(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "History of Des Moines County, Iowa"






\ 






HISTORY 

OF 

DES MOINES COUNTY 

IOWA 

AND ITS PEOPLE 

By AUGUSTINE M. ANTROBUS 



ILLUSTRATED 



VOLUME 



CHICAGO 

THE S. J. CLARKE PUBLISHING COMPANY 
1915 



THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 

731363 

ASTOR, LENOX AND 

TILDEN FOUNDATIONS 

R 1916 L 



PREFACE 



In presenting this volume to the people of Des Moines County, the author 
has this to say. It was with some reluctance he undertook the task of writing 
a history of the county and its people. He felt such a history ought to be 
written, but would have preferred that its writing would have fallen to a more 
competent person. He does not claim that the work presented is a complete 
history of the county in every respect, nor that it is free from error. To 
write such a history would be impossible. It is the best that could be produo d 
under the circumstances and within "the allotted time for its writing. The 
writer has lived in the county for fifty-nine years and knew many of the pioneers 
and early settlers of the county while many of the incidents of which he has 
written, are from memory. 

He is under many obligations to the Hon. J. L. Waite, editor of the Burlington 
Ilawkeye; Hon. Arthur Springer of Wapello, Louisa County; Mrs. A. T. 
I lav, the oldest living native resident of Des Moines County; Hon. Daniel 
Matson of Mediapolis; the Hon. J. II. Dodds and II. C. Springer of Danville; 
and to Miss Miriam I'.. Wharton, the efficient librarian of the Free Public Library 
of Burlington, for valuable assistance in procuring proper material for the 
work; and he is especially under obligation to lion. Thomas Merrill of Mediap- 
\olis for permission to obtain information from the valuable history of Yellow 
ISprings and Huron Townships written by his father, J. W. Merrill, now 

deceased. 

A. M. AXTROBUS. 






CONTENTS 



CHAPTER I 

PAGl 

INTRODUCTION I 

CHAPTER II 

THE LOUISIANA PURCHASE 8 

CHAPTER III 

;'I KE's EXPEDITION IO 

CHAPTER IV 

ORGANIZATIONS OF THE DIFFERENT TERRITORIES OUT OF WHICH DES MOINES 

( OUNTY, IOWA, CAME INTO EXISTENCE I -> 

CHAPTER V 

INDIAN OCCUPATION I S 

CHAPTER VI 

BLACK HAWK PUR< HASE 22 

CHAPTER VII 

TOPOGRAPHY OF DES MOINES COUNTY, IOWA 

CHAPTER VIII 

GEOLOGY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 31 

CHAPTER IX 

PIONEERS OF OLD AND NEW DES MOINES I OUNTY I 1 

CHAPTER X 

BURLINGTON, tTS FOUNDATION AND GROWTH 95 

CHAPTER XI 

HISTORY OF BURLINGTON, CONTINUED ' "' 

V 



vi CONTENTS 

CHAPTER XII 

PAGE 
HAWKEYE PIONEER ASSOCIATION I ig 

CHAPTER XIII 

EXTENSION OF THE CITY LIMITS 147 

CHAPTER XIV 

TRIAL, SENTENCE AND EXECUTION OF WILLIAM AND STEPHEN HODGES 1 50 

CHAPTER XV 

HOTELS OF BURLINGTON 1 37 

CHAPTER XVI 

PUBLIC AND OTHER SCHOOLS OF BURLINGTON 162 

CHAPTER XVII 

WAR WITH MISSOURI l8l 

CHAPTER XVIII 

JUDICIAL DISTRICTS AND JUDGES AND OTHER OFFICES 331 

CHAPTER XIX 

PUBLIC HIGHWAYS . 348 

CHAPTER XX 

SUBSCRIPTIONS FOR STOCK IN 15. M. R. R. CO 353 

CHAPTER XXI 

BANKS AND BANKING 357 

CHAPTER XXII 

THE SEMI-CENTENNIAL IN IOWA 364 

CHAPTER XXIII 

POLITICS AND POLITICIANS 387 

CHAPTER XXIV 

MEMBERS OF THE DES MOINES COUNTY' BAR 398 

CHAPTER XXV 

SOME OF THE PIONEER MINISTERS OF DES MOINES COUNTY 412 

CHAPTER XXVI 

MEDICAL PROFESSION 424 



CONTENTS vii 

CHAPTER XXVII 

PAGE 

Li PRESS OF DES MOINES COUNTY 1^1 

CHAPTER XXVII] 

RAILWAYS AND I II I.IK BUILDERS Me 

i HAPTER XXIX 

DRAINAGE DISTRK TS |l „ , 

CHAPTER XXX 

HAWKEYE NATIVES y , _■ 

CHAPTER XXXI 

CHURCHES OF BURLINGTON ji,; 

CHAPTER XXXII 

YOUNG MEN'S AND YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS OF BURLINGTON. .487 

CHAPTER XXXIII 

FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY OF BURLINGTON 49J 

CHAPTER XXXIV 

CRAFO AND OTHER PARKS OF BURLINGTON |o s 

CHAPTER XXXV 

POSTOFFICE AND POSTMASTERS AT BURLINGTON 500 

CHAPTER XXXVI 

COMMERCIAL EXCHANGE 5°3 

CHAPTER XXXVII 

BURLINGTON, \UGUSTA, UNION, BENTON, FLINT RIVER, JACKSON, TAMA AND CON- 
CORDIA TOWNSHIPS 5°4 

CHAPTER XXXVIII 

YELLOW SPRINGS AND HURON TOWNSHIPS . r ' S 

ill U'TKR XXXIX 

DANVILLE. PLEASANT GROVE. FRANKLIN AND WASHINGTON TOWNSHIPS 537 



I^^^^^^^^B 






















Ma 



AUGUSTIXE M. ANTROBUS 



History of Des Moines County 



Chapter i 

INTRODUCTION 

A county is an integral part of a state, and a state, of a nation composed of 
states. In writing a history of a county, one of necessity must write concerning 
the activities taken by its people in the affairs of the state or nation, as well as 
those of its own domestic concerns. The people of a county are not only citizens 
of the state to which the county belongs, but of the nation of which the state is 
a part. The people comprising the states at the formation of the Federal Con- 
stitution were the fathers of the republic. In the preamble of that Constitution 
they caused to be written, "We, the people of the United States, in order to form 
a more perfect union, establish justice, etc., do ordain and establish this Constitu- 
tion for the United States of America," thereby declaring they were citizens of 
the republic as contradistinguished from their citizenship to state or any other 
municipal body. They recognized as binding upon them as individuals the 
Federal Constitution which they had created. From the premises thus laid down 
it will be seen that in writing a history of a county one must take into consideration 
all those things with which it is directly connected in so far as its material welfare 
is concerned, as well as the mental and moral development of its people. To 
write a complete history of a county one must go back of its organization as a 
municipal body and discover the condition of things before it came into existence. 
We want to know who discovered the country of which it is a part; when dis- 
covered, and trace in a chronological order, the successive events which have 
taken place in past times. In 1492 Columbus gave to Castile and Arragon a new 
world. From this event we now have a white race of people inhabiting the country 
in which we live. Pefore this discovery, west of that narrow strait which sep- 
arates Europe from Africa, was an Ultima Tliule, an unknown region, a bound- 
less ocean, in whose fathomless depths lay slumbering the fabulous but lost 
Atlantas. For one hundred years and more after the discovery of the new world, 
bold navigators of Spain, Portugal, France and England skirted along the coast 
of the two Americas, going into bays and up great rivers, seeking to find an open- 
ing whereby they could reach Cathay, which Marco Polo had in the latter part 
of the thirteenth century made known to the world. A century and more had 
passed before any attempts had been made towards a permanent settlement in 
this country. The discovery of rich mines of gold and silver in South America 
and Mexico had fired the imagination of men to such an extent that expeditions 
had been fitted out to explore the vast territories lying between the Atlantic and 
Pacific oceans. While on one of these expeditions, Fernando De Soto found bis 



2 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

grave in the waters of- the great river which washes the shores of Des Moines 
County. In 1640 Coronado and companions, lured by the call of the wild and 
the seven fabled cities of Civola amidst the mountains, in which they were told 
were rich mines of gold and silver, started from the Spanish settlement on the 
shores of the Pacific, fought their way over mountains, passed by the cliff dwellers 
of Arizona, thence proceeded east over deserts of sand on which grew the thorny 
cactus, then over the great plains on which roamed unmolested the bison, and 
came to the Missouri River. Where, worn and weary, there they halted ; then 
retraced their steps to the place from which they had departed. During, and after 
these times of adventures on land, pirates and buccaneers infested the seas, prey- 
ing on ships laden with the products of the mines of Peru and Mexico and rich 
cargoes of spices and fruits. In 1O07, 115 years after the discovery of Colum- 
bus, the first permanent settlement was made at Jamestown, Ya. In 1620 the 
Pilgrim Fathers made a settlement in what was subsequently called New Eng- 
land. ' In 1626 Peter Minuit bought from the Indians Manhattan Island for 
the equivalent of $24. Between 1607 an d 1680 permanent settlements had been 
made along the Atlantic Coast from Maine to Georgia. This is the time during 
which is called the "Swarming of the English." Canada was discovered by Henry 
Cabot in 1497. The first settlement, made in 1544 by the French, was at St. 
Croix Harbor, and the country discovered became known as New France. In 
the near future the French founded Quebec and Montreal. Through the St. 
Lawrence, the then Xew France, they had communication with the great lakes, 
and to all that uninhabited part of the country west of Pennsylvania, and lying 
south of lakes Erie, Huron, Michigan and Superior, and by portage, from the Fox 
River to the Wisconsin, thence to the Mississippi River, and thence to the Gulf of 
Mexico. What was to be the destiny of this country, lay between two peoples ; 
one the Anglo-Saxon, the other Celtic. Neither had a primary right to the soil, 
it belonged to the Indians, the first discoverers and settlers. Why the people of 
Des Moines County are not French instead of English in nationality, has been 
determined by what was done in succeeding times. The French held the vantage 
points of this vast territory. The English colonists had a long line of settlements 
along the coast of the Atlantic, a feathery edge of battle line, without the means 
of entering into this land except over mountains and through dense forests. The 
struggle was to be for a land more beautiful and fruitful than the one which the 
eyes of Moses, when dimmed with age, saw from the top of Xebo. France laid 
claim to this land by right of discovery. The English claimed it, because of the 
discovery of the coast line. The French voyagers and missionaries went together; 
one to discover and claim for his King the land discovered, the other, to claim 
what was discovered for Christ, and where one set up the standard of his King, 
the other, near by, erected the Cross of Calvary ; established a mission, and made 
known to the wild savage there dwelling, the name of the Redeemer of Mankind. 
There were no obstacles, which were permitted to retard their progress, no dan- 
gers they would not face. Silently and alone, they paddled their frail barks along 
the margins of the great lakes, and at vantage points erected their several stand- 
ards ; there to mark the place for the erection of a fort, there also to be built a 
church of logs, on which was to be placed a bell, whose solemn sound penetrating 
the dense forests would call their wild dwellers to prayer. Where the discoverer 
designated, the military power of France came, built a fort which was mounted 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COl NTY 3 

with a few pieces of rusty cannon. There it erected log houses for soldiers' ti- 
ters surrounded by stakes driven in the ground and pointed at their tops I" 
guard this vast extent of territory a line of such forts had been established at 
vantage points, commencing at Fort Du Quesne at the confluence of the Monon- 
gahela and Ohio rivers. Due north from this fort, another was erected on the 
shore of Lake Erie. These were the strategic points to bar the invasions of the 
English; especially Fort Du Quesne. Another had been erected at what is now 
called Detroit, to guard there, that narrow neck of water, to prevent entrance 
from Lake Erie to Lake St. Clair, Lake Huron, Lake Superior and Michigan. 
Another was erected at St. [gnace at the Straits of Mackinac, to guard the 
entrance to Lake Michigan. The occupation of the French was a military occu- 
pation, with little, if any, effort, to make homes for a people, who had C e to till 

the soil, to conquer a wilderness and make it administer to their outward wants. 
The missionary came with the discoverer to convert the inhabitants, nol to con- 
quer the red skinned Canaanites who dwelt in this land, lie came to point them 
the way to Lleaven and God, instead of digging in the ground, "to dress the earth 
and keep it." Contemporary with the French discoverer and missionary, came 
the "Couer Des Boies," the trapper and hunter, lie was the pioneer of trade; 
was the familiar of the Indian; lived in his wigwam, dipped hi-- dirty wooden 
spoon into the same bowl of succotash with the Indian; squatted around hi- camp 
fire, learned his speech, engaged in his chats; wooed and won tin dark skinned 
maiden of the forest, who gave birth to his child; but always faithful to tin one 
to whom he had plighted his love. During the long cold winters, he set his traps 
amidst the woods and along the margins of rivers and lakes, and daily plodded 
from one to the other, and when night came, skinned the animals caught, pre- 
served their pelts to await the coming of spring time; then, loading them in 
canoes, commenced his long journey along the edges of the lakes, then through 
the St. Lawrence to Alontreal and Quebec, which were his only markets. When 
there in glowing tones described the country from which he came, arousing 
others to follow his course. Such was the character of the men and tin co 
tions which existed at those times, and continued to exist for more than a cen- 
tury, in the territory out of which has been carved the states of Michigan, Wis- 
consin, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky. Tennessee, .Mississippi, Alabama, and 
the states west of the Mississippi River. A young lad of twenty-one years of age. 
named George Washington, with a small hand, was directed b) the governor of 
Virginia, in the winter of 1754, to proceed and warn the French to leave what was 
called the Ohio Country. In midwinter, through dense forests and over frozen 
rivers Washington carried out his commission. I laving arrived at Lort I )u 
Quesne he was hospitably entertained, but given to understand his majesty the 
King of France was ruler of all the territory lying to the west, and thi 
there to guard it. On May 28, [854, on his homeward journey. George Wash 
ington had the temerity to attack a French scouting party, whose commander wa 
killed. On the 3d of July of the same year, he fought with the French what is 
called the battle of the ••('.real Meadows." The action taken by George Wash- 
ington in these attacks, precipitated what is known in history in this country as 
the "French and Indian War." and in Europe, as the "Seven Years' War." When 
Gen. lames Wolfe lav dying on the Plains of Abraham, and I'.ritish red ■■..its and 
American militia were thundering at the gates of Quebec, all the claim of right 



4 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

of the French to what is called Canada, and that portion to which it laid claim 
east of the Mississippi, passed away, and England became the owner and master 
of the land extending from the long line of Atlantic coast to the Mississippi. In 
1763 peace was declared by which England acquired this territory. But such was 
the decree of fate, to hold it only for a short period, for in 1775 England engaged 
in war with its North American colonies and lost them at the termination of the 
Revolutionary war. 

The treaty of peace between the United States and Great Britain was con- 
cluded at Paris on the 30th of November, 1782. This treaty fixed the boundaries 
of the United States. That portion pertaining to its western boundary set out 
in substance, "The line on the north was to pass through the middle of Lake 
Ontario, to the Niagara River; thence along the middle of said communication 
into Lake Erie; thence through the middle of said lake, until it arrives at the 
water communication between that lake and Lake Superior; thence through 
Lake Superior north and to the Isles Royal and Philipeaux, to the Long Lake; 
thence through the middle of said Long Lake and the water of communication 
between it and the Lake of the Woods; thence through said lake to the north- 
western point thereof ; and, from thence on a due west course to the Mississippi 
River ; thence by a line to be drawn along the middle of said Mississippi until it 
intersects the northern-most of the thirty-first degree of north latitude. South, 
by a line to be drawn due east from the determination of the line last mentioned, 
in the latitude of thirty-one degrees north of the equator to the middle of the 
River Apachicola or Chatahouche; thence along the middle thereof to its junction 
with the Flint River, thence straight to the head of St. Mary's River; thence down 
the middle of the St. Mary's River to the Atlantic Ocean." It will be seen from 
the above described boundaries what is now called Lake Huron was called Lake 
Superior; and what is now known as Lake Superior was called Long Lake in 
the Treaty of Paris. By the treaty the southern boundary line was sixty miles 
and more north of the City of New Orleans, thus preventing the United States 
from having the free navigation of the Mississippi River to the Gulf of Mexico, 
which subsequently caused so much "inquietude" to the people of the United 
States as expressed by President Jefferson, and which led to the acquisition of the 
territory known as the District of Louisiana. 

In 1762 France ceded to Spain all her possessions west of the Mississippi 
which extended to the Rocky Mountains. This territory was subsequently trans- 
ferred by Spain to France, and acquired by the United States in 1803, and is 
known in history as the Louisiana Purchase. So it is, the source of title which 
the inhabitants of this county hold to their lands comes from France. In 1668, 
Marquette, a Jesuit priest, founded a mission at St. Mary's Falls, and two years 
later established one at Point St. Ignace. While at St. Ignace, Marquette learned 
from the Indians the existence of a great river far away to the west. It was 
pictured to him in glowing terms, its waters deep and wide, and smooth, and as 
flowing through the most beautiful of lands. That upon its shores dwelt tribes 
of red men who fished in its waters, hunted the deer in the woods bordering its 
banks, and the big bison that roamed the prairies beyond the woods. These 
stories excited his imagination and inflamed the zeal of this disciple of Loyola 
to make known to the natives of this land the name of the Redeemer, and to 
strengthen and extend the name and fame of the Holy Catholic Church. On the 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

other hand, M. Tolon, the governor-general of Canada, was just as anxious to 
extend the dominions of his king, as Marquette was to extend the knowledge of 
the Gospel to the benighted heathen inhabiting this far away land, and to find out 
whether that great river flowed into the Pacific Ocean, or the Gull ol Mi :i o 
One Joliet, under the direction of the governor-general, was to be the commander 
of the expedition which consisted of himself, Marquette and five French-Cana- 
dians. On the l8th of May, 1673, they started from .Mackinac on their perilous 
journey of discovery and of converting the heathen whom they might find. I 
bell of the church at St. Ignace called to prayers the denizens of the forests, 
after which they were to witness the departure of these bold adventurers. No 
attempts of persuasion could induce them to forego their perilous journey. 
Marquette said to them "he was willing to encounter all dangers of the unknown 
regions, even to lay down his life, for the salvation of the souls of these children 
in the far away unknown regions who dwelt along the great river." The paddles 
of the canoes all day long kept striking the water, as silently they coasted along 
the north side of Lake Michigan until they came to the smooth waters of Green 
Bay; then they passed up into the Fox River and Lake Winnebago, and came to 
a village of Miamis and Kickapoos. A mission had been established at this place 
the previous year. Marquette caused to be assembled the chiefs of those tribes, 
and addressed them. Among the things he said to them was, "M\ friend lure 
with me (pointing to Joliet) has been sent forth by his king, to discover new 
countries, and I am an ambassador of God going with him, to make known to the 
people the truths of the Gospel." At this place two Miami guides were furnished 
to pilot them to the Wisconsin River. On the 10th of June, with all the inhabit- 
ants of the village present, they took their departure into a region where the fool 
of white men had never trod. Under the direction of their guides they ra 
the portage from the Fox to the Wisconsin River; their guides returning, they 
proceeded down the Wisconsin with its gloomy forests on both sides, when on 
the 17th day of June their canoes shot out on the broad white waters of the I lie.it 
Mississippi at a point more than eleven hundred miles north of where one hundred 
and thirty-two years before Ferdinando De Soto had discovered the lower Mis- 
sissippi. It was then, the veil of mystery which had hid from the view of white 
men this unknown land was lifted. Rapidly drifting with the current of the 
great river, they pursued their course, not knowing whether they would enter 
the Gulf of Mexico, or their barks glide out on the smooth waters of the Pacific. 
They saw great herds of Buffalo standing on the banks of the river, and many 
deer which came to its margins, there to slake their thirst. ( )n the _>4th of June 
they passed the high bluff which is the eastern border of Crapo Park in Burlii 
ton, where on the 23d of August, 1S05, Lieut. Zebulon M. Tike, a -on ol a 
hero of the Revolutionary war, unfurled the stars and stripe- [32 years after- 
wards. From the time they departed from the village of the Miamis and Kicka- 
poos on the Fox River, they had been unable to detect the trace of a human foot, 
until on the 25th of June they stopped at a place where they found some 1 races of 
human beings, and a path which led out to a prairie to the west. Following the 
path for several miles, they saw in the distance', a strip of woodland extending 
in a southwest direction and smoke coming from amidst the woods. Eagerly they 
sought this a human habitation, and arriving there, found a village of wigwams. 
On the banks of another river which flowed in an easterly direction, they found 



6 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

also two other villages a few miles away from the one first discovered. Here our 
voyagers stayed for several days, Marquette preaching to them, while Joliet 
made known to them the Great Father, the King of France. A dispute exists 
as to the place where they landed and saw the foot prints. We will not take sides 
in this controversy. We quote from the history of Iowa by Gue: "The exact 
location of the point on the Mississippi where Marquette and his party landed is 
not known ; but from the meager description that was given, nearly all investi- 
gators agree, that it must have been near where the Town of Montrose stands, 
in Lee County, at the head of the lower rapids. The village at which the 
explorers were entertained was called by the Indians Mon-in-go-na. Whether 
the same name was given to the river along which their villages were built is not 
certain." Nicolet gives the following version of the matter and of the origin and 
meaning of the name "Des Moines" which was given to the river by the earliest 
white settlers in its valley. He writes: "The name which they gave to their 
settlement was Moningonas or Moningona (as laid down in the ancient maps 
of the country) and is a corruption of the Algonquin word Mikonang, signifying 
at the road. The Indians by their customary elliptical manner of designating 
localities, alluding in this instance to the well known road in this section of the 
country, which they used to follow as a communication between the head of the 
lower rapids and their settlement on the river that empties itself into the Missis- 
sippi ; to avoid the rapids. This is still the practice of the present inhabitants 
of the country." Prof. Laneas Gifford Weld in a well considered article pub- 
lished in the Iowa Journal of History and Politics in January, 1905, contends 
with force and reason, that the place where these voyagers landed and discovered 
the human foot prints and the villages of Indians was on the Mississippi near 
Port Louisa in Louisa County, Iowa, sixty miles or more north of the site of 
Montrose. Professor Weld's contention, as we understand it, is based on an 
error of Marquette as to the latitude of the place where they landed. That if the 
correct latitude be taken, it places their stoppage near Port Louisa. Marquette 
says, after they had reached the mouth of the Wisconsin, "Proceeding south and 
southwest we find ourselves at 40 north ; then at 40 and some minutes, partly 
southwest after having advanced more than sixty leagues since entering the river, 
without discovering anything. At last, on the 25th of June, 1673, we saw foot 
prints of men by the water's edge and a beaten path leading to several Indian vil- 
lages, and we resolved to reconnoiter ; we accordingly left our two canoes in charge 
of our people, cautioning them strictly to beware of surprises." Mr. Weld con- 
tends that the latitudes given on Marquette's map are about one degree too far 
south. We will not go farther into this contention but will leave the subject for 
those who desire a fuller understanding to investigate for themselves. The 
natives found were a part of the Indian tribe which belonged to the Algonquin 
family with whose dialect Marquette was familiar. When the parting time came, 
more than six hundred accompanied them to the Mississippi, whom with the best 
of wishes our voyagers bade adieu. They proceeded on their course of explora- 
tion without seeing any more traces of human habitations until they came near 
the mouth of the Arkansas River, where they found a part of a tribe and a vil- 
lage which they called Ak-an-sea. From those dwellers they learned that the 
Mississippi flowed into the Gulf of Mexico. One of the purposes for which the 
expedition had been undertaken had been accomplished, when they retraced their 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COl MY 7 

journey until they came to the mouth of the [llinois River. Thence proceeded 
up that river to near its source; then made a portagi over the prairies t" the 
Chicago River which they followed till they came to Lake Michigan. 1 1 err they 
parted, [olid going to Quebec to report the discoveries lie had made and Mar- 
quette to his missions among the Hurons. Thus ended one of the greatesl dis- 
coveries on this continent, a discovery by which France laid claim to all the 
territory west of the Mississippi to the Rocky Mountains. The claim of France 
to the land existed for a short period of time when it was ceded to Spain, then, 
by the famous treaty of San Jldifonso, it became once more a French colony. 

DEATH OF MARQUETTE 

"On the 8th day of May, 1675. while with some of his boatmen, he was pac- 
ing up Lake Michigan, he asked them to land at the mouth of a stream near by. 
Leaving them in the canoe, he went away a short distance to pray. The boatmen 
waited some time for his return, then they recollected he had said something of 
the time of his death being near at hand, and sought him. They found him dead 
where he had been praying. His companions dug a grave near the mouth of the 
stream on whose banks he had offered his last earthly prayer, and there buried 
him in the sand." 

"His solitary grave was made 
Beside thy waters, Michigan: 
In the forest shade. 
The bones were laid. 

Of a world-wide wondering man: 
By all the world unknown ; 
No mausoleum marks the spot, 
Nor monumental stone. 

He died alone — no pious hand 
Smoothed the pillow for his head ; 
No watching followers reared the tent. 
Or strewed the green leaves for his bed. 

His followers left the holy man 
Beside a rustic altar kneeling — 
The slanting sunbeams' setting ra\ s 
Through the thick forest branches stealing. 

An hour has passed, and they returned : 
They found him laying where he knelt. 
Put lo! how changed: the calm of death 
I 'pun his marble features dwelt. 

Even while he prayed his living soul 
I [ad to its native heaven tied. 
While the last twilight's holiest beams 
Fell, like a glory, on his h 

— Western Messenger. 



CHAPTER II 

THE LOUISIANA PURCHASE 

The region west of the Mississippi was first explored to a certain extent by- 
white men in 1512, but no settlement was made until in 1699, when two French 
gentlemen, Iberville and Bienville, during the reign of Louis XIV founded a 
colony in Louisiana. In 1712 the French king granted a charter to M. Crozot 
which included the then Province of Louisiana. At the termination of the French 
and Indian war, and the treaty in 1768, the British power was extended from 
the Atlantic to the main channel of the Mississippi ; a tide of emigration began 
to pour into this country. The Ohio River was the means by which its occupation 
was greatly facilitated from the northern portions of the country; while from 
the Carolinas and Virginia the Cumberland Gap permitted a passage to the 
southern portion of the country. By the hardy pioneers the wilderness was 
being subdued, and the foundation of an empire laid. But no means of com- 
munication existed by which to reach the outside world, except down the Mis- 
sissippi, and through its mouth into the Gulf of Mexico. These people were 
hemmed in, and conditions were such that it was impossible to have communica- 
tions with their own countrymen on the Atlantic seaboard. Spain controlled the 
mouth of the Mississippi on both sides, and laid an embargo on every parcel of 
merchandise which passed into the Gulf of Mexico. These pioneers were men 
not to be fooled with, and let it be known to the authorities at Washington what 
they wanted. In 1788 Spain proffered to grant them the free navigation of the 
river on condition they would separate themselves from the United States and 
establish a government of their own, which proposition was rejected. Thomas 
Jefferson had been elected President, and was a strict constructionist of the Con- 
stitution, when a strict construction was necessary, and a loose constructionist 
when such in his opinion was necessary. He was a great politician but a poor 
lawyer. At this time the New England States were not overzealous for the free 
navigation of the Mississippi, for it would bring into competition with them 
things which they produced. Conditions were such, something had to be 
done to satisfy the West. When it was learned Spain had been compelled to cede 
to France all her domain west of the Mississippi, was Jefferson's opportunity 
to gain by diplomacy what must in the end be gained by war, if diplomacy failed. 
In 1788 Congress in a resolution had declared "The free navigation of the Missis- 
sippi to be a clear and essential right of the United States and ought to be 
enforced." A more foolish resolution was never put on paper, because Spain, 
at the time, owned and held both banks of the river and New Orleans was a 
port of entry. When Spain had control, the American minister at Madrid pro- 
posed, if Spain would cede to the United States what she held east of the Missis- 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 9 

sippi and New Orleans, the United Stales would enter into a treaty that in no 
event would it claim any of the territory west of that river, lint Spain would 
not agree to the proposition. On January 11, 1803, Jefferson sent a message to 
the Senate in which he says: "The cession of the Spanish Province of Louisiana 
to France, and the suspension of our right of deposit at New Orleans arc events 
of primary interest to the United States." Then he states: "Measures have 
been taken to prevent further causes of disquietude. The object of these meas- 
ures was to obtain territory on the left bank of the Mississippi, and eastward, 
if practicable, on conditions to which the proper authorities of our country could 
agree, or at least to prevent any changes which might lessen the secure exercise 
of our right.'' Mr. Livingston at this time was minister to France. Also in the 
above message Mr. Jefferson nominated Mr. Livingston minister plenipotentiary, 
and James Monroe minister extraordinary and plenipotentiary, with full powers 
to enter into a treaty with the First Consul of France for the purpose of enlarging 
and more effectually securing our rights and interests in the River Mississippi, 
and the tributaries eastward thereof." It will be seen from the above, it never 
was the intention of Air. Jefferson to acquire any territory west of the Mississippi. 
Above all things else, history wants to be reliable so as to give credit where it 
belongs. On the 16th of July, 1803, Mr. Jefferson issued a call for the convening 
of Congress on the 17th of October following, and in his message on its con- 
vening said: "YVe have not been unaware of the danger to which our peace 
would be exposed with so important a key to our commerce, if the western coun- 
try remained under foreign control. Propositions had been authorized for obtain- 
ing on fair conditions the sovereignty of New Orleans, and other possessions in 
that quarter interesting to our quiet, to such an extent as was deemed practicable, 
and an appropriation of $2,000,000 to be applied. The intelligent government of 
France saw with just discernment the importance to both nations such liberal 
arrangements as might best permanently promote the peace and interest of both, 
and the property and sovereignty of all of Louisiana be transferred to the United 
States." Then Mr. Jefferson in his message tells Congress "if it can constitu- 
tionally carry out the bargain to do so." The making of the bargain in the first 
instance belongs to Mr. Livingston, for Mr. Monroe did not reach Paris until 
after the bargain had been completed. At the special session called the Senate 
ratified the treaty. Thus for a bagatelle ($15,000,000) the United S1 it ai quired 
the whole of Louisiana. But the strange part of the transaction is, that it had to 
be shown to the administration at Washington by the First Consul, it was to our 
interest to obtain the whole instead of that small strip of land east of the Missis- 
sippi in which New Orleans was situated. What influenced Napoleon was not 
that he needed the money so badly, that he would cede away an empire twice as 
large as Europe, but of his inability to hold it against England and the Continent 
leagued against him. 



CHAPTER III 

PIKE'S EXPEDITION 

i 
On the 19th of October, 1803, the treaty agreed upon between Mr. Livingston 
and the First Consul was ratified by the Senate of the United States, and on the 
31st of the same month the President was directed by the Congress to take pos- 
session, which was done on the 20th of December of the same year, through 
William C. C. Claiborne, who had been authorized to go to New Orleans for that 
purpose ; by hoisting the American flag, and the issuance of a proclamation 
informing the people of the change of the nationality of the territory in which 
they lived. On the 26th of March, 1804, Congress caused to be organized out of 
the territory purchased the Territory of Orleans, which territory was in 1812 
admitted as a state into the Union, under the name of Louisiana. After the 
organization of the Territory of Orleans, the remainder of the land purchased 
from France was called the District of Louisiana. On March 3, 1805, this district 
was organized into a territory by the name of Louisiana, and Gen. James Wil- 
kinson appointed its governor. It was an unknown and uninhabited region, 
except by the Indians and some hunters and trappers, the white population not 
exceeding ten or twelve hundred souls. To know something of the land pur- 
chased, its climate, soil, and mineral resources, and to find out the navigability of 
its waters, two exploring expeditions were fitted out, one, known as the Lewis 
and Clark Expedition, which started from St. Louis on the 14th day of May, 
1804. These explorers were to go up the Missouri River and explore a region 
entirely unknown. This expedition consisted of forty-two men, of whom Lewis 
and Clark had joint command. The other expedition was under the sole command 
of Zebulon M. Pike, a son of a hero of the Revolution. He was a young man, a 
lieutenant in the army, and distinguished himself not only in this exploration, but 
as an officer in the War of 1812. He was mortally wounded at the taking of 
Toronto, Canada, at which place he died. On the 9th of August, 1S05, with 
twenty men under his command, he left St. Louis to explore the Mississippi River 
to its source. Among other things in his report he says : "We have arrived at 
the foot of the Rapids des Moines, which are immediately above the confluence 
of the river of that name with the Mississippi. The rapids are eleven miles long, 
with successive shoals, extending from shore to shore across the bed of the river. 
The channel, which is a bad one, is on the eastern side of the first two falls. It 
then passes under the edge of the third, crosses to the west side, and ascends that 
side all the way to a Sac village. We had passed the first and most difficult 
shoal when we were met by William Ewing, an agent of the United States, resid- 
ing at the Sac village, to instruct the Indians in agriculture. A French interpreter 
and fifteen men of the Sac Nation came with Mr. Ewing in their canoes (with a 

10 




PLAT OF ORAPO PARK 




SPOT WHERE LIEI TEN W T PIKE LANDED U Gl -I 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY U 

United States flag) to assist me over the rapids. Taking a part of my load and 
putting two pilots in my barges, we soon reached Mr. Ewing's house al the vill 
We wish to be particular as to this part of Lieutenant Pike's exploration tor 
the purpose of showing that members of the "Stars and Stripes Chapter of the 

Daughters of the American Revolution of Burlington" are not mistaken as to the 
place Lieutenant I 'ike landed and unfurled the Stars and Stripes, and to com- 
memorate the same have placed in Crapo Park in the City of Burlington a large 
granite boulder on which is inscribed: 

1805 1905 

COMMEMORATE E 

OF THh: FIRST UNFURLING 

OF THE 

STARS AND STRIPES 

ON THIS SITE 

BY LIEUT. ZEBULON M. PIKE 

SON OF 

A' REVOLUTIONARY HERO 

AUGUST 23d, 1805 

ERECTED BY THE STARS AND STRIPES 

CHAPTER, DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN 

REVOLUTION, ON THE ONE HUNDREDTH AXXI\ ERSARY 

On the 20th of August they had reached the mouth of the Des Moines River, 
and with difficulty passed over the rapids, and came to a Sac village situate at 
what is now the Town of Montrose. They stayed at this place over night, for the 
next morning he made known to the chief men of the village the purpose of the 
expedition. On August 23d he passed a number of islands, and the river was 
wide and full of sandbars. After ascending twenty-eight miles from the Sac 
village, they came to a place where the channel passes under a hill which rise- 
perpendicularly to a height of about one hundred and sixty-six feet. "I In the 
summit is a platform of about four hundred yards. In the rear is a small prairie 
of about ten acres, suitable for a garrison. Directly under the rocks is a lime- 
stone spring, which would supply a regiment of men with water. The landing 
is bold and safe, and a road could easily be made up the hill for teams. Black 
and white oak timber are found in abundance. The hill continues for two mil.-. 
and gives rise to line springs in this section. The view from the hill across the 
river east is very beautiful, showing broad prairies as far as the eye can reach, 
occasionally interrupted by groups of trees. We remained here for nine hours 
and saw traces of Indians. We leann-d that the largesl Sa( village was about 
two miles and a half westward on the prairie, and that this point was about half 
way between St. Louis and Prairie du Chien." From the description -1 the 
place where Lieutenant Pike landed it must have been where the Daughters of 
the American Revolution placed that granite boulder. 



CHAPTER IV 

ORGANIZATIONS OF THE DIFFERENT TERRITORIES OUT OF 
WHICH DES MOINES COUNTY, IOWA, CAME INTO EXISTENCE 

To discover whence Iowa and Des Moines County came into existence as 
municipal bodies we will have to go back to 1784-, at which time was ceded to the 
United States by Virginia what is called the North Western Territory, lying 
north of the Ohio and east of the Mississippi rivers, and extending to the northern 
boundary of the now United States. When the western boundary of the United 
States was extended to the Rocky Mountains, that portion west of the Mississippi 
River was called the New Northwest. On the 13th of July, 1787, Congress 
adopted an ordinance for the government of the territory northwest of the Ohio 
River, which ordinance forever consecrated it to freedom. In 1805, Congress 
passed an act dividing the Territory of Indiana into two separate governments. 
This act provided "That all that part of Indiana Territory which lies north of a 
line drawn east from the southerly bend or extreme of Lake Michigan until it 
shall intersect Lake Erie, and east of a line drawn from the said southerly line 
through the middle of said lake to its northeast extremity, and thence due north 
to the north boundary of the United States, shall, for the purpose of temporary 
government, constitute a separate territory and shall be called Michigan. 

In June, 1834, Congress adopted an act which provided "that all that part 
of the territory of the United States bounded on the east by the Mississippi River, 
on the south by the State of Missouri, and a line drawn due west from the north- 
east corner of said state to the Missouri River on the southwest, and on the west 
by the Missouri River and the White Earth River, flowing into the same ; and on 
the north by the northern boundary of the United States, shall be attached to 
Michigan Territory." In the September following, all that part of Michigan 
Territory west of the Mississippi was by an act of the Territory of Michigan 
divided into two counties ; the dividing line was run due west from the lower end 
of Rock Island. The county south of this line was named Des Moines, the one 
north, Dubuque. Prior to this time settlements had been made at Flint Hills, 
now Burlington, and other points, and, it is claimed, the settlers were not subject 
to any government or law until in 1834. While in a sense this may be true, but 
as Englishmen they brought the common law of England with them and had the 
right to organize themselves into a political body and enforce that law. On the 
20th of April, 1836, Congress passed an act creating the Territory of Wisconsin, 
and Henry Dodge was appointed its governor by President Jackson. Prior to this 
time this district was a part of Northwest Territory, and in 1809 was included in 
the Territory of Illinois, and so continued till 1818, when Illinois was admitted in 
the Union as a state. When organized in 1836 it was made to include that part of 

12 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 13 

Michigan lying west of the Mississippi and the limits of the now State of Iowa. 
In 1836, Dr. Isaac Galland published at -Montrose, Lee County, a newspaper 
called the Western Adventurer. Two years afterwards James G. Edwards, who 
subsequently became known as "Old Hawk," purchased the paper, removed its 
place of publication to Fort Madison, and changed its name to Fort Madison 
Patriot. Not only changed its name, but politics from one of democracy to one 
advocating the political principles of the whigs. The first number of the Patriot 
published a bill introduced in Congress by George W. Jones for a division of 
Wisconsin Territory. 

The first session of the Wisconsin Legislature convened at Belmont in the then 
Iowa County, Wisconsin, in October, 1836. It selected Madison to be the capital 
of the territory and provided that until the capitol building was completed the 
Legislature meet at Burlington, in November, [837. 

The second session of the Legislature of Wisconsin met at Burlington on the 
first Monday of November, 1837; but prior to this time a call had been made for 
a convention of delegates from the west side of the Mississippi to meet in Burling- 
ton on the 6th of November to consider many things, and to memorialize Congress 
in reference thereto, among which was one for the organization of a territorial 
government over all that part of Wisconsin Territory west of the Mississippi 
River. This convention consisted of delegates chosen from Dubuque, 1 )es Mon 
Lee, Louisa, Van Buren, Henry, and Muscatine counties. The delegates chosen 
from Des Moines County were David Rorer, Robert Ralston, and Cyrus W. 
Jacobs. Cyrus W. Jacobs of Des Moines County was president of the convention ; 
vice presidents, W. V. Williams of Henry County and J. M. Clark of Louisa 
County. A committee was appointed to draft a memorial to Congress setting 
forth the reasons for the things asked. The committee to prepare the memorial 
for the territorial organization consisted of David Rorer of Des .Moines County, 
who was chairman of the committee; S. C. Hastings of Muscatine County, Van 
Caldwell of Van Buren County, J. L. Meyers of Henry County, John Claypool 
of Lee County, J. J. Rinearson of Louisa County, and G. W. Harris of I Klbuque 
County. This committee made its report ; the report is a long one, but since it 
so largely explains the conditions existing at the time, we here set out the 
part of the report : 

MEMORIAL 

"To the Honorable Senate and House of Representatives of the United State- in 
Congress Assembled : 

"The memorial of a general convention of delegates from the respective conn 
ties in the Territory of Wisconsin, west of the Mississippi River, convened at the 
capitol at Burlington in said territory. November 6, [837, respectfully repri 

"That the citizens of that part of the territory west of the Mississippi River, 
taking into consideration their remote and isolated position, and the vast extent 
of country included within the limits of the present territory, and the impractica- 
bility of the same being governed as an entire whole, by the best administration 
of our municipal affairs, in such manner as to fully secure individual rights, and 
the rights of property, as well as to maintain domestic tranquillity and the good 
order of society, have by their respective representatives, convened in general 



ree 



14 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

convention as aforesaid, for availing themselves of the right of petition as f lc 
citizens, by representing their situation and wishes to your honorable body and 
asking for the organization of a separate territorial government over that' part 
of the territory west of the Mississippi River. 

"Without in the least designing to question the official conduct of those in 
whose hands the fate of our infant territory has been confined, and in whose 
patriotism and wisdom we have the utmost confidence, your memorialists cannot 
refrain from the expression of their belief, that taking into consideration the 
geographical extent of her country, in connection with the probable population 
of Western Wisconsin, perhaps no territory of the United States has been so 
much neglected by the parent Government, so illy protected in the political and 
individual rights of her citizens. 

"Western Wisconsin came into possession of our Government in June 1833 
Settlements were made and crops grown during the same season ; and at that 
early day was the impulse given to the mighty throng of immigration that has 
subsequently filled our lovely and desirable country with people of intelligence 
wealth and enterprise. In a little over four years, what has been the condition 
of Western Wisconsin ? Literally and practically a large portion of the time with- 
out a government. With a population of thousands, she has remained ungoverned, 
and has been left by the parent Government to take care of herself without the 
privilege on the one hand to provide a government of her own, and without any 
existing authority on the other to govern her. From June, 1833, to Tune, 1834, 
there was not even the shadow of government or law in all Western Wisconsin.' 
"In June, 1834, Congress attached her to the then existing Territory of Michi- 
gan, of which territory she nominally continued a part until July, 1836, a period of 
a little more than two years. During this time, the whole country west, sufficient 
of itself for a respectable state, was included in two counties, Dubuque and Des 
Moines. In each of these two counties there were holden during this time of two 
years, two terms of a county court of inferior jurisdiction, as the only sources 
of judicial relief, up to the passage of the act of Congress creating the Territory 
of Wisconsin. That act took effect the 3d of July, 1836, and the first judicial 
relief afforded under that act was at the April term following. 1837, a period of 
nine months after its passage; subsequently to which time there had 'been a court 
holden in one solitary county of Western Wisconsin only. This, your memorial- 
ists are aware, has recently been owing to the unfortunate indisposition of the 
esteemed judge of our district ; but they are also aware of the fact that had West- 
ern Wisconsin existed under a separate organization, we should have found relief 
in the service of other members of the judiciary, who are at present, in conse- 
quence of the great extent of our territory and the small number of judges, dis- 
persed at too great a distance, and too constantly engaged in the discharge of the 
duties of their own district, to be able to afford relief to other portions of the 
territory. Thus, with a population now of not less than twenty-five thousand, 
and of near half that number at the organization of the territory, it will appear 
that we have existed as a portion of an organized territory for' sixteen months 
with but one term of court. 

"} our memorialists look upon these evils as growing exclusively out of the 
immense extent of country included within the present boundaries of the terri- 
tory, and express their belief that nothing would so effectually remedy the evil 



HISTORY OF DES MOINHS COl'MY 15 

as the organization of Western Wisconsin into a separate territorial government. 
To this your memorialists consider themselves entitled b) right, and the same 
obligation that rests upon their present ( iuvernment to protect them in the enjoy- 
ment of their rights, until such time as they shall be permitted to provide pro- 
tection for themselves, as well as from the uniform practice and policy of the 
< iovernment in relation to other territories. 

"Your memorialists therefore pray for the organization of a separate terri- 
torial government over that part of Wisconsin Territory lying west of the Missis- 
sippi River." 

One of the reasons for the production of the memorial in these pages i Lo 
show that the men who wrote it were not ordinary men. But few papers can be 
found which are its equal in simplicity of language and clearness of statements. 
The report was unanimously adopted by the convention; was then transmitted to 
Gen. George W. Jones, their delegate in Congress, through whose efforts the 
bill then pending to establish a separate territory became a law on the i-'tli day 
of June, 1838. The bill recited "That from and after the 3d day of July next, 
all that part of the present Territory of Wisconsin which lies west of the Mis 
sippi River and west of a line drawn due north from the headwaters or souro :s 
of the Mississippi to the territorial limits, shall, for the purpose of temporary 
government, be and constitute a separate territorial government by the name of 
"Iowa." It will be seen from the above boundaries given, Iowa Territory com- 
posed a large part of what is now Minnesota and Dakota. When the Legislative 
Assembly of Iowa Territory met at Iowa City on the 4th of December, [843, it 
adopted an act in accordance with which was submitted to the people the question 
of forming a state government. At this time the total white population was a little 
over seventy-five thousand, of which Des Moines County had 9,109. In accord- 
ance with the provisions of the act, an election was held in April for the pur- 
pose of ascertaining whether the people were in favor of a convention of delegates 
to frame a state constitution, from which it appeared 6,719 votes were in favor 
of such constitution and 3,974 against. As soon as the vote was ascertained, 
Governor Chambers issued a call for an election to nominate seventy three dele 
gates to frame a constitution. In selecting delegates lo this convention party 
lines were strictly observed. The democrats had a large majority of the deleg 
in the convention. James Clarke. J. C. Hall, Henry Robinson. John D. Wright, 
Shepherd Leffler, Andrew Horton. Enos Lowe, John Ripley and George Hepner 
were from Des Moines County. J. C. Hall was an eminent lawyer and without 
a superior for his time. Shepherd Leffler was more of a politician, but both were 
democrat- to the core. The convention met at Iowa City on the 17th of ( Ictober, 
1844. and continued in session till the first of the following November, and as a 
result of their labors, produced a constitution which, among other things, fori 
the establishment of banking institutions. It defined the boundaries of the 
as follows: "The south line the line separating fowa from Missouri, the west 
line the middle of the channel of the Missouri River north to the mouth of the 
Big Sioux; thence in a direct line in a northeasterly direction to the middle channel 
of^St. Peter's River (Minnesota), where the Watonwan River (Blue E^rth) ei 
the same- thence down the middle of that river to the middle channel of .! 
sissippi River, thence down the middle channel of that river to the place oi begin- 



16 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

ning." The state was inhibited from creating a debt exceeding one hundred 
thousand dollars, twenty years was fixed as the limit of the life of all corporations, 
and stockholders were made liable for corporate debts. This constitution was for- 
warded to Hon. A. C. Dodge, the then delegate to Congress from Iowa Territory. 
\\ hen its consideration came up in Congress, a radical change was made in the 
territorial boundaries. The change made by Congress took away all that portion 
lying west of a due north and south line, commencing near the southwest corner 
of Ringold County and crossing the northern boundary line of the state at the 
northwest corner of Kossuth County, leaving out twenty-five counties now west 
of this line. Hon. A. C. Dodge did all he could to prevent the change. However, 
when the change was approved by Congress, he gave up the fight and advised his 
constituents not to oppose its ratification. He issued an address to his constituents. 
We will not set out this address, but state the reasons given for the change as 
given by Mr. Dodge. He tells his constituents that the delegate from Florida 
(which territory was at the time seeking to be admitted as a state) brought for- 
ward a proposal for admission of that proposed state, and in order to obtain a 
greater representation in the United States Senate the delegate offered to divide 
Florida. That the proposition of the delegate from Florida met with strong 
opposition from the non-slave holding states, and they came back with a counter 
proposition to cut down the territorial limits of Iowa. He says in his address: 
"After being fully discussed at various meetings of the committee, the propo- 
sition to divide Florida was carried, and that to divide Iowa was rejected by a 
strictly sectional vote. When the bill came before the House, the action of the 
committee was overruled by a large majority. The clause for the division of 
Florida was stricken out, and the boundaries of Iowa, in opposition to my earnest 
protest, was subjected to considerable curtailment." This curtailment of the 
proposed boundaries fell like a bombshell among the people of the territory. 
Party spirit was intense at the time, and the whigs, who were in a hopeless 
minority, at once grasped the situation as their opportunity. They believed in 
the establishment of banks, which was inhibited by the proposed constitution, 
and the lessening of the territorial limits of the proposed new state but added 
fuel to increase the flame of their zeal. There were a number of young men in 
the democratic party who, at this time, saw with a clear vision the outrage that 
was being perpetrated upon the people of the new state. Among them were 
Theodore S. Parvin, Enoch M. Eastman and Frederick D. Mills, who were joined 
by some older members of the party, among whom were Shepherd Leffler and 
James W. Woods (the latter known as Old Timber Woods). Messrs. Leffler, 
Woods and Mills lived at Burlington. At the incoming of a new administration, 
or on the formation of a state government, there is always a school of political 
tadpoles, swimming in the pool of politics, always ready to grab any crumbs 
which may be cast on the surface of its waters. But those men whose names we 
have mentioned were not of that order. They were big enough to see that the 
glory of a great state as well as the welfare of its people demanded the Missouri 
River should be the western line of the state, and they declared it should be 
placed there. They went into the contest and fought its ratification, held public 
meetings and eloquently set forth the outrage. They claimed that the two great 
rivers, the Missouri and the Mississippi, should mark its eastern and western 
boundaries. The result was, the constitution was rejected by the small majority 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 17 

of 421 votes. Then.- cannot be any doubt but for the efforts of those voting men 
the western boundary of Iowa would have been about forty miles west of the now 
City of Des Moines. The Legislature convened again on the ist of December, 
1845. lion. James Clarke, the governor, in his message deplored the rejection 
of the constitution. The Legislature made provision for another constitutional 
convention, to consist of thirty-two members, to be chosen at the April election, 
and the members so selected to meet at Iowa City in May, 1846, to frame a con- 
stitution. The people of Des Moines County sent as delegates to this convention 
Enos Lowe, Shepherd Leffler and G. W. Bowie. The constitution framed by this 
convention fixed the boundaries of the state as they are at present. It contained 
a provision against the establishment of banks, which caused the whigs to oppose 
its ratification. There were cast for its adoption 9,492 votes and 9,024 against. 
The small majority for its adoption foreshadowed that in the near future it 
would have to be amended or a new one substituted. The delegates who composed, 
framed and signed this constitution were : Enos Lowe, president ; Thomas Dib- 
ble, Erastus Hoskin, David Galland, Sullifand S. Ross, Shepherd Leffler, Curtiss 
Bates, William G. Coop, John Ronalds, Samuel A. Bisscll, Socrates H. Tryron, 
Wareham G. Clark, William Hubbel. John J. Selman, George Berry. John Conrey, 
Josiah Kent, Joseph H. Hedrick, Sylvester G. Matson, S. B. Shelledy, James 
Grant, George Hobson, H. P. Haun. Stewart Goodrell, Sanford Harned, David 
Olmestead, G. W. Bowie, Alvin Saunders, William Steele, T. McCraney, F. K. 
O'Ferral, J. Scott Richman. Attest : William Thompson, secretary. 

On its ratification by the vote of the electors and by act of Congress it became 
the organic law of the state. In the foregoing pages we have covered the period 
showing the discovery of that part of the territory of the United States and its 
organization into municipal bodies out of which came into existence Des Moines 
Countv, Iowa. 



CHAPTER V 

INDIAN OCCUPATION 

In the preceding chapters we omitted to write concerning the Indian occupa- 
tion of that part of the territory which composes Des Moines County, for the 
reason we want to keep distinct and separate certain principal events from others, 
although having taken place at the same time. 

At the place where Joliet and Father Marquette landed they found three 
Indian villages occupied by a part of the Illini. They were the first Indians seen 
by them after they left the village of the Miamis and Winnebagos on Fox River. 
When Lieutenant Pike ascended the Mississippi in 1805, he found where the 
Town of Montrose is now located four Sac villages, and on the Iowa River, were 
located some Sac villages. He found three Fox villages, one on the Iowa side 
of the Mississippi River above Rock Rapids, and one twelve miles west of the 
present site of the City of Dubuque, and another at the mouth of Turkey River. 
The largest Sac village, and the oldest one, was on Rock River. This was the 
birthplace of Black Hawk, and where his father Py-a-sa lived, who was a Sac 
chief. By some authorities it is claimed Black Hawk was not a chief (sachem). 
If he was, he must have been made chief, as there did not exist at the time among 
the Sacs, the law of descent of chieftainship, for by this law it was confined to 
the female line. If Black Hawk was chief of the Sacs it was because his mother 
was one, and his father belonged to some other tribe. Since Black Hawk's father 
was a Sac, and he a Sac, he was not chief by descent. The tribe called by the 
whites Sacs; in their speech was called Sau-kies which in their language means 
"men with a yellow badge." The tribe called the Foxes, in their dialect, was 
called "Mus-qua-kies," meaning "Men with a red badge." The French called them 
"Reynoes," Reynard being the proper name of the Fox ("Roman de Renart"). 
According to the report of Lieutenant Pike, the population of the two tribes in 
Iowa was 2,800, including men, women and children. Whence they came is not 
known. They belonged to the Algonquin family and spoke their dialect with 
some modification. In 1671, both tribes dwelt east of Lake Michigan and not far 
from the Mississippi. They were known at this time among traders in pelts, as 
the "Far away Indians." The letters of Father Marquette state, that at this 
time (1670) "the Illinois lived beyond the Mississippi thirty days' journey from 
LaPointe; whither they had been driven by the Iroquois, from their former 
abode near Lake Michigan." 

There existed among the North American Indians, although it may not have 
been so with all the tribes, a social institution which may be called "totemism," 
and its existence was very great in determining their political conditions. Inde- 
pendent of their tribal relation, there existed among them distinct clans. Each 

18 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 19 

member of a clan wore an emblem, which told of what clan the wearer was a 
member. There was the clan of the Wolf, the Hawk, the Eagle. I hese emblems 
were known as totems. The emblem always consisted of some animal, bird <>r 
reptile. Some members of a clan would have the emblem signifying the elan to 
which he belonged, tattooed on his body, some would have the image suspended 
around their neck by a string of deer skin. According to this social institution, 
a member of one clan was forbidden to marry a member of the same elan. A 
Wolf could not marry a Wolf, but could a Hawk. And a peculiar characteristic 
of this custom was, the children belonged to the elan of which the mother was 
a member. If a Wolf married an I'.agle their children were Eagles. This cus- 
tom was strictly adhered to among the Iroquois. There existed among the 
Iroquois eight totem clans, and it was by this means they became the most pow 
ful of all the confederations of Indians in North America. The members of the 
same clan, though they spoke different dialects, and lived far apart, and did not 
know each other, were bound together in the closest bonds. If a member of a 
clan had been killed, the clan was bound to avenge his death. Whether totem-hip 
existed among the Sacs and Foxes I do not know, but would say it did not. 

Just what time the Sac and box Indians came here is unknown. In 1820 
Tamea (Tama), "The man who makes the rocks tremble," hail a village 
where Burlington now stands. Subsequently he and his band had moved about 
nine miles further north on what is known as Tama Town I'rairie. I lis 
village when located on the present site of Burlington was called "Shock-o-con " 
Lietuenant Pike in his report says: "Ten miles up the Iowa from its mouth is a 
village of the Iowa Indians." In the treaty made with the Indians on the 9th 
of July, I/89, at Fort Harmon, the Indian tribes represented in that treaty were 
the Wyandots, Chippewas, Delawares, Ottawas and Sacs, and the territory in 
which Iowa is situated was represented by two Sae chiefs. The Sacs and Fo 
by virtue of a confederation entered into between them became practically one- 
tribe. 

In 1690 the Iowa Indians dwelt in the northern section of the country near the 
Great Lakes. They migrated westward, but at what time is unknown. When 
first found in Iowa, they were living on the Iowa River. Lewis and Clark refer 
to them as the Ayouways. It was from their name the word "Iowa" came. They 
were the same as the Kiowas. Much discussion has been bad as to the meaning 
of the word "Iowa." Antoine Le Claire, a half-breed Frenchman, who knew the 
Algonquin dialect, says: "It signified 'This is the place.' ' : Mr. 1'arvin, an early 
settler, and one who was well acquainted with Indian traditions, says: "These 
tribes separated from the Saes and boxes and in their wanderings crossed the 
Mississippi and in their journey southward reached a high bluff near the mouth 
of the Iowa River. Looking out on the beautiful valley spread out before them, 
thev halted, exclaiming 'Iowa.' or. 'This is the place." Thai such meaning can 
be given to the word "Iowa" is very improbable. It will do for romance, but for 
history on investigation it will not bear the stamp of truth. If the word "Iowa" 
is derived from the name of the tribe "Aoway," which is indicated by the spelling, 
it is no proof that the meaning of the word "Iowa" is "This is the place." for 
long before thev came to Iowa they bore that name. It i- more reasonable that 
the name was given to this section of territory by the whites who tir-t explored 
it, at which time the "Aoways" or "Attoways" lived here. 



20 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

As we have stated, the Sacs and Foxes occupied this section of the country 
just prior to its first settlement by the whites. In 1832 and 1833, Black Hawk 
was a Sac chief, and here he dwelt with his tribe. He was a most remarkable 
man in many respects. Historians have thrown around his name the glamour 
of romance, which tends to make him an object of hero worship. He cannot be 
compared with Pontiac and other Indian chiefs known in history, but for the 
time and the conditions surrounding him he was a great chief. The date of his 
birth is not accurately known. It is generally conceded from the best authority, 
that he was born in 1767 in a Sac village situated about three miles from where 
the Rock River empties into the Mississippi. He was the son of a Sac chief 
called Py-a-sa. Black Hawk had certain heroic elements that appeal to the mind 
and heart. He clearly saw what would be the destiny of his race, and with 
almost unequaled heroism, contended against the decrees of fate. It was this 
which makes him spectacular. He was the implacable foe of the whites, and so 
remained to the time of his death. He was closely attached to the country of 
his birth and with veneration looked upon the graves of his fathers. He saw the 
Indian could and would not assimilate with white men, adopt their customs, 
habits and laws. It was not in their nature. He could not do it himself. Stung 
with resentment, he was bold and fearless in all the ways of the Indians. On 
June 27, 1804, William Henry Harrison negotiated a treaty with the Sacs and 
Poxes by which was granted to the United States 51,000,000 acres on the east side 
of the Mississippi, extending from a point opposite St. Louis to the mouth of 
the Wisconsin, for the small sum of $2,234.00 worth of goods, consisting mostly 
of trinkets, and an annuity of $1,000 for five years. They had agreed to convey 
away the homes of his and their fathers. His pride was stung by the transaction, 
and with other chiefs, he repudiated the treaty, and refused to be bound by its 
terms. While it is claimed he afterwards ratified this treaty, he always insisted 
its ratification by him was procured by deception and fraud. This treaty in terms 
provided that the Indians could remain in occupation of their lands until sur- 
veyed and sold to the settlers. Before they were surveyed the whites came and 
began to stake out claims. The Indians insisted this was a violation of the treaty 
and young Black Hawk at the head of a party of Sacs and Foxes made an attack 
on Fort Jefferson which had been built on the west side of the river as a means 
of protection to the whites; which assault was repulsed. In 1814 Maj. Zachary 
Taylor with 300 soldiers was given orders to destroy the corn fields of the Sacs 
and Foxes, and burn their towns on Rock River. The Indians were joined by 
some British soldiers then located at Prairie du Chien. In the engagement Black 
Hawk displayed great prowess. The hero of Buena Vista was repulsed and com- 
pelled to retreat. Black Hawk had become an ally of Great Britain at this oppor- 
tune time, when the United States was at war with that country. What is known 
as the Black Hawk war has no place in this history, but properly belongs to that 
of Illinois, and we have to pass over that important period in the life of Black 
Hawk. What we say concerning this war is to illustrate the character of this 
Sac chief. Black Hawk always felt his people had been wronged by the treaty 
of 1804. The white settlers had come in and taken possession of their homes and 
fields when his people were away on their annual hunting expedition. This 
aroused his indignation. He drove them out and took possession. It was this 
which precipitated the Black Hawk war. In time the Indians were driven out 




V M.nkl K Till: \\ ATI III 1 I. I "V 

This half t ■ portrait is from a daguerreotype taken 

in 1847, -w ben i In- great i biei « as 61 3 ears ol age 
has been generallj accepted bj in-' orical v ritei 
faithful likeness oi h lebrati towa 1 bief. 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 21 

and compelled to move to the west side of the Mississippi. By the terms of 
treaty made on the 30th of June, 1831, Black J lawk and his Indians were for- 
bidden to return to the east side of the river, but in April, [832, Black Hawk 
with those Indians whom he eould persuade, with their wives and children, 
crossed to the east side of the Mississippi at the mouth of Rock River. He was 
warned by General Atkinson, then stationed at Fort Armstrong, to immediately 
return. This he refused to do. He said his purpose was not to make war on the 
whites, that their mission was a peaceable one to the Winnebagoes, who had 
invited them to come to help in raising their crop of corn. Whether his mission 
was peaceful or not, Black Hawk must have known war would be the result. When 
he and his warriors were near Dixons Ferry, General Whiteside sent Major 
Stillman with a small force to see what Black Hawk was about, Black Hawk- 
hearing of Stillman's approach, met these young men with a flag of truce and 
asked Major Stillman to come into his camp. Black Hawk's messengers were 
taken prisoners and one of them shot. War was then commenced which ended 
in the battle of "Bad Axe," where more than three hundred Indians were slaugh- 
tered. Men, women and children were murdered while they sought to escape 
by swimming the Mississippi River. Black Hawk was an Indian Spartacus, 
proud and defiant to the last. He attributed his downfall to Keokuk ("The 
Watchful Fox"), a Sac chief who was his junior by three years. IF- was more 
cunning than Black Hawk, the better politician. His ambition was to supplant 
Black Hawk and in this he succeeded. Keokuk was the leader of what was 
known as the peace party. He foresaw the result of Black Hawk's movemenl in 
re-crossing the Mississippi in violation of the treaty he had made, and used every 
endeavor to thwart his plans. He called his warriors together and said to them, 
"As their chief it was his duty to lead them to war if they were determined to go. 
That the United States was a great nation, and unless it was conquered they 
must all perish. He would lead them, but only on one condition, that they would 
put to death all their women and children, and having done so, cross the river 
not to return, but to perish among the graves of their fathers rather than yield 
to the white men." Through his persuasive powers of eloquence he succeeded in 
dividing the Sacs, so Black Hawk was left with a small following to undertake 
his perilous adventure. After Black Hawk's overthrow, Keokuk was installed 
chief in his stead. This was the piosoned arrow that entered Black Hawk's heart, 
and he and his followers ever afterwards were the implacable enemies of Keokuk. 
They said he did not have the soul of an Indian. Keokuk delighted in gaud) 
dress and to be noticed. He was the proud husband of four squaws. Became a 
confirmed inebriate, and in 1848 was poisoned by a member of his tribe. 

It cannot be denied that the treaty of 1804 was an infamous one. At that 
time Pasheha-ho ("The Stabber") was head chief of the Sacs. Tt is charged 
he and other chiefs with him were made drunk and compelled for a pitiful sum 
to convey to the United States 51,000,000 acres of the best land on this continent. 
This was done by a people called civilized and enlightened. Draw a parallel 
between Black Hawk, the savage, and the white man who stole the land of Black 
Hawk and his fathers. It was said in a time long ago, "Therefore all things 
whatsoever ye would that men should do to you, do ye even so to them ; for this 
is the law." When measured by this Divine command, who violated it. the 
savage, Black Hawk, or the white man? 



CHAPTER VI 
BLACK HAWK PURCHASE 

What we have written in the foregoing pages is merely an introduction to 
the main purpose of this book, which is to preserve to future generations a his- 
tory of Des Moines County and its people. 

This history commences on the extinguishment of the Indian title to the land 
within its corporate limits. The Black Hawk war terminated in 1832, and at its 
termination, on the 21st of September, 1832, where is now situated the City of 
Davenport, a treaty was entered into between the United States, which was 
represented by Gen. Winfield Scott and Governor Reynolds of Illinois, and the 
Indians by Keokuk, Pash-e-pa-ho ("The Stabber"), who was a party to the 
infamous treaty of 1804, and some thirty other chiefs of the Sacs and Foxes. By 
this treaty the Sac and Fox Indians ceded to the United States 6,000,000 acres 
of land bordering on the Mississippi River, commencing at the northern boundary 
line of Missouri ; thence northward along the Mississippi to the mouth of the 
Upper Iowa River, thence west fifty miles, then south to the Missouri line, thence 
to the place of beginning. The consideration for this cession was $20,000 annually 
for thirty consecutive years, and the payment of the debts of the Indians, which 
amounted to $50,000. 

P.efore the extinguishment of the Indian title white settlements had been made 
at several places along the Mississippi. Dr. Samuel C. Muir, a Scotchman by 
birth, who had married an Indian girl, had built a cabin where is located the City 
of Keokuk; this was in 1821. A Frenchman named M. Blondieu had a cabin 
further up the river. At the head of the Des Moines Rapids, Louis Honore 
Tesson had a trading post. In 1829 Dr. Isaac Galland settled where the Town 
of Nashville is located; his place was called Ap-wip-e-tuck. Here was born to 
the doctor and his good wife, in 1830, Eleanor Galland, who was the first white 
child born within the now limits of Iowa. At Shok-ko-kon (Burlington) Maurice 
Blaundeau, a halfbreed, had a trading post. Here he died and here was his grave. 
When the first white settlers came, they found the grave enclosed by a fence 
made of palings, and at its head had been erected a wooden cross. His remains 
were taken up and interred, very probably in the old cemetery grounds on which 
is now built the Burlington City High School. 

By the terms of the treaty ceding to the Government what is known as the 
Black Hawk Purchase there was reserved what is known as Keokuk's Reserve. 
Mr. Arthur Springer, historian of Louisa County, has examined very thoroughly 
this matter and I quote what he says : "Keokuk's Reserve has been described in 
so many different publications, and in so many different ways, that there are many 
conflicting views extant as to its original shape and location. Doctor Pickard in 

22 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COl NTY 23 

his historical lectures upon the Indians of Iowa has a map which gives it in one 
form. I iiKtor Salter gives it in a different form, ami hoth of these usually excel- 
lent authorities are wrong. From the fact that this reservation included a con- 
siderable part of the best land in this county, we deemed it besl to procure an 
accurate description of it. By the treaty of 1832 this reserve was to he marked 
off under the direction of the President of the United States. Accordingly it was 
surveyed by Charles D. Ward, assistant surveyor for William Gordon, surveyor. 
The survey commenced on April 30, [835, and was finished < »ctober, [835. Robert 
Neil and Joseph Prepi were chain carriers. Etienne Tourville was axman, Francis 
Ray was flagman, and Michael Dennis, Coles Olivier and Xarcis Blaycamp v. 
camp keepers and hunters. The shape and location of this reserve is shown on the 
map of Louisa County as it was first established, which appears in this work. 
This map was prepared by W. S. Kremer, county surveyor of Louisa County, 
and according to his judgment, the southwest corner of the Keokuk Reserve was 
situated about fifty-two rods (thirteen chains) south of the quarter post between 
sections 16 and 21, township j$ north, range 2 west, and extended north 29 
west forty-two miles and thirty chains to the Indian boundary line. It then 
extended southwest along the Indian boundary line nine miles and thirty-seven 
hundredths chains ; thence south 29 east forty-two miles and thirty chains to a 
point a little south of latitude 41 ° ; thence north 28 to the place of beginning. 
The information we give in regard to the Keokuk Reserve is derived from a cer- 
tified copy of the original blue print, and a portion of the field notes, and was 
furnished us by the commissioner of Indian affairs." According to the map to 
which Mr. Springer refers, the southwest corner of the reserve commenced at 
the southeast corner of the southeast quarter of section 33, township -2 north, 
range 3 west (Yellow Springs Township). But it will he remembered that tin- 
northern boundary of old Des Moines County was a line drawn due wesl from 
the lower end of Rock Island to the Missouri River. Such being the case 
large part of this reservation must have been in old Des Moines County. It is a 
well-known fact that in Yellow Springs Township a large portion of the western 
part of the township was not settled until after this reserve had been extinguished, 
which was in 1836. 

On the 4th of August, 1824, in a treaty made in St. Louis between the I 'nitcd 
States and the Sac and Fox Indians, they relinquished their title to the lands 
which they held in Missouri. By the terms of this treaty there was set off and 
reserved for the use of the halfbreeds what is known as the Halfhreed Tract, 
they holding the title in the same manner as Indians. They had the right to 
occupy the land, but could not convey title, the reversion being in the Govern- 
ment. On the 30th of July, 1834. the Congress passed an act by which this rever- 
sionary interest was relinquished, and the halfbreeds acquired the fee title. The 
result was, as soon as the halfbreeds had been clothed with the fee title, many 
speculators entered this district and for a quart of whiskey, a blanket, a pony, 
or any small sum, purchased most of these lands. They also purchased from 
some claiming to be halfbreeds. but who in fact were not. and who had taken 
possession of certain portions of the land. It was a general mixup 
of fraud and deception to acquire valuable property. To settle the difficul- 
ties which arose from these acts, and to decide the validity of the claimants, the 
Legislature of Wisconsin Territory on the [6th of July. [838, passed an 



24 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

appointing Edward Johnston, Thomas S. Wilson and David Brigham commis- 
sioners, with power to settle the difficulty. After the commissioners had com- 
menced their labors the next Legislature repealed the act appointing them. The 
repealing act also provided that the commissioners should receive $6 per day 
for the services which they had rendered, and gave them authority to bring actions 
against the owners of the half breed tracts to recover for the services rendered. 
In August, 1839, Edward Johnston, one of the commissioners, obtained judgment 
against the owners of the said tract for $1,290, and David Brigham, another of 
the commissioners, obtained judgment against the same owners for $818, both 
judgments being rendered by the District Court of Lee County. Execution was 
issued on these judgments, and the sheriff made return on these executions, 
stating he had sold to Hugh T. Reid the halfbreed tract containing one hundred 
and nineteen thousand acres, more or less, for $2,884.06, and had executed and 
delivered to him a deed for the same. Webster, the defendant ( plaintiff in appeal) 
claimed title to 160 acres of the land sold to Reid, and offered to prove that 
Na-ma-tau-pas was a halfbreed. Objection to this evidence was sustained. Then 
he offered to prove that he had entered into possession of the land and had im- 
proved it, and no service had ever been made upon him of the pendency of the 
suit of Johnston and Brigham; that Reid was the counsel who had procured said 
judgment ; that he as well as the owners of the said land were prevented by the 
fraudulent acts of plaintiffs from appearing and defending ; that the return made 
by the sheriff was false and fraudulent. The court sustained the objections to this 
evidence, whereupon plaintiff below had judgment and for costs, and upon writ of 
error the case came before the United States Court (Webster vs. Reid, 20 How- 
ard 437)." The Supreme Court reversed the court from which appeal had been 
taken, holding the court erred in sustaining objections to the evidence offered by 
the defendant. This put an end to Reid's title. Subsequently the title to these 
lands was determined by partition decree issued by the United States District 
Court for the Territory of Iowa. The partition decree divided the tract into 101 
shares, and it was provided in the decree that each claimant should draw lots for 
his share. Francis S. Key, author of the "Star Spangled Banner," and Henry 
W'. Starr, attorney, of Burlington, were attorneys in the case ; Judge Mason pre- 
sided as the court. This trouble commenced when the half breeds' land was a part 
of old Des Moines County, for it was in 1834 the halfbreeds were clothed with 
the fee title to these lands. 

The treaty by which the United States acquired the lands described in and 
known as Black Hawk Purchase was ratified on February 13, 1833. Col. J. W. 
Johnson had in 1808 a trading post at Shoc-ko-kon, near the mouth of Flint 
Creek. 

The names of white settlers who came to what was Des Moines County 
before the extinguishment of the Indian title will be considered in another place 
in this history. It may not be out of place at this point to state why in the course 
of events the Indians were compelled to give way to the coming of the pioneers. 
The North American Indian possessed characteristics different from those of any 
other race of men on the face of the earth. He was different from the ancient 
Britain, German and Gaul, who led a tribal existence amongst the mountains 
and forests of the land in which he dwelt ; different from the hordes which came 
from Asia and devastated Europe. Like the Indians, the Celtic, German and 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 25 

other tribes inhabiting Western Europe were continually at war among themselves. 
When they had been conquered by the Roman power, they took upon themselves 
the customs and habits of their conquerors, and in coming time became the con- 
querors of those who had conquered them. More than this, they conquered 
themselves by weeding out the wildness in their natures, and became in lime 
masters in all the arts of civilization and enlightenment. Not so with the North 
American Indian. He was a part of the wilds he inhabited. He could not sep- 
arate his life from his environments. He was as untamed as the wild buffalo 
which he chased over the prairies, or the deer or elk which he hunted amidst the 
forests. He lacked the power to reason and comprehend ; was governed by hate 
and revenge. He had no fixed habitation ; was not rooted to the soil ; was blood- 
thirsty, and to satisfy this hunger for the blood of his enemy would in midwinter 
traverse the forests for hundreds of miles, and with hideous yells, with tomahawk 
and scalping knife in his hand, pounce upon his sleeping foe and without any 
discrimination of age or sex, massacre them. He fought in ambush, and not in 
the open. His bravery w : as a fiendish bravery, and only when he thought his 
enemy was in his power would he exhibit it. He is passing away with the buffalo, 
with the forests in which he lurked, and the wild prairies which he roamed. If 
he had possessed the nature of the German or Celtic tribesmen he would have 
become rooted to the soil on which he dwelt, would have cultivated fields, built 
for himself a home ; would by his labor and skill have made the material universe 
administer to the satisfaction of his outward wants ; would have developed his 
inward being. He had to give way before the irresistible march of the white man 
wearing the coonskin cap ; the man who came to till the soil ; to make a home for 
himself, his wife and children. 



CHAPTER VII 
TOPOGRAPHY OF DES MOINES COUNTY, IOWA 

Before writing the history of Des Moines County, with its present territorial 
limits, as well as its people, we wish to know something of the natural features 
of the county, its streams, prairies, timber lands, and its altitude; where on the 
face of the earth it is located. 

The City of Burlington, its capital, is situated on the west bank of the Mis- 
sissippi River, in longitude 91 ° 7' Greenwich time, and in latitude 40 40' north 
of the terrestrial equator. Near the center of the South Hill Square, the exact 
latitude north of the equator is 40 48' 20". Longitude west from Washington 
14 3' 30". This makes the difference in time between Burlington and Washing- 
ton fifty-six minutes and fourteen seconds sideral time. 

Until December 18, 1838, as we have stated, Des Moines County comprised 
all that territory north of Missouri to a line drawn from the lower end of Rock 
Island to the Missouri River. For the purpose of this history, we have called it 
Old Des Moines County. The territorial existence of Old Des Moines County 
extended from June, 1834, to December 18, 1836. 

On December 7, 1836, the Wisconsin Legislature passed an act which pro- 
vided for the division of Old Des Moines County, and establishing the territorial 
limits of Lee, Des Moines and other counties. It established the territorial limits 
of Lee County as follows: "Beginning at the most southern outlet of Skunk- 
River on the Mississippi ; thence in a northern direction passing through the grove 
at the head of the northern branch of Lost Creek ; and thence to a point corre- 
sponding with the range line dividing ranges 7 and 8; and thence south 
with said line to the Des Moines River ; thence down the middle of the same to 
the Mississippi ; and thence up to the place of beginning." 

It established the territorial limits of Des Moines County as follows : "Begin- 
ning on the Mississippi River at the northeast corner of Lee ; thence up said 
river to a point fifteen miles above Burlington, on the bank of said river; thence 
on a westerly direction to a point on the dividing ridge between the Iowa River 
and Flint Creek, being twenty miles on a due west line from the Mississippi 
River; thence in a southerly direction so as to intersect the northern line of Lee 
at a point twenty miles on a straight line from the Mississippi River ; thence east 
with the northerly line of said County of Lee, to the beginning, be and the same 
is hereby set apart into a separate county by the name of Des Moines." From 
the above description, the northeast comer of Des Moines County was at a point 
on the Mississippi River fifteen miles northeast of Burlington, and the northern 
line would be the boundary line between Huron, Yellow Springs, Washington 
and Pleasant Grove, Franklin, Benton and Jackson townships. The southern 

26 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY ^7 

boundary line would be a line running due west from the Mississippi River pass- 
ing Patterson Station on the section line running east and west for twenty miles. 
On December 18, 1838, the Wisconsin Legislature, in session at Burlington, 

p;issed an act which took effect on its immediate publication, to establish the 
boundaries of Lee, Van Buren, Henry, Louisa, Muscatine and Slaughter (Wash- 
ington) counties. It provided "The boundaries of Lee County shall be as fol- 
lows: Beginning at the main channel of the Mississippi River due east from 
the entrance of Skunk River into the same; thence up the said river to where 
the township line dividing townships 68 and 69 north, leaves the said river; thence 
with said line between ranges 4 and 5 west." Section 3 of the act provided: 
"The boundaries of Des Moines County shall be as follows, to wit: Beginning 
at the northeast corner of Lee Count)-; thence west with the northern line of said 
county to the range line between ranges 4 and 5 west; thence north with said 
line to the township line dividing townships 72 and 73 north; thence east with 
said line to the middle of the main channel of the Mississippi River; thence down 
the same to the place of beginning; and the seat of justice of said county is hereby 
established at the Town of Burlington." 

It will be seen by this act that Skunk River was not the south boundary line 
of Des Moines County, except for a short distance. 

The eastern border of the county is washed by the Mississippi River. Here 
we will digress for a time to give the proper meaning of the word "Mississippi" 
in the Algonquin dialect. 

The name was spelled by Marquette in 1673 "Mississipy." Claude Dablon, 
1671, "Mississippi." Francis L. Merciew, 1666, "Missipi." Hennepin, 1680, 
"Mschaspi." D. Cox, 1698, "Mischaspe." In Annals of Iowa, 1869, pages 200 
and 201, appears the first of a series of articles by Dr. Isaac Galland, one of the 
first settlers in Iowa; who lived among the Indians, knew their language and cus- 
toms, and was better qualified to speak on any subject concerning their language 
than any one of his time. He devotes a part of this article to the Mississippi 
River, a brief history of its discovery, and the etymology of the name. We quote 
what he says : 

"There are two sources from which we may trace generally the great con- 
fusion in all the names of rivers, lakes, nations and places, etc., to wit: 1st, the 
actual dialectic difference in pronunciation of the same name by the several differ- 
ent tribes, as for example, we give the following instances : 

English Sauk- Chippewa 

River Se-pe Se-be 

Water Xe-pe Ne-be 

Fire Sku-tah Ish-ko-da 

Thunder Al-lem-o-kee An-nem-i-kee 

1 .vath Neho Ne-bo 

Great Kit-che Git-che 

"2d. But still the most material difference in the correct enunciation of Indian 
words by European and other nations will be found in the varied orthography 
adopted by different writers to express the same sound (as in the examples given 



28 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

above in spelling the name of the river we call Mississippi). It should be borne 
in mind that the above names with the exception of D. Coxe, were Frenchmen, and 
they adopted a French orthography to enunciate the articulate sounds uttered by 
the Indians in pronouncing this name. 

ETYMOLOGY 

Indian English 

Mis-sisk Grass 

Mis-sisk-ke-on Weeds 

Mis-sis-que Medicinal herbs 

Mis-sis-ke-wau-kuk A field of exuberant herbage 

Mis-sku-tah (meadow) Prairie, from 'mis' 

The root of the term for herbage is shu-tack, i. e. fire, and literally signifies 
grass fire, or fire of herbage. The fitness of this name as applied to the vast 
native meadows of the West has been for ages past most forcibly impressed on 
the beholder, on witnessing the annual conflagrations of the immense masses of 
grass and other herbage which cover the whole face of the country, and when 
set on fire, and accompanied with wind, presents a scene, not easily described, and 
still more difficult to conceive without an actual view of the sublimity and splen- 
dor of the scene." He continues, saying : "From the annual scenes of vernal love- 
liness and autumnal desolation which the natives had witnessed from time 
immemorial, the former with pleasure, the latter with dismay, and which con- 
stituted .the prominent character of this great valley from all of the coun- 
tries known to the natives. And it was from those distinctive features of 
the country, that their great native meadows were called 'Mis-ku-tah,' as already 
shown." But the native tribes who occupied the country on both sides of the 
river were denominated "Mis-sku-tem," which signifies "Meadow people," or 
"people of the meadows," while the great river which flows through these 
extensive meadows or fields of luxuriant herbage has, in like manner, received 
its name from the same source, as follows: "Mis-sis," being the two first syl- 
lables, and forming the radix of "Mis-sis-ke-wau-kuk," which signifies meadows, 
or more literally, "fields of exuberant herbage," or "River of Meadows." 

We have thus quoted largely from Doctor Galland, concerning the meaning of 
the word "Mississippi," for the reason that, in many of the encyclopedias, and 
in the public schools, it is taught that the word "Mississippi" in the Indian dialect, 
signifies "Father of Waters." The crest of Iowa, from which the water flows 
into the Mississippi, runs diagonally across the state and enters the State of Mis- 
souri at the southwest corner of Appanoose County. The highest point of this 
crest is near Spirit Lake, Dickinson County, being 1,250 feet above low water 
mark at Keokuk or 1,694 feet above sea level. At Creston in Union County, it 
> s 1.355 f eet above sea level, and about 885 feet above low water mark of the 
Mississippi at Burlington. 

The fall of the Iowa River from Iowa Falls to Iowa City is three feet and one 
inch per mile. From Iowa City to its mouth, two feet and four inches per mile. 
The fall of Skunk River from Colfax Station to Oakland, Henry County, is two 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 29 

feet and two inches per mile; and from Oakland to its mouth, one fool and a 
half per mile. Skunk River has the least fall of any river in Iowa which empties 
in the Mississippi. On each side of this river are the richest of bottom lands. 
The most important and the largest stream in Des Moines County is Flint (reek, 
which, with its tributaries, furnishes drainage to the western ami northwestern 
portions of the county, and empties into the .Mississippi a short distance above 
the City of liurlington. 

The greater portion of Des Moines County at the coming of the pioneer con- 
sisted of prairie land. The prairies were elevated plateaus, lying between 
streams, and sometimes almost surrounded by streams, on whose bottoms and 
adjoining lands for a distance of one, and sometimes two miles, grew an abun- 
dance of timber. On the bottom lands of those streams grew black and white 
walnut trees to an immense size, as well as the cotton wood, elm, maple, and some 
species of oak. On the adjoining high land grew the white and black oak, and 
hickory ; while on the rough land bordering on the prairie, grew what was called 
scrub oak. The prairies were much higher than the adjoining timber lands, so 
much so. when one was out near the middle of a high prairie, he could only see 
the tops of the trees along the streams. Frequently the situation of the streams 
gave names to the prairies. Round Prairie in Yellow Springs Township was 
called such, because it was almost surrounded by streams, along which timber 
grew. The prairies themselves had certain features of their own, affording a 
system of drainage. There was a crest to each prairie from which the water 
flowed in sloughs in different directions into adjoining creeks. In these sloughs 
grew a species of prairie grass from two to three feet in height. 

Much has been written about those prairie lands, their formation, soil, and 
why it is that in the long past ages they had not become woodlands, but with all 
that has been written, no satisfactory explanation has been given. Their soil con- 
sists of a rich loam from ten to twenty inches or more in depth, and is particularly 
adapted to the production of maize, wheat, barley, potatoes, turnips, blue grass, 
timothy, and all the cereals grown in this latitude. They evidently had their 
beginning in the glacial period, when great ice sheets slowly through countless 
ages ground their way to the south, crushing and pulverizing the calcareous 
elements now found in the soil. In their slow, but irresistible southern journey, 
these ice sheets left behind them scattered in their pathway, boulders of granite 
of all sizes and shapes, which bear on their surface the scars of the terrific grind- 
ing process through which they passed. 

The soil of the prairies is such that it is not adapted to the growth of the hard 
woods, such as the oak and hickory ; while the soft woods grow to a large size 
on prairie lands. 

The largest prairie in Des Moines County lay between Flint Creek and the 
Iowa River on the north, and its tributary streams. In width, it varied from 
eight to fifteen miles and extended in a northwesterly direction. The direction of 
this great plateau was northwesterly, lying between the Skunk River on the south, 
and the Iowa River on the north, through which ran Mint Creek. It joined the 
great prairie in the southeast part of the state. The prairies in this county had 
their termination in this great plateau. In the southern part of the county existed 
a prairie which lay between Skunk River on the south and Flint Creek on the 
north. It joined the great prairie at the head waters of Flint Creek. The state 



30 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 



road leading from Burlington to Mount Pleasant was laid out through this prairie. 
No words are adequate to describe the beauty and grandeur of a great prairie. 
When looked upon in spring time, it presents one vast expanse of land, of gently 
sloping hills and level plains, clothed in a garment of green ; a picture painted 
by the hand of the Creator, over which he has suspended a blue canopy of sky 
by an invisible thread. A gentle breeze caressing the tall feathery grass causes 
it to rise and fall in ripples, which reflect the rays of the sun as he pursues his 
course along the canopy of the sky. The tall rosin weed, with its yellow flowers, 
on which is perched the prairie lark, bows and nods, as the lark sings his song 
of joy; then, rising, with flapping wings, beating an ocean of air, he is borne aloft 
and lost in the blue ether of sky. Xo sound can be heard, save the song of the 
lark and the rustle of the blades of grass when touched by the fingers of the 
breeze. When night comes, the picture is changed. It is then darkness and 
empty space, through which blinking stars look down. Now it has no rim. 
There is nothing but star light above, blackness below, from which comes the 
cry of the wolf. When fall time comes, and the grass is turning to an ashen hue; 
when Indian summer has come, and a hazy mist fills the air, shutting out any 
distant view; when the sun, a red ball of fire up in the sky, pursues his course; 
then it is, the beholder feels the awful solemnity of life, and there comes into his 
heart the realization that he is a part of a universe subject to a universal law of 
death. 



CHAPTER VIII 

GEOLOGY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

North America, known and called the New World, is in fact the oldest portion 
of land surface of the earth. Speaking of the formation of the continents of our 
globe, Professor Agassiz says : "America was the firstborn among the continents, 
though so much later in culture and civilization than some of a more recent birth. 
America, so far as her physical history is concerned, has been falsely denominated 
the New World. Hers was the first dry land lifted out of the waters; hers the 
first shore washed by the ocean that enveloped all the earth besides ; and while 
Europe was represented only by islands arising here and there above the sea, 
America already stretched one unbroken line of land from Nova Scotia to the 
far West.'' To trace and mark definitely each period in the building up of a 
continent or any section of the same is the work of the geologist, and for this 
work in Iowa the state has intrusted it to the most competent men. We only 
know how the building-up process was carried on, by the strata of rocks which 
lie beneath the earth's surface, the substances of which they are composed, and 
the organic remains in them found, and further, by the marks of erosion on their 
surfaces, the depth of the rivers, the vast amount of detritus by them deposited 
at certain places, the thickness of coal deposits, and from what they contain; the 
kind of deposits; all of which comprise, as it were, the leaves of a book to be 
opened, studied and read. It is by reason of animal and vegetable fossils found 
in rock layers and coal measures the geologist is enabled to tell the story of the 
destruction of the life of one period and the beginning of another, in the million 
of bygone ages. The first leaf of this book when opened discloses to him what is 
called the primary rock formation, which does not contain any vegetable or animal 
fossils; such is the granite, thus indicating that at the time of their formation 
no life existed on the face of the earth. The next leaf or layer he examines he 
finds contains fossils of the simplest forms of life. The next contains fossils 
more complex in their organization ; and as he turns the succeeding leaves or 
layers he finds fossils more complex and perfect in organization than those in 
the last. The fossils thus found are such that could only live in water. These 
fossils consist of the shells of marine life. In reading his book he finds vegetable 
fossils, the first the simplest forms of vegetable life, which to live must breathe 
the air. Continuing his reading, he comes to the leaf showing the coal measure, 
indicating a luxuriance of vegetable life. He concludes that at this time at tin's 
place there was not an entire submergence of the land. On the top of this he 
finds other rock formations containing fossils, showing that there existed at the 
time marine life. Then finally he comes almost to the close of the book, the la I 
leaves of which show a stratum of sand, pebbles, soil, etc. In reading the book 

31 



32 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

he explores mountain ranges; crosses seas and oceans; traces the windings of 
rivers from their sources, until they empty their waters through, sometimes, 
deltas into gulfs. Professor Calvin of the State University says : "These geologic 
records, untampered with, and unimpeachable, declare that for uncounted years 
Iowa, together with the great Valley of the Mississippi, lay beneath the level of 
the sea. So far as it was inhabited at all, marine forms of animals and plants 
were its only occupants." The story of the geologist tells how the great river 
which washes the eastern border of this county came about; that in the million 
years in the past mighty icebergs slowly but irresistibly crept along over the sur- 
face of a shallow sea, crushing and grinding, and gouging a pathway, which in 
the long coming time became the channel of the great river ; tells the story of 
vast, thick sheets of ice slowly, but irresistibly, inch by inch, as it were, creeping 
over a shallow sea, crushing and grinding into marl what it met in its pathway, 
and leaving in its wake the great boulders which are found scattered on 
the prairies, some being left in this county. That animal as well as 
vegetable life existed in Des Moines County long before the glacial epoch is 
proven conclusively by what was found some years ago in excavating for the 
cellar of the building which stands on the southwest corner of Fourth and Wash- 
ington streets, where were exhumed the molars and tusks of a mastodon, each 
tooth being six inches in length. They were found in a stratum of sand and 
gravel, superimposed by clay many feet in thickness. This stratum of sand under- 
lies the ground north of Hawkeye Creek. When Jefferson Street was cut through, 
the hillside bordering on its north side then left an embankment some ten or 
more feet in height. This stratum of sand lies just below the surface of Jefferson 
Street as now improved. When excavating for the basement of the new Iowa 
State Savings Bank Building this stratum was struck, and is the same stratum in 
which the mastodon teeth and tusks were found. This stratum is superimposed 
on the top of the Kinderhook Group, as shown by the excavations for the bank 
building, where they had to go down to blue clay to get a solid foundation. The 
same was true in reference to acquiring a solid foundation for the postoffice 
building. That Mastodon americanus had his habitation here in pre-glacial times 
there cannot be any doubt. In Missouri and Nebraska have been found at many 
places the remains of the mastodon in the Pliocene period. The same is true in 
Indiana. All goes to show that the mastodon at this period of time roamed over 
a wide extent of country. The surface of the land in Des Moines County lies 
below what is called the carboniferous group. The following is a list of the solid 
beds of rock as they appear in the Mississippi Valley: 

i. Chester limestone. 

2. St. Louis limestone. 

3. Keokuk limestone. 

4. Upper and lower Burlington limestone. 

5. Kinderhook beds. 

All these beds are found in Iowa except the first, and all in Des Moines 
County except the first and second. The Kinderhook bed derives its name from 
the Town of Kinderhook in Southern Illinois. The Kinderhook group at Bur- 
lington consists of seven beds. Commencing at the bottom, No. 1 is composed 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 33 

mostly of fine-grained shale, ranging in color from a blue to yellow. Its thickness 
is from ioo to 250 feet. Borings at Burlington on Lower Alain Street by .Mr. 
Bosch show the thickness of this bed to be 250 feet. The upper portion of this 
bed contains in some places many fossils. Bed No. 2 is a solid limestone about 
six inches in thickness, and lies immediately on the top of No. 1. This bed con- 
tains many shells. No. 3 is a band of limestone averaging three inches in thick- 
ness. It is what is called oolithic limestone. The peculiarity of this limestone is, 
its grains are like the roe of a fish. In many places it contains shale. Bed No. 4 
has an average thickness at Burlington of twelve feet. It is a solid limestone and 
withstands the effects of freezing and thawing. No. 5 is a tine grained yellow 
sandstone and full of fossils. Its thickness will average seven feet. No. 6 is an 
oolithic limestone, and has a thickness of about three feet. Its color is a light 
gray. This limestone can best be seen at Kemp's Quarry, south of Burlington. 
No. 7 is an impure limestone, and may be considered good for nothing. The 
above completes the Kinderhook group. On the top of the Kinderhook group 
rests the Burlington limestone. If one wishes to see a portion of the Kinderhook 
and the Burlington limestones, go out to Flint Creek to what is called Starr's Cave 
and he will observe that a portion of this overhangs that below. The lower 
portion belongs to the Kinderhook group. If he will but examine, he will find at 
the bottom of the Kinderhook on the ground next to the wall of stone a fine 
white substance, and testing it, will find it to be epsom salts. How epsom salts 
came to be there is this : The Kinderhook limestone contains carbonate of mag- 
nesia and sulphuret of iron, in iron pyrites, in fine particles. When exposed to 
the weather the pyrites are decomposed, and by uniting with the magnesia dis- 
place the carbonic acid, with which it was once combined, and forms epsom salts. 
All the surface of Des Moines County lies below the carboniferous formation, 
except in the western part of Augusta Township, where exist the lower strata 
of the carboniferous formation, in which can be found an inferior quality of coal 
at certain places. 

BURLINGTON LIMESTONE 

It is somewhat difficult to determine at all points where the Kinderhook group 
ends and the Burlington limestone beds commence. One gradually 
passes into the other, and both contain, to some extent, fossils of the same char- 
acter. This is true only as to the lower bed of the Burlington limestone. The 
beds between the layers of the Burlington limestone are separated by a layer of 
silicon deposit. This deposit indicates there was a subsidence and destruction of 
life forming the lower deposit. In fact this must be true, because none of the 
kind of fossils in the lower bed are found in the upper. Both divisions of the 
Burlington limestone are crinoidal, but the species in the lower are entirely distinct 
from those in the upper, showing that there was an entire extinction of life in the 
lower before the formation of the upper. Burlington is known all over the world 
by geologists as possessing the most fruitful field where can be found so many 
species of those "flowers of the sea" sometimes called. Messrs. Wachmuth and 
Springer spent many years in investigating these, the most wonderful fossils, 
classifying the different species and grades. Up to 1S70 Mr. Wachmuth has 
classified as follows: 

Vol. 1—3 



34 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

Crinordse 338 species, included in 40 genera 

Blastordse 17 species, included in 4 genera 

Echenidas 6 species, included in 4 genera 

Asterordce 4 species, included in 4 genera 

Ophimidae 4 species, included in 4 genera 

Total species 366 56 

Since the above time Messrs. Wachmuth and Springer have discovered and 
classified many more species and genera of this form of life. The Burlington 
limestone is not comprised wholly of calcareous crinoids. This formation con- 
tains the remains of vertebrates, but only of fishes. Fish teeth and spines are 
found, such as belong to the shark. Some are found which belong to the Ganoid 
family, like that commonly called by fishermen "Billy Gars." Both layers of the 
Burlington limestone are frost proof, and furnish good material for building 
purposes and street curbing, but little of it can be used for making lime, because 
of its color being too dark. But to retrace to a certain extent what we have gone 
over: Any one interested can find exposed the lower Kinderhook formation, 
which is the shale used by the Burlington Brick Company in the manufacture of 
paving brick. The investigations of Wachmuth and Springer show that the 
transition and development of the various grades of elements was gradual, a 
development from a weaker into a larger and stronger. The species in the lower 
Burlington are small and fine in structure, those in the upper bed are large and 
stronger. Bi order to fully show geologic conditions as they exist in Des Moines 
County, and to be of practical benefit to the people of the county, we copy the 
following from volume 21. pages 625 to 639, in Iowa Geological Survey, being 
the report by W. H. Norton, geologist, whose work was in reference to "Under- 
ground Water." 

TOPOGRAPHY 

The topography of Des Moines County is controlled for the most part by a 
few simple factors. The county is wholly in the area of the Illinois drift, and by 
far its larger part is an upland molded to a nearly level surface by the 1111- 
noisan ice. 

On the east the upland overlooks from a singularly straight and steep escarp- 
ment the broad bottom lands of the Mississippi. The interstream areas of the 
upland, chosen by the railways in preference to the valleys, present to the eye 
level or slightly undulating floors, with low swells and sags ten to twenty feet 
in relief. The tabular divides are incised along their edges by steep, narrow, 
young ravines which lead down to the broader shallow valleys of the creeks. 
Their digitate lobes, still flat-surfaced, reach even to the escarpment overlooking 
the Mississippi, where the minor water courses break into cascades as they 
descend from hanging ravines. Ground water in an upland so young may very 
naturally stand high, except near the dissected edges. 

The Mississippi, which forms the eastern boundary of the county, here passes 
diagonally across a broad alluvial floor, five miles in width, traversed by numer- 
ous inosculating bayous and overflowed by the river's annual floods. To the south 




BRIDGE AlKoss MISSISSIPPI RIVER, BURLINGTON 




ROCK FORMATION NEAR STARR'S CAVE, BURLINGTON 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 35 

this strip of flood plain narrows until, at Burlington, where the great river saps 
the bluffs of the escarpment, it is entirely lacking. 

Skunk River, which bounds the county on the south, flows for most of its 
course through a narrow valley. Five miles above its mouth it develops a flood 
plain which opens broadly on that of the Mississippi, since here the river trav- 
erses a deep pre-glacial valley filled with easily eroded drift. 

GEOLOGY 

The country rock of Des Moines County belongs wholly to the Mississippian 
series of the carboniferous. At the base of this series lies a group of shales and 
shaly limestone, the Kinderhook, measuring, as sounded in the deep well at 
Crapo Park in Burlington, about three hundred feet in thickness. Only the upper 
portions of the Kinderhook are exposed within the county. The bulk of the 
stage consists of soft blue "mud-rock"' shale, -.well known and easily recognized 
by all well drillers. Toward the top, however, are : clayey sandstones and impure 
limestones — transition beds to the overlying Osage stage. 

The Osage stage comprises two formations, the Burlington limestone at the 
base, and the Keokuk limestone at the top. The lower part of the Burlington 
limestone is characterized by the singular whiteness of the cuttings obtained by 
the driller and by the fragments of crinoid stems and plates of which the lime- 
stone in places is largely composed. Because of its easy solubility, this limestone 
has been extensively tunnelled by subterranean waterways to which numerous 
sinkholes give access. It occurs in two beds separated by about twenty feet of 
cherty and calcareous shale, and forms the country rock over about one-fourth 
of the entire county, underlying a broad upland belt along the Mississippi. Upon 
this basal white limestone lies a well-defined bed of chert or flint about thirty feet 
thick, to which the Iowa State Survey has given the name Montrose chert. The 
chert, which composes the upper division of the Burlington limestone, is overlain 
by the Keokuk limestone, a blue compact limestone containing much chert in 
flinty nodules and irregular bands, passing upward into geode-bearing shales, 
which furnish cuttings of milk-white chalcedonic silica and crystals of quartz. 

The St. Louis limestone forms the summit of the Mississippian series over 
southeastern Iowa and forms the country rock in the southwest corner of Des 
Moines County. The beds include white marl, gray and brown limestone, and a 
hard, brittle, broken and recemented limestone of fine grain in angular fragments 
whose interstices may be filled with greenish clay. 

The Des Moines stage of the Pennsylvania series occupies only a few isolated 
areas in the southwestern part of the county. Its rocks consist of buff sandstones 
and may reach a thickness of 50 to 100 feet. 

The surface deposit over the uplands of Des Moines County is the loess — a 
soft silt of dust, buff above, in many places gray at base, and free from sand, 
pebbles and larger stones. Beneath the loess in many places lie as many as three 
distinct stony clays separated by different water-laid deposits. The uppermost is 
the Illinoisan drift, a yellow or, where un weathered, a bluish stony clay, gener- 
ally bleached and leached superficially and supporting an ancient soil developed 
during the long interval which elapsed after its deposition and the accumulation 
upon it of the loess. Beneath the Illinoisan drift lies the Kansan, a hard, stony 



36 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

clay, blue where not weathered. Lowest of all lies the Nebraskan drift, a still 
darker stony clay. Ancient soils and buried peat bogs and beds of sand and gravel 
in many places separate the Kansan drift from both the Illinoisan and the 
Nebraskan. 

UNDERGROUND WATER 

Sources 

On the broad flood plain of the Mississippi, sheet water is found in river sands 
and gravels at depths of sixteen to twenty feet. Driven wells, consisting of i>4- 
inch pipe with a sand point, are almost universally employed. 

On the narrow flood plains of Skunk River and the other streams of the 
county the alluvium is of little importance except in villages. The Village of 
Augusta, situated on the Skunk River bottoms, draws its house supplies from 
wells from sixteen to twenty-four feet deep, sunk to rock through river deposits 
which find a sheet of ground water about two feet deep moving riverward in sand 
resting on the rock surface. 

Some of the silts at the base of the loess supply water, especially for shallow 
open wells on the tabular divides in places where ground water stands near the 
surface owing to the flatness of the land or to local sags. The beds lying between 
the Illinoisan drift and the Kansan include in places sands of some thickness. 
Unfortunately these beds also include old soils, muck, and buried wood, which in 
places injure seriously the quality of the water. 

Water is also obtained from the sands and gravels which separate the Kansan 
from the underlying Nebraskan drift and also from the sand and gravels that 
in some places rest on the country rock. 

Besides these fairly constant water beds of the drift, irregular and inconstant 
beds of sand and gravel may occur in any of the drift sheets, and, where of suf- 
ficient continuity and extent or sufficient connection with interglacial sands, may 
form local water beds adequate for small wells. 

On the whole the drift, where thickest and where least dissected by stream 
ways, forms an adequate reservoir for ground water and the supply of common 
wells. But where bedrock comes near the surface and the drift sheets are thin, 
and where they have been intricately cut by streams leaving the steep-sided and 
narrow divides locally called "breaks," the drift is often found nearly dry and 
water must be sought in the rock beneath. The drift is specially thick along the 
terminal moraine of the Illinoisan sheet which extends from north to south 
through Washington and Pleasant Grove townships. Here the ridge of the 
moraine rises sixty or seventy feet above the level of the adjacent uplands plains 
and the drift has not been found less than one hundred and twenty feet in thick- 
ness. On this ridge wells find water in drift sands and gravels. Other areas of 
specially thick drift occur where ancient rock-cut river valleys have been filled 
with glacial and interglacial deposits. Several deep wells in drift from Sperry to 
southeast of Latty point to a buried channel which apparently debouches into the 
Mississippi channel between Flint River and the north line of Burlington Town- 
ship. A deep drift well a mile south of Kossuth marks perhaps a northeast tribu- 
tary of this channel, although it may point to an independent valley leading to 
the Mississippi. Thus near Latty, along a north-south line a mile in length, are 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 37 

three deep wells, two of which are nearly one hundred and ninety feel deep and 
strike no nick, and the third — the mosl northern — 233 feet deep, finds the blue 
shale of the Kinderhook at 231 feet. Drillers report "deep country" from smith 
of Dodgeville, running northwest to between Pleasant Grove and Yarmouth. 
1 Ither wells of exceptionally deep drift reported from Middletown, northwest of 
Danville, and east of New London, may mark another buried channel whose rock 
floor lies at about the level of the present bed of the .Mississippi at Burlington. 
\ few flowing wells from the drift are reported on low ground from Danville to 
south of Middletown. 

The basal member of the rocks exposed in the county, the shale of the Kin- 
derhook, is dry. Wells finding little or no water before reaching this shale have 
penetrated it to a depth near Augusta of 220 and 257 feet, and near the Mississippi 
north of Burlington to even as much as three hundred feet without success. Un- 
less the owner is prepared to go through this heavy shale, and several hundred 
feet still deeper to tap the Galena waters, the drilling should be stopped on reach- 
ing the Kinderhook, and a well sunk in another place. 

The limestones overlying the Kinderhook are water bearing, the chief aquifiers 
lying in the lower part of the Burlington limestone. Ground water collects in 
this limestone in the crevices, joints and waterways formed by solution, its down- 
ward progress being stopped by the underlying floor of impervious shale. The 
upper cherty member of the Burlington (Montrose chert) is also water bearing. 
The St. Louis limestone probably carries water in the small area which it occupies 
in the southwestern townships, as may be inferred from the known water beds 
along its outcrop farther to the west. 

At and near Burlington, except for the drift gravels found on the rock and 
minor veins, the first dependable water bed is the Silurian. It is apparently this 
bed which supplies wells about five hundred feet in depth, affording to some of 
them a generous yield. The initial head seems to have been about five hundred 
and seventy feet above sea level, but no exact statements can he made since 
requests made of the city officials for information as to the elevation of the 
different well curbs have not been answered. A sharp fall of static level was 
observed in several wells on the completion of the Clinton-Copeland well. The 
water bed is evidently overdrawn, and flows from it can no longer he expected, 
except from the lowest levels. To protect the wells at Burlington which now 
draw from it no further drafts should be made, and all wells drilled in the city 
should not only seek a deeper supply but should also case off the Silurian water. 
In. quality the Silurian water is hard and corrosive. As shown in the analyses, 
calcium approaches four hundred parts per million, sodium runs between seven 
hundred and eight hundred parts, and the sulphate irons somewhat exceed two 
thousand, three hundred and thirty-eight parts in one of the wells. The total 
solids were about four thousand parts per million in the wells analyzed. 

The reference to the Silurian of the water bed of the 500-foot wells at Bur- 
lington is made with a good deal of hesitation, although no other reference seems 
possible, since the Crapo Park well record places the base of the Maquoketa shale 
(Ordovician) below the bottom of these wells. On the other hand, the Crapo 
Park record is supported by but few sample drillings over the critical horizons. 
Some of the wells reach nearly to the supposed base of the Maquoketa. Local 
drillers speak of this water bed as the St. Peter sand rock, a term rather easily 



38 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

applied to the water-bearing Galena dolomite, a rock which crushes under the 
drill to a sparkling crystalline sand, but which it seems hardly probable would be 
applied to any Silurian rock that appears in the samples of any of the Burlington 
wells. The Galena forms one of the chief water beds at Fort Madison, and 
appears in full thickness at Mount Pleasant, where again the Silurian contains no 
water-bearing rock, if the record and the large amount of anhydrite present are 
reliable guides. It is hoped that the question whether the Silurian or the Galena 
supplies the water for the 500-foot wells at Burlington may soon be definitely 
settled by obtaining a complete set of samples of the drillings of a well reaching 
to the well-defined horizon of the St. Peter. 

New wells should not fail to go as deep as the St. Peter, which here lies about 
two hundred and sixty feet below sea level. The formation is exceptionally thick 
at Burlington and yields generously. The pressure is much higher than that of 
the Galena, the static level apparently reaching at present six hundred and thirty 
or six hundred and forty feet. Because of the marked difference in pressure of 
the St. Peter and the Silurian waters, the Silurian should be cased off to prevent 
lateral escape of the deeper waters through its waterways. The quality of the 
St. Peter water is much better than that of the higher flows, containing less than 
one-half the solids in solution, the greatest differences being in the sodium and 
the sulphate irons, according to Hendrixson's analyses. As but three wells at 
present draw water from the St. Peter, no overdraft has yet occurred. 

The water beds lying beneath the St. Peter are tapped by but one well, that of 
Crapo Park. The water from these beds has about the same static level as that 
of the St. Peter, but is distinctly superior in quality, the combined waters of all 
horizons in the park well containing only about half as much dissolved solids as 
that of the St. Peter and the Galena combined and one-fourth that from the 
Galena alone. As the static level at Crapo Park is more than one hundred feet 
higher than the lower grounds of the city, wells drilled in the manufacturing parts 
of the city situated near the level of the Mississippi will have higher pressure 
and proportionately large discharge. 

CITY AND VILLAGE SUPPLIES 

The city well at Crapo Park has a depth of 2.430 feet and diameter of 6 inches 
from the surface to 1,700 feet and 5 inches to bottom; cased to limestone at a 
depth of 18 feet. The curb is 685 feet above sea level, and the head 38 feet below 
curb. The tested capacity is 250,000 gallons a day, the water coming principally 
from 950 feet below surface. The well was completed in 1898, at a cost of $5,095, 
by Tweedy Brothers, of Keokuk. Later a casing was inserted between depths of 
no and 210 feet, as a result of which water rose to 30 feet below curb. 

The following record is based on determinations made by the writer of sam- 
ples of drillings saved by F. M. Fultz, superintendent of the Burlington Public 
Schools. It agrees for the most part with the record given by Mr. Fultz. 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 39 

RECORD OF STRATA IN CRAPO PARK WELL AT BURLINl 

I hickness Depth 

Pleistocene : feet feet 

Loess and drift 18 iN 

Carboniferous : 

Mississippian (422 feet thick; top, 667 feet above sea level) : 
Limestone, hurt; effervescent rather slow; some chert in 

small chips 23 41 

Limestone, buff and white, granular; rapid effervescence.. 37 78 

Limestone, light yellow; in line meal; rapid effervescence; 

some chert [9 97 

Limestone, buff; in fine meal and flour; rapid effervescence; 

some chert 13 no 

Limestone, magnesian or dolomite, blue-gray, crystalline. ... 39 149 

Shale, blue and drab ( Kinderhook ) 291 440 

Devonian and Silurian (140 feet thick; top, 245 feet above sea 
level) : 
Limestone; in light gray, highly argillaceous powder; rapid 

effervescence 140 580 

Ordovician : 

Maquoketa shale (108 feet thick; top, 105 feet above sea level) : 

Shale, light gray, highly calcareous ; in powder 38 618 

Shale, drab 70 688 

Galena dolomite and Platteville limestone (257 feet thick; top, 3 
feet below sea level ) : 
Dolomite, light buff, crystalline-granular; with hard brown 

bituminous shale at 868 feet ; 6 samples 207 895 

Limestone, buff, finely granular; rapid effervescence 31 926 

Dolomite, light yellow ; in sand and powder i<) 945 

Saint Peter sandstone (120 feet thick; top, 260 feet below sea 

level) : 
Sandstone, fine-grained, white; some limestone; grains of 

considerable range in size; moderately well rounded. ... 10 955 

Sandstone; clean, white; somewhat coarser than above 45 1,000 

Sandstone; as above ; much hard, green shale like the basal 

shale of the Platteville limestone 40 1 .040 

Sandstone, clean, white; largest grains reach 0.7 millimeter 

in diameter IO ' .°5° 

Sandstone ; as above ; largest grains slightly exceed r milli- 
meter in diameter '5 1.065 

Prairie du Chien stage (565 feet thick; to]), 380 feet below 

sea level ) : 

Dolomite, light gray, some chert 35 1,100 

Marl, white and pink, highly dolomitic; large residue of fine 

quartz sand and argillaceous material and flakes of chert ; 

3 samples -35 ' >335 

Dolomite : in line, light yellow, crystalline meal 15 l>35° 



40 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

Thickness Depth 
feet feet 

Sandstone and pink oolitic chert 10 i ,300 

Dolomite, arenaceous, or sandstone calcareous, all in fine, 

yellow sand 20 1,380 

Dolomite, light yellow, highly arenaceous; angular grains of 

pure dolomite and rounded grains of quartz sand 20 1,400 

Marl, white; residue minutely quartzose 10 1,410 

Chert and dolomite 9 1,419 

Dolomite, buff and light gray ; in fine sand ; cherty ; 4 samples 56 1,475 

Unknown ; drillings washed away 44 1,519 

Dolomite and chert 6 1,525 

Chert and dolomite, gray 20 1,545 

Dolomite, gray, cherty and arenaceous 25 1,570 

Dolomite, light brown, cherty 15 1,585 

Dolomite, gray, cherty 45 1,630 

Cambrian : 

Jordan sandstone, Saint Lawrence formation, and underlying 
Cambrian strata (800 feet penetrated; top, 945 feet below 
sea level) : 

Unknown, drillings washed away 40 1,670 

Sandstone, clean ;. grains well rounded ; largest reaching 1 

millimeter in diameter 20 1,690 

Sandstone, calcareous, or dolomite, arenaceous, buff; dolo- 
mite in angular particles with rounded quartz grains. ... 35 1,725 

Unknown ; drillings washed away 275 2,000 

Sandstone, light gray ; in fine angular meal ; minute grains of 
quartz and of glauconite with dolomitic cement or matrix ; 

4 samples 95 2,095 

Dolomite, gray ; in fine chips, minutely quartzose, 3 samples . . 35 2,130 
Sandstone ; as from 2,000-2,095 feet ; brownish, highly glau- 

coniferous 95 2,225 

Sandstone; fine grains of clear quartz, some pink, some with 

secondary enlargements 10 2,235 

Sandstone, gray, glauconiferous, calciferous; grains varying 

in size, some being large and well rounded .' 35 2,270 

Sandstone ; as from 2,000 to 2,095 leet 5 2,275 

Sandstone; in loose grains of clear quartz, largest, diameter 

of 1 millimeter 85 2,360 

Unknown ; drillings washed away 40 2,400 

Sandstone, dark brown, glauconiferous; in rounded grains 
and minute siliceous particles ; chips of drillings have 
rough surfaces (due to projecting granules) and not the 

smooth fractures of quartzite 5 2,400 

Sandstone, yellow ; in chips of minute grains of quartz and 
glauconite and some rounded quartz grains, embedded in 
dolomitic matrix or cement ; chips crumble easily after 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY a 

I hickness I tepth 
fed feet 

digestion in acid ; drillings contain considerable hard 

green shale 2,405 

Sandstone, buff, calciferous, glauconiferous ; much hard 

green shale 5 2,410 

Sandstone, buff, calciferous, glauconiferous; much green and 

reddish shale 10 2,420 

Shale, hard, dark green and reddish, fissile; and sandstone, 
calciferous and glauconiferous; in angular chips; grains 
minute and angular 10 2,430 

The well of Iowa Soap Company has a depth of 509 feet and a diameter of 
6 inches ; casing, 70 feet to rock. The curb is 540 feet above sea level. The 
original head was 33.5 feet above curb and the head in 1905, 4 feet above curb; 
the loss was due to the sinking of the Clinton-Copeland well. The flow in 1905 
was 15 gallons a minute through ij4-inch pipe. Temperature, 56 degrees 
Fahrenheit. 

RECORD OF STRATA IN WELL OF IOWA SOAP COMPANY AT BURLINGTON 

Thickness Depth 

feet feet 
Pleistocene (70 feet thick; top, 540 feet above sea level) : 

Till 15 15 

Till, yellow ; four samples 35 50 

Gravel, coarse, up to i]/* inches diameter 10 60 

Gravel, fine 10 70 

Carboniferous (Mississippian) : 

Kinderhook stage (210 feet thick; top, 470 feet above sea level) : 

Shale, blue, plastic, calcareous ; two samples 58 128 

Shale, olive-gray, fissile 7 135 

Shale, light green-gray 5 1 4° 

Shale, brown, hard, bituminous 15 155 

Shale, blue and green-gray ; four samples 45 200 

Shale, light brown, bituminous 10 210 

Shale, olive bluish and green-gray ; nine samples 7° 2 &° 

Levonian and Silurian (160 feet thick; top, 260 feet above sea 
level) : 
Limestone, gray, soft, argillaceous; effervescence slow; two 

samples 25 305 

Shale, calcareous, hard, blue ; in large flaky chips 10 315 

Limestone, hard, gray, in sand; rapid effervescence 10 325 

Limestone, light yellow; rapid effervescence; in fine sand and 

argillaceous powder 15 34° 

Limestone, yellow-gray; fossiliferous, with fragments of 

brachiopods ; soft ; in flaky chips 10 350 

Limestone, yellow ; rapid effervescence ; in fine meal ; two 

samples 10 360 



42 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

Thickness Depth 
feet feet 

Limestone, strong blue ; f ossiferous ; hard, compact ; earthy 

luster, siliceous but not arenaceous 10 370 

Shale and limestone in light yellow-gray concreted powder; 

effervescence rapid 10 380 

Limestone, blue, dense, hard, in part of lithographic fineness 
of grain and conchoidal fracture ; rapid effervescence ; in 

chips 10 390 

Limestone, compact, gray, in sand ; rapid effervescence 5 395 

No record 5 400 

Limestone, blue-gray, rough ; slow effervescence ; some chert .10 410 

Limestone, light buff and white, compact, fine-grained ; rapid 

effervescence 10 420 

Limestone, light yellow-gray or white ; rapid effervescence ; 
residue quartzose with minute grains and flakes and pris- 
matic crystals of quartz; in fine meal; four samples. ... 20 440 
Unknown ; no samples 69 509 

The well of George Boeck at 2-8 North Fifth Street, has a depth of 450 feet 
and a diameter of 5 inches ; casing, 74 feet. The head is 30 feet above bottom 
of cellar. The well flowed "a full 5-inch stream," with no decrease in 1905. 
Water was found in white limestone 150 feet below soapstone (Kinderhook) ; 
temperature, 60 degrees Fahrenheit; effect on boilers, not good. 

The well of the Clinton-Copeland Company, at 100 South Fourth Street, has 
a depth of 465 feet and a diameter of 5 inches throughout; casing, to 72 feet. 
The head originally was 28 feet above curb, and no change has been noticed. 
Water is said to have begun to overflow when well reached depth of 440 feet. 
The temperature, taken after flowing through 175 feet of hose, was 59 degrees 
Fahrenheit. 

The well of the Moehn Brewing Company has a depth of 510 feet and a 
diameter of 5 inches. The original head was 30 feet above curb, but the well 
had ceased to flow in 1905, and the capacity under pump was small. Water 
was found in small quantity at 90 feet, but the main supply came from 500 to 
510 feet. 

The well of the Murray Iron Works has a depth of 831 feet and a diameter 
of 6 to 4 inches; casing, 120 feet from surface into blue shale. The head is 92 
feet above curb. The original flow of 300 gallons a minute had not diminished 
in 1905. The first water was in a gravel just above rock at 75 feet, and the first 
flow at 450 feet ; a strong flow came in at 500 feet and the drilling were washed 
away from 600 to 760 feet and from 800 to 831 feet. The rock from 800 to 832 
feet said to be like granular sugar. The temperature at tap after water has 
passed through 300 feet of pipe in foundry was 6.3.5 degrees Fahrenheit. The 
water is too hard for use in boiler. 

The well of the Sanitary Ice Company, near the intersection of Osborn Street 
and Central Avenue, has a depth of 852 feet and a diameter of 5 inches ; casing, 
95 feet from surface. The head was 51 feet above curb, and the flow 500 gallons 
a minute. Water at 80 feet was shut off ; water at 430 feet rose nearly to the 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 13 

surface; the first flow was at 700 feet, and the water from the 800-foot level 
rose 51 feet above curb. Temperature, fi.|'_- degrees Fahrenheit. The water 
corrodes boilers and is used for condensing. 

The well of the Sanitary Milk Company lias a depth of 487 feel and a diameter 
of (i inches. The original head was 15 feet above level of corner of Third and 
Court streets, but the head in August, 1905, was 31 feet below same level; the 
head lowered on completion of Clinton-Copeland well. 

The well of Smith & Dalton has a depth of 460 feet and a diameter of 5 in< hi 
The original head was 30 feet above curl). The original tlow was estimated at 
40 gallons a minute, but had decreased in 11P5. Temperature reported as 60 
degrees Fahrenheit. 

Mediapolis — Mediapolis (population. 858) depends for its water supply on 
drilled and bored wells from 50 to no feet deep, all but 30 or 40 feet of which 
are in rock. The water heads 20 to 30 feet below the curb. 

The well of D. Hutchcroft. two miles east of Mediapolis, has a depth of 600 
feet and a diameter of 5^ inches to 360 feet and 5 inches to bottom; casing to 
360 feet. Water found at depth of 40 feet, in drift, was not cased out. Pumping 
capacity, 8 gallons per minute. 

RECORD OF STRATA IN HUTCHCROFT WELL NEAR MEDIAPOLIS 

Thickness Depth 

feet feet 

Clay, yellow, sandy, calcareous, arenaceous 75 75 

Shale, drab, or sandstone, argillaceous, in concreted masses 60 135 

Shale, olive-green, hard, non-calcareous 213 3.1S 

Limestone, blue-gray, argillaceous, minutely arenaceous 22 370 

Limestone, light gray, non-magnesian, argillaceous and slightly 

arenaceous 20 390 

Limestone, light yellow-gray, granular, soft, fossiliferous, non-mag- 
nesian 22 412 

Limestone, light blue-gray and white, soft, earthy ; in thin flakes. ... 18 131 1 

Limestone, blue-gray and white ; earthy ; in line chips 25 455 

Limestone, light yellow-gray and drab, non-magnesian ; cherty 20 475 

Limestone, light yellow-gray, non-magnesian ; in fine sand ; drillings 

slightly arenaceous 25 500 

Shale, dark blue, in chips ; calcareous and cherty 100 600 

The shale whose base is found at 348 feet is evidently the Kinderhook; below 
it, the drill, as at Burlington, passed through about 150 feet of limestones, which 
may represent the Devonian and Silurian. The shale from 500 to Cioo feet may 
be taken as the equivalent of the shale (Maquoketa) at Burlington which imme- 
diately succeeds the limestones below the Kinderhook. The drift, therefore. 
seems to have passed through the water bed which supplies the less deep wells at 
Burlington and yet to have found very little water. 

Mediapolis is 764 feet above sea level. If an adequate supply is not found 
in the Mississippian limestones, a well which adventures through the heavy dry 
shale of the Kinderhook, here at least 200 feet thick, will probably find water 



44 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

in the Devonian or Silurian. Should the supply still prove insufficient, the drill 
should proceed through the next considerable shale, the Maquoketa, and tap what 
water may be found in the Galena dolomite and Platteville limestone. The water 
bed of the Saint Peter sandstone will be encountered at about 1,150 feet from 
the surface. 

-Minor Supplies— Minor village supplies are described in the following table: 

VILLAGE SUPPLIES IN DES MOINES COUNTY 

Town Name of supply Depth Depth to Depth to Head be- 

rock water bed low curb 

Feet Feet Feet Feet 

Augusta. Wells 16— 24 . . 24 10 

Danville. Bored and drilled wells 16 — 125 . . 75 I2 

Roscoe. .Drilled wells 60 — 100 



40 



ARTESIAN WATERS 



The people of Des Moines County want to know from whence their under- 
ground water supply has its source, by which is fed so many deep wells in the 
county. Artesian wells are those whose flowing water rises to a considerable 
height within a tube under hydrostatic pressure. To constitute an artesian well 
it is not necessary, as some suppose, that the water should overflow at the surface 
of the ground. They are divided into two groups, those which overflow at the 
mouth are called flowing wells, the others non-flowing. The height at which the 
water stands is called its head. In Iowa there are certain beds of stone impervious 
to water. These beds dip southward from high lands in the North. These beds 
constitute a floor over which is supplied the waters of artesian wells. The higher 
the source, the higher will the water rise in the tube of any well under certain 
hydrostatic pressure. It is similar to stand pipe system of water works. The 
stand pipe furnishing the source of supply. The head on level at which the 
water will stand in any well depends upon the elevation of the source of water 
supply, together with the amount of rainfall which supplies the source. All the 
waters in and on the earth's surface come from the clouds, and where the area is 
large, where the water beds outcrop or come near the earth's surface the water 
supply will be great and the head level of any well is determined by distance 
from the source from which it receives its waters. The supply of the water beds 
of Iowa for its artesian wells comes principally from the Cambrian and Ordovician 
sandstone found mostly in Southern Minnesota and Wisconsin. Here it covers 
about fourteen thousand five hundred square miles at surface. This area differs 
greatly in its elevation above sea level. In some places more than twelve hundred 
feet above sea level. If we take the City of Burlington, which at low water mark 
of the Mississippi is 550 feet above sea level, and the head source of supply, say 
one thousand feet above sea level, it will be seen nearly what the head line of an 
artesian well will be in Burlington. The head of the well at Crapo Park is 136 
feet above the line of the water in the Mississippi at low water. Above sea 
line, 657 feet. The true head line of any well cannot be determined unless all 
leaks have been closed to prevent escape. 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 45 

PERMANENCE OF YIELD 

This presents a question of great importance. There are many tilings which 
may interfere with the usefulness of a well. In drilling such wells, the well drill 
passes through many strata of rocks, some hard, some not so dense, and liable to 
crumble and fall in the orifice and the well hecomes clogged. Besides, the supply 
may he cut off by the sinking of other w^ells in the same neighborhod. Perma- 
nency of water supply depends on, first, the construction and the care with which 
the well is taken ; second, on the character of the water bed from which it is 
supplied and third, on the draft of other beds in the same vicinity. As to the 
drilling of artesian wells in Des Moines County when the Kinderhook group has 
been reached, if no water in sufficient quantities has been found, it is best to 
stop and drill at some other place (This is to the farmer). If the well goes down 
through the Kinderhook, and water is found, it probably will be so mineralized 
as to be unfit for household use, such as the waters of the Iowa Soap Company. 

SPRINGS 

A word about the springs in Burlington. The water coming from springs in 
Burlington should not be used till at least all outhouses and stables shall have been 
banished from the city. These springs come from the base of the Burlington 
limestone. This limestone is full of fissures, crevices and pockets which permits 
surface water to percolate till it reaches the impervious bed of the Kinderhook 
group, when it comes out in a spring. The mouth of the spring on lower Main 
Street is just above the top of the Kinderhook shale, and is nothing but an under- 
ground sewer for all that part of South Hill. We recollect some twenty years 
ago in the western part of the city occurred an epidemic of sickness among 
people who used the water coming from certain springs. Many people were 
dying, some said it was cholera, others gave it the name of the "West Hill" dis- 
ease. Doctor Henry at the head of a committee of physicians examined into the 
water supply of those taken sick, and it was found they used spring water. The 
City Council caused the springs to be closed, when the West Hill disease ceased 
to exist. 



CHAPTER IX 

PIONEERS OF OLD AND NEW DES MOINES COUNTY 

In June, 1834, Michigan Territory was extended west of the Mississippi 
River and the part west of the river divided into two counties Dubuque and Des 
Moines, the boundary line being a line due west from the foot of Rock Island 
to the Missouri River. All south of this line constituted Old Des Moines County 
until December 7, 1836, when it was subdivided as shown in these pages. We will 
here note the settlements made in Old Des Moines County. The first of which 
we have any record is, that on the 30th of March, 1799, Zenon Tudeau, lieutenant- 
governor of Upper Louisiana, made the following order: "It is permitted Mr. 
Lewis (Teson) Honori to establish at the head of the rapids of the River Des 
Moines, and his establishment once formed, notice of it shall be given to the 
governor-general, in order to obtain for him the commission of a space sufficient 
to give value to said establishment, and at the same time to render it useful to 
commerce of the peltries of this country; to watch the Indians and keep them 
in the fidelity which they owe to His Majesty.'' Annals of Iowa, Volume VII, 
1869, page 229. Honori had improved his property "by building houses, plant- 
ing orchards and had placed a small piece in cultivation.'' Honori subsequently 
became involved in debt to one Robodaux, his property was seized March 2j, 
1803, under the Spanish law, and sold by the public crier of the town at public 
sale at the door of the Parish Church in St. Louis at the conclusion of high mass. 
This grant and sale constitutes the oldest legal title to lands in the State of Iowa. 
The validity of this Spanish Grant came before the Supreme Court, and patent 
for the same was signed by President Van Buren February 7, 1839. This is 
the earliest patent given by the Government to any lands in Iowa. Henry W. 
Starr of Burlington, who had defended the title under the Spanish Grant, exhibited 
the same to the Rev. V. Salter of Burlington. (See account of this transaction 
in Volume X. Annals of Iowa, in an address delivered by Mr. Salter before the 
Historical Society of Iowa.) In reference to the above matter, Hon. Daniel F. 
Miller (Saturday Post, October, 1891) says: "He was present in the court- 
house in Fort Madison, at a term of the District Court in 1841, when an aged 
witness, a Frenchman of the name of John M. Courville. testified in a case on 
trial, that he had planted the trees in 1793 under the employment of an Indian 
trader named Louis Henori Tesson." D. C. Riddle, Esq., of Montrose, an early 
settler, says : "Courville was mistaken as to the time of planting the orchard." 
Louisiana Territory subsequently passed to the French, who in turn sold it to 
the United States ; and our government sanctioned the grant to Tesson so far as 
to issuing a patent to those claiming under him. for a mile square of land which 
now includes the Milage of Montrose, where the orchard stood. Parties claim- 

46 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 17 

ing title under the Indians or half breed reservation purchase made counter claim 
to the title of this land. On the trial, Tesson's claim was upheld and on appeal, 
the opinion of the lower court was sustained. The next white occupation in 
what subsequently became "< >1d Des Moines County" was the erection of a fort 
by the United States in [808 on the site where is now located the City of Fort 
Madison. The erection of this fort was undoubtedly in violation of the treat) 
of [804 made by the Government with the Sac and Fox Indians. Its erection 
provoked the hostility of the Indians who under the leadership of Black Hawk, 
then a young brave, attempted its capture on the 5th of September, [812. The 
battle lasted from the 5th until the 8th of the same month, when the Indians 
withdrew. In 1813 the fort was again besieged, and in their attempts to take it 
were defeated and several soldiers killed. In August of the same year, a large 
force of Indians besieged the fort, entirely surrounding it, determined to starve 
its occupants. The garrison defended it, until exhausted by starvation, so much 
so, that to retain possession, was a hopeless task, and the only thing left for them 
to do was, to find some means of escape. In order to accomplish this, a trench 
was dug from the block house to the river where boats were landed. At mid 
night, crawling on hands and knees through this trench or hole in the ground, 
they reached the boats and were carried away, the river being lit up by the burn- 
ing fort and building to which they had applied the torch on their departure. 
Colonel Johnson, an agent of the American Fur Company, had a trading post 
at Flint Hills in 1808. It was located near where Flint Creek empties into the 
Mississippi. He did a thriving business with the Indians. In August of that 
year, he received merchandise invoiced at $14,715.99, which he traded to the 
Indians for pelts. On the 28th of March, 1809, he reports he had bought by 
barter. 

710 lbs. bear skins, valued $ 1,420.00 

1350 muskrat skins, 25c each 338.25 

3585 racoon skins, 25 each 896.25 

28,021 lbs. deer skins 7,256.45 

P>ear and otterskins ' 426.OO 

Beeswax and tallow 141.00 



$10.477 .95 



The above shows there must have been an abundance of beaver, coon, dei 
and some bear in this section in 1820. Dr. Samuel C. Muir. a surgeon in the 
army of the United States, settled and built a cabin on the ground on which th< 
City of Keokuk is located. He married an Indian squaw of the Sac tribe by 
whom he had five children. Doctor Muir was a Scotchman by birth, and a grad- 
uate of Fdinburgh University. He complained bitterly of his treatment by his 
brother officers because of his marriage to an Indian girl. When an order was 
made requesting all officers to abandon their squaw wives. In- resigned his office. 
Such was his sense of right, he clung to the woman to whom he had pledged his 
love, and who gave him bis children. Capt. James W. Campbell in his address to 
the Tri-State Old Settlers Association held at Keokuk October 2, [884, states 
some very interesting history. I fe says : "In [821 under the direction of M 



48 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

Marston, my father tore down the first and only house at the mouth of the 
Des Moines River; and floated the puncheon floor across the river to be used 
in the fort on the bluff. At Puck-e-chu-tuck, now Keokuk, he passed Doctor 
Muir's cabin. The Clyde Hotel now occupies the ground where it stood. One and 
a half miles further up, he passed Andrew Stautamonts, where is now located 
Rands Park. The next settlement on the west side of the river was by Le Moilese, 
a Frenchman, stationed at the town now called Sandusky. In the spring of 1830 
and 183 1 I attended a school taught by Beryman Jennings. Captain Galland, who 
is here today with us, was one of my school mates." Moses Stilwell settled at 
Puck-e-chu-tuck (Keokuk) in 1828. Dr. Isaac Galland settled at a place called 
by the Indians Sh-wip-etuck, now Nashville, in 1829. Nashville can boast of being 
the place where the first school was taught, as well as the place where the first 
white child was born in Iowa. Doctor Galland in his book describing Iowa, 
says : "As we passed up the river we saw the ruins of Old Fort Madison, about 
ten miles above the rapids, near a sand bluff rising perpendicular from the 
water's edge. On the second day after our keel boat reached Shoc-o-con, or Flint 
Hills. An Indian village of the Foxes stood at the mouth of Flint Creek; its 
chief was Timea." J. C. Parrott, an old pioneer, in a letter to Edward Johnston, 
of Keokuk, says: "I came to this county (Lee) in September, 1834, and was a 
member of Company T,' First United States Dragoons. There was a post at 
Camp Des Moines, now known as Montrose. This post was commanded by 
Lieut.-Col. Stephen W. Kearney, and the command consisted of Companies B., 
H. and I., commanded respectively by Capts. E. V. Sumner, Nathaniel Boone (son 
of Daniel Boone) and J. B. Brown. The only improvements on our arrival were 
a log house and a small field of corn; Capt. Jas. W. White being the occupant. 
The Government purchased the claim, and the house was used as a hospital for 
the post. There were a few citizens at this place in 1834, most of whom I will 
name: Campbell, John Gaines, Bill Price, Alexander Hood, Bill McBride, 
Thos. W. Taylor, Val. Yanorsdale, and a few others, some of whom, to use a 
common phrase, were 'hard cases.' From the camp to Fort Madison, there was 
but one cabin in 1834, which was situated near what is known as Websters Big 
Springs, and was occupied by a man by the name of Foster. Fort Madison con- 
tained a few cabins, and if my memory serves me correctly, Small, Cheney, and 
Horton were among the early settlers. John and Nathaniel Knapp made their 
purchases from them, I think, in 1835, and laid out the town, the western boundary 
of which was near where the McFarland house now stands. William Skinner, 
in 1834, made a claim or improvement on Devil Creek. This, I think, is the 
first claim made in Lee County oft' the Mississippi River. In 1835 several claims 
were made. Among them was Howard, who made a claim on Sugar Creek, 
which locality is known as Howard's Settlement. Thomas Clark made a claim, 
which is known as Clark's Point ; and Cruckshank, known as Cruckshank's Point. 
In the same year, several claims were made where South Augusta now stands, 
the noted Spurlock was one of those settlers. E. D. Ayres, John Box, Thomas 
Wilson, and Hugh Dunn made claims near Fort Madison. I was informed by 
Frank Labisner, United States interpreter for the Sac and Fox Indians, that the 
name of Skunk River was a wrong interpretation. The Indian name was 
Checaqua. which, in their language is anything of a strong or obnoxious smell, — 
such as onions. I think, that from the fact that the head waters of the stream 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY (0 

abounded with wild anions, the interpretation should be 'Onion.' " ( lharles Negus 
i Annals of Iowa) writes: "In [832, soon alter the Black Hawk Purchase, 
Zachariah Hawkins, Benjamin Jennings, Aaron White, Augustine I [orton, Samuel 
Gooeli, Daniel Thompson and Peter Williams made claims at Fort Madison. In 
1833, these claims were purchased by John II. and Nathaniel Knapp, upon which 
in [835 they laid out the town." We will now cross Skunk River and come within 
the limits of the now Des Moines County and make known the pioneers of Old 
Des Moines County, their county before December 7, 1836. The Indian title to 
the lands included in the Black Hawk Purchase did not expire until June 1st, 
1833, and no one had a right prior to this time to make settlements by taking 
up a claim. The lands were unsurveyed, and no purchase could be made from 
the Government until after survey. The only method, and the one adopted, was 
the claimant took actual possession of a certain quantity of land, marking its 
boundaries by the blazing of trees, the setting of stakes or doing something as 
an indication of the boundaries of the claim. These stakes, or whatever was 
done to mark the boundary line, bore the claimant's name. These claimants were 
called "squatters." There being no organized government existing at the time, 
they voluntarily enacted a code for their own protection, and to protect themselves 
in the right of occupancy. If in the temporary absence of a "squatter," anyone 
entered into possession of his claim, he was called a "claimjumper." To protect 
themselves against "claimjumpers" the squatters confederated and according to 
the rules adopted, they, as the saying is, "made it hot" for the claim jumpers. 
After the survey of the lands had been made, the proper method for the claim- 
ant was to make entry of the land desired to be purchased in the manner provided 
by law. If the survey did not correspond with the boundary of the claimants, 
they adjusted the matter among themselves. Among those who came to this part 
of Old Des Moines County was Dr. William R. Ross. Doctor Ross says he 
crossed the Mississippi River and landed on Iowa soil one-half a mile below 
the mouth of Flint Creek. Prior to his coming in August, 1833, were Joseph 
B. Teas, Joseph Morgan, William Morgan, William Stewart, John Ward, Isaac 
Canterberry. Lewis Walters, Isaac Cranshaw, Benjamin Tucker, Ezekiel Smith 
and his two sons, Paris and Linias ; John Ballard, Richard Larned, Thomas 
Donnell, David Tothero, S. S. White, M. M. McCarver, Beryman Jenkins, William 
Wright, John Harris, Charles Teas, with others who were in Iowa when I came 
in 1833. Sarah Hilleary, wife of Alexander Hilleary. came with her father, William 
Morgan, in February, 1832." Perhaps nothing will better show the condition 
of these early times than the following letter, written, undoubtedly, by William 
R. Ross, as it appears in the Iowa Patriot of June 6, 1839: 

"REMINISCENCE OF THE EARLY SETTLERS OF BURLINGTON, I. T.. NO. i" 

"Mr. Edwards : 

"At your request, and believing that a brief sketch of the first settlement of our 
county would be of interest to the readers of your paper, I communicate the 
following: I arrived at what was formerly called Flint Hills, now the City -1 
Burlington, in August, A. D. 1833, at which time everything was in a rude stale 
of nature; the Indian title to the lands being extinguished the first of June pre- 
vious. The only white persons that I found residing in or near the place on 

Vol. 1—4 



50 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

which Burlington has since been laid out, were Messrs. M. M. McCarver and 
S. S. White, who had settled here, previous to the extinguishment of the Indian 
title, with their families, suffering all the privations and difficulties attending the 
settlement of a wilderness country, which were great and not a few of them. 
Frequently without bread or meat, only such as the God of nature supplied the 
country bountifully with, wild honey, venison, fish and vegetables, in addition 
to which, they were driven from their newly finished cabins, which were fired and 
burned down by the soldiers from Rock Island, as ordered by the Government 
to remove the settlers from lands yet owned by the Indians. Much credit is due 
to these citizens for their enterprise, having made the first claim, and established 
the first ferry that enables emigrants to cross the great Mississippi into this newly 
found land, and endeavoring to make them as comfortable as circumstances would 
admit. A short period after they had made their claim, they sold one-third of 
their interest to Air. A. Doolittle, who went to improve : but did not become a 
citizen until the early part of the year 1834. In the fall of A. D. 1833. William 
R. Ross brought a valuable stock of goods here, with his household furniture at 
great hazard and much expense, accompanied by his aged father, who had fought 
through the Revolutionary war, and who was one of the first settlers of Lexington, 
Ky. Worn down with toil and age, and being exposed to the inclemency of a 
new home, the old gentleman was carried off the same fall with chills and fever ; 
and now lies beneath the sod on the topmost pinnacle of our city; the first white 
person buried in this section of the 'new purchase.' Late in the same fall, Maj. 
Jeremiah Smith landed with a fine stock of goods, having some time previously 
settled and improved the farm on which he at present resides, about i l / 2 miles 
from Burlington. Having given a history of all the permanent settlers of what 
is now called Burlington, in 1833, I will now state a circumstance concerning the 
natives. Burlington had long been a great point of trade for the Indians, as 
would appear from the numerous old trading houses, root houses and number of 
graves that were all along the bank of the river, together with some that were 
deposited in canoes with their trinkets, and suspended in the trees; the canoes 
being made fast to the limbs by strips of bark. Among the rest was the noted 
French, or half-breed. M. Blondeau. who was interred immediately in front of 
the old storehouse of S. S. Ross, with palings around his grave, and the cross 
which bore his name cut thereon, he being a Roman Catholic. We had his 
remains removed and reinterred in the present burying ground for Burlington. 
This trade was somewhat valuable to the merchants of 1833; but the Government 
having purchased all their lands within our present surveyed boundary, and their 
natures and habits of life being so different from that of a civilized community, 
they had entirely removed beyond our western boundary, still pursuing the wild 
game for a livelihood. The original Town of Burlington (which should have 
been Shok-ko-kon, the English of the Indian title Flint Hill) was draughted and 
surveyed by Benjamin Tucker and William R. Ross, in the months of November 
and December, 1833. As I have been more lengthy than I expected in the outset, 
I will endeavor, in as concise a manner as the nature of the case will permit, to 
detail a few particulars in regard to the settlement of this county by that worthy 
class of our community, the farmers, who deserve the greatest applause for their 
unexcelled industry and perseverance. In October. 1832, there were some twelve 
or fifteen individuals who crossed the river in canoes, at the head of Big Island, 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 5] 

and landed at the claim of the Messrs. Smith, two miles below Burlington, and 
made an excursion a few miles around the edge of the timber in the lower prairie, 
laying claims for future settlement. But little was done by them, until February, 
[833, when they brought over their stock, and commenced building and cultivating 
the soil, but to their great detriment, and suffering, they were driven by the 
Government soldiers from Rock Island, across the river to Big Island, taking with 
them their implements of husbandry and their stock. Their cabins and fencing 
were set on fire and entirely consumed. Notwithstanding all this, and still resolute 
to hold on to their own homes, they held a council, and it was pretty unanimously 
agreed by vote, to stake their tents and build a flat boat to enable them to cross over 
the river as opportunity served, to pursue the culture and improvement of their 
claims. Many of those worthy individuals, after making a small improvement, 
have sold out at a trifling advance, to such as were more able and who preferred 
buying, to going back and taking up wild lands and improving them. There vet 
remain a few families of those that first settled here, who have deeds for their 
lands, from the Government, their farms being now under a high state of cultiva- 
tion. Being already too lengthy I defer giving you the extent of improvements 
made by the settlers of 1833, but will say, it was from ten to fifty acres in corn, 
and as the by-laws were enacted, in the fall of 1833, for the manner of improving 
and holding claims I will refer you to them for names and points. 

"A Citizen of Burlington." 

"REMINISCENCE OF THE EARLY SETTLERS OF BURLINGTON, No. I l" 

"After a very hard winter the river remained blocked till late in the spring. 
Then steamboats began to ascend and prosperity to come. Notwithstanding, 
we were, as supposed and expressed by some individuals beyond the Govern- 
ment of the United States, without law or gospel, we are governed by the principle 
which reigns in the breast of every American citizen, to do unto others as we wish 
they should do unto us, and among other particulars I would notice in passing, 
that there were a few of the fair sex who attracted the notice of the boys, but 
the question was, how could the nuptials be performed? As for my own part I 
was willing to be governed by the custom which prevailed, but not being satis- 
factory to all parties, we crowded the flat boat and paddled on the river to the 
opposite shore, and the ceremony was performed by Judge — — — , of Mon- 
mouth, Illinois, which was on the 3d of December, A. D. 1833. The parties 
were William R. Ross and Matilda Morgan. I presume the first couple that were 
united in wedlock in the Black Hawk Purchase. In the spring of 1834. the 
Black Hawk Purchase was attached to the Territory of Michigan for judicial 
purposes. The same spring public documents were sent to William R. Ross, from 
the Legislature of Michigan, at Detroit, containing instructions to notify the 
citizens throughout the county to hold elections to fill offices. An election was 
accordingly held in the fall. In the fall of [833 there was a schoolhouse built by 
William R. Ross on his claim, immediately back and adjoining the town claim as 
originally laid out; and a school went into operation in the spring of [834, of 
about sixteen scholars, taught by Zadock C. Inghram. There were considerable 
improvements; houses built, fencing done, and grain deposited in the ground in 
1833, and 1834. We were likewise supplied, in 1834, with a minister from Illinois, 



52 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 



specially licensed by Elder Peter Cartwright; his name was Barton Cartwright, 
a young man of promise. We were also visited in the summer by Elder P. Cart- 
wright, W. D. Trotter and Asa McMurty, who had a ten days' meeting and 
preached under a shady grove where there was a stand erected and seats pre- 
pared by the friends; all classes uniting in the worship of Almighty God. In 
this connection I will state that George W. Teas, a son of Maj. B. Teas, attended 
the fortieth reunion of the old soldiers of the Civil war at Burlington, on the 16th, 
17th and 18th of June, 1914, and stated that he was born on the first day of 
June, 1 838, in a hewn log cabin situated on the bank of Hawk-Eye Creek, near 
its mouth. He enlisted in the First Iowa Cavalry in 1861, and was a member of 
Company H. commanded by Daniel Anderson. Hon. Fitz Henry Warren was 
its first colonel. Major Teas moved from Burlington to Mount Pleasant in 1852. 
The above names compose but a small portion of the settlers of Old Des Moines 
County. We herewith set forth complete census report taken under the direction 
of Solomon Perkins, sheriff and censor, with its spelling. This census report 
bears date of August 15th, 1836." 

THE FIRST CENSUS OF THE 

ORIGINAL COUNTY OF DEMOINE, IOWA 

TAKEN IN JULY, 1836 

CENSUS OF DEMOINE COUNTY 



Males Females 

Names of Persons Under 21— Over 21 Under 21— Over 21 

Thomas Anderson 1 

Solomon Perkins 4 ■ 3 

Henry Parrish 2 

Benjamin Tucker 1 

Thomas Tucker 4 

Thomas Wyatt 2 

Joseph Morris 2 

Elias Riddli 1 

Isaac Medbaugh 

James Morris 3 

Francis Bennett 1 

Henry Smith 2 

Edward Goodwin 

Michael Shuck 

William Stewart 4 

Emery Sealy 

Cooper Harris 1 

John Franklin 1 

Richard Land 1 

Thomas Forrest 

A. G. Doom 2 



3 
2 

3 

1 
1 

r 
3 



1 
2 

1 
1 

3 
1 



Total 

(0 

4 

11 

6 

3 

10 
6 

5 
3 
2 
8 
3 
7 
2 

3 

10 
1 

4 
8 

7 
3 

4 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 



53 



Names of Persons 

Jacob Winters 

James Morgan 

1 [enry Walker 

Absolani Badgly 

John Garrison 3 

George Jackson 1 

William Greenwood 

George Jarvis 1 

James Frits 1 

Francis Hilery 3 

Jacob Shuck 3 

Martin Shuck 1 

Jessee Parrish 1 

George Gibson 3 

61 



Males Females 

Under 21- Over 21 Under 21 • 

4 
3 
3 



46 



3 
1 

2 
2 
2 

2 
3 

2 

3 
3 

59 



j 1 



37 



Total 

( 1 ) 
11 

7 
8 

7 
6 
6 

4 
6 

3 

7 

10 

4 
6 



204 



Names of Persons 

Isaac Basey 

Jonathan Moffitt . . . 

Francis Redin 

Abraham Harty . . . 
William Ihickhanan 

James Philpot 

Daniel Harty 

William Mires 

Solomon Osborn . . 
William Brown .... 
Jeremiah Buford . . 
Benjamin Box .... 

Charles Duke 

Samul Cole 

Robert Box 

William Smith .... 
George Sapingfield 
Minus Sapingfield . 

Jonas Grimes 

J. S. Hendrix 

Charles Merrill .... 

Stillmon Smith 

William Wright . . . 
Lewis Churchill . . . 
Amos Dunham .... 
Elijah Dunham .... 
John Spencer 





Alales 




Females 


Total 


Under 21 — Over 21 


Under 21 — Over 21 


(2) 


2 






3 I 


7 


1 






1 1 


4 


3 






2 2 


9-- 


1 








3 


1 








4 


1 








3 


2 






1 2 

2 1 


8 
4 


3 






3 ' 
3 1 
3 1 


8 

5 
6 


3 






4 1 


9 


2 






1 1 


5 


3 






2 1 


6 
2 






2 


1 1 

2 1 


4 
2 


1 






1 1 


4 


3 








5 


1 






2 1 


S 


1 








3 


1 






2 


4 


6 




2 


2 1 
1 


1 1 
2 


1 








3 


1 






1 1 


4 


4 






2 1 


8 



54 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 



Names of Persons 

John Wright 

Wilson Trent 

Jacob Emerson .... 
A. H. Haskell ....'. 
Jacob Westfall .... 
John Buckhart .... 
Henry Holston .... 
William Vanliligan . 



Males 


Females 




Total 


Jer 21 — Over 21 


Under 


21- 


— Over 21 


(2) 


I 2 


i 






2 


6 


5 3 


5 






3 


16 


i 










i 


i I 


i 








4 


3 i 


i 








6 


2 I 


3 








7 


2 


i 








4 


I 


3 








5 



52 



45 



52 



39 



Males Females 

Names of Persons Under 21 — Over 21 Under 21 — Ov 

Levi F. Larkin 1 

Elias M. Larkin 

John Parrel 1 

Michael Naddy 1 

Samuel Belem 4 

John Jackson 2 

Charles Borraus 1 

Wily Balland 4 

John McDonald 3 

Thomas McCee 3 

John Lorton 6 

Samuel Durham 

Stephen Rolsin 2 

William Lester 6 

James Lewis 1 

Belitha Griffith 2 

Richard Parker 4 

Elijah Grigery 2 

Aaron Richardson I 

John Helmish 2 

Silas Cartwright 

D. R. Chance 5 



3 
2 
1 

2 

3 
2 

7 

5 



er 21 


(3) 


2 


5 




1 


1 


6 


1 


5 


1 


8 


1 


4 


1 


7 


1 


9 


1 


7 


2 


14 


2 


US 


1 


3 


1 


5 




8 


1 


4 




4 


1 


7 


1 


4 


1 


3 


1 


7 


1 


2 


2 


9 



51 



27 



36 



23 



137 



Ennumeration made by S. Perkins sheriff 
and Censor D, C, W, T 



Males Females Total 

Names of Persons Under 21 — Over 21 Under 21 — Over 21 (1) 

Robert Avery 3 1 2 1 7 

J. S. Hollee 3 5 2 10 

Samuel Gory 1 2 1 2 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 



Names of Persons 

Milton Mitchell 

John Simpy 

John Kennady 

John Creswell 

Samuel Hollyday . . . 

J. H. Miller 

Aaron Usher 

Garrison Carman 

Elias Gibs 

Jacob Walker 

John Mofford 

J. G. Coleman 

Benjamin Car 

C. S. Burns 

Farrington Bartlow . . 
William Bartlow 
Samuel Cumstock . . . 

James Fugate 

John Knapp 

Lewis Huff 

William Sparks 

James Chambers 
Levi Chamberlain . . . 
William Chambers . . 

W. L. Clully 

Daniel Clully 

Mayo Cullin 

R. C. Ballard 

Anson More 

Mitchell Pace 

Joseph Pace 

James Wilkinson 



Berry Hurt 



Names of Persons 
Joseph Morrisson . . . 

John Wild 

Joel Smith 

Randolph Smith 

Peter P. Jones 

Isaac Briggs 

Josua Owen 

Sylvia Pain 



Males Females 

Under 21 — Over 21 Under 21 — Ove 

1 5 



1 
1 

2 
2 
2 

3 

5 
2 

5 
1 
2 

4 

7 

5 

5 

1 

1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
4 

72 



5 
3 

1 

3 
63 



2 
2 

3 
.3 

2 
2 

1 
1 

5 

1 

5 
1 
2 
2 
2 

5 
2 

3 
2 

3 
3 



69 
3 



21 



Males Females 

Under 21 — Over 21 Under 21 — Over 21 



3 

5 
6 
1 
2 

3 
1 



2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
1 
2 



1 
2 
1 

5 
1 
2 
7 



1 

1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
2 



55 

Total 
(I) 

7 

4 

9 
6 

12 

2 

5 

5 

4 

4 

9 

5 

9 

6 
1 1 

8 

9 

9 

6 

2 

9 

1 1 
10 

15 
4 
3 
5 
4 

9 
8 

3 
9 

245 



Total 
(1) 

7 

8 
10 
15 

6 

13 

3 



56 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 



Names of Persons 

George Herrin 

John S. Cotton 

David Driskal 

Abraham Hunsucker 
Hawkins Taylor . . . 

Isham Burton 

Levi L. Jackson .... 

J. J. Martin 

Stephen Perkins . . . 
Aantonia Swere .... 

Peter Lory 

Henry Miller 

Christopher Swan . . 

James Fike 

Abraham Hinkle . . . 
Zebidiah Hinkle .... 

Issac Xelson 

William Stewart . . . 
William Forrester . . 

Jessie Ruggles 

Edward Coon 

Joseph Howard .... 
Harrison Foster . . . 
William Howard . . . 
Lewis Pitman 



Males Females 

Under 21 — Over 21 Under 21 — Ov 



3 
3 

5 
4 

1 
1 

2 
1 



1 

4 



4 
1 

1 

5 

65 



3 
1 
1 
2 

3 

1 

3 
2 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

3 
2 

1 
1 
1 
1 

50 



3 
1 
1 

3 

1 

3 
4 
3 
4 



1 
2 

1 

3 
4 
3 
3 
2 
2 
6 
3 

72 





Total 


er 21 


(1) 


3 


1 1 


2 


6 




2 


1 


10 




6 


1 


5 


1 


6 


2 


10 


1 


8 


2 


8 


1 


2 




1 




1 


1 


4 


1 


8 


1 


2 


1 


3 


1 


7 


1 


6 


1 


8 


1 


8 


1 


8 


1 


5 


1 


9 


1 


10 



37 



221 



Names of Persons Under 

Robert McCulla 

Peter Russull 1 

Michael H. Walker 1 

Isaac Renfro 4 

William McCulla 2 

Creth Renfro 2 

Jesse Johnson 2 

Samul Harris 5 

John Wilson 

W. G. Coop 2 

David Coop 3 

John Huff 1 

James Lardman 2 

S. S. Walker 

George Jackson 2 

Tacob Pehler 



Males Females 

!i — Over 21 Under 21 — Over 21 



3 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

3 
1 
2 
1 
r 

5 
2 
1 
1 





Total 


:r 21 


(» 


2 


5 


1 


5 


1 


5 


1 


8 


1 


5 


1 


7 


1 


4 


1 


13 




1 


2 


X 


1 


5 


1 


3 


1 


12 


1 


3 




3 




1 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COI \ J V 



57 



Males 
Names of Persons Under 21 — Over 2] 

William Rolin 1 

Ezekiel Kirk 1 

Bartlet Kirk 1 

Amos Lemon 3 2 

Jehu Carter 2 2 

Alary Masterson 1 

Robert Stanly 2 1 

Henney Cole 1 

Alfred Stone 1 

Samuel Clark 3 2 

Thomas Clark r 

Lambert Morgan 1 

Levina Barnett 2 

Russell Turney 1 

James Hill 4 1 

Zacariah Stewart 1 

John Richards s 1 1 

S. M. Heddleston 1 4 

Jeriba Kirk 1 



Females 


Total 


nder -m ( >ver 21 


(2) 




I 




I 




I 


2 1 


8 


4 1 


9 


1 1 


6 




4 


2 1 


4 




1 


1 1 


7 


1 1 


3 




1 


1 


3 


1 1 


3 


4 1 


10 


1 1 


3 


1 1 


4 


2 1 


8 



49 



48 



40 



28 



163 



Names of Persons 

John Jones 

John Wintermoot 

Nathan Smith 1 

Edward Brisinell 1 

Yulincort Vanasdal 1 

Peter Bruso 

Henry Debuts 3 

William Skinner 2 

Edward Askin 

John Janes I 

David Brewer 

Matison Claton 

Samuel Xeadham 

Johnson Chapman 

Charles McVey 4 

Edly McVey 1 

Miles Driskal 1 

Joseph Carmack 2 

Linsey Ware 1 

Esekiah Cleavland 

Richard Hern 

G. M. Perkins 1 



Males Females 

Under 21 — Over 21 Under 21 — Over 21 

1 



3 
1 
1 

1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
6 

1 
2 
1 
3 



Total 
(3) 

3 
2 

6 

6 

4 
2 
6 
7 
3 
3 
2 

3 

x 

2 

7 
6 

5 
8 

3 

1 

7 

4 



58 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 



Males 
Names of Persons Under 21 — Ov 

Alexander Crookshanks 1 

Samuel Pascal 1 

William Walker 1 

John Taylor 3 

Daniel Neucum 4 

Solomon Jackson 5 

Solomon Fine 3 

Abraham Whitehead 

Alexander Magers 1 

Rosannah Martin 1 

William Sunvanul 

Ebenezar Hargen 

Stephen Scott 4 

G.W.Clark 







Females 


Total 


er 21 


Under 21 — Over 21 


(3) 


1 




1 


3 


1 




1 1 


4 


2 






4 


1 




3 1 


8 


2 




3 ^ 


11 


2 




1 


8 


1 




2 i 


7 


1 






2 


1 


, 


2 


4 






2 1 


4 


2 




3 1 


6 


1 




1 


2 


1 




1 1 


7 


1 




. . 1 


2 



44 



44 



47 



35 



170 



Names of Persons 
William Anderson . . . 

Aaron White 

William Lucas 

John Craig 

Thomas Small 

Thomas Small 

A. H. Harrison 

James Killgore 

Datas Benton 

Frederic Bachelor . . . 

Joseph Ervin 

George Sheperd 

William Ledly 

John Stevison 

William Sheperd 

David Tade 

Nathan Underwood . 

John Tade 

Peeter Barb 

Hepsey Aldrage 
John Fornsworth . . . 

Joseph Swoop 

H. A. Davis 

J. L. Lorton 

Daniel Mckinsey 

Abraham Jago 

James Pedago 



Males Females 

Under 21 — Over 21 Under 21 — Over 21 



1 

1 

3 
4 



3 
1 

4 
1 

4 

1 
2 

1 



4 
1 
2 
4 

1 

1 



4 
3 

1 
2 



Total 

(4) 
8 

7 
6 

9 
9 
3 
3 
1 
2 
2 
5 
5 
2 

4 
9 
9 
1 
6 

7 
8 
2 

4 
6 

3 

1 
1 
7 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 



Names of Persons 

John I lanes 

Samuel Fisher 

Thomas Dickey .... 
Mathew Spierlock . 

Charles Lewis 

Asa Webster 

Leviver Moreland . . 

John Wild 

Solomon McCound . 



Males Females 

Under 2i — Over2i Under 21- Ove 



4 
1 
2 

5 




2 
2 

3 
1 
2 
1 
2 
2 



-'i 



59 

Total 

(4) 

1 1 

5 

6 

10 

3 

5 

4 
7 
6 



5i 



48 



55 



33 187 



Names of Persons 
Nathanel Knapp 

John Granter 

G. L. Dagett 

G. B. Wheeler 

Thomas Scott 

Henry Rockley 

W. G. Terrill 

Enod Gilbert 

W. N. Shaw 

Thomas Williams . . . 

John Bernett 

George Taylor 

W. Zilert 

Sarahann Taylor . . . 
Alfred Kennady 

Jacob Cutler 

John Silas 

J. H. Knapp , 

G. J. Wood 

John Mable 

J. Fenton 

James Crago 

Philo Dodge 

Martin Brogid 

Henry Hawkins .... 
Benjamin Grines . . . 
William McAntire . 

Edward Dyle 

James McCutchan . 

J. A. Drake 

Elexander Perry . . . 
Edward Guthery . . 



Males 
Under 21 — Ove 
2 



Females Total 

21 Under 2 1 — Over 21 (5) 

3 1 



2 
6 
2 

3 

1 
1 
1 
1 
4 



60 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 



Males 



Females 



Names of Persons 

Micagy Pool 

Anton Mitindoff . . . 
Bennett Hillmon . . . 



Under 21- 



-Over2i Under 21- 
i 
i 
i 



-O 



er 2i 



36 



Males Females 

Names of Persons Under 21 — Over 21 Under 21 — Over 21 

Charles Perry 6 

James Hartly 2 6 

Hopden Ratin 

Michael Ferrin 

Michael Puncher 

William Sawtle 1 2 1 

J. O. Neal 1 3 

J. D. Shaw 2 1 1 

J. C. Cutler 1 4 

Arthara F. Aldradge 1 1 2 

N. C. Steel 12 3 

Smith Mathews 

J. B. Crook 

Thomas Shepherd 

Joseph Skinner 

Jacob Wiler 

Lorenzo Ballard 3 2 

Nathan Connerad 1 1 2 

J. J. Farris 1 3 

David Haver 

L. B. Parker 2 

Calvin Dillan 3 

Cyrus Pegg 

Moses Stone 

Horatio McCardel 3 

Collins McCardel 

Reubin Wright 6 2 1 

Benjamin Thomas 1 1 

William Richer 1 1 1 

Thomas Young 3 

Cannuel Gilmer 1 1 3 

John Box 6 1 1 

E. A. Ayres 1 3 1 

R. A. Palmer 2 

Emily Stewart 1 . . 1 



Total 

(5) 
1 
1 

1 

66 

Total 

(6) 

7 

9 
2 
1 
1 



36 



61 



35 



25 



4 
5 
6 
6 

5 

16 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
6 
5 
5 
1 

5 
6 

4 
1 

7 

1 

10 

3 

4 
5 
6 

9 
6 

3 
3 

157 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

Males Females 

Names of Persons Under 21 — Over 21 Under 21 — Ove 

Allen McQuary 

James Taylor 

Eli Wily 1 3 

Thomas Wilks 1 1 

John Draggoo 4 2 4 

Benjamin Warren 3 1 1 

Paul Bratten 5 1 2 

Micagy I!. Rolin 

Anthony A. Pruett 1 

Henry Moss 3 

William Warren 

James Bradly 2 1 4 

Thomas I lowel 4 1 2 

Mathias Anderson 8 2 2 

Lewis Cass 

J. R. Sparks 3 

Isaac Holmes 

Rohert Swan 

Thomas Brown 

J. W. Swan 

M. T. Mathers 

John Henderson 

Aaron Street 1 

Mary Pew 3 

Isaac Pigion 1 

Aaron Street 2 

Peter Dover 1 

Jeremiah Huntly 

Isaac Edwards 4 

Joel Bernett 

Robert Gillingwater 

Lewis Watson 

Thomas Wright 

James Welch 

James Mallett 

I liram Young 



5 
5 
3 
3 
5 
2 

68 



39 



1 
1 
6 
1 

1 

5 

2 

2 

1 



44 



Names of Persons 

James Davis 

George Smith 

James Whitely 

John Morris 

John Whitely 



Males Females 

Under 21 — Over 21 Under 21 — Ove 



-•1 



21 



61 

Total 

(7) 
1 

1 

5 

4 

1 1 

6 

9 

1 

4 
7 
3 
8 
8 

13 

1 

7 



4 
5 

10 
6 



2 
9 

9 
6 
6 
8 

4 

182 

Total 
(8) 

7 
2 
1 

4 
4 



62 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 



Names of Persons 

Andrew Turner 

Elijah Turner 

Washington Lewis . 

James Richer 

James Aken 

Joel Westen 

William Remett . . . 
Michael Simmons . 

Daniel Allsup 

John Russ 

David Kindred 

Thomas Kindred . . . 

Elijah Buntin 

Sarah Thomas 

Rohert Simmons . . . 
Samuel Simmons .. . 

J. P. A. Box 

H. C. Smith 

C. B. Beber 

T. M. Clark 

John Burns 

William Brown .... 
Abraham Clark 
Henry Woodard . . . 

C. C. Perry 

J. C. Casibear 

Jonathan Simmons . 
Amos Yandover . . . 

Gideon Clinith 

Asbury Simmons . . 
E. N. Low 



Males Females 

Under 21 — Over 21 Under 21 — Over 21 

3 1 2 

1 

1 

324 

1 1 1 



3 
3 
1 

3 
5 
2 
2 
6 



1 
2 

2 

3 

7 



Total 

(8) 

7 

3 

3 

10 

4 
1 
1 
2 

2 

1 

5 

3 

13 

3 

5 
2 

6 

7 

3 

7 
10 
11 

4 

10 

2 

5 
6 
6 

3 
4 

7 



52 



37 



50 



35 



Males Females 

Karnes of Persons Under 21 — Over 21 Under 21 — Over 21 

John Romp 1 

Henry Midindof I 

W. K. Patrick 1 1 2 1 

T. K. Patrick 1 r 1 1 

C. E. Stone 1 

J- L. Stone 1 

James Foggy 6 2 1 1 

David Casibeare 3 1 .. 1 

William Dodds I 2 I I 

Orvin Collfield 2 1 1 1 



r 74 

Total 

(9) 

1 

1 

5 

4 

1 

1 
10 

5 

5 

5 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COl \ IV 



Names of Persons 

Edward I 'edago i 

Timothy Fox i 

Lewis Epps 

Curtis Shed 

H. F. Hills 

F. A. Hills 

Samuel Houston 

J. B. Fletcher 

Samuel Combs 4 

Jacob Wily 

Michael Smith 2 

J. O. Smith 3 

Josua Wright 5 

Joseph White 3 

Samuel Ross r 

A. P,. Welch 

William Tiffin 

Jesse Wilson 

J. M. Gillan 

Preston Tilford 

Samuel Hesler 

John Davison 6 

James Cordle 2 

Elijah White 

John White 

Joseph Douglass 2 



Males Females 

Under 21 — Over 21 Under 21 — Over 21 



3 

4 



63 

Total 
(9) 

5 
5 



1 
1 
1 

1 

7 
2 

5 
7 
8 

5 
6 
2 

1 

3 

1 
1 
2 
1 1 
8 
1 
1 
4 



44 



41 



23 



2 3 



Names of Persons 

Samuel Conck 

Augustin Horton .... 
Elizabeth Whitney . . . 

James Williams 

John Gandy 

Nathan Cannady 

J. P. Dunmvidy 

Abraham Foster 

Richard Dunn 

Theophilus P.ullard . . 

Peter Perkins 

Hugh Wilson 

George Wilson 

Archibald Montgomery 
Henry Hillman 



Males Females 

Under 21 — Over 21 Under 21 — Over 21 



4 
1 

1 
1 
1 

3 

2 
1 
2 
1 

3 

1 

1 
2 



2 
2 
2 

4 
1 
1 
1 



131 

Total 

(10) 

10 

6 

5 

1 

10 

4 
10 

s 

1 1 


8 
7 
4 
1 

4 



64 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 



Males 
Names of Persons Under 21 — Over 21 

Bennett Sands 1 

J. H. Camp 1 1 

J. A. Shin 2 

William Meak 1 

Robert Roberts 1 

John Billips I 

Stephen Bertis 6 7 

Robert McEIvanion 4 1 

Stephen Yinven 1 

Abner Tibbets 2 1 

Jacob Snoderly 4 3 

William Williams 1 

T.W.Taylor 3 6 

Samuel Brily 1 5 

James Brily 1 1 

Likum Aldrage 1 

Alexander Hood 1 

William Price 1 5 

William McBride 1 2 

J. R. Cambell 2 5 

Jesse Grotom 1 



60 



72 



Females 


Total 


der 21 — Over 21 


(10) 


1 


2 


1 1 
1 


4 
3 

1 




1 


. . 


1 


1 1 
1 


14 
7 
2 


3 1 


4 

11 

1 


1 1 
1 1 


11 
8 


1 1 

4 1 

1 1 

2 1 


3 
3 
6 
8 
6 


2 2 


11 




1 


43 28 


203 


Total.. 1 


.654 



CENSUS OF THE WESTERN PART OF DES MOINES COUNTY, WISCONSIN TERRITORY, AS 
TAKEN BY H. bXTEMAN, DEPUTY SHERIFF 



Names of Heads of 
Families and Ages 

Jonas Daney 

Widow Lowry 

Ezekiel McCarty 

James Alfrey 

William Brattan, Jr. . . 

Jacob Crow 

Lewis Crow 

Lewis D. Kent 

John Crow 

Joseph A. Swasey.... 

William Brattan, Sr. .. 

Charles Davis 

Crittenton Terquin . . . 

Richard W. Jones 

Robert Littleton 



Males 






Females 


Total 


er 21- 


-Over 21 


Under 


21 — Over 21 


(0 


4 




2 


3 




1 


10 


3 






2 




1 


6 


2 




1 


2 




1 


6 


6 




2 


4 




1 


13 


1 




3 


2 






6 


2 




1 


2 






5 


3 




2 


1 




1 


7 


1 




1 


1 






3 


4 




1 


2 




1 


8 


1 




2 


. . 




1 


4 


1 




4 


2 




1 


8 


5 




1 


3 




1 


10 


2 




1 


3 




1 


7 


1 




1 






1 


3 






1 


2 




1 


4 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 



Names of Heads of 
Families and Ages 

William Jordan 

William Williams 

Tilford Reed 

John Maxwell 

Abraham Goodwin 

Abel Galland 

Henry Bateman 

Edward Y. Williams 

Abington Johnson 

John Webb 

James Smith 

Edward Cochram 

Nathaniel Dews (under 21 two 

blacks) 

Henry Lile 

Isaac Q. Nowell 

John Moore 

Samuel C. Reed, Esq 

William Newell 



Males Females 

Under 21 — Over 21 Under 21 — Over 21 



2 

3 
2 
2 
1 

1 

3 



Names of Heads of 

Families and Ages 
No. brought over from 1st page. 

Charles Price 

William Bogart 

Thomas Goodall 

II. G. Turney 

William Phelps 

Wharton McPherson 

John Patchett 

Ashbel Van Sihock 

John Tolman 

Andrew Spivy 

James Baker 

Henry Green 

Ishem Keeth 

James Sturdy van 

James William Baker 

Min Williams 

Robert Moffit 

John Risk 

John Welch 

John Moffit 

Isaac Reed 

Vol. 1—5 



3 
2 

7 

5 
2 



No. carried over jt, 



1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 

3 

1 
1 
1 
1 
I 

1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 

45 



Males 
Under 21 — Over 21 



73 
2 

3 
3 
1 
2 



1 
2 

2 

5 

3 
2 

2 

2 
2 



45 
1 

1 
2 

1 
5 

3 

2 

3 

4 
1 
2 

1 

3 

1 
1 
r 
1 

3 

2 

1 
1 



1 
2 
1 

3 
1 

3 
2 

2 

1 
1 

1 
3 
3 

2 
2 



57 



29 



Females 
Under 21 — Over 21 



57 
2 



1 
r 
4 



2 

7 
3 

5 

4 

3 
1 



29 



65 

Total 
(1) 

4 

4 

5 

5 

7 

6 

8 

4 

7 

2 

3 
6 

6 

7 
12 

2 
10 

6 



204 



1 
2 



Total 
(2) 
204 
6 

5 
8 

3 

9 

4 

10 

3 

6 

6 
12 
10 
14 

4 

8 

7 
5 
3 
2 

3 
7 



66 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 



Names of Heads of 

Families and Ages 
C. P. San ford, female (one black) 

Tiles O. Sullivan 

Ralph Parsons 

S. P. Ross 

James Smart 

Andrew Carter 

Charles Huddleston 

William Matthews 

James Lamb 

Samuel Claton 

Peter S. Wood 

John Goodwin 

Elijah Purdam 

David Ely 

William Brooks 



Males 
Under 21 — Over 21 



Females 
Under 21 — Over 21 
1 

3 

2 
2 
1 

3 
1 

3 
2 



4 
1 
1 



No. carried to 3d page 132 



no 



121 



66 



Names of Heads of 
Families and Ages 
No. brought over from 2d page. 

Peter Gillis 

Fraces Anson 

Henry Anson 

Isaac W. McCarty 

Edwar \ Powell 

Thorns Blankenship 

Hiram Brown 

Jesse Carl 

Woodson Blankinship 

John Neal 

Urial Neal 

James Sanders 

Obadiah Cook 

Irvin Wilson 

Joseph Maxwell 

P. K. Rice 

George Jackson 

Wm. M. Jacks 

James J. Jordan 

Joseph Rhodes 

John Moss 

John Newport 

Frances Martin 

Wm. F. Nelson 

Samuel T. Maxwell 



Males Females 

Under 21 — Over 21 Under 21 — Over 21 



13 s 



4 
1 
2 

4 
2 
2 
1 
1 



2 
1 

4 

2 
2 
3 

1 
2 



no 

1 
3 
5 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
r 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 

3 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 



121 



66 



1 
1 
1 

3 
2 
2 
2 



Total 
(2) 

3 

7 

6 

5 
6 
8 
3 
9 
4 
1 
8 
2 

19 

5 
3 



429 



Total 

(3) 
429 

4 
3 
13 
3 
7 
8 

5 
3 
6 

4 
2 

5 
3 

12 
6 
7 
5 
6 

3 
6 

7 
6 

T 

3 
7 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 



67 



Names of Heads of 
Families and Ages 

George W'hitall 

John Richards 



Males Females 

Under 21 — Over 21 Under 21 — Ovei 2] 

1 

1 1 



Citizens' Names 

Archibald Walters . 

Jacob Fiess 

John Shepherd .... 
Solomon Dover 
Abraham Dover . . . 
Richard Childers . . . 
John J. Wilson 
Wilson B. Clarke . . 

Jacob Burge 

Westley Prior 

John Sutton 

James Sutton 

Benjamin Sutton . . 

John Wilson 

Stephen Holes 

Richard Eubanks . . 

John Roberts 

John Terrell 

Thomas Clarke . . . 

Isaac l'.oen 

Christopher Heath . 
George Moffitt, Sr. . 
George Moffitt, Jr. . 
Samuel Peters .... 

Leven Caulk 

Ezekiel Cooper 
Benjamin F. Hutton 
Samuel Hutton 
Claibourne Jones . . 

William Lusk 

Benjamin Horton . . 
Johnson Hampton . 
Matthias Mintor . . . 

I liram Young 

Caleb Spencer 

Robinson Morris . . 
Joshua Hale 



Total 

4 
5 



179 l 5 l 


!5-2 




9* 


~?7S 


Males 




Females 


Tola 


Under 21 — Over 


21 Under 21- 


-Over 21 


(i) 


2 1 


2 




1 


6 


1 


1 
2 




1 


2 

4 


1 1 


2 




1 


5 


4 1 


4 




1 


10 


3 1 


2 




1 


7 

1 
1 


1 1 


3 




1 


6 


4 1 


4 




2 


1 1 


5 2 


1 




1 


9 


1 1 


3 




1 


6 




1 




1 


3 


2 1 


1 




1 


5 


2 1 


2 




1 


6 


1 1 


1 






3 


2 1 


3 




1 


7 

1 


4 1 


4 




2 


1 1 


1 1 


4 




2 


8 


3 1 


2 






7 


1 1 


2 






5 


1 1 








3 


1 1 


1 






4 
2 


2 1 








4 


1 1 








3 


5 1 


3 






10 


1 2 


2 

1 
1 






3 
3 


1 1 


3 






6 
4 


2 1 








4 

1 


1 1 


1 




1 


4 

1 



53 



40 



56 



33 



r82 



68 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 



Males 
Names Under 21 — Ove 

James J. Caldwell 1 

John Caldwell 

John A. Black 2 

Isaac Anderson 

John Morgan I 

John Mailey 

William Nash 5 

Thomas Caldwell 5 

Granville Gholson 

Levi Smith 1 

Nathaniel Scott 

Orval Portor 1 

William Williams 

Marshal Saunders 1 

Joseph Moon 2 

Robert Caulk 3 

Henry Caulk 

Henry Freedly I 

Jesse Burge 2 

Peter Hale 2 

William Hale 

Daniel Morris 1 

John- Hale 3 

Isaac Morris 2 

Ezekiel Hale 

Absolem Cornelius 6 

Israel Chamness 

William Manly 

John Duke 1 

William Dodds 1 

J. D. Payne 2 

Robert Patton 3 

Matthew Latta 2 

Mason Wigginton 1 

Jacob Rexrout 2 

Abraham Sells 1 

William Parker 3 

John Bailey 3 



Females 

21 Under 21 — Ove 

2 

1 



1 

3 

4 
3 

1 
1 



2 
2 



1 
3 

1 

1 

3 
1 

1 

3 

2 



58 



42 



52 



34 



186 



Males Females 

Names Under 21 — Over 21 Under 21 — Over 21 

William O'Neill 3 3 2 1 

James McDole 1 1 2 1 

George Cole 1 • • 1 



Total 

(3) 

9 

5 
2 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 



69 



Names 
Harrison Brooks 
Christopher Ladd 

William Carries 

Joseph Johnson 

Joseph Pickum 

Simeon Drulard 

Phillip Huffman 

Xehemiah Jackson . . 
William Southard . . . 

Joseph Ralston 

Henry Arnett 

William Latta 

Toshua Clarke 

I sham Edwards 

Taulbird H. Edwards. 
Benjamin Clarke 
Reuben Westfall 
Ezekiel Blanchard . . . 

Nathan Rah 

Joseph Carter 

Job Carter 

John Anderson 

Thomas Blair 

David G. Blair 

Noah Parish 

Allen Elliot 

William Dupont 

Nathanial Prime 

Matthew Pace 

Reuben C. Mason 

Phillip Mascle 

W'illiam H. Lee 

Robert W. Lee 

Henry Sidenbinder . . 
Jacob Crane 



Males Females 

Under 21 — Over 21 Under 21 — Ove 
1 1 1 

1 
2 



3 
6 

2 

2 

4 

5 
2 

3 
1 



2 
3 
5 
2 
1 
4 
4 



Jesse Parish 1 



70 



50 



1 
1 
3 
3 
1 
1 

1 
1 



3 
2 
1 
4 
3 
1 

5 
2 

1 



1 

4 



3 
2 

3 
3 
3 



60 



21 



39 



Total 

(3) 
4 
4 
4 

1 

3 

4 
6 
6 
7 
4 
4 
3 
3 
5 
3 
4 

9 
10 

6 
9 
9 
9 
9 
7 
4 
2 

3 
3 
8 

5 
8 

7 

5 

10 

9 
6 



219 



Males Females 

Names Under 21 — Over 21 Under 21 — Over 21 

Phillip B. Harrison 2 

Joseph Derben 1 3 

Richard Slauter 1 4 2 2 

John Spence 2 . . 1 

Jacob Rinearson 2 4 I 1 



Total 

(4) 
2 
6 

9 
3 
8 



70 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 



Males Females 

Names Under 21 — Over 21 Under 21 — Over 21 

Isaac H. Rinearson 1 2 

William Luster 6 1 

William Walters 2 2 

Robert Cusley 6 1 

Oliver Pollock 3 1 

Jesse Thomas 5 2 

John Williford 1 1 

James Williford 2 2 

Baily Williford 1 2 

Thomas Tucker 2 1 

John Laughlin 2 1 

Claibourne Wright 1 1 

John H. Randolph 1 

John M. Menefee 1 2 

W. L. Jenkins 1 

Presley Saunders 1 3 

Keeling T. Maulding 3 1 

William M. Morrow 2 1 

Jesse Hancock 2 

Samuel Nelson 2 2 

M. G. Wood 1 . 

Louis Morgan 2 

Moses Shirley 2 

Lampton Tucker 1 2 

Vordre Matthews 1 

Martin Tucker 2 2 

Randolph Casey 1 

John Phillips I 1 

Mary Johnson 4 

Tible Hughes 3 1 

George Walters Sr. . '. 1 

George Walters, Jr 1 2 

Thomas Stout 2 1 



1 

1 

5 
2 
1 
3 
3 
2 



2 
2 

3 
1 

2 

1 
1 

1 



1 
6 

1 

1 
3 
3 
2 





Tota 


er 21 


(4) 


1 


5 
8 


2 


11 


1 


10 


1 


6 


I 


11 


1 


6 


2 


8 


I 


4 


I 

I 


4 
6 


I 


5 




1 


2 


8 


I 


3 
6 


I 


5 


I 


5 


I 


3 
6 


I 


2 




2 


■ 


3 


I 


10 


. 


1 


2 


7 


I 
I 


3 

6 


I 


8 


I 


7 


I 


2 


I 


4 


I 


4 



59 



62 



5i 



36 



208 



Names 
Elisha Walter .... 
George Sizemore . 
James McCoy .... 

Isaac Jordan 

Abraham Updegraff 
William Updegraff 
Daniel Edmunds . . 
D. C. Ruberts .... 



Males Females 

Under 21 — Over 21 Under 21 — Over 21 



1 
1 

3 
2 



Total 

(5) 
4 
6 
6 

5 

5 
2 

1 

1 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 



Males 
Names Under 2 1 — Ove 

Washington L'pdegraff 

Berryman Jones 2 

Richard Shockley 1 

John D. Wood 1 

Joseph Smart 

William Dotson 

Elijah Hilton 

John Bullock 

1 Iopkin Williams 2 

John Ristine 

Adam Ritchie 3 

Zacharia Wilbourne 1 

William Morris 

John Fariss 2 

Robert Wilson 

A I oscs Shirley I 

Wilson Soule 1 

Tatam Hancock 

David Smith 1 

Stephen Rose 

Samuel Heaton 

Riley Gar rem 1 

Hezekiah Lee 2 

Frederick Lee 3 

Jacob Pricket 2 

Elias Lee 

James McCracken 1 

Phillip Ballard 

William Miller 5 2 

Abraham Miller 1 



39 



j 1 



Females 

Under 21 — Over 21 



46 



Males 
Names Under 21 — Over: 

John McKee 2 1 

John Hartman 2 1 

Benjamin Carr 3 1 

Moses Priest 3 1 

Robert Wasson 5 2 

Joseph Wasson 1 

William Shover 4 1 

Abraham Smith I 3 

Abner Hacklemon 2 2 

Obediah Archer 2 1 

Rhomas Ratliff 2 1 



2 

1 

1 
3 
3 
2 
1 
3 



5 
6 



55 



33 



Females 

Under 21 — Over 21 



2 

3 
4 
1 



71 

Total 
(5) 

3 

7 
5 
4 
1 
1 
1 
2 
7 
5 

13 
6 

3 

4 
4 

4 

5 
3 
3 
3 

5 
6 
6 



14 



i73 



Total 
(6) 

5 
6 
8 
6 
10 
2 
8 
8 

5 
4 



72 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 



Names Under 21- 

John Henderson 4 

Daniel Duvall 

Washington Light foot 1 

Francis Lightfoot 

Amos Dunham 1 

Elijah Dunham 

Lyman Chace 2 

Richard B. Davis 1 

Chauncy Beeman 2 

William Parker 3 

John Bailey 3 

Stephen Cole 1 

Edward Pickum 1 

Elijah Townsend 

James McGuffa . .'. 

Thomas Gilleland 1 

Angelo Driskall 

David Laswell 

James Hatcher 2 

Rolla Driskall 4 

Gideon B. Alexander 

Robert Williams 3 

Wright Williams 

Thomas Stoddard 

Joshua Swank 4 

Westley Swank 

William Milligan 5 



les 


Females 




Total 


Over 21 


Under 21- 


—Over 21- 


-(6) 


1 








6 


2 


1 






4 


1 


1 






4 


2 


1 






4 


1 








3 


1 


1 






3 


4 


1 






7 


1 


1 






4 


2 


2 






7 


1 


3 






8 


1 


2 






7 


1 


1 






4 


3 








4 


1 








1 


2 


3 






6 


1 


7 






10 


1 








2 


1 


. . 






1 


2 


1 




2 


7 


1 


3 




3 


11 


2 


2 




2 


6 


3 


3 




1 


10 


1 


1 




1 


3 


2 






1 


3 


1 


3 




1 


9 


1 


2 






3 


1 


1 




1 


8 



64 



56 



57 



39 2I 6 



Males Females 

Names Under 21 — Over 21 Under 21 — Over 21 

David Russell 1 2 1 

William Creighton 2 

Rufus P. Burlingame 5 

Hannah Smith 3 . . 2 

Jeremiah Smith, Sr 7 2 2 

Samuel Smith 1 3 1 

David L. Davis 2 1 

James C. Reed 1 1 

Rodney Arnold 2 1 2 

Jesse Johnson 1 



Total 

(7) 

4 

4 

5 

6 
12 

7 
4 
2 
6 
2 



14 



19 



10 



52 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 



73 



Whole Number 
Males Females 

Names Under 21 — Over 21 Under 21 — Over 21 

Harvey McFarlin I 2 

David Smith 1 1 

Hussetow Compton 3 2 1 

Anthony Potts 1 

Alexander Evans 2 1 1 

John Logan 1 

Jonathan Morgan 2 2 4 

Hezekiah Archer 7 1 2 

William Smith 2 1 1 

John R. Cochran 3 • 2 2 

Vincent Smith 2 1 

William Shuck 3 1 

Jonathan Casterline 4 3 3 

Israel Robinson 2 2 2 

John Wright I 2 I 

Daniel Chance 3 1 3 

Peter D. Smith 1 4 1 

Paris Smith 1 2 3 

James Anderson 1 1 

Noah Parrish 1 1 2 

John Bridges 3 9 4 

Robert King 3 1 2 

Samuel Hencely 1 1 

William M. Blankenship 2 1 2 

Ebenezer Riddle 1 1 

John Darbyshire 4 2 5 

Michael C. Harris 1 1 1 

Peter Smith 6 1 1 

Alexander Hilleary 2 2 

David Bolick 3 2 4 

Jesse Hunt 1 3 

John Hunt 2 1 3 

Anderson C. Wilson 1 2 

William Morgan 2 3 2 

Butler B. Delashmutt 3 2 1 

John Scott 1 4 

John J. Huber 1 5 

Robert H. Ivcrs 2 2 2 



1236 
Total 

(1) 
4 
3 
7 
4 
5 
1 

9 

1 1 

5 
8 

4 

5 
1 1 

7 
6 
8 
7 
7 
4 
5 
i/ 
7 
3 
6 

3 

12 

4 
10 

4 
10 

5 
7 
3 
8 

7 
6 
6 

7 



1.8 



68 



7i 



3' 1 



246 



Names 
Elias N. Delashmutt 
John Hammer 



Males Females Total 

Under 21 — Over 21 Under 21 — Over 21 (2) 
3 1 2 1 7 

2 1 3 1 7 



74 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 



Names 

Orien Carter 

Benjamin Simmons 
Stephen Gearhart . . 
Elijah Shockley . . . 
James Camron .... 
William Sunderland 

John Simpson 

Andrew Hagy .... 
Mathias Grimes . . . 

John Hodgen 

Lewis Elliott 

William Lamme . . . 
William Buckhanan 

Laben Hollen 

James Crutchfield . 
John R. Moore .... 

Joseph York 

Young L. Hughes . 

John Turner 

Claiborn Hughes . . . 
Jeremiah Cutbirth . 
Richard W. Gunn . 
Cornelius Conner . . 
Jackson Dolahite . . 

Levi Moffit 

Frederick Kesler . . 
Nicholas R. Teas . . 



Males Females 

Under 21 — Over 21 Under 21 — Ove 



George W. Teas 



Charles Teas 

Lefevre Moreland . . 

John Whitaker 

George Hepner 

John Haines 

Charles H. Snelson . 
Alexander Robertson 
Tohn Herrell 





1 


1 


3 


2 




1 


3 


2 


3 


1 


1 


3 


1 


3 


1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


2 


3 


1 


3 


2 


1 


5 


2 


4 


2 




1 


1 


2 


2 




2 


4 


2 


1 


1 




4 


1 


2 


2 


3 


1 


4 


1 


1 


2 


1 


2 


2 


2 


1 




1 


2 




2 


2 


2 


1 


4 




2 


5 




1 


2 


3 


6 


4 




1 


1 




4 






1 


3 


3 


2 


2 




2 


1 


4 


3 


3 




1 


1 


4 


1 


5 


3 


2 


2 


2 


1 


3 


3 


1 


3 



21 



Total 

3 
6 

7 
8 



8 

9 
11 

3 

5 

10 

3 



7 
6 
6 

5 
6 
8 
9 
5 
14 

3 
6 

5 
8 

4 
11 

2 
11 



78 



67 



40 



263 



Males 



Females 



Names Under 21- 

William Carpenter 3 

James Gipson 3 

Johnson King 4 

Reuben Chance 3 

Isaac Copple 



-Over 2 1 Under 2 1 — Ove 



2 

4 

3 
1 



21 



Total 

(3) 
7 
9 
9 
7 
4 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 



7.-. 



Names 
Daniel G. Cartwright 

Wilson Pitner 

1 fenry Lee 

Joseph Edwards . . . 

Jesse Ashlock 

Lewis A. Garrison . 

Tobias Moore 

William Moore .... 

John W. Teas 

Enoch Cyrus 

Elihu Chandler .... 
Hepsey Mathis .... 
Azariah Gregg .... 
Christian Eslinger . 
William D. Eakins . 

John Grimley 

Evan T. Lamb .... 
William Mathis . . . 

Jose Mathis 

John C. Chandler . . 
Elizabeth Hanby . . . 
Millington McHone 

Charles Lee 

Asa Ellison 

David Duke 

William Curry .... 
Richard Robinson . 
Samuel Brown .... 

Charles Duke 

John L. Hennis . . . 

Adam Smith 

Michael Miahs 

Zenus Grimes 



Males Females 

Under 21 — Over 21 Under 21 — Over 21 



7 


3 

1 


2 


1 


3 


2 


3 




4 


2 






2 






3 




3 
1 

1 


5 




3 


2 




2 


1 




1 


1 




1 


2 




3 


2 




7 


2 




3 


1 




2 


5 








2 


2 


2 




4 


1 






1 




1 


2 




7 


1 




1 


1 




2 


1 




3 




2 


2 


2 




1 


2 




1 


1 




1 


6 




4 


3 




4 


3 







78 



44 



78 



Males Females 

Names Under 21 — Over 21 Under 21 — Over 21 

George Satinfield 1 

Shelby Hendricks 1 1 

James D. Spearman 4 1 2 

Asa Lane 3 2 3 

Isaac Canterberry 1 2 2 

Leonard Abney 1 4 

John A. Lewin 7 1 3 

Enoch Sexon 1 1 



Total 

(3) 

'5 
1 

9 

9 
3 
4 
8 

3 
2 

10 

6 

3 

4 

8 

1 1 

9 

5 
7 

5 
8 
2 

4 
1 1 

4 

5 
6 

4 
5 
5 
4 
12 

9 

5 



38 238 





Total 


er 21 


(4) 


1 


2 


1 


3 


2 


9 


1 


9 


1 


6 


1 


6 


1 


12 


1 


3 



76 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 



Males Females 

Names Under 21— Over 21 Under 21— Over 21 

Jacob Sexon 1 

Ludlow Maxwell 2 

Jacob Wolf 2 

David Feace 

Anderson Ogle 

Arthur Inghram I 

William W. Chapman 2 

Jacob Feace 3 

Henry Emerson 1 

Benjamin Colston 2 

Daniel Strang 3 

Andrew Fouts 1 

David Pierson 1 

Absolam Leffler 4 

Jesse Frasher 1 

William E. Brown 

Michael Tromley 

George Leebrick 3 

George W. Hight 5 

Isaac Crenshaw 2 

Jeremiah Smith 3 

Samuel C. Agnew 1 

Royal Cottle 3 

Isaac Leffler 3 

John Pierson 6 

John Jackson 2 

Levi Scott 3 

Cary Keller 

Lewis Walters 2 

Francis A. Roe 1 



1 
1 
1 

1 

3 
4 
1 

3 
1 

1 
1 
6 
1 
1 

4 
1 
1 

4 
1 
2 

3 
1 

1 
2 
2 

1 

3 

1 

1 
1 



3 

4 
1 

3 
2 

1 

3 
6 



1 
1 

6 
1 

4 
4 
1 
2 

4 
5 
4 



5 

1 

3 
i 



Total 

(4) 
4 
4 

7 
6 

5 

9 

5 

8 

6 
10 

6 
11 

3 

7 

7 

2 

2 

13 

11 

6 

10 

3 

10 
11 
13 

4 
12 

3 

7 
3 



73 



65 



79 



40 



257 



Males 
Names Under 21 — Over 2 1 

Isaac Parsons 4 1 

John H. Benson 2 2 

William L. Toole 1 

Orien Briggs 2 2 

Christopher Shuck 4 2 

Elias Keever 2 

William Dunbar 1 

James A. Campbell 1 6 

James Magers 1 

John McClung 3 1 

John Ranken 1 2 



Females 

Under 21 — Ove 

6 



2 

2 

1 

1 ■ 

6 

3 

3 



Total 

21 (5) 
12 

5 
1 

7 
9 
4 
3 
14 
5 
8 

4 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 



77 



Names i 
James Erwin 
John Reynolds . . 
Thomas Kellow . . 
Robert Childers . 
George Umphrey 
Abraham McClary 
Levi Thornton . . 
Err Thornton . . . 
Silas Richardson 
Nathaniel Parson 
Samuel Shortridge 
Thomas Starks . . 
"William McClaren 
Joseph Crane .... 
William Starks . . 
Thomas M. Crane 
Samuel L. Crane 
Isaac Lathrop . . . 

John Cobb 

Silas Lathrop .... 
James W. Casey . 
John Vannetty . . 
Thomas Burdett . 
Adison Reynolds . 
Eli Reynolds .... 
James Davis .... 
John \Y. Furgason 



Males Females 

Under 21 — Over 21 Under 21 — Ove 

1 i 

3 
1 
1 

5 
2 

1 



2 


1 


I 


2 




1 


3 


2 


5 


4 




2 


4 


1 




4 




1 


4 


3 


3 


1 


1 


1 


4 


2 




1 


1 


2 




1 




1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


1 




6 




2 




3 


1 


1 


1 


1 




2 


2 


2 



21 



52 



71 



62 



Males Females 

Names Under 21 — Over 21 Under 21 — Over 21 

Asa Hughes 4 

Robert Balmford 2 

Jacob Kiser 1 

George Storms 3 

Williamson Daniel 4 

John Hesser 1 

Peter Hesser 1 

Benjamin Nye 

Henry Merry 2 

Benjamin Budd 

Smith Mounts 5 

Luce Severe 

William McCaffrey 3 

John D. Richey 1 



3 

1 
1 
2 

7 
6 
2 
2 



Total 

(5) 
6 

7 
2 

9 

'5 
5 
8 

5 

3 

11 

6 

5 
9 
4 
6 
2 

3 

4 
5 
7 
7 
5 
3 
4 
3 
3 
5 



38 223 



Total 
(6) 
10 

7 
4 
7 
19 
9 
5 
8 

4 

1 

12 

3 
8 



78 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 



Names 

Miram Mudgett 

Olover Blood 

Andrew Cable 

Joseph Mounts 

John S. Robinson . . . 
Archileus D. Parker 
Benjamin W. Clark . 
Adrian H. Devemport 
M. S. Devemport . . . 

John R. Brown 

William Lingo 

Athrel D. Camp 

David Sullivan 

Otho Devemport .... 

William Pool 

John Browning 

Rufus Ricker 

Young P. Barbee . . . 

Ira Cook 

William L. Cook . . . 

Ross Jones 

Levi S. Coalton 

James Franks 

Andrew Motts 



7 

2 
2 
2 
I 
6 

4 



2 

2 



6 
3 
3 

2 



Males Females 

Under 21 — Over 21 Under 21 — Ov 
2 1 

1 

5 2 

4 

1 
1 1 

4 2 

5 
5 
2 

8 
1 
3 

7 
11 

1 

5 
2 
2 

1 
1 

7 
1 
1 



1 

4 
3 

2 
1 

1 
1 





Total 


er 21 


(6) 




4 




2 




12 




7 




2 




3 




13 




9 







2 


6 


. 


8 


. 


1 


2 


1 


1 


14 




11 


1 


10 


1 


12 


1 


8 


2 


6 


2 


6 


2 


10 


1 


12 


1 


5 


1 


6 



68 



104 



64 



40 



276 



Males Females 

Names Under 21 — Over 21 Under 21 — Over 21 

Alexander M. Gredd 2 2 .. 6 

Aaron Brewer 3 1 1 1 

Reuben S. Searls 1 . . 1 

William Scudder 4 



I 



Total 

(7) 
10 

6 

2 

4 



Total amount of the county brought over. 



22 
1504 

1526 



BURLINGTON CENSUS 



Edward Marlow . 
James Clark 
Robert Cock 
Armstead Crump 
Theodoras Davis 
Tohn Davis 



6 


1 


1 


1 


9 


2 


1 


3 


1 


7 


2 


3 


2 


1 


8 




1 


1 




2 


1 


3 


3 


2 


9 


1 


1 


2 


1 


5 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 



Names 

Beden Davis 

Kendal Hosey 

James Davidson 

Jonathan J. King 

Aniri Dooliltle 

Win. P. Cowpersthwaite 
Thomas S. Reynolds . . . 

Charles Beal 

David G. McKnight 

William S. Keeler 

John Dunnigum 

David Harned 

John W. Travis 

Purnell Yeach 

Anderson Perkinson . . . 

Thomas Cooper 

Garretson Vincent 

William W'ade 

Joseph McNeil 

Daniel Harges 

William Walace 

John Harris 



Males Females 

Under 21 — Over 21 Under 21 — Ove 
2 1 2 

1 1 



4 


1 


3 


1 


4 


1 


3 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 




1 


1 


2 


2 


4 


3 


2 




1 


1 


1 


1 


4 


1 


2 


2 




5 


1 


2 




1 




2 




4 


5 


2 




3 


1 


5 


5 


6 
2 


1 


2 


3 


3 


1 


1 


3 


4 


1 


5 



2] 



VJ 

I otal 

(7) 
6 

3 
9 
8 

7 
3 
3 

TO 

6 
4 
7 
5 
9 
2 

7 

8 
10 
13 

3 

9 

6 

1 1 



60 



5o 



50 



28 



Total brought over. 



1714 
1714 



Names 

William Wright 

Gilbert Stinson 

Tohn Sampson 

William Lewis 

Morton M. McCarver 

Samuel S. White 

Jeremiah White 

Jonathan Farris 

Nathaniel Stringfield 
George W. Kelley 

Joseph Steel 

Thomas Jones 

Thomas Wilbur 

William Stockholm . . 
Zadok C. Inghram . . . 
Hiram C. Bennet . . . 



Males Females 

Under 21 — Over 21 Under 21 — Over 21 Total 



5 
4 
6 
6 
2 
2 



1 
2 

5 
4 

2 

2 
2 



2 
2 

I 
I 
2 



I 


8 


I 


14 


I 


12 


3 


7 


2 


7 


1 


5 


1 


5 


1 


3 


1 


4 


1 


2 


1 


6 


1 


5 


1 


3 


. 


2 


1 


8 



80 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 



Males Females 

Names Under 21 — Over 21 Under 21 — Over 21 Total 

Samuel D. Enocks 3 

George W. Cook 1 1 

Robert C. Kinney 29 

Samuel Kinney I 1 

Matthew Alvis 1 

William E. King 2 

Bryant Brown 1 1 

William R. Ross 2 

Sulifand S. Ross 4 4 

John Sackett 4 1 

Alexander Black 1 

L. N. English 3 1 

Robert Rolston 1 1 

John B. Gray 2 

Samuel F. Stephens 2 1 

Jonathan Donnell 1 3 

George H. Beeler 3 2 

Carter Wilkie 1 9 

James Wells 1 2 3 

Berry Holland 3 1 3 

Adam Funk 1 1 

David Rorer 2 1 2 



1 
2 
1 
2 
1 

3 

2 



4 
7 
7 



5 

5 

32 

5 
2 
6 
6 

3 

12 

10 

2 

12 

4 

4 

5 

5 

7 

12 

8 



3 
6 



64 



99 



61 



41 1979 



Males Females Total 

Names Under 21 — Over 21 Under 21 — Over 21 (9) 

Elliott H. Scott 1 1 2 4 

Smith Hawkins 3 1 1 1 6 

James B. Jones 2 2 1 5 

John Martin 3 2 . . 5 

Abraham Jones 4 7 2 1 14 

Matthew Ednuinson 2 2 1 5 

Nicholas Harman 4 .. 1 5 

John L. Eoff 1 2 1 4 

John C. Newton 1 1 1 1 4 

James W. Mitchell 2 4 .. 1 7 

William Boyd 1 2 1 1 5 



11 28 14 
No. brought up from pages 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 



11 



64 
1979 



Total 



.2043 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 81 

According to our computation this census reports : 

Males under twenty-one years of age i 8og 

Males over twenty-one years of age 1,789 

120 

Females under twenty-one years of age 1 628 

Females over twenty-one years of age 899 

729 

CITY OF BURLINGTON 

Total population 517 

Males under twenty-one years of age 135 

Males over twenty-one years of age 177 

Male population 312 

Females under twenty-one years of age 1 25 

Females over twenty-one years of age 80 

Female population 205 

The above census is approximately correct. There were at the time many per- 
sons living in now Lee and Muscatine counties whose names do not appear in the 
above report. Wright Williams, whose name appears in the above report, settled 
in what is now Louisa County. He was born in Crawford County, Indiana, and 
located in now Louisa County in 1836. He was the first county judge of Louisa 
County. Was active in all matters pertaining to the public welfare. Was one of 
the delegates to the first constitutional convention. Was a member of the first 
and second legislative assemblies of Iowa Territory. William L. Toole, whose 
name appears in the above census report, was a Virginian by birth. He came to 
old Des Moines County in 1836 and set up his Lares and Penates near the mouth 
of the Iowa River. Was a prominent man in all the affairs of Louisa County. 
Was a member of the board of county commissioners in 1838. Was a delegate 
to the constitutional convention of 1844. John Deihl and John Ronalds came to 
old Des Moines County in 1836 and settled in now Louisa County. Mr. William 
L. Toole in Annals of Iowa, 1868, says, "the first occupants of the district in 
Louisa County was in 1835, near the mouth of the Iowa River and near the 
ancient mounds and forts. Among those were Harrison, Chreighton, Deihl, 
Toole, McClary, Parsons, Benson and Shuck. They, like many of the first settlers 
of Iowa, impelled by the pioneering spirit, forsook friends and comforts and 
located here near the wigwams of those celebrated Indian chiefs, where hundreds 
of Indians could be seen engaged in their savage sports and occupations of hunt- 
ing and fishing. They became personally acquainted with Black Hawk, who was 
usually attired in citizens' dress. In this location, as in others, great strife and 
contention was kept up in those days through conflicting interests in claims, or the 
encroachments of unprincipled adventurers. Cabins were burned, torn down or 



82 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

unroofed, and the lives of persons frequently placed in jeopardy." As we pass 
along we come next to the territory comprising the now Muscatine County, which 
originally belonged to old Des Moines County. The first settlement made in 
this part of Des Moines County was by Benjamin Nye at the mouth of Pine 
Creek. At the close of the Black Hawk war a man by the name of Farnham, 
with two other men, settled at "Grindstone Bluff" and there erected a trading 
house. John Yanater was the first settler in the now City of Muscatine and a 
man by the name of G. W. Casey the second. Casey came to Muscatine in the 
spring of 1836. His wife died in the fall of the same year, and was the first 
white woman buried at Muscatine. In August, 1836, Suel Foster and his brother, 
Dr. John H. Foster, purchased a one-sixth interest in the town lots of a claim 
which Mr. Vanater and Captain Clark had caused to he surveyed and platted. 
Captain Clark then lived at Clarks Ferry, subsequently called "Buffalo." At the 
old settlers' reunion of Muscatine, held on August 30, 1898, there were present 
the following pioneers, who were residents of now Muscatine County, when its 
territory was a part of old Des Moines County. Mrs. Laura Patterson, daughter 
of Benjamin Nye, 1834; Mrs. Moses Gouch, 1836; Hiram Jarrard, 1836; Mrs. 
A. T. Banks, 1836; Mrs. W. A. Duray, 1836; James Keefover, Sr., 1S36; James 
Keefover, Jr., 1836; Mrs. Nabugal, 1836; Edward Clark, 1836. We cannot pass 
by and fail to record the name of one of the mothers, an early settler in old Des 
Moines County. We take the following from the Hawk Eye, June 3, 1883: 

DEATH OF A PIONEER MOTHER 

"While the town is crowded with the people gathered to celebrate the first 
half century of our history, and to commemorate the coming of the first white 
settlers to this place, one of the first settlers was slowly passing away from the 
scenes that have so wonderously changed since her foot first stepped upon this 
soil. Mrs. John G. Bosch came to this city in 1833 with her first husband, Francis 
T. Bercht, a German carpenter, who was accidentally killed in 1853. August 21, 
1853, she married John G. Bosch, the brewer, and, with the exception of three 
trips to Europe and other health resorts in this country at which she sought 
relief from severe rheumatic trouble of eleven years' duration, she has lived in 
this city, where she died last Sunday morning at the residence of her daughter, 
Mrs. Theodore Waldschmidt, 604 South Main Street. The deceased was well 
known and admired for her amiable character, and though weakening unto death, 
the venerable pioneer mother thought of the celebration and expressed a desire to 
be with her old friends of early days. She was born October 10, 1810, in Wurtem- 
burg, came to Florida in 1825, removed to Burlington in 1832, married Frances 
T. Bercht in 1833. Two children, Mrs. Theodore Waldschmidt of this city and 
Charles Bercht of East St. Louis, are her surviving children." 

As far as obtainable we here give the names of pioneers who came to the 
now Des Moines County when it was a part of old Des Moines County. 



Anderson, James A., April 11, 1836 Archer, Hezekiah 

Avery, Robert, 1836 Avery, Henry, 1836 

Archer, Obadiah 




CHRISTIANA BERCHT 



HISTORY OF DBS MOINES CO! MY 



83 



B 



Blair, M. W., May 9, 1836 
Brown, William, Nov. 19, 1834 
Bolick, David 
Bennett, Herman C. 
Blair, Thomas, 1834 
Blair, David E., 1834 
Beal, Charles 
Brown, Bryant 
Boyd, William 
Bridges, John 
Bridges, Solomon, 1834 
Blanchard, Ezekiel, 1835 



Beeler, George II. 
Bridges, John 
Black, Alexander 
Ballard, John, 1836 
Berry, W. C, 1835 
Bane, William, 1836 
Brown, Morton, 1836 
I Hake, Frances, 1836 
Ballard, John, 1833 
Berryman Jenkins, 1833 
Bercht, Frances T., 1833 
Bercht, Mrs. Frances T., 1833 



Canterbury, Isaac, 1833 
Crenshaw, Isaac, 1833 
Clark, James 
Clark, B. W., 1835 
Calkins, Serena, 1834 
Clark, F. L., 1836 
Chuff, Dr. John, 1834 
Cock, Robert 
Crump, Armstead 
Cowpersthwaite, Wm. P. 



Cooper, Thomas 
Cook, George W. 
Carter, William 
Cameron, James 
Chapman, William W. 
Carter, Job, 1834 
.Carter, Joe, 1834 
Chreighton, W. H., 1835 
Cartwright, Rev. Daniel, 1836 



D 



David, Barton B., Aug., 1836 
David, John S., May, 1835 
Donnell, Jonathan, June 1, 1834 
Dorn, Paul, Nov., 1836 
Duval, D. J., 1835 



Driskell, Angello, 1835 
Dovell, Thomas, 1833 
Doolittle, Amzi, 1833 
Delashmutt, E. N., 1834 



English, L. N. 
Edmonson, Mathew 
Eoff, John L. 



Enocks, Samuel D. 
Elliott, Allen 



Farris, Jonathan 
Funk, John Adam, 1836 
Feese, David, Aug. 4, 1834 
Foote, John G., 1836 



Franklin, N., 1835 
Frazier, J. K., 1836 
Flaenor. W. P., 1836 
Fleenor, Isaac, 1836 



84 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

G 



Gray, John B. 

Grimes, James W., Apr. 15, 1836 

Garrett, William, Apr. 11, 1836 



Gearhart, Stephen, July 1, 1836 
Gregg, Azariah, March 17, 1834 
Griffith, James, June, 1835 



H 



Harned, David 
Hawkins, Smith 
Hargis, Samuel 
Harmon, Nicholas 
Hepner, George 
Hay, Mrs. A. T., 1835 
Hedge, Thomas, Sr., 1836 
Hilleary, Alex., Oct., 1833 
Hilleary, Jacob, 1833 



Huffman, Jesse, March, 1835 
Hunt, Mrs. Ann, 1835 
Hunt, G H., 1835 
Hunt, Jesse, Dec, 1834 
Hunt, Samuel, Sr., 1833 
Hedges, Joash, 1835 
Hilleary, Sarah, 1833 
Harris, John, 1833 
Hull, John, 1835 



Ingraham, Arthur B. 
Ingraham, Zedock C. 



Inghram, Thomas, March, 1836 
Inghram, John, March 26, 1836 



Jones, Thomas 
Jones, James B. 
Jones, Abraham 



Jackson, M. H., July, 1835 
Jackson, Mrs. Elizabeth G, 1834 
Johnson, Joel, 1836 



K 



Keeler, William S. 
Kelly, George W. 



King, William E. 



Leebrick, George 

Lewis, William 

Logan, John 

Lamme, William, 1835 

Larkin, L. T., 1835 

Lee, Conrad, Sept. 30, 1835 



Leffler, Jacob, March 15, 1835 
Latty, Mathew, Mch. 17, 1834 
Leebrick, Samuel, Dec, 1834 
Leffler, E. G, 1835 
Leffler, William, 1836 



M 



Morton, Edward 
McNight, David 
McCarver, Merton, 1833 



Mathes, William 

Mathes, Jose 

Moore, Henry, May 4, 1834 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 



85 



Martin, John 
Mitchell, James VV. 
McCarty, Isaac W. 
Mathews, William 
Moore, John R. 
Moffat, Levi 
Mathes, Hepsey 

Neally, M. VV, 1833 



Morgan, William, June 5, 1833 
Morgan, Zadock C, 1836 
Morgan, Joseph, 1833 
Miller, William, 1835 
Manley, William, 1835 
Magel, Sibert, 1835 



N 



Norton, John C. 



Otten, Mrs. John, 1836 
P 



Perkins, Solomon 

Priest, Moses 

Pearson, David, Sept. 28, 1835 



Pearson, John, Sept. 28, 1835 
Portlock, D. L, 1836 
Patterson, John, Sept. 28, 1835 



R 



Ross, Dr. William R, 1833 
Ross, Sulifand S. 
Ralston, Robert, Sept, 1836 
Rankin, D. C, Oct. 3, 1836 
Rankin, A, Sept, 1836 



Robertson, R. H, 1836 
Rorer, David, March 27, 1836 
Ryearson, Jacob, 1836 
Russell, David, 1836 



Stephens, Samuel F. 

Stinson, Gilbert 

Sackett, John 

Snelson, Charles H. 

Sauer, Phillip, 1835 

Salladay, J. R., 1836 

Seammans, B. B, 1835 

(First white child born in Union Tp.) 

Smith, Ellison, Aug. 15, 1835 

Smith, Samuel, Aug. 15, 1835 

Smith, Tillman. Aug. 15, 1835 



Smith, Jeramiah, Sr, 1833 

Smith, W. H, born Aug. 3, 1835 

Smith, Samuel, 1833 

Stormer, John, Apr. 10, 1835 

Sunderland, William, Oct. 15, 1835 

Smith, Ezekiel, 1833 

Smith, Paris, 1833 

Smith, Linneas, 1833 

Stewart, William, 1833 

Swank, Wesley, 1835 

Swank, Joshua, 1835 



Teas, Joseph B, 1833 
Teas, Geo. W. 
Travis, John W. 
Tucker, Thomas 



Tucker, Benjamin, 1833 
Tother, David, 1833 
Teas, Charles, 1833 



86 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

V 

Veach, Purnell, 1836 
W 



White, Simpson S., 1833 
Wade, Enoch 
Ward, John, 1833 
Walters, Lewis, 1833 
Wright, William, 1833 
Wallace, Williams 
White, Samuel 



Wells, James 
Warson, Robert 
Warson, Joseph 
Wright, John D. 
Westfall, Reuben, 1836 
Westfall, Jacob, 1834 
Wright, Charles, 1836 



We do not claim the above list contains all the names of the pioneers who 
came to the now Des Moines County before the division of old Des Moines 
County took place ; or that it is correct in every respect. With the time and 
opportunity we have had for investigation it is the best we could do. 

The names of pioneers of new Des Moines County, from 1837 to 1840 
inclusive, follow : 



Armstrong, John H., Nov., 1838 
Armstrong, Robert, Aug., 1838 



Anderson, W. S., 1837 



B 



Beams, William, 1837 
Blake, Luther, 1837 
Bell, Peter B., 1837 
Bandy, John, 1838 
Belknap, Silas G., 1839 
Bandy, E. W., 1840 
Bane, John, 1840 
Barger. Anthony, 1838 
Baumberger. Lewis, Aug., 1837 
Baumberger, Jacob, Aug., 1837 
Bennell, Mrs. E. C. Aug., 1837 
Bernard, Cornelius, Aug. 18, 1838 



Brendel, George, Nov. 24, 1839 
Bridges, Sol., Oct., 1837 
Broadwell, J. M., Nov., 1837 
Broadwell, Ellen M., Nov., 1837 
Ballard, William, 1838 
Browning, Wilton D., April, 1837 
Bruce, James, 1837 
Bude, John, Sept., 1837 
Burkholder, John, April 18, 1837 
Bush, Benjamin, Sept., 1839 
Byrkit, Mrs. Aug., 1839 






Cameron, H. D., 1837 
Cameron, Robert, 1839 
Cartwright, H. W., Aug., 1839 
Carpenter, A. W., Dec, 1837 
Cassell, Conrad, Oct., 1840 



Clark, W. A., Feb. 3, 1839 
Cocayne, H. S., Oct., 1840 
Cock, Oliver, March 20, 1839 
Comstock, Toab, 1839 
Cook, Lyman, March. 1840 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 



87 



Chamberlain, Mrs. C. H., 1838 
Chamberlain, George, 1840 
Chandler, George, July 1, 1840 
Chase, Kernble, 1837 



Church, Juliana, 1839 
Clark, William, 1839 
Comstock, J. C, 1839 



D 



Davis, E. B., 1837 

Dee, Warren, Oct. 16, 1838 

Dewein, John, 1840 



Dodge, A. C, June 18, 1838 
Dorens, J. B., Oct., 1839 



Eads, H. K., Oct., 1840 
Eads, S. J., 1840 
Eads, Airs. August, 1837 
Egnolf, John, March 8, 1840 
Endsly, William, Dec. 16, 1840 



Ervin, Nat., July 21, 1837 
Evans, Evan, April 28, 1838 
Evringham, M. E., 1840 
Ewing, D. M., Aug. 9, 1839 
Edwards, G. W. 



Funck, G. H., 1838 
Fullenwider, Dr. Samuel, 1837 
Fairweather, J. R., Dec. 24, 1839 
Fairweather, J. R., Jr., Dec. 24, 1839 
Fennirmone, R., 1839 
Fletcher, J. C, July 1, 1839 



Fletcher, C. H., 1839 

Foote, Mark A., 1840 

Foote, John G., 1840 

Fordney, Adam, March 30, 1840 

Fordney, William, Nov. 24, 1840 

Foster, John T., Sept., 1840 



Gear, John H., April, 1837 
Goodrich, P. A., March 4. 1840 
Green, Joseph, Oct., 1839 
Gregg, A. C, 1840 



Hagar, Levi. Sept. 30, 1837 
Haight, Cornelius A., 1837 
Haight, II. H., 1837 
Hall, C. J., Nov., 1839 
Hall. B. J.. Nov., 1839 
Hannum, Mrs. Alexander, 1839 
Haskill. Daniel, May 1, 1837 
Hayden, W. F., 1840 
Ililleary, James L., 1838 
Hillhouse. A. J., Sept. 15, 1840 
Hillhouse, William, Oct. 16, 1840 



Gilmore, R. U. D., 1839 
Gannaway, John. 1838 
Graham, J. C, 1837 
Gonnaway (born), 1839 



H 



Hunter, William. 1837 

Hughes, Luke, March, 1840 

Hunter. William. 1837 

Hunter, William. Aug. 10, 1839 

Hall, Dr. R. \\\. 1840 

Hill. Ellen. 1840 

Hunter. W.. 1839 

Hanna. S. O., 1837 

Higley, E. C. 183') 

Hall, Dr. J.. 1837 

Hurlbut, T. K., 1837 



88 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 



Howard, Aug., April 18, 1837 
Howard, Wesley, 1837 
Hudson, Silas A., June, 1839 
Hughes, Carleton, Aug. 12, 1837 



Hale, Bernard, 1837 
Hall, Oliver, 1838 
Hanks, A. J., 1838 



Inghram, W. D., born Aug. 30, 1840 
J 



Jaggar, E. D., Nov., 1839 
Jaggar, F. B., Aug., 1837 
Jaggar, H. B., April, 1837 



Jordan, Moses, July 9, 1837 
Joy, E., April 1, 1838 
Jackson, A. P., 1840 



K 



Kaster, G. T., May 16, 1839 
Raster, W. B., 1839 
Kitchen, Mrs. Mollie, 1839 



Kriechbaum, John Phillip, Oct., 1839 
Kerr, James H., 1838 
King, W. W., 1837 



Latty, J. W., 1839 

Laumann, W. B., 1840 

Loyd, Joseph A., 1837 

Loper, W. R., 1838 

Love, Mrs. James, born Feb. 11, 1839 

Love, W. D., 1838 

Lowry, F. B., 1839 



McCash, W. D., Sept., 1838 
McCormick, H. W.. July, 1839 
McCutcheon, William, April, 1840 
Mclntire, William, Sept. 18, 1837 
McKell, Mrs. James, Oct. 4, 1837 
McKenny, J. Smith, April 15, 1839 
McKinny, A. B., 1840 
McKinny, T. J., December, 1839 
McMaken. J. J., 1839 
McMun, J. R, 1837 
Mason, Charles, Feb. 19, 1837 
Mathews, H. C, 1840 
Mauro, W. H., October, 1838 
Mower, Peter. April 17, 1838 



Lowry, G. W., 1840 
Lutz, Susan, 1839 
Lukenbill, Beu, 1840 
Loper, William, 1840 
Laughlin, William, 1837 
Laughlin, John T., 1837 
Laughlin, Lewis A., 1837 



M 



Messenger, A. J., April, 1839 
Moore, J. W., April, 1838 
Morgan, Abraham, 1839 
Mayers, S. N., 1839 
Murphy, James, Aug. 15, 1840 
McClure, William, 1839 
McElhenney, Robert, 1840 
McMullen, Robert, 1840 
McCash, William D., 1840 
Magel, Elizabeth (born), 1840 
Murphy, John, 1837 
McMaken, J. L., 1838 
Moore, William R., 1838 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

N 



Nealey, John M., February, 1840 



Nichols, Reuben, 1839 



89 



Palmer, Luke, July 23, 1839 
Parriott, William, April 17, 1837 
Parriott, Lawson 
Patterson, John, March 28, 1840 



Rand, E. D., 1839 
Rand, Mrs. E. D., 1837 
Ramsey, Michael, 1837 
Ramge, Conrad, October ,1837 
Rand, Geo. D., 1839 
Rapp, Mrs. Geo., 1840 
Reed, L. P., March 18, 1837 
Rice, David, March 17, 1838 



Ping, M., Oct. 14, 1839 
Proctor, William, 1839 
Porter, Mrs. S., 1838 



R 



Remey, W. B., April, 1837 
Riply, Isaac N., Aug. 23, 1837 
Ritchey, John, 1838 
Riply, John, Aug. 31, 1838 
Robins, Dr. Gilbert, 1837 
Robinson, M. W., October, 1838 
Ryan, Mrs. Charlotte, 1839 



Sales, D. J., April 3, 1839 
Shaefer, Martin, Nov. 20, 1837 
Sherbey, Solomon, November, 1837 
Shelby, J. M., November, 1837 
Scott, Samuel, Sept. 29, 1839 
Sebring, W. H., 1838 



Tansen, A. H., August, 1838 
Taylor, James, 1838 
Temple, A. D., 1840 
Temple, Geo., June 30, 1837 



Valentine, J. R., 1838 
Van Dyke, B., 1839 



Walker, E. S., November, 1839 
Walker, Isaac, April, 1839 
Walker, James Q., June, 1839 



Seymour, Wolcott, July 5, 1838 
Smith, Ben, 1840 
Starr, Henry W., June, 1837 
Stewart, Robert, Oct. 28, 1840 
Sunderland, Thos. (born May 5, 1839) 
Swan, John W., 1838 



T 



Thompson, William, April 18, 1839 
Todd, Alvin, May, 1837 
Todd, Eli. 1838 



V 



Vance, J. C, May, 1837 



W 



Williams, J. Wilson, 1838 
Williamson, Robt, April 7, 1838 
Wilson, J. B., Aug. 20, 1840 



90 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

Walker, Jesse Wood, Elijah, 1837 

Walker, Martin, September, 1837 Woods, James W., April, 1837 

Walker, John, April, 1839 Woodward, Erastus, 1838 

White, J. W., July 10, 1839 Wykert, Theodore, April, 1840 

White, W. C, 1838 Waddle, John, 1838 

Wilhelm, G. C, August, 1839 Waddle, William, 1837 



Zeagenheim, Theo., April, 1840 Zion, Jonathan, 1837 

Zion, John, 1838 

LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLIES 

List of Names of Members Chosen from Des Moines County During the Terri- 
torial and State Existence 

WISCONSIN TERRITORY 

First session convened at Belmont, Wisconsin, October 25, 1836, adjourned 
December 9, 1836. 

Council: Joseph B. Teas, Arthur B. Inghram, and Jeramiah Smith, Jr. 

House: Isaac Leffler, Thomas Blair, John Box, David R. Chance, Geo. W. 
Teas, Warren L. Jenkins, Eli Reynolds. 

Second session of Wisconsin Territory convened at Burlington, Wisconsin 
Territory, November 10, 1837, and adjourned to January 20, 1838. 

Council: Arthur Inghram, Robert Ralston, and George Hepner. Arthur 
Inghram was chosen president of the council. 

House: James W. Grimes, Isaac Flenor, Thomas Blair, George H. Beeler, 
William R. Ross, Shepherd Leffler. 

On June 12, 1838, an act of Congress was approved dividing the Territory 
of Wisconsin and establishing the territorial Government of Iowa, to take effect 
July 3, 1838. Governor Lucas was commissioned governor of Iowa Territory 
on the 17th day of July and immediately started for Burlington, the capital of the 
new territory. He arrived at Burlington with Theodore S. Parvin, his private 
secretary, August 13, 1838. His first official act was to issue a proclamation 
dated the day of his arrival, dividing the territory into eight representative dis- 
tricts and apportioning a number of members from each district to the Council 
and House. The members elected under this call convened in Legislative Assem- 
bly in Old Zion Church on November 12, 1838. The census of Wisconsin Terri- 
tory taken in 1836 showed its population west of the Mississippi River: 

Dubuque County 4. 2 74 

Des Moines County 6,257 



io,53 1 



A second census was taken in May, 1838, of the territory which formerly 
comprised Dubuque and Des Moines counties, which had a population of 22,859. 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 91 

At this time sixteen counties had been organized out of Dubuque and Des Moines 
counties. Under this reorganization the territorial limits of Des Moines County 
were not the same as at the present time. Its population as shown by this census 
was 4,605. The act establishing Iowa Territory provided the Legislative Assem- 
bly shall consist of a Council and House. The Council to consist of thirteen 
members and the House of twenty-six members. The Legislature which con- 
vened in Old Zion Church on November 12, 1838, was the first session of the 
Legislature of Iowa Territory. 

Members from Des Moines County : 

Council: Arthur Inghram, Robert Ralston, and George Hepner. 

House: James W. Grimes, George Temple, V. B. Delashmut, Thomas Blair, 
and George Beeler. 

The second session of the Legislature convened at Old Zion Church on the 
first Monday of November, 1839. 

Council: Arthur Inghram, Robert Ralston, and George Hepner. 

House: William R. Ross, Shepherd Leffler, L. N. English, Isaac Flenor, 
and Joseph C. Hawkins. 

The third and extra session of the Iowa Legislature convened in Old Zion 
Church the first Monday in July, 1840. 

Council: J. C. Hawkins. 

House: Shepherd Leffler, M. D. Browning, Alfred Hebard, Robert Avery, 
and David Hendershott. 

The Fourth Legislative Assembly convened at Iowa City, December 6, 1841, 
and adjourned February 18, 1842. 

Council: Shepherd Leffler. 

House: Alfred Hebard, Isaac Leffler, David E. Blair, George Hepner, James 
M. Morgan. 

The Fifth Legislative Assembly convened at Iowa City, first Monday of 
December, 1842. 

Council: Shepherd Leffler. 

House: David E. Blair, George Hepner, James M. Morgan, Abner Hackle- 
man, and David J. Sales. 

The Sixth Legislative Assembly convened at Iowa City, first Monday of 
December, 1843. 

Council: Shepherd Leffler. 

House: Alfred Hebard, Abner Hackleman, James W. Grimes, John John- 
son, John D. Wright. 

The Seventh Legislative Assembly convened at Iowa City, first Monday of 
December, 1845. 

Council: Shepherd Leffler. 

House: James M. Morgan, John Johnson, E. W. Davis, George Chandler, 
Richard Noble. Mr. Morgan was elected speaker of the sixth and seventh 
assemblies. 

The eighth session convened at Iowa City in December, 1845. 

Vouncil: Shepherd Leffler. 

House: James M. Morgan, John D. Wright, John Ripley, A. McMichael, 
and Joshua Holland. 

There were ten territorial legislatures in which Des Moines County was 



92 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

represented. Two during the Wisconsin territorial existence and eight during 
the Iowa territorial existence. 

The first Legislature of Iowa convened at Iowa City, the capital, in 1846. 

Representatives from Des Moines County: 

Setiate: Milton D. Browning, Samuel E. Fullenwider. 

House: David E. Blair, G. W. Bowie, Alfred Hebard, Joshua Holland. 

The second convened at Iowa City in 1848. 

Senate: Milton D. Browning, Alfred S. Fear. 

House: T. L. Sargent, George Davidson, John Penny, J. L. Corse. 

The third convened at Iowa City, December 2, 1850. 

Senate: Elias Lowe, George Hepner. 

House: William Harper, Geo. Temple, M. W. Robinson. 

The fourth convened at Iowa City, December 6, 1852. 

Senate: Milton D. Browning, George Hepner. 

House: Justus Clark, James W. Grimes, Wolcott Seymour, J. Wilson 
Williams. 

The fifth convened at Iowa City in 1854. 

Senate: Milton D. Browning, W. F. Coolbaugh. 

House: George S. Albright, John L. Corse. 

Extra session in July, 1854. 

Senate: M. D. Browning, W. F. Coolbaugh. 

House: T. L. Sargent, J. L. Corse, Joshua Tracy, G. S. Albright. 

The sixth convened at Iowa City, December 1, 1856. 

Senate: Lyman Cook, W. F. Coolbaugh. 

House: Thomas J. L. Perry, J. Willson Williams, E. D. Rand. 

The seventh convened at Des Moines, the capital, 1858. 

Senate: Lyman Cook, W. F. Coolbaugh. 

House: Justus Clark, William H. Clune, and D. N. Shergren for Des Moines 
and Louisa counties. 

The eighth convened at Des Moines, i860. 

Senate: W. F. Coolbaugh. 

House: Justus Clark, J. C. Hall, M. W. Robinson. 

The ninth convened at Des Moines in 1862. 

Senate: John G. Foote. 

House: Franklin Wilcox, Andrew Johnson, J. Willson Williams, Calvin 

Jackson. 

The tenth convened at Des Moines, July 1, 1864. 

Senate: John G. Foote. 

House: James Bruce, J. J. McMackin. 

The eleventh convened at Des Moines in 1866. 

Senate: FitzHenry Warren. 

House: Charles Ben Darwin, Samuel A. Flanders, J. Willson Williams. 

The twelfth convened at Des Moines, January 13, 1868. 

Senate: Gen. Charles L. Matthies. 

House: A. G. Adams, Robert Allen. 

The thirteenth convened at Des Moines, January 13, 1870. 

Senate: Gen. Charles L. Matthies. 

House: Robert Allen, A. G Adams. 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 93 

The fourteenth convened at Des Moines, January 8, 1872. 

Senate: Charles Beardsley. 

House: Thomas J. Sater, William Harper. 

The fifteenth convened at Des Moines, January 12, 1874. 

Senate: Charles Beardsley. . 

House: John H. Gear, B. J. Hall. 

The sixteenth convened at Des Moines, January, 1876. 

Senate: J. Willson Williams. 

House: John H. Gear, William Lynch. 

The seventeenth convened at Des Moines, January 14, 1878. 

Senate: J. Willson Williams. 

House: John H. Gear, William Larame. 

The eighteenth convened at Des Moines, January 12, 1880. 

Senate: J. Willson Williams. 

House: John H. Gear, William Lynch. 

The nineteenth convened at Des Moines, January 9, 1882. 

Senate: John Patterson. 

House: Wolcott Seymour, Martin Kopp. 

The twentieth convened at Des Moines, January 14, 1884. 

Senate: Benton J. Hall. 

House: William Lynch, W. B. Culbertson. 

The twenty-first convened at Des Moines, January 11, 1886. 

Senate: W. W. Dodge. 

House: W. B. Culbertson, John S. Penny. 

The twenty-second convened at Des Moines, January 9, 1888. 

Senate: W. W. Dodge. 

House: Fred W. Kline. 

The twenty-third convened at Des Moines, January 13, 1890. 

Senate: W. W. Dodge. 

House: Ellison Smith. 

The twenty-fourth convened at Des Moines, January 11, 1892. 

Senate: W. W. Dodge. 

House: P. Henry Smythe, James P. Welch. 

The twenty-fifth convened at Des Moines, January 8, 1894. 

Senate: T. G. Harper. 

House: C. I. Barker, Hector Ross. 

The twenty-sixth convened at Des Moines, January 13, 1896. 

Senate: T. G. Harper. 

House: W. C. McArthur, W. B. Hunt. 

The twenty-seventh convened at Des Moines, January 10, 1898. 

Senate: W. C. McArthur. 

House: W. B. Hunt, Lewis M. Jaeger. 

The twenty-eighth convened at Des Moines, January 8, 1900. 

Senate: W. C. McArthur. 

House: W. D. Dodds, Lewis M. Jaeger, W. B. Hunt, Ex. 27. 

The twenty-ninth convened at Des Moines, January 13, 1902. 

Senate: Fred N. Smith. 

House: W. D. Dodds, Lewis M. Jaeger. 



94 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

The thirtieth convened at Des Moines, January n, 1904. 

Senate: Fred N. Smith. 

House: Henry Ritter. 

The thirty-first convened at Des Moines, January 8, 1906, 

Senate: Fred X. Smith. 

House: Henry Ritter. 

The thirty-second convened at Des Moines, January 14, 1907. 

Senate: Fred N. Smith. 

House: William D. Dodds, Henry Ritter. 

The thirty-third convened at Des Moines, January 11, 1909. 

Senate: Fred X. Smith. 

House: William D. Dodds, Ex. 33. 

The thirty- fourth convened at Des Moines, January 9, 191 1. 

Senate: La Monte Cowles. 

House: Henry Ritter, Samuel H. Sater. 

The thirty-fifth convened at Des Moines, January 13, 1913. 

Senate: La Monte Cowles. 

House: James Jamison. 

The thirty-sixth convened at Des Moines, January 11, 191 5. 

Senate: Frank E. Thompson. 

House: James Jamison. 




JOHN B. <;i:.\\ 



\V:i^ born in Sheffield, Caledonia County, Vermont, April 9, 
L809; emigrated to Black Hawk Purchase (now State ol towa) 
in January, 1834; named Burlington in March, L834. 



CHAPTER X 

BURLINGTON, ITS FOUNDATION AND GROWTH 

The City of Burlington contains by far a greater population than the rest of 
the county, from which fact it is best to first give its history. We cannot do 
better in this than to quote from a letter of John B. Gray, written to the Hawk- 
eye, April 6, 1861 : 

REMINISCENCES OF THE EARLY SETTLERS OF BURLINGTON 

"I landed in Burlington, January 10, 1834. Amzi Doolittle, Simpson White and 
McCarver were the first settlers. Soon after their settlement, the following 
named persons came with their families : Jeremiah Smith, William R. Ross, 
Sullifand Ross, Isaac Crenshaw, David Tothero, Mr. Dunham and William Mor- 
gan. The following young men came about the same time: Benjamin Tucker, 
Theo Jennings and a Mr. Hopkins, who clerked for Jere Smith, and who died in 
July, 1834. Amzi Doolittle kept a boarding house at which I boarded. The town 
at that time contained one small frame house and four log cabins a mile or so 
back. Early in the fall of 1834, a difficulty occurred between Doolittle, White 
and McCarver, which resulted in McCarver's leaving the place. After McCarver 
left, Doolittle and White commenced surveying and laying off lots. I drove the 
first stake that was driven in the town as a starting point at the southeast corner 
of the block that their old state house was built upon, and afterwards was burned 
down. The southeast lot in the above block I purchased of Doolittle, for which 
I gave him $50, with the understanding that I should have the privilege of naming 
the town. Doolittle executed the deed in March, 1834. The papers were made 
out and headed Burlington, Black Hawk Purchase, which was the first deed 
made to a town lot in Burlington. About the 10th of March the steamboat 
O'Connell was heard below the point coming up the river. Men, women and 
children, and Indians, who far outnumbered the whites, flocked to the river bank 
to witness the arrival. As it approached, it was welcomed with cheers. I gave 
the name Burlington to the city because I had lived in Burlington. Vermont." 

Mr. Gray's letter is too long to copy in full. It tells of a ruffian named Comp- 
ton, who lived across the river, and of his assaulting Jere Smith. That during 
the fracas, one Dinwiddie took Smith's part, Compton struck Dinwiddie and in 
return Dinwiddie got in his work with a penknife, inflicting a wound from which 
Compton died on the spot. This is the first homicide of which there is a record 
which took place in Des Moines County. This was in 1835. 

We have the following extract by Hawkins Taylor (Annals of Iowa, Vol. IX, 
pages 452, 453, 454). In accordance with the pledge given by the members of 

95 



96 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

Des Moines County (to Belmont Legislature) conditional on the establishment of 
the temporary seat of government at Burlington, Jerry Smith built a suitable 
building on Front or Water Street (lot 651, O. C), near where Sunderland's Mill 
was afterwards built. The building cost $8,000 and was well adapted to the wants 
of the Legislature, which met the first of November, 1837 (November 6). Early 
in the fall of 1837, the river rilled with floating ice, but it was late in the season 
before the ice blocked so as to stop navigation. The result was that each thaw 
would bring boats from below, until late in December. There was great rivalry 
then among steamboat men in their boats being the first to reach Galena in the 
spring. A little after dark, a boat came in the night, and before they had made 
fast to shore some one on board shouted that a mob at Alton had killed the "Abo- 
litionist Lovejoy" and destroyed his press. (Lovejoy was killed November 7, 
1837.) To this announcement there was a cheer of joy sent up from the crowd 
on shore in which almost all joined, and no man in that crowd would have dared 
to condemn that mob. There were many, and probably a majority present, who 
condemned the act of the mob, but the wugh pro-slavery sentiments of the day 
overawed all opposition. That same night a few hours later the new capitol took 
fire and burned down (December 13, 1837, at 2 o'clock A. M.). After the fire, 
the House of Representatives met over the store of Webber & Remey (south- 
east corner of Main and Columbia streets), and the Council in a small building 
near by (on the northwest corner of same streets). 

We have carefully examined the statements by different parties, and believe 
Mr. Gray is mistaken in saying he drove the first stake in the original plat of the 
town called Burlington. Undoubtedly it is true Mr. Gray drove the first stake 
as he says in his letter, and named the town ; but prior to this time a small portion 
of land had been laid off into lots. We quote from a letter written by Mr. White 
to the Chicago Historical Society as it appears in its history of Des Moines 
County, published in 1879. "The present site of Burlington in 1829 was occupied 
by a branch of the American Fur Company, who had a trading post with the 
Indians. In the summer of that year, Amzi Doolittle and S. S. White were 
employed to put up an additional building to the post. While at the post, they 
explored the surrounding country and prosecuted their search for claims, feeling 
confident it would not be long until it could be rightfully occupied. The Black 
Hawk Treaty was signed September 21, 1832, but did not go into effect until June, 
1833. Within two weeks after the signing of the treaty, White, Doolittle and 
McCarver came across the river and made claim to the land along the river point 
of the present site of Burlington. They at once built a cabin and took possession 
of their claim. While the cabin was being erected, these pioneers employed men 
on the east shore to build a flatboat to be used as a ferry. 

"Then came Theodore Jennings, who located on land north of the original 
claim, and Benjamin Tucker and Isaac Crenshaw on the southwest. In the fall 
of 1832 David Tothero built the second cabin in this region and the first one away 
from the site of Burlington, southwest of town some two miles or more. 

"Before winter set in, twelve or fifteen families located in the surrounding 
country. The Smiths built cabins two miles below town. The treaty with the 
Indians did not require them to give possession to the land until June 1, 1833, but 
no attention was given to that clause by the settlers. Complaint was made to 
the commanding officer at Rock Island (Fort Armstrong) and a company of 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 97 

fifteen men was sent down to drive us off. We received notice of their purpose 
in time to move our effects across the river. They were under the command of 
Jefferson Davis of the late Confederate States. He was then a lieutenant in the 
army. I afterwards learned the troops occupied our cabins over night and in the 
morning they left, setting fire to their cabins. The settlers from the surrounding 
country had taken refuge on the large island below our claim." White says he 
returned to the west side of the river about the middle of May, 1833, when he 
built a cabin made of rails, and covered it as best he could with boards split out 
of logs. Doctor Ross says he crossed the Mississippi River in July, 1833, and 
landed a half mile below the mouth of Flint River. The place was called Flint 
Hills and extended five miles below the site of Burlington. When he came, 
Morton M. McCarver and Simpson S. White were residing in cabins about twelve 
feet apart. White says: "Shortly after Ross, came Jeremiah Smith, Jr., and 
Daniel Strong located on land on the prairie west of town. Smith caused us to 
lay off some lots, as he said he would purchase a lot if we would sell it to him ; 
if we would not do that he would occupy the ground anyway, as he had come to 
start in trade. If he could not do it peaceably he would do it forcibly. It was 
not our intention to lay off a town till we had acquired title, but the positive stand 
taken by Smith caused us to change our minds. Doctor Ross surveyed the front 
line of two blocks, which was all the survey made that year. Smith purchased a 
lot, built a house and commenced business in the fall of 1833. The same fall," 
says White, "I purchased McCarver's interest in the town and ferry. McCarver 
then went to Monmouth, where he remained for two years and then returned to 
Burlington. In the spring of 1834 John B. Gray came to Burlington and opened 
the first grocery store. During the year 1834 the town was surveyed and many 
lots were sold." The fact that White caused to be surveyed the front line of 
two blocks to get a place for Jere Smith to build a store don't show Jere used 
much force. Mr. Gray is undoubtedly correct in his statement that the original 
plat as now exists of the city had its beginning in the survey of 1834, but Mr. 
White's story of Jefferson Davis coming from Fort Armstrong with a squad of 
soldiers and burning their cabins is one of imagination. All had received notice 
of the coming of soldiers and had removed their effects to Big Island. The troops 
stayed in White's cabin one night after he left ; but that Jefferson Davis, presi- 
dent of the late Confederate States, had charge of them, we have only White's 
statement without his giving his means of knowledge. General Dodge in his 
address at the commemoration of the Fiftieth Anniversary of Iowa, held in 
Burlington, June r, 1883, says: "I may mention as a historic truth the gentle- 
manly and humane treatment extended by Jefferson Davis, late of the Confed- 
erate States to the vanguards of America, who first settled Dubuque. Davis was 
a second lieutenant in the regular army, and was sent from Prairie du Chien by 
General Taylor, afterwards President Taylor, to drive off the settlers. He left 
his men on the opposite side of the river fat Jordan's Ferry, East Dubuque), 
and in person visited our people in their humble cabins. He persuaded them to 
withdraw till the first of June east of the Mississippi, but wholly unlike Lieu- 
tenant Gardner, sent here (to Flint Hills), did not burn their humble houses or 
commit any act of destruction upon their mining property, but treated all with 
characteristic courtesy and kindness." Besides, to even charge Lieutenant Gard- 
ner with an act of vandalism in what he did is wholly wrong. These early settlers, 



98 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

however much we admire them, had no business on the west side of the river at 
the time. They were here in violation of the treaty made with the Indians. 
White says: "They paid no attention to this portion of the treaty." What they 
did was calculated to excite the Indians to resentment and bloodshed. One of the 
causes which led to the Black Hawk war was the violation of the treaty made 
with the Indians by the settlers. Doubtless Lieutenant Gardner had good reason 
to believe that as soon as he departed, and before the coming of June, those 
settlers would be back in their cabins getting ready to plant corn in May. It is 
presumed Lieutenant Gardner acted under the orders of his superior officer. The 
pioneer did not care much for the Indian and his rights and the treaties made 
with them when it conflicted with his own interests. True it is, Mr. Roosevelt 
in his "Winning of the West," and John Quincy Adams in a learned discussion, 
say the Indians did not own the land, that they were tribes of wild men frequently 
at war with each other, one year at one place, in another at a different place ; 
that if the land had been allotted to them, hundreds and thousands of acres would 
be set aside to each member ; that the demands of civilization were such that it 
was right to dispossess them of the lands they claimed and give it to the white 
settlers, who would conquer and make it serve the welfare of the millions to come. 
But back of all this is, what right has any one man to own the soil as against 
another man who does not own it? The Government sold to the Ohio Company 
several million acres of land. This company was composed of George Washington 
and seven or eight other gentlemen. Is it not true, since the foundation of the 
Government, it has either chased or driven the Indians off the land? Has it at 
any time given him any portion except in one instance, and tried to help him dress 
and keep it and make a home for himself? We call to mind the case of the 
Christian Indians under the fostering care of the Moravian missionaries. By 
force they were dispossessed of their holdings, driven from their homes and 
fields. The policy of the Government has been to dazzle an ignorant people with 
a few trinkets, and the payment of a paltry sum of money to justify it in taking 
from them all the lands and push them back, and back, towards the setting sun. 
The answer of Cain, "Am I my brother's keeper?" has been the answer given 
by the white man since he first set foot on the Western Hemisphere, with no 
regard to any rights of the natives he found when he came. The whole conduct 
of the Government to the Indian has not in it one single atom of morality. It 
has held to the enforcement of the laws of the survival of the fittest. The struggle 
has been the man with a coonskin cap on his head and rifle on his shoulder, 
against the ignorant man with the bow and arrow, who found a living by following 
in the chase the wild animals. It was cheaper for the white man to kill him than 
to civilize him, cheaper to stir him to revenge, to provoke him to war, then kill 
him. than to allot him a portion of the land and instruct him how to cultivate it. 
Ancient Rome conquered the wild barbarian, but never drove him from his land 
and allotted it to its citizens. It made him its friend, gave him its laws, fostered 
his welfare, from which has sprung the grandest of civilizations in the whole 
world. 

Burlington had its beginning in the minds of the two "squatters," S. S. 
White and Amzi Doolittle. They had crossed the river before the treaty had been 
made with the Indians, and had determined to lie the first on the ground and await 
developments. Subsequently McCarver joined them, and on compulsion of Jere 




LOG CABIN ON THE PRAIRIE 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 99 

Smith commenced to lay out a town and to sell lots. None of them had a shadow 
of title to the land or lots sold. With Mr. Ross as their surveyor, they made a 
beginning to lay out the town soon after Doctor Ross came. In November or 
December, 1833, they employed another surveyor, one Benjamin Tucker, and 
commenced in dead earnest to lay off and plat a townsite. How much of this 
town was surveyed and platted by Tucker the records do not show, but things 
went on without any hindrance, the proprietors selling lots and giving deeds to 
the same till July 2, 1836, when the Government "jumped" their claim by passing 
an act for the laying off of Burlington and other towns. Among other things the 
act provided "That Burlington, in the County of Des Moines, shall, under the 
direction of the surveyor general of public lands, be laid off into town lots, streets 
and avenues, and the lots for public use, called public squares, and into out lots, 
having regard to lots and streets already surveyed, and in such manner and of 
such dimensions as he may think proper for the public good and the equitable 
rights of settlers and the occupants of said town, provided the tract to be so laid 
off shall not exceed the quantity of one entire section. When the survey of lots 
shall have been completed, a plat thereof shall be returned to the secretary of the 
treasury, and within six months thereafter the lots shall be offered for sale at 
public sale to the highest bidders under the direction of the President of the 
United States; and provided further^ that a quantity of land of a proper width 
on the river bank, and running" with- said fiver the whole length of said town, shall 
be reserved from sale for publicises, and so remain forever for public uses as 
public highways, and for other public purposes." The act thus provided for a 
public highway along the river front from South Boundary Street to North 
Street. Our readers will look in vsin fdr-thrs public highway for its full length. 
On February 14, 1853, the Congress passed an act which provided that the 
land bordering on the Mississippi River in front of the city reserved by the act of 
July 2, 1836, for a public highway, and for other public uses, together with the 
accretions which may have formed thereto in front thereof, to be disposed of in 
such manner as the corporate authorities of said city may direct." But it was 
further provided in the act of 1853 "That the grant made by this act shall operate 
as a relinquishment only of the right of the United States in and to said premises, 
and shall in no manner affect the right of third persons therein, as to the use 
thereof, but shall be subject to th: same." The Mississippi River is a great public 
highway, and the object of the reservation was for the purpose of leaving an 
approach to the highway for tho full length of the city's river front. In Cook 
vs. The City of Burlington, 30 Iowa 94, the Supreme Court in construing the 
above provision of the act of Congress held, that by virtue of the act the' strip 
reserved was dedicated to the public use and that, after the sale of the lots abut- 
ting thereon to individuals, the act making this dedication assumed the character 
of a contract which could no L afterwards be abrogated or repealed. That a 
relinquishment on the part of the Government to the city of the title to said prop- 
erty, which it thus held in trust for public uses to which it was dedicated, invested 
the city with no greater title than it possessed and subject to the same uses and 
trusts, and held by the same tenure. The court further held the natural accretions 
from the river made to this reserved strip partook of the same nature of the 
original reservation, became subject to the same uses and trusts, and held by the „<\ 

same tenure. It was also held, that the owners of lots abutting such reservation ^^ 

rfb y 



100 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

did not, by their purchase, acquire the title thereto, or any part thereof ; but they 
possess such an interest therein, and to the accretion thereto, as that a court of 
equity will interpose in their behalf, to enjoin an absolute conveyance of the prop- 
erty for private purposes by the city, or any other diversion thereof from the uses 
and purposes for which it was dedicated. The court also held that the laying down 
and operating a railway track on a part of a street is not an obstruction of its 
free uses, nor incompatible with its original dedication. The question whether 
the city has the power to grant to a corporation the right to so occupy a street 
as to wholly dispossess the public of its use was not in the case. 

The original survey of the city made by the Government included all that 
territory bounded as follows : "On the north by North Street, on the west by 
West Boundary Street (now Central Avenue) and Old Boundary Street; on the 
south by South Street ; on the east by the Mississippi River," including in all 908 
blocks. Prior to the 19th of January, 1836, all that constituted the town was some 
log cabins and a few log houses used for stores, located in White and Doolittle's 
staked-out town. On the date above mentioned, the Council and House of Rep- 
resentatives of Wisconsin Territory passed an act entitled, "An act to incorporate 
the City of Burlington." It gave the electors power to elect a mayor and board 
of aldermen, and prescribed their duties; provided for the election of a city 
recorder, treasurer and city engineer. Among other things, it provided, "That 
when, in the opinion of the council, it is expedient to borrow money for public 
uses, the question shall be submitted to the electors of Burlington. The nature 
and object of the loan shall be stated and a day fixed for the electors of the city 
to express their wishes, and the loan shall not be made, unless a majority of the 
votes given shall be in the affirmative." I cannot give the date when the first elec- 
tion of city officers was held, but I find the first meeting of the board of aldermen 
was held in the law office of David Rorer on the 29th of April, 1837. One of its 
first acts was an order to fix the boundaries of the city, which it did in accordance 
with its charter of July 19, 1836. When first incorporated it included only that 
territory embraced in the first plat, and conveyances of lots in this survey are 
described "according to the original survey of said city." 

On Tune 10, 1845, tne Council and House of Representatives of Iowa Terri- 
tory passed an act which repealed the former charter, and enacted one in lieu 
thereof. Various amendments were made to this charter until the city became 
incorporated under the general law for the incorporation of cities of the first class. 
The election for the abandonment of the old special charter rights took place 
January 11, 1875, at which were cast: 



For abandonment 961 votes 

Against abandonment 127 votes 



By this act, almost every semblance of the old "New England town meeting" 
was blotted out and the people of the city left to the mercies of the State Legis- 
lature to determine for them what they wanted. 

Matters remained in this situation until 1908, at which time it was submitted 
to the electors whether they would adopt what is called the commission form of 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 101 

government for which provision had been made under a law of the state. At an 
election held on that date the vote was as follows : 

For commission form of government 2,638 votes 

Against commission form of government 1,268 votes 

The city is now being operated under the provisions of this late law. At the 
present time is being agitated another change, that of having a general manager. 
After all that has been done, it is questionable whether in fundamentals any 
improvement has been made on the old charter government of 1836. The tendency 
has been since the abandonment of the special charter system to centralize power 
in the city council ; to take away from the citizens their right to vote on many 
important questions. It is a historical fact that Burlington increased in popula- 
tion and wealth at a greater rate while it was operated under the special charter 
system. But to go back to the earlier time of its history: Before its incorpora- 
tion from the small beginning of White, Doolittle, Ross, Gray, Smith and McCar- 
ver and their families in 1833, we find that in 1836 it contained a population of 
517 people, old and young. As soon as the Indian title had been extinguished 
people from all sections of the country came to make it their home, and to start 
in trade and establish themselves in their several professions. The founders of a 
city are those who come to stay and work. 

In the spring of 1836 Thomas Cooper came from Kentucky with his family, 
lie purchased some lots on Front Street from Enoch Wade, on which he built a 
house of boards which he bought from Daniel Haskell, who had a sawmill located 
a little south of the west terminal of the Chicago, Burlington & Ouincy Railroad 
bridge and afterwards known as Dickey's Mill. Cooper moved into this house 
with his family. This house stood near where now stands the office of the Rand 
Lumber Company on lower Main Street. In the spring of 1837 Cooper built a 
double roomed house, on the corner of Front and Columbia streets, on the lot on 
which afterwards was built the McCutcheon House. When Mr. Cooper had com- 
pleted his house he had a house warming, which consisted of a dance by all the 
gallants and ladies of the town. This was the first dance held in Burlington. The 
second was the one held by the Indians when they came to interview Governor 
Lucas. Zach Morgan was the fiddler, and doubtless with pleasure the time sped 
away until Aurora opened the gates of morn. Cooper soon after opened a dry 
goods store in the front room of the building. Mr. George Kelly came from 
Wheeling, Va., and brought a stock of dry goods with him, and finding no vacant 
room, bought Mr. Cooper's stock and store and commertced business. 

fudge Rorer came in the spring of 1836 and opened a law office and from that 
time made Burlington his home till the time of his death. He took great interest 
in building up the city in various ways. He bought of Enoch Wade a tract of 
nine acres, which was surveyed by Johnson Pierson. This land lay west of Front 
Street, bounded on the north by Spring Branch, which came down from the 
southwest part of the town and is now known by the name of Bogus Hollow, where 
Bill Calendine made the false money, and from which it derived its present name. 
The north line crossed Main Street a little south of where the Bosch Brewery 
stood and struck the Mississippi just north of where Mr. Wade had a warehouse 
on the bank of the river. Mr. Johnson Pierson says: "I commenced the sur- 



102 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

veying of this land early in the morning. Had two chainmen and one axeman, and 
Judge Rorer served in the capacity of stake or flagman. That the ground was 
thickly studded with forest trees of almost every variety, such as oak, hickory, elm, 
ash, linden and sugar maple, and thickly set with an undergrowth of hazel brush, 
gooseberry bushes, grape vines, requiring the continued vigilance of the axeman 
to open the way for the chainmen to count measurements. We were engaged four 
days in making the survey. Front Street had been extended to the bluff (Prospect 
Hill), by Doolittle and White, and on the west line of this street is based the 
survey of this tract making the streets and alleys conform with those of the city 
proper and the lots and blocks of the same size. On the east side of Front Street 
and a little north of the Rand Lumber Company's office, Thomas Cooper had 
erected a dwelling of sawed lumber and with his family occupied it. South of 
this, in a southeast direction, and immediately south of the west pier of the 
Chicago, Burlington & Ouincy Railroad bridge, and directly under the northern- 
most height of Prospect Hill, stood Daniel Haskell's mill, afterwards known as 
Dickey's Mill. East of where the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy roundhouse 
now stands, about a half a block, Judge Rorer had put up a comfortable cabin, 
his first residence in the city. About the middle of August in the same year the 
judge said to me one day : 'Get your compass and chain and come to my office ; 
I want to stake off a lot and set pegs at the corners for a foundation for a house 
I intend building.' As required, I came equipped for the work. We traced the 
line of Fourth Street to the desired point, on which line as a base I laid off the 
lot, placing posts at each intersection, then laying off the dimensions or size of 
the foundation, setting the pegs at each corner intersection. 'Now,' said he, 'I 
am going to put up a brick house on this lot.' He obtained the brick from 
Colonel Leffler. John Mower did the brick work, Henry Moore the carpenter 
work, Jerry White and Jake Arick the plastering, which was the first brick house 
put up in Burlington, Judge Rorer himself laying the first brick. The house 
stood a little off the street on the corner lot on Fourth and Columbia (southeast 
corner of said street). Colonel Warren afterwards became the owner, Mrs. 
Shelton taught a children's school in it during the summer months, Zach Morgan 
lived in it some time ; finally Colonel Warren tore it down and erected a residence 
on its site, which later became the Nassau home." 

Many of those who first came to Burlington were the first to leave. The hum 
of industry had no charms to hold them where they had located; they. wanted to 
be away among the wilds, which lured them westward. They had always lived 
a frontier life and could not break away from its charms. Among the first to 
leave the town which they had staked out were Amzi Doolittle and S. S. White. 
They sold lots and by this means had acquired some money. When, in 1849, Oregon 
was opened for settlement, they were among the first to make footprints on the 
"Oregon Trail" across the plains, then through the passes of the Rocky Moun- 
tains. There was another class, the rough element who were satisfied if they could 
earn enough to procure a slice of bacon, a corn dodger and a dram of whiskey. 
They were the sporting element who had little regard for either morals or law. 

We copy the following description of Burlington as described in the Hawkeye 
at an early period: "Burlington is situated on the west bank of the Mississippi, 
about seven hundred miles below the Falls of St. Anthony, and eighteen hundred 
miles below its source and something over two hundred miles above St. Louis. 




IOWA'S FIRST BRICK HOUSE, BURLINGTON 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 103 

The city is built on a high bluft" bank about two hundred feet above the water in 
the river, and is cut by a small stream called Hawkeye. 

"The space from the landing to the summit and along Hawkeye will afford an 
ample space for business, manufacturers, etc., for many years to come; while a 
more beautiful place for residences cannot be well imagined than the level plain 
above. The scenery cannot be excelled for beauty. The river, with its woody 
islands, stretches away to the north and south, until enchanted by distance, and 
mellowed by the sunlight of our Indian summers, it seems a fairy magic dream- 
land, too beautiful to be real. Opposite and reposing in the distance are the bluffs 
on the Illinois side." One living at the present who never saw the natural beauty 
of the place before the hand of man had disturbed the soil and cut down the trees, 
can have but little conception of the place on which the city has been built. The 
beautiful glens through which streatns of sparkling water flowed into Hawkeye 
have been filled, or so mutilated, that hardly a vestige remains indicating what 
once they were. Bogus Hollow is almost gone, and what is left is an eyesore. 
Stony Lonesome, which separates South Hill from West Hill, has ceased to be 
the Stony Lonesome of the past, when Fox Abrahams lived there in his little 
cottage. It was a retreat which soothed the little man's heart when loaded with 
the cares of life. The grapevine clambered over the porch of his cottage. The 
bluebirds made their nests in obscure corners around and about his little dwelling. 
The robin chirped from leafy bowers. The jay flew from tree to tree and 
squawked the while. The cardinal sang his sweet notes of joy ; while the wood- 
pecker pounded away, the drummer in this chorus of birds. In the springtime 
the Jbhnny-Jumpup sprang from the ground and looking up with its blue eyes, 
smiled and said: "Look at me. I am the beginning of life after the winter of 
death. I am the first up in the resurrection." The Sweet William covered the 
hillsides with a tint of blue. The May apple sprang up, spreading its umbrella of 
leaves shading its yellow fruit. In limpid pools minnows jumped and sported in 
play. Such was Stony Lonesome, in springtime, when Fox Abrahams lived there. 

Just west of Stony Lonesome was located Old Boundary street (now Central 
avenue). On the west side -of this street was a long high trestle sidewalk over a 
ravine which came down Market street. The men who worked in the railroad 
machine shops who lived on West Hill passed on this bridge in going to and from 
their work. In the early winter mornings Mr. Abrahams could hear their tramp 
on this bridge. This led him to write 

THE TIN-BUCKET BRIGADE 

By James Fox Abrahams 
(Born 1812, in Philadelphia ; named for husband of sister of his father ; his father, 
an Irishman, fought in navy, under Commodore Bainbridge ; died Jlily 8, 1875.) 

I 

In the gray of the morn, ere the steam whistle shrill 
Calls the laborers forth from the valley and hill, 
Night's silence is broken — how sweet to mine ear — 
By an echoing music none other may hear. 



104 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

At the foot of the gorge, in my cottage at rest, 

Here its echoing voice is my earliest guest ; 

O'er the chasm beyond the long foot-bridge is laid — 

Hark! they come! tramp-a-tramp, the tin-bucket brigade. 

II 

I listen — who would not? — such time do they keep; 

Completely the echo now banishes sleep ; 

The musical brook that runs laughing along. 

The music of voices, the mocking-bird's song, 

^Eolian music, that wakens the trees — 

I share with all others the music of these ; 

But the music that seems for mine ear only made 

Is their tramp-a-tramp-tramp, the tin-bucket brigade. 

Ill 

Now steady ! No straggling ! A squad marches o'er ; 
Ha! Ha! Don't I know they've done marching before? 
Blithe Tom, how he whistles, while I can but grieve, 
When I think of his toil and his dear empty sleeve. 
Now faint grow the footsteps, they tread on the sod, 
With brow all devoted to mandate to God. 
No pageant of brightness, however arrayed, 
Like their tramp-a-tramp-tramp, the tin-bucket brigade. 

IV 

Do they gaze down the valley and envy my lot, 
When they see the bright side of my vine-covered cot? 
No ! No ! For such feeling they'll surely forbear, 
When they know that each station in life has its care! 
That there's something implanted in every breast, 
Which may give us contentment, or bring us unrest. 
God's love is impartial, 'tis clearly portrayed, 
Oft he "sends to the front'' the tin-bucket brigade. 

January 4, 1872. — Stony Lonesome. 

SANTA CLAUS 

If I could a picture of Santa Claus paint, 
'Twould astonish you, children, his form is so quaint ; 
His benevolent face lighted up with good cheer, 
And his pack full of presents the same as last year ; 
It is wonderful how he goes peeping around 
Down the chimneys, 'till all the good children are found; 
He is very particular, we must suppose, 
For 'tis only good children that Santa Claus knows. 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 105 

He can tell, to be sure, when the children are good ; 

I guess if he couldn't, then nobody could. 

When he sees them asleep, nicely tucked in their bed, 

In a minute he knows if their prayers have been said. 

He ponders a moment, selecting the toys ; 

He has some for the girls, and some for the boys ; 

Where the stockings are hung there on tiptoe he goes ; 

But 'tis only good children that. Santa Claus knows. 

He counts, to be sure that the hose are all there ; 
And he finds in addition the tiniest pair ; 
Then the chuckling old fellow gives vent to his joy, 
When he sees by their make they belong to a boy. 
A rousing red rattle, surrounded with bells, 
With many sweet things the confectioner sells, 
He puts in these stockings, and things in all those, 
But 'tis only good children that Santa Claus knows. 

Yet, oh! when the stockings are counted all o'er, 
And a vacant nail found, where the Christmas before 
Hung the prettiest pair that were found in the row, 
Then he knows you've had sickness, and sorrow, and woe. 
He heaves a deep sigh, and he drops a warm tear, 
For the lost one, the loved one, that left you last year; 
Then he blesses you all in your sleep ere he goes, 
But 'tis only good children that Santa Claus knows. 

Away then he starts on his generous round, 

But his task is so great that all homes are not found ; 

Yet he knows you will give of your plentiful lot 

A share to poor children that he has forgot. 

He'd have you kind-hearted, and friendly, and true, 

And generous always, as he is to you ; 

So you'll next year confidingly hang up your hose, 

Tho' 'tis only good children that Santa Claus knows. 

J. Fox Abrahams was not only a poet and a man of culture, but a public- 
spirited man. He kept a book store on Jefferson street, and represented his 
ward in the City Council in 1860-1861 and 1863, and was at one time postmaster 
of the city. 

In going back to the beginning to discuss the names of the men who came here 
and took an active part in building up the city, the first of importance is Mr. 
William R. Ross, who, in September, 1833, opened the first general store in the 
new settlement, and almost at the same time Maj. Jeremiah Smith opened a 
general store with a large stock of goods. As there were but few white people 
here then, trade was to a large extent with the Indians. Pelts were as good 
almost as money, as they had a ready money value at St. Louis, where they could 
be shipped by boat. Smith was not only a merchant, but dealt in land. He 
acquired title to land adjoining the town just west of Old Boundary Street, of 



106 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

which a plat was filed for record, and is known as Smith's Addition. In regard 
to what Air. Smith has done in connection with the city, we find that in June, 
1841, Jeremiah Smith. Jr.. conveyed to the city a portion of land lying west of 
lot No. 978, in the city, and extending to Boundary Street, and a certain portion 
of land west of Boundary Street, on which was afterwards erected the Burlington 
University, and on which now stands the new Burlington High School Building. 
This land was conveyed to the city for its use as a public graveyard, but the deed 
did not provide for a reservation of title to the original grantor in case it ceased 
to be used for the purposes granted. This old graveyard was known as the "City 
Burial Ground." On the nth of July, 1853, the City Council adopted an ordi- 
nance declaring it to be a nuisance, and directed it to be vacated, and prohibited 
the burying of any body therein after the passage of the ordinance. On the 23d 
day of April, 1852,- Abner Leonard and wife had conveyed to the city a tract of 
land containing 3.37 acres situated north and immediately opposite Aspen Grove 
Cemetery, as a place of public interment, and to be known as the "Burlington 
Cemetery," and that said cemetery should be "A free public burial ground for 
the interment of citizens and strangers." The ground was to be divided into four 
sections, one for the use of the inhabitants of the city, one for the interment of 
strangers, one for paupers, and one for people of color. The said ordinance pro- 
vided that the removal of bodies from the old graveyard must be done in five 
months after October 20, 1853. The City of Burlington agreed with the trustees 
of the Burlington University, that in consideration of the tract of land furnished 
by Abner Leonard, known as the "Burlington Cemetery," to remove within six 
months from the passage of the ordinance all monuments and tombstones, etc., 
"and so many of the bodies as said city may deem necessary to the removal of 
tin- monuments, and the use and enjoyment of said grounds by said university." 
At the time this transaction took place much feeling was engendered on account of 
the action of the council and board of trustees of the university. The relatives 
and friends of many of the old settlers had been buried at this place; they claimed 
the old burial ground was not a nuisance ; that this was but a pretext to enable the 
carrying out of an infamous bargain made by the trustees of the university with 
the city to obtain a location for the university ; that other places just as suitable 
could be had. The fact is, the bodies of many of those buried there were not 
removed. Years afterwards, the university sold portions of this ground for resi- 
dent purposes, and in excavating for cellars and grading of streets laid out, 
decayed coffins were unearthed, and with the bones they enclosed, were thrown 
into wagons and dump-carts and hauled away. 

On March 4, 1838, the Patriot (Fort Madison) contained the following: "If 
a division of this territory is effected, we propose that the Iowans take the cog- 
nomen of 'Ilawkeyes.' Our etymology can then be more definitely traced than 
can that of the Wolverines, Suckers, Gophers, etc., and we shall rescue from 
oblivion a memento, at least the name of the old chief ; who seconds the motion?" 
In the same number is the following account of a ball: "The 22d ult. (Wash- 
ington's Birthday) was celebrated in this town by a ball. We attended it merely 
to state that by invitation General Black Hawk and Nashe-as-kuk, his oldest son, 
with their wives, were present on the occasion. The former chief had on his full 
court dress. The bride of Black Hawk's firstborn is said to be a very modest 
and pretty young woman of the Sauk tribe." 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 107 

On the first Monday of June, 1838, one J. P. Stewart opened an "Academy 
of Science and Literature." Mr. Stewart's academy was in the spacious upper 
rooms of the building formerly occupied by C. Nealey as a store. This was the 
first academy established in Burlington. 

In 1839, Bridgman & Partridge were selling scythes, wall paper, Boston nails, 
teas, sugar, coffee and molasses, etc. At the same time Charles J. Starr had what 
he called the "New General Store," and sold boots, shoes, hardware and white 
lead. In the same year H. W. Moore & Co. were dealing in groceries, liquors, 
wines, hardware and paper at their brick store on Water Street. 

William S. Edgar had on hand at his store a stock of fresh drugs, medi- 
cines and paints. 

In the same year Robertson & Armstrong were operating a wholesale and 
retail drug store. Charles B. Wall, at the corner of Water and Washington 
streets, had on hand a large assortment of West India goods and groceries. Mrs. 
Wall (whether she was the wife of the above named Charles we do not know) 
advertised herself as a "fashionable dressmaker and tenders her services to the 
ladies of Burlington." Her residence is on Water Street, immediately under the 
Hawkeye printing office. 

In 1840, L. A. Smith advertised herself as a "milliner and mantua maker," 
and requests the ladies to call and look over her styles before purchasing else- 
where. Webber & Remey want "wheat." They advertise, "Our customers who 
are indebted to us can have an opportunity to settle their accounts by the delivery 
of wheat, for which we will pay 50 cents per bushel." Luke Palmer has fourteen 
barrels of fresh flour and 22,000 good oak shingles which he wants to sell. One 
S. W. Babbit is running a grocery store at the old stand in the rear of the jewelry 
store. W. B. Ewing and W. M. Logan are doing business under the firm name 
of Ewing & Logan. Cook & Cochran have established a new hardware store on 
Water Street, second door from Jefferson. George Blackburn, a tailor, has on 
hand a large assortment of cashmere, vestings, etc. He keeps ready-made cloth- 
ing for sale, all at the southwest corner of Washington and Water streets, under 
the Hawkeye printing office. Now comes the first tooth puller in the town. 
"James Reid, M. D. Dentist, will attend to professional callers at the National 
Hotel." David & Kitchen have formed a partnership and succeed J. S. David 
as grocers and commission dealers. C. T. Dabney has started a new saddlery 
store, one door east of Robert Burrus on Water Street. Y. S. and M. T. Benton 
are selling ready-made clothing and brush hats. A. W. Carpenter is still in the 
ring and selling "Yankee clocks" at the sign of the "Golden Watch." On Main 
Street, William S. Keller is in the cooperage business and "wants fifteen compe- 
tent coopers at good wages." 

We now skip on two years and come to 1842. Francis J. C. Peasley is still 
in the granary and commission business on Water Street. Samuel C. Thompson 
is in the same business. Barton T. David is in the same line of business as 
Thompson and Peasley. W. H. Mauro is in the dry goods and grocery business 
at corner of Front and Washington streets. E. D. Rand is dealing in groceries 
and provisions, boots and shoes, on Water Street. J. F. Tallant is a wholesale 
and retail dealer in drugs and medicines. Deutsche Apotheke C. Bodemann has 
just opened up a new drug store on the corner of Main and Washington streets. 
Copp & Parsons have just received from Boston a large assortment of cotton 



108 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

domestics, flannels, at their store on Jefferson Street. R. S. Adams has 6,000 
pounds of Spanish and oak tanned sole leather for sale. Wesley Jones is in the 
hat, cap. boot and shoe trade. George Partridge has gone into the pork packing 
business. Thomas Hedge has opened up a news store opposite Doctor Ransom's. 
A new bakery has just been started by John Pettinger in a building on Washing- 
ton Street opposite Boyle's Livery Stable. L. Stoddard and Jedadiah Bennett are 
manufacturing carriages on Washington Street near the Methodist Church. 
Corse & Hammon have a coach factory on Jefferson Street between the Western 
and National Hotels. Wilbur Green is a book binder and blank book manu- 
facturer. 

We pass along, omitting many names, until we come to 1845. D. Mclntire is 
an importer and dealer in china and hardware. W. M. H. Holcomb Company 
have established a stage line from Burlington to Springfield, Illinois. W. F. 
Coolbaugh & Co. have received an immense consignment of queensware, carpets, 
etc. The fine steamer Amaranthe is making regular trips from St. Louis, for 
Nauvoo, Burlington, Bloomington and Rock Island. The St. Louis and St. Paul 
packet "Lynx" makes regular trips, etc. There are several other boats doing the 
same. 

In the year 1S45, two exciting and important incidents took place. The trial 
and conviction of William and Stephen Hodge, and the infamous act of Congress 
in cutting down the state boundary limits described in the state constitution, which 
constitution the people of the state refused to ratify. 

The following account appears in the Hawkeye and Patriot of July 30, 1840: 
"Below will be found in detail an account of the convention held in this place on 
Thursday and Friday last. There were about fifty Indians, most of whom pre- 
sented a noble appearance. Although not a chief, young Black Hawk appeared 
to be the chief among this nobility. When he stood up to speak of the desecration 
of his father's sepulcher — as he told of the white men coming to the sepulcher 
and stealthily removing his father's head in the summer, and coming again to 
take away the remainder of his body at another time, we imagined him to be 
a complete personification of grief, telling to a sympathizing audience his tale of 
woe. The recital of the sacrilegious act sent a thrill of horror through the whole 
assembly. When he learned that this was an offense against our laws, and the 
perpetrators would be punished, he seemed satisfied." Governor Lucas addressed 
them as follows : "My children, when I met you in the village last spring, I 
told you my ear was opened at all times to listen to your complaints, and I would 
always be ready to make such representation to your great father, the President, 
as you might wish to communicate through me. Any grievance which you wish 
me to lay before your great father, the President, I will now hear." 

\\ ish-e-lan-e-qua, or Hardfish, rose and said "he was well pleased with what 
he had told them at the village in the spring — he opened their ears a little and 
they were pleased. Now those with him did not know about the business of the 
money, how it was appropriated, their women and children were destitute and 
bad off and they wanted them fixed better. Their chiefs, Keokuk. Appanoose, 
Wapello and Powishiek, do what they don't understand and this wa« the reason 
for their coming. He was not well, but the other men would speak, he was not 
able to speak himself." 




THE INDIAN CHIEF WAPELLO 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 109 

Wa-ha-kis-kok, the Prophet, said "they were all very glad to see their father 
today, and to know they were not forgotten (pointing upward) ; that their good 
Father above had not forgotten them. Those with him know they are bad off, they 
will tell the truth so all the men and women around can hear. That all those with 
him were braves." The interpreter informed the audience that they were the 
only chiefs, that they did not acknowledge Keokuk or any other to be their chief. 
Wah-at-aqua said "they were all very glad to have their ears opened. When 
they started it was very cold, but cold or warm they determined to come. They 
had been blind, they did not know what became of their money, they think Gen- 
eral Street has been a great cause of making them blind with the other chiefs. 
These are the chiefs (meaning Hardfish and the Prophet), we wish to have 
them and no others. The other chiefs, Keokuk, etc., have done wrong. Hard- 
fish and the Prophet want each one of the tribe to have a share of the money; 
this is the mind of all his friends." Nashe-as-kuk, son of Black Hawk, said "that 
he was well pleased with what had been said by his friends. Our children and 
families are poor and are suffering, and that is what brought us here. The other 
chiefs have kept us blind. He and his friends wish the money divided." "Gov- 
ernor Lucas addressed them and matters were so arranged that they had no fur- 
ther complaint. After the above conference the meeting adjourned until the 
afternoon, when the Indians amused a very large audience for about two hours 
in performing religious and war dances. During these exercises the Indians were 
almost naked, and their bodies painted with various colors which made them 
appear quite terrific. After the dancing a contribution was taken up on behalf 
of the Indians. Throughout the whole ceremony Hardfish and young Black- 
Hawk stood all in their native dignity as silent spectators of the scenes. The 
latter looked remarkably sedate, and his features bore the marks of apparent 
grief, probably because of the wrongs received from the white man. It is said 
young Black Hawk is opposed to whisky and dram drinking." Where this coun- 
sel and dance was held the Hawkeye fails to state. 

That an Indian war dance was ever held in Old Zion Church we do not know. 
The story is traditionary as far as we can learn. In February, 1845, f> ve years 
after the incidents recited, an article appeared in the Hawkeye headed, "Meth- 
odist Church," which bears somewhat on the question, and out of which would 
grow the story of an Indian war dance in Old Zion. The author of the article 
did not sign his name to it. He says : "Application was made to the trustees 
who have control of this house to permit its use for a sacred concert. Two of 
the board gave their consent, but the third placed his official ban upon the neg- 
ative, saying he would not give his consent to appropriate the building to any 
other purpose than preaching. We have the highest regard for the purity of 
the sanctuary, but in this case there are qualifications which change the relation, 
etc. No fane covered with shingles has been used for more various purposes, 
etc. We do not know that there was ever a bowling alley, a faro bank, or a 
roulette table, within its walls, etc., but we do know if credit be given to oral 
testimony that it has been occupied for the meeting of the Territorial Legislature, 
Indian councils, war dances and Indian pow-wows, etc." We refrain from giv- 
ing all this gentleman's choleric article, but will state it is out of such as the 
above the story of a war dance being held in Old Zion has grown. 



CHAPTER XI 

HISTORY OF BURLINGTON, CONTINUED 

It will be remembered that the district of country now comprising Iowa was 
by act of Congress in June. 1834, attached to Michigan Territory. That Wis- 
consin Territory was organized April 20, 183d, and was made to include all 
that part of Michigan Territory west of the Mississippi River. 

At the first session of the Legislature of Wisconsin, meeting at Belmont, to 
which Jeremiah Smith of Burlington was a delegate, it selected Madison as the 
capital, and in the act provided that, until the capitol building was completed, the 
Legislature should meet at Burlington. 

After other counties had been carved out of old Des Moines County conten- 
tion arose as to the location of the county seat of Des Moines County. The 
Iowa Territorial Legislature, by an act approved January 25, 1839, divided Des 
Moines County into three districts, from each of which was to be elected a county 
commissioner. That part of the county south of Flint Creek formed the first 
district. That portion north of Flint Creek constituted the second district. The 
City of Burlington comprised the third district. The Territorial Legislature on 
the 9th day of January, 1840, passed an act entitled, "An act to enable the 
citizens of Des Moines County to establish the seat of justice for said county." 
Section 1 of the act provided: "That there shall be an election held in the sev- 
eral precincts within said county on the first Monday of March next, at which 
each qualified voter in said county shall have the right to vote," etc. Section 2 : 
"That the votes shall be confined to two points only ; that is to say, the 'Center,' 
or Burlington, and those voting at said election shall vote by ballot. Those voting 
in favor of the 'Center' will write or print on their ticket the word 'Center.' and 
those in favor of Burlington will write or print on their ticket the word 'Burling- 
ton,' and if a majority shall be in favor of the 'Center,' then it shall be the duty of 
the county commission to proceed to make the selection of a suitable site at or 
near the center as a good situation can be had on which the seat of justice shall 
be located ; but should the majority be in favor of Burlington, then in that case 
Burlington shall be the seat of justice for said county." The election took place 
on the 2d day of March, 1840: 

Townships Burlington Center 

votes votes 

Burlington 465 40 

Augusta 70 21 

Union 3 58 

Yellow Springs 40 155 



578 274 

Majority for Burlington, 304 votes. 

110 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 111 

It may seem strange that forty votes would be cast in Burlington Township 
for the "Center.*' At the time many of the land aristocrats of Burlington had 
entered large tracts of land near what they considered the center, and just the 
place where the county seat ought to be located. This fully accounts why those 
forty votes in Burlington were cast for the "Center.'' 

Burlington, from 1846 to 1859, made great growth. Soon after the settle- 
ment of a new county, or the formation of a city, a weeding out process com- 
mences, many of the first settlers moving away to newer lands. Such was the 
case with Burlington. From a population of 517 in 1836, with many of the first 
settlers leaving, the city continued to increase in population, and many substantial 
brick homes and business buildings had been erected since the first brick house 
erected by Judge Rorer in July, 1836. 

In 1856 was published the Burlington Business Directory, which gives a review 
of the trade, commerce and manufacturers of the city. We quote largely from 
this book. "Burlington's population at the census taken over a year ago was 
11,000. Now it is computed at 13,000 to 14,000 inhabitants. The vote cast imme- 
diately after the census was taken was 1,100, while the vote cast at the last Feb- 
ruary non-contested election was 1,500. At the same ratio of votes to the people, 
the present number of the population would be 15,000. 

"The pork packing business is carried on more extensively in Burlington than 
any city of its age in the United States, and Burlington has already been named 
by some, the 'Porkopolis' of Iowa. There are three pork packing houses here, 
all of them extensive. That of Schenck & Denise is deserving of notice. It is 
90 feet wide and 200 feet deep, with two stories and a cellar. The smokehouse 
is capable of smoking at once not less than eight thousand hams. In two packing 
houses I saw about an acre of park piled up several feet high, through which 
there are narrow lanes and passages." 

The pork packed during the past season is as follows : 

Schenck & Denise, hogs I 8,535 

McFaul & Co., hogs 17,208 

J. G. Law & Co., hogs 10,000 



Total packed 45.943 

These firms shipped live hogs to Chicago during the same year 30,172 



Total receipts of hogs at Burlington for 1856 76,115 

Dressed hogs shipped to Chicago I 9,°75 

Pork shipped to Chicago, barrels 7 r 9 

Lard shipped to Chicago, pounds 59 2 ,^55 

The above is a pretty good showing in the pork line for a town of the size 
of Burlington in 1856. 



112 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 



AMOUNT OF GRAIN HANDLED 



Wheat 
Names of Dealers bushels 

Ogden & Copp 40,000 

Michaels, Parks & Co 60,000 

Thomas Hedge & Co 30,000 

Joseph Norton 

Norton 

A. S. Fear, about 

Reeves & Wightman 

C. O'Brien 



17,000 

15-000 

15.000 

15.100 

20,000 

Burroughs 25,000 

T. Walkup, about 20,000 

Other operators, probably 40,000 



Oats 

bushels 

60,000 

5,000 

15,000 

60,000 

25,000 
3,000 

83,000 
3,000 

50,000 



Total 297,000. 304,000 

Seven-eighths of this grain was shipped to Chicago. 



Corn 
bushels 

5,000 

5,000 

20,000 

10,000 

2,000 

3,000 

15,000 

40,000 

100,000 



Rye 
bushels 



500 
1,600 



1,000 



1,000 
2,000 

6,100 



AMOUNT OF FLOUR MANUFACTURED 

There are two mills in Burlington manufacturing flour: 

Barrels 
Since August, 1855, to August 1, 1856, Putnam & Co. manufactured. . . . 9,900 
Sunderland & Bro 12,000 

Total 21,900 

AMOUNT OF LUMBER SOLD 

Feet 

E. D. Rand & Co 2,000,000 

J. W. & W. D. Gilbert 1,500,000 

Campbell & McClure 1,500,000 

Evan Evans 1,000,000 

M. S. Foote, Chicago Lumber 1,200,000 

Total 7,200,000 

SALES, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

Dry goods (two wholesale) $300,000 

Dry goods, retail ( four houses) 285,000 

Groceries, wholesale 477,000 

Hardware ( four wholesale and retail) 209,000 

Drugs, paints (two wholesale and retail) 150,000 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 113 

IRON FOUNDRIES AND MACHINISTS 

Steam engines Sawmills Value of 

built Boilers erected manufactures 

C. Hendrie 52 56 75 $140,000 

C. Sowden & Co 13 . . 10 15,000 

Renz & Co 20 . . 35 20,000 



Total 85 56 120 $175,000 

Four years prior to 1856 there were two seven by nine foundries in this city 
doing $10,000 worth of work in a year. In 1856 there was $150,000 of this kind 
of work done. In 1856 there were two plow manufacturing industries in the city 
sending out work to the amount of $75,000 annually. There were two marble 
yards ; our patent churn factory. There were manufactured in Burlington at 
this time threshing machines, smut machines and portable sawmills. There 
were two extensive carriage factories, one starch factory. Was being erected a 
linseed oil mill. Rand & Starr had erected Marion Hall. The Burlington Gas 
Works was commenced at a cost of $65,000, under the superintendence of Mr. 
Henry Spellman. Eleven churches had been erected, two Methodist, one Pres- 
byterian, one Baptist, one Congregational, one Protestant Episcopal, one German 
Methodist, one Lutheran, one Cumberland Presbyterian, and two Roman Catholic. 

During the year 1855, Green, Thomas & Co. had erected a new bank building. 
Parsons & Copp had erected a banking building occupied by White & Cook. 
Dr. J. F. Henry had erected two buildings. Four buildings erected by Kriech- 
baum & Co., and one by Criswell & Hillhouse. James W. Grimes had completed 
the erection of a splendid hotel. J. S. Schramm had contracted for the erection 
of a building 60x118 feet on the corner of Main and Washington streets. J. F. 
Tallant and Luke Palmer had secured drawings and plans for fine residences on 
South Hill ; besides all of the above, the building of the Burlington & Missouri 
River Railroad was being pushed on its way to the mouth of the Platte River. 

The first Burlington City Directory published by J. L. Corse & Son, in 1859, 
gives under the head 

BUSINESS 

Containing the names of many business men in the city in 1859. 

Agricultural Implements Auction and Commission 

Keith, Robinson & Co. Harris, O. H. 

Spencer, R. & Co. Utter, W. V. 

Architects Bakers and Confectionery 

Bassett, A. G. Hoerr, Geo. & P. 

Dunham, C. A. Rankin & Taylor 

Leonard, S. P. Schank, J. 

Stover, J. Woellhaf, H. 

Walz, Charles 



114 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 



Barbers 



Anderson, T. 
Augutta & Co. 
Brown, Louis 
Graesser, M. 
Miller, George 
Walker, A. 
Gunnell, S. 

Blacksmiths 

Andrew, John L. 
Burg, John 
Christman, J. 
Eads, David 
Fewens & Patton 
Fink, John & Co. 
Grape, Phillip 
Hirst, A. 
Merryman, Geo. 
Pendleton, John 
Reppert, C. 
Wiggins, Charles 

Boarding 

Eells, Odin 
Hovey, Z. C. 
Isaacs, J P. 
Lorenz, vlrs. A. 
Nealey House 
Reed, L. P. 
Snyder, Mrs. E. 
Wilkin, C. 

Brass Foundry 
Allen, Samuel 

Boiler Makers 

Lendrum & Fawcett 
Howard, Wra. 
Rider, Jacob 
Wilson, J. M. 

Book Binders 

Acres, Stephen T. 
Hirt, C. 



Books and Stationery 

Brown, J. P. 
Corse, J. L. & Son 
Hawley, H. H. 

Boots and Shoes 

Adams, R. S. 
Bernet, F. 
Bramford, B. 
Caffrey & Harper 
Danner, W. T. 
Dewein, J. 
Fick & Hamm 
Klein, C. 
Krumholz, A. 
Mesmer, M. 
Neseman, H. 
Schwarz, C. 
Scott, H. H. 
Sweetser, C. H. 
Uttry, Frederick 
Wahl, G. 
Walcher, J. 
Weher, T. B., & Co. 
Wollmer, A. 

Brewers 

Bauer & Schaffner 
Bosch, George 
Bosch & Leopold 
Fischer, P. 
Gugel, F. 
Willem, Inez 



Brick Makers 



Callendine, \Y. 
Kite. John 
Strickler, D. B. 



Butchers 



Collins, Samuel A. 
Gephard, John 
Martin & Fishbeck 
McElheimer, G. W. 
Patterson, R. W. 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 



115 



Rouser, R. 
Trau, Philip 
Wilhelm & Ramge 



Candle and Lard Oil 



Hecker & Mathes 
Ford, H. T. 

Carpenters and Builders 

Adam, D. M. 
Bomgardner, Geo. 
Brautigan, C. 
Colter, T. P. 
Cox, D. Y. 
Crider, J. C. 
Doran, P. 
Egenolf, J. 
Evans, Wm. J. 
Fleming, Thos. 
Fordney, A. 
Fordney, Wm. 
Grove, James 
Howard, R. 
Ingall, Mathias 
Joy, Edward 
Lloyd, T. E. 
Loper, Uriah 
Philips & Little 
McKinney, S. J. 
McPherin & Coads 
Nairn & Gillies 
Ogden, Enoch 
Owens & Haws 
Russell, William 
Reed, J. H. 
Young, Wm. A. 

Cigars and Tobacco 

Gnahn & Gabriel 
Heimbeck, G. H. 
Matern & Herminghaus 
Robinson, S., & Co. 
Schmidt & Krieg 
Watts, C. L. 



Clothiers and Tailors 

Brown, M. 
Brugge, M. 
Cook, J. S. 
Dewein, C. 
Ebenhack, J. 
Eisfeld, E. M. 
Elkus, Isaac 
Ezekiel, B. 

Greenbaum & Kaskel 
Hamm, John 
Herschler, Solomon 
Kaiser & Co. 
Lalk, W. 

Lehmann, L., & Co. 
Neely, John M. 
Wehrle, Joseph 
Willner, A. & B. 
Wright, C. H. 

Crockery 

Backus, C. B. 
McKitterick & Miller 

Daguerrean Artists 

Baird, J. G. 
Campbell, L. D. 
Vanselow, H. 

Dentists 

Abercrombie, J. C. 
Bailey, Horton 
Branson & McCollom 

Dry Goods 

Dwyer & Bonfield 
Greenbaum & Schroeder 
Jones, Joseph 
Kendall, R. C, & Co. 
Kimball, J. S., & Co. 
Maura, W. H. 
Parsons, T. L., & C. B. 
Perkins, P. 
Postlewait, W. H. 
Rosenthal & Buchman 



116 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 



Schramm; J. S., & Co. 
Scott, H. H. 
Surth, John 

Druggists 

Bierworth, F„ & Co. 
Darling, A. 
Garthe, Aug. Th. 
Gay, E. E. 
Hendricks, A. 
Squires & Bloss 

Fish Dealer 



Garard, L. H. 

Forwarding and Commission 

Fear & Hagar 
Ogden & Copp 

Foundries and Machine Shops 

Hendrie, C. 
Renz & Co. 
Sowden, C, & Co. 

Furniture Dealers 

Bartruff & Fennimore 
Burge, S. B. 
Hardy, H. C. 
McElhany, James 
Prugh, I. & J. 
Tubbesing & Neihaus 
Weber, Henry 

Grocers, Wholesale and Retail 

Abbey & McLaughlin 
Adams, R. B. 
Bohns, M. 
Bosch, L. 
Brennan, F. 
Chrissinger, J. W. 
Cunningham, }. 
David, J. S. 
Eads & Co. 
Eitman, W. 
Enderle, W. 



Eylward, Martin 

Fleming, M. 

Funk, Fred 

Gear, J. H., & Co. 

Geschwend, E. 

Granger, E. G. 

Hawes, \V. A. 

Hunt, H. E. 

Jones, Joseph 

Kicssling, Geo. 

Kimball, J. S., & Co. 
Lillis, Martin 

Long, C. B. 
Mclntire, J. R. 
Meyer & Heitmeyer 
Nelson, J. R. 
Otten, John 
Pilger, J. 
Poehler, August 
Ridding, D. C. 
Ritchie, C. W. 
Robinson & Johnson 
Rogers, I. N., & Co. 
Schmidt, L. 
Smith, W. B. 
Starker, C, & Co. 
Tedford, R. B. 
Vanleuven & Powell 
Wagner, Charles 
Whitteker & Co. 
Zeigelmuller, L. & J. 

Gunsmiths 
Ebner, F. 
Heimbeck, G. H. 

Hardware 

Kraimer, Westren & Co. 
Morton, James, & Co. 
Perkins, P. 
Ross & Whipple 
Schiffer, G., & Co. 

Hats and Caps 

Ahlert & Kroppach 
Scott, II. II. 
Somers, P. W. 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 



117 



Hotels 

Barret House 
Burlington House 
Lawrence House 
Market Hotel 
McCutcheon House 
Pacific House 
Pennsylvania House 
Western Hotel 
Wightman House 

Livery 
Clark, J. D. 
McCash, W. D. 
Stewart, Robert 

Lumber 

Campbell & McClure 
Evans, Laidlow, & Co. 
Gilbert, }. W. & W. D. 
Rand, E. D., & Co. 
Scarflf, James 

Marble Dealers 
Donahue & McCosh 

Matches 
Burhans, A. H., & Co. 

Milliners and Dress Makers 

Alexander, Mr. S. S. 
Baird, Mrs. J. M. 
Fischer, Mrs. C. 
Hinkle, Mrs. F. J. 
Hixon, Mrs. D. W. 
Leet, Mrs. Isabella 
Lilly, Mrs. Mary 
Martin, Mrs. G. A. 
McElhinney & Candy 
Young, Mrs. Jane 

Millers 

Keiser, Woodward & Sherrill 
Putman, Olmsted & McEwen 
Sunderland. J. P. & I. S. 



Music Dealers 

llawley, H. H. 
Perry, A. W. 

Painters 
Brydolf, F. 
Caravall, W. H. 
I lartman, C. 
O'Keefe, C. 
Raney, B. 
Webster & Wright 
Wetmore & Bro. 
Wetzler, Stephen 

Planing Mills 

Derby, Foote & Co. 
Winter, D. L. 

Pork Packers 

Favorite, S., & Co. 
Schenck & Denise 
Sunderland, Davey & Co. 

Produce Dealers 

Bryan, C. 
Nichols, W. C. 
Norton, J. 

Rectifiers 

Becker, F. 
Kamke & Matthies 



Saddles and Harness 



Deal, E. W. 
Demerle, A. 
Lindstadt, F. 
Ware & Mclntire 

Sash, Doors and Blinds 

Loper, U. 
Washburn, R. M. 

Second Hand Furniture 
Jarvis, H. J. 



118 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 



Smut Mills 

Keiser, Woodward & Sherrill 
Keith, Robinson & Jordan 

Soap Manufacturer 

Ulrich, C. 

Stoves and Tin Ware 

Ashby, T. G. 
Brown, B. 
Foote & Ewing 
Hudson, S. A. 
Kupper, J. 
Mellinger, S., & Co. 
Moore, David 
White, J. W. & C. A. 

Undertakers 

Bartruff, H. S. 

Vinegar Manufacturers 

Bergmann, A. 



Brand, J. G. 
Eggelmann, C. 
Fogelgesang, J. 
Krull, C. 



Wagons and Carriages 

Bennett, J. 
Bischoff, G. 
Boquet, C. 
Cornwell, W. 
Crowley, F. G. 
Burg & Hertzler 
Hinkle, H. 

Watches and Jewelry 

Brooks, A. 

Carpenter, A. W. & W. 
Flint, Louis 
Prochaska, J. 
Vaughn, H. R. 
Waldin, G. H. 



The names given above are those of the business men of Burlington fifty-five 
years ago. We can call the name of but one of them who is now living, our 
honored citizen George Whipple. Before we leave this subject, we will say the 
aggregate of wares manufactured in Burlington in the year 1856 amounted to 
$1,031,000, not including lumber, shingles, flour, pork, lard, etc., but using the 
word "ware" in its ordinary sense. From the Port of Burlington for the year 
1856 there were arrivals and departures, 973 steamboats. No city on the Missis- 
sippi River north of St. Louis had better opportunities than Burlington in 1856, 
and without doubt Burlington today would have a population of over one hundred 
thousand souls but for a process of centralization which commenced soon after 
this time. What brought it about has no place in this book. The direction of 
business has materially changed in many things since that time, of which we do 
not care to write. 

Since writing the above Mr. Whipple has passed away. 



CHAPTER XII 

HAWKEYE PIONEER ASSOCIATION 

In 1858, but twenty-two years after Burlington became incorporated by an 
act of the Legislature of Wisconsin Territory, the people began to think they 
were old settlers, so great had been the changes which had taken place since the 
first settlement. It was then they organized the above named association. This 
association held what they called an "Old Settlers Celebration," June 2, 1858. 
We want to know something about how those "Old Settlers" felt, what their 
thoughts were. In order to do this, we set out the things done and said on 
that occasion. 

OLD SETTLERS 
CELEBRATION 



Burlington, Wednesday, June 2d, 1858. 



ORDER OF EXERCISES. 



1. The Old Settlers of Des Moines County will meet at Marion Hall at 1 o'clock 

precisely. 

2. After the ceremonies they will form a procession, as follows : 

1. The Band. 

2. The Officers of the Hawkeye Pioneer Association. 

3. The Native Young Ladies. 

4. The Ladies who resided here in 1840, with their husbands, gentlemen 

on the right. 

5. The gentlemen of 1840, their Ladies on the right. 

6. Gentlemen and Ladies of 1840. 

3. The Procession will then move down Fourth street to Jefferson, down Jeffer- 

son to Third, up Third and halt in front of Barret House. The invited 
guests, of 1840, will then be invited into the Procession by the President 
of the Association, and take their place immediately in front of the Native 
Young Ladies. 

4. From the Barret House the Procession will move up Third street to Old Zion 

Church, and on arriving and being seated the following exercises will be had. 

119 



120 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

AT THE CHURCH. 

i. Music by the Band. 

PRAYER. 

2. The President will be introduced and welcome our old friends and Settlers 

3. Music. 

4. Address to the "Old Settlers" by Hon. Charles Mason. 

5. Music. 

6. Poem by Johnson Pierson, Esq. 

7. Music. 

8. Address by the President, David Rorer, Esq. 

9. Music. 

10. The audience will join in singing Auld Lang Syne. 
n. Music. 

BENEDICTION. 

After the exercises are over at the Church, the Procession will again form in 
the same order in which it arrived and march to the Barret House, where a Com- 
mittee will be in waiting to seat the guests at the "festival board." That Committee 
will consist of the following named gentlemen, Lyman Cook, J. H. Gear, fames 
McKell, Wm. Sunderland, S. A. Hudson, Wm. Thompson, John Buel,'and J. 
Smith McKenny. 

AT THE TABLE. 

i. Music. 

2. Dinner. 

3. Music. 

4. Regular Toasts, responses and Music. 

5. Volunteer Toasts, speeches and Music. 

Tickets for the Festival will be delivered by the Committee. 

At 8 o'clock in the evening, a GRAND BALL will come off at Grimes' Hall 
on Main Street, to which all will be admitted who have tickets, which may be had 
at the office of the Barret House, and from the Managers. 

M. D. Browning, Ch'n. Gen. Com. 

J. C. Hall, Cha'n. Com. of Arrangements. 
June 2nd, 1858. 

OFFICERS. 

President. 
Hon. David Rorer. 

Vice Presidents, 
Henry W. Starr, Esq., Elbridge G. Leffler, Esq., 

James McKell, Esq., A. W. Carpenter, Esq., 

Col. John S. David. Evan Evans, Esq. 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 121 

At a subsequent meeting of the Board of Officers, held on the 12th of January, 
A. D., 1858. the following appointments were made, to wit : 

Secretary, 
William Garrett, Esq. 
Corresponding Secretary, 

Johnson Pierson, Esq. 

Treasurer, 

Thomas Hedge, Esq. 

The Board of Officers, as empowered by the Constitution, subsequently 
decided upon celebrating the First Annual Festival upon the first Wednesday in 
June, and appointed the 

Hon. J. C. Hall, Marshal of the Day. 

THE FIRST ANNUAL FESTIVAL. 

Wednesday, June 2d, A. D..1858. 

At two o'clock P. M. of this day, the members of the Association assembled 
at Marion Hall, and, having exchanged friendly greetings, were called to order 
by the President, Hon. David Rorer, and proceeded thence to the 'Barret House,' 
in order, as follows : 

Marshal of the Day, 

Hon. J. C. Hall. 

Band. 

President. 

Vice Presidents. 

Secretary. 

Corresponding Secretary. 

Treasurer. 

Members at Large. 

Having reached the Barret House, the procession was opened, and the orator 
and chaplain of the day, and a large number of invited guests, residents in 1840, 
who were there assembled, were received into the ranks immediately following 
the officers of the association, and the line of march was continued to the Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church, in which (a continuous rain having prevented their join- 
ing in the procession, as expected), a large number of ladies were already as- 
sembled. 

The procession having entered the church, the president resumed the chair, 
and order being restored, the Hon. J. C. Hall, marshal of the day, rose and said: 

"Ladies and Gentlemen : This is the first festival of the Hawk-Eye Pioneer 
Association of Des Moines County. I take pleasure in introducing to you the 
first president of the association. Judge Rorer." 

Whereupon the president delivered the following welcome : 

"Old Settlers of Iowa: We welcome you here this day in the name of our 
old settlers, and in the name of all the people of Burlington. 



122 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

"We come together to celebrate our advent into this beautiful land, and to 
renew our early friendships. 

"If there be aught of vanity or weakness in it, we know it will be overlooked 
when we see here present so many of those who came after us, all sympathizing 
in our feelings. They, too, in turn will be old settlers. 

"New Comers of Burlington : We thank you for your presence here this day. 
We greet you from our hearts, as new comers were greeted in days of old. 

"You as well as we have learned what it is to sever the ties of childhood, and 
seek out new homes and new friends in other places. 

"To our Young Friends who are Native Born : We also extend a hearty 
welcome. 

"You link the present to the future, as we link the present to the past. It is 
still your happy lot to enjoy the scenes that cluster around the places of your 
nativity. Should that lot hereafter be changed, then more than ever will you 
appreciate your present privilege." 

PRAYER. 

By the chaplain of the day, Rev. William Salter : 

"Almighty God, our heavenly Father, we come to thee this day with the 
voice of thanksgiving and praise. Thou hast ordered the bounds of our habita- 
tion in great mercy. The lines have fallen to us in pleasant places, and we have 
a goodly heritage. We laud and magnify thy Name. 

"We thank thee for thy favor to those adventurous men who planted upon 
this soil the institutions of Christian civilization. We give praise to thee for the 
courage, and fortitude, and patience, with which thou didst inspire and strengthen 
their hearts in the midst of privation and hardship. We thank thee that so many 
of them continue to this day, and are here present to talk of thy goodness, and 
speak of thy wonderful works. We commend them to thy providence and grace. 
If it please thee, give them length of days, and let their hearts be' continually 
made glad in witnessing the good fruits of their sacrifices and toils. 

"O thou Supreme Ruler of men, thou Governor among the nations, command 
thy blessings upon our beloved state. May peace and prosperity be in all our 
borders. Dispose those that are called to rule over us, to rule in thy fear, and 
as become the representatives of eternal justice. May they be a terror not to 
good works, but to the evil. May the blessings of knowledge, and of our holy 
religion, be universally diffused. May schools and churches be multiplied, and all 
the people be gathered under their influence. Prosper all the efforts of good men 
in every part of the commonwealth to advance whatever is lovely and of good 
report, and let our civil and religious liberties be preserved to the latest age. And 
by thy blessings may this state gain an advanced position among the people of 
the earth in all that enriches and adorns human life, and makes man worthy to 
bear the image of his Maker and Redeemer. 

"O Lord, our God, remember our whole country and all the nations of the 
earth in mercy. Build up in all lands the Kingdom of thy Son. Let his throne 
be exalted, and all kings fall down before him, and all nations serve him. 

"Attend with thy blessing the grateful services of this occasion, and let them 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 123 

be the means of confirming our hearts in patriotism, in public spirit, and in all 

noble virtues. 

"And to thy great name be honor, and power, and glory, forever. Amen." 
The Hon. Charles Mason, being introduced by the president, next delivered 

the following 

address : 

"Air. President, Ladies and Gentlemen: 

"On the first day of June, 1833, the white man first set foot on the ground 
whereon we now stand — claiming it as his own. The former occupants, who, for 
centuries, had been slowly retiring before the steady progress of their more 
powerful neighbors, and again yielded to their destiny, and reluctantly left behind 
them this great river, with the prairies and forests by which it was skirted, to 
follow still further the setting sun — fit symbol of the approaching extinguishment 
of their devoted race — and the civilized American thus obtained a foothold upon 
this shore, to lay the foundation of new cities, and plant the germ of another 
empire. We are now holding the first annual meeting of a society organized to 
commemorate that event, so interesting, not only to ourselves, but to our country 
and to the whole world of mankind. 

"To you, sir, and to most of those who now hear me, I can hardly offer any 
statement of facts which will be either novel or interesting. The event we cele- 
brate is so recent in its date, that it seems to belong to the present rather than 
the past. The mists of forgetfulness have not yet obscured any of the attending 
circumstances. So far from giving scope to the embellishments of fable, or the 
exaggerations of fancy, they have not yet subsided into sober, settled history. A 
quarter of a century seems but a short time in the recollection of an individual — 
still less in the history of a community. Many of those whom I now address 
witnessed the retiring steps of the reluctant savage, as he still lingered around 
the pleasant hunting grounds he was abandoning forever. Within seven years 
from that event every member of this society had taken up his abode within the 
limits of the newly acquired territory, where the aboriginal footprints had not 
then become erased. Men on whom the winter of age has not yet settled, who 
still feel the full glow of active, useful manhood, participated as adults in the 
event we are now commemorating. The Romulus of our city is still among us, 
with a fair promise of as many more years as have elapsed since he modestly 
gave to the city, he and his associates were founding, not his own name, but that 
which then so freshly dwelt in his emigrant heart, associated with tearful recol- 
lections of the past, and of the scenes and friends of his early home. 

"Under these circumstances, I shall not attempt any general recapitulation of 
events as a matter of information. Still, it will not be deemed improper to bring 
to your recollection some of the circumstances connected with the early settle- 
ment of this city and county, and to add such reflections as the present occasion 
may seem to render appropriate. 

"When, in February, 1837, I nrs t se t f°°t within this city, then in the fourth 
year of its infancy, it was a village of some three hundred inhabitants. They 
occupied houses mostly of a single story, and even of a single room, constructed 
of logs, or slightly built frames. Not more than two of the whole number were 



124 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

composed of more substantial materials, and even these have long since vanished 
before the advance of superior improvement. A small opening had been made 
extending a few squares up and down the river, and a still less distance perpen- 
dicularly from the shore; but the hills around, now crowned with comfortable 
and tasteful residences, were then covered with the unbroken primeval forest. 
Not a church or a schoolhouse had as yet made its appearance among us, and 
although the streets had received their geographical position, yet the plastic sub- 
stratum of clay, which had perhaps lain dormant for hundreds of generations, 
had not evinced its capacity for tormenting its disturbers, and for imposing the 
ruling fashion which prevailed for so many years of the frequent change of sides 
between the leg of the boot and that of the pantaloon. Such was the unpretend- 
ing condition of the town which was at that time the seat of government of a 
territory which included what now constitutes three states and the materials of 
a fourth. 

"The condition of the rural districts was in harmonious correspondence with 
that of the metropolis. Skirting the timber land in most parts of the countv might 
be seen a continuous series of incipient farms, each adorned with a settler's cabin. 
Occasionally, some one more adventurous than the rest had launched boldly out 
from the shore, where the others had nestled, into the open ocean of prairie, and 
had fixed his home where the storms of summer and the wintry winds might 
approach him on all sides, and in defiance, also, of the distance whence the 
materials for fire and shelter and fences were to be procured. 

"Public highways were then in an entirely embryotic condition. Between cer- 
tain points tracks had become defined and established, but the traveler generally 
regulated his course across the prairies by the same rule that would have guided 
him over the lake or the desert. The cultivated fruits were wholly an expectancy. 
Like most of the other comforts and conveniences of life, they were visible only 
to the eye of faith — they existed only in the regions of hope. 

"The whole population of what now constitutes the entire State of Iowa, 
taken in the summer and early autumn of 1836, was a little upwards of ten 
thousand. In February following it was probably two or three thousand greater. 
The usual time requisite to send by mail to New York or Washington and obtain 
a reply was ninety days, though the traveler, under favorable circumstances, might 
hope to make that journey in about one-third of that time. I have seen a letter 
which had been one year and twelve days on its pilgrimage from the City of Xew 
York to our Burlington postoffice. 

"The inhabitants within the present limits of our state were almost exclusively 
of the class so widely known under the denomination of squatters. Destitute of 
titles to their lands, they expected and received little protection from statutory 
enactments. But being without the law in this respect, they became a law unto 
themselves, and I think I can safely state, that I have never known justice to be 
meted out with more strict impartiality, or to be tempered with more genuine 
equity. 

"Such is a hasty glimpse which personal observation enables me to present; 
and though the recollections of many who now hear me may reach back a few 
years farther, still, to those who have been eye witnesses of all these events, this 
reminiscence will serve to call up the past in all its vividness. 

"Contrast for a moment this picture of the past with that afforded by a glance 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 125 

at the present, and tell me, whether this earth has often witnessed instances of 
more rapid progress? Within the last twenty-one years, while the infant has been 
growing to the man, the population of our city and that of our state have respect- 
ively increased about fifty fold; their wealth and importance in a much greater 
degree. The practical distance to the seaboard cities, measured through the mails, 
is less than one-tenth of what it was, and not more than one-fifth to the traveler; 
while the telegraph has, for some purposes, effectually annihilated time and dis- 
tance. The open prairie throughout our country has been transformed into a 
series of almost continual enclosures. The plowshare has developed the latent 
fertility of the soil, intrinsically more valuable than the mines of California. 
Comfortable homes are scattered over its entire surface. Orchards and gardens 
and fields, bright with the promise of abundant harvests, are blooming in every 
direction. The necessaries, the comforts, and even the luxuries of life, are enjoyed 
by us in a degree scarcely inferior to those which the people of any of the older 
states can boast. Such are some of the changes which a brief retrospect of what 
we ourselves have witnessed enables us to realize. 

"Much of this improvement may be regarded as peculiar to this and some of 
the other new states. But very much is also due to the general progress which the 
whole human race has made within the last twenty-five years. Probably never 
since the creation has the world made so great a general advance within the same 
limit of time. That wonderful instrument, the telegraph, has sprung into exist- 
ence during that period, and given to man a faculty he never before possessed. It 
is not only spreading its network of nervous sensation all over the land, but is 
now aiming to produce a like result under the ocean also." * * * 

"Railroads, though invented just previously, can hardly be said to have been 
practically known to the world prior to 1833. They were confined to a very few 
localities ; they have now become a common convenience, an almost daily neces- 
sity in all civilized and populous countries, giving to humanity an almost 
ubiquitous power, never before conceived of. Especially in the United States 
have they been constantly and rapidly extending themselves westward, checkering 
every state from the Atlantic to the Mississippi. Onward still is their note of 
progress, and with a bold ambition, they are manifesting an unmistakable inten- 
tion of overlapping the intervening rocky barriers and formidable deserts, and of 
connecting the two oceans by their ligaments of iron. 

"Within the same space of time has steam been successfully applied to ocean 
navigation. The broad Atlantic is now traversed in this manner with as much 
regularity as the steam ferryboats ply across the Mississippi ; and other seas and 
oceans are fast becoming witnesses of like results. That mute, submissive power 
which has learned to urge these floating leviathans for thousands of miles with- 
out food or rest, against winds and currents, has, in numberless other new modes 
since the epoch we are considering, been made implicitly subservient to the will 
of man. The inventive genius of our race has, in fact, received a new general 
impulse. It has explored every portion of the wide field of human efforts, sub- 
stituting the labor of machinery for the far less perfect skill of human hands, 
and contributing in a thousand other methods to enlarge the faculties, minister 
to the comfort, and advance the progress of the human race. * * * 

"This is not the same world it seemed when our city was founded, nor is man 
the same being he then was. His capacities have become enlarged. He can 



126 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

accomplish now what would then have been entirely chimerical. He has risen 
one degree in the scale of being. He has commenced a new era in the progress 
of development. If the wonders described in the Arabian tales should become 
realities during the next generation, hardly will a greater change be effected 
than that which has taken place since the occurrence of the event we are this 
day commemorating. All this have we witnessed. In all this have we partici- 
pated, aside' from our experience in relation to the development of our own body 
politic, in which the world at large has not shared. 

"Reckoning by events and the power of accomplishing results, the day of 
antediluvian longevity seem almost again restored. Methuselah could not 
accomplish in a thousand years what we can now complete in our brief three 
score and ten. I doubt whether during his whole life he saw more important 
changes or witnessed a more substantial progress, either physically, morally, 
socially, or politically, than we have done within the last twenty-five years. 

"We have within that time looked in upon the cradle where human institu- 
tions were in their swaddling clothes, and we have witnessed all their stages of 
development up to the period of their present maturity. We have practically 
been back to the days of the early patriarchs, and many of the changes which, 
in other instances, it has required three thousand years to produce have passed 
successively before our own vision. We have seen society in the very process 
of its first formation. Little by little have we beheld the elements organizing 
into regular order, crystallizing into forms in accordance with the laws of their 
being, and developing progressively into higher and more perfect organizations 
as circumstances permitted or required. 

"Some of us at least have witnessed the entire absence of all the forms of 
civil government within our limits. More than a year elapsed after the savage 
had yielded to the white man before the laws of Michigan were extended over 
the western shore of the Mississippi. Two years later we became a portion of 
the Territory of Wisconsin, and the winter following regular territorial courts 
of general jurisdiction were, for the first time, established among us. Even 
then the administration of the laws was for some time extremely imperfect. 
Counties were organized, but their limits no one could ascertain. The course of 
a stream, and lines indefinitely drawn from grove to headland, were all the 
boundaries which the circumstances of the case permitted. 

"In July, 1838, we became a separate territory, and not long afterwards, the 
surveys of the public lands in this neighborhood having been completed, the 
boundaries of our counties were fixed with precision. The public lands were 
brought into market, and we became possessed of the legal titles to our real 
estate. Regular government was soon afterwards established in the older coun- 
ties, and rapidly extended as civilization made its way into the interior. 

"As illustrative of the novel uses to which it was necessary to adapt the 
limited means within our reach in those early days,' and of the shifts to which 
we were driven by the great mother of invention, I need but remind you of 
some of the scenes which have been witnessed within these very walls (Old 
Zion Church). The main body of this edifice has now been standing about 
twenty years. It was the first and for many years the only church building in 
the City of Burlington. 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 127 

"Whoever at the present day sits within its hallowed precincts, listening to 
the fervid prayer, the calm discourse, the swelling anthem, or the loud hosanna, 
would be very erroneous in the conclusion that these were the only sounds that 
had ever echoed within its consecrated walls. No; other halls have witnessed 
more important and more tragical scenes, but where will you find those that 
could give a more variegated history of what had transpired within them? 

"Here was embodied, for several years, the legislative wisdom of the Ter- 
ritory of Iowa — the 'lower' house paradoxically occupying the hall above, and 
the 'upper' house the room below. From these went forth those edicts which 
for many a year have ruled this goodly land. Here, too, the supreme judicial 
tribunal of the territory held its sometime session, and the regular terms of the 
District Court were here convened for many a successive year. Here the rights 
of persons and property were adjudicated. Here the felon trembled and hoped 
at the prospect of an inefficient penitentiary, and here the murderer received his 
sentence. 



* * * 



"Since the epoch we now celebrate the population of the United States has 
fully doubled; and wealth, power and importance have augmented in a much 
greater ratio. Already have we the largest commercial marine of any power 
on the face of the earth; with only one competitor in all the arts of peace, and 
with a more active and enterprising people than can be found elsewhere under 
the sun. At the end of another quarter of a century our numbers, judging by 
the past, will have doubled again — exceeding those of France or Great Britain, 
including all except her Asiatic dependencies; and by the commencement of 
another century we shall equal those of even Russia herself. Before that date 
the financial center of the civilized world will have crossed the Atlantic. Our 
limits will include all that is of essential value in the whole of North America ; 
our progress in science, agriculture, the useful arts, the means of locomotion, and 
all that gives real prosperity, shall be unequalled by any other nation, and we 
shall stand confessedly the leading power upon the face of the whole earth. 

"Not that our military strength and appointments, either on the ocean or on 
the land, shall exceed those of any of the sovereigns of Europe ; not that we 
are about to enter on a career of conquest, to subjugate by force our neighbors, 
either on the north or on the south. Such an attempt would be the extreme of 
folly, not to say of wickedness, and would lead us far away from the end at 
which we should be aiming. 

"Our mission is, 'Peace on earth and good will to all men.' On that as a 
foundation our government rests. That is the source of all our real power and 
progress. Unless urged by some great necessity, we should not deviate from 
that line of policy. We have but to follow the precept of the Golden Rule, and 
the dictates of our own moral sense, to deal justly, kindly, generously, with each 
other, and with all other nations ; to practice charity and moderation, but at the 
same time friendship, both at home and abroad; in order not only to confer on 
others, but also to secure to ourselves the greatest possible amount of benefits — 
including territorial expansion, national growth and that moral power which 
as greatly exceeds physical force on the score of efficacy as on that of humanity." 

"If there is any class in all our wide domain who, more than all others, can 
be relied upon as being loyal to our present constitution and government it is 



128 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

the pioneers of Iowa who have given a state to that very Union. In their name, 
and in this sacred presence, I here utter the solemn pledge that they will ever 
be found standing shoulder to shoulder in defence of. that great political fabric, 
which is partly the work of their own hands, and which they have so essentially 
aided to strengthen and adorn." 

P O E M, 

By Johnson Pierson, Esq. 

"OLD PIONEER :— Your deeds and toils I sing, 
Progress, my Muse, the West, my fabled Spring; 
And thou, "Old ZIOX," be my Delphic grot, 
Where brooding Memory pours historic thought : 
And ye, "OLD SETTLERS," lend a list'ning ear. 
That I may sing, and you, approving hear; 
Your deeds my theme, the burden of my song ; 
Rough though the verse, its notes to you belong. 
What more adore the old heroic times, 
To grace the Poet's lay, or tuneful rhymes, 
Than the great actions of the wise and good, — 
The hardy dwellers of the cave and wood. 

The Alban Kings, in Rome's primeval day, 
Live in the Epic flow of Virgil's lay; 
And I, to praise your deeds, would wake a song, 
Which with this River's flood should sweep along, 
Roll onward, with its ever ceaseless flow, 
Far as the tide of wand'ring Time shall go : — 
So that the Future, rising into view, 
Might hear my Doric myth and think of YOU. 
Welcome, welcome, one and all 
Where the bridal and the Pall 
Often met, as often parted, 
Blithe with joy, or broken hearted ; 
In God's first Temple, which ye in olden time uprear'd, 
With willing hands and hearts, to him your hardy Sires revered, 
In this vast wilderness, upon the Mississippi's shore, 
Where ye might cultivate the arts of Peace, and God adore. 
' This is then your PLYMOUTH ROCK, 
Within the desert wild, 
Where the Anglo parent stock 

First nursed its Western Child ; 
Here sooth'd the little elfin's cries, 

With pleasant nursery tales, 
Conn'd in New England's placid skies, 

Or Shenandoah's vales : 
Teaching it as it grew up. 
Tasting Life's delusive cup, 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 129 

Words to form its tender thought, 

To mould aright its yielding heart, 
So that in Life, whate'er its lot, 

It still would act a patriot's part ; 
Eschewing Wrong, defending Right, 

And chasing from the West, its Night." 



VALEDICTORY BY THE PRESIDENT. 

Hon. David Rorer. 

In all ages and amongst every people it has been customary to commem- 
orate leading events by traditions, inscriptions, games or ceremonies, or by mon- 
uments of some sort or other. At first, monuments rude and simple, suitable 
to the state of the arts and the tastes of a primitive people; but afterwards by 
permanent erections, some of which among the ancients rival the skill and power 
of modern civilization. In other instances it has been done by the institution 
of orders, ceremonies or anniversaries, which shall perpetuate forever the events 
thus commemorated. 

When the Children of Israel passed over Jordan they took up twelve stones 
out of the midst thereof and carried them unto the place where they lodged, 
and laid them down there ; and those twelve stones, which they took out of 
Jordan, Joshua set up for a memorial, and said unto the Children of Israel: 
"When your children shall ask their fathers, in time to come, saying, 'What 
mean these stones?' — then ye shall let your children know, saying, 'Israel came 
over this Jordan on dry land.' " 

When Saul sought the life of the boy David, it was by the stone monument 
in the field that he was warned of his danger. 

When Columbus landed upon the New World he set up a cross there in 
token of Christian dominion, and bowed down with his followers and wor- 
shiped. That cross is now an emblem of faith all over the land, and the cer- 
emonial of that worship has been repeated therein, morning and evening, ever 
since, and will continue until the end of time, whilst the smoke from the fire- 
sides of fifty millions of free people ascends to heaven as a perpetual memorial 
of the bold navigator — a monument more honorable and lasting than the pyr- 
amids of Egypt, or the cenotaphs of kings and conquerors. 

When the Pilgrim Fathers reached their Land of Promise, they bowed down 
and worshiped the rock of their deliverance upon the rock of their landing place. 
That rock has ever since been regarded by their descendants as a memorial of 
the great event, the anniversary of which is every year celebrated by processions 
and orations and hymns and thanksgiving. 

When our common fathers achieved their independence as one among the 
nations of the earth, they, by common consent, celebrated the day by orations, 
processions, bonfires, rejoicing and the firing of cannon ; whilst the several occur- 
rences in the history of that great struggle have been commemorated by books, 
by paintings, by monuments and by traditions and names of places. 



130 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

When Boone descended into the "dark and bloody ground" he carved his 
name there upon a beech tree as a memorial of the daring step ; and though that 
humble monument has long since passed away, the town of Boonsboro now 
marks the spot ; and his honored name is now commemorated by the names of 
counties and of towns in almost every region of the West. 

Everywhere in our land the progress of civilization has been marked by 
mementos of leading events and of leading spirits, from the footsteps of the 
hunter and the trail of the pioneer, to the camps of the conquerors and halls of 
civil rulers. 

These monuments of our forefathers, and earliest pioneers, have been fol- 
lowed up by the more glorious one of a great confederation, spreading out, like 
the seed of Ezekiel's parable of the two eagles and the vine, from ocean to 
ocean, beside the great waters. Of this glorious monument our own Iowa forms 
a part. Humble as they may be, she, too, has her traditions and mementos of 
the past to commemorate her pioneers, and which in the brief space of a quar- 
ter of a century have led to the erection of a great state, with a free and happy 
people, with civil and literary institutions and works of art and internal improve- 
ments unequaled by those of any other people of the same age on the face of 
the globe. The germ of all this we and our contemporaries planted; and, though 
no bigger at first than a man's hand, yet spreading out like the little cloud that 
rose up out of the sea, they extend now from river to river, and from confine 
to confine of our state until every homestead and every village is an institution 
of learning — until our land is covered with lowing herds, and our ears are 
everywhere enlivened with the whistle of steam and the hum of industry; and 
until the footprints of the red man are wiped out by the track of the locomotive. 
We meet here this day to commemorate the beginning of these things, and the 
names of such of our fellows as have gone before us. Yes — here upon almost 
the very ground where the remnant of red men, within the recollection of many 
now present, kept up their nocturnal wailings over the bones of their fathers — 
almost upon the very ground, where, for years, they periodically came back to 
renew their wild devotions and to deplore the loss of this, their cherished spot 
in "the beautiful land." There, close to the foot of the lower bluff, hard by the 
residences of our friends Anderson and McKell, there is the enchanted ground, 
where the outcast remnant kept up their orgies. 

Seeing, then that there is a sort of instinctive desire in the human breast 
to preserve some recollections of the past, it is not strange that we have met 
together to renew our early friendship; to greet each other as in days of old, 
when the stealthy glance of the red man and the wild state of the country taught 
us the true value of a friend ; when hardships and privations surrounded us ; 
when luxuries, and even comforts, were strangers to us, and when our slum- 
bers were serenaded by the wolf and the catamount instead of by soft strains 
of music. 

Under these circumstances we may be permitted to speak of little things and 
unimportant events which ordinarily do not find their way into any book. 

There is a place now known as Florence, on the south bank of the Iowa 
River, about twenty-three miles from this. We say a place, for it can hardly 
be called a town, though laid out for one and named as such. There was the 
home of Black Hawk, and there, too, was the village of his band. They recrossed 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 131 

the Mississippi to their former homes in the spring of 1832 and commenced 
planting corn, and probably committing depredations on the whites. This brought 
on what is termed the Black Hawk war, in which there are some present who 
did honorable service. Our friend, Jonathan Donnell, for one, the first man who 
committed matrimony in our county, and the man who built the first mill. A 
good man and true — we are most happy to see him here this day. 

That war resulted in a treaty by which this country, from the state line of 
Missouri to opposite Prairie Du Chien, and extending back from the river some 
forty miles, was ceded to the United States, except a reservation of ten miles 
wide on the Iowa River. By this treaty the United States got possession of the 
country on the first day of June, 1833. To celebrate that event we are here this 
day. * * * 

In the fall of 1832 David Tothero came in with his family and settled on 
the prairie at a place about three miles out, since known as the farm of Judge 
Morgan. About the same time, Samuel S. White and family built and occupied 
a cabin at this place, close to the river, at the upper bluff — just above the present 
gas works. The dragoons came down from Rock Island next winter and drove 
White and Tothero over the river and burned down their cabins. White win- 
tered at Honey Creek and returned here and built his cabin on the first of the 
next June, the day of taking possession. It was rebuilt on Front street, between 
Court and High streets, just below the Sunderlands Mills. That cabin was 
removed since to Mr. Keeler's lot near Hawkeye bridge, out Jefferson street; 
and finally pulled down and worked into the bank of the creek for spiling — 
and a spoiling piece of vandalism it was to thus desecrate the old house, the 
mother of all the houses in town. * * * 

The settlement increased with great rapidity, and there being no civil gov- 
ernment, the settlers made regulations for themselves. Some of those are inter- 
esting relics, and will be read : 

"3. Resolved, That any person or persons allowing the Indians to have 
whisky on any account whatever shall forfeit all the whisky he or they shall 
have on hand, and likewise the confidence and protection of this association." 

Surely this looks a good deal like the origin of the "Maine Law." 

It also indicates very clearly that whisky was the only article in the drinking 
way known to the country, for there is no inhibition against any other strong 
drink. 

Another one of these laws is as follows : 

'-'4. Resolved, That any person harboring or protecting a refugee, who, to 
evade justice, has fled from the other sections of the Union, shall be delivered 
with such refugee on the other side of the river." 

These regulations were rigorously enforced. In them there is the spirit of 
patriotism blended with the love of order. * * * 

In Tune, 1834, Congress passed an act annexing the Black Hawk purchase 
to the Territory of Michigan for temporary government. In September follow- 
ing the Legislature of Michigan divided the purchase into two counties — Des 
Moines and Dubuque — the boundary between them being a line running due 
west from the foot of Rock Island. They also organized a county court in 
each county. The seat of justice was at this place for Des Moines County. The 
first court here was holden in April, 1835, in a log house on the hill, on lot No. 384, 



132 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

where Air. Ritchie now lives. We will now call the grand jury for that court, 
and see how many, after this twenty-three years, will answer to their names. 
They were: Hugh Wilson, David Hunter, James Hatcher, Mathew W. Latty, 
James Dawson, Solomon Osborn, William Derkins, John Chandler, Francis 
Redding, Daniel Chance, Enoch Wade, Jonathan Morgan, George Leebrick, 
Jeremiah Smith, and Arthur Ingram, foreman. None anszver. 

The business of the term consisted in granting three divorces, convicting one 
person for assault and battery, and fining one person, a Mr. John Toopes, for a 
contempt of the court, with an order of committal until the fine should be paid. 
This fining for contempt is the first entry of record. The occasion was this: 
While the. court were empaneling the grand jury a fight occurred in open court 
between John Toopes and one W'alters. In the rencontre they upset the table 
of the judges, or rather the dry goods boxes used by them as such, and that was 
the contempt for which Toopes was punished. 

By referring to the list of Santa Fe prisoners taken by the Mexicans in 
Cook's expedition to annex Santa Fe to Texas, it will be found that the name 
of John Toopes, our hero of the county court, is among them. That not con- 
tent with overturning that primitive tribunal, he turns filibuster, and, Don 
Quixote like, goes to Mexico to fight for his rights and breaks a lance with 
Santa Anna. Circumstances justify the belief, however, that he was not prompted 
so much by a lawless purpose as by that thirst for adventure so characteristic 
of the American pioneer — a race of men always ready for any honest enter- 
prise, from the court leet to the battle field — from the cabin to the White House. 
Their march is ever onward, bearing the banner of manifest destiny all over 
our continent. 

They go not for the sake of gain — but for the love of going — and are so 
constituted as to always still love to go. They are brave and hospitable, high 
minded and honorable. They are faithful friends, and dangerous but honorable 
enemies. Frank in their intercourse, and open in their purpose, they hold dis- 
simulation in contempt and never smile with purpose to deceive. They would 
spurn a benefit procured by crouching, and are generous to a fault. They are 
temperate without pledges, and practice the moral virtues without professing 
them. They are the truest representatives of the Cavaliers, possessing most of 
their virtues, with few of their faults. As points the needle to the pole, so tend 
their footsteps southward, or westward towards the setting sun. Their wants 
are few — they are always poor, but never paupers. The iron hand of the oppressor 
comes not near them. With the mountains for curtains, and the heavens for a 
canopy, they make their beds in peace, and build their log huts far from the 
intrigues of the busy world. Prompted by a law of their nature, their march is 
ever onward. Hence we find but few of ours remain. 

Where, then, are those of our pioneers who answer not our call this day? 
Why come they not up to meet us? They are gone! But think you yonder 
cemetery holds them all? No! by far not all. 

They came — they looked upon the land — they plucked the wild flower from 
the prairie — they built them houses and planted fields — they hunted the wild 
beast from his native cover. With contented hearts and noble hands, in priva- 
tion they laid the basis of a state, and for this brief time were happy. The 
country then was new — they never dreamed it would be old to them. But when 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 133 

these things were done the freshness of the land was gone — the charm of novelty 
was broken. Then, seeing the land of promise still ahead, they sickened at the 
deed which they had done, and were unhappy ; for they were pioneers and still 
longed to go. In the meantime many are dead — their last "claim" is made — a 
small green mound by the Father of Waters! And while a few, restrained by 
local influences, reluctantly remained behind, and are left, like the lost boulders 
which lie scattered over our prairies, the great mass of them who lived went on. 
By the rippling waters towards the setting sun they found themselves new homes 
• — and then again found others along Vancouver's shore — or, some diverging to 
the left, in California's golden sands they stuck their stakes, with restless eye 
turned toward the sunny South. Some, like Moses, have fallen by the way- 
side, their graves as little known as his. 

On the cold summit of the Nevada ; 

And on the green sward of Central America ; 

In the deep gorges of the mountain pass; 

And on the battle fields of Mexico; 

On the lone, Pacific coast, 

And all along the route from here, to there, they rest. There unhonored 
are their lonely graves, or there, unburied, bleach their honored bones — their 
memory we renew this day. * * * 

On the suggestion of the Hon. J. C. Hall, marshal of the day, the whole 
assembly joined in singing 



AULD LANG SYNE. 

Should auld acquaintance be forgot, 

And never brought to min' ! 
Should auld acquaintance be forgot, 

And days o' lang syne? 

CHORUS. 

For auld lang syne, my dear, 

For auld lang syne, 
We'll tak a cup o' kindness yet, 

For auld lang syne. 

We twa hae run about the braes, 

And pu'd the gowans fine ; 
But we've wander'd mony a weary foot, 

Sin' auld lang syne. 

For auld lang syne, etc. 



134 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

We twa hae paidl't i' the burn, 

Frae mornin' sun til dine ; 
But seas between us braid hae roar'd 

Sin' auld lang syne. 

For auld lang syne, etc. 

And here's a hand, my trusty frien, 

And gie's a hand o' thine ; 
And we'll take a right guid-willie waught, 

For auld lang syne. 

For auld lang syne, etc. 

And surely ye'll be your pint-stowp, 

As sure as Fll be mine ; 
And we'll take a cup o' kindness yet, 

For auld lang syne. 

For auld lang syne, etc. 



BENEDICTION. 

By the Rev. William Salter. 

The grace of the Lord Jesus Christ, and the love of God, and the communion 
of the Holy Spirit, be with you all. Amen. 

The large assemblage of old settlers, ladies and gentlemen, preceded by the 
band, then formed in procession and marched to the Barret House, where, 
under the direction of a special committee, a most sumptuous and elegant dinner 
was spread for them upon the ample board of "mine host," R. A. Deming. The 
chair was occupied by the Hon. David Rorer, president of the association, with 
the numerous invited guests, on either hand. He was assisted by the vice pres- 
idents, who presided at the several tables. 

GRACE. 

By the Rev. William Salter. 

Our Father, who art in heaven, we give Thee thanks for these bounties. 
Inspire our hearts with gratitude for peace and plenty, and every mercy, and 
help us to declare Thy praise, not only with our lips, but in our lives. Bestow 
Thy benediction upon the "Old Settlers" and upon their children and the children's 
children, and fill the State of Iowa with light, and knowledge, and salvation, 
through Jesus Christ, our Lord. Amen. 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 135 

REGULAR TOASTS. 

i. IOWA — She claims Michigan as her grandfather, Wisconsin as her 
father; and with due respect to her progenitors, she claims to be an improvement 
upon the breed — not only in natural resources, and moral, social and educational 
advancement, but in her future prospects. 

2. OLD DES MOINES, the Mother of Counties— -She welcomes to her 
maternal board the representatives of her daughters, Lee, Van Buren, Henry, 
Jefferson, Washington, Louisa, Muscatine and Scott. 

The Hon. D. W. Kilbourn, of Lee, responded to this toast. He said : 
Mr. President, Ladies and Gentlemen: 

I return you, Mr. President, and through you, the Hawk-Eye Pioneer Asso- 
ciation of Des Moines County, my sincere thanks for your invitation, which has 
given me the privilege of meeting with you here today. I regard this, sir, as no 
common occasion. It is, I believe, the second meeting of the kind ever held in 
the state, and your society is the second and last county society of "Old Settlers" 
yet organized. 

I am most happy to be present here today, but not so happy, sir, in attempting 
to make a speech. I expected our county to be ably represented here today. Gov- 
ernor Lowe, Mayor Sample, General Van Antwerp, General Bridgeman, of 
Keokuk, and others from various parts of the county, promised to be on hand. 
No doubt all of these gentlemen will give good reasons for their absence; but 
I venture to predict that not one of these "old settlers" will ever admit that 
the severe rainstorm of this morning had anything to do in preventing their 
presence here. 

I, sir, settled in Des Moines County more than twenty years ago, and it is 
no fault of mine that I am not now a citizen of your county. I was legislated 
out of it, as I lived in that part which now forms Lee County, and of which 
all her citizens are proud, as they are of her mother, Old Des Moines. 

My first visit to this spot was in April, 1837. Wonderful is the change since 
then. Then only a few small frame and log buildings occupied the ground 
where now appears this beautiful city. Palatial residences and substantial and 
imposing business houses have taken the places of the unpretending and tem- 
porary structures of 1836. 

Then the only hotel was a small frame house on the bank of the river, named 
the "Iowa House." The dining room was in the rear, built of rough logs, and 
just before had been used as a stable. But as this was the best in the town, 
and the accommodating landlord did the best he could by his guests, everybody 
was satisfied. 

Today we are assembled under different circumstances. This commodious 
and splendidly kept house, this beautiful and extensive dining room, these tables, 
loaded with luxuries, and these ladies, surrounded by — I had almost said it — 
make us realize the change that has taken place in twenty-one years. 

Mr. President, I must tell you about the first public speech it was my priv- 
ilege to listen to in Iowa. It was a "Fourth of July Oration," and was delivered 
in this place in January, 1838, by "The Starr" of Burlington. Some of you, no 
doubt, have a vivid recollection of that occasion. Among the reminiscences of 
early times I often think of it. 



136 HISTORY OF DES .MOINES COUNTY 

.Mr. President, though but two are here today from Keokuk, we claim to 
make up somewhat in time what we lack in numbers. Valencourt Van Orsdall, 
Esq., who is here present, is no doubt the oldest settler in Iowa here this day, 
and most likely the oldest settler at present resident in the state. He came to 
the site of Keokuk in the year 1827, and is the only person now residing in 
Keokuk who resided there in 1840. I am glad that he is here present today, and 
unless a better claim be put in I think our City of Keokuk may boast that one 
of her citizens is the oldest settler in Iowa. 

Mr. Kilbourn having concluded, H. W. Starr, Esq., proposed that three cheers 
be given to Mr. Van Orsdall, the oldest citizen of Iowa, which were given with 
heartiness. 

The Hon. Charles Foster, of Washington County, being called upon, also 
responded to the second toast. He said : 
Mr. President: — 

Children always are indebted to their parents for much of their own peculiar 
character. The descendants of Romulus and his robber band never lost the 
predatory character and wolf-like ferocity of the nurse-mother of their great 
ancestor. And the method taken to supply the new colony with their first wives 
did not add to their moral character, nor increase the respect of those old repub- 
licans for woman's rights. 

This western world of ours is settled by more diverse elements of national 
character than any other. The Huguenot of France, the plodding Hollander, the 
persevering German, the Swede, Finn and Dane, the Irish, Scotch and English, 
with all the results of their mingled races, were originally scattered along, in 
separate colonies, from Maine to Georgia. The early Indian wars, and more 
especially the Revolutionary war, fused these differing colonies into one nation, 
and from this fusion have already sprung twenty new states. If, as is generally 
acknowledged, the character of a people is improved by this intermingling of 
various branches of the race, what may we not expect in this country? In the 
"Father of His Country," in the united band of revolutionary patriots, in the 
array of hero settlers — the first "old settlers," from the veritable, original John 
Smith, of Virginia, to Ethan Allen, of Vermont, we have the promise and germ 
of our future greatness. The valor, enterprise and integrity of our founders 
will perpetuate themselves in our institutions forever. 

It is not becoming that I should, in their very presence, speak of the first 
settlers of Des Moines, the mother of Iowa counties. They are here to speak 
for themselves. Seldom has it been the good fortune of the founders of a state 
to witness the log cabins of their building, colonizing into a large and populous 
state, with every accompaniment of wealth and intelligence, while they them- 
selves are yet in the midsummer of life. It is difficult for us to realize that, 
within twenty-five years of this time, the first log cabin of the first legal squatter 
sovereign was, in the profound solitude of a vast wilderness, erected here where 
now the busy hum of a great city welcomes us to her festal day. In behalf 
of the invited guests, I thank you for the kind invitation and your cordial wel- 
come — so freely given, so nobly fulfilled. Yet for certain reasons I wish the 
ladies here to understand that I am not a very old settler. 

In conclusion I beg leave to offer this sentiment : 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY . 137 

THE CHILDREN OF OLD DES MOINES— May their mother ever be 
able to point them out, as did the mother of the Gracchi, and say with just pride, 
"behold my jewels." 

12. OUR INVITED GUESTS— W 7 ? give you a hearty welcome. 

Responded to by Willard Barrows, Esq., of Scott County, who, being intro- 
duced by the Hon. J. C. Hall, spoke as follows : 

I am called upon, Mr. President, as an invited guest. I am no orator. My 
life has been spent for twenty-five years in camp. For more than twenty years 
I have rambled over the rich prairies of Iowa as a surveyor. Twenty years ago 
I visited the lovely spot upon which your prosperous and beautiful city now 
stands. What changes have taken place ! Your green hills have been covered 
up by the habitations of man. The Indian and the deer have fled alike towards 
the setting sun, and the last wild footprints of the red man have been covered up 
by the onward march of civilization. 

To those of you who have witnessed the change, how great the contrast! 
You stand here today, my pioneer friends, comparative strangers in your own 
homes. Your log cabins have given place to the most stately mansions. It is 
not only so in your own city and county, but in every city and village throughout 
the state. The progress of our adopted state is beyond all precedent. The world 
has never beheld such rapid strides as we have seen. But this festival today 
gives abundant evidence that you have not forgotten the past. The happy smile, 
the familiar greeting, the nod of recognition, all attest the joy of the occasion, 
and every eye is bright with hope for the future. 

We should cherish these feelings, my friends. Let the joy of the cabin in 
the days of infancy never be forgotten in the pride of your palaces. Let the 
reminiscences of a pioneer life never be forgotten, or thrown aside for the 
splendors and magnificence of the present. But tell your early struggles to 
your children, and hand down to posterity, by the records of your association, 
the conflicts through which you have passed, that future generations may know 
the beginning of the mighty West. Perpetuate these reunions. They will 
strengthen the bonds of unity, and as you annually come to the festive board, 
and some familiar face is gone, it will but remind us of our pilgrimage to another 
and better land. 

The pioneers of Iowa, like the devoted and self-sacrificing Marquette and 
Joliet, the first white men who ever trod her soil, led the way to great and 
glorious results. How little did we think when we built our first cabin that we 
should so soon celebrate the event with so much magnificence, luxury and beauty. 
We expected the emigrant to come — sometime ; but who believed that in twenty 
years this city would contain 18,000 inhabitants, and our adopted state more 
than six hundred thousand. But the sound of the mighty West has gone forth, 
and we love to believe that we hear the tramp of the coming millions, and that 
we can brush away the misty veil that hides the future and behold mighty cities 
scattered along our beautiful river, and over our rich and exhaustless prairies. 
I have traversed the length and the breadth of our state, and compared it with 
all the states of our Union, with Oregon, California and other portions of the 
world I have visited, and I am here ready to assert, without the fear of contra- 
diction, that there is not the same number of square miles in America, if there 
is on the globe, capable of supporting so dense a population as the State of 



138 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

Iowa. It is most emphatically true that, westward the star of empire takes its 
way. Why, tell me, Mr. President, what is to become of the starving hordes of 
Europe if they come not to the new world? Or, I might better ask, how long 
will the sons of New England cling to those sterile rocks and the three-inch 
soil which produces only white beans and pumpkins? Why, sir, I hope and 
expect yet to see in my day all these vast prairies teeming with life and beauty. 
I hope yet to see the smoke curling from the campfires of 10,000 happy homes, 
and hear the great anthem of human liberty sung on every hill and in every vale 
of the mighty West. And I expect yet to see — and my children will, if I do not 
■ — the Scu-ti-Na-co-to-co-soc — the fire horse of the Indian, flying across these 
prairies with lightning speed, leaping the "Big Muddy," and, with its shrill 
whistle, frightening the bald eagle from her covert in the Rocky Mountains' 
top, and she be seen soaring away to the Pacific, screaming victory, victory, vic- 
tory to the Anglo Saxon race. 

I conclude, Mr. President, with the following sentiment : 

THE HAWKEYE PIONEER ASSOCIATION OF DES MOINES 
COUNTY — May its members have many happy reunions like this, and enjoy 
long years of health and prosperity ; but in their onward progress to wealth, 
power and greatness may they never forget the joy and the sorrow of the old 
log cabin, and always leave the "latch-string hanging out." 

VOLUNTEER TOASTS. 

The president next read the following toast from his honor, J. P. Wightman, 
mayor of Burlington : 

THE IOWA PIONEERS — Burlington justly claims a larger number pos- 
sessing more talent than any other city in the state of those who first traversed 
the vast prairies and mighty rivers to find a home in the far West. These are 
our old settlers. Honor and respect are due them from those who have fol- 
lowed in the paths they have made plain. 

Judge Hall, being loudly called for, responded as follows: 
Ladies and Gentlemen: 

As an humble member of the Hawkeye Pioneer Association — having crossed 
the Father of Waters just in time to entitle me to membership — I am in the rear 
rank of old settlers ; and whilst I should be happy to say a great deal on this 
occasion, my position as a member, and the waning hours of the day, admonish 
me that I am here in about the same condition that I was at the very start of 
my life, a pioneer, yet not all a pioneer — a little behind, yet not entirely out of 
the synagogue. My father was one of the first settlers in Western New York. 
He voted at the first election ever held in Buffalo Township. He, with other 
pioneer settlers, traveled more than forty miles, from what is now Batavia to 
the point where now stands the great City of Buffalo, to cast his vote. All 
that part of the State of New York west of the Genesee River was one town- 
ship. It was bounded on the north by Lake Ontario, east by the Genesee River, 
south by the Pennsylvania line and on the west by Lake Erie and the Niagara 
River. 

In this almost unbroken wilderness I had my nativity. That country then 
was a western wilderness, and its early settlers were pioneers. The hardships 
and vicissitudes of a frontier life were realized and overcome with as much 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 139 

energy, zeal and manhood in that wilderness country as ever emigrated to 
the western bank of the mighty Mississippi. Yet, geographically, the longi- 
tudinal line of the pioneers of even that early day was far in the West — Ohio, 
Indiana, Kentucky, with now and then a spot of Illinois, were the pioneers' goal. 

In early life I followed the pioneers to Ohio, and again to Iowa — all the while 
in time, but late. I was a tardy comer, and if I had continued to go, an astrologer 
might designate my locality. 

Here in Burlington, on the 1st of June, 1840, according to the lex loci of 
our pioneer constitution, all were pioneers and are members of our association. 
But how many have we retained and how many have we here today who fall 
within this class? Of the men of 1840 you can scarcely count sixty within our 
city. It would be curious to inquire the whereabouts of the 700 voters who 
cast their ballots at Burlington precinct in that year. Many, very many, have 
passed away. More have taken wings and pressed rapidly towards the setting 
sun. Westward they have taken their flight, and now we can count scores of 
our early settlers upon the shores of the great Pacific. They have passed over 
the whole boundless continent, and, as we hear, are now wistfully looking 

"O'er the glad waters of the dark blue sea," 

and sighing that there is no more land in the West; and some few are actually 
carting dirt and filling up, and extending the North American Continent west- 
ward into the Pacific Ocean. 

In the trail of the valiant pioneers have arisen states, cities and towns. A 
wilderness continent has been redeemed from the roaming savages, and their 
retreating footprints have been followed by a speedy introduction of the arts 
and sciences which characterize and distinguish a high state of civilization. 

The pioneers are a distinct people. They have their peculiar character in 
the great drama of our country's history. They represent the motive power of 
our country's progress. They are like a compass to the mariner — like the helm 
to the ship. Every city of the West has had its pioneers. Many, like ourselves, 
have remained to see that the work so bravely and nobly begun was com- 
pleted — that states were organized, cities built and free institutions established. 
Notwithstanding this, the great army that has been moving westward has been 
constantly recruiting. It has had accessions at every step. The children have 
taken up the enterprise of their fathers, and we may live to see many, very 
many, of the bright-eyed boys who run merrily through our streets pioneers 
and settlers, nay governors, senators and congressmen, in the new states which 
will spring up in the West, and Mexico will make at least ten of them. 

The president then read the following note and the accompanying toast from 
Gen. James M. Morgan, of Burlington: 

Burlington, June 1, 1858. 
Hon. D. Rorer, President Hawkeye Pioneer Association : 

Dear Sir: — Although prevented, by indisposition, from joining with other 
"old settlers" in commemorating the anniversary of the day which witnessed the 
transfer of the "Black-Hawk Purchase" into the hands of the white man, yet 
my heart is so thoroughly with you all in this most laudable testimonial to 
"days lang syne" that I feel bound to contribute my mite, however humble, toward 
the occasion. 



140 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

With this view I send you the accompanying sentiment, commemorative of 
the virtues and good fame of our territorial governors, the lamented LL CAS, 
CHAMBERS and CLARKE. 

The relations, personal and official, which I had the honor to bear towards 
each of these truly excellent men during their several administrations, not only 
enabled me to justly estimate their merits, but so deeply impressed me with 
their real worth as to make it with me a sentiment of duty at all times to bear 
my best tribute to their exalted characters. 

These honorable dead were known to you, and to all who knew them, as 
all that was pure and true, and good, in private life — all that was honest, upright 
and honorable in public station. We can best enforce their worthy examples by 
properly perpetuating their memories. 

Very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

James M. Morgan. 

OUR TERRITORIAL GOVERNORS, LUCAS, CHAMBERS and 
CLARKE— Simple and unostentatious in private life as they were honest and 
patriotic in the discharge of public duties, they gave to Iowa the stamp of a 
pure character, and reared for themselves a monument of fame worthy of the 
highest and most lasting honor of our whole people. 

Drunk standing and in silence. 

The following toast, received from his excellency, Gov. Ralph P. Lowe, who 
was expected to be present, was also read by the president : 

THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF IOWA— May it be given to them so to 
act their part in forming a state government and a system of laws and institu- 
tions that the work of their hands may be owned and blessed of posterity. 

Henry W. Starr, Esq., being loudly called upon, spoke as follows: 
Mr. President: 

The short space of time remaining for our festivities warns me to be brief; 
and I should not trespass on your time at all if this occasion did not seem 
eminently suitable to bring to your recollection and especial notice the memory 
of the renowned chief, BLACK HAWK. At a meeting of the "Old Settlers" 
should we not remember the older settlers of a different race, and especially the 
great chief who seems to form a connection-link between two races, and, more 
than any other, to symbolize the great transition from the dominion of the Indian 
to that of the white man? 

He died at the ripe age of seventy-two years, and said to me that he was 
born upon the banks of our great river. A half century ago, when we were just 
struggling to emerge from our strife for national existence, he roamed the mon- 
arch of these prairies, and with a renown as universal and terrific to the hostile 
Kaskaskias and Sioux as was ever to Southern Europe the name of Attila or 
Alaric. He was an ally of Tecumseh, and spoke of him with enthusiasm. He 
was identified with all the wars of the frontier Northwest. His last great strug- 
gle to preserve his home, and that of his people, and transmit the same unim- 
paired to his posterity, commenced in 1832. He was conquered and overcome 
by the iron tread of the Anglo Saxon. He yielded to necessity, and ceded to us 
his country, and without the magnanimity of victors he was degraded from his 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 141 

position as chief by our Government, and a worthless and abandoned man (Keo- 
kuk ) appointed to represent the tribe. He could cheerfully surrender to the 
onward stride of the white man — could surrender this beautiful valley and retire 
to another frontier — but to be disrobed of office, and disgraced with his own 
tribe by the power and authority of his conquerors, stung his sensitive heart. 

In 1837, at the house of Major Smith, where I was boarding, I roomed with 
Black Hawk for weeks, and observed him carefully and under all circumstances. 
He was uniformly kind and polite, especially at the table; but often silent, 
abstracted and melancholy. His appearance and manner realized to me the 
expression of Cardinal Woolsey in Henry VIII : 

"I am a poor, fallen man, unworthy now 
To be thy lord and master. I have floated 
These many summers in a sea of glory, 
But far beyond my depth." 

The vices of the whites had not overtaken him until his habits were formed. 
He presented the noble spectacle of a warrior chief, conquered and disgraced 
with his tribe by his conquerors ; but, resigned to his fate and covered with the 
scars of many battles, in the spirit of true heroism, breaking bread with and 
enjoying the hospitality of his destroyers. 

There were noble traits in his character, and he deserved to be called the 
Washington of the Indian tribes. As an evidence of his love of country and 
resignation of his fallen state, I wish to read a speech he made at a Fourth 
of July celebration at Fort Madison in the summer of 183S (July 4th). He 
spoke, in response to the toast, "Our Illustrious Guest, Black Hawk," as follows: 

"It has pleased the Great Spirit that I am here today — I have eaten with my 
white friends. The earth is our mother — we are now on it, with the Great 
Spirit above us ; it is good. I hope we are all friends here. A few winters 
ago I was fighting against you. I did wrong, perhaps, but that is past — it is 
buried — let it be forgotten. 

"Rock River was a beautiful country. I liked my towns, my cornfields and 
the home of my people. I fought for it. It is now yours. Keep it as we did — 
it will produce you good crops. 

"I thank the Great Spirit that I am now friendly with my white brethren. 
We are here together, we have eaten together ; we are friends ; it is his wish 
and mine. I thank you for your friendship. 

"I was once a great warrior ; I am now poor. Keokuk has been the cause 
of my present situation ; but I do not attach blame to him. I am now old. I 
have looked upon the Mississippi since I have been a child. / love the great river. 
I have dwelt upon its banks from the time I was an infant. / look upon it now. 
I shake hands with you, and as it is my wish, I hope you are my friends." 

The old chief died in the fall of 1839, and his bones now remain in the pos- 
session of the Historical Society of Burlington. He served his tribe and country 
well, and his memory will long be cherished. 

Sir, when we reflect that but twenty years ago that old man (whose bones 
we now possess) was the monarch of these prairies, as the representative of an 
aboriginal race, we are startled at our own progress, as we gaze upon the 



142 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

triumphs of steam, the telegraph and the railroad. The tomahawk and scalping 
knife of the savage have retired before the advancing tread of civilization, and 
our poor aborigines are dropping in despair at the setting sun. 

The age of poetry has passed, because the world of fancy is outrun by fact. 
It is difficult to realize our own progress. Scarcely half a century ago the poet 
Campbell was thought to have gone quite to the verge of the "poet's license" 
when he said: 

On Erie's bank, where tigers steal along, 
Where the dread Indian chants his dismal song; 
Where human fiends on midnight errands walk. 
And bathe in brains the murderous tomahawk, 
There shall their flocks on thy my pastures stray, 
And shepherds dance at summer's opening day ; 
Each wandering genius of the lonely glen, 
Shall start to vfew the glittering haunts of men, 
And silence watch the woodland heights around, 
The village curfew as it tolls profound. 

How has this prediction been realized? What cities now stud the banks of 
Erie, teeming with population and all the improvements and refinements of civ- 
ilized life? And farther than Erie and the poet's dream, witness the spread of 
civilization, surging from both oceans towards a common center, soon to be 
united by a common bond of rail and telegraph, when we may fold our hands 
and exclaim : 

"No pent up Utica contracts our powers, 
But the whole boundless continent is ours." 

I offer you the following sentiment : 

THE MEMORY OF THE ILLUSTRIOUS BLACK HAWK— The oldest 
settler of Burlington — the monarch of the prairies when we were in our cradles. 
In regard to our red brethren, whilst we "feel power, may we not forget right." 

Col. James W. Woods, being loudly called for, responded as follows: 
FcIIovl' Pioneers of Iowa: 

I am happy in meeting my old friends and settlers here on this occasion. I 
traveled from Wapello this morning, and arrived before u o'clock, in order 
to be present. 

It is doubly cheering to me, as I had but little hope, owing to the almost 
impassable state of the roads, of being able to reach here in time. But a little 
of the old settler energy and the exercise of that spirit of early and late toil 
and travel enabled me to conquer and gain my purpose. 

I call myself amongst the oldest settlers of this county. I attended the first 
court ever held in Burlington. It was held in a little log cabin, without floor, 
chimney, or scarcely a roof. This whole country was then an almost unbroken 
waste, and many, very many, of those early pioneers, whose wants and necessi- 
ties at that day demanded the aid of the judicial arm. have passed away — yet I 
am able to count several who have withstood the wearing hardships of a new 
country, and the temptations and seducing influences of western El Dorados, 
and still remain in our midst. 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 143 

Great has been the change that twenty-five years have made ; young men have 
become old, a new generation has arisen, and I can now see around me many 
joyful faces, who proudly claim Iowa as their native land. 

Upon the conclusion of Colonel Woods' remarks a motion was made and 
carried that the audience adjourn to Grimes' Hall, where, until a late hour, the 
old settlers and their invited guests 

"Tripped the light, fantastic toe," 

or enjoyed themselves in mutual reminders of the early settlement of the land 
now grown so populous, rich and great, and at last separated to meet again, as 
many as may, at the next annual festival. 

CORRESPONDENCE. 

The following letters were received by the committee of invitation, respond- 
ing to notes requesting the several writers to honor the festival with their pres- 
ence as guests. 

They are inserted in the order of their date. 

Columbus City, Iowa, May 31, 1858. 

Gentlemen : I have to express my regret that the state of the roads will prob- 
ably prevent my acceptance of your "cordial" invitation to attend the anniversary 
celebration of the Hawk-Eye Pioneer Association*on the 2d day of June next. 

Reading your note of invitation, my mind reverts to the period of my first 
advent to the "far West." On a frosty morning, in the last month of the year 
1838, in company with one of your townsmen, who will doubtless be present at 
your festival, I crossed the Mississippi on a bridge of ice, at your place, and 
took lodging at the "Old Wisconsin." 

Burlington was then a crude, rough village, peopled by some three or four 
hundred "pioneers." The footprints of the "native American" were still fresh, 
and the stakes of the wickiup, in some instances, yet sticking in the ground. 
That does not seem to me to be very long ago, and yet how remarkable the change 
which has taken place in the condition of your city and Iowa generally ; and, 
must I say, in the pioneers also? In some respects, yes; and yet I think it may 
be said of those of us who survive' and remain here that we have not grown old 
as fast as the country has improved and matured. Take your city as an example, 
whose growth has been, perhaps, about a general average. At the period I 
speak of there were no paved sidewalk, no graded streets paved or macadamized ; 
no majestic squares of brick and mortar; no machine shops, no foundries, no 
magnetic telegraph, no railroads, no elegant public schoolhouses, no colleges, no 
stately church edifices, with their spires pointing upward toward the heavens. 
The village of yesterday is today the matured city, abounding in all the elements 
of a prosperous and enlightened community. The same may be said of our state 
generally — her growth and development have been equally vigorous and remark- 
able, with a future correspondingly bright. But I leave the subject with my 
thanks for your kind remembrances of me, and offering for your acceptance the 
subjoined sentiment. 

Francis Springer. 
Hon. J. C. Hall, A. W. Carpenter, Lyman Cook, committee. 



144 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

THE EARLY SETTLERS OF IOWA— Like the sybilline leaves, as they 
diminish in number, may they appreciate in worth, in usefulness, and in the just 
regard of their fellow men. 

Keokuk, June i, 1858. 

Gentlemen: Your polite invitation to attend the anniversary meeting of the 
old settlers, came duly to hand, and it was my intention to be present and assist 
in the celebration, but I regret to say that it will not be possible for me to do so. 

Twenty-two years ago today I arrived in Chicago, a youthful adventurer in 
quest of health and fortune. Chicago at that time contained from twelve hundred 
to two thousand inhabitants, while Iowa, then known as the "Black-Hawk Pur- 
chase," was almost an unbroken wilderness. A month later I was traveling up 
the Mississippi on the good steamer Dubuque, Capt. Geo. W. Atchison, com- 
manding, and Capt. Le Roy Dodge, clerk. We passed the site of the present 
City of Keokuk in the night, and the next day — the first day of July, 1836 — 
landed at Burlington (as I find noted in my journal), "a new town in Wiscon- 
sin." Our stay was brief, but long enough for me to ascertain that the price of 
the best lots was $500 each, which, from the appearance of the place, I deemed 
extravagantly high, but readily accounted for in view of the wild mania for 
speculation then prevailing. I may add that I am happy, however, to learn from 
some of my ''ancient'" Burlington friends that an investment at that time, even 
at the price mentioned, notwithstanding the present stringent times, would have 
been a remunerative one. 

The day following we passed the City of Davenport, then recently laid out, 
but containing no buildings; Stephenson (now Rock Island), containing about 
thirty houses, mostly built of logs, and, landing at the Island of Rock Island, 
Col. George Davenport came on board and went with us to Galena. He informed 
me that emigrants were going into the "Black-Hawk Purchase" in great numbers, 
and he was of the opinion, extravagant as it might appear, that not less than 
from three to four thousand had already settled there. Previous to this time, and 
up to the 4th of July, the territory constituting the present State of Iowa was 
under the government of Michigan, and the title to all the lands, to which the 
Indian title had been extinguished (except the half-breed reservation in Lee 
County), remained in the United States, and so remained for a further period 
of two years. 

How wonderful the change ! There were then two counties in the territory, 
and a population of 4,000. Now we have 100 counties, with a population of 
600,000; and it is gratifying to know that this unparalleled increase in population 
has brought with it to the early settlers and founders of this fair commonwealth, 
generally a corresponding increase in wealth, in the comforts and luxuries of life, 
educational advantages, and all those things which distinguish the dweller in 
cities from the settler on the frontier. 

Trusting the Hawk-Eye Pioneer Association may hold their annual celebra- 
tion while any of the original band remain, and that I may have the pleasure at 
some future gathering to meet with them, 

I am, gentlemen, very respectfully, yours, 

Edward Kilbourn. 

To Messrs. J. C. Hall, A. W. Carpenter and Lyman Cook, Committee. 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 145 

Mr. Henry W. Starr, in his address saying Black Hawk died in the fall of 
1839, and that his bones now were in the possession of the Historical Society 
of Burlington, Mr. Starr is mistaken as to the date of Black Hawk's death, as 
well as to the remains being then in the possession of that society. Mr. Charles 
Negus, in Annals of Iowa, 1870-71, page 10, tells of his death and burial, "That 
early in October, 1838, the commissioner for adjusting claims of the Sac and 
Fox tribes were to meet at Rock Island, and most of the Indians were there on 
the first of the month. Black Hawk had been attacked with a violent bilious 
fever and could not go with them. He seemed to have a presentiment that he 
was going to die, and said some days before his death, 'He is getting old, he must 
die, Monotah (God) calls him home.' He died October 3, 1838. While at Wash- 
ington at the close of the Black Hawk war, the President gave him a uniform of 
which he was very proud. Dressed in this uniform his corpse was placed upon a 
bier, made of two poles with bark laid across them, and was carried to the grave 
which had been prepared to receive his body, by four Indian braves, followed by 
his family, and about fifty of his tribe. The chiefs were all absent, being at Rock 
Island at the time. His grave was six feet deep, and of the usual length, situated 
upon a little eminence about fifty yards from his wigwam. His body was placed 
in a sitting position upon a seat constructed for that purpose. On his left side 
was placed in an upright position the cane presented him by Henry Clay, his right 
hand holding it. Some of the trophies which he had earned were placed in the 
grave, and some Indian garments, together with his favorite weapons. A mound 
of earth was raised on his grave and sodded with blue grass sod. At the head 
of the grave was erected a flag-staff, bearing the national flag. At the foot of 
his grave was placed a post on which was inscribed in Indian characters many of 
his heroic deeds, together with his age, which was supposed to be about seventy- 
two years. The whole was surrounded by a picket fence about twelve feet high. 
Here rested all that was mortal of one of the most unique Indian characters 
of the then West. But the white man whom he had fought during his turbulent 
life, who had followed him and his people, driving them away from their hunting 
grounds and homes, would not let him rest in peace and "sleep on, in the grave 
where they had laid him." A Doctor Turner, a resident of Lexington, Van Buren 
County, for the purpose of making money by exhibiting his bones to gaping 
crowds, violated the sepulcher of the dead hero, disinterred his ghostly skeleton 
and carried it away, together with all the trophies, the cane given him by Henry 
Clay and whatever else was deposited in his grave. His skeleton came into the 
possession of the Burlington Historical Society in whose room it was kept at the 
time of the visit of Nash-e-os-kuk, his son, with about fifty other braves who 
visited Governor Lucas at Burlington, as stated in another chapter. His widow 
was permitted at that time to look upon them, and it is said went away satisfied. 

The room of the Burlington Historical Society was adjoining the office of 
Doctor Lowe, situated on Main Street. This building took fire on January 16, 
1853, m which Black Hawk's skeleton was consumed. 

In a postscript, Annals of Iowa, 1870-71, is the following: "The author of 
this sketch (Charles Negus) of Black Hawk has spent months of time and 
bother to get a true knowledge of facts, and finds many conflicting statements 
about the last events of this great warrior, especially in those written of recent 



H6 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

date. The statements as to the time of his death on pages 50 and 490 of the 
Annals (1863), are certainly incorrect. The history thus furnished has been 
gathered from statements which were written about the time the incidents hap- 
pened, and are believed to be correct." 



CHAPTER XIII 
EXTENSION OF THE CITY LIMITS 

The Legislature of Iowa passed an act, which was approved February 4, 1851, 
greatly enlarging the limits of the city. The limits as therein denned are as 
follows: "Commencing in the middle of the channel of the Mississippi River at 
a point eighty rods south of the line dividing section 4 and 9, township 69, north 
range 2 west ; thence west and parallel with the line dividing said sections to the 
west line of section 8 of the same township; thence north along the west line of 
section 32 of township 70, north of range 2 west, for a distance of 2J4 miles from 
the southeast corner of said boundary ; then east with the north line of said section 
32 to the middle channel of the Mississippi River to the place of beginning." The 
limits thus extended embraced all of Smith's Addition; that part of Leebrick's 
Addition and Subdivision and subdivision east of Wood Street, Starr and Foster's 
Addition ; David's Addition, Cameron's Addition, Neiman's Subdivision, Guenter's 
Subdivision, White and Cook's Addition, Foster's and Warren's Subdivision, 
Carstens and Isaac's Addition, all the property of Mr. C. E. Perkins north of 
Dill Street, and a large part of the land laid out in lots south of Dill Street; 
Piesley's Subdivision, Starr's Subdivision, Morton's Addition, Chalafant's Addi- 
tion, Northern Addition, and Bodeman and Guahu's Addition. The northern 
boundary line of the above described limits, was a line due east and west coin- 
ciding with the north line of Old Aspen Grove Cemetery grounds, being the south 
line of Corse Street, from a point where said line would touch the west line of 
Aspen Grove Cemetery, and from that point east to the Mississippi River. On 
the 15th of May, 1876, the city council adopted an ordinance further extending 
the limits of the city, to-wit: "Commencing in the middle of the main channel 
of the Mississippi River at a point east of the center of fractional section 28, 
township 70 north, range 2 west ; thence west on a line passing through the center 
of section 28 and 29 to the center of section 29; thence north to the quarter- 
section corner on the north side of section 29; thence west along the northern 
line of section 29 and 30 in township 70 north, range 2 and 3 ; thence south along 
said township line to the quarter-section corner on the west side of section 18, 
township 69 north, range 2 west; thence east along the center line of section 18, 
17 and fractional section 16, township 69, range 2 west and a continuation of said 
line to the middle of the main channel of the Mississippi River; then northerly 
along the middle of the main channel of said river to the place of beginning." 

As heretofore stated, Congress had passed an act granting power to the city 
to dispose of what is called the "accretions," etc. By an ordinance adopted 
August 4, 1853, the mayor of the city was directed to have surveyed the land 
and accretions which the city had been authorized to sell; and a plat of the same 

147 



148 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

to be made, and was authorized to lease a portion of the same to the Burlington 
& Missouri River Railroad Company for the yearly sum of $i per year, and on 
the further consideration, that the company would bind itself in the lease, to fill 
up the premises so leased, and establish thereon its depot, machine shops and 
other buildings. The proposition whether this lease should be made had to be 
submitted to a vote of the electors. It was so submitted, and there were 901 
votes cast for making the lease and 54 votes against its making. The lease 
was made on those conditions, and the company built its shops on ground next 
the bluff and east of where is now located the market yard. On the 5th of 
December, 1866, the city executed its deed to convey the land (accretions) 
described therein, which in words provided "That the conveyance was made on 
condition that the Burlington & Missouri River Railroad Company shall build 
and place their freight and passenger depot, their proposed machine shops, etc., 
upon said accretions heretofore conveyed, or upon such other grounds within the 
limits of said City of Burlington as said company may procure for that purpose." 
The people had voted to authorize the lease to this company on the conditions 
contained therein ; but when it came to make this deed, their vote was entirely 
disregarded by the city council. Can it be said, had the question of the locating 
of the shops at Leffler's Station on a small portion of ground just opposite on 
which was to be placed the shops, and adjoining this ground and outside the limits 
of the city, was to be laid out the Town of West Burlington, the voters of the city 
would have authorized the sale? But the city council by the express terms of the 
conveyance left it with the company to select such grounds as it wished, provided 
they were in the city. At the time of the execution of the deed, the grounds 
selected by it were not in the city, and did not come within the limits of the city 
until January 9, 1880. On that date, the city council adopted an ordinance, as it 
had the right, without submitting it to a vote of the people by which the limits 
of the city were extended as follows : "Commencing on the township line between 
ranges 2 and 3, west, at the north line of the Chicago, Burlington & Ouincy 
Railroad Company's right of way ; thence westerly along the northern line of said 
right of way 26.38 chains ; thence north 27 chains to the center line of section 
25, township 70 north, range 3 west ; thence westerly along the center line of said 
section 25 14.25 chains; thence north 12.43 chains; thence west 25.05 chains; 
thence south 29.77 chains; thence west 15.30 chains; thence south 17.26 chains 
to the south line of section 25, township 70, range 3 west ; thence east along the 
south line of said section 25 to the township line between ranges 2 and 3 west." 
The purpose of the voters in voting to lease the accretions to the company as a place 
on which to erect its shops was that the men working in them would be residents of 
the city, and therefore increase its population and wealth. This has almost been 
frustrated by what was done. Good faith required the city council under the cir- 
cumstances, from what had been done, to have submitted the question of extension 
to the voters of the city. It may be true that the place selected was the one most 
available on which to locate the shops, still, when the limits of the city was 
extended, why not made to include all that ground on which is located West 
Burlington, thereby sustaining the purpose for which the accretions had been 
voted away. But this action is on a par with the action of the city council in 
repudiating the obligations of the city in reference to its subscription for stock of 
the B. & M. R. R. Co. of which we will speak in a separate chapter. It was to be 



2 
o 







HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 149 

expected the company would look after its interests and the council to look after 
the interest of the city in what was done. We do not place blame on the com- 
pany. We know we live in a commercial age, one of strife to make the best of 
opportunities. With weak men at the head of city affairs it cannot be expected 
the interest of the people will be properly attended to. On the 3d day of March, 
1913, the city council adopted an ordinance still further extending the limits of 
the city as follows, to-wit : "Commencing at a point on the center east and west 
line of section 29, township 70 north, range 2 west of 5 P. M. ; then 340 feet west 
of the east Kne of said section; thence east along said center line of said section 
and the center line of section 28 of said township and range to low water mark 
on the bank of O'Connell Slough ( said slough being a part of the Mississippi 
River) ; thence northerly along the low water lind upon the west bank of said 
slough (the low water line being at an elevation of 510 feet above the Memphis 
datum) to a point 660 feet north of the north line of said section 28, thence west 
to the section line between sections 21 and 20, township 70, range 2 west 5 P.M.; 
thence south to the place of beginning." 

The bounded limits of the city now include about eleven square miles. Rome 
was built on seven hills, Burlington is built on four. Instead of giving a name 
to a hill because of something done or erected there as in Ancient Rome, Burling- 
ton gave the names of the hills on which it is built according to the points of the 
compass, except in one case, that case is "Prospect Hill," that high bluff which 
juts against the Mississippi a little south of the confluence of the stream in 
Bogus Hollow, where Bill Calendine manufactured pewter dollars and passed 
them off on the unsuspecting natives for good money. The original name of this 
hill was "Vinegar Hill" and was so called for many years because some one had 
a vinegar factory there, but in later years-; -af'ter-'4he.ci£.y.. had constructed a bridge 
over the deep ravine that separated it from the main portion of the city, which 
gave that part of the city a boom, and many of the wealthy class, because of the 
beautiful outlook across the river made their homes there, the name "Vinegar" 
was not in accordance with their taste. They wanted something better, and as 
no good brand of whisky had ever been manufactured there, they could not give 
it a liquid name, and called it Prospect Hill, because of the view which is there. 
Burlington in its extension followed the line of least resistance. It started down 
near where is now located the gas and waterworks. From there it extended 
south along the river front and back, including Main Street, until it came to 
Jefferson Street, which presented fewer obstacles than Washington and Columbia 
streets, as the ground was more level, besides it offered a better approach from 
the west and from the southwest and northwest. 



CHAPTER XIV 

TRIAL, SENTENCE AND EXECUTION OF WILLIAM AND 
STEPHEN HODGES 

No incident has been more talked and written about by the people of Des 
Moines County than the trial, sentence and execution of William and Stephen 
Hodges. Theirs was the first and only legal execution in the county and marked 
an epoch by which old settlers regulated their calendars, events in their lives 
happening either before or after "the hanging of the Hodges." 

To understand this tragedy in all its relations we must remember that the 
public mind had been wrought to a fever heat at this time because of depredations 
committed through this part of the state and of which, to a large extent, the 
Mormons were charged as being the perpetrators. At this time, a very strong 
prejudice existed against this band of religionists. They were a new sect which 
had come into existence and proclaimed beliefs not in harmony with those pre- 
vailing among the mass of people. They claimed to have revealed to them from 
Heaven a Bible containing revelations from the Most High. That the days of 
prophecy had not ended with the death of the prophets of old, that God still 
revealed to men his wishes concerning his children, as in times past. One Joseph 
Smith was at the time their prophet. His followers first attempted to found a 
colony at Kirkland, Ohio, where a minister of the Christian Church lived by the 
name of Rigdon, who had met Smith soon after he had found the golden plates 
containing a revelation, and from which the Mormon Bible came into existence. 
Rigdon and Smith printed the Mormon Bible from translations made by an angel 
of the writings on these golden plates. Smith and Rigdon on the 6th day of 
April, 1830, at Kirkland organized a church called the "Church of Latter Day 
Saints.'' Both Smith and Rigdon were enthusiastic in propagating the beliefs 
of the new cult, so much so, that in one year from the foundation of their church 
they had secured more than one thousand converts. Smith said to his followers 
that he had a revelation commanding him to go west and found a colony of the 
"Saints" and to build a temple in the New Jerusalem, which he decided was 
somewhere near the Town of Independence, Missouri. Missouri was the "Prom- 
ised Land" towards which they directed their weary march. Here they purchased 
a large tract of land, built houses and commenced farming in good earnest. Here 
they began to build their temple as directed by the revelation to Prophet Joseph 
Smith. Their converts came from all sections of the country ; sold their belong- 
ings and immigrated to the New Jerusalem, in Missouri. They were there but 
a short time until they got into trouble with the natives. Such was the opposition 
to them that a large mob collected, destroyed their printing office, burnt some of 
the buildings and flogged some of their members. The governor of the state 

150 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 151 

called out about five thousand of the militia, which was under the command of 
Gen. J. B. Clark, whose instructions were "to exterminate the Mormons or drive 
them out of the state." General Clark executed the orders given him without 
any compassion either for the old or young. Destitute almost of food or clothing, 
in the month of November, without tents or anything to protect them from the 
driving storms of rain and snow, they were driven out on the bleak prairies to 
find a shelter, they knew not where. In their march, women and children sick- 
ened and died for want of food and clothing. Mothers carried in their arms their 
starving children and in agony listened to their cries for food. More than 
twelve hundred of them, weak and emaciated, came to the banks of the Missis- 
sippi, their Jordan, over which they crossed into Illinois. Their pitiful condition 
awakened the sympathy of the people of Iowa and Illinois, who treated them 
kindly, and furnished them food and shelter. Their expulsion from Missouri 
took place in the fall of 1838. Dr. Isaac Galland, who was a Mormon elder and 
who was one of the first settlers in Lee County, took an interest in his fellow 
brethren upon being assured by Governor Lucas of Iowa that there was no law 
against their living in Iowa, and being so informed many of them with their 
families located near Keokuk, Nashville and Montrose, but the greater part 
settled across the river north of Montrose in Illinois. At this time there existed 
a small town on the Illinois side of the Mississippi nearly opposite Montrose 
called Commerce, which was founded by some New York speculators. This town 
site and adjoining lands "the Saints" purchased and changed the name from 
Commerce to Nauvoo. Prophet Joseph Smith, who had been incarcerated in jail 
at Independence, was released, came to Nauvoo, joined his people and continued 
the propagation of the Mormon faith. They had sent missionaries at this early 
period throughout the country, even so far as England, strengthened by the oppo- 
sition against them and the appeal of the new faith to their love of the super- 
natural. The converts to the new faith were increasing rapidly and most of them 
came to Nauvoo, their Jerusalem. So great was their increase in numbers that, 
from 1838 to 1846 the Town of Nauvoo had a population of near twenty thou- 
sand souls. Nothing of moment had taken place to render them inimical to the 
surrounding people until July, 1843, when it was claimed a revelation had been 
received permitting a plurality of wives. One can imagine what a storm of 
indignation would be raised by the announcement of such a belief in the present 
in any community of Protestant or Catholic religionists. The propagation of this 
belief raised a storm of indignation among their neighbors. When an ox or horse 
had been stolen belonging to a non-Mormon, it was laid to the Mormons. If a 
burglary had been committed, the Mormons were charged with the crime. They 
were an industrious and frugal people, and in a short time had acquired consid- 
erable wealth, so much so, that they were enabled to build a temple which cost in 
the neighborhood of one million dollars. To illustrate the temper and feeling of 
many people at the time is the fact that some of the best people of Union and 
Augusta townships in Des Moines County met at Augusta and passed resolutions 
denouncing Mormonism and abolitionism as "dangerous to the peace and safety 
of society." In these early days, the Mississippi River was infested with a large 
number of renegades, thieves, murderers and cut-throats, who made Nauvoo their 
headquarters, many of them claiming to be Mormons. The charges against 
Smith and his people were that they harbored criminals. Their prophet, Joseph 



152 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

Smith, with other leaders in the church, were arrested by the order of Governor 
Ford of Illinois in June, 1844. They were charged with riot and lodged in the 
jail at Carthage. June 27, 1844, a mob of over two hundred persons disguised 
as Indians, attacked the jail, overcame the guards, broke through the door of the 
jail, shot and killed Joseph Smith and his brother Hiram. Brigham Young suc- 
ceeded Smith in apostleship, gathered his followers together and commenced to 
make preparations to emigrate to the far West, there to start again to build a 
city, another "New Jerusalem." In the fall of 1846 they crossed the Mississippi, 
more than sixteen thousand, and commenced their journey westward through Lee 
County. Their caravans consisted of 16,000 men, women and children, 3,000 
wagons, 30,000 head of cattle and other stock. We will not follow them in their 
cold, dreary march through Iowa or relate their sufferings amidst the winter 
storms on its bleak prairies. 

THE KILLING OF MILLER AND LICEY 

We quote from Annals of Iowa, Vol. VIII, page 303. "On the 25th of 
August, 1845, John Miller with his son-in-law, by the name of Licey, with their 
families, emigrated from Ohio, and stopped in Lee County, where they offered 
to pay cash for a good farm ; and from this circumstance, it was soon reported 
through the neighborhood that they had a large amount of money. Miller, Licey, 
and another man were the only male inmates of the house. On the night of the 
10th of May, the family as usual retired to bed for the night. About 12 o'clock 
at night, they were aroused from their slumbers by three men entering the house 
with a dark lantern, and demanding their money. The old man and his son-in- 
law, not being disposed to quietly give up their possessions, did not readily comply 
with their demands, but undertook to drive the robbers from their house, while 
the third man, being frightened, hid himself under the bed clothes. There was a 
desperate struggle between the robbers and the old man and his son-in-law. Miller 
was stabbed in the heart, and immediately breathed his last. Licey, being first 
shot with a pistol, and then receiving several deep gashes upon the head and back 
from a bowie knife, fell helpless on the floor. The assassins, being disheartened 
at the fatal resistance with which they had been received, and, probably fearing 
that the disturbance they had made might arouse the neighbors, made a hasty 
retreat without securing their booty. The rumor of the bloody tragedy spread 
rapidly, and the whole neighborhood became alarmed for their own safety. Every 
imaginable effort was made to discover the perpetrators, but for a long while 
nothing could be obtained which threw any light upon the dark transaction. A 
cup was found (we think this is an error in print, as it has been stated by others 
it was a "cap" which was found) near the house, which was supposed belonged 
to one of the murderers which he had probably dropped in his haste to get away 
from the scene of carnage. A man by the name of Edward Bonney, who resided 
at Montrose, and well calculated to find out dark deeds, having heard of the cup, 
undertook to ascertain the owner. He found by stratagem the owner of the cup, 
and became satisfied that two young men by the name of William and Stephen 
Hodges and a Thomas Brown, who resided in Nauvoo, must have been the men 
who committed the murder. Brown made his escape, but the two Hodges were 
arrested and taken before Licey, who was still living, though he died soon after 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 153 

from his wounds, and they were identified by him as being two of the men who 
entered the house." The above is incorrect in some of its statements. Mr. 
Edward Bonney of Montrose, through whose efforts the Hodges were arrested, 
in "Bandits of the Prairies," of which he is the author, says: "About 12 or 1 
o'clock, May 10th, three men entered the house of Miller, and after a desperate 
struggle, Miller succeeded in pushing his antagonist from the house, and as he 
passed the door, was stabbed and fell to the ground. Licey succeeded in throw- 
ing one of the ruffians on the floor, and while choking him, the other desperado 
was inflicting deep gashes on his head and neck. Maddened with pain, Licey with 
one effort freed himself from their hold, forced them through the door, and while 
closing it was shot." The news of the murder reached Montrose on the morning 
of the day on which it was committed. Parties in searching the prairies, found 
a cloth cap, trimmed with fur. When Bonney heard this, he recollected of seeing 
a young man in Nauvoo some three weeks before, who wore a cap of similar 
description. On the afternoon of the 12th he left for Nauvoo to find the owner 
of the fatal cap. On the morning of the nth, one of the Hodges was seen going 
to his home bareheaded. On the nth Stephen was seen in a grocery with blood 
stains on the bosom of his shirt, and being questioned, retired home and returned 
with a clean one. At 2 o'clock on the morning of the 13th with a posse Bonney 
proceeded to the place where they resided and arrested three brothers, Amos 
William and Stephen Hodges. Thomas Brown, the third man at Miller's, hearing 
of their coming, at once fled. There being no evidence against Amos, he was 
discharged. The territorial court was then in session at West Point, and after 
indictment he proceeded at once, and on requisition they were taken and lodged 
in jail at Fort Madison. Change of place of trial was taken to Des Moines 
County. The trial was set for June 8th. Hall and Mills of Burlington were 
employed to defend them, their fee being $1,000. L. D. Stocton prosecuted. An 
affidavit for a continuance was filed sworn to by the Hodges to obtain the evidence 
of the following named witnesses : John and Aaron Long, Judge Fox and Henry 
Adams of St. Louis, John W. Broffert, Henry Moore, Samuel Smith, Lydia 
Hodges, John Bliss, Caroline Moore, Samuel Walters, Sarah Ann Wood, Thomas 
Morgan (son of the author of the disclosure of Masonry), Mrs. Campbell, sister 
of the Hodges, Harriet St. John and a Miss Hawkins of Nauvoo. That these 
witnesses then not present would swear, that the accused were in Nauvoo at the 
time the murder was committed. On the filing of the affidavit the case was con- 
tinued until the 15th of the same month." It will be seen that John Long and 
Aaron Long were the murderers of Colonel Davenport at Rock Island on the 4th 
of July following, and with Graville Young were hanged on the 19th of October, 
1845. With the circumstantial evidence produced on the trial, backed by the 
dying declaration of Licey, and the testimony of the widows of Miller and Licey, 
who swore they were the perpetrators of the deed, the state made out a clear case, 
which was strengthened rather than disparaged by the attempt to prove an "alibi," 
for on this one point the witnesses disagreed, which was, as to the place where 
the brothers were on the night of the murder. Some testified they were at one 
place, others at another. Lydia Hodges, wife of Amos, was absent from the 
courtroom, and as one of the counsel of defendants was about bringing her in the 
room, she burst into tears, and exclaimed, "Must I go to court?" "If you can 
swear the boys were at home that night." "They were out that night." "Do you 



154 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

know where they were?" "They left home in company with Tom Brown and 
said they were going over to Iowa." "When did they return?" "Early next 
morning." "What did they say?" "They had been unsuccessful," etc. "What 
is their business?" "Robbery is the only one I know." "Who are engaged with 
them?" "All their family, and leaders in the Mormon Church encourage them 
in it and share their spoils." "You know all this, or is it merely rumor?" "I 
know it, and am now brought here to swear them clear. They have been kind to 
me, and yet I cannot swear my soul to eternal perdition, and destroy all my hopes 
of happiness both here and hereafter, to save them. I cannot go to court, will 
not do it. I cannot swear for them and will not swear against them." Other 
conversation was had, and the attorney returned again to court convinced of the 
hopelessness of his case. Still he struggled to the end. The above is taken from 
"Bandits of the Prairies," by Edward Bonney, pages 48-49. The court sessions 
were held in Old Zion Church over which Judge Mason presided. The trial com- 
menced June 16, 1845, before a jury consisting of David Leonard, Robert Mickey, 
James Snow, Isaac Chandler, Vincent Shelley, Eli Walker, William Bennett, Joel 
Hargrove, Moses B. McNutt, John Smith, Thomas Stout and John D. Cameron. 
On the next Saturday after being instructed as to the law, the jury retired to 
consider what their verdict ought to be. On Sunday morning the jurors returned 
into court and announced their verdict. The jury was then discharged, the court 
adjourned until 3 o'clock P. M. of that day, when, with both prisoners present 
and standing. Judge Mason addressed them as follows: "The trial on which your 
lives depended has now terminated, and to you, that determination is fatal. 
After a full and fair investigation, that jury to which you had intrusted your 
fate, and which, from the privileges extended to you, may almost be said to have 
been your own selection, have declared you have been guilty of murder, a murder 
which, in point of atrocity, may almost be said to be unparalleled in the annals 
of crime. With scarcely an apparent inducement for the commission of the most 
trivial of offenses, you have been guilty of the greatest; you have not only with 
sacrilegious hand invaded the sacred fountains of life ; but with apparent, deliber- 
ate purpose, nearly akin in malice to that of the arch fiends, you have entered 
into the little Eden of love and contentment, with which a quiet and unoffending 
family were surrounding themselves — cut off in the bloom and maturity of man- 
hood, ties of their chief support ; desecrating their very hearth stones and their 
life's blood, and brought desolation and unutterable woe into that house, which 
but for you would have been the abode of all the sacred and innocent pleasures . 
of domestic life. Xor are the consequences of your crime confined to the imme- 
diate sufferers. Though lessened in intensity, they have extended to the whole 
community a feeling of apprehension and insecurity, which has been communi- 
cated to every cottage throughout the country. Where a blamelessness of life 
which creates no enemies — a mediocrity of condition which excites to envy — 
where an almost entire absence of that motive which addresses itself to the sordid 
love of gain, cannot secure the slumberer from the assaults of the midnight 
assassin, well may the indweller of every cabin feel that anxiety and consterna- 
tion which must so greatly augment the aggregate evils of human existence. For 
all these evils, immediate and remote, the law holds you responsible, and is now 
about to apply all that there is of remedy within its reach. Blood for blood, is its 
stern demand, and never was the sanguinary requisition more righteous. Unable 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 155 

to restore the dead, it accords such vengeance to the living. Your lives, too, are 
regarded as incompatible with the safety of society, and in the bloom of youth 
and health, you are by the hands of your fellow mortals to be consigned to the 
gallows and the grave. As an example also seems to be called for, to deter others 
from a repetition of like offenses, and you are about to be exhibited as an awful 
beacon to warn all others from a course like that which has resulted in your ruin, 
etc. You need not be reminded of the awful condition in which you are now 
placed ; of the blackness of that gulf which is now opening beneath your feet, etc. 
Look, therefore, for mercy only from Heaven. Expect pardon from none but 
the good God. In the discharge of the solemn duty which is now imposed upon 
me. I feel almost overwhelmed with awe, as I become one of the instruments by 
which the lives of two human beings are about to be extinguished — for life, how 
much soever it may have been perverted from its original purpose, is still an 
emanation from the divinity. But, as the irresponsible organ of that law which 
requires your death, I here pronounce its final sentence: I direct that you, 
William Hodges and Stephen Hodges, be taken from this place to the jail of the 
County of Des Moines, there to remain until Tuesday, the 15th day of July next; 
that on that day, you be taken by the proper officers of this county, to some con- 
venient place within the same, and there, between the hours of 10 o'clock A. M. 
and 4 o'clock P. M., that you be hung by the neck until you are dead, and may 
God have mercy on you." The sentence of the court was carried out, on the 
15th of July, 1845, at which time they were hanged by John H. McKenny, sheriff 
of the county. They were hung in what is now called Patterson's Hollow. 

The late William Henry Smith, who was present when William and Stephen 
Hodges were hanged, writes the Hawkeye of May 8, 1910, as follows : "The place 
where the gallows was erected was on Mount Pleasant Street, about one hundred 
yards west of the railroad track, at the foot of the slope of the hill on which is 
the Lincoln Schoolhouse. The Northwestern Cabinet Company's building now 
covers the spot and the gallows must have stood near where the frame office build- 
ing stood and near to the southwest corner of the establishment. The gallows was 
built of timbers and planks. A white oak tree perhaps five or six inches in 
diameter was utilized for a post to support the platform at the northwest corner. 
Posts four or five feet in height were placed at the three other corners, and 
stretchers nailed to them to support the platform. I think the platform was 
about eight or nine feet square ; possibly twelve-foot planks were used in the 
longest direction north and south. On a line with the center of the platform two 
higher posts were erected ; one at the north, the other at the south end, and upon 
those rested a crossbeam to which ropes were tied. The trap door was composed 
of planks running longitudinally north and south and was hinged at the north 
end. The south end was held in place by a rope fastened to it, and extending 
upward a short distance, and then passing through a hole notched in the post, 
then was carried down on the south side of the post below, and there fastened. 
To release the trap all that was required was to cut the rope. There were steps 
at the east side on which to ascend to the platform. At the rear of the platform 
was a bench with a crosspiece for a back. Great crowds of people came from 
town and from the surrounding country and towns ; some from a distance of 
fifty miles or more. A steamboat loaded with people came down from as far 
north as Muscatine and one from Keokuk. The ferry boat from Nauvoo brought 



156 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

a crowd. Many stood around, near the gallows. There was a tree near by, which 
some boys climbed to get a good view. The bulk of the crowd were on the hill 
sides south of the gallows, where some were seated and some standing. 

"The prisoners were brought in a two-horse lumber wagon from the jail to 
the gallows. There was a muffled drum to add to the solemnity. Their hands 
were manacled and an armed guard accompanied them. The prisoners descended 
from the wagon and then went up the steps to the platform, taking their seats on 
the bench on the west side of the platform and faced the east. They were accom- 
panied by Sheriff McKenny and a preacher whose name I do not remember, I 
think he was a Mormon priest. The prisoners were asked if they had anything 
to say. William, the youngest, said nothing. Stephen made a good speech. 1 lis 
handcuffs being connected with a short chain, he had to raise both arms in his 
gesticulations. He quoted largely from their attorneys' speeches made in court at 
the trial. In conclusion he said: 'You are now putting two innocent men to an 
ignomanious and shameful death. Hang us. We are Alormons.' 

"William stood at the north end and Stephen at the south end of die drop. 
The sheriff put on the 'heads of each of them a black cap, then put over their 
heads and around their necks the dangling nooses and fitted them closely around 
their necks. Then he stepped to the south end of the platform and picked up a 
hand axe, and called out 'Once! Twice! Thrice!' Then struck the rope with the 
keen edge of the axe. The drop fell. 

"Their bodies were taken to Nauvoo for burial. 

"The Hodges once lived in Burlington. I at one time attended school with 
William and his sister, and this is one reason which made the execution one of 
interest to me." 

There cannot be any doubt but the above account written by Air. Smith is 
correct in every respect. When their ecution took place he was at that age 
when the memory of the event would lasten itself on his mind. When he wrote 
concerning it. he was nearing his eighty-fourth year of age. All know it to be 
a fact that in the later part of an aged man's life the early events come back into 
consciousness and he sees them as if they had taken place but yesterday. 



CHAPTER XV 
HOTELS OF BURLINGTON 

In all countries of the world, where there are cities and towns and public 
highways have been established, are places of public entertainment. Each country 
gives to these places a name. 

In the earlier days of England and in this country they were called taverns, 
or inns. At the present the general name for such places is the word "hotel." 
Strictly speaking, a tavern was a public house for the supply of food and drink. 
The same could be said of an inn, and generally of a hotel. At the present they 
supply food fully as liberally as in former times, but as to drink (intoxicant) 
the kind supplied is in many states limited to the softer kind. It will not be 
contended in the earlier days such limitation existed. It is a matter of as much 
interest to us of the present and those who follow us to know who kept the first 
tavern at Flint Hills or Burlington, as the one who kept the first store. 

William Henry Smith says : "The first hotel I remember was the 'Black 
Hawk.' It was on the site of the present Harris House. It had a good view of 
the river. There was an oval sign on a pole in front of the house bearing the 
portrait of an Indian and the words 'Black Hawk.' " 

Mr. Smith says the Oregon Hotel, kept by George W. Hight, was the next. 
It stood on High Street where the gas works are located at the present time. 

In addition to those mentioned we find in 1840 James Morgan kept the 
Burlington House. That at the corner of Columbia and Main streets D. and 
T. B. Hammers kept the Mansion House (formerly the Wisconsin Hotel). In 
the advertisement concerning the merits of their hostelry they say : "The bar and 
cellar have received the special attention of the proprietors." 

Mr. J. C. Fletcher (1840), who subsequently became known as one of the 
leading hotel keepers of Burlington, established what was known as the National 
Hotel. He announces he had leased and at great expense had prepared for hotel 
purposes the commodious building of Cameron and Pierce, situated in the lower 
part of Burlington. He says in proclaiming the merits of his house, "Due atten- 
tion will be given to the appetites of the guests and boarders." Without doubt 
no hotel keeper in Burlington has gained the reputation of Mr. J. C. Fletcher in 
the matter of cuisine connected with the houses he has kept for the entertainment 
of the public. 

The only hotel keeper in Burlington who at any time approached him in this 
respect was R. C. Deming, who kept the Barrett House in 1857, etc. 

James W. Neally went into the hotel business in 1843. He established the 
Western Hotel, which was situated on the southwest corner of Fourth and Jeffer- 

157 



158 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

son streets. That corner was used for hotel purposes until the erection of the 
present building on the same by Mr. Hedge. 

Air. William M. Walbridge was the proprietor of the Iowa House, situated 
on the corner of Water and Court streets. This was in the year 1844. How 
long Air. Walbridge continued in the hotel business we do not know. 

We come now to the most famous of the early hotels of Burlington, the 
Barrett House. This house was erected on the northwest corner of Third and 
Jefferson streets, and was opened in August, 1845. J. C. Fletcher, proprietor. 
The Barrett House was to Burlington from that time for as much and more than 
a third of a century what the Burlington is to Burlington today. If the walls of 
its rooms were standing, and had a tongue to give utterance, they could tell a 
story of political intrigue, of counsel for what was wise and good, of hate and 
love, of joy and sorrow, as no other tongue could tell of those early times. The 
building with additions built to it covered near a quarter of the block in which 
it was situated. In June, 1850, Mr. D. K. Garman seems to have been the proprie- 
tor. Mr. Garman operated the hotel not quite one year, for in April, 1851, 
Mr. J. C. Fletcher is installed as its proprietor. Mr. R. C. Deming had it in his 
charge in 1857. 

Omitting the wine list, which is as full if not larger than the dinner bill in 
comparison to the importance of the two, we herewith set forth : 

DINNER BILL OF FARE 
Thursday, July 9, 1857 

SOUP 

Fish 

FISH 

Bass a la Jardinese Baked Buffalo, Claret sauce 

White Fish a la mode Mackinaw Trout, Egg Sauce 

BOILED DISHES 

Leg of Alutton, Caper sauce Beef Tongue 

Chicken with Pork, Lemon sauce Corned Beef 

Turkey, Oyster sauce New Sugar-cured Ham 

SIDE DISHES 

Myonaise de Poulet Beef Steak Pie 

Oyster Patties Fricasse of Chicken 

Young Chickens Mareirad, fried in Ahitton a la Perdrix 

Batter Coquettes of Rice 

Lamb Chops, with Mashed Potatoes Calves' Liver with Rice 

Chicken Alyonaise Maccaroni with Cheese 

Fillet de Beuf, Jardinese Fillet de Veau 

Sweet Breads, Tomato Sauce Myonaise of Oysters 

Stewed Veal, with Green Beans Jenny Lind Pancakes 



. , '-2~ 










BARRET HOUSE, BURLINGTON 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 



159 



Turkey Gizzards, stewed with Giblets 
Pork and Beans, a la Anglaise 
Breast of Chicken, Madeira Sauce 
Fresh Fish, Force Balls 
Chicken Stew, American Style 
Spring Chickens, Broiled 
Ham Rolls, Egg Sauce 
Veal Stewed, Spanish Style 
Stuffed Heart, a la Sobe 
Beef Olives, Madeira Sauce 
Omelet du Rum 

Racket of Mutton, Russian Style 
Turkey Wings Garnished with Rice 
Beef a la Fineerette 



Calves Feet, Madeira Sauce 

Veal Cutlets, Breaded 

Welsh Rabbits 

Chicken Pie 

Calves Liver Breaded and Fried 

Oysters Fried in Batter 

Minced Tongue 

Spare Rib of Pork, Broiled 

Pig's Head 

Stewed Lamb, German Style 

Hashed Mutton, a la Parisian 

Fried Salt Pork with Liver 

Vo-lo de Voleville, French Style 



Turkey, Bread sauce 
Goose, Apple sauce 
Pomroy's Ham, Cham- 
paign's 
Rib of Beef 
Saddle of Mutton 



ROAST DISHES 

Fillet of Veal 

Rib of Pork 

Mutton with Green Peas 

Surloin of Beef 

Chicken Breaded 

Pig Stuffed, Apple sauce 

COLD DISHES 



Loin of Pork 

Veal with fine herbs 

Loin of Pork 

Beef's Heart, Stuffed 

Spare Rib of Pork 

Lamb, Mint Sauce 



Roast Beef, Mutton, Tongue, Pork, • Hani arid- Corned Beef 



Stewed Tomatoes 

Stringed Beans 

Carrots 

Boiled Potatoes 

Green Peas 



VEGETABLES 

Boiled Beans 
Browned Potatoes 
Homony 
Asparagras 
Turnips 



Greens 

Mashed Potatoes 
Baked Beans 
Green Onions 
Boiled Rice 



RELISHES 

Cucumber Pickles, Green Onions, Radishes, Lettuce, Cheese and Olives 



PASTRY 



Pies 
Currant 
Gooseberry 



Rhubarb 
Custard 



Tarts, &c. 
Cream Schells 
Jelly Tarts 



Puddings 
Farrina, Wine Sauce 
English, Cream Sauce 



Ornamental Fruit Cake 
Ornamental Pound Cake 
Ornamental Jelly Cake 



CONFECTIONERY 

Sponge Cake 
Marrengoes, a la Mode 
Boston Cream Cake 



Lemon Rings 
Spanish Cake 
Queen's Cake 



160 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

Lady Fingers Strawberry Ice Cream Rum Jelly 

Chocolate Maccaroons Lemon Jelly Champaign Jelly 

Tea Cake Fruit Jelly Charlotte Russe 

DESSERT 

English Walnuts, Pecans, Hazel nuts, Fiberts, Raisins and Figs 

If any hotel, inn or tavern, whether in ancient or modern times, furnished a 
more elaborate menu, it has not come to our knowledge. 

Mr. Charles Fales was proprietor of the McCutcheon House on Columbia 
Street, near the "Ferry Landing," in 1851. 

In the same year Mr. S. J. Roderick had prepared the "commodious building 
recently occupied by O. H. W. Stull on Third Street," which he called the "Tem- 
perance House." This was the first and only temperance house of public enter- 
tainment of which we have any knowledge that ever existed in Burlington. How 
long Mr. Roderick's Temperance House continued to exist we are not informed. 
The charges for board and lodging at the Temperance House were : Board and 
lodging, per week $2.00. Transients, per day 75 cents, per meal 25 cents. Horse 
feed at night 25 cents, single feed I2j4 cents. 

Mr. G. W. Kessler opened the Farmers' Hotel June 3, 1851. This hotel 
was situated at the southwest corner of Valley and Eighth streets. This house 
was for years the leading stopping place for farmers coming to town from the 
west, southwest and northwest part of the county. Horace Kemey succeeded 
Kessler. William B. Lawrence ran it for a time. The last proprietor was L. 
Teedrick, who was quite a prominent democratic politician. The city subse- 
quently purchased the ground, which is now used for a market yard. 

In September, 1851, Charles Fales had the management of the McCutcheon 
House, on Columbia Street, near the "Ferry Landing." 

The Planters' House, situated at No. 48 North Main Street, came into exist- 
ence the same year. J. Brenett & Co., proprietors. 

In the same year the Sunderland House, situated on the southwest corner of 
Fourth and Jefferson streets, when completed was leased to W. B. Lawrence, 
who ran the house from that time on until he became its purchaser, when he 
changed its name to the Lawrence House. It was destroyed by fire some time in 
the early '70s and was rebuilt by Mr. Lawrence. He continued to operate it as 
a hotel, when again it was damaged by fire to such an extent it was not rebuilt. 

M. and J. L. Perkins were the proprietors of the Burlington House, situated 
on the southwest corner of Water and Washington streets. A hotel was kept 
on this corner for many years by different persons. 

We do not know the date of the establishment of the Union Hotel, situated 
at the southwest corner of Main and Elm streets. This hotel has been the most 
successful in Burlington. The recollection of the writer is, it was constructed in 
1868 or 1869. When opened it was under the name of "Union Hotel," and has 
borne that name to this day. Mr. Chris Geyer was its first proprietor and lessee; 
subsequently became its owner, and continued in its operation until his death. 
Since that time it has been under the sole charge and management of his widow, 
I [annah A. Geyer. 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 161 

The Scott House, situated at the corner of Main and Columbia streets, came 
into existence in 1873. Samuel Scott, proprietor. 

In the same year the Green Tree House, 205 and 207 South Main Street, 
made its appearance. 

The new McCutcheon House, corner of Columbia and Front streets, was 
opened in 1873. 

The City Hotel, No. 127 South Main Street, was opened by Michael Hames 
in 1877. 

The Grand Central Hotel was opened by J. Kleppish, proprietor, in 1886. 
This house was situated at 127 South Main Street. 

Hotel Duncan came into existence in 1886, George A. Duncan, proprietor. 
This hotel was situated on the southeast corner of Main and Valley streets. 
Whether prior to this time this property was used for hotel purposes the writer 
cannot say. It has been used for such purposes ever since. The New Delano is 
located at this place. 

The Palmer House, 501 North Main Street, had its beginning about 1886. 

While Burlington in the early days could rejoice in the quality of its hotels 
for the time, the time came when it had no occasion to boast of its hotel accom- 
modations. During those days the only hotel that could be fairly counted upon 
with reasonable certainty was the Union Hotel. 

The building of the Burlington Hotel, situated at the northeast corner of 
Third and Valley streets, at a cost of near three hundred thousand dollars, was 
the commencement of a new era in the matter of hotel accommodations in Bur- 
lington. 

Those here at the time of the beginning of the building of the Burlington saw 
that the old way of accommodation must cease and something be done for the 
better. The result is that Burlington has at the present time sufficient hotel accom- 
modations for a city of its population. 

The people of the city and the traveling public know of the present hotels in 
the city, and it is not for us to say anything concerning them except you get what 
you pay for. 

It is impossible to trace the history of the establishment of every hotel oper- 
ated in the city since its foundation. The names of the buildings used for hotel 
purposes change almost with the changes of the names of the proprietor. 

It will not be out of place to mention the Harris House on North Main Street. 
It is more in the nature of a boarding house, where anyone can go and get a good 
meal. It is the successor of the Black Hawk Hotel, the first hotel erected in 
Burlington. Miss Birdie Harris is its present proprietor. More than a half a 
century has passed since it became known as the Harris House and been under 
the management and control of the members of that family. 



CHAPTER XVI 
PUBLIC AND OTHER SCHOOLS OF BURLINGTON 

It is not the laying of brick in mortar, the grading of streets, the establishment 
of industries which give employment to men and women, that constitute a city, 
state or nation in the highest and best sense. Civilization does not altogether 
consist in the development of the material universe to make it more completely 
satisfy man's outward needs. There are other and better things — the develop- 
ment of man's mental, moral and spiritual being — without which, and by the loss 
of which, human society would resolve itself back to a tribal condition — that con- 
dition from which it was evolved. For more than six hundred years the wander- 
ing Arab has pitched his tent and laid himself down to sleep among the ruins of 
once mighty cities of Asia Minor. With wonder he has looked upon fallen 
columns of magnificent temples erected by human labor and skill. There all alone, 
in a desert of sand, stand the columns of temples, supporting entablatures, 
beneath whose friezes the bat finds a shelter. If the question is asked, why those 
ruins? What became of the people who once inhabited the fallen cities of Asia 
Minor, who reared those once magnificent temples? The answer will be: Those 
ruins were brought about by a change in inward conditions of the people who 
inhabited those cities, the loss of national life and spirit. Those of a community, 
either of a state, nation or city, who devote their time and energies for the better- 
ment of man's inward conditions are as much the builders of states and nations 
as those who contribute to its material wealth. 

The minister, the school teacher, or wherever there is a human soul who seeks 
to make men, women and children more intelligent, to better their moral and 
spiritual beings, are the equals of and co-operators with those possessed of 
wealth in the upbuilding of a city or state. The minister who preached the first 
sermon in Burlington ; Zadoc Inghram, who taught the first school, is entitled to 
as much credit as the one who built the first cabin or laid out the town ; as the 
one who established the first store and delivered goods over a rude counter made 
of rough unplaned boards. 

Prior to 1840 no law existed to enable the people to impose a public tax for 
any school purpose, and the one enacted at that time was the best that could be 
devised under existing conditions. Whatever schools existed prior to this time 
were what were called "subscription schools." In 1836 Burlington had 124 boys 
under twenty-one years of age and 112 girls under eighteen years of age. It is 
reasonable to suppose that at least half of them, or more, were of school age. 
In the fall of 1833 Dr. William Ross built a log cabin schoolhouse southwest of 
where is now the North Hill Public Square, which was used for school and 
religious purposes. In the winter of 1833 and 1834 a man by the name of Phil- 

162 




JAMES. CLARKE 
First President of the School Board 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 163 

pot lived in this cabin. In the spring of 1834 Zadoc C. Inghram taught school 
in it during the summer months. After Mr. Inghram a Mrs. Shelton had a chil- 
dren's school in this cabin during the summer time. From this time up to 1841 
schools were kept in different parts of town. In 1839 Old Zion had been com- 
pleted so far that a Rev. E. M. Scott had a school in its basement. In 1838 Mr. 
J. P. Stewart established a school called "Academy of Science and Literature." 
This school was held in the large upper rooms of the building formerly occupied 
by C. Nealey as a store. In 1839 ' 3V an act °^ tne Legislature this institution 
became incorporated under the name of "The Burlington Academy." The incor- 
porators were Charles Mason, George Temple, William H. Starr, James P. Stew- 
art, George H. Beeler, William B. Remey, James W. Grimes, Augustus C. Dodge, 
James C. Clark and Dr. S. S. Ransom. In 1840 Samuel H. Clendenen advertises 
in the Hawkeye, "Select School opposite Mr. John S. David's." His school 
consisted of two sections : 

First. Orthography, reading, penmanship, intellectual and practical arith- 
metic and geography. 

Second. English grammar, ancient and modern history, natural and moral 
philosophy, algebra, geometry, mensuration, atlas of the United States, rhetoric 
and original composition. Tuition, first section, per term, $6.00. Tuition, second 
section, per term, $8.00. 

A Mrs. McGill taught a school in a building situated near where the railroad 
crosses Jefferson Street. Hawkeye afforded a good place for skating, and when 
skating the whig youngsters would sing: "In the year 1844 the whigs will rise to 
fall no more." 

Mrs. McGill made it a rule to have prayers each morning before the com- 
mencement of school work. There existed what was called the Stone Schoolhouse, 
where Division Street crosses the creek in the western part of town ; Johnson 
Pierson was its first teacher. 

In 1834 a log schoolhouse was built in the valley afterwards known as "Fox 
Abraham's Hollow," now "Stony Lonesome." Benjamin Tucker, the man who 
made the survey of the first lots in Burlington, taught in this school building in 
1835. William Henry Smith, in "Authentic Story of the First Settlement of 
Burlington," speaks of Tucker as being cross and ill-tempered. That he gave 
little Robert Cooper one of the worst whippings he ever saw. The teacher who 
followed Tucker was a Mr. Newton, a son-in-law of a Mrs. Jones who kept a 
boarding house on Front Street. Mr. Newton's pupils liked him, for he seldom 
whipped. However, his patriotism overcame him, for on a Fourth of July he 
got on a spree which continued for a week, for which he was discharged and 
Johnson Pierson finished his term. 

What was known as the Washington and Fifth Street School was kept by Mrs. 
Hogan, principal. A school was kept by Miss Emma Clarke at the corner of 
Division and Fourth streets. A Mr. S. Wetzlew had a school at No. 46 Columbia 
Street. Miss Cheesman had a school on Angular Street, near Main Street. A 
school existed in the northwest part of the town, but its location and the name 
of its teacher I cannot tell. 

Doubtless there were public schools in Burlington prior to 1852. If such was 
the case there is no record of them. Prior to January 19, 1838, the time when 
Burlington received its first charter, the town consisted of an aggregation of 



164 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

people who lived in log eabins and a few frame houses, with the exception of 
two or three brick structures. There did not exist a township organization at this 
time. On the 3d of April, 1838, the board of commissioners caused to be entered 
of record certain orders, among which were orders establishing certain town- 
ships, one of which is an order establishing election precinct No. 1, or Burlington 
Township. From this time until 1840 no law existed whereby the people could 
organize school districts. Under the law of 1840, which provided for the estab- 
lishment of a system of common schools, it was made the duty of the school 
inspectors, whose election was provided for in the law, to divide the townships 
into school districts and deliver a written notice to a taxable inhabitant of the 
district describing its boundaries and the time and place of a meeting of the 
voters of the district ; and it was mandatory on the person to whom the notice had 
been given to notify the electors of the district of a meeting by posting up notices 
of the meeting and the purposes for which it was called. The electors assembled 
had authority to organize as the law provided. When the voters had organized 
themselves into a school district, the district so organized became a corporate 

body by the name and style of "School District No. of the Township of the 

County of , Iowa Territory." When lawfully assembled the voters 

had power to designate the site for a schoolhouse, to purchase or lease school- 
houses. Had power to impose a tax from time to time to keep the schoolhouse 
in repair; to impose a suitable tax for the purchase of a library case and books. 
It was made the duty of the inspectors to file a report with the clerk of the 
District Court concerning the schools of his township. No such reports were 
ever filed with the clerk of that court for Des Moines County. It was made the 
duty of the clerk to report to the superintendent of public instruction what had 
been done by the inspectors. Mr. William Reynolds, superintendent of public 
instruction, in his report to the Legislature in 1842 says: "Those reports should 
have been made before the 20th of November last. I regret, however, that but 
three counties have reported, and those three are not as full as desirable. The 
three counties which have reported are Clayton, Lee and Des Moines. Des 
Moines County has nine townships — Burlington, Union, Augusta, Flint River, 
Danville, Benton, Pleasant Grove and Yellow Springs — all of which have organ- 
ized except Union. Those organized, except Benton, have elected school inspectors, 
but none of them have made a report of their doings. This is a matter of sur- 
prise to me, for being personally acquainted in that county, I am convinced that 
materials are not wanting for publishing reports, both desirable and interesting. 
There are several good schools in that county and are being liberally supported. 
The City of Burlington has seven schools, one in which the higher branches of 
an English education and the classics are taught, and another devoted to the 
education of young ladies." 

Of what had been done prior to 1849 respecting the establishment of com- 
mon schools in Burlington we have no record. 

In 1847 Hon. Chas. Mason, Hon. James W. Grimes and George Partridge 
were elected school inspectors. A better selection could not have been made. 
They were educated men and felt the necessity of popular education. As soon 
as possible, under the conditions then existing, they commenced carrying into 
effect their ideas on this important matter. They were ably assisted by Mr. 
Edwards, editor of the Hawkcye, who in 1850 in an editorial said: "We 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 165 

regard it as vastly important that in laying the foundation of a system of com- 
mon schools for our city we should begin upon the most important plans, with 
better wages than our traders now get ; with children properly classified, seven 
teachers can better instruct them than seventeen can under the system which 
now prevails." It appears up to 1849 no attempt had been made to establish 
even approximately a graded system of common schools. Mr. William Walker, 
school inspector for Burlington Township, in his notice to Mr. Edwards (see 
hereafter) says he had consolidated all the districts in the city into one district, 
known as School District No. 2. 

On March 29, 1849, a meeting of the qualified electors of the City of Bur- 
lington, composing School District No. 2 of the Township of Burlington, was 
called to meet at the Congregational Church in Burlington for the purpose of 
organization by virtue of a notice which reads as follows : 

"Burlington, March 19th, 1849. 
Mr. J. G. Edwards: — 

Sir: — I notify you that I have changed all of the school districts in this city 
into one district, to be known as "School District No. 2" of the Township of 
Burlington, in the County of Des Moines, State of Iowa, and request you to 
give notice of the same as required by law (Sec. 34, school law). The first 
meeting will be held on the 29th of March, at 2 o'clock P. M.. in the Congre- 
gational Church. William Walker." 

This meeting was called to order by James G. Edwards, who nominated 
James Clarke, Esq., as chairman, who was chosen accordingly. The chairman 
having stated the object of the meeting, on motion of James W. Grimes, Oliver 
Cock was appointed secretary of the meeting. On motion of Mr. Grimes, it was 
resolved that the meeting now proceed to elect by ballot a president of School 
District No. 2, Burlington Township. 

James W. Grimes nominated Rev. William Salter, A. W. Carpenter nom- 
inated James Clarke, Esq., J. C. Hall nominated Rev. D. N. Smith. 

The following are the names of the persons who voted for a president, viz. : 
John Johnson, E. D. Ransom, William Walker, William Salter, Isaac Leffler, 
I. W. Webber, Z. C. Hovey, James W. Grimes, S. S. Ransom, J. G. Edwards, 
L. D. Stockton, L. P. Reed, David Rorer, Wesley Jones, Thomas Sperry, J. C. 
Hall, George Temple, Harvey Ray, James F. Stephens, H. Pasche, Evan Evans, 
J. W. Neally, Edward Marlow, Gilbert Robbins, Dr. John F. Henry, P. Dunlap, 
Joseph Clarke, James Hayes, James Golden, D. S. Ebersol, David Rice, John 
Whittaker, H. B. Ware, J. A. Funck, D. N. Smith, Silas Ferry, John Grey, 
James Bridges, E. W. Gray, S. B. Goodwin, Joseph Greenough, Dr. G. M. Mc- 
Kenny, William M. Walbridge, W. W. Wightman, Thomas W. Scott, William 
Morgan, John W. Myers, A. W. Carpenter, William Lewis, Lewis Boerstter, B. 
C. Hopping, C. Parr, William Endsley, Martin Heisy, H. K. Eads, Martin 
Wheeler, James Kurtz, John G. Foote, M. G. Criswell, James Eads, John H. 
Armstrong, George W. Snyder, James Armstrong, James Clarke, Oliver Cock — 68. 

The ballots being taken and counted, James Clarke was duly elected president 
of School District No. 2, Burlington Township, Des Moines County, Iowa. 



166 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

On motion of James W. Grimes it was resolved, That a committee of five 
persons from different parts of the town be appointed to ascertain as to the 
propriety of building one or more schoolhouses, and to collect information as to 
the eligibility of sites for schoolhouses, cost of ground and such other information 
as may be of importance, and to ascertain how many schools are needed for 
the district the ensuing summer. 

The chairman appointed the following persons upon said committee: James 
W. Grimes, George Temple, Oliver Cock, John W. Webber and Dr. George 
W. Snyder. 

On motion the meeting adjourned for two weeks, until April 12, 1849, a * 
2 o'clock P. M., to meet at the same place. 

At the adjourned meeting on April 12 the committee appointed on March 29 
reported. After much discussion the following resolutions were adopted: 

Resolved, That two schoolhouses be erected in this district for the use of 
the district during the year 1849; the cost of the same with the lots upon which 
they may be erected not to cost more than four thousand five hundred dollars each. 

On motion of James W. Grimes the following resolution was adopted by the 
meeting : 

Resolved, That the board of directors is authorized to levy a tax of not more 
than 1 per cent, on the taxable property of this District No. 2, for the purpose 
of purchasing lots and erecting two schoolhouses during the year 1849. 

On motion of James G. Edwards it was 

1. Resolved, That the board of directors be required to report to the next 
regular meeting a draft of the schoolhouses to be erected, the sites such school- 
houses shall occupy and the probable cost of the same. 

At this meeting L. D. Stockton was elected secretary ; John Johnson, treas- 
urer of the board; James W. Grimes was selected chairman of a committee to 
make inquiry of the number of schools needed. 

At a meeting held May 11, 1849, a tax of one-third of 1 per cent, on all 
the taxable property of this city was authorized for the purchase of schoolhouse 
sites. 

At a meeting of the board, May 11, 1849, School District No. 2 was sep- 
arated into four districts : 

First. All the city south of Market constituted a district. 

Second. All the city east of Fourth Street, between Market and Court, to 
constitute a district. 

Third. All the city west of Fourth Street, between Market and Court streets, 
to constitute a district. 

Fourth. All the city north of Court Street to constitute a district. 

Schools were soon afterwards opened in the other districts. Samuel M. 
Clendenen was elected principal of the district north of Court Street, O. L. 
Palmer of No. 3, Abraham Darbey of No. 2 and Mrs. Purge of No. 1. Her 
daughter was her only assistant. Mrs. Purge was compelled to resign on account 
of ill health, when David S. Moure was elected principal, with Miss Eliza A. 
Clark assistant. Mrs. May Wiggins was assistant in No. 2, Miss Ellen Griffey 
in No. 3 and Mrs. Price in No. 4. Mrs. Purge has the honor of being the first 
woman principal of the Burlington city schools, at the magnificent salary of 






HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 167 

$25.00 per month, and her daughter at $8.00 per month, but be it said to the 
credit of the school board, she received the same salary as the men principals. 

The school census, taken in September, 1850, a little over one year after 
their establishment, is as follows : 

No. 1 238 Attendance, No. 1 130 

No. 2 473 Attendance, No. 2 183 

No. 3 192 Attendance, No. 3 140 

No. 4 112 Attendance, No. 4 109 



Total 1. 01 5 Total 562 

To those of the present time this attendance is not a good one, but it is not 
as bad as it looks, for at these times were many private and parochial schools ; 
besides, in the minds of many there existed a prejudice against public schools. 
Some aristocratic mothers did not want their children to mix with children of 
the "common people," and sent them to private schools. That which survives 
and attains the excellent has to struggle. So it was with the public schools of 
Burlington. As time passed, through their excellence they overcame all oppo- 
sition, while on the other hand private schools as such have almost ceased to exist. 

The city in 1849 ' la d an estimated population of four thousand. In the mat- 
ter of public schools up to 1852 the Burlington district was far behind the 
country districts. Almost immediately on the adoption of the act of 1840 all the 
organized townships (except Union) had taken advantage of that act. Had 
elected school inspectors, who had divided their several townships into school 
districts. Had erected school buildings, principally of logs, in which schools 
were being taught. 

NORTH HILL SCHOOL 

In September, 1850, the school board made a contract with Myers & Kelfer 
for the erection of a school building on lots 729 and 730, original city, at the 
southeast corner of High and Sixth streets, at a cost of $4,150. Mr. Charles 
Starker was its architect. This building was completed early in 1852. Charles 
Ben Darwin was elected its principal at a salary of $40 per month and entered 
upon the discharge of his duties as principal in April, 1852. Mr. Darwin subse- 
quently became distinguished as a lawyer; was elected as representative of Des 
Moines County in the Eleventh General Assembly; was by joint resolution of 
the Senate and House of the Eleventh General Assembly appointed one of the 
commissioners to draft and report to the Judiciary Committee of the two houses 
a code of crime and criminal procedure and to revise and harmonize the exist- 
ing laws of the state; was afterwards appointed district judge of the District 
Court of Washington Territory. Since then additions have been made to this 
school building. The time finally came when it became necessary to construct 
a new and modern building for this district. 

In 1913, by a vote of the electors of the district, it was determined to erect 
a new building on a new site. The district purchased the ground situated at the 
corner of Eighth, North and Spring streets, being a space of 135x150 feet, on 



168 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

which is to be erected a building at a cost of $50,000. The plans and specifica- 
tions of the same have been drawn and adopted. 

The principals who have had charge of North Hill School follow : C. B. 
Darwin, 1852; (no principal), 1852-53 ; J. H. Smith, 1853-54; R. J. Graff, 1854- 
58; Clara Miller, 1858; J. E. Dow, 1858-61; R. J. Graff, 1861-63; J. Thorpe, 
1863-64; M. Dunn, 1864; C. P. DeHass, 1864-72; George A. Miller, 1872-73; 
Logan Steece, 1873-81; R. S. Davis, 1881-1904; Josephine B. Burt, 1904-1915. 

WILLIAM SALTER SCHOOL 

This school is situated at the corner of Maple and Seventh streets and is 
the second school building of Burlington in age. It belonged to Subdivision 
No. 1, made by the school board in 1849 I was built by Myers & Kelber in accord- 
ance with the plans made by Charles Starker, architect. It was known and 
called South Hill School till the year 1913, when the name was changed by order 
of the school board to William Salter School. The original structure was not 
competed till in May, 1853. The first cost of the building was $4,700. Several 
additions have been added to it since first constructed. 

The principals of this school since 1850 have been: Mr. Lemon, 1856-57; 
E. L. Jaggar, 1857-58; T. B. Gray, 1858-59; A. J. Graff, 1859-61; J. E.'Dow, 
1861-64; J. K. McCullough, 1864-66; J. Morrison, 1866; A. M. Antrobus, 1867; 
A. E. Millspaugh, 1867-72; J. A. Fairbrother. 1872-73; A. E. Millspaugh, 1873; 
Charles H. Morey, 1873-74; W. M. Forbes, 1874-76; William J. Samson, 1876- 
I9I5- 

LINCOLN SCHOOL 

In 1858 the school board caused to be erected a one-story frame building 
containing two rooms. This building was situated three blocks west of the pres- 
ent building. The ground on which the first building was constructed was pur- 
chased from Hon. Shepherd Leffler in 1856. Mr. Leffler had commenced the 
erection of a dwelling house on the site, on the foundation of which the school 
district erected a two-story brick school building, with one room in the first story 
and one in the second. Afterwards the building was enlarged to a four-room 
building. At the time of the erection of the first building it was given the name 
of "Dutchtown School" and was so known and called by the school authorities 
and people. The people who lived in this district were mostly Germans and 
good loyal American citizens. In time the old building gave way to a good, mod- 
ern, substantial school building. To show their admiration for the savior of 
their adopted land the people of this district demanded that the school be called 
"Lincoln School," and such was the name given it. 

The principals who have had charge of Lincoln School follow : C. P. De- 
Hass, 1858-60; John Ritchie, 1860-61; Susan Coulter, 1861-62; C. P. DeHass, 
1862-64; Jennie Chapman, 1864-65; William Inghram, 1865-70; Logan Steece, 
1870-72; j. W. C. Jones, 1872-74; R. S. Davis, 1874-81 ; William Inghram, 1881- 
88; J. Allison Smith, 1888-93; Mary C. McKitterick, 1893-1915. 

JAMES WILSON GRIMES SCHOOL 

In 1863 Richard Howard built what was known and called the "South Bound- 
ary School" building. The name "South Boundary School" was given it because 




"*«. 



NORTH HILL SCHOOL HOUSE 
As it appeared in 1853 




SOUTH HILL SCHOOL HOUSE 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 169 

it was situated just north of the north line of South Boundary Street, which 
marked the southern line of the original City of Burlington as surveyed and 
platted under the direction of the general surveyor of the United States. 

The cost of the building when first constructed was $1,900. Subsequently 
additions were made to it, so that it is now among one of the largest school build- 
ings in the city. The name was changed by order of the school board in 1913 to 
"James Wilson Grimes School." 

The principals who have had charge of this school are: Mrs. Lat Little- 
field, 1863-64; Milton Campbell, 1864-65; T. J. Trulock, 1865-67; John Paisley, 
1867-68; William Pardee, 1868-69; William Hummell, 1869-1913; Miss L. 
Gutekunst, 1913-1915. 

JOHN LOCKWOOD CORSE SCHOOL 

In 1865 the school board caused to be set off a school district in the west 
and southwest part of the city, known as West Hill School District, and in the 
next year a one-story building was erected at the northeast corner of Leebrick 
and Amelia streets. In 1869 a second story was added containing two rooms. 
In 1876 an addition was made to this building containing three rooms and a 
large hall. In 1S94 three more rooms were added to this structure. About this 
time the Rutan system of heating and ventilation was placed in the building. 
On the'morning of January 21, 1896, it was completely destroyed by fire, which 
was the best thing that could have happened for the good of this district. In 
the same year the board purchased 3^ acres for the site of a new school, three 
blocks south of the old building, on which was erected the present building. In 
1913 the school board changed the name of this school from "West Hill" to 
"John Lockwood Corse School." 

The principals who have had charge of this school are: Miss M. M. Pol- 
lock, 1866-67; S. O. Thomas, 1867-72; C. A. Lisle, 1872-73; T. J. R. Perry, 
1873-74; E. E. Fitch, 1874-75; S. O. Thomas, 1875-1911; Robert K. Corlett, 
1911-1915. 

JACOB GARTNER LAUMAN SCHOOL 

This school was known and called the "North Oak School" until 1913, when 
its name was changed by the school board to "Jacob Gartner Lauman School." 
The school building is situated at the corner of North Oak and Ninth streets. 
The district in which it was constructed was set off in 1868 and in the same 
year a school building was erected to supply the wants of this district. In 1876 
a four-room addition was constructed, making it an eight-room building. Twice 
it has been partially destroyed by fire. 

The principals who have had charge of this school are: A. Montmorency, 
1868-71; W. D. Inghram, 1871-81 ; Logan Steece, 1881-1912; J. B. Robinson, 
1912-13; Mabel Young, 1913 — . 

WASHINGTON SCHOOL 

The district in which this school is situated was organized in 1879, and dur- 
ing this year a four-room two-story building was erected. This building was 
destroyed by fire during the first of the year 1892, and in the same year the pres- 



170 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

ent school was built, but not on the same site on which the old building stood. 
The district was known and called "Hibernia" and the school "Hibernia School" 
because of the "Irish who lived there." In 1913 the name of the district and 
school was changed to Washington. 

The principals who have had charge of this school are: Fred Embeck, 1875- 
91; Marian S. Todd, 1891-93; Anna L. Robins, 1893-1901 ; Belle J. Taylor, 
1901-10; Howard Mathews, 1910-11; C. F. Banghart, 1911 — . 

PROSPECT HILL SCHOOL 

Harrison Avenue 

The Prospect Hill District was set off in 1879, and during the same year a 
two-story four-room brick building was constructed. In 1889 a two-story four- 
room addition was built. In 1892 the entire building was destroyed by fire, and 
in the same year the present building was constructed according to plans drawn 
by C. A. Dunham, architect. This school building is one of the best in the city. 
The site covers two acres of ground. 

The principals who have had charge of Prospect Hill School are: J. K. 
McCullough, 1879-93; Marian S. Todd, 1893-1912; J. B. Robinson, 1912-13; 
Mary G. Leebrick, 1913 — . 

CHARLES ELLIOTT PERKINS SCHOOL 

Perkins Avenue 

The district in which this school is erected was set off in the year 1870. Prior 
to this time the children in this district attended what is now known as the 
"James Wilson Grimes School." For want of room in the last named school 
the West Madison District was organized, and a two-story brick building was 
erected on a three-sided piece of ground, with a frontage of 228 feet on Sum- 
mer Street ( West Madison Road) and 256 feet on Fifteenth Street and 56 feet 
on Pine Street. This school was known and called "West Madison School" 
because it was situated on what was called West Madison Road. As the west 
and southwest portion of the district was built up, the people of the district 
demanded a larger and better building, situated in a different location. In 1913 
the electors authorized the construction of a new building for the district. In 
pursuance to this vote a modern school building is being erected fronting on 
Perkins Avenue. When completed this building will cost about fifty thousand 
dollars. This school and building was properly named "Charles Elliott Perkins 
School." The late Charles Elliott Perkins had with his famiy made his home 
in this school district for more than forty years. He was a man of fine character 
and lover of the best in literature and a friend of education. He had through 
his energies and opportunities done as much, if not more, than any other man 
for the material advancement of the people of Iowa. His widow, Mrs. Edith 
Farbes Perkins, with a large public spirit and a commendable generosity, gave 
to the district the ground upon which the new school building is being erected. 

The principals who have had charge of this school are : A. Montmorency, 
1870-72; George A. Miller. 1873-1901 ; Anna L. Robins, 191 5. 






HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY m 

SAUNDERSON SCHOOL 

The district in which this school is situated was established in 1892. The 
school building was commenced and completed the same year. The school was 
given the name "Saunderson Grammar School" in memory of Robert G. Saun- 
derson, who at the time of his death was superintendent of the city public schools. 
Mr. Saunderson graduated at the State University of Iowa, and soon after his 
graduation was elected principal of the Burlington High School, which position 
he held for one year. He was then elected superintendent of the city schools, 
which office he held to the time of his death. Perhaps no one who has held 
the office of superintendent gave more general satisfaction to the people, teachers 
and school authorities than Mr. Saunderson. He was well fitted to discharge 
the duties of that important office ; was a practical man, had good common sense, 
to which was added a liberal education. In no sense was he a faddist. He fully 
comprehended the objects for which the public schools had been established, to 
fit the great mass of the pupils to discharge the duties and responsibilities of 
life, and to attain this end he devoted his energies. His aim was to have the 
pupil master thoroughly the most important branches constituting a course of 
study, believing a few things fully comprehended was far more important in the 
life work of the pupil than a superficial knowledge of many things. He took 
into consideration the age of the pupil, opportunities and surroundings and 
conditions in life, and on these lines provided a course of study, and this course 
of study was limited to the time in which the average pupil would attend school. 
He believed the pupils' acquiring knowledge depended largely on the personality 
of the teacher. That the teacher in his or her own way should be left perfectly 
free to use such methods as to his or her judgment would be the most efficient in 
acquiring results. He believed the schoolroom was a place where the pupil and 
teacher worked for mental development. That it did not depend whether the 
teacher or pupil sat on a mahogany seat with desks before them or on a rude 
bench without any desk. He believed in good sanitary conditions, pure air, good 
light and sufficient warmth. He fully recognized that the state wanted the best 
results for the money expended in the education of its children. That it did not 
have any money to be wasted in matters that did not amount to much ("frills"). 
Was positive in his conviction, but above all things else in his dealings in the 
conduct of the schools he was man enough to shoulder responsibilities, for he 
considered he was the head of the schools ; that the teachers were working under 
his directions, and if anything went wrong between teacher and pupil, or between 
teacher and parent, growing out of the relation which the teacher sustains to the 
parent and pupil, he took the responsibility on himself to make amends if any 
wrong was done; if not, stood firm, defending their action as his own. By such 
course of conduct he always had the good will of the teachers. In connection 
with the Saunderson School, and as a separate department, is a Teachers' Train- 
ing School, of which the principal of the Saunderson School has charge, and 
is assisted by the other teachers of the school. 

Since the establishment of the Saunderson School, Miss Martha Cox has 
been its principal. 



172 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

SUNNY SIDE SCHOOL 

In July, 1876, the city limits of Burlington were extended so as to include 
the territory of the Independent School District of "Sunny Side." The question 
arose whether the extension of the city limits destroyed the corporate existence 
of said Sunny Side District ; whether two independent school districts could 
exist within the corporate limits of a city. To determine this question the state 
at the instance of the Burlington Independent School District brought quo war- 
ranto proceedings against the board of directors of the Sunny Side School Dis- 
trict. The holding of the lower court being against the state, the case was 
appealed to the Supreme Court, which held that the school system of the state 
was complete within itself, and such was the case with the laws and regulations 
governing cities. That the law providing for the extension of city limits did not 
provide how it would affect school districts within such extended limits, and 
the extension of the city territory did not affect the corporate organization of 
Sunny Side District. Subsequently the Legislature passed an act which in terms 
provided that all the territory of a city should constitute the territory of the 
Independent School District of the city. It was by this means Sunny Side School 
became a part of the Independent School District of Burlington in 1882. The 
old schoolhouse and grounds were sold and a new building erected in 1891 a 
short distance east from the old site. This school has a large area for play- 
grounds and has one of the most beautiful locations for a school. 

The principals who have had charge of Sunnyside School since it became part 
of the Burlington Independent District are: J. A. Smith, 1882 to January, 1887; 
C. P. DeHass, January, 1887, to February, 1887 — died in office; J. A. Barnes, 

February, 1887, to June, 1893; Josephine B. Burt, 1893; Mabel S. Young, ; 

llattie E. Kline, 1915. 

BURLINGTON HIGH SCHOOL 

Dr. William Salter was president of the school board in 1853, and in his 
report of that year says : 

"With the enlarged facilities that will be furnished with the completion of 
the schoolhouse on the South Hill it is to be hoped that an improvement will 
take place in the character of the schools. Before long the erection of a new 
schoolhouse will be necessary to serve for a high school. The board is of the 
opinion that the time for that enterprise has not yet arrived. Our primary and 
grammar schools must first be established on a more firm and satisfactory basis 
than at present. The number of children somewhat advanced in years who 
are found to be ignorant of the first rudiments of knowledge is exceedingly 
large. The board is at the same time of the opinion that a high school is to be 
regarded as an indispensable part of our common school system, and that they 
will hail with joy the day of its establishment." 

Nothing seems to have been done looking to the establishment of a high 
school with a prescribed course of study until the annual meeting of the electors, 
March 14, 1864, at which Mr. McCosh offered the following resolution: 

"Resolved, That the board of directors of this school district be instructed to 
establish a school in which more advanced studies than those now pursued in 
the schools shall be taught." After some discussion it was carried. 





3-3-gaa„ 











lUT.UXIJTOX UNIVERSITY 





1-f prT" ' i^i ..l*U5SJSS5 
Jiii ■■ ■■ ■■ 




llli. II SCHOOL, BURLINGTON 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 173 

The records of the board for April 18, 1864, show that the board considered 
the vote of the electors as binding upon them: "On motion, Luke Palmer, the 
president, was directed to appoint a committee to ascertain the cost of a building 
for a high school ; also to report upon a proper building or place for the school." 

On June 6th the same record tells of the establishment of a high school com- 
mittee, defines its powers and asks for a report at the next meeting. 

This committee reported August 10th, in full, a course of study and rules, 
which report was adopted. 

The electors having decided that a high school should be established, the 
board to carry out their rule, on June 15, 1864, on motion of Mr. McCosh, 
ordered a contract to be made with the trustees of the Cumberland Presby- 
terian Church. The contract leases the building for two years at $200 per year 
with the privilege of renewal for three years. On month later J. E. Dow was 
elected principal of the newly established school and Miss Josephine Cutter his 
assistant. 

The school opened in September, 1864, in the old Cumberland Presbyterian 
Church, corner of Division and Fourth streets. The first class graduated in 
1868. The school remained in the old church for five years and was moved to 
Marion Hall, the present city hall, in 1869. It remained here until 1873, when 
it moved into its new building. 

The question of construction of a high school building had been discussed 
for a year or more prior to 1865. At this time considerable opposition to its 
construction existed; but at the annual meeting of that year a tax levy of 2 
mills carried. The opponents of the measure, however, carried the day at that 
meeting, and the money raised for the above tax levy was appropriated for 
other purposes. In 1867 the title to the land east of West Boundary Street 
(now Central Avenue), on which the old high school building was erected, was 
examined. On June 27, 1867, the board determined to purchase the Burlington 
University grounds and a committee was appointed to ascertain on what terms 
it could be acquired. This committee reported favoring the payment of $38,000 
for the building and grounds and $1,500 for the ground east of Boundary Street, 
the title to which had been investigated under the law then in existence. The 
question of purchase had to be submitted to a vote of the electors of the district 
at their March meeting. This was not done because the trustees of the university 
withdrew their proposition. Then came up the question at the meeting of 
electors whether to purchase the ground east of Boundary Street, paying for 
the same $2,000, for which sum the trustees of the university had offered to sell. 
This proposition carried, and it was determined to go ahead and build on this 
ground. In the meantime the university people seeing their opportunity to sell 
was about to vanish, renewed their offer to sell for $38,000, which offer was not 
considered. 

In July, 1868, plans were drawn by C. A. Dunham, architect, and accepted 
by the board, and advertisement for bids for excavation for foundation was 
made. A contract was made for the stone work of basement and brick cross 
walls at a cost of $10,085.59. When this was completed it was covered with 
boards and remained in this condition for four years, during which time the 
battle for and against the high school was going on. The minutes of the annual 
meeting of March 9, 1869, contains the following: 



174 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

"John H. Gear moved that the board be instructed to give notice of a special 
meeting of the electors to vote on the proposition to issue the bonds of the Inde- 
pendent School District of Burlington to raise the funds necessary to complete 
the high school," which motion was carried. The special election was held; the 
vote was: 

For issuance of bonds 224 votes 

Against issuance of bonds 532 votes 

Notwithstanding this vote, the friends of the high school did not lose cour- 
age. At the annual meeting in March, 1870, the report of the secretary of the 
board showed on hand $22,517.19, the result of taxes collected under the 2-mill 
levy for the past three years and i-mill tax in 1868. The question arose how to 
dispose of this money. Mr. Thomas French, the leader of the opposition to the 
establishment of any high school, offered a resolution that $8,000 of this money 
raised for high school purposes be used in the construction of primary school- 
houses. This resolution was adopted. The opponents of the high school at the 
time were the loudest shouters for the grammar schools, while the friends of the 
high school were not slow in telling them in plain words that their love for the 
grammar schools was not in fact that they loved them so much, but was engen- 
dered by their hate of the high school, and were not over-delicate in showing up 
their past record in reference to the grammar schools. But the end to all con- 
troversy came at the regular annual meeting of the electors in Marion Hall in 
1872. Both sides had marshalled all their forces. At this meeting Mr. Thomas 
French offered the following resolution : 

"Resolved, That the judgment of this meeting is that the board of school 
directors are requested to suspend the high school for the ensuing year and 
the sum raised for that purpose be placed for the benefit of the common schools." 
This motion was met with a second, and the battle was on. Captain French and 
his follows supported the resolution. Robert Donahue, Thompson McCosh, 
George H. Lane, A. M. Antrobus and others opposed its adoption. It will not 
look well in print to put down all that was said at the time. A voice vote was 
taken, and a great shout went up — "ayes." The negative was called and as 
great a shout "no." It was impossible for the chairman to decide whether the 
resolution had been adopted, and a division was called. Those for the resolution 
to line up on the south side of the middle of the room, those against on the 
north side. The heads were counted and the "ayes" had a good majority. The 
friends of the high school, seeing they had a majority in the meeting, were not 
slow to act. Mr. Thompson McCosh immediately made a motion that a tax of 
3 mills be levied for the purpose of erecting the high school building, which 
was carried. This ended a five-year struggle to have a high school building 
erected in Burlington. A contract was at once made with Hayden & House- 
worth for the completion of the work, at a cost of $28,000. The building was 
ready for occupancy in February, 1S73. Since this time opposition to the high 
school has practically ceased, and many of those who were its strongest oppo- 
nents have become its warmest friends. The building completed in 1873 has 
served its purpose for the time, when on March 17, 1002, the electors voted to 
purchase the Burlington University grounds on which to erect a new high school 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 175 

building. Being authorized to make the purchase, the board of directors pur- 
chased the grounds of the university for $9,540. Soon after the purchase the 
first and second floors of the main building in the university were remodeled and 
used for a manual training and domestic science department. 

At the meeting of the electors in the year 1907 the board was authorized to 
issue the school bonds of the district to the amount of one hundred and fifty 
thousand dollars ($150,000.00), and at the election in 1909 an additional sum of 
five thousand dollars ($5,000.00), or over, with the proceeds of the sale to 
construct a new high school building on the- grounds purchased from the Bur- 
lington University. Plans and specifications for the new building were prepared 
by Temple, Burrows & McLane, architects, of Davenport, Iowa. The contract 
to construct the building in accordance with the plans was let to W. M. Allen 
& Co., Peoria, 111., on July 30, 1908. The work commenced August 13, 1908, 
by breaking ground for excavation. The cornerstone was laid November 13, 
1908; the building occupied May 9, 1910; the size of the building is 147 by 175 
feet, capacity 800, capacity of auditorium 750. 

The cost of new high school was: 

Grounds $ 9,540.00 

Cost of building 200,000.00 

Heating plant 28,000.00 

Furnishing 13,000.00 

Total $250,540.00 

Since the occupancy of the new building the manual training department has 
been transferred to the old building. 

The principals who have had charge of the Burlington High School are : J. 
E. Dow, 1864-1865; J. A. Smith, 1865-1872; Robert Saunderson, 1872-1873; 
George Gordon, 1873-1874; C. A. Lisle, 1874-1882; E. Poppe, 1882-1899; M. 

Ricker, 1899; W. L. Hanson, ; H. M. Elliott, ; George A. Brown, 

1913-1915. 

When the City of Burlington became an independent school district I have been 
unable to find out, as no records of the proceedings of its board of directors prior 
to 1865 can be found. 

SYNOPSIS OF LAWS IN REFERENCE TO PUBLIC SCHOOL DISTRICTS SINCE 184O 

a. Chapter 140, Revised Statutes of Iowa Territory. An act to establish a 
system of common schools. Approved January 16, 1840. 

b. Article 9, Constitution of 1846, Education and School Laws. 

c. School Fund Commission. Chapter 68. Code 185 1, January 15, 1849. 

d. School Districts. Approved January 15, 1847. Chapter 69, Code 1851. 

e. Election, terms and duties of district offices. Approved January 15, 1849, 
Chapter 70, Code 185 1. 

f . Laws of Board of Education. "An act to amend an act to provide a system 
of common schools," passed December 24, 1859, took effect March 1, i860. By 
this act each civil township was constituted a corporate body. Lender prior acts 



176 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

each subdistrict was a corporate body. The adoption of this act dissolved the 
subdistrict corporations. The electors of each subdistrict elected a director for 
their district, and the directors so elected constituted the board of directors for 
the township district. This board had power to make contracts, to admit pupils 
to school; determine the number of schools; length of time taught; fix site for 
schoolhouses ; establish grades or a union school ; to determine what branches 
should be taught ; to provide for the election of a county superintendent, and 
prescribe his duties, etc. 

g. This act provided, "That every city or incorporated town, including the 
territory annexed thereto for school purposes, may constitute a separate school 
district." For all the above, see Chapter 88, Revision i860, Laws of Iowa. 

December 24, 1859, the board of education passed an act to amend an "Act 
to provide a system of common schools," passed by the board December 24, 1859, 
Title X, Chapter 19, Acts of Eighth General Assembly. Among other things this 
act provided for the election of a county superintendent of common schools. 

h. Chapter 172, Ninth General Assembly. An act to amend an act passed by 
the board of education, December 24, 1859. By the provision of this act (passed 
in 1862), the acts of the board of education to provide a system of common 
schools was repealed. Among other things this act provided that any city or 
town, containing within its surveyed territory might become a separate school 
district." The former act limited its purposes to any city or incorporated town. 

Chapter 143, Acts of the Eleventh General Assembly, provides amendments 
to Chapter 172, Ninth General Assembly. 

Chapter 89, Acts of the Twelfth General Assembly, provides for legalizing 
an independent school district in Des Moines County, to-wit : "That the organi- 
zation of subdistricts 1 and 4, in Burlington Township, Des Moines County, Iowa, 
into indeepndent school districts, and the proceedings in relation thereto, be and 
the same is (are) hereby legalized and declared valid from the date of its organi- 
zation." 

The Code of Iowa, 1873, took effect on the 1st day of September, 1873. 
Section 47 provides : "All public and general statutes passed prior to the present 
session (adjourned session of Fourteenth General Assembly), and all public and 
special acts, the subjects thereof are reserved in this code, or which are repugnant 
to the provisions thereof, are hereby repealed, subject to the limitations herein 
expressed." Since this time there has been one codification of the laws of Iowa, 
1897, and supplement codification, 1907. We will not pursue this subject further. 
The board of education passed out of existence when the code of 1873 was 
enacted. 

HOARD OF EDUCATION OF THE INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT OF BURLINGTON, IOWA 

I849-I9I5 

The members of the board of education since 1849 have been : 
James Clarke, 1849-1850, died in office ; John Johnson, 1849-1850, 1851-1852; 
L. D. Stockton, 1849-1853, 1854-1857; A. W. Carpenter, 1850-1851, 1857-1863, 
1865-1868; James W. Grimes, 1850-1852 : John G. Foote, 1852, elected but 
declined to serve; Wm. Salter, 1852-1853, 1855-1861 ; O. H. Schenck, 1852-1853 : 
Geo. Snyder, 1852-1854, resigned; Wm. Chamberlain, 1853-1855 ; J. F. Tallant, 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 177 

1853-1858; Lyman Cook, 1853-1856, 1861-1862; Adam Funck, 1853, resigned; 
J.' N. Evans, 1853-1856, died in office; J. H. Ranch, 1853-1854; Geo. Temple, 
1854-1860; Oliver Cock, 1854-1860; Win. W. White, 1855-1858; John M.' Corse, 
1857-1860, 1865-1868, died in office; D. J. Sales, 1857-1863, 1865-1867; J. P. 
Weightman, 1858-1859; T. L. Parsons, 1859-1863; Denise Denise, 1859, elected 
but declined to serve; E. McKitterick, 1860-1861, 1862-1863, 1865-1867, 1868- 
1870; W. F. Baird, 1860-1862, 1 864-1 865 ; Geo. Darwin, 1861-1863, died in office; 
A. J. Messenger, 1 862-1 863 ; Silas Hudson, 1863-1864; Luke Palmer, 1863-1865; 
H. H. Hawley, 1863-1864; John Hertzler, 1863-1865, resigned; J. C. Power, 1863, 
resigned; W. D. McCash, 1863-1865; Thompson McCosh, 1863-1865, 1868-1871 ; 
D. Y. Overton, 1864-1865, resigned; E. E. Gay, 1864-1867; J. H. Davey, 1865- 
1867; R. Spencer, 1865-1868; B. J. Hall, 1867-1870; J. S. Schramm, 1867-1879; 
I. N. Ripley, 1867-1872; A. C. Sales, 1867, resigned, 1868-1870; Chas. Starker, 
1867, elected but declined to serve; A. W. Parsons, 1867-1870; Horton Bailey, 
1870-1879; L. Teedrick, 1870-1872; W. McD. Houseworth, 1870-1880; Wm. 
Wolverton, 1871-1880; W. S. Berry, 1872-1878; I. P. Wilson, 1872-1875, 1901 ; 
Robert Donahue, 1873-1874; C. B. Parsons, 1875-1887 ; Theo. Guelich, 1878-1887; 
J. M. Sherfey, 1879-1891 ; G. R. Henry, 1879-1885, died in office; C. F. Schramm, 
1880-1892; A. M. Antrobus, 1880-1895; S. Wadleigh, 1885-1892, resigned; J. R. 
Nairn, 1887-1896; E. Hagemann, 1887-1899; C. C. Clark, 1891-1897; G. H. 
Bicklen, 1892-1901 ; W. W. Baldwin, 1892-1897; Wm. Lyon, 1895-1898; J. T. 
Illick, 1896-1899; H. G. Marquardt, 1897; J. D. Harmer, 1897-1900; Frank Mil- 
lard, 1898; G. B. Little, 1898-1901 ; W. E. Blake, 1899; A. H. Kuhlemeier, 1899- 
1902; C. H. Mohland, 1900; G. C. Henry, 1901 ; H. H. Oilman, 1902. 

MEMBERS OF BOARD SINCE I902 

The members of the board since 1902 have been : 

March, 1903— W. E. Blake, H. H. Gilman, T. G. Harper, Frank Millard, 
Dr. I. P. Wilson, J. H. Dustman, Geo. Henry. 

March, 1904— W. E. Blake, H. H. Gilman, T. G. Harper, J. W. Swiler, H. C. 
Garrett, E. E. Stevens, J. H. Dustman. 

March, 1905— W. E. Blake, H. H. Gilman, H. C. Garrett, J. W. Swiler, J. II. 
Dustman, T. G. Harper, E. E. Stevens. 

March, 1906— W. E. Blake, H. C. Garrett, J. W. Swiler, E. E. Stevens, H. H. 
Gilman, J. H. Pettibone, James Moir. 

March, 1907— W. E. Blake, H. H. Gilman, H. C. Garrett, J. W. Swiler, E. E. 
Stevens, J. H. Pettibone, James Moir. 

March, 1908— W. E. Blake, H. H. Gilman, H. C. Garrett, J. W. Swiler, E. E. 
Stevens, J. H. Pettibone, James Moir. 

March, 1909— W. E. Blake, H. H. Gilman, H. C. Garrett, J. W. Swiler, E. E. 
Stevens, H. S. Rand. J". W. McLain. 

March, 1910— W. E. Blake, H. C. Garrett, H. H. Gilman, H. S. Rand, J. W. 
McLain, H. L. Madison, H. W. Stadtlander. 

March, 191 i—C. C. Clark, H. C. Garrett, H. L. Madison, H. W. Stadtlander, 
H. S. Rand, S. P. Gilbert, W. M. P. Shelton. 

March, 1912— C. C. Clark, H. C. Garrett, H. L. Madison, H. W. Stadtlander, 
S. P. Gilbert, Geo. C. Boesch, Dr. A. C. Zaiser. 



178 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

March, 1913 — C. C. Clark, H. C. Garrett, H. L. Madison, Geo. C. Boesch, 
Dr. A. C. Zaiser, S. P. Gilbert, W. F. McFarland. 

March, 1914 — C. C. Clark, H. C. Garrett, H. L. Madison, S. P. Gilbert, Geo. 

C. Boesch, Dr. A. C. Zaiser, Win. F. McFarland. 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION 
1 849- 1 902 

Presidents 

James Clarke, March, 1849, t0 J U ') T > ^d, died in office; A. W. Carpenter, 
July, 1850, to May, 1851, to fill vacancy; James W. Grimes, 1851-1852; John G. 
Foote, 1852, elected but declined to serve; YYm. Salter, 1852-1853, 1855-1856, 
1859-1861; \V. B. Chamberlain, 1853-1855; Geo. Temple, 1856-1858? J. P. 
Weightman, 1858-1859; T. L. Parsons, 1861-1863 ; Luke Palmer. 1 863-1 865 ; E. 
McKitterick, 1865-1867; B. J. Hall, 1867-1870; J. S. Schramm, 1870-1873; Robert 
Donahue, 1873-1874; W. S. Berry, 1 874-1 875 ; Horton Bailey, 1875-1878; Wm. 
Wolverton, 1878-1879; C. B. Parsons, 1 879-1 887 ; A. M. Antrobus, 1887-1895; 
W. W. Baldwin, 1895-1897; E. Hagemann, 1897-1899; H. G. Marquardt, 1899- 
1900; W. E. Blake, 1900-1911 ; C. C. Clark, 1911-1915. 

Secretaries 

L. D. Stockton, 1849-1852; Geo. Snyder, 1852-1854; Oliver Cock, 1854-1858; 

D. J. Sales, 1858-1863, 1865-1868; J. C. Power, 1863, until July, resigned to enlist 
in the Union Army; D. Y. Overton, 1863-1865; A. C. Sales, 1868-1872; A. C. 
Hutchinson, 1 872- 1 875 ; Geo. Frazee, 1875-1876; H. A. Kelley, 1876-April, 1900; 
W. W. Turpin, April, 1900; D. S. Cooper, 1915. 

Treasurers 

John Johnson, 1849-1850, 1851-1852; James W. Grimes, 1850-1851 ; O. H. 
Schenck, 1852-1853; J. F. Tallant, 1853-1857; A. W. Carpenter, 1857-1863: W, 
D. McCash, 1863-1865; J. H. Davey, 1865-1867; Chas. Starker, 1867, declined 
to serve; 1882-February, 1900; A. W. Parsons, 1867-1877; Chas. Mason, 1877- 
1882; E. Hagemann, February to March, 1900; Louis Wallbridge, 1900; F. W. 
Brooks, — ; Louis Wallbridge, 191 5. 

Superintendents 

J. C. Dowe. 1864-1865, principal of high school and city superintendent; J. A. 
Smith, 1865-1870, principal of high school and city superintendent; Wm. M. 
Bryant, 1871-1872; R. G. Saunderson, 1873-1890; Robert McCay, 1890-1893; 
C. E. Shelton, 1893-1899; F. M. Fultz, 1899—; W. L. Hanson, — 1915. 

BURLINGTON UNIVERSITY 

This institution, incorporated in 1852, opened its preparatory department in 
1854 as an academy. This was the beginning of a larger work to be performed 
in the near future. 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 179 

» 

The institution had its origin in an educational convention called by a com- 
mittee of the Iowa Baptist State Association held at Iowa City, April 13 and 
14, 1852. 

These were the times when there were many discussions between different 
denominations in reference to the teaching of the Scriptures on certain subjects 
and each denomination sought to establish institutions of learning controlled by 
the denomination calling it into existence. 

The articles of incorporation of this institution, among other things, provided 
for the establishment of different departments in academic, collegiate, theological 
and others. 

The management of the institution was under the direction of a board of 
trustees consisting of twenty-four members. The board of trustees met for the 
first time in Burlington in April, 1852, to consider a proposition of the people of 
Burlington for the establishment of the institution in this city ; the principal 
inducement to its location in Burlington was the donation to it of certain lands 
then partly occupied as a burial place. 

The corner stone of the institution was laid July 4, 1853, a young lawyer by 
the name of Clune making the principal address on the occasion. 

I am unable to state when the building was completed, but probably not until 

i855- 

The first record we find concerning the Burlington University is in 1856,- 

wherein is stated : 

"The terms of tuition as follows : 

For Primary Studies for session $ 5.00 

Higher English and Classical Studies 7.00 

Studies in Collegiate Course 10.00 

Private Instruction in Vocal Music (extra) 5.00 

Instruction on Piano, Guitar, etc. (extra) 10.00 

Instruction in Painting, Drawing, etc 3.00 

"The institution has in its possession a valuable library of about 12,000 vol- 
umes, and an extensive reading room and cabinet of curiosities. For full par- 
ticulars inquire of Rev. J. A. Nash, Fort Des Moines, Iowa, president of board 
of trustees; Hon. Lyman Cook, Burlington, vice president; Rev. G. J. Johnson, 
Burlington, secretary; Hon. T. W. Newman, Burlington, treasurer; Wm. B. 
Ewing, Burlington, chairman of executive committee, or Rev. Silas Tucker, 
Galesburg, 111., chairman of examining committee." 

The first teachers were Rev. G. W. Gunnison, A. M., principal and professor, 
Mrs. M. A. P. Darwin, preceptress. Rev. L. B. Allen, D. D., had charge of the 
institution for several years, commencing in 1857. Rev. J. T. Robert succeeded 
Reverend Allen. 

An addition was added to the building in 1857, costing nearly ten thousand 
dollars. 

From 1857 until after the close of the war, the institution had a hard time to 
keep open. The minds of the people were taken up with the great conflict then 
going on between the North and South. Young men who were in school went 
into the military service of the country. It had increased its indebtedness during 



180 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

the hard times following 1857 to tide it over the financial depression then existing. 
The Baptist people, like many other denominations, had established too many 
institutions of learning in the state, thus limiting the field of each. The common 
school system was then advancing rapidly, seeking to furnish educational facili- 
ties, claiming them to be superior to those of denominational schools. The insti- 
tution at Burlington could not withstand this pressure and the result was the 
City Independent School District purchased at a low figure the grounds of the 
Burlington University on which it erected a splendid high school building. 

The institution during its existence did a valuable work for many young men 
of Burlington and throughout the country. The benefits it conferred in the way 
of education more than compensated for its cost. 

ladies' seminary 

This institution was situated at the corner of Fifth and Court streets. Its 
instructors were : 

Miss Josephine A. Cutter, principal and teacher of higher mathematics ; Miss 
Emma R. Brown, teacher of Latin and French languages ; Miss Martha A. 
Robert, teacher of history and rhetoric; Miss Martha R. Cutter, teacher of nat- 
ural science and principal of preparatory department; Mrs. Jane P. Hawley, 
teacher of instrumental music ; Mrs. Augusta P. Willey, teacher of drawing and 
painting. 

How long this institution continued we have no means of knowing. All we 
can find about it is the above taken from the Hawk-Eye of 1852. It is reasonable 
to suppose it had some connection with the Burlington University at this time, 
when the young men's department was being held in the basements of the Baptist 
and Congregational churches awaiting the completion of the university building, 
which was in 1854. We find the names of Miss Cutter and Miss Brown among 
the teachers in the university in 1857. 

BURLINGTON COMMERCIAL COLLEGE 

As far back as 1856 Burlington boasted of having one of the best business 
colleges in the West. L. H. Dallhoff at that time was the proprietor of the Bur- 
lington Commercial College. 

All other institutions of like character in the city claim this institution as 
their origin. 

The Burlington Commercial College was succeeded by the Burlington Business 
College in 1871. It was located upstairs in the building situated on the northwest 
corner of Main and Jefferson streets. Its proprietors were Bonsall, Lillibridge & 
Company. D. Brugess succeeded Bonsall, Lillibridge & Company as proprietors 
in 1875. Mrs. Bonsall succeeded Burgess in 1877, at which time she moved it to 
the southwest corner of Fourth and Jefferson streets, at which place it has been 
carried on ever since but under a different name. When the late G. W. Elliott 
became the owner and proprietor, the writer does not know ; but it must be as 
much as thirty years or more. When Mr. Elliott assumed charge he changed its 
name to Elliott's Business College, and under this name the institution is being 
conducted at the present time. 



CHAPTER XVII 

WAR WITH MISSOURI 

The act of Congress of March 6, 1820, under which Missouri was admitted 
into the Union, defined the northern boundary of that state : "The parallel of 
latitude which passes through the rapids of the River Des Moines — thence east 
along the parallel of latitude to the middle of the channel of the main fork of 
said River Des Moines to the mouth of the same where it empties into the Missis- 
sippi." J- C. Sullivan, who was properly authorized, had in 1816 surveyed a line 
establishing the northern boundary of the Territory of Missouri. This line was 
designated by stakes and mounds. It will be observed that the act above defines 
the parallel of latitude to determine the northern boundary of the State of Mis- 
souri as the one which passed through the "rapids of the River Des Moines." 
In 1837, the State of Missouri appointed commissioners to make survey in accord 
with the act of Congress to which reference has been made. These commis- 
sioners discovered some ripples in the Des Moines River near Keosaqua, and 
claimed these were the rapids in the River Des Moines referred to in the act of 
Congress. Taking these ripples as a starting point and surveying the line as pro- 
vided in the act, added near ten miles to the territory of Missouri ; and extended 
ten miles further north than the northern boundary of the Half Breed tract. 
Van Buren County in Iowa Territory joined Clark County, Missouri, on the 
north. The authorities of Clark County claiming the jurisdiction of that county 
extended to the line as run by the commissioners of Missouri, levied taxes on the 
inhabitants of Van Buren County living in this ten mile strip, which they refused 
to pay. To enforce payment, the sheriff of Clark County with a posse undertook 
to distrain some cattle of the Van Buren County Hawkeyes, when the sheriff of 
Van Buren County wtih a posse arrested the sheriff of Clark County and his 
men and sent them to Burlington. Governor Lucas then at Burlington, for fear 
of a raid from Missouri to release the captives, sent them to Muscatine. This 
act was precautionary, for Governor Boggs of Missouri had ordered out the 
militia of his state. Governor Lucas to counter this menace, ordered out the 
militia of Iowa Territory, and soon had camped on the south boundary line of 
Van Buren County 500 troops to repel any invasion of that county by the "Pukes." 
Burlington was the rallying place for the Iowa militia and Old Zion Church the 
officers' headquarters. Drums rattled, fifes whistled and bugles blowed. James 
W. Grimes of Burlington was captain of a company called the "Grays." The 
militia rallied from all sections, Burlington being their place of rendezvous. Suel 
Foster, of Muscatine, thus describes the event : "I was an invalid at the time, 
just recovering from a bilious attack, and was boarding at the house of Mr. 
Josiah Parvin, father of Prof. T. S. Parvin, and at the same place was boarding 

181 



182 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

the sheriff prisoner from Missouri, who had his liberty on parole of honor. Mr. 
and Mrs. I'arvin remonstrated strongly against my going, said it would be my 
death, but my country called me and I was determined to go. It was in Decem- 
ber and very cold, the snow about six inches deep. I found a nice little black 
pony and a good messmate in the person of D. R. Wakefield, who had a splendid 
coon robe, and I furnished the blankets. We mounted and formed into the line 
of Captain Hasting's company of dragoons, and I was immediately made second 
corporal. This raised me above the privates, and raised my ambition some, and 
improved my health. Firearms were scarce, and if we stopped to look them up, 
it would delay us in getting to the seat of war. I got hold of a little crooked 
sword, about the shape of a half of a barrel hoop, and buckled it on to support 
the dignity of my office. The infantry, baggage wagons, and military stores, with 
a barrel marked "vinegar" started on some two hours ahead of the dragoons, for 
we had considerable delay in consequence of some of our drafted men deserting, 
and we had considerable trouble to get our company out of town. Captain Hasting 
had a long Indian spear, with a few red ribbons tied to it, a formidable looking 
weapon. He succeeded in getting his company out of town, and took the road in 
the rear, and swore he would run the first man through who attempted to desert. 
We rode briskly on for about twenty miles to the Iowa River below Wapello, 
when a halt was called to camp for the night. The infantry, baggage wagons and 
dragoons all came up in good order, supper was got, consisting of fried pork and 
short cakes ; the snow was scraped away, and the blankets and robes spread down 
ready for camping. We had a little drum major who had for some time been 
honored with the title of 'The Duke.' Well, that evening, by some unaccountable 
mistake, the duke's drum-head was broken in, and the drum used as a vessel of 
dishonor. After breakfast, the camp was raised, the river crossed in safety by 
dragging the loaded wagons over by hand, and we resumed our line of march. 
This night we halted at Flint Creek bottoms. We were building fires and pre- 
paring for camping, when a drum and fife were heard coming over Flint Hills, 
and saw the Iowa Grays under Capt. James W. Grimes, who bore the sad news 
that peace had been declared. But our ambition and courage was raised even 
higher at the news of peace, and we were ordered to unload our wagons and take 
up our line of march to Burlington, about three miles. I believe I never saw a 
wilder set of men and a greater carousal than there was in the City of Burlington 
that night. It was then the capital of the territory. The Legislature was then in 
session, occupying the new brick Methodist Church for the House of Representa- 
tives, on the floor of which most of our soldiers were permitted to camp that 



night." 



HOW PEACE WAS BROUGHT ABOUT 



Governor Boggs of Missouri had sent General Allen with 1,000 men to collect 
the taxes from the denizens of Van Buren County, Governor Lucas had 1,200 
men under the command of Gen. B. Brown to see they should not be collected. 
Before proceeding to an actual conflict, General Brown selected A. C. Dodge of 
Burlington, General Cherbrim of Dubuque and Doctor Clarke of Fort Madison 
to act as envoys on the part of Iowa Territory to arrange a settlement and avoid 
the shedding of blood. The sheriff of Clark County had been directed to desist 
from anv further action while these warlike preparations were going on and had 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 183 

sent Governor Lucas a proposition for an amicable settlement of the question. 
General Allen had withdrawn his warriors and awaited negotiations. Colonel 
McDonald and Doctor Wayland of Missouri, commissioners, went to Burlington 
and held a conference with Governor Lucas and the members of the Legislature in 
session, and it was agreed that the war be declared off and the dispute referred 
to Congress for settlement. The Congress of the United States passed an act 
directing the President to cause the boundary line to be surveyed and marked. 
Lieut. Albert M. Lea was appointed commissioner of the United States for this 
purpose, and Dr. James Davis of Keokuk was appointed commissioner for Iowa 
Territory by Governor Lucas. The governor of Missouri failed to make an 
appointment. The two appointed entered upon the discharge of their duties and 
examined the boundary lines surveyed. Lieutenant Lea made his report to the 
commissioner of the general land office in July, 1839. The question was not 
settled till 1848, when it was decided by the Supreme Court of the United 
States, holding the Sullivan line was the correct boundary line, sustaining the 
Iowa contention, which was that the Rapids Des Moines to which reference is 
made in the act of Congress defining the northern boundary of Missouri are in 
the Mississippi just above the mouth of the Des Moines River. That these rapids 
were first made known by Lieutenant Pike on his voyage of exploration in 1805. 
He reported that "on Tuesday, the 20th of August, we arrived at the foot of the 
Rapids Des Moines, which are immediately above the confluence of that river 
with the Mississippi." He so marked these on a map. The rapids in the Missis- 
sippi from that date had been designated as the Rapids of the Des Moines, and 
no other rapids bore that name at that time or since. 

MILITARY HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

Mexico was a Spanish province from the time of its conquest by Cortez until 
1821, when it threw off the Spanish yoke. During the long time of its control 
by Spain, a civilization had grown up, partly Spanish and partly Indian. The 
two races admixed to a large extent, producing a race of half breeds, called 
Mexican. What is known as Texas was uninhabited land, except by Indians, for- 
merly. After Mexico had acquired her independence she claimed this land, and 
to induce its settlement, invited its colonization by people from the United States. 
With this purpose in view, it granted to Moses Austin of Connecticut a large 
tract of land. The condition of this grant was that he would colonize this vast 
domain. Moses, Austin died, and the land grant was given to his son Stephen, 
who established colonies consisting of near five hundred families. Large num- 
bers of emigrants from the southern portions of the country poured into Texas. 
These represented Anglo-Saxon thought and civilization, while the governing 
power represented Spanish-Mexican thought and customs. It was patent from 
the first, that the two could not exist in harmony in the same country. The 
Anglo-Saxon element, unable to bear such government as was imposed upon 
them by the parent state, revolted, and declared their independence. Sam Hous- 
ton, a former governor of Tennessee, was the commander of the Texas forces. 
The massacre at San Antonio of the American forces in the defense of the 
Alamo, roused the war spirit of all Americans. It was a propitious time for the 
Texans to make application to be annexed to the United States. However, this 



184 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

was not done, until Texas had gained her independence, after which Houston was 
made president of the Republic of Texas. No sooner had Texas gained her inde- 
pendence, than the leading spirits of the new republic wanted Texas annexed to 
the United States. The convention which nominated James K. Polk adopted a 
resolution favoring the annexation of Texas; the battle cry of the democrats was, 
"Polk, Dallas and Texas." After the election of Polk, the question of annexa- 
tion came before Congress, which passed a bill for its annexation, March i, 1845. 
The Texan Congress took action on the same matter, and the union was consum- 
mated on July 4, 1845. I n tne annexation of Texas, the United States inherited 
a dispute between Texas and Mexico in reference to the boundary between them. 
The Texans claimed that the Rio Grand del Norte, for a certain distance formed 
the boundary between the two provinces, while Mexico claimed that the Nueces 
formed the boundary line. The Washington authorities agreed with the Texan 
contention, and held that Coahulia, which lay between the two rivers, was a part 
of Texas. The United States directed General Taylor with his forces to take 
possession of the disputed territory. Out of this act, war arose between the 
United States and Mexico. On May 14, 1846, Congress passed an act, which 
authorized the raising of 50,000 volunteers. The quota of Iowa was one regi- 
ment. On June 1. 1846, James Clark, governor of Iowa, at his office in Burling- 
ton, issued his call for volunteers to serve in the army of the United States, then 
at war with Mexico. On June 26, 1846, the ten companies which were to com- 
pose the regiment from Iowa had been raised, and were ready for service. 

Capt. James M. Morgan's Independent Company of Iowa Infantry Volunteers 
was the first of the ten-companies to be raised by Iowa. Its term of enlistment 
was twelve months. It was mustered into the service at Fort Atkinson, July 15, 
1846, and mustered out on the same date the following year. 

ROSTER 

James McGowan Morgan, captain, age 42 years; came to Burlington in 1837; 
died at Burlington, Iowa, October 6, 1862. 

John Harrison McKenney, first lieutenant, age 32; came to Burlington in 
1837; died at Chatfield, Minn., May 23, 1878. 

David Stokely Wilson, second lieutenant, age 23 ; residence, Dubuque, 
Iowa; died April 1, 1881, at Dubuque. 

Sylvester Greenough, first sergeant, age 35; residence, Burlington; mus- 
tered out July 15, 1847; reinlisted same date as sergeant in Morgan's Company 
Mounted Volunteers. t 

Abasolom J. Beeson, age 25 ; residence, Burlington ; was mustered out and 
reinlisted in Morgan's Mounted Volunteers. 

Walter Pollard Rowell, third sergeant, age 31; residence. Burlington; 
mustered out and reinlisted in Captain Morgan's Mounted Volunteers. 

James F. Stephens, fourth sergeant, age 21 ; residence, Burlington; mustered 
out July 15, 1847. 

William Anderson, second corporal, age 36; residence, Burlington. 

W. S. Dollahride, third sergeant, age 20; residence, Burlington. 

Grove A. Warner, fourth sergeant, age 21 ; residence, Burlington. 

Andrew A. Timmons, musician, age 43; residence, Burlington. 

Charles Elder, musician, age 18. 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 185 

PRIVATES 

John J. Adams, age 36; residence, Burlington; mustered out July 15, 1847; 
reinlisted same date in Morgan's Company Mounted Volunteers. 

Edward Barr, age 16 ; residence, Burlington ; mustered out as second cor- 
poral. 

Oliver Beard, age 36; residence, Burlington; mustered out July 15, 1847, 
at Fort Atkinson. 

Francis W. Buck, age 20; residence, Burlington; mustered out July 15, 
1847 ; reinlisted same date in Morgan's Mounted Volunteers. 

I ames R. Burke, age 20; mustered out July 15, 1847; reenlisted same date in 
Morgan's Mounted Volunteers. 

David Daily, age 21; residence, Burlington; mustered out July 15, 1847; 
reenlisted in Captain Morgan's Mounted Volunteers. 

William R. Dwyer, age 25; residence, Burlington; deserted September 1, 
1846. 

Hiram P. Fleetwood, age 20; residence, Des Moines County; mustered out 
July 15, 1847; reenlisted same date in Morgan's Mounted Volunteers. 

William Hoffman, age 36; residence, Burlington; mustered out July 15, 
1847 ; reenlisted same date in Morgan's Mounted Volunteers. 

John Hughes, age 24; residence, Burlington; mustered out at Fort Atkinson 
July 15, 1847. 

Edwin Hukill, age 24; residence, Burlington; mustered out July 15, 1847, 
at Fort Atkinson. 

John H. Hume, age 23; residence, Burlington; mustered out at Fort Atkin- 
son July 15, 1847. 

Joseph Curtis Ives, age 21; residence, Burlington; mustered out at Fort 
Atkinson July 15, 1847; reenlisted in Morgan's Mounted Volunteers. 

Hulburt Tagger, age 20; residence, Des Moines County; mustered out at 
Fort Atkinson July 15, 1847. 

John W. Kynett, age 20; residence, Des Moines County; mustered out at 
Fort Atkinson July 15, 1847. 

Charles Leahr, age 23 ; residence, Burlington ; mustered out at Fort Atkin- 
son July 15, 1847. 

Jesse Lines, age 20; residence, Des Moines County; mustered out at Fort 
Atkinson July 15, 1847. 

Daniel Loper, age 21 ; residence, Des Moines County; mustered out at Fort 
Atkinson July 15, 1847; reenlisted in Morgan's Mounted Volunteers. 

John Lumly, age 19 ; residence, Burlington ; mustered out at Fort Atkinson 
Tuly 15, 1847; reenlisted in Morgan's Mounted Volunteers. 

Ellis C. McCormick, age 27 ; residence, Burlington ; mustered out at Fort 
Atkinson July 15, 1847; reenlisted in Morgan's Mounted Volunteers. 

Joseph Madden, age 19 ; residence, Des Moines County ; accidentally killed 
July 6, 1847, at Fort Atkinson by the blowing up of a small magazine. 

John C. Martin, age 21; residence, Des Moines County; mustered out at 
Fort Atkinson July 15, 1847; reenlisted in Morgan's Mounted Volunteers. 

Titus Owens, age 21 ; residence, Burlington ; mustered out at Fort Atkinson 
July 15, 1847; reenlisted in Morgan's Mounted Volunteers. 



18G HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

Isaac Oliver, age 21 ; residence, Burlington; mustered out at Fort Atkinson 
July 15, 1847; reenlisted in Morgan's Mounted Volunteers. 

Alfred E. Purcell, age 21 ; residence, Des Moines County; mustered out at 
Fort Atkinson July 15, 1847; reenlisted in Morgan's Mounted Volunteers. 

William Topp, age not given; enlisted at Burlington July 8, 1846; drowned 
July 10, 1846, in the Mississippi River by falling from the steamer Belmont 
while en route to Fort Atkinson. 

The regiment organized for service in the Mexican war to which Captain 
Morgan's company belonged was stationed at Fort Atkinson at Prairie du Chien, 
from which regular troops were taken to Mexico. As seen from the preceding, 
most members of this company joined Captain Morgan's Mounted Volunteers at 
the expiration of service, which took place on the 15th of July, 1847. 

At the termination of the Black Hawk war, the Indian tribes west of the 
Mississippi River were ready to make war on the whites at any time as occasion 
offered. This was especially the case with the Winnebagoes, a part of whom 
had left their reservation, and had gone to their old hunting grounds in Wiscon- 
sin, while another part had gone west in Iowa. At the close of the Black Hawk 
war, the Government had gathered together this tribe of Indians and had settled 
them on a neutral strip of land in Northern Iowa. They did not like this reserva- 
tion, and it was exchanged for one in Western Minnesota. This did not suit all 
of them, and the result was that many objected to their removal. The difficult 
task of their removal fell to Captain Morgan and his company of mounted volun- 
teers. The number to be removed was about twenty-one hundred. They agreed 
to march across the river at Winona under the escort of Captain Morgan and 
his mounted men. All started from Turkey River on June 8, 1848, and moved 
north until the Mississippi River was struck at Wabasha Prairie, the present site 
of Winona, Minn. At this place, a revolt took place. This was brought about 
through the machinations of the Sioux. Here they refused to be moved any 
further. Captain Morgan sent to Fort Snelling for assistance. He was rein- 
forced by Captains Eastman and Knowlton. The incipient rebellion was soon 
crushed by this manifestation of force, when they were loaded on barges and 
towed by steamboats to near the Falls of St. Anthony, from which place they 
were taken on a march to the mouth of the Watab River, where was located the 
new reservation. From the latter place Captain Morgan returned to Fort Atkin- 
son with his company. While this gallant company was disappointed in not 
receiving orders to go to Mexico, it and its commander had rendered service as 
honorably and bravely as if they had been with either Scott or Taylor. In this 
connection I will say that but three of the companies of the ten called for by 
the President from Iowa had been mustered into the service, although raised. 
Why this was the case I am unable to state. Frederick D. Mills, a young and 
prominent lawyer of Burlington, at once, after the call had been made, commenced 
to organize a company of infantry for service in Mexico. His was the first 
company organized, but for some reason the company which Captain Morgan 
organized was given precedence. It is supposed in order to right a wrong, the 
company organized by Mr. Mills was transferred to the Fifteenth United States 
Infantry. Mr. Mills was made captain of the company which he with Captain 
Guthrie of Fort Madison had raised. After the company had been assigned to 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 187 

the Fifteenth Infantry, Captain Mills was commissioned major of the regiment, 
and Edwin Guthrie made captain of the company. The company was transported 
from Fort Madison, Iowa, by steamboat to New Orleans, and thence by ocean 
steamer to Vera Cruz, where it joined the regiment. Major Mills was one of the 
attorneys who defended the Hodges for the murder of Miller and Leisy. Was 
opposed to the ratification of the Constitution of 1844 because it failed to provide 
that the Missouri River should be the boundary of the state. He was killed at 
the battle of Churubusco, August 20, 1847. The Third General Assembly of 
Iowa, to preserve his memory, on account of the services he rendered for his 
country, when organizing new counties, gave his name to one of them, and 
to another the name of Guthrie. 

George Washington Bowie, first lieutenant of U. S. infantry; commis- 
sioned March 8, 1847; assigned to Company K, Fifteenth Infantry, April 9, 1847; 
commissioned captain July 8, 1847 ; breveted major for gallant and meritorious 
conduct at Contreras and Churubusco ; mustered out of the service August 4, 
1848, at Covington, Ky. ; commissioned colonel of the Fifth California Infantry 
Volunteers November 8, 1861 ; breveted brigadier general of United States Vol- 
unteers March 13, 1865; honorably mustered out of the service December 14, 
1865; a native of Maryland; came to Burlington during the territorial existence 
of the state ; was a delegate to the Second Constitutional Convention, which met 
at Iowa City in 1846 ; was representative from Des Moines County in the First 
General Assembly of Iowa; returned to Burlington after the termination of the 
Mexican war, where he made his home until 1850, when he emigrated to Cali- 
fornia; died in an accident March 18, 1882. Mr. Bowie was one of the leading 
lawyers of Burlington. 

Francis O. Beckett, second lieutenant U. S. infantry ; commissioned March 
8, 1847; assigned to Company K, Fifteenth Infantry, April 9, 1847; breveted 
first lieutenant for meritorious conduct at Churubusco ; mustered out with the 
company at Covington, Ky.. August 4, 1848; born in the State of Maine, and 
became a resident of Burlington, Iowa, at an early period; aided largely in 
recruiting for the company of which he was made lieutenant. The recruits which 
he secured for the company came from Keosauqua, Van Buren County. 

Walter W. Hudson, second sergeant Company K, Fifteenth United States 
Infantry; residence, Burlington, Iowa, at which place he was enrolled on the 12th 
of April, 1847, by Lieutenant Bowie; born in Kentucky. From April 12, 1847, to 
July 18, 1848, was private, then sergeant and first sergeant of Company K, Fif- 
teenth U. S. infantry; brevet second lieutenant First Infantry June 28, 1848; 
died of wounds received April 7, 1850, in battle with the Indians near Laredo, 
Texas; was born June 11, 1828, in Mason County, Kentucky; his mother was a 
sister of Jesse R. Grant, father of General Grant; was promoted to a lieutenancy 
in the regular army for gallant services rendered in the Mexican war ; is credited 
with having carried the flag over the walls of Chapultepec ; Fort Hudson on the 
Rio Grande was named in his honor. 

John C. Abercrombie, third sergeant; came to Des Moines County in 1841 
and settled in Burlington as a tailor; enrolled April 7, 1847, a ^ Keosauqua, Iowa, 
by Lieutenant Beckett ; was credited to Keosauqua. How this was brought about 
I do not understand, as his home was in Burlington at the time of his enlistment. 
He returned to Burlington after the term of his enlistment had expired and 



188 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

entered upon the practice of dentistry. On the outbreak of the Civil war. he was 
commissioned first lieutenant of Company E, First Iowa Infantry, and was dis- 
charged on the termination of the term of his enlistment. When the Eleventh 
Iowa Infantry was organized, he was commissioned major of the regiment. Was 
afterwards promoted to lieutenant'colonel and then colonel of the regiment. After 
the close of the war he lived in Burlington until the time of his decease. Some 
years before his death he became totally blind. 

Fabian Brydolph, fourth sergeant; enrolled April 14, 1847, at Burlington by 
Lieutenant Bowie ; wounded at the battle of Churubusco ; mustered out with his 
company on the 4th of August, 1S48, at Covington. Ky. ; born in Ostergotland, 
Sweden, on the 28th of November, 1819, the son of Anders G. Brydolph, a noted 
Lutheran minister. Mr. Brydolph was by profession a landscape gardener. He 
emigrated to America in 184 1, first locating at Cleveland, Ohio, where he took up 
sign and other painting. He came to Burlington in 1846 as an interpreter for 
some of his countrymen. On the breaking out of the Civil war he organized a 
company and was made its captain. It was known as Company I, Sixth Iowa 
Infantry Volunteers. While at the head of his company on the first day of the 
battle of Shiloh he lost his right arm. He was afterwards promoted to lieutenant 
colonel of Twenty-fifth Iowa Infantry Volunteers, but resigned this position to 
accept position in the Veteran Reserve Corps November 1, 1863. He was mustered 
out July 1. 18OO, and died at Burlington, Iowa, January 25, 1897. 

Alexander Caldwell, second corporal ; enlisted at Burlington, Iowa, April 
6, 1847, by Lieutenant Bowie; was mustered out of the service at Covington, 
Ky., August 4, 1848. 

Peter B. Busart, private; enlisted April 7, 1847; residence, Burlington, Iowa ; 
died September 3, 1847, at Perote, Mexico. 

John Butler, private; enrolled April 22. 1847, at Burlington. Iowa, by 
Lieutenant Bowie ; left sick at the hospital at Perote, Mexico, July 2, 1847 ; died 
at Perote August 3, 1847. 

Stephen S. Cooper, private; residence, Burlington, Iowa; enrolled April 12, 
1847, at Burlington, Iowa, by Lieutenant Bowie; mustered out with company 
August 4, 1848. 

Aristiades Ellis, private; residence, Burlington, Iowa; enrolled at Burling- 
ton, Iowa, by Lieutenant Bowie, April 12, 1847; died September 14, 1847, in 
Hospital Puebla, Mexico. 

Thomas Fisher, private; residence, Burlington, Iowa; enrolled by Lieutenant 
Bowie April 22, 1847; c 'i cc ' m Mexico City October 7, 1847. 

[ames T. Magee, private; residence, Burlington; enrolled by Lieutenant 
Bowie April 16, 1847; mustered out August 4, 1848, at Covington, Ky. 

Peter A. Berry, private; enrolled at Burlington, Iowa, by Lieutenant Bowie 
on the 24th of April. 1847. In this connection we will say Fort Madison, Keosau- 
qua and Bloomington (Muscatine) contributed to the ranks of Company K, 
Fifteenth United States Infantry. Those of the company from Keosauqua were 
enrolled by Lieutenant Beckett. Those from Bloomington by Lieutenant Bennett. 
Those from Fort Madison by Captain Guthrie. 




FABIAN BRYDOLPB 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 189 

The total enrollment of the company 113 

Killed in battle 5 

Died of wounds 

Died of disease 49 

Discharged for wounds, diseases or other causes 8 

Burlington and Des Moines County can feel proud of the record made by Com- 
pany K, Fifteenth United States Infantry, in the war with Mexico. Both county 
and city can as well take pride in James M. Morgan's Volunteers and Mounted 
Volunteers. The Des Moines County bar may with pride point to Frederick D. 
Mills and George Washington Bowie. Both were eminent lawyers. The former 
showed the mettle of which he was made in preventing many leaders of his party 
from curtailing the boundaries of the state, the other the faith which the people 
of the county had in him by selecting him as one of the delegates to frame a 
constitution for the state and electing him to represent them in its First State 
Assembly. Burlington was noted in the early days for the military spirit which 
it displayed as well as at the breaking out of the Civil war. In 1857 there had 
been organized the First Battalion of Iowa Volunteers with Jacob Gartner Lau- 
man, major and acting colonel, and Fabian Brydolph, acting adjutant. 

BURLINGTON RIFLES 

The Burlington Rifle Company was organized June 8, 1857, with the follow- 
ing officers: C. L. Matthies, captain; M. Keller, first lieutenant; G. Detweiller, 
second lieutenant ; F. Eberle, first sergeant. 

BURLINGTON BLUES 

This company was organized and became incorporated under the laws of 
Iowa on the 22d of December. 1858. Its: officers were: Fabian Brydolph, cap- 
tain; J. S. McKenney, first lieutenant; D. Strickler, second lieutenant; J. M. 
Neely, third lieutenant; J. Winders, first sergeant; J. G. Schaffer, second ser- 
geant; J. S. Halliday, third sergeant; J. Perkins, fourth sergeant. 

WASHINGTON GUARDS 

Organized July 15, 1856. Officers: R. B. Tedford, captain; C. O'Brien, 
first lieutenant ; J. Dwyer, second lieutenant ; J. Lillis, third lieutenant ; P. Baker, 
first sergeant ; M. Smiley, second sergeant ; J. McCooey, third sergeant. 

IRISH VOLUNTEERS 

The officers of the Irish Volunteers were : H. H. Scott, captain ; F. Doran, 
first lieutenant. 

FIRST IOWA INFANTRY VOLUNTEERS 

In the great conflict for the preservation of the Union, Iowa soldiers took a 
prominent part. It can be said that none more so than those from Des Moines 
County. When President Lincoln issued his first call the above named com- 
panies were in existence in Burlington. Fort Sumter was fired upon on the 



190 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

12th day of April, 1861. President Lincoln issued a call for 75,000 volunteers 
on the 15th of the same month. On the 16th Simon Cameron, secretary of war, 
notified Governor Kirkwood of Iowa that the quota of the state under the call 
would be one regiment. Governor Kirkwood issued his proclamation on the 
17th calling for volunteers. But before the call had been made by the President, 
Captain Matthies, of the Burlington Rifles, offered his services and that of his 
company in case the same were needed. The First Iowa was mustered into 
service on the 14th of May, 1861, and was transported to Hannibal, Mo., from 
which place it was taken to Macon City by train, thence by march to Boone- 
ville, where it remained until the 13th of July, then with troops composing 
the command of General Lyon took up its march south to find and fight the 
enemy. It received its first baptism of fire on the 16th of August, 1861, at 
Wilson's Creek. Two companies from Des Moines County belonged to the gal- 
lant First Iowa Volunteers, I and E. I quote from Lieutenant-Colonel Merritt, 
commanding the regiment at Wilson's Creek : "Du Bois battery took a position a 
short distance east of where the enemy were being engaged, and the Iowa troops 
were drawn up in line of battle on its left. A brisk fire was commenced and 
kept up for thirty minutes. The enemy responded promptly with a battery in a 
ravine, but the shots passed over our heads. Detailed Company D, First Lieu- 
tenant Keller commanding, and Company E, First Lieutenant Abercrombie com- 
manding, to act as skirmishers in advance of my line. Ordered them to advance 
over the hill, engage the enemy and relieve the First Kansas." In this, the first 
and only battle in which the First Iowa took part, all the companies constituting 
the regiment are entitled to full credit. Shelby Norman, a young fair-haired boy 
of seventeen, a member of Company A, First Iowa Infantry Volunteers, was 
the first soldier from Iowa to yield up his life on the altar of patriotism to pre- 
serve for future generations the government founded by the fathers of the 
republic, and which, to establish, so many young men gave their lives on the 
battlefields of the Revolution. Those who wish to look upon the features of this 
brave boy can do so when looking on the statute of a private soldier on the 
Soldiers' Monument at the state capital. The commission having in charge the 
erection of the monument had this statue represent the fea'tures and form of the 
first Iowa soldier who gave his life for his country from Iowa. 

FIRST IOWA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 

Field and staff: John Francis Bates, colonel; William H. Merritt, lieutenant- 
colonel; Asbury B. Porter, major; George W. Waldon, adjutant; Theodore Gue- 
lish, quartermaster; William W. White, surgeon; Hugo Reichenbach, assistant 
surgeon ; I. K. Fuller, chaplain. 

COMPANY D 

Line officers: Charles L. Matthies, captain ; Mathias Keller, first lieuten- 
ant ; Joseph Enderle, second lieutenant. 

Privates: Lewis Bates, age 25 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Saxe Mein- 
ingen ; enlisted April 23, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 
1861. Lewis Bickler, age 24; residence, Burlington; nativity, Wurttemberg; en- 




(i KXERAL CHARLES L. MATTHIKS 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 191 

listed April 23, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861 
(see Company F, Fifth Cavalry). Edmond Bonitz, age 23; residence, Burling- 
ton; nativity, Saxony; enlisted April 23, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; wounded 
in abdomen August 10, 1861, at Wilson's Creek, Mo.; mustered out May 14, 
1S61. Nichol Bouquet, age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, Bavaria; enlisted 
April 23, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. Charles 
Bruokner, age 31; residence, Burlington; nativity, Bavaria; enlisted April 23, 
1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. William Christ, 
age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Hesse; enlisted April 23, 1861, as drum- 
mer; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. Joseph Enderle, 
age 26; nativity, Baden; appointed second lieutenant April 23, 1861 ; mustered 
May 14, 1861 ; promoted first lieutenant July 25, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 
1861. Laurens Feirtag, age 27; residence, Burlington; nativity, Prussia; en- 
listed April 23, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. 
Christ Griese, age 32 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Prussia ; enlisted April 
23, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. William 
Grothe, age 25 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Prussia ; enlisted April 2^, 1861 ; 
mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. William Alexander 
Haw, age 45; residence, Burlington; nativity, Prussia; mustered out August 21, 
1861 (see Company F, Fifth Cavalry). John Henn, age 42; residence, Burling- 
ton; nativity, Bavaria; enlisted April 23, 1 86 1 ;. mustered May 14, 1861 ; mus- 
tered out August 21, 1861. Frank Hille, age 32; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Prussia; enlisted April 2^, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 
21, 1861 (see Company F, Fifth CaValry). Casper Hohkamp, age 26; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Prussia; enlisted April 23, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; 
mustered out August 21, 1861 (see Company F, Fifth Iowa Cavalry). Henry 
Hohkamp, age 28 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Prussia ; enlisted April 23, 
1861; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. Gustav Hohm- 
brecker, age 23 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Prussia ; enlisted April 23, 
1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861 (see Company E, 
Twenty-fifth Infantry). Frederick Hoschle, age 22; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Germany; enlisted April 23, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered 
out August 21, 1861 (see Company F, Fifth Cavalry). Anton Hupprich, age 21 ; 
residence, Burlington ; nativity, Hanover ; enlisted April 23, 1861 ; mustered May 
14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. Charles Jockers, age 26; residence, 
Burlington ; nativity, Baden ; enlisted April 23, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; 
mustered out August 21, 1861 (see Company F, Fifth Cavalry). Frederick 
Kamphofner, age 21 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Prussia ; enlisted April 23, 
1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. Lewis Kasiske, 
age 23; residence, Burlington; nativity, Prussia; enlisted April 23, 1861 ; mus- 
tered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. Julius Kaskel, age 24; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Prussia; enlisted April 23, 1861 ; mustered May 
14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. Matthias Keller, age 44; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Germany; appointed first lieutenant April 25, 1861 ; mus- 
tered May 14, 1861 ; promoted captain July 25, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 
1861. Herman Kettner, age 35; residence, Burlington; nativity, Baden; enlisted 
April 23, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. Henry 
Klein, age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, Bavaria; enlisted April 23, 1861 ; 



192 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. Theobold Klein, age 
21; residence, Burlington; nativity, Bavaria; enlisted April 23, 1861 ; mustered 
May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861 (see Company K, Second Cavalry). 
Sebastian Klett, age 30; residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted 
April 23, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. Theo- 
dore Knaup, age 28 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Prussia ; enlisted April 23, 
1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. Michael Kohl- 
bauer, age 32; residence, Burlington; nativity, Bavaria; enlisted April 23, 1861 ; 
mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. Charles Leopold, age 
19; residence, Burlington; nativity, Prussia; enlisted April 23, 1861 ; mustered 
May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. Charles L. Matthies, age 37; res- 
idence, Burlington; nativity, Prussia; appointed captain April 23, 1861 ; mus- 
tered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861 (see field and staff, Fifth 
Infantry). Casper Mersch, age 37; residence, Burlington; nativity. Prussia; en- 
listed April 23, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. 
August Miller, age 23 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Prussia ; enlisted April 
23, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. Peter Mohn, 
age 22 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Bavaria ; enlisted April 23, 1861 ; mustered 
May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. August Nesselhaus, age 21 ; res- 
idence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted April 23, 1861 ; mustered May 
14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. John Christ Pieper, age 19; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Prussia; enlisted April 23, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; 
mustered out August 21, 1861. Christ Rayer, age 27; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Germany; enlisted April 23, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered 
out August 21, 1861. John Romminger, age 39; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Germany; enlisted April 23, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 
21, 1861. John Rothenberger, age 25; residence, Burlington; nativity, Bavaria; 
enlisted April 23, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. 
George Ruff, age 19 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Germany ; enlisted April 
23, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; wounded in left hand August 10, 1861 ; mus- 
tered out, Wilson's Creek, Mo., August 21, 1861 (see Company D, Twenty-fifth 
Infantry). Gregor Schaeffer, age 23; residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; 
enlisted April 23, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. 
James Scheurmaan, age 26; residence, Burlington; nativity, Switzerland; enlisted 
April 23, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21. 1861. Fred- 
erick Schramm, age 26 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity. Prussia ; enlisted April 
23, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. August 
Schultze, age 22 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Prussia ; enlisted April 23, 
1861 : mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21. 1861. Christ Sihrey, 
age 24; residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany: enlisted April 23, 1861 ; mus- 
tered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. John C. Wagener, age 30: 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Switzerland; enlisted April 23. 1861 ; mustered 
May 14. 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. Theodore Waldschmidt, age 30: 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted April 23, 1861 ; mustered 
May 14. 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861 ; enlisted as fourth sergeant; pro- 
moted second lieutenant July 25, 1861. John Wasmer, age 30; residence, Bur- 
lington; nativity, Baden; enlisted April 23, 1871 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mus- 
tered out August 21, 1861. John Weber, age 26; residence, Burlington; nativity, 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 193 

Bavaria; enlisted April 23, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 
21, 1861. Michael Weber, age 21; residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; 
enlisted April 23, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. 
Christ Wilde, age 23 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Germany ; enlisted April 
23, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. George Wil- 
lett, age 22; residence, Burlington; nativity, Bavaria; enlisted April 2^, 1861 ; 
mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. Gottlieb Wolhaff, age 
22 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Germany ; enlisted April 23, 1861 ; mus- 
tered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. 

COMPANY E 

Line officers: George F. Sheaper, captain; John C. Abercrombie, first lieu- 
tenant ; George W. Pearson, second lieutenant. 

Privates: John C. Abercrombie, age 36; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Pennsylvania; enlisted April 24, 1861 ; appointed first lieutenant May 14, 1861 ; 
mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. Robert R. Armstrong, 
age 21 ; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted April 24, 1861 ; mustered 
May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. George Bradley, age 26; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861; 
mustered out August 21, 1861 (see Company G, Fifth Infantry). Jacob S. 
Bradley, age 24; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; 
mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. W. F. Brandebury, 
age 26; residence, Burlington; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; 
mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. Joseph Bruckner, age 
22; residence, Burlington; nativity, France; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mustered 
May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. Lorin F. Bush, age 23; residence, 
Burlington ; nativity, New York; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; 
mustered out August 21, 1861. Charles A. Cameron, age 21 ; residence, Des 
Moines County; nativity, Virginia; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 
1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861 (see Company G, Thirty-ninth Infantry). 
William I. Campbell, age 22; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Illinois; 
enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861 
(see Company K, Fourteenth Infantry). Thomas S. Canfield, age 18; residence, 
Kossuth; nativity, Vermont; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; 
mustered out August 21, 1861 (see Company K, Fourteenth Infantry) ; wounded 
August 10, 1861, Wilson's Creek, Mo. John Carter, age 24; residence, Des 
Moines County; nativity, England; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 
1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. Samuel M. Chapman, age 22; residence, 
Des Moines County; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered 
out August 21, 1861 (see Company K, Fourteenth Infantry). John Collins, age 
22: residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Ohio; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mus- 
tered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. Hugh L. Creighton, age 21 ; 
residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Iowa; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mustered 
May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861 (see field and staff officers, Thirtieth 
Infantry). Charles Dansages or Donsays, age 31 ; residence, Des Moines County; 
nativity, Germany; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered 
out August 21, 1861 (see Company I, Sixth Infantry). Frederick I. Deadrick, 

Vol. 1—13 



194 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

age 22 ; residence, Des Moines County ; nativity, Germany ; enlisted April 20, 
1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861 (see Company F, 
Fifth Cavalry). John W. Deleplane, age 29; residence, Des Moines County; 
nativity, Virginia; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mustered May 14. 1861 ; mustered out 
August 21, 1861. John S. Drealard, age 21; residence, Des Moines County; 
nativity, Iowa; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out 
August 21, 1861. James Dreulard, age 24; residence, Des Moines County; 
nativity, Iowa : enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out 
August 21, 1861. Oliver P. Eads, age 21; residence, Des Moines; nativity, 
Iowa; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 
1861 (see Company K, Fourteenth Infantry). John English, age 26; residence, 
Des Moines County; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mustered 
May 14, 1861; mustered out August 21, 1861. John Espy, age 19; residence, 
Des Moines County; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mustered 
May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. Augustus Fairbanks, age 18 
residence, Des Moines County ; nativity, New York ; enlisted April 20, 1861 
mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. Henry A. Field, age 19 
residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Iowa; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mus- 
tered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 186.1. William J. Fuller, age 21 ; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Massachusetts; enlisted April 20, 1861, as third 
corporal; mustered May 14, 1861 ; wounded August 10, 1861, Wilson's Creek, 
Mo.; mustered out August 21, 1861. William Gregory, age 20; residence, Des 
Moines County; nativity, Indiana; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 
1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861 (see Company G, Nineteenth Infantry). 
Jacob M. Grimes, age 21 ; residence, Des Moines County: nativity, Pennsylvania; 
enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. 
James H. Guthrie, age 24 ; residence, Des Moines County ; nativity. Pennsyl- 
vania ; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 
21, 186 1- (see Company K, Fourteenth Infantry). Abram A. Harbach, age 20; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted April 20, 1861, as third 
sergeant; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861 ; subsequently 
sergeant in United States army. Thomas H. Hart, age 22 ; residence, Des Moines 
County; nativity, Rhode Island; enlisted April 20. 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; 
mustered out August 21, 1861 (see Company F, First Cavalry). William Haw- 
kins; rejected May 14, 1861. by mustering officer. David Hawksworth ; rejected 
May 14, 1861, by mustering officer. Robert N. Heisey, age 21 ; residence, Bur- 
lington; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted April 20, 1861, as second corporal; 
mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861 (see Company I 7 , Forty- 
fifth Infantry. William P. Heustis, age 20; residence, Des Moines County; 
nativity, Virginia ; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered 
out August 21, 1861. Henry A. Hills, age 19; residence, Des Moines County; 
nativity, Iowa; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mustered May 14. 1861 ; mustered out 
August 21, 1861 (see miscellaneous). Samuel B. Heizer, age 19; residence, 
Des Moines County ; nativity, Ohio ; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 
1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861 (see Company C. Thirtieth Infantry). 
Myron M. Jaggar, age 21: residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Iowa; en- 
listed April 20, 1861 ; mustered May 14. 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. 
Augustus Johnson, age 22 ; residence. Des Moines County ; nativity. Sweden ; 






HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 195 

enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. 
Frank Johnson, age 22 ; residence, Des Moines County ; nativity, Sweden ; en- 
listed April 20, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861 
(see miscellaneous). Frank B. Johnson, age 20; residence, Des Moines County; 
nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mus- 
tered out August 21, 1861 ; reenlisted in Company G, Fifty-seventh Illinois; 
wounded in foot April 6, 1862, Shiloh, Tenn. ; died of consumption brought on 
by exposure in service, Burlington, Iowa. Spencer Johnson, age 27 ; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted April 20, 1861, as fourth sergeant; mus- 
tered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861 (see Company G, Twenty- 
fifth Infantry). William Johnson; rejected May 14, 1861, by mustering officer. 
William F. Jordan, age 23 ; residence, Des Moines County ; nativity, Iowa ; en- 
listed April 20, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. 
Henry M. Kilmartin, age 28; residence, Burlington; nativity. New York; en- 
listed April 20, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; promoted fife major May 24, 
1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. Charles H. Kimball, age 31; residence, 
Des Moines County; nativity, New Hampshire; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mus- 
tered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. Charles P. King, age 23; 
residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Indiana; enlisted May 20, 1861 ; mus- 
tered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861 (see Company K, Fourteenth 
Infantry). George Lawrence, age 24; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, 
Canada; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; wounded August 10, 
1861, Wilson's Creek, Mo.; mustered out August 21, 1861. Ira Linton, age 22; 
residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; 
mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. Joseph D. McClure, 
age 24 ; residence, Des Moines County ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; enlisted April 
20, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861 (see Company 
K. Fourteenth Infantry). Richard McLane, age 21; residence, Des Moines 
County; nativity, New York; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; 
mustered out August 21, 1861. Stephen Martin, age 24; residence, Des Moines; 
nativity, Illinois; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered 
out August 21, 1861 (see Company G, Twenty-fifth Infantry). Isaac P. Mathews, 
age 26; residence, Des Moines; nativity, Ohio; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mus- 
tered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861 (see Company G, Twenty- 
fifth Infantry). John P. Mathews, age 24; residence, Des Moines County; 
nativity, Indiana; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered 
out August 21, 1861 (see Company C, Thirtieth Infantry). Daniel Matson, 
age 20 ; residence, Des Moines County ; nativity, England ; enlisted April 20, 
1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861 (see Company K, 
Fourteenth Infantry). Alfred L. Merrill, age 30; residence, Des Moines County; 
nativity, Maine; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out 
August 2, 1861. Reuben Miles, residence, Des Moines County; nativity, New- 
Hampshire; enlisted April 24, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; wounded August 10, 
1861, Wilson's Creek, Mo. ; mustered out August 21, 1861. Phillip Nesselhaus, age 
21; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Germany; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; 
mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861 (see Company E, Twenty- 
fifth Infantry). John E. Newland, age 19; residence, Des Moines Co.; nativity, 
Ohio; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 



196 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

1861 (see Company E, Twenty-fifth Infantry). William R. Payne, age 28; resi- 
dence, Des Moines County ; nativity, New York ; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mustered 
May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. John W. Peirson, age 32 ; residence, 
Burlington ; nativity, Virginia ; appointed second lieutenant May 9, 1861 ; mustered 
May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. Robert M. Pollock, age 20; res- 
idence, Des Moines County; nativity, Indiana; enlisted April 20, r86i ; mus- 
tered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861 (see Company C, Third Mis- 
souri Cavalry). John Reed, age 24; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; en- 
listed April 20, 1861, as second sergeant; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered 
out August 21, 1861 (see Company A, Fourth Cavalry). Richard M. Rhamey, 
age 20; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Ohio; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; 
mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861 (see Company C, 
Seventeenth Infantry). Charles Riggs, age 28; residence, Des Moines County; 
nativity, New York; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered 
out August 21, 1861 (see Company A, Fourth Cavalry. Aurelius Roberts, age 
26; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Ohio; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mus- 
tered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861 (see Company C, Thirtieth 
Infantry). Henry N. Robinson; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Ohio; 
enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861 
(see Company E, Fifteenth Infantry). Newton P. Rogers, age 28; residence, 
Danville; nativity, Ohio; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mus- 
tered out August 21, 1861 (see Company E, Fifteenth Infantry). Barton T. 
Ryan, age 23; residence, Burlington; nativity, Indiana; enlisted April 20, 1861, 
as fourth corporal; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861 (see 
Company C, Fourteenth Infantry; Company C, Forty-first Infantry; Company 
M, Seventh Cavalry). Ernst Schramm, age 24; residence, Des Moines County; 
nativity, Germany; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered 
out August 21, 1 86 1. Joseph Schaar, age 21 ; residence, Des Moines County ; 
nativity, Germany; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered 
out August 21, 1861. John G. Seeger, age 28; residence, Des Moines County; 
nativity, Germany; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered 
out August 21, 1861. Joseph O. Shannon, age 31 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, 
Kentucky; enlisted April 20, 1861, as first corporal; mustered May 14, 1861 ; 
mustered out August 21, 1861 (see Company E, Fourteenth Infantry). James 
A. Shedd, age 24 ; residence, Des Moines County ; nativity, Ohio ; enlisted April 
20, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861 (see miscel- 
laneous). Reuben Shiffert, age 24; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, 
Pennsylvania; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out 
August 21, 1861 (see Company G, Twenty-fifth Infantry). James Smith, age 21 ; 
residence, Des Moines County; nativity, New York; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; 
mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861 (see miscellaneous). 
Mark Strasler, age 22 ; residence, Des Moines County ; nativity, Germany ; en- 
listed April 20, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. 
George F. Streaper, age 26 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; en- 
listed April 20, 186 1 ; mustered May 14, 186 1 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. 
Charles Stypes, age 23 ; residence, Des Moines County ; nativity, Germany ; en- 
listed April 20, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. 
John P. Swaggart, age 21; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Maryland: 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 197 

enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. 
William H. Syester, age 26 ; residence, Des Moines County ; nativity, Virginia ; 
enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. 
William J. Tizzard, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted April 
20, 1861, as fifer; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861 (see 
Company G, Twenty-fifth Infantry). Albert Ulric, age 20; residence, Des Moines 
County; nativity, Germany; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; 
mustered out August 21, 1861 (see Company I, Sixth Infantry). Joseph Utter, 
age 28; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted April 20, 1861, as first 
sergeant; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861 (see Company 
G, Twenty-fifth Infantry). Robert R. Vannice, age 20; residence, Des Moines 
County ; nativity, Indiana ; enlisted April 22, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mus- 
tered out August 21, 1861 (see Company I, Fifth Cavalry). Andrew F. Wall, 
age 25; residence, Des Moines; nativity, Sweden; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mus- 
tered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. Eugene F. Ware, age 20; 
residence, Burlington ; nativity, Connecticut ; enlisted April 20, 1861 ; mustered 
May 14, 1 86 1 ; mustered out August 21, 1861 (see Company L, Fourth Cav- 
alry, and Company A, Seventh Cavalry). Alexander C. Virgin, age 20; res- 
idence, Pleasant Grove; nativity, Ohio; enlisted April 22, 1861 ; mustered May 
14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861 (see Company C, Fourth Cavalry). 
William T. Virgin, age 19; residence, Pleasant Grove; nativity, Ohio; enlisted 
April 23, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861 (see Com- 
pany C, Fourth Cavalry). 

COMPANY F 

William Conklin, age 23 ; residence, Pleasant Grove ; nativity, Indiana ; en- 
listed April 23, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. 
James C. Holland, age 21; residence, Augusta; nativity, Iowa; enlisted April 
23, 1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861. James M. 
Tibbetts, age 20 ; residence, Pleasant Grove ; nativity, Indiana ; enlisted April 23, 
1861 ; mustered May 14, 1861 ; mustered out August 21, 1861 (see Company H, 
Twenty-fifth Infantry). 

SIXTH IOWA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 

This regiment was composed of ten companies, one of which came from 
Des Moines County. The total enrollment of the regiment during the war was 
1,221 men. The regiment was mustered into the service on the 17th and 18th 
days of July, 1861. The companies composing the regiment were ordered to 
rendezvous at Burlington, occupying the fair grounds just west of the city. On 
August 6, 1861, the regiment was ordered to Keokuk, where it received its 
arms. From Keokuk it made a short excursion into Missouri to prevent a 
threatened invasion of Iowa from that state by rebel forces. The regiment 
returned to Keokuk, and on the 9th of August embarked on board a steamer 
for St. Louis and Benton Barracks. On September 19th it left Benton Bar- 
racks and proceeded by rail to Jefferson City, Mo. From this place it tramped 
over a large portion of Central and Southern Missouri hunting rebels. It is 



198 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

unnecessary to go into detail of those marches. The regiment was ordered to 
join the army of the Tennessee on March 7, 1862. It embarked on a steamboat 
and proceeded from St. Louis to Cairo, and from there up the Ohio and Ten- 
nessee to Pittsburg Landing, where it disembarked on the 16th day of March, 
1862. At Pittsburg Landing it was assigned to the First Brigade of the Sec- 
ond Division of the army of the Tennessee. This division was under the com- 
mand of Gen. W. T. Sherman and Col. John A. McDowell of the Ninth Iowa. 
The regiment was stationed at the extreme right of the army. Two companies 
had been detailed to defend a bridge which crossed Owl Creek. Those com- 
panies were stationed some distance in advance of the regiment. They were 
under the command of Captain Walden, who succeeded in extricating them from 
the dangerous position in which they had been placed. No regiment in this 
battle showed greater valor than the Sixth Iowa. This was its first baptism of 
fire, and the heroism it displayed would be of credit to veterans. The men 
showed their valor, and that at a critical time when they needed a cool headed 
commander, which they did not have in the person of Lieutenant Cummins, who 
seemed to have lost his head, and was relieved, and Capt. David Isemeinger 
placed in command. He was killed while in the discharge of his duty. The 
command then fell to Capt. John Williams, who was severely wounded late in 
the afternoon on that Sunday. Then Captain Walden took command. The 
attack by the enemy was made early in the morning on Grant's center, where the 
Sixth Iowa was brought into line of battle about fifty yards in front along the 
edge of some woods. Company I, commanded by Captain Brydolph, was thrown 
out as skirmishers. It was not long until the skirmish line was driven in and the 
fight became general along the whole line. The regiment had to yield the ground 
because of superior force, and make a change of position to prevent being cut 
off from the main line. The regiment at this time marched by left flank across 
an open field, and formed in line, the right resting on the Purdy Road. Here for 
a time the fighting was terrific. Captain Brydolph, Lieutenants Halladay and 
Grimes were wounded. At this point the regiment was joined by companies 
D and K, which had been stationed at Owl Creek. From this time on, the battle 
raged for the whole day until dusk. The regiment being hard pressed; in good 
order gradually fell back, and finally sustained the batteries through the night. 

LOSS AT SIIILOH 

Killed 64 

Wounded 100 

Missing 47 



211 



The regiment took part in the march and siege of Corinth, and was with Grant 
on that inland march to reach Vicksburg, which was a complete failure: Colonel 
McDowell resigned in March, 1863, and Lieut. John M. Corse became colonel. 
After the surrender of Vicksburg, the regiment was sent to Jackson, Miss., and 
took part in the siege of that place. On the 16th of July, 1863, it charged the 
batteries of the enemy at Jackson, in which it lost seventy officers and men in 




JOHN \I. i ORSE 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 199 

killed and wounded. Brig. Wm. Sooy Smith, commanding the First Division of 
the Sixteenth Army Corps, complimented Colonel Corse, commanding the Sixth 
Iowa, on account of its valiant services at Jackson. Among other things he spoke 
concerning this regiment: "Such has been the glorious conduct of the Sixth Iowa 
this morning, and those who shared your dangers and emulate your valor will 
join me in tendering to you and the brave men under your command my warmest 
thanks and most hearty congratulations." It was not long after this time when 
the regiment was assigned to the Second Brigade, Fourth Division of the Fifteenth 
Army Corps. Colonel Corse was promoted to brigadier general August H, 1863. 
The regiment was with the army on the march to Chattanooga, and bore its part 
in the assault and taking of Missionary Ridge. In the face of shot and shell, under 
the command of Col. John M. Corse, it climbed the rocky steeps of those heights. 
Here Colonel Corse was wounded and Capt. Robert Allison was killed. The 
regiment was with Sherman in his march to Atlanta and took part in all the 
engagements in that campaign. On the campaign from Chattanooga to Atlanta 
it lost in killed and wounded 150 men. What follows, tells the tale of the sac- 
rifices of this brave regiment. 

Total enrollment during the war , . 1,221 

Killed in battle 109 

Died of wounds 31 

Died of disease 126 

■ c "; 

Total deaths 266 

Wounded -. 295 

Captured 50 

Transferred 8 

Buried in national cemeteries no 

No regiment from Iowa shows as large a list of casualties as the Sixth Iowa 
in proportion to the enrollment. 

Field and staff: John Adair McDowell, age 39 ; residence, Keokuk ; nativity, 
Ohio; appointed colonel June 20, 1861 ; resigned March 12, 1863. Markoe Cum- 
mins ; residence, Muscatine ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; appointed lieutenant colonel 
August 30, 1861 ; mustered out May 20, 1862, by sentence of military commission 
(see Company A, First Infantry ). John M. Corse, age 28 ; residence, Burlington ; 
nativity, Pennsylvania ; appointed major July 6, 1861 ; promoted lieutenant colonel 
May 21, 1862 ; colonel, March 13, 1863 ; brigadier general, August n, 1863 ; brevet 
major general, October 5, 1863; mustered out April 30, 1866. Emmitt B. Wood- 
ward, age 2/ ; residence, Chariton ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; appointed adjutant 
July 22, 1861, from first lieutenant, Company B ; returned to Company B as first 
lieutenant November 6, 1861. Thomas J. Ennis, age 20; residence, Lyons; 
nativity, New York; appointed adjutant January 1, 1862; promoted major March 
14, 1863 ; wounded slightly in leg November 25, 1863, Mission Ridge, Tenn. ; killed 
in action July 28, 1864, Atlanta, Ga. James Brunaugh, age 29 ; residence, Mount 
Pleasant ; nativity, Ohio ; appointed quartermaster July 22, 1861, from first lieuten- 
ant, Company K ; resigned November 27, 1862. Albert T. Shaw, age 44 ; residence, 
Fort Madison; nativity, Maine; appointed surgeon August 30, 1861 ; mustered 



200 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

out at expiration of term of service. John E. Lake, age 23; residence, Marion; 
nativity, Ohio; appointed assistant surgeon August 3, 1861; resigned September 

3, 1862. William S. Lambert, age 27; residence, Bloomfield ; nativity, Ohio; 
appointed assistant surgeon October 22, 1862; promoted surgeon December 30, 
1864; mustered out July 21, 1865, Louisville, Ky. Norman M. Smith, age 46; 
residence, Monticello ; nativity, Massachusetts ; appointed assistant surgeon Octo- 
ber 22, 1862; mustered out July 21, 1865, Louisville, Ky. John Ufford, age 51 ; 
residence, Muscatine; nativity, Connecticut; appointed chaplain July 12, 1801 ; 
resigned July 7, 1863. 

company 1 

Line officers: Fabian Brydolf, captain: Joseph S. Halliday, first lieutenant; 
Samuel B. Philips, second lieutenant. 

Privates: John C. Antrobus, age 18; residence, Des Moines County, New 
London P. O. ; nativity, Indiana; enlisted July 22, 1861 ; mustered July 22, 1861 ; 
mustered out September 14, 1864, East Point, Ga., expiration of term of service. 
Lafayette Antrobus, age 20; residence, Des Moines County, New London P. O. ; 
nativity, Indiana; enlisted July 22, 1861 ; mustered July 22, 1861 ; promoted 
seventh corporal March 22, 1862; fourth corporal July 1, 1862; first corporal 
June 1, 1863; died at Andersonville, Ga., September 26, 1864; No. grave 8974 
National Cemetery. William Baker, age 19 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Ger- 
many ; enlisted July 12, 1861 ; mustered July 18, 1861 ; died October 14, 1863, 
Comanche, Iowa. Calvin Barbia, age 27 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Ten- 
nessee ; enlisted July 13, 1861, as wagoner; mustered July 18, 1861 ; discharged 
August 26, 1861, St. Louis, Mo., for disability. Alexander B. Boyde, age 24; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, .Ohio ; enlisted July 12, 1861 ; mustered July 18, 
1861 ; taken prisoner July 15, 1863, Jackson, Miss.; no further record. Stephen 
T. Bradley, age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted July 12, 
1861 ; mustered July 18, 1861 ; wounded July 16, 1863, Jackson, Miss. ; promoted 
fifth corporal December 30, 1863 ; discharged July 17, 1864, Chicago, 111. William 
Bradley (veteran), age 20; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted Sep- 
tember 11, 1861 ; mustered September 11, 1861 ; reinlisted and remustered January 
26, 1864; promoted second corporal January 1, 1865 ; mustered out July 21, 1865, 
Louisville, Ky. Jacob Cestine, wounded June 27, 1864, Kenesaw Mountain, Ga. ; 
no further record. Newby Chase, age 20 ; residence, Burlingtoii ; nativity, Ire- 
land ; enlisted July 2^, 1861 ; mustered July 23, 1861 ; promoted sergeant major 
January 4, 1863; taken prisoner July 3, 1863; promoted adjutant October 24, 
1863; wounded May 28, 1864; died of wounds May 30, 1864; buried in National 
Cemetery, Marietta, Ga., section C, grave S. Cornelius Clark, age 24 ; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted July 12, 1861 ; mustered July 18, 1861 ; dis- 
charged November 13, 1862, for disability. George W. Clark, age 20; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted July 12, 1861, as eighth corporal; mustered 
July 18, 1861 ; promoted fifth sergeant October, 1861 ; fourth sergeant December 

4, 1861 ; first sergeant June 1, 1863; wounded July f>, 1863, Jones Ford, Miss.; 
promoted first lieutenant October 24, 1863; captain July 29, 1864; wounded 
November 22. 1864, Griswoldville, Ga. ; mustered out at expiration of term of 
service at first lieutenant, captain's commission having been declined. Archibald 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 201 

Conner, age 22; residence, Burlington; nativity. Iowa; enlisted July 12, 1861 ; 
mustered July 18, 1861 ; killed in action April 6, 1862, Shiloh, Tenn. Thomas 
Conroy (veteran), age 22; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ireland; enlisted July 
12, 1861 ; mustered July 18, 1861 ; wounded July 16, 1863, Jackson, Miss.; 
reinlisted and remustered January 26, 1864. Peter F. Crichton, age 25 ; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Scotland; enlisted July 12, 1861, as fourth corporal; mus- 
tered July 18, 1861 ; promoted commissary sergeant March 22, 1862; quarter- 
master January 1, 1863; mustered out October 26, 1864. Jacob Debray (vet- 
eran), age 36: residence, Burlington; nativity, Switzerland; enlisted July 12, 
1861 ; mustered July 18, 1861 ; reinlisted and remustered January 26, 1864; mus- 
tered out July 21, 1865, Louisville, Ky. Charles A. Ericson (veteran), age 18; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Sweden; enlisted September 11, 1861 ; mustered 
September 11, 1861 ; reinlisted and remustered January 26, 1864; mustered out 
July 21, 1865, Louisville, Ky. Warren M. Fales, age 21 ; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, New York; enlisted July 12, 1861, as fourth sergeant; mustered July 18, 
1861 ; promoted third sergeant July 22, 1861 ; second sergeant October 1, 1861 ; 
first sergeant December 24, 1861 ; discharged March 6, 1863, for disability. 
Charles Fleming (veteran), age 18; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Ohio ; enlisted 
July 12, 1 86 1 ; mustered July 18, 1861 ; promoted fourth corporal December 30, 
1863; third corporal January 1, 1864; reinlisted and remustered January 26, 
1864 ; fourth sergeant January 1, 1865 ; wounded March 23, 1865 ; died of wounds 
April 20, 1865; buried in New Cemetery, Newburn, N. C, No. 90, plat 12, grave 
2158. Joseph S. Haliday, age 30 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Ohio ; appointed 
first lieutenant July 12, 1861 ; mustered July 18, 1861 ; wounded April 6, 1862, 
Shiloh, Tenn. ; discharged November 1, 1862, for disability. John Hannum (vet- 
eran), age 31; residence, Yellow Springs; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted July 
29, 1861 ; mustered July 29, 1861 ; promoted sixth corporal July 1, 1862; third 
corporal June 1, 1863; wounded in foot November 25, 1863, Missionary Ridge, 
Tenn.; promoted fourth sergeant December 20, 1863; reinlisted and remustered 
January 26, 1864; killed in action June 27, 1864, Kenesaw Mountain, Ga. ; buried 
in National Cemetery, Marietta, Ga., section A, grave 600. Oliver F. Howard, 
age 20; residence, Burlington; nativity, Virginia; enlisted July 12, 1861, as fifth 
sergeant; mustered July 18, 1861 ; promoted fourth sergeant July 22, 1861 ; third 
sergeant October 1, 1861 ; second sergeant December 24, 1861 ; second lieutenant 
January 1, 1863; mustered out October 26, 1864, expiration of term of service. 
Henry Hubiner, age 29 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Germany ; enlisted July 
12, 1861 ; mustered July 18, 1861 ; transferred to Invalid Corps December 15, 
1863; no further record. Gustavus Johnson, age 22; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Sweden; enlisted September 10, 1861 ; mustered September 10, 1861 ; 
killed in action April 6, 1862, Shiloh, Tenn. Harvey Bell Linton (veteran), age 
19 ; residence, Linton ; nativity, Iowa ; enlisted July 29, 1861 ; mustered July 29, 
1861 ; promoted sixth corporal June 1, 1863; fifth sergeant December 20, 1863; 
reinlisted and remustered January 26, 1864; wounded June 27, 1864, Kenesaw 
Mountain, Ga. ; promoted first sergeant January 1, 1865; second lieutenant Jan- 
uary 1, 1865; mustered out July 21, 1865, Louisville, Ky. Austin P. Lowry, 
age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted July 12, 1861 ; mustered 
July 18, 1861 ; wounded in head July 6, 1863, Jones' Ford, Miss.; mustered out 
July 16, 1864, Roswell, Ga., expiration of term of service. Oliver H. Lowry, 



202 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

age 21 ; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa ; enlisted August 6, 1861 ; mustered 
August 6, 1861 ; wounded July 6, 1863, Jones' Ford, Miss.; discharged July 16, 
1864, at Atlanta, Ga., expiration of term of service, as Oliver Lowery. Oscar W. 
Lowry, age 18; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Iowa; enlisted December 
29, 1863; mustered December 29, 1863; wounded November 22, 1864, Griswold- 
ville, Ga. ; mustered out July 21, 1865, Louisville, Ky. James T. Lutz, age 20; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted July 12, 1861 ; mustered 
July 18, 1861 ; mustered out July 18, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, expiration of term 
of service. Alonzo McMullen, age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, Virginia; 
enlisted December 30, 1863; mustered December 30, 1863; died en route home 
January 8, 1865, Shokokon, 111. Henry Mahler (veteran), age 21; residence 
Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted July 12, 1861 ; mustered July 18, 1861 , 
reinlisted and remustered January 26, 1864; taken prisoner October 26, 1864 
mustered out June 27, 1865, Davenport, Iowa. John Miller, age 35 ; residence 
Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted July 12, 1861 ; mustered July 18, 1861 
died October 23, 1863, Memphis, Term.; buried in Mississippi River National 
Cemetery, Memphis, Tenn., section I, grave 176. Joseph H. Monroe (veteran), 
age 13; residence, Burlington; enlisted July 9, 1861, as drummer; mustered July 
17, 1861 ; reinlisted and remustered January 26, 1864 ; mustered out July 21, 1865, 
Louisville, Ky. Swan C. Nelson, age 22 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Sweden ; 
enlisted July 12, 1861 ; mustered July 18, 1861 ; died October 25, 1861, Jefferson 
City, Mo. ; buried in National Cemetery, Jefferson Barracks, Mo., section 2, grave 
51. Matthew Nesselhouse, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; 
enlisted July 12, 1861 ; mustered July 18, 1861 ; discharged November 13, 1862, 
for disability. William P. Patterson or Pattison (veteran), age 18; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted July 12, 1861 ; mustered July 18, 1861 ; 
reinlisted and remustered January 26, 1864; discharged October 1, 1865, Daven- 
port. Iowa. Samuel B. Phillips, age 24; residence, Burlington; nativity, Penn- 
sylvania; appointed second lieutenant July 12, 1861 ; mustered July 18, 1861 ; 
resigned January 3, 1863. William A. Prussell, age 22; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Ohio; enlisted July 12, 1861 ; mustered July 18, 1861 ; wounded slightly 
May 27, 1864, Dallas, Ga. ; mustered out July 16, 1864, Roswell, Ga. David 
Ramsey, age 21 ; residence Burlington; nativity, Scotland; enlisted September 11, 
1861 ; mustered September 11, 1861 ; discharged April 13, 1864, for disability. 
James M. Randall, age 21; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted July 
12, 1861 ; mustered July 18, 1861 ; discharged September 19, 1861, St. Louis, Mo. 
Samuel A. Reid, age 22 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Indiana ; enlisted July 
12, 1861 ; mustered July 18, 1861 ; wounded in right shoulder; discharged January 
1, 1862, La Mine Bridge, Mo. Peter G. Seestrom, age 34; residence, Des Moines 
County; nativity. Sweden; enlisted February 2, 1862; mustered February 10, 
1862; mustered out July 21, 1865, Louisville, Ky. (see Company C). James B. 
Sexton, age 22; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted July 12, 1861, as 
second corporal; mustered July 18, 1861 ; promoted fifth sergeant July 22, 1861 ; 
fourth sergeant October 1, 1861 ; third sergeant December 24, 1861 ; discharged 
November 13, 1862, for disability. David Silversmith, age 28; residence, Bur- 
lington; nativity, Germany; enlisted July 12, 1861 ; mustered July 18, 1861 ; pro- 
moted fifer August 16, 1862; wounded in back November 25. 1863, Missionary 
Ridge, Tenn. ; mustered out July 16, 1864, Roswell, Ga. George S. Smiley, age 






HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 203 

31; residence, Burlington; nativity, Maine; enlisted July 12, 1861, as second 
sergeant ; mustered July 18, 1861 ; promoted first sergeant July 22, 1861 ; sergeant 
major December 11, 1861 ; second lieutenant of Company I January 4, 1863; first 
lieutenant January 1, 1863; resigned August 11, 1863. William H. Sutherland, 
age 20; residence, Kossuth; nativity, Indiana; enlisted September 11, 1861 ; mus- 
tered September 11, 1861 ; promoted sixth corporal; third corporal July 1, 1862; 
fifth sergeant June 1, 1863; killed in action July 12, 1863, Jackson, Miss. William 
F. Swank, age 19 ; nativity, Iowa ; enlisted July 12, 1861 ; mustered July 18, 1861 ; 
died of typhoid fever December 1, 1861, Jefferson City, Mo. Louis Swartz or 
Schwartz (veteran), age 35; residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted 
July 12, 1 86 1 , as first corporal; mustered July 18, 1861 ; promoted fifth sergeant 
March 29, 1862; second sergeant June 1, 1863; reinlisted and remustered Janu- 
ary 26, 1864; mustered out July 21, 1865, Louisville, Ky. Silas Thornton, age 
20; residence, Hawkeye ; nativity, Illinois; enlisted July 12, 1861 ; mustered July 
18, 1861 ; mustered out July 16, 1864, Roswell, Ga. Tobias Ulrich (veteran), 
a g e 351 residence, Burlington; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted July 12, 1861 ; 
mustered July 18, 1861 ; reinlisted and remustered January 26, 1864; killed by 
lightning May 11, 1865; buried in National Cemetery, Richmond, Va., section A, 
division 2, grave 21. Noyes W. Wadsworth, age 52; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Connecticut; enlisted October 1, 1861, as fifer; mustered October 1, 
1861 ; wounded April 6, 1862, Shiloh, Tenn. ; died of wounds August 17, 1862, 
St. Louis, Mo. ; buried in National Cemetery, Jefferson Barracks, Mo., section 
51, grave 86. Albert Wentworth, age 20; residence, Burlington; nativity, Indiana; 
enlisted July 12, 1861 ; mustered July 18, 1861 ; wounded April 6, 1862, Shiloh, 
Tenn. ; died of wounds April 6, 1862, at Shiloh, Tenn. James S. Williams (vet- 
eran), age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Michigan; enlisted July 12, 1861 ; 
mustered July 18, 1861 ; reinlisted and remustered January 26, 1864; mustered 
out July 21, 1865, Louisville, Ky. 

COMPANY C 

Privates: Henry M. Benner (veteran), age 25 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, 
Illinois; enlisted July 8, 1861 ; mustered July 18, 1861 ; reinlisted and remustered 
January 26, 1864; promoted third sergeant January 1, 1865; killed in action 
March 24, 1865, near Goldsboro, N. C. William Blanchard, age 24; residence, 
Pleasant Grove; nativity, Ohio; enlisted February 29, 186*4; mustered February 

29, 1864; mustered out July 21, 1865, Louisville, Ky. ; transferred from Company 
I, Thirtieth Iowa. Adelbert H. Buck, age 22 ; residence, Danville ; nativity, 
Indiana; enlisted February 22, 1864; mustered February 22, 1864; mustered out 
July 21, 1865, Louisville, Ky. ; transferred from Company I, Third Iowa Infantry. 
Robert M. Clouston ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Virginia ; enlisted July 4, 
1861 ; mustered July 17, 1861 ; died January 15, 1863, Keokuk, Iowa. Stephen 
J. Gahagan, age 21; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ireland; enlisted December 

30, 1864; mustered January 1, 1865; promoted captain from fifth sergeant of 
Company E December 30, 1864; mustered out July 21, 1865, Louisville, Ky. 
Henry Lenty, age 18; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, England; enlisted 
February 20, 1864; mustered February 29, 1864; died July 2, 1865, Louisville, 
Ky. ; buried in National Cemetery, Louisville, Ky., section C, range 2, grave 140; 



204 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

joined from Thirtieth Iowa Infantry. Abraham Reese, age 18; residence, Des 
Moines County; nativity, Ohio; enlisted February 22, 1864; mustered February 

29, 1804; mustered out July 21, 1865, Louisville, Ky. ; transferred from Thirtieth 
Iowa Infantry. John H. Riepe. age 20 ; residence. Des Moines County; nativity, 
Germany; enlisted December 28, 1863; mustered December 20, 1863; mustered 
out July 21, 1865, Louisville, Ky. (see Company H, Thirty-second Infantry). 
John Jasper Storms, age 19; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Ohio; 
enlisted February 22, 1864; mustered February 29, 1864; mustered out July 21, 
1865, Louisville, Ky. (see Company I, Thirtieth Iowa Infantry). John \Y. 
Torode, age 18; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Ohio; enlisted February 
22, 1864; mustered February 29, 1864; mustered out July 21, 1865, Louisville, 
Ky. (see Company I, Thirtieth Iowa Infantry). James W. Tucker, age 23; resi- 
dence, Des Moines County; nativity, Indiana; enlisted February 29, 18(14; mus- 
tered jVLarch 8, 1864; mustered out July 21, 1865, Louisville, Ky. (see Company 
C, Thirtieth Iowa Infantry). 

COMPANY E 

Privates: Stephen J. Gahagan (veteran), age 21; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Ireland; enlisted July 1, 1861 ; mustered July 17, 1861 ; promoted fifth 
sergeant November 27, 1861 ; taken prisoner April 6, 1862, Shiloh, Tenn. ; 
wounded in neck severely November 25, 1863, Missionary Ridge, Tenn. ; reinlisted 
and remustered January 26, 1864; promoted captain of Company C December 

30, 1864 (see Company C). Transferred from Company K. 

COMPANY F 

Privates: James H. Warthen, age 18; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Indiana ; 
enlisted December 26, 1863; mustered January 5, 1864; mustered out July 21, 
1865, Louisville, Ky. 

COMPANY G 

Privates: Hiram Mcintosh, age 26 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Vermont ; 
enlisted August 16, 1861 ; mustered August 16, 1861 ; died of disease March 14, 
1862, St. Louis, Mo. ; buried in National Cemetery, Jefferson Barracks, Mo., 
section 50, grave 80. Simon Shearer (veteran), age 33; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Kentucky; enlisted July 8, 1861 ; mustered July 18, 1861 ; promoted 
seventh corporal January 1, 1864; reinlisted and remustered January 26, 1864; 
died of typhoid fever April 5, 1864, Nashville, Tenn.; buried in National Ceme- 
tery, Nashville, Tenn., section E, grave 1638. 

COMPANY 11 

Privates: George H. Roberts, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Vir- 
ginia; enlisted January 31, 1865; mustered January 31, 1865; mustered out July 
21, 1865, Louisville, Ky. 

COMPANY K 

Privates: George W. Beall, age 18; residence, Danville; nativity, Illinois; 
enlisted January 16, 1865; mustered January 16, 1865; mustered out July 21, 
1865, Louisville, Ky. (see Company Ft, Thirtieth Iowa Infantry). William G. 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 205 

Beall, age 22; residence, Danville; nativity, Illinois; enlisted January 16, 1865; 
mustered January 16, 1865; mustered out July 21, 1865, Louisville, Ky. (see 
Company H, Thirtieth Iowa Infantry). Stephen J. Gahagan (veteran), age 21 ; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Ireland; enlisted July 12, 1861 : mustered July 
17. 1861 ; reenlisted and remustered January 26, 1864; transferred to Company E. 
William If. Harris (veteran), age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ireland; 
enlisted July 12, 1861 ; mustered July 18, 1861 ; reenlisted and remustered January 
26. 1864; promoted first corporal January 1, 1865; mustered out July 21, 1865, 
Louisville, Ky. Robert Harrison, age 22; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, 
Iowa; enlisted January 25, 1865; mustered January 26, 1865; mustered out July 
21, 1865, Louisville, Ky. (see Company E, Thirtieth Iowa Infantry). Ira Linton 
(veteran), age 23; residence, Linton; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted August 21, 
1861 ; mustered August 21, 1861 ; promoted first sergeant January 1, 1863; 
wounded July 6, 1863, Jones' Ford, Miss. ; reenlisted and remustered January 
26, 1864; killed in action July 28, 1864, near Atlanta, Ga. ; buried in National 
Cemetery, Marietta, Ga., section H, grave 609 (see Company E, First Iowa 
Infantry). James R. Mitchell, age 30; residence, Burlington; nativity, Indiana; 
enlisted February 29, 1864; mustered February 29, 1864; mustered out July 21, 
1865, Louisville, Ky. ; transferred from Company C, Thirtieth Iowa Infantry. 
Alvin C. Moore, age 19; residence, Dodgeville ; nativity, Ohio; enlisted July 12, 
1861 ; mustered July 18, 1861 ; deserted August 2, 1861, Burlington, Iowa. Charles 
W. Sense, age 18; residence, Danville; nativity, Iowa; enlisted January 16, 1865; 
mustered January 16, 1865; mustered out July 21, 1865, Louisville, Ky. ; trans- 
ferred from Company H, Thirtieth Iowa Infantry. 

SEVENTH REGIMENT, IOWA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 

This regiment was completed under the call made by the President of May 3, 
1861. Those composing it were mustered into the service at Burlington at differ- 
ent times during the latter part of July, 1861. The companies composing it 
had but a short stay at their place of rendezvous, the old fair grounds west of 
Burlington. The regiment left Burlington on the 6th of August, 1861, on the 
steamboat Jennie Whipple and arrived at St. Louis on the morning of the 8th of 
the same month. The regiment was stationed at Jefferson Barracks but a short 
time when it was ordered to Pilot Knob, and from there to Ironton. The first 
actual service of the regiment commenced with its march on the 1st of September 
with a division composed of six regiments commanded by Gen. B. M. Prentiss. 
The regiment with others for a time occupied Cape Girardeau. From this place 
it proceeded by steamboat to Cairo, 111. From this place it was sent to Fort Holt, 
Ky. From this point it was ordered to march to several points of which we make 
no mention. On the 6th of November the regiment embarked on board of steam- 
boat and proceeded to a point near Belmont, Mo. We will not give a detailed 
account of the battle of Belmont, in which it took a prominent part. The official 
report of Colonel Lauman shows the heroism displayed by those valiant volun- 
teers in this their first engagement. The number of men comprising the regiment 
was somewhat over four hundred and the loss in killed was 51 ; died of wounds, 
3; missing, 10; prisoners, 39; wounded, 124. The regiment was ordered soon 
after the battle of Belmont to Benton Barracks to recruit and to improve itself in 



206 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

the art of war. The regiment left Benton Barracks on the 13th of January, 1862, 
for the South. Jt was too late to assist in the capture of Fort Henry, where it 
remained until the 12th of February, when it commenced its march on Fort 
Donelson. In the assault on Fort Donelson the Second Iowa covered itself with 
glory, the Seventh Iowa taking only a subordinate part in the assault, acting as a 
reserve force to the Second Iowa. In this engagement the regiment lost two 
killed and thirty-seven wounded. From Fort Donelson the regiment embarked 
on the steamer White Cloud for Pittsburg Landing. At the battle of Shiloh the 
regiment was in command of Lieut. -Col. J. C. Parrott. The regiment took part 
in the siege of Corinth. From Corinth it was ordered to Iuka. The regiment 
took part in almost all the important engagements in Tennessee and Mississippi. 
Was with Sherman in the Atlanta campaign. Was engaged in the battles at 
Rome, Cross Roads, Dallas, New Hope Church, Big Shanty, Kenesaw Mountain, 
Nick-a-Jack Creek, and the battles around Atlanta. From Atlanta the regiment 
marched to Rome, Ga., was with the army of Sherman on its march to the sea, 
and from Savannah north through the Carolinas, thence to Washington. 

Total enrollment 1 ,552 

Killed 98 

Wounded 354 

Died of disease 142 

Died of wounds 38 

Discharged for disease, wounds, etc 328 

Buried in national cemeteries 109 

Captured 79 

Transferred 29 

Field and staff: Jacob G. Lauman, age 43 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, 
Maryland; appointed colonel July 11. 1861 ; wounded in leg November 7, 1861, 
Belmont, Mo.; promoted brigadier general March 21, 1862. Augustus Wentz, 
age 37 ; residence, Davenport ; nativity, Germany ; appointed lieutenant colonel 
August 30, 1861 ; killed in battle November 7, 1861, Belmont, Mo. ; buried Novem- 
ber 13, 1861, Davenport, Iowa (see Company G. First Infantry) ; served in Mexi- 
can war in 1845. Elliott W. Rice, age 25 ; residence, Oskaloosa ; nativity, Pennsyl- 
vania ; appointed major August 30, 1861, from second sergeant of Company C; 
wounded in right thigh November 7, 1861, Belmont, Mo. ; promoted colonel March 
22, 1862; brigadier general June 20, 1864. Daniel F. Bowler, age 25; residence, 
Keokuk; nativity, Rhode Island ; appointed adjutant August 31, 1861, from second 
lieutenant, Company D; wounded November 7, 1861, Belmont, Mo.; resigned 
August 8, 1864. Stiles E. Forsha, age 30; residence, Eddyville ; nativity, Ohio; 
appointed quartermaster August 2, 1861, from first lieutenant of Company I ; pro- 
moted commissary of subsistence of United States Volunteers November 29, 1862 ; 
discharged for promotion November 29, 1862. Amos Witter, age 55 ; residence, 
Mount Vernon : nativity, Ohio; appointed surgeon August 5, 1861 ; taken prisoner 
November 7, 1861, Belmont, Mo.; died March 13, 1862, Mount Vernon, Iowa. 
Calvin B. Lake, age 36; residence, West Union; nativity, New York; appointed 
surgeon March 18, 1862; mustered March 18, 1862; resigned September 12, 1863. 
Asa Morgan, age 35 ; residence, DeWitt : nativity, Ohio ; appointed assistant sur- 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 207 

geon August 5, 1861 ; resigned June 20, 1862. John Ashton, age 32; residence, 
Washington; nativity, New York; appointed assistant surgeon, August 19, 1862; 
mustered September 16, 1862; mustered out July 12, 1865, Louisville, Ky. Joseph 
Everingham, age 31 ; residence, West Point ; nativity, England ; appointed assistant 
surgeon August 20, 1862; mustered September 16, 1862; promoted surgeon Sep- 
tember 13, 1863 ; mustered out July 12, 1865, Louisville, Ky. I. Harvey Clark, age 
3S; residence, Burlington; nativity, New Jersey; appointed chaplain August 5, 
1861 ; resigned September 16, 1862. Isaac P. Teeter, age 34; residence, Oska- 
loosa ; nativity, Virginia ; appointed chaplain August 5, 1863 ; mustered August 21, 
1863 ; resigned January 7, 1864; promoted hospital steward United States Volun- 
teers August 27, 1864. 

COMPANY A 

Privates: Charles T. Wahrer, age 21; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ger- 
many; enlisted February 7, 1865; mustered February 7, 1865; mustered out July 
12, 1865, Louisville, Ky. 

COMPANY D 

Privates: George A. Albright, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; 
enlisted December 26, 1863 ; mustered December 29, 1863 ; transferred from Com- 
pany G, Thirty-ninth Regiment, June 1, 1865; mustered out July 12, 1865, Louis- 
ville, Ky. John Bloom, age 26; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Germany ; enlisted 
January 5, 1864; mustered January 5, 1864; mustered out July 12, 1865, Louis- 
ville, Ky. William Grubb, age 44 ; residence, Des Moines ; nativity, Virginia ; 
enlisted July 12, 1861 ; mustered July 25, 1861 ; discharged for disability August 
26, 1861, Ironton, Mo. Herman Kitner, age 38 ; residence, Danville ; nativity, Ger- 
many; enlisted February 19, 1864; mustered February 19, 1864; mustered out July 
12, 1865, Louisville, Ky. Lewis Long, age 44; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Germany ; enlisted January 2, 1864 ; mustered January 2, 1864 ; mustered out July 
12, 1865, Louisville, Ky. Francis M. Redding (veteran), age 21 ; residence, Des 
Moines County; nativity, Iowa; enlisted July 12, 1861 ; mustered September 25, 
1861 ; hit on hand by piece of shell February 15, 1862, Fort Donelson, Tenn. ; 
wounded slightly in side April 6, 1862, Shiloh, Tenn. ; reenlisted and remustered 
January 5, 1864; promoted third corporal May 16, 1864; second corporal June 1, 
1865 ; mustered out July 12, 1865, Louisville, Ky. Nehemiah M. Redding, age 18 ; 
residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Iowa; enlisted July 12, 1861 ; mustered 
July 25, 1861 ; discharged May 6, 1862, Shiloh, Tenn. (see Company D, Twenty- 
fifth Infantry). Daniel Reem, age 32; residence, Burlington; nativity, Pennsyl- 
vania ; enlisted August 5, 1861 ; mustered August 6, 1861 ; deserted December 10, 
1861, St. Louis, Mo. Marcus L. Welch, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Iowa; enlisted March 24, 1862; mustered March 24, 1862; wounded severely in 
wrist October 4, 1862, Corinth, Miss. ; mustered out March 27, 1865, Goldsboro, 
N. C, expiration of term of service. 

COMPANY E 

Privates: Peter A. Heiney (veteran), age 22; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Germany ; enlisted February 28, 1862 ; mustered February 22, 1862 ; reenlisted and 
remustered February 26, 1864; mustered out July 13, 1865, Louisville, Ky. 



208 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

Alonzo Huffman, age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted July 28, 
1861 ; mustered August 1, 1861 ; discharged for disease of lungs December 16, 

1861, St. Louis, Mo. James H. Rouse, age 24; residence, Kossuth; nativity, 
Indiana ; enlisted July 28, 1861 ; mustered August 1, 1861 ; taken prisoner Novem- 
ber 7, 1861, Belmont, Mo.; died July 28, 1862, Corinth, Miss.; buried in Union 
National Cemetery, Corinth, Miss., section 501, grave 18. 

COMPANY F 

Privates: James Lewellen, age 18; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, 
Iowa ; enlisted February 8, 1865 ; mustered February 8, 1865 ; mustered out July 
12, 1865, Louisville, Ky. Eli Saul, age 35; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ire- 
land; enlisted December 25, 1861 ; mustered December 25, 1861 ; wounded in foot 
February 15, 1862, Fort Donelson, Term.; wounded in right shoulder October 4, 

1862, Corinth, Miss. ; discharged November 27, 1862, Keokuk, Iowa. Harrison 
T. Stevens, age 27; residence, Burlington; nativity, Indiana; enlisted July 11, 
1861 ; mustered July 24, 1861 ; mustered out July 23, 1864, expiration of term 
of service. 

COMPANY G 

Privates: John A. Graham, age 21 ; residence, Burlington; nativity, Missouri; 
enlisted July 18, 1861 ; mustered July 24, 1861 ; hit on right arm by shell February 
15. 1862, Fort Donelson, Tenn. ; wounded severely in groin October 3, 1862, 
Corinth, Miss.; died of wounds October 17, 1862, Corinth, Miss. Thomas Hortz 
or Hartz, age 36; residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted January 5, 
1864; mustered January 5, 1864; died from amputation of right leg December 4, 

1864, Chattanooga, Tenn. ; buried in National Cemetery, Chattanooga, Tenn., 
section G, grave 275. 

company 1 

Privates: William Bartow, age 38; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; 
enlisted July 24, 1861 ; mustered August 21, 1861 ; died of congestive chills Octo- 
ber 21, 1861, Bird's Point, Mo. Emson J. Bodger, age 20; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Ohio; enlisted July 24, 1861 ; mustered August 22, 1861 (see Company 
K). Samuel Cunningham (veteran), age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Ohio; enlisted November 24, 1861 : mustered December 1, 1861 ; reenlisted and 
remustered January 5, 1864; mustered out July 12, 1865, Louisville, Ky. Daniel 
Gordon, age 35 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Illinois ; enlisted August 6, 1861 ; 
mustered August 6, 1861 ; died of chronic diarrhoea October 28, 1861, Mound 
City, 111. John I. Groth, age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; 
enlisted lanuary 9, 1864; mustered February 9, 1864; mustered out July 12, 

1865, Louisville, Ky. William Hindman (veteran), age 35; residence, Burling- 
ton ; nativity, Ireland ; enlisted July 24, 1861 ; mustered August 22, 1861 ; reenlisted 
and remustered January 5, 1864 ; mustered out July 12, 1865, Louisville. Ky. 
Marshall F. Hurd, age 38 ; residence, Burlington : nativity. New York ; enlisted 
July 24, 1861 ; mustered August 22, 1861 ; transferred to Company A August 3, 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 209 

1861 (see Company A). Wilbur F. Kelly, age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Illinois; enlisted July 24, 1861 ; mustered August 22, 1861 ; discharged August 27, 
1861, Ironton, Mo. Hugh Young, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ken- 
tucky; enlisted February 9, 1864; mustered February 9, 1864; wounded August 
10, 1864, Atlanta, Ga. ; no further record. 



NINTH REGIMENT, IOWA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 

Mustered into service of the United States at Dubuque, Iowa, September 24, 

1861, by Capt. E. C. Washington, United States Army; mustered out July 18, 
1865, Louisville, Ky. 

Field and staff: William Vandever, residence, Dubuque ; appointed colonel 
August 30, 1861 ; promoted brigadier general March 16, 1863; resigned March 
16, 1863; brevet major general June 7, 1865. Frank G. Herron, residence, 
Dubuque; appointed lieutenant colonel September 10, 1861 ; wounded March 7, 

1862. Pea Ridge, Ark.; promoted brigadier general July 30, 1862; major general 
November 29, 1863. William H. Coyl, residence. Decorah; appointed major 
August 30, 1861 ; wounded in shoulder severely March 7, 1862, Pea Ridge, Ark. ; 
promoted lieutenant colonel July 1, 1862; brevet lieutenant colonel March 13, 
1865 ; major and judge advocate May 18, 1865. William Scott, age 31 ; residence, 
Independence; nativity, England; appointed adjutant September 2, 1861, from 
second lieutenant of Company C; wounded in leg March 7, 1862, Pea Ridge, 
Ark.; resigned for ill health October 11, 1862 (see Company C). Ferdinand S. 
Winslow, residence, Marion ; appointed quartermaster September 4, 1861 ; pro- 
moted assistant United States quartermaster, with rank as captain, January 30, 
1862. Jerome Bradley, age 28; residence, Dubuque; nativity, Massachusetts; 
appointed quartermaster March 16, 1862, from second lieutenant of battery ; com- 
mission declined March 16, 1862; appears to have been appointed captain A. Q. 
M. volunteers February 19, 1863 (see Official Army Registers, 1861-1867). 
Benjamin McClure, appointed surgeon September 10, 1861 ; promoted assistant 
surgeon of volunteers February 4, 1864; surgeon of volunteers September 30, 
1864. Edward J. McCorrisk, age 28; residence, Des Moines; nativity, Ireland; 
appointed surgeon January 24, 1863 ; mustered January 24, 1863 ; mustered out 
July 18, 1865, Louisville, Ky. Henry W. Hart, age 43; residence, West Union; 
nativity, New York; appointed assistant surgeon September 10, 1861 ; mustered 
October 5, 1861 ; promoted surgeon of Thirty-eighth Infantry September 10, 
1862; resigned to accept promotion October 10, 1862, Helena, Ark. Charles A. 
Read, age 21 ; residence, Epworth ; nativity, Wisconsin; appointed assistant sur- 
geon August 19, 1862; mustered out July 18, 1865, Louisville, Ky. (see First 
Infantry). George W. Carter, age 36; residence, Blue Grass; nativity, England; 
appointed assistant surgeon September 17, 1862; promoted surgeon of Third 
Cavalry May 4, 1863. Lewis H. Cutler, age 41 ; residence, Belmont ; nativity, 
New York; appointed assistant surgeon May 30, 1863 (see Company A, Thirty- 
second Infantry). Amos B. Kendig, residence, Mount Vernon; appointed chap- 
lain September 20, 1861 ; mustered September 25, 1861 ; resigned April 4, 1862. 

Vol. 3—1 4 



210 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

COMPANY B 

Privates: Albert L. Cox, age 18; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, 
Ohio; enlisted March 24, 1864; mustered March 24, 1864; mustered out July 18, 
1865, Louisville, Ky. (see Company I, Twenty-fifth Infantry). 

COMPANY D 

Privates: James A. Oats, age 18; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, 
Indiana; enlisted November 15, 1864; mustered November 18, 1864; transferred 
to Veteran Reserve Corps, Indianapolis, Ind. ; no further record. 

COMPANY E 

Privates: Nicholas Dockendorf, age 2J ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Ger- 
many ; enlisted October 5, 1864; mustered October 5, 1864; mustered out July 
18, 1865, Louisville, Ky. (see Company G, Twenty-fifth Infantry). Durbin 
Grupe, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted December 31, 
1863; mustered December 31, 1863; mustered out July 18, 1865, Louisville, Ky. 
(see Company G, Twenty-fifth Infantry). 

COMPANY F 

Privates: Winfield Cowden, age 18; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, 
Missouri ; enlisted January 25, 1865 ; mustered January 25, 1865 ; mustered out 
July 18, 1865, Louisville, Ky. (see Company G, Twenty-fifth Infantry). George 
W. Huff, age 22 ; residence, Des Moines County ; nativity, Indiana ; enlisted Jan- 
uary 16, 1865; mustered January 25, 1865; mustered out July 18, 1865, Louis- 
ville, Ky. (see Company G, Twenty-fifth Infantry). 

COMPANY G 

Privates: Henry L. Dodge, age 25 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Ten- 
nessee; enlisted October 6, 1864; mustered October 6, 1864; mustered out July 
31, 1865, Louisville, Ky. (see Company G, Twenty-fifth Infantry). 

COMPANY H 

Privates: Philemon Parr, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; 
enlisted January 30, 1865; mustered January 30, 1865; mustered out July 18, 
1865, Louisville, Ky. (see Company G, Twenty-fifth Infantry). James Stinson, 
age 25 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Ireland ; enlisted January 20, 1865 ; mus- 
tered January 20, 1865; mustered out July 18, 1865, Louisville, Ky. (see Com- 
pany G, Twenty-fifth Infantry). 

COMPANY I 

Privates: Frederick Levy, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, New 
York; enlisted January 27, 1865; mustered January 27, 1865; mustered out July 
18, 1865, Louisville, Ky. (see Company G, Twenty-fifth Infantry). 






HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 211 

COMPANY K 

Privates: Peter Berg, age 23; residence, Burlington; nativity, Norway; 
enlisted November 16, 1861 ; mustered November 16, 1861 ; no record after Feb- 
ruary 13, 1865. Christopher Carnahan, age 22; residence, Des Moines County; 
nativity, Iowa; enlisted February 1, 1865; mustered February 1, 1865; mustered 
out July 18, 1865, Louisville, Ky. (see Company G, Twenty-fifth Infantry). 
Daniel Channel, age 18; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Virginia; en- 
listed January 23, 1865; mustered January 23, 1865 ; mustered out July 18, 1865, 
Louisville, Ky. (see Company G, Twenty-fifth Infantry). 

TENTH REGIMENT, IOWA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 

Mustered into service of the United States at Iowa City, August 21, 1861, 
by Capt. Alexander Chambers, United States Army ; mustered out at Little Rock, 
Ark., August 15, 1865. 

Field and staff: Nicholas Perczel, age 48 ; residence, Davenport ; nativity, 
Hungary; appointed colonel September 1, 1861 ; resigned November 1, 1862. 
William E. Small, age 40 ; residence, Iowa City ; nativity, Maine ; appointed 
lieutenant colonel September 10, 1861 ; promoted colonel November 2, 1862; dis- 
charged August 19, 1863, for disability. John C. Bennett, appointed major Sep- 
tember 1, 1861 ; mustered September 29, 1861 ; resigned January 24, 1862. 
Thomas W. Jackson, age 26; residence, Toledo; nativity, New York; enlisted 
adjutant September 24, 1861, from second lieutenant, Company C; mustered 
September 29, 1861 ; resigned April 26, 1862 (see Company C). James Trusdell, 
residence, Iowa City; appointed quartermaster October 21, 1861, from second 
lieutenant, Company G; mustered September 28, 1861 ; resigned January 28, 
1863, Memphis, Tenn. (see Company D). William P. Davis, appointed surgeon 
August 30, 1861 ; mustered September 29, 1861 ; resigned April 14, 1862. Richard 
J. Mohr, age 23 ; residence, Fairfield ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; mustered September 
6, 1861 ; appointed assistant surgeon February 21, 1862, from first lieutenant of 
Company E; mustered out August 15, 1865, Little Rock, Ark. (see Company E). 
Andrew J. Willey, residence, Ashland ; appointed assistant surgeon September 2, 
1861 ; mustered September 29, 1861 ; resigned February 20, 1862. William C. 
Cummings, residence, Oskaloosa ; appointed assistant surgeon April 16, 1862; 
mustered June 12, 1862; resigned October 17, 1862. William Everett, age 49; 
residence, Pacific City ; nativity, Vermont ; appointed assistant surgeon November 
14, 1862; mustered November 29, 1862; resigned September 15, 1864. Tohn O. 
Skinner, age 38; residence, Des Moines; nativity, Ohio; appointed assistant sur- 
geon August 19, 1862; mustered September 6, 1862; mustered out June 24, 1865, 
Louisville, Ky. David W. Tolford, age 38 ; nativity, Iowa ; appointed chaplain 
September 5, 1861 ; mustered September 29, 1861 ; resigned September 3, 1862. 
William G. Kephart, age 45 ; residence, Kossuth ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; ap- 
pointed chaplain February 1, 1863; mustered February 22, 1863; mustered out 
August 15, 1865, Little Rock, Ark. 



212 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

COMPANY E 

Privates: William Bailey, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; 
enlisted February 9, 1865; mustered February 9, 1865; mustered out August 15, 
1865, Little Rock, Ark. 

ELEVENTH REGIMENT, IOWA INFANTRY VOLUNTEERS 

Mustered into the service of the United States at Davenport, Iowa, October 
19, 1861, by Capt. Alexander Chambers, United States Army. Mustered out 
July 15, 1865, Louisville, Ky. 

The Eleventh Regiment, Iowa Infantry Volunteers, was composed of ten com- 
panies. The regiment was one among others to complete the quota of Iowa under 
the call of the President dated July 23, 1861. The rendezvous of the regiment 
was Camp McClelland, Davenport. From this place it embarked on the steamer 
Jennie Whipple, November 16, 1861, and arrived at Benton Barracks, St. Louis, 
Mo., on the 19th of the same month. The regiment remained at this place for 
the purpose of drilling and preparing itself for active duty in the field, until the 
9th of December, when it took the field for active service. From St. Louis it 
went to Jefferson City, Mo., and from there to Boonville, where for a time it was 
engaged in scout duty. From thence the regiment returned to St. Louis, when 
on the 10th of March, 1862. it was transported by steamboat to Cairo. From 
this place it was transported by boat up the Ohio and Tennessee rivers to Savan- 
nah, where it remained until the 23d of March, when it was moved to Pittsburg 
Landing. Here it had its first experience in real warfare. It was assigned to the 
First Brigade of the First Division of the Army of the Tennessee, Maj.-Gen. 
John A. McClernand, commander. Col. A. M. Hare of the Eleventh Iowa com- 
manding the First Brigade. The first indication of the approach of the enemy 
had by the regiment was early in the morning of the 6th of April, 1862, when 
firing was heard on the picket line in front of the regiment. The loss of the regi- 
ment in this battle was thirty-three killed, 160 wounded and one missing. 

After the battle of Shiloh, the regiment was assigned to a brigade composed 
of the Eleventh, Thirteenth, Fifteenth and Sixteenth Iowa Infantry and became 
known as the "Iron Brigade." The regiment was ordered to Corinth, and from 
there to luka ; was with Grant on his expedition through Mississippi, then 
returned to Memphis, where, on January 21, 18C3, it embarked on transports and 
was taken to Young's Point. Was at Yicksburg during its siege. The time of 
enlistment of the men composing the regiment having expired, most of them 
reenlisted. From Yicksburg they came home on thirty days' furlough to Daven- 
port, from which place they went to their homes and returned to Davenport, 
when on the 22d of April, with many recruits, they started south and landed 
at Clifton. Tenn., from which place the regiment started on a long march across 
Tennessee and Alabama and joined General Sherman's army at Ackworth, Ga., 
June 8, 1864. Was with Sherman from that time until the close of the war. 

Field and Staff: Abraham M. Hare, age 49; residence, Muscatine; nativity, 
Ohio; appointed colonel October 1, 1861 ; mustered November 1, 1861 ; resigned 
August 31, 1862. • William Hall, age 29; residence, Davenport; nativity, Canada; 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 213 

appointed lieutenant colonel October 10, 1861, from major; mustered October 
11, 1861 ; promoted colonel September 1, 1862; resigned August 1, 1864. John 
C. Abercrombie, age 36 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; appointed 
major October 19, 1861 ; mustered October 19, 1861 ; promoted lieutenant colonel 
September 1, 1862; colonel August 7, 1864; mustered out November 5, 1864, 
Davenport, Iowa (see First Infantry). Cornelius Cadle, Jr., age 25; residence, 
Muscatine; appointed adjutant October 18, 1861 ; mustered October 18, 1861 ; 
promoted captain and assistant adjutant general May 1, 1863; mustered out July 
1, 1863, to accept appointment as captain and assistant adjutant general on Gen- 
eral Crocker's staff; promoted brevet colonel March 13, 1865; brevet lieutenant 
colonel and assistant adjutant general; major and assistant adjutant general April 
3, 1865. Richard Cadle, age 42; residence, Muscatine; nativity, New York; ap- 
pointed quartermaster October 30, 1861 ; mustered November 2, 1861 ; mustered 
out November 1, 1864, Chattanooga, Term., expiration of term of service. Wil- 
liam Watson, age 35 ; residence, Dubuque ; nativity, England ; appointed surgeon' 
October 21, 1861 ; mustered October 22, 1861 ; promoted sergeant United States 
Volunteers September 2, 1863 ; resigned March 4, 1863. Frederick Lloyd, age 35 ; 
residence, Iowa City; appointed assistant surgeon October 21, 1861 ; mustered 
October 22, 1861 ; promoted surgeon of Sixteenth Infantry June 4, 1862. John 
G. Miller, age 42 ; residence, Knoxville ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; appointed assist- 
ant surgeon June 4, 1862; mustered July 5, 1862; promoted surgeon March 5, 
1863; mustered out July 10, 1865, Louisville, Ky. Frederick Meyer, age 46; 
residence, Dubuque; nativity, Switzerland; appointed assistant surgeon April 14, 
1863; mustered May 13, 1863; resigned June 5, 1863. D. P. Johnson; residence, 
Muscatine; appointed assistant surgeon August 12, 1862; resigned Sept. 24, 1862. 
J. C. Batdorf ; residence, Walnut; appointed assistant surgeon October 25, 1862; 
resigned June 5, 1863. J. R. Duncan; residence, Knoxville; appointed assistant 
surgeon July 1, 1863. John S. Whittlesey, age 49 ; appointed chaplain October 10, 
1861 ; mustered November 1, 1861 ; died of diphtheria May 11, 1862, Durant, 
Iowa. Chauncey H. Remington ; residence, Muscatine ; nativity, Ohio ; appointed 
chaplain June 25, 1862; mustered July 2, 1862; resigned August 7, 1863. 

COMPANY C 

Privates: John C. Glasgow, age 24 ; residence, Linton ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; 
enlisted September 23, 1861 ; mustered October 3, 1861 ; discharged for disabil- 
ity January 30, 1863, St. Louis, Mo. 

COMPANY F 

Privates: Jonathan H. Eldridge, age 19; residence. Burlington; nativity, 
Indiana; enlisted February 9, 1863; mustered February 9, 1863; mustered out 
July 19, 1865, Louisville, Ky. Samuel K. Fullerton, age 29; residence, Burling- 
ton; nativity, Ohio; enlisted February 9, 1865; mustered February 9, 1865; mus- 
tered out July 19, 1865, Louisville, Ky. Doran, Edward, age 18; residence Dodge- 
ville ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; enlisted September 23, 1861 ; mustered October 8, 
1861 ; died February 21, 1862, Fulton, Mo. ; buried in National Cemetery, Jeffer- 
son Barracks, St. Louis, Mo.; section 37^, grave 44. 



214 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

COMPANY G 

Privates: Abraham Springer (veteran), age 20; residence, Burlington; nativ- 
ity, Russia; mustered October 15, 1861 ; reenlisted and remustered January 1, 
1864; mustered out July 15, 1865, Louisville, Ky. 

COMPANY H 

Privates: Charles I. Fitchner, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ken- 
tucky; enlisted October 12, 1861 ; mustered October 18, 1861 ; died of pneumonia 
February 1, 1862, California, Mo. 

company 1 

Privates: John E. Crowder, age 23; residence, Hawkeye ; nativity, Indiana; 
enlisted November 2, 1861 ; mustered November 2, 1861 ; promoted third sergeant 
December 10, 1861 ; second sergeant; transferred to Invalid Corps May 1, 1864; 
no further record (see Company E, First Infantry). Thomas N. Crowder, age 
25; residence, Hawkeye; nativity, Indiana; enlisted November 2, 1861 ; mustered 
November 2, 1861 ; discharged September 18, 1863, Keokuk, Iowa. Cornelius 
E. Stevens, age 26; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted October 19, 
1861 ; mustered October 19, 1861 ; deserted February 17, 1862, Fulton, Mo. 

COMPANY K 

Privates: George Galliher, age 21; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, 
Iowa; enlisted September 27, 1861 ; mustered October 18, 1861 ; mustered out 
July 15, 1865, Louisville, Ky. Stephen Gearhart, age 24; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Iowa ; enlisted September 22, 1861 ; mustered October 18, 1861 ; wounded 
April 6, 1862, Shiloh, Term. ; discharged for disability October 31, 1862, Keokuk, 
Iowa. William Shomate (veteran), age 22; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; 
enlisted October 6, 1861 ; mustered October 18, 1861 ; reenlisted and remustered 
January 1, 1864; mustered out July 15, 1865, Louisville, Ky. George W. Stucker 
(veteran), age 21; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Indiana; enlisted 
October 4, 1861 ; mustered October 18, 1861 ; promoted sixth corporal November 
13, 1862; fifth corporal; fourth corporal January 1, 1864; first lieutenant October 
27, 1864; discharged June 3, 1865. 

FOURTEENTH REGIMENT, IOWA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 

Mustered into service of the United States by Capt. Alexander Chambers, 
United States Army, as follows : Companies A, B and C, at Iowa City, Iowa, 
October 23-25, 1861 ; Companies D to K inclusive, at Davenport, Iowa, November 
2-6, 1861. Mustered out of service at Davenport, Iowa, November 6, 1864. 

This regiment had in the beginning bad luck, so to speak. It was mustered 
into the service under the call of the President, dated October 3, 1861. Seven 
of the companies were ordered into quarters at Davenport. By order of the War 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 215 

Department, Companies A, B and C were transferred to the Forty-first Iowa 
Infantry and sent to Fort Randall, Dakota Territory. The men who enlisted in 
these companies expected to see service in the South, and if they did not it was not 
their fault. To take the place of these three companies three other companies 
were subsequently organized, but did not join the regiment, two of them, until 
late in the fall, and one company not until the next spring. When the regiment 
left the state it had but seven companies, which left Davenport on the 28th and 
29th of November, 1861, under the command of Col. William T. Shaw, who had 
seen service in the Mexican war. Having arrived at Benton Barracks, the regi- 
ment was kept there for a time, preparing itself for actual service. The regiment 
left Benton Barracks on the 5th of February, 1862, and proceeded by boat to 
Cairo, and from that place by boat to Fort Henry. On the 12th it started on the 
march to Fort Donelson, where it became a part of the Fourth Brigade, com- 
manded by Col. Jacob Gartner Lauman of the Second Iowa Infantry. Was at 
the taking of Fort Donelson on the 13th and 14th of February, 1862. The regi- 
ment was stationed at Fort Donelson until some time in March, when it proceeded 
to Pittsburg Landing, and went into camp at this place on the 18th of March. 
When at Pittsburg Landing it became a part of the First Brigade of the Second 
Division, commanded by Gen. Lew Wallace, and the brigade by Col. James M. 
Tuttle of the Second Iowa Infantry. I do not care to go into a description of the 
part which this regiment took in the battle of Shiloh. The seven companies did 
their part heroically. Enough has been written about whose fault it was that 
Prentiss was beaten and the Fourteenth Iowa with other regiments were taken 
prisoners of war. The loss of the Fourteenth was 267 killed, wounded and cap- 
tured. They were held as prisoners until the autumn of 1862, when they were 
released and paroled, and exchanged on November 19, 1862. Then two companies 
joined the regiment, making nine companies. The nine companies embarked on 
a steamer and went to Cairo, where the third, Company C, joined it. From Cairo 
the regiment went to Columbus, Ky., and performed garrison duty for seven 
months. While at Columbus, Colonel Shaw was directed on the 24th of January, 
1864, to take his regiment to Yicksburg. When at Vicksburg, it was assigned to 
the Second Brigade of the Third Division of the Sixteenth Army Corps. On 
February 4, 1864, the Sixteenth Army Corps started on that memorable expe- 
dition through Mississippi, destroying railroads, capturing stock, literally sweep- 
ing the country clean of everything to eat, living themselves off the country 
through which they passed. March 4th it returned to Vicksburg after having 
marched over three hundred miles. On the 13th of March the regiment started 
on its march to Fort de Ressey, and from there to engage in that disastrous Red 
River Expedition. By its valor it covered the retreat of General Banks. This 
regiment seems to have tramped over more ground in the West than any other 
regiment. Its history is a long and entertaining one ; but our space is so limited 
we cannot say more than has been done. 

Field and Staff: William T. Shaw, age 40; residence, Anamosa ; nativity, 
Maine; appointed colonel October 24, 1861 ; mustered November 16, 1861 ; taken 
prisoner April 6, 1862, Shiloh, Tenn. ; returned November 16, 1862; mustered 
out November 16, 1864, Washington, D. C. Edward W. Lucas; residence, Iowa 
City; appointed lieutenant colonel October 30, 1861 ; mustered November 16, 



216 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

.1861; missing April 6, 1862, Shiloh, Term. ; resigned March 12, 1S63. Hiram 
Leonard; residence, Kossuth County; appointed major November 6, 1861 ; 
mustered November 16, 1861 ; resigned February 26, 1862. Leander C. Noble; 
residence. West Union; appointed major February 27, 1862; commission de- 
clined. Clinton C. Buell, age 35 ; residence, Anamosa ; nativity, New York. Ap- 
pointed quartermaster November 6, 1861 ; mustered November 16, 1861. Dis- 
charged November 25, 1864, expiration of term of service. Noah N. Tyner, age 
23 ; residence, Davenport ; nativity, Indiana ; appointed adjutant November 6, 
1861 ; mustered November 16, 1861 ; wounded and missing April 6, 1862, Shiloh, 
Tenn. ; discharged November 6, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, expiration of term of 
service; commissioned brevet captain volunteers March 13, 1865. George M. 
Staples, age 34 ; residence, Dubuque ; nativity, Maine ; appointed surgeon 
November 2, 1861 ; mustered November 16, 1861; no further record. Samuel 
N. Pierce; appointed assistant surgeon October 1, 1861 ; resigned April 8, 1863, 
St. Louis, Mo. John H. Stevens, age 26; residence, Butlerville ; nativity, New 
York; appointed assistant surgeon August 19, 1862; mustered September 16, 
1862; mustered out November 16, 1864, Davenport, Iowa. Samuel E. Benton; 
residence, Anamosa; appointed chaplain November 22, 1861 ; mustered Novem- 
ber 22, 1861 ; resigned November 30, 1862. 

COMPANY A 

Privates: Samuel W. Davis, age 22; residence, Pleasant Grove; nativity, 
Illinois; enlisted October 9, 1861, as fifth corporal (see Forty-first Infantry.) 
John H. Dodds, age 22 ; residence, South Flint ; nativity, Iowa ; enlisted August 
27, 1861 (see Forty-first Infantry). Joseph R. Dodds, age 21; residence, Dan- 
ville; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 29, 1861 ; mustered August 29, 1861 (see 
Forty-first Infantry). Isaac Zion, age 24; residence, Pleasant Grove; nativity, 
Illinois; enlisted September 27, 1861 (see Forty-first Infantry). 

company c 

Privates: Frank Barlow, age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, Kentucky; 
enlisted September 25, 1861 (see Forty-first Infantry). William Beatty, age 19; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted October 9, 1861 (see Forty-first 
Infantry). William H. Hendee, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Connec- 
ticut; enlisted September 25. 1861 (see Forty-first Infantry). George Jenkins, 
age 23; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Kentucky; enlisted October 2, 1861, as 
second corporal; promoted first corporal April 1, 1862. Augustus Killough, age 
21 ; residence, Burlington; nativity, Indiana; enlisted September 17, 1861, as third 
sergeant (see Forty-first Infantry). Theodore Kline, age 18; residence, Bur- 
lington; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted October 2, 1861 (see Forty-first In- 
fantry). William E. Meason, age 26; residence, Burlington; nativity, Pennsyl- 
vania; enlisted September 25, 1861, as first sergeant (see Forty-first Infantry). 
Jesse: A. Sisk, age 20; residence, Burlington; nativity, Indiana; enlisted October 
7, 1861 (see Forty-first Infantry). Henry Wanzer (veteran), age 20; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted September 23, 1861 ; promoted eighth cor- 
poral April 1, 1862; seventh corporal May 24, 1862 (see Forty-first Infantry). 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 217 

William Williams, age 23 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Iowa ; enlisted Septem- 
ber 16, 1861 ; promoted seventh corporal; sixth corporal January 8, 1862; fifth 
corporal April 1, 1862 (see Forty-first Infantry). 

COMPANY E 

Privates: Alfred Fleming; residence, Burlington; nativity, Indiana; enlisted 
September 23, 1861 ; wounded in back ; died of wounds February 10, 1862, St. 
Louis, Mo. ; buried in National Cemetery, Jefferson Barracks, St. Louis, Mo. ; 
section 51, grave 69. Joseph Paxton, age 22; residence, Burlington; enlisted 
September 27, 1861, as first sergeant; discharged for disability January 8, 1862. 
Joseph O. Shannon, age 32 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Kentucky ; appointed 
captain November 4, 1861 ; missing in action April 6, 1862, Shiloh, Tennessee; 
discharged November 24, 1862 (see Company E, First Infantry). 

COMPANY G 

Privates: Jeremiah Lawrence, age 28; residence, Burlington; nativity, In- 
diana; enlisted October 12, 1861 ; missing in action April 6, 1862, Shiloh, Ten- 
nessee; mustered out November 8, 1864, Davenport, Iowa. 

COMPANY H 

Privates: James Barron, age 29; residence, Burlington; nativity, Pennsyl- 
vania; enlisted January 4, 1864; mustered January 4, 1864 (see Company B, 
Residuary Battalion Fourteenth Infantry). Jonathan B. Jennings, age 23; resi- 
dence, Burlington; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted January 4, 1864; mustered 
January 4, 1864 (see Company B, Residuary Battalion Fourteenth Infantry). 

COMPANY K 

Privates: William H. Agler, age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, Penn- 
sylvania; enlisted October 15, 1861 ; killed in action May 18, 1864, Old Oaks, La. 
James R. Ariel, age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted October 
10, 1861 ; missing in action April 6, 1862, Shiloh, Tenn. ; wounded in arm slightly 
April 9, 1864, Pleasant Hill, La. ; mustered out November 16, 1864, Davenport, 
Iowa. Charles C. Ashlock, age 22; residence, Middletown ; nativity, Iowa; en- 
listed November 16, 1861 ; mustered November 16, 1861 ; discharged for disability 
December 19, 1863, Columbus, Ky. James C. Babeson, age 27; residence, Des 
Moines County; nativity, Ohio; enlisted November 16, 1861 ; mustered Novem- 
ber 16, 1861 ; mustered out November 16, 1864, Davenport, Iowa. Benjamin 
Baker, age 27; residence, Kossuth; nativity, Maryland; enlisted October 26, 1861 ; 
died in hospital April 20, 1862, St. Louis, Mo.; buried in National Cemetery, 
Jefferson Barracks, St. Louis, Mo., section 50, grave 139. John C. Banta, age 
34; residence, Burlington; nativity, Indiana; enlisted January 5, 1864; mustered 
January 5, 1864 (see Company A, Residuary Battalion Fourteenth Infantry). 
Martin V. Barton, age 19; residence Des Moines County; nativity, Ohio; enlisted 
October 15, 1861 ; mustered out November 16, 1864, Davenport, Iowa. Alex- 



218 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

ander Bell, age 18; residence, Kossuth; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted October 
14, 1 86 1 ; missing and taken prisoner March 22, 1864, Alexander, La.; mustered 
out November 16, 1864, Davenport, Iowa. William R. Bell, age 18; residence, 
Kossuth; nativity, New York; enlisted March 13, 1863; mustered March 13, 
1863; wounded in right thigh July 15, 1864, Tupelo, Miss, (see Company A, 
Residuary Battalion Fourteenth Infantry). Jonathan Bishop, age 21; residence, 
Des Moines County; nativity, Ohio; enlisted October 10, 1861 ; mustered out 
November 16, 1864, Davenport, Iowa. James A. Bowen, age 19; residence, Des 
Moines County; nativity, ocean; enlisted October 10, 1861 ; missing in action 
April 6, 1862, Shiloh, Tenn. ; mustered out November 16, 1864, Davenport, Iowa. 
John R. Braden, age 27 ; residence, Kossuth ; nativity, Ohio ; enlisted October 10, 
1861 ; promoted fifth sergeant March 1, 1862; fourth sergeant April 1, 1863; 
discharged December 4, 1863, Columbus, Ky. Arthur Bridges, age 21 ; residence, 
Kossuth ; nativity, Ohio ; enlisted October 10, 1861 ; discharged for disability Jan- 
uary 21, 1862, Benton Barracks, St. Louis, Mo. James A. Bridges, age 18; 
residence, Kossuth; nativity, Ohio; enlisted October 10, 1861 ; discharged for 
disability February 6, 1863, St. Louis, Mo. Lawrence H. C. Bruce, age 18; 
residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Ohio; enlisted October 10, 1861 ; pro- 
moted eighth corporal; fifth corporal April 1, 1863; fourth corporal June 30, 
1863; right foot cut off and thigh fractured May 18, 1864, Yellow Bayou, La.; 
promoted third corporal June 1, 1864; died of wounds September 14, 1864, 
Jefferson Barracks, St. Louis, Mo. Millard B. Calkins, age 22 ; residence, Bur- 
lington; nativity, New York; enlisted October 18, 1861 ; missing in action April 
6, 1862, Shiloh, Tenn.; discharged for disability February 6, 1863, St. Louis, Mo. 
William J. Campbell, age 22; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Illinois; 
appointed captain September 16, 1861 ; missing in action April 6, 1862, Shiloh, 
Tenn.; mustered out November 16, 1864, Davenport, Iowa (see Company E, 
Fifth Infantry). Joshua Carmean, age 25; residence, Kossuth; nativity, Ohio,' 
enlisted October 28, 1861 ; discharged for disability April 1, 1863, Camp Herron, 
Davenport, Iowa. Pierson Carmean, age 28 ; residence, Kossuth ; nativity, Ohio ; 
enlisted October 28, 1861, as second corporal; mustered out November 16, 1864, 
Davenport, Iowa. James R. Cartright, age 35 ; residence, Kossuth ; nativity, New 
York; enlisted February 28, 1863; mustered February 28, 1863 (see Company A, 
Residuary Battalion, Fourteenth Infantry). Andrew J. Chambers, age 19; resi- 
dence, Middletown ; nativity, Ireland; enlisted December 7, 1863; mustered 
December 7, 1863 ( see Company A, Residuary Battalion. Fourteenth Infantry) 
Samuel M. Chapman, age 22 ; residence, Kossuth ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; enlisted 
October 18, 1861, as fifth sergeant; promoted fourth sergeant March 1, 1862; 
second sergeant April 1, 1863; mustered out November 16, 1S64, Davenport. 
Iowa (see Company E, First Infantry). George Daum, age 21; residence, 
Middletown; nativity, Ohio; enlisted October 22, 1861 ; discharged for disability 
April 19, 1862, Pittsburg Landing, Tenn. Dolbee, Peter A., age 18; residence, 
Kossuth; nativity, Iowa; enlisted October 10. 1861 ; wounded in right thigh April 
6, 1862, Shiloh, Tenn.; discharged for disability October 15, 1862, Keokuk, Iowa 
(see Company G, Forty-fifth Infantry). Erasmus Downer, age 18; residence, 
Kossuth; nativity, Iowa; enlisted March 26, 1863; mustered March 26, 1863 
(see Company A, Residuary Battalion, Fourteenth Infantry). Elkin Driskill, 
age 23; residence. Des Moines County; nativity, Iowa; enlisted October 26, 1861 ; 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 219 

wounded October 4, 1862, Corinth, Miss.; mustered out November 16, 1864, 
Davenport, Iowa. Oliver P. Eades, age 21; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Iowa; enlisted November 7, 1861 ; promoted seventh corporal; sixth corporal 
June 30, 1863; fifth corporal December 4, 1863; fourth corporal June 1, 1864; 
mustered out November 16, 1864, Davenport, Iowa (see Company E, First 
Infantry). Milton J. Frame, age 34; residence, Kossuth; nativity, Indiana; 
enlisted December 25, 1863 ; mustered December 25, 1863 (see Company A, Resid- 
uary Battalion, Fourteenth Infantry). Jacob Fritz, age 27 ; residence, Des Moines 
County; nativity, England; enlisted October 28, 1861 ; missing in action April 6, 
1862, Shiloh, Tenn. ; mustered out November 15, 1864, Davenport, Iowa. John 
H. Fullenwider, age 33 ; residence, Kjossuth ; nativity, Indiana ; enlisted December 
25, 1863; mustered December 25, 1863 (see Company A. Residuary Battalion, 
Fourteenth Infantry). Samuel Fullenwider, age 18; residence, Des Moines 
County; nativity, Iowa; enlisted October 10, 1861 ; mustered out November 16, 
1864, Davenport, Iowa. Chauncy F. Gillett, age 19; residence, Hawkeye; nativity, 
Ohio; enlisted November 16, 1861 ; mustered November 16, 1861 ; died of chronic 
diarrhoea May 7, 1862, Pittsburg Landing, Tenn.; buried in Shiloh National 
Cemetery, Pittsburg Landing, Tenn., section C, grave 8. William D. Goben, 
age 18; residence, Kossuth; nativity, Iowa; enlisted October 10, 1861 ; missing in 
action April 6, 1862, Shiloh, Tenn. ; taken prisoner April 9, 1864, Pleasant Hill, 
La. ; mustered out June 20, 1865, Davenport, Iowa. William D. Gray, age 25 ; 
residence, Kossuth; nativity, Illinois; enlisted October 18, 1861, as first corporal; 
promoted third sergeant June 30, 1863; missing in action April 9, 1864, Pleasant 
Hill, La.; returned; mustered out June 20, 1865, Davenport, Iowa. John W. 
Gregory, age 18; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Iowa; enlisted October 
10, 1861 ; mustered out November 16, 1864, Davenport, Iowa. James S. Grier, 
age 18; residence, Kossuth; nativity, Iowa; enlisted October 10, 1861 ; missing in 
action April 6, 1862, Shiloh, Tenn.; promoted by special order additional aide de 
camp, rank captain, United States Army, January 8, 1862. James H. Guthrie, 
age 24; residence, Kossuth; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted October 18, 1861, 
as fourth sergeant; promoted third sergeant March 1, 1862; missing in action 
April 6, 1862, Shiloh, Tenn.; discharged June 25, 1863, Keokuk, Iowa (see Com- 
pany E, First Infantry, and Field and Staff, Eighth Cavalry). Henry Haight 
(veteran), age 19; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Iowa; enlisted Octo- 
ber 10, 1861 ; missing in action April 6, 1862, Shiloh, Tenn.; reenlisted and re- 
mustered December 1, 1863 (see Company A, Residuary Battalion, Fourteenth 
Infantry). Joseph Hannam, age 19; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, 
Ohio; enlisted October 10, 1861 ; mustered out November 16, 1864, Davenport, 
Iowa. David B. Heizer, age 18; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Iowa; 
enlisted October 10, 1861 ; missing in action April 6, 1862, Shiloh, Tenn.; mus- 
tered out November 16, 1864, Davenport, Iowa. David E. Hemphill, age 21 ; 
residence, Kossuth; nativity, Ohio; enlisted November 4, 1861 ; mustered out 
November 16, 1864, Davenport, Iowa. John W. Hemphill, age 19; residence, 
Kossuth; nativity, Ohio; enlisted October 10, 1861, as third corporal; discharged 
for disability January 22, 1863, St. Louis, Mo. John H. Holcraft, age 18; resi- 
dence, Des Moines County; nativity, Iowa; enlisted October 10, 1861 ; missing 
in action April 6, 1862, Shiloh, Tenn. ; mustered out November 16, 1864, Daven- 
port, Iowa. Daniel T. Hopkins, age 28 ; residence, Des Moines County ; nativity, 



220 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

Indiana ; enlisted October 10. 18G1 ; missing in action April 6, 1862, Shiloh, 
Term.; mustered out November 16, 18(14, Davenport, Iowa. Edward Hukill, 
age 33; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Indiana; enlisted October 28, 
1861 ; wounded in hand April (>, 18(12. Shiloh, Tenn. ; mustered out November 16, 
1864, Davenport, Iowa. Jason A. Hurd. age 18; residence, Middletown; nativ- 
ity, Iowa; enlisted October 15, 1861 ; died of typhoid fever May 29, 1861, Pitts- 
burg Landing, Tenn. Samuel G. Irwin, age 20; residence, Des Moines County; 
nativity, Ohio; enlisted January 17, 18(14; mustered January 19, 1864; died of 
disease April 3. 1864; buried in National Cemetery. Memphis, Tenn., section 1, 
grave 139. Francis Johnson, age 18; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, 
Iowa; enlisted January 18, 1864; mustered February 1, 1864 (see Company A, 
Residuary Battalion, Fourteenth Infantry ). Joseph M. Johnson, age 29; residence, 
Kossuth; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted October 28, 1861 ; missing in action 
April 6, 1862, Shiloh, Tenn.; discharged for disability February 28, 1863, St. 
Louis, Mo. William S. Kimerer, age 19; residence Des Moines County; nativity, 
Ohio; enlisted October 10, 1861 ; mustered out November 16, 1864, Davenport, 
Iowa. Charles P. King, age 24; residence, Huron; nativity, Indiana; appointed 
second lieutenant November 6, 1861 ; missing in action April 6, 1862, Shiloh, 
Tenn.; promoted first lieutenant February 16, 1863; wounded in right shoulder 
severely May 18, 1864, Yellow Bayou, La.; mustered out November 16, 1864, 
Davenport, Iowa (see Company E, First Infantry). Benjamin F. Larue, age 22; 
residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Virginia; enlisted October 10, 1861 ; 
mustered out November 16, 1864, Davenport, Iowa. William Lentz, age 22; 
residence, Augusta; nativity, England; enlisted October 26, 1861 ; wounded Feb- 
ruary 15, 1862, Fort Donelson, Tenn.'; died of wounds March 6, 1862, Mound 
City, 111. Floward D. Leonard, age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; 
enlisted October 26, i8i>i ; died March i<), 1802, Mound City, 111. Oscar Lewis, 
age 21; residence, Middletown; nativity, New York; eidisted October 10. 1861 ; 
missing in action April 6, 1862, Shiloh, Tenn. ; promoted eighth corporal April 
1, 1863; seventh corporal January 30, 1863; sixth corporal December 4, 1863; 
fifth corporal June 1, 1864; mustered out November 16, 1864, Davenport, Iowa. 
Henry S. Littler, age 18: residence. Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted January 
20, 1864; mustered January 20, 1864; died of typhoid fever May 22, 1864, mouth 
of Red River. Harrison Long, age 22 ; residence, Augusta ; nativity, Pennsyl- 
vania ; enlisted November 4, 1861 ; discharged for disability December 15, 1862. 
Tohn McChesney, age 25; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Ohio; enlisted 
October 18, 1861 ; mustered out November 16, 1864, Davenport, Iowa. Edward 
P. McClure, age 19 ; residence, Kossuth ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; enlisted October 
10, 1861 ; missing in action April 6, 18(12. Shiloh. Tenn.; promoted sixth corporal 
April 1, 1863; fifth corporal June 30, 1863; fifth sergeant December 4, 1863; 
mustered out November 16, 1864, Davenport, Iowa. James McClure, age 39; 
residence, Kossuth ; nativity, Ohio ; enlisted December 25, 1863 ; mustered Decem- 
ber 25, 1863; wounded in neck slightly April 9, 1864, Pleasant Hill, La.; died 
of typhoid fever May 11, 1864, Alexandria, La. John A. McClure, age 24; 
residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Illinois; enlisted October 26, 1861 ; miss- 
ing in action April 6, 1862, Shiloh, Tenn.; mustered out November 16, 1864, 
Davenport, Iowa. Joseph D. McClure, age 24 ; residence, Kossuth ; nativity, 
Pennsylvania; enlisted October 10, 1861, as first sergeant; promoted second lieu- 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 221 

tenant February 16, 1863; mustered out November 16, 1864, Davenport, Iowa 
(see Company E, First Infantry). John McCullough, age 22; residence, Des 
Moines County; nativity, Ohio; enlisted October 10, 1861 ; mustered out Novem- 
ber 16, 1864, Davenport, Iowa. William T. McMaken, age 30; residence. Middle- 
town; nativity, Ohio; enlisted October 15, 1861, as third sergeant; promoted 
second lieutenant March 1, 1862; missing in action April 6, 1862, Shiloh, Tenn.; 
promoted first sergeant April 1, 1863; mustered out November 16, 1864, Daven- 
port, Iowa. William A. Mathews, age 22 ; residence, Kossuth ; nativity, Indiana ; 
enlisted October 10, 18G1 ; promoted drummer October 20, 1861 ; discharged for 
disability November 20, 1862. Daniel Matson, age 19; residence, Kossuth; 
nativity, England; enlisted October 18, 1861, as second sergeant; mustered 
November 6, 1861 ; promoted sergeant-major January 1, 1862; discharged to 
accept promotion in Second Tennessee Heavy Artillery, (colored), October 29, 

1863, Columbus, Ky. (see Company C, First Infantry). Tiburtis Miller (vet- 
eran), age 18; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Iowa; enlisted October 
23, 1861 ; reenlisted and remustered December 1, 1863 (see Company A, Resid- 
uary Battalion, Fourteenth Infantry). Columbus C. Proctor, age 18; residence, 
Kossuth; nativity, Iowa; enlisted October 10, 1861 ; promoted eighth corporal 
June 30, 1863; wounded severely in right foot April 9, 1864, Pleasant Hill,. La.; 
promoted seventh corporal December 4, 1863; sixth corporal June 1, 1864; mus- 
tered out November 16, 1864, Davenport, Iowa. Charles Robeson, age 38; 
residence, Northfield ; nativity, Illinois; enlisted February 28, 1863; mustered 
February 28, 1863 (see Company A, Residuary Battalion, Fourteenth Infantry). 
James H. Robeson, age 26; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Ohio; enlisted 
November 16, 1861 ; mustered November 16, 1861 ; promoted eighth corporal 
June 1, 1864; mustered out November 16, 1864, Davenport, Iowa. Lemuel Rob- 
inson, age 21; residence, Burlington; nativity, Virginia; enlisted January 20, 
1864; mustered January 20, 1864; missing in action and taken prisoner April 9, 

1864, Pleasant Hill, La.; returned (see Company A, Residuary Battalion, Four- 
teenth Infantry). Michael J. Sater, age 31 ; residence, Des Moines County; nativ- 
ity, Kentucky; enlisted October 15, 1861 ; wounded in hand and leg April 9, 
1864, Pleasant Hill, La. ; mustered out November 16, 1864, Davenport, Iowa. 
Milton J. Seeds, age 23; residence, Kossuth; nativity, Ohio; enlisted October 10, 
1861 ; promoted fife-major November 6, 1861 ; discharged April 8, 1863, Benton 
Barracks, St. Louis, Mo. (see Field and Staff). John Shafe, age 40; residence, 
Kossuth; nativity, Ohio; enlisted October 15, 1861 ; discharged for disability 
November 28; 1862; Corinth, Miss. William Sherwood, age 28; residence, 
Kossuth; nativity, Ohio; enlisted October 15, 1861 ; discharged for disability, July 
8, 1862, Pittsburg Landing, Tenn. Hopkins Smith, age 26; residence, Franklin; 
nativity, Illinois; enlisted October 19, 1861 ; promoted seventh corporal June 1, 
1864; mustered out November 16, 1864, Davenport, Iowa. James O. Stall, age 
Hi ; residence, Dodgeville ; nativity, Ohio; enlisted October 15, 1861 ; discharged 
for disability September 5, 1862, St. Louis, Mo. Josiah T. Statler, age 25; resi- 
dence, Middletown; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted October 22, 1861 ; promoted 
fifth corporal November 6, 1861 ; missing April 6, 1862, Shiloh, Tenn. ; promoted 
fourth corporal April 1, 1863; third corporal June 30, 1863; discharged to accept 
commission in First Missouri Colored Infantry November 11, 1863, St. Louis, 
Mo. Charles Stilwell, age 18; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Ohio; 



222 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

enlisted October 10, r86i ; missing in action April 6, 1862, Shiloh, Tenn. ; mus- 
tered out November 16, 1864, Davenport, Iowa. John W. Sutherland, age 22; 
residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Indiana; enlisted October 10, 1861 , 
mustered out November 16, 1864, Davenport, Iowa. Joseph H. Sypherd, age 24, 
residence, Burlington; nativity. Virginia; enlisted January 5, 1864; mustered 
January 5, 1864 (see Company A, Residuary Battalion. Fourteenth Infantry). 
David L. Tennant, age 21; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Ohio; en- 
listed October 10. 1861 ; mustered out November 16, 1864, Davenport, Iowa. 
William T. Tennant, age 23 ; residence, Des Moines County ; nativity, Ohio ; 
enlisted October 22, 1861 ; mustered out November 16, 1S64, Davenport, Iowa. 
William II. Thompson, age 25; residence, Dodgeville ; nativity, Indiana; enlisted 
October 10, 1861, as fourth corporal; missing in action April 6, 1862, Shiloh, 
Tenn.; promoted third corporal April 7. 1863; third corporal June 30. 1863; 
mustered out November 16, 1864, Davenport, Iowa. Waldo P. Tilton, age 25; 
residence, Des Moines County ; nativity, Ohio ; enlisted October 10, 1861 ; wounded 
in leg severely April 6, 1862, Shiloh, Tenn.; mustered out November 16, 1864, 
Davenport, Iowa. William H. Tracy, age 22; residence, Des Moines County; 
nativity, Ohio; enlisted October 21, 1861 ; mustered out November 16, 1864, 
Davenport, Iowa (see Company F, Sixteenth Infantry). William Trobee, age 
18; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Iowa; enlisted October 18, 1861 ; 
missing in action April 6, 1862, Shiloh, Tenn. ; mustered out November 16, 1864, 
Davenport, Iowa. Mortimer T. Tubbs, age 43 ; residence, Kossuth ; nativity, 
Pennsylvania; enlisted October 10, 1861 ; discharged for disability December 5, 

1862, Keokuk, Iowa. Isaac C. Tyson, age 20; residence, Des Moines County; 
nativity. Iowa; enlisted October 10, 1861 ; discharged for disability April 26. 

1863. John H. Tyson, age 18; residence, Middletown ; nativity. New York; 
enlisted December 3, 1863 ; mustered December 22, 1863 (see Company A, Resid- 
uary Battalion, Fourteenth Infantry). Abraham Vannice, age 22; residence, Des 
Moines County; nativity, Indiana; enlisted October 10, 1861 ; mustered out 
November 16, 1864, Davenport, Iowa. Thomas M. Wall, age 18; residence, 
Kossuth ; nativity, Maryland ; enlisted February 20, 1862 ; mustered February 20, 
1862; missing April 6, 1862, Shiloh, Tenn.; discharged for disability July 22, 
1862. Edward H. Ware, age 41 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Ohio ; enlisted 
December 25, 1863; mustered December 25, 1863 (see Company A, Residuary 
Battalion, Fourteenth Infantry). James- D. Welch, age 19; residence Burling- 
ton ; nativity, Iowa ; enlisted October 6, 1861 ; died of fever March 28, 1862, 
Savannah, Tenn. ; buried in Shiloh National Cemetery, Pittsburg Landing, Tenn., 
section M, grave 272. John S. Wertz, age 25; residence, Des Moines County; 
nativity, Pen lsylvania ; enlisted October 22, 1861 ; promoted sixth corporal; 
missing in action April 6, 1862, Shiloh, Tenn.; promoted fifth sergeant April 1, 
1863; fourth sergeant December 4, 1863; mustered out November 16, 1864, 
Davenport, Iowa. William J. White, age 19; residence, Des Moines County; 
nativity, Ohio ; enlisted October 9, 1861 ; mustered out November 16, 1864, 
Davenport, Iowa. Harvey Yeatnan, age 44 ; residence, Des Moines County ; 
nativity, Ohio; enlisted October 31, 1861 ; mustered out November 16, 1864, 
Davenport, Iowa. 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 223 

RESIDUARY BATTALION FOURTEENTH IOWA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 

i I iMl'AXY A 

Privates: John C. Banta, age 34 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Indiana ; 
enlisted January 5, 1864; mustered January 5, 1864; mustered out August 8, 
1865, Davenport, Iowa (see Company K, Fourteenth Infantry). Joseph T. Banta, 
age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted January 21, 1865; mus- 
tered January 21, 1865 ; mustered out August 8, 1865, Davenport, Iowa. William 
H. Blair, age 18; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Illinois; enlisted De- 
cember 2, 1863; mustered December 9, 1863; mustered out August 8, 1865, 
Davenport, Iowa (see Company K, Fourteenth Infantry). James R. Cartwright, 
age 35 ; residence, Kossuth ; nativity, New York ; enlisted August 30, 1862 ; mus- 
tered August 30, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Davenport, Iowa, expiration 
of term of service (see Company K, Fourteenth Infantry). Andrew J. Chambers, 
age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ireland; enlisted December 7, 1863; mus- 
tered December 7, 1863; mustered out August 8, 1865, Davenport, Iowa (see 
Company K, Fourteenth Infantry). Milton J. Frame, age 34; residence, Des 
Moines County; nativity, Indiana; enlisted December 25, 1863; mustered Decem- 
ber 25, 1863; mustered out August 8, 1865, Davenport, Iowa (see Company K, 
Fourteenth Infantry). John H. Fullenwider, age ^; residence, Des Moines 
County; nativity, Indiana; enlisted December 25, 1863; mustered December 25, 
1863; promoted sixth corporal, February 1, 1864; fifth corporal, July 3, 1865; 
mustered out August 8, 1865, Davenport, Iowa (see Company K, Fourteenth 
Infantry). Henry C. Haight (veteran), age 21; residence, Kossuth; nativity, 
Indiana; enlisted October 10, 1861 ; mustered November 6, 1861 ; mustered out 
AugustS, 1865, Davenport, Iowa (see Company K, Fourteenth Infantry). Henry 
H. Heiney, age 34; residence, Burlington; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted Jan- 
uary 21, 1865; mustered January 21, 1865; mustered out July 3, 1865, Spring- 
field, 111. Joseph McClure, age 27 ; residence, Kossuth ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; 
appointed first lieutenant November 19, 1864; mustered November 19, 1864; 
promoted captain August 4, 1865 ; mustered out August 8, 1865, Davenport, 
Iowa (see Company K, Fourteenth Infantry). Alexander McMurren, age 19; 
residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Iowa; enlisted February 13, 1865; mus- 
tered February 13, 1865; mustered out August 8, 1865, Davenport, Iowa. Tibur- 
tis C. Miller (veteran), age 19; residence, Dodgeville ; nativity, Pennsylvania; 
enlisted October 23, 1861 ; mustered November 6, 1861 ; mustered out August 8, 
1865, Davenport, Iowa (see Company K, Fourteenth Infantry). Charles Rob- 
inson, age 38 ; residence, Des Moines County ; nativity, Illinois ; enlisted August 
28, 1862; mustered August 28, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Davenport, 
Iowa, expiration of term of service (see Company K, Fourteenth Infantry). 
Lemuel Robinson, age 21; residence, Des Moines County; nativUy, Virginia; 
enlisted January 20, 1864; mustered January 20, 1864; mustered out June 21, 
1865, Clinton, Iowa (see Company K, Fourteenth Infantry). Joseph H. Sypherd, 
age 24; residence, Burlington; nativity, Virginia; enlisted January 5, 1864, as 
sixth corporal; mustered January 5, 1864; promoted fifth corporal January 26, 
1865; fourth corporal July 3, 1865; mustered out August 8, 1865, Davenport, 
Iowa (see Company K, Fourteenth Infantry). John D. Waddell, age 28; res- 
idence, Des Moines County ; nativity, Ohio ; enlisted February 3, 1865 ; mus- 



224 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

tered February 3, 1865 ; mustered out August 8, 1865, Davenport, Iowa. Edward 
H. Ware, age 41 ; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Ohio; enlisted Decem- 
ber 25, 1863; mustered December 25, 1863; mustered out July 3, 1865, Spring- 
field, 111. (see Company E, Fourteenth Infantry). 

COMPANY B 

Privates: James Barrow, age 29; residence, Burlington; nativity, Pennsyl- 
vania; enlisted January 4, 1864; mustered January 4, 1864; mustered out August 
8, 1865, Davenport, Iowa (see Company H, Fourteenth Infantry). George E. 
Brown, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted February 8, 1865; 
mustered February 8, 1865; mustered out August 8, 1865, Davenport, Iowa. 
George S. Chalmers, age 25 ; residence, Des Moines County ; nativity, Ohio ; en- 
listed January 24, 1864 ; mustered January 24, 1864 ; discharged March 28, 1864, 
Jefferson Barracks, St. Louis, Mo. (see Company H, Fourteenth Infantry). 
Russell Duval, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Indiana; enlisted Feb- 
ruary 2, 1864; mustered Feb. 29, 1864; no further record found (see Company 
H, Fourteenth Infantry). Jonathan B. Jennings, age 23; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted January 1, 1864; mustered January 4, 1864; 
mustered out August 8, 1865, Davenport, Iowa (see Company H, Fourteenth 
Infantry).- George W. (S.) Miller, age 20; residence, Des Moines County; 
nativity, Michigan; enlisted February 29, 1864; mustered February 29, 1864; 
discharged dishonorably July 15, 1865. Zachariah H. Ream, age 18; residence, 
Burlington ; nativity, Iowa ; enlisted March 3, 1865 ; mustered March 3, 1865 ; 
mustered out August 8, 1865, Davenport, Iowa (see Company I, Fourteenth 
Infantry). 

FIFTEENTH REGIMENT IOWA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 

Mustered into service of the United States at Keokuk, Iowa, February 22, 
1862, by Chaplain Charles C. Smith and Lieut. C. J. Ball, United States army; 
mustered out July 24, 1865, Louisville, Ky. 

Field and Staff: Hugh T. Reid, age 50 ; residence, Keokuk ; nativity, Indi- 
ana ; appointed colonel November 1, 1861 ; wounded in neck April 6, 1862, Shiloh, 
Tenn. ; promoted brigadier-general March 13, 1863. William Dewey, age 50; 
residence, Sidney ; nativity, Massachusetts ; appointed lieutenant-colonel Novem- 
ber 1, 1861 ; mustered November 6, 1861 ; appointed colonel of Twenty-third 
Infantry August 1, 1862; resigned to accept commission August 28, 1862 (see 
field and staff, Twenty-third Infantry). William W. Belknap, age 32; residence, 
Keokuk; nativity, New York; enlisted November 7, 1861 ; appointed major 
November 7, 1861 ; mustered December 7, 1861 ; wounded slightly in shoulder 
April 6, 1862, Shiloh. Tenn.; promoted lieutenant-colonel August 1, 1862; colo- 
nel April 22, 1863; brigadier-general August 17, 1864; brevet major-general of 
volunteers March 13, 1865. George Pomutz, age 35; residence, New Buda; 
nativity, Hungary; appointed adjutant December 23, 1861 ; mustered December 

23, 1861 ; wounded in thigh severely April 6, 1862, Shiloh, Tenn.; promoted 
major April 22, 1863; lieutenant-colonel August 18, 1864; mustered out July 

24, 1865, Louisville, Ky. Samuel R. Davis, age 35 ; residence, Atchinson, Kan. ; 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 225 

'nativity, Ohio; appointed surgeon February 22, 1862; promoted assistant sur- 
geon in regular army February 19, 1863; resigned March 1, 1863. John C. 
Johnson; residence, Keokuk County; appointed surgeon February 18, 1865. 
William Gibbon, age 29; residence, Chariton; nativity, Iowa; appointed assistant 
surgeon November 2, 1861 ; mustered November 30, 1861 ; promoted surgeon 
December 1, 1863; mustered out December 22, 1864, expiration of term of 
service. William W. Nelson, age 37 ; residence, Utica ; nativity, Ohio ; appointed 
assistant surgeon August 19, 1862; mustered September 14, 1862; mustered out 
July 24, 1865, Louisville, Ky. William W. Estabrook, age 34; residence, Clinton; 
nativity, New Brunswick; appointed chaplain December 2, 1861 ; resigned April 
2, 1863 (see field and staff, Forty-fifth Infantry). 

COMPANY A 

Privates: Cornelius Clark, age 27 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Ohio ; 
enlisted October 13, 1864; mustered October 13, 1864; mustered out July 24, 
1865, Louisville, Ky. 

COMPANY B 

Privates: George Berrier, age 23; residence, Burlington; nativity, North 
Carolina; enlisted October 4, 1864; mustered October 4, 1864; mustered out 
July 24, 1865, Louisville, Ky. John Brown, age 19; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Ohio; enlisted October 12, 1864; mustered October 12, 1864; mustered 
out July 24, 1865, Louisville, Ky. Daniel Garner, age 18 ; residence, Burlington ; 
enlisted October 23, 1864; mustered October 25, 1864; mustered out July 24, 
1865, Louisville, Ky. George W. Russell, age 18 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, 
Ohio; enlisted October 13, 1864; mustered out July 24, 1865, Louisville, Ky. 

company c 

John Q. Haines, age 18 ; residence, Danville ; nativity, Ohio ; enlisted Octo- 
ber 17, 1861 ; discharged for disability June 16, 1862, Corinth, Miss. 

COMPANY D 

Privates: Francis M. Kirkpatrick, age 30; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Virginia; enlisted October 15, 1864; mustered out July 24, 1865, Louisville, Ky. 

COMPANY E 

Privates: James A. Abbott; residence, Burlington; enlisted August 29, 1802; 
mustered out May 6, 1865, Davenport, Iowa. William H. Anderson, age 21 ; 
residence, Danville; nativity, Virginia; enlisted October 2, 1861 ; died of con- 
gestion of the brain August 26, 1863, Vicksburg, Miss. James M. Arnold (vet- 
eran), age 24; residence, Danville; nativity, Indiana; enlisted November 4, 1861 ; 
mustered December 1, 1861 ; reenlisted and remustered December 6, 1863; pro- 
moted seventh corporal August 1, 1864; fifth corporal November 26, 1864; 



226 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

fourth corporal April i, 1865; third corporal May I, 1865; mustered out July 
24, 1865, Louisville, Ky. Joseph Arnold (veteran), age 18; residence, Danville; 
nativity, Virginia; enlisted October 29, 1861 ; mustered December 1, 1861 ; re- 
enlisted and remustered December 6, 1863; mustered out July 24, 1865, Louis- 
ville, Ky. Charles Cady, age 32 ; residence, Danville ; nativity, Connecticut ; 
enlisted October 21, 1861 ; promoted fifth sergeant July 27, 1862; fourth ser- 
geant March 1, 1862; third sergeant March 1, 1863; second sergeant June 4, 
1863 ; mustered out March 26, 1865, Chattanooga, Tenn., expiration of term of 
service. John W. Chambers, age 21; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; en- 
listed August 29, 1862; died September 21, 1863, St. Louis, Mo. Aaron Cling- 
man, age 18; residence, Danville; nativity, Ohio; enlisted October 21, 1861 ; 
wounded in side and spine April 6, 1862, Shiloh, Tenn. ; discharged for dis- 
ability July 8, 1862, Corinth, Miss. William Clingman, age 23 ; residence, Dan- 
ville ; nativity, Ohio; enlisted October 21, 1861 ; died of consumption September 
12, 1862, Danville, Iowa. William Cockayne, age 20; residence, Burlington; 
mustered August 29, 1862; mustered out July 24, 1865, Louisville, Ky. Henry 
B. Daily, age 22 ; residence, Danville ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; enlisted October 
21, 1861 ; mustered December 1, 1861 ; discharged for disability June 10, 1862, 
near Corinth, Miss. Benjamin Davis, age 19; residence, Danville; nativity, Penn- 
sylvania; enlisted October 21, 1861 ; mustered December 1, 1861 ; wounded in 
head severely April 6, 1862, Shiloh. Tenn.; died October 2, 1862, Corinth, Miss. 
Columbus Doolittle, age 21 ; residence, Danville; nativity, Ohio; enlisted October 
21, 1861 ; mustered December 1, 1861 ; mustered out May 26, 1865, Chattanooga, 
Tenn., expiration of term of service. Jones Doolittle, age 23 ; residence, Dan- 
ville; nativity, Ohio; enlisted October 21, 1861 ; mustered December 1, 1861 ; 
died June 10, 1862, Monterey, Tenn. Temple I. Elliott; residence, Burlington; 
enlisted August 25, 1862; mustered November 1, 1862; mustered out July 24, 
1865, Louisville, Ky. William Mall (veteran), age 21; residence, Danville; 
nativity, England; enlisted November 15, 1861 ; mustered December 1, 1861 ; re- 
enlisted and remustered January 1, 1864; mustered out July 24, 1865, Louisville, 
Ky. Henry H. Hickley ; residence, Burlington; enlisted August 23, 1862; mus- 
tered out July 24, 1865, Louisville, Ky. Albert Hunter (veteran), age 19; res- 
idence, Danville; nativity, Ohio; enlisted October 29, 1861 ; mustered December 
1, 1861 ; promoted seventh corporal November 17, 1862; fifth corporal March 1, 
1863; fourth corporal June 4, 18(13; reenlisted and remustered December 6, 
1863; promoted third corporal July 1, 1864; fifth sergeant November 26, 1864; 
fourth sergeant December 26, 1864; mustered out July 24, 1865, Louisville, Ky. 
Douglas Jagger, age 36 ; residence, Danville ; nativity, New York ; enlisted March 
6, 1862; discharged for chronic diarrhoea July 9, 1862, Corinth, Miss.; died 
July 15, 1862, Keokuk, Iowa; buried in Oakland Cemetery, Keokuk, Iowa. Frank 
Jordon (veteran), age 20; residence, Danville; nativity, Iowa; enlisted Novem- 
ber 29, 1 86 1 ; reenlisted and remustered February 1, 1864; mustered out July 24, 
1865, Louisville, Ky. John L. Mothershead, age 20 ; residence, Danville ; nativity, 
Iowa ; enlisted November 6, 1861 ; mustered out November 10, 1864, Chattanooga, 
Tenn. Jonathan R. Porter, age 19; residence, Parish; nativity, Iowa; enlisted 
March 11, 1862; wounded slightly in breast April 6, 1862, Shiloh, Tenn.; dis- 
charged for wounds February 23, 1863, Keokuk, Iowa (see Company K, First 
Cavalry). Vear Porter, age 27; residence, Danville; nativity, Virginia; en- 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 227 

listed October 21, 1861, as eighth corporal; wounded severely in left shoulder 
April 6, 1862, Shiloh, Tenn. ; discharged for wounds October 15, 1862, Keokuk, 
Iowa. James N. Roberts, age 27 ; residence, Danville ; nativity, Virginia ; en- 
listed October 21, 1861, as sixth corporal; mustered December 1, 1861 ; promoted 
first corporal; fourth sergeant March 1, 1863; third sergeant June 4, 1863; 
wounded in left thigh severely July 21, 1864, near Atlanta, Ga. ; died of wounds 
September 6, 1864, Rome, Ga. ; buried in National Cemetery, Marietta, Ga., 
section C, grave 197. Henry N. Robinson, age 29; residence, Burlington ; nativity, 
Ohio; enlisted January 5, 1864; mustered January 20, 1864; promoted seventh 
corporal November 26, 1864; sixth corporal April 1, 1865; fourth corporal 
May 1, 1865; mustered out July 24, 1865, Louisville, Ky. Newton J. Rogers 
(veteran), age 28; residence, Danville; nativity, Ohio; enlisted October 21, 1861, 
as third sergeant; promoted second lieutenant July 9, 1862; captain December 
26, 1862; reenlisted and remustered November 1, 1864; mustered out July 24, 
1865, Louisville, Ky. James H. Rose, age 18; residence, Des Moines County; 
nativity, Iowa; enlisted March 28, 1864; mustered out July 24, 1865, Louisville, 
Ky. William Sanders (veteran), age 19; residence, Danville; nativity, Penn- 
sylvania; enlisted October 21, 1861 ; reenlisted and remustered January 1, 1864; 
mustered out July 24, 1865, Louisville, Ky. Henry C. Seymour, age 18; res- 
idence, Danville; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 23, 1862; promoted eighth cor- 
poral November 26, 1864; seventh corporal April 1, 1865; fifth corporal May 1, 
1865; mustered out July 24, 1865, Louisville-, Ky. John Smith, age 19; res- 
idence, Danville; nativity, Ohio; enlisted November 15, 1861 ; mustered Decem- 
ber 1, 1 86 1 ; died of disease November 13, 1862, Corinth, Miss. Oscar E. Stewart 
(veteran), age 18; residence, Danville; nativity, Iowa; enlisted November 5, 
1861 ; reenlisted and remustered January 1, 1864; wounded in left finger severely 
July 21, 1864, near Atlanta, Ga. ; mustered out July 24, 1865, Louisville, Ky. 
Lewis M. Syster, age 22 ; residence, Danville ; nativity, Virginia ; enlisted Octo- 
ber 21, 1861 ; wounded; died of chronic diarrhoea July 14, 1862, Keokuk, Iowa. 
Otis Watson (veteran), age 18; residence, Danville; nativity, Ohio; enlisted 
October 29, 1861 ; reenlisted and remustered January 1, 1864; mustered out July 

24, 1865, Louisville, Ky. Thomas Wright, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Iowa; enlisted February 18, 1864; wounded in left side and face July 21, 1864, 
near Atlanta, Ga. ; died of wounds July 25, 1864, near Atlanta, Ga. ; buried in 
National Cemetery, Marietta, Ga., section F, grave 227. 

COMPANY F 

Timothy Patterson ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Indiana ; enlisted October 

25, 1864; deserted. 

COMPANY G 

Privates: George Ackles, age 18; residence, Pleasant Grove; nativity, Iowa; 
enlisted October 21, 1864; mustered out July 24, 1865, Louisville, Ky. 

COMPANY H 

Privates: Benjamin F. Crites, age 36; residence, Kingston; nativity, Mis- 
souri; enlisted October 4, 1864; promoted seventh corporal December 16, 1864; 
sixth corporal May 10, 1865; reduced to ranks May 31, 1865; mustered out 



228 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

July 24, 1865, Louisville, Ky. Perry McDaniels, age 24; residence, Burling- 
ton; nativity, Ohio; enlisted October 6, 1864; died of small pox June 7, 1865, 
Philadelphia, Pa. ; buried in National Cemetery, Philadelphia, Pa. 

COMPANY K 

Privates: George A. Huff, age 16; residence, Pleasant Grove; nativity, Indi- 
ana; enlisted January 5, 1864; mustered out July 24, 1865, Louisville, Ky. 

SIXTEENTH IOWA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 

Mustered into service of the United States by captains Alexander Chambers 
and S. A. Wainwright on dates ranging from December 10, 1861, to March 12, 
1862, at Davenport, Iowa ; mustered out at Louisville, Ky., July 19, 1865. 

Seven companies of this regiment were mustered into the" service at Camp 
McClellan, Davenport, between December 10, 1861, and March 12, 1862. Com- 
pany F was mustered in at Keokuk in February and I and K at Benton Bar- 
racks, near St. Louis, March 20, 1861. From December 10, 1861, to March 
20, 1862, was the only time the men had to prepare themselves with any knowl- 
edge of the art of war. On March 20 the regiment started from Daven- 
port by steamboat to St. Louis, and from there marched to Benton Barracks. 
On April i, 1861, Colonel Chambers, its commander, received orders to at once 
proceed to Pittsburg Landing, Tenn. The regiment boarded a steamer at St. 
Louis on that date and arrived at Pittsburg Landing early in the morning of 
April 6, 1862. While being disembarked the men heard the roar of the battle 
then in progress. This was the first time they had had the opportunity to load 
a gun. They were at once ordered to the front, which they reached about 10:30 
o'clock A. M. It is unnecessary to go into detail concerning the part which the 
regiment took in this battle. The loss in this battle was two officers, seven non- 
commissioned officers and privates killed ; nine officers and ninety-four non- 
commissioned officers and privates wounded and fifteen non-commissioned offi- 
cers and privates missing. When one reads of this battle in the light of subse- 
quent events it shows two things : first, the valor of intelligent undisciplined 
men ; second, the ignorance of the art of war by those who commanded them. 
The experience gained in this battle was invaluable and prepared the way for 
victories in the future. After the battle of Shiloh the regiment, with others, 
marched on Corinth. The enemy had fortified Corinth, for it was the door from 
which the Union forces could cut off communication of the enemy by rail with 
Memphis on the west and from the southwest and southeast. 

On the 27th of April, 1862, the Eleventh, Thirteenth, Fifteenth and Sixteenth 
Iowa Infantry Volunteers were organized into what was subsequently known 
as "Crocker's Brigade," commanded by Col. M. M. Crocker of the Thirteenth 
Iowa. The Sixteenth took an active part in the siege of Corinth, which the 
enemy evacuated on the night of the 30th of May, 1862. From the time of 
evacuation of Corinth until September, 1862, the regiment was at Bolivar, 
Tenn., part of the time looking out for the enemy in that part of the country. 
The brigade was in the battle of Iuka, which took place on the 19th of Sep- 
tember, 1862. Colonel Chambers was seriously wounded in this battle and taken 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 229 

prisoner, but was left by the enemy in the hospital at Iuka. In this battle the 
regiment lost 14 killed and 48 wounded and 14 missing. From Iuka the reg- 
iment marched to Grand Junction and on the 5th of November joined the army 
in its southern march against Vicksburg ; was with Grant on that inland march 
for the purpose of reaching Vicksburg, which he was forced to abandon because 
of the loss of his train of provisions at Holly Springs, Miss.; was with the army 
on its withdrawal from Mississippi to Memphis, where it went on transports for 
Vicksburg and landed at Milliken's Bend. Here the brigade to which it belonged 
was assigned to the Seventeenth Army Corps, comamnded by Gen. James B. 
McPherson. The regiment took part in digging that canal of which so much 
has been written. During the siege of Vicksburg the brigade to which it belonged 
was confronting Johnston in the rear of Vicksburg; was on the Meriden cam- 
paign, and after a march across the State of Mississippi came to Vicksburg, 
March 4, 1864, and on the 17th of the same month started home on veteran fur- 
lough ; started back, leaving Davenport on May 3, 1864, and arrived at 
Clifton, Tenn., about the middle of the month. From this place it marched to 
Huntsville, Ala., and from there to Decatur, thence across the mountains to 
Rome, Ga., where it arrived on June 5 ; thence to Ackworth, where it joined the 
army under Sherman. Part of the regiment was engaged in the attack on Ken- 
esaw Mountain, June 27, 1864; was with Sherman's army from this time on; 
took part in the battles before Atlanta on the 21st and 22d of July, 1864. In 
the battle of the 21st it lost sixty-five men killed and wounded; was left in an 
exposed position in the battle which took place on the 22d. It was surrounded 
when so exposed and 225 of its men, including officers, were captured. They 
were taken to Macon, Ga., and from there to Andersonville, near by. 

Field and Staff: Alexander Chambers, age 29; residence, Owatonna, Minn.; 
nativity, New York; appointed colonel December 11, 1861 ; wounded slightly 
April 6, 1862, Shiloh, Tenn.; wounded severely September 19, 1862, Iuka, Miss.; 
promoted brevet brigadier-general of volunteers February 14, 1864; was for- 
merly captain in Eighteenth United States Infantry. Addison K. Sanders, age 
38 ; residence, Davenport ; nativity, Ohio ; appointed lieutenant-colonel Novem- 
ber 14, 1861 ; wounded severely October 3, 1862, Corinth, Miss. ; missing in 
action July 22, 1864, near Atlanta, Ga. ; promoted brevet colonel of volunteers 
and brevet brigadier-general March 13, 1865; discharged for disability March 
24, 1865, Davenport, Iowa. William Purcell ; residence, Muscatine County: ap- 
pointed major December 11, 1861 ; wounded October 3, 1862, Corinth, Miss.; 
discharged January 29, 1865, expiration of term of service. George E. McCosh; 
residence, Davenport ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; appointed adjutant March 24, 
1862; resigned for disability July 13, 1862. Charles W. Fracker ; residence, 
Iowa City; appointed quartermaster March 24, 1862; resigned July 22, 1862. 
Fred Hope, age 23 ; residence. Mount Pleasant ; nativity, New York ; appointed 
quartermaster September 3, 1862; mustered out May 31, 1865, expiration of 
term of service. Jacob H. Camburn, age 37; residence, Cedar Rapids; nativity, 
New York; appointed surgeon March 22, 1862; resigned June 3, 1862. Fred- 
erick Lloyd ; residence, Iowa City ; nativity, England ; appointed surgeon June 
14, 1862, from assistant surgeon Eleventh Iowa Infantry; promoted assistant 
surgeon United States Volunteers August 15, 1863 ; surgeon of volunteers Novem- 
ber 14, 1863; brevet lieutenant-colonel March 13, 1865. Josiah L. Philips, age 



230 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

28; residence, Dubuque; nativity, Maine; appointed assistant surgeon Novem- 
ber 25, 1861 ; promoted surgeon September 13, 1863; mustered out July 19, 1865, 
Louisville, Ky. Dixon Alexander, age 43 ; residence, Fayette ; nativity, New 
York; appointed assistant surgeon March 5, 1865; mustered out July 19, 1865, 
Louisville, Ky. D. C. McNeil ; residence, DeWitt ; appointed assistant surgeon 
August 19, 1862; resigned April 25, 1865, Milliken's Bend, La. Freeman Mc- 
Clelland; residence, Kingston; appointed assistant surgeon July 21, 1863; re- 
signed August 20, 1864. 

COMPANY D 

Privates: Napoleon B. Fite, age 35 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Ohio ; 
enlisted October 5, 1864; died January 16, 1865, Savannah, Ga. ; buried in 
National Cemetery, Beaufort, S. C. 

COMPANY E 

Privates: Mathevv Brown, age 26 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, New 
York; enlisted November 15, 1861 ; died July 23, 1862, Evansville, Ind. ; buried 
in National Cemetery, Evansville, Ind. John Johnson, age 43; residence, Bur- 
lington; nativity, Ireland; enlisted November 26, 1861 ; discharged for dis- 
ability October 4, 1862, Keokuk, Iowa. Hugh McClellan, age 33; residence, 
Burlington ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; enlisted October 7, 1861 ; discharged Decem- 
ber 10, 1862. Austin A. McDowell, age 26; residence, Burlington; nativity, New 
York; enlisted November 14, 1861, as first sergeant; killed in action April 6, 
1862, Shiloh, Term. John A. McElhany (veteran), age 18; residence, Burling- 
ton; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted November 14; 1861 ; promoted third ser- 
geant September 1, 1862; second sergeant September 1, 1862; first sergeant 
September 5, 1863; reenlisted and remustered January 4, 1864; missing in action 
July 22, 1864, Atlanta, Ga. ; promoted first lieutenant May, 12, 1865; mustered 
out July 19, 1865, Louisville, Ky. Wilson S. Stafford, age 26; residence, Bur- 
lington; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted November 18, 1861, as third sergeant; 
wounded severely April 6, 1862, Shiloh, Tenn. ; discharged for disability Jan- 
uary 20, 1863. 

COMPANY F 

Privates: Jefferson Bowers, age 20; residence, First Congressional District; 
nativity. Indiana; enlisted October 19, 1864; mustered October 19, 1864; mus- 
tered out July 19, 1865, Louisville, Ky. William J. Sawyer, age 29; residence, 
Burlington ; nativity, Ohio; enlisted February 21, 1862, as first sergeant; wounded 
severely April 6, 1862, Shiloh, Tenn. ; promoted second lieutenant November 19, 
1862; first lieutenant January 12, 1863; mustered out March 26, 1865, Golds- 
boro, N. C. 

company H 

Privates: John Canterbury, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; 
enlisted October 22, 1864; mustered October 22, 1864; died of disease January 
18, 1865, Savannah, Ga. ; buried in National Cemetery, Beaufort, S. C. George 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 231 

H. Hale, age 19; residence, First Congressional District; nativity, Iowa; enlisted 
October 31, 1864; mustered October 31, 1864; mustered out July 19, 1865, Louis- 
ville, Ky. William Harper, age 19; residence, First Congressional District; 
nativity, Virginia; enlisted October 18, 1864; mustered October 18, 1864; mus- 
tered out July 19, 1865, Louisville, Ky. William O. Jackson, age 34; residence, 
First Congressional District; nativity, Kentucky; enlisted October 5, 1864; mus- 
tered October 5, 1864; mustered out July 19, 1865, Louisville, Ky. Benjamin F. 
Lite, age 32 ; residence, First Congressional District ; nativity, Virginia ; enlisted 
October 13, 1864; mustered October 13, 1864; mustered out July 19, 1865, Louis- 
ville, Ky. 

COMPANY I 

Privates: George Yount, age 22; residence, First Congressional District; 
nativity, Indiana; enlisted October 6, 1864; mustered October 6, 1864; mustered 
out July 19, 1865, Louisville, Ky. 

COMPANY K 

Privates: John Hobson, age 31; residence, First Congressional District; 
nativity, Ohio; enlisted October 6, 1864; mustered October 6, 1864; mustered 
out July 19, 1865, Louisville, Ky. Henry Huff, age 21 ; residence, First Con- 
gressional District; nativity, Iowa; enlisted October 6, 1864; mustered October 
6, 1864; mustered out August 30, 1865, New York City, N. Y. John Lackey, 
age 20; residence, First Congressional District; nativity, Kentucky; enlisted 
October 17, 1864; mustered October 17, 1864; discharged for disability June 
28, 1865, Louisville, Ky. 

TWENTY-FIFTH REGIMENT IOWA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 

Term of service, three years. Mustered into service of the United States at 
Mount Pleasant, Iowa, September 27, 1862, by Capt. George S. Pierce, United 
States Army. Mustered out of service June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. 

This regiment was called into the service by virtue of the proclamation of 
the President of date July 2, 1862. The regiment was composed of ten com- 
panies and went into quarters at Camp McKean, Mount Pleasant, in August 
and September, 1862. The regiment had 972 men including officers. It was 
mustered into the service by George S. Pierce, United States Army, on the 27th 
of September, 1862. The regiment left Camp McKean in November for St. 
Louis, Mo., and from that place down the Mississippi River to Helena, Ark. 
After it had reached the front it was assigned to the Second Brigade of the First 
Division of the Fifteenth Army Corps. The regiment was under the command 
of General Sherman and took part in the attack on Vicksburg, which was a 
failure ; was with the forces which assaulted and captured Arkansas Post. The 
regiment was with other forces on that expedition to Greenville, Mississippi. 
From Greenville it returned to Milliken's Bend, from which place it marched 
to Hard Times Landing. At the latter place it crossed the river, but was too 
late to join the main body of the army on its march to Jackson. The regiment 



232 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

on the 18th of May joined the army under the command of Grant to invest 
Vicksburg, and took part in the siege of that place until its fall on the 4th of 
July, 1863. It was engaged in the assault on Vicksburg on the 22c! of May. 
Colonel Stone in his official report says of this regiment of which he was colonel : 
"A general attack was ordered by our entire line. Our division, occupying the 
extreme right of our army, was ordered to gain the heights to our left, near 
the center of our line, and to assist in carrying the fort opposite. In making 
this movement I had the advance with my regiment and kept it until the heights 
above mentioned were gained. We failed to carry the fort, and at night the 
entire division was withdrawn to the position each regiment had occupied in 
the morning. Officers and men of my regiment behaved well, and I shall not par- 
ticularize bv mentioning any, save Private Isaac Mickey of Companv F. who, 
when I called for some one to volunteer to carry an order for me past a line 
exposed to the enemy's entire line of sharpshooters, responded at once to the 
call, carried my message and returned promptly when the order was executed." 
The next day after the surrender of Vicksburg the regiment with other forces, 
with General Sherman in command, started in a pursuit of Gen. J. E. Johnston. 
After returning from the pursuit of Johnston to Vicksburg the regiment embarked 
for Memphis. From Memphis it took up the march to Corinth, from there 
to Iuka, then Cherokee Station. From Cherokee Station it had to fight its way 
to Chattanooga. Took part in the battles around Chattanooga and Lookout 
Mountain. After the battle of Ringgold the regiment returned to Chattanooga, 
from which place it marched to Woodville, at which place it went into winter 
quarters. From Woodville the regiment joined the main army and commenced 
the campaign against Atlanta. Was in the battle of Resaca. Was in the fight 
at Dallas. Was at Kenesaw Mountain and took part in that battle. After the 
fall of Atlanta took part in the pursuit after General Hood, which continued until 
the 1 6th of October, when it went into camp at Little River, Georgia. From Little 
River the regiment started on its long march to join Sherman with his army on 
its march to the sea. The regiment took part in all the actions of the army on 
its march from Atlanta until the surrender of Johnston with his army, which 
terminated the war. 

Field and Staff: George A. Stone, age 28; residence, Mount Pleasant ; nativity, 
New York; appointed colonel August 10, 1862; promoted brevet brigadier-gen- 
eral United States Volunteers March 13, 1865. Fabian Brydolf, age 43: res- 
idence, Burlington; nativity, Sweden; appointed lieutenant-colonel September 6, 
1862; mustered September 27, 1862; resigned June 8, 1863 (see Company' I, 
Sixth Infantry, Fabrian Brydolf). Calvin Taylor, age 40; residence, Bloom- 
field; nativity, Indiana; appointed major August 10, 1862; discharged May 8, 
1863. S. Kirkwood Clark, age 18; residence, Iowa City; nativity, Ohio; ap- 
pointed adjutant August 20, 1862; wounded severely January 11, 1863, Arkansas 
Post, Ark. ; died of wounds February 20, 1863, St. Louis, Mo. Frederick J. 
Clark, age 54 ; residence, Mount Pleasant : nativity, Connecticut ; appointed 
quartermaster August 20, 1862; resigned July 22, 1863. William S. Marsh, 
age 45 ; residence, Mount Pleasant ; nativity, Nantucket ; appointed surgeon Sep- 
tember 16, 1862; resigned February 7, 1863, Young's Point, La. James D. Gray, 
age 41 ; residence, Talleyrand ; nativity, Ohio ; appointed assistant surgeon Sep- 
tember 16, 1862; resigned September 16, 1863. Henry M. Farr, age 34; res- 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 233 

idencc, Salem ; nativity, Vermont ; appointed assistant surgeon September 16, 
1862 ; promoted surgeon February 8, 1863 ; resigned September 26, 1864. Thomas 
E. Corkhill, age 40; residence, Mount Pleasant; nativity, England; appointed 
chaplain September 27, 1862; resigned April 22, 1863. 

Non-commissioned Staff: William F. Conrad, age 35; residence, Burling- 
ton ; nativity, New York ; promoted sergeant-major from Company G ; pro- 
moted captain of Company K, January 1, 1863. William Gregg, age 31 ; res- 
idence, Burlington ; nativity, Virginia ; appointed quartermaster sergeant from 
Company E; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Jerret W. Garner, 
age 19 ; residence, Columbus City ; nativity, Ohio ; promoted commissary ser- 
geant from Company F ; promoted quartermaster July 23, 1863 ; mustered out 
June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Charles F. Marsh, age 20; residence. Mount 
Pleasant; nativity, Illinois; appointed hospital steward September 16, 1862; pro- 
moted assistant surgeon February 8, 1863; surgeon November 11, 1864; mustered 
out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Welcome B. Walker, age 44; residence, 
Salem ; nativity, Canada ; appointed drum major from Company C ; returned to 
company October 17, 1862. Charles Clark, age 19; residence, Burlington ; nativity, 
France; promoted fife major from fifer of Company G; returned to company 
October 10, 1862. 

COMPANY B 

Privates: Perryander Barr, age 20; residence, Burlington; nativity, Penn- 
sylvania; enlisted February 6, 1865; mustered February 6, 1865; transferred to 
"Company D, Fourth Infantry, May 30, 1865 (Peryander Barr). Cicero Gillaspy, 
age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted February 6, 
1865; mustered February 6, 1865; transferred to Company D, Fourth Infantry, 
May 30, 1865. Edson C. Hall, age 27; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, 
Wisconsin; enlisted February 10, 1864; mustered February 29, 1864; transferred 
to Company G, Fourth Infantry, May 30, 1865. John Laux, age 21 ; residence, 
Danville; nativity, Germany; enlisted January 5, 1864; mustered January 22, 
1864; killed in action May 13, 1864, Resaca, Ga. 

COMPANY D 

Privates: Robert W. Ansell, age 21; residence, Burlington; nativity, New 
York; enlisted July 29, 1862; mustered September 12, 1862; promoted sixth 
corporal September 16, 1864; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. 
Benjamin Babb, age 20; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 
13, 1862; mustered September 12, 1862; wounded severely November 27, 1863, 
Ringgold, Ga. ; died of wounds December 26, 1863, Chattanooga, Tenn. ; buried 
in National Cemetery, Chattanooga, Tenn., section D, grave 81. Jacob Bacher, 
age 21; residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted August 5, 1862; 
mustered September 12, 1862; died of disease, December 26, 1862, Helena, Ark. 
Simeon Badley, age 34 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Ohio ; enlisted August 
18, 1862; mustered September 12, 1862; died of disease November 9, 1865, 
Cairo, III; buried in National Cemetery, Mound City, 111., section 8, grave 138. 
Zachariah Badley, age 25 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Ohio ; enlisted Jan- 



234 HISTORY OF DES .MOINES COUNTY 

uary 18, 1862; mustered September 12, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Wash- 
ington, D. C. John W. Bailey, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; 
enlisted January 18, 1865; mustered January 18, 1865; transferred to Company 
G, Fourth Infantry, May 30, 1865. James N. Barlow, age 24; residence, Bur- 
lington; nativity, New York; enlisted August 11, 1862, as fifth corporal; mus- 
tered September 12, 1862; promoted fourth sergeant October 12, 1862; first 
sergeant February 18, 1863; taken prisoner August 15, 1864, Atlanta, Ga. ; 
taken prisoner November 1, 1864, Cave Springs, Ga. ; no later record found. 
Henry Beck, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted July 
31, 1862, as eighth corporal; mustered July 31, 1862; promoted seventh corporal 
October 12, 1862; killed in action May 28, 1863, Vicksburg, Miss. Jacob Berk, 
age 21; residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted August 11, 1862; 
mustered September 12, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. 
Jasper D. Bloomer, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, New York; .enlisted 
August 7, 1862; mustered September 12, 1862; died of disease October 29, 1862, 
Burlington, Iowa. Frederick William Boesch, age 26; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Germany; enlisted August 12, 1862, as fifth sergeant; mustered Sep- 
tember 12, 1862; wounded severely March 20, 1865, Mill Creek, N. C. ; died of 
wounds March 27, 1865, Goldsboro, N. C. Arthur Bridges, age 18; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 4, 1862; mustered September 12, 
1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Harrison D. Brown; 
rejected September 28. 1862, by mustering officer. Henry I. Brugge, age 19; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 6, 1862, as third corporal; 
mustered September 12, 1862; promoted second corporal October 12, 1862; first 
corporal ; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Matthew I. Bryson, 
age 20; residence, Burlington; nativity, Indiana; enlisted August 6, 1862, as 
fourth corporal; mustered September 12, 1862; promoted third corporal; second 
corporal July 1, 1864; fifth sergeant September 16, 1864; mustered out June 
6. 1865, Washington, D. C. Frederick A. Burkhart, age 22; residence, Bur- 
lington; nativity, New York; enlisted August 22, 1862; mustered September 12, 
1862; died of disease March 23, 1863, St. Louis, Mo.; buried in National Ceme- 
tery, St. Louis, Mo. Hiram L. Buttles, age 21; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Indiana; enlisted July 20, 1862, as seventh corporal; mustered September 12, 
1862; reduced to eighth corporal October 12, 1862; promoted seventh corporal; 
sixth corporal July 1, 1864; fifth corporal September 16, 1864; mustered out 
June 6, 1S65, Washington. D. C. James H. Chase, age 19; residence, Bur- 
lington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 8, 1862; mustered September 12, 1862; 
died of disease October 19, 1863, St. Louis, Mo.; buried in National Cemetery, 
Jefferson Barracks (St. Louis), Mo., section 7, grave 150. Hobart Clark, age 
i<i; residence, Burlington; nativity, Illinois; enlisted July 29, 1862; mustered 
September 12, 1862; discharged for disability February iS, 1864, Paducah, 
PC)'. Patrick Clark, age 18; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Ireland; 
enlisted February 3, 1865; mustered February 3. 1865; transferred to Company 
E, Fourth Infantry, May 30, 1865. George T. Coe, age 39; residence, Burling- 
ton: nativity, New York; enlisted August 22, 1862; mustered September 12, 
1862; promoted fourth sergeant February 18, 1863; transferred to Invalid 
Corps September 1, 1863; mustered out May 9, 1865. Allen B. Collins, rejected 
September 28, 1862, by mustering officer. Peter Connell, age 39; residence, 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 235 

Burlington; nativity, Ireland; enlisted January 31, 1865; mustered January 31, 
1865 ; transferred to Company A, Fourth Infantry, May 30, 1865. J oml L - 
Councell, age 24 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Maryland ; enlisted August 
16, 1862; mustered September 12, 1862; promoted seventh corporal June 5, 
1863; third sergeant November 2, 1863; wounded severely November 27, 1863, 
Ringgold, Ga. ; transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps June 15, 1864; no further 
record. Marshall Cox, age 18; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Illinois; 
enlisted January 23, 1865; mustered January 23, 1865; transferred to Company 

C, Fourth Infantry, May 30, 1865 (see Company D. Forty-eighth Infantry). 
John Crammer, age 20 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Ohio ; enlisted August 
12, 1862; mustered August 12, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, 

D. C. Luther Crammer, age 22 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Ohio ; enlisted 
September 12, 1862; mustered September 12, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, 
Washington, D. C. Noble Crawford, age 36; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Ohio; enlisted August 9, 1862; mustered September 12, 1862; discharged for 
disability February 18, 1863, St. Louis, Mo. George E. Dennis, age 18; resi- 
dence. Pleasant Grove; nativity, New Hampshire; enlisted August 15, 1862, 
as fifer; mustered September 12, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, 
D. C. John A. Dennis, age 44 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, New Hamp- 
shire; enlisted August 15, 1862; mustered September 12, 1862; mustered out 
June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. John Q. Dennis, age 19; residence, Burling- 
ton; nativity, New Hampshire; enlisted August 15, 1862; mustered September 
12, 1862; killed in action January 11, 1863, Arkansas Post, Ark. George W. 
Fads, age 18 ; residence, Des Moines County ; nativity, Indiana ; enlisted January 
20, 1865; mustered January 20, 1865; transferred to Company A. Fourth In- 
fantry, May 30, 1865 (see Company F, Forty-fifth Infantry). Norman B. 
Eggleston, age 18 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Iowa ; enlisted August 14, 1862 ; 
mustered September 12, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. 
George Eversman, age 20; residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted 
August 6, 1862; mustered September 12, 1862; wounded slightly March 20, 
1865, Mill Creek, N. C. ; mustered out June 7, 1865, New York City, N. Y. 
Henry Fischer, age 21; residence, Burlington; nativity, Missouri; enlisted 
August 4, 1862; mustered September 12, 1862; wounded slightly May 22, 1863, 
Vicksburg, Miss.; promoted fourth corporal December 31, 1863; second cor- 
poral September 16, 1864; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. An- 
drew Madison Fox, age 39 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Ohio ; enlisted 
August 15, 1862; mustered September 12, 1862; wounded severely January 11, 
1863. Arkansas Post, Ark. ; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. 
Calvin E. Fox, age 18; residence, Kingston; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 21, 
1862; mustered September 12, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, 
D. C. Christian Garling, age 28 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Germany ; 
enlisted August 13, 1862; mustered September 12, 1862; died of disease, on 
Steamer "Champion," January 25, 1863. John W. Garrison, age 18; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 4, 1862; mustered September 12, 
1862; died of disease February 5, 1863, Young's Point, La. James Gellie, age 
32; residence, Burlington; nativity, Scotland; enlisted August 22, 1862; mus- 
tered September 12, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. John 
J. Goodv, age 19; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Prussia; enlisted 



236 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

January 19, 1865; mustered January 19. [865; transferred to Company A. 
Fourth Infantry. .May 30, 1865. John T. Gough, age 45; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, New York; enlisted August 14. 1862; mustered September 12. 1862; 
discharged for disability August 1, 1863. Camp Sherman, Miss. Henry Grana- 
man. age iS; residence. Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 5. 1862; 
mustered September 12. 18(12; wounded severely August 19, 1864, Atlanta, Ga. ; 
mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington. D. C. Edward Hay. age 20; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted August 22, 1862; mustered Septem- 
ber 12, 1862; promoted fourth corporal February 28,, 1864; fourth sergeant, 
December 31, 1863; taken prisoner June 18, 1864, Kenesaw Mountain, Ga. ; 
promoted third sergeant July 1, 18(14; no later record found. Kaspar Heller, 
aged 24; residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted August 5, 1862; 
mustered September 12, 18(12; promoted seventh corporal September 16, 1864; 
mustered out June 6. 1865, Washington, D. C. Josiah Helmerigh, age 31 ; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted August 6, 18(12; mustered 
September 12, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington. D. C. Charles 
D. Hendricks, age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, Kentucky; enlisted Aug. 
14, 1862; mustered September 12, 1862; died of disease March 26, 1863, on 
hospital boat. James D. Hillabrant, age 30; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
New York; enlisted August 22, [862; mustered September 12, 1862; discharged 
for disability August 1, 1863; Camp Sherman, Miss. George Hillyard, age 30; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 22, 1862; mustered Sep- 
tember 12, 1862; died of disease March 8, 1863, St. Louis, Mo. Landon Hill- 
yard, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 22, 1862; 
mustered September 12, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. 
Lewis Hillyard, age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 
19, 1S62; mustered September 12, 1862; wounded October 21, 1863, Cherokee 
Station, Ala.; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington. D. C. Paren, Hillyard, 
age 21; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 19, 1862; mus- 
tered September 12, 1862; promoted seventh corporal November 2, 1863; sixth 
corporal May, 1864; fifth corporal July 1, 1864; fourth corporal September 16, 
1864; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Thomas I. Hutson. age 
42; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 6, 1862; mustered 
September 12, 1862; promoted musician November 1, 1863; mustered out June 
6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Samuel G. Irwin, age 18; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 5, 1862; mustered September 12, 1862; dis- 
charged for disability October 10, 1862, Mount Pleasant, Iowa (see Company 
K, Fourteenth Infantry). Lorenzo D. Jackson, age 20; residence, Burlington; 
nativity. Iowa; enlisted August 20, 1862; mustered September 12, 1862; died 
of disease December 7, 1862, Helena, Ark. James Jarvis, age 25; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 4, 1862; mustered September 12, 
1862; wounded slightly November 27. 1863, Ringgold, Ga. ; mustered out June 
6, 1865. Washington, D. C. Charles O. Johnson, age 18; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Norway; enlisted August 5, i8C>2; mustered September 12, 1862; died 
of disease April 25, 1863, on steamer Nashville; buried in National Cemetery, 
Vicksburg, Miss., section A, grave 14. John A. Johnson, age 22; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Sweden; enlisted August 14. 1862, as second corporal; 
mustered September 12, 1862; reduced to third corporal October 12, 1862; 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 237 

wounded January u, 1863, Arkansas Post, Ark.; promoted second corporal 
January, 1864; fifth sergeant July 1, 1864; fourth sergeant September 16, 1864; 
mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. John W. Kite, age 18; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted January 31, 1865; mustered January 31, 
1865 ; transferred to Company E, Fourth Infantry, May 30, 1865. Henry 
Korf, age 25; residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted August 14, 
1862; mustered September 12, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, 
D. C. John F. Kullenbeck, age 24 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Germany ; 
enlisted August 14, 1862; mustered September 12, 1862; mustered out June 6, 
1865, Washington, D, C. Christian Lichtenberg, age 30; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Germany; enlisted August 22, 1862; mustered September 12, 1862; 
died of disease September 11, 1863, Camp Sherman, Mississippi. Allen D. 
Lockwood, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 6, 
1S62; mustered September 12, 1862; promoted fifth sergeant December 31, 
1863; fourth sergeant July 1, 1864; third sergeant September 16, 1864; wounded 
severely March 20, 1865, Mill Creek, N. C. ; mustered out June 6, 1865, Wash- 
ington, D. C. Albert P. McClure, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Iowa; enlisted January 18, 1865, as musician; mustered January 18, 1865; trans- 
ferred to Company C, Fourth Infantry, May 30, 1865. (Albert McClure) 
(see Company F, Forty-fifth Infantry). John McParlin, age 18; residence, Des 
Moines County; nativity, Ohio; enlisted January 25, 1865; mustered January 
25, 1865; transferred to Company A, Fourth Infantry, May 30, 1865 ( see Com- 
pany F, Forty-fifth Infantry). (John McPartland. ) Edwin A. Miller, age 
18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 12, 1862; mustered 
September 12, 1862; transferred to Invalid Corps March 15, 1864; discharged 
Inly 10, 1865, Trenton, N. J. John Orn, age 23; residence Des Moines County; 
nativity, Ohio; enlisted January 16, 1865; mustered January 16, 1865; transferred 
to Company C, Fourth Infantry, May 30, 1865. Londice Owens, age 18; resi- 
dence Burlington ; nativity, Iowa ; enlisted January 30, 1865 ; mustered January 30, 
1865 ; transferred to Company A, Fourth Infantry, May 30, 1865 (see Company F, 
Forty-fifth Infantry). Albert A. Perkins, age 22; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Illinois; appointed second lieutenant July 28, 1862; mustered August 28, 1862; 
promoted first lieutenant February 5, 1863; captain May 9, 1863; brevet-major 
of volunteers March 13, 1865; aide-de-camp to Major-General Osterhaus, March 
15, 1865; mustered out June 6, 1865; Washington, D. C. John L. Perkins, 
age 25; residence, Burlington; nativity, Illinois; appointed captain August 6, 
1862; mustered September 27, 1862; promoted major May 9, 1863; mustered 
out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Henry Rausher, age 22; residence, Bur- 
lington; nativity, New York; enlisted August 14, 1862; mustered September 12, 
1862; wounded; leg amputated August 31, 1864, Jonesborough, Ga. ; mustered 
out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Nehemiah M. Redding, age 19; residence, 
Turlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 12, 1862, as sixth corporal; mustered 
September 12, 1862; promoted fifth sergeant October 12, 1862; killed in action 
October 26, 1863, Tuscumbia, Ala. (see Company D, Seventh Infantry). David 
Rock, age 18; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted 
January 13, 1865; mustered January 13, 1865; transferred to Company C, 
Fourth Infantry, May 30, 1865. George Ruff, age 20; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Germany; enlisted July 31, 1862, as fourth sergeant; mustered Sep- 



238 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

tember 12, 1862; reduced to fifth corporal October 12, 1862; promoted third cor- 
poral July 1, 1864; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington. D. C. (see Company 
D, First Infantry). Orange S. Seamans, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativ- 
ity, Iowa; enlisted August 6, 1862; mustered September 12, 1862; died February 
5, 1863, on hospital boat. Robert M. Seamans, age 23; residence, Burlington; 
nativity. Iowa ; appointed first lieutenant July 23, 1862 ; mustered September 2j, 
1862; died of disease February 4, 1863, Burlington, Iowa. Caspar Shrader, age 
20; residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted August 5, 1862; mustered 
September 12, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. John W. 
Sisler, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 21, 1862; 
mustered September 12, 1862; died of disease December 22, 1862, Helena, Ark. 
George D. Smith, age 20; residence, Burlington; nativity, Pennsylvania; en- 
listed August 4, 1862; mustered September 12, 1862; transferred to Invalid 
Corps, September 1, 1863; no further record. Daniel J. Spencer, age 20; resi- 
dence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 6, 1862, as drummer; mus- 
tered September 12, 1802; wounded slightly August 31, 1864, Jonesborough, 
Ga. ; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Charles N. Stoddard, age 
iS; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 9, 18(12; mustered 
September 12, 1862; wounded March 20, 1865, Mill Creek, N. C. ; mustered 
out July 7, 1865, David's Island, X. Y. Oscar A. Stout, age 18; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 9, 1862; mustered September 12, 
1862; wounded; finger amputated July 22, 1864; Atlanta, Ga. ; promoted eighth 
corporal; taken prisoner February 3. 1865, Hickory Hill, S. C. ; mustered 
out July 15, 1865, Davenport, Iowa. John Sulzer, age 19; residence, Burling- 
ton; nativity, Germany; enlisted August 4, 1862; mustered September 12, 1862; 
discharged for disability February 18, 1863, St. Louis, Mo. Groeling Ub- 
belohde, age 43; residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted August 11, 
1862; mustered September 12, 1862; died December 6, 1863, Bridgeport, Ala.; 
buried in National Cemetery, Chattanooga, Tenn., section H, grave 345. David 
B. Underwood, age 19"; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 
2, 1862; mustered September 12, 1862; died of disease September 30, 1863, 
Memphis, Tenn.; buried in Mississippi River National Cemetery, Memphis, 
Tenn., section 1, grave 172. Theodore Volz, age 20; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Germany; enlisted July 31. 1862, as second sergeant; mustered Sep- 
tember 12. 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington. D. C. Lebanon, 
Walker, age 22; residence, Burlington; nativity, Virginia; enlisted August 14, 
1862; mustered September 12, 1862; died of disease March 19, 1864, St. Louis, 
Mo. ; buried at Arsenal Island, St. Louis, Mo. Lewis G. Walter, age 26 ; resi- 
dence, Burlington: nativity. Pennsylvania; enlisted August 9, 1862, as third 
sergeant; mustered September 12, 1862; promoted first sergeant November 2, 
1863; second liteutenant May 2, 1865; n °t mustered; mustered out June 6, 
1865; Washington, D. C. Oscar A. Wells, age 29; residence, Burlington; 
nativity. New York; enlisted August 22, 1862, as first corporal; mustered Sep- 
tember 12, 1862; discharged for disability December 19, 1862, Helena, Ark. 
Abial L. Wintz, age 26 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Ohio ; enlisted August 
14, 1862; mustered September 12, 1862; promoted musician; discharged for pro- 
motion in United States Colored Infantry October 22, 1864, Little River, Ga. 
Levi I. Woodmansee, age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 239 

August 6, 1862; mustered September 12, 1862; discharged for disability April 
8, 1863, Keokuk, Iowa. David Work, age 27; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Pennsylvania; enlisted August 22, 1862; mustered September 12, 1862; trans- 
ferred to Veteran Reserve Corps March 15, 1864; no further record. 

COMPANY E 

Privates: Thomas R. Acres, age 18; residence Burlington; nativity, Spain; 
enlisted July 18, 1862, as second sergeant; mustered July 18, 1862; mustered 
out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Charles G. Anderson, age 18; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Sweden; enlisted August 15, 1862; mustered August 15, 
1862; wounded June 24, 1864, Kenesaw Mountain, Ga. ; mustered out June 
6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Rollin Arnold, age 21; residence, Burlington; na- 
tivity, Virginia; enlisted August 22, 1862; mustered August 22, 1862; mustered 
out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Franklin B. Baker, age 30; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 15, 1862; mustered August 15, 1862; 
mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Edward C. Bangs, age 25 ; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Illinois; enlisted August 14, 1862; mustered 
August 14, 1862; promoted eighth corporal, April 10, 1863; second sergeant 
January 22, 1864; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Charles Baw- 
mann, age 27 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Germany ; enlisted August 4, 
1862; mustered August 4, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. 
William Bawmann, age 24 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Germany ; enlisted 
August 5, 1862; mustered August 5, 1862; wounded slightly January 11, 1863, 
Arkansas Post, Ark.; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. John N. 
Bell, age 23; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; appointed captain July 21, 
1862; mustered September 27, 1862; wounded slightly January 11, 1863, Arkan- 
sas Post, Ark.; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Edward Benk- 
ert, age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, Saxony; enlisted Aug. 11, 1862; 
mustered August 11, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. 
Albert Benson, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Illinois; enlisted August 
22, 1862, as drummer; mustered August 22, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1862, 
Washington, D. C. Samuel H. Borger, age 29; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Sweden; enlisted August 8, 1862; mustered August 8, 1862; died of disease 
October 19, 1863, St. Louis, Mo. ; buried in National Cemetery, Jefferson Bar- 
racks (St Louis), Mo., section 31, grave 96. Nick Bouquet, age 21 ; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted July 5, 1862, as fourth sergeant; mus- 
tered July 5, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Joseph 
Breece, age 23 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Indiana ; enlisted August 2, 
1862; mustered August 2, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. 
James H. Brewer, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Pennsylvania; en- 
listed August 22, 1862; mustered September 10, 1862; mustered out June 6, 
1865, Washington, D. C. Louis Brucker, age 18; residence, Burlington; na- 
tivity, France; enlisted August 12, 1862; mustered August 12, 1862; mustered 
out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Thomas P. Bryan, age 20; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Missouri; enlisted February 25, 1864; mustered February 
25, 1864; transferred to Company C, Fourth Infantry, May 30, 1865 (Thomas 
P. Bryant). John A. Burge, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Tennes- 



240 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

see; enlisted July 21, 1862; mustered July 21, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, 
Washington, D. C. John Burns, age 25 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Ire- 
land ; enlisted July 22, 1862; mustered July 22, 1862; wounded December 28, 
1862, Vicksburg, Miss.; transferred to Invalid Corps September 3, 1863; dis- 
charged July 5, 1865, Indianapolis, Ind. William Butt, age 38; residence, Bur- 
lington; nativity. Ohio; enlisted February 25, 1864; mustered February 25, 
1864; transferred to Company C, Fourth Infantry, May 30, 1865. James A. 
Castell, age 20; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 2, 1862; 
mustered August 2, 1862 ; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. William 
A. Castell, age 26 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Iowa ; enlisted August 15, 1862 ; 
mustered August 15, 1862 ; transferred to Invalid Corps, September 1, 1863; mus- 
tered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Jacob Cline, age 18; residence, Bur- 
lington; nativity, Germany; enlisted July 31, 1862; mustered July 31, 1862; pro- 
moted fifth corporal March 19, 1863; wounded slightly November 27, 1863, Ring- 
gold, Ga. ; promoted third sergeant November 9, 1864; wounded severely March 
20, 1865; Bentonville, N. C. ; mustered out July 6, 1865, David's Island, New 
York. Edmund B. Davis, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; en- 
listed August 12, 1862; mustered August 12, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, 
Washington, D. C. Ephraim Davis, age 21; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Ohio; enlisted July 28, 1862; mustered July 28, 1862; promoted second ser- 
geant May 17, 1863; died of disease December 25, 1863, Memphis, Tenn. Ben- 
jamin B. Davison, age 21 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; enlisted 
August 7, 1862; mustered August 7, 1862; killed in action May 19, 1863, Vicks- 
. burg, Miss. John G. Davison, age 25 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Penn- 
sylvania ; enlisted, August 9, 1862; mustered August 9, 1862; promoted fourth 
corporal October 24, 1862; second lieutenant March 1. 1863; mustered out June 
6, 1865. Washington, D. C. John S. Dodge, age 40; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, New York; enlisted July 24, 1862, as third sergeant; mustered July 
24, 1862; mustered out May 8, 1865, Davenport, Iowa. John Donahue, age 28; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Ireland; enlisted August 22, 1862; mustered 
August 22, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Richard 
Dressel, age 21; residence, Burlington; nativity, Prussia; enlisted August 15, 
1862, as first corporal; mustered August 15, 1862; discharged for disability 
March 28, 1863, St. Louis, Mo. (see Company E, Eighth Cavalry). Albert B. 
Dunham, age 21; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted July 19, 1862, 
as sixth corporal; mustered July 19, 1862; discharged for promotion as captain 
and assistant quartermaster United States Volunteers, August 4, 1864. David 
Earnest, age 43 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; enlisted August 
15, 1862; mustered August 15, 1S62; transferred to Invalid Corps September 
1, 1863; died October 22, 1863, Memphis, Tenn.; buried in Mississippi River 
National Cemetery, Memphis, Tenn., section 1, grave 1 10. Griffith Elliott, age 
20; residence, Burlington; nativity, Pennsylvania ; enlisted October 29, 1862; 
mustered April 29, 1863 ; died of disease June 26, 1863, St. Louis Mo. ; buried 
in National Cemetery, Jefferson Barracks, (St. Louis) Mo., section 1, grave 
183. William H. Ennis, age 25; residence, Burlington; nativity, New York; 
enlisted July 31, 1862; mustered July 31, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, 
Washington, D. C. Joseph N. Fleming, age 21; residence, Burlington; nativity. 
Ohio; enlisted July 19, 1862; mustered July 19, 1862; promoted second corporal 




LEFT, CHARLES STAFF; RIGHT, DAVID A. EARNEST 
Members of the Thirty-seventh and Twenty-fifth Iowa Infantry dining the Civil War 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 241 

August 21, 1863; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Harry V. 
Foote, age 17; residence, Burlington; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted Novem- 
ber 2, 1862; mustered November 2, 1862; promoted drummer, died of disease 
July 15. 1863, regimental hospital, Walnut Hills, Miss. Walter L. Gamage, 
age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 7, 1862, as fifer; 
mustered August 7, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. James 
Gant, age 27; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 14, 1862; 
mustered August 14, 1862; died of disease, March 23, 1863; St. Louis, Mo. 
William B. Garman, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Pennsylvania; en- 
listed August 2, 1862; mustered August 2, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, 
Washington, D. C. Robert W. Gregg, age 19; residence, Parrish; nativity, 
Virginia; enlisted August 22, 1862; mustered August 22, 1862; mustered out 
June 6, 1865; Washington, D. C. Virgil Gregg, age 18; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 22, 1862; mustered August 22, 1862; trans- 
ferred to Veteran Reserve Corps July 1, 1864; mustered out August 12, 1865. 
William Gregg, age 31; residence, Burlington; nativity, Virginia. Enlisted 
August 22, 1862; promoted quartermaster sergeant (see field and staff). 
Robert Grieves, age 23 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Ohio ; enlisted August 
7, 1862; mustered August 7, 1862; discharged March 1, 1865, Goldsboro, N. C. 
William Grieves, age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted July 
28, 1862; mustered July 28, 1862; died of disease November 17, 1862, Burling- 
ton, Iowa. Charles Gross, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Pennsyl- 
vania; enlisted August 21, 1862; mustered August 21, 1862; mustered out 
June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Johannes Gubser, age 25 ; residence, Burling- 
ton ; nativity, Switzerland; enlisted July 29, 1862; mustered July 29, 1862; 
wounded severely May 22, 1863, Vicksburg, Miss.; died of wounds June 19, 
1863, Memphis, Tenn. Albert Hanna, age 20; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Iowa; enlisted August 22, 1862; mustered August 22, 1862; mustered out 
June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Lewis R. Hilleary, age 19 ; residence, Bur- 
lington ; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 5, 1862; mustered August 5, 1862; mus- 
tered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Gustav Holmbrecker, age 24 ; resi- 
dence, Burlington ; nativity, Prussia ; enlisted July 27,, 1862 ; mustered July 23, 
1862; promoted fifth corporal November 9, 1864; mustered out June 6, 1865, 
Washington, D. C. (see Company D, First Infantry). Dennis Holden, age 41; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted July 31, 1862; mustered July 31, 
1862 (see Fourth Infantry). (Unassigned). Endoras A. Holland, age 20; 
residence, Burlington ; nativity, Iowa ; enlisted August 22, 1862 ; mustered Sep- 
tember 27, 1862; promoted wagoner; wounded severely January 11, 1863, Ar- 
kansas Post, Ark.; died of wounds January 15, 1863, Memphis, Tenn.; buried 
in Mississippi River National Cemetery, Memphis, Tenn. Homer Holland, age 
18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 13, 1862; mustered 
August 13. 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Daniel Hoover, 
age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted August 4, 1862; 
mustered August 4, 1862; died of disease January 7, 1863, Helena, Ark. George 
W. Hoover, age 22 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; enlisted 
August 11, 1862, as fifth sergeant; mustered August 11, 1862; discharged for 
disability April 10, 1863, St. Louis, Mo. Martin Hoover, age 20; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted August 2, 1862; mustered August 2, 



242 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. David Hunter, age 28; 
residence, Burlington;- nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 15, 1862; mustered 
August 15, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Jacob Juengel, 
age 22; residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; -enlisted August 8, 1862; 
mustered August 8, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Ed- 
ward S. Kendall, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Indiana; enlisted July 
25, 1862, as seventh corporal; mustered July 25, 1862; mustered out June 6, 
1865, Washington, D. C. Joseph L. King, age 39; residence, Burlington; nativ- 
ity, Pennsylvania; enlisted August 7, 1862; mustered August 7, 1862; mustered 
out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Martin Kirchmer, age 22 ; residence, Bur- 
lington ; nativity, Germany; enlisted October 24, 1862; mustered April 29, 1863; 
wounded May 22, 1863, Yicksburg, Miss.; mustered out June 6, 1865, Wash- 
ington, D. C. James B. Layton, age 21; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; 
enlisted July 30, 1862; mustered July. 30, 1862; killed in action May 22, 1863, 
Yicksburg, Miss. Andrew W. Linburg, age 22; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Sweden; enlisted August 15, 1862; mustered August 15, 1862; discharged for 
disability September 11, 1863, Black Bridge, Miss. James M. Neal, age 18; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted August 22, 1862; mus- 
tered August 22, 1862; promoted first corporal September 1, 1864; mustered 
out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Lucius Newcomb, age 24; residence, Bur- 
lington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 21, 1862; mustered August 21, 1862; 
wounded severely January 11, 1863, Arkansas Post, Ark.; died of disease July 
7, 1863, Walnut Hills, Miss. ; buried in National Cemetery, Vicksburg, Miss.; 
section G, grave 1252. Samuel K. Peel, age 38; residence, Burling- 
ton; nativity, Virginia; enlisted August 15, 1862; mustered August 15, 
1862; promoted fourth corporal February 20, 1863; second corporal 
March 28, 1863; discharged for disability August 21, 1863; Vicksburg, 
Miss. Swan F. Peterson, age 31; residence, Burlington; nativity, Sweden; 
enlisted August 22, 1862; mustered August 22, 1862; killed in action January 
11, 18(13, Arkansas Post, Ark. Charles L. Renz, age 24; residence, Burlington; 
vity. Pennsylvania; enlisted July 30, 1862; mustered July 30, 1862; wounded 
s. tly January 11, 1863, Arkansas Post, Ark.; wounded October 21, 1863, 
Che, jkee, Ala.; died July 15, 18(14, Memphis, Tenn. Adolph Schrei, age 22; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted August 22, 1862; mustered 
August 22, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Joseph Schuler, 
age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, Baden; enlisted July 31, 1862; mustered 
July 31, 1862; discharged for disability August 1, 1S63, Camp Sherman, Miss, 
(see Company F, Eighth Infantry). Joseph Shafer, age 22; residence, Burling- 
ton; nativity, Germany; enlisted August 6, 1862; mustered August 6, 1862; dis- 
charged for disability September 29, 1864, East Point, Ga. John W. Shafer, 
age 26 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Germany ; appointed second lieutenant 
July 24, 1862; mustered July 24, 1862; promoted first lieutenant March 1, 1863; 
mustered out June 6, 1865. Washington, D. C. Daniel Shultz, age 18; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted February 25, 1864; mustered Feb- 
ruary 25, 1864; transferred to Company C, Fourth Infantry, May 30, 1865. 
David C. Shultz, age 22 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; enlisted 
August 2, 1862, as fourth corporal; mustered August 2, 1862; deserted October 
15, 1862, Camp McKean (Mount Pleasant), Iowa. John Shultz, age 42; resi- 



HISTORY OF t>ES MOINES COUNTY 243 

dence, Burlington; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted August 2, 1862; mustered 
August 2, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Samuel W. 
Snow, age 24; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; appointed first lieutenant 
July 21, 1862; mustered July 21, 1862; promoted adjutant March 1, 1863; 
wounded November 27, 1863, Ringgold, Ga. ; wounded August, 1864, Atlanta, 
Ga. ; resigned for promotion as captain and assistant adjutant general, United 
States Volunteers, April 8, 1865. James S. Spencer, age 27; residence, Burling- 
ton; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted August 15, 1862, as first sergeant; mustered 
August 15, 1862; reduced to third corporal October 1, 1862; wounded December 
28, 1862, Vicksburg, Miss. ; promoted first corporal ; discharged for promotion 
in First Mississippi Colored Infantry, February 23, 1864, Vicksburg, Miss. 
Walter Steingraber, age 19 ; residence, Des Moines County ; nativity, Germany ; 
enlisted February 29, 1864; mustered February 29, 1864; wounded severely; 
leg amputated July 22, 1864, Atlanta, Ga. ; transferred to Company G, Fourth 
Infantry, May 30, 1865. Frazier Storer, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Pennsylvania; enlisted August 6, 1862; mustered August 6, 1862; died of 
disease February 14, 1863, St. Louis, Mo. John C. Tallman, age 18; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Virginia; enlisted July 30, 1862; mustered July 30, 1862; 
promoted fourth corporal March 28, 1863; mustered out June 6, 1865, Wash- 
ington, D. C. Henry W. Taylor, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; 
enlisted August 14, 1862; mustered August 14, 1862; promoted eighth corporal 
January 22, 1864; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Isaac N. 
Train, age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, New York; enlisted August 21, 
1862; mustered August 21, 1862; taken prisoner and exchanged June 18, 1864, 
Kenesaw Mountain, Ga.; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. 
Thomas G. Troxel, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Pennsylvania; en- 
listed August 21, 1862; mustered August 21, 1862; promoted first sergeant 
October 1, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Robert Turner, 
age 26; residence, Burlington; nativity, Virginia; enlisted August n, 1862, as 
eighth corporal; mustered August 11, 1862; promoted fifth sergeant April " ■•, 
1863; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Seth Wade, age 29; 
dence, Burlington; nativity, Indiana; enlisted August 11, 1862; mustered A j ast 
11, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Thomas Wagg, age 
19; residence, Burlington; nativity, England; enlisted August 11, 1862; mustered 
August 11, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. George Ward, 
age 31; residence, Burlington; nativity, Massachusetts; enlisted August 15, 1862, 
as third corporal; mustered August 15, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Wash- 
ington, D. C. Hugh Watson, age 24; residence Burlington; nativity, Ohio; 
enlisted August 12, 1862; mustered August 12, 1862; discharged for disability 
April 8, 1863, St. Louis, Mo. Frederick Weiss, age 19; residence Burlington; 
nativity, Germany; enlisted August 11, 1862; mustered August 11, 1862; mus- 
tered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Martin Whitehead, age 18; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, England; enlisted July 19, 1862, as second corporal; mus- 
tered July 19, 1862; discharged for disability July 29, 1863, Vicksburg, Miss, 
(see Company F, Forty-fifth Infantry). Joseph P. Wightman, Jr., age 23; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 22, 1862; mustered August 
22, 1862; promoted sergeant major June 11, 1863; adjutant April 20, 1865; mus- 
tered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. William B. Williamson, age 44; resi- 



244 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

dence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted July 24, 1862; mustered July 24, 1862; 
mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Lawrence M. Wilson, age 19; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 2, 1862; mustered August 
2, 1862; wounded slightly November 2J, 1863, Ringgold, Ga. ; promoted first 
corporal; killed in action September 1, 1864, Jonesborough, Ga. John Yealey, 
age 27; residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted August 11, 1862; mus- 
tered August 11, 1862; died of disease September 30, 1864, East Point, Ga. ; 
buried in National Cemetery, Marietta, Ga. ; ' section E, grave 873. Henry L. 
Young, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Mississippi; enlisted July 21, 
1862; mustered July 21, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. 

COMPANY G 

Privates: Charles Ackles, age 43; residence, Burlington; nativity, Illinois; 
enlisted August 15, 1862, as sixth corporal; mustered September 10, 1862; dis- 
charged for disability February 28, 1863, St. Louis, Mo. Samuel Adair, age 20; 
residence, Burlington ; nativity, Ohio ; enlisted August 2, 1862 ; mustered Sep- 
tember 10, 1862; died July 27, 1863, Milliken's Bend, La. John Aitken, age 23; 
residence, Middletown ; nativity, Scotland; enlisted August 12, 1862; mustered 
September 10, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. John Baner, 
age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 22, 1862; mustered 
September 10, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Jacob B. 
Barnhart, age 39 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; enlisted Au- 
gust 14, 1862; mustered September 10, 1862; wounded January 11, 1863, Arkan- 
sas Post, Ark.; died of wounds January 17, 1863, on hospital boat, "D. A. Jan- 
uary ;" buried in Mississippi River National Cemetery, Memphis, Term. John 
Barton, age 22; residence, Middletown; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 14, 1862; 
mustered September 10, 1862; died of disease July 7, 1864, Rome, Ga. ; buried 
in National Cemetery, Marietta, Ga., section C, grave 370. Benjamin F. Bonner, 
age 23; residence, Danville; nativity, Indiana; enlisted August 18, 1862; mus- 
tered September 10, 1862; died of disease March 27, 1863, Young's Point, La.; 
buried in National Cemetery, Vicksburg, Miss., section C, grave 311. Nelson 
Bundy, age 44 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, New York ; enlisted July 29, 
[862; mustered September 10, 1862; wounded September 3, 1864, Lovejoy's 
Station, Ga. ; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. William F. Burns; 
rejected September 27, 1862, by mustering officer. Christopher Carnahan, age 
22; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Iowa; enlisted February 1, 1865; 
mustered February 1, 1865; transferred to Company K, Ninth Infantry, May 
30, 1865. Daniel Channel, age 18; residence, Danville; nativity, Virginia; en- 
listed January 2^, 1865; mustered January 23, 1865; transferred to Company K, 
Ninth Infantry, May 30, 1865. James PL Chinnith, age 20; residence, Burling- 
ton; nativity, Iowa: enlisted August 7, 1862; mustered September 10, 1862; 
mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Charles Clark, age 19; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, France; enlisted August 22, 1862, as fifer; mustered Sep- 
tember 10, 1862 ; promoted principal musician ; returned to company October 10, 
1862; deserted October 11, 1862, Cam]) McKean (Mount Pleasant), Iowa (see 
field and staff). James H. Clark, age 32; residence, Burlington; nativity, New 
York; enlisted August 22, 1862; mustered September 10, 1862; deserted Octo- 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 245 

ber 9, 1862, Camp McKean, Mount Pleasant, Iowa. Robert Clark, age 31 ; res- 
idence, Middletown ; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted August 14, 1862; mus- 
tered September 10, 1862; missing in action January 11, 1863, Arkansas Post, 
Ark.; wounded March 20, 1865, Bentonville, N. C. ; mustered out June 8, 1865, 
Albany, N. Y. Cyrus R. Claypool, age 34; residence, Kossuth; nativity, Ohio; 
enlisted August 9, 1862; mustered September 10, 1862; mustered out June 6, 
1865, Washington, D. C. Henry J. Close, age 27; residence, Middletown; 
nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 6, 1862; mustered September 10, 1862; missing 
May 15, 1863, Yicksburg, Miss.; taken prisoner October 28, 1863, Tuscumbia, 
Ala.; died of disease December 14, 1863, Danville, Va. ; buried in National Cem- 
etery, Danville, Va. William F. Conrad, age 35 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, 
New York; enlisted August 13, 1862; mustered September 10, 1862; promoted 
sergeant-major (see field and staff; see also Company K). Winfield Cowden, 
age 18; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Missouri; enlisted January 25, 
1865; mustered January 25, 1865; transferred to Company F, Ninth Infantry, 
May 30, 1865. Carlisle Crawford, age 18; residence, Middletown; nativity, 
Iowa; enlisted August 7, 1862; mustered September 10, 1862; died November 
7, 1862, Yicksburg, Miss. George Culp, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Pennsylvania; enlisted January 18, 1864; mustered January 20, 1864; killed in 
action June 30, 1864, Kenesaw Mountain, Ga. ; buried in National Cemetery, 
Marietta, Ga., section A, grave 817. Aaron Daily, age 18; residence, Middle- 
town; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted August 14, 1862; mustered September 10, 
1862; mustered out May 18, 1865. Nashville. Tenn. William B. Daily, age 29; 
residence, Parrish; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted August 22, 1862; mustered 
September 10, 1862; died of disease June 21, 1863, Nashville, Tenn.; buried in 
National Cemetery, Nashville, Tenn, section J, grave 395. John G. Davis, age 
29; residence, Danville; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted August 14, 1862, as 
seventh corporal; mustered September 10, 1862; promoted sixth corporal; fifth 
corporal December 1, 1864; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Nich- 
olas Dockendorf , age 27 : residence, Burlington ; nativity, Germany ; enlisted 
October 5, 1864; mustered October 8, 1864; transferred to Company E, Ninth 
Infantry, May 30, 1865. Henry L. Dodge, age 25 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, 
Tennessee; enlisted October 6, 1864; mustered October 6, 1864; transferred to 
Company G, Ninth Infantry. May 30, 1865. Michael Eagan, age 38; residence, 
Des Moines County; nativity, Ireland; enlisted February 10, 1865; mustered 
February 10, 1865; transferred to Company I, Ninth Infantry, May 30, 1865. 
John Farroll, age 30 ; residence, Middletown ; nativity, Ireland ; enlisted August 

20, 1862; mustered September 10, 1862; wounded severely November 27, 1863, 
Ringgold, Ga. ; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. John W. Fetrow, 
age 42 ; residence Des Moines County ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; enlisted August 

21, 1862; mustered September 10, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, 
D. C. Calvin Follett, age 22 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, New York ; en- 
listed August 6, 1862; mustered September 10, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, 
Washington, D. C. Francis Fordney, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Virginia; enlisted October 7, 1864; mustered October 7, 1864; transferred to 
Company G, Ninth Infantry, May 30, 1865. Arthur O. Gieger, age 20; residence, 
Des Moines County; nativity, Germany; enlisted January 16, 1865; mustered 
January 16, 1865; transferred to Company G, Ninth Infantry, May 30, 1865. 



246 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

Lewis P. Gieger, agei8; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Germany; 
enlisted January 16, 1865; mustered January 16, 1865; transferred to Company 
K, Ninth Infantry, May 30, 1865. William F. Gilbert, age 18; residence, Bur- 
lington ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; enlisted July 26, 1862 ; mustered September 10, 
1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. James Goben, age 21; 
residence, Burlington ; nativity, Indiana ; enlisted August 16, 1862 ; mustered Sep- 
tember 10, 1862; discharged for disability March 21, 1863, St. Louis, Mo. Wil- 
liam Goundry, age 45 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, New York ; enlisted 
August 14, 1862; mustered September 10, 1862; transferred to Invalid Corps 
September 1, 1863 (no further record). Durbin Grupe, age 18; residence, Bur- 
lington; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted December 31, 1863; mustered Decem- 
ber 31, 1863; transferred to Company E, Ninth Infantry, May 30, 1865. Rodol- 
phia Hall, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, New York; enlisted July 20, 
1862; mustered September 10, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, 
D. C. Brainard D. Harper, age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; ap- 
pointed first lieutenant July 26, 1862; mustered September 27, 1862; resigned 
August 3, 1863 (see Company F, Forty-fifth Infantry). John Herman, age 29; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted August 21, 1862; mustered 
September 10, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Albert Hill, 
age 21; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 22, 1862; mus- 
tered September 10, 1862; promoted fifer; mustered out June 6, 1865, Wash- 
ington, D. C. (see Company H, Sixth Infantry). George Hill, age 37; residence, 
Burlington ; nativity, Ohio ; enlisted August 7, 1862 ; mustered September 10, 
1862; discharged for disability January 9, 1863, Jefferson Barracks, St. Louis, 
Mo. Micajah Hinson, age 25; residence, Kingston; nativity, Indiana; enlisted 
August 20, 1862; mustered September 10, 1862; died of disease January 17, 

1864, camp near Woodville, Ala. Robert Hodges, age 21; residence, Kossuth; 
nativity, Indiana; enlisted August 21, 1862; mustered September 10, 1862; died 
of disease January 26, 1863, on hospital boat Champion, near Yicksburg, Miss. 
Scott Hodges, age 19; residence, Kossuth; nativity, Indiana; enlisted August 8, 
1862; mustered September 10, 1862; killed in action May 22, 1863, Yicksburg, 
Miss. Rufus H. Holland, age 24; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Virginia; en- 
listed October 22, 1862; mustered October 22, 1862; discharged for disability 
June 27, 1863, St. Louis, Mo. Isaac Houseworth, age 38; residence, Burling- 
ton; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 6, 1862; mustered September 10, 1862'; 
wounded August 21, 1864, Jonesborough, Ga. ; mustered out June 6, 1865, Wash- 
ington, D. C. George W. Huff, age 22 ; residence, Des Moines County ; nativity, 
Indiana; enlisted January 16, 1865; mustered January 16, 1865; transferred to 
Company F, Ninth Infantry, May 30, 1865. John S. Jacoby, age 19; residence, 
Des Moines County; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted January 23, 1865; mus- 
tered Tanuary 23. 1865; transferred to Company I, Ninth Infantry, May 30, 
1865 (see Company F, Forty-fifth Infantry). Johnston Jacoby, age 27; res- 
idence, Burlington; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted August 11, 1862, as second 
sergeant; mustered September 27, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, 
D. C. Sebastian Jacoby, age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, Pennsylvania; 
enlisted August 1, 1862; mustered September 10, 1862; mustered out June 6, 

1865, Washington, D. C. Spence Johnson, age 28 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, 
New York; enlisted August 9, 1862, as fourth sergeant; mustered September 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 247 

io, 1S62; died of disease January 19, 1863, Benton Barracks, St. Louis, Mo.; 
buried in National Cemetery, Jefferson Barracks, St. Louis, Mo., section 38, 
grave 16 (see Company E, First Infantry (Spencer Johnson). Augustus Jones; 
rejected September 27, 1862, by mustering officer. David Judd, age 21 ; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 14, 1862; mustered September 10, 
1862; wounded slightly November 22, 1863, Ringgold, Ga. ; mustered out June 
6, 1865, Washington, D. C. David Keeler, age 19; residence, Burlington ; nativity, 
Iowa-; enlisted January 4, 1864; mustered January 4, 1864; transferred to Com- 
pany E, Ninth Infantry, May 30, 1865 (David Keller). James M. Kelly, age 18; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 9, 1862; mustered Sep- 
tember 10, 1862; wounded severely January 11, 1863, Arkansas Post, Ark.; 
died of wounds January 12, 1863, Arkansas Post, Ark. Richard Kelly, age 25; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Virginia; enlisted August 22, 1862; mustered 
September 10, 1862 ; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Clarence 
J. Lemen, age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, Illinois; enlisted August 20, 
1862, as fifth corporal; mustered September 10, 1862; reduced to sixth corporal; 
missing in action January 11, 1863, Arkansas Post, Ark. ; promoted fifth corporal; 
fourth corporal December 1, 1864; discharged for promotion in One Hundred 
and Twenty-eighth United States Colored Infantry March 26, 1865. Frederick 
Levey, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, New York; enlisted January 
27, 1865 ; mustered January 27, 1865 ; transferred to Company I, Ninth Infantry, 
May 30, 1865 (Frederick Levy). John Little, age 33; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Connecticut; enlisted January 1, 1864; mustered January 1, 1864; trans- 
ferred to Company H, Ninth Infantry, May 30, 1865. Isaac McCandless, age 
18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 9, 1862; mustered 
September 10, 1862; wounded May 22, 1863, Yicksburg, Miss.; mustered out 
June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. John McCune, age 28 ; residence, Middletown ; 
nativtiy, Pennsylvania; enlisted August 14, 1862; mustered September 10, 1862; 
promoted second corporal June 30, 1863 ; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, 
D. C. Andrew McGuire, age 36; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Ireland ; enlisted 
August 21, 1862; mustered September 10, 1862; killed in action January n, 1863, 
Arkansas Post, Ark. Henry Clay McKee, age 18; residence, Burlington ; nativity, 
Ohio; enlisted August 15, 1862; mustered September 10, 1862; discharged for 
disability April 2, 1863, St. Louis, Mo. Isaac McLane, age 19 ; residence, Bur- 
lington ; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted August 22, 1862; mustered September 
10, 1862; transferred to Invalid Corps January 15, 1864; no further record. 
Hugh McLernon, age 21 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Ireland ; enlisted August 
21, 1862; mustered September 10, 1862; missing in action May 22, 1863, Walnut 
Hills, Miss.; supposed to have been killed. Joseph Mott, age 18; residence, Bur- 
lington ; nativity, Germany ; enlisted August 2, 1862 ; mustered September 10, 
1862; promoted third corporal January 31, 1863; second corporal; fourth ser- 
geant June 30, 1863; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. James E. 
Mower, age 24; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted October 7, 1864; 
mustered October 8, 1864; transferred to Company I, Ninth Infantry, May 30, 
1865. Albert Murphy, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Indiana; enlisted 
January 19, 1865 ; mustered January 19, 1865 ; transferred to Company H, Ninth 
Infantry, May 30, 1865 (see Company F, Forty-fifth Infantry). Michael Murphy, 
age 26; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Ireland; enlisted March 16, 



248 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

1864; mustered March 21, 1863; transferred to Company F, Ninth Infantry, May 
30, 1865. Thomas Murphy, age 24 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Ireland ; 
enlisted August 22, 1862; mustered September 10, 1862; wounded May 26, 1864, 
Dallas, Ga. ; promoted seventh corporal December 1, 1864; mustered out June 6, 
1865, Washington, D. C. Samuel J. Myers, age 23; residence, Middletown ; 
nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 20, 1862; mustered September 10, 1862; died 
January 30. 1863, on transport. Isaac B. S. Nelson, age 24; residence, Burling- 
ton: nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 22, 1862; mustered September 10, 1862; 
promoted wagoner; transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps March 15, 1864; dis- 
charged July 5, 1865, Harrisburg, Penn. James Newton, age 22; residence, Des 
Moines County ; nativity, New York ; enlisted January 9, 1865 ; mustered January 
9, 1865; transferred to Company H, Ninth Infantry, May 30. 1865. William 
Nicholson, age 27; residence, Danville; nativity, Indiana; enlisted August 21, 
1862 ; mustered September 10, 1862 ; mustered out June 14, 1865, Nashville, Tenn. 
Frank J. Parks, age 21 ; residence, Burlington; nativity, Illinois; enlisted August 
20, 1862; mustered September 10, 1862; deserted October 31, 1862, from steamer 
Decatur, Burlington, Iowa. Philemon Parr, age 18; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Iowa ; enlisted January 30, 1865 ; mustered January 30, 1865 ; transferred 
to Company H, Ninth Infantry, May 30, 1865 (see Company F, Forty-fifth Infan- 
try). John Pattison, age 26; residence, Burlington: nativity, Ohio; enlisted 
August 21, 1862; mustered September 10, 1862; wounded; mustered out June 6, 
1865, Washington, D. C. Alexander Pelein, age 36; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Ireland; enlisted August 11, 1862; mustered September 10, 1862; died 
of disease September 22, 1863, Black River Bridge, Miss.; buried in National 
Cemetery, Yicksburg, Miss., section F, grave 177. John L. Pierson, age 18; 
residence. Burlington; nativity, Illinois; enlisted August 2, 1862; mustered Sep- 
tember 10, 1862; promoted second sergeant October 3, 1862; wounded May 19, 
1863, Walnut Bluffs, Miss.; promoted first sergeant; discharged for wounds 
January 23, 1863, St. Louis, Mo. Isaac Proudfit, age 18; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 11, 1862; mustered September 10. 1862; died of 
disease January 12, 1862, Helena, Ark. William Rankin, age 19; residence, 
Middletown; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted August 7, 1862, as first corporal; 
mustered September 10, 1862; promoted fourth sergeant January 31, 1863: third 
sergeant; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. John G. Reese, age 27; 
residence, Middletown ; nativity, Wales: enlisted August 21. 1862; mustered Sep- 
tember 10, 1862; missing in action January 11, 1863, Arkansas Post, Ark.; died 
of disease May 11, 1863, St. Louis, Mo. James D. Rice, age 20; residence, Bur- 
lington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 20, 1862; mustered September 10, 1862; 
mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Joseph Rice, age 18; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 22, 1862; mustered September 10, 
1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Arch. Rigsby, age 18; 
residence, Burlington"; nativity. Illinois; enlisted August 9, 1862; mustered Sep- 
tember 10, i862rpromoted eighth corporal December 1, 1864; mustered out June 
6, 1865. Washington, D. C. Joseph Robbins, age 18; residence, Des Moines 
County: nativity, Iowa; enlisted January 13, 1865; mustered January 13, 1865; 
transferred to Company K, Ninth Infantry, May 30, 1865. John G. Roth, age 23 ; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted August 22, 1862; mustered 
September 10, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. George A. 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 249 

Rouse, age 23; residence, Kossuth; nativity, Indiana; enlisted August 21, 1862; 
mustered September 10, 1862; killed in action January 11, 1863, Arkansas Post, 
Ark. Peter Rusch, age 21 ; residence, Burlington; nativity, Switzerland; enlisted 
August 15, 1862, as eighth corporal; mustered September 10, 1862; promoted 
seventh corporal; sixth corporal December 1, 1864; mustered out June 6, 1865, 
Washington, D. C. Milton Salladay, age 27; residence, • Burlington ; nativity, 
Indiana; enlisted August 9, 1862, as wagoner; mustered September 10, 1862; 
discharged for disability April 4, 1863, St. Louis, Mo. George W. Sargent, age 
18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted July 26, 1862; mustered Sep- 
tember 10, 1862; discharged for disability June 11, 1863. Young's Point, La. 
James E. Sargent, age 18; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Ohio; enlisted July 26, 

1862, as second corporal; mustered September 10, 1862; reduced to third corporal 
October 3, 1862; died of disease January 24, 1863, on hospital boat Champion, 
Young's Point, La. Charles F. W. Schell, age 18; residence, Burlington ; nativity, 
Germany; enlisted December 31, 1863; mustered December 31, 1863; transferred 
to Company E, Ninth Infantry, May 30. 1865. Alonzo Shephard, age 19; resi- 
dence, Burlington ; nativity, Indiana ; enlisted August 22, 1862 ; mustered Sep- 
tember 10, 1862; wounded slightly May 18, 1863, Yicksburg, Miss. ; mustered out 
June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Reuben Shiffert, age 25; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted August 14, 1862, as first sergeant; mustered Sep- 
tember 10, 1862; died of disease June 24, 1863, Vicksburg, Miss.; buried in 
National Cemetery, Vicksburg, Miss., section G, grave 1241 (see Company E, 
First Infantry). Conrad Spangler, age 36; residence, Danville; nativity, Ger- 
many; enlisted August 20, 1862; mustered September 10, 1862; promoted first 
corporal January 31, 1863 ; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Samuel 
M. Steel, age 20; residence, Burlington; nativity, Indiana; enlisted August 11, 
1862; mustered September 10, 1862; died of disease August 18, 1863, on hospital 
boat Nashville, Yicksburg, Miss. James Stinson, age 25 ; residence, Danville ; 
nativity, Ireland; enlisted January 20, 1865; mustered January 20, 1865; trans- 
ferred to Company H, Ninth Infantry, May 30, 1865. Richard Storer, age 24 ; 
residence, Burlington ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; enlisted August 20, 1862 ; mus- 
tered September 10, 1862; missing after action January 11, 1863, Arkansas Post, 
Ark. ; died of disease July 5, 1863, Burlington, Iowa. William I. Tizzard, age 20; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; appointed second lieutenant July 26, 1862; 
mustered September 27, 1862; promoted first lieutenant August 4, 1863; mustered 
out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. (see Company E. First Infantry). Eli Todd, 
age 26; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 15, 1862; mustered 
September 10, 1862; transferred to Invalid Corps December 15, 1863; discharged 
July, 1865, Jefferson Barracks (St. Louis), Mo. Israel Todd, age 25; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 15, 1862; mustered September 10, 
1862; discharged for disability March 13, 1863, St. Louis, Mo. Joseph Utter, 
age 29; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; appointed captain July 26, 1862; 
mustered September 27, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. 
John W. Vanosdol, age 18 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Iowa ; enlisted August 
20, 1862; mustered September 10, 1862; discharged for disability February 23, 

1863, Young's Point, La. George W. Vertz, age 18; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted August 16, 1862; mustered September 10, 1862; 
mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Lewis McC. Yertz, age 17; resi- 



250 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

dence, Des Moines County; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted March 28, 1864; 
mustered March 28, 1864: transferred to Company E, Ninth Infantry, May 30, 
1865 (Lewis C. Mc Verts). Edward Ward, age 18; residence, Des Moines 
County; nativity, Iowa; enlisted February 22, 1862; mustered February 22, 1862; 
transferred to Company F, Ninth Infantry, May 30, 1865. Isaac Ward, age 18; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 1, 1862, as third corporal; 
mustered September 10, 1862; promoted fifth sergeant December 1, 1864; mus- 
tered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. John W. Ward, age 20 ; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 9, 1862; mustered September 10, 
1862; wounded May 22, 1863, Yicksburg, Miss.; discharged for wounds October 
21, 1863, Keokuk, Iowa. Andrew W r atson, age $7 '. residence, Burlington ; nativity, 
New York; enlisted October 5, 1864; mustered October 5, 1864; transferred to 
Company G, Ninth Infantry, May 30, 1865. Henry C. Watts, age 15 ; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, New York; enlisted August 2^, 1862, as drummer; mus- 
tered September 10, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. William 
E. W r ehmer, age 21 ; residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted August 2, 
1862; mustered September 10, 1862 ; wounded November 27, 1863, Ringgold, Ga. ; 
wounded April 12, 1865, Raleigh, N. C. ; mustered out June 21, 1865, Philadelphia, 
Pa. Erick West, age 28 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Sweden ; enlisted Octo- 
ber 6, 1864; mustered October 8, 1864; transferred to Company G, Ninth Infan- 
try, May 30, 1865. Cornelius Wilkin, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Ohio; enlisted August 14, 1862, as fourth corporal ; mustered September 10, 1862; 
promoted third corporal December 1, 1864; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washing- 
ton, D. C. Andrew Willem, age 18 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Iowa ; enlisted 
August 22, 1862; mustered September 10, 1862; killed in action June 19, 1863, 
Yicksburg, Miss. Cyrus L. Wilson, age 19 ; residence, Parrish ; nativity, Penn- 
sylvania ; enlisted August 16, 1862; mustered September 10, 1862; mustered out 
June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Jacob Wolfe, age 19; residence, Middletown; 
nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 7, 1862; mustered September 10, 1862; wounded 
December 28, 1862, Yicksburg, Miss.; died of disease July 11, 1863, Memphis, 
Tenn. 

COMPANY H 

Privates: Calvin Johnson, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; 
enlisted October 7, 1864; mustered October 7, 1864; transferred to Company D, 
Ninth Infantry, May 30, 1865. 

company 1 

Privates: Albert L. Cox, age 18 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Ohio ; 
enlisted March 24, 1864; mustered March 24, 1864; transferred to Company B, 
Ninth Infantry, May 30, 1865. 

COMPANY K 

Privates: Merril Antrobus, age 25; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, 
Indiana ; enlisted August 9, 1862, as fifth sergeant ; mustered September 10, 1862 ; 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 251 

promoted fourth sergeant; third sergeant; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washing- 
ton, D. C. James S. Bishop, age 26; residence, Pleasant Grove; nativity, Indiana; 
enlisted August 22, 1862; mustered September 10, 1862; mustered out June 6, 
1865, Washington, D. C. John R. Bishop, age 18; residence, Des Moines County; 
nativity, Iowa; enlisted March 7, 1864; mustered March 8, 1864; transferred to 
Company A, Ninth Infantry, May 30, 1865. Camillus L. Burnett, age 18; resi- 
dence, Pleasant Grove ; nativity, Iowa ; enlisted August 22, 1862 ; mustered Sep- 
tember 10, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. William F. Con- 
rad, age 35 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, New York ; promoted captain from 
sergeant major January 1, 1863; taken prisoner May 15, 1864, Raymond, Miss.; 
mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. (see field and staff; see also Com- 
pany G). John T. Laughlin, age 25; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, 
Illinois; enlisted August 8, 1862, as fourth corporal; mustered September 10, 
1862; promoted second corporal February 12, 1863; first corporal; discharged 
July 29, 1863, Yicksburg, Miss. John H. McCune, age 19; residence, Des Moines 
County; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 22, 1862; mustered September 10, 1862 
died of disease August 17, 1865, hospital, Vicksburg, Miss. James M. Philpott 
age 18; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 12, 1862 
mustered September 10, 1862; wounded January n, 1863, Arkansas Post, Ark. 
discharged for wounds April 4, 1862, Memphis, Tenn. David Scott, age 22 
residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 22, 1862; mus- 
tered September 10, 1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Chris- 
topher C. Stanley, age 23 ; residence, Pleasant Grove ; nativity, Alabama ; enlisted 
August 22, 1862; mustered September 10, 1862; wounded January n, 1863, 
Arkansas Post, Ark. ; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. James P. 
Steele, age 19 ; residence, Des Moines County ; nativity, Ohio ; enlisted August 7, 
1862; mustered September 10, 1862; died of disease June 23, 1863, camp near 
Yicksburg, Miss. ; buried in National Cemetery, Vicksburg, Miss., section G, 
grave 1374. Uriah M. Stewart, age 30; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, 
Ohio ; enlisted August 13, 1862 ; mustered September 10, 1862 ; mustered out June 
6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Joseph Talbot, age 25; residence, Des Moines 
County; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 22, 1862; mustered September 10, 1862; 
mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. James M. Tibbett, age 21 ; resi- 
dence, Pleasant Grove ; nativity, Indiana ; enlisted August 7, 1862, as second 
sergeant; mustered September 10, 1862; promoted second lieutenant June 10, 
1863; first lieutenant August 22, 1863; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, 
D. C. (see Company F, First Infantry). Andrew J. Yirgin, age 22; residence, 
Pleasant Grove ; nativity, Ohio ; enlisted August 18, 1862 ; mustered September 
10, 1862; wounded; leg amputated January 11, 1863, Arkansas Post, Ark.; died 
of wounds January 15, 1863, on steamer D. A. January, near Memphis, Tenn.; 
buried in Mississippi River National Cemetery, Memphis, Tenn. James M. 
Virgin, age 26; residence, Pleasant Grove; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 15, 
1862; mustered September 10, 1862; promoted second sergeant; mustered out 
June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. Milton Wise, age 24 ; residence, Des Moines 
County; nativity, Indiana; enlisted August 22, 1862; mustered September 10, 
1862; mustered out June 6, 1865, Washington, D. C. 



252 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

THIRTIETH REGIMENT, IOWA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 

Term of service, three years. Mustered into service of the United States at 
Keokuk, Iowa, September 23, 1862, by Lieut. Charles J. Ball, United States Army. 
Mustered out of service June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. 

Roster of file, commissioned and non-commissioned staff officers at muster in 
of organization, together with subsequent appointments from civil life: 

Field and Staff: Charles H. Abbott, age 43 ; residence, Columbus City ; nativ- 
ity. Xew Hampshire; appointed colonel August 10, 1862; mustered September 23, 
1862; killed in action May 22, 1863, Vicksburg, Miss. William M. G. Torrence, 
age 38; residence, Keokuk; nativity, Pennsylvania; appointed lieutenant colonel 
September 3, 1862; promoted colonel May 29, 18(13; killed in action October 21, 
1863, Cherokee Station, Ala. (see held and staff, First Cavalry). Lauren Dewey, 
age 55 ; residence. Mount Pleasant ; nativity, Xew York ; appointed major Septem- 
ber 3, 1862 ; mustered September 24, 1862 ; resigned March 12, 1863. Edwin Reiner, 
age 23; residence, Columbus City; nativity, Ohio; appointed adjutant September 
8, 1862; mustered September 11, 1862; resigned June 10, 1863. Samuel Towns- 
end, age 48; residence, Wapello; nativity, Pennsylvania; appointed quartermaster 
Septembers, 1862; commission declined. John C. Lockwood, age 51; residence, 
Louisa County; nativity, Delaware; appointed quartermaster October 15, 1862; 
mustered October 24, 1862; mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. John 
W. Bond, age 38 ; residence, Keokuk ; nativity, Maryland ; appointed surgeon 
September 9, 1862; mustered September 15, 1862; resigned March 20, 1863. 
David B. Allen, age 38; residence, Indianola; nativity, Ohio; appointed surgeon 
April 10, 1863; mustered May 1, 1863; resigned February 25, 1864 (see field 
and staff, First Cavalry). Peter Walker, age 48; residence, Liberty ville; nativity, 
Ohio; appointed assistant surgeon September 9, 1862; mustered September 16, 
1862; resigned December 26, 1862, Arkansas. I. C. Stoddard; residence, Eddy- 
ville; appointed surgeon February i~, 1863; commission declined. Samuel C. 
Rogers, age 41; residence, Crystal; nativity, Massachusetts; appointed assistant 
surgeon March 12. 1863; mustered March 21. 1863; promoted surgeon May 25, 
1865; not mustered; mustered out June 2. 1865. Washington, D. C. Charles G. 
Lewis, age 29 ; residence, Libertyville ; nativity, Ohio ; appointed assistant sur- 
geon September 9, 18(12; mustered September 16, 1862; resigned January 30, 
[863, Vicksburg, Miss. John Burgess, age 41; residence, Fairfield; nativity, 
Maryland; appointed chaplain November 1, 1862; mustered November 1, 1862; 
resigned January 21;, 1863, Vicksburg, Miss. 

Non-commissioned Staff : William Dixon, age 26; residence, Keokuk; nativ- 
ity, England; promoted sergeant major from second sergeant of Company D 
September 23, 1862; reduced to ranks and returned to company January 5, 1863. 
David S. McConahey, age 25 ; residence, Washington ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; 
promoted quartermaster sergeant from Company K October 12, 1862; discharged 
for disability August 15, 1863. Elias W. Gray, age 41; residence, Glasgow; 
nativity, Ohio; promoted commissary sergeant from Company G October 10, 
[862; promoted hospital steward March 20, if ; discharged for promotion as 
assistant sur. eon, Sixth Mississippi C 'ored, ,i.*mitry, November 20, 1863. 
Nathan L. Pi e, age 44; residence. Blooi. .field , nativity, New Jersey; promoted 
hospital steward from Company F, October 1, 1862; promoted assistant surgeon 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 253 

March 7, 1863; surgeon February 27, 1864; resigned May 8, 1865. Moses F. 
Campbell, age 21; residence, Kossuth; nativity, Illinois; promoted drum major 
from drummer of Company C ; returned to company. Ogden Eber, age 35 ; resi- 
dence, Salina; nativity, New Jersey; promoted fife major from fifer of Company 
G October 1, 1863; mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. 

COMPANY C 

Privates: Tohn Bain, age 42 ; residence, Kossuth ; nativity, Ohio ; enlisted 
August 9, 1862; mustered August 25, 1862; discharged for disability May 30, 
1863, St. Louis, Mo. Sylvester Bain, age 19; residence, Kingston; nativity, Iowa; 
enlisted August 9, 1862; mustered August 25, 1862; died of disease October 12, 
1862, Keokuk, Iowa. William Bain, age 30; residence, Kingston; nativity, Ohio; 
enlisted August 9, 1862; mustered August 25, 1862; discharged for disability 
June 21, 1865, Keokuk, Iowa. John Bantle, age 27; residence, Des Moines 
County; nativity, Germany; enlisted August 9, 1862; mustered August 25, 1862; 
died of disease September 25, 1863. on steamer Thomas E. Tutt, near Lake 
Providence, La. ; buried in National Cemetery, Vicksburg, Miss., section E, 
grave 392. William H. Barnhill, age 36 ; residence, Kossuth ; nativity, Kentucky ; 
enlisted August 9, 1862; mustered August 25, 1862; wounded May 22, 1863, 
Vicksburg, Miss; taken prisoner August 10, 1863, Black River Bridge, Miss.; 
mustered out June 17, 1865, Camp Chase, Ohio. Joseph G. Bayles, age 19; resi- 
dence, Kossuth; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 9, 1862; mustered August 25, 
1862; wounded May 22, 1863, Vicksburg; mustered out June 5, 1865, Washing- 
ton, D. C. Thomas Bell, age 42 ; residence, Kossuth ; nativity, "at sea" ; enlisted 
August 9, 1862, as seventh corporal ; mustered August 25, 1862 ; promoted sixth 
corporal September 15, 1862; fifth sergeant April 27, 1863; fourth sergeant July 
2, 1863; wounded severely October 21, 1863, Cherokee, Ala.; promoted third 
sergeant December 16, 1863; discharged for wounds January 26, 1865, Keokuk, 
Iowa. John B. Berry, age 21; residence, Dodgeville ; nativity, Iowa; enlisted 
August 7, 1862; mustered August 25, 1862; died of disease December 25, 1862, 
Helena, Ark.; buried in National Cemetery, Jefferson Barracks (St. Louis), Mo., 
section 50, grave 6. Lewis J. Bishop, age 22 ; residence, Dodgeville ; nativity, 
Indiana; enlisted August 12, 1862; mustered August 25, 1862; discharged for 
disability January 28, 1863, St. Louis, Mo. (see Company G, Forty-fifth Infan- 
try). John A. Braden, age 18; residence, Northfield ; nativity, Ohio; enlisted 
August 19, 1862; mustered August 25, 1862; discharged for disability September 
5, 1863, Black River, Miss, (see Company K, Second Cavalry). Elijah B rid well, 
age 25; residence, Kossuth ; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 9, 1862; mustered 
August 25, 1862; discharged for disease June 16, 1863, Keokuk, Iowa. Alex- 
ander Calderwood, age 22; residence, Northfield; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 
12, 1S62; mustered August 25, 1862; discharged for disability February 20, 1863, 
St. Louis, Mo. Moses F. Campbell, age 21 ; residence, Kossuth; nativity, Illinois; 
enlisted August 7, 1862, as drummer; mustered August 25, 1862; promoted drum 
major; returned to company; rY diarged for disability June 7, 1863, St. Louis, 
Mo. (see field and staff; see-al:-^ 'Cor <>any G, Forty-fifth Infant' v). Thomas 
S. Canfield, age 20; residence, KoSSuth; nativity, Vermont; enlisted lily 25, T862, 
as third corporal; mustered August 25, 1862; died of disease February 21, 1863, 



254 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

Young's Point, La. (see Company E, First Infantry). John \Y. Carl, age 19; 
residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 7, 1862; mustered August 
25, 1862; mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. David Carmean, age 
19: residence, Northfield; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 5, 1862; mustered 
August 25, 1862; wounded severely July 22, 1864, Atlanta, Ga. ; mustered out 
June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. James E. Chichester, age 19; residence, Kos- 
suth; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 5, 18O2; mustered August 25, 1862; mus- 
tered out May 6, 1865, Davenport, Iowa. Cyrus Claypool ; rejected August 25, 
1862, by mustering officer. Henry C. Cosens, age 21; residence, Dodgeville; 
nativity, Illinois; eidisted August 2, 1862, as fifth corporal; mustered August 25, 
1862; promoted fourth corporal September 15, 1862; third corporal April 27, 
1863; second corporal July 2, 1863; fifth sergeant December 16, 1863; fourth 
sergeant April 1, 18(15; mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. (see Com- 
pany E, First Infantry). Deodatus Crawford, age 19; residence. Pleasant Grove; 
nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 9, 1S62; mustered August 25, 1862; mustered out 
June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. Marcus Crawford, age 21 ; residence, Pleasant 
Grove; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 5, 1862; mustered August 25, 1862; died 
of disease August 10, 1863, Black River Bridge, Miss. ; buried in National Ceme- 
tery, Vicksburg, Miss., section O, grave 550. William M. Darlington, age 24; 
residence, Northfield; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 9, 1862; mustered August 
25, 1862; promoted eighth corporal April 27, 1863; fifth corporal July 2, 1863; 
third corporal December 16, 1863; mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. 
Thomas F. Davis, age 19; residence, Huron; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 5, 
1862; mustered August 25, 1862; wounded May 22, 1863, Vicksburg, Miss.; 
wounded slightly June 30, 1864, Kenesaw Mountain, Ga. ; discharged March 20, 
1865, Davenport, Iowa; William C. Davis; rejected August 25, 1862, by muster- 
ing officer (see Company F, Seventh Cavalry). George H. Day, age 24; resi- 
dence, Dodgeville; nativity, Vermont ; eidisted August 9, 1862; mustered August 
25, 1862; mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. Peter J. Dolbee; re- 
jected August 25, 1862, by mustering officer. Benson Downer, age 19; residence, 
Northfield; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 7, 1862; mustered August 25, 1862; 
discharged for disability April 6, 1863, St. Louis, Mo. John B. Downer, age 
26; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted August 4, 1862. as 
third sergeant ; mustered August 25, 1862 ; transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, 
August 10, 1864; mustered out June 5, 1865, Cincinnati, Ohio. John M. Fetter- 
man, age 19; residence, Pleasant Grove; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted January 
1, 1864; mustered January 1, 18(14; wounded slightly May 14, 1864, Resaca, Ga. ; 
transferred to Company C, Sixth Infantry, May 30, 1865. Harrison T. Fleenor, 
age 18; residence, Pleasant Grove; nativity, Iowa; enlisted December 29, 1863; 
mustered December 29, 1863; wounded severely May 13, 1864, Resaca, Ga. ; 
transferred to Company C, Sixth Infantry, May 30, 1865. (Harrison D. Fleenor.) 
Alfred B. Gillmore. age 23; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Ohio; 
enlisted August 11, 1862; mustered August 25, 1862; died of disease February 
18, 1865, Davenport, Iowa. Leonard Gilson, age 31; residence, Kossuth; nativ- 
ity, Vermont; enlisted August 7, 1862; mustered August 25, 1862; transferred to 
Invalid Corps February 6, 1864; no further record. Amos H. Goodnow, age 18; 
residence, Kossuth; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 7, 1862; mustered August 
25, 1862; wounded severely; leg amputated May 13, 1864, Resaca, Ga. ; dis- 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 255 

charged for wounds May 24, 1865, Keokuk, Iowa. Lewis Goodnow, age 42; 
residence, Kossuth; nativity, Vermont ; enlisted August 9, 1862; mustered August 
25, 1862; transferred to Invalid Corps September 16, 1863; no further record. 
Jonathan F. Hannam, age 19; residence, Kossuth; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 

9, 1862; mustered August 25, 1S62; wounded severely May 14, 1864, Resaca, Ga. ; 
mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. Samuel Hannam, age 27; resi- 
dence, Kossuth; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted August 12, 1862; mustered 
August 25, 1862; mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. George W. 
Harris, age 26; residence, Kossuth; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 12, 1862; 
mustered August 25, 1862; died of disease March 29, 1863, Memphis, Term. 
Benjamin F. Hedges, age 24; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Ohio; 
enlisted August 9, 1862; mustered August 25, 1862; wounded fatally January 11, 
1863, Arkansas Post, Ark.; died of wounds January 14, 1863, on steamer D. A. 
January. Cyrus Hedges, age 23 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Ohio ; enlisted 
August 7, 1862; mustered August 25, 1862; wounded May 22, 1865, Vicksburg, 
Miss.; discharged July 10, 1865, Keokuk, Iowa. Gideon Hedges, age 44; resi- 
dence, Des Moines County; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 9, 1862; mustered 
August 25, 1862; died February 12, 1863, on steamer City of Memphis; buried 
in National Cemetery, Jefferson Barracks (St. Louis), Mo., section 38, grave 248. 
Martin L. Heizer, age 25 ; residence, Kossuth ; nativity, Ohio ; enlisted August 

10, 1862; mustered August 25, 1862; mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, 
D. C. Samuel B. Fleizer, age 21; residence, Kossuth; nativity, Ohio; enlisted 
July 28, 1862, as first sergeant; mustered August 25, 1862; promoted first lieu- 
tenant May 30, 1863; captain June 15, 1864; mustered out June 5, 1865, Wash- 
ington, D. C. (see Company E, First Infantry). (Samuel B. Hiser.) William 
Henderson, age 24; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 4, 
1862; mustered August 25, 1862; promoted eighth corporal October 30, 1862; 
killed in action January 11, 1864, Arkansas Post, Ark.; buried in National Cem- 
etery, Little Rock, Ark., section 4, grave 374. Mortimer E. Higerson, age 26; 
residence, Kossuth; nativity, New York; enlisted July 26, 1862, as second cor- 
poral; mustered August 25, 1862; taken prisoner; died October 9, 1863, while a 
prisoner, Richmond, Va. ; buried in National Cemetery, Richmond, Va. Daniel 
W. Hixson, age 19; residence, Dodgeville ; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 7, 
1862; mustered August 25, 1862; wounded May 22, 1863, Vicksburg, Miss.; dis- 
charged November 30, 1863, Keokuk, Iowa; Noah B. Hixson, age 21 ; residence, 
Dodgeville; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 7, 1862; mustered August 25, 1862; 
wounded May 22, 1863, Vicksburg, Miss. ; transferred to Invalid Corps Septem- 
ber 30, 1863; discharged June 30, 1865, Indianapolis, Ind. John W. Howe, age 
19; residence, Kingston; nativity, Indiana; enlisted August 9, 1862; mustered 
August 25, 1862; wounded slightly January 11, 1863, Arkansas Post, Ark.; 
wounded slightly August 10, 1864, Atlanta, Ga. ; mustered out June 5, 1865, 
Washington, D. C. Edward T. Hilling, age 27; residence, Northfield ; nativity, 
Virginia; enlisted August 12, 1862; mustered August 25, 1862; killed in action 
August 12, 1864, Atlanta, Ga. ; buried in National Cemetery, Marietta, Ga., sec- 
tion H, grave 788. Charles A. Hully, age 23 ; residence, Pleasant Grove ; nativity, 
Indiana; enlisted August 9, 1862; mustered August 25, 1862; discharged for disa- 
bility August 8, 1863, St. Louis, Mo. George H. Hully, age 22; residence, Pleas- 
ant Grove; nativity, Indiana; enlisted August 7, 1862; mustered August 25, 1862; 



256 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

wounded May 22, 1863, Vicksburg, Miss. ; died of disease August 10, 1863, Black 
River Bridge, Miss. Thomas M. Husted, age 21; residence, Kossuth; nativity, 
Ohio; enlisted August 11, 1862; mustered August 25, 1862; wounded May 23, 
1862, Vicksburg, Miss.; wounded severely June 30, 1864, Kenesaw Mountain, 
Ga. ; promoted eighth corporal April 1, 1865; mustered out June 5, 1865, Wash- 
ington, D. C. Aaron P. Jackson, age 21; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Iowa; 
enlisted August 2, 1862, as sixth corporal ; mustered August 25, 1862 ; promoted 
fifth corporal September 15, 1862; fourth corporal April 27, 1863; first sergeant 
July 2, 1863; mustered out June 5. 1865, Washington, D. C. Silas G. King; 
rejected August 25, 1862, by mustering officer (see Company G, Forty-fifth In- 
fantry). Webster M. King, age 19; residence, Kingston; nativity, Iowa; enlisted 
August 9, 1862; mustered August 25, 1862; wounded severely January 11, 1863, 
Arkansas Post, Ark.; died of disease March 11, 1863, Memphis, Tenn. ; buried 
in Mississippi River National Cemetery, Memphis, Tenn., section 1, grave 64. 
John Knight, age 19; residence, Kingston; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 7. 
1862; mustered August 25, 1862; mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. 
Adolphus F. Larkin, age 23; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Iowa; enlisted 
August 12, 1862; mustered August 25, 1862; killed in action May 14, 1864, 
Resaca, Ga. ; buried in National Cemetery, Chattanooga, Tenn., section K, grave 
27. Alonzo B. Larkin, age 21; residence, Dodgeville; nativity. Iowa; enlisted 
August 12, 1862; mustered August 25, 1862; wounded severely; leg amputated 
October 21, 1863, Cherokee Station, Ala.; discharged for wounds February 3, 
1864, St. Louis, Mo. James H. Latty, age 25 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, 
Iowa; enlisted August 7, 1862, as eighth corporal; mustered August 25, 1862; 
promoted seventh corporal September 15, 1862; fifth corporal April 27, 1863; 
third corporal July 2, 1863; first corporal December 16, 1863; mustered out June 
5, 1865, Washington, D. C. Henry Lenty, age 18; residence, Des Moines County; 
nativity, England; enlisted February 20, 1864; mustered February 20, 1864; 
transferred to Company C, Sixth Infantry, May 30, 1865. Robert R. Lockhart, 
age 21; residence, Kossuth; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted August n, 
1862; mustered August 25, 1862; promoted seventh corporal July 2, 1863; fifth 
corporal December 16, 1863; mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. 
William F. Long, age 21; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 
12, TS62; mustered August 25, 1862; died of disease July 31, 1864, Marietta, Ga. 
Lewis D. Loper, age 19; residence, Kingston; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 7, 
1862; mustered August 25, 1862; discharged for disability April 15, 1863, Mem- 
phis, Tenn. Joseph A. Loyd, age 35 ; residence, Kossuth ; nativity, Indiana ; 
enlisted August 15, 1862; mustered August 15. 1862; wounded May 22, 1863, 
Vicksburg, Miss.; wounded severely May 14, 1864, Resaca, Ga. ; discharged June 
1, 1865, Keokuk, Iowa. William N. McBride, age 19; residence, Northfield; 
nativity, Iowa; enlisted August \2, 1862; mustered August 25, 1862; mustered 
out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. James B. McCray, age 24; residence, Des 
Moines County; nativity, Indiana; enlisted August 3, 1862, as fourth sergeant; 
mustered August 25, 1862; promoted third sergeant April 27, 1863; second ser- 
geant July 2, 1863; sergeant major September 16, 1863; first lieutenant June 15, 
[864; mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C Robert T. McMullen, age 
27 : residence, Northfield ; nativity, Ohio ; enlisted August 7, 1862 ; mustered 
August 25, 1862; mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. John P. Mat- 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 257 

thews, age 25 ; residence, Kossuth ; nativity, Indiana ; appointed first lieutenant 
August 7, 1862; mustered September 23, 1862; resigned March 2, 1863 (see 
Company E, First Infantry). (John C. Mathews.) Miles M. Miller, age 21; 
residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Indiana; enlisted August 9, 1862; mustered 
August 25, 1862; promoted seventh corporal September 1, 1864; fifth sergeant 
April 1, 1865; mustered out June 5. 1865, Washington, D. C. James R. Mitchell, 
age 30; residence, Burlington; nativity, Indiana; enlisted February 20, 1864; 
mustered February 29, 1864; wounded; arm amputated; discharged August 22, 
1865, Keokuk, Iowa; transferred to Company K, Sixth Infantry, May 30, 1865. 
Tohn Nelson, age 43; residence, Kossuth; nativity, Indiana; enlisted August 9, 
1862; mustered August 25, 1862; died of disease January 23, 1863, Young's 
Point, La. Samuel Nichols, age 27; residence, Northfield ; nativity, Ohio; enlisted 
August 9, 1862; mustered August 25, 1862; discharged for disability June 7, 
1863, St. Louis, Mo. William Olson, age 36; residence, Des Moines County; 
nativity, Sweden; enlisted August 9, 1862; mustered August 25, 1862; discharged 
for disability May 5, 1863, Memphis, Term. Andrew Osborn, age 22; residence, 
Kossuth; nativity, Indiana; enlisted August 9, 1862; mustered August 25, 1862; 
discharged for disability May 7, 1863, Memphis, Term. Alexander S. Perry, 
age 38; residence, Burlington; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted August 9, 1862; 
mustered August 25, 1862; discharged for disability March 27, 1863, Paducah, 
Ky. Samuel S. Perry, age 32; residence, Burlington; nativity, Pennsylvania; 
enlisted August 8, 1862, as second sergeant; mustered August 25, 1862; killed in 
action May 22, 1863, Vicksburg, Miss. William P. Perry, age 22; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted August 8, 1862, as first corporal; 
mustered August 25, 1862; transferred to Invalid Corps September 30, 1862; 
discharged June 30, 1865, Indianapolis, Ind. William Proctor, age 42; residence, 
Kossuth; nativity, Kentucky; enlisted August 12, 1862; mustered August 25, 
1862; promoted sixth corporal September 15, 1862; fourth corporal July 2, 1863; 
second corporal December 16, 1863; mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, 
D. C. Joseph W. Prugh, age 23 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Ohio ; enlisted 
August 7, 1862 ; mustered August 25, 1862 ; promoted commissary sergeant March 
20, 1863; mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. Thomas F. Ramsey, 
age 19; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 7, 1862; mustered 
August 25, 1862; discharged April 19, 1863, St. Louis, Mo. Lewis L. Ratliff, age 
18; residence, Pleasant Grove; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August n, 1862; mustered 
August 25, 1862; mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. John H. Riepe, 
age 20; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Germany; enlisted December 25, 1863; 
mustered December 29, 1863; transferred to Company C, Sixth Infantry, May 
30, 1865. Charles J. Ries, age 20; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted 
August 7, 1862; mustered August 25, 1862; died December 25, 1862, Helena, 
Ark. Aurelius Roberts, age 27; residence, Kossuth; nativity, Ohio; appointed 
captain July 25, 1862; mustered September 23, 1862; promoted lieutenant colonel 
May 29, 1863 ; mustered out June 5, 1865. Washington, D. C. (see Company E, 
First Infantry). John E. Sheppard, age 20; residence, Kossuth; nativity, Ohio; 
enlisted August 9, 1862 ; mustered August 25, 1862 ; killed in action May 22, 1863, 
Vicksburg, Miss. Cameron Smith, age 20; residence, Pleasant Grove; nativity, 
Iowa; enlisted August 7, 1862; mustered August 25, 1862; wounded slightly 
January 11, 1863, Arkansas Post, Ark.; discharged for wounds April 23, 1863, 

Vol. I— IT 



258 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

Milliken's Bend, La. James M. Smith, age 21 ; residence, Pleasant Grove; nativ- 
ity, Iowa; enlisted August 9, 1862, as fourth corporal; mustered August 25, 1862; 
promoted second lieutenant May 30, 1863; adjutant April 1, 1864; mustered out 
June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. Rankin Smith, age 20; residence, Dodgeville ; 
nativity, Illinois; enlisted August 9, 1862; mustered August 25, 1862; wounded 
severely May 14, 1864, Resaca, Ga. ; mustered out May 9, 1865, Davenport, Iowa. 
Thomas S. Smith, age 32 ; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Illinois; enlisted August 
7. 1862, as fifth sergeant; mustered August 25, 1862; promoted fourth sergeant 
April 27, 1863; wounded May 18, 1863, Yicksburg, Miss; promoted third sergeant 
July 2, 1863; second sergeant December 16, 1863; mustered out June 5, 1865, 
Washington. D. C. Joseph W. Stewart, age 40; residence, Des Moines County; 
nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted August 9. 1862; mustered August 25, 1862; mus- 
tered August 25, 1862; wounded severely May 22, 1863, Vicksburg, Miss.; died 
of disease August 18, 1863, Black River Bridge, Miss. Orville Swank, age 22; 
residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 9, 1862; mustered 
August 25, 1862; promoted eighty corporal September 15. 1862; died of disease 
October 26, 1862, Keokuk, Iowa. Oliver E. Thornton, age 26 ; residence, Des 
Moines County; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 9, 1862; mustered August 25, 
1862; mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. John W. Torode, age 18; 
residence, Kossuth; nativity, Ohio; enlisted February 20, 1864; mustered Feb- 
ruary 20, 1864; transferred to Company C, Sixth Infantry, May 30, 1865. George 
W. True, age 28; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Indiana; enlisted August 9, 
1862; mustered August 2-,, 1862; died August 12, 1863, St. Louis, Mo.; buried 
in National Cemetery, Jefferson Barracks (St. Louis), Mo., section ^^, grave 7. 
James W. Tucker, age 23; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Indiana; 
enlisted February 29, 1864; mustered February 29, 1864; accidentally wounded 
May 9, 1864, Resaca, Ga. ; transferred to Company C, Sixth Infantry. May 30. 
1865. Luther M. Vannice, age 19; residence, Kossuth; nativity, Iowa; enlisted 
August 4, 1862; mustered August 25, 1862; promoted eighth corporal July 2, 
1863 ; sixth corporal Dec. 16, 1863 ; mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. 
William M. Vaughn, age 18; residence, Kossuth; nativity, Indiana; enlisted 
August 4, 1862; mustered August 25, 1862; wounded May 22, 1863. Yicksburg, 
Miss; promoted eighth corporal September 1, 1864; seventh corporal June 5, 
1865; mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. Thomas E. Yost, age 36; 
residence. Kossuth; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 7, 1862, as wagoner; mustered 
August 25, 1862; wounded accidentally; discharged for disability February 7, 
1863, Keokuk, Iowa. George W. Zion, age 20; residence, Pleasant Grove; na- 
tivity, Iowa; enlisted August 7. 1862; mustered August 25, 1862; wounded; 
mustered out May 30, 1865, Davenport, Iowa. 

COMPANY E 

Privates: Robert Harrison, age 22 ; residence, Des Moines County ; nativity, 
Iowa ; enlisted January 26, 1865 ; mustered January 26, 1865 ; transferred to Com- 
pany K, Sixth Infantry, May 30, 1865. Charles Hug, age 38; residence, Burling- 
ton; nativity, Germany; enlisted August 15, 1865; mustered August 25, 1862; 
died of disease July 19. 1863, Vicksburg, Miss.; buried in National Cemetery, 
Vicksburg, Miss., section G, grave 1289. 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 259 

COMPANY II 

Privates: George W. Beall, age 18; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, 
Illinois; enlisted January 16, 1865; mustered January 16, 1865; transferred to 
Company K, Sixth Infantry, May 30, 1865. 

company 1 

Privates: William T. Blanchard, age 22; residence, Des Moines County; 
nativity, Ohio; enlisted February 29, 1864; mustered February 29, 1864; trans- 
ferred to Company C, Sixth Infantry, May 30, 1865. (William Blanchard.) 
Adelbert H. Buck, age 21; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Indiana; 
enlisted February 22, 1864; mustered February 22, 1864; transferred to Company 
C, Sixth Infantry. May 30, 1865. William L. Miller, age 18; residence, Des 
Moines County; nativity, Iowa; enlisted February 22, 1864; mustered February 
22, 1864; transferred to Company C, Sixtli Infantry, May 30, 1865. Abraham 
Reese, age 18; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Ohio; enlisted February 
22, 1864; mustered February 22, 1864; transferred to Company C, Sixth Infantry, 
May 30, 1865. Wood, James, age 22; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, 
Virginia; enlisted February 29, 1864; mustered February 29, 1864; wounded 
slightly September 4, 1864, Jonesboro, Ga. ; transferred to Company C, Sixth 
Infantry, May 30, 1865. 

COMPANY K 

Privates: Isaac Waddell, age 27 ; residence, Des Moines County ; nativity, 
Ohio; enlisted August 16, 1862; mustered September 14, 1862; mustered out June 
5, 1865, Washington, D. C. 

THIRTY-SEVENTH REGIMENT, IOWA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 

Term of service, three years. Mustered into the service of the United States 
at Muscatine, Iowa, December 15, 1862, by Capt. H. B. Hendershott, United 
States Army ; mustered out of service May 24, 1865, Davenport, Iowa. 

Field and Staff: George W. Kincaid, age 50; residence, Muscatine; nativity, 
Ohio; appointed colonel September 17, 1862; mustered out May 24, 1865, Daven- 
port, Iowa. George R. West, age 63 ; residence, Dubuque ; nativity, New York ; 
promoted lieutenant colonel from Company F November 12, 1862; mustered out 
May 24, 1865, Davenport, Iowa. Lyman Allen, age 54 ; residence, Iowa City ; 
nativity, New York; appointed major November 12, 1862; mustered December 
15, 1862; mustered out May 24, 1865, Davenport. Iowa. David H. Goodmo, age 
52 ; residence, Muscatine ; nativity, New York ; promoted adjutant from Com- 
pany B, November 4, 1862; mustered out May 24, 1865, Davenport, Iowa. Pren- 
tice Ransom, age 55 ; residence, Iowa City ; nativity, New York ; appointed quar- 
termaster November 4, 1862; mustered out May 24, 1865, Davenport. Iowa. John 
W. Finley, residence, Dubuque; appointed surgeon October 1, 1862; mustered 
January 23, 1863 ; mustered out May 24, 1865, Davenport, Iowa. George S. 
DeWitt, residence, Colesburg ; appointed assistant surgeon January 2, 1863 ; mus- 



260 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

tered January 16, 1863; resigned February 17, 1863, St. Louis, Mo. Edward 
Dorn, residence, Dubuque; appointed assistant surgeon February 18, 1863; mus- 
tered March 7, 1863; mustered out May 24, 1865, Davenport, Iowa. Samuel C. 
Haynes, age 36; residence, Bradford; nativity, Vermont; appointed assistant sur- 
geon January 2, 1863; mustered January 22, 1863; resigned March 14, 1863. 
Joseph Orr, age 55 ; residence, Mount Pleasant ; nativity, Ohio ; appointed assist- 
ant surgeon March 15, 1863; mustered March 18, 1863; mustered out May 24, 
1865, Davenport, Iowa. James H. White, age 48; residence, Mount Pleasant; 
nativity, Ohio; appointed chaplain November 12, 1862; mustered December 15, 
1862 ; mustered out May 24, 1865, Davenport, Iowa. 

Line Officers: Company G — Henry C. Markham, first lieutenant. 

COMPANY C 

Privates: John B. Akins, age 56; residence, Augusta; nativity, Connecticut: 
enlisted September 15, 1862; mustered November 4, 1862; died of disease May 
26, 1863, St. Louis, Mo.; buried in National Cemetery, Jefferson Barracks (St. 
Louis), Mo., section 2, grave 120. 

COMPANY G 

Privates: John Bacher, age 48; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Germany; 
enlisted November 7, 1862; mustered November 7, 1862; discharged for disa- 
bility May 26, 1863, St. Louis, Mo. Jacob G. Bell, age 45; residence, Augusta; 
nativity, Indiana; enlisted September 23, 1862; mustered September 2T,, 1862; 
mustered out May 24, 1865, Davenport, Iowa. Daniel Bennett, age 45 ; resi- 
dence, Burlington ; nativity, New York ; enlisted October 16, 1862 ; mustered Octo- 
ber 16, 1862: discharged for disability May 26, 1863, St. Louis, Mo. William L. 
Bitley, age 45; residence, Danville; nativity, New York; enlisted December 29, 
1862; mustered January 2, 1863; mustered out May 24, 1865, Davenport, 
Iowa. Samuel Bowers, age 60 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Pennsyl- 
vania ; enlisted October 8, 1862; mustered October 8, 1862; died of disease 
August 29, 1863, Alton, 111.; buried in National Cemetery, Alton, 111. Samuel 
B. Burge, age 49; residence, Burlington; nativity, Virginia; enlisted October 
15. 1862, as first sergeant; mustered October 15, 1862; promoted second 
lieutenant December 12, 1863; mustered out May 24, 1865, Davenport, Iowa. 
Lemmon Burk, age 57; residence, Burlington; nativity, Maryland; 
enlisted October 4, 1862; mustered October 4, 1862; discharged for disa- 
bility October 28, 1864, Camp Chase, Ohio. Henry Caldwell, age 48: residence, 
Burlington ; nativity, Ireland ; enlisted September 23, 1862 ; mustered September 
23, 1862 ; discharged for disability November 3, 1864, Indianapolis, Ind. Andrew 
B. Carl, age 51 ; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Ohio; enlisted November 3, 1862, 
as third corporal ; mustered November 3, 1862 : discharged November 30, 1863, 
Keokuk, Iowa. Elias N. Delashmutt, age 62 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, 
Virginia; enlisted September 11, 1862; mustered September 11, 1862; promoted 
fifth corporal May 26, 1863; fourth corporal March 11, 1864; third corporal 
March 11, 1864; third corporal October 22, 1864; discharged for disability Febru- 
ary 14, 1865, Camp Chase, Ohio. Benjamin F. Fairbanks, age 46; residence. 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 261 

Burlington; nativity, Vermont; enlisted September I, 1862; mustered September 
9, 1862; promoted fifth corporal; died of disease April 3, 1865, Camp Chase, Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio; buried in National Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio, section M, grave 
344. William Kirchoff, age 52; residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; 
enlisted October 7, 1862; mustered October 7, 1862; mustered out May 24, 1865, 
Davenport, Iowa. Robert McClure, age 46 ; residence, Kossuth ; nativity, Ohio ; 
enlisted September 29, 1862, as second sergeant ; mustered September 29, 1862 ; 
mustered out May 24, 1865, Davenport, Iowa. Hiram Merrick, age 55 ; residence, 
Dodgeville ; nativity, Massachusetts ; enlisted October 6, 1862 ; mustered October 
6, 1862; mustered out May 24, 1865, Davenport, Iowa. John Morrison, age 60; 
residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted October 10, 1862; 
mustered November 7, 1862; discharged for disability October 16, 1863, Alton, 
111. Peter Moter, age 62; residence, Burlington; nativity, New York; enlisted 
September 8, 1862; mustered October 4, 1862; discharged for disability Novem- 
ber 3, 1864, Indianapolis, Ind. Simon Nowlan, age 62; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Ireland; enlisted October 10, 1862; mustered October 10, 1862; trans- 
ferred to Company H March 1, 1863; returned to company March 1, 1863; dis- 
charged for disability April 10, 1865, Memphis, Tenn. Garrett W. Power, age 
45; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Kentucky; enlisted November 7, 1862; mus- 
tered November 7, 1862; discharged for disability May 26, 1865, St. Louis, Mo. 
Elbridge Reed, age 47; residence, Danville; nativity, Massachusetts; enlisted 
September 13, 1862; mustered September 13, 1862; died July 9, 1864; buried in 
National Cemetery, Rock Island, 111. Isaac Sailor, age 45 ; residence, Burlington ; 
nativity, New York; enlisted September 20, 1862; mustered September 20, 1862; 
died of disease May 1, 1864, St. Louis, Mo. Charles M. Staff, age 50; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Sweden; enlisted October 16, 1862; mustered October 16, 
1862; mustered out May 24, 1865, Davenport, Iowa. Joel Stover, age 48; resi- 
dence, Burlington; nativity, Virginia; appointed captain August 29, 1862; mus- 
tered December 15, 1862; mustered out May 24, 1865, Davenport, Iowa. Henry 
Swan, age 58 ; residence, Danville ; nativity, Virginia ; appointed second lieuten- 
ant September 13, 1862; mustered September 13, 1862; resigned December 11, 
1863, Alton, 111. Gerhard Zender, age 52; residence, Burlington; nativity, Prus- 
sia; enlisted September 19, 1862; mustered September 19, 1862; mustered out 
May 24, 1865, Davenport, Iowa. 

COMPANY H 

Privates: Granville Kirk, age 45 ; residence, Pleasant Grove ; nativity, Vir- 
ginia ; enlisted November 26, 1862; mustered November 28, 1862; died of disease 
January 28, 1863, St. Louis, Mo.; buried in National Cemetery, Jefferson Bar- 
racks (St. Louis), Mo., section 38, grave 202. Simon Nowlan, age 62; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Ireland; enlisted October 10, 1862; mustered October 10, 
1862; transferred to Company G, March 1, 1863 (see Company G). 

COMPANY I 

Privates: James C. Gentry, age 43 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Illinois ; 
enlisted September 15, 1862; mustered November 19, 1862; struck off by muster- 
ing officer, on account of age. 



262 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

THIRTY-NINTH REGIMENT, IOWA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 

Mustered into the service of the United States at Davenport, Iowa, November 

24, 1862, by Capt. H. B. Hendershott. United States Army. Mustered out of 
service June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. 

Field and Staff: Henry J. B. Cummings, age 31; residence, YYinterset ; 
nativity, New Jersey ; appointed colonel September 12, 1862 ; mustered out Decem- 
ber 22, 1864 (see Company F, Fourth Infantry). James Redfield, age 38; resi- 
dence, Redfield ; nativity, New York ; appointed lieutenant colonel September 16, 
1862; wounded severely December 31, 1862, Parker's Cross Roads, Tenn. ; killed 
in action October 5, 1864, Allatoona, Ga. Joseph M. Griffiths, age 39; residence, 
Des Moines; nativity, Pennsylvania; appointed major September 16, 1862; mus- 
tered November 24, 1862; wounded slightly December 31, 1862, Parker's Cross 
Roads, Tenn. ; promoted lieutenant colonel October 6, 1864; colonel May 12, 1865 ; 
not mustered; mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. George C. Tiche- 
nor, age 24; residence, Des Moines; nativity, Kentucky; appointed adjutant Sep- 
tember 15, 1862; promoted major and aide-de-camp, Department of Missouri, 
February 2, 1865; resigned April 30, 1865. Frederick Mott, age 34; residence, 
Winterset; nativity, Pennsylvania; appointed quartermaster September 15, 1862; 
promoted captain and assistant adjutant general February 3, 1865 ; resigned July 
8, 1865. Peter N. Woods, age 33 ; residence, Fairfield; nativity, Ohio; appointed 
surgeon September 5, 1862; mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. Wil- 
liam L. Leonard, age 39 ; residence, Winterset ; nativity, Ohio ; appointed assistant 
surgeon September 17, 1862; mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. 
Ephraim P. Davis, age 23 ; residence, Adel ; nativity, Indiana ; appointed assistant 
surgeon September 17, 1862; resigned January 6, 1865 (see Company D, Second 
Infantry). William A. Dinwiddle, appointed assistant surgeon May 19, 1865; 
not mustered (see field and staff, Twenty-second Infantry). Thomas J. Taylor, 
age t,^, ; residence, Winterset ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; appointed chaplain October 
31. 1862: resigned July 13, 1863. Peter T. Russell, age 52; residence, Adel; 
nativity, New Hampshire; appointed chaplain August 1, 1863; mustered August 

25, 1803; mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. 

COMPANY G 

Privates: Thomas Callen, age 21; residence, Pleasant Grove; nativity, Illi- 
nois; enlisted August 22, 1862; mustered October 18, 1862; mustered out June 5, 
1865, Washington, D. C. Charles A. Cameron, age 21; residence, Dodgeville ; 
nativity, Virginia ; appointed captain August 16, 1862 ; mustered out June 5, 1865, 
Washington, D. C. John T. Cameron, age 27; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, 
Virginia ; enlisted August 20, 1862, as third sergeant ; mustered October 18, 1862 ; 
promoted second sergeant January 1, 1863; mustered out June 5, 1865, Washing- 
ton. D. C. David M. Clark, age 22 ; residence, Dodgeville ; nativity, Ohio ; enlisted 
August 22, 1862; mustered October 18, 1862; promoted eighth corporal January 
1, 1863; discharged for disease April 26, 1864, Mound City, 111. John M. Clark, 
age ii); residence, Dodgeville: nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 16, 1862; mustered 
October 18, 1862; mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. John Clymer, 
age 36; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Indiana; enlisted August 22, 1862, as 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 263 

second sergeant; mustered October 18, 1862; promoted first sergeant January I, 
1863 ; mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. Henry C. Cockayne, age 
18; residence, Dodgeville ; nativity, Iowa; enlisted December 29, 1863; mustered 
December 29, 1863; killed in action October 5, 1864, Altoona, Ga. ; buried in 
National Cemetery, Marietta, Ga., section C, grave 807. Patrick Coyne, age 20; 
residence, Linton; nativity, Ireland; enlisted August 22, 1862; mustered October 

18, 1862 ; mustered out May 17, 1865, Nashville, Tenn. Joseph W. Cross, age 28 ; 
residence, Dodgeville ; nativity, Indiana ; enlisted August 22, 1862 ; mustered Octo- 
ber 18, 1862; mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. John R. Cunningham, 
age 19; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Iowa; enlisted January 25, 1864; mus- 
tered January 25, 1864; taken prisoner October 5, 1864, Allatoona, Ga. ; paroled; 
transferred to Company D, Seventh Infantry, June 1, 1865. David B. Davis, 
age 34 ; residence, Dodgeville ; nativity, Wales ; enlisted August 22, 1862 ; war 
department reports: "No record; not borne on company rolls." William Y. 
Dougherty, age 24 ; residence, Linton ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; enlisted August 22, 
1862, as fourth corporal; mustered October 18, 1862; promoted third corporal 
December 31, 1862 ; second corporal January 1, 1863 ; reduced to ranks at his own 
request June 16, 1863; mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. John 
Dugan, age 18; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 22, 1862; 
mustered October 18, 1862; discharged for disability February 6, 1864, Mound 
City, 111. Alexander J. Franks, age 24; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Pennsyl- 
vania ; enlisted August 22, 1862 ; mustered October 18, 1862 ; mustered out May 

19, 1865, Davenport, Iowa. Gideon Hall, age 20; residence, Pleasant Grove; 
nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 22, 1862, as eighth corporal; mustered October 
18, 1862 ; died of disease December 31, 1862, Jackson, Tenn. Benjamin F. Halm, 
age 26; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 22, 1862; war 
department reports : "No record ; name not borne on company rolls." Robert Han- 
num, age 27 ; residence, Kossuth ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; enlisted August 16, 1862 ; 
mustered October 18, 1862 ; mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. Randel 
M. Hartzell, age 23 ; residence, Dodgeville ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; enlisted August 
16, 1862, as fourth sergeant; mustered October 18, 1862; promoted third sergeant 
January 1, 1863 ; taken prisoner October 5, 1864, Allatoona, Ga. ; paroled ; mustered 
out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. Emory S. Huston, age 18; residence, Dodge- 
ville ; nativity, Iowa ; enlisted August 22, 1862, as fifer ; mustered October 18, 1862 ; 
mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. Daniel Jones, age 23; residence, 
Dodgeville; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 22, 1862; war department reports: 
"Name not borne on company rolls." David R. Jones, age 25 ; residence, Dodge- 
ville ; nativity, Wales; enlisted August 22, 1862; mustered October 18, 1862; 
mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. John M. Jones, age 22 ; residence, 
Dodgeville ; nativity, Illinois ; enlisted August 22, 1862 ; war department reports : 
"Name not borne on company rolls." John B. Kline, age 21 ; residence, Dodge- 
ville ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; enlisted August 22, 1862, as first corporal ; mustered 
October 18, 1862 ; promoted fifth sergeant January 1, 1863 ; fourth sergeant Octo- 
ber 6, 1864 ; mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. Joseph Kline, age 21 ; 
residence, Dodgeville ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; enlisted August 20, 1862 ; mus- 
tered October 18, 1862; taken prisoner December 31, 1862, Parker's Cross Roads, 
Tenn.; discharged December 11, 1863, Keokuk, Iowa. Solomon F. Kurtz, age 
18; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted August 22, 1862; mus- 



264 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

tered October 18, 1862; mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. John E. 
KviKtt, age 23; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Iowa; enlisted January 1, 1864; 
mustered January 1, 1864; wounded severely October 5, 1864, Allatoona, Ga. ; 
transferred to Company D, Seventh Infantry, June 1, 1865. William B. Kynett, 
age 19; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 22, 1862; mus- 
tered October 18, 1862; promoted fifth corporal August 1, 1864; mustered out 
June 12, 1865, Louisville, Ky. Melville Lefforge, age 18; residence, Dodgeville; 
nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 22, 1862; mustered October 18, 1862; mustered 
out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. Joseph Lewis, age 22; residence, Dodge- 
ville; nativity, Wales ; enlisted August 22, 1862; w^ar department reports: "Not 
borne on company rolls." Elliott Lines, age 25 ; residence, Dodgeville ; nativity, 
Indiana ; enlisted August 22, 1862, as second corporal ; mustered October 13, 1862 ; 
taken prisoner December 29, 1862, Shady Grove, Term. ; promoted first corporal 
January 1, 1863; wounded slightly October 5, 1864, Allatoona, Ga. ; promoted 
fifth sergeant October 6, 1864; mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. 
Lewis Lines, age 20; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 22, 
1862; mustered October 18, 1862; wounded severely October 5, 1864, Allatoona, 
Ga. ; mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. Joseph Lloyd, age 36; resi- 
dence, Dodgeville; nativity, Indiana; enlisted August 22, 1862; war department 
reports: "Not borne on company rolls." John Logan, age 22; residence, Dodge- 
ville; nativity, Ireland; enlisted August 22, 1862; mustered October 18, 1862; 
taken prisoner December 29, 1862, Shady Grove, Tenn. ; promoted eighth cor- 
poral April 1, 1865 ; mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. Owen McCal- 
lon. age 20; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 22, 1862; mus- 
tered October 18, 1862; taken prisoner December 29, 1862; Shady Grove, Tenn.; 
paroled; taken prisoner October 5, 1864, Allatoona, Ga. ; died; buried in National 
Cemetery, Wilmington, X. C., grave 337. Andrew J. M. McConaughy, age 20; 
residence, Linton; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted August 22, 1862; mustered 
October 18, 1862; mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. Abraham 
McCullough, age 29 ; residence, Dodgeville ; nativity, Ohio ; enlisted August 22, 
1862, as sixth corporal: mustered October 18, 1862; promoted fifth corporal 
December 31. 1862; died of disease January 13, 1863, Jackson, Tenn. William 
McLaughlin, age 18; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted 
August 22, 1862; mustered October 18, 1862; taken prisoner December 29, 1862, 
Shady Grove, Tenn.; wounded severely October 5, 1864, Allatoona, Ga. ; pro- 
moted eighth corporal October 6, 1864; seventh corporal April 1, 1865; mustered 
out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. Amos L. McMichael, age 29; residence, 
Dodgeville; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted August 16, 1862, as fifth sergeant; 
mustered October 18, 1862; promoted fourth sergeant January 1, 1863; killed in 
action October 5, 1864, Allatoona, Ga. ; buried in National Cemetery, Marietta, 
Ga., section C, grave 808. William Mehan, age 18; residence, Kingston; nativity, 
Iowa; enlisted August 22, 1862; mustered October 18, 1862; taken prisoner 
December 29, 1862, Shady Grove, Tenn.; mustered out June 5, 1865, Washing- 
ton, D. C. James Moffatt, age 30 ; residence, Dodgeville ; nativity, Illinois ; enlisted 
August 22, 1862; deserted October 21, 1862. Alfin C. Moore, age 20; residence, 
Dodgeville; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 22, 1862; mustered October 18, 1862; 
wounded severely October 5, 1864, Allatoona, Ga. ; died of wounds October 26, 
1864, Rome, Ga. ; buried in National Cemetery, Marietta, Ga., section C, grave 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 265 

359. Anderson T. Orr, age 21; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Iowa; enlisted 
August 22, 1862 ; war department reports : "Not borne on company rolls." Mar- 
tin V. Orr, age 25; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 22, 
1862 ; war department reports : "Not borne on company rolls." Thomas Painter, 
age 22; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, England; enlisted August 16, 1862; mus- 
tered October 18, 1862; mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. Mathias 
Ping, age 41; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Kentucky; enlisted August 22, 
1862 ; mustered October 18, 1862 ; mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. 
Robert G. Ping, age 17; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 22, 
1862; deserted October 4, 1862; war department reports: "No record; not borne 
on company rolls." Isaac N. Power, age 20 ; residence, Dodgeville ; nativity, 
Iowa; enlisted August 20, 1862; mustered October 18, 1862; promoted eighth 
corporal May 26, 1864; killed in action October 5, 1864, Allatoona, Ga. ; buried in 
National Cemetery, Marietta, Ga., section C, grave 810. William G. Power, age 
18; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 22, 1862; mustered 
October 18, 1862; wounded severely October 5, 1864, Allatoona, Ga. ; discharged 
July 28, 1865, Keokuk, Iowa. Samuel Reed, age 38 ; residence, Dodgeville ; 
nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted August 22, 1862; mustered October 18, 1862; 
mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. Philip Reif, age 22 ; residence, 
Dodgeville ; nativity, Ohio ; enlisted August 22, 1862 ; war department reports : 
"No record; not borne on company rolls" (see Company I, Thirteenth Infantry). 
David Remaly, age 26 ; residence, Dodgeville ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; enlisted 
August 22, 1862 ; war department reports : "No record ; not borne on company 
rolls." Jacob H. Sei fried, age 27; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Pennsylvania; 
enlisted August 22, 1862; mustered October 18, 1862; taken prisoner December 
31, 1862, Parker's Cross Roads, Tenn. ; promoted eighth corporal December 31, 
1862 ; seventh corporal ; sixth corporal ; fifth corporal January 5, 1863 ; discharged 
for disability June 25, 1864, Mound City, 111. David Spencer, age 26 ; residence, 
Dodgeville; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted August 22, 1862; war department 
reports: "No record; not borne on company rolls." John Sweeny, age 26; resi- 
dence, Dodgeville ; nativity, Ireland ; enlisted August 22, 1862 ; mustered October 
18, 1862 ; mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. Christian Timmerman, 
age 23 ; residence, Dodgeville ; nativity, Prussia ; enlisted August 22, 1862 ; mus- 
tered October 18, 1862; mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. Edward 
Tolbatt, age 21; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Indiana; enlisted August 22, 
1862; mustered October 18, 1862; mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. 
James Tucker, age 21 ; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Indiana; enlisted 
August 22, 1862 ; war department reports : "No record ; name not borne on com- 
pany rolls." Hugh W. Walkinshaw, aged 20 ; residence, Linton ; nativity, Ohio ; 
enlisted August 22, 1862; mustered October 18, 1862; promoted second corporal 
May 12, 1863 ; taken prisoner October 5, 1864, Allatoona, Ga. ; paroled ; promoted 
first corporal October 6, 1864; mustered out June 5, 1865, Washington, D. C. 
Robert Walter, age 30 ; residence, Dodgeville ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; enlisted 
August 22, 1862; war department reports: "No record; not borne on company 
rolls." Lawrence Welch, age 18; residence, Kingston; nativity, Pennsylvania; 
enlisted August 22, 1862 ; mustered October 18, 1862 ; taken prisoner December 29, 
1862, Shady Grove, Tenn. ; war department reports: "Absent without leave from 
May 12, 1863." Jerry K. Wetzel, age 22; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Penn- 



266 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

sylvania ; appointed second lieutenant August 22, 1862; mustered October 16, 
1862; promoted first lieutenant January 1, 18O2; mustered out June 5, 1865, 
Washington, D. C. Robert I. Wright, age 25 ; residence, Dodgeville ; nativity, 
Ohio ; appointed first lieutenant August 16, 1862; died October 17, 1862, previous 
to muster. 

FORTY-FIRST IOWA INFANTRY BATTALION 
COMPANY A 

Privates: Thomas Coad, age 26; residence, Danville; nativity, Pennsylvania; 
enlisted October 11, 1861 ; mustered October 23, 1861 ; transferred to Company 
K, Seventh Cavalry, April 2s, 1863 (see Company A, Fourteenth Infantry). 
Dodds, John H., age 22 ; residence, South Flint ; nativity, Iowa ; enlisted August 
9, 1861 ; mustered October 23, 1861 ; transferred to Company K, Seventh Cavalry, 
April 25, 1863 (see Company A, Fourteenth Infantry). Dodds, Joseph R., age 
21; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 27, 1862; mustered 
August 27, 1862; transferred to Company K, Seventh Cavalry, April 25, 1863 
(see Company A, Fourteenth Infantry). Lyman Z. Lotspeitch, age 20; resi- 
dence, Des Moines County; nativity, Illinois; enlisted September 20, 1861 ; mus- 
tered October 23, 1861 ; transferred to Company K, Seventh Cavalry, April 25, 
1863 (see Company A, Fourteenth Infantry). Morton Powell, age 18; resi- 
dence, Des Moines County; nativity, Ohio; enlisted October 1, 1861 ; mustered 
October 23, 1861 ; transferred to Company K. Seventh Cavalry, April 25, 1863 
(see Company A, Fourteenth Infantry. Absalom Wood, age 39; residence, Bur- 
lington; nativity, Virginia; enlisted September 18, 1861 ; mustered October 23, 
1861 ; transferred to Company K, Seventh Cavalry, April 25, 1863 (see Company 
A, Fourteenth Infantry. 

COMPANY C 

Privates: Frank Barlow, age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, Kentucky; 
enlisted September 25, 1861 ; mustered October 24, 1861 ; transferred to Company 
M, Seventh Cavalry, April 25, 1863 (see Company C, Fourteenth Infantry). 
William Beatty, age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted October 
9, 1S61 ; mustered October 24, 1861 ; transferred to Company M, Seventh Cavalry, 
April 25, 1863 (see Company C, Fourteenth Infantry). Lucius C. Crum, age 39; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Kentucky; enlisted September 17, 1861, as second 
sergeant; mustered October 24, 1861 ; discharged for disability May 21, 1863 
(see Company C, Fourteenth Infantry). Elmer J. Cushman, age 20; residence, 
Burlington ; nativity, Ohio ; enlisted October 13, 1861 ; mustered October 24, 1861 ; 
transferred to Company M. Seventh Cavalry, April 25, 1863 (see Company C. 
Fourteenth Infantry). William J. Elliott, age 19; residence, Burlington; nativ- 
ity, Pennsylvania; enlisted October 1, 1861 ; mustered October 24, 1861 ; trans- 
ferred to Company M, Seventh Cavalry, April 25, 1863 (see Company C, Four- 
teenth Infantry). George Jenkins, age 23; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Ken- 
tucky; enlisted October 2, 1861, as second corporal; mustered October 24, 1861 ; 
promoted first corporal April 1, 1862; discharged for disability May 21, 1863 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 267 

(see Company C, Fourteenth Infantry). Theodore Kline, age 18; residence, 
Dodgeville ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; enlisted October 2, 1861 ; mustered October 
24. 1861 ; transferred to Company M, Seventh Cavalry, April 25, 1863 (see Com- 
pany C, Fourteenth Infantry). William E. Meason, age 36; residence, Burling- 
ton; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted September 25, 1861, as first sergeant; mus- 
tered October 25, 1861 ; transferred to Company M, Seventh Cavalry, April 25, 
1863 (see Company C, Fourteenth Infantry). Jesse A. Sisk, age 21; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Indiana; enlisted October 7, 1861 ; musiered October 24, 
1861 ; promoted eighth corporal; transferred to Company M, Seventh Cavalry, 
April 25, 1863 (see Company C, Fourteenth Infantry). 

FORTY-FIFTH REGIMENT, IOWA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 

Term of service, 100 days. Mustered into the service of the United States at 
Keokuk, Iowa, May 25, 1864, by Capt. T. W. Walker, United States Army ; mus- 
tered out of service September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa. 

Field and Staff: Alvah H. Bereman, age 35 ; residence, Mount Pleasant ; 
nativity, Kentucky; appointed colonel May 21, 1864; mustered out September 
16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. Samuel A. Moore, age 
42 ; residence, Bloomfield ; nativity, Indiana ; appointed lieutenant colonel May 
10, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of 
service (see Company G, Second Infantry). James B. Hope, age 35; residence, 
Washington; nativity, Tennessee; appointed major May 4, 1864; mustered out 
September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. Alvanus W. 
Sheldon, age 22; residence, Keokuk; nativity, Ohio; appointed adjutant May 12, 
1864; discharged for promotion as captain and commissary of subsistence of vol- 
unteers September 13, 1864. John P. Dawson, age 25; residence, Washington; 
nativity, Ohio; appointed quartermaster May 13, 1864; mustered May 13, 1864; 
mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. 
William W. Estabrook, age 38 ; residence, Keokuk ; nativity, New Brunswick ; 
appointed surgeon May 24, 1864; mustered May 24, 1864; mustered out Septem- 
ber 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service (see field and staff, 
Fifteenth Infantry). Samuel H. Stutsman, age 28; residence, Van Buren 
County; nativity, Indiana; appointed assistant surgeon May 25, 1864; mustered 
out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. John 
Hurley, age 49 ; residence, Wapello ; nativity, Ohio ; appointed assistant surgeon 
May 24, 1864; mustered May 26, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, 
Iowa, expiration of term of service. Anson Skinner, age 30; residence, Van 
Buren County; nativity, Indiana; appointed chaplain May 25, 1864; mustered out 
September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. 

COMPANY F 

Privates: Abraham W. Roland, first lieutenant. Henry Acres, age 18; resi- 
dence, Burlington; nativity, England; enlisted April 30, 1864; mustered out 
September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. John Bailey, 
age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted May 10, 1864; mustered 



268 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. John M. 
Barnhill, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted May 10, 1864; 
mustered out September [6, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. 
Asa Barton, age 18; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Ohio; enlisted April 
29, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of 
service. Ross M. Biggs, age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, Illinois; enlisted 
May 9, 1864, as first sergeant; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, 
expiration of term of service. Gould J. Brown, age 18; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Iowa; enlisted April 30, 1864, as fourth corporal; mustered out Septem- 
ber 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. John L. Brown, age 
18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted April 30, 1864; mustered out 
September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. Plyn Brown, 
age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted April 30, 1864; mustered 
out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. Jacob 
Bumgardner, age 25 ; residence, Des Moines County ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; 
enlisted May 2, 1864, as seventh corporal; mustered out September 16, 1864, 
Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. Jonathan H. Burget, age 19; resi- 
dence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted May 12, 1864; mustered out Septem- 
ber 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. Cornelius Clark, age 
27; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted May 6, 1864; mustered out 
September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. Harry M. 
Danner, age 20 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; enlisted April 30, 
1864, as fifth sergeant; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expira- 
tion of term of service. William S. Darling, age 21 ; residence, Burlington ; nativ- 
ity, Vermont ; appointed second lieutenant April 30, 1864; mustered out Septem- 
ber 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. Herman Depperman, 
age 22; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Prussia; enlisted April 30, 1864; 
mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. 
George W. Eads, age 17; residence, Burlington; nativity, Indiana; enlisted May 
10, 1864, as musician; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expira- 
tion of term of service (see Company D, Twenty-fifth Infantry; see also Company 
A, Fourth Infantry). John Foley, age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, In- 
diana; enlisted May 13, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, 
expiration of term of service. Isaac Fetterman, age 21 ; residence, Des Moines 
County: nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted May 14. 1864; mustered out September 
16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. John H. Forney, age 18; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted May 12, 18(4; mustered 
out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. William 
Franks, age 18 ; residence, Dodgeville ; nativity, Ohio ; enlisted May 2, 1864 ; mus- 
tered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service (see 
Company G, Thirty-ninth Infantry). Joseph Fuller, age 20; residence, Des 
Moines County; nativity, Ohio; enlisted May 2, 1864; mustered out September 
16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. John S. Funk, age 21; 
residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted May 13, 1864; 
mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. 
William Gannaway, age 20 ; residence, Dodgeville ; nativity, Iowa ; enlisted May 
5, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of 
service. John Gilmore, age 32 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Scotland ; enlisted 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 269 

April 30, 1864; mustered May 25, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keo- 
kuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. John Grannaman, age 18; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted April 30, 1864; mustered out September 
16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. William Grannaman, age 
18; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Iowa; enlisted May 5, 1864; mustered out 
September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. William 
Gregg, age 27 ; residence, Des Moines County ; nativity," Virginia ; enlisted May 4, 
1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of 
service. Amos Gulick, age 18; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Iowa; enlisted 
May 13, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of 
term of service. Edward Hall, age 18; residence, Pleasant Grove; nativity, 
Iowa; enlisted May 3, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, 
expiration of term of service. Brainard D. Harper, age 22 ; residence, Burling- 
ton ; nativity, Ohio; appointed captain April 30, 1864; mustered out September 
16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service (see Company G, Twenty- 
fifth Infantry). Sheldon Hawley, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, New 
York; enlisted April 30, 1864, as sixth corporal; mustered out September 16, 
1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. Robert N. Heisey, age 24; 
residence, Burlington ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; enlisted April 30, 1864, as fourth 
sergeant; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term 
of service (see Company E, First Infantry). John S. Jacoby, age 18; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted May 11, 1864; mustered out Septem- 
ber 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service (see Company G, 
Twenty-fifth Infantry). Francis Johnson, age 34; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Ireland; enlisted May 16, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, 
expiration of term of service. Wilhelm Jacob Knauss, age 24 ; residence, Bur- 
lington ; nativity, Germany; enlisted May 2, 1864; mustered out September 16, 
1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. John L. Lemberger, age 18; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted April 30, 1864; mustered out Sep- 
tember 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. Nathan A. Lewis, 
age 18; residence, Danville; nativity, Iowa; enlisted May 5, 1864; mustered out 
September 16, 1864, Keokuk. Iowa, expiration of term of service. Alexander 
Lockart, age 23 ; residence, Des Moines County ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; enlisted 
May 5, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term 
of service. Simon Losier, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted 
May 2, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of 
term of service. Charles A. McCash, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Iowa; enlisted April 30, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, 
expiration of term of service. Albert P. McClure, age 15 ; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Iowa; enlisted April 30, 1864, as musician; mustered May 25, 1864; 
mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. 
John McPartland, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted May 
8, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of 
service (see Company D, Twenty-fifth Infantry). (John McPartlin.) (See also 
Company A, Fourth Infantry) (John McPertlin.) John T. Marshall, age 18; 
residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Iowa; enlisted May 5, 1864; mustered out Sep- 
tember 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. George W. C. 
Miller, age 47; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Virginia; enlisted May 12, 1864; 



270 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

died of disease July 18, 1864, Memphis, Tenn. (see Vol. VII, Roll of Honor 
XVI, pages 210-239). James B. Miller, age 18; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, 
Iowa; enlisted May 16, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, 
expiration of term of service. Marshall Morgan, age 21 ; residence, Des Moines 
County; nativity, Iowa; enlisted May 5, 1864, as wagoner; mustered out Septem- 
ber 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. John Miller, age 18; 
residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Michigan; enlisted May 16, 1864; mus- 
tered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. 
Albert Murphy, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Indiana; enlisted May 
14, [864; mustered out September 16, 1864; Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of 
service (see Company G, Twenty-fifth Infantry; see also Company H, Ninth 
Infantry). George W. Orr, age 18; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Iowa; en- 
listed May 5, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration 
of term of service. Londoree Owens, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Iowa; enlisted April 30, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, 
expiration of term of service (see Company D, Twenty-fifth Infantry; see also 
Company A, Fourth Infantry). Philemon Parr, age 20; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Iowa; enlisted May 9, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, 
Iowa, expiration of term of service (see Company G, Twenty-fifth Infantry; 
see also Company H, Ninth Infantry). John Patterson, age 20; residence, Des 
Moines County; nativity, Iowa; enlisted April 29, 1864; mustered out September 
16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. Matthew M. Perry, age 
22; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted May 2, 1864, 
as third sergeant; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of 
term of service. Winfield S. Reiter, age 18; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Iowa; 
enlisted May 5, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration 
of term of service. William H. Rice, age 23; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Iowa; enlisted April 30, 1864, as second corporal; mustered out September 16, 
1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. Joseph Robbins, age 18; 
residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Ohio; enlisted April 30, 1864; mustered 
out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. Abram 
W. Roland, age 27; residence, Burlington; nativity, Indiana; appointed first lieu- 
tenant April 30, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expira- 
tion of term of service. Emil Rundorff , age 23 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, 
Germany; enlisted April 30, 1864, as eighth corporal; mustered out September 
16, 1864, Keokuk. Iowa, expiration of term of service. John R. Stewart, age 21 ; 
residence, Burlington ; nativity, Iowa ; enlisted April 30, 1864 ; mustered out 
September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. James M. 
Stockton, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Tennessee; enlisted May 11, 
1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of 
service. Daniel A. Valentine, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; en- 
listed May 2, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration 
of term of service. John N. Valentine, age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Iowa; enlisted May 13, 18(14; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, 
expiration of term of service. Martin Whitehead, age 20; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, England; enlisted May 1, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keo- 
kuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service (see Company E, Twenty-fifth Infantry). 
Albert Wilkin, age 18; residence, Burlington; enlisted April 30, 1864; mustered 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 271 

out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service; Enoch 
B. Williamson, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Illinois; enlisted May 10, 
1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of 
service. John C. Wilson, age 19; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Ohio; 
enlisted April 29, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expira- 
tion of term of service. 

GOMPANY G 

Privates: William C. Ainsworth, age 22; residence, Augusta; nativity, New 
York; enlisted May 3, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, 
expiration of term of service. Emerson Arnold, age 25; residence, Danville; 
nativity, Indiana; enlisted May 16, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, 
Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. Tennis S. Barlow, age 18; resi- 
dence, Des Moines County; nativity, Kentucky; enlisted May 5, 1864; mustered 
out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. Austin 
Barnes, age 19; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Iowa; enlisted May 5, 
1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of 
service. Daniel Bates, age 34 ; residence, Des Moines County ; nativity, Pennsyl- 
vania ; enlisted May 17, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, 
expiration of term of service. Walter G. Bell, age 18; residence, Des Moines 
County; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted May 3, 1864; mustered out September 
16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service (see Company K, Second 
Cavalry). James Billing, age 18; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Illi- 
nois; enlisted May 16, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, 
expiration of term of service. Lewis James Bishop, age 23 ; residence, Kossuth ; 
nativity, Indiana; enlisted May 12, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keo- 
kuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service (see Company C, Thirtieth Infantry). 
Richard Bishop, age 19 ; residence, Kossuth ; nativity, Indiana ; enlisted May 7, 
1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of 
service. Charles N. Blair, age 18; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Iowa; 
enlisted May 2, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration 
of term of service. Charles S. Blake, age 20; residence, Des Moines County; 
nativity, Iowa; enlisted May 6, 1864; died of disease July 28, 1864, Memphis, 
Tenn. ; buried in Mississippi River National Cemetery, Memphis, Tenn., section 
1, grave 301. Jacob S. Bradley, age 28; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; 
enlisted May 4, 1864, as second corporal; promoted fifth sergeant July 1, 1864; 
mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service 
(see Company E, First Infantry). James A. Bridges, age 21; residence, Des 
Moines County; nativity, Iowa; enlisted May 2, 1864, as seventh corporal; mus- 
tered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. David 
R. Bruce, age 18; residence, Des Moines County; nativity. New Jersey; enlisted 
May 11. 1864; mustered out September 16, 1S64, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of 
term of service. Moses F. Campbell, age 22; residence, Des Moines County; 
nativity, Illinois; enlisted May 2, 1864, as fourth corporal; promoted principal 
musician June 13, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expira- 
tion of term of service (see Company C, Thirtieth Infantry). Joseph M. Chap- 
man, age 24; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted May 



272 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

3, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term 
of service. Joab C. Comstock, age 21; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, 
Iowa; enlisted May 21, 1864 ; mustered out September 16, 1864, expiration of 
term of service. Thomas N. Crowder, age 28 ; residence, Des Moines County ; 
nativity, Indiana; appointed captain May 3, 1864; mustered out September 16, 
1864, expiration of term of service (see Company I, Eleventh Infantry. Peter 
A. Dolbee, age 20; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Iowa; enlisted May 
2, 1864, as first sergeant; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expu 
ration of term of service (see Company K, Fourteenth Infantry). Sebum P. 
Dorland, age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity. New York; enlisted May 3, 
1864, as first corporal; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expira- 
tion of term of service. Daniel J. Duval, age 43 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, 
Kentucky; enlisted May 21, 1864; mustered out, September 16, 1864, Keokuk, 
Iowa, expiration of term of service. Charles W. Eoff, age 41 ; residence, Bur- 
lington ; nativity, Kentucky; enlisted May 3, 1864; mustered out September 16, 
1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. William J. Graham, age 18; 
residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted May 2, 1864; 
mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. 
Allen Hendricks, age 30 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Kentucky ; enlisted May 
21, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of 
service. Jesse B. Howe, age 18; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Iowa; 
enlisted May 5, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expira- 
tion of term of service. Amos H. Huntington, age 18; residence, Des Moines 
County; nativity, Iowa; enlisted May 17, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, 
Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. Bishop R. Kellogg, age 22 ; resi- 
dence, Des Moines County; nativity, Ohio; enlisted May 12, 1864, as second 
sergeant; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of 
service (see Company I, Fourth Infantry). Erasmus M. King, age 18; residence, 
Des Moines County; nativity, Iowa; enlisted May 3, 1864; mustered out Septem- 
ber 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. Silas G. King, age 22; 
residence, Des Moines County ; nativity, Iowa ; enlisted May 5, 1864 ; died of 
disease July 22, 1864, Memphis Tenn. ; buried in Mississippi River National 
Cemetery, Memphis, Tenn., section 2, grave 406. Leroy S. Lamkin, age 21 ; 
residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Vermont ; enlisted May 4, 1864, as eighth 
corporal; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of 
service (see Company K, Second Cavalry). George V. McCullough, age 18; resi- 
dence, Des Moines County; nativity, Iowa; enlisted May 2, 1864; mustered out 
September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. James McMul- 
len, age 27; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Ohio; enlisted May 3, 1864, 
as musician; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of 
term of service. John Mehan, age 25 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Pennsyl- 
vania; enlisted May 16, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, 
expiration of term of service. James W. Merrill, age 30; residence, Des Moines 
County; nativity, Ohio; enlisted May 2, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, 
Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. John Osbom, age 18; residence, 
Des Moines County; nativity, Ohio; enlisted May 3, 1S64; mustered out Septem- 
ber 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service (see Company K, Sec- 
ond Cavalry). Charles Pierson, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 273 

enlisted May 21, 1864, as third corporal; mustered out September 16, 1864, 
Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. Edwin M. Pike, age 18; resi- 
dence, Des Moines County; nativity, Iowa; enlisted May 2, 1864; mustered out 
September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service (see Company 
K, Second Cavalry). John Ratledge, age 18; residence, Des Moines County; 
nativity, Ohio; enlisted May 14, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, 
Iowa, expiration of term of service. Alfred B. Reiter, age 21 ; residence, Bur- 
lington ; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted May 12, 1864; mustered out September 
16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. John C. Rhea, age 33; 
residence, Kossuth; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted May 2, 1864; promoted 
fourth corporal June 13, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, 
expiration of term of service. Aurelius Richardson, age 44; residence, Burling- 
ton; nativity, Kentucky; enlisted May 23, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, 
Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. James Roads, age 31 ; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted May 14, 1864; mustered out Septem- 
ber 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. James W. Seamans, 
age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted April 30, 1864, as third 
sergeant; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term 
of service. Ortus C. Shelton, age 24; residence, Burlington; nativity, Virginia; 
appointed first lieutenant May 21, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keo- 
kuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. Frederick M. Smith, age 37; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted May 3, 1864; mustered out Septem- 
ber 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. George W. Soper, 
age 25; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Canada; enlisted May 16, 1864, 
as wagoner; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of 
term of service. John W. Storks, age 23 ; residence, Des Moines County ; nativ- 
ity, Ohio; enlisted May 3, 1864, as fifth corporal; mustered out September 16, 
1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service (see Company C, Thirtieth 
Infantry). John W. Stromberg, age 18; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, 
Sweden; enlisted May 9, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, 
expiration of term of service. George W. Swank, age 18; residence, Des Moines 
County; nativity, Indiana; enlisted May 3, 1864; mustered out September 16, 
1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. Lawrence Tee, age 18; resi- 
dence, Des Moines County; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted May 14, 1864; mus- 
tered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. 
Ephraim Thornton, age 19; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Illinois; en- 
listed May 3, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration 
of term of service. Thomas V. Tilton, age 18; residence, Des Moines County; 
nativity, Ohio ; enlisted May 2, 1864. Mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, 
Iowa, expiration of term of service. William M. Turner, age 18; residence, Des 
Moines County; nativity, Iowa; enlisted May 5, 1864; mustered out September 
16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. Jeremiah C. Vance, age 
34; residence, Burlington; nativity, Kentucky; enlisted May 7, 1864; mustered 
out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service (see Com- 
pany C, Eighth Infantry). Isaiah VanTrump, age 18; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Ohio; enlisted May 18, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, 
Iowa, expiration of term of service. Samuel H. Waddle, age 20; residence, Des 
Moines County; nativity, Iowa; enlisted May 3, 1864; mustered out September 



274 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa; expiration of term of service. Charles Walker, age 30; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, England; enlisted May 3, 1864; mustered out 
September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service. Joseph P. 
Ware, age 19; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Iowa; enlisted Alay 2, 
1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of 
service. Lewis C. Williams, age 18; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, 
Iowa; enlisted May 2, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, 
expiration of term of service (see Company K, Second Cavalry). John Wilson, 
age 18; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted May 16, 
1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of 
service. Charles B. Woodhead, age 18; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, 
Ohio; enlisted May 6, 18(14; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, 
expiration of term of service. 

COMPANY H 

Privates: James W. Boyers, age 18; residence, Des Moines County; nativ- 
ity, Arkansas; enlisted May 2, 1864; mustered out, September 16, 1864, Keokuk, 
Iowa; expiration of term of service. Levi Lightfoot, age 18; residence, Des 
Moines County; nativity, Illinois; enlisted May 13, 1864; mustered out Septem- 
ber 16, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa, expiration of term of service (see Company E, Fif- 
teenth Infantry). Daniel Milton, age 21; residence, Des Moines County; nativ- 
ity, Ohio; enlisted May 16, 1864; mustered out September 16, 1864, Keokuk, 
Iowa, expiration of term of service. 

FORTY-EIGHTH IOWA INFANTRY BATTALION 

Term of service, 100 days. Mustered into the service of the United States at 
Davenport, Iowa, July 13, 1864, by Capt. Alexander Chambers, United States 
Army. Mustered out of service October 21, 1864, Rock Island, 111. 

Field and Staff: Oliver H. P. Scott ; residence, Farmington ; nativity, Ohio ; 
appointed lieutenant colonel July 7, 1864; mustered out October 21, 1864, Rock 
Island, 111., expiration of term of service. William T. Hayes, age 29; residence, 
Davenport; nativity, Delaware; appointed adjutant July 14, 1864; mustered July 
14, 1864; mustered out October 21, 1864, Rock Island, 111., expiration of term of 
service. Lewis Todhunter, age 47 ; residence, Indianola ; nativity, Ohio ; appointed 
quartermaster June 1, 1864; mustered June 8, 1864; promoted captain and 
A. Q. M., U. S. Volunteers, June 30, 1864. John A. Blanchard, age 32; resi- 
dence, Elkader; nativity, New Hampshire; appointed surgeon June 9, 1864; 
mustered June 9, 1864; mustered out October 21, 1864, Rock Island, 111.; expira- 
tion of term of service. Charles L. Mundt, age 46; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Germany; appointed assistant surgeon July 16, 1864; mustered July 16, 
1864; mustered out October 21, 1864, Rock Island, 111., expiration of term of 
service. 

COMPANY D 

Privates: George Blanck, age 44: residence, Burlington; nativity, France; 
enlisted June 21, 1864; mustered out October 21, 1864, Rock Island, 111., expira- 
tion of term of service. lohn M. Burton, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 275 

New Jersey; enlisted June 15, 1864; mustered out October 21, 1864, Rock Island, 
111., expiration of term of service. Emanuel Cerber, age 19; residence, Burling- 
ton; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted May n, 1864; mustered out October 21, 
1864, Rock Island, 111., expiration of term of service. William Christ, age 21 ; 
residence, Burlington ; nativity, Germany ; enlisted May 4, 1864, as third sergeant ; 
promoted second sergeant September 1, 1864; mustered out October 21, 1864, 
Rock Island, 111., expiration of term of service. Michael Dick, age 21 ; residence, 
Dodgeville ; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted June 2, 1864; mustered out October 
21, 1864, Rock Island, 111., expiration of term of service. Joshua Downer, age 
44; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted June 3, 1864, as eighth 
corporal; promoted seventh corporal July 22, 1864; sixth corporal July 24, 1864; 
third corporal September 1, 1864; mustered out October 21, 1864, Rock Island, 
111., expiration of term of service. Peter Fuhs, age 20 ; residence, Burlington ; 
nativity, Prussia; enlisted May 9, 1864; mustered out October 21, 1864, Rock 
Island, 111., expiration of term of service. Andreas Gieselmann, age 19; resi- 
dence, Des Moines County; nativity, Prussia; enlisted May 5, 1864; mustered out 
October 21, 1864, Rock Island, 111., expiration of term of service. John H. 
Gieselmann, age 22 ; residence, Des Moines County ; nativity, Prussia ; enlisted 
May 5, 1864; mustered out October 21, 1864, Rock Island, 111., expiration of term 
of service. Joseph Gilder, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa.; enlisted 
May 24, 1864; mustered out October 21, 1864, Rock Island, 111., expiration of 
term of service. John Glenn, age 32; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ireland; 
enlisted June 22, 1864 ; promoted eighth corporal July 23, 1864 ; fourth corporal 
September 5, 1864; mustered out October 21, 1864, Rock Island, 111., expiration 
of term of service. Theodore Guilich, age 35 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, 
Germany. Appointed second lieutenant May 23, 1864. Mustered out October 
21, 1864, Rock Island, 111., expiration of term of service (see Company 
G, First Infantry (Theodore Guelick) ; see also field and staff, First 
Infantry). Dominick Fiassel, age 27; residence, Des Moines County; 
nativity, Germany; enlisted June 2, 1864; mustered out October 21, 1864, 
Rock Island, 111., expiration of term of service. John Hauer, age 27, res- 
idence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted June 2, 1864; mustered out 
October 21, 1864, Rock Island, 111., expiration of term of service. George Heck, 
age 45; residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted May 13, 1864; mus- 
tered out October 21, 1864, Rock Island, 111., expiration of term of service. 
Jacob Hecker, age 39; residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted May 
11, 1864, as fifth corporal; promoted fourth corporal July 22, 1864; mustered 
out September 5, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, by reason of reenlistment for one year 
in Company D, Twenty-fifth Infantry. Conrad Heitmeier, age 44; residence, 
Burlington: nativity, Prussia; enlisted June 6, 1864; mustered out October 21, 
1864, Rock Island, 111., expiration of term of service. Louis Hupner, age 18: 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Illinois; enlisted May 20, 1864; mustered out 
October 21, 1864, Rock Island, 111., expiration of term of service. Joseph Janger, 
age 28; residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted May 28, 1864, as 
fifth sergeant; promoted fourth sergeant July 22, 1864; third sergeant Septem- 
ber 1, 1864; mustered out October 21, 1864, Rock Island, 111., expiration of term 
of service. John G. Jansen, age 45 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Germany ; 
enlisted May 24, 1864; mustered out October 21, 1864, Rock Island, III, expira- 



276 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

tion of term of service. Frederick Kann, age 36; residence, Burlington ; nativity, 
Germany; enlisted June 11, 1864; mustered out October 21, 1864, Rock Island, 
111., expiration of term of service. Lorenz Knollmuller, age 45 ; residence, l!ur- 
lington ; nativity, Germany; enlisted June 1, 1864; mustered out October 21, 
1864, Rock Island, III, expiration of term of service. George William Krekel, 
age 22; residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted May 5, 1864; pro- 
moted eighth corporal September 5. 1864; mustered out October 21, 1864, Rock 
Island, 111., expiration of term of service. Michael Laydon, age 18; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, New York; enlisted June 23, 1864; mustered out October 
21, 1864, Rock Island, 111., expiration of term of service. Charles Long, age 18; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Missouri; enlisted May 22, 1864; mustered out 
October 21, 1864, Rock Island, 111., expiration of term of service. John Luxen- 
burger, age 40; residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted June 21. 
1864; mustered out September 5, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, by reason of reenlist- 
ment for one year in Company D, Twenty-fifth Infantry (John Luxenberger). 
Otto Mathes, age 32 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Germany ; enlisted May 23, 
1864; mustered out October 21, 1864, Rock Island, 111., expiration of term of 
service. Ernest Gottlieb Meier, age 19; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, 
Prussia; enlisted May 5, 1864; mustered out October 21, 1864, Rock Island, 111., 
expiration of term of service. Joseph Meier, age 18; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Germany; enlisted May 20, 1864; mustered out October 21, 1864, Rock 
Island, 111., expiration of term of service. Joseph Morlok, age 18; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted May 24, 1864; mustered out October 21, 
1864, Rock Island, 111., expiration of term of service. Gottlieb Munk, age 25 ; 
residence, Des Moines County ; nativity, Germany ; enlisted May 18, 1864 ; mus- 
tered out October 2?, 1864, Rock Island, 111., expiration of term of service. 
John Naegele, age 34 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Germany ; enlisted June 
12, 1864; mustered out October 21, 1864, Rock Island, 111., expiration of term 
of service. Joseph Neil, age 18 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Ohio ; enlisted 
June 12, 1864; mustered out October 21, 1864, Rock Island, 111., expiration of 
term of service. Ferdinand Pietzh, age 22 ; residence, Des Moines County ; 
nativity, Germany; enlisted May 10, 1864; mustered out October 21, 1864, Rock 
Island, 111., expiration of term of service. Isaac N. Reed, age 28; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Delaware; enlisted July 2, 1864, as third corporal; pro- 
moted second corporal September 1, 1864; mustered out October 21, 1864, Rock 
Island, 111., expiration of term of service. August Reinhart, age 45; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted June 22, 1864; mustered out October 
21, 1864, Rock Island, 111., expiration of term of service. Henry Ries, age 20; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted May 19, 1864; mustered out Sep- 
tember 5, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, by reason of reenlistment for one year in 
Company D, Twenty-fifth Infantry. John Roth, age 45; residence, Des Moines 
County: nativity, France; enlisted May 22, 1864; mustered out October 21, 1864, 
Rock Island, 111., expiration of term of service. Daniel Schafer, age 26; res- 
idence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted May 22, 1864; promoted sixth 
corporal September 5, 1864; mustered out October 21, 1864, Rock Island, 111., 
expiration of term of service. Martin Schafer, age 36; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Germany; enlisted May 29, 1864: promoted fifth corporal September 
5, 1864; mustered out October 21, 1864, Rock Island, 111., expiration of term of 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 277 

service. Charles Schultze, age 22. ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Germany ; 
enlisted May 18, 1864, as fourth corporal; promoted fifth sergeant July 22, 1864; 
fourth sergeant September 1, 1864; mustered out October 21, 1864, Rock Island, 
111., expiration of term of service. Christop T. Seeber, age 32; residence, Bur- 
lington; nativity, Prussia; enlisted May 21, 1864; mustered out October 21, 1864, 
Rock Island, 111., expiration of term of service. Samuel M. Shortridge, age 36; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Indiana; enlisted July 7, 1864, as first sergeant; 
mustered out October 21, 1864, Rock Island, 111., expiration of term of service. 
John H. Stadtlander, age 44; residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted 
May 24, 1864; mustered out October 21, 1864, Rock Island, 111., expiration of 
term of service. Theodore Waldschmidt, age 32 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, 
Germany; appointed captain May 23, [864; mustered out October 21, 1864, Rock 
Island, 111., expiration of term of service. Manuel Weiss, age 19; residence. 
Burlington; nativity, Prussia; enlisted June 18, 1864; mustered out October 21, 
1864, Rock Island, 111., expiration of term of service. Joseph Widmer, age 40; 
residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Switzerland; enlisted May 21, 1864; 
mustered out October 21, 1864, Rock Island, 111., expiration of term of service. 

FIRST BATTERY OF IOWA LIGHT ARTILLERY 

Term of service three years. Mustered into the service of the United States 
at Burlington, Iowa, August 17, 186 1, by Capt. Alexander Chambers, United 
States Army. 

Governor Kirkwood in May, 1861, called for the enlistment of a company 
to be called the First Battery of Iowa Light Artillery. In pursuance to this call 
an artillery company was organized, of which Charles H. Fletcher of Burling- 
ton was made captain. It consisted of 116 men. 

The company rendezvoused at Burlington until some time in December, 1861, 
when it was ordered to proceed to Benton Barracks, Mo. When there it 
received its armament, which consisted of six guns. Many of the men had never 
seen a cannon until the company had arrived at Benton Barracks. Here the 
company commenced to drill with the guns until in January, 1862, when it was 
ordered to Rolla, Mo. Captain Fletcher had been ordered to report for duty 
to his regiment, the First United States Infantry, and Lieut. J. A. Jones was 
commissioned captain. 

The battery was assigned to the army under the command of General Curtis. 

The first opportunity given to the battery to show what it could do was at 
the battle of Pea Ridge, which took place on the 7th and 8th of March, 1862. 
We had at this time a battery composed of young men who never had any 
military training except what had been gained within three months, taking part 
in one of the hardest fought battles of the war. When put to the test the men 
stood by their guns and never flinched. 

Captain Jones resigned in March, 1862, when the command fell to Lieut. 
Abram Harbach of Burlington. 

After the battle of Pea Ridge the battery continued with the army under the 
command of General Curtis and went from Cassville, Mo., to Batesville, Ark. 

Capt. H. H. Griffith of Company E of the Fourth Iowa Infantry was com- 
missioned captain of the battery on the 16th of May, 1862, and a better officer 



278 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

could not have been found. Under his command the battery rose to the highest 
degree of efficiency. 

From Batesville the company marched to Helena, Ark. 

In November, 1862, it was a part of the expedition which under the com- 
mand of General Horey reached Oakland, Miss., on its way to Arkansas Post, 
but was turned back and returned to Helena. 

The battery formed a part of General Steel's division in the attack at Chick- 
asaw Bayou, when the Union forces were repulsed. 

The battery took part in the battle of Arkansas Post on January 11, 1S63. 
It was complimented by General McClemond for the efficient service rendered 
by it at Arkansas Post, who presented to it two fine Parrott guns which had been 
captured from the enemy. 

From Arkansas Post it was taken to Sherman's Landing, opposite Yicks- 
burg. Here the battery was assigned to General Carr's division of the Thir- 
teenth Army Corps on April 3, 1863, and ran the blockade and arrived at Bruins- 
burg, Miss., April 30, 1863. From Bruinsburg it went to Port Gibson. 

On the way to Port Gibson the Union forces engaged in a night battle with 
the enemy in which the enemy were repulsed. 

Here it was ordered to join General Steel's division of the Fifteenth Army 
Corps on the 13th of May and participated in the first capture of Jackson, Miss. 

From Jackson it proceeded to Yicksburg, where it arrived on May 18, 1863, 
on which day it fired its first shot into the enemy's entrenchment. It fired into 
the enemy's works over fifteen hundred rounds to each gun during the siege. 
Yicksburg surrendered July 4, 1863, and on the night of July 5 the battery com- 
menced its march to Jackson and engaged in the siege of Jackson, which resulted 
in the capture of that city on the 16th. 

From Jackson the battery marched to Brandon, Miss., and from there to 
Big Black River bridge, where it stayed until September; then it marched to 
Vicksburg and took transports to Memphis, Tenn. 

From Memphis it went by rail to Corinth, and from the latter place marched 
to Tuscumbia, Ala. From Tuscumbia it went to Chickasaw Station and did 
some fighting there. Returned to Chickasaw, Ala., then crossed the Tennessee 
River and marched 400 miles over mountains and through valleys to Chatta- 
nooga, Tenn. 

On the morning of the 25th of November, 1863, it opened fire on the rebel 
works on Lookout Mountain. Was complimented by General Hooker for the 
part it took in this action. The next day it took part in shooting Missionary 
Ridge before its assault by the Union forces. The guns of the battery had been 
worked out because of the service they had rendered. At Chattanooga the com- 
pany received a new equipment of 10-pound Parrott gnus. In his report Cap- 
tain Griffith says : "I desire to thank senior First Lieut. W. H. Gay, for a long 
time commander of the company, for his faithful discharge of duty and invar- 
iable gallantry and skill; junior First Lieutenant Curtiss and Second Lieutenants 
I james and Park. I also desire to thank First Sergeant Lubert, Sergeants B. 
Antrobus and Thomas Fitken, and Corporals Olney, Gardner, Black and J. L. 
White for invariable good conduct. 

A severe battle took place at Resaca, Ga. The first Iowa Battery went into 
action at 4 o'clock P. M. in an open field in front of two rebel batteries. The 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 279 

firing of the Iowa battery was so accurate and deadly that in a short time it 
had silenced the two rebel batteries. 

The battery with the army arrived at Dallas, Ga., on the 25th of May, 1863, 
where the enemy were strongly entrenched. On the 28th the battery was ordered 
to take an advanced position without any support. The battery took its position 
and fired thirty-three rounds, mostly canister, when the enemy, from the front 
and two sides, swarmed in upon it yelling like demons. Seeing the danger of 
capture, Captain Griffith gave the command to fall back, which was done so coolly 
that every gun was saved from capture. In this action Private John W. Moris 
was severely wounded; Private S. H. Titus captured, but killed his capturer and 
escaped. Captain Gay, in his report of this action, commends Sergeants Thomas 
Filkin, James Elting, A. C. Blanchard, Mathew Blake, John M. Burnside, Henry 
Day and John Shick for great personal courage. 

It took part in the battle of Kenesaw Mountain, at which it fired 722 rounds 
of ammunition. 

The hardest test to which its men were put was on the 20th of July, 1863, 
during the battles around Atlanta. The battery was on this day ordered to take 
a position and to reserve its fire until ordered. There it remained for one hour 
while the enemy was firing into it a deadly hail of shell and missile, and the men 
were not permitted to respond ; still they stood their ground while Lieutenant 
Ijames was severely wounded and taken from the field, Sergeant Blanchard 
and Private Michael were killed and Privates Odell and Burnside were severely 
wounded and several slightly wounded, but when the order came the enemy 
knew what they were. 

On the 22d of July the battery had its heaviest engagement. On that day 
it expended 598 rounds of ammunition. Time and again it was assaulted, but 
poured such a storm of shot into the ranks of the rebels that made them recoil. 
The enemy made strenuous efforts on this day to capture the caissons of the 
battery, but failed on account of the bravery of Corp. Elliott Frazier of 
Morning Sun, under whose charge they had been placed. For his bravery he 
was made sergeant. 

The original time of service of the men expired on August 10, 1864. Those 
who did not reenlist were sent to Davenport, Iowa, where they were honorably 
discharged from service. Those who had reenlisted and those recruited left 
their positions around Atlanta on the 26th of August and moved to Flint River, 
south of Atlanta, and from there to Jonesboro, at which place it took part in 
the battle at Lovejoy's Station. From Lovejoy's Station it went to East Point, 
September 8, 1864. It took part in the operations against Hood's army. The 
battery, after pursuing Hood, finally came to Nashville, where it participated in 
the battle fought on December 15 and 16, 1864. This ended its active service. 

Was assigned to garrison duty at Nashville and stayed there until June, 1865, 
when it was sent to Davenport, Iowa, where it was mustered out on July 5, 1865. 

Names of officers at muster in of the First Battery. Service record given 
opposite their names in the alphabetical roster following. Harbach Abram, 
junior second lieutenant. Bolivar Antrobus, age 25; residence, Des Moines 
County, postoffice, New London; nativity, Indiana; enlisted August 17, 1861, 
as third corporal; promoted second corporal February 24, 1862; first corporal 
May 1, 1863; seventh sergeant September 1, 1863; sixth sergeant January I, 



280 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

1864; fifth sergeant February 13, 1864; fourth sergeant July 22, 1864; mustered 
out August 17, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, expiration of term of service. Edwin 
fl. Cooper, age 33; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 17, 
1861, as seventh corporal; promoted sixth corporal October 1, 1861 ; fifth cor- 
poral January 1, 1862; fourth corporal February 24, 1862; discharged for dis- 
ability April 3, 1862, Rolla, Mo. Samuel B. Darlington, age 29; residence, Des 
Moines County; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted December 25, 18(33; mustered 
December 25, 1863; promoted third corporal August 18, 1864; second corporal 
October 1, 1864; first corporal November 1, 1864; sixth sergeant March 1. 1865; 
mustered out July 5, 1865, Davenport, Iowa. Denis W. Dean, age 18; resi- 
dence, Burlington; nativity, Illinois; enlisted March 28. 1863; mustered March 
28, 1863; discharged for disability May 9, 1865, Nashville, Tenn. James Elting, 
age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, New York; enlisted August 17. 1861 ; 
promoted eleventh corporal June 3, 1862; seventh sergeant July 1, 1802; sixth 
sergeant August 1, 1862; fifth sergeant September 1, 1862; fourth sergeant 
September 1, 1863; third sergeant February 13, 1864; second sergeant July 22, 
1864; mustered out August 17, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, expiration of term of 
service. Charles H. Fletcher, age 24 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Ohio ; 
appointed captain August 17, 1861 ; resigned to rejoin his company (A) First 
United States Infantry January 14, 1862, St. Louis, Mo. John Gibberlin, age 
36; residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted August 17, 1861 ; mus- 
tered out August 17, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, expiration of term of service. 
Gustavus Gustavison, age ^t, ; residence, Burlington ; nativity. Sweden ; enlisted 
December 1, 1861 ; mustered December 1, 1861 ; wounded fatally March 7, 1862, 
Pea Ridge, Ark.; died of wounds March 8, 18(12, Pea Ridge, Ark. Abram Har- 
bach, age 45 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; appointed junior 
second lieutenant August 17. 1861 ; resigned August 21, 1863, Vicksburg, Miss. 
Thomas Hartz, age 35 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Germany ; enlisted Sep- 
tember 1, 1861 ; mustered September 1, 1861 ; discharged June 3, 1862, Spring- 
field. Mo. John R. Hoffman, age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; 
enlisted September 1, 1861 ; mustered September 1, 1861 ; wounded May 1, 1863, 
Port Gilson, Miss.; discharged for disability March 21, 1864. William R. Jones; 
residence, Burlington; enlisted January 30, 1863; died of disease February 18, 

1863, Camp McClellan, Davenport, Iowa; buried in National Cemetery, Rock 
Island, 111. John Milne, age 24; residence, Burlington; nativity, Scotland; en- 
listed August 17, 1861, as artificer; died of disease September 5, 1862, Helena, 
Ark. ; buried in Mississippi River National Cemetery, Memphis, Tenn., section 3, 
grave 624. James C. Roe, age 2j ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Maryland ; 
enlisted August 17, 1861, as eighth corporal; promoted seventh corporal October 
1, 1861 ; sixth corporal January 1, 1862; fifth corporal February 24, 1862: fourth 
corporal April 3, 1862; third corporal August 1, 1862; mustered out August 17, 

1864, Davenport, Iowa, expiration of term of service. Joseph Schwartz, age 36: 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted August 17, 1861 ; discharged 
for disability October 8, 1862. St. Louis. Mo. (see Company D, Ninth Cavalry). 
Austin Seebring, age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 
17, 1861 ; mustered out August 17, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, expiration of term 
of service. Henry Sheridan, age 22 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, the ocean ; 
enlisted February 10, 1864; mustered February 29, 1864; no further record 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 281 

found. Calvin Townsend, age 41; residence, Burlington; nativity, Maine; en- 
listed August 17, 1861 ; transferred to Invalid Corps September 1, 1863; no 
further record found. Algernon Wentworth (veteran), age 19; residence, Bur- 
lington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 17, 1861 ; mustered August 17, 1861 ; 
reenlisted and remustered January 29, 1864; promoted twelfth corporal March 
1, 1865; eleventh corporal June 1, 1865; mustered out July 5, 1865, Daven- 
port, Iowa. 

FIRST REGIMENT IOWA VOLUNTEER CAVALRY 

Term of service three years. Mustered into the service of the United States 
at Burlington and Davenport, Iowa, on dates ranging from July 30 to Septem- 
ber 12, 1 86 1, by Capt. Alexander Chambers, United States Army. Mustered 
out of service February 15, 1866, Austin, Texas. 

Field and Staff: Fitz Henry Warren ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Mas- 
sachusetts ; appointed colonel June 13. 1861 ; promoted brigadier-general United 
States Volunteers July 16, 1862. Charles E. Moss; residence, Keokuk; nativity, 
Connecticut; appointed lieutenant-colonel June 13, 1861 ; resigned June 28, 1862. 
Edwin W. Chamberlain; residence, Burlington; appointed major June 13, 1861 ; 
resigned April 4, 1863. James O. Gower, age 27 ; residence, Iowa City ; nativity, 
Maine; promoted major from captain of Company F September 1, 1861 ; pro- 
moted colonel August 26, 1862; resigned August 20, 1863. William M. G. Tor- 
rence, age 37; residence, Keokuk; nativity, Pennsylvania; promoted major from 
captain of Company A, October 26, 1861 ; resigned May 3, 1862. Joseph C. 
Stone, age 33; residence Iowa City; nativity, New York; promoted adjutant 
from hospital steward October 7, 1861 ; mustered out April 10, 1862. Martin L. 
Morris, age 45; residence, Iowa City; nativity, Pennsylvania; promoted quarter- 
master from Company F, August 14, 1861 ; mustered out April 10, 1862. Henry 
L. Dashiell, age 26; residence, Albia ; nativity, Kentucky; promoted commissary 
from Company H, August 26, 1862; mustered October 29, 1862; resigned 
December 5, 1864. David A. Kerr, age 22; residence, Keokuk; nativity, Illinois; 
promoted first battalion adjutant from first sergeant of Company A, October 7, 
1861 ; mustered out September 16, 1862; reentered the service as adjutant Octo- 
ber 1, 1862; resigned February 6, 1863. James M. Bryan, age 25; residence, 
Indianola, nativity, Ohio; promoted second battalion adjutant from first sergeant 
of Company D, October 7, 1861 ; mustered out September 16, 1862. Henry K. 
Robinson, age 18; residence, Lyons; nativity, Illinois; promoted third battalion 
adjutant from Company M, October 7, 1861 ; resigned May 1, 1862. John A. 
Landis, age 26 ; residence, Martinsburg ; nativity, Ohio ; promoted first battalion 
quartermaster for Company I, October 7. 1861 ; mustered out April 10, 1862 
(see Company D, Eighteenth Infantry). Charles A. Case, age 36; residence, 
Lyons ; nativity, Connecticut ; promoted second battalion quartermaster from 
first sergeant of Company M, October 7, 1861 ; mustered out April 10, 1862. 
William H. Muzzy, age 25 ; residence, Clayton County ; nativity, New York ; pro- 
moted third battalion quartermaster from quartermaster sergeant of Company 
K, October 7, 1861 ; mustered out April 10, 1862. Milton B. Cochran, age 35; 
residence, Iowa City; nativity, Vermont; appointed surgeon July 29, 1861 ; 
mustered August 5, 1861 ; resigned for promotion as assistant surgeon United 



282 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

States Volunteers, August i, 1864. David B. Allen, age 37; residence, Indian- 
ola ; nativity, Ohio ; appointed assistant surgeon August 3, 1861 ; resigned for 
promotion as surgeon of thirtieth infantry April 21, 1863. John A. Ladd, age 
29; residence, Wheatland; nativity, New York; appointed assistant surgeon from 
hospital steward of Twenty-sixth Infantry April 17, 1863; mustered May 22, 
1863; resigned September 27, 1863. Abram B. Hershe, age 29; residence Mus- 
catine; nativity, Pennsylvania; appointed assistant surgeon October 3, 1863; 
appointment declined and commission cancelled February 10, 1864. John I. 
Sanders, age 33 ; residence, Iowa City ; nativity, Indiana ; appointed assistant 
surgeon January 20, 1864; mustered February 26, 1864; dismissed November 
10, 1864. Charles R. Bosbyshell; residence, Glenwood; appointed additional 
assistant surgeon April 21, 1862; appointment declined April 28, 1862. Charles 
H. Lothrop, age 31; residence, Lyons; nativity, Massachusetts; appointed addi- 
tional assistant surgeon May 14, 1862; promoted assistant surgeon February 1, 
1863; surgeon July 2, 1864; mustered out February 15, 1866, Austin, Texas. 
James W. Latham, age ^2; residence, Winchester; nativity, Virginia; appointed 
chaplain August 20, 1861 ; resigned February 5, 1863, Springfield, Mo. John M. 
Coggeshall, age 42 ; residence, Denmark ; nativity, Rhode Island ; appointed 
chaplain June 12, 1863; died of disease October 29, 1863, Little Rock, Ark. 
James S. Rand, age 34 ; residence, Lewis ; nativity, New York ; promoted chap- 
lain from unassigned recruit, Fourth Infantry, May 18, 1864; mustered May 
19, 1864; mustered out February 15, 1866, Austin, Texas. 

company c 

Privates: William P. Allen (veteran), age 18; residence, Burlington; nativ- 
ity, Maine; enlisted July 1, 1861, as bugler; reenlisted and remustered February 
22, 1864; discharged for promotion as lieutenant in Sixty-seventh United States 
Colored Infantry March 19, 1864. Wilbert S. Andrews, age 21 ; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, New York; enlisted August 13, 1862; mustered August 13, 
1862; died March 25, 1863, Gladden Valley, Mo. Franklin Arrickson, age 22; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Sweden; enlisted June 1, 1861 ; discharged for 
disability December 2, 1862, Woody Springs, Mo. Samuel (or Stout) Atherton, 
age 23; residence, Burlington; nativity, Illinois; enlisted July 14, 1861 ; mustered 
July 31, 1861 ; mustered out September 9, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, expiration of 
term of service. John L. Baltzer (veteran), age 20; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 1, 1861, as third corporal; promoted second cor- 
poral May 27, 1862; reenlisted and remustered February 22, 1864. George Barr, 
age 19; residence, Kossuth; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted July 14, 1861 ; mus- 
tered out September 9, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, expiration of term of service. 
Joseph Boltz, age 27 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; enlisted 
June 2, 1861 ; mustered out September 9, 1864, Davenport, Iowa; expiration of 
term of service. Armond W. Bowman, age 25 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, 
Virginia; enlisted July 10, 1861 ; mustered out September 9, 1864, Davenport, 
Iowa, expiration of term of service. Michael Boyer (veteran), age 36; resi- 
dence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted June 20, 1861 ; mustered July 31, 
1861 ; reenlisted and remustered February 22, 1864. John H. Brandt, age 26; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted January 4. 1864; mustered 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 283 

January 4, 1864. Benjamin A. Brewer, age 26; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Virginia; enlisted June 1, 1861 ; mustered out September 9, 1864, Davenport, 
Iowa, expiration of term of service. William L. Brown (veteran), age 22; 
residence, Des Moines County ; nativity, Iowa ; enlisted August 16, 1862 ; mus- 
tered August 16, 1862; reenlisted and remustered February 22, 1864. Loren 
T. Bush, age 23 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, New York ; enlisted January 4, 

1864; mustered January 5, 1864; wounded April , 1864, Little Rock, Ark.; 

discharged for disability June 2, 1865, Memphis, Tenn. (see Company E, First 
Infantry). (Lorin F. Bush). Josiah Cameron, age 21; residence, Burlington ; 
nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 13, 1861 ; mustered July 31, 1861 ; wounded May 
27, 1862, Monagan Springs, Mo. ; died of wounds May 28, 1862, Osceola, Mo. 
George H. Carey (veteran), age 23; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; en- 
listed June 20, 1861 ; mustered July 31, 1861 ; reenlisted and remustered Feb- 
ruary 22, 1864. Jackson D. Carter, age 28 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, 
New York; enlisted July 18, 1861, as seventh corporal; mustered July 31, 1861 ; 
promoted sixth corporal May 22, 1862; sixth sergeant December 1, 1862; fifth 
sergeant January 1, 1863; fourth sergeant January 1, 1864; mustered out Sep- 
tember 9, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, expiration of term of service. Benjamin S. 
Castle, age 22; residence, Danville; nativity, Ohio; enlisted June 8, 1861, as 
fourth sergeant; promoted third sergeant July 1, 1862; second sergeant Decem- 
ber 12, 1862; mustered out September 9, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, expiration of 
term of service. John H. Clark, age 20 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Iowa ; 
enlisted December 29, 1863 ; mustered December 29, 1863. William A. Clark, age 
23; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 1, 1861, as third sergeant; 
promoted first sergeant July 1, 1862; second lieutenant February 14, 1863; re ~ 
signed June 18, 1864, Little Rock, Ark. Benjamin F. Clegg, age 23; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, New York; enlisted July 10, 1861 ; mustered out September 
9, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, expiration of term of service. Harvey J. Clingfield 
(veteran), age 22; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted June 1, 1861 ; 
mustered July 31, 1861 ; reenlisted and remustered February 22, 1864; deserted 
July 16, 1864, Benton Barracks (St. Louis) Mo. Joseph Clothier (veteran), 
age 23; residence, Burlington; nativity, Canada; enlisted June 10, 1861 ; mus- 
tered July 31, 1861 ; reenlisted and remustered February 22, 1864. John B. Cole, 
age 25; residence, Burlington; nativity, Indiana; enlisted June 1, 1861 ; mus- 
tered July 31, 1861 ; mustered out September 9, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, ex- 
piration of term of service. Doddridge W. Cook, age 35 ; residence, Burling- 
ton ; nativity, Ohio; enlisted January 4, 1864; mustered January 4, 1864; mus- 
tered out May 23, 1865, Davenport, Iowa. Simeon W. Cooley, age 36; resi- 
dence, Burlington ; nativity, Ohio ; enlisted July 2, 1861 ; died of disease April 

, 1864, West Point, Iowa. James Corkwell (veteran), age 21; residence, 

Burlington; nativity, New York; enlisted June 13, 1861 ; mustered July 31, 
1861 ; reenlisted and remustered February 22, 1864; discharged October 6, 1865, 
Jefferson Barracks, (St. Louis), Mo. William L. Cutter, age 24; residence, 
Burlington ; nativity. New Hampshire ; enlisted January 4, 1864 ; mustered Jan- 
uary 4, 1864. Edwin W. Deal, age 34; residence, Burlington; nativity, Pennsyl- 
vania; enlisted June 14, 1861, as saddler; accidentally drowned October 4, 1861, 
enroute from Burlington, Iowa, to St. Louis, Mo. Henry J. Depperman (vet- 
eran), age 21; residence, Burlington; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted July 18, 



284 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

1861 ; mustered July 31, 1861 ; reenlisted and remustered February 22, 1864; 
promoted seventh corporal, September 10, 1864; fourth corporal February 4, 
1866. Franklin Drurey, age 21; residence, Burlington; nativity, Vermont; en- 
listed June 10, 1861 ; died of disease October 15, 1863, Little Rock, Ark.; buried 
in National Cemetery, Little Rock, Ark., section 1, grave 87. Charles C. East- 
man, age 24; residence, Burlington; nativity, New York; enlisted June 1, 1861 ; 
mustered out September 9, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, expiration of term of service. 
Noah W. Estep, age 25; residence, Burlington; enlisted September 24, 1861 ; 
mustered September 24, 1861 ; mustered out September 9, 1864, Davenport, 
Iowa, expiration of term of service. John M. Fife, age 18; residence, Burling- 
ton; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted June 1, 1861 ; transferred to Invalid Corps 
August 15, 1863; returned to company February 19, 1864; mustered out Septem- 
ber 9, 1864, Davenport. Iowa, expiration of term of service. William A. Gard- 
ner (veteran), age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 13, 
1861 ; mustered July 31, 1861 ; reenlisted and remustered February 22, 1864; 
promoted eighth corporal February 4, 1866. Henry Gearheart (veteran), age 
22; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 13, 1862; mustered 
August 13, 1862; reenlisted and remustered February 22, 1864; promoted sec- 
ond corporal, September 10, 1864; sixth sergeant February 4, 1866. Matthew 
C. Glann. age 2J ; residence, Burlington; nativity, New York; enlisted June 10, 
1861 ; mustered out September 9. 1864. Davenport, Iowa, expiration of term of 
service. Alexander T. Hamilton, age 41 ; residence, Morning Sun ; nativity, 
Ohio; enlisted July 10, 1861 ; mustered out September 9, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, 
expiration of term of service. Isaac Hammond, age 23; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Holland; enlisted July 14. 1861 ; mustered out September 9, 1864, 
Davenport, Iowa, expiration of term of service. William G. Harbach, age 
22; residence, Burlington; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted July 18, 1861, as 
company quartermaster sergeant ; wounded by guerrillas near Monagan Springs, 
Mo. May 27, 1862; died of wounds May 2j, 1862, Osceola, Mo. George \V. 
Hardin, age 18 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Kentucky ; enlisted January 5, 
1864; mustered January 5, 1864. Porter \Y Henry, age 22; residence, Bur- 
lington; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted June 13, 1861 ; discharged for disabil- 
ity November 1, 1862, Cross Hollow, Ark. Michael Higgins, age 22; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 13, 1861 ; wounded fatally by guer- 
rillas May 2j, i8f>2, near Monagan Springs, Mo., died of wounds May 28, 
1862, Osceola, Mo. John J. Hillery, age 20; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Iowa; enlisted June 10, 1861 ; wounded fatally April 14, 1864; White Oak Creek, 
Ark.; died of wounds April 26, 1864, Camden, Ark. Thomas Hutchinson (vet- 
eran), age 23; residence, Burlington; nativity, Illinois; enlisted June 1, 1861, as 
farrier; mustered July 31, 1861 ; reenlisted and remustered February 22, 18^4; 
mustered out December 18, 18(15, New Orleans, La. James Ingersol, age 35; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted June 13, 1861, as farrier; 
mustered out September 9, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, expiration of term of service. 
Charles Johnson, age 18 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity. Iowa ; enlisted January 
4, 1864; mustered January 4, 1864; mustered out May 28, 1865, Memphis, Tenn. 
Luther B. Johnson, age 21; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 
1, 1 86 1 ; mustered out September 9, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, expiration of term 
of service. Marion Johnson, age 20; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 285 

enlisted January 4, 1864; mustered January 4, 1864. Bascomb H. Kelly, age 19; 
residence, Burlington ; nativity, Kentucky ; enlisted August 16, 1862 ; mustered 
August 16, 1862; mustered out June 13, 1865, Memphis, Tenn. Rolla Kimball 
1 veteran), age 39; residence, Burlington; nativity, New York; enlisted June 
1, 1861 ; mustered July 31, 1861 ; reenlisted and remustered February 22, 1864; 
absent without leave from June 17, 1864. Frederick O. Lane (veteran), age 
23; residence, Burlington; nativity. New Hampshire; enlisted June 6, 1861 ; 
promoted eighth corporal November 1, 1862; sixth sergeant January 29, 1S63; 
reenlisted and remustered January 1, 1864; promoted fifth sergeant January 1, 
1864; second sergeant September 10, 1864; absent without leave February 17, 
1865 ; no later record found. Robert G. Laughlin, age 21 ; residence, Burling- 
ton ; nativity, New York; enlisted July 10, 1861 ; mustered out September 9, 
1864, Davenport, Iowa, expiration of term of service. Charles E. Madera 
(veteran), age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 1, 1861 ; 
mustered July 31, 1861 ; reenlisted and remustered February 22, 1864; killed by 
guerrillas September 27, 1864, Centralia, Mo.; buried in National Cemetery, 
Jefferson Barracks, (St. Louis), Mo., section 45, grave 543. Martin M. Moore 
(veteran), age 21; residence, Burlington; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted June 
7, 1861; mustered July 31, 1861 ; promoted eighth corporal January 29, 1863; 
fifth corporal March 1, 1863; fourth corporal January 1, 1864; reenlisted and 
remustered January 1, 1864; promoted first corporal September 10, 1864; dis- 
charged September 28, 1865, Jefferson Barracks, St Louis, Mo. Richard F. 
Morgan (veteran), age 25; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted 
August 16, 1862; mustered August 16, 1862; reenlisted and remustered February 
22, 1864; promoted sixth corporal September 10, 1864; fifth corporal February 
4, 1866. William Morgan (veteran), age 34; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Ohio; enlisted August 28, 1862; mustered August 28, 1862; promoted wagoner; 
reenlisted and remustered February 22, 1864. William Mosena, age 37; resi- 
dence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted March 21, 1864; mustered March 22, 
1864. John C. Murphy, age 27; residence, Burlington; nativity, Illinois; en- 
listed January 5, 1864; mustered January 5, 1864. Stevenson D. Parkenson, 
age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 1, 1861 ; mustered 
out September 9, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, expiration of term of service. George 
W. Patterson, age 24; residence, Kossuth; nativity, Ohio; enlisted June 15, 1861, 
as fifth corporal; promoted fourth corporal May 27, 1862; first corporal March 
1, 1863; discharged for disability November 2, 1863; Keokuk, Iowa. Thomas 
J. R. Perry, Jr. (veteran), age 23; residence, Burlington; nativity, Pennsylvania; 
enlisted June 1, 1861 ; mustered July 31, 1861 ; promoted sixth sergeant Septem- 
ber 1, 1862; company quartermaster sergeant October 4, 1862; first sergeant Feb- 
ruary 28, 1863; reenlisted and remustered January 1, 1864; promoted first lieu- 
tenant July 6, 1864; captain April 15, 1865. Benjamin Raney, age 36; resi- 
dence, Burlington; nativity, New York; appointed first lieutenant May 12, 1861 ; 
died December 11, 1862, Springfield, Mo.; buried in National Cemetery, Spring- 
field, Mo., section 10, grave 53. Charles H. Rankin (veteran), age 19; resi- 
dence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted June I, 1861 ; mustered July 31, 
1861 ; reenlisted and remustered February 22, 1864; mustered out June 7, 1865, 
Memphis, Tenn. Matthew Ronaldson, age 24; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Ohio; enlisted July 18, 1861, as second sergeant; wounded slightly March 25, 



286 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

1862, St. Clair County, Mo.; promoted second lieutenant December 12, 1862; 
first lieutenant February 14, 1863; resigned June 29, 1864, St. Louis, Mo. 
George C. Sackett, age 25 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Ohio ; enlisted July 
14, 1861 ; mustered out September 9, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, expiration of term 
of service. Joseph O. Scranton, age 26; residence, Burlington; nativity, Penn- 
sylvania; enlisted July 18, 1861 ; transferred to Burges' Sharpshooters Oct. 20, 
1861. Michael Seyb (veteran), age 21; residence, Franklin; nativity, Germany; 
enlisted July 28, 1861 ; mustered July 31, 1861 ; promoted sixth corporal March 
1, 1863; fifth corporal January 1, 1864; reenlisted and remustered January 1, 

1864; promoted fifth sergeant September 10, 1864; fourth sergeant, April , 

1865. William P. Shelton, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; en- 
listed July 9, 1861 ; promoted eighth corporal March 1, 1863; s i- xtn corporal; 
mustered out September 9, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, expiration of term of 
service. John E. Simmons, age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, New York; 
enlisted June 18, 1861 ; mustered out September 9, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, ex- 
piration of term of service. William H. Slocum, age 22; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, New York; enlisted June 10, 1861 ; mustered out September 9, 1864, 
Davenport, Iowa, expiration of term of service. Samuel Smith, age 20; resi- 
dence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted January 20, 1864; mustered January 
25, 1864; mustered out May 28, 1865, Memphis, Tenn., expiration of term of 
service. William B. Smith (veteran), age 24; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Illinois; enlisted August 8, [861 ; mustered August 9, 1861 ; reenlisted and re- 
mustered February 22, 1864; deserted December 26, 1865, Austin, Texas. 
James D. Starkey, age 18; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Iowa; en- 
listed February 24, 1864; mustered February 24, 1864. Edward L. Stone (vet- 
eran), age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted July 18, 1861, as 
fourth corporal; promoted third corporal May 27, 1862; company quartermaster 
sergeant February 28, 1863; reenlisted and remustered February 22, 1864. Nich- 
olas Stovpr, age 37 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; enlisted 
August 13, 1862; mustered August 13, 1862; mustered out June 13, 1865. John 
D. Sunderland, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted December 
29, 1863; mustered January 5, 1864. Franklin C. Taylor, age 22; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted June 15, 1861 ; promoted fifth corporal May 
27, 1862; second corporal March 1, 1863; first corporal January 1, 1864; mus- 
tered out September 9, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, expiration of term of service. 
John Upton, age 34; residence, Burlington; nativity, Xew York; enlisted Decem- 
ber 28, 1863; mustered January 5, 1864; died of disease March 16. 1864, Little 
Rock. Ark.; buried in National Cemetery, Little Rock, Ark., section 1, grave 
352. George Yanbeek (veteran), age 27; residence, Burlington; nativity, Hol- 
land; enlisted June 20, 1861 ; mustered July 31, 1861 ; promoted seventh corporal 
March 1, 1863; sixth sergeant January 1, 1864; reenlisted and remustered Febru- 
ary 22, 1864; promoted third sergeant September 10, 1864; second sergeant 

April , 1865; second lieutenant April 15, 1865; not mustered; mustered out 

February 15, 1866, Austin, Texas. Samuel E. Welch (veteran), age 21; resi- 
dence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 13, 1862; mustered August 
13. 1862; reenlisted and remustered February 22, 1864; djscharged October 6, 
1865, Jefferson Barracks, (St. Louis), Mo. Elijah G. Wilcox, age 27; resi- 
dence, Burlington; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted June 13, 1861 ; discharged for 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 287 

disease January i, 1862, Jefferson City, Ma Pliny Wilcox, age 20; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Vermont; enlisted August 13, 1862; mustered August 13, 
1862; accidentally killed July 19, 1863, Bloomfield, Mo.; buried in National 
Cemetery, Jefferson Barracks, (St. Louis). Mo., section 38, grave 7. Samuel 
H. F. Wilson, age 32; nativity, Virginia; enlisted July 18, 1861, as first sergeant; 
reduced to ranks at his own request October 7, 1861 ; mustered out September 
9, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, expiration of term of service. Jacob R. Wolf, age 
26; residence, Burlington; nativity, Illinois; enlisted June 13, 1861 ; died of dis- 
ease December 22, 1861, Jefferson City, Mo.; buried in National Cemetery, 
Jefferson City, Mo., section 2, grave 3. Andrew W. Wyman, age 38; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Maine; enlisted July 18, 1861, as second corporal; pro- 
moted first corporal May 27, 1862; discharged for promotion as first lieutenant 
in Company L, Second Arkansas Cavalry, January 26, 1864. 

COMPANY D 

Privates: Charles H. Corey, age 22; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; 
enlisted January 5, 1864; mustered January 5, 1864. Whitman Corey, age 18; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted January 5, 1864; mustered Jan- 
uary 5, 1864; promoted trumpeter. James Dailey, age 18; residence, Des Moines 
County; nativity, Indiana; enlisted August 9, 1864; mustered August 9, 1864. 
Philip Dailey, age 28; residence, Burlington; nativity, Indiana; enlisted Jan- 
uary 5, 1864; mustered January 5, 1864. Samuel A. Flanders, age 28; res- 
idence, Des Moines County ; nativity, New Hampshire ; enlisted September 24, 
1861 ; mustered September 24, 1861 ; wounded March 11, 1862, Latayette County, 
Mo. ; mustered out September 9, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, expiration of term of 
service. Joseph C. Hewitt, age 30 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Indiana ; 
enlisted January 4, 1864; mustered January 5, 1864; died of disease February 
21, 1865, Memphis, Tenn. ; buried in Mississippi River National Cemetery, 
Memphis, Tenn., section 1, grave 102. John L. McClelland, age 21 ; residence, 
Des Moines County; nativity, Illinois; enlisted December 21, 1863; mustered 
December 21, 1863; promoted seventh corporal September 9, 1864; mustered out 
May 28, 1865, Memphis, Tenn. Perry Robert, age ^7 ; residence, Burlington ; 
nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted January 5, 1864; mustered January 5, 1864; 
died August 10, 1864, Van Buren, Ark. John A. Roberts, age 19; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Indiana; enlisted January 5, 1864; mustered January 5, 
1864; promoted trumpeter. William H. Rowe, age 21; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Indiana; enlisted January 23, 1864; mustered February 3, 1864. James 
H. Stewart, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted December 
29, 1863; mustered January 5, 1864; died August 10, 1864, Little Rock, Ark; 
buried in National Cemetery, Little Rock, Ark., section 1, grave 855. William 
H. Stewart, age 29; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Ohio; enlisted 
December 29, 1863 ; mustered December 29, 1863. William Wallace Wright, 
age 26; residence, Des Moines County; nativity. Canada; enlisted December 21, 
1863; mustered December 21, 1863. 

COMPANY E 

i "h'aies: Freling H. Cale, age 18; residence, Burlington; enlisted July 31, 
1861 ; mustered out September 9, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, expiration of term of 



288 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

service. John Campbell, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Pennsylvania; 
enlisted January 5, 1864; mustered January 5, 1864; promoted bugler; mustered 
out May 24, 1865, Memphis, Tenn. (see Company I). Amasa Daily (veteran), 
age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted June 13, 1861 ; 
mustered July 31, 1861 ;• reenlisted and remustered February 24, 1864; died of 
disease May 10, 1864, St. Louis, Mo. Lucian D. Fowler, age 17; residence, Bur- 
lington; nativity, New York; enlisted January 27, 1864; mustered February 8, 
1864. Jeremiah Kitchen (veteran), age 23; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Iowa; enlisted July 31, 1861 ; mustered July 31, 1861 ; reenlisted and remustered 
February 24, 1864. Samuel W. Morgan, age 21 ; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Delaware; enlisted August 14, 1862; mustered August 14, 1862; mustered out 
June 15, 1865, Memphis, Tenn. Henry R. Newcomb (veteran), age 33; res- 
idence, Burlington ; nativity, Illinois ; enlisted February 27, 1864 ; mustered 
March 8, 1864; discharged for promotion as captain in Fourth Arkansas Cav- 
alry, October 25, 1864. George W. Ramsey, age 23; residence, Des Moines 
County; nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 18, 1861 ; mustered out September 9, 1864, 
Davenport, Iowa, expiration of term of service. Joseph B. Ramsey, age 22; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted August 30, 1862; mus- 
tered August 30, 1862; mustered out June 15, 1865, Memphis, Tenn. Upton S. 
Ramsey (veteran), age 21; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Iowa; en- 
listed August 14, 1862; mustered August 14, 1862; reenlisted and remustered 
January 5, 1864. 

COMPANY F 

Privates: Thomas W. Priddy (veteran), age 39; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Virginia; enlisted August 30, 1862; mustered August 30, 1862; reen- 
listed and remustered January 1, 1864; promoted second corporal October 31, 
1864 ; first corporal August 3, 1865. 

COMPANY H 

Privates: Phineas D. Judson, age 25 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Con- 
necticut ; enlisted September 7, 1861 ; mustered September 7, 1861 ; mustered 
out September 9, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, expiration of term of service. John 
McDowell, age 22 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; enlisted Sep- 
tember 30, 1 86 1 ; mustered September 30, 1861 ; mustered out September 9, 
1864, Davenport, Iowa, expiration of term of service. Henry Osborn, age 21 ; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Indiana; enlisted September 30, 1861 ; mustered 
September 30, 1861 ; died of disease November 16, 1861, Jefferson City, Mo. 

company 1 

Privates: John Campbell, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Pennsyl- 
vania; enlisted January 5, 1864; mustered January 5, 1864; transferred to Com- 
pany E. Edwin M. Church (veteran), age 21; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Illinois; enlisted June 13, 1861 ; mustered August 3, 1861 ; reenlisted and re- 
mustered January 1, 1864; promoted fourth sergeant January 1, 1865; first ser- 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 289 

geant February 17, 1865. Thomas A. Jessup, age 18; residence, Des Moines 
County; nativity, Indiana; enlisted February 29, 1864; mustered February 29, 
1864. James L. Sayers, age 18; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Ohio; 
enlisted August 11, 1864; mustered August 11, 1864. 

COMPANY K 

Privates: John W. Holmes, age 21 ; residence, Burlington; nativity, Indiana; 
enlisted January 20, 1864; mustered January 25, 1864; died of disease July 10, 
1864, Little Rock, Ark. ; buried in National Cemetery, Little Rock, Ark., section 
1, grave 752. Anthony Kelley, age 25; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, 
Indiana; enlisted August 13, 1862; mustered August 13, 1862; mustered out 
June 13, 1865, Memphis, Tenn. George W. Kelley (veteran), age 20; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Indiana; enlisted August 13, 1862; mustered August 13, 
1862; reenlisted and remustered January 1, 1864; promoted Eighth corporal 
February 20, 1864; seventh corporal May 1, 1864; fifth sergeant February 21, 
1865 ; third sergeant December 14, 1865. William M. Kelley, age 21 ; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted June 13, 1861 ; mustered August 17, 1861 ; 
promoted eighth corporal September 1, 1862; sixth corporal April 1, 1863; fifth 
corporal August 4, 1863; fourth corporal November 2, 1863; third corporal 
January 1, 1864; reduced to ranks at his own request January 26, 1864; died of 
disease September 14, 1864, on steamer "Burlington." John B. Kelly, age 18; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted February 22, 1864; mustered 
February 24, 1864; mustered out September 1, 1865, St. Louis, Mo. Jonathan 
R. Porter, age 21; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted January 20, 
1864; mustered January 25, 1864; discharged for disability March 28, 1865, 
Keokuk, Iowa. Hiram S. Root, age 23 ; residence, Des Moines County ; nativity, 
Canada; enlisted March 18, 1864; mustered March 18, 1864. 

COMPANY L 

Privates: Joseph Moody (veteran), age 25; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Ohio; enlisted August 25, 1862; mustered August 25, 1862; reenlisted and re- 
mustered January 5, 1864; mustered out February 15, 1866, Austin, Texas (see 
Company F). 

COMPANY M 

Privates: Nelson P. Hill (veteran), age 29; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
New York; enlisted October 5, 1861 ; mustered October 5, 1861 ; promoted far- 
rier January 5, 1864 ; reenlisted and remustered February 22, 1864. Richard 
Smith, age 28; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ireland; enlisted September 2, 
1861 ; mustered September 12, 1861 ; discharged for disability July 24, 1862. 

UNASSIGNED RECRUITS 

Jared W. Chamberlin, age 26 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Indiana ; en- 
listed January 4, 1864; mustered January 5, 1864; War Department reports: 



290 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

"No record found." Charles Davis, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Maryland; enlisted August 23. 1864; mustered August 23, 1864; War Depart- 
ment reports: "No record found." William Kepler, age 18; residence, Des 
Moines County; nativity, Illinois; enlisted March 12, 1864; mustered March 21, 
1864; War Department reports: "No record found." John H. Lea, age 23; 
residence. Burlington; nativity, North Carolina; enlisted January 5, 1864; mus- 
tered January q. 1864; War Department reports: "No record found." 

SECOND REGIMENT IOWA VOLUNTEER CAVALRY 

Term of service three years. Mustered into service of the United States at 
Davenport, Iowa, September 28, 1S61, by Capt. Alexander Chambers, United 
States Army. Mustered out of service September 19, 1865, Selma, Ala. 

Field and Staff: Washington L. Elliott; appointed colonel September 14, 
1861 ; mustered September 14, 1861 ; promoted brigadier-general June 11, 1862; 
brevet major-general March 13, 1865. Edward Hatch, age 30; residence, Mus- 
catine; nativity, Maine; promoted lieutenant-colonel from First Battalion major 
September 12, 1861 ; colonel June 30, 1862; wounded severely December 4, 1863, 
Moscow, Tenn. ; promoted brigadier-general April 27, 1864 (see Company A). 
William P. Hepburn, age 27; residence, Marshalltown ; nativity, Ohio; promoted 
First Battalion major from captain of Company B September 13, 1861 ; lieuten- 
ant-colonel July 1, 1862; mustered out October 3, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, expira- 
tion of term of service. Datus E. Coon, age 30: residence, Mason City; nativity, 
New York; promoted Second Battalion major from captain of Company I Sep- 
tember 14, 1861 ; colonel May 1, 1864; brevet brigadier-general March 8, 1865; 
mustered out September 19, 1865, Selma, Ala. Hiram W. Love, age 31 ; res- 
idence, Iowa City ; nativity, Ohio ; promoted Third Battalion major from cap- 
tain of Company H September 15, 1861 ; resigned August 8, 1863. Charles F. 
Marden ; nativity, New Hampshire; appointed adjutant September 26, 1861 ; 
mustered September 28, 1861 ; promoted first lieutenant of Company G April 15, 
1862. William B. Blaney ; appointed regimental quartermaster September 26, 
1861 ; mustered September 26, 1861 ; died of disease February 18, 1862, St. Louis, 
Mo. Duncan McGregor; appointed regimental quartermaster February 13, 1862; 
promoted first lieutenant of Company B April 15, 1862. Richard McC. Kirtland, 
age 25 ; residence, Iowa Falls ; nativity, New York ; promoted regimental com- 
missary from Third Battalion sergeant-major October 1, 1862; mustered out 
October 3, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, expiration of term of service (see Com- 
pany F). Gustavus Schnitger, age ^y ; residence, Davenport; nativity, Germany; 
promoted First Battalion adjutant from second lieutenant of Company E, Decem- 
ber 1, 1861 ; mustered out August 26, 1862. Joseph H. Freeman, age 35; res- 
idence, Scott County; nativity, Ohio; promoted Second Battalion adjutant from 
first lieutenant of Company C December 1, 1861 ; mustered out August 26, 1862. 
William W. Mills, age 25 ; residence, Dubuque ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; pro- 
moted Third Battalion adjutant from first lieutenant of Company I December 
1, 1861 ; resigned January 22, 1862. Samuel Gilbert, age 35; residence. Fort 
Madison ; nativity, Kentucky ; promoted First Battalion quartermaster from first 
lieutenant of Company K December 1, 1861 ; mustered out April 26, 1862, Ham- 
burg, Tenn. (see Company F). James M. Hannam ; residence, Muscatine; pro- 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 291 

moted Second Battalion quartermaster from second lieutenant of Company A 
December i, 1861 ; mustered out April 26, 1862, Hamburg, Tenn. George R. 
Ammond, age 24 ; residence, Hamilton County ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; pro- 
moted Third Battalion quartermaster from second lieutenant of Company F ; 
mustered out April 26, 1862, Hamburg, Tenn. George Reeder ; appointed sur- 
geon September 10, 1861 ; mustered October 1, 1861 ; resigned June 8, 1862, 
Booneville, Miss. George H. Noyes, age 32 ; residence, Clinton ; nativity, New 
Hampshire ; appointed assistant surgeon from assistant surgeon of Eighth In- 
fantry September 10, 1861 ; mustered September 19, 1861 ; promoted surgeon 
June 9, 1862; mustered out September 19, 1865, Selma, Ala. Erastus D. Yule, 
age 40 ; residence, Clinton County ; nativity, Ohio ; appointed assistant surgeon 
June 9, 1862; mustered June 2-, 1862; resigned June 30, 1864. S. E. Jones; 
residence, Wapello; appointed assistant surgeon March 7, 1865; commission 
declined and returned. Jesse R. Burgess, age 44; residence, Webster City; 
nativity, Pennsylvania; appointed additional assistant surgeon April 21, 1862; 
promoted assistant surgeon January 7, 1863; mustered out September 19, 1865, 
Selma, Ala. Charles G. Trusdell, age 36 ; residence, Marshalltown ; nativity, New 
York; appointed chaplain August 30, 1861 ; mustered October 2, 1861 ; resigned 
October 7, 1862, Corinth, Miss.; reappointed August 20, 1863; commission de- 
clined. Joseph J. Watson, age 40; residence, Hazelton ; nativity, Ohio; appointed 
chaplain May 17, 1864; mustered June 4, 1864; resigned June 1, 1865, Nashville, 
Tenn. 

COMPANY A 

Privates: Thomas Birkimer, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; 
enlisted January 23, 1865 ; mustered January 2^, 1865 ; mustered out September 
19, 1865, Selma, Ala. Daniel W. Caviness, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Indiana; enlisted January 23, 1865; mustered January 23, 1865; mustered out 
September 19, 1865, Selma, Ala. Alonzo J. Chandler, age 18; residence, Bur- 
lington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted January 19, 1865; mustered January 19, 1865; 
mustered out September 19, 1865, Selma, Ala. James R. Crakaal, age 18; res- 
idence, Des Moines County ; nativity, Iowa ; enlisted February 15, 1865 ; mustered 
February 15, 1865; mustered out September 19, 1865, Selma, Ala. Alvin R. 
Downing, age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted January 19, 
1865 ; mustered January 19, 1865 ; mustered out September 19, 1865, Selma, Ala. 
William T. Free, age 18 ; residence, Des Moines County ; nativity, Iowa ; en- 
listed February 15, 1865; mustered February 15, 1865; mustered out September 
19, 1865, Selma, Ala. James W. Frush, age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Ohio; enlisted January 19, 1865; mustered January 19, 1865; mustered out Sep- 
tember 19, 1865, Selma, Ala. 

COMPANY D 

Privates: Napoleon B. Callehan, age 31; residence, Des Moines County; 
nativity, Kentucky; enlisted December 29, 1863; mustered December 29, 1863; 
mustered out September 19, 1865, Selma, Ala. Joseph P. Holt, age 27; res- 
idence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted January 4, 1864; mustered January 



292 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

5, 1S64; died of disease February 29, 1864, Memphis, Tenn. ; buried in Missis- 
sippi River National Cemetery, section 1, grave 237. Thomas Paul, age 29; res- 
idence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted December 28, 1863; mustered Decem- 
ber 28, 1863. 

COMPANY F 

Privates: Martin C. Lyons, age 21; residence, Burlington; nativity, New 
York; enlisted March 13, 1862; mustered April 26, 1862; deserted April 14, 
1863, Memphis, Tenn. 



COMPANY H 

Privates: James Deming, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; en- 
listed January 17, 1865; mustered January 17, 1865. 

COMPANY I 

Privates: Thomas Anderson, age 28; residence, Des Moines County; nativ- 
ity, Ohio; enlisted March 7, 1864; mustered March 7, 1864. William E. Fehren- 
back, age 32 ; residence, Kingston ; nativity, South Carolina ; enlisted February 
29, 1864; mustered February 29, 1864; wounded and taken prisoner August 
13, 1864, near Hurricane Creek, Miss.; mustered out June 8, 1865, Clinton, Iowa 
(see Company K; see also regimental band). 

COMPANY K 

Privates: Amos Allen, age 21; residence, Kossuth; nativity, Kentucky; en- 
listed August 28, 1861 ; mustered out October 3, 1864, Davenport, Iowa. Clark 
Anderson, age 21 ; residence, Linton; nativity, Ohio; enlisted December 25, 1863; 
mustered out September 16, 1865, Selma, Ala. William H. H. Anderson, age 23; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Illinois; enlisted May 10, 1864; wounded severely 
December 17, 1864, Little Harpeth, Tenn. ; mustered out June 9, 1865, Quincy, 
111. Moses Armentrout, age 21 ; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Ohio; 
enlisted August 12, 1861 ; died of pneumonia January 16, 1862, Good Samaritan 
Hospital, St. Louis ; buried in National Cemetery, Jefferson Barracks, section 38, 
grave 102. Albert Babb, age 18; residence, Dodgeville ; nativity, Iowa; enlisted 
December 2, 1863; mustered December 2, 1863. Miles W. Babb, age 19; res- 
idence, Kossuth; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 21, 1861 ; mustered August 30, 
1861 ; mustered out October 3, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, expiration of term of 
service. Levi L. Backus (veteran), age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, New 
York; enlisted August 19, 1861 ; mustered August 30, 1861 ; promoted farrier; 
reenlisted and remustered March 1, 1864; promoted seventh corporal November 
1, 1864; wounded severely December 17, 1864, Little Harpeth, Tenn.; promoted 
sixth corporal January 1, 1865; fifth corporal March 1, 1865; fourth corporal 
April r, 1865; third corporal June 18, 1865. Jeremiah R. Bailey, age 25; res- 
idence, Des Moines County; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted November 12, 1861 ; 
mustered November 12, 1861 ; discharged November 11, 1864, Memphis, Tenn., 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 293 

expiration of term of service. John N. Bailey (veteran), age 19; residence, 
Burlington ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; enlisted August 19, 1861 ; mustered August 
30, 1861 ; promoted eighth corporal April 1, 1862; fourth corporal October 15, 
1862; third corporal February 1, 1863; sixth sergeant June 1, 1864; fourth ser- 
geant November 1, 1864; third sergeant March 1, 1865. Elijah W. Bandy, age 
21 ; residence, Kossuth; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 12. 1861, as second cor- 
poral; mustered August 30, 1861 ; promoted first corporal February 1, 1862; 
mustered out October 3, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, expiration of term of service. 
Jacob F. Bandy (veteran), age 26; residence, Kossuth; nativity, Indiana; enlisted 
August 12, 1861, as quartermaster sergeant; mustered August 30, 1861 ; pro- 
moted second lieutenant December 1, 1861 ; first lieutenant June 11, 1862; cap- 
tain May 7, 1864. John Bandy, age 36; residence, Kossuth; nativity, Indiana; 
enlisted December 7, 1863; mustered January 5, 1864; promoted eighth corporal 
June 1, 1864; seventh corporal July 23, 1864; sixth corporal September 13, 1864; 
fourth corporal November 1, 1864; third corporal January 1, 1865; second cor- 
poral March 1, 1865 ; first corporal April 1, 1865 ; discharged June 18, 1865, Nash- 
ville, Tenn. George D. Barnes, age 18; residence, Linton; nativity, Pennsyl- 
vania; enlisted August 21, 1861 ; mustered August 30, 1861 ; died of disease Jan- 
uary 25, 1862, hospital, St. Louis, Mo. Jacob K. Barnes (veteran), age 20; res- 
idence, Burlington ; nativity, Ohio ; enlisted August 12, 1861, as farrier; mustered 
August 30, 1861 ; reenlisted and remustered March 1, 1864. James R. Barnes, 
age 20; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 19, 1861 ; mus- 
tered August 30, 1861 ; died of disease January 15, 1862, hospital, St. Louis, Mo. 
Uriah Barnes, age 44 ; residence, Kingston ; nativity, Kentucky ; enlisted August 
19, 1861, as first corporal; mustered August 30, 1861 ; discharged for disability 
February 14, 1863, Keokuk, Iowa. John Bartscherer, age 18; residence, Kos- 
suth; nativity, Iowa; enlisted December 25, 1863; mustered January 5, 1864; 
wounded severely November 19, 1864, Butler Creek, Ala. Thomas Bell, Jr. 
(veteran), age 22; residence, Kossuth; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted August 
30, 1861 ; mustered August 30, 1861 ; promoted saddler January 1, 1864; reen- 
listed and remustered March 1, 1864. Walter G. Bell, age 18; residence, Burling- 
ton; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted January 23, 1865; mustered January 23, 
1865. Zion Bishop (veteran), age 19; residence, Dodgeville ; nativity, Indiana; 
enlisted August 21, 1861 ; mustered August 30, 1861 ; reenlisted and remustered 
March 1, 1864; promoted eighth corporal November 1, 1864; seventh corporal 
January 1, 1865; sixth corporal March 1, 1865; fifth corporal April 1, 1865; 
fourth corporal June 18, 1865. Henry M. Blanchard, age 26; residence, Kos- 
suth; nativity, Indiana; enlisted August 12, 1861, as third corporal; mustered 
August 30, 1861 ; promoted second corporal February 1, 1862; first corporal Octo- 
ber 15, 1862; mustered out October 3, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, expiration of 
term of service. John A. Braden, age 20 ; residence, Kossuth ; nativity, Ohio ; 
enlisted December 18, 1863; mustered January 5, 1864; died of disease June 4, 
1864, Memphis, Tenn. (see Company C, Thirtieth Infantry). Garret R. Bradley 
(veteran), age 23; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 24, 
1861, as saddler; mustered August 30, 1861 ; promoted wagoner; wounded 
slightly May 9, 1862, Farmington, Miss.; promoted fifth corporal October 15, 
1862; fourth corporal February 1, 1862; third corporal June 1, 1864; second 
corporal July 23, 1864; first corporal September 13, 1864; fifth sergeant Novem- 



294 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

be i, 1864; fourth sergeant March 1, 1865. John Canterbury, age 19; residence, 
Middleton ; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 20, 1861 ; mustered August 30, 1861 ; 
mustered out October 3, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, expiration of term of service. 
Lucullus Casens, age 18 ; residence, Dodgeville ; nativity, Illinois ; enlisted Decem- 
ber 2, 1863; mustered December 7, 1863. Amos M. Clark (veteran), age 24; 
residence, Danville; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 12, 1861 ; mustered August 
30, 1861 ; reenlisted and remustered March 1, 1864. Terrence Cox, age 24; res- 
idence, Kingston; nativity, Ireland; enlisted December 14, 1863; mustered Jan- 
uary 5, 1864; deserted July 29, 1865, Decatur, Ala. Davis J. Crocker, age 38; 
residence, Burlington; nativity. Ohio; appointed captain August 25, 1861 ; mus- 
tered August 30, 1861 ; resigned June 11, 1862, Farmington, Miss. George B. 
Darlington, age 18; residence, Northfield ; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted Sep- 
tember 5, 1864; mustered September 5, 1864; taken prisoner December 17, 1864, 
Little Harpeth, Tenn. ; mustered out June 7, 1865, Clinton, Iowa; substitute for 
Thomas L. Lawrence (see Company H, Seventh Infantry). Benton S. Darwold, 
age 18; residence, Huron; nativity, Virginia ; enlisted December 22, 1863; mus- 
tered January 5, 1864; promoted eighth corporal April 1, 1865; seventh corporal 
June 18, 1865. Albert Dean, age 18 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Iowa ; en- 
listed December 8, 1863. Henry C. Dolbee, age 18; residence, Des Moines 
County; nativity, Iowa: enlisted January 17, 1865; mustered January 17, 1865. 
Derwin A. Downer (veteran), age 21; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Iowa; 
enlisted August 20, 1861 ; mustered August 30, 1861 ; promoted bugler March 1, 
1862 ; wounded severely May 9, 1862, Farmington, Miss. ; reenlisted and re- 
mustered March 1, 1864. Robert M. Downer, age 23 ; residence, Linton ; nativity, 
Ohio; enlisted August 21, 1861, as first sergeant; mustered August 30, 1861 ; re- 
duced to ranks March 1, 1862 ; wounded slightly May 9, 1862, Farmington, Miss. ; 
promoted fifth sergeant August 1, 1862; discharged for disability October 16, 
1862, St. Louis, Mo. William R. Driskell, age 21 ; residence, Kingston; nativity, 
Iowa; enlisted January 5. 1864; mustered January 5, 1864. William M. Driskill, 
age 20; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 12, 1861, 
as fifth corporal ; mustered August 30, 1861 ; promoted third corporal February 1, 
1862; discharged for disability September 8, 1862, Corinth, Miss. Aaron R. 
Edgington, age 43 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Ohio ; enlisted August 20, 
1861 ; mustered August 30, 1861 ; discharged for disability November 6, 1861, 
Davenport, Iowa (see Company D, Seventeenth Infantry). Robert Edwards, 
age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity. New York; enlisted February 13, 1865; 
mustered February 13, 1865. Richard H. Elston, age 19; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 18, 1861 ; mustered August 30, 1861 ; discharged 
for disability November 12, 1861, Davenport, Iowa. William E. Fehrenback, 
age 31 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, South Carolina ; enlisted August 12, 1861, 
as wagoner ; mustered August 30, 1861 ; promoted third-class musician ; returned 
to company August 26, 1862 ; discharged for disability October 3, 1862, Keokuk, 
Iowa (see regimental band; see also Company I). Martin F. Fetrow, age 18; 
residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Iowa; enlisted January 25, 1865; mus- 
tered January 25, 1865. William Fetrow; residence, Burlington; nativity, Penn- 
sylvania; enlisted October 10, 1864; mustered October 10, 1864; mustered out 
June 5, 1865, Davenport, Iowa. William Fosbender (veteran), age 24; residence, 
Northfield; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted August 12, 1861, as sixth corporal; 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 295 

mustered August 30, 1861 ; reduced to ranks February i, 1862; taken prisoner 
May 30, 1862, Booneville, Miss. ; returned to company January 10, 1863 ; pro- 
moted eighth corporal February 1, 1863; wounded severely February 21, 1864, 
near West Point, Miss. ; reenlisted and remustered March 1, 1864; promoted fifth 
corporal June 1, 1864; fourth corporal September 13, 1864; first corporal Novem- 
ber 1, 1864; sixth sergeant March 1, 1865; company quartermaster sergeant 
April 1, 1865. Amer. Friend, age 20; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, 
Virginia; enlisted December 8, 1863; mustered December 22, 1863. William H. 
Gillett, age 29 ; residence, Dodgeville ; nativity, New York ; enlisted December 

29, 1863 ; mustered out June 12, 1865, Mound City, 111. (see Company G, Thirty- 
ninth Infantry). Jacob H. Goodwin (veteran), age 23; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 30, 1861 ; mustered August 30, 1861 ; promoted 
seventh corporal February 1, 1862; sixth corporal February 4, 1862; fifth cor- 
poral April 1, 1862; sixth sergeant October 15, 1862; fifth sergeant February 
1, 1863; reenlisted and remustered March 1, 1864; promoted fourth sergeant 
June 1, 1864; second sergeant November 1, 1864. Warner N. Gray; died of 
disease January 17, 1862; buried in National Cemetery, Jefferson Barracks (St. 
Louis), Mo., section 38, grave 93. David H. Harper, age 26; residence, Kos- 
suth; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 15, 1861, as third sergeant; mustered 
August 30, 1861 ; promoted company quartermaster sergeant February 1, 1862; 
mustered out October 3, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, expiration of term of service. 
Robert G. Harris, age 18; residence, Kossuth; nativity, Indiana; enlisted August 

30, 1 86 1 ; mustered August 30, 1861 ; mustered out October 3, 1864, Davenport, 
Iowa, expiration of term of service. Albert A. Higgerson, age 25 ; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Tennessee; enlisted January 21, 1865; mustered January 
21, 1865. Lewis E. Hixson, age 25; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Ohio; en- 
listed December 25, 1863 ; mustered December 25, 1863. Alexander Hood, age 
28; residence, Burlington; nativity, New York; enlisted August 24, 1861 ; mus- 
tered August 30, 1861 ; mustered out October 3, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, expira- 
tion of term of service. Thomas Hood, age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Pennsylvania; enlisted August 25, 1861 ; mustered August 30, 1861 ; mustered 
out October 3, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, expiration of term of service. Alfred 
Huested, age 25 ; residence, Kossuth ; nativity, Indiana ; enlisted August 30, 1861 ; 
mustered August 30, 1861 ; mustered out October 3, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, ex- 
piration of term of service. Samuel D. Jackson, age 20; residence, Dodgeville; 
nativity, Iowa ; enlisted December 2, 1863 ; mustered December 2, 1863 ; drowned 
May 4, 1865, Troy, Ky. Perry W. Johnson, age 20; residence, Kossuth; nativity, 
Illinois; enlisted August 24, 1861 ; mustered August 30, 1861 ; died of disease 
Tuly 6, 1862, hospital, Farmington, Miss. ; buried in LTiion National Cemetery, 
Corinth, Miss., section 507, grave 12. William L. Keller, age 23; residence, 
Kingston; nativity, Indiana: enlisted January 5, 1864; mustered January 5, 1864. 
Joseph S. Key, age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 19, 
1861, as bugler ; mustered August 30, 1861 ; promoted third-class musician Decem- 
ber 1, 1861 ; returned to company August 26, 1862; mustered out November 5, 
1864, Memphis, Tenn., expiration of term of service (see regimental band). 
Selvy S. King, age 20; residence, Kossuth; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 12, 
1861 ; mustered August 30, 1861 ; mustered out October 3, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, 
expiration of term of service. Theobald Klein, age 24 ; residence, Des Moines 



296 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 



County; nativity, Germany; enlisted December 14, 1863; mustered December 
22, 1863; taken prisoner December 17, 1864, Little Harpeth, Term.; mustered 
out June 7, 1865, Clinton, Iowa. Charles E. Lambkin (veteran), age 20; res- 
idence, Kossuth; nativity, Virginia; enlisted August 12, 1861 ; mustered August 
30, 1861; promoted sixth corporal February 1, 1862; fifth corporal February 
4. 1862; fifth sergeant April 1, 1862; fourth sergeant August 1, 1862; third 
sergeant February 1, 1863; reenlisted and remustered March 1, 1864; promoted 
company commissary sergeant November 1, 1864. Leroy S. Lambkin, age 19; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Vermont; enlisted August 18, 1862; mustered 
August 18, 1862; discharged for disability March 10, 1863, La Grange, Tenn. ; 
reentered the service January 21, 1865 (see Company G, Forty-fifth Infantry). 
John II. Lee, age 23; residence, Kingston; nativity, Canada; enlisted January 5, 
1864; mustered January 5, 1864; promoted eighth corporal September 13, 1864; 
sixth corporal November 1, 1864; fifth corporal January 1, 1865; fourth cor- 
poral March 1, 1865; third corporal April 1, 1865; second corporal June 18, 
1865. Abraham Leffler (veteran), age 23; residence, Burlington; nativity, New 
Jersey; enlisted August 28, 1861 ; mustered August 30, 1861 ; wounded slightly 
May 9, 1862, Farmington, Miss.; reenlisted and remustered March 1, 1864. 
Frederick Lehart, age 20; residence, Kossuth; nativity, New York; enlisted 
August 12, 1861 ; mustered August 30, 1861 ; wounded slightly May 9, 1862, 
Farmington, Miss. ; mustered out October 3, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, expiration 
of term of service. Joseph S. Long, age 18; residence, Des Moines County; 
nativity, Ohio; enlisted December 2, 1863; mustered December 2, 1863. Lewis 
D. Loper, age 18; residence, Kingston; nativity, Iowa; enlisted December 7, 
1863 ; mustered December 7, 1863 ; mustered out May 20, 1865, Davenport, Iowa. 
James E. McAllister, age ^2; residence, Danville; nativity, New Jersey; enlisted 
August 12, 1861; mustered August 30, 1861 ; discharged for disability May 18, 
1862, Farmington, Miss. Addison McCray (veteran), age 19; residence, Des 
Moines County ; nativity, Indiana ; enlisted November 21, 1861 ; mustered Novem- 
ber 21, 1861 ; promoted eighth corporal February 1, 1862; seventh corporal 
February 4, 1862; sixth corporal April 1, 1862; second corporal October 15, 
1862 ; sixth sergeant February 1, 1863 ; reenlisted and remustered March 1, 1864; 
promoted fifth sergeant June 1, 1864; third sergeant November 1, 1864; company 
quartermaster sergeant March 1, 1865; first sergeant April 1, 1865. Philander 
McCray, age 31 ; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Indiana; enlisted Jan- 
uary 19, 1865; mustered January 19, 1865. James H. McGinnis, age 23; res- 
idence, Burlington; nativity, Kentucky; enlisted August 25, 1861, as farrier; 
mustered August 30, 1861 ; discharged for disability January 18, 1863, Quincy, 
111. James A. McManus, age 18; residence, Kossuth; nativity, Delaware; en- 
listed August 20, 1861, as bugler ; mustered August 30, 1861 ; mustered out Octo- 
ber 3, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, expiration of term of service. John T. Mickey, 
age 18; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Iowa; enlisted January 24, 1865; 
mustered January 24, 1865. William W. C. Miller (veteran), age 30; residence, 
Burlington ; nativity, Ohio ; enlisted August 28, 1861 ; mustered August 30, 1861 ; 
promoted First Battalion commissary sergeant December 1, 1861 (see field and 
staff). John R. Monden, age 19; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Illi- 
nois; enlisted February 10, 1865; mustered February 10, 1865. William W. 
Monden, age 18; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Illinois; enlisted Feb- 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 297 

ruary 10, 1865; mustered February 10, 1865. Charles P. Moore (veteran), age 
32 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Maine ; appointed second lieutenant August 
20, 1 86 1 ; mustered August 30, 1861 ; promoted first lieutenant December 1, 
1861 ; captain June 11, 1862; Second Battalion major May 6, 1864. William H. 
E. Morris, age 25 ; residence, Des Moines County ; nativity, Ohio ; enlisted August 
12, 1861, as eighth corporal; mustered August 30, 1861 ; promoted seventh cor- 
poral December 26, 1861 ; fourth corporal February 1, 1862; mustered out Octo- 
ber 3, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, expiration of term of service. Robert C. Moter, 
age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 19, 1861 ; mus- 
tered August 30, 1861 ; mustered out October 3, 1864, Davenport, Iowa; expira- 
tion of term of service. William A. Moter, age 20; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 19, 1861 ; mustered August 30, 1861 ; 
mustered out October 3, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, expiration of term 
of service. John Ogle, age 20; residence, Kossuth; nativity, Iowa; 
enlisted December 25, 1863 ; mustered December 25, 1863 ; died of disease 
Tanuary 26, 1865, Memphis, Tenn ; buried in Mississippi River National 
Cemetery, Memphis, Tenn., section 2, grave 318. John Osborn, age 18; resi- 
dence, Des Moines County; nativity, Ohio; enlisted January 24, 1865; mus- 
tered January 24, 1865. Ira D. Patterson, age 18; residence, Des Moines 
County; nativity, Illinois; enlisted March 25, 1864; mustered March 26, 1864. 
Lyman B. Pierce (veteran), age 27; residence, Kossuth; nativity, Vermont; 
enlisted August 24, 1861, as seventh corporal; mustered August 30, 1861 ; reduced 
to ranks December 1, 1861 ; promoted eighth corporal October 15, 1862; seventh 
corporal February 1, 1863; reenlisted and remustered March 1, 1864; promoted 
fifth corporal June 1, 1864; fourth corporal July 23, 1864; third corporal Sep- 
tember 13, 1864; sixth sergeant November 1, 1864; fifth sergeant March 1, 1865. 
Thomas Pierson, age 18 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Germany ; enlisted De- 
cember 4, 1863; mustered December 4, 1863. Edwin M. Pike, age 18; res- 
idence, Des Moines County ; nativity, Iowa ; enlisted January 19, 1865 ; mustered 
January 19, 1865; mustered out June 20, 1865, Davenport, Iowa (see Company 
G, Forty-fifth Infantry). Isaiah Pilling, age 26; residence, Kossuth; nativity, 
England; enlisted August 30, 1861 ; mustered August 30, 1861 ; mustered out 
October 3, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, expiration of term of service. Robert G. 
Ping, age 18; residence, Dodgeville ; nativity, Iowa; enlisted December 2, 1863; 
mustered December 2, 1863. Thompson Rader, age 18; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Ohio; enlisted February 1, 1865; mustered February 1, 1865. Robert- 
son M. Reed, age 21; residence, Kossuth; nativity, Indiana; enlisted December 
18, 1863; mustered December 18, 1863. Henry H. Robinson, age 18; residence, 
Des Moines County ; nativity, Iowa ; enlisted January 25, 1865 ; mustered Jan- 
uary 25, 1865. William Russell, age 19 ; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; 
enlisted August 12, 1861 ; mustered August 30, 1861 ; mustered out October 3, 
1864, Davenport, Iowa, expiration of term of service. Dennis Ryan; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Ireland; enlisted August 21, 1861 ; mustered August 30, 
1861 ; mustered out October 3, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, expiration of term of 
service. John H. Scott, age 20 ; residence, Des Moines County ; nativity, Penn- 
sylvania ; enlisted August 12, 1861 ; mustered August 30, 1861 ; died of disease 
January 19, 1862, Benton Barracks (St. Louis), Mo. Elias H. Sheppard (vet- 
eran), age 20; residence, Kossuth; nativity, Ohio; enlisted October 4, 1861 ; mus- 



298 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

tered October 4, 1861 ; promoted eighth corporal December 26, 1861 ; fifth corporal 
February 1, 1862; fourth corporal February 4, 1862; fifth sergeant October 15, 
1862 ; fourth sergeant February I, 1863; reenlisted and remustered March 1, 1864. 
Thomas M. Skaggs, age 28 ; residence, Kingston ; nativity, Kentucky ; enlisted 
January 5, 1864; mustered January 5, 1864; mustered out June 3, 1865, Louis- 
ville, Ky. Samuel K. Spaulding, age 18; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, 
Pennsylvania ; enlisted February 8, 1865 ; mustered February 8, 1865. Sever- 
enous Stamm (veteran), age 23; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Penn- 
sylvania; enlisted August 12, 1861 ; mustered August 30, 1861 ; promoted bugler 
January 1, 1862; reenlisted and remustered March 1, 1864. John T. Stathers, 
age 18; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted August 
24, 1861 ; mustered August 30, 1861 ; killed in action December 4, 1862, Water 
Valley, Miss. Mathew P. Tenant, age 18; residence, Dodgeville ; nativity, Ohio; 
enlisted December 2, 1863; mustered December 2, 1863; died of disease October 
13, 1864, Des Moines County, Iowa. Cornelius Thompson, age 20; residence, 
Des Moines County; nativity, Ohio; enlisted February 2, 1865; mustered Feb- 
ruary 2, 1865. William Thompson, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; 
enlisted February 2, 1865; mustered February 2, 1865. Elisha Vance, age 38; 
residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 28, 1861 ; mus- 
tered August 30, 1861 ; promoted wagoner September 30, 1861 ; mustered out 
October 3, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, expiration of term of service. Samuel G. 
Vannice (veteran), age 24; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Indiana; enlisted 
October 5, 1861 ; mustered October 5, 1861 ; promoted fifth sergeant February 
1, 1862; fourth sergeant April 1, 1862; third sergeant August 1, 1862; second 
sergeant February 1, 1863; reenlisted and remustered March 1, 1864; first ser- 
geant March 1, 1865; died of disease March 22, 1865, Eastport, Miss.; buried 
in Shiloh National Cemetery, Pittsburg Landing, Tenn., section 1, grave 123. 
John I. Vaughn, age 19 ; residence, Des Moines County ; nativity, Indiana ; en- 
listed October 4, 1861 ; mustered October 4, 1861 ; mustered out October 23, 1864, 
Davenport, Iowa, expiration of term of service. Jacob Walker, age 18; residence, 
Des Moines County; nativity, Iowa; enlisted December 8, 1863; mustered De- 
cember 22, 1863; taken prisoner December 17, 1864, Little Harpeth, Tenn.; mus- 
tered out June 7, 1865, Clinton, Iowa. Thomas M. Wall, age 19; residence, Des 
Moines County; nativity, Maryland; enlisted March 31, 1864; mustered April 
12, 1864; wounded slightly December 17, 1864, Little Harpeth, Tenn.; mustered 
out September 19, 1865, Selma, Ala. (see Company K, Fourteenth Infantry). 
Henri Wempe, age 25 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Germany ; enlisted August 
20, 1861 ; mustered August 30, 1861 ; promoted saddler, December 1, 1861 ; mus- 
tered out October 3, 1864, Davenport, Iowa, expiration of term of service. 
George Werner, age 25 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Germany ; enlisted 
August 20, 1861 ; mustered August 30, 1861 ; died of disease March 24, 1864, 
Jefferson Barracks (St. Louis), Mo.; buried in National Cemetery, Jefferson 
Barracks (St. Louis), Mo., section 6, grave 245. Lewis C. Williams, age 18; 
residence, Des Moines County ; nativity, Iowa ; enlisted January 19, 1865 ; mus- 
tered January 25, 1865 (see Company G, Forty-fifth Infantry). Jonathan Wil- 
son, age 23; residence. Kingston; nativity, Ohio; enlisted December 8, 1863; 
mustered January 5, 1864; wounded slightly November 19, 1864. Butler Creek, 
Ala. Henry H. Yates, age 22 ; residence, Des Moines County ; nativity, Illinois ; 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 299 

enlisted January 23, 1865; mustered January 23, 1865; mustered out October 
31, 1865, Davenport, Iowa. 

COMPANY M 

Privates: John W. Bridwell, age 20; residence, Kossuth; nativity, Iowa; 
enlisted January 19, 1865; mustered January 19, 1865; died of disease May 7, 
1865, Eastport, Miss. ; buried in Shiloh National Cemetery, Pittsburg Landing, 
Tenn., section E, grave 275. Kelson Wells, age 38; residence, Des Moines 
County; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted March 16, 1864; mustered March 16, 
1864. 

UNASSIGNED RECRUITS 

William Fitzpatrick, age 26 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Indiana ; enlisted 
January 17, 1865; mustered January 17, 1865; no further record found. James 
Fleetwood, age 23 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Illinois ; enlisted January 
2, 1865 ; mustered January 2, 1865 ; no further record found. John Fraser, age 
25; residence, Burlington; nativity, Missouri; enlisted January 20, 1865; mus- 
tered January 20, 1865; no further record found. Charles F. Mitchell, age 21; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, New York; enlisted February 2, 1865; mustered 
February 2, 1865; no further record found. Charles W. Tompson, age 23; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted February 2, 1865; mustered Feb- 
ruary 2, 1865; no further record found. George Wright, age 21; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Indiana; enlisted January 2, 1865; mustered January 2, 
1865; war department reports: "No record found." Martin Wright, age 23; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Canada; enlisted January 2, 1865; mustered 
January 2, 1865 ; no further record found. 

THIRD REGIMENT IOWA VOLUNTEER CAVALRY 

Term of service three years. Mustered into the service of the United States 
at Keokuk, Iowa, September 14, 1861, by Capt. Charles C. Smith and Lieut. Ira 
K. Knox, of the United States Army. 

Field and Staff: Cyrus Bussey ; residence, Bloomfield ; nativity, Ohio; ap- 
pointed colonel August 10, 1861 ; mustered August 10, 1861 ; promoted brigadier- 
general April 10, 1864. Henry H. Trimble, age 34; nativity, Indiana; appointed 
lieutenant colonel August 26, 1861 ; wounded severely March 7, 1862, Pea Ridge, 
Ark.; resigned September 4, 1862. Carleton H. Perry: residence, Keokuk; 
nativity, Vermont; appointed first battalion major August 26, 1861 ; resigned for 
disability November 18, 1862. Henry C. Caldwell; residence, Keosauqua ; ap- 
pointed second battalion major August 26, 1861 ; promoted lieutenant-colonel 
September 5, 1862; colonel May 1, 1864; resigned June 25, 1864. William C. 
Drake, age 35 ; residence, Corydon ; nativity, Illinois ; appointed third battalion 
major September 11, 1861 ; died of disease October 24, 1862, Corydon, Iowa. 
John W. Noble, age 30; residence, Keokuk; nativity, Ohio; appointed adjutant 
August 26, 1 86 1 ; transferred to Company C, as first lieutenant November 1, 
1862; promoted major from first lieutenant of Company C, November 18, 1862; 



300 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

lieutenant colonel May i, 1864; colonel May 23, 1864; mustered out August 9, 
1865, Atlanta, Ga. Enos T. Cole; residence, Bloomfield ; appointed quartermas- 
ter September 17, 1861 ; transferred to Company A, as first lieutenant April 30, 
1862. Thomas II. Brown (veteran), age 22; residence, Garden Grove; nativity, 
Ohio; promoted regimental commissary from third battalion commissary ser- 
geant October 1, 1862; brevet captain of volunteers, May 19, 1865; mustered 
out July 15, 1865, Nashville, Tenn. 

COMPANY A 

Privates: William Burns, age 17; residence, Burlington; enlisted Novem- 
ber 26, 1862; mustered November 26, [862; died of disease January 24, 1864, 
Keokuk. Iowa. Lewis Gray, age 20 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Illinois ; 
enlisted January 28, 1864; mustered out August 9, 1865, Atlanta, Ga. Robert 
A. Patterson, age 36; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Ohio; enlisted 
February 22, 1864; mustered February 29, 1864; mustered out August 9, 1865, 
Atlanta, Ga. 

COMPANY B 

Privates: George W. Eaton, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; 
enlisted January 5, 1864; mustered January 5, 1864; mustered out August 9, 
1865, Atlanta, Ga. 

COMPANY E 

Privates: John West, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; en- 
listed November 4, 1863; mustered November 4, 1863; mustered out August 9, 
1865, Atlanta, Ga. 

COMPANY F 

Privates: James L. Brown, age 22; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, 
Iowa; enlisted January 4, 1864; mustered January 4, 1864; taken prisoner Jan- 
uary 3, 1865, near Franklin, Miss. ; mustered out June 15, 1865, Davenport, Iowa. 
William A. Carter, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted Jan- 
uary 4, 1864; mustered January 4, 1864; mustered out June 12, 1865, Louisville, 
Ky. William Dodds, age 40; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Penn- 
sylvania; enlisted January 2, 1864; mustered January 21, 1864; mustered out 
August 9, 1865, Atlanta, Ga. Charles Fletcher, age 18; residence, Des Moines 
County; nativity, Illinois; enlisted January 4, 1864; mustered January 4, 1864; 
mustered out August 9, 1865, Atlanta, Ga. Benjamin C. Karnes, age 20; resi- 
dence, Des Moines County; nativity Iowa; enlisted January 4, 1864: mustered 
January 21, 1864; mustered out August 9, 1865, Atlanta, Ga. Alexander C. 
Laughlin, age 19 ; residence, Des Moines County ; nativity, Iowa ; enlisted January 
4, 1864; mustered January 21, 1864; mustered out August 9, 1865, Atlanta, Ga. 
Stewart C. Laughlin, age 18; residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Pennsyl- 
vania; enlisted January 4, 1864; mustered January 21, 1864; mustered out 
August 9, 1865, Atlanta, Ga. Henry P. Long, age 18; residence, Burlington; 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 301 

nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted January 4, 1864; mustered January 4, 1864 
mustered out May 29, 1865, Louisville, Ky. James W. McCormick, age 22 
residence, Des Moines County; nativity, Indiana; enlisted January 4, 1864 
mustered January 21, 1864; mustered out August 9, 1865, Atlanta, Ga. William 
H. Monroe, age 26 ; residence, Des Moines County ; nativity, New Jersey ; en-, 
listed January 4, 1864; mustered January 21, 1864; mustered out August 9, 
1865, Atlanta, Ga. Solomon Vaught, age 19; residence, Des Moines County; 
nativity, Indiana; enlisted January 5, 1864; mustered January 5, 1864; mustered 
out August 9, 1865, Atlanta, Ga. Francis Winn, age 32; residence, Des Moines 
County; nativity, England; enlisted January 4, 1864; mustered January 21, 
1864; mustered out August 9, 1865, Atlanta, Ga. 

COMPANY G 

Privates: Joseph Boyer, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; 
enlisted January 5, 1864; mustered January 5, 1864; mustered out August 9, 
1865, Atlanta, Ga. Calvin S. Brown, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Iowa; enlisted January 5, 1864; mustered January 5, 1864; mustered out August 
9, 1865, Atlanta Ga. Miner McCrary, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Iowa; enlisted January 5, 1864; mustered January 5, 1864; mustered out August 
9, 1865, Atlanta, Ga. Thomas H. Pace, age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Virginia; enlisted November 4, 1863; mustered November 4, 1863; taken 
prisoner May 1, 1864; mustered out August 9, 1865, Atlanta, Ga. William H. 
Perry, age 33; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted January 5, 1864; 
mustered January 5, 1864; mustered out August 9, 1865, Atlanta, Ga. Calvin 
Root, age 22 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Ohio ; enlisted November 4, 1863 ; 
mustered November 4, 1863; mustered out August 9, 1865, Atlanta, Ga. 

company 1 

Privates: Casper Hellmuth, age 24; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ger- 
many; enlisted October 4, 1863; mustered December 11, 1863; died January 6, 

1864, Devall's Bluff, Ark. John C. Mersch, age 38; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Germany; enlisted September 21, 1863; mustered December n, 1863; 
mustered out August 9, 1865, Atlanta, Ga. Wesley S. Scott, age 40; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted January 21, 1864; mustered February 13, 
1864; taken prisoner June 10, 1864, Ripley, Miss.; died of disease September 
26, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa. 

COMPANY K 

Privates: Silas A. Harris, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Illinois; 
enlisted January 5, 1864; mustered January 5, 1864; mustered out August 9, 

1865, Atlanta, Ga. 

COMPANY L 

Privates: Daniel McCristol (veteran), age 35; residence, Kingston; nativ- 
ity, Pennsylvania; enlisted October 14, 1861 ; mustered October 14, 1861 ; reen- 
listed and remustered February 2, 1864; mustered out August 9, 1865, Atlanta, 
Ga. 



302 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

FOURTH REGIMENT IOWA VOLUNTEER CAVALRY 

Term of service three years. Mustered into the service of the United 
States at Mount Pleasant, Iowa, January i, 1862, by Capt. Alexander Cham- 
bers, United States Army. 

Field and Staff: Asbury B. Porter, age 53; residence, Mount Pleasant; 
nativity, Kentucky; appointed colonel October 1, 1861 ; mustered December 26, 
1861 ; resigned March 19, 1863. Thomas Drummond, age 30; residence, Vinton ; 
nativity, Virginia; appointed lieutenant colonel December 24, 1861 ; resigned 
June 3, 1862. Simeon D. Swan, age 31; residence. Mount Pleasant; nativity, 
Pennsylvania; appointed first battalion major September 17, 1861 ; mustered 
December 26, 1861 ; promoted lieutenant colonel June 4, 1862; resigned July 13, 
1863. Joseph E. Jewett, age 49 ; residence, Des Moines ; nativity, Vermont ; 
appointed second battalion major, October 14, [86] ; mustered December 26, 
1861 ; promoted first battalion major June 4, 1862; resigned January 2, 1863 
(see Company D, Second Cavalry). George A. Stone, age 28; residence, Mount 
Pleasant; nativity, Xew York; promoted third battalion major from Company 
H, November 2, 1861 ; mustered December 26, 1861 ; promoted second battalion 
major June 4, 1862; mustered out for promotion as colonel of Twenty-fifth 
Infantry August 10, 1862. George W. Waldron, age 33; residence, Dubuque; 
nativity, New York; appointed regimental adjutant December 8. 1861 ; mustered 
December 26, 1861 ; mustered out June 1, 1862 (see field and staff, First In- 
fantry). Simon P. Lauffer, age 30; residence, Mount Pleasant; nativity, Penn- 
sylvania; appointed regimental quartermaster November 19, 1861 ; mustered 
December 26, 1861 ; mustered out April 21, 1862, St. Louis, Mo. William T. 
Allen, age 2j ; residence, Iowa City ; nativity, Vermont ; promoted regimental 
commissary from regimental commissary sergeant September 15, 1862; mustered 
September 16, 1862; promoted captain and commissary of subsistence of volun- 
teers,- August 10, 1864. Warren Beckwith, age 28; residence. Mount Pleasant; 
nativity, New York; promoted first battalion adjutant from Company C, Decem- 
ber 25, 1861 ; mustered December 26, 1861 ; promoted captain of Company C, 
January 1, 1863. Watson B. Porter, age 25; residence, Mount Pleasant; nativ- 
ity, Illinois; promoted second battalion adjutant from first lieutenant of Com- 
pany C, December 25, i8r>i ; mustered December 26, 1861 ; promoted captain of 
Company C, April 15, 1862. Samuel F. Cooper, age 34; residence, Grinnell; 
nativity, Massachusetts; promoted third battalion adjutant from fourth sergeant 
of Company E, December 25, 1861 ; mustered December 26, [86] ; mustered out 
September 6, 1862 (see field and staff. Fortieth Infantry). J. Marshall Rust, 
age 32 ; residence, Sidney ; nativity, Virginia ; promoted first battalion quarter- 
master from second lieutenant of Company A, December 25, 1861 ; mustered 
December 26, 1861 ; promoted regimental quartermaster April 12, 1862 ; pro- 
moted captain of Company A, June 5, 1862. William P. Brazelton ; residence, 
Mount Pleasant ; appointed second battalion quartermaster October 18, 1861 ; 
mustered December 26, 1861 ; promoted second battalion adjutant April 15, 
1862; mustered out July 29, 1862. Ira F. Phillips, age 39; residence, Mount 
Pleasant; nativity, New York; promoted third battalion quartermaster from 
Company C December 25, 1861 ; mustered December 26, 1861 ; mustered out 
April 18, 1862. Andrew W. McClure, age 33; residence, Mount Pleasant; nativ- 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 303 

ity, Ohio; appointed surgeon October 20, 1861 ; mustered December 26, 1861 ; 
resigned April 24, 1863. Wellington Bird, age 45; residence, Mount Pleasant; 
nativity, Pennsylvania; appointed assistant surgeon November 29, 1861 ; mus- 
tered December 26, 1861 ; promoted captain and commissary of subsistence of 
volunteers, May 18, 1864. William McK. Findlay; residence, Bloomfield; ap- 
pointed assistant surgeon March 7, 1863; mustered March 13, 1863; resigned 
June 2, 1863. Charles Fitch, age 38; residence, Van Buren County; nativity, 
New York; appointed assistant surgeon July 6, 1863; not mustered; regiment 
below minimum; commission revoked. Samuel W. Taylor, age 47; residence, 
Glasgow; nativity, Connecticut; appointed assistant surgeon June 4, 1864; mus- 
tered June 7, 1864; mustered out August 10, 1865, Atlanta, Ga. Robert R. 
Taylor, age 36; residence, Cedar Rapids; nativity, Virginia; appointed assistant 
surgeon March 13, 1862; resigned October 22, 1862. David Stewart, age 31; 
residence, North Liberty; nativity, Pennsylvania; appointed assistant surgeon 
December 2, 1862; promoted assistant surgeon of Twenty-eighth Infantry; com- 
mission in this regiment revoked. Stephen Cummings, age 36; residence, Hop- 
kinton; nativity, New York; appointed assistant surgeon July 2, 1863; mustered 
July 20, 1863; mustered out August 10, 1865, Atlanta, Ga. William Robinson, 
age 40 ; residence, Grinnell ; nativity, New York ; promoted additional assistant 
surgeon from third battalion hospital steward June 1, 1862; promoted assistant 
surgeon January 7, 1863; surgeon June 28, 1863; mustered out August 10, 1865, 
Atlanta, Ga. Andrew J. Kirkpatrick. age 44; residence, Mount Pleasant; nativ- 
ity, Ohio; promoted chaplain from Company K, November 29, 1861 ; mustered 
December 26, 1861 ; discharged December 5, 1864, Memphis, Tenn., expira- 
tion of term of service. 

Non-commissioned Staff: Ambrose Hodge (veteran), age 31; residence, 
Burlington ; nativity, Ohio ; promoted third battalion quartermaster sergeant 
from Company H; promoted second lieutenant of Company L January 9, 1862; 
promoted adjutant from second lieutenant of Company L, July 30, 1863; pro- 
moted captain of Company K, January 25, 1865. 

COMPANY A 

Privates: Charles Riggs, age 29 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, New 
York; enlisted January 1, 1862; mustered January 22, 1862; discharged August 
1, 1863 (see Company E, First Infantry). 

company c 

Privates: Alexander C. Virgin (or Virgen), age 21; residence, Pleas- 
ant Grove; nativity, Ohio; enlisted October 1, 1861 ; mustered November 25, 
1861 ; promoted first sergeant June 21, 1862; discharged for disability June 10, 
1863. William T. Virgin (or Virgen), age 19; residence, Pleasant Grove; 
nativity, Ohio; enlisted October 1, 1861 ; mustered November 25, 1861 ; dis- 
charged for disability June 14, 1862, Batesville, Ark. 

COMPANY D 

Privates: Jacob Frie, age 27 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Germany ; 
enlisted December 2, 1863 ; mustered December 2, 1863 ; mustered out August 8, 



304 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

1865, Atlanta, Ga. John R. Johnson, age 18; residence, Des Moines County; 
nativity, Indiana; enlisted January 13, 1864; mustered January 13, 1864; mus- 
tered out August 8, 1865, Atlanta, Ga. Daniel Saxton, age 22; residence, Bur- 
lington; nativity, Ireland; enlisted January 4, 1864; mustered January 4, 1864; 
taken prisoner June 11, 1864. Ripley, Miss.; returned to company November 
1, 1864; mustered out August 8, 1865, Atlanta, Ga. Enoch A. Sexson (vet- 
eran), age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted September 25, 
1861 ; mustered November 25, 1861 ; promoted eighth corporal January 15, 
1862; seventh corporal June 30, 1862; sixth corporal December 19, 1862; sixth 
sergeant March 1, 1863; reenlisted and remustered December 20, 1863; pro- 
moted fifth sergeant January 19, 1864; fourth sergeant May 1, 1864; second 
sergeant January 1, 1865; mustered out August 8, 1865, Atlanta, Ga. 

COMPANY K 

Privates: Ambrose Hodge (veteran), age 31; residence, Burlington; na- 
tivity, Ohio; promoted captain from regimental adjutant January 25, 1865; 
mustered June 11, 1865; mustered out August 8, 1865, Atlanta, Ga. (see field 
and staff; see also Company H and Company L). Lafayette L. Shoup, age 18; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Illinois; enlisted January 19, 1864; mustered 
January 19, 1864; mustered out August 8, 1865, Atlanta, Ga. 

COMPANY L 

Privates: Daniel Clancy (veteran), age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Ireland; enlisted September 2, 1861 ; mustered November 25, 1861 ; taken pris- 
oner November 21, 1862; paroled; reenlisted and remustered December 12, 
1863; mustered out July 24, 1865, Cincinnati, Ohio. George Dashman, age 19; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Prussia; enlisted September 5, 1861 ; mustered 
November 25, 1861 ; taken prisoner August 15, 1863, near Lexington, Ky. ; 
mustered out January 31, 1865, Louisville, Ky., expiration of term of service. 
Edward L. Hammond, age 34; residence, Burlington; nativity, Rhode Island: 
enlisted February 28, 1862; mustered March 7, 1862; mustered out February 
24, 1865, Davenport, Iowa. George Harvey, age 26; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Ohio; enlisted February 6, 1862; mustered March 7, 1862; promoted 
second battalion hospital steward May 15, 1862 (see field and staff). Ambrose 
Hodge (veteran), age 31; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted Sep- 
tember 18, 1861 ; mustered November 25, 1861 ; promoted second lieutenant 
from third battalion quartermaster sergeant January 9, 1862 ; promoted adjutant 
July 30, 1863 (see field and staff; see also Company H and Company K). 
Lyman Hotaling (veteran), age 29; residence, Burlington; nativity, New York; 
enlisted August 28, 1861 ; mustered November 25, 1861 ; promoted eighth cor- 
poral February 2, 1862; sixth corporal August 1, 1862; company commissary 
sergeant November 1, 1862; reenlisted and remustered December 12, 1863; re- 
duced to ranks at his own request January 26, 1865; mustered out August 8, 
1865, Atlanta, Ga. Daniel Johnson (veteran), age 31; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted September 14, 1861 ; mustered November 25, 
1861 ; promoted seventh corporal July 21, 1862; sixth corporal November 1, 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 305 

1862; fifth corporal February 14, 1863; fourth corporal March 1, 1863; third 
corporal September 1, 1863; reenlisted and remustered December 12, 1863; pro- 
moted second corporal July 1, 1864; first corporal January 1, 1865; mustered 
out August 8, 1865, Atlanta, Ga. Daniel Lorrigan, age 21 ; residence, Bur- 
lington ; nativity, Canada; enlisted January 21, 1862; mustered January 23, 1862; 
killed in action April 8, 1863, St. Francis River, Ark. ; buried in Mississippi 
River National Cemetery, Memphis, Tenn., section 3, grave 720. John McEvoy, 
age 26; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ireland; enlisted February 28, 1862; 
mustered March 7, 1862; deserted July 16, 1862. Richard McLane, age 21; 
residence, Burlington ; nativity, Canada ; enlisted January 16, 1862 ; mustered 
January 23, 1862; died July 5, 1862, St. Louis, Mo.; buried in National Ceme- 
tery, Jefferson Barracks (St. Louis), Mo., section 50, grave 137. Ralph Kis- 
vvell Okell (veteran), age 21; residence, Burlington; nativity, England; enlisted 
September 1, 1861 ; mustered November 25, 1861 ; reenlisted and remustered 
December 12, 1863; promoted eighth corporal December 16, 1864; fourth cor- 
poral January 1, 1S65 ; third corporal February 1, 1865; second corporal July 
1, 1865; mustered out August 8, 1865, Atlanta, Ga. James Martin Parsons, 
age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, New York; enlisted October 30, 1861 ; 
mustered November 25, 1861 ; accidentally killed July 13, 1862, Phillips County, 
Ark. Chalmers Stockton, age 16; residence, Burlington; nativity, Tennessee; 
enlisted March 23, 1864; mustered March 23, 1864; discharged for disability 
December 16, 1864, Memphis, Tenn. John S. White, age 18; residence, Bur- 
lington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted February 28, 1862; mustered March 7, 1862; 
mustered out March 6, 1865, Gravelly Springs, Ala., expiration of term of 
service. 

FIFTH REGIMENT IOWA VOLUNTEERS CAVALRY 

Term of service three years. Mustered into the service of the United States 
on dates ranging from September 1, 1861, to February 11, 1862, by mustering 
officers of the United States Army, at St. Louis, Mo., and other localities. 

Reorganized and consolidated with the Fifth Infantry August 8, 1864, as 
the Fifth Veteran Cavalry Consolidated. 

Field and Staff: William W. Lowe, age 31; residence, St. Louis, Mo.; 
nativity, Indiana; appointed colonel December 5, 1861 ; mustered December 5, 
1861 ; transferred to Fifth Veteran Cavalry Consolidated August 8, 1864. 

COMPANY B 

Privates: Jacob S. Nichols, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Maine; 
enlisted January 5, 1864; mustered January 5, 1864; taken prisoner July 31, 
1864, Chattahoochee River, Ga. ; transferred to Company B, Fifth Veteran 
Cavalry Consolidated, August 8, 1864. 

, COMPANY C 

Privates: Charles W. Allen, age 26 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Ohio ; 
enlisted June 12, 1864; mustered June 13, 1864; transferred to Company C, 
Fifth Veteran Cavalry Consolidated, August 8, 1864. 



306 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 



COMPANY D 

Privates: John McMahon, age 23; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ireland; 
enlisted January 4, 1864; mustered January 4, 1864; transferred to Company D, 
Fifth Veteran Cavalry Consolidated, August 8, 1864. 

COMPANY F 

Privates: Felix Acker, age 23; residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; 
enlisted August 30, 1861 ; discharged for disability March 31, 1863, Fort Donel- 
son, Tenn. Lewis Bicklen, age 24; residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; 
enlisted September 2, 1861 ; promoted farrier October 25, 1861 ; taken prisoner 
July 31, 1864, Chattahoochee River, Ga. ; transferred to Company F, Fifth 
Veteran Cavalry Consolidated, August 8, 1864 (see Company D, First Infantry). 
(Lewis Bickler). Martin Choumee, age 33 ; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Germany; enlisted August 29, 1861, as second sergeant; promoted first lieutenant 
December 21, 1861 ; captain April 9, 1863; transferred to Company F, Fifth 
Veteran Cavalry Consolidated August 8, 1864. Charles Ende (veteran), age 
23; residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted September 6, 1861, as 
sixth corporal; mustered October 25, 1861 ; promoted fifth sergeant January 1, 
1862; taken prisoner May 5, 1862, Lockridge's Mill, Tenn.; returned to com- 
pany June 10, 1862; promoted company commissary sergeant October 1, 1862; 
first sergeant May 17, 1863; reenlisted and remustered January 14, 1864; pro- 
moted second lieutenant April 5, 1864; transferred to Company F, Fifth Veteran 
Cavalry Consolidated, August 8, 1864. Ferdinand Ende, age 18; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted September 27, 1861 ; mustered October 
25, 1861; discharged for disability February 8, 1863, Fort Heiman, Ky. William 
Alexander Haw, age 45 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Germany ; appointed 
first lieutenant August 22, 1861 ; mustered October 25, 1861 ; promoted captain 
December 20, 1861 ; wounded and taken prisoner May 5, 1862, Lockridge's Mill, 
Tenn.; paroled October 15, 1862; exchanged and returned to company January 
, 1863; resigned for disability April 8, 1863, Murfreesboro, Tenn. (see Com- 
pany D, First Infantry). Frank Hille, age 32; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Germany; enlisted September 17, 1861 ; mustered October 25, 1861 ; mortally 
wounded May 5, 1862, Lockridge's Mill, Tenn.; died of wounds May 19, 1862, 
Corinth. Miss, (see Company D, First Infantry). Frederick Hoeschle, (vet- 
eran), age 32; residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted September 25, 
1861 ; mustered October 25, 1861 ; reenlisted and remustered January 14, 1864; 
transferred to Company F, Fifth Veteran Cavalry Consolidated, August 8, 1864 
(see Company D, First Infantry). William Hoffman (veteran), age 26; resi- 
dence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted August 30, 1861 ; mustered Octo- 
ber 25, 1861 ; promoted second battalion veterinary sergeant January 9, 1862; 
reentered the service December t. 1862; promoted sixth sergeant January 1, 
1863; fifth sergeant April 19, 1864; transferred to Company F, Fifth Veteran 
Cavalry Consolidated August 8, 1864 (see field and staff). Edward Lange, age 
34; residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted October 1, 1861 ; dis- 
charged for disability July 19, 1862, St. Louis, Mo. Arnold Nolting (veteran), 
age 21; residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted September 9, 1861; 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 307 

mustered October 25, 1861 ; reenlisted and. remustered January 14, 1864; trans- 
ferred to Company F, Fifth Veteran Cavalry Consolidated, August 8, 1864. 
John B. Ritzmann, age 27 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Germany ; enlisted 
September 16, 1861 ; mustered October 25, 1861 ; promoted seventh corporal 
October 1, 1862; sixth corporal January 16, 1863; fifth corporal May 17, 1863; 
fourth corporal; third corporal April 19, 1864; transferred to Company F, 
Fifth Veteran Cavalry Consolidated, August 8, 1864. August Schlapp, (vet- 
eran), age 24; residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted September 7, 
1861, as eighth corporal; mustered October 25, 1861 ; promoted fourth corporal 
January 9, 1862; taken prisoner May 5, 1862, Lockridge's Mill, Term.; returned 
to company June 10, 1862; promoted third corporal January 16, 1863; com- 
pany commissary sergeant May 17, 1863; reenlisted and remustered January 
14, 1864; promoted first sergeant April 19, 1864; transferred to Company F, 
Fifth Veteran Cavalry Consolidated, August 8, 1864. Henry Schlapp (veteran), 
age 20; residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted September 7, 1861 ; 
mustered October 25, 1861 ; promoted eighth corporal March 17, 1863; seventh 
corporal May 17, 1863; sixth corporal; reenlisted and remustered January 14, 
1864; promoted fifth corporal April 19, 1864; transferred to Company F, Fifth 
Veteran Cavalry Consolidated, August 8, 1864. George Schmelz, age 22 ; resi- 
dence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted September 12, 1861 ; mustered 
October 25, 1861 ; transferred to Company F, Fifth Veteran Cavalry Consol- 
idated, August 8, 1864. 

FIFTH CAVALRY CONSOLIDATED 
COMPANY F 

Privates: Charles Venator (veteran), age 18; residence, Burlington; nativ- 
ity, Germany; transferred from Company F, Fifth Cavalry, August 8, 1864; 
promoted sixth corporal November 1, 1864; mustered out August 11, 1865, 
Nashville, Tenn. 

SEVENTH REGIMENT, IOWA VOLUNTEER CAVALRY 

Term of service three years. Mustered into the service of the United States 
at Davenport, Iowa, on dates ranging from April 27 to July 13, 1863, by Lieut,- 
Col. William N. Grier, First United States Cavalry. 

The Seventh Regiment of Iowa Cavalry, excepting the lieutenant colonel 
and Companies K, L and M, was mustered out of service at Leavenworth, Kan., 
May 17, 1866; Companies K, L and M were mustered out at Sioux City, Iowa, 
June 22, 1866. 

Field and Staff: Samuel W. Summers, age 43 ; residence, Ottumwa ; nativ- 
ity, Virginia; appointed colonel January 8, 1863; mustered out January 31, 
1865, Omaha, Neb. John Pattee, age 43; residence, Iowa City; nativity, Canada; 
appointed lieutenant colonel May 15, 1863; transferred to field and staff, Seventh 
Cavalry Reorganized. Herman H. Heath, age 39 ; residence, Dubuque ; nativity, 
New York ; appointed first battalion major January 8, 1863 ; promoted colonel 



308 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

May 3, 1865; transferred to field and staff, Seventh Cavalry Reorganized. 
George M. O'Brien, age 35; residence, Dubuque; nativity, Ireland; appointed 
second battalion major May 15, 1863; transferred to field and staff, Seventh 
Cavalry Reorganized, as first battalion major. John S. Wood, age 38; residence, 
Ottumwa ; nativity, Delaware; promoted third battalion major from captain of 
Company A July 8, 1863; mustered July 25, 1863; mustered out January 31, 
1865, Omaha, Xeb. Andrew Jackson Wiley, age 23 ', residence, Ashland ; nativ- 
ity, Pennsylvania; appointed surgeon November 14, 1862; transferred to field 
and staff, Seventh Cavalry Reorganized. James W. LaForce, age 36; residence, 
Agency; nativity, Kentucky; appointed assistant surgeon November 13, 1862; 
mustered June 2, 1863 ; resigned December 7, 1864. Stephen P. Yeomans, age 
41 ; residence, Sioux City; nativity, Xew York; appointed assistant surgeon July 
2 7> J 863; mustered August 5, 1863; transferred to field and staff, Seventh Cav- 
alry Reorganized. Eugene S. Sheffield, age 18; residence, Ottumwa; nativity, 
Indiana; appointed adjutant March 1, 1863; mustered April 8, 1863; transferred 
to field and staff, Seventh Cavalry Reorganized. William H. Northrop, age 31 ; 
residence, Ottumwa; nativity, New York; appointed regimental quartermaster 
March 25, 1863; mustered April 12, 1863; transferred to field and staff, Seventh 
Cavalry Reorganized. Benjamin F. Giger, age 33; residence, Agency; nativity, 
Xew York ; promoted regimental commissary from third sergeant of Company E, 
July 23, 1863 ; transferred to field and staff, Seventh Cavalry Reorganized. 

Non-commissioned Staff: Eugene Fitch Ware (veteran), age 22; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Connecticut; promoted sergeant major from Company A 
July 2j, 1863; promoted second lieutenant of Company F, September 4, 1863. 

COMPANY A 

Privates: John (A.) Anderson, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Sweden; enlisted April 6, 1863; mustered April 6, 1863; transferred to Company 
C, Seventh Cavalry Reorganized. John D. Bridges, age 18; residence, Burling- 
ton; nativity, Iowa; enlisted April 16, 1863; mustered April 16, 1863; transferred 
to Company C, Seventh Cavalry Reorganized. Edward J. Burton, age 26; resi- 
dence. Burlington; nativity, Louisiana; enlisted March 26, 1863; mustered March 
26, 1863 ; transferred to Company C, Seventh Cavalry Reorganized. Abner C. 
Leonard, age 18; residence, Kossuth; nativity Iowa; enlisted April 21, 1863; 
mustered April 21, 1863; promoted second corporal November 10, 1863; first 
corporal July 3, 1864; transferred to Company C, Seventh Cavalry Reorganized. 
George S. Luckey, age 18; residence, Middletown ; nativity, Iowa; enlisted April 
26, 1863; mustered April 26, 1863; transferred to Company C, Seventh Cavalry 
Reorganized (see Company F). George D. McCristal, age 18; residence, Kings- 
ton; nativity, Iowa; enlisted March 18, 1863; mustered March 18, 1863; trans- 
ferred to Company C, Seventh Cavalry Reorganized. Charles H. Maclin, age 25 ; 
residence, Burlington ; nativity. Tennessee ; enlisted April 13, 1863 '> mustered 
April 13, 1863; deserted May 2, 1863, Davenport, Iowa. James W. Morrow, age 
18; residence, Middletown; nativity. Virginia; enlisted April 17, 1863; mustered 
April 17, 1863; died of disease October 13, 1863, Omaha, Neb. Ira C. Schenck, 
age 38 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, New York ; appointed second lieutenant 
March 6, 1863; mustered March 6, 1863; promoted first lieutenant August 20, 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 309 

1864; transferred to Company C, Seventh Cavalry Reorganized. Charles Wolf, 
age 35 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, France ; enlisted March 6, 1863 ; mustered 
March 6, 1863; deserted May 2, 1863, Davenport, Iowa. 

COMPANY D 

Privates: Robinson Franklin, age 41; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ten- 
nessee; enlisted October 7, 1864; mustered October 7, 1864; transferred to Com- 
pany D, Seventh Cavalry Reorganized. 

COMPANY F 

Privates: Alfred W. Davis, age 18; residence, Pleasant Grove; nativity, 
Iowa; enlisted May 11, 1863; mustered May 11, 1863; promoted eighth corporal 
February 13, 1864; seventh corporal April 18, 1864; sixth corporal April 27, 
1864; fifth corporal May 29, 1864; fourth corporal November 20, 1864; second 
corporal January 8, 1865; transferred to Company F, Seventh Cavalry Reorgan- 
ized. William C. Davis, age 26; residence, Pleasant Grove; nativity, Illinois; 
enlisted May 2, 1863, as first corporal ; discharged for disability September 20, 
1863, Davenport, Iowa (see Company C, Thirtieth Infantry). George S. Luckey, 
age 18; residence, Middletown ; nativity, Iowa; enlisted April 26, 1863; mustered 
April 26, 1863 ; transferred to Company C July 13, 1863. Henry Meyers, age 32 ; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted April 26, 1863; mustered 
April 26, 1863; transferred to Company F, Seventh Cavalry Reorganized. Cor- 
nelius F. Niff, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Switzerland; enlisted April 
26, 1863; mustered April 26, 1863; transferred to Company F, Seventh Cavalry 
Reorganized. 

company H 

Privates: Daniel S. McKennon, age 24; residence, Burlington; nativity, In- 
diana; enlisted October 6, 1864; mustered October 8, 1864; transferred to Com- 
pany H, Seventh Cavalry Reorganized. Lewis H. Mitchell, age 38; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted October 6, 1864; mustered October 8, 1864; 
transferred to Company H, Seventh Cavalry Reorganized. Charles A. Petter, 
age 19 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Iowa ; enlisted June 28, 1863, as eighth cor- 
poral ; mustered June 29, 1863 ; promoted fifth corporal November 1, 1863 ; fourth 
corporal January 28, 1864; reduced to ranks February 15, 1864; transferred to 
Company H, Seventh Cavalry Reorganized. 

company k 

Privates: John H. Dodds, age 22; residence, South Flint; nativity, Iowa; 
enlisted August 9, 1861 ; mustered October 23, 1861 ; mustered out October 31, 
1864, Sioux City, Iowa, expiration of term of service (see Company A, Forty- 
first Infantry). Henry M. Kennedy, age 23; residence, Kingston; nativity, New 
York; enlisted September 23, 1861 ; mustered October 23, 1861 ; mustered out 
October 31, 1864, Sioux City, Iowa, expiration of term of service (see Company 



310 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

A, Forty-first Infantry). Lyman Z. Lotspeitch (veteran), age 20; residence, Des 
Moines County; nativity, Illinois; enlisted September 20, 1861 ; mustered October 
23, 1861 ; reenlisted and remustered March 31, 1864; transferred to Company K, 
Seventh Cavalry Reorganized. Morton Powell (veteran), age 18; residence, 
Des Moines County; nativity, Ohio; enlisted October 1, 1861 ; mustered October 
23, 1861 ; reenlisted and remustered February 29, 1864; transferred to Company 
K, Seventh Cavalry Reorganized. Absalom Wood (veteran), age 39; residence, 
Burlington ; nativity, Virginia ; enlisted September 18, 1861 ; mustered October 
23, 1861 ; reenlisted and remustered February 29, 1864; promoted farrier October 
22, 1864; transferred to Company K, Seventh Cavalry Reorganized. 

SEVENTH REGIMENT, IOWA VOLUNTEER CAVALRY REORGANIZED 

COMPANY C 

Privates: Edward K. Valentine, age 21 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Iowa ; 
transferred from Company C, Seventh Cavalry, as third sergeant ; promoted ser- 
geant major April 6, 1865; adjutant September 7, 1865; mustered out May 17, 
1 866, Fort Leavenworth, Kan. 

COMPANY D 

Privates: Franklin Robinson, age 41; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ten- 
nessee; enlisted October 7, 1864; mustered October 7, 1864; mustered out Novem- 
ber 8, 1865, Fort Leavenworth, Kan., expiration of term of service. 

COMPANY M 

Privates: William H. Hendee (veteran), age 18; residence, Burlington; na- 
tivity, Connecticut; enlisted September 25, 1861 ; mustered October 24, 1861 ; 
mustered out June 22, 1866, Sioux City, Iowa (see Company M, Seventh Cavalry ; 
see also Company C, Forty-first Infantry). Augustus Killough (veteran), age 
21; residence, Burlington; nativity, Indiana; transferred from Company M, 
Seventh Cavalry, as second sergeant; mustered out June 22, 1866, Sioux City, 
Iowa (see Company C, Forty-first Infantry). Theodore Kline (veteran), age 18; 
residence, Dodgeville ; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted October 2, 1861 ; mustered 
October 24, 1861 ; mustered out June 22, 1866, Sioux City, Iowa (see Company 
M, Seventh Cavalry; see also Company C, Forty-first Infantry). William E. 
Meason (veteran), age 26; residence, Burlington; nativity, Pennsylvania; trans- 
ferred from Company M, Seventh Cavalry, as first sergeant; mustered out June 
22, 1866, Sioux City, Iowa (see Company C, Forty-first Infantry). Jesse A. 
Sisk (veteran), age 21 ; residence, Burlington; nativity, Indiana; enlisted October 
7, 1861 ; mustered October 24, 1861 ; mustered out June 22, 1866, Sioux City, 
Iowa (see Company M, Seventh Cavalry; see also Company C, Forty-first In- 
fantry). William Williams (veteran), age 23; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Iowa; transferred from Company M, Seventh Cavalry, as fourth sergeant; mus- 
tered out June 22, 1866, Sioux City, Iowa (see Company C, Forty-first Infantry). 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 311 

EIGHTH REGIMENT, IOWA VOLUNTEER CAVALRY 

Term of service, three years. Mustered into the service of the United States 
at Davenport, Iowa, September 30, 1863, by Lieut. -Col. William N. Grier, United 
States Army. Mustered out of service August 13, 1865, Macon, Ga. 

Field and Staff: Joseph B. Dorr, age 38 ; residence, Dubuque ; nativity, New 
York; appointed colonel April 13, 1863; wounded March 6, 1864, Waverly, 
Tenn. ; wounded and taken prisoner July 29, 1864, Lovejoy's Station, Ga. ; 
returned to command November 7, 1864; died of disease May 28, 1865, Macon, 
Ga. (see field and staff, Twelfth Infantry). Horatio G. Bamer, age 42; resi- 
dence, Sidney; nativity, Indiana; appointed lieutenant colonel July 30, 1863; 
promoted colonel June 9, 1865 ; mustered out August 13, 1865, Macon, Ga. John 
Tay Brown, age 37 ; residence, Hopkinton ; nativity, Kentucky ; appointed first 
battalion major May 28, 1863; resigned April 14, 1864 (see Company K, Twelfth 
Infantry). James D. Thompson, age 31 ; residence, Eldora ; nativity, New York ; 
appointed second battalion major September 15, 1863; resigned May 13, 1864 
(see Company G, First Infantry). Avalo J. Price, age 20; residence, Gutten- 
berg; nativity, Iowa; appointed third battalion major June 3, 1863; resigned Sep- 
tember 19, 1864, Atlanta, Ga. (see Company H, Twelfth Infantry). John H. 
Isett, age 29 ; residence, Wapello ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; appointed adjutant 
September 10, 1863 ; promoted second battalion major May 14, 1864 ; taken pris- 
oner July 30, 1864, Newnan, Ga. ; died of disease April 6, 1865, South Bend, Ind. 
(see Company I, Sixth Infantry). John Q. A. Dawson, age 39; residence, 
Agency; nativity, Maryland; appointed quartermaster September 17, 1863; 
resigned March 29, 1864. Cornelius Bennett, age 36; residence, Dubuque; 
nativity, New York; appointed quartermaster April 20, 1864; mustered May 11, 
1864; taken prisoner July 30, 1864, Newnan, Ga. ; returned to command Novem- 
ber 16, 1864; mustered out August 13, 1865, Macon, Ga. James E. Pritchard, 
age 32; residence, Iowa City; nativity, Ohio; appointed commissary August 18, 
1863 ; taken prisoner July 30, 1864, Newnan, Ga. ; returned to command Novem- 
ber 16, 1864; mustered out August 13, 1865, Macon, Ga. (see field and staff, 
Twenty-eighth Infantry). William H. Finley, age 32; residence, Hopkinton; 
nativity, Missouri; appointed surgeon July 23, 1863 ; resigned April 14, 1864 (see 
field and staff, Twelfth Infantry). D. A. Hoffman, residence, Oskaloosa ; 
appointed surgeon December 12, 1864; commission declined and returned January 
6, 1865. Abraham S. Carnahan, age 40 ; residence, Andrew ; nativity, Pennsyl- 
vania ; appointed assistant surgeon August 5, 1863; promoted surgeon April 5, 
1864; resigned November 19, 1864. Daniel H. Warren, age 32; residence, Sid- 
ney ; nativity, Ohio ; appointed assistant surgeon October 10, 1863 ; mustered 
October 14, 1863 ; taken prisoner July 30, 1864, Newnan, Ga. ; paroled ; promoted 
surgeon January 19, 1865 ; mustered out August 13, 1865, Macon, Ga. Thomas 
C. Clark, age 30 ; residence, Martinsburg ; nativity, Indiana ; appointed chaplain 
September 9, 1863; resigned April 7, 1864. 

COMPANY D 

Privates: Walter N. Atwood, age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, Indi- 
ana ; enlisted August 10, 1863 ; mustered September 2, 1863 ; mustered out August 
13, 1865, Macon, Ga. Theodore William Blake, age 18; residence, Northfield; 



312 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 3, 1863, as fourth corporal; mustered September 
2, 1863; taken prisoner July 30, 1864, Newnan, Ga. ; promoted second corporal 
October 1, 1864; returned to company October 14, 1864; promoted sixth sergeant 
January 10, 1865; fifth sergeant January 18, 1865; mustered out June 10. 1865, 
Louisville, Ky. William H. Campbell, age 28 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, 
Ohio; enlisted August 14, 1863; mustered August 28, 1863; taken prisoner July 
30, 1864, Newnan, Ga. ; mustered out August 13, 1865, Macon, Ga. Francis M. 
Crawford, age 21; residence, Burlington; enlisted October 9, 1863; mustered 
October 28, 1863; mustered out May 17, 1865, Davenport, Iowa. Jacinth A. 
Daniels, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, New York; enlisted August 8, 
1863; mustered September 2, 1863; mustered out August 13, 1865, Macon, Ga. 
Joseph B. Downer, age 23 ; residence, Linton ; nativity, Ohio ; enlisted July 29, 

1863, as fourth sergeant ; mustered September 2, 1863 ; taken prisoner July 30, 

1864, Newnan, Ga. ; returned to company October 14, 1864; promoted regimental 
commissary sergeant December 20, 1864; returned to company July 15, 1865 
mustered out August 13, 1865, Macon, Ga. David Hellyer, age 21; residence 
Kossuth; nativity, Ohio; enlisted July 27, 1863; mustered September 2, 1863 
mustered out August 13, 1865, Macon, Ga. William H. Lee, age 24; residence 
Linton; nativity, Iowa; enlisted July 18, 1863; mustered September 2, 1863 
promoted seventh corporal January 10, 1865 ; sixth corporal February 22, 1865 
fifth corporal March 1, 1865; fourth corporal March 3, 1865; sixth sergeant July 
15, 1865; mustered out August 13, 1865, Macon, Ga. Edmond Linton, age 18; 
residence, Linton; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 17, 1863; mustered September 
2, 1863; promoted eighth corporal March 1, 1865; seventh corporal March 3, 
1865; third corporal July 15, 1865; mustered out August 13, 1865, Macon, Ga. 
Aimer L. McClure, age 18; residence, Kossuth; nativity, Iowa; enlisted July 29, 
1863; mustered September 2, 1863; mustered out August 13, 1865, Macon, Ga. 
Tohn H. Mickey, age 18; residence, Linton; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 10, 
1863; mustered September 2, 1863; promoted seventh corporal July 15, 1865; 
mustered out August 13, 1865, Macon, Ga. John C. Power, age 22; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Ohio; appointed second lieutenant September 30, 1863; 
mustered September 30, 1863; promoted third lieutenant July 15, 1864; taken 
prisoner July 30, 1864, Newnan, Ga. ; promoted captain January 29, 1865 ; resigned 
March 21, 1865. James W. Scott, age 21 ; residence, Linton; nativity, Pennsyl- 
vania; enlisted July 29, 1863; mustered September 2, 1863; taken prisoner July 
30, 1864, Newnan, Ga. ; paroled; mustered out June 29, 1865, Clinton, Iowa. 
Samuel H. Williams, age 18; residence, Linton; nativity, Ohio; enlisted July 29, 
1863; mustered September 2, 1863; accidentally killed May 5, 1865, Macon, Ga. ; 
buried in National Cemetery, Andersonville, Ga., grave 13325. Hiram Wossom, 
age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted August 17, 1863; mus- 
tered September 2, 1863; mustered out August 13, 1865, Macon, Ga. 

COMPANY E 

Privates: Aloys H. Bohner (veteran) , age 32 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, 
Germany ; transferred from chief bugler to bugler ; taken prisoner July 30, 1864, 
Newnan, Ga. ; paroled January 18, 1865, Annapolis, Md. ; retransferred as chief 
bugler July 16, 1865 (see field and staff). James Cresap, age 21 ; residence, Bur- 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 313 

lington ; nativity, Maryland ; enlisted August 21, 1863 ; mustered August 21, 1863 ; 
promoted farrier; taken prisoner July 30, 1864, Newnan, Ga. ; exchanged; mus- 
tered out July 25, 1865, Davenport, Iowa. Richard Cunningham, age 18; resi- 
dence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 7, 1863; mustered August 7, 
1863; wounded May 7, 1864, Varnell's Station, Ga. ; mustered out August 13, 
1865, Macon, Ga. Richard Dressel (veteran), age 22; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Prussia; enlisted August 18, 1863, as company quartermaster sergeant; 
mustered August 18, 1863 ; discharged for promotion as first lieutenant in One 
Hundred and Thirty-sixth United States Colored Infantry ( see Company E, 
Twenty-fifth Infantry). Joseph H. Dunn, age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Illinois; enlisted August 4, 1863; mustered August 4, 1863; deserted, Davenport, 
Iowa. Henry Flamm, age 45 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Germany ; enlisted 
July 1, 1863; mustered July 1, 1863; mustered out May 20, 1865, Murfreesboro, 
Tenn. Kellis W. Foster, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted 
July 25, 1863 ; mustered July 25, 1863 ; promoted eighth corporal ; fourth corporal 
January 30, 1865; mustered out August 13, 1865, Macon, Ga. Levi S. Hannah, 
age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Indiana; enlisted June 26, 1863; mus- 
tered July 26, 1863 ; promoted third corporal company commissary sergeant Jan- 
uary 30, 1865; mustered out August 13, 1865, Macon, Ga. John Lee, age 30; 
residence, Burlington ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; enlisted August 5, 1863, as com- 
pany commissary sergeant; mustered August 5, 1863; mustered out August 13, 
1865, Macon, Ga. John H. Reid, age 40 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Canada ; 
enlisted July 11, 1863, as wagoner; mustered July 11, 1863; taken prisoner July 
30, 1864, Newnan, Ga. ; died of disease while a prisoner December 14, 1864, 
Florence, S. C. Reuben Rock, age 18 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Pennsyl- 
vania ; enlisted August 1, 1863; mustered August 1, 1863; mustered out August 
13, 1865, Macon, Ga. Frederick Schnittger, age 28; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Germany; enlisted August 9, 1863; mustered August 9, 1863; promoted 
first corporal; taken prisoner July 30, 1864, Newnan, Ga. ; promoted fifth ser- 
geant January 30, 1865; mustered out August 13, 1865, Macon, Ga. David 
Schultz, age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, Pennsylvania; enlisted July 31, 
1863 ; mustered July 31, 1863 ; mustered out August 13, 1865, Macon, Ga. James 
B. Simmons, age 19 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Iowa ; enlisted July 10, 
1863, as seventh corporal; mustered July 10, 1863; wounded May 7, 1864, Var- 
nell's Station, Tenn. ; promoted fourth corporal ; reduced to ranks at his own 
request January 30, 1865 ; promoted sixth sergeant April 30, 1865 ; mustered out 
August 13, 1865, Macon, Ga. (see miscellaneous). Thomas Watkins, age 22; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Indiana; enlisted August 7, 1863; mustered 
August 7, 1863 ; died of disease April 8, 1864, Nashville, Tenn. ; buried in National 
Cemetery, Nashville, Tenn., section E, grave 1636. Joseph Winsell, age 18; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted August 15, 1863; mustered 
August 15, 1863; taken prisoner April 6, 1865, Tuscaloosa, Ala.; mustered out 
June 7, 1865, Davenport, Iowa. Levi J. Woodmansee, age 20; residence, Bur- 
lington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted August 27, 1863; mustered August 27, 1863; 
died of disease March 16, 1864, Nashville, Tenn. ; buried in National Cemetery, 
Nashville, Tenn., section E, grave 1333. John W. Woodside, age 18: residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted July 1, 1863; mustered July 1, 1863; mus- 
tered out August 13, 1865, Macon, Ga. 



314 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

COMPANY F 

Privates: John O. Mitchell, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Indiana; 
enlisted August 24, 1863; mustered September 6, 1863; mustered out August 13, 
1865, Macon, Ga. 

company H 

Privates: John Harris, age 18; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, Iowa; enlisted 
August 8, 1863; mustered September 30, 1863; taken prisoner July 30, 1864, 
Newnan, Ga. ; died of disease while a prisoner August 13, 1864, Andersonville, 
Ga. ; buried in National Cemetery, Andersonville, Ga., grave 5461 (see Company 
G, Thirty-ninth Infantry). 

COMPANY L 

Privates: William H. Beckman, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, New 
York; enlisted August 13, 1863 ; mustered August 13, 1863; mustered out August 
13, 1865, Macon, Ga. 

COMPANY M 

Privates: William A. Arel, age 18 ; residence, Dodgeville ; nativity, Iowa ; 
enlisted August 12, 1863; mustered August 12, 1863; promoted eighth corporal 
March 26, 1864; taken prisoner July 30, 1864, Newnan, Ga. ; promoted fourth 
corporal February 3, 1865; mustered out May 31, 1865, Davenport, Iowa. Ben- 
jamin I. Jones, age 21 ; residence, Dodgeville; nativity, England; enlisted August 
12, 1863; mustered August 12, 1863; taken prisoner July 30, 1864, Newnan, Ga. ; 
paroled December 20, 1864, Annapolis, Md. ; promoted first corporal July 14, 
1865 ; mustered out August 13, 1865, Macon, Ga. Oliver H. Jones, age 18; resi- 
dence, Dodgeville ; nativity, Iowa ; enlisted August 27, 1863 ; mustered August 27, 
1863; promoted fourth corporal July 14, 1865; mustered out August 13, 1865, 
Macon, Ga. Samuel Reid, age 24 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Indiana ; 
enlisted June 29, 1863, as first sergeant; mustered June 29, 1863; transferred to 
Veteran Reserve Corps April 1, 1865; mustered out August 15, 1865, Washing- 
ton, D. C. Wesley M. Vannice, age 18; residence, Kossuth; nativity, Indiana; 
enlisted August 13, 1863; mustered August 13, 1863; promoted fifth corporal 
February 3, 1865; third sergeant July 14, 1865; mustered out August 13, 1865, 
Macon, Ga. 

NINTH REGIMENT, IOWA VOLUNTEER CAVALRY 

Term of service, three years. Mustered into the service of the United States 
at Davenport, Iowa, November 30, 1863, by Lieut.-Col. William N. Grier, United 
States Army. Mustered out of service on dates ranging from February 3 to 
March 23, 1866, at Little Rock, Ark. 

Field and Staff: Mathew M. Trumbull; age 38; residence, Cedar Falls; 
nativity, England; appointed colonel September 26, 1863; promoted brevet briga- 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 315 

dier general; mustered out February 28, 1866, Little Rock, Ark. (see Company I, 
Third Infantry). John P. Knight, age 43; residence, Mitchell; nativity, Ver- 
mont- appointed lieutenant colonel November 6, 1863; mustered out March 31, 
!866 Davenport, Iowa (see Company I, Third Infantry). Edgar T. Ensign, age 
24- residence, Des Moines; nativity, New York; appointed First Battalion major 
October 25 1863- promoted brevet lieutenant colonel and colonel March 13, 
1865; resigned October 27, 1865 (see Company D, Second Infantry). Willis 
Drummond, age 37; residence, McGregor; nativity, Missouri; appointed Second 
Battalion major November 1, 1863; resigned June 2, 1865, Little Rock, Ark 
William Haddock, age 41 ; residence, Waterloo; nativity, New York; appointed 
Third Battalion major November 3, 1863 ; resigned September 13, 1864 (see field 
and staff, Eighth Cavalry ; see also Company E, Twelfth Infantry) . John Wayne, 
age 26- residence, Cedar Falls; nativity, New York; appointed adjutant October 
17 186 V mustered October 27, 1863; promoted Third Battalion major Septem- 
ber 14 1864- mustered out February 28, 1866, Little Rock, Ark. (see Company 
K Third Infantry). Jesse J. Grant, age 34 ; residence, Davenport; nativity, Ken- 
tucky appointed quartermaster September 29, 1863 ; mustered October 16, 1863; 
died of disease April 19, 1864, Benton Barracks, Mo. (see Company B, Sixth 
Infantry) Ward B. Sherman, age 23; residence, Waterloo; nativity, New 
York- appointed commissary November 5, 1863; mustered November 30, 1863; 
promoted adjutant September 14, 1864; resigned April 1, 1865 (see Company G, 
Thirteenth Infantry) . Jesse Wasson, age 42 ; residence, LaPorte ; nativity, Indi- 
ana - appointed surgeon October 19, 1863; mustered October 19, 1863; resigned 
for disability January 27, 1865 (see field and staff, Thirty-second Infantry). 
John Bell a-e 43 ; residence, Wapello ; nativity, Ohio ; appointed assistant sur- 
geon October 3 1863; promoted surgeon February 18, 1865 ; mustered March 2, 
1865 • mustered out February 28, 1866, Little Rock, Ark. Edwin Kirkup, age 38 ; 
residence, Davenport; nativity, England ; appointed assistant surgeon October 22, 
186 V mustered November 23, 1864; discharged for promotion as surgeon in 
Eighteenth Infantry November 12, 1864 (see field and staff, Twelfth Infantry;- 
see also Company D, Thirty-eighth Infantry). James W. Larimore, age 29; resi- 
dence, Des Moines ; nativity, Ohio; appointed chaplain November 7 ,_ 1863; mus- 
tered December 4, 1863 ; discharged for promotion as hospital chaplain, U. S. V., 
March 20, 1865. 



company c 



Privates: Cornelius Hopkins, age 35 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Ireland ; 
enlisted November 6, 1863; mustered November 30, 1863 ; discharged August 20, 
1864 Devall's Bluff, Ark. Samuel V. Jackson, age 18; residence, Burlington; 
nativity New Jersey; enlisted October 29, 1863; mustered November 30, 1863; 
mustered out February 28, 1866, Little Rock, Ark. Christopher Lewis, age 37; 
residence, Burlington ; nativity, Iowa ; enlisted November 9, 1863 ; discharged for 
disability August 7, 1865, Lewisburg, Ark. 

COMPANY G 

Privates: Albert W. Prole, age 22; residence, Burlington; nativity, New 
York- appointed second lieutenant November 30, 1863; promoted first lieutenant 
May 13, 1864 ; mustered out February 3, 1866, Little Rock, Ark. 



316 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

COMPANY H 

Privates: Charles A. Frick, age 25 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Pennsyl- 
vania ; promoted captain from first lieutenant of Company D, March 9, 1865; 
mustered out February 3, 1866, Little Rock, Ark. 

COMPANY M 

Privates: Lucius C. Crum (veteran), age 41 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, 
Kentucky; enlisted September 26, 1863, as company commissary sergeant; mus- 
tered out February 3, 1866, Little Rock, Ark. (see Company C, Forty-first Infan- 
try). Alexander P. Hittle (veteran), age 23; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Indiana; enlisted September 26, 1863, as sixth sergeant; mustered November 30, 
1863; promoted fifth sergeant July 1, 1864; fourth sergeant January 10, 1865; 
third sergeant July 1, 1865 ; mustered out February 3, 1866, Little Rock, Ark. 

The names of volunteers from Des Moines County who enlisted in the various 
regiments other than Iowa regiments follow : 

THIRTEENTH UNITED STATES INFANTRY 

George Kaut ; residence, Burlington ; enlisted in Company B on the 24th day 
of November, 1861 ; wounded May 19, 1863, at Walnut Hills, Vicksburg, Miss.; 
discharged November 24, 1864, Edgefield, Tenn., by reason of expiration of term 
of service. 

ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTH NEW YORK INFANTRY 

Thomas Hedge; residence, Burlington, Iowa; enlisted private in Company E 
in 1864; promoted to second lieutenant, Company G, same regiment; was with 
the Army of the Potomac until mustered out in 1865 at close of war. 

SIXTIETH UNITED STATES VOLUNTEERS (a. D.) 

Henry Brown; enlisted August 11, 1864; mustered out October 15, 1865. 
William H. Brown; enlisted August 18, 1864; mustered out October 15, 1865. 
Fred Harris; enlisted August 12, 1864; mustered out October 15, 1865. Henry 
White; enlisted August 11, 1864; mustered out October 15, 1865. Madison 
Alexander; enlisted October 10, 1864. 

SIXTEENTH ILLINOIS INFANTRY 

Dennis Quinn ; enlisted May 24, 1861 ; transferred to Sixtieth Illinois. John 
S. Hill ; enlisted May 24, 1861. William Jackson ; enlisted May 24, 1861, veteran ; 
mustered out July 8, 1865. John Mangold; enlisted May 24, 1861, veteran; mus- 
tered out July 3, 1865. George Haydon ; enlisted May 24, 1861, veteran ; mustered 
out July 8, i£ '15, as sergeant. F. J. Adams ; enlisted May 9, 1861 ; discharged 
June 18, 1862. 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 317 



FORTY-SECOND ILLINOIS INFANTRY 

Peters Herman; enlisted July 26, 1861 ; died February 27, 1863, wounds. H. 
L Haywood; enlisted July 26, 1861, as first sergeant; mustered out September 
16 1864 term expired. William Ambury; enlisted July 26, 1861 ; mustered out 
September 16, 1864. George W. Copeley ; enlisted July 26, 1861 ; discharged May 
5 1863 disability. Christian Grace; enlisted July 26, 1861 ; mustered out Septem- 
ber i S '1864; James Kelley ; enlisted July 26, 1861 ; died in rebel prison November, 
1863 wounds. Ephraim Martin; enlisted July 26, 1861 ; died at Murfreesboro, 
April 19 1863 William Miller; enlisted July 26, 1861. William McGmley; 
enlisted July 26, 1861 ; died at St. Louis February 23, 1862. John Redgeley; 
enlisted July 26, 1861 ; mustered out September 16, 1864. Otho Rhodes; enlisted 
July 26, 1861, veteran; mustered out December 16, 1865, as corporal. John 
Smith- enlisted July 26, 1861 ; discharged March 1, 1862, for disability. Christ 
Solvisburg; enlisted July 26, 1861 ; discharged July 14, 1862, disability. George 
Weston; enlisted July 26, 1861. 

FORTY-THIRD ILLINOIS INFANTRY 

Henry Hertzler ; enlisted October 14, 1861 ; killed at Shiloh. Fred Kemp- 
holfner; enlisted September 1, 1861 ; mustered out December 16, 1864. Ernst 
Linneman; enlisted October 14. 1861 ; mustered out December 16, 1864. Chris- 
tian Schrey; enlisted September 1, 1861 ; mustered out December 16, 1864. V. 
Volkner; enlisted September 1, 1861 ; discharged July 12, 1862. 

FORTY-FOURTH INFANTRY 

Matthias Willem; enlisted September 1, 1861, veteran; mustered out Sep- 
tember 25, 1865. 

FIFTIETH ILLINOIS INFANTRY 

Charles Blind; enlisted September 16, 1861, veteran; mustered out July 13, 
1865. Richard Gordon; enlisted September 16, 1861, sergeant; mustered out 
September 17, 1864, as private. George C. Latimer; enlisted November 1, 1861, 
sergeant; mustered out October 31, 1864, as private. 

FIFTY-SEVENTH ILLINOIS INFANTRY 

George Hirt; enlisted December 17, 1863, veteran; mustered out July 7, 1865. 
Edward Blender; enlisted October 5, 1861 ; veteran, December 17, 1863 ; mustered 
out Tuly 7, 1865. David Blender; enlisted October 5, 1861 ; veteran, December 
27, 1863 /mustered out July 7, 1865, as corporal. Hafer Blender; enlisted Octo- 
ber 5, 1861 ; veteran, December 27, 1863; mustered out July 7, 1865, as corporal. 
Peter Conrad; enlisted October 9, 1861 ; veteran, December 27, 1863; mustered 
out July 7, 1865, as corporal. F. Disque ; enlisted October 5, 186; ; discharged 
Tuly' 11, 1862, disability. Charles Geinger; enlisted August 26, -861; veteran, 



318 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

December 27, 1863; mustered out July 7, 1865. George Hirt ; enlisted October 
10. 1861 ; transferred. Charles Hirt; enlisted October 10, 1861 ; discharged July 
3, 1862. Charles W. Humberger; enlisted May, 1861 ; veteran, December 27, 
1863; mustered out July 7, 1865, as corporal. Michael Hoebringer; enlisted 
September 16, 1861. Emil Hatz ; enlisted December 13, 1861. Peter Ismert; 
enlisted September 16, 1861 ; veteran, December 27, 1863; mustered out July 7, 
1865. Frank B. Johnson; enlisted January 25, 1861 ; died. Jacob Miller; enlisted 
September 2, 1861 ; discharged September n. 1862, disability. Julius Ruby; 
enlisted September 27, 1861 ; transferred. Peter Saftig; enlisted September 10, 
1861 ; died at Keokuk. Jacob Stanott ; enlisted September 24. e86i ; discharged 
July 3, 1862, disability. Fred Schnittger; enlisted September 8, 1861, veteran; 
mustered out, July 7, 1865. Henry Steetman ; enlisted August 26, 1861 ; veteran, 
December 2j, 1863; mustered out July 7, 1865, as sergeant; Henry Strumpe; 
enlisted May, 1861 ; veteran, December 27, 1863; mustered out July 7, 1865, 
as sergeant. Joseph Stumpt ; enlisted December 7, 1861. Joseph Schneider; en- 
listed September 28, 1861 ; discharged July 3, 1862. George Schafer; enlisted 
October 12, 1861. Henry Steempt ; enlisted September 28, 1861, veteran; mus- 
tered out July 7, 1865. John U. Tschudy; enlisted August 26, 1861 ; deserted 
February 8, 1862. F. Yogler; enlisted August 26, 1861. Charles Wagner; en- 
listed October 23, 1861 ; discharged July 30. 1862. Charles Wobeser; enlisted 
October 26, 1861 ; discharged July 30, 1865, disability. E. Weber; enlisted De- 
cember 10, 1861 ; mustered out January 23, 1865. Bernhard Waltz; enlisted 
August 26, 1861 ; mustered out December 26, 1864. John Weyand; enlisted Sep- 
tember 21, 1861. Charles Zollikoffer; enlisted September 28, 1861 ; discharged 
July 27, 1862. Adam Zimmermann ; enlisted December 9, 1861 ; mustered out 
September 25, 1864, wounds. Charles Zwicker; enlisted November 12, 1861 ; dis- 
charged August 16, 1862, wounds. Jacob Zeller; enlisted September 18, 1861. 
Samuel Cisna ; enlisted November 29, 1861. David Fuller; enlisted November 
29, 1861. Lewis Mozingo ; enlisted November 29. 1861. Simon Solon; enlisted 
November 29, 1861. 

FIFTY-NINTH ILLINOIS INFANTRY 

John G. Hinkles; enlisted September 27, 1861 ; discharged April 7, 1862, dis- 
ability. Arthur Ingersol ; enlisted September 27, 1861 ; veteran, January 12, 
1864; mustered out December 8, 1865. William K. Smith; enlisted September 
27, 1861; discharged March 26, 1863, disability. 

SIXTY-SECOND ILLINOIS INFANTRY 

Jonathan Nicholson; enlisted January 15, 1862; mustered out May 2, 1865. 

SEVEXTY-SECOND ILLINOIS INFANTRY 

William Felsing; enlisted August 11, 1865; mustered out May 1, 1865, ser- 
geant. 

ELEVENTH ILLINOIS CAVALRY 

Andreas Albertson; enlisted September 23, 1861 ; discharged March 27, 1863, 
wounds. John Heins ; enlisted September 23, 1861 ; mustered out December 20, 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 319 

1864. Charles Bork; enlisted November 6, 1861 ; mustered out September 30, 

1865. William Barker; enlisted November 1, 1861, veteran; mustered out Sep- 
tember 30, 1865, as sergeant. Hugh Burns; enlisted November 1, 1861. Patrick 
Burns; enlisted November 6, 1861 ; discharged October 15, 1862, disability. Tim 
Barnett; enlisted November 6, 1861 ; discharged November 13, 1862, disability. 
Henry Dow; enlisted December 20, 1861 ; discharged January 28, 1862, disability. 
Michael Foley; enlisted November 1, 1861 ; died March 9, 1864. Levi Gaus; 
enlisted November 6, 1861. Matthew Landragan; enlisted November 1, 1861 ; 
discharged December 19, 1864. Michael Murphy; enlisted November 1, 1861 ; 
discharged January 22, 1862. Samuel T. Martin ; enlisted November 6, 1861. John 
Martin; enlisted November 6, 1861 ; died at Monmouth, 111., March 6, 1862. 
William Murphy; enlisted November 6, 1861 ; discharged January 22, 1862. H. B. 
O'Neal ; enlisted November 6, 1861 ; discharged December 19, 1864. William 
Sebring; enlisted November 6, 1861 ; mustered out September 30, 1865. John 
Shomboucher; enlisted November 6, 1861. James M. Tucker; enlisted Novem- 
ber 6, 1861 ; mustered out September 30, 1865. James Tinian ; enlisted November 
6, 1861 ; sick at muster out. 

ENGINEER REGIMENT OF THE WEST — COMPANY I 

Sergeant Frank Bras; enlisted September 13, 1861 ; promoted second lieu- 
tenant Company B. Musician Clark Morrell ; enlisted October 24, 1861. Artifi- 
cer F. M. Bradley; enlisted September 30, 1861. Artificer F. M. Johnson; en- 
listed November 5, 1861. Artificer Alfred D. Ross; enlisted September 28, 1861 ; 
discharged February, 1863, disability. Artificer Asher Sillick; enlisted Septem- 
ber 21, 1861 ; promoted sergeant. Artificer John Swank; enlisted September 19, 
1861. Artificer John W. Sylvester; enlisted September 28, 1861. Artificer John 
P. Anderson; enlisted September 19, 1861 ; died December 16, 1863, at Jefferson 
City. Reuben Cudney; enlisted September 23, 1861. A. J. Daniel; enlisted Octo- 
ber 19, 1861 ; died at Vicksburg July 8, 1863. E. Frederick; enlisted September 
30, 1861. Joseph Hulick; enlisted September 28, 1861. T. Jacobs; enlisted Sep- 
tember 23, 1861. Joshua Miles; enlisted November 5, 1861. John H. Sprows; 
enlisted September 30, 1861 ; died at Jackson, Term. Sidney Sprows; enlisted 
October 25, 1861. William H. H. Swank; enlisted September 19, 1861. Benja- 
min Ward; enlisted October 10, 1861. William W. Westfall; enlisted September 
19, 1861. 

TWENTY-FIFTH MISSOURI INFANTRY 

William E. Hight; enlisted December 26, 1861. 

THIRD MISSOURI CAVALRY 

Corp. Robert M. Pollock; enlisted October 15, 1861 ; discharged for disability. 

TENTH MISSOURI CAVALRY 

Sergt. Martin L. Root; enlisted August 1, 1861. 



320 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

FIRST NEBRASKA CAVALRY 

Corp. Lewis P. Wall; enlisted June 30, 1861 ; discharged August 29, 1862. 

SECOND KANSAS CAVALRY 

First Sergt. Clarence J. Williams; enlisted October 2, 1861. Corp. John C. 
Nye; enlisted October 2, 1861. Farrier Perrine Arnold; enlisted October 2, 1861. 
Charles W. Meeker; enlisted October 1, 1861. Thomas Stockton; enlisted Sep- 
tember 28, 1861. 

COMPANY K 

Sergt. A. D. Whitcomb; enlisted September 5, 1861. Sergt. James Carlin ; 
enlisted September 10, 1861. Corp. William Ganz; enlisted September 17, 1861. 
Corp. Alfred Ogden ; enlisted September 17, 1861. Corp. William T. McCash ; 
enlisted September 26, 1861. Wagoner John C. Clark; enlisted September 24, 

1861. Artificer James Amlin; enlisted September 30, 1861. Artificer William 
H. Burge; enlisted September 16, 1861. Artificer L. G. Brandeburg; enlisted 
September 16, 1861. Artificer I. N. Berry; enlisted September 30, 1861. Ar- 
tificer J. Davis; enlisted September 10, 1861 ; discharged May 22, 1862, disabil- 
ity. Artificer John Dexter; enlisted September 25, 1861 ; discharged October 22, 

1862. Artificer John E. Dort ; enlisted September 21, 1861. Artificer Charles 
Gillespie; enlisted September 15, 1861. Artificer Frank Herman; enlisted Sep- 
tember 23, 1861. Artificer Edward Lane; enlisted September 25, 1861. Artificer 
John McCandless ; enlisted September 26, 1861. Artificer Isaac Overston; enlisted 
September 30, 1861 ; discharged April 30, 1862. Artificer O. P. Roman ; enlisted 
September 28, 1861. Artificer Swan Swanson ; enlisted September 20, 1861. Ar- 
tificer Thomas D. Simpkins; enlisted September 26, 1861. Artificer M. B. Web- 
ster; enlisted September 16, 1861 ; promoted commander sergeant. John G. 
Dewein; enlisted September 26, 1861. H. D. George; enlisted September 10, 
1861 ; discharged December 21, 1861. Charles Graham; enlisted September 24, 
1861 ; Charles Howard; enlisted September 28, 1861. Joseph Levi; enlisted Sep- 
tember 18, 1861. Charles Linn; enlisted September 26, 1861. Daniel M. Moore; 
enlisted September 6, 1861. William Misner; enlisted September 15, 1861. 
S. Tucker; enlisted September 24, 1861. Fenton Young; enlisted September 12, 
1861 ; discharged February 15, 1862. 

COMPANY UNKNOWN 

William R. Cornwell ; enlisted September 28, 1861 ; promoted corporal. C. 
Dougherty; enlisted September 20, 1861 ; promoted sergeant. John Guinnit; 
enlisted September 11, 1861 ; promoted corporal. 

REVOLUTIONARY SOLDIERS 

The following Revolutionary soldiers died and were buried in Des Moines 
County : William Blair, a native of Pennsylvania ; enlisted for the Revolutionary 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 321 

war when sixteen years of age. At the close of that was married and moved to 
Benton County, Kentucky. From there in 1797 moved to Ohio and settled near 
Chillicothe, Ohio. From Ohio he moved to Illinois. From Illinois he came to 
Iowa, where at the time lived his sons, Thomas and David E. He died in 1840 
at the age of eighty-two years, and was buried in the cemetery north of Kos- 
suth in Des Moines County. 

The first white person who died and was buried in Des Moines County was 
a Revolutionary soldier — the father of Dr. William R. Ross. In September, 1833, 
Doctor Ross came to Burlington, his aged father accompanying him. In speak- 
ing of his father's death the doctor says : "He was accompanied by his aged 
father, who had fought through the Revolutionary war and who was one of the 
first settlers of Lexington, Ky. Worn down by age and toil, and being exposed to 
the inclemencies of a new home, the old gentleman was carried off the same fall 
with the chills and fever and now lies (1839) on the topmost pinnacle of our 
city." At the time of the death of this Revolutionary hero there was not a 
graveyard in Burlington and there is nothing to mark the place where he lies 
buried. 

John Morgan, a soldier of the Revolutionary war, is buried in Aspen Grove 
Cemetery, Burlington. At his grave is erected a beautiful granite monument at 
a cost of $500. It bears this inscription : 

JOHN MORGAN, A SOLDIER OF THE AMERICAN REV- 
OLUTION. BORN IN GLOUCESTER COUNTY, VIRGINIA, 
1758. DIED IN BURLINGTON, IOWA, 1843. SERVED TWO 
YEARS IN McLANAHAN'S SEVENTH REGIMENT, VIRGINIA 
TROOPS. WAS IN BATTLES OF BRANDYWINE AND GER- 
MANTOWN AND ON VARIOUS TOURS WITH PEYTON AND 
PAGES, VIRGINIA MILITIA. ERECTED BY THE STATE OF 
IOWA, AIDED BY THE STARS AND STRIPES CHAPTER 
DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION AND MAT- 
THIAS POST G. A. R. 

SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR 

The proclamation of President McKinley was issued April 23, 1898, and 
recited the declaration of war against Spain. It called for 125,000 volunteers. 
On the 25th of the same month the governor of Iowa was advised of the quota 
of volunteers from Iowa. In the organization of Iowa regiments the First 
Iowa National Guard became the Forty-ninth Iowa Infantry. The Third, Fourth 
and Fifth Iowa National Guards became the Fifty, Fifty-first and Fifty-second 
Iowa Infantry. The state was also called upon to furnish two batteries of light 
artillery. The Forty-ninth Regiment was mustered into the service at Camp 
McKinley, Des Moines, June 2, 1898, and mustered out at Savannah, Ga., May 
13, 1899. On December 19, 1898, the regiment was ordered to Cuba and arrived 
at Havana on the 21st of same month. While in Cuba it was principally engaged 
in performing guard duty. The Fiftieth Infantry was mustered into the service 
of the United States at Camp McKinley, Des Moines, May 17, 1898, mustered 
out of the service at the same place on November 30, 1898. This regiment was 



322 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

sent south with the expectation of being sent to Cuba. It went into camp near 
Jacksonville, Fla. The camp was called "Cuba Libre." From this place it was 
returned to Iowa. 

FIFTIETH REGIMENT, IOWA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 

Field and Staff: Frederick Goedecke, age 25 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, 
Iowa; appointed regimental adjutant April 26, 1898; mustered May 18, 1898; 
mustered out November 30, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. 

COMPANY F 

Privates: Edmund W. Bringer, age 21 ; residence, Burlington ; enlisted June 
27, 1898; mustered June 2~, 1898; mustered out November 30, 1898, Des Moines, 
Iowa. George K. Coulter, age 20; residence, Burlington; enlisted July 5, 1898; 
mustered July 5, 1898; mustered out November 30, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. 
Philip A. Crapo, age 24; residence, Burlington; enlisted June 21, 1898; mustered 
June 21, 1898; died of disease September 18, 1898, St. Luke's Hospital, Jackson- 
ville, Fla. Richard J. Cullaton, age 21; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; 
enlisted April 29, 1898; mustered May 17, 1898; mustered out November 30, 
1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Clarence A. Dodge, age 21; residence, Burlington; 
enlisted June 22, 1898; mustered June 22, 1898; mustered out November 30, 
1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Gust Falk, age 19; residence, Burlington; enlisted June 

29, 1898; mustered June 29, 1898; mustered out November 30, 1898, Des Moines, 
Iowa. George W. France, age 25 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Illinois ; 
enlisted April 29, 1898; mustered May 17, 1898; mustered out November 30, 
1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Philip A. Gugeller, age 22; residence, Burlington; 
enlisted June 24, 1898; mustered June 24, 1898; mustered out November 

30, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. William Jennings, age 21 ; residence, Burling- 
ton ; enlisted June 2j, 1898; mustered June 27, 1898; mustered out November 30, 
1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Charley McDowell, age 25 ; residence, Burlington ; 
nativity, Iowa; enlisted May 14, 1898; mustered May 17. 1898; promoted cor- 
poral July 14, 1898 : mustered out November 30, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Pryor 
L. Mathews, age 27; residence, Burlington; enlisted July 8, 1898; mustered July 
8, 1898; mustered out November 30, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Louis Meyer, age 
21 ; residence, Burlington; enlisted June 2y, 1898; mustered June 2j, 1898; mus- 
tered out November 30, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Daniel R. Page, age 35; resi- 
dence, Burlington; enlisted June 29, 1898; mustered June 29, 1898; mustered out 
November 30, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Guy E. Pennington, age 21 ; residence, 
Burlington ; enlisted June 22, 1898 ; mustered June 22, 1898 ; mustered out Novem- 
ber 30, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Leonard Peterson, age 21 ; residence, Burling- 
ton ; nativity, Iowa; enlisted May 4, 1898, as musician; mustered May 17, 1898; 
mustered out November 30, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Benjamin J. Sheagrin. 
age 21; residence, Burlington; enlisted June 27, 1898; mustered June 27, 1898; 
mustered out November 30, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. John H. Smyth, age 22: 
residence, Burlington; enlisted June 25, 1898; mustered June 2j, 1898; mustered 
out November 30, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Frank E. Tubbs, age 20; residence, 
Burlington; enlisted June 27, 1898; mustered June 27, 1898; mustered out 
November 30, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 323 

COMPANY G 

Privates: Isaac L. Stone, age 20; residence, Burlington; enlisted July 8, 
1898; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out November 30, 1898, Des Moines, 
Iowa. 

COMPANY L 

Privates: Samuel Shugar, age 28 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Ohio ; 
enlisted April 30, 1898; mustered May 17, 1898; mustered out November 30, 
1898, Des Moines, Iowa. William M. Simons, age 27; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Iowa; enlisted April 30, 1898; mustered May 17, 1898; transferred to 
U. S. Hospital Corps, Seventh Army Corps, June 8, 1898. Charles C. VanEtten, 
age 29; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Illinois ; enlisted April 26, 1898, as second 
sergeant; mustered May 17, 1898; mustered out November 30, 1898, Des Moines, 
Iowa. 

COMPANY M 

Privates: Nathaniel Heizer, age 21 ; residence, Mediapolis ; enlisted June 24, 
1898; mustered June 24, 1898; mustered out November 30, 1898, Des Moines, 
Iowa. John A. Matson, age 19; residence, Kossuth; enlisted June 30, 1898; 
mustered June 30, 1898; mustered out November 30, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. 
Ernest P. Parsons, age 22 ; residence, Mediapolis ; enlisted June 28, 1898 ; mus- 
tered June 28, 1898; mustered out November 30, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Harry 
Reid, age 22 ; residence, Burlington ; enlisted June 24, 1898 ; mustered June 24, 
1898; mustered out November 30, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. 

FIFTY-FIRST REGIMENT, IOWA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 
COMPANY A 

Privates: Emanuel R. Koesling, age 25 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Iowa ; 
enlisted April 26, 1898; mustered May 30, 1898; promoted corporal June 20, 
1898; mustered out November 2, 1899, San Francisco, Cal. 

SIXTH BATTERY, IOWA LIGHT ARTILLERY 

(Mustered out September 5, 1898) 

Roster: Frank S. Long, age 32 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Connecticut ; 
appointed captain June 24, 1898; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 
5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Albert H. Huebner, age 24; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Iowa; appointed first lieutenant June 24, 1898; mustered July 8, 1898; 
mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. William T. Garrett, age 20; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; appointed second lieutenant June 24, 1898; 
mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. 
Frank C. Norton, age 29; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 24, 
1898, as first sergeant; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, 



324 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

Des Aloines, Iowa. Martin A. Hellwig, age 24 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, 
Germany; enlisted June 24, 1898, as quartermaster sergeant; mustered July 8, 
1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Frank L. Kuhlen- 
beck, age 22 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Iowa ; enlisted June 24, 1898, as 
veterinary sergeant; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des 
Moines, Iowa. Sylvester F. Kelley, age 25 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Iowa ; 
enlisted June 24, 1898, as sergeant; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out Sep- 
tember 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Frank D. Thomas, age 23; residence, Bur- 
lington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 24, 1898, as sergeant; mustered July 8, 
1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Frank B. Carver, 
age 32 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; enlisted June 24, 1898, as 
sergeant; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, 
Iowa. Joseph B. Sutter, age 21 ; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted 
June 24, 1898, as sergeant; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 
1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Louie D. Perrine, age 22 ; residence, Burlington ; 
nativity, Illinois; enlisted June 24, 1898, as sergeant; mustered July 8, 1898; 
mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Benjamin B. Johnson, age 
21; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 24, 1898, as sergeant; 
mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. 
Maxwell H. Scott, age 31 ; residence, Burlington; nativity, Illinois; enlisted June 
24, 1898, as corporal; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, 
Des Moines, Iowa. Albert H. Kriechbaum, age 22; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 24, 1898, as corporal; mustered July 8, 1898; mus- 
tered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Lyman E. Swain, age 22; resi- 
dence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 24, 1898, as corporal; mustered 
July 8, 1898 ; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Thomas M. 
Green, age 24 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Iowa ; enlisted June 24, 1898, as 
corporal; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, 
Iowa. John W. Hulsebus, age 22; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted 
June 25, 1898, as corporal; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 
1898, Des Moines, Iowa. John G. Raichle, age 24; residence, Burlington ; nativity, 
Germany; enlisted June 25, 1898, as corporal; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered 
out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Frank P. Martin, age 19; residence, 
Burlington ; nativity, Iowa ; enlisted June 24, 1898, as corporal ; mustered July 8, 
1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. William F. Rhea, age 
24; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 24, 1898, as corporal; 
mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. 
Harry Richards, age 22 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Iowa ; enlisted June 24, 
1898, as farrier; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des 
Moines, Iowa. Louis Micheal, age 38 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Iowa ; 
enlisted June 25, 1898, as artificer; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out Septem- 
ber 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. William M. Dailey, age 19; residence, Burling- 
ton; nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 27, 1898, as artificer; mustered July 8, 1898; 
mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. John F. Riemann, age 23 ; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 24, 1898, as saddler; mus- 
tered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. John W. 
Viers, age 21; residence, Burlington: nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 24, 1898, as 
musician; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5. 1S98, Des Moines, 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 325 

Iowa. William R. Pearson, age 22 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Iowa ; enlisted 
June 25, 1898, as musician; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 
1898, Des Moines, Iowa. John A. Stucker, age 28; residence, Pleasant Grove; 
nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 24, 1898, as wagoner; mustered July 8, 1898; mus- 
tered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. J. E. Anderson, age 23 ; resi- 
dence, West Burlington ; nativity, Sweden ; enlisted June 24, 1898 ; mustered July 
8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Robert F. Back, 
age 23 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, New York ; enlisted June 24, 1898; mus- 
tered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. James F. 
Ballard, age 21 ; residence, Burlington; nativity, Michigan; enlisted June 24, 1898; 
mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. 
Herman C. Berlin, age 22 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Iowa ; enlisted June 
24, 1898; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, 
Iowa. Charles Bohlken, age 24 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Germany ; 
enlisted June 24, 1898; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, 
Des Moines, Iowa. John A. Braucht, age 33 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, 
Illinois; enlisted June 28, 1898; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 
5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Willis Brown, age 18 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, 
Iowa; enlisted June 24, 1898; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 
1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Fred C. Bruhl, age 20; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Iowa; enlisted June 24, 1898; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 
1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Howard L. Buck, age 21; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Iowa ; enlisted June 24, 1898 ; mustered July 8, 1898 ; mustered out Sep- 
tember 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Charles A. Burch, age 23 ; residence, Bur- 
lington ; nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 24, 1898; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered 
out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Robert R. Buri, age 19 ; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 24, 1898; mustered July 8, 1898; mus- 
tered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Frank W. Campbell, age 21 ; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 24, 1898; mustered July 8, 
1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Roland Cave, age 22; 
residence, Burlington ; nativity, Canada ; enlisted June 24, 1898 ; mustered July 8, 
1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. John B. Downer, age 
21; residence, Sperry ; nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 24, 1898; mustered July 8, 
1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. John Earhart, age 21 ; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 28, 1898; mustered July 8, 
1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Edward Federspiel, 
age 21; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 24, 1898; mustered 
July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Oscar Felling, 
age 21; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 24, 1898; mustered 
July 8, 1898 ; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Michael F. 
Galvin, age 30; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 27, 1898; 
mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. 
Alfred R. Gearhart, age 19; residence, Burlington; nativity, Kansas; enlisted 
June 25, 1898; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des 
Moines, Iowa. Clarence Griffith, age 23 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Iowa ; 
enlisted June 24, 1898; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5. 1898, 
Des Moines, Iowa. Louis Head, age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; 
enlisted June 24, 1898; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, 



326 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

Des Moines, Iowa. Wilson L. Holloway, age 23 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, 
Iowa; enlisted July 7, 1898; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 
1898, Des Moines, Iowa. John J. Huddleston, age 24 ; residence, Burlington ; 
nativity, Wisconsin ; enlisted June 24, 1898; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out 
September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Andrew Koehler, age 38; residence, Bur- 
lington ; nativity, Illinois; enlisted July 7, 1898; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered 
out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Henry Krieger, age 24; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 24, 1898; mustered July 8, 1898; mus- 
tered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. William Kropp, age 21 ; resi- 
dence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted June 24, 1898; mustered July 8, 
1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Edward Kuhn, age 
26; residence, Burlington; nativity, Illinois; enlisted July 7, 1898; mustered July 
8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Theodore C. Kurtz, 
age 22; residence, Burlington; nativity, Germany; enlisted June 25, 1898; mus- 
tered July 8, 1898: promoted corporal July 15, 1898; mustered out September 5, 
1898, Des Moines, Iowa. John A. Link, age 28; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Iowa; enlisted June 24, 1898; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 
1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Dell E. Lyons, age 21 ; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Iowa; enlisted June 27, 1898; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 
1898, Des Moines, Iowa. John J. McGuire, age 19; residence, Burlington; 
nativity, Iowa ; enlisted June 24, 1898 ; mustered July 8, 1898 ; mustered out Sep- 
tember s, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. John B. Maddox, age 25 ; residence, Burling- 
ton ; nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 24, 1898; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out 
September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. John H. Martin, age 26; residence, Bur- 
lington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted July 1, 1898; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered 
out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. John Mauer, age 19; residence, Bur- 
lington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 24, 1898; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered 
out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Frank J. Mesmer, age 32 ; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 25, 1898; mustered July 8, 1898; mus- 
tered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Leo Mesmer, age 29; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 24, 1898; mustered July 8, 1898; mus- 
tered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Henry B. Miller, age 21 ; resi- 
dence, Danville; nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 24, 1898; mustered July 8, 1898; 
mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. George H. Moore, age 21 ; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 24, 1898; mustered July 8, 
1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Thomas Naven, age 
24; residence, Burlington; nativity, Illinois; enlisted July 7, 1898; mustered July 
8, 1898 ; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Ernest Neugebauer, 
age 21; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 27, 1898; mustered 
July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Edward 
Oberschelp, age 20; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 24, 1898; 
mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. 
Dennis T. O'Connor, age 34; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted July 
7, 1898; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, 
Iowa. George H. Peel, age 22 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Iowa ; enlisted 
June 24, 1898; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des 
Moines, Iowa. William F. Pennebaker, age 21 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, 
Iowa; enlisted June 24, 1898; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 327 

1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Curtis A. Peterson, age 23 ; residence, Burlington ; 
nativity, Illinois; enlisted June 24, 1898; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out 
September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Nels P. C. Peterson, age 19; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Europe; enlisted June 27, 1898; mustered July 8, 1898; 
mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Bion M. Power, age 21 ; 
residence, Burlington ; nativity, Iowa ; enlisted June 28, 1898 ; mustered July 8, 
1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Frank Randall, age 
26; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 24, 1898; mustered July 
8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. William Randall, 
age 18; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 24, 1898; mustered 
July 8, 1898 ; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Charles Rosen, 
age 27; residence, Burlington; nativity, Illinois; enlisted June 24, 1898; mustered 
July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Henry Ryder, 
age 38 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Illinois ; enlisted June 24, 1898 ; mustered 
July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Bert Sabins, 
age 22 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Iowa ; enlisted June 24, 1898 ; mustered 
July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Charles 
Sabins, age 23; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 24, 1898; 
mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. 
John R. Scales, age 35 ; residence, Mount Union ; nativity, Iowa ; enlisted June 24, 
1898; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. 
Charlie Shaul, age 21 ; residence, Burlington; nativity, Illinois; enlisted June 25, 
1898; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. 
Charles Simpkins, age 21; residence, Burlington; nativity, Illinois; enlisted June 

24, 1898; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, 
Iowa. James P. Stucker, age 22 ; residence, Pleasant Grove ; nativity, Iowa ; 
enlisted June 24, 1898; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 1898. 
Des Moines, Iowa. Waldo E. Stucker, age 27 ; residence, Pleasant Grove ; 
nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 24, 1898; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out Sep- 
tember 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Martin A. Sutter, age 23 ; residence, Bur- 
lington ; nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 25, 1898; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered 
out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Gust Swanson, age 31 ; residence, 
Burlington; nativity, Sweden; enlisted June 24, 1898; mustered July 8, 1898; 
mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Joseph Swartz, age 44; 
residence, Burlington; nativity, Ohio; enlisted June 24, 1898; mustered July 8, 
1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. William Theis, age 
21 ; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 24, 1898; mustered July 
8, 1898; discharged for disability August 2, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Joe 
Tierney, age 22; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 25, 1898; 
mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. 
Frank R. Walker, age 21 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Iowa ; enlisted June 27, 
1898; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. 
William B. Ward, age 19 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Iowa ; enlisted June 

25, 1898; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, 
Iowa. George A. Weimer, age 24 ; residence, Burlington ; nativity, Germany ; 
enlisted June 24, 1898; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, 
Des Moines, Iowa. Frank G. Woellhaf, age 21 ; residence, Burlington; nativity, 
Iowa; enlisted July 7, 1898; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 



328 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Andrew P. Youngstrom, age 26; residence, Burling- 
ton; nativity, Sweden; enlisted June 24, 1898; mustered July 8, 1898; mustered 
out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Joseph R. Zimmerman, age 27 ; resi- 
dence, Burlington; nativity, Illinois: enlisted June 24, 1898; mustered July 8, 
1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. Frank B. Zorn, age 
21; residence, Burlington; nativity, Iowa; enlisted June 25, 1898; mustered July 
8, 1898; mustered out September 5, 1898, Des Moines, Iowa. 

SOME OF THE PROMINENT MILITARY AND NAVAL HEROES OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

From and prior to the organization of the state government the sons of Des 
Moines County have won for themselves both a name and fame of which the 
people of the county justly have feelings of pride. The first of its sons, and the 
first son of Iowa who gave his life for his country's cause on a foreign battle 
field was Capt. Frederick D. Mills of Burlington. Fourteen years had only 
passed away when its sons were again called upon to help save the country. 

GEN. CHARLES L. MATTIIIES 

The subject of this sketch, a native of Germany, was born May 31, 1824. 
Died at the Union Hotel, Burlington, Iowa, October 16, 1868. Was devoted to 
his adopted country. Was both generous and liberal. He was Nature's free man. 
He loved children, although unmarried and had none of his own. Cared little for 
wealth, and was satisfied with the ordinary and simple comforts of life. When 
Mr. Lincoln issued his call for 75,000 volunteers for the suppression of the 
rebellion Mr. Matthies was the captain of a volunteer military company in Bur- 
lington. On reading the call he immediately telegraphed the President offering 
his services and that of his company to the Government. He was commissioned 
captain of Company D, First Iowa Infantry, on the 9th day of May, 1861. Was 
in the front line of the battle of Springfield and near General Lyon when he fell. 
For gallant services he was promoted to lieutenant colonel of the Fifth Iowa 
Infantry. Was afterwards commissioned brigadier general. General Rosecrans, 
in his report of the battle of Iuka says: "The glorious Fifth Iowa under the 
brave and distinguished Matthies, sustained by Boomer with part of the Twenty- 
fifth Missouri, bore the repeated charges and cross-fires of the enemy's left and 
center with a valor and determination never excelled by the most veteran sol- 
diery." General Hamilton in bis official report says: "The Fifth Iowa, under 
the brave and accomplished Matthies, held its ground against four times its 
numbers, making their desperate charges with the bayonet, driving back the foe 
in disorder each time." 

JACOB GARTER LAUMAN 

Tacob Garter Lauman, a resident and citizen of Burlington, on the call of the 
President for volunteers, was commissioned colonel of the Seventh Iowa Infantry. 
In times of danger he was cool and brave, was a born soldier. He exhibited this 
quality of manhood in the first battle in which bis regiment was engaged, Bel- 
mont, where he was wounded. It can be said, through his bravery and self- 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 329 

control, he saved the day at this battle. Was commissioned brigadier general for 
gallant services rendered his country. While sons of Des Moines County have 
become distinguished for the services rendered their country in the army, there 
are those who have won for themselves a name and the gratitude of the nation 
for distinguished services in the navy. 

JOHN M. CORSE 

There were few men in the volunteer service of the army who rose more 
rapidly than John M. Corse, a resident of Burlington. His father, John L. 
Corse, was one of the early settlers in the city where young Corse spent his 
boyhood days and received his' early education. 

When Mr. Lincoln issued his call for 400,000 volunteers, Mr. Corse offered 
his services to his country. He took an active part in providing enlistments in 
the volunteer service. When the Sixth Iowa Infantry Volunteers was organized 
he was commissioned major on July 6, 1861. After the regiment had gone 
south and seen some service, he was promoted colonel of the regiment on the 
21st of May, 1862. 

Colonel Corse was a great disciplinarian, and it was principally through his 
efforts as the commander of the regiment it became recognized one of the best 
drilled regiments in the service. 

For distinguished services he was commissioned brigadier general on August 
11, 1863. It was because of the valor displayed by those veterans under his 
command Allatoona Pass was held with a force of about fifteen hundred against 
assaults made by 7,000 of the enemy. 

On October 5, 1864, he was promoted major general. 

The people of Burlington and Des Moines County have erected in Crapo 
Park his equestrian statue. 

GEORGE GARTNER REMEY 

The people of the county rightfully have feelings of admiration and respect 
for the subject of this sketch. George Collier Remey was born in Burlington, 
August 4, 1841. His father was one of the early settlers of the county, having 
come to Burlington in April, 1837. George C. Remey attended the schools of 
the city and graduated at the Burlington University, and at his graduation was 
awarded the medal for proficiency in his studies. Through Gen. A. C. Dodge, 
he received an appointment to a cadetship at the naval academy at Annapolis, 
when fourteen years of age. He graduated in the class of 1859 when eighteen 
years of age. At the commencement of the Civil war he was in China aboard 
warship on what is called in naval parlance the "firing line." Was on the U. S. 
Hartford for a time at the beginning of the war and engaged in the blockade 
service. Had command of a naval battery on Morris Island, S. C, for a time. 
A night attack was made on Fort Sumter, then in the possession of the enemy. 
The attack was made only by those who would volunteer and take the risk, and 
was not commanded by those in charge, on account of the great hazard of the 
undertaking. In this assault, George C. Remey, then twenty-two years of age, 
was taken prisoner and continued to be a captive of the enemy for fourteen 



330 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

months. Part of this time he was in Libby Prison, the balance in the jail at 
Columbia, S. C. Was released on parole, and a few months later was exchanged. 
After being exchanged, he went back into active service, and continued in it until 
the close of the war, and is still connected with the navy. He was promoted to a 
lieutenancy in August, 1861. Afterwards was promoted to lieutenant commander. 
From that to a captaincy and in the regular order of promotion to that of admiral. 
In the early '70s he had charge of a surveying expedition for what was known 
as the Tehuantepec Canal Route. He reported the route feasible, but the cost 
of construction would be too great. 

WILLIAM B. REMEY 

Brother of George C. Remey, was born in Burlington in 1842. Died in Wash- 
ington, D. C, 1895. Was for a time connected with one of the departments of 
the Government in Washington, and while there studied law and was admitted to 
the practice. Soon after the breaking out of the Civil war, he entered the marine 
service of the United States. Had command of the marine guards on the U. S. 
Vanderbilt, a ship which Cornelius Vanderbilt had purchased and fitted as a war 
vessel, which he gave to the Government. Was present at the time and saw the 
battle between the Monitor and the Merrimac. Because of his legal ability 
was made judge advocate with office at Washington. He held the office at the 
time of his decease. 

EDWARD W. REMEY 

Was born in Burlington, Iowa, in 1846. Like his brothers, his life was a 
sea life. Received his primary education in the schools of Burlington. When 
sixteen years of age he was through James W. Grimes appointed to a cadetship 
at Annapolis, U. S. Military Academy, where he graduated in the class of 1866. 
Never was a midshipman, but was commissioned a lieutenant on account of 
having seen service during the war. He was a practical sailor and loved that 
life. His nature was such he had great influence with sailors. He died at sea 
in 188;. 




HON. I. < . HALL 
Firs! Judge of Supreme Court from IVs Moines County 



CHAPTER XVIII 
JUDICIAL DISTRICTS AND JUDGES AND OTHER OFFICES 

MICHIGAN TERRITORY 

In the year 1834 the territory north of Missouri and west of the Mississippi 
was attached to the Territory of Michigan for judicial purposes, and that part 
now comprising Iowa was divided into two counties, Des Moines and Dubuque. 
That part south of Rock Island to the mouth of the Des Moines River and fifty 
miles west of the Mississippi composed Des Moines County. As directed by 
the governor of Michigan, Dr. William R. Ross gave notice of an election to be 
held in the fall of 1834. At this election Col. William Morgan was chosen chief 
justice, George L. Hughes and Henry Walker assistant judges. At this election 
John King of Dubuque was elected one of the judges. The first court held in 
old Des Moines County, Michigan Territory, convened in the Town of Burling- 
ton, in a log house situated on North Hill, on lot No. — , original city. The 
judges presiding were William Morgan and George L. Hughes, who continued 
to hold office till the next election, which occurred in the fall of 1835. The first 
court held in Des Moines County convened on the 13th day of April, 1835, at 
the place above stated. Present, William Morgan and George L. Hughes, judges. 
At the fall election of 1835 were elected Isaac Leffler, Arthur Inghram and 
Henry Walker, judges. They entered upon the discharge of their duties on the 
nth of April, 1836, at which time they held a session of court in Burlington. 
William R. Ross was the clerk. 

WISCONSIN TERRITORY 

The bill creating Wisconsin Territory was approved April 20, 1836, just one 
week after Leffler, Inghram and Walker, judges, had entered upon the discharge 
of the duties of their offices. Upon the organization of Wisconsin Territory, 
Gen. Henry Dodge was appointed its governor by President Jackson. The act 
of organization provided that the Legislative Assembly consist of a Council and 
House of Representatives, the Council to consist of thirteen members, whose 
term of office was fixed at four years, and the House to consist of twenty-six 
members, whose term of office was fixed at two years. The act also provided 
for calling of an election at such times and places as determined by the gov- 
ernor, but before the calling of an election a census of the territory be taken in 
order to apportion the number of representatives to each district. The first ses- 
sion of court held in old Des Moines County during the Wisconsin territorial 
existence convened at Burlington on the 3d of April, 1837. Hon. David Irwin, 

331 



332 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

judge of the Second Judicial District and associate justice of the Supreme Court 
of Wisconsin, presided ; William R. Ross, clerk, and Francis Gehorn, marshal. 
But we want to know what became of Justices Leffler, Inghram and Walker. 
The record shows that the last session which they held terminated on the iCth 
of April, 1836, just four days before Michigan Territory ceased to exist and 
Wisconsin Territory took its place. The organic act of Wisconsin failed to 
make provision for the holding over of the judges of Michigan Territory, but, 
on the contrary, provided that suits pending in the Michigan territorial courts 
be transferred and tried by the courts herein established. The result was. no 
district courts were held from the 16th of April, 1836, to the 8th of April, 1837, 
in Des Moines County. This was one of the reasons which led to the memorial 
we have set forth, asking that that part of Wisconsin Territory west of the 
Mississippi River be organized into a separate territory, which was accomplished 
June 12, 1838. 

IOWA TERRITORY 

The law organizing Iowa Territory, June 12, 1838, provided that the gov- 
ernor shall nominate, and, by the advice and consent of the Legislative Council, 
"shall appoint all judicial officers, justices of the peace, sheriffs," etc. That the 
judicial power shall be vested in a Supreme Court, District Court and in justices 
of the peace. It provided for the division of the territory into three judicial 
districts, and a District Court to be held in each district by one of the judges, 
the judges of the District courts to constitute the Supreme Court. The Leg- 
islative Assembly of Wisconsin Territory on the 19th of January, 1838, passed 
an act entitled, "An act to amend an act concerning the Supreme and District 
courts, and defining their powers and duties and the commencement of actions 
in the District courts." This act was repealed by an act of the General Assembly 
of Iowa Territory, December 14, 1838. On November 28, 1838, the Legislative 
Assembly of Iowa Territory passed an act by which the Supreme Court of Iowa 
Territory was to be held at Burlington on the 28th of November, 1838, the date 
of the approval of the act. The Legislative Assembly on January 25, 1839, 
passed an act fixing the times of the Supreme and District courts and for other 
purposes. By the eighth section of the act the counties of Des Moines, Lee, 
Henry and Van Buren were to comprise the First Judicial District ; the counties 
of Louisa, Muscatine, Cedar, Johnson and Slaughter (Washington) to consti- 
tute the Second Judicial District ; the counties of Jackson, Dubuque, Scott and 
Clayton to constitute the Third Judicial District. The governor had appointed 
Hon. Charles Mason chief justice of the Supreme Court, Joshua Williams and 
Thomas S. Wilson associate justices. Judge Mason was assigned to the First 
District, Joseph Williams to the Second and Thomas S. Wilson to the Third. 
For judicial purposes Lynn County was attached to Johnson County, Jones to 
Cedar and Clinton to Scott. At this time we had thirteen counties with three 
judges to do the work. From November, 1838, to January 10, 1842, Burlington 
was the place at which sessions of the Supreme Court were held. The Territorial 
Legislature on the 10th of February, 1842, passed an act which provided. "The 
Supreme Court should have and exercise appellate jurisdiction only, and shall 
have final and conclusive jurisdiction in all cases wherein the rules of law or 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 



333 



equity prevail " The first session of the District Court of Des Moines County, 
Iowa Territory, convened at Burlington, November 26, 1838, the Hon. Thomas 
S. Wilson, associate justice, presiding; John S. Dunlap, clerk ; Alfred Rich, pros- 
ecuting attorney. 



STATE OF IOWA 



The constitution of Iowa provided: "The judicial power shall be vested in a 
Supreme Court, District Court and such other inferior courts as the General 
Assembly may from time to time establish. The Supreme Court to consist of a 
chief justice and two associate justices." One of the first acts of the State 
General Assembly was to divide the state into four judicial districts-First Dis- 
trict the counties of Lee, Des Moines. Louisa and Washington. This act went 

into' force February 4. i847- The above named COimtieS constituted the Flrst 
Judicial District until January 22, 1853, when the governor approved an act 
which provided that the counties of Lee, Des Moines, Louisa and Henry "shall 
constitute the First Judicial District." The Legislature on April 3, 1868, passed 
an act establishing the Circuit Court and a General Term Court, and defined 
the powers of the same. The Circuit Court was abolished by an act of the Leg- 
islature approved April 10, 1886. The act abolishing the Circuit Court enlarged 
the powers and jurisdiction of the District Court by giving it jurisdiction over 
all probate matters. By the provisions of the act there was a general reorganiza- 
tion of the judicial districts of the state. This act provided that the First Judicial 
District shall consist of the counties of Lee and Des Moines. Henry County 
was attached to the Second District and Louisa to the Sixth. Des Moines County 
remained in the First District until 1896, when the General Assembly passed an 
act which provided the counties of Des Moines, Henry and Louisa constitute 
the Twentieth Judicial District. 

JUDGES OF THE FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF IOWA WHO HAVE HELD COURT IN 

DES MOINES COUNTY : 

Name— Residence Ter ™ 

George W. Williams Lee County a s^ 

Ralph P. Lowe Keokuk, Lee County 1852-1857 

Thomas H. Clagett Keokuk, Lee County 1857- 

Francis Springer Columbus City, Louisa County ^f ^ 9 

Joshua Tracy Burlington, Des Moines County 1869-1874 

P Henry Smyth - . . Burlington, Des Moines County 1874- 

Thomas W. Newman Burlington, Des Moines County 187 4- 1«7« 

Abraham H. Stutsman Burlington, Des Moines County ^'f 6 

Charles H. Phelps Burlington, Des Moines County 'fj' 1 ^ 

Joseph M. Casey Fort Madison, Lee County 1887-1895 

Alvin M. McCrary Keokuk, Lee County i§95- 

James D. Smyth Burlington, Des Moines County 1891-1897 



334 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

TWENTIETH JUDICIAL DISTRICT 

Name — Residence Term 

James D. Smyth Burlington, Des Moines County 1S97- 

Winfield S. Withrow Mount Pleasant, Henry County 1896-1913 

Oscar Hale Wapello, Louisa County l 9 l 3~ 

P. Henry Smyth served but a short time when he resigned and Thomas W. 
Newman was appointed to fill the vacancy. 

Winfield S. Withrow was appointed associate justice of the Supreme Court 
and Oscar Hale appointed to till vacancy. 

PROBATE COURT 

During the Michigan, Wisconsin and Iowa territorial existence of Iowa there 
existed what was called a Probate Court. This court had jurisdiction of the 
probate of wills of deceased persons and the settlement of their estates. The 
Legislative Assembly of Iowa Territory passed an act of date January 25, 1839, 
specifically defining the mode of procedure in the Probate Court and the admin- 
istration and settlement of decedent's estates. By this act a widow in all cases 
was allowed one bed and bedding, the wearing apparel of herself and family, 
one milk cow and calf, her saddle and bridle, one horse, household and kitchen 
furniture sufficient for herself and family, and provisions for the same for one 
year. If the deceased husband did not have any of the above articles and left 
other property, then she was entitled to the money value of a cow and calf, etc. 
The title of the property of the deceased dying intestate descended in equal 
shares to his children, the share of a deceased child going to his children. No 
distinction was made between the whole and half blood, but in all cases the fee 
title was subject to the common law of dower in the widow, and if the deceased 
a wife, then he took his courtesy as at common law. When a will gave the widow 
a certain portion of property, either real or personal, even if the will failed to 
state it was given in lieu of dower, she took in lieu of dower unless within six 
months she executed a written instrument and delivered it to the probate judge 
renouncing the provisions for her benefit made in the will. The Legislative 
Assembly of Iowa Territory passed an act of date February 13, [843, which 
provided, a person dying intestate, his property shall descend as follows : First, 
in equal shares to his children and to the issue of any deceased child by right of 
representation. Second, if he leave no issue, then to his father. Third, if he 
have no issue, nor father, his estate shall be divided equally among his brothers 
and sisters, and to the children of any brother or sister, and to the children of 
any brother or sister by right of representation; provided, if he have a mother 
she will take an equal share with his brothers and sisters. Fourth, if he shall 
have no issue, no father, and no brother or sister, his estate shall descend to his 
mother to the exclusion of any issue, if any, of deceased brothers or sisters. 
Fifth, if he have no issue, and no father, mother, brother or sister, his estate 
descends to his next of kin in equal degree. Sixth, if any person shall die, leav- 
ing several children, or having one child, and the issue of one or more others, 
and any such living child shall die under age and not having been married, all 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 335 

the estate that came to the deceased child by inheritance from such deceased 
parent shall descend in equal shares to the other children of the same parent, 
and to the issue of any such other children who shall have died, by right of rep- 
resentation. Seventh, if at the death of such child, who shall die under age 
and not having been married, all the other children of his said parent shall also 
be dead, and any of the same shall have left issue, the estate that came to said 
child by inheritance from his said parent shall descend to all the issue of the 
other children of the same parent, and if all the said issue are in the same degree 
of kindred to the said child, they shall share the said estate equally, otherwise 
they shall take according to the right of representation. Eighth, if the intestate 
leave no kindred, his estate shall escheat to the people of the territory or state. 

Section 2. Every illegitimate child shall be considered as heir of his mother, 
and shall inherit her estate in whole or in part, as the case may be, in like man- 
ner as if he had been born in lawful wedlock, but he shall not be allowed to 
claim, as representing his mother, any part of the estate of any of her kindred, 
either lineal or collateral. 

If any illegitimate child shall die intestate, without lawful issue, his estate 
shall descend to his mother, except as follows: When, after the birth of an 
illegitimate child, his parents shall intermarry, and his father shall, after the 
marriage, acknowledge him as his child, such child shall be considered as legiti- 
mate. The act provided, "Nothing contained in this chapter shall affect the title 
of the husband as tenant by the courtesy, nor that of a widow as tenant in dower." 

The code of 1851 took effect July 1, 1851. Under the head, "The disposition 
of real property," it was provided, "One third in value of all the real estate in 
which the husband at any time during the marriage had a legal or equitable 
interest, which had not been sold on execution, etc., or to which she had not 
made relinquishment of her rights, shall under the direction of the court be set 
apart by the executor as her property in fee simple upon the death of the hus- 
band if she survive him." This act provided the widow's dower could not be 
affected by any will of the husband if she objects thereto and relinquishes all 
the rights conferred upon her by the will. The remaining estate, in the absence 
of any will, descended in equal shares to his children. If one of his children 
be dead, the heirs of such child inherit by right of representation. If the intestate 
leave no issue, the one-half of his estate (including the dower of his wife) shall 
go to his father and the other half to his wife, and if he leave no wife nor issue, 
the whole shall go to his father. If his father be previously dead, the portion 
which would have fallen to his share shall be disposed of in the same manner 
as though he had outlived the intestate and died in the ownership of the portion 
falling to his share, and so on through each ascending ancestor and his issue 
unless heirs are sooner found. If heirs are not found in the male line, the por- 
tion thus uninherited shall go to the mother of the intestate, and to her heirs, 
following the same rules as above described. If heirs are not thus found, the 
portion uninherited shall go to the wife of the intestate, or to her heirs if dead, 
according to like rules ; and if he has had more than one wife, who either died 
or survived in lawful wedlock, it shall be equally divided between the one living 
and the heirs of those who are dead, such heirs taking by the right of repre- 
sentation. If there remain property uninherited, it shall escheat to the state. 
Illegitimate children inherit from the mother and the mother from the children. 



336 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

All the provisions made in relation to the widow of a deceased husband shall 
be applicable to the husband of a deceased wife. The estate of courtesy was 
abolished. 

The General Assembly passed an act which took effect July i, 1853, which 
repealed the provisions of the code of 1851 in reference to the widow's share 
in her deceased husband's estate, and in lieu thereof provided, "One-third in 
value of all the real estate in which the husband at any time during the mar- 
riage had a legal or equitable interest, and to which the wife had made no relin- 
quishment of her rights, shall under the direction of the court be set apart by 
the executor as her property in dower upon the death of the husband. Said 
estate in dower to be and remain the same as at common law." 

The Ninth General Assembly passed an act which was approved April 8. 
1862, which took effect April 18, 1862, repealing the act of July 1, 1853, an d ' n 
lieu thereof provided, "One-third in value of all the real estate in which the hus- 
band had a legal or equitable interest at the time of his death to which she had 
not made any relinquishment of her rights shall be set apart to her in fee simple." 
The provisions of the Ninth General Assembly in reference to the widow's share 
in her deceased husband's estate were so enacted by the code of 1873, the hus- 
band having the same share in his deceased wife's estate. Dower and courtesy 
at common law abolished. The law thus remains at the present time. 

I have gone into the history of legislation on this matter as much as space 
will permit. I did so for the reason the subject is one of the greatest importance 
and with which so few people are familiar. 

JUDGES OF PROBATE COURTS OF DES MOINES COUNTY DURING TERRITORIAL EXISTENCE 

Michigan Territory 

John Whittaker, first term commenced April 19, 1835. Judge Whittaker con- 
tinued to act until February 13, 1837. 

Wisconsin Territory 

Robert Cock, judge, held first term February 13, 1837, and continued to dis- 
charge the duties of his office until May, 1838. 

Iowa Territory and Iowa State 

Robert Cock, from May, 1838, until 1840. 

Charles Madera held first term November 7, 1840, and continued to act until 
1842. 

John W. Webber had been elected and held his first term, commencing August 
30, 1842. His successor was O. H. YV. Stull, who was elected in 1846. Judge 
Stull's successor was J. P. Wightman, who held his first term of court com- 
mencing August 10. 1847. Judge Wightman continued to hold the office until 
Hon. Charles Mason was elected county judge. 

What is known as the code of 1851 went into effect July 1, 1851. Judge 
Mason was elected at the August election, 1851, and entered upon the duties of 
his office September 10, 1851. Judge Mason was succeeded by Hon. O. C. 







DI'.S MOINES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, BURLINGTON 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 337 

Wightman in 1852, who was succeeded by Hon. T. W. Newman in 1855. Judge 
Newman was succeeded by Hon. O. C. Wightman in 1857. Judge Wightman 
was succeeded by Judge H. C. Ohrt in 1861. In 1865 Hon. J. C. Power was 
elected county judge and continued to hold the office until 1868, when Emery 
S. Huston was elected and continued to hold the office until the abolishment of 
the Circuit Court in 1869. 

JUDGES OF CIRCUIT COURT, FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT 

Name — ■ Residence Term 

John C. Power Burlington, Des Moines County, second circuit. 1869-1872 

Charles H. Phelps Burlington, Des Moines County, second circuit. 1878-1880 

John B. Drayer Mount Pleasant, Henry County, first circuit. . . 1869-1872 

John B. Drayer Mount Pleasant, Henry County 1873-1876 

John B. Drayer Mount Pleasant, Henry County, first circuit. . . 1878-1890 

The First Judicial District was divided, the counties of Louisa and Des 
Moines constituting the second circuit and Henry and Lee the first circuit. 

JUDGES OF SUPREME COURT OF IOWA FROM DES MOINES COUNTY 

Name — Residence Term 

Charles Mason Burlington, Des Moines County 1847- 

Jonathan C. Hall Burlington, Des Moines County 1854-1855 

Lacon D. Stockton Burlington, Des Moines County 1856-1860 

PROSECUTING ATTORNEYS OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

Name — Residence Term 

W. W. Chapman Burlington, Des Moines County ^35- 

J. B. Teas Burlington, Des Moines County 1835- 

W. W. Chapman Burlington, Des Moines County 1836-1838 

Alfred Rich Burlington, Des Moines County 1838-1841 

William H. Starr Burlington, Des Moines County 1841-1842 

H. T. Reid Burlington, Des Moines County 1842-1843 

L. D. Stocton Burlington, Des Moines County 1843-1846 

J. C. Hall 1847- 

James W. Woods 1848-1852 

David Rorer 1852-1854 

Charles H. Phelps 1854- 

C. Ben Darwin 1855- 

Charles H. Phelps 1856-1858 

In 1858 the office became a district one until 1887. 

PROSECUTING ATTORNEYS, FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT 

Name — Residence Term 

Joshua Tracey Des Moines County 1860-1869 

George B. Corkhill Henry County 1869-1870 

D. N. Sprague Lee County 1870-1878 

T. A. Beneman Henry County 1878-1882 

D. N. Sprague Lee County 1882-1887 

voi.r -22 



338 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 



COUNTY ATTORNEYS 



Name — Term 

C. J. Dodge 1887-1^ 

James D. Smyth 1889-1891 

George S. Tracy 1891-1899 

C. C. Clark 1899- 1902 



Name — Term 

W. W. Dodge 1902-1904 

Frank E. Thompson 1904- 1907 

H. F. Kuhlemeier 1907-1913 

George E. Hill 1913-1915 



CLERKS, DISTRICT COURT 

Michigan Territory 
William R. Ross, April 13, 1835- 1837. 

Wisconsin Territory 

William R. Ross, April 3, 1837-1838. 

John S. Dunlap, appointed clerk, June term, 1838. 

Iowa Territory 



Name — Term 

John S. Dunlap 1838-1847 

John S. Dunlap 1847-1850 

Oliver Cock 1850-1852 

Oliver C. Wightman 1852-1860 

John Lahee 1860-1864 



Name — Term 

William Garrett 1864-1874 

T. G. Foster. 1874-1883 

C. P. DeHass 1883-1889 

W. D. Inghram 1889-1900 

C. E. Demling 1900-1915 



SHERIFFS AND MARSHALS 

Michigan Territory 
Solomon Perkins, 1834 to June 20, 1836. 

Wisconsin Territory 

First session, April 3, 1837; Francis Gehorn, marshal. 
Second session, June 2, 1838. 

Iowa Territory 



First session, November 26, 1838. 

Name — Term 

James Cameron 1840-1846 

J. H. McKemey 1846-1850 

Anthony W. Carpenter 1850- 1853 

Edward H. Ives 1853-1S57 

William Garrett 1 857-1861 

Allen J. Hillhouse 1861-1865 

Martin Heisey 1865-1867 

Alexander S. Perry 1867- 1872 

James H. Latty 1872-1874 



Name — Term 

William Shaffner 1874-1880 

Mathew Ronaldson 1880-1882 

George Smith 1882-1887 

George Kriechbaum 1887-1892 

Samuel B. Hunt 1892-1901 

William A. Muenzemeyer. . .1901-1903 

Jacob Williams 1903-1911 

C. G. Earnest 1911-1915 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 339 

commissioners' court 

The Legislative Assembly of Iowa Territory passed an act December 14, 
1838, providing for the election of county commissioners and prescribing their 
powers and duties. By the terms of the act it had all the powers heretofore 
given to the County Board of Supervisors. However, prior to this enactment, 
and while Iowa was a part of Wisconsin Territory, there existed by virtue of 
law a board of commissioners. The board had the administration of county 
affairs, the allowance of claims, levy of taxes, etc. Appeals were allowed from 
its findings to the District Court. When first organized Gen. George W. Hight 
and Jonathan Morgan constituted its members. The Legislative Assembly of 
Iowa, on January 25, 1839, passed an act which entitled Des Moines County to 
three commissioners — one to be selected from the north of Flint Creek, one from 
the south of the same and one from Burlington. Under the act George W. Hight, 
John D. Wright and Richard Land were elected commissioners. 

The following persons constituted the board in 1840, at the October session: 
John D. Wright, George W. Hight and Jonathan Morgan. In 1841 the board 
was composed of Levi Scott, Jonathan Morgan and George W. Hight. 

The October, 1841, session of the board consisted of George W. Hight, Jon- 
athan Morgan and Jeremiah Larieson. 

For the year 1842 Jonathan Morgan, William Edmundson and Luke Palmer 
composed the board. 

Jonathan Morgan, John Ripley and Luke Palmer constituted the board for 

1843- 

John Ripley, M. W. Robinson and Luke Palmer composed it for 1844. 

At the October session in 1844 Luke Palmer, M. W. Robinson and Gordon 
McCauley composed the board. 

In 1845 Gordon McCauley, M. W. Robinson and Daniel Haskell composed 
the board. 

The same persons constituted the board in 1846 as in 1845. 

Daniel Haskell, M. W. Robinson and B. W. Clark composed it in 1847. 

M. W. Robinson, B. W. Clark and William F. Coolbaugh constituted it in 
1848. 

B. W. Clark, William F. Coolbaugh and Levi Hagar in 1849. 

Levi Hagar and William C. Hackett constituted it in 1850. 

COUNTY JUDGES 

By virtue of the provisions of Chapter XV, Code 1851, there was established 
what is known as a "County Court." It provided for the election of each county 
at the following August election a county judge to hold the office for a term 
of three years. He was required to keep his office at the county seat and to 
keep it open for business at all usual times, and was made the keeper of the 
"County Seal." He was invested with all the powers which the county com- 
missioners possessed and in addition thereto, was made judge of probate. He 
had the managing of all county business. To audit all claims of money against 
the county, to audit and settle the accounts of the treasurer, etc. Had all the 
powers which the board of supervisors now possess, and in addition thereto, 



340 HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 

acted as a County Court which held regular sessions on the first Monday of 
each month, except the months of April and August. Had jurisdiction of the 
probate of wills, the administration of estates of decedents, and the guardian- 
ship of minors and insane persons. The right of appeal existed from all judg- 
ments, decrees and decisions of the County Court to the District Court 
on matters affecting the rights or interests of individuals as distinguished from 
the public ; including immediate orders involving the merits and necessarily affect- 
ing the decree or decision. When first organized the clerk of the District Court 
was ex-officio clerk of the County Court. It is questionable if anything has been 
devised the better to take its place. 

The first judge of the County Court of Des Moines County, Iowa, 
was Hon. Charles Mason, a man who was distinguished for his learning, high 
sense of duty and was eminent as lawyer and judge, having served as district 
judge and chief justice of the Supreme Court during the territorial existence 
of Iowa, as well as when a state. He entered upon the discharge of his duties 
as judge of the County Court, September i, 185 1. O. C. Wightman was the 
first clerk of this court. In the absence of Judge Mason, David Rorer, prose 
cuting attorney, acted in his place. 

O. C. Wightman was elected county judge at the August election in 1852, 
and held the office until 1855 when Thomas W. Newman was elected. 

Judge Newman held the office until 1857 when O. C. Wightman was elected. 

In 1861 there was established in the place of the County Court, the 

SUPERVISOR SYSTEM 

This system was the worst of all that could be inflicted on a people. Every 
township in the county elected its representative on the board. The board con- 
sisted of fourteen members, to do what three persons could far better perform. 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 1 86 1 

Thomas Hedge, Burlington. J. P. Sunderland, Burlington. 

John Sawyer, Augusta. Alex W. Gordon, Benton. 

S. Hibard, Danville. G. W. Smith, Franklin. 

G. W. Marchand, Flint River. J. S. Dolbie, Huron 

James Bruce, Yellow Springs. Samuel Packwood, Pleasant Grove. 

Franklin M. Cox, Union. Edward Enkee, Washington. 

Charles M. Garman, Jackson. Franklin Wilcox was elected chairman. 

The writer was personally acquainted with all the above named persons, 
with the exception of three of them, and can say that they constituted a body 
of representative men in the several townships and the county. 

BOARD, 1862 

James Bruce, chairman. L. Leforge. 

Edward Enkee. H. W. McCornic. 

A. W. Gordon. Samuel Packwood. 

C. M. Garman. J. C. Rankin. 

Thomas Hedge. John Sawyer. 

C. Hughes. J. P. Sunderland. 
S. Hibard. 



HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY 341 

1863— James Bruce, chairman; L. Leforge, Thomas Hedge, John Sawyer, 
S. Hibard, S. Packvvood, C. Hughes, H. W. McCormick, C. Garman, C. H. 
Snelson, John Penney, T. L. Parsons and S. D. Coonrod. 1864— John Penney, 
chairman; W. H. Cartwright, J. Clark, S. D. Coonrod, M. Gladden, C. Hughes, 
L. Leforge, H. W. McCormick, W. D. McCash, T. L. Parsons, John Sawyer, 
C. H. Snelson, M. C. Long. 1865 — William D. McCash, ch