Harwood, for fourteen years secretary and treasurer of the 
St. Paul Gas Company, was born on May 20, i860, in Dearborn county, 
Indiana, the son of Ebenezer and Caroline (Sumpter) Harwood, the former 
of whom was a native of Dearborn county. He and his wife were suc- 
cessful farmers in that county. 

Cyrus D. Harwood, who died on August 15, 1913, came to Decatur 
county when a small lad, probably five or six years old. They settled in 
Shelby county for a short time and then moved to Adams township, Deca- 
tur county, settling near St. Omer. 

In 1863 Ebenezer Harwood enlisted in the Union army and served 
until June 27, 1864, when he died at Knoxville, Tennessee. He was a brave 
and efficient soldier, and was one among the thousands of patriotic citizens 
who gave up their lives in the cause of human freedom. At his death he 
left a wife and five children, the names of four of whom are herewith 
given, Mrs. Susan Pope, of Milford; Mrs. Mary Wilson, of Milford; 
Thomas, of Illinois; James of Bloomfield, Missouri; and Cyrus D., the sub- 
ject of this sketch. 

The late Cyrus D. Harwood grew to manhood at St. Omer and when 
about fifteen years of age his mother married again, after which time Cyrus 
D. went to Illinois, where he took a position with a mining company, which 
he held for several years. He became postmaster at Bartly, Illinois, and 
for some three or four years was engaged in the mercantile business at 
that town. 

About 1887 Mr. Harwood, after a trip west made in order to regain 
his health, came back to Decatur county and was married to Julia Short, 
March 29, 1888, a daughter of Joseph and Nancy (Gulley) Short, the 
former of whom was born on Flatrock river, Adams township, Decatur 
■county, Indiana, and where he lived until his death on February 26, 191 1. 
Nancy (Gulley) Short was born in Shelby county and came to Decatur 
county when a child and lived here all of her life, where her father was a 
farmer. Her father and mother died within three weeks of each other, 
the mother on February 5, 1911, and the father on February 26, 1911. Her 
father was a Republican and a member of the Baptist church. During the 
Civil War he was a corporal in Company D, Seventy-sixth Regiment, Indi- 
ana Volunteer Infantry, a patriotic citizen and a man popular in the neigh- 
borhood where he lived. 



760 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

After his marriage Cyrus D. Harwood entered business at St. Omer, 
but a short time after that they moved to St. Paul, where he engaged in 
business. During a period of about fourteen years he was secretary and 
treasurer of the St. Paul Gas Company. He was also a notary public and 
a man of unusual ability, possessed of a genial disposition, and had many 
friends in this county. He took a great interest in public improvements, 
and especially in the improvement of his own town, where Mrs. Harwood, 
his widow, lives at her home with her adopted daughter, Zelman, who is 
now a student in high school. Mrs. Harwood, who is a strong believer in 
education, is trying to give her adopted daughter the very best educational 
advantages. Mrs. Harwood taught school for six 3'ear previous to her mar- 
riage and is a cultured and refined woman. She has a wide circle of friends 
in Adams township. 



MORGAN L. ]\nERS. 



Emerson, in his great essay on Character, recalls the indignation of 
an eloquent Methodist at the kind admonition of a Doctor of Divinity — "My 
friend, a man can neither be praised nor insulted," and, indeed, in this age 
when the superlative is shrieking throughout the land, it would seem that 
even the common acceptance of the term praise had outworn its wonted 
use, for everything whose praises the promoters are shouting from the house- 
tops is either the greatest this or the greatest that that ever was. What 
with "the puff direct and the puff collateral and the puff oblique"' of the 
old time magnified by the megaphonic methods of the modern advertiser, 
praise — if, despite the eloquent JNIethodist whom Emerson cites, praise be 
possible — has overshot itself. When everything has become alike superlative, 
there are no superlatives and the promoter's adjectives are regarded askance 
by those whose ears are assaulted by the tumult of his cries. However, there 
is such a thing as proper and due praise, the modest meed that merit claims, 
and it surely is not ill-timed or unfitting that on such a page as this a few 
words be said in passing regarding the life and the personality of Morgan L. 
Aliers, one of the most influential men in Decatur county, the owner of four- 
teen hundred acres of land in Clay township and president of the Third 
National Bank at Greensburg, than whom no man in the county is more 
widely known or regarded with higher favor by his neighbors. Mr. Miers 
is a man of quiet, unassuming manner, of genial disposition and a philosophic 
turn of mind; qualities which bind his friends to him as "with hoops of 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 761 

steel," and it properly may be said that no man in this part of the state 
has firmer or more devoted friends than he. Mr. Miers' grandfather, Thomas 
Miers, was one of the early settlers of Decatur county and for three genera- 
tions members of the Miers family have been prominent in the affairs of this 
county, their influence ever having been exerted in behalf of the welfare of 
the whole community. A brother of Mr. Miers, the Hon. Robert W. 
Miers, of Bloomington, this state, represented this district in Congress for 
eight years and in all ways the family has stood for good government and 
decent living; being faithful and true in all the relations of life. 

Morgan L. Miers was born in the year 1855 on the farm on which he 
now lives, one and one-half miles south of the pleasant village of Burney, in 
Clay township, Decatur county, Indiana, the son of Thomas S. and Mahala 
(Braden) Miers, both members of pioneer families in that section of the 
county. Thomas S. Miers came to this county when about seven years 
of age with his parents, his father, Thomas Miers, emigrating from Ohio 
at an early day in the settlement of this county and entering from the gov- 
ernment a tract of land in the Burney neighborhood, in Clay township, 
where the rest of his life was spent, his death occurring not many years 
.after he came to this county. Thomas S. Miers was reared in the pioneer 
home in Clay township and upon succeeding to the ownership of the farm 
prospered largely, gradually increasing his holdings until he became the pos- 
sessor of more than si.x hundred acres of fine land, the larger part of which 
he had brought under an excellent state of cultivation. Though laboring 
under the many and manifest disadvantages of his day and generation, 
Thomas S. Miers displayed much executive ability and, a keen business fore- 
sight, becoming one of the foremost factors in the development of that part 
of the county in which he lived. He was a farmer of unusual skill and 
his farm became very profitable to him, his chief source of revenue being 
derived from feeding hogs, he finding that the value of the extensive crops 
of corn that he raised was thus largely enhanced. Thomas S. Miers was 
a member of the Episcopal church, a Democrat and a member of the Ma- 
sonic lodge at Milford. He was active in the good works of his community, 
influential in local politics and interested in the affairs of his lodge. Of a 
singularly optimistic nature, he radiated cheer wherever he went and was 
exceedingly popular throughout that part of the county. Ever ready to 
help others, he never forgot a kindness directed toward himself and it 
is said of him that he would go as far as anyone to accommodate a friend. 
Thomas S. Miers married Mahala Braden, a member of one of the pio- 
neer families of the county, and to this union there were born seven children,. 



•762 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

namely: Mary, who married Isaac Sefton, of Greensburg, this county; 
Robert W., of Bloomington, Indiana, former member of Congress from 
this district, now judge of the [Monroe count}' circuit court; Mrs. Emma 
Gihnore, deceased; Morgan L., the immediate subject of this sketch; Wil- 
lard A:, a well-known farmer of the Burney neighborhood, who owns three 
hundred and twenty acres of choice land in Clay township, is a well-known 
breeder of fine horses, having some time ago sold one of his trotters, "Little 
Snapp," for twenty-five hundred dollars; Nevada, wife of William A. Minor, 
of Clay township, and Maggie B., who married Frank Stapp and lives 
at Hope, Indiana. 

Morgan L. Miers was reared on the home farm in Clay township, 
receiving his elementary education in the local schools, which he supple- 
mented by a course of four years at Indiana University and was graduated 
from the law department of that excellent institution. Upon completing 
his education he devoted his time to the development of the growing farm 
interests of his father, giving his particular attention to the raising of live 
stock, soon becoming known as one of the heaviest shippers in the state. 
Recognizing the growing value of land in the neighborhood of the home 
acres he gradually bought land as he prospered and now owns fourteen, 
hvmdred and sixty acres of choice land, all of which lies in Clay town- 
ship. ]\Iuch of this land, purchased for fift}- dollars an acre, is now well 
worth one hundred and twenty-five dollars an acre, and Mr. ]Miers 
maintains that if he had had the acumen to have extended his purchases during 
the days of cheap land thereabout he now would be a millionaire. Howe\'er, 
he is a man of remarkably optimistic nature, as was his father before him, 
and he is not worrying because of this lack of foresight years ago. In fact, 
lie makes it a point never to worry, his genial temperament placing him 
above the petty worries that sometimes afflict less optimistic individuals. 
Though giving his chief attention to his great estate, Mr. Miers has found 
time to extend his activities in other directions and is interested in numerous 
enterprises in this and adjoining counties. Since the opening of the Third 
National Bank of Greensburg, thirty-four years ago, Mr. Aliers has been a 
director in that sound old financial institution and for the past two years 
has been president of the same; a position of prominence in the financial 
circles of southern Indiana exceeded by few therein. His sound judgment 
regarding values and thorough acquaintance with commercial and indus- 
trial conditions in this part of the state give to his opinions in connection 
with investments a weight of well nigh dominant force hereabouts and few 
financiers in southern Indiana have a higher standing in banking circles than 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 763 

he; his enterprising spirit being sufficient!}- well balanced b}- a native con- 
servatism to give to his decisions that unerring quality which business men 
in this section have learned to appreciate and value so highlv in consulta- 
tions regarding investments. 

Thirty-three years ago Morgan L. ]\Iiers was united in marriage to Gail 
Hamilton, of Clay township, this county, daughter of G. M. and Mary Susan 
(Logan) Hamilton, members of pioneer families in Decatur county, the 
latter of whom was a daughter of John Logan, and to this union two children 
were born, a son and a daughter, Roy, now twenty-three years of age, and 
Mary, now aged sixteen, the latter of whom is attending school in Boston, 
Massachusetts. Mrs. Miers met her death in an automobile accident on Oc- 
tober 20, 1914, a tragedy which plunged the entire community into mourning, 
for she was a woman of exceptional strength of character and for years a 
leader in good works in the vicinity in which her gentle influence so long 
had been exerted in all good ways. 

Mr. Miers is a member of the JNIethodist church and he and his son, 
Roy Miers, are members of the Masonic fraternity. Mr. Miers is a Demo- 
crat and takes an earnest interest in the political affairs of the county, state 
and nation, though he never has been included in the office-seeking class, his 
extensive personal interests being sufficient to engage his undivided atten- 
tion. He is a constant exponent of good government and all measures look- 
ing to the advancement of the public welfare find in him an ardent champion. 
Energetic and public spirited, Mr. Miers is a powerful factor in general 
affairs hereabout and no man in the county is held in higher esteem. 



GEORGE M. MEEK. 



Of the private soldiers who belonged to the Seventh Regiment, Indiana 
Volunteer Infantry, recruited during the latter months of 1861, no one 
living or dead had a more valiant record in the service of his country than 
the venerable George M. Meek, a well-known farmer of Fugit township. 
Having enlisted on September 13, 1861, in Company G, which was for two 
years commanded by his brother, Capt. John Meek, and under him Lieut. 
Orville Thomson, he served altogether three years. In the battle of the 
Wilderness he was wounded by a shot through the right breast, a wound 
which has bothered him all of his life. Few soldiers participated in a 
:greater number of severe battles than George M. Meek, who fought at 



764 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Greenbrier, Winchester, Port Republic, the second battle of Bull Run, 
Antietam, Gettj'sburg, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Slaughter Mountain, 
Virginia, and in the Wilderness campaign. After serving in every battle in 
which his company and regiment was engaged, he was mustered out of the 
service on September 20, 1864, full of honors yet weighted with the terrible 
burden of military service and disabled by the ghastly wound he had received 
in the Wilderness. 

The venerable George M. Meek, who was only eighteen years old at 
the time of his enlistment, was born on May 3, 1842, three miles northeast 
of Greensburg, the son of .Adam R. and Nancy (Logan) ]\Ieek. Adam R. 
Meek, a native of Kentucky, was the son of Thomas Meek, and came to 
Decatur county in 1825, just after the settlement was beginning in this 
section. He was twice married. Among his eighteen children were Tay- 
lor, of Greensburg; John, of Kansas; Mrs. Jerusha Patton, of California; 
Mrs. Mollie Donnell, of Missouri; Samuel; Mrs. Alinerva Bonner; Tirza 
Mclllvane;; Mrs. Rebecca Henry; William N., deceased; Thomas; Mrs. 
Laura Kincaid, deceased, and Josiah, deceased. 

After becoming one of the largest landowners in Decatur county, Adam 
R. Meek divided his land among his children, presenting each child with 
eighty acres in fee simple. 

George M. Meek, who now owns three hundred and thirty acres of 
land in Fugit township, settled, after his marriage, on the eighty-acre farm 
given to him by his father. After his marriage, he purchased the old Logan 
or Patton farm and in 1887 built his present farm home. A few years 
ago he also built a home for his son. 

On November 26, 1883, ^^^- Meek was married to Charlotte Miller, 
who was born on November 28, i860, at Clarksburg, and who is the daugh- 
ter of Louis C. and Elizabeth (Barneman) Miller, natives of Ohio and 
Germany, respectively. They were, married in Ohio and moved from that 
state to Decatur county in 1857. Mr. and Mrs. George M. Meek have had 
three children, the youngest of whom died in infancy. The two living 
children are Thomas, a well-known farmer of this county, who married 
Daisy Carroll, and Mrs. Fredericka Smith, who lives near Williamstown 
on a farm and who has one child. Carmen. 

As a farmer Mr. Meek feeds a large amount of live stock, and it is 
principally from live stock that he has made his greatest profits in farming. 
During his twenty-nine years of experience in the business of farming he 
has made a close and careful study of its methods, and few men living in 
Decatur county today are better informed regarding its various phases than 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 765 

he. 'Sir. ]Meek understands first the cultivation of the soil; he recognizes 
the importance of good seed and the preparation of a good seed bed. More- 
over, he believes in frequent and careful cultivation. He is not a man who 
sells a great deal of grain, practically everything raised on the farm in the 
way of grains or cereals being fed to the stock. 

The venerable George M. Meek comes from a distinguished family 
and one which has been intimately identified with the history of the county 
since pioneer times. If nothing more, his valiant service as a soldier in 
■our great Civil War would be sufficient to entitle him to rank as one of 
the foremost citizens. But as a careful, enterprising, thrifty farmer, he 
is quite as much a hero of peace as he was a hero of war. 



JOHN H. LOGAN. 



John H. Logan, a successful farmer and breeder of Fugit township, 
who passed away in Oklahoma, where he had gone to recover his health, 
on March 28, 1908, was one of the best-known citizens living in this part 
of Decatur county. 

The son of Joseph A. and Mary Jane (Straney) Logan, John H. Logan 
was born on November 8, 1849, on the farm where he spent the most of 
his life. He was the son of Joseph A. Logan, as heretofore noted, who was 
born on January 9, 1821, and who married Mary Jane Straney, a native of 
Kentuck}^. Joseph A. was the son of ]\Iartin Logan, a pioneer in Fugit 
township, and a native of Kentucky. He married Nancy Martin and died 
in 1888. Joseph A. Logan entered the land where Ezra Kirby now lives 
in 182 1. His father filed the papers for this farm, which afterward passed 
into the possession of his son, Hugh, and is now owned by Ezra Kirby. 
Mrs. Mary Jane (Straney) Logan, who was born on May 12, 1824, was 
the daughter of Jane Brown, who was born on December 27, 1748, and 
who had also two other children, John Brown Straney, born on November 
9, 1825, and Sarah Agnes Straney (Mayne), August 20, 1827. 

Joseph A. Logan was only nine months old when his father removed 
from Kentucky to Decatur count\% Indiana, and settled on the old home- 
stead, where the widow of his son, John H., now lives. He and his wife 
Tiad eight children. Of these children, Nancy Martin was born on March 
9, 1844, married a Mr. May, now deceased; Mrs. Mary Ann Cook, Octo- 
ber 14, 1845; Mrs. Margaret (Findley) Manlove, August 13, 1847; John 



j66 DECATUR COrNTY, INDIANA. 

H., is the subject of tliis sketch; Leander, February 9. 1S53, deceased; Will- 
iam R., August 20, 1S55, deceased; Nathan McDill Logan, September 27, 
1857, and lives in Fugit township, Luna Ames, October 2^, 1865, died on 
January 3, 1891. 

After his marriage the late John H. Logan and his wife purchased the 
old homestead, consisting of one hundred and nineteen acres, and later 
bought sixtv--six acres more, making in all one hundred and eighty-five 
acres. Upon this farm they erected a splendid modem home in 1900, and 
from time to time excellent outbuildings. He was a large stock raiser and 
feeder, and made a specialty of road horses with which he was ver}- suc- 
cessful. In 1908 ]Mr. Logan went to Oklahoma for the purpose of regain- 
ing his health, which was fast failing, and died six years afterward. At 
the time of his death he not only left to his undow and heirs the farm in 
Fugit toAvnship, but also a farm where he lived at the time of his death of 
one hundred and fifty acres southwest of Oklahoma Cit}s Oklahoma. An 
energetic and honorable citizen, a good business man and fanner, he was 
also a splendid t}-pe of the man who practices the Christianitx- which he 
professes. If John H. Logan had any enemies at the time of his death, he 
did not know about it, since he lived according to the Golden Rule, and 
never had trouble with anybody. A Republican in politics, he was a loyal 
and devoted member of the Springhill United Presbyterian church. 

On October 10, 1888, the late John H. Logan had been married ta 
Jeimie Carson, who was bom on September 26, 1865, in Tipton county, 
Indiana, and who is the daughter of John and Helen (Picken) Carson, 
natives of Brown count}', Ohio, and Scotland, respectively. The former 
was the son of Irish parents, and died in Tipton count\^ in 1884. His wife 
died later in Indianapolis. 

^Ir. and Mrs. Jolin H. Logan had four children. O.f these children, 
Harry Carson, born on Jime 22. 1890, was educated in the Clarksburg high 
school, and after lea^■ing high school, spent two years in a military- school 
in Tennessee; Ruth, December 11, 1891, is a student at the Bradley Insti- 
tute at Peoria, Illinois, having taught school for two years ; Jessie, Decem- 
ber 22, 1893, ■^^'^s a student in the Bradley Institute until her graduation in 
1915, and William, April 2, 1902, is attending the Clarksburg school. 

At the death of her beloved husband, Mrs. John H. Logan was left 
well provided for, and out of their combined earnings and savings she may 
enjoy all the comforts of life, and the conveniences which her beloved hus- 
band meant her to have. His memory is revered not only by the widow 
and children he left here, but by the host of friends he gained during a long 
and active life in this countv. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 767 

WALTER T. BOLIXG. 

Among the enterprising business men of St. Paul, Decatur county, 
Indiana, may be mentioned Walter T. Boling, the proprietor of a feed and 
grain business at that place. Born in 1887, in Franklin county, Indiana, he 
is the son of William and Hannah (Humphrey) Boling, the former of 
whom was born in 1828 and died in 1899. Hannah Humphrey was the 
second wife of William Boling, the first wife having been a Miss Sloan, 
who bore him one child, Josephine, now deceased. By his second marriage 
there were twelve children, of whom Alice, the eldest and Jasper, the fifth 
born, are deceased. Mrs. Alice Wheeler died in February, 1914, at her 
home in Laurel. The living children are, Mrs. Martha Jane Carr, of 
Frankfort; Mary, who is the housekeeper for George Logan, of Clay town- 
ship; Albert, who is the treasurer of Decatur county; Mrs. Ada Wright, 
the wife of Wilbur Wright, of Adams; George W., who is engaged in the 
hardware business in St. Paul; W. T., the subject of this sketch; Clyde, 
Elmer, Owen and Edna, all of whoin reside in Indianapolis. 

Walter T. Boling, after spending his boyhood days on the farm, and 
receiving his education in the common schools of the county, left home at 
the age of seventeen and afterward worked on a farm in Decatur county 
until 1901, when he came to St. Paul and was employed in the grain ele- 
vator of William Nading, for whom he worked for six years. At the end 
of this period, he purchased an interest in the St. Paul Hardwai"e Com- 
pany, where he remained for three years. Later he sold out and purchased 
his present business in which he has been engaged ever since. Mr. Boling 
handles and sells many thousands of bushels of corn each year as well as 
all kinds of feed and flour. He has been successful in business and now 
owns the mill and building. At the present time he is building a strictly 
modern up-to-date home in St. Paul and is spending in the neighborhood 
of two thousand dollars in its construction. 

■ In October, 1904, Mr. Boling was married to Gertrude M. Wynkoop, 
of Sand Creek township, the daughter of Isaac Newton and Mary Eliza- 
beth (AIcGee) Wynkoop, the former of whom was born on February 24, 
1850, in Franklin county, Indiana, the son of James and Barbara (Her- 
rick) Wynkoop, and the latter born on April 8, 1854, in Sand Creek town- 
ship, two and one-half miles from her present home, the daughter of Ralph 
and Sarah (Jones) McGee, the former of whom was born on January 8, 
1827, and the latter born on April 12, 1832. Ralph McGee died on June 
20, 1909, and his wife on February 3, 1906. Ralph McGee was the sort 



768 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

of John McGee, a native of Ireland, who came to Butler county, Ohio, in 
1810, and who was a soldier in the \\'ar of 1812. He married Jane Cas- 
sell. Mrs. Boling's paternal grandparents, James and Barbara (Herrick) 
Wynkoop, were natives of Pennsylvania, the former having been born on 
July 19, 181 7, died on February 27, 1893, ^^^ the latter born on January 
23, 1817, died on November 30, 1903. 

Having started in life with five cents in money, it cannot be denied that 
Mr. Boling has made a wonderful success in his business. He has suc- 
ceeded by dint of great nerve and a philosophy all his own. He is a well- 
known citizen in the county and is highly respected wherever known. 

He is a stanch Democrat and for many years served as precinct com- 
mitteeman. Fraternally, he is a member of the Ivnights of Pythias Lodge 
No. 148, at Greensburg, and has been a member since he was twenty-one 
years old. Mrs. Boling is a member of the Baptist church, while Mr. Bol- 
ing is a member of the Presbvterian church. 



JOHN E. OSBORN. 



The legal profession has claimed many of the brighest minds of Decatur 
county and from the beginning of the county's history in 1822 the bar of 
the county has included men of high standing. From the bar of this county 
men have gone out to become congressmen, members of the highest courts 
of the state and lieutenant-governors. In whatever position they have found 
themselves they have acquitted themselves with credit. One of the younger 
members of the Decatur county bar is John E. Osbom, the senior member 
of the firm of Osbom & Hamilton. Without those advantages which so 
many of the younger lawyers of today have, he has arisen to a high place 
in his community through the sheer force of his personality and enjoys the 
utmost confidence of both bench and bar in this section of the state. 

The Osborn family is of English ancestry and were early settlers in the 
state of New Jersey. It was in that state that Albert I. Osborn, the father 
of John E., was born on February 3, 1831. Albert I. Osborn was only 
four years of age when he came with his father, John Osborn, to Dearborn 
county, Indiana, later locating in Decatur county. In this county he grew 
to manhood, married, reared his family, and is still living. He is now in his 
■eighty-fifth year and makes his home at Newpoint. 

John E. Osborn, the youngest child of his parents, was born on August 




.>-ir^,fiQfts,^ ^^-c-.-K?' 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 769 

25, 1S72, near Newpoint, Decatur county, Indiana. Reared on the farm and 
educated in the pubhc schools at Newpoint, Rossburg and Alechanicsburg, 
he reached man's estate without any other than a sohd common-school edu- 
cation. He remained on the farm until he was nineteen years of age, and 
desiring to become something else than a farmer, he began the study of law 
by himself. So rapidly did he master the rudiments of the legal profession 
that he was admitted to the bar in ^lay, 1897. However, he had previously 
been appointed deputy county auditor, receiving the appointment at the age 
of nineteen, and had served as deputy auditor under his brother-in-law, John 
J. Puttman, from December 7, 1891, to March, 1896. 

The professional career of Mr. Osborn was begun in partnership with 
Elmer E. Roland, but six months later he resigned from the firm to become 
the partner of Hugh Wickens, the present circuit judge. After the election 
of Mr. Wickens as judge of the ninth judicial circuit, Mr. Osborn was .in 
partnership with Lewis A. Harding, the firm being known as Osborn & 
Harding from November, 19 10, to January i, 19 12. On the latter date 
Frank Hamilton became a member of the firm, which was then changed to 
the firm of Osborn, Hamilton & Harding. This partnership continued until 
November, 1912, when Mr. Harding was elected prosecutor of this judicial 
district and withdrew from the firm. Since that time Mr. Osborn has been 
associated with Mr. Hamilton. 

John E. Osborn has now been practicing before the bar of this county 
for nearly twenty years and has had many important cases in the county, 
district and state courts. His practice has constantly increased and he has 
had the management of many interesting cases. So successful has he been 
that in his several firm changes he has been able to take with him the personal 
business which he had acquired as a member of these respective firms. The 
career of Mr. Osborn has not altogether been confined to his legal business. 
He has branched out in industrial and commercial enterprises with the 
same degree of success which has marked his progress in his chosen field 
of law. He is a stockholder and a director of the American Cooperage 
Company of Helena, Arkansas; the Columbia Cooperage Company of Mc- 
Gehee, Arkansas; the Arkansas Cooperage Company of Jennie, Arkansas, 
and is a partner with John T. Meek in a plantation in Concordia Parish, 
Louisiana, near Natchez. He and Mr. Meek own forty-four hundred acres 
of land on which they raise rice, cotton and considerable live stock. They 
-also have a saw-mill on the plantation. 

On July 17, 1900, John E. Osborn was married to Grace Guile fer, the 

(49) 



770 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

daughter of Dr. Thomas B. and Louise (Hederick) Gullefer, to which union 
one son has been born, Wendell G., born on October 23, 1905. 

Mrs. Osborn's father, Dr. T. B. Gullefer, was born eight miles from 
Indianapolis, Indiana, on March 12, 185 1, a son of Stephen Gullefer, also 
a native of Marion county, Indiana, who died on his farm in that county 
in 1901. Stephen Gullefer was a son of Aaron Gullefer, a native of Wayne 
county, Indiana, an early settler of Marion county, where he acquired a farm 
of six hundred and forty acres. The wife of Stephen Gullefer was Emily 
Bowers, born in Salem, Indiana, in 1824, who died in July, 1853. Dr. T. B. 
Gullefer is the only child born to this union now living. After the death of 
his first wife Stephen Gullefer married a second time and had six children 
by his second marriage, three of whom are dead, those living being John N., 
who owns the home farm; Eliza A., who resides with her brother John, and 
Judson, a resident of Indianapolis. 

After receiving a common-school education in the schools of Marion 
county, Doctor Gullefer spent one year in Butler College and then became 
a student of DePauw University for three years. After leaving college he 
taught school in the rural districts for six years. In 1879 he entered the 
medical college at Indianapolis and was graduated with the class of 1881, 
later taking a post-graduate course in the Chicago Homeopathic College, 
from which he was graduated in 1891. Doctor Gullefer practiced in Plain- 
held, Indiana, for five years; in North Vernon, Indiana, for two years, and 
has been in continuous practice in Greensburg, this county, for the past 
twenty-five years. 

Dr. Thomas B. Gullefer was married in 1873 to Louise Hedrick, who 
was born in Gallatin county, Kentucky, in 185 1, daughter of John and 
Charlotte Hedrick, to which union two children were born, Grace and 
Bessie. Grace is the wife of 'Sir. Osborn and Bessie married John Hor- 
nung, Jr., a grain merchant of Greensburg. Mrs. Gullifer passed away on 
July 5, 1915. 

Doctor Gullefer is a Republican in politics and has served as coroner 
of Decatur county for eleven years; six years as secretary of the county 
board of health, and four years as secretary of the city board of health. 
He also served as United States pension examiner for one year, and is the 
present medical examiner for the government civil service in the fourth con- 
gressional district. He is a member of the Indiana Institute of Homeopathy. 

John E. Osborn made his iirst start in Democratic politics immediately 
after reaching his majority and has taken a keen interest in political affairs 
ever since. As member of the Democratic state central committee from the 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 



17^ 



sixth congressional district from January, 1908, to January, 1912, his wise 
and judicious management of Democratic affairs was largely responsible for 
the election of many Democrats to office. When Finley Gray was elected to 
Congress in 1912, he was the first Democrat to go to Congress from this 
district for twenty-five years. Mr. Osborn deserves no little share of the 
credit for bringing about the election of this Democratic congressman. 

Mrs. Osborn is an active member of the Christian church of Greens- 
burg. :Mr. and Mrs. Osborn are prominent in the various activities of the 
community which go toward making it a better and happier place in which 
to live. Their influence is always cast in behalf of all humanitarian and 
benevolent projects and in this way they have earned the commendation of 
all those with whom they come into contact. 



GEORGE W. BOLING. 



During a period of nearly a century, various members of the Boling 
family have been prominent in the agricultural, industrial, commercial and 
political life of Decatur and adjoining counties. The family was founded 
in this section of Indiana by Benjamin Boling, an interesting pioneer citi- 
zen of this region. William Boling, the father of George W., and the son 
of Benjamin Boling, owned a farm just over the line from Decatur county 
in Franklin county, and spent all of his life on this farm. It is now owned 
by Albert Boling, a brother of George W., and the present county treasurer. 

George W. Boling, who is best known in Decatur county for his inter- 
est in the St. Paul Hardware Company, of St. Paul, Indiana, was born on 
September 14, 1873. in Franklin county, Indiana. His parents were Will- 
iam and Hannah (Humphrey) Boling, the former of whom was born in 
1828 and who died in October, 1899. Hannah Humphrey was the second 
wife of William Boling and now lives in Adams in this county. His first 
wife was a Miss Sloan, who bore her husband one child, Josephine, now 
deceased. By the second marriage there were twelve children, of whom 
two, Mrs. Alice Wheeler, the eldest, and Jasper, the fifth born, are deceased, 
the former dying in February, 19 14, at her home in Laurel, Indiana. The 
living children are, Mrs. Martha Jane Carr, who lives at Frankfort; Mary, 
who makes her home with George Logan in Clay township, and is his 
housekeeper; Albert, who is the present treasurer of Decatur county; Mrs. 
Ada Wright, who is the wife of Wilbur Wright, of Adams, Indiana; George 



772 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 



W., who is the subject of this sketch; WaUer T., who is in the feed and 
grain business and operates a mill at St. Paul; Clyde; Elmer; Owen, and 
Edna, all of whom are in Indianapolis. 

Although a member of a large family, George W. Boling was not 
denied the very best educational advantages and, after completing the com- 
mon school course of Decatur county, was a student at the Danville Normal 
school and the Indianapolis Business University. He was employed by 
various firms in Indianapolis after graduating from the business college, 
particularly the William B. Burford Printing Company, the Erie Railroad 
and the American Express Company. In 1901 he came to St. Paul, Indiana, 
and for two years operated the ^Villiam Nading elevator. In 1903 Mr. 
Boling entered the hardware business under the firm name of Lefiler & 
Boling at St. Paul. This arrangement continued until in October, 1903, 
when the firm became Mobley & Boling. This firm continued until 1905, 
when Elmer Upjohn purchased Mr. Mobley's interest when the St. Paul 
Hardware Company was organized. In 1908 C. F. Thompson purchased 
the interest of Mr. Upjohn and he is now a member of the firm. The 
company has a storeroom, thirty by eighty feet, and a wareroom adjacent 
in a brick block. They also have a garage in the Red Men's building, forty 
by forty feet, which is used as a storage room for automobiles. The com- 
pany handles general hardware, agricultural implements, the Johnson line 
of implements, Oliver plows and other standard lines, cream separators, 
Fehring buggies, manufactured at Columbus, Indiana, standard makes of 
wagons, guns and ammunition, stoves, kerosene and gasoline. The com- 
pany is also the local agent for the Studebaker Automobile Company, and 
the agent in Shelby, Rush and Decatur counties for the Hercules car. Inci- 
dentally, they handle automobile supplies and automobile tires. They sell 
gas and gasoline engines, washing machines, install furnaces, water sys- 
tems and plumbing. The company is well equipped to fit up a residence in 
a most modern way, so far as heating and water systems are concerned. 

George W. Boling is connected with the St. Paul Building and Loan 
Association in the capacity of secretary. This company has its offices in 
Mr. Boling's store and was organized in 1886. It has done more to build 
up St. Paul than any other concern in the township, particularly in enabling 
laborers and quarrymen to erect homes in this community. 

In May, 1901, George W. Boling was married to Nona B. Burner, the 
daughter of William Burner of Greensburg. To this union has been born 
three children. Mildred Louise, Vivian Avalon and Clara Virginia. 

Mr. and Mrs. Boling and family are members of the ]\Iethodist Epis- 



DECATUR COUNTY^ INDIANA. "J-JT^ 

copal church. Fraternally, Mr. Boling is a member of the Free and Accepted 
Masons, the Knights of Pythias and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
He is identified with the Republican party, but has never held office. 



JAMES N. BUSH. 



James N. Bush, a veteran of the Civil War and formerly a stone 
quarry superintendent and bridge builder of Adams township, was born in 
1842 in Owen county, Kentucky, and is the son of Pleasant and Drusilla 
(Smoot) Bush, both of whom were natives of Kentucky. Their parents 
came from Virginia to Kentucky. The Smoot family came originally came 
from Scotland. 

Pleasant Bush was the son of Joseph and the Bush family came orig- 
inally from England, and Joseph Bush's wife, who before her marriage was 
a Miss Duncan, was of German extraction. Pleasant Bush, himself, was 
born, lived and died in Kentucky. 

In 1869 James N. Bush came to Decatur county with his wife, to whom 
he had been married in 1866, in Kentucky. They had one child at the time. 
Catherine (Smoot) Bush, the wife of James N., was born in Kentucky and 
was the daughter of George Smoot, a native of that state. Born in 1842, 
she died in Decatur county in 1908. They had a family of six children, 
three of whom are still living at St. Paul, \A^illiam, who is a blacksmith; 
A. M., who is a restaurant keeper, and C. L., who is a partner with A. M. 
They have erected many fine buildings in this part of the county, including 
a fine concrete business building in St. Paul. 

When Mr. Bush came to Decatur county he began cutting stone. He 
followed this trade for about a year, when he was employed by W. W. 
Lowe, for whom he worked for twenty-one years as superintendent of stone 
quarries. He afterward leased and operated for himself a stone quarry 
and, in the meantime, was engaged in bridge building. 

In 1863 Mr. Bush enlisted in Company E, Thirtieth Regiment, Ken- 
tucky Volunteer Infantry, which was mounted and commanded by Colonel 
Alexandria. This regiment was attached to the army of General Stone- 
man. Mr. Bush saw hard service and was detailed to scout work mostly, 
his regiment having operated chiefly in Kentucky, Tennessee and Virginia. 
He served until the close of the war, being mustered out of service on April 
18, 1865. On one occasion his division engaged the army of General 



774 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Breckenridge at Saltville and was badly defeated; in fact, almost anni- 
hilated. However, they returned to Saltville with four thousand men and 
there engaged General Breckenridge and defeated him. Saltville was an 
important point, since it was the source of salt for the Confederate army. 
The Union army destroyed the salt works and the available supply of salt. 
J\lr. Bush had many thrilling escapades in scout duties. He was possessed 
of wonderful zest and courage which served him well on many occasions. 
He was a brave and resourceful soldier and is today very proud of his 
mihtary record, which he ha-s every right to be. 

For many years James N. Bush has been badly afflicted with rheuma- 
tism, but nevertheless is a man of cheerful disposition. In his life he has 
made considerable money and had a comfortable competence laid by to 
last him the remainder of his life. On account of sickness and death in 
his family his fortune is somewhat depleted. After the death of his wife 
he divided his propert)- among his children and went to live with his son, a 
business man of St. Paul. 

Mr. Bush is a man of strong convictions, which have alwaj's been a 
good guide for his actions. Reared in one of the strongest rebel counties 
of Kentucky, where all of his neighbors and practically all of his relatives 
joined the Confederate army, Mr. Bush himself believed in the cause of 
the Union and chose to support the stars and stripes. He believed that 
slavery was wrong and human freedom was right, and cast his lot accord- 
ingly. No citizen is more high!}' respected in Decatur county than the ven- 
erable James N. Bush. 



JOHX R. KANOUSE. 



The late John R. Kanouse was a well-known merchant and farmer of 
St. Paul, Adams township, Decatur county, Indiana. He was a man of 
large mental mold and of prodigious physical energy, one who by careful 
application to his personal business built up a large patronage in this com- 
munity and who held, at the time of his death, the respect and confidence 
of the host of friends he had made during his life. 

The late John R. Kanouse was born in 1844 in Clay township, Decatur 
county, Indiana, the son of George and Isabelle ( Sumpter) Kanouse, the 
latter of whom was the daughter of John and Elizabeth Sumpter, natives of 
Iowa, and relatives of General Sumpter of Civil War fame. George Kanouse 
himself was a soldier in the Civil War. In 1871 John R. Kanouse was 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 775 

married to Courtney McCoy, a daughter of Isaiah and Mary (Short) McCoy, 
the former of whom was a native of Virginia, born in 1815, and who 
died in 1909. After coming to Decatur county with his parents, Wilham 
and Nancy (Waple) McCoy, when seven years of age, he settled with them 
on a- farm in Adams township. WilHam McCoy was a miller on Clifty 
creek and a soldier in the War of 1812. He died in Kentucky. Isaialt 
McCoy was a Decatur county farmer and a very successful business man, 
who started in life with nothing and who by his shrewdness, industry and 
good management accumulated considerable property. He owned several 
hundred acres of land at the time of his death. A Republican in politics, 
he was a man of strong convictions as well as of good moral character. 
He died in 1909, leaving a family of seven children. John, Benjamin and 
Mrs. Nancy Lawhead are deceased; Mrs. Eliza Garrett is the wife of Lewis 
Garrett, of Adams township; Mrs. Julia Bright is the wife of John Bright, 
of Adams township; Courtney married Mr. Kanouse, and Mrs. Arminda 
Boicourt is the wife of George Boicourt, who lives near Letts in Sand 
Creek township. 

Mrs. Courtney Kanouse was born in 1850 in Adams township* and 
educated in the common schools of Decatur county. She grew to woman- 
hood at home and there lived until her marriage in 1871. She is a woman of 
keen business judgment, well able to care successfully for the business 
with which she was left at the time of her husband's death. She is a mem- 
ber of the Christian church at St. Paul, of the Order of the Eastern Star 
and the Rebekahs. 

After their marriage in 1871, Mr. and Mrs. John R. Kanouse started 
in life at St. Omer in Decatur county, where he was engaged in the mer- 
cantile business. He was very successful there, but after two years, in 
1880, he and his wife removed to St. Paul, where he engaged in the mer- 
cantile business and in which he continued until two years before his death. 

An unusually successful business man, the late John R. Kanouse owned, 
at the time of his death, not only the large store in St. Paul, but three hun- 
dred acres of land as well. 

Mr. and Mrs. John R. Kanouse had eight children, seven of whom are 
now living, as follow : Roy K. is a merchant in Greensburg ; Mrs. Daisy 
Bewley lives in California; George is in the automobile business in Indian- 
apolis; Mrs. Rose Hill, wife of Oscar Jay, prosecuting attorney of Elkhart, 
Indiana; Mrs. Nellie Hill is the wife of James Hill, of Westport; Mrs. 
Edna Wolf is the wife of Carl Wolf, of St. Paul; Frank lives at home. 

No duty, public or private, was neglected by the late John R. Kanouse. 



77^ DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

A man of deep religious convictions, he was a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. Fraternally, he was identitied with the [Masonic frater- 
nity and the Knights of Pythias. He was also a Red Man. His acquaint- 
ances and friends were not confined to Decatur county. He had a host of 
friends in Shelby county as well. His beloved widow is a woman of refine- 
ment and of splendid Christian character. She has a beautiful home in St. 
Paul, where, with her son and his wife, she is living. 



JOHN T. PAVY. 



No family in the western part of Decatur county has exerted a more 
widely marked influence for good throughout that section than has the 
Pavy family, which has been active in the good works of the Milford 
and the Burney neighborhoods for the past four or five generations and 
is one of the most substantial and well-established families in this part 
of the state. The late John T. Pavy, whose death at his home in Burney 
on March 21, 1914, was widely mourned throughout the section of the 
county in which he so long had been one of the leaders in the religious 
and social life thereabout, was an able, upright and influential citizen; a 
man who created a distinct impress upon the life of his time in the com- 
munity in which for years he had gone about doing good, and it is but 
fitting and proper that in a history of the county covering the period of 
his activities here, there should be presented a modest sketch of his useful 
career, together with some of the salient points relating to his interesting 
family. Though a quiet, unassuming man, John T. Pavy ever was fore- 
most in the good works of his neighborhood and none therein was held in 
higher esteem and respect than he. Generous and kind-hearted, he ever 
was willing to lend a helping hand and many there are in the part of 
the county to which his labors were devoted who have cause to cherish 
his memory with feelings of gratitude and warmest admiration. A de^'out 
Christian, he imparted to all his relations with his fellow men a spirit of 
sincerity that left no doubt regarding the noble and disinterested motives 
that animated his course of action. In his daily walk and conversation, 
John T. Pavy was frank and direct, open and aboveboard; and all men 
knew where he stood on questions affecting the general welfare. Being 
one of the most substantial farmers in the western part of Decatur county, 
he very naturally and by proper right took his place among the leaders of 



DECATUR COUNTY^ INDIANA. "J-JJ 

thought and sentiment thereabout and his judgment on local issues or on 
questions of right and policy exerted a fine and enduring influence upon 
the neighborhood. He and his wife were members of the Baptist church 
and their children were reared in that faith, the family being among the 
most active workers in the various beneficences of the church. He was 
an ardent Republican, though not of the office-seeking class, and his sound 
judgment and keen knowledge of affairs gave to his political opinions no 
light weight with the managers of the party in this county. lie was an 
ideal husband and father, his invariable and unswerving devotion to his 
family having been beautiful to see, and his death created a vacancy in 
the family circle which time does not fill, his widow and children being 
devoted to his memory, cherishing the same as a priceless legacy, for he 
left a stainless name; the record of a blameless life, than which there can 
be no more fitting phrase used in eulogy. 

John T. Pavy was born on a farm in Clay township, Decatur county, 
Indiana, a short distance west of the village of Burney, in the year 1848, a 
son of J. J. and Nancy (Deem) Pavy, both members of pioneer families 
in this county, further details of the genealogy of this family being pre- 
sented elsewhere in this volume, these families having been prominent and 
influential in the days of the county's early settlement. Reared on the 
home farm, receiving the most careful training in the rudiments of agri- 
culture, a vocation to which he was destined to devote his life, John T. 
Pavy attended Hartsville College for a time and completed his education 
at Franklin College. He entered upon his life as a farmer with charac- 
teristic energy, giving to the details of the farm a studious attention which 
was productive of results and he became quite successful, leaving a valuable 
estate at the time of his death. 

On March 28, 1878, at Mil ford, Decatur county, Indiana, John T. 
Pavy was united in marriage to Anna Jackson, who was born on a farm 
in Clay township, this county, daughter of William T. and Margaret (Miers) 
Jackson, the former of whom was the son of William D. and Amelia (Hill- 
man) Jackson, who settled in this county in 1840. William D. Jackson was 
a Virginian and his wife was a native of Maryland. Shortly after their 
marriage they located in Cincinnati, where William D. Jackson became a 
prosperous real estate dealer. In 1840 they came to Decatur county, set- 
tling on a quarter-section of land in Fug^it township, removing thence, in 
1847. to Clay township, where they lived until 1853, in which year they 
moved to a farm two and one-half miles west of the town of Greensburg, 
where they spent the rest of their lives. An interesting story of the life 



778 . DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

■of this pioneer family is presented elsewhere in this volume in the bio- 
graphical sketch relating to William E. Jackson, a brother of ]\lrs. Pavy. 

William T. Jackson was about eighteen years of age when his parents 
moved from Cincinnati to this county. He married Margaret J\Iiers, daugh- 
ter of Thomas Miers, one of the most substantial of the pioneer farmers of 
Decatur county, and to this union were born eight children, namely: Anna, 
the widow of Mr. Pavy; James, deceased; Edwin, a well-known farmer of 
Clay township, this county; Benjamin J., deceased; Adelaide, who married 
Henry Barnes; William E., a prominent farmer of Washington township, 
this county, who married Alta Moore ; Charles J., who died in infancy, and 
Harry, who lives in Colorado. William T. Jackson died at the age of 
sixty years and his wife died at the age of sixty-eight. 

Anna (Jackson) Pavy was bom in a log cabm on what is now known 
as the Miers farm in Clay township, then owned by her father, previously 
by her grandfather. She was educated in the schools at Milford, this county, 
and at the old academy at Danville," Indiana, her father having been for 
a time engaged in the dry goods business at Dan\ ille. Upon her marriage, 
in 1878, to Mr. Pavy she entered seriously upon the life of farming and 
was an earnest and devoted helpmeet of her husband. When she was 
married she was a member of the Methodist church, but changed her church 
affiliation to the Baptist in order to conform her faith to that of her hus- 
band, he having been reared in the Baptist faith, and for years they were 
among the most active and influential members of the congregation to which 
they were attached. A woman of broad mind and sterling character. Mrs. 
Pavy has always been an influence for good in the Burney neighborhood 
and her home in the pleasant village of Burney is a center from which 
radiate only the blandest and most salutary promptings. 

To John T. and Anna (Jackson) Pavy were born two children, a son 
and a daughter, Harry, who was born in 1882, is operating a part of the 
home farm, and Lena, who married Ewing Arnold, lives on the William F. 
Smiley farm, one and one-half miles south of Greensburg. Beside his 
wife and children, John T. Pavy left several brothers and sisters to mourn 
his death, to his parents having been born the following children : Susan, 
who lives on the old Pavy farm south of Burney; Elizabeth; Dorcas, who 
married Felix Gartin, a prominent live stock dealer of this county, died 
in 1915; Matilda, who lives on the home farm; John T., deceased, the 
subject of this sketch; James, a farmer of the Forest Hill neighborhood; 
Rev. \A'illiam A., pastor of the Baptist church at ^^'aldron; Nannie, who 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 779 

married Daniel Harker; Mary J., who married John Templeton, and Mi- 
nerva, who was born bhnd and who is hving at the old home. Minerva 
Pavy was educated in the Indiana school for the blind at Indianapolis and 
became a proficient musician, being not only a fine singer, but an accom- 
plished pianist, having supplemented her course in the state school by a 
finishing course in the Indianapolis Conservatory of Music. She is a 
woman of much charm and grace of manner and of a highly cultivated 
mind. Despite the affliction which has shut her out from a sight of all the 
beauties and the wonders of the world, she is possessed of a charmingly 
cheerful disposition and is a great favorite with her many friends. 



OTTO F. DIETRICH. 



Ampng the prosperous and well-established enterprises of Burney, Clay 
township, Decatur county, Indiana, is the saw-mill, owned and operated by 
Otto F. Dietrich, which was established in 1902 with an invested capital 
of three thousand dollars. This mill has a capacity of eight thousand feet 
daily and Mr. Dietrich, while he does some commercial custom work, is 
largely engaged in cutting and sawing his own timber. He buys timber in 
large tracts, has the logs cut and saws them in his own mill. He employs 
the minimum of six hands and sometimes as many as twenty. The mill 
consists of the very latest equipment. 

Otto F. Dietrich was born on April 8, 1876, in Germany, and is the son 
of Ferdinand and Marie (Weber) Dietrich. On May 9, 1888, Otto F. 
Dietrich, at the age of twelve years, arrived in America with an aunt, 
Pauline Dietrich. For some time he resided with an uncle, Charles Dietrich, 
in Tipton county. Although he had received a liberal education in Ger- 
many, he attended school for four years after coming to America and 
mastered the English language. For five years he worked as a farm hand 
in Tipton county, Indiana. In 1893 his parents and brothers and sisters 
came to Bartholomew county, Indiana, and began farming one and one- 
half miles west of St. Louis. They purchased a farm near Hartsville and 
there the father died in 1895. After his death, the motVier and sisters 
moved to Cincinnati, where the mother purchased a home. 

Mr. Dietrich, however, remained in this state and engaged in farming 
and in saw-mill business. He took charge of the old mill at Burney and 
in 1905 tore out all of the old machinery and installed new. Mr. Dietrich 



780 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

rents land extensively on which he raises crops to feed the horses which 
he uses in the mill and for hauling logs to the mill. 

On October 8, 1902, Mr. Dietrich was married to Lillie Aton, who 
was born on a farm, one and one-half miles southwest of Hope in Bar- 
tholomew count}-. They have had two children, Frank, who died at the 
age of nine years in the fall of 1913 of diphtheria, and Paul, who is now 
six years old. 

yir. Dietrich is a Democrat and he and his wife are members of the 
Lutheran church. Fraternally, he is a member of the Loyal Order of 
Moose. Formerly, he was a member of the Knights of Pythias. 



ANTHONY B. ^lULROY. 

Anthony B. ]\Iulroy, a substantial citizen and business man of Decatur 
county, Indiana, and a resident of St. Paul, was born in 1859, in this town, 
the son of Richard and Bridget (Barrett) Mulroy, the former of whom was 
a native of County Mayo, Ireland, born in 1825. 

On the day that Richard Mulroy was twenty-two years old, he took 
passage on a sailing boat, "Star of the North," for America, landing in 
New York city after an eventful voyage in 1847. When the ship on which 
he came to x\merica was three days out of port, a terrific storm was encount- 
ered and the experiences of all on board was something to be remembered 
during their entire lives. For three days the ship was completely lost, and 
at times those on board almost gave up hope of ever seeing land. However, 
the "Star of the North" was a good, seafaring boat and successfully with- 
stood the severe storm. When Richard ^Mulroy landed in New York city, 
he was without funds or friends. Starting out in life in the new world, he 
obtained employment on a farm in New York state, and after working a 
year there removed to Pennsylvania, where he remained for three years. 
He made three unsuccessful attempts to enlist as a soldier in the Mexican 
War. 

After three years in Pennsylvania, Richard Mulroy left Pittsburgh and 
came to Lawrenceburg, Indiana, by boat. From Lawrenceburg he walked 
to Indianapolis where he remained for four or five years, during which time 
he was engaged in railroad construction work, making Indianapolis his 
headquarters. 

In 1857 Richard Mulroy was married to Bridgett Barrett, who was 



DECATUR COUNTY^ INDIANA. 78 1 

born in 1823 in Ireland in County Mayo within forty miles of the birth- 
place of her future husband. Born on the west coast of Ireland, she came 
alone to America in 1856, and after landing in this country came direct to 
Greensburg, Decatur county, Indiana, where she had a sister living, Mrs. 
John Riley, with whom she made her home until her marriage in 1858. 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Mulroy came to St. Paul in 1858, where her 
husband lived until her death in 1906. He died on June 2, 1915, at the age 
of ninety years. During his entire active life he had been engaged in rail- 
road construction work and in stone quarries. He had been retired only 
five years. In fact, in 19 14, at the age of eighty-nine, he planted and culti- 
vated a large garden. He was a stanch Democrat in politics, and a member 
of the Catholic church, as was his good wife also. They had four children, 
Anthony B., the subject of this sketch, of St. Paul; Edward, of St. Paul; 
Anna, who lives at home, and Margaret, who died in infancy. 

Anthony B. Mulroy, who was born in St. Paul one year after his par- 
ents removed to this town, was educated in the common schools and when 
he was thirty-two years old, engaged in stone quarry work. At this time 
he was married to Henrietta Avey, the daughter of Daniel Wilson and 
Melissa (Pence) Avey, natives of Shelby county, Indiana, and old, well- 
established and highly respected citizens of this section. 

As late as 1914 Anthony B. Mulroy was engaged in railroad construc- 
tion and stone quarry work. In October of 1914 he purchased the grocery 
and mercantile business of William Kelso, of St. Paul, and is today engaged 
in business for himself. He handles a complete line of dry goods and gen- 
eral merchandise. Within a comparatively short time he has built up a 
large trade in this community. Mr. Mulroy is a popular citizen and one 
with whom the people of this community naturally like to trade. He has 
been honorable and upright in all his relations with the public, and upon 
this basis his business has grown since he took possession. 

Mr. and Mrs. Mulroy have had one son, John A. Mulroy. who was 
born on January i, 1899. He was born on Sunday morning, the first day 
of the week and the first day of the year. Luck seems to have been with 
him, as he has never been sick a day since his birth. He is a young man 
of rare promise and is popular in this community. Having graduated from 
the common schools in 1914, he is now a student in the freshman vear at 
the high school at St. Paul. 

In a beautiful residence of St. Paul, Mr. and j\lrs. Mulroy have their 
home. Formally speaking, Mr. Mulroy is a Democrat, but he is not quite 
-so stanch a Democrat as was his father in his earlier 3'ears. Mr. Mulroy 



782 ' DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

places the welfare of his country above the success of his party. He is a 
progressive citizen of the substantial and solid type and has a host of friends 
in this community. All his life has been spent in St. Paul. As a conse- 
quence of his industry and good management he has accumulated a sub- 
stantial competence and now owns considerable property in this section. 



JAMES B. DAMS. 



An enterprising and successful farmer of Decatur county, Indiana, 
who lives three miles southeast of Burney, now living retired, and who has 
succeeded in life as a consecjuence of his own persistent industry and good 
management, is James B. Davis, a man who believes strongly in principles 
of right and justice, and who during his long life in this county, has been 
regarded as one of its very best citizens. 

James B. Davis, who was liorn in 1848, in Union county, Indiana, is 
the son of Isaac and Martha (Barr) Davis, the former of whom was born 
in Butler count}-, Ohio, in 1803, the son of James Davis, Sr., who married 
Mary Taylor. They were natives of New Jersey. Alary Taylor was of 
Scotch-Irish origin, and James Davis was of German parentage. They were 
among the earliest settlers in Union count}-, Indiana, and lived the greater 
part of their lives in that county. They were very prosperous farmers, and 
at the time of his death, he owned approximately one thousand acres of 
land. They had eight children, of whom Isaac Davis, the father of James 
B., was the seventh child. He was born in Butler county, Ohio, and about 
1803, when Isaac was born, the family removed to Union county, and there 
entered land, where they spent the remainder of their lives. Isaac Davis 
was a successful farmer and owned several hundred acres of good land 
at the time of his death. Until 1856, when the Republican party was organ- 
ized, he was a Whig, and he affiliated with the party of Lincoln, and remained 
loyal to it all the rest of his days. He was more of a patriot than a partisan 
and always had at heart the best interests of his country. 

Isaac and Alartha (Barr) Davis had eight children, of whom James B. 
is the fifth child. The father died in 1858. James B. Davis lived at home 
and worked on the farm until he was twenty-two years of age, when he 
removed to Decatur county, Indiana, and purchased a farm in Jackson 
township. In 1873 ^^^- Davis w-as married to Martha C. Ewing, who was 
the daughter of Patrick and Lydia (Morgan) Ewing. 



DECATUR COUNTY,. INDIANA. 783 

The Ewing family is one of the oldest and most prominent in Decatur 
count}-, and is descended from one Patrick E. Ewing, who emigrated to 
America from Ireland some time during the War of the Revolution. On 
the voyage a son was born, and on account of kindness shown to him by 
General Putnam, he was named for the general and to this day the name 
has been kept in the famil}^ On Patrick's arriyal in America, he settled in 
Maryland, near the Susquehanna river, some forty miles from Baltimore, 
where he died. His family consisted of four sons, Samuel, Joshua. 
Nathaniel and Putnam. The first three settled in Virginia, where they 
became prominent citizens. Their descendants have since migrated to Ten- 
nessee and Missouri, and have attained considerable prominence in different 
states. Putnam Ewing remained in Maryland until some time after his 
■ marriage to Miss Jennie McClelland, the daughter of Doctor McClelland, of 
that state, and then came to Bourbon county, Iventucky, in 1806. Subse- 
quently, he settled in Bath county and there lived and died. He had ten 
children, namely : Robert, Patrick, Joshua, Polly, Samuel, Jennie, James, 
Eliza, George McClelland and Andrew Jackson. It was the Patrick Ewing 
of this family who was the father of Mrs. James B. Davis. He was born 
in Cecil county, Maryland, in 1803, and was three years old when brought 
by his father to Kentucky. He remained on the farm in Kentucky until 
after his marriage to Lydia Morgan, of Montgomery county, Kentucky. 
He was a member of the state militia of Kentucky and was married in 
September, 1826, to Miss Morgan. About 1827 he came with his wife and 
infant daughter to Decatur county. He was a hardy son of illustrious 
ancestors and was a man of exceptional native ability. He accumulated a 
large tract of land in this county. 

Mrs. James B. Davis is a woman of rare intelligence and one whose 
conversation sparkles with wit and humor. She had only the meager 
advantages of the pioneer public schools as far as an education is concerned, 
but she is a woman of great native ability, and one does not have to listen 
to her conversation long before discovering this wonderful native ability. 
Her children can be justly proud to have for their mother a woman of her 
intelligence. 

After the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Davis, they lived in Jackson town- 
ship on a farm until 1883, when they sold out and purchased the farm they 
now live upon, three miles southeast of Burney. In the early years of their 
married life they had the usual experiences of the pioneer citizens. They lived 
in a log cabin for the most part, and both remember keenly the hardships, 
of this early life. 



■784 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Mr. and Mrs. Davis have had three children, George was born in 
1874, and is a farmer in Decatur county; WilHam, in 1875, and is engaged 
in farming with his brother, George, and Delia is the wife of Samuel Hanks, 
who lives three miles northwest of Burney and who is a prosperous farmer. 
Delia has one child, Mary C. Hanks. George and Will Davis lived on 
the farm at home until Geofge was twenty-eight years old, when he decided 
to begin life for himself. At that time the parents gave to the sons, George 
and Will, a farm of one hundred and twenty acres with an incumbrance 
of some two or three thousand dollars. This was no small load, even for 
mature shoulders, but b_\' industry and shrewd management they cleared the 
farm of indebtedness in sixteen months' time. They have prospered pro- 
portionately ever since, and are now large dealers in live stock. Their home 
is called "Bachelors' Hall." 

James B. Davis had always been identified with the Republican party 
until 1912, when the new Progressive party was formed, with which he 
afiiliated. He is a man who is little impressed by political parties or party 
emblems, but believes it is his duty, as a citizen, to support superior men 
and superior measures, rather than to cast his vote blindl}' without regard 
to platforms or principles, or the moral standing of the party's candidate. 
The sons are like their father in this respect. They are well respected in 
this community and favorably known. 

Mr. and Mrs. Davis have lived honorable and upright lives and have 
set a worthy example for their children and for their friends in this com- 
munity. K'o word of suspicion has ever attached to the character of James 
B. Davis. He is a manly man and a true Christian gentleman. 



GEORGE S. CRAWFORD, M. D. 

In the historical and biographical annals of any section, a review of 
the lives of leading physicians is interesting not only because of the pro- 
fessional service which this honorable body of men perform, but because, 
as a general rule, physicians attain the rank of leadership in public move- 
ments and public enterprises. This may be true because, aside from their 
professional education, their standard of intelligence and their breadth of 
information and sympathy are such as to uphold ideals which the various 
members of the community emulate. No one can ever take the place of the 
physician in the affection of the family or in the home, neighborhood, town or 




{/(a^-^^<^t..^u^^^iy-^^ OK/Q, 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 785 

city. To some extent the physician is the arbiter between hfe and death 
and upon his skiU depends frequently the very endurance of human hfe. 
When the art of the good physician fails and life flows out, he, neverthe- 
less, remains as the comforter of loving and dear friends in times of sorrow 
and distress. No one can measure his influence, since it is of a most inti- 
mate and personal kind. Dr. George S. Crawford, a well-known physician 
of Milford, this county, who has practiced his profession forty-one years 
in this community, is the very type of man to attain a position of proud 
eminence in the community life. Day by day, week by week and year by 
year, he has gone about the homes of Clay and adjoining townships doing 
his duty in a professional way; but, what is far greater and grander, doing 
his duty as a sympathetic-minded friend and man. 

George S. Crawford was born, on December 23, 1852, in Lawrenceburg, 
Dearborn county, Indiana, the son of Rev. James and Hannah F. (Robinson) 
Crawford, natives of New York and Madison, Indiana, respectively. When 
Doctor Crawford was an infant only three days old, he was bereft of the 
loving tenderness and care of a fond mother by her untimely death, and 
he was taken in charge by Mrs. Owensby, who had just lost her baby by 
death, and was reared by her until he was two years of age, the Owensby's 
home having been in Crawfordsville, this state. Subsequently, Rev. James 
Crawford remarried, his second wife having been Kate Woodfill, a sister of 
James M. Woodfill, of Greensburg, and after his death his widow made her 
home with Doctor Crawford, in Milford, for twenty-five years. Rev. James 
Crawford was a pioneer Methodist minister, had a large circuit in this section 
of the state and, during his life, filled many appointments. He was a man 
of noble and generous impulses, whose life seemed to be devoted to the 
service of his fellowmen. 

When he was old enough George S. Crawford attended the typical 
Hoosier schools and there obtained the rudiments of a liberal education, 
later pursuing his education in Moores Hill College. At the age of twenty- 
one he was graduated from the Indiana Medical College at Indianapolis, 
and upon his graduation, came to Decatur county, locating at Milford, where 
he established himself in the practice of his profession. There he has 
remained for forty-one years, during which time he has built up one of the 
largest practices of any physician now living in Decatur county. 

Doctor Crawford was not married until rather late in life. His wife, 
to whom he was married on July 6, 1898, before her marriage was Frances 
Olive Blackmore, who was born on October 19, 1867, on a farm five miles 
(50) 



786 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

west of Greensburg, the daughter of Lawrence O. and Frances W. (Wallace) 
Blackmore, natives of Shelby county, Kentucky, and Rockbridge county, 
Virginia, respectively, the former being the son of Owen W. Blackmore, of 
Shelby county, Kentucky, who came to Decatur county, Indiana, in 1835. 
Mrs. Crawford's wife's mother was the daughter of John and Jane (Quig- 
ley) Wallace, natives of Virginia, who moved to Decatur county in 1837 and 
settled in Washington township. This was only two years after the coming 
of the Blackmores, who lived only a mile east of the Wallace farm. 

Doctor and Mrs. Crawford have had no children. They are prominent 
in the social life of Clay township and both are well known in Greensburg 
and popular there. Both are members of the Presbyterian church at Greens- 
burg. Dr. Crawford is a member of the IMasonic fraternity, having joined 
this lodge at IMilford many 3'ears ago. He is a member of the Decatur 
County Medical Society and the Indiana State ^Medical Association. He is 
a Republican and one of the most uncompromising of men as far as his 
political belief is concerned. He believes in the principles of the Republi- 
can party and believes that this party is best equipped from tradition and 
from its record of past usefulness to administer the affairs of this govern- 
ment. A man who believes this as strongly as does Doctor Crawford is 
naturally well settled in his political belief. He is a grand and useful figure 
in the community where he has lived and worked so long and enjoys the 
universal confidence and esteem of the people. 



JAMES M. SHORTRIDGE. 

Among the better known and older citizens of St. Paul, Indiana, is 
James AI. Shortridge, formerly a well-known hardware merchant of this 
community, who is now living retired. However, he devotes considerable 
time to the business of W. W. Townsend, a dealer of this place, and acts as 
a bookkeeper for him. 

James 'SL Shortridge was born on November 6, 1849, in Johnson 
county, Indiana, the son of John and Ellen (Smock) Shortridge, the former 
of whom was bom in 1822 and who died in 1899. The father was a native 
of \\'ayne county, Indiana, the son of George Shortridge, Sr., a native of 
Kentucky and an early settler in ^^"ayne county. The parents of Ellen 
Smock were also natives of Kentucky. Her mother died in 1885 at the 
age of over ninety 3'ears. 



DECATUR COUNTY^ INDIANA. 787 

The parents of James M. Shortridge moved to Greenwood and retired 
late in life and there died. The farm located near Greenwood, Johnson 
county, was purchased by James M. and his brother, George, and was 
farmed by the latter until his death. There were three children in the Short- 
ridge family, George, now deceased; Mrs. Vandelene Washard, of Green- 
wood, and James M., the subject of this sketch. 

When a lad of twenty-two years, James AI. Shortridge became a brake- 
man on the Pennsylvania railroad and followed this occupation for four 
years. He then took up carpentering and house building in his home local- 
ity and also worked for the railroad as a carpenter. He was for four years 
employed by the Lake Erie & Western railroad as a bridge carpenter. 

On November 26, 1879, Mr. Shortridge was married to Allie Martin, 
of St. Paul, the daughter of Ralph Martin, an early settler of Decatur 
county. After his marriage, Mr. Shortridge engaged in the hardware busi- 
ness. He bought out the store owned by John Buell and remained in busi- 
ness for thirty years, having been very successful. In 1909 Mr. Shortridge 
sold out the business. He has extensive real estate holdings in St. Paul, 
owning a two-story brick building .on Main street, a one-story stone build- 
ing and residence property. He also has two lots and fifty-five acres of 
farm land, beside other personal investments. 

Mr. and Mrs. Shortridge have had four children, Elmer, who is a 
motorman on the Indianapolis & Cincinnati Traction line and is a machinist 
by trade; Mrs. Hazel Clark, of Indianapolis; Irene E., who is a teacher in 
the public schools and lives at home, and Helen, who also lives at home and 
is a student in the high school. 

James M. Shortridge was reared a Republican as was his father before 
him, but late in life the father voted the Prohibition ticket. Mr. Short- 
ridge voted for Horace Greeley and was a Democrat until 1896, when he 
refused to subscribe to the free-silver doctrine of the Democratic party and 
voted the Republican ticket, which he has voted ever since. Mr. and Mrs. 
Shortridge are members of the Christian church, in which he is a trustee. 
Fraternally, he is a member of the Free and Accepted Masons and is a mem- 
ber of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite Masons of Indianapolis and 
also the Murat Temple, Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, at Indianapolis. He 
is a member of the Baldwin commandery and the Knights Templar at 
Shelbyville. In May, 191 5, he attended the golden jubilee of the Scottish 
Rite Masons at Indianapolis. In addition to these fraternal relations, Mr. 
Shortridge is a member of the Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks No. 475, at Greensburg. 



788 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Of Mr. and Mrs. Shortridge's children, Elmer married a Miss Hess 
and has one child, Priscilla. Mrs. Hazel Clark also has one child, June 
Ellen. 

It will have to be admitted that the life of James M. Shortridge has 
been a distinct and unqualified success, that he has accomplished a reason- 
able measure of the things he set out to do, and that, in his declining years, 
he may enjoy the comforts of life without the necessity of the toil which 
characterized his earlier 3'ears. 



JOHN JOHNSON. 

The Union soldier during the great war between the states builded 
wiser than he knew. Through four years of suffering and wasting hard- 
ship, through the horrors of prison-pens and amid the shadows of death, 
he laid the superstructure of the greatest temple ever erected and dedi- 
cated to human freedom. One of Decatur county's highly respected citizens 
who had a part in this memorable struggle is the venerable John Johnson, a 
retired farmer of Burney. He remembers very well the Polk and Tyler 
campaign. 

John Johnson is the son of Richard and Fannie (McKee) Johnson, 
the latter of whom was a native of Pennsylvania, born in 1805. Richard 
Johnson was born in Kentucky in 1799, and, after emigrating to Indiana, 
settled near Vevay, Indiana, in Switzerland county, the home of Colonel 
Welsh and Edward Eggleston. He died in 1857 in Decatur county, Indi- 
ana, thirty-two years after coming to Decatur county, where he entered land 
near the town of Burney. He made the trip with an ox team in a covered 
wagon, camping in the woods on the way. At the side of a giant poplar 
tree he and his wife built a log cabin, where they lived when John Johnson 
was bom. Decatur county was an unbroken forest at the time, there being 
no roads and scarcely any paths. Such as were used and passable were 
designated by marked trees. The wolves were thick in this county at the 
time and many a time chased the father of John Johnson into his cabin. On 
one occasion a deer came up to the Johnson cabin with the cows. 

At the outbreak of the Civil War the venerable John Johnson tried 
to enlist under Colonel Welsh in the Seventh Regiment, Indiana Volunteer 
Infantry, but was rejected on account of his eyesight, being blind in one eye. 
He then joined the Seventy-sixth Regiment. Indiana A^olunteer Infantry, 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 789 

by resorting to a trick. In order to get past the inspection officer he changed 
sides with a man next to him and was successful. The Seventy-sixth Regi- 
ment performed vahant service in Kentucky. Mr. Johnson for the most 
part performed scouting and picket duty. 

After the war, Mr. Johnson came back to Decatur county, and resumed 
farming on the old Johnson homestead, entered from the government by 
his father. This tract, originally comprising one hundred and sixty acres, 
was later enlarged by the addition of forty acres, making two hundred acres 
in all. He has always been a farmer and very successful in a business way. 
At the present time he is living with his youngest daughter. 

In 1871 Mr. Johnson was married to Sarah Jones, a daughter of the 
Rev. Preston Jones, and a native of Decatur county. Mr. and Mrs. John- 
son have had two children, namely: Mrs. Lilly (Johnson) Miers, the wife 
of Willard Miers, and Fannie, a teacher in the Burney schools, who lives 
with her father. 

Mr. Johnson's father was a Whig politically, but, upon the organization 
of the Republican party identified himself with that political organization. 
John Johnson, who was formerly a Republican, now is a Prohibitionist. 
For many years he has been prominent in the fraternal circles of this sec- 
tion, being a member of the Masonic lodge at Milford and a charter member 
of the Knights of Pythias lodge at Burney, Indiana. On March 4, 1913, 
Mr. Johnson had the misfortune to lose his wife, who passed away quietly, 
and whose remains are buried at Milford. At the present time he is in fair 
health only, but nevertheless his mind is clear and active and he has a vivid 
and accurate memory of the many stirring incidents of his life. He has 
been a useful citizen in this county and a man who well deserves the respect, 
which, in his declining years, is showered upon him by the people of Clay 
township. 



JOHN T. CUSKADEN. 



John T. Cuskaden, postmaster at St. Paul, Decatur county, Indiana, 
farmer, school teacher and real estate dealer, prominent Democrat and 
public-spirited citizen, was born on July 6, 1858, in Clay township, south- 
east of Milford, the son of George W. and Charity (Bartley) Cuskaden. 

The paternal ancestry of John T. Cuskaden came to America from 
Ireland. George W. Cuskaden was a native of County Donegal, Ireland, 
who came to America about 1850. He landed in New Orleans, and after 
some wandering located in New York city, where he became an Irish linen 



790 DECATtTR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

peddler. This was the foundation of his business fortune, which has been 
one of more than ordinary success. After peddhng and walking across the 
country he finally landed in Greensburg, where he abandoned his pack and 
went to work on a farm for Hi Alley, for whom he worked some one or 
two 3'ears, after which he was married to Charit}^ Hartley in Jasper county, 
Illinois. 

After his marriage George W. Cuskaden purchased eighty acres of land 
in Illinois. He came back to Decatur county and began the usual life of a 
man on a rented farm in Clay township. After renting land for about two 
years, he purchased a farm just west of Milford, comprising one hundred 
acres, and located on the Shelby county line. Here he lived for about ten 
years, when he sold out and moved to Oregon. After remaining in Oregon 
a year, he came back to Indiana and purchased a large farm in Shelby 
county, Indiana. A few 3'ears before his death, which occurred in March. 
19 14, he traded the Shelby county farm for city property in Shelby ville, 
where he lived the last years of his life. 

George W. Cuskaden was a prominent Democrat in Shelby county, 
and was honored with four terms as county commissioner of that county. 
He was a man of keen perceptions and had a broad knowledge of human 
nature. He was a member of the Episcopalian church. His good wife. 
Charity Bartley, was a native of Shelby county, born near St. Paul and 
the daughter of Jonathan and Elsie (Allen) Bartley, of Shelby county. 
The Aliens of Shelby county are descended from early settlers in this part 
of the country who came from Massachusetts. They brought with them 
from old England considerable pewter plate which was later molded into 
bullets for self-defense. The present Cuskaden family has in its posses- 
sion only one plate of this original collection. George Washington is sup- 
posed to have been served on this plate while in Trenton, New Jersey, some 
time during the Revolutionary War, by Mrs. Cuskaden's Grandmother Allen. 

John T. Cuskaden grew to manhood in Shelby county, and was mar- 
ried in 1880 to Orpha Wright, a daughter of John Wright, who was an 
emigrant from Derbyshire, England. Her mother, Annie Ridlen, was a 
native of Shelby county. After Mr. Cuskaden was married he and his wife 
lived on a farm in Shelby county until about sixteen years ago, when he 
removed to St. Paul. Mr. Cuskaden taught school for twenty-two years. 
He has always taken an active interest in politics and is allied with the 
Democratic part)^, a stanch and true adherent of this party. He was 
appointed postmaster of St. Paul on August i, 1914. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 



791 



Mr. and Mrs. Cuskaden have had two children, Charity Ann, who was 
born on August 30, 1881, and who married Charles F. Mitchell, of Shelby- 
county, has four children, Mildred M., Allen Wright, John William and 
Malcom F., and Ora Wright, on October 26, 1887, married Dora E. Rob- 
erts, of Shelby county, and thej' have one child, Clarice Winifred. 

There is no doubt that Mr. Cuskaden, who has always been prominent 
in public affairs in Shelby and Decatur counties, owes much of his. success 
to the splendid equipment he was permitted to obtain in the common schools 
of Shelby'county and later in the National Normal School at Lebanon, Ohio. 
It was at the latter school he prepared for teaching. It was there that he 
developed his native capacity for learning and became a student of history 
and politics. John T. Cuskaden is a good man and a good citizen. 



LONDA WRIGHT. 



Londa Wright, one of the prominent farmers and citizens of Sand 
Creek township, Decatur county, Indiana, now living one and one-half miles 
north of Westport, was born on the old Richard Wright homestead in Clay 
township, near the Liberty church, and is a son of Richard and Luvica 
(Stark) Wright, the latter of whom was a daughter of Caleb and Anna 
(Boone) Wright. The genealogy and family history of the Wright and 
Stark families may be found in the biographical sketch of Caleb Stark 
Wright, contained elsewhere in this volume. Richard and Luvica (Stark) 
Wright had a number of children, of whom Londa was the youngest. 

Born on the old Wright homestead in 1864, Londa Wright lived at 
home until he reached the age of twenty years, at which time his father died. 
He supplemented the education he received in the common schools of his 
home township in Decatur county by some fifty weeks spent at the Northern 
Indiana Normal School at Valparaiso. From the time he was twenty years 
old until he was twenty-three, Mr. Wright was engaged in teaching school. 

In 1888 Londa Wright was married to Minnie May Smiley, a daughter 
•of Harvey and Serilda (Robbins) Smiley, who was born on May 17, 1870, 
in Sand Creek township, Decatur county, Indiana. Her father was a native 
of Franklin county, Indiana, and when a lad came to Decatur county, where 
"he became a prosperous farmer. He was a son of William Smiley, whose 
family history is contained elsewhere in this "volume. 

After their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Wright began life together on a 



792 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

farm of one hundred and eight acres, one and one-half miles north of Hor- 
ace, in Sand Creek township. His present farm, which comprises two hun- 
dred and seventeen acres of fine land, is known as the old Robert Armstrong 
farm and is one of the best to be found in Sand Creek township. 

'Sir. and Airs. Wright are the parents of five children, Arthur, born 
on April 5, 1890: Robert C, December 13, 1891 ; Lois Victoria, December 11, 
1894, and Marshall and Margaret, twins, April 26, 1906. 

A Democrat in politics. INIr. Wright is progressive in his political 
ideas and principles, and is in no sense a hide-bound partisan. Both he 
and his good wife are members of the Bapti.st church at Westport. For- 
merly he was a member of the Knights of Pythias lodge at Greensburg, 
and during his membership there, passed through all the chairs, but some 
time ago dimitted on account of his inability to attend lodge meetings. 



JOSEPH CORY. 

In the history of the agricultural life of Decatur county, Joseph Cory,, 
the proprietor of "Sulphur Springs Farm"' of one hundred and si.xty-eight 
acres, four miles from Greensburg on the Vandalia pike, occupies a conspicu- 
ous place. During almost a half century he has been one of the repre- 
sentative farmers of Decatur county, progressive, enterprising and perse- 
vering. Such qualities always bring a satisfactory reward. While Mr. 
Cory has benefited himself and the community in a material way, he has also 
been an influential factor in the educational, political and moral life of Wash- 
ington township. 

Joseph Cory was born in Clay township, Decatur county, Indiana, on 
December 26, 1845, ^ son of James and Martha (Dorton) Cory, the former 
of whom was born in 181 7, coming- to Decatur county about 1844, ^t which 
time he purchased the farm now owned by George Logan, where all of his 
children, except the eldest, were born and grew to manhood and womanhood. 
Mrs. Martha (Dorton) Cory, who was born in 1822, and whose parents came 
from New Jersey to LTnion county, Indiana, where their children were born, 
died in June, 1899. James Cory owned two hiuidred and forty acres of 
fine land in Decatur county, and was a Republican in politics. He was a 
successful farmer and a stockman of ability and promise. Mrs. IMartha 
Cory's brother and sisters were John, Matthew, Ann and Belle. 

James Cory was a son of Joseph and Nancy (Baker) Cory, the former 



VF 







DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 7gj 

of whom, born in New Jersey, in December, 1788, came to Ohio on horse- 
back in young manhood. The Cory family is of Scottish and English origin. 
Nancy (Baker) Cory was a daughter of Daniel and Hannah (Westfield) 
Baker, the latter of whom was a daughter of Joseph and Mary (Halsey) 
Westfield. Daniel Baker was one of eight children born to Nathaniel and 
Abigail (Hendricks) Baker. Nathaniel Baker was born in Scotland in 1716, 
and came to America in 1735. He died on January 17, 1786, in his seven- 
tieth year, and his wife died on October 3, 1775, in her fifty-sixth year. 

At the age of twenty-one years, Daniel Baker, who had enlisted as a 
soldier in the Revolutionary War, attracted the attention of Gen. George 
Washington, and served on his personal staff. It was Daniel Baker who 
piloted General Washington through the British lines to a silversmith for 
the purpose of having the general's field-glasses repaired. Daniel and Hannah 
(Halsey) Baker were the parents of nine children, Rhoda, Mary, Jacob, 
Joseph, Patrick, Philip, Elizabeth, Hannah and Nancy. In 18 14 Daniel 
Baker and wife, with their children, came west to Ohio, where his death 
occurred in 1830, and there was inscribed upon his tombstone the fol- 
lowing words: "A companion of Washington." 

To James and Martha (Dorton) Corj^ six children were born, those 
besides the subject of this sketch being: Ephraim, who is a resident of 
Missouri; Henry, living in Iowa; Mrs. Sarah Carter, widow of Elijah 
Carter, living at Alexandria, Indiana ; James, a resident of Clay township, 
living south of Burney, and Mrs. Belle Pleak, wife of Charles Pleak, living 
in Iowa. 

Joseph Cory lived at home on his father's farm until his marriage on 
November 14, 1871, to Leanora Deem, the daughter of Thomas and Sarah 
(Riner) Deem. Thomas Deem was born in Ohio in 1796, and came with his 
family from Ohio to this county, about 183 1, locating on the farm \vhere 
Joseph Cory now lives, where he died in 1853. His family remained there 
until about 1865, when they removed to Adams, where Mrs. Deem, widow 
of Thomas, died in 1895. Of their ten children five are still living, namely: 
Mrs. Catherine Daily, the widow of A. G. Daily, living in Greensburg at 
the age of eighty-five years; John W. Deem, of Greensburg, is eighty-four 
years of age; Mrs. Elizabeth Whitlow, wife of John Whitlow, a resident 
of Topeka, Kansas, eighty-one years of age; Oliver Deem, seventy-four 
years of age, a resident of Greensburg, and Mrs. Joseph Cory, the wife 
of the subject of this review. The deceased children of Thomas Deem 
«nd wife were Mrs. Eliza Anne Steward, who was the wife of Barney 
Steward, both of whom are now deceased ; Lemuel, deceased : William 



^94 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Henry, who died wiiile in the service of his country during the Civil AA'ar; 
Thomas Henry, also a soldier of the Civil War, who died while in the ser- 
vice, and Mrs. Mary Anna Heaton, widow of Thomas Heaton, who died 
on March 6, 1915. The mother of these children, who, before her mar- 
riage, was Sarah Riner, was born, on October 20, 1809, in A^irginia, and 
removed with her parents to Butler county, Ohio, in 1846. She was mar- 
ried to Thomas Deem in 1825, and they removed to Decatur county in 1S33. 

To Joseph and Leanora ( Deem ) Cory two children have been born, 
Walter B., deceased, and Irma, who married John M. Douglas, a native of 
this county, who is farming the old home place for Mr. Cory. 

"Sulphur Springs Farm" in A\'ashington township, consists of a fine 
quality of soil, which is gently undulating, and there general farming and 
stock raising are carried on. The farm is beautifully situated and the 
buildings are kept in a first-class state of repair. Hogs, corn and clover 
are the chief products of the farm, and Joseph Cory has always been rated 
as a successful farmer and business man. 

The part which Joseph Cory has played in the agricultural development 
of Decatur county, Indiana, cannot be overestimated, but he has been no 
less prominent as a farmer than as a business man and citizen, and today, 
surrounded with all the material comforts of life, he enjoys the respect of 
his neighbors and the esteem of everyone with whom he has ever come in 
contact. 



WILLI A?^I H. .AIOBLEY. 

In Clay township, Decatur county, Indiana, one mile east of Harts- 
ville and about five miles southwest of Burney on the Columbus and Greens- 
burg pike, lives William H. ^lobley, a distinguished citizen, farmer and 
mule dealer, who it may be truthfully said, had he been born and reared 
under the shadow of and inlluence of Wall street, would certainly have 
become one of America's foremost captains of industry and millionaires. A 
comparatively young man but a man who is today known in all of the leading 
mule markets of the world, he could, if he decided to convert his per- 
sonal property into cash and liquidate whatever indebtedness he has, have, 
besides, his twelve hundred and eighty-five acres of 'rich farming land in 
Decatur county, at least twenty thousand dollars in cash. He is one of 
the largest horse and mule dealers in the Middle AA'est and buys from all 
parts of the L^nited States and ships to all of the leading markets of this 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 795 

.country, mules worth at least a half million dollars every year. Although 
he has expended great muscular and physical energy in his work, he has 
made his brain do most of the work and this is one of the secrets of his 
large success. 

A man who is not yet forty-five years old and who has never had 
a single dollar given to him, his wealth today probably amounts to over 
two hundred thousand dollars. In 1894 he bought forty acres of land 
and in 1901 he had accumulated four hundred and ten acres which had 
cost him fifty-five dollars an acre and upon which he had a loan of twenty 
thousand dollars. Since then he has bought and sold several farms and has 
now twelve hundred and eighty-five acres. 

William H. JMobley, who was born in 1871, is the son of John Henry 
and Mary Ann (Burk) Mobley, natives of Pennsylvania and of Scotch- 
Irish descent and who came to Indiana about 1842 and settled in Bartholo- 
mew county on a farm. His father was a successful farmer and business 
man and died in 1897 ^t the age of seventy-five years. He was a strong 
Republican in politics and leader in the councils of his party during his life. 
Mrs. • Mary Ann Mobley was the daughter of Hunter Burk, who married a 
Miss Hunter, both of whom were natives of Pennsylvania. Mrs. Mobley 
lives in Bartholomew county with her youngest son. She and her husband 
had a family of ten children, Lyman, who lives in Kansas; Mrs. Emma 
Wilson, of Bartholomew county; Randolph M., who is a resident of North 
Dakota; Theodore, who lives in Bartholomew county; Mrs. Margaret 
Wright, who lives in California; Mrs. Ella Loose, who died in Iowa; 
Loren, who died in infancy; Arthur, who died in infancy; William H., the 
subject of this sketch, and James Hunter, who resides in Bartholomew 
county. 

Large successes generally have small beginnings. It was so with the 
career of William H. Mobley. Beginning in a small way, his rise to for- 
tune has become a matter of remarkable interest to the people of this county. 
The home farm and outbuildings are well kept and present a pleasing home 
appearance, nevertheless, an air of large and important business. The sale 
barn is eighty by one hundred and thirty-two feet and the cattle barn, fifty 
by eighty feet. Mr. Mobley holds auction sales attended by buyers from 
all parts of the country. The size of the buildings on his home farm and 
the business-like appearance of the establishment, suggest the auction barns 
of the large cities. Besides the two large barns on the farm, there is also a 
blacksmith shop and a garage. The owner of this great business enterprise 
has been offered one hundred and fiftv dollars an acre for his home farm, 



796 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

comprising four hundred and fifteen acres, and, according to the tax duph- 
cates of Decatur county, is the highest-priced land to be found in the county. 
Mr. Mobley thinks real estate, and especially farm real estate, is the best 
investment in the world. The annual sales of the Mobley farm amount to 
between thirty and forty thousand dollars for every sale and at least one 
sale amounted to sixty-one thousand dollars. William H. Mobley buys one 
carload or ten carloads of mules in as many minutes and makes a thousand 
or two dollars quite as quickly. The expenses of his business are enormous 
for an enterprise of this kind. Ordinarily his telephone rent amounts to 
fifty dollars a month and he pays high wages to all of his employees. One 
man worked for him for ten years and received sixty dollars a month dur- 
ing the entire time. There are six tenant houses on the farm and the tenants 
rent land for one-third of the annual production. Men regularly employed 
on the farm, however, live at Hartsville. On September 25, 1914, the date 
of Mr. Mobley's annual sale, five hundred mules were sold. He has from 
one hundred to one hundred and fifty head of mules on hand at all times of 
the year and raises about two hundred head of cattle every year. 

As a matter of fact, the large capacity for business with which Will- 
iam H. Mobley is endowed is not surprising when it is remembered that his 
deceased father was a large speculator, having the same active instinct 
regarding business. 

In 1903 Mr. Mobley was married to Grace Pearl Myers, of Decatur 
county, the daughter of George M. and Mary Alice (Taylor) Myers, the 
former of whom lives one mile east of Forest Hill on a farm of one hun- 
dred acres, and who is a son of William Myers. Mary Alice Taylor was 
the daughter of George and Hannah (Wise) Taylor. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Mobley have been born two children, Mary Florine, in 1904, and Franklin 
Wayne, in igo8. 

William H. Mobley has made good because he has given strict atten- 
tion to his business. His striking personality has been no small factor in 
his success. He believes in taking chances and, moreover, he believes in 
taking big chances. To begin with, he is a man of highly progressive ideas. 
His mind is always at work. Although he received a good common school 
education and additional training in Hartsville College, there is nothing in 
his educational experience which would account for his magnificent success 
in life. While talking to you he leaves the impression of a man who knows 
what he wants and how to get it. He has always been a heavy borrower of 
money and is a stockholder in the Burney State Bank and a director of the 
Hope State Bank. He is a firm believer in his home county and believes in 



DFXATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 797 

investing in land in this county rather than in other states. Everything that 
Mr. Mobley buys, he buys at home, if it is at all possible to do so. 

Although a Republican, he is interested in politics only as a citizen, 
and would not have the best office within the gift of the people if it were 
offered him. Any community is indeed fortunate to have as one of its 
citizens a man of the temper and ability of William H. I^Iobley, who is widely 
and favorably known. 



CLARENCE E. GREELEY. 

The Greeley Stone Company of St. Paul, Indiana, is one of the large 
and flourishing enterprises of Decatur county and one in which the people 
of this county have every reason to take great pride. This enterprise is the 
conception of a father and two sons, the latter being Clarence E. and R. E. 
Greeley, both of whom have been residents of St. Paul since the beginning 
of the industry in 1908. 

Li the first place, the Greeley Stone Company, which was incorporated in 
190,8, with a capital stock of fifteen thousand dollars, is the largest plant 
of its kind in Decatur county, employing twenty-five men and producing 
twelve hundred carloads annually of stone for road building and concrete 
work. The plant is located on sixteen acres of land on the bank of Flat- 
rock and has a capacity of one thousand tons per day. The stone is exca- 
vated to a depth of thirty feet and elevated for grinding. The crusher 
which is of the Gates design, breaks the stone into different sizes and 
■delivers the product into waiting cars on a special track owned by the com- 
pany. The plant is operated by a one-hundred-and-fifty-horse-power engine, 
which derives its power from two hundred-and fifty-horse-power boilers. 
Besides crushing all sizes of stones for road purposes, the company crushes 
and pulverizes limestone dust for fertilizer. This dust is obtained by 
screening and is a by-product of which about one carload daily is produced. 
By chemical analysis it shows about ninety-four per cent, calcium carbide 
and magnesia, and is valuable for fertilizer and is extensively used in this 
section. The pay roll of the company is from eight hundred to one thou- 
sand dollars per month and in 19 14 amounted to nearly sixteen thousand 
dollars. 

The geniuses who are behind this industry, actively, are Clarence E. 

Greeley, secretary and treasurer, and R. E. Greeley, general manager. 

Albert Greeley, of Muncie, Indiana, the father of Clarence E. and R. E., 

is the vice-president of the company. Clarence E. Greeley is a native of 



798 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Warren county, Ohio, being born on the Little Miami river in 1879, the 
son of Albert and Tena Greeley, both of whom were born in Ohio. Albert 
Greeley was engaged in the saw-mill and flour-milling business at Foster 
Crossing, Ohio, until the beginning of the gas boom in Delaware county, 
Indiana, when he moved to this state. After moving to Muncie, Indiana, 
he engaged in the lumber business, in which he has been very successful. • 
He is now rated as one of the substantial business men of Delaware county. 
In 1908 the Greeley Stone Company was incorporated and another industry 
added to the interest of the Greeley family. Albert Greeley was president 
of the Indiana Lumber Dealers' Association and is, at the present time, one 
of the directors of the Mutual Fire Insurance Company of Indiana. 

Born in Warren county, Ohio, Clarence Greeley was educated in the 
public schools of Muncie, Indiana. When twenty-four years of age, he 
engaged in the lumber business at Selma, a small town east of Muncie, and 
there he was very successful. From Selma, he moved to Illinois, where he 
was also engaged in the lumber business. He sold out in 1908 at the time 
of the organization of the Greeley Stone Company. 

Clarence E. Greeley was married to Louise Bantly Kirk, a- native of 
Muncie, Indiana, and the daughter of John and Bertha Kirk, also natives 
of JMuncie. Mr. and Mrs. Greeley have one daughter, Helen, who was 
born in 1903. 

R. E. Greeley, who is the general manager of the Greeley Stone Com- 
pany, was born in Ohio in 1881 and was educated at Muncie, Indiana, and 
at Culver Alilitary School. Before the organization of the Greeley Stone 
Company, he was also engaged in the lumber business. In 1901 H. E. 
Greeley was married to Velma Keltner, a daughter of Dr. F. M. and 
Rebecca Keltner, of Muncie. Mr. and Mrs. Greeley have four children, 
Mildred, thirteen years old; Robert, ten years old; Francis, seven years old, 
and Virginia, six years old. 

Both Clarence E. and R. E. Greeley have been active in politics since 
coming to Decatur county. They are ardent and active Republicans as is 
their father also. R. E. was a member of the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks at Muncie, but has since transferred his membership to the 
Greensburg lodge, and R. E. Greeley is a member of the Free and Accepted 
Masons. 

Here in Decatur county, the Greeley brothers have come to be recog- 
nized as among its most aggressive and capable young business men. The 
industry which they helped to establish and which they manage, has brought 
thousands of dollars to this county and the people here are highly pleased 
with their great success. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 



JOHN W. BURNEY. 



799 



The careers of men who have been successful are instructive as guides 
and incentives to those who are just beginning hfe. The examples which 
successful men furnish, patient purpose and consecutive endeavor, strongly 
illustrate what each and every man may accomplish- John Burney, a model 
citizen of Clay township, Decatur county, Indiana, is a man whose life is a 
conspicuous example of industry, courage as a citizen, wise and frugal 
living, cordial relations with the public generally. As a farmer he has 
enjoyed a large measure of success. He owns two large tracts of land, 
one a farm of two hundred acres, two miles northwest of Burney, and 
another of two hundred and eight acres, three and one-half miles southwest 
of town on the Columbus and Greensburg pike. The latter is known as the 
Graham farm. 

John \V. Burney was born on the old Burney homestead now owned 
by Edward Jackson, son-in-law of S. M. Burney, in 1849. He is the son of 
S. M. and Sarah (Pumphrey) Burney, old citizens of this county. S. M. 
Burney was born in 1814 in North Carolina, and came to Decatur county 
with his parents in pioneer times when Clay township was nothing but a 
howling wilderness. The family settled on the farm that Edward Jackson 
now owns, and which is known as the old Burney farm. The parents of 
S. M. Burney spent the remainder of their hves in Milford, the mother 
having died at the home of her son, S. M. He was a very successful farmer 
and owned several hundred acres of land in this county. He gave five hun- 
dred dollars to the town of Burney when it was founded and purchasecf stock 
in the railroad when it was built. Burney was named for him. A progres- 
sive, broad-minded man, his word was as good as his bond. A public- 
spirited citizen, he donated several hundred dollars to the building of the 
Methodist church at Milford and at Burney. He was a stanch Democrat 
and true to his party. While he never asked for office, he always held at 
heart the welfare of his party and country. He left the impress of his char- 
acter and influence upon the life of this community, and died full of honors 
as only a private citizen who has done well his duty can die. He passed 
away in 1901 at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Edward Jackson. The 
Pumphreys are an old family in this section. 

John W. Burne\' began life for himself when about twenty-five years 
old. He had a small start from his father, but has accumulated most of his 
land and property by his own efforts. 

In 1875 Mr. Burney was married to Mary Sharp, daughter of James 



SOO DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Sharp, a native of Decatur county, and an old and well-established family 
in Sand Creek township. The Sharps were early settlers here, and promin- 
ent in the social and agricultural life of the county. 

Eleven children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. John W. Burney, 
of whom Samuel, Annie, Opal and Orlif are deceased; Lula, Clara, Arthur, 
Clifford, Bertha, Mattie and Ethel. Arthur lives in Adams; Bertha is the 
wife of Charles Gilliland, of Hope; Mattie married Clarence Thompson, of 
Burney; Ethel lives at home; Clifford married Blanche Horner. Although 
Mr. Burney is a stanch and true Democrat, he is, nevertheless, a progressive 
thinker, and is somewhat independent in his political thought and action. 
In 1890 he was elected trustee of Clay township, and gave a most efficient 
and satisfactory administration. He is a man well respected in this com- 
munity and well known. Fraternally, ]\Ir. Burney is a member of the 
ICnights of Pythias lodge at Burney. He is a charter member of this 
organization. 

Mr. Burney's success as a farmer he attributes to raising corn and 
hogs, because from these he has derived his greatest profits. 



ALBERT BOEING. 



The ancestral history of the Boling family in Decatur county goes 
back to the time when Benjamin Boling, a native of Virginia and the scion 
of a very old family of the Old Dominion, emigrated to Decatur county in 
1818, four years before the city of Greensburg was laid out, and here 
homestead a farm of eighty acres, now owned by Albert Boling, the 
present treasurer of Decatur county. The Boling family have been promi- 
nent property owners in Decatur county for at least three generations and 
they have also been prominent in the civic and political life of this section. 
No case can be cited where they have ever failed to discharge worthily 
the sacred trusts imposed upon them by their neighbors and fellow citizens. 
Albert Boling has conscientiously and faithfully performed the duties of 
treasurer of Decatur count)', and the efficiency and honesty with which 
he has managed this office were rewarded in 191 4 by his election to a 
second term. 

Albert Boling, who was born on October 4, 1867, on a farm near the 
Decatur and Franklin county line, is the son of William W. and Hannah 
(Humphrey) Boling, the former of whom was born on October 8, 1828, and 



DECATUR COUNTY^ INDIANA. 50I 

died in 1898, and the latter of whom was born in 1857 and is still living at 
Adams, in this county. William W. Boling was the son of Benjamin and 
Elizabeth Boling, natives of Virginia, who, after coming to Decatur county 
in 1818 and homesteading the farm of eighty acres now owned by Albert 
Boling, lived in an Indian wigwam for a time, or until they could clear a 
place for and erect a house. Benjamin Boling died at the age of twenty-eight, 
a few years after coming to Decatur county. His widow, who lived to be 
ninety-two years of age, died near Crawfordsville, Montgomery county, 
Indiana. William W. Boling spent the whole of his life on the ancestral 
farm. 

To William W. and Hannah (Humphrey) Boling were born five daugh- 
ters and seven sons, two of whom, Alice, the first born, and Jasper, the 
seventh born, are deceased, the former dying in January, 1914. Of the 
surviving chiWren, Mary lives in Clay township; Mrs. Martha Carr lives 
at Frankfort; Ada is the wife of Wilbur W. Wright, of Adams; Edna lives 
in Indianapolis; Albert is the subject of this sketch; George is engaged in 
the hardware business at St. Paul, this county; Walter also lives in St. 
Paul; Clyde, Elmer and Owen live in Indianapolis, where the latter is 
an attorney. 

Educated in the district school of his neighborhood, located near the 
Decatur and Franklin county line, and in the Stubbs high school, Albert 
Boling was engaged in farming until he was thirty years of age. He then 
engaged in the grain business at Adams, and remained there for seventeen 
years, or until his election as treasurer of Decatur county in the fall of 1912. 
Having been re-elected in the fall of 1914, he is now serving his second 
term. Mr. Boling owns the old home farm, which now comprises alto- 
gether a hundred and twenty acres, city property in Indianapolis, and in 
Adams, where he owns a large grain elevator and residence. He is therefore 
entitled to rank as one of the well-to-do farmers, business men and citizens 
of this county. 

Albert Boling was married in April, 1893, when he was twenty-six 
years old, to Carrie Harrison, daughter of Robert Harrison, an early set- 
tler of Adams township, Decatur county, Indiana. To this union two chil- 
dren have been born, Dorothy and Robert, both of whom are attending 
school. 

For three generations the politics of the Boling family has been 
decidedly Democratic. Benjamin Boling was a Democrat, William W. Boling 
was a Democrat, and the son and grandson, Albert, the subject of this sketch, 
(51) 



8o2 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

is and has always been an ardent and enthusiastic Democrat and has been 
for years a leader in the councils of his party. Ish. and Mrs. Boling and 
family are members of the Christian church, and the former is a member of 
St. Paul Lodge No. 368, Knights of Pythias. Honorable in all the rela- 
tions of life, private as well as public, Albert Boling has a host of friends 
in Decatur county, men who have stood valiantly at his side and fought the 
battles waged for the political success that is now his. He is a man who 
never forgets and never fails to cherish his obligations to a friend and to 
those who have stood by him in a common thought and for a common cause. 
He well deserves the confidence of the people of the citizenship of this 
county. 



RICHARD T. STOTT. 



That the Stott family was among the first to settle in the state of Indi- 
ana is proved by a tax receipt now owned by the venerable Richard T. 
Stott, of near Westport, Sand Creek township, Decatur county, which shows 
that his father, Louis Lunsford Stott, in 1813, paid taxes in Indiana for 
the years 1810, 1811 and 1812. Of course this was before Indiana was 
admitted to the Union, and before in reality it was a state at all. The 
family was founded in x'Vmerica by the great-grandfather of Richard T. 
Stott, wdio emigrated from Germany to Scotland, and from Scotland came to 
America. Raleigh Stott, the grandfather of Richard T., was a soldier in 
the Revolutionary War, who migrated from one of the Eastern states to the 
Middle West. Raleigh Stott"s son, who was Richard T.'s father, was a 
soldier in the War of 1812, and Richard T. Stott was a soldier in the Civil 
War, so that with the possible exception of the Mexican War, members of 
this family have fought valiantly in behalf of individual and personal free- 
dom in all of our great wars. 

Richard T. Stott, who was born on November 14, 1842, in Jennings 
county, three miles south of Westport, is the son of Louis Lunsford and 
Sallie ( .Stewart) Stott, the former of whom was bom in 1780 and who 
died in 1856. Louis Lunsford Stott had first married Miss Allen, who 
bore him eight children, all of whom are now deceased and the names of 
whom were as follow: Christopher, the father of Capt W. T. Stott, a 
former sheriff of Decatur county; Mrs. Hulda New, Allen, Mrs. Polly 
Griffin, ?(Irs. Mariah Kirtley, Mrs. Elizabeth Smith, Frances Marian and 
Mrs. Sarah Jane Gaston. By the second marriage there were three chil- 



DECATUR COUNTYj INDIANA. 803 

clren: D. W., who is deceased; Richard T., the subject of this sketch, and 
Mrs. Susan Newsome, who hves at Azaha, Indiana. 

After removing to Decatur from Bartholomew county, when Mr. Stott 
was four years old, his mother died, and he was taken by an uncle, Willis 
C. Stribbling, who lived near Sardinia, Decatur county, to be reared, together 
with a sister. Here he lived until he grew to manhood, attending, so far as 
possible, the pioneer country schools of the time and receiving a limited 
education. After the breaking out of the Civil War, Richard Stott was only 
nineteen years old. Nevertheless he enlisted on July 8, 1861, in Company 
H, Nineteenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served three 
years^ three months and eleven days. Having been assigned to the com- 
missary department on detached service, he was under fare in nearly all of 
the battles and especially was on the firing line in the second battle of Bull 
Run, the battles of Fredericksburg, South Mountain, Antietam and Gettys- 
burg, as well as the Wilderness campaign. 

Returning home at the close of the Civil War, Mr. Stott began farm- 
ing in Jackson township on rented land, and late in 1865 was married. 
During the earlier years of his married life he lived in Decatur and Bartholo- 
mew counties, spending two years in Illinois later on, in 1881 and 1882. 
For seven years he lived in Edinburg after his removal to Decatur county, 
in March, 1907. He now owns a farm of twenty acres adjoining Westport. 

In 1865 Mr. Stott was married to Eliza Ann Chaille, who was born on 
April 3, 1844, in Jennings county, Indiana, near Butlerville, and who is 
the daughter of William D. and Hulda A. Chaille, the former of whom was 
a native of Indiana, born on December 26, 1814, and the latter of whom 
was born on February 19, 1806. William D. Chaille was the son of John 
and Jane (Duncan) Chaille, natives of Maryland, who came to Indiana 
after their marriage. A brother of Jane (Duncan) Chaille was a soldier in 
the Revolutionary army and was held a prisoner by the British for seven 
years. 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard T. Stott have six living children, as follow: 
Dora C, who lives at Richmond, Indiana, has one daughter, Leota, by his 
first wife, who was a Miss Davis; his present wife is Birdellia (Rose); 
Hulda Elizabeth is the wife of William A. Knight, who lives near Sardinia, 
and has four sons, James R., Wallace L., George Ta3dor and John F. ; 
William Preston lives near Auburn in the state of Washington ; Louis 
Eldridge, of Indianapolis, married Rosa Smeiser, and they have three 
children, Louis Graves. Beryl Taylor and Russell Payne; John Franklin, of 
Colorado, married Mary Wilds, and they have one child, Martha Emily; 



8o4 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

James j\I., of Edinburg, married Ethel Russell, and they have one child, 
Loring Russell. 

Politically, Mr. Stott is a Republican. He and his good wife are mem- 
bers of the Baptist church. Fraternally, he is a member of the Improved 
Order of Red Men at Edinburg, and of the Knights of Pythias at West- 
port. He has filled all of the chairs in the Red Men's lodge. Mr. Stott is 
also a member of Fred Small Post No. 531, Grand Army of the Republic, 
at Westport. 



HUBER C. MOORE. 



Perhaps no county in the state is on a sounder basis as regards its 
banking and financial affairs than is Decatur county. In the hands of safe, 
conservative men, the banks of the county are noted for their solidity and 
for the careful manner in which the money entrusted to their care is 
handled. For the most part, the men engaged in banking in this county 
have had special training for their work and the mere technical side of 
banking is conducted with a degree of accuracy and a proper regard for the 
most conservative forms of investment, insuring to depositors a feeling of 
safety. Among the banks of more recent origin in this county, few', if any, 
have made larger strides in public confidence than the Burney State Bank, of 
Burney, the pleasant village in Clay township, which in late years has made 
such rapid progress in industrial, commercial and civic development. This 
bank, which was opened for business on December 22, 19 13, had a capital 
stock of twenty-five thousand dollars, and has enjoyed an unusual degree of 
success. Surrounded by rich farming territof}', peopled by substantial stock 
raisers and shippers, the' opportunities for modern banking methods were 
awaiting the coming of the gentlemen who organized the Burney bank and 
these opportunities have been promptly and properly utilized, the number 
of depositors of the bank growing from the very first day of the opening 
of the bank, until they now number more than four hundred and are increas- 
ing daily. The officers of this bank are as follow. William G. Smiley, 
president; John W. Corya, vice-president; Huber C. ]Moore, cashier; the 
other directors being John Gartin, Frank Alexander, W. F. McCullough. 

Huber C. Moore was born at Morgan, Kentucky, in 1890, a son of 
James P. and Sarah J. (Green) Moore, both natives of Kentucky, the latter 
of whom was born in the city of Lexington, a daughter of John Green. Mrs. 
Moore died some years ago and ]\Ir. Moore continues to make his home in 



DECATUR COUNTY^ INDIANA. ^05 

Kentucky, being one of the prominent and wealthy citizens of Pendleton 
county, that state. James P. Moore is one of the best-known bee breeders 
in the country, his apiary supplying a demand for queen bees in all parts of 
the world. He has been in the business of bee culture for the past twenty- 
five years and has been very successful, the variety of bees of which he 
makes a specialty having created a wonderful demand. 

Huber C. Moore received his elementary education in the schools of 
Falmouth, Kentucky, following his graduation from the high school at that 
place with a course of one year at the Kentucky State University, after 
which he pursued a thorough course in a business college at Lexington. 
Thus equipped for a business career, Mr. Moore entered the employ of the 
Citizens State Bank, of Falmouth, Kentucky, as assistant cashier, remaining 
with this bank for two years, at the end of which time his services were 
secured by the Indiana National Bank, of Indianapolis, and he moved to the 
Indiana state capital, remaining with the Indiana National Bank at that 
place for a period of four years, at the end of which time his services were 
solicited as cashier of the newly organized bank at Bumey, this county. 
Mr. Moore accepted this proffer and upon the opening of the Burney State 
Bank was installed as cashier, a position which he since has occupied, his 
skilled and efficient service having proved most satisfactory, not only to the 
directors of the bank, but to the customers of the same. 

On December 25, 19 10, Huber C. Moore was united in marriage to 
Olive Ruby Williams, of Whiteland, Indiana, daughter of Dr. Luke P. V. 
and Sarah Jane (Woollen) Williams, the former of whom is a native of 
Kentucky and the latter of whom is a native of Ohio. Dr. Luke P. V. 
Williams was born in 1862, son of Luke P. and Elizabeth P. (Simer) 
Williams, both natives of Kentucky, the former of whom was of Welsh 
descent and the latter of whom was of German descent. Sarah Jane Wool- 
len was the daughter of John W. and Mary C. Woollen, who moved from 
Ohio to Kentucky in 1883, they also being of German descent. 

Dr. Luke P. V. Williams, who is a direct descendant of Roger Williams, 
"that noble champion of religious liberty," of whom Milton thus sang, the 
founder of Rhode Island, who came to America from Wales in 1636, was 
a member of the last Kentucky constitutional convention, having repre- 
sented the counties of Bath and Rowan in that historic gathering. He was 
reared in Kentucky and from the days of his young manhood took an active 
part in the affairs of his community. He is a man of tremendous energy; 
in fact, a veritable "human dynamo," as some of his friends characterize 
him. He early began to take a prominent part in Kentucky politics and, 



8o6 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

besides the distinction of being a member of the constitutional convention, 
above noted, served as an elector on the Democratic ticket from his district 
in the second Cleveland campaign. Some years ago he moved to Indiana, 
locating at Whiteland, in Johnson county, where he organized the White- 
land National bank. He also was active in the organization of the Jones- 
ville State Bank, of Jonesville, this state, and was one of the principal pro- 
moters of the organization of the Burney State Bank. 

Mr. and Mrs. Moore are members of the Baptist church at Burney and 
are active in the good works of the community. Though comparatively 
recent additions to the society of that pleasant village, they have entered into 
the social life of the town with characteristic energy and are among the 
most enthusiastic promoters of the various and rapidly growing interests of 
the village. Mr. Moore is a Democrat and takes an intelligent and proper 
interest in the political affairs of the county, being an ardent advocate of all 
measures along the line of good government. He is a member of the local 
lodge of the Knights of Pythias and at present is much interested in the plan 
which is being promoted for the erection of a fine new two-story Pythian 
hall in Burney. He is an enterprising and energetic young man and his 
native love for the intricacies of business and financial life has given him 
an interest in his life's work which rapidly is bringing him to the front as 
one of the most prominent young financiers of Decatur county, he having 
displayed an ability in this direction that has inspired in the breasts of his 
business associates the utmost confidence and respect, they having the high- 
est regard for the ability he has displayed in conducting the difficult trans- 
actions which confront him in connection with his important position in 
the bank. 



HENRY CHRIS BOWMAN. 

Henry Chris Bowman, an enterprising farmer of Washington township, 
Decatur county, Indiana, who owns one hundred and sixty acres for which 
he has worked and for which he has himself paid, is a splendid type of the self- 
made American citizen and his career forcibly illustrates what industry, 
economy and good management ma}? accomplish. There is no man living in 
Decatur county who deserves more personal credit for what he has accom- 
plished than Mr. Bowman, since he has by his own hard toil and by his 
systematic and methodical saving, built up his own fortune and obtained for 
himself and his good wife all the comforts which they now enjoy. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 807 

Henry Chris Bowman was born on March 9, 1867, in Frankhn county, 
Indiana, the son of Henry and Johannah (Thesin) Bowman, natives of 
Germany, who were married after coming to this country. Henry C. Bow- 
man left home at the age of twenty-one and came to Decatur county, working 
for twelve years for William Warder Hamilton, a. pioneer mule dealer of 
Decatur county. At the end of twelve years' hard toil, he had saved fifteen 
hundred dollars and out of this he paid one thousand dollars down on the farm 
he purchased at this time and used the other five hundred dollars to stock the 
farm. His father, who was born in 1825, was killed in 1870 while working 
as a carpenter on the Enochsburg church. He had come to America in 1841. 

Henry, Sr., and Johannah Bowman had three children, Mary, who is 
deceased; Lena, who married Clem Rowling, a dairyman, who lives near 
Cincinnati, and Henry C, the subject of this sketch. After the death of Mr. 
Bowman, the mother married again, this time to Martin Frichtman, and they 
had eight children, George, who lives in Decatur county ; John, of Washington 
township; Matthew, who lives on the Robinson farm; Kate, the wife of 
Joseph Mincke, of Cincinnati, who died in October, 1914; Lizzie, the wife of 
George Lampe, of Shelbyville; Sophronia, the wife of William Oberlein, of 
St. Louis : Rosa, who married Chester Luther, of Shelbyville, and Celia, of 
Indianapolis. The mother of these children died in Shelbyville, Indiana, at 
the age of seventy-eight years, in 1908. 

At the time Henry Chris Bowman purchased his farm in Washington 
township, the farm was very much run down. He and his good wife lived in 
an old house on the place until they were able to erect a handsome, modern 
farm residence. The house sets back from the road and leading down to it is 
a large, well-kept farm. The barn, which is sixty-four by sixty feet, was 
built in 1908, and a corn-crib built in 191 1 cost five hundred dollars. Alto- 
gether about eight thousand dollars has been spent in various kinds of 
improvements, including fencing and tiling. When Mr. Bowman first pur- 
chased the farm, he sold hogs at three dollars a hundred. He has had a hard 
time to get on in the world and has always been a hard worker. One of the 
secrets of his success, perhaps, is that he never sells any grain, but feeds all 
that he raises to hogs and cattle, selling a hundred head of hogs and from 
twelve to fifteen head of cattle every year. 

On September 2, 1884, Mr. Bowman was married to Bridget Woods, who 
was born on December 4, 1864, in County Clare, Ireland, and who is the 
daughter of John and Bridget (Kerivan) Woods, who came to America in 
1880 and located on a farm three miles from Zenas, Indiana. It is a matter 
of interest to note here the St. Denis's church was named after Denis Woods, 



8o8 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Mrs. Bowman's uncle, who gave ten acres of ground for the church. Mrs. 
'Bowman's father died in 1889 and her mother in 1890, one year later. John 
and Bridget Woods had six children, Mrs. Marie Slattery, who Ii\-es in Ire- 
land; John, who died in Jennings county, in 1913; Sarah, the wife of William 
Vansickle, of Kansas ; Thomas, of near St. Denis, who married Margaret 
Duffv; Denis, who died in 1888, and Mrs. Bowman. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Henry C. Bowman have been born four children, 
Florine, the wife of Samuel Ardery, of Washington township; John, who 
lives at home on the farm; Rosa, who died at the age of twenty-three years, 
on April 6, 1912, and Sophia Lillian, fourteen years of age, is a student in 
the Greensburg high school. 

]Mr. and Mrs. Henry C. Bowman have at their command practically 
every convenience which is available to anyone who lives on the farm. They 
are fortunate in having at their disposal a natural gas well, located on the 
farm, and also an artesian well. They have most comfortable and convenient 
buildings located on magnificent grounds which are always well kept, and 
they themselves are the people who most deserve to enjoy these conveniences. 
Although Mr. Bowman owns an automobile along with the other comforts 
of life, yet he still works very hard and he and his good wife deserve great 
credit and praise for what they have accomplished. Genial and hospitable by 
nature, they are popular in the community where they reside. Mr. Bowman 
is a Democrat. The Bowman family are all members of the St. Mary's 
Catholic church at Greensburg. 



JAMES B. THROP. 

Settlement was just beginning in Decatur county, Indiana, in 1821, when 
Thomas Throp, a native of New Jersey, who had immigrated to Warren 
county, Ohio, in 1817, came on west to Decatur county, Indiana, and pur- 
chased the northeast one-quarter of section 23, township 11, range 10, com- 
prising one hundred and sixty acres and located in what is now Fugit town- 
ship. The deed for this farm, which was signed by James Monroe, was 
dated on December 17, 1821, and this worthy pioneer had previously entered 
the farm where a daughter, Margaret J., now resides, an entire section which 
he purchased at one dollar and twenty-five cents an acre. It was Thomas 
Throp. the father of the late James B. Throp, who established the family in 
Decatur countv- \\'hen he came to Decatur countv, the land was covered 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 809 

with heav}- timber, but he cleared a place for a home and later built a log 
cabin. His granddaughter, ^Margaret J- Throp, lives in the first brick house 
which he erected. 

The late James B. Throp, who at the time of his death was one of the 
wealthiest farmers in Decatur county, owning six hundred and eighty acres 
of well-cultivated and fertle land, the son of Thomas and Ellen (Emily) 
Throp, was born on December 22, 181 5, in Monmouth county, New Jersey, 
and died April 6, 1864. His father, who was born on October 17, 1776, was 
married on November 29, 1800, to Ellen Emily, who was born on November 
30, 1784, and who died on August 12, 1859. They had ten children, William 
F., who was born on August 7, 1802; Bethany, December 15, 1804, who 
married Daniel Eden, of near Adams; Jane, March 4, 1807, who married 
James Freeman, a merchant of Greensburg; John I., March 15, 1810; Mary 
Ann, December 2;^, 1812, who married a Mr. Gilham; James B., the subject 
of this sketch; Eleanor, February 10, 1818, who married Granville Kindred; 
Margaret Finley, April 26, 1820, married a Mr. Clark; Charles C, December 
6, 1822, and Wesley, November 29, 1825. All of these children erected 
homes in the vicinity of the old home on the Throp land. 

The late James B. Throp was six years old when his parents moved 
from Warren county, Ohio, to Decatur county, Indiana, and when he was 
twelve years old, he moved with his parents to a brick mansion erected about 
1827. In this house he lived continuously until his death, on April 6, 1884. 
Owning six hundred and eighty acres of land, during the latter years of his 
life, and being one of the most extensive farmers in Decatur county, he was 
naturally well known. 

The wife of the late James B. Throp was Mary Kerrick, who was born 
near Fairfield, in Franklin county, Indiana, on August 15, 1830, and died in 
1907, at the age of seventy-six. She was the daughter of Thomas and Phoebe 
Kerrick, of Loudoun county, Virginia. The Kerricks comprised an old 
family of the Old Dominion state and included many teachers and preachers. 
Mrs. Thomas Kerrick's mother was a prominent member of the Quaker 
church. Thomas Kerrick taught a subscription school in Franklin county and 
was paid partly in supplies and partly in cash. He had come from Virginia 
to Ohio, and finally to Franklin county, Indiana, in 1857. After purchasing 
land in Decatur county, he moved here. Rev. Nimrod Kerrick, a son of 
Thomas and the brother of Mrs. Throp, was for many years a prominent 
teacher and minister in Decatur coimty. He was the eldest child and the 
others were James, Walter, Armisted, Mrs. ]\Iary Throp, Joanna, Hugh and 
Stephen, fourth child. 



:8lO DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

The late James B. Throp and wife had three children, Ella, the wife of 
Marshall Xewhouse, who died in 1907; Phoebe A., the wife of George Wirt, 
who lives in Fiigit township, and JMargaret J., who lives on the old home- 
stead and who owns one hundred and sixty acres of this farm and one hun- 
dred and eighty acres of her mother's original old home farm, a total of 
three hundred and forty acres. She is an active member of the Alt. Carmel 
Methodist Episcopal church. 

Not only was James B. Throp a prominent farmer, but he was also 
prominent in fraternal and religious circles in his community, being a charter 
member of the ISIasonic lodge at Clarksburg and a regular attendant at the 
•services of the Methodist Episcopal church. In politics he was an ardent 
Republican, who believed strongly in the principles of Abraham Lincoln and 
the principles of the party which Lincoln helped to found. 

No volume purporting to set forth the historical annals of Decatur 
•county would be complete which did not contain a record of the life and 
works of James B. Throp, a well-known citizen and farmer during his day 
and generation, one who had a large part in the pioneer development of this 
splendid county now in a high state of development. James B. Throp belonged 
to a family which has never failed to measure up to the opportunities and 
obligations of their time. The Throp family has performed well its duties in 
all the multifarious relations of human existence. 



WESLEY THROP. 



The late Wesley Throp, of Fugit township, Decatur county, Indiana, 
belonged to one of the oldest families of the county, his father, Thomas 
Throp, a native of New Jersey, who had come to Warren county, Ohio, in 
181 7, having emigrated to Decatur county and entered a tract of land from 
the government in 1821, at a time when the settlement of Decatur was just 
beginning. Since 1821, therefore, a period of nearly a century, the Throp 
family have been prominent in the agricultural, political and civic life of this 
section, and in all of this period have contributed materially to the progress 
and prosperity of Decatur county. It was so with the original Thomas 
Throp, and also true of the family he left at the time of his death. 

The late Wesley Throp, who, during his lifetime, was a well-known 
farmer of Fugit township, and who owned two hundred and forty acres of 
land at the time of his death, land which is now in the possession of a son, 
Bruce, and a daughter, Miss Jennie, himself was born on December 29, 1825, 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 8l I 

the son of Thomas and Ehen (Emily) Throp, the former of whom was born 
on October 17, 1776, and who was married, November 29, 1800, to EUen 
Emily, who was born on November 30, 1784, and who died on August 12, 
1859. Of their ten children, William was born on August 7, 1802; Bethany, 
December 15, 1804, and married Daniel Heaton, of near Adams; Jane, March 
4, 1807, married James Freeman, a merchant of Greensburg; John I., March 
15, i8'io; Mary Ann, December 23, 1812, and married, first, a Mr. Miller, and 
second, Talbert Gillam; James B. was an extensive farmer of Fugit township 
during his life, December 22, 181 5, and married to Mary Kerrick, who was 
born on Attgust 15, 1830, and who died in 1907, and died on April 6, 1884; 
Eleanor, February 10, 1818, and married Granville Kindred; Margaret Fin- 
ley, April 26, 1820, and married Richard Clark; Charles C, December 6, 
1822, married, first, Kate Roberts, and second. May Sneidiger, and Wesley, 
the subject of this sketch, November 29, 1825. All of the children erected 
homes in the vicinity of the old homestead and owned the Throp land. 

The subject of this sketch, who was the youngest child born to his 
parents, was a native of Decatur county, born after the removal of the parents 
from Warren county, Ohio, to Indiana, and he spent all of his life in this 
section. After his marriage, in 1855, he and his wife began housekeeping in 
a log cabin on his farm, and a few years later removed to a new frame house 
which he built, now occupied by his daughter, Jennie, and his son, Bruce. 
Here the parents lived until their death. Eventually, he became the owner 
•of two hundred and forty acres of land, adding to his original tract as he was 
able to do so, and this entire farm is still intact and is still owned by members 
■of his family. 

On September 4, 1855, Wesley Throp was married to Nancy M. Ardery, 
who was born on January 22, 1835, in Fugit township, the fifth child born to 
Tier parents, Thomas and Martha (McKee) Ardery, the former of whom was 
born in 1801, and who died in 1846. The latter was a daughter of Daniel 
McKee. Thomas and Martha (McKee) Ardery were natives of Kentucky, 
who were married in that state and who came with their family to Fugit 
township, Decatur county, Indana, in 1830. Their children were Mrs. Jane 
Wallace Smith, deceased; Mrs. Mary Alexander Walters, deceased; Mrs. 
Martha Thomas Thomson, deceased : Mrs. Eliza Archibald Spear, of Rush- 
ville; David A., a well-known farmer of Washington township, Decatur 
■county, Indiana, and John William, who died in youth. 

Of the six children born to Mr. and Mrs. Wesley Throp, three are now 
deceased. The living children are Bruce, the eldest child, born on November 
22, 1856, and lives on the old home farm with his sister, Jennie, April 4, 



8l2 DECATUK COUNTY, INDIANA. 

1873, the sixth child; Mattie, April 11, 1867, who was the fifth child in her 
parents' family, married William R. Pleak, and lives at Culpeper, Virginia. 
The deceased children are Luna, Omer and Bessie. Luna was born, February 
4, 1859, and died on April 25, 1862; Omer, February 10, 1862, and died on 
October 7, 1863; Bessie, January 24,. 1865, married William Schomper, and 
died on November 23, 1890. She left one son, Ralph, born on November 21, 
1890. He lives in Tipton county, Indiana. 

The father of all these children, who passed away quietly at his home in 
Fugt township on August 18, 1881, was a Republican in politics, and a mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian church at Kingston at the time of his death. He was 
also a charter member of Clarksburg Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons. His 
wife survived him many years, dying on February 3, 1914. 

The only male descendant of the late Wesley Throp is his son, Bruce, 
who is unmarried, and who lives on the home farm with his sister. Miss 
Jennie. In fact, these two members of the family of Wesley Throp are the 
only ones who now reside in Decatur county. Miss Throp is a member of the 
Kingston Presbyterian church, and for many years has been active in church 
work. Wesley Throp was a man who was highly respected during his life, a 
man of honorable and humane impulses, kind to his family and cordial to his 
neighbors, one of the empire builders, whose work and labors live on, even 
though the author of the work and labors has passed away. 



MAX RUHL. 



It is a distinction of no mean importance to have lived to become the 
oldest living native-born settler of the township of one's residence. This 
distinction belongs to the venerable Max Ruhl, a retired farmer of Marion 
township, now living in Millhousen, himself the son of native-born German 
parents, who settled in this township three-quarters of a century ago. While 
it is a considerable distinction to have attained the rank of the oldest living 
native-born citizen of a township, it is a further distinction to have lived an 
honorable and useful life in this community and this also belongs to the life 
works and career of Max Ruhl. 

The venerable Max Ruhl, a pioneer citizen and farmer of Marion town- 
ship, now living retired in Millhousen, was born on February 15, 1843, O" ^ 
farm in this township in a log cabin, built by his father, the late Gehardt 
Ruhl. This farm, which now comprises two hundred acres all in one tract, 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 813 

is a productive body of land, which, in recent years, has been maintained in a 
high state of cultivation. A magnificent house sets back a quarter of a mile 
from the main road and is reached by a well-kept driveway. Gerhardt Ruhl, 
who was born in Germany, came to America when a young man and, after 
working in Cincinnati and Franklin county for some time, in 1840 settled in 
Marion township, one mile north of Millhousen. It is literally true that his 
farm was cut out of the virgin forest. Here he cleared in all one hundred 
and twenty acres of land and, in the meantime, built a comfortable home. He 
passed away at the the age of sixty-six on February 8, 1875. His wife, who, 
before her marriage, was Mary Ann Peters and to whom he was married at 
Oldenburg, Franklin county, died on March 10, 1872. They reared a family 
of ten children, seven of whom are now living and three deceased, Mrs. 
Caroline Fischer, who was the eldest ; Christ, the fourth born, and Catherine, 
the youngest. The living children are. Max, the subject of this sketch; Joseph, 
who lives in Cincinnati ; Mrs. Mary Henneker, who lives in Millhousen ; John, 
of Minnesota; Grefor, who lives on a farm near Batesville; Adam, of India- 
napolis, and Anthony, of Cleveland, Ohio. 

When Max Ruhl was a young man, he worked in various parts of the 
country and, for a considerable period, was engaged in driving a team for a 
miller at Millhousen, Indiana. After his marriage, in 1872, he came back to 
the home farm and eventually purchased the interest of the other heirs to his 
father's and mother's estate in the home farm of one hundred and twenty 
acres and has since added eighty acres to the original tract, making in all two 
hundred acres. When we consider that practically the entire value of this two 
hundred acres has been created by its present owner and that he has had little 
-assistance of anybody, we can understand his real work as a citizen, since this 
value could not have been created and this farm could not have been paid for 
and increased without hard and laborious efforts, unfailing determination, 
frugal living and careful management, all of which are distinctive marks of 
worthy citizenship. This venerable pioneer citizen deserves inexpressible 
credit for his many sturdy qualities of head and heart. 

On January 7, 1872, he Avas married in the state of Ohio to Rosa Spander, 
who was born on February 15, 1850. and who has been the companion in all 
■of his struggles, trials and tribulations of his early life and the triumphs and 
comforts of his later years. 

In one respect Mr. and Mrs. Ruhl have been exceptionally fortunate, 
since everv one of the six children born to them is still living, is married and 
rearing a familv of his or her own. The names of the children, in the order 
•of their birth, are as follow : Mary, William, John, Clara, Anna and Law- 



8l4 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

rence. Mary married Joseph Zapfe, of Jennings count}', and has eight chil- 
dren, Luella, Esther, Harry, Wilham, Edward, Ohvia, Lawrence and Ray- 
mond. William, who lives on a farm in Alarion township, first married Rosa 
Herbert. After her death, he married a Miss Rosczell and has two children, 
Leo and Herbert. John, who lives in Kokomo, in Howard county, Indiana, 
married Julia Ann Zapfe and has two children, Esther and Albert; Clara 
became the wife of William Fry, of Marion township, and has three children, 
Alfred, Olivia and Ferdinand; Anna, who is the wife of Harry Leuken. of 
Marion township, has four children, Luella, Edna, Frank and Walter, and 
Lawrence, who married Josephine Blankman, lives on the home place. 

Max Ruhl has never been an office seeker nor has he ever been active in 
the councils of the Democratic party, with which he is affiliated in ]\Iarion 
township, since he has always preferred to devote his time and attention to his 
home, his family and his farm. The Ruhl family are all members of St. 
Alarv's Catholic church at ]\lillhousen. 



WTLLL\:\I HARRISON ISGRIGG. 

In the industrial field there are few names better known in Decatur 
county than that which the reader notes above. One of the most prominent 
building contractors in southern Indiana, a form of activity to which he 
turned his attention very naturally, following the footsteps of his father, 
who was one of the best-known builders and decorators in this part of the 
state, Mr. Isgrigg has made a name for himself which must be enduring in 
this region, for the buildings which he has erected hereabout stand as impres- 
sive testimonials of the substantial character of his work. 

The firm of W. H. Isgrigg & Son, for Mr. Isgrigg's son, Isaac J. 
Isgrigg, is associated with him, does a business of not less than one hundred 
thousand dollars to two hundred thousand dollars annually, employing a large 
number of workmen. This firm has made a specialty of erecting school 
buildings and is well known in this field, having in the last few years com- 
pleted twelve high and grade schools. They have also completed many other 
buildings, such as churches, passenger stations, factories, etc. At the time 
this is being written, the firm is erecting the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion building in Greensburg. 

Mr. Isgrigg also has done work in Cincinnati, Chicago, St. Louis, Den- 
ver, Wichita, Colorado Citv, Ft. Scott, Dodge Citv and other cities in Iowa, 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 815, 

Michigan and Nebraska and in Arkansas City and other cities in the West 
and South. He started contracting in 1873, operating under the firm style of 
Isgrigg & Brown and later under the firm style of Isgrigg & Tumulty, then 
for a time he again operated alone, in 1904 taking his son, Isaac J. Isgrigg, 
into partnership, since which time the firm has been W. H. Isgrigg & Son and 
has been very successful. 

William Harrison Isgrigg was born in the city of Greensburg, Decatur 
county, on April 16, 1853, the son of Jefferson and Martha Rebecca (Morris) 
Isgrigg, natives, respectivel)', of Ripley and Dearborn counties, this state. 
Jefferson Isgrigg, who was born on November 4, 1828, and died on July 8, 
1859, was the son of Elijah Isgrigg, who came to America with his father, 
Daniel Isgrigg, from England when nine years of age and settled in Ripley 
county, this state. Jefferson Isgrigg was reared in Ripley county and learned 
the trade of plasterer and stucco worker, becoming very proficient in that 
line of work. On February 29, 1852, he married Martha Rebecca Morris, 
who was bom six miles north of Lawrenceburg, in Dearborn county, on 
December 28. 1833, daughter of Isaac and Matilda (Fitzgerald) Morris, 
natives, respectively, of Wayne county, Virginia, and Newcastle, Kentucky. 
Matilda Fitzgerald was a daughter of Joseph Fitzgerald, a native of Ireland, 
who fought in the War of American Independence under General Wayne. 
Isaac Morris was a son of Amos and Rebecca (Tyler) Morris, the latter of 
whom was a sister of John Tyler, tenth President of the United States. 

On March i, 1853, a little more than a year after his marriage, Jeffer- 
son Isgrigg came to Greensburg to perform the ornamental work on the 
Decatur county court house, which was being erected at that time, and liked 
the town so well that he remained, making Greensburg his headquarters the 
rest of his life, althougjh his work required him to travel extensively over the 
country. To Jefferson and Martha Rebecca (Morris) Isgrigg were born 
three children, Mrs. Nellie Throp, William Harrison, the svibject of this 
sketch, and Sarah, who was born on January 26, 1856, and died on Septem- 
ber 29, 1857. 

William H. Isgrigg was educated in the schools of Greensburg and early 
devoted himself to the building trades, following in the footsteps of his 
father. \Vith a view to learning the business literally from "the ground up" 
he began at an early age to learn the bricklayer's trade under William Dyer 
and Mr. J. W. Stites. At fourteen years of age he started to carrying the 
hod and served his apprenticeship of three years. Upon completing his trade, 
he started out as a journeyman workman, going westward through Illinois,- 
Iowa and Nebraska. After acquiring some very practical experience by this- 



.8l6 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

method, he returned to Greensburg and engaged in contracting on his own 
account. He later was associated with others in the same hne of business, as 
noted above, and in 1904 made his son, Isaac J. Isgrigg, a partner in the 
business, since which time the firm has been known as W. H. Isgrigg & Son, 
one of the most successful and energetic firms of building contractors in the 
state of Indiana. 

On December 10, 1882, William Harrison Isgrigg was united in mar- 
riage to A'ira Byrum, of this county, and to this union two children have been 
born. Isaac J., on December 5, 1883, who married Lela Gayette Burke and 
has two children, Lela Florine and William Shelton, and Mary, July 18, 
1885, married Frank Hamilton, a well-known attorney, of Greensburg, a 
biographical sketch of whom is presented elsewhere in this volume, and has 
one child, a son, William Everett. 

Mr. Isgrigg is a Republican and gives due attention to the political 
affairs of his home county. He is an active, public-spirited citizen and is 
deeply interested in the cause of good government, throwing his influence 
invariably in behalf of such measures as are designed to uplift the common 
cause of the people. He is a member of Greensburg Lodge No. 136, Free 
and Accepted Masons, and is warmly interested in the affairs of that order. 
Starting at the very bottom of the ladder, so to speak, Mr. Isgrigg has 
created for himself a very distinct position in the industrial life of this part 
of the state and is honored and respected by all who know him or with 
whom his extensive building operations bring him in contact. 



DR. CHARLES B. GROVER. 

Very likely there are no physicians practicing in Decatur county who 
have had a more general experience in the practice of a profession than 
Dr. Charles B. Grover, the proprietor of the Grover Sanatorium, which is 
located in the Everhart block, city of Greensburg, and which is fitted up 
especially for treating patients in emergency cases. The hospital has twelve 
beds and two attendant nurses during all hours of the day and night. It is 
quite natural that Dr. Charles B. Grover should be a successful physician, 
since he is descended from a family of medical experts, both his grandfathers 
having been physicians in New Hampshire, the state of his birth. 

Born and reared on a farm in the state of New Hampshire, Dr. Charles 
B. Grover is from every standpoint a self-made man. The parental home, 
which was located near the new Hampshire and Vermont state line, was the 




CHAIiLES B. (ilJOVEU. il, D. 



DECATUR COUNTY^ INDIANA. 817 

scene of his early labors and the place where his early ambitions began to 
shape themselves. He was born, May 21, 1851, the son of Andrew T. and 
Laura (Kimball) Grover, who were intelligent, progressive and broad-minded 
people, and successful farmers. 

The career of Dr. Charles B. Grover is a striking example of the young 
man, who is led away from home ties and home influences successfully to 
seek his fortune in the outside world. At the age of seventeen years he left 
home, parents and friends, and eventually arrived in Boston, where for 
three years he worked at various odd jobs, doing any sort of work which 
presented itself. A man of splendid physique, and powerful build, able to 
perform the most arduous labor, after three years in Boston he was lured 
by the opportunities for work in the Northwest, and for two years was en- 
gaged in various kinds of labor in the state of Minnesota. In the meantime, 
however, he had devoted his spare time to the study of medicine, and had 
spent almost two years continuously in grounding himself in the funda- 
mentals of medicine and surgery. When scarcely past twenty-two years of 
age he returned to his New Hampshire home, and was there engaged in the 
practice near his old home for seven years. During this period he was 
associated with a well-known physician of that community, Doctor Weeks. 
Subsequently, however, he went from New Hampshire to Chicago, and for a 
short time was there engaged in the practice with a Doctor Wilson. Later 
he practiced medicine for seven years at Frankfort, Indiana, with a Doctor 
Saylor, and during all of this period was improving his medical education 
and enlarging his information by home study. He had come to be known 
by the medical profession in the various communities where he had practiced 
as a profound student of medical science. 

In 1894 Doctor Grover came to Decatur county, locating at Greens- 
burg, and one year later established the Doctor Grover Sanatorium, which 
had met with a very satisfactory measure of success. He is known today as 
one of the hardest-working physicians in Decatur county, and one who prac- 
tices medicine for the love of the work, rather than for the desire of gain. 
Patients are welcome to his office and to his sanatorium. No questions are 
asked regarding their ability to pay for the treatment they receive. Fitted 
up with the latest appliances, devised for present-day practice, the sana- 
torium is especially equipped for the successful treatment of tubercular 
patients, and many of them have been cured under Doctor Grover's care and 
treatment. A self-made and a self-educated man, not only in medicine, but 
along broad and general lines of information, his entire evening periods are 
now devoted to the acquisition of the latest knowledge available to practi- 
(52) 



8l8 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

tioners of the medical profession. Genial, whole-souled, and indifferent to 
pecuniary success, Dr. Charles B. Grover has established for himself a 
place in the hearts of the people of the county seat, which no one is 
likely very soon to take away. Earnest and sincere in his Hfe's vocation, 
he deserves to be classed among the citizens of Decatur county as one of 
nature's own noblemen. Doctor Grover is not only a member of the De- 
catur County Medical Society, and of the American Association of Pro- 
gressive Medicine, but formerly he was a member of the American Medi- 
cal Association. 

In 1909 Dr. Charles B. Grover was married to Ethel demons, daughter 
of Henry demons, a well-known citizen of Greensburg, to which union 
two children have been born, Gladys and Laura Margarette. 

A member of the Christian church since 1885, Doctor Grover is one of 
the leading members of the Greensburg congregation, and takes a reverent 
interest in the affairs of the church. Fraternally, he is a member of the 
Knights of Pythias at Faribault, Minnesota. A Republican in politics, 
he has been honored by the people of this county to election as county 
coroner of Decatur county, and served four years in this office, from 1908 to 
1912. During his residence in Clinton county he was deputy coroner there 
for eight years. 

Men of Doctor Grover's type are so few that a community which num- 
bers one among its citizens is fortunate indeed, ^^'hen his work is finished 
he will have what money cannot buy, the respect and esteem of this county. 



EDGAR EARL HITE. 



The lawyer's training is vastly dift'erent now from what it was a genera- 
tion ago. Today the best law schools are within the range of opportunity of 
every young man who aspires to the legal profession. Most of the younger 
lawyers have been trained efficiently in the standard law schools of the coun- 
try. One of the well-known younger attorneys of Greensburg, Indiana, who 
enjoys the advantages of a splendid preparation for the law and a splendid 
training in the law, is Edgar Earl Hite. 

Mr. Hite was bom on October 3, 1881, on a farm near Clarksburg, in 
Decatur county, the son of Lewis E. and Elizabeth (IMiller) Hite, the forrner 
of whom was born in 1849 in Rush county, and the latter of whom was born 
in 185 1 in Fairfield, Franklin county, and who died in 1904. Lewis E. Hite 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 819 

is the son of Nicholas Hite, who married Sarah Fisher. The latter was born 
in 1 819 in Pennsylvania, and came overland with her parents from that state 
in 1830. She died in 1913. The former is a native of Virginia, and was an 
early settler in Rush county. Nicholas Hite, who was born at Staunton, 
Virginia, owned a large tract of splendid farming land on the Rush and 
Decatur county line. Edgar Earl Hite is one of three children born to his 
parents. The others are Albert M., a farmer, and Charles C, who is fifteen 
years old. 

Edgar E. Hite, after having received a common school education, and 
having been graduated from the Clarksburg high school, spent the year 
1900-01 in Butler College at Indianapolis, and then three months at the 
Indiana Law School at Indianapolis. Subsequently, he spent four years in 
Indiana University, from which he was graduated in 1905 with the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws. From 1905 to 1906 Mr. Hite was associated with Judge 
Douglas Morris, now on the Indiana supreme court. Coming to Greensburg 
in October, 1907, he began the practice of law here, and served one year as 
deputy prosecuting attorney. 

Since 1910 Mr. Hite has served as city attorney of Greensburg, having 
been elected by the city council of that year for four years. He was re-elected 
in 1914 for a term of four years. In 1904 he was a candidate for prosecuting 
attorney of Decatur and Bartholomew counties, and has always been active 
in politics. Recognized as one of the leaders of the Democratic party in this 
county, he served for two years as secretary of the Democratic central com- 
mittee in Rush county, from 1905 to 1907. From 1908 to 19 14 he was secre- 
tary of the Democratic central committee of Decatur countv. He has also 
been secretary of the Democratic city committee since li\ing in Greensburg. 

Edgar E. Hite was married on October 19, 1908, to Eva M. Cartmel, 
daughter of Joseph A. and Susan Cartmel, formerly of Clarksburg. Mrs. 
Kite's father is now deceased. She is the mother of one daughter, Hazel 
lone. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edgar E. Hite are members of the Christian church. 
Fraternally, he is a member of the Free and Accepted Masons. He is at 
present chancellor commander of the Greensburg lodge. Knights of Pythias, 
and exalted ruler Greensburg Lodge, Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks. 

A young man of affable and agreeable personality, well learned in the 
law, Edgar E. Hite not only enjoys a comfortable practice in Decatur county, 
but is a highly respected citizen of the county, and one who enjoys to the 
fullest degree the confidence of the Decatur county people. 



820 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 



GEORGE M. SCHEIDLER. 



All success in this life represents progress, and those who laid down 
their burden in the dangerous days of the wilderness, planted the seeds that 
have, by careful pruning and scientific grafting, grown into trees whose 
fruits have benefited, not only the new country, for which they braved the 
perils of the seas to reach, but have reached far beyond our own shores, back 
to the homes of their native soil, and in fact over the entire civilized world, 
in many instances. For those of us who are interested in evolution and 
scientific progress, it is a matter of deep regret that we cannot know what will 
be accomplished along these lines after we are put away under our si.x feet 
of ground. The prosperous looking farm wagon of today bears but little 
resemblance to the oxen-drawn wagons of pioneer days. 

George M. Scheidler, wagonmaker, of Marion township, was born on 
December i, 1853, in Cincinnati. He is a son of John and Kunigunda 
(Steger) Scheidler. At the age of fifteen, he began to learn wagon making 
and repairing and machine repairs, and now conducts a general machine and 
repair shop at Millhousen, Marion township, which was established in 1862 
by his father, and now is operated as the John Scheidler estate. He is a 
stanch Democrat, was elected trustee in 1908, and served six years. He was 
justice of the peace from 1878 to 1898, twenty consecutive years, and was 
notary public from 1898 to 1908, and is a member of St. Mary's church at 
Millhousen. His present farm covers two hundred acres of land in Marion 
township. 

John Scheidler was born in Waldthurn, Bavaria, on June 19, 1826, and 
died on December 18, 1898. His wife, Kunigunda (Steger) Scheidler, was 
born on November 6, 1831, in Bavaria, Germany, where she was reared to 
young womanhood. He learned the wagon maker's trade in Germany, where 
he served three years as journeyman wagonwright. He came to America in 
1849, snd was married at Cincinnati in 1850, to Kunigunda Steger, who had 
come over with her parents. John came with his two sisters, Mrs. Hager, of 
Marion township, and Mrs. Anna Haubner, who lives near Cincinnati. In 
1862 John came to Millhousen and established the business now carried on 
by his sons. Of their children there are only five who are now living, 
Adam died at the age of sixty years, at Earl Park; George, subject; John is a 
blacksmith at Millhousen; Catherine, Michael and Joseph died in infancy; 
Louis is a blacksmith ; Joseph is in the employ of Herbert & Son, millers, at 
Millhousen; Herman is a farmer and lives in Ripley county; Edward, Francis 
and Anthony are all dead. John established his shop and dwelling in a little 



DECATUR COUNTY^ INDIANA. 82 1 

farm building still standing in Alillhousen. The business grew to considerable 
proportions, and in 1870 Mr. Scheidler erected a brick wagon, blacksmith and 
general machine repair shop, as well as a handsome brick dwelling, in the 
town, and in addition to this, he owned several pieces of valuable town 
property. The shop is yet the proj^erty of the estate. Mr. Scheidler is a 
member of St. Mary's Catholc church at Millhousen. He was drafted in the 
Civil War, but paid a substitute to take his place. 

George M. Scheidler was twice married, first to Catharine Koelker, on 
June 4, 1878. She died on September 10, 1883, leaving one daughter, Olivia 
(Heidlage) Oldenburg, who has a son, Victor. Mr. Scheidler's second mar- 
riage, on May 26, 1885, was to Josephine Huber, who died in April, 1895, 
leaving three sons, namely: Paul L., Lawrence ]., and Carl R. Paul L. is 
married to Clara, daughter of Joseph Herbert, and has two sons, Norbert and 
Urban. He is a farmer ; Lawrence attended the Terre Haute College, and 
graduated n 1915, and married Anna Moorman. He is a teacher in the high 
school, and Carl R. is in a clothing store at Greensburg. 



MICHAEL HEGER. 



Few farmers living in Marion township deserve greater credit for their 
achievements and their accomplishments than Michael Heger, the largest 
individual land owner in Marion township, and a man who has earned every 
dollar of his wealth by his own indomitable energy, frugal living and careful 
management of his agricultural interests. The Heger estate comprises four 
hundred and thirty-five acres of which one hundred and fifty acres is creek 
bottom, and very rich soil. The remainder of the land is fairly level, and is 
an ideal farm, taken as a whole, for mixed farming, and stock raising. As 
the passerby approaches Cobb's Fork there may be seen, overlooking the 
wide valley and situated on a prominent eminence, the Heger homestead, 
which is reached by a gravel driveway one-fourth of a mile from the road. 
The spacious lawn surrounding the house is bounded by a large stone wall 
built in 191 1. This wall also surrounds the spacious barnyard, where there has 
been erected a large bank barn, forty-four by fifty feet, and which is thirty- 
two feet to the eaves. Equipped with two sets of buildings and this large 
acreage, the farm is admirably adapted to the purposes and methods of its 
owner and proprietor. Not only is he the largest individual landowner in 
Marion township, but he likewise takes a very high rank among the farmers 



822 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

of this township in the number of head of hve stock raised and sold on the 
farm. 

Michael Heger was born on January 5, 1859, in Oldenburg, Franklin 
county, Indiana, the son of Michael and Josephine (Scheidler) Heger, the 
former of whom was born in 1826, and who died on January 26, 1899, and 
the latter of whom was born in 1831, and who now lives at Millhousen. 
Both natives of Germany, Michael Heger, Sr., after coming to America, 
settled in Cincinnati, and when a young man married there, and removed to 
Franklin county, where he engaged in farming and manufacturing brick. 
Michael, Jr., was a mere child when the family moved to the Millhousen 
neighborhood. He is one of a family of nine children born .to his par- 
ents, of whom eight are herewith named. John lives in Decatur, Illinois; 
Michael is the subject of this sketch; Jacob is deceased; Joseph lives in Mis- 
souri; William lives in Oklahoma; Frank died in infancy; Mrs. Wanner lives 
in Millhousen, and Mrs. Margaret Hardeback lives in Kokomo, Indiana. 

Patience it may be said is the keynote of Mr. Heger's success. Until he 
was thirty-two years old he lived on the old home farm of his parents, and 
then invested first in the S. T. Lowe farm on February 2, 1891. From his 
savings since that time he has invested in additional land until he now owns 
four hundred and thirty-five acres, the largest single farm in Marion town- 
ship. And with the able assistance of his good wife and his family he has 
personally earned all the money which has been invested in this large tract of 
land. 

On October 30, 1880, Michael Heger was married to Cassilda Witt, 
who was born on April 10, 1858, in Decatur, Illinois, and who is the daughter 
of Xavier and Marian Schott, natives of France, who died in Decatur, Illi- 
nois. They had been farmers by occupation. Mr. Heger journeyed to 
Decatur, Illinois, to meet and to marry his wife. 

The parents of Michael Heger, Jr., having been natives of Germany, 
and the parents of Mrs. Heger having been natives of France, the Heger 
children combine the sturdy character of their Germany ancestry with the 
quick, adaptable and keen intelligence of their French ancestry on the 
maternal side. Mr. and Mrs. Heger have had six children, as follow: Mary 
Josephine, who was born on August 29, 1883, married William Cahill, of 
Indianapolis; Francis Xavier, who was born on December 6, 1884, lives at 
home on the farm; Mary Conacunda, who was born on September 16, 1886, 
married Albert Fry, a son of Henry Fry, and since their marriage in the fall 
of 1914 they have lived on a farm in Marion township; Mary Philomena, 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 823 

who was born on October i6, 1888, died on July 11, 1891 ; John' Anthony, 
December 27, 1890, hves at home; Ruth Cassilda, May 13, 1894, also lives 
at home. 

Mr. Heger has been identified with the Democratic party during his 
entire life. The Heger family are members of St. Mary's Catholic church, 
and are active in the affairs of this denomination. 



GEORGE S. PERRY. 



George S. Perry, a well-known farmer of Washington township, who 
owns one hundred and fifty acres of land three miles east of Greensburg, 
which was entered in 1825 by his grandfather, was born on April 6, 1866, 
and is the son of Leonard and Cinderella (Boyce) Perry, the former a native 
of Kentucky, who had come with his father, Dan S. Perry, Sr., from Ken- 
tucky to Washington township, Decatur county, in 1824, and the latter of 
whom was a native of Indiana and reared in Decatur county. After settling 
in Decatur county, Dan S. Perry, Sr., cleared a small tract and erected a log 
cabin. He was a soldier in the War of 1812, who had moved from the 
ancestral home in Virginia to the state of Kentucky, and it was his father, 
Frederick Perry, who was a member of the personal body guard of General 
Washington during the Revolutionary War. Leonard Perry, who lived on 
the ancestral farm for sixty years, was born in 1824 and died in 1909. His 
wife, who died in 1873, left a family of nine children, all of whom except 
George S., are residents of Greensburg, Mrs. Dinah P. Craig; Will L. and 
Louisa; Squire D., farmer; Mrs. Chester Edkins; Allen M. and Pierce, 
deceased, and Dan S., Jr., the cashier of the Greensburg National Bank. 

George S. Perry was born on the old home farm where he now lives and 
where both his father and his grandfather had lived and died. Educated in 
the McCoy schools, he has been engaged in farming the ancestral farm of the 
•Perrys his whole life. Pie raises a great number of cattle and hogs and 
specializes in Poland China hogs and Shorthorn cattle. 

On August 16, 1892, George S. Perry was married to Retta Brodbeck, 
who was born in Lawrenceburg, Indiana. . They were married in Los Angeles, 
California, and have one child, Jean, who was born on January 16, 1895, and 
who is now attending a girls' seminary at Nashville, Tennessee. 

Mr. Perry is a Democrat. He is a member of the Free and Accepted 
Masons, the Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent and Protective Order of 



824 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Elks. He is a worthy citizen of Decatur county, a capable farmer and one 
who has added new distinction to the family whose name he bears. Mr. and 
Mrs. Perry are popular socially in Washington township and in Greensburg, 
where they are so well known. 



JOHN W. DeMOSS. 



In every community may be found men who are especially desen-ing 
the respect and admiration of their neighbors on account of the severity 
of the struggle they have had for success and on account of the large 
measure of attainment which has attended their efforts. John- \V. De- 
Moss, the present sheriff of Decatur county, is a man who belongs to this 
class of citizens. Left an orphan at a tender age by the untimely death 
of his father while serving as a soldier in the Union army, he has had to 
make his own way in the world practically since he was ten years old. By 
the hardest kind of labor, by diligent and intelligent application to this 
labor, by economical living, consistent saving and careful management he 
has attained a position of high influence in this county, and no better evidence 
of the respect and admiration he enjoys can be cited than his election in 
1912, and his re-election in 1914, to an office which was practically unsought. 

John W. DeMoss was born on August 27, 1856, in Sand Creek township, 
Decatur county, Indiana, the son of Benjamin Lewis and Harriet (Masters) 
DeMoss, the former of whom was born in 1832 and died in 1863, and the 
latter of whom was born in 1840 and died in 1901. Benjamin L. DeMoss, 
the son of William and Elizabeth DeMoss, early settlers in Decatur county, 
came with his parents to this county in the late thirties of the last cen- 
tury. His wife, who was the daughter of John and Hannah (Byrum) 
Masters, was a native of Kentucky, and her parents also settled in Decatur 
county, with a colony of citizens, in the early thirties. 

Enlisting in the Thirty-seventh Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, 
at the breaking out of the Civil War, despite his physical weakness, because 
he believed it was his duty to go, Benjamin L. DeMoss became ill and died 
of pneumonia at Murfreesboro, Tennessee. He left a widow and three 
children, John W., Edward Wallace, now deceased, and Belle, who married 
Andrew Martin, of Marion township. The widow and children had a hard 
time to get along after the death of the father and husband. Wfth the 
kind assistance of the children's grandparents and the neighbors, however. 




JOHN W. l)i:.\lUSf 



DECATUR COUNTY^ INDIANA. 825 

they were able to live. Eventually, the mother married again, her second 
husband being E. E. Goodwin, and to this second union one child was 
born, Cortez, who is a carpenter. 

John W. DeMoss has always worked hard. He began earning his own 
way in the world at a tender age, taking employment in a stone cjuarry when 
ten years old, carrying water for the men, and gradually worked himself 
into a good position. He saved his money and, from doing ordinary day's 
work has bought and paid for two hundred acres of excellent land in Sand 
Creek township. A highly qualified and skillful superintendent during his 
employment at the Harris City quarries, he used not only his muscles, but his 
brain as well, and this combination of muscular and mental energy is largely 
responsible for his success. In 1904 he began devoting himself to farming, 
choosing this rather than the foremanship of the quarries. 

On April 12, 1877, John W. DeMoss was married to Martha A. Jack- 
son, of Sand Creek township, daughter of William B. and Amanda Jackson, 
who was born on October 4, 1856, in Kentucky, her parents having come 
to Indiana during the Civil War times. To this union three sons and three 
daughters have been born. Of these children, Benjamin, a farmer, is oper- 
ating the home farm. He married Euphemia McFarland and they have si.x 
children. Mrs. Bird Borden lives in Sand Creek township and has three 
children. Her husband is foreman for the contracting firm of Craig & Son, 
of Greensburg. Mrs. Delia Styers has four children. Her husband owns 
a farm in Sand Creek township. Grover, who married Lena Hamer, and 
has one child, is the deputy sheriff imder his father ; Mrs. Belle Vandiver 
lives on a farm in Jackson township, and has three children. Irdo is a farmer 
in Sand Creek township. 

In the fall of 1912 Mr. DeMoss was elected sheriff of Decatur county, 
and was re-elected to the same office in the fall of 1914. The office was 
practically unsought and came to him largely as a reward for his service 
in the past in behalf of Democratic principles and Democratic candidates. 
Sheriff and Mrs. DeMoss and family are members of the Methodist Episco- 
pal church. Fraternall}', he is a member of the Masonic lodge, which he 
joined in 1896, and the Knights of Pythias, which he joined in 1887. 

Many men who have the advantage of a good start in life achieve a 
large measure of success, but the man who starts with nothing' and who 
acquires a comfortable home, a competence in life, and rears a family of 
children, is undoubtedly entitled to the very greatest praise. Sheriff John 
W. DeMoss is a man of this character. Naturally he is very popular in 
Decatur county where he is so well known. 



826 DECATUR COUNTY, IXDIANA. 

JOSEPH B. KITCHiN. 

That there are enormous differences in the casual power exerted by 
different minds, depending on their place of vantage in the social system, is, 
of course, true. ^lost men merely echo the prevailing opinion or swell the 
general tide of passion. Even so, such men in the aggregate give to opinion 
its tendency to prevail, and to passion its tidal and overwhelming power. 
But the contribution of a single member of the mass is not comparable with 
that of the individual who occupies a place of prominence or authority. Such 
a mind operates at a source, coloring all that springs from it, or at a crucial 
point where every slight deflection is enormously magnified in the consequence. 
There are not a few such men of initiative in Decatur county, one of the best 
known of whom is Joseph B. Kitchin, secretary and treasurer of the Greens- 
burg Water Company and a man of very wide influence for good in the com- 
munity in which his whole life has been spent, the subject of the following 
interesting biographical review. 

Joseph B. Kitchin was born on a farm in Washington township, Decatur 
county, Indiana, on December 29, 1850, the son of Thomas and Sarah L. 
(Boone) Kitchin, natives, respectively, of Ohio and Kentucky, the former of 
whom was a son of Joseph Kitchin, a native of Pennsylvania, and who 
migrated to Ohio, coming thence to this county at an early day in the settle- 
ment of this section of Indiana. Joseph Kitchin was a farmer and blacksmith 
as well as a pioneer minister of the Methodist church. He came to this county 
from Pennsylvania after his sons had established homes here. He was the 
father of five children, Thomas; John; Bryce. who is still living at the age of 
eighty-six, making his home at Arkansas City, Kansas ; Sarah, who married 
Michael Shera, a merchant of the early days in Greensburg, and Maria, who 
married James IMunns and became a pioneer settler in the state of Iowa. 

Thomas Kitchin, who was born in Ohio in the year 1818, emigrated to 
Decatur county with his brothers in the year 1839 and settled on a farm of one 
hundred and sixty acres of land, two miles south of Greensburg. To this farm 
he added, by purchase, until he had three hundred acres in one tract. He sold 
this and for a few years made his home in Greensburg, later moving to 
Lebanon, Indiana, where he resided for seven years, at the end of which time, 
in 1902, he returned to Greensburg, whre his death occurred in 1904. Thomas 
Kitchin married Sarah Luffborough Boone, a daughter of Brumfield Boone, 
who was born in Kentucky, a son of Thomas Boone, a soldier in the patriot 
army during the Revolutionary War. and to this union seven children were 
born, Rachel, the wife of Charles I. Ainsworth. of Greensburg; Joseph B., the 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 827 

immediate subject of this sketch, and Frank B., formerly a farmer in a large 
way in this county, who lived in Greensburg until it became time to give his 
children the advantages of higher education, when, some years ago, he moved 
to Irvington, at Indianapolis, the seat of Butler College; the remaining four 
died in infancy. 

The Boones are of Norman origin, the name at the time of the Norman 
invasion of England having been spelled Bohnn. The first family of the 
Bohnns to cross the channel into England settled in Lincolnshire and after- 
ward some of the same name settled in Devonshire. It is from this latter 
family that the American Boones are descended. The Bohnn coat-of-arms 
was used before the fourteenth century, probably having been granted by an 
Anglo-Norman king. Not until the sixteenth century are the names Bohnn 
and Boone found in the same document. The first of this family to come to 
America was George Boone, who was born about 1670 at the old family seat, 
Brodwick, about eight miles from Exeter, England. There he married Mary 
Mauridge, by whom he had nine sons and two daughters. The entire family 
emigrated to America, landing at Philadelphia on October 10, 171 7. George 
Boone purchased a tract of land in what is now Bucks county, Pennsylvania, 
and called it Exeter, in memory of the town in England from which he had 
emigrated. In this review it will be necessary to name but two of the sons 
born to the union of George and Mary ( Mauridge) Boone, Joseph and Squire. 
Joseph Boone was the father of Thomas Boone, Mr. Kitchin's Revolutionary 
ancestor, and Squire Boone was the father of Daniel Boone, thus establishing 
the relationship of Thomas Boone and the immortal Daniel Boone, showing 
indeed that they were first cousins. 

Thomas Boone served in the Revolutionary War as a private in Capt. 
James Murray's company of the Tenth Battalion of Lancaster County Militia, 
state of Pennsylvania, Robert Elder, colonel; having enlisted on April 12, 
1 781. He was born in the town of Reading, Pennsylvania, on August 21, 
1759, and married Susannah Brumfield, a Pennsylvania Quakeress, being 
compelled to elope with her on account of the objections raised by the Quakers 
at that time to any of their number marrying outside the faith. After the 
war, he moved to Upper Sandusky, Ohio, where he lived for a short time, 
after which he moved to Limestone, which is now Maysville, Kentucky, and 
in the year 179 1 moved to Bryant's Station, entering the blockliouse there, 
where Brumfield Boone was born in the same year. In 1794 Thomas Boone 
moved to a point on the little Miami river, just above Cincinnati, where, for a 
time, he operated a tavern, later going to Cincinnati. The Boone and Kitchin 
families still have old deeds showing Thomas Boone's ownership of property 



828 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

in what is now the Bay street section of Cincinnati and some of the property 
owned by him is still in the possession of the family. In 1807 Thomas Boone 
moved to Oxford, Ohio, where he and his wife spent the remainder of their 
lives, their bodies now resting in the old Baptist cemetery, four and one-half 
miles south and a little west of Oxford, near what was the old Boone farm. 

Joseph Brumfield Kitchin was reared on the home farm in Washington 
township, this county, receiving his education in the home schools. Upon 
reaching manhood's estate he began farming on a tract of one hundred and 
sixty acres in the same township, near the town of Greensburg. He prospered 
and as the years passed he increased his land holdings and also became actively 
interested in other enterprises. He now owns two valuable farms near Greens- 
burg and has other extensive investments. Mr. Kitchin aided in the organiza- 
tion of the Greensburg National Bank in 1900 and for irve years served this 
excellent financial institution in the capacity of cashier, still retaining a direc- 
torship in the bank. He is president of the Workingmen's Building and Loan 
Association and for some time has been secretary and treasurer of the Greens- 
burg Water Company. 

On July 26, 1 87 1, Joseph Brumfield Kitchin was united in marriage with 
Nancy Elmira Robbins, a daughter of John E. and Nancy (Hunter) Robbins, 
a member of one of the oldest and most prominent families in Decatur 
county. Mrs. Kitchin also is of Revolutionary descent, tracing from William 
Robbins, a distinguished soldier in the war which secured to America the 
independence for which the patriots fought seven long years. William Rob- 
bins married Bethiah Vichery, who was born on December i, 1760, and to this 
union there were born three children, Abel, Charity and Benjamin. The 
father of these children was killed in the Revolutionary War soon after 
enlisting in the service of the patriots and his widow subsequently married 
the second William Robbins, the scene of the wedding being in Guilford 
county. North Carolina. To this latter union there were born nine children, 
namely: Elizabeth, on February 5, 17S8: Marmaduke and John, twins. May 
15, 1789; Polly, .\pril 9, 1791; Nathaniel, April 5, 1793: John, February 8, 
1795: William, August 6, 1797, and Dosha, May 20, 1804. 

The father of the children above named was born in Randolph countv. 
North Carolina, on October 21, 1761, and in October, 1777, when sixteen 
years of age, enlisted as a private in the army of General Washington, remain- 
ing in the service until August, 1781, during which time he had but one cap- 
tain, Capt. Joseph Clark, and two colonels. Colonel Dligan and Col. Anthony 
Sharp. Following the war, William Robbins moved from A^irginia to Ken- 
tucky and in 1 82 1 again moved, this time locating in Decatur countv, Indiana. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 829 

He entered a farm from the government, about nine and one-half miles south 
of Greensburg, where, amid the hills, he carved a home out of the virgin 
forest. The first home which he set up for his family consisted of but one 
room, the house being constructed of hewed logs, to which was attached a 
lean-to, in which the family loom was set up. Presently he also erected a 
rude blacksmith shop of logs nearby and thus life in the new country was 
begun, the wife busy with her loom and other household duties and the 
husband busy in his smithy. On September ii, 1834, thirteen years after 
settling in this county, William Robbins died, his body being laid away in Mt. 
Pleasant cemetery, about six miles south of Greensburg. 

The third William Robbins mentioned in this sketch, son of above, was 
born in the Blue Ridge mountains of Virginia on August 6, 1797, as noted 
above, and was taken by his parents to Henry county, Kentucky, to which 
point they emigrated. When, in the year 1821, they moved to the New Pur- 
chase, the name applied to that part of the new state in which they settled, 
William Robbins, then twenty-four years of age, accompanied them and 
selected a site for a farm for himself about one and one-half miles north of 
that selected by his parents. In 1822 he returned to Kentucky, where he mar- 
ried Eleanor Anderson, one of the pioneer belles of the neighborhood in which 
he formerly had lived. With his bride at his side, he returned to his new 
Indiana home and during that year his three sisters, together with his 
brothers, John and Nathaniel, settled in the same vicinity. In a short time 
other relatives of the Robbins family arrived in the same township and the 
Robbinses became prominent, both numerically and in the matter of the large 
influence they exerted in the early affairs of that part of the county, Nathaniel 
Robbins being the first justice of the peace in Sand Creek township. 

William and Eleanor Robbins lived on the farm originally selected as 
their home during the remainder of their days, he dying on February 3, 1866, 
his widow surviving him until the year 1872. To William and Eleanor 
(Anderson) Robbins were born four children, namely: Sarilda, in October, 
1823, who married WilHam Styers; John E., February 20, 1825, who mar- 
ried Nancy Hunter: James G., June 10, 1827, married Elmira Stout, and 
Merrit H., in 1829, married Janet Gilchrist. 

John E. Robbins remained on the paternal farm until November 7, 1844, 
the date of his marriage with Nancy Hunter, daughter of Nathaniel and 
Elizabeth Hunter, at which time the young couple began housekeeping on a 
farm of forty acres given them by the bridegroom's father. They remained 
on this farm until February 15, 1848, by which time they had accumulated 
■enoi^gh to purchase one hundred and sixty acres of land one mile south of 



830 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Greensburg, on which place they made their home the remainder of their 
Hves. To this purchase they subsequently added large tracts of land and other 
valuable interests, until their possessions consisted of about three thousand 
acres of land in Decatur county and two hundred and forty acres in Bartholo- 
mew county, besides personal property of large value. In 1882 John E. Rob- 
bins helped organize the Third National Bank of Greensburg, of which he 
was director and president until his death. Under his direction and manage- 
ment this bank grew to be one of the most substantal and successful institu- 
tions in the county. Mr. Robbins died on July 22, 1896. His widow, who 
had shared all his interests and labor, proving in all things a most willing and 
efficient helpmeet, continued to live on the home farm until her long and useful 
life closed on May 2, 1905. 

To John E. and Nancy (Hunter) Robbins were born fourteen children, 
namely: Elizabeth Ellen, deceased; Charlotte Adaline died on February 11, 
1869: Sarilda Ruth, who married H. K. Smiley; Minerva Jane, who married 
Archibald Gilchrist ; Nancy Elmira, who married J. B. Kitchin : Sarah Jane, 
deceased; William Hunter, who married Cora Sefton; Clara Alinda, who 
married Frank B. Kitchin; Olive Ida, who married Robert McCoy; John 
Everman, who married Louisa Elder ; Frank Rosco, who married Kate Sef- 
ton; Eliza Angeline, who married Will O. Elder, and two who died in infancy. 

To Joseph Brumfield and Nancy Elmira (Robbins) Kitchin were born 
three children, Maud Elmira, on October 18, 1872, who married Charles H. 
Johnston, of the firm of ^\'. H. Robbins & Company, wholesale grocers, of 
Greensburg, to which union four children have been born, Mildrd Elmira, Jo 
Charles, ]\Iarjorie and Thomas Ludlow; Otta Pearl, September 16, 1874, 
who married Charles Woodfill, of Greensburg, and has two children, daughters, 
Helen and Sarah, and Hal T., August 3. 1878, who married Iva Lanham and 
has one child, a son, Hal Thomas. 

]\Ir. and Mrs. Kitchin are members of the Centenary ]\Iethodist church, 
in the various beneficences of which they always have taken an active interest 
and their children were reared in that faith. Mr.. Kitchin is a member of the 
Greensburg lodge of Elks. His large business and financial interests in and 
about Greensburg give to his position in that community a degree of stability 
second to none in the county and he naturally exerts a wide influence in the 
affairs of the community. Both he and Mrs. Kitchin are deeply concerned in 
all matters having to do with the general social welfare of the citv and 
county and are held in the highest regard by all. Mrs. Kitchin and her 
daughters are members of the society of the Daughters- of the American 
Revolution and are regarded as among the leaders in the social life of the city 
of Greensburg, their active influence ever being exerted in behalf of all move- 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 83 1 

ments looking to the general betterment of conditions in this section of the 
state. Airs. Kitcliin's daughters are eligible to the Daughters of the Ameri- 
can Revolution from three different ways. Hal T. is a Mason and has filled 
all chairs in the local lodge, and is a Knight Templar and a member of the 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine at Indianapolis. 



HENRY FRY. 



Reared under primitive conditions, and of German parentage, whose 
ancestors knew Indiana while the Indians still roamed her forests, Mr. Fry 
has advanced, step by step, making capital of every opportunity that crossed 
his pathway, until now, he stands at the top step of his desires, and, wisely 
enough, he knew when to stop and enjoy the fruits of his long years of labor. 
He has put aside enough of this world's goods to enable himself and wife to 
live in ease and comfort the remainder of their lives, in addition to which he 
has the satisfaction of knowing that he has been in a position to provide his 
own with the means whereby they have escaped the many struggles exper- 
ienced by himself as a young man. 

Henry Fry, a farmer of Millhousen, Marion township, Decatur county, 
was born on April 17, 1841, at Cincinnati, and is a son of John and Mary 
(Barger) Fry. Mr. Fry was reared in a log cabin, under very trying condi- 
tions and times, and was but nine years old when his mother died. He began 
life as a young man, with f6rty acres of land, which he soon increased to one 
hundred and eighty acres. This he sold, in 1904, to his sons, and moved to 
Millhousen, where he bought four acres of land, containing a good brick 
house, where he now lives. In 1865 Mr. Fry enlisted in Company C, Thir- 
teenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, served until the close of the 
war, and did general duty at Goldsboro, Raleigh, and throughout the South 
after the war. His political policies are strongly Democratic, and he is a 
members of St. Mary's Catholic church at Millhousen. 

John and Mary Fry were natives of Germany. They came out to the 
Millhousen settlement in 1841, and chopped a home from the woods, where 
they both died. After the death of his first wife (mother of our subject), 
Mr. Fry later was married to a Mrs. Moggert. 

Henry Fry was united in marriage, in 1870, to Theresa Verekamp, who 
was born in 1851, on a farm in Marion township. She is a daughter of 
Frank and Theresa (Snyder) Verekamp, natives of Germany, who came at 
an early day to settle in Marion township, whose children were Franks 



832 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

deceased; John, deceased; Mrs. Anna Rolfes lives in Marion township, and 
has six children, Nora, Hilda, Martin, Harry, Richard and Clarence; George 
is a farmer in Marion township, and has been twice married. His first wife 
was Lucy Herbert, and his second wife was Mrs. Leda (Hutterbach) Her- 
bert, by whom he has had five children, Virgie, Walter, Raymond, Sylvia and 
Herbert; William was married to Clara Ruhl, and lives on the home farm. 
They have three children, Alvin, Lillian and Ferdinand; Edward was united 
in marriage to Rosa Lucken. They live in Marion township, and ha\'e four 
sons, Oscar, Oswold, Lawrence and Edmund; Mrs. Laura Kroeger lives in 
Marion township and has two sons, Maurice and Charles. 



HENRY H. LOGAN. 



During nearly three-quarters of a century of residence in Decatur county, 
Indiana, various members of the Logan family have occupied many posi- 
tions of trust and responsibility in the political life of this county. Not 
only is the Logan family one of the older families of this section, but they 
have always been noted for their high ideals, sterling integrity and large 
business capacity. Many of the members of the family have been farmers 
and their influence has greatly enriched the agricultural life of this county, 
making it wholesome and progressive, honorable and independent In a 
material way, the earlier members of the family helped to clear the forest 
and drain the swamps. They had a most commendable part in the trans- 
formation of a wild and unbroken forest into fields of growing grain which 
.now yield abundant harvests. Henry H. Logan, the eldest son of the founder 
of the Logan family in Decatur county, has himself had a most interesting 
and fruitful part in the development of this splendid community. 

Born on September 17, 1841, in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, 
Henry H. Logan was only one year and three months old when brought here 
by his father and mother, Samuel H. and Millie (Hice) Logan, in 1843. 
Arriving in Decatur county in April of 1843, Samuel H. Logan settled on 
land entered from the government by his father, John Logan, the farm now 
occupied and owned by Will W. Logan, a younger brother of Henry H. 
Samuel H. Logan, a native of Indiana county, Pennsylvania, born on Febru- 
ary I, 1819, was the son of John and Isabel (Graham) Logan, who came 
to America from Ireland late in the eighteenth century and located in In- 
diana county, Pennsylvania, where they spent the remainder of their li\-es. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 833 

They had four children: Samuel H., Mrs. Hanna Hice, born on June 17, 
1822; Mrs. Margaret Elliot, February 20, 1825, and Mrs. Ann Baker, July 
12, 1827. The last named lives four miles from Greensburg, in this county. 

Three years before coming to Decatur county, on November 26, 1840, 
Samuel H. Logan was married to Millie Hice, a native of New Jersey, born 
on October 20, 1818, the daughter of Henry Hice, who had come to America 
from Germany. Shortly after their marriage, or in 1843, they came to 
Decatur county. Samuel H. Logan was a clear-headed man, enterprising, 
public-spirited and an excellent farmer, and became* one of the heaviest land 
holders in Decatur county. For some time he served his fellow citizens 
efficiently as a member of the board of county commissioners, and was hon- 
ored and respected by the citizens of this community at the time of his 
death on October 19, 1904. His wife had died a quarter of a century 
previously, on October 15, 1879. 

To Samuel H. and Millie (Llice) Logan ten children were born, of whom 
Henry H. is the eldest. The others are Isabella G., born on September 22, 
1843, who is the widow of Samuel Applegate and resides in Greensburg; 
Mary S., November 26, 1845, the widow of Will Murray, who resides in 
Nevada, Missouri; John B., October 8, 1847, who is a traveling salesman 
and lives at Indianapolis ; William W., who is a well-known farmer of 
Decatur county and lives on the old homestead; Sarah, October 19, 1852, the 
widow of Joseph Ketchum, lives in Cincinnati; Marine R., March 6, 1855, 
who died on May 22, 1885; Samuel, September 16, 1857, died on April 18, 
1893; Emma J., August 20, i860, died on August 16, 1865, and George M., 
September 13, 1862, who is the general agent of the International Harvester 
Company at Richmond, Indiana. 

Like other members of the family, Henry H. Logan received the rudi- 
ments of an education in the local schools of Decatur county, principally 
at the Tarkington school house, which was located on his father's farm. 
His youth was not especially eventful but it may be said here that he per- 
formed with diligence and a willing spirit the tasks that fell to his lot 
as a young man in a pioneer community. He lived on the old homestead 
with his parents until his marriage and afterward moved to a farm of 
eighty acres given to him by his father. Later he purchased an additional 
eighty acres from his father. As a matter of fact, Mr. Logan has lived 
on the farm he now occupies, comprising one hundred and sixty acres in 
Washington township, since October 10, 1865, a period of just a half cen- 
tury. From time to time he has made additions and repairs to the houses, 
(53) 



834 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

barns, and outbuildings located on the farm and now owns a completely 
modernized residence, the equal of any in this community. 

Henry H. Logan was married on the same date that he moved to his 
present farm, October 10, 1865, to Eliza Sidwell, who was born near 
Greensburg, in this county, on December 11, 1844, the daughter of Hugh 
and Eliza (English) Sidwell, early settlers of Decatur county. On October 
10, 191 5, Mr. and Mrs. Logan will celebrate their golden wedding anni- 
versary. Thev have reared several children, among whom is a nephew. 
Forest M., who lived with them from the time he was five years old. 
He vi^as graduated from Purdue University and later attended the Uni- 
versity of Illinois at Champaign, completing a course in civil engineering, 
and is now engaged in the practice of this profession in Chicago. He mar- 
ried Rein Robertson, of Lafayette, and they have one child, Alice ]\Iarie, who 
is eight years old. 

For many years Henry H. Logan has been prominent in Masonic cir- 
cles in Greensburg, being a member of Greensburg Lodge No. 36, Free and 
Accepted Masons. Both Mr. and Mrs. Logan are members of the Pres- 
byterian church and he is a Democrat. I\Ir. and Mrs. Logan spent the 
winter of 1914-15 in Florida, returning in the early spring, thoroughly 
imbued with the idea that "there is no place like home," and that Indiana, 
good old Hoosierdom, is the best place in the universe, after all. 

Few farmers in this county are better or more favorably known than 
Henry H. Logan, and few have done more than he to win the confidence and 
esteem of the people of this county. By careful regard for the rights of 
his neighbors and friends, he has maintained cordial relations with the 
people of Decatur county and is today one of its most popular farmers 
and citizens. 



JACOB C. GLASS, M. D. 

Physician, farmer, postmaster and ex-school teacher, Jacob C. Glass, 
M. D., of Millhousen, Marion township, Decatur county, Indiana, is one of 
the most versatile men in his community. A product of Decatur county soil, 
he had always been a successful farmer and at the present time, owns a 
splendid farm of one hundred and sixty acres in the township of his resi- 
dence. For eleven 3'ears a teacher in the public schools of Decatur county, 
during this period of his life, he was known as one of the foremost educators 
in the county. Since 1907 he has been engaged in the practice of medicine,. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 835 

first in the state of Arkansas and later in Decatur county. Postmaster since 
1908, he has filled this important office with credit to himself and has attained 
a high mark of proficiency in the management of the postal business. His 
career is a notable exception to the philosophy of the old saw, since he has 
not only followed many occupations, but he has and is following them with 
efficiency. His father and grandfather, having- served in the Civil War, it 
may be truthfully said that he comes from militant and patriotic stock, and 
from a family which has been well known in this county for many years. 

Dr. Jacob C. Glass, physician and surgeon of Millhousen, Indiana, was 
born on September 21, 1873, in Decatur county on the old Glass homestead 
in Adams township, the son of John T. and Susan Jane (Grant) Glass, the 
former of whom was a native of Decatur county, born on February 14, 
1845, ^"*i ^^'l^o rio^^' resides in Greensburg, Indiana. A private soldier in 
Company E, Thirty-seventh Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, John T. 
Glass served more than three years in the Civil War and, attached to the 
Army of the Cumberland, he fought at Stone's River, Chattanooga, Kenesaw 
Mountain, Missionary Ridge and Lookout Mountain, also in the beginning 
of the Atlanta campaign, when he was transferred to another part of the 
army to meet Beauregard at Knoxville. His father, William A. Glass, a 
native of Ireland, born in 1832 and died in 1900, came to America when a 
young man. He was a soldier in the Sixty-eighth Regiment, Indiana Volun- 
teer Infantry, and served with distinction during a greater part of the war. 

Reared on a farm in Adams township, Decatur county, Indiana, Dr. 
Jacob C. Glass was educated in the common schools of the township and in 
the Central Normal College at Danville, Indiana. In the earlier years of his 
life, he taught school for eleven years in Decatur county and subsequently, 
when he decided to study medicine, took the first year of his work in the 
Illinois Medical College at Chicago. His second, third and fourth years' 
work were taken at Kentucky University at Louisville, at which time he was 
graduated from that institution with high honors. For some time after his 
graduation, he practiced at Cotton Plant, Arkansas, having passed the 
Arkansas medical registration examination three months before his gradua- 
tion. After one year's practice in the South, he settled at Millhousen, where 
he has been engaged continuously in the practice of his profession since 1908. 
Professionally, he is a member of the Decatur County Medical Society, the 
Indiana State and the American Associations, a prominent member in all of 
these organizations, one who not only attends, but takes a prominent part in 
their proceedings. 

In 1908 Dr. Glass was appointed postmaster at Millhousen and took 



836 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. . 

charge of this office on December 15, of that year. He has served continu- 
ously as postmaster since 1908, a period of seven years. For some time he 
has owned several farms in jMarion township and devotes considerable atten- 
tion to supervising the work on the farm. 

In 1895 Dr. Jacob C. Glass was married to Ida May Crist, of Adams, 
the daughter of Abram and Kiturah Crist, who were early settlers in Decatur 
county, the former coming here from Franklin county on horse-back with 
only a small supply of pewter spoons and pie pans, the nucleus of the home 
which he established in the Decatur county wilderness. 

Dr. and Mrs. Jacob C. Glass are members of the Presbyterian church, 
which is the family faith. Fraternally, he is prominent in Decatur county, 
being a member of seven fraternal societies. He is a member of Knights of 
Pythias Lodge No. 341, at Burney; the Adams lodge of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows; the Greensburg lodge, Free and Accepted Masons; 
the Fraternal Order of Eagles ; the Improved Order of Red Men ; the Mod- 
ern Woodmen of America, and the Loyal Order of Moose. 

Dr. Jacob C. Glass is a man of splendid professional attainments, and, 
being equipped with strong intellectual powers and native aggressive attain- 
ments, naturally has become a leader in all public movements in Marion 
township. He is a man who has never been known to waver in the slightest 
degree from the strict code of ethics maintained by the medical profession 
and who, in private life, has been quite as strict in the code of principles 
governing his relations with the public. He is not only a well-meaning citi- 
zen, but he is a man who is capable of carrying that perquisite into effect. 
Naturall}^, he is popular in Marion township, where he enjoys the confidence 
and esteem of a large number of friends. 



JESSE H. STYERS. 



The late Jesse H. Styers, who, until his death, on January 15, 1910, was 
one of the most prominent farmers and citizens of Decatur county, owed his 
large success in life to the fact that he was generally willing and able to do 
the right thing at the right time. A man of more than average attainment, 
he knew the tendency of farm values during his life, and from time to time 
invested his savings and profits in land. A man of large vision and one who 
knew how to get the very largest returns from an acre of land, he naturallv 
became wealthv, and at the time of his death owned seven hundred and 



DECATUR COUNTYj INDIANA. 837 

twenty acres of land in this county. But the greatness of the late Jesse H. 
Styers. as a man and a citizen, did not consist wholly in his prosperous career 
as a farmer. He took a commendable interest in politics and served six years 
as a member of the Decatur county board of commissioners. In this office 
he was able to perform valuable service in behalf of public improvements, 
and his vote and his influence could always be depended upon in their behalf. 
He was not only a successful financier and a capable and efficient manager, 
but he was a man of scrupulous integrity, whose relations with his fellows 
was founded upon an inflexible and unyielding determination to do the right 
thing. He had at the time of his death many friends in Decatur county. 
Few men have passed away in recent years whose loss has been more gen- 
erally mourned than this honored citizen of Sand Creek township. 

Jesse H. Styers. who was born on February 4, 1844. and died on 
January 15, 1910, at the age of sixty-six years, was born in Greensburg, 
Decatur county, Indiana, the son of William and Sarilda (Robbins) Styers, 
the former of whom a native of North Carolina, came to Greensburg when 
a young man and here engaged in carriage making, at which he worked for 
several years. Without friends and without resources he saved his money 
and, subsequently, at the time of his marriage, was able to purchase a small 
farm south of the city. There he engaged in the dairy business, and later 
extended his operations to general farming, in which he was ver}'^ successful. 
He was able to give each of his children a farm and a good start on the high- 
way of life. A prominent citizen during his life, he was a man of especially 
quiet and unassuming manner, a man who had an enviable reputation in the 
community where he lived. His home farm was just across the road from 
the farm owned by Frank and John E. Robbins. 

William and Sarilda (Robbins) Styers had five children, three of whom, 
including Jesse H., are now deceased. William G. died lately in Sand Creek 
township ; Evermont died on the old homestead, and his widow is now living 
in Greensburg with IMrs. Privit : Evermont left one daughter, Mrs. Earl Rob- 
bins, at the time of his death ; Charles, the last son, lives in Indianapolis. 

The mother of the late Jesse H. Styers, who, before her marriage to 
William Styers, was Sarilda Robbins, the daughter of William and Eleanor 
(Anderson) Robbins, was born in 1823. Her father, William Robbins, was 
born in the Blue Ridge mountains of Virginia, and was taken bv his parents 
to Henry county, and later to Indiana in 1821. At the time of the removal to 
Indiana, William Robbins was twenty-four years old. He selected a site for a 
home for himself about one and one-half mile north of his father's home in 
Decatur county, and the next year returned to Kentucky and was married to 



838 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Eleanor Anderson, of that state. Upon their return to Indiana, they were 
accompanied by his three sisters and two brothers, John and Nathaniel, who 
settled in the same vicinity. A short time later, other relatiA'es of the Rob- 
bins family came to the same township, which family became prominent, both 
as to numbers and influence, in the early affairs of the county. William and 
Eleanor Robbins lived on the farm originally selected as their home, during 
the remainder of their lives. They had four children, of whom Mr. Styers' 
mother was the eldest. The other three children were, John K., born on 
February 20, 1825, who married Nancy O. Hunter; James G., June 10, 1827, 
and who married Elmira Stout, and Holman, in 1829, who married Jeannette 
Gilchrist. William Robbins died on February 3, 1868, and his wife four 
years later. 

Of the earlier history of the Robbins family, it may be said that the 
family begins with Bethiah Vickery, who was born on December i, 1760, and 
who married W^illiam Robbins. They had three children, Albe, Charity and 
Benjamin. W^illiam Robbins was killed in the Revolutionary War soon after 
enlisting, and his widow married a second William Robbins in Guilford 
county, North Carolina. This couple had the following children: Marme- 
duke and Jacob, born on May 15, 1783; Elizabeth, February 5, 1788; Polly, 
April 9, 1791 ; Nathaniel, April 5, 1793; John, February 8, 1795: William, 
August 6, 1797, and Dosha, May 20, 1804. William Robbins, the second 
husband of Bethiah Vickery, was born on October 21, 1761, in Randolph 
county, North Carolina. In October, 1777, when sixteen years of age, he 
enlisted in the Revolutionary army, serving until 1781 under Capt. Joseph 
Clark and Colonel Dugan and Col. Anthony Sharp. He left Virginia for 
Henry county, Kentucky, and in 1821 came to Decatur countv, settling nine 
and one-half miles south of Greensburg, where he made a home among the 
timbered hills. Trees were cleared away and a new log house of one room 
was erected with a shed, in which was built a room for carpet weaving and 
the weaving of many kinds of cloth. On September 11, 1834, William Rob- 
bins passed away and was buried at Mt. Pleasant cemetery. The third Will- 
iam Robbins, heretofore referred to in the children born to the second Will- 
iam Robbins and Bethiah Vickery, was the father of Mrs. Sarilda (Robbins) 
Styers. 

The late Jesse H. Styers was married in 1872 to Emma C. Blume, who 
was born on February 28, 1844. near Hope, in Bartholomew county, and who 
is the daughter of Calvin and Maria (Warner) Blume, natives of North Caro- 
lina and Ohio, respectively. The father, who was born in 1824, came to 
Indiana with his father, John Philip Blume, in 1834. John Philip Blume was 
of German ancestry and had only fifty cents when he came to Bartholomew 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 839 

county. He brought all his belongings in a covered wagon. During his life 
he accumulated a farm of two hundred acres of well-improved land. He was 
many years a justice of the peace in Bartholomew county. Calvin Blume 
was also a prosperous farmer and succeeded quite as well as his father before 
him. He had four children by his marriage to Maria Warner, two of whom 
are living and two of whom arc deceased. Rufus, the first born, and Albert, 
the youngest, are deceased. Mrs. Emma C. Styers and Mrs. Mary Seiss are 
living. The latter is a resident of Missouri. 

After their marriage, in 1872, Mr. and Mrs. Styers settled on the Styers 
farm, south of Greensburg, where they lived for one year and later removed 
to a farm of three hundred and ten acres in Sand Creek township, which farm 
is located in a beautiful section of Decatur county, where the ground is slightly 
rolling and where some of the land is very rich. There were very few 
improvements upon this property when Mr. and Mrs. Styers purchased it. 
Subsequently, they bought another farm and still other land until he owned, 
at the time of his death, seven hundred acres of land. 

Mr. and Mrs. Styers had six children, three of whom are deceased and 
three of whom are still living, John died in September, 1914, leaving a widow 
and three children. Vera May, Carson and Maletta, lived on the home farm ; 
George H., who lives on a farm given him by his father, has four children, 
Howard, Harold, Lawrence and Louise; Mrs. Hannah Moore, the wife of 
Delgar Moore, near Forest Hill, in Jackson township, has two children, 
Bernice and Arthur ; Mrs. Nellie McGee lives n-ear the Liberty church ; and 
two of the Styers children, Loyley and Alpha, died in infancy. Before his 
death, Mr. Styers gave to each of his sons a farm of two hundred acres and 
reserved a three-hundred-and-twenty-acre farm for the daughters. 

The late Jesse H. Styers, at the age of eighten, enlisted in Company C, 
One Hundred and Thirty-fourth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and 
served for eighteen months as a soldier in the Civil War. At the time of his 
death he was a member of the Pap Thomas Post, Grand Army of the Repub- 
lic. A Republican in political affiliations, he served six years as county com- 
missioner. He was a member of the Baptist church, and loyal and active in 
this faith. For many years he was a deacon of the First church at Greens- 
burg. 

The late Jesse H. .Styers was a man of large vision and of wonderful 
capacity as a farmer, and of wide influence in the community where he lived. 
He was a man who was affectionately devoted to the interests, welfare and 
comfort of his wife and family. His first interest was his home and his 
family, and next to these was the conscientious performance of his duty as a 
citizen. 



840 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

JOHN W. HOLCOMB. 

Among the ablest of the younger members of the Indiana bar, is John 
W. Holcomb, an attorney of Westport, Indiana. With the blood of Revolu- 
tionary ancestry coursing through his veins, and the overshadowing influ- 
ence of the Puritanic thought of his progenitors, it is not surprising that we 
find him not only a prominent lawyer, but a leader in the affairs of the state. 
With other honors gathered in his comparatively short lifetime, this young 
man has the distinction of having been the youngest member of the Indiana 
Legislature during the session of 1899, when he represented Decatur county, 
having been elected the preceding fall. When a man transcends the average 
of attainment, a look into the history of his ancestors often reveals hidden 
forces which play an important part in his own life. In the present instance 
this is eminently true, and we shall find a brief study of the family record 
of unusual interest, especially from a psychological viewpoint. The attorney 
whose name forms the caption of this article was born on a farm in Marion 
township on February 27, 1874, but he did not stay on the farm. 

The earliest progenitor of the Holcomb family in America was Thomas, 
who came from Devonshire, England, to America in 1630, locating at 
Dorchester, Massachusetts. Born in 1590, he came to this country for the 
same reason that actuated his other Puritan friends, and it was his descend- 
ants who fought in the Revolutionary War. After five years' residence at 
Dorchester, he went to Connecticut to live, and here it was that he passed 
away in 1639. His son Nathaniel became the paternal ancestor of John W. 
Holcomb. 

Next in the line of descent, is Rufus, whose father, Luther, was a 
Revolutionary soldier. Rufus was a native of Connecticut, born in 1786. 
Stirred by the desire for adventure, he came west at an early day, locating 
near Moore's Hill, Dearborn county, where Eli, grandfather of John W. 
Holcomb, was born in 1823. When a young man he moved to Ripley 
county. His wife, Emeline Hall, was of the true type of pioneer mother, 
presenting her husband with six children. These were Daniel, father of 
our subject, Emma WilHams, of Kansas; Albert, also of Kansas; Benson, 
who lives in Arizona; Walter, a resident of California, and Dora Oldham, 
who lived in Kansas until her death in 1903. Eli Holcomb and his wife 
left their pioneer home in Indiana for a home farther West, in Kansas, and 
it was here that the aged man died in 1899. Daniel W. Holcomb, father of 
our subject, was born in Ripley county in 1852. About the year 1870 he 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 84I 

came to Decatur county. .He settled in Marion township on a farm in 1873, 
and it is here that he still lives. The tract of land which he first purchased 
consisted of forty acres, but the energetic farmer added to this as his 
success permitted until he has acquired two hundred and thirty-five acres. 
He gave especial attention to stock raising besides the usual agricultural 
enterprises. He is still hale and hearty and is active in politics, being a 
strong Republican. He is at present township trustee, and has been for 
many years a member of the Baptist church. Mrs. Holcomb, Sr., was form- 
erly Mary E. Evans, and was born in September, 1855. Their children are 
John W., the subject of this sketch; Albert, A retired farmer of Westport; 
Ada Mozingo, who died in December, 1914; Lewis, of Oklahoma; Janie 
Mozingo, wife of Edward Mozingo, of near Greensburg; Margaret Brown, 
of North Vernon, and Joseph B., who lives upon his father's farm. 

John W. Holcomb received a good general education before he special- 
ized in the studies which prepared him to become the successful lawyer that 
he is. While he was brought up on the farm, he attended first the common 
schools, and then the Central Normal College at Danville, Indiana. At the 
age of eighteen, when many young men are still in college, he began teaching, 
and for the following eight years, taught in Marion township and Jennings 
county. He was admitted to the bar in 1897, and practiced for two years in 
Greensburg, and later spent five years in Indianapolis. Locating in West- 
port in 1908, he began to build up the practice which now makes him a leader 
in his profession, and entitles him to a place among the best-known lawyers 
of the county. 

On September, 1899, Mr. Holcomb was married to Margaret Owen, 
daughter of Thomas and Margaret Owen, of Marion township, and to them 
two children have been born. These are, Mary, whose birth date is January 
26, 1906, and Mabel, born on June 7, 1908. 

Mr. and Mrs. Holcomb are prominent members of the Baptist church. 
Mr. Holcomb belongs to the Odd Fellows lodge, and also to the Modern 
Woodmen of America of Westport. 

Mr. Holcomb has not been active because of the fact that his profession 
has led him into political fields, but because here he finds the kind of activity 
that is congenial to his tastes. The Republican party in his part of the state 
is stronger because of his leadership, and the fact that he was elected town- 
ship trustee in 1914 and a representative of his county in the Indiana Legisla- 
ture of 1899, attests to the measure of confidence and popularity which his 
constituents accord him. Both positions he has filled with credit both to 
himself and to those vl'ho elected him. Although a youthful member of the 



S42 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Assemblv, he was an able representative, and his county had no reason to 
regret its choice. i\Ir. Holcomb has a keen, penetrating mind, called perhaps 
more technically, a "legal mind," yet his character has the elements of 
strength that are intellectual, for his nature is at once judicial and sympa- 
thetic. He is a good husband and father, a kind friend, a genial neighbor 
and an upright, loyal citizen. 



ALFRED M. AR]\1STR0NG. 

For nearlv a century the Armstrong family has been prominently identi- 
fied with the financial, commercial and agricultural life of Decatur county, 
Indiana. Sprung from a family of worthy ideals and ambitions, it is not 
surprising that the present generation of the Armstrong family in Decatur 
county is prominent in various spheres to which its representatives have 
turned their attention. Several memibers of the family are prominent farm- 
ers in Decatur and adjoining counties and, at least, one is a prominent banker. 
The career of Alfred M. Armstrong, of Sand Creek township, is interesting 
particularly since it discloses ambitions and ideals formed early in life in the 
neighborhood where he now lives and where they are more fully realized 
on the farm, in the happy, independent and wholesome life of the country- 
side. His career discloses in particular how he has, from a small start in 
life, increased his wealth until now, when the period of his active endeavor 
is nearing a close, he has a magnificent farm of four hundred and thirty acres 
in Sand Creek township, a comfortable house and all of the conveniences 
which present-day country life afifords. 

Alfred JM. Armstrong, who was born on November 17, 1851, in Sand 
Creek township, one and three-fourths miles north of his present home, is the 
son of Robert and Rebecca Jane (Hamilton) Armstrong, the former of whom 
was a well-known citizen of this county. Robert Armstrong, a native of 
Pennsylvania, born in 1817, was brought by his parents to Decatur county 
when three years old, the family settling in Sand Creek township east of 
Westport. His father having died shortly after their arrival in Decatur 
county, Robert was reared in a pioneer log cabin and experienced both the 
hardships and the joys of pioneer life. Early in life he was married to 
Rebecca Jane Hamilton, who was born in 1818 and who was the daughter of 
James Hamilton, a relative of the Hamiltons of Fugit township. He came to 
Decatur countv earlv in its historv and here spent the remainder of his life. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. S43 

his wife living to the ripe old age of ninety-seven. After his marriage, 
Robert Armstrong settled on a farm near Letts and later moved to near 
Westport, having, by the time the Civil War began, accumulated three hun- 
dred acres of land. He early manifested an interest in ci\ic affairs and 
politics and served many years as justice of the peace and two terms as town- 
ship trustee. He was a charter member of the Free and Accepted Masons 
at Westport and a prominent man during his day and generation. He died 
in 1878, while his brother James had died one year previously, and his other 
brothers and sisters, William, Mrs. Sallie Barnes, Mrs. .Jane Singleton, Mrs. 
Mary Falkenberg and Mrs. Rebecca Boicourt, are all now deceased. 

Robert and Rebecca Jane Armstrong had several children, James W., 
deceased, lived in Sand Creek township; John H., lives in Marion township, 
south of Greensburg; Oliver P., who is a resident of Fayette county, Illinois; 
George W., who is a well-known farmer; Albert M., the subject of this sketch, 
and Francis D., who is president of the First National Bank at Westport. 
After the death of his first wife, Robert Armstrong was united in marriage 
to Eliza Jane McDonald and had three children by this second marriage, 
Robert F., of Letts; Mrs. Mary Jane Harding, of Westport, and Mrs. Louisa 
Helen Updike, also of Westport. 

Alfred M. Armstrong, who was educated in the district schools of 
Decatur county, spent his boyhood as most boys of his neighborhood, in 
grubbing, planting, sowing and reaping. He assisted his father on the farm 
until the latter's death in 1878, and, after his death, he and his brother James 
operated a farm near Letts for two years. Alfred M. then purchased eighty 
acres, south of Letts, and to this original purchase he has added from time 
to time until he now owns four hundred and thirty acres. Sonle years ago 
he erected a barn, forty by sixty feet, and for more than ten years has gotten 
his light and fuel from a gas well which flows on his own farm. In front 
of the Armstrong residence, an attractive country farm house, is a large 
stone monument erected by the Chicago Herald in commemoration of the 
spot being chosen as the center of population in 1890. 

On July 4, 1886, Mr. Armstrong was married to Hettie AI. Dixon, born 
on July 23, 1862, in Lewis county, Kentucky, the daughter of Levi and Mary 
(Toler) Dixon, natives of Kentucky, who came to Jennings county in 1865 
and four years later to Decatur county. Farmers by occupation, they owned 
a large tract of land in Sand Creek township south of Westport. Alfred 
Armstrong was a stockholder in the First National Bank of Westport, 
Indiana and carries on general farming and stock raising. The father died 
in 1878 and the mother, who was born in September, 1837, died on May 30, 



844 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

191 5, at the age of eighty-seven years. Mrs. Armstrong, who was a teacher 
in the pubhc schools of this county, attended Hope and Butlervihe academies. 
Airs. Armstrong also taught school in Jennings county, having begun as a 
school teacher at Sherwood. She taught five years in all, the last year at 
the home school. 

Air. and Airs. Alfred Al. Armstrong have been the parents of ten chil- 
dren, one of whom, Roxina, the second born, is deceased. The other chil- 
dren are, Dewitt Talmage, born on April 17, 1887; Cassius Dixon, January 
30, 1890; Forrest Eugene, December 12, 1891 ; Giant Leland, June 20, 1893; 
Oakleigh, February 14, 1895; Lotus Lowell, June 30, 1898; Winifred, March 
28, 1899; Alary Elma and Alartha Elva, twins, July 15, 1903. Of this family, 
Giant Leland is a student at Purdue University and one of the well-known 
leaders in college life at that institutions 

Like his father before him, Alfred M. Armstrong is a loyal and faithful 
adherent of the Democratic party. Air. and Airs. Armstrong and family are 
members of the Baptist church. As a farmer, Alfred AI. Armstrong is not 
excelled an}-where in the township where he lives. As a citizen he has always 
taken a commendable interest in public affairs and, at all times, has given 
loyal and valuable support to worthy public enterprises. The Armstrong 
family is well known throughout Sand Creek township and are popular with 
all classes of people. 



JOHN LOGAN. 



The late John Logan, who, during his lifetime became one of the fore- 
most farmers of Decatur county, Indiana, was born on August 14, 1829, in 
tliis county and died, July 16, 1912. The son of early pioneers of this county, 
John Logan's father, Samuel Logan, a native of Pennsylvania, and his 
mother, Susanna (Howard), a native of Ohio, in 1818 came down the Ohio 
river by flat-boat and, after stopping a while in Kentucky, settled in Decatur 
county when the land was covered with forests. After assisting in the con- 
struction of the fi_rst log cabin ever erected in Greensburg, he entered land 
from the government and became very prosperous. A leader of his fellow 
citizens during his day and generation and a man who attended strictly to his 
own business. Of the thirteen children born to Samuel and Susanna Logan, 
there were the following: James, deceased; Samuel, Jr., of Letts Corner, 
Decatur county; John; Aaron, who lives west of Greensburg, in Washington 
township: Frank, of Topeka, Kansas; Alartha Ann, who married a Doctor 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 845 

Hitt, now both deceased; Mrs. Margaret Jane Deem, deceased; Mrs. Mary 
Hamilton, deceased, and Mrs. Rachel Hobbs, who was the wife of Reverend 
Hobbs a Christian minister, and who died in Des Moines, Iowa, in January, 

1915- 

The late John Logan lived at home with his parents until his marriage, 
January 24, 1856, to Eliza E. Hungate, after which he and his wife settled on 
a farm in Clay township, five miles west of Greensburg. This farm, which 
was improved and where he and his wife lived until September, 1886, is now 
occupied by his son. In the meantime, they had prospered and accumulated 
seven hundred and forty acres of land. Having first begun with a small 
competence, he. had at first purchased two hundred and fifty-seven acres on 
credit and, after paying for this, by hard work and careful management, he 
continued buying land, purchasing subsequently four large farms. 

Eliza E. Hungate, to whom Mr. Logan was married in 1856, was born 
in Jefferson county, Kentucky, on June 27, 1838, and was the daughter of 
John and Eliza (Gregory) Hungate, natives of Kentucky, who immigrated 
to Shelby county in 1840 and later settled in Noble township, Shelby county, 
Indiana, where they died. He was born in 1798 and died on September 21, 
1891, his wife having died previously, at the age of seventy-seven years. 
Their children were as follow : Andrew Jackson, deceased ; George Wash- 
ington, deceased ; Mrs. Cynthia Jones, deceased ; John, who lives on the old 
homestead in Shelby county; Mrs. Eliza Logan, and Catherine, the wife of 
Thomas Vaughn, deceased. 

To Mr. and ]Mrs. John Logan were born three children, Orange H., 
George Andrew and Eliza E. Orange owns the old home farm and is a 
prosperous farmer. He was born June 10, 1857, and married Emma Gregory, 
a native of Kentucky. They have three children, Earl C, Clem and Nellie. 
George Andrew, born on March 7, 1862, who is a farmer in Clav township, 
married Artemus Hayman and has one son, Harry. Mrs. Eliza E. Covert, 
born on February 23, 1870, resides with her mother. She owns a farm of 
two hundred acres in Washington township. 

A Democrat in politics, the late John Logan took an active part in the 
councils of his party and was known as one of the leaders in this section of 
the state. Nevertheless, he was a man of strong domestic temperament and 
loved his home and friends. One of the largest stock raisers and dealers in 
Decatur county, Mr. Logan in his lifetime dealt in mules, cattle, horses and 
sheep. He was accustomed to buying them through the country, then fatten 
them on his farm and ship them to distant markets. 

Mrs. Eliza E. Covert and her mother are active workers in the Chris- 



846 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

tian church, of which both are members. ^Irs. Covert is a member of the 
Department Club of Decatur county and is prominent in this organization. 
Mrs. Logan has one great-granddaughter, Leia Emma, the daughter of Clem 
and Freda (Simmons) Logan. Clem is the son of Orange and Emma 
(Gregory) Logan. On January 24, 1906, Mr. and Mrs. John Logan cele- 
brated their golden wedding anniversary. It was more than six years after 
this that Mr. Logan passed away. 

As a man well known in the community, the late John Logan will be 
remembered as of modest and unassuming manners and a man, who during 
his long and useful life, was interested in the welfare of his neighbors and 
devoted to the cause of a wholesome and healthful community spirit. His 
beloved widow is a woman of most pleasing manners, intelligent, cultured 
and refined, whose life reflects the high order of womanhood in this county. 



GEORGE W. METZ. 



George W. Metz, for many years a successful merchant at Newpoint, 
Salt Creek township, Decatur county, Indiana, and the son of John Henry 
Metz, of Fugit township, is the proprietor of a business which was estab- 
lished in 1890. During the past quarter of a century, he has built up an 
enormous trade in the village and surrounding country and is one of the best 
known citizens of Decatur county. In September, 1909, the building in 
which his store was housed was destroyed by fire and shortly thereafter he 
erected a large brick building in the place of the one destroyed. This is a 
building forty by sixty feet and has two floors, with the family residence on 
the second floor and the stock of merchandise on the first. Two rooms on the 
ground floor, however, are devoted to the kitchen and the laundry. Mr. Metz 
who has a large trade in country produce, has two show-rooms, and a stock of 
goods valued at thirty-five hundred dollars. 

George W. Metz was born on May 18, 1862, on a farm near Springhill 
in Fugit township, Decatur county, Indiana, son of John Henry Metz, who, 
a poor German lad of twenty-two, came to this county in 1854 and, after liv- 
ing two vears in Ohio, settled in Decatur county, Indiana, where, four years 
later he was married to Louise Huber, a native of Franklin county, this state, 
who was born on July 16, 1836, and who died on July 10, 1895, the daughter 
of Gottfried and Margaret (Ziegler) Huber, natives of Germany. From 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 847" 

twenty-five cents, which was all the money that John Henry Metz had on his 
arrival in America after a tedious voyage across the Atlantic, his fortune has 
grown from year to year until he now, at the age of eighty-three, owns six 
hundred acres of land in Fugit and Salt Creek townships, this county, and is 
regarded as one of the wealthiest men in this section of the state. Although 
George W. Metz was one of a family of eight children, he, nevertheless, 
remained at home until his marriage at the age of twenty-eight and assisted 
his father on the farm. In the early part of 1890 he left the farm and moved 
to Newpoint, where he engaged in business.- On Thanksgiving Day, 1890, 
Mr. Metz was married to Katie Rabenstein, of Cincinnati, Ohio, the daugh- 
ter of George Rabenstein, for many years recorder of Hamilton county, Ohio, 
a position he held at the time of the celebrated court house riot, and a very 
prominent citizen not only of Cincinnati, but a man who was well known 
throughout the state of Ohio. He was holding the office of county recorder 
at the time of his daughter's marriage to Mr. Metz. To this union nine 
children have been born, all of whom are living: Amanda, the wife of 
McClelland Wolfe, of North Berne, Ohio, who has two children, Neola and 
Oren : Elma, the wife of Howard Starks, who resides on the F. B. Kitchin 
farm in Fugit township, this county, and has two daughters, Bessie and 
Audrey, both of whom are graduates of the Greensburg high school; Chris- 
tine, who is at home and w^orks in her father's store ; McKinley, who is a 
student in the Greensburg high school, and Louise, Marguerite, Cora May, 
George Henry and Katherine, who are at home and attending school. 

George W. Metz has always been an ardent believer in Republican prin- 
ciples and a warm supporter of Republican candidates. Appointed post- 
master at Newpoint in 1896, during President McKinley's administration, 
he served eighteen years in that office, or until 1914, two years after the 
inauguration of President Wilson. He is proud of the various commissions 
he holds from President McKinley, President Roosevelt, President Taft and 
President Wilson. All of the members of the Metz family attend the Presby- 
terian church. 

Many of Mr. Metz's most sterlmg traits, the traits of character which 
have made him one of the leaders in the business life of Salt Creek town- 
ship, he. no doubt, has inherited from his worthy father. Careful in his 
business methods, honorable in his relations with his patrons, he has enjoyed 
their uncpialified confidence and support since his business was first estab- 
lished at Newpoint. No one has ever been disposed to question the intel- 
lectual sincerity or personal honor of Mr. Metz. While he has been promin- 



;S48 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

ent in the life of the community, he is, nevertheless, a man of domestic tem- 
perament, who is devoted primarily to the interests of his home and his 
family. He deserves credit in a large measure for what he has accomplished 
and especially for the worth}- example he has set for his children. 



ISAAC SHERA. 



There is no positive rule for achieving success and yet in the life of the 
successful man there are always lessons wliich might well be followed. The 
man who attains success is he who can see and utilize the opportunities that 
come in his path. The essential conditions of human life are ever the same, 
the surroundings of individuals differing but slightly. When one man passes 
another on the highway of life it is because he has the power to see and to 
use the advantages which probably fall within the vision and opportunities 
of every man. Today among the prominent citizens and successful farmers 
of Decatur county Isaac Shera, of Westport, stands out as a conspicuous 
example of what the farm may yield up to a man if he is possessed of dis- 
crimination, sound judgment and executive ability. Altogether he owns 
seven hundred and twenty acres of land, in four farms, on which have been 
erected six sets of buildings. On September lo, 1912, ;\Ir. Shera moved 
from his farm in Jackson township to Westport, where he has a beautiful 
town residence on ^^'est Main street, which he has remodeled and modern- 
ized, spending o\-er six hundred dollars on the town property, ^^'hen a lad 
Isaac Shera cultivated ground occupied by what is now a part of old Sardinia, 
his father's farm having adjoined that village. 

The story of Isaac Shera's rise to fortune is a most interesting chapter 
in the history of Decatur county. He began his farming operations when a 
young man of twenty-one years, and in 1880, shortly after his marriage, 
purchased one hundred and twenty acres, which tract is now looked, on as the 
family homestead. From time to time he has added to this land from the 
fruits of his industry, his toil and his good management. In 1890 he bought 
fifty-two acres across the road from the original one-hundred-and-twenty- 
acre tract and the next year bought twenty-eight acres, the remainder of the 
eighty-acre tract. The next year he purchased one hundred and sixty acres 
one mile east of the homestead in what is known as the Big Horn neighbor- 
hood, and adjoining the Big Horn high school. In 1904 he bought eighty 
acres adjacent to the Big Horn high school, and a few years later one bun- 




IS.\.\C SHEKA. 




S mT: r. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 849 

•dred and twenty acres one mile south of Sardinia. A little later he added 
forty acres to the Sardinia tract, making one hundred and sixty acres, and in 
the meantime purchased eighty acres one mile west of the homestead. In 
a way, there is no complex chapter in his rise to success, except that he has 
fed all the grain he raises to live stock and has always striven to do the right 
thing at the right time and in the proper way. Although his farms are all 
rented they are kept in first-class condition, Mr. Shera devoting his time to 
looking after repairs and keeping up the land. In 19 14, for instance, he had 
eight barns painted. 

Isaac Shera was born on August 25, 185 1, near Sardinia, in Decatur 
county, Indiana, the son of Caleb and Elizabeth (Shaffer) Shera, the former 
of whom was born in 1815 and died in 1883, and the latter of whom died in 
1868. Caleb Shera was a native of Ireland, who at the age of twenty-five 
came to America and settled in Bartholomew county, this state, moving 
westward to Decatur county after his marriage in Franklin county. Eliza- 
beth Shera was reared in Franklin county, the daughter of John and Cath- 
erine Shaffer, of Pennsylvania-German stock. Of the eleven children born 
to Caleb and Elizabeth (Shaffer)' Shera, six are living and five are deceased. 
The deceased children are Mary Elizabeth; Isabelle, who died at the age of 
fifteen ; John Wesley ; \\^illiam. who died in the service of the Union army in 
a hospital at Nashville, Tennessee ; and Thomas M., who was a farmer. 
The living children are Catherine, of Lebanon, Indiana ; James, of Lebanon ; 
Isaac, the subject of this sketch; Wilson M., a farmer of Jackson township; 
Sylvester C, who lives in Kansas ; and Mrs. Martha A. Watkins, a widow 
who resides at Wellington, Kansas. The late Caleb Shera was a Republican, 
but had never aspired to office. 

On November 28, 1878, Isaac Shera was married to Mary A. Updike, 
who was born on October 23, 1852, the daughter of Elijah and Matilda 
(Gilbert) Updike, the former of whom was born on August 4, 1818, and 
died on May 10, 1893. Peter Updike, the father of Elijah and grandfather 
•of Mrs. Shera, was a native of Pennsylvania, who packed up his household 
goods in wagons and brought his family to the rough timber lands of Indi- 
ana, looking into the uncertain and dangerous future with faith in himself 
and in the God of his fathers. Nor was this pioneer's faith misplaced, as the 
after years have proved. It was in Franklin county that Elijah Updike 
began life and when he had reached manhood he married and made his home 
on a farm two miles north of Westport, in this county. His wife, whose 
maiden name was Matilda Gilbert, was twice married, being at the time of 
(54) 



850 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

her marriage to Elijah Updike, the widow of a Mr. Luse, who had a daugh- 
ter, Nancy J. Luse. Matilda Updike was a daughter of James Gilbert, 
whose enterprising spirit and ambition brought him from bonnie Scotland 
to this country in the days of his young manhood. He had a reputation m 
all the country around for his honesty and integrity, and his good business 
ability. His daughter, Matilda, was born in 1834 and passed away on July 

1, 1889. On the farm on which Elijah Updike and wife settled in i8'6t 
they spent the rest of their lives. They were the parents of four children, 
namely: William G., former commissioner of Decatur county; Mary Ann, 
who is the wife of Mr. Sliera; Frank M., of Butler county, Ohio, and John 
Riley, who died in Franklin county when two years of age. 

To Isaac and Mary A. (Updike) Shera have been born two children, 
the youngest of whom, Elmer Ray, was born on November 4, 1887, and 
died on April 22, 1889. Earl Leroy, the eldest, was born on November 

2, 1885, and is a farmer in Jackson township. He married Mamie Clark and 
they have two children, Glen G. and Lucile. 

Isaac Shera has one of the most beautiful country homes in Decatur 
county. His residence sets back fifty feet from the road, and is reached 
through an avenue of shade trees and shrubbery by a graveled driveway, the 
lawn being surrounded by a beautiful iron fence. Flowers are to be found 
everywhere, and everything is kept in the very neatest condition. There are 
two gas wells on the Shera farms. Isaac Shera erected all the buildings on 
his farm and is proud of his place and achievements, as he has a right to be. 
He has improved and remodeled more farms in Jackson township than any 
other resident thereof. 

Mr. and Mrs. Shera are members of the Baptist church, Mr. Shera hav- 
ing joined that church at Westport on February 10, 1913. He is treasurer 
of the congregation and a trustee of the church. He gave land valued at 
sixteen hundred dollars on which the new church is to be erected, and also 
presented the congregation with a house and lot for a parsonage. In addi- 
tion he also donated the cash for the erection of the church and in this com- 
munity he is known as one of its most liberal citizens. He is a member of 
the Knights of Pythias lodge at Letts, and he is a Republican, although he 
has never aspired to office. 

A man who believes in public improvements and who believes not only 
in public improvements, but in private improvements ; who is industrious, 
frugal and business-like in habits ; who is honorable and upright in his deal- 
ings with his fellows, Mr. Shera is entitled to the profoundest respect of the 




JUDGE SAMUKI. A. IIONNKU. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 85 1 

public. Isaac Shera has been all of these things and today he not only is 
one of the more well-to-do citizens of the county, but he has also, in his race 
for fame and fortune, attained what is even more valuable, the good will of 
the people with whom he has come into contact. 



JUDGE SAMUEL ALEXANDER BONNER. 

The late Samuel Alexander Bonner, one of the judges of the common 
pleas court of Decatur county during the Civil War and a later judge of the 
circuit court, was one of the leading citizens of Decatur county for many 
years. Inheriting a love for righteousness and justice from his distinguished 
father, who left his home in Alabama in 1836 to escape the iniquities of 
slavery, Judge Bonner lived up to the high ideals of his worthy father in all 
things. 

The late Judge Samuel Alexander Bonner was born on a plantation in 
Wilcox county, Alabama, on December 5, 1826, the son of James and Mary 
(Foster) Bonner. His parents were both of Scotch-Irish ancestry and 
descended from families who first settled in South Carolina. About 1830 
the serious agitation against slavery was beginning in this country, started by 
men and women, first called fanatics, it was carried forward during a period 
of thirty years, culminating in the most serious civil crisis in the history of 
the world. James Bonner was bitterly opposed to the institution of slavery, 
and, finding that he could accomplish nothing against it in the state of his 
residence, he left the Southland in 1836 and came to the North, where slavery 
was an illegal institution. There were six children, four sons and two daugh- 
ters, who came North with the parents, when they located in 1836 near 
Springhill in Fugit township in the old United Presbyterian settlement. Of 
these four sons, James Foster died in 1913 at the age of ninety-two, in the 
city of Greensburg; Rev. John Irwin settled in Due West, South Carolina, 
and died in 1881, in the midst of eminent usefulness in ecclesiastical, editorial 
and educational service, as leader from 1847, in every department of church 
activity, and, for many years, editor of the Associate Reformed Presbyterian, 
and president of the Due West Female College: William Harvey died in 1874; 
Samuel A., is the subject of this sketch; two daughters, Margaret E. and 
Mary J. died in 1858 and 1864. respectively, while visiting a brother in South 
Carolina. The father, James Bonner, passed away in 1844. 



852 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Any student of history will know that the educational advantages in 
pioneer settlements of the Hoosier state during the forties, were exceedingly 
limited. Fortunately, Samuel A. Bonner was not compelled to rely upon 
the pioneer schools for his education. He was able to attend the Richland 
■ Academy in Rush county, and, subsequently, ]\Iiami University, at Oxford, 
Ohio. Still later he was a student at Central College at Danville, Kentucky, 
and was graduated there in 1849. These two institutions, Miami University 
and Center College, at this period, offered perhaps the widest educational 
advantages west of the Alleghany mountains and it would be difficult to esti- 
mate what they did for the pioneer educational life of Indiana, Ohio and 
Kentucky. Samuel A. Bonner was only one of the young men of this early 
period who came under their protecting aegis. 

After stud3nng law in the office of Judge Andrew Davison, in Greens- 
burg, he was graduated from the law department of Indiana University in 
1852. He then began the practice of his profession in Greensburg with 
Barton W. Wilson. Two years later he was elected a member of the Indiana 
General Assembly and was re-elected for a second term. About this time he 
was elected judge of the common pleas court of Rush and Decatur counties 
and served four years. In i860 he became a law partner of the late Will 
Cumback, which partnership continued until Mr. Cumback retired from prac- 
tice. In 1877 Judge Bonner was elected to the circuit bench and served twelve 
years, when, upon his retirement from the bench, he became the senior part- 
ner of the law firm of Bonner, Tackett & Bennett, which firm continued for 
several years, with a few changes in the partnership meanwhile. It is note- 
worthy and shows the estimation in which he was held as a learned and 
impartial jurist that he was unop])osed for his second term by both parties, 
and that no decision of his was ever reversed by a superior court. Judge 
Bonner loved the bench and cared little for the active practice of law, either 
as a counselor or as a solicitor. In fact, he rarely went into the court room 
after retiring from the bench. For nine years Judge Bonner was a member 
of the board of trustees of the Indiana School for the Deaf. 

Having been elected a ruling elder in the Greensburg Presbyterian 
church in 1862, he served in this capacity until his death on April 5, 1904. 
He was always prominent in church work and six times was commissioner to 
the General Assembly of the Presbyterian church, an exceptionally high 
honor for any layman and a fitting testimonial to his service in the church. 

Judge Samuel A. Bonner was twice married, the first time in 1852 to 
Ella M. Carter, a niece of John I. Morrison, who was prominent in the pioneer 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 853 

educational affairs of the state. She died on October 27, 1861, leaving two 
daughters, Mrs. Lizzie C. Wampler, and Mrs. Minnie E. Dechant, a widow, 
both of Richmond, Indiana. The latter has one son, Frederick Bonner 
Dechant, a student at Kenyon College, at Gambler, Ohio. The former also 
has one son, John Bonner Wampler, a graduate of Purdue University, a civil 
engineer by profession, who is employed by the Chicago Lift Bridge Com- 
pany. He was married in June, 1913, to Hester Light, of Chicago. 

Judge Bonner was again married on August 22, 1867, the second time to 
Abbie A. Snell, who was born at East Randolph, now Holbrook, Massa- 
chusetts, the daughter of xA.lvan and Anna (Holbrook) Snell. Both the Hol- 
brook and Snell families were pioneers in the Old Bay state. Mrs. Bonner 
is descended from eight persons who came over to this country on the "May- 
flower," among them being Miles Standish, John Alden, Priscilla Mullins and 
Governor Bradford. On the Snell side of the family, several members fought 
in the Revolutionary War. Mrs. Bonner is a direct descendant of both 
Joseph and Sarah Alden, children of John and Priscilla Alden. One child 
born to Judge and Mrs. Bonner, Anna Bingly, died in infancy. 

Mrs. Abbie Bonner lives in her home in Greensburg, where the family 
located in 1869. She has traveled extensively during her lifetime. Edu- 
cated in Maplewood Institute at Pittsfield, Massachusetts, she began teaching 
in 1859 in Holly Springs, Mississippi, leaving there in June, after war was 
declared. After teaching in Massachusetts until 1865, she came to Greens- 
burg and was employed for two years as a teacher in the public schools. For 
six years after her marriage, she taught a private school in Greensburg at the 
solicitation of a number of residents. For thirty-five years she has been 
officially identified with the women's miL.3ionary work of the Presbyterian 
church in both Presbytery and Synod, being president for seven years in the 
latter and thirty-five years in the former. 

Judge Samuel A. Bonner will be remembered in this county, not only as 
an eminent jurist and lawyer, but as one of the organizers of the Third 
National Bank at Greensburg, one of the leading financial institutions in the 
city. He was a director of this institution at the time of his death. Legis- 
lator, lawyer, jurist and banker. Judge Bonner was more than all of these. 
since he was an eminent, trustworthy and honorable citizen, a man who had a 
part in the best interests of the great county and state in which he lived. 
His life's career reflects high credit upon the personnel of the Decatur citizens 
during the last century, in which most of Judge Bonner's work was done. 
Whether he ruled over rich or poor, he administered justice conscientiously 
and impartially. 



854 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

WILSON M. SHAFER. 

Among the earlier settlers of Ohio and Indiana we find none with 
sturdier ambition and more forceful character than those of Dutch lineage. 
Here was combined a spiritual ideal, along with a sense of the necessity of 
the material, the two making such a balance that such progeny was almost 
universally progressive and constructive, and consequently successful. It 
was a common phrase among the earlier inhabitants of these states, that "who- 
ever carries within his veins Dutch blood, carries a key to success," and this 
rule seems not to hav been altered when, on- June 2j, 1850, Wilson M. Shafer 
was born down in Jackson township, Decatur county, Indiana. 

Wilson M. Shafer w'as the son of Rev. John Shafer, whose father was 
of Dutch ancestry born and reared in Pennsylvania, but who afterward 
removed to Butler county, Ohio, where, on Christmas day, 1813, John Shafer 
was born. 

Rev. John Shafer, after spending his boyhood days in Butler county, 
moved to near Hamilton, Ohio, and after some years residence there, moved 
to Springfield, Indiana, in Franklin county, where he met and later married 
Ada McCaw, which union proved a most helpful and happy one, lasting until 
Mrs. Shafer's death on November 18, 1876. 

There is a prevalent notion that the average minister is so engrossed 
with the affairs of his congregation that he is apt to neglect his own house- 
hold, but this never could have been said of John Shafer, for while he was 
at all times faithful to his ministerial obligations, he was also equally faithful 
to his parental duties. Jolin Shafer was a regularly ordained Methodist min- 
ister and was subject to all of the hardships to which the "circuit rider'' of his 
day was accustomed, yet this did not prevent him from accumulating, through 
the persistent efforts of himself and his faithful wife, the means wherewith 
to rear a large family. 

John Shafer came from Ohio about 1835 and settled in Decatur county, 
Indiana, where he bought, at a very low price, a tract of timber land and, 
during the intervals between his ministerial and other duties, cleared this farm 
and soon had it under cultivation. He prospered, and soon another tract was 
entered and cleared, and thus his land investments increased until he at one 
time owned five hundred acres of good farming land. His thought was 
always of his home and of his children, of which the following were born 
into his family: Catherine, James and John, who, after they were almost 
fully grown, w^ere stricken with typhoid fever, during an epidemic of that 
disease, and died; Asbury and Elizabeth, who died in infancy; Isaiah, who 



DECATUR COUNTY^ INDIANA. 855 

died in 1887, was a Union soldier who enlisted with the Seventh Regiment 
Indiana Volnnteer Infantr}-, and was wonnded in battle at Port Republic, 
Virginia; Mary Jane, wife of John Shaw, of Greensburg, died in 1909; 
Amaretta (McComb), who died in 1874; Wilson M., the subject of this 
sketch; Josephine (Rice), whose husband was a minister, died in Iowa; 
Richard William, now a resident of Greencastle, and Ada, who died at the 
age of eight. 

W^ilson M. Shafer, the ninth child of this notable family, was educated 
in the common schools of Indiana, but, like many of the sturdy settlers of the 
earlier days, secured his real education in the pioneer school of "Hard 
Knocks." He also attended Moores Hill College for one year. On August 
15, 1877, he married Emma Clendenning, of Franklin county, and to them 
three children were born, J. Carl, of Anderson, Indiana, who married Ethel 
Ping, born in Virginia and a daughter of Senator Henry Ping, of Virginia. 
She is a fine musician. Ada Delse, who died at the age of two years, and 
Earl L., also of Anderson, Indiana, with the Union Traction Company. 

Emma Clendening was born in Franklin county on May 16, 1856, and 
was the daughter of John and Hannah (Creager) Clendenning, natives of 
Ohio and of Franklin county, respectively. They were of Scotch ancestry 
and both died in Franklin county. John Clendenning was a son of John 
Clendenning, who emigrated from Scotland to this country and married a 
Miss Elliott, whose brother, John Elliott, was the first editor of the Western 
Christian Advocate. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wilson JNI. Shafer, at the time of their marriage, secured 
a tract of eighty acres of partly cultivated land, cleared, ditched and other- 
wise so improved it that today it is said to -be the best tract of land to be 
found anywhere in Jackson township. In 1882 they sold this farm at a 
highly profitable figure and purchased a one-hundred-and-sixty-acre tract, a 
part of the old home place, known as the Petree farm, located two miles west 
of Westport. Here the same process of improvement was pursued until this 
farm was brought up to standard in the way of soil requirements and modern 
buildings. A beautiful home was built and here Mr. and Mrs. Shafer lived 
and labored until in December, 1911. 

Wilson M. Shafer, by his honesty and persistency, had won not only the 
admiration and respect of his neighbors, but of the whole county. He was a 
stanch Republican, and during the summer of 191 1 was placed in nomination 
for county commissioner and elected to that office for a term of three years. 
After his election he decided to leave the farm and bought a beautiful resi- 
dence in Westport and in December of 1911 established his residence as a 
citizen of that town. 



8c6 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

It is almost useless to state that ^Nlr. Shafer filled the office of county 
commissioner in a creditable and honorable manner, because one should know 
that character so well-grounded through years of service in knowledge of 
community needs would not sit idle when the moment and opportunity for 
action arrived. The three years of service which j\Ir. Shafer rendered his 
community in this otBce, showed many needed and constructive activities in 
which his ability and influence was in no manner negative. 

Throughout their married life, Mr. and yivs. Shafer have been active 
church workers and, while their activities have been not wholly sectarian, 
they are members of the ]\Iethodist church. Nor have they in any manner . 
neglected their social and humanitarian obligations. Mr. Shafer is a mem- 
ber of the Westport Knights of Pythias, while Mrs. Shafer is a very ardent 
and active member of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union, of the 
Woman's Relief Corps and of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society. 

During the winter of 19 14-15, Mr. and Mrs. Shafer spent a period of 
time visiting in Florida and the Southern states. They visited many points 
of historical as well as of educational interest, and returned to Westport with 
renewed interest in life. Though they have announced to their friends that 
they have retired from active life, it is generally thought that the habits of 
an active life are so deep in the dye that Wilson and Emma Shafer will yet 
be busy with their Master's work. 



FRANCIS D. ARMSTRONG. 

Francis D. Armstrong, president of the First National Bank, of West- 
port, Indiana, is a scion of one of the old and honored families of the state, 
his grandfather having come here from Pennsylvania nearly a century ago. 
Deeply engraved in the history of Decatur county are the name and achieve- 
ments of Mr. Armstrong whose influence in the social and economic life of 
his community has been most potent and of the highest possible order. Not 
only because of his success as a man of affairs, but because of his strength 
of character and inflexibility of purpose, does his life history deserve to be 
incorporated in this publication whose function it is to record those personal 
biographies which have contributed to the advancement of the state as a 
national power. As a business man, as a farmer and banker, as well as in 
his religious, political and social relationships, Mr. Armstrong has won a 
place of leadership, and the confidence of his associates. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 857 

Ancestry plays such an important part in our lives that it seems that it 
is the silent, forceful background of every picture, and in the present instance, 
it is especially worthy of record. The honored citizen whose name forms the 
caption of this article, was born on ■March 15, 1847, i'^ ^ place called "Jericho'' 
in Sand Creek, but his father, Robert Armstrong, was a native of Pennsyl- 
vania. The latter was born in 18 17, and when three years of age came with 
his parents to Decatur county, where they settled in Sand Creek township, 
east of Westport. Robert's father died soon after coming to this state, and 
the boy was reared in a rude pi<ineer cabin, surrounded by the love of his 
mother and brothers and sisters. In early manhood, Robert married Rebecca 
Jane Hamilton who later became the mother of nine children of whom 
Francis D. Armstrong was third in chronological order. Rebecca Hamilton 
was born in 1818, and was the daughter of James Hamilton, a relative of 
the Hamiltons of Fugit township. James Hamilton came here at an early 
date, and in passing, it is interesting to note that his wife, Judy, lived to the 
ripe age of ninety-nine years. The mother of Francis Armstrong died in 
1856, His father settled on a farm east of Letts, first clearing the land in 
true pioneer fashion. It was in 1857 that he moved near Westport, and so 
proficient was he in the management of his agricultural interests, that by the 
time of the Civil \\'ar, he had become a large and influential landowner, hav- 
ing come into possession of three hundrd acres of well-improved land. He 
was also a speculator. It was one of his ambitions to be able to give each 
of his sons' a farm, believing that with this much to start with, they should 
be able to succeed in life. The esteem in which he was held, is evidenced by 
the fact that for many years Robert Armstrong served as justice of the peace, 
and for several terms as township trustee. His interest in public affairs 
made him a political leader in the Democratic party, and he was equally force- 
ful as a church member. He was always a close student of the Bible, a 
supporter of the church and charities, and altogether, a public-spirited citizen 
in his sphere of influence in all civic and social matters, using the word social 
in its broad sense. His genial, whole-souled nature found pleasure in organ- 
ization, so it is not surprising to learn that he was a charter member of the 
Free and .Accepted Masons of Westport. It is said that he never missed a meet- 
ing of his favorite lodge. The life history of this interesting personality 
might be said to close with his death in 1878, but his influence still lives in 
the hearts and lives of those who knew him, and of the town in which he 
made his home. 

Returning for a moment to his immediate family, it is necessary to 
record that he had a number of brothers and sisters whose names were as 



..■gqg DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

follow: James, who died in 1877, William, also deceased; Sallie Barnes; 
Jane Singleton; Mary Falkenberg; Rebecca Boicourt, and Elizabeth Long- 
necker, all of whom have passed away. 

With this significant ancestral setting in mind, we can approach the life 
history of Francis D. Armstrong, which we are permitted only to sketch 
briefly, with added interest and undertaking. W'ith parents such as he had, 
it is not surprising that Francis Armstrong has come to occupy, the place he 
does in the locality of his home and in the hearts of his fellow citizens. Of 
Mr. Armstrong's two elder brothers, James W., died in 1909, and John lives 
four miles south of Greensburg in Marion township. Of his younger 
brothers, Oliver P., lives in Fayette county. Illinois ; George W. is deceased 
and Albert M., the latter, is a resident of Sand Creek township. Robert 
Armstrong married, secondly, Eliza June ilcDonald, who died in 1910. 
They were the parents of Robert F., of Letts, Sand Creek township; 'Slavy 
Jane (Harding) of Westport, and Louisa Helen (Updike), also of Westport. 

Francis D. Armstrong was educated in the country schools of his boy- 
hood home, and w-as early accustomed to hard work, for he and his brothers 
helped their father on the farm. Francis lived with his father until the lat- 
ter's death which occurred when he was sixty-one years of age. His busi- 
ness ability was shown even in his young manhood, for after his father's 
death he rented a farm, and from the very first made it a financial success. 
This property he occupied for four years, combining the raising and selling 
of stock with his agricultural pursuits. Then he purchased a farm, shipped 
live stock in carload lots and managed the work until 1905, when he retired 
from his farm to his home in \\'estport where he and his family have lived 
since September, 191 2. 

On February 10, 1887, Mr. Armstrong was united in marriage to Martha 
Ellen Morgan who Avas born in 1866 in Sand Creek township. She was the 
daughter of Robert P. and Nancy Ann Morgan natives of Kentucky. I\Irs. 
Armstrong lived until 1900, when she passed away, leaving her husband and 
three children to mourn her loss. The children are Leo; Frances Shirley, 
wife of Barney Williams, and Howard Ward who was born in 1897, and 
who lives at home. Mrs. Shirley was only recently married. 

Beside the splendid residence in which he lives, ]Mr. Armstrong has one 
hundred and thirty acres of valuable land near \\'estport. He now devotes 
the greater part of his time to the banking business, having become president 
of the First National Bank in 1908, this institution succeeding a private bank. 

Outside of their domestic relations, the two most important character- 
izations concerning men's affiliations are in relation to their politics and 



DECATUR COUNTY^ INDIANA. 859 

jreligion, and they never seem quite classified until these two facts are known. 
Mr. Armstrong adheres to the principles of the Democratic party, and is a 
member of the Baptist denomination. Like his father, he has been a loyal 
member of Lodge No. 52, Free and Accepted Masons, of Westport. 

Having outlined the chief events in the life of Mr. Armstrong, the reader 
can understand why he is considered one of the alert, progressive business 
-men who have advanced the economic and social interests of Decatur county, 
and whose lives have been a distinctive impetus to the commercial success 
of the locality in which they have li\ed and labored. The prestige and respect 
accorded Mr. Armstrong ma}- best be measured by the scope and importance 
of the business institution which he directs. 



WILL W. LOGAN. 



Born in this county sixty-five years ago and still living in the house in 
which he was born, the son of a pioneer who early discerned the possibilities 
hidden in the wilderness which once covered this now favored region and 
proceeded to take advantage thereof, becoming one of the foremost and 
most influential members of the community of which he made a part; wit- 
nessing the wonderful material advancement of this community during the 
last half century, proving himself a no small factor in the development thus 
noted, the subject of this interesting biographical review very properly may 
be regarded as one of the leaders of the common life of Decatur county. 
Honored by his fellowmen by election to one of the most useful and respon- 
sible positions of trust in the gift of the people of the county and serving 
capably and well in the capacity thus trustfully imposed .upon him, Mr. Logan 
becomes one of the county's distinctive personalities, and no history of the 
times in this county would be complete without fitting reference to his life 
and to the character of his public services. 

Will W. Logan was born on a farm on the northwest edge of the cor- 
porate limits of the city of Greensburg, Decatur county, Indiana, January 16, 
1850, the son of Samuel H. and Millie (Hice) Logan, both natives of Penn- 
sylvania. 

Samuel H. Logan, who was born in Indiana county, Pennsylvania, Feb- 
ruary I, 1819, was the son of John and Isabel (Graham) Logan, v,-hose par- 
ents came to America from Ireland late in the eighteenth century and located 
in Indiana county, Pennsylvania, where they spent the remainder of their 



86o DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

lives. John and Isabel Logan were the parents of the following children: 
Samuel H., the father of the immediate subject of this biographical sketch; 
Mrs. Hanna Hice, born on June 17, 1822; Mrs. Margaret Elliot, February 
20, 1825, and ^Irs. Ann Baker, July 12, 1827, who lives four miles from 
Greensburg, in this county. 

On November 26, i8'_|0, Samuel H. Logan was united in marriage to 
Millie Hice, who was born in Pennsylvania on October 20. 1818, a daughter 
of Henry Hice, who was a nati\-e of Germany. Shortly after marriage 
Samuel H. Logan and his wife came to Decatur county, his father having 
bought government land in Washington township. Mr. Logan was a very 
clear-headed man, enterprising and public spirited and an excellent farmer. 
He prospered and presently began to enlarge his land holdings, shortly 
becoming one of the large land owners in this county. He took a deep inter- 
est in public affairs and was ranked among the leading men of the county. 
He served the people very acceptably as county commissioner for some time 
and his sound judgment and fine executive ability gave to this service a real 
value to the public. As his children grew to manhood and womanhood he 
gave to each a fine farm out of his extensive estate, the old homestead place 
being given to Will W., the subject of this sketch. Samuel H. Logan was 
honored and respected in this county and at his death there was general and 
sincere mourning throughout the whole country. He died on October 19, 
1904.. His wife had long preceded him to the grave, her death having occurred 
on October 15, 1879. 

To Samuel H. and Millie (Hice) Logan were born ten children, namely: 
Henry H., born on September 17, 1841, a w-ell-known farmer of this county, 
who lives two miles west of Greensburg on the Milford road; Isabella G., 
September 22, 1843, widow of Samuel Applegate, resides in Greensburg; 
Mary S., November- 26, 1845, widow of Will Murray, resides in Nevada, 
Missouri: John B., October 8, 1847, ^ well-known traveling salesman, resides 
at Indianapolis: Will W., the subject of this sketch; Sarah. October 19, 1852, 
married Joseph Ketchum and lives at Cincinnati: Marine R.. i\Iarch 6, 1855, 
died on May 22, 1885; Samuel, September 16, 1857, died on April 18, 1893; 
Emma J., Auust 20, i860, died on August 16, 1865, and George M., Septem- 
ber 13, 1862, who is the general agent of the International Harvester Com- 
pany at Richmond, Indiana. 

Will W. Logan received his youthful education in the Tarkington school 
house, which was situated on a corner of what is now his home farm, which 
then was the home of the Rev. Joseph Tarkington, supplementing this early 
schooling with a course in the Greensburg schools under the instruction of 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 86l 

Mrs. Samuel Bonner, a noted teacher of tliat period. Upon reaching man- 
hood's estate he entered seriously on the business of farming, a vocation in 
which he had received his father's best instructions, and, having inherited a 
large measure of his father's sagacity, has prospered, his place of one hun- 
dred and sixty acres, located on the very outskirts of the county seat, being 
recognized as one of the finest farms in the county. Mr. Logan is alert and 
enterprising in his methods of farming and keeps fully abreast of all the 
latest developments in the science of agriculture. The old brick homestead 
house, which his father erected, has been remodeled along modern lines and 
is regarded as one of the pleasantest and most comfortable homes in the 
county, a place where hospitality and good cheer ever prevail. 

When natural gas was discovered in Decatur county, many years ago, 
Samuel H. Logan organized a company and drilled a number of gas wells. 
The well on the home farm proved to be a valuable producer and at his death, 
Mr. Logan left it to his children, in trust. Will W. Logan being named as 
trustee, which trust still is faithfully being executed. The Logan wells have 
been yielding gas in paying quantities since the fall of 1887 and have been a 
source of considerable profit to the Logan fam.ily. 

On June i, 1887, Will W. Logan was united in marriage to Katie M. 
Forkert, who was born on September 13, i860, in the village of Adams, 
Decatur county, Indiana, daughter of Ernest and Catherine Forkert, natives 
■of Germany, who came to America, locating in this county, early becoming 
regarded as among the best-known people of the Smyrna neighborhood. 
Ernest' Forkert has been dead for some years, but his widow is still living in 
Salt Creek township, this county, highly esteemed by all who know her. 

To Will W. and Katie ( Forkert ) Logan two children have been born, 
Stella May. born on July 29, 1889, who married Clyde L. Jones and lives in 
the city of Indianapolis; to that union one child has been born, a son, 
William Logan; and Frederick W., June, 1892, who married Merle Wiley 
and is now managing the home farm for his father. 

Mr. Logan is a member of the Presbyterian church and Mrs. Logan is a 
member of the Presbyterian church at Greensburg. Mr. Logan is a life-long 
Democrat, his father also having been one of the leaders of that party in this 
county, and for years has given close attention to political affairs in this 
county. In the fall of 1912 he was elected to the important and responsible 
office of county commissioner from his district and is now filling very ably 
and very acceptably the exacting duties of that office, the only office, bv the 
way, for which he ever permitted his candidacy to be announced. Recogniz- 
ing the opportunities for useful public service this office offers, Mr. Logan is 



862 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

giving the very best of himself to this service and his painstaking efforts on 
behalf of the county's best interests have been noted with satisfaction by the 
people. ]Mr. Logan is a member of the Greensburg lodge of the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks, in the affairs of which he takes much interest. 
He is a genial, whole-souled gentleman and is very popular among the mem- 
bers of that order as well as among all who know him, and that includes 
pretty much everyone in the county, for there are few men in Decatur county 
better known than he. 



JA^IES THOMAS KERCHEVAL. 

America has a goodly heritage, which we should endeavor to hand on 
with value unimpaired to those who shall come after us. Only as we realize 
our own high duty and responsibility shall we be able to bequeath to poster- 
ity the noble inheritance we ourselves have received. America is in the 
making. The blending of her various peoples into one homogeneous whole 
to work out the vast problems of civilization both for herself and the entire 
world is the immediate task before us. The descendants of the original 
settlers will be expected to stand foremost among the many in projecting the 
activities of the future. Among the many families in Decatur county 
descended from the original settlers of this section of the state there is none 
held in higher esteem than the Kerchevals, the fifth generation of whom is 
now contributing to the well-being of this county. The gentleman whose 
name heads this biographical review has behind him the traditions of an 
honorable past and he and his children and his children's children are main- 
taining right honorably those glorious traditions. Mr. Kercheval's great- 
grandfather on his father's side was a soldier in the Continental arm\' during 
the War of Independence and his great-grandfather on his grandmother's 
side also was a patriot soldier during that successful revolutionary struggle. 
Mr. Kervechal has in his possession two silver spoons out of a set of six 
made from coin silver received as pay by his ancestors in the Re\'olutionary 
War. The progenitor of the Kercheval family in America was a French 
Huguenot who fled to this country to escape the oppression which awaited 
those of his faith on the other side and the Kerchevals have made their mark 
in various points in which this now widely-separated family is located. 

James Thomas Kercheval, who lives on a farm of ninety acres in 
\\'ashington township, this county, two miles east of the city of Greensburg, 
was born on the farm on which he now lives, February 8, i860, the son of 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 863 

Lemuel W. and Elizabeth Ann (Travis) Kercheval, both natives of this 
county, the former of whom was born on January 19, 181 5, and died in 
1880, and the latter of whom was born in 1821 and died in 1889. 

Lemuel W. Kercheval was the son of George Washington and Hannah 
(Grant) Kercheval, natives of Virginia, the former of whom was born on 
March 21, 1782, and the latter on September 17, 1784, who were married 
on December 5, 1805, emigrating to Kentucky, in which state they lived until 
1 82 1, in which year they came to Decatur county, locating in Washington 
township, which ever since has been the seat of Kercheval family in this 
county. George W. Kercheval's father was a soldier in the patriot army 
during the Revolutionary War. His wife, Hannah, was a daughter of 
Robert and Sarah Grant, the former of whom also was a Revolutionary 
soldier. 

To George W. and Hannah (Grant) Kercheval were born seven chil- 
dren, namely: Caroline Frances, born on August 22, 1807; Elizabeth Sarah, 
August 24, 1809; Lucinda P., April 2, 181 1; Mariah Jane, March 6, 1813; 
Lemuel Willis, January 19, 181 5; Armand Melvina, February, 1817, and 
Eliza Ann, April 6, 1821. 

Lemuel Willis Kercheval was reared on the home farm, receiving such 
education as the limited schools of his day afforded, and on March 6, 1850, 
married Elizabeth Ann Travis, of this county, daughter of Hannah Frances 
Travis, a widow, whose husband was killed when Elizabeth Ann was a small 
child. Lemuel W. Kercheval owned one hundred and eighty acres of good 
land and was a good farmer and a good citizen. He was a member of the 
Methodist church, but late in life espoused the faith of the Baptists. He 
was a Republican and took a good citizen's part in the political affairs of the 
county, though never being included in the office-seeking class. He and his 
wife were the parents of two children, sons, James T. and George W., the 
latter of whom lives in Grensburg, this county. 

James Thomas Kercheval received his education in the district schools 
of Washington township, supplementing the same with one year's schooling 
in town. He inherited his farm of ninety acres, the home farm being 
divided between him and his brother at the death of their parents. He has 
made the most of his opportunities and is known as a wide-awake, enter- 
prising farmer, ever alert to the most advanced methods in the rapidly 
expanding science of agriculture. In addition to his general farming he 
gives considerable attention to the raising of live stock and has prospered. 

On August 6. 1885, James T. Kercheval was united in marriage to 
Martha J. Privett. daughter of William and Cynthia Privett, who died on 



864 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

December 7, 1897, leaving two children, Lemuel Willis and Forest D. Lem- 
uel Willis Kercheval lives at Newport, Kentucky. He married Theresa 
Hoffman, to which union two children have been born, George W. and 
Arthur. On August 17, 1899, Mr. Kercheval married, secondly, Mrs. Effie 
M. Harrison, a widow, who had one child, a daughter, Glendora. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kercheval are adherents of the Presbyterian church and 
take an active interest in the works of that church and in the general social 
affairs of their community, being very popular with all who know them. 
Mr. Kercheval is a Republican and is a member of the Knights of Pythias. 
He is an excellent citizen and is held in high regard among his large circle of 
friends. 



JAMES LANCASTER HARDING. 

Among the leading and honorable citizens of Decatur county is James 
Lancaster Harding of Newpoint, a native of Salt Creek township where he 
has always lived and pursued the even tenor of his way. As sturdy as an 
oak tree, James L. Harding has stood as one of the leading representatives, 
in his generation, of a family and name which have a history reaching back 
to the time "when knighthood was in flower" in England, in the da3's of 
William the Conqueror. 

John Harding, the father of James L. Harding, emigrated to Decatur 
•county with his family, through Butler county, Ohio, from Virginia, and 
was one of the pioneer settlers in the eastern part of Decatur county not long 
after the red man had kindled his last fire on the hillsides of old Salt Creek. 
James L, Harding, his brothers and sisters, his parents and the thrifty neigh- 
bors of his boyhood days, lived to see a wonderful transformation in the 
rural life and the agricultural processes of the country about them. Such 
men as they know what it meant in the days agone to live in a home in the 
wilderness. They saw what it meant to fell the trees of the heavy virgin 
forest, to clear and prepare the land for the planting and then to gather the 
harvest with implements of the crudest sort. Mr. Harding remembers many 
of the achievements of the scattered, early pioneer communities of the eastern 
section of the county, the genuine frolic and fun of the husking-bees and the 
triumphs and the merriment of the log-rollings of the hardy days before the 
Civil War. It is a wonderful thing to have lived, as he has done, over the 
period when the boundary line between two epochs in the history of the 
industry and progress of the country was being crossed, and to have been in 




JAMES LANCASTER HAKDIXG. 




LOG CABIN BUILT BY JA.MES L. HARDING IN 1S66 AND THE BIRTHPLACE OF 
ALL HIS CHILDREN. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 865 

that period a part and parcel of its very achievements. James L. Harding 
himself has done his part well in the promotion of good citizenship in the 
land, by the example of his own true character and his live interest in public 
affairs and by his characteristic championship of absolute honesty and 
integrity in private and public life. He supports religious movements gener- 
ally and is a stanch Democrat as are his sons. Among more important duties 
he has served two terms as land appraiser, in 1903 and in 191 1. While he 
has done his part, also, in transforming agricultural life and opportunities in 
Decatur county, he has done so as a man possessed with a vision of newer and 
greater achievements. It is his son, by the way, the Hon. Lewis A. Harding, 
graduate of the Indiana State University, now prosecuting attorney of the 
ninth judicial circuit of Indiana and a member of the American Historical 
Association, who is the editor of the historical section of this volume. 

James L. Harding, who owns a productive farm in Salt Creek town- 
ship, Decatur county, Indiana, was born on July 3, 1842, on the old Harding 
homestead, in a double hewed log cabin, the last child of John and Susan 
(Abraham) Harding, the former of whom was born on April 27, 1790, and 
died on March 3, 1882, at the age of ninety-one years, and the latter of whom 
was born in 1798 and died at the age of eighty-seven years in 1885. John 
Harding was a native of Augusta county, Virginia, the son of John Hard- 
ing, Sr., of old Cavalier stock, who died in his native state. John Harding, 
Jr., with others, emigrated to Kentucky and thence to Butler county, Ohio, in 
an early day. In Butler county, Ohio, John Harding married Mary Ash- 
craft, who was a sister of Amos Ashcraft, and established a pioneer home 
at the Kinnard hill, about two miles east of the state line on which is now 
the Brookville & Hamilton pike. To this first marriage was born one child, 
a son, Providence. The wife of John Harding's early young manhood died 
young. He later married a Miss Abraham, and to this second union also but 
one child was born, a daughter, Mary Ann. After the death of his second 
wife, John Harding married her sister, Susan Abraham, to which union nine 
children were born, namely : Mrs. Emaline Earls, Israel, Sr., Enoch, Eliza- 
beth, Mrs. Hester Osborn, Mrs. Florence Osborn, Harrison, Mrs. Sophia 
Jane Marlin and James L., the last named and eleventh child of the family, 
being the only one born in Indiana. 

The old well at the site of the early home at the Kinnard hill remained 

intact until about five years ago, when it was filled up and a railroad was 

built across the place to Okeanna. The Harding place in Ohio embraced 

•only eighty acres and soon proved too small for the large family. Accord- 

(55) 



866 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

ingly, John Harding procured from Amos Ashcraft a tract of t\vo hundred 
and forty acres in Salt Creek township, Decatur county, Indiana. To this 
place, now known as the old Harding homestead, where James L. Harding- 
now lives, John Harding removed from Butler county, Ohio, in the month of 
February, 1839, crossing the Whitewater river at Brookville, and other 
streams, on the ice. The eldest son. Providence and family moved to Salt 
Creek township about a year later and settled on what later became known as 
the old Volk homestead. In that early time of the pioneer there was no 
drivewav in the forests south of Salt creek and John Harding and his family 
chopped a roadway out of the wilderness. When he located on the farm 
only about two acres on the two hundred and forty were cleared. Enochs- 
burg at the very western edge of Franklin county, Indiana, had been in exist- 
ence then only a short time as a frontier outpost of the coming civilization. 
A ]\Ir. Longfellow and a Mr. Beach were pioneers then living at Enochsburg. 
The town took its name from Enoch Abraham, an uncle of James L. Hard- 
ing, who came to Indiana shortly before John Harding and established a 
homestead and erected a log house on what is now the John Suttmann place 
one mile east of Enochsburg, where the old house still weathers the storms 
of the years. 

James L. Harding, who was the only child of his father's famil}' born in 
Indiana was named after his mother's brother, James Abraham. Charlotte 
Cook, who officiated at the important event of July 3, 1842, said to call the 
baby Lancaster, after the town of Lancaster, Pennsylvania, named after the 
founder of Mrs. Cook's early childhood home, Lancaster, New Jersey, she 
having named her own son James Lancaster Cook, and thus was completed 
the name of James Lancaster Harding. During the childhood days of James 
L. Harding his father and elder brothers were still busy clearing and improv- 
ing the farm where John Harding lived until the end of his days. Their 
gallant neighbors shared with them the toil of many a log-rolling on the old 
homestead. Among the early neighbors of John Harding in Salt Creek 
township, who rolled logs on his place, were the following pioneers : Ephraim 
Ashcraft, David Davis, Asa Davis, Harrison Dortan, Henry Kyle, William 
Barkley, Parkinson Barkley, Samuel Richardson, William Glidewell, Barney 
Shouse, Sr., Joseph Palmer, John JNIoody, James Moody, Joseph Moody, 
David Lawrence, Henry Lawrence, James Cook, Sr., Joel Colson, Robert 
Ross, Wash Barkley and Chris Welsh. The wife of David Lawrence and a 
daughter of Henry Kyle are said to be the first two persons buried in the 
cemetery at Rossburg. The remnants of an old wagon made by Henry Law- 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 867 

rence for James L. Harding in 1865 still remain upon the Harding home- 
stead. 

John Harding's beloved wife, Susan Abraham, was a native of Bracken 
county, Kentucky. She was born about eight miles from the present county 
seat of that county and was a daughter of Benjamin and Mary Abraham, of 
that state. Benjamin Abraham with his family emigrated to Butler county, 
Ohio, and later became one of the early settlers in Franklin and Decatur 
counties, Indiana. Benjamin, the husband of Mary Abraham, died in Frank- 
lin county, Indiana, and he was buried in the old private cemetery on his 
farm, the old Ben Abraham place in Franklin county, north of Oldenburg. 
The Abrahams were of Scotch-Irish descent. In addition to Susan Abraham 
who was the mother of James L. Harding, the children and grandchildren of 
Benjamin and Mary Abraham were as follow: Enoch (before mentioned), 
whose children were Benjamin, Jr., Noah, Jr., Enoch Perry, Jackson, Mrs. 
Rebecca George of Adams county, Iowa, and Woodson Wilson Thompson 
Abraham, who died at Casey, Illinois, July 30, 1915; Noah, whose children 
were Sarah Jane, and James of Wells county, Indiana; Isaac; Benjamin 
(Benjamin and James, ne.xt named, were twins), whose children were Sarah 
of Chicago, Mary, James, and Nancy Sherwood; and James, whose chil- 
dren were Benjamin, William, Mary ("Polly") Bowman, of Franklin county, 
Indiana, recently deceased, Nancy Young, Rachel Weston (wife of Hugh 
Weston and buried at Stipp's Hill, Franklin county, Indiana), and Nathan, 
of Iowa; Sarah Welch, whose children were James. Isaac, Enoch, Mary, 
Thomas, Abisha, Florence, Fletcher and Abe, all of Jackson county, Iowa; 
Florence Morin, whose children were Mary Ann, Benjamin and Sarah Eliza- 
Ijeth, all of Mercer county, Missouri ; Mrs. John Whitinger, of Fayette 
county, Indiana ; and Lot, who had one son, John, who lived and died at 
Maquoketa, Iowa. Of the above named grandchildren of Benjamin and Mary 
Abraham, the greater number are at this time ( 1915) deceased. The Harding 
and Abraham families both have always been ardent Democrats. John 
Harding was at one time a census enumerater in his section. He was a firm 
believer in the universality of religion and sought to live out in his daily life 
the teachings of the common faith. Of his eleven children, only two are now 
(1913) Hving, Mrs. Hester Osborn, who resides one mile west of Newpoint, 
and James L., the youngest of the family. 

The other sons and daughters, deceased, of John Harding, and their 
children were as follow : Providence, who married Sarah Ann Johnson, of 
Butler county, Ohio, whose children were Mary Jane Earls, Newport, Indi- 
ana, deceased; John (whose children are Arthur, Ella, La Mond, Blanche 



868 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

and Robert Harding of Cincinnati. Ohio) ; Rebecca Ann Hall. Paris, Illinois; 
Reuben, an attorney of Chicago, Illinois (deceased) ; ^larcus, now of Hills- 
dale, Indiana: ^Irs. Caroline Waltman, died July i. 1915; ^lary Ann Marlin 
(wife of Wesley Marlin and buried in the Marlin cemetery on the old 
Charlie Marlin farm in Franklin county, Indiana), whose children were John, 
Charles, Susan, Tamsen Green and Cicero; Emaline Earls; Israel, Sr., whose 
children were Enoch F., of Newpoint, Elizabeth Dortan, now of Washington 
state, Richard, of Newpoint, Nancy Graham, of Terre Haute, Indiana, 
George Albert, of Troy, Ohio, John, of Clarksburg, Indiana, James, of North 
Loop, Nebraska, died in February. IQ15, Susan, deceased; Sarah, and Ed, of 
Newpoint; Enoch, whose children were Israel, Jr., John, Providence, Reuben, 
Alfred, Hester Ann, and William; Elizabeth; Hester, wife of George Osborn; 
Florence, wife of Albert I. Osborn, whose children were Hester Puttmann, 
Susan Jane Barnard, Annie and John; Harrison, whose wife was Mary 
Abraham Smith, now of Indianapolis: and Sophia Jane, deceased, wife of 
Lewis Marlin, now of Richmond. Indiana, whose children were Mary Ellen 
(deceased), Mollie Strohmeier, of Philanthropy, Butler county, Ohio. Olive 
Alyea, of Richmond, Indiana, and John, deceased. 

James Lancaster Harding during his boyhood and youth was able to 
obtain a rather liberal education for the time in which he lived. He was 
educated at Rossburg and Newpoint, and, after completing his education, 
settled on the "east eighty" acres of his father's farm. The one-and-one- 
half-story log house situated at the northwest corner of this eighty acre part 
of the farm, in which all of the children of James L. Harding were born, was 
razed in the spring of 191 5, after it had been carefully photographed. The 
present Harding home was erected in 1887, ^t the site of John Harding's 
old home. 

On January 11, 1866, James L. Harding was married to Eliza Louisa 
Hennking THankins) of Franklin county, Indiana, at which time he built the 
log house and soon afterward moved into it. The parents of his beloved 
wife were Herman and Mary (Thole) Hennking, both of whom were natives 
of Germany. Herman Hennking took ship for America at Bremen, some 
time in the thirties. After spending a while in Baltimore he came westward 
to Cincinnati where he married Mary Thole, whose family name became well 
known in Cincinnati. Eliza L. Harding was born on August 22, 1844, in 
Cincinnati, Ohio, where she lived until her ninth year, and was baptized in 
the St. John's Lutheran church, of Cincinnati. She, with her parents, then 
removed to Newport, Kentucky. After residing there five years, she again 
removed with her parents, to Franklin count}', Indiana, where she lived until 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 869 

her marriage in 1866. Her father, Herman Hennking, was born in August, 
1 814, in Germany and died on October 30, 1892, on the Hennking homestead, 
east of Newpoint, at the edge of Franklin county. Her mother, Mary 
(Thole) Hennking was born in Germany, on March 25, 1821, and died on 
August 18, i8'99, on the homestead in Franklin county. Eliza Louisa Hard- 
ing had one brother, Ed, deceased, and one sister, Mary, wife of Eli Snedeker 
and also deceased. The father and mother of Mrs. Harding were buried in 
the Huntersville German Lutheran cemetery at Batesville, Indiana. 

The children born to Mr. and Mrs. James L. Harding, and the grand- 
children, are as follow: George Edward, born on December 27, 1866, who 
was married on November 24, 1892, to Electa Coon, of Osgood, Indiana, to 
whom were born six children, Walter O., Edward, Lewis J., Chester D., 
Juanita, and Mary Elizabeth; Ira Melvin, November 18, 1868; Charles Mil- 
ton, April 17, 1870; Augustus Clifford, June 25, 1872; Evert and Ella 
(twins), February 24, 1875, died in infancy; Oscar Judson, March 5, 1876; 
Lewis Albert, February i, 1880, and Grover Cleveland (Clyde), July 23, 
1884. Of these, Augustus C, a man steady and reliable in his business lives 
in Indianapolis ; Ira M. faithfully assists his father in the agriculture of the 
homestead; Charles M., a man noted for his thrift and skill of hand, manages 
much of the business of the homestead for his father, and because of his 
prudence and good judgment, his wide reading, knowledge and live interest 
in affairs, contributes his talents as a most valuable citizen in the community 
in which he lives; Lewis A. is an active man of affairs in public life, and is 
now serving his second term as prosecuting attorney of the ninth judicial 
circuit of Indiana, at Columbus. 

Eliza Louisa Harding, wife of James L. Harding, died when she was 
a comparatively young woman. The appropriate scrrpture reading at her 
funeral was Proverbs 31 : 10-31. Her obituary, read by the Rev. G. W. 
Bower, who conducted the services at Rossburg, contained the following 
tribute offered by one of her sons : 

"Wife, mother, and neighbor, she lived the even tenor of her life with 
busy thrift, and ruled her home with counsel wise and kindly, loving words. 
Her ways were ways of pleasantness and all her paths were peace. 

"Alas! that strange affliction should becloud her closing days. She 
struggled for six long years with patient hope, and endured what she alone 
could tell. On May i, 1901, she peacefully succumbed to death, age fifty-six 
years, eight months and nine days. The Master called and she was well pre- 
pared to die. 

"Loved one, wife, mother, friend — thy troubles and trials are over now. 



870 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Rest, mother, rest. We have gone down with thee to the dark valley ; but 
thou hast left us and crossed 'over the river to rest under the shade of the 
trees.' " 

Oscar J. Harding, died on December 11, 1902. "Whatsoever things are 
true, whatsoever things are honest, whatsoever things are pure, whatso- 
ever things are of good report," he thought on those things. By his life well 
did he, indeed, prove the saying that a wise son maketh a glad father. 

Grover C. Harding began his career in educational work in which he 
had a particular interest and for which he possessed an exceptional faculty, 
but like one of his first teachers in school, he had to leave that work in man- 
hood's early morning. His purposes and ideals were high and he got his 
first- inspiration for this work perhaps from a brother of Superintendent 
Jacob G. Collicott, of the Indianapolis schools, the late Harmin R. Collicott, 
who taught school at Rossburg. Lewis A. Harding and Grover C. Harding 
were two of the latter's students, and the good influence of that teacher will 
go on and on in the lives and souls of all who were fortunate enough to learn 
the lessons both of books and of life which that one man taught in the little 
school at Rossburg. Grover C. Harding was graduated from the Newpoint 
high school on April 20, 1897. In the course of his oration entitled "Value 
of An Education," which he gave on that occasion he said : 

"Education does not mean cramming our heads with 'book learning,' but 
our moral training as well. Our state would rather see us ignorant Christians 
than educated criminals. * * * Many treat the subject of education too 
lightly. They do not realize the bearing it will have on after life." He 
died on July 19, 1905. 

The eldest son, George E. Harding, died at Osgood, Indiana, Septem- 
ber 13, 1905. His obituary stated regarding him: "He was a man who 
looked faithfully to the interests of his home, his wife, and his children. He 
always sought the betterment of the community in which he lived and spent 
his days in industry and thrift." 

A general survey of the genealogy of the Harding family shows that one 
of the knights in the train of William the Conqueror, 1066, was named Hard- 
ing, or Hardyng, as it was spelled. Sometimes there is a final "e," Hardynge. 

It seems that the name, a compound of "bar" or "here" and "ing," 
means the place where an army camps. "Here" is army and "ing" a meadow. 
Much curious data is found in books devoted to surnames, and in a list of 
names which are peculiar, to say the least, we find that one Harding, of 
Lewes, was graceful. He figures in the list as "Graceful Harding of Lewes." 
Others of a like kind are "Fight-the-Good-Fight-of-Faith White" and "^^"eep 
Not Billing." Hardyng, w'ho was one companion of William, and founded 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 87 1 

the family which flourishes in Kent, Warwick, Devonshire and Derbyshire, 
was "of royal blood." One of the learned men of his time was Thomasi 
Harding, of Combe Martin, Devonshire. In the Visitation of Derbyshire the 
descent is given from Nicholas Harding, of Knewton, who had Robert. His 
son, Nicholas, was the father of Robert, who had a son, Nicholas, born in 
1662. Sir Robert, of Nottinghamshire, and Knewton, or King's Newton, 
was knighted at Whitehall, February 2, 1674. John Harding of this lineage 
was born in 1686, was prominent in the political life of England and member 
of Exchequer, 171 5. William Harding, of Surrey, who died in 1503, had a 
son, William, by his wife, Catherine, daughter of Sir John White, Lord 
Mayor of London, 1563. The son, William, dying without children, his 
sister, Mary, became the heiress of William Harding, her father. Mary 
married Sir Robert Georges and became the mother of eight. As far as the 
Harding lineage is concerned, she, of course, plays no part in the Harding 
records. Mary's sister, Elizabeth, married John Buckland, "of an ancient 
family."' Sir Robert Gorges was born of Sir Ferdinando Gorges and his 
wife, Ann Bell. One Robert Gorges was living in Plymouth Bay Colony in 
1623. He was Sir Robert, or near kin to him. After his death his land in 
Plymouth went to his brother, John. Sir Ferdinando Gorges's second wife 
(but not the mother of his children) was Eleanor, Marchioness of North- 
ampton, and widow of William Parr, Marquis, who was the brother of Cath- 
erine Parr, one of the Queens of Henrv VHI. 




HARDING COAT-OP-ARMS. 



The Harding coat of arms is blazoned : Argent, a bend sable, with three 
martlets, or, crest, a falcon displayed, proper. This coat armor is ascribed to 
the Thomas Harding who was prominently connected with the settlement of 
Virginia. 



872 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

"Colonial Gentry" gives an account of that branch of the Harding family 
which lives in Somerset county at Milverton, near Taunton. George Rogers 
Harding, who was born in Somerset county and had a political appointment 
in Queensland, was the son of George Harding, of Devonshire. The Morris 
and Winter are allied families. Nicholas Harding, "of Kingston-upon- 
Thames, Esquire," was born in 1772. His daughter, Jane, married Henry 
Pelham, of Sussex, and had Anne, who married Thomas Papillon. Monu- 
ments to the memory of both may be seen in Acrise church, Kent. Of 
Frances, daughter of Thomas Papillon, it is recorded that she was "a servant 
of Christ and friend of the poor." 

A member of the Harding family contributes the following data : "As 
I am informed, the Hardings were prominent in Virginia and in ]\Iassa- 
chusetts. In Virginia they were called 'Cavaliers,' and Augusta county was 
their home. My grandfather, John Harding, was not a first settler, for he 
was born in Virginia. He left there while a lad in company with his father, 
and uncle Samuel and others, when the country was a wilderness. The party 
came through Kentucky, staying there long enough to help clear a farm. 
Thence thev crossed the Ohio river at Cincinnati and settled in Butler county, 
Ohio, where another farm was cleared, and there John Harding raised his 
family. All were born there except my father, who is a Hoosier product, and 
proud of the fact. My grandfather often talked of that journey through the 
wilderness, of its incidents and trials, and the perilous trip across the moun- 
tains. Their principal food was the deer they killed. Their passage was so 
slow that many times they were obliged to go back and get fire to start their 
supper from their previous night's camp. They were sixteen or eighteen 
days ' crossing the mountain — slow going, the travel of those old pioneers. 
At times they unhitched their horses and pulled the wagons, one part at a 
time, up the steep precipices." 

John Harding, of Virginia and Ohio, married Susan Abraham, who was 
born in Kentucky. Her parents settled in Butler county, Ohio, about the time 
the Hardings made their home there, and near the "Dry Fork of the White- 
water." Thomas Harding was one of the Virginia pioneers. He is put down- 
in old records as prominently connected with the settlement of Virginia and 
from London, "member of an ancient family." In New England we find the 
Hardings in Massachusetts and Vermont, where they contracted marriages 
with. the Vintons, Gibbs, Waldos, Marceys and Maxhams. Rev. Alpheus 
Harding, of New Salem, Massachusetts, was in the War of 1812 as chaplain. 

We also find that the Hardings belong in Pennsylvania. John Harding, 
of Germantown, of English stock, had a son, John. Saunders and Haws 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 873 

are allied families, and the goodly number of nine daughters — all lovely girls, 
we may rest assured — and two sons is the count in one household. All his- 
tories of A'lontgomery county, Pennsylvania, have records of the Hardings 
as worthy pioneers, who always were to the fore in affairs demanding execu- 
tive ability. 

The Hardin (no "g") family of Kentucky became Western pioneers. 
Asa Hardin, the father of ten, and born in Kentucky, went to Illinois. Allied 
families include the Stith, Reager, Rucker and Butler families. Benjamin 
Hardin, famed as an orator and lawyer, was the son of Benjamin Hardin, of 
Kentucky, and his wife, Sarah, who was also his cousin, the daughter of 
Colonel John Hardin. Wat Hardin was also a famous Kentucky lawyer and 
orator. It is in Kentucky that Hardin is the usual form of the name. Steve 
Harding, of Milan, Indiana, was appointed the first territorial governor of 
Utah by Abraham Lincoln. 

An allied family is that of Barbour. The Barbours were from Virginia, 
and an early father was a burgess. Major James Barbour was in the War of 
1812. Brigadier-General Martin Hardin, United States senator and secretary 
of the state of Kentucky in 1812, was a remarkably brilliant man and a splen- 
did soldier. He belonged to the fifth generation of a race of soldiers. He 
married Elizabeth Logan. Stuarts, Chinns and Clays are allied families. The 
Hardings, as well as the Hardins, have their soldiers, bold and true, ready to 
sacrifice all save honor for home and country. Gen. William Harding is one 
of the soldiers of the family, and there is a connection with the Jackson 
family, through the marriage of Selene, daughter of General Harding, to 
Gen. William Jackson, born in Virginia. 

General Jackson's home was Belle Meade Farm, Tennessee, where he 
died a few years ago. He was a West Point graduate. Judge Howell, brother 
of General Jackson, married Mary Elizabeth, sister of Selene Harding. The 
mother of Selene and Mary Elizabeth was Elizabeth Irwin McGavock. The 
father of Gen. William Harding, was John, who married Susannah Shute. 
The general, who had three other daughters and a son, William, is called a 
scholar and soldier, and a gentleman. Family connections of this branch of 
the Harding family include the Langhornes, Whites, Kents and Campbells. 
Gen. William Campbell, of Revolutionary fame, belongs here. 

Of the Hardings of Mississippi, Lyming Harding was prominent, and 
one of the securities for Aaron Burr's appearance at the superior court at the 
time of his arrest, when he was compelled to surrender to the authorities and 
was conducted under guard to Washington, Mississippi, the seat of govern- 
ment of the territory. Burr gave his recognizance in the sum of five thousand 



^74 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

dollars, with Col. Benaiah Osmon and Lyming Harding as securities. This 
was when Aaron Burr was on his way to seize Mexico and make it his per- 
sonal empire. He was a guest of Colonel Harding at Windy Hill manor, and 
during his sojourn there he became infatuated with the beautiful Madeline 
and impetuously made love to her. "She was a niiracle of beauty," and good 
as beautiful. 



WALTER HUNGERFORD. 

Seldom do we find a family living in the rural sections of the middle 
West, which is able to trace its ancestry, not only to the earliest wars of 
this country, but to the ancestral home in the country, from which the 
family came to America. The Hungerfords are a notable exception. In a 
straight line of descent the family is traceable to Lord Walter Hungerford, 
who was lord treasurer of England under Henry VL The family origin- 
ated near Bath and Trowbridge, England, and owned many thousands of 
acres of agricultural and hunting lands, villages, schools and churches. 
Farleigh Castle, now called Farleigh-Hungerford, is the old ancestral home in 
England. The family was quite prominent in England during the War of 
the Roses, the motto on the ancient seal of the Hungerfords being the Latin 
phrase "Et Dieu mon appuy," or "God, my protector.'' 

Walter Hungerford, the cashier of the St. Paul Bank at St. Paul, 
Indiana, which was organized on December lo, 1904, is a direct descendant 
of Lord and Lady Hungerford, of Farleigh Castle. A native of Rush 
county, Indiana, he was born on a farm, July 13, 1873, the son of Orlando 
and Margaret (Knapp) Hungerford, both of whom were natives of Rush 
county, the former born in 1852 and the latter in 1854. Orlando Hunger- 
ford is a son of Calvin Hungerford, a native of Connecticut and a scion of 
an old colonial family of Connecticut, who was born on December 10, 181 1, 
and who died on June 23, 1867. The latter married Eleanor Sefton, who 
was born on October 18, 181 8, and died on February i, 1892. Calvin 
Hungerford was the son of Richard Hungerford, who was born on Decem- 
ber 28, 1788, and died in 1870. Richard Hungerford was the son of Lem- 
uel and Abigail (Beebe) Hungerford, the former of whom was born on 
February 21, 1761, and who died on February 21, 1846, and the latter born 
on July 10, 1761, and died on January 27, 1842. Lemuel was the son of 
Lemuel Hungerford, Sr., who was born on May 23, 1733, and who mar- 
ried Sarah Stewart. Lemuel, Sr.. was the son of Green Hungerford, who 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 875 

married Jemima Richardson, and Green Hungerford was the son of Thomas 
and Mary Htmgerford, the former of whom died in 17 14. Thomas Hun- 
gerford moved from New London, Connecticut, to Haddam, Connecticut, 
in 1692. He was granted a section of land and was first selectman or mayor 
of Haddam. By trade he was a blacksmith and nailmaker. Capt. Zach- 
ariah Hungerford was commander of Ft. Trumbull and Ft. Griswold, on 
the Connecticut river, during the Revolutionary War. The family's church 
burying lot in Haddam shows a massive slab, bearing the inscription, "A 
Son of the Revolution." Thirteen Hungerfords from Connecticut fought 
in the Revolutionary War and this was only a part of the family who 
served in this great conflict. Benjamin Hungerford was second lieutenant 
in the First Company of the Fourth Regiment; David was long a prisoner 
at Fort \\'ashington ; Elijah was a "minute man" who volunteered in 1776; 
James was a soldier of East Haddam; Thomas H, was captain of the Fif- 
teenth Militia ; Uriah was a surgeon at Long Island ; Uriah was a piper, and 
Zachariah a surgeon. John, Joseph, Nathaniel, Oliver and Stephen were 
also soldiers. William E. Hungerford was one of the first of the family to 
come to America. He had a beautiful home and estate on the banks of the 
Connecticut river. At his death, his remains were taken back to England 
and buried in Salisbury cathedral, where the twin tombs of Lord Walter and 
Lady Hungerford are still shown. 

Richard Hungerford came from Connecticut to Indiana, in the early 
twenties of the last century, settling in Rush county, where he took up 
government land in tracts of one hundred and sixty acres each for each of 
Tiis five children. Orlando Hungerford resided in Rush county until his 
marriage and then moved to Shelby county in 1875, locating near Blue 
Ridge, where he prospered. He became a large landowner and is one of 
the wealthiest citizens of this section today. To his union with Margaret 
Knapp three children were born : Walter, cashier of the bank at St. Paul,' 
who is the subject of this sketch ; Pearl, a farmer near St. Paul ; and Dora, 
assistant cashier in the bank of St. Paul. Orlando Hungerford lives just 
across the line in Shelby county. 

Walter Hungerford was educated in the common schools of Blue Ridge, 
in Rush county, and spent two years in the Marion Normal College at 
Marion, Indiana. He then followed farming until 1904, when he came to 
Decatur county, locating at St. Paul, where he opened_ the St. Paul Bank 
on December 10, 1904. This bank has had a remarkable growth since its 
opening for business and this growth is largely due to the enterprise, indu.s- 
try and good management of its cashier. Mr. Hungerford is a man of 



876 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

engaging personality, cordial in his relations with the patrons of the bank,, 
the depositors, directors and officers, as well as the public generally. 

Walter Hunger ford has been twice married, first in 1894, to Zora K. 
Yarling, the sister of Senator Yarling, of Shelby county. She died in 
November, 1904, leaving two sons, Donald, who was born on May 28, 1896, 
and George, October 2, 1898. By the second marriage, on December 10, 
1905, to ]\Irs. Nellie Kelso, of St. Paul, there has been no issue. Mrs. 
Hungerford is the daughter of Mrs. Cohil E. Pearce, a widow of this 
county. 

^Ir. Hungerford is a Democrat but has never been active in political 
circles. He is a member of the Free and Accepted Masons at Waldron and 
of the Knights of Pythias and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at 
St. Paul. He and his wife are members of the Christian church. They 
occupy a splendid residence in St. Paul. Walter Hungerford is known 
in this community as a fine fellow, cultured and progressive, a good citizen 
and a very pleasant gentleman. 



FRED E. MULFORD. 



After various attempts by local boys to work the hot sandwich business 
at nights on the streets of Greensburg, there finally came an outsider from the 
neighboring town of North Vernon, who has held that vocation at his will 
since October 19, 1899. This young man is Fred Mulford, who was born 
and reared at North Vernon, his birth occurring on January 13, 1874. His 
parents were Hoosiers, being natives, respectively, of Jennings and Dearborn 
counties, Indiana. Fred, as he is known by every man, woman and child 
for miles around, has endeavored at various times to better his condition 
financially, but, having engaged in a business in which he was his own boss, 
being sure of not getting fired off the job and having a family of five children, 
he did not get very far away from the sure m.eal-ticket provider, that of the 
sandwich business. 

When fourteen years of age, Fred IMulford learned to lath with the 
plasterers and follows that line of work steadily at North Vernon, Charles- 
town and at Memphis, Tennessee. He also turned a number of jobs at 
Greenburg and elsewhere in Decatur county. This led him into taking a 
complete course in architecture with the Scranton International Correspond- 



DECATUR COUNTY^ INDIANA. 877 

■ence School. He became very proficient in this line of work. He was the 
agitator and furnished sketches for the improvement of the Centenary Meth- 
odist Episcopal church at Greensburg. Though the building committee used 
other plans, Mr. Mulford received compensation for the time previously spent 
in getting the work under way. He also drew several sets of plans for differ- 
ent buildings in Greensburg, but, bcause of real estate deals, they were not 
carried out and built upon. It was because of his drafting ability that he was 
mentioned to the publishers of this work as being capable of drawing the 
maps used herein. His ability is displayed in the complete maps of the 
county and the nine townships, with all farms platted according to the spring 
assessor's platting in 191 5. 

It was during the progress of this work that a tragedy occurred that was 
a sad blow to Air. Mulford and family and the entire community. Mr. AIul- 
ford went to Indianapolis on June 5, 191 5, to submit his work to the pub- 
lishers, according to previous contract. Wishing to show his little five-and- 
one-half -year-old daughter. Alma Alleen, a pleasant day's outing, he took 
her with him to the city. From the B. F. Bowen Company offices, Mr. Mul- 
ford and his little daughter went to the Century building in Indianapolis, 
where they took the elevator for the eighth floor. Directly after entering the 
elevator, another passenger entered and the elevator started up. This pas- 
senger got off at the third floor. The operator started the car up and 
attempted to close the screen door. Alma Alleen, who was standing at the 
side and partly back of her father, seeing the door still standing open, thought 
it was her getting-off place. She hurried out, 'and, as the car was at least 
fifteen inches above the floor level, missed her footing, fell forward and struck 
her forehead. She let out a smothered scream as her other foot slipped off 
the elevator floor and she fell back down into the shaft three stories, on to a 
concrete basement floor, her skull being fractured and the right leg broken 
at the thigh. The accident, which would not have occurred had the operator 
closed the door of the elevator before starting the car, resulted in the death 
of little Alma Alleen, who lived jtist twelve hours, dying in the Deaconess 
hospital, at Indianapolis, just before midnight. At the coroner's inquest the 
passenger who left the elevator at the third floor, testified that the father was 
not at all to blame, and that the operator had failed to close the door before 
starting the car. 

Mr. Mulford's family consists of his wife, Cora, one daughter, Harriet 
Thelma, and three sons, David Sherman, Irvin Gaylord and Glen Emmert, 
all of whom were born in Greensburg. as was also little Alma Alleen, who 
tnet so sudden a death. 



878 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

THOMAS EDGAR HAMILTON. 

A great movement cannot be built on one little ship — the "^Mayflower." 
It takes a lot of ships and a big lot of people to make a commonwealth. A 
pyramid cannot be built on its apex, nor a great nation on one ship. Ply- 
mouth and Salem and Boston: Providence, Hartford and Xew Haven; 
Manhattan. Philadelphia. Baltimore, Jamestown, Raleigh, Charleston and 
Savannah are the bright and shining stars of the Pilgrim immigration to 
America; and the Brotherhood of Separationists, of Puritans, of Dutch 
burgomasters, of Roman Catholic freemen, of Philadelphia Quakers, of 
Virginia planters, of Carolina descendants of Locke and of Georgia Hugue- 
nots illustrate the fact that one type of motive makes the world akin. The 
above typical lovers of freedom whose crowning act was the wresting from 
the home government of independence for the thirteen original colonies have 
many descendants in this county, families of Revolutionary descent being 
naturally very common in a district whose early settlement followed so soon 
after the westward movement of many soldiers of the Revolution. Few of 
these families have a wider connection in this county or a more distinguished 
descent than the Hamilton family, to which the gentleman whose name is 
noted above is attached, and it is a pleasure for the biographer to set out here 
something of Thomas Edgar Hamilton's career in the county in which he 
was born and in which his whole life has been spent. 

Thomas Edgar Hamilton, a well-known farmer of Washington town- 
ship, this countv, whose well-tilled farm adjoins the city of Greensburg on 
the north, was born in Clinton township, this county, April 19, 1853, but has 
lived on his present farm, in the fine brick mansion built by his father in 
1864, for fifty years. This substantial old mansion was constructed of brick, 
and the fine old trees which surround the house and the ivy-covered 
driveways leading thereto speak volumes for the loving care which is 
bestowed upon it by its present occupants. Mr. Hamilton is a son of Thomas 
George and Eliza Jane (Lewis) Hamilton, the former of whom was born 
in Nicholas county, Kentucky, in 1819, and died at his home in this county 
of March 13, 1870, and the latter of whom was a daughter of Dr. M. 
Lewis, a pioneer physician of this county, who came here in the year 1823 
and helped to lay out the town of Greensburg. Thomas G. Hamilton's 
brothers, William W. and Samuel R., also were residents of this county. 
Another brother, Cincinnatus, remained in Kentucky. 

Thomas George Hamilton was a son of Col. William Hamilton, who 
drilled a company for service in the War of 1812. Col. William Hamilton, 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 879 

who married Polly Bernau, was born in 1792 and died in 187S; was born, 
spent his whole life and died on the ancestral home in Kentucky. He was a 
son of Thomas Hamilton, a native of Virginia and a pioneer settler in Ken- 
tucky. Thomas Hamilton was a son of William Hamilton, another of- whose 
sons, William Hamilton, Jr., lost his life while battling for independence 
during the Revolutionary War. Thomas G. Hamilton came to Decatur 
count}- in 1845 ^"<^1 after a short residence in Greensburg, where he made his 
home with a brother who had preceded him to this state, he bought a farm 
of one hundred and sixty acres south of town, where he resided two years, 
at the end of which time he bought a farm of three hundred and seventy-six 
acres in Clinton township, on which he resided until 1865, in which year he 
bought the farm adjoining the town of Greensburg on the north now owned 
and occupied by his son, Thomas E. This farm is well improved and very 
productive, being one of the choicest farms in Decatur county. One section 
of this land, one hundred and sixty acres, originally was owned by William 
Kingstone, a grant to him from the government in 18 14, in recognition of his 
services in the French and Indian wars. He sold the section for four hun- 
dred dollars, being, no doubt, well satisfied with what probably was considered 
a "bargain" in those days. Needless to say, that one hundred and sixty acres 
of land has increased in value fifty-fold since the day William Ivingstone 
pocketed his four hundred dollars. 

Thomas G. Hamilton married Eliza Jane Lewis, born in 1828, died in 
1872, to which union were born three sons, William Lewis, who lives at 
Indianapolis; Thomas Edgar, the immediate subject of this sketch, and John 
Livingston, a well-known farmer of this county. In connection with his 
extensive farming operations, Thomas G. Hamilton was the pioneer dealer 
in mules in this county, buying and selling large numbers of these patient 
animals. He was a Democrat and was prominent in the political affairs of 
the county, being one of the best-known and most influential men of this 
section in his day. He and his wife w«re devoted members of the Presby- 
terian church and their sons were reared in that faith. 

Thomas E. Hamilton was reared on the paternal farm and received his 
education in the district schools and the Greensburg high school. He early 
devoted himself to farming and now has one hundred and fiftv-two acres 
and also owns a farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Clinton township, 
this county. Mr. Hamilton is an intelligent, useful citizen, "honest to th? 
core," as his neighbors delight to phrase it, and is doing most excellent 
service on behalf of the public in the responsible position of a member of 
the county council, to which office he was elected in 1914 and in which he is 



88o DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

doing his duty honestly, conscientiously and with an eye single to the public 
good. He is an able executor and has been administrator and trustee for 
several large estates in this county, a form of service in which he gave the 
utmost satisfaction, and has done and is doing his full duty, as he sees it, as 
a faithful, efficient and capable man of affairs. 

On November 20, 1879, Thomas E. Hamilton was united in marriage 
to Ida May Wooden, daughter of the late Dr. John L. Wooden, a one-time 
well-known physician of Greensburg, whose genealogy is set put elsewhere in 
this volume in the biographical sketch relating to her brother, Elmer E. 
Wooden, a retired merchant of Greensburg, and to this union one child was 
born, a daughter, Florence M., who is living at home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hamilton and their daughter are members of the Presby- 
terian church and are devoted to the good works of the community in which 
their lives have been spent in faithful and loving service. Mr. Hamilton is a 
Democrat and is prominent in the councils of his party in this county, his 
sound judgment and keen executive ability giving to his counsels much 
weight in the deliberations of the party managers. He is a good citizen, one 
whom all his fellow citizens delight to honor. 



EDWARD W. DAVIS. 



Visible for miles in every direction, the new residence of Edward W. 
Davis stands as a veritable landmark in the northwestern part of Clay town- 
ship, this county. Mr. Davis' recently completed home, which was erected at 
a cost of something more than seven thousand dollars, is one of the most 
complete and thoroughly-appointed farm houses in Decatur county, fitting 
evidence of the enterprise and good taste of the owners. Mr. and Mrs. Davis 
are very popular in the community in which they live and their new home 
promises to be the center of much cordial hospitality. The Davis home is a 
modern nine-room house erected on a pleasant eminence on the Davis farm of 
more than three hundred acres in Clay township, from which a view of all 
that picturesque region for miles about is obtainable ; one of the most desir- 
able sites in the count}'. The house is piped for gas, both for lighting and 
heating, the gas being secured from a high-pressure well on the Davis farm, 
and is equipped with a complete water system, with hot and cold running 
water throughout : nothing having been neglected in making up the plans for 
this house to secure the greatest degree of comfort and convenience for the 




EDWAltl) \V. DAVIS AND FAMILY. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 88 1 

•occupants thereof. Mr. Davis has two dwellings on his farm, part of which 
farm lies in Decatur county and part in Shelby county, and during the time 
of the erection of the new house he and his family lived in the house just over 
the line in the latter county. The Davis farm is one of the most fertile 
thereabout and is well provided with all the necessary improvements in accord- 
ance with the latest dictates of agricultural science and, under the thorough- 
going system of farming adopted by Mr. Davis, has proved very productive. 
In addition to his general farming, Mr. Davis is an extensive breeder of live 
stock, having shipped as much as twenty-seven hundred dollars' worth of 
hogs and eight hundred dollars' worth of cattle in a year. Besides his farm 
of three hundred and twelve acres surrounding his home. Mr. Davis is the 
owner of a fine farm of two hundred and eighty acres in Daviess county, this 
state, making his land holdings five hundred and ninety-two acres in all. 

Edward W. Davis was born on a farm in Adams township, Decatur 
county, Indiana, on March 28, 1876, the son of James and Sarah E. (Braden) 
Davis, the former of whom was a native of Ireland and the latter of this 
county, daughter of Jack Braden, a Kentuckian, one of the best-known pio- 
neer residents of Clay township ; the man who built the first blacksmith shop 
in the town of Greensburg, a reference to whom may be found on several 
pages of this volume of biography, particularly in the biographical sketch 
relating to Charles Templeton, whose wife is a sister of Mr. Davis. James 
Davis was twenty years of age when he left Ireland to make his fortune in 
the land of the free across the Atlantic. Upon arriving in this country he 
proceeded to Cincinnati and for some time was engaged in freighting between 
Cincinnati and Brookville, this state. He presently located in Decatur county 
and became very wealthy, owning at one time as much as three thousand 
acres of land. No man in the county was better known than he. He had 
more than a local fame as a trader and was an exceedingly energetic and 
enterprising person. 

Edward W. Davis received his education in the local district school and 
has always lived in the neighborhood of his present home. Following his 
marriage in 1903, he moved onto his present farm, remodeling a three-room 
house, which then stood on the place, into a nice residence and in this he 
lived until his present fine new home was completed. Inheriting much of 
the energy and enterprise of his father, Mr. Davis has been quite successful 
in his farming operations and is looked upon as one of the substantial men 
•of the county. 

On January 3, 1903, Edward W. Davis was united in marriage to Ella 

(56) 



882 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Lawson, who was born in Kentucky on June lo, 1879, daughter of Thomas 
and Mary Ann (Ross) Lawson, both of whom died in Kentucky. Ella 
Lawson came to this county on a visit to the family of her brother, Frank 
Lawson, and here she met Mr. Davis, their marriage following not long 
after. To this union one child has been born, a son, James Edward, born on 
October 18, 1903. 

Mr. and Mrs. Davis are members of the United Brethren church and are 
devoted to the good works of the community in which they live, being looked 
upon as among the leaders in all movements for the advancement of the 
common good. Mr. Davis is a Democrat and takes a warm interest in local 
political affairs, though not an active political worker. However, he is inter- 
ested in good government and aids in every proper way the promotion of the 
same. 



JOHN HENRY SCHROEDER. 

The student interested in the history of Decatur county does not have 
to carry his investigations far into its annals before learning that John 
Henry Schroeder has long been one of its most active citizens, in both its 
mercantile and agricultural interests, and that his labors have been a potent 
force in advancing the interests of this locality. Mr. Schroeder has lived a 
useful and honorable life, a life characterized by perseverance and well- 
defined purpose and he has established a character as a man who measures 
up to the type of the good American citizen. To him there also belongs the 
distinction of being the oldest resident of Decatur county. 

John Henry Schroeder, who lives on a farm adjoining the town of 
Enochsburg, Salt Creek township, was born in Germany, November 19, 
1822, the son of Frank and Mary Elizabeth Schroeder, who came to America 
two years after their sc^n had located here. When John H. Schroeder was 
about fourteen years of age, in 1836, enthused by the wonderful stories of 
the great possibilities in the United States for a young man of ambition and 
energy, he came to this country, locating first at Cincinnati, where he engaged 
in common labor. He also worked in a store for five years. In 1841 he 
went to Louisville, Kentucky, where, for five years, he was employed in a 
store, and in 1846 went to Missouri, and clerked in a store at Lottsport. 
Two vears later he returned to Louisville and after a residence there of one 
year came to Decatur county in 1849, locating in Enochsburg, where he 
established a store, which he operated with considerable success for about 



DECATUR COUN'TY, INDIANA. 883 

eight years. It was at a period antedating the advent of railroads in this 
section of the state and it was necessary to bring his stocli of goods from 
Cincinnati. On one occasion when he was sending a wagon load of dressed 
hogs to the Cincinnati market and while crossing a stream near Harrison, 
the ice broke and the valuable team of horses which he was driving was 
drowned. When he discontinued his store at Enochsburg, Mr. Schroeder 
located on the farm where he now lives and which comprises two hundred 
and seven acres of valuable land. He has resided there for about forty 
years and has worked a wonderful transformation in the condition of the 
place. At the time he moved upon it there were no improvements of any 
kind and it was necessary for him to cut timber in order to erect his build- 
ings. He since then has done strenuous labor, but despite his hard luck he is 
now, at the advanced age of ninety-three years, remarkably well preserved, 
both physically and mentally. He has always taken a keen interest in local 
afifairs and has lent his aid to the advancement of all worthy propositions and 
to the raising of the standard of living. While living in Enochsburg he 
served two years as trustee of the township, and one term as appraiser and 
was in other ways prominent in the affairs of his neighborhood. During 
the Mexican War, Mr. Schroeder assisted in organizing a company for 
service and also helped to organize a military company during the Civil 
War. 

On February 8, 1849, ^^^- Schroeder was married to Elizabeth Tuka, 
who was born in Germany on September 8, 1828, and who passed away in 
March, 1894. She came to America, locating in Louisville when fourteen 
years of age and her marriage to Mr. Schroeder occurred at Enochsburg. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Schroeder were born the following children: Henry H., 
Henry, deceased; Everhard Henry, October 9, 1852, who died in 1905; 
John G., November 17, 1854, who lives three miles south of Greensburg and 
who is married and has four sons, John, Edward, Frank and Gregory ; John 
Ambrosius, deceased; Herman Henry, October 24, 1858, was married, July 
13, 1897, to Rosa Sandrock; Mrs. Alary Elizabeth Northorst, of New 
Albany, is the mother of three children, Joseph, Rosa and Henry; Louisa 
Zizilia, December, 1862; Mrs. Annie Frances Thea, of Posey county, who 
has seven children, Rosa, Elizabeth, Joseph, Clara, Frances, Julia and 
Anthony; Rosa Clara Wessels died in Louisville, Kentucky, on November 
23, 1899, at the age of thirty-two years, leaving four children, Lizzie, Bennie, 
Edward and Rosa. John Henry Schroeder also has four great-grandchil- 
dren, namely: Joseph and Leonard, sons of his grandson, John; and Rich- 
ard and Paul, sons of Joseph Morthorst. 



884 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Mr. Schroeder has been a life-long adherent of the principles of the 
Democratic party, having cast his first Presidential vote for Henry Clay and 
has voted for every Democratic presidential candidate since. His religious 
affiliation is with the Enochsburg Catholic church, of which he is a liberal 
supporter. 

As the oldest resident of Decatur county, J. H. Schroeder has seen his 
county develop from a sparsely settled community to its present prosperous 
condition, and has performed a very important part in helping to bring about 
the advanced standing of the locality. Though now in the evening of life, he 
is still hale and hearty and enjoys life with the zest of a far younger man. 
His long residence in this section has given him a great number of friends, 
bv whom he is held in the highest esteem for his many commendable traits 
of character. 



OMER T. IMANLIEF. 



Ripley county, Indiana, has furnished many of the present generation 
of enterprising farmers in Decatur county. It is not difficult to explain why 
many of the more ambitious young farmers of Ripley county have come to 
Decatur, the principal reason being, according to all loyal Decatur county 
folk, that the soil in Decatur county is far superior to that in Ripley county. 
Of the many native-born sons of Ripley county, who have sought a home 
and fortune in Decatur county, Omer T. Manlief, of INIarion township, who 
came here more than forty years ago, may be mentioned. 

Omer T. Manlief, who owns one hundred and sixty acres of well- 
improved land in Marion township, Decatur county, was born on July 17, 
1849, in Ripley county, Indiana, the son of Benjamin and Catherine (Ruble) 
Manlief. of German descent, both of whom died in Ripley county. 

After coming to Decatur county in 1873, at the age of twenty-four, 
Omer E. ^Manlief purchased eighty acres of land at ten dollars an acre, 
paying cash for the tract. At this time the land was covered with timber. 
Immediately after purchasing this tract, he built a log house of two rooms 
in which he and his family lived for twenty years, or until they built their 
present home. During the first year or two after coming to Decatur county, 
Mr. Manlief rented cleared land, which he cultivated and worked at odd 
times and at night to clear his own land. In 1910 he purchased eighty 
acres of land situated across the road from his original tract, paying for the 
same twenty-four hundred dollars. He ordinarilv has about fortv acres of 



DECATUR COUNTY^ INDIANA. ' 885 

corn and about the same amount of wheat. He now has a good home with 
well-kept and well-painted buildings and with many fruit and shade trees, 
which add greath' to the attractiveness of the place. 

In 1872 Omer T. Manlief was married to Mary Elizabeth Suter, of 
Dearborn county, who was born on January 13, 1852, the daughter of 
Joseph and Sarah Ann Suter. To this union three children have been born, 
all of whom are married and now have children of their own; Mrs. Edna 
Leo Lena Surface, of Westport, who has five children, Omer, OUie, Anna, 
Erra and Birdie; Clyde, a farmer of Jennings county, who married Mary 
Shumach and has one daughter, Martha ; and Carl, who farms at home, 
married Stella Rathburn and has two children, Woodrow Lowson and Ruth. 

Mr. Manlief is a Democrat 1jut has never been active in politics, pre- 
ferring to devote his time and his energy to his own personal and private 
business. The Manlief family are all members of the Baptist church and 
Mr. Manlief is a liberal contributor to the support of this faith. 

By prodigious industry, most economical living and careful manage- 
ment, Omer T. Manlief has accumulated a snug fortune in farm property 
and is recognized today as one of the foremost citizens of Marion township. 
He well deserves the confidence of the public because he has won that 
confidence by his own personal efiforts. 



JOHN R. COLLINS. 



During recent years much has been written and said regarding intensive 
farming in this country. The apparent inexhaustibility of the soil of this 
favored land for generations caused the tillers of the soil to display an 
almost disdainful laxity in the matter of the proper upkeep of the same, with 
the very natural result that in time many once valuable farms became worth- 
less, by reason of being worn out. and were abandoned. Then came the 
demand for scientific fertilization and intensive farming; agriculturists all 
over the land began to wake up to the importance of keeping the soil alive, and 
the result has been the raising of crops that would have been deemed impos- 
sible b\' the pioneers, even in the davs of the soil's virgin fertility. Much 
has been done along this line in Decatur county, though it must be admitted 
that there still remains very much yet to be done. There is one farmer, 
however, who has cultivated his land to such advantage that he has become 
recognized among his neighbors as the most successful farmer in the county ; 



886 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

a measure of praise which lie by no means courts, but which is ungrudgingly 
given him by those who have noted with much interest the resuhs of his 
labors. Though the possessor of but a small acreage, his place consisting of 
eighty acres in all, John R. Collins, of Salt Creek township, is widely known 
as the man who raises the bumper crops in this county and his methods have 
attracted much attention, the spirit of emulation thus created undoubtedly 
having resulted in the elevation of the standards of farming throughout the 
whole countv. As an example of the intensive methods adopted by Mr. 
Collins, it may be mentioned that at one time he spent one thousand dollars 
for tile with which to drain a tract of forty acres. Those who may have 
looked askance at such an apparently extravagant expenditure altered their 
opinion when this tract was found to be producing seventy-five bushels of 
corn to the acre. As this was written this tract was bearing a luxuriant stand 
of wheat which promised to break all local records for yield. In 19 12 Mr. 
Collins sold seed corn for two dollars a bushel to his admiring neighbors and 
he has raised as high as eighty bushels of corn to the acre. The title of 
most successful farmer in Decatur county, therefore, very properly may 
be applied to him, notwithstanding his modest disclaimer of any such dis- 
tinction. 

John R. Collins was born in Jennings county, this state, near the town 
of Brewersville, on July 29, 1857, the son of John Roberts Parsons and 
Nancy Jane (Roszell) Collins, the former of whom was born in 1823 and 
died on July 29, 1911, and the latter of whom was born on June 2, 1832, and 
died on July 13, 1895. John Roberts Parsons Collins was a native of Scot- 
land and, with a sister, was brought to this country when quite young by his 
mother. The father was to follow his family to this country on a vessel 
sailing later, but never again was heard from and it was supposed that he was 
lost at sea. Mr. Collins's mother died shortly after coming to America and 
her son and daughter were reared by their maternal grandparents, who 
some years before had come to this country, locating at Oxford, Ohio. There 
J. R. P. Collins lived until he was fifteen years of age, at which time he 
moved to Jennings county, this state. He had been apprenticed to the car- 
penter trade and upon locating in Jennings county he worked at this trade 
until the year 1862. in which year he came to Decatur county, locating in 
Salt Creek township, buying the farm on which his son, John R., now lives. 
On this place he built a log cabin and lived there until 1865, moving in that 
year to Pennington, where he farmed and worked at his trade the rest of his 
life. His death occurred in a hospital at Madison. 

Nancy Tane( RoszelH Collins was born in Greensburg, this countv. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 887 

daughter of John Roszell, the first blacksmith in the town of Greensburg. 
John Roszell was a native of Kentucky, whose father lived to be one hun- 
dred years old He came to this county about the year 1822 and built the 
first blacksmith shop in the then hamlet of Greensburg. Upon arriving here 
he turned his wagonbed upside down, erecting around the same a barricade of 
brush, thus creating his first shelter in Decatur county. He married a Miss 
Brockman, cleared a tract of land for a home and became one of the best- 
known pioneer settlers of the county. 

To John Roberts Parsons and Kancy Jane (Roszell) Collins were born 
nine children, namely: Ida, born on August 11, 1855, married W. R. 
Copper, of New Pennington, this county, and died in March, 1905; John R., 
the immediate subject of this sketch; James R., who served five years in the 
United States army, then became a conductor on the San Francisco street 
railway, serving in such a capacity for fourteen years, and has not been heard 
of since the San Francisco earthciuake, in 1906; Anna B., principal of one of 
the ward schools at Indianapolis ; Carvel H., of Eaton, Blackford county, 
Indiana; Minnie, of Indianapolis, a teacher in the schools of Elwood, this 
state; Albert, a successful contractor and builder in the Isle of Pines, off the 
coast of Cuba, and Grace, who married Edward Hatfield, of Indianapolis, 
and has three children. 

On September 10, 1891, John R. Collins was united in marriage to 
Sophia Rachel Schilling, who was born in Salt Creek township, this county, 
daughter of William and Minnie (Harris) Schilling, natives of Germany 
and old residents of Salt Creek township, the former of whom was born in 
1836 and died in 1899 and the latter of whom was born in 1836 and died 
in 1907. who were the parents of eight children, as follow: Sophia R., who 
married Mr. Collins ; Henry, deceased ; William, who lives on the old Schil- 
ling farm; Mrs. Rosa Cullicut, of this county; Mrs. Minnie Bradewater, of 
Salt Creek township, this county; Edward, of the same township; Lucy, 
deceased, and John, also of Salt Creek township. 

To John R. and Sophia Rachel (Schilling) Collins have been born six 
children, William, aged twenty-two, who is at home ably assisting his father 
in the management of the farm ; Edward, Ida, Minnie, Bertha and Harry, 
at school. 

Mr. and Mrs. Collins are members of the Methodist church and their 
children have been reared in that faith. Mr. Collins is quite independent in 
his political views, ever giving the best citizens preference in making up his 
ballot. He is not a member of any of the various lodges, believing that 
home is man's best "lodge," and takes great pleasure and comfort in his 



888 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

home. He and his good wife take a warm interest in the church and social 
affairs of their home community and no couple in that part of the county 
are held in higher regard than they. As pointed out in the beginning of this 
narrative, there is no better farmer anywhere in Salt Creek township than 
Mr. Collins, and it may be said with ec]ual truth that no man in the township 
is more popular than he. or held in higher esteem. 



GEORGE F. REDELMAN. 

One of the leading financial institutions of the eastern part of Decatur 
county is the First State Bank, of New Point, which was organized in 1906 
as a national bank and on January i, 1912, was converted into a state bank. 
The institution is housed in a commodious brick building owned by the 
company and is capitalized at twenty-five thousand dollars. It now has a 
surplus and undivided profits of thirty-five hundred dollars and deposits of 
one hundred thousand dollars. The officers of the bank include John Hoff, 
president ; J. A. Meyer, vice-president, and George F. Redelman, cashier. 
The directors, besides the officers, include Edward A. Buckley, T. M. Clark, 
Joseph Kramer, J. H. Metz, Sr., Charles Risinger and Peter P. Schuh. 
During the last four years none of the officers has had more to do with the 
success and growth of this bank than its cashier, Mr. Redelman. 

George F. Redelman was born on November 19, 1884, in Greensburg, 
this county, son of Henry M. and Sarah A. (Herman) Redelman, the 
former of whom was born in 1854, near Millhousen, this county, on a farm, 
son of Matthias Redelman, a native of Germany, and the latter of whom 
was born near Harris City, in Decatur county. Mrs. Sarah- A. (Herman) 
Redelman's parents, however, were natives of Germany. Henry M. Redel- 
man is an extensive farmer and stockman of Marion township, whose life 
history is told elsewhere in this volume. 

Receiving his early education in the Slabtown school, in Marion town- 
ship, George F. Redelman later attended the Hamburg schools, going to 
school in the same building and receiving instruction from the same teacher 
as did his father. This venerable teacher was Theodore Wilmer. After 
graduating from the Slabtown school when fourteen years of age, Mr. 
Redelman worked on the farm until twenty years old, at which time he 
received a license to teach school. Instead of teaching, however, he went to 
Indianapolis as a student of the Vorhees Business College, from which 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 889 

institution he was graduated in 1905. Subsequently he worked as a book- 
keeper and collector for the Badger Furniture Company at Indianapolis for 
one year, and was then employed on the Indianapolis Star for some time. 
In the fall of igo6 he returned to Decatur county, going to Greensburg as 
bookkeeper of the Greensburg National Bank, and on July 5, 191 1, took 
charge of the First State Bank at New Point. 

On June 18, 1913, Mr. Redelman was married to Lena Spitzmesser, of 
Greensburg, daughter of Leopold and Caroline Spitzmesser, to which union 
one son has been born, Robert George, born on April 19, 1914. 

A Democrat in politics, Mr. Redelman has never taken an active part 
in the councils of his party. He and his wife are members of the Enochs- 
burg Catholic church. Fraternally, he is a member of the Knights of 
Columbus and the Knights of St. John at Greensburg. 

George F. Redelman is still a very young man to be charged with 
important financial responsibility, and this proves better than anything else 
the estimation in which he is held by tl-;p people of this section. He enjoys 
not only the confidence and respect of the officers and directors of the First 
State Bank at New Point, but he has also maintained, since his connection 
with the bank, cordial relations with the patrons of the institution and the 
public generally and well deserves the high esteem in which he is held by the 
people of this community. 



GEORGE A. LOGAN. 



The most pretentious country house to be found anywhere in the west- 
ern part of Decatur county, Indiana, is that located on the farm of George 
A. Logan in Clay township. This house, of nineteen rooms, is finished 
throughout in native wood, cut and seasoned on the farm, the walls made of 
bricks of clay dug on the farm, and recjuired five years for construction, 
being com.pleted about 1889. The rooms are finished in wild chetry, walnut, 
ash and quartered-oak, and the po])lar doors are cut from native wood. 
Logs for the construction of the house were hauled eight miles to Burney, 
and the rock was quarried near Milford. Incidental material for furnishings 
was hauled to Greensburg and then brought back to the farm. In 191 3 a 
beautiful concrete and brick veranda was added to the house, a veranda 
which circles front and sides of the house and gives it a most imposing 
appearance. This magnificent place is located on a farm of two hundred 



890 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

and seventy-five acres of land which was given to INIr. Logan by his father, 
but at that time it had no improvements. Since that time Mr. Logan has 
erected two large barns, a double corn-crib, tool-house and garage, all of 
which are painted yellow. The proprietor of this splendid estate also owns 
seventy-five acres north of the home farm. 

George A. Logan, who may be regarded as the author and finisher of 
this beautiful countryside home, was born on March 7, 1862, on a farm 
one-fourth mile from his present home, the son of John and Eliza A. 
(Hungate) Logan, the former of whom was born on August 14, 1829, in 
Decatur count}', Lidiana, and died on July 16, 1912, and the latter of whom 
was born in Jefiferson county, Kentucky, on June 7, 1838. The late John A. 
Logan was a son of early pioneers of Decatur county. Samuel and Susanna 
(Howard) Logan, natives of Penns5'lvania, who, in 1818, came down the 
Ohio river on a flat boat and who. after stopping for a time in Kentucky, 
settled in this county. After constructing a rude log cabin, they entered land 
from the government, and during their lives became very prosperous. Sam- 
uel and Susanna Logan were the parents of thirteen children, among whom 
were James, deceased; Samuel, Jr., of Letts Corners, Decatur county; John, 
of Greensburg; Aaron, who lives west of Greensburg, in Washington town- 
ship; Frank, of Topeka, Kansas; Martha Ann, who married a Doctor Hitt, 
now both deceased ; Mrs. Margaret Jane Deen, deceased ; Mrs. Mary Hamil- 
ton, deceased ; Mrs. Rachel Hobbs, who was the wife of the Rev. Mr. 
Hobbs, a Christian minister, and who died at Des Moines, Iowa, in January, 
19 1 5. The late John Logan was married to Eliza A. Hungate on January 
24, 1S56, and after his marriage settled on a farm in Clay township, five 
miles west of Greensburg. They lived on the farm until in September. 
1886, accumulating in the meantime seven hundred and forty acres of land. 
Mrs. Eliza E. (Hungate) Logan was a daughter of John and Eliza (Gre- 
gory) Htmgate. natives of Kentucky, who emigrated to Shelby county, 
Indiana, in 1840, and who later settled in Noble township, that county, 
where they died. John Hungate was born in 1798, and died on September 
21, 1 89 1. His wife had passed away previously, at the age of seventy- 
seven. They were the parents of the following children : Andrew Jackson, 
George Washington and Mrs. Cynthia Jones, deceased: John, who lives on 
the old homestead in Shelby county, Indiana; Mrs. Eliza Logan, and Cath- 
erine, the wife of Thomas Vaughn, deceased. John Logan and wife were 
the parents of three children, Orange, George Andrew and Eliza. Orange 
owns the old homestead farm. He was born on June 10, 1857. He mar- 
ried Emma Gregory, a native of Kentucky, and they have two children. 



DECATUR COUNTY^ INDIANA. 89 1 

Clem and Nellie. Eliza, born February 23, 1870, lives with her mother. She 
owns a farm of two hundred acres in Washington township. 

After receiving a liberal education in the public schools of Decatur 
county, Indiana, George Logan took up farming and was so engaged until 
his marriage, on July 22, 1886, to Mary Hayman, a native of Shelby county, 
Indiana, daughter of Alfred and Minerva. (Knight) Hayman, the former 
of whom was born on July 7, 1826, and who died June 29, 1887, and the 
latter of whom was born on October 16, 183 1, and who died on May 8, 1872 
Alfred and Minerva Hayman were married on March 23, 1856, in Shelby 
county, this state, and to this union were born two children ; Everett, born on 
August 26, 1859, who is a resident of ^^^aldron, and Mrs. Mary Logan, who 
was born on September 17, 1863. 

Mr. and Mrs. George A. Logan have only one child, Harrison A., who 
was born on June 14, 1887. He lives at home with his parents on the farm 
and is engaged in farming with his father, who is extensively engaged in 
dairying. The dairy is located on the north farm, where Mr. Logan has a 
herd of Jerseys, varying from twenty to thirty in number, and ships his 
products to the Polk Dairy Company, of Indianapolis. 

Mr. Logan is a Democrat, but has never been active in political affairs, 
preferring to devote his entire time and attention to his agricultural interests. 
Mrs. Logan is a member of the ^Methodist Episcopal church at Adams and 
Mr. Logan is identified with Milford Lodge No. 94, Free and Accepted 
Masons. His son, Harrison A., is a member of the same Masonic fraternity, 
and of Adams lodge of Odd Fellows, and of Greensburg lodge. Fraternal 
Order of Eagles, and Greensburg Lodge, Improved Order of Red Men. 

Mr. and Mrs. Logan are hospitable entertainers, and Mr. Logan is 
known in this community and throughout Decatur county as a hail fellow, 
well met; broad-minded, good-hearted, a hustler and an optimist. 



RANDOLPH STARK. 



To attain a worthy citizenship by a life that is always honored and 
respected even from childhood deserves more than naming. One may take 
his place in public life through some vigorous stroke in public politics and 
even remain in the hearts of friends and neighbors, but to take the same 
position by dint of the practice of an upright life and without a craving fr 
-exaltation and popularity, is worthy of the highest praise and commendation. 
Probably no citizen of Decatur county occupies a higher place in theesteem 



892 DECATUR COUJifTY, INDIANA. 

of the community at large than "Uncle"' Randolph Stark, of Xew Point, 
Salt Creek township. He is respected and honored by all who know him 
because of his exemplary daily life, each day having been one above criticism 
and passed upon in the light of true manhood. Strong and forceful in his 
relations w'ith his fellowmen, he has not only made his presence felt, but has 
also gained the good will and confidence of his associates and the general 
public, ever retaining his reputation among men for integrity and high 
character, no matter how trying the circumstances, and never losing that 
dignity which is the birthright of a gentlem.an. 

Randolph Stark, now retired and living in the pleasant little village 
of New Point, was born on October 14, 1838, in Clermont county, Ohio, 
and is the son of John and Charity (Meeker) Stark, natives of New York 
and New Jersey, respectively. John Stark was the son of John Stark, whose 
father was Gen. John Stark, of Revolutionary fame, whose words, "There 
are the redcoats ! We must beat them today or Mollie Stark is a widow," are 
historical. In 1850 John and Charity Stark came from Ohio to Indiana, 
settling in Salt Creek township, Decatur county, where they resided nearly 
a half century, their deaths occurring in 1889. They were the parents of the 
following children : Mary Jane, deceased ; Mrs. Sarah Jane Hollensbe, of 
Clarksburg; Mrs. Harriet INIorrow, of Hidalgo, Illinois; Leander, who died 
in 1891 ; Alvira. deceased; Randolph, the subject of this sketch; James, who 
died in 1912; William H.. of New Point, this county; John P., who died at 
the age of twelve years ; Charles Foster, deceased ; and Mrs. ]\Iaria Sample 
and Mrs. ]\Ielissa Freeland, twins, both deceased. John Stark followed the 
dual occupation of farmer and lumberman and was successful in both. He 
was a man of splendid qualities of character and stood high in the com- 
munity where he so long resided. 

Randolph Stark w-as reared under the parental roof and received his 
education in the district schools. At the early age of eighteen years, he 
engaged in the lumber business on his own account and was in partnership 
with his brother, Leander, for many years. They owned the New Point 
mills for over twenty years and at one time operated many mills scattered 
over different counties, the firm of Stark Brothers being one of the most 
important concerns of its kind in southern Indiana. So widely recognized 
is Mr. Stark's connection with the growth of New- Point that he is fre- 
quently called "The Father of New Point." He has always had the keenest 
interest in the w-elfare of this community and in many substantial ways has 
contributed to its welfare and upbuilding. After sixty years of an honored 
and successful career, he has retired from active business affairs, but. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. , S93 

although nearly seventy-seven years of age, is still hale and hearty. One of 
the interesting and pleasing incidents in Mr. Stark's later life was the post 
card shower of which he was the recipient on November 13, 1910, the occa- 
sion being his seventy-second birthday anniversary. These cards, many 
hundreds in number, represented every state in the Union and were received 
from Odd Fellow lodges, war veterans, various publications and many emi- 
nent public men, including President Taft, ex-Vice-President Charles W. 
Fairbanks, Senator Albert J. Beveridge and other prominent men. One of 
the fine things in connection with Mr. Stark's life is the fact that he has 
never uttered an oath nor touched liquor or tobacco in any form. He is 
also a total abstainer from coffee and tea. 

At the outbreak of the Civil War, Randolph Stark enlisted as a private 
in the One Hundred and Thirty-fourth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infan- 
try, with which he served one hundred days and later, when General Morgan 
made his famous raids through southern Indiana, Mr. Stark again enlisted, 
assisting in repelling the invaders. 

On March 13, 1864, Randolph Stark was married to Rosetta Showalter, 
who was born in Jackson county, Indiana, on August 3, 1844, the daughter of 
Isaac and Mary (Hollensbe) Showalter, natives of England. Mrs. Stark's 
parents eloped from England when Mary Showalter was only fourteen years 
of age. The Showalters later came to America, locating in Decatur county, 
about 1845. Late in ]Mr. and Mrs. Stark's lives there were born to them 
two children, a son and a daughter, the elder, the son, dying in infancy. 
The daughter, Cora, is a talented musician, having studied under the most 
competent instructors, both in Cincinnati and Indianapolis. For the past 
two years she has been conducting musicales and recitals in Kentucky, Ohio, 
Indiana and Illinois. Highly accomplished as a musical performer, and 
equally successful as a teacher, she is esteemed highly in musical circles of the 
cities where she is called. 

Mr. Stark has always given his support to the Republican party and 
has been honored by his fellow citizens, having served as trustee of Salt 
Creek township for six years. His fraternal relations are with the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, he belonging to the lodge of that order at 
New Point. He assisted in building the New Point Christian church and 
"has been one of its most faithful and earnest supporters. He takes an active 
part in the affairs of this church and served the communion for forty years. 
Mr. Stark possesses a rare equanimity of temper and is noted for his kind- 
ness of heart, qualities which have won for him the sincere regard of all 
who know him. His nature is genial and cordial and his manner attractive. 



894 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

His mind is rich and cultivated b}- a life of reading and observation. He 
has no personal enemies and provokes no one to enmity, for the simplicity 
and cordiality of his nature and manner invite friendship and forbid enmity. 
He is a hospitable man and cordially responds to all social claims, his home, 
one of the most commodious and attractive in New Point, being favorite- 
stopping places for many friends. 



SAMUEL CLARK. 



When the pioneer emigrant, John Clark, came to Decatur county, 
Indiana, with his wife in 1823, and entered a quarter section of land in 
jMarion township, he might not have been conscious of the fact that he was 
here establishing a homestead for his posterity which would remain in the 
famil}' at least to the fourth generation. The present farm of Samuel Clark 
in Marion township, which comprises three hundred and ninety-two acres, 
includes the quarter section of land entered by John Clark, his grandfather, 
in 1824. Since the latter's time this farm has been owned successfully by 
the son, William Clark, and at present by the grandson, Samuel, the subject 
of this sketch. 

Samuel Clark, who now lives in Greensburg, but supervises his farm,^ 
was born on September 16, 1859, the son of William and Rebecca (Cassel- 
dine) (Newman) Clark, the former of whom was born on September 22, 
1807, and who died, April i, 1893, and the latter of whom was born, June 
10, 1817, and who died about three years before the passing of her husband. 
on November 14, 1890. Born at Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, Rebecca Cassel- 
dine was descended originally from North Carolina stock. Her husband, 
who was born in Bourbon county, Kentucky, was the son of John Clark, a 
native of Maryland, born in 1768, and who died in i860. He came from his 
home near Blackhorse Tavern, in ^Maryland, on horseback to Kentucky, and 
there was married to Mary Beckett, and in 1823 came on to Decatur county, 
entering a cparter-section tract in Marion township. The next year he 
returned to Kentucky and removed with his family permanently to this state. 
Each winter, however, he returned to Kentucky and cut cord wood. In his 
younger days he had been a fireman on a river steamer and with others had 
made several trips to New Orleans by flat-boat with various kinds of produce, 
walking all the way back home. He was a strong, sturdy character and one 
fitted to found a home in the Hoosier wilderness. He and his wife reared a 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. , 895 

family of eleven children, Joseph, Rohert, Wilham, James, Richard, Thomas, 
Walker, John, Xancy, Eliza and Susan, all of whom are deceased, Richard 
having died in August, 1913. 

When William Clark reached maturity he purchased the old home farm, 
and during his lifetime accumulated altogether about four hundred acres of 
land in one tract. He also owned eighty acres south of Greensburg, or in 
all four hundred and eighty acres. He was a strong Republican. To Will- 
iam and Rebecca (Casseldine) Clark were born three children: Eliza J., 
who lives with her brother, Samuel, the subject of this sketch; Nancy A., 
who died on April 7, 1894, and Samuel. 

Until his removal to Greensburg, Indiana, Samuel Clark had alwa3's 
lived on the farm where he was born. In March, 191 5, I\Ir. Clark removed 
to north Greensburg, but still raises hogs and many cattle on the farm, 
which is immune from cholera and all other hog diseases. There have been 
altogether six different houses on the farm, but one burned, and there are 
only two left, these having supplanted pioneer structures. The house in 
which Mr. Clark himself lived was built in 1865. 

On January 3, 1895, Samuel Clark was married to Susanna demons, 
who was born on October 4, 1866, in Dearborn county, Indiana, is the 
daughter of Frederick and Louise (Krummel) demons, natives of Ger- 
many, who came to this country when young people and who were married 
in Dearborn county. z\fter their marriage they removed to Ripley county, 
and settled near Napoleon, where they died. A great-grandfather of the 
Clark children on their maternal side fought with and was killed while 
fighting under General Washington at the memorable defeat of General 
Braddock during the French and Indian wars. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Clark have been born four children, as follow : 
Helen, born on October 31, 1895: Bertha, 1900, died in 1902; Nesbit, Decem- 
ber 21, 1904, and Chauncey Howard, April 2, 1907. 

All the members of the Clark family, except Mr. Clark, are members of 
the Methodist Episcopal church, and Mr. Clark himself attends church. At 
the formation of the Progressive party in 1912 Mr. Clark identified himself 
with this party, and since then has been actively identified with the organiza- 
tion of the party. He is an enthusiastic admirer of Colonel Roosevelt and 
also of former Senator Beveridge. 

Samuel Clark takes a great interest in the farm which has come down 
to him from his grandfather, and is anxious that the farm be kept in the 
family for several generations to come. He is devoting his life not only to- 
the business of farming, but to rearing his children to honorable and useful 



S96 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

lives, for which he has every reason to expect that they will carry on the 
work so successfully carried forward by their father, grandfather and great- 
grandfather in this county. Here in old Decatur county the name of Clark 
is synonymous with industry, honesty, sobriety and intelligent citizenship, 
and Samuel Clark is a worthy exponent of these principles. 



CHARLES W. WORLAND. 

Under the operation of the American system of politics there are few 
evidences of personal popularity more convincing in their expression than the 
returns given at the polls. When the election returns give to a candidate for a 
responsible and important county office the largest majority ever returned for 
any candidate of the party on whose ticket his name is represented in that 
county, this indisputable and very tangible evidence may be accepted as creat- 
ing a very fair presumption of a most complimentary personal following on 
the part of that favored candidate. These thoughts are suggested by a 
review of the returns of the last election in Decatur county, in which County 
Commissioner C. W. Worland, of Clay township, was re-elected by the 
largest majority ever given a Democratic candidate for county commissioner 
in the history of this county. Not only that, but Mr. Worland has the further 
distinction of being the only Democratic county commissioner who was ever 
re-elected in Decatur county. His popularity in the vicinity of his home was 
amply demonstrated by the fact that, although his precinct is naturally heavily 
Republican, Mr. Worland carried the same by a majority of fifty-seven votes, 
an expression of confidence and esteem on the part of his neighbors that 
must have been exceedingly gratifying to the candidate. All agreed, how- 
ever, that this expression was well deserved, for in the administration of the 
affairs of the county commissioner's office, Mr. Worland had displayed a 
degree of sagacity, sound business judgment and keen executive ability that 
very properly called for his retention in this important office, and there were 
many who announced, at the opening of his second campaign, that his re- 
election was a foregone conclusion, a forecast which the returns proved to be 
quite accurate. Commissioner Worland is one of the best-known men in 
Decatur county. He owns a fine farm of one hundred acres in Clay town- 
ship, admirably tilled and prudently managed : the studious attention given to 
the management of his own affairs having been one of the strongest recom- 
mendations urged in behalf of his candidacy during the two campaigns he 
successfully conducted for the office which he now holds. 



DECATUR COUNTY^ INDIANA. 897 

Charles W. Worland was born in Shelby county, Indiana, on January 20, 
1862, son of William Leo and Nancy Ellen (Barnes) Worland, the former 
of whom was born on September 6, 1834, and died in July, 1903, and the 
latter of whom was born on July 16, 1843, ^"^ died on October 17, 1890, 
Mr. Worland dying at Shelbyville, Indiana, and Mrs. Worland dying at 
Letts Corner, this county. William L. Worland was born in Kentucky, son 
of Leo W. Worland, of Scottish ancestry, who, in an early day moved from 
Kentucky to Indiana and spent the rest of his life in this state. Nancy Ellen 
Barnes was a daughter of Elijah and Polly (Gregory) Barnes, whose last 
days also were spent in this county. 

William L. Worland came to Decatur county in 1880, locating in Sand 
Creek township, engaging in the saw-mill business at Letts Corners, where 
he became quite successful. Upon the death of his wife, he went to Shelby- 
ville, this state, where his last years were spent in the home of his daughter, 
Mary Margaret, who still is living in Shelbyville. William L. and Nancy 
Ellen (Barnes) Worland were the parents of eleven children, namely: Mary 
Margaret, who lives at Shelbyville, Indiana; Charles W., the immediate sub- 
ject of this sketch ; Elijah, who lives at Williamstown, Rush county, Indiana ; 
Albert, who lives at Shelbyville, Indiana; Lewis, who lives at Indianapolis; 
Mrs. Nora Simmonds, of Indianapolis ; Henry, deceased ; William, deceased ; 
Lilly, who lives at Denver, Colorado ; Francis, who lives at Shelbyville, 
Indiana, and Morris, who lives at Greensburg, this county. 

C. W. Worland has been a resident of this county since 1880, in which 
year he came with his parents from Shelby county. Until he was twenty-six 
years of age he assisted his father in the mill business at Letts Corners, but 
after that time rented a farm in Sand Creek township, where he lived until 
in September, 1904, when he moved to Clay township and entered seriously 
upon the life of a farmer. Being progressive in his methods of farming and 
energetic in his operations, he prospered and ten years ago bought his present 
farm of one hundred acres near the village of Milford, then known as the 
Rothschild farm. This is a fine farm, gently rolling, and its soil is of that 
variety locally known as "sugar tree" or "black walnut" soil. 

On October 29, 1884, Charles W. Worland was united in marriage to 
Emma Davis, of Westport, this county, daughter of John and Mary (Dare) 
Davis, natives of Union county, this state, who came to Decatur county about 
the year 1870 and became prominent residents of the Westport neighbor- 
hood. Mary Dare's parents were natives of New Jersey and emigrated to 
Indiana shortly after their marriage, settling in Union county, where they 
spent the rest of their lives. 
(57) 



SQo DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

To C. W. and Emma (Davis) Worland were born six children, as fol- 
low: Mrs. Eva Miers, of Adams township, this county; Clarence E., who 
remains on the home farm; Mrs. Mary Pumphrey, of Shelbyville, Indiana; 
Edward Leo, an express messenger on the "Big Four" Railroad, whose run 
is between Cleveland and Kansas City; Mrs. Alma Salter, of Marion, Indiana, 
and Raymond, who lives at home. 

Mr. Worland is a member of the Christian church and is active in the 
good works of that church. He is a Democrat and ever since coming to 
Decatur county has taken a warm interest in the political affairs of the 
county, being deeply concerned in questions of good government. In Novem- 
ber, 19 1 4, he was re-elected county commissioner from his district, his 
services during his first term in that important office giving to the public 
ample evidence of his excellent qualifications for that important office. He 
is a member of the Knights of Pythias lodge at Letts Corners and of the 
Masonic lodge at Milford, and takes a warm interest in the affairs of these 
two popular orders. Mr. Worland is a jovial man who has many warm 
friends throughout the countv, all of whom hold him in the highest esteem. 



JOHN JOSEPH PUTTMANN. 

The gentleman, whose nam.e appears at the head of this biographical 
review, needs no introduction to the people of Decatur county, since his- 
entire active life has been spent here; a life devoted not only to the promotion 
of his own interests, but also to the welfare of the communit}' at large. An 
honorable representative of one of the most highly esteemed families of this 
section and a man of high character and worthy ambitions, he has filled nO' 
small place in the public view, and, although a partisan, with strong con- 
victions and well-defined opinions on questions on which men and parties 
divide, he holds the esteem and confidence of the people of his community. 
Pie has been identified with many of the most important enterprises of this 
community and, in this way, has been largely instrumental in the prosperity 
of the localitv with which he has been identified. A successful business man 
himself, he has, by his counsel and advice, been instrumental in assisting 
others along the highway of life and has rightfully earned the enviable 
position which he holds in the community. 

John J. Puttmann was born on June 4, 1857, at Enochsburg, Franklin- 
county, Indiana, the son of John Henry and Christina Charlotte (Storig) 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. . 899 

Puttmann, natives of Germany. John H. Puttmann was born in 1784 and 
died in September. 1861, and his wife, Christina C, was born in 181 5 and 
died on February 28', 1885. John H. Puttmann was a sailor and worked 
on the sea for many years, being the captain of a German vessel and, at one 
time, owned two ships of his own. He was an accomplished linguist, being 
able to speak seven languages. He finally abandoned a seafaring life and 
came to Cincinnati, where he operated a grocery, subsequently moving to a 
farm near Enochsburg. About 1858 he bought a farm in Salt Creek town- 
ship, in Decatur county, where he spent the remainder of his days. His son, 
the subject of this sketch, now owns the homestead. Christina Puttmann 
had been married prior to her union with Mr. Puttmann, her name having 
been Klimper, to this first marriage two children having been born, Fred and 
Henry Klimper, both of whom are deceased. Of the children born to the 
union of John H. and Christina Puttmann, John J. is the only survivor, 
Eliza, F'rances. Margaret, Louis and Josephine, all being dead. 

John J. Puttmann attended the common schools of Salt Creek town- 
ship and, at the age of fifteen years, in 1872, he became a telegraph operator 
at New Point and on January 9, 1874, entered the service of the Big Four 
railroad as agent and telegraph operator at North Bend. On May i, 1874, 
he went to Lebanon, Boone county, Indiana, and on October 2, of the same 
year, he was again assigned to New Point, where he remained until his 
resignation, on May i, 1888. He had faithfully discharged his official 
duties and was held in high esteem by his superior officers. 

During all these years Mr. Puttmann had been keeping closely in touch 
with the public affairs of his locality and in 1882 was elected trustee of his 
township. So efficiently did he discharge the duties of this office that in 
1884 he was again nominated by his party and re-elected. In 1890 the 
Democrats of his county nominated him for the position of county auditor 
and, being sticcessfuJ at the polls, he served four years in this responsible 
position. During President Cleveland's first administration, Mr. Puttmann 
served as postmaster at New Point, beginning on April i, 1886. He has 
taken an active interest in political and other public affairs for many years 
and is numbered among the strong and influential men of his community. 

John J. Puttmann has, from time to time, become interested in various 
enterprises in Decatur county and is now numbered among its most prom- 
inent business men. That his interests are diversified may be inferred from 
the following statements. A merchant at New Point, he deals in hardware, 
farming implements, grain, feed and building material and also operates, in 
connection with this business, a lumber yard and keeps a complete line of 



goo DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

drain tile. He also owns two saw-mills, one in New Point and another a 
short distance from that place, both of which are devoted to the manufac- 
ture of hardwood lumber. He engaged in the lumber and building material 
business until 1S78 and in the hay, grain and feed business until 1879, and 
in 1892 established the hardware business. He was successful in all of 
these lines and was counted one of the most successful business men of his 
community, gaining the confidence and good will of all who had dealings 
with him. His grain business has been very extensive. He bought grain 
while in the employ of the railroad company and, since entering business on 
his own account, he has pushed this line of operation so that now he ships 
from three thousand to five thousand bushels of wheat annually. His 
elevator has a capacity of thirty-five hundred bushels. His investments in 
these lines are approximately as follow : In the lumber and building mater- 
ial business, two thousand dollars ; grain, two thousand dollars, and hard- 
ware and implement business, four thousand dollars. In addition, he is 
also the owner of four hundred acres in Salt Creek township, which he 
devotes largely to live stock and general farming and in the operation of 
which he has met with well-deserved success. One of the largest enter- 
prises in this community and with which Mr. Puttmann is very closely identi- 
fied is the Big Four Stone Company, which employs from thirty-five to sixty 
men and whose annual pay roll is from twenty thousand to twenty-five thou- 
sand dollars. The output of this quarry is shipped to all parts of the United 
States and, since the quarry began operations, in April, 1882, the annual 
shipment has amounted to from three hundred to five hundred cars. The 
output consists largely of building stones, flagging and crushed stone. The 
capital investment of this enterprise is thirty thousand dollars and the com- 
pany has one of the best quarry equipments in central Indiana, including a 
private railroad three miles long, rolling stock and a locomotive to facilitate 
the handling of the quarry output. Stone is now being produced from this 
quarry for a large building in West Virginia and for the colored Young- 
Men's Christian Association building at Cincinnati. In the management of 
this entereprise, as in everything else in which he has engaged, Mr. Putt- 
mann has shown business qualities of a high order and his progressive spirit 
and indefatigable industry have been duly appreciated by his business asso- 
ciates. Wisely conservative, yet aggressive when necessary in his business 
affairs, Mr. Puttmann is considered a man of keen judgment and sagacious 
insight into the possibilities of a proposition to which he addresses himself. 
On June 19, 1878, John J. Puttmann was married to Hester E. Osborn, 
who was born on January 10, 1855, the daughter of Albert I. and Florence 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 9OI 

Osborn, of New Point, this count_y. Mrs. Puttmann died on September 28, 
1914. To this union were born five children : Rose E., the wife of Bernard 
Santen, of Columbus, Ohio, who has one son, Vernon; Clyde E. H., a farmer, 
who married Virginia Jones and has three sons, Joseph J., Charles and Wal- 
ter; Elva Dora, who is the wife of Professor Bass, postmaster and principal 
of the schools at New Point; Leona L., at home, and Clara C, who married 
R. B. Bartow, of Ft. Wayne, Indiana, who is connected with the American 
Steel and Wire Company. 

Mr. Puttmann is a member of the Catholic church at Enochsburg and 
gives liberally to all charitable and benevolent offerings. He has lived and 
labored to worthy ends and is one of the sterling citizens and representa- 
tive men of his communitv. 



BERNARD ORTMAN. 



A native of this county, who has spent his whole life on the farm which 
he now owns, few men in his neighborhood take a larger degree of interest in 
the general welfare of that community than does Bernard Ortman, of Marion 
township, this county, a progressive and industrious farmer, who enjoys the 
esteem and confidence of his neighbors throughout that part of the county. 

Bernard Ortman, a well-known farmer, of Marion township, this county, 
was born on October 27, 1867, on the old home place, a son of Barney and 
Mary (Losekamp) Ortman. He owns a fine farm of one hundred and sixty 
acres on which there is a modern house, which was erected in 1902. It is 
one of the best in Marion township. His parents both lived with him, and 
he cared for them in old age, and received as his share of the estate, the one 
hundred and sixty acres already mentioned, of which he plants twenty-five 
acres in wheat, and sixteen acres in corn each year. He is a stanch believer 
in the principles of the Democratic party and an earnest member of St. 
Mary's Catholic church at Millhousen. 

Barney Ortman, father of the subject of this sketch, was born in 1834 
and died on November 13, 1912. His wife, Mary Losekamp, was born in 
1838, and died on March i, 19 14. Barney Ortman was born in Germany 
and came to this country in 1856, locating in Cincinnati, where he worked 
in a boiler factory until 1858, in which year he came to Decatur county and 
worked on a farm near Greensburg, later moving to Marion township, where 
he rented awhile, and then bought sixty acres, on which he lived for a time. 



g02 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

and then sold it, buying part of an eighty-acre farm, on which he prospered, 
gradually increasing his holdings until he owned three hundred and twenty 
acres. Altogether, he bought and owned three or four farms. He was a 
good trader and money-maker, and was shrewd enough to conclude that land 
investment was the best. He was rated as a wealthy man, whose advice was 
sought by neighbors and friends. During the time of the Civil War, he 
dealt in cattle and was known as a great trader. He spent much time on 
horseback — trading. He was a strong believer in the principles of the Demo- 
cratic party and was a member of St. Mary's Catholic church at Millhousen. 
His wife was born four miles northeast of Millhousen, a daughter of Henry 
Losekamp, a very early German settler, and a man of wealth. Barney Ort- 
man and wife were the parents of eight children, namely: Henry, Lizzie, 
Bernard, Katie, Mary, Josephine, Verlena and George. Henry died at the 
age of nine years ; Lizzie is the wife of Adam Hessler, and lives at Muncie, 
Indiana; Katie is the wife of Ben Hoeing, and lives in Marion township: 
Mary is the wife of James McQuarry, and lives in Tampa, Florida : Josephine 
is the wife of Charles Hahn, and lives in Marion township, near St. Dennis; 
Verlena lives across the road from her father's home. 

Bernard Ortman was married in 1902 to Miss Josie Funke, who was 
born in Marion township, this county, a daughter of Frank Funke, who was 
an old German settler, and to this union have been born the following chil- 
dren : Louise, aged twelve years ; Carl, aged ten ; Frank, aged eight : Ralph, 
aged six; Bertha, aged three, and Leona, born on October 30, 1914. Mr. 
Ortman is a member of the Progressive party and is enterprising and a 
hustler. 



HARLEY SHULTZ McKEE, M. D. 

Dr. Harley Shultz McKee, township trustee of Salt Creek township, 
Decatur county, Indiana, and a well-known practicing physician of Decatur 
county, located at New Point, was born on November 21, 1878, at St. Paul, 
this county, son of John B. and Mary (Lowe) McKee, both of whom were 
born in 1848. John B. McKee, a native of St. Paul, Decatur county, was a 
son of the Rev. Samuel McKee, a native of Pennsylvania. The former 
conducted a grocery for the stone workers and quarrymen for a number of 
years at St. Paul, New Point. His wife, who, before her marriage, was 
Mary Lowe, was a native of Decatur county, the daughter of Mack Lowe, 
a native of Kentucky, who was a school teacher by profession. Rev. Sam- 



DECATUR CbUNTY, INDIANA. 9O3 

xiel McKee, the grandfather of Dr. Harley Shultz McKee, was a minister in 
the United Brethren church, and a farmer. During the days when ministers 
of the Gospel were accustomed to ride horseback to reach their various 
assignments, he was the minister at Gratis, and also preached at other 
churches in that vicinity. 

To John B. and Mary (Lowe) McKee five children were born, in the 
order of their birth, as follow : Nellie, the wife of Doctor Kerchel, of 
Greensburg; Kathleen, the wife of Rev. S. G. Huntington, of Rushville, 
Indiana, a well-known Baptist minister of southern Indiana; Gertrude, the 
wife of W. F. Barber, a well-known teacher in the schools of St. Paul ; Dr. 
Harley S., the subject of this sketch, and J. F., assistant superintendent of the 
Big Four freight depot at Shelbyville, Indiana. 

Educated in the public schools at St. Paul, Indiana, Doctor McKee 
studied for his profession in the Indiana Medical College at Indianapolis, 
and was graduated from the Illinois Medical University at Chicago in 1907. 
After his graduation he began the practice of his profession at New Point, 
and has built up a large practice among the people of that community, who 
have profound confidence, not only in his ability as a physician, but who 
admire him for his pleasing personality and modest, unassuming disposition. 
He is a member of the Decatur County Medical Society and the Indiana 
State Medical Association. 

On January 17, 1914, Doctor McKee was married to Jennie M. Starks, 
■daughter of Edward F. and Mary Starks, the former of whom is a well- 
known jeweler at New Point. 

That Dr. H. S. McKee enjoys the confidence and respect of his fellow 
citizens and the people of Salt Creek township is thoroughly proved by his 
■election, in the fall of 1914 on the Progressive ticket, as trustee of this town- 
ship. The people of the township admire Doctor McKee because he is a 
self-made man. They admire him because he was willing during the time 
he was struggling to obtain an education for the practice of medicine to 
teach several terms of school in this county. In this way he was able to pay 
his way through medical college. 

Doctor and Mrs. McKee are members of the Christian church. Fra- 
ternally, the doctor is a member of the Free and Accepted Masons at New 
Point, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows of the same city, the Knights 
of Pythias of St. Paul and the Royal Order of Moose at Greensburg. He is 
also a member of the Order of Eastern Star and of the Rathbone Sisters. 

Doctor McKee is a highly deserving physician and citizen, and the large 
practice which he enjoys has been built up on the substantial foundation of 
merit alone. 



904 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

CURTIS McCOY. 

It is always a pleasure to write the history of a man who puts his abilities 
and capabilities to a use that not only gives pleasure to those of his own 
generation, but one who stands as a monument to his broad-minded nature, 
from which future generations may derive profitable lessons. Curtis McCoy, 
a well-known farmer of Washington township, this county, possesses an eye 
for the beautiful, and is a true lover of nature, as will be noted in the follow- 
ing pages. He has dug up some of the diamonds that, someone has truthfully 
said, are all around our feet. If more farmers would only beautify their 
homes, as Mr. McCoy has done, they would not only give a great deal of 
pleasure to themselves and their families, but they would double the selling 
value of their property. 

Curtis McCoy was born in this county on May 2, 1863, a son of James 
Thornton and IMartha Jane (Custer) McCoy. He attended school at McCoy's 
Station, and later went to DePauw University, attending in 1881 and 1882. 
He has always been a lover of farm life, and when he was married he and his 
wife moved on their farm of eighty acres in Wabash county, where they 
remained three years, at the end of which time they sold the farm and 
returned to Decattir county. After a short residence at McCoy's Station, 
they moved to Greensburg, where Mr. McCoy engaged in the clothing busi- 
ness, in which he was engaged until 191 1, when he retired to the home farm 
at McCoy's Station, some time later selling the clothing store, since which 
time he has devoted all of his time and attention to general farming. 

After years of planning and trying to arrange, Mr. McCoy and his wife 
have created a beautiful pleasure lake on the east side of their farm, one mile 
from McCoy's Station, and four miles from Greensburg, by pike road. The 
lake comprises forty-five or fifty acres, and the woodland section set aside 
covers one hundred and twenty acres. It is a beautiful tract of land and 
water, and Mr. McCoy has created a fine pleasure resort of this lake, which 
is already stocked with bass and channel-cat fish. He has boats and bathing 
houses for boating and bathing. The lake is over half a mile long and two 
miles around, with an average depth of twenty feet, and is the only resort of 
its kind in southern Indiana. The lake is fed by running springs at the head 
of Cobbsfork creek, the waters of which are very valuable on account of their 
medicinal qualities. The lake is in a picturesque setting, with beautiful scen- 
ery and a wooded shore. McCoy's Station was an important place in the 
county, in the early days, having been at one time the greatest grain shipping 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 9O5 

point in Decatur county. It was an important trading point long before the 
war, and was also a noted "underground railroad" station. 

Mr. McCoy is as successful in his farming as he was in business. 
McCoy's lake is his pride, and a realization of an ambition. Unaided, he 
expended funds in 191 2 to build a large dam, and now has a body of clear, 
fresh water that has withstood drouths and floods, bidding fair to become a 
noted resort in the course of a few years. Mr. McCoy's farm now consists 
of two hundred and seventy-five acres, all in one tract. It is well improved, 
with fine farm houses, barns, etc., and has been in the family since it came 
into the possession of his grandfather in the year 1825. 

James Thornton McCoy, father of Curtis McCoy, was born on May 22, 
1824, in Bourbon county, Kentucky, and died on October 5, 1905, at Greens- 
burg, Indiana. He was a son of Judge Angus C. McCoy, and came with his 
parents, in 1825, to Decatur county, at his father's death, buying the home 
farm. He was for years postmaster at McCoy's Station, and his barn was a 
station of the "underground railroad." James T. McCoy was married on 
November 15, 1849, to Martha Jane Custer, who was born on September 3, 
1829, and died on July 15, 1893, and to this union were born the following 
children: Quincy Monroe, who died in infancy; Arabella, who married a Mr. 
Oder, and went to California; Sarah Elizabeth, deceased; Robert Arnold, 
who lives in Greensburg; Hattie Gertrude, deceased; William A., who lives 
near his brother, Curtis, and Glendora, deceased. Mr. McCoy was a Whig 
and then a Republican and later became a member of the Prohibition party. 
He and his wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal church and their 
children were reared in that faith. 

Angus McCoy, grandfather of Curtis McCoy, was born on March 13, 
1789, in Washington county, Pennsylvania. His father, William McCoy, 
was bom in Scotland in 1730, a son of Alexander McCoy, and came to 
America in 1772, settling on the west coast of Maryland, and later moved to 
Wyoming Valley, Pennsylvania. Judge Angus McCoy died on October 12, 
1865, in Decatur county. He was married, first, to Elizabeth Mary Smith, of 
Virginia, and his second wife was Elizabeth McPherson. McCoy's Station 
was erected on his farm. He was the first probate judge of Decatur county, 
serving from 1829 to 1843, and was a strong anti-slavery man. He and his 
wife were the parents of eighteen children. 

Curtis McCoy was married on November 18. 1885, to Carrie A. Trimble, 
who was born on a farm four miles west of Greensburg, on January 12, 
1864, a daughter of John B. and Mary Adelaide (Owens) Trimble, natives, 
respectively of Virginia and Indiana, both now deceased. John B. Trimble 



■906 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

was one of nature's noblemen. He was self-educated, a deeply-read student 
■of the law and became one of Decatur county's most prominent citizens. He 
built the first fence around the court house at Greensburg. He was a strong 
supporter of the Republican party, and for years was one of the leaders of 
that party in Decatur county, and was well liked for his honest and straight- 
forward dealings. His children were: Maria, who married William Morse, 
and lives in Indianapolis ; Fred, deceased ; Oscar, ex-county treasurer, who 
lives at Milford; Arthur, a farmer at Milford. and Carrie, who married Mr. 
McCoy. 

To Curtis and Carrie A. (Trimble) McCoy two children have been 
'born, Hazel, a graduate of DePauw University, now at home, and Trimble, 
who married Edna Hess, and is living on the home farm. Mr. and Mrs. 
McCoy are members of the Methodist church and their children have been 
reared in that faith, the family being looked upon as leaders in the good 
works of their neighborhood and held in the very highest regard by the entire 
•community. Mr. McCoy is a Republican and a member of the Odd Fellows 
and the Knights of Pythias. 



BENEDICT BRUNS. 



To be satisfied with one's lot in this life, and make the most out of one's 
^opportunities, places one on the list of those to be looked upon with a feeling 
amounting almost to envy. The most of us are so far-reaching in our desire 
for worldly gain, that we overlook many valuable opportunities. Mr. Bruns 
lias been fortunate in recognizing that which was most suited to his desires 
.and ability, and has been wise enough to let well enough alone. The life, 
termed by so many as the "humdrum" farmer's life, has proved to be an oasis 
to Mr. Bruns, after his years of activity in other lines. 

Benedict Bruns, a well-known farmer of Marion township, this county, 
was born on July 24, i860, in Ripley county, Indiana, a son of Herman and 
'Christine (Waben) Bruns. Reared in Ripley county, Benedict Bruns went 
from there to Cincinnati, where he served as stationary engineer. He learned 
Tiis trade when a boy of fourteen, and followed it for twenty years in Cin- 
cinnati, and from there he came to this county, locating in Marion township. 
Remaining there but a short time, he returned to Cincinnati, where he lived 
until November, 1900, at which time he returned to Marion township and 
Thought his present farm of one hundred and sixtv acres, located about one 



DECATUR COUNTY^ INDIANA. 9O7 

and one-half miles west of Millhousen. The place has a brick house, which 
has been remodeled under Mr. Bruns' ownership, and a barn, forty by sixty 
feet, which has also been rebuilt. Mr. Bruns devotes a considerable portion 
of his time to the breeding of horses and cattle, and pure bred white Leghorn 
chickens. His political views are Democratic, and, in religion, he is a mem- 
ber of St. Mary's Catholic church at Millhousen. 

Herman Bruns, father of Benedict, was born in 1823 and died in 1902, 
and his wife, Christine, was born in 1829 and died in 1902, about two weeks 
after the death of her husband. They were natives of Germany. Herman 
located in Cincinnati, when a young man, and went to work as a laborer. 
While in Cincinnati, he took unto himself a wife, and saved enough money 
to buy a farm of one hundred and twenty acres in Ripley county, where he 
spent the remainder of his life. To this couple were born four children, 
Henry, Joseph, Benedict and Mary. Henry lives in Cincinnati, and has one 
child, Herman, who died at the age of three years: Joseph died in 1913, and 
Mary (Mrs. Koors), lives two miles south of her father's home. 

Benedict Bruns was married in 1893, to Bernardine Rottman, daughter 
of Henry Rottman, of Decatur county, to which union nine children have 
been born, namely : Lawrence, who died at the age of nine months ; Edward, 
who is a student at a veterinary college at Indianapolis, from which he will 
graduate in 1916; Alfred, also a student of the same college, who will gradu- 
ate in 1917, and Joseph, Marie, Carl, Harry, Bernard and Louis. 



THOMAS M. HAMILTON. 

The late Thomas M. Hamilton was born on June 17, 1830, and died 
on December 26, 1892. He was the son of Robert and Polly (Henry) 
Hamilton, the former of whom was born in 1796, and who died on August 
II, 1855, and the latter of whom died on August 14, 1855, three days after 
the death of her husband. Robert Hamilton, a native of Carlisle, Kentucky, 
was married on April 15, 1819, and migrated in 1821 to Decatur county, 
Indiana, where he became one of the pioneer settlers. Here he reared a 
family of six children, namely : Isabelle J., who was born on February 7, 
1820, married Warder W. Hamilton on September 26, 1843, and is now 
■deceased; James D., February 14, 1822, died on July 3, 1824; Harriet N., 
February 17, 1824, married I. P. Monfort on September 26, 1843, ^"^ is 
now deceased; Lavina G., April 30, 1826, died on July 18, 1835; Almira L., 



908 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

May 24, 1828, died on September 13. 1853, the wife of W. W. Bonner, and 
Thomas M., the youngest of the family. Robert Hamilton was a very suc- 
cessful farmer in Washington township, and one of the founders of the 
Kingston Presbyterian church. He was known as a good man during his 
generation and did much to improve the country life of Decatur county. 

After the marriage of the late Thomas M. Hamilton on November 7, 
1854, to Elizabeth McLaughlin, he and his wife lived one mile north of the 
old homestead, and on the death of Robert Hamilton moved to the old home- 
stead, and there were engaged in farming for about twelve years. At the 
end of this period they removed to Greensburg, and erected their home on 
North East street, where Mrs. Hamilton still lives. Thomas M. Hamilton 
looked after his agricultural interests while living in Greensburg, and was 
more or less active as vice-president of the Third National Bank of that city. 
He owned altogether four hundred and eighty acres of the old home farm, 
and Mrs. Hamilton also owned a large farm in her own name. 

To Thomas M. and Elizabeth (McLaughlin) Hamilton were born 
three children: Luna R., who was born on September 25, 1855, died on 
January 16, 1875, at the age of nineteen; Mary C., February 11, 1858, died 
on July 14, 1875, at the age of seventeen, and Maud, May 31, 1863, died on 
February 15, 1892. Maud had married Samuel L. Baker on May 4, 1887, 
and by him had one child, Helen Flamilton, who was born on September 2, 
1888. Helen married Leonard O. Lumbers. April 23, 1908, and they have 
two children, Leonard George, born on February 5, 1909, and Elizabeth 
Helen, June 15, 1911. They live in Toronto, Canada. 

Mrs. Elizabeth (McLaughlin) Hamilton, who was born on November 
25, 1834, on a farm in Clinton township, three miles from the place where 
her early married life was spent, is the daughter of George and Sarah 
(Carter) McLaughlin, natives of Kentucky, who came to Decatur county 
in 1827. Her father was born in 1802, and died in 1885. He was a son of 
George McLaughlin, a gentleman of Scotch-Irish descent, who lived near 
Maysville, Kentucky. Her mother, who was born in Kentucky in 1804 and 
who died in 1873, was the daughter of James and Anna D. Larue (Drake) 
Carter. The latter was the daughter of the Rev. Mr. Drake, one of the 
pioneer Baptist ministers of this section and a native of England. He mar- 
ried a French lady by the name of Larue. Mrs. Hamilton's father, George 
McLaughlin, was an extensive farmer and owned a large tract of land in 
this section. A Republican in politics, he was also a member of the Chris- 
tian church, and one of the founders of the church of that denomination in 
Greensburg. he having affiliated with that communion after removing tO' 



DECATUR COUNTY^ INDIANA. 9O9 

■Greensburg in the latter part of his hfe. Among his children, three of whom 
died in infancy, may be mentioned the following: Mary Frances, who died 
at the age of twenty-five years, was the wife of Thompson Riley, a Decatur 
county farmer who died in 1854. James Carter McLaughlin, who was born 
in 1 82 1, and who died in 1892, was a farmer and was married to Louisa 
Davidson who resides on Franklin street, Greensburg. He was a soldier in 
the Union army during the Civil War. George, the next born, died at the 
age of sixteen years. Elizabeth A. married Mr. Hamilton. Caspar, a former 
merchant at Greensburg, removed to California and died there, after twenty 
years residence, in 1885. He also served as a Union soldier during the Civil 
War, and was a lieutenant in charge of a battery. Caspar McLaughlin mar- 
ried Helen Morrison, of Connersville, and they had four children, three sons 
and one daughter, namely : Mrs. Alice Williams, a widow who lives in 
Cincinnati with her mother; George deceased, who was an electrical engineer; 
Charles, a dentist in Cincinnati, and Ray, an attorney in Cincinnati, who 
married a Miss McElfresh. 

Abram Carter, who was born in 1800, and who was an uncle of Mrs. 
Hamilton, was a talented physician and surgeon who settled in Decatur 
county on a farm and later removed to Greensburg, where he practiced medi- 
cine and surgery. During his life he was called to many points in the south- 
eastern part of the state to practice his profession. He married Miss Har- 
riet Norris, of Mason county, Kentucky, and when in middle life they 
removed to Iowa. He is now deceased, having died at the age of seventy- 
five years. He was well known by the early pioneer families of this section. 
His wife lived to be ninet}^ years old. The family, consisted of two chil- 
dren, who were born in Kentucky, Adelia and Perlina. Adelia married a 
Doctor New of Greensburg. They lived in Greensburg for several years 
and then moved to Indianapolis. Doctor New was a surgeon in the LTnion 
army during the Civil War. He died in Indianapolis, leaving one child, 
Frank, now a resident of that city. Mrs. Perlina Tatham lived in Williams- 
town for some time, but later removed to Iowa, and died there, leaving two 
children, Florence and Cora, the latter of whom has become very prominent 
in the work of the Young Women's Christian Association in New York 
City. It may be mentioned here that Gen. James B. Foley, of honored 
memory in this county, was an uncle of Mrs. Hamilton by marriage. 

The late Thomg.s M. Hamilton was an ardent Republican. A member 
of the Presbyterian church, he had much to do in the work of building up the 
church in this county. Mrs. Hamilton, however, is a member of the Chris- 
tian church. She is a remarkably well preserved woman, intelligent, keen 



9IO DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

and mentally alert, despite her age. She has traveled widely, having made 
several trips to Europe and makes one trip annually to Canada to visit her 
grandchildren. Mrs. Hamilton is now eighty years old. 



HARRY LATHROP. 



Among the best-known residents of Greensburg in Decatur county, and 
one of the most popular citizens of this section of the state is Harry Lathrop, 
the secretary of the Retail Merchants Association of Greensburg, Indiana, 
and whose father. James B. Lathrop. the president of the Citizens National 
Bank of Greensburg, is the oldest li\'ing resident of the city, the oldest living 
graduate of Indiana State University, and the oldest ]\Iethodist minister in 
the state of Indiana. The subject of this sketch, therefore, belongs to one 
of the oldest and most distinguished families of Decatur county. The his- 
tory of the Lathrop family is given in the sketch of the venerable James B. 
Lathrop, to be found elsewhere in this volume. In this place it will suffice 
to say that the family is of English descent and dates back to Yorkshire, 
England, where the family was prominent in the fourteenth century. In 
America the family was founded by the Rev. John Lathrop, a Congregational 
preacher who, after imprisonment for his non-conformist views on religion, 
fled to America, and at Plymouth Rock rejoined a considerable number of 
his old congregation whom he had served as pastor in the mother country. 
He became a prominent man in the early history of Massachusetts, and his 
son. Erastus Lathrop, who was born in Connecticut, was a captain of a com- 
pany of home guards which served during the battle of Lake Champlain in 
the War of 1812. Erastus, who was by occupation a farmer, became eventu- 
ally a well known Baptist minister of his day and generation. Ezra Lathrop, 
the next member of the family in direct line of descent, and the father of 
the venerable James B. Lathrop, was born in 1803, in Canada, and was reared 
in the British dominion. 

It was Ezra Lathrop, who settled in Decatur county, Indiana, on a farm 
which he entered from the government, about 1822. His wife, Abbie Pot- 
ter, was a woman of equally patriotic stock, whose father, Nathaniel Potter, 
a gentleman of Huguenot descent, emigrated from North Carolina to Ken- 
tucky, and from Kentucky to Decatur county. Ezra and Abbie (Potter) 
Lathrop had only two children, who lived to maturity; Levi, who died in 
1884, and James B., the father of Harry. Born on November 24, 182^, in 



DECATUR COtTNTY, INDIANA. 9II 

a one-Story brick house, which his father had buiU, James B. Lathrop was- 
a minister in the Methodist church from 1847, when he was twenty-two years 
old, continuously for thirty-one years. Today at the age of ninety years, he 
is one of the best-known citizens of southern Indiana, and has had, among 
the pioneers still living, a larger part in the history of this section, perhaps^ 
than any other man. 

Descended as he is from such eminent stock and such well-to-do ancestry, 
it is not surprising that Harry Lathrop achieved a large success in business. 
Educated in the public schools of Greensburg, and in the Greensburg high 
school, he spent two years in Northwestern University, at Evanston, Illinois, 
and after leaving college spent two years as a traveling salesman in the west, 
with headquarters at Newton, Kansas. During this period of his career 
there were developed those fine instincts and accurate notions of human 
nature, and the rules of business, which served him later when engaged in 
business for himself. Upon returning from Newton, Kansas, he engaged 
in the steam-laundry business at Greensburg, when laundries of this kind 
were in the infancy of their development. Here he conducted a laundry 
for twenty years and three months, all the time in the same building on West 
North street. Not only did he build up an enormous business, measured by 
the population of this city, but in that period he accumulated for himself a 
splendid fortune. In June, 191 2, he sold out the business, and for the past 
year has served as secretary of the Retail Merchants Association. In this 
position his own personal e.xperiences in business have served him well, since 
he acts as a kind of clearing house for the information of the members of this 
association. He is not only an expert judge of credit in Greensburg, but 
the force of his own personality has created a harmonious and agreeable 
working relationship between the several members of this association. 

In 1894 Mr. Lathrop was married to Lillie Drusilla Browning, of Indi- 
anapolis, who at the time of her marriage was prominent in the social life 
of the capital city, and to this union one child has been born, Nelle Browning 
Lathrop, now a student in the Greensburg high school. 

A Republican in politics, the subject of this sketch served as mayor of 
the city of Greensburg in 1890, and gave to the people of the city a most 
satisfactory and efficient administration. ■ During the most of his life he has 
been prominent in the fraternal circles, not only of Greensburg and Decatur 
countv, but of the state as well. As a member of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows he served on the building committee which erected the Greens- 
burg hall. He is a member of the Knights of Pythias, the Improved Order 
of Red Men, the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, and of the Fraternal 



.912 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Order of Eagles. I\Ir. Lathrop also is a thirtj-second degree ^Nlason, a 
member of the Indianapolis consistory of the Scottish Rite and of Murat 
Temple, Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. 



DANIEL WESLEY HOLCOMB. 

In the history of Clarion township, Decatur county, Indiana, no Repub- 
lican had ever been elected trustee of the township until 1914, when Daniel 
Wesley Holcomb, a well-known and prosperous farmer of that township was 
successful as a candidate for that office. A grandson of a soldier in our 
second war for independence, he is known as a successful farmer and stock- 
man, and no better evidence of his standing among his neighbors and fellow 
citizens can be cited than his election to the office of township trustee. On 
his paternal side it may be said that the family has been established in southern 
Indiana for considerably more than three-quarters of a century. 

Daniel Wesley Holcomb, who was born on January 11, 1852, in Ripley 
county, Indiana, is a son of Eli Asa and Emeline (Hall) Holcomb, the 
former of whom was born on April 3, 1823, and died in 1898, and the latter 
of whom was born on March 24, 1826, and died in January, 1865. The 
former, who was born in Dearborn county, Indiana, was the son of Rufus 
and Nancy (Gloyd) Holcomb. Rufus Holcomb was a native of Connecticut 
and probably of English descent. With his family he emigrated to the West 
early in the nineteenth century, and built one of the first brick houses in 
Dearborn county, ten miles west of Aurora. There he lived and reared a 
family of eleven children and died. Before coming west he had served in 
the War of 1812. The eleven children born to Rufus and Nancy (Gloyd) 
Holcomb in the order of their birth were as follow : Ethel, Daniel, Luther, 
Turner, Eli, Rufus, Hulda, Nanc}'-, Elizabeth, Lucinda and Lydia. Eli 
Holcomb, the fifth child born to his parents, and the father of Daniel Wes- 
ley, although reared in Dearborn county, lived for a short time in Ripley 
county, and returned to Dearborn county, and there reared most of his 
family. After removing to a farm near the Decatur- Jennings county line in 
1866, the family disbanded, Eli going to Kansas, where he died at his son's 
home. Eli Holcomb's wife, who, before her marriage, was Emeline Hall, 
was born in Ohio, the daughter of Benaiah Hall, a native of New York, 
-who settled in Ripley county, Indiana. 

Eli and Emeline (Hall) Holcomb had eight children, four of whom 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 9I3 

are deceased. Of these children, Edwin Perry was born on September i6, 
1848, and died on July 3, 1850; Louis Philander, August 20, 1850, died, 
August 9, 1851; Daniel Wesley, January 11, 1852, was the third child; 
Georgia Evangeline, October 15, 1853, died, October 8, 1854; Emeline 
Celeste, March 14, 1855, married Reid Williams, and lives in Kansas; George 
Albert, January 25, 1852, also lived in Kansas; Eli Benson, February 3, 
1859, lives in Arizona; Caroline Medora, March 6, i860, married John Old- 
ham, of Kansas, and both are now deceased. 

After Daniel W. Holcomb's marriage in Marion township, he settled 
on a farm three miles north of his present farm, where he lived for ten years, 
selling out in 1883, and emigrating to Kansas. But after farming one sea- 
son in Kansas, he returned and located on a farm three miles south of his 
first farm. Subsequently he purchased eighty acres of land and has since 
acc[uired altogether two hundred and thirty-five acres, two hundred and 
thirteen acres of which is in Marion township, and twenty-two acres of 
which is in Jennings county. Altogether Mr. Holcomb has twenty-five acres 
of timber. He raises live stock and grain, including forty acres of corn, 
forty acres of wheat, twelve to fifteen head of cattle, and fifty head of hogs 
every year. There can be no question that he has made a gratifying success 
of farming, and that his success is due to his enterprise, foresight, industry 
and good management. 

In May, 1873, Daniel Wesley Holcomb was married to Mary E. Evans, 
who wasborn on September 25, 1855, in Decatur county, Indiana, the daugh- 
ter of John and Nancy (Robbins) Evans, the former of whom was born in 
1 84 1 and died in 191 1, and the latter of whom was born in 1844 and died 
in 1897. John Evans was born in Dearborn county, Indiana, the son of 
Joseph Evans, a native of Virginia, and an early settler of Indiana, who 
entered land here and who in the early thirties was numbered among the 
pioneer settlers of this community. Mrs. Nancy (Robbins) Evans was the 
daughter of Micajah Robbins, who was a relative of the Robbins family of 
Decatur county, Micajah being a brother of John Robbins, a prominent 
pioneer citizen of the county. Of the children born to John and Nancy 
(Robbins) Evans five are dead and five are living. Frank, the first born, 
Sarah Belle, the third born, Mrs. Augusta Hawkersmith, the fourth born, 
James, the eighth born, and Mrs. Rosa Dell Croucher. the seventh born, are 
deceased. The living children are Mrs. Mary Holcomb: Thomas, of Hamil- 
ton, Ohio : Joseph, of Bena, Kentucky ; Jacob, of Sand Creek township, this 
county, and Ida, who married Ed. Sutton, of Marion township. 
(S8) 



gi4 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

To D. W. and Mary E. (Evans) Holcomb seven children have been 
born. Of these children, John W., born on February 27, 1874, is the trustee 
of Sand Creek township, and lives at Westport; Albert Asa, November 22, 
1875, also resides at Westport; Adaline, March i, 1878, the wife of Henry 
Mozingo, died on December 20, 1914; Lewis Franklin, November 19, 1897, 
living in Oklahoma, married Mabel Becker, by whom he has had four sons 
and two daughters; Nancy Jane, November 7, 1881, the wife of Ed. 
Mozingo; Margaret Medora, May 25, 1884, the wife of Arch Brown, of 
North Vernon, has four children, and Joseph Benson, January 28, 1884, 
residing on his father's farm, married Viola Clements, by whom he has had 
four children. 

A Republican in politics, as heretofore stated, Mr. Holcomb was elected 
trustee of Marion township in 1914. He was the first Republican to be 
elected to this office in the history of the township. Mr. and Mrs. Holcomb 
attend the Methodist Episcopal church, although Mr. Holcomb was reared 
as a Baptist. Judged from many standpoints, Daniel Wesley Holcomb is a 
valuable citizen of this great county and a man of wide influence in the town- 
ship where he lives. He has always enjoyed the confidence of a host of 
friends, who admire him for his ability and respect him for his rugged 
integrity. 



DANIEL BUCKLEY. 



For more than a quarter of a century one of the foremost leaders of 
the Democratic party in Decatur county and one of the most dependable 
organization Democrats in Marion township, Daniel Buckley has served 
several times as a delegate to state conventions of his party and is one of the 
most widely acquainted citizens of this county, especially among the state 
leaders of the party. Mr. Buckley's long service in behalf of Democracy 
has not gone wholly unrewarded, he having served as storekeeper in the 
revenue service, with headquarters at Lawrenceburg, Indiana, during the 
last Cleveland administration. For many years the Marion township com- 
mitteeman for the Democracy of Decatur county, during late years his place 
has been taken by his son, who is equally capable as a political leader. 

Daniel Buckley, who was born on February 14, 1849, i" Cincinnati. 
Ohio, is the son of John and Mary (Glennon) Buckley, the former of whom 
was born in 1830 and who died in 1890, both being natives of Ireland. He 
came to America when a young man and, after his marriage in New York 



DECATUR COUNTY^ INDIANA. 915 

city, followed the blacksmith trade in Cincinnati. In 1861 he moved from 
Cincinnati to the farm, where his son, Daniel, now lives, in Marion town- 
ship, this county, and there built a house, which is still standing. With the 
able assistance of his son. he cleared the land and developed one of the best 
farms in the neighborhood. A Democrat in politics, he was also active in 
the afifairs of the Napoleon Catholic church. Of his four children, John, 
the second born, is deceased. The living children are Daniel, the subject of 
this sketch ; Edward, of Indianapolis, and Mrs. Kate Griffin, who lives south 
of Millhousen. in this county. 

When the Buckley family moved from Cincinnati to Decatur county, 
Daniel Buckley was twelve years old and had begun his educational course 
in the Queen City schools, but he completed his education in Decatur county. 
Here he helped his father oh the farm, clearing the land, cutting the timber 
and grubbing. Daniel Buckley and his son now own all of the old home 
farm, the son having purchased the interest of his father's brother and 
sister. The farm consists of one hundred and fifty acres of good level land, 
upon which a modern home was erected in 1910. Mr. Buckley and his son 
ordinarily raise seventy-five to eighty head of hogs and keep fifteen to 
twenty head of cattle on the farm. They specialize in Duroc-Jersey hogs. 
At the present time they are spending considerable money in various kinds 
of improvements, principally woven-wire fences. 

In 1870 Daniel Buckley was married to Alvina Margaret Lamb, a native 
of Ohio, and the daughter of Michael Lamb, a native of Ireland. Mrs. 
Buckley was a good woman and a faithful and loving helpmate. Her death, 
on February 22, 1912, came as a distinct shock to her husband, with whom 
shehad lived in comfort and happiness for forty-two years. At the time of 
her death, she was sixty-two years old. Her only son, Edward A., who 
was born on December 12, 1876, is a partner with his father in operating the 
home farm. No one will ever be able to take the place of this devoted wife 
and loving mother and today lier memory is revered by the loving ones she 
left behind. 

Edward A. Bucklev is a well-known dealer in farm implements, hard- 
ware and buggies. He also is the local agent in his neighborhood for the 
Continental Fire Insurance Company and also handles lightning,, insurance. 
On June 13, 1915, while on a trip to the Pacific coast, Edward A. Buckley 
was united in marriage, at Fallow, Nevada, to Lillie Fey, of Millhousen, 
this county. 

Daniel Bucklev and his son, who are skillful and successful farmers 
and prominent citizens of Marion township, well merit the high opinion in 



gi6 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

which they are held by their neighbors. If they are leaders in the political 
circles of their home township, it is because of their genial and cordial 
manners and their friendly and honorable relations with the people with 
whom they come into contact. In other words, the recognition accorded 
them is the reward of true merit. 



EBER I. OLDHAM. 



Seldom do we find, in searching out the biographical and genealogical 
annals of a family, one whose ancestors have served more valiantly in our 
country's wars than have those of Eber J. Oldham, a well-known and pros- 
perous farmer of Marion township, this county, both of whose grand- 
fathers were soldiers in the War of 1812, and who also enjoys the honor- 
able distinction of having had six maternal uncles who served their country 
during the great Civil War. Moreover, Mr. Oldham's maternal grand- 
father married into the Judd family, which was prominent during Revolu- 
tionary days and which served its country valiantly in the first great war 
of this country. 

Born on July 15, 1850, Eber J. Oldham was too young at the breaking 
out of the Civil War to enlist for service, but as an honorable and successful 
farmer, one who has performed his duty as a citizen of his county and state 
and country, he deserves to rank as a hero of peace. A native of Jackson 
township, Ripley county, Indiana, he is the son of Matthew and Salina 
(Hull) Oldham, the former of whom was a native of Pennsylvania, the son 
of Absalom Oldham, a native of Maryland, who came to Indiana from 
Pennsylvania. Of English parentage, Absalom Oldham was a resident of 
Pennsylvania during the War of 1812 and enlisted from that state. J^Iany 
years afterwards, in 1835, he brought his family to Jennings county, Indiana, 
and there died. Matthew Oldham, who was born on December 8, 1823, was 
married April 2, 1846, to Salina Hull, a native of Pennsylvania, born on 
August 2, 1824, the daughter of Charles and Prue (Judd) Hull, natives of 
Connecticut and Pennsylvania, and died on March 21, 1901. Charles Hull 
was also a soldier in the War of 181 2, who settled in Ripley county, Indiana, 
after immigrating from Pennsylvania in 1836. His wife, who, before her 
marriage, was Prue Judd, had several relatives who served in the Revolu- 
tionary War. The late Matthew Oldham and wife, who came to Decatur 
county in 1865 and settled in Alarion township, occupied a farm one and one- 



DECATUR COUNTY^ INDIANA. 917 

half miles east and two miles south of the farm their son, Eber J., now 
owns. Eleven years after coming to Decatur county, they moved to the farm 
which Eber J. now owns and died on this farm. Mrs. Salina Oldham had 
six brothers who served in the Union army, William, Sylvester, Lemuel, 
Lorenzo, Daniel and Franklin. Daniel died in the service of his country at 
Georgeton, Missouri, and Franklin met death in the famous catastrophe of 
the "Sultana," a transport ship used during the Civil War, which was blown 
up in the Mississippi river. 

Of the six children born to Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Oldham, two, Mrs. 
Eliza Sweazy and Mrs. Jane Adams, are deceased, the latter dying in Ripley 
county. Charles A., of Marion township; Archibald, of Jennings county; 
Mrs. Sarah Wheeldon, of Marion township, and Eber J., the subject of this 
sketch, are still living. 

Eber J. Oldham has enjoyed a most interesting career, having sought 
his fortune in many states. At the age of twenty-five, he took Horace 
Greeley's advice to the young men of this country and went west to Nebraska, 
where he homesteaded a quarter of a section of land and where he lived for 
four years. Subsequently, however, he abandoned the farm and in 1879 
went to Colorado, where he was tlie manager of a lumber yard for four 
years. From Colorado he journeyed on to the state of Washington, where 
he lived for nine and one-half years and where he became a lumber inspector, 
connected with the largest lumber concern on the Pacific coast. Returning 
home in 1892, at the age of forty-two. he applied his savings to the mort- 
gage on his father's and mother's farm and his father subsequently gave him 
a deed and bill-of-sale for the land. Four years later his father died, 
November 21, 1896, and nine years later his mother passed away, her death 
occurring on March 21, 1901. In the meantime, he had cared tenderly for 
his parents, living with them and doing his duty as becomes a son who is 
grateful for the affectionate and parental love and care during his childhood. 

On November 16, 1892, Eber J. Oldham was married to Florence I. 
Love, who was born in Marion county, Indiana, on December 13. 1871, the 
daughter of Randall and Nancy ( Gillibrand) Love, natives of Dearborn 
county and Clarion township, Decatur county, respectively. To this union 
have been born four children, all of whom are living: Nellie, born on 
October 7. 1893: Francis Eber. November 2t,. 1897. '^^'ho is a student in the 
Westport high school; Daniel Howard, October 11, 1902, who is a student 
in the eighth grade of the local public schools, and Herl, August 12, 1910. 

All of the members of the Oldham family are identified with the Meth- 
odist Eliscopal church at Zion, although they were originally Free Baptists 



9l8 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

in religious faith. Air. Oldham is a member of Westport Lodge No. 68 1, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and has been an Odd Fellow for thirty- 
five years, or since 1880. 

Eber J. Oldham enjoys the confidence and esteem of his neighbors and 
has made a host of friends in the neighborhood where he lives, because of 
his honorable and upright character, which his neighbors and friends admire : 
his clean and decent point of view in the human relations of life and his fair 
and square dealings with the public at large. 



BERNARD ANTHONY HOEING. 

No more thrifty and enterprising emigrants have ever come to America 
than the thousands of German citizens, who have become citizens of this 
comparatively new land, but who have established homes in all sections of 
the coimtry, and who have especially prospered in agriculture. Although 
comparatively few of the pioneer settlers of Decatur county were German 
citizens, yet the German families, who have come to this county from time 
to time, have succeeded here in a large measure, and today the second and 
third generations are equally prosperous. Bernard Anthony Hoeing, of 
Marion township, who represents the second generation of the Hoeing 
family in America, upon reaching maturity took up his father's occupation 
and has made of farming an even more conspicuous success than did his 
father before him. He owns a farm of a hundred and twenty acres in 
Marion township, which his father owned at the time of his death, and to 
this tract has added forty acres more — a well improved, fertile and highly 
productive farm, practically all of which is level land, and which yields 
abundantly every year. 

Bernard Anthony Hoeing, who was born on December 12, 1870, in the 
log house built by his father, Bernard Joseph Hoeing, has spent his entire 
life upon this farm. His parents, Bernard Joseph and Christine (Schroer) 
Hoeing, the former of whom was born in 1824, and who died in June, 1902, 
and the latter of whom was born in 1834, and who died in December, 1890, 
were born, reared and married in Germany, and after coming to America, 
in 1868, settled in Marion township on forty acres which was partly cleared. 
The elder Mr. Hoeing finished clearing the land, and eventually owned alto- 
gether a hundred and twenty acres. He was a Democrat in politics and a 
devout member of St. Mary's church. The late Bernard Joseph and Chris- 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 919 

tine (Schroer) Hoeing, had five children, one of whom, Mrs. Louise Funke, 
is deceased. The hving children are Mrs. Mary Harpring, of near Mill- 
housen; Mrs. Anna Dickhoff, of Jennings county; Mrs. Christine Harpring, 
of Alarion township, and Bernard Anthony, the subject of this sketch. 

After caring for his father, who survived his mother for twelve years, 
Bernard Anthony Hoeing purchased the home farm from his father just 
before the latter's death, and about 1896 added forty acres to this tract. 
The farm is completely fenced with woven wire fence and comprises a splen- 
did country home with buildings erected by the senior Hoeing, remodeled 
by the son, painted a beautiful pale green, and located in the center of the 
tract. The present owner of this farm raises on an average thirty-five acres 
of wheat and from thirty to forty acres of corn. His land produces seventy- 
five bushels of corn to the acre by the use of fertilizer. The land is immune 
from hog cholera, and Mr. Hoeing has never lost any hogs as a consequence 
of this dreaded plague. On an average he sells from sixty to seventy-five 
head of hogs every year. He also raises his own horses, and specializes in 
the Percheron breed. In this connection it may be said that he is regarded 
as one of the foremost breeders of Marion township. Judged from many 
standpoints, from the neatness and attractiveness of the home and building, 
fences, fertility of soil and drainage and live stock, Bernard Anthony Hoe- 
ing is entitled to rank as one of the most successful farmers in this section 
of Decatur county. Much of his knowledge and skill he obtained from his 
worthy father, who was known as a careful farmer. 

On September 5, 1894, Bernard Anthony Hoeing was married to Cath- 
erine Anna M. Ortman, the daughter of Barney Ortman, deceased. Mr. and 
Mrs. Hoeing have had seven children. Of these children, Joseph Bernard, 
born March 17, 1897, is attending St. Mary's school; Leo Bernard, May 4, 
1899, is a graduate of St. Mary's school, having finished the course in 1913; 
Lawrence Bernard, October 28, 1902; Erwin George, January 18, 1905; 
Clemens John, January 28, 1907; Marie Josephine, April 18, 1909, and Alma 
Mary, August 3, 191 1. 

Among other important conveniences on the Hoeing farm in Marion 
township is a gas well, drilled in 1914, which shows two hundred and fifty 
pounds pressure, which supplies his house, grounds and outbuildings with 
light and fuel. 

Bernard Anthony Hoeing, like his father before him, is identified with 
the Democratic party, but he has never been active in politics, and has never 
held office. Mr. and Mrs. Hoeing and family are all members of St. Mary's 



920 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Catholic church, and he is a member of the Knights of St. John, of Mill- 
housen. 

Too much emphasis cannot be placed upon the ease with which Bernard 
Hoeing has mastered the intricacies of modern agriculture, and the skill 
with which he has followed scientific principles, which not only has placed 
him in the foremost ranks of Decatur county's farmers, but has won for him 
as a citizen the respect and confidence of all people in Marion township, 
where he resides and where he is well known. 



VALEXTIXE HAHN. 



Among the successful farmers of Marion township, who are comfort- 
ably situated on productive farms, is Valentine Hahn, who has a beautiful 
farm on a graveled thoroughfare, excellent farm buildings, including a 
beautiful white house surrounded by trees and a good barn. With twenty 
acres of timber on the land, the farm is well fenced and now has a gas well, 
drilled in January, 191 5, with a three-hundred-pound pressure. ]Mr. Hahn 
is one of the frugal farmers of German descent who have done so much 
for the stability of our institutions and the improvement of agricultural 
life in this country. 

Born on February 27, 1847, in Dearborn county, Indiana, Valentine 
Hahn is the son of Anthony and Mary Ann (Huff) Hahn, both natives of 
Germany, the former of whom was born in 1818 and died in 1903, and the 
latter born in 18 19 and died in 1898. Anthony Hahn came to America when 
sixteen years of age and his wife came at the age of ten. His parents settled 
first in Pennsylvania, subsequently moving to Ohio and then to Dearborn 
county, Indiana. Finally, in 1861, they came to Decatur county. They 
owned a farm near IMillhousen, where they were highly respected citizens 
and where they died. Of their nine children, three are now deceased: Mrs. 
Christina Huegal, Joseph and John. The living children are : Mrs. ^lary 
Huegal, of Muncie ; Valentine, the subject of this sketch : Anthony, who 
lives with Valentine : Mrs. Frances Eahardt, of Kokomo : Louis, who lives 
in Morris, Franklin county; and Mrs. Magdalena Hageman, of Muncie. 

Valentine Hahn has been compelled for the most part to make his own 
way in the world. In April, 1865, he enlisted in Company H, Thirteenth 
Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and was in the service of his country 
for six months, serving" in North Carolina and adjoining states. He per- 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. g2 T 

formed guard duty at Raleigh and Goldsboro and returned to Decatur county 
by the way of Baltimore, Maryland. On entering the ser\'ice he had passed 
through New York city. 

On September 20, 1870, Valentine Hahn was married to Susanna Her- 
man, who died on June 2"/. 18S7, seventeen years after their marriage, 
leaving nine children, one of whom is deceased, namely : Caroline, born on 
July 20, 1871, the wife of Herman Rolfes, of Fugit township, has four 
children, Raymond, Ruth, Thelma and Mildred; Ida, March 8, 1873, married 
Frank Xotter, of Indianapolis, and has one child, Henrietta; Charles, 
November 20, 1875, of Marion township, married Josephine Ortman and 
has two children, Edna and Catherine; Henry, April 11, 1877, also of Mar- 
ion township, married Minnie Langs and has two children, Marie and 
Frank; Dora, August 17, 1879, wife of William Link, of Millhousen, has 
four children, Walter, Ethel, Martha and Howard; Sarah, September, 1881, 
deceased; Mary, March 26, 188,3, married William Bruns, of Ripley county, 
and has three children, Esther, Elma and Bernetta; Andrew, March 21, 1885, 
of Marion township, married Rose Hardeback and has four children, Hil- 
bert, Maurice, Naomi and Susanna, and Albert, June 5, 1887, of Washing- 
ton township, married Eva Tucker and has three children, Leon, David and 
Valentine. 

Two years after the death of Mrs. Susanna Hahn, Mr. Hahn married, 
secondly, August 7, 1889, Elizabeth Herman, who was born on September 
25, i860, in Cincinnati, Ohio, the daughter of Joseph and Susanna (Young) 
Herman, natives of Germany, the former having been born in 1809 and 
died in 1884. and the latter born in 1823 and died in 1898, at the age of 
seventv-five vears. Joseph Herman came to America with his parents when 
ten years old. He became a gardener and in 1861 settled in Sand Creek 
township, Decatur county, where he owned a farm. Finally, he moved to 
Marion township, where he died To this second union five children have 
been born, all of whom are living: Wilfred, born on October 12, 1890, 
married Anna Gates and has one child, Wilfred, Jr. ; Lawrence, January 16, 
1894; Leonard, January 16, 1896; Carlotta, November 6, 1898, and Ernest. 
January 3, 1902. 

Following Valentine Hahn's first marriage, he mo\'ed to a small farm 
in Jennings count}', which he had purchased. Two years after his second 
marriage, he sold this farm and purchased another in Marion township. 
Mr. Hahn has prospered through life and is now in comfortable circum- 
stances, being recognized as one of the well-to-do citizens of this commun- 
ity. He has educated all of his children and in every way possible helped 



922 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

them to get a start in the world. All of them are enterprising citizens in the 
respective communities where they live and are doing exceedingly well as a 
consequence, not only of the material assistance given them by their father, 
but by the splendid example which he has set for them. 

A Democrat in politics, Mr. Hahn has never been especially active in 
politics, but has devoted his time, energy and talents to his own personal 
business. The Hahn familv are members of the St. Denis Catholic church. 



ELMER E. WALKER. 



No more highly improved farm can be found in Marion township, this 
county, than the eighty-acre farm of the late Elmer E. Walker, one of the 
most beautiful tracts in that part of the county, on account of the splendid 
trees growing near the home. There are two tracts of timber, comprising 
twelve acres in all, which protect the house and yard, the former being a 
white frame structure reached from the east and west road by a driveway. 
With these magnificent trees, fronting the modern farm building, and the 
beautiful, well-trimmed hedge along the road, the farm presents an espe- 
cially pleasing appearance to the passerby. A gas well, which has a pressure 
of three hundred and twelve pounds, furnishes gas for lighting the buildings 
and grounds and heating. The farm is well drained and well fenced, a verv 
tangible evidence of the thrift and enterprise of its late owner, providing a 
very comfortable home for his widow and her children. 

Elmer E. Walker, the late owner of this magnificent farm, was born on 
February 12, 1866, in Salt -Creek township, near New Point, in Decatur 
county, Indiana, the son of Milton B. and Martha J. (Colson) Walker, the 
former of whom w-as born in 1829 and died on November 30, 1913, and the 
latter of whom was born in 1843, and died on February 12, 1912. The late 
Milton B. Walker, a native of Carlisle county, Pennsylvania, having been 
born near Pittsburgh, came to Decatur county about 1850, and after his 
marriage settled on a farm in Salt Creek township, working for neighboring 
farmers until he earned enough money to send to Pennsylvania for his 
mother. Mary (Hall) Walker, who then came with two other children, 
Beth and Angeline. Her husband having died, she married, secondly, Benja- 
min Robertson, and lived in Salt Creek township until her death. Mrs. 
Martha J. (Colson) Walker, who was the daughter of Squire Colson, a 
native of England, and an old settler in this communitv, who kept a hotel 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 923 

•when the Big Four railroad was built and who owned part of the town site 
of New Point, was herself born near New Point. 

Of the twelve children born to the late Milton B. and Martha J. (Col- 
-son) Walker, five died in childhood, seven were reared to maturity and five 
are still living. Of these children, the Rev. Joel Walker, a Methodist Epis- 
copal minister, died in Montana in February, 1913. Elmer E., the subject 
-of this sketch, died on May 21. 1915; Mrs. Ollie Tucker lives near New 
Point on the old home farm ; Curtis is a section foreman for the Big Four 
railroad and lives at New Point; Elza, a farmer, lives one mile south of 
New Point; Roy lives one and one-half miles south of New Point, and 
Frank lives on the old home farm, three miles out of New Point. 

Elmer E. Walker was not always engaged in farming. Upon leaving 
home, at the age of twenty-three years, he farmed for two years, and then 
was engaged in railroading for fourteen years, serving during that time as' 
track foreman for the Big Four railroad. On April 17, 1903, he purchased 
the old home farm of his father-in-law, the Rev. David A. Tucker, in Marion 
township, and moved to that farm. During the twelve years he was there 
engaged in farming. Mr. Walker prospered with exceptionally satisfactory 
progress and deserved great credit for the care with which he developed his 
farm to its present high state of productivity. 

On April 21, 1893, Elmer E. Walker was married to Fannie Tucker, 
who was born on December 12, 1868, in Ripley county, Indiana, the daugh- 
ter of the Rev. David A.- and Susan Tucker, the former of whom was for 
many years a Baptist minister, but who is now residing at Linnhaven, Florida. 
Mrs. Walker was brought by her parents to the old Tucker farm, where she 
now lives, when only an infant. Her mother died in 1888. 

To Elmer E. and Fannie ( Tucker) Walker were born se\'en children, 
three of whom, are living: William McKinley, the eldest; Gladys M., the 
second born; Olive Opal, the fourth born, and Forrest Adrian, are deceased. 
The living children are Freda M., who was born on February 25, 1901 ; 
Frances Naomi, June 7, 1909, and Benton Bailey, April 16, 1913. 

A stanch Republican in national politics, Mr. Walker was more or less 
independent in local matters, and did not hesitate to cross party lines to vote 
for some worthy man on the ticket of another party. Fraternally, he was 
a member of the Carthage, Indiana, lodge of Odd Fellows, having been the 
first member initiated into that lodge after its organization. For a time he 
was a member of the Knights of Pythias. Mrs. Walker is a member of the 
Methodist church, as was her husband, and the children are being reared in 
that faith. 



924 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

As one who had worked hard for material success as a farmer, and one 
who was rearing a family of children to be useful citizens in the community 
where they will live, Mr. Walker deserved credit as a valuable citizen of this 
great county and township. He was popular in the community where he 
lived and where he had done so well his part in all the relations of life, and 
his death was widely mourned throughout tliat section of the county. Mrs. 
Walker is held in the warmest esteem in the community in which practically 
her whole life has been spent and the heartfelt sympathy of the entire 
neighborhood went out to her upon her bereavement. 



JOHN G. GUTHRIE. 



The venerable John G. Guthrie, a retired farmer of Greensburg, Indiana, 
is the oldest living citizen of Adams township and to him the publishers of 
this volume are indebted for much of the history of Adams township, herein 
contained. Hale, hearty and vigorous for his age, he has been an upright 
citizen and is a genuine patriarch of pioneer days, well-informed and intelli- 
gent. He owns a splendid farm of one hundred and ninety acres in Adams 
township and, during his declining years, is able to enjoy all of the comforts 
which this life may afiford. 

John G. Guthrie, former county treasurer of Pecatur county, was born 
on September 8, 1835, on a farm near Adams, in Clay township, the son of 
Moses and Mahala (Stark) Guthrie, the former of whom was born on 
November 8, 1808. in Gallatin county, Kentucky, and the latter of whom 
was born in 181 5 in Kentucky and died in 1906. ]\Ioses Guthrie was the son 
of Richard and Nancy (Keys) Guthrie, natives of Ireland, who immigrated 
to this country about 1800. With Richard Guthrie came his wife and three 
children, the other members of the family being born in this country. Alto- 
gether he had seven sons and three daughters : John, Moses, Thomas, George, 
James, William. Erwin, ]\Iary, ?^Iargaret and Esther. Mary. John and 
Margaret were l)orn in Ireland. Closes Guthrie brought his familv to Deca- 
tur county in 1822 and settled in .\dams township, where he preempted 
government land, west of Adams. After clearing tlie land of the timber, 
he grew a crop of corn. Before coming to Decatur county, he had lived for 
a few years in Jefferson county, Indiana. He became a naturalized citizen 
of this country and died on his farm in 1837. 

After his marriage, Moses Guthrie settled in Clay township and lived 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 925 

there all of his life. His wife, who, before her marriage, was Mahala 
Stark, was the daughter of Philip and Elizabeth ( Robbins) Stark, natives of 
Kentucky and members of an old colonial family, who moved from Shelby 
county, Kentucky, to Decatur county about 1822. Elizabeth Robbins was 
the daughter of William Robbins, a Revolutionary soldier, who served for 
several years in the Revolutionary army. He enlisted as a private in Octo- 
ber, 1777, under Capt. James Clark and and re-enlisted on September 22, 
1778. He enlisted once more in 1781, being at that time a resident of North 
Carolina. The venerable John G. Guthrie remembers well his grandparents. 
His grandfather, Philip Stark, died in January, 1837, and his grandmother, 
Elizabeth Robbins, died about 1885. 

To Moses and Mahala Guthrie were born ten children, all but two of 
whom are deceased. The two living children are John G., the subject of 
this sketch; and Mrs. Nancy Hamilton, the wife of John W. Hamilton, who 
resided in Pottawattamie county, Iowa. The names of the children, in the 
order of their birth, are as follow: John G., Philip S., who died while 
serving the cause of his country in the Civil War, a member of the Thirty- 
seventh Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry; James E., who died in 191 1 
at his home near Adams, in Decatur county; Elizabeth, who was the wife 
of Sanford Cline; Mary, who married Samuel Coleman; Epsie, who mar- 
ried Henry Kirbey, both now deceased ; Nancy, who married John W. Ham- 
ilton; Esther, who was the wife of Sydney Sidener; Martha A., who was 
the wife of Ananias Pavey, and Alice, who is also deceased. 

John G. Guthrie was educated in the.comitry schools of Decatur county 
and took up farming at an early age. When thirty years of age he moved 
to Greensburg, having been appointed deputy county treasurer, in which 
•capacity he served for three years. Since that time has has followed various 
lines of business, now owning a splendid farm of one hundred and ninety 
acres in Adams township. 

On May 6, 1887, John G. Guthrie was married to Amanda Hazelrigg. 
who was born in 1845 and who died in May, 19 12. She was a native of 
Marion township, Decatur county, Indiana, thrdaughter of John and Eliza- 
beth Hazelrigg, early settlers of the county, who came from Kentucky. To 
John G. and Amanda (Hazelrigg) Guthrie were born two children: Guy 
H., born in 1879, who is in the drug business in Greensburg, married Cath- 
erine Eich and has one child, Catherine, and Irwin Stanton, born in 1882, 
was a merchant of Greensburg, married Marie Russell. 

Politically, Mr. Guthrie is a Republican. He has-been a lifelong member 
of the Baptist church, his wife also having been a member of that church. 



p26 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Fraternally, he is a member of the Masonic lodge. There is no citizen in 
all of the length and breadth of Decatur county who occupies in the hearts 
of his fellowmen a warmer place than John G. Guthrie. He has lived a long 
and useful life and has behind him a career of which he may be justly proud. 



FRANK M. WEADON. 



No history of Decatur county would be complete without fitting refer- 
ence to the life and the labors of the late Frank M. Weadon, who for many 
years was one of the best-known and most popular residents of this county. 
From 1854, in which year Mr. Weadon came to this county from Virginia 
to serve as deputy postmaster in the postofifice at Greensburg, until the year 
1882, in which year he moved to Indianapolis, where for many years he 
occupied a position of high trust and responsibility in -the division head- 
quarters of the Big Four Railroad Company, there was no man in Decatur 
county who had a wider following of friends, or who more highly esteemed. 
These friendships were retained after he left this county and there always 
was awaiting him here a warm welcome upon the occasion of his visits back 
to the old home; while in the considerable Decatur county colony at Indian- 
apolis no others were more popular or more highly regarded than Mr. and 
Mrs. Weadon, who always took a prominent part in the annual reunions at 
the capital-city of the Decatur county association of former residents of this 
county now li\ing in Indianapolis. Mr. Weadon died on December 21, 
1914, and his death, was sincerely mourned, not only among his associates 
and friends of many years at Indianapolis, but cjuite as sincerely among his 
earlier friends in this county. His widow, Mrs. Mary Jane Weadon, who 
was born at Greensburg, this county, in the year 1838, still is living at Indi- 
anapolis, her pleasant home at 906 Woodlawn avenue often being the scene 
of quiet gatherings on the part of her friends, who delight to do honor to 
her dignified old age. 

Frank M. Weadon was born in London county, Virginia, on ^^ly 7r 
1835, and received an excellent education in his home state. In 1854 he 
came to this county, entering the postofifice at Greensburg as deputy post- 
master under Postmaster J. V. Bemustafifer. In this capacity he quickly 
made friends in his new home and was regarded as one of the "coming" 
young men of the community. President Lincoln later appointed him rev- 
enue collector for this revenue district, and he ser\'ed most acceptably in that 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 927^ 

capacity until 1871, in which year he was elected county auditor of Decatur 
county, a position of trust which he filled with the utmost fidelity to the 
public. This service continued for four years, at the end of which time his 
services were engaged by the Big Four Railroad Company, and in 1882 
the scene of his activities was transferred to Indianapolis, in which city he 
spent the remainder of his life, his death occurring on December 21, 1914. 
In his thirty years of service in- the division headquarters of the Big Four 
Railroad Company at Indianapolis, Mr. Weadon was absent from the office 
but four weeks. He remained with the company until he was retired on 
pension on account of the encroachments of age. He was singularly faith- 
ful and devoted in his service to the company and was held in the very 
highest esteem by all his office associates and the authorities of the road. 

On October 8, 1856, Frank M. Weadon was united in marriage to Mary 
Jane Jamison, who was born in Greensburg, this county, on April 24, 1838, 
the daughter of Francis and Nancy (Preston) Jamison, both members of 
pioneer families of this county. Francis Jamison was the son of Martin 
and Barbara (Seebaugh) Jamison, the former of whom was born in Glas- 
gow, Scotland, coming to this country in early manhood and locating at Har- 
risburg, Pennsylvania, where he married Barbara Seebaugh, a member of 
one of the old Colonial families, later coming to Decatur county and enter- 
ing business in the then rapidly growing village of Greensburg. Martin 
Jamison had been trained to the hatter's trade in Scotland and he engaged 
in the hatter's business at Greensburg, to which he added a general stock of 
dry goods, becoming one of the leading business men in southern Indiana. 
He built the first two-story building in Greensburg, his place of business 
having been located on the site now occupied by Minear's dry-goods store, 
and was a power in the early development of the commercial and industrial 
interests of this count}^ his influence in the religious and civic life of the 
community having been equally potent, so much so that few names in the 
early historv' of Decatur county are entitled to more respectful recognition 
than that of Martin Jamison. 

Francis Jamison was born at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, and as a child 
came to this county with his parents, being reared at Greensburg, and upon 
reaching manhood was associated with his father in the dry-goods business 
at Greensburg, being for many years one of the leading merchants in that 
city. He married Nancy Preston, who was born in Georgetown, Kentucky, 
and who came to Decatur county with her parents at the age of sixteen 
years, her father, Thomas Preston, becoming one of the best-known pioneer 
farmers of this county. Thomas Preston entered a government tract, at 



^28 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

what is now known as the Doss Pleak fann, and became a substantial and 
honored resident of that part of the county. 

To Frank M. and Mary Jane (Jamison) Weadon were born the fol- 
lowing children : Percy, who is prominently connected with the theatrical 
business in New York City; George A., a prominent business man in Indian- 
apolis, in the millinery line, a biographical sketch of whom is presented else- 
where in this volume; Burt C. and Bruce. 

The Weadons are held in high esteem throughout Decatur county, 
though long having been absent the connection of the two names, Jamison 
and Weadon, formerly so strongly identified with the commercial and politi- 
cal life of the county seat, giving to the family a substantial position in 
this county which time cannot effect. 



OSCAR B. TRIMBLE. 



Among the men of sterling worth and strong character in Decatur coun- 
ty, who have left the mark of their influence on the institutional life of this 
section, none has been honored with a larger measure of popular respect than 
Oscar B. Trimble, a prominent farmer of Clay township, former trustee of 
that township and twice elected treasurer of Decatur county. Mr. and Mrs. 
Trimble have a splendid farm of one hundred and seventy acres, three-quar- 
ters of a mile south of Milford, on the old Vernon road, where they have 
lived for many years in comfort and happiness, sweethearts quite as much 
as they were in the days of their courtship. 

Oscar B. Trimble was born in Washington township, Decatur county, 
Indiana, in 1859, the son of John B. and Adelaide (Owens) Trimble, the 
former of whom was born in 18 18 in Grayson county, Virginia. The Owens 
family, originally from Pennsylvania, came to Decatur county in pioneer 
times, first settling in Jackson township, where their descendants are still 
numerous. Risden Owens, the founder of the present branch of the family 
in this section, emigrated, when past the prime of life, to Kansas and there 
entered land and became wealthy. He died in that state, after having spent 
a life of unusual vigor. He and his wife were the parents of ten children, of 
whom Adelaide, the mother of Mrs. Trimble, was one of the daughters. 

The Trimble family is of Scotch-Irish descent and came to Decatur 
county in 1836 from Virginia, settling in Washington township, near Greens- 
burg. John B. Trimble was a carpenter in his younger days, and there are 




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DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 929 

several houses still standing and in good condition which he built in Decatur 
county. The house on what is known as the old Tarkington farm, where the 
ancestors of Booth Tarkington lived, now owned by Bird Sefton, was built 
by Mr. Trimble and stands today as a monument to his skill and honesty as a 
builder. Later he abandoned carpentering and became a farmer. He was 
married in 1855 to Adelaide Owens and after their marriage, they purchased 
a farm in Washington township, now known as the Applegate farm. After 
selling this farm, John B. Trimble moved to Kansas, where he remained one 
year, and then came back to Decatur county, purchasing land in Clay town- 
ship, now owned by his sons, O. B. and A. B. Trimble. 

Although reared a Democrat, the late John B. Trimble, soon after 
coming to Decatur county, became a member of the Whig party and, upon 
the organization of the Republican party, in 1856, became a member of that 
party. He was always true to the party of Lincoln and was intensely pat- 
riotic, ever displaying the utmost loyalty to the principles of the Union during 
the time of the Civil War. John B. Trimble was elected several times as 
trustee of Clay township and made a fine record in that office. A noble 
citizen and an influential man, he had a wide acquaintance and was popular 
with his neighbors, especially on account of his brilliant conversational abili- 
ties. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity and of the Christian 
church. He died on August 24, 1907. His widow, who died less than two 
months later, on October 12, 1907, was a woman of kindly, Christian charac- 
ter and was much loved and respected in Clay township. 

To .the late John B. and Adelaide (Owens) Trimble the following chil- 
dren were born : Mrs. Maria Morse, wife of William Morse, of Indianapolis ; 
O. B., the subject of this sketch; Arthur B., a farmer of Milford, this county; 
Mrs. Carrie McCoy, wife of Curtis McCoy, of this county, and Fred B., a 
well-known Decatur county farmer, who died in 1900, at the age of forty- 
two. 

In 1879 O. B. Trimble was married to Ida M. Butler, who was born in 
Bartholomew county, this state, in i860, daughter of John F. and Susan 
(Woodard) Butler, who later were well-known residents of this county. 
Mr. and Mrs. Trimble began life on the farm where they now live and there 
they have lived a life noted for its peacefulness and happiness. To them 
two children have been born, Claudia A., wife of Dr. Charles A. Kuhn, of 
Greensburg, and Ethel B., wife of Christian Steen, of Minneapolis, Minne- 
sota. Dr. and Mrs. Kuhn have two children, Dorothy and Hilda. 

Always intensely loyal to the principles of the Republican party, O. B. 

(59) 



930 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Trimble has been prominent in the affairs of his party for many years and is- 
regarded as one of the influential men in the party's councils in Decatur 
county. In 1894 he was elected trustee of Clay township and served for five 
years. In 1906 he was elected treasurer of Decatur county and was re-elected 
in 1908. Both as trustee of Clay township and treasurer of Decatur county, 
Mr. Trimble was one public official who worked at the job; who kept the 
business of the county and the township absolutely straight and who devoted 
his time exclusively to looking after the public business. He is a man of 
whom the people of this county have reason to be proud. Mrs. Trimble is a 
member of the Christian church and takes a warm interest in the affairs of the 
same. Mr. Trimble is a Mason, being a member of the lodge of that order at 
Milford. He also is a member of the Odd Fellows lodge at Milford, the 
Knights of Pythias lodge at Burney and the lodge of the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks at Greensburg, being very popular among the 
members of these several fraternities. He and has wife are active in all 
good works in their neighborhood and are held in the highest esteem there- 
about. 



DILVER E. DOUGLAS, M. D. 

Among the prominent physicians and surgeons of Greensburg, Indiana,, 
who also have been prominent in the political and civic life of the county, 
is Dr. Dilver E. Douglas, whose grandfather came down the Ohio river 
from Pennsylvania and settled early in the history of the state near Vevay,. 
Indiana. The career of this successful physician, the subject of this sketch, 
is a striking example of boyish ideals and ambitions which have been fully 
realized in later life. 

Dilver E. Douglas was born on a farm near Vevay, Indiana, on Novem- 
ber 9, 1870, son of John and Esther (Pocock) Douglas, natives of Indian^, 
the former of whom was born in 1840 and died in 1892 and the latter born 
in 1842 and died in 1894. John Douglas was the son of Jackson Douglas, a 
native of Pennsylvania, who, as heretofore stated, came down the Ohio 
river from Pennsylvania and, after numerous experiences and exploits, 
settled near Vevay. 

Educated in the district schools and in the Vevay high school, Dilver 
E. Douglas was also a student for some time at the local normal school and 
taught school for seven years in Switzerland county. Beginning the study 
of medicine in his boyhood, in the oftice of Dr. R. D. Simpson, he entered the 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 93 1 

Ohio Aledical University in 1892, later entering the Kentucisy School of 
Medicine at Louisville, from which he was graduated with the class of 1897. 

From 1897 to 191 2 Dr. Dilver E. Douglas was engaged in the practice 
of medicine at East Enterprise, near Vevay, but in 191 2 came to Decatur 
county and has since that time been successfully engaged in the practice of 
medicine in Greensburg. Doctor Douglas is a member of the Decatur County 
Medical Society, the Indiana State Medical Association and the American 
Medical Association, in all of which organizations he takes a prominent part. 

On June 10, i8'96. Dr. D. E. Douglas was married to Lillian Adams, 
of Vevay. To this union two children, Robert E. and F. Mareta, have been 
born. 

A member of the sixty-sixth General Assembly of Indiana, Doctor 
Douglas served as a member of the committee on ways and means, the com- 
mittee on state medicine and the committee on benevolent institutions. He 
was a prominent and influential member of that session, having been elected 
as a Democrat and serving" as a member of a body which was Democratic 
for the first time in several years. During this session, however, the upper 
house of the General Assembly remained Republican. 

Doctor Douglas is a member of the Free and Accepted Masons, the 
Knights of Pythias, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Modern 
Woodmen of America. A Democrat in politics, in addition to his service 
as a member of the Indiana General Assembly, he also served as county 
surveyor of Switzerland county for one term before moving from East 
Enterprise to Greensburg. 

Although a resident of this county a comparatively brief period. Doctor 
Douglas has already established a flourishing practice. During his short 
residence here, he has gained a host of friends and is honored and esteemed, 
not only by his patients, but by all the people of Greensburg, Decatur county. 



MATHIAS JOHANNIGMANN. 

If one should visit Decatur county in search for a model farm, from 
the standpoint of improvements, buildings and natural advantages, and one 
that was cultivated and farmed by the most modern methods, he would 
more than likely be directed to Marion township in search of Mathias Johan- 
nigmann. 

Mathias Johannigmann was born on August 16, 1856, in a log cabin 
on the farm on which he now lives, the son of Bernard Dominicus Johannig- 



932 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

mann, who was born in Germany in 1S21, and who died in Decatur county 
in 1896. After emigrating to America in 1850 Dominicus Johannigmann 
hved for a time in Cincinnati and then came to Decatur county and bought a 
tract of land in Marion township that had been partly cleared by the Indians, 
the aboriginals having liad a village at that point. The remainder of this 
land was cleared by Dominicus Johanningmann and in 1876 he made the 
bricks and built the fine brick residence in which his son, Mathias Johannig- 
mann, now lives. 

The wife of Bernard Dominicus Johannigmann was Elizabeth Egbert, 
who was born in Germany in 1832 and died in Decatur county in 1866. 
They had the following children : Mary, who lives in Cincinnati ; John, who 
is deceased; Mathias, the subject of this sketch; Henry, who lives at Walnut 
Hills, Cincinnati ; Joseph, who lives at Price Hill, Cincinnati, and Anna 
(Theimann) St. Bernard, of Cincinnati. 

Mathias Johannigmann is now in possession of a tract of two hundred 
and forty-six acres of well-improved land, which has a running stream of 
water passing through it. Mr. Johannigmann has one of the finest barns in 
Decatur county.. This barn was built in 1909 and is sixty-four by forty- 
eight feet and three stories high. It is made out of hard-wood lumber that 
was cut from trees taken on this farm. The construction of the barn is such 
that any of the three stories will support a wagon and team. The barn is 
well supplied with granaries and has running water for the stock. It is 
unquestionably the finest barn in Decatur county. The Johannigmann farm 
presents a most picturesque sight with its hills and valleys and fine old 
buildings set in surroundings of huge old maple trees. The fine brick resi- 
dence was built by Mathias Johannigmann's father in 1877, and is in an 
excellent state of repair. Mathias Johannigmann has always lived on this 
farm, with the exception of six years spent in Cincinnati, as a teamster, when 
a young man. He is a breeder of Shorthorn cattle and has a fine herd of 
fifteen head of this breed. He has five head of fine mules and five head of 
pure-bred Percheron horses, and on both horses and mules he has won 
premiums at Batesville, North Vernon, Osgood and Greensburg fairs and 
stock shows. Pie also raises annually from twenty-five to fortv head of fine 
Duroc- Jersey hogs. 

Mathias Johannigmann was married on February 19, 1884, to Anna 
Kuhlman, who was born in Madisonville, Ohio, in 1859, the daughter of 
John Kuhlman, a native of Germany, who came to Indiana from Ohio. To 
Mathias and Anna fColeman) Johannigmann have been born six children, 
of whom three are living: Clara, born in 1888, now resides in Cincinnati; 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 933 

Mathias. June 8, 1893, is now farming at home, and Helen, October 25, 
1894. 

Mathias Johannigmann is a Democrat. He is a member of St. Mary's 
CathoHc churcli and is a good example of the sturdy German blood which 
has done so much to enrich America, he and his family being held in the 
highest esteem throughout a part of the county in which for years he has 
taken so prominent a part in agricultural development. 



EDWIN S. FEE. 



Our republic, consciously or unconsciously, was founded on the idea 
that man's economic objects are to be obtained by the exploitation of one 
class by another class — by the appropriation of others' labor rather than by 
one's own labor, by political rather than by economic need. It is another 
instance of the institution of government designed to preserve in our civ- 
ilization the principle that the fittest shall survive. The aristocratic char- 
acter of our legislative bodies, particularly the federal court, and, until quite 
recently, the United States Senate, are glaring instances of the fact that at 
every crucial point the few have been foresighted enough to protect their tra- 
ditional rights, to exploit all not within the pale of their own social class. 

When we find in our examination of the personal and biographical an- 
nals of the past generation, one who has devoted his life's energies to oppos- 
ing the aggressions of the few, who lived and died for the cause which he 
knew was right, who withstood the trials and discouragements, the opposi- 
tion and the isolation of friends and even relatives, yet remained steadfast 
in the cause and uplift of a downtrodden race of humanity, we are com- 
pelled to render a tribute to the memory of the man who put personal and 
selfish interests aside and cast his fortunes with those who were being prc)'ed 
upon. 

In the agitation against the institution of slavery which preceded the 
Civil War, no man gave greater power or more intelligent direction to the 
crusade than the late Rev. John G. Fee, founder of Berea College, at Berea, 
Kentucky. A school which today ranks with our foremost colleges and uni- 
versities, with an enrollment of more than two thousand students, it is a liv- 
ing monument to the memorj' of Reverend Fee, who was the father of 
Edwin Sumner Fee, a well-known farmer and stockman of Decatur county 
and the subject of this writing. 



,034 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Edwin S. Fee, born on March 17, 1863, in Clermont county, Ohio, is 
today the only surviving member of a family of six children, reared under 
the best impulses of Christian citizenship, and under the protecting love of 
a noble and capable Christian mother, who added her best energies, her best 
thought and action to the success of her husband and the cares of her house- 
hold. ]\Ir. Fee has complete data on the genealogy of his ancestors as far 
back as 1630, which is greatly prized by himself and will increase in value 
in coming generations. Mr. Fee's infancy was contemporaneous with the 
stirring period of the Civil War. He, like all his brothers and sisters, was 
educated in the schools of Berea, Kentucky, and in Berea College. 

On September 11, 1883, Edwin S. Fee was married to Enrie J. Ham- 
ilton, of Fugit township, Decatur county, Indiana, a daughter of the late 
William McCoy and Euphemie (Donnell) Hamilton, both members of old 
and prominent families in the county, the former of whom was born on 
November 26, 1822, and died on Februarj' 25, 1905, and the latter of whom 
was born on October 5, 1829, and died on December 6, 1892. Mrs. Fee's 
father was a citizen of Decatur county and lived his entire life within its 
borders, a son of Cyrus and Mary (McCoy) Hamilton, natives of Kentucky. 
William McCoy Hamilton was born and reared on the paternal farm in the 
Kingston neighborhood in Decatur county. On January 24, 1854, he was 
married to Euphemie Donnell, the only daughter of Luther and Jane (Braden) 
Donnell. Immediately after their marriage they moved to the farm on which 
their only son, Luther Donnell Hamilton, now lives. At that time there was 
an old pioneer dwelling on this farm, which, ten years later, was supplanted 
by a fine, large brick residence, which Mr. Hamilton erected and which, with 
some remodeling to suit modern conditions, still does fine service as a coun- 
try home. 

Mrs. Hamilton inherited about six hundred acres of land from her 
father, and gradually this was increased by Mr. Hamilton until he became 
the possessor of more than three thousand acres of land. He bred and 
raised a great number of mules, cattle and hogs for the market. He was one 
of the most substantial citizens in this county, an earnest Republican and 
took an active part in political affairs. He was a fiery abolitionist and 
served in the capacity of county commissioner for two terms. He was prom- 
inently connected with the afifairs of the "underground railroad," by which 
agency many slaves found their way to freedom before the war. He was 
president of the First National Bank of Greensburg. Both Mr. Hamilton 
and his wife took active interest in all church work and charitable institu- 
tions. Mrs. Hamilton's main work was in her household and aiding poor 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 935 

and unfortunate people who came within the reach of her kindly care and 
Christian influence. 

To William McCoy and Euphemie (Donnell) Hamilton were born Ave 
children: Enrie Jane, born on November 8, 1854, the wife of Mr. Fee; 
Grace Greenwood, November 20, 1858, died on January 16, 1898; Luther 
Donnell, at present one of the largest farmers in the county; Myrta Gay, 
February 18, 1865, married John M. Berry on December 26, 1893, and died 
at her Chicago home on March 19, 1897, ^^^^ Mary Blanche, May 9, 1868, 
married George W. Lyons in December, 1900, and is now living in Greens- 
burg. 

Mrs. Edwin S. Fee, the eldest of the family, was educated at Oberlin 
College, and took special courses in the conservatory of music and was affil- 
iated with the class of 1875. ^°^ two years she taught music in Berea Col- 
lege, and was teaching at the time she met Mr. Fee. After their marriage 
they began farming in this county. Today Mr. and Mrs. Fee own over nine 
hundred acres of land in three farms. They have a beautiful modern home 
in the town of Clarksburg, perhaps the finest residence in the county. Com- 
pleted in the fall of 1906, it contains twenty-one rooms and is finished 
throughout with native hardwood and with hardwood floors. It is hot- 
water heated and is lighted with natural gas. The rooms are all artistically 
decorated and a large open fireplace in the spacious living room is a most 
attractive and comfortable feature of this magnificent country home. It is 
painted cream and white and has French plate-glass windows and a large 
circular porch, which extends almost around the entire house, with the porte- 
cochere on the south side. 

On this body of land there are four sets of farm buildings. Mr. Fee is 
an extensive cattle, mule and hog raiser, and a large feeder of Shorthorn 
cattle. He averages not less than one hundred and fifty head of cattle and 
twenty-fi\e mules and two hundred head of hogs for market per year. Four 
men are employed by the year to aid in the work on these farms, their fami- 
lies living on these farms. 

To Edwin S. and Enrie J. (Hamilton) Fee five children have been born, 
two sons and three daughters, all of whom after attending the high school 
at Clarksburg enjoyed the advantages of higher education. Burritt Hamil- 
ton, born on June 26, 1884, was educated at Berea College and is now a 
farmer and stockman; William Howard, July 4, 1886, attended Berea, 
Tarkio (Missouri) and Valparaiso (Indiana) College, and is farming near 
Kingston. Both sons own one hundred and sixty acres of land apiece, be- 
sides other interests. Mary E., February 24, 1889, is pursuing special 



0^6 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

courses of music in Berea College, DePauw University and Oberlin and Cin- 
cinnati conservatories. Nellie M., August 4, 1891, attended Monmouth Col- 
lege, Illinois, for three successive years in the liberal arts course, at the same 
time taking a course in vocal music at the conservatory. Bessie E., July 16, 
1894, attended college a year each at Miami University, at Oxford, Ohio, 
Monmouth College and Bradley Polytechnic, at Peoria, specializing in music, 
domestic science and painting. 

The family are members and regular attendants of the Clarksburg Pres- 
bv-terian church. Mrs. Fee having been organist and leader of the choir for 
more than forty years, and is today still doing excellent service in that 
capacity. All the family live at the home in Clarksburg. 

Edwin S. Fee is a progressive Republican, but is independent in his 
voting and thinking. He has proved a valuable citizen in this great county, 
and is a director and largest individual stockholder in the Clarksburg State 
Bank, and is a trustee of Lincoln Institute at Louisville, Kentucky, and 
prominent on temperance boards and affairs of community interest and bet- 
terment. Both Mr. Fee and his two sons are valuable factors in the com- 
munity as farmers and men of judgment, prominent in corn and stock shows 
and farmers' institutes. 

There is an old saying that blood will tell, and if we believe in this 
statement we must say that Mr. and Mrs. Fee, by their every thought, word 
and act, are fulfilling the noble desires and traditions of two families which 
have figured prominently in the public and religious life of two continents. 



J. MINOR GASTON. 



Indianapolis, the state capital, has gained many very excellent citizens 
at the expense of Decatur county, the Decatur colony at the capital being 
one of the most strongly marked and individualized of anv of the state's 
numerous county colonies there. The attractive force of Indiana's chief 
city and political center has drawn from all ranks of Decatur county's social 
order, and most all the industries and professions in the capital are repre- 
sented among those who have left the borders of this county, seeking wider 
opportunity there for the exercise of their talents. Among those who thus 
have departed, few have left pleasanter memories among their friends who 
remain here than the family of the Gastons, who, in the spring of 1912, 
moved to Indianapolis, where Mr. Gaston has found an ample outlet for 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 937' 

his enterprise and energy in the banking business, a business which he 
proved himself so well qualified for during his residence in the village of 
Westport, this county. Though he no longer is a resident of Decatur county, 
J. Minor Gaston still retains considerable property interest in and about his 
former home at Westport and still likes to regard himself as one of the 
Decatur county folk. It is quite fitting therefore that some record of his 
life in this county, together with a brief history of his interesting family, 
should be set out in this volume of biographical reference to the men and 
the women who have helped to make Decatur county what it is — one of the 
most favored sections of the proud old Hoosier state. 

J. Minor Gaston was born at Sardinia, Decatur county, Indiana, on 
September 19, 1856, of excellent pioneer stock, the son of Francis M. and 
Margaret (Gray) Gaston, both natives of Butler county, Ohio, who came 
to this county in the year 1849, locating in Jackson township, in the village 
that at that time was known by the name of Maxwell, where Francis M. 
Gaston engaged in the general merchandise business. Upon opening his 
store in the village, Mr. Gaston gave a great sardine supper, free to all who 
would attend, as a means of advertising, in a day when newspaper adver- 
tising was not so much a factor in commercial enterprises as it is today. 
Needless to say, the sardine supper was attended by the entire countryside 
and the fame of the unique "spread" became enduring. About that time 
Maxwell attained the dignity of being made a postoffice, and, on account 
of there being another Maxwell postoffice in the state, it became necessary 
for the villagers to select another name for their town. In compliment to 
Mr. Gaston, and to perpetuate the fame of his sardine supper, the people 
unanimously agreed that the town should be called "Sardinia," and the post- 
office department so ordered. And Sardinia it is to this day. 

Francis M. Gaston was reared on a farm in Butler county, Ohio, not far 
from the city of Cincinnati, and there he married Margaret Gray, one of 
the belles of his home neighborhood. As stated above, the Gastons came 
to this county, locating at Sardinia, where Mr. Gaston operated a general 
store for five or six years, becoming one of the best known men in that 
entire section of the county. The success which attended his effort as a 
village storekeeper enabled him presently to purchase an excellent farm of 
two hundred and forty acres in the neighborhood, and on this farm he and 
his wife spent the remainder of their lives, his death occurring in 1893 and 
hers in 1911. Mr. and Mrs. Gaston were among the most influential fac- 
tors in the life of that community. They both were persons of strong moral 



^•38 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

fiber and were active in promoting all causes designed to advance the gen- 
eral good. 

J. Minor Gaston's _vonth was spent in and near the village of Sardinia, 
his elementary education being received in the schools of that village. This 
schooling he supplemented by a course in the National Normal College, at 
Lebanon, Ohio, following which he went to the village of AVestport, this 
■county, where he engaged in the general merchandise business, continuing 
this form of commercial activity for four years. He also owned farm lands 
near Westport and gave these his direct personal attention. About the year 
1905, Mr. Minor engaged in the banking business in Westport with J. S. 
Morris, who previously had opened a bank there, operating the same as a 
private bank. In 1912 Mr. Gaston sold his interest in the Westport bank 
and moved to Indianapolis, in which city he aided in the organization of 
the Marion County State Bank, being elected to the position of vice-presi- 
dent of the same, holding that position until 19 14, in which year he was 
elected president of the bank, a position in which he is still serving. The 
■other officers of the bank are Mr. Minor's son-in-law, Clarence C. Deupree, 
another Decatur county man, who is cashier, and John Duvall, vice-presi- 
dent. With Mr. Gaston's and Mr. Deupree's connection with this bank, it 
is hardly necessary to say that all Decatur county people find a hearty wel- 
come when they step into that popular financial institution while visiting 
the capital city. 

In 1913 Mr. Gaston also helped organize the Beech Grove State Bank, 
at Beech Grove, a suburb of Indianapolis. While officially known as the 
assistant cashier of this latter institution, Mr. Gaston is practically manager 
of the same, devoting nearly all of his time to this bank, being the only 
member of the management who does so. He has disposed of most of his 
holdings in this county, though still retaining some property at Westpoint, 
which place, through long association, he still likes to think of as home. 

In 1885 J. Minor Gaston was united in marriage to Lottie Beesley, who 
was born at Brewersville, Indiana, daughter of Robert and Charlotte (Brum- 
ley) Beesley, the latter of whom is a native of England, having been 
brought to this countrs' by her parents in her girlhood, and the former of 
whom was born in this country, of English parents, his birth having oc- 
curred shortly after his parents arrived in America. Robert Beesley and 
Charlotte Brumley were married at Brookville, this state, later moving to 
Jennings coimty, this state, where their daughter, Lottie, was reared on a 
farm. Mr. and Mr. Beesley remained on the Jennings countv farm until 
the year 19 10, when they moved to Sardinia, this county, where their old 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 939 

age is being spent in quiet and pleasant retirement. During his residence 
in Westport Mr. Gaston was accounted one of the most forceful and ener- 
getic men thereabout and much credit is given him by the people of that 
village for the part he took in public affairs there. In 1906 he was the 
president of the town board. During the years since its establishment as a 
hamlet, the town had grown up around the old cemetery, creating a situa- 
tion that was very distasteful to many of the townspeople. Mr. Gaston 
promoted a movement for the location of a new cemetery, well outside the 
town limits. An ordinance to this effect was adopted by the town board and 
bonds were offered for sale. For some reason, however, these village bonds 
would not sell. Upon consulting an attorney, Mr. Gaston found that he 
was not barred from being a buyer of the bonds, even though a member of 
the board which authorized their issue, and he purchased the entire issue on 
his individual responsibility, thus insuring to the village the location of the 
cemetery at the point most popularly favored by the people thereabout. 
Though the action in moving the cemetery for a time aroused some opposi- 
tion in the neighborhood, some desiring to retain the time-honored burial 
ground, that opposition long since has vanished, all now agreeing upon the 
desirability of the change. Westport cemetery, the new burial ground, is a 
beautiful plot, a credit to the town, and the townspeople are proud of it. 
The first interment in the new Westport cemetery was that of the body of 
Christopher Stott, who, at the time of his death, was the oldest man in 
Sand Creek township. 

To J. Minor and Lottie (Beesley) Gaston one child has been born, a 
daughter, Stella Edith, who was born and reared on the same farm as was 
her father. On October 20, 1910, Stella Edith Gaston was united in mar- 
riage to Clarence C. Deupree, son of Thomas M. and Laura V. (Pritchard) 
Deupree, a member of one of the old families of this section of the state, 
who was born at Westport, this county, on January 8, 1888, and to this 
union there has been born one child, a son, Robert Gaston. Mr. Deupree 
is cashier of the Marion County State Bank at Indianapolis, and a bio- 
graphical sketch of him. with a genealogy of his family, is presented else- 
where in this volume. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gaston are members of the First Baptist church at Indian- 
apolis and are earnest in good works, the same kindly influence they exerted 
for so many years during the time of their residence in this county having 
been extended to their new field of labor in the state capital, where they 
have made many friends and are held in the highest esteem by all who 
know them. 



940 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 



ISAAC H. TAYLOR. 



The late Isaac H. Taylor, a native of Westmoreland county, Pennsyl- 
vania, who came to Decatur county, Indiana, with his parents in 1842, 
became, during his life, one of the most prominent farmers of Decatur 
count}', and was rated by the friends he had and the men who knew him 
as one of the best citizens of the county. His goodness of heart and gener- 
ous, lo\able disposition naturally attracted to him many warm and ardent 
friends whom he cherished highly. Ever tender and loving to his wife and 
children, all were left, at his death, well provided with the comforts of life 
which the husband and father had worked so patiently and so diligently to 
acquire. 

Born on July 26, 1838, Isaac H. Taylor passed away quietly on January 
21, 1903, a few months after moving to Greensburg, Indiana. Mr. Taylor 
first settled on a farm near Horan, Indiana, which he later sold and then 
moved to a farm near Gaynorsville, on which he lived until his removal to 
Greensburg. This latter farm consisted of one hundred and sixty acres and, 
due to Mr. Taylor's prodigious toil, it was brought up to a high state of 
cultivation. 

The late Isaac H. Taylor was twice married, the first time to Mary E. 
Miller, November 18, i860. She died on November 30, 1863, and he mar- 
ried, secondly, March 9, 1865, Emily A. McConnell, who was born March 8, 
1841, in Decatur county, the daughter of Archibald and Emily (Burk) 
McConnell, natives of Kentucky and early settlers in Decatur county. Of 
their family of seven children, only one, Mrs. Taylor, is now living. The 
parents died in 185 1, when Mrs. Taylor was only ten years old. Her 
mother was the daughter of John Burk, a native of Kentucky, who built 
Burk's Chapel. The six deceased children, brothers and sisters of Mrs. 
Taylor, vi-ere : Elizabeth, Patsy Jane, John Burk, Archibald, Nancy and' 
Chesley. 

Of the children born to Isaac H. and Emily A. (McConnell) Taylor,, 
three are deceased and four are still living: Emma, born on July 18, 1866, 
is the wife of Ira Scripture and lives at Moores Hill; George died in infancy; 
John, October 10, 1867, married Mollie S. Jackson on December 29, 1895, 
and lives in Henry county; James, October 2, 1871, lives on a farm near 
Sandusky, Decatur county: Mary died in infancy; Gertrude, October 2, 
1875, died December 31, 1893. and Hugh, February 2, 1879, living on a farm- 
two miles north of Greensburg, married Otie Fiscus. 

Of the late Isaac H. Taylor it may be said that he was one of the best 



DECATUR COUNTY^ INDIANA. 94I 

Jiien in all Decatur county, a man whose heart was pure, whose motives 
sincere and aboveboard, and whose will was centered on any means which 
might be taken to uplift his neighbors or his fellows. During his residence 
in the country, he and his wife were loyal and faithful members of Burk's 
Chapel of the Methodist Episcopal church, a building which had been ori- 
ginally erected by Mrs. Taylor's maternal grandfather. Faithful in all of 
the duties of life, Isaac H. Taylor well deserved the confidence of his fellow- 
men. This confidence, so freely bestowed upon him, was the result of true 
merit. 



R. RAY HAMILTON. 



The Hamilton family in Greensburg township, this county, is descended 
from William Warder Hamilton, who was one of the best-known farmers 
and citizens of the state, a native of Carlisle, Kentucky, born in 1821, who 
died in 1907. Coming to Decatur county, Indiana, during the forties, he 
settled in Fugit township and became one of the largest farmers in this sec- 
tion of Indiana. He was especially well known because of his connection 
with the board of agriculture, having for some time sen'cd as president of 
that body. R. Ray Hamilton, the subject of this sketch, is a representative 
of the third generation of this family in Decatur county, a grandson of W'ill- 
iam Warder Hamilton. 

R. Ray Hamilton was bom on April 8, 1876, the son of William Brutus 
and Catherine (Cunningham) Hamilton, the former of whom was born in 
1848 and died on September 17, 1903, and the latter of whom was born in 
Warren county, Ohio, in 1849 and died in February, 1905. William Brutus 
Hamilton was one of two sons born to William Warder Hamilton and wife. 
Cassius, the other son, is a farmer living near Greensburg and is well known 
throughout the county. Mrs. Catherine Hamilton was a well-educated, 
intelligent and refined woman, who, after coming to Decatur county from 
Ohio, taught school for several years until her marriage to William Brutus 
Hamilton. They had four children : William Cassius, who is a coal dealer 
in Indianapolis; Florine, the wife of Elmer Roland, formerly of Columbus, 
Indiana, who has one child, Kathryn; Richard Ray, the subject of this sketch, 
and Harry Warder, a well-known manufacturer of Indianapolis, who mar- 
ried Disney Bird, to which union three children were born, two now living 
and one deceased, William Warder, Helen Florine and Harry Cassius, the 
latter of whom died in 19 14 at the age of three years. 



942 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

R. Ray Hamilton received a splendid educational training for business. 
After completing the prescribed course in the public schools of Greensburg, 
being graduated from the high school, he was for some time a student in 
one of the business colleges at Indianapolis, where he was especially well 
prepared for business. For several years he was engaged in the stone busi- 
ness with his father-in-law, Ira J. Hollensbe. At the present time they are 
engaged in the manufacture of automobile radiators, the firm being known 
as the Take- Apart Radiator Company, the auto radiator being an invention 
controlled by the firm. This company has enjoyed an unusual success, due 
in a large measure to the business foresight of Mr. Hamilton. His excep- 
tional business ability is not unusual, since his father, William Brutus Ham- 
ilton, was a very successful business man. Reared on a farm, his father 
was engaged for many years in the hardware business and later became a 
pioneer promoter of telephone enterprises, in association with the Bell Tele- 
phone Company. He was the manager of many telephone companies and 
at one time, in association with five other members of the family, owned the 
Hamilton Gas Company, a concern which was finally sold to the Muddy- 
fork company. He and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church 
and he was politically identified with the Democratic party: 

On June 8, 1898, R. Ray Hamilton was -married to Alyrtle Hollensbe. 
the daughter of Ira J. Hollensbe. for many years a well-known manufac- 
turer of Decatur county, and to this union three children have been born : 
Ira Brutus, bom on September 4, 1899: Richard Ray, July 13. 1901, and 
William Hollensbe, November 5, 1909. 

Mr. Hamilton is a Democrat and is at present a member of the Greens- 
burg board of education. He was a member of the board at the time the 
new high school building was erected. Fraternally, he is a member of the 
Knights of Pythias and of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 
Mr. and Mrs. Hamilton are active members of the Presbyterian church aV 
Greensburg. 

Not only has R. Ray Hamilton made a gratifying success in business, 
but his success has not been won by any sacrifice of principle or yielding 
up of the respect of those with whom he has had dealings. As a citizen, he 
has been especially active in educational affairs and is entitled to no small 
part of the credit for the high standard of the Greensburg schools today. 
Mr. and Mrs. Hamilton are socially popular in Greensburg and are among 
- the most hospitable entertainers in the city. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 943: 

CLIFFORD G. ASKIN. 

Among all the numerous county reunions held at Indianapolis during 
the summer months, meetings for the foregathering of the former residents 
of the respective counties of the state who, for one reason or another, have 
found their ways to the capital city, none is more largely attended or marked 
by a larger flow of real fraternal feeling than is the annual reunion of 
Decatur county folk now living in the capital. Much of the success and 
good fellowship of these annuall)- recurring reunions of exiled Decatur 
county folk undoubtedly may be attributed to the untiring zeal of the genial 
president of the Decatur County Association of Indianapolis, Clifford G. 
Askin, a former well-known resident of Forest Hill, this county, who for 
many years has been engaged in lousiness at Indianapolis, where he has made 
a distinctive place for himself as a. funeral director. Mr. Askin is one of 
the best-known undertakers in the state of Indiana, his reputation, indeed, 
extending beyond the borders of the state. He is proprietor of the well- 
known Askin Training School of Embalmers at Indianapolis, an institution 
which counts its graduates in all jjarts of the country, and since 191 1 he has 
held the chair of embalming in the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, 
a position which has given him a most unusual opportunity to aid in the 
dissemination of proper information regarding the best and most hygienic 
disposition of the dead. In the councils of the National Undertakers" Asso- 
ciation and of the Indiana State Undertakers' Association, Mr. Askin occu- 
pies an important and leading position, his counsels ever being accepted with 
respect and consideration in those bodies. Among all the many Decatur 
county folk who have gone out into the wider world none is held in higher 
esteem here at home than he, and it very properly may be said that none 
retains a livelier interest in old home affairs. It is his constant delight to 
keep in touch with his old home and with his many friends in this county, 
and he is acknowledged by the Decatur county colony at Indianapolis to be 
the very life of the annual reunions of that colony in the capital city. 

Clifford G. Askin was born at Forest Hill, this county, on March 31, 
1878, the son of George and Hannah (Harris) Askin, the former of whom 
was born in 1836 and died on March 10, 19 10. George Askin was born at 
Tobbercurry, near Sligo, Ireland, a son of Richard and Ann Askin, the 
latter of whom was of English birth. Richard Askin died when his son, 
George, was ten 3'ears old, and his widow emigrated to America with her 
little family of four sons and one daughter, of whom George was the young- 



-944 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 



est. The family landed in New York City, proceeding thence to Rochester, 
New York, in which city George remained, the other members of the fam- 
ily coming to this county, where the eldest son established a permanent home 
for his mother and brothers and sister in the Forest Hill neighborhood. 
George Askin was apprenticed to the cabinet maker's trade at Rochester, 
and remained there until he had completed his trade, at the end of which 
time he rejoined his family in this county. Here he followed his trade for 
a few years, after which he entered a general store at Forest Hill as a 
clerk. This form of business appealed to him so strongly that he presently 
bought tlie store from his employer and continued in business at Forest 
Hill for more than twenty-five years, becoming a man of large and admir- 
al)le influence throughout that whole section of the county. In the spring 
of 1896 he sold his store and bought a farm at the edge of Forest Hill, 
where he engaged in farming until 1909, in which year he retired and 
moved to Indianapolis, where his death occurred the following March. Mr. 
Askin ever was interested in movements affecting the public welfare in the 
county and particularly in that section of the county in which for so many 
years he was a leader in business affairs. During the seventies and early 
eighties he was postmaster of Forest Hill and was very popular as an offi- 
cial, his service in that connection being fondly remembered by the older 
people thereabout. He was a member of the Methodist church, in the aft'airs 
of which he ever took a warm interest, and was a potent factor for good in 
the community. He was a stanch Republican, though not in any way 
offensive in his partisanship, respecting the views of others, even as he was 
firm in his own views and opinions. As a leader of the party in his section 
of the coimty, his political services throughout the county ever were appre- 
ciated b_v the managers of the party in this section of the state. 

In 1868 George Askin was united in marriage to Hannah Harris, who 
was l^orn at Dunlapsville, near Liberty, Indiana, a daughter of Isaac and 
Sarah (Kromb) Harris. Isaac Harris was born in New Jersey, in which 
state his youth was spent. He became a very proficient shoemaker and in 
his early manhood came to Indiana, locating at Dunlapsville, where he 
opened a shoeshop and where the rest of his life was spent. His wife. Sarah 
Kromb, was born in Union county, this state, a daughter of John and Sarah 
(Combs) Kromb, the former of whom was a native of Holland, and the 
latter a native of New Jersey. John Kromb emigrated to this country in 
his young manhood, coming to Indiana, where he became a well-known 
pioneer of the Liberty neighborhood. Sarah Kromb grew up in Union 
county and was married there to Isaac Harris. In 1855 Isaac Harris and 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 945 

his family moved to Boone county, this state, where, in 1858, Mrs. Harris 
died, leaving seven children, Mrs. Askin being one of these. Upon the 
death of his wife, Isaac Harris moved back to Union county, where he 
remarried and moved to Rush county, where his second wife died. He 
married again and spent the rest of his life in Rush county, his death occur- 
ring in the town of Glenwood. Mrs. Askin spent her girlhood partly in 
Franklin and partly in Union county, later living at Lebanon, in Boone 
county. Upon her marriage to Mr. Askin her home was changed to Forest 
Hill, in this county, where she immediately became a strong factor in the 
social and religious life of that community, her influence ever being exerted 
for the good. She is now living in Indianapolis, honored and respected by 
all who know her. 

To George and Hannah (Harris) Askin were bom three children, 
namely: Clifford G., the immediate subject of this sketch; Henry J., a 
virell-known member of the Indianapolis detective force, and Effie M., who 
married John M. Barbour and lives at Lawrence, Indiana. 

Clifford G. Askin spent his early youth in the town of Forest Hill, his 
education being received in the excellent schools of that town. When he 
was eighteen years' of age his father moved to the farm, and there Clifford 
G. remained until he was twenty-four years of age, at which time he moved 
to Indianapolis, entering upon a position there with an undertaking firm. 
He remained with this firm one year, at the end of which time he formed 
a partnership with Charles H. Royster, and went into business for himself, 
the establishment of Royster & Askin at that time being located in the 
western part of the city. This firm continued operations there for five 
years, and in 19 10 moved to its present centrally located and commodious 
quarters at 837 North Illinois street, in the city of Indianapolis, where it 
has a large and constantly growing patronage among the best families in 
the city. This establishment is one of the finest and most thoroughly 
equipped in the state of Indiana. 

Clifford G. Askin, as stated in the introduction to this narrative, has 
made for himself a distinctive place in undertaking circles over the state 
and throughout the middle states, and enjoys the unreserved confidence of 
business circles generally in Indianapolis. Two years after he had estab- 
lished the Askin Training School of Embalming, Mr. Askin associated with 
him in that branch of the business Dr. W. B. Ryan, another Decatur county 
man, who was added to the staff as instructor. Doctor Ryan died two years 
•or more ago, since which time Mr. Askin has conducted this valuable train- 
(60) 



946 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIAJSTA. 

ing school alone. His position with the faculty of the University of Michi- 
gan, he having occupied the chair of embalming in that excellent institution 
since 191 1, has proved a means of extending his influence as a scientific 
embalmer into all parts of the country, and there are few hygienists who 
enjoy a better established reputation along this particular line than he. 

Mr. Askin is a member of the Tabernacle Presbyterian church at Indi- 
anapolis and is held in high esteem among his large circle of friends in the 
capital cit}'. He is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
retaining his membership in the lodge at Clifty, this county, of which lodge 
he became a member during his residence in the Forest Hill neighborhood, 
and in the affairs of which he continues to take a warm interest. He also- 
is a member of the Masonic order, his membership being held in Mystic 
Tie Lodge at Indianapolis, and he also is a member of the Loyal Order of 
Moose and of the Improved Order of Red Men, in the same city. Mr. Askin 
is president of the Decatur County Association of Indianapolis and is one of 
the prime movers in the annual meetings of that society, these meetings, held 
in one or another of the pleasant parks with which the capital abounds, prov- 
ing a season of rare enjo)^ment and fellowship to all the numerous Decatur 
county folk who make their home in Indiana's chief city. He is very popu- 
lar with all the members of the Decatur colony there and enjoys their high- 
est confidence and esteem. 



WILLIAM H. MIERS. 



Having resided all his life on the farm on which he was born, in Clay 
township, this county, few men in that part of Decatur county are better 
known than William H. Miers, the genial owner of "Tanglewood Farm," 
one of the most progressive and popular men in his vicinity, a brief and mod- 
est biographical sketch of whom it is a pleasure for the biographer to present 
at this point in this history of the prominent families of Decatur county. 

William H. Miers was born on the farm on which he now lives, in Clay 
township, Decatur county, Indiana, August 31, 1853, the son of John L. and 
Rebecca (Braden) Miers, the former of whom was born in 1842 and died in 
October, 1912, and the latter of whom was born in 1839 and died in October, 
1913. John Laughlin Miers was a native of Virginia who came to this 
county at an early day and became one of the best-known pioneers of the Clay 
township section of the county. He married Rebecca Braden, daughter of 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 947 

Jack Braden, a Kentuckian, who came to this county at an early period in the 
settlement of the same and was prominent in the pioneer life of the com- 
munity in which he located. John L. Miers was one of the most prosperous 
and influential residents of Clay township in his day and generation. He 
became the owner of three hundred acres of land, which he brought to an 
excellent state of cultivation and was regarded as one of the most substan- 
tial citizens of the county. For two terms he served as township trustee of 
Clay township and his enterprising and public-spirited administration of that 
office undoubtedly did very much toward advancing the best interests of the 
township and in the establishment of the present stable conditions therein. 
He was highly reputed throughout that part of the county and his recent 
death was the occasion for much mourning on the part of his many friends. 
The death of his widow in the following year was none the less the occasion 
of mourning, for she, too, was held in the highest respect thereabout, having 
been a woman who ceaselessly went about doing good. 

To John L. and Rebecca (Braden) Miers were born six children, 
Thomas, James and Oscar, all now deceased ; Herschell, who lives on the 
Goff farm, in Adams township, this county; Mrs. Delia Ford, of Greens- 
burg, this county, and William H., the immediate subject of this sketch. 

William H. Miers received his education in the schools of Clay town- 
ship and was reared to the life of the farm. He inherited a portion of the 
home farm, including the homestead, and added to this inheritance .by buy- 
ing an adjoining tract, bringing his place up to its present acreage, one hun- 
dred and eighty acres ; all of which he has brought under excellent cultiva- 
tion, and on which he has made numerous and substantial improvements. 
The home on "Tanglewood Farm" is a pretty and comfortable brick cottage, 
trimmed in green, and the outlying farm buildings surrounding the big yellow 
barn are in keeping with the general well-kept appearance of the place, the 
whole presenting a fine picture of substantial farm life. Mr. Miers takes 
much pride in his livestock, particularly in the fine breed of his Percheron and 
Belgian horses and his Shorthorn and Jersey cattle. 

In January, 1879, William H. Miers was united in marriage to Lida 
Graham, daughter of John G. Graham, a one-time well-known farmer of 
Clay township, this county, a large landowner in that township and in 
Bartholomew county, this state, who died some years ago at Hartsville. 

To William H. and Lida (Graham) Miers seven children have been 
born, namely: Ray, who farms a part of the Anderson farm, married Ethel 
Anderson and has three children, Dale, Margaret and Marion ; Merle, house- 
keeper for her uncle at Hartsville; Oscar, who lives three and one-half miles 



940 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

northeast of his father's place, married Eva Worlden ; Mrs. NelHe Wildman, 
who Hves on the home farm, has one child, a son, Van Pierce; Sherman, a 
traveling salesman for the Heinze Company ; Wayne, who lives at home, and 
Gladys, a stenographer, living at Indianapolis. 

Mr. and Mrs. Miers are members of the Christian church and take an 
active and earnest part in the good works of their community, being regarded 
as among the leaders in all movements designed to elevate the standards of 
living thereabout. Mr. Miers is a Democrat and takes a good citizen's part in 
the political affairs of the county, though never having posed as an active 
politician. He is interested in all matters of good government, however, and 
is looked upon as one of the most substantial and dependable men in that part 
of the county. 



JOHN C. HAYS. 



Not only are the business interest of Decatur county well represented, 
but in the main they are under capable direction. The merchants of the 
county are enterprising, energetic and up-to-date, their stores generally being 
well-stocked and operated along modern lines. Among these merchants 
there are few who have a wider reputation for enterprise and energy than the 
affable gentleman whose name the reader notes above. No town in the 
county is better located than the pleasant village of Burney, in Clay township, 
the country thereabout being one of the very garden spots of Indiana. 
Wealthy and prosperous farmers give to the neighborhood an air of sub- 
stantiality most impressive to the casual visitor at Burney and the well-kept 
appearance of the delightful village bespeaks the enterprise and thrift of the 
inhabitants thereof. The business of the town is conducted by enterprising 
and energetic men who are devoted to the best interests of the whole com- 
munity and who are constantly striving to advance the general welfare of 
that section of the county. Among these merchants none is better known 
than John C. Hays, proprietor of the popular general store at Burney, and 
it is a pleasure for the biographer to call the attention of the reader at this 
point to some of the salient points in Mr. Hay's interesting career as a mer- 
chant and as a public-spirited citizen. Beginning practically with nothing, 
Mr. Hays entered upon his career as a merchant at Burney fourteen years 
ago, and in that time has built up one of the most successful and popular 
general merchandise stores in the county. "Satisfied customers" ever has 
been his motto, and the popularity his well-stocked store enjoys throughout 



DECATUR COUNTY^ INDIANA. 949 

the entire western section of the county as well as in the adjacent sections of 
Shelby and Bartholomew counties affords ample evidence that, in the direc- 
tion of his constantly growing commercial interests, he ever has been faithful 
to this motto. Mr. Hays is one of the most enthusiastic boosters of Clay 
township and the village of Burney and ever is found in the lead in ainy 
movement designed to promote the best interests of that section of the county. 
Possessed of exceptional business ability, Mr. Hays has built up a trade of 
which any merchant in a town many times the size of Burney might well be 
proud, and is very properly regarded as one of the most enterprising and sub- 
stantial citizens of the county. He has learned the valuable secret of being 
able to adapt his business to the territory which it is designed to cover, early 
in his experience having added to the motto above mentioned the equally 
efficacious phrase: "Quality, not quantity.'' By keeping his select and com- 
pact stock constantly replenished, IVIr. Hays is able to cater to the discriminat- 
ing trade of that section with the best and most up-to-date goods, thus con- 
tinually making good the first part of his motto relating to "satisfied custom- 
ers." Mr. Hays maintains a motor-truck huckster service which covers the 
entire region embraced in his territory of trade and spares no effort to 
accommodate and satisfy his customers, his enterprising ways and obliging- 
manner having gained for him the undivided friendship of the whole region. 

John C. Hays was born in Clay township, Decatur county, Indiana, on 
June 12. 1874, son of Judson and Mary E. (Jones) Hays, prominent resi- 
dents of that township. Judson Hays was a pioneer tilemaker of Decatur 
countv, his tile-kiln in Clay township being one of the most important indus- 
tries thereabout. Not only was the clay of that section of the county well 
adapted to the purposes of tile-making, but Mr. Hay's careful and scientific 
study of the processes of tile-making lent to his product a quality which 
caused it to be much sought by farmers throughout this whole region and 
thousands of acres of well-drained land hereabout have been greatly increased 
in value by the discriminating and intelligent use of the product of this once 
well-known kiln. Judson Hays died in 1895, the death of his widow 
occurring not long thereafter. Both were most estimable people and their 
passing was deeply mourned by many. 

To Judson and Mary E. (Jones) Hays were born seven children, namely: 
Flora, who married Will Pumphrey. of this county; Dora, who married 
Jacob Kuntz; John C, the immediate subject of this sketch; Mamie, who 
married Clarence Maze; Gertrude, who married Tilden Knouse; Katie, who 
married Walter Skinner, and Karl, who lives at Detroit. 

J. C. Hays was reared on a farm and for a time was an assistant to his 



950 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

father at the tile-kihi, but did not attempt to continue the operation of that 
plant at his father's death. Fourteen years ago he engaged in the general 
merchandise business at Burney and has been very successful. Starting with 
a sail stock, but with a practical knowledge of the needs of his trade, he 
gradually increased the scope of his business until now he has a thriving 
trade, covering a wide territory. His commercial methods from the very 
start were enterprising, his desire to give the very best service possible lead- 
ing him to employ only the best and most approved agencies for the promo- 
tion of his trade. The straightforward and direct manner appealed to his 
customers immediately and it was not long until he was prospering as he 
deserved to prosper. These conditions continued and now Mr. Hays is 
regarded as one of the most substantial merchants in the western part of the 
county. 

On December 24, 1895, John C. Hays was united in marriage to Mattie 
Edwards, who was born in Kentucky, the daughter of Daniel Edwards, who 
now lives at Columbus, this state, and to this union two children have been 
born, Lory and Mrytle Irene. Mr. and Mrs. Hays are members of the 
Baptist church and take an earnest interest in the good works of the com- 
munity, being regarded as among the leaders in all movements helpful to the 
general welfare. 

Mr. Hays is a Republican and gives a good citizen's attention to the 
political affairs of the county, though never having been included in the 
office-seeking class. He is a member of the Knights of Pythias lodge at 
Burney and is one of the leaders in the affairs of that lodge. Genial, affable 
and accommodating, he is one of the most popular men thereabout and has 
hosts of warm friends. 



WEBSTER HOLLAND HOLMES. 

Among the former residents of Decatur county who now are success- 
fully engaged in business in the state capital, few are better known or have 
a more popular following among old friends in this county than Webster 
H. Holmes, a prominent building contractor, formerly of Horace, this 
county, now living in Indianapolis, where he has been quite successful in 
his building operations. 

Webster Holland Holmes was bom in Clinton county, Ohio, on June 7, 
1856, the son of the Rev. William and Elizabeth (Cowgill) Holmes, old 
and honored residents of that section of Ohio. Rev. William Holmes, a 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 95 1 

""local" minister of the Methodist church, was born in New Jersey in Sep- 
tember, 1808. He grew to manhood in that state and then migrated to Ohio, 
locating in Clinton county, where he engaged in farming and where he spent 
the rest of his life. He was one of the best-known "local" ministers of the 
Methodist church in that part of Ohio, and for over fifty years was engaged 
in preaching the Gospel, to him ever a labor of love, for "local" ministers 
of the Methodist church received no compensation for their services in those 
days. Three of his sons served their country faithfully and well as sol- 
diers in the Union arm during the Civil War and the family was highly 
honored and respected throughout that whole section of the state. William 
Holmes was a member of an old family in New Jersey, his father being of 
sound Colonial stock, and his first wife, who, before her marriage, was 
Katherine Brouse, was also of an old family in that section. 

Rev. William Holmes married, secondly, Elizabeth Cowgill, who was 
born in Clinton county, Ohio, daughter of William Cowgill, a pioneer of 
that section of Ohio, of Scottish descent. Mrs. Holmes was a most excel- 
lent woman. She lived all her life in Clinton county, both she and her hus- 
band spending their last days on the farm near Sabina, Ohio, within twelve 
miles of the point where she was born. 

Webster H. Holmes received his education in the district schools of his 
native county in Ohio, this schooling constantly being supplemented by the 
sound admonitions of his godly father and mother. Upon reaching man- 
hood he engaged in farming and for twelve years was thus engaged in 
the neighborhood of his home. In 1887 he moved to Morgan county, Ten- 
nessee, where he remained for a year, engaged in the lumber business, at 
the end of which time he moved to a farm near Williamstown, Kentucky, 
on which he lived for three years. In 1891 he moved to a farm five miles 
south of Greensburg, in this county, and became a general building con- 
tractor, his operations in that line being extended to various parts of the 
county. This venture proving successful, he later moved to the village of 
Horace, this county, where he remained until 1906, in which year he moved 
to Indianapolis, seeking a wider field for his building operations, and has 
been quite successful in the capital city, being well recognized and respected 
among the master carpenters of that city. 

On October 19, 1876, Webster H. Holmes was united in marriage at 
Hillsborough, Ohio, to Martha E. Marsh, who was bom on October 13, 
1856, and to this union five children have been born. Aura A., Jessie L., 
Oscar W., Ilo (deceased) and Daisy. 

Mr. and Mrs. Holmes are members of the Methodist church and their 



P52 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

children have been reared in that faith. Mr. Hohnes retains his member- 
ship in the Knights of Pythias lodge at Greensburg, and continues to take 
a warm interest in the affairs of the same, as well as in the general affairs 
of the county in which he formerly made his home. He and Mrs. Holmes 
are quite popular in the considerable Decatur county colony at the state 
capital and are held in the highest esteem by their many friends. 



CLAY ALEXANDER. 



Clay Alexander is a representative farmer, liveryman and stockman of 
Clay township. In his life he has outstripped many of those less active on 
the highway of life and during the last decade, especially, has made a con- 
siderable amount of money in the various enterprises in which he has been 
engaged. He is a man of unfailing integrity and one whose word is gen- 
erally recognized as being as good as his bond. He owns a farm three miles- 
south of Burney and is engaged in the livery, feed and sales business in 
Burney. 

Clay Alexander was born in Bartholomew county, Indiana, on June 8, 
1862, son of A. J. and Charlotta (Steward) Alexander, the former of whom 
was a native of Butler county, Ohio, born in 1839, who came to Indiana 
when he was eighteen years old, settling in Bartholomew county. He later 
owned eighty acres of land near Hartsville, but traded this for one hundred 
and sixty acres of land in this county, to which he moved and there spent the 
remainder of his active business life. Charlotta Steward, who was born in 
Ireland, came with her parents when six years old to America. They settled 
in Bartholomew county, Indiana, where she was married to A. J. Alexander 
and by industry, economy and shrewd management, she and her husband 
became prosperous farmers. Clay Alexander was about thirteen years old 
when his parents came to Decatur county and he lived on the old Alexander 
homestead south of Burney, in Clay township, until he was twenty-seven 
years old. 

At the age of twenty-seven. Clay Alexander was married to Mollie 
Elliott, daughter of James Elliott, after which he moved to Hartsville where 
for a time he was engaged in various callings. Later he rented a farm for a 
year and then moved to Burney where he engaged in teaming and kindred 
work for fifteen years. At the end of that time, Mr. Alexander built the 
livery barn in Burney, which he still owns. He has been in the hav, straw. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. .953- 

feed and livery business since that time and has a flourishing patronage in this 
county. He buys large quantities of hay and straw and ships it to distant 
points, after bailing. For ten years he has been an extensive dealer in horses 
and about three years ago purchased eighty acres of land three miles south 
of Burney. This farm is operated by a tenant and its chief products are 
corn and clover ; he is also a breeder of hogs. 

Clay Alexander is a stanch Republican and one of the leaders of his 
party in Clay township. Fraternally, he is a member of the Knights of 
Pythias lodge in Burney. Mrs. Alexander is a member of the Baptist church. 
She is the local correspondent of the Grecnshurg Daily News and for thirteen 
years had charge of the Independent Telephone Company's plant at Burney. 
Mr. Alexander is one of the solid and substantial citizens of Decatur county 
and for the past ten years has made a remarkable record in business. Both 
he and his wife are well liked and respected by the people of the community 
in which they live. 



CHARLES E. REMY. 



In agricultural circles in Decatur county, few names are better known 
than that of the gentleman whose name the reader notes above and few men 
in the county have constructed their careers on a more solid foundation than 
has he. Recognized as one of the most substantial and progressive farmers 
in the county, Mr. Remy also is known as a public-spirited citizen to whom 
every movement looking to the betterment of general conditions in his home 
county is welcome, finding in him an earnest and influential supporter. Mr. 
Remy brings to his farm work an active intelligence, stimulated by the best 
schooling and grounded on the fullest and latest information relating to the 
most modern methods of tilling the soil and, in consequence, has prospered as 
he deserves to have prospered. A native of this county, of as fine stock as 
ever made its influence felt here ; his father a physician of note and power 
in his day, his grandfather a pioneer minister of the Baptist faith, whose 
influence in southern Indiana still goes on, even to the third and fourth 
generation, Mr. Remy very properly may be regarded as one of the leaders 
in the community life of Decatur county, and the biographer takes much 
pleasure in presenting at this point a brief review of his life. 

Charles E. Remy was born on a farm in Marion township, Decatur 
county, Indiana, six miles south of the town of Greensburg, on July 15, 1869, 
the son of Dr. Alfred S. and Anna M. (Kluge) Remy, the former of whom 



-954 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

was born near the town of Brookville, Franklin county, Indiana, and the lat- 
ter of whom was born in Pennsylvania. 

Alfred S. Remy was born on October 4, 1819, the son of the Rev. 
James I. Remy, a native of South Carolina, of French Huguenot stock, a 
pioneer minister of the Baptist faith in southern Indiana ; a man who exerted 
a powerful influence for good throughout the region round about Brookville, 
where for many years he lived and labored. Rev. James I. Remy married 
an Adair and one of the children of this union, Alfred S. Remy, father of 
the immediate subject of this sketch, became a physician, who practiced his 
profession for many years in this county, at the same time carrying on exten- 
sive operations as a farmer. Dr. Alfred S. Remy was a graduate of Ohio 
Medical College at Cincinnati and for a time following his graduation prac- 
ticed his profession in Jennings county, this state, later coming to Decatur 
county, locating in Marion township, where he bought a farm of one hun- 
dred and seventy-one acres, to which he later added one hundred and forty 
acres, making three hundred and eleven acres in all, forty acres of which lay 
in Jennings county. 

Doctor Remy was twice married. To his union with Almira Jane 
Scoby, who was born on December 24, 1821, and who died on May 6, 1862, 
there were born four children. Dr. Alfred S. Jr., born on January i, 1S47, 
who died in 1880; Henry, born on October 30, 1850, who resides at Con- 
cordia, Kansas; Mary Ellen, who died on September 21, 1852, at -the age of 
one year, and Orlando Ellsworth, born on April 4, 1861, who is a resident of 
Denver, Colorado. Upon the death of his wife, Almira, Doctor Remv mar- 
ried, secondly, Anna Kluge, who was born at Lebanon, Penns3dvania, Decem- 
ber 26, 1839, and who died in this county on October 28, 1898, to which 
union two children were born, Charles E., the subject of this sketch, and 
Emma Catherine, the latter of whom was born on September 27, 1867, and 
died on September 25 of the next year. The father of these children died 
on March 31, 1890, having been a man of much influence in his day and 
generation. 

Charles E. Remy received his elementary education in the district schools 
of his home township in this county, supplementing this schooling with a 
course in Hope College. He then entered upon his career as a farmer and 
for years lived on the home place in Marion township. He bought the 
interest of the other heirs in his father's estate and added to the home farm 
until he now owns four hundred acres of choice land in that part of the 
county. In connection with his work as a general farmer, Mr. Remy has 
given considerable attention to the breeding of live stock and has cultivated 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 955 

only the best strains of stock on his farm. In 1909 Mr. Remy retired from 
active farm Hfe and moved into Greensburg, where he has a very pleasant 
home. He still gives close personal direction to the affairs of his farm and 
is keenly alive to all the advancements in the present-day science of agri- 
culture. 

On September 23, 1891, Charles E. Remy was united in marriage to 
Catherine Lowe, who was born in Decatur county, the daughter of Samuel 
T. and Martha Lowe, also natives ©f this county, to which union two chil- 
dren were born, one who died in infancy, and Edith, who married Charles 
Martin, of Greensburg. 

Samuel T. Lowe, who was born in this county in November, 1835, for 
many years was one of the most prominent and influential residents of 
Marion township. He was a farmer on a large scale and was known through- 
out this section as a successful stock buyer, being also a large shipper of mules. 
He was an ardent Democrat and was actively interested in the political affairs 
of the county. For many years he served as trustee of Marion township, 
his services in that connection proving of large value to the public. His 
father, Jonathan Lowe, was one of the early pioneers of this county, a native 
of Kentucky who came to Indiana at an early day in the settlement of this 
section, first settling in the Paoli neighborhood, but later coming to Decatur 
county, entering government land in Marion township. He died in 1836, 
leaving to his widow, who was Elizabeth Whitman, previous to her mar- 
riage, the duty of rearing a considerable family, most of the children of this 
family still being young at the time of their father's death. This duty she 
performed with the energy of the true pioneer mother and was able to add 
to the family's holdings by the additional entry of land in her own name. 
Samuel T. Lowe reared a large family and in his later years moved to South 
West City, Missouri, where his death occurred in March, 1913. His widow 
is still making her home in that city. 

Mr. and Mrs. Remy are members of the Presbyterian church at Greens- 
burg and are active workers therein. Mr. Remy is a Republican and .takes 
an earnest interest in the political affairs of this county and the state at large. 
He several times has been a delegate to the state conventions of his party 
and in 19 12 was a delegate to the historic national convention of the party at 
Chicago. He is a member of the local lodges of the Elks, of .the Knights of 
Pythias and of the Woodmen, in the affairs of all of which he takes an active 
interest. He and Mrs. Remy take a proper interest in the social affairs of 
the city in which they live and are veiy popular, being held in the highest' 
regard by a large circle of friends. 



956 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

FRANCIS M. PUMPHREY. 

At the election in 19 14 Clay township elected one of the foremost and 
most progressive citizens of Decatur county to serve in the important and 
responsible office of township trustee, one of the most important offices within 
the gift of the people; the office which bears a closer relation to the intimate 
affairs of a community than any other. That the nomination for this office 
was given to Francis M. Pumphrey by a vote of two to one is satisfactory 
evidence that the people of the township were convinced of that gentleman's 
eminent qualifications for the proper and faithful administration of the affairs 
of this office, and his subsequent election by a very gratifying majority was 
further confirmation. Mr. Pumphrey is devoted to the school interests of 
his home township, holding the belief that in educational matters no pains or 
expense should be spared to secure the best results in behalf of the youth of 
the township. Clay township schools are well organized and the township 
high school at Burney is the pride of the township. Erected at a cost of 
something like fifteen thousand dollars, this admirable high-school building 
is thoroughly equipped with all the modern appliances for an up-to-date edu- 
cational plant and the assurance is given that Trustee Pumphrey will neglect 
no precaution necessary to further advance the high reputation this excellent 
school has earned throughout that section of the county. Unusually success- 
ful in the management of his own extensive business enterprises, Mr. Pumph- 
rey is bringing to bear on his administration of the affairs of his new office 
the same sound judgment and fine executive ability that has brought him a 
pronounced personal success, and the general consensus of opinion there- 
about is that the affairs of the township are in most competent and capable 
hands. Mr. Pumphrey for years has been largely interested in the stock- 
buying business and is known far and wide as one of the most extensive buy- 
ers and shippers of live stock in Decatur county. He owns two small farms, 
one of sixty acres, one-fourth of a mile north of the village of Burney, and 
one of forty acres, three-fourths of a mile south of that town, and, while 
giving to these farms his careful attention, makes his chief business that of a 
stock dealer, a business in which he has been actively engaged since he was 
twenty years of age. 

Francis M. Pumphrey was born on the home farm in Clav township in 
the year 1865 and has always lived in that township. He is the son of Wil- 
liam and Lodusky (Jewell) Pumphrey, former prominent and well-known 
residents of Clay township, the former of whom was a native of Kentucky, 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 957 

who died about six years ago at the age of seventy-two years, and the latter 
of whom died about twenty years ago. 

WilHam Pumphrey was a stanch and stable citizen, a successful farmer 
and a leader in the good works of the community in which he had lived so 
long. He and his wife were members of the Methodist church and their 
children were reared with the strictest regard for all the moral obligations 
of good citizenship. William Pumphrey abhorred profanity and all coarse- 
ness of speech and his sons grew up with the same feeling of repugnance 
toward such forms of expression, and it is a matter of pleasant neighborhood 
note that to this day no one can be found who ever has heard any of the 
Pumphrey "boys" swear. Though a successful farmer along the general 
lines of agriculture, William Pumphrey's specialty was the breeding of hogs 
and cattle for the market and his son, the immediate subject of this sketch, 
came into the live-stock business cjuite naturally. 

To William and Lodusky (Jewell) Pumphrey were born eight children, 
namely : James A., a prominent farmer of Clay township, who lives north 
of Burney, on one of the finest and best farms in Decatur county; Francis 
M., the immediate subject of this sketch; William, who lives in Shelbyville, 
Indiana; Edwin, a progressive and up-to-date farmer living three- fourths 
of a mile north of Burney: Elizabeth, the wife of Frank Alline, a well-known 
farmer living one and one-half miles south of Burney; Fannie, the wife of 
Joseph Minor, of Burney ; May, the wife of Clyde Elliott, a well-known 
farmer living one mile west of Burney, and Iva, the wife of Earl Littell, of 
Indianapolis. 

Francis M. Pumphrey was reared on the paternal farm in Clay town- 
ship, receiving his education in the excellent schools of that township. At 
the age of twenty years, he engaged in the live-stock business on his own 
responsibility and has become one of the most successful stock buyers in 
Decatur county, it being doubtful if any dealer in the county handles more 
stock in the course of a year than does he. When twenty-three years of age, 
Mr. Pumphrey was united in marriage to Margaret Stealman, daughter of 
James Stealman, a prominent farmer of the Burney neighborhood. James 
Stealman, now deceased, was a native of Virginia, whose home was near 
the famous natural bridge. 

To Francis M. and Margaret (Stealman) Pumphrey have been born 
three children, Floyd, who married May Champ and lives at Burney; Isophene 
and Marie, the daughters both being at home. Mr. and Mrs. Pumphrey are 
members of the Baptist church at Burney and take a leading part in the gen- 
eral good works of the community, being highly regarded throughout that 



958 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

whole section of the county. Mr. Puniphrey is a Democrat and for years has 
taken an active part in local politics, though he had never been a candidate 
for public office until his recent successful candidacy for the office of tovi^n- 
ship trustee. He is a charter member of the Knights of Pythias lodge at 
Burney and has been one of the most active promoters of the interests of 
that popular organization. His extensive business affairs have brought him 
into touch with the leaders of the business interests of Decatur county for 
years and he enjoys the unbounded confidence and the utmost esteem of all 
his associates. 



HENRY M. REDELMAN. 

Henry M. Redelman, farmer and stock breeder of Marion township, this 
county, is a representative of the second generation of the Redelman family 
in America. The owner of three hundred and twenty acres of land, one 
hundred acres of which is in timber, situated in Marion township, Mr. 
Redelman has been a breeder of live stock for many years. He owns four 
registered Percheron mares, two Percheron stallions, a German coach stallion, 
Ernus, and one jack. He began breding Aberden Angus cattle in 1898, and 
now raises, feeds and sells a great many head every year. He also keeps 
thoroughbred Duroc-Jersey hogs, which he raises for breeding purposes, 
selling them all over Decatur county. His breed is widely and favorably 
known, particularly since his farm is immune from cholera. He also has 
specialized in poultry and is an extensive fancier of thoroughbred Barred 
Plymouth Rocks. He sells pullets, roosters and settings and has a large 
business in poultry. Of the stallions which Mr. Redelman owns, "Massala" is 
an educated horse that has been taught many tricks. A fine driving mare has 
also been trained to perform many tricks. Mr. Redelman's fine farm house 
is thoroughly modern, having been remodeled in 1913 and painted a salmon 
color. Tt is equipped with an acetyline-light plant and with a private water 
system. A large yellow barn, forty-six by fifty-six feet, with sheds on three 
sides, giving plenty of room, and other attractive out-buildings, including a 
garage, make the Redelman farm one of the most attractive spots in Marion 
township. The owner and proprietor of this farm has every reason to be 
proud of his success as a farmer and breeder. 

Born on May 31, 1854, in Decatur county, Indiana, Henry M. Redelman 
is the son of Alathias and Marv (Bergsterman) Redelman, both natives of 
Germany, the former of whom was born in 1820, and died in 1855, and the 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. g^(^ 

latter of whom was born in 1826, and died in 1866. Mathias Redelman 
came to America in 1849 and after spending a few years in Cincinnati came 
to this county, locating in Marion township, where he purchased a farm two 
miles south of that now owned by his son, Henry M. He and his wife were 
the parents of two sons, Henry M. and John W., the latter of whom died in 
1895. After her husband's death, Mrs. Mathias Redelman married Bernard 
Rolfes, to which union one child was born, Herman, who died in infancy. 
After Mrs. Rolfes' death, in 1866, Bernard Rolfes married an aunt of 
Henry M. Redelman's. Mrs. Mary Redelman, the widow of Frank, who 
was the mother of eight children at the time of the marriage, and who after 
her second marriage gave birth to three more. Of the eight children born 
to Frank and Mary Redelman, the whereabouts of two, H. B. and John, are 
unknown. Of the others, Ferdinand, is living at Peoria, Illinois; Rosina 
married Adam Ruhl, and died in Nebraska ; Mrs. Christina Ruhl lives in 
Minnesota; Frank lives in Franklin county; Joseph is deceased, and Mrs. 
Mary Wagner lives in Peoria, Illinois. The three Rolfes children are Her- 
man, of Washington tawnship; Elizabeth, who married Orville King, of 
Greensburg, and Mrs. Katie Stier, of Harris City. 

Beginning life on his own account in 1869, at the age of fifteen years, 
Henry M. Redelman learned the cigarmaker's trade in Cincinnati. After 
serving his apprenticeship he worked for three months in Indianapolis and 
then went to St. Louis, where he found his trade unprofitable. About that 
time he began selling medicine, traveling with a horse and rig in Illinois in 
1873 and in Missouri in 1874. In the fall of 1874 he returned to Indiana, 
driving through from St. Louis. Here he followed his business for several 
years, eventually settling on a farm in 1885. 

Two years before removing to the farm, Henry M. Redelman was 
married, on November 27, 1883, to Sarah A. Hermann, who was born in this 
county on February 25, 1864, the daughter of Joseph and Susanna (Young) 
Hermann, the latter of whom came to this country at the age of six years 
with her parents, who located in Ohio. There were five children in the 
Hermann family, those besides Mrs. Redelman being as follow : Susanna, 
now deceased, who married Valentine Hahn. of Marion township, this 
county; Lizzie, who, upon the death of her sister, Susanna, married the 
latter's husband, Valentine Hahn, and is now living in Marion township; 
Josephine, who married Michael Wurtz, of Indianapolis, this state; and 
Henry, a well-known farmer of Marion township, this county, who married 
Katie Lohman. The mother of these children was twice married, her first 
husband having been a Mr. Farraday, a native of Germany, who died about. 



960 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

1849, to which union there were born two children, Mary, now deceased, 
who married Ben Flack, of Indianapolis, and Anthony, who married Jennie 
Holwell and lives in Colorado. 

To Henry M. and Sarah A. (Hermann) Redelman have been born six 
children, namely: George F.. cashier of the bank at New Point, this county; 
Walter B., who owns a farm near Slabtown, one mile north of his father's 
home; Mae J., the wife of T. A. Woods, of St. Denis, Jennings county; 
Edward V., who is employed by the Sears-Roebuck Company, of Chicago, 
and Maurice H. and Arthur S., living at home. George F. Redelman mar- 
ried Lena Spitzmesser and they have one son, Norbert. Walter married 
Amelia Zaphe and they have one daughter, Edna. Mrs. May Woods has one 
child, Marjorie. Edward married Laura Ruberg. Mr. and Mrs. Redelman's 
children, several of whom now have homes of their own, are leading honor- 
able and useful lives in the various communities in which they reside. 

The success of Henry M. Redelman as a farmer and stock breeder has 
not been won without patience, toil and consistent diligent effort. He is a 
man of generous impulses, who takes a commendable interest in the welfare 
of his neighbors and who is a popular citizen of Marion township. There are 
no better citizens living in this county than Henry M. Redelman. Mr. and 
Mrs. Redelman are members of St. Mary's Catholic church at Greensburg, 
active in all good works, and their children have been reared in that faith. 
Mr. Redelman is a Democrat and for years has taken a good citizen's part in 
the political affairs of the county, ever having been an exponent in the best 
sense of that term. 



JOHN GRAHAM EVANS. 

In any review of the lives of those men and women who wrought largely 
.and well in that portion of Decatur county comprised in Jackson township, 
the historian is compelled to give due weight to the influence exerted in the 
•early period of the settlement of that section by. the Evans and the Davis 
families. These families for many years have been prominent in all the good 
works of that community, few families thereabout having done more for 
the material and social advancement of that section than they. When, by the 
marriage in 1887, of John Graham Evans and Emma B. Davis, there was 
■effected a happy union, all the neighbors joined in wishing the new home well, 
ior the union was regarded universally among the friends of the young cou- 
ple as one of the most fitting that could be brought about. As predicted by 




JOHN (i. EVANS 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 96I 

all, the new home prospered and very properl)' became one of the social cen- 
ters of that part of the county, the genial hospitality of the host and hostess 
and the engaging qualities of the children who presently came to bless that 
union, making the Evans home one of the most delightful in the county. 
This home was established in a fine, large farm residence which Mr. and Mrs. 
Evans caused to be erected on their Jackson township farm, one of the most 
substantial houses in the county; white and green, standing in the midst of 
a large, well-shaded lawn, with farm buildings of the most svibstantial char- 
acter — an immense barn, painted yellow and white, with outbuildings to 
match. In the fall of 1914, the head of this pleasant family met his death 
as the result of an accident, Mr. Evans having died from injuries received in 
a fall from the haymow. His widow and those of his children who have 
not yet married and left the paternal roof, still occupy the Evans homestead 
and in their hearts is enshrined the memory of a kind and devoted husband, 
a loving and indulgent father. 

The late John Graham Evans was born on the farm on which his whole 
life was spent, in Jackson township, Decatur county, Indiana, on May 6, 
1864, the son of William A. and Emily ( Hice) Evans, and died at the same 
place on November 23, 1914. William A. Evans, who was born on Novem- 
ber 3, 1835, and died on October 11, 1910, came to this county with his fath- 
er, William Evans, from Hamilton county, on November 5, 1837. At that 
time a dense forest marred the site of the present beautiful Evans home in 
Jackson township, for it was there that William Evans settled. He cleared 
the forest and established a prosperous home and there his son, William A., 
was reared and in turn established his home there, to be succeeded by his 
son, the late John G. Evans. 

On December 16, 1858, William A. Evans was united in marriage to 
Emily Hice, a member of one of the pioneer families of Decatur county, and 
to this union there were born three children, John Graham, the subject of 
this sketch; Milton E., a farmer of Jackson township, and Winston, deceased. 
Mrs. Evans died in June, 1898, and Mr. Evans married, secondly, February 
19, 1901, Melissa Thompson, who died on April 20, 1908, and on July 8, 
1909, he married Sarah Updike, who survives him. After his second mar- 
riage, Mr. Evans retired from the active duties of the farm and located in the 
• village of Letts, this county, where his last days were spent. He is survived 
by two sisters, Mrs. Williams, of Delhart, Texas, and Mrs. Martha Fraley, 
of Forest Hill, this county. Mr. Evans was a good man and a good farmer 
.and had prospered largely. He was an active member of the Presbyterian 
(61) 



962 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

church and for many years was one of the most influential men in his part 
of the county. 

John G. Evans was reared on the paternal farm, receiving his education 
in the local schools and grew up to be one of the most highly-respected young 
men in Jackson township. On March 28, 1877 he united with the Presby- 
terian church and on February 3, 1900, became a member of the ■Mt. Aerie 
Baptist church, becoming a trustee of that church in 1906 and ordained as a 
deacon in April. 1907. Mr. Evans cultivated his farm of two hundred and 
ninety acres in accordance with the latest discoveries in agricultural science, 
using the most modern appliances in the operation of the same. He took 
a deep interest in affairs outside the immediate range of the farm and was 
one of the most active men of affairs in that part of the county. He was a 
director in the First National Bank of Westport and of the State Bank at 
Letts, and also was interested in various other enterprises of an important 
character. The social side of his nature was one of Mr. Evans's most engag- 
ing qualities and he was one of the most popular men in that part of the 
county. He was a member of the Odd Fellows lodge at Westport and of the 
Knights of Pythias lodge at Letts, taking a warm interest in the aft'airs of 
both these organizations, both of which passed earnest resolutions of respect 
and condolence upon his passing. No man in the county took a deeper inter- 
est in good government than did Mr. Evans, and he was looked upon as one 
of the leaders of the Democratic party in his township. In the fall of 1908- 
he was elected to the responsible and important position of township trustee 
for Jackson township and should have served for si.x years, his term being 
due to expire on January i, 1915. He was performing excellent service in 
this office, when his untimely and lamented death cut short his useful tenure. 
As noted above, Mr. Evans farmed on a large scale and was very successful 
in his agricultural undertakings; he also was an extensive breeder of Duroc- 
Jersey hogs. 

On October 6, 1887, John Graham Evans was united in marriage to 
Emma B. Davis, who was born in Jackson township, this county, on Novem- 
ber 13, 1864, the daughter of Aaron and Jane (Barrett) Davis, both natives 
of Franklin county, Indiana. 

/\aron Davis was born on May 16, 1833. the son of James and Martha 
(Smathers) Davis, both natives of Kentucky. James Davis was the son of 
Matthias Davis, a native of Wales, of Welsh and Scottish parentage, who- 
came to this country and was a soldier in the War of 18 12. He married 
a Miss McClellan, a member of the same family from which Gen. George B. 
McClellan, of Civil War fame, sprang, and located in the Mt. Sterling neigh- 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 963 

borhood of Kentucky, where James was born and reared. In 1830 Matthias 
Davis left Kentucky and came to Indiana, locating in Franklin county, from 
which point he moved to this county, settling in Salt Creek township, where 
his death occurred in 1840. He and his wife were the parents of ten chil- 
dren, Melinda, James, Joseph, Elizabeth, Isaac, Daniel, Allan, Ambrose, Wil- 
liam and Mathias. 

James Davis, who was born in 1798 and died in 1866, was married in 
Kentucky to Martha Smathers, a daughter of Hugh Smathers. a native of 
Ireland, who immigrated to America, took part in the Indian wars and in the 
War of 1812 and went to Kentucky, where he married and prospered. In 
1830 he came to Indiana and ten years later emigrated to Iowa, where he 
spent the remainder of his life. Hugh Smathers was twice married, his sec- 
ond \\'ife, who was a Miss Hopkins, having been the mother of three chil- 
dren, Hugh, Sabina and Benjamin. To the union of James Davis and 
Martha Smathers there were born ten children, namely : Mrs. Sarah Shelton, 
Harrison, a well-known resident of Clay township ; Matthias, deceased ; Mrs. 
Nancy Pavey, Mrs. Sabina Burkman; Aaron, father of Mrs. Evans; Mrs. 
Andocia Sharp; Mrs. Eliza Barnes; Martha and Elizabeth. The mother of 
these children died in 1866. 

Aaron Davis was reared on the home farm in this county, receiving such 
educational advantages as the schools of his boyhood afforded, and at eigh- 
teen years of age began to work for himself as a farm hand. When twenty- 
one years old he married and settled on a small farm in Sand Creek town- 
ship, which he sold and bought a farm in Clay township. Four years later 
he sold this farm and bought one hundred and sixty acres near the village of 
Letts, in Jackson township. Here he prospered and gradually added to his 
holdings until he was the owner of two hundred and forty acres of excel- 
lent land, on which he erected a fine, large two-story brick house. In 1881 
he and O. S. Mitchell built a grain elevator at Letts and for some time he 
was successfully engaged in this business, but in 1894 sold his interest to his 
partner and retired from active business. He was a Republican and took a 
warm interest in local politics, being one of the strongest factors in the pro- 
motion of the cause of good government in that part of the county. 

On October 24, 1858, Aaron Davis was united in marriage to Jane 
Barrett, who was born in Franklin county, this state, October 10. 1837, the 
daughter of Charles and Mildred (Gentry) Barrett, natives of Virginia. 
Charles Barrett was a soldier in the War of 1812 and died in Franklin coun- 
ty in 1837. His wife was the daughter of Clairborn Gentry, a native of Vir- 



964 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

ginia, and who came of an old Colonial family, who settled in Franklin coun- 
ty in I S3 7. 

To Aaron and Jane (Barrett) Davis were born eight children, namely: 
John C, a former instructor in the United States army, in service in Cuba, 
now living in Montana; Albert, who lives in Idaho; Emma B., the widow of 
Mr. Evans; Mrs. John Shafer, who lives in Pierce, Colorado; Mrs. Ida M. 
Moore, who lives in Champaign, Illinois; Rev. Henry Davis, a minister of 
the Baptist church, who, on September 27, 1899, married Eva White and 
lives at Eugene, Oregon; Everett, who lives in the state of Washington, and 
Clifford C, who is operating the old home farm. 

To John Graham and Emma B. (Davis) Evans were born six children, 
as follow : Mrs. Ethel ^^'illiams, of Letts, this county, who has a daughter, 
Ruth; Mrs. Hazel Gilmour, of Jackson township; Nelle, a teacher in the 
schools of Jackson township; Mildred, a student in the Newburg high school; 
Blanche, who is in the sixth year of her school work, and Russell, who is in 
the fifth grade of his school work. 

Mrs. Evans is a member of the Mt. Airie Baptist church and is devoted 
to the good works of the same. Her influence is felt in many wa^^s through- 
out that part of the county in which she lives. 



ALBERT LINK. 



Agriculture has been an honored vocation from the earliest ages and, 
as a usual thing, men of honorable and humane impulses as well as of energy 
and thrift have been patrons of husbandry. The free outdoor life of the 
farm has a decided tendency to foster and develop that independence of mind 
and self-reliance which characterize true manhood. No greater blessing can 
befall a boy than to be reared in close touch with nature in the healthful, 
life-inspiring work of the fields. Albert Link is a prosperous and skillful 
young farmer of Clay township, who has always enjoyed the best advantages 
of farm life. At the present time he is farming one hundred and thirty- 
three acres of land of his own and an additional farm of ninety acres, alto- 
gether one of the finest tracts of land in the county. He has a magnificent 
home situated on a knoll, with a wide lawn and many shade treees. Two 
large yellow barns and other outbuildings in a splendid state of repair, make 
his home one of the most attractive in that section of the county. The farm 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 965 

is owned jointly by Mr. Link and his father-in-law, John F. Templeton, who 
specialize in cattle, but plant forty acres of wheat and sixty acres of corn, 
yielding from seventy-five to eighty bushels to the acre. 

Albert Link was born in Greensburg, this county, on January 29, 1891, 
the son of Henry and Elizabeth Ling, natives of Germany, the former of 
whom was born in 1854 and who came to America in 1880, settling in Greens- 
burg, where he engaged in the meat business with Charles Zoller, Sr. He 
made a success of this business and retired a few years ago, now living in a 
fine home in the southeastern part of the city. Of the eight children born to 
Henry and Elizabeth Link, seven are living: Anna; Lizzie, who married 
Thomas Miller, of Clinton township ; Cora, the wife of Roy Privett, of 
Greensburg: Albert, who is the subject of this sketch; Charles, a traveling 
salesman, living in Greensburg, and Lewis and George, who live on their 
father's farm on the outskirts of Greensburg. Albert Link was educated in 
the public schools of Greensburg, Indiana, and early in life took up the 
butcher business with his father, in which business he was engaged until his 
marriage. 

In October, 1909, Albert Link was married to Lela May Templeton, 
daughter of John F. and Elizabeth (Pavy) Templeton, the former of whom 
was born in Franklin county, Indiana, in 1856, and who is the brother of 
Nelson M. Templeton, whose biographical sketch, presented elsewhere in this 
volume, gives the history of the Templeton family. Mr. Templeton lived 
on the farm for twenty years and today is considered an able and wealthy 
farmer. In 1915 he enjoyed a trip to the Pacific coast, attending the Panama- 
Pacific exposition. Mrs. John F. Templeton's family history is presented in 
the biographical sketch of her father on another page of this volume. Mrs. 
Albert Link was born on the Templeton homestead, the only child born to her 
parents. She and her husband have two children, John Henry and Mary 
Elizabeth. 

Albert Link has a herd of twenty-seven thoroughbred Shorthorn cattle, 
including twenty-two cows, a source of considerable profit. The Link home 
is situated some distance from the main road and is surrounded by a large 
lawn, shaded by two rows of fine ever green trees. The approach to the 
house and lawn consists of a beautiful graveled driveway, leading from the 
Columbus and Greensburg pike. Large maple and locust trees furnish addi- 
tional shade and the house is flanked by an orchard on the west. The land, 
which is level, consists of a rich loam. 

Intelligent and keen. Albert Link is one of the leading young farmers 



966 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

of Clay township. ]\'Ir. and Mrs. Link are members of the Baptist cliurch. 
He is identified with the RepubHcan party and the Loyal Order of Moose. 
Mr. Templeton is also is a Republican and he and his wife are also members 
of the Baptist church. 



JOSEPH S. MINOR. 



Joseph S. Minor, farmer and railroad man, enjoys the distinction of 
owning and living in perhaps the finest residence in Burney, which is second 
only to Greensburg in importance as a city of this county. Mr.. Minor owns 
a farm of one hundred acres, part of which lies at the north edge of Burney, 
and consists of the very best land to be found in Clay township. 

Joseph S. Minor was born at Hartsville, in^ Bartholomew county, Lidiana, 
in 1873, ^"<i is the son of John and Mary E. (Burney) Minor, the latter of 
vi'hom was a native of Decatur county, whose father and mother also were 
natives of this county. John Minor was a native of New Jersey, who came 
to Bartholomew county when a young man and settled on a farm near 
Hartsville. After his marriage to Mary E. Burney, they began life on the 
farm. At the age of forty years John Minor passed away suddenly, leaving 
a widow and a family of eight children, of whom Joseph S., the subject of 
this sketch, was next to the youngest. At the time of his death, John ]\Iinor 
left one hundred and twenty acres of land, rather heavily mortgaged. Mrs. 
Minor traded this tract in Bartholomew county for one hundred and twenty 
acres where the town of Burney now stands. This was a master stroke, 
netting Mrs. Minor a large profit. She was a woman of great business 
ability and native shrewdness, who not only kept what her husband left, but 
paid off the indebtedness. As her children became of age she bought and 
paid for the inherited interest of each of the eight children. 

After trading for the Clay township farm, Mrs. Mary E. Minor was 
married, in 1880, to Harrison Davis, and at his death, about eighteen years 
later, she also purchased the interest of his heirs, who numbered five. She 
was a member of the Baptist church. Educated in the common schools of 
Decatur county, Indiana, by extensive home study she kept herself well 
informed on current topics, and was a subscriber to the best newspapers, 
periodicals and farm papers. She always displayed an intelligent interest in 
politics and was able to discuss political affairs as few women of this county. 
Mrs. Minor died in 1913, at the advanced age of seventy years, retaining her 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 967 

wonderful mental faculties to the last. She was the mother of eight children, 
namely: James, who lives in the West; Mrs. Jennie Hansell, deceased; 
Milton, who lives in Burney, this county; Mrs. Minerva Cummins, a resident 
of Hartsville; William B., who lives south of Burney; Taylor, a resident of 
Richmond, Indiana; Joseph S., the subject of this sketch, and Esta, who died 
when a child. 

At the age of nineteen years Joseph S. Minor left home to study tele- 
graphy and railroad work. For a year he was clerk in a general store in 
Burney. At the age of twenty-one he was married to Fannie Pumphrey, 
daughter of William Pumphrey, Sr., whose family history is contained else- 
where in this volume. For twenty years Mr. Minor has been the railroad 
agent at Burney. 

Joseph S. Minor is a Progressive in politics and is one of the substantial 
citizens of Clay township. He is recognized as a man who is alert to every 
possibility of making money and aside from his railroad work and agricul- 
tural interests owns a considerable amount of gilt-edge stocks. Practically 
everything he has today he has made himself, though no doubt he inherited 
his mother's keen business ability. Mrs. Minor is an active member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. She and her husband believe in getting all out 
of life that is possible. They have an automobile and enjoy practically all 
of the luxuries and conveniences available to people of this section. 



JOSIAH WARREN ROBERTSON. 

Josiah Warren Robertson, a general farmer and stockman of Adams 
township, this county, belongs to an old family of Decatur county, his father 
having come here about 1829, during his day and generation having become 
one of the most prosperous farmers in this section of Indiana. It is a matter 
of no small peronal pride to have lived all of one's life in the township and 
county of one's birth. Men, who are so fortunate as to have enjoyed a large 
success in the community of their birth, are entitled to the respect and confi- 
dence of their neighbors and this is a distinction which Josiah Warren Rob- 
ertson enjoys in a high degree. 

Born on April 29, 1854, in Adams township, Josiah Warren Robertson 
was reared in that township. The old homestead is within sight of his present, 
home and is located on the adjoining farm. His parents, Oliver P. and 
Mary A. (Davis) Robertson, were early settlers in Adams township, the 



90(5 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

former having been born in Lawrencebnrg, Dearborn county, Indiana, on 
August I, 1825, the son of John and Ruth (Ridlen) Robertson, natives of 
Maryland and early settlers in Dearborn county. After coming to Adams 
township in 1829, the family became very prosperous, and there, for nearly a 
century, the Robertson family has been rcognized as one of the leading fac- 
tors in the agricultural life of the community. Mary A. Davis, the second 
wife of Oliver P. Robertson, was born on June 15, 1833, the daughter of 
John W. and Sarah (Forsythe) Davis, natives of New Jersey, who came to 
Decatur county about 1830, settling in Adams township. Mrs. Mary A. 
Robertson died on May 25, 1907. She was the mother of seven children, all 
of whom are living, namely: Josiah W., the subject of this sketch; J. Frank 
and Will, both of whom live in Adams township ; Charles, who lives at Acton, 
in Marion county, this state; Edward, who lives in Adams township; Lydia, 
who is the wife of Elmer Shelhorn, and Ruth, who is housekeeper for her 
two brothers, Josiah W. and Edward. 

Oliver P. Robertson was first married to Nancy Edrington, who was 
born in 1831 and who died in June, 1852. She was the daughter of Hiram 
and Rhoda Edrington, natives of Kentucky and pioneer settlers in Adams 
township. After coming to this township, they cleared the land, built a log 
house and later erected a large brick house, now owned by E. Shellhom. 
Oliver P. and Nancy Robertson had two children, Louisa L., who is deceased, 
and Lafayette, a farmer of Adams township, this county. At the time of his 
death, in 1907, Oliver P. Robertson owned one hundred and sixty acres of 
land, which is now known as the old Robertson homestead and which is 
owned jointly by his daughters, Lydia and Ruth. Josiah W. Robertson has 
lived in his present home since 1901, moving to this farm from the old home 
place. 

Mr. Robertson is a Progressive in politics, but has never taken an active 
interest in political matters. He is a man of generous and humane impulses 
and is popular in his neighborhood because of his many good works, his 
cordial relations with the citizens of his home township and his upright, 
honorable dealings with the public. He lives in a large brick house situated 
on his farm of three hundred and six acres and is engaged in general farming 
and stock raising. He is one of the most extensive stockmen of this town- 
ship, his annual output of the farm being two carloads of hogs and two 
carloads of cattle. Mr. Robertson is accustomed to buy live stock for feed- 
'ing purposes in the city market and. after they are fed out on the farm, are 
sold to the packing houses in the city. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 969' 

REV. JAMES WESLEY TURNER, A. M., D. D. 

Not too often can be repeated the life story of one who has Hved so 
honorable and useful a life and attained to such notable distinction as has the 
gentleman whose name appears at the head of this sketch; one of the most 
successful and distinguished ministers of the Methodist Episcopal church in 
the state of Indiana. His character has been one of signal exaltation and 
purity of purpose. Well disciplined in mind, maintaining a vantage point 
from which life has presented itself in correct proportion ; guided and guarded 
by the most inviolable principles of integrity and honor, such a man could not 
prove other than a force for good in whatever relation of life he may have 
been placed. His character is the positive expression of a strong nature and 
his strength is as the number of his days. His career has been a long, busy 
and useful one, and his name is honored by all who have had occasion to 
come in contact with him on life's pathway. Doctor Turner has dignified 
and honored his profession by his able and self -abnegating services through 
long years of earnest and indefatigable effort in a noble cause. His life has 
been one of concentration to his calling and well does he merit a place of 
honor in this history touching upon the lives and deeds of those who have 
given the best of their power and talent for the aiding and betterment of their 
kind in this county. 

James Wesley Turner was born in Dearborn county, Indiana, on August 
II, 1857, the son of Rev. Isaac and Alice (Kenyon) Turner, to whom but 
two children were born, the other having been Alice, the wife of Rev. M.. A. 
Farr, who died at Shelbyville, this state. Rev. Isaac Turner was born in 
England in 1830, and was educated in his native country. Studying for the 
ministry, he became identified with the Wesleyan Methodist church, in which 
he attained considerable prominence as a preacher. In 1854 he came to 
America and located in Dearborn county, where he continued his ministerial 
labors. He preached throughout southern Indiana, his circuit being a very 
large one, embracing the territory from Brookville to Napoleon. In that 
early day traveling facilities were very poor in this section of the state, and 
Isaac Turner made most of his journeys on horseback. He lived for many 
years at Smyrna, this county, where he presided over a large circuit, but in 
later years located in North Madison, Avhere his death occurred in 1905. As 
one of the pioneer preachers of his section of the state he exerted a large 
and beneficent influence on the side of morality and higher living, and his 
name is revered by many who knew him in his active years. His wife, Alice 
Kenvon, also a native of England, was a member of the Kenyon family noted 



■970 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

for its scholarly attainments. Her father, James Kenyon, was a man of 
much learning and served for many years as a tutor in families of the 
nobility. 

James Wesley Turner recei\-ed his elementary education in the common 
schools, and then became a student in Moore's Hill College, where he received 
the degree of Master of Arts in 1880. Subsequently, in 1905, his alma mater 
conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Divinity. Rev. J. W. Turner 
entered the ministry of the Methodist Episcopal church in 1877, his first 
charge being that of the Arlington circuit, which he filled for a short time. 
Entering then upon the regular itinerary, he was first appointed to the Milroy 
circuit, later serving one year at Laurel, three years at Irvington. a suburb 
of Indianapolis, three years at Edinburg, four years at Madison, and then 
was transferred to the Trinity church at Louisville, Kentucky, where he 
remained five years. From Louisville he went to the Trinity church at 
Evansville, Indiana, and four years later was appointed presiding elder of 
the Evansville district, in which position he served with eminent ability and 
success for five years. During the following two years he accepted nominal 
appointments and at the end of that period accepted the pastorate of Rush- 
ville church, where he remained for two years. Because of failing health, 
Reverend Turner felt the necessity of withdrawing from active labors for a 
time, and, locating in Clinton township, this county, he is living there with his 
family on a farm of two hundred and sixty-seven acres, comprising their 
present estate. There Mr. Turner built a splendid house, beautifully located 
on a hill commanding a magnificent view of the surrounding country, and 
there he is spending his days in quiet enjoyment of the fine library which he 
owns, valued at about nine thousand dollars and considered one of the best 
private collections of books in the state of Indiana. A special room was 
built in the house for the care of these books. Mr. Turner's farm comprises 
a magnificent tract of land which is in a high state of cultivation and which 
is operated by his sons, Harry D. and James W., Jr. The place is well 
improved and js numbered among the most productive farms in the locality. 

Doctor Turner has been a life-long Republican and has given earnest 
Tieed to the welfare of his community in the casting of his ballot. Fra- 
ternally, he is a member of the Free and Accepted Masons, belonging to the 
commandery of the Knights Templar at Evansville. A well-educated man, 
broad-minded and liberal in his thought and attitude toward the great ques- 
tions of the day, Mr. Turner has long been recognized as a man of superior 
qualifications and attainments and for a number of years has been a popular 
lecturer, among his lectures being the following: "Three Indices of the 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 97I 

Infinite," "True Intelligence and its Practical Manifestations," "Wasted 
Forces,'' and "Philosophy and Christianity." 

On July 29, 1880, Rev. James Wesley Turner was united in marriage 
to Lizzie Woodfill, who was born in Greensburg, the daughter of William S. 
and Sarah (Talbott) Woodfill, who were for years among the most prom- 
inent residents and influential citizens of Decatur county, Mrs. Turner's 
Grandmother Hendricks having been given the privilege of naming the town 
of Greenburg. W. S. Woodfill was born in Owen county, Kentucky, Novem- 
ber 16, 1825, the son of Gabriel and Eleanor (Pullam) Woodfill, of Welsh 
and English extraction, respectively. The Woodfill family was established in 
Pennsylvania in early colonial days. Rev. Gabriel Woodfill, the great-grand- 
father of William S., emigrated from Pennsylvania to Kentucky in an early 
day in the settlement of the latter state, locating in Shelby county, thence 
moving to Jefferson county, Indiana, where he spent the remainder of his 
life. He was a minister of the Gospel, a pioneer in the Methodism of Ken- 
tucky and Indiana, and a man of large influence. His son, Andrew, the 
grandfather of William S. Woodfill, was born in Pennsylvania, but spent 
most of his life in the neighborhood of Madison, Indiana. He married a 
Mitchell, and to that union were born twelve children, among whom was 
Gabriel, the father of William S. William S. Woodfill was educated in the 
schools of Greensburg, and in 1825 became a partner with his father in a 
general store at Greensburg. In January, 1863, the father retired from active 
lousiness, and William took into the firm two brothers, John and James, the 
business being conducted under the firm name of Woodfill Brothers. Various 
changes later were made in the copartnership, and the firm was conducted 
under various names, but always by a member of the family, being now under 
the individual management of W. W. Woodfill. In 1875 William S. Wood- 
fill organized the Greensburg Gas and Electric Company, of which he was 
president at the time of his death. He also owned various commercial and 
industrial interests and four valuable farms in this county. He was a faithful 
Methodist in his religion, and an earnest Republican in his political views, 
while his fraternal membership was with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. To him and his wife were born four children, namely: Lizzie, 
wife of the subject of this sketch; William Wirt, a Greensburg merchant; 
Harry Talbot, superintendent of the Greensburg gas and electric plant, and 
Web. The mother of these children died on October 31, 1898. 

To Rev. J. W. and Lizzie (Woodfill) Turner have been born the fol- 
lowing children: Rollin A., an attorney in Greensburg; Sarah, wife of 
Lewis Uhl, a pottery manufacturer in Huntingburg, Indiana, and who has 



972 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

three children, AHce, Robert and Hannah: Lieut. William W., U. S. N., a 
graduate of the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis, now a professor 
of electricity in the academy; Harry D. and James W., successful farmers; 
Rachel K., a graduate of the Greensburg high school of the class of 191 5, and 
Web W., who is attending the Sandusky centralized school. 



HENRY MOZINGO. 



Perhaps the best-known citizen of Clinton township, this county, is 
Henry Mozingo, who for many years has been one of the leading corn grow- 
ers in the state of Indiana, and who in the township of his residence has 
been prominent politically, having been elected as trustee on the Progressive 
ticket in the fall of 1914. Mr. Mozingo, by careful attention to the details 
of farming, has reduced it almost to an exact science and has gained prom- 
inence as a corn grower and stockman. He is accustomed to sell annually 
about three hundred bushels of seed com, though in 191 5 he sold five hundred 
bushels, for which he received two dollars and a half a bushel. In these times, 
when fifty bushels to the acre is an exceptional yield in this state, Mr. 
Mozingo's success is apparent by contrast ; since he grows more than ninety 
bushels to the acre on a part of his land, and last year had one hundred and' 
twenty acres of corn which averaged seventy-five bushels to the acre. He 
makes a specialty of Reed's yellow Dent, and Johnson county white corn, 
having taken many prizes on the product of his farm. He took the fourth 
and sixth prizes in the state corn show ; fourth prize on ten ears of yellow 
corn, and sixth on one ear of yellow. He also took sixth prize on ten ears of 
white in the same show. At the Clarksburg corn show he took four first 
prizes, and his son, Arthur, took second on ten ears of white, and on a single- 
ear, ten ears mixed, and second sweepstakes. Mr. Mozingo himself won 
the sweepstakes at Clarksburg and at the Greensburg com show, Arthur won 
sweepstakes and a silver cup, winning a trip to Purdue University in 1912 as 
a result of his splendid showing in the corn show. Mr. Mozingo's daughter, 
Grace, is a noted breeder of White Wyandottes, keeping about one hundred 
and fifty pure-bred chickens, and when she exhibited at Greensburg won first, 
second and third on cockerels ; first and second on pullets ; first, second and 
third on hens, and first on pens. 

Henry A^ozingo was born on a farm four miles south of Greensburg- 
on December 25, 1871, the son of James and Lydia (Caseldine) Mozingo,. 



DECATUR COUNTY^ INDIANA. 973 

natives of Decatur county, the former of whom was born in 1841, and died 
in May, 1913, and the latter of whom was born in 1853. James Mozingo 
was the son of Henry Mozingo, a native of Kentucky, who walked from 
Kentucky to Indiana in 1832 and entered land in Marion township, this 
county, where he built a log cabin. Later he returned to his native state and 
bought back with him his mother and the family. His mother lived to be 
one hundred and four years old. The older Henry Mozingo, who was born 
in 1809, died in 1888. He was a great admirer of Abraham Lincoln, and an 
ardent member of the Republican party. His wife, Elizabeth Mozingo, died 
in 1905. Of their twelve children, only five are living, Mrs. Mary Riley and 
Mrs. Eliza demons, of Greensburg; Mrs. Nancy Tremain, of Columbia, 
Missouri; Mrs. Belle Marlow, of Missouri, and Mrs. Edna Beagle, of near 
Westport, this county. 

James Mozingo, the father of Henry Mozingo, resided for a long time 
on the farm entered by his father, but in 1888 purchased a farm in Marion 
township, on which he spent the rest of his life. He was a progressive 
Republican in politics and was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church 
and of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. All of the nine children born 
to James and Lydia (Caseldine) Mozingo are living. In the order of their 
birth they are as follow: Henry, the subject of this sketch; Mrs. Minnie 
Skinner, who lives near the Mt. Pleasant church ; Mrs. Carrie Tumilty, who 
lives near Greensburg; Ed, who lives near Mt. Pleasant; Everett and May 
(twins), both of whom live on the home place; Mrs. Nona Cheek, who lives 
at Harris City; Mrs. Bessie Stoneking, of Osgood, and Clarence, who lives 
at home. May and Everett, twins. Mrs. James Mozingo is still living at her 
home on the old farm. 

Educated in the Hazelrigg district school, where he received only a 
limited education, Henr)' Mozingo was able to supplement the education he 
received at that time by assistance from his good wife, now deceased, who 
was a teacher for five years in Jennings and Decatur counties. On February 
28, 1900, Henry Mozingo was married to Ada Holcomb, a well-known 
teacher in the public schools of Decatur county, who was bornon a farm four 
miles east of Westport, the daughter of D. W. and Mary Halcomb, old resi- 
dents of Decatur county. To that union six children were born, Grace, 
Arthur, \^ernon, Ernest, Frank and Helen. The mother of these children 
died on December 20, 1914. 

A Progressive in politics, and an ardent admirer of Colonel Roosevelt 
and former Senator Beveridge, Mr. Mozingo was elected township trustee 
■on the Progressive ticket in the fall of 1914, succeeding Ed Meek to that 



974 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

office. Fraternally, he is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, the Free and Accepted IMasons, and the Knights of Pythias and has 
filled all of the chairs in the Odd Fellows lodge. Mr. Mozingo is a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, as was his wife, and their children have 
been reared in that faith. 

Not the least of Henry Mozingo's achievements is the breeding of fine 
hogs, cattle, horses and mules on his farm of three hundred and seventy-five 
acres in Clinton township. While his fame as a farmer may be attributed to 
his success with corn, ordinarily he keeps one hundred head of cattle, and 
more than that many hogs on the farm. He also has at the present time 
eightv-two head of horses and mules, and always keeps from fift}^ to seventv- 
five head. The extensive scale upon which Mr. Mozingo carries on farming 
in this countv clearlv entitles him to foremost rank as a scientific farmer. 



HEXRY A. DRAPING. 



Henry A. Draping, now a well-known and prominent farmer of Marion 
township, this county, was born on December 21, 1873. in that township in a 
log and frame house built by his father a few years before, a son of William 
and Mary (Tresler) Draping, and he and his brother George are operating 
two hundred acres of land in Marion township, doing general farming. 
Their land is fairly level and well-tiled. The place has been improved with a 
comfortable white house of seven rooms, a good barn forty-eight by seventy 
feet, tool and carriage sheds, etc. They feed about forty head of hogs 
annually. In addition to his farming interests, Henry Draping also has oper- 
ated a threshing-machine, in season, for the past twenty-two years and a 
corn-shredder for the past sixteen years. His brother, George Draping, 
also operates a saw-mill and does commercial sawing, his three sons assisting 
him in that work. 

William Draping, father of the subject of this sketch, was born on 
June 3, 1838, and died on April 20, 191 1. His wife, Mary Tresler, was born 
on January 28, 1849, and died on ]\Iarch 26, 1902. William Draping was 
born in Germany and came to America about 1865, settling in Marion town- 
ship, this county, where he eventually bought the place now owned by his 
sons. At the time of purchase, the place was all in woods, and with the 
assistance of his sons, it was soon put in a tillaljle condition. Before mar- 
riage, Mr. Draping worked at various points, following the trades of stave- 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 975-, 

maker and cooper. To this couple were born seven children, Frank W.,. 
Regina, Henry, George, Albert, Frederick and Lizzie. Frank W. is a 
farmer in Marion township. Regina died when six years of age. George- 
was born on July i6, 1876. He and his brother, Henry, have been in charge 
of the home farm about twelve years. Albert and Frederick are dead. Lizzie 
married a Mr. Fonseth, of Marion township, and died on May 30, 1912. 

William Draping's father was born in Germany and at the age of four- 
teen came to America, landing at New Orleans, going to Cincinnati. He 
learned both the cooper and tailor trades, and once operated a tailor shop in 
Cincinnati, in partnership with his brother, August. In 1861, he moved to- 
Ripley county, Indiana, and on March 26, 1868, came to Decatur county and 
went to farming. His wife was Mary Anna Trisler. 

In March, 1904, Henry Draping was united in marriage to Clara Oetjen,. 
of Napoleon, Indiana, who was born on October 12, 1882, in Napoleon, a 
daughter of Henry and Mary (Brandt) Oetjen, natives of Hanover, Germany 
and Napoleon, respectively. The former, a tailor by trade, who came to 
America at the age of fourteen years, died in 1895. To Henry and Clara 
(Oetjen) Draping have been born four children, namely: Alvena, born on 
April 6, 1905; Walter, December 15, 1907; Elmer, January 16, 1911, and' 
Herbert, February 9, 1913. 

Mr. and Mrs. Draping are members of the Lutheran church and their 
children are being reared in that faith. Mr. Draping is a Democrat and 
takes a good citizen's part in the political affairs of the county, and is one of 
the best-known men in that part of the county. He served as one of the 
jurymen in the celebrated Beogle murder trial. 



ALEXANDER HILLIS. 



It cannot be urged too strongly upon those who read the biographies of 
those who have passed on, the importance of securing from the older mem- 
bers of the present generation, as well as from the few still left of the pre- 
ceding generation, their store of ancestral knowledge, before death comes to 
claim his own, after which much interesting and valuable data inevitably will 
remain a sealed book. Persons who take pride in their ancestral records 
ought not to permit present opportunities to be neglected, and the lessons on 
genealogy presented in this volume ought not to be overlooked. 

The late Alexander Hillis, a one time well-known farmer of Marion' 



^76 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

township, this county, was born on August 2, 183 1, a son of John and Ann 
(Hazelrigg) Hilhs. He died on June 15, 1910, at the old HilHs home, south 
of Greensburg, where he owned one hundred and twenty acres of land. He 
was an industrious, energetic man, and a kind husband and father. 

John Hillis was a native of Kentucky. His wife, Ann, who was born 
on May 23, 181 1, was a daughter of Alese and Kitty Hazelrigg. The Hillis 
family came to Decatur county in 1830, in which year John Hillis entered a 
tract of land, where the Hillis home now stands. He was a very intelligent 
and able man and traded and bought until he had a fine farm of over four 
hundred acres, becoming a wealthy man in an honest, straightforward way. 
John and Ann Hillis were the parents of eight children, namely : Alexander, 
the subject of this sketch; Martha Ann, now deceased, who married Mar- 
cellus Wright; Sarah Catherine, born on February 2, 1837, now deceased, 
who married William Carper; Mrs. Margaret Jane Foley, a widow, living at 
Greensburg, this county; W^illiam Wallace, born on January 27, 1840, who 
died at the age of ten years; Sophronia, born in 1848, died at the age of 
nineteen years ; Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Christy, now deceased, born on March 
15, 1845, ^nd Mrs. Nancy Miranda Cobb, January 18, 1848. 

Alexander Hillis was married to Elizabeth McCullough, who was born 
on February 22, 1832, in Ripley county, a daughter of William and Drusilla 
(Morgan) McCullough, of Kentucky. Drusilla Morgan was born at Mor- 
gan's Station, Kentucky, a daughter of John Morgan, founder of Morgan's 
Station. The McCuUoughs came to Decatur county in 1833 s"^ later in that 
year settled in Ripley county, where William McCullough opened a country 
store. He spent the rest of his life there and was buried at Cross Plains. 

To Alexander and Elizabeth (McCullough) Hillis were born the fol- 
lowing children: Morgan A., born in 1854, was accidentally killed in 1898; 
John W., February 12, 1858, died on August 19, 1884; Frank O., April 20, 
1866, who lives in Milroy, where he operates a machine shop, married Flora 
Doles and has three children, Loren, Elizabeth and Thomas ; Lizzie, Novem- 
ber 27, 1866, is now deceased ; Clara, a skilled music teacher, who was edu- 
cated in the Conservatory of Music at Indianapolis, has large classes at Milroy 
and Westport, and Hetty, who lives at home. 

Mr. Hillis was a devoted and consistent member of the Christian church, 
as is his widow, and their children were reared in that faith, growing up to 
be useful members of the community. Mr. Hillis was a Republican and 
ever gave his attention to all matters of good government. He was a good 
citizen and a generous neighbor, being held in the highest regard throughout 
the community in which he so long had made his home, and was sincerely 
mourned by many at his passing. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 



JEPHTHA LAYTON. 



977 



The late Jephtha Layton, of Marion township, was well known during 
Tiis life time in Decatur county; first, because he lived in this county all of his 
life, or practically so, and second, because, for many years, he was engaged in 
operating a saw-mill at Slabtown, in Marion township, where he did an exten- 
sive business in lumber and from which he furnished a great deal of the lum- 
ber for the building of Greensburg Moreover, he became an expert judge 
of timber and, as a result of his extensive dealings, became quite wealthy, 
accumulating a great deal of land and other property. He was a man who 
devoted himself closely to his own personal business and whose relations with 
the public were based upon the most rigid code of honorable and upright 
dealings. 

Jephtha Layton was born in Kentucky on July 25, 1823, and died near 
Madison, Indiana, on August i, 1891. He was the son of John and Mary 
Layton, natives of Kentucky, the former of whom was of English parentage. 
About 1830 John Layton came to Decatur county and here settled on a farm 
south of Greensburg, which is now owned by Green B. Barnes. At that 
time Jephtha Layton was only seven years old. He continued to live at home 
with his parents, assisting his father in the work on the farm, until his mar- 
riage in 1852 to Susan McLaughlin, who was born on October 20, 1827, and 
who, left an orphan at a tender age, was reared by friends of her parents' 
family. She died on August 7, 1890, a little less than one year before the 
death of her husband, the subject of this sketch. 

In 1855 Jephtha Layton formed a partnership with his brother, James, 
and they established the old Layton mill at Slabtown, on the Greensburg & 
Layton's Mill turnpike, where they did an extensive business in hard lumber 
and especially in the manufacture of shingles, the mill being a lumber station 
for a large expanse of territory. After the death of his father, in 1891, 
Frank Layton took up the work of this mill and is still continuing its opera- 
tion. In 1880 Jephtha Layton erected a large brick house, manufacturing 
his own brick, on the farm. Jephtha and James Layton built this house. 
John and Cyrus Layton were associated with their brothers for some time, 
but they died soon after the venture was started. In 1870 Jephtha and James 
Layton dissolved partnership. 

To Jephtha and Susan (McLaughlin) Layton were born six children, 
namelv: Avarilla, who married Obadiah Martin, of Marion township, lives 
on part of the old farm and has two children, Zola, a teacher in the public 
(62) 



978 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

schools of Marion township, and Ottis, a farmer; Nancy Ann, who died at 
the age of sixteen years ; Mar\% who is at home ; Frank, who is a farmer, 
well-driller and saw-mill operator of Marion township : John, who died in 
the West, and Florence, who also is at home. Florence and Mary own one 
hundred acres of land, which their brother, Frank, for the most part culti- 
vates, but part of the land is rented out to others. 

As above stated, Jephtha Layton died in 1891. Five years later his 
brother, James, with whom he had been associated for many years in busi- 
ness, died in the large frame house which he had built in Slabtown, in i8g6. 
Jephtha and James Layton were among the younger children of a large 
family born to John and Mary Layton. The others were : Mrs. Emily 
Fletcher, Allen, John and Mrs. Mary Downey (twins), Mrs. Harriett Mc- 
connell, Mrs. Matilda Ransted. Mrs. Betsy Bonderant, John and Cyrus. 

As men who did real constructive work in the material development and 
upbuilding of Decatur county, it would be difficult to find anyone who would 
pass the Layton brothers. It might be said with some truth that, had they 
not operated a saw-mill in that part of the county, some one else would have 
done so. Nevertheless, the fact remains that they possessed the foresight to 
erect a mill and that their estimates of the commercial possibilities of such an 
enterprise were pre-emJnently correct. The Layton family will go down in 
the history of this county as one which contributed very largely to its material 
advancement. 



JAMES CLINE. 



James Cline, one of the prominent leaders in the councils of the Demo- 
cratic party in Decatur county, and the present assessor of the coimty, is a 
well-known farmer of Marion township, born on March i, 1864, in that 
township, and the son of Francis and Catherine (McCormack) Cline, both 
natives of Ireland, the former of whom was born in 1816, and died in 1891, 
and the latter of whom was born on September 8, 1823, and died on May 7, 
1915,- past the age of ninety-one, the oldest woman in Decatur county. She 
came to America from her native country when a girl with relatives, and was 
married in New York City to Francis Cline. Her husband, a native of Ire- 
land, came alone to America when a lad and after working in New York 
City for a time moved to Cincinnati, Ohio, from which place he emigrated 
during the fifties to Decatur county, purchasing a farm of forty acres in 
Marion township. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 979 

Although James Cline was born in a pioneer log cabin, his father subse- 
quently built another house, and it was there that he was reared. Fishing 
and hunting were good in those days, and the life of a country lad offered 
more wholesome if not greater diversion than it does today. James Cline 
was one of three children born to his parents. The other two, who were 
elder, were Mrs. Katie Smith, of Napoleon, Ripley county, whose husband 
is cashier of the Napoleon bank, and Anna, a member of the Sisters of 
Charity, who died in 1909. 

Educated in the common schools of Marion township, and in the normal 
at New Marion, James Cline taught school for twenty-two years and six 
months, beginning at the age of twenty-two years, and performing all of this 
service in Marion township. In the meantime he purchased a farm in Marion 
township, and, after improving it, sold it in 1898 and removed to Greens- " 
burg, where he began the study of law. Finding the law distasteful, he 
returned to the farm in 1900, having purchased his present farm of eighty 
acres at Slabtown, in Marion township. This farm was badly run down, 
but Mr. Cline has since erected a fine house and other buildings and has the 
farm well fenced and well drained. It is regarded as one of the best country 
homes on the Michigan road, and is located six miles southeast of Greens- 
burg, and six miles from Napoleon. 

Interested in politics from the time of his boyhood, Mr. Cline served on 
the Democratic county central committee and as township committeeman 
for Marion township. He has also attended several Democratic state con- 
ventions, and is well acquainted with the Democratic leaders in the state of 
Indiana. In the fall of 1914, having received the nomination for county 
assessor, he was triumphantly elected to a four-year term, and is now serving 
in this office. 

On April 27, 1893, James Cline was married to Margaret Foley, who 
was born in Salt Creek township in June, 1865, daughter of Michael Foley, 
and who died on February 20, 1898. To this union three children were 
born, one of whom died in infancy. The two living children are Mary, who 
is her father's housekeeper, and Anna, who was graduated from the Academy 
of the Immaculate Conception at Oldenburg, Indiana, on June 17, 1915, hav- 
ing completed a four-years' course. 

A member of the Greensburg Catholic church, James Cline is also a 
charter member of the Knights of Columbus at Greensburg, and has been 
prominent in that organization since the Greensburg lodge was instituted. 
The deep and active interest which Mr. Cline has always taken in the councils 
of the Democratic party in Decatur county has not prevented him from look- 



980 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

ing carefully after the interests of his home, his family and his farm. With- 
out any qualifications or modifications, it must be conceded that he has per- 
formed every duty which devolves upon a citizen of this great country. Loyal 
to his home, his neighborhood, his county and to his state, he has a host of 
friends, men who are attached to him by the warmest ties of personal rela- 
tion, and who hold him in the highest regard. 



JOSEPH MOENKEDICK. 

Like many others of Ohio's sons and daughters who have adopted Indi- 
ana as their permanent home, the gentleman whose name forms the caption of 
this sketch has been loyal to the home of his adoption, and well may he feel 
satisfied with his success in producing on his farm in this county the best 
that nature wills. His splendid acres, his fine family of children, and his 
remunerative crops, all contribute toward making him a satisfied man. Mr. 
IMoenkedick has won the respect and confidence of the citizens of Marion 
township, and has trained his children along the same lines. 

Joseph Moenkedick was born at Cincinnati, Ohio, on July 11, 1859, a 
son of Henry and Catharine Moenkedick. Henry Moenkedick was born in 
Germany in 1818, and came to America in 1857, settling in Decatur county, 
where he bought a farm in 1865. He lived in a log cabin, which is still 
standing, and where his son Joseph, the subject of this sketch, spent his child- 
hood. Henry Moenkedick, in old age, moved to Millhousen, where his last 
days were spent, his death occurring in 1890. By his first wife, he had two 
children, Mrs. Theresa Herbert, of Ripley county, Indiana, and Joseph. 
Henry Moenkedick's second wife was a widow, Mrs. Moller, to which union 
there was no issue. 

At the age of fourteen years Joseph Moenkedick started in to earn his 
living, receiving at first but five dollars a month, which wage gradually was 
increased until he was receiving twenty dollars a month, and eventually he 
earned enough to pay one thousand six hundred dollars down on a farm 
costing him three thousand two hundred dollars, the balance to be paid in 
eight years. He now has a well-improved farm, on which he has spent about 
nine thousand dollars in improvements. Mr. Moenkedick's farm covers one 
hundred and twenty acres of very productive, level land, located a quarter of 
a mile from the pike road, on which he has a substantial brick dwelling. He 
raises from fifteen to eighteen head of cattle and from twentv-five to forty 
hogs annually. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 9«I 

On April ig, 1893, Joseph A'loenkedick was united in marriage to Anna 
May Hessler, who was born on August 26, 1866, at Millhousen, this county, 
a daughter of Adam J. and Katharine (Stahl) Hessler, to which union the 
following children have been born : Theresa, Louis, Catharine, Henry, Will- 
iam and Joseph, all of whom are at home save Catherine, who is living in 
Greensburg. Mrs. Moenkedick's father, Adam J. Hessler, was born in 1840, 
and died in March, 1903. He was a native of Millhousen. a son of John 
Hessler, and his wife was a native of Germany. Adam J. Hessler was a 
farmer all his life. His father. John Hessler, a native of Germany, was the 
first shoemaker in Millhousen. Mr. and Mrs. Moenkedick are memliers of 
St. Mary's Catholic church at Greensburg and their children have been reared 
in that faith. Mr. Moenkedick is a Republican and is warmly interested in 
the county's political affairs, being an earnest supporter of all measures 
designed to advance the public welfare. 



WILLARD A. MIERS. 



Few men living in Decatur county are better known than Willard A. 
Miers, a prominent farmer and stockman, living a quarter of a mile south 
of Burney, in Clay township, on a farm consisting of two hundred and fifty- 
seven acres of level land and of first-class soil. He is known to the world 
of harness horsemen as the man who bred and trained "Little Snapp," which 
at three years old held the world's record for geldings. 

Willard A. Miers was born on the old homestead, which he now owns, 
in 1858, the son of Thomas S. and Mahala (Braden) Miers. Thomas S. 
Miers was born in Ohio, and came to Decatur county when seven or eight 
years old with his father, Thomas Miers, who was one of the early settlers 
of Decatur county, and who died a short time after settling in Clay town- 
ship. Thomas S. IMiers was one of the most successful farmers of Decatur 
county, having accumulated at the time of his death six hundred acres of 
land. Most of his money he made out of hogs and corn. 

Willard A. Miers started life for himself when about twenty-one years 
old. He has been a very successful farmer and stockman, and especially suc- 
cessful with horses and mules. He bred and trained "Little Snapp," which 
at three years old held the world's record for geldings of that age and con- 
tinued to hold the record for three successive years. Mr. Miers has bred and 
raised several other horses, which while not holding world's records, never- 
theless have distinguished themselves for speed. He is still actively engaged 



982 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

in operating his farm and is still as enthusiastic as a youngster in regard to 
his horses. He trains and educates his own animals. He has now a four- 
year-old filly in whose veins runs the blood of Allen Winters, and Allen 
Winters won the lifty-thousand-dollar Derby, which to horse lovers is the 
big event of the grand circuit. He is a true lover of the sport of kings and 
never intends to give it up, declaring the chances for him are too good to 
quit. He is one of the well-to-do farmers of Decatur county, but his heart 
is in and with his horses. 

Mr. Miers laso handles jacks, mules, cattle and hogs. He has been 
handling jacks ever since he started in business, and all of his animals were 
bred and raised by himself. His two oldest jacks are two of the best-boned 
and largest animals in the middle West. His fes are one-third greater than 
the average fee, yet, despite this, he enjoys a large patronage. He also has 
six jennets and breeds and sells these animals for the market. He raises 
three or four jacks every year, and these animals bring on an average from 
twelve hundred to fifteen hundred dollars per head. It can readily be seen 
that some of the profits of the farm come from the jacks, jennets and mules. 
Jennets irdinarily bring from five hundred to eight hundred dollars. Not 
every man who has engaged in this business has made a success of it, but Mr. 
Miers is one of those men who has succeeded in a large mesaure. He employs 
two men the year round and several additional men during the bus\' season. 

In 1895 Willard A. Miers was married to Lilly Johnson, the daughter 
of John and Sally (Jones) Johnson, members of an old family in Decatur 
county, now living retired at Burney, Indiana. To this union three children 
have been born, Braden Johnson, Bessie and Alice Nevada. Mr. and Mrs. 
Miers are members of the Methodist church at Burney and their children 
have been reared in that faith. The Miers home is situated in Burney on 
twenty acres of land at the south edge of town. The stock farm and race 
track are situated about a quarter of a mile south of town. Mr. Miers is 
devoted to his business and personally attends to all the details of managing 
every department of the farm. 

Mr. Miers is a Democrat, although not greatly interested in politics.. 
For many years he has been a member of the Masonic lodge at Milford. He 
is possessed naturally of a genial disposition, which has been no small factor 
in his large success. Ten 3^ears of his life were spent in Greensburg, and 
Mr. Miers is quite as well known there as he is in Clay township. There is 
an old saying that every man has his own trade. The truth of this saying is 
generally accepted, and, assuming that it is correct, no one will doubt that 
Willard -A. Miers has found the business of life not only that which he likes 
best, but the one in which he could have been most successful. 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. ggi^ 

WATSON BOSTIC 

A veteran of the Civil War, who enlisted in the service of his country 
-when a lad of seventeen 3'ears, enduring many hardships and privations, 
Watson Bostic, a successful farmer of Clay township, this county, and for 
twenty years the local representative of the Continental Fire Insurance Com- 
pany of New York, was born in 1847, the son of Mathias and Elizabeth 
(Jones) Bostic, the former of whom was a native of Ohio, and the latter of 
Maryland. Mathias Bostic was an early settler of Dearborn county, Indi- 
ana, one of four brothers, who, with their sister, came from Ohio to this state. 
The Bostics were also identified with the early history and settlement and 
development of Decatur county, having come .here from Dearborn county in 
October, i860. Mathias Bostic died about 1858 in Dearborn county, and 
after his death his widow married a man of the name of Fowler, and they 
came to Decatur county in i860. Mr. Bostic's mother died near Milford. 
By her first marriage she had three children; Watson, the subject of this 
sketch; Richmond B., who died in 1891, and Mrs. Serinda Elliott, who is 
deceased. 

At the outbreak of the Civil War Watson Bostic was a lad of only 
fifteen or sixteen. In the winter of 1863 and 1864 he joined the One Hun- 
dred and Twenty-third Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, which was 
organized in Greensburg, and served until the end of the war, attached to the 
Twenty-third Corps of the Army of the Cumberland. Mr. Bostic fought at 
the battles of Nashville and Franklin. At Nashville, he was stricken down 
with measles and disabled for service, losing the use of his voice and suffer- 
ing other disabilities from which he has never wholly recovered. He was 
discharged from the service in June, 1865. At the end of the war Mr. Bostic 
came back to Decatur county, arfd^worked on a farm for some time. Subse- 
quently he emigrated to Adams county, Illinois, and after being there for a 
year or two returned to Decatur county. 

On August 27, 1868, Watson Bostic was married to Debby Reeves, who 
was born on May 7, 1850, the daughter of N. G. and Jane Reeves, the former 
of whom came to Indiana from Ohio, and the latter of whom came here from 
North Carolina. To this union four children were born, namely : Jennie, 
who. married T. C. Goff, of Greensburg, now living at Milford, and has two 
sons, Lloyd Gallentine and Artie, who live with their grandfather; Rillie, 
who married M. B. Chambers, a well-known farmer, living on the Vernon 
road in Clay township and has four children, Watson, Flossie, Hilda and 
•Cecile Anna; Charles Ora, who died in 1890, and Mrs. Nora Barnes, widow 



g84 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

of George Barnes, now lives at home with lier father. The mother of these 
children died on September 15, 19 14. 

Mrs. Watson Bostic's mother was the daughter of William Craig, a 
weaver of coverlids, who lived in this county. The Bostic family has in its 
possession a coverlid woven in 1844, and in perfect condition. They also 
have a pair of tongs made by Mrs. Bostic's great-great-grandfather, who 
was a blacksmith by trade. 

In 1884 Mr. Bostic purchased ninety-six acres of land and has added to 
this tract until he now owns two hundred and fifty acres, situated two miles 
from Milford and two miles from Burney on the Vernon road and in a very 
fertile section of Clay township. He has always been an industrious farmer 
and a hard worker. In 1904 he purchased the tract upon which he now 
lives, and more land in 1910 and now owns, in all, two hundred and fifty 
acres. The soil originally grew sugar trees, poplars and walnut. Mr. Bostic 
has made every dollar he has by his own hard work. A good deal of his 
money has been made by raising and feeding hogs. 

In the community where he lives Watson Bostic is known as a dyed-in- 
the-wool-Republican. He has always been greatly interested in politics and 
is regarded as one of the leaders of his party in Clay township, having been 
on the firing line in most of the campaigns. He is a man of liberal views, 
conscientious and sincere, who inspires confidence in his fellows. For nearly 
forty years he has been a member of the Masonic lodge at Milford and is a 
member of the Greensburg post of the Grand Army of the Republic. The 
family are members of the Methodist Episcopal church and Mr. Bostic has 
always taken a prominent part in local religious work. In fairly good health, 
he is of an optimistic turn of mind and is considered one of the substantial 
citizens of Decatur county. 



CECIL G. HARROD. M. D. 

The man who devotes his talent and energy to the noble work of min- 
istering to the ills and alleviating the sufferings of humanity, pursues a call- 
ing which in dignity and importance is second to none other. If true to his 
profession and earnest in his efforts to enlarge his sphere of usefulness, he 
is indeed a benefactor to mankind. To him more than to any other man 
are entrusted the safety, comfort and lives of the people. In the professional 
ranks of this county Dr. Cecil G. Harrod, a physician and surgeon of Burney, 
has stood for many years as one of the leading physicians of Decatur county 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 985 

and his practice probably is equal to that of any other physician in the county. 
ReaHzing early in his career as a physician that to obtain a success in the 
medical profession, he must have, not only technical ability but also broad 
human sympathies. Doctor Harrod has endeavored conscientiously and dili- 
gently to develop himself along these two lines. He has dignified and hon- 
ored the profession to which he belongs by his noble services in this county. 

Dr. Cecil G. Harrod, of Burney, is the scion of two very old families in 
America. Born in 1884, he is the son of Charles Fremont and Olive (Gard- 
ner) Harrod, natives of Scott county, Indiana. Charles Fremont Harrod, 
who is now fifty-eight years old, and who was born in Scott county, lives on 
a farm and is a successful and well-known school teacher, who follows this 
profession because of his native love of the work. He is well and favorably 
known in Scott county. He was named for John C. Fremont, the first candi- 
date of the Republican party for the Presidency, and is a stanch Republican. 

Doctor Harrod's mother, who before her marriage was Olive Gardner, 
and is now fifty-six years old, is the daughter of James Gardner, a prominent 
citizen of Scott county, who was honored by the people of that county, by 
election to several different positions of trust and responsibility. The Gard- 
ners originally came to Indiana from Virginia, and an ancestor of Doctor 
Harrod's mother came over to America in the "Mayflower." The family is, 
of course, of English origin. 

The Harrod family came to Indiana from Kentucky, having previously 
emigrated to the latter state from Virginia. It was the great grandfather 
of Charles Fremont Harrod, who entered the land which the latter now owns 
in Scott county. This family also is of English origin. The Harrod family 
is one of professional men. nearly all of the male members having been law- 
yers or physicians. Former Judge Willard New of the Indiana appellate 
court, who is now a practicing lawyer in Indianapolis, is a cousin of Doctor 
Harrod. 

In 191 1 Dr. C. G. Harrod, of Burney, this county, was grad;iated from 
the medical department of the University of Louisville, a medical school well 
known throughout the Middle West for the high standard of its instruction. 
Immediately after his graduation. Doctor Harrod located in Burney and 
began the practice of his profession. His practice has grown from year to year 
until he now enjoys probably as large a practice as any physician in Decatur 
county. Indeed, he is the busiest man in Clay township and his books show 
that in a single day, he made twenty-nine professional calls. He never wastes 
a minute of time to reach a case. He believes in giving to each case his 
greatest skill, energy and talent. In his home township, where he is so well 



■986 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

known, he is regarded as a human dynamo and no man is more popular with 
the people of Clay township. He is a man of most kindly impulses, broad 
and liberal in his views and generous by nature and he occupies a firm place 
in the hearts of the people of the neighborhood covered by his practice. 



IRA C. CARMAN. 



The student of Decatur county history does not have to make searching 
investigations to discover that Ira C. Carman for many years has been one 
of its most active farmers and stock raisers as well as one of its most influen- 
tial citizens. From time to time, he has added to his land holdings until he 
now has two hundred and sixty-seven acres lying two and one-half miles 
northeast of Burne}' on the Hope, Mil ford and Greensburg pike. Yet Mr. 
Carman himself would say that he has had no time to accumulate money but 
rather would have what he can buy with a dollar than to keep the dollar for 
its own sake. In his entire business career he has been zealous of his credit 
and this is one of the large secrets of his success. Aside from being an exten- 
sive landholder, he is a stockholder in the Hope bank and has at least ten 
thousand dollars worth of property in Burney, against which there is not one 
cent of indebtedness. This is the present condition of affluence of a man 
who, less than twenty-five years ago, began life with a poor horse and cow 
and without a dollar in the world. A man who has made money easily. Ira 
C. Carman has likewise been what might be called a liberal spender. 

Ira C. Carman was bom in 1859 in Ripley county, Indiana, and two 
years after his birth was brought to Decatur county by his parents, Reuben 
and Rebecca Jane (Jones) Carman, natives of Ohio, who settled on a farm 
near Milford. The father was a successful farmer and a well-respected man 
in the community, one of the local leaders of the Republican party. In 1866 
the family moved to Missouri, where a little later Reuben Carman died, leav- 
ing a wife and six small children. The mother remained about two years in 
Missouri and then came back to Decatur county, settling near Milford, where 
she reared her family. On the trip to Missouri the Carmans had been accom- 
panied by Thomas Fowler and family, Ira Sathmarsh and Watson Bostic, a 
young' man. 

To Reuben and Rebecca Jane f Jones) Carman were born six children, 
two of whom, William Reuben and Elmer E., are deceased. The living 
■children are Mrs. Lodicy Elliott, the widow of James Elliott: Mrs. Elizabeth 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 987 

Pumpher, the widow of Lon Pumpher; Ira C, the subject of this sketch; and 
Mrs. Mary B. Ra)'mond, the widow of VViUiam Raymond. Frank Carman 
is a half brother of Ira C. The mother of these children died in 1884. She 
was a woman of rare business ability and reared her family to honorable and 
useful lives. 

Ira C. Carman began life for himself at the age of eleven years and by 
the time he was twenty-five years old had begun to accumulate a little prop- 
erty. In 1880 he was united in marriage to Emma Peddicord, the daughter 
of Levi and Hulda (Henshaw) Peddicord, and to this union two children 
have been born, Edward, born in 1882. married Mattie Thompson and lives 
on the home place, and Maude, the wife of J. J. Boyle, principal of the high 
school at Columbus, Indiana. 

Mr. Carman has been a very successful farmer and business man. About 
seventeen years ago he purchased ninety acres of land and began to raise hogs 
and cattle. Previous to that time he had worked for three years by the day 
and finally got together a "plug" horse and one cow. Subsequently, he had 
an opportunity to farm on the shares for Frank Butler. This was his start 
in life. He saved about four hundred dollars, which he paid on his first 
ninety-acre tract of land. He then began farming on a large scale and at 
dififerent times has cultivated as much as five hundred or six hundred acres 
of land and at the present time is farming about five hundred acres and rais- 
ing about one hundred and eighty acres of corn each year. Two years after 
he purchased his first tract of land, he bought another tract of one hundred 
and seventy-eight acres, being compelled to borrow the money to make the 
first payment. He paid for this farm in ten or twelve years, an exceptional 
record for money making, there having been numerous predictions at the 
time that he would fail. Many years ago he began breeding and dealing in 
mules and is today one of the best-known mule breeders in the state of Indi- 
ana. The mule business has been one of the great sources of his revenue, 
but by no means the greatest. Mr. Carman attributes his success more to 
hogs, corn and clover. He buys and matches mules, fattens them and sends 
them to market. His farm is one of the most highly improved farms, all 
things considered, to be found in Decatur county, particularly when external 
improvements are considered. It is well-drained, has splendid outbuildings 
and a three-story bank barn, equal to any to be found in the county. A lovei- 
of good horses, Mr. Carman also has had considerable success with raising 
them. He has a large silo on the farm made of vitrified tile. His land is 
.igently undulating and formerly grew sugar trees and black walnut. 

A Republican in politics, Mr. Carman has always been an active political 



988 DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 

worker and is a firm believer in the principles of the party of Abraham Lin- 
coln. He is a member of the Masonic lodge at Milford and of the Knights 
of Pythias at Burney. being one of the trustees of the latter lodge. Mr. and 
Mrs. Carman are members of the Methodist church at Milford and liberal 
supporters of the same and are held in the highest regard throughout that 
whole section of the countv. 



ED\\'ARD A. JACKSON. 

Practically industry, wisely and consistently followed, never fails to 
bring success. It carries a man onward and upward, brings out his indi- 
vidual character and acts as a powerful stimulus to the efforts of others. The 
greatest results in life are often attained by simple means in the exercise of 
the ordinary qualities of common sense and perseverance. The everyday life 
with its cares, necessities and duties afifords ample opportunity for acquiring 
experience of the best kind and its beaten paths provide a true worker with 
abundant scope for effort and self improvement. Edward A. Jackson, one 
of the prominent citizens and farmers of Clay township, this county, belongs 
to an old family of that section. 

Edward A. Jackson was born in Decatur county in 1857, the son of 
William T. and Margaret T. (Myers) Jackson, the former of whom was a 
native of Ohio, who came to Decatur county, settling in Clay township with 
his parents when a mere lad. He was born in Cincinnati about 1829, and 
died in 1889 at the age of sixty years. \\'illiam T. Jackson was the son of 
William D. Jackson, who was born near the mouth of the Chickahominy 
river in Charles City county, Virginia, on October 13, 1797. The family 
originally lived in York county, a few miles east of the Chickahominy river 
in a very uphealthful region. The parents of William D. Jackson were 
stricken with malarial fever and died, leaving a large family of destitute chil- 
dren. The boys of the family were hound out to farmers, of the neighbor- 
hood to lives of bitter toil, while the girls were sent to a public institution. 
^^'illiam D. Jackson was one of these boys and was compelled to work in 
the fields with the negro slaves under the direction of a cruel overseer. The 
Jackson family is of Irish origin, and William D., being of a fiery Celtic 
nature, could not endure such a life. One day he crossed the James river and 
left the country. After walking for many miles he reached Petersburg, and 
there learned the tailor's trade. At the same time, however, he had a strong 
inclination for the sea. His brother, Henry, did become a sailor and another 



DECATUR COUNTY, INDIANA. 989 

brother, John, also went to sea and was shipwrecked and lost. William D. 
Jackson was accustomed to ride the river boats on the James river in follow- 
ing his trade as a tailor and on one of these trips got off the boat at a small 
town, called Crocks Ferry, on the Nanticoke river, and there met his future 
wife, Amelia Hillman, a daughter of Samuel Hillman, a merchant who kept 
the store at Crocks Landing. They were married in 1823, and, after living 
in Maryland until 1831, crossed the Alleghany mountains in a covered wagon 
and proceeded down the Ohio river by boat to Cincinnati, and there found 
work. At Cincinnati William D. Jackson met the elder Nicholas Longworth 
and with his assistance engaged in the real estate business and accumulated 
a snug fortune, which he invested in a farm of one hundred and sixty acres 
in Fugit township, this county, in 1840. In 1844 he moved to this farm, and 
afterward owned various farms in this county, and here spent the remainder 
of his life. By his marriage to Amelia Hillman, William D. Jackson had a 
large family of children, of whom William T. was one. 

William T. Jackson was about eighteen years old when he came to 
Decatur county with his parents. His wife, who bef