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Full text of "History of DeKalb County, Indiana : together with sketches of its cities, villages and towns ... and biographies of representative citizens : Also a condensed history of Indiana .."

M. L 

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977.201 
D36hi 
v. 2 
1414605 

GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



I ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 
l ll l l l l l J l 

3 1833 02299 8154 



HISTORY 



DE KALB COUNTY, 



INDIANA, 



TOGETHER WITH SKETCHES OF IT8 CITIES, VILLAQI08 AND TOWNS, 
EDUCATIONAL, RELIGIOUS, CIVIL, MILITARY, AND POLITICAL 

HISTORY, PORTRAITS OF PROMINENT PERSONS, AND 
, BIOGRAPHIES OF REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS. 



ALSO A CONDENSED 



HISTORY OF INDIANA, 



EMBODYING ACCOUNTS OF PREHISTORIC RA0E8, ABORIGINES, WINNE- 
BAGO AND BL.ACX HAWK WARS, AND A BRIEF REVIEW Of ITP 
CIVIL AND POLITIOAL HISTORY. 



EIiLVMTKATKD. 



CHICAGO: f^fy &, 



INTER-STATE PUBLISHING CO. 



. 


















1111605 



CHAPTER XII. 



BUTLER TOWNSHIP. 



Situation. — Geography and Topography. — Organizatii >n. 

— First Settlers. — First Churches. — Early Justices, 
Constables and Trustees. — Something ok Abraham 
Fair, a Pioneer. — Population. — Property and Taxa- 
tion. — Agricultural Statistics. — Biographical. 

Lying in the extreme southwestern corner of De Kalb County 
is Butler Township. It is bounded on the north by Keyser 
Township, on the east by Jackson, on the south by Perry Town- 
ship, Allen County, and on the west by Swan Township, Noble 
County. It is well watered by Cedar Creek in. the eastern part 
and the Little Cedar and the Black in the western part. Two 
railroads traverse it, — the Wabash, St. Louis & Pacific, and the 
Michigan Southern, — both running southwest and northeast. 
Thus the farmers have three shipping points — Cedar Creek on 
the Wabash, and New Era and St. John on the Michigan 
Southern. Garrett, the nearest trading town, is only two miles 
from its north line. The soil is generally rich, and the town- 
ship is advancing to the front as an agricultural and stock rais- 
ing section. 

The first regular meeting of the County Board of Commis- 
sioners was held Sept. 4, 5 and 6, 1837, attended by the full board. 
On the second day's session they " ordered that the congres- 
sional township 33 north, range 12 east, be and it is hereby 
organized as a civil township, to be known by the name of But- 
ler Township." It was also resolved " that Andrew Surface be 
appointed Supervisor for the road district No. 1, comprising 
the whole of Butler Township, and all the hands in said town- 
ship shall be assigned to the same district." The first election 
was afterward appointed for the first Monday in April, 1838, at 
the house of Robert Work. As thus organized, Butler was six 
miles square ; and it remained that large until 1876, when twelve 
sections were taken from its northern side, toward the new 
488 



HISTORY OF DE KALI! COUNTY. 



township of Keyser — thus reducing Butler to its present dimen- 
sions, four miles by six, or twenty-four sections. 

The pioneers of Butler Township were Peter Fair and his 
sons Charles and Abraham (Peter Fair was Chairman of the 
first Board of Commissioners of Dc Kalb Count)', and held the 
position for several years), Charles Crouse, George De Long-, 
and the Surface family, Andrew, and his sons Jacob and John. 
The year 1835 witnessed their permanent settlement, although 
they came in the fall previous with a wagon and two spans of 
horses, and built their cabins. They had to cut their own road 
from 'Squire Caswell's, in Allen County, beyond Huntertown, 
five miles, to the place where they settled ; and also a consider- 
able part of the way from Fort Wayne, as the track was too 
narrow and crooked for a four-horse team. Later in the same 
year Lewis Holbrook, Lyman Holbrook, Joseph Stroup, Henry 
Miller and Michael Miller moved into the township. In the 
spring of 1836 the population was increased by the arrival of 
William Surface, John Gregg and James Bell. Sanford Bas- 
sett, now of Waterloo, came to the township in 1838, and John 
Noel, John C. Clark, John Embry and Henry Fair came in 
1839. George Ensley, of Auburn, came to make his home in 
Butler in 1S41. Among other families who are identified with 
the progress of the township are the Moodys, Works, Enslcys 
and Hoffmans. 

The first Justice of the Peace, elected in April, 1838, was 
William Day, and George Ensley was the next. In 1841 the 
first church built in this county was erected on the farm ot 
Robert Work, and that relic of a former generation yet stands 
on the hill. It was built by the Methodist Episcopal denomi- 
nation, — which is the pioneer religious organization in almost 
every locality. A log church building was erected near the 
same site at an early day by the Lutherans. The first Sabbath- 
school was organized by O. C. Clark, then a young man. 

The Justices of the Peace of Butler Township prior to i860 
were William Day, Silas Hand, George Monroe, George En- 
sley, Wm. McAnnally, Job C. SmitC G. R. Hoffman, O. C. 
Clark, E. S. Hanson. 

Early Constables were Stephen Clark, Abram Brown, Wil- 
liam Young, Peter Simons, Uriah Wigent, David Trussell, 
James Forbes, Jehu Bricker, James McAnnally, R. B. Showers, 
John Noel, Martin Bilger. 



Mt 



400 



HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 



The Trustees for the first few years were Jacob Shull, C. 
Probst, Henry Clark, I. N. Young-, P. Simons, John Grubc, J. 
V. Keran, George Monroe, George Ensley, Uriah Wigent, S. 
Hutchins, J. Clark, G. R. Hoffman, Daniel Hoffman, Georg c 
Gordon, James Goetschius. 

"Pioneer Sketches" contains some reminiscences in regard 
to Butler Township, from which we extract: 

"Abraham Fair (one of the eight first settlers who came in Oc- 
tober, 1834) is our informant. ' Our plan,' says he, 'was to 
come out, build cabins, make a little beginning, and then return 
to our old homes in Montgomery County, Ohio, to winter, and 
bring on the family in the spring. We brought provisions 
enough with us to last until our return, excepting meat — calcu- 
lating to kill deer enough to supply that. In this, however, we 
were mistaken. We found deer quite scarce in those woods 
that fall. One day, Andrew Surface found a hollow tree (on 
Black Creek, where Peter Simons' ashery now stands) filled 
with honey, into which a bear had gnawed a hole and helped 
himself to as much as he wanted. On cutting the tree we 
found what was left of Bruin's dinner, six gallons of honey. 
The first fair day after this, we found two bee trees, cut them, 
and took the honey. We eight had all the honey we wanted 
for twenty days (and had little to eat except bread and honey), 
and on returning to Montgomery County we had twenty -one 
gallons of strained hone}' left.' 

'• We will interrupt ' Uncle Abraham ' in his narrative to re- 
mark that when it is remembered that it was in Butler Township 
that Wesley Park and Joseph Miller lay out in the woods on a 
rainy night with 'new milk fresh from the cow' for their entire 
bill of fare, surely it might be said that Butler was 'a land flow- 
ing with milk and honey. 

" But let us hear Uncle Abraham's 'coon story' — wish I could 
tell it on paper as he did orally — with his expressive jovial 
countenance and an occasional interlude in the form of a hearty 
laugh — wish I could, but I can't. ' After finding the bee trees,' 
says he, ' Andrew Surface found a hollow tree with two 
"coons" in, and cutting them out, he brought them to our 
shanty. We took the hides off and hung the meat out in the 
frost over night, and in the morning, Charley Crouse, who was 
our cook, prepared them for our breakfast. Being rather meat 
hungry, we all ate heartily of them, except John Surface, who 






HISTORY OF DIC KALI! COUNTY. 



49 1 



declared he would starve first — though he ate some of the 
gravy. After breakfast we all went at cutting and hewing logs 
and making clapboards for William Surface's cabin. John and 
I went to sawing a large oak for clapboards. John didn't pull 
the saw very strongly. "Ah," said I to him, " you didn't cat 
coon, or you could have sawed better." 

" ' Presently he thought the saw went too hard and that he 
must have the iron wedge from the shanty to drive in the kerf. 
My father, Peter Fair, was lying in the shanty, and John sup- 
posed he was asleep. So he went to the skillet where there 
was a quarter of a coon left from breakfast, and taking off the 
lid, he took up the meat; and after smelling it awhile, applied 
his teeth and stripped the bone in short meter. All this time 
my father lay pretending to be asleep, but struggling to keep 
from laughing. When John returned and took hold of the saw 
again, I remarked to him that he must have either, been eating 
coon or smelling of it, he pulled so much stronger. When 
Crouse went in to cook dinner my father told the joke ; and it 
was some time before John heard the last of the coon story.' 

" ' I was twenty -two years of age,' continued Uncle Abraham, 
'when I moved into the township, twenty-four years ago. I 
then weighed 160 pounds, and my wife 140. Now (1859) I 
weigh 210, and my wife 200. We have had eleven children 
born in the township, and nine are still living. In the twenty- 
four years I have not lost as many hours by sickness. I am 
now six feet four and a half inches high, and there never has 
been cleared land enough in De Kalb County to throw me 
down on. I still live on the farm where I first settled, and 
have never moved but once — from one part of my farm to 
another.' " 

Butler has a population by the last census (1880") of 778, or 
32.4 to the square mile. In 1870 it had 1,209, but it was then 
fifty per cent, larger territorially. The rate of taxation for 1S84 
is S1.5 1 ; the poll tax, Si. 25 ; number of acres of land assessed, 
15,279.18; value of lands, $306,670; value of improvements, 
$50,395 ; value of lands and improvements, $357,065 ; value of 
lots, $482 ; value of improvements, $2,260 ; value of lots and 
improvements, $2,742 ; value of personal property, $70,840 ; 
total value of taxables, $430,647 ; number of polls, 143 ; total 
amount of taxes levied, $6,753.29. The valuation per capita is 
$521.79. The number of children of school age is 234. 



492 



HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 



In 1S81 it had 2,711 acres in wheat, producing 27,1 10 bushels, 
or 10 bushels to the acre; 1,438 acres in corn, producing 57,360 
bushels, an average of 40 bushels to the acre on upland, and 
50 bushels on bottom land ; 430 acres in oats, producing 10,- 
750 bushels, or 25 bushels to the acre; 417 acres of meadow, 
producing, at the rate of a ton an acre, approximately, 417 
tons; 92 acres of potatoes, producing 2,576 bushels, or 28 
bushels to the acre. 

BIOGRAPHICAL. 

William Cornell, deceased, was born in Carroll County, Md., 
Jan. 14, 1813, a son of Smith and Mary Cornell. The former 
died in Maryland, and the latter in Nebraska. . He was reared 
in his native State and there married. In 1850 he came with his 
wife and five children to Indiana, making the trip with wagons. 
He bought eighty acres of land in Butler Township, DeKalb 
County, a part of which was cleared, and four years later bought 
eighty acres more. Of this land he made a good farm, residing 
on it till his death. When he came to Indiana he had $300 in 
money, and his team, wagon and household goods. He and his 
wife went bravely to work, and the farm is now one of the best 
in the county. He was a man of firm, upright principles, and 
won the confidence and respect of all who knew him. I Ie was 
an exemplary member of the Lutheran church. Mr. Cornell 
died Feb. 16, 1882. Mrs. Cornell resides on the old homestead. 
Of the seven children born to them, five are living — \V. H. H., 
Benjamin F., Sebastian II., Winficld S. and Ellen V., wife of 
Stephen Surfis. Two sons were soldiers in the war of the 
Rebellion — W. II. H. and Benjamin F. Both enlisted in Corn- 
pan)- K, Forty-fourth Indiana Infantry. At Shiloh Benjamin 
received a slight wound, and at Mission Ridge a severe one. 
He veteranized and served till the close of the war. 

IV. II. H. Cornell, son of William and Mary M. Cornell, was 
born in Maryland in 1840, and was ten years of a^c when his 
parents moved to Indiana, and has helped to bring Butler 
Township to its present state of cultivated farms from a state 
of timber and wild land. He now owns a good farm of forty 
acres, all well improved. In 1861 he enlisted in Company K, 
Forty-fourth Indiana Infantry, and was soon sent to the front. 
He participated in the battles of Shiloh and siege of Corinth, 
Perryville, Stone River, and others of less note. He served 
three years, receiving an honorable discharge. Mr. Cornell 



HISTORY OF DE KALI! COUNTY. 



•I'M 



was married in 1870 to Eliza Timberlain, daughter of Isaac 
Timberlain, an old settler of Butler Township. They have two 
children — Perry B. and Jesse O. In his political views Mr. 
Cornell adheres to the faith of his father, and is a staunch Re- 
publican. He has served as Constable of his township a year 
and a half. He and his wife are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 

D. W. Fair, the eldest son and second child of Abraham and 
Christcna (DcLong) Fair, was born in Butler Township, Dc Kalb 
County, Ind., Aug. 9, 1838. His boyhood was passed on the 
farm, where he early learned the practical part of agriculture. 
He obtained a good education in the district school, and after 
leaving school assisted his father till twenty-three years of age, 
when Nov. 20, 1861, he was married to Irene Perry, who was 
born in Noble County, Ind., Oct. 6, 1841, a daughter of Oliver 
and Mary (Francis) Perry. After his marriage he settled on 
the farm where he has since resided, which contains ninety-two 
acres of choice land, the greater part of which he has cleared 
and improved. He has been successful, and has won the con- 
fidence of his fellow-townsmen, and by them has been elected 
to several offices of trust. Mr. and Mrs. Fair have eight chil- 
dren — Perry W., Carlton G., Aldrainie, Caroline, Vinnie M., 
Wells, Mary and Fay. Politically Mr. Fair is a Republican. 
He and his wife are members of the United Brethren church, 
and are earnest workers in all departments of their church. 

Abraham Fair, second son of Peter Fair, was born in Fred- 
erick County, Md., in 1815. In 1827 his parents moved to Mont- 
I gomery County, Ohio, and there he grew to manhood and was 
married in the winter of 1835 to Christena De Long. Immedi- 
ately after his marriage he came to De Kalb County, Ind., and 
settled on Section 33, Butler Township, where he had previous- 
ly entered 160 acres of land. He built a small cabin, and cleared 
and improved his land, adding to his first entry till he owned 
313 acres. He was an energetic and successful business man. 
When he first came to the county his nearest neighbor was 
three miles distant. He helped to build the first house in Au- 
burn, a dwelling for Wesley Park, in which the first court was 
afterward held. Politically he was a Whig till the organiza- 
tion of the Republican party, with which he afterward affiliated. 
He and his wife joined the Methodist church in their young 
days, and have been among the most earnest workers in its 



- 4, 



494 



IISTOKY OF DE KALI! COUNTY. 



ranks. Mr. Fair died in February, 1S67. Mrs. Fair is living at 
Auburn, aged sixty-eight years. To them were born twelve 
children, nine of whom arc living — Barbara, E. W., Matilda, 
William, James, Calvin, Mary, Alice and Laura. The deceased 
arc — Charles Irwin, (twin brother of D.W.), Henrietta and Jane. 
Mr. Fair's father came with his family to Dc Kalb County in 
1S35, and met with the first Board of County Commis- 
sioners July 28, 1837. He was widely known and was recog- 
nized as a man of good judgment and executive ability. He 
was a successful farmer and accumulated a large property. He 
and his wife were members of the German Reformed church. 

William A. Fcaglcr was born in Montgomery County, Ohio, 
Feb. 13, 1840, a son of Henry and Rebecca (Wyrick) Feagler, 
natives of Ohio, his father of Warren County and his mother of 
Montgomery County. In the spring of 1S37, Henry Feagler, 
then a single man, came with his brother Joshua and his 
brother-in-law, Jacob Wyrick, to De Kalb County, Ind., and 
entered land in Richland Township. Soon after entering his 
land he returned to Ohio, where he was married and remained 
till the fall of 1847, when he returned to Indiana and settled in 
Jackson Township. He was a man of fair education and pos- 
sessed those strong forces of mind and character that made him 
prominent among his fellow citizens. In i860 he was elected 
to the Legislature on the Republican ticket, serving one term, 
and also an extra session during the war. He took considera- 
ble interest in local affairs, and wrote an account of his recollec- 
tions of the early settlement of De Kalb County. To him and 
his wife were born eight children — William A., Susanna, John, 
Elizabeth, Rebecca, Lorena, Henry and Joshua. Mr. Feagler 
died June 14, 1881, aged about sixty-five years. His wife died 
April 13, 1882, aged sixty-seven years. William A. Feagler re- 
mained on the farm with his parents till manhood, receiving his 
education in the district schools. In August, *i 861, he enlisted 
in Company H, Thirteenth Indiana Infantry, and was appointed 
leader of the Regimental Band. They were soon sent to the 
front, and assigned to the Army of the Cumberland. He par- 
ticipated in the battles of Shiloh, Stone River and Chicka- 
mauga. At the latter place, Sept. 21, 1863, he was captured, 
and was confined in Libby Prison, Danville, Va., Andersonville, 
and Florence, S. C, till Dec. 8, 1864. Before his capture 
he weighed 180 pounds, and when released, 100 pounds. 



HISTORY OF DK KALIS COUNTY. 



Jle was discharged at Indianapolis, Jan. 26, 1865, and returned 
to Indiana, and located on the home farm, remaining there till 
1S71, when he moved to his present farm in Butler Township, 
which contains sixty-three acres of good land, well cultivated, 
and with good improvements. Mr. Feagler was married June 
27, 1867, to Eliza Whetscl. They have five children — Ella, 
James C, Le Roy, Orvie, and Ted. Politically, Mr. Feagler is 
a Republican. 

Rev. William Finney, pastor of the German Baptist church, 
Butler Township, was born in Fort Wayne, Ind., in 1847. His 
parents died when he was a child, and he has no knowledge or 
remembrance of them. Mis early life till fifteen years of age 
was spent with kind friends in Fort Wayne, and he obtained a 
good education in the public schools. In 1863 he enlisted in 
Company D, One Hundred and Twenty-ninth Indiana Infantry, 
and was actively engaged till the close of the war. He partici- 
pated in the engagements at Kenesaw Mountain, Resaca, Buz- 
zard's Roost, Atlanta, Jonesboro, Pulaski, Columbia, Franklin, 
Nashville, Kingston, and others less noted. He was discharged 
at Charlotte, N. C, in 1865. Returning to Fort Wayne, he at- 
tended school part of the next winter, and then went West, vis- 
iting Kansas, Colorado, Dakota, Wyoming and Utah ; was en- 
gaged in the survey of the Union Pacific Railroad a portion of 
the time. In 1869 he returned to Indiana and followed agricult- 
ural pursuits near Hunterstown till 1875, when he was or- 
dained a minister in the German Baptist church, and has since 
devoted his time to the churches of Allen and De Kalb coun- 
ties. Mr. Finney was married July 4, 1869, to Almira E., 
daughter of Jeremiah and Sarah Gump. They have seven 
children — Lawrence, Delbert, Francis M., Jeremiah C, Henry, 
Sarah and Mary (twins). 

fared F. House! was born in Farmington, Trumbull Co., Ohio, 
Sept. 6, 1836, a son of Absalom and Rhoda (Allen) Housel. 
When he was eleven years of age his parents moved to Wells 
County, Ind., where he grew to manhood. In 1857 he removed 
to De Kalb County, where he followed farming till after the 
breaking out of the Rebellion. Sept. 25, 1861, he enlisted in 
Company K, Forty-fourth Indiana Infantry, and the following 
December was sent to the front and assigned to the Army of 
the Tennessee. At the battle of Shiloh he was wounded in the 
right thigh, and lay in the hospital at Evansville, Ind., till Nov. 



496 HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 

29, 1862, when he was discharged and returned home. After 
his recovery he resumed agricultural pursuits, and has since 
lived in Butler Township. He has been Postmaster of Dc Kalb 
since 1882, and has held several minor offices of trust in the 
township. In 1864 he was married to Drucilla C, daughter of 
Michael and Rebecca (Ott) Rccver. The)' have one son, Elzie 
E. Mr. and Mrs. Ilousel arc members of the United Brethren 
church. Politically, he is a Republican. 

Jesse Jackson, deceased, was among the first setlers of Butler 
Township. He was born in Monmouth, N. J., in 1795, a son 
of Benjamin Jackson, of English descent. He was reared on a 
farm, receiving a limited education in the common schools. 
When a young man he went to New York, and was there mar- 
ried about 1815 to Edith Smith. In 1S33 he moved to Hillsdale 
County, Mich., and in 1837 to DeKalb County, Ind., and settled 
in the southwest corner of Butler Township, entering 120 acres 
of land from the Government. He built a small cabin, and 
began clearing his farm, which he made his home the rest of 
his life. He and his wife were members of the Society of 
Hicksite Friends, and devout adherents to the faith. He was 
successful in his business enterprises, and was widely known, 
and had many friends who appreciated His manly character 
and sterling integrity. To him and his wife were born eleven 
children — Hiram S., Sallie G., Mercy, Mary, Harriet, Amos, 
Levi, Drusilla, Hannah, Walter and Myron W., the latter two 
born in DeKalb County. Mrs. Jackson died in 1857, aged fifty- 
eight years. Mr. Jackson died Aug. 25, 1S68. 

Levi Jackson, third son and seventh child of Jesse and Edith 
(Smith) Jackson, was born in New York, Sept. 13, 1829. Before 
he was eight years old his parents moved to the wilds of 
Indiana, and his education was limited to the primitive schools 
of the early pioneer times, and he did not have free access to 
even these, as his services were required on the farm. He re- 
mained with his parents till his majority, and then began to 
work for himself, and for eleven years ran a threshing machine 
in connection with farming. He now has a fine farm of 144 
acres, which is well improved, and has a good residence and 
farm buildings. He was married July 3, 185 1, to Johanna M., 
daughter of Robert Knott, who was born March 16, 1828. She 
died Nov. 13, 1872, leaving three children — Juliette, Gill, and 
Levi M. Dec. 14, 1873, Mr. Jackson married Martha L., 



HISTORY OF DE KALI? COUNTY. 



497 



daughter of Jacob S. and Hannah S. (Weldon) Thomas. They 
haYC one son, Delbert D. A twin brother of Delbert died in 
infancy- In religious belief Mr. Jackson is a Univcrsalist. 
Politically he is a Democrat, lie has served two years as As- 
sessor of Butler Township. 

Robert Knott, deceased, one of the old and well-known citi- 
zens of DeKalb County, was born in Pennsylvania June 22, 
1S01. He was married in Crawford Count)', Ohio, to Eliza- 
beth Gill. In the spring of 1845 he came to Indiana and bought 
348 acres of land on section 23, Butler Township, DeKalb 
County ; built a cabin, and the following fall moved his family, 
at that time consisting of his wife and six children, to his frontier 
home. He was an energetic, enterprising man, and accumulated 
considerable property. Public-spirited and liberal, he was often 
called on to contribute to objects of public interest and charity, 
and every worthy enterprise received his patronage. He and 
his wife were exemplary members of the Protestant Methodist 
church, and liberal supporters of all its interests. Mrs. Knott 
died May 26, 1877, aged seventy years, and Mr. Knott Dec. 8, 
1879. They had a family of eleven children — Joannah, Mary, 
Henry H., Adams, Martha, Catherine, S. M„ Joseph, Sarah E., 
Cordelia W., and Francelia. Catherine and Joseph died in Ohio. 
Politically Mr. Knott was a Republican. 

S. M. Knott, son of Robert and Elizabeth (Gill) Knott, was 
born in Crawford County, Ohio, in 1841. He received his ele- 
mentary education in the district schools and later attended the 
higher institutions of learning. He was reared on a farm in 
DeKalb County, and since arriving at man's estate has given 
his attention to agricultural pursuits. He owns a good farm of 
\$7l4 acres in Butler Township, which is under a good state ot 
cultivation, and his buildings are commodious and in good re- 
pair. Mr. Knott was married in 1S72 to Miss Roxanna Parker. 
They have five children — Robert D., Fred. W., Flint D., Lena 
M. and an infant. Mr. Knott is a member of DeKalb Lodge 
No. 214, F. and A. M. Politically, he is a Democrat. He is an 
influential man in his township, and is serving his second year 
as Trustee. 

Paul Lung, retired farmer, is the oldest living resident of But- 
ler Township. He was born in Champaign Count}', Ohio, in 
December, 18 10, a son of John and Susanna (Pence) Lung, na- 
tives of Shenandoah County, Va. When he was about ten 



,t 



.|oS HIS TORY OF DE KAI.l: COUNTY, 

years of age his father died, and lie was bound out to serve till 
he was twenty-one. Having to toil early and late for a hard 
taskmaster, he had no educational advantages. He was mar- 
ried Jan. 12, 1S32. In 1S41 he came with his wife and four chil- 
dren to Dc Kalb County, fnd., and settled where he now lives 
in Butler Township. He bought 160 acres of wild land, pay- 
ing $4.33 an acre, on which he built a small cabin, and after 
getting his family settled, went to work to improve his land, 
which took years of patient toil. He now has a pleasant home 
where he has lived forty-four years, and from a wilderness has 
seen the country develop into farms and villages. He added 
to his first purchase till he owned 230 acres, but has reduced 
his farm to 150 acres. He is purely a self-made man, and has 
made the greater part of his money in De Kalb County, having 
but about $200 when he first came to Indiana. He was a 
natural mechanic, and worked at the carpenter's trade a por- 
tion of the time after coming to the county. Deer and other 
wild animals were plenty, and he was one of the best marks- 
men in the county. He has always been a Democrat, casting 
his first vote for Andrew Jackson. He has held the office of 
Supervisor several years, always discharging his duties in a 
conscientious and impartial manner. His wife died June 20, 
1884, aged seventy-three years, three months and thirteen days. 
They had a family of seven children ; but four arc living — 
Serena, wife of O. C. Clark; Elizabeth, Henry A., and George 
VV. Barbara, wife of George Ott, Anna, wife of Peter Fair, 
and John, are deceased. Mr. Lung has been a member of the 
Lutheran church forty years. His wife was a member from 
her girlhood. 

Philip Lung, farmer, was born in Champaign County, Ohio, 
Aug. 15, 1819, a son of John and Susanna Lung, of Shenandoah I 
County, Va., who settled in Ohio in an early clay. He was the 
youngest of six children, four of whom are living — Paul, Noah, 
David and Philip. The boyhood of our subject was spent in 
his native county, where he attended school eighteen months, 
which was the extent of his educational advantages. Before 
he was eight years of age he was bound out to serve till of age. 
He came to De Kalb County in 1840, and entered 160 acres of 
wild land in Butler Township ; returning to Ohio he remained 

there ten years, and then game again to De Kalb County, sold 

his land and entered the farm where he now lives, which he has 



HISTORY OF DEKALB COUNTY. 499 

cleared and improved. He lias disposed of a part of his land, 
but still owns eighty acres. Mr. Lung- was married in Penn- 
sylvania, Nov. 3, 1S59, to Margaret S. Ott, who died March 1, 
1S72, aged thirty-four years. To them were born four children; 
two are living — Nicholas and Daniel. Mr. Lung, as was his wife, 
is a member of the Lutheran church. He has always affiliated 
with the Democratic party, casting his first vote for Van Buren 
in 1S40. He is one of the representative citizens of Dc Kalb 
County, having by his integrity and honorable dealing won the 
esteem of his fellow citizens. 

John Noel, deceased, was one of the pioneers of DeKalb 
County. He was born in Adams County, Pa., April 6, 1813, a 
son of John Noel, who settled in Seneca County, Ohio, in an 
early day, and there died in 1863. He was reared on a farm, 
receiving a limited education, and after reaching manhood de- 
voted his attention to agricultural pursuits. He was married 
Nov. 3, 1836, to Elizabeth Endsley, a native of Wayne County, 
Ohio, born Nov. 20, 18 16, a daughter of Michael Endsley, a 
pioneer of DeKalb County. In 1839 they left their Ohio home 
and emigrated to Indiana, locating on a farm on section 33, 
Butler Township, DeKalb County, Oct. 27, which had been 
bought by Mr. Noel in 1837, and on which was built a small 
log cabin. He lived there till 1850, when he sold the farm and 
bought 160 acres on section 15, seventeen acres of which had 
been chopped, part of the brush burned, and a few rails made. 
Here he lived the rest of his life, and by industry and judicious 
management, assisted by his wife and children, was successful, 
and at the time of his death had one of the best farms in the 
township. In his political views he was first a Whig and then 
a Republican. Although a strong supporter of his party he 
had no aspirations for official honors. He was a member of no 
church, but in faith was a Universalist. To Mr. and Mrs. Noel 
were born eleven children, all but the eldest in DeKalb County 
—Philip, born Feb. 25, 1838 ; Sarah E., April 27, 1840; George, 
deceased, June 30, 1S42; Mary S., deceased, Feb. iS, 1844; 
Eliza L., April 2, 1846; Lucy J., April 2, 1846; William, de- 
ceased, Nov. 18, 1848; Solomon, Nov. 8, 1850; Silas, Jan. 14, 
1S53; Perry, May 21, 1855; Samuel, June 5, 1858. Mr. Noel 
died Oct. 27, 1858. Mrs. Noel subsequently married Henry 
Bricker, and now resides in Auburn, DeKalb County, Ind. 

Philip Noel, the eldest son of John and Elizabeth (Endsley) 



500 HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 

Noel, was born in Seneca County, Ohio, Feb. 25, 1S38. He 
was reared and educated in DeKalb County, coming here when 
an infant, with his parents. lie received Iris rudimentary edu- 
cation in the district schools, and subsequently attended the 
Auburn Academy two terms. Aug. 28, 1861, he enlisted in 
Company II, Thirtieth Indiana Infantry, and Sept. 24 was mus- 
tered into the service of the United .States. Oct. 9 he left In- 
diana for Camp Ncvin, in Hardin County, Ky., and the next 
mouth went to Murfrcesville, Ky. From there went to Ten- 
nessee and joined Bucll's army, and participated in t he battles 
of Shiloh, LaVcrgne, Stone River, Liberty Gap and Chicka- 
mauga, where, after fighting two days, he was taken prisoner 
Sept. 20, 1863, and for two months was confined in Richmond, 
Ya., and five months in Danville, Ya. He was paroled and 
sent to the Federal lines May 2, 1864, and May 7 was exchanged. 
June 8 all Indiana soldiers were examined and those found unfit 
for duty were ordered to Indianapolis for discharge. Among 
this number was our subject. He arrived at Indianapolis June 
16, and remained there till Sept. 29, 1864. His brutal treatment 
in Southern prisons so undermined his health that he has never 
recovered from its effects. When he enlisted he was appointed 
Fourth Corporal, and when discharged he ranked Duty Ser- 
geant. Returning to civil life he resumed agricultural pursuits, 
and now owns a good farm of 120 acres, eighty acres in Butler 
and forty in Keyser Township, DeKalb Count)-. He is a wide- 
awake, progressive farmer, and his land shows the effect of 
having a thrifty owner. He has nearly two miles of under- 
ground tiling. In 1874 he was Assessor of Butler Township.' 
He is a public-spirited, enterprising citizen, and has hosts of 
friends and acquaintances. He was married June 29, 1865, to 
Mary C. Stoner, a native of Cuyahoga County, Ohio, born Jan. 
18, 1835, a daughter of John and Agnes Stoner, of Butler 
Township. Mr. and Mrs. Noel have had three children — an 
infant, deceased, born June iS, 1866; John C, born Jan. 1, 
1869; and Isaac, born Jan. 31, 1872, died Sept. 15, 1872. Mi-. 
and Mrs. Noel are members of the Methodist Protestant 
church, and he has been Superintendent of the Sunday-school 
for several years. He is a member of Mentor Lodge, No. 591, 
I. O. O. F., Auburn and DeLong Post, No. 67, G. A. R. In 
politics he is a Republican. 
Micliacl Rccvcr, deceased, was born in Maryland Jan. 20, 1806. 














































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HISTORY OF 1JE KALB COUNTY 



50i 



In his youth he learned the miller's trade, at which he worked 
while in his native State. He was married in Maryland to Re- 
becca Ott, and about 1844, with his wife and two children, 
Thomas F. and Drucilla C, removed to Indiana and located in 
Butler Township, DeKalb County. He purchased 160 acres of 
wild land, built a small cabin and went to work to make a home. 
His means were limited, and he was obliged to rely on his own 
labor for the maintenance of his family. He was successful in 
his pursuits, and accumulated a good property. His farm is 
now owned by his daughter, Mrs. Housel. He and his wife 
were members of the Lutheran church. In politics he was a 
strict adherent to the principles of the Republican party. He 
was a genial, social man, and had hosts of friends, and his ster- 
ling integrity won him the confidence of the entire community. 
He died June 8, 1878. His wife died July 26, 1868, aged sixty- 
live years and seven months. 

Jonathan Simon, farmer, Butler Township, was born in Co- 
lumbiana County, Ohio, Aug. 6, 181 1; a son of George and 
Elizabeth (Hewitt) Simon. He was reared and educated in his 
native county, and in 1836 married Rachel Yarian. The same 
year he came with his father's family to Indiana and entered 
land, but returned to Ohio and remained a year and a half. In 
1838, with his wife and one child, Polly, he came to DeKalb 
County and settled on the place where he now lives. He built 
a small log-cabin in which he lived three years. He has cleared 
and improved his farm, and now has one of the best farms in 
the township. He is a prominent man, and has held several of 
the minor offices of trust, and has been appointed and acted as 
guardian for several orphan children. He is a self-made man, 
and now owns 240 acres of good land, besides settling homes on 
several of his children. To Mr. and Mrs. Simon have been 
born ten children, seven of whom are living — Polly, wife of 
John Miller; Mary Ann, wife of Lycurgus Bowman; David, 
Benjamin F., Jacob G., Jonas and Sarah O., wife of Charles 
Ogden. The deceased are Alice M., wife of Samuel Dudley, 
Sarah C, and Benjamin. Politically, Mr. Simon is a Repub- 
lican. He and his wife are members of the Lutheran church. 

George Simon, deceased, was one ol the first settlers of Perry 
Township, Allen County, coming here in 1836. He was a na- 
tive of Pennsylvania, born about 1779, a son of Andrew 
Simon. His father was captured by the Indians when a boy, 
32 






502 



HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 



and was kept by them nine months. George Simon was mar- 
ried in Pennsylvania to Elizabeth Hewitt, and moved to Co- 
lumbiana County, Ohio, where he lived till his removal to Al- 
len County, Ind., where he entered land from the Government 
which he improved and made his home. lie and his wife were 
exemplary members of the Lutheran church. He died in 1872. 
His wife died in 1878, aged ninety -two years. They had a 
family of twelve children, five of whom are living — Jonathan, 
Solomon, Sarah, Catherine, wife of Amos Jackson, and Rachel, 
wife of Jacob Myers. The deceased are David, Peter, Samuel, 
Elizabeth (wife of Frame Freeman), Lydia (wife of Henry 
Bricker), Anna (wife of Levi Zinn), and Mary Ann. Mr. Si- 
mon served six months in the War of 1812. In politics, he was 
a Whig, and subsequently a staunch supporter of Republican 
principles. 

Henry Smith, farmer, Butler Township, was born in Bedford 
County, Pa., Nov. 14, 1829, a son of Jacob and Margaret (Burk- 
heimer) Smith, natives of Pennsylvania. His father was born 
March 2, 1803, and his mother Dec. 24, 1805. In 1831 his parents 
moved to Richland County, Ohio, where the father died July 
16, 1863, and the mother in 1876. They had a family of nine 
children — Fanny, Henry, Polly, Levi, Aaron, John, Frederick, 
Susanna and Maria. They were prominent and consistent 
members of the German Baptist church. Henry Smith was 
reared on a farm and received such education as the district 
school of his day afforded. In i860 he moved to DeKalb 
County, Ind., and bought 120 acres of land, on which he has 
since resided. He has since bought another tract of 120 acres, 
and now has one of the finest farms in the township. Mr. 
Smith was married April 30, 1854, to Miss Susanna, daughter 
of Jacob and Susanna Leedy, the former a native of Pennsylva- 
nia and the latter of Maryland. To Mr. and Mrs. Smith have 
been born nine children — Margaret, Levi, Jacob, Mary, Lydia, 
Mahala, Lodema, Amanda and John. Levi died Aug. 29, 1869. 
Mr. Smith is one of the self-made men of the county. He and 
his wife are members of the German Baptist church. 

David Stoncstrcet, farmer, Butler Township, was born in Bath 
County, Va.,Oct. 7, 1825, a son of Ashford and Jemima (Ross) 
Stonestreet, Virginians, who removed with their family to 
Richland County, Ohio, in 1829. His boyhood was passed on 
a farm, and he obtained a limited education in the common 



- _'• .<- 



HISTORY OF DE KAI.B COUNTY. 



5<H 



schools. In 1849 ne came to DcKalb County, Ind. He bought 
a tract of land near Albion, Noble County, which he afterward 
traded for land in Butler Township, on which he settled and 
has since lived. Like most early settlers he was a poor man 
when he came to the county, but by his industry he accumu- 
lated a good property. He owns a fine farm of 250 acres, which 
is well cultivated and improved with good farm buildings. He 
was married Aug. 3, 185 1, to Rebecca, daughter of David 
Smith. To them have been born eight children, five of whom 
are living — Margaret E., John, George, Anna and Rebecca. 
The deceased are Ellison, Charity and Lydia. Mrs. Stonestreet 
is a member of the German Baptist church. Politically, Mr. 
Stonestreet is a Democrat. He is Trustee of Butler Township. 
He is one of the self-made men of the county, having by his 
own efforts, with the aid of his wife, made his property, and is 
now one of the prominent men of the county. Mr. Stone- 
street's parents had a family of nine children — Elitha, David, 
Ellison, Mary, Jemima, Ashford, Lydia, Robert and Levina. 
David is the only one living in DeKalb County. Mrs. Stone- 
street's parents located in Butler Township in 1848. They 
were exemplary members of the Baptist church. They had a 
family of twelve children, eight of whom are living — Rebecca, 
John, David, Anna, Josiah, Samuel, Henry, Franklin. The de- 
ceased are Susan, William, Nancy and Simon. Mr. Smith died 
July 2, 1870, aged about sixty years. Mrs. Smith died July 10, 
1868, aged fifty-seven years. 

Joseph Straub is of German ancestry. He came from Marion 
County, Ohio, in 1835, with his wife and three children and set- 
tled in Butler Township, De Kalb Co., Ind., where he bought a 
half section of land from the Government, of which he cleared 
about forty acres. In 1842 he sold his land and removed to 
Carroll County, where he farmed five years, and in 1847 re- 

tmnptl ta this tmuity, whin lip beughfc a auarter nefcien, ami 

here he resided till his death, which occurred Dec. 25, i860, on 
his fifty-ninth birthday. His wife survived till June, 1881, when 
she died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. L. S. Bassctt, which 
adjoins the old homestead. Eight children were born to them 
—Henry, farming in Dakota ; Susan (deceased) ; Simon Peter, 
who lives on the homestead farm ; Jacob, a Universalist minis- 
ter; Margaret Ann, Maria, Barbara Elizabeth, wife of L. S. Bas- 
sett of Butler Township, and Solomon W., residing at Wood- 



sk 



504 HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 

lawn Park, near Chicago. Rev. Jacob Straub entered the min 
istry in 1S60 and has become a prominent minister of the Uni- 
versalis! denomination. Me lias preached at Dowagiac, Mich., 
five years; Lansing, Mich., seven years ; Muskegon, Mich., four 
years. He then engaged in literary pursuits for two years, liv- 
ing in Chicago and preaching irregularly, and for the past seven 
years he has been pastor at Marseilles, 111. He is the author of 
" Consolations of Science," which has received favorable notice 
from scientific and religious thinkers in Europe and America. 
He intends to devote his future years to literary pursuits. 
Mary Ann Straub has been in the Universalist ministry five 
years, filling the pulpit at Castalia, Iowa, for three years. She 
now resides at Woodlawn Park, 111. She has composed many 
Sunday-school hymns and has also written an unpublished 
work for women. Maria Straub also resides at Woodlawn 
Park. She has a volume of poems almost ready for publica- 
tion, and has also written much sacred music. She is the reg- 
ular correspondent of the " Religious Telescope," of Dayton, 
Ohio. Prof. S. VV. Straub has made music, vocal and instru- 
mental, his life's work. He has conducted musical conventions 
for many years, and has published a dozen or more musical 
books, including several Sunday-school books which are exten- 
sively used. Those best known are " Morning Light " and 
" Living Fountain," for Sabbath-schools. He has also published 
" Convention, Choir and Anthem Treasures" for choir purposes, 
and also some sheet music. » He founded " Song Friend," a mu- 
sical periodical now in the sixth volume, which he still conducts 
in connection with general music publishing in Chicago. His 
son, Arthur M., is a pianist of promise. He is now teaching 
and studying music. Henry Straub, his eldest son, has been 
Justice of the Peace for many years. 

Timberlain Brothers. — Isaac and David Timberlain were na- 
tives of New Jersey, sons of Jonathan and Hannah Timberlain. 
Their boyhood was spent in Columbiana County, Ohio, where , 
their parents located in the earl)' settlement of the county. I 
There they grew to manhood, having only such educational 
advantages as the early schools afforded. In 185 1 they came 
together to Indiana and settled in Butler Township, De Kalb 
County, purchasing eighty acres of wild land. They erected 
a log cabin and began clearing their land. Here Isaac lived till 
his death and David still lives. . Isaac was married in Ohio to 



KY OF UK KALI) COUNTY. 



505 



Elizabeth Sheets, and to them were born eight children, seven 
of whom are living — Hannah, Mary, Eliza, Silas, David, Eliza- 
beth and Rebecca. One died in infancy. Isaac died Dec. 11, 
1S79, aged nearly sixty-nine. David is aged about seventy- 
eight years. In politics they were both staunch supporters of 
the principles of the Democratic party. Like other early set- 
tlers when they came to De Kalb County they were in limited 
circumstances, but their eagerness to procure a home inspired 
them with energy and they went to work with a determination 
to overcome all difficulties, and were rewarded with good 
crops and a full larder, and finally by a competency for old age. 



m 




^CP^^*^0$* 









CHAPTER XIII. 



CONCORD TOWNSHIP. 



Situation.— Geography and Topography. — First Election- 
—First Justice of the Peace in the County.— Early 
Settlers. — Sketch of Nelson Ulm.— List of Pioneers.— 
Early Justices, Constables, Trustees and Assessors,— 
Spencerville. — St. Joe. — Population. — Property and 
Taxation. — Crop Statistics. — Biographical. 
This township, situated in the southeastern portion of De- 
Kalb Count) - , is bounded on the north by Wilmington Town- 
ship, on the east by Ncwville Township, on the south by 
Springfield Township, Allen County, and on the west by Jack- 
son Township. The St. Joseph River flows in a meandering 
course from northeast to southwest, while Bear Creek, entering 
in the northwest corner, flows through the center to the river. 
Good mill sites were afforded by the river, upon which two 
grist and two saw mills were erected. A saw mill was erected 
near the center of the township on Bear Creek many years ago, 
and also one on the stream known as the " Twenty-six Mile 
Creek." In natural features, the township presented many ad- 
vantages to the early immigrant, and it has been claimed by 
its people to be the best, agriculturally, in the county. 

DeKalb was the name first given to this township, in the fall 
of 1837. It then included what is now Concord, Stafford and 
Newville Townships, but in March following Stafford was de- 
tached and temporarily added to Wilmington, while the present 
name Concord was substituted for DeKalb. An election was 
ordered held the first Monday in April following, at the house 
of Jared Ball, and Cornelius Woodcock was appointed Inspec- 
tor of Elections. At this election Washington Robinson was 
chosen Justice of the Peace. Newville was afterward made a 
separate township, leaving Concord its present limits. 

Under date of April 9, 1838, Mr. Robinson made the first re- 
port to the county that was rendered by any justice, as follows: 



u ~ 



HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 



507 



Plaintiff. 



" State or Indiana, 
DeKalb County, 
Concord Township, 
March 30, 1838. 

" This day personally appeared before me, Washington Rob 
inson, a Justice of the Peace in and for the township aforesaid, 
Lyman Benton and William Rhodes ; being found guilty of an 
affray by the information of Thomas L. Yates, Judge of the 
Circuit Court, and confessed themselves guilty, and the cause 
being heard and inspected, it is therefore considered that the 
said Lyman Benton and William Rhodes stand convicted in the 
sum of one dollar fine for each one, making two dollars and 
fifty cents their cost. 

"Given under my hand this 30th day of March, 1838. 

" Washington Robinson, J. P. 

"I do hereby certify the above to be a true list of fines 
assessed by me and recorded on my docket. 

"Given under my hand this 9th day of April, 1838. 

" Washington Robinson, J. P." 

In 1S35, of ten families settled in the county, nine were resi- 
dents of Concord. The St. Joseph of the Maumee was at an 
early day the main channel for all commercial traffic, and on its 
fertile borders were founded the earliest settlements. Ranging 
from 1835 to 1839 tne following named were located on the 
river: Homer Blake, David Butler (who for many years en- 
joyed the distinction of being the oldest living settler of this 
county), John Mathews, Thomas L. Yates (on the present site 
of Spencerville), John T. Rhodes (pioneer hotel keeper of 
Spencerville), Jerry Rhodes, Daniel Rhodes, Brandt Rood, 
Cramwell Rood, William Mathews, Mr. Lytle, Jared Ball, and 
others. 

In the spring of 1834, Washington Robinson entered an ex- 
cellent tract of land across the river from the present site of 
Orangeville, built a cabin, and in January, 1837, moved in. In 
November, 1836, he, as proprietor, platted a portion of section 
12, and named the tract Orangeville. Here, in the spring of 
1837, Platter and others opened the first store in the county. 
Other early settlers were Gavin Hamilton, long known as the 
owner of the Orange Mills; Lott Herrick, the first Probate 
Judge of DeKalb County ; George Barney, for four years 
Treasurer of the county ; James Hadsell, Cornelius Woodcox, 









' 






508 HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 

R. J. Dawson, John Blair and sons, Charles Wilbur, William 
Burley, Joseph Ludwick, Judge Walden, Samuel Widney (one 
of the first Board of Commissioners), John P. Widney, Rev. 
Benjamin Alton and Dr. Babcock. James Hadsell was one of 
the most useful pioneers of Concord, filled several responsible 
offices, was a minister of the Disciples church, and was the 
main builder of the brick structure in Waterloo, where he died 
during the winter of 1877. 

Nelson Ulm, one of the oldest residents of the county, moved 
here in 1834 and settled on the present site of Spencerville. He 
tells of helping drive from Fort Wayne in the fall of 1834 the 
first hogs and cows ever brought to Spencerville, eight hogs 
and one cow for David Butler, and two cows for Dan Rhodes, 
both of whom are deceased. Dan Yates, then living at Spencer- 
ville, was the first white settler there, for whom Mr. Ulm 
worked during the fall of 1834 and subsequent winter. Dur- 
ing that same winter Mr. Yates sent Mr. Ulm to Fort Wayne 
to mill. He took two bushels of corn on a hand-sled, making 
the distance in two days, camping on the bank of the river near 
where the Feeder dam now is, drawing the sled on the ice, the 
river being the only highway at that time. 

In the fall of 1S35 he had a big tramp after Yates' and Rhodes' 
horses, which were allowed to roam the woods in quest of some- 
thing to eat. The horses failing to put in an appearance at the 
usual time, he started to bring them in, striking their trail on 
Bear Creek, followed them up the river where Ncwville now 
stands, crossed the river where the United Brethren church 
I has since been erected, left the trail and returned to Daniel 
I Rhodes', where he staid all night. Early the following morn- 
j ing he struck the trail and followed the same all day without 
i any success, camping that night near Maumee River. Awaken- 
j ing in the night, he found that the horses in their wanderings 
came up to where he was then camping. He got up, bridled 
two of the horses and hitched them to some saplings and retired. 
He started home, leading one horse, carrying gun and knap- 
sack, striking the St. Joseph River near where Hursh's mills 
now are. In consequence of riding bareback, with heavy load, 
and it raining all the time, the horse's back became surfeited, 
and in time the hair all came off its back. 

Starting for Houlton's mill on Fish Creek in the fall of 1S34 
after a raft of lumber, he arrived at the mill, and, with the assis- 



HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 



5 Oy 



tance of Mr. Houlton, succeeded in getting back with a raft 
without accident. Stopping near the mouth of Buck Creek, 
he found the skeletons of two deer, their horns so interlocked 
that it was impossible to separate them. He supposed that they 
had been fighting and had become so entangled that separation 
was impossible, and had so died. From this incident Mr. Ulm 
gave the creek the name of Buck Creek, the name it still bears. 

The following catalogue of Concord's early settlers was pre- 
pared by J. D. Leighty, of St. Joe, and reported to the pioneers' 
meeting in June, 1883. It is believed to be nearly complete. 

Those who came in 1833 were Samuel Wasson and David 
Butler; 1834, Nelson Ulm, Mrs. Polly Rhodes, Jeremiah Rhodes, 
Mrs. Jeremiah Rhodes; 1835, Samuel Draggoo, Cynthia Engle, 
William Knight, Aseneth Ricketts, Henry Robertson; 1836, 
William Henderson, Mrs. William Henderson, Jane Lawhead, 
Charles W. Widney, Mrs. Nancy Wyatt, John Widney, Mrs. 
Nancy Widney, Elvira Ulm, James H. Abel, Abigail L. Abel, 
Electa Abel, Mary Hadsell ; 1837, Abraham Johnson, Charles 
Widney, G. W. Woodcox, Solomon Woodcox, Erastus White, 
Jacob B. White, Ira Picketts, Hugh Wyatt, Jonathan Boyle, 
Henry J. Abel, Mrs. Samuel Wasson; 1838, H. H. Fales, Mrs. 
H. H. Fales, George Barney, Mrs. Sophia Moody, Milas 
Rhodes, E. D. White, Susan White, J. M. Lonsbcrry, Martha 
Lawhead, Charles M. Coburn; 1839, Isaac Lawhead, James M. 
Hamilton, S. L. Widney, Nancy Culbertson, Samuel Lawhead; 
1840, Eva Lonsbcrry, Elizabeth Wineland, Hugh Maxwell, 
Mary Maxwell, Sarah A. Hull, Maria C. Williams, Harlow 
Gee, Harmon Gee ; 1841, O. H. Widney, William Draggoo, 
Amand Meese, Rebecca Smith, George Maxwell, Betsey A. 
Leighty, John Wyatt, S- E. Parsons ; 1842, Daniel Butler, David 
Butler, Mary A. Widney, Jane Jenkins, Mrs. Erastus White, 
Elizabeth Widney, Jacob Dermott, Moses Perry ; 1843, J acl< 
Moody, Jonas Emanuel, Benjamin Hursh, Mrs. M. Widney, 
Robert Culbertson, J. M. Milliman, Mary Milliman ; 1844, Mar- 
garet Stewart, John Leighty, Mrs. John Leighty, Sol. Barney, 
Henry Jenkins, William Leighty, J. D. Leighty, Levi Sechler, 
Mary Sechler, Lizzie Chaney ; 1845, Catherine Silberg, Robert 
Johnson, Sep. Hull, John W. Dills, George W. Draggoo, Mary 
Ann Koch, Adeline Showalter, Catherine Jenkins. 

The following are some of the early officials of Concord 
Township : 



510 HISTORY OF DE KALli COUNTY. 

Justices of the Peace. — John Blair, Ebenczcr Coburn, George 
Barney, Jeremiah Rhodes, John Bates, Asher Coburn, James 
Draggoo, Moses Perry, Lorenzo Dawson and Robert Cul- 
bertson. 

Constables. — Gardner Mellindy, W. Monroe, Uriah Miller, 
Henry Fales, Eben Smith, D. Harrington, James Smith, J. Z. 
Henderson, Samuel Flint, Moses Boyles, John Smith, D. An- 
drews, Michael Knight, W. R. Drake. 

Trustees. — S. Widney, John Blair, Ebenezer Coburn, Asher 
Coburn, J. P. Widney, J. E. Shilling, James Hadsell, Asa 
Fletcher, John F. Coburn, William Monroe, Michael Silberg, 
John Helmick, Moses Perry, Jonathan Boyles, Bushrod Catlin, 
Romeo Catlin, W. Horner, James Draggoo, John Shutt, Jacob 
Dills. 

Assessors. — Jeremiah Rhodes, John A. Chillis. 

Spcnccrville is a thriving village, though not on a railroad, 
and though one of the oldest points in the county, shows no 
signs of decay. Its business firms are as follows: Barney & 
Eirick, dry goods and hardware; Peter Bishop, dry goods; 
Olds & Carnes, general merchandise; J. A. Provines, drugs; 
Dr. Jonas Emanuel, drugs ; George Wise, blacksmith ; Batz 
& Son, blacksmiths; Smith & Son, blacksmiths; Bce'ms 
Bros., undertaking goods and furniture; Murray Bros., 
saw and grist mill; Moody, Hollobaugh & Steward, saw 
mill and tile factory; Stephen Silberg, barber; Henry Myers, 
cooper; Mr. Chaney, wagon shop; Chancy Bros., meat 
market; J. R. Nichols, hotel, insurance and notary public; 
George Barney, Justice of the Peace ; Mr. Shaubaugh, shoe- 
maker ; Luther Jones, shoemaker; O. W. Rummel, harness 
maker; John Somers, harness maker; Murray Bros., handle 
factory ; J. A. Provines is Postmaster, and the medical profes- 
sion is here represented by Drs. J. E. Emanuel, Jacob Hull and 
Houghton. Spencerville has two churches. The M. E. denomi- 
nation has a brirk stniGUin; !'!!'!< in [§§£, |j g cost (if S|,§§§i 
Previous to this a frame church was used. The pulpit is filled 
at present by a minister who resides at Leo. The Evangelical 
Lutherans have a frame church, twenty years old, which cost 
about $2,000. The pastor is Rev. E. K. Baker. 

St. Joe is a station on the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. Though 
a small place, it has come to be an important business center, 
and one of the best grain shipping points in the county. Its 



HISTORY OF DE KALI! COUNTY. 



5U 



business firms include the following enumerated : J. D. Leighty, 
dry goods ; S. & T. Barney, dry goods ; Case & Olds, dry goods; 
VV. C. Patterson, drugs; M. Testeson, groceries; Augustus 
Copp, blacksmith ; S. Wincland, handle and shingle factory ; 
Filley "& Lounsberry, saw-mill; Jos. Baker, barber; William 
Curie, butcher; Chancy Bros., meat market; Harry Meek, 
cooper; Mr. Meek, painter; Wm. Bohls, wagon shop; David 
Grill, machinist; Mr. Brooks, shoemaker; A. Zern, shoemaker; 
L. A. Bartlctt, millinery ; Ed. White, livery ; Aug. Kinscy, furni- 
ture; Hart Bros., brick yard; C. A. Washier, saloon; Wm. 
Stamen, timber dealer; M. T. Bishop, lumber dealer; J. II. 
Conrad, tinner ; E. W. Boyles, stone mason and plasterer ; Arch. 
Evans, stone mason and plasterer ; Wm. Leighty, hotel ; G. W. 
Woodcox, Justice of the Peace; James A. Reed, Constable; 
A. C. Donaldson, builder and carpenter ; James A. Reed, car- 
penter; B. S. Sheffer, physician ; H. W. Bowman, physician; 
M. T. Bishop, Postmaster. The village has one church, the 
Evangelical Lutheran, built in 1881, at a cost of Si, 500. The 
present pastor is Rev. E. W. Baker ; he was preceded by Rev. 
E. W. Eirick. 

Concord had a population by the last census (1SS0) of 1,623, 
or 45 to the square mile. This is a gain of 151 over the popu- 
lation in 1S70. The rate of taxation in 1SS4 is $i.Si ; poll tax, 
S1.25 ; acres of land, 22,591.47; value of lands, $399,595 ; value 
of improvements, $43,915; value of lands and improvements, 
$443,510; value of lots, $2,287; value of improvements, $16,670; 
value of lots and improvements, $18,957 ; value of personal pro- 
perty, $126,990; total value of taxables, $589,457; number of 
polls, 328 ; total amount of taxes, $11,244.02. The valuation 
per capita is $368.10. The number of children of school age 
enumerated is 399. 

In 1881 this township had in wheat 3,366 acres, producing 
seven bushels to the acre, or 23.562 bushels; in corn, 2,134 acres, 
producing 25 bushels to the acre on upland, and 40 bushels on 
bottom land, in all, 49,100 bushels; in oats, 969 acres, producing 
30 bushels to the acre, or 29,070 bushels; in meadow, 1,029 
acres, producing a ton and a half per acre, or 1,543 tons; in 
potatoes, 66 acres, producing 30 bushels to the acre-, or 1,980 
bushels. 

BIOGRAPHICAL. 

George H. Abel, deceased, was born in Trumbull County, 



5»2 



HISTORY OF DE KALI! COUNTY. 



Ohio, Feb. 21, 1S08, a son of Damon and Sally (Root) Abel. 
He was married April 21, 1828, to Electa Hodsell, a native of 
New York, daughter of John and Abigail (Bray) Hodsell. Af- 
ter his marriage he settled on a farm in Ohio, and in September, 
1836, came to Indiana and entered 160 acres of land in Concord 
Township, De Kalb County. Here he cleared and improved a 
farm, where he lived till his death, May 10, 1874. Mrs. Abel still 
lives on the old homestead in the seventy-seventh year of her 
age. They had a family of ten children, seven of whom are 
living — James H., Cyrus W., Henry J., Mclvinas, Mary Al- 
mira, Walter M. and Alice L. George D., Nancy and La- 
vesta are deceased. In politics Mr. Abel was a Democrat. 
Mrs. Abel is a member of the Disciples church. 

Henry J. Abel, son of George H. and Electa (Hodsell) Abel, 
is a native of De Kalb County, Ind., born in Concord Town- 
ship Aug. 19, 1837. He remained with his parents assisting in 
the care of the farm till his marriage, and then settled on a farm 
adjoining the one where he now lives, remaining there till 1875, 
when he bought his present home. He owns no acres of im- 
proved land with a pleasant residence and good farm buildings. 
Nov. 22, 1 861, he enlisted in Company F, Forty-fourth Indiana 
Infantry. Soon after going South he was taken sick, and was 
in the hospital the most of the time till discharged March 10, 
1863. He was married Nov. 14, 1858, to Eliza Shull, daughter 
of Daniel and Susan (Ncwcomc) Shull. To them have been 
born seven children — Jonathan E., George H., Merton, Her- 
bert E., Essie M., Marion C, and Grace S. Mrs. Abel is a 
member of the Disciples church. In politics he is a Republi- 
can. He is a member of John C. Cams Post, No. 144, G. A. R. 

James H. Abel was born in Trumbull County, Ohio, Feb. .9, 
1829, the eldest son of George H. and Electa Abel. He was 
seven years of age when his parents moved to De Kalb County, 
and was reared and educated in the wilds of Indiana. He and 
his father cleared about seventy acres of the old homestead. 
He attended school during the winter when his services were 
not needed on the farm. He remained with his parents till May 
14, 1848, when he was married to Abigail Robe, a native of Me- 
dina County, Ohio, daughter of Amherst and Abigail (Liswell) 
Robe, her father a native of Connecticut, and her mother of 
Massachusetts. After his marriage Mr. Abel bought eighty 
acres of wild land for which he gave his note. He was but 



HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 



513 



twenty years of age but was possessed of a large degree of en- 
ergy and perseverance and went bravely to work to improve 
his land. His wife assisted him by taking in sewing, and to- 
gether they worked and paid for their home. He cleared 
eighty acres of heavily timbered land in three years. Sept. 23, 
1S61, he enlisted in the defense of the Union in Company F, 
Forty-fourth Indiana Infantry, and Nov. 23 they started for the 
South. They participated in the battles of Fort Donelson and 
Shiloh. At the latter battle his regiment went in with 480 men 
and came out with 241. Soon after the battle of Shiloh he was 
taken sick with typhoid fever, and not regaining his former 
health was discharged Sept. 3, 1862. Oct. 6, 1864, he was 
drafted, although still suffering from the effects of his illness, 
and was assigned to Company C, Thirty-fifth Indiana Volun- 
teers. Nov. 30 he participated in the battle of Franklin, Tcnn., 
and Dec. 15 and 16 in the battle of Nashville. From there he 
went to Huntsville, Ala., and the following March to Bull's 
Gap, thence back to Nashville, and from there in June to Vic- 
toria, Tex., where they remained till discharged Sept. 30, 1865. 
Since his return from the war he has engaged in agricultural 
pursuits, although his army experience has unfitted him for any 
hard work. He was elected Assessor of his township in the 
fall of 1864, but appointed a deputy while he was in the ser 
vice. He was re-elected in 1866 and again in 1872, and in 1S80 
he was appointed to take the census of his township. He has 
been a Republican in politics since 1856, casting his first Presi- 
dential vote for Frank Pierce. To Mr. and Mrs. Abel have 
been born three children — Mary E., wife of John B. Taylor, of 
Baltimore, Md.; Ida O., wife of Adclbert Andrews, of Hicks- 
ville, Ohio; and Freeman H., who married Ella Kelley and lives 
on the old homestead. Mrs. Abel's parents came to De Kalb 
County in 1837 and entered eighty acres of land in Wilmington I 
Township, where her mother died in 1S40. They had a family 
of four children. The eldest son also died in 1840. The other 
son, Bennett S., died at Chattanooga while a soldier in the civil 
war. The father afterward married Amilla Hayford, and of 
their two children a son is living. Mr. Robe died in 1S46. 

James Baker, farmer and stock-raiser, Concord Township, 
was born in Bedford County, Pa., Sept. 28, 1 8 14, a son of 
Joseph and Nancy (Smith) Baker. When he was seven years 
of age his parents moved to Adams County, Pa., where his 



^A 



5i4 



HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 



mother died two years later. He then lived with relatives till 
fifteen years of age, and then began to take care of himself, 
working by the month till his majority. He was married Dec. 
22, 1842, to Barbara Rummel, a native of Adams County, Pa., 
daughter of John and Barbara (Demer) Rummel. After his 
marriage he lived four years in Franklin County, Pa., and in 
the fall of 1S47 moved to Ashland County, Ohio, and a year 
later to DcKalb County, Inch, where he bought eighty acres of 
unimproved land, now owned by William Short. He cleared 
and improved this land, living on it till February, 1869, when 
he sold it and bought the farm where he now lives, which con- 
tains 148 acres of land all under cultivation. Mr. and Mrs. 
Baker have had nine children — Mary E., Daniel, Susan, Will- 
iam, Henry, Jacob, Sarah, Joseph, and John. In politics Mr. 
Baker is a Republican. He and his wife are members of the 
Lutheran church. 

George IV. Barney, one of the pioneers of Concord Township, 
is a native of Essex County, N. Y., born in Willsboro, Oct. 13, 
181 5, the youngest son of Solomon and Charity (Horde) Bar- 
ney, his father a native of England, and his mother of New 
York, of bcotch parentage. When he was a small boy his 
father moved to Ashtabula County, Ohio, and built an iron 
foundry, and as soon as old enough he began to assist him, con- 
tinuing till fifteen years of age, when his father died ; and three 
years later he went to Canada and lived with an older brother 
till 1836, when he returned to Ohio and lived with a brother-in- 
law till the spring of 1838. He then came to DeKalb County, 
Ind., and assisted in building one of the first mills in the county, 
at Orange. He worked in this mill two years, and in the mean- 
time bought eighty acres of land in Wilmington Township, 
which he rented for a time. In 1840 he moved to Spencerville 
and was employed as manager of the mill, store and large farm 
of Reuben J. Dawson, till the death of the latter. In 1861 he 
was elected Treasurer of the county, and served four years. 
Previous to this, in 1845, ne was elected Magistrate, but after 
serving a year resigned, but in 1849 was again elected and 
served twelve years. The first couple he married lived in New- 
ville Township, and he walked five miles, without compensation, 
to perform the ceremony. In 1865, after the expiration of his 
term as Treasurer, he returned to Spencerville, and engaged in 
the mercantile business with Henry Miller a short time. His 



HISTORY OF DE KALI) COUNTY, 



5'5 



son Solomon then became his partner, and subsequently, as 
the} - became old enough, his other sons were admitted to the 
firm, the name being George W. Barney & Sons. In 1879 ne 
retired from active business, leaving the management of the store 
to his sons. In 1880 he was elected Justice of the Peace and 
served four years. Mr. Barney was married May 28, 1840, to 
Jane Bratton, a native of Pennsylvania, born July 11, 1816, and 
to them have been born eight children, but three of whom 
are living — Solomon, born Sept. 22, 1844; Franklin, born Jan. 
13, 1852; and Marquis, born Nov. 21, 1S5S. Lucius, born May 
15, 1S41, was a soldier in the war of the Rebellion, enlisting as 
Orderly Sergeant of Company A, One Hundredth Indiana In- 
fantry, and being mustered out as Captain. He died Oct. 5, 
1869. John S., born Nov. 13, 1S42, enlisted in the Eleventh In- 
diana, and died while a prisoner in Texas, October, 1S64. Mary 
C., born Jan. 25, 1S4S, died Dec. 23, 1S69. George W., Jr., was 
born Dec. 20, 1S49, and died July 23, 1S53. Stephen, born Dec. 
5, 1S54, died March 15, 1S56. Mr. and Mrs. Barney have been 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church since 1850. In 
politics he has been a life-long Democrat. 

Jonathan Boylcs, one of the first settlers of Concord Town- 
ship, was born in Knox County, Ohio, Feb. 12, 1S15, a son of 
John and Nancy (Merritt) Boyles, the former a native of West 
Virginia, son of Jonathan Boyles, of English and Irish descent, 
and the latter a daughter of Moses Merritt, of Irish and Welsh 
descent. In 1825 his parents moved to Morrow County, Ohio, 
where he grew to manhood. His father being in feeble health, 
he was obliged to take charge of the family, and before he was 
twenty-one years old had cleared and fenced sixty acres of 
land and built a good house. He was married Feb. 25, 1S36, 
to Elizabeth Oliver, daughter of Samuel and Catherine (Alman) 
Oliver. In the fall of 1S36 his house and all its contents were 
destroyed by fire. Soon after he left home and came to De. 
Kalb County, Ind., and entered eighty acres of land on section 
17, Concord Township, and again began to make a home. He 
returned to Ohio, and in August, 1837, moved his family to 
their new home. In company with Henry Brown and family, 
Isaac Brown and family, his father and mother, grandmother 
Knight, James Herrod and son James, in all sixteen in the com- 
pany, with two wagons with three horses to each, they were 
eleven days on the way, camping out nights and cutting their 



516 HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 

roads through the unbroken forest. On arriving in the vicinity 
of Brunersburg the company stopped at the cabin of a pioneer 
to water their teams. There was no door to the cabin, a quilt 
serving its purpose. His father and James Hcrrod went to the 
door and pulling aside the quilt found no one at home, but dis- 
covered a quantity of meat hanging from the walls. They con- 
eluded it to be venison, and thought they could not go on 
without a supply. Securing what they thought sufficient for 
their purpose, they deposited money to pay for it on the tabic. 
After traveling a few miles they met a man and his wife, who, 
upon inquiry, they learned were the owners of the cabin, who 
informed them that it was part of an ox that had broken his 
neck by turning the yoke. Pursuing their journey, they arrived 
at their destination on Saturday, the first day of September, 
1S37. Having no house, they stopped at the cabins of David j 
and Michael Knight, who had preceded them with their fami- 
lies. Within one week after they arrived twelve out of the six- 
teen were down sick with the ague, including the entire family 
of Mr. Boyles. He had a chill each day for sixty-three days. 
He had but $10, and sold forty acres of his land, and had built I 
a cabin about twelve feet square. His wife and her small 
brother sawed timber and split it in shape, laid the floor, chink- 
ing and daubing the best they could; they then carried him to 
it, he being now afflicted with dropsy. Their only window was a 
log sawed out with sticks crossed in it and greased paper pasted 
over them. The door was made the same way, with a quilt I 
'hung over it. During the winter his wife cleared five acres of 
ground up to trees of one foot, the tender twigs serving as the 
only feed by which he wintered two cows and one horse. By 
the month of April, 1S3S, their scanty supplies were exhausted, 
and he, in company with three others, secured a pirogue and 
started for Fort Wayne down the St. Joe River, without a cent 
of money, in quest of food for their starving families, leaving 
them to subsist for four days upon one meal of thickened milk 
and a few dried pumpkins. They applied to Thomas Swaney 
for corn, who, upon finding they had no money, refused to sup- 
ply their wants. They then applied to Col. Spencer, who, 
after inquiring their names, and where they were from, and the 
amount of their probable wants, directed them to "go down 
the Maumee River six miles, shell what they wanted, and pay 
me seventy-five cents a bushel when you can. And if any of 



HISTORY OF DE KALIS COUNTY. 517 

your neighbors are in need, they shall not starve while I have 
anything to supply them with." They lived upon parched corn 
while away from their families. During his absence on this 
expedition, the wolves surrounded his house at night, fighting 
his dog. Mrs. Boyles sallied forth armed with a fire shovel, 
and with the assistance of the dog drove them away. He has 
undergone all the hardships and privations of pioneer life, but 
by persistent effort has accumulated a good property, having a 
pleasant home where he has now lived forty-eight years. His 
wife died Feb. 16, 1S49. They had a family of seven children, 
four of whom are living — Nancy C, Martha J., Newton, and 
Emma. The three eldest are deceased — John and William 
(twins) died in infancy, and Artemus, while a soldier in the war 
of the Rebellion. June 30, 1850, Mr. Boyles was married to 
Susan Rummel, and to them have been born three children — 
Maggie M., Anna Eliza, and Elnora M. Mrs. Boyles died Feb. 
10, 1870. In politics Mr. Boyles was formerly a Democrat, but 
since the war has affiliated with the Republican party. He has 
been an active member of the Methodist Episcopal church for 
nearly half a century, and assisted in the organization of the 
first Methodist church in the township. 

David Buchanan, deceased, was born in Washington County, 
Pa., in iSiJ, a son of John and Ann (Adams) Buchanan. He 
was a wagon-maker by trade at which he worked in Brooke 
County, W. Va., till 1S46, when he moved to Ashland County, 
Ohio, and engaged in agricultural pursuits till the spring of 
1853, when he moved to DeKalb County, Ind., and bought 
forty acres of partially-improved land. He died July 25, 1S55, 
leaving his wife with a family of small children to rear in a new 
country, and among strangers. He was married March 21, 
1S39, to Elizabeth McGee, daughter of Alexander and Ruth 
(Talbot) McGee, and to them were born four children — Reason, 
Florence, Lucinda and Samantha. Reason and Lucinda are 
deceased. The former enlisted in the defense of the Union in 
September, 1S62, in Company A, One Hundredth Indiana In- 
fantry, and died Jan. 30, 1S64, from disease contracted in the 
service. Mrs. Buchanan went bravely to work after the death 
of her husband, and, with the help of her sons, improved her 
farm and made a comfortable home for her family. She reared 
her children to lives of usefulness, and fitted them for honorable 
positions in society. 



5 18 HISTORY OF DE KALIS COUNTY. 

Florance Buchanan, farmer and stock-raiser, Concord Town 
ship, was born in Brooke County, W. Va., Dec. 24, 1S41, the 
second son of David and Elizabeth (McGec) Buchanan. When 
seventeen years of age he went to Auburn to learn the cabinet- 
maker's trade, at which he served an apprenticeship of two and 
a half years. Sept. 5, 1S61, he enlisted in Company H, Thir- 
teenth Indiana Infantry, and participated in many hard-fought 
battles. He was wounded at the battle of Shiloh and was dis- 
abled for four months. Joining his regiment, he participated 
in the battle of Chickamauga and the Atlanta campaign. He 
was captured and was at Andersonville prison thirty days. He 
was discharged Oct. 15, 1S64, having served a little more than 
three years. After his return home he worked at his trade a 
short time, and then at the carpenter's trade four years. In the 
fall of 1 871 he opened a cabinet-shop and furniture store in Au- 
burn, in company with Wm. E. Rush, but five years later sold 
his interest and moved to a farm in Concord Township, where 
he lived till the fall of 18S0, when he bought the farm where he 
now lives, which contains about eighty-five acres of improved 
land. He was married March 21, 1870, to Mary D. Rush, daugh- 
ter of William E. Rush, of Auburn. They have three children — 
Harry L., Martha E. and Florance J. Mr. Buchanan is a mem- 
ber of John C. Cams Post, No. 144, G. A. R. He and his wife 
and one daughter, are members of the Protestant Methodist 
church. In politics he is a Republican. 

David Butler, deceased, one of the most influential and es- 
teemed of the pioneers of DeKalb County, was born in Cul- 
peper County, Va., June 28, 1805, and died in Concord Town- 
ship September 3, 1884. His father died in Virginia, and 
when sixteen years of age he accompanied his mother to Pick- 
away County, Ohio, where he lived till manhood. In 1S33 he 
moved to DeKalb County, and bought sixty acres of land on 
section 32, Concord Township, which he cleared and improved, 
and to which he afterward added 160 acres. This farm is now 
one of the finest in the county. He was one of the first settlers 
of the county and became one of the most prominent citizens. 
He held many local offices of trust and responsibility, and al- 
ways performed the duties of his office in an efficient and satis- 
factory manner. He had many friends, especiallv among the 
early settlers, his upright, honorable life being acknowledged 
by all who knew him. His family consisted of eight children 






HISTORY OF 1)E KALI! COUNTY. 



519 



—Ellen, wife of Frederick Row, of Garrett; Irvin, died while 
a soldier during the war of the Rebellion ; Andrew resides in 
Idaho; Amos, in Kansas; Christiana, wife of James Barber, of 
Jasper County, Kan.; David and Daniel, twins, and Minerva, 
wife of John Moody. His wife died March 4, 1877. They 
were members of the Methodist Episcopal church in early life, 
but later united with the United Brethren church. In politics, 
he affiliated with the Republican party. 

David C. Duller, farmer and stock-raiser, a son of David 
and Elizabath (Yates) Butler, was born in Concord Township 
on the farm where he now lives, Dec. 6, 1842. He was reared 
a farmer, receiving a good education, attending the schools of 
Spencerville. He was married Oct. 7, 1875, to Miss Sarah J. 
Keyes, a native of Carroll County, Ohio, daughter of Zepha- 
niah and Fanny Keyes. After his marriage he settled on a part 
of the old homestead and has since successfully followed agri- 
cultural pursuits. lie owns fifty acres of valuable land and his 
residence and farm buildings are among the best in the town- 
ship. He is one of the enterprising farmers of Concord, and 
assists liberally every enterprise of benefit to his native county. 
He is a .nember of the Odd Fellows' order, Spencerville Lodge, 
No. 432. In politics he casts his suffrage with the Democratic 
party. Mrs. Butler is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. 

Daniel W. Duller, son of David and Elizabeth (Yates) Butler, 
and twin brother of David C. Butler, was born in Concord 
Township, Dec. 6, 1842. He was reared on the old homestead 
and was given a good education at Spencerville. He remained 
with his parents till manhood, and after attaining his majority 
took charge of the homestead. He was married Feb. 2, 1871, 
to Miss Sarah Jane Boots, daughter of John Boots, of Jackson 
Township, this county. After his marriage he settled on a part 
of the old homestead where he has since lived, successfully en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits. He is one of the enterprising, 
public-spirited men of the township, a worthy representative of 
one of the most esteemed men of the early days of De Kalb 
County. To him and his wife have been born three children — 
Frank L., Merritt A., and^Audrey Elizabeth. In politics Mr. 
Butler is a Democrat. 

Asher IV. Coburn, deceased, was born in Ontario County, N. 
Y., March 3, /803, and died in De Kalb County, Ind., July 11, 



1414605 



520 



HISTORY OF DL KALIS COUNTY 



1874. He was a son of Asher and Esther (Whitney) Coburn, 
who moved to Trumbull County, Ohio, about 18 18, where he 
lived with them till manhood. He was by occupation a farmer, 
following it in Ohio till his removal to De Kalb County, Ind., 
March 1, 1S36. Here he entered 240 acres of Government land 
on sections 23 and 24, Concord Township, which he cleared 
and improved and made his home till his death. He was mar- 
ried June 13, iS23,to Hannah Headley, daughter of Samuel and 
Rachel (James) Headlcy, who came from Pennsylvania to Ohio 
in an early day. To them were born three children — Phcebe, 
wife of Jacob Dermott ; Francis, deceased ; Roxanna, widow 
of Harvey Ackley. His wife died Sept. 8, 1S57, aged Pfty- 
three years. He afterward married Mrs. Susan Shull, now a 
resident of Allen County. He was a member of the Disciples 
church. In politics he was at first a Whig but after its organi- 
zation voted with the Republican party. 

Charles M. Coburn, farmer and stock-raiser, was born in Trum- 
bull County, Ohio, Nov. 21, 1S27, a son of Ebenezer and Deliv- 
erance (Wilson) Coburn. In August, 1S3S, his parents moved 
to De Kalb County, Ind., and settled in Concord Township, 
where he was reared, his youth being spent in assisting his 
lather clear and cultivate a frontier farm. When seventeen 
years of age he began to work for the farmers by the month, 
and when nineteen years of age he was married, and then for 
several years rented land in this township. In February, 1S55, 
he bought forty acres of timber land which he cleared, and to 
which he has since added thirty acres. This he has brought 
under a good state of cultivation and now has a pleasant home 
and is surrounded with all that makes life comfortable. He 
was married Nov. 15, 1846, to Almira Milliman, a native of New 
York, daughter of John and Mary (Warren) Milliman. To them 
were born eight children, five of whom are living — Helen A., 
Emma A., William H. II.. Charles Marcellus and Otis B. Har- 
riet E., Agnes B., and Rosalie F. are deceased. Mrs. Coburn 
died Feb. 12, 1S71, and Feb. 5, 1874, Mr. Coburn married Jane E. 
Allen, daughter of William and Elizabeth (Brownlev) Allen. 
They have five children — Allen E., Clarence A., Ella C., Caro- 
line B., and John H. Mr. Coburn is a member of the Disciples | 
church. Politically he is a Republican. 

Ebeuczcr Coburn, deceased, was one of the most esteemed 
pioneers of De Kalb County. He was born in Vermont, Oct. 



HISTORY OF DE KALli COUNTY. 



521 



8, 1794, a son of Ebenczer and Sybil (Robinson) Coburn, the 
former born July 4, 1752, of Scotch parentage, and the latter 
Sept. 14, 1755, of English descent. His parents were married 
Nov, 22, 1777, and when he was a child moved to New York 
State, where he grew to manhood. Sept. 13, 18 13, he was mar- 
ried to Fhcebe Henry, who died July 1, 1815. They had one 
child — John H., deceased, Sept. 17, 1815, he married Deli\-cr- 
ance Wilson, and in the fall of 1827 moved to Trumbull County, 
Ohio, where he engaged in farming, and also worked at the 
shoemaker's trade. In 1835 he entered 160 acres of Govern- 
ment land in Concord Township, De Kalb Co., Ind., and in 
August, 1S38, moved his family to their new home in the 
woods. He cleared and improved his land, remaining on it till 
his death, Aug. 9, '847. His wife survived him till May 14, 
1864. They had a family of ten children, six of whom arc liv- 
ing — Otis R., Russell G., Charles M., Henry VV., Chauncey, 
and Caroline. Fhcebe II., William W., Eliza J., and Ann A., 
are deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Coburn were members of the Disci- 
ples church. In politics he was an old line Whig. He se'rved 
his township as Justice of the Peace four years. 

John F. Coburn, deceased, one of the most prominent of the 
old pioneers, was born in Ontario County, N. Y., July 22, 1806, 
a son of Asher Coburn, and died in De Kalb County, Ind., 
April 8, 1879. He was ten years of age when his parents 
moved to Trumbull County, Ohio, and there he was reared 
on a frontier farm, obtaining a practical education in the 
district schools, and by studying in his leisure hours. He 
learned the shoemaker's trade in his youth, and worked at it 
till his removal to De Kalb County, Ind., March 1, 1836. He 
entered 120 acres of Government land, which he began to clear 
and improve, and also worked at his trade. He was elected 
County Clerk and Recorder, the first in the. county, and made 
an efficient officer. He was an active member of the Disciples 
church, and took a great interest in the cause of Christianity. 
Politically he was first a Whig and later a Republican. He 
was married Nov. 25, 1830, to Minerva Twadell, who died Oct. 
8, 1840. They had three children — Jacob O., Laura E., and 
Edwin R, The sons were both soldiers in the war of the Re- 
bellion. Jacob O. died in a rebel prison. Edwin R. is now a 
resident of Dushville, Isabella Co., Mich. July u, 1841, Mr. 
Coburn married Alzada M. Gay, who died March 28, 1S50. 



522 



HISTORY OF DE KALI! COUNTY. 



April 20, 1852, he married Betsey A. Wilmot, a native of Por- 
tage County, Ohio, born June 7, 1812. They had one child — 
Wilmot P. Mrs. Coburn and her son are living on the old 
homestead, which contains 160 acres of valuable land, under a 
good state of cultivation. 

Russell G. Coburn, a son of Ebenezer and Deliverance (Wil- 
son) Coburn, was born in Ontario County, N. Y., Aug. S, 1825, 
and was two years of age when his parents moved to Trumbull 
Count)', Ohio, and thirteen when they moved to De Kalb 
County, Ind. He remained with his parents, assisting in the 
cultivation of the farm, till his marriage, and then took charge 
of the old homestead and cared for his parents the remainder of 
their lives. For forty-six years he has lived on his farm, and 
has witnessed and materially assisted the development of the 
county. For twenty years he worked at the carpenter and 
joiner's trade in connection with farming. He was married 
July 6, 1S45, to Mary Milliman, daughter of John and Mary 
(Warren) Milliman. They have had a family of eleven chil- 
dren, nine of whom are living — Augustus B., Sarah J., Phcebe 
Eve, Elsie Ann, Mary E., Alva S., Warren W., Caroline E. and 
Harriet A. Mr. and Mrs. Coburn have been members of the 
Christian church forty-five years. Politically he has been a 
member of the Republican party since its organization. 

Robertson Culbertson, one of the prominent citizens of Concord 
Township, was born in Coshocton County, Ohio, April 6, 1S15, 
a son of Robert and Mary (Pepplcs) Culbertson, natives of 
Pennsylvania ; his father of Westmoreland County, of Scotch 
descent, and his mother of Adams County, of Irish descent. In 
1 8 10 his parents moved to Coshocton County, Ohio, where the 
father died six weeks before the birth of our subject. Four 
years later the mother married John Henderson. When eight 
years of age he went to live with his grandfather Culbertson in 
Wayne County, and remained with him till nineteen years of 
age. He then began to work for farmers by the month, and in 
1S38 came to De Kalb County, Ind., and entered 120 acres of 
land in Concord Township. Returning to Ohio he remained 
five years and then moved his family to the new home, which 
he has since cleared and improved, and now has one of the best 
farms in the township. He was married Nov. 10, 1836, to 
Margaret Robinson, daughter of Hugh Robinson, and to them 
were born seven children, but three of whom are living. One 



HISTORY OF DE KALP, COUNTY, 



523 



son, Joseph, enlisted Sept. 5, 1S61, in the first company that left 
De Kalb County for the defense of the Union, and was killed 
at the battle of Shiloh, April 7, 1862, aged twenty-one years. A 
daughter, Mary J., was the wife of John C. Owens, and died at 
the age of thirty years, leaving a family of children. Mrs. Cul- 
bcrtson died June 24, 1874, aged fifty-five years and twenty days. 

August 28, 1SS3, Mr. Culbertson married Brown, widow 

of Samuel Brown, by whom she has three children — Calvin H., 
Willis B., and Herman L. In 1855 Mr. Culbertson was elected 
Magistrate of his township and served eight years. He served 
as Assessor and Land Appraiser seven years. In politics he is 
a Republican. He and and his wife are members of the Prot- 
estant Methodist church. 

George W. Draggoo, farmer and stock-raiser, Concord Town- 
ship, is a native of Richland (now Ashland) County, Ohio, born 
March 22, 1S26, the youngest of twelve children of Frederick 
and Martha (Angel) Draggoo. His father died when he was 
twelve years of age and he remained with his mother till man- 
hood, receiving a common school education. His mother died 
when he was twenty-one years of age, and the following fall, 
1847, ne came to De Kalb County, Ind., and bought the land 
which is now his valuable farm. To his first purchase he has 
added till he now owns 155 acres, all under cultivation, and his 
residence and farm buildings arc pleasant and are built with all 
the modern conveniences. Mr. Draggoo has accumulated his 
property by hard work and frugality. He has been an influen- 
tial man in the township, and in i860 was elected Magistrate 
and served eight years. He is a member of the Masonic fra- 
ternity and one of the most esteemed of the brotherhood. In 
politics he is a Democrat. He was married April 26, 1849, to 
Samantha Blair, daughter of John and Margaret (Douglas) 
Blair, one of the first families in De Kalb County. They have 
two children — Alice A. and Franklin B. Mrs. Draggoo is a 
member of the Presbyterian church. 

Amos Draper is a native of Otsego County, N. Y., born April 
5, 1804, a son of Bethuel and Polly (Vaughn) Draper, his father 
a native of Massachusetts, son of Joshua Draper, of English 
descent, and his mother a native of New York, of Holland de- 
scent. When he was ten years of age his father died, leaving 
his mother, with six small children, in limited circumstances. 
The children were scattered, and our subject found a home in 



524 



HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 



the family of Stockwell in the city of Troy, where he lived three 
years, when his mother, having married again, he lived with her 
a short time. When he was twenty-two years of age he began 
teaching, his first school being near Hardwick. He then taught 
several years in his native county. In 1840 he moved to 
Huron County, Ohio, where he engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits till 1873, when he moved to Dc Kalb County, Ind., and 
bought eighty acres of land in Concord Township, all under 
cultivation. He is a self-made man, having made his property 
solely by his own industry and frugal habits, accompanied by 
his integrity and good business ability. He was married Jan. 
22, 1837, to Sally Ann Doan,a native of the State of New York. 
To them were born five children, but three of whom are living 
— Horace, William, and Miranda. ' Emily and Harriet are de- 
ceased. Mrs. Draper, born May 10, 18 18, died Nov. 12, 1879, 
aged sixty-one years, six months, and two days. In politics 
he is a Republican. 

Jacob Dcrtnott, farmer and stock-raiser, Concord Township, 
was born in Schuylkill County, Pa., May 16, 1824, a son of 
Peter and Hannah (Williams) Dermott. His father, a native of 
Ireland, came to the United States when a young man, and the 
latter a native of one of the Southern States of Welsh descent. 
When he was fifteen years of age his parents moved to Ohio, 
and settled in Paulding County. Two years later he went to 
Ft. Wayne, and for six years was engaged in the manufacture 
of chairs. In 1S47 ne bought eighty acres of unimproved land 
in Allen County, which he subsequently sold, and bought 160 
acres of partially improved land in Concord Township, DeKalb 
County, which he exchanged about five years later for the farm 
where he now lives, which contains 120 acres of valuable land 
all under cultivation, and has since engaged in agricultural 
pursuits. He was married Oct. 23, 1845, to Phcebe Coburn, 
daughter of Asher Coburn, one of the first settlers of DeKalb 
County. They have had five children, four of whom are liv- 
ing — Asher M., John E., Olive C.,and J. M. Their eldest son, 
Charles M., is deceased. Mrs. Dermott is a member of the 
Disciples church. In politics Mr. Dermott is a Democrat. 

Jonas Emanuel, M. D., is the oldest practising physician of 
DeKalb County. He was born in Hardin County, Va., April 
15, 1818, a son of Jacob and Mary (Kimball) Emanuel, the for- 
mer a native of Germany, and the latter of Virginia of German 









. 



HISTORY OF DE KALI) COUNTY. 



5-5 



descent. When he was about ten years old his parents moved 
to Fayette County, Ohio, where they died. In 1840 he began 
the study of medicine with Dr. Thomas MacGorough, a prom- 
inent physician of old Chillicothe, and remained with him three- 
years. Me took his first course of lectures at Cincinnati, and 
graduated from the Ft. Wayne Medical College. He began 
the practice of his profession at Franconia, Putnam Co., Ohio, 
and Dec. 19, 1843, came to DeKalb County and located in Spcn- 
cerville. Since his settlement in DeKalb County he has trav- 
eled about 150,000 miles, the greater part of it on horseback, 
fie was for several years the only physician of this part of the 
county and his labors were necessarily very laborious, often 
having to go miles through the dense forest, and being obliged 
to carry a hickory torch to see his way. He has been success- 
ful in his practice, and not only has acquired a good property, 
but has endeared himself to the hearts of the people, especially 
of the old settlers, with whom he shared their privations and 
difficulties, never refusing on any account to attend one who 
needed his services. In February, 1880, Dr. Emanuel took his 
honorary degree at Ft. Wayne College. He is a member of the 
Allen County Medical Association. I le was married Dec. 25, 
1S42, to Esther Ilawley, daughter of Richard Hawley, and to 
them three children were born — Mary E., wife of A. C. Taylor, 
of Kansas; Charles E., an attorney, of Auburn, and Appclles 
D., who was making a good record as a physician in Ohio, and 
in 1876 died of typhoid fever, aged thirty-two years, leaving a 
widow and three children. Mrs. Emanuel died Sept. 28, 1850, 
and May 16, 1852, Dr. Emanuel married Laura E. Coburn, a 
native of Trumbull County, Ohio, daughter of John Coburn. 
They had a family of seven children— Angelina, deceased ; 
Anoret and Henry are deceased; Hamilton is a physician oi 
Ohio; Marcus O, an attorney of this county; Ella, wife of 
Bruce L. Bogorte, an attorney of Dakota ; Gerry E., a phy- 
sician, the youngest man ever graduated from Rush Medical 
College, Chicago, 111. Dr. Emanuel lost his wife Nov. 28, 1871, 
and was again married Jan. 21, 1877, to Lucinda Silsbee. He 
has a fine farm of 200 acres in Concord Township, and one of 
the pleasantest homes in the county. In politics he was first a 
Whig, but now is a member of the Republican party. 

Henry H. Falcs is a native of New York, born Dec. 18, 181 8, 
a son of Peter and Judith Ann (Cole) Fales, the former a native 



- I 



526 HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 

of Massachusetts, of Welsh descent, and the latter of Rhode 
Island, of English descent. When he was fifteen years of aye 
his parents moved to Trumbull County, Ohio, where his youth 
was spent in assisting his father in the blacksmith's shop. May 
10, 1S38, he came to Indiana and helped build one of the first 
mills on the St. Joseph River, at Orangeville, and ran it two 
years. He then moved to Spcncerville, Concord Township, 
De Kalb County, engaged in different vocations till 1844, when 
he settled on a farm and engaged in agricultural pursuits till 
1S71, and for twelve years was associated with his son in the 
furniture and undertaker's business at Spencerville. Since 1883 
he has lived retired from the active business of life. Mr. Fales 
was married Feb. 9, 183S, to Rebecca White, a native of Trum- 
bull County, Ohio, daughter of Ephraim and Betsey (Bartholo- 
mew) White. To them have been born ten children, eight of 
whom are living — Emily, wife of Joseph Spittler ; Betsey, wife 
of William Leighty ; Eli, of Allen County, Ind.; William, on 
the old homestead ; Orange, of Elkhart County, Ind. ; Elliot S., 
of St. Joe ; Thomas L., and William L., of Concord Township. 
Rosa Ann and Malcolm are deceased. In politics Mr. Fales is 
a Republican. He has served as Magistrate of his township 
fourteen years. He and his wife are members of the Evangel- 
ical Lutheran church. 

Harlow J. Gcc, farmer and stock-raiser, Concord Township, 
is a native of Ohio, born in Ashtabula County, April 19, 1827, 
the second child of Anson and Amelia Gee. When he was four 
years of age his father died, leaving his mother in limited cir- 
cumstances with three children to care for. As soon as they 
were large enough, he and his elder brother were obliged to 
follow the plow and clear the land. His mother subsequently 
married Enoch Hay ford, and in 1834 they moved to Bartholo- 
mew County, Ind., where his stepfather died. In 1840 they 
came to DeKalb County and bought eighty acres, to 
which he afterward added forty acres near Newville, pay- 
ing S3 an acre. He was married. Aug. 25, 1850, to Lucinda 
Loomis, daughter of Amos Loomis, and settled on the home- 
stead. In 185 1 he bought his present farm of fifty acres in Con- 
cord Township, all under cultivation. To Mr. and Mrs. Gee 
have been born eight children — Harriet A., wife of James Sich- 
ler ; Mary A., wife of James Lindermuth ; Elizabeth, wife of 
George B. Wilson ; Marcellus D., married Carrie Coburn ; Jud- 



HISTORY OF DE KALIS COUNTY, 



son O.; Caroline, deceased ; Burton A., and an infant, deceased. 
In politics Mr. Gee is a Republican. His success in life is due 
to his habits of industry and economy learned in youth from 
the counsels of a wise mother. 

Rev. James Hadscll, deceased, was the second minister of the 
Disciples church in DeKalb County. He was born in Broome 
County, N. Y., Feb. 28, 1S13, a son of John and Abigail Had- 
scll. When he was a boy his parents moved to Trumbull 
County, Ohio, where he was reared on a farm, receiving his 
education in the district school, and by studying in his leisure 
hours when his services were not required on the farm. He 
began teaching school when a young man, at a time when he 
received $10 a month for his services. He was married March 
12, 1S35, to Mary A. Abel, who was born in Trumbull County, 
Ohio, Aug. 21, 18 1 3, a daughter of Daniel and Sally (Root) 
Abel. In 1836 they moved to DeKalb County, Ind., and en- 
tered eighty acres of Government land in Concord Township, 
where they lived thirty years. A short time after his settle- 
ment in the county he was licensed to preach in the Disciples 
church, and the rest of his life was an active worker in the 
cause of Christianity, traveling over DeKaib and adjacent 
counties for about forty years. He held many offices of trust 
and responsibility, and at one time represented his county in 
the Legislature. To him and his wife were born eight children 
—Byron A., Orlina E., Marshall D., Austin A., Maria M., 
Carson C, Eveline S. and Camillus J. Mr. Hadsell died March 
6, 1876. 

Benjamin Hamilton was born in Franklin County, Pa., Dec. 6, 
1845, a son °f Edward and Rebecca (Bishop) Hamilton. His 
father died before his birth, and he lived with his grandfather 
Bishop, till eight years of age, when his mother moved to 
Adams ounty, Pa., where he lived till seventeen years of age. 
When twelve years of age he began to assist his mother in the 
maintenance of the family. In 1863 they moved to DeKalb 
County, Ind., and settled in Concord Township. His mother 
now lives in Hicksville. November, 1S64, he enlisted in Com- 
pany A, Thirteenth Indiana Infantry, and participated in the 
battles of Fort Fisher and others of less importance. He was 
discharged in October, 1S65, and returned to Allen County, 
thence to DeKalb County, where he has since followed agricult- 
ural pursuits. In 1S72 he sold his farm in Concord Township, 






528 HISTORY OF DE KAMI COUNTY. 

and bought one in Allen County where he lived till 1S81, when 
he sold it and returned to Concord Township and bought the 
farm he now owns on section 14, containing 132 acres of valua- 
ble land. He was married Jan. 21, 1SG8, to Catherine Houk, 
daughter of George and Mary (Shilling) Ilouk. To them have 
been born six children — John A. (deceased), George F., Milli. 
cent, William, Mary and Adclphia. Mr. Hamilton is a member 
of John C. Cams Post, No. 144, G. A. R. In politics he is a 
Democrat. 

James AI. Hamilton. [By A. H. Bittinger, Esq.] — The subject 
of this sketch was born near Defiance, Defiance Co., Ohio, Oct. 
2, 1832. He was a son of Gavin W. and Anna B. Hamilton. 
His parental ancestors were Scotch and his maternal ancestors 
of German descent. His grandfather, William Hamilton, came 
from Scotland, arriving in New York in 1796. In the early part 
of the year 1839 ms parents removed to DeKalb Countv, Ind., 
and he is therefore one of the old settlers of the county. He re- 
ceived his education in the local schools which did not at that 
early day furnish the facilities for education for which in after 
years that section of the county became noted, but he was an apt 
scholar and acquired a good and substantial education for the 
time spent in procuring it. He is a farmer from choice, and 
has owned the farm upon which he now lives for thirty-three 
years. He is also the sole proprietor of the Orangeville grist- 
mill, situated upon the same site on the St. Joseph River selected 
by and upon which his father erected a grist and saw mill in 
1839, being the pioneer mills of that section of the country. Al- 
though domestic in his habits, he never married. In early life 
he planned tours through his own and foreign countries which 
he faithfully carried out in his maturer years. In 1S64 he made 
a tour of the Southern States with the assistance of the officers 
of the Union Army, who furnished him with the proper passes 
through their lines. In the year 1871 he made a tour of the 
Pacific slope, spending fifteen months in Idaho, Oregon, 
Nevada, California and Utah. In 1876 he journeyed through 
the Eastern States and to the capital of the United States. In 
1878 he took a voyage to Europe, visiting France, Germany, 
Switzerland, Belgium, Holland, England, Ireland, and the home 
of his ancestors in Scotland, where he found many of his kin- 
dred still occupying the ancestral homes. In 1885 he again 
made a tour of the Southern States, this time without the re- 


















, 















HISTORY OF I)K K/XI.Ii COUNTY. 



529 



straint of army passes, the principal object of which was the 
World's Exposition at New Orleans, La. He has acquired much 
useful information in his extensive travels. In politics, he is a 
Republican, his first vote being cast for John C. Fremont for 
President in 1S56, with which party he has ever since voted for 
National and State officers — he never sought nor held an office. 
He zealously advocates any cause he espouses, and is positive 
in his likes and dislikes. He is quick and electrical in his move- 
ments, possessed of much strength and vigor, enjoys the com- 
forts of a pleasant home, and esteem of a large circle of friends 
and acquaintances. 

George Hank, retired farmer, was born in Dauphin County, 
Pa., Oct. 23, 1S12, a son of Samuel and Catherine (Spraker) 
Hauk, natives of Pennsylvania, of German descent. His father 
died in Lebanon County, Pa., aged sixty years, and his mother 
in Stark Count) - , Ohio, aged eighty-six years. When he was 
eighteen years of age he left his native State and went to Stark 
County, Ohio, where he learned the miller's trade, serving an 
apprenticeship and worked at it ten years. He then bought a 
farm and followed agricultural pursuits in Stark Countv till 
the fall of 1S53, when he came to De Kalb County and bought 
160 acres of land in Jackson Township. lie subsequently 
added to it from time to time, till he now owns a fine farm of 
400 acres. In 1S74 he retired from the care oi his large farm, 
relinquishing it to his children, and bought thirty-nine acres in 
Spenccrville, where he and his wife are now enjoying the ac- 
cumulations of their many years of toil. He was married June 
27, 1S3S, to Mary Shilling, daughter of Adam and Mary (Roan) 
Shilling. To them have been born seven children — Marv A., 
wife of George Shutt, of Allen County; Hiram, of Allen 
County; Elizabeth, wife of William Shutt, of this township; 
Daniel married Rila Kiner and lives on the old homestead ; Erne- 
line J. Bell, wife of Nicholas Goldsmith, on the old homestead ; 
Amelia Catherine, wife of Benjamin Hamilton, of this township, 
and Sarah Matilda, wife of Samuel Canard, of Allen County. 
Mr. and Mrs. Hauk are members of the Lutheran church. In 
politics he was originally a Whig, but now casts his suffrage 
with the Democratic party. 

William Henderson, one of the pioneers of De Kalb County, 
is a native of Ashland County, Ohio, born April 26, 1S24, the 
eldest of thirteen children of Samuel and Lettie (Moody) Hen 



53° 



HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY, 



dcrson, natives of Pennsylvania, of Irish parentage. They 
were married in Harrison County, Ohio, and soon after settled 
on rented land on the present site of Haysville, and afterward 
bought a farm two miles north, where they lived till the fall of 
1S36. In July of that year Mr. Henderson came to De Kalb 
County and entered 320 acres of land, and returned to Ohio for 
his family. Sept. 25 they left the latter State and Oct. 13 ar- 
rived at their frontier home. They built a fire by the side of a 
log and made their wagon their house till a cabin could be 
built. The next morning the father started for Fort Wayne to 
mill, and was gone four days. When he returned the boys had 
their cabin ready to raise, and in less than a week from the 
time of their arrival they had a house to live in, the first in the 
township. He afterward bought 120 acres more land, making 
a large farm of 440 acres which he and his sons cleared and im- 
proved. He was elected the first Justice of the Peace in the 
township but refused to qualify, having no aspirations for offi- 
cial honors. He lived to see all but three of his children mar- 
ried and settled on homes of their own, and died Feb. 15, 1S63, 
aged sixty-five years. His wife survived till December, 1SS0, 
and died at the age of seventy-five years. William Henderson 
was twelve years old when his parents moved to De Kalb 
County, and although so young he was obliged to assist in 
clearing and improving a frontier farm. His educational ad- 
vantages were limited, never attending school but seven weeks. 
He was married Jan. 9, 1S45, to Matilda Watson, a native of 
Ashland County, Ohio, daughter of William and Susan (Kcffcr) 
Watson, of Allen County, Ind. After his marriage he settled 
on a tract of heavily timbered land, and began to make a farm 
for himself. He built a cabin i6xiS, in which he commenced 
housekeeping, aud went bravely to work to clear his land. He 
has cleared 160 acres, and now has one of the finest farms in 
the township, and has made it his home for forty years. To 
him and his wife have been born four children, two of whom 
are living — Margaret and John W. Their eldest died in in- 
fancy, and Elizabeth was the wife of Milo F. Walker, and died 
May 5, 1SS3, aged twenty-eight years. Mr. and Mrs. Hender- 
son have been members of the Methodist Episcopal church 
forty years. He is a member of Concord Lodge, No. 5 56, A. F. & 
A. M. In politics he was originally a Democrat, but since its 
organization has affiliated with the Republican party. He was 



HISTORY OF DE KALI! COUNTY. 



53' 



elected County Commissioner in 1S66 and served four years, 
and has also served as Township Trustee four terms. 

Andrew Horn is a native of Adams County, Pa., born Aug. 
ii, 1814, a son of George and Louisa (Cramer) Horn, natives of 
Pennsylvania, the former of Adams County and the latter of 
York County, of German parentage. He was reared on a farm, 
residing with his parents till manhood. He was married Feb. 
15, 1S3S, to Sydney Pilkington, daughter of Joseph and Jane 
(Gettys) Pilkington. After his marriage he settled on the old 
homestead, where he lived a year and a half, and in September, 
1S39, he and his father moved to Richland County, Ohio, where 
he lived thirteen years. In 1848 he came to De Kalb County and 
bought eighty acres of land in Newville Township, and four 
years later moved his family to this county. He sold his land 
in Newville Township and bought eighty acres of land in Con- 
cord Township, which is his present home. Sixty-five acres of 
his land are under cultivation. His father died in the spring of 
1862, aged seventy-three years, and his mother in 1S64, aged 
seventy-one years. To Mr. and Mrs. Horn have been born six- 
children — Israel, Mary J. (wife of George Lake, of Allen 
County), John M., Caroline (deceased), Edwin and Lorena. 
Their sons were all soldiers in the war of the Rebellion. In 
politics Mr. Horn is a Republican. He and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Lutheran church. 

Isaac N. Hombcrgcr is a native of Berks County, Pa., born 
Feb. 25, 1S24, a son of John and Leah (Rcmp) Hornberger, na- 
tives of Pennsylvania, of German descent. When he was ten 
years of age his parents moved to Stark County, Ohio, where 
he lived with them till his majority. He was married Dec. 25, 
1S4S, to Lucinda Lehman, daughter of David and Nancy (Zent) 
Lehman. He lived in Ohio two years after his marriage, and 
then moved to De Kalb County, Ind., and settled on the land 
which is his present farm, containing 160 acres, about fifteen of 
which were partially improved. He now has it all under culti- 
vation, and has a pleasant residence and good farm buildings. 
Mr. Hornberger is purely a self-made man, having acquired his 
property by hard work and economical habits. He is in poli- 
tics a Republican. Though not an aspirant for official honors 
he has served his township two years as Constable. To him 
and his wife have been born seven children — Nancy C, wife of 
Francis Koeht, of Union Township ; Mary A., wife of Isaac 



532 HISTORY OF DE KALI; COUNTY. 

Mann, of Wilmington; Belle E., wife of George Swinford, of 
Wilmington Township; John P., of Union Township, married 
Laura Weeks ; Susannah M., wife of James Sherwood, of Union 
Township; Anna A. and Myrtle J. Mrs. Hornbcrger died 
Nov. 30, 1SS1. She was, as is also Mr. Hornberger, an active 
member of the United Brethren church. 

Henry Hull, farmer and stock-raiser, Concord Township, was 
born in Knox County, Ohio, March 24, 1S34, the eldest son of 
Hiram and Sarah (Sloan) Hull, natives of Ohio, German of de- 
scent. He was reared by his grandfather, Henry Hull, 
living with him from his second till his twenty-sixth year. 
When he was fifteen years of age his grandfather moved to De 
Kalb County, Ind., and settled on a farm near Orangeville. He 
was reared to agricultural pursuits, and by close attention to 
business, and industrious and economical habits has acquired a 
large property. In 1S55 he bought eighty acres of wild land, 
which he cleared, and to which he has added till he now has a 
fine farm of 188 acres, all well improved with good buildings. 
He was married Dec. 29, 1S59, to Sarah A. Widney, daughter 
of Samuel Widney. To them have been born three children — 
Joseph A., Clarence H., and Delbert L. In his political affilia- 
tions Mr. Hull is a Democrat. 

Henry Jenkins, farmer and stock-raiser, Concord Township, 
was born in Knox County, Ohio, May 1, 1834, the second son 
of John and Margaret (Hull) Jenkins. When he was ten years 
of age his parents moved to De Kalb County, Ind., and settled 
on a tract of wild land where he was reared, his youth being 
spent in assisting his father to clear and improve his land. He 
received a common-school education attending the schools of his 
district. He remained at home till his marriage, Feb. 1, i860, 
to Martha J. Johnson, daughter of Thomas and Lydia (Drag- 
goo) Johnson, and then bought 106 acres of land which is his 
present home. He has been successful in his pursuits and now 
has a pleasant home. To him and his wife have been born six 
children, three of whom died in infancy. Those living are — 
Emma, wife of C. Elson, of Fairfield Township ; Frederick A., 
and Clara B. In politics Mr. Jenkins is a Democrat. Mrs. 
Jenkins is a member of the Methodist Protestant church. 

George Kimes, deceased, was born in Lancaster County, Pa., 
and died in Concord Township, De Kalb Co., Ind., March 17, 
1S7S. He was a son of Peter and Nancy Kimes, who, when he 



. 



• 






HISTORY OF DE KALli COUNTY. 



533 



was two years old moved to Dauphin County, Pa., where he 
was reared and married May 17, 1831, to Sarah Boyer, a native 
of Maryland, daughter of David and Elizabeth (Kramb) Boyer. 
In 1836 Mr. Kimes moved to Wayne County, Ohio, and in 184S 
to De Kalb County, Ind., and bought eighty acres of unim- 
proved land in Concord Township, which he improved, and in 
1S61 added eighty acres of heavily timbered land to it. He was 
an enterprising citizen and a liberal supporter of all interests of 
benefit to the community. In 1S31 he and his wife united with 
the Lutheran church, but in 1S39 becoming dissatisfied with 
that denomination, united with the Church of God, of which 
they were ever active and consistent members. To them were 
born thirteen children, twelve of whom lived till maturity — 
David, Elizabeth, JosiahH., Jacob C, Catherine A., Daniel M., 
George, Andrew, William H. Sarah J., Harvey and Amanda L. 
Mrs. Kimes has reared two grandchildren — Cora Barr and 
Ellery Kimes. She still lives on the old homestead, and is loved 
and esteemed by all who know her. In his political affiliations 
Mr. Kimes was an old line Whig, but after its organization cast 
his vote with the Republican party. 

Joscpli Koch, son of Ulrich and Barbara (Repman) Koch, was 
born in Ashland County, Ohio, in July, 1S32. His parents 
were natives of Germany, his father coming to America when 
sixteen and his mother when two years of age. Their family 
consisted of nine children, but three of whom lived till matur- 
ity. In 1852 Joseph Koch came to De Kalb County, Ind., and 
began clearing a tract of heavily timbered land which his father 
had bought some time before. He lived on and improved this 
farm till after the breaking out of the Rebellion when, Nov. 4, 
1S64, he enlisted in Company C, Thirty -fifth Indiana Infantry, 
and served till the close of the war. He participated in many 
hard fought battles, among others Franklin and Nashville. His 
health became impaired from exposure and as the result of an 
accident at Nashville, and he has never recovered from its 
effects. Since his return from the war he has followed agri- 
cultural pursuits, and now has one of the finest farms in the 
township, containing 160 acres, all under cultivation. He was 
married April 17, 1S53, to Mary Ann Jenkins, daughter of John 
and Margaret (Hull) Jenkins. They are the parents of eleven 
children — Sarah L., John U., Reuben J., Wilson, Annie, 
Margaret E., Ida, Lillie, Delia, Charley, and Amanda K. Mr. 
34 






53-1 



HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 



Koch is a member of John Cams Post, No. 144, G. A. R. 
Politically he is a Democrat. 

Tliomas Krisc was born in Center County, Pa., in 1840, the 
sixth of seven children of Philip and Elizabeth (Smith) Krise. 
When he was six weeks old his parents moved to Lorain 
County, Ohio, and in 1854 his father came to De Kalb County, 
Ind., and bought seventy-one acres of unimproved land, and re- 
turned to Ohio for his family. While making his arrangements 
to move he was taken sick and died in July, 1854, leaving his 
widow with five children. The following October the family 
came to their frontier home, which the sons cleared and im- 
proved, and where the mother still lives, in the eightieth year 
of her age. Thomas was in the fifteenth year of his age when 
he came to De Kalb County. He remained with his mother 
till after the breaking out of the Rebellion, and, Aug. 7, 1S62, 
enlisted in Company H, Eighty-eighth Indiana Infantry, and 
participated in many hard fought battles, among others being 
Perryville, and the Atlanta campaign. While on picket duty 
at McMean's Mill, S. C, he, with William Weeks, a member of 
the same company, was attacked by two rebels ,\vho placed 
revolvers against their breasts and commanded them to sur- 
render. Mr. Krise wrenched the revolver from him, although 
after a hand to hand struggle, and captured his opponent. The 
other rebel was killed. As a reward for his bravery the Gov- 
ernment gave him the captured revolver, which is among his 
most prized relics. He was discharged June 27, 1S65. After 
his return home he learned the carpenter's trade, at which he 
worked nine years, at the same time having charge of the old 
homestead. He has been successful in his pursuits, and now 
owns 160 acres of valuable land under a good state of cultiva- 
tion. Mr. Krise was married Sept. 30, 1S69, to Almira J., 
daughter of William Clark. To them have been born five 
children— Gertrude May, William H., Erne J. (deceased), 
Charles^O., and Milton Thomas. Mr. Krise is a member of 
William Hacker Lodge, No. 326, F. & A. M., and John Cams, 
Post, No. 144, G. A. R. In politics he is a Republican. 

Samuel Lau'licad, one of the prominent pioneers of Concord 
Township, was born in Fayette County, Pa., March 26, 1822, 
the fifth of eleven children of James and Martha (McClelland) 
Lawhead, natives of Pennsylvania, of Scotch and Irish parent- 
age. In 1824 his parents moved to Greene County, Pa., and in 



HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 



535 



j 1S35 to Wayne County, Ohio, where they lived four years, rc- 
I moving in May, 1839, to De Kalb County, Inch, where his 
; father entered 240 acres of Government land, which he cleared 
j and improved and made his home till his death in 1S4S, aged 
J sixty years. The mother lived till 1880 and died at the age of 
I eighty-seven years. Eight of their children are living. They 
j were active members of the Presbyterian church. Samuel was 
I seventeen years of age when his parents moved to Dc Kalb 
County, and from that time till twenty-four years of age he as- 
sisted his father in clearing and improving his land. April 6, 
1846, he was married to Martha Draggoo, a daughter of Peter 
and Nancy (Williams) Draggoo. In 1S4S he bought eighty 
acres of unimproved land which he has cleared and cultivated 
and has now made his home for thirty-two years. He has been 
an honest, upright citizen, and merits the respect of his fellow 
townsmen and has been entrusted by them with several posi- 
tions of responsibility. He and his wife are members of the 
Lutheran church. They have had three children ; but one is 
living — Nancy E. Mary E. and an infant are deceased. In poli- 
tics Mr. Lawhead is a Republican. 

Jacob D. Lciglity, merchant, St. Joe, Ind., was born in West- 
moreland County, Pa., Oct. 19, 1840, a son of John and Eliza- 
beth (Sowash) Leighty. I Ic was four years of age when his par- 
ents moved to Dc Kalb County in 1844, and here he was reared. 
When he was sixteen years of age he began teaching school, 
and subsequently taught and attended school till the breaking out 
of the war of the Rebellion, being at that time in the sophomore 
class at Wittenburg College, Springfield, Ohio. July 8, 1S61, 
he enlisted in Company E, Eleventh Indiana Infantry, and was 
appointed a Sergeant of his company. His first engagement 
was in the spring of 1S62, at Fort Henry. Subsequently he 
participated in the battles of Fort Donelson, Shiloh, Grand 
Gulf, Port Gibson, Raymond, Champion Hills, and others. At 
the last named battle he was wounded in the left hip and dis- 
abled from active service for sixty days. He joined his regi- 
ment at Baton Rouge, and from there went down the Missis- 
sippi to New Orleans and into West Louisiana as far as Opelou- 
sas, his regiment being in several engagements on the wav. 
Then he returned to New Orleans, but as he was still suffering 
from his wound he resigned in March, 1864, and returned 
home. He was a gallant soldier, and for his bravery was com- 



536 HISTORY OF DE KALI! COUNTY. 

missioned Second Lieutenant Jan. 24, 1862, and First Lieutenant 
Dec. 1 following. After his return home he engaged in the 
mercantile business in Spcnccrvillc in company with Miller & 
Myers a short time, and then he and Mr. Miller purchased Mr. 
Myers' interest and the firm of Miller & Co. continued a year, 
when his father bought Mr. Miller's interest, changing the firm 
to John Lcighty & Son. In 1872 he bought his father's interest 
and in 1S74 sold his stock to P. Bishop. In 1875 he and his 
father laid out the village of St. Joe and the following year he 
became established in the mercantile business at this place, 
lie was appointed Postmaster in 1S75 and served till 1880, 
when he was elected Township Trustee. He is a member 
of the Masonic fraternity, Concord Lodge, No. 556; William 
Hacker Chapter, No. 56; Angola Council, No. 27; Apollo 
Commandery, No. 19. He is a member of John C. Cams 
Post, No. 144, G. A. R. In March, 1866, Mr. Lcighty was mar- 
ried to Kate A. Metzger, a native of Circleville, Ohio, daugh- 
ter of Judge Andrew Metzger, of Fort Wayne. To them 
have been born three children, but one of whom is living — 
John R. 

John Lcighty, one of the prominent and successful early set- 
tlers of DeKalb County, is a native of Westmoreland Countv, 
Pa., born Nov. iS, 1S0S, a son of John and Catherine (Welker) 
Leighty, natives of Pennsylvania, of German descent. When 
he was fifteen years of age he went to learn the shoemaker's 
trade, serving an apprenticeship of three years. He then 
worked as a journeyman till his marriage and then settled on a 
farm in his native county, where he lived till 1S44, when in the 
early part of June he moved to DeKalb Count)-, Ind., and set- 
tled on section 33, Concord Township, where he built a cabin 
and began improving a farm. In 1859 he left the farm and 
moved to the village of Spencerville, where in 1S65 »e engaged 
in the rrjercnntilc business with hjg son \\\ i§j?jj he and his son 
moved to section 15, Concord Township, where they bought 
uic hundred acres of land and laid out the town of St. Joe, 
which is now a thriving village. Mr. Lcighty was married 
April 4, 1833, to Elizabeth Sovvash, a native of Westmoreland 
.County, Pa., a daughter of Abraham and Susan (Weaver) 
Sowash. To them have been born ten children, seven of whom 
are living— Catherine, Alexander, Jacob D., Maria, William, 
Charles B. and Mary. Susan, John and Elizabeth are deceased. 



HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 



S3 7 



Mr. and Mrs. Leighty are members of the Lutheran church. 
Politically he is a Democrat. 

Stcplicn Lute, farmer and stock-raiser, was born in Knox 
County, Ohio, Aug. u, 1S49, a son °f John and Elizabeth 
(Woodruff) Lutz, natives of Ohio, of German descent. When 
lie was sixteen years old, in the spring of 1S66 he came to Dc- 
Kalb County with his parents and settled in Concord Town- 
ship, and lived with them till manhood. Me has always given 
his attention to agricultural pursuits and now owns a good farm 
of eighty acres, all under cultivation, with good improvements. 
He was married Feb. 9, 1871, to Catherine Moore, a native of 
Ohio, daughter of Enoch and Rebecca (Johnston) Moore, who 
came to DeKalb County when she was a child. They have 
one child — -Samuel J. W. In politics Mr. Lutz is a Democrat. 
He and his wife are members of the Methodist Protestant 
church. 

James Malone, farmer and stock-raiser, Concord Township, 
was born in Holmes County, Ohio, in 1S20, a son of Elias and 
Catharine (Steffey) Malone, natives of Maryland, who moved 
to Ohio in an early day. He was reared a farmer, remaining 
with his parents till manhood. He was married Jan. 6, 1S42, to 
Mar) - Ann Eller, a native of Maryland, daughter of Jacob and 
Margaret (Grime) Eller, also early settlers of Ohio. After his 
marriage he lived on the old homestead a short time, and then 
went to Knox County, Ohio, and rented land till the fall of 
1S50, when he came to De Kalb County, and bought eighty 
acres of wild land, which he has cleared of the timber and put 
under a good state of cultivation. To this he has added till he 
now owns a good farm of 154 acres of valuable land. He is a 
self-made man, being in limited circumstances when he came to 
De Kalb County, but by energy and industry has accumulated 
' a good property. In politics he is a Democrat. To him and 
his wife have been born eight children, seven of whom are liv- 
ing — Henry, William, Jacob, Margaret, Sarah J,, Harriet, Mary 
F., and Anna ; the latter is deceased. 

Henry Maxwell, farmer and stock-raiser, Concord Township, 
was born in Wayne County, Ohio, July 31, 1S35, the fifth of ten 
children of John and Polly (Thomas) Maxwell, natives of Ohio, 
of Irish and English descent. John Maxwell was a millwright 
by trade, and about 1S40 built the first bridge across the St. 
Joseph River. In the winter of 1S41-2 he moved to De Kalb 



53* 



HISTORY OF DE KALI! COUNTY. 



County, and worked at his trade till 1S49 in Newville Town- 
ship, when he bought the farm now owned by his son Hugh, 
where he lived till his death. Henry Maxwell remained with 
his parents till fifteen years of age, and then went to Michigan 
where he lived twelve years. He enlisted in the war of the 
Rebellion in Company K, Second Michigan Infantry, and the 
following June received a wound which disabled him for active 
duty, and from the effects of which he has never recovered. 
Since his return from the war he has followed agricultural pur- 
suits, and now owns a fine farm of eighty acres all under culti- 
vation. He was married in 1859 to Mary Ann Brown, and to 
them were born two children, Hugh and Rosa J. The former 
died aged three years. His wife died in 1S61, and in 1863 he 
married Alvira Hull, who died Feb. 17, 1879. Oct. 8, 1S79, he 
married Lura L. Jackson. They have one child— Winiferd 
Alene. Mr. Maxwell is a member of Newville Lodge, No. 326, 
F. & A. M., and John C. Cams Post, No. 144, G. A. R. In poli 
tics he is a Democrat. 

J. H. Murray, of the firm Murray Brothers, millers, Spencer- 
ville, Ind., was born in Seneca County,' Ohio, Nov. 7, 1S39, the 
youngest son of James and Nancy (Herrin) Murray. Before he 
was a year old his father died, and he was reared by a widowed 
mother. When he was about fifteen years old he accompanied 
her to Allen County, Ind., where he lived till the fall of i860, 
when he came to De Kalb County, and in company with John 
Zimmerman bought a saw and grist mill, which they conducted 
till the death of the latter, when he, with his brother Thomas, 
bought the interest of the heirs, and they have since carried on 
the business. Mr. Murray was married Jan. 30, 1S73, to Maggie 
Langley, a native of Virginia, daughter of John and Elizabeth 
Langley. To them have been born two children — Mabel and 
Winifred. Mr. Murray is a member of Concord Lodge, 'No- 
556, A. F. & A. M. His wife is a member of the Methodist Epis" 
copal church. In politics he affiliates with the Democratic 
party. 

Thomas S. Murray, of the firm Murray Brothers, proprietors 
of the saw and grist mill, Spencerville, Ind.', was born in Seneca 
County, Ohio, Oct. 2S, 1S37, the third of four children of James 
C. and Nancy R. (Herrin) Murray, natives of Pennsylvania and 
early settlers of Ohio, where his father died when he was three 
years old. In 1*854 his mother came with her family to Indiana 



HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 



5 50 



and settled in Allen County, where in 1857. he began to work at 
the carpenter's trade, and followed it ten years. In 1S65 he 
came to De Kalb County and settled on a farm in Concord 
Township, and in 1S67 removed to Spcncerville, and formed a 
partnership with his brother in the milling business, which they 
have since successfully conducted. He was married Dec. 20, 
1S60, to Pauline Opdyke, a native of Allen County, Ind., daugh- 
ter of Henry C. and Elinor (Sunderland) Opdyke. They are 
the parents of four children, three of whom are living — Laura 
A., wife of John Baltz, of Allen County ; Maud E. and Mary 
E. Charles L. died at the age of sixteen months. Mr. Murray 
is a member of Concord Lodge, No. 556, F. & A. M. In poli- 
tics he is a Democrat. In 1S70 he was elected Trustee of his 
township and served two years. 

Thomas Nelson, one of the most successful farmers and stock- 
raisers of Concord Township, was born in Tuscarawas County, 
Ohio, Aug. 14, 1S16, the eldest son of Hugh and Mary (Wilson) 
Nelson, natives of Harrison County, Ohio, the former a son of 
John Nelson, who came from Ireland with his parents when ten 
years old, and settled in Pennsylvania, and when a young man 
moved to Ohio, and the latter a daughter of Thomas Wilson, a 
native of New Jersey, also an early settler of Ohio. Our sub- 
ject was born about the time the Indians left that part of Ohio, 
and his youth was spent in helping to clear a frontier farm. He 
was married in August, 1S34, when eighteen years of age. He 
then entered eighty acres of land and built a pole-cabin in the 
woods, where he commenced housekeeping. He had thirty- 
five bushels of wheat and borrowed Si 5 with which he entered 
forty acres more land. The first winter he taught a subscrip- 
tion school which furnished them with provisions. After get- 
ting his land under cultivation, he sold it for $1,200 and bought 
200 acres of unimproved land and again began to clear a second 
and larger farm. He afterward bought eighty-eight acres i 
which he sold a year later for $500 more than he gave for it. He ' 
then bought 1 50 acres near New Philadelphia Landing, which he 1 
kept four years and sold for $1,700 advance of the purchase price. '■ 
He then sold his 200 acres for $5,000, and in 1S6S moved to De- 1 
Kalb County and bought 150 acres of land for $6,600, seventy 
acres for $925, forty-six acres for $1,500, and three acres near 
Newville for $400 ; now has a landed estate of 269 acres 
all under cultivation. He has some of the finest stock 



5-|0 HISTORY ()!•' UN KAMI COUNTY. 

in the county, generally Laking the first premium wherever it is 
exhibited. His family has consisted of ten children — Mary A. 
died at the age of twenty-two years; Elizabeth J. is the wife of 
Richard Crumb; John T. died, aged thirteen years; Rachel 
married Samuel Armstrong, who died, and she is now the widow 
of William Sechler; Levina is the wife of Job Worford ; Re- 
becca is the wife of John Deardorf; T. W. married Martha 
Warner; Lennie is the wife of Chester Hoisington ; Hugh 
died, aged one year, and Sarah aged two years. Mr. and Mrs. 
Nelson joined the Methodist Episcopal church in their youth, 
but there being no church of their choice near them they are 
now members of the United Brethren church. Mrs. Nelson 
has for several years been afflicted with her eyes, and in 1SS4 
entirely lost her sight. In politics Mr. Nelson was originally a 
Whig, but now casts his suffrage with the Republican party. 

Samuel N. Olds, one of the prominent business men of Spen- 
cerville, now retired, is a native of Franklin County, Vt., born 
June 24, 18 1 8, a son of Elias and Abigail (Alcott) Olds, the 
former a native of Massachusetts, of Scotch descent, and the 
latter a native of Vermont. When twenty years old he left his 
native State and came to Indiana, locating in Fort Wayne, 
where he engaged in the manufacture of hats and caps, re- 
maining there till 1S66, when he moved to Spenceryille and 
engaged in general merchandising, which he followed success- 
fully till 1SS3, when he retired from active business. He is a 
shrewd business man, a good manager, and by close attention 
to his business and strict integrity, has been successful, and has 
surrounded himself with the comforts of life with which to 
enjoy the remainder of his days in this world. He was mar- 
ried Oct. 30, 1S44, to Caroline Robinson, a native of Vermont, 
daughter of Paul and Elizabeth Robinson. To them have been 
born ten children, six of whom are living — Mary E., Mortimer 
E., Lena, William, Nellie, and Arthur. George H., Charles, 
Harriet, and Sarah are deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Olds are mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal church. In politics he casts 
his suffrage with the Republican party. 

John A. Provines, druggist and Postmaster, Spencerville, 
Ind., was born in Wayne County, Ohio, July 22, 1S43, the eld- 
est son of Alexander Provines, When he was ten years of 
age, in the spring of 1S53, his parents moved to De Kalb 
County, Ind., and settled in Jackson Township, where he was 



HISTORY OF Dli KALIi COUNTY. 



541 



reared and educated, remaining with his parents till after the 
breaking out of the Rebellion, when, Sept. 5, 1S61, he enlisted 
in Company II, Thirtieth Indiana Infantry. The following 
October the regiment went to Munfordville, Ky., and in Feb- 
ruary, 1862, to Shiloh, participating in the battle there, pro- 
ceeded to Corinth, thence to Lavergne, Stone River and Chick- 
amauga. At the latter place, Sept. 21, 1S63, he was captured 
and taken to Richmond, and from there, Nov. 13, to Danville, 
where he, with a comrade, L. C. Delano, made his escape t he- 
next day. They made their way to West Virginia, where they 
were recaptured the 25th of the month, having walked 240 
miles in ten days. They were taken to Stanton, Va., and kept 
in a guard-house over night, and then taken to Richmond and 
confined in a dungeon three nights and two days. On the 29th 
they were taken to Belle Isle and kept in the guard-house till 
Christmas. March 10 they were taken to Richmond, and on the 
12th were started for Andersonville. On the 21st he and two 
others cut a hole in the bottom of the car and escaped, but the 
22d were captured by five men and thirteen dogs, and the fol- 
lowing morning were taken to Barnwell Court-House and re- 
mained one night; then were sent to Augusta, Ga., where they 
were kept in jail till April 12, thence to Macon, and the 14th 
landed in Andersonville, where he was confined till Sept. 9 ; 
thence to Charleston, where he was kept under fire of our own 
gunboats three days, and then taken to the Fair Grounds, and 
about three weeks later to Florence, and confined in the stock- 
ades till the Sth of December, and then taken to Charleston, 
and on the 10th was exchanged. He arrived at Annapolis, Md., 
Dec. 13, where, Dec. 25, he was given a thirty days' furlough, 
and arrived at home the 30th, weighing ninety pounds. Jan. 
25, 1S65, he was discharged. He followed farming till Oc- 
tober, 1S72, when he moved to Spencerville, and engaged 
in the grocery business till the spring of 1873, and then became 
established in the drug business. In 1S74 he erected the only 
brick building in Spencerville. He has built up a good busi- 
ness, and has gained the confidence of the residents of the vil- 
lage by his upright dealing and courteous manners. He has 
been Postmaster since July 28, 1S73. He was married March 
28, 1867, to Elizabeth, daughter of William Prosscr. They have 
had five children, four of whom are living — Minnie, Clauda, 
Ella and Ethel. Their eldest child, Henry, is deceased. Mr. 



542 HISTORY OF HE KAI.Ii COUNTY. 

Provincs is a member of Spcnccrvillc Lodge, No. 424, F. & A. 
M., and John C. Cams Post, No. 144, G. A. R. In politics he 
is a Republican. 

Ira Ricketts, farmer and stock-raiser, Concord Township, is a 
native of De Kalb County, born May 20, 1838. His father, 
Jonathan Ricketts, was a native of Kentucky, and when a 
young man went to Morrow County, Ohio, where he married 
a Miss Van Treese, who died, leaving five children. In 1 S3 5 
he married Mary Runnels, and to them were born five children 
— Jeremiah, Ira, Eka, Zcrua, and Jacob I. In August, 1837, 
he came to De Kalb County, Ind., and bought 240 acres of wild 
land, to which he moved his family. Merc he passed through 
all the hardships of pioneer life. He lived to get thirty acres 
cleared and improved and died in September, 1S46, aged forty, 
two years. His widow still lives in Illinois. Ira Ricketts re- 
mained with his mother till manhood. The care of the farm 
and the maintenance of the family fell on him and his elder 
brother after the death of his father, and although so young 
they went bravely to work, and by the time they arrived at 
man's estate had the farm cleared and under cultivation. He 
was married Feb. 5, 1S57, to Lydia Draggoo, daughter of Peter 
and Nancy (Williams) Draggoo, who came to De Kalb County 
from Ashland County, Ohio, in 1837. The father died in 1S67 
and the mother in 1872. After his marriage Mr. Ricketts lived 
in Elkhart County, Ind., a few months, and then returned to the 
old homestead, where he lived till the spring of 1S72, when he 
moved to Dallas County, Iowa, and two years later to Macomb 
County, 111., where he lived three years. In 1S7S he returned to 
De Kalb County and bought eighty acres of the old homestead 
where he has since lived. Mr. and Mrs. Ricketts have had 
three children, but two of whom are living — Charles S. and 
Nancy. Mary A. died in October, 1SS1. Politically Mr. Rick- 
etts is a Democrat. He and his wife arc members of the Prot- 
estant Methodist church. 

Owen W. Ruuuucl, harness-maker, Spcnccrvillc, Ind., was 
born in Beverly, Randolph Co., W. Va., Feb. 19, 1S37, a son of 
William and Martha (Williams) Rummel, the former a native 
of Pennsylvania and the latter of Virginia, of Welsh descent. 
In his youth he learned the printer's trade, serving an appren- 
ticeship of three years, and then worked two years as journey- 
man. He then began working with his father, who was a har- 






III.sTOKY (.'!•' ]>K KAI 



543 



ncss-maker, remaining with him till January, 1S60, when he 
came to De Kalb County, Ind., and established his business in 
Spencervillc. In February, 1S65, ne enlisted in Company H, 
One Hundred and Fifty-second Indiana Infantry, and served 
till the close of the war. The following July after his enlist- 
ment he received a sunstroke, which disabled him for active 
duty in the field and he was detailed as Regimental Postmaster, 
and subsequently assigned to duty in the harness shop, where 
he remained till the time of his discharge. Since his return to 
Spencervillc he has worked at his trade, at which he has been 
successful and has built up a good business. He was married 
Jan. 3, 1S62, to Nancy C. Boyles, daughter of Jonathan Boyles. 
They have>five children — Martha E., wife of Lewis Shutt ; Lu- 
cretia, Jonathan, Hulbert N., and Owen W. Mr. Rummel is a 
member of Concord Lodge, No. 556, A. F. & A. M., John C. 
Cams Post, No. 144, G. A. R., and Spencervillc Lodge, No. 
422, I. O. O. F. He and his wife are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. In politics he is a Republican. 

Nelson Scholes was born in Belmont Count)', Ohio, Nov. 15, 
1S19, a son of John and Mary (McGee) Scholes, natives of 
Maryland, and early settlers of Ohio. When he was four years 
old his parents moved to Richland County, where he was 
reared, and lived till his removal to De Kalb County. When 
he was sixteen years old his father died, and he remained with 
his mother till his marriage. In November, 1S52, he moved to 
De Kalb County, and bought his present farm of 150 acres on 
sections 14 and 23, Concord Township. A part of it was for- 
merly the Widney farm, and partially improved. He has been ' 
successful in his pursuits, and now has his land under cultiva- 
tion, and his buildings are among the best in the county. He 
was married in 1847 to Lydia, daughter of Peter and Sarah 
(Butlinger) Wiltison. They had three children, but one of 
whom is living — John, now of Dallas County, Iowa. His wife 
died April iS, 1S51. Sept. 5, 1S52, he married Mary Swaidner, 
daughter of Jacob and Barbara (Goodbakcr) Swaidner. To 
them have been born six children — Emma J., wife of Charles 
Abel, of Muskegon County, Mich. ; Franklin, of Allen County ; 
Florence, wife of Charles Justison ; Joseph, Ida and Elida. The 
latter died aged five years. Mr. and Mi*9. Scholes are members 
of the Disciples church. In politics he is a Democrat. 

Levi Sechler, another of the prominent pioneers of Concord 



5-14 



Township, is a native of Lehigh County, Pa., born June zG 
1S12, a son of Jacob and Mar)' (Fusselman) Sechlcr, natives ot 
Pennsylvania, of French and German descent. He was reared 
on a farm, receiving a common school education, and remained 
with his parents till after attaining his majority. In 1S37 h c 
started for the West, and with the exception of crossing the 
lakes made the entire journey to De Kalb County on foot, 
being nearly four weeks on the way. He entered eighty acres 
of land in the wilderness, and during the summer helped his 
brother clear and improve a piece of land. The following fall 
he walked back to his native county and remained there till 
1S53, when he returned to De Kalb County and began to im- 
prove his land. He has added to his first entry, and now has a 
fine farm of 100 acres all under cultivation. He was mar- 
ried in February, 1S39, to Mary Kistlcr, a native of Lehigh 
County, Pa., and to them have been born eleven children — 
Catherine, William (deceased), James, Levi, Jacob, Mary, Emma, 
Henry, Franklin, Susan, and Rosetta. Mr. and Mrs. Scchler 
are members of the German Reformed church. In politics he 
and his sons cast their suffrage with the Democratic party. 

./. R. Shilling, farmer and stock-raiser, Concord Township, is 
a native of this township, born Nov. 4, 1851, a son of Solomon 
Shilling, one of the early settlers of De Kalb County. He was 
reared a farmer but was given a good education, attending the 
district schools and later the Auburn and Spcnccrvillc High 
Schools. Before reaching his majority he began teaching, and 
followed the vocation winters for eight years, working on the 
farm in the summer. In February, 1SS0, lie bought the farm 
in Concord Township where he now lives, which contains 
eighty acres of choice land all under cultivation. He is indus- 
trious and enterprising, and is one of the representative young 
farmers of the township. He was married March 4, 1S79, to 
Alice J. Gill, a daughter of John Gill. They have one child, 
Cecil Guy, born April 5, 1S80. Mr. and Mrs. Shilling are mem- 
bers of the Protestant Methodist church, and he has been 
Superintendent of the Sabbath-school the past three years. In 
politics hc is a Republican. 

Solomon Shilling, one of the most successful and enterprising 
citizens of Concord Township, was born in Stark County, Ohio, 
March 15, 1823, a son of Adam and Mary (Roan) Shilling. He 
was reared and educated in his native county, remaining on his 



HISTORY OF 



E kali; cou: 



545 



Miner's farm till 1S50, when he came to De Kalb County, Ind., 
and settled on 160 acres of wild land which his lather had pre- 
viously entered from the Government, on section 19, Concord 
Township. He built a cabin into which he moved his family 
and began to clear and improve his land. He has been an en- 
ergetic and hard working man, and has accumulated a large 
property, adding to his land from time to time, and now has 
400 acres all well improved. For the past thirty years in ad- 
dition to farming he has been engaged in buying and shipping 
live stock, being the oldest stock dealer in the county. In 1S72 
Mr. Shilling was elected Township Trustee and in 1674 was re- 
elected, serving four years. He and his wife are members of the 
Methodist Protestant church. They have had a family of 
twelve children, eleven of whom are living — Daniel J. R., Will- 
iam, Mary E., Sarah A., Adam, Francis, Hiram E., John, Vienna 
L., and Dora. A daughter died in infancy. In politics Mr. 
Shilling has affiliated with the Republican party since its 
organization. 

Levi Showalter was born in Wayne County, Ohio, Jan. 4, 1S3S, 
ajson of Joseph and Barbara (Hoff) Showalter. The former died 
in January, 1884, aged eighty years, and the latter still lives on 
the old homestead, age eighty years. In 1S59 Levi Showalter 
came to Indiana and located in Steuben County. He had 
learned the blacksmith's trade in his native county and worked 
at it in Steuben County one winter. He then returned to Ohio, 
walking from Angola to Ft. Wayne and carrying his baggage. 
He remained in Wayne County till the fall of 1S61 and then 
came to De Kalb County, and the following spring, March 27, 
was married to Clarinda, daughter of Joseph Shilling, an 
old settler of Concord Township. After his marriage he went 
to Huntington County, Ind., and lived a year on an unimproved 
farm of his father's. He then returned to De Kalb County 
and bought eighty acres of partially improved land in Wilming. 
ton Township, and two years later moved to Steuben County, 
and engaged in farming two years. Then moved to Angola 
and worked at his trade two years, and then again engaged in 
farming eight years. In the spring of 1S76 he sold his property 
and went to Ohio and carried on the old homestead for his 
lather a year. In 1877 he bought the old Shilling homestead 
which was entered by Mrs. Showalter's grandfather, Adam Shill- 
ing. This farm contains 160 acres of choice land and the im- 



54^ HISTORY OF DE KALIS COUNTY. 

provcments are among the best in the township. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Showalter have been born eleven children, seven of whom 
are living— Joseph E., Anna Mary, Cora E., Flora J., Hortense 
May, Myrtle J., and William A. The deceased are, Leandcr 
C, Barbara A., Catherine J. and Alice C. In politics Mr. 
Showalter is a Republican. He and his wife are members of 
the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Jonatlian Skull, farmer and stock-raiser, Concord Township, 
was born in Fayette County, Pa., April 21, 1S38, a son of Daniel 
and Susan (Newcomer) Shull, the former a native of Maryland, 
born in January, 1S10, and the latter born in 1S15. His parents 
were married Sept. 3, 1S31, and in 1S37 moved to Wayne 
County, Ohio, where they lived till the fall of 1S46, when they 
came to De Kalb County, Ind., and bought eighty acres of wild 
land, afterward adding to it 160 acres. Here the father died 
Sept. 2S, 1S53. He was an old line Whig in politics, and a 
member of the Disciples church, as was also his wife. They 
had a family of nine children ; eight lived till maturity and 
seven are now living — David, of Lansing, Mich.; Jonathan; 
Eliza, wife of H. J. Abel ; Henry C., of Allen County; Sarah, 
deceased, was the wife of Abraham Cottrcll, of Lansing, Mich.; 
Lydia, wife of M. D. Hadsell, of Nebraska; Joseph; Harriet, 
wife of Lucius Palmer, of Allen County. Their eldest child, 
Mary, died in September, 1S43, aged twelve years. In 1857 
the mother married Asher Coburn, who died Sept. 1 1, 1S74. 
She now resides in Allen County. Jonathan Shull was eight 
years of age when his parents moved to De Kalb Count)-. lie 
was reared on a farm, receiving a good education in the district 
schools, completing it at the Newville Academy. When eigh- 
teen years of age he began teaching school, and taught winters 
for fourteen years, farming during the summer. After his mar- 
riage he continued in the business of farming and teaching for 
eleven years, and then moved to Lansing, Mich., where he en- 
gaged in the mercantile business two years. Then he returned 
to De Kalb County, and added fifty acres to the old homestead 
farm where h.e now lives, which contains 130 acres, all under 
cultivation. Mr. Shull was married Dec. 25, 1S62, to Maria M. 
Hadsell, a native of Trumbull County, Ohio, daughter of James 
and Mary (Abel) Hadsell. They have had a family of seven 
children— Clara C. (wife of Lewis Lake), Cadmus C., Thurman 
H., Rosa (died in infancy), Henry C, Carl D., and Fred. N. Mrs. 



r=^- 



. 






. 



Shull is a member of the Disciples church. In politics Mr. 
Shull is independent. 

William Sliutt, one of the most prominent and influential citi- 
zens of Concord Township, was born in Stark County, Ohio, 
March 23, 1S31, a son of Jacob and Nancy (Dickerhoof) Shutt. 
He was a year and a half old when his parents moved to Sum- 
mit County, Ohio, and lived there till seventeen years of age. 
In the spring of 184S he accompanied the family to Dc Kalb 
County, and settled on a tract of unimproved land. This he 
assisted in clearing and improving, remaining with his mother 
till manhood. His first purchase of land was 100 acres, but to 
that he has added till he now owns 2S0 acres, including the 
old homestead. He has been a successful agriculturist, and 
since. 1869 has also dealt in agricultural implements and farm 
machinery. He was married Feb. 13, 1S62, to Elizabeth F., 
daughter of George Houck, of Concord Township. They are 
the parents of five children — Laura A., Eva B., Alda A., Jennie 
L.. and Muriel A. In politics Mr. Shutt is a member of the 
Democratic party. In 1S6S he was elected Trustee of his 
Township and served two terms. He is a member of Concord 
Lodge, No. 556, F. & A. M. He and his wife are members of 
the Evangelical Lutheran church. 

Levi Smith, farmer and stock-raiser, Concord Township, was 
born in what is now Mahoning County, Ohio, Feb. 22, 1S2S, a 
son of Peter and Elizabeth Smith, early settlers of Ohio from 
Pennsylvania. His early life was spent on a farm, and when 
seventeen years of age he began to work at the shoemaker's 
trade, serving an apprenticeship. In 1S49 he bought fifty acres 
of land in Portage County, Ohio, where he lived till the spring 
ot 1S54, when he came to Dc Kalb County, Ind., and bought 
eighty acres of land, but very little being improved, and by close 
attention to his pursuits and industry he has now a farm of 320 
acres all under cultivation. He is a self-made man, and can 
R9W !§@k b&Gk OH :! ffSll §Bgnt !lfg illicl SDJQY 'I 1 ? f niits of his 
early years of toil and hardship. He was married April 24, 
1849, to Harriet Robb, a native of Ohio, daughter of Jacob and 
Elizabeth Robb. They have two children — Ira E. and Isaiah. 
Mr. and Mrs. Smith are members of the Church of God. In 
his political affiliations he is a Democrat. 

John H. St. Clair, the second son and fourth child of John C. 
St. Clair of Union Township, is a native of De Kalb County, 






548 HISTORY UK DE KALI; COUNTY. 

Ind., born April 5, 1S5S. He was reared on a farm, receiving a 
common school education, and since leaving school has followed 
teaching in the winter, at which he has been successful, being a 
good disciplinarian, and thoroughly competent to fill the position 
he has chosen for a livelihood. He has devoted the summer to 
agricultural pursuits, and in 1 882 settled on a farm of 1 20 acres in 
Concord Township, which is under a good state of cultivation. 
He was married Oct. 6, 18S1, to Miss Ella S. Erchart, a native 
of Wilmington Township, daughter of Adam and Mira(Kiner) 
Erehart. She was a teacher in the public schools before her 
marriage. To Mr. and Mrs. St. Clair have been born two chil- 
dren — Roscoe R., and an infant, deceased. In politics Mr. St. 
Clair affiliates with the Democratic party. 

Cyrus C. Walters, farmer and stock-raiser, Concord Township, 
was born in Wayne County, Ohio, Nov. 26, 1840, the eldest son 
of Joseph and Sarah (Nixon) Walters. In October, 1846, his 
parents moved to De Kalb County, Ind., and settled on a tract 
of unimproved land, moving into a cabin without doors or win- 
dows, and with the ground for a floor. Here he was reared, 
his youth being spent in assisting his father. He attended the 
district school a few weeks each winter when his services were 
not required on the farm, and by application in his leisure 
hours was qualified to teach when he was twenty years of age, 
a vocation he followed five years during the winter. He was 
married April io, 1862, to Sarah Donaldson, a native of Wayne 
County, Ohio, daughter of Henry and Jane Donaldson. After 
his marriage he settled on a part of the old homestead, where 
he lived a year and then bought a farm where he lived till 1873, 
when he began the study of law, but a year later he abandoned 
it and engaged in the hardware business a year. In Februarv, 
1876, he bought the farm of 120 acres in Concord Township, 
where he has since lived. He is a member of Hacker Lodge, 
No. 326, A. F. & A. M. In politics he is a Democrat. To him 

and hi& wife have bees barn five ehildren— d D,,of St. Jeieph, 

Ind., Joseph, M. L., Ford and Frank. 

Samite! IVasso/i, one of the first settlers, and the first of those 
now living, of De Kalb County, was born in Funkstown, Pa., 
July 9, 1809, a son of David and Flora (Graham) Wasson, na- 
tives of Ireland. When he was a child his parents moved to 
Montgomery County, Ohio, and later to Darke County, where 
he grew to manhood. After attaining his majority, in 1830, he 















v 






X 






^^ o^cm^a^ri/ 



I 



' 



^9mSu^^ 



;Y Ol'' DE KAL11 COUNTY. 



549 i 



went clown the Mississinncwa River and worked for the Indi- 
ans from spring till fall; then returned to Darke County, and 
in the spring- of 1832 went to Ft. Wayne and worked on the 
canal, and in the fall of 1833 came to De Kalb County in com- 
pany with six or seven families and worked for the settlers 
till 1837, when he entered eighty acres of land in Concord 
Township, which he cleared and improved, and on which he 
has lived nearly a half century. He has been a hard working- 
man and has probably assisted in building more log cabins and 
houses than any other man in the county. He has cut and split 
2,000 rails in seven days. He has lived to see De Kalb County 
change from a country of Indians and wild animals to one of 
cultivated farms and prosperous villages, and no one has done 
more to bring about this change than he. Although seventy- 
six years old he still retains considerable of his youthful vigor 
and oversees the cultivation of his farm. He was married Jan. 
16, 1840, to Eliza Means, a native of Pennsylvania, daughter of 
James and Elizabeth Means, who came to De Kalb County in 
1837. To them have been born twelve children, ten of whom 
arc living — Sarah, Elizabeth, Lewis, David, Benjamin F., Nancy, 
Jane, Matilda, Milton and Ann. James and John are deceased. 
In his youthful days Mr. Wasson was a Whig in politics, but 
since its organization has cast his sulfrage with the Republican 
party. 

Erastus White, a son of Ephraim and Betsey (Bartholomew) 
White, was born in Trumbull County, Ohio, Dec. 1, 1S20, and 
in April, 1S38, came with his parents to De Kalb County, Ind., 
and settled in Concord Township, near where he now lives on 
rented land. He afterward bought eighty acres of school land 
in Concord Township, which he improved, and lived on till his 
death, May 2, 1847. T' ie mother afterward married Alexander 
Crawford and moved to Ohio, and lived till after the death of 
her husband, and then returned to Dc Kalb County, where she 
died Nov. 17, 1869. Our subject remained with his parents till 
the death of the father and then took charge of the homestead, 
subsequently buying the interests of the other heirs. To the 
original purchase of his father he has added till he now owns 
about 127 acres of valuable land, 100 under cultivation, and 
twenty-seven timber land. He was married Jan. 1, 1846, to 
Clarissa Johnson, a native of Pennsylvania, daughter of Thomas 
and Lydia (Draggoo) Johnson. To them were born four child- 



550 HISTORY OF HI'. KAI.lt COUNTY. 

rcn, three of whom arc living—Jacob I., Thomas E., and Frank- 
lin J. Their third son, Henry E., died at the age of twenty 
years. Mrs. White died Nov. 6, 1883. Mr. White is a member 
of the Methodist church. In politics he is a Republican. 

Charles W. Widney, the eldest son and second child of seven 
children of Samuel and Johannah (Brearley) Widney, was born 
in Franklin County, Pa., Dec. 18, 1S25, and was ten years of 
age when his parents moved to De Kalb County. His youth 
was spent in assisting his father to clear and improve a frontier 
farm. He remained with his parents till manhood, and then 
bought 100 acres oi unimproved land on section 10, Concord 
Township, where he lived till 18S0, when he retired from the 
active labors of farm life and moved to the village of St. Joe. 
He has been successful in his pursuits, and now has a compe- 
tency for his declining years. Mr. Widney was married Oct. 
5, 1854, to Nancy Cole, a native of Jefferson County, Ohio, 
daughter of John Cole. To them were born three children, 
but one of whom is living — Mary J., wife of Jacob Sechler. 
Mrs. Widney died Sept. 30, 1S72, and Nov. 10, 1S74, Mr. Wid- 
ney married Mary Sechler, daughter of Levi Sechler. Mr. 
and Mrs. Widney are members of the Lutheran church. In 
politics he affiliates with the Republican party. 

John Widney, farmer and stock-raiser, Concord Township, 
was born in Franklin County, Fa., Jan. 26, 1S34, the fifth child 
of Samuel Widney, one of the earliest settlers of De Kalb 
County. He was reared and educated in this county, remain- 
ing with his parents till his marriage, and then settled on a part 
of the old homestead, where he lived six years. He then 
bought ten acres in Concord Township, to which he has added 
from time to time, till he now has 123 acres of the best land in 
the township, all under cultivation. His improvements are 
valuable, his residence and farm buildings being among the best 
in the county. He was married Jan. 1, 1857, to Nancy Knight, 
dftughtei 1 ei faeols and Mm*y (Boybs) Kttight. To ihBhi htive 
been born eight children — Wilson D. (was killed while chopping 
a tree at the age of twenty-three years), Sylvester S., Mary C. 
(wife of Franklin Sechler), Etta, Cyrus J., Addie S., Lulu J., and 
Cora B. In 1S84 Mr. Widney retired from the active labors of 
farm life and moved to the village of St. Joseph. He and his 
wife are active members of the Evangelical Lutheran church. 
In politics he is a Republican. 



HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 



55' 



Samuel Widney, deceased, was one of the most esteemed citi- 
zens of De Kalb County. He was born in Franklin County, 
Pa., July 21, 1796, the second son of Charles and Mary (Hen- 
derson) Widncy, the former a native of Ireland, born in 1763, 
and the latter a native of Cumberland County, Pa., of Irish 
descent, born in 1775. He was reared on a farm in his native 
county, but was given a good education, and subsequently 
taught school a number of terms in connection with farming. 
He was married May 2, 1822, to Johannah Brearley, a daughter 
of Joseph and Jane (Mitchel) Brearley, the former a native of 
England, and the latter of Ireland. In May, 1836, Mr. Widncy 
moved to De Kalb County, Ind., and settled on 200 acres of 
Government land, entered the year before. A part of this was 
on section 10, and the rest on section 11, Concord Township. I 
Here Mr. Widney cleared and improved a farm, making it his 
home the remainder of his life. He was one of the most influ- 
ential men of the township, taking an interest in anything that 
tended toward the advancement of its material and social wel- 
fare. He held various offices of trust and responsibility, among \ 
others was Commissioner, Township Trustee, and Associate 
Judge. He and his wife were in early life members of the 
Methodist Protestant church, but in later life he united with 
the Lutheran church. He died Feb. 1, 1S78, and his wife Sept. 
3. 1S75. 

Samuel L. Widncy, farmer and stock-raiser, Concord Town- 1 
ship, is the eldest son of John P. and Jane (Linn) Widncy, and 
was born in DeKalb County, Ind., June 26, 1S39. He received 
a good education attending the schools of his native county, 
and remained with his parents till manhood, assisting his father 
in the work on the farm. He was married Jan. 1, 1S60, to Mary 
A. Moore, a native of Richland County, Ohio, daughter of 
James and Ellen Moore, early settlers of Jackson Town- 
ship, DeKalb County. After his marriage Mr. Widncy lived 
on his father's farm a year, and in 1861 settled on the farm 
in Concord Township, where he now lives, where he has 333 
acres of choice land, under good cultivation. He has been 
successful in his pursuits, which is the just reward of industry 
and energy, and has one of the pleasantest homes in the town- 
ship. To him and his wife have been born five children, 
four of whom are living — Byron E., Viola, Otto L., and Iva 
May. Their eldest. child, Marion, is deceased. Mr. Widney is 






5 5-' 



KAI.K COUNTY. 



a Republican in politics, and a strong supporter of the prin- 
ciples of his party. 

George W. Wilmot, farmer and stock-raiser, was born in Port- 
age County, Ohio, Jan. 10, 1825, a son of Ella and Lucretia 
(Blair) Wilmot. When twenty years of age he went to Wis- 
consin, and remained there a year and a half. He then returned 
to Ohio, passing through DeKalb County, Ind., on the way. In 
1S49 he came to the county and bought the farm now owned by 
13. A. Hodsell, remaining through the winter and spring. He 
returned to Ohio, and in 1854 came again to DeKalb County, 
and settled on the farm in Concord Township, where he has 
since lived. He owns eighty-one acres of valuable land which 
he has brought under a good state of cultivation, it being all 
heavily timbered when he first settled on it. He has always 
taken an active interest in the public affairs of the township 
and in 1S59 was elected Magistrate and served four years. He 
has also held several minor offices of trust. He was maried Jan. 
13, 1852, to Lucia Palmer, a native of Pennsylvania, daughter 
of Roswell Palmer. To them have been born nine children — 
Ella, Arthur, Pliny G., Leon, George Carroll, Vernon, Lucre- 
tia, Albert E., and Victor. Mr. and Mrs. Wilmot are members' 
of the Disciples church. In politics he was formerly a Whig, 
but since its organization has affiliated with the Republican 
party. 

William Wyatt, deceased, was born in the State of Pennsyl- 
vania, in 1819, and died in Concord Township, DeKalb County, 
Ind., Jan. 22, 1870. He was a son of Nathan Wyatt, also a 
native of Pennsylvania, who moved to Ohio when our subject 
was a child. He was reared a farmer and on arriving at man- 
hood came to Indiana that he might with his limited means pro- 
vide himself with a home, thinking a new country the best place 
for a young man to gain a livelihood. He was married in this 
county July 17, 1842, to Miss Nancy Strong, a native of 
Geauga County, Ohio, daughter of Daniel Strong, also an early 
settler of DeKalb County. He built a log cabin into which 
they moved the first day of August following their marriage, 
and began housekeeping on their farm, which, at that time, was 
heavily timbered. They were industrious and economical, and 
by their united efforts soon had a good farm and a pleasant 
home. To them were born fourteen children, eleven of whom 
are living — Nathan, Daniel, Lydia, Ephraim, William H., Isaac 
N., Marietta, George W., Israel, Laura J. and James A. 



.1 . 



CHAPTER XIV. 



FAIRFIELD TOWNSHIP. 



Situation. — Geography and Topography. — Organization 
as a Township. — Pioneers.— Early Events. — Fairfield 
Center. — Early Justices, Constables and Trustees. — 
Population. — Property and Taxation. — Agricultural 
Statistics.— Biographical. 

" Fair Fields," indeed, are those of the township to which 
this chapter is devoted. Owing to its situation it was the last 
township settled in De Kalb Count)-. It lies in the northwestern 
corner of the county, and contains neither railroad nor town. 
Its trade is drawn by the village along the line of the Michigan 
Southern Railroad, which lies on its southern border. Fair- 
field is bounded on the north by Salem Township, Steuben 
County, on the east by Smithfield Township, on the south by 
Richland, and on the west by Wayne Township, Noble County. 
It is drained by several small creeks, and the outlets of Stony 
Lake, which is on section 3 and 4, and Indian Lake, on sections 
20 and 29. 

The surface is somewhat broken, and there are more hills 
than in most of the townships. Its long slopes, rugged bluffs, 
deep ravines, winding streams, and limpid lakes present an 
inviting view to the immigrant, although it was not brought 
into notice until the other townships were settled, being off the 
routes of travel, and remote from the county seat. Much of 
the land was bought by speculators, in ;in early day, and this 
contributed to retard aetuai settlement, Quo D@drleW. entered 
r, 100 acres; a bank in Pennsylvania held a large tract; and 
other parties owned various parcels of land, which were sold 
through the agency of Wesley Park. Gradually the lands 
came into the hands of immigrants, who have since received a 
rich tribute from the soil, as is evinced by excellent residences, 
barns, stock, and all the modern appliances of agriculture. 

March 7, 1844, the Board of Commissioners received a peti- 
503 



554 HISTORY OK DE KAI.l! COUNTY. 

tion, reading: "We, the undersigned, inhabitants of the un 
organized township of Dc Kalb County, in consequence of the 
distance we have to go to elections, and the inconvenience of 
having to go to another township to do township business, do 
most humbly pray your Honorable Body that you would organ- 
ize said township at your March session, and order an election 
for a justice of the peace, and other officers for said township; 
and your petitioners will ever pray." This was dated Feb. 27, 
1844, and signed by Rufus R. Lounsbcrry, George W. Story, 
A. Bail, Oran B. Story, Miles Allen, C. Allen, George Powell, 
Benjamin Hunt, and Nathan W. Powell, who were all the 
voters in the township. 

This petition was received favorably, and the Board ordered 
that township 35 north, range 12 east, be organized for civil 
purposes as a separate township, to be known by the name of 
Fairfield ; and the first election was ordered held on the first 
Monday in April, 1844, at the house of Rufus R. Lounsberry, 
to choose one justice of the peace. This man was also appointed 
inspector of elections. An election was held on the last Satur- 
day in August for three trustees. 

The Story family, five in number, were the pioneers of Fair- 
field, and lived along the north line of the county. YVillard 
I Childs, one of the prominent early settlers, set out on foot from 
his home in Onondaga County, N. Y., and walked through to 
Ft. Wayne, thence to Kendallville, where there were but two 
cabins, and taking- a guide came into De Kalb County, March 4, 
1S37, the day Martin Van Buren was inaugurated President 
of the United States. 

He selected 120 acres on section 27, paid for it, and then set 
to work, at Ft. Wayne, to earn enough to take him home. 
When the land was entered, the Storys, five in number, as above 
mentioned, were the sole settlers. Mr. Childs returned in 
October, 1844, to pay taxes, and ro. review his purchase, to ■'■>■. 
trrmine Whether lie should make the plaec his home. The 
result was satisfactory. Settlers had moved in, and in the 
southeast was David McNabb and family. Farther east was 
Wilbur Powell, and adjoining on the north was the clearing 
and cabin of George Powell, the first Justice of the Peace, and 
one or two others. 

In 1846 Childs moved in, and temporarily lodged with Ben- 
jamin Chaffee, who sold his place to Childs, and made another 



HISTORY OF D1C KALI! COUNTY. 



settlement in the north part of the township. lie aftcward be- 
came Postmaster at Corunna. Rufus R. Lounsberry, of Wil- 
mington, also became a settler in Fairfield. Other early settlers 
were: The Wilseys, William and Isaac, D. Rager, Esq., Hiram 
Thomas, Miles Allen, John Shook, and Henry Hartman. Al- 
though there were now about fourteen families settled in Fair- 
field, there were not to exceed eighty acres cleared, and all were 
occupants of log cabins. 

There now came a lull in settlement. About 1850 those who 
had held lands for a rise began to sell them, and clearing and 
building began in earnest. The tide of immigrants poured in, 
and soon occupied all the land. Log rolling and raising, in 
185 1, took up much of the time. The first frame building was 
a barn, 24 x 30 feet in size, on the premises of Mr. Childs. One 
spring day in the year 1847, thirty men and three boys assembled 
to put up the bents ; by noon of the same day the work was 
completed, refreshments were served, and the settlers dispersed 
homeward. 

One ol the first marriages was that of David Gonser to Miss 
Gushwa. The first religious organization was a Methodist class, 
formed by P. Jones, since a resident of Lagrange. A frame 
church was erected in 1S55 ; Hiram Thomas was class-leader, 
and there were a dozen members. The Lutherans also organ- 
ized at Fairfield Center. The first innovation of the period of 
log school-houses was 1S4S, when a frame structure was erected 
in district 10; Alvin Thompson was ils first teacher. The first 
road was laid out in a northerly direction from Sedan. 

Fairfield Center is a hamlet located on the line between sec- 
tions 15 to 22. It is not destined to any remarkable degree of 
prosperity, as trade is attracted naturally to Corunna, Waterloo, 
etc. Messrs. Morrell and Hoover were early store-keepers at 
the Center. Edward Wright, a most respected pioneer, located 

d thii pomtj bull! an aihgryj and al§p kept a §tgre. 

It is said of Henry Hovater, the pioneer blacksmith, dud ho 
was hard pressed for food for his family of eight or ten children. 
He worked early and late, in the shop and on the clearing, and 
finally became independent, living to see his sons comfortably 
established. 

Mr. McNabb entered his tract of eighty acres, and paid for 
it with money earned by himself and wife. He had $50, she 
an equal sum, and after paying for their land, they had a half a 



556 HISTORY OF DEKALB COUNTY. 

dollar left. A pole cabin was built, and the beginning of a 
home made. 

The Justices of theH'cace in Fairfield Township prior to i860 
were: D. Rager, R. Worrell, Jesse Brumback, Job C.Smith, 
S. Greenamyer, George Powell and William Harper. 

The Constables for the same period were : Samuel Story, J. 
Hatch, George Rowe, D. D. Powlcss, J. Gushwa, D. C. Shipe, 
W. Short, John Gonser, Daniel Gonser. 

The Trustees were: R. Worrell, D. Rager, W. Childs, S. 
Miser, J. C. Smith, G. W. Smith, D. Gonser, D. N. Nidick, B. 
Hunt, John Long, E. Wright, J. Short, W. H. Wilsey, Moses 
Gonser, D. Kimbell, B. A. Chaffee, H. Thomas. 

The last census (18S0) gives Fairfield Township a population 
of 1,558, or 43 to the square mile. The rate of taxation in 
18S4 was $1.61; poll tax $ t .75 ; number of acres of land, 
22,794.09; value of lands, $349,255; value of improvements, 
§79,755; value of lands and improvements, $429,010; value 
of personal property, $136,005 ; total value of taxablcs, $565,- 
015; number of polls, 233; number of children of school 
a S e 547- valuation per capita, $356.19. The township had 
in 1SS1, 4,036 acres in wheat, producing 20,180 bushels, or 5 
bushels per acre; 2,343 acres in corn, producing 70,930 bush- 
els, about 30 bushels to the acre of upland, and 40 bushels 
on bottom lands; 861 acres in oats, producing 21,525 bushels or 
25 bushels per acre; 969 acres in meadow, producing 1,938 tons 
of hay, at the rate of two tons per acre ; 113 acres in potatoes, 
producing 2,260 bushels, or 20 bushels per acre. 

BIOGRAPHICAL. 

David C. Aiislcy, farmer and stock-raiser, was born in Gor- 
ham, Ontario County, N. Y., June 27, 1824, a son of Albert and 
Prudence (Clark) Ansley, natives of New York, of English de- 
scent. He was reared on a farm, residing with his parents till 

manhood. In 1844 he came West and lived in Dc Kalb County, 
Ind., one winter, and then went to Pennsylvania and located in 
Potter County, where he engaged in the lumber business 
eighteen years. In January, 1863, he was married to Elizabeth 
Ames, daughter of Jacob and Jcrusha (Bell) Ames, a native of 
Steuben County, N. Y. In 1863 he again came to De Kalb 
County, and settled in Fairfield Township, where he has since 
been successfully engaged in agricultural pursuits. Mrs. Ans- 



HISTORY <)K DIC KALI! COUNTY. 



557 
In poli- 



lcy is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church 
tics he affiliates with the Republican party. 

Christian Barkey, farmer and stock-raiser, Fairfield Town- 
ship, is a native of Westmoreland County, Pa., born April 6, 
1820, a son of John and Susannah (Bussard) Barkey, natives of 
Northampton County, Pa., of German descent. When he was 
live years of age his parents moved to Ohio and settled in 
Holmes County, where he was reared and lived till 1851, when 
he came to De Kalb and settled on a tract of land which is now 
his valuable farm in Fairfield Township. This land he had 
entered about 1841, and at the time of his settlement it was 
wholly unimproved and heavily timbered. He now has it 
under a good state of cultivation, and his improvements are 
among the best in the township. Mr. Barkey was married 
March 13, 1S51, to Hannah Herrington, a daughter of Thomas 
and Elizabeth (Long) Herrington, of Ohio. They are the pa- 
rents of nine children, eight of whom are living — Mary Ann, 
John W., George A., Henry, Sarah E., Samuel, Thomas, and 
James F. Calvin is deceased. In politics Mr. Barkey affiliates 
with the Democratic party. 

Francois BcucJiat, farmer and stock-raiser, is a native of Switz- 
erland, born Nov. 7, 1830, a son of Barnard and Mary Ann Beu- 
chat. His youth was spent on his father's small farm, and 
when fifteen years of age he went to work in an iron foundry, 
and was thus employed two years. He then engaged in farm- 
ing till the spring of 1S51, when his father and five sons came 
to the United States, his mother having died a short time 
before. They located in Stark County, Ohio, where his father 
bought a small farm, and made it his home the remainder of his 
life. He was born in 1792, and died in 1871. Francois Beu- 
chat remained in Stark County till the spring of 1866, when he 
came to De Kalb County, Inch, and bought forty acres of land 
in Fairfield Township, twenty acres of which was partially 
cleared. He went to work to improve his farm, and has added 
to it from time to time, till he now owns eighty-two acres of 
improved land. He was married Sept. 20, 1854, to Mary Smith, 
a native of Berks County, Pa., born Sept. 1, 1S25, daughter of 
John and Maria Smith. To them have been born five children, 
three of whom are living — Maria E., William Henry, and Lois 
M. Peter John and Lewis E. are deceased. Politically Mr. 
Beuchat affiliates with the Democratic party. 



5SS HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 

George Billman, one of the prominent citizens of Fairfield 
Township, is a native of Washington County, Pa., born Feb. 
23, 1801, a son of David and Catharine Billman, natives of Ger- 
many, who were sold by the ship company to pay their passage 
to America. Our subject was reared in his native county, and 
when eighteen years old began to work at the tanner's trade, 
serving an apprenticeship of three years. He then worked as 
a journeyman, dressing leather, for nine years, and then en- 
gaged in farming till Aug. 15, 1834, when he moved to Seneca 
County, Ohio, and cleared and improved a farm of ninety-four 
acres. In 1864 he sold his farm and moved to De Kalb County, 
Ind., and bought the farm where he now lives. He has been 
successful in his pursuits and has a comfortable property for 
use in his declining years. He was married Dec. 25, 1827, to 
Mary Wansettler, and to them were born two children, both 
deceased. His wife died April 5, 1830, and he was again mar- 
ried June 21, 1833, to Catherine Denccr, a native of Washing- 
ton County, Pa., daughter of George and Catherine Dencer, of 
German descent. They have had five children, two of whom- 
arc living — Mary Ann, wife of Henry Hecht, of Michigan, and 
Matilda, wife of Daniel Cartret, of this township. Politically, 
Mr. Billman is a Democrat. 

Josiah Boyer, the youngest son of Michael and Christina 
(Troutman) Boyer, was born in Somerset County, Pa., Jan. 22, 
1834. When he was live years old his parents moved to Fay- 
ette County, Pa., and in 1841 to Holmes County, Ohio, where 
they remained till 1851. He accompanied them to De Kalb 
County, lnd., in the latter year and assisted his father in clear- 
ing and improving a frontier farm. When he was twenty-one 
years old he bought a tract of unimproved land on the south 
side of Story Lake, which he cleared and improved, at the same 
time making his home with his father and assisting in the cul- 
tivalion of the homestead, til 1 ill'trr his marriage- He |jicn 
settled on his own farm, where he now has 120 acres 01 finely 
improved land, with a good residence and farm buildings. lie 
was married Dec. 27, 1 881, to Mrs. Margaret M. McClish, daugh- 
ter of Daniel and Elizabeth (Cole) Kimbel, and widow of Alexan- 
der McClish, by whom she has two children — Alice and Libbie. 
Mr. and Mrs. Boyer are members of the German Reform 
church. In politics he affiliates with the Democratic party. 

Michael Boyer, farmer and stock-raiser, Fairfield Township, is 



_ 



HISTORY OF i>\: KALI) COUNTY. 559 

one of the most prominent citizens of Dc Kalb County. He is 
a native of Somerset County, Fa., born Aug. 29, 1804, a son 
of Benjamin and Christina (Duffman) Boyer, natives of Penn- 
sylvania, of German descent, lie was reared on a farm in his 
native county, and was there married in 1829 to Christina 
Troutman, a native of Somerset County, a daughter of Peter 
and Barbara Ann (Stanler) Troutman, natives of Philadelphia. 
After his marriage he settled on the Troutman homestead, 
where he lived ten years, and in 1839 moved to Holmes 
County, Ohio, and twelve years later, in 185 1, moved to De 
Kalb County, Ind., and bought eighty acres of timber land in 
Fairfield Township, which he has cleared and made one of the 
finest farms in the township. He is a successful agriculturist 
and has surrounded himself and family with all the comforts of 
life. To him and his wife have been born four children — Solo- 
mon, of Noble County, Ind.; Josiah, of this township; Maria, 
wife of George Henney, and Elizabeth, wife of Moses Deitz. 
They are members of the Lutheran church. In politics he is 
a Democrat. 

Jesse M. Brumback, one of the successful pioneers of Fairfield 
Township, is a native of Ohio, born in Huron County, April 2, 
1S23, a son of Daniel and Sarah (Culp) Brumback. lie re- 
mained with his parents till his majority, and then engaged in 
farming in his native county till October, 1846, when he came 
to De Kalb County, Ind., and began clearing 160 acres of 
heavily timbered land in Fairfield Township. His means were 
limited, but by industry and frugality he was successful, and 
lias now 200 acres of fine land, and has given his son a farm of 
123 acres. His residence and farm buildings are among the 
hest in the county. Mr. Brumback was married April 7, 1S50, 
to Melissa J. Showers, daughter of Solomon Showers, of Rich- 
land Township. They had a family of three children, but two 
O! WhQn] are living-- Celia R., wile of John E. Walters, and 
Edward M. Cornelia J. is deceased. Mfn. liiuiinUuuk a»eu 
March 9, 1S55, and Nov. 2, 1S56, Mr. Brumback married Lu- 
cinda Gloid, a native of Richland County, Ohio, daughter of 
Samuel and Rebecca (Smith) Gloid. In politics Mr. Brumback 
is a Democrat. He served his township as Magistrate a short 
time, and in 1S62 was elected County Clerk and served three 
years. 

David Buchanan was born in Chester Comity, Pa., Nov. 6, 1SS0, 



- 



560 history or de KALI! CoUNTV. 

the eldest of six children. When he was about one year old 
his parents moved to Washington County, Pa., and four 
years later removed across the State line into Brooke County, 
W. Va., where they remained until the fall of 18 15. They then 
moved to what was Wayne County, Ohio, now Holmes 
Count) - , which was at that time almost an unbroken wilderness. 
Indians roamed the county and wild game was very plenty. 
John Buchanan, the father of our subject, purchased and settled 
on a tract of land on a small stream called Paint Creek and im- 
proved it, and other farms were opened up about the same 
time or soon after. After residing there about four years they 
built a small woolen factory and carded wool for their neigh- 
bors, and also scrutched flour by water-power in the same 
building'. David Buchanan learned to card wool, and followed 
the business a few years. Plis means of gaining an education 
were very limited. His father was a very good scholar for 
that time, and taught school among the neighbors. Being very 

; apt he became well versed in orthography, penmanship, arith- 
metic and surveying. He taught school a few terms, and fol- 
lowed surveying in connection with his farming for twenty-five 
years. He settled up a great many estates in his life time. He 
was married to Lydia Tribby Sept. 23, 1824, by Samuel Spen- 

| ccr, a Justice of the Peace, and soon after his marriage built a 
log cabin in tiie woods on a title of 100 acres of heavily timbered 
land in Monroe Township, Holmes County, Ohio, and some 
fifteen years later bought the land of the original owner. They 

j lived in the log cabin nearly twenty-eight years, and there their 
children were all born. They had seven sons and one daugh- 
ter. Six of the children are living. James G. died June rr, 
1852, aged twenty-three years, six months and five days ; Elmira 
died Jan. 8, 1S42, aged fourteen months and seven days. Mr. 
Buchanan was elected to the office of Justice of the Peace in 
1838 as a Whig in a strong Democratic township, and filled the 
office with credit to himself and to the township, and came 
within a lew votes of being re-elected. He visited Indiana 
several times from 1847 to 1 S54 to sec the country and buy 
land, and purchased six eighty-acre tracts in Fairfield Town- 
ship, De Kalb County. He moved to this land in October, 
1854, and his surviving children all came with him or soon 
after. Here he remained till death. He was a firm Republican 
from the organization of the party till his death. He was elected 






HISTORY OF DE KALI! COUNTY. 561 

[he office of County Commissioner in this county in October, 
.;.,. and held the ollicc one term or three years. Lydia 
fribby Buchanan was born in Loudoun Count}', Va., May 11, 
. ,2 and is now in the eighty-fourth year of her age. She lias 
■ ccn a hard worker, a good manager, and a kind, indulgent 
mother and an affectionate wile. Her many acts of neighborly 
kindness have endeared her to the hearts of legions of friends. 
\n earnest, active Christian, she has been identified with the 
church fifty years. Her parents moved to Wayne County, 
Ohio, in October, 18 16, with seven children. They each lived 
to be about eighty years old, and their children all survived 
ihcm except one. 

George M. Bitc/iauaii, farmer and stock-raiser, was born in 
Holmes County, Ohio, March 19, 183S, the sixth son of David 
and Lydia (Tribby) Buchanan. He received his early educa- 
tion in the schools of his native county, completing it at the 
Auburn High School. He was sixteen years ol age when his 
1 arents came to Dc Kalb County, and the most of his time sub- 
sequent, till manhood, was spent in assisting his father. He 
was Surveyor of De Kalb County from August, [861, till Aug. 
19, 1S62, when he enlisted in Company A, One Hundredth In- 
diana Infantry, and participated in many hard fought battles, 
among the more important being the siege of Vicksburg, At- 
lanta campaign, and those incident to Sherman's march to the 
sea. At Griswoldville, Ga., Nov. 22, 1S64, he was wounded in 
the left shoulder and disabled for further field duty. He was 
then assigned duty in the hospital, joining his regiment at Alex- 
andria at the close of the war and accompanying it to Wash- 
ington, where he was in the line at the grand review of the 
array, and was discharged June 9, 1S65, and mustered out at 
Indianapolis June 19, 1865. Returning to De Kalb County he 
engaged in farming, and the following spring bought the farm 
he now owns. He was married April 19, 1S66, to Margaret 
Kreger, a native of Holmes Count)-, Ohio, daughter of Thomas 
Kreger. September, 1SS2, he went to Tennessee, and engaged 
in the furniture and undertaking business successfully till No- 
vember, 1884. Aug. 8, 18S4, his wife died, and he then sold out 
his business and prepared to return to his old home in De Kalb 
County. He has one daughter, Lydia I. Mr. Buchanan and his 
daughter are members of the United Brethren church, as was 
also his wife. He casts his suffrage with the Republican party. 



5<'o HISTORY Ol"' D1C KALI! COUNTY. 

John Buchanan, fanner and stock-raiser, Fairfield Township, 
was born in Holmes County, Ohio, July 14, [826, the eldest, of 
seven children of David and Lydia (Tribby) Buchanan, the 
former a native of Chester Count)-, Pa., and the latter of Lou- 
don County, Va., and early settlers of Holmes County, i ie was 
reared ill his native county, remaining with his parents till man- 
hood. He was married Sept. 1, 1853, to Emily Burns, a native 
of Holmes County, Ohio, daughter of James and Margaret 
(Stuart) Burns. In November, 1 S 5 5 , Mr. Buchanan moved to 
De Kalb County, Inch, where his parents had moved the year 
before, and settled on 160 acres of wild land. In addition to 
clearing and improving his farm, he worked at the carpenter's 
trade, and also taught school during the winter for six years. He 
has been successful, and now has 312 acres of valuable land and 
his improvements arc among the best in the township. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Buchanan have been born three children, but two ol 
whom are living — Amina, wife of Dr. J. W. Squires, of Whitley 
County, Ind., and James, who married Millie Tucker, and lives 
in this township. In politics Mr. Buchanan is an uncompromis- 
ing Republican, lie was one of the organizers of the County 
Agricultural Society, and has always been one of its Directors. 

Lcandcr Buchanan, farmer and stock-raiser, Fairfield Town- 
ship, was born in Holmes County, Ohio, Oct. 3, 1S31, the third 
son of David and Lydia (Tribby) Buchanan. He remained 
with his parents till manhood, and in 1854 went to Winchester, 
Tcnn., for health, but came to Dc Kalb County, Ind., the same 
fall. When seventeen years oi age he took a severe cold, which I 
settled on his lungs, and for several years he was unable to i 
work, and has never fully recovered from its effects, lie was 
married Oct. 18, i860, to Clara Chilcote, a native of Seneca 
County, Ohio, daughter of Humphrey and Christiana (Snivlcy) 
Chilcote, early settlers of Ohio, wln> moved to De Kalb County 

in [§47, After his marriage Mr. Bu§hanan §cttled on a farm in 

Fairfield Township, where he lived two and a half years, and 
then sold it and bought the one where he now lives, which 
contains eight)' acres of the choicest land in the township, ah 
well cidtivated. In 1S53 he began to learn the carpenter's trade 
and followed it several years in connection with farming. He 
has always taken an active interest in the public affairs of the 
county, and has assisted materially in building up all enterprises 
of benefit to the community. To Mr. and Mrs. Buchanan have 












. 



0^*ArZ-/2>?ZJjrPzS 



HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 563 

been born three children, but one of whom is living — Elmira 
Ellen. Mary Vienna died at the age of fifteen years, and one 
died in infancy. In politics Mr. Buchanan is a Republican. He 
and his wife arc members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Willctrd Childs is a native of New York, born in Oneida 
County, Feb. 15, 1S1 1, the second son of Phineas and Theodosia 
(Evans) Childs, the former a native of Massachusetts, of English 
descent, and the latter of Connecticut, of Welsh descent. In , 
[S13 his parents moved to Jefferson County, N. Y., and thence 
in 1S26 to Onondaga County. When he was fifteen years of 
age he began to work by the month for farmers. In 1837 nc 
came De Kalb County, lnd., and bought 120 acres of land, and 
alter paying for it had 73 cents left. He then went to Ft. 1 
Wayne and earned the money with which 1o return to New 
York. In 1846 he moved his family to De Kalb County, land- 
ing in Fairfield Township, Aug. 24. He moved into a log cabin, 
. belonging to B. A. Chaffee, and a short time after bought the 
land on which it stood. There were, but fourteen families in 
the township when he settled here, and the land was mostly 
heavily timbered. He has added to his first purchase till he has 
2S6 acres of land, which comprises one of the best farms in the 
township. 125 acres of this he has cleared and improved him- 
self, lie has seen De Kalb County change from a forest to one 
of the most prosperous counties. 

A. If. Dei/", farmer and stock-raiser, Fairfield Township, is a 
native of Holmes Count)', Ohio, born Feb. 27, 1S29. His 
. I li or, Henry E. Dcitz, was a native of Pennsylvania. His 
first wife, the mother of our subject, Elizabeth Coverlase, died, 
leaving six children, five of whom are living. He afterward 
married Barbara Weaver, and to them were born five children. 
After her death he married Mary Ann McCasland, by whom he 
had five children, four of whom are living. Henry Deitz ac- 
companied his parents to Tuscarawas County, Ohio, when a 
child, and was there reared and married, runi.uuin^ theft and 
in Holmes County till the fall of 1853, when he came to De 
Kalb County, lnd., and settled on sections 10 and 15, Fairfield 
Township, where he died in May, 1S70. He was a successiul 
farmer and accumulated a good property. He was a member 
of the German Reformed church, and in politics a Democrat. 
A. 11. Dcitz was reared a farmer, residing with his father till 
manhood. In 185 1 he moved to Allen County, Ohio, and in 



564 HISTORY OF DEKALB COUNTY. 

the spring of 1854 to Dc Kalb County, Intl., and bought the 
farm where he now lives. The land was mostly uncultivated 
when he settled on it, but he has cleared it of timber and im- 
proved it, and now has one of the finest farms in the township. 
In 1S70 he built a large barn, which is the finest in the town- 
ship, and in 1879 built his line brick residence, with all modern 
improvements. He was married Sept. 5, 1S50, to Maria Long, 
a native of Ohio, daughter of John and Esther Long. To 
them have been born nine children, eight of whom are living — I 
Elizabeth, Sarah, Sophia, Louise, William, Susan, Oliver P., 
and Elmer. Edward is deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Deitz are 
members of the German Reformed church. Politically he is a 
Democrat. 

Moses Deitz, farmer and stock-raiser, is a native of Holmes 
County, Ohio, born Aug. 28, 1S35, the fourth son of Henry E. 
Deitz. He was reared on a farm in his native count) - , and 
in the spring of 1S53 came with his father to De Kalb County, 
Inch, and settled in Fairfield Township. He assisted his father 
in clearing and improving his farm, remaining with him till his 
marriage, March 2, 1S62, to Miss ElizaDcth Boycr, a daughter 
of Michael Boycr, one of the early settlers of the county. After 
his marriage he bought eighty acres of land on section 3, Fair- 
field Township, where he lived till 1875, when he sold his farm 
and bought a part of his lather's old homestead. He owns 
fifty acres of choice land, under a fine state of cultivation, and 
his residence and farm buildings are comfortable and commo- 
dious. To him and his wife have been born two children ; both 
died in infancy. They are members of the German Reformed 
church. In politics he affiliates with the Democratic part}'. 

Sebastian Eckart, a prominent farmer and stock-raiser of 
Fairfield Township, is a native of Germany, born Nov. 9, 1S22, 
a son of Peter and Eve Eckart. His father died in March, ; 
1S30, and the following May his mother with her six children 
e&me to the United States unci oeulud \\\ Ffflnkiin Count)-, J?rv„ 
where he was reared. In 1S45 he emigrated to Wayne County, 
Ohio, and in March, 1835, to De Kalb County, Ind., and bought 
the land which is now his valuable farm. At that time there 
were but fifteen acres partially cleared, but now he has 120 
acres all under a fine state of cultivation. He was a poor man 
when he came to De Kalb County, and his present prosperous 
condition is due to his energy and industry, coupled with good 



management and frugality. Mr. Eckart was married Dec. 14, 
1848, to Susan Cox, a native of Wayne County, Ohio, daughter 
of Jacob and Jane (Denman) Cox. They have had a family of 
twelve children, but three of whom are living — Jacob If., Will- 
iam O., and Spencer F. Elizabeth, Francis A., Margaret D., 
Amiel C, Alice C, Florence E., Luther S. L., Kate, and Eva 
Bell are deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Eckart are members of the 
Evangelical Lutheran church. In politics he is a Democrat. 

George E>nerick, one of the successful pioneers of Fairfield 
Township, was born in Somerset County, Fa., May 3, 1S1S, the 
seventh of nine children of John and Mary (Troutman) Emc- 
rick, and grandson of Andrew Emcrick (who was a soldier un- 
der General Washington) and Peter Troutman, natives of Ger- 
many, who came to the United States prior to the war of the 
Revolution. When our subject was four years old his parents 
moved to Wayne County, Ohio, and there he grew to man- 
hood, residing with his parents till his majority. He then fol- 
lowed agricultural pursuits for himself till 185 1, when he came 
to De Kalb County, Ind., and bought 280 acres of heavily tim- 
bered land. Here he and his wife commenced to make a home 
for themselves, and though obliged to endure all the privations 
and inconveniences of pioneer life, they were uncomplaining 
having the assurance that the future was one of prosperity. 
They now have a landed estate of 400 acres and one of 
the pleasantest homes in the county. Mr. Emerick was 
married May 4, 1S39, to Sarah Guthrie, a native of Richland 
County, Ohio, daughter of Richard and Mary (Vanscoy) Guth- 
rie, natives of Pennsylvania, of Irish and German descent. To 
them have been born six children, five of whom are living — 
Mary J., wife of Solomon Dover; George W., Peter Alexan- 
der, Lucinda Catherine, wife of Denjamin Wilhoit, and Andrew 
Jackson. Francis M. died, aged five years. In politics Mr. 
Emerick is a Democrat. 

George Frederick, farmer and stock-raiser, is a native of Ohio, 
born in Stark County, April 1, 1S31, a son of John and Char- 
lotta (Aultman) Frederick, natives of Pennsylvania, of German 
and English descent. He was reared on a farm, residing with 
his parents till his majority. In 1S52 he bought a farm adjoin- 
ing the old homestead, where he lived till 1864, when he sold 
iiis farm and came to De Kalb County, Ind., and bought forty- 
four acres of land in Fairfield Township, and eighty acres in 
3G 



566 HISTORY Of DK KAl.l; COUNTY. 

Salem Township, Steuben Count}-. But very little of his land 
had been improved, the most of it being heavily limbered, lie 
has been a hard working man, and has cleared and cultivated 
his land till he now has a fine farm with a good residence and 
farm buildings. In addition to farming he has been engaged in 
the marble business, which has been a successful enterprise. He 
was married Oct. 12, 1S51, to Ann Maria Frybarger, daughter 
of John and Hannah (Zcrbe) Frybarger, the former a native of 
Pennsylvania of German descent, and the latter of Vermont of 
English descent. To them have been born fourteen children— 
Charlotta, David (deceased), John C, Franklin S., Henry, James 
R., Rachel, Delia, Joseph W. R, Lydia M„ Mary Belle, William 
A., George T., and Amos A. In politics Mr. Frederick is a Re- 
publican. His wife is a member of the German Reform and he 
of the Evangelical church. 

Henry Freed, farmer and stock-raiser, Fairfield Township, 
was born in Stark County, Ohio, June 28, 1S42. His father, 
Peter Freed, was born in Shenandoah County, Pa., and was a 
son of John Freed, a native of York County, Pa., of German 
descent. When Peter was nine years of age he accompanied 
his parents to Columbiana County, Ohio, where he was reared, 
and in 1S19 married Hannah Miller, a native of that countv, 
daughter of Anthony and Susan Miller. After their marriage 
they settled in Stark County, where eleven children were born, 
of whom our subject is the youngest, six of whom are living. His 
wife died in 1S61, and in 1S64 he came to De Kalb County, and 
has since made his home with his son Henry. Henry Freed 
was reared and educated in his native county, and was there 
married Aug. 2, 1S63, to Barbara Haynes, a native of Stark 
County, daughter of Jonathan and Mary (Ileinum) Haynes. 
The following fall he moved to De Kalb County and settled on 
the farm where he now lives, which contains seventy-eight 
acres of improved land. He and his wife have had a family of 
nine children, eight of whom are living — Peter L., Jonathan, 
Samuel, Alvin, Mary, William II., Martha, and Emma E. 
One died in infancy. Mr. and Mrs. Freed are members ol the 
Mennonite church. In politics he is a Republican. His father 
was originally a Whig, but has voted with the Republican 
party since its organization. 

John Freed, one of the prosperous farmers of Fairfield Town- 
ship, was born in Columbiana County, Ohio, Aug. 12, 1S25, a 



.. 



iiis'n 



iUNTY. 



V>7 



son of Peter and Hannah (Miller) Freed. When he was four 
rears of age his parents moved to Stark County, Ohio, where 
lie was reared and educated, attending the district schools. He 
remained with his parents till nearly twenty-four years of age, 
and Jan. 21, 1S49, married Analiza Muct, a daughter of Joseph 
and Mary Huct. In 1S52 he moved to De Kalb County, Ind., 
and bought a ti-act of unimproved land in Fairfield Township, 
which he has improved and is now a fine farm. He owns 120 
acres all under cultivation, except thirty acres of woods, and his 
improvements arc among the best in the county. Mr. Freed 
has been a hard-working man, and has earned his property by 
industry and frugality. Me is a public spirited, benevolent 
citizen, and assists with both time and money every laudable 
enterprise. In politics he was originally a Whig, but now casts 
his suffrage with the Republican party. He is, as was also his 
wife, a member of the German Reform church. To them were 
born nine children, seven of whom are living — Lucinda, wife of 
Peter Gonser, of this township; Elizabeth, wife of Byron Mc- 
Endarfer; Lydia Ann, wife of Joseph Muct, of Smithlield 
Township; Alice, wife of Oliver Stoter, of Smithfield Town- 
ship ; John A., Mary Ada, and William B. Peter and Joseph 
are deceased. Mrs. Freed died May 27, 1SS5, aged fifty-five 
years, seven months and thirteen days. 

Henry Gardner, farmer and stock-raiser, Fairfield Township, 
was born in Westmoreland County, Pa., Feb. 14, 1S30, the 
youngest son of John and Barbara (Camp) Gardner, and was 
an infant when his parents moved to Holmes Count)-, Ohio, 
where he was reared and educated, remaining there till 1S59, 
when he came to De Kalb County, Ind., and settled on a tract 
of land he had bought in 1S50. Me built a cabin for his family, 
and began to clear and improve his land. Me now has a valu- 
able farm of 160 acres, and thirty-eight acres a short distance 
north of his homestead. Mr. Gardner has been an energetic, 
frugal citizen, and one of the most public spirited and influen- 
tial men of his township. Me was married April 27, 1855, to 
Eliza Swihart, a native of Holmes County, Ohio, daughter of 
George and Catherine (Snider) Swihart. They had a family 
of live children— Sarah A., John O., George W., William IL, 
and one that died in infancy. Mrs. Gardner died April ;o. 
1S64. Oct. 5, 1S66, Mr. Gardner married Mrs. Sarah Ann 
(Miller) Dunn, daughter of Jacob and Sarah (Ash) Miller. To 



56S HISTORY OF DE KALE COUNTY. 

them have been born five children — David S., Clarence E., 
Harvey E., Cyrus A., and Irvin H. In politics Mr. Gardner is 
a Democrat. He and his wife are members of the Evangelical 
Lutheran church. 

John Gardner, one of the most successful farmers of Fairfield 
Township, is a native of Westmoreland County, Pa., born Jan. 
25, 1S24, a son of John and Barbara (Camp; Gardner, natives of 
Pennsvlvania, of German descent. In 1830 his parents moved 
to Holmes County, Ohio, where he was reared on a farm, re- 
ceiving his education in the district schools. Soon after reach- 
ing his majority he came to De Kalb County, Ind., and re- 
mained two years, entering a tract of land in Fairfield Town- 
ship. He returned to Ohio and remained till June 15, 1854, 
when he was married to Catherine Deitz, a native of Holmes 
County, Ohio, daughter of Jacob and Mary (Noll) Dcitz. Im- 
mediately after his marriage he moved to his frontier home, 
and together they went to work to improve their land and 
make a farm, and how well they succeeded is proved by a visit 
to their beautiful home, where they have 1G0 acres of choice 
land all under cultivation and a pleasant residence and good 
farm buildings. They have a family of live children — Joseph 
D., Lydia A., Sarah, William A., and John II . Mr. and Mrs. 
Gardner are members of the Evangelical Lutheran church. In 
politics he affiliates with the Democratic party. 

David Goodrich, son of Philander and Salmeda (Jewett) Good- 
rich, was born in Cayuga County, N. Y., Jan. 31, 1S3S. He re- 
mained with his father till his death, and then worked by the 
month till after the breaking out of the war, anil Aug. S, 1862, 
enlisted in Company A, Eighty-eighth Indiana Infantry. lie 
participated in the battles of Perryvillc and Stone River, and 
was then placed on detached duly till the close of the war. He 
was discharged June 26, 1865, and returned to De Kalb County, 
and in [866 bought; llis present farm, to which he has added till 

now he 6WH8 niiieiy-luui iici'et, ui land ali midcr eultlVflttOH, 

He was married Jan. 10, 1867, to Mary A. Phelps, daughter of 
Chauncey and Mary (Chadwick) Phelps. They have had a 
family of six children, but five of whom are living — Orrin G., 
Albert B., Laura B., Derward G., and Edna May. A son died 
in infancy. Mrs. Goodrich is a member of the Disciples church. 
In politics Mr. Goodrich is a Republican. 

Philander Goodrich, deceased, was born in the State of New 



HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 5G9 

York in 1S09, a son of Zcbulon and Goodrich, his father 

of Puritan and his mother of German descent. He was reared 
on a farm, remaining- with his parents till manhood. He was 

1 married about 1S36 to Salmcda Jcwctt, a native of Connecticut. 

; In the fall of 1S40 they moved to Lag-range County, Ind., 
where his wife died in 1S41. Mr. Goodrich afterward moved 

; to Steuben County, and in 1S46 to Dc Kalb County and settled 
in Smithfield Township, but in less than a year moved to Fair- 
field Township and bought a tract of unimproved land, which 
he began to improve, and on which he lived till his death in 
1S56. His family consisted of three children, two sons and a 
daughter — David, William A. and Harriet. The latter is de- 
ceased. 

Jonatlian A. Gushwa, a representative of one of the pioneer 
families of De Kalb Count)', was born in Holmes County, Ohio, 
Jan. 15, 1835, and was ten years of age when his parents moved 
to this county. His youth was spent in assisting his father 
clear and improve a frontier farm, and six months before his 
majority, his father gave him his time and he then worked for 
wages till the breaking out of the war of the Rebellion. Au- 
gust 10, 1S61, he enlisted in Company B, Twenty-ninth Indiana 
Infantry, and served thirty-seven months. The first half of 
his service he was detailed teamster. He contracted the erysip- 
elas in his leg while in the army, and has never fully recovered 

; from its effects. After his return from the war he settled on the 
old homestead and took charge of the farm for his father till 
his marriage, Jan. 4, 1S66, to Harriet Williams, daughter of 
David and Mary Williams. He then settled on a farm of his 

I father's in this township, where he lived sixteen years, and then 
bought forty acres of land, but three months later sold it and 
rented a farm of his brother a year. Nov. 1, 1SS3, he moved to 
the farm where he now lives, where he owns eighty acres of 
choice land, with a pleasant residence and good farm buildings. 
His wife died Jan. iS, 1SS3, leaving two sons — Charles and Ed- 
ward. Oct. 4, 1SS3, he was married to Mrs. Margaret Jane 
Swinhart, a sister of his first wife. Mr. Gushwa has been a 
prominent man in his township, and held several offices of trust 
and responsibility; among others those of Supervisor, Con- 
stable, Road Supervisor; and in the fall of 1SS4 was elected 
Justice of the Peace. In politics he is a Democrat. He and 
his wife are members of the Albright church. 



- - 



5/0 HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 

Philip Gushwa, deceased, was one of the prominent pioneers 
of Fairfield Township. He was born in Somerset County, 
Pa., Sept. 7, 1802, a son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Phillips) ! 
Gushwa, natives of Pennsylvania, of German descent. His i 
parents were in limited circumstances and he was early obliged 
to assist his father in the maintenance of the family. When he 
was four years of age his parents moved to Westmoreland 
County, Pa., and when he was twenty-two, in 1S23, to Holmes 
County, Ohio. He was married Nov. 20, 1825, to Mary A. 
Mahr, a native of Pennsylvania, born July S, 1S06, daughter of 
Jacob and Elizabeth Mahr, of German descent. Mr. Gushwa 
bought eighty acres of wild land in Ohio, which he cleared and 
improved, and then sold it and bought 1G0 acres. This he 
cleared and improved, and subsequently met with reverses in 
his business, and in 1845 came to De Kalb County, and the third 
time settled in the woods. He bought 200 acres of land at 
$2. 50 an acre, which he went to work to improve. At his death 
he had 226 acres of land all well cultivated. He died Dec. 16, 
1SS4. His widow is still living, in the seventy-ninth year of her 
age. They had a happy married life of nearly sixty years, and 
by their hospitality and kindness won many friends. To them 
were born eleven children, all of whom grew to maturity and 
ten of whom are living — Jacob, Elizabeth, Hannah, John, Su- 
san, Jonathan, William (deceased), Mary Ann, Philip, Jr., Sarah 
and Benjamin. In politics Mr. Gushwa was a Democrat. Mrs. 
Gushwa is a member of the Lutheran church. 

Pliilip Gushwa, Jr., the fifth son and ninth child of Philip 
and Mary A. (Mahr) Gushwa, was born in Holmes County, 
Ohio, March 5, 1841, and was four years of age when his par- 
ents moved to De Kalb Count)-. Here he was reared and edu- 
cated, remaining with his parents till the breaking out of the 
Rebellion. Nov. 20, 1S62, he enlisted in Company B, Twenty- 
ninth Indiana Infantry, and participated in many hard-fought 
battles, the more important being Chickamauga where he was 
wounded in the right thigh, the ball passing out of his leg. 
This disabled him from service lor three months. He served 
till the expiration of his term and was discharged Nov. 20, 
1S65. After his return home he worked on his father's farm 
where he has since lived with the exception of three years, 
when he lived on land of his own in the same township. He 
was married Sept. 7, 1867, to Sarah Williams, a native of Holmes 



! 



County, Ohio, daughter of David and Mary Williams, who 
came to Dc Kalb County in 1864. To Mr. and .Mrs. Gushwa 
have been born three children — James F., Alva \\\, and Nellie 
M. In politics Mr. Gushwa affiliates with the Republican 
party. He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episco- 
pal church. 

Daniel Haller, farmer and stock-raiser, is a native of Germany, 
born March 14, 1824, the fourth son of Jacob Haller. lie was 
three years of age when his parents came to the United States, 
and eleven when they moved to Wayne County, Ohio. He was 
reared and educated in Wayne County, and in 1 S45 accom- 
panied his parents to Noble County, [nd., and settled on the 
line of De Kalb County. In 1S57 he moved a mile north into 
De Kalb County where he lived till April, 1S7S, when he bought 
the farm where he now lives, which contains eighty-nine acres 
of improved land. Mr. Haller was married in 1S49 to Eliza- 
beth Bolenbaugh, a native of Seneca County, Ohio, but a resi- 
dent of Indiana at the time of her marriage. They are the 
parents of ten children, but lour of whom are living — William B., 
John W., Annie E. and Minnie M. Nancy A., Mary M., 
Hiram A., James N., Henry H. and Susan V". arc deceased. 
Mr. Haller, in politics, affiliates with the Republican party. 

John F. Haller, farmer and stock-raiser, Fairfield Township, 
is a native of Wurtemberg, Germany, born July 16, 1S21, a son 
of Jacob and Catherine (Wcller) Haller. His lather served 
eight years in the French army under Napoleon Bonaparte, 
and two years in the German army. In 1S27 he came to the 
United States, landing in New York, and settled in Lancaster 
County, Pa., where he lived till 1S35, then moved to Wayne 
County, Ohio, where our subject grew to manhood. In 1S45 
he moved to Noble County, Ind., where he died in 1 S53, aged 
seventy-two years. His wife died in 1864, aged sixty-five years. 
John F. Haller remained in Wayne County till 185 1, and then 
come to De Kalb County and settled on the farm where he now 
lives, which contains 135 acres of valuable land. He also owns 
a farm of 130 acres in Noble County. He was in limited cir- 
cumstances when he commenced life for himself, but by indus- 
try and good management he has accumulated a competency 
for his declining years. He was married April 30, 1846. to 
Joanna Childs, daughter of James and Elizabeth (Cochran) 
Childs, the former a native of England, and the latter of Mary 



- 



572 HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 

land, of Irish parentage. Mr. Childs died in Wayne County, 
Ohio, in 1S50, aged seventy-five years, and his wife in 1876, 
aged ninety-two years. To Mr. and and Mrs. Mailer have been 
burn nine children, six of whom arc living — Catherine E., Jacob, 
Sarah Ann, Nannie E., Samuel M. and Wilber L. The de- 
ceased are James, John T. and James II. Mr. Hallcr has al- 
ways taken an active interest in the welfare of his adopted 
county and lias assisted materially in its growth and develop- 
j mem. In politics he is a Republican, and a ready supporter of 
I all the issues of his party. Mrs. Hallcr is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 
Leonard Hartman, one of the most successful of the pioneers 
j of Fairfield Township, is a native of Hesse-Darmstadt, Ger- 
! many, born Sept 27, 1S19, a son of Leonard Hartman. When 
j he was about six years of age his parents moved to the United 
I States and settled in Franklin County, Pa., thence to Wayne '■ 
County, Ohio, where he grew to manhood, remaining there till 
1S45, when he came to De Kalb County, Ind., and bought 160 
acres of wild land in Fairfield Township, which is a part of his 
present farm. He had but $24 when he reached this county 
and was obliged to buy his land on time. He cleared and im- 
proved his land, paid for it, and has added to it till he now j 
owns 450 acres, the greater part under cultivation. His suc- 
cess is due to his energy and industrious and economical 
habits, aided by a most estimable wife. He has assisted materi- 
ally in the growth and development of the township, and gives 
liberally of his means for the furtherance of every laudable en- 
terprise. Mr. Hartman was married June 24, 1841, to Mary 
Martz, a native of Germany, who came to the United States 
with her parents when seventeen years of age. They have had 
twelve children, ten of whom are living — Cassie, John, Susan, 
Sophia, Adam, Lydia, Joseph, Levi, Emma and Martha. The 
deceased are Solomon and Libbie. Mrs. Hartman is a member 
of the Lutheran church. In politics he is a Democrat. 

Hon. Jacob Helwig, deceased, was born in Jefferson County, 
Ohio, Sept. 10, 1S04, a son of George Helwig. He, in his 
youth, learned the cabinet-maker's trade of his father, and 
worked at it several years in Ohio. He was a resident of Tus- 
carawas and Carroll counties, several years each, and was a 
prominent man wherever he lived, holding several offices of 
trust. In 1S41 he came to De Kalb County, Ind., and settled in 



[ISTORY OF DE KALI; COUNTY. 



573 



Troy Township. He was elected twice to the Legislature from 
this district, and also served two terms as County Commissioner 
anci one as Treasurer. He was a member of the Lutheran 
church in early life, but after coming to De Kalb County united 
with the Methodist Episcopal church. In politics he was a 
strong Democrat. He was married to Jemima Jenkins, and to 
them were born five children — George, Elizabeth, Peter, Isaac, 
and John B. The latter was for eight years President of Wit- 
tenburg College, Springfield, Ohio, and is now pastor of the 
Lutheran church at Akron, Ohio. His wife died and he after- 
ward married Sarah Gossage. The)' had a family of five chil- 
dren—Barbara A., Kezia, Mary, Rebecca, and Christina. Mr. 
Hclwig died Dec. 10, 1S69. 

Alonzo Hcmstrcct, deceased, was born in Ohio, Feb. 6, 1S40, a 
son of Jeremiah and Mariam (Smith) Hemstreet. When he 
was a child his parents moved to De Kalb County, Ind., and 
settled in Smithfield Township, where he was reared and edu- 
cated, attending the district schools. He remained with his 
parents till his marriage, and then bought the farm in Fairfield 
Township where his family now live, and where he died Feb. 
22, 1S70. The farm contains eighty acres of valuable land, but 
when Mr. Hemstreet settled on it was some improved and 
neavily timbered. He was an energetic, frugal man, and with 
the assistance of a most estimable wife, cleared and improved 
his land, and at his death left one of the best farms in the town- 
ship. He was married Dec. 5, 1S65, to Julia Zwilling, a native 
of New York, daughter of Henry and Julia (Howald) Zwilling, 
who came from German)- and settled near Utica, N. Y., and 
subsequently moved to Holmes County, Ohio, and in 184S to 
De Kalb County, and settled in Fairfield Township, and re- 
moved to Smithfield where the father died. The mother is 
now living in Marshall County, Iowa, in the seventy-fourth 
year of her age. To Mr. and Mrs. Hemstreet was born one 
son — Clark A., who lives on the old homestead with his mother. 
Mr. Hemstreet in his political views was a Democrat. 

John Ilovatcr, Sr., one of the most esteemed of the old pio- 
neers, was born in Lebanon County, Pa., Nov. 3, 1809, a son of 
Christopher and Julia Ann (Cormack) Hovater, natives of Lan- 
caster County, of German parentage. He was reared in his 
native county, and in his boyhood worked in the shop ol his 
father, who was a blacksmith. When he was fifteen years old 



574 HISTORY (!!■ DJi KALI) COUNTY. 

he was able to Lake the place ol a journeyman, and worked for 

his father till his majority. lie then went to Ohio, and for four 
years was in business for himself in Holmes County. Then 
was associated with a Mr. Oten in Dalton a year, and from that 
lime on till 1850 lived in different places in Ohio, the last being 
Sugar Creek, where he bought a home and remained seven 
years. In 1S50 he moved to De Kalb County, Ind., and bought 
eighty acres of wild land in Fairfield Township, which he has 
cleared, and now has a good farm. He has worked at his trade 
in addition to caring for his farm, and will long be remembered 
as the pioneer blacksmith of Fairfield Township. He has, by 
his many years of upright and honorable dealing, won the con- 
fidence and respect of all who know him. He was married 
Dec. 4, 1S34, to Nancy, daughter of John and Betsey (Roop) 
Wyers. To them have been born thirteen children, nine of 
whom are living. They are members of the United Brethren 
church. In politics he is a Democrat. 

George IV. Husselman, one of the successful farmers and stock- 
raisers of Fairfield Township, was born in Wayne County, 
Ohio, May 8, 1S30, a son of Samuel and Susan (Trapp) Hussel- 
man, and when fourteen years of age came with his parents to 
De Kalb County, Ind. They lived in Fairfield Township two 
years, and then moved to Union Township, where he assisted 
his father in clearing and improving a farm, remaining with his 
parents till manhood. He then began farming for himself, and 
bought a farm of 200 acres, where he has since lived. At that 
time his land was wholly unimproved, but now it is one of the 
finest farms in the township. He was married April 5, 1853, to 
Mary J. King, a daughter of John and Kate (Reaver) King, 
who came to De Kalb County, Inch, from Maryland in 1846. 
Mr. and Mrs. Husselman have had a family of four children — 
Calvin H., John W., Emily, wife of Henry Neidig, and Susan 
M., wife of John Kandel. Mr. Husselman is in politics a Re- 
publican. He and his wife are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 

John T. Husselman was born in Wayne County, Ohio, April 
13, 1S27, the eldest son of Samuel and Susan (Trapp) Hussel- 
man. In May, 1845, he accompanied his parents to De Kalb 
County, Ind., and settled in Fairfield Township, where he- 
assisted his father in clearing and improving a farm. After 
attaining his majority he bought a tract of land a mile and a 



/ : ^ 



HISTORY OF DE KALI; COUNTY. 



575 



half north of Fairfield Center, and began to make a farm for 
himself. In June, 1S55, he sold his farm and bought the one 
where he now lives, which at that time was unimproved. 
Thus a third lime he began to make a farm out of a tract 
ol timber land. lie has been an energetic, industrious man 
and succeeded in surrounding himself and family with a com- 
fortable home, and lias a competency for his declining years. 
His farm contains 1S0 acres of choice land under a good state 
of cultivation. In September, 1864, Mr. Hussclman enlisted in 
Company C, Forty-second Indiana Infantry, and served till the 
close of the war. lie was married March 11, 1852, to Elvina, 
daughter of Abraham Hartman. They have eight children — 
Wesley E., Amanda E., Melissa J., Emma A., Alma, Flora Ada, 
Ida May and John A. Mr. and Mrs. Husselman are members 
of the Evangelical Lutheran church. In politics Mr. Hussel- 
man is a Republican. 

Harrison Jones, is a native of Kentucky, born in Maysville, 
June 10, 1S12, the second of three children of William and 
Lucy (Thompson) Jones, natives of Kentucky, of Welsh de- 
scent. When he was three years of age his parents moved to 
Greene County, Ohio, and three years later to Lower Sandus- 
ky, now Fremont; thence, when he was nine years old to 
Canada, but a few months later returned to Ohio and located 
in Miami County. While living in the latter county his father 
went to New Orleans and died there of yellow fever. When 
lie was seventeen years of age his mother moved to Indiana 
with his older brother, and he remained in Miami County till 
attaining his majority. About \Syj he moved to Carroll County, 
lnd., but returned to Ohio a year later and remained till 1S45, 
when he came to Allen County, and rented a farm about eight 
years. In the meantime he bought 150 acres of land in Fair- 
field Township, De Kalb County, to which he has since added 
till he now has 200 acres, all under a high state of cultivation. 
Mr. Jones was married June 13, 1833, to Elizabeth Burkett, a 
native of Ohio, daughter of Christian Burkett. They had two 
children — Joseph and Lucy, and to Mr. Jones by his second 
marriage was born one daughter — Silvia. Mrs. Jones is a mem- 
ber of the German Methodist church. In politics Mr. Jones is 
a Republican. 

Frederick Kralin, deceased, was a native of Prussia, Germany, 
born Aug. 25, 1S30, a son of Jacob Krahn. He was reared in 



5/G IIISTOKY 01' UK KA.I.H COI STY. 

his native country, and in his youth served an apprentice: iip 
at the rope-maker's trade, which he followed till he came to the 
United States, when still a young man. lie landed in New 
York Citv and walked from thereto Stark County, Ohio, where 
he was employed at brick making by the month for five years. 
Me then went into business for himself, and in 1863 left Ohio 
and came to Dc Kalb County, Ind., and bought eighty acres of 
land in Fairfield Township, and engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits till October, 1864, when he was drafted in the defense of 
his adopted country in Company E, Thirteenth Indiana Infan- 
try, and served till the spring of iS6$, when, April 5, he died 
and was buried at Newbern, N. C. He was married March 22, 
185S, to Julia Arna, a native of Germany, where her parents, 
George and Susan (Barley) Arna, died when she was a child, 
and when nineteen years of age she came to the United States. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Krahn were born four children — William 
John (deceased), Amelia and Mary N. Mrs. Krahn is a mem- 1 
ber of the Evangelical Lutheran church. 

Martin Lehman was born in the province of Baden, Germany, 
Nov. 9, 1829, a son of Job and Mary (Klotz) Lehman. He was 
reared and educated in his native country, working at. various 
occupations in his youth. He received a good education in 
the schools of Germany, and in 1K4.8 came to the United States 
and located in Adams County, lnd., where he worked by the 
month till his marriage, lie then bought 100 acres 01 land in 
Noble County, Ind., where he lived ten years, and in 1SG5 sold 
his farm and moved to Dc Kalb County and bought the farm 
in Fairfield Township where he now lives. He has 215 acres 
of valuable land all under cultivation, and is one of the most 
prosperous and thrifty farmers of the township. He was mar- 
ried March 4, 1855, to Mary Martz, a native of Germany, 
daughter of Bartle and Anna (Jauch) Martz. To them have 
been born ten children, but three of whom are living — John P., 
Willy Bartlcy, and Christian. Mr. and Mrs. Lehman are mem- 
bers of the Lutheran church. In politics he is a Democrat. 

John L. Ling, farmer and stock-raiser, Fairfield Township, 
was born in Coshocton County, Ohio, Jan. 13, 1S27, a son ol 
Peter and Dorcas (Russcl) Ling, natives of Bedford County, 
Pa., of German and English descent. In 1848 he came to De 
Kalb County, Ind., and bought the land which is now his finely 
cultivated farm, but at that time was a tract of heavily timbered 



..Y 01- IJ 



577 



land, lie returned to Ohio, and in 1851 came again to this 
county and began to clear and prepare his land for cultivation. 
He was married April S, 1S52, to Susan Gonser, daughter of 

David and Catherine (Miller) Gonser, early settlers of De 
Kalb County, from Coshocton County, Ohio. To them have 
been born five children — Emily, wife of A. W. Bair, of Smith- 
field Township ; Ellen, wife of Eugene Krum, of Fairfield 
Township; Ida, wife of Joseph Gardner; David, of Steuben 
County, married Delia Frederick; and Edward, of Kansas. In 
politics Mr. Ling is a Republican. lie has taken an active in- 
terest in all the public affairs, and has been elected by his fel- 
low townsmen to different offices of trust and responsibility. 

Elihu Mclnturf, one of the prominent early settlers of De 
Kalb County, was born in Licking County, Ohio, June 17, 1816, 
1 a son of John and Hannah (Parr) Mclnturf. When he was 
twelve years of age he went to live with an uncle, and re- 
mained with him till nineteen years of age, when his uncle 
died, leaving him enough to buy fifty acres of land. He was 
sick for the next three years and needed the money, and upon 
his recover)' was obliged to go to work for wages. In 1840 he 
went to Clark Count)', HI., but in less than a year returned 
home and remained till October, 1844, when he came to Indi- 
ana, and bought eighty acres of Government land. He worked 
lor the settlers to obtain provisions to live on, and in the mean- 
time began to clear his land and get it ready to plant a crop. 
lie has been industrious and frugal, and to his first purchase 
has added till he now has a fine farm of 132 acres, ail under cul- 
tivation. He was married in 1S41 to Rachel Brown, a native 
of Knox County, Ohio, daughter of Silas and Sarah Ann (Mer- 
riott) Brown. They have two children — Sarah Ann, wife o: 
Abraham Orr, of Kendallville, and William M., who married 
Emma Bronson, and lives on the old homestead. In politics 
: Mr. Mclnturf is a Democrat. 

David McNabb is a native of Center County, Pa., born Dec. 
9, 1S19, a son of John and Mary (Young) McNabb, natives of 
Pennsylvania,' the former of Scotch and the latter of English 
and Swiss descent. When he was thirteen years of age his 
parents moved to Ashland County, Ohio, where he was reared, 
receiving a common school education. In 1843 he came to De 
Kalb County, Ind., and entered eighty acres of wild land in 
i\ Fairfield Township, on section 35, where he built a cabin and 

J [ 



5/S HISTORY I '!■ .'.- KALIi COUNTY. 

commenced to improve his land. He lived on this farm twenty 
years, and in 1S63 sold it and bought the one where he now 
lives, on section 32. Mis farm contains 120 acres of choice land, 
all under cultivation. Mr. McNabb was married (Jet. iS, 1S42, 
to Sophie Dunfee, a daughter of James and Sophie (Hazlett) 
Dunfee, who moved from Adams County, Pa., to Ohio in 1833. 
Mr. and Mrs. McNabb have had eight children, seven of 
whom are living — James, George, John, Francclia, Wan-en, 
Martha and Frank. Ella is deceased. Mr. McNabb is a self- 
made man, having no means when he started in life for himself, 
but by his own industry and good management, assisted by a 
most estimable wife, he has accumulated a good property. In 
politics he affiliates with the Democratic party. 

John Jacob Metzger, farmer and stock-raiser, is a native of 
Germany, born March 31, 1S15, a son of Philip Powell and 
Margaretta (Gross) Metzger. He was reared on a farm, remain- 
ing with his father till his majority. His mother died when he 
was three years old. When he was twenty-one years old he 
was drafted into the German army and served three years. He 
then on account of his good behavior was allowed to purchase 
a substitute and was discharged. He followed farming five 
years after leaving the army, and was then married, and soon 
after came to the United States and settled in Lawrence County, 
Ohio, buying fifty acres of land, where he lived nine years. In 
[855 he came to De Kalb County and bought 100 acres of wild 
land which he has cleared and improved, and now has one of 
the finest farms in the township. lie was married in .March, 
1S46, to , who died April 26, 1S57, leav- 

ing six children — Kate, Henry, John, Elizabeth, George and 
Mary. In October, 1S57, he married Mrs. Barbara (Stomm) 
Miller, a native of Germany, who came to America in 1854. 
She has four children— Margaretta, Jacob, Valentine and Henry. 
Mr. and Mrs. Metzger are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. In politics he is a Democrat. 

Emanuel Ncidig is a native of Columbiana County, Ohio, 
born Aug. 3, 1824, a son of Joseph and Margaret (De Koff) 
Neidig, natives of Pennsylvania. He was reared and educated 
in his native count)', spending his leisure time in his father's 
blacksmith shop. When twenty years of age he began to 
work at the carpenter's trade, serving an apprenticeship of two 
months. He was a natural mechanic and his employer took 









LY 01'' l)Ii 1 



579 



. ins to explain the business to him. lie worked at his 
trade in his native county till 1654, and then came to Dc Kalb 
County, Ind., and bought a tract of heavily timbered land in 
Fairfield Township, lie worked at his trade and hired his land 
cleared, and then attended to the cultivation of his farm in con- 
nection with his other work. lie has been successful in his 
business and now has two farms, the one where he lives, con- 
taining eighty acres and another of forty acres. lie was mar- 
ried July 27, 1848, to Susan Freed, a native of Columbiana 
County, Ohio, daughter of Peter and Hannah (Miller; Freed. 
To them have been born nine children, but three of whom are 
living — Cornelia, wife of Benjamin Cline, of Steuben County; 
Henry, of Fairfield Township, and Joseph at home. Hannah, 
Anthony, Angcline, Emanuel, Peter, and an infant are deceased. 
Mr. and Mrs. Neidig are members of the German Reform 
church. In politics he is a Democrat. 

Daniel Phelps, farmer and stock-raiser, Fairfield Township, 
was born in Stark Count}-, Ohio, Feb. 28, 1830, a son of William 
and Magdeline (Marsh), Phelps, the former a native of Mary- 
land, of English descent, and the latter of Virginia, of German 
descent. He attended the public schools till ten years of age, 
when his lather died and he was then obliged to rely upon his 
own resources, and from that time till his marriage worked for 
farmers by the month. He was married Nov. 20, 1853, to Han 
nah, daughter of Peter Freed. In the fall of 1854 they moved 
to Pe Kalb County, lnd., where his wife died. Their only 
child died in infancy. He was again married June 20, 1S58, to 
Delilah Riscly, a native oi Stark County, Ohio, daughter of 
Eliasand Catherine (Livingston) Risely. They have had three 
children; two are living— Amanda and Lovina. One child 
died in infancy. Mr. Phelps has one 01' the best farms in the 
township, which he has brought from a heavily timbered con- 
dition to a state of advanced cultivation. He and his wife are 
members of the German Baptist church. He in politics casts 
his suffrage with the Republican party. 

John Potts is a native of Stark County, Ohio, born Feb. 4, 
1S13, the eldest son of Jonathan and Elizabeth (Triplet) Potts, 
natives of Virginia and of English ancestry, and grandson of 
John Potts and Joseph Triplet, the former a soldier in the war 
of the Revolution. When he was five years of age his parents 
moved to Wayne County, Ohio, and there he was reared and 



5S0 HISTORY OF DE KAUi COUNTY. 

educated. In 1837 they moved to Lawrence County, 111., and in 
1855 while on a visit to our subject the lather died. The mother 
died in Lawrence County. John Potts lived in Wayne County 
till 1846, when he moved to De Kalb County, Ind., and bought 
forty acres of land which is a part of his present farm. To this 
he has added forty acres, and now has a valuable farm with a 
good residence and farm buildings. He has been an industrious 
and enterprising citizen, and has gained the confidence and 
esteem of the entire community. In 1 864 he was elected Magis- 
trate of his township ami served twenty years. He is a Demo- 
crat in politics, lie was married Feb. G, 1S34, to Elinor Metcall, 
daughter of Josiah and Hannah Mctcalf. To them were born 
two children — Almira L. died at the age of twenty years ; and 
Hannah E. is the wife of Albert Buchanan. Mrs. Potts died 
Aug. 25, 1S66, and Aug. iS, 1S67, Mr. Potts married Maria 
Shaffer, a native of Westmoreland County, Pa. Mrs. Potts is 
a member of the Lutheran church. 

George Putt, one of the most prosperous and prominent of the 
early settlers of De Kalb County, was born in Berks Count} - , 
Pa., Nov. 19, 1 8 14, the eldest son of Jacob and Catharine (Shaf- 
fer) Putt, natives of Pennsylvania, of English and German 
descent. He was reared in his native State, and when fifteen 
years of age began driving a freight team over the mountains, 
a vocation he followed fifteen years. About 1S35 he settled in 
Lebanon County, Pa., and in 1841 moved to Stark County, 
Ohio, and eleven months later, in 1S42, came to Indiana and 
entered forty acres of land, and bought forty more in De Kalb 
County. It was located in the dense timber, but he went to 
work and soon had enough cleared to build a log cabin and 
raise a crop. He has been successful and to his land has added 
forty acres till now he has 120 acres of choice land, all well im- 
proved. He was married Nov. 15, 1S35, to Sarah Ann, daugh- 
ter of Nicholas and Elizabeth (Polm) Getz, natives of Pennsyl- 
vania, of German descent. To them were born two children 
— Levi and Joanna Elizabeth Catharine, wife of John Anstett. 
Mrs. Putt died Sept. 9, 18S4. She, as has also Mr. Putt, had 
been a member of the German Reform church from her youth. 
Politically, Mr. Putt is a Democrat. 

David Re inoe Id, deceased, one of the most esteemed pioneers 
of Fairfield Township, was born in Lebanon County, Pa., Feb. 
22, 1809, the eldest of nine children of Michael and Catherine 












U*o* 



r\y 



msTi >ky or in-: ka] ;nty. 58 r 

Fisher) Rcinochl. When he was nineteen years of age he ac- 
nied his parents to Stark County, Ohio, and was there 
married Dec. iS, 1831, to Rebecca Weirich, who was born in 
Lebanon County, Pa., Aug. 9, 1S12, a daughter of John and 
Elizabeth (Rupe) Weirich, who moved to Wayne County, 
Ohio, in 1S30. After their marriage they lived on the old 
homestead nine years and then moved to Richland County, 
ihio, where they lived till the fall of 1S52, when they came to 
Dc Kalb County, and bought 152 acres of land in Fairfield 
Township, very little of which was improved. Mr. Rcinochl 
was an industrious, energetic man, and soon had a good home 
.vhere he spent the rest of his life. He died Feb. 16, 1869. Me, 
as is also his wife, was a member of the Evangelical Associa- 
tion. To them were born seven children, five of whom are 
living — John, Elizabeth, wife of Michael Eckart ; Louisa, wife 
of C. Wert ; Mary, wife of William Shaffer ; and Solomon, on the 
old homestead. Catherine, the eldest, and Amos, the young- 
est, are deceased. 

Michael Rcinochl, farmer and stock-raiser, Fairrield Township, 
is a native of Lebanon County, Pa., born Feb. 5, 1S26, the 
:ighth of nine children of Michael and Catherine (Fisher) Rcin- 
oehl, natives of Pennsylvania, of German parentage. When he 
was two years of age his parents moved to Ohio and settled in 
Stark County, where he was reared on a farm, remaining with 
his parents till his majority. He was married Jan. 2, 1S51, to 
Catherine Weirich, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Rupe) 
Weirich. After his marriage he carried on the old homestead 
rive and a half years, and in the fall of 1856 moved to De Kalb 
County, Ind., and bought a tract of wild land in Fairrield 
Township, which he has cleared and cultivated, and which is 
now his valuable farm. He owns 160 acres of land, and his 
residence and farm buildings are large and comfortable. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Reinoehl have been born five children, but two 
/!' whom are living — Adaline, wife of Alfred Weirich, and 
George Mitchel. The deceased are— Malinda, John Henry and 
Catherine. In politics Mr. Reinoehl is a Democrat. He and 
his wife are members of the Evangelical Lutheran church. 

Peter Rcinochl, farmer and stock-raiser, is a native of Stark 

County, Ohio, born Feb. 23, 1S31, the youngest son of Michael 

and Catherine (Fisher) Rcinochl. He was reared a farmer, 

receiving a good education in the common schools, remainm ; 

37 



.- 



5SJ history oi' !)]■; icai.ii coi ... 

with his parents till twenty-live years ol age, when, Sept. is. 
1856, lie was married to Sarah Ann Sids. He remained on win 
father's farm till November, 1863, when he came to Dc Kalb 
County and bought forty acres of land in Fairfield Township, 
twenty-live of which were partially cleared. He afterward 
bought thirty-five acres adjoining it on the south, which he 
subsequently sold and bought eighty acres adjoining his farm 
on the north. He now owns 120 acres of valuable land, all 
well improved. His wife died in Ohio, Sept. 5, 1863, and he 
was married in De Kalb County, Ind., Jan. 10, 1S67, to Eliza- 
beth, daughter of John Hovater. They have had eleven chil- 
dren — David, born July n, 186S; John Henry, born Sept. 8, 
1869; Mary Ellen, born Feb. 16, 1871 ; Albert, born May 13, 
1872; Emma May, born May 21, 1S73; Charley, born July 11, 
1S74; Cora Alice, born Jan. 17, 1S76; Elizabeth Ann, born July 
8, 1878, died Feb. 4, 1S81 ; Franklin, born April 8, 1SS1 ; Me'l- 
vin, born May 1, 1883; Silvcincs, born May 31, 1885. Politi- 
cally, Mr. Reinoehl is a Democrat. 

Solomon Reinoehl, son of David and Rebecca (Weirich) Rein- 
oehl, was born in Richland County, Ohio, Aug. 6, 1843, an d 
was nine years of age when his parents moved to De Kalb 
County, Inch, where he was reared on a frontier farm, receiv- 
ing his early education in the subscription schools. He re- 
mained with his parents till manhood, and since the death of 
his father has had charge of the homestead, his mother making 
her home with him. He is a practical farmer, and has made 
many valuable improvements on the farm. He is one of the 
prominent citizens of the township, and has served his towns- 
men in different offices of trust and responsibility. He assessed 
the township in 1877, and in 187S was elected Trustee and 
served two terms of two years each. In politics he is a Demo- 
crat. He was married Aug. 2, 1866, to Martha Eckart, daugh- 
ter of Henry and Barbara (Freilich) Eckart. They have had 
seven children — Mary A., Job A., Cora R., Isaiah O., William 
E., Charley M., and Rosa V. Mr. and Mrs. Reinoehl are mem- 
bers of the Evangelical Association. 

Chauncey Ringlcr, farmer and stock-raiser, is one of the suc- 
cessful pioneers of Fairfield Township. He was born in Som- 
erset County, Pa., Jan. 6, 1S22, a son of Henry and Martha 
(Keller) Ringler, natives of Pennsylvania, of English and 
German descent. He was reared on a farm, residing with his 



•■ 



UlSTwRV OK \)Y. KALI; COUNTY. 



583 



•,arcnts till twenty-one years of age, and in 1843 he went to 
l )hio and worked by the month two years, lie then rented 

md in Holmes County till 1849, when he came to De Kalb 
County, Ind., and settled on forty acres of timber land. He 
;lcared a small spot and built a log cabin into which he moved 
his family, and then went to work to improve his farm. He 
lived on this land five years and then sold it and bought eighty 
acres in Steuben County, just across the De Kalb County line, 
where he lived five years. In 1859 he bought 120 acres of land 
across the line from Steuben County, and in 1SS0 bought forty 
acres adjoining, making a fine farm of 160 acres where he now 
lives, which he has improved and has now under a line state of 
cultivation. He was married Nov. 27, 1S45, to Elizabeth Al- 
mendinger, a native of Holmes County, Ohio, daughter of 
Frederick and Annie Almendinger. They had a family of four 
children — Franklin, Henry, Israel and Allen (deceased). His 
wife died Sept. 4, 1S54, and Jan. 25, 1S55, he married Susan 
Anstett, daughter of George and Susan (Stofer) Anstett, natives 
of France, who came to the United States about 1S33, and to 
Dc Kalb County, Ind., about 1854, and thence to Steuben 
County where the father died in 1878, aged eighty years, and 
the mother in 1881. To Mr. and Mrs. Ringler have been born 
twelve children, eight of whom are living — John, Caroline, 
Adtlie, Mary E., George A., Chauncy W., Susan M., and Nellie 
May. Charley, Catherine Jane, Harriet Malinda, and Edward 
L. are deceased. Mr. Ringlcr's father died in 1S83, aged ninety- 
seven years, and his mother in 1S84, aged ninety-three years. 
In politics Mr. Ringler is a Republican. 

Gi-or^c IV. Rota is a native of Holmes County, Ohio, born 
Nov. 14, 1831, a son of Jacob Row, grandson of George Row 
and great-grandson of Frederick Row, who was a soldier in the 
war of the Revolution. Jacob Row was born in Union County, 
Pa., Jan. 1, 1802, and when fifteen years of age went with his 
parents to Holmes County, Ohio, where he grew to manhood 
and married Magdalene Guttery, a native of Harrison County, 
Ohio, daughter of Samuel Guttery, who came from London- 
derry, Ireland, in an early day. In 1S47 they moved to De 
Kalb County, Ind., and entered forty acres of Government land 
and bought forty acres, which he cleared and improved. He 
died Aug. 17, 1S73, an d the mother is now living in Michigan 
in the seventy-third year of her age. They had a family of 



5S4 HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 

eleven children, but five of whom are now living. George \V. 
Row was fifteen years oi age when his parents moved to Dc 
Kalb County, and his youth was spent in assisting his father to 
clear and improve his farm. When twenty years of age he 
learned the shoemaker's trade, at which he has worked at inter- 
vals since, in connection with farming and working at the 
carpenter's trade. He saved his earnings and bought forty 
acres of wild land which he improved, and in 1866 sold it and 
bought the farm where he now lives, which contains nearly 
forty-seven acres of valuable land. When he settled on his 
farm it was heavily timbered with the exception of eighteen 
acres, and that was only partially improved. lie has been an 
energetic, economical man, and now has a pleasant home, lie 
has taken an interest in all the public affairs of the town- 
ship, and has held the office of Constable four years, and Magis- 
trate twelve years. In politics he is a member oi the Green- 
back party. He was married Jan. 1, i860, to Harriet F. Shook, 
a native of Crawford County, Ohio, daughter of Samuel and 
Ann (Shong) Shook. To them have been born four children — 
Albert E., Charles A.. Emma Ann, and Bertha May. Mrs. 
Row is a member of the German Reform church. 

George Rufjicr is a native of Stark County, Ohio, born Feb. 5, 
1830. a son of John and Rachel (Smith) Rufner, natives of Penn- 
sylvania, the former of Berks County, of German descent, and 
and the latter of Adams County, o; German and Irish descent. 
He remained with his parents till the spring of 1853, when he 
moved to De Kalb County and settled in Richland Township 
on land now owned by the Lintz estate. Three years later he 
sold his farm and bought another tract of wild land in the same 
township, where he lived nine years, and in the meantime got 
his land cleared and under good cultivation. He then moved 
to Smithfield Township, where he lived thirteen years, and in 
April, 1S78, moved to Fairfield Township and bought the farm 
of 138 acres where he now lives. His land is all under a good 
state of cultivation, and his improvements are among the best 
in the county. Mr. Rufner was married Nov. 27, 1S51, to 
Nancy Boyer, daughter of John and Mary (Thomas) Boyer, 
natives of Pennsylvania, of German descent. They have had 
four children, but three of whom are living — Eliza Ann, Mary 
Ann and Josiah. Jeremiah is deceased. Oct. 16, 1S59, Mr. 
Rufner united with the German Baptist church, and in June, 



HISTORY OK DE KALB COUNTY. 585 

- 1, he was elected Deacon. June 4, 1874, he was appointed 
ister in the first degree, aud June 8, 1877, minister in the 
: „': degree, and has since been pastor of the church at Cedar 
Lake. His wife and daughters are members oi the same or- 
ganization. 

Andrew Schmid, farmer and stock-raiser, is a native of Stark 
County, Ohio, born June 12, 1830, a son of Fi'ederick and Tho- 
r ;da (Burch) Schmid, natives of Germany. The parents were 
reared and married in their native country, and, with two ch.il- 
| r cn, came to the United States and settled in Columbiana 
County, Ohio, removing later to Stark County. Four of their 
j-even children are living. Andrew was reared on a farm, re- 
maining with his parents till manhood. When seventeen years 
of age he began to work at the carpenter's trade which he fol- 
lowed till 1854, when he came to De Kalb County, Ind., and 
bought a tract of heavily timbered land which he has cleared 
and cultivated, and now has eighty acres of valuable land under 
a good state of cultivation. He was married Aug. 26, 1S52, to 
Susanna Wolf, a native of Columbiana County, Ohio, daughter 
of William and Catherine Wolf, early settlers of Ohio, from 
Pennsylvania. To them have been born six children — William 
X., John W., Henry B., Catherine Ann, Charles (deceased) and 
Edward J. In politics Mr. Schmid is a Democrat. He and 
his wife are members of the German Reform church. 

Charles Sckmipff, farmer and stock-raiser, is one of the promi- 
nent pioneers of Fairfield Township. He is a native of Ger- 
many, born Sept. 8, 1S22, a son oi Michael and Elizabeth 
(Keller) Schmipff. When he was eleven years of age his par- 
ems came to the United Sates, and after a short stay in New 
York City went to Albany, then to Buffalo, and from there to 
Cleveland, Ohio, and thence to Stark County, locating in Aus- 
tinburg, where his father bought a tannery. Charles spent his 
youth in his father's tannery, and when seventeen years of age- 
went to Paris, Ohio, and began to learn the wagon-maker's 
trade, serving an apprenticeship of three years. He then 
worked at his trade till his marriage in 1846, and then moved 
to Steuben County, Ind., and the following spring entered forty 
acres of Government land in Smithfieid Township, De Kalb 
County, on which he lived four years, clearing a part of it. He 
then sold his farm and bought the one on section 3, Fairfield 
Township, where he now lives, and a second time began to 



; 





















580 HISTORY in' UK K.M.I. COUNTY. 

make a (arm out of the timber land of Dc Kalb County. In 
connection with farming he has worked at his trade, and by his 
industrious habits and frugality has accumulated a good prop. 
erty. He was married Jan. iS, 1846, to Eliza Ann Bair, daugh- 
ter of Daniel Bair, one of the early settlers of Stark County, 
Ohio. To them have been born thirteen children, eleven of 
whom are living — Alonzo, Melissa, Catherine, Susan, Amanda, 
Elizabeth, Mary, Charles, Electa, Daniel H., Cora R. The de- 
ceased are Eliza and Martin. Mr. and Mrs. Schmipff are mem- 
bers of the German Reform church. In politics he is a 
Democrat. 

Park Seberts, farmer and stock-raiser, Fairfield Township, was 
born in Knox County, Ohio, July 4, 1S40, a son of Henry and 

J (Park) Seberts, his father a native of German} - and his 

mother of Virginia. In 1S46 his parents moved to Dc Kalb 
County, Ind., and settled in Union Township, where his father 
died in 1850. His mother survived him twenty years and died 
in Richland Township in August, 1870. After the death of his 
father Park found a home with his sister, Mrs. Talbot, of Rich- 
land Township, and remained with her till after the breaking 
out of the Rebellion. Aug. 7, 1S62, he enlisted in Company A, 
Eighty-eighth Indiana Infantry, and participated in the battles 
of Perryville, Stone River, Chickamauga, Lookout Mountain, 
and Mission Ridge. He started on the Atlanta campaign, but 
on account of ill health was sent back to Chattanooga, and was 
in the hospital till his discharge May 26, 1865. Since his re- 
turn from the war he has followed agricultural pursuits. He 
lived in Richland Township till 1868, and then bought the farm 
in Fairfield Township where he now lives. He owns eighty 
acres of valuable land, all well improved with large and com- 
fortable farm buildings. He was married Aug. 14, 1866, to 
Mary J., daughter of Edward Wright. To them have been 
born eight children, five of whom are living — Lila A., Edward 
E., Albert J., Flora O. and Polly. Politically, Mr. Seberts is a 
Republican. 

John Scz/t-r, one of the most prominent farmers and stock- 
raisers in Fairfield Township, was born in Lebanon County, 
Pa., Oct. 15, 1S15, a son of Mathias and Barbara (Curry) Seiler, 
natives of Pennsylvania, of German descent. In 1S32 his par- 
ents moved 10 Wayne County, Ohio, where his mother died at 
the age of fifty-three years, and his father aged ninety-three 



HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 5S7 

r s. He was reared on a farm, but his father being a stone- 
he learned the trade in his youth, and upon reaching his 
.jority went into business with his father, continuing four 
irs. Me subsequently followed his trade alone till 1864, when 
c came to De Kalb County, Ind., and bought the farm of 
, rhty-five acres where he has since lived, in Fairfield Town- 
l,f p. [-lis land is all well cultivated and his residence and farm 
,uildings arc among the best in the township, lie has always 
icen an industrious frugal man, and as a result hasagood home 
and is surrounded by all the comforts of life, lie was married 
Oct. 4, 1838, to Lucetta, daughter of Michael and Catherine 
I Fisher) Reinoehl, a native of Lebanon County, Pa. They are 
tl;e parents of five children — Caroline, wife of Samuel Gallatin, 
of Clark County, 111. ; Cyrus, Treasurer of Elkhart County, 
Ind.: Michael, Professor of mathematical, physical and polit- 
ical geography in Indiana State Normal School, Terre Haute, 
Inch, from which he graduated in 1S76; Franklin, a graduate of 
Eastman College, Poughkeepsie, N. Y.,is by profession a book- 
keeper and teacher ; and John Henry, a graduate of the College 
of Medicine in Michigan University, Ann Arbor, in the class 
of 18S5. 

Ephraim Sliipc, was bom in Westmoreland County, Pa., 
March 31, 1823. His father was born in Lancaster County, Pa., 
Nov. 5, 1S01, and when quite a lad moved with his parents to 
Westmoreland County, where he was married in May, 1822, to 
Catharine Deedes. Both were of German descent. In the 
fall of 1834, when our subject was in his twelfth year, they 
moved to Holmes County, Ohio. His father was in feeble 
health, and being in limited circumstances he was obliged to 
assist in the maintenance of the family, and had no educational 
advantages. When twenty-one years of age he commenced life 
for himself, without even a good suit of clothes, his only capital 
being good health and a determined will. He began to work 
at the carpenter's trade for $S a month and worked for the same 
man four seasons. In the meantime he attended school four 
and a half months. In the winter time when not otherwise em- 
ployed he chopped and split rails and cut cord wood. In the 
fall of 1847 h e pursuaded his father to move to Indiana, and to- 
gether they located in Noble County. Feb. 8, 1S48, he went to 
Ft. Wayne and bought 160 acres of land in Fairfield Township, 
DeKalb County, for $440, paying $110 in cash, and the rest to 



588 HISTORY OF DE KALI; COUNTY. 

be paid in three annua! installments. lie then went to Holmes 
I County to take charge of two contracts he had made before 
leaving Ohio. The following October, having finished his work 
and paid his hands and for his tools, he started for Indiana. 
After making the payment on his land and paying the interest 
he had $2.50 left. Me spent a few days with his parents and 
then proceeded to Dc Kalb County, and began to improve his 
land. Nov. 6, his father died leaving a large family with no 
means for their support. This burden fell on our subject, who 
built a cabin, and Dec. 31 moved his mother and nine children 
into his home. The future indeed was dark, but he was strong 
and went bravely to work. With the added expenses of his 
father's sickness and funeral he was unable to pay for his land 
as soon as he had hoped, but September, 1S52, saw this accom- 
plishment. In the fall of 1850 his mother returned to her 
native county, and during the summer his eldest sisters had left. 
Thus he was without a housekeeper. Oct. 6, 1850, he married 
Sarah, daughter of John Kreighbaum. His mother took her 
youngest child, leaving five to his care. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Shipc were born seven children— A son born Dec. 12, 1851, 
died, aged two weeks; Ellen, born Sept. 14, 1853, died at the 
age of four weeks; Alma, born Dec 21, 1854, is the wife of 
Isaiah Meas ; John, born March 16, 1856, married Mary Eck- 
hart; David, born July 27, 1S57 ; Leonard, born Jan. 23, 1859, 
married Amanda lleaney ; and a son born Jul}' 4, i860, died in 
infancy. His wile died July 5, i860. Jan. 24, 1861, he married 
Elizabeth Krogin, a native of Tuscarawas County, Ohio, born 
in 1S34, a daughter of Daniel and Anna (Charlton) Krogin, the 
former of German anil the latter of Irish descent. The mother 
died at the age of sixty-six years, and the father is still living 
in the eighty-ninth year of his age. Mrs. Shipc removed with 
her brother-in-law, Samuel Tetcrs, to Steuben Count) - in her nine- 
teenth year, and worked for her own support till her marriage. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Shipc have been born six children — Sarah A., 
born Dec. 29, 1861, is the wife of Emra Teal; Ida Jane, born 
Feb. 20, 1S63, died aged ten years and tour months; Catharine 
I., born Oct. 16, 1864, wife of John Norman; Frank, born Oct. 
1, 1S65, died in infancy; Elizabeth, born Oct. 25, 1S67, died 
aged two years and two months; Mary, born Dec. 16, 1S71. 
In ins finances Mr. Shipe has overcome all difficulties and has 
; accumulated sufficient property to maintain him in comfort in 



HISTORY OK !>!• KAI 



589 



his declining years. In 1869 he built a brick kiln on his farm, 
and in 1S72 built the first brick house in Fairfield Township. 
In January, 1S66, he and his wife united with the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and have since been faithful to its tenets and 
earnest workers in the cause of Christianity. In all his business 
transactions Mr. Shipe has endeavored to be honorable and 
prompt to fill every obligation, and has thus gained an enviable 
reputation among all with whom lie has had any deal. In poli- 
tics he has been a life-long Democrat. Although he has never 
aspired to official honors, he was elected Justice of the Peace in 
1S60, and served efficiently four years. He was drafted into 
the service of the Union in 1S64, but being in poor health and 
having a family of small children, he sent a substitute, giving 
him SS25. Mr. Snipe's experience is a lesson to all young men 
in limited circumstances, as his prosperity is but the result of a 
life of hard work and economy, undaunted by trials, but with 
determination overriding all obstacles, and coming off conqueror 
at last. 

Jonathan Shook, farmer and stock-raiser, is a native of Ohio, 
born in Jefferson Township, Stark County, Nov. 19, 1835, a son 
of Jonathan and Mary (Strawser) Shook, natives of Pennsyl- 
vania, of German descent. When two years of age he was 
bound to Frederick Strawser for his board and clothes till six- 
teen years old. He then worked for farmers for wages till 
twenty-one years old, when he went to Pennsylvania to visit 
his father, whom he had never seen. His father was a black- 
smith, and he went to his shop and asked for a night's lodging, 
not thinking his father would know him. But his father immedi- 
ately recognized who he was, and they had a pleasant visit of 
four days, lie then returned to Ohio, and the next year began 
to work at the carpenter's trade, which he followed fourteen 
years. He was married Aug. 31, 1S54, to Rebecca Conrad, a 
native of Summit County, Ohio, a daughter of Jacob and Re- 
becca (Fisher) Conrad, natives of Pennyslvania. In 1S62 he 
rented a farm and followed agricultural pursuits till the fall 
of 1S65, when he came to De Kalb County, Ind., and settled on 
his present farm in Fairfield Township. He owns eighty acre^ 
of choice land, and his residence and farm buildings are large 
and comfortable. To Mr. and Mrs. Shook have been born 
eight children — Elma (deceased), Harriet, Nelson, David, 
Emery, Benjamin, Mary and Frank. In politics Mr. Shook is 



5<p IMS'] OKY ()!'' DM KAMI I < HJN'I V. 

.. Democrat. lie and his wife arc members ol the Reform 

church. 

George Slay man, deceased, was born in Cumberland Count)-, 
Pa., May 27, 1824, and died in De Kalb County, inch, Feb. 2, 
1SS1. He was a son of John and Susannah (Gross) Slayman, 
natives of Pennsylvania, of German descent. His mother died 
when he was an infant, and when he was three years old his 
father moved to Wayne County, Ohio, where he was reared, 
and was married Feb. 26, 1S47, to Miss Barbara Bales, a native 
of Wayne County, Ohio, daughter of David and Anna (Mor- 
gan) Bales, natives of Westmoreland County, Pa., of German 
descent. The following fall they moved to De Kalb County, 
Ind., and settled on forty acres of wild land his father had en- 
tered from the Government. Fie bought forty acres adjoining 
this, and at once went to work to clear and improve a farm. 
Me was successful in his agricultural pursuits, and added to his 
first purchase till he had a landed estate of 455 acres, all under 
cultivation. In politics he was a Democrat. Although he had 
no aspiration for official honors, he took an active interest in all 
public affairs and was ready with both time and means to assist 
any enterprise of benefit to his town or county. In his death 
Fairfield Township lost one of her most worthy and esteemed 
citizens, and his family a kind husband and indulgent and affec- 
tionate father. To Mr. and Mrs. Slayman were born eight chil- 
dren, but live of whom arc living — Rebecca Ann, Sarah E., 
Maria J., Mary E. and Arwilda E. Ida Belle and an infant son 
and daughter are deceased. Mrs. Slayman is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, and takes an active part in all the 
work of the church of her choice. She is a benevolent, kind 
woman, and is beloved by her neighbors and esteemed by all 
who know her. 

Harrison Smith, one of the most prominent of Fairfield's j 
pioneers, was born in Genesee County, N. Y., Oct. 23, 1S24, a 
son of Enos and Clarissa (Jones) Smith, the former a native of 
Rhode Island, and the latter of New Hampshire, of English de- 
scent. Flis mother died when he was a boy, and his father sub- i 
sequently took his children to Crawford County, Pa., remain- 
ing there three years, thence to Huron County, Ohio, remain- 
ing there till 1S44, when he came to De Kalb County, Ind., and 
settled on a tract of wild land. He bought forty acres and at 
once began to clear and improve it. Our subject was reared a 



---' I- 1 



59' 



farmer and by practicing the lessons taught mm in Ins youth, 
has been successful, and now owns 107 acres ol land, eighty acres 
under cultivation and the rest timber land. His farm buildings 
are large and convenient. His lather died at his home Oct. 10, 
i860, aged eighty-five years, nine months and one day. Mr. 
Smith was married Aug. 12, 1852, to Elizabeth Rohrer, a native 
of Holmes County, Ohio, daughter of David and Sarah (Wible) 
Rohrer, who came from Pennsylvania to Holmes County in an 
early day, and to DcKalb County in 1S47. Mr. and Mrs. Smith 
have had five children, but two of whom are living — David 
Edward and Walter D. Sarah J., Martha E. and Rebecca Ann 
are deceased. Mrs. Smith is a member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church. Politically he is a Democrat. 

James Stonebraker, a native of Holmes Count)', Ohio, born 
Feb. 2, 1845, is tnC second son of Daniel and Eliza (Gilmore) 
Stonebraker. He was but three years old when his mother 
died, and but four when he lost his father. He was reared by 
strangers, working for his board and attending school as soon 
as he was old enough. July I, 1862, he enlisted in Company 
D, Seventy-fourth Indiana Infantry, and participated in many 
hard-fought battles, among others Chickamauga, Mission Ridge 
and Altoona. At the latter he was wounded in the right hand, 
and was in the hospital nine months, never again being able 
to join his regiment. He was discharged May 25, 1865, and 
returned to Dc Kalb County, where he has since followed ag- 
ricultural pursuits. In 1875 lie settled on a part of his father's 
old homestead, and now owns 145 acres of choice land. In 
1S81 his residence was destroyed by lire, but the following sum- 
mer he built his large two-story residence with all modern im- 
provements, which is one of the finest in the township. Mr. 
Stonebraker was married April 7, 1871, to Rebecca A., daugh- 
ter of George and Barbara (Bales) Slayman. They have a 
family of three children — Celia R., Minnie S., and Jesse II. In 
politics Mr. Stonebraker affiliates with the Republican party. 

John M. Stonebraker was born in Holmes County, Ohio, Jan. 
27, 1S42, the eldest of four children of Daniel and Eliza ^Gil- 
more) Stonebraker. His father was a native of Ohio, born 
June 8, 1817, and lived in his native State till 1S50, when he 
moved to De Kalb County, Inch, and settled in Fairfield Town- 
ship, buying seventy acres of land and subsequently adding 
eighty acres to it. His wife died in 1^53, and the same year 



592 



HISTORY OF UE KALC COUNTY 



he married again. Me died Sept. 24, 1S54. After the death of 
his father John M. found a home in the family of his guardian, 
J. M. Brumback, with whom he lived most of the time till after 
the breaking out of the Rebellion. Aug. 27, 1S61, he enlisted 
in Company B, Twenty-ninth Indiana Infantry, and partici- 
pated in the battles of Shiloh and Stone River. At the latter 
battle he was wounded in the right leg, and for six months was 
unable to perform any active duty. Nov. 13, 1863, he was 
transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps, and was sent to 
Chicago where he remained till the expiration of his term of 
enlistment. He was discharged Aug. 27, 1864, and returned to 
De Kalb County, and worked most of the time in a saw-mill 
till 1S67, when he began farming on the old homestead. He has 
a fine farm of 100 acres, and his improvements are among the 
best in the county. He was married March 12, 1S67, to Har- 
riet, daughter of George and Almond (Page) Drowley. Thev 
have had six children — Otelia May, George M., Mary Bessie, 
John G., Louie, and Nellie (deceased). Mrs. Stonebraker is a 
member of the United Brethren church. Politically he is a 
Republican. 

Henry Stomm, farmer and stock-raiser, is a native of Baden, 
Germany, born March 24, 1S33, a son of George and Margaret 
(Holtzworth) Stomm. When he was fifteen years of age he 
began to learn the weaver's trade, serving an apprenticeship of 
three years. He then worked as a journeyman two years, 
when he was drafted into the German army, but before he was 
mustered in he left the country and came with his parents to the 
United States. They located in Stark County, Ohio, but in 
the spring of 1S54 he came to De Kalb County, lnd., and 
bought a tract of land in Fairfield Township, and the following 
spring sent to Stark County for his parents. His lather was 
born in 1S02 and died in 1S74. His mother died April 3, 1S84, 
aged eighty-three years. His land was unimproved, but a very 
little having been cleared of the timber, but he went bravely to 
work and now has about 160 acres of the best land in the town- 
ship, all under cultivation. His residence and farm buildings 
are among the best in the county. He was married Jan. 9 
1S56, to Maria Gctts, daughter of William ana Eliza (Hosier) 
Getts, early settlers of De Kalb County. To them were born 
ten children, eight of whom are living — Daniel, Eliza E., Moses, 
William, Mary L., Nore A. and Cora A. (twins), and Clara A. 



1USTOKY OF Dli KAI.l; COUNTY. 593 

Sarah C. and Amanda arc deceased. Mrs. Stomm died Oct. i, 
1SS2, and Jan. 22, 1SS5, Mr. Stomm married Mrs. Catherine 
Bickle, a native of Berks County, Pa., burn in 183S, daughter 
of Conrad and Mary A. Schreber, and widow of Henry Bickle. 
Mr. and Mrs. Stomm arc memberb of the German Reform 
church. In politics lie affiliates with the Democratic party. 

John T. Urcy, deceased, was a native of Coshocton County, 
Ohio, born June C\ 1828, a son o! George and Nancy (Thomp- 
son) Urey, natives of Jefferson County, Ohio. lie was reared 
on a farm, receiving a good common-school education. lie re- 
mained with his parents till his marriage, and then engaged in 
farming for himself. In the fall of 1S64 he moved to De Kalb 
County, Ind., and settled on a tract of wild land on section 23, 
Fairfield Township, which he cleared and improved, making a 
good farm, on which he lived till his death, Jan. 31, 1S79. He 
was a public spirited, energetic citizen, and was influential in 
promoting many enterprises of benefit to his township. He 
was a member of the German Baptist church, and most exem- 
plary Christian. He was married Dec. 29, 1S59, to Elizabeth 
Hostetter, daughter of Jacob and Esther (Arnold) Hostctter, of 
German descent, who moved from Somerset County, Pa., to 
Coshocton County, Ohio, when Mrs. Urey was filteen years of 
age, and thence to St. Joseph County, Ind., where the father 
died and the mother still lives. To Mr. and Mrs. Urey were 
born six children — George, John H., Samuel C, Nancy E., 
Rebecca E., and Etta May. The first three are school-teachers 
in this count}'. Mrs. Urey is a member of the German Baptist 
church. 

Samuel Watts, farmer and stock-raiser, Fairfield Township, 
was born in Lancaster County, Pa., March 30, 1821, a son of 
George and Rachel (Zimmerman) Watts, natives of Pennsyl- 
vania. His grandfather, Thomas Watts, was a native of Ire- 
land and came to the United States prior to the war ..; the 
Revolution. His maternal grandparents were natives of Ger- 
many. When he was twelve years oi age Iris parents moved 
to Holmes County, Ohio, where he lived with them till eighteen 
years of age, working in the meantime to assist in the maintenance 
of the family. In 1S49 ne came to De Kalb County, Ind., and 
bought a wild tract of land in Fairfield Township. Returning 
to Ohio he worked at the carpenter's trade till he had paid for 
his land, and in 1S59 came again to De Kalb County and began 



504 HISTORY OV DE KALIi COUM rY. 

to clear and improve his frontier farm. He lias by industry 
and economy been successful and now has 200 acres of valuable 
land under a good state of cultivation. lie was married June 
16, 1853, to Barbara Gardner, daughter of John and Barbara 
(Camp) Gardner. To them have been born four children, two 
of whom are living — Josiah and William II. John and Sarah 
are deceased. In politics Mr. Watts is a Democrat. He is one 
of the most enterprising and public-spirited men of the town- 
ship, and is esteemed by all who know him. 

Adam Weirich, farmer and stock-raiser, is a native of Lebanon 
Count)', Pa., born July 16, 1S27, the youngest son of John and 
Elizabeth (Rupe) Weirich. When he was four years of age his 
parents moved to Wayne County, Ohio, and there he grew to 
manhood, living with his parents till his maturity. He then ' 
learned the blacksmith's trade, serving an apprenticeship of two 
years. He worked as a journeyman two years and engaged in 
business for himself two years in Stark County and then re- 
turned to Wayne County and followed his trade till 1S5S, when 
he moved to De Kalb County, lad., and settled on a tract of 
second-handed land he had previously bought. This he has 
cleared and improved and to his original purchase of ninety 
acres has added thirty-five acres, having now a fine farm of 125 
acres, lie has also worked at his trade in connection with 
tanning and has been very successful, having acquired a com- 
petency for his old age. lie was married Oct. 8, 1852, to Mar- 
tha Sidle, a native oi York County, l J a., daughter of Jacob and 
Catherine (Wise) Sidle. They have had seven children — 
Martha E., wife oi W. II. Gardner; Adam S., Jacob M., Sarah 
J., Samuel M., James W. and Catherine E. Mr. and Mrs. 
Weirich are members of the Lutheran church. Politically he 
is a Democrat. 

Jacob Weirich is a native of Lancaster County, Pa., born May 
8, 1S23, the eighth of twelve children of John and Elizabeth 
(Rupe) Weirich, natives of Pennsylvania, of German parent- 
age. When he was four years of age his parents moved to 
Wayne County, and he lived with them on a farm till sixteen 
years of age. He then began to learn the shoemaker's trade, 
serving an apprenticeship of two and a half years. After work- 
ing some time as a journeyman he engaged in business for him- 
self, and in 1S50 came to De Kalb County, Ind., and bought 
forty acres of wild land on section iC, Fairfield Township. To 



HISTORY OF 



A.LB COUNTY. 



this he afterward added ten acres, and after getting it partially 
improved sold it and bought the 120 acres which is now his fine 
farm, which he has brought from a wild-timbered state to one 
of advanced cultivation. He was married April 11, 1844,10 
Caroline Reinoehl, a native of Lebanon County, Pa., daughter 
of John and Catherine (Johnson) Reinoehl, early settlers of 
Wayne County. They have had a family of seven children, four 
of whom are living — Joseph, Jesse, John and Alice, wife of 
Samuel Smith. In politics Mr. VVeirich is a Democrat. 

Martin Wetzel, farmer and stock-raiser, is a native of Ger- 
many, born May 4, 1834, a son of Andrew and Caterlyc (Smith) 
Wetzel. When he was twenty years of age, in 1 S54, he came 
to the United States, landing in New York Nov. 26, and from 
there proceeded to Ohio, finally locating in Erie County, where 
he worked three years by the month. He was married Nov. 22, 
1857, to Elizabeth Hahn, a daughter of John and Barbara (Men- 
dell) Hahn, who came to America from Germany in July, 1857. 
After his marriage he rented land in Erie County till the fall 
of 1863, and Nov. 1 came to De Kalb Count)', Ind., and bought 
forty acres of land in Fairfield Township, twenty of which 
were partially improved. To this he has added forty acres, 
and now has a fine farm of eighty acres, with a pleasant resi- 
dence and good farm buildings. Sept. 27, 1S64, he enlisted in 
the Twenty-ninth Indiana Infantry and served till June 26, 1865. 
While he was in the army, Feb. 22, 1S65, h' s w 'f e died, leaving 
four children, three of whom are living — Kate, Lucy and John. 
Margaret died Oct. 8, 1S65, aged eight months. Sept. iS, 1865. 
Mr. Wetzel married Elizabeth Hommerhouse, widow of John 
Hommerhouse, and sister of his first wife. She died April 15, 
1 $73, leaving six children — Augustus, John, Margaret, Christo- 
pher, Martha and Lydia, the first two being children by her 
first marriage. March 15, 18S3, Mr. Wetzel married Mrs. Eliz- 
abeth Booran, daughter of Michael Treesh. She was first mar- 
ried to Frederick Rhom, who left three children. She then 
married William Booran, by whom she has one child — Francis 
Martin. Mr. and Mrs. Wetzel are members of the Evangelical 
Lutheran church. Politically he is a Democrat. 

Samuel F. White, farmer and stock-raiser, is one of the most 
prominent and influential citizens of Fairfield Township. He- 
was born in Hamilton County, Ohio, Jan. 7, 180S, a son of 
James and Jane (Mitchell) White, natives of Ireland, where they 



_y/) iiistoky i >r 1.1: KAl.li coi n : V. 

were married and subsequently came to the United States, and 
settled first in Pennsylvania, moving to Hamilton County sev- 
eral years later, and when Samuel was a child, to Covington, 
Ky., where his lather died in 1S14. His mother afterward re- 
turned to Hamilton County, and about [824 moved to Guern- 
sey County, Ohio, where he grew to manhood. He was mar- 
ried Dec. 10, 1S33 > to Hannah Salt, daughter of Hugh and Eliz- 
abeth (Hivcly) Salt. They settled in Morrow County, Ohio, 
where they lived till September, 1853, and then moved to Dc 
Kalb County, Ind., and bought 132 acres of land, but a small 
part of which had been cleared of timber. Of this land he has 
made a fine farm, and is now one of the most prosperous citi- 
zens of the township. To Mr. and Mrs. White have been born 
eight children, but three of whom arc living — James M., John 
()., and Albert M. The two eldest, James and John, were 
soldiers in the war of the Rebellion. In politics Mr. White 
was originally a Whig, but since its organization has affiliated 
with the Republican party. He and his wife are members of 
the Evangelical church. 

William P. Wiley, farmer and stock-raiser, was born in Jun- 
iata County, Pa., May 22, iSu.a son of Samuel and Nancy 
(Porter) Wiley. His father was a native of Pennsylvania, of 
Scotch descent, a sun of Samuel Wiley, a soldier in the war of 
the Revolution. In 1X12 his parents moved to Ohio and settled 
in Miami County where he grew to manhood. When sixteen 
years of age he began to work at the blacksmith's trade, and 
served an apprenticeship of four years. He then worked as a 
journeyman eight years. In 1839 he moved to Pickaway, Ohio, 
and engaged in business for himself four years; thence to John- 
son's Mills, and two years later to Lockport. In 1848 he came 
to De Kalb County, Ind., and settled on the farm where he now 
lives in Fairfield Township. He bought 333 acres of wild land 
which he has cleared and improved, and now has one of the 
finest farms in the township. He was married Sept. iS, 1834, 
to Mary J. Winans, a native of Miami County, Ohio, daughter 
of Anthony and Hannah (Freeman) Winans. They have had a 
family of eight children, five of whom are living — Hannah, 
Catherine, Mary, Harriet and David. The deceased are Nancy 
E., Sarah Maria and Collista. Mr. and Mrs. Wiley are mem- 
bers of the Disciples church. He cast his first vote for Presi- 
dent Jackson, and has since affiliated with the Democratic party. 



■■■ 












\S 






<;l Qso^ c/IZ/fjcl^t^TTrCf/^^ — 



'yrm 



HISTORY OF DE KALI; COUNTY. 597 

William H. Wilscy, farmer and stock-raiser, was born in 
Greene Count)-, N. Y., July 10, 1821, a son of Isaac and Jane 
(Carpenter) Wilscy, the former a native of New York, of Hol- 
land descent, and the latter of Puritan ancestry. When he was 
a child his parents moved to New Jersey, and in 1839 t0 Tomp- 
kins County, N, Y., where he lived till 1S45, when he came to 
Indiana and entered forty acres of Government land in Dc 
Kalb County, lie built a small cabin into which he moved his 
family, and began to make a home out of a tract of timber land. 
He cleared and cultivated his land, and by industry and good 
management has been successful, ami has added to his land till 
he now owns 120 acres all well improved. He has erected 
good buildings on his farm, and has one of the pleasantcst and 
most convenient homes in the township. He was married Jan. 
25, 1S43, to Ursula Jane Haskins, a native of Rutland County, 
Vt., daughter of Arisand Sarah (Warner) Haskins. They have 
had a family of eight children, but four of whom are living — 
Mary Jane, wile of George W. Anstett ; Elizabeth Ann, wife of 
Walter W. Crise; John W. and Henry E. Sarah M., Sarah 
H., Charles L., and Frank E. are deceased. In politics Mr. 
Wilsey is a Democrat. He has served his township two terms 
as Trustee. Mrs. Wilsey is a member of the Evangelical 
church. 

Jacob Wiltrout, deceased, was a native of Pennsylvania, born 
in 1806. When a young man he emigrated to Summit County, 
Ohio, and was there married to Sarah Kendall, a native of Penn- 
sylvania. In 1S52 they moved to De Kalb County, Ind., and 
settled in Richland Township, where the mother died in 1857, 
aged forty-two years. In 1S63 he moved to Fairfield Town- 
ship and settled on the farm now owned by his sons, where he 
died in March, 1875. His family consisted of four children, 
three sons and a daughter. The daughter, Alice, died before 
the mother, aged two years. One son, William R., was a soldier 
in the war of the Rebellion, and died at Washington from the 
effects of his exposure and hardships, aged twenty years. The 
remaining sons are Benjamin S., born in 1S39, and Franklin W., 
born Dec. 22, 1849. The latter was about three years old when 
his parents moved to De Kalb County. Here he was reared 
and educated, and since attaining manhood has given his atten- 
tion to agricultural pursuits. He now owns a part of the old 
homestead, his farm containing no acres of valuable land. He 



598 HISTORY OF DE KALI, COUNTY. 

was married Oct. 9, 1878, to Maria Elizabeth, daughter of 
Francis Bcuchat. To them have been born four children, but 
three of whom are living — Mary M., Essie May and Amos H. 
William F. died aged three months and twelve days. In pol- 
itics Mr. Wiltrout is a Republican. 

Edward Wright, retired farmer, is a native of New York, born 
Jan. 30, 1 8 10, a son of Jcphtha and Betsey (Gordon) Wright, 
natives of New Hampshire, of Scotch and English descent. lie 
was married April 26, 1832, to Polly Barry, daughter of John 
and Eve (Failing) Barry. Her grandfather and his sister were 
captured by the French during the French and Indian war 
and taken to Canada. The sister was soon after released, but 
he was held and exchanged as a prisoner of war. Mrs. Wright 
died Feb. 14, 18S 5, after sharing the hardships and privations 
and the comforts and pleasures of married life with her hus- 
band nearly fifty-three years. Their family consisted of six 
children, four of whom arc living — Louisa, wife of Moses Gon- 
ser; Elizabeth, wile of Jacob Ringer; George J., of Osborn, 
Kas., and Mary J., wife of Park Sebert. Hiram and Celestia 
died in childhood. George J. was a soldier in the war of the 
Rebellion, enlisting in the Seventy-fourth Indiana Infantry. In 
December, 1S63, on account of ill health, he was transferred to 
the Veteran Reserve Corps, where he served till his discharge, 
July 17, 1S65. In 1837 Mr. Wright left his native State and 
located asout twenty miles from Detroit, where he kept a hotel 
during the building of the first railroad from Detroit to Chi- 
cago. In 1838 he moved to Steuben County, Ind., and settled 
on eighty acres of land his father had entered the year before. 
In the spring of 1839 he built a cabin into which he moved his 
family and began making a farm. Pie added to his land till he 
had 160 acres and made it his home till the winter of l847-'8, 
when he moved to Fairfield Center and engaged in the mer- 
cantile business and in the manufacture of potash and pcarlash, 
shipping to New York, and thence to England. In 1S60 he 
moved to Sedan where he ran an ashery three or four years. Sell- 
ing this, he bought about thirty acres of land and built a tan- 
nery, and also manufactured gloves and mittens a number of 
years. He then in company with his son-in-law, Park Sebert, 
bought eighty acres of land, and subsequently added more to it 
till they had a large farm. They afterward divided their land, 
and Mr. Wright now has a good farm of 116 acres. He was 



IISTORV 



A!.:. CI lUNTY. 



599 



postmaster at Fairfield Center three or four years, and was the 
.econd Postmaster at Sedan. He has also served as Trustee of 
Fairfield Township. In politics he is a Republican. 

Anthony Zenker, one of the successful and well-known pioneers 
u f DeKalb County, was born near Lancaster, Pa., Sept. 23, 1818, 
.1 son of Joseph and Elizabeth (Rode) Zonkcr, natives of Swit- 
zerland, who came to the United States after their marriage and 
settled in Pennsylvania. In 1S25 they moved to Stark County, 
Ohio, where our subject-grew to manhood. The father died in 
Seneca County, Ohio, aged sixty-five years, and the mother 
near Avilla, Ind., aged eighty-two years. In 1S45 Mr. Zonker 
came to De Kalb County, Ind., and bought 130 acres of unim- 
proved land, which he commenced to clear and improve. In 
1S55 he sold his land and bought a saw-mill on the outlet of In- 
dian Lake, which he ran ten years. He was successful, and in 
the mean time bought a large tract of land, and subsequently 
quit his mill and has since given his attention to agricultural 
pursuits. He now owns 500 acres of choice land, the greater 
part under cultivation. Mr. Zonkcr was married July 16, 1846, 
to Elizabeth Hosier, a native of Stark County, Ohio, daughter 
of Michael Hosier. The}- have had a family of nine children, 
six of whom are living — Mary J., Margaret Ann, Wayne A., 
John Edward, William A. and Eliza Ellen. Samuel, Eli and 
Emma are deceased. Mr. Zonker is one of the most practical 
and thorough farmers of the township, and has always taken 
an active interest in the growth and development of the county. 
In politics he is a Democrat. 




CHAPTER XV. 

franklin township. 

Situation.— Geography and Topography.— Organization. 

— John Houlton, the First Settler of the County.— 
Other Pioneers. — Roads, Mills and Markets.— First 
Election. — Early Preachers, School-Houses and 
schools. — Population. — Property and Taxation.— Ag- 
ricultural Statistics. — Reminiscences of John Houl- 
ton. — Anecdote of Beecher. — John Driscal.— Nearest 
Neighbors. — Early Township Officials. — Biographical. 
The township bearing this name is situated in the northeast- 
ern part of De Kalb Count} - , in the northern tier. It is bounded 
on the north by Steuben County (Otsego Township), on the 
east by Troy Township, on the south by Wilmington Town- 
ship, and on the west by Smithfield Township. It is watered 
by the tributary headwaters of Cedar Creek and Fish Creek, 
and has two small lakes on its northern border. It contains 
neither railroad nor village, the nearest trading point bein^ 
Butler, on the Michigan Southern Railroad, near the south line. 
The land is generally very good, and is worth, on an average, 
S40 an acre, while forty years ago it was selling at the Gov- 
ernment price of Si. 2 5 per acre. It was originally heavily 
timbered, but a good proportion has now been reduced to cul- 
tivation. Franklin is the oldest township in the county, both 
in organized existence and in priority of settlement. 

The first act of the first Board of Commissioners of De Kalb 

County, July -*■■ i%$?, was, after ft] pointing n§i , \ ■ ■ 

to provide for the organization of Franklin Township, with the 
following boundaries: " Commencing at the northeast corner 
of said county (De Kalb), thence west to the corners of ranges 
13 and 14 east, townships 35 and 36 north, thence south six 
miles to township 34 north, ranges 13 and 14 east, thence east 
on the town line to the east line of said county, thence north to 
the place of beginning; the above shall constitute the first town- 
ship in De Kalb County." 

GOO 



6oi 



The Board (Peter Fair and Samuel Widney) then appointed 
-Peter Boyer for Inspector of Elections for township No. i in 
I said county of De Kalb, and do order a writ of election for one 
I Justice of the Peace for said township on the first Monday of 
! August next (1837), and do also appoint Isaac T. Aldrich for 
I Constable of said township, to serve until his successor is 
! chosen and qualified, and do also appoint John Holton for Su- 
pervisor ol said township No. 1, and district No. 1, in said 
! county of De Kalb." The limits thus provided made Franklin 
i to include what is now Troy Township, in addition to its pres- 
ent territory ; but some years afterward Troy was organized, 
leaving Franklin of its present dimensions, six miles square. 

John Houlton, the pioneer of De Kalb County, built his rude 
log dwelling on the bank of Fish Creek in the northeastern 
corner of the township in 1833. For a time he was the sole- 
resident of the woods. Two years elapsing, his loneliness was 
then relieved by John Smith locating on section 4, where B. 
F. Greenwood afterward lived and died. 

In 1836 the first few arrivals of pioneers began to come in 
and locate their future homes. Abner Smith entered part of 
section 9; Abram Beecher settled on section 4, a near neigh- 
j bor to John Smith: Luther Keep settled on section 8 where 
I Orrin Keep afterward lived ; Charles Crain, a shoemaker by 
! trade, cleared and built where Isaac Loutzenleizer afterward 
j lived ; and besides these there came Willis O. Hyde, Peter 
Boyer, Jacob Myers, Michael Boyer and Messrs. Deming and 
Corwright. In October of this year George Firestone and 
family moved in, driving his stock, and hauling his goods in a 
wagon by oxen, and on the iSth arrived on that part of section 
23, which he cleared and made his life-long home. While build- 
ing his cabin he enjoyed the hospitality of Michael Boyer, and 
between these two an enduring friendship was then contracted. 
iuppllsi Of wheat and GQrn *V§f§ obtained by these pioneers 
on Jackson Prairie. The rifle was speedily brought Inta 
service to provide venison, and intervals of rest from labor 
were spent in making acquaintances; among these being mem- 
bers of a roving band of Pottawatomie Indians. The land was 
heavily timbered, yet the settlers speedily Idled and cleared 
small tracts and planted buckwheat, corn and potatoes. In the 
spring of 1837 grists were taken to the Union Mills in La- 
grange, distant thirty miles, and several days were required to 



602 HISTORY 01' DK KM. IS COUNTY. 

make Lhc journey. The pioneer roads were mere trails, bushed 
and logged by the scaler in advance of his team. The first 
roads laid out in Franklin were the Defiance and Lima State 
road and the Fort Wayne and Lima State road, forming a junc- 
tion a half mile cast of Hamilton. 

Among the arrivals in 1837 were Daniel Kepler, Samuel Kep- j 
ler, Arial Rood, Cranel Rood, Grant Bowers, M. L. Wheeler, 
John Matson, Elisha Waterman and John Farley. Later came 
Jason Hubbell, Daniel McEntarfer, William Letz, Levi Nelson, • 
John and Edward Jackman, Preston Bowman, Cyrus Bowman, 
and James Bowman. 

The voters who attended the first township election, in Au- 
gust, 1837, were twelve in number, and they chose Abram F. 
Bcecher as Commissioner, and Luther Buck as Justice of the 
Peace. At the next election, held at the house of George Fire- 
stone on the first Monday in April, 1838, thirty-five votes were , 
polled, and John Linsey was elected Justice. Irregularity in mak- 
ing the returns prevented the receipt of commissions. The first 
legal election was held in the spring of 1839, at tne house of M. 
L. Wheeler, he being chosen Justice of the Peace, and George 
Firestone, Constable. 

Early preachers in the township were Addison Coleman, a 
Methodist, and Elder Staley, a Baptist. The latter preached 
his first sermon at the house of John Houlton in 1S37. The 
first church organization took place in 1843, at Kepler's, now 
Haverstock's Corners. Here the denomination, the Evangeli- 
cal Lutheran, under the pastoral care of Rev. James Cather, 
ilourished, meetings being held in the school-house. A church 
building was erected in 185 1 by Elisha W. Beard. Reorganiza- 
tion was effected by Jacob Seidle, who, dying, the church was 
completed during the pastorate of Rev. William Waltman. 
Rev. John McCurdy was the first local minister. The fifteen 
members who reorganized the church were : Samuel Haver- 
stock and wife, George Firestone, wife and daughter, Elizabeth 
King, William Oberlin and wife, John Eckhart and wife, Elias '< 
Kepler and wife, William Ashley and wife, and a Mrs. Kene- 
strick. A wonderfully effective revival resulted in January, 
1S70, from the efforts of Revs. John McCurdy and James 
Cather, and about seventy-five were converted, of whom about 
thirty joined that class. The society enjoyed another remark- 
able revival in January and February, 1872, conducted by Rev. 



ISTORY 



DE :. \. .; COUNTY. 



' , 



Nathan Pcdychord. In 1S83 the place of worship was removed 
to College Comers school-house, and the society again reorgan- 
ized as the College Corners M. E. Church. The membership 
at this time was about twenty-live, and the pastor was Rev. C. 
II. Wilkinson. For a year past the society has had no regular 
services. C. M. Lewis is class-leader and superintendent of the 
Sunday-school. At College Corners also is the Church of God, 
whose members arc called also Winebrenncrians. This society 
was organized with about twenty members, in March, 1885., by 
Rev. Mr. Fuller. J. W. Shultz is class-leader. 

Belle Fountain U. B. church, situated on section 2, on the 
Belle Fountain road, was organized in February, 1S58, in the 
Houlton school-house on section 1 1. The society was formed at 
the close of a series of meetings held by Rev. Mr. Crosslin. 
They worshiped for some time in the school-house, and then 
in an unoccupied dwelling on section 2, opposite where Samuel 
Kepler now lives. In 1862 they built their present commodious 
house of worship, 30 x 40 feet, with a fine spire. There are 
now forty-five communicants. Services are held on alternate 
Sundays by Rev. George Robinet, and prayer-meetings on 
Wednesday evenings and on alternate Sundays. The Sunday- 
school is kept up six months in each year. 

Jerusalem U. B. church was organized at Jerusalem school- 
house on section 24, in March, 1882, by Rev. Alonzo Gaff, with 
seven members. The next year Rev. Aaron Lilly was pastor, 
and in 1884, the pulpit was filled by Rev. Mr. Brown. The 
present minister, Rev. James Martin, commenced his labors in 
January, 1885. There arc now about forty communicants. Ser- 
vices arc held every other Sunday, and prayer-meetings every 
Thursday night and on alternate Sunday evenings. Sunday- 
school is maintained six months in each year. 

The first school-house was built on section 12, the present 
site of No. 1, and was known in 1S40 as the Houlton school- 
house. The first teacher was Miss Lucy Orton, of Angola, 
Steuben County. The first physician was William Sheldon, 
who resided for a year on section 2. At an early day a saw- 
mill was built at Taylor's Corners, and this was also the site of 
a post-office. The latter has long since been discontinued. A 
good grist-mill known as the Franklin Mills is located on Fish 
Creek in the northeastern part of the township, ft was erected 
in 1856, by Samuel Kepler. 



604 HISTORY OF DK KAI.I! COUNTY. 

The population of Franklin in 1SS0 was 1,231, or 34 to the 
square mile. This is a decrease of 12 from the population in 
1S70. In [S84 the rate of taxation was $1.61 ; poll tax, Si. 50; 
number of acres of land, 22,493.14 ; value of lands, $320,298 ; 
value of improvements, $46,377 ; value of lands and improve- 
ments, $366,675 ; value of personal property, §88,860 ; total 
value of taxables, $455,535 ; number of polls, 204; number of 
children of school age, 409 ; valuation per capita, $372.89. 

In 18S1 Franklin had 3,706 acres in wheat, producing 25,942 
bushels, or 7 bushels per acre ; 2,343 acres in corn, produc- 
ing 5S.575 bushels, or 25 bushels per acre ; 1, 491 acres in oats, 
producing 52,185 bushels, or 35 bushels per acre; 6^0 acres in 
meadow, producing S50 tons of hay, or a ton and a quarter per 
acre ; S6 acres in potatoes, producing 4,300 bushels, or 50 
bushels per acre. 

REMINISCENCES. 

From John Houlton's narrative in " Pioneer Sketches," we 
extract the following: 

" When the county was organized, Sheriff Park came here, 
put up notices for an election of county officers, and appointed 
me Inspector. 1 chose Luther Keep and A. F. Beecher, Judges. 
In organizing the township, Mr. Keep, being the oldest man 
told me that as I was the first settler I should name the town- 
ship ; and we agreed together on the name of Franklin. This is a 
good township ; though not so ' propitiously blest as Butler, 
flowing with milk and honey.' True, honey was very plenty, 
yet milk was tolerably scarce, till after a while we got some 
cows in the township." 

ANECDOTE OF BEECIIER. 

" As Mr. Abram F. Beecher was one of the early settlers, and 
of the first Board of County Commissioners, I feel it due to his 
memory, as he has gqnc from earth, to relate an adventure of 
; : flllCl U! iitlotiier of out citizens m Ins company. Dr. Pink 
was living in Hamilton, and the ' blacklegs ' of Noble County 
stole his horse. Beecher and Willard Eddy started on horse- 
back for the Tamarack Mouse to look for the horse. Although 
they did not find the animal, yet they did find about a dozen of 
the most noted blacklegs in a barn, distributing their counter- 
feit money to their runners. They had quite a pile of it. 

'• Beecher made a lunge among them and grabbed a lot of 



HISTORY O 



60? 



their money, and started to run away ; but Latta, their Presi- 
dent, knocked him down, and they got all the paper back. It 
was certainly lucky that the two did not get hurt. They went 
to a Justice to take law, but the Justice was either one of the 
gang or afraid of his life or property. It was about that time 
that several bams were burned in Noble County bv the black- 
legs. Pity Bccchcr's strength had not been equal to his noble 
courage. Pink went out to look for his horse, but got nothing 
but a severe raw-hiding from Latta for his trouble and his 
horse. I myself have lost about $200 by the same gang of vil- 
lains. This Belle Fountain road was one of the principal routes 
leading to their nest." 

JOHN DRISCAL. 

" About a week after moving on my place, in 1833, a stranger 
rode up to my house. He was an awful looking man, but car- 
ried the prettiest rifle I ever saw. Said I, ' Stranger, you have 
the nicest kind of a gun ; will you let me look at it?' ' Yes,' 
said he, and I took hold of it; but he jerked it back, saying that 
he would not trust his gun in the hands of strangers. He went 
011, and passed the road several times afterward. About 
twelve years ago the people of Northwestern Illinois took the 
same man out in the open prairie, formed a half-circle on one 
side of him, and told him to run for his life, and they would all 
shoot at him as he ran. lie started and fell dead pierced by 
twenty bullets! Such was the end of John Driscal." 

NEAREST NEIGHBORS. 

" When I first moved into Franklin my nearest neighbor was 
at Denmark, ten miles off. My next neighbor on the west was 
on Jackson Prairie, twenty-two miles away. I had to buy my 
grain on the prairies, and take it to White Pigeon Prairie to 
get it ground ; and with the many mire holes I had to struggle 
through, and with the vast number of times I had to unload 
and pry up the wagon, and take a bag at a time on my shoulder 
through creeks and sloughs often breast deep in water, and fre- 
quently ice, to break at that, it generally took me from two to 
four days to make the trip. Often when away from home I 
had fears lest some blackleg might murder my wife and child, 
and little sister-in-law, ten years old, and rob the house. But 
they were never disturbed. 

" I came in with the very best of constitutions, but I am now 



T 



6o6 HISTORY OF DEKALB COUNTY. 

very much broken, and afflicted with rheumatism so that I 
have to get help to put on my clothes. Of the four of us robbed 
by the Indians, I suppose I am the only one alive. Avery died 
in Fort Wayne; Samuel Houlton died at the mill on Fish 
Creek in May, 1S39; Hughes left Wayne in 1839 for the West, 
and he undoubtedly has tilled a drunkard's grave ere now, for 
1 heard him say in the presence of Samuel Houlton and Wil- 
liam Rogers that lie thought he was doing well when S500 a 
year paid his grog bill." 

Early Justices of the Peace for Franklin were : M. Wheeler, 
L. Buck, J. King, John McCurdy, George Beard, George Fire- 
stone, T. M. Mitchell. Early Constables were : G. W. Jeffords, 
Miles Waterman, Cyrus Jackman, David Clark, John Shock, 
Abner Slentz, John R. Ball, George Firestone, Wm. Oberlin. 
The Trustees prior to i860 were: G. Beard, B. Smith, Jabez 
Hubbell, Miles Waterman, G. Shultz, H. Slentz, A. Baxter, J. 
T. Aldrich, J. Jackman, H. Smith, Joseph Boyer. A. Baxter 
and E. H. Taylor were early Assessors. 

BIOGRAPHICAL. 

Jason D. Aldrich, deceased, was born in Franklin Township, 
Sept. 17, 1839, an d died Nov. 27, 1877. Me was a son of Isaac 
Aldrich, a -pioneer of Franklin Township, who died Feb. 1, 
18S3. He was reared and educated in his native township 
where he won many friends by his genial, courteous manners, 
and honest, upright dealings. lie was married May 20, 1860, 
to Sarah Knisely, daughter of William Knisely. To them were 
born lour children, three of whom are living — Isaac N., Ada 
D. and William E. Isaac married Mary Rummel, and has one 
child — Bertha. Ada married James Kannel, and has one child 
— Flora. Mr. Aldrich was a sincere Christian, although at the 
time of his death he was a member of no religious organization. 
He was a member of the Odd Fellows' order. 

Andrew Baxter, section 5, Franklin Township, was born in 
Washington County, Pa., March 15, 1813. He is the youngest 
of a family of ten children. His father, William Baxter, mar- 
ried Sarah Rogers in their native County Tyrone, Ireland, and, 
after the birth of two children, Daniel and Jcnnette, they emi- 
grated to America in 1791 and settled in Washington County, 
Pa., where was born to them other children as follows : Sarah, 
William, James, Moses, Mary, a daughter who died in infancy, 



HISTORY 01' DE KAL1J COUNTY. 607 

John and Andrew. The subject of this sketch, William Bax- 
ter, died in January, 1832, after the marriage of all their chil- 
dren, except Sarah, John and Andrew, and with them, their 
mother removed to Wayne County, Ohio, in March, 1835. 
Here John married Sarah Kelley, and Andrew, in the spring 
of 1838, married Nancy Brown, eldest child of Andrew Brown, 
of Scottish birth ; whose wife, Ellenor Richey, was a native of 
North Ireland. In June, 1841, John and Andrew, accompanied 
by their brother, James, and Simon Feglcy, came to De Kalb 
County, built rude cabins upon their land entered from the 
Government in 1838; Andrew upon the farm where he still 
resides, and John in Smithfield Township, and in October, 
1841, they moved with their families upon their farms, each 
with a wife and two small children, and their mother and sister 
Sarah, as members of the family with Andrew. Here, in the al- 
most unbroken forest, with privations and ague almost con- 
stantly with them, they "cleared" their farms, took their 
quinine (when they could get it) and " raised " their families. 
Andrew and Nancy Baxter had born to them children as fol- 
lows: Elvina, Ellen, William, a daughter who died in infancy, 
Andrew J., Mary J., John W., Nancy E. and James B. Nancy 
died January 18, 185S, leaving her husband and the eight chil- 
dren above named surviving her. May 4, 1859, Andrew was 
again married this time to Elizabeth L. Brown, the youngest 
sister of Nancy, his former wife, and to them were born six 
sons — Orrin A., Charles O., Miles, Chauncy B., Cora L. and 
George D. Elizabeth L. died Jan. 3, 1S77, leaving her husband 
and the five last named sons surviving her. Andrew Baxter 
has held the important ofrices of Township Trustee and Asses- 
sor, each for several terms and with credit to himself. Of his 
thirteen living children, Elvina Baughman is a widow, and is 
generally employed at keeping her father's house ; Ellen, wife 
of David Carter, is living upon a farm in Nebraska ; William 
is owner and manager of a good farm in Iowa, and the others 
all live in De Kalb County. Andrew J. is practicing law in 
Butler; John W. in Auburn ; Mary J., after teaching more than 
twenty-five terms of public school, has become the wife of 
Frank A. Brink, an attorney and teacher, and lives in 
Butler ; Nancy E. is the wife of William Fee, and lives on a 
farm adjoining the old home in Franklin Township ; James B. 
is the Deputy Clerk of De Kalb Circuit Court, and lives in Au- 



6o8 HISTORY OF 1>K KAI.R COUNTY. 

burn, and the others still domicile under the paternal rool-trce. 
Nine of the children of this family have taught in the public 
schools of the county, and three others are expecting to do so 
in the near future. Of the brothers and sisters of Andrew Bax- 
ter, all arc now dead, except Moses, who lives in Smithfield 
Township where he reared a large family of children, all 
of whom have taught in the public schools of the county. 
His sisters, Jane, daughter of William and his first wife ("and 
half-sister of Andrew) and Jcnnettc married two brothers, 
Joseph and William Scott respectively, and died, leaving fami- 
lies in Southern and Western Ohio. Daniel, his brother, died in 
Harrison County, Ind., and William but recently died in Wes- 
tern Pennsylvania, near the place of his birth. The family of 
James survive him in Van Buren County, Mich. John died up- 
on his farm in Smithfield Township in 1S53, leaving a large 
family of small children who have grown, married and scat- 
tered, leaving only three who are still residents of De Kalb 
! County ; all are prosperous. Mary, a sister of Andrew, married 
George J. Duncan and came to Smithfield Township where 
they settled and reared a large and respectable family, nearly 
all of whom still live and prosper in De Kalb County. 

Nicholas Bontragcr, farmer, section 36, Franklin Township, 
was born in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, Nov. 19, 1838, a son of 
Joseph Bo'ntrager. In the fall of 1S52 his father moved to De 
Kalb County, Ind., and settled in Troy Township, where he 
died in December, 1879. Nicholas Bontrager was reared a 
farmer, and has always followed that vocation. He remained 
at home till the breaking out of the war of Rebellion, when he 
enlisted in Company F, Forty-fourth Indiana Infantry, under 
) Captain Gunsenhouser. He participated in seven battles, but 
; was on detached service the most of the time. He now draws 
a pension for injuries received. Mr. Bontrager was married 

; Dec. 30, 1S77, to Elisabeth J, Hants, daughter •■' [6§§e Hanti, 

1 oi Stuubcn County, Ind. They have three children — Amy A., 
Joseph A. and Jesse H. Mr. Bontrager settled on the farm 

; where he now lives Feb. 5, 1SS4. He now owns forty acres of 

1 good land, with a pleasant residence and comfortable farm 
buildings. Mrs. Bontrager is a member of the Methodist Epis- 

1 copal church. 

Cyrus C. Boycr, section 20, Franklin Township, is a native of 

, this township, born July 2, 184S, a son of Joseph and Sarah 



— — . 
"o v 



HISTORY 0I«' DE KALJJ COUNTY. 009 

(Jackman) Boycr. Joseph Boycr was born in Stark County, 
Ohio, Sept. i, 1821, and in 1836 came to Dc Kalb County with his 
lather, Peter Boyer, who entered 160 acres of land on section 
[7, Franklin Township. He was a man of fine business quali- 
ties, and by good management and strict adherence to business, 
he became one of the most wealthy and influential men of the 
township. He died March 9, 1S81. Cyrus C. Boyer is the 
third of eight children. He received a lair education, such as 
the schools of Auburn, Waterloo and Angola could afford. 
With the exception of six years spent in study and in business, 
iii Waterloo, he has always devoted his attention to agriculture 
and stock-raising. He has a large farm in a high state of culti- 
vation and fully stocked with improved breeds of cattle, sheep 
and swine. Mr. Boyer was married June 9, 18S1, to Mary E. 
Walsworth, daughter of William J. Walsworth, a pioneer of 
De Kalb County, now a resident of Union Township. Mr. and 
Mrs. Boyer have two children — Carey W. and Nellie W. 

William Brat ton, deceased, was born in Williams County, 
Ohio, May 19, 1S3S, a son of John Bratton, of Edgcrton, Ohio, 
lie was a farmer by occupation, and an esteemed and honored 
citizen. lie was married Oct. 30. 1861, to Mary J. Houlton, 
daughter of Francis and Evalinc Houlton, of Franklin Town- 
ship, De Kalb County. Me settled in Edgcrton, Ohio, residing 
there till his death, Oct. 2, 1SC5. Mrs. Bratton then returned to 
her father's home where she has since lived. The homestead 
contains 1G0 acres of valuable land, and is superintended by 
George A. Young, a native of Atchison County, Vt, born Jan. 
27, 1S52, a son of Horace and Electa Young, who moved to 
Michigan in 1863. Me has had charge of the Houlton home- 
stead since August, 1S7S, soon after the death of Mr. Houlton. 
Mrs. Bratton has had two children, but one of whom is living- 
John. She has an adopted daughter, Sarah Scwell. 

Benjamin Casey, farmer and stock-raiser, section 26, Franklin 
Township, was born in Holmes County, Ohio, Sept. 4, 1835, 
a son of Benjamin Casey. Benjamin Casey began to learn the 
carpenter's trade of his lather and worked at it eight years. In 
1S48 his 'parents moved to Steuben County, Inch, where he lived 
with them till the spring of 1SG4, when he came to Dc Kalb 
County, and lived in Wilmington Township three years and a 
'naif. He then moved to the farm he now owns, where he pays 
special attention to stock-raising, having many fine grades. His 



6lO HISTORY 01- Dlv KALI! COUNTY. 

Poland -China and Chester-white hogs arc unexcelled in the 
county. In addition to attending to his farm he also works at 
his trade. Mr. Casey was married Feb. 22, 1858, to Sarah A- 
Mathews, a native oi Chester County, Pa., daughter of Noble 
Mathews. Mr. Casey is a member of the Odd Fellow's order. 
Captain George H. Casper, section 1 1, Franklin Township, was 
born in Chemung County, N. Y., Jul)' 2, 1X42, a son of Charles 
Casper, a native of Pennsylvania, who settled in Chemung 
County when a young man, and in the spring of 1845 moved to 
De Kalb County and settled on -section 33, Wilmington Town- 
ship. His mother, Lucinda Casper, was a native of Vermont, 
a daughter of William Weeks. Me was the seventh of a family 
of twelve children. He remained at home till the breaking out 
of the Rebellion, when he enlisted Sept. 21, 1861, in Company 
F, Forty-fourth Indiana Infantry, as a private. He was pro- 
moted to Second and later to First Lieutenant, and for some 
time was acting Captain of his company, and subsequently was 
commissioned. He participated in the battles of Fort Donel- 
son, Shiloh, Corinth, Stone River, Chickamauga, Mission 
Ridge, and many others of less importance. He was wounded 
at Shiloh, and at Stone River he with a few others were cap- 
tured, but thinking he had a chance to escape he turned and 
ran, with a rebel infantryman in pursuit. A bail from his 
enemy's musket took off the fore finger of his left hand, in which 
he was carrying his gun. He ran till he fell, when the enemy 
gained on him, and he turned and surrendered, placing his gun 
by his side with the stock on the ground. The rebel irritated 
him by swearing at him, and lie raised his gun and plunged the 
bayonet into his breast, killing him instantly, then turned and 
ran again and escaped from the fast approaching army. After 
his return from the war, Sept. 14, 1S65, he engaged in agricult- 
ural pursuits in Steuben Count\ r five years, then returned to 
De Kalb County, and with the exception of the years 1S80 and 
1 88 1, again in Steuben County, he has made this his home. 
He settled on the farm where he now lives April 4, 1882. He 
owns nearly fifty-four acres of valuable land, with a good resi- 
dence and farm buildings. Mr. Casper was married Feb. iS, 
1864, to Evaline, daughter of Isaac Dirrim, of Steuben County. 
They have had five children — George M., Ada (deceased), 
Renna, Mary, and Ona. Mr. Casper is a member of the Grand 
Army of the Republic, and is Senior Vice-Commander of his 



HISTORY OF DEKALB COUNTY. Gil 

post. He and his wife are members of the United Brethren 
church. 

John N. Clark, farmer and stock-raiser, section 16, Franklin 
Township, was born in York County, Pa., Ma)' 26, 1822. His 
father, David Clark, was born in Lancaster County, Pa., Dec. 
13, 1799, and in the spring of 1S46 moved to Dc Kalb County, 
Inch, and settled on section 17, Franklin Township, where lie 
lived till 1S75 ; then lived with our subject till his death, Sept. 8, 
1879. John N. Clark moved to De Kalb County in thi 
1S46, and lived with his father till March, 1847, when he moved 
to the farm where he now lives. He was the first settler on 
section 16. He has cleared 200 acres of land, 130 of which he 
owns. In 1S47, 4 s an d '49 he planted his corn without plow- 
ing the ground, chopping holes and dropping corn in them. 
He was married December, 1843, i n Stark County, Ohio, to 
Mary M. Hamman, daughter of Daniel Hamman, an early set- 
tler of De Kalb County. To them were born nine children, 
six of whom are living — Levi, Martha A., Joanna, Olive, Fietta 
and Phila. Mr. Clark owns 240 acres of valuable land, with a 
good residence and farm buildings. 

Ervin A. Crain, farmer and stock-raiser, section 11, Franklin 
Township, is the youngest of six children of Ervin J. and Xancy 
(Gaylord) Crain, and a grandson of Charles Crain and Eleazer 
Gaylord. Charles Crain was a native of Middlebury, Vt. He 
was a soldier in the war of 1S12, and after his return home, in 
1816, emigrated to Chautauqua County, N. Y., and thence, in 
1S34, to Paincsvillc, Ohio, and to Dc Kalb County, Ind., in 
1S36, settling on section 8, Franklin Township, where he died 
in March, 1S66. Ervin J. Crain was born in Middlebury, Yt., 
Jan. 29, 1S15, and remained with his father till manhood, com- 
ing with him to De Kalb County. He was married to Xancy 
Gaylord April 5, 1S40, and to them were born six children, 
tour of whom are living — Melissa L., Leander T., Horace 
Greeley and Ervin A. A daughter, Phidelia J., died at the age 
of thirty-two years. She was the wife of B. C. Lemon, and left 
two children, Lucinda and Luther K. A son, Luther K., went 
West when eighteen years of age, and was employed in the 
mail service, and subsequently by Powell & Newbern, freight- 
ers across the plains. He has not been heard from for sixteen 
years, his family being unable to find a trace of him. Ervin J. 
Crain was killed by a pet bull Oct. 2S, 1874. Ervin A. Crain 



6l2 HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 

was born in Franklin Township on the old homestead Dec. 6, 
1852. lie received a good education, completing it at the 
Hamilton select school. He was married April 5, 1872, to De- 
lana Dirrim, a native of Franklin Township, born Jan. 10, 1852, 
a daughter of James Dirrim. They have three children — Eva, 
Luther J., and Delana. Mr. Grain owns eighty-eight acres of 
valuable land, all well improved, and is making a specialty of 
stock-raising. 

Lcander T. Crain, section 1, Franklin Township, is a native of 
this township, born May 29, 1S45, a son of Ervin J., a native of 
Vermont, and an early settler of De Kalb County. He was 
reared on a farm, and received a common-school education, re- 
maining with his parents till the breaking out of the Rebellion. 
In 1S63 he enlisted in Company A, One Hundred and Twenty, 
ninth Indiana Infantry, and participated in the battles of 
Rcsaca, Buzzard's Roost, Rocky Face, Kenesaw Mountain, 
Atlanta campaign, Jonesboro, Franklin, Nashville, Fort Ander- 
son, Fort Fisher, Wise's Forks, and others. Since his return 
he has devoted his attention to agriculture and now has a good 
farm, well improved. In 1S70 he went to the Rocky Mount- 
ains, visiting Montana, Idaho and Washington Territory, but 
spent most of his time in Montana. He visited the Geysers of 
Yellow Stone Valley, and there saw the Devil's Mush Pot, a 
large oval depression in the ground about eight or ten feet 
deep, at the bottom of which is a quantity of boiling sulphur; 
also visited the hot springs, and saw parlies catching fish in 
Gardner's River, and without removing the fish from the line 
or changing their seats, swing them into the boiling water and 
cook them. He returned to De Kalb County in December, 
1S75. March 22, 1876, he married Mary A. Fee. a native of 
Steuben County, Ind., born May 10, 1S43, daughter of John 
Fee, a pioneer of Steuben County. They have had three chil- 
dren — Charles (deceased), Ervin J. and James. Mr. Crain is a 
member of the Odd Fellows' order and the Grand Army of the 
Republic. 

John Dirrim, farmer, section 1 1, Franklin Township, was born 
in Chenango County, N. Y., Aug. 11, 1809, a son of Richard 
Dirrim, a native of Delaware, and a pioneer of Chenango 
County. After the war of 1812, in which he was a soldier, in 
September, 1S15, Richard Dirrim moved his family to Stark 
County, Ohio, and settled in Brown Township, where our sub- 












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&4i*.e,4&. ^<l~~*&z5z£z~ 



HISTORY ' IF OK KALI; COUNTY. 613 

i was reared and educated. In May, 1845, nc moved to Dc 
Kalb County, Ind., and settled where he now lives, on what 
v as then a tract of heavily limbered land. lie was married 
Ian. 20, 1S31, to Sarah Harkless, daughter of William Hark- 
less. To them were born two children, but one of whom is 
;j v j n cr — William, who married Mar}- A. Barker, and has four 
children — Hannah R., Viona, Florence and Maurice. Mrs. 
Dirrim died in November, 1S34, and April 15, 1835, Mr. Dirrim 
married Hannah Gillespie. Of their eleven children, nine are 
|i vino" — Sarah, Hugh W., Leonard, Richard, Margaret, Isaac, 
Delana, Milton and Elizabeth A. James G. died while in the 
service of his country in the war of the Rebellion. Sarah 
married Fred D. Oberlin. Hugh married Catherine Spease, 
and has six children — Orlando, Lincoln, Clarence, Jordan, Net- 
tic and Emma. Leonard married Mary Gowdy, and has nine 
children — Frederick, William, Mina, Etta, Samuel, Anna, Sarah, 
George and Delana. Richard married Alice Wilkius, and has 
five children — Eugene, May, James, Pearl and an infant daughter. 
Margaret married M. M. Barker and has five children — Clara, 
Delana, Isaac, Charles and Chester. Isaac married Angeline 
Wagoner and has two children— Phcebc and Mary. Delana 
married Irvin Crane and has three children — Luther, Eva and 
Delana. Milton .married Minnie Turner and has two children 
-Jennie and Lulu. Elizabeth married Stewart W. Houston 
and lias two children— James and May. Mr. Dirrim owns 100 
acres of laud in the homestead, which is now under the super- 
vision of his son Milton. 

William H. Dirrim, section II, Franklin Township, was born 
in Carroll County, Ohio, July S, 1S20, a son of Richard Dirrim, 
a native of Delaware, who died in this county in 1875, aged 
ninety and a half years. At the time of his death his descend- 
ants numbered 142. In 1S33 the family moved to Wayne County, 
Ohio, and in 1844 our subject came to De Kalb County, and the 
following fall settled on the farm where he now lives. lie 
bought 160 acres of wild land, 100 acres of which he improved, 
lie now owns 146 acres, and his residence and farm buildings 
are convenient and comfortable. Mr. Dirrim was married Sept. 

' 12, 1839, t0 Christiana Haughey, a native of Jefferson County, 
Ohio, daughter of Robert Haughey. They have had a family 
of nine children, seven of whom are living — Hannah J., Robert 

' R., William S., Mary E., Christiana, Caroline and Timothy H. 
39 



014 IMSTOUV > it Dli i.Ai.i; ( I lUNTY. 

Hannah married Isaac Firestone, of Williams County, Ohio, 

and has seven children — Christiana, Dora, William, Sheridan, 
Timothy, Mary and Cora. Robert R. married Amanda Fire- 
stone; Mar) - married William Gowdy, of Steuben County, Ind., 
and lias six children — Marion F., Francis, Charles, Mary, Rob- 
ert and Fannie. Caroline married George E. Hammond, and 
has two children — Timothy and Roy. Mr. Dirrim has served 
his township as Trustee one term and as Assessor two years. 
He and his wife and four of their children are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church at Hamilton. 

George Firestone, section 23, Franklin Township, was born in 
Stark County, Ohio, June 30, 1S11, a son of George Firestone, 
a native of Hagerstown, Va., and an early settler of Stark 
County. Our subject received a limited education, his services 
being required on the farm as soon as he was old enough to 
work. Oct. iS, 1S36 he came to De Kalb County, Ind., and 
settled on the land which is now his valuable farm. At that 
time the chief inhabitants were Indians and wild animals, and 
the land was all heavily timbered. He entered 160 acres from 
the Government, which he improved and to which he has 
added, owning now 192^ acres. His first house was a cabin 
of round logs, and his furniture was of the most primitive sort. 
He early learned the use of tools and made the most of his fur- 
niture. For two years a chest, which he now uses to keep oats 
in, was used as a table. Mr. Firestone was married Oct. 9, 
1S32, to Catherine Crum, and to them were born thirteen chil- 
dren, ten of whom are living — Samuel K., Isaac, Hattie, Cath- 
erine, Amanda, Daniel, Benjamin F., Sarah, George S., and 
John L. One son, Josiah, died at the age of twenty-three 
years and two died in infancy. Mrs. Firestone died April 1, 
1870, and the following fall he married Mrs. Mary Mclntyre. She 
had a large family by her first husband, but three of whom are 
living — Julia, Eliza and Ellen. Mr. Firestone is now living 

with his third wife, whom he marrii d Marsh :, i%? Shi 

the widow ol Richard Cook and the daughter of Samuel Lar- 
rabec. Her four children by licr first husband— Samuel S., 

Mary M., Folly M., and Russell W., are all deceased. Mrs. 
Firestone came West with her father and settled in Adrian, 
Mich., in 1S35. She cooked by a fireplace many years, using a 
cooking-stove for the first time in 1S43. I' 1 1840 she made the 
largest johnny-cake ever heard of in the United States, for a 



- 



. 



Fourth of July celebration at Cold water. It was drawn by a 
six-horse team, in a canoe made of the largest whitcwood tree 
to be found in the country, and was known as the Tippecanoe 

johnny-cake. A son of Mr. Firestone, Isaac, served over three 
vears in the war of the Rebellion as a member of Company F, 
Forty-fourth Indiana Infantry, fie participated in many hard- 
fought battles, the more prominent being Fort Donclson, Stone 
River, Shiloh, Chickamauga, Mission Ridge. He was wounded 
at Shiloh. Mrs. Firestone's son, Samuel S. Cook, served over 
four years as a member of Company C, Eighth Iowa Infantry, 
participating in the battle at Vicksburg, Sherman's march to 
the sea, and many others. Me was killed by the accidental dis- 
charge of a gun in his own hands six years after his return 
from the war. 

Samuel K. Firestone, section 23, Franklin Township, was born 
in Crawford Count} - , Ohio, June 27, 1S33, a son of George Fire- 
stone. In 1837 his father moved the family to Dc Kalb County 
and settled in Franklin Township on a tract of heavily timbered 
land. Mere he was reared, receiving his education on the farm 
and among the wild animals in the woods surrounding them, 
but attending school very little, a few weeks in the winter 
being all the time allotted for that purpose. He became an ex- 
pert with his gun, killing many deer and other animals native 
to the county. Me assisted his father till manhood, and when 
he began life for himself had very little money, but having a 
determined will and a strong arm he made up his mind to succeed, 
and having put his hand to the plow he kept steadily on, and 
his efforts have ever been crowned with success, and prosperity ! 
is his reward. When he commenced housekeeping he made 
the first bedstead of bass wood poles, using the bark for a cord, 
and his wife painted it with poke-berry juice. Fie nows owns ; 
220 acres of valuable land, which is well cultivated, and his 
residence and farm buildings are among the best in the town- 
ship. The first two years of his married life were spent in a ( 
log house in what is now Butler, occupied at present by Tim 
Otis. He was married Aug. 6, 1853, to Caroline Nelson, 
daughter of James Nelson, who settled in De Kalb County in 
1S47. They have had six children, five are living — George A., 
Hannah C, James E., Esteile, Maggie and Maude I. Mrs. 
Firestone is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Gilbert F. Greenwood, farmer and stock-raiser, section 4, Frank- 



6i6 



HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 



lin Township, was born in Stafford Township, Dc Kalb Co., Ind., 
Nov. 30, 1859. His father, Benjamin F. Greenwood, was a native 
of Trumbull County, Ohio, a son of Oliver P. Greenwood, a na- 
tive of Stockbridge, Mass., born Feb. 20, 1S0S, and grandson of 
John Greenwood, a native Rehoboth, R. I., of English descent, 
and a sailor on a man-of-war for the United States in the war of 
1S12. He settled in Trumbull County, Ohio, in 1S1S. Benja- 
min F. Greenwood moved to De Kalb County, Inch, in 185S, and 
settled in Stafford Township, and in 1873 removed to Franklin 
Township, and settled on the farm where our subject now lives. 
He married Maria, daughter of John Henry, and their family 
consisted of two sons — Gilbert F., and Eugene, of Steuben 
County. Gilbert F. Greenwood remained at home till man- 
hood. He received a good education completing it at Purdue- 
University, Lafayette, Ind. lie was married Sept. 4, 1879, to 
Orilla Felger, daughter of David Felgcr, of Defiance, Ohio. 
They have three children — Floyd, Ethel and Benjamin F. Mr. 
Greenwood owns 236 acres of valuable land, and is among the 
prosperous young farmers of Franklin Township. 

Adam Haiuman, farmer and stock-raiser, section 7, Franklin 
Township, was born in Stark County, Ohio, May 12, 1 S 3 3 , the 
seventh of eight children of Daniel and Saloma (Thomas) Ham- 
man, natives of Virginia. In 1848 his parents moved to Dc Kalb 
County and settled on the farm where our subject now lives. 
At that time it was a tract of uncultivated land. The father 
was in feeble health, and the greater part of the work fell on 
Adam. He was a faithful, industrious young man, and was re- 
warded with good crops, and the consciousness of being a com- 
fort and stay to his parents in their declining years. He now 
owns eighty acres of valuable land, with good farm buildings. 
He has many friends in the county, and, although not an as- 
pirant for official honors, has served two terms as Constable. 
He was married in December, 1S57, to Rebecca Curry, daugh- 
ter of John Curry. To them have been born ten children; 
seven are living — Ida M., Emma C, Ada M., Lydia. Jesse L., 
Rebecca and Miles. 

John Haiuman was born in Stark County, Ohio, May iS, 18 17, 
a son of David Hamman, a native of York County, Pa., who 
emigrated to Stark County prior to the war of 1S12. In 1S37 
our subject left home and explored the northern part of In- 
diana, visiting De Kalb County in his travels. Tn 1S44 ne again 



I'll UN' 



COUNTY. 



6.7 

hilc 



came to Dc Kalb County and remained two months, and 
here boughta tract of wild land on section 19, Franklin Town- 
ship. In 1S47 he moved his family to their frontier home, and 
began to make a farm out of a tract of limber land. ! [ow well 
he has succeeded is proven by a visit to his pleasant home and 
viewing his 101 acres of cultivated, valuable land. Mr. Ham- 
man was married May 22, 1839, to Margaret Frick, daughter of 
Henry Frick. Mrs. Hamman died in September, 1S50, leaving 
five children — Simeon, Daniel, John, Franklin and Sarah. The 
latter died at the age of thirty-three years. Nov. 25, 1852, Mr. 
Hamman married Anna Clark, a native of Stark County, Ohio, 
daughter of David Clark, an earl)' settler of De Kalb County. 
They have had eight children, five of whom are living — Susan, 
Clara E., Freeman, Commodore P. and Hamilton C. One 
daughter, Francelia, died at the age of twenty-four years. M r. 
Hamman's sons, Simeon and Daniel, were soldiers in the war of 
the Rebellion. Mr. Hamman is a member of the Presbyterian, 
and his wife of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Peter Helwig, farmer and stock-raiser, section 36, Franklin 
Township, was born in Carroll County, Ohio, Jan. 31, 1S30, a 
son of Jacob Helwig, a native of Jefferson County, Ohio, and 
grandson of George Helwig, a native of Germany. Nov. 3, 
1841, his parents moved to De Kalb County, Ind., and settled 
on a tract of timber land in Troy Township. All kinds of wild 
animals common to Indiana were abundant. His father was 
fond of hunting and furnished the family with plenty of meat. 
He at one time killed four deer, from one of which they pro- 
cured eighteen pounds of tallow. Our subject received a fair 
education in the district schools, but was early in life obliged to 
assist his father on the farm. When he started in life for him- 
self he worked for fifty cents a day, and part of the time for $5 
a month. In this way he earned the money to pay for thirty- 
six acres of land, where he commenced his married life. In the 
winter ef jSS3=S4 1"- built ft log 6ftbl». \\i had & SlOVi 
borrowed the rest of their furniture. Their only sauce was 
dried elder-berries, and when cooked had to borrow a dish to 
put it in. They made their own sugar, he carrying the water 
night and morning, and his wdfe boiling it down during the day 
while he worked at the carpenter's trade at fifty cents a day. 
He was married Sept. 10, 1853, to Elizabeth Jadwin, daughter 
of Andrew Jadwdn. Of the five children born to them four are 



6lS HISTORY 01'" UK KALI! COUNTY. 

living — Phcdima, Thcodosia, Ann E., and Jacob R. Phcdima 
married Eli Bryan, and lias one child — Luther Lee. In [8G6 
Mr. Hclwigsold his first home and bought the farm in Franklin 
Township where he has since lived. His father was a promi- 
nent man of the county, and in 1843-44 represented his district 
in the Legislature. Me died Nov. 10, 1869. 

Francis Ilotiltou, deceased, was born in Highland County, 
Ohio, Feb. 3, 1807, a son of Samuel Houlton. He was reared 
in his native count} - , receiving a common-school education. In 
the spring of 1S39 nc came to De Kalb County, Ind., and set- 
tled on sections 5 and S, Franklin Township. There were four 
acres cleared on section 5, and here he built a cabin and lived 
ten years, then moved across the line to section 8. He was a 
hard working, energetic man, and cleared seventy-five acres oi 
his land himself. He was married in January, 1S38, to Mrs. 
E valine (Kellogg) Wood, widow of Abner Wood, by whom she 
had four children, but one of whom is living — John K. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Houlton were born four children ; two daughters are 
living — Corrinna, wife of Isaac Lautzenheiser, of Edgerton, 
Ohio, and Mary J., widow of William Bratton. Mr. Houlton 
was murdered May 18, 1879, by a neighbor boy, Lewis Abbott, 
who entered the house with the evident intention of murdering 
the entire family and plundering the house. Mrs. Houlton 
died Oct. 14, 1SS1. They were earnest, sincere Christians, Mr. 
Houlton a member of the United Brethren and Mrs. Houlton 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

JoJin Houlton, deceased, the first settler of De Kalb County, 
Ind., was born in Highland County, Ohio, Sept. 21, 1804, a son 
of Samuel Houlton, a pioneer of Highland County, and a 
soldier in the war of 1S12. He was reared in the wilds of Ohio, 
having Indian boys and wild animals for his playmates. In 1S27 
he came to Williams County, Ohio, and worked for his brother 
Samuel in a saw-mill on Fish Creek, near its confluence with 
the St. Joseph River. They rafted the lumber down the river 
to the Fort Wayne market. He was married Feb. 5, 1833, to 
Sarah Fee, who was born May 12, 1S12. The following Sep- 
tember they moved to De Kalb County, and Sept. 4, raised the 
first house in the county. It was built of round logs, was one 
and a half stories high, and twenty feet square. It remained 
standing till 1S60, when it was torn down, and the De Kalb 
County Pioneer Society had a number of canes made from its 



[STORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 



6l< 



lo^s, presenting a cane to each pioneer whose settlement dated 
prior to 1S40. Mr. lioulton's wife died July 12, 1839, leaving 
three children — Samuel, born at Lima, Ind., Feb. 1, 1839, was :: 
member of Company B, First Michigan Infantry, in the war of 
the Rebellion, and died in Libby prison; Margaret, born April 
S, 1S36, was the first female white child born in De Kalb County; 
Sarah, born July 1, 1S39. All grew to maturity, and all are de- 
ceased. Margaret married William II. Slcutz, and had three- 
children, two of whom are living — Rinaldo Burnett and Nancy 
Rosette. Sarah married Norm; n Nichols, and had six children, 
rive of whom are living— Orilla, William, Viola, Inez and 
Mary. Nov. 21, 1839, ^ r - Houlton married Nancy Lewis, 
daughter of Samuel Lewis who settled in Williams County, 
Ohio, in April, 1834, and was the seventh settler on the St. 
Joseph River. Nine children were born to them, six of whom 
are living — William L., Rebecca, John, Mathew K., Lewis N.. 
and Roger R. One daughter. Mary Ann, died Aug. 3, 1S69. 
She was the wife of Jeremiah Gnagy, and left one child, John, 
now a student at Valparaiso Normal School. Rebecca married 
! her brother-in-law, Jeremiah Gnagy, and has four sons — Guy, 
; George, Girt and Glen. John married Mary Getz, and has 
J two children — Bert and Mary. Lewis married Rhoda Martin, 
I and has one son — Verna S. Roger married Amanda Mills, and 
has one son — Artemus L. Roger is leader of the Houlton 
Orchestra. Mr. Houlton died on the old homestead, June 2, 
1S75. ^ e was a consistent Christian, and a member of the 
Disciples church. Mrs. Houlton has passed through many 
hardships and relates many peculiar and interesting accounts 
of the experiences of her early life. She was possessed of un. 
usual courage and was often helpful in time of need, when it 
was necessary to have a strong hand and a brave heart. One in- 
stance of her undaunted will and courage may interest our 
readers, and especially the descendants of Mrs. Houlton : At 
i one time when about eighteen years of age her father and 
brothers were away from home, and a man came to the house 
i and asked if any one could take him across the St. Joseph 
! River, then swollen even with the banks. She told him she 
would take him over if he would obey her orders. He wanted 
to place the horse above the canoe, but that was not her way. 
and she refused to take him over. He finally came to her terms- 
She then placed the horse below the canoe, and told him to hold 



OZO HISTORY 01 DE KAL13 COUNTY. 

the bridle bit, while she rowed the canoe across the river. The 
man was forced to admit the soundness of her judgment, sav- 
in-- he never saw a girl of so much courage and good sense. At ; 
the time Mr. Houlton settled in De Kalb County, the Indians 
and wild animals roamed the forest at will. The only thing he 
ever hunted was squirrels; deer was safe from his gun, al- 
though there were many a; that time. One Sunday a ;lock of 
thirty turkeys came into his orchard, just ai the rear of the 
house, and although acting contrary to the wish oi Mrs. Houl- 
ton his earl}- Presbyterian training would not allow him to 
shoot one on the Sabbath. lie set out the first orchard in De 
Kalb County, in the spring of 1S54, obtaining the trees in Con- 
stantino, Mich. 

Mathcto K. Houlton, farmer and stock-raiser, section 12, 
Fianklin Township, was born on the old homestead on section 1, 
Oct. 4, 1S51, a son of John and Nancy (Lewis) Houlton. He 
was reared and educated in his native township, and after 
reaching manhood, engaged in agricultural pursuits. He now 
owns forty-rive acres of valuable land, with a good residence 
and farm buildings. He makes a specialty of stock-raising, hav- 
ing a good grade of cattle and hogs. Mr. Houlton was married 
in September, 1872, to Marietta Case, a native of Steuben 
County. Ind., born Sept. 25, 1 S55, a daughter of William L. 
Case. They have two children — Jink J. (named for the song, 
"Captain Jink's"), born June 20, iS73,and Rinaldo R., born Nov. 
7, 1S74. Mr. and Mrs. Houlton are among the representative 
young people of De Kalb County, and are enterprising and in- 
dustrious, and have the prospect of a prosperous future. 

William L. Houlton, section 1, Franklin Township, is a son of 
John Houlton, the first settler of Franklin, and was born on the 
old homestead Nov. 13, 1S42. He remained at home till after 
the breaking out of the Rebellion, and enlisted in Company K, ! 
One Hundred and Eighty-second Ohio Infantry. He was as- ' 

signed to tjie engj gr •....-. [ye geryjge. 

In 1S66 Mr. Heulton bought a saw-mill, which he ran two years, 
and then sold it. In 1S77 he bought a light portable mill and 
threshing machine, which he sold two years later, and in irfSi 
bought the saw-mill he now owns. He has run a threshing 
machine eight seasons, and in 1SS3 bought a new Massillon 
Thresher. Mr. Houlton was married Sept. 19, 1S63, to Mercy 
N. Haddix, daughter of Stephen K. Haddix, of Defiance, Ohio. 



— I 



K kali; cou: 



62 1 



She died in October, 1S65, leaving one child — Alice, now Mrs. 
Lewis Shultz. Dec. 19, 1S67, Mr. Houlton married Mrs. Ru- 
hama McCurdy, widow of T. J. McCurdy and daughter of 
William Knisely. They have had three children, but two of 
whom are living — John M. and Nancy Maude. Mr. Houlton 
is a member of the Odd Fellows' order, lodge and encampment, 
and also the daughters of Rebecca, same order. 

Theodore Hunt, section 2, Franklin Township, was born in 
Seneca County, Ohio, May 20, 1S26, a son of Obediah Hunt, a 
pioneer of Seneca County, from Genesee County, N. V. He 
was reared and educated in his native county, and in his youth 
learned the mason's trade which he followed forty years. He 
came to De Kalb County, Ind., in the fall of 1S77 and bought 
130 acres of land where he has since lived. In addition to carry- 
ing on his farm, he is engaged in making concrete tiling and 
sewer-pipes, and also laying down concrete sidewalks. He is a 
fine workman, and has made a success of his business. He en- 
listed in the war of the Rebellion, in Company G, Fifty-fifth 
Ohio Infantry, and participated in the battles of Cedar Mount- 
ain, White Sulphur Springs, second Bull Run and many 
others. Fie went out as Corporal and returned Second Lieu- 
tenant of his company. Mr. Hunt was married March 4, 1S47, 
to Harriet, daughter of Ebenezer Boughton. Of their eight 
children, six are living — Hoyt B., Emma, Theodore, Hattie, 
Ebenezer and Jennie. Elien and Mary are deceased. Mary 
was the wife of Edward Hinkie. Hoyt B. is a minister of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, and lives in St. Joseph County, 
Mich. He married Ida Rockwood. Emma is the wife of John 
Hinkie, of this township, and has four children — Olive, Theo- 
dore, Lora and John. Theodore married Belle Taylor, and 
makes his home with his father. Mr. Hunt has been a member 
of the Odd Fellows' order thirty-six years. He is a member of 
the Grand Army of the Republic. 

John T. Huyck, farmer and stock-raiser, was born March 4, 
1S40, iu Huron County, Ohio, a son of John T. and Lucinda 
(Britten) Huyck, his father a native of New York State, now 
deceased. Our subject was reared to farm life and educated in 
the common schools. In September, 1S62, he enlisted in Com- 
pany E, Fourteenth Ohio Infantry, to serve three months, and 
afterward served in Company C, One Hundredth Indiana Infan- 
try, till the close of the war. He was taken prisoner at Lime- 



622 HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 

stone Station Sept. S, 1S63, and was imprisoned at Belle Isle six 
months. He was then removed to Andcrsonville Prison, and 
alter undergoing all the horrors of thai den for seven months 

he tried to escape, but was caught by blood hounds. lie was 
then removed to Savannah, but at the end of three weeks he 
and another man escaped through a tunnel sixty-five feet under- 
ground. It was night when they found themselves in the city 
of Savannah. A negro whom they met took them to the house 
of a Union lady, who kept them over night and the following 
day secured a room near by, where they were secreted two 
months when they made good their escape. Mr. Huyck came 
to this county in the spring of 1S6S, and in the spring of 1880 
settled on his present farm on section 28, Franklin Township, 
where he owns 150 acres of land. He is a member of the 
Grand Army of the Republic. He was married March 23, 
1870, to Mary J. Jefferds, born in this township in 1S47, and 
daughter of James W. Jefferds (deceased). To them have been 
born eight children, six now living — Bertha J., Pearl, Charles 
L., Mamie M., Earl M. and Eva E. Mr. Jefferds was a native 
of New York. He lived in Toledo, Ohio, many years ago, and 
from there moved to Steuben County, Ind., and in 1842 he 
came to this county. 

Cyrus Jackvian, one of the pioneers of Franklin Township, 
and an honored citizen of the county, was born in Carroll 
County, Ohio, Feb. 14, 1S22, a son of Edward Jackman, a 
native of Virginia. When a young man Edward Jackman, in 
company with his brother Adam, settled in the wilds of Ohio, 
remaining there till 1840, when he moved his family to Dc 
Kalb County and settled where our subject was born, on section 
18, Franklin Township, and again prepared to make a farm in 
the wilderness. They reached De Kalb County May 2S, and 
after building a rude cabin cleared a piece of land, and raised 
the first year thirty bushels of potatoes, six or eight acres of 

wheat, and got eut eaough logs by fall to build a h< ,vei 

house and make a comfortable home for winter. There were 
240 acres in the Jackman homestead, 140 of which Cyrus Jack- 
man now owns. He remained at home assisting his father till 
manhood. He was married Sept. 20, 1S49, to Sarah Taylor, 
daughter of John Taylor. They have one son, John Fletcher, 
who was born July 8, 1S50, and married Nora E. Gutridge. 
I They have two children — Burton and Bertha (twins), born May 
I 



HISTORY OF l)i; KAi.l; COUNTY. 623 

[S, 1876. Fletcher Jackman owns eighty acres of valuable land, 
and is a successful agriculturist. 

Isaac Jackman, deceased, was born in Carroll County, Ohio, 
Oct. 20, 1S18, and died in Franklin Township, April 12, 1872. 
He was raised in his native county, and in his youth learned 
the blacksmith's trade, but worked at it very little, preferring 
the life of a farmer. He came with his father, Edward Jack- 
man, to De Kalb County, lnd., in 1S40, and settled in Franklin 
Township. He was a successful agriculturist and stock-raiser, 
and accumulated a large landed estate. He was married Nov. 
11, 1847, to Maria Stoner, a native of Wayne County, Ohio, 
born in 1S26, a daughter ol John and Agnes (Critcr) Stoner, 
who came to De Kalb County in 1846. But three of a family 
of ten children are living — Mrs. Jackman, Henry and Mary C. 
Two died in childhood, and five, David E., William, John, Hes- 
ter, and Margaret, had reached maturity. John was a minister 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. Two brothers, David and 
Henry, were soldiers of the war of the Rebellion. Mr. and 
Mrs. Jackman had a family of three children — John S., Norman 
T. and Olive. The sons reside in Waterloo and the daughter 
in Los Angeles, Cal. 

Milton C. Jones, farmer and stock-raiser, section 19, Franklin 
Township, was born on the farm where he now lives, Dec. 26, 
1842, a son of Samuel and Jerusha (Chamberlin) Jones, natives 
of Monkton, Vt., the former, born Sept. 15. 1S06, is now a resi- 
dent of Waterloo. His mother was born in July, 1812; died 
Sept. 22, 1SS4. He was reared a farmer and has always fol- 
lowed that vocation. He received a practical business educa- 
tion, attending a select school in Hamilton, Steuben County. 
When the war of the Rebellion broke out he enlisted in Com- 
pany B, Thirtieth Indiana Infantry, and served a year. After 
his return home, in 1S62, he enlisted in Company B, Twelfth 
Indiana G&Y§!ry» and served three years as Orderly Sergeant. 
He participated in many severe engagements, ftBWftg l-hein 
Nashville, Chattanooga, Mobile and Murfreesboro. At the lat- 
ter place he was struck with a sabre and fell from his horse, the 
blow dislocating his shoulder, and the fall breaking his arm. 
He was a brave soldier, and won the respect of all his com- 
rades in arms. Mr. Jones has been Assessor of Franklin Town- 
ship six years. He is a member of the Odd Fellows' order. 
Mr. Jones' parents moved to Seneca County, Ohio, in 1834; to 



La Porte County, Lad., in [837, and to Dc Kalb County in 1S40. 
The)- had a family of ten children, six of whom arc living- 
Sarah A., Milton C, Sydney P., Henry M., William II. and 
Harriet. Three sons served in the war of the Rebellion. Ju- 
lius died a short time after the close of the war with the camp 
disease. Sydney is living in Beratus, Neb. Samuel Jones was 
hurt by a falling tree in 1863, from which lie has never fully 
recovered. In 1S70 he lost his house by lire, which, owing to 
his poor health, was a misfortune not easily remedied. He, 
however, has since rebuilt, and has one of the pleasantesl homes 
in the township. 

Alfred Kepler is a native of Franklin Township, born Nov. S, | 
1839, a son °f Daniel Kepler, a native of Pennsylvania, who 
moved when a child with his parents to Stark County, Ohio, 
and in the fall of 1837 to De Kalb County, Ind., and settled on 
section 27, Franklin Township, subsequently removing to Smith- 
field Township, where he now lives. Alfred Kepler was reared 
and educated in Franklin Township, attending the district 
schools of his neighborhood, lie remained with his parents 
till eighteen years of age, and then went to Missouri and re- 
mained two years. After his return to Indiana he engaged in 
farming and Aug. 18, 1S60, was married to Lovina Mecse, 
daughter of Isaac Mcese. To them were born two children, 
both now deceased. Mrs. Kepler died July 24, 1863. In Jan- 
uary, 1864, Mr. Kepler went to Montana and remained nearly 
two years, working in the mines, returning to Indiana in De- 
cember, 1865. Since his return he has devoted his attention to 
agriculture and stock-raising. He owns a valuable farm of 106 
acres. In 1882 he built a large two-story brick house, the 
main part 18 x2s feet, with one wing 16x24, and another 
16x30. His farm buildings are commodious and in good re- 
pair. Sept. S, 1867, .Mr. Kepler married Mary M. Headley, 
daughter of Samuel Headley, a pioneer of De Kalb County. 

The) havi . , hi] ■ ■ Maud Sl„MimiisM, ■ L, Cora 

C, and Bertha B. 

Elias Kepler, section 27, Franklin Township, was born in 
Stark County, Ohio, Jan. 4, 1832, a son of Daniel Kepler, who 
brought his family to Dc Kalb County March 6, 1S37, and set- 
tled on section 27, Franklin Township, entering 4S0 acres of 
land from the Government. Elias was reared and educated in 
De Kalb County, remaining with his parents till manhood. He 



HISTORY OF UK KAI.l! COUNTY. 625 

was married Feb. 5, 1854, to Eliza Deems, daughter of George 
Deems, an early settler of Wilmington Township, who was 
killed by a falling tree many years ago. Seven children have 
been born to them — Jay, Phedina A., Hannah E., William S., 
Estella, Ida M. and Charles F. Hannah married James S. Lowe, 
and has one child — Earl. Mr. Kepler owns a fine farm of 240 
acres, and is engaged in general farming and stock-raising, mak- 
.1 specialty of Spanish merino sheep. lie and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Samuel Kepler, deceased, was born in Stark County, Ohio, 
Oct. 30, 1S14, a son of John Kepler. He came to Dc Kalb 
County, Ind., in the fall of 1S37, ar >d settled on section 21, 
Franklin Township, entering land on sections 21 and 28. He 
was a hard-working man and a successful farmer and stock- 
raiser. In 1S45 he built a large frame barn across the street 
from his residence on section 28, which is still standing, and 
across the gable end bears the inscription " S. K. 1845." About 
1S53 he built the first grist-mill in the township, on Fish Creek, 

1 section 2, which is still doing good work. At his death he 
owned 1,600 acres of land, all earned by his own industry, as- 
sisted by his estimable wife. He gave employment to many, 
and thus assisted in building up and advancing the interests of 

I the county. The season he built his barn, in 1845,11c killed 
fourteen hogs and two beeves, all used by his hired help and 

: family. He owned a store in Hamilton, Ind., a year and then 
moved it to his place in De Kalb County and sold it three 
\ ears later. He was married in 1S34 to Mary Noragon, a native 
of Pennsylvania. Six of their fourteen children are living — 
Andrew, John, Samuel, Jane, Solomon and Jacob. Cue son, Ed- 
win, died in his nineteenth year, and a daughter, Caroline, aged 
twenty-six years. Mr. Kepler died March 19,1862. His widow 

j afterward married Elisha Beard, an early settler of this county. 
Samuel Kepler, section 2, Franklin Township, was bum on 
the aid homestead bn efitibH H, this tcrWu^hijJj March 2, i 

' a son of Samuel and Mary (Noragon) Kepler. He was reared 
and educated in this township and has always followed agricult- 
ural pursuits. He was married Dec. 20, 1S63, to Melinda 

I Rosenbcrry, daughter ol Alex Rosenberg, of Waterloo. They 

1 have five children— Nedia M., Alta B., Mary M., Vernon and 

: Jennie Pearl. Mr. and Mrs. Kepler arc members of the United 
Brethren church at Bellefontaine Chapel. 



*. Q - 






626 



USTORY OF DE KALI; CO i '. 



William Knisely, one of the most successful young farmers 
and stock-raisers of Franklin Township, resides on section 26, 
where he owns a line farm well improved, with good farm 
buildings. He was born in Troy Township, Dc Kalb County, 
Ind., Feb. 20, 1S51, and was a son of William Knisely, a pio- 
neer of De Kalb County. He was reared and educated, and 
has always lived in his native county. He was married June 
2, 1S72, to Malinda Pinchin, who died in April, 1S73. Their 
only child is also deceased. Dec. 10, 1S74, he married Phoebe 
J. Plank, daughter of Martin W. Plank. They have one son — 
Lorcn David, born March 25, 1876. Mrs. Knisely is a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Ezra E. Lautzcnheiser, section 9, Franklin Township, was 
born in Carroll County, Ohio, May 5, 1S45. In 1S62 his parents 
moved to De Kalb County and settled in Franklin Township, 
where they have since resided. He remained at home till man- 
hood, and then began farming for himself. He has been success- 
ful and owns a fine farm of 1S6 acres, with a good residence 
and farm buildings. He was married March 23, 1871, to 
Elizabeth Richmond, a native of Williams County, Ohio, born 
Nov. 2, 1852. a daughter of Samuel Richmond, a native of 
Tuscarawas County, Ohio, but a resident of Atchison, Kan., 
since 1S71. Mr. and Mrs. Lautzenheiser have six' children — 
Minnie M., John, Frank, Ora, Efne and Edward. Mr. Lautzen- 
heiser is one of the representative men of Franklin Township. 
He is a courteous, free-hearted gentleman, a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, and is universally respected by his 
associates for his fine manly qualities, and strict business integ- 
rity. In January, 1SS1, while attempting to lead a horse across 
a ditch the animal jumped on him, and broke a bone in his right 
leg, split the cap bone of his right ankle and badly injured his left 
leg. Fear was entertained for some time that he was crippled 
[gr life, but he has now pearly recovered his former strength, 

Jm: J> If, Latotsenhefstr was barn in Stark County, Ohio, Nov. 
2, 1S09, a son of Ezra Lautzenheiser. He came to Dc Kalb 
County, Ind., and settled in Franklin Township. He was mar- 
ried in 1S33, to Catherine Reese, daughter of John Reese. Of 
their rive children three are living — -Isaac, Ezra and Hannah. 
Mrs. Lautzenheiser died in November, 1874. Mr. Lautzenheiser 
now makes his home with his daughter.- He is an honored 
member of the United Brethren church. 



bom i» Carroll County, Oh >. _ 10. 1S30, a son oi Joseph 

. Elizabeth (Masters) Lewis, his father a native of West- 
moreland County, Pa., and his mother of Yorkshire, England. 
His grandfather, Jonathan Lewis, was a native of Germany. 
His father was an early settler of Carroll County, Ohio, and 
later of Tuscarawas County. He died Jan. 6, 1S73. Our sub- 
ject was reared and educated in Ohio, attending when a child, 
a school taught by an Irishman named Peter Conoly. Their 
1 school-house was a rude log structure and the black snakes, 
which were abundant in that country, often stuck their heads ' 
through the cracks of the floor and roof. The teacher kept his 
gun by his side, and occasionally shot one, which if overhead 
would drop to the floor, much to the discomfort of the terrified 
pupils. March 10, 1S55, Mr. Lewis came to Indiana and settied 
on the farm in Franklin Township where he now lives. He 
owns 200 acres of hue land with good improvements. From 
1S63 till 1S66 he was employed by Russell ec Co., of Massillon, 
Ohio, manufacturers oi agricultural implements, his farm being 
carried on by hired help. Mr. Lewis was married March 16, 
1S51, to Martha A. Henderson. To them were born four chil- 
dren, but three »are living — Charles H. V., Calvin McM., and 
Addie. Mrs. Lewis died Jan. 25, 1S73. Jan. 22, 1S74, Mr. 
Lewis married Bell, daughter of Andrew Reed, who died Sept. 
5, 1S79. Their two children arc also deceased. Mr. Lea-is 
then marrried Mrs. Jennie Graham, widow of John E. Graham, 
by whom she had two children ; but one is living — John E. Mr. 
and Mrs. Lewis are members ot the Methodist Episcopal church. 
George IV. Newcomer, section 29, Franklin Township, was 
born in Columbiana County, Ohio, April 15, 1S45, a son of 
Christian Newcomer, a native oi Pennsylvania and an early 
settler of Columbiana County. In 1S47 his parents moved to 
De Kalb County, Ind., and settled on section 29, Franklin 
Township, where he was reared. At the time of their settle- 
ment in the county it was heavily timbered, and the trees had 
to be cut before a house could be built. A tree in front of 
their cabin was cut into shingles, and the stump was used as a 
table. They were in limited circumstances, but possessed a de- i 
gree of ambition and energy which overcomes all obstacles and 
wins the victory over every battle in life, being undaunted by 
hardship, but seemingly strengthened with renewed vigor by 






6j,S IIISTI IKY ()] 1)1 KM COI N'J .'. 

each privation. Our subject was early inured to the lilc of a 

frontier farmer, and initialed into the mysteries of clearing and 
breaking land. His education consisted mainly of the rules of 
agriculture, as his services were required at home, and his at- 
tendance even at the early district school was limited to a few- 
weeks in the winter. After reaching manhood he began life 
for himself, and by following the lessons of industry and appli- 
cation learned in his youth, has been successful and now owns 
eighty acres of valuable land. Mr. Newcomer is one of the 
representative men of the township, and has always contributed 
of his time and means for the advancement of every laudable 
enterprise. He was married Aug. 4, 1S72, to Barbara Van 
Horn, daughter of John Van Horn, of Greenville, Mich. They 
have live children — Charles E., Mary M., Luna L., Arna 0., 
and Elmer G. In religious faith Mr. and Mrs. Newcomer arc 
Mennonites. 

John Matson, a son of Elijah Matson, was born near Rutland, 
Vt., Feb. 3, 1806, where he lived until he was about twenty-one 
years of age, when he went to Onondaga County, N. V. In 
1S35 he came to Indiana and entered 160 acres of wild land in 
De Kalb County, had a cabin built on section 30, Franklin 
Township, and the following year with his family moved there, 
reaching Hamilton Sept. 30, 1836. He was very energetic and 
ambitious, working all dav clearing his land of timber and pre- 
paring it for cultivation, alter which he worked several hours 
each night at the carpenter's Hade, making doors and window 
frames for the new settlers, taking his pay in work on his land. 
In 1 his way he soon had 100 acres under cultivation. He be- 
came a successful farmer, and owned, at the time ol his death, 
a pleasant home and 213 acres of valuable land. He was high- 
ly esteemed by all who knew him. He was public spirited, and 
contributed liberally toward the advancement of any laudable 
enterprise. He was a kind and obliging neighbor, and a bene- 
volent and considerate friend of the poor. He was married 
Sept. 10, 1S33, to Margaret Waterman, daughter of Elijah Wa- 
terman, and sister of Hon. Miles Waterman. To them were 
born ten children — Cordelia, Aivin, Chloc, James, Lewis, Lydia, 
George and Ophelia. Two died in infancy. Cordelia married 
Chester Taft, and lives at Waterloo, Iowa. Chloc married 
Alonzo Collin, of Mt. Vernon, Iowa, and has two children — 
Ruth and Margaret. James, of Cedar Rapids. Iowa, married 



IIIS'H IKY OF 1'jIC KALI! CO UN"] V. o2g 

Frances Taylor, and has two children— Lillian and Abliic. 
Lewis, of Pleasant Lake, Ind., married Orcelia Clarke, and has 

, hjldrcn— Clarke, James, Mabel and John. Lydia married 
|. 15. Albrook, of Iowa, and died in her twenty-seventh year, 
leaving one child — Luclla. George married Matilda Ridge, and 
msonc child — Mcrritt. Ophelia married Mcrritt A. Goodell, of 
[owa, and has lour children — Willard, Alonzo, George and Ed- 
ward. Mr. Maison died Nov. 4, 1.S76. Mrs. Matson lives with 
, , :orge on the homestead, and is one o; the few old settlers of 
the county now living, and has witnessed all the varied changes 
which have brought the country from a wild state to one of ad- 
vanced cultivation. 

Robert McCurdy, section 25, Franklin Township, was horn in 
Holmes County, Ohio, Oct. 12, 1838, a son of John McCurdy, 
now of Butler Township, Dc Kalb County. I lis parents came 
to this county in 1843, ;uu ' settled on a tract of heavily timbered 
land, at a time when wild animals were their most familiar 
neighbors. Our subject remained at home till the breaking 
out of the war of the Rebellion, when he enlisted in Company 
G, Fifty-third Indiana Infantry, and served ten months. lie 
participated in the battle of Kingston and several minor en- 
gagements. Me was married Oct. 8, 1S63, to Sarah A. Ken- 
nedy, who died three months later. July 20, 1865, he married 
Celinda Mumma, daughter 01 George Mumma, of Troy Town- 
ship. To them have been born five children ; but three are liv- 
ing — Inez, Elsie and Sarah. Mr. McCurdy was reared a farmer, 
and since attaining manhood has followed the vocation for him- 
self. He has been successiul. and now owns eighty acres of 
valuable land, with a good resilience and farm buildings. Me 
is a member of the Masonic fraternity. He and his wife are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal cimrch. 

James C. Myers, section 23, Franklin Township, was born in 
Ashland County, Ohio, April 18, 1S26, a son of Jacob and Susan 
(Doughnut) Myers. In 1828 his parents moved to Cra .. ird 
County, Ohio, and in September, 1837, to De Kali; County, lnd., 
ami settled on section 22, Franklin Township. Their nearest 
neighbor was live miles distant. On account of the wild ani- 
mals, they buiit their log cabin without a door, and entered the 
house by a hole in the roof. His father was a great hunter, be- 
ing very fond of the sport, and one morning before ten o'clock- 
killed six deer. James C.'s playmates were Indian boys. His 

40 



\ a ~- 



030 HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 

father died in November, 18S1. Of a family of ten children, 
seven .ire living — George, Amos, James, Nancy, Jacob, Amzi, 
and John C. John C. Myers was reared a farmer, and has al- 
ways followed that vocation. He now owns seventy acres of 
land, well cultivated, with good buildings. lie was married 
Aug. 12, 1851, to Sarah Slentz, daughter of Henry Slentz. 
They have lour children — Nancy Jane, Hannah, Benjamin and 
Ellen. Nancy married Charles Culbcrtson, of Otsego Town- 
ship, Steuben County, and has three children — James H., Ella 
D. and Sarah E. Hannah married Peter Dirrim and has three 
children — Cyrus B., Franklin E. and Berton. Benjamin mar- 
ried Martha Dirrim and has three children — Eva, Isaac and 
Sarah E. Ellen married Robert C. Piatt and has one child- 
Byron. Mr. Myers enlisted in the war of the Rebellion, in 
Company A, One Hundred and Twenty-ninth Indiana Infantry, 
and participated in the battles of Dalton, Buzzard's Roost, 
Resaca, Atlanta, Franklin, Nashville, Kingston, and many 
others. 

David Oberlin, farmer and stock-raiser, section iS, Franklin 
Township, was born in Stark County, Ohio, April 5, 1S1S. His 
father, Frederick Oberlin, was a pioneer of Stark County, mov- I 
ing there from his native State, Pennsylvania, prior to the war 
of 18 12. He was reared on a frontier farm, and alter reaching 
manhood left his native county, then a thickly populated and j 
prosperous country, and started for the West, to again put in 
practice the lessons learned in his youth. In October, 1847, nc 
arrived in De Kalb County, Ind., and entered a tract of Gov- 
ernment land in Franklin Township, at that time heavily tim- 
bered. He went bravely to work and by spring had enough 
land cleared to plant a crop, and in due time by his own labor 
had cleared sixty acres. In 1870 he moved to the farm where | 
be now lives, and where he owns 106 acres of valuable land. 
Mr. Oberlin was married March 10, 1841, to Mary Van Horn, 
daughter of David Van Horn. They have four children — 
Susan, Mary M., Elizabeth and Josephine. Susan married 
Baless Boyer, of Smithfield Township, and has four children — 
Warren, Alien, Minnie and Franklin. Mary married Charles 
Kelly, of Union Township, and has three children — Alta, Ger- 
trude and Clyde. Elizabeth married Daniel Lockamire, of 
Franklin, and has one child — Bertha May. Mr. and Mrs. Ober- j 
lin are members of the Lutheran church. 



HISTORY OF DE KALD COUNTY. 63 I 

Nathan D. Obcrlin, farmer, section 15, Franklin Township, 
was born in Stark County, Ohio, Feb. 5, 1830. In 1845 ' us 
father, John Obcrlin, moved his family to De Kalb County, 

Inch, and settled on the northwest quarter of section 28, Frank- 
lin Township. Nathan D. worked for Samuel Kepler two 
years at $S per month, and in the meantime cradled oats in the 
summer at five shillings a day. In the winter of 1S50-51 he 
bought forty acres of land, paying $300 for it. In 1850 he- 
began to work at the carpenter's trade with Elisha W. Beard, 
and remained with him five years, receiving $10 a month for 
his services. He worked at his trade in connection with at- 
tending to his farm, and has been successful in all his pursuits, 
lie now owns 160 acres of well-improved land. In 1S70 he 
built a large brick house, the main building two stories 18 x 2S 
feet, with one two-story wing 17 x iS feet, and another one-story 
16x26 feet. Mr. Oberlin was married Feb. 12, 1S54, to Sarah 
Dirrim, daughter of James Dirrim. To them have been born 
six children, 'but three of whom arc living — Kyrus C John J., 
and Isaac C. Kyrus married Nancy Chard and lives in Otsego 
Township, Steuben County ; has two children — Ora E. and 
Mertie. John married Lenora Fifcr, and resides in this town- 
ship. Mr. Oberlin has served two years as Township Trustee, 
and three years as County Commissioner. In the war of the 
Rebellion he was a member of Company G, Fifty-third Indiana 
Infantry, and participated in the battle of Kingston or Wise's 
Forks, N. C. He is a member of the Grand Army of the Re- 
public, Hamilton Post. 

Isaac D. Sawvel, farmer and stock-raiser, section 33, Franklin 
Township, was born in Stark County, Ohio, Oct. 18, 1836. In 
1S47 his father, Jacob Sawvel. moved to De Kalb County, Ind., 
and settled in Smithfield Township, where our subject grew to 
manhood and was educated in the iog-cabin schools. He was 
reared a farmer and has made agriculture his vocation, also pay- 
ing considerable attention to stock-raising, having some of the 
finest grades of cattle and hogs. He owns 105 acres of valuable 
land, all well improved, with a pleasant residence and good farm 
buildings. Mr. Sawvel was married Oct. 21, 1S63, to Mary 
Lutz, daughter of Michael Lutz, who settled in De Kalb Countv 
in 1S48. They have six children — John, Sadie, Mary, Sher- 
man, Laura and Sumner. 

Reuben Sawvel, section 32, Franklin Township, is one of the 



632 HISTORY OF DE KALE COUNTY. 

most successful teachers of De Kalb County. He devotes his 
summers to tilling the soil and improving his farm, and during 
the winter months spends his time in the school-room. He has 
taught nineteen terms, and by his genial and courteous man- 
ner wins the confidence of his pupils, at the same time inspir- 
ing them to diligent study and thoroughness in all their under- 
takings. Mr. Sawvel was born in Stark County, Ohio, Feb. 11, 
1847, a son of Jacob Sawvel, who came to De Kalb County the 
following summer. He was educated in the common school and 
Auburn High School, where he was under the tuitorship of 
Profs. Mcintosh and Dills. In the spring of 1880 he moved to 
Franklin Township and settled where he now lives. He owns 
eighty acres of valuable land, all well improved. Fie was mar- 
ried Dec. 24, 1S75, to Laura Phillips, a native of Wayne County, 
Ohio, daughter of John Phillips. Mr. Sawvel served as As- 
sessor of Smithfield Township one term. 

Allen Shultz, section 21, Franklin Township, was born in Ash- 
land County, Ohio, April 15, 1S46. His father, George Shultz, 
was a native of Union County, Pa., and settled in Ashland 
County in 1835 ; thence in the fall of 1S53 to De Kalb County. 
Here our subject was reared and educated. He learned the 
carpenter's trade in his youth and worked at it several years. 
From 1S69 till 1875 he ran a threshing-machine during harvest. 
In the spring of 1S76 he bought a portable steam saw-mill, 
which he ran three years. He then sold the mill, keeping the 
boiler and engine, and bought a new mill, which he ran, in com- 
pany with his brother, Franklin, three years, when he sold it 
and bought the Taylor's Corners' mill and moved it to his farm. 
This mill is of forty-five horse-power, with a capacity of 10,000 
feet in ten hours. Fie cuts 250,000 feet of lumber annually. He 
owns sixty-four acres of valuable land and carries on farming in 
addition to running his mill. He was married Jan. 20, 1S67, to 
Amanda Mann, daughter of Philip Mann, Sr.. who was a sol- 
dier in the war of 1812 under General Harrison, and in 1842 
settled in De Kalb County. To Mr. and Mrs. Shultz have been 
born eight children, six of whom are living — Henry, Delia, 
Loma, Burton, Rhoba and Junie. Mr. Shultz has been a mem- 
ber of the Knights of Honor at Waterloo three years. 

George //. Shultz, deceased, was born in Union County, Pa., 
June 25, 1S06, and died in Franklin Township, De Kalb County, 
Ind., Oct. 26, 1873. He was reared and educated in his native 



HISTORY OF DE ICAL13 O • - 



<<„3 



county, and when fifteen years oi ag< began to learn the ma- 
son's trade, at which he worked at intervals all his life, lie 
was married Anril 9, 1S44, to Salonia Walter, a native of Union 
County, Pa., daughter o! Benjamin Walter, who moved to Ni- 
agara County, X. V., in the spring of 1828, and to Ashland 
Comity, Ohio, in the fall ol 1S3S. To Mr. and .Mrs. Shultz were 
born ten children, eight ol whom are living — Curtis, Allen, 
Shannon, Franklin, Rosanna, Arillie, Lewds and William. In 
September, 1S53, they moved to De Kalb County, and settled 
on section 21, Franklin Township. A small patch of land was 
cleared on which was a small log cabin. Mr. Shultz was a 
hard-working, energetic man, and accumulated a good prop- 
erty. He was a prominent, influential man. and held several 
offices of trust and responsibility; among others was Trustee 
of the township two terms and Constable three terms. He was 
a memb.r of the Lutheran church as is also his wife. 

John II. Smith, section 23, Franklin Township, was born in 
Columbiana County, Ohio, Sept. 20, 1S39. In the fall of 1844 
his lather, Adam Smith, came with his parents to De Kalb 
County and settled in Franklin Township where he still lives. 
John H. Smith was reared and educated in this county, attend- 
ing the log-cabin schools in the winter, when his services were 
not required on the farm, lie early acquired a knowledge of 
agriculture, and since attaining manhood has devoted his at- 
tention to that industry, and now owns a good farm of ninety 
acres. He was married Oct. 7, 1859,10 Margaret Slentz, daugh- 
ter of Henry Slentz, an early settler of Franklin Township. 
Their only child, Alice Ida, died in the second year of her age. 
Mr. Smith enlisted in Company F, Forty-fourth Indiana In- 
fantry and served three years. He participated in the battle of 
Chickamauga, but soon alter was detailed to the Quartermaster's 
department. 

Levi Stay, farmer, section 1, Franklin Township, was born in 
Tuscarawas County, Ohio, April 4, 1S19, a son of John Stoy, a 
native of Stoyestown, Pa., and one of a colony of five families 
who first settled in Tuscarawas County. Our subject was 
reared in the wilds of Ohio, his only schooling being nine days 
to one Hambright Reese. He afterward worked for Thomas 
Bays, also a teacher, and received $S a month and two hours 
tuition every evening. In August, 1S44, be moved to Indiana 
and settled in Stafford Township, De Kalb County. Mr. Stoy 






634 HISTORY 01' DE KALIi COUNTY. 

learned the shoemaker's trade in his early life and worked at it 
nineteen years, his wile assisting him after he came to Dc Kalb 
County. Their means were limited, and after their settlement in 
this county it was difficult many times to procure food. At one 
time they lived three months on corn and corn-coffee, ground 
in a coffee-mill. At another time his wife went to the store of ; 
Mr. Cela and bought $11 worth of goods, paying $5 cash. Mr. 
Cela told her he would trust her husband for the rest till he 
could make it hunting mink and foxes. This was something he 
had never done, but nothing daunted he tried, and the first day 
caught two mink and one fox, for which he received $10.75. 
In nine and a half days he made $44.33, and by this time con- 
cluded that hunting was more profitable than shoemaking. One 
Sunday morning they arose late, and Mr. Stoy remarked, " If 
we had any meat I would have been up long ago." His eldest 
son, then just old enough to talk, replied, " Dad, if you get 
mectin I'll jump on one leg." That was enough to make him 
take his gun and go out, and before breakfast he shot a deer. 
He then looked up and down the road to see if anyone saw 
him, and hurried home, thinking the report from his gun had J 
never been so loud before. He took a shoulder to his pastor i 
who lived near by, and said, " Brother Olds, would you be of- 
fended if I presented you with a piece of veal?" " Not at all, 
sir, not at all." Mrs. Olds then said, " Brother Stoy, was that 
you — " " Elmira," said the minister, "not a word, for we want 
the meat," and Mrs. Olds never knew whether or not Mr. Stoy 
was the man who shot on the Sabbath. Mr. Stoy lived in Staf- 
ford Township till 1S70, when he moved to Franklin Township 
and settled on the farm where he now lives. He owns sixty ! 
acres of valuable land, with good farm buildings, his farm being 
now carried on by his son John. Mr. Stoy was married Sept. 
7, 1842, to Rosanna Brown, daughter of Joseph Brown. They 
have had five children, lour of whom are living — William H., 
Samantha, Susan and John. William H. married Mary Chard 
and has two children — John and Nancy Rosella. Samantha 
married Aaron Mills and has two children — Jerome C. and Pearl 
Maude. Susan married James Ireland, and John married Lydia 
Robertson and has one child — Ada Elnora. Mr. Stoy enlisted 
in the war of the Rebellion in Company H, Eighty-eighth In- 
diana Infantry, and participated in the battles of Perryville, 
Chickamauga and Mission Rids;e. At the latter battle he re- 



if 



HISTOID - >;■ ... KAI.Ii i i il MTV. 635 

ccivcd wounds from the effects oi which he has never recov- 
and is drawing a pension, lie is a member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal and his wife of the United Brethren church. 1 1c 
is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic. In the 
soring of 1S45 Mr. Stoy built his first house, the house being 
14 x 16; having no doors they used quilts hung over the 
doorway until the cold winter forced him to build a door, 
which he did himself, his only tools being an ax, a shaving- 
knife and shoe-hammer. The same spring Mr. Stoy began 
work for John Webster, hewing the timber for a grist-mill 
known as the Webster mills, the agreement being for Mr. 
Stoy to work nine months for 40 cents per day and board, 
he walking four miles to and from his work every night and 
morning. He then proceeded to plant an orchard, and as he 
did not have a foot of land cleared, he set out his apple trees 
among the native trees of the forest. Two years after he- 
cleared the land between his little apple trees, and in time had 
one of the best orchards in the county. Mr. Stoy soon be- 
came famous as a hunter, and many were the exciting chases 
he had with the deer which abounded so plentifully in the (then) 
unsettled portions of Indiana. On one occasion he had a light 
with a wounded buck that knocked him down and tore all the 
clothes and part of the skin fro ly. He was finally res- 
cued by some of his neighbors, after half an hour's hard fight, in 
a rather bad state as his clothes were torn off, and the snow was 
about eight inches deep. lie afterward tanned the hide of the 
deer, and with another one made himself a pair of pants which 
he wore to church for some time. 

Peter Teutsch, farmer, section 36, Franklin Township, was 
born near Alsace, France, March 22, 1850, a son of Michael 
Teutsch, who brought his family to America in i860, and set- 
tled in Franklin Township, Dc Kalb Co., ind., where he has 
since lived. Our subject was reared a farmer, and has always 
followed that vocation. He was educated in France and in the 
common schools of Franklin Township, acquiring a practical 
business education. lie now has a good farm of seventy-three 
acres, which is well cultivated, and his farm buildings are com- 
modious and in good repair. Mr. Teutsch was married Jan. 5, 
1S73, to Artemisia Olds, daughter of Carlisle Olds, an early 
settler of Franklin Township. To them have been born three 
children, two of whom are living — Frank 3. and Leota E. 



r— 



; 






6$6 HISTORY OK I;E KALI; COUNTY. 

Mr. and Mrs. Teutsch arc members of the United Brethren 
church. 

Hon. Miles Waterman, section .7, Franklin Township, was 
born in Onondago County, X. \\, Dec. 22, 1S1S, a son of Elijah ' 
and Sarah Waterman, natives of Massachusetts, the former of ' 
Pittsfield and the latter of Salem. In the spring of 1837 he [ 
accompanied his parents to Steuben County, Inch, and the fol- 
lowing fall to De Kalb County, and settled on section 19, 
Franklin Township. At thai lime there was no house between 
their place of settlement and Auburn, a distance of eight miles. 1 
The principal inhabitants were Indians, who often visited them i 
to exchange cranberries and game for corn meal and bread. 
The father died in 1864, aged seventy-five years, the mother 
having preceded him several years. Our subject was reared 
on a farm, receiving a common-school education. After com- 
ing to De Kalb Count)' he assisted his father in clearing his 
land and improving a farm, and since attaining manhood has i 
followed agricultural pursuits. He has been successful, and 
now owns a good farm of 330 acres. He has always taken an 
interest in the public affairs of the county, and in the fall of 
1 45 was elected County Auditor, and served ten years. In 
the fall of 1S5S he was elected to the Slate Legislature, again 
in 1862, and a third time in 1S74, serving in the meantime in 
two special sessions, aad while there introduced two important 
bills, which were adopted. lie was married in tiie fall of 1845 
to Susan Beard, daughter 01 George Beard, an early settler of 
the county. They have had live children — Jasper M., Oliver 
P. and Olive C. (twins), M. Jefferson and Emma A. Oliver P. 
is deceased. 

Henry Willard, deceased, late of Franklin Township, was 
born in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, March 13, 1812. He came 
to this county in 1841, settling in Troy Township when it was 
a heavily timbered forest, and after clearing land he built a 
log cabin. He was quite a hunter, and in those days killed 
hundreds of deer. He was married June 6, 1838, to Mary 
Brown, a native of Tuscarawas Countv, and a daughter of 
Joseph Brown, who is now deceased. To them were born two 
children — an infant deceased and Joseph died at the age of 
thirty-nine years. The latter was twice married, the first time 
to Miss Louisa Nichols, and his second wife was Mrs. Caroline 
Jackman, by whom he had two children — Mary and Henry. 



"■J 



[l 



Oi 



rch. 



jcci was also an earnest member ol the United Brethren ch 
[lis death occurred March 31, 1877, leaving a host ol friends to 
mourn his loss. Mrs. Willard moved to Duller Nov. 6, 18S4, 
having sold her farm in Franklin Township where she had 
lived twenty-eight years. Mrs. Willard attended the first 
United Brethren meeting held in Butler, which was held by 
Bishop Henry Coomler and Rev. Jonathan Thomas. 

Mat hew Henry Wilson, farmer and stock-raiser, sec: ion 36, 
Franklin Township, was born in England, March 16, 1842. His 
father, George Wilson, was a merchant in England, but in 1S51 
moved his family to the United States and settled on a farm in 
Wayne County, Ohio, and in 1S60 came to De Kalb County, 
Ind., and settled in Stafford Township where he still lives. 

\ Our subject was reared on a farm from his ninth year, receiving 
a common-school education. Since attaining manhood he has 
devoted his attention to agriculture and stock-raising, making 
a specialty of fine horses ol the English draft and Norman 

j breeds. His stallion, Fred, is a fine black horse, sixteen hands 
high and weighs 1,350 pounds. Mr. Wilson was married in the 

I fall of 1S62 10 Mary Ocker, daughter of Jacob and Keziah 
Ocker. They have had three children ; but two are living — 
William and Clyde. Mr. and Mrs. Wilson are members of the 

I Methodist Episcopal church. 

Michael Wolf, one of the most enterprising farmer: 
worthy and respected citizen of Franklin Township, resides on 
section 31, where he owns eighty acres of valuable land, sixty- 
five acres of which he has cleared of the timber. He was born 
in Stark County, Ohio, Dec. 17, 1S23, a son of John Wolf, a 
native of Loudoun County, Va. He was reared and educated 
in his native count)', and 1S51 came to De Kalb County, Ind., 
and settled in the woods, having to clear away the trees before 
he could build a cabin. Bringing with him little money, but an 
abundance of energy and ambition, he went bravely to work 
and from a heavily timbered tract of land has made one of the 
finest farms in the township. Mr. Wolf was married Oct. 25, 
1849, to Frances Willey, daughter of James Willey. To them 
have been born five children, but four of whom are living — 
Hiram F., Edward H., Alice M., and Jennie S. 



id 



I 



CHAPTER XVI. 
jackson township. 

Situation.— Geography and Topography.— Organization. 

— First Comers— Recollections of a Pioneer i;y John 
Wyatt. — Population. — Property and Taxation. — Agri- 
cultural Statistics. — Early Justices, Constables, 
Trustees and Assessors. — Biographical. 

Jackson Township is in the southern tier of the county, and 
is bounded on the north by Union Township, on the east by 
Concord Township, on the south by Cedar Creek Township, 
Allen County, and on the west by Butler and Kcyser town- 
ships. It is crossed in its northwestern part by Cedar Creek. 
The township has a heavy clay soil and much swamp-land. 
Successful efforts are now being made to drain these swamps 
by means of ditches, and in time the character of the farms will 
be much improved. 

In the northwestern corner is Auburn Junction, where three 
railroads meet, making six iron roads in different directions. 
These are : The Wabash, St. Louis <v Pacific, Baltimore & Ohio, 
and Michigan Southern. Auburn Junction is a good place for 
a town, were it not so close to the ancient and prosperous 
county seat, whose prosperity seems firmly rooted. 

Jan. i, 1S38, the Board of Commissioners "ordered that town- 
ship 33 north, range 13 east, be organized as a civil township 
to he known by the name ol Jackson Township, and that John 
Watson be appointed Inspector ol Elections for said township. 
The hrst election was afterward appointed for the first Monday 
in April, 1S3S, at the house of John Watson. 

Among the pioneers of Jackson Township was William Mil- 
ler, whose son, Joseph, was the first County Surveyor. An- 
other son, Thomas, was killed by tlie overturning of a wagon 
load of cross-tics for the Eel River (now Wabash) Railroad. An 
early settler was Thomas L. Yates, the eccentric Judge, who 
sold his farm on the river, and settled three miles down the 

lioS 



HISTORY 01' DE KALB COUNTY. 630 

reck from Auburn on the land which was afterward '.he home 
: Alonzo Lockwood. Others in that part of the township were : 
Leonard Boice, Adam P. llartlc, the Phillips family and Ben- 
jamin Miller. In the southeast there were early to be found 
James Steward, Samuel Henderson, John and David Moody, 
fohn and William Watson, Srs., and their families, Nathan 
Wyatt and his sons, then forming three families, Jacob Maurer, 
for a long time Justice of the Peace, and Willis Bishop. 

Northward of these on the east side of the township were 
found William Means, the first Justice of the Peace in Jackson 
Township; Samuel Farney, a prominent citizen; Henry Dove, 
Abraham Johnson, Amariah Johnson, William R. Moore, Will- 
iam McClure, William Squicrs, Henry Brown, Matthew 
George, William George, Samuel Geisinger and Nelson Grif- 
fith, for three years a County Commissioner. In the center of 
the townships the first settlers were, Joseph Walters, the former 
County Commissioner, Mr. Essig and William McNabb. 

RECOLLECTIONS OF A PIONEER. 

BY JOHN WYATT. 

In the fall of 1836 1 came to this township from Richland 
County, Ohio, in search of a location for my future home. I 
procured the services of David Butler, then a resident of this 
county, to pilot me in search of land. We started westward 
from Spencerville, he following the section lines, while 1 trav- 
eled through the woods, which were full of a dense growtli of 
wild pea vine, prickly ash, etc. The knees of my pants soon gave 
out — it was rough on the naked hide — binding myself tip 1 
struggled on. Upon reaching the south line of section 34 (the 
section where 1 now live), 1 selected my land and returned to 
Ohio, and in the fall of 1S37 returned here with my family, 
following the trail made by Samuel Henderson and the party 
accompanying him the year before (October, 1S36). That party 
consisted of Mr. Henderson and his family, John Watson, Will- 
iam Watson, Willis Bishop, John Hursh, James Means, Edward 
Porter, and their families, with a few unmarried younger mem- 
bers of the different families. They made the hrst settlement in 
the southern and eastern half of the township. The trail made by 
these settlers was followed by my father and his family relatives, 
who came here in the spring following (1S37). Their leaving 
of Ohio was called the exodus of the " tribe of Wyatt." My 



040 



ll.Vl.l; COUNT 



lather, Nathan Wyatt, had with himself ana wife, three sons 
and one daughter in their immediate family, one married son, 
Thomas and his family, four married daughters with their hus- 
bands; Amariah and Abraham Johnson, Wm. A. Squiers and 
Samuel Tarney, made the families of the party. Other rela- 
tives followed within the next lew years. The Wyatt tribe 
bore an honorable part in making De Kalb County. 

Soon after 1 reached here 1 was taken sick. 1 hired my 
brother-in-law, William A. Squiers, 10 cut logs to make my 
house ; we buiit this with a puncheon floor and an outside chim- 
ney made with clay and straw. The following spring I added 
a hearth made of mud ; we were comfortable, and in better cir- 
cumstances than some of my neighbors. About holidays winter 
set in. I had nothing of any kind to winter my seven head of 
cattle brought with me. The poor animals would roam around 
the house and moan so pitifully in the night, that I would cover 
my head to keep out the sound. I bought, some corn meal and 
a barrel of salt (for which I paid $9) in Fort Wayne. A little 
corn meal, one pint per day, salt and browsing of tree tops, 
brought them out in good condition in the spring. 

The season of 1S3S brought, by the use of swamp water, which 
we had to strain the " wigglers " out of, the fever and ague. 
I had no money. 1 broke up my yoke of cattle, giving one ox 
to two of my brothers-in-law for making me a well. After going 
down thirty feet we ran out of provisions. I managed to get 
two bushels of corn, and going nine miles to mill by a zigzag 
road through the woods, could not get my grist until the next 
day, and then not, because I would not buy a jug of whisky; as 
I " tasted not and handled not," I refused. I traveled that road 
five times, and finally to keep from starving at home, gave 
money to fill that jug, got my grist and finished my well 
and got good water, which we felt was like drinking water 
from the well of Salvation. 

That year (1S3S) I hired a man to clear four acres of ground. 
He brought his wife to help him, and their two children, one a 
babe and the other thought to be old enough to keep the mos- 
quitoes from the infant, but the poor little thing looked as 
though it had the chicken pox and itch combined before they 
got through. 

In February, 1845, on m )' wa }' t0 mill, nine miles away, in 
going; down a hill on which the road turned almost at a right 



HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 641 

angle, a Mr. Barnes coming up the hill v. team met me, 

and being unable; (not seeing each other soon enough) to avoid 
a collision, my team and myself were thrown down the preci- 
pice about twenty-five feet. 1, by landing in dense underbrush, 
escaped withoul serious injury; one of my horses was consid- 
erably hurt. 

In the spring of 1S3S ! gave §12 for a barrel of flour 
and $16 a hundred for pork. I was out of provisions at 
one time, and my father said he would pay for some corn 
for both of us if I could find any. He wanted twelve 
bushels. I went out west of Fort Wayne and found a Mr. 
Sweeney who had plenty of corn, three years old, musty and 
covered with litters of rats. I could have some at $1 per 
bushel. 1 complained of its condition as not being fit to 
eat ; he said, " You take it or let it alone." We had to watch 
that corn night and clay on our way home to keep it from be- 
ing stolen. Coming up the St. Jo River with our boat loaded 
was hard, laborious work. We landed and cut a road back 
to the river for our oxen to haul the corn home ; for the 
days of toil and nights of watching I got for my share three 
bushels of corn, which had to be washed and picked over ker- 
nel by kernel before I could take it to mill to be ground at 
28 cents per bushel. 

In the fall of 1S3S my father, Isaac De Pew, Samuel Tarnev 
and myself went to Fort Wayne to buy our winter's supply of 
pork. None could be bought in town: we went two miles be- 
low and bought out of a drove coming in, and helped butcher 
them. The following day we started homeward with our boat 
loaded. De Pew had found the attractions of the town too 
powerful for him and we were obliged to leave him. The 
river was flooded and rapidly rising from the heavy rains of the 
few days previous, and what was worse the weather had 
turned to freezing. We made against the current only six 
miles that day, and that only by keeping out of the river and 
working through the timbered-flooded bottoms. We were 
nearly overcome by the cold, and many times barely esca »ed 
being wrecked. We could not land to eat ; finally, when about 
exhausted and unable to make any further progress, Mr. Nott- 
stine and another man came to our relief, took charge 01 our 
boat and cargo while we made our way to their hospitable 
homes for rest and refreshment. 



" 






642 HISTORY OF Dp; KAI.i; COUNTY. 

The following day the bottoms were ten feet under water 

and full of running- ice. We left our pork and went home and 
waited for the waters to run down. 

Scores of pages I might fill with stories of pioneer hardships, 
which, perhaps, would sound like fiction to the young of this 
day. 

My brother Thomas was a great hunter of deer, bear, coon, 
etc. One morning upon rising he spoke to his wife about bare 
foot tracks on his porch in the new snow. She could not ex- 
plain them ; he, bound to find out the course, followed them 
down to a deer crossing in the swamp and saw where the 
breech of a gun had been resting in the snow, and followed the 
tracks back to his own door, and thus became aware of the 
realities of his dream of midnight hunting. 

Henry Dove was a great hunter — rarely in early days made 
any other preparations for his support. I remember that in 
1S3S he was so hard pushed at one time for game as to shoot 
and eat a hawk. 

The first religious services ever held in this township within 
my knowledge were in 1S39, at Wm. Watson's house, by Rev. 
James T. Robe, of the M. E. church. 

Rev. Lewis Hicklan, missionary of the Methodist Protestant 
church, came here in 1S41 and organized a church ; to-day we 
have several churches : The " Church of God " (Free church), 
the Methodist Protestant church, " Rehoboth " and the " Hope- 
well " United Brethren church. 

The first school was taught in a log cabin on section 23 by 
my brother-in-law, James P. Plummer, I think in 1645 ; he 
taught several years. Plummer was hot tempered and made it 
warm tor refractory scholars ; he came from Ohio two or three 
years later than myself; he was not popular; had but few 
friends ; was opinionated intolerant — full of passion. Pie died 
of consumption. His last days were full of penitence and en- 
deavor to make his peace with all men ; dying full of Christian 
faith, he was as one "snatched from the burning." Now we 
have ten school districts. How little our school children of 
this day realize the deprivations of their fathers, or in any great 
degree appreciate their own advantages. If in an)- degree I 
nave awakened appreciation of the blessings now enjoyed under 
God by our youth of the present, by this brief sketch of the 
past, I am content. 



The |j 

|0 10 Hi 






mi.'i case 



ill 



.' Lc of taxation in 1SS4 is $1.61 ; t he 

umber ol acres ol land, 22,739.02 ; value 



a 1870. 
poll tax, Si. 25 ; the 
of lands, §389,001; value of improvements, $44,265; value of 
lands and improvements, §433,266; value of lots, §3,045 ; value 
of improvements, $1,480; value of lots and improvements, 
S4.025 : value of personal property, $95,299; total value of tax- 
able?. $533,090; number of polls, 241; total amount of taxes, 
S9.02S.12 ; number of children of school age, 493 ; valuation per 
capita, $361.50. 

In 1S81 the township had 3,445 acres in wheat, producing 
27,560 bushels, or 8 bushels per acre ; 2,oSo acres in corn, 
producing 52,410 bushels, or 25 bushels per acre of upland 
and 35 bushels for bottom-land; 958 acres in oats, producing 
24,950 bushels, at 25 bushels per acre ; 662 acres in meadow, pro- 
ducing 496 tons of hay, al three-fourths of a ton per acre ; and 
68 acres in potatoes, producing 1,904 bushels, or 28 bushels 
per acre. 

Following are some of the early township officials prior to 
1 860 : 

Jus/ins of the Peace— William Means, John C. Hursh, A. D. 
Goetschius, Henry Brown and Jacob Mowrer. 

Constables— William R. Moore, William McNabb, Benjamin 
Bailey, Frank Bailey, David Mathews, S. Gcisingcr, . . 
Wyatt, Willis Bishop, William Bcatty, A. 11. Flutter, John 
Carper, Burton Brown, and John McClelland. 

Trustees — Oliver Shrocder, Aaron Osborn, A. D. Goetschius, 
James Moore, Israel Shearer, Christian Sheets, Samuel Tarney, 
Joseph Walters, Isaac Fiandt, Peter Shal'er, James Woolsey, 
David Henderson, Elias Zimmerman, Abraham Johnson and 
James McClelland. 

Assessors — John G. Dancer, Joseph Walters and Alexander 



EIOGKAPIIICAL. 

James IV. Bishop was born in Jackson Township, Jul}- 10. 
1842, and has always lived on his father's old homestead. His 
parents, Willis and Mary Bishop, with two children, came to 
De Kalb County from Richland, County, Ohio, in October 
1836, arriving here the 20th of the month. He located on sec- 
tion^, then a piece of wild land, and lived here till ;.. 



; IIISTOI HI-" DK 1 

i ; widow is; cl . 

stead with her son James. . ily of fo is, 1 

born in Ohio and two in De Kalb County— John W. . 

who died in May, iSob; Willis and James W. Mr. Bis! ip 

was a useful, active citizen, and lived lu try, making 

a good home for his family and giving his children a starl in 
life. John W. and James W. own th homes! ad jointly. The 
former was born in Richland County, Ohio, Feb, 20, 1S33, and 
has never married, making his home in his brother's family. 
James \V. went West when a young man and spent four years, i 
and on his return settled down to a quiet, agricultural life. He 
was married July 7, 1S7S, to Mary Mullen, a native of Jackson 
Township, bom Sept. I, 1858, daughter of Daniel and Hester 
Mullen. They have three children — Martha E., Ophia J. and 
Charles C. Mr. Bishop is a good, practical farmer, and a citi- 
zen fully alive to all the material interests of the township, 
taking an especial interest in the cause of education, although 
other causes are not neglected by him. 

John S. Boots, one of the leading farmers and fruit-growers, 
and a representative man of Jackson Township, resides on sec- 
tion 35. Of the 260 acres of land which his farm contains, 160 
are under an advanced state of cultivation. He pays special 
attention to the raising of fruit, having three orchards planted 
by his own hands, and every variety of fruit grown in this 

climate can be found in its seai on Mr. Boots' farm. His 

vineyard is with ml don >1 the finest in the county. Iu 18J 1 h 
received a diploma from the Indiana State Board of Agriculture 
for the finest display of apples. His residence is commodious, 
and is conveniently arranged with all the modern improve- 
ments. Mr. Boots was born in Smithheld Township, Jefferson 
Co., Ohio, Oct. 5, 1S22, a son of James and Sarah (Springer) 
Boots, his lather of Scotch and Holland, and his mother of Eng- 
lish and Irish descent. His father died in 1S55 and his mother 

111 ' I / hlS !■•■" iHS IttH ' :' 

He remained with them till manhood, and April 12 [849, ma 
l'ied Eliza An Pa., born 

Feb. 22, 1S23, a daughter of John and Barbara ( Folck) Ambrose 
May 6, following, Mr. Boots started for the West in search ol 

a place to locate. He entered his present farm and rem 1 
to Ohio, and June 20, started with iiis wife lor the wilds ol 
Indiana. To them were born six children — Sarah J., wife ol 



''•',5 * 

i ; Amanda S. ; J I 

,V . 66, 

Feb. 22, i S68, Mr. Bool ... ■ na- 

, of Seneca < . iio, born .March 18, 1S35, a daughter I 

1 and Soph . .... ve :< en 

— Ferley, Elsie C. and Myrtle. Mr. Bi ots is one of the most I 
cntcrpri: an sive men of I town hip. He has. 

Road Supervisor manj and made his district 

.. .......... ... The Northeastern Indiana Agri- 
cultural and Hon : ... ;ave S25 to the dis- 
trict having the best roads, and Mr. Bool . . ith for his 
district, No. 5. He is a very positive and decided man in his 

pinions, and his outspoken manner t< fends, but neverthe- 
less he is highly esteemed and respected for his upright charac- 
ter and honest integrity. As a School Director he has been a 
very efficient worker, and in all Ids relations to the to ... and 
county has been a public-spirited, p nthropic benefactor. 

Burton Brown, son of Henry and Aseneth (Knight) Brown, 
was born in Marion County, Ohio, Aug. 23, 1832, and was 
about five years of age when his parents moved to DeKalb 
County. He was reared on the farm, receiving his education 
in the district schools. He was married April 15, 1855, to 
Harriet J. Squiers, a native of Sandusky County, Ohi 
Oct. 4, 1836, a daughter of William A. and Susan (Wyatt) 
Squiers, early settlers of the county. Her mother died Aug. 
12, 1863, and her father now makes her house his home. He is 
eighty-six years of age, and with the exception of some ol the 
infirmities of old age, is in the enjoyment of good health. Mr. 
and Mrs. Brown have had a family of nine children — William 
II., Samuel R., Laban A., Adelia (died at the age of fourteen 
years), Sidney Susan, Phebe Dorcas, Stephen B., John (died at 
the age of seven years), audi Russell \Y. Mr, Brown has a 

• ■ . - ' (jl 11 i .i.LU,L..i,^ , 

and by his upright dealing has gained the confidence of his fcl- 

low-townsmcn. In 18S1 he was obliged to havi I 

putated as the effects of a lever sore, and is now oblige* to Hvi 

retired from active farm life, although he still superintends the 

work. 

Hairy Brown was born in Knox County, Ohio, ami in 1 .-..-,; 
came with his family, consisting of a wife and three children, 
from Marion County, Ohio, to De Kaib County, I; nd set- 



Lied on ecti i, Jackson Town: lip - n next winter he was 

obliged to go seventy miles for corn, for which he paid si a 
bushel. He improved a farm of eighty acres, residing here till 
his death. lie married Aseneth Knight in Ohio, and to them 
were born six children, three in Ohio — Burton; Leander, died 
Oct. 2, 1871 ; Mary Ann, died Sept. 22, 1840; two died in in- 
fancy, and Milas, born July 15, 1S39. ^ rs - Brown died July 
23, [S44, in the thirty-fourth year of her age. 1" 1847 Mr. 
Brown married .Agnes Cooper, and to them were born six chil- 
dren — Samaria, wife of P. C. Wyrick; Samuel, Amaziah, Henry 
C, Dinah and Levi. Mrs. Brown died (Jet. 17, 1872, aged 
forty years, and Mr. Brown March iS, 1879, aged sixty-nine 
years. The tornado that swept over the country in 1841 en- 
tirely destroyed Mr. Brown's house. The little son, Milas, and 
a little cousin, a child of William Munroe, were the only occu- 
pants of the house- at the time. A bread-trough made of half a 
log scooped out stood on the end, and the door, which was torn 
from its hinges, fell over ana rested on the trough directly over 
the children. This was covered with the debris. When this 
was dug away and an opening made, the eldest one immedi- 
ately asked, " Can we come out now ? " 

Jolin Cool, one of the prominent and reliable citizens of Jack- 
son Township, resides on section 17, where he has a comforta- 
ble home and is surrounded with a happy family and kind 
friends. He was born in Yates County, N. V., Aug. 1, 1S2S, 
and when five years of age his parents, Philip and Mary Cool, 
moved to Sandusky County, Ohio, where his father soon alter 
died. His mother then returned to New York with her five 
youngest children, her eldest, Daniel, remaining in Ohio. She 
died about a year later. When eleven years of age John re- 
turned to Ohio and lived with his brother Daniel, who was 
married, till 1S43, when he came to De Kalb Count}' with his 
brothers Christopher and Isaac, reaching the county Nov. 18. 

Both brethi 1 <•■• •■ in this bounty. Dariii I , nd hig 1 

afterward moved to Jackson Township and later to Union 
Township, where he died in 1882. Another brother, Thomas 
Cool, came still later and now resides in Auburn. A sister, 
Mrs. Catherine Thrall, moved to Sandusky County, Ohio, and 
died there. John Cool remained in De Kalb County till 1850 
and then visited Ohio and New Jersey where he had a sister, 
Mrs. Sarah D. Hunt, spending about a year, and while there, 






IIIS'I ,' OF DIC I ."TV. 

Oct. s. [851, was married to Sarah A. Wilson, a native ol Sus- 
sex County, N. J., bom April 5, [S3 1. They then came to his 
. I commenced housekeeping in the log cabin. 

Ten children have been born to them — James, Mary E., wile 
of W. S. Dancer; Alice, wife ... Alpheus McClellan; Thomas; 
Clara, wife of J. S. Weaver; John, Jr., Viola and George W. 

Two are deceased, Perry and Charles P. Mr. Cool is a Dem- 
ocrat in politic, . 

Samuel Cornell, one of the substantial citizens of Jackson 
Township, was born in Carroll County, Md., June 29, 1821, a 
son of Smith and Man- Cornell. I lis father was a well-educated 
man and a teacher by profession, mathematics being .his spe- 
cialty. Samuel was the eleventh of his father's family, seven of 
whom grew to maturity and lived to an advanced age, the 
youngest living to become sixty years of age. Mr. Cornell had 
<^ood educational advantages in his youth, which he well im- 
proved. He was taught mainly by his fa; her, a most excellent 
preceptor, and also had the benefit of several terms at Gettys- 
burg College. Mr. Cornell visited this county first in 1S3S in 
company with his older brothers, Benjamin and John. The 
former settled in Williams County, Ohio, and the latter in But- 
ler Township, this county. Both are now deceased. Samuel 
remained in this vicinity two years, then returning to Maryland 
he taught the most of the time till [S48. Lutein that year he 
again visited this township and ;clci ; d the place he now occu- 
pies, spending a year here. lie then returned to Maryland 
and taught two terms in Washington County, and. March 2G, 
1S50, was married to Mary A. Hawver, who was born in 
Frederick County, Md., March 9, 1S30. The following June 
found them in their new home, having made the journey in a 
wagon, being three weeks on the road. Mr. Cornell com- 
menced life in Dc Kalb County with very limited means, but 
industry combined with frugality has had its proper reward, 
and he now has one of the finest farms in this part of the 
county. I lis dwelling ami farm buildings arc imsurpa 
in his declining years he has promise of plenty of this world's 
goods, which, combined with the love and esteem of his neigh- 
bors, insures him a peaceful old age. Mr. Cornell taught the 
first school in his district. He and his wife are members ot 
the Lutheran church. In 1S59 ne was sent as a delegate to the 
General Synod convened at Pittsburg, Pa., to represent the 



1 (>.|S Hi.vitiKV < 'I M. :. 

Northern Indiana Synod, join« - , i 

City that he might visit r, Rev. Nathan II. I 

then located al Ghent, Columbia Co., N. Y. Me loves to 
the adventures hi pearancc led to. One in particu- 

lar which occurred in the streets oi N< w York City. 

; bany boat having reached the wharf at an carl; r, he thou hi 

I he would stroll uninterrupted as the streets were quiet. 
Walking up Cortland street, the only two n 
to see something in him worth i >.\ lopin - A . ■ ie prelim- 
' inaries one approached him from the front and the oil.' 
, the rear. This to him meant robber ... i dauntless bear- 
| ing and unwavering course of Mr. Cornell caused a retreat of 
| the ruffians, who upon closer inspection found they wei 

taken in their man. Mr. Corned served two terms of four 
i years each as Director of Wittcnburg Co ngficld, 

Ohio, lie, as was his father, was a strong anti-slaver) 
prior to the war, and that in the slave State of Maryland. Me 
j is now an ardent Republican. Mr. and Mrs. Cornell ha\ 

a family of six children — Mary, deceased, wife of Alexander 
Freeman: Wesley Calvin, of Washi iry ; Hester 

Y.. wife of R. C. Provines; Martha E., wife of Thomas Elson ; 

Laura, at home, and George, who died at the aj; >l . 

j months. Mattic Frecn 

Mary, has been adopted into the hi cr grandparents. 

]\'i/soit S. Dancer, son .... and Margaret Dancer, was 

born in Ashland County, Ohio, < )ct. 9, 1S42. In 1S48 his parents 
came to De Kalb County, and kept the old Parsons Hoi I in 
Auburn the first year ; then bought 240 acres of heavily tim- 
bered land in Jackson Township, on section 20. His .. 
born in Washington County, Pa., April 26, 1802, and his wife, 
Mar-.. ret Boyce, in New York. April 12 of the same year. 
They were married in Ohio, July 10, 1S23. Mr. Dancer wa> a 
man of strict integrity, highly intellectual and a prominent citi- 
zen of the county. His wife died April 29, 1669, and he July 
20, 1S73. They had a family of nine children — Elizabeth 
married John Duncan, who died in Ohio, and is now !:. 
of William Essig; John, a physician of Lagrange County, Ind.; 
William, a physician, who came to Indiana in 1846 ... 
ticed in Auburn till his death in 1854: Eliaswentto Vermillion 
County, 111., and there married, and enlisted in Company I. One 
Hundred and Twenty -fifth Illinois Infantry, and died in ;,-'■<.; ; 



HIST. iRY 0I<" t>Ii KAI.H COl n n . 649 

Mary, wife of GeorgcMoorc, I; p dj Mich.; brirahAnn, 

lV -ife 0! Theodore Shepard, of Lagrange, Ind.; Elij h di d n 
Ohio, Jan. 9, 184S, aged twenty-two years; Wilson S.; James 
died in 1S50. Wilson S. Dancer was six years of age when 
his parents came to De Kalb County. In his recollections of 
early advantages lie says he was nine years of age when he was 
first enabled to attend school, which was taught by Samuel 
Cornell. 1 le made the best of his limited opportunities and ob- 
tained a good business education, lie was married Jan. 1, 1865, 
to Nora A., daughter of Thomas and Ellen Rowley. She died 
July 1, 187S, leaving six children — John, James, Jessie, Charles 
R., Virdie and an infant, Harry D., who died the 24:., ... the 
same month. All save James are living with their father. March 
11, 1SS0, Mr. Dancer married Mary E. Cool, who was born 
Aug. 18, 1S55, a daughter of John and Sarah Cool. Mr. Dancer 
is one of the most honored citizens of Jackson Township. In 
politics he is a Democrat, and has been elected by his part}' to 
several positions of trust. He owns 115 acres of land on sec- 
tion 20, which is a part of his father's homestead. 

Isaac Ditmars, son of John A. and Eliza Ditmars, was born in 
Wayne County, Ohio, Sept. 7, 1837. When he was sixteen 
years of age he came to De Kalb County with his parents and, 
with the exception of the time he was in the service of his 
country, remained with them till twenty-five years of age. He 
enlisted in September, 1S61, in Company F. Forty -fourth In- 
diana Infantry, and participated in the battle of Fort Donelson 
and at Shiloh, Tenn., on the 6th of April. 1S62, where he was so 
seriously wounded as to necessitate his discharge from the ser- 
vice, and is now receiving a pension on account of his injuries. 
He was married Oct. 30, 1862, to Martha A. George, a native 
of Ashland County, Ohio, born May 24, 1841, a daughter of 
John T. and Nancy George, who came to Indiana in 1844. 
. , in Qtitlgr Town- 

ship where he bought 10s acres of land, which by industry tmd 
frugality he has made into a good farm. His residence is now 
on section 7, Jackson Township, and is one ... th< best in the 
township. He owns sixty-nine acres in the home farm, all un- 
der good cultivation. Mr. and Mrs. Ditmars have had four 
children, but three of whom are living — George M., Mary and 
Anna L. Ulysses M. E., the eldest son, died Oct. 2, 1S73, m 
his eleventh year. He was a robust, healthy boy and in his 



6$0 IIISTO F DE KALB O lUNTY. 

!<>vc for adventure and oul I d >cd a tree, 

when in some w..\ lie lo hi too o tin 

cciving injuries which rcsuUci in do irtv minutes. Mr. 

D • in politics a Re] [ the 

ativc men of the county. Mrs. Ditmars' father was born in 
Pennsylvania, Dec. 9, [Si [, and is still living in Jackson Town- 
ship, DcKalb County, Ind. Her mother was born in Pennsyl- 
vania, July 17, iSi2,and died at her home in Jackson Township, 
March 23, 1S76. 

Peter Ditmars, son oi John A. and Eliza Ditmars, was born 
in Wayne County, Ohio, Aug. 31, 1834, and was in his nine- 
teenth year when his parents moved to De Kalb County. He 
remained at home assisting his father on the farm till after the 
breaking out of the Rebellion. Jan. 25, 1805, he enl 
Company D, Fifty-ninth Indiana Infantry as a recruit and 
served till the mustering out of the regiment in July, 1865. He 
returned home and remained with his parents till his marriage, 
Jan. 6, 1S70, to Lois Grace West, a native of Onondaga County, 
N. V., born Aug. 6, 1840, a daughter of Joseph and Joanna 
West, who settled in Butler Township, De Kalb County, Ind., 
in 1S44. Both arc now deceased. Mr. Ditmars' home is on 
section 6 near the railroad junction, and is noticeable for its 
fine location and beautiful buildings. His farm contains eighty 
acres of valuable land. To Mr. and Mrs. Ditmars have been 
born four children, but two of whom arc living — Jessie May 
and Amy Grace. The eldest, Ida Ivern, died in her third year, 
and the second, William D., aged fifteen months. Mr. Ditmars 
is a Republican in politics. He stands high in the estimation of 
his fellow townsmen and is a representative citizen. 

Edmund Freeman was born near Clarksburg, W. Va., Oct. 22, 
1813. His parents, William and Nancy Freeman, were earl)- 
settlers of Richland County, Ohio, locating there in 1820. His 

Out being a natural mechanic has given considerable attention 
to carpentering and mill work. lie was married Sept. 14, 
1832, to Martha Dancer, a native of Jefferson County. Ohio, 
born June 5, 18:7, a daughter of John and Elizabeth Dancer. 
In March, 1S30, Mr. and Mrs. Freeman and Mr. and Mrs. Dan- 
cer came to De Kalb County. Mr. Freeman bought the farm 
on section 30 known, as the Miller farm where he has since 
lived. He owns fifty-nine acres of choice land, and his resi- 






n ce and I • ■■ .In addi- 

• ,,, to the homestead Mr. Fr< < 

irts o! the counl y. To Mr. and I rci i 

thirteen children, eleven ol \. Li 

j. .no, deceased, married George Essig; Elizabeth, wife of I leiiry 
Myers; Julia, wife of Owen Hensinger; Ro an, wife 

Louisa, widow of John Bowcn ; John, married Eiiza- 
i ey; Caroline S., wifeof Madison Dc Pew; Alexander, 
married Mary Cornell; James, married Mary Hilkey ; George, 
married Miss Bowen ; Edmund H., married Mary Ricklewall. 
The eldest and youngest died in infancy. Mr. Freeman was 
reared in the Methodist Episcopal church, and since 1830 has 
been an active member of the society. In politics Mr. Free- 
man is a Republican, but in local elections sets aside political 
differences and votes for the man he considers the most fitted 
for the place. Mr. Freeman's grandfather, Samuel Freeman, 
bore an honorable part in the war for the independence of the 
colonics. 

Michael Friend was born in Richland County, Ohio, Feb. 7. 
rSio, a son of George and Barbara Friend, natives of Pennsyl- 
vania, and early settlers of Richland County, where the father 

died in 1S28. His mother afterward married Robcrl ... 

In [8 Mr. Friend came to Jackson Township, and 
tract of heavily timbered land, which is now his home, and in 
1842 his mother and stepfather came to the county, and made 
this farm their home till his mother's death in 1852. Mr. Alli- 
son then went to Michigan and died there. Michael Friend 
was married July 23, 1844, to Eliza Miller. In 1S54 they settled 
on their farm which is one of the best in the township. Mr. 
Friend is one of the most practical farmers of the township, 
and his home shows the care of a painstaking and thrifty owner. 
Mis buildings arc all in good order, and his residence is one of 
the best iii the township. To Mr, um\ Mrs. Friend have been 
born five children — Mary Ellen, wife of Samuel Osbornj James 
M., with his lather; Nancy Jane, deceased; Norris and Amos; 
the two latter born in this county. July 9, 1883, Mrs. Friend 
died, leaving her husband after thirty-nine years of happy mar- 
ried life, to finish the journey of life alone. 

Charles P. Glazier, was born in Trumbull County, Ohio, Aug. 
28, 1848, a son of Mosley and Alzina Glazier. When he was 
four years of age his parents moved to De Kalb County, Ind., 



V 



652 .:. l'i n<\ tJl Dli ...v. U COI . i ', . 

and scltlcd on section 27, Butler Town hip. Hi: 1 di, d 

in Ohio, Jan. 14, i S77, while visiting relatives, and his remains 
were brought to Muntertown, Ind., where his eldest son now re- 
sides. His mother still lives at the old homestead in Bu 
Township. Their family consisted of four children — Ellen J. 
born July 16, 1S36; Nathan C, born March 25, 1846; Charles 
P., born Aug. 28, ;.X-;N; Ann E., born Oct. 8, 1855. Ellen J. 
married Samuel Clark from Ohio, and subsequently moved to 
Wisconsin where Mr. Clark died, and she afterward married 
M. F. Lunt. Nathan married a daughter of Samuel Lize. 
C. P. married Eliza E. Rowley, daughter of Thomas and Ellen 
Rowley. Ann E. married M. A. Carnahan, and resides on the 
old homestead. Their father was a very energetic and hard 
laboring man. At the time oi bib death he had just completed 
a nice residence. C. P. Glazier remained with his parents till 
his marriage, and then located on section 3 1 , Jackson Township, ] 
where he has a fine farm of 113 acres. He is a great lover of i 
sports, especially the chase, and since the game has been driven 
1'rorn this county he occasionally goes to Wisconsin for a few 
weeks' deer hunting. In the winter of 1SS4 he visited his sister 
Mrs. Lunt, in Clark County, Wis., and brought home several 
trophies of his expertness. In politics he is a Democrat. 

John Hamilton was born in Medina County, Ohio, Nov. 2, ! 
1840, a son of Dr. Nathan and Julia Hamilton. In 1S42 Dr. 
Hamilton, with his wile and two children, John ana George 
W.. came to Dc Kalb County and located in Concord with the 
intention of making it his home, but his career of usefulness 
was suddenly brought to a close. May 2, 1843, m company 
with his brother-in-law, Lyman Chidscy, lie attempted to cross 
the .swollen St. Joseph River in a skiff, but their boat was upset 1 
and the Doctor was drowned. The mothersoon after returned 
with her children to Ohio, and in 1S46 married Eden Hamilton, j 
a cousin of the Doctor's. He. . '■■'. ., . . 

- . \\ ,: ■ , ;.....,. ,. . .... hi ; 1 ... came to De 

I Kalb County and settled on section 10, Jackson Township, on 

1 the farm now owned and occupii . b; ■ on George W. One 

J son was born to Mr. and Mrs. Cahow, Leonard, now a resident 
j of Steuben County. Mrs. Cahow died Oct. S, 1877. John 
! Hamilton made his home with his mother till the breaking out 
j of the war of the Rebellion, when, Aug. 24, 1S61, he enlisted in 
Company H, Eighth Ohio Infantry. He was with General 2>Ic 



Clcllan in his , Vi inia, and \\ ith • 

Shields a1 Winchester, where, Marcl i, i . ■ wa wounded 
by a minic ball passing through his thighs. In May he was 
.. and July 19, 1862, « 

hew; emp ■ cr 

army of the Cumberland, and while 

I shoulder. Returning home, in 1866 he 
became id* li the interests of De Kalb County. Sept. 
24, 1S68, Mr. Hamilton was married >< th Welch, a na- 
tive of Medina County, Ohio, born Oct. 7, 1844, a daughter ol 
Cornelius and Sally Welch. They had two children — James 

id Mary. In 1876 Mr. and Mrs. ttled on 

farm where they now reside. He receives a pension for inju- 
ries received while in the service of his country. I . 

was the first while child born in Medina T..\ p, Medina 

Co.. Ohio, and a wealthy man had promised the deed of 
fifty acres to the first male child born in the township, but 

owing to the enhanced value ol the settled by gi\ 

cents instead of the deed. 

George IV. Hamilton, the eldest son of Dr. Hamilton 
born in Medina County, Ohio, Jan. 28, 1838. He lived with 
his mother till manhood, and then came to Dc Kalb C lunti . 
and soon after, Sept. 5, 1861, enlisted in Company H, Thir- 
teenth Indiana Infantry. He participated in the battles of 
Shiloh, Stone River, Chickamauga, Atlanta. Franklin and Nash- 
ville. Dec. 12, 1S63, he veteranized and served till Xwv. 25, 
1865, serving four years and two and a half months. He 
returned to De Kalb County, and Jan. 25, 1866, in Medina 
County, Ohio, was married to S. Elizabeth Phelps, a native oi 

that count} - , born Nov. 12, 1839, a daughter ol George ; 

Sally Phelps. One child has lived to grace their home — Eva- 
line J. John R. died in infancy. Mr. Hamilton resides on the 
old homestead of his mother on section 10. 

James Henderson, son of Samuel and Letty (Moody) Hender- 
son, was born in Richland County, Ohio, June 2, 1S31, and was 
in his sixth year when his parents moved De Kalb County. 
He lived with them till manhood, receiving as good an educa-- 
tion as could be obtained in the district schools. He was reared 
a farmer, and has made that vocation his life work. Oct. 5, 
1S56, he married Mary Jane Sanders, a native of Wayne Count)-, 
Ohio, born June 22, 1S37, a daughter of Henry and Mary San- 



654 HISTORY OF DE KALI; o - 

ders. The first three years he worked his father's farm, and 
then moved to the home where they now live, which is 160 
acres of his father's old homestead on section 36. 1 lis land is well 
cultivated and his residence and farm buildings are among the 
best in the township, lie pays special attention to sheep-grow- 
ing, having one of the finest Hocks in the count)'. He and his wife 
take a just pride in their hencry where they have about twenty 
varieties of pure-bred fowls, Mrs. Henderson giving this indus- 
try her personal supervision. They have a family of three sons 
— Newton, William Franklin and George. Mr. Henderson is a 
worthy representative of one of the leading pioneer families of 
De Kalb County. 

John Hetiderson, farmer and stock-raiser, section 36, Jackson 
Township, was born on the old homestead of his father in this 
township, July 3, 1S44, a son of Samuel and Letty Henderson. 
After his father's death he continued to make his home with 
his mother till his marriage. He now has a fine residence on 
section 36, his farm of 160 acres being one-hall of the home- 
stead. Mr. Henderson inherits his father's love of fine stock, and 
the greater part of his attention is given to breeding blooded 
stock. He was the first to introduce Devon thorough-bred 
cattle and Shropshire-down sheep into Northeastern Indiana, 
and in this enterprise has been a public benefactor. He is one 
of the most successful stock-raisers in the county, and his cattle 
herds and flocks of sheep are unexcelled. Mr. Henderson 
one of the most influential and prominent men of the tow 1 hip. 
lie is now serving his third term as Magistrate. In politics he 
adheres to the Democratic party. He was married March 30, 
1870, to Adeline Keycs, a native of Carroll County, Ohio, born 
Oct. 21, 1S46. They have four living children — Josephine, 
Mabel, Glengyle and Kitty. Their eldest child, William R., 
died at the age of six years. 

Smuncl Henderson, one of the earliest and most prominent 
settlers of Jackson Township, De Kalb County, Ind., was born 
in the State of Pennsylvania, in the first year of the nineteenth 
century. His father, William Henderson, moved a few years 
later to Harrison County, Ohio, where our subject was reared 
on a farm. He was married in Richland County, Ohio, in 1823, 
to Letty Moody, a native of Westmoreland County, Pa., born 
in 1S05. In October, 1836, they moved to De Kalb County, 
Ind., locating on section 36, Jackson Township. Mr. Henderson 






&55 



built a log cabin, which was 

: art of the township. en children, six w< 

in Ohio and four in Jackson Township — William resides in 
Concord Township; Jane married Henry Blake, and dice; in 
1S63; George resides in Allen County ; Sarah married Peter 
High, of Auburn; James is a prominent farmer of Jackson 
Township; David lives in Michigan; Rachel is the wife S. M. 
Braden ; Joseph R. resides in Kosciusko County; John and 
Elizabeth, now Mrs. Samuel Stafford, reside in Jackson Town- 
ship. Mr. Henderson early turned his attention to raising 
Mock, and made that industry a successful and lucrative one. 
He was a man of untiring energy, and is remembered by all 
who knew him as a man of active and enterprising zeal in all 
public affairs. His affection was largely centered in his family, 
and he never let anything interfere with his giving them his 
first and principal attention. He gave to each of his sons, ex- 
cept David, who preferred and received a college education, 
100 acres of land, and to each of his daughters he gave an 
equal amount in money. He was a devoted member of the 
Masonic fraternity, squaring his life by its tenets. He died in 
1S63 and was buried by his beloved order with honors. His 
wife survived him till Dec. 5, 1880. In her childhood she 
joined the Methodist Episcopal church, but later joined the Lu- 
theran church, always living a devoted Christian life. 

Amos Hilkey was born in Ashland County, Ohio, June 28, 
1843, the third child of John and Susanna Hilkey. John Hil- 
key was born in Maryland. Oct. 16, 1S16, and when a small boy 
removed with his parents, George and Barbara Hilkey, to Ash- 
land County, Ohio, where he grew to manhood and was mar- 
ried Feb. 29, 1S39, to Susanna Anthony. In March, 1846, he 
became identified with De Kalb Count)-, locating near Spencer- 
ville. Notwithstanding he had passed the age which required 
him to perform military service, he enlisted in the war - 
Rebellion in Company L, Second Indiana Cavalry, and se wed 
fourteen months. He died at Nashville, Tenn., Sept. 14, iS'63. 
His widow survived him till Oct. 16, 1875. Three of their sons 
were also in the service of their country, viz.: George W., who 
enlisted in the Eighty-eighth Infantry, but was discharged in 
1S63 for disability, and after his recovery enlisted in the One 
; Hundred and Fifty-second Infantry and served till the close of 
the war. Daniel enlisted in the Thirtieth Infantry and served 



V' 



656 HISTORY 01 r Dli KALli COUNTY. 

till the close of the war; now resides in Alabama. Amos 
enlisted Aug. 11, 1S62, in Company D, Eighty-eighth Infantry, 
and participated in the battles of Perr}'villc, Stone River, 
Chickamauga, Atlanta, and all others of that gallant regiment, 
with Sherman, and at Washington, D. C, in May, 1865, was one 
of the proud heroes of the grand review ; was discharged June 

7, 1S65. Of the other children of John Hiikey, Frani 1 

ried George Thorp, of Allen County ; John E. and Abraham 
(twins) died in infancy ; James A. resides in Nebraska; Benja- 
min and Samuel arc residents of Jackson Township ; Mary, de- 
ceased, was the wife of J. D. Freeman ; Charles Bennett died 
at the age of fifteen years. Amos Hiikey entered the employ 
ol Edmund Freeman after his return from the war, and soon 
after married his daughter, Rosan, who was born in Ohio, Sept. 
13, 1S42. He remained in the employ of Mr. Freeman six years 
and then bought eighty acres of land on the same section (30), 
where he has a comfortable and happy home. Mr. and Mrs. 
Hiikey have eight living children — Edmund Norton, Martha 
S., Elmer L., Mary J., Howard Hayes, Bessie A., Jesse O. and 
Francis M. Daniel B. died at the age of four years; Amos A., 
aged two years, and Edith B.,aged four months. Mr. and Mrs. 
Hiikey are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. In 
politics he is a Republican. 

Henry Hincs, Justice of the Peace, Jackson Township, 
was born in Ashland County, Ohio, April 1, 1839, a son °f 
Francis and Lovina (Culler) Flines. In 1S44 his parents moved 
to Kosciusko County, Ind., where the father died in 1877, and 
the mother still lives on the old homestead. Our subject lived 
with his parents till his marriage to Sarah Abigail Smith, Feb. 6, 
1S58. She was born in Medina County, Ohio, April S, 1838. 
The year following their marriage they came to De Kalb 
County and settled in Jackson Township, and began making 
a farm out of a tract of heavily timbered land. Th 
have a fine farm of 160 acres, eighty acres and their residence 
being on section u, and eighty acres on section 10, all cleared 
by frugality and good management. Mr. Mines is a man of 
sterling character, and upright, independent action, and his 
worth was soon recognized by his fellow-townsmen, who 
placed him in the front in township affairs. He is now serving 
his third term as Justice of the Peace. His honorable dealings 
coupled with a strong sense of right and justice to all, make 



, 



:.. I'ORY Of DE K/\ .. i i 657 

especially fitted for this po; itio 1. In politics he acts with 
the Democratic party. Mrs. and Mrs. Mines have six children 
—LilHe Louisa, wife of James II. Farver,of Kosi iu ko ( ml 
lad.; Francis M., Wesley L., Leonard A., Lovina and Effic A. 

Xatkan Johnson was born in Richland County, Ohio, Feb. 19, 
[tJ35, a son of Amariah and Jane (Wyatt) Johnson, who came 
to Dc Kalb County in 1S37. He remained with his father till 
twenty-seven years of age, when, on Christmas day, 1862, he 
was married to Hannah Hay ward, a native of Lenawee 
Count}', Mich., born Jan. 5, 1845, a daughter of S. R. and Polly 
flayward. She came to De Kalb County to take charge oi the 
district school. They commenced housekeeping on sc< tion 
Jackson Township, where they have since lived. Mr. Johnson 
enlisted in the late war of the Rebellion, as a recruit in Com- 
pany A, Thirteenth Indiana Infantry, joining- the regiment in 
front of Petersburg: was afterward in the expedition of Gen- 
eral Butler against Ft. Fisher, and in the expedition of General 
Terry, participating in the severe battle culminating in the sur- 
render of the fort. He was discharged with the regi 
Goldsboro, N. C, and returned to his peaceful life on the farm. 
Mr. Johnson is one of the most enterprising men of the town- 
ship, and is an influential and prominent citizen. He has a fam- 
ily of two children — Dora A. and Clark Sylvester. 

William Johnson, son of Amariah and Jane (Wyatt) Johnson, 
was born in Jackson Township, May ;j. 1842. His parents 
came to the county from Richland Count)-, Ohio, in company 
with his grandfather, Nathan Wyatt, and settled on section 13. 
Mis mother died Aug. [4, 1854, and his father, Sept. 14, 1877. 
Aug. 9, 1S62, Mr. Johnson enlisted in Company D, Eighty- 
eighth Indiana Infantry, and participated in the battles of 
Perryville, Stone River, Chattanooga, Chickamauga, Lookout 
Mountain, Mission Ridge, Atlanta, Kenesaw Mountain, with 

Sherman tsthi ■ n, ind through Eh is to Bentonvilie, 

where he was wounded in the left side, lie was taken tu the 
hospital at Xew York, from there to Madison, Ind., and there 
discharged June 9, 1865, but has never recovered from the 
effects of his wounds, and now receives a pension. After his 
return home he was married Sept. 17, 1865, to Rachel Hayward, 
a native of Lenawee County, Mich., born Dec. 14, 1842, daugh- 
ter of S. R. and Polly Hayward, and a teacher in the public 
schools of this county. The first year after their marriage they 



T 



_^______ . —_ _ I 

65S ... I'l >UV 1 IK I)1C .... 

in 1870, settled on section 1 5 where they now live. They have 

a good farm ol eighty acres, and a pleas 1 idence. Their 

family consists ol live children Riley M., George, Lewis C, 
Minnie and Hannah F. Political!}', Mr. Johnson is a Rcpu ili- 
can. lie is an upright,, honorable business man and an esteemed 
member ol society. 

Janus G. Lawhcad, son of Benjamin and Mary Jane (Essig) 
Lawhcad, is a native ol Jackson Township. Mis grandparents, 
James and Martha Lawhcad, came to Dc Kalb County from 
Wayne County, Ohio, in 1S39. Of their nine children all save 
Elizabeth, who married George Moore, are living — Johnson, 
Isaac, Benjamin, Samuel, Nancy, widow of Isaac Culbertson; 
Eleanor, wife 01 John Boyles; John, and Eliza, wife of Henry 
Nott. James Lawhcad died in 1854, and his widow in March, 
1SS0. Benjamin Lawhead was born in Fayette County, Pa., 
April 1, 1S20, and moved with his parents to Wayne County, 
Ohio, in 1S34, and to Dc Kalb Counts- in 1 S39. lie was 
married in 1S43 to Mary Jane Essig, a native of Stark County, 
Ohio, born in 1S21. He bought the farm where they now 
reside on section 17 in 1851. Two children have been born 
to them — James G. and Caroline, wife of Charles L. Cool, 
of Auburn. James G. Lawhcad was married April 17, [S70, 
to Wealthy B. Nelson, who died April 27, 1877, leaving two 
children — William B. and Queen Victoria. Sept. 1, 1879, 
Mr. Lawhead married Eliza Walter, a native of Jackson 
Township, born Nov. 27, 185 1, a daughter of Joseph and 
Sarah Walter. They have three children — Gertrude, Walter 
and Frank. Mr. Lawhcad has always made his home on the old 
homestead with his parents. He is one of the most active and 
energetic men of the township, always ready to assist any cause 
of public benefit. 

William McClcllan was born Oct. 23, 1826, in Wayne County, 
Ohio, his lather being a pioneer of that county, lie remained 
at home till twenty years of age, and in October, 1846, came to 
Dc Kalb County and Worked for his brother John, who had 
preceded him, clearing land. In October, 1S47, he returned to 
Ohio and remained till August, 184S, when his mother, Eliza- 
beth (Knapp) McClcllan, died and he then came again to Dc 
Kalb County and found employment clearing and chopping for 
Jlj the settlers. He was married Sept. 2, 1849, to Permelia Os- 



u\ 



it' - ni'i 



i i ■-. i . 



i 

borne, a native ol Wayne Counl.y, Ohio, born May 29, 1829, a 
daughter ol Aaron and Susanna (I luch) O b ... .vho settled 

i n Jackson Township in 1841. 1 ler moth* 1 1 162 and her 

father in 1S82. In April, 1852, Mr. McClellan settled on section 
3 where he has sir.ee resided. He has a pleasant home and is 
surrounded with all material comforts. Mr. and Mrs. McClel- 
lan have never been blessed with children, but have reared to 

man and womanhood several who were left to the mercies of 
a cold world. Aaron Osborne, a nephew of Mrs. McClellan, 
and now a resident ol this township, found in them a father and 
mother in place of those who were called to leave this world. 
Susannah Watson, a child of Mrs. McClellan's sister, was given 
a home from her ninth year till her marriage to Silas McGov- 
ern. Harrison S. Wiser found a home with them from his 
third till his fourteenth year. William Arnold McGovern, a 
son of Silas and Susannah McGovern, was born Sept. 12, 1869, 
and is now an adopted child of Mr. and Mrs. McClellan. Their 
home is the embodiment of hospitality, and their kindness and 
liberality have won them many friends. 

John W. Means was born in Jackson Township, Oct. 23, 1S50, 
a son of James and grandson of James Means. James Means, 
Sr., came from Richland County, Ohio, 1838, and settled on 
100 acres of land on section 23, Jackson Township. He and 
his wife, Elizabeth Hall, were natives of Pennsylvania, bui 
moved to Ohio alter their marriage. Two sons, William and 
James, came to Indiana in 1836 in company with Samuel Hen- 
derson, and eight, Eliza, Hugh, John, Peggy, Lewis, Mary 
Ann, Isabella and Andrew, came with their parents. William 
and Hugh lost their lives in a well from the foul gases. Eliza 
is the wife of Samuel Wasson, of Concord Township. John 
lives in Cass County, Micii. ; Peggy married George Friend 
and died in Ohio; Lewis died in this county ; Mary Ann is the 
wile ol Frank Lailey, of Nebraska; pabeda married Hiram 
Petty, ol Cass County, iowa ; Andrew lives m kcu Cloud 
Minn. James Means, Sr., died in 1852. His widow survived 
him many years, and died at the home of Samuel Wasson. 
James Means, Jr., was born in Pennsylvania in 181 1. He was 
married in Dc Kalb County, March 14, 1S39, to Isabella Wat- 
son, a native of Richland County, Ohio, born Feu. 15, 1S21, a 
daughter of John and Elizabeth Watson, who came to He Kalb 
County in 183G. To them were born six children— William ; 






66o HISTORY OK l)E KALI! CO 

Elizabeth, wife oi Willis Bishop; Mary and .'■ ... 

died in infancy; James, an i deceased. Mr. Means died 

Sept. 22, iS6S. Mrs. Means resides on the old homestead with 
her son John W., on section 24. This farm contains 160 acres 
of choice land, and is one of the best farms in the township. 
John YV. Means was married Aug. 1, 1S69, to Rebecca C. Far- 
ver, a native of Ashland County. Ohio, born May 21, 1852, a 
daughter of Isaac and Mary Ann Farver. They :..... 
seven children ; but four are living — Clara J., Ida Viola, Irene 
May, and Nettie E. Mary Belle, James W. and an infanl un- 
named are deceased. 

Wesley D. Miller, son of Thomas and Mary Miller, was born 
in Jackson Township, March 3, 1S47. His grandfather, William 
Miller, came to the county about 1030, from Stark Counl j . ( ... . 
and settled on section 6, Jackson Tow nship, his wife dying soon 
after their arrival. Their children were seven in nun 
three of whom are living — Joseph, Benjamin and John, all of 
whom live in Missouri. Lettice was the wife of Robert Will- 
iams; Jane married Thomas Griffin and moved to Missouri, 
where Mr. Griffin died, and she subsequently married a Mr. 
Cowan ; William died in Missouri. Thomas married Mary E., 
daughter of Daniel McCroy. Her mother was killed in Ohio 
by a falling tree, and her father afterward married again and 
came to De Kalb County. He died in Allen County. Thomas 
and Mary E. Miller had a family of eight children — Wesley D., 
John G., Lydia J., wife of Samuel Andrews; Mary, died at the 
age of ten years; Emma, wife of Fremont Smith; Celia, de- 
ceased, wife of Thomas Stafford ; William died in infancy ; and 
Addie, now living with her widowed mother. Thomas Miller 
was killed in 1871 by the overturning of his wagon loaded with 
railroad ties. Wesley D. Miller was married Jan. 21, 1875, to 
Rebecca Coy, a native of Jackson Township, born April ;. 
1S52, a daughter of John Coy, who came to De Kalb County 
from Wayne County, Ohio, in 1845. After Ins marriage Mr. 
Miller remained a year on the old homestead, and then moved 

to his present home on section 9. In addition to cttlth 

small farm, he has lor the past eleven years been engaged in 
brickmaking, and by his skill and industry has made it a suc- 
cessful and lucrative business. Mr. and Mrs. Miller have had 
three children — Ada, Minnie, who died at the age of three 
years, and May. Mr. Miller's uncle John has been a great 









CilS2/>L<) ' &-7*J ^SCMA&z 



/ 



HISTORY OF DE KALlt COUNTY. G6l 

hunter, enjoying the sport and making a good shot, which in 
in early 'lay was very useful to the old settlers. 

Samuel Osborne , son of Elias and Mary Ann Osborne, was 
born in Jackson Township, Aug. 5, 1844. His grandfather, 
\aron Osborne was a native of New Jersey, and subsequently 
moved to Wayne County, Ohio, and thence in November, 
1841, to De Kalb County, Ind. He was one of the pioneers of 
Jackson Township, locating on section 16. He gave each of his 
<.ons. Moses, William, Elias and John, eighty acres of land. 
Moses, now of Michigan, is the only one living, flis two 
(blighters, Mrs. Permelia McClellan and M rs. Jane Lige, reside 
,n Jackson Township. Aaron Osborne died in February, 1883 ; 
his wife many years earlier. Elias, his son, married Mary Ann, 
daughter of John Watson, a pioneer of 1836. They reared a 
family of four children — Samuel, Aaron W. and John W. (twins) 
and Elizabeth. Elias Osborne died Nov. 24, 1S75. His widow 
lives on the old homestead on section 16, with her daughter. 
Samuel Osborne was married Nov. 10, 1S69, to Mar)- Ellen 
Friend, a native of Ohio, born May 18, 1S45, a daughter of 
Michael and Eliza Friend. They have two children — George 
F. and an infant. Mr. Osborne has a pleasant home on section 
16, Jackson Township. 

John C. Owens, the youngest of six children, and the fourth 
born on New Year's day, of John and Phcebe Owens, was born 
Jan. 1, 1828, in Wayne County, Ohio. His father died when 
he was an infant, and his mother was left to rear her family. 
His educational advantages were limited, but he was ambitious, 
and by private reading and observation has acquired a good 
business education. He was reared on a farm, and has made 
agricultural pursuits his life work. In the fall of 1849, with very 
little money, he came with his brother, Marchall, to De Kalb 
County, Ind., intending to enter land, but the next winter was 
Mck with typhoid fever and was unable to work. This ex- 
hausted the little money he had, and he was obliged as soon as 
able, to work by the month to regain what he had lost. In 1851 
he bought forty acres of heavily timbered land on section 1, 
Jackson Township, and in 1852 began to clear it, working on 
his own land when not employed by some one else. In August, 
1S52, he was married to Julia A., daughter of John and Anna 
Thomas, who came to De Kalb County in 1840. The follow- 
ing May Mrs. Owens died, and Mr. Owens afterward married 
42 






111STUK\ UK UK KM 



Mary Jane, daughter ol Robcrl and Margaret Culbcrl on, . 

Concord Township. Pive children w r< bo ... Robcrl 

W. died in his fifth year; Margaret E., wife of Henry McGin- 
nis; James M. and Marchall, al home, and J-..:. VV. lied in 
infancy, Dec. 5, iSj2. Mr. Owens' home was again left mother- 
less, and in December, 1S73, he married Elizabeth Wilson, a 
native of Holmes County, Ohio, born May 30, 1S54. Mr. 
Owens' mother makes her home with him. She is now in her 
eighty-fifth year, and enjoys good health. Mr. Owens' farm 
contains sixty-live acres of good land, well cultivated, and he is 
one of the most esteemed men oi the township. He is in poli- 
tics a Republican. 

Marchall Ozocus, farmer, section 1, Jackson Township, was 
born in Wayne County, Ohio, Jan. 1, 1825, a son of John and 
Phcbe Owens. His father died when he was three years of 
age. His mother is living with his brother John in Jackson 
Township. Reared by a widowed mother he was early obliged 
to learn the lesson ><[ independence. He remained in his na- 
tive county till 0; age, and in the tall 0; 1846 came 10 Indiana 
and lived in Auburn the following winter. The next year he 
worked at anything that offered, and in the spring of 184S 
bought the land which is now his home and went to work to 
clear the timber, in connection with a friend, William Rey- 
nolds, who had land near him. In the tali of 1S4S he returned 
to Ohio and remained a year. In the tall of 1S49 ' :c came again 
to De Kalb County, but the following winter was sick and un- 
able to work, and on his recover) - was obliged to work for 
others to pay his indebtedness and to get the money to enable 
him to resume work on his own land. He was married No- 
vember, 1S54, to Nancy McDowell, a native of Ohio, born Feb. 
20, 1S29, a daughter of Abraham and Mar)- McDowell, pioneers 
..i Welis County, lnd. Together the young couple went to 
work, and by ■■■ ! ■■' ■■■■■ ■ -•" ■ " •■'■" ' ■ ■ ■• ■ '■' 
themselves a good home. Understanding by experience the 
hardships having to be undergone by the poor they are always 

ready to assist worthy applicants and help them to a more c - 

fortable way of living. They have had a family of six children, 
but three are living— Julia Ann, Erne A. and Etta A. (twins). 
The eldest died in infancy, Mary at the age of sixteen years and 
Laura A. aged two years. 

Adam Prosscr, a son of William and Mary Prosser, was born 



6C3 

. 

a o-c when his parents came to De K 

with his parents till twenty-four yer id then enlisted, 

Aug. 6, 1662, in Company C, I 1 I Infantry. 

He participated in the the engagement 

at Stone River found him sii 

in the ranks at Chick; .... ... 1 he was with S 

lanta and in all the subsequent engagements till July, when he- 
was wounded in the right thi: his active service. 
He then served on detached service till his discharge, July 15, 
[S65. He is now receiving a pension on account of injuries 
received while in the service of his country. After his return 
home he went West and was employed about ten years in the 
building of railroads,, the greater pari of ... 1 the Kan- 
sas Pacific. July i. T , 1876, he bought the farm which is now 
his home, on section 3, Jackson Township. He was married 
Oct. 8, 1S82, to Barbara, daughter of Henry : 
Stroh. She was born in Union Township, De Kalb County, 
March 25, 1852. Mr. and Mrs. Prosser have one child — Ar- 
lington, born May 21, 1,884. 

Joseph C. Prosser, son of William and Mary Prosser, was born 
in Ashland County, Ohio, April 25, 1S41, and was twelve years 
of age when his parents moved to De Kalb County. He 
remained at home till Aug. 15, 1S62, and then enlisted in Com- 
pany A, One Hundredth Indiana Infantry. His first engagc- 
ment was at Holly Springs, Miss., in the fall of 1S62. Subse- 
quently he participated in the siege of Vicksburg, battle of 
Mission Ridge, and all the battles of his regiment in the cam- 
paign with Sherman to Atlanta and the sea, and thence to 
Washington, D. C, where he participated in the grand review 
of the army May 22, 1S65. June 8, 1S65, he was discharged 
and returned home, where he has since been as faithful to the 

iluticsof 

pated in eighteen battles and many skirmishes. Mr, Pro ui 

was married April 24, 1S79, to Louisa Da'.iz, a native ol Fr 

lin County, Pa., born Oct. 15, 1833, a daughter of Jacob and 

Barbara Baltz, natives ol Germany, co he United 

States before their marriage, locating in Pennsylvai 
iater in Indiana. Her mother died in November, 1877. 

William Prosser was born in Erie County, Pa., Sept. 12, 1802, 
and was there married in 1S29 to Mary Lefler, who was burn 



66.) IIIKTOIO I i|< l")l KM ,. CO! 

iii Canton County, Sept.. 26, 1S0S. Tl 

spent in Ohio, and in 1S53 . Kalb C mnl >. , Ind., 

and settled on section 10, Jackson Tow p. lie ... 

the most prominent citizens of the county, residing' here till his 

death, May 9, 1SS1. liis widow is si;'.', living on the 

stead with her son, Joseph C. To them were born twelve chil- 
dren, nine of whom went to De Kalb County with their 
parents — Nancy (wife of John Lawhead), Henry, Adam, Will- 
iam S., Joseph C, Sarah (wife 1 >i Daniel Si 
of John A. Provines), .Maria (wife ol Jacob B. Coy), a.,.. Mai ■, 
(wife of Sanmel Goodwin). James came to the county in 1854 
and now resides in Auburn. The eh '.est son, John, died in Oc- 
tober, 1 S 5 1 , in his twenty-second year, and the youngest died 
in infancy, March, 1S53. 

Alexander Provines was born in the village of Burgettstown, 
Washington Co., Pa., Jan. 31, 1S1S, a son of Robert and Jane 
(Smith) Provines, natives of Pennsylvania, of Irish descent. Fie 
is the third of five children, and the only one now living. In 
the fall of 1S1S his parents moved to Harrison County, Ohio, 
where his mother died April 27, 1S23. Sept. 11, 1S23, his father 
married Esther Jenkins. Two of their three children are liv- 
ing — Mrs. Lovina Dickason and Mrs. Esther Dickason. I lis 
father entered 160 acres of land in Harrison County, and re- 
mained there seven years, when he moved to Tuscarawas 
County. The second wife died Oct. 7, 182S. He then left the 
farm and worked at the blacksmith's trade till taken with the j 
sickness which resulted in his death, Aug. 3, 1829. Alexander 
Provines was thus left an orphan at the early age of eleven ; 
years. He lived with a relative, William Moore, a short time, 
and then went to Wayne County, Ohio, where he spent the i 
greater part of the time till his majority, working at the car- | 
penter's trade and in grist-mills. He early learned the lesson 
of independent action, and it has tended to make him a self- 
reliant, energetic and prosperous business man. His education 
was mainly obtained by private reading and observation, lie I 
is a close observer oi passing events, a man of decided convic- | 
tions, and one free to express his opinions on matters of public 
interest. He is a ready and pleas.:.,; conversationalist, a genial, 1 
social friend, and is esteemed by all with whom he comes 11 
contact. It has been his habit for many years to keep a daily- 
record of temperature and rain and snow fall, and in extremes 



[STORY 01 D ....; COUNTY. 



66? 



of heat or cold an hourly ob m sun to sun. He is 

an ardent Republican, and, although on thi ■ noril 

in his township, has held sevi il itions of trust. He was 
Assessor two years in an early day, and has been County Com- 
missioner live years. Mr. Provir.es was married Oct. 21, 1841, 

to Dorcas Adams, a native ol A I County, Ohio, born Jan. 

16, 1821. In April, [853, they came to Dc Kalb County, and 
settled on section 9, Jackson Township, where they have a 
pleasant home of 15/acrcsall well improved. But fifteen acres 
had been cleared when he settled on it. The first year he 
planted an orchard, which is now one of the best in the county. 
Mr. and Mrs. Provines have had nine children, four ol whom 
were born in De Kalb County. The eldest and youngest died 
in infancy. Those living are — John A., James, Alexander H., 
Lucian, Robert C, Mrs. Jane Prosser and Mary. John A. is a 
druggist of Spencerville, the rest all reside in Jackson Town- 
ship. 

James Provines, third child of Alexander and Dorcas Pro- 
vines, was born in Wayne County, Ohio, Jan. 7, 1846, and was 
in his eighth year when his parents moved to De Kalb County. 
His early education was received in the schools of Jackson 
Township, and but for his ambition would have ended 
as his services were needed on the farm, but his studious habits 
when not otherwise employed have made him one of the best 
informed men in the township. April 30, 1864, he enlisted in 
the war of the Rebellion in the 100-day service, in Company K, 
One Hundred and Thirty-ninth Indiana Infantry, and served 
till Sept. 29, 1SG4. Nov. 11, 1609, he was married to Helen 
Woolsey, a native of Delaware Count)-, N. V., born Nov. 10, 
1S44, a daughter of Joseph and Maria Woolsey- They have 
three children— Frank A., Mary E. and Perry M. Mr. Pro- 
vines is an active, successful business man. In connection with 

gun |fing on hi! -■ ■■• \\ toqk, shipping to 

the Buffalo market. Mrs. Provines' par-cms came to Dl Ivalla 
County in February, 184S, and settled on section 3, Jackson 
Township, the west half of their homestead of 160 acres being 
the home of Mr. Provines. They had a family of eight chil- 
dren — Elizabeth, a prominent school teacher, died at the age 
of twenty -six years; Abigail, widow of William Stewart, who 
died while in the war, a member of the Twenty-fourth Iowa 
Infantry; Mary, wife of Henry Straub, of Sargent County, 



666 1 1 1 stok v k j .... 

Dak.; Jotham, ol Si own i ■ 

Charles Sherlock, died in Kansas in March, 1S84; Frances, wife 
of Athens Carr, died in Michigan in February, 1S74; Helen, 
wifeof James Provines; Charlotte, died in 1851, aged five years, 
and Clarinda. Joseph Woolscy was a liberally educated man 
for his time, a cousin of President Woolscy of Yale College, 
and was born the same year, 1S01. lie was Township Super- 
intendent of Schools fourteen years in Delaware County, and 
after coming to Indiana was prominent in all matters of educa- 
tional interest, and at the time of his death, Nov. 6, ;.. _-, , .... 
Township Clerk. His widow died March 10, 1S80, at the home 
of her daughter, Mrs. Provines. 

Nathan Squiers, son of William A. and Susan (Wyatt) Squiers, 
was born in Richland County, Ohio, June 30, 1830. He re- 
mained with his parents till manhood, assisting in the work on 
the farm and attending the district school. Nov. 15, 1S53, he 
was married to Anna S. Marshall, a native of Cornwall, Eng- 
land, born Jan. 17, 1S26, a daughter of James and Anna S. 
(Prout) Marshall. Her mother died when she was an infant, 
and her father soon after came to the United States and set- 
tled in Ohio, where he died in i860. Mr. Squiers was married 
in East Cleveland, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, in 1S53, and immedi- 
ately came to De Kalb County and bought the farm where he 
now lives on section 22, Jackson Township. Aug. 9, 1S62, Mr. 
Squiers enlisted in Company A, One Hundredth* Indiana In- 
fantry and participated in the siege of Vicksburg, Chattanooga, 
and Mission Ridge where he was wounded, and was in the hos- 
pital two months. Joined his regiment and was then wita 
Sherman at Atlanta and on the march to the sea, and through 
the Carolinas to Washington where, in May, 1S65, he was in 
the line at the grand review. He bore an honorable part in 
fifteen battles and many skirmishes, and was discharged June 
S, 1S65. Mr. and Mrs. Squiers have had twelve children, ten 
of whom nre iivlnfi =J&mg« W„ t>i kVhUlcj Cumuy, iud,; &nui. 
uel A., Sydney N., Fillmore A., Susan A., wife of Frank Dancer ; 
John S., Wyatt M., Horace C, Orange V. and Daisy. One 
child died in infancy and one aged two years and three months. 
William A. Squiers was born in New Milford, Conn., March 
l 7> T 799i and when a young man emigrated to Ohio, where he 
was married Jan. 1, 1S20, to Betsey Frisbce, who died April 12, 
1S24, leaving two children — Jonathan, of Allen County, Ind., 



and Eliza « lh, u if< Lester W • Cou . ■ 

Aug. [2, 1S26, Mr. Squicrs married Susa 1 dan jht< r il N 

...... Mary Wyatt, and in 1837 came with the Wyatt family to 

. '. Lib County, and settled on ectio 1 
on the farm now owned by Will . 

were born eight children,,.,.- f— Nathan ; 

Rebecca, wife of Newton Askew; Harriet, wife ol Burton 
Brown; and John VV., of Kansas. Asher C. Squicrs died Aug. 

12, 1863. Mr. Squicrs is making hi: .. ■ c wit! daui lit 

Mrs. Burton Brown. 

James K. Stafford, the third child of James and Ann Stafford, 
was born in Jackson Township, April 23, 1846. ; [e was reared 
to the life of a farmer, remaining with his parents till manhood. 
He received a good education in the common schools. Sept. 
19, 1S72, he was married to Margaret Ann Duncan, a native of 
Ohio, born March 6, 1S48, a daughter of John and Elizabeth 
Duncan. Her father having died in the fall of 1S48, her mother 
moved to De Kalb County with her father, John Dancer, and I 
settled in Jackson Township, and is now the widow of William | 
Essig. Mrs. Stafford is a very cultured woman and before her 
•marriage was a prominent teacher in the De Kalb County I 
schools. Soon after their marriage Mr. Stafford settled on sec- 
tion 14, Jackson Township, where they have since lived. Tl 
are genial and hospitable, and have many friends, who always 
find a welcome at their fireside. Their eldest child died in 
infancy. Two children, Ida B. and Charles D., now make the 
home a happy and lively one. In politics Mr. Stafford is a 
Democrat. 

Samuel Stafford the eldest child of James and Ann Stafford, 
was born in Richland County, Ohio, Feb. 11, 1S40. In October, | 
1S41, his parents came to De Kalb County, Ind., and settled on i 
section 23, Jackson Township, where they lived tiil their death. 
The mother died in October, 1873, aged fifty-five years, and I 

ei the following February, aged sixty-seven years. 

had a family of twelve children, eleven born in De Kalb 
County, nine of whom arc living — Samuel, John, James K., 
Emanuel, Jane (wife of Samuel Morr), Rebecca Ann (wil 
Frederick Morr), Thomas, Sarah E. (wife of Joseph Williams), 
Malinda (wife of John Brown). Samuel lived with his parents 
till his marriage, and then settled on section 15 where he has 
since lived. He has a good farm of eighty acres, well-improved 






66S history 01 i j i -. i,.\; 

land. lie is a pi'.iciic.il fariin i itati\ ul Ll 

township. Lie was married Sej t. i ■' ■,. Lo Susan S; 
native of Richland County, Ohio, born Dec, 10, [S46, . 
ter of William and Rose Ann Saylor, .. . • 1 . ■ to De Kalb 
County in 1S47. Her mother died Nov. 27, 1 s 5 5 . Her father 
is still living on the homestead. Mr. and Mrs. Stafford have 
had five children; three arc living- — George W., James F., and 
Perry A. Their second sun, William W.. and their \ 
Herman, died in infancy. In politics Mr. Stafford is a I >cmocrat. 
John M. Steward, son of James P. and Fanny Stewai 

neers of Dc Kalb County, Ind., was born in Jackson Tov 

July 6, 1S41. James P. was born Sept. 12, 1792. He first mar- 
ried Salley Bidwell Nov. 17, 1S16, to whom were born seven 
children — Eliza, Horace, Mary, Irena, James L., Caroline and 
Salley, of whom none are now living. Salley, his wife, died March 
10, 1S33. He again married, Oct. 23, 1S33, Mrs. Farm}' Pellet, a 
daughter ol Mr. and Mrs. McGown, born Nov. 25. 1802. She 
was married to Richard Pellet Jan. 2, 1S23, and to them were 
born three children — Lucinda, Adelbert and Richard. Richard 
and Lucinda are deceased. Richard Pellet died April 15, 1829. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Steward were born four children — Harriet 
N., now Mrs. Jonathan Ervin ; Dulcena, David V\ ., and John 
M. Dulcena is deceased. James P. Steward died Jan. 2, 1841, 
and in 1S44 or 1S45 his widow married John Watson, an early 

pioneer to Indiana, from the State of Mar)'] 1, .... . settled and 

lived, in Jackson Township. To them was born one son — 
James W., who is now dead. Mrs. Watson died Sept. 5 and 
Mr. Watson Sept. 26, 1S71. James P. and Fanny Steward emi- 
grated from Pennsylvania to Indiana in 1S36, entered and 
bought eighty acres of land on section 36, Jackson Township, 
which is now the property of John M., the youngest son. Nine 
children, as follows, came with them to Indiana — Eliza, Horace, 
Irena, James L., Caroline, Sally, Harriet N.. and Dulcena Stew- 
ard and Lucinda Pellet. John M. has made this township his 
home a greater part of his life. In 1S61 and 1S62 he worked 
with J. and R. Ettinger, in Auburn and Waterloo, at the cabi- 
net-maker's trade. With this exception, and the time he was 
in the army, he has devoted his attention to agricultural pur- 
suits, but has also given his trade some attention. He has held 
the agency for the sale of sewing-machines and agricultural 
machinery. He enlisted in Company A, Eighty-eighth Indiana 






... 



'. '. 









Infantry, Aug. to, ■ S< >2 1 rved ne; 

charge bearing date of June 7, 1805. He was in Lhc unpaign 
with General Buell against General Bragg, and in tin 
of [ J crryville. Tullahoma and Stone River with General Ro«e- 
crans, in battles of Stevenson, Chickamauga, Chattanooga 
Lookout Mountain, Mission Ridge and Tunnell Hill and inter- 
mediate skirmishes with Generals Thomas and Sherman ; 
in battles of Ringgold, Buzzard's Roost, Rocky-face, Rcsaca, 

Kingston, Rome, Allatoona Pass, Kern - in, Chatta- 

hoochic River, Decatur and Atlanta, an intcrmedi • 

mislics ; with Sherman to the sea, through the Cat . via 

Richmond to Washington City, D. C, and was in review at 
Richmond, May 11, 1S05, andalso in grand review at Washing- 
ton, May 24, 1S65. Alter his discharge lie returned to Indiana. 
March 3, 1866, he married Mrs. Lydia J. Steward, a daughter 
of Samuel and Elizabeth Tarney, early pioneers to Indiana from 
Ohio, and widow of his brother James L., who was a soldier in 
Company 13, Thirteenth ludn.u.i ima.itry, .;;... • . ■ 
Fisher, N. C, Feb. 14, 1S65, leaving six children, Samuel T., 
Elizabeth T., now Mrs. Samuel George; Jasper X., Ida A., now 
Mrs. James Furnish ; Lewis W., Eva J., now Mrs. Wm. C. Reed. 
To Mr. and Mrs. John M. Steward have been bom two chil- 
dren — Adelbert Sherman and Rosella Myrmcita. Mr. Steward 
is of patriotic parentage, his lather having served in the war oi 
1812. His brother, David \\\, served in Company E, Eleventh 
Indiana Zouaves. 

Samuel J. Tarney, youngest child of Samuel and Elizabeth 
(Wyatt) Tarney, is the oldest native resident of Jackson Tow n 
ship. He was born on the old homestead, Feb. 4, 1841. His 
lather was born in Pennsylvania in 1794, and was left an orphan 
before his recollection. In his boyhood he went to Ohi 
he was apprenticed to the miller's trade, and there grew to 
manhood. lie married Matsey Maloy Sept. 14, 1820. She 
died April 14, 1S22. Aug. 21, 1823, he married Catharine Horn, 
who died Oct. i, 1S26. Nov. 8, 1827, he married E 
daughter of Nathan Wyatt, and in [S37 came to De Kal 
County, Ind., with the Wyatt family and bought 160 acres of 
land on section 24, Jackson Township. Me was also engaged 
in milling in the pioneer days, and was the first miller of Spen- 
cerville. To this iast marriage were born six children, all of 
whom are living — Mrs. Magdalina Henderson, oi Alien County, 






Inch; Mrs. Lydia Jane Steward, John VV., Nathan, Si 
and Samuel J. A daughter by the i . iage, Mrs. Mary 

Ann Galloway, is living in Ashland Ohio. Mrs. Tar- 

ney died June 20, 1807, and Aug. 7, 1870, Mr. Tarney married 
Mrs. Ann Berry, also a daughter of Nathan VVyatt. Mr. Tar- 
ney died Feb. iS, 1878. He was an energetic, public-spirited 
man, and is remembered by the pioneers [or his mai 
qualities. He helped organize the township and was for eigh- 
teen years Town Clerk, in addition to holding other positions 
of trust. Samuel J. Tarney lived with his parents till man- 
hood. He was married May 22, 1862, to Nancy Waller, a na- 
tive of Wayne County, Ohio, born Aug. 27, 1842, and cam 
with her parents, Joseph and Sarah Walter, to De Kalb 
County in 1846. She is the third of a family of fourteen chil- 
dren. Her father died Dec. 31, 1882, aged sixty-live years. 
Her mother is living on the old homestead on section iG, Jack- 
son Township. Sept. 20, 1864, Mr. Tarney enlisted as a recruit 
in Company D, Seventy-fourth Indiana Infantry, and served 
till July 27, 1S65. lie participated with Sherman in the inarch 
to the sea and through the Carolinas. Alter his return home 
he remained on his father's farm till the fall of t868, when he 
bought 100 acres on sections 15 arid 22, where he has since re- 
sided. His farm is well cultivated, and his residence and farm 
buildings are among the best in the township. Mr. Tarney is 
a Democrat in politics. He is a very popular man with his 
fellow townsmen, and has held several official relations. Six- 
children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Tarney — S 
a graduate of the Indiana State Normal School, now Principal 
of the High School at Bourbon, Marshall Co., Ind. ; Walter 
Marion died in 1871, aged four years ; Cora Olive, Estella May, 
Joseph Byron, and Frank Marion are at home. 

Daniel Wyatt, son of William and Nancy (Strong) Wyatt, and 
grandson of Nathan Wyatt, was born in Concord Town 
Dc Kitlb Cmiliiy, Irttli, Dec;, b, 1845, wimrc hi \ parents sotiii ;i 
after their marriage. His lather died in January, 1870. I lis 
mother still lives on the homestead, lour children, Isaac, Israel, 
James and Lydia, living with her. Daniel Wyatt lived with his 
parents till his marriage. In the spring of 1S74 he moved to his 
present residence on section 13, where he has a finely improved 
farm of fifty acres, with good farm buildings. He was married 
Dec. 12, 18C9, to Susan Bcaty, a native of De Kalb County, 



born Feb. 14, 1849, a 

Mr. and Mrs. VVyatt have h; d .... I i dr 

are living — Charles W. and Blanch 

iam Oscar died in infancy, the latter aged seveni 

Mr. VVyatt is a most wort! ... . h< VVyatl 

family, being an energetic, industrious eral-minded 

citizen. 

John VVyatt, son of Nathan and Mary VVyatt, was 
Mercer County, Pa., April 4, 181 1, and came to De Kalb County, 

lad., in 1S36. lie was Tie I April 1, 1834, in Medina County, 

Ohio, to Eva Kitchen, who died Feb. 12, 1S39. Their only child, 

Rachel, was born about sixteen mon < r they came to this 

county, and died at the age of lour years and twelve days. 

Sept. 12, 1S39, M r - W] ■ J ane Robe, a native 

of Cumberland County, Pa., born in 1820. They hav 
large family of children, viz: — Mary Jane, wife of Jacob Hull, 
M. D., of Spencerville; Rebecca?!, died in infancy ; William 
T., of Allen County, Ind.; Rachel M., wife of Israel Horn ; Re- 
becca A., wife of E. J. Coder ; Matilda J., wife of S. T. Gallo- 
way ; Maggie M., at home; Samuel VV. died Nov. 27, 1SS1, 
aged twenty-eight years; Andrew .(., a physician of Rome 
City ; Euphemia E., at home, and John Edmund. Mr. and Mrs. 
VVyatt are members of the Method I Epi copal church. In 
politics he adheres to the Republican party, 
one of the finest farms in D< Kalb County, co 
acres of improved land. His residence i< large and 
able, and the host and hostess are hospitable to fri 
stranger alike. Their home is the home of the oppressed, peace 
reigns supreme, and a happier home is not to be found. Frugal- 
ity and industry have gained them a competency for their de- 
clining years. [For a more extended account of Mr. Wyatt's 
coming and early life in De Kalb County, sec his " R 
tions," page 639.] 

Nathan Wyatt, the pioneer, settled on section 34, 
Township in June, 1837, bringing with him from Richland 
County. Ohio, his wife, Mary, and three sons and one ■ 
Of these children. William afterward settled in Concoi 
ship and died several years agi ■ , S. Bosl ,'ick lives in Rome City, 
Inch; James lives in Allen County, and Rachel married Charles 
Watson, of Jackson Township. The eldest son, Samm 
to the county in 1S42, and lives in Newvillc Town . . 



'}— - — > 



6yz ... .-.''. 01 DE KALI 

eighty-four years. Ano li family, 

in company with his fa lier, low lives in Allen County. 

Two daughters, Jane and Mary, wivi o two brothci . 
and Abraham Johnson ; Susan, wife of William A. 
and Elizabeth, wife of Samuel Tarncy, with their families, com- 
pleted what was called the tribe of Wyatt, .. most v; >le 

dition to the infant settlement of Jackson Township. About 
two years later another daughter, Ann, came with her hus- 
band, James P. Plummer. After the death of Mr. Pi 
she married Mr. Berry, and after his death became the fourth 
wile of Samuel Tarncy, her sister, Elizabeth, Mr. Tarney's wife, 
having died in 1S67. Siic is now the widow of Mr. Tarney. In 
1S47 Mr. Wyatt's daughter, Lydia, with her husband, Samuel 
Watson, moved to the township. She died in 1849, ar "d stu l 
later another daughter, Rebecca and her husband, Jacob 
Maurer, (now deceased) came and settled where she still lives. 
Nathan Wyatt joined the Methodist Episcopal church in his 
boyhood, but the last forty years of his liie was a member of 
the Methodist Protestant church, the greater part of the tim< a 
class-leader. His influence was felt on the side of right and 
was a power for good in the new settlement. He was loved 
and honored by all who knew him, and his death was a bereave- 
ment to many friends as well as his own family. He died Dec. 
28, 1S62, in his eighty-fourth year. His widow lived till Sept. 
20, 1874, and died in her ninety-seventh year, retaining her 
mental vigor till nearly the close of her life journey. 




CHAPTER XVII. 



X^YM..: YwY. 



•v 



Vouxgest Township in n - - Situation.— Geo- 

graphy and Topography. — Organization. - .:. .., 
cence of Harrison Rogi hton.- P 

and Taxation."— Agricultural Statistics.— G/ 

Business. — Present Business Directory. — P i es- 
sional. — Paper. — Town Officers. — Churches and Socie- 
ties.— Biographical. 

The youngest township of the county is Keyser, in 1.. .. 
em tier. It is bounded on the 

on the east by Union and Jackson, on the south by Bu 
on the west by Allen and Swan Townships, Noble County. It 
is drained by several small creeks, tributaries of Cedar Creek. 
Its territory is crossed by three railroads. The Baltimore & 
Ohio runs east and west through the center of the township, 
and the Wabash and Michigan Southern lines run across the 
southeastern corner. 

Keyser owes its organization to the construction of .... Ba 
timore& Ohio Road, which led to the founding of the town of 

Garrett on the line between Richland and Butler to\ 

To avoid having the town on two townships, a new township 
was formed by the Board of Commissioners at their June term, 
1876, when it was " ordered, directed and decreed by thi 
that the territory bounded by a line commencing at the . 
east corner of section 25, township. 34 north, range 12 cast, and 
nmniiiis from thence 1 line of scctin 

27,2s, 20 and 30, to the west Hi ..... ,. 

ihencc south on the wc north,] 

cast, to the southwest corner oi se< tion 7 in Butler Tow 
thence east on the south line of sections 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12, to 
the east line of said township; thence north along the 1 .. 
ol said township to the place oi beginning; shall be known by 
the name and style of Keyser Township." i: thus includes 
070 



twenty-four sections, or two-thirds of a Con 

The following is the reminiscence o .. ■ 

this township: 

"In the fall of 1846 1 moved from A 

with my family, my wile and son Charles, then old. 

I hired Orrin Rogers, my cousin, to Ik lp me Lo remove to the 

eighty acres previously bought and id. Orrin 

his team tor the piece of land on which Jo >cll now lives, 

and gave me a job ot chopping to enable me to ] 

$6. We stopped lor a few days with Henry Clark, \... . 

Strouse now lives; then moved into an old cabin which stood on 

an eighty owned by O. C. Clark at the til pro ■ rt \ 

of Henry Probst, and situated a hundred rods west ol Hope- 
well church. 1 was laid up by a cut in the knee luring the 

winter, vet managed in the spring to p "tick > itch 

some corn. The fleer feci tit night upon my corn, and watch- 
ing lor them, 1 was able to kill some of them. Oct. 16 we 
moved into the woods where we now live. My fathi r move . 
in and entered forty acres. Building a house for aim, we all 
moved in together, and April 1, following, we raised a cabin 
for ourselves. I bought a yoke ol stags 1 Uriah Wi 
time for $40, and mortgaged my land as security. Partic . 1- 
visecl me not to pay the note, arid to let the land go, but I re- 
deemed the land, six acres of which I have since sold for Si go 
per acre. 

" We had no road farther north than to the present site of 
Hopewell church. 1 prepared a petition, obtained signers, and 
presenting the same to the Commissioners, a road was located 
as far north as the present site of Altoona ; ami from that point 
it ran a zigzag course until intersecting the State road near the 
residence of Albert Hathaway, Later we had the route 
changed north from Altoona, and intersecting the State road in 
front of John Yaw's place, My team was thg first to ■■■ 
o.on.^n tht ,..0 r-aati, i hauied a saw-log to Wight's 1 
of Hathaway's. Robert Showers entered the land now owned 
by James Downend. O. C. Clark, R. B. Shower and myself 
worked together to make ' black salts.' A tract of timber land 
abounding in elm was chosen. Trees were felled, cut, hauled 
by oxen, and piled, trunks and branches. When burned, th< 
ashes were leached, the lye boiled into the ' black ... 
product sold at Fort Wayne for two to three iollan 



r 






. 



"-'■• 

[O cli in ... ivccl 



, , pounds." .Mr. Ro -,■:-. ;,. 
10 Indiana. 

•flic population of Keyser Township, exclusive ol < .... i 

. at 944, or about 40 to the square mile. The rale ol 

taxation in 1SS4 is §1.71 ; poll tax, §i. 25. The numb 1 

of land assessed is 14.5S9.27; value of same, §317,726 ; value oi 
improvements, $21,780; value of lands ami improvements, $339,- 
506; value of lots, $3,564; value of improvements, $4,311; 
value of lots and improvements, $7,875; value ol 
property, $54,080; total value of taxables, $401,461; total 
number of polls, 224; total amount of taxes levied, $7,267.1 1. 

The following crop statistics are for the year iSSi : Acres in 
wheat, 1,956; product of same, 23,572 bushels, oj . 
ncr acre ; acres in corn, 1,036; pro nc ...-'■ ; bush- 
els, or 30 bushels per acre of upland, and 45 for lo 

acres in oats, 380; product of same, 1 [,400 bushels, or 
els per acre; acres in mca low, .... s, 630 tons, 

or a ton and a half per acre; acres in Irish potatoes, 63 ; pro- 
duct of same, 1,260 bushels, or 20 bushels per acre. 



The town of Garret'., named in honor ol the 

John W. Garrett, President of the mon <$ Ohio R; 

Company, is indebted Lo that road for its y.cry exi Lcnce. i: is 
located four miles west and one mile south Auburn on sec- 
tions 34, 33, 4 and 3, of Keyser Towns . 

town of varying population, which may now be fairly stated at 
1,200. The Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company has extensive 
repair shops here, and Garrett is the home of many train men, 
conductors, engineers and other employes. On the old town- 
ship line (which divided Butler and Richland, before . 
mation of Keyser) is located the round in rase, a semi-circle of 
masonry 265 feet in diai ti and con inin .alls for 32 loco- 
motives. A machine shop, 265 x 100 feet in dimensions, . . ill 

brick, stone and iron, contains a number of lathes, drills, p ss 

and bolt-cul tera and other machine) . . TI 

capacity to employ a thousand men. 

Fifty acres were set apart '.r: .,> o.mpanv :'or t..c!r 

purposcs, and several hundred acres were purchased by B. D. 
Thomas, with a number of Ohio men. The tract was laid out 
and desirable building lots placed on the market. 



T 



town lots were so n a year 150 build. 

iad been constr 

500. rn the time named §125,000 \v rth ol its; 
been sold to the entcrprisin 

spent in improvements and v ... A large three- 

story brick hotel (now the De K. 

meantime, while this and other accommodations were being 
prepared, not a few resorted to the expedients ol 
times. 

An incident worth recordin i thai .. . . 
the first child born in the new city. The parents of two chil- 
dren claimed the honor and reward, and each child was duly 
honored. William Penfield, Esq., of Auburn, was tl 
on the felicitous occasion. 

BUSINESS. 

There were as yet but five ho;. . ,. John L. 

Davis, of Auburn, stai . 1 
place, and installed John Robl 

of Auburn) as manager. In the s 1 

part by the hardware, F. E. Davenport, also of Aubur d 

the first drug store, in company with Eli Kuhlman. Among 
the hotels put up were the De Kalb Hou: iwncd by M. & G-. 

Ohmer, and operated by C. Kennccht ; C 

W. Wagner; Tarney House, by X. Tarney ; and the Sargenl 
House, by W. E. Sargi ... 

1 >ry go 1 Is -; ires w< re started by Litman Bros. A: Co., T. E. 
& X. W. Lancaster, Joseph Wyman & Co., and L. Covell. A 
boot and shoe store was opened by H. Upmeyer, a wholesale 
grocery by Samuel G. Lemmon, and a furniture store by Roons 
& Rowe. E. Wing, H. Bickneil and Putt Bros, opened drug- 
stores. Charles Beckmeyer was the first jeweler; Messrs. 
Clark & Embry the first butchers, and W. G. Pierce was the 
pioncerinthelumbcrtn.de. Saloons were soon unci 
way. R. Beuniston, formerly of Auburn, was the firsl black- 
smith; and E. F. Allen, .V. , ers and S. O, 

painting. The pioneer carpenters were W. McMorgan, R. W. 
McLean, M. Thomas and XV. J. Frederick. At tae present 
writing, those following the trade of carpentry are, William 
Sanders, Walter Vaughn, Newton Hall, Harry Vaughn, C. A. 
Branch and Chris. Watz. 









& 






lLI; co 



. 



IJUS] • rOKY. 

The following are the busini ss firms of Garrett : 

E. B. Alsbaugh, jeweler and watc hmaker; Austin Bro .. booi 

and shoes ; Charles Bacon, blacksmith and wagon shop A i 

Bennett, grocer} 7 ; R. Bloom, saloon; Miss Phcmic Bender, 

milliner; Boyd & Smith, jeweler and newsdealer; Fritz Bchler, 

shoemaker; George Behler, sal Albert W. Behlcr, 

II. M. Bickncll, drug store; C. W. Camp, drug store; Miss J. Co- 
mesky, jewelry and notions; John Crow, saloon ; Isaiah Decker, 
livery stable; John L. Davis, hardware k, furni- 

ture; P. K. David, grocery; Mrs. Elizabeth Downend, B >wen 
House; W.J.Frederick, lumber; Fyke & Gunnett, millers; 
E. Grover, broom factory; Frank Gilmorc, barber; A. B. 
Ilaynes, blacksmith and repair shop; B. Hunsel, tailor and 
dealer in boots and shoes ; Haynes & Ray, dressmakers; Will- 
iam Imler, bakery; Jaques, barber ; C. B. Jones, saw-mill, plan- 
ing-mill, wood and lumber; N. Korniske, renovating esl 
ii, cut ; Mrs. C. Lindorfer, millinery and fancy goods : G. W. 
Lackey, dry goods; Charles Linkenhelt, saloon; Mager & 
Bevicr, meat market ; B. W. Ocker, Dc Kalb House; A. II. 
Phillips, postoffice ; Otho J. Powell, Hera hi; Mrs. Rice, dress- 
maker ; J. V. Reyher, sewing-machine; C. Rcyher, dry goods; 
George Reeves, saloon: Mrs. V. Schnitzer, grocery; R. L. 
Simpson, repair shop ; Miss F. G. Stickncy, millinery .. 
goods; Joseph Single, grocery ; A. J. Stewart, grocery : T. C. 
Sargent, Sargent House ; Thomas Sullivan, photographer ; N. 
Tarney, Tarney House ; J. William Wagner, saloon. 
I'Ri i] ESSK iNAL. 
The first physician to locate and remain, was S. M. Sherman. 
Others who came later were: A. S. Parker, C. E. Pratt, S. 
Simpson and J. F. Thompson. Those practicing at presenfare: 
A. A. Kester, J. F. Thompson, D. B. Roether, T. 11. Stewart 
and Dr. Dunn. The legal profession is represented by L. 



d F. M. Bi 






... 



Public). 

PAPER. 
The press was first represented by the Garrett News, pub- 
lished by C. W. Wing & Co., and edited by Thomas Maloney. 
It was started in October, 1S75, but was of brief existence. In 
August, 1877, the present Garrett Herald was started, for an ac- 
count of which see the Press chapter. 



6jS [IISTOl 

TOW S 01 

The first township 

follows : Trustees, Will 

kenhelt (2d district), and Hiran >.... . 

Thomas Maloney; Marshal, James R. 
Joseph Hyman; Assessor, A. ..... 

Covell. At present the Trustees are: Walter Vaughn (3d dis- 
trict), Joseph Singler (2d McLaughlin (1st 

district); Clerk, W. il. Schnitzi M Reeves; 

Treasurer, Barney i lunscl. 

RELIGIO 

The first sermon at Garrett was preached by Rev. V, 
Long, brother of Michael Long, Sr., so well known to the old 
residents of the county. There are now three well-supporl 
religious organizations in the town. 

The Protestant Episcopal church whs buill in 1876,; 

cated in July, 1S77. The land was pun . ... ... ... 

furniture put in, am . • .. by J 

King, Jr., and William Kcysi . F - con I 

dents, respectively, of the Bal ■ ) 1 Railroad Con 

and presented as a free gifl Lo Bi i0] L'albot ol the Indiana 
Diocese. It cost $3,000, is oi brick, and will seat 250 ti 
people. The first pastor wa Rev. B. L After he 

left, the pulpil was u ... 

a Rev. Mr. Wcatherby, ol Lagrange, c; here to 'nolo ser- 
vices once in two weeks. After an R 

was here as past year. The church was th 

once more. In the wintci 1 • .-, -'4 Rev. S. M. CO 
from Lima, [nd., and preached every two weeks. He was suc- 
ceeded by Rev. Benjamin R. Phelps, who resides now at Gar- 
rett and holds services on alternate Sundays. He is from East 
Orange, X. Y. Mr. Phelps also acts rib Superintendent of the 
Sunday-school, The church is located at the corner of [jms 

and Hon 

The Methodist Episcopal people have built a neat brick edifice 
on Cowan streel at a cost .' , [t ... 

[S79. Among the pastors who have served al Garrett are: 
Revs. Adams, Sawyer, Dive.., Hunter, Stout, .Madden and Mc- 
Carthy. Rev. C. King, the present incumbent, came in the 
spring of 1SS3. The well-attended Sunday-school is presided 
over by C. B. Jones. 



r, 7'j 

The Catholic church is a i 

\ un ol Au :.. 1 1 

isters to the Garrett Catholics. 

The town is well su; 
nizations, of which the 

Garrett City Lodge, No. 537, F. & A. Ai 

1876 with D. Nichols as Worthy Master. . n< 

ipol sixty-th c, and meet - tl 

each month in the Dm . - 

follows: G. \Y. Lackey, VV. :-.. W. Gill, 

nell, J. VV.; J. H. Kooken, See.: VV. . reas.; Ed- 

ward Hilgardner, S. D.; James Kellura, J. D.; F. Behler, Tyler. 
The lodge is in an excellenl . ition. 

Garrett Lodge, No. 602, I.O.O.F., - . Aug. 2 

1883, with T. C. Sargent as N. G. 3 V. G.; 

Charles VV. Camp as Sec; B. D. Thomas as Treas. Ai 

Charles W. Camp is N. G.; L :wood, V. G.; T 

S. Merica, Sec, and H. F. Sembowen, Treas. The lodge is in 
a flourishing condition, having thirty-five members in good 
standing, and meets every Wednesday evening at Odd Fellows' 
Hall. 

Charles Case Post. No. 233. G. A. A'., was instituted in Sep- 
tember, 18S3, with William E. Sargent as Commander; W. J. 
Frederick as Senior Vice-Commander; J. H. House as Junior 
Vice-Commander, and William A. Shreve as Adjutant. The 
present officers are: W. J. Frederick, Commander; William ... 
Shreve, Senior Vice-Commander ; J. H. Houser, Junior Vi 
Commander; D. B. Rather, Adjutant; R. L. Simpson, Chap- 
lain; M. L. Duck, Quartermaster. The post has twenty-five 
members, and meets the tirst and third Saturdays of each 
month at the B. of L. E. hail. 

The Brotherhood oj Locouiotivi Euginccn holdsksni 
the Duck building on Randolph street. The brakemen 
conductors have recently organi; 1 loi 
Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen, No. 203, meets Fri 
evenings at the B. of L. E. hall. 

The B. & O. reading room was established bj .... ^ ....\ 

in 18S2, and has a library of several hundred voli 

'— eping on file many standard papers and periodicals. The VV. 



6So 

C. T. U., 

Smith and Ad* lan, n istcd .Irs. C. B. 

Garrett, holds very interesting meetings S i 

the readinsr room. Mrs. C. B. Jones is President of the Union. 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 

Isaac N. Askcxv was born in Richland (ni ■ .. 1) County, 

Ohio, Feb. 19, iS24,theson of Isaac T. and Mar} (] 

Askew, his father a native of Maryland, and his ... A hi rof < ■ 

and a grandson of Colonel Jonathan Harvout, ol Revolutionary 
fame. He was reared in his native county on a farm, remain- 
ing there till 1S47, when he came to Indiana and ■ - 

improved tract in Allen County, residing there about six years. 

He then sold his land ..; .- . to De Kalb County, .,..; ... ., 

farm east of Spencerville, on the St. Joe River, which he im- 
proved. He subsequently sold this farm and bought one west 

of Spencerville, where he lived till April, 1874. He 1 

out and moved to Keyset - Township, buying where he 

has since resided. He owns eighty acres of finely-cultivated 
land, and is surrounded with all that makes life pleasant. For 
the past twenty years he has in connection with attending to 
his own farm assisted his neighbors during harvest, running a 
threshing-machine. Mr. Askew was married Nov. 27, 1S53, to 
Rebecca H. Squiers, daughter of William A. and Susanna 
Squiers. They have had five children — W. T. M., born March 
11, 1S55 ; George W., born Sept. 16, 103S ; Perry, born Dec. 16, 
1860, died in infancy; Nettie, born Oct. 4, 1877, and Jennie, 
born Aug. 29, 1S71. Mrs. Askew is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. Politically, Mr. Askew affiliates with the 
Democratic party. 

H. M. Bickncll, druggist, Garrett, Ind., was born in Noble 
County, Ind., June 16, 1S4S, the youngest son of Dr. T. P. and 
Lydia (Myers) Bickneil. His youth was spent in assisting his 

; thi d ig ■ in a II ehooL ] 

pleted his education at Noire Dame Academy, South Bern:, 
Ind.. in 1866, and alter his return home engaged in the drug 
business at Kendallville, in partnership with Dr. Ericson. In 
1S75 he moved to Garrett and built what is known as the 
Pioneer Drug Store, where he has since carried on a success- 
ful and lucrative trade. He was married Jan. 1, 1869, to Jen- 
nie Dunn, a native of New York, who came with her parents 









to Noble County when a chi ud .ub 

foseph County where 

Mr. and Mrs. Bicknell have one d: Lighter — Nellie. Mr. Bic :- 

nell is politically a Republican. He is a mei :r etl 

Lodge, No. 602, I. O. O. F., and Garrett Lodge, No. 537, F. & 
A. M. He was the first Vice Grand, the second Nobic Grand 
and 1 ho first representative to the Grand Lodge from the Gar- 
rett Lodge, [.O.O. I. 

'f. P. Bicknell, .J. D., deceased. — Alt gh no 

,,. De Kaio County, there arc lew who vill be longer remem- 
bered by the early settlers than Dr. Bi< 

native of Chenango Count)-, N. Y., and received his educati ... 
in his native State. In 1S46, re.... le op- 

portunities offered a young man in the West, he moved 

Northern Indiana and settled in Lisbon, Noble Co 

time little more than a wilderness. Being a skillful physician, 
he soon gained a wide reputation in Noble, De Kal 
and surrounding counties, and he was obliged to ride night and 
day in all kinds of weather. From constant exposure his .. 
became impaired and for several years he was unable to enga^ 
in active practice. Such was the confidence reposed in him 
and his skill that when he was unable to visit patients the} . 

brought to him from miles away on cots. In 1854 Dr. Bi 

was elected to represent Nobie County in the conventi 1 
revise the Constitution of the State of Indiana, and was . 
youngest member of the convention. In 1S61 he was the 
Examining Surgeon appointed in his district, and was twice 
appointed by Governor lorton as Surgeon (first of the Thirtieth 
and second of the Forty-fourth Regiment/, but was obliged to 
decline on account of his health. Dr. Bicknell died in 1S63, leav- 
ing a large circle of friends to mourn his loss. He was married 
in New York to Lydia Myers, and to them were born three 
children— Hattie, Thompson P. and ...A.. Mrs. Bicknell re- 
sides in Fort Wayne. 

Jacob Brcch ■,!! was born ii 
1832, the second son of Martin and Barbara (Guyer) Brechbill, 
natives of Pennsylvania, of German origin. In 1834 his parents 
moved to Indiana County, Pa., where he was reared a:.,, e ...- 

cated. In 1S54 he moved with his parents to S 'k G 

Ohio, where he assisted his father till his marriage, an . then : 
rented land till 1S62, when he moved to De Kalb County, Ind., 






682 HISTORY 01' l)K KALI] COUNTY. 

and bought the farm in Keyser Township, where he ha 
lived, ilis first purchase was eighty acres, and that only par- 
tially improved. He went bravely to work and cleared his 
land, and has from time to time made additions to it till he now 
owns 370 acres. He was married Feb. 3, 1859, t0 Sarah Ober, 
a native of Bedford County, Pa., who moved to Stark County, 
Ohio, with her parents, John and Nancy (Becktel) Ober, when 
fifteen years of age. They have had eight children ; but six arc 
living- — Martin, John, Nancy, Lizzie, Sarah Ann, and Mary J. 
Cora A. and Francis C. are deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Brcchbill 
are members of the United Brethren church. Politically he is 
a Republican. 

Dcvobo Bruce, an honored and respected farmer of Keyser 
Township, was born in Cayuga County, N. Y., May 9, 1824, a 
son of Ezra and Anna (Glazier) Bruce, his father a ative 1 
New York, and his mother of Massachusetts. Whei . ,-as : 

child his parents moved to Eric County, Pa., am 

Noble County, Ind., where his father died in 1854. In hi 
hood Mr. Bruce learned the carpenter's trade, and foliou 
till within a few years, although at the ^:.rr.e time he devoted 
the summer seasons to agricultural pursuits. In 1855 .. < . 
to De Kalb County and settled on section S. Keyser To -ns i .. 
where he owns ninety acres of choice land all und r a hii 1 
state of cultivation. Mr. Bruce was married Oct. 3, . ;o, to 
Sarah M. Clark, daughter of Henry Clark, who came froi -\, .. 
York to De Kalb County, Ind., in 1841. They have three chil- 
dren — Charles E., Henry C. and Jennie. Politically, Mr 1 

iates with the Republican party. 

Thomas Jefferson Clark was born in Richland Count Ohio, 
Sept. 9, 1S50, the eldest son and second child of George and 
Delilah (Schaffer) Clark. In 1851 his parents moved to De 
Kalb County, Ind., and 'here he was reared ana educated. 
When he was ten years of age he began to assist his ... . r ... 

inning . tl sshing-machine, and since eighteen year.- . . - 
h arge of a machine, working for the farmers in harvest. 

.. has been successful in his business transact) >n 1 is one 
oi the most prosperous young men in the county. . o\\ - 

to acres oi choice land, all weii improved, wi h .. .... 

residence go* i farm buildings. Mr. Clark >.-... 

S71 to Harriet Weaver, daughter of Davi We; .: Au- 
burn Ind. To them were born two children — Mar'. ] 



KAI.II COUN'I V. 



. 



, May. In 1S76 Mrs. Clark was burned whili lighting .. 
,vith kerosene, and lived but a few hours. Feb. 27, 1879, 

\Ir. Clark married Dorothea Ann Cochran, daughter of Thomas 
Cochran, of Keyser Township. They have two children — 
. £. and Walter S. Politically, Mr. Clark is a Repub- 
lican. 
Thomas Cochran, a son of John and Mary (Cubison) Cochran, 

,-as born in Perry County, Ohio, Aug. 24, 1S1 5. His father 
was a native of Pennsylvania, and his mother of Ireland, cora- 
ing to America in childhood. They were married in Pennsyl- 
vania, and soon after moved to Perry County, Ohio, being 

ong the earliest settlers. Thomas was reared in his native 

county, making the old homestead his home for over forty 
years. After attaining his majority he bought ihe interests of 
the other heirs to his father's estate, and took care of his parents 
till their death. In September, 1858, he moved to Indiana, 

urchasing land in Richland, now Keyser Township, where he 

has since resided. He has been an industrious, energetic n, 

.;. I irosperity has crowned his labors. lie was marric 1 Mai ch 

. -, , ..;, to .' mda Soine, born Jan. 18, 1S26, daughter oi 

Henry and Catherine Soine, natives of Mai}..;... ."... \ have 
had thirteen children — Hannah C, born Dec. 26, 1S44 ; Edward 
T., born July 9, 1846, died July 17, 1650; Mary A., born Jan. 
S, .84S; Emily M., born Aug. 22, 1849; William . .. born May 
r 5s 1S51 ; Joseph P., born Jan. S, 1S53 ; David S., born rob. 21, 
1S55 ; Dorothea A., born March 2S, 1S57; Eli T., born May .3, 
[S59; Benjamin F., born April 19, 1S61 ; Ira A., born Dec. 25, 
1S62, died .May 8, 1S64; Ralph B., born Aug. 24, 1804; Charles 
K., . >rn Sept. 14, 1S67. Mr. and Mrs. Cochran arc members of 
the Baptisi church. Politically he casts his suffrage with the 
Democratic party. 

Josiah Cottcll was born in Burlington, N. J., Aug. 22. [814, a 
son of John and Sarah (Grant) Cottcil. When he was fifteen 
'/cars of age Ids parents moved to Columbiana County. Ohio, 
and there he grew to manhood. He was reared a fanner, but 
after reaching his majority learned the carpenter's trade and 

worked at it fifteen years. In 1S52 he came to De Kalb Cot , 

Ind., and bought a tract of wild land in Keyser Townsi ip, 
which he cleared and improved, and which is now transformed 
into one of the best farms in the county. He passed through 
.... the hardships and privations of pioneer life, and surmount- 



DE KALB COUNTY. 



ing- every difficulty, has gained the top of the ladder ol pros- 
perity. His farm contains 160 acres of land, his farm buildings 
are commodious, and his residence one of the best in the town- 
ship. He has by his uprightness and success gamed the con- 
fidence of the people, and has been chosen to transact the busi- 
ness of the township in several of its offices. Mr. Cottell was 
married in 1S37 to Jane Chance, b}' whom he had one child, 
Sarah Jane (deceased). I lis wife died in 1839, and in 1842 he 
married Mary Teetci's, of Stark County, Ohio. To them were 
born five children — John, James, Elizabeth, Winfield H. and 
George. The eldest and youngest only are living. Mrs. Cot- 
tell died in 1S53, and in 1855 Mr. Cottell married Mrs. Annie 
Houser. They have three children — Theodore, Mary and Jon- 
athan. Mrs. Cottell has two children by her former marriage- 
John Henry and David. Politically, Mr. Cottell is a Democrat. 
Jacob Cupp, farmer, section 35, Keyser Township, was born 

in Somerset Co v, Pa., Jan 19, iSoS, a sou of Frederick and 

Mary (Sholtz) Cupp, of English and German descent. 1.. n 
mained In his native county with his parents till twi .. . 
of age, when he went to Stark County, Ohio, win e he w 

by the day and month cighl years. [-Ic then botigl 

an ' fo owed agricultural pursuits till 1842, when he 1 ann 
Indiana and settled in DeKalb Com.!', where he has a good 
home, and now in the seventy-eighth year ol his ag< ■ 
back on a life of industry and honesty, and can enjoy tl I nil 
of a well-spent life. Mr. Cupp was married Nov. 26, ; S; 3 5 . to 
Elizabeth Hoover, a native of Stark County, Ohio, who died 
'; leaving three children — Mat,;. as. Ethalinda (now Mrs. 
.. . ters), and Hiram. In 1S60 Mr. Cupp married Mrs. Bar- 
bara Smith. They have one child— Levi H. Politically, Mr. 
Cupp is a Democrat. 

Abel Depcw, deceased, was born in Marion County, Ohio, 
Dec. 1 . [817. He was reared :. farmer, receiving a practical 
education in the district schools. In [S36 he left home n . to I 
■0 icctii ti nir i.i the Southern and Western S 1 

1 he settled on a farm in Noble County, .- 1 

.-. .... 1831 when he moved to De Kalb County, and bought 
the farm in Keyser Township which has long been known as 

epew 1 1 ■ lie was married Feb. 2j, . ■ .. 1 

C - - ine Gifford, a native of Athens County, Ohio, who 
noveri with her parents, Alexander and abel (Cain) Gifford, 






' 





















HISTORY OF DU KALH COUNTY. 685 



;,, Moble County, hid., when she was nine years old. T 1 ... 

,vere born twelve children ; ten are living — William Henry, 
Mary, Hannah, Lucy E., Catherine J., Minerva, Alice A., Mar- 
garet J., Almon O. and George F. Melissa and Phcebe are de- 
ceased. Mr. Dcpew died Oct. 29, 1S71. 

Elias Fisher, farmer, Keyser Township, was born in Stark I 
County, Ohio, in iS2q, a son of Jacob and Rebecca (Hoover) 
Fisher. In 1846 his parents moved to De Kalb County, Ind., I 
and ins father entered a tract of land in Wilmington Tow:,-... 1. 
[lis father died in 1S51. He remained with his mother till j 
1S70, superintending the farm. lie was married in [858 to 
Matilda Freeman, a native of Allen Count}', Ind. Of their five 
children, but two are living — Lewis C. ana Adeiphia J. Will- 
iam F., Harvey L. and Catherine, arc deceased. Mrs. Fisher 

died in 1S71. In 1S72 Mr. Fisher married Mrs. 5:. rah - 

ler, a native of New York, who died in 1S76, lea :\. g one 
—Lena R. March 16, 1079, ^ r - Fisher married Mrs. Cati . - 

ine De Pew, widow of Abel De Pew, and since this - 

ance has resided in Keyser Township: Mr. Fisher is a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

. ... . Fortncr, farmer, section 7. Keyser Townshi i, was 
•in Franklin County, Mass., in 18 14, a son of Eiil , Sarah 
(Burnington) Former, of Sotci. ...v. English deso 
father died about a month before his birth, and his 
when he was seven years of age. He lived win. I is gr; ... ai ( r 
Burnington till fourteen years oi age and then came IVc: 

li.enawee County, Mich., and worked as a farm han< 

of years. He then worked : t tin- lime kilns four years, .... : . 

the lumber business the same length of time. After his - 

riage he moved to De Kalb County, Inch, and bougr.i 160- acres 
of unimproved land in Keyser Township. He lived on this > 
land two years and then returned to Michigan and remained 

thi ; again to his farm ?n De Kalb Counr 

ivhere he has since resided, tip lias iarfauglij m *! ii Mi 

state i nature to :. high state of cultivation and ... - n > 
ij the pleasantest hom 

.. Michigan, I 1 Urania Hoppema, a nat ve ol Wayne 
( unity, N. Y. They have three children — Sarah, Ernesl ... 

Clyde. Politic r, Mr. Fortner is a Republican. 

. "dliam Foinitaii, , ...... 

,. son oi Sim< .1 and Rebecca Fountain. His mother died when 



686 



U.IJ i 



he was three days old. He follow .. 

country till 1S4S, when he moved to the United States. . 

lived a short time in Ohio, and then settled in Do Kalb C 

lnd., on wild land, which he cleared and improved. He was 
married Dec. 12, 1848, to Sarah, daughter of Thomas Truelovc, 
a native of England. Together they commenced life, and with 
energy and an ambition to make life a success they have been 
untiring in elTorts, and as a result have triumphed over every 

adverse circumstance and have accumulated a property '. 

enables them in their declining years to live with ease. They 
have 400 acres of good land, 200 acres of which is under a . 
state of cultivation. In performing the practical duties of life 
they have not omitted the higher and more important. From 

childhood they have been connected with the Episcopal c v.. 

and have lived with strict conformity to all her tenets. T . 
have been at all times mindful of the needs of the poor, and are 
ever ready to assist them. Hospitable, their home is always 
open to friends and strangers, all feeling that they are welcome. 
Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Fountain — 
Sarah Ann, Elizabeth, wife of Joseph Tarlton, and Wi . 

Richard. Politic:.. 1\ Mr. Fountain casts nis suffrage e 

Re mblican party. 

Calvin Grub, farmer, section 12, Keyser Township, .v..- bo: 
in De Kalb County, Ind., July 23, 1853, the second son John 
and Catherine (Ketchum) Grub, prominent citizens oi Ive 
Township. He was reared on his ...... . a rr .... . fron . '.. 

learned the practical and hence successful mode of agricul 
and since attaining manhood has utilized his knowledge for his 
own encfit. Mr. Grub was married March 5, .073. to M 

Rhodenb To them have oeen born two children — A'.iie 

May ar.ci j.j.m. Politically Mr. Grub affiliates with the Demo- 

■ -" L y- 

John Grub was born in Stark County, Ohio. Sept. 22, 1S22. ;. 

;onol Peter and Elizabeth (Rex) Grub, natives ol Pennsylv 

nd French descent. When he was five vc...': old 

... r with nine children ... rear 

is moi her >n the fan 

-s [ age, and from his eighteei his twenty- 
second y-ear taughi school in the winter, working on the farm 
in the summer. In 1S44 he began clerking in a store re- 



mai 




there 


till .051 


when he came to Indi ind ought a 










~~T 



HISTORY OF 



tract of unimproved land in what was then Butler To 

County. When he came to Indiana he had but $i 50; 
paid lor his land, and then commenced to improve and 

make a home. He has by his indomitable will and persever- 
ance overcome the obstacles of settling in a new country, and 
has by his continued additions to his first purchase a landed 
estate of 424 acres, all under cultivation. Having no one but 
himscli to rely upon, he early in life learned the lesson of in- 
dependent action, and it has tended to make him through life 
self-reliant and sagacious. Mr. Grub was married Ma - 7, 1847, 
to Catherine Kutchner, a native of Stark Count Oh They 
have had five children, but three of whom arc living — Jeffer- 
son, Calvin and Clara. Politically, Mr. Grub is a Democrat. 
He has served his township as Justice of the Peace t._ 
and as Trustee four years, and has proved himself to : an 
;fficiem and worthy officer, attendi 51 3 public affairs with the 
same fidelity as his own. Mrs. Grub is a membe 
Dunkard church. 

Albert Hathaiuay was born in Lake County, Ohio May 9, 
1828, a son of Nathan and Hannah (Hamilton) Hathaway, na- 
tives of Massachusetts, who moved to 01 i ■ in the earl) 1 . 
■ t State's existence. He remained with his parents till 

enty-two years of age, and with them in 1S42 came to 

and settled in Richland Township, Do Kalb Co 

where his father died Dec. 16. He was reared a farmer . . . 

has always made agricultural pursuits his occupatii 

owns 156 acres of choice land, well improved. He was mar- 
ried Dec. 25, 1854, to Phcebe Haulk, -ofjohi ulk 

ivho moved from Pennsylvania to Ohio in an early da} . encc 
Ad .. is County, In ... where Mrs. Hathaway was born. Mr. 
ana Mrs. Hathaway have had thirteen children, eleven are liv- 
ing — Eunice Ellen, Hannah, Mary Jane, Nathan, Jol 
L) lia Silas, Dollie, Stella and Calvin. Politically, Mr. Hatha- 
way casts his suffrage with the Democratic party. He and his 
wife are members of the German Baptist church. 

Lucian Hathaiuay was born in Lake County, Ohio, in :S36. a 
son of Nathan and Hannah (Hamilton) Hathaway. fe w; - 
out six years of age when his parents moved to De Kalb County, 
[nd., ana his education was all obtained in the county of his 

adoption. He re ed on his father's farm till manhood. He 

... ed in the war of the Rebellion in Company H, Thirtieth 



C ' ... TORY Of UIC K.A . 

: y. While in Lin en : had I he nv . 

owing- to exposure ana lack of attention, took cold and has 

never regained his former health. Me was discharge 

1863. In 1S66 he bought the farm where he resides, in Kcyscr 
Township, which contains eighty acres of well-improved land. 
Mr. Hathaway was married Sept. 27, 1866, to Elizabeth Swan- 
ders, a daughter of Jonathan Swanders, who moved from Penn- 
sylvania to Carroll County, hid., in an early day. Mr. and 
Mrs. Hathaway have had eight children; but seven are living 
— Diana, Miles, Ellen, Pogie, Alton, Cyrus and Milton. Politi 
cally Mr. "Hathaway is a Democrat. He is a member of Charle 
Case Post, No. 233, G. A. R. 

Amos Jackson was born in Niagara County, N. Y., April 15 
1S27, the second son and six.:: ..." eleven children of Jesse and 
and Edith (Smith) Jackson. In 1S34 his parents moved to ... .. 
..;..... and in 1837 to DeKalb County, Ind. His father entered 
120 acres of Government land in Butler Township, which he 
improved and made his home the re . 01 . ii.-, life. Amu 3 was 
but ten years of age when his parents moved to Dc ECa D 
Count)-, and hence by far the greater part of his life has been 
identified with her interests. Reared a farmer, lie chose the 
vocation as his life work, and is now one of the most prosperous 

i xprising agriculturists in the township. He owns [60 

acres ol land, all well improved. Mr. Jackson was 

March 24, 1863. to Catherine Simon, a native of Co bia 

C ... ty, Ohio, daughter of George Sim in, an early settler of 
Allen County, Ind. They are the parents of three children — 
-. A., Dora O. and Vesta L., the latter deceased. Po .... 
caily Mr. Jackson is a Democrat. He was reared in the society 
of Friends, but he and his wife are now members of the Luth- 
eran church. 

Edward Kelhavi, farmer, section 31, Keyser Township, was 
... ... e, England, Nov. 13, 1826, the tenth of thir- 

rho - and Mar) , Bo ithby 1 I\.e m. I le 

«"i> reared and educal - native country, and in . 

» America and icatc-d in R.h County. Oh >. He 

r i :. lake steamers three wars, and 

... imical saved enough to buy forty acres of land, 
. . _\ .. making a home. Ln [857 i.e moved to De Kail 

ought eighty acres of unimproved land, to 

which, by good management and industry, he has added ti . h 



HISTORY OF DEKALB COUNTY. 689 

now owns 400 acres of the best land in the township, all well 
tted. He is a pul I and liberal man, and is held 

t ;teem by ail who know him. In 1S7S he was elected 
County Commissioner and served three years; was again nomi- 
nated, but refused to serve on account of the demands of his 
personal business. Mr. Kelham is a purely self-ma 
coming to this country as lie did a poor man he has worked his 
way from poverty to affluence, and now ranks with the best 

; men of De Kalb County. He was married in R 
County, Ohio, April 22, 1S53, to Miss Sarah Downend, a native 
of England, who came with her parents, James and Mary 
Shaw) Downend, to America when she was eight years old. 
They have had ten children— Thomas, Edward, Jr., Mary, 
Joseph A., James, Martha, George, Charles T., Matilda and 
William F. Matilda, William and Martha are deceased. Polit- 
ically Mr. Kelham is a Democrat. 

A. A. Kestcr, M.D., Garrett, Ind., the second son of Peter S. 
Kester, a pioneer of De Kalb County, was born in this county, 
Oct. 5, 1844. His earlv"Iifc was passed on the farm in .1 man- 
ner common to pioneer days, and he experienced a mixture of 
hardship and pleasure incident to that day. In the cho 
then in vogue he laid the foundation of his education. By 
cl isc application, the difficulties of an imperfect schoi I 
and the greater imperfections in the manner of imparting in- 
struction, were successfully overcome, ana a practical under- 
standing of the fundamental principles was acquired. He was 
married in January, 1864, to Miss Sarah Bassett, dau< 
Sanford Bassett, formerly of Madison County, Ohio, but 
of D Kalb County, Ind. Pur ten years alter his n 

< took place in his life. In 1S74 I 

the study of medicine under the direction of Dr. Geoi 
ter, a skillful physician of Richland County, Ohio, and subse- 
quently matriculated at Hahnneman Medical College, Chicago, 

111. Afterward he returned to Ohio, and practiced in ] r- 

ship with his preceptor till 1S76, when he returned to Ms native 
county and located at Ceaar Creek, remaining there sever. 
years. During this time he built up a practice 





.. irge area of country, and in order to have his residence and 




near the geographical center, in 1883 he moved to Gar- 




rett. His success as a physician has been remarkable for 




short time he has devoted to the profession, ana being ambi- 




.' "" 



6V)0 HISTORY OK DE KA1.U COl ... 

tious and a close student his prospects are bright for a future 
of usefulness and . Politically Dr. Kcstcr . 

publican. He and his wife are members of the Methodist Prot- 
estant church. They have six children — Cora A., Ida M., 
Orville, Estina, Roy and Mabel. 

James A. McClure is among the prominent citizens of Keyser 
Township, and no one is more worthy of extended notice in 
the history of the township than he. He is a native of Indian;;, 
born near Fort Wayne, Allen County, Dec. iS, 1S38, the only 
son of William and Eve (Moody) McClure, of Ohio and Penn- 
sylvania birth, respectively. His mother died when he was 
three months old and he was adopted into the family of his 
Grandfather Moody, of De Kalb County, Ind. He remained 
with his grandfather during his minority and attended the 
common schools, subsequently taking a thorough course oi 
study at Fitch's Seminary, in Alien County, Ind. After leav- 
ing school he worked a year for $So, which he applied as pan 
pavment for fifty-five acres of land, for which he was to pr.j 

S575. Energetic and of unlimited perseverance, wit irig] 

and hopeful disposition, obstacles were overcome and hard I . 
endured. Adverse circumstances which would have discour- 
aged many, were endured by him with a cheerfulnes .... 
more determined will to succeed, and from poverty he has 
reached a life of affluence and a position of usefulness ana 
prominence in the county. His farm, which contains 135 acres, 
is one of the best in the township. He has served in 
official relations, among them Assessor four years. 
he is an uncompromising Democrat. Mr. McClure was mar- 
ried Aug. 30, 1865, to Sarah J. Swihart, daughter ol Samuel 
and Harriet Swihart. They have three children — Clara A., 
William Warren and Samuel E. 

Benjamin Franklin Moody was born in Richland, now Morrow 
County, Ohio, Jan. 26, 1S26, the youngest son and tenth of thir- 
teen children of Daniel and Mary Ann (Davis) Moody. In 
[S36 his parents moved to De Kalb County, Ind., ana < 
.. dense forest, and his youth was spent in assisting to clear and 
improve the frontier farm. Being the youngest son he remained 
on the homestead till after the father's death, and then boughi 
the north half, and has now lived on the same farm over forty- 
eight years. From a wilderness he has seen De Kalb County 
grow into one 0: the best in the State, and has assisted materi- 



. . OF DE KALB COUNTY. 



ally in promoting this growth. lie \va 

Trustee in 1S74 and served four years. He was married Jan. i, 
1849, to Margaret, daughter oi John and Susanna (Culler) Teagle, 
who came from Montgomery County, Ohio, to De Kalb County. 
They have four daughters — Rosanna, Mary Ann, Miranda and 
Alicia. Mrs. Mood)- is a member of the Lutheran church. Mr. 
Moody is a member of Auburn Lodge, No. 214, F. & A. M. 
Politically he has been a life-long Democrat. 

Harvey Moody, one of the most successful and prominent farm- 
ers, now retired, of De Kalb County, was born in Pennsyl- 
vania, Aug. 14. iSiS, the fifth of thirteen children of Daniel 
and Mary Ann (Davis) Moody, and grandson of Peter Moody 
who came to the United States from Germany in an earl) 

. >aniel Moody moved with his family to Rid 

Morrow) County. Ohio, and in 1836 to De Kalb County, Ind., 
and entered eighty acres and bough; fort}-, which he improved 
and made his home till his de..... at .... ..40 of eighty-four years. 

He ....1'. his wife were members of the Presbyterian church in 

■ but after their removal to De Kalb County united 

• e Methodist Episcopal church. Politically he affiliated 

with the Democrat c ........ Harvey Mood) remained wi s 

parents till twenty-four years of age. He entered ;'. ■ e 

cnt the land on which the village ol Con . ' . , - 

. iwnship, is now located, which he ex :hanged for eighty 
;icres in the same township, which he improved an,; subse- 
quently sold and bought the farm which he now owns in 
Keyser Township. In 1S77 he retired from active farm life 
and moved to the city of Garrett. Mr. Moody was married 
Oct. 10, 1S43. to Elizabeth De Witt, who died in Maw 1S4S. 
! hey ..at! three children, but one of whom is living — Marcus 
li. Ami and Delilah are deceased. Mr. Moody was married 
May 31. [850, to Azuba Axtell, a native of Knox County. Ohio, 

,. them were born four children — William A., . x 1 . - 

ceased . Maria, and Lenora E. Mrs. Moody died in 1856. Feb. 
25, :65s, Mr. Moody married Mary Melvin, of Summil ...; , , 
Ohio. They have three children — Daniel II., Phoebe A., .:.. . 
Sal 'A Politically, Mr. Moodv is a Democrat. 

.'.'.::. / IV. Ocker was \j /:\\ in Wilmington Town 
I 1. ...... Feb. 25, [849, .1 son of Elihu U. and Nancy A. 1 ...... 

Ocker. He rec . I iges of the common school, re- 

maining with his parents till fifteen years 01 age. . .. 






■ . .• n iky ok in: k/ 

1S64, he enlisted in Company li, Ei h In 

try, and was soon after transferred to Company II, One Hun- 
dred and Fifty-second Indiana Infantry, lie served with the 
Western Division of the army, and was discharged at Indianap- 
olis in August, 1805. After his return home he attended school 
in the winter three years. In 18G0 he began working at the 
rer's ...... and served an apprenticeship of two years. 

; lie then worked at his trade in the summer and on the ... 

I in the winter till 1S73. From 1S73 till 1879 he was employed 

! as brakeman and conductor on the Lake Shore & Michigan 

Southern Railroad. In 1SS0 he moved to Garrett am 

charge of Sargeant's Hotel till August, 1SS1, when he w< 
Butler and bought the Commercial House, which .... < 
February, 1SS2, and went West on a prospecting tour. Upon 
his return he again assumed the charge of Sargeant's Hotel, 

' and in January, 1SS3, took the De Kalb House. He is genial 
and accommodating, and well calculated to succeed in the hotel 
business. He was married April 1, 1S72, to Belle M.. di 
of W. E. and E. J. Sargeant, of Butler, Ind. They nave two 
children — Jessie D. and Edna M. Mr. Ocker is a member of 
Garretl L dge, No. 537, F. & A. M., William Meeker Chapter, 
No. 65, R. A. M., and Butler Lodge, No. 1S2, I. O. O. F. 

Elihu U. Ocker, deceased, was born in Tuscarawas County, 
Ohio, May 25, 1S25, a sun of David and Elizabeth (Undcn 
Ocker, his father of German and his mother of English dc 

.. received a practical education in the common schi , ..- 

.:' on the farm with his parents till manhood. In 1837 his 
parents moved to De Kalb County, Ind., and settled in Wilming- 

| ton Township. He worked as a farm hand in the summer and 
tausfhtschool in the winter till after his marriage, and then settled 
on a .arm :.. Wilmington Township, remaining there three 

years when he was burned out, and then moved to his own 

where he lived till 1864. In his early life he studied mc 

c< [iiired a thorough knowledge of the profession, althou h 

practical use. He was a township cial 

irly eighteen years, servingas Assessor and Land Appi 1 
■ sold his farm in [i C4 and moved .. 1 Butler, ,vh< re he . • 

leath. In i867-'68 he was engaged in the mercantile 
.... He was married in 1845 lu Nancy -V. Ball, of De Kalb 
County. Tot lem were born seven children; six lived till ma- 
turity — John William, David H., Abraham, Stephen L., James 



lir.i. >i:\ • n HI KAI.I1 < i iUN I v. i 11,3 

-.;.. ()|lic M. One died in infancy. Jolin W. enlist d ,., I ui . 

. .us- 11, Eighty-eighth Indiana Infantry, and died while in the 

>. ice in 1805. Mr. Ocker was a member of the Odd Fellows' 

irder, both subordinate lodge and encampment, and was 

mty Grand Master of the latter. He represented Butler 
; Lodge, Xo. 282, in the Grand Lodge of Indiana five times, and 
was well and favorably known by the Odd Fellows of the State. 
His death was sudden and without warning, falling dead on the 
street June 24, 1SS2. His wife died April 30, 1872. They were 
exemplary members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and he 
was for many years a class-leader and Sunday-school Superin- 
tendent. In his political views he was an uncompromising Re- 
publican. 

Henry Probst, Commissioner of De Kalb County, was born 
in this county Aug. 12, 1S46, a son of Charles and Lydia(Kemp) 
Probst, his lather a native of Lehigh County, Pa., born Feb. 20, 
.619. and his mother a native of New Hampshire. Charles Probst 
lost his father when he was eighteen years of age. He then went 
to Newark, N. J., and three years later to Miami County, Ohio, 

where for a time he taught school, and while there was r- 

ried to Lydia Kemp. In February, 1844, they moved to Dc 

Kalb County, Intl., and settled on section S of what w 

Butler Township. He was a prosperous business nam and a 
prominent citizen of the county. Among the official relations 
sustained by him was that of County Surveyor four years and 
Township Trustee several terms. He was an exemplary Chris- 
tian and a consistent member of the Lutheran church. Politi- 
cally he was a firm supporter of the principles of tin D . 10- 
cratic party. He died May 7, 1880. His wife survives him. 
She is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. Their 
family consisted of two sons, Henry being the only one living. 
George died from the effects of a wound received by the 
dental discharge of a gun. Henry Probst grew to man's es- 
tate on his father's farm, receiving a practical education in the 
district schools. He has given his attention to agriculture and 
iv owns a fine .arm of 500 acres. He was married April 21, 
1867, to Almira E., daughter of Leonard E. Chase. The)' had 
amily of five children — George W., Chloe E., Lydia A., Mar- 
garet A., Lophena M. Lydia A. died Aug. 7, 15:77. Almira 
E., wife of Henry Probst, died May 11, 1880. Henry Probst 
was married to Myrt'illa A., daughter of John and Elizabeth 



694 HISTORY OF DE KALB C01 

Grim, Aug. IS, tSSi. They have two children, twins — CI 
13. and Christina B. Henry Probst was elected Trustei 
Keyser Township in 1SS2, and in June, 1884, was appointe 

1 fill out the unexpired term of one of the County Commis: 
ers, and in the fall of 1S84 was elected to the same position for 
a term of three years. Henry Probst is a member of the 

1 German Baptist church. In politics he is a Democrat. 

Mahlon Rakestraw, farmer, section 6, Keyser Town h .. 
born in Clark County, Ohio, Dec. 26, 1830. a son of Josi 
. '. iscilla (Bates) Rakestraw. He was reared on a farm, as 
ing his father, and attending school the earlier part 01 his life. 

After reachi _ m; ; he engaged in the mercantile business, 

e followed successfully six years. In September, 1865, he 
came to De Kalb County, Ind., and bought eighty acres of land 
:.. Kcy>er 7</wnM.ip. waerc in lias since resided. He is .... 
enterprising and thrifty agriculturist, and has made a success of 
tins as of other vocations in which he has engaged. Politically 
Mr. Rakestraw is a Republican, but has no aspiration for official 
honors. He was married Dec. 26, 1869, to Elizabeth Barber, a 
native of De Kalb County, a daughter of Akalis and Rebecca 
Barber, who came from Dayton, Ohio, to De Kalb Count) in 

: an early day. Mrs. Rakestraw died Dec. 27, 1874, leaving one 
daughter — Melissa Estella. 

C. Rcy, . 1.. in general merchandise, Garrett, Inch, is 

of the most prominent representatives of the retail mere; 

I trade in De Kalb and adjoining counties. He carries a stock 
valued at Sio.ooo or Si5,coo, comprising the best grades of all 

! goods in his line. Buying in large lots and always for cash, he 
is able to compete with any of the large dealers and is recog- 

; nized as a rival hard to be excelled. Mr. Reyher was born in 
Beaver County, Pa., in 1835, the eldest child of John P. and 
Susanna Reyher. When he was twelve years of age his par- 
ents moved to Ashland County, Ohio, where from that time till 
twenty-one years of age he attended school, and assisted 

.v. wh 1 was a blacksmith, in the shop. Upon attain 

irity, he went to Williams County, Ohio, where he engaged 

facture of wagons and buggies eleven years, con- 

... ing a successful business. Disposing of his stock, lie em- 
barked ... the general mercantile business, and for two 
was a successful merchant of Williams County. In 187c he 
moved to Kendallville, Ind., where he .remained two years; 



v 






HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 695 



ent the same length of time in Goshen, Inch, and in 1876 
located in Garrett, where he has had a constantly increa 
trade. Mr. Reyher was married Nov. 27, 1S56, to Miss Hel 1 
M. Vanminan, of Ashland County, Ohio. They have had f\v< 
children, but four are living — Blanche, wife of Addison Stew- 
hn V. married Lizzie Rowe; Edward C. married Mary 
erman; and Ebcn E. The sons are associated with their 
lather in business, and are young men of promise and ability. 
Mr. Reyher is one of the self-made men of the times, having by 
his own industry worked his way through the many obstacles 
that beset the Hie of mankind, and has reached the top of the I 
ladder of success. He is an enterprising, public-spirited man, ! 
giving readily of his sub tarn e and influence to assist any laud- ' 
able undertaking. Politically he is a Republican. He and his 
wife arc members of the Christian church. 

Harris Rogers, farmer, section 4, Keyser Township, was born 
in Xew York, Nov. 12, 1821, a son of Elisha and Hannah Rog- 
ers. When he was a child lus parents moved to Pennsylvania, 
and in 1S36 moved to Medina County, Ohio, where he grew 

ity. In 1S46 he moved to De Kalb County, Ind., and 

il eighty acres of land in section 4, Butler (now Keyser, 
Township. His land was unimproved, but he has pat it under 
good cultivation and erected good farm buildings, and has in- | 
creased his farm to 100 acres. In addition to agriculture he 
has engaged extensively in the manufacture of drain tile, b< 
the first man in the vicinity to engage '.., the enterprise. Mr. 
Rogers was married Jan. 2, 1842, to Miss Paulina .i. Vaughn, .. 
native of the State of Xew York. They have one son— 
sF. They reared to young womanhood a daughter— Cor- 
..isley, now the wife of William Dove. Mr. Rogers is 
not identified with any religious or secret organization. Politi- 
cally he is a Republican. He is a strict temperance man, and 
that all may know his principles has a cabinet-size photograph 
oi each member of the family, ten in number, with the date of 
birth inscribed on each, on the wall of the front room, and over 
the door is the motto, i- A Temperance Family." If one should 
become a drunkard or tippler, ]iis picture will be turned face 
to the wall, that ail may know who has caused the division on 
this question. 

Jonathan Rummel, Superintendent of County Poor Farm, 
was born in Portage County, Ohio, Jan. 26, 1637. He is the ' 






STOKY OF DE KALB COUNTY 



second son of John and Sarah (Brown) Rummel, natives of 
Ohio, of German dc-scca:. When he was eight years old his 
father died. He remained with his mother till fourteen years 
of age, the greater part ol the time being devoted to study. At 
e "I fourteen he began to work at the harness-maker's 
trade, which he was obliged to abandon on account of ii'l hi . 
He then returned to the farm, but the next year (1852) came to 
Indiana, locating in Wells County. He was variously employed 
till ;$5S, when he began to work at the painter's trade, and fol- 
lowed that vocation till the breaking out of the Rebellion. 

May 19. 1S61, he enlisted in Company F, Thirteenth Indi 

Infantry, the first three years' regiment in the State. Among 
the more prominent battles in which he participated were: 
Petersburg, Jones' Run, Winchester and Richmond. At Green 
brier Creek, Oct. 3. 1S61. he was wounded in the right leg . 
disabled for two months, and at Fort Fisher received four slight 
flesh wounds. A portion of his term of service he performed 
the duties of Commissary Sergeant. He was discharged S 
5, 1 S65, after a service of lour years and four months. U .. 
his return .0 civil life he resumed work at the painter's trade 
in Fort Wayne. In 1S70 he moved to Waterloo, Ind., and in 
1S76 accepted the management of the De Kalb County Poor 

At that time the farm was in a deplorable condition, be- 

ing .. source of expense to the taxpayers, but under Mr. Rum- 
mei's wise administration, system has been adopted, chaos 
changed to order, and the farm is now self-supporting. Mr. 
Rummel was married July 13, 1S65, to Mary E., daughter of 
Simon Acker, of Portage County, Ohio, and later of Wabash 
County, Ind. To them have been born six children ; but one 
is living — Cora E. The deceased are — Charles W., Bradford 
E., Lillie G., Ada and Ida. Mr. and Mrs. Rummel are mem- 
bers of the Lutheran church. He is a member of Waterloo 
Lodge, No. 420, K. of H. Politically he c ■ 
the Republican party upon issues oi national interest, 

i ■.. / Sivihart, one oi the most prosperous farmers of De 
Kalb County, was born in Stark County, 1 )hio, in 1826, a son 
of John and Rebecca (Palmer) Swihart, his father being a na- 
tive of Pennsylvania and ids mother of Maryland. He was 
reared in his native county, remaining with his pa 

.. He received but a limited education, as early in 
...e he was obliged iu rely on his own resources. In 1S52 he 



. . .... Gj7 

came to Indiana and bou wild nd Town- 
ship, De Kalb County. A:,. a struggle 

with poverty, he was undaunted, and by pcrsevcrana 
came all difficulties, and success ultimately crowned h 
[ [e owns one oi the best farms in the township, com;.... i 
a< esol finely cultivated land, and his residence and farm build- 
ings are comfortable and commodious. Mr. Swihart was married 
in 1854 to Miss Elizabeth Bowman. To them were born seven 
children — Jennie,. Wilson, Monroe, Clara, Sarah Jane, Martha 
ana Sylvester. Jennie ana Sylvester are deceased. Mrs. Swiharl 
died in May, 1S65. Oct. 11, 1866, Mr. Swihart married Sa- 
mantha Sherlock, who came with her parents to De Kalb 
County in 1S55. Politically, Mr. Swihart is a Democrat. 

Washington Teeters was born in Stark County, Ohio, Oct. 6, 
1S27, the second son and fourth child of Jonathan and Elizabeth 
(Roller) Teeters, his father a native of Pennsylvania and his 
mother of Tennessee. When fifteen years of age he began learn- 
ing the carpenter's trade of his father. In 1S50 he came to Indi- 
ana and worked at his trade in De Kalb County four years. In 
1S54 he bought the farm where he now lives. At that time the 
land was heavily timbered, but he has cleared and improved and 
[ 20 acres o I the choicest land in the county. He has 
been a irominent man of the township, and has held several 
offices of trust, among others, Justice ol the Peace cig 
and Township Trustee six years. Mr. Teeters has been twice 

married. Lydia Ann Houser, a native of Pennsylv 

whom he was married Aug. 9, 1 S 5 5 , died July 12, 1610. April 
9, 1S58, he was married to Ethalinda, daughter of Jacob Cupp, 
of De Kalb County. To them have beer, born seven children 
—Franklin M., Samuel S., Josiah C, Annie E., Isaac S., Lydia 
B. R. and Mary S. Mrs. Teeters is a member of the Presbyte- 
rian church. Politically, Mr. Teeters is a Democrat. He is a 
member of the Masonic fraternity. 

. ■ 

in 1818, a son of Thomas Truelove. When a young man he 
came to the United States, and lived for a time in Marion 
County, Ohio. In 1842 he moved to Indiana and bought (on 
time) 145 acres of heavily timbered land in Keyser Township, 
De Kalb County. During the summer he worked for the farm- 
ers and in the winter seasons applied himself to clearing his 
land. He was married June 1, 1852, to Mary, daughter oi 





60S HISTOID 01 D] LU OUNTY. 

' li verridge, who came with hi . »ited 

States from England when lour years of age, and settlei 
Richland Count)-, Ohio, where she grew to womanhood. '. . 
September following their marriage they, settled on the farm in 
Keyser Township, where just as he was prepared to enjoj 
fruits of his early life of toil Mr. Truclove died, March 4, 1864. 
He was a gentleman ot true merit, respected by all who knew 

' • 1 ..._. . hild, William R., was born on the homestead, 

March 19, 1S53. He was married Feb. to, 1881, to Katie, 
daughter of Thomas Malone. William R., like his father, i a 
strong adherent to the principles of the Republican party. His 
a member of the Evangelical church. 

/. William Wagner was born in Germany Oct. 1, 1835, and 

was there rearec d educated. In 1S54 he came with his 

father's family to the United States .... . settled in Man: 
Richland Co., Oiiio. In 1872 he was appointed Deputy CI . k 
0: the Probate Court of Richland County, and heid the posi- 
tion three years. Dec. 1, 1S75, he moved to Garrett, Ind., 
established the saloon and restaurant which he is stiil con . 
ing. Mr. Wagner .... been a reliable citizen, and has been 
I with the most of the town offices. Al present he is 
serving as School Trustee. Political! he easts his suffrage 
with the Democratic party. He is a member of the Odd 
Fellow's order, Richland Lodge, No. 161, at Mansfield, Ohio. 
Mr. Wagner was married May 1, 1864 to 
native of Germany. To them have been born eight children; 
but six are living — Fannie, Julia, Clara, Walter, Lizzie, and 
Herman. Fanny and Adolph are deceased. 

Allen Weaver, farmer and stock-raiser, is a native of De Kalb 
County, Ind., and was born on the farm where he now lives 
May 24, 184S, the eldest son of David and Kittie Ann (Swan) 

Weaver. He was reared a farmer, receiving a good e 

igtrigt schop . ...v. Art.d- 

v :..y- ■'■ ■ » hi .vi ..I to Kaasab and was on ..■ 1 d In - 1 

a County a year. Then returned home and re- 

ed two year: and then went again ... Brown County and 

for two years sold sewing-i achii . with good suc- 

. . he returned to De Kalb County, and has since 

lived on the old homestead, having charge of the farm. He 

Tied Sept. 10, 187S, to Etta Garver, a native of De Kalb 

County, daughter of Joseph and Mary Ann Garver, pioneers of 



• .u.vrv, 



■ 



unty. To them have I \ drcn Kill io and 

Daisy May. In politics Mr. Weaver affiliates with the D( mo- 
iarty. 
David Weaver, one of the old settlers of De Kalb County, 
is a native of Stark County, Ohio, born Aug. 18, 1807. His 
arents, Valentine and Martha Weaver, were natives ol 
State of Virginia, and early settlers of Stark County, Ohio. He 
,-as reared in his native county on a farm, receiving- but 
limited educational advantages. He remained with his parents 
till manhood, and in the spring of 1S3S came to Indiana and set- 
tled in De Kalb County, where for several years he ran a . n - 
mill. He was married in \Sj,j to Kittie A. Swan, a native of 
Stark County, Ohio, but a resident of De Kalb County at the ' 
time of her marriage. After his marriage he settle;, on a tract 
of heavily timbered land, and began to open and clear a farm. 
On this farm he lived till 1S75 and then removed to Auburn 
where he has since lived retired from the active labors of life. 
. [is farm contains 320 acres of choice land, and is now carried 
.■ his so. is Allen and Henry. To Mr. and Mrs. Weaver 
. irn three children — Allen llenr) and Harriet. '. 

ter was the wife ol Jcffer Clark. She died in [875, 

from the effects of burns received . the 1 . 

sene ip, and left two children. 

Henry Weaver, farmer and si ick-raiser, Keyscr Township, was 

born on the old homestead where he now lives .' 

the youngest son of David and Kittie Ann (Swan) Weaver. He ■ 
was reared on the farm, receiving a common-school cdui : tion 
and remained with his parents till twenty-four years of age. He 
at to Missouri and engaged in the sew in busi- 
ness, traveling in different counties of the Stale three years. 
Then went to Kansas and engaged in stock dealing t\\ 
In 1879 k° returned to De Kalb County and located on . .... 

. : ! • j . 

suits. He was married Jan. 1, 1S79, t0 Delphia j. Seer-est, a 
■ Missouri, a dang! .... ,' lomas and Mary Ann 

(Sholtz) Secrest. To thei v> been born twi children > . ; 1 .. 

Leona and Lura Leslie. In politics Mr. Weaver is a Dem icrat. 
John Yarde, Sr., was born in Devonshire, England, March .2, 
1812. His parents died when he was a child, and he was reared 
by his mother's sister and given a collegiate education. When 
seventeen years of age he began teaching school, and, with the 



700 

exception 

that vocation thirty-five year 

Devonshire, and to them were born twelve i 
eleven daughters and one son; but four Mary J.. 

Emma, Lucy and John, Jr. In August, 1852, Mr. Y... 
with his family to the United States. He lived in 
County, Ohio, about one month, and men came to DeKalb 
County, Ind., and bought fifty acres of unimproved land, and 
after paying for his land had $75 left. Having the us 
one hand, I 1 of the work ol clearing and improving 

land fell to his son, then only sixteen years oi age. This 
farm has since been the home of Mr. and Mrs. Yarde, i 
i are among the most highly esteemed citizen 

estant Episcopal church. . 
ically Mr. Yarde is a Republican. 

John Yarde, Jr., was born in Devonshire, England, Xov. 17, 
1836, the son of John and Mary [S ... ■ . Yarde. His early 

is spent in school, and before sixteen years of ag 
taught seventeen months. He cam is parents to De- 
Kalb County, Ind., and assisted in clearing and improving his 
father's farm. He has been verysucces ... - busines - pur- 
suits, and now owns 2S0 acres of fine d. His residence and 

farm buildings are among the best in the county. He was mar- 
ct. 10, 1858, to Lydia -Van Houser, a native of Wayne 
County, Ohio, born July 22, 1S40, a daughter of David and ! 
Rebecca Houser. They have six children — Martha, Frank 
David, Nettie, Henry and Bertha. 



CHAPTER XVIII. 



NEWVILLE TOWNSHIP. 



... 



Situation. — Geography and Topography.— Pioneers — 
Newville.— Early Township Officials. — Population.— 
Property and Taxation. — Agricultural Statistics. — 
Biographical. 

Occupying the southeastern corner of De Kalb County, ana 
lying adjacent to the State of Ohio, is the fractional 

known as Newville, being six miles long and two and a half 
wide, and containing twelve whole and six half sections. It is 
bounded on the north by Stafford Township, on the east by the 
State of Ohio, on the south by Scipio Township, Allen County, 
and on the west by Concord Township. It is crossed by the 
Baltimore & Ohio Railroad east and west, nearly midway, and 
is drained by the St. Joseph of the Maumee, which flows 
through the northwestern corner, from northeast to south west. 
The land is of much the same character as that in Concord, 
and may be divided into three classes — the rich river bottom 
lands, the oak-timbered wheat lands, and the beech and sugar 
maple timbered lands at the south end of the township. 

The pioneers of Newville Township were John Platter and 
Solomon De Long, who, traveling tnrough the woods in the 
summer of 1S34, became bewildered, and encamped at the bor- 
der of a prickly ash swamp. Mere they dug a hole for water, 
being almost perishing with thirst, and by using their axes and 

id. was so heavily 
impregnated with the juices from the reets as tej be ;......_ I; 

drinkable, thoug heir natural cravings to make 

thebestoi it. Their adve - es are de 1 igth in the 

chapter on " early incidents." 

John Platter settled on section 7, just north of his present 
location, and there lived till within a few years, when he moved 
upon his present farm. Marilla, his eldest daughter, was for 
many years a teacher in common and graded schools, and was 









702 .... 

■ - . m the 

across from Newville; was one of the early Cou 
. rs; served during the war in the Forty-foi i . 

laving the rank 

tenant-Colonel in the latter, and died some yea 
Daniel Strong was a pioneer, and settled on the farm after- 
ward owned by Jackson Andrew, deceased. Other old settlers 
were: Dwight Moody, J. S. Feck, John Thompson, I. X. 
Alva Lawrence and Ephraim Strong.' S. II. Bartlett, 
and altogether a family of eleven per.-. .. . 
to the township in 1S36. George Week--, ex-surveyor, came ,.< 
at the same date. 

"The Mound " is an elevation of ground on section 7, on the 
Ashman farm. It is about ten rods from the " Little St. joe," 

the south bank of a small creek that empties into the 

St. Joe at this point. It was opened in ihe fall of 1S37 by Silas 
H. Bartlett, Daniel Strong-, jr., John Platter and Frasier Bart- 
lett. They found a large quantity of human bones about three 
. . from the surface. The elevation was then ten fc I 1 

.. about four. It is evident thai :pulcherof 

...>.: builders, and the rude earthworks indicate thai 
here was also at some time a fortification. 

The tillage of Newville, formerly called Vie..;. a, is situated 

on the northwest oank of the river, on the southwest quarter 

of section 6. It was surveyed . . by George \V. 

. in March, 1S37, for Washington Robinson, a pioneer 

r and owner of the land. The ori ;'. . pla c 

... ty-six .and a half acres, exclusive of streets. Washington 

nson was the first Justice of the Peace in the county d 

.iouse the first election was held. N. L. Thomas, a 
Methodist minister, was the first storekeeper in Newville. In 
the chapter on "Pioneers' Association" is told how he trans- 

r ; 

iUf eh, a lag house, wa: y the Methodists. 

Dodge was the host of the first tavern _ ene I, 1 ... .... . <■ • 

Lattman was the pion'eer physician. John C... ae- 

maker, and also an early Justice of the Peace, after-.. 
_-.- a: Salem Center, in Steuben Com 

;es have been built across the St. Joseph River at 

Newville, at considerable expense to the county. Heavy 
convert the stream into a flood, deluging the low lands 






. 



HISTORY OF DE K.M.l; 



. 



iway all obstruction. Newville i i . 

. . he railroad, but its people have always beer: known as an in- 
progressive community. There are now two 
stores, one drug and grocery store, two physicians, three 
blacksmith shops, two wagon and carriage shops and one saw 
and planing mill. 

The Newville Christian church was organized in th< 
1S5 1 by James Hadsell, in a school-house where the United 
Brethren p; rsonage now stands, across the river and southeast 
from Newville. Of the twenty-seven first members, three arc- 
yet living — Mrs. Henrietta Strong and Mrs. Julia A. Rex, of 
Newville, and Sarah Coburn, of Hicksville. At the close of 
1879 the church had a membership of 192. There are now 154 
communicants. The present pastor is Elder Oscar B. Jewell. 
Services are held on alternate Sundays, and on the other Sun- 
days social meetings are held. 

The Newville United Brethren church was organized in 1S42 
Ri v. H. Kumler, with four members, of whom S. De Long 
was Leader and M. Soper, Steward. Their house of . 
was erected in 1S55. A new roof was out on and other repairs 

.... >ut 1880, and at the present writing (18S5) a brick 
tion is being constructed, which, with other changes, will cost 
c ;:oo. The successive pastors have been: Revs. H. Kumler, J. 
Thomas, J. Fink, — . Briggs, J. Geer, S. Linsey, E. Day, Will- 
iam Mathers, William Butler, C. O. Lawrence, T. Osi 
K. Alwood, D. Holmes, j. Lower, C. Grassland, — . Rhodes, 
William O. Butler, J. Dixon, J. Brown, J. G. Bowersox, G. 
Crawford, J. N. Martin, S. J. Colgen, and R. T. Martin, who 
now fills the pulpit. The present membership is fifty-nine. The 
Trustees are : Messrs. Nichols, May and Tarney. A good par- 
sonage, near the church, is the property of the society. The 
Sunday-school has an average attendance of about seventy-five. 

The first school-house was built of round bass-wood logs, 
about 16x20 feet, with a "shake " roof held in place by weight 
poles. There were two small windows, and the door of rough 
lumber, was hung on wooden hinges; a string raised it« 
latch. The fireplace was surmounted by a stick and mud 

timney. A round piece of timber was split in two d ... 

..... side of each turned up, and four or five pins insc 

legs, to form the seats. A puncheon laid upon pins stuck in the 

wall formed a writing desk. This house was built in the spring 



704 



HISTORY OF DE KALE COUNTY. 



and the following fail the first term of sch 
taught by Marietta E. Robinson, for Si -So per week. A new 
frame school-house was built about 1843, on what is now the 
site of the United Brethren p; ... 1 in [850 a church and 

school-building was erected, under the lead of R. Faui 1 
1S52 a select school was opened by I\. Faurot, which was 
maintained until 1S61. After Mr. Faurot, the principal .. 
J. E. Hcndrix, A. Hartness and L. Barr. Since 1S61 it has 

been a township school. It has now two departments, -3 

and high. The latter is presided over by F. M. Merica 
an enrollment of eighty pupils. Mrs. Josie De Long 
ninety-six pupils in the primary department. William Seciy is 
Trustee. 

The first school in the township, however, and also 
in De Kalb County, was taught in 1S37, by E mice Str ... 
daughter of Daniel Strong, and now the wife of James '. 
of Kearney Junction, Xcb. The house was a frame, side . u 

- .ved clapboards, or whip shingles. It was the first 
frame house built in the county. It still stands, on section 7, 
Newville Township, on the homestead of Ephraim B. Strong, 
.. br ....... g: Eunice. 

Among tiie early Justices of the Peace in Newville Town- 
ship were, besides Washington Robinson already mentioned, 
.-. John Cary, J. S. Pecl< and Dwight Moody. Early 
Constables were : John P. Widney, John Thompson and Asa 
Overacker; and the first few Trustees were: D. Strong, A. B. 
Fetterer, X. Fuller, John Newton, John Murphy, N. L. Thomas, 
Newton Thomas, I. N. Blood, Alva Lawrence, S. De Long, D. 
ly, Ephraim Strong and John Platter. 

The population of the township is now 760, or 5: to the 
square mile, and the valuation per capita is $314.81. The num- 
ber of acres of land assessed is 8,813.25 ; value of same, §161,677; 

improvements, $2 1,220; value of - and 

ments, $182,897; value of lots, Si, 270; val ■ovements, 

S5o75; value of loth and improvements, $6,645 ; value of per- 

50 property, $5 1,880; total value .. 3, $241,422; rate 

... ...-. : number of polls, 119; poll tax, $1.50; total 

..... mnt of taxation, $4,388.54. 

The following crop reports are for 1SS1: There was in wheat, 
. : . acres, producing 10 bushels per acre, or 15,180 
in corn, 929 acres, producing 25 bushels per acre, or 23,255 



. . . 705 

s; in oats, 504 acres, producing 25 bushels per acre, or 

12,600 bushels; in m vr, 595 acres, producing at one ton per 

r.crc, 595 tons of hay; in Irish potatoes, 26 acres, producing at 
28 bushels per acre, 728 bushels. 



Si/as //. Bartlett, proprietor of the Newville Motel, and in- 
surance agent, was born in the town of Melbourne, County of 
Sherbrooke, Lower Canada, Jan. 20, 1825, a son of Frazier and 
Arolina (Brown) Bartlett, natives of Vermont. His grand- 
father, Joseph Bartlett, served seven and a half years in the 

. tionafy war; three years of the lime was Washington's 

body-guard. In July, 1S36, his parents came to De Kalb 
County, Ind., and settled in Concord Township, and thi - 
ing October moved to section 7, Newville Township. The 
country was inhabited mainly by Indians who often visited 
them, tracing venison and berries for supplies. One evening 
in the fall of 1S37 when the family were at supper, they were 
startled by an Indian's voice, and on looking around saw an 
Indian's head sticking through a hole in the wall, called a win- 
dow. After trading a ham of venison for some potatoes and a 

pumpkin, he left in delight. The Bartlett cabin was 1 

round hickory logs, 20 x 30 feet in size, with puncheon floor, 
clapboard ceiling and roof. The)- cooked by lire-place. Wild 
animals were numerous and very troublesome. Their home 
was in the woods and they were obliged to undergo ...... 

hardships. The father went to Maumee to buy corn, a distance 
of fourteen miles. Six miles of the way he had to cut a road 
through the woods, and two miles had to cut through the ice. 
He took a part of the com to Hughes Mill and took home a 
box full of ears. His oxen gave out on the way, and he was 
obliged to leave a part of his load. He hung some pork, which 
he had bought, in the bushes to keep it from the wolves. For 

... - "'■■■ 

>o, and the mother Dec. 27, 1882. fhey had a family 

1 eleven children, but four of whom are living — Mrs. Lucina 
Wocdcox, Silas H., Simon S. ana Mrs. Delilah Aw..-. S as 
tlett was married March 29, 1S49, to Almira A. Weeks, 
daughter of Luther Weeks. To them nave been born seven 
children; but five are living — Adelaide, Sarah, Charles, Eva- 
line and Greorge. He engaged in farming till forty years of 



■JOO ::■ . 

age and then in saw-milling several years. He 1 

: Peace twelve years, and is now a Notary Publii 
is a member of the Disciples church. 
Benjamin F. Blair, druggist and grocer, Newville 

horn in Lorain County, Ohio, Feb. 3, 1S33, a son of Jo 
who brought his family to Dc Kalb County in the fall of 1 
and settled in Concord Township. They made the journey by 
teams, having two spans of horses and one yoke of oxen. They 
often made but one mile in a day, the road being throi 
black swamp, and the trip was a long and tedious one. At 

the country was inhabited by Indians, but they were 
friendly and rarely made them any trouble. Our subjeel was 
reared in the woods of De Kalb County, .... I early learned the 
duties of a pioneer life, .lis educational advantages w 

- schools were iew and his services were net ded at 

The lands ed 1 . by the Blair family has all been cleared, 

.... I is the present s : i I - own .' St. Joseph. . 
1S63. Mr. Blair was married to Caroline A. Dodge, a native of 
.... born Feb. 9, 1S40, daughter of Anthony Dodge, a 
pioneer of this township. They have two children— . i 
Don Juan. In 1S62 he moved to Newville and boi 

. -■■ stock from that time till 1S76. ... the spring of 1S84 
he engaged in his present business, and carri a ful and com- 
plete stock of drugs, medicines, pa I , etc. He 
. as .. good trade, which is constantly . . . 
genial and accommodating manners won the confide] 

1 tf the entire community. He was elected County 

C -.>:oner in 1S76, and made an efficient and reliable officer. 

Otis S. Blood is a native of Ohio, born Jan. 15, 1S42, and in 
1S46 accompanied his parents, Albert N. and Sophia Blood, to 
De Kalb County, Ind.,and settled in Newville Township. Here 
he was reared and educated, remaining with his parents till the 

out of the Rebellion, lathe fall of 1861 ... si 

• ■ ■ ■ 

served till Nov. 23, [864. After his return home he en 

. locating on the old homestead . 
. e has since lived. He was married Dec. 13, 1867, to Leah 
Culler, a native of Massillon, Ohio, daughter of Joseph Culler. 

■ ... ..'1 N. Blood, was a local preacher of the United 

... thren church. Reserved his township as Trustee and As- 
sessor several terms. His three sons were all soldiers in the 



HISTORY OK Dl ■ I 70/ 

\t 

, died in the hospital, and ll 
of disease com 

K< ... March i, 1S63 his wile is now living at 

:sville. 

'. Cobi . c Xv ivville, I id., w as bi <. .1 in 

Trumbu! Country, ( hio, March, 15, 1830, a son of Ebenezerai . 

Delia (Wilson) Coburn, his lather a native 01 Burlington, Vt., 

Massachusetts. In 1538 his parents moved 

e Kalb County, Ind., and settl . Co ement 

in Concord Townshi] , where he was reared and educated. In 

[S57 he was rried and moved to Newville, an :ated on 

the li it where he has since lived. In 1S64 lie built his . 1 
He worked at the carpenter's trade a few years, and ... the 
s iring of 1863 bought a hah interest in the Newville saw-mill, 
which he ran four years. He then worked at ids trade till the 
spring of 1S70, when he engaged in merchandising in company 
.■ if .'.. A. Fetterer, under the firm name of Fetterer & Col 
In 1S76 he bought his partner's interest and has since ca. 
the business alone. He carries a capital stock of $5,000, 
Is, groceries, boots, 
croi :ery, hardware, etc. He ke< ntly on hand a corn- 

stock of everything in his line and ...... 

1 .. mual business of §io,ooo. h 1 new sti 

x 50 feet in size, which is one of the neatest and most conven- 

y arranged in the town. Mr. Coburn ,vas -ied Nov. 

27, 1857, to Sophia Mathews, a native of Concord Township, 

ghter of John Mathews, a pioneer of Dc Kalb County, now 

deceased. Mr. Coburn is one of the representative business 

men ol Newville, but is quiet and unassuming in his m . ., 

and never seel 1 onors, prefer, . ly to 

his own affairs, and leaving the cares of office to others, 
and his wife are members of the Christian church. 

Randal Fajirpt .. was born in the town of Hopewi 

near Canandaigua, .\, \ ..... 1 .... 

Randal . ... ■ Dolittie) Faurot, who moved to Royalton, 

no; rCl 01 Hav- 

. ■ ■ re lor an education, he relinquished his share in the 
pective fine farms for a few terms in an academy and 
to study. As soon as competent he taught s :h >1 .. 
inter and devoted his summers to study, and finally entered 
' Oberlin College where he remained several terms. He subse- 



... , in: KM. I 

..... I 

life he Look .1 decided stand witli I Disci] ... 

worked cai nestly with the peopl< . o ... Li] . 

churches of devoted Christians on the Western Reserve, Ohio, 
and soon became a successful preacher as well as teacher. 
While on a visit to his father and brothers who had moved to 
Michigan, he met the natural orator and revivalist, Benjamin 
Alton, whose labors were so productive of good in Ohio, Mich- 
igan and Indiana, and engaged in holding meetings \. i . ... 
Stafford, Newville, Coburn's Corners, and other po . Fcel- 
rawn toward this pari of the vineyard, he decided to 

remain in De Kalb County and becan ol greal cc in 

building the churches at Newville, Waterloo, Kendallvillc 

M . awa Ei erton, riding u hors< ick over the rough 

. .. . >n to holding meetings, visiting the ic .. 

3d, comforting the oor and needy, and leading many 

ousness. He was largely instrumental in the b\ 

Newville Academy, which flourished and was a great sour 
good :oc many years. His memory is held in grateful re,... - 

brance by many in different States, because o ard 

labors in the cause of education. He w; 

ough worker. His work was never . I ... ... ,. 

strongly opposed to secret societies, and was a clear, shrew,. 
r, carrying his audience with him more by the force of 
dc than by his persuasive powers. Kind and thoughtful, 
his greatest desire was to be useful to his friends, finding his \ 
greatest pleasure in seeing those lie loved happ3 . While prea< fl- 
ing in Philadelphia, he wrote and had published, " Pilgrim's 
Progress," a book written in imitation of John Bunyan, in which 
he showed the advantages and joy of living a Christian life. It 
. as a work of great interest to a Christian, and of benefit to a 
young convert, and he received many letters, acknowlei 
the help derived from its perusal, and thankin . . 
the public a work of the kind. At tne ore.; . 

Rel lion many of his students enlisted, and i dsh 01 

some that he should go a. . knew 

him well, said: " No : Elder Faurot could not look on sin and 
jue with sufficient allowance to work among thoi . o 
. sd each other." However, he and his wife went twice 
Tennessee during the war, first as volunteer nurses aftej the 
battle of Murfreesboro, and again to look after wound* . fri 





































IJ (h*sW* ^^ 



f\ ( f 

1/ , ye) ^-o^OiMX-i 

(I (i 



HISTORY OF DE KALI) COUNTY. 



709 



While there they lent such valuable aid in starting schools for 
the colored people that he was subsequently called South to 
locate a school for the oppressed race, and after many months 
of labor, during which he was engaged much of the time in 
missionary work, he, with Dr. W. A. Belding, located the 
Southern Christian Institute on an old plantation of 800 acres, 
lying on the railroad fourteen miles east of Vicksburg and 
twenty-six miles west of Jackson, Miss. Here in the midst of 
the work he builded, and which was as dear to him as his own 
family, he died Oct. 10, 1882, the day before his sixty-second 
birthday. He was married in May, 1847, to Letitia Hutchings, 
in Cortland Count)-, N. Y. She had preceded him in the 
pioneer educational work of De Kalb County, and there they 
met in 1845. She proved a worthy help-meet for a noble man, 
sympathizing with him in all his work, and aiding him bv her 
counsel and prayers in all his varied vicissitudes. Her kindly 
ministrations to the sick and oppressed endeared her to the 
hearts of all who knew her. They had no children to gladden 
their home, but reared from childhood a motherless nephew 
and niece, Marvin Faurot Hall, of Hillsdale, Mich., where he 
attended college, and subsequently located and is engaged 
in the electric-light business; and Mary L. Hutchings, now the 
wife of Dr. W. P. Andrews, proprietor of the magnetic springs at 
St. Louis, Mich. Their home was ever the home of the widow 
and orphan, and the weary and oppressed were ever welcome, 
and given a resting place. Truly, the deeds of the good live after 
them and shine as bright stars in the crown of their rejoicing. 

Nathan T. Fuller, section 9, Newville Township, was born in 
Strongsville, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, Aug. 11, 1821, a son of 
John Fuller, a native of Vermont who settled in Cuyahoga 
County in 1818 and lived there till 1841, when he moved to 
Henry County, Ohio. Nathan remained with his parents till 
manhood, accompanying them to Henry County, and in 1844 
began life for himself. He worked three years by the month 
on farms and in saw-mills, and in the spring of 1847 went to 
work on a lake steamer. The following fall he went to Cin- 
cinnati and enlisted in the Mexican war and served till August, 
1848. In September, 1848, he came to De Kalb Countv and 
lived with Southard Ellis four years, and in April, 1851, bought 
the farm where he now lives. He has no acres of good 
land, sixty-five of which he cleared himself, it being all heavilv 
45 



7io 



HISTORY OK DE KALB COUNTY. 



timbered when he settled on it. He is engaged in general farm- 
ing and stock-raising, at which he is very successful. lie en- 
listed in the war of the Rebellion Sept. 20, 1861, in Company 
F, Forty-fourth Indiana Infantry, and served till Nov. 22, 1864. 
He participated in the battles of Shiloh, Corinth, Battle Creek, 
Perryville, Stone River, Chickamauga. and thence to Chatta- 
nooga where his regiment was on guard duty till their dis- 
charge. At Stone River he had four bullet holes shot in his 
clothes, and his pocket-book was torn to . pieces, but he was 
unharmed. He is a member of the Grand Army of the Re- 
public, an organization in which he is much interested. He 
was married July 4, 1854, to Lucinda Nichols, and to them 
were born five children, but three of whom are living — Fran- 
cine, Flora and Logan. Francine married Benjamin F. Nelson, 
of Hicksville, Ohio, and has three children — Inez L., Earl D. 
and Ivah F. Mrs. Fuller died in September, 1873, and March 
4, 1875, Mr - Fuller married Mrs. Mary Hull, daughter of Haz- 
ard Webster and widow of John Hull, who was killed at the 
battle of Stone River. To them have been born two children, 
but, one of whom is living — Harry. She had three children by 
her first marriage, but two of whom are living — Ellen and John. 
Mr. Fuller has served his township three years as Trustee and 
two terms as Assessor. 

Henry Fusselman was born in Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, 
May 6, 1815. He was the youngest of fourteen children, and 
his eldest sister had married and emigrated to a distant State 
before he was born. Of all the influences which surrounded 
his early life we know nothing, but they must have been gra- 
cious to form a character so strong in its simplicity, purity and 
integrity of purpose. If of the learning of schools he was 
taught little, he learned somewhere the better lessons of love 
for God, obedience to His laws and enduring trust in His 
mercy through Christ; of patience, charity and good will to- 
wn!;! .ill Ins (ellew biiHfei of industry, psrievsrniieG and Been. 

omy as regards his own life and practice. These qualities, 
added to strong good sense, made him an excellent business 
man, a valuable citizen and a faithful friend. He was married 
in Braceville, Portage Co., Ohio, Dec. 22, 1836,10 Almeda M. 
Gay, who was born May 15, 18 10. She was, a woman of strong 
intellect, and distinguished among her acquaintances for her 
bright, keen wit, whose shafts, to her credit be it said, were 



HISTORY OF 



KM. II COUNTY. 



never poisoned by envy or malice. To her husband she was a 
valuable and valued helper; to her neighbors a ready and sym- 
pathizing friend; in her family, energetic and untiring. Mr. and 
Mrs. Fusselman arrived at the St. Joe River in Stafford Town- 
ship, April 15, 1838. On the nth of August after, their eldest 
child, Barbara, was born. She is now Mrs. Geo. Garver, of 
Des Moines, Iowa. Afterward were born to them Sarah (Mrs. 
Henry Herrich), Harriet (Mrs. Charles Thomas, of Omaha, 
Neb.), Lester, who died in the army; Henrietta and Quincy. 
The following sketch of Mr. Fusselman was written to his eldest 
daughter, Mrs. Garver, by John P. Widney, himself long an hon- 
ored citizen of De Kalb County, but now a resident of Belle- 
ville, Richland Co., Ohio. It is so just a characterization, and 
so honorable to its author that we give it verbatim : " I became 
acquainted with your father, Henry Fusselman, when he first 
moved into the county. I went with him and Wm, Scoville to 
Fort Wayne in a pirogue when he laid in his first supplies as 
a settler. This was our first acquaintance, and it was a pleas- 
ant one. I found Mr. Fusselman to be one of the most genial 
companions, of more than average intelligence and of the most 
unswerving integrity. This first opinion of his character was 
fully confirmed in after years, for his sterling qualities of head 
and heart were soon appreciated by a wide circle of friends, 
and he became a leader in every enterprise that tended to build 
up good society. In him the widow and the orphan found a 
fast and reliable friend, as he was frequently called upon to 
manage the estates of decedents and minors. And such was the 
confidence of his neighbors in his justice and his judgment that 
he was, perhaps, more than any other man selected as referee 
in personal disputes, and his decision was generally satisfactorv. 
For many years he held the office of Justice of the Peace in his 
township (Stafford), and in after years was selected as one 
of the County Commissioners. In all his public duties he fully 

met the confidence of his friends, f lj§ religious instincts were 

not less marked than his social. In the church of his choice, 
the Disciples or Christian, he stood among the foremost. 
Firm in his convictions, but tolerant and kind to those of oppo- 
site views, as a lay preacher he had but few equals. His pub- 
lic addresses were the overflowings of a sympathetic nature 
guided by a clear head. As a business man he had many ex- 
cellent traits, and was specially useful as a dealer in farm pro- 



712 



HISTORY OF DE KALU COUNTY. 



duce. His energy and industry in this direction brought on, 
by exposure, the disease that closed his life. In the accumula- 
tion of property he was fairly successful, but all through life 
his generous nature made large draughts on his accumulations. 
In his death the county lost a good and useful man; one who 
was respected by all, and highly esteemed for his many virtues." 
Five or six years before he died, perhaps more, Mr. Fussel- 
man removed to Newville where he opened a store and carried 
on an active business while he lived. He died Feb. 27, 1863, 
of congestion of the lungs. When the news of his serious ill- 
ness went abroad his friends came from many miles distant, 
anxious to see him, to help, if possible, but at least to testify in 
some manner to their affectionate sympathy. The peace of 
God which passeth all understanding went with him through 
the valley and shadow of death. For him it had no sting, and 
a visible joy shone on his dead face, as if even the lifeless clay 
were witness to his happiness. His widow survived him 
nearly twelve years, dying Jan. 29, 1875. To her whose life 
had been maimed by the loss of her husband, to whom the in- 
tervening years had been a period of waiting, death came as a 
welcome friend. Let us humbly hope that it reunited in para- 
dise those whom it had separated here. 

Isaac Gunsenhouser, section 4, Newville Township, was born 
in Stafford Township, De Kalb County, Ind., on the old home- 
stead, on the southeast quarter of section 6, March 8, 1838. In 
1836 his father, John J. Gunsenhouser, came to this county and 
settled in Stafford Township. At that time the county was all 
heavily timbered and the inhabitants were principally Indians 
and wild animals. Isaac Gunsenhouser was reared a farmer 
and has followed that vocation the most of his life, with the ex- 
ception of 'the decade from 1872 to 1882, when he ran a steam 
saw-mill on the St. Joseph River at Newville. He received a 
common*school education, attending the schools of his native 
township. He moved to Newville Township in 1872 and set- 
tled on section 4, where he owns seventy-six acres of choice 
land, under a good state of cultivation. He served as Justice 
of the Peace three years in Stafford Township, and has held 
the same office eight years in Newville. He is a prominent 
member of the Masonic fraternitv. He was married in i860 to 
Rosanna, daughter of Jacob Dickerhoff. They have had two 
children — Inez (deceased) and Mary E. 



HISTORY OK DE KM. II COUNTY. 



713 



H. H. Hull, M. D., was born in Coshocton County, Ohio, Feb. 
4, i8i5,ason of Henry and Christiana (Cox) Mull, natives of 
Virginia and Pennsylvania. Me lived on his father's farm till 
twenty-one years of age, receiving his education in the public 
schools of Knox County, Ohio. When nineteen years of age 
he began the study of medicine, and when twenty-one began 
his practice. In 185 1 he moved to De Kalb County, Ind., and 
located at Newville, where he has built up a large and lucrative 
practice. He was married April 24, 1856, to Melissa Rex, daugh- 
ter of Joshua and Martha (Watson) Rex, natives of Vermont 
and New York. To them have been born six children, four of 
whom are living — Lorinda, C. O., Inez and T. M. Dr. Hull 
became a member of the Masonic fraternity in the fall of 
I 1857, and is a member of William Hacker Lodge, No. 326, 
Newville. 

Wilson S. Headlcy was born in Trumbull County, Ohio, 
June 26, 1843, a son of James Headley, who was born Jan. 10, 
1810, in Greene County, Pa., and a grandson of Maurice Head- 
ley. In 1845 James Headley brought his family to De Kalb 
County, Ind., and entered eighty acres of land on section 8, 
Newville Township, where he has since lived. Wilson S. re- 
ceived a good common-school education, completing it at the 
Newville select school. He remained at home till after the 
breaking out of the Rebellion, and in 1863 enlisted in Company 
F, One Hundred and Twenty-ninth Indiana Infantry, and served 
nearly two years. He participated in the battles of Kenesaw 
Mountain, Burnt Hickory, Atlanta, Franklin, Nashville, Ben- 
tonville, and others of less importance. After his return home 
he worked on the homestead three years and then spent two 
years on Bear Creek, Concord Township. In 1877 he moved 
to Newville where he has since lived. He has been promi- 
nently identified with all the interests of the town since living 
here, and in 1884 was elected Justice of the Peace, and makes 
an efficient and reliable orh66F. He was mariiud Jan, §, iS6?, 
to Sarah E. Bradley, daughter of Joseph Bradley. To them 
have been born six children — Vernon D., James, Maud, Lee, 
Dott and an infant son. 

Rev. Oscar B. Jewell, pastor of the Newville Christian church, 
was born in Washington Township, Licking County, Ohio, 
April 12, 1845, a son of William Jewell, now of Ottawa Lake, 
Mich., a.native of Elizabeth City, N. J. He was reared on a 



L 



714 



HISTORY OF DE KALI) COUNTY. 



farm but received a good education in the schools of Utica 
Ohio, and after leaving school taught fourteen years. April 
12, 1878, he was ordained a minister in the Disciples church, 
and has since given his time to the pastoral work of the church. 
He came to Newville in February, 1884, and now has charge 
of the churches at Newville and Coburn Corners. He is a gen- 
tleman of pleasing address, a fine orator, and a ready expounder 
of the doctrines of the Bible, and has many friends both in and 
out of the church. He was married Nov. 14, 1867, to Melissa 
Cullison, daughter of John M. Cullison. They have one child 
— Frank, aged sixteen years. 

John Mathews was born in one of the New England States 
Aug. 9, 1790, and died in Newville, Ind., Aug. 27, 1862. His 
father, John Mathews, was one of the pioneers of Shelby Coun- 
ty, Ohio. He was married in the fall of 1832 to Priscilla H. 
Clayton, daughter of Robert Clayton, and to them were born 
twelve children, eight of whom are living — Mrs. Eliza McCosh, 
Mrs. Elizabeth Fetterer, Mrs. Jane Stoughton, Mrs. Mary E. 
Moody, Mrs. Sophia Colburn, Mrs. Melissa Briggs, Aaron and 
Mrs. Alice McCabe. William H. was a soldier in the war of 
the Rebellion, and was killed in the battle at Vicksburg. Aaron 
was also a soldier in the late war. Robert, Mrs. Rebecca Snook 
and Mrs. Ettie Sanders are also deceased. Mr. Mathews came 
to De Kalb County in December, 1833, and located on the 
present site of Spencerville, and from that time till his death 
was one of the prominent citizens of the county. 

John Nelson, farmer and stock-raiser, section 28, Newville 
Township, was born in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, Feb. 26, 
1819, son of Hugh and Mary (Wilson) Nelson, the former a 
native of Pennsylvania and the latter of Virginia. He was 
reared in his native county, and in the fall of 1853 came to De 
Kalb County and settled on the farm where he now lives. The 
first year he lived in a small pole cabin, but in the fall of 1S54 

built a log house, lie owns, ninety-six aersi of land.&ixty aeraa 

of which he has cleared with his own hands. He enlisted in 
the war of the Rebellion in Company F, One Hundred and 
Twenty-ninth Indiana Infantry, and served two years. He par- 
ticipated in the battles of Resaca, Nashville, Kingston, and 
others. At the battle of Nashville he was shot through the 
wind-pipe, when making a charge, the second day of the fight, 
Dec. 1 5,, 1864. He enlisted as a private and was discharged as 



11ISTOKV OK DE KALI) COUNTY. 



;i Duty Sergeant, lie was married Sept. 22, 1842, to Eliza 
Thornburg, daughter of Benjamin and Nancy (Underwood) 
Thornburg. To them have been born eight children, seven of 
whom are living — Benjamin F., Jennie, John W., William II., 
Hugh A., Samuel L.,and Celia. All are married except Henry 
and Celia. Benjamin married Francinia Fuller and has three 
children — Inez L., Earl D., and Ivah F. Jennie married Edwin 
(). Harris, of Antwerp, Ohio, and has six children — Frank, 
Mabel, Elva, Myrtle, Ross and Ethel. John W. married Matil- 
da Clark and has one child — Ray. Hugh, of Cole City, 111., 
married Dellia Pardee, of Grundy County, 111., and has one 
child — Ralph. Samuel married Carrie Lupton, and lives in 
Springfield, 111. Their eldest child, Thomas J., died at the age 
of six years. Mr. and Mrs. Nelson are members of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. He is a member of the Grand Army 
of the Republic. He has served his township as Constable two 
terms, and as justice of the Peace the past nine years. 

James IV. Platter, the first white male child born in Dc Kalb 
County, Ind., was born in Concord Township, Oct 11, 1836, a 
son of Jacob and Jane (Weeks) Platter, his father a native of 
Miami County, Ohio, born Feb. 16, 1805, and his mother of 
Rockbridge County, W. Va., born Aug. iS, 1809. He was edu- 
cated in the pioneer log school-houses, and in his youth learned 
the blacksmith's trade, although the greater part of his life has 
been devoted to agricultural pursuits. He now owns a fine 
farm of 100 acres on section iS, Newville Township. He lived 
in Concord Township till twelve years of age, and then went 
with his parents to Defiance County, Ohio, where he lived four- 
teen years. Then moved to Allen County, Ind., and seven years 
later returned to De Kalb County, and in 1873 settled on the 
farm where he now lives. He was married Dec. 23, 1859, to 
Harriet Rcaser, daughter of Daniel and Sarah Rcaser, of Wayne 
County, Ohio. They have had four children — Cornelius, born 

Sept, 12, 1S61 ; Ulysse§, born July 26, 1^63, died April 2, 1884; 

Arthur, born Aug. 13, 1866, and John, born March 21, 1873. 
Mr. and Mrs. Platter are members of the United Brethren 
church. 

Captain Marquis L. Rhodes, deceased, was born in Piqua, Ohio, 
Feb, 15, 1835, a son of Jeremiah Rhodes, who settled in De Kalb 
County in 1836, and is now a resident of Spencerville. He re- 
mained at home on the farm till fourteen years of age, and then 



yi6 HISTORY OF DE KALI? COUNTY. 

went to Fort Wayne, and for six years was employed as clerk 
in the store of Henry Orff. He then returned to Spencerville 
and established a general store, which he conducted till the fall 
of 1857, when he moved to Auburn and carried on his business 
there till August, 1862, when he raised Company A of the One 
Hundredth Indiana Infantry, and was appointed its Captain. 
He was a valiant soldier, serving till the following December, 
when he died at Memphis, Tenn., from the effects of measles. 
He was married Dec. 4, 1856, to Sarah E. Harmony, daughter 
of Jacob Harmony, of Decatur, Ind. To them were born three 
sons, but one of whom is living — Cecil, who lives in one of the 
Western States. One son, Leon, died in June, 1880, aged twen- 
ty-one years. Mrs. Rhodes is a resident of Newville, and one 
of the most esteemed ladies of the place. Captain Rhodes was 
a prominent member of the Masonic fraternity. 

William Scelcy is a native of New York State, born in 1833, 
the eldest of three sons and one daughter of Amzi and Mercy 
Ann (Ray) Seeley. July 3, 1843, his parents moved to De Kalb 
County, Ind., and the following fall settled on the Richmond 
farm where they lived two years. In the fall of 1845 they 
moved to Orangeville where the father bought an interest in 
the flouring mill. In 1858 he sold his mill and moved to New- 
ville where he died in the spring of 1877. He was one of the 
prominent men of the county, and held the office of County 
Commissioner four terms. William Seeley lived with his par- 
ents till eighteen years of age and then learned the cabinet- 
maker's trade, at which he worked till the spring of 1872, when 
he bought the saw-mill which he has since run. He has built 
up a good trade, and is one of the prosperous citizens of the 
township. He was married in 1863 to Ellen Stager, a native of 
Ohio, born in 1836. They have a family of five children, all 
living at home. In 1882 Mr. Seeley was elected Township 
Trustee, and re-elected in 1884. 

Alpha Warmi Smith, farmer and stock-raiser. S6@tiQI1 4< N§W* 
ville Township, was born in Erie Countv, Pa., March 17, 1S27, 
a son of Daniel Smith, a native of Saratoga Countv, N. Y., and 
an early settler of Erie County. He was reared and educated 
in his native county, and when sixteen years of age, in 1843, l ert 
home and, after wandering in several States, in 1849 located in 
Putnam County, Ohio, where he remained till the fall of i860, 
and then went to Lawrence County, 111., and spent the winter, 



HISTORY OF DE KAI.B COUNTY. 



7*7 



and the following spring came to De Kalb County, Ind., where 
he has since lived. He owns seventy-six acres of choice land all 
well improved, and in addition to his agricultural pursuits has 
worked at the shoemaker's trade. He was married in the fall 
of 1S49 to Sarah Miller, daughter of Jacob and Anna (Robers) 
I Mi'.ler. The father died about 1870, and the mother is living 
with Mrs. Smith, aged seventy-five years. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Smith have been born seven children ; but two are living — 
Minerva and Paulina. Minerva married Willis Aten, of New- 
ville Township, and Paulina married William Countryman, and 
has one child — Carl. One son, Oscar, died at the age of twenty- 
two years. He married Dora Bailey, and left one child — 
Blanch. 

Philander Smith, section 5, Newville Township, was born in 
Morrow County, Ohio, Dec. 4, 1825, a son of Elisha Smith, a 
native of New York and a pioneer of Delaware CountY- He 
was reared and educated in his native county, and in the early 
part of 1 85 1 came to De Kalb County and spent several months 
in Newville making fanning-mills. He then returned to Ohio, 
but in 1852 came again to Newville, and in company with John 
S. Peck established the first cabinet shop in the place. A year 
later he sold his interest to Mr. Peck, who ran the shop till 
1860, when he sold out to William Seeley, and in 1865 Mr. 
Smith bought an interest in the business and they ran it together 
five years. The latter then sold his interest, but in 1879 bought 
the entire business and ran it alone till 1882, when he sold out 
and moved to the farm where he now lives. He has forty acres 
I of good land on his farm, and also owns forty acres in Henry 
I County, Ohio. He enlisted in the war of the Rebellion in 1861 
in Company E, Eleventh Indiana Infantry, and served a year, 
when he was discharged on account of disability. In 1863 he 
helped raise Company H, of the Eighty-eighth Indiana Infan- 
try, and was commissioned its First Lieutenant. The following 
winter he was wounded at the battle of Murfreesboro and re- 
signed. In 1S64 he helped raise and enlisted as private in Com- 
pany F, One Hundred and Twenty-ninth Indiana, but was soon 
after appointed Second Lieutenant and subsequently First 
Lieutenant. He participated in the battles of Pittsburg Land- 
ing. Burnt Hickory, Murfreesboro, Perryville, siege of Atlanta, 
Franklin, Nashville, Kingston, and others of less importance. 
He was married in the spring of 1846 to Lucy Lord, and to 



7i8 



HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 



them were born two children — Elizabeth (deceased) and Philura. 
Mrs. Smith died in the spring of 1850, and in December, 1851, 
he married Caroline Griffith. To them have been born eight 
children, six of whom are living — Loretta, Corlistia, Effie, 
Alfred, Ellsworth, and Birdie. Mr. Smith is a member of the 
Masonic fraternity. He and his wife are members of the Dis- 
ciples church. 

Ephraim B. Strong, section 7, Newville Township, was born 
in Geauga County, Ohio, Jan. 5, 181 5, a son of Daniel and 
Eunice (Bundy) Strong, natives of Northampton, Hampshire 
Co., Mass., a grandson of Daniel Strong, a hero of the Revolu- 
tion. His grandfather's brother John was a Colonel in that 
war. His father was Captain of a military company in the 
early days of Ohio. His parents moved to Geauga County, 
Ohio, in 1813, and in 1836 to De Kalb County, Ind., landing in 
Newville Township, June 4. There were no roads through 
from Defiance County, Ohio, and they were obliged to cut 
their way through the woods. They settled on section 7, where 
our subject now lives, which at that time was heavily timbered. 
They cleared the timber from four acres that fall and sowed it 
to wheat, without plowing the ground, dragging it in, and har- 
vested a crop of 102 bushels. There was a family of twelve 
children, but five of whom are living — Ephraim B., Eunice, 
Stephen W., Nancy and Albert B. Two died in childhood and 
five, Daniel B., Lucy, Laura, Triphosa, and Israel, had reached 
maturity. Albert B. was a soldier in the war of the Rebellion. 
Ephraim B. Strong remained with his parents till manhood, 
assisting his father to clear and improve a frontier farm. He 
was married May 28, 1840, to Marietta E., daughter of Ralph 
F. Robison. To them have been born five children, three of 
whom are living — Henry B., William L., and Ida G. Lisbon 
E., and an infant are deceased. Henry married Anna L. Leitch, 
and has one child. He lives in Clay Center, Neb. Ida is the 
wife of Andrew C. Harrod, of Newville Township. 

James IV. Wair, section 4, Newville Township, was born in 
Paulding County, Ohio, Dec. 23, 1839, a son of J. M. Wair, a 
native of New England, who moved West when our subject 
was small and died there. James W. was reared and educated 
in his native county. He was married June 22, 1871, to Mrs. 
Almeda S. Boland, widow of Edward Boland, and daughter of 
Samuel Swetland. She was born in the State of New York, 



HISTORY OF OK KM. II COUNTY. 



7«9 



January, 1834, and when eleven years old her parents moved 
to Lorain County, Ohio, and she was married there when nine- 
teen years old to Edward Boland, and came directly to this 
county. Mr. Wair has been a cripple since two and a half years 
of age. He and his wife are members of the United Brethern 
church. 










J> 






CHAPTER XIX. 



RICHLAND TOWNSHIP. 



Situation.— Geography and Topography. — Organization. 

—Early Township Officers.— First Settler.— Other 

Pioneers. — First Schools and Churches. — Population. 

— Property and Taxation. — Crop Statistics.— Sedan.— 

Corunna. — Biographical. 

The township known as Richland is situated in the western 
tier, and is bounded on the north by Fairfield, on the east by 
Union, on the south by Keyser, and on the west by Allen 
Township, Noble County. Through the northern part the air- 
line of the Michigan Southern Railroad Company runs, having 
two villages within the limits of Richland, Corunna and Law- 
rence, or Sedan. It has several small streams, tributary to the 
Cedar and Little Cedar, and one or two small lakes. The sur- 
face is uneven and somewhat hilly. The soil is sandy, with oc- 
casional tracts of clay. This latter is of beautiful color and 
superior quality for the manufacture of tile or bricks. The 
prevailing timber is beech and maple, but there is interspersed 
a supply of ash, oak and poplar ; there is little walnut left. 

Richland was organized as a civil township in September, 
1S37, as a whole Congressional township, and Jacob Weirick 
' was appointed its first Supervisor. At the first election held, 
but six votes were cast, and William Showers was elected Jus- 
tice. On the formation of Keyser Township, in June, 1876, 
12 sections were taken from its southen side, reducing it to 24 

ggetigm, Seme r >f the early towRihip officers were a^ (ok 

lows: Justices, besides William Showers, already mentioned, 
James Blake, D. Shaw and L. D. Britton ; Constables, Lyman 
Green, John Clay, Robert Williams, Leeman Fulson, J. Simons, 
D. Mallery, A. P. Bristol, John Palmer, L. Thomas, B. Sanders, 
David Swander and C. B. Kagey; Trustees, Peter Treesh, 
Joshua Brubaker, David Lawrence, A. J. Hunt, Jacob Palmer, 
Jefferson Wallace, Christian Fretz, Solomon Showers, H. Wil- 

720 



HISTORY OF Di: KALD COUNTY. 



lis, W. Connelly, J. C. Mead, Japhet Ingraham, James Blake, 
Lyman Green, W. Showers, L. D. Britton, II. Sherlock, II. 
Knapp and I. Kanaga ; Assessors, William Welker, C. Knapp, 
John Shaw and Henry Sherlock. 

The first settler was Joseph Miller, who, during August, 1836, 
cut his way in from his father's clearing in Jackson, and located 
on the farm later sold to and occupied by George Olingcr, two 
miles west and one half mile south of Auburn. Previous 
to moving his family he had chosen a site for a cabin; then 
one day he cut logs ; the next he made the clapboards, having 
to chop off the timber (for want of a saw) two clapboard 
lengths, then split it into bolts, and chop them in two before 
riving. He and two others put up the house without any fur- 
ther assistance on the third day. 

During October following, Jacob Weirick and Joshua Feag- 
ler moved in; the former occupied a log house built for him by 
Miller, Van Sickle and Obadiah Whitmore. Mr. Feagler passed 
his life upon this place, and his name is perpetuated by the 
name " Feagler's Corners " applied to the intersection of roads. 
Weirick's entry was the land which later became the property 
of Peter Raub. Calvin Calkins set out in the fall of 1839, 
Irom Sandusky County, Ohio, on foot, with a knapsack upon 
his back to carry his provisions, and arriving in this township, 
selected a quarter-section, or two eighties, lying on the present 
road south of Corunna. He learned that another land-hunter 
had chosen part of the same lands, and made the best time pos- 
sible to the land office at Fort Wayne, and was scarcely half 
an hour in advance of his competitor. The family moved in 
during June, 1840. Neighbors were few and scattering; Peter 
Kronkite, who had come during the previous fall, had a cabin 
in the woods on his entry of land, adjoining Calkins on the 
west, and Peter Moody had located previously on land about a 
mile east of Corunna, and had begun a small clearing about his 
cabin. 

In the northeast part of the township was the Showers* set- 
tlement. Solomon Showers being the pioneer was called upon 
to give lodging to those who were moving in to become his 
neighbors. His cabin was small, but room was always found, 
and his garden and truck patch of two or three acres indicated 
to others the initial steps of early settlement. Lyman Green, 
for whom the corners south of Sedan were named, Daniel 



i 















722 



IIISTOKY OK 



Webber, William Beck, William Showers and Daniel Showers 
were others who soon established themselves in this neighbor- 
hood. Japhct Ingraham settled where L. D. Britton afterward 
lived, having purchased it from Samuel Jones, by whom it 
had been entered as early as 1836, and Peter Treesh made 
the first clearing of the Amos Britton farm. Thomas Daily 
moved in from Michigan and setttled in the western part of 
Richland, and Dimick Harding came from Lima, Ind., and chose 
a tract for his life-long home. Other early settlers were: The 
Moodys, Peter, John and Harvey ; the Connellys, Ezra, Will- 
iam and John; Samuel Hayncs, James Blake, Heman Bangs 
and James McCrum. Henry Willis, afterward Sheriff, and 
who subsequently settled in Waterloo, came at an early date 
and located in the northeastern part of the township. He bv 
chance or choice located on a sugar-timbered tract, and there 
he gathered the sap from the tall maple trees with neck-yoke 
and pails, manufactured sugar, and this was exchanged for 
breadstuffs, sometimes requiring a three-days' journey. This 
was a very common expedient with the first settlers, and was 
of invaluable service. Indeed, they would have fared very 
poorly had it not been for sugar and saw logs. It was well, 
indeed, that they had this means of "sweetening" their bitter 
experiences of pioneer life. 

The first school-house was erected at Green's Corners prior 
to 1 84 1. In 1849 a frame was put up by Charles Knapp on the 
old site. A year or two later L. D. Britton was a teacher in 
this building. In 1842 a log school-house was built a half a mile 
northeast of Calkin's Corners ; Loretta Rawson was teacher, 
and she had fifteen pupils. Harvey Smith was the first male 
teacher. The Baptists were the first religious organization, 
and erected the pioneer log church on Calkin's Corners. Early 
ministers were : Elders Town, Spear and Blanchard. The first 
grist-mill was built at Corunna by Obadiah Bear, and the first 
water sawmill on section 16, by John Weaver. Burgess and 

Green put up a steam saw-mill on the land belonging to Mr. 
Green. 

The population of Richland Township is 1,598, or 66 to the 
square mile. The valuation per capita is $337.96. In 1884 the 
number of acres of land assessed was 14,787.70; value of same, 
$383>334; value of improvements, $49,010; value of lands and 
improvements, $432,344; value of lots, $6,999; value of im- 




■ 



J^2^^>^ / ^OaMa<f 



HISTORY 01' I)K KAMI COUNTY. 723 

provcmcnts, §16,690: value of lots and improvements, $23,689; 
value of personal property, $109,232; total taxablcs, $565,265 ; 
rale of taxation, $1.56; number of polls, 214; poll tax, §1.50. 

The following figures of staple crops arc for 1881 : Acres in 
wheat, 1,834; product of same at 5 bushels per acre, 9,170 bush- 
els; acres in corn, 1,113; product of same at 25 bushels, 27,. 
1 825 bushels; in oats, 636 acres; product of same at 30 bushels 
j per acre, 19,080; in meadow, 518 acres; product of same at two 
! tons per acre, 1,036 tons of hay; in Irish potatoes, 40 acres; 
product of same at 15 bushels per acre, 600 bushels. 

Sedan and Corunna arc two stations on the Lake Shore & 
Michigan Southern Railroad, the latter being far more import- 
ant as a business point. At Corunna the following are the busi- 
ness firms : F. G. Fried, general store ; Hclmcr & Metz, general 
, store; Mercer & Baughman, drugs; B. G. Cissle, drugs ; John 
1 Lipsctt, grocery; Wallace & Knapp, hardware; W. B. Adams, 
j hardware; G. H. Miles, harness; J. Kirkpatrick, agricultural 
implements; J. Lanning, grocery; John Baker, blacksmith; J. 
Kirkpatrick, blacksmith; Al. H. Williamson, wagon and repair 
' shop; Dewitt Griffith, barber; James Gettings, saloon; John 
Finch, repair shop; Mel. Reynolds, meat market; Osborn cS: 
Kline, saw-mill; Miles Calkins, saw-mill, brick and tile yard; 
! Charles Imus, Union Hotel. The medical profession is rep- 
resented by Drs. F. Snyder, W. M. Mercer and W. H. Nus- 
baum. Corunna has two churches, both brick. The M. E. 
! church was built about fifteen years ago, and that of the 
United Brethren denomination was erected in 1875. 

BIOGRAPHICAL. 

Hcnian Bangs, farmer, section 11, Richland Township, was 

born in Bennington County, Vt., June 14, 1813, a son of 

1 Nathaniel and Judah (Elwell) Bangs, of English descent. His 

j great-grandmother went with her sixteen sons to the place of 

I enlistment and saw them all enrolled in the service of the 

Uiiltutl aiUUih in the UbvullliiuiiUFy Wftfi kilt! tlifcstl ftt lilb t iyo 

of 104 years. Hi,s father died at the age of ninety-seven years. 

His mother was drowned in the Eric Canal, at Lockport, N.V., 

when on her way West to visit him. She was in the fifty-first 

year of her age. When our subject was eleven years old he 

went to live with Robert Madison, a neighboring farmer, and 

j remained with him till manhood, moving with him when fifteen 



724 



ms r- 



DE KALI) COUNTY. 



years of age to Genesee County, N. Y. When he reached his 
majority he had $100 as a nucleus upon which to build his 
future. After working a time by the month he bought a farm 
in Niagara County, N. Y., of the Holland Company, and lived 
there two years. In 1839 he sold his farm and came West. 
The first winter he spent in Kalamazoo, Mich., and March 13, 
1840, came to De Kalb County, Ind., and settled on the farm 
where he now lives. It was heavily timbered, and neighbors 
were few, there being but twelve families in Richland and three 
in Fairfield Township at the time. He was a young man of 
energy and ambition and went bravely to work to make a home. 
He also for a time worked at the carpenter and joiner's trade 
in connection with farming, there being a demand for that kind 
of labor. In addition to his home farm, Mr. Bangs has had 320 
acres of land which he has given to his children. He has been 
prosperous in his business operations, and is now one of the 
wealthiest farmers of Richland Township. He was married 
Nov. 22, 1842, to Catherine E. Chaffy, born in 1821, a daughter 
of Joshua and Polly (Bowers) Chaffy, who came to De Kalb 
County from New York in 1838, and subsequently moved to 
Lagrange County. They have had seven children — Eunice L., 
Nathaniel, John H., Winfield Scott, Caroline L., Charles H., 
and Matilda (deceased). In 1841 Mr. Bangs united with the 
Protestant Methodist church, but afterward transferred his 
membership to the United Brethern church, which church his 
wife joined later. He has always taken an interest in church 
and Sabbath-school matters, and has for several years been a 
Trustee and Steward, and Leader of the United Brethern 
church for five or six years, and Superintendent of the Sab- 
bath-school. Politically he was formerly a Whig, and is now 
one of the foremost workers in the Republican ranks. In the 
spring of 1840 Mr. Bangs helped to build the first school-house 
in Richland Township. He also made the first coffin for the 
first person who died in the township, it being for a child of 
Obadiah Smith. The first loom in the county was made by Mr. 
Bangs in the spring of 1840. 

Christian C. Browand was born in Erie County, Pa., June 30, 
1838, the fifth child of David M. and Catherine (Shank) Brow- 
and, natives of Lancaster County, Pa., of Swiss descent. When 
our subject was five years old his parents settled in Fort Wayne, 
Ind., where he lived till fourteen years of age when they settled 



J^ 



HISTORY OF l>K KAI.lt COUNTY. 725 

on a farm. In 1S59 our subject went to Noble County, I nd., 
where he was employed as a clerk in a store till his enlistment, 
Oct. 20, 1862, in Company G, One Hundredth Indiana Infantry. 
His regiment was in the army of the Tennessee, and pariici- 
pated in the battles of Resaca, Kenesaw Mountain, Big Shanty 
Station, Dallas, New Hope, Hardy and Allentown ; was with 
Sherman in his march to the sea, and at the close of the war he 
participated in the grand review at Washington. July 15, 1R65, 
he was honorably discharged, after which he returned to Noble 
County and found employment in the store he left at the time 
of his enlistment where he worked two years. Jan. 7, 1S67, he 
married Miss Samantha Crogsley, a native of Ohio and a 
daughter of Solomon and Susana (Gault) Crogsley, natives of 
Lehigh County, Pa., of German and Irish descent, who settled 
in this township in 1848. They have had four children, but 
one living — Alice. The deceased are Minnie J., Beatrice and 
Gracie E. Mr. Browand lost his health in the army, and for 
ten years he was unable to do any labor, but is now partially 

! recovered. In 1S7S he settled in De Kalb County. Mr. Brow- 
and and wife are members of the Disciples church. He is a 
member of F. & A. M. and I. O. O. F. fraternities. In politics 
he is a Republican. He had five brothers in the late war, three 
in the Eighty-eighth, one in the One Hundredth, and one in 
the Twenty-sixth Indiana Infantry. Two received wounds ; all 
served three years. 

Christian C. Buss, the eldest of twelve children of Christian 
and Margaret (Staley) Buss, was born in De Kalb Countv, Ind., 
July 2, 1844. His father was a native of the canton Berne, 
Switzerland, and after arriving at manhood came to the United 
States and located in Ohio, where he married Margaret Staley, 
also a native of Switzerland. In 1843 ne came to De Kalb 

I County and entered eighty acres of land, and then returned to 
Ohio and moved his family to the new home, making the jour- 
ney with o\- teams, He lived one season on the farm of John 
Husselman, and then moved to his own land, which he had 
been preparing in the meantime for his family, erecting a log 
house and clearing a part of the timber. He made this place 
his home till his death in 1867. His widow survived him a few 
years. They had a family of six sons and six daughters, two 
sons and five daughters are living. Mr. Buss was a graduate 
of a high school in his native country, and was one of the finest 
46 



J\l 



7 26 HISTORY OF DE KALI) COUNTY. 

German scholars in the county. He worked at the cooper's 
trade in his early life, and later at the carpenter's trade. He 
was a skillful mechanic, and many buildings are still standing 
in DcKalb County as an evidence of his handiwork. C. C. 
Buss, the subject of our sketch, was reared a farmer, and in his 
youth learned the art of surveying. His father owned a saw- 
mill, and when not in school he assisted on the farm and in the 
mill. He subsequently went to Smithfield Township and ran 
the Lockhart Mills three years ; then returned to Richland 
Township, where he is now doing a good business, buying and 
sawing hard wood lumber. His farm contains 120 acres of 
choice land, all well improved, and is one of the most valuable 
in the township. He was married March 14, 1866, to Eliza- 
beth, fourth daughter of William and Barbara Park. To them 
have been born eight children, seven of whom are living — Will- 
iam H., John H., Isaac H., George H., Charles L., Barbara M., 
and Belle. Eda May died in infancy. 

Pollaus N. Calkin was born in Essex County, N. Y., Nov. 27, 
1830, the sixth son and twelfth child of Calvin and Kezia (Kel- 
logg) Calkin. In 1833 his parents moved to Sandusky County, 
Ohio, and in 1840 to De Kalb County, Ind., locating on 160 
acres of wild land in Richland Township. Here our subject 
grew to manhood and was early inured to the hardships and pri- 
vations of life on a frontier farm. He was married March 27, 1851, 
to Matilda Brown, daughter of Levi and Jane (Peak) Brown, 
who came to De Kalb County from Seneca County, Ohio, in 
1850. After his marriage he settled on a part of his father's 
farm where he still remains. In 1873 he engaged in the manu- 
facture of tile, brick and lumber, which he still continues, at 
present, however, is also superintending his farm. He has 1 10 
a'cres of land all well improved, with a good residence and farm 
buildings. Mr. and Mrs. Calkin have eight children — Horace 
N., Milo L., Frank C, Lindal G., Adna W., Charles F., Mary 
J., and Rosa May. Mr, Calkin in his political affiliations is a 
Republican, lip ita a mom bar df thd Mtiaunlu ffAtefnity, 

Benjamin A. C/iaffic, Postmaster, Corunna, was born Oct. 11, 
1S15. in Tompkins County, N. Y., a son of Benjamin and Clarissa 
(Brefford) Chaffie, the former a native of Massachusetts, the lat- 
ter of New York. In 1836 he removed to Medina County, Ohio, 
and Nov. 25 of that year was married to Caroline, daughter of 
George Story. In 1845 he settled in Fairfield Township this 



Jt^ 



HISTORY OF DE KAI.ll COUNTY. 



7-7 



county, on forty acres of land entered from the Government. 
He changed locations several times, but continued farming pur- 
suits till 1858, when he engaged in the mercantile business at 
Turkey Creek, which he followed till 1861, when he came to 
Corunna, where he was similarly engaged till 1S69. In 1S73 ne 
received the appointment of Postmaster and Express Agent, 
positions he still holds. To him and his first wife, who died 
Feb. 4, 1864, were born three children — Orlin, Lavisa (deceased), 
and Albert O. April 30, 1865, he married Mrs. Mary Conway, 
whose maiden name was Thompkins. At the first election held 
in Fairfield he was elected Trustee, and while living in Steuben 
County, Ind., served as Magistrate two terms. He is a mem- 
ber of the United Brethren church. He casts his suffrage with 
the Republican party. 

Andrew F. Cox was born in Wayne County, Ohio, Nov. 5, 
1833, the fifth of nine children of Jacob and Jane (Denman) 
Cox, natives of Pennsylvania, his father of German and his 
mother of Scotch descent. Jacob Cox died March 15, 1885. His 
golden wedding was celebrated Dec. 5, 1874, and the following 
April his wife died. Our subject remained with his father till 
manhood. In 1854 he came to Indiana and taught school in 
Miami County, one winter; then returned home, and after a brief 
stay came to De Kalb County, and March 18, 1856, was married 
to B. A. Hehvig, daughter of Jacob and Sarah (Garsnage) Hcl- 
wig. The first year after their marriage they lived in Noble 
County, Ind., then moved to Steuben County and bought 
twenty acres of unimproved land, which he improved, and sub- 
sequent)' sold and bought fifty acres in the same township where 
he lived till March 28, 1882, when he came to De Kalb Count} - , 
and bought eighty acres of improved land in Richland Town- 
ship. Mr. and Mrs. Cox have a family of three children — Sarah 
L., Belle O., and George Elmer. Mr. Cox is a member of the 
Baptist, and his wife of the Evangelical Lutheran church. In 
politics he affiliates with the Democratic party. 

Thomas D. Daily was born in Ontario County, N. Y., Oct. 25, 
1818, a son of William and Elizabeth (Dillingham) Daily, the 
former a native of Vermont and of Irish descent, and the lat- 
ter a native of Massachusetts and of Welsh origin. In the fall 
of 1827, our subject with his father's family removed to Oak- 
land County, Mich., where he was reared on a frontier farm re- 
ceiving a limited education in the early schools of that county. 



HISTORY OF DE KALI! COUNTY. 



When he was sixteen years old he purchased his time of his 
father and began working for himself. In the spring of 1841 
he came to De Kalb County, Ind., and purchased eighty acres 
of wild land, which his brother had previously entered. Me 
cleared ten acres during the summer, and then returned to his 
home in Michigan, where, Oct. 25, 1825, he was married to Miss 
Susan Knapp, a daughter of Henry and Esther (Moses) Knapp. 
She was born in Livingston County, N. Y., and came with her 
parents to Michigan when ten years of age. After his marriage 
our subject removed to his new home in De Kalb County, 
where they passed through all the hardships and privations of 
a pioneer life, but by close attention to his pursuits, and through 
their good management he has accumulated a good property. 
He has one son — William H., who married Mary L. McDonald, 
and now resides on the old homestead. In 18S2 Mr. Daily and 
his wife removed to the village of Corunna, where they are en- 
joying the accumulation of many years of hard toil. Politi- 
cally Mr. Daily is a Republican. 

T. J. Eldridgc was born in Sandusky County, Ohio, April 9, 
1835, the only son of Benjamin and Ellen (Hite) Eldridge, na- 
tives of Ohio, of English and German descent. His mother 
died when he was five months old. When he was fourteen 
years old he began to work by the month for farmers, and 
when eighteen years of age began to work at the carpenter's 
trade, which he followed fourteen years. In the meantime the 
Rebellion broke out, and May 2, 1864, he enlisted in Company 
H, One Hundred and Sixty-ninth Ohio Infantry, and served till 
Sept. 4, 1S64. In 1866 he came to De Kalb County, and settled 
in Richland Township on land he had bought in 1858. Here 
he has since resided, engaged in agricultural pursuits. Mr. El- 
dridge was married March 31, 1859, to Mahala Kenan, of San- 
dusky, Ohio. To them have been born six children, but three 
of whom are living — Benjamin F., Ann M. and Oliver P. The 

deceased are Henrietta, Ida M, and Emcline. Politically Mr. 

Eldridge Is a Republican. 

Manoah Franks was born in Wayne County, Ohio, April 17, 
1827, the third son and fifth child of Peter and Julia (Fletcher) 
Franks, his father a native of Fayette County, Pa., born May 
21, 1797, and his mother of Virginia, of English parentage. 
His father was a son of Jacob and Sarah (Livengood) Franks, a 
grandson of Jacob and Barbara (Bradbury) Franks, and a great 



HISTORY OF DIC KAI.U COUNTY. 



;-\< 



: grandson of Michael Franks, who with three sons came from 
j Alsace, Germany, to America in the early part of the eighteenth 
century. A record of the Franks family for a period of 
j 500 years is preserved by them, and is now extant in Ohio. 
Our subject was reared on a farm, remaining with his parents 
J till manhood. He received a fair education in the common 
I schools of his county. He was married Feb. 7, 1849, to Lu- 
cinda, daughter of William and Mary (Hackett) Mackey, the 
former a native of Ireland and the latter of Pennsylvania, of 
French descent. In the spring of 1 85 1 Mr. Franks, with his 
[ wife and one child, moved to Indiana and bought 160 acres of 
1 land on section 12, Allen Township, Noble County. It was 
t heavily timbered land, but after building a small cabin for his 
family he went bravely to work to clear it and make a home. 
When he reached Indiana, after paying for his land, he had just 
! money enough to buy a cow, ten bushels of wheat and two 
bushels of corn. Possessed of unlimited energy, he improved 
: his land, and for twelve years made Noble County his home. 
In 1863 he bought the farm in Richland Township, De Kalb 
County, where he resided for twenty -two years, moving back 
to the old homestead in Noble County in the spring of 1885. 
His farm in De Kalb County contains 131^ acres of fine land, 
all well improved. Mr. and Mrs. Franks have had three chil- 
dren, but two of whom are living. John, the eldest, was born 
in Wayne County, Ohio, Oct. 8, 1850, and died of consumption 
at the homestead in DeKalb County, Ind., Sept. 8, 1872. Ma- 
rion and Mary (twins) were born at the homestead in Noble 
County, Ind., June 8, 1S54. Marion married Minnie Britton, 
and lives on the' old homestead in De Kalb County. Mary 
married Francis L. Britton, of Richland Township. Mr. and 
Mrs. Franks are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
In politics he is a Democrat. 

Thomas F, Franks, fourth son of Peter and Julia (Fletcher) 
Franks, was borti In Wftytib Comity, Ohiu, NqV, ag, iHj3, lie 
was reared on a farm till his marriage, receiving only a com- 
mon-school education. Feb. 27, 1855, he was married to Miss 
Eliza Ann Millard, a native of Crawford County, Ohio, and a 
daughter of Richard and Rebecca (Moore) Millard, who were 
natives of Lancaster County, Pa., coming to Crawford County, 
Ohio, among the early settlers. After his marriage Mr. Franks 
resided in his native county till 1864, when he removed to De 






. 






7.^> 



HISTORY OK DE KALIi COUNTY. 



Kalb County, Ind., and purchased his present (arm of eighty 
acres of improved land on section 5, Richland Township. Mr. 
Franks and his wife have been active members of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church for thirty years. Of their eight children, 
seven are living — Julia R., Mary Almcda, William J., Lucinda 
A., Samantha Alma, Frank N. and Harvey Peter. Virgie O. is 
deceased. Mr. Franks was appointed Township Trustee to fill 
a vacancy, June, 1SS1, and elected to the same office in 1882, 
and has held the same position by re-election ever since. In 
politics Mr. Franks is a Democrat. 

F. G. Fried, merchant, Corunna, Ind., was born in Germany, 
June ii, 1840, a son of Gottlieb F. Fried. When our subject 
was fourteen years of age he emigrated to America, landing in 
Kendallville, Ind., Jan. 5, 1855, and in 1857 he went to Fort 
Wayne, where he found employment in a store till the break- 
ing out of the Rebellion. July 12, 1862, he enlisted in Com- 
pany D, Seventy-fourth Indiana Infantry. He participated in 
the battle of Chickamauga, the Atlanta campaign, and a num- 
ber of other engagements. He rose from the ranks to Orderly 
Sergeant and subsequently to Sergeant-Major of the regiment. 
Later he was detailed to the Commissary Department, and while 
in the discharge of his duty met with an accident, and was af- 
terward furloughed and went home to vote for Lincoln's second 
term, after which he joined his regiment at Goklsboro, N. C. 
He was discharged June 30, 1865. He returned to Kendall- 
ville, and soon after embarked in the mercantile business with 
W. S. Northam, and after a short time sold his interest and 
clerked till 1867, when he bought an interest in a store, in Wa- 
waka. Noble County, which he conducted two years, and in 
1869 located at Corunna where he has since carried on a pros- 
perous business. Dec. 31, 1866, he married Oric R. Brown, 
daughter of Rev. William C. Brown. They have four children 
— F. Eugene, William C, Heber M. and Fletcher. Mr. and 
MlS. Fried tiro members of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
and he is an earnest and efficient worker in the Sunday-school. 

James B. Frost was born in New Haven, Huron County, Ohio, 
Oct. 24, 1842, the only son of Richard and Mary (Lewis) Frost, 
his father a native of Waterbury, Conn., and his mother of the 
State of New York. They moved to Ohio with their parents 
when children, and there grew to maturity and were married. 
In 1845 they moved to Noble County, Ind., where the mother 



HISTORY OF DE KAI/B COUNTY. 



n i 



died July 4, 1879, and the father June 13, 1883. Our subject 
grew to manhood in Noblo County. He was married July 0, 
1862, to Margaret King, daughter of Christian and Christina 
(Stark) King, natives of Germany, who moved with their family 
to America and settled in Ohio where the mother died. Mr. 
King moved to Indiana in 1851, and died in Wabash County 
in 1873, aged sixty-three years. Mrs. Frost was reared by 
Tacob C. Miller, of Noble County. After his marriage Mr. 
Frost settled on a farm a mile from the old homestead where ho 
lived till March, 1882, when he sold his property and bought a 
farm in Richland Township, De Kalb County, where he now 
lives. Mr. and Mrs. Frost have two children — Chloe B. and 
Arthur D. In his political affiliations Mr. Frost is a Democrat. 
James M. Goctschius, known by the early settlers as the noted 
wolf hunter of De Kalb County, was born in Dutchess County, 
N. Y., July 4, 18 12, a son of Lewis and Helen (McMasters) 
Goetschius. In 1815 his parents moved to Tioga County, N. Y., 
and there he grew to manhood and married, in 1833, Miss Bet- 
sey Waterman, a native of New York. The next spring he 
moved to Huron County, Ohio, where, in August, 1S34, his 
wife died, leaving a daughter — Catherine, now the wife of 
Daniel Hoffman, of Auburn, Ind. In the spring of 1836 he 
came to Indiana and entered 240 acres of land in Butler Town- 
ship, De Kalb County. He cleared and improved a part of the 
land, built a log house, and May 22, 1839, married Miss Cath- 
erine Barnes, a native of Tioga County, N. Y. They had many 
hardships to contend with, but were young and ambitious, and 
succeeded in making the farm tillable, and in placing them- 
selves on an equal footing with their neighbors. In 1850 Mr. 
Goetschius crossed the plains to California and remained there 
a year and a half, successfully engaged in mining. He returned 
home through Central America, via the Nicaraugua route. In 

1 85G he sold his farm in Butler Township and bought the one 

in Richland Township, section 14, where he has since resided. 
His farm contains 160 acres of land, and his residence and farm 
buildings are among the best in the township. Mr. and Mrs. 
Goetschius have had ten children, but six are living — Helen, 
Elizabeth, Emily, Philander, Abraham and Ira. Mary and three 
infants are deceased. Politically Mr. Goetschius is a Democrat. 
I He has held many offices of trust and responsibility in the town- 
ship, and served three terms as County Commissioner. 



732 



HISTORY OK DE KALB COUNTY, 



Nelson Griffith was born in Fayette County, Pa., Jan. 24, 
1 8 12, a son of Asa and Jane (Blair) Griffith, natives of York 
County, Pa., of Welsh and Irish descent., In 1817 his parents 
moved to Wayne County, Ohio. When he was eighteen years 
of age he went into a woolen factory and served an apprentice- 
ship of three years. He then worked in the same factory four 
years as a journeyman. In 1839 he moved to De Kalb County, 
Ind., and entered eighty acres of land in Jackson Township, 
where he lived fourteen years. In 1853 he sold his farm and 
purchased the one in Richland Township where he now lives. 
At the time he bought his land it was mostly heavily timbered, 
but he has cleared and improved it, and now has one of the 
finest farms in the township. Mr. Griffith was married March 
19. 1837, to Sarah Ann Cobbler, daughter of Philip and Char- 
lotte (Wolf) Cobbler, who moved from Lancaster County, Pa., 
to Ohio in 1822. Mr. and Mrs. Griffith have had ten children, 
eight of whom are living — Lewis C, Annie, Clark W., Philip 
A., Lottie, John and Aaron (twins), Dewitt. The deceased are 
Harriet and David K. Politically, Mr. Griffith is a Democrat. 
He has served as Assessor of his township six years and as 
County Commissioner three years. He and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Disciples church. 

Peter Grogg, a successful and enterprising farmer of Richland 
Township, residing on section 22, was born March 2, 1S21, in 
Stark County, Ohio, the youngest of seven sons of Solomon 
and Mary (Snyder) Grogg. After attaining his majority he 
worked for the neighboring farmers and rented land in Stark 
County seven years. In 1849 he came to Indiana and bought 
160 acres of his farm in Richland Township, De Kalb County. 
His land was a wild, uncultivated tract, but he and his wife 
were industrious, and came to a new country expecting to un- 
dergo hardships and privations, and looking ahead to the time 
when they would have a home and the accompanying 
comforts. They endured their hard life without a murmur 
of complaint. He has been successful, and now has 320 
acres of finely cultivated land, a good residence and comfort- 
able farm buildings. He was married Sept. 3, 1846, to Eliza 
Smith, a native of Stark County, Ohio, daughter of Benjamin 
Smith. They have had a family of nine children — Amy Ann, 
Benjamin S., Lucinda, Jacob W., James H., Mary, Daniel S., 
Ellen and Elmer Ellsworth. The eldest is deceased. Mr. and 



J&2, 



[ISTORY OF DE KAI.U COUNTY. 



733 



Mrs. Grogg arc members of the English Reformed church. 
Politically he is a Republican. 

John F. /farter was born in Stark County, Ohio, Oct. 24, 
[S48. lie is the third son and fifth child of six children of 
Emanuel and Mary Ann (Rasor) Ilarter. The former is a son 
of Jacob Hartcr, a native of Pennsylvania and of German 
parentage; the latter was a daughter of William and Mary Ann 
(Evcrhard) Rasor, formerly from Westmoreland County, Pa., 
and later of Medina County, Ohio. Our subject was reared on a 
farm, the district schools affording him the means for an educa- 
tion. I Ic lived with his parents till twenty-two years of age, 
when he came to De Kalb County and remained one year, then 
returned to his former Ohio home. A year later he returned 
to De Kalb County, and Jan. 8, 1873, was married to Eliza, 
daughter of William and Catherine Schoup, and again returned 
to Ohio, where he remained till after the death of his father, 
which occurred June 24, 1873. His mother died July 14, 18S2. 
Returning to De Kalb County he rented land, and in 1881 pur- 
chased eighty acres, on which he now lives. He has two chil- 
dren — William E. and Rosetta. He is a member of the Lutheran 
church. 

Samuel S. Haynes, farmer, section 20, Richland Township, 
was born in Portage (now Summit) County, Ohio, Aug. 1, 1813, 
a son of Benjamin and Christiana Haynes, his father a native of 
Maryland and his mother of Virginia. He was reared and edu- 
cated in his native county, of which his parents were early 
settlers. In May, 1841, he moved to Indiana and purchased 
forty acres of heavily timbered land north of Auburn, and 
began making a frontier farm. He cleared the land which is 
now the public square of Auburn. In 1844 he sold out and 
bought eighty acres in Richland Township, and the second 
time settled in the woods and cleared a farm in De Kalb Coun- 
ty, He 1ms miule this Inst purchase his home, and now has one 

of the finest farms in the township. Mr. Haynes was married 
Feb. 22, 1837, to Marian Meed, a native of Vermont, who came 
with her parents, Julius and Marian (Bain) Meed, to Ohio when 
she was sixteen years of age. Mr. and Mrs. Haynes have had 
ten children — Julia L., George B., Charles S., Lorenzo D., Eg- 
bert M., Tryphcna C, Freeman E. (deceased), Perry F., Alfred 
G. and Chloe K. Politically Mr. Haynes is a Republican. He 
and his wife are members of the German Baptist church. 






734 



HISTORY OF DE KALI! COUNTY. 



J. IV. Helmer, dealer in general merchandise, grain and pro- 
duce, Corunna, Ind., was born in Allegany County, N. Y., Jan. 
12, 1824, a son of Godfrey and Barbara Helmer, natives of New 
York, of German descent. He was reared on a farm, attend- 
ing the district schools till sixteen years of age, when his par- 
ents moved to Ashtabula, Ohio, where he began to work at the 
cabinet-maker's trade, and served an apprenticeship of three 
years, receiving as a remuneration $30 a year, and was also to 
have the privilege of attending school eleven months, which was 
not given him. After completing his time he went to Buffalo 
and worked as a journeyman two years. He then came west to 
Conneaut, Ohio, and bought the shop that he formerly learned 
his trade in and employed his old boss, and continued in busi- 
ness at that place for himself for the next three years, during 
which time he married Miss A. Z. Spalding, and bought a 
home. He rented his property and moved to Pierrepont, where 
he built a saw-mill ; after running it one year he sold it and 
built another, three miles from the first, running that one year 
and sold it, making $3,500 in two years. At this time his health 
failed and he went to Sheboygan, Wis., where he engaged in 
the livery business till 1852, when he went to California, re- 
maining there two years, then returned to Ohio and bought a 
farm; he remained ten years (till 1864) when he sold and moved 
to Goshen, Ind., and engaged in the livery business and a stage 
route from there to Warsaw, which he sold a month later, mak- 
ing Si, 200. In 1864 he moved to Kcndallville, and the following 
fall to Corunna, where he engaged in the general mercan- 
tile business till 1870. He then moved to a farm in Steuben 
County, which he had traded for, and subsequently engaged in 
the mercantile business in Kcndallville till 1876, when he re- 
turned to Corunna, where he has since resided. Mr. Helmer 
was married in April, 1847, to Anna, daughter of D. Spalding. 
They have two children— Guilford S. and Hattic. Mr. Helmer 
is a member of the Presbyterian and his wife of the United 
Brethren church. In politics he is a Republican. Mr. Helmer's 
life is a strong incentive to our young men, as by hard labor and 
close economy and strict honesty in business he has succeeded 
in accumulating a handsome fortune. 

Horatio S. Hinc, miller, farmer and stock-raiser, was born in 
Erie County, Ohio, Aug. 10, 1822, the second son of Shclden 
and Sally Hine, natives of Connecticut who settled in Ohio in 



HISTORY OF I)E KALI! COUNTY. 



735 



1819, where the former spent the rest of his life. Mrs. Iline 
died in De Kalb County, at the age of eighty-three years. In 
the district schools and at the academy at Norwalk, Ohio, our 
subject obtained a good education. Nov. 15, 1847, he was mar- 
ried to Cynthia, daughter of Deacon Lonson Brooks, of Erie 
County, Ohio. Mrs. Hine died Sept. 22, 1855, leaving three 
children — Shclden, Charles and Frank. His second marriage 
was celebrated with deceased wife's sister, Jane S. Brooks, 
Nov. 10, 1857. They have three children — Nellie, Brooke and 
Lemon. In 183S Mr. Mine's father bought 384 acres of land in 
Richland and Fairfield townships, now the site of Sedan. 
When nineteen years old our subject came to pay taxes on this 
land, but considering it worthless after seeing it, he returned 
home with the money in his pocket. In 1856 he returned and 
began making improvements, cleared a site for a saw-mill, and 
in six weeks time had a mill running, which for ten years he 
operated successfully. In 1868 he bought a flouring-mill, and 
run the two for about two years. In 1S73 this business was left 
in charge of his sons, and he went to Williams County, Ohio, 
where he had interests, remaining there ten years, after which 
he returned to De Kalb County where he has since lived. At 
present he owns 280 acres of highly improved land. He and 
wife are consistent members of the Lutheran church. Politi- 
cally he is Republican. 

Christian B. Kagcy was born in what is now Ashland, then 
Richland County, Ohio, Oct. 21, 1829, the second child of Isaac 
and Ann (Brinker) Kagey, natives of Virginia, of English and 
German descent. He was reared on a farm, attending school 
till twelve years of age, when his father died, and being the 
eldest son the care of the farm devolved on him. He remained 
with his mother till her death which occurred the day he at- 
tained his majority. After the estate was settled, in 1852, he 

game fce De Kalb County, ln<l„ aad bought eighty acres ef lii§ 

present farm, six acres of which were partially cleared. He 
has cleared his land, and to his first purchase has added twenty- 
six acres, having now a good farm, and his buildings are among 
the best in the township. Mr. Kagey was married March 23, 
1854, to Mary Ann, daughter of Michael Treesh. They have 
live children — John F., Sarah C, Daniel E., Eliza Ann, and 
Nancy Bell. They have also taken a nephew, John Frederick 
Rohn, now nine years old, to rear and educate. Mr. and Mrs. 



7& 



HISTORY OK DE KAI.Ii COUNTY. 



Kagey arc members of the Lutheran church. Politically he is 
a Democrat. lie has held the office of Township Trustee one 
term, and Assessor three terms. 

George Keen, farmer, section 17, Richland Township, was 
born in Somersetshire, England, in 1825, a son of Samuel and 
Jane (Dorsetter) Keen. In 1835 his parents came to the United 
States and settled in Onondaga County, N. Y., and three years 
later moved to Huron County, Ohio, where he grew to man- 
hood. In 1849 ne came to Indiana and built a log house on 
land he had previously purchased in De Kalb County; then re- 
turned to Huron County and was married in the spring of 
1850 to Caroline Parker, a native of New York. The next fall 
he moved to his frontier home, where the following spring his 
wife died. Mr. Keen's first purchase was eighty acres of uncul- 
tivated land. To this he has added till he now owns 300 acres 
of choice land, all well improved. He was married a second 
time, in 1852, to Minerva Franklin, a daughter of George and 
Esther (Loomis) Franklin, who moved from Sandusky County, ! 
Ohio, to Steuben County, Ind., in 1840. Mr. and Mrs. Keen I 
have had twelve children — Mary J., Caroline (deceased), Al- 
via, Millie Bell (deceased), Amos, Sarah, Henry, John, Ed- 1 
ward (deceased), Boyd, Wesley, and one who died in infancy. 
Politically, Mr. Keen is a Republican. He and his wife are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Joseph Kirkpatrick, farmer, section 7, Richland Township, 
was born in Perry County, Pa., March 18, 1S30, a son of Jo- 
seph and Matilda (Murphy) Kirkpatrick, natives of Pennsyl- 
vania, of Irish descent. When he was eighteen months Old his 
parents moved to Richland County, Ohio. When he was thir- 
teen years old his father died. He remained with and assisted 
his mother on the farm till he was eighteen years of age, and 
then went to learn the blacksmith's trade, but on account of 
his health was obliged to abandon it after working a year, nn.f] 
then iotu'ned the carpenter's trade at which he worked and was 
successful till 1857, when he moved to De Kalb County, Ind., 
and settled on land he purchased in 1853. His original pur- 
chase was 160 acres. This he cleared and improved, and in 1872 
bought eighty acres adjoining, and now has one of the best 
farms in the township. Mr. Kirkpatrick was married Sept. 16, 
1855, to Elizabeth Marks, a native of Richland County, Ohio. 
They have had eight children — Francis M. (deceased), John R., 



>l' DIO KAI.li COUNTY 



737 



George W.. Matilda M. (deceased), William H. (deceased), 
Charles L., Joseph E. and Sarah A. Mr. and Mrs. Kirkpatrick 
are members of the Protestant Methodist church. Politically 
he is a Democrat. 

Charles H. Knapp, of the firm of Wallace iV Knapp, hardware 
dealers, Corunna, Ind., was born in Richland Township, Dc 
Kalb Co., Ind., May 30, 185 1, the only son and child of Charles 

' and Sarah (Calkins) Knapp. The former was a native of Liv- 
ingston County, N. Y., and removed to Michigan in an early 
day, thence to De Kalb County, Ind., where he was married to 
Miss Sarah Calkins, a daughter of the late Coburn Calkins. Mr. 
Knapp died while engaged in the Auditor's office in Auburn, 
when our subject was ten months old, after which Mrs. Knapp 
and her son resided with her father for about fourteen years, 
when he went to work for himself, working with his uncle, P. N. 

! Calkins, for about ten years in the summer season and attending 
school in the winter. After completing his education at J. B. 
Jordan's Commercial College, Toledo, Ohio, in 1876, he went 
to Portland, Mich., and engaged as clerk in a general merchan- 
dise store for two years. In 1883 he engaged in his present 
business, where he is meeting with flattering success. June 26, 
1877, he was married to Miss Clara, daughter ot John McCul- 
logh, of Fairfield Township, Dc Kalb County. They have had 
two children born to them — Inez M. and Karl C. Mr. Knapp 
is a member of the Portland, Mich., Lodge, No. 22, A. F. & A. 
M. Politically he affiliates with the Republican party. 

David Lazurcncc, one of the earliest settlers of Richland Town- 
ship, was born in Philadelphia County, Pa., Nov. 30, 1S21, a son 
ol John and Sarah (Ritzer) Lawrence, who were of English and 
German descent. His mother died when he was ten years old. 
He remained with his father till manhood, receiving a good 
education in the district schools. In 1845 he came to Indiana 
and went to work. for Jacob Case. De Kalb County at that 
time was heavily timbered, He was determined to have a 
home, and worked by the month till he had paid for sixty acres 
of wild land. He then began to clear and improve his land, 
and has since added to it till he now owns 200 acres of highly 
cultivated land. His farm buildings are among the best in the 
county. His residence, which was built in 1884, is the finest 
frame residence in the county. Mr. Lawrence was married 
Nov. 30, 1848, to Mary Charlotte, daughter of James and Sarah 



' 



73" HISTORY til'' IHC KAMI i ' »UN'I V. 

(Camp) Symonds, who came from Gcncscc County, N. Y., to 
Dv Kalb County, lnd., in 1841. Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence have 
had three children ; two are living — Emily and John. Politi- 
cally Mr. Lawrence is a Republican. 

Jacob Lckncr, retired farmer, was born in German)', March 
10, 1807, and is the youngest of twelve children born to Jacob 
Lehncr. His mother died when he was eighteen months old, 
and his father when he was six years old. He lived with his 
oldest brother till fourteen years of age, after which he worked 
for one man till he was twenty-three years old, at which time 
he was drafted into the army and for six years served as a sol- 
dier. In the spring of 1836 he emigrated to America, landing 
in New York, where he worked for one month to get funds 
to carry him farther west, and eventually landed in Stark 
County, Ohio, where for eighteen months he worked for Will- 
iam Trccsh. May 27, 1S38, he was married to Mary A., 
daughter of his late employer. The September following he 
removed to Knox County, Ohio, where he bought fifty acres of 
land, on which he lived six years; then removed to Richland 
County, Ohio, where he bought land and lived for seven years. 
In 1854 he came to De Kalb County and bought eighty acres of 
timbered land which he cleared and improved, and has added 
to it till he now owns 140 acres of good land. To him and wife 
were born eleven children; eight are living — Susan, Christian, 
W. II., George, Washington, Michael. John and Rachel. The 
deceased arc William, Catherine and Nancy. His wife died Oct. 
24, 1877. Both were exemplary members of the Lutheran church. 

Irwin Lockwood is one of the pioneer children of De Kalb 
County. He was born in Jackson Township, April 12, 1844, 
and is a son of Alonzo and Rosamond (Phelps) Lockwood. His 
youth was spent with his parents, and he was early inured to 
the duties devolving on a farmer. His education was limited 
to the district school. Arriving at man's estate he began farm- 
ing lor hifflielfi and now owns a g@ed homi in Ru hland Te« 11 

ship. His land is well improved, and his residence and farm 
buildings are pleasant and convenient. Mr. Lockwood was 
married April 20, 1865, to Mary E. Lawhead, a native of Con- 
cord Township, born April 3, 1843, daughter of Isaac and Jane 
M. (Widney) Lawhead, pioneers of De Kalb County. Thev 
have had two children — Carrie and Emil, the latter deceased. 
Politically Mr. Lockwood is a Republican. 



1 



HISTORY OF DIC KM. 11 COUNTY. 739 

Daniel Linty, deceased, was a native of Germany, born Sept. 
10| 1816, a son of Daniel and Catherine Linty. In 1818 his 
parents came to the United States and lived in New York City 
seven years, then removed to Stark County, Ohio, where he 
jrrew to manhood. He was married May 23, 1839, to Sarah 
Shuman, a native of Center County, Pa., born March 28, 1820, 
a daughter of George and Hannah (Arney) Shuman, natives of 
Pennsylvania, of German descent. After his marriage Mr. 
Linty settled on his father's farm, and cared for his parents till 
their death. In October, 1855, he moved to De Kalb County, 
Ind., and bought the farm in Richland Township where his 
family reside, and where he died Aug. 21, 1883. The farm con- 
tains 120 acres of choice land, well cultivated, with a good resi- 
dence and farm buildings. Mr. Linty was an honorable, upright 
citizen, a kind husband and father, a good neighbor, and an 
honored member of society. To him and his wife were born 
eight children, but four of whom are living — Catherine, Aman- 
da, Eli and Nettie. The deceased are — Hannah, George, Ella 
and Artie. Political^- Mr. Linty was a Democrat. He was, as 
is his wife, a prominent member of the Lutheran church. 

Elijah S. AIcDowcll, farmer, section 24, Richland Township, 
was born in Wayne County, Ohio, April iS, 1826, a son of John 
and Mary A. (Marshall) McDowell, natives of Pennsylvania, of 
Irish descent. He received a t;-ood education, completing it at 
the high school in Dalton, Ohio. He remained on the farm 
with his parents till 1850, when he went to California, and was 
ninety days in making the trip from St. Joseph, Mo. He re- 
mained there four years, engaged in mining the greater part of 
the time, and in July, 1854, returned to Ohio, where he followed 
agricultural pursuits till 1862. In 1S62 he moved to De Kalb 
County, Ind., and located near Auburn. In 1864 he bought the 
farm in Richland Township where he has since resided. He 
owns 194^ acres of choice land, all well improved. Mr. Mc- 

Dow§l! was married May 29, 1855, to Mary Ann George, a 

native of Ashland County, Ohio, daughter of James George, 
an early settler of De Kalb County. Mr. and Mrs. McDowell 
have had eight children ; but six are living — Ida, James F., Min- 
nie, Mollie, Nannie and Roy. Jennie and an infant are deceased. 
Politically Mr. McDowell is a Republican. He has served his 
township two terms as Trustee. He and his wife are members 
of the Presbyterian church. ; \ 



;-i" 



>K 1>K KM. I! COUNTY. 



lion. William J/. Mercer, J/. D.— In France, Lhe home of the 
paternal ancestry of this honorable gentleman, the name was 
spelled M-c-r-c-i-c-n, which has been changed by the descend- 
ants of those who settled in this country to the present ortho- 
graphical mode, which has been universally adopted in 
America by all of that name. The time of settlement and the 
Christian names of the founders of the family in the New 
World are unknown to the present generation, which prevents 
the biographer from going farther back in the Doctor's ances- 
tral lineage than his worthy parents, who arc Samuel and 
Sarah (Cavender) Mercer, of the State of Ohio by birth and 
education ; his mother being a descendant of English stock. 
Samuel Mercer died in Ohio in 1S34, leaving his wife with the 
care of two children — William M., born in Miami County, 
Ohio, Oct. 30, 1830, and Samuel, who was two years his broth- 
er's junior. Mrs. Mercer subsequently married John B. Blue, 
who still survives and is a resident of Newville, this countv. 
For six years following his father's death our subject was cared 
for by his widowed mother, who to him proved a wise and 
faithful counselor, and by her early teachings inculcated in him 
principles that later in lite have resplendently shown to his 
credit and honor. At the age of ten years his mother's mar- 
riage with Mr. Blue was consummated, and from that time until 
sixteen years of age he resided at home — having had only such 
advantages for obtaining an education as the primitive schools 
of that day offered. Upon leaving the home of his youth he 
went to Fort Wayne, Ind., which was the opening of his career, 
and from which time on he vigorously applied himself to the 
irksome duties of a clerkship in the store of John Hamilton, 
with whom he found employment for three years, having de- 
voted a portion of that time to attending school. Leaving Fort 
Wayne he returned to his former home and entered a store of 
which his stepfather was proprietor, and labored assiduously 
lor two years in the capacity of clerk, alter which he [ovk up 
ihu bUidy of medlelno with Dr. John Champer, ot Leo, lnd., a 
pioneer physician of note, who was his preceptor for three 
years, and during that time his leisure hours were spent in as- 
sisting his stepfather in the store. The Doctor was now twen- 
j ty-four years of age, one-third of which time his existence had 
1 been maintained by his own efforts, and only by the strictest 
] economy and greatest self-denial had he been able to save the 



HISTORY ( 


)!•• I)K KAl.li COUNTY 




.]/. Mercer, 


M.D.—ln Prance, 1 


ic Ik 


y of this 1 


onorablc gentleman 


the 


■en, which 


has been changed 


bytl 



-40 

lion. William M. Mercer, /)/. u.- -in i-rancc, tlie home ol 1 

paternal a 

spelled M-c-r-c-i-c-n, which lias nccn cnangca Dy tlie descend, 
ants of those who settled in this country to the present ortho- 
graphical mode, which has been universally adopted in 
America by all of that name. The time of settlement and the 
Christian names of the founders of the family in the New 
World are unknown to the present generation, which prevents 
the biographer from going farther back in the Doctor's ances- 
tral lineage than his worthy parents, who are Samuel and 
Sarah (Cavender) Mercer, of the State of Ohio by birth and 
education; his mother being a descendant of English stock. 
Samuel Mercer died in Ohio in 1S34, leaving his wife with the 
care of two children — William M., born in Miami County, 
Ohio, Oct. 30, 1S30, and Samuel, who was two years his broth- 
er's junior. Mrs. Mercer subsequently married John B. Blue, 
who still survives and is a resident of Newville, this county. 
For six years following his father's death our subject was cared 
for by his widowed mother, who to him proved a wise and 
faithful counselor, and by her early teachings inculcated in him 
principles that later in life have resplendently shown to his 
credit and honor. At the age of ten years his mother's mar- 
riage with Mr. Blue was consummated, and from that time until 
sixteen years of age he resided at home — having had only such 
advantages for obtaining an education as the primitive schools 
of that day offered. Upon leaving the home of his youth he 
went to Fort Wayne, lnd., which was the opening of his career, 
and from which time on he vigorously applied himself to the 
irksome duties of a clerkship in the store of John Hamilton, 
with whom he found employment for three years, having de- 
voted a portion of that time to attending school. Leaving Fort 
Wayne he returned to his former home and entered a store of 
which his stepfather was proprietor, and labored assiduously 
j lor two years in the capacity of clerk, alter which he tool; nn 
1 Uiu study ut medielne with Dr. John ©hamper, oi Leo, lnd., a 
pioneer physician of note, who was his preceptor for three 
years, and during that time his leisure hours were spent in as- 
sisting his stepfather in the store. The Doctor was now twen- 
I ty-four years of age, one-third of which time his existence had 
been maintained by his own efforts, and only by the strictest 
economy and greatest self-denial had he been able to save the 















■ 






f^Jtl&^a 





i ^//p&r<S^r 



HISTORY OF DE KALI! COUNTY. J.\ I 

small sum lie then possessed. Desiring to lake medical lectures, 
jut hindered by the inadequacy of his means, he was in sore 
perplexity to find a way out of the difficulty, which was event- 
ually accomplished by the' generosity of his brother Samuel, 
who contributed the "mite" he had saved (which was after- 
ward repaid), and thus by " doubling teams " the Doctor ma- 
triculated at the Ann Arbor School of Medicine and Surgery 
in the winter of 1854. The following spring he entered upon 
the practice of his profession at Fairfield Centre. De Kalb 
County. This section at that time was comparatively new and 
sparsely settled by men of small means, who, nevertheless, to 
the Doctor's advantage, were subject to the ills to which flesh 
is heir, and he had an extensive practice during the summer 
season, which upon settling the following winter he found to 
exceed his most sanguine expectation. At Leo, Ind., on the 9th 
day of November, 1856, he was united in marriage with Miss 
Rachel Ann, daughter of Henry A. and Hannah McEwen, 
pioneer settlers in Indiana. Always ambitious, the event of his 
marriage spurred him to greater efforts and risks, and becom- 
ing infatuated by glowing accounts from Iowa, which was then 
settling up, he and his young wife started for the Eldorado of 
the West and selected a location at Penora, Guthrie County. 
Here he found himself confronted by seven other physicians, 
all competitors for a practice that two or three could easily 
have attended to. Nothing daunted, however, by the array of 
professional talent ahead of him, he entered the "lists" and 
soon made his competition felt by the other disciples of Escula- 
piusand built up a paying practice. At this juncture his for- 
mer friends and patrons at Fairfield Centre earnestly solicited 
him to return to them, and after careful deliberation assented 
to their request. After a stay of six months in Iowa he returned 
and was installed in the practice he had previously vacated. 
The labors of his practice were of the most arduous kind, his 
alls, ewing to liie in .u'luToiiH and at times almost ImpHUSftbli 
roads, were made mostly on horseback, and at times in inclem- 
ent weather the horse had to be dispensed with. After six 
years of unremitting toil and incessant hardship, in which he 
won laurels in his profession and put dollars in his pocket, he 
went to Auburn where he purchased a stock of drugs. This 
venture proved unfortunate, and after a year's operation it ter- 
minated in a failure, and the Doctor once more returned to his 



74- HISTORY Ol- DE KALli COUNTY. 

former field of success, this time Locating at Corunna, near 
Fairfield Centre. In 1S64 he was commissioned by the late- 
Governor, Oliver P. Morton, Assistant Surgeon of the One 
Hundred and Fifty-second Indiana Volunteer Infantry, in 
which capacity he creditably served till the close of the war. 
Upon his return to civil life he entered upon the duties of his 
profession at Corunna, and the following year entered the 
medical department of the University of Medicine and Surgery 
at Buffalo, N. Y., from which he graduated with honors. In 
1S70 he entered the Rush Medical College, Chicago, III., and 
afterward the Indiana Medical College at Indianapolis, and re- 
ceived diplomas from both institutions. He has spared neither 
time nor expense to acquire such skill in his profession as the 
most learned could impart. His library comprises one of the 
best private collections in the State, embracing both literary 
and medical works of all best known authors. In his cabinet is 
also to be found all the modern instruments used in the most 
delicate and difficult surgical operations. For nearly thirty 
years the Doctor has gone in and out before the people of this 
county in a professional way, and by his prompt and efficient 
responses to the call of duty he has endeared himself to a host 
of patrons and friends. In 1S76 lie received the nominatian of 
State Senator in the Republican Senatorial Convention of this 
district, to which office of responsibility and trust he was sub- 
sequently elected, and served his constituency ably and well, 
' for one term. By his zeal and party devotion in the promulga- 
tion of Republican principles he evidenced the ability of an able- 
legislator. Of late years he has not been active in his practice, 
having during his service in the army contracted inflammatory 
rheumatism, from which he at times suffers severely. Other- 
wise the Doctor is well preserved considering his age and the 
amount of exposure he has endured. To him and his estimable 
wife have been born six children, four of whom are living— 
Chaiks E„ Fiank M., Arthur E. and William M, The de- 

ceased were — -Warren E., aged two years, and Katie, the only 
daughter, aged ten years. 

G. B. Monroe^ farmer, section 11, Richland Township, was 

born in Knox County, Ohio, Dec. 6, 1S31. His father, William 

Monroe, was born in Fairfax County, Va., in 1803, and when a 

boy moved with his uncle, William Harris, to Knox County. 

1 His uncle was a distiller, and he worked with him till thirty 



HISTORY OK DE KALB COUNTY. 743 

years of age. He was married in 1823 to Rachel Knight, a na- 
tive of Knox County, and in 1836 moved to De Kalb County, 
and settled in Concord Township, paying $1 .25 an acre for 
eighty acres of heavily timbered land. He also engaged in the 
manufacture of brick, and was the first to establish that industry 
in the county. He was a man of influence in the township, and 
held several offices of trust. He died July 14, 1867, and his 
wife Sept. 20, 1S81. He was a member of the Disciples church, 
and his wife of the Methodist Protestant church. They had a 
family of thirteen children ; but six are living — Grecnberry, 
Aseneth, Susannah, Rhoda, Missouri and Mary. The deceased 
are: David, William, Elias and Elijah (twins), Sophronia and 
Priscilla. G. B. Monroe was five years of age when his par- 
ents moved to De Kalb County. He was reared on a frontier 
farm, his early education being obtained in the Sunday-schools. 
After he had reached man's estate he helped build the first 
school-house in his district. He was married May 20, 1855, to 
Didamia, daughter of Jonathan and Mary (Van Gordon) Hall, 
who came to De Kalb County from Pennsylvania in 1842. 
After his marriage Mr. Monroe settled on the farm in Richland 
Township where he now lives. He has 130 acres of improved 
land, and is one of the most successful agriculturists of the 
township. He and his wife are members of the Evangelical 
Lutheran church. They have had five children — Ella, William 
(deceased), Nettie, Jonathan, Mary Belle. Politically he is a 
Prohibitionist. 

Peter Moody was born in Guernsey County, Ohio, Sept. 11, 
1824, the eldest of ten children of Peter and Nancy (White) 
Moody. The former was a native of Wayriesburg, Pa., and 
when twenty years of age came to Ohio where he was subse- 
quently married to the above. She was a daughter of James 
White who immigrated from Ireland to Ohio a short time 
previous to the birth of Mrs. Moody, where he taught school 
for many years. Mr. Moody followed farming in Ohio until 
1840 when he removed his family to De Kalb County, Ind., 
where he entered seventy-two acres of Government land in 
Richland Township, which he cleared and improved, and re- 
sided here until 1871, when he sold out and removed to Noble 
County and purchased a farm where he passed the balance of 
his days, and where his widow now resides at the age of eighty- 
four years. When our subject was sixteen years of age he 



744 HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 

came with his parents to De Kalb County, remaining with them 
until he was twenty-six years of age. He was married Nov. 13, 
1 8 50, to Miss Matilda M. Barnes, a daughter of Edmund and 
Susan H. (Beardsley) Barnes, who were natives of New York, 
and came to Ohio when Mrs. Moody was three years old, and 
to Lagrange County, Ind., in 1S44. Mr. Moody has cleared 
and improved several tarms in Richland Township, and in 1869 
he settled on the place where he now resides, which is one of 
the finest in the township. To Mr. and Mrs. Moody were born 
five children; three are now living — Mary E., Ida I., and 
Frank B. The deceased are: John R., and one died in infancy. 

Henry Obcr was born in Mifflin County, Pa., June 26, 1822, 
the eldest son and second child of John and Nancy (Bechtel) 
Ober, natives of Pennsylvania, of German descent. He re- 
mained with his parents till his marriage and then bought sixty 
acres of heavily timbered land in his native county, which he 
cleared and improved. In 1852 he moved to Stark County, 
Ohio, and rented land four years. He then bought eighty acres 
of land and made it his home till 1862, when he moved to De 
Kalb County and bought the farm in Richland Township, now 
Keyser, which he still owns, and where he lived till 1S79. In 
1879 he bought twenty acres in Richland Township and built a 
fine residence, rented his farm and retired from the active 
scenes of agricultural life. He was married March 31, 1846, to 
Elizabeth Deihl, a native of Germany, who came with her par- 
ents. John and Margaret (Stilser) Deihl, to America when four 
years of age. Mr. and Mrs. Obcr have had five children — Isaac, 
Margaret, John, Aaron and Nancy. The latter is deceased. 
Politically, Mr. Obcr is a Republican. He and his wife are 
members of the Brethren in Christ church. 

Harlan Page Mead, deceased, was born in Auglaize County, 
Ohio, Oct. 2, 1840, a son of Julius C. and Marium (Barr) Mead. 
When he was an infant his parents moved to Dc Kalb County, 
ind., and settled in Richland Township, and here he was reared 
and educated, receiving a common-school education. He was 
married Sept. 1, 1861, to Mary Ellen Hathaway.a native of Rich- 
mond, Lake Co., Ohio, third daughter of Nathan and Hannah 
Hathaway, early settlers of De Kalb County. He remained 
on his father's farm five years, and then moved to Smithfield 
Township. In 1873 he moved to Keyser Township, where he 
died, June 12, 1873. He was an industrious, energetic man, a 



HISTORY OF DK KAI.Ii COUNTY. 



745 



good manager, economical and enterprising, and although 

but a young man when his life work was finished he had 
accumulated a good property, and had the prospects of a 
prosperous and useful future. During his last sickness he 
said to his wife, " Mary, my time has come, prepare to 
meet me in heaven." He was unable to speak above a 
loud whisper, but conversed with all who visited him till the 
last, urging them to prepare for death. He said he would 
like to see all his friends and neighbors, and told his wife to tell 
them how he died in the triumph of a living faith, and urge 
them to prepare to meet him with the blood-washed throng. 
He talked constantly of his Savior, and at one time said, " I 
suffer, Mar}', but my sufferings are not to be compared with 
those of my dear Savior's, for he sweat, as it were, great drops 
of blood." At one £ime he called Mrs. Hathaway to his bed- 
side, and said : " Mother, I came here with good intentions to 
care for you in your old age and make you comfortable, but 
God has ordered it otherwise. My time is about to close on 
earth, I will leave you in the hands of your Savior and my 
Savior, and he will eventually take you home." At one time 
he laughed, and said : " Mary, can't you laugh? If you could 
see what I see you would laugh." His wife said: " Page, what 
do you see?" He said: " They arc all there, and there is my 
Savior spreading for me his precious hands. I have but one 
thing to make me cling to earth and that is my dear wife, but 
I will leave her in 'the hands of a just God and he will take 
care of her." " Mary, prepare for death, and when the pale 
horse comes mount on and I will meet you." He told his two 
brothers-in-law and nephew to care for his wife, and never see 
her trampled on or abused. He selected the hymns to be sung 
at his funeral and the text for the discourse. The latter was Job 
xiv: 14, 16. J Io ]| ( k1 no fear of death. " It is just a step and I 
anion the other side where Justis Standi! lundy U, rrCt'ivu IliC," 
he said. He was very anxious to make his will, that his wife 
might have all the property, and after that was done was con- 
tent. Mrs. Mead is living on a farm in Richland Township, 
which she superintends, and is a woman of unusual energy and 
ability. She was a member of the Disciples church in early life, 
but in 1875 transferred her allegiance to the German Baptist 
church. In politics Mr. Mead was a Democrat. 
Jacob S. Palmer, farmer and gunsmith, section 15, Richland 



746 HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 

Township, was born in Stark County, Ohio, Dec. 10, 18 10, a 
son of John and Margaret (Swihart) Palmer. In 18 12 his father 
took the family to Washington County, Pa., and left them with 
the mother's father and enlisted in the war of 18 12 ; was taken 
ill and died five days later. Our subject was reared by his 
grandfather, Peter Swihart, remaining with him till twenty-one 
years of age. His grandfather was a gunsmith and also carried 
on a farm, and he learned the trade and worked on the farm. 
He received a good education in the subscription schools. Af- 
ter reaching his majority he worked as a journeyman till 1833, 
when he moved to Ohio, and in 1S36 opened a shop of his own. 
In 1S50 he moved to De Kalb County, arriving in Auburn, Sept. 
6. He remained in Auburn till the following spring, when he 
bought a farm in Richland Township, which he has carried on 
in connection with his trade. He was married April 5, 1831, 
to Susan Tiger, a native of Pennsylvania, who died March 10, 
1 866, leaving five children — Margaret, John, Maria, Caroline 
and Eli. Sept. 12, 1867, Mr. Palmer married Mrs. Abigail 
(Walford) Baird. They have five children — Amos, Sabina, 
Annie May, David L. and Marion Edwin. Politically Mr. 
Palmer is a Democrat. He and his wile are members of the 
German Baptist church. 

Gilbert I. Patterson. — Among the prominent citizens of De 
Kalb County, none are more worthy of notice than the gentle- 
man, whose name stands at the head of this sketch. He was 
born near Canandaigua, N. Y., April 5, 1834. He is a twin son 
of William and Rachel (Ireland) Patterson, natives of New 
York, and probably of Irish descent. In 1S36 they settled in 
Steuben County, then a dense wilderness. In 183s Mr. Patter- 
son died, leaving his wife with six children to care for. After 
this our subject lived with John R. Moody, his brother-in-law, 
in De Kalb County, till of age, at which time he went on a pros- 
pecting tour through the Western States and purchased land 
at Government price in Waupaca County, Wis. March 10, 
1S59, he was married to Mary Ann, daughter of George De 
Long, an early settler of De Kalb County, and with his wife 
moved to their new home in the West, remaining there about 
three years. In the fall of 1861 they returned to this county 
where his wife died March 2S, 1S62, leaving one son — John R., 
who died aged about three years. The following August he 
sold his Wisconsin property and enlisted Oct. 12, 1862, in Com- 



747 



pany H, Thirtieth Indiana Infantry, serving ten months. lie 
was discharged July 31, 1863, and then took another trip 
West, going through Texas and New Mexico, returning in 
1S64, and in November of that year enlisted in Company H, 
Fifty-third Indiana Infantry, and served till the close of the war, 
participating in the grand military review in Washington, June, 
1S65 ; was discharged July 21, 1865, at Indianapolis and returned 
to his home in De Kalb County. March 1, 1866, he was mar- 
ried to Mrs. Eliza E., widow of Marry McClellan, and daugh- 
ter of John T. George. He lived on a farm west of Corunna 
one summer, and then purchased where he now lives in Rich- 
land Township, owning at this time 140 acres of highly improved 
land. Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Patterson 
— Mary Ann, Clara Ellen, Amy Estella, Ida Irene and Rosa. 
Mr. Patterson has held many local offices of trust and responsi- 
bility. Politically he is a Democrat. He and his wife are 
members of the German Baptist church. Mr. Patterson is a 
self-made man in every sense of the term, and from his means, 
which are ample, contributes with unstinted hand to every 
laudable enterprise, calculated to benefit the public. 

Joscpli Quince, son of Acla and Mary (Rogers) Quince, was 
born in Lincolnshire, England, May 17, 1S25. He resided in 
his native country till he was almost twenty-six years of age 
when, in 1S51, he came to America, and worked on a farm two 
years. He then came to Richland County, Ohio, and rented 
land till t864, and in the fall of 1864 he came to De Kalb 
County, Ind., and purchased the farm where he has since re- 
sided, and which contains eightyacres of well-cultivated land. 
He was married Jan. 1, 1S57, to Miss Christina Liprett, a 
daughter of Anthony and Mary Liprett, who came from Ire- 
land and settled in Richland County, Ohio, at an early day. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Quince have been born five children, of whom 
■ living=Emmn J-, Ifla Fk'H and Thomas E. Those 
deceased are: Henry L. and Willie E. Mrs. guinea and lie? 
daughter are members of the Protestant Methodist church. 
Politically, Mr. Quince affiliates with the Republican party. 

Jacob Ringer was born in Stark County, Ohio, Aug. 4, 1S26, 
and is the only son of George and Mary (Herbster) Ringer, his 
father a native of Pennsylvania, of German descent, and his 
mother of Maryland, of German and English descent. He grew 
to manhood in his native county, receiving a common-school 



f 









. 









74S HISTORY 01' 1)1'. KAi.l; COUNTY. 

education. lie learned the shoemaker's trade alter his mar- 
riage and worked at it several years in Ohio. In September, 
1S53, he moved to Dc Kalb County, Ind., and settled on eighty 
acres of timbered land which he had bought in the spring of 
1851. He now has a good farm, all well improved, with a 
pleasant residence and farm buildings. Mr. Ringer was mar- 
ried Dec. S, 1S46, to Mary M., daughter of Peter Raub, of 
Stark County, Ohio. She died isept. 9, 1865, and March 25, 
1866, he married Elizabeth, daughter of Edward Wright, an 
early settler of De Kalb County. They have three children- 
Mary M., Sarah A. and Martha S. Mr. Ringer and his family 
are members of the Evangelical Lutheran church. Politically 
he is a Republican. 

Gilbert Shavers was born in Greene County, N. Y., March 
11, 182S, a son of Solomon and Mahala (Greene) Showers. 
When he was four years old his parents moved to Michigan, 
and five years later to De Kalb County, Ind., where he was 
reared and educated. He helped to build the first school-house 
in Richland Township. With the exception of three years, 
when he was engaged in the manufacture of lumber at Show- 
er's Corners, he has lived near the old homestead, and in 1864 
settled on the home farm where he still lives. He was mar- 
ried Oct. 6, 1854, to Elizabeth, daughter of Charles and Bar- 
bara (Thomas) Chancy, who moved from Ashland County, 
Ohio, to De Kalb County, Ind., in 1S53. They have three 
children — Ida, Gilbert M. and Almeta M. Mr. and Mrs. Show- 
ers are members of the United Brethren church. Mr. Showers 
is the only surviving member of a family of eight children. His 
father was born in New York in 1801, and was married to 
Mahala Greene in 1827. They moved to De Kalb County in ! 
1837, there being at the time of their settlement but three other | 
settlers in Richland Township. Their deceased children were 
— Catherine J., Jane M., Emily, Seth, Alfred. Rovtta arid, %q\q- 
won, AUroti died while in the defense el his country in the 
war of the Rebellion. Mr. Showers was a member of the first 
Board 01 Township Trustees of Richland, and a man univers- 
ally respected. He and his wife were members of the United | 
Brethren church. He died April 24, 1S51, and his wife Sept. j 
1, 1884. The April following his settlement, his brother Will- 
iam, a bachelor, followed him to the township and became one 
of the most prominent citizens. He was the first Justice of the 



HISTORY OF OK KALB COUNTY. 749 

Peace of Richland, and a County Commissioner several terms. 
He died Aug. 8, [S61. 

Henry A. Skull, farmer, section 24, Richland Township, was 
born in Stark County, Ohio, April 3, 1S17, the eleventh of thir- 
teen children of Henry and Catherine (Reed) Shull. His grand- 
father, Peter Scholl, came from Germany to the United States 
when seven years of age, being the only one of his father's fam- 
ily to reach America, the rest all dying on shipboard. At that 
time the name was spelled S-c-h-o-1-1, but when our subject's 
father moved to Ohio he spelled it Shull, and it has never been 
changed by the family. Henry A. Shull received his education 
in the German and English schools in his native county. He re- 
mained with his parents till his marriage Sept. 8, 1844, when he 
moved to De Kalb County, Ind., and bought 160 acres of heav- 
ily timbered land in Richland Township. This land he cleared 
and improved, and now has one of the best homes in the town- 
ship. He was married Feb. 4, 1841, to Ann Eliza Weaver, a 
native of Stark County, Ohio, daughter of Henry and Susanna 
(Bender) Weaver. But one of their five children is living — 
Elias. Levina, Ephraim, Isaac, and an infant are deceased. 
Ephraim enlisted in the Rebellion in Company K, Thirty-third 
Indiana Infantry, and died while in the service, Nov. 15, 1861. 
Mrs. Shull died May 27, 1849. April 7, 1S50, Mr. Shull mar- 
ried Rebecca Bain, a native of Stark County, Ohio, daughter 
of Daniel and Mary (Thomas) Bain. To them have been born 
nine children, but four of whom are living — Daniel B., Peter, 
Josiah and Rebecca Ann. The deceased are — Obadiah, Hen- 
rietta, Harvey, Mary C, and Edward. Mr. and Mrs. Shull 
are members of the Lutheran church. Politically he is a 
Republican. 

George Simons, farmer, section 21, Richland Township, was 
born in Devonshire, England, Oct. 23, 1S23, a son of Charles 
. ;; ; 'i S,,i ;i ;; (TF0US) iifilQn!- When he was thirteen v^ars-' .. r, 
his parents came to the United States and located in Portage 
(now Summit) County, Ohio, where his youth was spent in as- 
sisting his father clear and improve a farm, attending the sub- 
scription schools a portion of the time. He was married Dec. 
31, 1S46, to Mary A., daughter of Peter and Fanny (Saunders) 
Pipher, natives of Pennsylvania, but early settlers of Ohio. 
After his marriage he settled on a part of his father's farm, re- 
maining there till 185 1, when he moved to De Kalb County, 



75o 



- 



[nd., and bought the farm in Richland Township where he has 
since resided. Me was actively engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits, and was very successful till the breaking out of the 
Rebellion, when, Nov. 5, 1862, he enlisted in Company K, One 
Hundredth Indiana Infantry. After serving about one year he 
was taken sick with typhoid fever, and for weeks his life was 
despaired of, but he finally recovered sufficiently to be taken 
home, after two years' service, where he partially regained his 
health, but has never been able to endure manual labor. He 
was discharged from the service Oct. 29, 1864. Politically Mr. 
Simons is a Republican. He has never aspired to official honors, 
the only office he ever held being Constable two years in the 
early part of his settlement in the county. He is a member 
of Charles Case Post, No. 233, G. A. R. Mr. and Mrs. Simons 
have had seven children ; but five arc living — Lucinda, Charles, 
Sevilla, Eliza Jane and Wesley. Alice and an infant are 
deceased. 

James L. Smith, farmer, section 20, Richland Township, was 
born in Dalton County, Pa., July 13, 1S37, a son of Joseph ami 
Annie (Guist) Smith, natives of Pennsylvania, the father of 
English and the mother of Scotch descent, his paternal ances- 
tors coming to America with William Penn. In 1839 his 
parents moved to Columbiana County, Ohio, where he was 
reared and educated. When he was sixteen years of age he 
went to Stark Count)', Ohio, and served a two years' appren- 
ticeship at the carpenter and joiner's trade. He then worked 
as a journeyman till twenty-one years of age, when he engaged 
in business for himself. In 1565 he moved to Dc Kalb Count}', 
Ind., and bought 100 acres of land in Keyser Township, a part 
of which is now the town site of Garrett. He~ rented his farm 
and worked at his trade till 1875, when he sold out and bought 
the farm of 100 acres in Richland Township, where he has 
since resided <ind 1,;^ gjy§n his attention u > agHSUltUf@i '^'- 
lias been successful in his business transactions, and has a good 
home, where he is surrounded with all the comforts of life, 
Mr. Smith was married Oct. 4, 1858, to Amanda, daughter of 
Samuel and Leah (Baker) Shirk, who came from Lancaster 
County, Pa., to Stark County, Ohio, in 1846. To them were born 
eight children — Isaiah J., Elmer (deceased), Harrison H., Alice 
E., Ida W., Ella, Minnie, and Samuel (deceased). Mrs. Smith 
died Sept. 6, 1877. Sept. 13, 1878, Mr. Smith married Priscilla 



HISTORY OF DEKALB COUNTY. 75 I 

Wyant, a native of Champaign County, Ohio, born Dec. 20, 
i $47. They have had four children — Arta May, Cora (de- 
ceased), James M. and Frances B. Mr. Smith is a member of 
Garrett Lodge, No. 537, F. & A. M. Politically he is a Demo- 
crat. 

Daniel Thomas was born in Stark County, Ohio, Oct. 30, 183 1, 
and is the second son and third child of David and Anna 
(Batchie) Thomas. The former was born in Washington Coun- 
ty, Pa., in 1805, and was a son of John and Mary Thomas, who 
settled in Ohio in 18 10. John Thomas was a soldier in the war of 
1S12. The mother of our subject was born in Switzerland, and 
was twenty-one years of age when her parents came to America ; 
her father dying at the age of 100 years and nine months. The 
parents of our subject were married in Stark County, Ohio, 
where they lived till 1S46, removing then to Louisville, Ohio, 
and in 1S48 came to this county and township, where they lived 
the remainder of their lives. Eight children were born to them, 
live still survive. Mr. Thomas died March 3, 1862, and his 
wife April 26, 1883. Daniel lived with his parents till twenty- 
two years of age, and in his minority obtained a limited educa- 
tion in the district schools. Me began life by working by the 
month, and in this way earned eighty acres of land which he 
yet owns. By close attention to his business and hard work he 
has grown in wealth, and now owns 1 15 acres of good land and 
a living compensation, besides his improvements being among 
the best in the county. Mr. Thomas ranks among the self-made 
men of the county, having hewn from the rough his fortune by 
his own industry, and is now surrounded by all the comforts of 
life. He is known by all as a man of much public spiritedness 
and generosity of heart. He was married Oct. 14, 1858, to 
Elizabeth, daughter of Jacob Rietenwald, an early settler of 
De Kalb County. To them have been born two children — 
Milo and Elmira. The latter died aged six weeks. The son 
received a practical education at the State Normal School, 
Valparaiso, Ind. They have reared two other children, Thomas 
and Martha Wiseman, now grown and in homes of their own ; 
and have recently taken another little girl to raise, Minnie Ann, 
aged fifteen years, daughter of J. J. Thomas. Mr. Thomas and 
his wife are members of the Lutheran church. Politically he 
has voted the Democratic ticket all his life. 

Levi W. Treesh was born Jan. 10, 1S46, in Stark County, Ohio, 



HISTORY OK DI-: KALI; COUNTY. 

F 



and is the third son and ninth child of Michael Trccsh. When 
seven years of age he removed with his parents to Dc Kal'o 
County, Ind., where he was reared on a farm, and educated in 
the district schools. He remained at home till Sept. 10, 1854, 
when he enlisted in Company A, One Hundred and Forty. 
second Indiana Inlantry, and served in the armies of the Poto- 
mac and Cumberland till the close of the war, when he was 
honorably discharged June 28, 1865, at Nashville, Term. After 
the war he worked out during- the summer and engaged in 
teaching vocal music during the winter seasons till 1872, when 
he settled on a part of his father's farm, and has since followed 
agricultural pursuits. He was married April 3, 1873, to Miss 
Margaret, daughter of Henry Ober, and to them have been 
born four children — Olive May, Chester Lloyd, Jesse Eugene 
and Earl Leroy. Mr. and Mrs. Trccsh are members of the 
Lutheran church. Politically he is a Democrat. He was 
elected Justice of the Peace in the spring of 1884. He has been 
Superintendent of the Sabbath-school for five years, and is 
President of the De Kalb County Sunday-School Association. 

Michael Trccsh is another of the early settlers of this county. 
He was born in Westmoreland County, Pa., March 28, 181 1, 
and is the second of eleven children of William and Christina 
(Barlicn) Treesh, natives of Pennsylvania, and of German 
descent. I lis Grandfather Treesh was a Captain in the con- 
tinental service during the Revolutionary war, and his Grand- 
father Barlicn was a soldier in the ranks during the same strug- 
gle. Both were brave and intrepid soldiers, and did their 
country excellent service. When our subject was seven years 
old his parents removed to Stark County, Ohio, where his 
youth was spent in assisting his father on the farm, with whom 
he remained till twenty-two years of age. Nov. 15, 1S32, he { 
was married to Catherine Wagner, a native of Pennsylvania. 
In 1833 he and his bride settled in the woods and cleared up a 
farm on which they lived till 1S53, when they removed to Indi- 
ana. Fifteen children were born to this couple, nine now liv- 
ing — John, Mary Ann, Eliza, Michael, Sarah, Levi W., Eliza- 
beth, Lydia and Silas. The deceased arc Harriet, Daniel, 
William A., Catherine and two infants. In 1S53 Mr. Treesh 
removed to this county and purchased 160 acres of land in De 
Kalb County, which he has mostly cleared and improved. Mrs. 1 
Treesh died Sept. 28, 185S. March 29, 1S60, he was married to 



T 



HISTORY OF DE KAI.l; COUNTY. 753 

Mrs. Nancy Vail, a native of New York, who has borne him 
two children — Amy and Martin Luther. Mr. Trcesh is a sell- 
made man, having by his own exertion acquired the wealth he 
possesses, owning at this time 234 acres of excellent land. lie 
and his wife are exemplary members of the Lutheran church. 
He is a Democrat in politics. 

Peter Treesh, farmer, section 16, Richland Township, was 
born in Westmoreland County, Pa., March 3, 181 5, a son of 
William and Christina (Barlien) Treesh. His father was a na- 

. tive of Bedford County, Pa., a son of John Trcesh, a native of 
Holland, who was married on shipboard while en route to 
America, and after his arrival enlisted in the war of the Revo- 
lution. His mother was a native of Westmoreland County, 

; Pa., a daughter of Jacob Barlien, who was a native of Holland. 
In 1S19 his parents moved to Stark County, Ohio, where he 
was reared and educated. He was married Nov. 10, 1S36, to 
Rachel Hubler, a native of Stark County, Ohio, daughter of 
Abram and Elizabeth (Darick) Hubler. After his marriage he 
settled in Richland County, Ohio, and Oct. 28, 1842, moved to 
De Kalb County, Ind. He purchased the northwest quarter 
of section 10, Richland Township, which at that time was heav- 
ily timbered. He cleared and improved his land, residing on 
it till 1S65, when he sold it and bought the northeast quarter of 
section 16, where he has since resided. When Mr. Treesh 
came to Dc Kalb County, after paying for his land he had but 
Si-50 in money and a small team of horses. He went to work 
with a determined will and has outlived the hardships and pri- 
vations of his early life, and can now enjoy the fruits of his 

; early life of toil. Mr. and Mrs. Treesh have had eleven chil- 
dren — William Philip, Jacob, Samuel, Caroline, Sarah, Henry, 
Daniel, Mary M., Josiah, Almira and Joel. Samuel and Al- 
mira are deceased. Mr. Treesh is politically a Democrat. He 
was the second Trustee of Richland Township. He and his 
wife are members of the Lutheran church. 

William Trcesh, the youngest of eleven children of William 
and Christina (Barlien) Treesh, was born in Stark County, 
Ohio, Dec. 28, 1830. He was reared on a farm and resided 
with his father until the death of the latter. He was first mar- 
ried Aug. 30, 1853, to Miss Christiana Hontz, of Stark County, 

i Ohio, and to them were born three children — John H., Mary 
M. and Anna R. He lost his wife by death Nov. 18, i860, and 



754 HISTORY OK DEKALB COUNTY. 

was again married May 18, iS6i, to Miss Lydia Hortcn, of 
Stark County, Ohio, and to this union were born four children 
— Jonathan H., Emanuel, Sarah C. and Lydia A. In 1S63 Mr. 
Trecsh removed to De Kalb County, Ind., and settled on his 
present farm of 100 acres of highly improved land. He and 
his wife are members of the Evangelical Lutheran church. Po- 
litically he affiliates with the Democratic part}-. 

William J. Wallace, of the firm Wallace cS: Knapp, hardware 
dealers, Corunna, was born in Auburn, De Kalb Co., Ind., Jan. 
16, 1S57, a son of Thomas Wallace and a grandson of the late 
Jefferson Wallace, who was a native of Pennsylvania, who 
removed to Ohio, thence to De Kalb County, Ind., in an early 
day. His mother, Fidiela (Stratej Wallace, was a daughter of 
William Strate, who was one of De Kalb County's earlv 
sheriffs. Thomas Wallace, the father of our subject, died in 
1S61, when our subject was but four years of age, after which 
his mother, with her family, in company with her father's 

1 family, removed to Marshall County, Iowa, where, after three 
years' residence, she returned to De Kalb County on a visit, 
when our subject was left with his Grandfather Wallace, with 
whom he lived for two years. He then worked on a farm til! 
he was sixteen years of age, when he began learning the tin- 
ner's trade, serving three years as an apprentice to William B. 

, Adams, of Corunna, after which he worked as a journeyman 
until 1883, when he engaged in his present business, which has 
proved successful. He was married Oct. 9, 1880, to Miss 
Amanda J. Reed, a native of Richland Township and a daugh- 
ter of Isaac Reed, of this county. To this union were born 
two children— Effie May and Bessie Bell. Politically Mr. Wal- 
lace affiliates with the Democratic party. 




.CHAPTER XX. 

smitiifield township. 

Situation.— Geography. — Topography. — First Settler.— 
Isaac B. Smith.— His Narrative. — Entering Land under 
Unusual Difficulties.— Other Pioneers.— First Births 
in the Township. — First Mills.— First School. — First 
Church.— First Election.— A Poem(?).— Early Township 
Officials. — Population. — Property and Taxation.— 
Agricultural Statistics.— Biographical. 
The township of Smithfield occupies the north central part 
of Dc Kalb County, and is bounded as follows: on the north 
Steuben Township, Steuben County ; on the east, Franklin 
Township; on the south, Union Township; and on the west, 
Fairfield Township. The Fort Wayne, Jackson & Saginaw 
division of the Michigan Southern Railroad runs due north and 
south through the central part of the township, and has one- 
station within its limits — Summit. The township is drained by 
tributaries of the Cedar, all very small streams. On section 30 
is Cedar Lake, a very pretty body of water. This township 
lias an excellent soil, mostly mixed with sand and gravel, with 
but very little of that tlat clay land found in many other parts 
of the county. 

The first settler in Smithfield was Isaac B. Smith, after whom 
the township was named. His own narrative is given in 
" Pioneer Sketches," from which we quote: 

" Mr. Smith came to Mr. Murray's, at Pleasant Lake, Steuben 
County, and from thence explored the woods of Smithfield 
Township to find a piece of vacant land that would suit him for 
a home. Three several times he had selected pieces, and he- 
went afoot each time to Fort Wayne (thirty-two or thirty-three 
miles); and finding the pieces selected already entered, had to 
return to Pleasant Lake, upward of forty miles, and renew his 
search for a home. The fourth time he returned to the land 
office, only to meet with another disappointment. Tired in 
7o5 



756 HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 

body and heart sick with hope deferred, he met a man at the 
land office from Wells County, not far from where Bluffton now 
is, who represented to him that he was building 1 a mill in that 
region, and knew of a very good quarter section of land still 
vacant; and stated that although he had thought of entering it 
himself, yet he would give way and let Mr. Smith have it. 

" The Register of the Land Office told Mr. Smith that he 
might depend on the veracity of this man, and accordingly h j 
entered tbe tract and went afoot to where it lay. When he found 
it, he discovered that he was badly imposed upon, as the entire 
tract was an unbroken cottonwood swamp, boot-top deep with 
water. He now returned to the land office, and told the Regis- 
ter the facts in regard to the land, and was told that by taking 
a man with him as witness and examining the land, the man 
making oath that it was unfit for cultivation, he could have 
about a week to change his entry to another piece of land. 
Meeting with Wilbur Powell, afterward of Fairfield Township, 
at the land office, he prevailed on him to accompany him as a 
witness. On reaching the place they traced all the lines 
around the quarter section, and passed through it twice diago- 
nally from corner to corner, and did not see a single tree ex- 
cept cottonwood on the entire tract. Returning to Fort 
Wayne, now for the sixth time, lie got a newly corrected plat 
of Smithficld Township, and took the trail for the north again. 

" Traversing the woods again, in company with two others, 
he selected a suitable tract, but just as he was about striking 
for the Auburn trace, to start again for Fort Wayne, lie nut 
with three other men looking around the same lines. He in- 
quired of them if they were going to Fort Wayne to enter 
land. They replied in the affirmative. He inquired when, ami 
they replied, ' not for two or three days; ' but from the expres- 
sion of their eyes, he concluded that they were trying to 
deceive him. So, when the two companies parted, he told his 
companions that they would have a race for it. Both parties 
struck for the shanty built by Park on Cedar Creek, where 
Uniontown now is: but Smith and his friends got too far north, 
and came out to the trace near the site of what was allcrwa d 
Mr. Smith's residence, and discovered their whereabouts by 
means of the mired ox mentioned in Park's narrative. It was 
now dusk and they were three miles north of the desired 
shanty . 



HISTORY OF UK KAI.lt COUNTY, 



757 



« Passing over these miles they reached their lodging place 
gometimc after dark. Their competitors were not there. The 
next morning they were off before day, passing down the trail 
.it an Indian trot, and ate no breakfast until they reached 
•Squire' Caswell's, some twenty miles from where they started 
in the morning. All this distance was traversed in a con- 
tinual trot. Mr. Smith having gained on hi* companions 
some, they told him to call at Caswell's and order something to 
cat ' instantcr.' He did so, and by the time the rear came up, 
breakfast was on the table. Eating in great haste, they left 
their coats, and trotted on, arriving at Fort Wayne, a distance 
of thirty miles in all, at eleven o'clock, a. m. On going to the 
land office, lo! the pieces of land selected were entered. 

"After spending about an hour in resting and taking refresh- 
ments, Mr. Smith started back to look again, and as he was 
crossing the St. Mary's bridge close to town, he met his com- 
petitors, also afoot, puffing and sweating, en route for the land 
office. He gave them the comfortable assurance that their race- 
was in vain, without intimating at all that he was in the same 
row. lie returned that night to Mr. Park's at Auburn, having 
traveled that day over fifty miles on foot. There were two 
men at Park's that night, Reuben J. Daniels and Ira Camburn. 
The next morning Mr. Smith gathered from their conversation 
that they were going up into the north regions to look for land, 
and that Mr. Park was to go with them ; for which each was 
to pay him one dollar, lie proffered his dollar also for the 
privilege of accompanying them, and having the assistance of 
Park in finding vacant land. 

"The proposal was accepted, and the result was that Park 
showed them the tracts on which they afterward severally set- 
tled. It was agreed that each should privately mark lor his 
first choice of the lands, and providentially or accidentally as 
you may please to consider it, each one marked the tract on 
which they subsequently settled as their several choices, and 
each without knowing anything about the choice of the others. 
It was now Friday evening, and Mr. Smith had but one more 
clay to change his entry. So he had another race to get to 
Fort Wayne before the land office closed on Saturday. This 
time he was successful, but was nearly worn down with fatigue 
and anxiety. Eight times had .he visited Fort Wayne before he 
secured his future home. 
4S 



1 



75S HISTORY OF DE K.ALB COUNTY. 

'• It was on Friday, the 27th of May, 1S37, in the afternoon 
of the day, that Isaac B. Smith, Cyrus Smith and Joseph 
Dclong, with their families, arrived on the hill where Mr. 
Smith fixed his residence. There was not even a shanty or 
wigwam then. To keep off the night dews, they cut forks, and 
driving four of them in the ground, and laying poles on these 
covered them, with brush. Under these they lay on the ground 
on Friday night, and on Saturday they put up a cabin (such as 
the three men could raise) to the joist; and again lay under the 
brush that night. 

"The next morning they discovered an unwelcome bcdfcl- 
low, in the form of a 4 massasauga,' or black rattlesnake; and ! 
not being very much disposed to share their bed with these 
• natives,' they went at it on Sunday morning and ' cobbed ' up 
the cabin. They covered one side with black-ash bark peeled 
from the adjacent trees; and, fixing poles in the crevices be- 
tween the logs, laid their beds some feet above the ground that 
Mr. Massasauga might have the ground to himself. On Mon- 
day they covered the other side of the cabin and the joists 
with bark, and carrying in some pole sleepers, laid a puncheon 
floor. Bv the time the floor was laid, the joists were found 
to be so low that even a woman (Mrs. Camburnj, who after- 
ward settled in the neighborhood, could not walk straight un- 
der them. We will not say but that she may have been taller 
than the majority of her sex. 

" Whatever may be thought of cabin raising on Sunday, it 
must be remembered that necessity knows no law. It seemed 
fortunate that the cabin was finished as soon as it was, for no 
sooner was the bark roof laid than it began to rain ; and for 
twenty days there was scarcely one that was not more or less 
rainy. In this cabin, i6x iS feet, the three families lodged to- 
gether for two months, and then Mr. Delong moved back to 
Pleasant Lake, and Cyrus Smith put up a cabin for himself. 

•' On leaving Ohio, Mr. Smith had boxed up five bushels of 
potatoes, and among them had packed his pots and kettles not 
wanted on the road, and sent the box with other goods, bv pub- 
lic conveyance to Adrian, Mich. He did not get them to his 
cabin until about the first of July, and on opening the box J 
found them 'awfully' smashed up by the ironware. He \ 
thought it was now too late to plant them, but Mr. Park ad- j 
vised him by all means to do so." He planted them on the 8th 



HISTORY OF DIC KAI.Ii COUNTY. 739 

and 9th of July, and in the fall dug eighty-six bushels from the 
five bushels of mangled seed ! 

" In July following his settlement, Mr. Smith took the ague, 
and had it with but little intermission till the June following. 
1 In December, 1S37, he had it so severely each alternate day that 
he was unable to be about. On his well day he could be 
around ; but, of course, was very weak. Getting out of bread- 
stuff, it became necessary that, sick as he was, he should go in 
J quest of some. So, yoking up his oxen, he started for the town 
! of Gilcad, Mich., six miles beyond Orland, or the ' Vermont 
i settlement,' as it was then called. It had rained much, and the 
I streams were swollen. lie made his way along, however, lying 
by sick every other day, until he reached Gilead, where he got 
eight bushels of corn and started back to the Vermont mills, in 
the settlement of the same name. It had now turned ' cold as 
Greenland,' and the wind was blowing fiercely while the air 
was filled with descending snow. It was yet early in the morn- 
ing, and he had gone but three-fourths of a mile on the road to 
the mill when the wind blew a tree down across the road, al- 
most brushing the oxen's heads. 

" To get around the tree, he turned out of the road, expect- 
ing to come right in again, but failed to do so ; and getting 
bewildered amid the falling snow, he drove on through the 
openings as near as he could in the direction of the mills, on — 
on — for hours after hours, and still no road or mill was found. 
Mr. Smith had on his head a palm leaf hat that had been rather 
a fine one, but was now rather the worse for wear. While 
traveling, bewildered, through the openings, a whirling blast 
whisked it from his head, and the last he saw of it, it was 
mounting on the wings of the wind, rising higher and higher, 
until it was lost to sight in a cloud of snow. Having a com- 
forter on his neck, he drew the end of it over his head and 

led on. 

" Thus the time passed in continual traveling through the 
I cold, stormy, dreary day, and the failing light told the lost man 
that night was near. He began to picture to himself the long 
cold night that would follow, in all probability the last that he 
should see ; or if he should survive, a morning of distressing 
sickness to follow the night of suffering, and he all alone in the 
snow-clad forest. Just then the cloud broke in the West, and he 
could see the place where the sun set. Striking out in that di- 



*U 



760 HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 

rection, in about eighty rods he found the road he had left in 
the morning, and the bridge across Crooked Creek about half 
way from Gilcad to the mills ; so that he had no! advanced 
more than three miles in all his hard day's travel. Place. your- 
self in his circumstances, reader, and imagine, if you can, his 
joyful feelings in seeing the road again. In an hour he was 
safely housed at the home of Deacon Stocker. 

" Mere he lay sick the next day, and on the day following left 
his corn at the mill and started for Tull's mill near the White 
Pigeon prairie. There he obtained fifteen bushels of very 
smutty wheat, which he brought to the Vermont mills also. 
Here at Deacon Stocker's again he spent three days, two of 
them too sick to travel, and the third waiting for his grist. 
Finally starting for Pleasant Lake, he lay there during a sick 
day, and on the next day got a man to go with him to break 
ice in the streams. By dint of hard work all day they got 
within a half mile of home, where they had to leave the wagon, 
the trail, turn out the oxen in the woods and ' foot it' in. The 
next day, being the eleventh since leaving home, he got. his 
wagon home. His grist, not counting the price of the corn, 
which was paid as he moved in, cost him in all in cash, $45." 

The second permanent settler in Smithficld Township was 
Reuben J. Daniels. He emigrated from Orleans County, N. 
Y., and came by way of Michigan to this county. He was ac- 
companied by Ira Camburn, and they, having located and en- 
tered 200 acres, paid for it in silver which they had carried with 
them. These two settlers together erected a cabin, into which 
they moved on January 2S, 1S38. It was said of this cabin, that 
it was doorless, without upper floor, and without daubing. 
There were plenty of Indians and wolves at that time. The 
next summer Mrs. Daniels went to the bed to move a chair, 
when lo ! a massasauga lay coiled up thereon. 

Pharez Blake, of Ohio, came next and located on section 27. 
His son, Norton, married Huldah Holmes in 1S39, and this cer- 
emony, performed by Squire Daniels, was the first in the 
township. None of the family are now residents of this county. 
Jacob McLeish and sons, Isaiah and Jacob, and Thomas Locke, 
moved in during the spring of 1S3S and settled upon section 19. 
Joseph Delong and family moved by way of Pleasant Lake 
into this county in 1S39, an d took up a tract of land on section 
22. He afterward became a resident of Waterloo. Solomon 



A 



HISTORY OF DE KAI.l; COUNTY. 



76l 



. 



Brandcberry came dunn: 
part of section 23, whicl 
|ohn and his sons, William, J 
tiers of 1X39. The two 1: 



the same yc: 
he still occupi 



uul located upon a 
The McEntaffcrs, 
)b and Abraham, were also set- 
named afterward removed to 
Union Township. Daniel Kepler, a pionccrof Franklin, moved 
into Smithfield, and became known as an enterprising settler of 
the township. The same may be said of Cyrus Bowman, a 
well-known farmer and citizen. Other early settlers were: 
Henry Shoemaker, Thomas Locke, David Martin, J. Haun, ' 
John Baxter, Jeremiah Hemstreet, Isaac Grate, William Clark, 
Hugh McOsker and George Seiner. 

The first birth in Smithfield was that of Martha Smith, who 
married Edward Richards and moved to Missouri. The sec- 
ond birth was that of Lucinda Daniels, since a well-known 
teacher. 

Cedar Lake is situated on the west border, adjacent to Fair- 
field. At the foot of this sheet of water the first saw-mill was 
raised about 1844. Daniel Martin, an early settler, built a saw- 
mill on the south branch of Cedar Creek, and one Fansler put 
up a grist-mill on the west branch about a mile below the lake. 
A part of the old frame of this latter was incorporated into the 
Waterloo mill, and continues to do service. Isaac B. Smith 
planted the first potatoes, Reuben J. Daniels the first wheat, 
and Norton Blake introduced the use of the reaper in har- 
vesting. 

Education was not neglected by the pioneers; and Isaac B. 
Smith and Reuben J. Daniels put up a log school-house on a 
corner of the farm of the latter during 1S39. Miss Murray was 
the first teacher and Laura Phelps the second. The better 
financial condition of the farmers in later years was apparent in 
the erection of several frame school-houses at nearly the same- 
date. Among the more intelligent and skillful teachers were : 
j Albert Blake, afterward a lawyer; George Duncan, since 
County Commissioner, and Peter Colgrove, at present a 
County Superintendent in Kansas. 

Organized Christianity was first introduced by the United 
Brethren, who had regular services at the Smith school-house, 
now known as " Number Six." The pioneer minister was Rev. 
Samuel Chaplin. The Methodists met at Barker's and formed 
a class of which Mr. Barker was the leader, and they have held 
steadily together to the present time. A frame church built at 



762 IIISTROY OF DE KALI; COUNTY. 

a later clay, now servos their purpose. The Disciples, organ- 
ized under the able and devoted leadership of Revs. Bartlett 
and Hadsell, have a church at Cedar Lake. 

The first township election was held at Smith's log-house in 
thespring of 1839, and there were only five present, just enough 
to form a board. Ferris Blake was chosen Township Clerk; 
Isaac B. Smith, Isaiah McLeish and Pharez Blake, Trustees; 
N. Blake, Constable, and R. J. Daniels, Justice of the Peace. 
Daniels had a large territory, with scant population, and on one 
occasion, when called upon to join in wedlock Jake McLeish 
and Miss Chaffee, he went on foot to Story Lake in Fairfield 
Township, performed the ceremony, and consented to take his 
fee in wild hogs, but faiicd to catch any of them. 

Thursday evening, Feb. 19, 1S63, by Rev. A. H. Widney, at 
the residence of the bride's father, in Smithfield Township, Mr. 
Henry A. Zwilling and Miss Theodosia A. Childs, both of De 
Kalb County, became one. Where.upon some graceless wit 
perpetrated the following: 

" He always was (Z)willing to take a wiie; 
She never was (Z)willing in all 'her life, 
But now, strange to say, her objections arc past, 
And she vows she is (Z)willing, while life shall last. 

The following are some of the early township officials ot 
Smithfield: Justices: R. G. Daniels, David Martin, Daniel 
Gingrich, Jeremiah Hemstreet, R. McBride, J. E. Rutan and 
Aaron Smith; Constables: Daniel Shull, Henry Nevin, Henry 
Trees h, Thomas Lock, Aaron Smith, Justus B. Howard 'and 
Edward Richards; Trustees: Pharez Blake, Isaac B. Smith, D. 
Smith, I. Grate, Isaiah McLeish, Augustus Ball, H. Freeman, 
Samuel Delong, John Leas, Thomas Lock, Harman Mullen, 
John McOsker, John Hornberger, George W. Frout, George 
J. Duncan, William Hoffman, R. Lockhart and William Cox ; 
Assessors: John Baxter, H. Freeman, John Schrantz and Cyrus 
Duncan. 

The population of Smithfield is 1,424, or 40 to the square 
mile. The valuation per capita is $363.45. The number of 
acres of land assessed in 1SS4 is 22,272.08 : value of same, $389,- 
482; value of improvements, $40,1 15; value of lands and improve- 
ments, $429,597; value of lots, $334; value of improvements, 
$413 ; value of lots and improvements, $747; value of personal 



:l-l~ 



HISTORY OF DEKALB COUNTY. 763 

property, $104,275; total value of taxablcs, $534,619; rate of 
taxation, Si. 50; number of polls, 230; poll lax, $1.50. 
The following statistics of staple crops are for 1881 : Acres 

in wheat, 3,236; product of same, at 6 bushels per acre, 19,416 
bushels; acres in corn, 2,121 ; product of same, 65,430 bushels, 
or 30 bushels per acre of upland, and 40 for lowland; acres in 
oats, 1,177; product of same, at 35 bushels per acre, 41,195 
bushels; acres in meadow land, 709; crop from same, at 2 tons 
per acre, 1,418 tons of hay; acres in Irish potatoes, 75; crop 
from same, 10 bushels per acre, or 750 bushels; acres in tobacco, 
11 ; crop, at 500 pounds per acre, 5,500 pounds. 

BIOGRAPHICAL. 

Milton P. Barker, section 11, Smithfield Township, is a son of 
Edward Barker, who settled on section 10, Smithfield Town- 
ship in 1S52. Edward Barker was a native of Nottinghamshire, 
England, born June, 1S06, and came with his parents to the 
United States in 1S34. He lived two years in Detroit, Mich., 
and then moved to Branch County, Mich., where he lived till 
1S50. lie then came to Indiana and lived two years in Steuben 
County. Me was by trade a miller, serving an apprenticeship 
of seven years in England, and worked at his trade in connec- 
tion with farming prior to his settlement in De Kalb County. 
He was a local preacher in the Methodist Episcopal church 
and a zealous worker and liberal supporter of the church of his 
choice. lie was mainly instrumental in the building of Barker's 
chapel on section 10; was the first to advocate the enterprise 
and contributed freely of time and money to accomplish the \ 
object. He was much respected by all who knew him and was 
often called upon to officiate at funerals and weddings, lie was 
married in England to Susanna Pitts, who died in September, 
1840, leaving four children ; but two of whom are living — Mary ! 
Ann, now Mrs. Dirrim, and Milton P- Edward and Emma are j 
deceased. Emma married Henry J. Salander, and died March j 
10, i860, leaving one son, who died in June, 1S84. Mr. Barker 
subsequently married Rebecca Oram, of Knox County. Ohio, 
who died in 1876. Their only son, Edward O., resides in Pratt 
County, Kas. Mr. Barker died Sept. 21, 1872. Milton P. was 
born in Branch County, Mich., in 1840. Forty acres of his 
farm of 140 acres is a part of the homestead. He was 
married to Margaret, daughter of James Dirrim, of Franklin 



764 HISTORY 01- l-i: KM A: COUNTY. 

Township. The)' have live children — Clara, wife ol Preston 
Miller; Hannah D., wile of William Updegraph ; Isaac ]•;., 
Charles M., and James C. 

Cyrus Bowman, Postmaster, Waterloo, fanner and stock-raiser, 
a son of John and Matilda Bowman, was born in Van Burcn, 
Onondaga Co., X. V., Nov. 9, [818. Mis father was a native 
of New Jersey, and his mother of Connecticut. Mr. Bowman 
lived with his parents till he was twenty-one years old, and 
worked on his father's farm. He then came to this county 
where he spent three years a single life, clearing land, splitting 
rails, by the job, etc., and in the meantime cleared twenty acres 
of 160 given him by his father, entered in the fall of 1838. He 
then returned to his home in Xew York, where, June 15, 1843, 
he married Miss Rachel Waterman, a native of Van Buren, 
X. Y. In the fall of 1S43 he and his wife moved to this county, 
built a cabin in the woods where they lived until her death, 
Oct. 17, 1855. To them were born two children — Harriet 
Matilda, who died Oct. 8, 1835, aged nearly eleven years, and 
Rosa G.. born June 19, 1831, now the wife of Phineas D. 
Childs, of Fairfield Township. Sept. 4, 185S, Mr. Bowman 
was married to Sarah Ann Smith, his present wife, a native of 
Stark Count)', Ohio, but an early settler in this county. They 
have two children — Archie S., born Jul}- 1, 1839, a farmer of 
Cass County, Mich., and Fred C, born Nov. 1, 1866. Fred is 
still at home, and superintends the work of the farm. Mr. and 
Mrs. Bowman are now on the shady side of life very pleas- 
ant ly situated, both of them of strict integrity, and loved and 
respected by all their acquaintances. 

Adam Boycr, section 19, Franklin Township, came from Ohio 
with his father, Peter Boycr, in 1836. The following fall, after 
assisting his father to build a log cabin and clear a small patch 
of ground, he returned to Ohio, but in March, 1837, came again 
to Dc Kalb County, accompanied by his brother-in-law, Daniel 
Kepler. He made his home with his brother Michael, who 
came in 1S36, till his marriage, Jan. 11, 1S38, to Rebecca Hol- 
den, daughter of Samuel Holden, a native of Highland County, 
Ohio, born in 1S13. She came to De Kalb Count)' with her 
brothers, Mathew and Francis Holden, in 1837. He built a log 
cabin, but notwithstanding their inconveniences they made the 
best of his circumstances, and with the energy of youth and the 
hope and happiness of newly married life passed the winter in 



._ 



HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 765 

comparative comfort. Their household effects were limited, 
but in the spring of 1830 he returned to Southern Indiana for 
furniture belonging to his wife. In 1.S40 he returned to De 
Kalb Count)- and settled where he now lives. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Boycr have been born five children; but four are living — 
Eliniina, wifeof Andrew Duncan ; Balis 11. ; Mary Ann, wife of 
R. J. Fisk; Irene, wife of A. T.Smith. Their youngesl son, 
Ira, died Dec. 21, 1873, in the nineteenth year of his age. 

Balis II. Boycr, section 10, Smithficld Township, bought his 
farm in 1863 of Samuel Strugh. lie is a sun of Adam and Re- 
becca (Holdcn) Boycr, early settlers of Franklin Township. He 
was born in Highland County, Ohio, April 17, 1840. He was 
reared on the old homestead, receiving a good education in the 
common schools. He was married to Susan Oberlin, daughter 
of David Oberlin, early residents of Franklin Township. She 
was born in Stark County, Ohio, in 1843. Mr. and Mrs. Boyer 
have four children — Warren J., Mary M., Adam D., and Francis 
M., all living in Smithficld Township. 

Oliver J. Camp was born in Stark County, Ohio, in 1852, a 
son of John and Susanna (Smith) Camp, natives of the same 
county. His parents came to De Kalb County, lnd., in April, 
1S55, and settled on section 6, Smithficld Township, on land 
bought several years previous of Mrs. Camp's father, Benjamin 
Smith. The first house on the place was built by Mr. Camp in 
1855. The present residence, one of the best in the township, 
was built in 1S78. The farm is under a good state of cultiva- 
tion; there is a fine orchard of about 125 trees, and all the im- 
provements arc in good order, and among the best in the town- 
ship. Mrs. Camp still resides on the homestead. They had a 
family of lour children, three of whom arc living — Aaron \\\, 
Luther B. and Oliver J. The latter still resides on and has 
charge of the farm. 

Abel Campbell, deceased, was one of the early settlers of 
Smithficld Township, locating on the southwest quarter of sec- 
tion 2S in May, 1847. H e was a native of Pennsylvania, born 
Oct. 26, 1807, and when a boy moved with his parents to Stark 
County, Ohio, where he was reared and married June 16, 1S31, 
to Jane Taylor, a native of Washington Count}-, Pa., born May 
25, 1S12. In 1836 they moved to Summit County, and ther.ee 
to De Kalb County, making the journey hither by teams, tak- 
ing two weeks to make .the trip. Mr. Campbell bought his 



766 HISTORY OF DE KALI; COUNTY. 

farm of Andrew Ilouhn the previous fall. It had been entered 
in 1S36 bv John Taylor, father of Mrs. Campbell, who sold it 
to Mr. Ilouhn. Sixteen acres were cleared, and there was a 
small round-log house on the land which the family moved 
into. Mr. Campbell cleared about seventy-five acres and erected 
good buildings, making it his home till his death in November, 
1S60. Mrs. Campbell is still living on the homestead. They 
had a family of eight children, four of whom they brought 
with them to De Kalb County. Six are living — Margaret, 
John, Edward H., Ruth (wile of E. R. Leasj, James D. ami 
Lewis P. William C. died in 1871, aged twenty-three years; 
Benjamin F. died Sept. 4, 1S55, aged three years. Mr. Camp. 
bell was one of the most prominent men of the township. Po- 
litically he was a Whig, but after the organization of the 
Republican party was a strong adherent of its principles. He 
died the day following the election ol Abraham Lincoln as 
President of the United States. Edward II. resides on the 
homestead, a part of which he owns. lie was born in Summit 
County, Ohio, in 1S41. He has always lived with his parents, 
and has assisted in clearing the farm. He was married to 
Mariam E., daughter of Brickard Childs, who settled in Fair- | 
field Township in the fall of 1847, and subsequently moved to 
Smithfield Township, where he died in 1S7S and his wife in 
18S3. Mr. and Mrs. Edward Campbell have five children — 
Frank, Elnora, Albertis, Clark and Thomas. 

George H. Duncan, a prominent farmer of De Kalb County, 
settled on section 16, Smithfield Township, in 1858. He was 
born in Washington County, Pa., in 1827. His parents moved 
to Ashland County, Ohio, about 1S38, and there he grew to 
manhood and was educated. In the fall of 1849 he began teach- | 
ing school in Holmes County, Ohio, and subsequently taught ! 
twenty-six terms, his schools being in Ohio, Michigan and Indi- 
ana. His first school in De Kalb County was in the Bell dis- 
trict in the winter of 1S53-4. He was very successful, and for 
several years was one of the most prominent teachers of De 
Kalb County. Since 1S62 he has devoted his attention exclu- 
sively to farming. He was married first to Mary Chapman, a 
native of Ashland County, Ohio, who died in 1862, leaving one 
daughter — Mina, now the wife of Win. F. Till. In 1S63 he 
married Jane Chapman, a sister of his first wife. They have 
three children — Clementina, Benjamin F. and George B. Mr. 



HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. jCj-j 

Duncan has served six years, 1874-80, as Commissioner of Dc 
Kalb County. He is one of the representative men of the 
county, having been prominently identified with her interests 
since his first settlement in 1853. Ifis father, George J. Dun- 
can, was born in Washington County, Pa., Jan. 21, 1S03, and 
was married in March, 1825, 10 Mary Baxter, also a native of 
Washington County. He moved to Ashland County, Ohio, in 
1836, when that country was new, and in 1S53 moved to De 
Kalb Count)-, Inch, and settled on section 10, Smithficld Town- 
ship, where he died Jan. S, 1870. His wife died Dec. 10, 1S77. 
They had a family of eight sons and four daughters, all of whom 
lived till maturity. Seven sons and two daughters are still liv- 
ing, all save one son in De Kalb County. William B. resides in 
Kansas. 

Robert T. Duncan, son of George j. Duncan, was born in 
Holmes County, Ohio, in 1848. He came with his parents to 
De Kalb County and remained with them till their death. Since 
his father's death in 1S70 he has lived on the old homestead, a 
sister, Margaret Duncan, also making her home with him. lie 
has been twice married. His first wife, Florence Wilson, came 
to De Kalb County from Ohio with her mother, Mrs. Mary 
Jane Wilson, her father having died in Ohio. Mrs. Duncan 
died Jan. 4, 1878, leaving one son — Andrew W. Mr. Duncan 
subsequently married Sarah Ann Freed, daughter of Peter 
Freed, of Smithficld Township. 

Edward Erwin, farmer, section 16, Smithficld Township, was 
born in Stark County, Ohio, in 1S3S, a son of William Erwin, a 
native of Pennsylvania, who went to Ohio when a boy, and in 
1853 with his wife and five children moved to De Kalb County, 
Inch, and settled in Union Township. He bought a partially 
improved farm and lived in Union Township several years ; 
then removed to Smithficld. Edward Erwin received a good 
education. He remained Oil the farm, assisting his father till 
manhood. In 1861 he enlisted in the Second Indiana Cavalry 
and served three years. His regiment was assigned to the 
Army of the Cumberland. He participated in the battles of 
Shiloh, Stone River, Chickamauga, siege of Corinth, and other 
important engagements. Since his return home he has engaged 
in agricultural pursuits, and has a fine farm, with a pleasant 
residence and good farm buildings. He was married to 
Elizabeth McEntaffer, daughter of Michael McEntaffer. She 












J 












;68 


IIIS'I 


was born in F 


ranklii 


and Mrs. Erw 


in l.av 



H iR'i i >F DE KAi.l; O »UNTY. 

n Township, De Kalb County, in i'\, ,. Mr. 
e live children— Mary C, Arthur II., Mina 
Delilah M. and an infant son. 

David Feaglcr, son of Joshua Feagler, was horn in R .... 
Township, De Kalb County, tnd., June, 1847. His father was 
a native of Maryland, and subsequently moved to Dayton, 
Ohio, from whence he came to De Kalb County. He was one 
of the first settlers of Richland Township, and made it his 
home till his death, May 30, 1875. The mother now resides in 
Auburn. They have six children living in De Kalb County. 
David Fcaglcr was reared a farmer, and since attaining man- 
hood has given that industry his attention. He has been very 
successful and now owns a fine farm on section zj, Smithfield 
Township, which is well cultivated and improved, with a good 
residence and farm buildings. He was married to Lucinda 
Grogg, daughter of Peter Grogg, of Richland Township. They 
have now two children — Elmer and Jesse. 

Henry Frick was born in South Huntington Township, West- 
moreland Co., Pa., Nov! 23, 1815, and in 1825 removed with his 
father, Henry Frick, to Stark County, Ohio, where he was 
reared and educated. lie was married in 1838 to Christina 
Smith, a native of Bedford County, Pa., and in 1854 they 
moved to De Kalb County, Ind., and settled in Smithfield 
Township, where he bought 160 acres, paying <§8 an acre. He 
has cleared and improved 100 acres of his land, and now has 
one of the best farms in the township. To Mr. and Mrs. Frick 
have been born ten children, nine of whom are living, five sons 
and four daughters — Henry, Jr., married Appy Davis; Abra- 
ham married Berna Weaver; John married Nettie Cool; 
George married Silbv Dclond ; Daniel, at home, unmarried; 
Lovina, wife of George McEntaffcr ; Mary, wife of John Reu- 
pcy ; Elizabeth, wife of Jacob Bathael ; and Sarah, wife of 
Harman Wharcham. Henry, Abraham and Lovina live in 
Branch Count)', Mich.; Mar}' in Steuben County, and the rest 
in De Kalb County. Ind. Henry enlisted Aug. 12, 1862, in 
Company A, Eighty-eighth Indiana Infantry, and served till 
March 21, 1863, when he was discharged on account of disa- 
bility. After his recovery, in September, 1S64, he enlisted in 
Company A, One Hundred and Forty-second Indiana Infantry, 
and served till June 28, 1865. He participated with General 
Thomas in the battle of Nashville. 






HISTORY OF DEKALB COUNTY. 769 

Richard Gramling, section 10, Smithfield Township, was 
born in Pennsylvania in 1831, a son of Isaac and Mary (Horn- 
berger) Gramling. Isaac Gramling was a native of Bucks 
County, Pa., born in 1805. lie was married in his native Slate 
and subsequently moved to Stark County, Ohio, and from there 
in 1849 to De Kalb County, lnci. lie settled on a tract of un- 
improved land on the southwest quarter of section 4, Smithfield 
Township, which he improved and made his home till his detail 
July 2. 1885. His wife died in April, 1881. They had a family 
of eleven children, eight of whom came with them to De Kalb 
County. The eldest wtis married, out iollovvcd his parents 
to Indiana the next year. Six of their children are living, till 
in Smithfield Township, within a mile of the old homestead — 
Richard, Peter, John, William, Frank and Amanda. Eliza, 
Sarah, Henry, Susan and Mary are deceased. Richard Gram- 
ling was married in 1S58 to Margaret Mortorff, daughter of 
Moses Mortorff, who settled in De Kalb County in 1843. They 
have one son, William Albert, born Sept. 24, 1859; married 
Mary, daughter of Lewis Chapman, and has one son — Rollin. 
Mr. Gramling has a fine farm, on which he settled in i860. His 
residence and farm buildings are good, and he is one of the 
most enterprising fanners of the township. 

Franklin Hamman, section 22, Smithfield Township, was born 
in Franklin Township July 1, 1848, a son of John Hamman, an 
early settler of that township, who died May 27, 1885. When 
two years of age he went to live with an uncle, Solomon Bran- 
dcrburg, and remained with him till manhood, lie was car- 
ried to Phoebe Martin, daughter of John Martin, of Smithfield 
Township. They have two children — Francclia and Olive. 
Mr. Hamman, in connection with his agricultural interests, 
is extensively engaged in the manufacture of draining tile, 
brick and lumber, lie has a patent kiln for the manufacture 
of tile, and makes all sizes, having a capacity for making 400,000 
annually. 

Thomas Hamman, one of the most successful farmers and 
stock-raisers of De Kalb Countv, bought his farm on section 
16, Smithfield Township, in the fall of 1847. The next April 
he began clearing his land which was heavily timbered, ami 
the same year began the erection of a dwelling which he fin- 
ished in the spring 01 1849. This was the first frame house in 
Smithfield Township. It is 18x30 feet in size, with 13-li. 



7/0 HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 

posts. Mr. Hamman has always been a hard working man. 
The first six years he was in Do Kalb County he cleared and 
fenced sixty acres of heavily timbered land, and since coming 
to the county has chopped the timber from 140 acres. He now 
has 312 acres of land, 135 of which is under cultivation. Mis 
buildings are among the best in the township. His barn, which 
is 85 X42 feet in size, was built in 1864, and for a long time was 
the best, and is not excelled now by any in the township. Mr. 
llamman was born in Stark County, Ohio, in 1823. His father 
died when he was fifteen years old, and from that age he was 
obliged to rely on himself for a livelihood. lie was married in 
1S50 to Elizabeth Sayler, a native of York County, Pa., who 
came with her stepfather, Adam Hood, to De Kalb County in 
an early day. Mr. and Mrs. Hamman have had nine children, 
but five of whom are living — John, Henry, Caroline, Thomas 
and Simon. Samuel died at the age of thirty years in 18S3; 
Eliza and two others died in infancy. 

Jeremiah Hemstreet was born in Half Moon, Saratoga Co., N. 
V., in 1803. He was reared in Herkimer and Lewis counties, 
X. Y. He married Sabrina Merchant, who died in New York. 
Their four children are also all deceased. After the death of 
his wife he went to Huron County, Ohio, and there married 
Mariam M. Smith, a native of New York, who went with her 
parents to Ohio when twelve years of age. In 1842 Mr. Hem- 
street loaded his household goods on a wagon and with his 
family started for De Kalb County. He entered a tract of 
wild land from the Government on what is now section 22, 
Smiihi'ield Township. He lias been a hard working, persever- 
ing man, and has cleared, broken and fenced over 100 acres of 
land with his own hands, and at the age of eighty-two years is 
still hale and hearty. To Mr. and Mrs. Hemstreet have been 
born seven children; but five are living — Cornelia, wife of 
John Campbell; Sabrina, wife of Jotham Woolsey ; Mary, wile 
of Orlando Seery ; Ellen, wife of Adam Strow ; Albert D., of 
San Francisco, Cal. The latter is a native of Smithfieid Town- 
ship, born Sent. 12, 1S43. Melvina dieci at the age of nine 
j months, and Alonzo, aged thirty years. 

Edward M.Jackman was born in Carroll County, Ohio, July 
! 13, 1835, a son of Edward Jackman. His parents moved to De 
I Kalb County, Ind., in 1840, and here he was reared and edu- 
cated, and with the exception of four years residence in Iowa 



HISTORY OF D1-; KALB COUNTY. . 771 

has since lived here. lie was married in 1856 to Margaret A. 

Taylor, a native of Stark County, Ohio, Lorn in 1S33, daughter 
of John Taylor, who settled in De Kalb County in 1S4.S, and in 
1S65 moved to Cedar County, Iowa, and subsequently moved 
to Carroll County where he died. Mr. and Mrs. Jackman 
have had six children; but two arc living — Margaret Ella and 
Charles F. A daughter, Sarah F., died in July, 1S79, aged 
twenty-two years. The others died in early childhood. Mr. 
Jackman has a pleasant home on section 1, Smithneld Town- 
ship, which he purchased in 1S7S. He is one of the most suc- 
cessful and influential farmers in the township, and is a 
public-spirited, liberal citizen, doing all in his power toward the 
promotion of enterprises of public benefit. His eldest sister, 
Mrs. Sarah Boycr, is the widow of Joseph Boyer, who died in 
1881. She has live children — Edward II. and Oliver, in Kan- 
sas; Cyrus C, in Franklin Township; Alma Celcstia, wife of 
William Boyles, of Wilmington Township; Electa L., wife of 
Walter Thompson, of Steuben County. 

Wesley Jackman was born in Carroll County, Ohio, in 1S27, 
a son of Edward Jackman. In 1837 Edward Jackman came to 
De Kalb County, accompanied by his brother Robert, and en- 
tered 440 acres of land on sections 17 and 18, Franklin Town- 
ship, and 160 acres on section 12, Smithneld Township. He 
then returned to Ohio, and in 1840 moved with his wife and 
nine children, and settled on the cast half of his land on section 
18, Franklin Township, where he lived till his death in 184S. 
His wife died Jan. 1, 1S55. One son, John, was married in 
Ohio, but followed the family to Indiana in the fall of 1S40. 
Five of the ten children are living — Sarah, widow of Joseph 
Boyer ; Cyrus resides on the homestead in Franklin Township ; 
Wesley and Edward M. in Smithneld ; and Adam C. in Grand 
Rapids, Mich. Wesley Jackman settled on the land entered by 
his father in Smithheld Township in April, 1853, and now 
has one of the finest farms in the county. He was married 
to Sarah M. Baxter, daughter of Moses Baxter, of this town- 
ship. They have had eight children ; but seven are living 
— Edith L., a teacher in the normal school at Mitchell, Ind. ; 
Mary E., a teacher ; Florence V., teaching in the State Normal 
School of Alabama ; Charles S. and Harry E. (twins) ; Minnie 
A. and Addie. Florida V., a twin sister of Florence, died 
March 4, 1SS1, at the age of twenty-two years. She was at that 



r 



JJ2 HISTORY OF Dl£ KALB COUNTY. 

time a student at the normal school at Danville. Mr. Jackman 
has taken great pains to educate his children and fit them for 
any position in life to which they may be called. Edith is a 
graduate of tiie normal school at Lebanon, Ohio, and the 
Others, save Minnie, of Danville, Ind. He left the farm and re- 
sided in Danville several years, that his children mighl have 
the advantage of the school of that place. 

John Jenkins, section 26, Smithficld Township, was born in 
the State of Maryland, near Washington, in 1815, a son of John 
Jenkins. His father was a slaveholder in Maryland. He died 
when our subject was a child. In 1S33 John Jenkins, Jr.. went 
to Knox County, Ohio, at that time sparsely settled, and re- 
mained there about twelve years. He was married in Ohio, to 
Margaret Hull, a native of Pennsylvania, but a resident of 
Knox County from her infancy. July 17, 1845, he came to 
Dc Kalb County, Ind., and bought a tract of heavily timbered 
land on section 16, Concord Township. He cleared 120 acres, 
erected good buildings and made it his home till 1S79, when he 
bought his present farm of eight}- acres, of Homer Henning. 
He has made a specialty of stock-raising and for several years 
has dealt extensively in horses, buying and shipping West. 
Mr. and Mrs. Jenkins have had eight children ; but seven are 
living — Martin, Mary Ann, Henry, Alvin, John, Sarah and 
Orange. A daughter, Ellen, is deceased. 

Samuel Kennedy, section 23, Smithficld Township. His father, 
John Kennedy, was born in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, June 
10, 1S10, and subsequently went with his parents to Stark 
County, where he married Sarah Oberlin, and in 1844 removed 
with his family to Wayne County. In 1852 he came to De Kalb 
County, and bought a farm on section 23, Smithfield Township, 
forty acres of which was improved, where he died Oct. 20, 
1S54. He had a family of ten children, seven of whom are 
living — Samuel, William, Benjamin F., an.; Phi;;. ....- .... 

De Kalb County ; Josiah, of Kansas; Joseph, also in the West, 
and Mary J., wife of A. S. Blake, of Colorado. Five of the 
sons were soldiers in the war of the Rebellion. Samuel en- 
listed in 1S64 in the Ninth Illinois Cavalry, and served till the 
close of the war. Josiah enlisted in 1S61, in the Forty-fourth 
Indiana Infantry. Philip enlisted in the Thirtieth Indiana, and 
was transferred to the Mississippi Marine v Brigade. He was 
severely wounded twice. Benjamin F. enlisted in 1863, in the 



HISTORY OF DE KALE COUNTY. 773 

Eighty-eighth Indiana Infantry and served till the close of the 
war. Joseph served in the First Indiana Heavy Artillery, serv- 
ing in the Mississippi Marine service. Samuel, the only son 
living in -Smithfield Township, owns and occupies the old j 

homestead. He was born in Stark County, Ohio, in 1830, and ! 
was therefore a young man when he came with his parents to i 
Indiana. lie was married in Dc Kalb County, to Annette 
Holmes, a native of Seneca County, Ohio, born in 1838, a < 
daughter of Benajmin and Nancy (Knapp) Holmes, natives of 
New York. To Mr. and Mrs. Kennedy have been born two 
sons — Jay S., born March 14, 1863, and one that died in infancy. 
Mrs. Kennedy's father moved to De Kalb County in 1843, and 
in 1S67 sold his farm and removed to Tiffin, Ohio, where he 
died the following March. He was married three times, his 
third wife is living in Kansas. Five of his nine children arc 
living, three in De Kalb County: Mrs. Flora McTaffin, Mrs. 
Olive Kennedy, and Mrs. Annctta Kennedy. 

Daniel Kimmell, section 5, Smithfield Township, was born in 
Stark County, Ohio, in 1827, and was reared and educated in 
iiis native county. In 1853 he came to De Kalb County and 
bought the tract of land of Peter Grogg, where he has since- 
resided. Twenty-five acres were cleared and a log cabin had 
been erected. He has cleared 110 acres, and now owns 135 
acres of choice land under cultivation and about twenty acres 
ol woodland. He has built a good residence and farm build- | 
ings, and has one of the best farms and pleasantest homes in 
Smithfield Township. Mr. Kimmell was married to Lucinda 
Smith, a native of Stark Count)-, Ohio, born in 1825. They 
have six children, all save the youngest, born in Ohio — Orlando, 
John, Benjamin, Martha, Alma and Jennie. 

John Martin, section 23, Smithfield Township, was born in 
York County, Pa., in 1822. When he was fourteen years of 
age his parents moved to Ohio, and in 1841 he came to De Kalb 
Count}', Ind. Fie was married in 1S45 to Almira Cole, a native 
of Erie County, Ohio, born in 1826. Mrs. Martin's father died 
when she was a child, and her mother subsequently married 
Isaac B. Smith, and May 27, 1836, they came to De Kalb 
County, Ind. The family afterward moved to Missouri, 
where Mrs. Martin's mother died. Mr. Smith and his two 
eldest children, a son and a daughter, are living in Missouri. 
' His youngest son, Isaac B., Jr., died while a soldier in the war 
49 



7/4 HISTORY OK DE KALB I 01 NTY. 

of the Rebellion. When Mrs. Martin canv b County, 

forty-nine years ago, Indians were more numerous than white 
men, and wild game of all kinds were in abundance. Mr. and 
Mrs. Martin have had two children — Phcebe, wife of Franklin 
Hamman, and a daughter deceased. 

John McOscar, section 9, Smithfield Township, was born in 
Bedford County, Pa., in 1S22. His father, Hugh McOscar, was 
a native of Ireland, and came to America when a young man, 
and sealed in Pennsylvania, where he was married, and in 1843 
came with his family to De Kalb County, and located on sec- 
tion 9, Smithfield Township, which he had bought the year 
previous. The mother died in 1S55 and the father Julv 5, [857. 
They had a family of four children — John; Fergus, of Pratt 
County, Kan. : James died in Montana several years ago ; Jane, 
wife of Ferdinand Fetters, of Smithfield. John McOscar re- 
sides on the farm adjoining the old homestead of his father, and 
has one of the best farms in the township. He was married in 
1856 to Mary Skilling, daughter of Michael and Rosanna Skil- 
ling, who located in De Kalb County in 1S46. Mr. Skilling was 
born in County Tyrone, Ireland, and came to America in 1829. 
and settled in Philadelphia, Pa., where he married Rosanna 
Riley, who was born in Philadelphia in 1S0S. Mr. Skilling died 
in Notre Dame Hospital in June, 1S79. Mr. and Mrs.. Skilling 
had a family of six children, five of whom are living, three sons 
and two daughters. Mrs. McOscar was born in Philadelphia, 
Dec. 29, 1S34. Mr. and Mrs. McOscar have had seven sons, four 
of whom are living- — William, Edward, Amos and Emory. 
Their eldest son, James, died Jan. 4, 1S79, at the age of twenty- 
I one years. Two died in early childhood. Edward J. graduated 
from the Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, in 18S4. The 
rest of their family are at home. 

John D. Porter, section 24, Smithfield Township, was born in 
Ripley, Huron County, Ohio, in 1S21, and when he was two 
years of age his parents moved to Wyandotte County, Ohio. 
When he was twelve years of age his father died, leaving a 
widow and five sons. John D. and his youngest brother, 
Mathew, of Ohio, are the only ones living. His mother died 
in i860. When he was fifteen years of age he went to live 
with a maternal uncle, but a year later began to work by the 
month.. In 1842 he came to De Kalb County, Ind., with Hiram 
Holmes, for whom he worked four years, remaining with him 



HISTORY OF D1C KALI; COUNTY. 775 

till his marriage. Mr. Holmes settled in Franklin Township, 
remaining- there five years, when he moved to La Porte County 
and laid out a town on the Michigan Southern Railroad, which 
he named Holmesville. He subsequently left there and moved 
to Iowa. Mr. Porter was married in 1846 to Catherine Mc- 
Andaffer, daughter of David McAndafler, and a native of Stark 
County, Ohio, born January, 1S29. He then settled on his 
father-in-law's farm, in Smithficld Township, and after the lat- 
tcr's death, in 1S51, rented the farm live years. He then bought 
the homestead of the heirs, at that time containing 1 54 acres, 
seventy of which" were improved. lie now owns 196 acres, 
1 150 improved. He has about 700 rods of tiling on his farm 
' and other valuable improvements. Mr. and Mrs. Porter have 
had four children, three sons and a daughter; but two sons are 
living — David, born Aug. 6, 1S49. married Martha, daughter of 
I Joseph Ballby. of Waterloo ; Franklin E., born September, 1S59, 
was married Feb. 7. 18S4, to Emma, daughter of John Lowe, 
of Franklin Township. 

Charles L. Rempis, Jr., was born in Germany, March 21, 1831, 
a son of Charles L. Rempis, who was born in Germany in 1S01, 
and came to America with his family in 1S32 and settled in 
Tuscarawas County. Ohio, and later in Massillon, Ohio, remain- 
ing there till 1S53, when he removed to De Kalb County and 
bought 120 acres of land on the southeast quarter of section 22, 
Smithfield Township. Forty acres of the land were cleared 
and under cultivation, and had a log cabin and barn. He went 
to work to improve his farm, but lived only six years after com- 
ing to the county, dying in December, 1859. His wife survived 
him a number of years. They had a family of eight children, 
six of whom are living, four in De Kalb Count v. Charles L. 
Rempis, Jr., went to California in 1851, and remained on the 
Pacific coast three and a half years. In the fall of 1S54 he re- 
turned East, and his father having in the meantime removed to 
1 De Kalb County, settled in this county. He was married 
! to Elizabeth, daughter of William Middleton, who settled 
in Adams County, Ind., in 1842, and in 1843 removed to De 
Kalb County, and in 1845 settled on section 4, Union Town- 
1 ship, but sold out in 1864 and moved to Waterloo, where lie 
died in 1S66. His wife died July 19, 1S74. They had a family 
of four children — Isaac, died in Idaho Territory; Mrs.'Rempis; 
Hester, wife of Jacob K. Norton, of Eaton County, Mich. ; 



yy6 HISTORY OF DE KALE COUNTY. 

James. The latter born in De Kalb County. Mrs. Rempis is 
the only member of the family living in Dc Kalb County. Mr. 
and Mrs. Rempis have three children— William II., Lewis F. 
and Theodore. Mr. Rempis has a fine farm on the northeast 
quarter ol section 32, and is one of the most enterprising and 
influential farmers of the township. 

Jacob Sawvell, section 24, Smithfield Township, bought his 
farm in 1S47 of John Anthony. At that time but very little of 
the land was improved ; now it is one of the best farms in the 
township, sixty of the eighty acres being under cultivation. 
Mr. Sawvell was born in Adams County, Pa., near Gettysburg 
April 23, 1S07, and lived in his native county till twenty-one 
years of age, when he moved with his parents to Stark County, 
Ohio, where he was married to Sarah Anthony, who accom- 
panied him to De Kalb County. She was a native of Pennsyl- 
vania, but was reared in Stark County. They had a family of 
ten children, but seven of whom are living, two in De Kalb 
County. Mrs. Sawvell died in July, 1862, and Mr. Sawvell 
subsequently married Mary Mortorff, a native of Adams 
County, Pa., born in 1822. He has been a hard working, 
economical man, and his efforts have been crowned with suc- 
cess. 

Eli Staffer was born in Columbiana County, Ohio, in 1.X36, a 
son of Samuel StolTcr. In 1864 he moved to De Kalb County, 
Ind., and settled in Fairfield Township, and in 1874 moved to 
the southwest quarter of section 19, Smithfield Township, where 
he has since resided. In 1S84 a cheese factory was built on his 
farm, and May 23 he began manufacturing, the firm name being 
Smithfield Dairy Association. Mr. StolTcr is President of the 
association. The factory has the capacity of manufacturing 
500 pounds of cheese per da)'. Mr. Stoffer is one of the mo.it 
Successful and enterprising business men of the township, he 
was married in Ohio to Elizabeth Weaver, a native ol Colum- 
biana County. They have seven children — Oliver, Delilah, 
Amanda J., Edwin O., John F., Mary K. and Ella X. 

Aaron A. Stout was born in Lenawee County, Mich., in 1S29, 
a son of George and Delight \V. (Bliss) Stout, his father a 
native of New Jersey, born in 1799, and his mother a native of 
Vermont, a daughter of Nelson Bliss. His lather moved to 
Western New York with his parents when about five years <: 
age, ana when a young man moved to Lenawee County, Mich.. 



HISTORY OF DEKALB COUNTY. ■;■;■; 

where he was married, and in November, 1836, moved to De 
Kalb County, and settled in Fairfield Township. In IS;, 
had entered eight}- acres ol land in Steuben County just across 

the line from De Kalb, and in the spring of '.'^17 settle 1 this 

land and improved it, making it his home several years. He 
subsequently moved to section 1, Smithfield Township, and 
thence to Jackson Township, Steuben County, where he died 
in the spring of 1S66. Mis wife died in 1853. They had a 
family of five sons and two daughters — Herbey B., the eldest, 
died of cancer, aged fifty-three years; Aaron A.; George L. 
died at the age of twenty-three years; Orville L. died at the 
age of fortv vears; Nancy W., wife of Frederick Story ; Caro- 
line, now Mrs. Forst ; Edwin went West several years ago, and 
is supposed to be dead. After the death of his first wife Mr. 
Stout married Mrs. C. (Shotto) Clark, who is still living. To 
them were born four children. Aaron A. Stout remained with 
his parents till his marriage to Malinda Bower, who was born 
in New York, April 13, 1S34, daughter of John Bower, who 
settled in Fairfield Township in 1851. Her father is now living 
in Kent County, Mich.; her mother died in 1861. Mr. and Mrs. 
Stout have had three children, but one is living — Frances A., 
wife of Archie W. Irwin. Lydia L. died Jan. 29, 1S7S, aged 
twenty-two years, and one died in infancy. In 1S61 Mr. Stout 
enlisted in the Forty-second Indiana Infantry for three years, 
but was discharged in January, 1862, on account of disability. 
In April, 1S63, he settled on his present farm on section 12. 
Smithfield Township, where he has one of the pleasantcst 
homes in the countv. 

John R. Walker, section 35, Smithfield Township, bought his 
farm of 160 acres of Weslev Parks in August, 1844. At that 
tune it was heavily timbered, but he cleared and improved it, 
and in 1S60 bought the quarter section adjoining. By hard 
work and economy he has acquirei ency and is mi 

of the successful farmers and most respected citizens of the 
countv. Mr. Walker was born in York County, Pa., in 1808, 
and was there reared and married to Catherine Chrumrine, a 
native of Maryland, born in 1S10. In 1835 they settled in Co- 
lumbiana County, Ohio, and lived there till their removal to 
De Kalb County in 1844. Mr. Walker's father, Nicholas 
Walker, was a distiller, and in his vouth he learned the 
business and followed it a number of vears in Ohio. Mr. 



■jy^ HISTORY OP DE ] 

and Mrs. Walker hav< had eighl children; bul four are liv- 
ing — Sarah, Amanda, Eli and George, the two latter born in 
Indiana. 

Frederick C. Waterman, section S, Smithfield Township, a son 
of Othnicl and grandson of Elijah Waterman. I lis grand- 
father settled on section 30, Franklin Township, De Kalb 
County in 1S37, and resided there till his death in 1863. His 
father, Othnicl Waterman, settled on section 9, Smithfield 
Township in 1S40, but about 1S43 moved to Steuben County, , 
and from there two years later to Milwaukee, Wis.; thence to j 
Waukesha County, Wis., and from there to Fox Lake, Dodge | 
County, and thence to Tomah, Monroe County. He engaged 
in the lumber business north of Tomah, till 1S6S, and then 
bought a farm near town, where he lived till his death in the 
fall of 1882. The mother, Mary (Gambia) Waterman, still re- 
sides on the homestead. Of their six children but three are 
living — Frederick; Alice, wife of Mervin Jones, of Monroe 
County, Wis.: and Charles, a conductor on the Chicago, Mil- 
waukee & St. Paul Railroad. Frederick was born in New 
York Mills, Oneida Co., N. Y., Aug. 26, 1S41. He remained ' 
with his parents till the breaking out of the Rebellion, when, j 
May 11, 1S61, he enlisted in the Second Wisconsin Infan 
which was a part of the famous Iron Brigade of Wisconsin. 
He participated in the first battle at Bull Run, July 21, 1861, ! 
Gainesville, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville. and on the first ' 
day oi the battle of Gettysburg, was taken prisoner, but was 
paroled by General Early the same evening. However, in- 
stead of being allowed to report immediately at parole camp, 
he was required to assist in taking care of the wounded. He 
rejoined his regiment at Bristow's Station, a few days later, and 
subsequently participated in the battles of tire Wilderness, 
Cold Harbor, North Anna; was forty-two clays in the trenches 
before Petersburg; was at Five Forks, and Appomattox at the 
surrender of General Lee. After the close of the war he re- 
turned to Wisconsin, and worked at his trade (printer) in Mil- 
waukee a short time ; then returned home and assisted his 
father for sometime, and subsequently went to Walworth 
County, Wis., where he engaged in farming till 1S70, when he 
moved to De Kalb County, Ind., where he has since lived, i le 
owns eighty acres of good land on section 8, which formerly 
belonged to George Brunner. Mr. Waterman was married 
to Ellen, daughter of Orris Danks. They have two sons — 
Herbert and Orris O. 






CHAPTER XXI. 



STAFFORD TOWNSHIP. 



Situation. — Geography and Topography.— Early Set- 
tlers. — Religion and Education in ax Early Day. — 
First Township Officials. — Population. — .Propei n 
and Taxation. — Agricultural Statistics. — Bi< •.. . 

ICAL. 

On the east line of the county, midway north and south, lies 
Stafford, one of the three small townships in the county. It is 
bounded on the north by Troy Township, on the east by the 
State of Ohio, on the south by Newville Township, and on the 
west by Wilmington. The northern end is crossed by a rail- 
road used by both the Michigan Southern and the Wabash, St. 
Louis & Pacific Railroad companies. The St. Joseph River 
crosses the southeast corner, and Big Run has its course west 
to east across the north end. On the river and creek the lands 
are quite fertile; between the two they are variable in quality, 
but none too poor for wheat when properly cultivated. The 
surface is generally level, with bluffs in the south on the river. 
The township is six miles long, north and south, and nearly 
two and a half wide easl and west; thus containing twelve 
whole and six fractional sections. 

The earliest settler of this township was James Lytle, who 
located during the summer of 1836, and after a short stay left 
the county. The next and permanent sellers were John and 
Hazzard Webster, Rufus Coats and John Rose, and their fami- 
lies, in all a colony of twenty-six persons. They emigrated 
from Trumbull County, Ohio, and arrived at their d( 
in this township on Oct. 4, 1S36. John Webster bought some 
hundreds of acres of very rich land on the river near the Ohio 
State line and settled on the same. He was a some" 
centric man, an ardent devotee of wealth, careless on religii u 
subjects, and yet a good citizen and neighbor, lie was very 
useful in supplying the early settlers with corn, potatoes, etc., 



7*0 HISTORY 01' OK KALIS GO .... 

at very reasonable rates for the limes, and, some years later, b) 
erecting a good saw and gristmill on his premises. I-L 

his sons, three in number, have been in the spirit land for thirty 
years or more. Mis brother, Hazzard Webster, was also an 
early settler, res] ctcd by those who knew him. lie died in 
California a generation ago. 

Other early settlers were: Jacob Gunscnhouscr, John Rose, 
Rufus Coats, James W. Rosc,Jamcs E. Rose and Daniel Coats. 
The first habitation was built by Lytic, and the next four were 
raised about the same time by the families above named. During 
the year following Edward Scovillc and Ariel Walden (for years 
an Associate Judge for this county) came in. During the years 
1S3S and 1839 many families moved in, entered land and en- 
gaged heartily in the work of developing the country. Prominent 
ones were: Christian Wanemaker, Henry Fusselman (a Justice 
and County Commissioner) and Thomas Strote. John Barber 
made his home in the northern part of the township, and C. R. 
Wanemaker (since County Commissioner), and Stephen W. 
Hackley, were other early settlers in the same locality. 

Though there was hard labor and few comforts save as they 
were won by industry, yet these settlers were not unmindful of 
the claims of religion and of education. Early preachers there 
were, men unschooled, and appearing in their shirt sleeves, 
who were full of zeal and awakened religious fervor in man)' a 
cabin home. Lewis Hicklen was a Methodist Protestant min- 
ister, and preached in the settlers' cabins. Then there were 
Byron Miner and Henry Kumler, the latter since known as 
Bishop Kumler ; Jonathan Thomas, of the United Brethren 
church, and Elder Josiah Cooper, a Methodist Episcopal. The 
first school patronized by the people of Stafford was taught by 
Miss Emily Handy. The building occupied for the purpose 
was a cabin not in use, and owned by Walter Slang!: er. [1 
stood near Coats' Corners. The firs! school-hot 1 
such, stood near the residence ol .Mrs. Joslin, in the Wane- 
maker settlement, and has known many occupants, teachers 
... . pupils, now engaged in other duties. The youth of the 
early days have grown to manhood; and, in vivid contrast with 
the husbandry of the present, memory recalls 

" How we grasped the old sheepskin with feelings of scorn, 

As we straddled the back of the old sorrel mare, 

And rode up and down through the green rows of corn, 



HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 7S1 

Like a pin on a clolhcs-linc that sways in the air; 
We can hear our stern .. .;.,-. ., • •■..:•:-; us still, 
As the careless old creature comes down on a hill." 

Some of the early Justices of the Peace in Stafford Tow 
were: Rufus Coats, Henry Fussclman, David McDanicl, Noyce 
Coats, Samuel Wanemaker, F. Hoffman and J. J. Imhoff. Early 
Constables were : I. Gaft, C. R. Wanemaker, II. Dickerhoof and 
H. H. Wanemaker. The first Trustees were: J. J. Gunscn- 
houser, Isaac Deal, A. Fussclman, Joseph A. Coats, Noyce 
Coats, J. J. Imhoff, F. Hoffman, Peter Walter, John Crouse, 
Samuel Hcadley, John W. Rose, Jesse W. Rose, C. H. Wane- 
maker, William Brown, John Webster, William Webster and 
Chris. Wanemaker. C. R. Wanemaker, James Cather and 
Jacob Crise, were early Assessors. 

The Big Run U. B. church was organized in the spring 
of 1S43 by Rev. Jonathan Thomas, who is still living in 
Hamilton, Steuben County. The charter members were Jacob 
Gunsenhouser and wife, Thomas Olds and wife, David Flick- 
inger and wife, Stephen Hackley and wife, and Mary Willard. 
They organized in the house of Jacob Gunsenhouser, and wor- 
shiped there for about five years, afterward using the old log 
school-house on Mr. Gunsenhouser's land. While using this 
house, they had a most successful revival, resulting in the con- 
version of sixty souls. Rev. Chester Briggs conducted the 
meetings. Their present church building, 30x40 feet, was 
begun in 1S61, and completed during the war. Services are 
held alternate Sundays by Rev. James Martin. The cemetery 
by this church was the first in the township. The first person 
buried there was Miss Abigail Hackley ; her death occurred 
several years before the organization of the church. 

The population of Stafford Township is 569, or 38 to the 
square mile. The valuation per capita is $453.73. In 1884 the 
number of acres of land was assessed 9,311.57; value of sami 
$198,975 ; value of improvements, $26,240; value of lands and 
improvements, $225,215 ; value of personal property, $48,465; 
total value of taxables, $273,680 ; rate of taxation, $1.66; num- 
ber of polls, 93; poll tax, $1.00; total amount of taxation, 
$4,698.31. 

The following statistics are of staple crops raised in 1881 ; 
there were 1,526 acres in wheat, producing 7 bushels per acre, 
or 10,682 bushels; S79 acres in corn, producing 15 bushels per 



782 HISTORY 01 DE KA 

acre of upland and 25 per acre of lowland, or 13,460 bushels; 
531 acres in oats, producing 35 bushels per acre, or 16,585 bush- 
els; 353 acres in meadow land, producing a ton to an acre of nay, 
or 353 tons; 44 acres in Irish potatoes, producing 15 bushels 
per acre, or 660 bushels. 

BIOGRAPHICAL. 

Robert Arford, section 4, Stafford Township, was born in Fay- 
ette County, Pa., March 27, 1S28, a son of Jacob Arford, a na- 
tive of Maryland, who moved to Wayne County, Ohio, in the 
spring of 1831, and to Tuscarawas County in 1839. Robert 
Arford grew to manhood in the latter county, and in 1852 came 
to De Kalb County, Ind.,and settled on the land where he now 
lives. He cleared a small patch of ground and built a hewed 
log house 26 x iS feet in size, a story and a half high, fie was 
in meager circumstances when he came to this county, and \ 
alter paying for part of his land and buying a few necessary i 
articles, had but $12 dollars left, fie bought seventy-live acres j 
of land for S550, and paid §130 cash. He went to work for 
others till he had paid the rest. lie made all the furniture in j 
their house with the exception of two chairs and a bureau. lie- 
had no team, and he and Jacob Crise bought a yoke of oxen 
together. Although commencing life in what seemed adverse- 
circumstances, he has toiled bravely on, assisted by a noble 
wife, till he now has a fine farm of nearly 200 acres, all under 
a good state of- cultivation. He was married June 16, 1850, to 
Margaret Weimer, daughter of John Weimer. They have had 
a family of seven children, but three of whom are living — Mary 
E., Maville C. and Charles S. Mr. and Mrs. Ariord are mem- 
bers of the United Brethren church. 

Daniel Bcha, farmer and stock-raiser, section 9, Stafford j 
Township, is a native of Baden, Germany, born Jan. 25, 1S45. 
He was reared in his native country, and when twenty-five 
years of age, in 1S70, came to the United Slates, and in 1872 
settled in Stafford Township, De Kalb Co., Ind. Till within 
the past three years he has worked for the railroad, but since 
then has engaged in farming. He owns forty-three acres of 
land, thirty-eight acres being in Stafford Township and live 
acres just across the line in Ohio. He was married in 1872 to 
Caroline Barmmaert, and to them have been born three chil- I 
dren — Rosa, Katie and John. Mr. and Mrs. Beha are members 
of the Catholic church at Ed< r erton, Ohio. 






HISTORY OP D :i pUNTY. 7-3 

David W. Blaker, section 18, Stafford Township, was born in 
Lycoming County, Pa., May 19, 1S50. a son of Jesse Blaker, a 
native of Bucks County, Pa., and what was called a Hickory 
Quaker. He enlisted in the war of 1812, but the war cl 

before he was called into service. David W. lost his moi 
when he was seven years old, and before he was nine years old ' 
began to take care of himself. Before he was fourteen years 
old he found himself 200 miles from home without friends, 
barefooted and with no shoes nor money. lie worked on the 
canal nearly a year and then at the blacksmith's trade fourteen 
years. In 1S53 he came to De Kalb County and located at But- 
ler, where he worked at his trade for the contractors of the 
Lake Shore Railroad. He remained in Butler till 1867, work- 
ing at his trade with the exception of one year, when he was 
associated with his brother in a meat market and grocery. In 
the spring of 1S67 he settled on his farm, which at that time 
contained eighty acres of land, partially run down, but by dili- 
gence and care he has made it equal to any farm in the town- 
ship, lie now owns 120 acres of tine land, and his crops are 
among the best in the county. He was married July 4, 1852, 
to Ethilinda Fowler, of Flat Rock, Wayne Co., Mich., and to 
them have been born ten children, but five of whom arc living 
—George W., Frederick D., Ella M. B., William L. and James 
C. George married Emma Flickinger and lives in this town- 
ship. Mr. and Mrs. Blaker are members of the- Methodist Epis- 
copal church. 

Joseph Bradley, deceased, was born in New Lisbon, Ohio, Oct. 
26, 1 Si 5, a son of William Bradley, a native of Ireland. When 
he was live years old he went with his mother to Marylai 
and soon after to Belleville, Washington Co., Pa. When nine- 
teen years of age he came West as far as Ohio and located in 
Wayne County, and a few years later moved to Defiance 
County. April iS, 1S54, he came to De Kalb County, Ind., and 
settled on section 32, Stafford Township, where he opened a 
farm 'and made for himself a home, remaining here till death, 
Oct. 20, 1865. He was married Ian. 2, 1S3S, to Mary E. Tharp, 
daughter of Isaac Tharp. To them were born nine children, 
.. il whom are living — Mary J., Melissa, William, Sarah, 
Margaret, Mandana and Zelma. Elmer and Caroline are de- 
ceased. Elmer married Louisa Johnson and left a son, Franklin, 
who lives with his Grandmother Bradley. Mary J. is the wile 



784 HISTORY OF DE KAI.l; COUNTY. 

of John McCollough, of Bryan, Ohio, and has six children - 
Scott, Bertha, Charles, Nelia, John and Estclla. Melissa is the 
wife of Ryer McDonald, and has nine children — James A., 
Elmer, Laura, Bertha, Ida, Frank, Dca, Minnie, Flattie. Will- 
iara, of Butler County, Kas., married Mary E. Smith, and has 
two children — Frank L. and an infant son. Sarah is the wife 
of Wilson Headley. Margaret is the wife of Ephraim Allen, of 
Defiance County, Ohio, and has five children — Darius, Mary, 
Gertrude, E. C. and an infant. Mandana is the wife of Sumner 
Rose, and Zelma of David Bali, both of De Kalb County. 

Rev. James Cat/ier, section 6, Stafford Township, is a native of 
Guernsey County, Ohio, born Aug. 25, 1819. His parents moved 
to Frederick County, Pa., where he was educated, and subse- 
quently attended the Lutheran Literary and Theological Semi- 
nary at Gettysburg. He began preaching in the Allegheny 
Mountains while there recruiting his health, and in 1S42 came 
West and preached a year in Stark and Tuscarawas counties, 
Ohio. He came to De Kalb Count}- in 1S44 and settled near 
Butler. He was employed as a missionary by the English 
synod of Ohio, and to organize churches, and in September, 
1S44, organized the Kepler church. He also organized the 
Wittenberg, Melbourne Station, Denmark, and Spencerviiie 
churches. He was engaged in the work of the ministry thirty 
years, and in 1S72 retired to agricultural life, although he still 
preaches occasionally to fill vacancies. Fie settled in Stafford 
Township on a farm, where he owns 120 acres of choice land. 
He was married Jan. 1, 1847, lo Lydia Norris. They com- 
menced married life with nothing but their clothes, a horse and 
$3 in money. Mrs. Gather lived at home till he could buy an 
acre of land in Franklin Township. He then built a log house, 
which at that time was the best one in the county. He taught 
one winter and preached on the Sabbath and at night hunted 

■ ti qqi . vvhii : -•- mack mon [none) than both his other 

occupations. He has made his home in De Kalb County since 
1S44, with the exception ol three years spent in Elkhart. He 
was Assessor of his township sixteen or seventeen years. He 
has experienced all the trials and hardships of a pioneer 
preacher, but has been rewarded fur ins toil by the conscious- 
ness that his labor has not been in vain. To him and his wife 
have been born nine children, but three of whom are living — 
Isabella, now the wife of Rev. J. B. Hawkins, of Ashland, Ohio; 



7'"' 5 



Charles F. and Pitt. Elizabeth, William, Kate, Susannah, James 
and Josephine are deceased. Mrs. Cather's father, Charles 
Norris, was a pioneer of this county, and laid out the town of 
Butler. He was a native of New England, a soldier in the war 
of 1 8 1 2, and died at an advanced age. 

David McDaiincl, section 5, Stafford Township, is a native of 
Stark County, Ohio, born Feb. 11, 1816, a son of James Mc- 
Daiincl, an early settler of that count)'. He was reared on a 
farm, but when a young man learned the carpenter's trade, at 
which he has worked the most, of the time since. He came to 
De Kalb County in June, 1843, and July 4 settled on the land 
where he now lives. He lived in a board shanty till the follow- 
ing fall, when he finished his present residence, which was the 
first frame house in the township. He owns seventy-five acres of 
fine land, but the greater part of it is carried on by tenants. He 
has been an influential citizen of the township, and has served 
as Justice of the Peace thirteen or fourteen years, and several 
years as Trustee. He was married Oct. 27, 1839, to Annie 
Gunsenhouser, daughter of John Gunsenhouser. To them 
have been born six children, but three of whom are living- 
Emily, Mary, and Martha. Emily married Frederick Gindcr, \ 
and Martha married Philip Gindcr, of Wilmington Township. 
Sarah, Elizabeth and John are deceased. John lost his hearing 
when five years of age from the effects of brain fever, and was 
educated in the deaf and dumb institute at Indianapolis. He 
was a very intelligent young man, and especially skillful in 
line cabinet work. He was run over and killed by tiie last 
express train on the Lake Shore Road, May 11, 1882, when on 
his way to Butler. Mr. and Mrs. McDannel are members of 
the Lutheran church. 

Isaac Dichl, farmer and stock-raiser, section 7, Stafford 
Township, was born in Adams County, Pa., Nov. 25, 1812, a 
son ol Jacob Diehl, a tanner unci farmer. I [is father died when 
he was eleven years of age, and he was early thrown on his 
own resources. He learned the cooper's trade when a young 
man, and followed it three years. He came to De Kalb County, 
End., in June, 1843. ancl settled where he now lives, entering 
eighty acres of land from the Government. He cleared away 
enough of the timber to build a log cabin, and then went to 
work to make a farm out of a tract of heavily timbered land, 
working at his trade in the fall and winter months. He was in 



;;m. [ItSTO \ DUN'TV. 

[ limited circumstances when he 

. by industry and good management accumul ipetency 

; for his old age, owning 160 acres of finely cultivated land. He 

1 was married in October, 1S35, . S ly, 

have been born eleven children, seven of whom are living- 
Eliza, Ephraim, Daniel D., William, Eunice, Leander J., and 
Isaac M., all married but Ephraim. Mr. Diehl and his wife are 
members of the Evangelical Association. 

James Gaff, section 6, Stafford Township, was born in Stark 
County, Ohio, Dec. 24, [818, a son 0! David and Ruth (Certes) 
Gaff. When he was seventeen year of age cuts moved 

to Wayne County, Ohio, and in rS.4.8 he came to D 

County, and settled in Troy Township on the la li 

now his farm. With the exception ol five acres from which he 
hired the trees chopped, he has cleared and brought under cul- 
vation 105 acres of timber land. He owns 272 acres of valu- 
able land which is now carried mi ;>v his son Frank. He was 
married Feb. 26, 1S42, to Mary Haverstock, daughter of Tobias 
and Peggy Haverstock. Her father was opposed to her mar- 
riage and they left home and were married in Mount Eaton, 
Wayne Co., Ohio. Her father then refused to give her her 
clothes and she was obliged to wear the ones she wore till she 
could make more. Their first years of married life were filled 
with disappointments and adverse circumstances, but they 
finally overcame all obstacles and secured for them 
good home. The days were spent in working for others and 
the nights till midnight in clearing and improving nis own farm, 
his wife assisting in clearing away the brush. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Gaff have been born nine children, but four of whom are living 
— Margaret, David, Amanda and Frank. One son, Hiram, was 
a soldier in the war of the Rebellion, and was wounded at the | 
battle of Shiloh, from the effects of which he died at Evans- 
ville, Ind., soon after. Another son, Orlando, died at the age 
of nineteen years. Their children are all married and have 
good homes of their own. Margaret married David Jennings, 
of Indiana, and has two children — James and Zella. David 
married Mclvina Jennings, and has six children — Mary, Nellie, 
James, Charles, Frank, and an infant. He lives in Elkhart, Ind. 
Frank married Julia Christophle, and has one child — Dora. 
Amanda married James Shull, of Butler, and has one child- 
Milton. In religious faith, Mr. and Mrs. Gaff adhere to the 



HISTORY 01 . ■ UNTY. 787 

United Brethren church. Me has been Constable of his town- 
ship !<>ur years. 

Daniel Greemualt, section 31, Stafford Township, was born in 
Berks County, Pa., June 26, 1837, a son of Jacob and Trafna 
(Correll) Greenwalt, and grandson of John Correll. Mis par- 
ents came to De Kalb County in 1847, an d settled in Concord 
Township, and the next spring his father bought the farm now 
owned by Catherine Greenwalt, where the father died in July, 
18S2, and the mother February, 1S83. There was a family of 
three children, but two of whom, Daniel and Catherine are liv- 
ing. Lovina is dead. Daniel and his sister are unmarried and 
live together on the oid homestead, which contains forty acres 
of good land. He recently sold a farm of forty-seven acres in 
Wilmington Township. He enlisted in the war of the Rebell- 
ion in Company F, Forty-fourth Indiana Infantry, and served 
three years and four months. He participated in the battles of 
Stone River and Perrvviile. He was wounded at the bal 
Stone River and has never recovered from its effects, and 
draws a pension 01 §15 a month. The greater part o: his term 
of service he was detailed to duty in the hospital at EvansviUc. 
Mr. and Mrs. Greenwalt are members ol the Disciples church. 
Mr. Greenwalt is a member of the Masonic fraternity. 

Peter Grubc, section 16, Stafford Township, is a native o. 
Bavaria, Germany, born Dec. 26. 1S04. He was married in 
December. 1S35, to Elizabeth May, also a native of Bavaria, 
born Nov. 23, 1S11. In the spring of 1836 they came to the 
United States and lived the first two years in New York City, 
and in August, 1S3S, moved to Stark County, Ohio, and in 
August, 1844, to De Kalb County, Ind. The second year alter 
coming here he left his wife with two small children and went 
to Hicksvilie, where he worked at fifty cents a day to buy flour 
for his family. When he reached New -York he had but $1 1, 
and at one time had but fifty cents, but by hard work and per- 
severance he has accumulated a competency for his old age, 
owning at present 215 acres of choice land. When he bought 
his first eighty acres he paid $50 cash, and the rest in eight 
■ years at 6 per cent, interest, it being school land. His son 
Peter now has charge of the farm, his health not permitting 
him to perform the duties necessary on so large a farm. His 
wife died Dec. 22, 186S. To them were born five children, but 
three of whom are living — Henry, Elizabeth, now Mrs. Can- 



■■! *--- 

788 HISTORY OK DE KALE COUNTY. 

non, and Peter. Kate .and Jacob are deceased. Mr. Grube 
has been a man of almost unlimited endurance. He lias oiten 

walked to Auburn and return, a distance of twenty-nine miles, 
in one day, reaching home by four o'clock in the afternoon. 
Me worked on his farm in the daytime and at weaving in the 
evening. 

William Henry Grube, section x 9, Stafford Township, was 
born in Massillon, Ohio, in October, 1843, a son of Peter Grube, 
of this township, lie was reared a farmer, having but limited 
educational advantages, and after reaching manhood worked at 
farming by the month several years. He then bought a Can- 
ton, Ohio, thresher, and during the summer threshed seven I 
years, working in the pineries of Michigan in the winter. He 
now owns a fine farm of 1 1 1 acres, and is a successful farmer 
and stock-raiser. He was married May 20, 1881, to Mary Haas, 
daughter of Michael Haas. They have one child — Charles, 
aged three years, and one child died in infancy. Mr. Grube 
has been a member of the Odd Fellows' order fifteen years. 

John Jacob Gunsenliouser, farmer and stock-raiser, section 6, 
Stafford Township, is a native of Switzerland, born May 28, 
1806, and in 1816 came with his father, John Gunsenhouscr, to 
the United States and settled in Lancaster County, Pa., and in 1 
1823 moved to Stark County, Ohio. In 1836 he came to De 
Kalb County, Ind., and settled on the northeast quarter of sec- 
tion 7, Troy Township, in the woods, where they were sur- 
rounded by wild animals and Indians. He entered over ^00 
acres of land and went to work to clear and cultivate a farm, 
having many hardships to endure and many obstacles to over- 
come. He has sold the greater part of his land, owning at 
present but forty-nine acres in his home farm, but in add ti 
to this owns village property in Newville. He tells many 
amusing incidents and many thrilling accounts -of his life in the 
woods, of the hardships and privations to be undergone, and 
the pleasures to be found in the chase. He was a true pioneer, 
and has assisted in a large degree in developing and improving 
De Kalb County. He was married June 14, 1S27, to Mary 
Strole, daughter of Nicholas and Elizabeth Strole. To them 
nave been born eleven children — Olive, Elizabeth, Mary A., 
Henry, Jacob, Nancy, Isaac, Ursula, Sarah, George and Will- 
iam (twinsi. One son, John, enlisted in Company F, Forty- 
fourth Indiana Infantry, and was appointed its Captain. He 






uLIJ C tUNTY. 789 

was killed at the battle of Chickamauga, and left a widow and 

four children. 

John Hollingcr, deceased, was a native of Huntingdon County, 
Pa., born Sept. 16, 1S12. Me received a common-school educa- 
tion, and was reared a farmer, a vocation he always followed. 
In 1S16 his parents moved to Stark County, Ohio, and there he 
grew to manhood and married, March 26, 183;, Elizabeth Borg- 
ner, and to them were born eight children, six of whom are 
living — George, Jacob, Mary, Isaac, Samuel and Daniel. John 
and Sarah are deceased. In 1846 they moved to Dc Kalb 
County, Ind., and settled in Stafford Township where the father 
died Oct. 7, 1883. The farm is now carried on by Samuel and 
Daniel, enterprising and industrious young men. It contains 
140 acres of choice land, and the resilience and farm buildings 
are large and commodious. Mr. Hollingcr united with the 
Evangelical Reformed church Oct. 13, 1832, but after coming 
to De Kalb County he and his wife united with the Lutheran 
church. 

Peleg Hull, farmer and stock-raiser, section 5, Stafford Town- 
ship, was born in Trumbull County, Ohio, June 12, 1S30, a son 
of Christopher Hull, a native of Allegany County, X. V., who 
moved to Mercer County, Pa., in 1822, and thence to Trui ....... 

County, Ohio, and in 1S36 to Dc Kalb County, Ind., and settled 
in Wilmington Township where he died about 1844. Peleg is 
the sixth of .1 family of eleven children, live of whom are living 
- ... es, Hiram, Peleg, Benjamin F. and Phebe. J.;:. 
Benjamin live in Kosciusko County, Ind.; Hiram, in Muskegon 
County, Mich., and Phebe, in Martin County, Minn. Six 
brothers were in the war of the Rebellion. John was killed at 
Stone River; Amos was killed at Chickamauga; Benjamin F. 
was wounded and captured at Richmond, Kv., was paroled 
and subsequently sent to Johnson's Island to guard rebel pris- 
oners. Hiram served in the Twenty-first Michigan Infantry, 
and Peleg and Amos, in Company H, Thirtieth Indiana Infan- 
try. Peleg participated in the battles of Shiloh, Hoover's Gap, 
Chickamauga, Big Shanty, Kenesaw Mountain, Fall's Church, 
siege of Atlanta, Franklin, Flint River, and others of less im- 
portance. Since his return from the war he has engaged in 
agricultural pursuits, and now owns a tine farm of sixty acres. 
lie was married April 18, 1865, to Maria Wannamakcr, daugh- 
ter of Samuel Wannamakcr. To them have been bom foui 
50 



79° IIISTi IRY > •: Dli KALIS O lUNTV. 

children, but. two of whom arc living — Anna and George. Mr. 
and Mrs. Hull and their daughter are members of the Disciples 
church. 

Lucius C. Loveland, section 31, Stafford Township, postomce, 
Newville, is a native of Defiance County. Ohio, born June 3, 
1S44, the eldest son of Luther and Mary M. (Clemmcr) Love- 
land, the former a native of Connecticut, born in 18 16, and the 
latter of Virginia, born in 1S15. He is a descendant of Thomas 
Loveland who settled in Glastonbury, Conn., in 1G70. His 

i great-grandfather, Pelatiah Loveland, was a blacksmith, and 
made the nails with which to shingle the first frame barn in 
that town. Two of his brothers were soldiers in the Revolu- 
tionary war. He was married Dec. 7, 1774, to Mollie Goodale, 
and the second time, Oct. 27, 1S16, to Eunice Butler. He died 
in 1S23. He reared a family of thirteen children ; the youngest 
son, the grandfather of our subject, Luther Loveland, was bom 
March 18, 1793, and was married May 15, 1814, to Lucy 
Wickam, and in 1824 moved to Lorain County, Ohio. His 
family consisted of nine children, six sons and three daughters. 

; Luther Loveland, our subject's father, came to the Maumec 

; River in 1S34, and to Hicksville, Defiance Co., Ohio, in 1S37, 
where he bought 160 acres of land on section 7. Hesowed the 
first crop of wheat in the township, on unplowed ground, where 
the town of Hicksville now is, for A. P. Edgerton, and made a 
harrow with wooden teeth to harrow it. He was married in 

; 1840, and had a family of seven children, three sons and four 
daughters. Lucius C. Loveland learned the tinner's trade 
when twenty-two years of age, and carried on that bu< ness 
eleven years. In the fall of 1S06 lie came to DeKalb Comm- 
and worked at his trade in Newville two years, and in iSCs 
removed to Hicksville. He was hurt by a falling tree when 
lb mt eighteen years of age, and was obliged to have the lower 

I part of his right leg amputated. In 1S71 he was elected Treas- 
urer of Hicksville Township, and served live years, and in 1873 
was elected Justice of the Peace, and served six years. During 
this time he was Clerk of Hicksville corporation, and served 
one year on the Village Council. In 1S76 he, with his father 
and John Crowl, built the Anchor Mills at Hicksville. In 1S79 
he exchanged his interest in the mill for the farm where he now 
lives, which was entered in 1836 by A. Walden. He was elected 
Justice of the Peace of Stafford Township in 1SS0, and served 






HISTORY OF DE KALE COUNTY. 791 f 

three and a half years, when he resigned. lie is a prominent 
member of the Odd Fellows' order. He was married Dec. 22, 
1S64, to Margaret J. Shroll, of DeKalb County, Ind. To them 
have been born nine children ; eight arc living — Frank S., 
Luther J., Cora and Ora (twins), Maud M., Ray P., Maggie, 
Mary F. and George. Maggie fell in a ditch and was drowned 
April 26, 1SS0, aged two years. 

Samuel Miller, farmer and stock-raiser, section 16, Stafford 
Township, was born on the old homestead, on the same section 
where he now resides, Feb. 24, 1844, a son of Jacob F. Miller, 
of Edgerton, Ohio, an early settler of De Kalb County. Ind., 
entering eighty acres of land where our subject now lives. He 
is a baker by trade, but is now living a retired life, at the age 
of eighty-four years. Samuel Miller was reared a farmer, a 

I vocation he has always followed. He was educated in his na- 
tive county, attending the district schools. He has been suc- 
cessful in his business pursuits and now has a fine farm of 151 
acres. He was married in January. 1 $67, to Elizabeth Eck, and 

I to them have been born five children — Joseph N., Ida E., Mary 
L., Daniel D. and an infant daughter. 

Edward Scovillc, one of the old pioneers of Stafford Town- 
ship, resides on section 29, where he owns fifty-two acres of 
valuable land. He was born in Ontario County, N. Y., Dec. 
15, 1813, a son of Enoch Scovillc, a native of Connecticut, and 
grandson of Michael Scovillc, a hero of the Revolution and the 
French and Indian wars. In 1827 he accompanied his parents 
to Trumbull County, Ohio, and in February, 1838, came to De 
Kalb County, Ind., and settled in Stafford Township, where he 
rented land two years. He then moved to Newville Township, 
where he had previously entered land on section 4, and in 1857 
bought and moved to the farm where he now lives. He lias 
been one of the hardest working men in the county, and has 
helped to clear and log oVer ioo uciVs Ol land, 
threshing-machine several years, and run the first separator in 
De Kalb County. He has never sought official honors, but lias 
served as Constable and Supervisor several terms. He was 
married Oct. 15, 1835, to Lydia Culp, and to them were born 
six children, but two of whom are living — William H. and 
Warren E. They are members of the Disciples church. 

William H. Scovillc, section 20, Stafford Township, is a native 
of this township, born May 10, 1840, a son of the pioneer, Ed- 



7Q2 HISTORY i'F DEKALB COUNTY. 

ward Scovi lie. He was educated in his native township and 

reared a farmer, a vocation he has followed for a livelihood. 
He owns ninety-eight acres of valuable land, and is engaged in 
general ['arming and stock-raising. He, in addition to raisino- 
stock, buys and ships it to the Western markets. For the past 
twelve years he has been selling farm implements and ma- 
chinery, wagons, reapers and mowers, having a salesroom and 
warehouse in Butler, but canvassing throughout the county. 
He is agent for the Champion Reaper and Binder, which is 
considered the best in the market, and his sales of this machine 
are more than any other. He has met with good success in 
this branch of his business, being a good salesman and an hon- 
orable, upright gentleman. He was married Jan. 16, 1S59, 
to Mary Dickerhoff, daughter of Jacob Dickerhoff. To them 
have been born seven children — L. Ellen, George E., William 
E. (deceased), Ida D., Charles R., Lctitia and Ross. 

Warren Ji. Scoville, son of Edward and Lydia(Culp)Scoville, 
resides on section 29, Stafford Township, where he has charge 
of the old homestead of his parents. He was born in Stafford 
Township, Sept. 10, 1S50, and was reared and educated in his 
native county, attending the common-schools of his district. 
He is an enterprising and industrious young man, and one of 
the representative farmers of his township. Reared a farmer, 
he understands all the details of agricultural life and is making 
a success of that vocation. lie was married Oct. 9, 1S77, to 
Hattie Joslyn, a native of Cortland County, X. Y., born Feb. 
3, 1S5S, daughter of Clark Joslyn, deceased. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Scoville have been born two children, but one of whom is liv- 
ing — Frank. Mrs. Scoville is a member of the Disciples 
church. 

John S//o///>, section 7, Stafford Township, was born in Wayne 
County, Ohio, Jan. 31, 1827. His father, Henry Shoub, was a 
native of Switzerland, and came to the United States in 1S16. 
While on shipboard crossing the ocean, he made the acquaint- 
ance of Elizabeth Huffman, and they were married soon after 
reaching America. They settled in Wayne County, Ohio, 
where they passed the remainder of their lives. John Shoub was 
reared and educated in his native county, remaining with his 
parents till manhood. In 1S49 he came to De Kalb County and 
remained till the spring of 1S50, when he returned to Ohio, and 
April 13, 1851, was married to Mary A. Strole, daughter of 






HISTORY OF DEKALB COUNTY. 793 

Thomas Strole, an early settler 01" Stafford Township, The 
First eighteen months after their marriage they lived in 
Wayne County, Ohio, and then moved to De Kalb County in 
the spring of 1S53 and bought forty acres of the land where he 
now lives, at that time regarded as swamp land, and sold by the 
State to him as such. He now owns eighty acres of finely cul- 
tivated land, and is engaged in general farming and stock-rais- 
ing. He takes great interest in the public welfare of his county, 
but never seeks official honors, although he served one term as 
County Commissioner. To him and his wife have been born 
three children — Thomas H., Sarah E. and Alice E. Sarah E. 
married Hugh H. Maxwell, and has one child — May. Alice 
married Walter S. Maxwell, and has two children — Lloyd L. 
and Mary D. Thomas is an intelligent, enterprising young 
man, and is in the employ of D. Appleton & Co., Publishers. 
Mr. and Mrs. Shoub are members of the Disciples church. 

John Smith, section 30, Stafford Township, was born in Wayne 
County, Ohio, May 9, 1S30, a son of John and Susannah (Light- 
foot) Smith, the former a native of Pennsylvania, of German 
descent, and the latter a native of Maryland, of English descent. 
When he was four years old his father died, and when seven 
years old he began to take care of himself, working for his board 
and clothes till fifteen years old. He then worked a year for 
his guardian for $40 and three months schooling, and during 
harvest overworked and for two years had the ague. When 
twenty years of age he began to learn the carpenter's trade, 
which he has followed the greater part of his life. In Decem- 
ber, 1S59, he came to Dc Kalb County, Ind., and settled in Jack- 
son Township where he lived till December, iSGG, when he 
moved to the farm where he now lives in Stafford Township. 
He owns sixty acres of good land, all well improved. He was 
married Sept. 2, 1S62, to Frances Donaldson, daughter of Henry 
and Jane (Laird) Donaldson, her mother a sister of the Laird 
Brothers, tobacconists of Covington, Ky., from whom she 
heired quite a fortune, but owing to the dishonesty 01 the admin- 
istrators never received an)' of it. To Mr. and Mrs. Smith 
have been born eight children — Catherine I., Henry W., 
Jennie, Myrtle (deceased), Leora, Warden B., Albert P. and 
Cassius C. Henry married Clara Swavsgood. Catherine 
married Benjamin Seigler, and has one child — Leora. Jennie 
married Daniel Bearer. Mr. Smith has been a member of the 



794 HISTORY OF DE KALI; COUNTY. 

Methodist Episcopal church since twenty years of age. Mrs. 
Smith is a member of the Lutheran church. Their daughters 
arc members of the Methodist church. 

George B. Sonic, section 6, Stafford Township, is a native of 
Schoharie County, N. Y., born April 15, 1S31, son of George ! 
Soulc, of Franklin Township. When he was five years of age 
his parents moved to Lenawee County, Mich., and in 1S47 to 
Steuben County, Ind. In 1S52 they moved to Kent County, : 
Mich., being the third family to settle in Solon Township, and 
in 1S57 came to De Kalb County, and settled in Franklin I 
Township. George B. Soule was reared a farmer, and also in 
his youth learned the carpenter's trade of his father, at which 
he has worked in connection with his agricultural pursuits- 
He has assisted in the development of several counties, and has 
■ experienced all the phases of pioneer life. He lived in Frank- 
lin Township till 1869, and then went to Montcalm County, 
Mich., where he lived ten years, and in 1879 returned to ^ e ! 
Kalb County. He owns a good farm in Montcalm County and 
one in Franklin Township, this county. In 18 he moved to 
Stafford Township where he has since lived. He was married 
in the fall of 185 1 to Matilda Lent, daughter of James Lent. To 
them have been born four children, but two of whom arc living 
—Mary and Laura. A son, Frank, was drowned in Montcalm 
County, Mich., aged fourteen years. Mary married Franklin 
Hoy, and has three children — Daisy, Mertie, and Lillie. Laura 
married Homer Maurice, and has three children — Wilmer, 
Hattie and George. Both daughters reside in Montcalm 
County. In politics Mr. Soule is a Republican. He served as 
Justice of the Peace in Franklin Township one year and is 
holding the same position in Stafford Township. 

Henry Tinstman, farmer and stock-raiser, section 7, Stafford 
Township, is a native of Beaver County, Pa., born Aug. 26, 
1826, son of Mark Tinstman. He worked with his father, who 
was a miller, till eighteen years of age, and then learned the 
wagon-maker's trade at which he worked fifteen years, when he 
began the manufacture of pumps which he followed fifteen 
years. When he was quite small his parents moved to Carroll 
County, Ohio, and in the spring of 1S55 he moved to Elkhart 
County, Ind., and in the fall of 1864 to Butler, De Kalb County, 
where he lived till the fall of 1866, when he settled on the farm 
where he has since lived. He owns 109 acres of valuable land 



HISTORY OF DEKALB COUNTY. 795 

which he has improved and now has under a fine state of cul- 
tivation.. He was married Jan. 2, 1848,10 Leah Fisher, daught r 
of Jonathan Fisher. To them have been born twelve chil- 
dren, but three of whom are living — John W., Adam II., and 
Alonzo E. The eldest two are brick and stone masons and 
plasterers of several years' experience, and are conversant with 
every detail of their business. John William married Sarah K. 
Gunsenhouscr, and has one child — Warren Clyde. Adam IT. 
married. Maville C. Arford, and has had three children, but one 
of whom is living — Arthur Roy. Mr. and Mrs. Tinstman and 
their sons, John and Alonzo, are members of the United 
Brethren church. 

Stewart Paterson Wartenbe, section 29, Stafford Township, 
was born in Muskingum County, Ohio, March 29, 1S23, a son 
of Joseph and Nancy (Smith) Wartenbe, and grandson of Will- 
iam Wartenbe, an early settler of Muskingum County. In 
1S34 his parents moved to Defiance County, Ohio, and later to 
De Kalb County, Ind. They experienced all the privations 
and inconveniences of pioneer life, often being without food or 
water, except what was found in the swamps. Since he was 
seventeen years of age he has had charge of the family, and 
although so young he nobly did his duty, and has the con- 
sciousness of having done his best to minister to the comfort of 
those he loved. His lather died in 1854, and his mo: her has 
since made her home with him, and is now in the eighty-fourth 
year of her age. He has been a good manager, industrious 
and frugal, and has now a competency with which to enjoy life. 
He owns 136 acres of choice land, all well improved, and is one 
of the most successful stock-raisers in the township. He 
learned the carpenter and joiner's trade in his youth and fol- 
lowed it several years in connection with farming, lie was 
married Feb. 3, 1S59, to -^ rs - Cordelia Webster, daughter of 
Rev. Samuel Wanemaker, and widow of Mr. Webster. To 
them have been born two children — Corwin G. and Charles S. 
Corwin married Mary Ellen Joslyn and has one child — Clara. 
Mrs. Wartenbe has one child by her first marriage — Wallace C. 
Mr. and Mrs. Wartenbe are members of the Disciples church 
at Newville. 

Hazzard Webster, deceased, was a native of Rhode Island, 
born Jan. 31, 1805, and when a small boy accompanied his par- 
ents to Trumbull County, Ohio, where he lived till eighteen 



V 



^& ■ t 






^ <fc 



_ . --- 

796 HISTORY OF DK KALB COUNTY. 

years old, when he started for the West and traveled over 
thirteen States and Territories, spending three years in the 
Galena, 111., lead mines. Me was married March iS, 183 1, to 
Laura Ackley, and to them were born seven children, but three 
of whom are living — Betsey, Mary and Lucretia. Sarah, Han- 
nah, Asel and John arc deceased. The latter was killed at the 
battle of Stone River when righting in defense of his country. 
Mr. Webster came to De Kalb County in the fall of 1836 with 
a colony of fifteen wagons. His first house in the county was 
made of poles covered with bark, with a puncheon floor, 14 x 16 
feet in size. The first night in the county fifteen persons staid i 
in his house. They were obliged to undergo many hardships, 
as life in a new country was not all sunshine; neither was it all 
shade, and they had many hours of pleasure. Mrs. Webster 
was a doctress, and was often called from home and obliged to 
cross the St. Joseph River when her horse nearly swam. 
Twice she has been carried across the river on a man's back. 
In 1S49 Mr- Webster crossed the plains to California, stopping 
two days in Salt Lake City. He died in California Feb. 6, I 
1S50. Mrs. Webster is living with her daughter, Mrs. N. T. 
Fuller, and is in the seventy-sixth year of her age. 



CHAPTER XXII. 



TROY TOWN: 



Situation. — Geography and Topography. — Early Set- 
tlers. — The Lost Child. — Church. — Postoffice. — 
Early Township Officials. — Population'.— Property 
axd Taxation. — Agricultural Statistics.— Biographi- 
cal. 

In the extreme northeastern corner of the county, farthest 
from the comity seat, and without village or railroad, is the 
little township of Troy. It is six miles long north and 
south, and two and a half miles wide east and west, thus con- 
taining twelve whole and six fractional sections. It is bounded 
on the north by Richland Township, Steuben County, on t he- 
cast by the State of Ohio, on the south by the township of Staf- 
ford, and on the west by the township of Franklin. Fish Creek 
enters the township from the northwest, passes through the 
center, and crosses the State line a mile north of the southeast 
II corner. It is the largest creek in the county after Cedar. It 
was on it, near its mouth, that lloulton & Hughes erected their 
' saw-mill in 1S27, as narrated in another chapter. Troy is an 
j excellent township of land, agriculturally, considered as a whole. 
The northern portion is generally of a clay soil. The central 
j and southeast sections are a rich, sandy loam, and to the south- 
west there is clay soil again. 
The advantages of good water-power stimulated early and 
I rapid settlement. Besides the Houlton & Hughes mill, already 
mentioned, the Hamilton mills were built on the outlet of Fish 
Lake, on the borders of Steuben County. The earliest settler 
in the township was Isaac T. Aldrich, who later became a resi- 
dent of Franklin. In the year following, Roger Aldrich, brother 
of Isaac, became a settler ; and Simeon Aldrich subsequently 
! moved in. The old log house built by the pioneer Aldrich 
still serves as a habitation, and the first frame building raised 
by Simeon is also used as a residence. Other families moved 



f 






. 



79$ HISTORY 01' DEKALB COUNTY. 

in and scaled on farms destined to remain their homes for life; 
and among- these were: George Skinner, Asa Ilaynes, G. Will- 
iams, R. Reed, Willard Eddy, S. Call, and the Casebeers, John 
and A. S. The last named built a saw and grist mill on the 
creek at an early day, to the great advantage of the settlers, i 
Amos Stearns settled early in the fall of 1838. lie was soon I 
taken sick, and from then till Jan. 1, 1839, t -' lc women of his 
family had the work to attend to, both indoor and without. \ 
Peter Helwig, Jacob Helwig, Updegraff Ciawson, I. Clawson 
and W. R. Herbert, were well-known pioneers. 

In May, 1850, Mr. and Mrs Samuel Learned took their little 
four-year-old daughter, Sabrina, to visit a family by the name 
of McDonald, in the northern part of Troy Township. This 
family lived in a log cabin which had an addition that was used j 
for a school, taught by Mary Chase. Going with other chil- 
dren into the held to gather flowers, Sabrina climbed over the 
fence into the woods. The children, instead of going after her, 
ran to the house and told her mother, who ran out and called 
her. The little one started, supposing she was going to the 
house, in exactly the opposite direction, which led her off into 
the big Tamarack swamp. She there stopped, took off her 
shoes and stockings and bonnet, and tied them up in her apron. 
Swinging them over her neck, she crawled for a long distance 
in the mud and mire, when seeing a black stump that she took 
for '• Xigger Jim " (the only colored man then in the commun- 
ity, and known all over the country), and being frightened, she 
lay down on a grassy plat by a stump to hide — the first grass 
spot she had come to in the swamp. Going to sleep, she re- 
mained in blissful unconsciousness the remainder of the after- 
noon and all night, the sun being high in the heavens when she 
awoke. She heard the neighbors hunting for her, but was at 
first afraid, and kept herself in hiding. As two men came 
walking near her she crawled into some brush to conceal herself ; 
but alter they had passed by she recognized them as her lather's 

hands. She then spoke, saying, " John, won't you take ; 
me home?" He took her up and began to blow the horn, 
giving the signal that the child was found alive. All at once 
assembled at her house where they had a regular feast. The 
woives had followed her trail for some distance, but were 
frightened off by the searchers, who kept fires all night and also 
made all the noise possible. The night was very cold, and ice 






kali; COUNTY. 



'99 



formed on the water, yet the little girl was bareheaded and 
barefooted, and was exposed for thirty hours. She was lour 
years old the day she was rescued, May 22, 1850. She is now 
the wife of Simeon G. Aldrich, of Troy Township. 

Artie postoifice was established in 1850, and was in charge of 
Amos Stearns until his death, in i860. His son James was 
Postmaster the following three years, and then John Stearns for 
one year. Resigning, he was succeeded by James McDonald, 
who held the office when it was discontinued, in 1865. It was 
re-established in 18S4, with Joseph Bell as Postmaster. 

The Lutheran church was organized by Rev. James Cather, 
in 1843, i° the house of John A. Zimmerman, on section 30. It 
nourished for many years, but by deaths and removals it has 
become a small congregation. The house of worship is on sec- 
tion 28. Services are conducted twice a month by Rev. Mr. 
Diefenbach. 

The first Justice of the Peace was A. S. Casebeer; other 
early incumbents of that office were : S. Learned, Hambright 
Reese, Jacob Helwig, G. C. Everetts, John McDonald and 
George Smiley. Early Constables were: Willard Eddy, Peter 
Helwig, R. R. Emmerson, II. Casebeer, and George Smiley. 
Among the Trustees prior to 1S60 were : Amos Stearns, Jacob 
Helwig, Roger Aldrich, Jacob Casebeer, John Robinet, Peter 
Jennings, W. R. Emmerson, Simeon Aldrich, William Knisely, 
B. Wise, B. Wallick, Timothy McClure and Daniel Knisely. 
W. R. Herbert, A. F. Pinchin, F. G. Bidclle and D. McCurdy, 
were Clerks during the same period, while the office of Treas- 
urer was filled by S. Learned, D. W. Aldrich, J. A. Zimmer- 
man, Amos Stearns and G. C. Everetts. 

The population of Troy Township is 646, or 44 to the square 
mile. This is a gain of 46 over the population by the United 
States census of tSjo. The valuation per capita is $-90.79. [n 
18S4 the number of acres of land assessed was 9,569.64 ; value of 
same, $151,650; value of improvements, $17,360 ; value of lands 
and improvements, $169,010 ; value of personal property, $55,- 
730; total value of taxables, $224,740 ; rate of taxation, $1.56; 
number of polls, — ; poll tax, $1.50. 

The following are statistics of the staple crops raised in 1SS1 : 
Acres in wheat, 1,398; product of same, at 6 bushels per acre, 
S.388 bushels; acres in corn, 993; product of same, at 30 
bushels per acre for upland and 35 bushels for lowland, 30,035 






HISTORY OF DE KALU COUNTY. 



bushels ; acres in oats, 085 ; product of same, at 30 bushels per 
acre, 20,550 bushels; acres in meadow land, 424; product of 
same, at a ton and a half per acre, 636 tons of hay ; acres in 
Irish potatoes, 28 ; product of same, 28 bushels per acre, or 7S4 
bushels. 

BIOGRAPHICAL. 

Roger A Idrich^ deceased, was born in Guilford, Vt., in 1798. 
He received but a limited education, being reared on a farm 
in the early days. In 1836 he came to Indiana and entered 160 
acres of land on section iS, Troy Township, Dc Kalb Co., 
and eighty acres in Franklin Township. At that time it was 
heavily timbered and Indians were their neighbors, lie cleared 
a small patch and built a log cabin 20x24 feet in size, which at 
that time was the best house in the county. The roof was 
covered with shakes, and the lumber for the floor was brought 
from Houlton's mill in Williams County, Ohio. Mr. Aldrich 
was one of the prominent men of the earl)- days of the county, 
and for several years was Trustee of his township. He died 
on the homestead in December, [S69. Mrs. Aldrich still lives 
with her daughter, Mrs. Rummel, on the old homestead, and 
although in the ninetieth year of her age is able to read, sew 
and knit, and goes about the house without assistance. The 
day she was seventy years old she spun her daily work of forty 
knots of yarn. Her maiden name was Lucy Tubbs, a daugh- 
ter of Miah Tubbs. She was married to Mr. Aldrich in Sep- 
tember, 1820. To them were born six children, but one of 
whom, Lucy M., wile of Talma Rummel, is living. One daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Amelia Pinchih, died at the age of twenty-seven 
years, and another, Elizabeth, aged fifteen years. 

Simeon J. Aldrich, farmer and stock-raiser, Troy Township, 
section 7, was born in this township, Aug. 4, 1S42, a son of 
Simeon Aldrich, one of the old pioneers, now deceased. He 
was reared on the farm, remaining at home till after the break- 
ing out of the Rebellion, and then enlisted in Company F, Forty- 
fourth Indiana Infantry, and served nearly four years. Two 
years of the time he was fife-major, and he has the fife used by 
him while in the service, which was presented to him by his 
comrades. He participated in the battles of Fort Donelson, 
Shiloh, Stone River, Chickamauga, and many others of less 
importance. Since his return from the war he has engaged in 
agricultural pursuits. He owns a fine farm of 170 acres where 



COI \'i'v. 801 

he has lived for the past eighteen years. He was married Feb. 
24, iS6y, to Sabrina, daugl tcr oi Samuel Learned, and to them 
have been born seven children — Samuel, Oren, Seth, Asa, 
Emily, Sarah and Leola. Mr. and Mrs. Aldrich are members 
of the United Brethren church. 

Brunner, farmer and stock-raiser, section 4, Troy Town- 
ship, is a native of Stark County, Ohio, born July 30, 1837, the 
eldest of eight children of Ulrich and Mary M. (Durlcr) Brun- 
ner. His father was a native of Switzerland, and came to 
America in 1S32, settling in Stark County, and subsequently 
moved to Tuscarawas County, and in the fall of 1 S52 to Dc 
Kalb County, Ind., and died in Troy Township in 1861. He 
was twice married, having four children by the first marriage, 
three of whom are living — Ulrich, Christian and Peter. Oi 
the eight children born to him by his second wife, but nxc are 
living — Jacob. Caroline, David, Sarah A. and Susan, all resi- 
dents of De Kalb County except Caroline, who lives in Wyan- 
dotte County, Ohio. Jacob Brunner was reared a farmer, and 
also learned the mason's trade which he has followed at inter- 
vals, la 1865 lie settled on the farm where he now lives, which 
was then heavily limbered, the only improvements being a log 
house and well. He now owns sixty acres of well-improved 
land, with valuable and convenient farm buildings. He was 
married Jan. 5, 1S62, to Mary E. Reese, daughter of Ham- 
bright Reese, who settled in this township in 1846. She is the 
second of five children, and the only daughter. Her brothers 
are: Benjamin F., of Ionia County, Mich.; John, of Crawfords- 
villc, hid.; George, of this township, and David, of Plcasanl 
Lake, Steuben County. To Mr. and Mrs. Brunner have been 
born five children — Ettic E., Ada S., J. Marian, Melvin II. and 
Adda. They are active and influential members of the United 
Brethren church. 

Henry Bnrkhart, farmer and stock-raiser, section 5, Troy 
Township, was born in Germany. April 25. 1815, a son ol Peter 
Burkhart. He was reared in his native country and in [837 
came to the United States with his parents and settled in Tus- 
carawas County, Ohio, where his parents died. About 1844 he 
moved to Williams County, Ohio, and early in iSsoto De Kalb 
County, Ind., and settled on the farm where he now lives, 
which is carried on by his sons. He owns no acres of valu- 
able land under a good state of cultivation. When he started 



- 



S02 HISTORY OF DK KALF. COUNTY. 

in life for himself he was entirely without means, but went 
bravely to work, and just as he was yetting a good start was 
laid up several months with a broken leg. This put him bai k 
and it was some time before he finally got his land paid for. Al- 
though he has had many adverse circumstances to contend 
with, he has overcome all obstacles, and now has a competency 
for his old age. He married Mary, daughter of George Nihart. 
and to them have been born live children — Jacob, Mary, 
George, Lucinda and Daniel. Mr. Burkhart was reared in the 
Episcopal church, but is a member of no religious denomination. 
George Casebeer, formerly of Troy Township, but now of St. 
i Joseph Township, Williams Co., Ohio, was born in Tusca- 
j rawas Count) - , Ohio, Oct. 5, 1831, a son of John Casebeer. Mis 
• parents came to De Kalb County, Ind., in 1S40, and settled in 
Troy Township on the line of Williams County, Ohio. His 
education was limited to the district school of his township, 
and this was two miles and a half distant. His services were 
early required on the farm in assisting to clear and improve a 
frontier home. He has made farming and stock-raising his life 
work and now has a good (arm on section iS, St. Joseph Town- 
ship, Williams Co., Ohio, near the old homestead. He has run 
a threshing-machine twenty-five seasons, helping to run the first 
thresher in the county. He enlisted in the war of the Rebell- 
ion in the One Hundred and Twenty-ninth Indiana Infantry, 
J and participated in the battles of Kenesaw Mountain, Resaca, 
J Atlanta, and others of less importance. He was detailed in 
1 charge of an ambulance train in February, 1S65, serving till 
discharged, Aug. 29, 1S65. He is a member of the Odd Fellow's 
: order and the Grand Army of the Republic. 

John Casebeer, deceased, was born in Virginia, Dec. 24, 1799. 
When he was sixteen years of age his father, John Casebeer, 
moved with his family to Tuscarawas County, Ohio, and settled 
near Canal Dover. When he was eigh een years of ag 
gan to learn the trade of a blacksmith at which he worked the 
greater part of his life. In 1S40 he came to De Kalb County 
and settled in Troy Township, on the Ohio line, his land at that 
time being all heavily timbered. In addition to clearing his land 
and making a farm, he made cow-bells and maple sugar and 
! traveled over the country with them, sometimes going forty and 
fifty miles, selling them to farmers for provisions. He cleared 
1 a farm of 120 acres on which he lived till his death. In 1S71 he 



rilSTORY OF Dl KALU COUNTY. S03 

moved his house just over the line into Williams County, Ohio, 

where his son George now lives. He was married Jan. 11, iS2i, 
to Nancy Smiley, a native of Washington County, Pa., daugh- 
ter of George Smiley. To them were born twelve children, 
but nine are living — William, Ann, Jane, Sarah, George, Kate 
A., Rachel, John F., and Nancy. One son, Jacob, was killed 
when twenty-one years of age by a horse falling on him. 
Robert died when twenty-four years of age. Mr. Cascbccr and 
his wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal church 
from their childhood. Mrs. Casebeer died May 4, 1870, and he 
subsequently made his home with his children till his death, 
Sept. 4, 1SS1. They were among Troy's most esteemed citi- 
zens; charitable and kind to all, and will long be remembered 
by many for their many virtues and honorable, upright lives. 
John F. Casebeer, section 21, Troy Township, was born in Tus- 
I carawas County, Ohio, Sept. 11, 1S39, a son of John Casebeer, 
1 who settled where our subject now lives in 1840. He 
was reared a farmer, and received a good education in the dis- 
I trict schools of his township. He remained at home till after 
the breaking out of the war of the Rebellion, and in June, 1S63, 
enlisted in Company E, Eighty -sixth Ohio Infantry, and was 
appointed Corporal, serving till discharged in February, 1S64. 
Since his return from the war he has engaged in agricultural 
pursuits, and now owns a hue \:\v.n <ii~ seventy-two acres, all 
well improved. He was married in August, 1S66, to Harriet 
Weitz, daughter of Adam Weitz, of Edgcrton, Ohio. To them 
have been born six children — Lulu. Curtis, Frances, Howard, 
Daniel and Hattie. Mr. arid Mrs. Casebeer and their daughter 
I Lulu are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Gilbert G. Evcretts, deceased, was born in the State of Penn- 
sylvania, Aug. 25, 1S16, a son of Cyrus M. Everctts. He 
remained in his native State till the fall of 1851, and then came 
j to Dc Kalb County, Ind., and settled in Franklin Township, but 
1 soon after moved to section 7, Troy Township, where he im- 
I proved a farm and lived till his death, which occurred Nov. 2, 
1874. He was a most estimable gentleman, and had many 
friends in the township. He was a Justice of the Peace twenty 
years, and always counseled dissenting parties to settle without 
law, when it was possible to do so. He was a Trustee of his 
township many years, and in all public affairs used the same 
, thought and carefulness that characterized the management of 









So.4 i ■'• i ■■ Dl KALIJ < OUNTY. 

his personal affairs. He was a devoted member of the Disc;;. 
church and was a liberal supporter of the gospel, and also of 
all charitable institutions, thereby laying up his treasures in 
heaven. He was married in Pennsylvania to Adeline Enzor, 
who died, leaving two children, but one of whom is living — ' 
Franklin. Nov. 24, 1S53, he married Mary C. Hayncs, daughter 
oi Asa P. Hayncs, who brought his family to De Kalb County 
and settled in Troy Township in the early part of 1837. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Everetts were born ten children, seven of whom are ' 
living — Martin C, Abraham L„ Andrew A., Joseph W., Reu- 
ben C, Mary A. and Gilbert C. 

Abraham Fisher, farmer and stock-raiser, section 5, Troy 
Township, was born in Stark County, Ohio, Oct. 9, 1822. His 
father, Jacob Fisher, was a native of Westmoreland County, 
Pa., and moved with his parents to Stark County before the 
war of 1812. Abraham Fisher learned the trade of a tanner 
and currier in his boyhood and followed it twenty years. I:; 
the fall of 1S55 he came to Dc Kalb County, lnd., and settled 
in Troy Township, and in March, 1S57, moved to Butler and 
established a tannery, in partnership with John Oberlin. He 
subsequently exchanged his tannery for eight}- acres of land on 
the northeast quarter of section 26, Franklin Township, where 
he lived till 1S64, when he returned to Troy Township. He 
was married Jan. 11, [S44, to Elizabeth Shane, daughter of '■ 
Abraham Shane, a General in the war oi 1S12. General Shane 
was a Civil Engineer, and was employed by the Government 
to survey a part of the State of Indiana, and subsequently 
surveyed the country as far West as the Rocky Mountains. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Fisher were born six children, three of whom 
are living — Albert W., Jacob F. and Cullen R. Jacob married 
Elizabeth Shoemaker; Albert married Eliza Leason, and Cullen 
married Ella Xortn. All are residents of Troy Township. 
Mr. and Mrs. Fisher are members of the United Brethren 
church. 

Get rge llcllcr, blacksmith, Troy Township, was born in Lan- 
caster County, Pa., Sept. 23, 1S22, a son of Philip Heller. 
When he was six months old his parents moved to Stark 
County, Ohio, and from there when he was eight years old to 
Holmes County, where he grew to manhood. He learned the 
trade of a blacksmith of his father, and has made that industry 
his means of obtaining a livelihood. In 1S54 he moved to 



HISTORY OF DEKALB COUNTY. 805 

Steuben County, Ind., and lived in Richland Township till De- 
cember, 1SS3, when he moved to De Kalb County and settled 
in this township. He has a good trade and owns the place on 
section 29, where he lives, lie was married in December, 
1S42, to Barbara Tinstman, daughter of Mark Tirtstman. To 
them were born six children; but two arc living — Philip and 
Dcwiit. Mrs. Heller died in 1SC0, and in 1S62 he married 
Abigail King, daughter of Peter King. To them have been 
born six children, but three oi whom are living — George, Edwin 
and Edward, the two Latter twins. Mr. Heller served two 
years as Constable in Steuben County. 

Peter Jennings, section 29, Troy Township, was born in Hun- 
terdon County, X. J., Sept. 13, 1S02, a son of Peter Jennings, a 
native of the same county, of English descent. He was reared 
a farmer, receiving a common-school education, and in 1S21 
left his native county and with his parents moved to Tuscara- 
was County, Ohio. In 1S43 he came to De Kalb Count v, Ind., 
and settled on the land which is now his valuable farm. At 
that time it was all heavily timbered, and he was obliged to 
clear a way the trees before he could build his log cabin. He 
now owns 209 acres oi choice hind, all well improved, which is 
cultivated by his son Abraham. He has been a hard working 
man, and has lived to reap the benefit of his many years of 
hardship and toil. lie has seen all the varied changes that 
have converted the wilderness as it was when he came to the 
county into the present prosperous county, with its populous 
towns and villages and thrifty and valuable farms, and has the 
consciousness of having done his part to bring about this 
change. He was married April 29, 1S29, to Catherine Rains- 
berger, daughter of John Rainsberger. To them have been 
born eight children, seven of whom are living — Elizabeth, John, 
[saac, William, George, Phcebe and Abraham, all married and 
settled in homes of their own. Mrs. Jennings died Feb. 20. 
1S81. Mr. Jennings is in the enjoyment of good health, and 
igl eighty-three years of age can see to read without the 
aid of glasses. 

William Jennings, section 21, Troy Township, was born in 
Carroll County, Ohio, Oct. 14, 1S35, a son of Peter and Cath- 
erine 1 Rainsberger) Jennings, of this township. I le came with 
his parents to De Kalb County in 1S43, and was here reared 
and educated. He early was obliged to assist his father in the 



■S, '.' __- 

' LB COUNTY. 

woods, doing w e could as .. child, and later helping to .. .. 

the trees and cultivate the soil. In his youth he worked al the 
carpenter's trade, serving an apprenticeship of two years, and 
has since worked al it at intervals in connection with farming. 
In rS6o he settled on the farm where he now lives, where he 
owns sixty acres of choice land, with a good residence and farm ; 
buildings. 1 le also owns ten acres on section 30, this township. 
He is engaged in general farming and stock-raising, having a 
finegradcol Spanish Mcrinoshccp. In 1884 he got 102 pounds j 
of washed wooi from ten of his fleeces. Mr. Jennings was mar- j 
ried May 4, 1S59, t0 Anna, daughter of David McCord, who 
moved from Ohio to Steuben County, Ind., in 1S40, where he 
died. Her mother afterward married Amos Stearns, and in 1S44 j 
they moved to De Kalb County. Mr. and Mrs. Jennings have 
had a family of six children, five of whom are living — Hiram 
S.. Olive L.. Eldora, Jesse M., and Jacob \V. 

John Kenistrick, farmer and stock-raiser, section 19. Troy- 
Township, was born in Tuscarawas County, Ohio. Dec. 7, 1S19, 
a son of John Kenistrick, a native of Maryland, who settled in 
Tuscarawas County in 1S12. He was reared a farmer, receiv- 
ing his education in the old-fashioned log cabin schools of his j 
native county. In 1852 he moved to Crawford County, Ohio, 
and in the spring of 1864 came to De Kalb County, Ind., and 
settled on the farm where he now lives. He owns 120 acres 01 
valuable land, and his farm buildings are all commodious and 
in good repair. He was married Nov. 6, 1845, to Martha ' 
Lewis, daughter of Joseph Lewis (deceased), and sister of Jere 
Lewis, of Frankiin Township, this county. To them have been 
born eight children, six of whom are living — Mary, Joseph, 
Sarah, Amelia, John and Sherman. Sarah is the wife of J. H. 
McCurdv, of Butler, and Amelia is the wife of William Moore, 
also of Butler. Their two eldest children died in 1849 °f chol- 
era. Seventeen of their relatives died of the same disease in 
two weeks. Mr. and Mrs. Kenistrick and four of their chil- 
dren are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Thomas Lcason, farmer and stock-raiser, section 8, Troy 
Township, is a native of Derbyshire, England, born in Decern- j 
ber, 1S13, a son of Francis Leason. He was the twelfth of a 
family of fifteen children, and his parents being in limited cir- 
cumstances he was early obliged to depend on his own re- 
sources for a livelihood, receiving but meaner educational 



HISTOID 01 Dl K VI :. COUXTY, 



So; 



advantages. He remained in his native country till 1845, and 
then came to the United States and settled in Sandusky, Ohio, 
where he lived till [863, when he came to Dc Kalb County, 
Ind., and located on the farm where he has since lived. He 
owns a good farm of ninety-eight acres, and his improvements 
are among the best in the county. He was married in Eric 
County, Ohio, in 1S50, to Mary Gillett, who died in June, 1 S 5 5 , 
leaving three children, but two of whom are living — Martha 
and Eliza. April 6, 1857, he married Mrs. Mary Abbott, 
widow of Jarius YY~. Abbott, by whom she has one child — Dow. 
Mr. and Mrs. Leason are members of the United Brethren 
church. 

David McCurdy, deceased, was a native of Ohio, born July 
27, 1830, a son of Rev. John McCurdy, of Butler, Ind. He 
came to De Kalb County, Inch, with his parents in 1845, and 
settled in Wilmington 'Township, where he grew to manhood. 
He received a good education and taught several terms of 
school in his early life, but the greater part of his life was en- 
gaged in farming. He was married in October, 1853, to Jemima 
Casebeer, daughter of Andrew Casebeer. She was born in 
Wayne County, Ohio, in 1834, and came to this county with 
her parents in 1S39, locating on section 30, Troy Township, and 
later moving to section 29. Mr. and Mrs. McCurdy lived in 
Stafford Township till 1S76, and then moved to Troy Township 
and settled on the old homestead of her father, on section 29, 
where she has since lived, and where he died Jan. 14, 1S85, of 
cancer of the stomach, alter an illness of two months. To 
them were born seven children — James N., Ida L., Rosella, Ann 
E., Ionia, Sadie and Mary M. James is a minister in the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, and is now at Elkhart, Ind. He mar- 
ried Nettie Reynolds, and has one child — Roy. Ida married 
Byron Gilmore, and lives near Little Sioux, Iowa. Mr. Mc- 
Curdy was a consistent Christian, and had been a member of 
the Methodist church since nineteen years of age. He was a 
kind, courteous gentleman, hospitable and generous, giving lib- 
erally of his means for the support of his church and the pro- 
motion of benevolent causes. In his death the community 
lost a valuable member, and his family a kind husband and 
father. 

Dr. Janus Milligan, section 32, Troy Township, was born in 
Washington County, Pa., May 31, 1S16, a son of James Milli- 



-s,,v 






SoS HISTORY OF DEKALB COUNTY. 



gan. He was reared on a farm and received his education, 
attending a select school in his native county. He began the 
study of medicine with Dr. James P. Scroggs, and in 1842 
removed to Tuscarawas County, Ohio, and began his practice. 
In the winter of 1843-44 he attended the Cleveland Medical 
College, and then returned to Tuscarawas County and con- 
tinued his practice till 1S53, when he came to Dc Kalb County 
and located at Butler, residing there till the fall of 1S65, when 
he settled on his present farm. He continued his practice till 
about 1879, and since then has given it into younger hands. 
He owns a fine farm of 240 acres, which is carried on by 
tenants. He also owns a house and lot in Butler. Dr. Milli- 
gan was married Oct. 17, 1S4S, to Margaret Browning, a native 
of Jefferson County, Ohio, daughter of John F. Browning. 
They have had a family of hve children, all deceased. Four 
died in childhood, and one daughter, Inez, died Oct. 10, 1S77, 
at the age of eighteen years. 

George RslSc, agent for the Wabash Railway at Troy Station. 
Troy Township, was born in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, March 
11. 1S46, a son of Hambright Reese, a native of Greene County. 
Pa. His parents moved to De Kalb County, Ind., in the fall 
of 1840 and settled in Trov Township, where he was reared 
and educated. When he was twelve years of age he began fir- 
ing a stationary engine, and subsequently partly learned his 
trade in Butler. He has been in the employ of the railroad 
since about 18S0, and since 1SS4 has had charge of the office at 
Troy Station. He was married Aug. 10, 1869, to Mrs. Matilda 
J. (Long) Whitner, daughter of Rev. Frederick Long, a Meth- 
odist clergyman, for many years a resident of this county, and 
widow of J. J. Whitner. To them have been born five chil- 
dren — Charles H., Margaret E., Martin E., Leona A. and Harry 
E. Mrs. Reese has two children by her former marriage — 
Lora E. and Arba W. Mr. Reese is an earnest workerjTor the 
temperance cause, and is one of the prominent citizens of the 
township. 

John Robinctt, section 17, Troy Township, is a native of Tus- 
carawas County, Ohio, born Oct. 22, 1S15, a son of James 
Robinett, who moved to Holmes County, Ohio, when our sub- 
ject was a child, where he was reared and educated. He re- 
mained in Holmes County till 1S46, and then came to De Kalb 
County, Ind., and settled on the farm where he now lives. At 



DE KALB COUNTY. 



'"',' 



that time the land was heavily timbered, but he has cleared 
and improved it, and now has ninety acres of the best land in 
the township. He was married Oct. 19, 1837, to Mary Swick, 
daughter of Peter Swick. She is a native of Pennsylvania, and 
moved with her parents to Stark County, Ohio, when she was 
a child. To them have been born nine children, but three of 
whom arc living — George, John VV. and Theodore. George is 
a minister of the United Brethren church, and lives at Metz, 
Steuben County. He married Mary A. Geddis, and has three 
children — Corintha, John and William. John W. married 
Maria Anspaugh, and has two children — Mary L. and Hattie 

B. Theodore married Sarah A. Brunner, and has two chil- 
dren — George and John R. John and Theodore reside on the 
old homestead and have charge of the farm. Two of their 
daughters were married and at their death left families. Han- 
nah was the wife of Conrad Rench, and left three children — 
Ida, Etta and John. Harriet was the wife of Robert Geddis, 
and left nine children — Lillie, Delia, John C, Arthur, Hattie, 
Mary, Jane, Nye and Alice. Mr. and Mrs. Robinett are mem- 
bers of the United Brethren church. He has served his town- 
ship one year as Trustee. 

Talma Rummcl, farmer and stock-raiser, section iS, Troy 
Township, was born in Columbiana County, Ohio, Sept. 5, 
1S33, and in 1S44 moved with his father, Henry Rummel, to 
Steuben County, Ind., and settled in Otsego Township, 
where the latter still lives. He received his early education in 
a small frame school-house, his teacher being Amos Letcher, a 
cousin of President Garfield. He was also captain of the canal 
boat on which Garfield worked when a boy. Talma remained 
at home till manhood, and Jan. 2, 1859, married Lucy M., only 
child of Roger and Lucy Aldrich. The day of their marriage 
they settled on the farm in Troy Township where they now 
live, and have since made it their home. He owns 160 acres 0; 
choice land which he has brought under a good state of culti- 
vation, and has made valuable improvements, his residence and 
farm buildings being among the best in the county. He takes 
an active interest in all public affairs of his township, and has 
served two terms as Assessor and one term as Trustee. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Rummel have been born four children — Roger 
A., Henry E., Ella E. A. and Chauncey S. Roger married Ada 

C. Jennings, daughter of George Jennings of this township 



SlO HISTORY OF EE KALE COUNTY. 

and has one child — Elsie A. Mr. and Mrs. Ruramcl and their 
son Roger and his wife arc members oi the Disciples church. 

George IV. Smiley was born in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, June 
25, 1823, a son of George and Jane (Blake) Smiley, his father a 
native of Somerset County, Pa., and his mother of Susque- 
hanna County, N. 'Y. Me was reared on a frontier farm, and 
was obliged to walk two or three miles to school, his brothers 
carrying him a part of the way the first term. He came to De 
Kalb County in 1S42 and settled in Troy Township, and was 
elected Constable of the township before he was twenty-one 
years old. After living in the county four years he returned to 
Ohio and cared for his parents the rest of their lives, returning 
to this county six years later. In 1S5S he moved to English 
Prairie, Lagrange County, and from there to Orland, Steuben 
Count)-, in 1S62, remaining there till 1S67, and then bought a 
farm four miles north of Angola and remained there till Sept. 6, 
1S7S, and then ran a saw-mill till 1SS4; is now engaged in the 
rail and wire-fence business. He was married Jan. 12, 1841, to 
Catherine Deaner, a native of Baltimore, Md., daughter of Con- 
rad Deaner. To them were born eight children, seven of whom 
are living — Mary J., Artimcsia, David W., Margaret, Shannon 
O., Maria A. and Ernest E. Mrs. Smiley died Sept. 6, 1S7S, 
and two years later Mr. Smiley broke up housekeeping. He 
has been a member ot the Methodist Episcopal church since six- 
teen years of age. He served his township as Justice of the 
Peace three years and four months. His daughter Mary 
is an elocutionist and has been a temperance lecturer several 
years. His Grandmother Smiley was taken a prisoner, with 
three other children, by the Indians during the Revolutionary 
war, and two of the children were killed. Her father was an 
officer in the continental army. Although but seven years of 
age, she remembered passing a stone against which Judge Wells 
was leaning, scalped and dead. 

Jacob H. Smith, farmer and stock-raiser, section 4, Troy 
Township, is a native of Columbiana County, Ohio, born July 
10. 1S46. In 1S47 his father, Adam Smith, moved with his 
family to De Kalb County, Ind., and settled in Franklin Town- 
ship where he was reared and educated, attending the common 
schools of the district. He was reared on a farm and has always 
followed agricultural pursuits, and by his industry and energy 
has accumulated a good home, owning a farm of seventy-three 



HISTOKY 01- .... KA1 li ' OUNTY. 8ll 

acres, with a comfortable residence and farm buildings In 1S70 
Lth took a trip West, visiting Illinois, Iowa, Nebraska 
Kansas Missouri, Wisconsin and Minnesota, returning to Do 
Kalb County in the winter of 1872. He was married Oct .2, 
:X-3. to Mary E. Olds, daughter of Carlisle Olds. Three 
children have been born to them-Willlam E., Ettie E. and 

B Soudcr, farmer and stock-raiser, section 19, Troy 
Township, was born in Perry County, Ohio, June 30, 1846, a 
son of John Soudcr, of Richland County, Ohio. His parents 
moved to Richland County in 1859. and there he grew to man- 
hood, receiving his education in the common schools. 1 ; e was 
reared a farmer, and since attaining manhood has given his at- 
tention to agricultural pursuits and stock-raising. He came to 
Dc Kalb County in the spring of 1874 and settled on section 24, 
Franklin Township, and in the spring of 1879 moved across the 
line into Troy Township. He owns 160 acres of valuable land 
and his residence and farm buildings arc among the best in the 
county. He pays special attention to raising Durham cattle , 
and Clydesdale horses, and much credit is due him for tos effoi ts , 
to improve the stock of horses in the county. His horse Lap 
is five years old, a son of the celebrated Buck Allen, and weighs 
I 600 pounds. He is one of the finest horses in the county. Mr. | 
Soudcr was the first man to introduce dram tiling in his neigh- 
borhood. He is an enterprising, progressive citizen, and assists 
any project and adopts any improvements that promises benefit 
to his county. He was married Feb. 2 7 1868 to Sarah M. 
Adams, daughter of Andrew Adams, ot Richland County 
Ohio To them have been born six children, five of whom are 
liv i ng _Charles M., George M., Ernest C, Jessie M. and 
Harry L. 



...".._. 'i - - ••-- •~^-' 1 ' 



CHAPTER XXIII. 

union" township. 

Position.— Advantages. — Ge< igrapiiy and Topography.— 
Early Settlers. — Reminiscences. — Organic ion of 
Township— Early Justices, Constables and Trustees. 
—Population. — Property and Taxation. — Agricult- 
ural Statistics.— Auburn. — Its Early History.— First 
Merchants, Professional Men, Buildings, etc.— Prog- 
ress. — Business Directory. — Manufacturing. — Pro- 
fessional. — Newspapers. — High School Building.— 
Churches. — Societies. — Waterloo. — Its Beginning 
and Growth. — Business Directory. — Professional.— 
Banks. — Religious.— Societies. — Biographical. 
The township named Union may well be regarded as the 
most favored one in the county. Central in location, and pos- 
sessed of excellent railroad facilities, it is also the possessor of 
two incorporated towns, one being- the county seat. It is 
bounded on the north by Smithheld, on the cast by Wilming- 
ton, on the south by Jackson, and on the west by Keyser and 
Richland. It is crossed by the Baltimore & Ohio, Wabash, St. 
Louis & Pacific, and the Fort Wayne, Jackson & Saginaw Divis- 
ion of the Michigan Southern railroads, which meet at 
Auburn Junction, and the air line of the Michigan Southern 
road crosses the last named at Waterloo. Cedar Creek flows 
through the township from northeast to southwest. 

Taken as a whole, Union is agriculturally a rich township of 
land. There are, however, several Tamarack swamps that are ' 
useless until drained. The northern and western portions of ,| 
the township are generally rolling and somewhat sand}'. The [| 
southeastern is more level and clayey. Early settlers in the 
township on farms were : Kneeland Abbott on the south, David ll 
Altenburg and Levi Walsworth on the east, and the Hussel- 
mans and McEntaffers on the north. Altenburg and Walsworth 
moved in during November, 1S3S; James R. Cosper and John 
Weeks in the spring of 1S41 ; and the same year John Somers 
812 



V 



" 




HISTORY 01 DE ,.A;.,, COUNTY. 



and Lyman Chidscy settled southcasl of Auburn. In the north- 
cast, Rockwell, Lightner and Morringston were the first 
settlers. Two days were occupied in raisin-- the heavy frame 
of the Husselman barn, and most of the abie-bodied settlers for 
miles around were engaged in the work. 

Union is one of the oldest townships in the county, being but 
two months younger than Franklin. At the first regular meet- 
ing of the Board of Commissioners of De Kalb County, Sept. 
5. 1S37, present Peter Fair, Samuel Widney and A. F. Beecher, 
it was "ordered that the congressional township 34 north, 
range 13 east, be organized as a township for judicial (civil) pur- 
poses, to be known by the name of Union Township, and that 
townships 34 and 35 north, range 12 east, and townships 33 and 
35 north, range 13 east, be attached thereto." It was also 
ordered " that Wesley Park be appointed Supervisor for the 
road district No. 1, comprising the whole of Union Township; 
and all the lands residing within said township are allotted to 
said district." The first election was appointed for the first 
Monday in December following, and Lanslot Ingman was 
• named as Inspector of Elections. 

Among the early Justices of the Peace of Union Township 
were: Lanslot Ingman, David Altenburg, John Carpenter, W. 
Griswold, John Davis, G. Wolf, S. W. Russell, J. D. Davis, 
J. W. Case and William Lessig. Earl)' Constables were: J. O. 
P. Sherlock, William Shirter, Lyman Chidsey, T. J. Freeman, 
Isaac Latson, Joseph Garvcr, John Drury, Z. Tanner, II. 
Siberts, J. Powlas, II. Jones, L. Weaver, S. Bowman, L. Leasure, 
Jonathan Hall, A. 0. Espy, J. Ilaun, Zopher Johnson, Jere- 
miah Plum, William Valcau, Andrew Harsh, J. II. Piles, 
Emanuel Miller, George Jones and J. B. Howard. 

The Trustees prior to 1SG0 were: J. B. Rockwell, David 
Altenburg, J. F. Coburn, John Husselman, X. Payne, James C. 
Ge >rge, C. Simonds, S. W. Sprott, Aaron Hague, James R. 
Cosper, T. J. Freeman, Kneeland Abbott, William Middleton, 
Henry Clay, G. R. Baker, J. E. Hendricks, A. Watkins, T. R. 
Dickinson, IT. Moneysmith, D. Eldridge, J. Hawk, Dr. W. 
Dancer, Jacob Cupp, J. J. Huffman, John Davis, O. A. Par- 
sons, O. C. Houghton, John Somers, John Lightner, W. W. 
Griswold, Adam Stroh, J. K. Hare, John Ralston, S. Sanders, 
and Jacob McEntaffer. Isaac Kutzner and John C. St. Clair 
were early Assessors. 



Sl4 HISTORY OF DE KAI.l; COUNTY. 

The population of Union Township, exclusive of Auburn and 
Waterloo, is 1,200, or 35 to the square mile. The assessed val- 
uation averages $624.44 P cr capita. In 1884 the acres of land 
assessed numbered 20,985.12; value of same, $017,829; value of 
improvements, $79,494; value of lands and improvements, 
$697, 323 ; value of lots, $5,035 ; value of improvements, $9,015 ; 
total, $14,050; value of personal property, $124,075 ; total tax- 
ables, $835,448; rate of taxation, $1.46; number of polls, 226; 
poll-tax, $1.00 ; total amount of taxation, $12,567.17. 

The following statistics of staple crops are for the year 1881 : 
Number of acres in wheat, 2,845 I product of same, at 8 bushels 
per acre, 22,760 bushels; acres in corn, 1,757 ! product of same, 
20 bushels per acre of upland, and 40 bushels per acre of low- 
land, or 37,000 bushels; acres in oats, 946; product of same, 35 
bushels per acre, or 33,110 bushels; acres in meadow land, 
1,054; product of same, at a ton and a half per acre, 1,581 tons 
of hay; acres in Irish potatoes, 104; product of same, 125 
bushels per acre, or 13,000 bushels. 

AUBURN. 
" Sweet Auburn, loveliest village of the plain." — Goldsmith. 

In the chapter of " Early Incidents," Wesley Park's narra- 
tive describes the trip of that pioneer, and his purpose in 
coming here. He had in view from the very first the founding- j 
ol a county seat. His selection was finally adopted in prefer- I 
ence to the rival site of " Ccntervillc," in the geographical j 
center of the county. Mr. Park doubtless had in view little 
more than a central position, easy of access, and level in sur- 
face. He laid out two parallel streets north and south, known 
as Main and Jackson streets, and these were intersected by 
numerous cross streets. Many of these were for a long 
. time useful only as affording pasturage for the live stock 
kept by the villagers. Park gave a lot to each settler who 
would build thereon, and by this and other public-spirited 
measures he hastened the growth of the village. He and a 
man named Ogdcn built a saw-mill in 1837, and he had the sat- 
isfaction of seeing steady improvement take place. L. Ingman 
built 'the second cabin in Auburn, and John F. Coburn, rirst 
County Clerk, put up the third. He set out some fruit trees, 
one of which, prominent for its size, still stands on the place. 
Riley Jacobs and Thomas Freeman were also early settlers. 



J 



HISTORY ■ ■; !•; 



: " : ' 5 , 



The first store was opened by a man named Comstock, who 
block was valued at $170, and whose license to sell was 85 
cents. Freeman opened a store in a frame building which 
stood on the southwest corner of Fourth and Cedar streets, and 
a source of profit was the revenue from the sale of liquor to the 
Indian and sealer. Nelson Payne formed a partnership with 
Freeman. Then Payne and Jefferson Wallace kept a store in 
the front room of a house just completed by Payne. Next the 
firm was Payne & Ralston. Samuel Ralston is still in trade 
here, and is the oldest merchant in the county. O. A. Parsons 
had in the meantime opened a store-tavern in wdiat was called 
the " Parsons' Rookery," north of Rant's. Hart's saloon stood 
near the site of Davis' hardware store. Following the lead of 
those given, stores and groceries were opened and ran their 
brief career — some long and others short — and there are but 
few in business to-day of Auburn's merchants, even from 1865. 

The first hotel, intended as such, was kept by Freeman, who 
some years afterward built what has been variously known as 
the Franklin, Griswold, and now the Auburn House. J. O. 
P. Sherlock, Sr., opened a hotel in the house which was after- 
ward long the home of Sheriff Miller. Nelson Payne had an 
ashery on Main street; he was an early blacksmith, and later a 
merchant and judge. ' Henry Moneysmith was also a pioneer 
blacksmith. The first physician was Dr. Ross; then followed 
Drs. llaynes, Cooper, Pritchard, Oliver & Roe. Succeeding 
these were Dr. Hendricks, prominent as a physician, mathema- 
tician, farmer and teacher; Dr. J. H. Ford, still a resident; and 
Dr. W. B. Dancer, who died in 1S53, and was buried in the old 
cemetery. 

Samuel Reed, a young, energetic and talented man, was the 
first minister in Auburn, and represented the Methodist Epis- 
copal denomination. The Presbyterians were supplied about 
1S45 by James T. Bliss, the first of that denomination to come 
here, and a pious, earnest preacher. 

The first resident carpenter was James R. Cosper, now a 
farmer in the township. Next came Samuel Ralston, Amos 
Hutchinson and O. C. Houghton. The first cabinet-makers 
were J. O. P. Sherlock and L. Ingman. The first gunsmith was 
Isaac Savage; soon after came Charles Stimely. The first 
wagon-maker was Jonathan Hall, who occupied as a resilience 
the place afterward refitted by George H. K. Moss, on South 



SlG HISTORY OF UK KA1.:; COUN"n . 

Main street. Philip Fluke was the first and only tanner. He 
continued the business until the demands of trade required his 
lots for building sites, when he retired from business and i on- 
verted his tannery into a harness shop, on the corner of Seventh 
and Jackson streets. The first, shoemakers, in order of time, 
were Cyrus Smith, A. Forshe and S. Latson. Messrs. Bolinger 
& Carpenter made farming-mills. William Albright was the 
first saddle and harness maker. Isaac Jones, Sr., introduced the 
first tinshop, followed by Abram Bass. Harrison Jones, Tri- 
dcll and J. D. Davis, followed the business of hatters, 

In October, 1S41, Auburn had a population of 72. and almost 
all the inhabitants were prostrated by sickness. Judge Mott, 
the pioneer lawyer who came in 1843, found Main street full of 
logs. He lived in a cabin put up by James Cooper, where A. 
J. Ralston's dwelling stands, and could chop his firewood in the 
forest but a lew rods distant. In 1849 triC town contained about 
50 houses, all of wood, and 300 inhabitants. For years it gained 
slowly, and, being without railroad communication, became 
tributary to the rival and thriving town of Waterloo, and was 
threatened with a loss of the county seat. An Auburn Repub- 
lican, of date Sept. 26, 1S56, affords a glimpse of the time when 
Wesley Park was receiving new goods; S. W. Widncy dealt in 
books ; Ralston & Gross in ashes; T. Boldock kept hotel ; G. YV. 
Stalil conducted the " Emporium of Fashion ;" L. Bowers had ;. 
grocery and variety store, and J. W. Rickel dealt in boots and 
shoes. At the close of the civil war Auburn was a quiet, re- 
tired village of some six or seven hundred inhabitants, its prin- 
cipal features being two long, tree-lined, handsome streets, the 
court-house just completed, the woolen factory and the acad- 
emy. The last two have been destroyed by lire. The octag- 
onal brick building, then the home of A. Wheelock, but now 
of Alonzo Lockwood, marked the western limit of dwellings. 
Where now stands the Fort Wayne & Saginaw station, was 
then the original forest. In the cool shade of the towering 
beech and maple trees, the celebrations were held. There- 
speeches were made, glee clubs sang, flags waved, drums beat 
and cannon roared; but the ax has done its work and the 
grove exists no longer. 

The vicinity of Cedar Creek and the clearing of heavy tim- 
ber from surrounding lands caused miasmatic fogs, subjecting 
residents to attacks of fever and ague, from which there were 



.'. i DE KALB i i tUNTY. S17 

few exemptions. The roads in an early day leading from town 
were execrable. Hacks run to Waterloo and to Fort Wayne, 
making a halt at Huntertown. Teamsters hauled grain and 
croods over roads which for chuck-holes defied comparison. 
An effort was made to change the location of the county seat 
to Waterloo, but this proved unsuccessful on accout of rail- 
road privileges secured by the Fort Wayne & Jackson road, 
constructed in the county by local aid. Again in 1S74 an ef- 
fort was made in behalf of Waterloo as the county seat, and 
this for a time bade fair to be successful. At this crisis Auburn 
joined hands with Butler to complete the Eel River road, and 
quashed the movement. 

BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 

The following list of business firms in Auburn is believed 
to be complete, and it shows that the town is second to few in 
number and character of its business men, while the diversity 
of enterprise is conducive to the independence of the place : 

Christopher Asherman, grocery; Austin Bros., boots and 
shoes; John Aber, photographer; Joseph .Albright, jeweler; 
Englcbert Ashlee, wagon shop; Fred Behringer, tailor; 
Ephraim Berry, machine shop; Fred Bass, tobacco and con- 
fectionery; Brown & Culbertson, musical instruments and 
sewing-machines; James A. Barnes, Courier paper; 1. (). Bah- 
tcll, Eagle mills; Bcugnot & Ober, stave factory; John Burke, 
blacksmith; J. Beuret, hardware; I. N. Cool, wagon shop; 
James (). Clifton, broom factory; Casebecr & Mathcny, livery 
stable; I Tumphrcy Chilcoat, Central House; Casebecr & Ma- 
thcny, drug store; Miss Cass, hair dresser; J.L. Davis, its 

ies; !•'. E. Davenport, drugstore; Dickinson \ McMil- 
icn, meat market; William Edgcrton, barber; Edward EI- 
dridge, saloon; Enslcy \ Harter, dry goods and millinery; 
Georgi Ensley, agricultural implements; Farmers' Bank; 

First National Bank; Grush Bros., flouring-mill and hoop fac- 
'tory; J. H. Gugerli, merchant tailor; G. W. Gordon, post- 
office; Phin'cas Gibson, bakery and grocery; Ben. Goodman, 
hardware and tin shop; Mitchell Huston, saloon; J. C. Henry, 
drug --lore; F. A. Hoff, grocery ; Sherman Hollister, restau- 
ranl ; i Icbcrling & Lewis, farm implements; Ilouscr & Hoising- 
ton, Republican paper; Hebe! Bros., grocery; Mrs. Jones iX 
Son, dry goods and millinery; John Kreger, ashcry; John 



8kS HISTORY OK I)K KAl.i; CO 

Knodcr, blacksmith; W. II. Kiblingcr, hard war. . Peter Lotz- 
enhizer, saloon; Mrs. Little, millinery ; Long & Trout, livery 

stable; Lewis & Widncy, lumber; Jacob Mitchell, saw-mill and 
boo factor} 7 ; Morel] Bros., foundry and machine shop; John 
R.Moody, Auburn House; McQuiston & Long", dry goods 
and groceries; M. Myers, general store; W. L. Meese, insur- 
ance; B. Miller, grocer)' and bakery; J. N. Myers, agricult- 
ural implements; John Otto, grocery and shoe shop; Charles 
Pommart, barber; J. A. Potter, boots and shoes; S. Pommart 
& Co., barbers; G. A. Porter, Auburn Woolen Mills; Sylvester 
Rogers, brewery: Rodenbaugh & Coleman, millinery and 
dressmaking; Rainier cV Headley, meat market; C. Ram & 
Sons, boots and shoes; S. C. Ralston, grocery; Harry Rush, 
harness shop ; W. E. Rush, confectionery ; Charles Resscgce, 
saloon; A. J. Ralston, grocery; C. C. Shafer, furniture; 
Thomas Summers, saloon ; Smith & Madden, Auburn Marble 
Works; Steele & Son, painters; Augustus Stutz, saloon; 
Schaab & Beugnot, groceries, dry goods and clothing; Frank 
Slayball, grocer}-; L. Spitler, grocery; J. W. Shafer, wagon 
J shop; S. W. Swineford, Swineford House; George Stahj, 
tailor; William Sheffer, harness shop ; William Snyder, black- 
smith ; John Stondecker, scroll factory ; Sibely & Co., oar 
factory; Snyder, McClellan & Best, Auburn Wagon Works; 
Shearer & Wilson, church furnishing company; S. U. Tamey, 
meat market ; James Umber, grocery ; Veley & Husselman, 
saw-mill; George Wagner, blacksmith; Joseph Williamson, sa- 
loon; M. S. Willis, books and stationery ,*Peter Young, mer- 
chant tailor; J. H. Yesbcra, merchant tailor; Zimmerman & 
Co., Monitor Windmill Company. 

MANUFACTURING. 

Auburn possesses several manufacturing establishments, 
which, though unpretentious, yet do a very respectable busi- 
ness, and give employment to a goodly number ol leople. 
Among them should be mentioned : The Auburn Marble Works 
of Smith & Madden, wagon and carriage factory of I. X. Cool, 
the broom factory of James A. Clifton, wagon shop of J. W. 
Shafer, Eagde Mills of I. O. Bahtcl, Auburn Woolen Mills of G. 
A. Porter, saw-mill of , Veley & Husselman, cooper shop of 
George Wagner, Jr., stave factory of Beugnot & Ober, Moni- 
tor Windmill Company of Zimmerman & Co. (also manufact- 



i : 01 Dl AXB COUNTY. 819 

urcrs of shingles and other ; :les i op of Englebert 

Ashlce, machine shop of Ephraim Berry, Church Fui 1 
Company of Shearer <N: Wilson, foundry and machine shop of 
Morell Bros., saw-mill and hoop factory of Jacob Mitchell, 
Hour-mill of Grush Bros., Auburn Wagon Works of Syndcr, 
McClcllan & Best, oar factory ol Sibely & Co. (one of the two 
establishments of the kind in ihc United States), and the brewery 
and bottling works managed by Sylvester Rogers. Many of 
these are described further in the personal sketches of the pro- 
prietors. 

BANKS. 

Auburn supports three of these institutions, two being private 
banks. The First National Bank of Auburn was organized 
Dec. 19, 1S74, and began doing business March 25. 1875. 1: 
lost heavily by the well-remembered George Hazzard some 
years ago, but is now in a prosperous condition, and does an 
extensive business. In the summer of 1876 a brick building 
was erected at a cost of $S,ooo, including fixtures, and this was 
occupied in August of the same year. The present Cashier is 
W. H. Mclntyre. The bank's statement for the year ending 
Sept. 30, 1SS4, shows the capital stock, all paid in, to be $50,- 
000; surplus, S3,6oo; deposits, §2,697.23; loans and discounts, 
$59,139.49. The directors are: W. Mclntyre, Ephraim Berry 
and C. A. O. McClellan. The Farmers' Bank began business 
in February, 1SS3. The stockholders are: Jacob Walborn, 
Nicholas Ensley, Albert Robbins, Guy Plumb and J. C. Henry. 
Albert Robbins is Cashier. John L. Davis also does an exten- 
sive banking business. 

PROFESSIONAL. 

The members of the DeKalb County bar, who reside in Au- 
burn, are as follows : W. L. Penfield, Henry J. SchaJer, W. H. 
Dills, James E. Rose, F. K. Blake, R. D. Teft, Ezra D. Hart- 
man, B. Green, Thomas H. Sprott, P. J. Lockwood, C. Eman- 
uel, H. C. Peterson, D. D. Moody, P. V. Hoffman, D. V. 
Husselman, C. A. O. McClellan and John Baxter. 

The medical profession is represented by Drs. J. H. Ford, J. 
A. Cowan, Casebeer & Matheny, J. J. Littlefield, D.J. Swarts, 
Mrs. Vesta Swarts, W. S. Allen, J. V. Lewis and David 
Sebring. 



S20 



HISTORY OF DE KALE O >UNTY. 



NEWSPAPERS. 

Auburn supports two weekly newspapers — the Dei;. 
publican and the Auburn Courier. For full sketches of ' 
see the Press chapter. 



th< 



EARLY S 



The first school-house in Auburn stood about a block west 
of the Auburn House, built and kept in those early da 
Thomas J. Freeman, who also had a little store in the north- 
west room, which then, as now, was the bar-room. This school- 
house was also used as a general meeting-house for religious 
purposes. It was a low. one-storied building, containing one 
room, without closet or vestibule. Around three sides ran 
sloping desks, with their backs against the wall. High benches 
furnished uncomfortable si jer scholars when they 

were obliged to use the desks. They were, hotvever, privile gcd 
to sit upon other benches with backs to them, rows 
faced toward the center of the school-room from thre 
it: the lowest seats for the little or.es, being nearesl th 
black stove in the middle of the room. Hcreassemb. 
winter seventy-rive or eighty pupils of all sizes, from the strap- 
ping six-footer who cast sheep's eyes at all the pretty girls, 
down to the urchin proud of his first pair of boots, who said 
his a-b-c with unvarying monotony through half the winter. 
The three R's, " Reading, Kiting and 'Rithmetic," were taught 
with varying energy and success; but spelling was the class in 
which the ability of both teacher and pupils was expected to 
assert itself pre-eminently. The hour for studying the lesson 
was a serious time. Seated on the benches, with open books 
in nana, each pupil conned the words in a loud whisper, while, 
keeping time with the voice, each form swayed back and forth. 
The buzz became at times almost deafening. " Nat so much 
noise," the almost distracted teacher would enjoin, but neither 
lienor his pupils seemed to imagine that the lessons could be 
learned quietly. Ail honor to the old-fashi ied schools, how- 
ever! They did turn out some good spellers— but then " the}' 
gave their time to it." 

Each pupil in arithmetic was taught by himself. Black- 
boards had not come into use in the backwoods, ai 
scholar with his slate and book " went it alone." If a ; 
ambitious, and his teacher attentive, remarkable iro^ress would 



[IS n IRY i iF Dl KALB i 



be made in the course of a winter term ; but som< oi th 
ing was rather remarkable. One lady relates that wh n 
eleven years old she went to a summer school taught by a man. 
She had a tolerably good knowledge of addition, multiplication 
and subtraction, and could divide a little, but had not the most 
remote idea what long division meant. Her arithmetic was 
Pike's ; no answers to the problems were given. The teacher 
asked her how far she had advanced in arithmetic. She told him. 
He did not examine her, but told her to go on. She went on 
solving each problem to the best of her ability. Some time 
during each clay the teacher would come around and inquire 
now far she had gone, and if she had any trouble, but never 
asked her to solve a problem for him to examine, and therefore 
never discovered that his ingenious pupil divided the dividend 
by each figure of the divisor in succession, and then added the 
quotients for a final quotient — which was the longest division 
she could invent. How long this might have gone on is uncer- 
tain, as the parents of the child becoming dissatisfied took her 
ou; o: -co. ... 

Of course there were some very good teachers among many 
inferior or.es. 

Mr. Mott taught during the winter of 1843-4. He was an 
unusually good scholar, and had been as a young man, a suc- 
cessful teacher in Pennsylvania. 

Hendricks B. Wright, afterward distinguished as lawyer and 
politician, was one of his pupils there, and so long as he lived, 
Mr. Mott used to refer with pleasure to the energy, industry 
and ability, which young Wright manifested as a school boy. 

Another good teacher was William Reynolds, a maternal 
uncle of Mrs. A. J. Ralston, who taught the Auburn school dur- 
ing the winter of 184S-9. This tribute to his energy, ability, 
and goodness is paid by one of his scholars who mourned his 
untimely death, and has always remembered him, as one of her 
first teachers, who affectionate respect. lie was a brother-in- 
law of James George, who lived about a mile cast ... town 
They were Loth men of excellent principles and agreeable man- 
ners. Mr. George had a remarkably pleasant face, and when 
lie smiled it lit up with sunshine. Both men died toward the 
close of 1S49 with typhoid fever. A young man by the name of 
Webb win- lived with Mr. George died of the same disease. 
. titia Hutchings, who afterward with her huso.; 



S22 MISTi >RY 01' ... ' LB . i iUNTY. 

Rev. Randal Faurot, was for many years identified with the 
educational interest ol the count} - , taught a summer 

Auburn in 1S45 and again in '46. She was an excellent tcachi r 
and continues to be what she was then, a most admirable 

Christian woman. Her good deeds will bring forth fruil . 

her good influence be felt, long after her eyes have closed in 
their last slumber. 

In the spring of 1849, a short term of school was taughl b\ 
Miss So;, liia Merrill, a sister of Mrs. Bliss, wife of the Pres- 
byterian .minister. Both sisters were women of much more 
than ordinary intelligence and culture, fn urging her pupils to 
faithful study, she used the argument that the mind must con- 
tinue developing- through all eternity, and that all which is 
gained here will help us there. During the winter of 1S49 a "d 
'50 the public school was taught bj' Alexander McMir.n, a tall, 
slender young fellow, with an uncontrolled temper. He- 
governed, emphatically, by the rod. Not a day passed that 
some one was not hauled over the benches and thrashed. The 
school was kept in a constant ferment, and the best scholars 

grew insubordinate under the constant provocation I 

One day Mr. McMinn saw William Freeman with his head 
down upon the desk apparently asleep. He approached him 
cautiously with uplifted whip. It came down with stinging 
force upon the boy's shoulders. He raised his hand, stupidlv, 

to ward off the second blow, which descended oniy the 

heavily. Again and again the master struck. William lifted 
his head and fell over backward, frothing at the mouth. He 
was in a convulsion. The terrified teacher sent for Mr. Freeman 
and the doctor, while the children, all semblance of order 
gone, huddled together like a Hock oi frightened sheep. 

As it transpired, the boy had been eating camphor gum and 
borax, and was poisoned. It is possible that the teacher's 
remedy, though severe, may have done no harm under the cir- 
cumstances. However, it is safe to say that no teacher ever 
bore away the ill-will of a greater proportion of his scholars. 

In the autumn of 1850 John B. Clark 'came from Lagrange 
County and opened a select school. He was divorced from his 
wile, but had three children — Jane, Ezra and Mary. He was an 
excellent teacher and enthusiast in his profession. He was the 
first teacher who ever formed an arithmetic class. He made 
his scholars learn the process of solution, and then followed 



HIS .'■ ... i . ... KALE COU: 



itil the most stupid among them had mastered 

the necessary principles. So in reading; he was the ... 
teacher who compelled his pupils to learn the rules for reading 
in McGuffey's series, and then obliged them by precept and 
example, and by the same constant drill to follow them. In the 
spelling lesson the definition also was required. To awaken 
ambition and inspire a worthy emulation, Mr. Clark offered 
prizes to the head scholar in every class. 

I would like to know how many of these were carried home 
by a little, quiet, demure girl, who later grew up into a brill- 
iant woman, the daughter of Judge Morris, now Mrs. James 
Wood worth, of Fort Wayne. She was one of Mr. Clark's 
favorites because so faultless in deportment and recitations. 
There must be many in the county who look back thankfully 
to Mr. Clark's thorough teaching. He loved to awaken 
thought in his pupils. At one time he electrified the school by 
\ demanding suddenly : " If I call a sheep's tail a leg, how many 
j legs has a sheep ?" "Five," responded the too eager voices. 
! He paused for a moment waiting, then asked quietly : " Does 
! calling a sheep's tail a leg make it one?" The lesson was worth 
: a volume of elaborate discourses. 

Farewell, old teacher. Some, perhaps, would dwell upon 
thy faults, but not I. Thou wast a kind master to me, and let 
those who have no faults linger in recollection upon thine. It 
is for thy good qualities I remember thee. 

The first Sunday-school was organized in the fall of 1844, 
Wesley Park being Superintendent. It met in the school- 
hi mse. There was very little teaching done at first. The chief 
idea seemed to be to have singing and prayer, and give an op- 
portunity to the scholars to recite all the verses of Scripture 
which they had learned during the week previous. This edi- 
fying exercise left little time for lessons. The pupils were en- 
couraged by prizes to do the best they could. 
There are preserved two small volumes, Nos. 1 and 2 of the 
' Evangelical Spectator, one of which contains the inscription : 
•• Egbert Mott— 
" Merit book, July 4, 1845. He recited 1,169 verses last quarter. 

" W. Park, Supt.' 



The other: 
Julia Mott— 
" Merit book. 



She recited 1,114 verses last quarter. 






824 HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 



The reci] I List completed her eighth year. 

After an interval, question books were introduced, arid the 
custom of learning verses dropped into disuse, but not until 
some of the scholars had learned all of the four Gospels. Al- 
though the practice of offering prizes is to be deprecated as 
affording an insufficient test of excellence, and tending- to dis- 
courage the many who could learn some, but not the greatest 
number of Scripture texts ; yet on the whole I am inclined to 
think much good was done, by forming in the children the 
habit of attending some public worship on the Lord's day. 

HIGH SCHOOL BUILDING. 

The old school-house that was most familiar to the citizens 
of Auburn was burned in the winter of 1875— '6, and in the 
spring following the School Board commenced the erection of 
a fine brick building, in a little park of five acres, that was in- 
tended to be an ornament to the town for a generation to come. 
It was two stories in height, besides a roomy basement. The 
dimensions were 61x75 feet, and the highest point was sixty 
feet above the ground. The contract was let to J. W. Case for 
$9,760, he having twelve competitors, bidding all the way up to 
$13,000. The total cost of building, grounds, furniture, fur- 
naces, etc., was $14,300. The entire building was heated with 
hot air furnished from the basement. 

This beautiful building, the pride of Auburn, was destroyed 
by fire on the evening of Tuesday, Nov. 30, 1SS0. The fire was 
first seen near the heating apparatus in the basement, where it 
undoubtedly originated. It was of very small proportions 
when first seen, and with any sort of facilities it could have 
be tn easily extinguished. Efforts were made, but they were 

1 vailing. The insurance on the building amounted to S7.000, 

and the net loss was about an equal amount. 

The disaster was a grievous one, but, not discouraged, the 
authorities at once took measures for rebuilding the school- 
house. The new structure is now in use its third year, and is 
a credit to Auburn, though it is general!}" pronounced some- 
what inferior to its predecessor. The present Principal is M. 

\ ' rison, who taught two years as assistant and is now ... 

his third year as Principal. His assistant is H. E. Coe, who 
is teaching his first year here, having been at Waterloo the 
four years previous. The other teachers are : Letit'ia A. Coats, 



HISTORY 01 Dl KAI.B O 

now teaching her fifth year; Flora L. li i >nd y ar; 

Tilly McTighe, fourth year ; Violcl Bowi ear; Mrs. 

Clifton, first year Altogether there are seven r 

teachers. 

CHURi ■ 
The first Methodist Episcopal church was organized in 1839, 
by Rev. Samuel Reed. He was a very brilliant young .. i - 
ter, and died at a comparatively cany age. This was first called 
the St. Joseph Mission. Rev. Geo. M. Bcswick was then the 
Presiding Elder. To Wesley Park is given the credit of form- 
ing this first class, which comprised forty-two members. The 
only two now living arc Daniel Altenburg and James R. Cos- 
per. The church was built in 1843, at the northeast corner of 
the square, on a lot still owned by the society. It was removed 
about 1870 to its present site and refitted, a lecture room being 
added. This was under the pastorate of Rev. J. N. Welch. 
The church is in an admirable state of preservation, and few 
would suspect that it is forty-one years old. The present 
pastor is Rev. C. W. Church, who came from Fort Wayne in 
the spring of 1S83. The present membership is 2^5. M. F. 

i Long is Superintendent of the Sunday-school. 

The Baptists have long held religious services in this county. 
Their Cedar Creek church in Richland Township was organ- 
ized about 1842, among the prominent members being Dim- 
mick Harding, T. D. Daily and Erastus Calkins. Their second 

1 branch was the Wilmington church, started in the township of 
that name in 1845. Among its leading members were: 
Richard Hicks, Dewitt Hicks, S. B. Ward and wife, and Mrs. 
Haynes. This church had a membership extending o\v. 
of this then thinly settled county, and numbering at one time 

; seventy. Aug. 13, 1S52, a number of the members, having 

taken letters from the Wilmington church, organized the 

Auburn church, and in two or three year.-, the former society 

Among the first members here at Auburn were: 

r S ,. Ward and wife, and Vesta M. Ward, Deacon J. R, 

Bacon and wife, Emily Clark, Robert Culbertson and wife, 

J Darwin Eldridge and wife, Philo San ford and wife, Jerei . 

j Hemstrect and wife, and others. Elders J. M. Whitehea 

liam N. Wclkcr had conducted protracted meetings before 
the organization. Elder Ward served as pastor several years, 
and Elder A. Town preached for one year. The church dis- 



820 HISTORY OF DE KALI; COUNTY. 

banded about i S59, on accounl of removals, etc. The presenl 
church was organize . . . 1870, with eleven members: 

S. B. Ward and wife, John H. Ehlers and wife, Mrs. C. C. 

Shafer, Mrs. John McKay, Mrs. Joseph McKay, Mrs. Maria 
Woolsey, Mrs. Hannah Totten, Mrs. Anna Burlingame and 
Addie Reed. The pastors since then have been successively: 
S. B. Ward, R. P.Jones, W. Langdon Sanders, P.J. Ward and 
II. J. Pinch, the last named, who came in May, 18S4, being the 
present incumbent. The church building was erected in 1S72, ' 
at a cost of $3,000. It is on the corner of Jackson and Sixth 
streets, and has a seating capacity of from 250 to 300. The 

membership of the society is now about eighty. The Si - 

school has been under the charge of Elder Ward ever since its 
formation. 

The Presbyterian society was organized in the fall of [846, 
Auburn first belonged to the Logansport Presbytery ; but this : 
being divided, it was added to the Fort Wayne Presbytery. 
Rev. Mr. Bliss, who was first assigned to this place, was stated 
supply until the spring of 1S56, at that time the membership num. | 
I -. .. ; forty-three. In the spring of 1S57 Rev. Edward Wright 
took charge ; in 1S63 Rev. Charles A. Munn ; and from i860 the 
church was for a short interval without services. Then Rev. 1 

C. A. Evans was here for two years. After another interval, 
in the spring of 1S72, Rev. J. Emory Fisher commenced con- 1 
ducting services every other Sunday. Rev. Henry Johnson 
came in the spring of 1874, and remained until the fall of 1S80. 
During his pastorate, in the fall of 1S76, the brick structure 
now occupied by the society, al the corner of Jackson and 
Twelfth streets was creeled, at a cost of $6,000. It was 

. .... .,i January, 1877. The Trustees were: E. D. I 

1 Iartman, S. B. Miller, Joseph Abright and Richard Elson. 
These gentlemen are the present Trustees. Rev. Win. F. ' 
Mathews was here one year, from the spring of 18S1. Rev. II. ! 

D. McCord came in the fall of iS rei ained through 18S3. | 
The present pastor, Rev. G. W. Barr, came from Albion in ! 

.-,1884. Recently the church ..,.- cely finished 

off, the Ladies' Aid Society having expended $300 upon seat- 
ing, gas fixtures, etc. The membership of the church is about 
150. The Elders are: E. D. Hartman, S. B. Miller, Richard 
Elson, A. C. Wilson and Edward Baker. Richard Elson has 
charge of the Sunday-school. 



HISTORY OF DE KALB CO 1 S27 

The English Evangelical Lutheran church was organ 
1S76. They bought the old Presbyterian church and 
it, the total cost being $i,ooo. Rev. Levi Rice the first pas- 
tor, came from Wabash County, and is now in Lagrange. lie 
was succeeded by Revs. Samuel Kelso, Waltman and VV. T. 
Trover. The last named came from Monroevillc in the fall of 
1S83. The society has a membership of thirty-eight. The 
Sunday-school is in charge of George Ensley. The Catholic 
church was built in 1874 at a cost of $3,000, by Father Augusl 
Young, who came from Fort Wayne in 1S72. The church has 
a congregation of 150, and is a frame structure on the corner of 
Fourth and Railroad streets. 

The Germans have three churches. The Reformed church 
was organized here in 1S6S, and their building was erected in 
1868, at a cost of $1,500. The successive pastors have been: 
Revs. Kiessel, I. Matzenger, W. P. Sandoe, P. Ruhl, J. Rettig 
and J. F. Winter, who came in June. 1SS2. The church is on 
Fourth street. The membership is 144. The Sunday-school is 
in charge of John Lomm. The German Methodist Episcopal 
church is a frame structure built in 1874, at a cost of $2,800. 
The society is thirty-five years old. The church was built 
under Rev. Andrew Myers. Other pastors since him have 
been: Revs. Charles Treischel, Charles Kunselman, Joseph 
Cam, Hamp, Mesling and John Gummer. The German Luth- 
erans have a frame church built in 1873, at a cost of $1,000. 
The first preachers were: Revs. Steinbach and Boese. At 
present Rev. Reichard, who lives near Avilla, comes here every 
three weeks. The membership of this church is twenty-five. 



SOCIETIES. 

De Kalb Lodge, No. 214, F. & A. M., was chartered May 26, 
1857, an d instituted and the officers installed June 6, 1857. The 
Masters of the lodge have been successively: Milton F. Pierce, 
Joseph H. Ford, John Butt. Guv Plumb, Joseph H. Ford, Guy 
Plumb, Wm. A. Lowrey, Wm. E. Rush,, J. E. Rose, F. E. Dav- 
enport, J. J. Van Auken and F. E. Davenport. The 're-.... 

officers are: F. E. Davenport, W. M.; S. II. Rush, S. W.; T. 
G. Matheny, J. W.; W. H. McQuiston, Treas.; J. E. Rose, Sec; 
W. il. Keeran, S. D.: .... .... Abright, J. D.; H. A. Lesh, 

Tyler. The present membership of the lodge is sixty-five. 

Wm. Hacker Chapter, No. 63, R. A. M., was organized under 



S2S IIIST< iRY i II' DE ., vLIS COUNTY. 

dispensation Sept. 3, 1866, ana chartered May 23, [867. fohn 
Butt was High Priest until [S78. George II. K. Mos 
that position in 1879; F. E. Davenport in 1880, and G. T. Ab- 
bey from iSSi to 1SS3. The officers elected for 1884 were: 
Jay J. Van Aukcn, II. P.; John Butt, K.; George E. Bool , S.; 
G. VV. Lackey, C. of H.; S. H. Rush, P. S.; A. R. Stevens, K. 
A. C; R. J. Fisk, T.; F. E. Davenport, Sec. The membership 
of the chapter is now seventy-two. It meets the first Monday 
oi each month at Masonic hall. The chapter was moved to 
Waterloo the year alter it was started, and brought back to 
Auburn November, 1SS3. 

Mentor Lodge, No. 591, I. O. O.F., was organized in February, 
1SS2, and has now forty members. It meets every Tuesday. 
The present officers are: B. F. Culbertson, N. G.; Thomas H. 
Sprott, V. G.; W. Baker, Sec; G. W. Gordon, Treas. 

Auburn Council, No. 511, Legion of Honor, is an insurance so- 
ciety, organized April S, 1881. It has at present ten members, 
but holds no mc etings. 

De Long Post, No. 67, G. A. A\, was mustered May 8, 1882, 
with the following officers: Ezra D. Hartman, Com.; John Otto, 
S. V. C; Nicholas Ensley, Jr., J. V. C; H. C Peterson, Q. M.; 
J. J. Littiefield, Surg.; P. W. Silver, Chap.; William Snyder, 0. 
of the D.; George W. Gordon, Adj.; Fred April, O. of the G.; 1 
H. E. Altenburg, Aid-de-Camp; B. F. Culbertson, Ass't Ins. ! 
The present officers are as follows: John Otto, Com.; Nicholas 
Ensley, S. V. C; J. R. Thomas, J. V. C; D. K. Houghton, 0. 
M.; J. A. Cowan, Surgeon ; M. B. Willis, Chap.; P. W. Silver, 
O. of the D.; Robert Simpson, O. of the G.; George W. Gor- 
don, Adj.; George H. Hoffman, S. M.; Thomas Hallam, Q. M. 
S.; H. E. Altenburg, Aid-de-Camp; B. F. Culbertson, 'Ass't 
Ins. The post is in good condition, financial and otherwise, 
and has a membership of seventy. It meets every alternate 
Monday. 

THE LADIES' LITERARY SOCIETY. 

In the afternoon of April 3, 1SS2, a few thoughtful, intelli- I 
gent women met by previous appointment at the residence of \ 
Mrs. Augustus Leas, and organized a Literary Society. The j 
preamble to the constitution declares that — 

" We, the undersigned, feeling that home and society demand 
of the women of to-day the broadest and fullest culture, and 
being well assured that our usefulness and enjoyment will be 



HISTORY 01 DE K ".:..■ I . 



increased by such culture, be] , o, that the interchange 

i ....', ■ of pur] e will stimulate oui I I 

growth, do hereby unite ourselves in a club [or the sole pur- 
pose ol study and menial improvement, and for the al 
of our object do adopt the following Constitution," etc. 

The Ladies' Literary Society, as the first clause of the 

Constitution declares it shall be called, took up Taine's I 

of English literature as the first text-book. A careful study of 
us pages, and the subjects discussed therein, occupied more 
than two years. In October, 1884, the society selected Under- 
wood's American Literature from among several works under 
consideration, and its members are now engaged in studying 
the authors of whom the work treats. 

The society has three times celebrated its organization by 
social and literary entertainments, each succeeding one giving 
evidence of increasing power and intellectual advancement. 

Its regular meetings are held every Saturday afternoon in 
the parlor of some member of the society, where the time from 
2 : 30 to 5 o'clock is spent in the recitation of a lesson assigned 
the preceding week, and in a variety of literary exercises, as 
orations, essays, discussions, recitations, songs and instrumental 
music. The report of a critic, who censures or approves, as 
the exercises may deserve, concludes the work. 

A list of members is appended: 

Mrs. J. A. Barns,* Mrs. F. K. Blake, Mrs. Willis Brown, Mrs. 
F. E. Davenport, Mrs. Albert Dawson, Mrs. Mary A. Elders,* 
Mrs. C. E. Emanuel, Mrs. Nicholas Ensley,* Mrs. G. H. Fork- 
ner, Mrs. E. D. Hartman,* Mrs. M. W. Harrison, Mrs. Chester 
P. Hodge, Mrs. C. P. Houser, Mrs. A. S. Leas,- Mrs. John L. 
Leasure, Mrs. B. A. Lewis, Mrs. \V. II. McQuiston,* Miss Lilly 
McTighe, Mrs. Lottie F. Osgood* Mrs. A. J. Ralston,* Mrs. 
Albert Robbins,* Mrs. James E. Rose, Mrs. George Schaab, 
Mrs. Vesta M. Swartz, M. D.,* Mrs. M. Willis,* Mrs. Elias Zim- 
merman, Miss Delia McClellan. 

Removed from Auburn: Mrs. Theo. Reed,* Mrs. Louis 
Johnson, Mrs. W. P. Myers,* Miss Laura Clark. 

WATERLOO. 

town of Waterloo is four and a half miles from Auburn, 



Th 

six and a half mile 

♦Charter members. 



from Corunna, and eight miles from Butler 



on sections 3 and 4, Union Township. It is at the junction 
of two railroads, both belonging to the L. S. & M. S. 
and thus, with railroads leading in each of the four point 
the compass, the place is destined to be of permanent impor- 
tance. The first improvement in this vicinity was made near 
the Cedar Creek, northeast of Waterloo, and was called Union- 
town. It is now a mere appendage, or "suburb" to the town. 
Wesley Park, Sheriff of the county, put up a board shanty on 
the site of Uniontown in 1S38 as a shelter for two men em- 
ployed to build a bridge over the Cedar at this point. At this 

small cabin, in November, 1838, D. Altenburg, L. Walswi 

their families and the two bridge-builders, passed a night v. . 
the settlers were on their journey from . Steubenville to their 
selections of land in Union Township. In a previous chapter a 
full account of their trip is given. One who stands on the 
present fine bridge and notices the high banks, cannot but 
wonder how the stream was crossed by Messrs. Altenburg and 
Walsworth. They ran poles under the wagon, between the I 
spokes, so as to block all the wheels; then a' yoke of oxen was 
hitched to the tongue to hold back, and another yoke to the 
rear of the wagon to pull back, and so the crossing was effected. 

Being on the' line of the State road from Fort Wayne north 
■ igh Angola, and sufficiently remote from other settlements, 
this was thought a good site for a town, and a plat was accoi l- 
...ade by Frederick Krum. A store building was put up, 
and a trading point established George Trout. The firm of 
M. & A. Hale was the next to engage in the mercantile busi 
ness at Uniontown. James Bowman erected a water-power 
saw-mill on the site or the Star Mills; and about 1856, after the 
laying out of Waterloo, changed it to a steam-power mill. 
School was started at an early day. Richard Burnistin was 
the village blacksmith, and bodily infirmities ,vere cared for by , 
Dr. Jones. Wareham was a gun-smith, and Smith kept a cabi- 
;.. L-shop. 

The construction of the air line of the L. S. & M. S. R. R. 
through the county was the signal for laying the foundation of 
Waterloo City (as it was called for some years, while there was 
another Waterloo in the State). Miles Waterman, a prom . 
Citizen oi tiie county, and for several terms Representative ... 

the State Legislature, had purchased a tract of land so; 

Uniontown, lying on both sides of the railroad track. On thi; 



HISTORY 01' DE KATJi COUNTY. 831 

c town of Waterloo was laid out by Miles Waterman 

and John Hornbergcr, and the acknowledgement taken before 
George Wolf, Justice of the Peace, March 14, 1856. The Rrs1 
structure erected was a railroad office which stood near the 
•• Hale store," upon what is known as the Gillctt lot. Eli Will- 
iamson, the pioneer carpenter, and yet a resident of the town, 
built the first dwelling house. This old building was shifted 
about, and finally owned and occupied by Wetmorc, and was 
destroyed by fire some years ago. Store buildings were raised 
by James Irvingand John Wood; the former rented to Willard 
i\ Keller, and the latter kept a grocery and 1 restaurant. Lots 
sold rapidly, and building once begun continued briskly. At- 
tention became directed to this place; business gathered hither, 
and leading citizens of other localities became residents. 

T. Y. Dickinson removed from Auburn, and in 183s began 
the publication of the Waterloo Press, which is still published, 
the oldest newspaper in the county. For a full history of the 
same, see the Press Chapter. Dr. J. N. Chamberlain, Sheriff of 
the county, from 1800 to 1862; Henry Willis, who lilled the 
.same office, from 1S64 to 1S6S ; Jacob Kahn, long a leading mer- 
chant; Gen. Lewis; J. Blair and others located in the new town 
and aided to give it that healthy and encouraging growth, 
which not only made it the mart of Northern De Kalb and 
and Southern Steuben counties, but enabled it to present a 
formidable claim to the county seat. John Shull opened the 
first tavern, which was later known as the Central House. J. 
P. Beers, from Auburn, was the first lawyer in the town, and 
later was heard from as a proprietor of a stage line at Stanton, 
Mich. The first grist-mill was built and run by Josiah and 
Jonathan Weaver, it stood in Uniontown and was built in 
1S6S. The next mill was built by George Thompson in Water- 
loo, and is now operated by Crane, Duncan & Co. The third 
was the Star Mills, a fine brick building erected by Messrs. 
Best, McClellan & Moody. It was more than a local loss when 
this interest was destroyed by fire in 1876. The flouring-mill 
now owned and run by Messrs. Bauer & Weirich, is one of the 
finest in Northern Indiana. 

Waterloo possesses a fire-engine, the only one in De Kalb 
County, and a citizens' volunteer fire department. The engine- 
house is centrally located by the railroad tracks. The fair 
grounds of the Northeastern Indiana Agricultural Association 



HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 



(a full account of which is given in the Agricultural Chap 
located just north of town, and the annual fair draws large 
crowds to Waterloo. The pioneer school-house stands in the 
southeast part of the town. It is a Utile old frame building, a 
striking relic of the poor educational advantages of the past. 
Just before the incorporation of the town, the township trustee 
caused the erection ol what afterward became Agricultural 
hall near the Presbyterian church. In this ill-contrived struct- 
ure, Spencer Dills, Peter Colgrove and Prof. J. A. Barns, taughi 
as Principals, and the last named conducted several successful 
normal schools in the upper room. Finally the fine high- 
school building near the railroad in the .western part of town 
was erected. 

BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 

Those now doing business at Waterloo are as follows: 
L.Anderson, carriage and blacksmith shop; Bauer & Wei- 
rich, flouring-mill : Boyer & Beidler, dry goods ; Jacob Beck, 
bakeiw ; Best & McCIellan, De Kalb Bank: William Bevier, 
drug store; Maggie Batcson, millinery; H. E. Brown, meat 
market; William Bigler, livery; Boozer & Smith, agricultural 
implements; Bassett & Maxwell, jewelers; Samuel Beck, gro- 
cery; J. S. Bowers, furniture; J. H. Clifford, saloon and restau- 
rant; J. D. Campbell, drugstore; Crane, Duncan & Co., plan- 
ing-mill; F. Deventer, wagon and blacksmith shop; Duncan 
Bros., grocery; Dickinson & Willis, Waterloo Press;]. A. 
Dennison, restaurant and confectionery ; Orris Danks, boots 
and shoes; Sol. Fisher, clothing; R. J. Fisk, grocery; Her- 
man Froelich, marble works; Prentice Gill, sewing-machines; 
Moritz Grueter, grocery; John Heighn, blacksmith; Louis 
Henke, blacksmith ; E. Klatz, wagon shop; Kenned)' & Jack- 
man, Long's Hotel; Koons & Son, livery; Loewenstein & 
Rothschild, clothing, dry goods, grocery : S. J. Locke, hotel 
and saloon; R. M. Lockhart, lumber; John Leas, Citizens' 
Bank; James P. McCague, saw-mill; Peter Montavon, shoe- 
maker: Philip Morell, shoemaker; McBride & Seiler, hardware ; 
H. R. Miller, saloon; H. H. Nutt, planing-mill ; Frank Ryan, 
Butts' Hotel; A. V. Sinclair, grocery; George Shoner, tan- 
nery; Speer & Son, grocery; R. Shull, millinery; A. R.Stev- 
ens, tailor; Sinclair Bros., hardware; Richard Till, saloon; 
Wareham & Harley, barber shop; J. N. Winslow, drug store; 






HISTORY OF DE KA1 053 

Willis & Co., book store ; William Wallace, harness shop; Eli 
Williamson, fanning-mill factory. 



The first physicians were: Drs. Jones & Hornberger. Of 

the following who are now pi i me arc old rcsid 

Drs. Solomon S tough, J. N. Chamberlain, A. Byron Darby, A. 
S. Farrington, '/.. W. Shepherd (Homeopathic), A. A. Ward, 
Ilenr) Lehman, (Homeopathic), C. M. Ewing and S. B. Johns- 

. The legal profession has always been credit; . 
represented at Waterloo. James f. Best is now a member oi 
the Supreme Court Commission, and is consequently al .... 1- 
apolis, but his home is really here. Other resident members 
of the bar are: R. Wes. McBridc (present Circuit Judge), 
Somers cS; Roby, L. J. Blair, C. M. Phillips, William EX.' Leas 
and John A. Garwood. 

BANKS. 

The town supports two banking establishments. The De 
Kalb Bank was organized June 1, 1S73. Its first Directors j 
were: James I. Best, O. T. Clark and C. A. O. McCleilan ; first 
cashier, A. F. Best. It is now owned by Messrs. Best and 
McCleilan, and Giles T. Abbey is cashier. The Citizens' Bank 
was organized July 21, 1S75, with John Leas, Joseph Roger, W. 
C. Langan, Jacob Kahn and Artemas Corbett as directors, and 
.Mr. Langan as cashier. This position is now filled by H. K. 
Leas. 

RELIGIOUS. 

Waterloo is well supplied with churches. 
The Presbyterian Church was organized June 5, 1S63. by 
C. Ford, with the following constituent members: P. B. Nim- 
mons, Mary Nimmons, James Lockhart, Robert M. Lock:;..... 
Elizabeth Lockhart, Abraham McCoy, Eiizabetn McCov, 

X.... s, Louisa Nimmons, Edward Craft, J. E. 

Rutan, Keziah Rutan, Joseph Mills, J. X. Mills, Jane Smith, 
jane Madden, J. H. Boon, Mary Hines, Celestia Hutchij ... 
Laura Hutchison, A. A. Howard, Sarah A. Howard and Racl 

. The first ruling Elders were: P. B. Nimmons, Ro 
Lockhart and A. A. Howard. The church building itself, a 
frame structure on Maple street, was erected in 1867, at a cost 
of 83,000. The first pastor, Rev. Edward Wright, remained 



- _ 

. fOKY i DF, KALI! i 

from 1S63 to [866. He died in 1S7S, in Blooi gton, ,;,. 

Rev. C. A. Munn came from Auburn, pre e I two 3 

is now in Michigan. Rev. L. C. Litt< 

years, and is now in Michigan. Rev. J. B. Fowler then cami .. 

Elkhart, whither he returned after a six years' stay at Waterloo. 
After he left, Rev. Henry Johnson, of Auburn, came here al- 
ternate Sundays for two years. lie is now in Michigan. Then 
Rev. W. F. Matthews, of Auburn, preached here 
Sundays, and after him for one year the pulpit was filled in the 
same manner by Rev. J. D. McCord, likewise of Auburn. The 
present pastor is Rev. G. W. Barr, who commenced in the 
spring of 18S4. The church lias a membership of forty. The 
Sunday-school is under the superintendency of F. W. Willis. 

The Catholic Church was built in 1863 and 1S64, at a cost ol 
Si. 400, by Father Achtereng. The congregation is small, and 
only monthly services are held. The priest is Father Max 
Bensinger, who has recently come from the seminary a*. Mil. 
waukee, Wis. 

The German Reform Church is a frame structure, just outside 
the corporation. It is on the Angola road, in Smithfield Town- 
ship-, and was built in 1876. 

The Methodist Episcopal people bought a seminary building 
in 1S67, which they used until recently. In the fall of 1SS4 
they erected a very fine brick church on the corner of Douglas 
and Walnut streets, at a cost of 84,000. The society is in a 
nourishing condition, having a membership of sixty-five. The 
present pastor. Rev. W. M. Slykc. came in the spring of 1883. 
The Sunday-school is in charge of Henry E. Coo. 

The United Brethren in Christ built a church in i860, and in 
1879, at a cost °* Si, -00, they rebuilt. Services were held long 
before the erection of the first mentioned building. The Revs. 
Fink and Lamon were the first to officiate here. They have been 
succeeded by Revs. Win. Moffatt, Morthland, A. Lower, Leon- 
ard, T. Osmun, J. K. Swihart, C. O. Lawrence, J. G. Bowersox, 
D. Bender, John Martin, Crawford B. Baldwin, C. II. Kiracole, 
Joseph Brown, W. O. Dinius, S. P. Klutz, James Snyder, \V. 
O. Butler, J. S. Tedrow, and J. W. Lilly. The last named, the 
present incumbent, began his labors here in September, 18S4. 
The society has a membership of 113. Simpson Duck is super- 
intendent of the Sunday-school. 

The Church of Christ, or Disciples, built a brick structure in 



[J ' 

1S70, on Maple street, ; Rev. X. N. B; 

the first past ir, remained two years. I le iv -csiclcnt of this 

county in early 1 al Paincsville, Ohio. Rev. 

fames Hodsell was at Watei or tin ensuing two ye; 

was from Kendallvillc, though formerly a resident of this 
county,;.... I Waterloo after two years' service. Rev. F. 
H. McCormick then came from < ... ir one year. H 

..; |\>e. Ail . • . ot pre; hing. Rev. M. M. Glea- 

son, of Steuben County, was here for ilic ensuing year. Rev. 
M. L. Blaney succeeded him for one year. He came he 
Kendallvillc, and is now at that place, though not preaching. 
The church has no services at present. Its membership is 25. 
A Sundav-schuoi urganizadun is maintained under Dr. A. 
Byron Darby. 

The English Reformed church is a fine brick structure 
on the corner of Center and Union streets. It was built 
in 1S72, at a cost of $5,500. The first pastor was Rev. 
Henry Baer. The next was Rev. Mr. Fenniman. He was fol- 
lowed in 1SS0 by Rev. F. F.Christine, who now nils the pulpit. 

The Evangelical Association built a church in 1877, at a cost of 
over $4,000, though the society was organized before the war. 
The church was built during the pastorate of Rev. Geist. The 
pulpit is now rilled by Rev. J. E. Stupps, who came from De- 
fiance in the spring of 1884. The membership is about 100. 

SOCIETIES. 

Waterloo City Lodge, Xo. 307, I 7 . e> A. Jlf., was organized in 
1 861. It has now a membership of forty-two, and meets the Wed- 
nesday on, or preceding, each full moon. The present officers 
are: Giles T. Abbey, W. M.; A. I. Sinclair, S. W.; W. H. Leas, 
J. W.; Charles Bassett, Treasurer; H. K. Leas, Secretary; J. C. 
' .... d, S. D.; Ed. Campbell, J. D.; S. Z. Dickinson, Tyler; A. 
R. Stevens and R. J. Fisk, Stewards. 

Waterloo Lodge, No. 221, I. 0. 0. E., was organized in 1S60. It 
has now a membership of forty, and meets at Odd Fellows' 
hall every Tuesday evening. The present officers are : Jacob G. ! 
Brown, X. G.; John M. Somers, V. G.; S. B. Johnston, Sec.; 
Phil. Morell, Treas.; C. K. Baxter, Perm. Sec. 

Union Lodge, Xo. 1,436, K. of H., was organized about 1S7S; 
has now thirty-eight members, and meets every Friday evening. 
Dr. S. B. Johnston is P. D.; J. M. Waterman, Die; G.J. Beck, 



HISTORY OF ' . . . . 

V. D.; J. R. Duncan, A. D.; F. E. Adam, Rep.; J. A. Shull, Fin. 
Rep.; George Shoner, Treas. The lodge has p; I 
of $2,000 to Jay B. Boyer's widow in 1882. 
. loo Post, No. 52, G. A. R., was mustered in Marc',., [8S2. 
Its membership is now sixty-one, and the time of meeting is the 
first Wednesday of each month. Dr. S. B. Johnston is Com.; j. 
P. McCague, S. V. C; F. D. Waterman, j. V. C; Prentice Gill, 
Adj.; S.J. Locke, Q. M.; A. R. Stevens, O. of the D.; J. N. Mc- 
Bride;0. of the G."? B. F. Kennedy, S. M.: C. K. Baxter, Q. M.S. 

...■ ICR U'HICAL. 

G. T. Abbey, cashier of the De Kalb Bank, is a native of Clyde, 
Sandusky Co., Ohio, born Nov. 24, 1S27, a son of Alanson and 
Lucy (Daggett) Abbey, natives of New York, who moved to 
Ohio in 1S19. Alanson Abbey was a soldier in the war of 1S12 
and received a pension for his services. His wife died ... .... 

and he afterward married again. To him and ...- ... 
were born ten children, six of whom lived till maturity. They 
were members of the Christian church. Mr. Abbey died in 
1S79, at tne a ii" e oi ' eighty -four years. Our. subject, G. T. 
Abbey, remained with his father till manhood. In 1858 his 
parents removed to Steuben County, Inch, and there he grew 
to manhood. He received a very limited education, but by 
perseverance became fitted to enter the business world and 
compete successfully for positions of honor and trust. In 1864 
he moved to Waterloo, which has since been his home. Ik- 
was married in 1S50 to Martha Long, a native of Ohio, daughter 
of James and Martha Long. To them were born three children. 
but two of whom are living — Ella J., wife of W. H. Hollister, 
oi Butler, Ind., and Carrie J. Mrs. Abbey died in Steuben 
County in 1862. Mr. Abbey is a member of Waterloo City 
Lodge, No. 307, F. eV. A. M., and has been Master of his lodge 
three years; Past High Priest and also Principal Conductor 
of the work of his council. For many years he has been iden- 
tified with the educational and political interests of the town. 
Politically he is a Republican. 

Joseph Abright, watchmaker and jeweler. Auburn, Ind., is a 
native of Ohio, born in West Rushvillc, Oct. 6, 183S, a son oi 
David and Jane (Thompson) Abright. When fourteen years of 
age he went to Chillicothe and served four years as an appren- 
tice at the watchmaker's trade; then worked in the same 



.. •...■;,.■::. U.I; c, 






establishment as foreman foui i went to Grcen- 

castle, Inch, and in the sprit;-- of rS6i to L; Ohio, w lere 

April 5, 1S61, he cnlist< : in the Sev tenth Ohi^ Infantry for 

three months. Alter his term of service expired, Au. 
again enlistee! in the Forty-sixth Ohio Infantry for three years, 
and when the call was made by the President to re-enlist 
veterans, responded Oct. 29, 1S63. He was mustered in as 
Orderly Sergeant. Jan. 1, 1S62, I pi m :d to Fii 

Lieutenant and soon alter to Adjutant of the regiment. lie 
served four years, three months and fourteen days, and was 
never away from ids regimi at for any cause. He participated 
in some oi the most important battles of the war, among them 
Shiloh, siege of Corinth, Vicksburg, Jackson, Miss., Atlanta 
campaign, and was with Sherman on his march to the sea, 
being in twenty-eight engagements. He was wounded twice, 
but not severely. He was present ... Joh ;ton' ... to 

General Sherman in April, 1S65. He was mustered out at 
Camp Chase, Columbus, Ohio, Sent. 21, 1865. He soon after 
went to St. Paid, Minn., and remained till 1867. Then returned 
to Ohio and worked a year in Circleville, and in Se 
[S6S, came to Auburn and established his present place of busi- 
ness, where he has built up a good trade. Mr. Abright was 
married Oct. 1, 1S67, to Louisa McFee, of West Rushville, 
Ohio. They have one daughter — Maud. He is a member of 
DeKalb Lodge, No. 214, F. & -V. M. He has served 'three 
years as Treasurer of Auburn, and has given perfect satisfaction 
to his constituents. 

John IV. Ashlemati, the second son of John W. and Mary 
Ashleman, was born in Wayne County, Ohio, March 27, 1844. 
His parents were natives of Germany, and were married in 
Switzerland about 1S34 and came to the L T nited States and lo- 
cated in Wayne County, Ohio. They subsequently moved to 
De Ivalb Count}', Inc., and settled on a farm just east of Au- 
burn, entering 160 acres. After getting ready to start for 
America, Mr. Ashleman's trunk was robbed of its contents, in- 
all his money. His friends assisted him, but he arrived 
in a strange country with no means. He was possessed of a 
large amount of energy, and went bravely to work and was 
eminently successful, accumulating a large landed estate, own- 
ing at his death over 900 acres. His family consisted. . .. nine 
children — Elizabeth, wile of A. J. Carmer ; Moses; Barbara, 



S3S HISTl iRY Ol" DI- KALB COUNTY. 

I a es Eckart; Mary, wi i I .; I R 

Enos Weaver; Anna, . ; John \\'. : 

Christian, and R< isa, wife of A. J. 

on a farm, receiving a common-school edui - 

marriage he settled i .resent farm, where he owns eight\ 

acres of land, with good buildings. He is a neat and thrifty 
farmer, and also pays considerable attention to stock-raising. 
Me was married in iS6S to Aurelia Chidsey, dan 
man Chidsey. To them have been born three suns — Lyman, 
William and Frank. 

[sane O. Bachtcl, proi)rictor of the Eagle Mills, Auburn, was 
burn in Canton, Stark Co., Ohio, April 7, [844, a son oi David 
and Elizabeth Bachtcl. When twelve vers ol age ... began 
to take care of himself, working in the mills of R. Elston at 

Magnolia, Ohio. He ■• d himself by working for his 

luri and . ling the public sc:; ... ; 

first work being in a mill, he early acquired a taste for thai 
. . and chose it for his life-work. When nearly eigh- 
teen yeaVs ... ag he enlisted ... C n E, Sixty-firsi Ohio 
Infantry, and participated in the battle of Bull Run and 
subsequent skirmishes during Pope's retreat. His health be- 

Co. -.-.'.ag impaired ..'. _-xp .sure, he was sent to the hospitals a; 

Washington, D. C, and Alexandria, but after three months was 
discharged for disability, in Xovember, 1S62. In 1864 he again 
enlisted, in the One Hundred and Sixty-second Ohio Infantry, 
too-day men, and served four months, doing guard duty at 
Covington, Ky. Alter his return to civil life he was em loj 
in Magnolia Mills, wl.-j'/c he learned his trade, a lew month-, 
and in October. 1S64, went to Canton, Ohio, and was en 
in the Union Mills till April, 1605, when lie came to Indiana 
ana worked in the Grove Mills at Kendallville till Xovember. 
. le then moved to De Kalb County, and worked in the 
mills at Sedan and Auburn till April, 1S72, when he purchased 
the mills at Corunna which he ran till May, iSSo, when lie ex- 

c gcd them for the Eagle Mills at Auburn. Mr. Bachtcl 

thoroughly understands every detail of his business, which he 
superintends, and makes a first grade flour. He was marric 
( >, .. ... 1870, to Amelia, daughter of Francis Baird, of Union 
Township, Dc Kalb County. They have three children El 
nier, Flora and Orris. Mr. Bachtcl is a member of Mentor 
.0 Igc, No. 591, I. O. O. F. 






/fs\ v> 



[Jyam&< 



\ . 13 I iUN'TY. 

Frank /•'. hip, was 

born in Lancaster County, Pa., Sept. [7, 1S17, th< 
four children of John and Agnes (Andrews) Baird. Eli 

cats moved to Wayne County, Ohio, in an early day, and in 
the spring of 1S46 to De Kalb County, Ind., and settled one 
mile east of Auburn where the father died in 1S51, and the 
mother in 1869. Frank Baird was reared a farmer, remaining 
with his parents till their death, and then Inheriting the home- 
stead. His father bought 160 acres of wild land when he came 
to Dc Kalb County, and to this he has added twenty acres. He 
now owns one oi the finest farms in Union Township, all well 
improved. In 1S76 he buill a large two-story brick residence, 
with all modern improvements. He has two large barns, and 

. is buildings are in good repair. Mr. Baird was married 

in Ohio, to Hester Stoner, who died in 1869, leaving six chil- 
dren — Amelia, wife of Isaac Beachlar ; John H., Calvin L.. 
Thomas F., Zora M. and William L. In 1S71 he married 
Sophia Leas, daughter of John Leas, of De Kalb County. lie 
is one of the successful and representative farmers of De Kalb 
Con ;ii v. 

Charles Basset t, of the firm Bassett & Maxson, jewelers, Wa- 
terloo, Ind., was born in Brownhelm, Lorain Co., Ohio, Jan. 8, 
1838, a son of Thomas and Nancy Bassett. While yet a child 
ids parents died, and he was thus left to battle with the world 
for himself. When eight years of age he went to Erie County, 
Ohio, and remained four years; then went to Union Citv, 
Mich., and from there to Coldwater, where he began to learn 
the jeweler's trade, serving an apprenticeship with C. II. 



rin unpson, remaining four \ e: 



In 1859 nc came to Water- 



loo, and in company with J. F. Maxson, established their pres- 
ent business. They have had a steadily increasing ;:. 
rank among the most prominent and substantial business men 
of Waterloo. Mr. Bassett was married in Jackson, Mich., Jan. 
i, 1859, to Caroline Maxson, a sister of his partner. They have- 
four children — Carrie, wife of Amos B. Walworth ; Charles 
Lewis, Bessie and William. In politics Mr. Bassett adheres to 
the Republican party. He has held several local offices of 
trust in the township. He is a member of the Masonic frater- 
nity, lodge, chapter and council, and has been Treasurer of 
Waterloo City Lodge, No. 507, twenty years. He and his wife 
are members of the Christian church. 



840 

Ohio, Jan. 5, 
.. si .: oJ John and Nancy (Slcntz) Ban,, 1 

Ohio. [lis gi parents were native 1, and 

1 ,, , cttlcrs of Ohio. In 1 . . . - ivcd to De Kalb 

Count)-, lnd.,and entered a tract of 120 acres from the Govern- 
ment on section 23, Union Township, which and to 
tly added irty acres. He was one ol 

sturdy pi' ie< . endurci • hardship privations. 

After paying for his land he had a little money left with w 

::.: 501 md .... and a scanty supply of provi- 
sions. 1 le was twice man ii d. To him and his firsl wife were 
. . . eight children Addison, George \\\, Isaiah, Eliza (wife 

...... dizcr), N '■ . ■ V\ Oider), Sa- 

mantha (wife of Sheldon Crooks), Ermina wife ol Henry Smith), | 

atilda (wife oJ James Seibert). His second wife was 
Elizabeth Weeks, and to them were born four children — John 
F., Idola, Ida and Carrie. Isaiah Baughman was reared : 
educated in De Kalb County, attending the log cabin district 
school. When seventeen years of age he enlisted in the defense 

in Company H, Thirtieth Indiana Infantry, and i 

served rom September, [S61, till February, [862, when he was 
. on account oi ill health. The following Atigu I 
1 nlisted, and was assigned to Company A, Eighty-eighth ! 

....; : Infantry. At the battle of Stone River, Jan. 2, 1! . 

he was •■■ ded in the right leg, and lay in the hospital till 

Aj.ril 20, when he was discharged. .Alter his recovery he 
enlisted March 25, 1864, and served in Company A, First liicii- 

ea\ v Artillery till the close of the war; was discharged 

in January, [866. lie then worked on the farm for his father 

narriage, when he settled on section 24, bu\ 

.and. Three years later he sold tins land and bought 

eighty acres on section 14, where he now lives, located on what 

was known as the " Island." This .... . hi .... improved, and 

has erected a fine two-story dwelling and a good barn and other 

dings. Mr. Baughman was married in 1S6S to Sophia 

Weeks, daughter of John and Mary A. Weeks, early settlers of 

De Kalb County. To them have been born six children — 

Willis, Laura, Anna, Cora, Dora and Ward. Mr. and Mrs. 

Baughman are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

C. K. Baxter is a native of Wayne dainty, Ohio, born Nov. 
30, 1838, a son of John and Sarah (Kclley) Baxter, natives ol 



irsTOkY > 






imsylvania, the former of Wa the latl 

of 1 [untingi i fn i s moved to D 

County, Ind d settled on section 25, Sn 

on a trad of heavily-timbered land. The father died in Sep- 
tember, 1859, and the mother in [879. They were among the 

ol the county, and contributed I; 

toward its ■ . er was reared 

\ but when sixteen 3 e entered the Messenger office at 

Auburn and rii ter's trade. When twenty-one 

years of age he bought an interest in fice at Water- 

I ioo, but in 1 So 1 sold his interest to his partner, T. V. Dickin- 
son, and enlisted in the Nineteenth Indiana Infantry, C01 
G, as a private, but was promoted to First Lieutenant. He 
participated in the second battle of Bull Run, South Mountain, 
Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Wildernes 
Petersburg. He was discharged Sept. S, 1864, after a service 
ol three years. Aftei turn home he again embarked in 

the newspaper business, editing the Press till 1884, when I 1 
out, and is now living a retired life. Mr. Baxter was married 
Nov. 10, 1S63, to Mary A. Dickinson, a native of Portage 
Count)-, Ohio, daughter of T. R. Dickinson. Mrs. Baxter died 
Feb. 26, 1866, leaving two children — William S. and Maurice. 
Oct. 7, 1S69, Mr. Baxter married Harriet, daughter of David 
Landis, of De Kalb County. But one of their three children is 
living — Mary. Mr. Baxter is a member of Waterloo Lodge, 
No. 221, I. 6. O. F., and Waterloo Post, No. 52, G. A. R. 

Jacob Beck, baker and confectioner, Waterloo, Ind., was born 
in Wittemburg, Germany, Dec. 24, 1S24. When he was fifteen 
years old he was apprenticed to a baker and served two years, 
receiving his board, but was required to pay $20 for learning. 
He was married in 1S4S to Louisa Fousel, and in 1854 emigrai . . 

with his ily to the United States. He located in B 

N. Y., and worked at his trade a short time, but subseq 
moved to Toledo, Ohio, and was employed by M. C. Wortz 
several years. In the spring of 1863 he moved to Waterloo, 
... and began business on the corner ol Wayne and Van 
Vlick streets, but afterward bouglu lie store where he is now 

[j located. Mr. Beck was in moderate circumstances when he 

J came to Waterloo, but being a thorough master of his trade he 
has built up a good business, and is now one of the most suc- 
cessful men of the city. To Mr. and Mrs. Beck have been born 



842 01 

nine children, bvit five oi whom arc living — Augustu . 
Emma, Henry, and Ada. 

, . .',.- /, one ol the 1 os1 enter] rising and sui 
business men of Waterloo, was born in Crawford County, Ohio, 
Feb. iS, 1S36, a son of Adam and Sarah (Gloyd) Beck, natives 
of Pennsylvania, but early settlers of Crawford County, where 
they were married in 1S34. Four of their seven children are 
living. The father died in 1S70 and the mother in June, 1882, 
both at the age of sixty-two years. Our subject received but a 
limited education, his father being a poor man and he being the 
eldest son, was early obliged to assist in the maintenance of the 
family. He came to Waterloo in 1861, and the following year 
became established in the general mercantile and produce bu - 
ness. He now has the largest trade in butter, eggs and poultry 
in Northern Indiana. Mr. Beck was married in 1S63 to Lillie 
Staers, a native of Maryland, but a resident of De Kalb County 
since her childhood. Mr. and Mrs. Beck have three daughters 
— Dora, Mary and Alta. Mr. Beck is a member of Waterloo 
City Lodge, Xo. 307, F. & A. M. He was drafted in the war 
of the Rebellion, but paid $700 to a substitute. 

John Beidlcr, the second son of Henry and Nancy (Ocherman) 
Beidlcr, was born in Westmoreland County, Pa., May 15, 1S18. 
When he was two years of age his parents moved to Ohio and 
scaled in Holmes County where they lived the remainder of 
their lives. In that county he grew to manhood, and was mar- 
ried when twenty-two years of age to Miss Elizabeth Fresher, a 

. Holmes County. In the spring of 1847 they 

and moved to De Kalb County, Ind., and settled on a tract of 
wild, timber land in Union Township, which had bee;. 1 . . en 
by his father. At that time the county was mostly inhabited 
by wild animals and Indians. Now a part of the city of 

is located on his land. He has two good residence 

houses on ids farm, a i: other buildings an ... e and con- 

... Although in meager circumstances when he com- 
menced life, he has now a competency for his old age. He has 
;. family of seven children — Frank M., Solomon, Catherine, wife 
of J. B. Taylor, of Waterloo; Henry, Hiram W., John C, and 
• filli S. He and his wife are members of the United Breth- 
ren church, of which he has served several years as Class-leader. 
Politically he is a Republican. 
Ephraim Berry was born in Champaign County, Ohio, 



'. 



o 






.. .. 19, [823, a son of David and Catherine Bern', lie was 

reared in his native < 1 education. From 

boyhood he was handy with tools and early began ork 

with machinery, although he never learned a trade, [n O to 

her, 1848, he came to Indiana and worked two years in Solomon 
Pence's saw-mill in Butler Township, De Kalb County, and in 

the ime built a new mill. The next two years he 

in different parts of the State, but in the spring of 1852 per- 
manently located in Auburn. He worked at the carpenter's 
trade and mill building five years, and then built an engine and 
lathe and engaged in repairing machinery and turning broom 
handles, etc., ten years, when he built an engine and machine 
for making moldings, to which he soon after added a planing 
machine, and carried on that business six years, when he sold 
out and retired from active business. Jan. 1, 1S45, he was 
married to Mary Jane Jenkins, ot Champaign County, Ohio. 
: le has always taken an interest in the public affairs of the city, 
and has served as Justice of the Peace and City Trustee 
several terms. 

General L. J. Blair, one of the most prominent, attorneys of 
De Kalb County, is a native of Franklin County, Ohio, and was 
born Dec. 29, 1829. When he was six years of age his parents 
moved to De Kalb County, and here he was reared on a farm, 
and in his early manhood was engaged in rafting. His early 
education was limited to the country schools, but having an in- 
satiable thirst for knowledge, he bade defiance to all difficulties, 
and in his youth determined to make the profession of law his 
life-work. He devoted his leisure hours to such books as he 
could procure, and wi. .. nin :l :cn years ol age was given the 
use of Reuben J. Dawson's law library, lie then became more 

diligent in his study, and in 1855 was admitted to the .-a; 

from that time till after the breaking out ol the civil war prac- 
ticed in DcKalb Count)-. In July, 1862, he recruited a com- 
pany, which was assigned as Company H to the Eight] -< i 
Indiana Infantry, and was commissioned its Cap!;..... 
regiment was assigned to the Army of the Cumberland under 
the command of General Thomas and subsequently General 
Rosecrans. He participated in many of the more important 
battles; at Chickamauga had command of the regiment. After 
the battles of Lookout Mountain and Mission Ridge, 1.. which 
battles he was engaged, he was promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 



. 

I 

o ic sc:i. After Ll 

at Savannah was pr ■ lie was 

.'. lien ( m ..-•:. 1 Jo i red, a 

review of Sherman's army. After the clo e ol the war he re- 
fvalb County, where he .... airsued his 

i i ion. Me is one of the most eloquent orators and most 

powerful advocates before th 

ing his audience spellbound fri nttothcclo 

of his argument. He is purel) ascl 

his ;>i. ice at the head of the fraternity by his indomita 

u'hic u'cd i ibs ■ to stand between him and success. 

Gencr; 153, to Mary, d 

of Manly Bruce, :auga County, Ohio. They have two 

daughters and one son. 

James Arnold Blodgctt is a native ol Wayne Count)', Ohio, 
born March 30, 1S36, the third son oi James and Elizabeth 
(Howard) Blodgett, natives of Lower Canada, and early v t- 
tlcrs of Wayne County, Ohio; later moved to Putnam County 
where the father died about 1838. In [S42 the mother moved 
her family to Dc Kalb Count)', tnd., and located in Wil- 
mington Township near the present iti Butler. Six years 

later she moved to 1 I nion Township, now owned 

by uur subject, where s!ic lived till her death in 1.S72, aged 
about seventy-six years. She was the mother of five children, 
three of whom arc living — Azuba, wife of Zopher Johnson ; 
Perry and James A. Our subject was but six years ol ... 
when hi- ti amc to Indiana, and was, thcrefo , ai"cd 

ited unt.y. He remained with his mother 

till manhood and assisted in 1 on oi the farm. lie 

now owns the homestead, which contains eighty acres o; fine 
land, and his improvements arc among the best in the count)-, 
lie is an energetic and enterprising farmer, and is also one of 
the most successful stock-raisers in the township. He was mar- 
ried in 1868 to Lillian L., daughter of John and Eli; 
natives of Maryland and early settlers of De Kalb County. To 
...v... have been born two children, but one of whom is living— 
James W., born Jan. 4, 1S71. S. E. died in infancy. Mr. i 

served as Constable of his township and as Road 
" ..... .-visor. 

Michael Roland, Auburn, Ind., was born in Toledo, Ohio, De- 



■ . . i 






p 

M Of ll 

. ; . I ........... 



nd 



A W [nd. R: 

. 



rci fOw 





iant, b) f; 

. 
il [i . 



chools ["o - mi wh 

he gradu cteen years ol ige. In S< >tci iber, 1871, 

he entered the oflii if the Lake S 

An aid ..>.:,. 

ici . . gave him th< charg< of tl r ifl at Corunna, De 

Co., Im position till the fall of 1876, when 

he was elected on the Democratic ticker. Recorder of Dc Kalb 
County, a position 1 il years. In the 

fall of 1SS3 he became a stockholder in the Firsl National Ban! , 
Auburn, and in January, 1S84, was elected one ol its Directors. 
He was married Oct. 31, 1S75, 10 Lottie, daughter of George 
W. McMiller, of Corunna. They have two children — Jessie 
B. and George C. Mr. Boland is entitled to much credit for 
his official and business career in De Kalb County. By his in- 
tegrity and strict attention to business he has gained an execi- 
lent reputation, and his genial and pleasant intercourse with 
his fellowmen has made him many friends throughou 
county. 

William M. BougJuxn, Justice of the Peace of Auburn, De 
Kalb Co., Ind., moved to Auburn, Dc Kalb County, in Decem- 
ber, 1S6S, and became associated with Charles Klotz in the dry 
goods and clothing business ; remained in that business until the 
fall of 1871, when he was appointed tation and ticket agent 
. ,. the ficl River Railroad, now called the 
Wabash; remained in 1 . ofl 1 until 1S73, when he b 

ciated with V. A. Beard in the grocery business, under the 
firm name of Beard & Co. In 1875 he retired from the firm 
and the same fall was appointed ticket agent tor the Baltimore 
& Ohio Railroad at Auburn ; remained in that office until the 
fail of 1S76, when, upon the death of his wife, he resigned his 
office and \vcn1 to St. Louis, Mo.; returned to Auburn in No- 
vember and married a second wife. He was in no particular 
business until the summer of 1880, when he was appointed 
target man at Auburn Junction for the Baltimore & Ohio, Lake' 
Shore & Michigan Southern and Wabash railroads, wide;'. 

incd until the fall of 1883. Being elccte 

office of Justice of the Peace, he resigned his position with the 



S46 '. DE KALB 

railroads I t< luti fice, in which In . 

engaged. Mr. Bong born in Ross County, Ohio, Nov. 

12, 1815. When four years old, he with his parents, moved to 
Union County, Ohio, where, Nov. 29, 1S35, he was married to 
Nancy Dixon, from Loudon County, Va. There, on the same 
farm, lie remained for forty years, having held several 
taut offices of trust ; served as Constable, Sheriff, Trustee. 
School Director, and nine years as Justice of the Peace. He 
was Captain of an Independent Rifle Con for fourteen 

years, during which time the war between Mexico and the 
United States came on, and he as Captain, with 100 men, fully 
armed and equipped, volunteered to go to Mexico, but the 
Governor would not let them go. Me remained in Union 
County, Ohio, till March, i860, when he moved to Richland 
County, in Southern Illinois, and carried on farming. Dec. 1, 
1 861, he volunteered in the service of the United States and 
raised a company of 100 men, of which he was made Captain. 
Dec. 10, 1S61, he received a commission from Governor Yates as 
Captain of Company C, Sixty-third Illinois Infantry, and served 
in that capacity during the war ; was offered promotion quite a 
number of times, which he refused, choosing rather to stay 
with the men he had enlisted. He participated in twenty-six 
battles, the names of which are all engraved on the sheath of 
iris saber, which he still retains. He was mustered out of the ser- 
vice at Goldsboro, N. C, April 9, 1865, after going the entire 
route with Sherman through the interior of Georgia and 
States to the sea. After going to Washington City and set- 
tling up with the Government, he returned to his home in Illi- 
nois. He was wounded three times, but none were very serious. 
He came to Auburn, as before stated, in 1868, and in 1S76 his 
wife died. They had ten children, five of whom, two sons and 
three daughters, are living. In the winter of the same ■. ..." he 
married : . , . lied and lie married 

Jane L. Goldey, with whom he is now living. 

John IV. Boyle, Sheriff of De Kalb County, Ind., came to In- 
diana in 1848, and settled in Concord Township, De Kalb 
County, where he followed farming till 1868, when he moved 
to Butler Township and resided there till his election to the 
office of Sheriff, when he moved to Auburn. He was re-elected 
for a second term in 1884. Mr. Boyle was born near Mount 
Gilead, Morrow Co., Ohio, July 24, 1S31. He was reared a 



,'itli p; I 

.in March, 1852, i.e was married to Mis 
Lawhead, o! Dc Kalb Co To them I , :n born six 

. ; but three arc 1 , Wil ■ 

Icrson N. Bcnj tober, 1862, aged two years; 

Lilian Sa - aged ten years; 

- ....:. .'.... 11; died ... J ..... ; I on Mr. Boyle is 
a Democ He is a Master and Royal Arch Ma- 

. . has filled all the stations in his 1 1 
Captain J. C. Brand is a native of Ashland County, Ohio, 
born Jan. 8, 1844, a son of W ... la (Cline) Brand, 

ins father ti .•■■ 1 A X, .-...■ and ■ 

vania. His parents were 1 "ried in Ohio, and . . 

... De K.alh County, Ind., and here he was reared and edu- 
cated. Occ. 1, 1862, he enlisted in the Second Indiana Cavalry; 
was in camp at Indian; :eks, and then started 
lor the South; participated in the battles of Resaca, Lookout 
tain, Missioi Ridge, Buzzard's Roost, Chattanoo 1 At- 
lanta, march to the sea, and West Point, where he fired his last 

shot at the rebels. The conn id was ordered to Macon, Ga., 

but before reaching there heard of Johnston's surrender. He 
was on the raid to Tallahassie, Fla.; from there marched to 
Nfashville, where he was mustered out July 22, and was dis- 
charged J ., [865. He was in the service nearly three 

years, and was always a brave, intrepid soldier, never shrink- 
ing from ai duty ... him. His mosl trying experi- 
ence was ....... ■ rci .... Mc( ook on Stoncman's raid. 

lie, with five others, was sent to tear up a railroad, and while 

. the Tallahatchie River he lost his horse and was - u 1 

off by the raid. They took to the woods, and were eleven 

before they joined their command. The first five days 
they did not have a thing to cat. < >n the morning of the fifth 

... got some corn bread and meat at a negro'; 

mi time till they j unmand had very little 

to cat. They were completely used up ! nearly starved to 

death. After the close ... die war he returned to De Kalb 



lias since been identi 

. Republican in politi 
.' ... rifl ....... , Sheriff Leas. lie 

Ann Amstutz, a native of Wayne 
three children — Onie E., Gertruc 


icd with 

for two 

was marr 

County 

e M. anc 


her interests. . te 
years was Deputy | 
ed July 3, 1 866, to 
Ohio. They have 
Frank D. He is . 












. 





[■' DK KAI.l 

i l, W; .. I 

member of Waterloo City Lodge, No. 7,07. F. & A. .'..'.. and 
Post No. 52, G. A. R., of which he is Junior Vice-Coi 

lac B. Bra), ', \va near 

( Ihio, Ma} (2, 1836, a son of John a >c 1 

In June, 1849, hi pare oved to De b )on Lj 

scttli d on whal is now (lie Brandon farm, joinii 

the west. Wii c exception il 111011 at In 

clerking in Auburn he lived wish his parents till 1862, assist- 
ing his father in the work on the farm. A ter i 
moved to a farm he owned in Richland Township, and lived 
there till the fall of 1873, when he moved to the 
In the iail of 1S74 he and his brother, Silas J., went to Ne- 
braska with the intention of buying land and locating, but in 
their absence the father was taken sick, and upon his return he 
settled permanently on the old homestead. Mr. Bi-andon is a 
good manager, a practical farmer and a successful business 
man. He has never aspired to official honors, preferring a 
quiet business iife. While in Richland Township he was 
elected Justice of the Peace, but did not qualify. He was 
married March 20, 1862, to Barbara A. Kutzner, a native of 
Canton, Ohio, daughter of Isaac Kutzner. They havi 
cl ildren— -Alva, a farmer of Union Township; Ira, Orin, Asa, 
Ulla, Myron and Artie, at home. 

Moses Brandon is a native of Stark County, Ohio, born Oct. 
25, 1S24, the youngest of ten children of James and Sarah 
(Campbell; Brandon, natives of Virginia. His father died in 
Stark County, and the mother afterward moved with her fam- 
ily to Columbiana County, where she died. Moses Brandon 
was engaged in contracting and manufacturing brick in Ohio. 
In 1S40 he bought 130 acres of land in De Kalb Count) 
1S56 came to the county and began clearing the timber and 
cultivating it. He has erected good buildings and cleared 
ninety acres. For many years he and his brother Alexander 
lived together and kept bachelor'? ... I :e the death of 

his brother, in the summer of 1875, he has hired a family to 
keep house for him. He has been a successful farmer, and has 
accumulated a good property. In addition to his farm he owns 
202 acres of land in Stark County, Ohio. 

Silas J. Brandon, Treasurer of De Kalb County, Ind., was 
born in Plain Township, Stark Co., Ohio, Dec. 29, 184 



HISTORY 0] Dl ;alu CO STY. 

of John and Mary Brandon, [n 1849 ' with his parents 

to Indiana and settled on a fan iburn, De Kalb County, 

lie lived till manhood. In 1804 he was married to Mi 
Maria Garvcr, of Auburn. lie then carried on his lather's 
farm till 1S69, when he purchased a tract of wild land which 
he improved, and it is now his fine farm in Jackson Township. 
Ln 1 878 he was elected Trustee of Ids township; was re-elected 
in 1SS0, serving tour years. In the fall of 1884 lie was elected 
.:.. ratic ticket, Treasurer of De Kalb County, a posi- 
tion he is filling with efficiency. Mr. and Mrs. Brandon have 
had live children; but four are living — Clement V., Clyde, 
Bertha G. and John. Nora G. died July 2, [876, aged nine- 
months. 

Henry E. Braun, proprietor of B rami's meat market, Water- 
loo, Ind., was born in Saxony, Germany, Feb. 28, 1831. lie 
vas re.. red and educated in his native country, and when eigh- 
teen years of age entered the German army and served two 
years and seven months, ln August, 1852, he came to the 
United States ; landed in New York, and thence proceeded to 
Licking County, Ohio. He soon after settled in Fort Wayne, 
[nd., where he remained till 1S70. when he removed to Water- 
loo. He has been engaged in his present line of business since 
coming to this country, and has met with a successful patron- 
age. Fie was married in Fort Wayne to Margaret Heath. 
The}- have had four children; but three are living — Katie, 
William and George. Mr. Braun is a member of the Knights 
of Honor. In politics he has affiliated with the Democratic 
party till the campaign of 1884, when he voted for St. John, 
the Prohibition candidate for President. His sons are also 
strong- advocates of temperance and prohibition. Mr. and 
Mrs. Braun are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Mrs. Delia Butt, wife of John Butt, of Auburn, De Kalb 
Co., Ind., was born Nov. 4, 1816, in County of Sussex, Eng- 
land. She was married to John liuti Nov. 16, 1840, and emi- 
grated to the United States in September, 1841, an 
with her husband in De Kalb County the following November; 
shared in the hardships and privations of frontier life without 
repining, and now in the decline 01 life, contemplates with pleas- 
ing reflections, the vast improvements made in this counl 
her adoption. She has witnessed its development from a vast 
forest to its present splendid improvement in agriculture, com- 






- 1 .. -■- 

850 . . ■ ■ lUNTV. 

merce and wealth; where the wild deer, bear and wo 

now the iron horse of the railroads rushes through the county, 

with its steam shriek and rumbli 11 thunder. 

John Butt, Recorder of Dc Kalb County, fnd., was born i n 
London, England, Sept. 22, [816, a son of John and Elizab 
(Tranter) Butt. lie was reared and educated in his native 
country, and in November, 1S40. was married to Deli; Buss, 
also of London. In 1S41 they came to the United States . 
settled immediately in Jackson Township, De Kalb County, 
1 :..!., where he found employment as teacher in the public 
schools. In 1S42 they moved to Auburn, and he was appoii 
Deputy by Recorder Samuel W. Sprott. While acting in thi 
capacity he also wrote in the Steuben County office, for Re- 
corder Dr. James McConnell. In 1844 he engaged in mer- 
chandising in Auburn, a business he followed till 1856, when he 
became proprietor of the Weaver Hotel that stood on the pres- 
ent site of the Swineford House. In 1865 he moved Lo Wai -.. 

loo and was employed as b :eeper for Jacob Kahn till 186s, 

when he entered ... employ of the Lake Shore & Michigan 
Southern Railroad as freight clerk at Waterloo, serving in 
capacity till 1S70. He then pur< hased Hotel Wa- 

terloo, and again engaged in the hotel business till [SS2, wl 
he was elected Recorder of De Kalb County on the Demo- 
cratic ticket. Mr. Butt is the lather of Freemasonry in De 
Kail) County, and is also a promincnl Odd Fellow. He has 
held ail the important offices in his lodge, chapter and 1 
mandery, and also in the subordinate lodge ami encampment of 
Odd Fellowship. 

Jacob 11. Casebecr, M. /'., was born in Holmes County, Ohio, 
April 11, 1S39; ' s l ' lc seventh child of thirteen children born 
to David and Rebecca (Kcnestrick) Casebecr, natives of Penn- 
sylvania and Maryland, respectively, and of German descent. 
The parents of David, John and Nancy (Best) Casebecr, settled 
in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, when he was a child, in which the 
greater portion of Ids after life was passed. He was married Oct. 
26, 1S26, to the above-mentioned lady. Nine of the thirteen 
children born to them are living, viz.: Susana, Enos L., David 
W., Rebecca M., Elizabeth N., Margaret C, Eliza E., Howard 
M. and Jacob B. Sarah A., Martha J., John and Joshua arc- 
deceased. Mr. Casebeer possessed an exemplary character, in 
which were harmoniously blended those admirable traits which 



' 



■ 



/ 






;;.\: 



so grandl) ( mbcllish tl i and < .. ci r ol the hono : .... 

just, i [e was soundly converted ai In ag< ol six years, and 
ever after every deed and act of his life was animated '.>, 
pure Christian spirit. Me lived nearly eighty years after his 
conversion, during which lime he was an active and consistent 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church. His d 
curred February 25, iSSj.aged eighty-five years and four days. 
Mrs. Casebeer was a daughter of John and Sarah (Hivnei 
Kenestrick, and a most estimable woman, who possessed those 
sterling qualities of mind and heart, which alone give grace 
and beauty to the highest types of true womanhood. As a 
wife and mother, no praise can commensurate what the deeds 
and acts of her life justly merit. Christianity was the illumin- 
ation which lighted her along life's pathway, and what she 
professed in the Methodist Episcopal church of which she was 
a useful member, she practiced in the daily walks of liie. Her 
death occurred at Fredericksburgh, Ohio, July iS, 1S73, aged 
sixty-four years, one month and seventeen days. The early life 
of the subject of this sketch was passed in a manner common 
with farmers' sons. He attended a district school during the 
winter seasons, in which, by close application to study, he had 
mastered the rudimentary branches when only thirteen years 
of age. He then attended the Middleton High School, two 
and a half miles from home, — to and from which he walked 
night and morning during a few terms. He was successful in 
passing a rigid examination by the County Board of Examin- 
ers, and the ensuing winter taught a country school ; subse- 
quently he attended the Fredericksburgh seminary for several 
seasons, which was alternated by teaching winter schools, and 
was eminently successful, having won by the faithful perform- 
ance of duty, the confidence and esteem of both patrons and 
pupils. At the age of twenty he went to Kentucky and en- 
gaged in teaching, first in a district school and afterward in a 
select school at Stepheilsburg, where he won an enviable repu- 
tation as an instructor. During the latter period of his term 
of school at the above place, the " war feeling" began to per- 
vade the minds and hearts of the " fire eating " Kentuckians, 
who never lost an opportunity to personally annoy the "school- 
teaching Yank" (a term derisively used by the unenlightened, 
and at. that time untcrriried ones), and numerous written im- 
perative commands did he receive, ordering his prompt depart- 






N5- HISTORY i iF Hi: K \l.'.: CO 

urc from " Dixie's land." Despite the threats of violence trom 
the more radical ones, as well as the milder requests ft n 
servative sources, he manfully stood his ground till hi 
school by virtue of contract had expired, at which time he 
crossed the Ohio River into the patriotic atmosphere of the 
loyal North. - The presidential election of i860 came off sev- 
eral months previous to his departure, and on the moi 
said election he astonished the" natives" by presenting himsell 
at the polls, Abolition ticket in hand, and although violence was 
threatened if he persisted in voting for Mr. Lincoln, he boldly 
declared himself a citizen of the Government and a legal voter 
of the State, and demanded to be peaceably allowed \n exercise 
the right of suffrage as guaranteed to such in the Constitution 
»; the United States. His fearlessness and cool determination 
so disconcerted the excited rabble opposed to him that his Re- 
publican ticket was formally entered on the election books (a 
mode of voting then in vogue in Kentucky), and afterward re- 
ceived due credit in the count, as did that oi his brother, L. 
Casebeer, there being only two Republican ballots voted in 
that precinct. For one year following his return to Ohio he 
taught the Middleton school, and the subsequent year was 
Principal of the Fredericksburgh graded school, in which he 
won new honors as an educator and disciplinarian. During 
this latter term of school he began reading medicine under the 
direction of Dr. James Martin, a skillful physician of more than 
local note, who was ids preceptor til! the winter of 1863-64, 
at which time he matriculated at the University of Ann Arbor 
(.Michigan) School of Medicine and Surgery. After taking a 
course of lectures he returned to his former tutor's office, and 
soon after the Government Medical Purveyor of Ohio ap- 
pointed and assigned him to duty in the Dennison U. S. A. 
1 [ospital at Cincinnati, Ohio. In February, 1865, lie was com- 
missioned by Governor Tod, of Ohio, Assistant Surgeon of th 
One Hundred and Third Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry. 
lie immediately joined his re , menl in North Carolina, with 
which he served till after the war was over. He was honor- 
ably discharged from the United States' service, June 27, 1865, 
in Cleveland, Ohio. Subsequent to his return to civil life he 
entered the Bellcvue Hospital Medical College, New York, 
which institution conferred on him the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine, March 1, 1866. Immediatelv thereafter he located in 



nun 



]-;■: k.m 



irxrv 



853 



Aubur 
.. large 
which 

; ,r(,(w 



scli to the demands ot 
lucrative pra< I 

lie is devoted 1.0 h 
cr labor nor expense 
lost in the rapid ad- 

surgcry. 1 lis library 



where since he has devi il :d hii 
onstanl ly incrca ing and rcn 

1— a hard student, sparing ncitl 
to keep himself well abreast of the fore 
vancement of the sciences of medicine an 
of medical works is large and well chosen, embracing volumes 
of all best known authors, and in his cabinet is to be found all 
modern appliances and instruments which facilitate operations 
in the most delicate cases, and give an approximation to safety 
before unknown in the more hazardous ones. I lis writings 
have gained for him considerable celebrity as an author; two 
of his papers, written at the request of the American Medical 
Association, before which they were read, have been exten- 
sively copied by leading journals of the United States, receiv- 
ing favorable comment wherever thev appeared. He has also 
written numerous articles which have been read before the 
County and Northeastern Indiana Medical associations, which 
never failed to elicit meritorious praise for their conciseness 
and logic. There is in all his productions a style peculiarly 
laconic and terse, yet so comprehensible as to be entirely de- 
void of ambiguity. Of all the above societies he is a valued 
member, and ot the last mentioned he is ex-President. Socially 
the Doctor is urbane and complaisant in speech and manner ; 
never indulges in sophism nor pedantic generalities; is method- 
ical and systematic in all his doings; and his conclusions are al- 
ways founded on honest convictions, and if ever wrong he has 
the moral courage and frankness 10 admit his error, fie is an 
uncompromising antagonist to immorality of every kind. For 
a quarter of a century he has been an acceptable, active and 
consistent member ol the Methodist Episcopal church — a 
greater portion of which time he has served on 'die official 
hoard. In the religious, as in every other relation of life, the 
Doctor is no laggard, shirking responsibilities and content with 
the small " portion " passive inactivity always begets, but an 
energetic worker, whose reward is always commensurate with 
the efforts made to secure it. He stands perfectly erect ; is of 
medium height; solidly or compactly built; his movements are 
quick, and graced with a business-like air that gives weight to 
his presence; is fluent and intelligible in conversation, the 
whole combining with an agrccability that makes him justly 



$54 HISTORY 0] DE KALB COUNTY. 

popular with all. Me has been twice married. To h 
wife, Hattic G., daughter of Eli 13. and Fannie Smith, of Fred- 
cricksburgh, Ohio, he was united in marriage in 1863. 
child is the fruit of their union — Fannie R. .Mrs. Casebccr de- 
parted this life Jan. 2S, 18C9, aged twenty-seven years, :,i;, t 
months and eleven days. Ills second marriage was celebrated 
with Sarah E., daughter of William and Margaret (Carr; Xy- 
cain, ol Fort Wayne, Ind., June 4, 1873, by whom he has had 
one child — Hattic E., an unusually sweet-tempered and intelli- 
gent, lovely little girl. 

fauns -V. Chamberlain, M. D., is a native ot Cayuga County, 
N. Y., born March 22, 1S22. His father, Samuel Chamberlain, 
was a native of Adams County, Pa., near Gettysburg, and when 
a young man went to Cayuga County, where he met and mar- 
ried Mercy Cotton, a native of Vermont. To them were born i 
twelve children, nine of whom lived till maturity. The father 
died in 1865, and the mother in 1881. James N. was educated 
in the district school and the academy in Cayuga. In 1844 lie 
went to Ohio and taught school in Richland and Huron coun- 
ties sever.d terms. In the spring of 1845 he began the study ol 
medicine, and subsequently attended the Western Reserve 
Medical College at Cleveland, graduating with honors in Feb- 
ruary, 1849. He located in Seneca County, but soon alter . 
returned to Plymouth, Richland County, where he remained 
till 1852. Then lived a year in Huron County, and in the fall 
of 1853 came to Indiana and located tit Auburn, and in 1S65 re- 
moved to Waterloo where he has built up a large practice. lie 
is one of the most prominent physicians of the county, and is 
held in high esteem, not only by the public, but by his brethren 
in the profession. He is a member of the Northeastern and the 
De Kalb County Medical societies. In i860 Dr. Chamberlain 
was elected Sheriff of De Kalb County and served two years. , 
In the early part of 1865 he entered the United States army as 
Surgeon of the One Hundred and Fifty-second Indiana Infantry 
and served tiil the close of the war. Dr. Chamberlain has 
always taken an interest in local affairs outside his profession, 
and has been an active member of the Agricultural Society ; 
was the first President of the society, and served nine consecu- 
tive years. He is a man of more than ordinary ability, and one- 
capable of filling acceptably any position to which he may be 
called. Dr. Chamberlain was married March 29, 1849, to 



. .. C01 N"J 



Catherine H. Brink, a native of Ohio. Two of their ;<>v,r chil- 
dren are living— Ida, wife of Judge R. W. McBridc, and Ella 
!•;., wife of John \Y. Baxter, of Auburn. Laura married John 
M. Somers, of Waterloo, and died Aug. 27, 1804. .Mrs. Cham- 
berlain died March 26, 1861. She was an active member ol the 
Presbyterian church, and was highly respected by all who 
knew her. In 1S62 Dr. Chamberlain married Sarah Thomas, a 
native of Wayne County, Ohio. They have two children- 
Harry D. and Nettie E. Politically Dr. Chamberlain is a Re- 
publican. 

Lyman Chidscyvtss born in the Stated New York, and in his 
youth removed with his parents to Medina County, Ohio 
whence in 1S41 he came to this county, where till his death, a 
period of nearly forty years, he resided. Jan. 11, 1844, he was 
married to a daughter of the late John Somers, Eliza, who sur- 
vives him. Shortly after their marriage they moved upon the 
farm adjoining Auburn, on which he breathed his last. Mr. 
Chidsey was a quiet and retiring man, and because of his 
early removal to new and unsettled portions of the country, 
had not the advantages of early education as our youths now 
have. He was a man of many virtues in his character, of a 
sound judgment, and of enlarged views of man and his obliga- 
tions. Mis mind was always open for information and to 
reason, and when made up was firm and unswerving, as was 
his attachment to family and friends. His neighbors and ass< - 
ciates always knew his convictions, which he maintained with 
reason and judgment, and always on the side of morality ana in 
the interest of and for the good of society. His neighbors and 
friends realized these good qualities in our friend and neighbor, 
as was evidenced by the large concourse who, regardless of the 
severe inclemency of the weather, attended the funeral from 
the Presbyterian church, of which denomination he had been a 
member for several years. Thus lived and died a good man 
(God's noblest work), a pioneer of the county, leaving to mourn 
his loss, a widow and one child, Mrs. William Ashleman, and 
hosts of friends and neighbors. 

Orrin C. dark, a pioneer of De Kalb Count}', was born near 
Beldingsville, Onondago Co., N. V., May 6, 1S25, a son if 
Henry and Betsy (Tappen) Clark, with whom he lived at his 
birthplace till seventeen years of age. In 1S42 they came to 
Indiana and settled in Butier Township, De Kalb County. 



856 HISTORY *<:•• DEKALB COUNTY. 

had but limited educational advantages, but by private study 
and observation he acquired a reasonable business education. 
lie remained at home ii.1 twenty years ol age, bu1 in the mean. 
time had worked for the neighboring farmers, and although a 
pari ". the time he had been paid but, $1 1 a month, he ... 
economical and in 1845 had saved enough to buy eighty acres 
of wild land in Butler Township. I Ie continued to work out 
for two years, mostly at chopping, and at odd times worked on 
his own land, and by the time lie was married, in J 847, had con- 
siderable of it cleared. He lived on different farms in Butler 
Township till 18S2, when he retired front agricultural pursuits 
and moved to Auburn. Me has served several terms as Justice 
of the Peace and Assessor of Butler Township, and two terms 
as Trustee of Keyser Township, and has been the nominee of 
the Republican party for Sheriff, Commissioner, and Represent- 
ative to the State Legislature. Oct. 17, 1S47, he was married 
to Serena, daughter of Paul and Susannah Long, of Butler 
Township. She was born in Champaign County, Ohio, Oct. 
14, 1S32, and came to De Kalb County, Inch, in 1841. They 
have eight children living at this date, and have buried three. 
Those now living are — Harriet, wife of John Huston ; Harvey, 
a farmer; Frank, a dealer in live-stock and butcher at Garrett; 
Nettie, Elmer, Origin, Mary and Roxanna at home. Mr. and 
Mrs. Clark are members of the Protestant Methodist church. 
He is a member of the Masonic iodge at Garrett; was one of 
the charter members, and has served as Treasurer. For thirty 
years he was a strong Abolitionist, and now an earnest, active 
Prohibitionist. 

/. N. Cool, manufacturer of buggies and carriages, Auburn, 
lnd., is a native of De Kalb County, hid., born in Jackson 
Township, Oct. 12, 1S50. He is the second son and third child 
of Isaac and Catherine (Snyder) Cool, natives of New York and 
early settlers of De Kalb County, coming here in 1843. hie 
was reared on a farm, receiving his earl}' education in the dis- 
trict schools and completing it at the Auburn Academy. While 
attending school he taught for a time. After reaching his 
majority he began to clerk in a general store in Auburn, and a 
year later became associated with his employer in the grocery 
department. He subsequently bought his partner's interest 
and carried on the business alone two years. Then sold out 
and engaged in the livery business five years, and in 1SS1 estab- 



IKY nF 1)1-: a.\: ,. ■ ol NVV. 



857 



lishcd his present business. Mc manufactut all ki 

buggies and carriages, and docs a general repairing business. 
Mr. Cool was married July 16, [877, to Allic Fair, daughter of 
Abraham and Christina (Delong) Fair, early settlers of De Kalb 
County from Dayton, Ohio. They have three children — Vina 
F., Sidney M., and Franklin C. Politically Mr. Cool is a Dem- 
ocrat. 

Janus R. Cosper, a pioneer of Union Township, was born in 
Tompkins County, N. Y., Feb. 20, 1813. Mis grandfather, 
John Cosper, was a native of Saxony; came to America in in- 
fancy; settled in New Jersey where he grew to manhood; mar- 
ried, ai\d to him were born three children. Early in the war for 
Independence, his wife and two children were killed by Indians. 
He then enlisted and served seven years. At the close oi the 
war, he again married and finally died in Pennsylvania. Of a 
second family, the eldest, David Cosper, father of the 
of our sketch, lived in New Jersey until eighteen, when he re- 
moved to Tompkins County, N. Y., where he married. In 1812 
lie entered the army; was engaged at Fort George, Chippewa, 
Lundy's Lane and Niagara; at the last-named place was severely 
wounded. Returned home and subsequently moved .•> Penn- 
sylvania where he lived ten years, when he went to Ohio 
and settled in Knox County. In February, 1841, he came to 
Dc Kalb County, Ind., settled upon a small farm in Concord 
Township where he died, Jan 2?, 1868, aged eighty-five years. 
James R. Cosper learned the carpenter's trade in his youth, 
was married February, 1 S35, to Mary McKay, and in May fol- 
lowing migrated to Knox County, and settled in Chestcrville, 
where he worked at his trade until 1S41, when he purchased 
land in De Kalb County. Ind. lie lived one year in Auburn 
and then returned to the farm where he stiil resides. He 
worked at carpentry and with the means thus provided, hired 
the chopping of his land. He put up his own buildings, lie 
was burned out in 1S50 and during the same year lost heavily in 
stock. Not discouraged by these losses he again took up his 
tools, and in time retrieved them. His land is now under a 
good state of cultivation. He has a good residence and capacious 
barns. Of eight children four are living; two died in infancy. 
The eldest son, James S., was a most promising young man; 
learned the trade of his father, and also taught school. At the 
outbreak of the civil war he enlisted in Company E, Eleventh 



.-:;.- HISTORY CM' OK [<AI.fi CO 

Indiana Zouaves, and was kill c battle ol C 

Mills, Mississippi, on May 16, [863. A commission as Licutcn. 
an1 reached Llic camp the day of his death. Mildred, second 
daughter, was educated as a teacher; married, had two children, 

ami died in 1867. Anna Z. Cosper was born in Auburn, in 
September, 1841; became a teacher; was a nurse in the hospitals 
of Murfrcesboro, Tcnn.; taught a colored school under the 
auspices of the Christian Commission; married Win. II. 
Mcintosh, and resides in Auburn. Florence, third daughter, 
married H. P. Colgrove, and lives in Kansas; Byron A. and 
Frank B., sons, are married and live upon the farm. 

John A. Cowan, 31. D., was born in Decatur, Adams Co., Ind.. 
March 1, 1843, a son of Israel R. and Eliza A. Cowan. He re- 
mained with his parents lill 1862, receiving a high school 
education. In August, 1802. lie enlisted in Company 11, 
Eighty-ninth Indiana Infantry, and served till the close of tin- 
war; was discharged at Mobile, Ala., Aug. 19, 1865. lie par- 
ticipated in thirty-seven battles; was slightly wounded twice, 
and was taken prisoner three rimes. He escaped from his 
captors twice and was exchanged once. After his discharge he 
returned home and taught during the winter, working on the 
farm the rest of the year for three years. In the mcantim : 
commenced the study of medicine under the tutelage of Dr. T. 
T. Dorwin, of Decatur. In the winter of t86S-'6n, he attended 
lectures at Rush Medical College, Chicago, [11.; subsequently 

\ attended Detroit Medical College, from which he graduate: 
June 9, 1S69. In February, 1870, he located in Auburn and 
succeeded in building up a large practice. He was married 
Si >t. 9, 1S69, to Lydia A. Teeple, of Decatur. To them were 
born two children — -Jennie and Annis. Mr. Cowan was a mem- 
ber of the DeKalb Lodge, No. 214, P. ,V. A. M., and DeLong 

j Post, Xo. 67, G. A. R., of Auburn. He died June iS, 1885, of 
asc contracted while in the si ■ •■ ■■ his country, 
Mathew. Crooks, one of the pioneers of De Kalb County, Ind., 
was born in Trumbull County, Ohio, April ro, 18 16, a son ol 
William and Jane (Nixon) Crooks; his father a native of Penn- 
sylvania, and his mother of Maryland. When he was sixteen 
3'ears old his father died, leaving the care of eleven children to 

I the mother. In 1S33 he came to De Kalb County, but remained 
only a short time, returning to Trumbull County in the spring 

; of 1834. In 1836 he came again to De Kalb County and worked 



__ 






. 1 1 S , 1 • 


'•■ 




for farmers and on tl 


several years, [nil 




ought ; lie farm in I 'ni..n Towns! 


ip where he has sin 




lived. He owns eighty acres ol good 


land, valued al S75 an 




acre. I le was married in July, ■;',., 


Nfan< . 1 >r) ai .live 




ol Lancaster County, Ohio. To them 


were born twelve chil- 




sn, seven ol whom arc living — Mari 


ida, Sheldon, Almond, 





Barbara, Amanda, George and Alice. Mrs. Crooks died April 
20, 1884. Politically, Mr. Crooks was originally a Whig, cast- 
ing his first Presidential vote lor 1 larrison, bul later i 
ated with the Republican party. When he first came to the 
county il was covered with timber and infested with wild ani- 
mals. Me was a noted ei hired by the set- 
tlers to hunt for them, as their only meat was game. He relates 
many interesting anecdotes of his adventures in the early settle- 
ment of the county, incidents ol thrilling interest, especially to 
all lovers of the hunt, as he has had many hair-breadth escapes 
from death by wild animals. 

A'. A". Crooks, farmer and stock-raiser. Union Township, was 
born in Trumbull County, Ohio, near Warren, Dec. 9, 1830, a 
son of William and Jane (Norris) Crooks, and grandson of Henry 
Crooks, a native of Scotland, who emigrated to America in an 
early daw William Crooks was one of the first settlers of 
Trumbull Count) - , and was married there to Jane Norris, an 
I early settler of the county, of Irish descent. Eleven of their 
thirteen children grew to maturity. Mr. Crooks, Sr., was a 
very energetic man and an active worker in the interest of the 
county. He was a very large man, he and two brothers being 
known as the " great race." When our subject was two years 
1 if age his father died, and the next year he went with his mother 
to Cuyahoga County, Ohio, and was there reared and educated, 
j and there his mother died in July, 1850. He was married in 
\ 1850 to Melvina Reynolds, who only lived three months and 
two days after her marriage. In November, 1852, he married 
Mary Ann Burdick. Of the sixteen children born to them, 
thirteen are living — Martha L., wife of Christopher Newcomer; 
Linna, wife of B. F. Frets; Flattie M., wife of George Crowe] ; 
Lucy II., Mary Rebecca, Eudora, Laura, Robert W., Fred- 
erick E., Victor H., Burton B., Clyde E. and James. Mr. 
Crooks came to De Kalb County in July, 1859, and purchased 
a farm on section n, Union Township. He owns a fine farm 
of 120 acres, valued at $75 an acre. In politics Mr. Crooks was 



S6o (IISTi iR\ OV DE KALB C< »UNTY. 

01 iginally a Republican, bul later lias affiliated with the Green, 
back party. He has held the office of Township Trustee six 
years, and was also electd Sheriff on the Greenback ticket. He 
is a member of Waterloo Lodge, No. $07, F. & A. M., and has 
passed all the chairs in the Odd Fellows' order; is also a mem- 
ber of the Knights of Honor. 

Captain E. />'. Cutler is a native of North Hadlcy, Hampshire 
Co.. Mass., born Oct. 12, 1831, a son of Elam and Mary (Gay- i 
lord) Cutter, flis great-grandfather, Jairus Cutter, cam 
America with the Pilgrims in the Mayflower. His great-grand- 
mother, Susan Bowman, was living in Charlestown at the time 
of the battle of Bunker Hill, and carried water to the gunners. 
She died in Boston at the age of 100 years, two months and five 
days. His Grandfather Cutter was a soldier in the Revolu- 
tion, and his father in the war of 1812. Our subject was 
reared in his native county, and when sixteen years ol age be- 
gan to learn the carpenter and joiner's trade of his lather. In 
the spring of 1S51 he went to Walworth County, Wis., and 
raised the first crop of tobacco in thai State for a man named 
Isaiah Hibbard. In 1S52 he went to Texas, where he hel . 1 
build the first steam saw and grist mill in Bonham, Fannin 
County. He then built a cotton-gin and mill in Grayson County, 
and in 1S53 went to Santa Fc, New .Mexico, for his health, but 
soon after returned home. In the spring of 1S56" he came to 
Indiana and spent a year in Steuben County, and there 
met Miss Eliza Vinton, to whom he was married May ro, 
1S56. May 3, 1S57, he moved to Waterloo, where he followed 
millwrighting and house building till Aug. 6, 1862, when he 
enlisted in Company A, Eighty-eighth Indiana Infantry, as a 
private. At his first battle, Perry ville, he was promoted to Or- 
derly Sergeant; at Stone River, to Sergeant, and soon after to 
Second Lieutenant. He participated in the battles of Chicka- 
mauga, Lookout Mountain and Mission Ridge, and in Decem- 
ber, 1S63, was commissioned Captain for his bravery, having 
previously risen to the rank of First Lieutenant. He was sub- 
sequently in the Atlanta campaign and in ail the engagements 
of the Fourteenth Army Corps, comprising Dalton, Rcsaca, 
Pumpkin Vine, New Hope Church, Kenesaw Mountain, Mari- 
etta, Chattahoochee River, Peach Tree Creek and siege oi 
Atlanta. After the battle of Atlanta he was given a leave of ab- 
sence, and subsequently was on detached service under General 



HISTORY OF 



KAL13 COUNTY. 



. ,1 



Thomas, and engaged in the battle of Nashville and the pursuit 
after Hood. He was then stationed al Whitcsidcs a short 
time; soon after joined his former command at Goldsboro, and 
with it participated in the battle at Raleigh where his com- 
mand captured a rebel flag, a part of which is still in his posses- 
sion. At the time of Sherman's and Johnston's armistice and 
Lincoln's assassination he was at Martha's Vineyard, N. C, and 
marched from there with his command to Washington, lie 
participated in the grand review at Washington where he was 
mustered out, and June 16, 1865, was discharged at Indianap- 
olis. He then returned to Waterloo where he has since 
resided. He has followed the millwright's trade, and has built 
mills in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois and Flori- 
da. He helped to erect the first grist-mill in Waterloo, Dc 
Kalb Co. To Captain Cutter and wife have been born six chil- 
dren — Carrie, Fancy, Charles, George, Frederick and Earl, lie 
is a member of Waterloo City Lodge, No. 307, F. & A. M., and 
Wm. Hacker Chapter, No. 63, R. A. M. In politics he is a 
Republican, and has twice been nominated by his party as can- 
didate for Sheriff. 

Orris Danks, dealer in boots and shoes, Waterloo, Ind., was 
born in Onondaga County, N. Y., July 16, 1S15, a son of Be- 
noni and Phoebe (Earle) Danks, natives of New York. Ills 
grandfather, Robert Earle, was a soldier in the war of the Rev- 
olution, and subsequently a very prominent man of his town. 
Our subject was reared on a farm, but received a good educa- 
tion for an early day. In 1836 he left his native home and 
started for the West to buy a home, and liking the looks of the 
country in De Kalb County, Inch, bought a tract of land on 
section 13, Smithfield Township, on which he lived two years, 
clearing the land of timber and preparing it for cultivation. In 
[838 he returned to New York where, in 1840, he was married 

to Euseba, daughter of William Brown. In the fall gi ' s - 1 

moved to De Kalb County and settled on his land, in a little 
log cabin 16x20 feet in dimensions. The young couple were 
poor in purse, but rich in ambition and perseverance, and with 
a determination to make a home for themselves and their fam- 
ily, laughed at all difficulties and obstacles, and bravely en- 
dured privation that they might gain the end for which they 
toiled. After sharing his cares and participating in his joys 
eleven years, the young wife died in 1S51, leaving two chil- 



S02 UtSTORY OF I1K KAT.IS COUNTY. 

dren— Charles O., who enlisted in the fall of 1861 in the Forty. 
fourth Indiana Infantry, and died at Battle Creek, Tenn., in 
August, 1862, and Ella, now the wife ol Frederick V\ '.. 
of Dc Kalb County. In the spring of 1862 Mr. Danks moved 
his family to Waterloo and formed a partnership in the hard. 
ware business under the firm name of St. Clair ^S: Co. In iS;o 
he sold his interest and engaged in I he grocery and boot and 
shoe business, but in 1874 disposed of his slock of groceries and 
has since devoted his attention to the boot and shoe trade. He 
was married in 1852 to Miss Estella Booge, who died in [863, 
leaving one child — Emma, now the wife of Wm. II. Leas, at- 
torney, of Waterloo. In 1864 Mr. Danks married Sarah A. 
Jones. He has been a prominent man in the township, and 
has served in many oflicial positions. 

A. Byron Darby, M.D., is a native of Fulton County, Ohio, 
born Nov. 18, 1839, a son °f Samuel Bryant and Sepharna 
(Guilford) Darby, his father a native of Vermont and his 
mother of Massachusetts. His parents were married in Alle- 
gany County, State of New York, in 1826, and in 1S36 emigrated 
to what was then Henry, now Fulton County, Ohio, with two 
yoke of oxen and lumber wagon (one of the yokes then used is 
still in the possession of the Doctor). Being among the first 
settlers of the county, Samuel B. Darby helped organize the 
first township in the county; kept the first postofficc; taught 
the first school and opened the first store which he carried on 
for several years. In early life he was a Democrat, but after 
its organization affiliated with the Republican party, and was a 
member of the Convention which nominated J. C. Fremont, 
and also Abraham Lincoln to the Presidency. Samuel Bryant 
Darby died July 15, 1884, aged seventy-seven years. Sepharna 
Darby is yet living, aged seventy-four years. They had a fam- 
ily of nine children, four of whomare living. A. Byron Darby 
attended Alfred College in Allegany County, N. Y., and subse- 
quently Oberlin College, Ohio, where he paid his school ex- 
penses by teaching and working hours not required for study. 
Having early in life had the desire to study medicine, in 1862 
and 1863 after reading the necessary text books, he attended the 
Eclectic Medical College at Cincinnati, Ohio, from which he- 
graduated in the spring of the latter year. After his graduation 
he located at Flint, Ind., and practiced in partnership with Dr. 
II. L. Smith a year, when Dr. Smith moved from the place 



and left him the only physician there. Me built up a large 
practice, bul his health becoming impaired, in [864 he movi . to 
Waterloo," De Kalb Count)- , hid., and has met with equally as 
good success here as in his former location. Me is a member ol 
the Siatc Medical Society, the Northeastern Indiana Med- 
ical Association and the Dc Kalb County Medical Society, 
and enjoys the confidence and esteem of his colleagues in 
the profession, as well as of the families who employ him. 
lie has been Secretary of the Board of Health ol Waterloo 
since the organization of the Board. Being ol a genial, 
but dignified and calm presence, he inspires die confidence 
of his patients, and Ids sympathetic and kindly nature wins 
for him their love and esteem. Dr. Darby was married 
April 2S, 1864, to Linda M. Huyck, youngest daughter of 
John T. and Lucinda (Basil) Huyck, the former of whom 
was born in the State of New York and the latter in the State 
of Vermont. Dr. A. Byron and Mrs. Darby have three children 
— Hadsell Byron, born June 3, 1S65; Frank Wm., born Feb. 11, 
1868. and their daughter Verna, born Nov. 6, 1878. The Doc- 
tor and his wife arc members of the Church of Christ and 
workers in the Sunday-school. He is a member of Waterloo 
Lodge, No. 307, F. & A. M., aiso No. 1.436, K. of II. He is a 
strong supporter of the temperance cause, and lends his influ- 
ence at every opportunity in his practice to encourage men to 

I be temperate, that they may not only preserve their health, 

i but their character also. 

John Davis, deceased, was born in Onondago County, N. 
Y., April 13, 1S13, the son of Solomon and Margaret (Baily) 
Davis, natives of Holland. When he was eighteen years of age 
his parents moved to Ohio and settled in Huron County. 
There he learned the trade of a carpenter and married Miss 
Jane Messner, a native of Dauphin County, Pa. After their 

: marriage they moved to Crawford County, Ohio, and in 1S47 

j came to Dc Kalb County, hid., and settled on a farm two miles 
north of Auburn, which he cultivated and on which he put 
good improvements. Fie was a prominent man of his township 
and served as Justice of the Peace two terms; also served his 
township as Trustee. He was widely known and universally 
respected, lie was a member of Auburn Lodge, No. 221, 
1. O.O.I". He died June 16, 1882. His widow lives on the 
homestead. She was born Dec. 31, 1820. She is the mother 



S64 HISTORY OI-' Dli KALIi COUNTY. 

of five children ; two arc living— Margaret, wife of !■.. 
ami Eda, wife of C. D. Reed. Ida, Jay and Ado arc da 

Ezra Dickenson, a retired fanner ol Auburn, was born in 
Sharon, Litchfield Co., Conn., Aug. 26, 170*. lie was reared 
a fanner, living with his parents till his majority. In 1819 
lie went to Ohio and located in Johnson Township, Tru in- 
bull County, where he bought a tract of wild land which 
ho cleared and cultivated, residing there till 1836, when he 
came to Indiana and entered 120 acres of Government land in 
Concord Township, Dc Kalb County. In 1S42, having three 
children who were mutes, he sold his farm in Concord Town- 
ship and bought one near Hicksville, Ohio, that his children 
might have the advantage of the deal and dumb asylum. In 
1S52 he sold his farm, and returned to Dc Kalb County and 
bought a farm in Wilmington Township where he lived till 
1880, when, feeling the infirmities of old age creeping on, he sold 
his farm and bought a residence in Auburn that he might spend 
the rest of his life in a more quiet manner. When he came 10 
Indiana, Dc Kalb Count)' was a dense wilderness. Indians were 
plenty, but white people scarce. There were no roads, and 
oxen were the only teams used. lie was one of the first Petit 
Jurymen of the first Circuit Court of De Kalb County. The 
first court was held in a log house on the site of the present 
court-house in Auburn. The jail was a loft over the court-room, 
which was entered through a hole in the floor, and the ladder 
taken away to prevent the escape of prisoners. The nearest 
markets were Fort Wayne and Ilicksvillc. While living in 
Wilmington Township, Mr. Dickenson served four years... 
Justice of tiie Peace. In 1861 when, in his sixty-third year, lie 
enlisted in Company F, Forty-fourth Indiana Infantry, barely 
passing the examination of the mustering officer, who took him 
to be about forty-five. April 3, 1862, he was discharged for 
disability, lie is living with his fifth wife who was Mrs. Re- 
becca (Waldron) Sibert, to whom he was married April 22, 1882. 
He is the lather of twelve children, eight of whom are living. 
He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and his 
wife of the Lutheran church. He is a member of Dc Long 
Post, No. 67, G. A. R. He has affiliated with the Republican 
party since its organization. 

William II. Dills, attorney at law, Auburn, Ind.. was born in 
Dearborn County, Ind., March 15, 1S34, a son of Jacob and 



HISTORY OK [)K K.M.I. COUNTY. 865 

Tcna (Dawson) Dills. In [S44 his parents moved to Dc Kalb 
County and settled in Spenccrville, where lie grew to manhood. 
Me was educated in the public schools and a sclecl school in 
Fort Wayne. When nineteen years of age he was employed 
as civil engineer by the Pittsburg, Ft. Wayne cV Chicago Rail- 
road, working in this capacity about a year when, in 1854, he 
began the study of law under the preceptorship of his unclc> 
Judge R. J. Dawson, of Spenccrville, and in 1855 and 1856 at- 
tended the law school at Grccncastlc, I nd., and after his grad- 
uation was admitted to the bar. In October, 1856, he was 
elected Prosecutor of the Common Pleas Districl composed ol 
De Kalb and .Steuben counties, and the same year located in 
Auburn where he has since pursued his practice. During his 
residence in Auburn he has held various official positions, 
among others Town Clerk, and attorney for the town and 
county, lie has been identified in the movements to secure 
the various railroads through Auburn, and at times has been 
connected with the local press, editorially and otherwise. lie 
has always been identified with the Democratic party, and iias 
taken an active part in politics, as speaker and writer, in both 
county and State. In 1SS2 he was a candidate for Circuit 
Judge, but was defeated by a small majority. In 1884 he was 
elected one of the Democratic electors, and took an active part 
in the campaign. He has the distinction of being the only man 
from De Kalb County that ever voted directly for the Presi- 
dent and Vice-President of the United States, and also of re- 
ceiving the largest number of votes from the people, of any 
resident in his Congressional District, viz.: 244,992. He has 
been Secretary of the De Kalb County Pioneer Association 
since its organization in 1876. He has been twice married. 
His first wife was Miss Emily A. Ralston, of Auburn, by whom 
he has two children — Frank and Kittie. May 30, 1879, he mar- 
ried his second wife, Mrs. Julia May (Miner) Brandon. 

James Dragoo, a pioneer of De Kalb County, Ind., was born 
near Hayesville, Ohio, Aug. 5, 1S17. lie was the sixth of 
nine sons of Frederick and Martha (Angel; Dragoo. He came 
to Dc Kalb County in 1S37 and entered land in Jackson and 
Concord townships. Then returned to Ohio and remained till 
1841, engaged in farming. In 1841 he moved to Dc Kalb 
County and settled in Concord Township where he improved 
a farm of 125 acres, on which he lived till 1874 when he rented 



r 






S66 HISTORY 01' DE KAl.i; ( i lUN'J 



his (arm and moved to Auburn. While living in Concord 
Township he served as Justice oi the Peace nine year.-. lj,. 

since coming to Dc Kalb County. At one time he was associ- 
ated with John P. Widney in the mercantile business. At 

another he bought, hogs and cattle and shipped to the Eastern 
markets, and in an early day he bought cattle and horses which 
he drove to markets in Illinois and Wisconsin. He has been 
twice married. First, in August, 1838, he married Zerniah 
Johnson, who died in Concord Township in March, 1873. In 
September, 1874, he married Mrs. Hannah Ferrell, of New- 
castle, Pa. They have one son — Harry D. A son, Terry, died 
March 4, 1S77, and a daughter, Clarissa, died July 11, iSSo. 
Mr. Dragoo has three adopted daughters — Sarah H., now the 
wife of E. Burke, of Monroe County, Ohio; Harriet, wife of 
II. P. Culbertson, of Auburn, and Charlotte, wife of Jeremiah 
Davis, of Jackson Township. 

George 1 1 Dunn, the only son of George and Sarah A. (Miller) 
Dunn, was born in Dc Kalb County, Ind., May 21, t86l. His 
lather was a native of Dc Kalb County and his mother of Ohio. 
His hither died before his birth and his mother found a home 
with Joseph Gardner, by whom he was reared and educated. 
He obtained a good common-school education, and was early 
taught the rules ol agriculture, which enabled him as he grew 
older to become successful in that, branch ol business, lie has 
always made Mr. Gardner's house his home, and now has 
charge of and superintends his farm. He litis made a specialty 
of stock-raising, and has some oi the finest grades of cattle and 
sheep in the county. He is an energetic and industrious young 
man, and is one of the progressive and enterprising young farm- 
ers of Union Township. He was married Feb. 12, 1885, to 
Almettie, daughter of Gilbert Showers, of this county. Me 
and Ids wile tire members of the United Brethren church, and 
he has been Superintendent of the Sunday-school. 1 ie is a Re- 
publican in politics, and an active worker in the ranks. 

Edward EUridgc has been a resident of Auburn since 1852, 
coming here from Fort Wayne, Ind. He was born in Sussex, 
England, March 24, 1826. When fifteen years of age he left his 
parents and emigrated to the United States. He landed in 
New York City, where he remained and was variously em- 
ployed three years, when, in 1S44, he came to Indiana and 






HISTORY OF DE KAI.l; COUNTY. 867 

located iii Fort Wayne, and there worked at the carpenter and 
cabinet-maker's trades till 1852. lie then came to Auburn and 
worked at the cabinet-maker's trade till 1861. Since 1861 lie 
has been engaged in either the grocery or saloon business. At 
present he is running a saloon, lie was married Jan. 15, 18G1, 
to Salinda McDowell, of Auburn. They have two children — 
Jenkenson, a compositor in the Republican office, and James D., 
a tailor of Auburn. 

Richard Elson, D. D. S., Auburn, Ind., was born in Stark 
County, Ohio, Oct. 28, 1839, a son of Thomas VV. and Ann 
(Baker) Elson. When he was about a year old ids parents 
moved to New Pittsburg, Wayne Co., Ohio, where he was 
reared, remaining with them till manhood. In September, 
1861, he enlisted, at Wooster, Ohio, in Company C, Sixteenth 
Ohio Infantry, and served till 1864. He participated in the 
battle of Cumberland Gap, and at the charge made at Chicka- 
saw Bayou, near Vicksburg, by General Sherman, in Decem- 
ber, 1862, was seriously wounded, and was sent to the hospital 
at Paducah, Ky. After his recovery he was detailed Hospital 
Steward at St. .Mark's Hospital, Paducah, and remained there 
till discharged at the expiration of Ids term of service. While 
in the service he was commissioned Second Lieutenant ol the 
Eighth United States Heavy Artillery by General Thomas, but 
declined to serve on account of poor health. After his dis- 
charge he returned to New Pittsburg, and the following winter 
taught school. In the spring of 1S65 became to Auburn and 
engaged in the drug business till 1868, when he began the 
stud)' of dentistry under Dr. W. K. Simpson, and practiced at 
Auburn till 1883, when he took a course of lectures at the 
Indiana Dental College, Indianapolis, graduating as D. D. S., 
March 5, 1884. While there he was appointed Demonstrator 
in the operative department. He is now permanent!) locati 
in Auburn, where he is reaping the reward, oi a well-established, 
professional reputation. In April, 1867, he married Helen Akla 
Ailing, of Auburn, a granddaughter of Wylys Griswold, one of 
the oldest pioneers of De Kalb County, by whom she was 
reared. They have one son — -Francis Ailing, born June 21, 
1870. Dr. Elson is a member of De Kalb Lodge, Xo. 214, F. & 
A. M., and De Long Post, No. 67, G. A. R. He and his wife 
are members of the Presbyterian church, ol which he is one of 
the Board of Trustees. 



S68 IIISTOK-Y OF DEKALB COL XIV. 

Hon. Nicholas liusUy, merchant and banker, Auburn, Inch, was 
born near Bcllvicw, Seneca Co., Ohio, Feb. 28, 1841. His parents, 
George and Lydia (Noel) Enslcy, moved to Indiana the follow- 
g November and settled in Butler Township, De Kalb County, 
here he was reared on a farm, helping his father cut down the 

! forest for three large farms, and received a good education. 
Nov. 1, 1S61, he responded to the call for volunteers by the 
President to defend the Union against rebel invasion, enlisting 
in Company K, Forty-fourth Indiana Infantry. He served four 
years, and was mustered out at Nashville, Tenn., Sept. 14, 1S65. 
For meritorious service he was detailed clerk of the military 
court at McMinnvillc, Tenn. In the spring of 1864, after the 
battle of Chickamauga, he was detailed chief clerk in the Pro- 
vost office at Chattanooga, and remained there six months. 
Previous to being detailed provost clerk, he had been pro- 
moted to Second Sergeant of his company. In the fall of 1S64 
he was promoted to Quartermaster-Sergeant, and in the spring 
of 1865 was commissioned Second Lieutenant of his Company 
K, and from that time till his discharge acted the most of the 
time as Regimental Quartermaster. After the war he returned 
to De Kalb County and took charge of Ids father's farm, the 

i old homestead at Butler Center. In 1872 he was nominated on 
the Republican ticket as a candidate for Treasurer of De Kalb 
County. Although his party was largely in the minority, he 
was elected by a majority of fifty-two votes, and in 1S74 was 
re-elected by 160 votes. He became a resident of Auburn in 

\ November, 1872, and has since been identified with her success- 
ful and enterprising business men. He has been a member of 
the Auburn School Board three years, and takes a great interest 
in educational matters. In the spring of 1S77 he engaged in 

i the farm-implement business, discontinuing it in 1884. In Janu- 
ary, 1879, he embarked in the general mercantile business and 
has met with good success. In February, 1S82, he assisted in 
the organization of the Farmers' Bank of Auburn, and is still 
one of its members. He was elected State Senator to represent 
De Kalb and Steuben counties, Nov. 4, 18S4, on the Republican 
ticket by a majority of 34S. Mr. Ensley was married to Helen, 
daughter of John A. Ditmars, of De Kalb County. They have 
five children — Oliver P., Eva Adel, Oscar J., Marion E. and 
Amber L. He is a member of De Long Post, No. 67, G. A. R., 
Auburn, Ind., of which he is Senior Vice-Commander. 



HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 

Dr. Almond S. Farrington, of Waterloo, was born in James- 
town, Chautauqua Co., N. Y., Dec. 4, 1832, a son of Keeler 
and Aseneth (South wick) Farrington, of Scotch descent. His 
ancestors were heroes of the Revolution, and his father was a 
soldier in the war of 1812. When he was five years old his 
parents moved to Peru, Huron Co., Ohio, and when he was 
seventeen to De Kalb County and located near Sedan, lie re- 
ceived but a limited education in his early life. The county 
being new and there being no public-school kind, the schools 
were supported by private subscription, which was with diffi- 
culty made large enough to carry on a school during the win- 
ter months. In 1849 his father bought a timbered farm in De 
Kalb County, and for about a year and a half he assisted in 
clearing and improving it, but wishing to have the benefit of a 
good school he then returned to Ohio, and attended during the 
winter for two years, working the remainder of the time to de- 
fray his expenses. In 1852 he entered Hiram College at Port- 
age County, Ohio, where he was a student under President 
Garfield. He remained there five years, and in 1857 began the 
study of medicine under the instruction of Dr. Elisha Hall, of 
Norwalk, and the next year entered the Eclectic Medical 
College, Cincinnati, where he remained until March 1, 1S60. 
The next month he located at Norwalk where he had a very 
satisfactory practice, but in 1S62 moved to De Kalb County, 
and lived in Sedan seven years. In 1S69 he sold his property 
in Sedan, with a view of locating in Waterloo, but not being 
able to suit himself in the village, bought a farm just outside 
the limits, which he superintended, although the greater 
part of his time was taken up with his practice. In 1S71 he 
purchased his home on Maple street, which is one of the most 
valuable and desirable residences in town. For twenty-two 
years he has been identified with the medical fraternity of De 
Kalb County, with a constantly increasing popularity, and is 
now in the enjoyment of an extensive practice which yields 
him a good income. As a surgeon Dr. Farrington has always 
met with good success, being a skillful and reliable operator, 
but his greatest merit lies in his medical practice. A close 
student and a constant determination to excel, places him at the 
head of the profession, and to a marked degree he has the love 
and confidence of his patients and their friends. Possessed of 
a strong character, a cheerful and sympathetic presence, his 



8 .'■ i HISTORY 01' DK KALI; COUNTY. 

calmness impresses those aboul him of his ability and fidelity. 
He is a worthy and earnest member of the Christian church, hi 
politics he is a Republican, and is firm and uncompromising in 
the support of his political convictions, yet generous and toler- 
ant of others not. in accord with him, and is in no sense a poli- 
tician, as applied to an office seeker. He is an earnest, and con- 
sistent temperance man, and in his practice as a physician aids, 
by his example, the cause. He is a genial, courteous, Christian 
gentleman, and is as greatly admired by the medical fraternity 
as by those outside the profession. Dr. Farrington was mar- 
ried Oct. 19, 1861, to Miss Elizabeth Link, of Union Township, 
a lady of rare intellect and pleasing manners; a kind neighbor 
and devoted Christian mother. They have eight children, five 
sons and three daughters. Dr. Farrington is in the prime of 
his manhood, notwithstanding he carries in his body sev- 
eral pieces of lead, received by the discharge of a gun in the 
hands of a maniac in 1S71. This disabled him for sometime, 
but his strong constitution, aided by his correct habits, over- 
came all the evil effects, and he is to-day in the enjoyment of 
robust health. 

Philip Fluke, retired currier and tanner, Auburn, was born 
in Bedford County, l'a., June 27, 1816, a son oi Philip and 
Mary (Summers) Fluke, who removed to Richland County, 
Ohio, in the fall of 1816. lie was reared and educated in 
Ohio, remaining there till 1844 when, in November, he mover! 
to Auburn, lnd. His education was received in the public 
schools, and when eighteen years of age he was apprenticed to 
the cunier and tanner's trade, serving three year,. He then 
worked as a journeyman six months at Ashland, Ohio, and 
then returned home and attended school four months, and ::: 
1S3S began in business for himself. In 1842 he sold his busi- 
ness, and in 1844 came to Auburn and opened a tannery which 
he conducted till 1874 when he retired from active business 
life. When he started in life his father gave him $500 and 
forty acres of land; this, added to a small amount, he received 
from his lather's estate, has been his only assistance. Possessed 
of good business management, he made the most of what lie 
had, and lias amassed a fortune, having a large landed estate 
adjacent to Auburn. He was married to Ruth, daughter of 
Thomas Ford, of Auburn, who died March 25, 1853, leaving 
one son — Wakeman C, a druggist of Clayton, Mich. Jan. 10, 



IIIST< ■;;>. KALB C01 NTY. ! ; I 

[S57, he married Sarah, daughter ol David Thomas, ol Rich 
land Township, De Kalb County. She died in Auburn, Ian. 
17, 1873. To them were born three children, two oi whom 
are living — Eliza J., wife oi S. L. Gibson, and Frank E., al 
home, liia May died in April, 1865, aged lour months. In 
politics Mr. Fluke lias always been a Democrat. 1 fe hasserved 
two terms as Trustee ol Auburn. 

Hernial! Frochlich was born in Zduny, Prussia, April 1, [S41, 
a son o[ Eduard and Ernstina (Langner) Frochlich. His mother 
died in 1845. ' n 1862 his father, a younger sister and himself 
came to the United States and located in Warsaw, Ind. Her- 
man Frochlich came to De Kalb County in 1865 and his father 
followed him in 1S69, where he died in 1S75. Herman learned 
in the old country in his father's shop the cabinet-making trade, 
and during his stay in Warsaw, [nd., he learned the marble 
monumental trade, and since has always followed this vocation. 
lie is an industrious, economical man, and has accumulated a 
good property, being to-day among the most substantial busi- 
ness men of Waterloo. He was married in November, [865, 
to Eva Eckhardt, daughter of George and Catherine (Pullman) 
Eckhardt. Her father came with his family from I lessen 
Darmstadt to America in 1847 and located in the State of New 
York, from whence he was sent by the American Tract Soci- 
ety to De Kalb County in 1851 to distribute tracts, and was 
employed by them four years, and subsequently a portion ol 
his time for two years. Mr. Eckhardt died in November, [874. 
Mrs. Eckhardt is living now in Toledo. Ohio. They had a 
family of four children, all of whom are living. Mr. and Mrs. 
Frochlich have three children — Olive E., Frederick H. and 
Edmund Carl. Mr. Frochlich cast his first presidential vote 
for Abraham Lincoln and his last for B. F. Butler. He and his 
wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Joseph Gardner, one of the earl}' settlers of Dc Kalb County, 
was born in Westmoreland County, Pa., April 13, 1819, the 
eldest son of John and Barbara (Kampf) Gardner, his father a 
native of Maryland and his mother of Westmoreland Count,-. 
Pa. In 1S50 his parents moved to Holmes County, Ohio, 
where they both died. Six of their nine children are living. 
Joseph was reared on a farm and early became skilled in the 
mysteries of agricultural life. He has made that occupation 
his work through life and has been uniformly successful. In 



$J2 HISTORY OF UK KALB COUNTY. 

the fall of 1S45 he came to Dc Kalb Count)' and bougl 

of 160 acres of wild land on time, paying for it with money lie 
had earned. Alter paying for his land he worked lor others, 
at clearing and farming, four years, and then married Catherine 
Beidlcr, eldest daughter of David Ash, and widow of Jacob 
Bcidler. After his marriage lie settled on his land and began 
to clear and cultivate it. Possessed of energy and good man- 
agement, lie has accumulated a competency for his declining 
years. In July, 18S4, his residence was destroyed by fire, and 
he has since erected a neat and substantial two-story brick 
dwelling. His farm buildings are all large and conveniently 
arranged. In politics Mr. Gardner was in his early life a Whin-, 
but since its organization has affiliated with the Republican 
party. His influence has always been on the side of temper- 
ance and good order. He has served his township acceptably 
in various offices of trust. 

Don A. Garwood, of the firm McClellan & Garwood, attorneys 
at law, Waterloo, is a native of Cassopolis, Cass Co., Mich., 
born March 9, 185S, a son of Dr. Alonzo and Ellen (Brown) 
Garwood. His father is a prominent physician of Western 
Michigan, and has also figured in State political circles, repre- 
senting his district in the State Senate in 1856. In 1S76 Mr. 
Garwood entered Michigan University, at Ann Arbor, and 
after teaching one year graduated in 1881. In September of 
the same year he came to Waterloo and was employed in the 
office of Best >_S: McClellan, and at the same time began the 
study of law. In 1883 he was admitted to the bar, and the fol- 
lowing September, Mr Best having retired from the firm, he 
was given an interest in the business by Judge McClellan, the 
firm name being McClellan cS; Garwood. In October, 1S82, Mr. 
Garwood was married to Jennie, daughter of Judge McClellan. 
They have one child — Aileen. Mr. Garwood is a member of 
Waterloo City Lodge, No. 307, F. & A. M.; Win. Hacker 
Chapter, No. 63, R. A. M., and De Kalb Council, R. cV S. M., 
of Auburn, and of Apollo Commandery, K. T., of Kendallville. 

Prentiss Gill, harness-maker, Waterloo, Ind., was born in 
Summit County, Ohio, Dec. 29, 1S39, a son oi " Thomas and 
Sarah (Sapp) Gill, his father a native of Pennsylvania and his 
mother of Maryland. They were among the early settlers of 
Summit County, locating a little before Akron was laid out. 
Prentiss was reared and educated in his native county, and 



HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 873 

! when thirteen years of age began working at the harness-mak- 
er's trade, serving an apprenticeship of four years. In April, 
1S61, he enlisted in the- Nineteenth Ohio Infantry (three months 
service) and was the first volunteer enrolled from Cuyahoga 

I Falls. He served four months, participating in all the engage- 
ments under General McClcllan. He was mustered out, and 
eleven days later enlisted in Company D, Fifteenth United 
States Infantry, Second Division (General McCook) Army of 
the Cumberland; afterward First Division, Fourteenth Army 

I Corps. He participated in the battles of Chattanooga, Rcsaca, 
New Hope Church, Kcnesaw Mountain, Peach Tree Creek, 
Atlanta, and Jonesboro, . Ga. He was mustered out as Ser- 
geant at Atlanta in 1864 and returned home, but soon after 
enlisted in Company — , One Hundred and Ninety-seventh 
Ohio Infantry, and served a year. In July, 1865, he came to j 
Indiana and began working at his trade in Kendallville, Noble ; 
Co. Remained there a few years, and then moved to Water- ! 
loo, where he now has a good trade. He was married Dec. ' 
25, 1S65, to Nancy Yant, to died in Waterloo in 1S81, leaving 
three children — Kate, Jessie and Lloyd. In 1S83 Mr. Gill mar- 
ried Mar)' Warren. Me is a member of Waterloo Post, No 52, 1 
G. A. R. 

Samuel Goodwin, one of the old settlers and representative I 
citizens of Union Township, was born in Center County, Pa., 
in October, 18 16, the second son of seven children of David and ; 
Catherine (Zimmerman) Goodwin, natives of Pennsylvania. In 
1822 his parents moved to Wayne County, Ohio, and subse- > 
quently to Ashland County, where the father died and where j 
Samuel grew to manhood. He was married in 1843 to Eli/a- 

! beth Good, and settled in Ashland Count}-, Ohio, where they 
lived till 1S54, when they moved to De Kalb County, Ind., and 
led on the .'arm where he now lives. At that time it was a 
tract of heavily timbered land, but by hard work and perse- 
verance he has cleared and reduced it to an advanced state of 
cultivation. He owns 115 acres of choice land, and his resi- j 

i dence and farm buildings are large and comfortable. Although 
his early years were full of toil and hardship, he has accunvu- 
latcd a good property, and his latter years can be spent in 
comparative ease, free from care and labor, wit h a consciousness 
that his life has not been lived in vain. His wife died in 1865, 
leaving five children— Mary E., now I he wife of Alfred Keck; 



Y 



S/4 HISTORY OK DEKALB COUNTY. 

Lcandcr S. married Rebecca I lively; Joseph W. married 
Olivia M. Brown; Lucy, now Mrs. Stephen George; Alice, 
now Mrs. William Atwood. Mr. Goodwin subsequen 
ried Mrs. Mary J. (Prosser) Brubaker, and to them have been 
born three children — Ina, married, Frank I'arncil and William 
F. Mrs. Goodwin has three daughters by her former marriage 
— Jennie, wife of Philemon Goodwin ; Catherine, wife of Oscar 
Zimmerman: and Emma, wife of John Lilling. Mr. and Mrs. 
Goodwin are members of the United Brethren church, and 
take an active part in the promotion of all objects of a religious 
or charitable nature. 

George W. Gordon, Postmaster, Auburn, Ind., was born near 
Republic, Seneca Co., Ohio, Dec. 7, 1834. In 1S41, when lie 
was seven years of age, he came to Indiana with his mother and 
stepfather, Lydia and George Enslcy, and was reared in Butler 
Township, De Kalb County, lie received a good education, 
attending the district and select schools, and afterward the 
Methodist College at Fort Wayne. He assisted his stepfather 
to clear and cultivate his farms, and endured all the hardships 
and privations incident to pioneer life, remaining on the farm, 
and teaching school during winter months, till the breaking out 
of the Rebellion. Sept. 25, 1861, he enlisted in Company K, 
Forty-fourth Indiana Infantry, as a private, but was promoted 
to Orderly Sergeant. He participated in the battles ni Fort 
Donclson, Shiloh, siege of Corinth. While on duty during the 
siege of Corinth he was taken sick with typhus fever and rheu- 
matism and was sent to the United States Hospital at Keokuk, 
Iowa, where lie remained under treatment from July till De- 
cember, returning to his regiment on the battle-field at Stone 
River. lie participated in all the further engagements of his 
regiment, including battles of Chickamauga and Mission Ridge. 
After the latter battle his regiment was detail d to provost duty 
at Chattanooga, and remained there till the end of their term of 
service. He was mustered out at Chattanooga, Tenn., Nov. 
22, 1S64, serving three years and nearly three months, and re- 
turned to Indiana. Soon after he went to Fort Wayne and 
engaged in the art of photography, remaining there one year. 
He then returned to the old home in Butler Township and 
engaged in farming till 1S71, when on account of failing health, 
the result of army life, he located in Auburn and opened a 
studio which he carried on till January, 1S82, when he was ap- 



irxs'i 



IRY 



INTY. 



ml Arth 



ub 



poinic 

tics M 

as Clerk of Butler Towi 

County Auditor, bul was 

county going Democratic. 

Ma 



■■;-. 



r, Postmaster of Auburn, la poli- 
can. In 1856 and 1857 '8 lie served 
lip, and in [S70 was nominated 
feated by seventy-five votes, tlie 
lie was married Nov. 22, 1856, to 
C, daughter of Charles F. Crouse. They have one 
daughter— Minnie M. Mr. Gordon is a member of Mentor 
Lodge, No. 591. 1. O. O. F., and Dc Long Post, No. Gj, G. A. R. 
He is Past Grand of his lodge, and is Deputy Grand Master of 
the 467th District of Indiana. He is Commander of his post. 
He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal 



Hiram Grisivold, bridge contractor and builder, of Auburn, 
Ind., was born in Litchfield County, Conn., April 4, 1827. He- 
went with his parents when a child to Stark County, Ohio, and 
later to Massillon. In 1844 he began clerking for Freeman Mc- 
Millan, wholesale dealer in dry goods and groceries, Massillon, re- 
maining with him four years. In 184S he went to Toledo, Ohi'o, 
and for three seasons followed boating, and from there to Day- 
ton, where he followed the same business till 1853. In the sum- 
mer of 1854 he came to Indiana and was associated with his 
father, Willis Griswold, in a saw-mill, which subsequently was 
burned. They then bought the old Mills, which they car- 
ried on several years. He was then variously employed, being 
for some time Marshal of Auburn and Deputy Sheriff several 
terms, serving under S. W. Ralston, Jeremiah Plumb and John 
McMillan. In 1S61 he began bridge building, and has since 
built the greater part of the bridges in De Kalb, 'Whitley and 
Steuben counties. He was married in December, 1849, t0 
Mary Copsly, of Dayton, Ohio. She died in June, 1S69, leav- 
ing three children — Grant, Alfred and Lilly, wife of Charles 
McDonald, son of J. B. McDonald, of Whitley County. 

Daniel Grogg, one of the early settlers of Union Township 
was bom in Stark County, Ohio, Aug. 13, 1818, a son of Solo- 
mon and Mary (Snyder) Grogg, natives of Northampton 
County, Pa., who emigrated to Stark County in an early day. 
The father died in Ohio, and the mother afterward came to 
De Kalb County, Ind., with her children, and died here at the 
age of ninety-five years. Daniel Grogg was reared on a farm, 
receiving a common-school education. In May, 1849, ne moved 
to De Kalb County, Ind., and settled on the farm where he still 



N;"6 HISTORY OF DE KA1 li COUNTY. 

lives, at that time a tract of wild land. lie first bought 120 
acres, and to this has added till he now owns 3S0 acres. His 
residence is a large, two-story brick building, and hi ; farm 

are among the best in the township. lie has made a 

specialty of wheat, but has also paid considerable attcnti 
stock-raising. He was married in Ohio, in 1843, to Elizabeth 
llutz, and to them have been born five sons — John, \ 
George, Peter and Franklin. Their only daughter died in 
young ladyhood. Mr. and Mrs. Grogg are members of the 
Lutheran church. Mr. Grogg is one of the representative 
farmers of Union Township, and has acquired his properly by 
Ids good judgment and strict attention to his business. 

Jacob Grogg, retired farmer, is a native of Ohio, born in Can- 
ton, Stark County, Feb. 14, 1S14, a son of Solomon and Mai . 
(Snyder) Grogg. When twenty-one years of age he began to 
learn the miller's trade in Rufner Mills, near Canton. In 1S40 
he took charge of the Roop Mills at Pekin, and remained one 
year. The next ten years he took charge of the Hostetter and 
Roop mills, and in 1S51 came to Indiana and prospected in De 
Kalb County where he had two brothers, Peter and Daniel. He 
purchased land in- what is now Keyser Township, and in the 
spring of 1S52 moved his family to the wilds of De Kalb County. 
He cleared and cultivated his farm, residing on it till the fall of 
1869, when he moved to Auburn, although he still owns it. 
He has never aspired to official honors, but has at different 
limes been elected to positions of trust and responsibility. In 
November, 1837. he was married ro Sarah Becker, of Canton, 
Oiiio. They have had five children, but two of whom arc liv- 
ing — Julia Ann, wife of Isaac W. Bard, of Dayton, Ohio, and 
Melinda, widow of Frank N. Barclay. Solomon died at Ruf- 
ner Mills, Ohio, July 3, 1845, aged three years; Adam died 
December, 1805, aged twenty-eight years; and Sadie, Feb. 
11. 1876, aged twenty-three years. Mr. and Mrs. Grogg arc 
members of the Lutheran church. 

John Frederick Groscop is a native of Germany, born June 12, 
1821. His youth was spent on a farm in his native country, re- 
ceiving a common-school education. When he was twenty-one 
years of age he enlisted in the regular army and served seven 
years. At the expiration of his term of service he returned 
home, and soon after married Christina Crennion. In 1S52 he 
started for the United States with his wife and three children. 



HISTORY OF DE KAI.li COUNTY. 877 

I lis wife and one child died on shipboard and he arrived in 
Mew York with his two children, without friends and with 
very hide money, lie went to Buffalo and remained one win- 
ter, and in 1S53 came, to Indiana and found employment on tin: 
railroad in De Kalb County. From his earnings he saved 
enough to pay for sixty-live acres of land, and to this has since 
added till he now owns 100 acres. When he bought his land it 
was mostly heavily timbered, but he went bravely to work and 
soon had sufficient cleared to plant a crop. He has been indus- 
trins and frugal, and now has one of the finest farms in the 
township. He has a new two story brick house, and a new 
barn 40 x 50 feet in size. His other farm buildings .are large 
and convenient. -Mr. Groscop was married a second time to 
Mary Myers, a native of Germany, cousin of his first wife. He 
has a family of nine children — William, Charles, Frank and 
Frederick (twins), Harmon, John, Caroline (wife of Charles 
Recs), Emma and Sophia. Mr. Groscop and his wife are mem- 
bers of the German Reformed church. When Mr. Groscop was 
married the second time he had but fifty cents, and the first hay 
he bought he paid for with $3 of his wife's money. 

Isaac Hague, a pioneer of De Kalb County, lnd., was born in 
Holmes County, Ohio, June 29, 1837, a son ol Aaron and Ruth 
(Culbertson) Hague. He came when a child to De Kalb 
County with his parents, who settled in Concord Township 
September, 1838. When he was sixteen years of age he was 
apprenticed to Isaac Brandt, of Auburn, to learn the shoe- 
maker's trade. After serving four years he went to Newville, 
where he worked at his trade and attended and taughl school, 
remaining there six years. In i860 he located in Waterloo and 
worked at Ids trade. In 1869 he was appointed Postmaster of 
Waterloo. In 1874 he was elected, on the Republican ticket, 
Auditor of De Kalb County, and resigned the position of Post- 
master and moved to Auburn. After his term of office expired, 
in the spring of 1879, ne became associated with Charles Rant 
in the boot and shoe business in Auburn, but in February, 
1883, sold his interest in the business. Mr. Hague was married 
to Miss Julia, daughter of J. B. Hoover, of Waterloo. They 
have two children — Stella M. and Charles E. He is a demitted 
member of Waterloo Lodge, No. 307, F. & A. M. He and his 
II wife arc members of the Disciples church. 

Ezra D. Hartman, attorney at law, Auburn, was born in 



. 



. 



[ISTORY OK Dli KAl.l; COUNTY, 



Lehigh County, Pa., .May 16, ts.u, a son of Abraham and Catli 
crinc Hartman, also natives of that State, his father of German, 
and his mother of English descent. Abraham Hartman was a 
minister in the .Methodist Episcopal church. In 1847 he moved 
to Dc Kalb County, Ind., and settled on a farm three miles 
northeast of .Auburn, where he lived several years and subse- 
quently moved northwest, of Auburn, where he died in the 
spring of 1873, aged sixty-three years, lie was an energetic, 
progressive citizen, and was especially active in all matters of 
interest to the church. His wile is still living on the homestead 
with one of her sons, in the seventieth year of her age. Ezra 
D. Hartman received a good education attending the district 
school and the Auburn High School. He began teaching 
when but seventeen years of age and taught several years, at- 
tending school in the meantime as he had opportunity and 
means. While teaching he borrowed some law books of Judge 
Mott and read during his leisure hours under his direction. 
He afterward entered the office of J. B. Morrison, and re- 
mained with him till September, 1S61, when he went to Ann 
Arbor, Mich., and entered the law department of the Michigan 
University, remaining there six months. Returning to Auburn 
he continued his studies and in June, 1862, was admitted to the 
bar. The following August he enlisted and helped to raise a 
company and on its organization was elected and appointed its 
Second Lieutenant ; in less than two months he was promoted 
to First Lieutenant, and two months later to Captain, having 
served in that capacity the greater part of the time from the 
start. lie participated in the operations of the army in Ken- 
tucky and Tennessee and later in the siege of Vicksburg and 
the capture of Jackson, Miss. While in the army he contracted 
disease, especially of the eyes, which disabled him for active 
service, and in the spring of 1864, having received an honora- 
ble discharge, lie went to Cleveland, Ohio, for treatment and re- 
mained tiil July, i860, attending in the meantime lectures at the 
law school from which he graduated in the spring, his previous 
knowledge of the law enabling him to pass the examination 
with very little reading. In July, 1866, he located in Waterloo, 
Ind., and began his practice. In the Republican Convention 
of that year he received the nomination for Representative 
in the State Legislature. His opponent was Hon. Freeman 
Kelly. Mr. Hartman entered at once into the campaign, 



HIST< ':;'. 01" DE KALli 

:ing :.: every availal 

county was very close politically, was elcctc d rved with 

credit. l,i the spring ol [867 he again l> 1 'ice in 

Waterloo, and the following fall was elected Prosecutin 
ney for the Fourteenth judicial Circuit, composing the counties 
ol Dc Kalb, Steuben, Lagrange, Noble, Elkhart, and Ko 

served three yeai"s. fn the meantime he had formed a part- 
nership with J. L. Morland, and the firm ol Hartman .V Morland 
continued till the winter of 1871, when Mr. Hartman moved to 
South Bend, engaging in practice there. In 1873 he re- 
turned to De Kail) County and located in Auburn, forming a 
lartncrship with J. E. Rose. In Septe — r, . 3i, this firm was 
dissolved and Mr. Hartman has since practiced alone, fie is ; 
iular and successful lawyer and has many friends both in and 
oul of the profession, lie is an eloquent speaker and although 
nol a bitter partisan freely gives his services to the cause ol the 
Republican party. lie is a Royal Arch Mason, and a m< 
ol the Grand Army of the Republic, and was the first Com- 
mander of the Post at; Auburn. He is a member of the Presby- 
terian church, and has served as Trustee and Elder since 1873. 
He was married Oct. 15, 1868, to Mary, daughter of Levi Cun- 
ningham, a prominent citizen of Bryan, Ohio. They have three 
children— Mabel, born May 16, 1870; Walter C, born Feb. 11. 
1S73, and Hubert Ezra, born Oct. 27, 1884. 

Dcwitt Clinton Headley was born in Concord Township, De 
Kalb County, Oct. 25, 1839, a son ol Samuel and Rebecca 
(Woodcock) Headley. When fifteen years of age he began to 
take care of himself by working at the mason's trade and for 
farmers. His father was a merchant, and he assisted him ii 
the store occasionally. In 1S59 he went to California and 
teamed across the Sierra Nevada Mountains from Sacramento 
to Virginia City till December, 1863, when he returned to 
Newville and worked on a farm till March, 1864. Then he en- 
listed in Company 11, Eighty-eighth Indiana Infantry, and 
served till August, 1865, when he was discharged at Indianapo- 
lis. He participated in all the engagements of Sherman's army 
after Buzzard's Roost. Alter his discharge lie returned to 
Newville, and soon after went to Marshalltown, Iowa, return- 
ing to De Kalb County in 1868. The summer of 1869 he spent 
in Iowa, and then was associated with Joseph Rainier in the 
livery business till the fall of 1S71. In the fall of 1872 he 



associated with John Grcenamyer in the boot and shoe 
business in Butler, and in December, 1873, th< 

stock to \> (c 11, Steuben Co., remaining there I 

1874, when, his partner having previously retired from the 

firm, he moved his stock to Auburn, and the following 

ber sold it. From 1S75 till 1SS1 he was variou 

and then was appointed by Joseph Rainier assistant Postmaster, 

1 osition till Jan. 16, 1S82, and since then has been 

.: ;soi iated with Mr. Rainier in carrying on the City Meat Mar- 
ket, the firm name being Rainier >V llcadlcy. April 10, 1873, 
Mr. llcadlcy was married to Corlanthia R., daughter ol |ohn 
11. Parks, of Marshall County, tnd. They arc members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Headlcy is a member of De 
Kalb Lodge, No. 214, F. & A. M. 

Solomon R. Hcberling, dealer in agricultural implements, sew- 
ing-machines and musical instruments, Auburn, Intl., \ 
near Somerset, Perry Co., Ohio, Feb. 7, 1838, the third son of 
Jacob and Susannah (Wymer) Heberling. His mother died 
when he was about eight years old, and his lather soon after 
moved ids family to Fremont, Ohio, where he was reared on a 
farm, attending school only five months in his life. He assisted 
his father till nearly twenty-two years of age, when, in the fall 
of 1859, he left home and with eight others went to Tennessee 
as agents for Dr. Gunn's medical work. They divided the ter- 
ritory, and he and three others commenced work in Obion 
County. The John Brown trouble at Harper's Ferry had just 
taken place, and there was a strong prejudice in the South 
against Northerners, and when about to deliver the books they 
had sold in Jacksonville, one man raised a mob and demanded 
Icparturc. Their gentlemanly bearing won them many 
friends, and after some excitement they were allowed to remain 
three weeks, and during that time many who were bitterly op- 
posed to them, became their warmest friends. Their party dis- 
banded, and with one associate he returned to Indiana, arriving 
at Evansville, March 1, i860. While traveling through Ken- 
tucky, they paid their expenses by selling fluid lamps. Finding 
note ritory in Indiana, they went, to Missouri, but here met 
same opposition as in Tennessee, and, not wishing to 
pass through the same trouble, returned to Indiana penniless. 
He worked a month on a farm near Evansville, and then 
engaged in book canvassing in Vanderburgand Posey counties 






HIS rOKY OF Dl II N'l'V. 88 1 



and in three months soli i and $i,Soo .. 

books, receiving hall as his commission. In August he went. to 
Vernon, Inch, where he was taken with typhoid fever and was 
.sick ten months. He had but $100 left, when 
lather's house, and all but $15 of this was taken from hi . po< k< I i 
while on the way. Me was taken with a congestive chill on 
the boat and was unable to proceed. Finally he reached his 
uncle's at Lima and remained there three weeks, arriving at 
home Jan. 2i, 1861. (Jet. 21, 1861, he enlisted in Company 1, Sev- 
enty-second Ohio Infantry, lor three years, but was di 
July, 1862, on account of disability. lie participated in tl 
battle of Shiloh. He returned to Fremont, and after his recov- 
ery bought a farm and remained on it till 1S71, when he began 
traveling for J. I. Case cS: Co., of Racine, and was in their em- 
ploy till November, 1883, having charge of Ohio, [ndi 
Kentucky. lie was then employed by the Snyder W 
Company till March, 18S4, when he became established in his 
present business in Auburn. Mr. Hcberling was married Dec. 
4, iS8l, to Mrs. Sophronia Alderman, of Van Wert County, 
Ohio. He is a member of the City Council of Auburn. He is 
a prominent Odd Fellow, a member of Helena Lodge, Xo. 592, 
and Thompson Encampment, No. — , Helena, Ohio. He is also 
member of De Long Post, No. 67, G. A. R. 

John C. Henry, banker and wholesale dealer in notions and 
drugs, Auburn, came to De Kalb County, Ind., Nov. 28, 
1862, and settled in Fairfield Township. He engaged in 
farming till August, 1864. He removed to Steuben County 
and engaged in farming until about 1871 when he removed to 
the town of Hudson (same county), Ind., and engaged in mer- 
cantile business until 1877. He removed to Auburn and en- 
gaged in the wholesale notion business, and in August, 1882. 
added to it the drug business and in February, 1SS2, he, with 
Nicholas Ensley, Jacob Walborn, Guy Plumb and Albert Rob- 
bins, in tituted the Farmers' Bank 01 Auburn. He has been 
Treasurer of Auburn High School for two years, and is the 
ill ol thai office at the present writing. Mr. Henry is a 
native of Ohio; was born in Millcrsburg, Holmes County, Jan. 
1. 1841. His father, Samuel S. Henry, died when he was about 
the age of twelve years. He remained with his mother, Jane 
C. (Allcook), until about the age of sixteen when, in the spring 
of 1856, he, thinking Ohio a poor place for a poor boy to gel a 





SS2 HISTORY 01 Dl KALB t 

start, went to try his fortune in the — . ol gold i 
where lie remained until the fall of iS6o, when he reti 
his homo in Millcrsburg, Ohio. No; having an oppi 
he received only a limited education, but. by natural a;-. ..■ . 

energy ho has acquired .. .■ ;s education. Nov. 2S, 

[861, he married Marian Baughman, of Millersburg, Oh 
whom he has two children — Helen Louisa and Harry Cook. 
lie is a Mason and a member of Do Kall> Lodge, No. 214; was 
formerly a member and one of the founders of Hiawatha 
Lodge, No. 52S, Hudson, Ind., and was Master of the same as 
long as he remained a citizen of the place. 

Cluster P. Hodge, the second son of the Rev. James Hodge 
and Keturah (Ransom), his wife, was born Dec. 16, ii 
Leroysville, Bradford Co., Pa. Man)' of his ancestors on both 
sides were old settlers of Orange County, N. Y. Among them 
were the Colcmans, Moffatts, Lamoreux, Turtles and Daven- 
ports. In an old history of Orange County lists are given 1 ; 
those who held any office between 1700 and '65, and of those 
who in June, 1775, signed the pledge to support the Col- 
onial Congress. Among these arc the names of three of Mr. 
Hodge's great-grandfathers — Isaac Hodge, Thomas Lamorcu> 
and Jeremiah Coleman. The fourth, Capt. Samuel Ransom, oi 
the Continental Army, fell at the head of his company, July 3, 
1778, one of the victims ol the massacre of Wyoming. On the 
monument erected to commemorate the massacre Ids name 
heads the list. I lis son, George Palmer, grandfather ol Mr. 
C. P. 1 lodge, who had enlisted in his father's company two 
years before, when fourteen years old, helped to bury the 
i\l\h\, among whom was his own lather. He afterward 
served in the army until peace was declared. He marrie 
his second wi.e, Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Lamoreux and 
Keturah (Tuttle) his wife. March 25, 1X30, the Rev. Jamc: 
Hodge, youngest son of William and Sarah (Coleman) Hodge, 
married a second wife, Keturah Ransom. He had a good 
mind, unusual refinement and an excellent command of lan- 
guage. His earnest piety and pure life commended to all the 
holy Gospel in which he believed, which lie preacher! from 
the 'pulpit and whose principles were his constant guide. 
Those who knew him chiefly in the pulpit remembered always 
the wonderful sweetness of his voice in singing and his "gilt in 
prayer." His wife was a fitting helpmeet for her husband; a 



HISTORY OF DE KALE COUN TV. 8.S3 

woman of great force of character and unusually capable in 
affairs. To them were born four children, oi whom Chester I'. 
was second. Me showed no unusual inclination to study until 
when in his fifteenth year he began algebra. His enthusiasm 
in the solution of problems was very great, and gave an im- 
petus to his mind in the prosecution ol his other studii . 1 .- 
prepared for college al Wyoming Seminary, Kingston, Pa., but 
taught much before entering Union College, Schenectady, N. 
V., in the spring of i860. His standing in his classes was always 
high, and he paid much attention to work in the laboratory. i 
lie was graduated in June, 1862, and received in course the ] 
degrees of A. 0. and A. M. On the 13th of the following Au- ; 
gust he enlisted in the One Hundred and Forty-first Regiment j 
of Pennsylvania Volunteers, but was discharged on the. 29th of 
December, 1862, on account oi disabilities existing before en- 
listment, lie returned to a home made desolate by the dead: ol 
his beloved mother, who "fell asleep" Nov. 21, 1862, aged six- 
ty-one years, in full hope of a joyful resurrection. April 14, 
1863, at 9:30 A. M., in the Methodist Episcopal church at Au- 
burn, End., by the Rev. Randal Faurot, Chester P. Hodge was j 
married to Julia E., only daughter of Hon. E. B. Mott. With 
his wife he returned to Lcroysvillc, Bradford Co., Pa., where 
his father and sister lived in the old home. From that home 
his revered father went to rest Nov. 5, 1863, at the age of sixty- 
eight years. The following spring Mr. Hodge removed to 
Auburn, Ind. He made thorough preparation for work at the 
bar, and was admitted to practice, but he enjoyed more the 
class-room and blackboard, and in 1S6S, having been elected 
acting President of the Fort Wayne College, which was then 
in a state of collapse, he took charge of it, and under the stim- 
ulating effect of his judicious management and thorough work, 
it revived and began a more prosperous era. At the close oi 
the academic year Mr. Hodge was offered the Presidency of 
the college, but declined as he preferred to teach mathematics. 
At the conclusion of the second year, the institution having 
passed into private hands, Mr. Hodge left Fort Wayne Col- 
lege and engaged in public school work. No Slate certifi- 
cates were given in Indiana until 1872. Mr. I lodge was one of 
the first class examined and received a first grade certifi- 
cate, unlimited as to time, which entitles him to teach in 
any school in the State without further examination. Mr. 



— - 

SS4 iRY OF D UXTY. 

[-lodge has been a Superintendent oi schools du....' 

of the last fifteen years. There was i pears 

during most of which he was pan owner and business mana 
of the Warsaw Indianian. His long experience in teachin 
abled him to make the educational department ol more than 
usual interest. In November, 1882, in consequence of the death 
6f Mrs. Hodge's oldest brother, E. B. Mott, Jr., Mr. Hodge re- 
moved his family to De Kalb County, and the)' now live on 
Green Hurst farm, a place which afforded Judge Mott much 
pleasure and amusement during his later years. It lies about 
a mile north of the court-house on the Waterloo road. Mr. 
Hodge has always been a strong Republican, but his modcra- i 
tion of speech and his consideration for the opinions of others 
have prevented political enmities, and he has reckoned among I 
his staunchest friends many who are diametrically opposed 
to him in politics. He is a close reasoner, accurate and logical, 
a man honest in purpose and deed. This sketch of him was 
gathered from the facts of his life without his knowledge, and 
judging from his habitual reserve would have been withheld i 
had he known that it was contemplated. He is a member of 
the Protestant Episcopal church. Mr. and Mrs. I lodge have 
been the parents of nine children, most of whom are not, for 
God took them, in their early infancy. Egbert Mott, born Nov. 
24, 1S67 ; Julia Mott, Nov. 12, 1S69, and Chester James, Jan. 21, 
1872, alone remain to them. Perhaps the sorest grief, which 
ever came to Mr. Hodge or his family, was the death on the 
fourth Sunday in Advent, Dec. 21, 18S4, of his youngest child, 
and dearly beloved daughter, Teresa Morris, who was named 
for a noble woman, Mrs. Judge Morris, of Fort Wayne. She 
was almost five years old, a child of unusual promise in person, 
mind and character. Long dark lashes shaded eyes of the deep- 
est blue, which looked out from a bright, sweet face upon a 
world in which she found much happiness and made it for oth- 
ers. Most loving, most truthful, most conscientious, she was a 
perpetual joy, an increasing delight to those who loved her. 
Her father was away from home when she was taken ill, and 
almost her first thought was for him. " Don't tell papa 1 have 
diphtheria, he will be so sorry," she begged. During her ill- 
ness of ten days she showed courage, patience, unfailing trust 
and meek submission, while through all shone the unfailing 
sweetness of her nature. " I do not think I suffer so much, 



HISTORY OF DEKALB COUNTY. 






mamma; I do not believe you will have to lose me," she said a 
few hours before the end came. As the eventide fell fast, she 
said to her father who watched by her bed: "Please ii .. a 
lamp, papa." lie went to do so, and when lie brought it she 
was gone — so swift the transit ion — lo the arms of everlasting. 
Love. Her's was a short life, but rounded and pure, and made 
perfect through suffering. 

Sherman Hollister, restaurateur, confectioner and baker, Au- 
burn, Intl., was born near Huron, Erie Co., Ohio, Jan. 25, 1834, 
where he was reared a farmer, and lived with his parents, Ash- 
lev and Cecilia (Pattee) Hollister. After reaching maturity he- 
took charge of the farm and cared for his parents till their 
death. He left the homestead in the summer of 1876, and came 
.0 Auburn, Ind., and the same year built his business house, a 
rick structure on Main, between Seventh and Eighth streets, 
and opened his restaurant and bakery where he has built up a 
good trade. Mr. Hollister was married Dec. 21, 1859, to ^ ss 
Velona Benedict, of Fort Wayne, Ind. They have one daugh- 
ter—Sarah E., now the wife of Prof. R. W. Cobb, professor of 
penmanship in the Champaign (111.) Industrial College. While 
residing in Huron Mr. Hollister served as Assessor of his town- 
ship rive terms, and as Trustee two terms. He is a Master, 
Royal Arch and Council Mason, and is a member of Marks 
Lodge, No. 359, Huron, of which he was Worshipful Master 
ten years. He is a demitted member of the Chapter at Milan, 
Ohio, and of the Council at Sandusky, Ohio. Mr. Hollister is 
of a warm, genial nature, and has a host of friends, both old 
and young, who delight to congregate at Sherm's as he is 
familiarly called. 

Leonard Hoodelmere was born in Wurtemburg, Germany. 
May 23, 1813. When sixteen years of age he accompanied his 
parents to the United States, and after forty-three days' voyage 
landed at Baltimore, Md.. where they hired a team and wen; to 
Pittsburg, Pa., where our subject remained eighteen months 
and learned the weaver's trade. His parents proceeded to 
Stark County, Ohio, and bought land, and alter completing his 
trade he followed them. In 1S42 the family moved to Dekalb 
County, Ind., and located first on what is now John Pyle'sfarm. 
Subsequently moved to Auburn, and in 1S44 returned to Ohio 
and worked for one man in Carroll County ten years. He then 
moveci to Fort Wayne, and five years later returned to De Kalb 
50 



>S6 HISTORY OK DE KALB COUNTY. 

Count v, and settled on what is now the West farm. In [86 
enlisted in Company K, Forty-fourth Indiana Infantry u 
served ten months, when he was disi barged on accounl 

.. In April, 1S64, he again enlisted and was assigned to 
his old regiment, and served till the close of the war. He par- 
ticipated in many severe battles, and was wounded in the wrist. 
After the war he returned to De Kalb County, and in 186; 
settled on the una.; where he now lives. lie own.-, forty acres 
of line land, and his buildings are all in good repair, and arc 
, comfortable and commodious. Mr. Hoodclmcre was married 
in 1839, to Phillipiana Napp. To them have been born fi 1 
children — Kvaiine, Maria, George, Harriet, and Christina. 

Calvin Husselman is the youngest son 01 Samuel and Maria 
Yager) Husselman, who were early settlers of De Kalb County, 
coming in 1S45, ant ' ul '^47 settled on the farm now owned by 
Calvin. On this farm he was reared, receiving his education in 
the public school and later at the Auburn High School. When 
eighteen years of age he began the study of law with his broth- 
er. D. Y. Husselman, and was admitted to the bar in Decem- 
ber, 1S74. He was married in June, 1876, to Rosa E. Britton. 
daughter of L. D. and Martha Britton, early settlers of Richland 
Township, this county. After his marriage he settled on his 
farm and has since devoted his attention to agricultural pursuits. 
His farm contains 122 acres of choice land, all well improved, and 
his buildings are large and comfortable. His barn, a bark struct- 
ure, 40x80 feet in size, built in 1851, is one of the old land- 
marks. He makes a specialty of fruit culture, especially grapes, 
of which he has a number of varieties. Mr. and Mrs. Hussel- 
man have had three sons, but two are living— Carl B. and 
Leroy. Frank is deceased. 

Daniel Y. Husselman, Clerk of the De Kalb Circuit Court, was 
born in Union Township, De Kalb Co., Inc.., Jan. 15, iS4S,a so;. 
of Samuel and Maria Husselman. He was educated in the 
county schools. When he was seventeen years of age his father 
died, and he remained with his mother and superintended the 
.'arm till twenty-one years of age. In 1870 he began the study 
of law in the office of R. Wes McBride, at Waterloo, Ind., and 
in August of the same year was admitted to the bar at Auburn. 
In June, 1871, he began his practice at Waterloo, and remained 
there till May, 1881, when lie removed to Auburn and became 
associated with James A. Barns in publishing- and editing the 1 



[IISTi <R\ O] Dl ., \ i >UNTY. i / 

urn Courier. On account of poor health i 

newspaper bi ...-and resumed thi 

tic is p . Auburn, [n November, 1X82, In 

clc< ted on . cratic ticket Clerk of the De Kalb Circuit 

Court over lion. E. D. Hartman, the Republican nominee. 
Nov. 23, 1870, Mr. Husselman was married to Miss Mar)- J. 
Smith. They have three children — Milo, Thomas A. and Dollic 
(twin; . 

. .....'. re E. [mhoffis a native of As nd County, Ohio, born 

A,.;;. 26, 1848, a son of Josiah . Jatilda (1 enner) ., ... ... 

natives of Pennsylvania. His parents were married in Ohio, 
remaining in that State till the fall of 1.S50, when they .. 
to De Kalb County and settled on section 14, Union Towi I 
where they lived till 1SS4, and then moved to Waterloo where 
they still live. Theodore was reared on the farm, being bul 
two years ol age when his parents moved to this county. 
received a common-school education, and alter attaining his 
majority began to work at the carpenter's trade, following it 
severai years. In 18^-4 he settled on the old homestead where 
he still lives. He is now engaged in the manufacture of sor- 
ghum molasses, which he is making a successful business. In 
addition to this and to working at his trade he attends to the 
cultivation of the farm. lie is an industrious and enterprising 

man, and one of the most prosperous citizens of the tow 

His farm contains eighty acres of finely cultivated land. He- 
was married in 1873 to Miss Viola M. Scattergood, of De Kalb 
County. They have three children — Irvin S., Lula G. and 
Erne P. Mr. Imhoff is a member of the Odd Fellow's Order, 
Lodge, No. 221, Waterloo. 

IV. H. Kiblinger, the genial and wholesouled hardware mer- 
chant of Auburn, De Kalb Co., Ind., has attained a prominence 
in both business and social circles fully becoming any man. 
lie has been generous without stint or ostentation in all enter- 
prises pertaining to the growth and advancement of his resident 
town. He is a model in his bestowments of charity, an. 1 . a 
politician is firm, thoughtful, and has impressed his individu- 
ality upon the local politics of the county. No one man empha- 
sized so much earnestness in the election of presidential, State 
and county officers as did Mr. Kiblinger. Strong but unpre- 
tentious, firm but magnanimous, he works diligently and suc- 
cessfully to make a given point in either business or politj ca i 



S8S rORY i .-:.:. 

Few business men tower to an equa 

with him for exactness, cli d 

ut his business room. Mis beginning in j 

marks ouf (or him a long unci successful career as a merchant, 

and although not yet matured to the turning po 

has established a substantial trade am ai ed considerable 

wealth. He was born at Fish Lake, Lagrange Co., Ind., May 
24, 1S4S, a son of Peter F. and Henrietta (Hoffman) Ki ■ 
His preliminary education was received in the common schools, 
and at the age of fifteen was a pupil in the R. Patch Seminar)', 
located at Ontario, Ind., and subsequently took a commercial 
course at Eastman's Cohere, Chicago, ill., from which institu- 
tion he graduated in the fall of 1864. His first business vent 
ure was as clerk in the wholesale tobacco house of Samuel 
Barbosia, Chicago, which position he held for one year, and 
... (okkecper for Spcakman & Proctor, wholesale book- 
sellers ami stationers, Chicago, until 1867. In the soring of the 
above year he became associated with his father in .. 
ware business at Williamsburg, Ind., under the firm name oi 
Kiblinger & Co. In the spring of 1877 he sold his interest at 
Williamsburg and moved to Auburn, where he opened a hard- 
ware store, to which he soon after .added farm machinery. lie 
was very successful in his business pursuits, and in 1880 erected 
a fine business building at the corner 01 .Main and Seventh 
streets. It is a brick structure two stories high and 22x130 
feet in length. In the fall 01 1877 he purchased the hardware 
slock of D. D. Snyder, and again in 1SS3 he bought out Snyder 
& Culbertson. From February, 1883, to February, 1884, he 
was associated with S. J. McBridc in a branch store at Water- 
loo, Ind., under the firm name of Kiblinger & Co. He was 
married Aug. 23, 1S73, to Miss Martha, daughter of John Mc- 
Bride, of Williamsburg, Ind. He is a member of Ligonier 
Lodge, No. 186, F. \; A. M. His wile is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, and Mr. Kiblinger, although not 
united with any denomination, is in accord with the Presbyte- 
rian creed. 

John M. Kimscy, Postmaster, Waterloo, Ind., is a native o: 
Carrollton, Carroll Co., Ohio, born Oct. 9, 1833, a son of Dr. 
Thomas B. and Sarah (Carr) Kimsey, his father a native of 
Ohio and his mother of Ireland, lie was the eldest of six 
children, five of whom are living. July 2S, 1861, he was mar- 



i 

: ricri ; E., daughter of R.J. Lent, ol New York 

......... 

the Fi .. ry. 1 [e wa the bat- 

ol Shiloh, first siege of Corinth and Per /ing till 

Move . when by an nenl all 

rcginv yen discharged. lis discharge he re- 

turned to Indiana, and .. ling in Waterloo a short 

time, went to Angola, where foi I charge of M. 

.\ A. 1 [ale's mere 

ncss for himself. In February, [877, he was ap] 
master at Waterloo. Mr. Kimsey is a member of Waterloo 
Citv Lodge, No. 307, F. & A. M., and a charter mem 
Waterloo Post, No. 52, G. A. R. He and his wile are mem- 

t bcrs of the Methodist Episcopal church. Politic ,.■ 

Republican. Mr. and Mrs. Kimsey have I y of six 

children — Lola, wife of Frank Broughton, M. D., of Avilla, 
Ind. ; Jessie A. died May 6, 1SS4; Sarah E., Reuben T., Rose 
E. and Jay F. are at home. 

Thomas B. Kimsey, M. D.,\ and one of 

. icians of De Kalb County. He began tin 

of his profession with Dr. Hunter, of Carrollton Ohio 

after completing his studies located in Carrollton, where he 
- . three years. He then wenl to Trenton, Tuscarawas 
Co.. Ohio, and in the fall o;" . ns County, Ind., mak- 
ing the last trip by teams, lie located at Monmouth, and rc- 
lained there till 1S52, when he removed to Auburn, Dc Kalb 
County, where be was actively engaged in practice till his 
Lth, in May, 1S56. He was a physician of the old school, a 
very successful practitioner, and was well and favorably know;, 
in the northern counties of Indiana. He married Sarah Carr, 
a native of Ireland, who came to America with her uncle, John 
Morrison, when seven years of age. They had a famil} ol 

:e ol vh "c living. Mrs. .viii.-. • 

September, l.Srd. The Doctor and his wife were cxcni] 
i members oi, and active workers in, the Methodist Epi 
; .vh. 

c I Kline, carpenter 1 Icr, was born in Pern 

County, i'a., Mav 23, [822, a son of John and Sophia (Froun- 

When lie was six months old his pan n 
Mansfield, Richland Co., Ohio, where he was reared. His 
: mother died in Ohio, and his lather subsequently went with one 



I 






Sqo history of ...lb county. 

of his sons to Missouri, where he died. Micl 

the trade of a carpenter in his youth of his father. He < 
liana in January, ;Sy., and located in Auburn, Do .. 
ity, where he lived till the spring of 1855, when he bought 
a tract ol wild land in Richland Township, which he cultiv; 
and improved. lie erected good buildings, including a fine 
.... residence, residing there till 1873, when ... 

since worked at his trade. In addition to | 

[arm he owns two residences in Auburn, the one in .. 
he is living being one oi the finest in the town. Mr. Kline was 
. ; in Crawford County, Ohio, in May, 1849, ; " Mar) '.. 
Wallace, who died in March, 1S50. In 1S51 he married A 

M. Somers, a native of Pennsylva daughter of Join; ..... 

Elizabeth Somers, who came to Indiana in 1841. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Kline have been born six children, three of whom are liv- 
ing — John F., now of Butte City, Mont.; Mary E., wife oi 
Amos Miller, of Ohio; Etta L., at home. Mr. and Mrs. Kline 
mbers of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

lutzner, the youngest son of Isaac and Mary Kul .. 
was born in Stark County, Ohio, Dec. 6, 1835, and was fifteen 
years of age when his parents moved De Kalb Count)-, 
lie received his primary education in his native county, 1 

. it after coming to Indiana. He remained with his par- 
ents to maturity, assisting his lather on the farm. In the fall ol 
1S60 he was married to Mary E. Rhodes, daughter of Elijah 
and Priscilla Rhodes. After his marriage he settled on the ... . 
where he now lives, which at that time consisted of eighty 
acres. To this he has added till he now owns ;6o acres of valu- 
able land. His resilience, which is a large two-story brick, was 

in 1873, and his farm buildings are large and substantial, i 
He is engaged in general farming and stock-raising, his Stoi . 
being of the finest grades. In politics Mr. Kutzner has been a 
life-long Democrat. He is one of the representative and sti - 
stantial farmers of the township. To him and his wife have 
been born four children — Isaac S., Mark, Evena and Ella. 

Myron S. Kutzner, the only son of Augustus and An,. 
(Eberly) Kutzner, was born in De Kalb County, Ind., March :-, 
[859. His parents were natives of Stark County, Ohio, his 
father, born June, 1S2S, died in March, i860, and his mother, 
bornabout 1S38, died Jan. 4, 1S70. They were the pare;.;, ii 
two children — Ellen F., wife of I. \V. Lowman, and Myron. 



HISTORY OF DE O Sol 

Myron Kutzrw ... • '■ ■ 1, 

with him till the lattcr's deatl ,. He received n » I 

education, atten 11 district school and later the Aul 

High School. After leaving school he engaged in agricultural 
pursuits, which he has since followed with uniform success. 
He owns a good farm of 112 acres on which his father settled ! 
ia 1S53, and his improvements arc all good, his buildings be- 1 

among the best in the township. He is engaged in general 
farming, .. on to stock-raising. lie is an en- 

terprising young man and one of the representative farmers ol 
the township. He was married January, tSSi, to Mary, third 
tcr of John and Maria Coy, of this county. They have 
one daughter — Winnie C. 

Sylvester Kutzner ^ a member of one of the pioneer families of 
De Kalb County, is a native of Stark Count}', Ohio, born near 
Canton, Dec. 15, 1S32. He is the fourth of six children of Isaac 
and Mary (Zuaers) Kutzner, his father a native of Cumherlan . 
County, Pa., born in 1796, and his mother of Franklin County, 
Pa., born in 1S01. They were married in their native State 
and moved to Ohio with a family of two children, and in 1851 
came to De Kalb County, and settled on land Mr. Kutzner 
had located in 1S36. The first entry was 200 acres, but to this 
he added till he had 400 acres, all in one tract, lie died Feb. 4, 
[883, and his wife now makes her home with her children, j 
Their family consisted of six children — August (decease..!). 
Sylvester, David, Calvin, Catherine, wife of John Grube, and 
Barbara A., wife of Isaac B. Brandon. .Sylvester Kutzner was 
reared in his native county, being in his nineteenth year when 
he came to De Kalb County. He had a good education and : 
after coming to this county taught school several winter terms. 
lie also engaged in agricultural pursuits and subsequently be- 
came a stockholder in the woolen-mills at Auburn, whii . , 
I roved a., unsuccessful venture. He was superintendent of 1' e 
mills, but the confinement was, injurious to his health, and 
was obliged to resign his position. Since his return to the 
labors of the farm he has been successful, and his health has 

. improved. He owns 154 acres of choice land, and his j 
js are substantial and convenient. He makes a specialty 

of stock-raising and has a fine srrade of Durham cattle. He 

. . . 

takes an active interest in township and county affairs, and has I 

served one term as Trustee, and has also been a member of I 



892 1I!ST( IRY 1 IF DE IvAI.l! I 

the Board of School Examiners ol Dc Kalb County, 
Secretary of Ihe Farmers' Mutual Fire Insurance ( omp; 

lie was married in 1861, to , of Stark County, Ohio. 

died while on a visit to her old home, leaving one child — Mag- 
gie. In [863 he married Clara Williams, who came to Dc Kalb 
County from the southern part ol Ohio. 

H. K. Leas, Cashier of (he Citizens' Rank, Waterloo, [nd., is 
a native oi Steuben County, hid., where he was reared on a 
farm, receiving his early education in the district schools. In 
1S75 he attended the Northern Indiana Normal School and 
Business College at Valparaiso, after which he engaged in 
the drug business, and during that time received an appoint- 
ment as Postmaster, and served as such while he was in the 
business, when he resigned his position as Postmaster, in April, 
1SS0. In rSSo he went to Poughkecpsie, X. Y., and graduated 
from the college there the same year. After leaving school he 
returned to the farm, but soon after was given the opportunity 
to make a practical use of his education by his appointment to 
his present position, in which he has served faithfully and well. 
Mr. Leas was married in June, 1881, to Ida M. Taylor, daugh- 
ter of John Taylor, of De Kalb County. He is a member .ol 
ihe English Reformed church, and of Waterloo City Lodge, No. 
507, F. & A. M. ; and served three years as one ol the Town 
Board of Waterloo, inch, ihe last year as President of said 
Town Board. In 18S5 was chosen as one of the Executive 
Committee of the Northeastern Indiana Agricultural Fair As- 



Joint I.cts, President of Citizens' Rjink, Waterhx 


. Inch, was 


horn in Adams County, Pa., near Gettysburg, July 


(2, [Si 5, .. 


son (.i Col. John, Jr., and Sophia (Spangler) Leas, na 


ives of the 


same Slate. Ten children lived to be adults, eight 


ol whoa; 



an now living. Ilis grandfather was a soldier in the war ol 
the Revolution. Mr, Leas was ; , farmer, fn 1S1S Mr. Leas 

emigrated to Stark County, Ohio, where he opened up 

In 183S he went to Guernsey County and opened up his secoi d 
(arm in a wilderness. In the fall ol 1852 he c; 1 11 to De Kalh 
County, [nd., and located on section 8, Smithiield Township, 
where he again made a farm. The Colonel was a man of more 
than ordinary ability, and was highly respected in the county 
where he resided. While in Stark County, Ohio, he was com- 
missioned as Colonel of a militia regiment by Wilson Shannon. 



. . 



Sy3 



ics he was an old Jackson Democrat, and held several 
local offices. lie died in De Kalb County in 1875. Mrs. Leas 
died in 1882. They were members of the Reformed church. The 
subject of this sketch was reared upon a farm. In early life his 
education was sadly neglected, as his parents were poor, and all 
the schooling he had was in the log cabin. He was married in 
Stark County, Ohio, to Susan Schimpff, a native of Gi rmany, 
nig rated to America when thirteen years of age. By 
this union there was a family of twelve children, nine of whom 
are living — Martin, Jacob, John, Obadiah, William II., Heze- 
kiah K., Daniel, Elizabeth (wife of Oscar Taylor), Adeline (wife 
of Miles J. Waterman). In 1842 Mr. Leas came to Indiana, 
and in 1843 he moved his family, purchasing 143 acres oi land, 
[n 1867 he came to De Kalb County, where he has a fine farm 
and houses. When Mr. Leas came to Steuben County he was 
a poor man, with only $85 in mom:', and a yoke of oxen, and a 
wife and baby, but by hard work he has accumulated a compe- 
tency, ami to-day is among the wealthy citizens of the county. 
For twenty-two years he has followed the shipping business, 
riding nigh, and day. June 15, 1881, Mrs. Leas died at her 
home, leaving a husband and nine children to mourn her loss. 
She was a true Christian, and highly respected by all. She 
was a kind and thoroughly respected and loving wife. In De- 
cember, [881, hi- was again married to Amanda Malory, widow 
ol Robt. Patterson, by whom she had live children; two living 
— William and Frederick. In politics he is a strong Democrat, 
and has held several local offices of trust in the gift of the peo- 
ple. He is a member of the Reformed church. Mr. Leas is a 
Master Mason, and a member of Waterloo Lodge, No. 207. 

Augustus S. Leas, ex-Sheriff of De Kalb County, was born 1:1 
Stark Count)', Ohio. In 1852 he came with his parents to De 
Kalb Count)', Ind., where he married Nancy Ford, by whom 
he had one child — Franklin. Mrs. Leas died, and he then mar- 
ried Electa Fay, of Bryan, Ohio, and to them were born four 
children, three of whom are living — Frederick, Nannie and 
Agnes. Mrs. Leas died, and he was again married to Arrella 
Amidon ^better known by the name of Teems). In early life he 
was a clerk in a store. In 1S7S he was elected to the office of 
Sheriff of the county, and filled the same for four years. He is 
a Republican in politics. 

Obc F.cas is a native of Steuben County, Ind., born Nov. 5, 



894 HISTORY OF DE KALB COUNTY. 

1851, the seventh of twelve children of John and Susan 
(Schimpff) Leas, natives of Pennsylvania. In 1849 his parents 
moved to Stark County, Ohio, and thence to Steuben County 
Ind., locating on the line of De Kalb County; now live in 
Smithfield Township, Dc Kalb County. Obc Leas was reared 
on a farm, receiving a good education, completing it at Water- 
loo. He remained with his parents till manhood, and soon after 
his twenty-first birthday was married to Lydia, third daughter 
of Joseph and Nancy Plum. After his marriage he settled on 
the farm where he has since lived, known as the old Middlcton 
farm, near the city of Waterloo. It contains ninety-six acres 
of choice land, the greater part under cultivation and the im- 
provements are all substantial and in good repair. He devotes > 
considerable attention to raising horses, having several of the 
celebrated Clydesdale breed. He is one of the enterprising 
young men of the township and a prominent and prosperous citi- j 
zen. He has three children — Byron, Franklin O. and Lulu M, 
William Lessig was born near Hancock, Md., Feb. 12, 1818, 
a son of John and Elizabeth (Keifer) Lessig. His maternal \ 
grandfather was a hero of the Revolutionary war, and his father 
was a descendant of Peter Stuyvcsant of Colonial fame. His 
parents located soon after in Franklin County, Pa., where they 
resided until his father's death which occurred when he was 
seven years of age. Sept. 10, 1840, he married Miss Fiances 
Barclay, a native of Franklin County, and located in Bedford 
County, Pa., where he engaged in the hatting business, then a 
"lucrative occupation. In 1842 they moved to Wayne County, 
Ohio, and in 1850 Mr. Lessig went to California by the over- 
land route, through Salt Lake City. In the spring of 1851 In- 
returned home via Mexico. In Sept., 1853, they moved to 
De Kalb County, Ind., and settled in the woods two miles east 
of Auburn, clearing and opening up a fine farm on which 
they lived till the fall of 187S, when they moved to Auburn j 
where they have since lived retired, renting their farm. They 
have endured many hardships and privations, and arc non- 
reaping the benefits of their many years of toil. In all the 
struggles which fate heaps upon the pioneer his noble wife 
has stood by his side, and has done her share toward making a 
home and a competency for their old age. They have had 
four children, of whom all died in infancy, save one, a daugh- 
ter — Ella E., wife of B. F. Culbcrtson, of Auburn, Ind. Mr. 



HISTORY OF DK KALB COUNTY. 895 

and Mrs. Lessig have been for many years members of the 
Presbyterian church. 

John J. Littlefield, M. D., was born in Verona, Oneida Co., 
N. V., March 13, 1831, a son of Josiah and Rachel Littleficld. 
He lived with his parents in Oneida County, N. Y., and Mon- 
roe County, Mich., till manhood, and was given a good English 
education, attending the district schools and Holley (N. Y.) 
Academy. From 1854 till 1856 he superintended his father's 
mills at Grafton, Mich. I laving had from his youth a desire to 
be a physician, in 1856 he entered the office of Dr. John L. Near, 
at Flat Rock, Mich., and began to study the profession. lie 
remained with Dr. Near till 1861, and then entered the medical 
department of the Michigan State University and took two 
courses, i86o-'6i and 1861-62. Ill health prevented him from 
finishing the last course. After his recovery, in May, 1862, he 
enlisted in Company F, Twenty-fourth Michigan Infantry, as a 
private. Soon after he was mustered into the service, while at 
Fort Lyons, Va., he was detailed dispenser of drugs in the regi- 
ment hospital, and also acted as Assistant Surgeon till his 
discharge for disability in August, 1863. He returned to Mich- 
igan and began the practice of medicine at Dundee, remaining j 
there till August, 1864, when he was appointed recruiting officer 
and the following October was commissioned Assistant Surgeon 1 
of the One Hundred and Eighty-eighth Michigan Infantry, and 
served till the close of the war ; was mustered out July, 1865. 
He returned to Dundee and resumed his practice. In 18O8 lie 
removed to Petersburg, Mich. In March, 1S70, he entered the 
Philadelphia (Pa.) Eclectic Medical College and graduated the 
following June. He continued his practice in Petersburg till 
March, 1871, when he moved to Auburn, Ind., where he has | 
built up a fine practice. Dr. Littlefield has been twice married. 
April 15, 1853, he married Mary A. Hawley, of Monroe County, 
Mich., from whom he was divorced in 1871. To them were 
born four children — Francis, Daniel, Carrie (wife of J. H. Pilk- 
ington, of Parsons, Kan.) and Addie (wife of Dr. Frank Pratt, 
of Jackson, Mich.). In June, 1872, Dr. Littlefield married Eliza 
E. Burdenow. They have one child — John. The doctor and 
his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. He is 
a member of Mentor Lodge, No. 591, I. O. O. F., and is agent 
and Examining Surgeon for the Odd Fellows' Mutual Aid 
Society of the State of Indiana. 



8 ,6 HISTORY OF DE KA 



c rm < mg ...... ... 

l;ul., was born in Pleasant Lake, Steuben Co., Ind., June 15. 

1S50, a son of Bcnajah B. Long-, who settled at Plea: 

1S36, thence lo Waterloo in 1859, and was for a number of years 
a leading- merchant of that place. lie was also engaged in the 
livery business eighieen years, and our subject remained with 
him all the time when not. in school. He received a good educa- 
tion in the schools of Waterloo, lie was married March 7, 
1S72, to Dora A. Dickinson, daughter of Timothy Dickinson.an 
j early settler of Auburn. They have one child — Mary (). Mr. 

Long became proprietor ol Long's Motel 7S and carried ii 

; on six years. He moved to Auburn in September, 1884, and in 

j company with Eugene Trout became established in the liven 

business. Thev have a good trade, their stock being valued at 

83,000. Mi". Long was Marshal of Waterloo in 1874 and 1875. 

i He is a member of the Knights of Honor, Union Lodge, No. 

1,436, at WaterL 1 1. 

Rev. Isaac IV. Loivman is a native of Indiana, born in Wabash 
County, April 7, 1S51, the eldest son of Martin and Priscilla 
, (Pike) Lowman, natives of Ohio, and early settlers of W; 
; County. Inch, and latter moved to Kosciusko County where 
j they both died. Isaac was reared and educated in tl 
\ named county, receiving his early education in the district 
, schools. After teaching he subsequently began to stud) - . 

ministry, and in 1869 began preaching in the Church of God, his 
first circuit extending over a part of Lagrange and De Kalb 
counties. He continued preaching eight years, and since then 
has given his attention to agricultural pursuits. He was . 
ried in 1S73 to Ellen F. Kutzner, only daughter of Augustus 
and Amanda Kutzner. After his marriage he lived on the 
Willaman farm till 1884, and then moved to the farm where he 
now lives, where he has eight}- acres of finely improv' d lam 
Mr. and Mrs. Lowman have two children — Vernon W. and Mar- 
\ ... Bliss. 

John l.ut:;, one of the ear Dc Kalb Count) 
came to the county with his parents, Michael' and Magdelinc 
(Crawford) Lutz, in 1847, and located in Union Township. Hi 
father died soon after their arrival, and the farm was cleared 
and cultivated by Mrs. Lutz. assisted by her children. Mrs. 
Lutz was an energetic, ambitious woman, and worked hard to 
e a home and rear her children. She died in 1882 after a 



%J&mmu{J($i 



ORY O] 897 

long life of usefulne I 1 1 

Ohio, in 1826, and \. . . 

whcnhecai 1 it) . He assist 

as his services wer and then commenced to \vi rk fi r 

himself. He has been successful, and now owns 270 a 

1, 100 acres under cultivation. He was marrii . 1 

1 368, to Susannah Oberholtzer, a native of Union To\ 

Dc Kalb County. To them were born six children, but four of 

whom are living — Jennie, Ada, Man!,;, and John. Mrs. . 

- April 24, 1880. She was a most estimable, cultured woman, 
and her friends were legion. A devoted wife and mother, and 
a kind., considerate neighbor, her loss cannot be estimated. 

Timothy G. Matheny, M. I)., a prominent physician of Auburn, 
Ind., was born in Morgan County, Ohio, April 20, 1830. He is 
a son of Nathan and Anna (Sheckley) Matheny, natives of 
Pennsylvania. His mother, who was a worthy member • .. 

I Baptist church, and a very estimable lady, was much beloved 
by ail who knew her, and although idolized at home she was 

removed by death in 1S37, wh< ty years old. After 

his mother's death he was sent to live with an uncle, George 
Daugherty, where he remained until eighteen years of age, re- 
siding in Washington and Hardin counties, Ohio. From 1848 
to 1 85 1 he attended school at Kenton, Ohio, working between 

1 sessions to defray expenses at school; thus heroically battling 
with poverty, determined to acquire as much of an education 
as his surroundings would permit. In those youthful days of 
hardships, without the sympathy and parental guidance which 
the young heart so much craves, he developed powers of inde- 
pendent thought and self-reliance, that with the maturer judg- 
ment of later years, goes far to make him the safe, careful, 
conscientious and valuable counsel, which reputation now 
crowns him with the desirable popularity he now enjoys with 

On the 17th day of Aug >vi ■ ■ 

to Miss Abi Hatch, daughter of Waterman and Mary (Young) 
Hatch. He is the third of five children in his father's family. 
Barbara A., Joseph E., Timothy G. and Martha J. yet living. 
One brother, Wm. N., died in Fort Wayne, Inch, in the spring 
of 1876, at the age of forty-four years. While at Kenton lie 
began the study of medicine in the office of Dr. Russell. In 
the fall of 1854 he removed from Kenton, Ohio, to Decatur, 
Adams Co., Ind., where he continued the study of medicine 





under the instruction of Dr. Pi . . 

cal lectures at Cincinnati, Ohio. Wh 

and prosecuting his studies, he found it necessary to do oi 

thing to secure the necessary revenue to meet ex; 

ing a fa: r.cl being a practical millwright he engaged in the 

milling business, where he had the reputation of turning out 

more flour, and o : 001 lali iy of his compeer: 

1862 he was appointed by Gov. (). P. Morton as enroll;:. 

cer for Adams County. He enrolled the county during the 

summer, made the draft in October that year, and 1.. 

were mustered in the United States service in Novemb . 

Camp Sullivan, Ind. lie also enlisted a company, and was 

about to be commissioned as its Captain, when In- ■.■ 

with typhoid fever, which so prostrated him that for about one 
year he was unable to do manual labor. He continued his 
medical studies, and in 1S63 removed to the north part of De 
Kalb County, and began the practice of medicine at Barker's 
Corners, and a few years later removed to Hudson, Ind., where 
he purchased some land and continued his practice . 
place where he was blessed with a large and lucrative busi- 
ness. After moving to Hudson he opened a drug store, 

he managed till 1S77, when he sold his drug stock to and ex- 
changed locations with Dr. J. J. Littleheld, and removed to 
Auburn. In 1S79 he formed a partnership with Dr. J. B. Case- 
beer in the practice of medicine and surgery, also in tin 1 
business. They are now proprietors of the Physicians' Drug 
Store, located on Main street, next door to the First National 
Bank, and are not only occupying a beautiful room, but are en- 
joying a nice drug trade as well as a very popular practice in 
medicine and surgery. The Doctor is a graduate of the Fori 
Wayne Medical College, and is an honor to his " Alma Mater" 
by the honorable and energetic manner in which he engages in 
the profession of nis choice. In politics he is a pronounced 

, Democrat, serving his party faithfully whenever' opportunity 
occurs. He is a Master Mason, a member of De Kalb Lodge, 
Xo. 214; has also been a member of I. O. O. F. since 1851. 

I Has five children living — David B., Sarah A., Robison \V.. 
Mary L. and Browncll. A daughter, Emma Z., died June 3, 
1853, aged three months. Dr. Matheny has been a student all 
his life, keeping pace with the advancement of the medical pro- 
fession. He comprehends his duties as a family physician, and 



01 NTV. 



... . i rms tin cl thus 

ny families who have emplo 

timatcl)' ... q with him. lie is heavily built, but at the 

age of fifty-five his step is very firm and elastic. In conver a- 
lion he is genial ; in the social circle he is lively, and enjoys 
dealing in innocent jokes with as much zest as those that are 
younger. 

j . F. Maxson, of the firm of Bassett & Maxson, jewelers, Wa- 
terloo, Ind., is a native of Greenbush, near Albany. X. Y., born 
A;>nl 4, 1832, a son of Jehu J. and Luna (Tompkins; Maxson, 
his father of Irish and his mother of Scutch descent. In 1836 
[lis parents moved to Jackson County, Mich., and entered .1 
farm from the Government. His mother died in Angus;. ; 
01 her seven children six are living. His lather afterward 
married Harriet Eastman, and to them were born eleven chil 

1 drcn, nine of whom are living. One son, Walter, was killed 
while in the service of his country in the war of the Rebellion. 
J. h\ Maxson was reared on a pioneer farm, at a time when 
Indians and wild animal.-, infested the country. When twenty- 
one years of age lie went to Cold water, Mich., and there 
icd the jeweler's trade of C. H. Thompson. While there 
he made the acquaintance of Charles Bassett, who was a fellow- 
apprentice, and after completing their trade, in 1850, together 
they came to Waterloo, Inch, and opened a store, at that time 
the only one of the kind in the place. They have the largest 
jewelry store in the county, and keep a complete stock of 
everything in their line. Their shrewd business qualities, com- 
bined with their thorough knowledge of their trade, has gained 

; for them a high position among the business men of the county. 
Mr. Maxson was married in 1863 to Martha J., daughter of 

1 James and Mary Maybee, of Lockport, N. Y. They have four 
.... dren — Mattie, John C, Aynes and Earl II. Mr. Maxson 

; cast his first presidential vote lor John C. Fremont, and has 

j since been a strong advocate of Republican principles. He 

; and his wife are members of the United Brethren church. 

William B. Maxwell is a native of Ohio, born in Wayne 

! Count)-, Aug. 9, 1S41. His parents, William and Elizabeth 
(Woods) Maxwell, were natives of Pennsylvania, the father 
born March 1, 1801, and the mother July 8, 1S06. They were 
married in Ohio, but in 1S42 moved to De Kalb County, Ind., 
..... settled in Wilmington Township. Of the twelve children 



900 

born to them seven arc living. h was an influential 

man in his neighborhood, and heli ..... of tr 

mother died Oct. 25, 1S55. Our-. 1 eiv i Lrlyedu- 

cation in the district schools of his adopted county. When j 
sixteen years of age lie began to leai n the cabinet-maker's trade, 
and served an apprenticeship of four years with J. & R. Ettin- 
...... of Auburn, receiving §140 a year (or his services. In 

August, 1S62, he enlisted in the One Hundredth . Infai 

try, Company A, and participated in the siege and battle ... 
Vicksburg and battle of Jackson. While at Belfort, Ala., he 
was taken with rheumatism and was sent to the convalescent 

.. Huntsville, where he remained til! October, 1864, 

when he was given a furlough to go home and vote. After his 
return to Huntsville he was assigned duty in the light artillery 
service. Me was mustered out at Nashville, Tcnn., May 13, 
1S65. His health being impaired he was unable to work, and 
...... .re attended school til! the spring of 1S06, when lie went I 

to Bureau County, 11!., and the following fall to Peru, LaS; 1 
County. In 1S67 he went to Omaha, and was in the employ of the 
Union Pacific Railroad till 1S70, when he returned to Do Kali; 
County and located in Waterloo. He was married in 1S73 to 1 
Emeline Stroh, a native of De Kalb County, born Oct. 13, 1S4G, 
a daughter of William and Sarah Stroh. To them have been 
born three children; but two are living — Albert E., born J.;:,. 
25, 1875, and Arthur A., born July 26, 1884. Frank W., born 
May 9, 1S7S, died Dec. 28, 18S0. .Mr. and Mrs. Maxwell arc- 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church. He is a member , 
of Waterloo Lodge, No. 221, 1. 6. O. F., and Waterloo Post, 
No. 52, G. A. R. 

Robert Wes McBride, Judge of the Thirty-fifth Judicial Cir- 
cuit, was born near Mansfield, Richland Co., Ohio, Jan. 25, 
842,3 son of Augustus and Martha A. (Barnes) McBride. 
His father was- a volunteer soldier in the Mexican war, and 
died in the City of Mexico in February, [84S. Mis mother, 
now the widow of James Sirpless, resides ..1 the old home, flvc 

a..!, miles southeast of Mansfield. When thirleen years 

. . .. . Mr. McBride went to Iowa and remained seven years. 

He acquired .1 good education in I id high schools, 

and when seventeen began teaching in Mahaska County, Iowa. 
He taught three years, and in 1862 returned to Ohio .a..! 
clerked in the hardware store .a B. S. Runyan a year. In 1SG3 





Jailed 


,ighi Gun 


A i unteer Ca 


I . 


. men or 


rod : 






s I \ . ■ , . 



ii ,. lent 
nized by Governor 

Pod I rem hi organization till 

: :d out, Sept. 14, [865. After about eight months 

... active service he beca n ■ :d and u r as assigned to d - 

tached service as clerk, and served successively from I 1 

a militar) coi — 1 u central guard-house, Washington, 

..- Adjutant-General's office til! mustered out. lie was 

then appointed to a citizen's clerkship in the Q ,■ ster- 

. 1 . , ivhi< .1 h< rcsignei I the fi iliowing Novel boi 

and returned to MansfieL .• s< ho >1 ... his ..... .. imc 

in the winter of 1865-6, and devoted his leisure time to 

the study of law. I:.... ■ Waterloo, 

Ind., and obtained employment as clerk and bookkeeper for 
R. M. & W. C. Lockhart, still co is law studies. Dur- 

ing the session of 1S67 he acted as ie ol the clerks of the Indi- 
ana State Senate, and at the April, 1867, term of De Kalb 

Circuit Court was itted to the bar. In September 

partnership was formed with Hon. James [. Besl for . 

tice of law, but in July, 1. i Incrship was dissolved 

... ...... . S70, when he J 

:rship with Jo , the firm being McBride & 

[1 76 Vi illiam i .. L as was itted ... the firm 

which was dissolved by the death ... Mr. Morlan, Aug. 23, 1878. 
After Mr. Morlan's death, Mr. McBride practiced alone till 
November, r8S2, when lie was eleel I j . Igc . the 
Jud ... Circuit, 1 imposed ol Noble De Kalb ai . 

s. Judge McBride was for several years Capta 

C pair A, Third Regiment, Indiana Legion, 

iw Lieutenant-Colonel of the regiment. He .vas mar- 
ried Sept. 27, .. ■ ... S., eldest daughter of Dr. J. X. 
Chamberlain, ol Waterloo. Thej have four children 
I., born Sept. 25, 1869; Charles H., born Nov. 11, 1871 ; Her- 
bert W., born Oct. 15, [S73, and Martha C, born Feb. 13, 

J. P. McCague, lumber dealer, Waterloo, Ind., is a native of 
Holmes County, Ohio, born July 12, .... His parents, Sam- 
uel C. and Eliza J. (Barfoot) McCague, were natives of Penn- 
sylvania, but in early life went to Ohio, where they were 
married. 01 their three children, two were born in Ohio and 



: ' HISTORY OF Mi KALI! COl 

one in De Kalb County, fnd hci die I in [852, and i 

1S55 Ins mother married Aaron 13. Smith, ol Stark Con 
Ohio, and to (hem was horn one son, Sanford S. T] 
died in August, rSSo. J. P. MeCaguc was early in lif, 
on his own resources, and therefore early learned 1.1k lesson < 
self-reliance. In 1861 he went to YVinncsheik County, Iowa, 
and in July, [862, enlisted in the Twelfth Iowa Infantry, bul 
was discharged on accouni ol his youth. He 311 
served in the Indian campaign in an independent com 
and was present at the capture of 600 Sioux, who were seal 1 , 
Davenport. While on a skirmish he was captured, and 
tied to a guard, but while the guard was sleeping he lo< 
himself. In so doing he disturbed a do'j;, which he killed ivi 
the guard's knife. By this time the guard awoke and hi 
killed him and made his escape. He carries the scars of , 
combat on his hands to this day. He returned to Winncshi 
County and attended school till the spring of [864, . 
enlisted in Company F, Forty-sixth Iowa Infantry, Sixteenth 

Army Corps, and participated in the battles of Tupelo 

Guntown ; was mustered out in August, 1864. After his dis- 
charge he came to 1 )e Kalb Counl v where he has since resided. 
1 fe is one of the most enterprising and influential business mi 11 
of Waterloo. lie is First Lieutenant ol Company A, Third 
Indiana National Rifles (Waterloo Rifles), and is a member ol 
the Grand Army of the Republic, lie was married in [S72 
Nancy A., daughter of James Bowman. They have six chil- ! 
drcn— Charles A., Nellie, Eddie, Blanche, Eston and Eugene. 

lion. Charles A. 0. McClellan, attorney at law. and Prcsid 
ol the Firsl National Bank, Auburn, hid., was born May ■ 
[835, in Ashland, Ashland Co., Ohio. His parents, William ai 
Eliza (Wiggins) McClellan, were natives ol New Jersey, hi 

of Scotch-Irish, and his mother ol German descent, 
his boyhood and youth Mr. McClellan had but limitei 1 
tional advantages, only attending the district school in the win 
ter months, assisting his father in his business the rest ol the 
year, until reaching the nineteenth year when, having beconi 
:. fine penman, he gave instruction in penmanship and pen-draw- 
ing lor two years. Notwithstanding his meager opportunities 
he, by extra personal efforts, acquired an excellent English 

. 1. in 1S56 he came to Indiana, settling in Auburn, 1 - 

Kalb County, where he was employed as deputy in the Counl 



HISTORY 01" ■■ ' >UNTY. 

Auditor's :r M. F. Pierce, i crving ii | I ... 

c Iii incl at • . o 

iv, and while in the Auditor' ... Ai 

voted his leisure time to its stud)', and at the s 

complete abstract of the county re prin . . 

he was appointed one o I .... nited States ^ to 

the census of De Kalb County. In the fall of iS6i he wenl o 

Waterloo engaged in the real-e; s, al though he 

still pursued his law studies, and in 1862 w: I 

bar. In January, i ;-'.' ■ . he 1 1 1 ... 

Best in the practice oi his profession and remained with him 

till February, 1 879, wh< n ip] it of Judge 

of the Fortieth Judicial Cir< ana, and filled this re- 

sponsible position with ability and honor. As a lawyer he oc- 
cupies a distinguished position among his professional brethren. 
He has always been a leader in public improvements in Dc Kalb 
County, and was one of the original stockholders and a director 
of the Fort Wayne, Jackson & Saginaw Railroad, and I I 

his influence to have it brought through the county, and 
Trustee 01 the Nickel Plate Railroad. In 1868, in compaiv 

with Judge Best, he built the Star M : a cosl 

of $18,000, which were operated only a short time, when they 
were destroyed by fire without insurance. In 1S73 he was one 

of the incorporators of the ] e Kalb Bank of W 

. .. intcrc - . lie is also a stockholdei of th 
Bank of Auburn, and was its Vice-President from 187s 
to 1S82, and since the latter \ ear has been President ol the cor- 
poration. He removed from Waterloo to Auburn in 1883. In 
lurchascd the Snyder Wagon Works and organized 
, H Si I'dcr ',.'...: Company, the largest manufacturin 
lishment in the county. Mr. McClellan is a pronounced Demo- 
crat in his political views, and was? . ... the Den 

State C< C "... Indian 

nent Mason, having taken the Blue Lodge, Chapter and Kn _ 1 ; 
Templar degrees, and has served as Worshipful Master and 
Eminent Commander. He was married Nov. 10, 1S59, to Eliza- 
ughter of Samuel D. Long, one of the pioneers ... De 
Kalb Count)'. They have three children— Jennie L., wife ... 
Don A. Garwood, an Attorney at Waterloo, associated with 
Mr. McClellan in practice at thai place; Charles, .. mi 
Governor Gray's military staff, and a graduate ol Michigan 



Q04 HISTORY OK I>K l.Al.i; V*. 

... . diversity, Ann Arb Delia. \ 

the Waterloo High School, and tin eldest, Jcnni ... ... 

musician, both vocal and instrumental, and graduated from the 
Musical Conscrvati . in 1879. 

Abram A one of tin earliest settlers of D ... 

Count)-, and lias seen this . o\\ rom a will 

heavily tim ol advanced civiliza- 
tion. He has been an energetic, progressive citizen, a 

assisted "liberally in both time and money all projci 

promise advancement to his adopted county. He came to ,. 
county with his parents, John and Catherine McEntaffcr, and 
located in Smithneld Township. At that time there were but 
four or live white families in the township. Indians and wild 
animals were the principal inhabitants, and Mr. McEntaffcr 
often visited the Indians and attended their dances in . . 
days. Our subject was born in Stark County, Ohio, I ... 
[821, and was, therefore, eighteen years of age when he came 
to Indiana. His education was received in his native count.)-, 

.- coming to De Kalb County his time was devote 

clearing his farm, lie was married July 4, 1842, to Margarel 
Crawford, a native of Stark County, Ohio. To them were 
born four children— Susan, wife of Samuel Rodcnban I 

vid, in-w ol Ohio; Hannah, wife of Lafaj isi r; Lou 

wife of Oliver Wharton, ol Waterloo. Mrs. McEntaffcr died in 
June, 1SS2. She was a devoted mother, a faithful wife, a kind 
neighbor and a consistent ( :in istian, a member of the old Luth- 
eran church. 

William II. McQu is i 'on, dealer in dry goods, groceries and 
queensware, Auburn, huh, is a native oJ Indiana, born in Allen 
County, June 28, 1S40, a son of John and Eliza (Rodgers) Mc- 
Ouiston, his father a native of Pennsylvania and his mother 
of West Virginia, His parents moved to Allen County in i ■;, 

..ih residents oi Wn h 1 _■ on L'ow 1 hip. 

:. good education, completing it at the Francisco Commercial 
College, Fort Wayne. He was employed as bookkeepi rfo ( 
Orff & Co. six years, and in 1S7] located in Auburn and began 
business on his own account, in 1S75 he became associated 
with 1. X. Cool in the grocery business, carrying on dry goods 
... d cl ithing by himself in a separate room. At the end of a 
year Mr. Cooi purchased his interest in grocery stock. In 1878 
he formed a partnership with G. C. Ralston, under the firm 



,, .... & Ralston. 1 . Lo , I . . 

illusion's interest and tin .... 

f. Mr. McQuiston bought Mr. Long': in I in 

1SS5, and he carric a com 

and has one of the best stoi in Auburn. Mr. McOui 

man ic to Malvinn R. rah irin ........ ... .1; 

, . 1 ...:.. is a member of De Kalb Lodjj :, 
No. 214, P. & A. M. . en ; b I Coun- 

cil since 1 ■ .-.'. 

Christian Monroe Mcrica, Superintendent of Schoo 
. '. ,.;.; y, is .; nath e ol , b 1 1 - Ihampaign Counl 7, '. "eb. 

10, 1853. I lc was 1 he next you ■ ■ 

na (Bodey) Merica, natives of Rockii . 1 
County, \'a., of German descent. Mis fnther died i 1 
in the fall of 1864 his mother married David Houscr, ... 
y, and moved here with her family. Young 
; with his pare 1 mrtcen years of 

brother William, with whom he remained four years, working- I 

. the farm in the summer and attending the district school 

in the winter. He then attended the Auburn High School I v. 1 1 

terms, and in the whiter of iS72-'3 he taught his first term of 

school in District No. 6 ('now No. 1) of Butler Township. 1 le 

:d school al Auburn two more terms and 

then taught in the winter, and attended the Northern fncliai 

Normal School at Valparaiso in the summer until the spring ol 

1S76, preparing himself for teaching. From this time untii 

the fall of 1879 he taught school in the winter, and in the 

summer worked upon the farm and wenl with ; 

J machine. He was married March 2. 1S76, to Minerva 

Wiant, daughter of J. P. Wiant. Esq., ol Butler Township. 

. have one daughter, Estclla, born Dec. 12, 1S76. In 

a successful ten-wee 

riial school at 11 d again in 1881 cl 

the latter he moved with his family to Val 

the No . ... 1 le then rel 

county and accepted the Si ....... icj if the Garrett publh 

ools, which position he held until elected County Superin- 
tendent in 1883. As Superintendent, he labored earnestly to 

establish more uniform tcmatic work, to grade the 

schools, and to elevate the stan ... both school and teacher, 
his work bcino- attended with marked success. In the summer 






bj ' 






lie h; 

..... 



...... .. 

. holds. 

o .. I ii 

. 

..... i County, 

...... 

. She w as .. 

■...'.... . ....... 

. . 

. 
....... 

Rev. J. G. I> . 

t of the St; ... her is still livii 

\'< ars. " 

living J ' . . n u ... . • , ■ . . Chri: 

■ '•< Mary, wife ol Josiali McTifl'er; Catherine, 

: :. A., wilr 

in George L5o\\ .-• r. M rs. M ei ... n il 

. mdchildren. Peter Miser was fourteen , . 

. .. n hi . pai cnl imt}'. Hi 

i.,,;!:.) in the common schools, remaining 

I ill mat uril \ tarried in 1857 to 1 

ativc ol ( )hio, daughtc n I • 

e children, 

eight oi : livin: Mar ,• E., i\ ife I Cochran ; 

., -.. .... 

iam O. ... . . 

of the Ger 

.. . . ... 

5 C unity, X. Y., July 23, 1795, b< 

. . 

nit of fair.ilii 

. [is lathe ... '• 

Revolutionary . mrth in direct d< at, 

Christian name, from Captain James Mot;, ol Mama 



.////// //// ///£ j/y ///?////// /// //// &#ult c//#(/<Jt ///■ (/////ft// 
0/„ /a///;///,/ ////'. YJ//; , <-jhj,; r /„/ f fi U ,/Or,J(«//Y/- ' 



$&'/!■ 






r // M . y/y,/ Mc M//, 





i - 






. L'OKY OK IJ 


; 




... C S 7 . Y. who 







County of 1; ) w is ai 


i .. 




and honorable one. ; 1c < amc to '6 a 


id ciio 



the new!} a q [i o\ ncc ol N T e\\ \ 01 1< foi .1 residence, 

. lie engage ...... me of E. 13. 

Mod's ancestors followed the 

...... ..... 1 ' mother v. as Mary, 

daughter of Jamc Denton, o N .vl , ST. \ .. a Rcvolution- 

. lie . e war, having begun his eight years of 

servic ^ress, Aug. 22, 1775, as a 

..... impany of foot. I [e was 

scent from the Rev. Richard Demon, a puritan divi ie ol ... li- 

fax, Yorksl • in the 

.. ,vith v • ivc] nor '.'.' inthrop : the company who 

umded Bos .... \V1 :n E. B. Motl wa? aboul twelve p ar 

old his father died I :a\ inp a famil five - 

. of their mother. After a lew ycai 

. ..■ in Saragota County, N. Y. . . >le family renw 

Lehman, Luzerne Co., Pa., about the )-ear 1824. Mr. Motl 
married Dec. 30, 1830, in Abingdon, Luzerne Co., Pa., to Mary, 
daughter of John Winterbotham, of Ashton, Lancashire, 
land. She was born Feb. 4, 1S06. Her father emigrated to 
America in the summer of 18 1 1 with his wife and three young 
. jhtcrs, Mary, Sarah and Ann, all of whom are yet living. 
Mrs. Mott is . tcr ... Hon. J. II. Winterbotham, of Michigan 
City, Inch In 1836 Mr. Mott removed with his wife and two 
sons from Pennsylvania to Fredericktown, Knox Co., .Ohio, 
where Mrs. Mott's family then resided. After living several 
years in Knox and Richland counties, Mr. Mott removed in 

! May, 1843, to Kalida, Putnam County. At the tavern ii 

swamp-environed village he made the acquaintance of Judge 
Morris, then a young lawyer, who, with his wife and child, had 

,'cd in Kali la the evening before. The acquaintance thus 

;un grew into .. I ...... Lwcen th ivi 

nig and as enduring as life. Not. finding Kalida a promising 
... acticc of their prolession, Mr. Mott and Mr. 
Morris came during the summer in search of a location in 
India vlr. M -emoved to Auburn the same autumn, ar- 
riving here Oct. 16, but Mr. Morris remained in Kalida until 
the ensuing year. Mr. Mott was the first lawyer who settled 
in Auburn. His first property was the place now owned by 



HISTORY OK J 

846 1 

1849 he built a house 

■ - 

v ....... • 

..... I. I-l 

. 
Led, how 

.......... 

I v . ... 

[ul sen . 

. 
.... . . 

..cute illness ks. Two 

.... and Sheri 

Edward, who, wounded at Chickamauga, Sept. 20, 1 
..: Nashville, May . : 1 

.1 him. Of 1 hese, E. B. Mo 

1 oi iinu - ■• .1:.; "kablc - » lalitic 

Sacramento, California, 

who Iviiex . . - hild en. John 

. ..■ lives in : . . .......... 

... : Eon. J. H. Winl the firm 

... ... ... Winterbotham & Sons, lie has two children. 

the only daughter ... f£. B. Vlott, is the wife of Chester P. 
. .... . They have I en, and live a mile north of 

Auburn on Greenhursl arn hich gave Jud 

luring many hours of his later life. Mrs. 
living, having entered her eightieth yen 

. . . - . .- . . ■ : • possi . f all h c r 

... . .'. . . 

. lie .-. .,;..'. as well 

of years, "... of 

Mally) W ....... 

[1 itt is now in . Iitieth year and in ... 

ihysical strength does 

. ■ i her h isc. ! Icr memory is un- 

........ interest and en 

i.-.inc/ reminiscences of her earlier life. 



..... 

iphi lice of one \> ... I ■■ ■ ■ tori 

years ....... 

.... .1 rs . ....,;..■.. 

e i ' ■ ley, Lancas ... 

... Idrcnol rohn W 

........ 

... .... .... 

good as his bond; ] i n . :. ■ 

........ 

. me. . . . 

■, >: rs. Motl ■ — ■]< . . 

wore no hid ■'- in those ... 

guided them in youth, so they expect un i 

ence r children whe 

Mr. Winterbottora having read of the advantages of Ken 
as a permanent home, del irly in the present century 

|| to sell his pro England and remove thither. . . :a - 

cordingly made his arrangements and >assagi in the sum- 

mer of 1S11 with his v. children and his wife's 

sister, Miss Rachel Wrigley, on board the ship " Herald," of 
New Bedford, Captain Price commander, from Liverpool for 
New York. The voyage lasted eight weeks, as was frequently 
the case in those times before the use oi steam had made the 
; iarin( : almost independent of winds and waves. At on 
during the passage, as Mrs. Mott well remembers, they were 
i stopped by an English man-of-war and their vessel searched for 
desert from the army o: navy; there happened to be a de- 
serter from the army on board, a certain Jack Buckley from 
Mr. Winterbottom's native town, but he was so wel 

-covered, and the war-shin sailed 
away after purchasing so u plies of which the en 

1 Y. ■ 

inthing for th it ft was t 

under the American Hag, 
I .;....... [812. Uter arm ing at > 

York Mr. Winterbottom was i ..... ...:.. 

decide I :i : ii i 

. . >a\ id I [in ihn Humphreys 

his younger brother, Wi li m . ..• manufacturii 

... . . iods br cloths, etc., at what is now the villi 

Conn., then called Humphi-cysville. This was the 



class i 
- 
died, ; 
. 
Mr. Wintcrb 
I 
ty, hid. 
, As will »f 

. 

..:..'. State Prison al 

■ Uiinoi S .. t Jolii L both of a 

of con 1 ...... 

. ... . . 

ii b .. I i Lie. . 

her earlier \ cars Mi in a 

cial point of vie - ... 

. . . ■ ■ ■ . .- 

bcr ol ... 2 fin : b< t .. one o ,.■..' ... -d< 

. ig the Revolutionary war and |uently the'l ....... 

.... -.... r to ] 'or ; S] ■ coun- 

. . . ... i to I 



. be p tsscssor of a con i ibl< ..... .... ... .. . 

authors, which : al all times at 1 o I ol Mr. WinLi r- 

,...■., ol his family. A1 an early age Mrs. Motl ... 
placed at a school in Derby, near Humphrey sville, •.. 

■ . .. Blakeslee, the wi low of an 

lace, wlicrc her schooling was carc- 

. .... .. . to and her soci i I raining ... . . ii ul; rh 

al 
were of the very best; her closest frie al years 

... ... 

Mott's health as prevc itcd her . 

i uired a 1 loroughl y g Eu 

tti the meantime the family had removed to South 

... 1 acre she passed the years until she was twentj . 
A; A. is lime the condition of her health suggested a protracted 
visit to an uncle, Mr. Abram YA'AAv, of Luzerne Count] . Pa., 



where ;hc rapidly impro o 

..... 
while 
: band, to whom she was i Dec. 30, [830. A 

- ■ ... . ental bias made the marriag* 

suitable ; Mr. M< \ me who coul I 

with him in his prefcrcn 

'■ biograph) . science, etc., as well as in ■ 

.■•..... been givi : world 

fifty or si ... iot the ago 1 

and those who .... ■ pursuits a 

as well .is a pa: Lime. Three or fom 
marriage Mr. Mott bec: .... .... 

.. ermined to 1 ' ; ■ ipportunity ofi 

... it . .. new railway a ■ . 

as surveyor and civil engineer 1 for which he av 

......... . . r wife and 

.... he determined to go to . . 

From there the family, now numl pare d 

dren, the s ber, having died in 

removed to Auburn, arriving Oct. .0, 1S43. The road from 

the east wn then came in by Sixth street, when th 

bridge crossing Cedar Creek at that time stood. A sho 
tance east of town the teams nearly mired, and 

. ig his youngest in i.is arms, brought his family on . 
to a point whence he could direct them to Mr. Parson's 
while he went back to assist in getting the horses out of 

mire. To the tavern on the northeast corner of Four 

Cedar streets the ok themselves, crossing by a cow- 

... the corner where Mrs. Mott now lives, and the lo1 
| above on which stands the old residence of the Mott .. 
built in 1849 ...id now . 00 pied as a boarding and lo 

ing house by Mrs. Roether. At that time Auburn ... 

. 1 of a plac< Mrs. VIott has little difficulty in j 

in features. Wesley Park lived where Charles Rant now 

does; John Butt just a< ... . tin Freeman 

.. . . i] iened a ...-. ei .. n here the Aubur I lous £, w liicl i > 
now stands. Mr. Launcelot Ingman lived on the site 

l/'s residence ; Mr. Hague lived in a house which looked 

old even then, probabl} fro ever having been painted. It 

stood on the corner occupied by John Baxter's residence, and 



d 

■ 

and Mr. 

iso on ■ ... 

sc .... the .. .... 

.'.... the co 

by 
i 

- 

i. J. Ralston aim ly. T 



. . . . . . . . ii, 

... 

loll. The 
...... ......',, ... uring currant 

. . iosc which 

In 1847 ^' •'■ MoLI 
.... 11 . . , ■. to Mile Wat ■...:. 

. . \1 . ... 

irovc, and ho 

01 Irccts. 

Jam 



.. '. 
■ 1 . ..... 

. 

lying lips, 


■ 
came. Her.c - . v." a young 

!- country. 

the only daughter Julia. In 
3, the youngest son Grenville, \vl . out dur- 



ing a t 


... 


a final 


..... ..... . 






eager, 


. . . 
Hence Ik 



STY. 913 

' term of ... 

............ 

mic Sheridan home from war, no longer alert, 

>ut with sealed c) and f ..... d 

• was borne, 864, to be laid to 

an was .... ; • .... .... .... 

n the evening 1865, « hil< the bell were ring- 
ing over the cap Lichi first grandchil 

her brie; life. July 20, 1865, Egbert, the oldest son, married 
Eleanor, daughter of A. C. Baldwin, of Tiffin, Ohio, and hither 
he brought his bride, Sept. 23d, summoned home from happy 

journeying, ... soothe his father' 

mother's heavy burden. Hen Mott died Sept. 30, and 

hence, also, a week later went his grandchild, little M; 
oldest and the youngest, united again in some one of the Fath- 
er's many mansions. Here or in the newer ... 
where she now resides, Mrs. Mott has lived durii most o 
years intervening since the death of Judge Mott, and for the 
greater part of the time no other member of the family has 
, ..; the count}', but two or three years ago her daughl . 
-in-law, Professor : ...'. .'. H idge, with their family, re- 
moved to this place from Lagrange, and are now living upon 

the far: ■ which ott bought in 1S54 

and named " Greenhurst." Mrs. Mott was never ; 
woman, physically, and as her years have increased, it is not to 
be wondered at that her life has become a secluded one. It is 
very noticeable, however, that she retains her interest in the 
affairs of the world quite as much as those who are thirty or 
forty vears youngc r. 

A very little conversation with her, especially if the political 
affairs of foreign countries are referred to, is sufficient to di 
the fact that the land of her birth, the little island acn 
which is the cradle ..." tin igl -- ..... race throughout the 
world, has a larger share in her affections than any oth .. ... 

Soudan and Afghanistan have e more interest for her 

than anything on this side of the Atlantic Ocean, for at ca< b ... 

mote points England is face to face with her enemies, 

and that is enough to dwarf other matters for the present. To 

:arly her own language: " I can hardly find words to 

the love and admiration 1 feel for the land of .... birth. 

My high opinion of her excellence has been formed upon . 



9 i4 



.ISW^Y , 



and sufficient evidence. .'../. ... : 

and 1 be icve I ma ■ 

sions. Such authors as A ic, Hallam, Macauly, Yat- 

tel, Blackstonc and [vent, ' ;raph ..... . . 

ton, Marlborough, 'Tli Lord • 'h a ' Queens of 

■ Ni ati 

and history they elucidate, and furni 

. ... foi ■ 

....'...... ady's remin 

the changes of a lifel . or debt was coi 

in New ..■:■ sixty or seven ■ . . ;o, and Mrs. 

remembers one ma.. - e County, Ma 

in the prison at Lenox for eight years or 

she knows to the contrary, died there. On one oci n 

a men.... 1 1 isi mer's d ... idy was I roughi 

.... jail that the unforti debtor t look 

at the ..... 

grave. It was ■- .■ • 

- mannei . . , however ho ;t the iiil 

Probably in every day :.:... 

letter writing a | service. Envelo] have 1 

. I .me into use within the last fifty years ; the cu toi 

comparatively recent tiim o • leei ... 

paper i ; i ar way, seal with a wafer or wax, and .. 

.: [dress upon the back. When the letter was dispatched 

twenty-five cents was paid at one or the other end of its 
, . , case might be. The postage on periodicals 

inl . .natter was high and very uncertain. Mr. John 
Pride, a friend of the family in Ohio, had been ta . 
. :woods Magazine," wide:., after reading, he usually 
warded to her. in 1S45 >'• ceased to come, and he explains in 

-of that year that iie had been paying $1.25 per year 

postage on the Ma . ... hi c had "recently been a 

'ostmastcr .... ....... 

emulations arc almost always adopted. So in this I 

••ease; the Magazine came Lo ; 1 I was told ... 

•■ : ... lormcr Post master had not charge , ...