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Full text of "History of the Disciples of Christ in Illinois, 1819-1914"

"LI B R.AR.Y 

OF THE 
UNIVERSITY 

OF ILLINOIS 

From the Library of 

Dr. R. E. Hieronymus 
1942 



2.89.JL 
H33h 
cop. 2 



ILUNOiS HISTORICAL SURYflf 



HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES 
OF CHRIST IN ILLINOIS 



1 8 1 91 914 



By 
NATHANIEL S. HAYNES, A.M. 

Author of "Jesus as a Controversialist" 




CINCINNATI 
The Standard Publishing Company 



Copyright, 1915 
By Nathaniel S. Haynes 



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DEDICATION 

To those men and women, few but true, who hold 
tender and grateful memories of our glorious heroes of the 
LONG AGO, who are yet forceful factors in the MIGHTY 
NOW, who are inspired by the splendid vision of the 
BETTER TIME TO COME to those elect remnants of 
the LORD, my faithful and glad fellow-helpers in this labor 
of love, with sincere appreciation, I dedicate this book. 

N. S. HAYNES. 

Decatur, Illinois, March 7, 1914. 



CONTENTS 



FACE 

FOREWORD 9 

CHAPTER I. 
THE DISCIPLES OF CHRIST THEIR PLACE AND PLEA 13 

CHAPTER II. 
BEGINNINGS IN ILLINOIS 20 

CHAPTER HI. 
CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 33 

CHAPTER IV. 
THE PERIOD OF CONQUEST THE ERA OF PUBLIC DISCUSSIONS 68 

CHAPTER V. 
BENEVOLENCES 88 

CHAPTER VI. 
LOCAL CHURCHES AND SOME OF THEIR ORGANIZED ACTIVITIES 109 

CHAPTER VII. 
BIOGRAPHIES 461 

CHAPTER VIII. 

MISCELLANEA 640 

5 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 



J. W. Allen 589 

John C. Ashley 564 

Atlanta Church 298 

Allison Prairie Church 
Brotherhood ....Frontispiece 

Mrs. C. C. Babcock 464 

Col. E. D. Baker 517 

Barney's Prairie Church and 

Site 415 

W. F. Black 633 

Bloomington, First Church.. 281 
Bloomington, Centennial 

Church 281 

Bloomington, Second Church. 281 

Walter P. Bowles 603 

F.. M. Bowman 106 

Clark Braden 633 

Mrs. O. A. Burgess 103 

J. G. Campbell 517 

Carbondale Church 367 

Champaign Church 130 

Charleston Church 130 

Chicago, Englewood Church. 150 
Chicago, Jacksonville Boule- 
vard Church 150 

Chicago, Memorial Church... 150 
Chicago, Metropolitan Church 150 

John J. Cosat 517 

Mrs. Persis L. Christian 103 

Mrs. S. J. Crawford 103 



Danville, First Church 407 

Danville, Second Church 407 

Danville, Third Church 407 

Danville, Fourth Church 407 

F. W. Darst 106 

Miss Annie E. Davidson 103 

Decatur, Central Church 298 

Decatur, First Church 298 

Decatur, First Courthouse... 347 

Miss Elmira J. Dickinson 103 

Daniel W. Ellege 630 

John England 550 

Eureka College 33 

Eureka Church 415 

J H. Gilliland 517 

J. R. Golden 461 

Thomas Goodman 603 

N. S. Haynes 464 

Bushrod W. Henry 564 

R. E. Henry 461 

T. T. Holton 589 

Joseph Hostetler 464 

D. R. Howe 630 

C. J. Hudson 106 

Jacksonville Church 298 

A. J. Kane 550 

W. P. Keeler 106 

S. S. Lappin 564 

Mrs. Catherine V. Lindsay... 103 

Long Point Church 347 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 



Macomb Church 130 

Wm. T. Major 564 

Map of Chicago Churches... 109 

Map of Illinois Churches 109 

J. B. McCorkle 570 

D. D. Miller 550 

G. W. Minier 570 

Mt. Pleasant Church 347 

M. O. Naramore 106 

Normal Church 281 

A. D. Northcutt 464 

Paris Church 367 

Pine Creek Church 347 

Pontiac Church 415 

Mrs. Lura V. Porter 103 

E. J. Radford 589 

James Robeson 570 

Rockford Church.. . 367 



Rock Island Church 367 

Wm. B. Ryan 464 

Chas. Reign Scoville 633 

J. W. Sconce 570 

Dr. John Scott 630 

C. W. Sherwood 603 

E. M. Smith 461 

Springfield, First Church 130 

O. W. Stewart 589 

J. S. Swaford 106 

The Sweeney Family 616 

R. F. Thrapp 461 

John W. Tyler 550 

J. G. Waggoner 630 

H. L. Willett 633 

E. B. Witmer 106 

John Yager 603 

S. H. Zendt.. . 461 



FOREWORD 

At the annual meeting of the Illinois Christian Missionary 
Society in Danville, September, 1911, Min. R. F. Thrapp 
introduced a resolution directing its State Board to appoint 
a committee of three to select a competent man to write the 
history of the Disciples of Christ in Illinois. Mins. R. F. 
Thrapp, J. R. Golden and R. E. Henry were constituted 
such committee. In November following they arranged 
with Min. N. S. Haynes to do this work. Upon the removal 
of Mr. Thrapp from the State, Min. S. H. Zendt was 
appointed to fill the vacancy, and upon the removal of Mr. 
Golden, Min. E. M. Smith was chosen to succeed him. 

The task of writing the history has proved to be more 
protracted and far more laborious than was anticipated. 
The chief difficulty was in securing the materials. Nearly 
all of the pioneers were dead. The records of many of the 
older congregations had nearly disappeared. But the main 
hindrance was the lack of appreciation by very many of such 
a volume and their consequent indifference to its preparation. 
Among a minority of willing and faithful helpers justice 
requires this grateful recognition of the assistance of Min. 
T. T. Holton and Prof. B. J. Radford. A decade ago Mr. 
Holton thought to write the biographies of the pioneer 
Christian preachers of Illinois. All the material he for- 
tunately secured at that time he graciously turned over to 
the author. Without his assistance it would have been 
impossible to make this volume what it is. 

A goodly number of the earliest churches of Christ in 
the State grew out of a reformatory movement that pre- 
ceded our own. These people were widely known as "New 
Lights." But, since they now disclaim this name, they are 



10 FOREWORD 

throughout this work referred to as the "Christian Denom- 
ination" their accepted name. 

In speaking of those who serve in the high calling of 
the Christian ministry designations more Scriptural are 
employed. In this work preachers are not called "elders," 
but ministers. Some ministers are elders, but all can not be ; 
hence, as a general designation, it is wrong. Besides, there 
is no perceptible or special affinity between the Disciples of 
Christ and the Seventh-day Adventists, or the Latter-day 
Saints, that should lead to the general designation of our 
ministers as "elders." A true preacher is a servant of 
Christ, and this relation and its consequent obligations are 
Scripturally expressed by the word "minister." If an abbre- 
viation is needed, "Min." is easily written and is so used 
herein. Nor are preachers termed "clergymen," since the 
Spirit calls the Lord's "flock" his clergy or inheritance. The 
title "Reverend" and its contraction "Rev." are also avoided. 
By the mouth of David the Lord says "his name is holy 
and reverend," and it is not befitting that we so denote our- 
selves. If this title, which has become in recent years, so 
glibly prevalent among the Disciples of Christ, is to be 
recognized and used, then why not "Very Reverend" and 
"Most Reverend," and so on up the scale to the climax of 
wicked assumption? In this work "Doctor" and its con- 
traction "Dr." are used to indicate a physician only. Its 
general use as meaning a teacher of religion, or of philos- 
ophy, is indefinite, and, if for no other reason, is objection- 
able. 

It is very gratifying that the facts in Chapter II. have 
been so well authenticated. Many of these, together with 
the section on slavery in Chapter VIII., were presented in 
an address delivered by the author before the State Histor- 
ical Society at Springfield in May, 1913. 

The incompleteness of and the inaccuracies in the his- 
tories of the local churches are attributable in large measure 
to the indifference and indisposition of many to furnish the 
data. Repeated appeals brought no responses. It was with 



FOREWORD 11 

much regret that lack of space compelled the omission of the 
lists of the names of pastors, where they were furnished, since 
the growth of congregations has depended so largely upon 
these faithful servants of God. 

The preparation of the biographies has been no less 
difficult. It is painfully deficient both in the subjects and in 
their fair proportions of treatment. Without doubt the 
names of some who are not mentioned should appear, while 
some of those who do appear should have received less and 
others larger notice. Many deserving younger men have 
been crowded out. The names of others may be found in 
the chapter on education and elsewhere. At best this bio- 
graphical chapter is an approximation, but it is illustrative 
of the brave and true men and women to whom the present 
generation is indebted far more than it is aware. In writing 
these, the author has brought under contribution the recol- 
lections, associations and fellowships of sixty years and such 
researches as the time permitted. 

He has written in the love of the truth and with the 
best spirit of fairness and justice. It is believed that this 
volume will be a source of valuable information and joyfu) 
inspiration to many multitudes. 

THE AUTHOR. 



CHAPTER I. 
THE DISCIPLES OF CHRIST THEIR PLACE AND PLEA. 

The great apostasy has perplexed all thoughtful people. 
The mystery of iniquity is an enigma of the later centuries. 
The church that was founded in the wisdom of God, and 
redeemed by the blood of his Son, forgot its heavenly 
origin and divine mission. Its light and power were lost 
and it became the nesting-place of unclean birds. 

That was a sad and sinful age upon which Martin Luther 
looked out. He beheld everywhere the usurpations of the 
Papacy. Priests and people were ignorant of the Holy 
Scriptures. The Pope arrogated to himself the prerogatives 
of God. The system of indulgences had grown to a scan- 
dalous height. John Tetzel, a Dominican friar, preached 
and peddled licenses to sin in Germany. Darkness covered 
the earth and gross darkness the people. Then God's great 
clock struck its spiritual midnight. These appalling con- 
ditions awakened and stirred the soul of the earnest German 
monk. He aroused in Germany a splendid turmoil of 
thought and precipitated a great battle between divine truth 
and human traditions. When its smoke had cleared away, 
these three things stood out clearly: First, the right of 
private judgment ; second, the all-sufficiency of the Scriptures, 
and, third, justification by faith. Luther was a child of 
Providence and a mighty man of God. He wrought mar- 
velous results. But even he could not make the journey 
from spiritual Babylon to spiritual Jerusalem in a day of 
human life. 

Bernhardin Samson, a Franciscan monk, went into 
Switzerland in 1518 selling indulgences. He was success- 
fully opposed by Zwingli, who appealed to the authority of 

13 



14 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

the word of God. This beginning of the Reformation in 
Switzerland produced the Reformed Church and the Heidel- 
berg Catechism or Confession, written in 1562. 

Meanwhile, John Calvin's great mind was engaged upon 
the religious problems of the time, and gave to the world 
the theological system that bears his name, but also the 
doctrine of the sovereignty of God, The Almighty is the 
supreme Ruler and Arbiter not the man with the triple 
crown, whose throne is by the yellow Tiber. 

The principles of the Reformation swept across the 
English Channel. The Anglo-Saxons possess a marvelous 
power of genius for liberty, and that was fruitful soil. 
Henry VIII. was on the throne. He had written a treatise 
denouncing Luther and defending the Pope. Just then his 
ardor for his lawful wife had cooled and he wished a 
divorce that he might marry pretty Anne Boleyn. The 
Pope said "No;" the King said "Yes," had his way and 
was excommunicated. The Parliament then passed the Act 
of Supremacy: "That the King, our sovereign lord, his 
heirs and successors, kings of this realm, shall be taken, 
accepted and reputed the only supreme head on earth of 
the Church of England, called the 'Anglicana Ecclesia.' " 
Thus the chain was broken that tied England to the Papal 
throne. The Episcopal Church had its beginning, and as 
the years passed grew gradually away from Papal errors 
to Protestant principles of Christian faith. And thus came 
the denial of the Pope's arrogant claim to the universal 
headship of the church on earth. 

A joint resolution of the English Parliament, June 12, 
1643, convoked a synod to settle the government and liturgy 
of the Church of England, and to promote a more perfect 
reformation than had been obtained during the reigns of 
Edward II. and Elizabeth. What afterward came to be 
known as the Presbyterian "Confession of Faith" was 
finally adopted by the Assembly of divines in the month of 
December, 1646, approved by the Parliament of Scotland 
in 1647, and by the English Parliament in 1648. Thus 



THEIR PLACE AND PLEA 15 

arose the Presbyterian Church with its different branches. 

About 1658 Congregationalism began to grow out of the 
Puritan movement in England. 

Out of the religious chaos of the sixteenth century came 
also the Baptist Church. Their earliest articles of faith 
were written by Zwingli in 1527. The London "Con- 
fession of Faith" was formulated in 1689, and that which 
held for a century in the United States was cast in Phila- 
delphia in 1742. In their earlier years the Baptists were 
generally Calvinists. To Roger Williams, Welshman, Bap- 
tist, Reformer and founder of the State of Rhode Island, 
the world is indebted for the principle of the absolute 
separation of the ecclesiastical and civil powers. 

On the human side the Methodist Church was the 
product of the great mind, heart and conscience of John 
Wesley. His aim at first was to effect a higher type of 
life in the Church of England, of which he was a member. 
The first "Articles of Religion" were prepared in 1784. His 
life and work gave tremendous emphasis to the doctrine of 
human responsibility and personal accountability to God. 

Thus for two hundred years the caravans of the Lord 
moved slowly along the way from spiritual Babylon to 
spiritual Jerusalem. Wycliffe, Jerome of Prague, Huss, 
Luther, Erasmus, Zwingli, Melancthon, John Knox, Calvin, 
Cranmer, John Robinson and John Wesley were the leaders 
whom the Lord raised up. They aimed and strove to recover 
the church, the body of Christ, from the ignorance, super- 
stitions, wrongs and oppressions of centuries. With their 
faces toward the new morning, they searched, struggled and 
suffered for Christ's sake a glorious company of God's 
elect. Severally and successively they led the generations 
to higher planes of Christian truth and life. The last 
centuries are debtors to them all. Ours is a splendid heritage 
from great souls who counted Christ and his truth more 
precious than their own lives. 

But, alas for the frailties of man! The creeds which 
the reformers thought and hoped to use as fulcrums for the 



16 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

spiritual uplift of the people became barriers to Christian 
faith. Opinions about doctrines were substituted for personal 
trust in the Christ. Men were measured not by the word of 
God in their faith and lives, but by the opinions and creeds 
of fallible men. Theological warfare ensued. In their pul- 
pits, on the platform and through the press, preachers con- 
tended and discussed with one another. The leading questions 
were of orthodoxy rather than orthopraxy correct thinking 
rather than right living. As churches grew in numbers and 
power, denominational pride dominated. The spirit of Jesus 
gave place to sectarian rivalries. Men wrangled and raged 
about their religious opinions. The seamless robe of the 
Master was rent many times. Bitterness banished brotherly 
love. Mutual appreciation was murdered by disparagement. 
Spiritual ostracism supplanted Christian fellowship. Broth- 
erly love was crucified on the cross of sectarian bigotry. The 
children of God came to hate one another for the love of God 
as they supposed. Thus the church of the living God, torn 
and divided, was shorn of its power. Having lost its divine 
ideals, it lost its divine aims. The evangelization of the world 
was forgotten ; the salvation of the people was neglected. 

Out of this religious travail the Disciples of Christ were 
born. Assuredly the Christian world needed a new voice. Did 
they come to the Kingdom for such a time as that? The first 
thing they said was: "We be brethren. Let us not fight, but 
let us reason together." After a hundred years, the things 
they said are now beginning to be heard. 

Protestant believers were divided in their teachings and 
into many religious bodies. However, in the nineteenth cen- 
tury, these divine truths which had been elucidated and em- 
phasized by the great leaders of reformatory movements had 
come to be the common possessions of all evangelical believ- 
ers. They all held and do yet hold the right of personal 
judgment, the all-sufficiency of the sacred Scriptures as the 
rule of faith and life, the doctrine of justification by faith in 
Jesus Christ; all are united in the denial of the Papal head- 
ship of the church; all affirmed the supreme sovereignty of 



THEIR PLACE AND PLEA 17 

God, individual responsibility and personal accountability to 
God; all stood for religious liberty and the absolute separa- 
ration of civil and ecclesiastical prerogatives and powers. The 
Christian peoples who are girdling the earth with this twen- 
tieth-century civilization are all united in these things. 

The Disciples of Christ have pleaded for a return to the 
word of God and the authority of Jesus Christ, the sole Lord 
and only Head of the church. The creeds of men may have 
served their purposes in former times, but they divide God's 
people, and division is weakness, inefficiency and appalling 
loss. Bishop Cranston, of the M. E. Church, before the Fed- 
eral Council of the Churches of Christ in America, said: 
"The church of Jesus Christ upon earth is constitutionally, 
intentionally and logically one, and we are staying apart 
without reason, economy or warrant of Scripture." As a 
revelation of God, the Bible is all-sufficient and alone-sufficient 
in the salvation of men arid in their preparation for the eter- 
nal life. Amid all the clashing confusion of earth and time, 
only the authoritative voice of Jesus can bring assurance and 
peace. 

The Disciples plead for the reproduction of the Church 
of Christ, which is his body on earth; for a return to and a 
restoration of primitive Christianity in all its fundamental 
elements. What is its basic teaching? What are its divinely 
appointed ordinances ? What its required and essential fruits ? 
What does the New Testament say? To the law and the tes- 
timony. "Where the Bible speaks, we speak; where the Bible 
is silent, we are silent." Assuredly this is a safe and wise 
rallying-cry. 

The Disciples plead for the union of all God's people on 
the common, catholic grounds of the Bible. Divisions to-day 
are the crowning sin of Christendom. The Holy Spirit con- 
demned divisions when he spoke through apostles, and Jesus 
prayed for the unity of all his people "that the world may 
believe that thou hast sent me." All efforts for Christian 
union must fail that are based on denominational interpreta- 
tions of the Bible. Opinions may serve in their places, but 



18 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

they must be subordinated to "thus saith the Lord." Hap- 
pily, all evangelized believers are now agreed in the catholic 
elements of the gospel ; namely, that Jesus is the Christ to 
save and the Lord to lead, that the Holy Scriptures can make 
a man of God perfect and thoroughly furnish him unto all 
good works, that immersion and the Lord's Supper are the 
ordinances given by him who has all authority in heaven and 
on earth, that Christ's people should wear his name, and that 
they should aim and strive to reproduce his life in their own. 
Tennyson expressed this goal when he wrote: "Step by step, 
with voices crying right and left, I have climbed my way 
back to the primal church, and stand within the porch, and 
Christ is with me." 

It is believed that the Scripturalness and catholicity of 
the position and plea of the Disciples of Christ are evidenced 
by the fact that so many ministers to say nothing of thou- 
sands of others have left the various denominational 
churches and now stand together on common ground and 
unitedly serve the one Master. From this multitude the fol- 
lowing are noted here as illustrating examples : W. H. Book, 
from the Baptist Church; M. M. Davis, from the M. E. 
Church; T. H. Adams, from the Protestant Methodist 
Church ; W. G. Loucks, from the Christian Denomination ; J. 
V. Updike, from the Church of God ; James Small, from the 
Presbyterian Church; A. B. Jett, from the Cumberland Pres- 
byterian Church ; C. C. Redgrave, from the Congregational 
Church ; T. P. Bauer, from the Lutheran Church ; Claris Yeu- 
ell, from the Plymouth Brethren; D. P. Shafer, from the 
Reformed Church ; James Vernon, from the Episcopal 
Church ; C. M. Price, from the Seventh-day Adventists ; D. 
H. Bays, from the Mormon Church, and T. J. O'Connor, 
from the Roman Catholic Church. Nearly all of these men 
are living and are, or have been, active ministers of the gospel 
in the churches of Christ. 

Mr. J. Wood Miller, a Presbyterian minister, visited the 
Englewood, Chicago, Church of Christ on a Wednesday 
evening in 1912, and read from memory Mark's Gospel to 



THEIR PLACE AND PLEA 19 

the congregation. Later he sent them the following note: 

MY FRIENDS : Never was I so greatly pleased as in my reception 
at your church. It is only what could be expected from your most 
distinctly American of all the churches in the United States that I 
know of; organized here and having the stamp of the universal church, 
too, under the head of immersion, the original baptism ; Christian, the 
original name ; the whole Word as the only creed, and observing the 
Supper every Lord's Day, the primitive custom, with every saint a 
preacher. Having read Mark before perhaps five hundred churches, 
I recall no larger or more responsive prayer-meeting audience. 



CHAPTER II. 
BEGINNINGS IN ILLINOIS. 

The beginning of the nineteenth century witnessed a 
widespread revolt against human authority, both Papal and 
Protestant, in religion. Many men in many places came to 
see that God alone can be Lord of the conscience. Every- 
where these reformers, protesting against the creeds of coun- 
cils and the dogmas of fallible men, appealed to the Bible 
alone. Everywhere their aim was the emancipation of the 
church from the bondage of human traditions and rule. This 
movement first focalized in the religious body known as the 
"Christian Denomination." For many years they were called 
"New Lights," but since they have never recognized this 
name, it is unfair to so designate them. They were also 
called the "Christian Connection" and "Christian Church." 
Throughout this work they are referred to as the "Christian 
Denomination." 

Min. James O'Kelley withdrew from the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church during its first General Conference, held in Bal- 
timore in 1792. In his earlier years he was a classmate of 
Thomas Jefferson and Patrick Henry. He was a popular 
preacher and an old presiding elder from Virginia. He urged 
upon the conference the right of those preachers who thought 
themselves injured by the appointment of the bishops, to ap- 
peal to the general body, then in session. His appeal was in 
vain. Many individuals and local congregations, either in 
mass or in part, seceded with him. Appealing for public 
favor to the public spirit of the time, they for a few years 
called themselves Republican Methodists. 

At the close of the eighteenth century, Dr. Abner Jones 

resided at Hartland, Vermont. He was a regular Baptist, 

20 



BEGINNINGS IN ILLINOIS 21 

but he was especially averse to human creeds, which he re- 
garded as walls separating the followers of our Lord. And 
sectarian names grieved him much. In those years when a 
man of God got a new thought he was compelled to get a 
new church to put it in. So Dr. Jones organized a church at 
Lynden, Vermont, in 1802, with twenty-five members, and 
another church the same year at Hanover, New Hampshire, 
and a third at Pierpont, New Hampshire, in 1803. 

About that time Elias Smith, then a Baptist minister, was 
preaching with great success in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. 
He fell in with Abner Jones, and soon the church under his 
care was led to adopt the principles and position of the 
Christians. 

Barton W. Stone, a learned and eloquent minister, with- 
drew from the Presbyterian Church in 1804, and became very 
actively identified with the Christian Denomination. 

Thus there arose simultaneously in the East, South and 
West congregations that wished to be known simply as 
Christians. These were remote from one another and with- 
out a knowledge of one another's work. They urged the all- 
sufficiency of the Scriptures as the rule of faith and life, the 
democracy of the local church, Christian character as the test 
of fellowship, and the name "Christian" to the exclusion of 
all denominational names. 

Those years were particularly auspicious for the proclama- 
tion of such Christian truths. Beginning in the last clays of 
the eighteenth century with the Presbyterians in Tennessee 
and Kentucky, and continuing to near the close of 1801, there 
was a most extraordinary revival of religion. Caneridge, 
Kentucky, was its -center; its circumference was almost the 
outer bounds of the nation. Its slogan was, "The Bible our 
rule of faith and practice." Many thousands turned to the 
Lord. Consecrated lives testified to the genuineness of their 
conversion. Its impressions were deep and its influences 
abiding. 

That revival was the John the Baptist of the movement 
inaugurated within less than two decades thereafter by the 



22 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Disciples of Christ. This also had its beginnings in various 
localities East, West and South. It came neither from the 
Biblical research nor thought of any one man. It was not 
accidental, but providential. Its members approached the 
Bible "with all readiness of mind, examining the Scriptures 
daily." 

It is believed by many that Alexander Campbell was the 
founder of the religious body known as the Disciples of 
Christ. This is a mistake, and the abundant and incontestible 
facts of history prove it to be such. It was at least a decade 
after the beginnings of this movement in various places that 
Mr. Campbell became the champion and later the most pow- 
erful advocate of those principles of Christian truth which 
differentiate the Disciples from all other religious bodies. 
This last fact was the occasion that led many uninformed 
people to call those with whom Mr. Campbell found himself 
to be in full accord "Campbellites." But this, to the Disci- 
ples, has always been an offensive nickname. Now it is no 
longer in use except in some back precincts where the trees 
grow tall and the brush thick, and hence the light of intelli- 
gence is slow in penetrating. 

William Barney came into what is now Wabash County, 
and settled about eight miles north of the site of Mount 
Carmel, in 1808. His family then consisted of himself and 
wife and the following children : George, William, Richard, 
James, Betsy, Jane, Sarah, Clara and Ann. Shortly after- 
ward, Mr. Barney's three sons-in-law, with their wives and 
children, also came. It is plain that this was a real Roose- 
veltian and patriotic family. Other settlers followed. Three 
forts for protection against the Indians in the locality were 
built. 

Seth Card came into this settlement in 1813. In 1814 he 
was a representative in the third Territorial Legislature, and 
in 1818 was a member of the convention that framed the con- 
stitution for the State. Evidently Mr. Card was one of the 
leading citizens of that section. He, with Minister James 
Pool and others, on the 17th of July, 1819, organized the 



BEGINNINGS IN ILLINOIS 23 

Barney's Prairie Christian Church. Seth Card was elected 
elder and Joseph Wood deacon. His grandson, O. H. Wood, 
now residing in that locality, has in his keeping the original 
book containing the record of this transaction. He is now 
in his sixty-eighth year, has been a member of the congrega- 
tion for over fifty years, and affirms that from its beginning 
the Barney's Prairie Church has always stood on apostolic 
ground. This congregation has had an unbroken and useful 
life for ninety-six years. Mrs. Eliza Shoaff, Goldengate, 
Illinois, says that she was born in 1844 two miles north of the 
Barney's Prairie Church; that her grandparents, Job and 
Abigail Pixley, came to this locality in 1817, and that not long 
afterwards they united with the church. Both Mr. O. H. 
Wood and Mrs. Shoaff unite in affirming the unquestioned 
statements of their parents and grandparents, that before 
1819 there had been a "New Light" church as they there 
called themselves about seven miles from Barney's Prairie, 
and that it had failed ; and further, that when these people 
met on July 17 they decided to drop the name "New Light" 
and form a Christian church simply, which they did. Beyond 
question, in point of time, the Barney's Prairie Church leads 
all the Christian congregations in Illinois. 

The Coffee Creek Church in Wabash County was the sec- 
ond. The original record reads : "At a meeting held at 
Brother Daniel Keen's on Saturday before the fifth Sabbath 
in August, 1819, a church of Christ was constituted, consist- 
ing of seven members." (See Keensburg.) The testimony 
of the original records, the history of Wabash County and 
the memories of the oldest residents of the community unite 
in affirming that from the first this was simply a church of 
Christ and has always continued as such. 

Stephen England settled near the site of Cantrall, Sanga- 
mon County, in 1819. He vas a native of Virginia, but grew 
to manhood in Kentucky. He was a Baptist preacher, but 
was acquainted with Barton W. Stone before coming to Illi- 
nois. Here he was never known as a Baptist minister. 
Shortly after settling here he invited the people to come to 



24 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

his cabin for public worship. That the people were soul- 
hungry is indicated by the fact that two women walked two 
miles to the meeting through prairie grass as high as their 
heads. On May 15, 1820, he constituted in his own house 
the first church of Christ in this county. In all there were 
nine members whose names have come down to us. From 
that date to this it has always been known as the church of 
Christ, or Antioch Christian Church. When the village of 
Cantrall was laid out in the sixties, the place of meeting was 
moved there and the local designation was changed from 
Antioch to Cantrall. 

In the fall of 1826 the Little Grove Church of Christ, 
located six miles east of Paris, was constituted by Minister 
Samuel McGee. Two sisters, Mrs. Mary Morrison and Mrs. 
Anna Fitzgerald, who had come from Kentucky, were the 
leaders in the formation of this congregation. From the first 
it was called "The Little Grove Church of Christ." 

MULKEYTOWN. 

Mr. T. K. Means was born in Tennessee in April, 1831, 
and was brought by his parents to Franklin County, Illinois, 
in 1834. He is still living at Mulkeytown. His mind is vig- 
orous and his thought clear. He says: 

The first settlers of this part of the country called themselves 
Baptists and met at the house of John Kirkpatrick, who settled here 
in 1818. But these people had been baptized in Kentucky and Ten- 
nessee by John Mulkey and his brother Philip, who were Baptist 
preachers, but went into the Reformation with B. . W. Stone early 
in the last century. It is a fact that John Mulkey was tried for 
heresy in 1809 in Kentucky. No one now knows when these people 
left off the name "Baptist" and adopted the name "Christian," for there 
was no Baptist church and people who held to the usages of that 
church in this whole settlement. 

I have been told that the first man that preached the primitive 
gospel here was by the name of Underwood. The first preacher I 
ever heard was Elijah Spiller, who was an old man at that time and 
had lived here many years. But the man who did most of the preach- 
ing was by the name of Silas Reid, who came to the county in 1832. 
Afterward there came other preachers, of whom I can name Wm. 



BEGINNINGS IN ILLINOIS 25 

Bristow, John Hayes, Ulysses Heap, Wm. Chance and then a host 
of others. 

I once heard D. C. Mulkey say that when he came to Illinois in 
1832, his elder brothers, John M. and Jonathan H. Mulkey, were then 
living here and that they were devoted church-members at that time. 
Then we must infer there was a church organization at that time. 

From this testimony of Mr. Means and the lucid preach- 
ing- of the pure gospel by John Mulkey, Sr., reinforced as 
he was by the splendid ministry of Barton W. Stone, the 
writer concludes that the beginning of the Mulkeytown 
Church of Christ may be fairly placed near the middle of the 
twenties. 

THE SPRING CREEK (MT. ZION) BERLIN CHURCH. 

In 1818 Andrew Scott came from Crawford County, Indi- 
ana, and located near Richland, in Cartwright Township, 
Sangamon County. He was a minister whose aim was to 
teach and preach the true faith and the pure gospel. He at 
once began to hold meetings in the log cabins of the pioneers. 
In 1824 he settled near Island Grove the woods skirting 
Spring Creek a mile or two northwest of the site of old 
Berlin. There he met Theophilus Sweet, a Baptist preacher 
ot the old school. It was not long until Mr. Sweet was in 
accord with Mr. Scott in his Christian faith and preaching. 
Their united labors soon developed a Christian Church on 
Spring Creek that met for worship in the log schoolhouse. 
It was doubtless organized there. Much as we admire those 
brave pioneers whose voices rang true to the word of God, 
still we are reminded that they were fallible. In a time after 
the beginning of this church, one of its members, named 
William Grant, accused Preacher Andrew Scott in plain 
speech ot lying. Of his defense the subjoined documents 
have come down to us : 

TAZWELL COUNTY, Illinois, June 30th, 1830. We whose names are 
undersigned, having been formerly members of the church at Spring 
Creek in Sangamon County, by permission of the church in the big 
grove on Kickapoo, do send to the churches and all whom the 



26 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

presents may concern, that Brother Andrew Scott was and is a min- 
ister in good standing among us. Signed: 

ISAAC CARLOCK, JAMES R. SCOTT, 

SAMUEL P. GLENN, LEVINA MARTIN, 

RUTH B. GLEN, JOHN P. GLEN, 

DANIEL VINCENT, NANCY GLEN. 
ANN VINCENT, 

I, John Glen, a member of the church of Christ at Big Grove, 
Kickapoo, do hereby certify that I have known Andrew Scott for 
forty years, and that I ever did consider him a man of truth and 
strictly honest. 

Given under my hand this 10th day of June, 1830. 

Signed: JOHN GLEN. 

The genuineness of these documents is attested by the 
following : 

I, M. B. Robertson, a Justice of the Peace in and for Sangamon 
County, Illinois, do hereby certify that the above are accurate copies 
of letters of commendation received by Andrew Scott, from the above 
parties. 

Given under my hand and seal this 15th day of October, 1913. 

M. B. ROBERTSON, 

BERLIN, Illinois, Oct. IS, 1913. Justice of the Peace. 

From these statements it is clear that there was a church 
of Christ in Big Grove, on the Kickapoo, in 1830. Nine 
members of this church had previously been members of the 
Spring Creek congregation. The latter was formed previous 
to this time, probably near 1825, the year after Messrs. Scott 
and Sweet began, to work together. 

Those who are curious will be interested in the following. 
On the reverse side of the sheet of paper containing the above 
testimonials this certificate is written : 

This is to sertify that I was at the meten on Spring Creek for 
the perpes of setlen of Deficelty betwen Brother Scott and Brother 
Grant he charges Brother Scott oi lying But DiD not prov it it was 
not setled to the satisfaction of Brother Scott But was left to ware out. 

JESSE WILSON. 

The church of Christ in Big Grove, on Kickapoo, was 
short-lived, or soon met in another place under another name. 



BEGINNINGS IN ILLINOIS 27 

None of the historians mention it, nor is there a tradition of 
it in the memories of octogenarians. 

Ebenezer Rhodes was born in Holland in 1780. He came 
to America, and in 1824 to McLean County, settling in 
Blooming Grove, five miles south of Bloomington. He was 
a Baptist preacher and married the first couple in that 
county. Reuben Carlock was a native of Overton County, 
Tennessee. He came to Illinois in October, 1827, and settled 
in Dry Grove, five miles southwest of the site of the present 
town of Carlock. Minister William Brown, a Christian min- 
ister, came to visit his friend, Reuben Carlock, in 1828. In 
August of that year, Mr. Carlock yoked his ox-team to his 
wagon, and, accompanied by some members of his family 
and his guest, Preacher Brown, drove to the cabin of Eben- 
ezer Rhodes for a three-days' meeting. Then and there a 
little church was constituted. Thereupon the recognized 
leader, Ebenezer Rhodes, said: "And now, brethren, we must 
have some articles of faith." Then Reuben Carlock, drawing 
a small copy of the New Testament from his pocket and 
holding it up, said: "Brother Rhodes, this book has all the 
articles of faith we need." Mr. Rhodes at once and in full 
assurance answered: "That is true." Thereafter he was 
known as a Christian minister and continued to preach the 
gospel without the mixture of human traditions until his 
death in 1842. That little congregation was simply a church 
of Christ. 

In 1815 "Christian Settlement" was founded in Lawrence 
County, seven miles northwest of Vincennes, Indiana. It was 
made up of members of the Christian Denomination. For 
ninety-eight years that country community has been remark- 
able for its industry, sobriety, thrift and high ideals. In 1828 
the church there came fully to apostolic grounds. 

The first sermon ever preached in Hittle's Grove, near 
what became the town site of Armington, was by a Method- 
ist minister named Walker, but he did not form a class. 
This and other public meetings for worship were held in the 
log cabin of Michael Hittle. After a time two women 



28 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

wished to be baptized, and a Baptist minister, probably 
Ebenezer Rhodes, was sent for. Finding no church there to 
vote on the fitness of the candidates, after deliberation it was 
decided to immerse them on the public confession of their 
faith in Christ. Thereupon a Baptist church was constituted 
with seven members. On January 11, 1829, this congregation 
was reorganized on the following basis: "We, the under- 
signed, do give ourselves to the Lord and to each other as a 
church of Jesus Christ, to be governed by his word contained 
in the Old and New Testaments." This church has had an 
unbroken life to the present time. This agreement to consti- 
tute a church of Christ was signed by seventeen persons. 

In 1829 a church was constituted in the southern part of 
Marion County. It was known as the Mount Moriah Free 
Will Baptist Church. In 1837 its members dropped the words 
"Free Will Baptist" and substituted for them "Christian," 
and since then, to this date, it has been known as "The Mount 
Moriah Christian Church." 

From an old, original record-book the following is taken : 

April 30, 1831, the church of Christ on Cedar Fork of Henderson 
River, Warren County, was constituted upon the bedief that the 
Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments are the Word of God, 
and the only rule of faith and practice, and are sufficient for the 
government of the Church. 

The location was one and a half miles northwest of the 
present town of Cameron. This was probably the first church 
of Christ in the Military Tract. Some of its families became 
representatives in that part of the State and elsewhere. 

The second Sunday in July, 1831, Minister John B. Curl 
constituted the "Bear Creek" Church in Adams County, and 
also the "Mill Creek" Church in the same county before the 
close of the year. Mr. Curl labored diligently through all 
that section of the State, and three or four other congrega- 
tions were formed about the same time. 

Bushrod W. Henry was a native of Culpeper County, 
Virginia. He came to Illinois and settled in Shelbyville in 
1830. He was then twenty-five years of age. He was a 



BEGINNINGS IN ILLINOIS 29 

Baptist preacher and man of superior mental endowments 
and magnificent personality. In July, 1831, he constituted 
the "First Baptist Church of Christ in Shelbyville." Within 
one year he was preaching clearly those Biblical truths com- 
monly held and taught by the Disciples. In 1834 Mr. Henry, 
with those of like views with him, were summarily expelled 
from the Baptist Church. Then the congregation in Shelby- 
ville dropped the name "Baptist" and has since then been 
known as the "Church of Christ." Mr. Henry has two sons 
living Judge W. B. Henry, of Vandalia, and Minister J. O. 
Henry, of Findley. The latter is eighty-six years old. He 
was a comrade of Richard J. Oglesby in the Fourth Illinois 
Volunteer Infantry during the Mexican war. Ever after- 
ward they were fast friends until "Uncle Dick" passed over 
the great divide. Mr. Henry clearly and positively affirms 
that his father was not assisted by any one except his wife 
in reaching his conclusions on the teachings of the Scrip- 
tures ; that together they, husband and wife, reverently and 
faithfully read themselves out of spiritual Babylon. 

By 1832 there began to be some general unity of thought 
and action among the widely separated Disciples in their 
efforts to restore the church after the New Testament pat- 
tern in its teachings, its ordinances and its life; so in this 
year a number of local churches had their beginnings. Most 
of them still live and have been forceful factors in building 
society. 

The church in Jacksonville had its beginning in that year. 
Several Christian families came to Morgan County from 
Kentucky in 1830 and 1831. Fourteen families of Disciples, 
then called Reformers by many, met together regularly that 
winter for public worship. In the summer of 1831 Josephus 
Hiett settled five miles east of Jacksonville. He was the first 
regular preacher of the Disciples in that section. 

James Green and Harrison W. Osborn, of the Christian 
Denomination, were in that locality at that time. They 
preached in the courthouse and in schoolhouses as they had 
opportunity. In 1832 there were good-sized nuclei of Disci- 



30 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

pies and members of the Christian Denomination in and 
around Jacksonville. It was in this year that the scholarly 
and pious Barton W. Stone came from Kentucky into the 
"Far West," as Illinois was then called. The reputation of 
this good man had preceded him, for he was an active factor 
in the Caneridge revival in 1800, whose influences and glory 
came to be more enduring than the stars. Mr. Stone made a 
tour through the Prairie State, preaching at Lawrenceville, 
Carrollton, Rushville, Springfield, Jacksonville and other 
places. He believed in and labored for the union of all God's 
people. At Jacksonville he laid his strong but tender hand 
upon the two separated bodies and left them united in one. 
This was in October, 1832. 

A similar result was effected at Carrollton a few days 
later. 

It may be properly noted here that the Disciples of 
Christ absorbed the larger part of the Christian Denomina- 
tion, not only in Illinois, but elsewhere. However, the latter 
body still lives. The appeal of both parties was to the Bible 
as the only recognized authority in religion, and in this way 
many of the latter concluded that the Disciples were nearer 
the divine standard than themselves. 

The church at Winchester was formed December 1, 1832. 
The old Union Church, located about ten miles west of Clin- 
ton, was constituted October 13 (the second Sunday), 1832. 
It was formed with seventeen charter members, under the 
spreading branches of a large white-oak tree, whose decay- 
ing stump marks the spot. This and the gravestones in the 
cemetery that grew around the house of worship, are silent 
sentinels of faded joys and departed glory. Hughes Bowles 
was the leader there. He was a product of the Caneridge 
(Ky.) revival, as were those associated with him in this be- 
ginning. His son, Walter P. Bowles, became the best known 
and most powerful preacher of his time in that section. He 
and Abraham Lincoln were familiar friends, and long before 
the immortal emancipator dreamed of place and fame, he 
said to Mr. Bowles: "Wat, if I could preach like you, I 



BEGINNINGS IN ILLINOIS 31 

would rather do that than be President." The old Union 
Church served its community and generation for just fifty 
years to a day, and then, railroads coming and towns grow- 
ing, it fell into sleep. 

Joseph Hostetler was a great, strong man in his time. In 
his youth he became a member of the Tunker Church and 
soon thereafter a preacher. With little help, his own study 
of the Bible led him to the common basic principles of the 
gospel. He came from Indiana to Illinois in 1832, and in No- 
vember of that year organized the West Okaw Church of 
Christ. It was located about two miles west of the site of 
Lovington, and became the mother of a number of congre- 
gations of like faith in that section. West Okaw still lives 
and flourishes in the Lovington Church. 

In the early thirties a number of families came from 
Christian County, Kentucky, to Illinois, and settled in Walnut 
Grove, now known as Eureka. In April, 1832, thirteen Dis- 
ciples met in the log residence of John Oatman, that stood 
about one-half mile northeast of the railroad station now 
there, and organized a church. Since that time it has been 
known as the Christian Church (or church of Christ) at 
Eureka, and has been one of the most forceful agencies in 
the entire State for truth and righteousness. 

In 1833 churches of Christ were organized at Springfield, 
Lawrenceville, Decatur, Ursa, Little Mackinaw, ten miles 
south of Mackinaw town, and elsewhere. 

The Mount Pleasant Church, Hancock County, was or- 
ganized in 1834, and made a remarkable record through 
eighty years. Mrs. Georgenia Walton has been a member of 
this congregation for fifty-five years. She is a woman of 
rare intelligence and spirit. Speaking of the early years, she 
says: "We were Campbellites in those days. A boy in the 
M. E. Sunday School was repeating the names of the tribes 
in Canaan when Joshua led the Israelites into it. This boy 
said there were Canaanites, Amorites, Jebusites and Camp- 
bellites." 

This church also produced that great soul, Dr. William 



32 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Booz. In the early sixties he sent a communication to the 
Carthage Republican over the pseudonym "Country Jake." 
The editor was so much impressed with its pungent character 
that he encouraged him to send weekly contributions. Thus 
was born, of these two fertile minds, provincial journalism 
in Illinois. 

This is less than a bird's-eye view of the beginnings of 
the Disciples of Christ in Illinois. Across the central and 
through most of the southern part of the State they continued 
to grow. Every inch of ground they occupy to-day has been 
won by battle. They met opposition, often bitter, always de- 
termined, from the older religious bodies. Where they are 
now strong in numbers, intelligent and wealthy and particu- 
larly "respectable," they are quickly and cheerfully recognized 
as "orthodox" and welcomed to the "sisterhood of the 
churches." Without doubt, with the changing times they 
have all changed with them, and, by divine grace, for the 
better, 




i. : mm 



CHAPTER III. 
CHRISTIAN EDUCATION. 

From the first the Disciples of Christ in Illinois have been 
earnest advocates of mental culture. In the early decades 
many of the leaders were well-educated men. In the fifties 
and sixties the question of establishing- academies for work 
supplementing that of the public schools was considered in 
the annual State meetings. A few such schools were started 
in addition to the colleges organized. But the Civil War 
closed all of these, and within five years thereafter the State 
high schools were begun. But it is a painful and serious fact 
that the Disciples in Illinois for the last twenty-five years 
have failed to keep step with the great educational column in 
the State. 

It is a significant fact that the Disciples were the leaders 
of coeducation in Illinois. Oberlin College, Ohio, was formed 
in 1833, and from its beginning trained young people of both 
sexes. So did Antioch College, at Yellow Springs, Ohio, of 
which Horace Mann was the head. In Illinois, Shurtleff 
College was founded as Rock Springs Seminary in 1827, and 
removed to its present location in 1831-32. Young women 
were first officially admitted to this institution in 1871. Knox 
College was founded in 1837. It had a female collegiate de- 
partment from 1849, but it was not "till the early seventies 
that the same courses were thrown open to women as to 
men." The school founded at Eureka in 1848 and that at 
Abingdon in 1853 were both coeducational from their begin- 
nings. So also were the other schools of the Disciples in 
Illinois. 

In 1900 there were 345 colleges and universities in the 
United States. Of these, 204 are coeducational. It is the 

2 83 



34 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

prevailing system in the West. Of the twenty-eight colleges 
in Illinois, twenty-six are open to women. 

The Disciples have also insisted that education should be 
affirmatively Christian; hence the Bible has a fixed place in 
the curriculums of their schools. 

EUREKA COLLEGE. 

Eureka College was a child of Providence. Its founders 
were men who walked with God. Central Illinois, into which 
the first white settlers came, was a land of entrancing beauty. 
The wide prairies, with grassy billows, reached out until, to 
the human eye, they touched the horizon. The streams of 
water were skirted with trees, only a part of which had 
grown to stately size. Charming wild birds and graceful wild 
beasts abounded everywhere, untamed and untouched save by 
the red men. The first immigrants made their homes among 
the groves. The timber was needed to build their cabins, 
make their fires and fence their farms. The settlements were 
known by the names of the groves to which the first pioneers 
gave names. That one along the west line of McLean 
County and the east line of Tazewell, which in 1841 became 
Woodford County, was called Walnut Grove, because those 
trees, indicating a rich soil, grew there abundantly. Into this 
place, in the thirties, a number of families came from south- 
ern Kentucky. Among them there were Ben Major and Wil- 
liam Davenport, who were double brothers-in-law; Elijah 
Dickinson, Sr. ; B. J. Radford, Sr. ; William P. Atterberry, 
R. M. Clark, E. B. Myers, A. M. Myers, Caleb Davidson, M. 
R. Bullock and Thomas Bullock. Other influential men, as 
John Darst and A. G. Ewing, came later. The families of 
the first settlers were generally large and growing. 

The schools for the instruction and training of children in 
that period were of the subscription class, and were often 
"kept" by impecunious and peripatetic pedagogjes. While 
the pioneers were engaged in subduing their part of the earth, 
thus helping to lay the foundations of a mighty material em- 
pire, they were even more concerned about the mental and 



CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 35 

moral training of their children. They felt keenly the in- 
adequacy of the ordinary facilities. In the fall of 1847 John 
T. Jones, an active and well-known minister among the Dis- 
ciples in Central Illinois, opened at Walnut Grove a select 
school for the education of girls, on a spot near the present 
site of Eureka College. In the following winter a malignant 
type of measles became epidemic in the community and broke 
up this school. 

In the summer of 1848 Mr. A. S. Fisher, a student from 
Bethany College, came to Walnut Grove. He was engaged 
by a number of the leading men of the community to conduct 
a school for a period of ten months. This school opened in 
a small frame building on September 10. The curriculum 
included the common English branches, with higher mathe- 
matics, natural philosophy, rhetoric, logic, etc. Evidently Mr. 
Fisher intended to earn his pay. The work of this school 
was suspended during a "big meeting" that was conducted 
by Mr. D. P. Henderson, an eminent evangelist of Jackson- 
ville, Illinois. This meeting continued through "many days," 
and added about one hundred persons to the Walnut Grove 
Church of Christ. At its close the work of the school was 
resumed and continued until the following Fourth of July. 
As the school was successful, Mr. Ben Major and his co- 
adjutors arranged with the young teacher for its continuance. 
Mr. Fisher submitted the following conditions, which were 
accepted by the patrons : First, that an addition, properly fur- 
nished, be made to the schoolhouse ; second, that he be per- 
mitted to employ an assistant teacher for the primary pupils ; 
third, that he be allowed the net income from tuition fees for 
his salary ; fourth, that adequate provision be made for board- 
ing all students who came from other localities. At this time 
a printed announcement of the school was circulated under 
the name of 

WALNUT GROVE SEMINARY. 

Miss Sue E. Jones, a daughter of John T. Jones and a 
graduate, was secured as assistant teacher. The school 



36 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

opened with such an encouraging outlook and growing attend- 
ance that the need of a larger building than the one enlarged 
was obvious. Hence the promoters of the school met in the 
autumn of 1849 and decided to erect a two-story brick build- 
ing to cost not less than $2,500. Ben Major led in this en- 
terprise. In December of that year this building was first 
occupied, and the school was incorporated as 

WALNUT GROVE ACADEMY. 

Its management was vested in twelve trustees. Of this 
board, John T. Jones was president and A. S. Fisher secre- 
tary. In September, 1850, John Lindsay, a graduate of 
Bethany College and a young minister, was added to the 
academy as teacher of Latin and Greek. The first philosoph- 
ical and chemical apparatus was secured in 1851. In the 
same year, to the "State Meeting," which assembled with 
the Walnut Grove Church, the trustees of the academy ex- 
plained that they were endeavoring to establish an institution 
of learning where the young people of both sexes might re- 
ceive the advantages of a liberal education under the care and 
influence of Christian teachers and free from all sectarian 
prejudices. They hoped the school would serve the Disciples 
generally throughout the State. 

The year 1852 was a remarkable one in Walnut Grove. 
The school was abruptly closed one month before the time by 
a scourge of Asiatic cholera which swept through the com- 
munity. Its chief victim was Ben Major, the founder of the 
school. His was a superior combination of head and heart. 
The best blood of the Huguenots and of Virginians filled 
his veins. A native of Kentucky and an owner of slaves, from 
early youth he had serious doubts on the question of human 
slavery. By the light of divine truth he reached his own 
purpose and matured his own plans. These were at variance 
with all his early teachings and antagonistic to all his family 
traditions and social relations. Having freed his slaves in 
the fall of 1835, he sent an agent with them to New York 
and shipped them to Liberia. In 1834, with his family of 



CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 37 

seven, he moved from Kentucky to Illinois in an ox-wagon. 
Through a period of eighteen years he served the new set- 
tlement at Walnut Grove as counselor, physician, friend and 
genuine leader. 

A. S. Fisher justly shares the honor of founding this 
school. Of him Professor Radford has given this admirable 
pen-picture : 

He seemed not to us as a man of like passions with the rest. 
Frivolity was a stranger to him, and that he should make a mistake was 
out of the question. Grand and peculiar, he might have sat upon his 
pedagogical throne, a sceptered hermit, but, much to our wonder, he 
went about the hard drudgery of pioneer school work with a con- 
stancy, a punctuality and devotion to duty which was in itself a 
profitable part of our course of instruction. Professor Neville used 
to call him 'an arithmetic in breeches,' but this was evidently, to use 
an arithmetical expression, reducing him to his lowest terms. He was 
accuracy incarnate. He impressed the ambitious student with the idea 
that inaccuracy was immoral, and that to make a mistake was unpar- 
donable. With infinite pains and patient repetition, he would lead 
even the dullest student to understand what had seemed to him hope- 
lessly incomprehensible. The lesson of the hour had the floor, and 
nothing else was to be recognized but a point of order, and he made 
a point of order all the time. In the years of his classroom ministry 
he inculcated upon thousands of youths such lessons of accuracy, indus- 
try and attention to the matter in hand as have in no small measure 
contributed to their success in life. 

After thirty-eight years of uninterrupted and self-sacri- 
ficing service, he left the college in 1885 and moved to Kan- 
sas City, Missouri. There he died in 1903. 

The "State Meeting" that convened with the church at 
Abingdon in 1852 indorsed the movement to build up an in- 
stitution of learning at Walnut Grove for the education of 
their sons and daughters and to fit young men for the Chris- 
tian ministry. There were students then at the school from 
more than twenty localities in Illinois and also from Indiana 
and Missouri. The same "State Meeting" also formed a 
Board of Education consisting of Ministers William Daven- 
port, John Lindsay, George W. Minier, Jonathan Atkinson, 
A. J. Kane and Prof. A. S. Fisher, the purpose of which 



38 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

board was to consider and report ways and means of estab- 
lishing academies in various parts of the State under the ex- 
clusive management of the Disciples in Illinois. 

In 1852 the first post-office was established in Walnut 
Grove. Before that the nearest office was at Washington, 
eight miles west. Mr. Fisher was made the first postmaster. 
Everything was on the general-delivery plan. To add to the 
burdens of the patient professor, many letters at that time 
were sent C. O. D., the postage on them being paid by the 
receivers. 

John H. Neville, a graduate of Bethany College, suc- 
ceeded John Lindsay as teacher in the fall of 1852. One year 
thereafter the academy began its work with the following 
teachers : A. S. Fisher, J. H. Neville, Mrs. Sarah Fisher, wife 
of the principal, and Miss Elmira J. Dickinson. 

The Annual Meeting of the Disciples at Jacksonville in 
September, 1853, received the report from the Board of Edu- 
cation. It was distinctly significant in three particulars: 
First, coeducational "that the brethren may endow their 
sons and daughters with a liberal education ;" second, that all 
education should be Christian "the Bible should have a con- 
spicuous place in the daily exercises of every school. Having 
been prepared by the Author of the human mind, it is 
superior to all human productions in developing morality 
among any people;" third, an educated ministry "that only 
an educated mind is competent to disengage the simple facts 
of Christianity from the many false dogmas with which they 
have become entangled through many centuries of false 
teachings and interpretations. Brethren, shall we have such 
schools among us and under our control?" These affirma- 
tions reflected fully the views of the Disciples in Illinois at 
that time. However, the Jacksonville meeting did not adopt 
the report. Other communities than Walnut Grove were am- 
bitious to establish such schools. The assembly decided to 
confine its activities exclusively to the direct work of evan- 
gelizing. Notwithstanding, the meeting voted in favor of 
raising $10,000 to endow a chair in Bethany College. Of 



CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 39 

this sum, the people of Walnut Grove raised and paid 
$2,225. 

The academy grew in attendance so that a boarding-hall 
sufficient for the accommodation of fifty students was com- 
pleted in the summer of 1854. Its cost was mainly met by 
citizens of the community. Mr. and Mrs. R. M. Clark, who 
were admirable Christians, were placed in charge. The hall 
became a pleasant home for many occupants in the years fol- 
lowing. 

A music department was introduced with the session be- 
ginning in September, 1855. Miss Ellen F. True, of Mt. 
Vernon, Ohio, was the first teacher. A one-room frame 
building was erected just across the street from the academy 
for the use of this department. When not in use by music 
pupils it was occupied by other classes. 

For reasons about which annalists are silent, the people 
of Walnut Grove desired to change the name of their village 
and post-office; so a committee of three was appointed near 
the close of 1854 probably by the trustees of the academy 
to choose a new name. Minister John Lindsay, one of the 
three, reported "Eureka," and the people, believing that they 
had found a favored spot in a goodly land, adopted it. 

As the result of an application and some necessary but 
altogether honorable caucusing, the Legislature of Illinois, 
by a special act passed in February, 1855, incorporated. 

EUREKA COLLEGE. 

Under the liberal provisions of this charter the institu- 
tion has continued uninterruptedly from September of that 
year to the present time. With the summer of 1855 the 
academy's work was merged into that of the college. The 
first Faculty was composed of the following: William M. 
Brown, president ; A. S. Fisher, J. H. Neville, O. A. Burgess, 
Richard Conover, Mrs. Sarah F. Conover and Miss Ellen F. 
True. Mr. Burgess remained but one year, preferring the 
work of the ministry to that of the classroom. He was a 
man of striking physique and commanding personality. Well 



40 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

developed and finely disciplined, he was self-conscious and 
self-poised. With the mentality of a master and the tender 
heart of a woman, he was a regal man whose influence re- 
mained with all lives he touched. 

The new Board of Trustees turned their attention at once 
to questions of finance, grounds and a new building. The 
school had grown steadily in popularity, numbers and ef- 
ficiency; so enlarged accommodations became imperative. The 
campus, a tract of about fifteen acres, was the joint gift of 
Elias B. Myers and James Conover, residents of the com- 
munity and faithful friends of the school. Its graceful 
slopes that the bluegrass loves, covered with stately trees of 
the primeval forest, have always been regarded as an ideal 
spot for a college. Its charms appeal to the love of the beau- 
tiful in nature in all beholders. 

President Brown and Minister William Davenport served 
as solicitors of finance and promoters of the institution in 
many parts of the State. Within a few months about $60,000 
had been secured in interest-bearing notes. One-third of these 
were to be used in the erection of the new building. Relying 
upon these notes and college friends, the trustees secured a 
loan and let the contract for the building in the spring of 
1857. It was completed in the summer of 1858, and has been 
in continuous use since that time. This loan had the per- 
sonal guarantee of Messrs. John Darst, E. B. Myers and 
William Davenport, joint-leaders in this enterprise. 

The financial panic of 1857 swept the whole country like 
a cyclone. Banks failed and business was paralyzed. Farm- 
ers marketing their products were paid in bank notes, many 
of which depreciated from 10 to 100 per cent, within from 
one to sixty clays. Printed "Bank Detectors" were circulated 
and consulted daily and eagerly. These conditions rendered 
many of the notes held by the trustees valueless, and hin- 
dered many patrons from sending their children to the school. 
The college thus suffered its first reverse. However, the 
matriculation in this session numbered 276. 

Professor Neville left the school in the summer of 1857. 



CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 41 

The facile pen of Professor Radford has given this picture 
of him: 

He was singularly handsome, and the contour of his head and 
the expression of his face suggested the purely intellectual in a greater 
degree than I have seen in any other person. He loved intellectual 
exercise for its own sake. The emotional and physical demands must 
wait upon the mental. He had little patience with mediocrity. Aptness 
in a student covered a multitude of sins, and dullness would discount 
a whole catalogue of virtues. His intense intellectuality, which often 
slid into the minor key of abstractedness, led to many eccentricities, 
which were copied by us in the sincerest of all flattery imitation. It 
was amusing, no doubt all that awkward and misfit affectation of 
oddities in gait and manner and abstractedness. But when we call 
to mind what extravagances are indulged in by the worshipers of 
Browning, or Balzac, or Kipling; what aping of royal eccentricities, 
deformities, and even vices, are common in high social life we shall 
see that these rustic admirers of the brilliant young teacher were not 
fools above all that dwell upon the face of the earth. 

In January, 1857, Charles Louis Loos came to the college 
as its president. He was a graduate of Bethany, and had 
served three years as a teacher in that institution. He was 
a native of France and had been trained in the Lutheran 
faith. His acceptance of the position of the Disciples came 
from a clear conviction of truth and duty. His change of 
church relation caused much bitterness among his Lutheran 
relatives. He remained at the head of the college only until 
the summer of 1858, when he returned to Bethany's Faculty. 

He was succeeded in the presidency by Mr. George Cal- 
lender, who came to Walnut Grove from Liverpool, England, 
in 1852. He was a Scotchman of fine mind and culture, and 
was highly esteemed by the students. Three years after his 
arrival in this locality, on a beautiful summer afternoon, be- 
fore a large concourse of people assembled on the bank of 
Walnut Creek, he declared in an impassioned address his 
joyful acceptance of the common, catholic principles of the 
New Testament faith, and, with his wife, was then immersed. 
Mr. Callender did little classroom work, but his frequent lec- 
tures were a source of information and inspiration to the 
students. The session beginning September, 1858, opened 



42 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

with the following Faculty: George Callender, B. W. John- 
son, A. S. Fisher, Dr. J. M. Allen, Misses Sue S. Smith, 
Elmira J. Dickinson and Jane Ewing. 

As early as 1849 a society was formed among the stu- 
dents for literary and social culture. It was named "Walnut 
Grove Literary Institute." Its meetings were held on Friday 
evening of every week, and were a source of great profit 
and pleasure to its members. In after years it was incorpo- 
rated under the name, "Edmund Burke Society." In 1857 
the Periclesian and Mathesian Societies were organized, the 
latter for the help of young men looking toward the Chris- 
tian ministry. These three societies were composed exclu- 
sively of males ; so in 1857 the Excelsior Society was formed 
for the advantage of young women. It continued as a helpful 
agency until in later years the Edmund Burke and Peri- 
clesian Societies declared ladies eligible to their memberships. 
Through the fifty-six years of the life of the college these 
societies have continued uninterruptedly. They have been 
valuable auxiliaries to the direct work of the institution. 

In 1860 the college graduated its first class Mr. E. W. 
Dickinson. He was then, and has been through most of the 
years since, a resident of Eureka, and has been one of its 
most honorable and useful citizens. 

To the Faculty of September, 1860, there were added 
Messrs. R. H. Johnson and J. H. Rowell and Misses Sarah 
Lamphere and Mary G. Clark, making altogether a teaching 
force of nine persons. Both the attendance and work of the 
school were encouraging. 

In 1861 came the beginning of the great Civil War. The 
one thought then uppermost in the minds, and the one pas- 
sion that then dominated every other in the hearts of all of 
America's loyal sons and daughters, was the preservation of 
the integrity of our Federal Union. In response to the first 
call of President Lincoln for volunteers, five of the seven 
men who were members of the Senior class one of whom 
was a teacher also entered the military service. It is a fact 
significant of the loyalty of the Disciples of Illinois to our 



CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 43 

flag that, in the awful period of storm and strife, the college 
graduated only three men. This institution has never been 
the slavish ally of any political party. Throughout its entire 
history it has always stood for those immutable principles of 
civic justice and righteousness that make peoples truly great 
and assure the life of the republic. 

B. W. Johnson succeeded to the presidency in 1862. He 
had performed the active duties of that office since 1858. He 
had been a student for three years in the academy, and there- 
after by two years' work in Bethany had graduated there. 
He was probably the best informed man on general history 
ever connected with the college. During that period many 
students listened eagerly to his remarkable and charming lec- 
tures on this subject. 

Mr. H. W. Everest came to the presidency in 1864. Leav- 
ing Bethany as a student because of his political convictions, 
he graduated from Oberlin. He left the presidency of Hiram 
College to come to Eureka. He was himself an untiring 
student of broad scholarship, a fine instructor in many lines 
of knowledge, and of superior executive ability. He was a 
modest man of fine personality who awakened commendable 
ambitions in his pupils and impressed them with high ideals. 
For more than half a century his influence was a potent factor 
in the lives of many who ever counted his guiding friendship 
a privilege. During the first three years of his administra- 
tion the number of students increased from 125 to 225. The 
close of the Civil War and the resumption of normal condi- 
tions contributed to this result. Then he was assisted by 
some able coadjutors in the school H. O. Newcomb, a grad- 
uate of the University of Michigan, a kindly teacher upon 
whom "the boys" could always depend in "emergencies," and 
Dr. J. M. Allen, a lovable and stimulating instructor. 

In 1863 the deficit in current expenses became serious. A 
canvass of the community was made and enough money was 
secured to tide over for a time. In this and many other 
emergencies of the college Mr. John Darst was the leading 
man. 



44 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Mr. Darst came from Ohio to Walnut Grove in 1851. 
Five years thereafter he laid out the town site of Eureka on 
land that he had previously purchased. He was the embodi 
ment of energy and industry, the soul of honor, "diligent in 
business, fervent in spirit, serving the Lord." Frequently he 
subordinated his personal interests to the public good. More 
than once he mortgaged his land to secure money to help 
the college. He was officially connected with the school for 
forty years and was one of its most steadfast and dependable 
friends. At a meeting held in Bloomington in 1868 to con- 
sider the educational interests of the Disciples in Illinois, 
reference was made to his liberality. Mr. Darst replied: 
"Indeed, brethren, it has been a sort of selfish thing with 
me; for I feel a great deal happier than if I did not give." 
He was the open foe of the saloon, and contributed five sons 
to the Union Army. He was the helpful friend of young 
men preparing for the ministry. B. B. Tyler was one to 
whom he extended practical encouragement. Mr. Tyler said: 
"I want the world to know what John Darst did for me and 
for the church of Christ. If I have been worth anything to 
the world, let the grand good man have the honor that be- 
longs to him." 

In 1866 an effort was made to add a few thousand dol- 
lars to the endowment, but, inasmuch as the donors were 
made the preferred borrowers, a large percentage of these 
notes became worthless through unexpected business failures; 
so the net result was small. The annual deficit increased in 
size like a rolled snowball. Overdue debts became an annoy- 
ance to the trustees and a very disagreeable inconvenience 
to the teachers. In this emergency individual claims were 
surrendered by numerous friends, a loan of $12,000 was 
secured, and thus temporary relief was attained. Meanwhile 
solicitors were afield. Among them were Dr. J. M. Allen 
and Ministers W. T. Maupin and W. G. Anderson. 

By 1867 the college had quite outgrown the capacity of 
the one building used for nine years. Its chapel was too 
small, the library and museum were overcrowded, and the 



CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 45 

literary societies needed more room. Hence the chapel build- 
ing was planned, partly financed and finished in 1868. 

At the close of eight years' service Mr. Everest resigned 
in 1872. He was succeeded the following year by A. M. 
Weston, who had come to the college two years before. He 
was a graduate of Antioch College under Horace Mann, had 
served as city editor on a Cincinnati (O.) daily paper, had 
given three years of his life in the Union Army, rising from 
a private to a second lieutenancy, and thereafter had given 
five years to educational work. During the three years of 
his presidency at Eureka the number of students steadily in- 
creased each year. 

B. J. Radford, the second, was born in Walnut Grove and 
has passed most of the seventy-five years of his busy and 
fruitful life in that community. After more than three years 
of military service in the Federal Army, he graduated at 
Eureka in the class of 1866. Beginning at Niantic, Illinois, 
in 1868 and closing in Denver, Colorado, in 1892, he spent 
sixteen years in ministerial work, interspersed with teaching. 
His ministerial work was from 1871 to 1881 at Eureka, and 
with intervals at Des Moines, Iowa, and Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Beginning in 1870, he was a college teacher, serving thirty 
full years, including one year as president of Drake Uni- 
versity ; the other twenty-nine years were given to Eureka 
College. He succeeded Mr. Weston in the presidency, con- 
tinuing two years in that position. His administration of all 
the interests of the institution was wise. Throughout his life 
Mr. Radford has been an omnivorous reader, an earnest stu- 
dent, a great thinker, an inspiring teacher and an interesting 
public speaker. Further, he is a clear and forceful writer, 
his productions including some genuine poetry. He has an ap- 
parently inexhaustible fund of humor and anecdote and is 
thoroughly democratic in his instincts. His life has been 
filled with earnest toil and uncomplaining self-sacrifice. Dur- 
ing his long career as a teacher he came into personal touch 
and the range of mental influence with thousands of young 
people who have passed through his classrooms. Hundreds 



46 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

of these were preparing for the Christian ministry; so he 
has gripped the lives of a larger number of youth by his po- 
tent personality than any other man ever connected with the 
institution. He has made an immeasurable contribution to 
the promotion of the Kingdom of God. Since 1886 he has 
been an associate editor of the Christian Standard. With 
Miss Jessie Brown he was coeditor of The Disciple for two 
years. For a period of ten years he was a popular lecturer 
on the Chautauqua platforms in Illinois, Indiana, Kansas and 
Tennessee, and for a much longer time in temperance and 
social-reform service. He is not without honor in his home 
community, for he has there united more couples in wedlock 
than any other man, while he has conducted probably one- 
half of all the funerals of those who now rest in Olio's 
silent city. "The Professor" is still strong, active and helpful, 
and is fairly entitled to be known as the honorable and hon- 
ored "Sage of Eureka." 

H. W. Everest returned to the presidency of the college 
in 1877. For three years more he led the school with his 
fine energy and scholarship. During this time a boarding- 
house for young men, with a capacity for forty-eight, was 
built. But this hall and that one erected in 1854, having 
served well their purposes, have gone the way of all earth. 
Each in its time was full of the romances of youth its joy- 
ous laughter and midnight oil but now there remain of them 
only a few fading memories. 

In 1881, Dr. J. M. Allen was elected to the presidency. 
Giving up the practice of medicine, he began his thirty years' 
service in the college in 1857. He gave the college faithful 
and efficient work as teacher, solicitor and president. His 
life was filled with good deeds and self-sacrifice. With a 
keen sense of humor, apt incident and fitting anecdote, he 
was always popular. His manifest sincerity and loyalty to 
truth and right awakened noble ideals in his pupils. His fine 
character left an imperishable impress upon thousands of 
young men and women. The college prospered during the 
four years of his administration. 



CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 47 

The teachers here have always received small salaries. 
Tuition fees are quite insufficient to meet the current expenses 
of any average school. Another effort was made to increase 
the endowment, but with limited results. Hence an Aid Fund 
was begun, and by this method a goodly number of friends 
gave direct help for thirty years. During that period Minis- 
ter W. F. Black gave valuable assistance. For the most the 
teachers have been men and women who were self-sacrificing, 
esteeming the Christian training and culture of young people 
greater gain than material riches. And since teachers and 
taught have been in almost daily personal contact, the influ- 
ence of this consecration has imperceptibly transformed ideals 
of life in the students as the vernal sun changes the face of 
the earth. 

The curriculum was broadened with the passing years, 
and, considering its limited material resources, the college 
kept pace with educational progress in a marked degree. 

In 1884 a commodious audience-room, designed by Pro- 
fessor Radford, was erected on the college campus, called 
"The Tabernacle." It is 80 by 100 feet in dimensions, seat- 
ing twelve hundred people. Its cost was $4,000, which was 
paid by citizens of the community. It stands on gently sloping 
ground that forms a natural amphitheater. For a period of 
twelve years the State Missionary Convention assembled 
there. It has served the college on Commencement and other 
occasions, and the community for various purposes, inclu- 
ding in the later years Chautauqua programs. 

In this year the union of Eureka and Abingdon Colleges 
was effected. The latter had been crippled years before by 
internal strife, and its popularity and usefulness much im- 
paired thereby. The public schools were growing steadily 
in efficiency and consequent appreciation. Removed from 
three to five decades from the period of pioneer school work, 
many Disciples did not understand the value and functions 
of colleges owned and directed by themselves. The material 
and mental steadily overgrew the spiritual in public esteem. 
Both of these colleges were receiving feeble financial support, 



4S HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

and that came mostly from the two localities in which they 
were situated. In the early eighties it became apparent that 
both of them could not live. Pres. F. M. Bruner made 
herculean efforts to save the Abingdon school. He knew its 
value to the churches of Christ in that part of the State and 
at large. But it was not so written in the records of destiny. 
After correspondence and personal consultations, it was de- 
cided to unite the college interests of the Disciples in Illinois 
at Eureka. By this arrangement F. M. Bruner; his son, H. 
L. Bruner; his daughter, Miss Lettie Bruner, and Mr. W. S. 
Errett became members of the Faculty of the united school. 
Up to that date Abingdon had graduated 164 and Eureka 
133 young men and women, a total of 297. This number 
probably did not amount to one-tenth of those who had come 
under their helpful influences. 

Carl Johann became president in 1887. He had served 
in this capacity during the preceding year while Dr. J. M. 
Allen was afield for finance. Mr. Johann was a native of 
Switzerland, near the boundary-line of France. From his 
sixth year he attended school eleven months in the year, and 
at the age of fifteen graduated from the high school of his 
native city Chaux-de-Fonds. During this period he acquired 
a knowledge of both the German and French languages, as 
both were in common use by the people of his native city. 
He was next sent by his parents to the College of Lausanne, 
where he completed its course of study in three years. 
Thereafter he was a student in the Universities of Aaran and 
Zurich for two years. At the age of twenty he went to 
Paris, France, to study, but within the year decided to come 
to America. Here he readily acquired a knowledge of our 
language. After various experiences as farm-helper, tutor, 
surveyor and public-school teacher, he came to Eureka in the 
fall of 1876 as Professor of Modern Languages. He was 
connected with the college twenty years eleven years as a 
teacher and nine as president. 

The attendance of students was steadily increasing, so that 
the boarding-halls were quite inadequate. At this juncture 



CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 49 

Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Ford, then residents of Eureka and sin- 
cere friends of the school, tendered to the trustees as a gift 
their beautiful residence, with four and a half acres of 
ground adjoining the campus, to be made into a boarding- 
hall for young lady students. The conditions were that it 
should be suitably enlarged and be known as "Lida's Wood" 
in memory of their only daughter. At a cost of $10,000 
the building was enlarged, completed and opened for students 
in the fall of 1888. After being used for five and a half 
years, this structure was burned to the ground January 11, 
1894. It was soon thereafter rebuilt on a larger and better 
plan. The yard of "The Wood" is covered with native, 
stately trees and is a charming place. The property has al- 
ways been a valuable and pleasing adjunct to the educational 
and social work of the institution. 

By 1890 the attendance of students had so increased that 
the classroom facilities were quite inadequate. The effort for 
a new building resulted in the completion of Burgess Memo- 
rial Hall in 1892, at a cost of $21,000. Of this sum, $10,000 
was the gift of Mrs. O. A. Burgess. The building was 
named by the Board of Trustees that it should stand as a 
memorial of her deceased husband, who, in its early years, 
had served as a teacher there and was a distinguished repre- 
sentative of the Disciples. In the session of 1892-93 there 
were 386 students enrolled, while the teachers numbered 
nineteen. 

In 1890 the trustees bought a five-acre tract near the 
campus for an athletic park. At the same time they con- 
verted a part of the old college building into a gymnasium. 

In these years of encouraging progress and helpfulness 
there were silent and potent forces at work that were soon 
to challenge the very life of the institution. The first and 
smaller of the two chief influences was the financial panic of 
the early nineties. The depreciation of values, the stagnation 
of business, the tramp of millions of industrious men and 
women in search of honorable work, and the utter ruin of 
countless commendable enterprises, were appalling. This de- 



SO HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

pression reached many nations. Naturally, attendance de- 
creased at such educational institutions, while their friends 
were generally less able to furnish the money they needed. 

But the greatest and continuing force with which all such 
colleges in Illinois must take account is the public-school sys- 
tem of the State. Founded in 1825, it has grown steadily in 
efficiency and popularity. This enlargement was particularly 
apparent in the two closing decades of the nineteenth century. 
In 1870 there were only two public high schools in Illinois; 
now (1912) there are 365 such schools in towns and cities, 
with fifty-seven township high schools having a four years' 
course a total of 422. Many of them are accredited to the 
State University. The curriculum of these schools has grown 
until now it is fully equal to that of the church schools forty 
years ago. While these colleges enlarged their courses of 
study and became more efficient in their work, they did not 
keep up with the State's high schools in popularity. The 
latter came to be regarded as the "People's College." Since 
about 1890, courses in these high schools have been elective, 
while at the present time there is a marked tendency toward 
vocational training. During this period of high-school 
growth the commonwealth had added to the two already in 
operation three additional Normal Schools one in the east- 
ern, one in the western and one in the northern part of the 
State. Access is thus made comparatively easy and inex- 
pensive to most of the young people who desire to attend 
them. Meanwhile, the University of Illinois has continued 
to grow in every way. The expenses incurred in the estab- 
lishing, equipment and conduct of this superior system of 
mental development and culture are largely met by general 
taxation, while the ever-increasing attendance develops en- 
thusiasm in the student body. These things have had a 
marked influence toward decreasing the growth of church 
schools in attendance. 

By 1896 an indebtedness of $30,000 confronted the trus- 
tees. Minister J. H. Hardin had shown his ability as a 
solicitor in several fields ; so, upon the invitation of the board, 



CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 51 

he accepted the presidency. It was understood that, for a 
time at least, his attention would be given to finance. Under 
his leadership the debt was paid and 200 acres of land in the 
corn belt of Illinois was given to the college by Mr. T. A. 
Bondurant, of De Land, Illinois. Mr. Hardin was a graduate 
of Kentucky and Missouri Universities, had served as presi- 
dent of Christian University at Canton, Missouri; as corre- 
sponding secretary of the American Christian Missionary 
Society, and in other responsible positions, before coming to 
Eureka. During his administration the academic garb was 
first introduced and worn at Commencement. 

The grade of work done by Eureka College is indicated, 
in some degree, by the following facts: The college was ad- 
mitted as a member of the Illinois Intercollegiate Oratorical 
Association in 1896. This is composed of Knox, Illinois, 
Monmouth and Eureka Colleges and Wesleyan and Black- 
burn Universities. For the ten years next ensuing, Eureka's 
place was this: 1896, second place; 1897, fourth; 1898, first; 
1899, first; 1900, first; 1901, second; 1902, first; 1903, sec- 
ond; 1904, first; 1905, first six firsts and three seconds for 
Eureka in one decade became painfully monotonous to the 
other colleges forming the association. Something had to 
be done ; so in 1906 the young men in Eureka preparing for 
the Christian ministry were, by a vote of the association, de- 
barred from its membership on the alleged ground that "they 
are professionals"! And, further, the same spirit and good 
work that fairly won these honors brought victory in other 
contests also. The only time Eureka had a representative 
in the Equal Suffrage Contest, the first place was given by 
every judge. The Peace Contest is open to all the colleges 
of the State. Eureka has taken fourth place, and in 1912 
secured third, fourteen colleges competing. Even better suc- 
cess has been the order in Prohibition work. One third place, 
two seconds and two firsts make a worthy record. Twice 
have Eureka's representatives won high honors in the Inter- 
state Prohibition Contest. One year Eureka's representative 
tied for first place in thought and composition and ranked 



52 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

third on the final grade, and in 1900 he took first place. 

Robert E. Hieronymus became president in 1900. Pie was 
born in Logan County, Illinois, in 1862, graduated from the 
State Normal in 1886, from Eureka in 1889, and thereafter 
was one year a student in the University of Michigan. He 
was a successful teacher in the college from 1890 to 1899, 
except two years in which he was engaged as superintendent 
of extension work in the University of California. During 
his presidency the central heating-plant was installed, and the 
college buildings were renovated, repaired and modernized. 
In the library $5,000 was invested and about twenty-five hun- 
dred volumes were added thereto. 

There were three problems that confronted the adminis- 
tration of Mr. Hieronymus, all of which had been accentuated 
by some preceding years. First, that of financial support 
was, of course, continuous. Second, the growing efficiency, 
popularity and geographical convenience of the system of the 
State schools, as above noted, imposed upon the church 
schools a very earnest and serious contest for students. 
Then, the question of holding growing and capable teachers 
was to be met and it is yet. The college has developed 
some of its graduates into very efficient teachers only to lose 
a number of them at the time of their larger usefulness to 
other better compensating institutions. 

Through the initiative of President Hieronymus, the 
Young Men's and Young Women's Christian Associations 
were formed in the college. He encouraged and emphasized 
the Student Volunteer Movement and foreign mission service. 
By means of these agencies the Christian activities of the 
college were brought up to date, and its religious influences, 
uniting with those of other Protestant church schools in 
Illinois, made themselves definitely felt in the State schools 
of higher education. 

For sixty-five years Eureka has been a center of mis- 
sionary education and activity. The college was imbued with 
the aim long since. The list of missionaries whom the college 
has helped to train is a notable one. Of these, three died 



CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 53 

before leaving their homes Miss Lois E. A. Pratz, Miss 
Alice Ropp and Mr. Oliver Moody. The following, by tea- 
son of ill health induced by residence in foreign field, or from 
other considerations, have either returned to America, or are 
now elsewhere and otherwise engaged: Mr. E. E. Faris, Mr. 
and Mrs. Roscoe Hill, Mr. and Mrs. C. S. Weaver and Mr. 
and Mrs. L. C. McPherson. Those now at work in oilier 
fields are Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Menges, Mr. and Mrs. F. E. 
Hagin, Mr. and Mrs. R. D. McCoy, Mr. Leslie Wolf, Mr. R. 
R. Eldred, Mr. A. E. Cory, Miss Edna Eck, Miss Bertha 
Lacock, Miss Nellie Daugherty (who became the wife of 
Dr. Butchart), Emory Ross, Mrs. Lillie Boyer Hedges, Dr. 
E. B. Pearson, Lewis A. Hurt, Dr. W. H. Freymire and Miss 
Frances Irene Banta. But the greatest of all was the beau- 
tiful young woman, Miss Ella C. Ewing, who, when on the 
banks of the great Congo River, mid-continent, she lay dying 
of African fever, said, "Tell them to come and take my 
place." In all, fifty-seven missionaries have received their 
training at Eureka; also, fourteen teachers who have served 
in the Southern Christian Institute at Edwards, Mississippi, 
and two in the academy at Hazel Green, Kentucky. 

The Illinois Christian Educational Association was formed 
by a few devoted women in Eureka in 1899. Its object is to 
help secure the co-operation of friends through the State in 
the maintenance and enlargement of the college. One dollar 
a year is paid by every member. Since its beginning about 
five thousand persons have thus co-operated. The present 
membership is fifteen hundred. During its thirteen years the 
association has raised and paid to the college $45,000. In 
this agency Mrs. S. J. Crawford has been the consecrated 
and honored leader. 

A campaign for a better endowment was inaugurated in 
the State Missionary Convention held at Paris in 1906. In 
January, 1912, the trustees reported that the college was en- 
tirely free from debt and that it had a bona-fide endowment 
of $170,000. The credit and honor of this achievement be- 
longs chiefly to Mr. H. H. Peters, who led in this campaign 



54 

for three years. A multitude of discouragements confronted 
him daily, but he went forward with the courage, the optimism 
and the resolute purpose that were simply admirable. How- 
ever, if the Disciples of Illinois think to conduct a creditable 
institution of learning for less than $1,000,000 in bankable 
endowment, they quite misread the signs of the times. 
The years of paltry parsimony in the best educational work 
have gone by. This school would have died long since had 
it not been that John Darst, Dr. N. B. Crawford, James P. 
Darst, and others while living, according to their financial 
ability, sustained it by thousands and tens of thousands of 
their own dollars. Fifty to sixty per cent, of all the money 
paid for this institution has been contributed by the com- 
munity in which it is located. This generosity has enriched 
the community. 

President Hieronymus brought the college to a standing 
among and recognition by the other educational forces of the 
State that it had never before had. During the nine years 
of his administration he put into the school the best of his 
fine mind and heart. The burdens were more than he could 
bear. Broken bodily health compelled him to relinquish the 
onerous responsibilities. 

Prof. A. C. Gray, who had taught in the college since 
1908, served as acting president for two and a half years, 
not wishing to accept its leadership. Mr. Charles C. Under- 
wood became president in February, 1912. He was succeeded 
by Mr. H. O. Pritchard, September 1, 1913. 

If schools are to be measured by the men and women 
they train and contribute to society, then Eureka College is 
the equal of any educational institution in the State or the 
nation. Doing severally their duties wisely and well, her 
sons are met upon the farm and in the marts of trade, in 
teachers and physicians, at the bar and upon the bench, in 
editorial rooms and in the councils of state; and her daugh- 
ters, if filling less conspicuous places, are no less helpful 
in serving their times. 

The following list of Christian ministers who received 



CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 



55 



their training chiefly at Eureka indicates in some degree the 
value of the institution to the church and to the world: 

GRADUATES. 

Those marked thus * are deceased. 



Adams, C. J. 
Allen, John W. 
Alsup, J. T. 
Bain, John. 
Barnett, H. M. 
Barnett, James A. 
Bennett, Harry Gordon 
Beshers, R. L. 
Boyer, E. E. 
Boyer, Thomas A. 
Breeden, H. O. 
Bullock, J. Harry 
Burgess, T. M. 
Burnham, F. W. 
Cannon, Wm. H. 
Carpenter, J. W. 
Carpenter, W. J. 
Chandler, George F. 
Chenoweth, Irving S. 
Clark, H. D.* 
Clemens, J. A. 
Cobb, Abner P. 
Coleson, Hiram K. 
Cory, A. E. 
Crank, J. R. 
Dabney, C. B. 
Dabney, J. D. 
Dale, Hiram U. 
Davis, L. F. 
Deweese, W. D. 
Doan, R. B. 
Doney, O. K. 
Drummet, Wm. 
Ennefer, S. A. 
Faulders, L. I. 
Finger, S. Daisy 
Fisher, Eli* 
Fisher, Stephen E. 
Garrison, W. E. 



Genders, Henry* 
Ghormley, J. F. 
Gilhland, Ernest A. 
Giililand, J. H.* 
Green, W. A. 
Hagin, Fred E. 
Hallam, S. K. 
Harrington, L. S. 
Harris, J. E. 
Hart, E. J.* 
Haynes, N. S. 
Heckel, C. A. 
Hieronymus, R. E. 
Horner, J. M. 
Hotaling, L. R. 
Huff, A. L. 
Huff, Lewie G. 
Idleman, Finis S. 
Jenner, H. H. 
Jones, Silas 
Jordan, O. F. 
Kern, W. H. 
Kindred, W. H. 
Kirk, James* 
Lappin, W. O. 
Lehman, L. O. 
Lichtenberger, J. P. 
Lyon, Clyde L. 
McBean, John L. 
McCoy, R. D. 
McKnight, J. P. 
McPherson, Lowell C. 
McReynolds, Paul 
Marlow, C. W. 
Marsh, Clark 
Mavity, Thos. W. 
Menges, Melvin 
Miller, Geo. A. 
Mitchell, Cyprus R. 



Nay, Roley 
Newton, R. H. 
Nichols, Fred S. 
Ogle, J. T. 
Oviatt, O. Q. 
Parke, Myrtle B. 
Parvin, Ira L. 
Peters, Geo. L. 
Peters, H. H. 
Pickerell, L. B. 
Price, Wm. 
Quinlan, J. G. 
Radford, B. J. 
Radford, Chas. T. 
Reichel, H. C. 
Reynolds, H. J. 
Richards, O. A. 
Richardson, W. F. 
Rogers, Edwin* 
Ross, Geo. W.* 
Ross, Charles W. 
Rowlison, C. C. 
Sealock, B. H. 
Serena, J. A. 
Seyster, D. F. 
Shaw, Herbert P. 
Shaw, W. F. 
Shields, David H. 
Sinclair, C. C. 
Sinclair, Ellmore 
Sinclair, John A. 
Skelton, Leroy* 
Smith, F. E. 
Smith, F. P. 
Smith, J. F. 
Smith, O. L. 
Smith, W. G. 
Sniff, W. W. 
Spicer, W. E. 



56 



HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 



Stauffer, C. R. 
Stewart, O. W. 
Stivers, J. T. 
Street, John W. 
Streibich, Harry M. 
Sutherland, Jos. R. 
Sutton, F. W. 
Sweeney, Geo. W. 
Thackaberry, F. M. 



Allen, J. Buford* 
Allen, James M.* 
Agee, Ivan W. 
Asbell, J. M. 
Beckelhymer, Isaac 
Beekman, J. V.* 
Berry, Geo. K. 
Berry, J. Festus* 
Borop, N. A. 
Bowen, F. L. 
Bradbury, D. C. 
Burr, Amos A. 
Calvin, F. N. 
Camp, J. W. 
Campbell. Walter S.* 
Cantrell, C. G. 
Carpenter, C. C. 
Clements, J. S. 
Cloe, J. N. 
Conner, A. M. 
Coombs, J. V. 
Cotterell, Henry A. 
Cragun, E. D. 
Cummings, Clark W. 
Dangerfield, Rachel 
Davis, F. S. 
Denham, W. W. 
Deweese, C. C.* 
Dunkerson, Thomas* 
Earl; Henry S. 
Eldred, R. R. 
Engle, Ira 
Ennefer, W. L. 
Evans, Chas. E. 



Thomas, J. N. 


Waggoner, J. G. 


Thomas, R. E. 


Waggoner, W. H. 


Thomas, S. M.* 


Weaver, Clifford S. 


Thrapp, R. F. 


Wetzel, D. N. 


Tucker, Harry E. 


Williams, Charles 


Vawter, S. D. 


Wilson, Arthur A.* 


Ventress, K. C. 


Wray, Burton L. 


Vogel, Peter* 


Zendt, S. H. 


Waggoner, H. G. 




NON-GRADUATE STUDENTS. 


Fannon, Shorland 


Lessig, Ray S. 


Finch, C. A. 


Lester, J. N. 


Finnell, Rufus 


McConnell, W. T. 


Gains, C. R. 


McCune, J. L. 


German, W. C. 


McElroy, G. W.* 


Gilcrest, R. A. 


McPherson, J. H.* 


Gish, Ellis P. 


McPherson, R. P. 


Golden, J. R. 


Madden, D. W. 


Golightly, T. J. 


Madison, W. D. 


Hale, A. M. 


Maupin, W. T.* 


Marker, J. N. 


Medbury, C. S. 


Harward, H. G. 


Miller, John* 


Hayden, W. H.* 


Moffett, F. L. 


Henry, A. W. 


Moomaw, Otho 


* Hiett, J. W. 


Monser, J. W.* 


Hill, Lew D. 


Organ, C. L. 


Holloman, T. J. 


Porter, J. W. 


Hougham, C. D. 


Poynter, D. J. 


Honn, D. W. 


Poynter, W. C* 


Howe, D. J. 


Pratt, B. C. 


Howell, R. E.* 


Ragsdale, Alva 


Humphrey, W. A.* 


Rowe, G. H. 


Husband, David 


Russell, W. J. 


Jefferson, S. M.* 


Rust, W. H. 


Jewett, J. E.* 


Scott, F. A. 


Johnson, B. W.* 


Scrivens, C. A. 


Johnson, J. B. 


Shirley, Arnold 


Johnson, R. H. 


Shurts, John W. 


1 Keller, E. H. 


Smith, J. T.* 


Kindred, C. G. 


Smoot, C. E. 


Kitchen, W. G. 


Snively, Geo. L. 


Lappin, J. C. 


Sorey, M. Lee 


Lappin, S. S. 


Speck, J. R. 


Ledgerwood, H. D.* 


Spicer, A. R. 



CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 57 

Spriggs, E. A. Sutton, F. W. Willoughby, W. D. 

Stauffer, C. Lee Sweeney, Z. T. Wisher, C. C. 

Stevenson, Marion Thomas, G. W. Wolfe, Leslie E. 

Stewart, James F. Thomas, L. R. Wright, N. J. 

Stout, Elijah* Tyler, B. B. York, P. F. 

Stout, John E. Weimer, G. M. Zinck, Gilbert 

To the list of those who were trained at Eureka for the 
service in the Kingdom of God, the following names should 
be added: Mrs. Caroline Neville Pearre, the mother of the 
Christian Woman's Board of Missions; Miss Elmira J. Dick- 
inson, her coadjutor in the national work and the mother of 
the Illinois C. W. B. M.; Mrs. O. A. Burgess, the president 
of the national society for twelve years and one of its wisest 
leaders ; Mrs. S. J. Crawford and Miss Anna E. Davidson, 
who have given to the State Society invaluable assistance. 

THE DISCIPLES' DIVINITY HOUSE. 

This school originated in 1895, with Mr. Herbert L. Wil- 
lett as acting dean. 

Its purpose is to provide, at the University of Chicago, 
an organization of all students who look toward ministerial 
and missionary work. The House is an organic part of the 
university. In addition to the regular courses of the divinity 
school of the university, the House offers courses of instruc- 
tion to graduate students in the origin, teaching, history, aims 
and literature of the Disciples, for which work credit is 
given in the university. Since its organization about three 
hundred students a few more or less have availed them- 
selves of its advantages, including a number of missionaries. 
Mr. Willett is the present dean, and Mr. Errett Gates, who 
is also a member of the university corps of instructors, is 
associated with him in its work. 

The management of the House is vested in a self-perpetu- 
ating board of fifteen trustees who handle all property and 
appoint the instructors. In 1895 a lot 150x175 feet at the 
corner of Fifty-seventh Street and Lexington Avenue, just 
opposite the "University Quadrangles," was bought for 



58 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

$13,000. On this the Hyde Park Church of Christ has a tem- 
porary chapel. In addition to this lot, the House has an 
interest-bearing endowment of $30,000. It is the purpose of 
the trustees to build on this lot a structure, costing about 
$150,000, which shall serve as the home of the Hyde Park 
Church of Christ, for the House with its office, library and 
classrooms, and which may further serve as the common 
meeting-place of all Disciples who may be in attendance at 
the university at any time. Mr. Charles M. Sharp is engaged 
to lead in this material enterprise, and also to serve as an addi- 
tional instructor in the House. The library was based on the 
private library of the late Min. J. T. Toof, to which has 
been added journalistic and other literature of the Disciples ; 
also German and Scottish literature pertaining to religious 
conditions of society out of which the Restoration movement 
grew. This is the only school among the Disciples for the 
higher training of men entering the ministry of the word of 
God. The Bible chairs are to furnish college students with 
a knowledge of the Holy Scriptures. The city of Chicago 
affords endless facilities for practical work. It is a labora- 
tory of human life. 

ABINGDON COLLEGE. 

On the first Monday in April, 1853, Patrick H. Murphy 
and John C. Reynolds opened a school in Abingdon, Illinois. 
They called it Abingdon Academy. It met in the Christian 
Church, a plain frame building. It grew and prospered. 
Messrs. Murphy and Reynolds were graduates of Bethany 
College. They possessed the educational spirit of the great 
founder of that institution. It was their purpose to build up 
a first-class college at Abingdon. 

Within a period of seventeen months a three-story brick 
building, 40 x 60 feet in dimensions, had been erected and 
equipped, the school had been chartered by special act of the 
State Legislature under the name of Abingdon College, and 
in September, 1854, the institution opened its doors for busi- 
ness. The first name written on the registration list was Miss 



CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 59 

Elvira Whitman, Cameron, Illinois. She was sixteen years 
of age. In the class of 1858 she graduated, taught four 
years thereafter, and in 1862 became the wife of Judge Dur- 
ham. They traveled very happily together past fifty Thanks- 
giving Days; when that of 1911 had gone, she went away to 
the Father's house. 

President Murphy was a product of the old church at 
Cameron. He was scholarly, a good teacher and executive, 
an eloquent preacher and a fine type of Christian gentleman. 
The college began most auspiciously. Everybody breathed 
daily the nope fulness and enthusiasm of youth. The country, 
the school, the building, the teachers and pupils were all 
young. The joy of living and learning was the keenest. Dur- 
ing the six years of Mr. Murphy's presidency 1,087 students 
were enrolled, of whom 600 were males and 487 females. In 
the summer of 1860 Mr. Murphy died of tuberculosis. 

He was succeeded in the presidency by J. W. Butler, who 
had been connected with the college from its beginning. Un- 
der his administration the school continued to prosper. New 
buildings were added at a cost of $40,000, and were fully 
paid for. The Civil War seriously affected the attendance at 
nearly all schools. However, the enrollment during nine 
years of Mr. Butler's ten years' administration was 1,604, of 
whom 983 were males and 721 females. During the later 
years of his administration a large number of the supporters 
and friends of the college concluded that the interests of the 
school would be promoted by a change in the presidency. 
These persons gave to Mr. Butler honorable recognition for 
his faithful and efficient service; still, they insisted upon a 
change. Mr. Butler fully determined that there should be 
no change in his official relation to the college at that time. 
This led to factional spirit and continued contentions. The 
school lost its prestige and its friends fell away. This was 
the beginning of the end of the institution. 

At this juncture J. W. McGarvey, of Lexington, Ken- 
tucky, was elected president, but declined the honor. Mr. 
Butler served till 1874, and was succeeded by Oval Pirkey, 



60 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

who passed through troubled times. Clark Braden was at 
the head of the school in 1876-77. In the latter year F. M. 
Bruner came to the presidency. He was a man of fine schol- 
arship, unflagging industry and commendable ambitions. He 
fully realized the worth of the college as a factor in general 
education and particularly its value to the churches of Christ 
in the Military Tract and at large as well. His efforts 
through a period of seven years, to reanimate and rehabilitate 
the college, were herculean and self-sacrificing to a degree. 
But it was not so written in the records of destiny. The 
evils of vain ambition could not be undone. In 1884 the in- 
stitution became affiliated with Eureka College and its doors 
were closed forever. 

But Abingdon was worth far more than it ever cost. It 
gave to the church and society useful men and women whose 
influences for good have been widely impressed. Among 
these may be named A. P. Aten, C. C. Button, M. F. Button, 
G. T. Carpenter, H. H. Coffeen, George Dew, Judge Durham, 
Lizzie Dodge Carson, J. H. Garrison, J. H. Gilliland, William 
Griffin, Josephus Hopwood, Marion Ingles, Mrs. Libbie F. 
Ingles, G. H. Laughlin, J. M. Martin, C. E. Price, J. H. 
Smart, A. J. Thompson, J. T. Toof and Emma Veatch Lor- 
man. During the life of the college it had graduated 164 
people, and about four thousand had come into direct touch 
with its helpful influences. 

Abingdon College had practically no endowment. 

BEREAN COLLEGE. 

This institution was organized at Jacksonville, under the 
general incorporation law of the State, April 25, 1854. Sec- 
tions 2 and 3 of the charter read as follows: 

The objects contemplated by this act of incorporation are to build 
up and maintain, in the town of Jacksonville, an institution of learning 
of the highest class, for males and females, to teach and inculcate the 
Christian faith and morality of the sacred Scriptures, and for the 
promotion of the arts and sciences. 

The trustees shall have power to erect the necessary buildings, to 



CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 61 

appoint a president, professors and teachers, and other agents and 
officers ; to confer degrees in the liberal arts and sciences, and to do all 
other tilings for the encouragement of religion and learning which are 
lawfully done by the most approved seminaries and colleges in the 
United States. 

The first Board of Trustees was composed of Hon. Joseph 
Morton, President ; Jesse Galbraith, Secretary ; Joseph J. Cas- 
sall, Treasurer; Nathan M. Knapp, Andrew J. Kane, William 
C. Mallory, Jacob Ward, James Simpson, Samuel G. Weag- 
ley, Samuel T. Galloway, Nimrod Deweese, Anderson Fore- 
man, Joel Headington, Jonathan Atkinson and William W. 
Happy, Sr. The Faculty was as follows: Minister Jonathan 
Atkinson, President, Professor of Latin and Greek, lecturer 
on sacred history and instructor in French; William W". 
Happy, Jr., teacher of mathematics and the natural sciences 
and instructor in German ; Miss Melinda Bond, governess 
and teacher of history, rhetoric and philosophy; William D. 
Hillis, teacher of vocal music; Mrs. L. E. Hillis, teacher of 
instrumental music. 

The school opened the first Monday in October, 1854. The 
term was forty weeks of two equal semesters. During the 
first year ninety-six pupils were enrolled fifty-nine males 
and thirty-seven females. 

In addition to academic courses, the study of the Bible 
was required of all students, and the president delivered 
every year a course of lectures on sacred history. 

The school was located a short distance east of the town 
on a five-acre campus, a quiet and beautiful place. The first 
term was held in a frame building located on one side of the 
ground. Meanwhile, an attractive brick building was erected. 
It was occupied by the school in 1855. This structure now 
forms the east part of Pasevant Memorial Hospital. In 
1857 Minister Walter Scott Russell came to the presidency of 
the college. He was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1832, and 
graduated from Bethany College in 1856, and was a man of 
unquestioned culture and piety. He was at that time the 
pastor of the Jacksonville Church also. While his sincerity 



62 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

and Christian excellences were admitted, he was a mystic of 
the Samuel Taylor Coleridge school of thought. The faith 
of the versatile thinker was kaleidoscopical. Coleridge says 
of himself that he became so absorbed in abstract specula- 
tion that history, facts, and even poetry, became insipid to 
him. Mr. Russell became so attached to and absorbed in this 
theory that the Bible as a revelation from God became sec- 
ondary to the direct spiritual illumination of the soul by the 
Holy Spirit. Upon this theory he insisted. His teaching, in 
both the college and the pulpit, was subordinated to this idea. 
Some of our leading ministers became the open advocates of 
this doctrine. The school was fairly successful for four 
years. But the mystical teaching of Mr. Russell produced a 
division in the Jacksonville Church of Christ. This rupture 
forced the discontinuance of the college forever. 

Mr. Russell went into the service of the Christian Com- 
mission. While caring for sick and wounded soldiers he con- 
tracted disease at Vicksburg, Mississippi, from which he died 
there in November, 1863. 

Mr. Campbell, speaking to the students of Berean College 
in 1858, said: "W. S. Russell is admirably qualified for the 
responsible position he occupies." 

MAJOR SEMINARY 

Was founded by William T. Major at Bloomington in 1856. 
The institution had long been in the heart of its founder. 
It was first designed as a female orphan school. This aim 
was soon abandoned and the school became a seminary for 
the general education and culture of young women under 
the auspices of the Christian Church. A brick building five 
stories in height, costing about $20,000, was erected by Mr. 
Major. It was on Seminary Avenue the street taking its 
name from the school and Lee and Oak Streets. For a 
number of years the seminary was fairly prosperous. A 
goodly number of young women were helped to finer ideals 
and better preparation for their life-work. But tuition fees 
were insufficient to sustain an efficient Faculty. The public 



CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 63 

schools grew in popularity, and coeducation found a larger 
following in the colleges of the time. The attendance of 
pupils at the seminary did not increase, and hence the enter- 
prise was abandoned in the later sixties. 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS COLLEGE. 

In 1856 the Presbyterian Church erected a brick building 
for a college in Carbondale, Illinois. The structure was 
enclosed and partly plastered. The Civil War killed the 
enterprise. 

In June, 1866, a convention of members of the churches 
of Christ in that part of the State was held at De Soto. 
At this meeting a committee was appointed to negotiate for 
the Presbyterian building and grounds in Carbondale. In 
a second convention, held in De Soto in August of the same 
year, the purchase of the property by the committee was 
ratified, a Board of Trustees was elected, and Clark Braden 
was chosen as president. 

The title to this property was then vested in Messrs. J. 
M. Campbell and D. H. Brush. They sold it to these trustees 
for $10,000, the first named donating $1,000 and the last 
named $500 on the purchase price. Messrs. Lysias Heap, 
Pleasant Pope, B. F. Pope, Frederick Williams, Stephen 
Blair, E. C. Ford, John Goodall, F. M. Goodall and S. R. 
Hog gave severally $500, leaving a debt of $4,000. 

In this unfinished, unfurnished and dilapidated building, 
the first week in October, 1866, President Braden opened the 
school with eight pupils. At the close of the first year 155 
different pupils had been enrolled. The second year, 1867-68, 
the enrollment went up to 240 pupils. The third year enroll- 
ment was 400 different pupils, of whom 360 were in attend- 
ance at the spring term. This was the largest enrollment of 
any school controlled by the churches of Christ up to that 
time. 

In the session of 1869 the Illinois Legislature enacted 
a law establishing a normal school in that city, in the 
southern part of the State, which would make the best dona- 



64 , HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

tion to such school. There was very keen competition for 
this institution between Olney, Centralia, Duquoin and Car- 
bondale. The last named was handicapped by its location, 
being only forty-five miles from the southern end of a State 
that is four hundred miles long. The chief claim of Carbon- 
dale was the great normal school in Southern Illinois Col- 
lege. The city of Carbondale proposed to purchase this 
school and its property and make them a part of their bid 
for the State Normal. The Faculty and the churches of 
Christ in that part of the State were urged to unite and 
work for the location of the State school there. 

President Braden and his wife, in addition to their 
arduous labors in the college, had spent $4,600 in finishing 
and furnishing the building. For its current expenses the 
college had cost no one a cent outside of tuitions. The 
interest on the $4,000 indebtedness had not been paid. At 
this juncture of affairs, in a meeting of the trustees and 
other friends of the college, Mr. Braden urged that the debt 
be paid off, that a wing to the building, which was over- 
crowded, be erected, and that the State Normal go to Olney, 
that then led the other cities in the bid. A goodly number 
of Disciples were in accord with these views. Air. Braden 
and his faithful colaborers had built up a great school. 
From its beginning, normal work had been the leading 
feature. The clock of time was striking the crisis-hour of 
Southern Illinois College. The money was not forthcoming, 
and the property was sold to the city of Carbondale. It is 
clear that to this growing young college and its normal 
work, the prime factor of which was Clark Braden, the city 
of Carbondale is indebted for the Southern Illinois Normal 
University. 

THE BASTIAN SEMINARY. 

In September, 1868, Mr. and Mrs. N. S. Bastian opened 
a school at Sullivan." They were well-educated and cultured 
people and saw clearly the need at that time of facilities 
that would supplement the limited work of the public schools. 



CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 65 

Possibly there was not a high school in the State at that 
time certainly not more than one or two. Mr. Bastian had 
sold about one hundred scholarships. These were to run 
five years, which was the life-period of the institution. The 
curriculum included the studies usually found in the small 
college of that time. In these there were enrolled from 
fifty to sixty pupils, never more than seventy-five. The 
lower grades were in charge of Miss R. Latherman, with 
an average attendance of sixty-five pupils. The school did 
good work and exerted a fine influence in the town and on 
the surrounding community. This aim was most commend- 
able. 

Mr. Bastian preached for the Sullivan Church during 
this time. In addition to all these duties, the principal of 
the school and his wife boarded a number of the students in 
their own home to help meet their living expenses. They 
aimed to apply some of the receipts from the school on the 
purchase price of the property that was occupied. Mrs. 
Bastian before her marriage was Miss Eunice Jewett, of 
Dayton, O. Her father's house had been the stopping-place 
of many of the pioneers in the Restoration movement. She 
had a superior knowledge of the Scriptures and was a 
woman of fine mental and social culture. Her home was 
a charming place. In addition to all of her domestic and 
school responsibilities, she was noted for her wise counsel, 
her ministries of sympathy to the forlorn and benevolences 
to the poor. In her last illness, after the attending physi- 
cian had assured her that the end was near, the Sunday- 
school superintendent, not knowing her condition, came 
into her room for her advice about the children's program. 
This she gave, spoke of the Lord's promise and bade 
the superintendent a final good-by. The value of such a 
woman is beyond human estimate, and her influence never 
dies. 

After five years of usefulness the school closed from lack 
of support. With rare exceptions is educational work main- 
tained by tuition fees and infrequent donations. 



66 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

ALMA INDUSTRIAL COLLEGE. 

The thought of an industrial school at Alma originated 
with Mr. W. S. Ross, a graduate of Abingdon College, and 
pastor of the Alma Christian Church. The proposition was 
heartily favored by the community. Subscriptions were 
secured. Four acres of land were bought, and a good two- 
story, eight-room frame building was erected thereon. The 
title to this property was vested in a Board of Trustees. The 
school opened in September, 1896. It was coeducational and 
aimed to help worthy young people to start well in life. 
An option on 420 acres of land was secured, and a printing- 
office was bought and installed in the building. The aim 
was to have the boys work part of the time on the farm 
and the girls in the printing-office, and thus pay part of their 
expenses. In addition to this labor, every pupil paid $120 
per annum. This work and cash secured for each and every 
pupil during the school year board and lodging, instruction 
and books. Experience proved that the school could not be 
maintained on this financial basis. Appeals for assistance in 
localities from which the school was easily accessible met 
with meager responses. Debt accumulated ; hence, in 1900, 
the school was discontinued. The property was sold, for 
public uses, for $3,000, which was said to have been one-half 
of its value. All debts were settled. The average attendance 
during the four years was about one hundred per year. The 
men who served as head of the school or president were 
H. Y. Keller, W. H. Boles, A. A. Hibner, Clark Braden, 
W. B. Bedell, P. J. Dickerson and Thomas Munnell. Mr. 
Munnell died just before the final closing of the institu- 
tion. His body is buried at Alma. This enterprise was 
most commendable. 

CHRISTIAN COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE. 

From 1881 to 1887 this school, which was of seminary 
rank, was conducted at Metropolis. The prime movers in the 
enterprise were Messrs. J. F. McCartney, Solomon Tan- 



CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 67 

hauser, T. S. Stone, M. N. McCartney, William Wright and 
J. M. Elliott. 

The sessions were held in the old seminary building that 
stood at the corner of Katherine and Fifth Streets, opposite 
the Christian Church. The average attendance during the 
period was sixty pupils. There were from four to six teach- 
ers employed, whose financial support was received from 
tuition fees and personal donations to the institution. 

The curriculum included a normal course, English classics, 
a business course and instruction in the Bible. 

The growing aims and efforts of the high schools in a 
degree took the ground occupied by this institute; hence it 
was closed and the property sold. 



CHAPTER IV. 
THE PERIOD OF CONQUEST. 
THE ERA OF PUBLIC DISCUSSIONS. 

There were two causes that led to many public debates 
between representatives of the Disciples and those of other 
religious bodies. The first was the spirit of controversy that 
was prevalent in most denominations at the beginning of the 
movement for the restoration of the New Testament church 
in its teachings, its ordinances and its life. The sermons of 
that time were full of denials and affirmations. Minister 
James Leaton, who was a member of the Illinois Conference 
and a godly man, was pastor of the First Methodist Episco- 
pal Church in Decatur from 1876 to 1878. During that 
time, speaking of the changed spirit of public discourses, he 
said to some friends: "Fifty years ago, whatever might be 
the sermon subject and text of the average Methodist 
preacher, the discourse generally closed with these words, 
'So you see, brethren, that Calvinism can not be true. Let 
us pray.' " Secondly, the preaching of the Disciples was new 
and strange. They appealed to the word of God as the sole 
and final authority; others appealed to their varying human 
creeds and went to the Bible for texts to prove them. Great 
confusion of thought and statement was inevitable. Party 
spirit was dominant, denominational pride uppermost. The 
deed was subordinated to the creed. Church people disliked 
or even hated one another for the love of God. The Disci- 
ples were sometimes misunderstood, sometimes misrepre- 
sented, sometimes condemned, sometimes shamelessly and 
shockingly slandered, and very generally counted without the 
circle of orthodoxy. One of these preachers wrote in 1844 

68 



THE PERIOD OF CONQUEST 69 

as follows: "I have stood here alone for four years, a mark 
for sectarian malice to vent itself against. A short time 
since I was pointed out in a congregation by one of the 
called and sent as 'a water-washed, white-faced devil, a wolf 
in sheep's clothing, a preacher of damnable doctrines.' )] To 
those who live in these better years such bigotry and base- 
ness seem hardly credible. The Disciples were compelled to 
fight. They have always been ready, and are yet where cir- 
cumstances require, to defend their teachings in the arena of 
public debate. In preaching the things which they sincerely 
believe to be the word of God and the requirements of our 
Lord, their preachers have many times clashed with others 
and frequently with unbelievers. The challenges for public 
discussion usually came from those who opposed. Their evan- 
gelists went often unheralded into many communities, pro- 
claimed an affirmative gospel of assurance and hope, and 
urged the people to read the New Testament. In this way 
thousands were won to the knowledge and obedience of the 
truth as it is in Jesus. Many came from churches to the 
common Christian ground. When local shepherds beheld such 
losses from their flocks they were filled with denominational 
fervor and indignation. Feeling fully assured of the cor- 
rectness of their own doctrinal positions and grieved at the 
losses of their members by what they conceived to be specious 
errors, they boldly proposed a public comparison of tenets. 
The aims of the debaters may not always have been single 
the elucidation of the truth nor the spirit with which they 
were conducted most commendable; but unquestionably they 
have seriously jarred "the kingdom of the clergy," broken 
up an incrusted formalism, and stimulated thousands to Bible 
reading and study. It is illogical and unwise to condemn a 
custom because its misuse or abuse is sometimes attended 
with objectionable features. 

Robert Owen, denying our Lord and his religion, openly 
defied the preachers of the United States to meet him in 
public defense of their teachings. Alexander Campbell was 
the only one to respond. The eight days' discussion in Cin- 



70 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

cinnati, Ohio, April, 1829, . assured the American people of 
the certainty of their Christian faith. The same mighty 
champion of the truth in January, 1837, in Cincinnati, Ohio, 
met Mr. "Bishop" Purcell, of the Roman Catholic hierarchy, 
in a seven days' debate. The book reports of these two dis- 
cussions are still worthy of a place in any library. Henry 
Clay was the presiding moderator during the discussion be- 
tween Mr. Campbell and Minister N. L. Rice (Presbyterian), 
at Lexington, Kentucky, in 1843. After the close of this 
discussion Mr. Clay said, "Alexander Campbell is the pro- 
foundest theologian and the ablest and most eloquent debater 
of this age." 

The public discussion of religious questions has divine 
warrant. The inspired apostles were frequently so engaged. 
Jesus himself was the greatest of all controversialists. 

If additional reasons need be cited, note this 

CLIMAX OF BIGOTED MENDACITY. 

An Irishman who signed himself "The Rev. James Shaw, 
of the Illinois Conference, Methodist Episcopal Church, 
America," preached twelve years in the United States. At 
the close of this period he published a book of 440 pages, 
of which he was the author, entitled "Twelve Years in 
America." It was sold in London, Dublin and Chicago in 
1867. Two quotations are here made from it. They indi- 
cate the religious bigotry of that time, the mendacious slan- 
ders of Mr. Shaw, and the conditions that were thrust upon 
the Disciples and which they were compelled to meet. On 
pages 164-5 he says: 

Swedenborgians, Tunkers, Shakers, Winebrennarians, Christians 
and Campbellites form the completion of the minor unevangelical 
sects, most of whom are immersionists in their views of baptism. 
The largest of these sects is the last mentioned. They are the fol- 
lowers of the late Alexander Campbell, an Irishman by birth, a Pres- 
byterian minister in his younger days, a Baptist after, and, lastly, the 
founder of a sect who are numerous in the West. Mr. Campbell was 
a fine scholar, an eloquent controversialist, and a voluminous writer. 
He died a year ago. His followers first assumed the name of 



THE PERIOD OF CONQUEST 71 

Reformers, then Disciples, now Christians, and by others are known 
as Campbellites. Mr. Campbell and his followers made an earnest 
attack on the leading doctrines and institutions of the churches and 
in their stead offered to the people salvation through immersion. He 
ridiculed the necessity of a change of heart, or the profession of 
the forgiveness of sins in any other way than by baptism. So easy 
a form of religion soon took hold of the indifferent and the irre- 
ligious : the system became popular, and thousands left the Baptist 
Church, and some the Presbyterian and others to join it, so that the 
denomination is made up of nearly all kinds of isms Unitarian, Uni- 
versalist, and the apostates from other churches the only bond of 
unity among them being baptism for the remission of sins. 

Speaking of his observations at Niantic, Illinois, Mr. 
Shaw says on page 294: 

In and around this town there was a large number of Campbellites, 
a sect to whom I have referred in Chapter X. on "American Churches." 
They viewed with jealousy the encroachments of the Methodists. -As 
they were generally fond of controversy, and their preachers flippant 
proclaimers of the "Gospel in the Water," their sermons are a strange 
medley of all sorts of stuff about salvation by immersion. Their style 
that of an auctioneer, reserving their wit and railing for other 
churches, and their praises for their own. Bible, missionary societies, 
Sunday schools, and colleges, received their loudest denunciations. 
Things the most sacred they ridiculed and institutions the most solemn 
they reviled. The Sabbath they disregarded ; the forgiveness of sins, a 
change of heart, they laughed at, unless what was connected with 
immersion. The divinity of Christ they did not generally believe in; 
the personality and operation of the Holy Spirit they scoffed at. They 
were literally immersed infidels, having little of the form or power 
of godliness. Where evangelical churches were cold and lukewarm, 
these prospered; but when alive and earnest, the Campbellites sank to 
their coverts by the waters. 

Such choice bits of Christian literature are rare and 
should not be lost. 

The debates conducted by the Disciples in Illinois are a 
part of their history. It has been impossible to secure re- 
ports of all, but the following named will indicate in a fair 
degree their frequency, influence and the trend of thought 
of the times : 

1840. Maurice R. Trimble and R. U. Newport, of the 
"Two-seed Baptists," held a debate at Palestine. 



72 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

In the forties Bushrod W. Henry held a number of dis- 
cussions of which no written record has been found. 

In this decade Walter P. Bowles held a discussion with 
James Barger, of the M. E. Church, at the Old Union 
Church in DeWitt County. The debate was reported greatly 
to Mr. Bowies' credit. 

1848. At Shelbyville, George Campbell met Hiram Buck, 
of the M. E. Church. 

1852. W. W. Happy held a discussion about this time 
with C. W. Lewis, of the M. E. Church, at Jersey Prairie, 
in Morgan County. 

1855. At Franklin, John S. Sweeney debated with Min- 
ister W. H. Pellatt, of the M. E. Church, the proposition 
that we are justified by faith only is a most wholesome doc- 
trine and very full of comfort. 

1856. Probably in this year John Lindsay debated with 
David Davis the question of Universalism, at Metamora. 

1857. A. D. Fillmore held a discussion at the Franklin 
Church, Edgar County, with William Shields, a "Hardshell 
Baptist." 

1858. About this year the following discussions were 
held: 

At Cruger, O. A. Burgess and John B. Luccock, of the 
M. E. Church, debated the usual questions of the time. Mr. 
Burgess was then a young man and had never engaged in 
public discussions. Mr. Luccock was fully matured and had 
participated in thirty-one debates before that time. He 
called Mr. Burgess "a stripling of a boy," and boasted that 
he would "make a halter and put it on the young colt and 
tic him up." Before the debate was over, competent critics 
said that the halter and tie-up had been very effectively ap- 
plied to Mr. Luccock. He took pleasure in contemptuously 
referring to Mr. Burgess as a "Campbellite." 

In Paris, N. S. Bastian debated the question of baptism 
with J. L. Crane, of the M. E. Church. Mr. Bastian had 
formerly been a presiding elder in that conference and had 
given Mr. Crane his license to preach. 



THE PERIOD OF CONQUEST 73 

At Mt. Pulaski, A. J. Kane and D. P. Bunn debated Uni- 
versalism. 

At Pontiac, Washington Houston held a discussion with 
an M. E. preacher. 

1859. At Whitehall, J. S. Sweeney debated the baptismal 
question with J. B. Logan, of the Cumberland Presbyterian 
Church. Mr. Logan was at that time the editor of the lead- 
ing denominational paper published in St. Louis. The dis- 
cussion was published in book form. Its spirit was fair and 
fine toned. From that time the Disciples began to increase 
in that section. 

At Glasgow, Mr. Sweeney and Minister Whiteside debated 
Universalism. Shortly thereafter Mr. Whiteside was taken 
ill and sent for Mr. Sweeney, who, being at the time in Wis- 
consin, could not respond to the call. Mr. Whiteside re- 
canted his Universalism, ordered all his books and papers 
bearing on Universalism destroyed, and shortly thereafter 
died. 

At Lexington, Benjamin Franklin met J. B. Luccock, who 
was then considered the champion of his denomination in 
such affairs. He sent his challenge to J. G. Campbell, who 
was then serving the Christian Church there as its minister. 
Mr. Franklin was chosen as their representative. People 
came from near and far. The interest was intense. Mr. 
Franklin, a plain and homely man, won the sympathy of the 
unchurched men of the community, a considerable number of 
whom arranged a private purse among themselves for him. 
A goodly number of these became Christians in the meet- 
ings that immediately followed the discussion. 

Probably in the same year the following debates were 
held: 

At Fairbury, O. A. Burgess met B. F. Underwood in a 
discussion upon materialism and Christianity. 

At Lincoln, John Lindsay met J. B. Luccock. 

At the White Oak Grove Church in McLean County, 
James Mitchell debated Universalism with Minister Davis, 
of Galesburgf. 



74 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

1860. Robert Foster debated with Daniel Waggle, of the 
"Dunkard" or Brethren Church, at Chapman's Point, in 
Macoupin County. Prior to this discussion the Brethren had 
held the sway in that community. After it they held nothing. 

Benjamin Franklin debated with D. P. Bunn the question 
of Universalism in Decatur. Mrs. Carrie Hostetter, who 
heard this debate, says that Mr. Bunn based his argument 
mainly on 1 Cor. 15:22: "For as in Adam all die, even so 
in Christ shall all be made alive." When Mr. Franklin had 
clearly and fully replied to his opponent's arguments, he 
would say, "And now, since my time is not out, I will preach 
you a sermon." This he would then do. Judge A. J. Galla- 
gher, a man of superior judicial temperament and ability, was 
the presiding moderator. After the smoke of the battle had 
cleared, he said to a number of his friends, "The Scriptures 
being true, hell is a certainty." Judge W. E. Nelson says, 
"The results of the discussion were very satisfactory to us." 
From that time the Universalist Church in Decatur began to 
decline, and has long since disappeared from the map. 

At Waukegan, A. R. Knox discussed the same subject. 
The debate grew out of the visits of a Universalist minister 
to Gurnee, where Mr. Knox was then preaching. After the 
discussion there was no Universalist society formed or 
church built at either Gurnee or W r aukegan. 

It is a significant fact that Universalist churches flour- 
ished in most of the cities of central and northern Illinois 
fifty years ago, but these are very nearly all now extinct. 

1862. About this time William Grissom held a debate 
with a Mormon elder in Washington Schoolhouse near Ipava. 
A Methodist minister of that section had said to the elder, 
"You do not preach the gospel ;" but he was not able to cope 
with the elder. Then Mr. Grissom, a pioneer Christian min- 
ister, was sent for. His work with the man from Salt Lake 
City was so thorough that he was glad to soon move on. A 
little time thereafter a congregation of Christians was formed 
there which in later years was merged into the Ipava Church. 

1864. At the Big Creek Church, in Edgar County, Har- 



THE PERIOD OF CONQUEST 75 

mon Gregg and Marion Brown, a Calvinist Baptist, held a 
debate. Among other things, Mr. Brown affirmed that the 
law of Moses is as binding now as it was in any age of the 
world or on any people. After this discussion Mr. Brown 
lost the use of his reason for a time. Upon becoming nor- 
mal he united with the Christian Church and continued in 
the ministry to the close of his life. The presiding mod- 
erator, Mr. Otis Eldredge, also said that this discussion had 
led him to his Christian conclusions. 

At Tuscola, David Walk held a public discussion with a 
lawyer who was a member of the M. E. Church. Mr. Walk 
had held a meeting there in 1863 and organized a little 
church. He was opposed by the three churches that were 
there at that time. Returning next year, he was compelled 
to defend his teaching in a public debate. The Presbyterian 
preacher was slow of speech and the Methodist minister was 
thought not to be strong enough for the contest; so a well- 
educated and glib-tongued attorney was chosen for the task. 
He affirmed that sprinkling is Scriptural baptism, and Mr. 
Walk that baptism preceded by faith and repentance is for 
the remission of sins. Mr. Walk, before uniting with the 
Disciples, had been actively engaged in the Methodist minis- 
try. This fact put ginger into the meeting. 

1865. Probably in this year David Walk and Minister 
Davies, of the M. E. Church, held a discussion at Berlin. 

1866. At Richview, Clark Braden and J. P. Den, of the 
M. E. Church, debated the question of baptism. 

At the same place Mr. Braden and Prof. H. V. Spencer, 
of McKendree College, held a discussion on Bible revision. 

At De Soto, Mr. Braden met Jacob Ditzler, of the M. E. 
Church. These men were two of the greatest debaters of 
that time. It was mutually arranged to consider the ques- 
tions of baptism, the work of the Holy Spirit and total 
hereditarv depravity ; but Mr. Ditzler, for reasons best kncv/n 
to himself, declined to debate the last two when they were 
reached. 

Dudley Downs and Minister Summerbell, of the old 



76 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Christian Denomination, held a spirited discussion at Clinton. 

John C. Reynolds discussed the question of Universalism 
with John Hughes at Table Grove. It was about this time 
that W. K. Pendleton wrote: "The Universalists are full of 
debate. If all may be saved anyhow, why bother us Chris- 
tians in our concern to make certain those who have misgiv- 
ings on the subject? Our faith can not cause us to be lost; 
and it at least satisfies our anxiety in this life to follow our 
own convictions of duty." 

At Bridgeport, J. K. Speer and George W. Hughey, a 
presiding elder, met in the arena of discussion. Mr. Hughey 
was a man of commanding personality and a good voice. In 
this debate he took the position that the covenant of circum- 
cision (Gen. 17) was the covenant of grace, and did not rest 
infant baptism on the ground that baptism came in the room 
of circumcision his discovery. During this debate a preacher 
of the M. E. Church expressed regret that the Saviour had 
used the word "baptism" in connection with his religion. 

W. B. F. Treat and Minister Abbott debated Universal- 
ism at Olney. In this discussion Mr. Abbott declared that 
the apostles knew no more of grammar than a ten-year-old 
boy. 

1867. In a schoolhouse near Rural Retreat, in the north- 
ern part of Coles County, Harmon Gregg accepted a chal- 
lenge from James Shaw, of the M. E. Church, and an eight 
days' discussion followed. 

1868. The most significant discussion of this year was 
that held at Atlanta between O. A. Burgess and Dr. Chas. 
H. Burrows, a noted infidel. 

The Atlanta Christian Church was feeble at that time and 
held in contempt by the other churches of the place. Two 
of its members, Andrew Wright and Jefferson Houser, 
went to the "union" prayer-meeting that was held the first 
week in January, and were met at the door of the M. E. 
Church and requested to leave, as no "Campbellites" were 
wanted in the meeting, they having been unanimously voted 
out as arch-heretics. 



THE PERIOD OF CONQUEST 77 

There was a "Freethinkers" club at Atlanta which in- 
cluded a number of the representative men of the place. Mr. 
Burrows was their leader and champion. For more than a 
decade he had traveled and lectured on Free Thought, Phren- 
ology, Spiritualism and Mesmerism. He boldly assailed the 
doctrines of denominationalism and held out a standing chal- 
lenge to those who would defend them. 

He first met in a public discussion, in Atlanta, Owen 
Davis, a farmer and pioneer Baptist preacher, January 16-18, 
1868, in the Christian Church. The results were not satis- 
factory to the Christian people of the community. Mr. 
Davis was an inferior debater. 

Shortly after he met Minister Orvis, of the Congrega- 
tional Church, in a debate. Mr. Orvis was a man of good 
education and well informed on the questions involved, but 
not much of a debater. 

After this, Mr. Burrows, like Goliath of Gath, defied the 
hosts of Israel. The Freethinkers were exultant, the friends 
of truth and righteousness discouraged. 

Andrew Wright, father of J. H. Wright, was making 
wagons in those days. He was a mild-mannered, gentle- 
speaking man, but counted it a part of his business to 
earnestly contend for the faith which was once delivered to 
the saints. This was his opportunity, and in the month of 
May he had his David, in the person of O. A. Burgess, on 
the ground. 

Mr. Burrows affirmed that "the Book called the Bible is 
of human origin and fallible in its teachings, and that Jesus 
was nothing more than a man, born of woman, as other 
people are." The crowds attending were immense, men com- 
ing from other States. The interest was intense, the occa- 
sion crucial. Some parts of the discussion were thrilling and 
climacteric. In speaking of the virgin birth of Jesus, Mr. 
Burrows said, "It is impossible for any father to swear to 
his own child," to which Air. Burgess replied, "This is a high 
compliment to Dr. Burrows' mother," which so angered Dr. 
Burrows and his followers that Mr. Burgess was threatened 



78 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

with some of the "hell fire" which he was in the habit of 
preaching tc his people. 

In answer Mr. Burgess said: "I suppose you saw me 
going out through that window. I have stood where bullets 
flew thick and can not be intimidated by words. Dr. Bur- 
rows well knows that when one party generalizes, his oppo- 
nent has permit to particularize." 

John S. Sweeney passed Mr. Burgess a note which read, 
"Give it to him; we are all here." 

The threat of violence was dismissed, and this incident 
closed, by Mr. Burgess, as he spoke in his lion-like manner: 
"Bah ! a threat. The last refuge of a lost cause." 

In speaking of special Divine Providence, Dr. Burrows 
said: "I am an old infidel. Why does not God afflict me?" 
His defiance of the Almighty was blasphemous. While 
trimming hedge that season a thorn punctured his hand, 
causing blood poison, which necessitated several amputations, 
and he was left with one arm and one leg. 

Two of his grandchildren were baptized into Christ at 
Atlanta in 1893, and several since that time, one now work- 
ing in the Christian ministry. 

Mr. Burgess, at the close of the discussion, was presented 
with a floral bouquet, by Mrs. J. M. Brooks, for the Chris- 
tian women of Atlanta, as a public expression of their appre- 
ciation of his impassioned defense of womanly virtue. 

Infidelity lost much of its arrogance in Atlanta, after this. 

March 28, 1875, at the age of fifty-one years and six 
months, Dr. Burrows died as he had lived, without God .and 
without hope. 

In Duquoin, Clark Braden and R. C. Dennis debated in- 
fidelity. 

At the White House, or Pleasant Hill Church, in Law- 
rence County, D. D. Miller and James McMillan on one side 
debated with John Mack, a Presbyterian minister, the ques- 
tion of baptism and the operation of the Holy Spirit. No 
reason is given why two preachers should have been pitted 
against one. 



THE PERIOD OF CONQUEST 79 

In the college chapel at Abingdon, Pres. J. W. Butler 
conducted a discussion with Minister Smith, of the M. E. 
Church. 

At Westfield, Harmon Gregg and Hiram Ashmore, a 
Cumberland Presbyterian minister, met. Mr. Ashmore af- 
firmed that Jesus Christ is the eternal Son of God. 

At Timewell, A. P. Stewart and Minister Yates, of the 
Baptist Church, held a discussion, which was admirable for 
its fraternal spirit. 

1869. At Timewell, D. R. Lucas and Minister Thomp- 
son, of the Baptist Church, debated on foreordination, elec- 
tion and free-will. 

It was probably this year that Clark Braden and G. W. 
Hughey, of the M. E. Church, debated at Vienna on bap- 
tism, the work of the Holy Spirit, the M. E. Discipline and 
human creeds. 

1870. At Farmer City, R. B. Roberts and Minister Man- 
ford, of Chicago, debated Universalism. 

Clark Braden and B. F. Underwood held a discussion at 
Duquoin on Christianity and materialism. 

Mr. Braden this year met Samuel Binns at Casey, in dis- 
cussing the questions of baptism. Mr. Binns was a minister 
of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church and much enjoyed 
the sobriquet of "Campbellite-killer." But those whom he 
"slew" one day were always up and ready for the battle the 
next morning. 

Theodore Brooks and R. N. Davies, of the M. E. Church, 
conducted a public discussion at Mechanicsburg about this 
time. Both were men of fine mental development. Great 
throngs of people attended. Those who heard the debate 
still refer to it as "a stem-winder." 

1871. S. K. Hallam conducted a discussion at Farmer 
City with C. C. Marston, on Seventh-day Adventism. 

This year Clark Braden met B. F. Underwood twice in 
discussing Christianity and materialism first at Time and 
later at Bushnell. 

In the spring of this year G. M. Goode held a discussion 



80 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

on the questions of baptism at Scottsville, with Ramsey 
Smithson, a presiding elder of the M. E. Church South. 
In those days Mr. Goode was called "the Macoupin boy." 
At the close of the debate Prof. M. G. Lain, the presiding 
moderator and a member of the Baptist Church, voluntarily 
gave Mr. Goode a note assuring him that his work was suc- 
cessful and satisfactory in every way. The report of this, 
going into the regions round about, much disquieted Mr. 
Smithson's friends, so they demanded that the discussion be 
repeated, that they might see how ''the boy" had so success- 
fully contended with a trained debater. Hence a second 
discussion of the same questions was held at Girard in the 
following July. Mr. Goode's friends were well pleased with 
the discussion and its results. His speeches were logical and 
always in fine spirit. 

1872. Clark Braden and B. F. Underwood debated 
Christianity and materialism at Washington. 

Mr. Braden also met John Hughes at La Fayette in con- 
sidering Universalism. 

At Dudleyville, in May, Frank Talmage held a debate 
with T. C. Sharp on baptism and the work of the Holy 
Spirit. This discussion followed a meeting conducted by Mr. 
Talmage at that place in which about sixty persons turned 
to the Lord. Mr. Sharp gave the challenge. His home at 
that time was in Mt. Vernon, Illinois, where he was the pas- 
tor of the M. E. Church. He was accompanied to the de- 
bate by one of his leading members, Mr. R. M. Hawley, who, 
having listened to the discussion with candor, was then bap- 
tized by Mr. Talmage. 

In September of the same year Mr. Talmage debated at 
Greenville with Henry Sharp this proposition: "Christianity 
Is an Enemy to the Best Interests of Mankind." There 
were only about three Disciples at Greenville at that time. 
The closing night of the discussion Mr. Talmage extended 
the gospel invitation. Mr. and Mrs. Frank Smith, who re- 
sided seven miles away, accepted Jesus, making the good 
confession. Inasmuch as they wished to be baptized the 



THE PERIOD OF CONQUEST 81 

same hour of the night, like the Philippian jailer, the minis- 
ter accompanied them home and baptized them. 

1873. Clark Braden debated infidelity at Bloomington 
with C. R. Sanborn, who referred to himself as a "Free Con- 
gregationalist." 

1874. In a Baptist church six miles east of Dongola, W. 
H. Boles debated Universalism with Matthew Stokes. Mr. 
Stokes gave up the battle at noon on the second day. Mr. 
Boles at once conducted a series of meetings in the near-by 
village of Moscow, which resulted in fifty accessions, the 
formation of a church and the purchase of a meeting-house. 
But the church was short-lived. 

At Lovington, C. H. Bliss pitched his tent and began 
preaching Seventh-day Adventism. A Christian minister, 
who was not well posted in the sinuosities of this error, in a 
trial with Mr. Bliss proved unsatisfactory. Whereupon 
Clark Braden was sent for. He walked direct from the rail- 
way station to the tent and said : "Good morning. Here are 
seven propositions ; you can take your choice." It was agreed 
to debate three of them and then decide about the other 
propositions. The first round proved quite enough for Mr. 
Bliss. During the discussion Mr. Bliss' moderator rose up 
and said, "Mr. Chairman, I rise to a 'pint' of order." Where- 
upon a Dr. Collet, who had a fine sense of the ludicrous, in- 
stantly spoke out so that all the audience heard, "Why not 
make it a quart?" 

In this year an attempted discussion took place at St. 
Augustine between Minister W. R. Jewell and a Roman 
Catholic priest whose name is not recalled. O. A. Burgess 
summoned Mr. Jewell to the town by telegraph. Arrange- 
ments were soon made for a three evenings' debate, each dis- 
putant speaking one hour each evening. The priest af- 
firmed that "the Holy Roman Catholic Church is the only 
true church." In his first reply Mr. Jewell used history, to 
which the priest objected. The moderators sustained Mr. 
Jewell's contention. The priest then became angry, left the 
hall and did not return. Mr. Jewell continued for a few 



82 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

days in a course of addresses on the question under discus- 
sion. 

1875. W. H. Boles and W. P. Throgmorton, Baptist, 
held a discussion at Marion. They considered "The Direct 
Impact of the Spirit, the Final Perseverance of the Saints 
and the Churches of Which They Were Members." These 
gentlemen were lifelong neighbors and friends. The debate 
was conducted in an admirable spirit. Mr. Boles followed it 
with a successful meeting. 

1876. In the summer of this year Clark Braden debated 
Christianity and materialism with B. F. Underwood in the 
city of Jacksonville. Brethren residing there proposed to Mr. 
Underwood to have this discussion repeated and published. 
They offered to pay him for his time and copyright. He 
replied, "Mr. Henderson, I am not ready to publish a de- 
bate with Braden." 

In the summer of 1875 Col. J. W. Judy, of Tallula, 
financed a tent meeting conducted by D. R. Lucas in Peters- 
burg. Before that the Disciples had been a feeble folk there, 
but at the close of this effort the church of Christ numbered 
190 members. Before the close of the meeting Mr. Lucas 
had received several challenges for a public discussion. He 
accepted that one made by the Presbyterians. They chose 
Minister D. R. Miller, of the Cumberland Presbyterian 
Church, to represent them. In the preliminary arrangements 
he contended for three sessions a day of two hours each. 
Mr. Lucas was compelled to accept this condition or have no 
debate. At the end of the fourth clay Mr. Miller was worn 
out and prostrated. This compelled an adjournment of the 
debate for six months. Then it was resumed and finished. 
During the discussion Mr. Lucas kept close to the Book and 
often repeated the maxim, "Where the Bible speaks, we 
speak; where the Bible is silent, we are silent." In affirming 
that immersion is the action in baptism, he quoted Acts 8 : 38 : 
"And they went down both into the water, both Philip and 
the eunuch ; and he baptized him." Mr. Miller replied : "The 
Bible says baptized, not immersed. Now, what becomes of 



THE PERIOD OF CONQUEST 83 

your oft-repeated maxim, 'Where the Bible speaks, we speak.' " 
He rang- the changes on this quite to Mr. Lucas' confusion. 
Finally it was agreed to leave to the German Lutheran min- 
ister to decide the meaning of the Greek word baptidzo. He 
reported that its primary meaning is "dip" or "immerse." 
Thus Mr. Lucas recovered his grip upon the audience. 

W. D. Owen served as Mr. Lucas' moderator, a Mr. 
Crozier was Mr. Miller's, while Judge Pillsbury presided. A 
question of order arose relative to the admission of a defini- 
tion of baptidso in an old edition of Liddell & Scott's lexicon 
which the world's scholarship had compelled those editors to 
omit from all the subsequent editions of their dictionary. The 
debaters each made his statement, followed by each one's 
moderator. Then Judge Pillsbury decided in favor of Mr. 
Lucas. At once a Presbyterian gentleman, who had sandy 
hair and beard, not satisfied with the decision, arose to say 
a word. Quick as lightning G. M. Goode, who sat near him, 
arose and spoke out: "Hold on, my friend. Bro. Lucas will 
take care of Bro. Miller, Bro. Owen will take care of Bro. 
Crozier, but, my sorrel-topped friend, if you want anything, 
I am your man." The hilarity was so general and continued 
that the moderator declared an adjournment for dinner. 

The spirit of the whole community was changed for good 
by the debate. On its last day Mr. Lucas was invited by 
and took dinner with a Presbyterian elder who would not 
even condescend to speak to him during the progress of the 
tent meeting. Many courtesies were shown by others. 

1877. Mr. Braden debated Universalism with John 
Hughes at Lewistown. 

1878. Mr. Braden and W. F. Jamison held a discussion 
at Salem on Christianity and materialism. 

Messrs. Jamison, Underwood and men of that class were 
public lecturers who sometimes published infidel papers and 
traveled over the country sowing seeds of error, falsehood 
and unbelief. The only Christian thing to do was to meet 
them in the arena of public discussion, expose their specious 
twisters and present the irrefutable evidences of divine truth. 



84 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

1879. J. M. Radcliffe and C. H. Caldwell, Baptist, held 
a discussion at Samoth, which was repeated at the Seven- 
mile Baptist Church in Massac County. 

1881. William Grissom and J. F. Leake, a Baptist, de- 
bated the question of baptism for the remission of sins, at 
Meredosia. Mr. Leake had previously been affiliated with 
the Disciples. During the discussion he expressed his regret 
several times that a stronger man had not been chosen to 
meet him. Mr. Grissom replied that his brethren thought it 
unnecessary "to load a cannon to shoot a mosquito." A son 
of Mr. Leake is now the pastor of the church of Christ at 
Newton, Iowa. 

1883. At Blandinsville, George F. Adams and William 
McNutt, Baptist, debated the two following propositions: 
"The Scriptures teach that the only proper subjects of bap- 
tism in water are believers in Christ whose sins are re- 
mitted," and "The church of which I, G. F. Adams, am a 
member is identical in faith and practice with the church 
founded by Christ and his apostles." Great crowds of people 
heard this discussion. 

At Cuba, G. F. Adams and D. D. Swindle, Baptist, de- 
bated this proposition : "The church organization of which 
I, D. D. Swindle, stand identified, possesses the Bible char- 
acteristics which entitle it to be regarded as the visible 
Church or Kingdom of Christ." Mr. Adams affirmed a simi- 
lar proposition of the church of his fellowship. This dis- 
cussion was an intellectual and fraternal treat to those who 
heard it. Without a single exception, the disputants bore 
themselves as Christian gentlemen from beginning to end. 
As often as Mr. Swindle insisted that his church was the 
church of Christ, that often did Mr. Adams reply, "Then, 
why do you refuse to call it that?" 

In the New Hope Baptist Church, near Samoth, John 
Mecoy held a debate with Green W. Smith, a Baptist. 

1884. T. L. Stipp and I. B. Grandy discussed Univer- 
salism at Hoopeston. Universalists sent the challenge. Mr. 
Stipp was chosen by the city ministerial association. He was 



THE PERIOD OF CONQUEST 85 

its youngest member except one. A series of successful 
meetings followed the debate. 

1886. U. M. Browder and F. Smith, of the M. E. 
Church, discussed at Smithfield the following propositions: 
"The Scriptures teach that the sinner or ungodly is justified 
in the sense of pardoned, or remission of sins, by faith only," 
and, "Baptism as commanded in the commission is in order 
to the remission of past sins." This discussion was full of 
smartness and sarcasm. 

1887. At Samoth, D. L. Kincaid and Green W. Smith, 
a Baptist, held a debate. 

1888. In the New Hope Baptist Church, in Massac 
County, J. M. Radcliffe and G. W. Smith, Baptist, held a 
discussion. 

1889. A discussion was held at Creal Springs led by J. 
F. Right and Robert Huggins, a Christadelphian. 

T. L. Stipp and J. T. Fender, of the M. E. Church, de- 
bated the questions of baptism and faith alone, at Fisher. 

At Bellair, Clark Braden and E. S. Kelley discussed Mor- 
monism. 

1890. In April this year, at McVey, A. C. Layman and 
Elder Milliard debated Mormonism. These elders are ag- 
gressive and self-assertive. Their entrance into a community 
is with the avowed purpose of making converts to their faith. 
The most direct method of defeating their aims is by a public 
discussion. This debate was held in a large tent and put an 
end to their advocacy in that community. 

At Barry, H. C. Littleton and L. T. Nichols, a Christadel- 
phian, held a discussion. At its close, defeat was confessed, 
and long since Christadelphian theories and following disap- 
peared from that community. 

1894. In the Oakley Avenue Church, in Chicago, Clark 
Braden and John Williams held a debate on Adventism. Mr. 
Williams was the editor of the First-day Adventist organ. 
His defeat was thorough. 

1896. At Birds, S? C. Hill and Minister Filroe, of the 
M. E. Church, held a discussion. 



86 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

In the Azotus Baptist Church, in Pope County, J. F. 
Hight and G. W. Smith, Baptist, conducted a debate. 

1897. At Joppa, J. F. Hight and R. H. Pique, of the 
M. E. Church, debated. 

And so did J. B. Briney and W. P. Throgmorton, Baptist, 
at Dixon Springs. 

In the West Panther Creek Schoolhouse, in Calhoun 
County, J. M. Bovee and J. W. Miller discussed instrumental 
music in public worship. 

1898. J. F. Hight and C. M. Weaver, Primitive Baptist, 
met in a debate at New Burnside. 

In Astoria, H. C. Littleton and M. J. McClure, German 
Baptist, discussed trine immersion and feet-washing as church 
ordinances. At its close the German Baptist sentiment ex- 
pressed itself in the words, "If we had known this man, we 
would have had a man from Pennsylvania to lead in the 
debate." The discussion helped the people in the community 
to a better knowledge of Scripture teaching on these subjects. 

At Orchard ville, Clark Braden and I. N. White debated 
Mormonism. Mr. White was one of the twelve apostles of 
the Josephite party. 

1899. Mr. Braden led in the two debates of this year; 
first, at Alma, with I. N. White on Mormonism; second, at 
St. Elmo, with C. H. Bliss on Seventh-dayism. 

1901. Mr. Braden met Minister Hicks at Nebo in a com- 
parison of the church of Christ and the Baptist Church. 

1902. Mr. Braden met J. R. Roberts at Belmont on the 
subject of "Anti-ism." 

1903. And also A. P. Roberts at Olney on the same 
subject. 

At Wayne City, Mr. Braden discussed the questions of 
baptism with D. B. Turney, of the Protestant Methodist 
Church. Mr. Turney was a very small man. 

1908. In February, at Colfax, J. Fred Jones affirmed in 
a public discussion that "the immersion of a proper subject 
in water is Christian baptism." This was denied by U. Y. 
Gilmer, of the M. E. Church. 



THE PERIOD OF CONQUEST 87 

1909. At Dahlgren, W. H. Boles and J. R. Daley, of 
the Primitive Baptists, each affirmed in a public debate that 
the church of which he is a member is the church of Christ. 
Through the four days there were great crowds and good 
nature throughout. 

J. F. Wright and F. M. Lawley, of the "Reorganized 
Church of Latter-day Saints," held a debate at Tunnel Hill. 
"The Saints" furnished the Disciples a boarding-place in 
their "temple" near Tunnel Hill, and accorded them great 
respect and hospitality. 

In the same year these two men held another discussion 
at Goreville. 

1910. W. H. Boles met Henry Sparling, one of "the 
Saints," at Springerton in a six clays' debate of two four- 
hour sessions. The Mormons had a large church there. 

1911. In the Mt. Pleasant Church, in Massac County, 
D. N. Barnett held a debate with J. R. McLain, a Latter-day 
Saint. 

This led to another discussion at the same place between 
J. F. Hight and Mr. McLain. 

These one hundred specific mentions of public discussions 
were probably not one-half of the number in Illinois in 
which the ministers of the churches of Christ have partici- 
pated. It is apparent that these preachers have fought all 
along the line of battle, from gross materialism to instru- 
mental music in public worship, and generally at such times and 
places as the advocates of error led in open attacks and ag- 
gressive assaults upon the truth. They have successfully met 
the manifold vagaries of religious and irreligious thought, 
many-phased infidelity, Universalism, the dogmas of human 
creeds and Mormonism. Every essential position for which 
they have contended through the past seventy-five years is 
now admitted, if not practically accepted, by intelligent evan- 
gelical believers. The Disciples are orthodox. Public debates 
have mostly ceased, not because they were a failure, but be- 
cause they were a success. 



CHAPTER V. 

BENEVOLENCES. 

SECTION 1. STATE MISSIONARY ACTIVITIES. 

Most of the pioneer preachers were missionaries sent of 
God and self-supporting. But at a very early day they saw 
clearly the need of united efforts. At the close of a pro- 
tracted meeting in Jacksonville, in October, 1834, it was 
decided to foster a co-operation among the churches. In that 
meeting B. W. Stone, John Rigdon, Alexander Reynolds, 
Josephus Hewett, H. W. Osborn, Abner Peeler, Edward D. 
Baker and others participated. John Rigdon was sent out 
as the evangelist for six months. This appeal was made to 
all the congregations in the State to unite in a voluntary 
association for the spread of the gospel. 

In March, 1836, John T. Jones and Guerdon Gates issued 
the final call for a proposed State Meeting in Jacksonville 
that fall. 

In 1839 a State Meeting was held in Pittsfield. 

In 1840 a call for "Our Annual Meeting" to assemble in 
Springfield on Friday before the fourth Lord's Day in Sep- 
tember was signed by B. W. Stone, John T. Jones, Peter 
Hedenberg, D. P. Henderson, Henry D. Palmer, William 
Davenport, John Rigdon, D. B. Hill and Theophilus Sweet. 
One object of the meeting was to put "as many evangelists 
in the field as possible." 

In 1842 the Annual Meeting was held in Springfield. 

May 18, 1843, a call was sent out from Bloomington for 
a "State Meeting" to convene there on Friday before the 
fourth Lord's Day in August following, signed by W. T. 
Major and H. H. Painter, elders, and R. O. Warrener, 
evangelist. As stated in the call, the objects of the meeting 

88 



BENEVOLENCES 89 

were "to cultivate acquaintance with each other, to hear of 
the success of the labors of our teaching brethren, to pro- 
mote brotherly love, advance the cause of union among the 
followers of Jesus, and, by teaching the truths of the Bible, 
edify and instruct each other and all who may attend." This 
meeting was well attended by brethren from different 
parts of the State. Co-operation was considered and dis- 
cussed. At its close J. A. Lindsay and H. D. Palmer became 
the evangelists in McLean and adjoining counties. 

In 1845 the State Meeting went to Pittsfield, and in 1848 
to Walnut Grove (Eureka). Whether other such meetings 
were held in the interims, the extant records do not disclose. 
During that period of twenty years the facilities for traveling 
were limited to stage-coaches and private conveyances ; hence 
the distances were, relatively, far greater than now. Rut the 
pioneers made the journeys with eagerness, for the "State 
Meetings" were occasions of mutual assurance, the sweetest 
fellowship and great joy. They were a source of mutual 
strength, led to a clearer understanding of Scriptural teach- 
ing and did much active missionary work. 

In 1839 John Rigdon was engaged as an evangelist in 
the counties of Adams, Brown and Pike. 

The same year "Tobias Grider was appointed to ride as 
an evangelist in Shelby County, where there were few 
churches." 

November 20, 1842, a co-operation meeting was held at 
Marion composed of the representatives of eleven churches 
located in the counties of Franklin, Gallatin, Hardin, Perry, 
Pope and Wabash. Except two, those eleven churches are 
extinct. Minister J. M. Mulkey was chairman. 

In 1850 there was a co-operation of the churches in Mor- 
gan, Scott and Cass Counties, with Ministers Happy and 
Pyatt as evangelists. In April, 1851, Benjamin N. Hum- 
phrey, the corresponding secretary of this co-operation, re- 
ported 208 additions by the labors of Evangelists Happy and 
A. McCollum. 

In 1848, A. D. Northcut, who had come from Kentucky, 



90 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

was employed by the co-operation of the churches in Shelby 
County as its evangelist. In the first year of this service he 
added more than three hundred people to the Lord. The 
co-operation in the same county in 1880 planted congrega- 
tions at Oak Grove and Mode. 

In 1851 the churches in Shelby, Moultrie and Macon 
Counties were engaged in co-operative missionary work. The 
following is an exact transcript from the minutes of the 
meeting : 

Proceedings of the cooperative meeting held at church called Bethel 
meeting house in Shelby County, State of Illinois. In complyance 
with arrangements made at a meeting held on Sand Creek in the 
County of Shelby: the brethren from the different named congrega- 
tions as here follows were in attendance. To make arrangements for 
evangelizing in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and 
fifty one. The (brethren) delegates from six congregations were 
there. 

Bushrod W. Henry was made chairman and Henry Y. 
Kellar, secretary. 

The names of the different congregations that were there repre- 
sented were called for. 

1st. West Okaw. Two delegates James H. Kellar, John Wood. 

2nd. Sullivan. Two delegates William Kellar, N. F. Higginbotham. 

3rd. Bethel. Two delegates J. W. Sconce, B. W. Henry. 

4th. Decatur. One delegate S. Shepherd. 

5th. Mud Creek. Two delegates E. Waggoner, L. McMorris. 

6th. Shelbyville. One delegate John Page. 

It was suggested that the meeting adjourn till evening, 
hoping for the arrival of other delegates. This was voted 
down on the ground that "it would be giving sanction to a 
bad precedent that was, one time to do business and doing 
it at another." The co-operation then decided to do its work 
"in the weak congregations and their immediate vicinity." 
Subscriptions were made as follows: West Okaw, $60; Sulli- 
van, $60; Bethel, $30; Mud Creek, $30; Decatur, $50; Shel- 
byville, $30; total, $260. At the night session the president 
suggested two evangelists one an aged man and the other 



BENEVOLENCES 91 

a young man "which was unanimously concurred in.'* 
Henry Y. Kellar was chosen as "the young preacher," and 
"B. W. Henry was selected as the senior evangelist." The 
co-operation decided to "pay the evangelists $26 a month." 

In 1854 the second meeting of the Southern Illinois Chris- 
tian Co-operation was held at Salem. This co-operation in- 
cluded the ten counties at the southern end of the State. 
The same year, June 14, a district co-operative meeting was 
held at Batavia. In the sixties there were county co-opera- 
tions in Tazewell-Mason, Fulton and Iroquois. In 1869, 
Mason County dropped out of the union with Tazewell and 
the latter established the church in Pekin. The same year 
the co-operation of the Northern District met at Batavia, 
November 12 and 13. In 1881 there were co-operations in the 
counties of Adams, Christian, Champaign, Douglas, Logan, 
McLean, Marshall, Pike, Shelby, Tazewell, Woodford and 
White. Within a year five of these had died a natural or 
violent death. These few facts indicate the convictions held 
and efforts made to care for weak congregations and plant 
churches in new fields by the co-operation of counties singly 
or unitedly. This work reached through about forty years. 
Hancock formed a co-operation of its churches in 1892 and 
continues to hold an annual meeting in the fall. 

The American Christian Missionary Society was formed 
at Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1849. It became the mother of all the 
wider missionary activities among the Disciples of Christ. 

Friday, September 20, 1850, the "State Convention of the 
Christian Church in Illinois began and held at Shelbyville." 
Those present were J. Atkinson, Theophilus Sweet, H. W. 
Osborn, Jas. A. Lindsay, W. F. M. Arny, A. Kellar, Morris 
R. Chew, Bushrod W. Henry, Wm. Davenport, J. T. Jones, 
H. D. Palmer, Wm. T. Major, G. W. Minier, John M. 
Hodge, Elijah Vawter, Alpheus Brown, James D. McPher- 
son, P. H. Murphy and A. A. Glenn. 

These men were delegates who represented local churches, 
counties and co-operations. Other congregations were repre- 
sented by letters. The number of Christian Churches then 



92 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

in the State was 104, with an aggregate membership of 
6,359. During the year then closing, l,i2J persons had been 
added to the churches. 

The first business transacted by this meeting was the or- 
ganization of "The Bible Society of the State of Illinois, 
auxiliary to the American Christian Bible Society." Next, 
"The Illinois State Missionary Society" was organized by the 
adoption of a constitution and the election of the following 
officers: President, Henry D. Palmer; Vice-Presidents, Wm. 
T. Major, Harrison W. Osborn, Bushrod W. Henry; Man- 
agers, Jas. A. Lindsay, Morris R. Chew, Wm. Davenport, J. 
Atkinson, John H. Hodge, John E. Murphy, John Houston, 
E. W. Bakewell ; Recording Secretary, A. J. Kane ; Treasurer, 
William Lavely. Mr. Palmer presided at this meeting, and 
Mr. Vawter served as secretary the first day and was suc- 
ceeded by Mr. Minier. Some sessions of the convention were 
held in the M. E. Chapel, and their pulpit was filled on Sun- 
day, September 22. 

At nine o'clock that morning a business-meeting session 
was held. At ten o'clock, three o'clock and evening public 
worship was conducted in both chapels. In part of these 
meetings there were two sermons. On Monday morning the 
convention heard the "valedictory address by J. Atkinson, 
and adjourned to meet the next year at Walnut Grove." 

In 1852, Mr. Daily D. Dawson was chosen recording sec- 
retary and served eight years in this capacity. He is still 
living in Chicago and has furnished the writer valuable in- 
formation. 

In 1856, Dr. W. A. Mallory became State evangelist and 
served in this capacity till 1860. 

In 1856 the State was divided into fourteen missionary 
districts, which in 1861 were changed to four and these again 
to nine in 1864. During this period there was a written con- 
stitution, which was frequently changed, and life member- 
ships. Attention and financial aid were directed chiefly to 
the congregations in Peoria and Quincy. S. T. Calloway was 
corresponding secretary in 1858. In the Annual Meeting of 



BENEVOLENCES 93 

1861 the question of a Students' Aid Fund was proposed, but 
it was defeated by a majority as not germane to the work of 
the society. 

W. J. Houston served as corresponding secretary and 
evangelist from 1860-63. In his first report, submitted in 
1861, he said that during the year he had traveled 2,500 
miles, preached 620 discourses "with numerous exhortations," 
and "added 374 to the army of the faithful, principally by 
confession and baptism." For this superior service the 
society paid him $800. This sum included "one coat received 
at Paris valued at $12." In 1862 he reported seven hundred 
discourses and "many exhortations" and over eight hundred 
additions. "Many new co-operations were organized during 
the year." That year three other evangelists were associated 
with Mr. Houston and their accessions totaled 1,349. A 
balance of $90 due on his first year's work was paid him then. 

During this period the society held a few semi-annual 
meetings, but they were soon found to be impracticable. 

John S. Sweeney served as corresponding secretary and 
State evangelist from 1863-65, and his father, G. E. Sweeney, 
by special vote of the society, also evangelized under its au- 
thority and auspices. One year J. S. Sweeney had sixteen 
evangelists at work. Mr. Henry C. Latham served as cor- 
responding secretary in 1865-66, but with only office duties. 
Minister A. H. Rice held the same title, doing active work 
in the field. 

Dudley Down succeeded as corresponding secretary and 
evangelist, but his devoted toil sapped his energies and sent 
him, within two years, into rapid decline and premature 
death. 

In 1870 work was begun under the "Louisville Plan," 
which was adopted at Louisville, Kentucky, in October, 1869. 
The State was divided into six missionary districts. This 
was the second period of missionary activity. J. C. Reynolds 
became corresponding secretary and State evangelist. His 
first task was to organize the districts and develop a senti- 
ment that would sustain an evangelist in the several divisions. 



94 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

He was followed in this work, severally, by J. W. Allen, 
John Lindsay, W. T. Maupin and J. H. Wright. Each did 
good service, aiming and striving to advance the Kingdom 
of God by all proper co-operative efforts. Mr. Wright or- 
ganized the Mt. Morris Church during his seven months' 
service. There was only a little money that came to support 
the work and it was a time of transition. During this period 
E. J. Lampton served as State evangelist and dedicated a 
mission chapel at Denver that had been built by the Mt. 
Pleasant country church, all in Hancock County. Before the 
close of the decade it was clear that the "Louisville Plan" 
would not be worked in Illinois. 

N. S. Haynes was chosen corresponding secretary and 
State evangelist in 1880 and entered actively upon the work 
the 1st of the following January. He served in this dual 
capacity till August, 1885, when he resigned because one 
member of the Board of Managers thought that too few per- 
sons were being added to the churches through the society's 
work. The next year W. J. Ford served as corresponding 
secretary. But the convention of 1886 returned Mr. Haynes 
to this office, and he continued as active manager of the work 
till August, 1891 a period of nine years and eight months. 
The chief aim of his administration was a campaign of edu- 
cation for world-wide missions. This was one of the chief 
needs of the Disciples in Illinois at that time. The Foreign 
Society had been organized only about five years and its 
management was feeble. In 1881 he received $44.80 for 
Foreign Missions, of which $7.35 came from one of the 
leading churches of the State! Hence he laid hold of 
printers' ink, church papers and all available preachers for 
missionary education. In the spring of 1883 he mailed copies 
of a printed circular appeal, with fifteen thousand envelopes 
for Children's Day, to 260 of the best Bible schools in the 
State. Some of the aims and results of his work were the 
following: He disseminated continually missionary intelligence 
in every way possible; prepared and published a list of min- 
isters in the State in 1882, and of churches in 1883, both by 



BENEVOLENCES 95 

counties; reported the aggregate value of church property; 
helped pastorless congregations and ministers without 
churches, and introduced and urged the co-operation of weak 
and near-together congregations in sustaining pastors; lo- 
cated the churches of the State and had a map made of the 
same ; later redistricted the State, which arrangement remains 
unchanged; introduced the desirability of parsonages to public 
attention, there being only about three in 1880 in 1913 there 
were 131 ; urged continually the moral and financial support 
of our colleges; raised a few hundred dollars to assist in 
building the first creditable house of worship in Washington, 
D. C. ; led in the formation of two ministerial institutes the 
Central, which continues to render helpful service, and one 
in the Military Tract, which was permitted to die years ago; 
organized the State Encampment in 1887, which continued 
twelve years; helped actively in founding and building the 
Students' Aid Fund; increased the permanent funds from 
$455 to above $20,000; and in 1890, at the request of Dr. 
H. K. Carroll, special agent of the United States to secure 
data of religious bodies for the eleventh census, prepared and 
transmitted to him a complete list of the churches of Christ 
in Illinois, on schedules furnished by the Government. July 
15, 1890, Dr. Carroll wrote him, saying: "I have received 
from you Schedules 687 A, B, C, D, E and F. I am very 
much pleased, indeed, with the work you have done so faith- 
fully and promptly." The maximum for his traveling 
expenses in any one year was $152.68. Comparing 1880 with 
1889, the remittances from Illinois were as follows: To the 
Foreign Society, $1,007 and $3,815; to the General Home 
Society, $230 and $3,534; to the State Society, $1,690 and 
$5,847, and to the State Sunday-school Association, $600 and 
$2,834. During the nine years and eight months' period, 
among the congregations organized by the State Society 
were Champaign, Mason City, Newton, Onarga, Roodhouse 
and Streator, and among those fostered were Carbondale, 
three in Chicago (Englewood, Northside and Westside), 
Galesburg, Keithsburg, Mt. Pulaski, Paxton, Pekin, Prince- 



96 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

ton, Pontiac, Rock ford, Sterling and Taylorville. The asso- 
ciated evangelists during this period were Isaac Beckelhymer, 
W. H. and Marion Boles, T. A. Boyer, A. Campbell, H. C. 
Cassell, W. H. Cannon, J. W. Carpenter, J. S. Clements, Jas. 
Connoran, J. E. Deihl, J. F. Ghormley, E. A. Gilliland, G. 
M. Goode, J. J. Harris, G. M. Hoffman, D. W. Honn, D. E. 
Hughes, W. A. Ingram, E. J. Lampton, L. M. Linn, Daniel 
Logan, L. B. Myers, C. B. Newnan, J. L. Parsons, G. W. 
Pearl, J. W. Robbins, J. R. Speck, J. Z. Taylor, H. R. 
Trickett, J. M. Tenneson and R. D. Van Buskirk. Some of 
these ministers served in the continued meeting only, and 
others of them in several periods or years. 

Min. G. W. Pearl began his service as corresponding secre- 
tary and State evangelist Aug. 1, 1891, and closed his term 
Dec. 31, 1896. No change was made in any way in the con- 
duct of the affairs of the society. Its work prospered and 
grew steadily in all lines. His management was wise. The 
evangelists during this period were J. S. Clements, O. W. 
Stewart, W. A. Ingram, S. S. Jones, Miss Sarah C. McCoy, 
C. E. Evans, T. A. Boyer, E. A. Gilliland, S. H. Creighton, 
T. F. Weaver, W. V. Boltz, R. H. Kline, G. W. Griffith, E. 
J. Ellis, F. L. Moffitt, J. F. Jones, J. P. McKnight. 

J. Fred Jones became State evangelist and corresponding 
secretary Jan. 1, 1896. In 1902 he became "Field Secretary." 
The period covered by this survey closes with June, 1913, or 
seventeen and a half years. He states "the ideals during this 
period" as follows: 

1. The organization and support of new churches in fruitful fields. 

2. The aiding of weak churches, mainly by evangelistic meetings 
about three hundred have been so helped. 

3. The support of an evangelist in each district. 

4. The needs of village and rural churches have been emphasized 
and the permanent co-operation of contiguous churches in supporting 
pastors has been urged. 

In 1896 the secretaries of the several missionary districts 
were made ex-officio members of the State Board and are so 
continued. 



BENEVOLENCES 97 

The chief evangelists who were engaged in the State and 
district work, not including Chicago, were the following: J. 
T. Alsup, W. B. Bedall, Isaac Beckelhymer, C H. Berry, R. 
Leland Brown, J. H. Beard, D. R. Beboit, R. L. Cartwright, 
W. R. Courter, J. D. and C. B. Dabney, F. L. Dairs, C. E. 
Evans, O. M. Eaton, W. A. Green, J. J. Harris, L. D. Hill, 
W. H. Harding, E. M. Harlis, George Hoagland, W. A. In- 
gram, Gilbert Jones, W. H. Kindred, S. S. Lappin, D. A. 
Lytle, H. E. Monser, M. W. Nethercutt, E. M. Norton, J. E. 
Parker, C. W. Ross, F. G. Roberts, T. J. Shuey, C. M. Smith- 
son, E. O. Sharp, Andrew Scott, F. M. Stambaugh, J. E. 
Stout, H. L. Veach, K. C. Ventress, J. O. Walton and J. D. 
Williams. Some of these served for longer and others for 
shorter terms. 

The more substantial churches formed were these : Alexis, 
Beecher City, Bunker Hill, Carlinville, Cowden, Fandon, 
Freeport, Findley, Havana, Indianola, Joliet, Johnson City, 
Kewanee, Kinmundy, Moline, Monticello, Ridge Farm, Rock 
Falls, Savana, St. Elmo, Tamaroa, Tampico, Villa Grove and 
West Frankfort. 

Following the plan of the Foreign Missionary Society, 
the State Board decided in 1904 to introduce the living-link 
feature ; hence the following churches have paid $200 or more 
per year for State mission work. Generally the congregations 
have chosen the mission points or weak churches they have 
assisted, and quite a number of these have been in their own 
cities or counties. This list is: Arcola, Adams County 
churches, Armington, Bloomington First and Second, Cham- 
paign, Concord (Tazewell County), Camp Point, Carthage, 
Decatur Central, De Land, Englewood (Chicago), Gibson 
City, Jacksonville, Long Point, Mackinaw, Minier, Morgan 
County Bible schools, a Niantic brother, Normal, Peoria Cen- 
tral, Pittsfield, Paris, Pleasantview (Adams County), Quincy 
First, Springfield First, and Tazewell County churches. 

A goodly number of mission points and weak congrega- 
tions have been fostered by "Link" offerings or appropriations 
from the treasury of the society. This list follows: Anna, 



98 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

$25 ; Alexis, $75 ; Ashland, $100 ; Bloomington Centennial, 
$200; Beardstown, $800; Bushnell, $200; Carlinviile, $135; 
Chicago Heights, $25 ; Chicago Northside, $50 ; Cooksville, 
$100; Delavan, $60; Dixon, $225; Decatur, Leaftand Avenue, 
$272; Elgin, $200; Freeport, $800; Fulton, $825; Findley, 
$100; Galesburg, $25; Granite City, $300; Griggsville, $230; 
Havana, $510; Harvey, $250; Hillsboro, $900; Jacksonville 
(negro), $10; Joliet First, $162; Kankakee, $400; Kewanee, 
$2,600; McLean, $400; Minonk, $319; Mossville, $158; Mo- 
line, $1,600; Mt. Vernon, $250; Paris Mission, $200: Pon- 
tiac, $400; Polo, $813; Peoria, Howett Street. $810; Prince- 
ton, $50; Quincy Mission, $317; Rock Falls, $230; Rockford, 
$1,400; Rockford (negro), $50; Redmon, $600; Savana, 
$271 ; Springfield, Stewart Avenue, $900 ; South Chicago, 
$150; Streator, $2,265; Tampico, $145; Time, $250, and Villa 
Grove, $388. 

THE OFFICE. 

Up to 1902 all of the corresponding secretaries had pro- 
vided offices for the society's work at their personal expense. 
In that year an office was rented and, through the generosity 
of friends, suitably equipped with needed furniture. Min. W. 
D. Deweese was chosen office secretary and did much of the 
necessary printing up to August, 1913. For several years he 
has served as treasurer also. 

CHRISTIAN COADJUTORS. 

The convention of 1910 decided to employ two Christian 
students in the State University at Urbana to work among 
their fellow-students a young man among the men and a 
young woman among the women. During the three school 
years following, these coadjutors were paid $25 per month 
an aggregate for the period of $1,023. Mr. Stephen E. 
Fisher, for ten years the pastor of the University Place 
Christian Church, says: 

The organization of the men and women from Christian Church 
homes in Illinois who attend the university has proven, under the leader- 



BENEVOLENCES 99 

ship of these special helpers, very effective. Committees on Bible-school 
work, church attendance, social life, etc., are constantly active. Many 
who would not otherwise do so hav; been led to affiliate with the local 
church actively during college residence, and about twenty girls in 
the three years and fifteen young men in the two years have been 
led to Christ through confession and baptism. "When we recall that 
these are the men and women who will hold the high places of power 
to-morrow in our nation, the value of this work is beyond estimate. 

In 1896 the reported number of churches was 730, with 
an aggregate membership of 95,257, while in 1913 the num- 
bers given were 692 congregations, with a total membership 
of 110,736. The value of the houses of worship and parson- 
ages was $4,299,710. The seating capacity of the buildings 
was 215,990. Mr. Jones gave eighteen of the best years of 
his life to this work. 

In addition to Peter Whitmer, Min. D. R. Van Buskirk 
and Dr. George D. Sitherwood, all of Bloomington, as mem- 
bers of the State Board gave most valuable assistance; so, 
also, has J. P. Darst, of Peoria, for twenty-five years. 

SECTION 2. INDEPENDENT AND INDIVIDUAL MISSION WORK. 

THE YOTSUYA MISSION, Tokyo, Japan (W. D. Cunning- 
ham, Director). In 1906, J. P. Hieronymus, a banker of 
Atlanta, received a copy of the Tokyo Christian, which, he 
says, produced a "spontaneous combustion" in him. "I be- 
lieve in both organized and individual missions," he says. He 
opened an account in his bank for Mr. Cunningham, and 
since then has received and remitted all sums sent him for 
this individual mission. In 1912 the amount was $266.81, 
which came from forty givers. He is pleased to continue as 
forwarding secretary. This mission has two hundred rope- 
holders in Illinois, including several organizations, each 
counted as one. 

W. H. WAGGONER was born in Princeton, 111., March 15, 
1868 Sunday morning, just in ti^e for the foreiern mi?sion- 
ary offering. Educated in the public schools. Eureka College 
and Yale University. Mr. Waggoner has given his life to 
lecturing on world-wide missions. He uses maps, charts and 



100 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

pictures with stereopticon. He is a great sower of good seed. 
His work receives the highest commendation. 

BuRKEY-SwoRD. Daniel Burkey was reared with the 
Mennonites and united with the church of Christ at New 
Bedford, 111. He said to Mr. Sword in 1908: "I have 
done little for the Master's Kingdom. I can not preach, but 
you can. Go into the field, receive what is paid you, and I 
will pay you the balance." The contract called for $1,500 
per year and expenses. This arrangement continued four 
years. Mr. Sword proved to be a very sane and successful 
evangelist and Mr. Burkey found great joy in his support. 
In the period Mr. Burkey paid $776 and Mr. Sword received 
about twelve hundred people into the churches. 

SECTION 3. PERMANENT FUNDS. 

The first suggestion of a permanent fund for missionary 
work in Illinois came from Mr. E. W. Bakewell, of Normal. 
At the State Meeting at Jacksonville in 1857 he publicly 
pledged himself "to be one of eight to give $100, or one of 
fifty to give $1,000, within a year, toward establishing a per- 
manent missionary fund." Nothing immediately came from 
this proposition. In 1876 the subject was revived with the 
view of securing $10,000, the annual interest from which 
would support the State evangelist. The nation's centennial 
was thought to be a fitting time to begin the building of a 
living memorial. The proposition was presented in and 
indorsed by the State Convention and advertised through 
church papers and otherwise. Mins. J. J. Moss, A. H. Trow- 
bridge and a few others gave a little time to this work. The 
two men who started it with $100 each in cash were A. R. 
Knox and John Doyle. In the early eighties they were fol- 
lowed in like sums by J. O. Bolin, W. R. Carle, John V. Dee, 
Col. J. W. Judy and S. H. Anderson. In 1880, upon the 
earnest suggestion of Peter Whitmer, the sum to be raised 
was placed at $13,000. He was a banker of Bloomington, 
and for twenty-six consecutive years the faithful and efficient 
treasurer of this fund. His annual reports were his joy. 



BENEVOLENCES 101 

The largest gift from any one person came from the estate 
of Mrs. Sarah A. Starr, of Bloomington, in 1886 $10,000. 
The Permanent Funds now aggregate $37,504. Of this sum, 
$5,400 is in annuity bonds. In 1902 the Board arranged to 
issue such bonds. Mrs. Emily Booth Turner, of Quincy, born 
in Kentucky in 1825 and a lifelong, earnest Christian, gave 
to this fund $2,000 on the annuity bond plan. This fund 
will be increased within two years by $60,000 from the 
estate of Thomas E. Bondurant. From the estate of Dr. J. 
H. Breeden nearly $4,000 has been received recently. This 
income from the regular permanent fund should pay the cost 
of administration. 

STUDENTS' AID FUND. 

With the view of assisting young men of limited means 
in their preparation for the work of the Christian ministry, 
this fund was started in 1886. The moneys were to be 
loaned to approved applicants on their notes of hand for 
varying periods. A committee of three persons chosen by 
the convention has very efficiently handled this business 
throughout the twenty-seven years. Later the privileges of 
the fund were extended equally to young women preparing 
for special Christian service. August, 1913, this sum totaled 
$8,219. From September, 1886, to July, 1913, 799 loans 
were made to 255 students, eleven of whom were women. 
These loans aggregated $22,264. The results of this stimu- 
lating benevolence have been far-reaching. An application 
came to the committee years ago from Frank L. Bowen. He 
was well indorsed by the church at Rock Island, but the 
indorsers said frankly that, in their opinion, it was question- 
able whether the elements of a successful preacher were in 
him. The conscientious and judicial consideration of the 
application placed the committee "on the fence." Finally, 
J. G. Waggoner said : "Brethren, let's take the risk and give 
the boy a chance." Then it was so voted. The many years 
of Mr. Bowen's fine ministry justify the committee's guess, 
and he will know before whom to lift his hat. 



102 



HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 



SECTION 4. STATE CONVENTIONS AND PRESIDENTS. 



DATES. PLACES. 



PRESIDENTS. 



1850 Shelbyville, H. D. Palmer. 

1851 Walnut Grove, H. D. Palmer. 

1852 Abingdon, W. W. Happy. 

1853 Jacksonville, W. W. Happy. 

1854 Decatur, W. W. Happy. 

1855 Charleston, W. W. Happy. 

1856 Mechanicsburg, W. W. 

Happy. 

1857 Jacksonville, W. W. Happy. 

1858 Bloomington, W. W. Happy. 

1859 Lincoln, W. W. Happy. 

1860 Carrollton, W. W. Happy. 

1861 Eureka, John T. Jones. 
162 Abingdon, John T. Jones. 

1863 Bloomington, John T. Jones. 

1864 Lincoln, John T. Jones. 

1865 Springfield, John T. Jones. 

1866 Eureka, John T. Jones. 

1867 Jacksonville, E n o s Camp- 

bell. 

1868 Winchester, Enos Campbell. 

1869 Macomb, Enos Campbell. 

1870 Chicago. Enos Campbell. 

1871 Bloomington, Enos Campbell. 

1872 Bloomington, Enos Campbell. 

1873 Jacksonville, A. A. Glenn. 

1874 Eureka, J. H. McCullqugh. 

1875 Bloomington, A. I. Hobbs. 

1876 Eureka, S. M. Connor. 

1877 Springfield, A. I. Hobbs. 

1878 Eureka, A. I. Hobbs. 

1879 Princeton, J. W. Allen. 

1880 Bloomington, A. I. Hobbs. 

1881 Jacksonville, N. S. Haynes. 



DATES. PLACES. PRESIDENTS. 

1882 Macomb, A. J. Thompson. 

1883 Springfield, G. M. Goode. 

1884 Eureka, S. M. Connor. 

1885 Eureka, S. M. Connor. 

1886 Sullivan, J. G. Waggoner. 

1887 Decatur, J. A. Roberts. 

1888 Eureka, Hiram Woods. 

1889 Eureka, A. N. Gilbert. 

1890 Eureka, J. H. Gilliland. 

1891 Eureka, F. N. Calvin. 

1892 Eureka, A. P. Cobb. 

1893 Eureka, W. A. Maloan. 

1894 Eureka, W. A. Humphrey. 

1895 Eureka, T. T. Holton. 

1896 Eureka, L. B. Pickerill. 

1897 Eureka, N. S. Haynes. 

1898 Eureka, J. H. Hardin. 

1899 Eureka, J. H. Smart. 

1900 Bloomington, N. S. Haynes. 

1901 Springfield, R. F. Thrapp. 

1902 Jacksonville, W. W. Weedon. 

1903 Eureka, J. E. Lynn. 

1904 Champaign, W. H. Cannon. 

1905 Decatur, Geo. A. Campbell. 
19C6 Paris, F. W. Burnham. 

1907 Jacksonville, O. W. Law- 

rence. 

1908 Chicago, H. L. Willett. 

1909 Eureka, J. H. Gilliland. 

1910 Springfield, J. W. Kilborn. 

1911 Danville, J. R. Golden. 

1912 Centralia, Silas Jones. 

1913 Jacksonville, W. W. Weedon. 



SECTION 5. THE CHRISTIAN WOMAN'S BOARD OF MISSIONS. 

The first effective call to the women of the churches of 
Christ in the United States to organize for missionary work 
was issued in May, 1874, by Mrs. Caroline Neville Pearre, 
then a resident of Mason City, Iowa. In God's providence 




MRS. O. A. BURGESS. MRS. V. T. LINDSAY. 

MRS. S. J. CRAWFORD. MRS. ANNIE E. DAVIDSON. 

MISS. E. J. DICKINSON. 
MRS. L. V. PORTER. MRS. P. L. CHRISTIAN. 



BENEVOLENCES 103 

this call proved to be bread cast upon the wide waters. 

On July 26, 1874, Miss Elmira J. Dickinson organized a 
local woman's missionary society at Eureka the first in the 
State. About the same time Pastor J. H. McCullough and 
wife, of Bloomington; Isaac Errett, then preaching in Chi- 
cago, and Pastor J. W. Allen, of Jacksonville, formed similar 
societies in the churches of these several cities. 

The Illinois Christian Woman's Board of Missions was 
organized by Miss Dickinson at Eureka, Aug. 28, 1874, at 
the close of the annual meeting of the State Missionary 
Society. There were present about fifty women, who were 
encouraged in their action by Mr. John Darst, of Eureka, 
and Pastor Ira J. Chase, of Peoria. This was the first State 
organization of the Christian women. It was their expressed 
intention to become auxiliary to a national society which it 
was proposed to form at Cincinnati, Ohio, the next October. 
At this national meeting seventy-five women were present 
from nine States, ten of whom were from Illinois. Such 
was the beginning of a Christian activity that has been of 
incalculable value to the women themselves and the church 
at large. It has given to their fine minds and true hearts 
worthy ideals and aims, and has conserved the spiritual life 
of the churches and brought thousands to the knowledge of 
the truth and to the service of the Master. On the first 
Sunday afternoon following the meeting in Cincinnati, Elder 
Tyra Montgomery formed a woman's auxiliary in the church 
at Mattoon, of which Mrs. Caroline Montgomery was the 
first president. 

Miss Dickinson was chosen the first president at the for- 
mation of the Illinois Society, and for a decade thereafter 
did the difficult and heroic pioneer work that was needed to 
lay the foundation of a splendid superstructure. Those who 
followed in the presidency were Mrs. James Kirk, Mrs. 
Emma Campbell Ewing, Mrs. O. A. Burgess, Mrs. Persis 
L. Christian, Miss Anna May Hale, Miss Annie E. David- 
son, Mrs. Carrie F. Zeller and now Mrs. Lura Thompson 
Porter. 



104 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

The corresponding secretaries have been Mrs. Ella Myers 
Huffman, Mrs. Happy, Mrs. M. M. Lindsay, Mrs. J. G. 
Waggoner, Miss Lura V. Thompson (two terms), Miss 
Rachael Crouch, Miss Gussie Courson and Miss Anna M. 
Hale, 

The treasurers in their order of service were Mrs. John 
Darst, Mrs. H. W. Everest, Mrs. Cassell, Mrs. M. B. Hawk, 
Mrs. S. J. Crawford, Miss Clara L. Davidson and now Miss 
Henrietta Clark. 

The superintendents of the Young People's Department 
were Miss Frank Haynes, Miss Annie E. Davidson, Miss 
Gussie Courson, Miss Minnie Dennis, Miss Lola V. Hale, 
Miss Irene Ridgely, Miss Clara B. Griffin, Miss Dora 
Gutherie and now Miss Effie L. Gaddis. 

Miss Dickinson gave the society, in various official capaci- 
ties, about thirty years of service; Mrs. S. J. Crawford was 
treasurer twenty-two years; Miss Annie E. Davidson in a 
dual capacity fourteen years, and Mrs. Porter fifteen years 
to September, 1913. Twelve of the women above named 
have been "field workers;" that is, they have gone through 
the State as educators and organizers. It may be truthfully 
said that all of these women in every official position have 
done their best; hence the work has grown steadily from its 
beginning. The pioneers in this movement overcame, by 
their Christlike devotion, uninformed indifference and out- 
spoken prejudice and opposition, and they merit the greater 
honor. At the first meeting in 1874 there was "a collection 
taken of $5.41 for the State development ;" the total offerings 
for the year closing with June, 1913, were $24,392. Starting 
with nothing save prayer, purpose and promise, the auxil- 
iaries and circles reported at the same time were 266, with 
a membership of 6277 . 

In January, 1901, a State paper was started to help in 
this work. It was called The Illinois Quarterly, but became 
Mission Leaves in 1906. It was first issued from Athens, 
with Miss Anna M. Hale as editor; in 1904 from Eureka, 
with Miss Annie E. Davidson as editor, and in 1909, first 



BENEVOLENCES 105 

from Cuba, then from Petersburg, with Mrs. Carrie F. Zeller 
as editor to August, 1913. There were eighteen hundred 
of these Leaves then in circulation. 

The headquarters of the society have been Eureka for 
two periods, Jacksonville and Springfield. The office is now 
in the First Christian Church there, and Mission Leaves will 
be issued from that city. Miss Jennie Call is the editor and 
is also the corresponding secretary. 

This movement owes much to Illinois. Its mother, Mrs. 
Pearre, was trained in this State. So also was Mrs. Burgess, 
whose superior administrative ability kept her in the presi- 
dency of the national society ten years. Mrs. Christian, who 
was known as a "queen of the platform," and who traveled 
ten years through the nation in the advocacy of this work, 
was a product of Illinois. Miss Dickinson, who was first in 
self-sacrifice, suggested the thought of a missionary training- 
school. And this was actualized through the munificence of 
Mrs. Maude Detterding Ferris, a fair daughter of the 
Prairie State. 

The total receipts of the National C. W. B. M. for the 
year ending September, 1913, were $358,944. This society 
has in its employ 518 men and women, who are at work in 
the United States, western Canada, Mexico, Jamaica, Porto 
Rico, South America, New Zealand, India, China and Africa. 

SECTION 6. CHRISTIAN HOME FOR THE AGED. 

This Home is located at 873 Grove Street in Jacksonville. 
It is a two-story brick, modern building, with forty rooms, 
that stands on a beautiful lot of two and a half acres. It is 
the property of the National Benevolent Association and was 
bought in 1900 at a cost of $6,500. This money was fur- 
nished by Mr. John Loar, Mrs. Nancy Henderson and Mrs. 
Lou Deweese Kaiser all members of the Jacksonville 
Church. The two women have passed to the life eternal. 
Since then a large addition was built to it. There are thirty 
rooms for the inmates, who are mostly women. Since its 
opening there have been seventy-eight of these. It has always 



106 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

been full, with a number on the waiting list. The annual 
current expenses amount to $6,000, which is paid from the 
offerings made at large to the National Benevolent Associa- 
tion. Admission is limited to members of the Christian 
Church. The Home is a credit to the Disciples of Christ 
and most worthy of their support. Mrs. Mary B. Thorn- 
berry is the present esteemed and capable matron. 

SECTION 7. CHICAGO MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Atty. Milton O. Naramore furnishes the following con- 
cise data: The Missionary Society was organized in the 
parlor of old Farwell Hall in 1887. The Christian Churches 
in the city at that time were the West Side (now Jackson 
Blvd.), Indiana Avenue, Englewood and the North Side (now 
Sheffield Ave.) and a few missions. Those present at the 
meeting were Dr. W. A. Belding, Geo. F. Childs, W. G. 
Morris, W. P. Keeler and some of the following, who earn- 
estly promoted the co-operation from the first ; namely, Mins. 
J. W. Allen and Blackwell ; A. A. Devore, who served as 
president for several years ; A. Larabee, C. C. Chapman, J. 
G. Hester and H. H. Hubard. Of all these, W. P. Keeler 
was actively identified with the society from the beginning, 
has given more years of faithful service than any other, and 
is still zealous for its usefulness. He was a native of Dan- 
bury, Connecticut. About 1855 the family home was where 
the Great Northern Hotel now stands. Chicago has been his 
place of residence ever since. In 1899 the society was reor- 
ganized and incorporated under the name of the "Chicago 
Christian Missionary Society." Under the constitution then 
adopted the society became a representative body consisting 
of delegates elected annually by the several churches of 
Christ in Chicago and Cook County. The first officers were: 
J. H. O. Smith, President; E. A. Orr, Vice-President ; E. 
M. Bowman, Recording Secretary; J. C. Lindsay, Corre- 
sponding Secretary ; Carl Bushnell, Treasurer ; E. W. Darst, 
Superintendent of Missions, and A. Larabee, Assistant Super- 
intendent. Besides these, an executive board of seven is 




W. P. KEELER. 
J. S. SWAFORD. 
C. J. HUDSON. 



E. W. DARST. 



M. O. NARAMORE. 
E. M. BOWMAN. 
E. B. W1TWER. 



BENEVOLENCES 107 

elected annually, to which is committed the entire business 
of the society. The first board was composed of Milton O. 
Naramore, Chairman ; E. M. Bowman, Secretary ; VV. P. 
Keeler, E. B. Witwer, Carl Bushnell, Charles J. Hudson and 
J, W. Swaford. 

One of the most effective means of arousing the churches 
to the needs of city missions was the plan inaugurated by 
this board of holding quarterly rallies of all the congrega- 
tions, at some central place on Sunday afternoons. The first 
of these was held at Kimball Hall, on Wabash Avenue, near 
Jackson, in February, 1900. This plan is still continued. 

Under the leadership of E. W. Darst, a tireless and 
devoted teacher of the gospel, 'city-mission work in Chicago 
moved forward with new life. In the few years he gave to 
this service, and during which he laid his own life on this 
altar, he fully proved the efficiency of this method. Most of 
the new churches of recent years stand as monuments to 
his wisdom and consecration. No great enterprise goes 
forward without a competent leader. Mr. Darst retired only 
when his failing health compelled. His life closed in a few 
years. 

He was succeeded by W. B. Taylor, who was also an 
indefatigable servant of Christ. During his term of service 
the plan of aggressive work in building up new missions 
through a superintendent was changed. Upon his retirement 
Asst. Supt. A. Larabee was given charge of this work, and 
continued therein till the close of his life. His life and work 
are held in tender and grateful remembrance. 

In addition to the contributions of the Chicago churches, 
the work of this society has been financially helped by the 
American Christian Missionary Society, the Illinois Mission- 
ary Society and the National and State C. W. B. M. 

O. F. Jordan has been the faithful and efficient secretary 
of this society for five years. He has aimed to secure and 
present annually a tabulated report of the churches of Christ 
in Cook County, thus giving a bird's-eye view of the growth 
of the Disciples therein. 



108 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

SECTION 8. THE CHICAGO UNION OF AUXILIARIES TO C. W. B. M. 

This society was organized in 1894. Its object was to 
promote the special work of missions as represented by the 
C. W. B. M. The union has grown from seven auxiliaries 
with about fifty members to twenty-two auxiliaries and circles 
with a membership of 547. The quarterly meetings of this 
union for twenty years have been very helpful to the indi- 
vidual women, to the local auxiliaries and to the congrega- 
tions with which they are connected. The Chicago Union 
has always responded loyally to all calls of the National C. 
W. B. M., and it has co-operated actively with the General 
Home Society and the City Mission Board in organizing and 
sustaining missions in Chicago, thus helping to unitize this 
great work. In 1913 the Chicago auxiliaries raised and paid 
for their special work, $2,261. 

For a number of years the National C. W. B. M. has 
paid $1,200 for mission work in Chicago. 



CVANSTOM 
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VALUE OF ALL PROPERTY 

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NUMB e R, TH EATERS 6 to 

TOTA u CHVR.CHES &NISSIOMS 1,1 14 

CMRISTIAN - ' -T 




CHURCHES OF CHRIST 

.in Illinois according to 

1913 Year Book. 



CHAPTER VI. 

LOCAL CHURCHES AND SOME OF THEIR ORGANIZED 
ACTIVITIES. 

SECTION 1. 
The Churches. 

ALEXANDER COUNTY. 

The confluence of great rivers seems to impress people 
with a migratory disposition. The inclination is to move on. 
In addition to this, the southern extremity of the State has 
been subjected to the dangers and vicissitudes of great floods. 
Besides, those who laid out and lotted the town were actuated 
mainly by a selfish, mercenary spirit. The influences have 
combined to keep most of its denizens in a state of continual 
flux. So Disciples have come to Cairo and gone away 
through the decades. 

Cairo First. 

Organized 1866, by G. G. Mullins; present membership, 
157; value of property, $20,000; Bible school began 1866; 
present enrollment, 93. 

Mr. Mullins was a chaplain in the Federal Army. The 
Disciples in Cairo had occasional meetings before the Civil 
War. At the date of organization, so far as can be learned, 
the following were the charter members : Mr. and Mrs. S. R. 
Hay, Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Fenton, Mr. and Mrs. Prussia Mor- 
rison, Mr. and Mrs. McCauly, Mr. and Mrs. Trambo, J. C. 
Talbot, Robert Condiff, Mrs. Mary E. Clark, Mrs. White, 
Mrs. Brown, Mrs. Gilkey, Mrs. Henderson, Mrs. Seely, Mr. 
and Mrs. Layton, Miss Gilkey, Miss Smith and Mrs. Wilson. 
S. R. Hay and A. B. Fenton were chosen as elders and J. C. 
Talbot and Robert Condiff, deacons. 

Meetings for public worship were held in the courthouse 

109 



110 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

until the county clerk turned them out. The erection of a 
building on Eighteenth Street, between Washington and 
Walnut, was then begun. Lack of funds delayed its com- 
pletion for two years, but occasional meetings were held 
meanwhile therein, seated with planks held on boxes and 
blocks. In 1867 a successful union Sunday school was held 
in the courthouse until the county clerk turned it into the 
street. This houseless school hastened the finishing of the 
chapel on Eighteenth Street. It was completed in 1868. In 
1894 this chapel was moved to the corner of Sixteenth and 
Poplar Streets. These lots were filled up by the ladies' aid 
society. The building was repaired in 1901. During its 
entire life the school has had struggles, occasional successes 
with frequent failures and not a few discouragements. 
Always there has been "a remnant according to the election 
of grace." S. R. Hay, A. B. Fenton, G. M. Alden and J. C. 
Talbot deserve to be held in grateful remembrance for their 
sacrifices and faithfulness. 

More than forty ministers have served the church. Some 
of the earlier were Peter Vogel, T. W. Caskey, B. F. 
Manire, J. C. Mason, David Walk, Alfred Flower and Clark 
Braden, whose term was particularly helpful. The present 
building was erected during the pastorate of Frank Thomp- 
son. Alden R. Wallace is now the pastor. 

Cairo Second. 

Organized 1908; present membership, 51; value of prop- 
erty, $300; Bible-school enrollment, 82. 

In June, 1908, forty- four members of the First Church 
signed a paper in which they expressed the belief that the 
time had come to establish a church of Christ north of 
Twenty-eighth Street, and therebv agreed to unite in this aim. 
Officers were elected. The meetings for public worship have 
been held in a public hall and a store building. The preach- 
ing has been done mainly by transient preachers. Floods 
from the great rivers have very seriously handicapped the 
work of the churches here. 



CHURCHES 111 

ADAMS COUNTY. 

Antioch (Golden). 

Organized 1843; present membership, 36; value of prop- 
erty, $1,000; Bible school began 1877; present enrollment, 76. 

This congregation was formed as the Big Neck Church 
of Christ, April 16. There were six charter members ; 
namely, H. A. Cyrus, A. R. Hagerty, Joseph, Nancy and 
Margaret Craig and Mary Ann Thompson. A reorganiza- 
tion was made in 1870 by Min. William Grissom, from 
which time it has been called Antioch. The first church 
house was built in 1877, which served till 1913, when a more 
suitable structure was occupied. It is five miles south and 
one west of Bowen. 

Camp Point. 

Organized 1865, by Joseph Lowe; present membership, 
458; value of property, including parsonage, $19,000; Bible 
school began 1866; present enrollment, 337. 

Organized in a near-by schoolhouse. Built first house 
in 1866; the second is a modern structure and was finished 
in 1912, during the pastorate of W. J. Reynolds, who served 
this church ten years. 

There were thirty-five charter members, among them 
Joseph Lowe, R. H. Routh, J. W. Miller and Dr. S. G. 
Moore, who were the elders, and T. G. Odell and G. M. 
Hess, deacons. 

The men given to the ministry were Walter Kline, Ivan 
Omer and Frank S. Booth. 

Clayton. 

Present membership, 187; value of property, $6,000; 
Bible-school enrollment, 102. 

Coatsburg. 

Present membership, 35; value of property, $2,000; Bible- 
school enrollment, 50. 



112 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Columbus. 

Organized 1844; present membership, 151; value of prop- 
erty, $2,500; Bible school began 1881; present membership, 
150. 

There were no records before 1857. 

The church has given Fred Meadows and James A. Seaton 
to the ministry. 

Fowler. 

Organized 1861, by Dr. William Hatch; present member- 
ship, 36; value of property, including parsonage, $2,900; 
Bible school began 1896; present enrollment, 33. 

The church does good work. 

Kellerville. 

Present membership, 54; value of property, $1,000. 
Liberty. 

Organized 1852, by Ziby Brown; present membership, 
177; value of property, $3,000; Bible school began 1862; 
present enrollment, 72. 

This congregation grew out of a series of meetings con- 
ducted by Min. Ziby Brown, in which he very successfully 
met the opposition of Romanists and other sectarians. The 
charter members were Jacob and Anna Connor, E. B., Solo- 
mon and Jane M. Rhodes, George Pond, George Benfield, 
James R. and Elizabeth Howerton, Phoebe A. Vanderlip, Levi 
and Phoebe Traver, Lovena C. Grubb, Rosena and Elizabeth 
Vanderlip, Lydia and Rebecca Benfield, Hannah Meacham, 
James and Margaret J. Dunlap, Nancy A. Malone, Jason and 
Mrs. Barnard ; Ira, Susanah, Samuel, Rebecca and Eliza- 
beth Kimmons ; Elizabeth Hunsaker, Susanah and Mary E. 
Titus, Eliza Malone, and Erastus and Euphrazina Rice. The 
organization was made in the brick schoolhouse. Min. Elijah 
L. Craig presided. 



CHURCHES 113 

Immediately following the formation of the church, Mr. 
Bond, an M. E. minister, challenged Mr. Brown for a public 
discussion. He was accommodated. Later the M. E. Church 
disappeared from that village. More than twenty ministers 
have served the congregation. The first house of worship 
was built in 1853 and the second was occupied in 1907. 

Lima. 

Organized 1830, by John B. Curl; present membership, 
110; value of property, $1,200; Bible school began 1898; 
present enrollment, 51. 

Loraine. 

Organized 1892, by S. S. Jones; present membership, 310; 
value of property, $12,000; Bible school began 1892; present 
enrollment, 191. 

There were 120 charter members. Fifteen pastors have 
served the church. The first building was erected in 1892. 
This gave place to a modern structure in 1908. 

Marcellene. 

Organized 1879; present membership, 50; value of prop- 
erty, $3,000 ; Bible school began 1879 ; present enrollment, 72. 

Mill Creek (Mendon). 

Present membership, 25; value of property, $1,000; Bible- 
school enrollment, 20. 

Mound Prairie (Beverly). 

Present membership, 90; value of property, $1,500; Bible- 
school enrollment, 30. 

Mount Hebron (Mendon). 

Present membership, 30; value of property, $2,000; Bible- 
school enrollment, 20. 



114 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Payson. 

Organized 1868, by J. H. Hughes; present membership, 
125;' value of property, including parsonage, $4,600; Bible 
school began 1866. 

The church has given Louis Cupp, O. W, Lamonte and 
O. W. Lawrence to the ministry. 

Pleasant Vieiv (Camp Point). 

Organized 1835, by David Hobbs; present membership, 
83; value of property, $3,000; Bible-school enrollment, 65. 

The location is three miles southeast of Camp Point. 
Some say the church was organized by John Ambrose, but 
the more probable name is given. Among the charter mem- 
bers there were John Ambrose, Nancy Foster, David, Char- 
lotte, Nicholas and Elizabeth Hobbs, Rodney and Rhoda 
Burnham, Daniel and Lucy Walker. Meetings were held in 
the residences and schoolhouse till 1848, when a chapel was 
built. The first pastor was T. J. Matlock, who served in 
1849. The church has done good work through its seventy- 
eight years. It has given to the ministry Elmer, William and 
Joseph Lowe and R. A. Omer. 

Quincy First. 

Present membership, 530; value of property, $25,000; 
Bible-school enrollment, 400. 

Min. Livy Hatchett, of Warren County, visited Quincy 
in 1840. There and then he met Jacob Creath, of Missouri, 
who addressed the citizens with great ability. Though none 
made the good confession, some united with us who were for- 
merly Baptists the wife of Governor Carlin and a Sister 
Turner. Evidently the church was formed before 1840. In 
1844 Mr. Creath reported that his meetings in Quincy had 
been much disturbed by military maneuvers connected with 
the Mormon riots at Nauvoo. Min. Patrick Murphy became 
the first pastor in 1850, when there were only twenty mem- 
bers. Shortly thereafter the chapel of the M. E. Church 



CHURCHES 115 

South was bought. It stood on Fourth Street, between Jer- 
sey and York Streets. This was used until the present build- 
ing on Broadway and Ninth Streets was erected. Following 
Mr. Murphy, the church was served by Mins. Simms, D. R. 
Howe, J. H. McCollough, H. D. Clark, J. T. Toof, F. N. 
Calvin and others. Governor Carlin was a member here. 

Quincy (East End). 

Present membership, 71; value of property, $2,500; Bible- 
school enrollment, 141. 

This mission has been fostered by the State Society. 

Richfield (Plainville). 

Present membership, 20; value of property, $1,500; Bible- 
school enrollment, 20. 

Ursa. 

Organized 1833, by Jesse Bowles; present membership, 
152; value of property, $5,000; Bible school began 1840; 
present enrollment, 159. 

This was organized as the Bear Creek Christian Church. 
The local name was changed in 1840. The charter members 
were Jesse Bowles and wife; Stephen A. Ruddle, wife and 
daughter ; Sarah Crawford, Miss Stephenson, and the Misses 
Lyttle and Elizabeth Stone. 

The pioneer preachers were Stephen Ruddle, Jesse Bowles, 
John Clark and Levi Hatchet. Mr. Ruddle was born in 
Bourbon County, Ky., in 1768. He did missionary work 
among the Indians. Came from Missouri to Adams County 
in 1829. 

Wolf Ridge (Camp Point). 

Organized 1892, by John Parrick; present membership, 
40; value of property, $1,000; Bible school began 1892; pres- 
ent enrollment, 50. 

Of late years the church has paid a little for missions. 

Charles A. Cate was a farmer-preacher of this county who 



116 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

did faithful service for many years. He was born in New 
Hampshire and died in Adams County in 1908. 

John B. Curl was also an active evangelist in the early 
thirties. His labors were earnest and reached a wide terri- 
tory. 

BOND COUNTY. 

Greenville. 

Organized 1878, by J. Carroll Stark ; present membership, 
300; value of property, $4,500; Bible school began 1878; 
present enrollment, 250. 

Isaac N. Enloe was instrumental in having Mr. Stark 
hold the series of meetings that resulted in the formation 
of this church. 

Among the leading members there are W. H. Dawdy, 
Cicero J. Lindly, E. E. Wise, C. E. Davidson, E. W. Miller 
and H. C. Mable. 

The two preachers produced were Jesse E. Stone a Tal- 
mage DeFreese. 

The church is healthy and prosperous. 

Mulberry Grove. 

Organized 1864, by John A. Williams; present member- 
ship, 200; value of property, $3,200; Bible school began 1864; 
present enrollment, 144. 

The charter members were A. J. Morgan and wife, 
Andrew Steel and wife, A. J. Leigh and wife, C. T. Smith 
and wife, Hiram Bixby and wife, and Mrs. Barnes. 

The German Baptists and United Baptists owned a chapel 
jointly here. The trustees bought out one party in the spring 
of 1865 and the other party a year afterward. By 1900 the 
house was old and poorly located, so then a better location 
was purchased and a modern chapel built thereon. 

Mr. Williams served the church several years. Twelve 
or more pastors have followed him. The congregation has 
half-time preaching. There are seven elders, six deacons and 
five trustees. Evert Elam is clerk. 



CHURCHES 117 

Smithboro. 

Present membership, 30; value of property, $2,000; Bible- 
school enrollment, 35. 

Tamalco. 

Present membership, 99; value of property, $800; Bible- 
school enrollment, 79. 

Woburn. 

Organized 1859, by John A. Williams; present member- 
ship, 50; value of property, $2,000; Bible-school enrollment, 
56. 

This was the first church in Bond County that was Chris- 
tian only. In 1859 Jonathan Skates, with his wife and his 
wife's sister, Mrs. E. M. Lemert all members of the church 
of Christ came from Ohio and settled in this locality. Mrs. 
Lemert was a woman of fine intelligence and Christian devo- 
tion. These, with other Disciples, arranged for monthly 
meetings in the schoolhouse. In the fall Mr. Williams held 
a revival and constituted the church. 

A chapel was built soon. In 1906 this gave place to a 
new and better house. 

There was a hard pull to pay for the first chapel because 
of the determined opposition of denominational neighbors. 
Not a church that opposed in that time has now either place 
or name in the community. 

The first officers were Henry Allen, elder; Jonathan 
Skates and D. V. Tabor, deacons. 

BROWN COUNTY. 

Coopcrstown. 

Organized 1881, by T. W. Cottingham; present member- 
ship, 103; value of property, $1,000; Bible school began 
1881 ; present enrollment, 81. 

Before this date Mins. A. P. Stewart, Cottingham, Pat- 
terson and Stanley had preached here. Like all village 



118 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

churches, this has lost many by the continual change of peo- 
ple. However, this one is still vigorous. 

Hazel Dell (Mt. Sterling). 

Organized 1870, by Minister Robison; present member- 
ship, 70; value of property, $600; Bible school began 1870; 
present enrollment, 89. 

The location is two miles east of Mt. Sterling, on the 
Ripley road. The chapel was built the same year. The work 
has been regularly and faithfully maintained, although sub- 
ject to constant changes in the community. Among the lead- 
ers in the earlier days were George Kendrick, Lemuel Cop- 
page, John Dennis and Lewis C. Perry. Mr. Perry was the 
efficient superintendent of the Bible school for many years. 

Mt. Sterling. 

Organized 1838, by John Taylor; present membership, 
383; value of property, $10,000; Bible-school enrollment, 300. 

The first preachers of the Christian Church came to 
Brown County as early as 1836, and began their work 
among the scattered pioneer settlers in the vicinity of Mt. 
Sterling. They were strong, rugged men, deeply rooted in 
the gospel, and staunch advocates of the Restoration move- 
ment. Among these were John B. Curl, Alexander Reynolds, 
Thomas Brockman, Barton W. Stone, John Rigdon, Jacob 
Creath, James Ross, W. P. Bowles, Pardee Butler (of Kan- 
sas fame), Robert Foster, with an occasional sermon by Alex- 
ander Campbell. 

John Price, a well-to-do farmer residing two miles east 
of Mt. Sterling, was one of the first to identify himself with 
the new movement. He became the most active servant of 
the Lord. Meetings for preaching, prayer and communion 
were held in his home, and others in the village in an old 
blacksmith and wagon shop and next in the courthouse. The 
first chapel was built in 1853 and still stands on the original 
site. The city owns it. 

The next preachers were D. P. Henderson, J. S. Sweeney 



CHURCHES 119 

and John Taylor, the latter of whom for many years was the 
resident minister of the church. He was a man of modest 
mien and limited education, but had large native ability both 
as a preacher and leader of men. His long and faithful 
service gave permanency to this church and introduced the 
gospel into other communities. Evangelist W. H. Brown also 
helped the church much. 

The pastorate of J. F. Stewart was especially fruitful in 
both spiritual and material results. On lots that were given 
to the congregation by him and George F. Tebo the present 
building was finished in 1887. This was enlarged and recon- 
structed during the pastorate of Mr. Lorton. 

The church is well organized and carrying on aggressive 
work under Mr. L. G. Huff's capable leading. 

New Salem (Mt. Sterling). 

Organized 1875, by J. T. Smith ; Bible school began 1875. 

Four miles north of Mt. Sterling, at the Bell School- 
house, a congregation of about fifty members was formed. 
Among them were some excellent families. Meetings were 
held regularly on the Lord's Days. In 1877 a chapel was 
built nearer town, which is known as above written. The 
pastors at Mt. Sterling have usually served this congregation. 

Ripley. 

Organized 1842, by John Taylor ; present membership, 72 ; 
value of property, $4,000; Bible-school enrollment, 112. 

For many years Alpheus Brown, a pioneer preacher, 
resided here and cared for this congregation. During this 
period it grew steadily and came to have near three hundred 
members, who controlled the bulk of the wealth in the village 
and community. Later the church was divided by the Sev- 
enth-day Advents and has never regained its power and influ- 
ence. Ministers Taylor and Brown were the chief factors in 
its growth. Associated with them as active servants of God 
there were P. A. Hows, Marion Stout, Nancy Tebo, W. A. 
Clark, John Adams, L. D. Stoffer, S. Glen, Mrs. Hawkins 



120 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

and Mrs. Hardin. Some of its later preachers were J. S. 
Sweeney, Mr. Price, J. T. Smith, C. H. Patterson, A. P. 
Stewart and Mr. Stanley. 

A modern house of worship was built in 1904. J. D. 
Williams is the present pastor. 

Timewell. 

Organized 1868, by P. D. Vermillion; present member- 
ship, 194; value of property, $12,000; Bible school began 
1868; present enrollment, 210. 

The former name of this town was Mound Station. Pre- 
vious to 1868 there were some scattered Disciples of Christ 
in the community, among them Mr. Laughlin, the Coopers, 
Webb, Oliver Ausmus and other good men. 

A strong congregation was organized and a good house 
built. 

The ministers who served the church were Wm. Gressom, 
Mr. McPherson, D. R. Lucas, T. W. Cottingham, A. P. 
Stewart, T. M. Weaver and E. J. Lampton. 

Two public discussions were held in this house. In 1878, 
A. P. Stewart met Minister Yates, of the Missionary Baptists. 
In 1879, D. R. Lucas met Minister Thompson, of the Regular 
Baptists. 

This is a strong church. Pastor W. A. Taylor led in the 
erection of the present fine structure. 

Versailles. 

Organized 1869, by W. S. Henry; value of property, 
including parsonage, $5,300. 

Mr. Henry was one of the first elders and A. G. Lucas 
the first minister. The growth in numbers was slow. In 
1874 the frame of a new church building was swept away by 
a storm. Renewed determination soon rebuilt it. In its 
earlier years George F. Adams and A. P. Stewart held suc- 
cessful meetings, when some of the most influential people 
of the community were included in its membership. This 
church has done good work. 



CHURCHES 121 

During Mr. Bassett's pastorate A. P. Cobb led in a great 
meeting. 

A new and modern building was erected in 1907 during 
the pastorate of R. S. Campbell. 

The church is doing aggressive work. 

BUREAU COUNTY. 

The Ross brothers (John, Joseph and Andrew) came from 
Tuscarawas County, O., and settled in Ohio Township in 
1845. Shortly thereafter they organized a church of Christ 
and built a chapel in their neighborhood. This did good 
service till 1872, when the place of meeting was changed to 
Ohio, a town that grew on the railroad three miles north. 
There the congregation also did good work. But its mem- 
bers moved away, Romanists and infidels came, so that for 
years the Christian Church has had no regular meetings. The 
chapel still stands there. 

About 1845, Min. Geo. G. McManis organized a church 
of Christ at Leepertown, which served the community for 
forty-three years, then it passed away by emigration. It was 
the first of its faith in the county. 

About 1850, J. F. M. Parker, assisted by John Wherry 
and G. G. McManis, organized at Boyd's Grove the Milo 
Church. It served its community well for many years, but 
it is now feeble. The Southerland family was prominent. 

Later the Lone Tree Church was formed seven miles 
southeast of Boyd's Grove, probably by G. G. McManis. 
Emigration carried it away. 

Cragy Sharp, a Scotch Disciple, settled near Lamoille 
and gathered together a small band there in the school- 
house. Two of his sons became preachers. 

The work at Maiden was begun by Elijah Isaacs and 
John and Andrew Ross. The congregation met in the For- 
ristal Schoolhouse, three miles north of Dover. The Car- 
penter brothers were reared in this neighborhood, one of 
whom became president of Oskaloosa College and chancellor 
of Drake University, both in Iowa. 



122 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Neither of the last two named congregations built a 
church house. 

What the name McManis meant to the southern part 
of this county, Ross meant to the northern part. 

New Bedford. 

Organized 1866, by Geo. W. Mapes; present membership, 
130; value of property, including parsonage, $4,500; Bible 
school began 1866; present enrollment, 125. 

John and Andrew Ross were the pioneer preachers here. 
There were twenty-two charter members, among whom were 
Jacob Sells, J. H. Symonds, Levi Baldwin, Henry Thomas 
and Mrs. Thomas Gibson. At first the church met bitter 
opposition from its religious neighbors. It became weak, 
and the chapel that was built in 1869 was sold. In 1887 the 
congregation was reorganized by Min. G. W. Black, under 
the auspices of the Ohio Church. Since then it has done 
excellent work. 

Princeton. 

Organized 1840, by John G. Yearnshaw; present mem- 
bership, 282; value of property, including parsonage, $14,500; 
Bible-school enrollment, 219. 

The charter members were James W. Howe, John, Cath- 
erine and Daniel R. Howe, John and Eliza Ireland, Daniel 
Bryant, Clark and Mary Bennett, Rachel and Juliet Radcliff, 
Elmura Elston, Sarah Minier, Mary Hays, Margaret McEl- 
wain and John G. Yearnshaw. Mr. Yearnshaw was chosen 
bishop, Mr. Bennett, deacon, and Mary Bennett, deaconess, 
on March 8. The next October four persons were added by 
conversion under the preaching of G. P. Young. Meetings 
were held in an upper room until 1846, when a brick house 
was completed through much toil and sacrifice. Min. G. G. 
McManis, who had come there in 1844, and his sons went 
into the woods and cut the timber that was used in the build- 
ing. It stood until 1870, when the present house was built. 

The church has had a varied history. The names of 



CHURCHES 123 

Mathew Trimble and his son, Wm. C. and Geo. G. McManis, 
Dr. G. W. Taylor and D. R. Howe are cherished. J. G. 
Waggoner was twice its pastor. Its present officers are well 
qualified. C. C. Carpenter is the minister. 

Walnut. 

Organized 1882, by R. B. Brown; present membership, 
242; value of property, $6,000; Bible school began 1882; 
present enrollment, 147. 

Andrew Ross preached the first sermon in the Red Oak 
log schoolhouse, about three miles from the site of Walnut. 
A little later G. W. Mapes preached there and the observance 
of the Lord's Supper was begun. Mr. Brown was assisted 
in the organization at Walnut by S. S. Jones. Prominently 
connected with this prosperous church were, or are, Messrs. 
Brower, McNitt, Wolf, Culver, Kelly, Martin, Potter, Long, 
Shirk and Ross. 

York town (Tampico). 

Organized 1891, by J. E. Pierce; present membership, 20; 
value of property, $2,500; Bible school began 1894; present 
enrollment, 48. 

Mrs. C. C. Babcock held a series of meetings in Wood- 
man Hall in September. She ordained J. E. Pierce, who 
formed the church with six members. The chapel was built 
in 1894. With varying fortune it continued till 1899. In 
that year it supported an evangelist in forming a congegra- 
tion at Tampico, in Whiteside County, to which it gave thirty 
of its members. Since then it has gradually declined by 
removals. It did good work. F. C. Thackaberry is corre- 
spondent. 

CALHOUN COUNTY. 

Bay (Mozier). 

Organized 1897, by J. M. Bovee; present membership, 
60; value of property, $800; Bible school began 1900; pres- 
ent enrollment, 75. 



124 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

This congregation was the result of a meeting conducted 
by Mr. Bovee in the West Panther Creek Schoolhouse. The 
use of an organ and the beginning of a Sunday school led to 
a division of the church. Those withdrawing put up a 
chapel within a stone's-throw of the other house. Then they 
challenged Mr. Bovee to publicly debate the "organ ques- 
tion." He complied. 

Farmers' Ridge (Nebo). 

Organized 1856, by J. W. Greer and James Burbridge; 
present membership, 123 ; Bible-school enrollment, 100. 
George and Richard Williams are preachers here. 

Indian Creek (Hamburg). 

Present membership, 60. 

A small, ultra-conservative congregation, with little influ- 
ence for good. 

CARROLL COUNTY. 

Lanark. 

Organized 1843, by Garner Moffett; present membership, 
122; value of property, $10,000; Bible-school enrollment, 120. 

Cherry Grove was five miles northeast of the site of 
Lanark. Into this place Garner Moffett, David Tripp, William 
Renner, Thomas and Abraham Moffett, with their families, 
came in 1840, and a little later David Miller, Emanuel Stover, 
William Hawk and the McCoy family. Some of these were 
from Virginia and others from Ohio. Min. Henry Howe 
preached in this settlement at that time, as did also J. M. 
Yearnshaw. After the church was formed, it authorized 
Garner Moffett and David Tripp to preach. Residences and 
schoolhouses were used for public worship till 1858, when 
a chapel was built at Stovertown. When the railway was 
built in 1861, Lanark was started and the chapel moved there. 
In 1879 a new house was built. This gave place to the 
present elegant structure in 1907. From the first the church 



CHURCHES 125 

has had many representative people and has done good 
service. This congregation has given to the ministry Robert 
and Frank L. Motfett, Wm. B. Clemner and F. A. Sword. 

Savanna. 

Organized 1904, by C. C. Carpenter; present membership, 
25 ; value of property, $700 ; Bible school began 1904 ; pres- 
ent enrollment, 55. 

There were thirty-one charter members. Adverse condi- 
tions and removals have handicapped the church from its 
beginning. It owns a lot, but the meetings are held in a hall. 
A C. E., L. A. society and teacher-training class are main- 
tained. Mrs. C. Gridley is clerk. 

Thomson. 

Organized 1852, by John Yeager; present membership, 
100; value of property, including parsonage, $4,000; Bible- 
school enrollment, 105. 

In 1852, Min. Garner Moffett, of Cherry Grove, established 
a mission at the Argo Schoolhouse, then called Hague. Soon 
after, Minister Yeager organized the Johnson Creek Church, 
with the following charter members: Henry Atherton and 
wife, Luke Atherton, Cephas Atherton and wife, Thomas Art 
and wife, Robert Art and wife, Ebon Balcom, Mrs. James 
Carroll, Mrs. Robert Carroll, Mrs. Alonzo Fuller, Henry 
Knigh, Amos Shoemaker and wife, and Mrs. Charles Thom- 
alson. Cephas Atherton was the last of these to pass on. He 
died in 1910. Robert Art was the first elder, and Amos 
Shoemaker and Thomas Art the first deacons. After Ministers 
Yeager and Moffett, C. W. Sherwood served the church one- 
fourth time as pastor for $100 per year. His sermons aver- 
aged one hour and thirty minutes. About 1860 the Baptists 
built a chapel at Bluffville, which was rented for one-fourth 
time. The district missionary meeting was held here with 
130 delegates present. At that time a chapel became a neces- 
sity; work on a railway had commenced, so it was built at 



126 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Thomson. The rock was quarried by the members and 
much of the other labor donated by them. J. N. Smith was 
then the minister. The women of the congregation paid off 
the indebtedness before the dedication. By reason of its 
financial weakness the church in its earlier years took L. B. 
Myers from a real-estate office, G. W. Pearl from a marble- 
cutter's shop, and C. C. Blakesley from music-teaching, and 
made good preachers of them. The Thomson Church is 
proud of three things: they have never had a quarrel, never 
had a mortgage on their property, and have always paid 
their ministers every dollar promised. Mrs. C. C. Babcock 
rendered the congregation fine services as pastor. 

CASS COUNTY. 

Ashland. 

Organized 1892, by G. W. Pearl; present membership, 
100; value of property, $3,000; Bible school began 1892; pres- 
ent enrollment, 126. 

A former congregation in this town had failed. This one 
was organized by State Evangelist Pearl. Its pastors have not 
all been the most worthy. 

Bcardstoivn. 

Organized 1910, by Chas. W. Ross ; present membership, 
137; value of property, $5,000; Bible school began 1910; pres- 
ent enrollment, 250. 

In the years long since gone, there was a congregation of 
Christians only here, but even memory of it has faded away. 
. The present church came from a six weeks' meeting, led 
by District Evangelist Ross, assisted for a time by Miss Alice 
Hornbeck, State Bible-school evangelist. First, Mr. Ross 
made a canvass of the town, visiting 982 homes personally. 
He found about one hundred persons who had been Disciples, 
and a ladies' aid society. The meeting followed. Mr. Ross 
reported 1.220 calls while on the field, challenges to debate 
and opportunities to side-track in controversies, but the faith- 



CHURCHES 127 

ful preaching 01 the gospel in love resulted in a congregation 
of ninety-seven members. 

At first the old chapel of the German Methodists was 
leased and then purchased in 1911. 

Chandlerville. 

Organized 1865, by Dr. D. W. Shurtleff ; present member- 
ship, 199; value of property, including parsonage, $12,500; 
Bible school began 1865 ; present enrollment, 180. 

In the early sixties, Dr. D. W. Shurtleff preached in the 
Buck and Pleasant Ridge Schoolhouses, located a few miles 
east of the town. In 1864 the place of meeting was changed 
to the village schoolhouse, and Min. John A. Raines minis- 
tered to the people there. The chapel was built in 1867, 
and the present fine structure was finished in 1913 during the 
pastorate of B. O. Ay les worth. 

The church owes much to Dr. N. H. Boone for his help in 
its first period. After four years of spiritual gloom, Min. 
H. C. Littleton began to revive the church in 1904. Since 
then, led by good men, it has moved forward. Dr. H. B. 
Boone has been Bible-school superintendent for sixteen years. 

Philadelphia. 

Organized 1837, by Samuel Brockman; present member- 
ship, 20; value of property, $1,500; Bible-school enrollment, 
25. 

In 1850, Princeton, Cass County, was a village of two 
hundred inhabitants and a good business. Its location was 
about midway between Virginia and Petersburg. With the 
coming of railroads, the town disappeared and its site is now 
farmed. There was a Christian chapel in that Princeton in 
1838. Minister Brockman was the first man who preached the 
primitive gospel in that community and probably formed the 
congregation. Alexander Campbell preached there one time. 
John Sybrant, a resident of Jacksonville, and now ninety years 
of age, became a member of this congregation in 1845. He 
says that Minister Patton and D. Pat Henderson, both then 



128 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

residents of Jacksonville, were then preaching there; that the 
elders then were James Conover, Martin Hoagland and Dr. 
Andrew Elder, and the deacons were Isaac Redding, John 
Conover and John C. Dennis; that William Black moved 
there in that year and was shortly made an elder; that 
Samuel T. Callaway thereafter preached for the church 
seven years ; that a new house of worship was built in 1849 
by Joseph Black; that in June a public discussion was held 
in this chapel between W. W. Happy and Minister Lewis, an 
M. E. preacher; that E. G. Rice came to the neighborhood, 
bought the James Conover farm, was chosen an elder and 
preached for the church; that Eleazer Griffin was their next 
preacher, but became a schismatic and was dismissed from 
the church ; that in 1866 this church held a meeting in the 
Garner neighborhood, J. B. McCorkle preaching; that in No- 
vember, 1866, Minister McCorkle and Dr. J. M. Allen con- 
ducted a series of meetings in a wood-shop in Philadelphia, and 
that the Princeton Church was reorganized there with 
Charles Elder and John Sybrant, elders, with Ripley Elder 
and Joseph Black, deacons. The chapel at Princeton was 
torn down, transferred to Philadelphia and rebuilt there by 
Joseph Black. It was dedicated in June, 1867, by Min. A. J. 
Kane, who was then serving the church. 

This church formed congregations at Jordonville and Ash- 
land, and gave to the ministry Charles Dean, Charles Elder 
and Ripley Elder. 

It has lost heavily by removals. Abram Bailey, Henry 
Shafer, Frank Cosner, Mrs. Ruth Harding and Mrs. W. D. 
Watkins are among the faithful few who remain. Pastor 
C. E. French, of Virginia, is serving them as he can. 

John Sybrant is a beautiful soul who waits in the vesti- 
bule of eternity for his glorification. 

Virginia. 

Organized 1839, by Wm. H. Brown ; present membership, 
160; value of property, including parsonage, $17,000; Bible 
school began 1855; present enrollment, 160. 



CHURCHES 129 

Among the charter members there were probably the 
following: Mr. and Airs. Alexander Naylor, Mr. and 
Mrs. Charles Brady, Mr. and Mrs. John Mosely and Mr. 
and Mrs. Thomas Mosely. Mr. Naylor was the elder of the 
church. 

It was not till 1843 that Evangelist Brown conducted a 
great revival in the old courthouse. He was assisted by A. 
J. Kane and Samuel Church. At this meeting Henry S. 
Savage, Sr., and Miss Sarah Frances Ward united with the 
church. Miss Ward became the wife of Mr. Savage. There- 
after she became widely and well known for many Christian 
works and noble character. Her father and mother, Jacob and 
Eliza Ward, came into the church at the same time. It was 
he who gave the lot upon which the first house of worship 
was built. This was in 1853. It was at the northwest cor- 
ner of Beardstown and Pitt Streets and was used till 1879. 
During this period the preaching was intermittent. Robert 
Foster, John Taft, George Owens, Harrison Osborn, A. H. 
Rice, J. A. Rains and Samuel Lowe were there, and others 
who held "big meetings." About 1875 the Black family 
moved into the city and ever since have added much to the 
strength of the church. 

J. L. Richardson became the first pastor in 1878. In the 
fall of that year the second church building was finished. It 
stood at the southwest corner of Beardstown and Cass 
Streets on a lot one-half of which was given by Mrs. Sarah 
F. Savage. This building was struck by lightning and 
burned in 1897. J. D. Dabney was the pastor. He was suc- 
ceeded by G. F. Shields, who led in the construction of the 
new building. During the period of the second building, 
Jas. McGuire, N. E. Cory, Minister Sewell and J. J. Cathcart 
were pastors. 

In the winter of 1888-89, Evangelist W. F. Black held a 
seven weeks' meeting here which was an event in the life 
of the church. After this, B. J. Radford supplied the pulpit 
and pastors succeeded. 

The church is active in Christian service. 

6 



130 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. 

The general history of this county says: 

"Cyrus Strong, an early settler on the Salt Fork, was a 
licentiate of the Disciples of Christ. He was the first min- 
ister whose name appears upon the marriage records of the 
county as officiating at a marriage early in the history of the 
neighborhood. He exercised his gifts in behalf of a religious 
life. 

"Samuel Mapes, a resident of Hickory Grove, of the 
same denomination, preached at different places in the county 
and was instrumental in the organization of a church at the 
schoolhouse in his neighborhood. 

"These were the earliest churches of this denomination 
and its earliest ministers." 

Champaign. 

Organized 1883, by N. S. Haynes; present membership, 
975; value of property, $70,000; Bible school began 1883; 
present enrollment, 836. 

The official records of the State Missionary Society show 
that this church was constituted by State Evangelist N. S. 
Haynes. After about two months of intermittent efforts, he 
gave place to Min. E. L. Frazier, who formed the Bible 
school and prayer-meeting. He moved to Champaign, but 
resigned the care of the mission after a short service on the 
ground that "permanent results promised to be more tardy than 
he thought he ought to wait for." The care of the mission 
then went to Min. A. N. Page. He resided in Champaign 
for about eight years. In 1884, Mr. Page began to give 
much time to the mission. He bought a cheap lot on White 
Street, solicited money in Champaign and other counties and 
practically built the chapel. Then he preached for the con- 
gregation till the close of 1885. Some of the pastors who 
have served the church were B. N. Anderson, S. S. Jones 
and E. C. Stark. 

For the past ten years S. E. Fisher has been pastor, and 




\ 



CHURCHES 131 

in this period the church has made gratifying growth. Mr. 
F. B. Vennum moved to the city in 1899 and shortly there- 
after bought and gave to the church a much better site. Mr. 
F. K. Robeson seconded the work of Mr. Vennum and they 
interested Mr. T. A. Bondurant, of DeLand. A substantial 
building grew during the pastorate of Jay W. Knight. This 
was much enlarged and improved in 1910. 

During the past decade, more than two thousand members 
have been enrolled. The church is located at the seat of the 
University of Illinois and is alive to its opportunities and 
responsibilities. 

Fisher. 

Organized 1885, by II. C. Castle; present membership, 
236; value of property, including parsonage, $6,500; Bible 
school began 1885 ; present enrollment, 222. 

This church was the result of a series of meetings con- 
ducted by Evangelist H. C. Castle in the U. B. chapel. The 
congregation occupied their house of worship in 1886, which 
was remodeled in 1907. J. F. Hollingsworth is in his fifth 
year as pastor. 

Gifford. 

Organized 1880, by John M. Smith ; present membership, 
60; value of property, $1,800; Bible school began 1880; pres- 
ent enrollment, 75. 

Meetings were held in the schoolhouse. The church 
building was finished in 1892. 

Homer. 

Organized 1856, by Dr. T. M. Hess ; present membership, 
107; value of property, $3,000; Bible school began 1856; 
present enrollment, 62. 

There were eleven charter members. There was a union 
chapel in Old Homer, but when it was moved to the new 
site the legal title passed to the M. E. Church. Dr. Hess 
built a hall in the new town which was used for public wor- 
ship. The present house was built about 1875. 



132 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

L. R. Conkrite has been given to the ministry and a num- 
ber of the sisters have married preachers. 

Longview. 

A feeble congregation with an intermittent life. 
Ludlow. 

Organized 1869, by R. M. Martin; present membership, 
183; value of property, $5,000; Bible school began 1869; 
present enrollment, 91. 

The first records of this church are yet available. The 
charter members were: J. D. Ludlow, William A. Haley, 
J. W. Dillon and wife, S. S. Proctor and wife, W. M. Cloyd 
and wife, W. S. Collier and wife, John Crawford, T. J. 
Johnson, G. W. Crose and wife, R. G. Braden and wife, 
Eliza J. Gregg, Belle Neville, Clista W. Dillon, Liddie Bra- 
den, Mary A. Dillon, Cassie R. Gregg, A. P. Cloyd and wife, 
Davis Dillon, J. H. Crawford, C. H. Beach, W. L. Braden, 
Viola Culbertson, Emily White, and three others whose 
names are not legible. 

The first house of worship, costing $3,000, was completed 
in 1871 during the pastorate of R. B. Roberts. While J. H. 
Hollingworth was pastor the building was fully modernized 
and made beautiful in 1907. 

Ira J. Walker served the church through fifteen consecu- 
tive years as janitor and organist, free of charge. 

Ogden. 

Organized 1871 ; present membership, 60 ; value of prop- 
erty, $1,000; Bible school began 1871; present enrollment, 50. 

Dr. T. M. Hess held the first meetings here about 1860 
in an old schoolhouse. In 1872 a church-house was com- 
pleted. Before the organization of this church the Disciples 
residing here held membership in the church at Homer. By 
reason of internal strife, the church disbanded in the early 
eighties. Through the leading of Mr. B. F. Firebaugh, 



CHURCHES 133 

assisted by Min. L. C. Warren, a reorganization was effected 
in April, 1886. The old records were lost. 

The church has given Walter Martin to the ministry. By 
the help of Min. S. E. Fisher, a Y. P. S. C. E. was formed 
in 1908, which is now supporting a native missionary on the 
Congo. 

Rantoul. 

Organized 1892, by S. S. Jones and J. S. Clements ; pres- 
ent membership, 278; value of property, including parsonage, 
$12,200; Bible school began 1893; present enrollment, 102. 

Meetings were held in public halls till November, 1893, 
when the chapel was occupied. This received an addition 
and improvements in 1907. 

Before the beginning of this church there was a congre- 
gation near the site of Rantoul called Bethany. It served 
its time and place. Many of its members moved to the 
town. The building was torn down and the available mate- 
rial used in the construction of the Rantoul chapel. 

Sidney. 

Organized 1856, by W. P. Shockey; present membership, 
68; value of property, $3,500; Bible school began 1870; pres- 
ent enrollment, 80. 

The church first met in a building which the Baptists had 
converted from a dwelling into a chapel. The next year a 
church was built. All the lumber used in it, except the sills, 
was hauled on wagons from Indiana. In 1901 a new frame 
building of modern architecture and construction was erected. 

The old records of the church were destroyed. 

Some of the other preachers who have served the church 
were Dr. T. M. Hess, J. W. Monser, Rolla and John Martin 
and Noah Walker. 

St. Joseph. 

Organized 1845, by Samuel Mapes; present memDership. 
237; value of property, including parsonage, $14,500; Bible 
school began 1845; present enrollment, 84. 



134 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

As early as 1845 Samuel Mapes came and located in 
Hickory Grove, five miles northeast of St. Joseph, and began 
preaching in that and adjoining settlements. This congrega- 
tion prospered for many years under the ministry of Mr. 
Mapes, Rolla M. Martin, Mr. McKinney, W. F. Yates and 
Dr. T. M. Hess. 

When the railway was built, the new town of St. Joseph 
was started. Here meetings were first held in the school- 
house. Dr. Hess preached for five years and the congrega- 
tion increased in numbers. Then the M. E. people built a 
house of worship which the Disciples rented for part time 
and used for a year. Then they built a chapel of their own 
in 1880. In this work Mr. Van B. Swearinger, who had 
come to the community at an early day, was the leading 
spirit. 

During the four years' ministry of J. W. Perkins the 
church grew. After him came Harmon Gregg, S. S. Jones, 
E E. Cowperthwaite, J. H. Hosteller, J. Lytle, D. H. Shank- 
lin, M. Metzler, D. H. Palmer and J. T. Davis. Following 
the pastorate of Mr. Jones, a schism in the church occurred. 
This was encouraged and led by a former minister, J. W. 
Perkins. A suit at law followed, which resulted in accord- 
ing the property to those opposed to Mr. Perkins. Two 
years after this an organ was placed in the church and used. 

There are others whose memory should be kept in the 
church. 

In the early years Benny and Alex. Argo were most 
faithful. Two sisters in the flesh and in the Lord did much 
to help teach people of their Christian duties. They were 
familiarly known as Aunt Kit Patterson and Aunt Pop 
Peters. Aunt Kit was a cripple for many years. She was 
always at church. When it was dark or rainy she carried a 
lantern. She was well endowed in mind, had good speaking 
ability and was prompted by a strong desire to teach people 
Christ's gospel. She could quote much of the Scripture from 
memory. Aunt Pop read the Bible through thirty-two times. 

During the five years' pastorate of Mr. Davis a new and 



CHURCHES 135 

modern church building, costing $12,000, was erected. It 
was first used June, 1909. 

There is also a congregation of conservatives here. 

CHRISTIAN COUNTY. 

Assumption. 

Organized 1874, by J. M. Morgan; present membership, 
120; value of property, $1,500; Bible school began 1874; 
present enrollment, 45. 

In 1870, Minister Morgan conducted a series of meetings 
in the Baptist chapel. Several people turned to the Lord. 
Four years later the organization was effected with twenty- 
five charter members. The building was erected in 1875. 

Berea (Mt. Auburn). 

Organized 1868, by John W. Tyler; present membership, 
100; value of property, $2,500; Bible school began 1869; 
present enrollment, 60. 

Mr. Tyler held a very successful meeting in the Sanders 
Schoolhouse, winning sixty-eight persons for the Lord, and 
organized the church with one hundred members. The first 
officers were James Sanders and Benjamin Cross, elders, 
with Wm. Pierson, John M. Abel and Oliver White, deacons. 
A good frame chapel was built in 1869. The location is 
beautiful a high bluff on the south side of the Sangamon 
River. A cemetery has grown in the rear of the chapel. Mr. 
Tyler and Dr. L. A. Engle served the congregation for about 
twenty-five years. 

"Uncle Jim Sanders" was a unique character in the com- 
munity in the early years. 

Edinburg. 

Organized 1856, by A. D. Northcutt; present member- 
ship, 299; value of property, including parsonage, $5,500; 
Bible-school enrollment, 150. 

Meetings were held in the schoolhouse till 1872, when a 



136 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

frame building costing about $1,800 was erected. This was 
struck by a cyclone in 1875, which picked up the structure 
down to the floor and carried it about ten rods. At the time 
the children were in the house, assembled about the organ 
and organist, practicing for a religious program. They were 
all uninjured. The house was immediately rebuilt. It was 
remodeled in 1901 and is still in use. 

A. O. Hargis and Homer Turner have been given to the 
ministry. 

In place of a Christian Endeavor there is a Kulture Klub 
of thirty young people for Bible study. Active C. W. B. M. 

Morganville (Blue Mound). 

Organized 1891, by J. O. Southerland; present member- 
ship, 100; value of property, $2,000; Bible school began 1891 ; 
present enrollment, 56. 

In this year there were living five and a half miles north- 
west of Blue Mound the following named seven Disciples: 
D. O. Daniels and wife, C. C. Hollier and wife, John Scott, 
Mrs. Maggie McKinnie and John Hall. Through their effort 
Min. J. O. Southerland held a series of meetings in the Syca- 
more Schoolhouse. He baptized forty-two people and organ- 
ized the Christian Church at Morganville, Christian Co., 
Hi., with forty-seven members. In August, 1892, a good 
frame chapel was finished and occupied. At present the 
elders are T. D. Scott and Elmer Ellis ; the deacons, Moses 
Morgan, Henry Gimnura, David Abel and Bert Wilcox. 

Mt. Auburn. 

Organized 1840, by A. D. Northcutt ; present membership, 
200; value of property, including parsonage, $3,500; Bible- 
school enrollment, 107. 

In December, 1836, A. D. Northcutt bought a farm near 
the site of the village of Osbornville, where Charles L. 
Osborne now resides. Mr. Northcutt was then a member of 
the Baptist Church, which was then very Calvinistic. He first 
disagreed with his Baptist minister because he debarred other 



CHURCHES 137 

church people from a communion service. The date was prob- 
ably about 1840. The noted Walter P. Bowles was at that 
meeting, which was held in a Presbyterian chapel about a 
mile east of Osbornville site. At the close of this meeting, 
Messrs. Northcutt and Bowles laid hold of such puncheons 
as they could carry, left the church and went to a near-by 
grove. The people went along. 

Mr. Bowles mounted a stump and preached to them. 
Thereafter Mr. Northcutt said to his Baptist minister: "I am 
now done with the Baptist Church." It was not long until 
Mr. Northcutt and his wife, William Hunter and wife, 
James Hunter and wife, and James Sanders, formed them- 
selves into a church of Christ. This was the beginning of 
the Mt. Auburn congregation. These people began at once 
to meet regularly on the first day of the week for public 
worship. It fell to Mr. Northcutt to lead and preside at the 
Lord's table. He had no thought whatever of becoming a 
minister. However, he soon showed his reverence for the 
Scripture and his aptness to teach. 

The little church grew and he was formally set apart to 
the ministry. The meetings were held in the Brush School- 
house. Mins. John W. Tyler, John Wilson and Mattie 
Brown preached here. Mr. Tyler once preached once a 
month for a year. His money pay was $60. When no other 
preacher was present, Mr. Northcutt officiated. Next the 
congregation changed its place of meeting to the Hunter 
Schoolhouse, some three miles northeast of Mt. Auburn, and 
in 1866 moved into the village. A chapel was built the same 
year. Later it was improved, and is yet in use. 

The work went on till 1875. Then the congregation fell 
to pieces. For a period of twelve years the house was 
opened only for funerals a solemn reminder of deplorable 
spiritual death. In 1889, Min. M. L. Anthony held a series 
of meetings and revived the congregation. Since then it has 
moved forward in a faithful effort to redeem the past. 

During the years of depression, Charles T. Cole was 
always faithful and hopeful. With his the name of Ira Ellis 



138 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

deserves to be remembered. In late years there is a goodly 
number cf earnest men and women, among them John W. 
Auger. 

Pana. 

Organized 1905; present membership, 60; value of prop- 
erty, $2,300; Bible-school enrollment, 21. 

A small congregation lived here in the seventies and 
eighties, but failed from a lack of leadership. 

Pleasant Hill (Pawnee). 

Present membership, 138; value of property, $2,000; 
Bible-school enrollment, 25. 

Taylorville. 

Organized 1853, by A. D. Northcutt; present member- 
ship, 410; value of property, including parsonage, $30,000; 
Bible school began 1879; present enrollment, 250. 

There were thirty-five charter members. Wm. Singer, 
B. F. Maupin and J. W. Thompson were chosen elders, with 
A. J. Sparks and Griffin Evans, deacons. 

The Cumberland Presbyterian Church was used for about 
a year, when a frame chapel was built. It cost $2,500, and 
at that time was the best in the county. The membership 
then was about 150. Later an internal strife disorganized 
the congregation and scattered its members every whither. In 
1879, after a year of hard work, Min. S. R. Wilson suc- 
ceeded in effecting a reorganization with thirty-three mem- 
bers. Wm. Frampton, R. P. Langley and W. N. Long were 
elected elders, with A. S. Thomas, Morgan Milligan and 
Joseph Torrence, deacons. Later, L. R. Hedrick was added 
to the eldership, where he served to the close of his life in 
1894. To him the church was and is yet indebted. 

The present edifice, "The Davis Memorial Christian 
Church," was the gift of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Davis, they 
furnishing most of the monev for its construction. It was 
built during the pastorate of W. W. Weedon. 



CHURCHES 139 

Among the ministers of the first period of the church, 
besides Mr. Northcutt, there were Alex. McCollum, Wm. M. 
Brown, Wm. Vanhooser, John L. Wilson, Thomas Cully, J. 
W. Tyler and W. T. Maupin. 

Mrs. Cordelia Davis Hoover and Mrs. Sarah Davis Deter- 
ding were daughters of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Davis. These 
women were both faithful to the Lord and his work when 
the church was weak and when it was stronger. Their 
names are held in tender and loving remembrance. Mrs. 
Deterding's daughter, Mrs. Maude Deterding Ferris, was the 
founder of the Missionary Training School at Indianapolis, 
Ind., giving $25,000 toward this enterprise. At first it 
bore her mother's name. Mrs. Ferris now supports a mis- 
sionary in India, Dr. Rosa Lee Oxer, and helps many good 
causes. 

The two auxiliary societies of this church unite in the 
support of a teacher in the school at Hazel Green, Ky., 
paying $450 a year. 

The New Liberty Church, located three miles southwest 
of Moweaqua, was organized by A. D. Northcutt in 1853. 
There were ten charter members. From 1859 to 1875 the 
congregation reached a membership of four hundred and was 
a power in the community. Decline marked the years until 
the formation of the church in Moweaqua, when it absorbed 
many of its members. In 1902 an ineffective attempt was 
made for its revival. 

CLARK COUNTY. 

This is the only county in the State in which no one could 
be induced to supply the writer with the necessary facts. 
The primitive gospel was first preached here about 1833 by 
Daniel W. Elledge. About 1836 he organized the first 
church. It was located three miles west cf Dalson Prairie, 
and was named the Blue Grass Christian Church. Later he 
helped build a chapel there. The Darwin Church was organ- 
ized in this county in 1840 bv Min. John Bailev. It was 
located in the south part of Union Township. There were 



140 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

fifty charter members. A Bible school was begun there in 
1873, with John Miller as superintendent. In 1913, there 
were eight congregations reported in the county, with a total 
membership of 615. Most of the leaders have been men of 
very circumscribed vision. 

CLAY COUNTY. 

Bethel (Louisville). 

Organized 1882; present membership, 224; value of prop- 
erty, $1,000; Bible-school enrollment, 103. 

This is six miles west from Louisville and was largely 
made up from Old Union, five miles west. 

Bethlehem (Flora). 

Present membership, 24; value of property, $1,100; 
Bible-school enrollment, 95. 

Bible Grove. 

Present membership, 139; value of property, $800; Bible- 
school enrollment, 57. 

Clay City. 

Organized 1871, by Geo. P. Slade; present membership, 
88; value of property, including parsonage, $6,200; Bible 
school began 1872; present enrollment, 100. 

About one year after Greenburg Owens settled in Clay 
City, he secured Evangelist Slade to conduct a meeting there, 
when, in the small M. E. chapel South, he formed a church 
of Christ with the following members: William, O. D. and 
Philadelphia Schooley, Greenburg and Martha Owens, Geo. 
W. Bailey, Josephine Driskell, Catherine Livings and Sarah 
A. Bassett. By meetings led by Ministers Slade and John A. 
Williams, the number was increased to 105 at the close of 
the first year. The first officers were Greenburg Owens, J. 
G. Alcorn and J. T. Evans, elders, with O. D. Schooley, A. 
G. Livings and J. D. Trains, deacons. 



CHURCHES 141 

A brick chapel was completed in 1872 and first used for 
a prayer-meeting by the congregation. A parsonage was 
secured in 1880. 

This is a congregation of fine people. While not rich in 
material property, they have never resorted to anything of 
doubtful propriety to raise money. They have respected and 
loved their pastors, paid all their bills promptly, commanded 
the respect of the community, and have always observed all 
the missionary days, even though they had no pastor. 

The membership has been busy in doing the Lord's work, 
united and happy. Very few have ever had a tale of woe 
to tell the pastor. This admirable spirit is credited to Mr. 
Owens and their other good leaders. Sixty of the first 105 
have passed on to the higher life. Mr. Owens was the first 
to go. Dr. J. T. Evans has long been a pillar of this church. 

Flora. 

Organized 1855, by William Schooley; present member- 
ship, 328; value of property, including parsonage, $16,000; 
Bible-school enrollment, 218. 

This church was organized in an old log schoolhouse that 
stood a mile west of the hamlet of Flora. The following 
were the nine charter members: Walter Kinnaman, Henry 
Kinnaman and wife, Samuel Kinnaman and wife, Felin Poe 
and wife and James Moore and wife. All of these have 
finished their work in this life. 

When a schoolhouse was built in the village, the congre- 
gation transferred its meeting-place there. The first chapel 
was completed in 1860. It cost $2,000, and served as the 
meeting-place for forty-three years. The present beautiful 
and modern building was first occupied in August, 1903, dur- 
ing the pastorate of A. B. Cunningham. During the same 
period the parsonage was built. 

C. W. Marlow is the present pastor. 

This congregation has had not a few royal men and 
women, great children of the King. Among the earlier and 
continuous residents the names of Wm. Kinnaman, Henry 



142 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Kinnaman and wife, Joseph Luse and wife, Alvin Kenner and 
wife, Jere. Billings and wife, R. B. Henry and wife, S. D. 
Rosenburger and wife and Albert Green and wife are held 
in loving and grateful remembrance. From its gates have 
gone hundreds of faithful people to help and bless the world. 

Ingraham. 

Organized 1839, by William Read; value of property, 
$5,000; Bible school began 1864. 

In 1840 the place now known as Ingraham was called 
the "Forks of Muddy." Muddy was on the west and Laws 
Creek on the east, and between the two was Ingraham 
Prairie. Marysville was the little hamlet there. When the 
post-office was established the name was changed to Ingra- 
ham, the word "Prairie" being dropped. 

William Ingraham was born in New York State in 1801. 
He cam~ with his parents to Barney's Prairie, Wabash 
County, in 1807, and to the Clay County settlement in 1838. 
The same year William Read settled there. In May, 1839, 
he, with Mr. Ingraham, went to the home of John Rogers 
to talk about religious matters. They were agriculturists and 
had taken no part in public worship other than to pray. 
However, they decided that the gospel must be preached and 
a church organized; so it was agreed that Mr. Read should 
serve as evangelist, Mr. Rogers as elder and Mr. Ingraham 
as deacon. Then they adjourned to meet the next Septem- 
ber. Later Mr. Rogers and Mr. Ingraham cordially ex- 
changed their official positions as their experiences had proved 
their fitness. At the September meeting, Mr. Read read the 
following : 

That we do here and now constitute ourselves into a church of 
Jesus Christ, to be known as "The Church of Christ in the Forks of 
Muddy," and that we will meet together, worship God. and build the 
Ccitise of Christ in this section, ard th?t orr creed shall be the Bible 
and nothing but the Bible. And now ?11 who agree to th ; s proposition 
will signify the same by giving me and to each other the hand as a 
token of said determination. 



CHURCHES 143 

The three men struck hands, and thus, under a pear-tree, 
this church was started. 

Soon afterward Philo Ingraham and Eli Read moved 
from Wabash County, who, with their wives and the wives 
of the first three, made a membership of ten. They entered 
zealously into the Lord's work, and within a few years had 
organized congregations of like faith in the present-day limits 
of Clay, Jasper and Effingham Counties. 

Within two years some Methodist brethren moved into 
the settlement. Soon the theological battle was on, and for 
a long time was both brave and bitter. 

This church developed a sturdy stock of men and women, 
such as make the abiding world and build the Kingdom of 
God. 

The Ingrahams, Reads, Lollars and Pixleys blessed their 
generation. The preachers produced were remarkable men. 
William Ingraham was the true overseer of this church for 
forty years. Dorman, Daniel and Williard F. Ingraham, 
William Read the evangelist, Jesse B. Shaddle (who gave 
over four years to his country's service), G. M. and F. M. 
Lollar, Gideon Bryan, Albert Meacham and Thomas Wood 
make up an honorable company. 

From a very early date the church observed its annual 
meetings, which were occasions of great interest and rejoic- 
ing. The Bible school was organized by David Hedrick, a 
Moravian. Later, in the State of Washington, he united 
with the church of Christ. 

The community was intensely loyal during the Civil War. 

It is a significant fact that this congregation did not come 
to the weekly observance of the Lord's Supper till 1874. 

There have been three chapels. The first was built of 
logs in 1848; the second of brick in 1853. Major Waller, 
of the M. E. Church, preached in this house once every 
month for a year. The third a frame was built in 1872. 
The Methodist brethren had the free use of this house also. 
Few congregations have a record that surpassed that of the 
Ingraham Church. 



144 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Liberty Chapel (Flora). 

Organized 1911, by C. W. Marlow; present membership, 
22. 

This church is located five miles southwest of Flora. It 
grew out of the desire of a few members of the Oak Mound 
congregation for a more convenient place to worship. They 
joined with the United Brethren people in the community 
in building a chapel, which was deeded to them, but used 
jointly. A union Bible school was maintained. The Disciples 
increased in the community and the U. B. people decreased, 
so a legal transfer of the property was made in 1911, Min. 
C. W. Marlow leading. 

The Bible school is up to date and a training-class doing 
good work. 

Louisville. 

Present membership, 82; value of property, $1,800; Bible- 
school enrollment, 45. 

McKinney (Sailor Springs). 

Organized 1871 ; present membership, 96 ; Bible-school 
enrollment, 85. 

This church is located on Levitt Prairie, and was first 
known by that name. A debate was held in the neighbor- 
hood schoolhouse in 1869 which awakened the community. 
There were twenty-five charter members, some of whom 
came from the Cooper congregation a few miles west, and 
others from the Slab chapel a few miles east. The chapel 
was built in 1871. The first elders were Daniel Reed and 
Joel Wammack. The church has given to the ministry W. 
E. Harlow and William Crackel. It is a country church that 
persists in living by working. 

New Bethlehem, 
This is five miles northeast of Flora. 



CHURCHES 145 

North Harter (Flora). 

Organized 1905, by E. S. Thompson ; present member- 
ship, 140; value of property, $1,350; Bible school began 
1905 ; present enrollment, 100. 

This church is located five miles northeast of Flora. It 
started with eighty- four members, some coming from sur- 
rounding congregations. Mr. Thompson was the efficient 
minister for five years. R. L. Brown followed, and A. R. 
Tucker is the present preacher. Walter Cox led to gradua- 
tion fifteen persons in Moninger's "Training for Service." 
Jas. L. McDaniels is the efficient church clerk. 

Oak Mound (Xenia). 

Present membership, 98; value of property, $700; Bible- 
school enrollment, 57. 

This is four miles north of Xenia. It was recruited from 
Old Union. Here most of the young people are church-mem- 
bers. 

Old Union (Xenia). 

Present membership, 60; Bible-school enrollment, 50. 
This is eleven miles west of Louisville. 

Red Brush (Louisville). 

Present membership, 31 ; value of property, $1,500; Bible- 
school enrollment, 80. 

Sailor Springs. 

Present membership, 80; value of property, $1,800; Bible- 
school enrollment, 65. 

Union Chapel (Louisville). 

Present membership, 71 ; value of property, $1,200; Bible- 
school enrollment, 47. 



146 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Xenia. 

Organized 1865, by John D. Williams; present member- 
ship, 45; value of property, $1,500; Bible-school enrollment, 
58. 

The first officers were Gillum Henson and John Dunn, 
elders ; Hiram Gibson and Jackson Barker, deacons. The 
congregation prospered and did good service in its earlier 
years. Then a period of wars, led by ultra-conservatives, set 
in and crippled its usefulness for a long time. At present 
there are some signs of better days. 

CLINTON COUNTY. 

Keyesport. 

Present membership, 100; value of property, $2,500; 
Bible-school enrollment, 50. 

COLES COUNTY. 

Brick (Westfield). 

Present membership, 90; value of property, $2,000; Bible- 
school enrollment, 180. 

This church is located about twelve miles southeast of 
Charleston. It is under the direction of the ultra-conserva- 
tives and has monthly preaching. 

Bushton. 

Organized 1873, by W. F. Black; present membership, 
200; value of property, $8,000; Bible school began 1873; 
present enrollment, 87. 

This church grew out of a meeting by Evangelist Black. 
The town grew after the building of the railroad. The first 
house of worship was built in 1874, which gave place in 1911 
to a modern structure during the pastorate of A. P. Cobb. 
This church is made up chiefly of substantial farmers who 
are growing in spiritual interests. 



CHURCHES 147 

Charleston. 

Organized 1840, by Samuel Pepper and Thomas Good- 
man; present membership, 1,150; value of property, includ- 
ing parsonage, $23,500; Bible school began 1854; present 
enrollment, 471. 

Messrs. Pepper and Goodman were Christian ministers. 
The former had come from Kentucky and the latter was 
then residing in Indiana. They came to Charleston, where 
they united in preaching the primitive gospel and organizing 
the church of Christ. There were twelve charter members. 
Of these, the names of James Wiley and wife, Stephen Wiley 
and wife and Susan Dunbar are now known. 

"The town branch" was the place used for baptizing in 
those years. 

They met regularly on the Lord's Days for worship. The 
first meetings were held in a storeroom where Bushrod W. 
Henry, with other pioneers, preached. From 1842-46 they 
met in the courthouse. Then a small red-brick chapel was 
built on Madison Street, between Ninth and Tenth. This 
was sold to the Romanists in 1860, when a second brick 
building was constructed at the corner of Sixth and Van 
Buren Streets. This was sold to the Episcopalians. The 
present modern stone edifice was erected in 1905 during the 
pastorate of J. M. Vawter. 

A second and successful attempt was made to organize a 
Sunday school by Susan Dunbar and Leroy Wiley in 1854. 

In 1856, Alexander Campbell spent a Lord's Day with 
the church. 

In the years agone the Wrights, Mintons, Dr. Spears and 
Dr. Van Meter were prominent and useful families; later, 
Geo. M. Sefton. All have passed on. 

The church has had a line of excellent pastors. 

Miss Edna Eck has gone out as a missionary and is 
serving at Bolenge, Africa. 

Charleston is the location of one of the State Normal 
Schools and the church is awake to its opportunities. 



148 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Etna. 

Present membership, 65; value of property, $1,000; Bible- 
school enrollment, 57. 

Humbolt. 

Organized 1858, by Thomas Goodman ; present member- 
ship, 161 ; value of property, $1,500; Bible school began 1897; 
present enrollment, 92. 

The organization was made with seven members in a 
schoolhouse east of town. Later a frame chapel was built, 
but not completed. During the sixties and seventies, J. W. 
Connor, Sr., with his family, resided in the community. He, 
with his sons James, Samuel and Americus preached at 
times for the church. With their removal the congregation 
declined. It was revived by Evangelist J. S. Clements in 
1897 and began work with thirty-eight members. Mr. and 
Mrs. E. M. Mullikin were the prime movers in this revival 
of the church and are yet its leading force. 

The church has had, in later years, ten ministers. 

Mattoon. 

Organized 1859, by J. C. Mathes ; present membership, 
903; value of property, $18,000; Bible school began 1862; 
present enrollment, 530. 

In its early years, N. S. Bastian, J. R. Lucas, E. L. 
Frazier, J. M. Streator, G. F. Adams and R. B. Roberts 
served as pastors. 

Oakland. 

Present membership, 70; value of property, $2,000; Bible- 
school enrollment, 79. 

Prairie Union (Kansas). 

Organized 1868, by John Callcord; present membership, 
26; value of property, $1,500; Bible school began 1868; pres- 
ent enrollment, 47. 

This congregation is located about five miles northwest 



CHURCHES 149 

of Kansas. It was formed in the neighborhood schoolhouse, 
but a frame chapel was soon built, which is still in use. Its 
beginning was the wish of farmers and landowners of the 
neighborhood to have a more convenient place for their 
public worship. They held membership in the church at 
Kansas; so, without conference or formal dismission, but in 
perfectly good feeling, they withdrew and began to keep 
house nearer their homes. Such was the spirit of ultra- 
independence in those years. The congregation maintains 
preaching one-half time and a small Bible school. 
It has given Daniel K. Honn to the ministry. 

Rural Retreat (Hindsboro). 

Organized 1857, by W. F. Black; present membership, 
86; value of property, $1,000; Bible school began 1857; pres- 
ent enrollment, 100. 

This congregation was formed in the Wells', later known 
as the Wyeth, Schoolhouse, located one and a half miles 
south of the church site. The chapel was built in 1867 and 
is located four miles southwest of Hindsboro. It had the 
services of about twenty-five ministers. Although depleted 
by many removals and death, it has kept up its public wor- 
ship regularly. From it the churches at Bushton and Hinds- 
boro have drawn goodly numbers. 

Its most prominent, capable and noted member was Miss 
Helen E. Turner, who became Mrs. Helen E. Moses, who 
was baptized here. 

Walnut Grove (Humboldt). 

Organized 1887, by James Steele and David Cotman; 
present membership, 12; value of property, $1,000; Bible 
school began 1889. 

This congregation is located about eight miles east and 
north of Humboldt. It was formed in the Honn Schoolhouse. 
The charter members were John D. Honn and wife, Joseph 
Honn and wife, A. A. Honn and wife, Isaac Honn and wife, 
George Toland and wife, A. C. Honn and wife, Robert 



150 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

McAlister, Mrs. Rachel Caffer, William Newman, J. C. 
Toland and wife, Mrs. Mace Jones, her son H. B. and daugh- 
ter Belle, Isaac W. Mace and wife, Mrs. Jessie Moler and 
her daughter Martha. The first elders were Robert McAlis- 
ter, A. A. Honn, George Toland and Isaac W. Moler. 

A chapel was built the same year. 

Next, by changes in the community, the work failed for 
several years, but was revived in 1910. 

Hitesville was a village three miles southwest of the site 
of Kansas in the early years. The location was beautiful. 
The church that grew and prospered there had many fine 
people. It became extinct in 1905. 

Stringtown Church was about six miles south of Charles- 
ton. For many years it was active and useful, but finally 
yielded to the law of change. Frank Spitler was its last 
officer. He kept it going for years by his own efforts. He 
was a faithful member who went home in 1912. 

COOK COUNTY. 

Beginnings. 

The Disciples of Christ in the United States have always 
been largely a rural people. It took them fifty years to learn 
how to do church work in the cities. But during this period 
they were learning many other things. Chief among these 
was the meaning and application of the basic principles of 
Christian truth that gave them birth and being. 

In April, 1837, David Cory wrote from Athens, which 
was about thirty miles from Chicago, saying that he had 
found only about ten Disciples in the county, and he appealed 
for a preacher to come to them. 

In 1843 some work was done in Chicago looking to the 
formation of a church wearing only the name "Christian" and 
appealing only to the word of God as the all-sufficient rule 
of faith and practice. A Minister Saunders, from Ohio, 
organized this mission. These people held the materialistic 
views of John Thomas. In September, 1846, M. H. Baldwin 



CHURCHES 151 

and wife, of Cleveland, O., united with this mission. 
Next year J. Reese and Miss Laura Balch, of Detroit, Mich., 
joined. In 1848, Platt Saunders and wife, from Mar- 
shall, Mich., and Dr. L. S. Major and wife, from Bloom- 
ington, 111., united with the mission church. In 1849 
materialism led to harmful discussions in the public worship ; 
so Mr. L. C. P. Freer proposed separation from the more 
recently received members, who were called "Campbellites." 

Early in 1850 the first church of the Restoration move- 
ment was formed in Chicago. The charter members were 
Dr. L. S. Major, Platt Saunders and wife, M. H. Baldwin 
and wife, J. Reese and Miss Laura Balch, who afterward 
became Mrs. Dickey. Lathrop Cooley, of Ohio, was the 
preacher. Mr. Baldwin was chosen elder, and Mr. Saunders, 
deacon. From that day to this the divinely appointed worship 
has been maintained by the Disciples there on every Lord's 
Day. 

At that time the population was twenty-five thousand, and 
there was not a church building of any denomination better 
than a one-story, flat-roofed, square-front frame. 

The first meetings were held in the residence of Mr. Bald- 
win, then in an upper room at the corner of Lake and Clark 
Streets, and next in the old city hall, and then in a school- 
house in the center of the city. In the latter, M. N. Lord 
began his ministry. 

The first addition to the church was a man named White. 
He had been converted while serving in the English Army 
and was a guard over Napoleon. In 1850, James Brenner 
and Dr. J. H. Millinger and wife united with the church. 
The first to make the good confession and be baptized were 
Mrs. D. M. Clark and Mrs. Ann Harris. 

In 1852 the church raised $300, and Lathrop Cooley, of 
Cleveland, Ohio, served as pastor for a year or more. He 
was succeeded by M. N. Lord. In 1854, Love H. Jameson, 
of Indianapolis, Indiana, conducted a three weeks' meeting 
in the city hall, with no additions. This much disappointed 
and discouraged the church. 



152 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

In 1857 a frame chapel was started on West Monroe, 
near Rucker Street, which was finished and dedicated by D. 
P. Henderson, July 4, 1858. This property was never fully 
paid for. But in the meantime a considerable number with- 
drew from the church on mere differences of opinion, and 
the meetings were held in the old federal courtroom. 

In the new chapel, Min. W. H. Hopson held a four 
weeks' meeting which brought, among others, to the church 
Mrs. -M. D. Raggio, for many years one of the most devoted 
Christians in the city. 

In 1861, Mr. Lord again resigned, after a pastorate of 
eight years. He, with others, had served earnestly and well, 
but the lack of spiritual vision had been such during the 
decade that the church numbered only 120 members. During 
the Civil War the church was served by N. S. Bastian, W. 
F. Black and J. S. Sweeney. During the occupancy of this 
chapel, among its members there were A. M. Atkinson, Ben 
Davenport, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Honore, Mrs. Abigail 
Keeler, Dr. and Mrs. Lichtenberger, Mrs. E. B. Stevens, Dr. 
and Mrs. Warriner and their daughter Belle. 

For a short time the congregation met in a room of the 
old Crosby Opera-house and then transferred to the North 
Side. The old St. James Episcopal Church at Cass and 
Illinois Streets was rented. Dr. W. A. Belding, Benj. H. 
Smith and D. P. Henderson preached here. It was during 
that time that Ira J. Chase and W. B. Hendryx were ordained 
to the ministry, and W. B. Craig was baptized there. In 
1868, through the influence of Dr. Belding, Mr. H. H. 
Honore and Dr. L. S. Major paid $5,000 each to a church- 
building fund. The chapel and lot on the South Side, at 
Sixteenth Street and Wabash Avenue, were bought and paid 
for. The congregation moved into it. D. P. Henderson, 
Isaac Errett and J. S. Sweeney were the ministers, Mr. 
Sweeney continuing till 1871. In 1869 the church divided. 
The forty who withdrew, led by D. P. Henderson, formed 
a congregation and met first in the chapel of the Orphan 
Asylum on Michigan Avenue, south of Twenty-second 



CHURCHES 153 

Street. Mr. E. B. Stevens gave this congregation the lot at 
the corner of Indiana Avenue and Twenty-fifth Street. On 
this a two-story frame building was erected and used. It 
was never fully paid for, and twenty years later was lost 
under mortgage. O. A. Burgess succeeded Mr. Henderson. 
The great fire, Oct. 9, 1871, reunited the two congregations, 
and the worship was at the Twenty-fifth Street place. I f 
was known as the First Christian Church. The congregation 
was served by Knowles Shaw, T. J. Toof, W. J. Howe, S. 
M. Connor and Isaac Errett. For a few years Potter Palmer 
and wife were members here. The Disciples in Chicago dur- 
ing those years were prolific in differences and dissensions; 
so, about 1878, this congregation again divided. At the 
Sunday morning meeting when the question of separation 
was discussed and decided, Timothy Coop, a highly esteemed 
English brother, was present and expressed his surprise and 
distress of mind. The fifty members who withdrew rented 
of the Congregationalists their chapel at South Park Avenue 
and Thirty-third Street. W. D. Owen was pastor there. 
About twenty-five years afterward he was expatriated. In 
a year the congregation moved to the old Memorial Baptist 
chapel on Oakwood Boulevard near Cottage Grove Avenue. 
Irving A. Searles, J. L. Parsons and Barton W. Johnson 
preached there. Late in 1880 the congregation moved to 
Thirtieth Street and Prairie Avenue, renting the brick chapel 
that stood there. In October, J. W. Allen began a two years' 
pastorate. In September, 1882, the two churches united. 
They had increased numerically little, if any, during the 
period of separation. Meanwhile the First Church was 
served by Geo. W. Sweeney and O. A. Burgess. The 
reunited church was known as the Central Church of 
Christ, and the place of worship was the Prairie Avenue 
chapel. In December, 1885, Henry Schell Lobingier came 
to the pastorate, and the next year the church returned to 
the building at Twenty-fifth Street. Following Mr. Lobin- 
gier's resignation, Z. T. Sweeney and G. B. Berry supplied 
the pulpit, and then Calvin S. Blackwell was pastor for two 



154 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

and one-half years. In 1887 the Central Church began to 
erect a new house on Indiana Avenue near Thirty-seventh 
Street. It was used for some eighteen years, when it 
passel by the mortgage route. W. F. Black left the evan- 
gelistic field in 1890 and became pastor of this congregation. 
For some years it prospered. C. S. Medbury entered the 
Christian ministry from this church. When they no longer 
had a home, some of the members, with Mr. Black, met for 
worship in the Masonic Home, until increasing bodily disa- 
bilities ended his work and his life. Other members of the 
Central formed the First Church in 1899, which was united 
with the Memorial Baptist. 

In all this migratory and painful pilgrimage of more 
than half a century not a few were found faithful and have 
gone to the heavenly rest; others deserted the Captain's 
flag in the days of battle. 

Armitage Avenue Church. 

This is a small congregation in the northwest part of the 
city. 

Armour Avenue Christian Church (negro; 3621 Armour 

Avenue). 

Organized 1888, by Wm. G. F. Reed ; present member- 
ship, 150; value of property, $5,000; Bible-school enroll- 
ment, 40. 

Minister Reed, with eight members, was the beginning. 
Through feebleness and lack of help, the effort failed and 
the property used for meetings at 2919 Dearborn Street was 
sold by the Chicago Missionary Society in 1893, and the 
proceeds used in buying another church home. Then for 
ten years the little band led a wandering and forlorn life. 
In 1903 Min. M. T. Brown came to the pastorate. The 
present property was then purchased and the congregation 
took on new life. F. C. Cothran served three years, when 
G. Calvin Campbell came in 1911. Under his leading the 
church prospers. The property is fully paid for, and there 



CHURCHES 155 

is a C. W. B. M. and a Y. P. S. C. E. Richard Mathews 
has been faithful through all these years. 

There are about sixty thousand negroes in Chicago, and 
the thought of their redemption is distressing except to 
Christian faith. 

Ashland Christian Church (Sixty-second and Laflin Streets). 

Organized 1899, by J. F. Findley; present membership, 
298; value of property, $6,000; Bible school began 1897; 
present enrollment, 220. 

This church had its beginning in the heart's desire of a 
good Christian man. In May, 1897, W. K. McGregor formed 
an undenominational school and mission called "The Work- 
ingmen's Mission." It united Bible teaching with social 
features, providing a place where men tempted by saloon 
influences could meet for mutual helpfulness. This effort 
grew steadily through two years. Then came Min. J. F. 
Findley in an evangelistic meeting. There were about fifty 
charter members. Being compelled to move to Sixty-third 
Street, near Center Avenue, the life of the little church was 
thereby imperiled, but God led them into their own modest 
chapel in September, 1902. 

Other than Mr. Findley, the church has been served by 
Guy Hoover, C. M. Sharp, Guy Hargot, W. R. Moffett and 
J. F. Fntcher, who is now in his sixth year. In its earlier 
years it was fostered by the Chicago City Missionary Board. 
"Every phase of church work is active and growing. Over 
and over again have we proved in our individual lives that 
God's grace and tender love always have met our every 
human need." 

Austin. 

About 1893, Min. A. Larabee interested a few members 
of the Monroe Street Church in starting a mission in this 
growing and inviting suburb. Assisted by Pastor Strickland, 
of the Douglas Park Church, meetings were held on Sunday 
afternoons in vacant halls or empty storerooms. The work 



156 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

grew encouragingly. George A. Campbell became pastor, 
and moved to Austin in 1898. The chapel vacated by the 
Baptists was purchased in 1902. With a fixed home, the 
congregation prospered. In 1908 this building was destroyed 
by fire, and then the members were nomads. But a com- 
manding lot was bought and a good building completed in 
1910. 

Among those who have given fine service here were Mr. 
and Mrs. L. S. Major, who were pioneers in the church in 
Chicago; Mr. and Mrs. W. O. Cline, Mr. and Mrs. H. A. 
Vandercook and family and Mrs. O. A. Kearney and sons. 

Chicago Heights. 

Present membership, 300; value of property, $30,000; 
Bible-school enrollment, 300. 

The Englewood Church fostered this mission and helped 
it to self-support. 

Douglas Park Church of Christ (Nineteenth Street and 
Spaulding Avenue). 

Organized 1895, by E. W. Darst; present membership, 
150; value of property, $12,000; Bible school began 1895; 
present enrollment, 200. 

In the spring of 1894, Messrs. H. F. Layton and A. Lar- 
abee, with others, started a Sunday school on Ogden, near 
Kedzie Avenue. It was successful from its beginning. In 
May and June, City Evangelist E. W. Darst held a series 
of meetings. Membeis of the Jackson Boulevard Church 
assisted, and Christian ministers of the city. There were 
thirty charter members. G. W. Doolittle and E. W. Reynolds 
were elected deacons. Mr. Reynolds served also as the very 
efficient superintendent of the Sunday school. Trustees were 
also chosen. The pastors were C. B. Edson, Geo. A. Camp- 
bell, Mr. Infield, H. J. Underwood, John Williams and C. L. 
Wait, who served six years. 

In the fall of 1899 the meetings went to a hall at 1812 
W. Twenty-second Street, the next spring to a storeroom at 



CHURCHES 157 

Ogden and St. Louis Avenues. During Mr. Campbell's pas- 
torate lots were purchased on Turner Avenue, near Sixteenth 
Street, and on these a tabernacle was built, largely by the 
volunteer labor of the members, in October, 1901. In 1911 
this property was sold to the Board of Education. Mean- 
while, F. C. Aldinger, S. M. Schoonover, Mr. McBean, Harry 
F. Burns and Vaughn Dabney served as pastors. In Octo- 
ber, 1911, the Douglas Park Congregational Church invited 
the church to meet with them for public worship in their 
church home. These union services were maintained until 
the following March, when this property was bought by the 
Douglas Park Church of Christ. 

Englewood Church of Christ (Stewart Avenue and Sixty- 
sixth Place). 

Organized 1885, by Henry Cogswell ; present membership, 
600; value of property, $55,000; Bible school began 1885; 
present enrollment, 600. 

In a room on Sixty-third Street and Yale Avenue, Sep- 
tember 20, ten adults from the Calkins, Palm and Caldwell 
families, led by Rollo Calkins, met and covenanted together 
and so formed this church. Soon after, Dr. Jonathan Pettit 
attached his name. Mr. Cogswell and Edward O. Sharp 
served as pastors till the close of 1886. During the next 
year, Dr. W. A. Belding served. He was a tireless servant 
of God and a fine leader. A lot was bought on the east side 
of Dickey Street, now Eggleston Avenue, south of Sixty- 
fourth Street, and a septagon chapel, costing $3,000, built 
thereon. By an addition made thereto in 1893, costing 
$3,500, the seating capacity was more than doubled. Its 
ugliness repelled all those whose carnal pride was stronger 
than their Christian faith, B. H. Hayden began a four 
years' fruitful ministry in January, 1888. During a part of 
this period the church was helped by appropriations from 
the State missionary treasury. N. S. Haynes followed in a 
six and two-thirds years' pastorate, during which the church 
made substantial progress. Then came E. A. Cantrell in a 



158 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

short ministry. C. G. Kindred became pastor in December, 
1899, and continues to the present time. He is a man of 
great faith in Providence, and with him the church has gone 
forward to splendid achievements. In 1901 it paid its mort- 
gage debt. In 1902 it became a living link in the Foreign 
Missionary Society, supporting one of its own daughters, 
Mrs. Lillian Chalman Shaw, in China. In 1904 it became 
a link in the Home Society, taking Chicago Heights as its 
mission point. By about this time the church had gathered 
$8,000 into a new-building fund. In 1905 it sold its prop- 
erty on Eggleston Avenue and moved into its new home on 
Stewart Avenue that it had bought from the Cumberland 
Presbyterians. It is a stone structure and cost, with the 
contiguous lot and residence on its north side, $21,500. In 
1911 the church negotiated a loan of $6,000, mortgaging its 
own property, to assist the Chicago Heights congregation in 
the erection of its own fine edifice. An annex to the Engle- 
wood building for the use of the Bible school was finished 
in 1913. It is of brick, cost $18,000 and has twelve class- 
rooms. The church and all of its departments are well 
officered and organized, and all do efficient service. The 
budget for 1911 showed $8,752 in disbursements, of which 
$2,419 went to general benevolences. And by Chicago 
standards there are no rich people in this church. 

It has given to the ministry C. W. Dean, Clark W. Cum- 
in ings and Charles J. Adams, with William Madison prepar- 
ing for medical missionary. To write a few names here of 
the men and women who have under God made this record 
would be an injustice to many others. Not a few of them 
are the incarnation of cultured Christian conscience. The 
presence here of Joseph Badenoch, Sr., and his wife for a 
term of years was a benediction and of fragrant memories. 

In prayerfulness and missionary zeal, in wise perspective 
and indomitable adherence to high aims, in liberality, hospi- 
tality and spiritual democracy, in forbearance and fraternity 
and all good works, the Englewood Church of Christ holds 
the first place among the Disciples of Christ in Illinois. 



CHURCHES 159 

Evanston Christian Church (Maple Avenue and Greenleaf 

Street). 

Organized 1896, by W. B. Taylor and E. W. Darst ; pres- 
ent membership, 135; value of property, $15,000; Bible 
school began 1896; present enrollment, 150. 

The first meetings were conducted in the residence of 
Mr. M. O. Naramore on Sunday afternoons, beginning 
Nov. 2, 1895, by W. B. Taylor, then pastor of the North 
Side Church, Chicago. Jan. 5, 1896, City Evangelist E. W. 
Darst began an eleven weeks' series of meetings held in 
Union Hall. 

Forty-two people turned to the Lord and thirty-four were 
received by letters and on statements, so there were seventy- 
six charter members. Among these were E. E. Starkey and 
wife, Dr. R. C. Knox and wife, J. W. Work and wife, and 
M. O. Naramore and wife. 

Other ministers who have served this church were E. S. 
Ames, A. L. Chapman, W. C. Payne, E. V. Zollars, W. D. 
Ward, and now O. F. Jordan. 

Harvey Christian Church (Turlington Avenue, between 153d 
and 154th Streets). 

Organized 1892, by C. H. Knapp ; present membership, 
209; value of property, $15,000; Bible school began 1892; 
present enrollment, 234. 

The charter members were Mr. and Mrs. G. R. and Miss 
Mary E. Kenyon, Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Joslyn, Mrs. Maggie 
Nichols, Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Masher, Mr. and Mrs. John 
Scoan, Mrs. Jessie Marr, Mrs. C. R. Palmer and Mrs. W. 
W. Wood. 

Meetings were held in various places until 1905, when 
the present location was secured. The building was com- 
pleted in 1906. 

The pastors who served the church were J. M. McKay, 
J. S. Clements, W. W. Denham, F. D. Ferrall, T. A. Linden- 
meyer, W. E. Orr, Robert Wilson, J. J. Higgs, S. G. Buck- 



160 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

ner, W. D. Enders, and for two years Asa McDaniel has 
been the faithful minister. The work grows and the outlook 
is encouraging. 

Hyde Park Church of Disciples of Christ (Fifty-seventh 
Street and Lexington Avenue). 

Organized 1894, by H. L. Willett; present membership, 
200; value of property, $7,000; Bible school began 1894; 
present enrollment, 100. 

Prof. W. D. MacClintock was also active in the forma- 
tion of this church. Meetings were first held in the Masonic 
Hall on Fifty-seventh Street, east of Washington Avenue, 
and later in Rosalie Hall. Mr. Errett Gates succeeded Mr. 
Willett in the pastorate, and during this period the present 
cliapel was built on the lots owned by the Disciples' Divinity 
House. E. S. Ames has served as pastor since 1900. 

'In this congregation "one of the most important features 
lias been the adoption of a plan by which Christian union 
could be practically and effectively realized. This plan does 
not assume to change the terms of church membership as 
taught and practiced by the great body of Disciples. It 
simply recognizes 'members of the congregation' as well as 
of the church in the technical sense. This plan has been 
employed since 1903 with the happiest results. It has not 
caused the slightest friction here." 

The church includes forceful people, and is active in 
many philanthropic and charitable agencies of the city. For 
a time it supported Mr. and Mrs. Guy Sarvis as missionaries 
in China. The congregation continues its $600 yearly to the 
Foreign Society. 

Irving Park Church (North Forty-third Street and West 
Cullom Avenue). 

Organized 1898, by E. W. Darst and A. Larabee; present 
membership, 240; value of property, $10,000; Bible school 
began 1898; present enrollment, 250. 

In May, 1898, the City Missionary Society decided to 



CHURCHES 161 

establish a church in this place, which is one of Chicago's 
most beautiful residence sections. Three fine lots were rented 
and a temporary structure built thereon. City Evangelist 
E. W. Darst, assisted by A. Larabee, conducted a six weeks' 
series of meetings. The formation of the church followed. 
George A. Ragan became the pastor in October following. 
The south wing of the permanent building was occupied the 
next month, which is now the Bible-school room. Marion 
Stevenson came to this pastorate in April, 1901. The main 
part of the building was occupied in October, 1903. Then 
came J. R. Ewers, W. F. Rothenberger, A. W. Taylor and 
C. C. Buckner, who is in the fourth year of his pastorate. 
During Mr. Taylor's term the Bible-school room was enlarged 
and fitted into a gymnasium. The building proper was 
finished and paid for after Mr. Buckner came. It is a frame 
without architectural beauty, but meets the present needs of 
the congregation. 

The church is well organized and is aggressive. Its most 
valuable asset is a group of men and women who are growing 
in all Christian graces. 

The Men's Club of this church was largely instrumental 
in forming the Federated Men's Club of Irving Park, the 
object of which is to promote and secure political and civic 

Jackson Boulevard Church. 

Organized 1873, by George G. Mullins ; present member- 
ship, 800; value of property, $54,000; Bible school began 
1873; present enrollment, 650. 

This church was first known as the West Side Christian 
Church. There were about thirty-five original members. 
The meetings were first held for a few months in the Jeffer- 
son Park Presbyterian Church. Then it had a wandering 
life till 1878, when it rented fifty feet of ground on Western 
Avenue, near Congress Street, and placed thereon a frame 
chapel, which was purchased of the Church of God. Later 
the rented lots were bought and about $5,000 used in repairs 
on the building, 



162 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

After Mr. Mullins, the pulpit was supplied by Knowles 
Shaw; A. J. White, pastor two years; A. J. Laughlin, one 
year; J. H. Wright, one year; F. M. Kirkham, and B. W. 
Johnson. 

In 1877, through dissensions, the congregation divided. 
Those who went out formed the Oakley Avenue Church and 
built a brick chapel in 1878. They continued till 1895, when 
they united with the Garfield Park congregation. 

J. W. Allen, in 1882, began a very successful pastorate 
of thirteen years. In 1891 the lots on Jackson Boulevard 
were bought and the basement of the present building con- 
structed. This was used until 1901, when the edifice was 
finished during the second period of J. W. Allen's pastorate. 
Since then the congregation has worn its present local name. 
In 1895, J. H. O. Smith, and in 1898, Bruce Brown, each 
began pastorates of two to three years ; Lloyd Darsie next 
served three years, and was followed by the brave and 
beloved Parker Stockdale, who fell on the front line of battle. 

In September, 1901, this church and the "Union Christian 
Church," worshiping at the People's Institute, united, Roland 
A. Nichols becoming the pastor. Austin Hunter became 
pastor in 1910. The church is well officered and organized, 
and is active, harmonious and prosperous. 

In 1911 property adjoining the church lots on the east 
was bought, and is used for social and other activities. It is 
known as "The Annex." 

Of the charter members, three remain Mrs. D. M. 
Clark, Mrs. Maggie Viete and Edwin Stewart, who has long 
been a faithful servant and officer. 

Kendall Street Church (Kendall Street, near Polk Street). 

Organized in 1865. 

James Bremner, Joseph Badenoch and other worthy 
Scotchmen formed this congregation. They came from the 
old First Church while it met on the West Side. They have 
been ministered to only by their elders, but have given to 
the kingdom many worthy servants. 



CHURCHES 163 

Memorial Church of Christ (Oakwood Boulevard, near 
Cottage Grove Avenue). 

Organized 1908; present membership, 600; value of prop- 
erty, $90,000; Bible-school enrollment, 270. 

The Memorial Baptist Church was organized Oct. 19, 
1881. It grew out of the University Place Baptist, which 
was formed Dec. 6, 1868. The young men who have gone 
out from this membership to preach the gospel are J. C. 
Chapin, C. A. Lemon, C. J. Price, W. P. Behan, Ph.D., 
C. A. Callup, Fred Merrifield and Mr. Ernest A. Clement, 
who made a name for himself in Japan. 

The First Christian Church was organized in April, 1899. 
The Presbyterian Church at Wabash Avenue and Thirtieth 
Street was secured as a meeting-place. The pastors who 
served here were Frank G. Terrell, J. W. Allen, Guy Hoover 
and H. L. Willett, with R. L. Hondley and William C. Hull 
as assistants. 

The Memorial Church of Christ (Baptist and Disciples) 
came into being June 17, 1908. The Memorial Baptist 
Church changed its name as above, and on June 19, 308 
members of the First Church of Christ united with the 
Memorial Church of Christ (Baptist and Disciples). Mr. 
Willett served as pastor till January, 1913, and was succeeded 
by E. Le Roy Dakin. 

All offerings for general benevolences are divided equally 
between the two bodies. 

Metropolitan Church of Christ (Van Buren and Leavitt 

Streets). 

Organized 1897, by J. H. O. Smith ; present membership, 
500; value of property, $100,000; Bible school began 1897; 
present enrollment, 300. 

The great building known as the People's Institute was 
erected by a stock company as a center for civic righteous- 
ness. Finally the building was sold. The Union Christian 
Church was organized there July 15, 1897, at the request 



164 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

of the Chicago Christian Ministerial Association. There 
were 218 charter members. For four years Mr. Smith led 
this work successfully. Upon his withdrawal, Evangelist C. 
R. Scoville came to it. He, with W. B. Taylor, city mis- 
sionary, and part of the membership, decided that it was 
better to reorganize the church and to change the name to 
the present one. This was done in January, 1902, with 107 
members. Other members went to other congregations. In 
May, 1903, the Institute was rendered unfit for use by a fire, 
so the congregation passed that summer in a large tent. In 
August the church bought property, 116x125 feet, two 
blocks west, at Oakley and Van Buren Streets, for $30,000, 
which it still owns. A temporary building was erected on 
the inside lot, the other being covered with storerooms and 
fiats. Meanwhile, the owner of the Institute property died 
and it was sold at sheriff's sale. The Metropolitan Church, 
led by Mr. Scoville, bought it for $35,000 cash. On both 
properties there is a total indebtedness of $40,000. This 
property, with repairs and an addition, had cost about 
$110,000. The great building has an auditorium, music-hall, 
storerooms on the ground floor, two lodge halls, music 
studios, nine doctors' offices, church library and reading- 
room, two clubrooms for boys, a gymnasium 45 x 80 feet 
(which at present is leased for the school work to the Board 
of Education), a ladies' exchange-room, kitchen, etc. The 
formal occupancy of this fine building took place in February, 
1913, amid much rejoicing. 

In all this work the resident pastor, John D. Hull, has 
been the capable and consecrated helper and leader. 

The Metropolitan is well located, and its possibilities of 
great Christian service are limitless. 

Monroe Street Church (corner Monroe and Francisco 

Streets). 

Organized 1^91; present membership, 140; value of 
property, $21,375; Bible school began 1887; present enroll- 
ment, 73. 



CHURCHES 165 

A mission Sunday school was formed and fostered by 
the Western Avenue Church, and out of this school this 
congregation grew. C. F. Saunders, J. H. Trunkey, C. M. 
Mershon, J. H. Norton and Virgil Fry were prominent in 
this work. J. W. Ingram was the first pastor. The first 
house of worship, costing $3,500, built on a lot costing 
$S,000, was built in 1892. In 1895 a union of this congre- 
gation with the First Christian Church, then meeting on 
Oakley Avenue, near Adams Street, was effected. This 
brought to the church Mr. and Mrs. A. Larabee and Mrs. 
M. D. Raggio, who were very useful servants of the Lord. 
At that time the present name of the congregation was 
adopted. Before this time it was known as Garfield Park 
Church. 

The pastors following Mr. Ingram were Charles B. 
Edson, C. A. Young, C. C. Morrison, E. A. Ott, A. T. 
Campbell (two terms) and I. R. Lines. During Mr. Morri- 
son's pastorate the new house of worship was built and first 
occupied in November, 1901. 

The Russian Christian Mission (rented store at 1709 S. 
Halsted Street). 

Organized 1909, by Basil Keusseff; present membership, 
40; Bible-school enrollment, 75. 

About 1909 the City Missionary Society E. M. Bowman, 
president was anxious to start gospel work among the for- 
eign-born people of the city. Providentially, C. G. Kindred 
met then Daniel Protoff, who seemed to be qualified to work 
among the 250,000 Russians of the city; so it was begun. 
Mr. Protoff's health soon failed, and Basil S. Keusseff was 
called by the City Board from Pittsburgh. He was doing 
missionary work there under the auspices of the Baptists. 
In the heart of the world's steel industry he labored with 
Russians, Bulgarians, Servians, Croatians, Macedonians and 
Turks. Mr. Keusseff was born in Bulgaria, converted by 
the Baptists in Roumania, educated in the American Mission- 
ary College in Samokov and in two colleges in England. 



166 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Then he was examined by the Military College in Sofia and 
became an officer in the Bulgarian Army. However, he pre- 
ferred philology and religion ; hence, he became an expert 
linguist in ten different languages and a minister of the 
gospel. He organized a Baptist church in Lorn, Bulgaria; 
built a chapel, and edited two newspapers in Sofia. Near 
Pittsburgh he met Robert Bamber, pastor of the Turtle 
Creek Christian Church, and soon came to apostolic ground. 
His work in Chicago is unique and successful. The field is 
most difficult. All Russians belong to the Greek Catholic 
Church, and are full of superstition and strongly attached 
to the church of the Czar ; its priests are active in their oppo- 
sition, as are also the Russian Socialists, Tolstoists, Nihilists 
and Anarchists. Such opposers challenge the courage of a 
true soldier of the cross. 

The work is carried on in a rented storeroom, but the 
Chicago Society, with the General Home Society and the 
State C. W. B. M., hopes to house this mission. For lack 
of room, all of the Bible school are adults. 

Sheffield Avenue Church (Sheffield Avenue and George 

Street). 

Organized 1890, by W. F. Black; present membership, 
200; value of property, $15,000; Bible school began 1890; 
present enrollment, 225. 

This was organized as the North Side Church. Prof. W. 
F. Black, then pastor of the Central Christian Church, began 
preaching Sunday afternoons in Cook's Hall. The charter 
members were Mr. and Mrs. Cicero Wallace, Mrs. H. J. 
Russell.. Mr. and Mrs. R. F. and L. R. Priest, Mrs. K. P. 
Kennedy, Miss Addie V. H. Barr, Mrs. W. H. Bauford and 
Mr. and Mrs. W. T. Pursell. 

Lots were bought at Montana and Sheffield Streets and a 
frame chapel built thereon. This property was lost under a 
mortgage. Meetings were then held in Belmont Hall until 
the present property was secured in 1905. W. B. Taylor was 
pastor here about six years, and J. Lathrop, Geo. F. Hall, 



CHURCHES 167 

Thad Tinsley, O. P. Spiegel and Bruce Brown for shorter 
periods. Will F. Shaw came to the pastorate in September, 
1905. He is a sincere and devoted minister and preaches 
very clearly the pure gospel of Christ. During this time the 
church has prospered in all excellent service, but has lost 
many by removals and death. In its membership there have 
been not a few superior Christian men and women, among 
them Cicero Wallace, Prof. H. N. Herrick, L. R. Priest, 
Elias A. Long, W. S. Shearer, John Thrash, L. G. Fertig 
and Misses Addie Barr and Elsie Fudge all of them leaders 
in the public's service. 

South Chicago Christian Church. 

Organized 1906, by A. Larabee; present membership, 50; 
Bible school began 1896; present enrollment, 50. 

City Evangelist Larabee started this work. The congre- 
gation owns no property, but is accumulating a building 
fund. The meetings are held in Sherman Hall, 9138 Com- 
mercial Avenue. The progress is slow because the com- 
munity is largely composed of foreign-born peoples of other 
tongues and religions. The church is brave and persistent 
in the face of overwhelming odds. 

West End. 

Present membership, 76; value of property, $3,500; Bible- 
school enrollment, 96. 

West Pullman. 

Present membership, 64; value of property, $5,000; Bible- 
school enrollment, 100. 

In years past there were churches at Barrington and Pala- 
tine. From the former, Ira J. Chase entered the ministry. 

A church at May wood was formed in 1905 and continued 
for several years, but recently disbanded. 

A church at Ravenswood had a similar record. 

Chicago is one of the world's greatest mission fields and 
challenges our courage and consecration. 



168 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 
CRAWFORD COUNTY. 

East Union (Palestine). 

Organized 1848, by John Bailey; present membership, 
150; value of property, $1,200; Bible-school enrollment, 25. 

Minister Bailey held a meeting in a log schoolhouse and 
formed a congregation with fifty members. There was a 
reorganization in 1858 by Dr. Alfred C. Malone with eleven 
members, mostly from the Palestine Church. Of these, 
Samuel Searcy is the sole survivor, aged eighty- four. The 
chapel was built three and a half miles southeast of Palestine 
in 1863. 

This church has given to the ministry George Hurst, 
Ralph Harding, J. S. Clements and O. J. Page. 

It is active in good works under the ministry of Wright 
Sparlin. 

Hardinville. 

Organized 1850; present membership, 103; value of prop- 
erty, $1,000; Bible-school enrollment, 50. 
The chapel was built in 1858. 

Hutsonville, 

Organized 1841, by Alfred P. Law; present membership, 
121; value of property, $3,000; Bible school began 1860; 
present enrollment, 140. 

The Disciples met for worship in their homes before the 
church was organized, which was made in a log house. 
About 1852 a brick chapel was erected by contributions from 
the general public, but the legal title soon passed to the M. E. 
Church. In 1858 the congregation built a house of their 
own. This was used until 1886, when the ladies' aid society 
bought a better located lot, on which a better building was 
erected. In 1911 this house was entirely remodeled and mod- 
ernized. 

In the early days the visits of Uncle Joe Wilson and 
Uncle Joe Wolf, of Indiana, were looked forward to with 
great pleasure. 



CHURCHES 169 

Here are the names of some men and women whose lives 
have meant much to the church: Ben and Lizzie Frakes, 
Charles Fiddlar, Curtis Bradberry, Hugh and Sarah Ham- 
ilton, R. J. Owens, John T. Shore and wife, Joel Musgrove 
and wife, Sarah Stark (who taught a Sunday-school class 
for twenty-five years and was eighty years old when she 
resigned), Nancy O. Hurst, Sarah McNutt, Charity and 
Deborah Canady. 

There is also a conservative church here with a Bible 
school. 

Landes. 

Present membership, 48; value of property, $550; Bible- 
school enrollment, 41. 

Oblong. 

Present membership, 144; value of property, including 
parsonage, $3,600; Bible-school enrollment, 218. 
A modern, prosperous church in the oil region. 

Palestine. 

Organized 1863; present membership, 250; value of prop- 
erty, including parsonage, $5,000; Bible-school enrollment, 
150. 

Since the waters have swept the site o-f Kaskaskia away, 
Palestine claims to be the oldest town in the State. There 
was a church of Christ here probably in the thirties. In 
1840, in this place, Maurice R. Trimble conducted a public 
debate with a "Two-seed Baptist" preacher. The records 
have all perished. A reorganization was made by Evangelist 
D. D. Miller, working in the Fourth District. There were 
seventy-nine charter members, of whom Press Carver only 
remains. 

The frame chapel on North Main Street was burned in 
1855. The present brick house was built in 1874. In 1893 
a number of the members who were opposed to the use of 
instrumental music in the public worship withdrew and put 



170 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

up a frame chapel two blocks south. This is now unused 
and stands as a monument to mistaken zeal. 

The church is prosperous. One Bible-school class is edu- 
cating an orphan in Porto Rico. E. W. Sears is pastor. 

Portersville. 

Organized 1875, by Minister Wood; present membership, 
65; value of property, $1,500; Bible-school enrollment, 85. 
There were twelve charter members. 

Robinson. 

Organized 1867, by A. D. Dailey; present membership, 
300; value of property, $12,000; Bible school began 1867; 
present enrollment, 162. 

The original members were N. S. Brown and wife, M. 
C. Sheppard, Mrs. Mary Callahan, Hickman Henderson and 
Jas. M. Gardner and wife. The church was a result of a 
series of meetings held by Minister Dailey. The first house 
was built in 1882. 

West Harmony (Bell Air). 

Present membership, 103; value of property, $800; Bible- 
school enrollment, 65. 

Inactive. Chapel built in 1871. 

Wirt Chapel (Oblong). 

Organized 1862, by G. W. Ingersoll ; value of property, 
$900. 

Met in Wirt Schoolhouse until 1875, when chapel was 
built on land given by Mrs. Deborah Ogden. 

CUMBERLAND COUNTY. 

Antioch (Greenup). 

Organized 1891, by H. C. Kuykendall ; present member- 
ship, 90; value of property, $700. 

This church is eight miles northeast of Greenup. Con- 
servatives are in control. 



CHURCHES 171 

Brush Creek (Roslin). 

Organized 1890; present membership, 25; value of prop- 
erty, $800; has a Bible school. 

This is two miles northwest of Roslin. The congrega- 
tion is fifty to sixty years old, and for a period met in 
Fairview Schoolhouse. 

Corinth (Toledo). 

Organized 1876; present membership, 45; value of prop- 
erty, $900. 

Two miles southwest of Toledo. 

Greenup. 

Organized 1887, by Wm. H. Williams ; present member- 
ship, 43 ; value of property, $500 ; Bible-school enrollment, 75. 

The organization was effected in the Universalist house 
of worship. J. D. Borden and John Decker were elected 
elders, and Messrs. Elstun and Garrett, deacons. The 
church has been an intermittent one. It gave to the ministry 
J. D. Borden and John W. Kellum. For several years 
Charles F. Walden was the efficient clerk. 

Hazel Dell. 

Present membership, 80; value of property, $1,000; Bible- 
school enrollment, 50. 

I. S. McCash bought a farm two miles northwest of 
Hazel Dell, and in 1860 moved his family there from Indiana. 
While he cultivated his farm in summer and worked at the 
carpenter's trade in winter, he preached regularly within a 
radius of twenty-five miles. He found a small congregation 
at the Copland Schoolhouse, which transferred membership 
to Hazel Dell when the chapel was built there. Mr. McCash 
was assisted in his pioneer work by an aged brother, Benja- 
min Duvee, and Daniel Corener, whose home was in the 
north edge of Jasper County. They went by twos; one 
would preach and the other would exhort. 



172 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Janesville. 

Present membership, 70; value of property, $1,000; Bible- 
school enrollment, 48. 
D. T. Gordon is clerk. 

Jewett. 

Organized 1893, by James R. Parker; present member- 
ship, 40 ; value of property, $600 ; Bible school began 1893 ; 
present enrollment, 80. 

The charter members were William, H. O., Harry and 
Tiney Goldsmith ; Rachel Clark, Emma Lamasters, Phoche 
Prather; C. O., Mattie and Robert Ray; Albert and Maggie 
Skidmore; Alfred, Jane, William and Emma Williams. 

The first chapel burned in 1900 and the second was built. 
The church was reorganized in 1911 by Evangelist J. E. 
Stout with forty members, and is now led by better ideals. 

There was a division in this congregation in 1909, and 
the conservatives formed a church that has now fifteen mem- 
bers and a Bible school, but no chapel. 

Johnstown (Toledo). 

Present membership, 58; value of property, $3,000; no 
Bible school. 

Seven miles north. J. D. Hill is clerk. 

Neoga. 

Organized 1896, by S. R. Lewis; present membership, 35; 
value of property, $1,000; Bible school began 1896; present 
enrollment, 34. 

Years ago there was a congregation four miles east called 
Copperas Creek; also at Neoga, but both passed away. The 
present church was organized in a hall with twenty-six 
charter members. The chapel was built in 1898. The con- 
gregation is active. Mrs. Maude Frazzel is clerk. 

Churches in this part of the State have been led to their 
serious hurt by non-scriptural ideals. 



CHURCHES 173 

Plum Grove (Hidalgo). 

Organized 1900; present membership, 80; value of prop- 
erty, $1,800; Bible-school enrollment, 100. 
Three miles north of Hidalgo. 

Plum Grove (Greenup). 

Organized 1900; value of property, $900; has a Bible 
school. 

Six miles northeast of Greenup. A congregation was 
organized two miles south of this place, in a schoolhouse, by 
Min. Benjamin Duvee in 1854. This was the first church 
in the county that was Christian only. Thomas Goodman 
preached there. When the place of meeting and the name 
were changed and the chapel built, is not learned. 

Toledo. 

Organized 1875; present membership, 200; value of prop- 
erty, $3,500; Bible-school enrollment, 167. 

The present chapel was built in 1902. The church has 
grown toward better ideals. Scott Calbert is pastor. 

Webster (Janesville). 

This is two and a half miles northeast of Janesville. 

Min. I. S. McCash constituted a church in 1864 near 
Hazel Dell, at the Washington Schoolhouse. At that place 
four of his sons were led to Christ and all of them entered 
the ministry ; namely, Andrew, Levi, Albert and I. N. 
McCash. Andrew has remained there over forty years. Levi 
has preached in California and Albert in Washington for 
nearly as long. I. N. has been more prominent, and, hence, 
more widely known. This congregation is now divided. 
About 1865, I. S. McCash also formed a church in the 
Painter Creek Schoolhouse. 

Miss Nellie Morgan, of Jewett, furnished many of the 
facts in this county. 



174 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 
DEWITT COUNTY. 

Clinton. 

Organized 1852, by W. G. Springer; present membership, 
560; value of property, including parsonage, $18,000; Bible 
school began 1852; present enrollment, 335. 

In the spring of 1857, Walter P. Bowles and Wm. G. 
Springer held a series of meetings about four miles south 
of Clinton, in the residence of Hiram Dodson, not far from 
the location of Texas chapel. During this meeting Mr. 
Springer proposed that a church-house be built in Clinton, 
which was approved. W. G. Springer, with Messrs. Wm. 
Bolin and Samuel Brown, were appointed the committee for 
this task. Judge David Davis gave the lot, and an old-time 
brick chapel was finished and occupied in the summer of 
1852. In that fall, W. G. Springer, assisted by Wm. 
Shockey, an able evangelist from Indiana, held a meeting. 
At its close a church of Christ was organized, with Wm. 
Bolin and W. G. Springer as elders, and Abram Crum and 
Milton Parkinson, deacons. There was some preaching by 
Messrs. Bolin, Springer, Bowles, Wm. Morrow and others, 
but little growth. Wm. H. Brown, the great evangelist, held 
a meeting in 1856, and W. P. Shockey in 1858. He also 
led a public debate on Universalism with Minister Davis. 
In 1860, J. Q. A. Houston, with Dudley Downs as singer, 
held a meeting. During this revival the floor of the chapel, 
filled with a great audience, broke down, causing a panic. 
Order was restored by the quick singing of the preachers. 
Mr. Downs then preached for the congregation part of the 
time for several years. David Walk, Benjamin Franklin, C. 
F. Short and Leroy Skelton preached in continued meetings 
and otherwise. In 1865, J. J. Miles settled in Clinton and 
preached some. Then there followed R. B. Roberts, George 
Owen. D. D. Miller, J. C. Tulley, Charles Rowe, James 
Mitchell, James Robinson, John Wilson, Peter Schick, Dr. 
John Zimmerman, H. G. Van Dervoort, W. H. Crow, Elijah 
Stout, N. S. Haynes, H. F. Tandy, Geo. F. Adams, Samuel 



CHURCHES 175 

Lowe and T. T. Holton in various kinds of ministerial 
service. In the winter of 1866, A. D. Fillmore taught a class 
in vocal music and preached for the church. In 1871, John 
Adkinson, who was the main financial support, died. Again 
the door of the chapel was closed. 

In 1881, Miss Mary Welsh, with Mr. and Mrs. Edward 
Allen, opened and cleaned up the building, replacing the 
fifty broken panes of glass, and began again the public wor- 
ship with seven of the members. Since that time the church 
has grown steadily in numbers and efficiency. The new 
building was erected during the pastorate of Mr. Young in 
1888; also he was the first minister giving full time to a 
congregation. The pastorate of Mr. E. A. Gilliland was 
fruitful of great good. 

Falrview (Heyworth). 

Organized 1887, by J. S. Stagner; value of property, 
$1,200; Bible school began 1877. 

The location is eight miles southwest of Heyworth. The 
situation is commanding a bluff on the bank of Kickapoo 
Creek. There is a well-kept cemetery there. 

The chapel was built in 1878. The congregation is now 
weak. A summer Sunday school is about the only appear- 
ance of life. 

Farmer City. 

Organized 1864, by Dudley Downs; present membership, 
147; value of property, $6,500; Bible school began 1868; 
present enrollment, 160. 

This congregation was formed in the old schoolhouse of 
the town. The chapel was built the next year on Main 
Street, which served till 1866. Then, during the pastorate 
of John I. Gunn, the building was moved two blocks east 
and reconstructed at a cost of $3,500. Other improvements 
thereon were made during the pastorate of Henry Genders, 
who died there. 

The living charter members are Milan Moore, Mehitabel 



176 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Watson, Chas. H. Watson, Catherine Wetzell, James H. Bean, 
Cynthia Webb, Emma Sangster and Nancy Watson. 

The church has never been numerically strong. It has 
given to the ministry David Wetzell, Joseph G. Slick and 
Frank L. Moore. 

Hallsville (formerly Old Union). 

Organized 1832, by Hughes Bowles; present membership, 
211; value of property, $1,200; Bible-school enrollment, 82. 

The Old Union Church was located about ten miles west 
of Clinton. Hughes Bowles, with his family, came from 
Kentucky in 1831 and settled on a farm in that locality. 
Under the spreading branches of a large white-oak tree, he 
constituted this congregation on October 13 the second Sun- 
day of the month with seventeen charter members. It was 
composed mainly of the Bowles and Hall families. A part, 
and probably all, of these first members were turned to the 
Lord at Caneridge, Kentucky. The first elders of this church 
of Christ were Mahlon Hall, Joseph Hall and Hiram Dotson. 
Besides these, Darius and Ambrose Hall, with Anderson and 
W. P. Bowles, were leading members. The first meetings 
were held in the log-cabin homes of the people and in groves. 
Among the first preachers there were Hughes Bowles, James 
Scott, William Ryan, W. P. Bowles, Mr. Painter, Abner 
Peeler, Isaac Martin, Alfred Lindsay, Sr., John G. Camp- 
bell, William Morrow and John England. John Rogers and 
John Irwin were Kentucky ministers who visited the congre- 
gation. Later there were A. J. Kane, J. Q. A. Houston, 
Dudley Downs, Samuel Knight, L. M. Robinson and T. T. 
Holton. 

The first chapel was built of logs in 1838. It was used 
jointly by the Disciples, Baptists and Methodists. This 
fact gave the word "Union" to this place of public wor- 
ship. As the years passed, "Old" was added. In 1864 a 
frame building, with a seating capacity of six hundred and 
costing $3,000, was erected. This was owned and used by the 
church of Christ only. 



CHURCHES 177 

These pioneer preachers laid deep and firm foundations. 
This congregation grew to a membership of four hundred. 
From first to last near thirteen hundred were baptized here 
upon the public confession of the Christ. 

It gave to the ministry Wm. P. Ryan, W. P. Bowles, 
Alonzo Henry, Simpson Ely, Harry Barnett, J. A. Barnett, 
Harry Piatt and John H. Piatt. 

Railways came, towns sprang up and Old Union became 
the mother of congregations. She contributed to "Texas," 
Maroa, Kenney and Midland, which received the old house ; 
but Hallsville is her direct offspring. On Oct. 13, 1882, 
the old church disbanded. A decaying stump marks the 
spot of her birth. This, with the gravestones in the cemetery 
that grew around the houses of worship, are the silent 
sentinels of faded joys and departed glory. Here sleeps the 
sacred dust of brave men and true women awaiting the 
resurrection of the just. 

Kenney. 

Organized 1883, by David Wetzell; present membership, 
140; value of property, $1,000; Bible school began 1902; 
present enrollment, 114. 

This church was constituted by members who came from 
the Old Union congregation and those gained in a meeting 
conducted by Mr. Wetzell in a public hall in 1883. The 
chapel was finished and occupied in 1884. The next year 
Robert Orr, W. W. Johnson and F. M. Hubbell were 
ordained as elders. Messrs. Orr and Johnson continue to 
serve the congregation as its elders. It grows and does good 
work. 

Lane. 

Organized 1850, by Dr. Zimmerman ; present membership, 
55; value of property, $400; Bible school began 1884; pres- 
ent enrollment, 70. 

The meetings of this congregation for a period of thirty- 
five years were held in the residences of its members and 



178 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

schoolhouses about seven miles east of Clinton. It was first 
known as Creek Nation and later as Harmony Church. With 
the coming of a railway, the village of Lane sprang up. It 
was named for Timps Lane, a representative man of the 
community and a leading member of the church. Then the 
chapel and place of meeting were moved there in 1884. It 
is probable that the Harmony congregation was formed by 
Min. George Owens in 1867. Mr. Lane died in 191.1. The 
church in the village is not strong. 

Long Point (Wapella). 

Organized 1851, by William Morrow; present member- 
ship, 51; value of property, $800; Bible school began 1858; 
present enrollment, 41. 

This church, located four miles north of Wapella, was 
formed in a grove near Liberty Schoolhouse. In 1858 the 
present house of worship was built, costing $2,000. The 
pioneer preachers who worked here were Wm. Ryan, W. P. 
Bowles, John Wilson, Dudley Downs and George Owens. 

The present elders are Abram Summers, C. W. Short and 
John B. Turner, who is also correspondent. 

At one time Benjamin Franklin debated with John 
luccock (M. E. Church) here. 

Rock Creek ( Waynes ville). 

Organized 1837, by Hughes Bowles ; present membership, 
80; value of property, $1,500; Bible school began 1876; 
present enrollment, 45. 

The meetings for public worship alternated between the 
residences of Peter Crum, at Long Point, and Samuel P. 
Glenn, at Rock Creek, till 1845, when the first house was 
built. This served till 1876, when the present house was 
constructed one-quarter mile south of the first site four 
miles east of Waynesville. 

This country church has maintained the primitive order 
of public worship during the seventy-five years of its life. 



CHURCHES 179 

Its pioneer preachers were Peter Crum, W. P. Bowles, S. P. 
Glenn and James Robeson. 

Texas (Clinton). 

Organized 1850, by W. G. Springer; present membership, 
77; value of property, $1,000; Bible school began 1876; pres- 
ent enrollment, 111. 

This church is located four miles southwest of Clinton. 
Its first house was built in 1850 and its second in 1876. The 
church was reorganized in 1860. Like many country 
churches, it has lost many members by removal, but maintains 
its public worship and work. Its elders are B. T. Williams, 
G. W. Wright and James Justis, with H. White and J. G. 
Jenkins, deacons. 

Wapella. 

Organized 1868, by George Owens; present membership, 
123; value of property, $2,000; Bible school began 1868; 
present enrollment, 100. 

The meetings were held in the schoolhouse till 1869, 
when the present house of worship was built. Joshua Carl, 
Peter Crum and Stephen Riggs were associated with Geo. 
Owen in forming the congregation. 

Mrs. Margaret Carl was one of the charter members. She 
was baptized by Thomas Campbell in 1826, and at the age 
of ninety-five years passed to her reward. 

O. C. Ives and Richard Short are the elders, with H. 
Conover and P. O. Scogens, deacons. 

Waynesville. 

Organized 1894, by R. Leland Brown ; present member- 
ship, 225; value of property, including parsonage, $6,000; 
Bible school began 1894; present enrollment, 263. 

This church grew out of a meeting conducted by Min. 
R. Leland Brown. There were eight Disciples at its begin- 
nino- and eighty at the close. The house of worship, costing 
$1,800, with a seating capacity of four hundred, was built 



180 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

at once. When the house was dedicated, practical expressions 
of goodwill came from the representatives of the community, 
both the churched and the unchurched. 

DOUGLAS COUNTY. 

Arcola. 

Organized 1858, by Dr. W. T. Sylvester; present mem- 
bership, 270; value of property, including parsonage, $21,000; 
Bible-school enrollment, 327. 

The charter members were John Lanaiger, Dr. Sylvester, 
Tipton Ward, David Evans and J. M. Harden. Dr. Sylvester 
was the leading member of this church for about fifteen 
years. He was an efficient elder and a good preacher until 
he became a railroad builder. 

The congregation was held back for years by hurtful 
opinions, but has fully recovered itself. It is active in all 
good works, with W. S. Rounds as pastor. 

Camargo. 

Present membership, 106; value of property, $10,000; 
Bible-school enrollment, 125. 

There was in the seventies and later a Christian congre- 
gation at Hugo, a few miles south of Camargo. The chang- 
ing tides of human life carried it away, some of its members 
coming to Camargo. 

Hindsboro. 

Organized 1863, by Harmon Gregg; present membership, 
150; value of property, $6,500; Bible school began 1878; 
present enrollment, 130. 

The Deer Creek Christian Church, located four miles 
north of the site of Hindsboro, was formed as stated. 
Besides Mr. Gregg, Thomas Goodman preached much for 
the congregation. Hindsboro grew by the coming of the 
railroad, and to this village the membership of the Deer 
Creek congregation was transferred in 1878. The first 



CHURCHES 181 

chapel was built there the next year, and the present house 
was erected in 1910 during the ministry of J. S. Rose. 

Murdoch. 

Organized 1902, by R. Leland Brown; present member- 
ship, 50; value of property, $1,500; Bible school began 1902; 
present enrollment, 80. 

Newman. 

Organized 1869, by N. S. Haynes ; present membership, 
450; value of property, $23,000; Bible school began 1869; 
present enrollment, 225. 

A series of meetings was begun by Mr. Haynes in the 
M. E. chapel. When people began to turn to the Lord, the 
trustees turned him out. The meeting was continued and 
the church formed in the public schoolhouse. A frame 
chapel was built about 1874, which gave place to a modern 
building in 1905. W. G. Pounds and Mr. and Mrs. Bennett 
were active helpers in the early years. 

The church has given L. H. Hooe to the ministry. 

Tuscola. 

Organized 1863, by David Walk; present membership, 
285; value of property, $15,000; Bible-school enrollment, 144. 

In 1863, W. B. Wharton and D. K. Walker, two Disciples, 
were residing in Tuscola. This had then been a county-seat 
for six years. These two men and their families wished the 
town should hear the gospel as they understood it, and also 
a church home for themselves ; so they sent for Min. David 
Walk. He held a series of meetings in the old courthouse 
and organized a church of Christ with eighteen members. 
The congregation met in the schoolhouse for public worship. 
Later, when Mr. Walk returned to Tuscola. he was com- 
pelled to defend his distinctive teaching in a public discussion. 
At its conclusion, members of the Baptist, Presbyterian and 
M. E. Churches united and prevailed upon the public-school 
officers to shut the Disciples out of the schoolhouse. This 



182 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

led to the construction of a two-story frame church building. 
It was used until 1892, when the present brick edifice was 
completed. The chief cost of the first building was met by 
John Chandler. Of the charter members, only Mrs. Julia 
Sloan remains. 

The church has always maintained its public worship. 

It has given to the ministry Wm. Walling and E. E. 
Hartley. 

Villa Grove. 

Organized 1906, by Harold E. Monser; present member- 
ship, 110; value of property, $7,000; Bible school began 
1906; present enrollment, 142. 

Mr. Monser was sent here by the mission board of the 
Sixth District, and conducted a four weeks' meeting in a 
tent. During the half-time service of R. L. Cartwright the 
house was built by the help of the Church Extension Society. 
The town depends for its life chiefly on railroad work, and 
the church has been pastorless part of the time, hence has 
not flourished. Dr. G. L. Kennedy is the clerk. 

EDGAR COUNTY. 

Some Extinct Congregations. 

The second church in the county was known through 
many years as Big Creek. There is a dim tradition that it 
was first called "Pickup," but not for a long time. It was 
organized in the thirties. Its first house of worship was 
made of hewed logs, with an open fireplace at one end. It 
was built about 1838 and stood within half a mile of what is 
now known as the Union Schoolhouse. The elders were Abner 
Leitchman and Isaac Elledge. The latter was a very good 
preacher. Harmon Greerer, Sr., and Robert Bloomfield were 
the deacons. About 1850 the log house gave place to a 
frame chapel placed within a half-mile northeast. The names 
associated with this house are Barnett Thomas, Jacob Zim- 
merly and Ottis Eldridge. In 1882 a new but very inferior 
chapel was built one and a half miles due south. This was 



CHURCHES 183 

used till 1904, when a part of the congregation went west 
to Bell Ridge and a part east to Oliver. The old church gave 
Harmon Gregg and Dudley Downs to the ministry. 

In 1840 a church was organized about three miles east 
of Grandview known as Central. It did good work for about 
twenty-five years. 

The Elbridge congregation was formed in the fifties 
and flourished for years. The members, "split up by the 
Civil War," moved away, and the house was sold about 1875 
to the public-school district. 

Maple Grove was a country church three miles east of 
Edgar. The property has gone back to the original owners 
of the land. 

Liberty Chapel was six miles east and one mile north of 
Paris. It, too, has probably gone back to the landowners. 

W. F. Black found a "union church" north of Hume and 
held a characteristic meeting in the fall of 1884. Then most 
of the people became Christians only. After some years, 
many changed membership to Sidell and elsewhere. The 
chapel was sold to be used as a barn, and the proceeds turned 
into the chapel at Metcalf. 

There was never a congregation at Grandview, but 
"Uncle Tom Goodman," who resided there, was anxious to 
tell the Methodist and Presbyterian brethren "where they 
stood." Refusing him the use of their houses, the chapel 
was built and, in later years, sold to the township. 

Asher (Paris). 

Organized 1907, by L. Hadaway; present membership, 
139; value of property, $4,900; Bible school began 1907; 
present enrollment, 90. 

The location is about five miles southwestward from 
Paris. The congregation grew out of a Bible school held in 
the Asher Schoolhouse, re-enforced by members from the 
old Big Creek Church. There were thirty-eight charter mem- 
bers. The Home Department has 125 members. Like many 
such, the abler members move to town. 



184 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Bell Ridge (Paris). 

Organized 1904, by H. M. Brooks; present membership, 
319; value of property, $6,000; Bible school began 1904; 
present enrollment, 162. 

This congregation grew out of the old Big Creek Church. 
It is located ten miles southwest of Paris. There were sixty- 
seven charter members. The chapel is a creditable one. 
There have been six regular preachers. Mrs. W. S. O'Hair 
has served as the very faithful and efficient Bible- school 
superintendent. The Home Department has 258 members. 

Brocton. 

Organized 1873, by C. C. Boyer and H. M. Brooks ; pres- 
ent membership, 50; value of property, $3,000; Bible school 
began 1893; present enrollment, 51. 

Before the chapel was built in 1893, meetings were held 
and a congregation organized in the White Elm Schoolhouse, 
in just what year is not known. Min. C. C. Boyer resided 
on his farm near here and was the leading man in the move- 
ment. Thomas Goodman, J. J. Vanhoutin, James Connor 
and Harmon Gregg preached here. After the chapel was 
built, the congregation was reorganized by H. M. Brooks. 

The church has given to the ministry two brothers T. 
A. and E. E. Boyer. 

Chrisman. 

Organized 1890, by G. W. Pearl; present membership, 
12; value of property, $1,500. 

Dr. J. M. Welch, now deceased, led this work in its 
earlier years. A church building that was owned by the 
Universalists was bought and used. 

The church is very feeble. There were about forty char- 
ter members. 

Conlogue. 

Organized 1872, by Z. T. Sweeney; value of property, 
$400; never had a Bible school. 



CHURCHES 185 

The house was built in 1873. Preaching now only 
periodically. 

Dudley. 

Organized 1868; value of property, $1,000. 
This church is about extinct. Landlordism and ultra- 
conservatism have proved its undoing. 

Hume. 

Organized 1875, by C. C. Boyer; present membership, 
167; value of property, including parsonage, $2,700; Bible 
school began 1881 ; present enrollment, 139. 

J. W. Perkins was the first minister. For about six years 
the congregation worshiped in the old schoolhouse. Squire 
Hume gave the ground and the chapel was finished in 1881. 
Miss Maggie Roberts was the first person baptized in the 
new building. The congregation is now looking toward 
another house of worship. 

To the ministry the church has given T. T. Roberts. 

Kansas. 

Organized 1856, by A. D. Fillmore; present membership, 
350; value of property, $25,000; Bible school began 1856; 
present enrollment, 250. 

This town was laid in 1853 on a flat prairie, where deer, 
wolves, wild ducks and geese, prairie chickens and snakes 
made their homes. In 1854 a union chapel was built, the 
title to which was in the Methodist Protestant Church. The 
building stood on the present site of the National Bank. 
Three denominations were interested in the property. In 
this building the church of Christ was organized with six- 
teen charter members, as follows: John K. Boyer and wife, 
W. F. Boyer and wife, Mrs. Katherine Brown, Mrs. Harriett 
Cornell, Mrs. Evaline Curd, Presley Martin and wife. Mrs. 
Margaret Atkins, James Wrieht and wife, Angeline Wilhoit, 
Sarah Wilhoit, Pendleton Wilhoit and Sarah Arterburn. It 
was some time afterward that the officers were elected, for 



186 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

the first elders were: Edward Pinnell, J. K. Boyer and N. S. 
Wiley, with W. F. Boyer, J. G. Wilhoit, W. L. Boyer and 

A. J. Pinnell for deacons. 

The "union church" did not work well; so in 1857 the 
Disciples put up a chapel of their own. The lot was given 
by Mr. William Brown, who was an Englishman by birth 
and "a brother-in-law of the congregation." This building 
was much improved in 1884. It gave place in 1910 to a 
beautiful modern edifice erected during the pastorate of 

B. F. Thomas. 

To the ministry the church has given N. S. Haynes, Z. T. 
Sweeney, Gilbert Zink, Ellis Purlee and Fred Jacobs. 

The following incident illustrates the viewpoint and 
experiences of many Disciples in the fifties and sixties. The 
services in union chapel were by rotation, the preachers 
taking their days. A young man from New England came 
to the village. Having a good voice, he was pleased to 
assist in the singing at church. He used a tuning-fork to 
help pitch the tunes. He sang the tenor. Here were two 
unheard-of things in the community a tuning-fork and a 
tenor. This at once brought to his feet one of the aged 
rulers of the assembly. He informed the young man that 
he "must drop that pinching-bug and dry up that mule- 
braying." His indignation spread so that not until the 
young man was arrested, tried and fined $5 for disturbing 
public worship, was the wrath of the righteous man appeased. 

Little Grove (Vermilion). 

Organized 1826, by Samuel McGee ; present membership, 
40; value of property, $500. Never had a Bible school. 

The first organization of the Little Grove Church, six 
miles east of Paris, was in the fall of 1826, in the home of 
Samuel McGee. The church was formed through the efforts 
chiefly of Mrs. Mary Morrison and her sister. Mrs. Anna 
P'itzgerald. These women, with others in this settlement, had 
come to Edgar County from Kentucky, where they had come 
to some knowledge of the Restoration movement. The Little 



CHURCHES 187 

Grove congregation was always a church of Christ; it was 
never in any way connected with the Christian Denomination. 
Meetings for worship were first held in residences, next in 
the McGee Schoolhouse, and about 1829 in the Prior School- 
house. By 1832 the members had increased to near one 
hundred. People would go sometimes a day's travel to be at 
the Saturday night and Sunday meetings. It was not uncom- 
mon for several of the early settlers to take their families 
together in an ox-wagon to go to church. In 1835 the con- 
gregation began to build a meeting-house, which was finished 
in 1837 with the seats. This served until 1875, when the 
present house was built. In its earlier years this church was 
visited by Alexander Campbell, John O'Kane, Daniel W. 
Elledge, Love H. Jameson, the brothers Job and Michel 
Combs, and others. The leading resident preacher up to 
1865 was William Hartley, who was assisted by Elijah Ward 
and other members. The congregation has never been with- 
out its active officers and has never had any serious trouble. 
Hundreds have been members here. Many have come and 
more have gone. Now only a few remain, mostly women, 
who meet for worship every Lord's Day. Its wide influences 
no man may measure. No regular preaching now. 

John J. Vanhouten, a grandson of Mrs. Mary Morrison, 
came to the ministry here. 

Metcalf. 

Present membership, 125; value of property, $1,500; 
Bible school enrollment, 70. 

Nevins. 

Organized 1858, by William Hurtly and A. D. Fillmore; 
present membership, 19; value of property, $600; never had 
a Bible school. 

This congregation was organized in the country with 
forty charter members and known as the Franklin Church. 
The building was moved to the near-by railway station, 



188 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Kevins, in 1881, and the church has since been known by 
that name. 

It has given William T. Simms and William H. Simms 
to the ministry. Both are dead. 

Some of those who preached here were Nathan Wright, 
Thomas Goodman, Wm. Holt, A. J. Frank, W. H. Simms, 
J. W. Perkins, John N. Mulkey, Hezekiah Williams, Isaac 
Lamb and H. W. Cuppy. 

Oliver. 

Organized 1896, by I. J. Lamb; present membership, 100; 
value of property, $1,200; Bible reading. 

A conservative congregation that was re-enforced from 
the Big Creek Church. 

Paris. 

Organized 1855, by John C. New ; present membership, 
1,714; value of property, $65,000; Bible school began I860: 
present enrollment, 435. 

There were thirty-one charter members. The first house 
for worship was purchased of the Presbyterians. The second 
was a two-story brick erected in 1866. The present stone 
edifice was finished in 1897 during the pastorate of A. E. 
Dubber. The church has had nineteen pastors and a host of 
fine men and women. Among those who have contributed 
not a little to its development were Geo. W. Redmon, LeRoy 
Wiley, A. J. Hunter, and Fred, Larz and Henry Augustus. 
Mr. George Brown, for twelve years county superintendent 
of schools, is the Bible-school superintendent. His is a fine 
union of head and heart. 

From the estate of Mr. Larz A. Augustus the congrega- 
tion received $25,300. Of this amount, $5,000 may be spent 
as two-thirds of the membership may vote; the balance is to 
be held in trust and the interest only "used in the best man- 
ner known to said church for the extension of the cause of 
Christ." 

For the past eight years the church has supported Fred 
E. Hagin as a missionary in Japan. 



CHURCHES 189 

D. N. Wetzell and W. B. Zimmerman have been given to 
the ministry. 

The church owns a chapel in the south side of the city 
and conducts a mission there. H. H. Peters is the pastor. 

Pleasant Hill (Kansas). 

Organized 1870, by Harmon Gregg; present membership, 
207; value of property, $3,000; Bible school began 1870; 
present enrollment, 118. 

Is located five miles southeast of Kansas. There were 
forty-six charter members. A. Boyer and J. N. Shoptaugh 
were chosen and set apart as elders, and R. Ratts, Ezra Nay 
and H. Hines as deacons. 

A good brick church, contiguous to a cemetery, was 
built soon after the formation of the congregation and is still 
used. 

This country church has been fruitful in the production 
of preachers. They were D. W. Nay, S. I. Stark, J. A. 
Shoptaugh, S. W. Nay, E. F. Kerans, Ross Kerans, Roley 
Nay and Bruce Nay. 

Redman. 

Organized 1907, by L. Hadaway; present membership, 
80; value of property, $6,000; Bible school began 1807; 
present enrollment, 118. 

State Line (Paris). 

Organized 1862; present membership, 30; value of prop- 
erty, $700; Bible school began 1880; present enrollment, 50. 

A number of people entered into an organization calling 
themselves the Clay's Prairie Church of Christ from the 
schoolhouse of that name. They met there until 1869, when 
the house of worship was built. Since then the congregation 
has been known as State Line because the chanel is near 
the Indiana line. The first elders were John Hunter (the 
father of A. J. Hunter), Tames Watson and Richard Hobbs. 

Among its ministers there were Nathan Wright, Abner 



190 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Daily, Thomas Goodman, William Holt, G. L. Rude, J. B. 
Mayfield, Geo. E. and Z. T. Sweeney (father and son), Wm. 
Simms and W. W. Jacobs. 

William Holt, a fine preacher, was the product of this 
church. 

Success (Vermilion). 

Organized 1895, by H. Williams; present membership, 
75; value of property, $600; Bible school began 1895; 
present enrollment, 50. F. C. Volker is the clerk. 

EDWARDS COUNTY. 

Albion. 

Organized 1841, by Elijah Goodwin; present membership, 
331; value of property, $1,800; Bible school enrollment, 221. 

The formation of this church, August 4, was just after 
the old brick Christian chapel was finished. Daniel Orange, 
a fine type of Englishman, led in this movement. He was a 
descendant of the French Huguenots and settled here in 
1818. He had heard the Campbell-Purcell debate in Cin- 
cinnati in 1836 and was fully persuaded that the doctrinal 
position of the Disciples was right. The charter members 
were Daniel, Elizabeth, Elizabeth S. and John B. Orange 
a fruitful beginning indeed. Four weeks later Alfred Flower, 
who married Elizabeth S. Orange with Charles and Sarah 
Burns was added to the number. The first elder was Daniel 
Orange, and the first deacons were Alvin Kenner and 
George Goodwin. Elijah Goodwin was employed one-fourth 
of the time at $50 the year. Like most churches, this one 
met reverses, but it has grown to wide service and useful- 
ness. The present chapel was built in 1868 and a new 
building is in process of construction. 

Bone Gap. 

Organized 1886, bv T. S. Rose; present membership, 154; 
value of property, $1,000; Bible school began 1886; present 
enrollment, 175. 



CHURCHES 191 

Mr. Rose was chiefly instrumental in establishing this 
church, serving it four years. Under his ministry the 
house was built in 1887. W. D. Walker is correspondent. 

Browns. 

Organized 1894, by Zacharia Harris; present membership, 
144; value of property, $2,500; Bible school began 1894; 
present enrollment, 134. 

The Bonpas Church, located on the eastern border of the 
county, was organized by Amos Miller in 1838. It served 
its generation and the remnant finally united with Browns. 

Ellery. 

Organized 1890, by J. C. T. Hall; present membership, 
150; value of property, $3,500; Bible school began 1888; 
present enrollment, 85. 

This congregation had its beginning in a Bible school 
that was started at the Woods Schoolhouse in 1888 and 
continued two years. The people of the community were 
led by Min. J. C. T. Hall in the erection of a frame church 
which was finished in 1890. 

Shiloh (West Salem). 

Organized 1862, by J. C. T. Hall; present membership, 
125; value of property, $1,500; Bible school enrollment, 109. 

The location is eight miles south of Albion. A large 
per cent, of the people of this community originally came 
from Kentucky, so it was sometimes called "Little Ken- 
tucky." It is noted for its hospitality. The church was 
organized in the barn of James McKinsey. 

West Salem. 

Organized 1858, by J. C. T. Hall; present membership, 
175; value of property, including parsonage, $13,000; Bible- 
school enrollment, 235. 

This church was formed by uniting the "Long Point" 
congregation with one that was meeting at the residence of 



192 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Jas. F. Barney. James Kinner and Blashel Foster led in this 
work. The twenty-nine charter members signed the follow- 
ing agreement: "We whose names are hereunto annexed, 
being immersed believers in the Lord Jesus Christ, do 
mutually and voluntarily associate ourselves together in a 
congregational capacity to be known as the Congregation of 
the Lord at West Salem, taking the Christian Scriptures as 
our only rule of faith and practice, taking no name as a 
church name but such as they authorize." 

West Village (Albion). 

Organized 1858; present membership, 293; value of prop- 
erty, $2,000; Bible school enrollment, 250. 

This church is four miles north of Albion. It was a 
scion of the Little Prairie Church. It was first known as 
Village Church, but as there was another not far distant by 
that name, this one was changed to West Village. The first 
meeting was held in an old log building one and a half miles 
from the present site. A Bible school was conducted there 
for a number of years, with occasional preaching. A frame 
building was erected in 1858, which was used till the present 
house was built in 1896. 

The Curtisville Church was organized by J. C. T. Hall 
in 1854. A few years later it united with the West Village 
congregation. But in 1878 it was reorganized and built a 
chapel. In later years it disorganized. 

The charter members were J. T., Nancy J. and Mary 
Hunt ; W. W., Nancy and Edward Willis ; Laurie Stroup ; 
W. A. and Sarah T. Inskipp; John T., Ann C. and Eliza 
Woods ; Joe J. Mitchell, Malinda Mann, Harriett McKibben, 
Harriett Winters, Thomas and Mary Niles, William and 
Narcissa Scott, and Jane I. Lines. 

Little Prairie (Ellery). 

Organized 1823, by Elder Alan Emmerson ; present mem- 
bership, 100; value of property, $2,000; Bible-school enroll- 
ment, 125. 



CHURCHES 193 

This church, located about four miles northwest of Albion, 
was for sixteen years a part of the Christian Denomination. 
It was organized in the house of Alan Emmerson, near the 
site of the present church building. The first elder was 
Alan Emmerson, and the first deacons were Joseph Apple- 
gath, Thomas Gill and William Hall. Amos Willis- was the 
first preacher of the Christian Denomination in the county 
and the first minister of this church. He died in 1840. 

The first house of worship of this congregation was a 
frame covered, ceiled and weather-boarded with clapboards 
and plastered with post-oak clay. It had a brick chimney 
and fireplace. With the passing years, that bear all things 
away, this superior temple of its time gave place to another 
frame building that is still in use. 

In 1837 the congregation came into the Restoration move- 
ment through the leading of Amos Willis, a minister of the 
older congregation. Later J. M. Mathes, John O'Kane, 
Moses Goodwin and others served the church. 

Marion (West Salem). 

Organized 1843, by Elijah Goodwin ; present member- 
ship, 150; value of property, $1,200; Bible-school enroll- 
ment, 82. 

This church is in the northwest corner of the county and 
is on the bank of Sugar Creek. Its first elders were William 
Foster and N. A. Shelby ; its first deacons, Quinton Nicks 
and B. F. Stark. It was formed in the residence of Quinton 
Nicks. Meetings were held in the home of N. A. Shelby 
and others till the chapel was built. Besides Elijah and 
Moses Goodwin, J. Standish and Cornelius Aids preached 
there in the earlier years. 

It gave George Morrall to the ministry. 

New Hope (Browns). 

Present membership, 52; value of property, $800; Bible- 
school enrollment, 44. 

Only occasional meetings are held here now. 



194 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

The East Village Church, after years of work, also disor- 
ganized. 

EFF1NGHAM COUNTY. 

Min. Claiborne Wright began the work of the Disciples 
in this county in 1862. He had settled on a farm east of 
Mason in 1861. He held meetings in the Graver School- 
house, and organized a church of Christ there with the 
following members: Margaret A. Stephens; Paschal C., 
Louisa, Celestus, David and Talitha Leonard ; Jefferson, 
Catherine, Claiborne, Charlotte, Catherine M., Wm. T.. Ellen 
Jane and Susan Wright ; Michael and Katherine Redinbaugh, 
Ezra and Phebe Morphew, Margaret Turner, Mary A. Cra- 
ver, and Wm. D. and Robert D. Porter. Additions to these 
were made steadily. A large shed used for sheltering sheep 
in winter was turned into a tabernacle and in this the con- 
gregation met for worship. In 1866 the place of meeting 
was changed to the new schoolhouse three miles east of 
Mason. After a time debates and divisions occurred, some 
of the members going to the Universalists and others uniting 
with the U. B. Church. Min. A. J. Harrell revived the work 
in 1879, which led to the formation of the church in Mason 

in 1880. . 

Beccher City. 

Organized 1902, by B. S. Taylor ; present membership, 
161; value of property, $1,600; Bible school began 1907; 
present enrollment, 136. 

The church was organized in the schoolhouse and met 
for worship in a canning factory until the chapel was erected 
in 1907. B. S. Taylor, J. L. Huffcult and M. E. Steele were 
the three men who were ably assisted by twenty-two women 
in the church during its first years. Evangelist J. E. Story 
added 168 people in one meeting and thus helped the congre- 
gation to a stronger position. 

Dieterich. 

Present membership, 65; value of property, $1,000; Bible- 
school enrollment, 52. 



CHURCHES 195 

Edgewood. 

Organized 1890, by W. T. Gordon ; present membership, 
110; value of property, $1,000; Bible school began 1890; 
present enrollment, 70. 

Minister Gordon preached Monday evening, May 19, 
1890, in the M. E. Church. A further use of the house was 
refused him. Then he accepted an invitation from the trus- 
tees to occupy the public-school house. When he returned 
the following July he found the doors closed against him. 
The managers of the Opera Hall tendered him the use of 
their auditorium. Following this opening, a church of thirty- 
seven members was organized the following September. A 
house of worship was built in 1891. 

Dr. Joseph Hall has been the chief leader and supporter 
of this congregation. There are other faithful servants. 

Effingham. 

Organized 1890, by W. T. Gordon; value of property, 
$10,000; Bible school began 1890. 

The first work of the Disciples in Effingham began near 
1867. There was a partial organization at that date. Occa- 
sional meetings were held in the courthouse. A lot was 
donated in the west part of town and a small frame building 
was erected thereon. This was burned a few years there- 
after. Then, by reason of a lack of good leadership, the 
congregation went to pieces. 

When the beloved H. Y. Kellar moved to Effingham in 
1888, he gathered together the remnants and preached to 
them in the temple until the church building was erected in 
1893. The citizens of the city helped liberally in this enter- 
prise. 

Elliottstown (Dieterich). 

Present membership, 54; value of property, $650; no 
Bible school. 

This place was the residence of Barlow Higgins, who did 
good work through many years. 



196 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Mason. 

Organized 1880, by W. T. Gordon; present membership, 
125; value of property, $1,700; Bible-school enrollment, 112. 

This church received its first impulse from a country 
congregation east of the town. Meetings were held in the 
Baptist chapel and the Masonic Hall. The church is much 
indebted to Minister Gordon. It is doing good service. 

Watson. 

Present membership, 30; value of property, $500; Bible- 
school enrollment, 32. 

Mins. Wiiford Field, Barlow Higgins, W. S. Mesnard 
and Frank Shane have done faithful work in this country. 

FAYETTE COUNTY. 

Arne Prairie (Brownstown). 

Organized 1907, by R. Leland Brown ; present member- 
ship, 17; value of property, $200; summer Bible school. 

This is five miles midway between Brownstown and 
Loogootee. 

Bethany (Brownstown). 

Present membership, 61; value of property, $1,000; Bible- 
school enrollment, 65. 

This church is about eight miles northwest of Browns- 
town. It is a new organization and was made up largely 
of members who previously belonged to the New Hope 
Church, a near-by country congregation whose chapel burned 
in 1867. 

Bethany congregation gave W. B. Hopper to the ministry. 

Bingham. 

Organized 1911, by D. R. Bebout; present membership, 
15; value of property, $1,000; Bible school began 1911. 

A little congregation was formed in 1892 by Min. John 
Meeks, but it was short-lived. Through the insistence of 



CHURCHES 197 

Mrs. W. B. Shelton, Mrs. Sarah Hurst and Mrs. Ellen 
Harper, a meeting was held by Min. C. M. Smithson in 
1910 which led to the organization of the church, the next 
year, of thirteen members. 

The meetings were held in the W. C. T. U. temple. 
Inasmuch as this building was running down, the society 
proposed to transfer to the people of the town as a union 
church. When the time for action came, the denominational 
representatives withdrew ; hence the property was deeded 
to the Christian Church. It was thoroughly repaired and 
put in a good condition. 

Broivnstozvn. 

Organized 1871, by Charles Smith; present membership, 
206; value of property, $17,500; Bible school began 1871; 
present enrollment, 190. 

An active church of not a few good people. Four Mile, 
New Hope and Liberty congregations all supplied members 
to Brownstown. 

S. D. Morton and Wm. Rode are true helpers. 

Four-mile Prairie (Brownstown). 

Organized 1843, by Wm. Chaplin and Wm. Schooly; 
present membership, 20; value of property, $1,200; Bible- 
school enrollment, 38. 

The first members were Moses D. and John F. Morey, 
Jacob Tinker and wife, Abner Griffith and wife, Mrs. 
Campbell, Mrs. Smith and M. W. Hickerson, who was a 
good preacher. This congregation died and after some years 
revived. The chapel was built in 1912. This is the home of 
Min. Geo. T. Bridges. 

Liberty (Brownstown). 

Organized by Wm. Schooley; present membership, 75; 
Bible-school enrollment, 70. 

This is one of the oldest churches in the county. 

It was organized in the residence of Mr. Van Workman. 



198 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Later they built a chapel, which was burned down in 1913. 
Some of the leading members were Mr. Van Workman, 
Joshua Arnold, Samuel Dayhoof, John and William Sefton, 
William Buchanan, Joseph Reynolds and William Dively. 

Macedonia (Loogootee). 

Organized 1868, by Charles Smith; present membership, 
75; value of property, $1,000; Bible school began 1869; 
present enrollment, 75. 

Worshiped in the Rush and Eldorado Schoolhouses till 
1901, when the chapel was built midway between the two. 

Gave C. M. Smithson to the ministry. James Idleman, 
the grandfather of Finis Idleman, helped form this congre- 
gation. The present elders are H. H. Smithson, Elihu Ful- 
ton, Samuel Odell, George Underwood, Wyatt Bledsoe and 
Charles Mills. 

Pittsburg (Vandalia). 

Present membership, 34; value of property, $1,000. 

Ten miles southwest of Vandalia. It was probably 
formed in the early seventies. The elders now are William 
Rodecker, John Hopkins and Samuel Jeffs. Mrs. Sarah 
Collier and Mrs. Horatio Evans are also active members. 

Ramsey. 

Organized 1851, by Wesley Smith; present membership, 
123; value of property, $1,000; Bible-school enrollment, 36. 

Among the first members there were Elijah, Elisha and 
Bazil Prather ; Alex. Williams, George Bartlett, William 
McCary and Jacob Miller. The congregation was formed at 
Chandler's Schoolhouse. Meetings were held there and in 
the houses of the members till 1866, when a brick chapel 
was erected in Ramsey. 

St. Elmo. 

Organized by W. H. Drummett ; present membership, 
167; value of property, $9,000; Bible-school enrollment, 189. 



CHURCHES 199 

Union (Ramsey). 

Present membership, 35; value of property, $1,000; Bible- 
school enrollment, 30. 

The chapel was built in 1872 on the farm of John H. 
Welch, now in Carson Township. It is doing fairly well. 

Extinct Congregations. 

An old congregation called Antioch, in Bowling Green 
Township, lived in the seventies. Conservatives paralyzed 
its activities and, later, their own. Some of the members 
went to Herrick. 

There was a small congregation near the present town 
of Holliday which died. The original members were Wash. 
Riley and wife, Wm. Fulk and wife, Griffin Tipsword, 
Thomas Holman and wife, John and Charles Dunaway. 

A congregation at Loudon has ceased to exist. 

For years there was a congregation in Vandalia. It 
perished from a lack of leadership. 

There was a congregation in the seventies near Laclede. 
It was composed mostly of renters and so died. 

Ministers. 

J. O. Henry was a great force in the churches of this 
county from 1862 to 1884. 

Jacob Miller was a man of strong character, but limited 
education. At ninety years of age he still resides on his 
farm near Ramsey. 

George T. Bridges grew up near Ramsey. He has always 
been active, energetic and enthusiastic. His home is south 
of Brownstown. 

John Meeks, Charles Smith and Michael Hickerson were 
all former preachers, and did unselfish work in their day. All 
have gone hence. 

R. Leland Brown is a native of this county and has been 
in the ministry since 1869. He has been very active and 
useful there and elsewhere, 



200 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 
FORD COUNTY. 

Gibson. 

Organized 1872, by G. W. Campbell; present member- 
ship, 430; value of property, including parsonage, $27,500; 
Bible-school enrollment, 448. 

There was occasional preaching for three years in neigh- 
boring schoolhouses and the town previous to the organization 
of the church. 

There were nineteen charter members. H. N. Karr and 
A. E. Pirkey were the first elders, with Andrew Jordan, 
John Dillingham, A. Canterbury and J. B. Lott, the first 
deacons. For six years the meetings were held in Union 
Hall and the church was served by Mins. Clark Braden, W. 
S. Campbell, F. Collins, J. F. Smith and Samuel Lowe. 

By reason of the death of Mr. Lott and financial reverses 
of Mr. Jordon, the principal financial supports, the congre- 
gation ceased to meet. This was in 1880. For ten years 
following, the local C. W. B. M. kept going. So in 1890 
the State Board of Missions sent Min. J. E. Jewett to revive 
the church. This he did. Mrs. O. H. Damon (nee Mrs. 
J. H. Lott) gave the lot and Mr. Jordon donated the brick. 
The building was erected and the congregation began work 
again with about twenty-five members. 

The pastors who followed were M. P. Hayden, C. C. 
Rowlison, R. F. Thrapp, W. W. Sniff, S. E. Fisher, John 
R. Golden, and L. O. Lehman, who is the present minister. 

The building has been much enlarged and modernized. 
The church has in its membership a superior class of Chris- 
tian men and women. 

Mt. Olivet (Paxton). 

Organized 1857, by Marston Dudley; present member- 
ship, 84; value of property, $1,500; Bible-school began 1860; 
present enrollment, 52. 

This is the oldest church in Ford County and has con- 
tributed of its members to many other congregations. Jacob 



CHURCHES 201 

Straxer and wife, Marston Dudley and wife, and J. P. Botton 
and wife began this work. Besides Mr. Dudley, Rolla M. 
Martin and J. L. Canada ministered to the congregation in 
its early years. Mr. Botton was the Bible-school superin- 
tendent fifty years ago and one of the most useful members. 
Elmer Higdon and Ernest Higdon were given to the 
ministry. 

Paxton. 

Present membership, 150; value of property, including" 
parsonage, $7,000; Bible-school enrollment, 160. 

This church was formed in the seventies. It has given 
Glen Mills and Jay Bonham to the ministry. 

FRANKLIN COUNTY. 

Benton. 

Organized 1889, by W. H. Ingram; present membership, 
200; value of property, including parsonage, $9,000; Bible 
school began 1889; present enrollment, 100. 

This church was organized in the courthouse under the 
auspices of the State Missionary Society. But it is lacking 
in spiritual vision. 

Christopher. 

Present membership, 385; value of property, $6,000; 
Bible-school enrollment, 240. 

This was among the early congregations of the county. 
It was at first a country church, but the coal interests grew 
the village into a city. It has kept pace and is active and 
growing. 

Long Prairie (Benton). 

Present membership, 50; value of property, $800; no 
Bible school. 

An old country church seven miles northeast of Benton. 
Irregular preaching. 



202 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Miner (Mulkeytown). 

Present membership, 108; value of property, $350; Bible- 
school enrollment, 45. 

This is twelve miles southwest of Benton and is one of 
the oldest churches in the county. It has monthly preach- 
ing. Mrs. Adelene Browning is clerk. 

Mulkeytown. 

Organized 1830, by Minister Underwood; present mem- 
bership, 380; value of property, $2,000; Bible-school enroll- 
ment, 212. 

This was first known as the Little Muddy Church because 
this was the name of the community post-office. Then it 
came to be known as the "Four-mile Church" because the 
meeting-place was in the prairie of that name. After the 
Civil War it took the name of the town from John M. Mulkey, 
who built the first house on the town site. (See Chap. II.) 

Six-mile ( Elkville ) . 

Organized 1848; present membership, 88; value of prop- 
erty, $800; Bible-school enrollment, 107. 

This congregation was probably reorganized in later years 
by W. A. Ingram. 

Sesser. 

Organized 1905 ; present membership, 48 ; value of prop- 
erty, $1,875; Bible-school enrollment, 130. 

West Frankfort. 

Organized 1902, by J. J. Harris; present membership, 
132; value of property, $3,500; Bible school began 1902; 
present enrollment, 120. 

Minister Harris conducted a series of meetings in the 
Congregational chapel which resulted in this organization. 
The church house is a monument to the devotion and liberality 
of W. L. Crim, an able preacher. 



CHURCHES 203 

White (Plumfield). 

Organized 1866, by Matthew Wilson; present member- 
ship, 40; value of property, $800; no Bible school. 

FULTON COUNTY. 

Astoria. 

Organized 1863, by J. B. Royal; present membership, 
175; value of property, $4,000; Bible school began 1862; 
present enrollment, 136. 

Mr. Royal held the first meetings in the old schoolhouse. 
The first prayer-meeting was also held there. Dr. B. C. 
Toler and John Gilliland were the only persons present. The 
charter members were Thomas, A. S., Uriah, M. J. and 
Unity Smith; Isaac, Joseph, Ellen, Eliza, Catherine, A. J. 
and Susan M. Engle ; Alexander M. Bride, C. and Eliza 
Douglas, J. A. Gilliland, I. and Elizabeth Darrow, Philip 
Wonderlick, B. Munson, Catherine Lane and Dr. B. C. Toler. 
These twenty-two people signed the following agreement: 
"We, the undersigned, do agree, and hereby have agreed, to 
worship together as a church of Christ, to take the Holy 
Bible as the only rule of our faith and practice, and to call 
ourselves Christian after the name of Christ our Lord." 

The present building was erected in 1885. Dr. Toler was 
a devoted and efficient leader. W. M. Horton is the pastor. 

Bryant. 

Organized 1852, by William Howard ; present member- 
ship, 48; value of property, $1,000; Bible-school enroll- 
ment, 50. 

This was known first as the New Antioch Christian 
Church, located in the northwest corner of Liverpool Town- 
ship. It was organized in the home of T. N. Hasson, with 
fifteen charter members. John W. Hopkins and Wm. G. 
Kirkpatric were chosen elders, and T. N. Hasson, deacon. 
Little progress was made until 1858, when Evangelist Wm. 



204 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Grissom awakened the community by the gospel. The chapel 
was built that year. The meetings were held there until 
1870, when the house was moved to the village of Bryant. 
The church prospered. Removals in the following years con- 
tributed not a few valuable members to Lewistown, Cuba and 
Canton, leaving Bryant a feeble congregation. 

H. C. Littleton was given to the ministry. James Wil- 
coxen was a valuable member here and afterward at Lewis- 
town. 

Canton. 

Organized 1890, by N. S. Haynes; present membership, 
500; value of property, $20,000; Bible school began 1891; 
present enrollment, 423. 

An effort was made in 1878 and another in 1888 to estab- 
lish a church of Christ in Canton, but neither proved perma- 
nent. In 1890 two devoted sisters, Mrs. Nellie Lawrence and 
Mrs. H. A. Whitnah, visited from house to house all known 
Disciples of Christ in the town. This led to the organization 
of the church on August 31, with forty-one charter members, 
in "Temperance Hall." S. E. Hogue and J. B. Romine 
were elected elders, with C. L. Whitnah, T. L. Frazier and 
J. C. Peterson, deacons. The young congregation was nur- 
tured by the prayers and faithful services of some most 
devoted people. 

The well-located lot and first brick chapel cost $12,500. 
In 1895 a brick auditorium was added. Marion Stevenson 
was the first pastor. During his term 325 additions were 
gained in a meeting led by Evangelist T. A. Boyer. Other 
ministers who have served the church were J. C. and S. S. 
Lappin, J. P. Lichtenberger, S. H. Zendt, J. G. Waggoner, 
and now W. W. Denham. 

The church has given to the ministry W. H. Betts and 
August F. Larson. 

From the first the congregation has had and has grown 
very useful Christian men and women. The Whitnah, 
Lawrence and Frazier families helped much. Their names 



CHURCHES 205 

are remembered tenderly and gratefully. The congregation 
is active in all good works. 

Cuba. 

Organized 1832, by John Secrist; present membership, 
226; value of property, $10,600; Bible-school enrollment, 
275. 

Ephraim Brown, a farmer, laid out a town about the 
center of Fulton County in 1834 and named it Middleton. 
Joel Solomon founded another town in 1836 and called it 
Centerville. The two were separated by a twelve-foot alley 
only. Later these two towns were united and named Cuba. 
Joel Solomon wanted a church; so he put up a chapel and 
sold it to the Christian congregation in 1837. 

Min. John Secrist, of Ohio, held a meeting in the settle- 
ment, and in February, 1832, baptized eighteen persons and 
organized a church with Charles Rigdon and Morgan Hart- 
ford as officers. This church is one of the oldest in the 
Military Tract. The congregation failed to pay for the 
purchased chapel, and so lost the use of it. Thereafter their 
meetings were held in residences, schoolhouses, shops, halls 
and groves until 1863. During the larger part of this period 
the preaching was done by transients like most pioneer 
churches had. Among these were John W. Hopkins, Wm. 
A. Howard, John Rigdon, John Miller, Dr. John Scott and 
C. P. Hollis. In 1854, Josiah Crawford settled in the com- 
munity and preached there. In 1857, Wm. Grissom went 
into Fulton County, held meetings, baptized hundreds and 
organized country congregations. His ministry at Cuba con- 
tinued up to 1865. The second church house was built in 
1895. The congregation took a pride in loyally supporting 
and patronizing Abingdon College while it lived, and since 
its discontinuance it has been equally loyal to Eureka. It is a 
church with a world-wide vision. 

It has given to the ministry H. R. Trickett, D. E. 
Hughes, J. W. Carpenter, George Snively, L. F. Davis and 
Charles Day. 



206 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

The long and excellent service that C. C. Riley gave the 
congregation is worthy of note. He was born within six 
miles of Cuba in 1845 and has lived in the town since 1868. 
He died in 1913. 

Ellisville. 

Organized 1887, by D. E. Hughes; present membership, 
25; value of property, $4,000; Bible school began 1899; 
present enrollment, 35. 

In 1887, Mr. Amzi Byrum, a citizen of Ellisville, invited 
Min. D. E. Hughes to preach there. There were eight pres- 
ent at the first meeting. The three weeks' revival closed with 
a membership of eighty-six and the formation of a church. 
The old chapel of the Presbyterians was used. The new 
chapel was built the same year. For twelve years a union 
Bible school was maintained ; after that the church held its 
own school. The village is inland and populations tend away 
from it. 

Ipava. 

Organized 1842, by William Howard ; present member- 
ship, 225; value of property, including parsonage, $10,000; 
Bible school began 1858; present enrollment, 136. 

As early as 1840 there was quite an emigration from 
Ohio and Kentucky into the southern part of Fulton County. 
Most of these were members or friends of the church of 
Christ. Prominent among them was Wm. P. Howard, then 
a young man. At first meetings were held from house to 
house. A schoolhouse of round logs, chinked and daubed 
with mud and straw, clapboard roof, with puncheon seats 
and floor, was built In this meetings were held and the 
congregation formed. This was four and one-half miles 
southeast of the site of Ipava. This house was soon too 
small to accommodate the worshipers, hence a church house 
was built. It was 30x40 feet, with eight feet to the ceiling, 
logs and poles, and roof of lap shingles, riven and shaved. 
The siding and all finishings were of walnut. This came 
to be known as the Howard Church. To this congregation 



CHURCHES 207 

Mr. Howard ministered for sixteen years without financial 
remuneration, supporting his family by his farm labor. 

All the conditions were primitive. The women then did 
all the spinning and knitting, sewing and weaving all this 
in addition to other household cares. In this community, 
when they would attend the business meeting of the church 
on Saturday afternoons, they would take their knitting along 
with them and knit going to and coming from the church. 
Those living within a radius of two miles of the meeting- 
house generally walked. These women would travel barefoot, 
carrying their shoes and stockings. When near the church 
they would put on these articles of dress. The time and the 
circumstances required economy. Those who rode went 
horseback, or in the big farm-wagons. Sometimes they were 
drawn by oxen. "Old Sam" and "Brin" were useful in 
those days. The seat-board was an oak plank, cushioned 
with a sheepskin. Everybody went to church, including the 
babies. 

In addition to Mr. Howard, Hughey Stoops and J. W. 
Hopkins were two ministers of this community who went, 
at their own charges, preaching the Word all self-sacrificing 
and faithful servants of God and men. After Mr. Howard's 
removal to Texas, in 1857, Wm. Grissom served the congre- 
gation, as did also Wm. Lorance. 

By 1867 the building was dilapidated and the congrega- 
tion disbanded. Part of the members went to Summum and 
part to the Washington Schoolhouse, where Dr. J. H. 
Breeden had built up a congregation. In 1869 they pur- 
chased the old M. E. chapel in Ipava and repaired it. There- 
after this town was the place of meeting. In addition to 
Dr. Breeden, P. D. Vermilion, M. T. Cooper and L. M. 
Robinson served the church. This chapel was not well 
located ; so it was sold and in 1895 a modern structure 

Kerton Valley (Havana). 

Organized 1889; present membership, 30; value of prop- 
erty, $800; Bible school began 1889; present enrollment, 50. 



208 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

The deed to the ground was made to the Christian 
Church, but the various religious people of the community 
united in building the chapel and in maintaining a union 
Bible school. The organization of the congregation was 
perfected by Isaac Beckelhymer in 1912. The clerk is R. L. 
Cole, R. R. 3, Havana. 

Lewistown. 

Organized 1874, by A. C. Smither; present membership, 
175; value of property, including parsonage, $10,000; Bible 
school began 1874; present enrollment, 175. 

Of the twenty charter members, only three survive. Two 
of these Henry C. Hasson and his sister, Miss Celinda 
Hasson are residents of Lewistown and active supporters 
of the one faith. The chapel, still in ase, was completed 
and dedicated by O. A. Burgess. In its construction and in 
maintaining the current expenses of the congregation, Mr. 
J. C. Wilcoxen, a royal Christian man, paid one-third of the 
expenses until his life closed on earth. 

Mr. Hasson was superintendent of the Bible school for 
thirty-four years. Mr. M. M. Beeman succeeded in 1908. 
He is also the head of the city's schools. The congregation 
has had its good fortune and ill, but has steadily gained 
ground and is now a power in its community for good. 

It has given to the ministry Marion Stevenson. 

London Mills. 

Organized 1887, by L. B. Meyers; present membership, 
111; value of property, $2,000; Bible school began 1887; 
present enrollment, 71. 

The church at Hermon, Knox County, sent its pastor to 
London Mills and planted this congregation. 

Mr. W. W. Voce has been a strong factor in this church. 
Miss Mina Fox is the clerk. 

The church gave Clarence Brown and Mr. Anderson to 
the ministry. 



CHURCHES 209 

Summum. 

Organized 1859, by Dr. J. H. Breeden; present member- 
ship, 200; value of property, $2,500; Bible school began 
1868; present enrollment, 117. 

As soon as Dr. Breeden settled in this village in 1858, 
he began to work for the formation of a church of Christ 
there. He soon associated with himself Min. Wm. Grissom, 
who was a fine evangelist. Among the charter members 
were Dr. J. H. Breeden and wife, Margaret Horton, Mrs. 
Clara Weese, Sarah E. Clary, Julia Dary, Elizabeth Dabson 
and John Thompson. 

For possibly forty years the care of the congregation 
devolved largely upon Dr. Breeden. Among others who 
served it were A. J. Kane, Wm. Brown, J. B. Royal, Alex- 
ander Johnston, J. B. McCorkle, A. G. Lucas, David Sharp- 
less and G. A. Burnett. 

The chapel was built in 1865 and is still in use. The 
church has given to the Christian ministry M. T. Cooper, H. 
O. Breeden (a son of Dr. Breeden), Guy Shields and Singer 
De Loss Smith. 

The current of young life flows outward as from most 
inland villages. 

Table Grove. 

Organized 1851, by Dr. J. H. Hughes; present member- 
ship, 112; value of property, $10,000; Bible school began 
1851 ; present enrollment, 163. 

Some pioneer preachers of the churches of Christ began 
to visit this country in 1840. Among them were Wm. How- 
ard, Wm. Muckley, Wm. Rigdon, J. W. Hopkins, Enos 
Monahan, John Harris, Robert Foster, Wm. Grissom, Wm. 
Griffin and blind Billy Brown. From their ministry about 
one hundred persons became identified with the cause of 
primitive Christianity. The church was organized in the 
schoolhouse. The officers elected were John Hendrickson and 
Asa Harlan as elders, with George Harlan and Ewing 



210 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

McCartney, deacons. The two resident members still living 
are Mrs. Anna M. Wilson and Addison Abernathy. 

After years of meetings in residences, barns, schoolhouses 
and groves, the chapel was completed in 1868 and dedicated 
by John S. Sweeney. Later this was replaced by a modern 
building. 

Steven Davis was given to the ministry. This church 
has never used questionable methods of raising money for 
its current expenses. The apportionment plan is followed 
and deficits are unknown. 

There was, in 1856, the Hickory Grove Church, three 
miles southeast. 

Vermont. 

Organized 1847, by Dr. J. H. Hughes; present member- 
ship, 376; value of property, $9,000; Bible-school enroll- 
ment, 305. 

The second church building was erected in 1891 during 
the pastorate of Geo. W. Ross. The congregation has given 
to the ministry J. H. and E. A. Gilliland, Charles W. Ross 
and Mrs. Nellie Daugherty-Butchart a missionary in China. 

Antioch Mission. 

This congregation sustains a mission point. It is located 
two and one-half miles north of Vermont, has a frame 
chapel, a Bible school of thirty people and bimonthly 
preaching. 

GREEN COUNTY. 

Athensville. 

Present membership, 75 ; Bible-school enrollment, 60. 
Carrollton. 

Organized 1832, by Barton W. Stone ; present member- 
ship, 90; value of property, including parsonage, $4,500; 
Bible-school enrollment, 70. 

The church grew for several years, coming to number 



CHURCHES 211 

120 members. Then it waned through deaths and removals. 
In 1841 a second start was made with twenty-eight members. 
Its life has moved like the tides. All of the early pioneer 
preachers of that section served here more or less. Col. E. 
I). Baker became a Christian here. Many fine people have 
had their homes in this church. 

Kane. 

Present membership, 100 (conservative). 
Roodhonse. 

Organized 1890, by H. G. Van Dervoort; present mem- 
bership, 138; value of property, $7,400; Bible school began 
1890; present enrollment, 100. 

Among the charter members there were Mrs. R. A. 
Young, Samuel and Sarah Long, Mrs. M. E. Briggs and 
Mrs. Wm. Heaton. The house was built in 1894. 

Union (Greenfield). 

Organized 1854, by John S. Sweeney; present member- 
ship, 40; value of property, $1,500, no Bible school. 

This is in the northeast part of the county. Among the 
charter members there were E. T. Venderveer, John Barnett, 
Benjamin Scott, Sr. and Jr., and Edward Prather and wife. 
J. S. Sweeney held a series of meetings here in 1857, adding 
one hundred. In 1868, Min. E. P. Bellche debated John 
Hughes, Universalist, in this chapel. Leroy Pippin is the 
correspondent. 

White Hall. 

Organized 1883, by W. S. Jermane and J. J. W. Miller; 
present membership, 230; value of property, $6,500; Bible 
school began 1884; present enrollment, 170. 

There were twenty-two charter members. A small chapel 
was bought of the Free Methodists and used till 1903, when 
the present brick edifice was finished. The present elders 
are Francis Fowler, W. H. Teter and G. J. Harris. 



212 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 
HAMILTON COUNTY. 

Broughton. 

Organized 1872, by Minister Truex; present membership, 
43; value of property, $1,250; Bible school began 1912; 
present enrollment, 40. 

W. T. Owen and his wife were baptized by Min. J. N. 
Mulkey, near Mulkeytown, in 1868. The next year they 
moved to the southern part of Hamilton County. They were 
the first and only Disciples there. They were solicited to take 
membership- in the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, but 
declined. On his earnest invitation, Minister Truex came 
from Roland, held a meeting in the schoolhouse just south 
of Broughton, and organized a church of thirteen members. 
This continued till 1880, when a union church house was 
built in the village which the Disciples used the fourth Sun- 
day in the month. This continued till 1898. For eighteen 
years, Mr. Owen, though living two miles in the country, 
served as janitor, superintendent of the union Sunday school 
and general utility man for the society. The old house went 
to wreck. Mr. Owen moved away. The congregation scat- 
tered. In 1910, Min. Marion Boles held a series of meet- 
ings. The next year it was decided to build a church house 
two miles west of Broughton, which was finished in 1912. 
Elijah Austin led in this movement. He and G. B. Simmons 
are the elders. 

Dahlgren. 

Organized 1906, by Lew D. Hill; present membership, 
42; value of property, $1,500; Bible school began 1905; 
present enrollment, 47. 

This church grew out of the Bible school. Meetings 
were held in homes and the town hall till the church was 
finished in 1910. 

Dale. 

Present membership, 35; value of property, $200; no 
Bible school. 



CHURCHES 213 

Liberty ( Thompson ville). 

Organized 1857 ; present membership, 55 ; value of prop- 
erty, $1,000; Bible-school enrollment, 75. 

The Lamkin family came to this locality in 1850. There 
was preaching there through the fifties by John A. and 
Samuel Williams, and a congregation was formed. The 
Civil War scattered its members. Thereafter an organiza- 
tion was formed with the following charter members : Joshua 
Pemberton, James H. Lamkin and John Odle, elders ; R. C. 
Flannigan, Jesse and W. C. Pemberton, deacons ; Joel Jacobs, 
Jas. W. Flannigan, Wm. and Elizabeth Simmons, Sally 
Lamkin; Charlotte, Mary C. and Millie Pemberton; Sitzma 
Organ, Martha A. Jacobs, Charlotte Odle, Sallie Ann and 
Alice Smith. The chapel was built in 1868. The church 
meets every week to worship. It is six miles south of 
Thompsonville. W. C. Lamkin, a son of J. H. Lamkin, 
furnished most of these facts. 

McLeansboro. 

Organized 1876, by James T. Baker; present membership, 
194; value of property, $3,000; Bible school began 1876; 
present enrollment, 85. 

The courthouse was used as the place of public worship till 
1880, when the church was finished and occupied. The 
church has made progress steadily in every way. 

Mt. Pleasant (McLeansboro). 

Organized 1851, by Moses Goodwin; present membership, 
69; value of property, $1,500; no Bible school. 

This church was organized in the barn of David Upton, 
August 22. It met there for worship until 1855, when a log 
house was built on land donated by Jefferson Garrison. After 
being used twenty years, this house was torn down and a 
frame chapel was erected which is still in good condition. 

The charter members were Alfred and Nancy Drew, 
James E. Lee and wife, Jefferson Garrison and wife, Sarah 



214 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Smithfeeters, Jane Reynolds and Alice Vaughn. The first 
elders were James E. Lee and Alfred Drew. From a daugh- 
ter of Mr. Lee these facts are learned. 

The location is six miles north of McLeansboro. 

Those who went forth from this congregation as min- 
isters were Thomas Mason, Alfred Drew, William Richards 
and Steven Hale. 

New White Oak (Springerton). 

Organized 1885 ; present membership, 75 ; value of prop- 
erty, $600; Bible school began 1885; present enrollment, 100. 

Mr. J. K. P. White gave one acre of land for the use of 
the congregation. It is located in Beaver Creek Township. 

HANCOCK COUNTY. 

Adrian. 

Present membership, 98; value of property, $1,500; Bible- 
school enrollment, 102. 

Augusta. 

Organized 1850, by James Stark; present membership, 
251; value of property, $10,000; Bible-school enrollment, 250. 

Mr. Stark was ordained at Jacksonville in 1837 and moved 
to Augusta in 1842. He was willing at all times to preach 
the gospel as opportunity offered. Meetings were held in 
the homes of Benjamin Gould and Wm. Dron. The first 
chapel was built in 1850. Elders Stark, Dron, Gould, Young 
and others led the Lord's Day meetings till 1868. Then E. 
J. Lampton conducted a series of meetings and served as 
pastor for six years. Since then fourteen other men have 
served the church in this relation, and about the same num- 
ber have conducted revivals. Besides these, not a few able 
and well-known ministers have preached here. 

From the first, 1,025 names have been on the roll of this 
membership, and numbers of these have been representative 
citizens. 



CHURCHES 215 

The church has given to the ministry James McClure, 
Robert E. Henry and Mrs. Mary Pickens-Buckner. 
D. P. Coffman is now one of the beloved members. 

Bcwen. 

Organized 1890; present membership, 250; value of prop- 
erty, including parsonage, $23,000; Bible-school enrollment, 
243. 

The congregation met for worship in the town hall until 
1892, when the present building was erected. In 1907 a new 
and modern house was occupied. A parsonage followed in 
1912. 

Among the leading members in the earlier years there 
were R. T. Lee and wife, Hyram Schulze and wife, W. T. 
Hough and family and Mrs. Laslie. 

The congregation has many members young in the faith 
and life, full of zeal and ambition for the Lord's work. 

Breckenridge ( Sutter ) . 

Present membership, 56; value of property, $1,500; 
Bible-school enrollment, 83. 

Burnside. 

Organized 1875, by J. H. Garrison ; present membership, 
68; value of property, $2,000; Bible school began 1875; 
present enrollment, 81. 

The first members were Mr. and Mrs. Alford Pettit, Mr. 
and Mrs. Wm. Bray (ages eighty-seven and eighty-four 
1913), Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Pettit, Mr. and Mrs. Hatch, Mr. 
Joshua Shreeves (age ninety-two), Mrs. Sarah Decker, D. 

C. Tyner, with the following four who are still living: Mrs. 

D. C. Tyner, Mr. and Mrs. E. Glaze and Mrs. O. C. Ing. 

Carthage. 

Organized 1864, by John Errett; present membership, 
360; value of property, including parsonage, $16,000; Bible 
school began 1864; present enrollment, 236. 



216 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Following a series of meetings, this church was organized 
with the following fourteen charter members: Allen 
McQuary, H. and Alice Crawford, Elizabeth Scofield, Mar- 
garet Crawford, William and Elizabeth Hughes, James M. 
and Mrs. Mayfield, William and Mrs. Patterson, Virginia 
Wilson, Mary A. and J. C. Williams. 

By the courtesy of the board of supervisors, the meetings 
were first held in the courthouse. In 1866 a small church 
building was erected, which gave place, in 1884, to the pres- 
ent structure. 

E. J. Lampton was the first pastor. Judge C. J. Scofield 
served as pastor for several years during the weakness of 
the church. 

These data were furnished by the patriarch of the con- 
gregation, "Uncle Jesse C. Williams," who is bright and up 
to date, although he now (1912) is ninety- four years of age. 
The church is active in every department, contributing to 
all missionary and benevolent enterprises. 

Dallas City. 

Present membership, 334; value of property, including 
parsonage, $11,500; Bible-school enrollment, 266. 

Denver. 

Organized 1875, by J. C. Reynolds; present membership, 
181; value of property, $3,000; Bible school began 1875; 
present enrollment, 202. 

Thirty-four of the Mt. Pleasant Church in this county, 
with permission, constituted the church in Denver; there- 
after they were formally dismissed by letters. The first 
officers were: James Black, M. K. Kirk and Geo. M. Brown- 
ing, elders, with Joseph Dorsey and J. S. McClure, deacons. 
All of them are dead. 

While M. K. Kirk remained there he preached to the 
church every second Lord's Day. D. C. Barber has been 
a faithful and useful member for many years. 



CHURCHES 217 

The congregation has always been active in all good 
works. It is well officered and organized. 

East Durham (Colusa). 

Present membership, 40; value of property, $2,500. 

Ferris. 

Present membership, 60; value of property, $2,500; Bible- 
school enrollment, 60. 

Golden Point (Hamilton). 

Present membership, 75 ; value of property, $4,500 ; Bible- 
school enrollment, 91. 

Hamilton. 

Organized 1893, by Samuel McGee; present membership, 
225; value of property, $7,000; Bible school began 1893; 
present enrollment, 108. 

This church was the immediate result of a six weeks' 
meeting conducted by Minister McGee. For a year the 
church worshiped in the city hall. During the pastorate of 
C. G. Blakeslee a church building was completed in 1894. 
The congregation struggled on for ten years with a half- 
time ministry by students from Canton (Mo.) University. 

There is being built at Hamilton one of the largest water- 
power dams in the world, and the city has promise of becom- 
ing a great manufacturing center. The church there is alert 
to its opening opportunities. 

La Crosse. 

Present membership, 90; value of property, $2,000; Bible- 
school enrollment, 90. 

La Harpe. 

Organized 1877, by H. P. Tandy; present membership, 
522; value of property, $8,000; Bible school began 1877; 
present enrollment, 225. 

A congregation was formed here about 1850, but its life 
was brief. In March, 1877, Evangelist G. W. Mapes held a 



218 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

successful meeting and the church was organized the follow-- 
ing month. Meetings were held in a hall till 1884, when the 
church was finished. 

Mt. Pleasant (Plymouth). 

Organized 1833, by Gilmore Callison; present member- 
ship, 70; value of property, $2,200; Bible-school enroll- 
ment, 60. 

Mrs. Hattie McClure-Smith, Muskegon, Mich., and Mrs. 
Georgenia Daw Walton, Plymouth, 111., have furnished the 
data for this history. Mrs. Walton has been a member of 
this congregation fifty- four years and is its eldest resident 
member. 

Mt. Pleasant Church is located midway between Carthage 
and Plymouth, ten miles from each, and four and a half 
miles east of Bentley. Into this locality, in 1833, there came, 
from near Columbia, Adair County, Ky., Gilmore Callison 
and his wife Elizabeth, her brother James McClure (who 
had been baptized in 1830 in Green River, Kentucky, by the 
pioneer Christian preacher, John D. Steele, and who was the 
father of Mrs. Smith), Mrs. Betsy Massie (who was a sister 
of Mr. Steele), Green Browning and others. These five 
persons met, on the first Lord's Day after their arrival, at 
the home of Mr. Callison, to "break bread," and then formed 
a church of Christ. This was the first Christian Church in 
Hancock County and became the mother of congregations. 
Plymouth, Carthage, Augusta, Oak Grove, Denver and 
Bentley are her spiritual children. 

The settlers soon gave to the place its name, "Mt. Pleas- 
ant." In 1839, Josiah Callison was ordained as an elder and 
William Smith as a deacon. The two Callisons served this 
and other communities as preachers. People came from five 
to twenty-five miles to the public worship. They came on 
horseback, by wagons drawn by horses or oxen, and were 
entertained by those living near the grove. Young people 
walked two to five miles to church. 

Robert, John, James, George and Elizabeth Stark united 



CHURCHES 219 

with the church some years after its formation. The Starks, 
Pattens, Drawns and others were firm friends of Alexander 
Campbell in Scotland. Margaret Patten was one of his 
friends who ministered to him in prison. He called her and 
her girl companion his "ministering angels." Robert Stark, 
when he first came from Scotland, and probably James 
Stark also, made their residence at Mr. Campbell's home in 
Virginia. Elizabeth Stark married Simeon B. Walton and 
settled near the church. He united with the congregation 
in 1843. James and Mary A. Black came from Elkton, Ky., 
in 1852. He was ordained an elder, and when there was no 
regular minister preached for the congregation till 1875. 
William and Lucy Lyon Bridgewater united with the church 
in 1852. 

Mrs. Alzada Groves, an octogenarian, says that when 
she first knew Mt. Pleasant the women wore homespun, as 
did the men also all made by the home folk. The women 
were proud of a calico dress and sunbonnet. The men wore 
skin caps and straw hats that were braided and sewed by 
the women. After her marriage she often walked two miles 
to church and carried her baby. At church they had "mighty 
good times." 

Mrs. Sarah Huey Daw, another octogenarian, says: "I 
tell you we had good meetings." After the teaching elders 
moved to the young towns, some of them would return to 
preach on Sundays. "I made a good long piece of jeans and 
gave old brother Grandpa Black a suit of clothes he was 
pretty proud of." 

In August, 1858, or 1859, a district meeting was held at 
Mt. Pleasant which lasted two weeks. Many preachers were 
present, among them Thomas Munnell and one of the 
Erretts. People came from afar. 

In the early days it was common to hear wolves howl at 
night ; but their proximity and blood-curdling howls did not 
keep any one away from church. A mother and her son 
were driving through the timber one night, when a wolf fol- 
lowed them. The boy drove the horses while the mother &at 



220 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

at the end of the wagon and kept it off with a pitchfork. 
At one time Robert Foster settled in the community and 
preached for the congregations. The members built a house 
for him on a farm about three miles from the chapel. Before 
that time, Mr. McClure met a man on the road near Tucker- 
town who asked him where he lived. Upon his reply the 
man said : "Why, that is over in the Campbellite settlement. 
Are they not dangerous? and do they not have humps on 
their backs, and horns?" Mr. McClure answered: "I am 
one of them. They are not dangerous, and they look like 
most people, I guess. Come over to our meetings." 

In 1875 the Mt. Pleasant Church built a mission chapel 
in Denver, Hancock County, and began to establish a Chris- 
tian congregation there. 

As the years passed, many of the members moved to the 
towns that had grown with the coming of the railways, and 
the frame chapel that had been built in the forties was 
becoming old. Some then proposed to disband the congre- 
gation. Then a sister urged in a public meeting that all 
could not go to the towns to church, and the children of 
the neighborhood were to be cared for. Thus it was decided 
to go on with the work. A new chapel was built. A tent 
was secured, and a series of meetings held in a near-by 
neighborhood which re-enforced the congregation. This 
meeting was in 1909. The house was remodeled in 1897. 

Long time ago ground was given by Simeon B. and 
Elizabeth Stark Walton for the church house and "grave- 
yard." 

J. B. Royal preached for the church when he was a 
young man, E. J. Lampton, J. C. Reynolds and many other 
faithful ministers. 

This has been an apostolic church and has done a 
world of good. It has had a host of faithful and truly 
great men and women. In the winter of 1912-13 a father 
and his daughter walked four miles by reason of the snow 
blockading the roads, rather than miss public worship. 

This church gave Henry Black, J. O. Walton, Mrs. 



CHURCHES 221 

Sadie McCoy Crank and Miss Ava S. Walton to the min- 
istry. 

Bentley is a mission of the Mt. Pleasant Church. It was 
formed in the end of the year 1890, and the chapel built 
later. 

Oak Grove (Carthage). 

Present membership, 70; value of property, $1,000. 

This is about ten miles east of Carthage and was the 
home church of Dr. Wm. Booz. For many years he made 
it a practice to preach a sermon here on New Year's Day. 

Plymouth. 

Organized 1855, by J. R. Ross; present membership, 73; 
value of property, $9,000; present enrollment, 62. 

The series of meetings out of which this congregation 
grew were held in the M. E. Church. The charter members 
were David and Susan Palmer, John and Zerilda Ritchey, 
Jonas and Margaret Myers, J. W. Bell, A. B. Moore, John 
and Rebecca Madison, John Hendrickson, David and Nancy 
Wade, Edward Wade, Ann Hooton, Wm. H. Hooton, 
Isapena Buyher, Thomas and Malinda Burdett, John and 
Elizabeth Ades, Phebe Ades, John Stark, Uphema Myers, 
Nancy Browning, Sarah Moore, Francis and Mary Ritchey. 

Some of the ministers who succeeded Mr. Ross were H. 
Young, E. Browning, E. J. Lampton, George Brewster, 
James Stark and J. Carroll Stark. 

Stillwell. 

Present membership, 110; value of property, $3,000; 
Bible-school enrollment, 97. 

West Point. 

Organized 1864, by David Hobbs ; present membership, 
160; value of property, $6,000; Bible school enrollment, 145. 

Minister Hobbs conducted two meetings here, and at the 
close of the second formed the church. Among the charter 



222 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

members there were Henry Hindle and wife, Elijah Rhodes 
and wife, David and Almira Wiggle, Mrs. Joseph McMillan, 
Mrs. Samuel Barber, Mrs. John S. Kelly and Miss Mary 
Louis. 

The meetings for public worship were held in the little 
schoolhouse, then in the new schoolroom, then in a hall, 
next in the Lutheran chapel, and in 1876 in their own 
building. 

The young church was fostered by Mins. John Stark 
and Joseph Tanner. 

Wythe (Sutter). 

Organized 1865, by E. J. Lampton; present membership, 
39; value of property, $1,500. 

Germans have bought the farms, and the life of the 
church is feeble. H. O. Knox and J. C. McMahan are the 
only charter members left. 

HARDIN COUNTY. 

Cave in Rock. 

Present membership, 66; value of property, $1,000. 
Rosiclare. 

Present membership, 146; value of property, $1,500; 
Bible-school enrollment, 115. 

Stone Church (Elizabethtown). 

Present membership, 132; value of property, $1,000; 
Bible-school enrollment, 65. 

HENDERSON COUNTY. 

Lom&x. 

Present membership, 150; value of property, $6,000; 
Bible-school enrollment, 81. 

The church maintains preaching and serves the com- 
munity well. 



CHURCHES 223 

Raritan. 

Present membership, 20 ; value of property, $3,000. 
Inactive. 

Stronghurst. 

Present membership, 71; value of property, $2,500; 
Bible-school enrollment, 140. 
A varied history. 

HENRY COUNTY. 

During the sixties and part of the seventies there was a 
congregation of Christians in Kewanee. It failed by deaths 
and removals. After twenty-five years the work there was 
revived. 

A part of the members of the first congregation in 
Kewanee, when it suspended, formed a church northwest of 
the city, in Burns Township. Its meetings were held in a 
schoolhouse during a part of the seventies and eighties. 
Then removals ended its meetings. 

For a few years there was a church at Cambridge. Then 
it was thought advisable to go into a sort of federation. 
The result was that the M. E. people got the property and 
the Baptists most of the members. At one time there was 
in this chapel the "altar" of the Methodists and the bap- 
tistery of the Disciples. 

There was a small congregation of Christians only at one 
time in Galva. 

At Woodhull there was formerly an active church of 
Christ which gave Oliver W. Stewart to the Christian min- 
istry. While not extinct, it has shown no desire to be 
revived in late years. 

Kewanee. 

Organized 1901, by A. C. Roach; present membership, 
366; value of property, $3,000; Bible school began 1901: 
present enrollment, 225. 

The charter members were A. C. Roach, S. J. Batchel, 



224 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Geo. W. Bean and wife, Mrs. Ida Deckerhoff, Mrs. Shorba 
A. Ewing, Thomas Grubbs, Mrs. M. J. Mooney, Eugene 
Rowe, Mrs. Martha Rodgers, D. S. and Mrs. F. A. Trout, 
C. G. and Mrs. C. G. Whittaker. Of these, four have died. 
This membership is made up almost entirely of working 
people who were deeply depressed by the panic of 1907. 

Meetings were held in a hall till 1903, when the old Pres- 
byterian chapel was bought, moved to its present location 
on East First Street between Elm and Walnut, and repaired. 

Lewis Hurt is preparing for the mission field in Africa 
and Leslie Crown has been given to the ministry. Charles 
Williams is pastor. 

This church was organized and fostered to self-support 
by the State Mission Board. 

IROQUOIS COUNTY. 

Cissna Park. 

Organized 1906; present membership, 57; value of prop- 
erty, $1,500; Bible school began 1906; present enrollment, 
143. 

This is a union church. The agreement was as follows : 

The undersigned charter members, while retaining their several 
denominational names, faith and membership, enter into a common 
fellowship known as the Union Church, and pledge themselves to sup- 
port this organization in every way consistent with their several views 
of Christian conduct and duty. 

Those signing this compact were Mr. and Mrs. J. C. 
Sailor, Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Kahney, Mr. and Mrs. R. F. 
Zehr, Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Ainsler, Mr. and Mrs. L. Stanbus, 
Mrs. E. G. Dryden, Mrs. Ida Stachell, Mrs. J. Herman, Mrs. 
W. Landes, Mrs. L. Lesch, Miss Lattie Lesch, Mr. and Mrs. 
Joseph Burt, Miss Flora Burt, Miss Lillie Thornton, Miss 
Martha Dryden, Mr. and Mrs. John Lucas, Miss Katie 
Miller, Miss Lillie Herman, John Dryden, Miss R. Lena 
Herman, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Lawson, Miss Nina Crain, 
Mrs. Carrie Penner and Wm. W. Dryden. 



CHURCHES 225 

Darrow. 

Organized 1911, by Leslie Crown; present membership, 
62; value of property, $4,500; Bible school began 1910; 
present enrollment, 74. 

Darrow is a village on a new railroad. In 1909, Leslie 
Crown, a student of Eureka College, began to preach in a 
schoolhouse near there. The church building, modern and 
up to date, was completed in 1912. Nearly every member 
of this church is a renter. The land-owners, with few 
exceptions, gave but little help. Mr. Crown led in this work 
throughout. He and the resident Disciples deserve much 
praise, as do also members of other religious bodies who 
have co-operated in the enterprise. 

Donovan. 

Organized 1856, by Silas Johnson and Nathan Cough- 
enberry ; present membership, 140 ; value of property, includ- 
ing parsonage, $9,000; Bible-school enrollment, 75. 

This organization was made in the Green Schoolhouse 
west of the Donovan site. There were thirty charter mem- 
bers. For many years the members worshiped in the Bean 
or Gay Schoolhouses. In 1876, during the ministry of C. W. 
Poole, who, like his Master, was both carpenter and preacher, 
a house of worship was built. This building was enlarged 
and modernized in 1908 during the ministry of J. Newton 
Cloe. 

Fairview ( Wellington ) . 

Organized 1892, by Will F. Shaw ; present membership, 
42; value of property, $2,000; Bible school began 1892; 
present enrollment, 66. 

This country church is about five miles east of Welling- 
ton. There were twenty-one charter members. 

The ladies' aid society is an active and very helpful force 
in the congregation. This is one of many instances where 
the faith of women is greater than that of men. 



226 



Iroquois. 



Organized by J. F. Ghormley; present membership, 10; 
value of property, $3,500; Bible-school enrollment, 24. 

Martinton. 

Organized 1893, by A. R. Crank; present membership, 
92; value of property $2,500; Bible school began 1893; 
present enrollment, 63. 

Mr. Crank was serving the congregations at Donovan and 
Iroquois regularly when he conducted a series of meetings 
and organized the Martinton Church. The schoolhouse was 
first used. When the crowds overflowed this, a large tent 
was pitched. There were about eighty charter members. 
Of these, only the following names are learned: Mr. and 
Mrs. Henry Barnball, Mr. and Mrs. Smith Hickman, Mrs. 
Alma McSaly, Miss Allen Wingard and Mary A. Hath- 
away. 

Miljord. 

Organized 1877, by C. B. Austin ; present membership, 
160; value of property, $12,500; Bible school began 1877; 
present enrollment, 130. 

Mr. Austin began his work here in the old Methodist 
chapel. As soon as results were reached, the doors were 
locked against him. In an old storeroom the church was 
organized. Among the charter members were James McCon- 
nell, Matilda Endsley, Abijah Perkins and wife, Emma 
Harmon, Mary Jones and Mrs. Finley Hopkins, four of 
whom are still living. The first chapel was built in 1879 
and the present edifice in 1910, during the pastorate of H. 
R. Lookabill. James Holton and T. L. Stipp gave good 
service here and J. M. McDermont was the first pastor. 

Onarga. 

Organized 1877, by R. D. Cotton; present memoership, 
75; value of property, including parsonage, $8,000 ; Bible 
school began 1877, present enrollment, 77. 



CHURCHES 227 

The controlling religious force in this community through 
the seventies was the M. E. Church. To two brothers, James 
and John W. Cunningham, belongs the honor of establishing 
a congregation there that should be simply Christian. They 
were Irishmen who had been led to the knowledge of the 
truth as it is in Jesus by the preaching of William Poynter. 
They both resided on their own farms five miles east of 
Onarga. But not distance, not hard manual labor, not 
muddy roads nor dark nights could dampen their ardor nor 
check their Christian courage. Their zeal for Jesus and his 
truth burned year after year with a quenchless devotion. 
They were plain farmers. 

The charter members were James, John W. and Rachel 
E. Cunningham, John and Jane Mason, Frank and Martha 
Dunkins, Lucie M. Parker, Hannah Smith, Robert and 
Margaret D. Teeter, and Thomas B. and Ellen Weakley. 

About fifteen pastors have served the church well. 

Pittwood. 

Organized 1894, by W. W. Sniff; present membership, 
80; value of property, $1,600; Bible school began 1894; 
present enrollment, 85. 

There is a good C. E. society. About ten ministers have 
served the church. 

Prairie Green (Wellington). 

Organized 1872, by Jacob B. Blonnt ; present membership, 
60; value of property, $1,000; Bible school began, 1872; 
present enrollment, 42. 

This church is located in the southeast corner of the 
county. It was organized in a little schoolhouse just across 
the State line in Indiana, but was soon afterward moved to 
the little old Round Top Schoolhouse in Prairie Green Town- 
ship. Here the meetings were held till 1875, when the 
present chapel was built. A reorganization was then made. 

Of the charter members the following are still living: 
J. J. Cowan, who was one of the first elders; Mrs. Elizabeth 



228 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Totheroh, Mrs. Nancy Parker, Mrs. Clara Allen, Thomas 
Guest and John F. Cowan, who helped build the church 
house. His address is Ambia, Ind. There is a good C. E. 
society. 

Sheldon. 

Organized 1890, by W. H. Hayden; present membership, 
150; value of property, $6,000; Bible school began 1890; 
present enrollment, 110. 

This church grew out of a series of meetings conducted 
in a public hall by Minister Hayden, who was supported by 
the State Missionary Society. There were sixty-five charter 
members. 

The church was erected in 1891. 

Watseka. 

Organized 1881, by C. E. Elmore; present membership, 
350; value of property, including parsonage, $25,000; Bible- 
school enrollment, 250. 

Minister Elmore held a meeting in the spring under the 
auspices of a county co-operation. There were eighteen 
charter members, among whom were Capt. John Franklin, 
E. F. Harris, Prof. L. F. Watson and Cyrus Leatherman. 

The meetings were held in a hall for a year, when the 
old Baptist chapel was bought and remodeled. The next 
winter Evangelist W. F. Black conducted a successful meet- 
ing, in which many of the most substantial people of the 
community were brought into the church. 

The church has given its intelligent and loyal support to 
its twelve good pastors. The present edifice was erected and 
the parsonage secured during the seven years' pastorate of 
B. F. Ferrell. 

The church has been actively missionary from the begin- 
ning, and planted congregations at Woodland, Sheldon and 
Pittwood. For twenty-five years Mr. L. F. Watson was a 
very forceful and helpful member here in many ways. He 
was eight years clerk of the State Senate. 



CHURCHES 229 

Mr. S. F. S win ford also did fine work here. Norman H. 
Robertson is the pastor. 

Woodland. 

Organized 1887; present membership, 34; value of prop- 
erty, $1,000; Bible-school enrollment, 58. 

The chapel was built in 1891. Ten ministers have served 
the church. Mrs. Sadie Cross is the correspondent. 

A church was formed at Buckley in 1892 of twenty 
earnest Christian men and women, and did good work for 
seventeen years. Lutherans gradually bought all the farms 
in the community that were offered for sale, and thus the 
congregation disappeared. The property was sold by Min. 
Osceola McNemar at public auction for $1,200, and the pro- 
ceeds turned to the custody of the State Missionary Society. 

The Prairie Dell congregation, in the vicinity of Watseka, 
has ceased to meet. 

JACKSON COUNTY. 

Carbondale. 

Organized 1862, by Dr. Isaac Mulkey; present member- 
ship, 450; value of property, including parsonage, $25,000; 
Bible school began 1862 ; present enrollment, 320. 

Dr. Mulkey organized this church in the old Presbyterian 
chapel with the following charter members : Himself, wife 
and daughter ; George Yost, wife and daughter ; Daniel Gil- 
bert and wife ; Stephen Blair, wife and daughter. Messrs. 
Mulkey and Blair were the first elders, and Messrs. Yost 
and Gilbert the first deacons. Dr. Mulkey continued to 
preach to the congregation, though irregularly, till 1868. 
The meetings were held in an unsightly old grain-house that 
stood opposite the Illinois Central Railway station. 

Clark Braden organized Southern Illinois College in 1866, 
and the prosperity of the school contributed to the growth of 
the church and, indeed, to many congregations in that part 
of the State. He also preached frequently for the church 
here. 



230 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

The basement of the brick chapel was first occupied in 
1870. In this a great revival was conducted by Evangelist 
John Friend. In 1874 this building was finished and dedi- 
cated free from debt. It cost $6,000, and was the best 
in the city. The property was sold in 1901 for a town hall, 
and the present fine structure finished in 1902. 

Elkville. 

Organized 1887, by W. H. Boles; present membership, 
145; value of property, including parsonage, $2,100; Bible 
school began 1887; present enrollment, 154. 

This church was the result of a tent meeting. The chapel 
was finished in 1889. The congregation is well organized 
and active. In the absence of a preacher the worship is con- 
ducted by an officer according to the Scriptures. J. J. 
Thompson is correspondent. 

Murphysboro. 

Organized 1899, by W. A. Ingram ; present membership, 
225; value of property, $10,000; Bible school began 1899; 
present enrollment, 130. 

In the courthouse Evangelist Ingrain held the meeting 
under the direction of the State Board that led to the forma- 
tion of this church. The chapel was built in 1900. The 
congregation is well organized and active. 

Oak Grove (Carbondale). 

Present membership, 25; value of property, $500; Bible- 
school enrollment, 30. 

Three and a half miles northeast of Carbondale. School 
kept up with occasional preaching. 

Pleasant Hill (Ava). 

Organized 1878, by David Husband ; present member- 
ship, 100; value of property, $3,000; Bible-school enroll- 
ment, 42. 



CHURCHES 231 

This is ten miles northwest of Mttrphysboro. About 
fifty years ago a Baptist church was formed in that section. 
In their chapel Mr. Husband held a meeting and formed the 
remnant of Baptists and others into a church of Christ. 
Among the charter members were the Graffs, Thompsons, 
Redmons and Lavans. The present chapel was built in 1895. 
D. A. Thompson is correspondent. 

Six Mile (Elkville). 

Organized 1848; present membership, 88; value of prop- 
erty, $800; Bible-school enrollment, 107. 

Dr. C. F. Mulkey settled in Six Mile Prairie in 1842. 
His influence doubtless led to the formation of the church 
there. Mrs. Rosa Kirkpatrick is correspondent. 

JASPER COUNTY. 

Bogota. 

Organized 1851, by Wm. Read and Wm. Ingraham; pres- 
ent membership, 150; value of property, $2,000; Bible-school 
enrollment, 39. 

Wm. Read and Wm. Ingraham began to preach in this 
neighborhood about 1848. In summer, meetings were held 
in groves ; in winter, in schoolhouses. This church is an 
outgrowth of the Ingraham congregation. In its earlier years 
it was known as the Wolf Creek and Honey Church. The 
charter members were James Bogard and wife, Dixon Woods 
and wife, Stephen Hams and wife, J. W. Honey, Sr., and 
wife, David White and wife, Andrew Fisher and wife, 
Patrick Woods and wife, and Garrison Grove and wife. Of 
these, Mary Woods is the only one now living. 

The meeting-house was built in 1867, repaired in 1890 
and modernized in 1912. 

Regularly and transiently fifty-six preachers have served 
the congregation. 

It has given to the ministry Geo. W. Tate, J. W. Honey 
and Benjamin W. Tate. 



232 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Christian Chapel (Winterrowd). 

Organized 1888, by F. M. Lollar; present membership, 
162; value of property, $1,600; Bible school began 1901; 
present enrollment, 42. 

This congregation is located in the southwest part of the 
county. There were twenty-one charter members, most of 
whom were from the church at Ingraham. Eleven of these 
are living. The first officers were John Chestnut and Thomas 
Blink, elders, with David Morgan and David Sparling, dea- 
cons. 

The congregation met for worship in a union house until 
1901, when the present chapel was occupied. The name was 
then changed from "Church of Christ at Union Chapel" to 
"Christian Church, Headyville, 111." Jas. B. Galloway is 
clerk. 

Latona. 

Organized 1855, by Wm. Coble; present membership, 150; 
value of property, $500; Bible school began 1875; present 
enrollment, 70. 

The congregation was the result of a meeting held by 
Minister Coble in the Mitchell Schoolhouse. The elders were 
Joshua Dobbins and Thomas Foster. Meetings for worship 
were continued in this schoolhouse for years, with Benjamin 
Duvee, Francis Marion, Jacob Sutherland, Joseph Powell and 
others as preachers. 

Min. Thomas Wall held a meeting in 1871 in the Matlock 
Schoolhouse and reorganized the church. Then it was called 
Latona Church. 

The church in 1910 gave Miss Myra Harris McLeoud to 
the foreign mission field, who is at Mahoba, India. 

Lis. 

Organized 1905, by C. W. Freeman; present membership, 
30; value of property, $6CO; Bible school began 1905; pres- 
ent enrollment, 48. 



CHURCHES 233 

James Frakes secured the services of ministers at various 
times, who held meetings in schoolhouses in the neighbor- 
hood. The bitter feeling and opposition of "religious neigh- 
bors" hindered the formation of a church that would be 
Christian only. There were nine charter members. Min. 
G. W. Morrel served the congregation one year. Benjamin 
W. Tate worked there three years, during which period the 
numbers were increased and the chapel built. Frank 
Daugherty is Bible-school superintendent. 

Newton. 

Organized 1881, by N. S. Haynes; present membership, 
140; value of property, including parsonage, $4,700; Bible 
school began 1888; present enrollment, 117. 

About 1858, A. D. Fillmore and S. W. Leonard formed 
a congregation, but, having no shepherd, the little flock soon 
scattered. In 1864, A. D. Taylor organized a congregation, 
but he proved to be unworthy and the church disbanded. 
Since 1881 the church has maintained its life and work. 
Meetings for worship were held in the homes of the mem- 
bers and in a hall till the church building was erected in 
1891. The impulse to this building was a result of a meet- 
ing conducted by Evangelist W. A. Ingram. 

A series of meetings was held at the time of the organiza- 
tion in the chapel of the Presbyterians. Their minister was 
a non-resident who came to their church statedly. He and 
Mr. Haynes exchanged courtesies in beginning the worship 
on Saturday evening and Sunday morning, his regular date. 
Immediately at the close of the prayer, in which Mr. Haynes 
besought the divine blessing on all the services of the hour, 
the Presbyterian minister stepped to the front of the plat- 
form and nodded. A fine-looking young couple came to the 
front bearing on their arms a very energetic baby boy, which 
the preacher proceeded at once to "baptize," although he 
protested by cries and kicks. 

Hon. Hale Johnson and Mr. J. W. Honey were valuable 
servants of the church in its earlier years. Among its pas- 



234 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

tors, G. W. Lollar and I. G. Tomlinson are well remem- 
bered. 

The church has ordained to the ministry C. L. Doty and 
H. G. Kellogg. W. A. Roberts was received from the Chris- 
tian Denomination, and a Baptist minister also was received. 
All these additions to the ministry were made during the 
pastorate of Benj. W. Tate. 

Wheeler. 

Organized 1883, by J. G. T. Brandenburg; present mem- 
bership, 65; value of property, $1,500; Bible school began 
1883 ; present enrollment, 60. 

There were thirty-one charter members. 

Extinct Congregations. 

Liberty Church was formed in the forties. It is located 
a few miles northwest of Hidalgo. The chapel built in 
1858 burned down, and the second was built in 1868. The 
preachers who served there before the Civil War were Daniel 
Connor, Benj. Duvee, James Duncan and H. J. Sutherland. 
It did not move to town after the railroad was built, and 
has gone down. 

St. Marie Church, ten miles southeast of Newton, was 
formed in 1903 by R. Leland Brown. He led the Baptist 
congregation there to apostolic ground, but the debt on the 
property was not paid, and after four years all was lost. 

The Hunt Church, located one-half mile south of Fal- 
mouth, served the community well for many years, but has 
disappeared. 

JEFFERSON COUNTY. 

These facts are furnished, after a year's effort, by Mrs. 
Martha E. Plummer, of Mt. Vernon. Meanwhile, she was 
separated by death from her husband, Dr. Hiram S. Plum- 
mer, with whom she had traveled three and fifty years. She 
is the daughter of Harvey T. Pace. 



CHURCHES 235 

Boyd. 

Present membership, 70; value of property, $1,000; Bible- 
school enrollment, 60. 

Ebeneser (Mt. Vernon). 

Organized 1899, by Marion Boles; present membership, 
22; value of property, $900; Bible-school enrollment, 64. 

The charter members were Elder J. Newton Brown and 
wife, Daniel Lewis and wife, W. C. Baker and wife, Grandma 
Cron, Sophia and George Correll and sister. This little 
country church has Christian grace and grit. They keep 
their chapel in a fine condition and pay their preachers 
promptly. It is six miles north. 

Elk Prairie (Ina). 

Organized 1852, by J. C. McBrian ; present membership, 
150; value of property, $1,000; Bible-school enrollment, 40. 

The congregation was prosperous until the Civil War, 
when it was destroyed by internal conflicts. In the seventies 
it was reorganized by Ministers Heape and Mulkey. Jas. 
B. Bean is Sunday-school superintendent. It is four miles 
west. 

Fouts (Cravat). 

Value of property, $1,000. 
Two miles northwest. 

Hickory Hill (Mt. Vernon). 

Organized 1880, by Wm. Henderson ; present member- 
ship, 50; union Bible-school enrollment, 50. 

This was first known as the Wolf Prairie Church. The 
charter members were Solomon Ford and wife, Peter Ollo- 
mon and wife, John Hodge and wife, Jas. C. Parsley and 
wife, George Bodine and wife, Edward Carter, Emaline 
Bradley and daughter, Belle C. Gray, and William Theims 
and wife. 



236 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

It has had eighty members and has given to the ministry 
Elijah Collins, Edward Carter and George Bodine. Mr. 
Collins is now serving the church. It is seven miles south. 

Ina. 

Organized 1911, by G. W. Foley; present membership, 
25; value of property, $1,000; Bible school began 1911; pres- 
ent enrollment, 35. 

The chapel was built in 1910. There were thirteen char- 
ter members. Mrs. Nellie F. Hodge is clerk. 

Little Grove (Walnut Hill). 

Organized 1841 ; present membership, 100 ; value of prop- 
erty, $2,000; Bible-school enrollment, 50. 

This is a country church in the north edge of the county, 
but most of its members reside in Marion County. It has 
constantly and consistently maintained the cause of the 
Master through seventy-one years. James Kell is clerk. 

Mt. Catherine (Woodlawn). 

Present membership, 95; value of property, $500; Bible- 
school enrollment, 54. 

Two miles northwest. Mrs. Frank Gaskin is corre- 
spondent. 

Mt. Vernon. 

Organized 1853; present membership, 300; value of prop- 
erty, $3,000; Bible-school enrollment, 210. 

At the first formation of this church of twenty-one mem- 
bers, Mins. J. C. Ashley, John E. McBrain, Horace Watrons 
and John A. Williams were present. Harvey T. Pace and 
wife were the leaders in this work. In 1854 he bought the 
old M. E. chapel, remodeled and refurnished it, and gave its 
use to the congregation. The church grew. After the 
death of Mr. Pace, this property was lost to the congrega- 
tion. Others died and moved away, so that there was no 
organization from 1874 to 1886. Then J. W. Robbins, under 



CHURCHES 237 

the auspices of the State Board, reorganized with fourteen 
members, which was increased to thirty-seven by the close 
of the meeting. Meetings were held regularly in courthouse 
and halls till 1889, when a chapel was occupied. A needed 
addition was made in later years. The church has passed 
through many trying experiences, but has always had the 
faithful few. 

It has given to the ministry Earl Israel and Charles 
Starr. Carl Green is the faithful pastor. 

Union ( Woodla wn ) . 

Organized 1842, by David Chance; present membership, 
50; value of property, $1,000. 

The charter members were Thomas Howell and wife, 
Burden Nichols and wife, Elijah Smith and wife, Paul 
McMillen and wife, and Robin Moore and wife. The pres- 
ent elders are Huston Johnson, A. L. Severs and O. L. 
Smith. The minister is Otto Timmons. W. J. Bledsoe is 
correspondent. It is two miles northwest. 

On the western edge of the county, three miles east of 
Ashley, there stood in 1866, in the woods, an old brick chapel 
which had no floor but dirt. It was called "Old Union," and 
the congregation that met there is thought to have been the 
oldest in the county, having been organized in the thirties. 

The Antioch congregation, two miles east of Dix, and 
that at Belle Rive, both having chapels, have both ceased to 
meet. 

This Antioch Church gave Orville Hawkins to the 
ministry. 

In 1913 a congregation of forty members was formed at 
Waltonville. 

JOHNSON COUNTY. 

Belknap. 

Organized 1896, by G. L. Wolfe; present membership, 
44; value of property, $1,800; Bible school began 1896; pres- 
ent enrollment, 54. 



238 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

This church was the result of a meeting held by Minister 
Wolfe ' Berea (Vienna). 

This is a country church located about five miles from 
Vienna. It was organized a few years after the Bethlehem 
Church, and its history is similar in nearly every respect. It 
has been served by the same preachers. The families of 
Fickens, Starke, Gage and Albriton have been prominent in 
the work here. Beverly Albriton was a local preacher who 
came from the South and settled here. He and his son, 
George Albriton, have served the church as elders almost 
continuously. 

Bethlehem (Vienna). 

Organized 1847, by Minister Wooten ; present member- 
ship, 30; value of property, $600; no Bible school. 

This is thought to be the oldest church of Christ in the 
county. 

Many of the people of the neighborhood came from 
Middle Tennessee, as did Minister Wooten also. The first 
meetings were held in a brush arbor. Then a log house was 
built. In later years this gave way to a comfortable frame 
building. Norman Mozley, Sr., was the leading spirit. Asso- 
ciated with him were faithful men and women. The church 
has had the services of able preachers. It has given J. F. 
Hight to the ministry. 

Grantsburg. 

Organized 1902, by J. N. Cowan ; present membership, 
24; value of property, $1,000; Bible school began 1902; pres- 
ent enrollment, 14. 

The formation of this church was largely due to the 
Christian activity of J. N. Cowan and W. B. Bivins, who 
have served it as elders since its organization. 

New Burnside. 

Organized 1875; present membership, 50; Bible-school 
enrollment, 27. 



CHURCHES 239 

Vienna. 

Organized 1866, by John Lemon; present membership, 
56; value of property, $2,500; Bible school began 1866; pres- 
ent enrollment, 57. 

During the Civil War, John Lemon and his son Josephus 
came as refugees from the South to Johnson County. They 
at once formed a church of Christ at Gum Spring, in 1863, 
four miles west of Vienna. Its members were also mostly 
refugees. The house used at Gum Spring was a union 
chapel. A Baptist church had been first organized there. 
After the close of the war, many returned to their homes in 
the South; thus the congregation ceased to be. However, 
this was the impulse that started the church in Vienna. The 
first meetings were held in the Cumberland Presbyterian 
Church. It was not long until the Disciples were denounced 
as "heretics" and the church door was locked against them. 
An intelligent lady who witnessed this expulsion said: 
"Surely these are the Lord's people ; for this is the way they 
treated the Saviour and his apostles." She cast in her lot 
with them. After Minister Lemon there came Matthew 
Wilson, John Lindsay and others. R. R. McCall and I. A. J. 
Parker were helpful in building up the church. A brick 
house was erected in 1871. 

There was a small congregation at Elvira thirty-five years 
ago that met in a schoolhouse. When Minister Shelt moved 
away, the members were scattered. 

There was a small band formed at Union Hill about 
1900, but it did not continue. 

PERSONALS. In the seventies J. W. Bradley, of Clay 
County, preached in this county ; so also did Stanton Field, 
of Grand Chain. Mr. Field was a farmer, but a great 
preacher too. He combined the logical faculty with a vivid 
imagination and a sympathetic heart. 

J. M. Radcliff did good service in this and other counties. 
He was a large man of lion-like appearance, and a fine 
revivalist. 



240 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

John F. Mecoy came from Marshall County, Ky. He 
grew to manhood under adverse circumstances, so that after 
his marriage his wife taught him to read. He spent his life 
on his farm, but he became a great teacher of the Bible, a 
brilliant preacher and a successful evangelist. In Kentucky 
he led many young men to the ministry. He stood first 
against slavery and for the Union. He was a born gen- 
tleman. 

James H. Carter served in the Legislature. S. M. Glas- 
ford was a member of the State Senate, and served the 
Vienna Church as an elder to the close of his life. 

Dr. R. M. McCall was assistant superintendent of the 
State Hospital for the Insane at Anna. 

Other Disciples filled various county offices. J. F. Hight 
has earnestly contended for the faith, and held a public dis- 
cussion on every occasion for a period of twenty-five years. 
Now he is serving as county judge. Evidently he is a diplo- 
matist. But he continues to preach to those who are poor 
and neglected. 

KANE COUNTY. 

Batavia. 

Organized 1852, by M. N. Lord; present membership, 72; 
value of property, $4,000; Bible-school enrollment, 108. 

There were twelve charter members. The public meet- 
ings were first held in a room over a store on Wilson Street, 
a few doors west of South River Street, then from 
house to house till the completion of a chapel in 1868. This 
is yet used. Among the earlier ministers who served the 
congregation there were L. Cooley, Dr. W. H. Hopson, Mr. 
Phinney, Moses E. Lard, B. F. Hall, J. D. Benedick, J. J. 
Moss and others. For a long time the congregation has been 
served by students from the Disciples' Divinity House. 
Deaths and removals have decimated the membership, and 
accessions have not kept pace. The church much needs the 
preaching of the gospel. 



CHURCHES 241 

John Gunzenhauser resides there and still serves the 
church well, as he has for many years. 

A church was organized in 1841 at Dundee with eighteen 
members, but never grew to self-support. 

Repeated and persistent efforts to establish a church of 
Christ in Elgin have all failed. 

KNOX COUNTY. 

One of the first churches in this county was constituted 
in the village of Henderson about 1838. In the forties J. E. 
Murphy, Smith Wallace and J. E. Martin preached there. 
Morran Baker was the leader. In 1850 a brick chapel was 
built. About 1853 Min. Ziba Brown held a revival which 
added to the church many prominent families of the com- 
munity. Then James Gaston ministered to the church nine 
years. Thereafter the congregation dwindled to its end. 

In the early times there was a flourishing church at 
French Grove, in the eastern part of the county. 

At Walnut Grove, also, near Altona, there was a strong 
church before the railroads came. 

In 1850 the Union chapel was built five miles east and 
one north of Galesburg, and a congregation formed there. 
This church gave E. B. Reynolds to the ministry. John 
Spooner was the leader here. Among the preachers were 
Milton Dodge, Jordan Dodge, Robert Wallace, Patrick H. 
Murphy, Henry Murphy and James W. Butler. 

There was a congregation of Christians in Maquon before 

and after 1870. ... , 

Abingdon. 

Organized 1850, by John E. Murphy and Milton Dodge; 
present membership, 450; value of property, including par- 
sonage, $5,000; Bible-school enrollment, 208. 

The pages of the history of the Abingdon Church are 
covered with smiles and tears, joys and sorrows. Its periods 
were measured by success and failure. It was a small village 
in 1849. 

Then, some who loved the gospel in its simplicity met 



242 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

for worship in Indian Point Schoolhouse, an old log build- 
ing, located about one mile west of the present school site; 
others met in the home of John Dawdy, south of town; 
others at Israel Marshall's home northwest, and some in the 
St. Augustine Schoolhouse. Those Disciples thought it no 
hardship to ride or walk through mud or snow to worship 
God according to his word. 

In 1850, John E. Murphy and Milton Dodge held a series 
of meetings in the Indian Point Schoolhouse. The interest 
became intense. People came from Meridian, Cold Brook, 
St. Augustine from far and near in wagons, on horseback 
and on foot. Many were obedient to the faith. At the close 
of the meeting the Abingdon Church was organized. 

The charter members were Jane Dowdy (Boydstrum), 
the sole resident survivor ; Thomas and Isabel Roberson, John 
Boydstrum, Alford and Cassie Dowdy, Elijah Meadows ; 
Jane, Sarah and Julia Meek; Cynthia Brunson, Willis Riggs, 
Taylor Lomax, Jonathan Bobbitt and wife, John Latimer 
and wife, John Vertreece and wife, Nathan Bradbury, B. 
Edmonson and wife, Mrs. John Killam, Israel Maxwell, Eliza 
and Phcebe Latimore, Lemuel Meadows and wife, William 
Meadows and wife, Mr. Williams and wife, and Nancy 
Williams. First elders, William Maxwell and Jonathan 
Price ; deacons, William and Lemuel Meadows. 

Besides the two named, the preachers of the early days 
were John Miller, Livy Hatchett, P. J. Murphy, Isaac Mur- 
phy and others. 

When the congregation outgrew the first house erected 
in 1857, they worshiped in the chapel of the Abingdon Col- 
lege building. Since then several houses have been built and 
used. The last was enlarged and otherwise improved at a 
cost of $7,000 during the pastorate of F. L. Moore. 

During the collee-e period the church was served by Mins. 
J. C. Reynolds, P. H. Murphy, J. W. Butler, A. J. Thomp- 
son, A. P. Aten and B. O. Aylesworth. 

The death of the college wrought a division in the church 
that continued ten years. 



CHURCHES 243 

From first to last, fifty- two preachers have served the 
congregation. It is now a fine church, faithful in attendance, 
missionary to the core and living in the spirit of unity. 

In its early years there was neither organ nor choir. 
They were thought to be sinful. Judge Durham led the 
songs for many years. The women were taught to keep 
silent. Mrs. Emma Aten was the first to read a chapter to 
the edification of the assembly. 

Many hundreds have begun the Christian life here, and 
many have gone in Christ's service into many lands. 

East Galcsburg. 

Organized 1902, by J. M. Morris ; present membership, 
75 ; value of property, $600 ; Bible-school enrollment, 60. 

Galesburg. 

Organized 1871, by Dr. J. B. Vivion; present member- 
ship, 878; value of property, including parsonage, $13,500; 
Bible-school enrollment, 714. 

Meetings were held here in the sixties, and possibly 
earlier, by a few Disciples in residences, halls and the office 
of Dr. J. B. Vivion, who was an intelligent and earnest 
Christian. The church was constituted in his office. 

The Swedish M. E. chapel was purchased and Evangelist 
Knowles Shaw conducted a series of meetings, adding 
some strength to the congregation. In 1878 the chapel was 
moved to West Thompson Street, between Broad and Cedar 
Streets. In 1892 the present building on North West Street 
was finished and occupied during the pastorate of G. J. 
Ellis. In late years the church has made rapid and sub- 
stantial progress. 

Henry M. Bruner and John B. Scheitlan were true sup- 
porters and leaders in the earlier years. 

Herman. 

Present membership, 116; value of property, $2,500; 
Bible-school enrollment, 106. 



244 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Knoxville. 

Organized 1869, by J. H. Garrison; present membership, 
255; value of property, including parsonage, $17,000; Bible 
school began 1869; present enrollment, 160. 

A church of Christ was formed here as early as 1838. 
There were twelve members. Among them were Min. Jacob 
Grum, Dr. Hansford and wife, John Karns, a tailor and 
clothier, and John Eads, an active Christian. As the years 
passed, so also did this congregation. It was reorganized in a 
meeting led by Mr. Garrison in 1869, and has steadily 
advanced into active usefulness. At that time it was increased 
by a remnant of members from the Union congregation, that 
had lived northwest of the town for nineteen years. 

This church gave H. J. Reynolds to the ministry. 

Meridian Church (Abingdon). 

Organized 1839, by John E. Murphy ; present member- 
ship, 80; value of property, $2,000; Bible-school enroll- 
ment, 90. 

Five miles west of Abingdon is an imposing structure 
that for many years has been known far and near as the 
Meridian Christian Church. Its records are still in a good 
state of preservation, from which the following excerpts are 
made: 

MAY 4TH, 1839. 

We the undersigned, having met at Bro. Meadows' agreeably by 
appointment for the purpose of forming a Christian congregation upon 
the word of God to men, and that the New Testament contains the only 
rule of faith by which Christians should be governed, we do agree to 
unite as a congregation to attend to the ordinances of the house of 
God and the means of edification afforded in his word. 

After a discourse was delivered by Bro. J. Murphy, the names in 
the following list agree to become vrited as a body of Christians upon 
the word of God: M. Jpmeson. ??rah Jameson, Lydn'pm Dawson, J. B. 
Reynolds. Phebe Reynolds, Charles Reynolds, John Dodge, Theodocia 
Dodge, Thomas Dodere. Jordan Dodge, John M. Dodge, Margarete 
Dodee, RarVipl Reynolds, Henry Meadows. Polly Mendows, Nancy 
Meadows. Melirda Meadows, Ephra'm Smith. Hannah Smith, Francis 
Godard, Seth C. Murphy, Irene Murphy, Elizabeth Murphy, Nancy 



CHURCHES 245 

Murphy, William Murphy, John Fisher, Elizabeth Fisher, Thompson 
Brock, Jacob Boydstun, Israel M. Marshall,. Stephen Howard, John 
Dandy, James Holland, Martha Howard, Mother Meadows. 

After the names of the Disciples were ascertained, it was thought 
best to have the officers chosen. J. B. Reynolds and Seth C. Murphy 
were chosen bishops of the congregation. W. Meadows and T. E. 
Smith were chosen deacons, and John M. Dodge, recorder. 

The people met in schoolhouses, in homes, and often, 
during the summer season, in the shade of the maple-trees 
breaking- the loaf and heeding the message from some honest 
pioneer preacher. 

The following from the old records are both instructive 
and suggestive. The first doubtless came from Vincennes, 
Ind.: 

"VINCENNES, January 14, 1842. 
"To All to Whom This May Come, Greeting: 

"That our beloved Bro. Edward Perdue and Sister Jane Perdue, his 
companion, were members in full fellowship in the Church of Christ 
ar Vincennes and we take great pleasure in recommending them to the 
care of the Brethren in the Lord wherever they may wish to enroll 
themselves. Done by order of the church at Vincennes." 

"The church of God in Cold Brook, Warren Co., Illinois, recom- 
mends to the faithful in Christ Jesus wherever she may choose to attach 
herself, our worthy and much beloved Sister Sarah Johnson, who has 
so conducted herself a Christian as to authorize us to commend her to 
the confidence and watchful care of all God's people. 

"Done by order of the church July 8th, A. D. 1842. 

"JOSIAH WHITMAN. 
"JNO. G. HALEY, 

"Elders." 

"December 26, 1847, John M. Lodge, who was employed as evan- 
gelist, closed his labors with fifty-three additions by baptism. 

"February, 1848, brethren were sent as delegates and agreement 
was entered into that John M. Dodge should be sustained for seven 
months and to receive eighteen and one-half dollars a month for his 
services, to proclaim the word of life wherever it was thought best to 
labor." 

Letters received were not simply placed on file, but were 
made a part of the church record. 

During those years many from Kentucky, and other 
Southern States, found their way into this county. Perhaps 



246 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

as many as fifty letters from the Southern Baptists were 
placed in the Meridian Church during a period of twenty 
years. 

The roster of the congregation has been revised seven 
or eight times. Many were received into membership and 
many have gone out into almost every part of the Union. 

They supported liberally evangelists who labored in other 
fields. This record tells of numerous collections that were 
taken up for the poor and needy. It tells of the social hour 
when smiles and tears mingled with joy and gladness. Those 
who may now read it will learn of the heroic faith and 
undying devotion of those Disciples to the cause of Christ. 
It is to-day one of the best communities to be found in the 
county. 

The first church house was built in 1841 ; the second and 
present one, in 1880. 

St. Augustine. 

Present membership, 110; value of property, $3,000; 
Bible-school enrollment, 62. 

LAKE COUNTY. 

In the thirties, Darius Gage and two of his brothers, 
with Benedict Stevens and Emmons Shepard, came from 
near Cleveland, O., and settled on lands in the northern part 
of Lake County. A village, located about three miles north- 
east of Fox Lake and one mile south of the Wisconsin line, 
was laid out, to which the name of Gageville was given. 
Some years afterward the name was changed to Antioch, by 
which it is still known. In this community a church after 
the primitive order was constituted Aug. 7, 1841. with twenty 
members, by Min. William Davenport, then of Walnut Grove. 
It was the first church of Christ in the northern tier of 
counties in the State. It lived and thrived until about 1910, 
when the chapel was rented to the German Lutherans. 

The Fort Hill Church, three miles south of Long Lake, 
was organized in 1850 by Min. L. J. Correll. It served its 



CHURCHES 247 

community well for fifty years and then disappeared. While 
A. R. Knox was preaching for this congregation he bap- 
tized in 1856 four heads of families who were Roman Cath- 
olics. Of one of these families there are two grandsons who 
are preaching the primitive gospel. 

In the sixties a church was formed at Millburn which 
did well for some years. 

In the seventies the congregations in Lake and McHenry 
Counties united in employing an evangelist. He was a fluent 
speaker, but, as soon after learned, of bad reputation. His 
conduct scandalized the cause he pretended to represent. 
When the iniquitous embroilment had passed, the cause was 
prostrate. Some of the churches did not recover, and others 
only after pain and loss. 

In 1849 the custom of yearly meetings was begun. These 
were continued for forty years. Their chief object was to 
reach by the gospel those who would not attend the meetings 
of the congregations. They also cultivated the spirit of lov- 
ing fraternity among the Disciples, who were mostly fine 
people in this county. 

Min. L. J. Correll came into this county in the early 
forties and did a yeoman's service. He died in Nebraska 
about 1908. 

Mins. G. B. Willis and A. J. Smith were also efficient 
preachers. 

Gurnee, 

Organized 1860, by A. R. Knox and Andrew J. Smith; 
present membership, 75 ; value of property, including par- 
sonage, $6,000; Bible-school enrollment, 115. 

In the summer of 1859, A. R. Knox began to preach in 
a schoolhouse four miles west of Waukegan, on the Oplain 
River. The community was much infected with Universalism 
and Spiritism. A month's meeting was held the following 
winter, in which Pastor A. J. Smith, of Antioch, did- the 
preaching. A goodly number were baotized and a. church 
was organized. The meetings were held in the schoolhouse 



248 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

till 1879, when the church building was erected. Before that 
time, in addition to those already named, Tohn Aylesworth, 
Wesley Marsh, W. L. Hayden, L. J. Correll and L. A. 
Dowling served the church. 

Waukegan First. 

Organized 1888, by A. R. Knox and E. A. Ott; present 
membership, 90; value of property, $8,000; Bible-school 
enrollment, 48. 

The first congregation here was wrecked by the evil influ- 
ence of the unworthy evangelist above referred to. After a 
lapse of ten years a new start was made. The charter mem- 
bers then were C. M. Cyrus and wife, Phila Winter, Lucretia 
Emmons, Sarah Calkins, Adelaide Connors ; A. R., Jane, New- 
ton, Mary, Emma and Lottie Knox. 

This church gave Dewitt Bradbury to the ministry. 

Waukegan West Side. 

Organized 1905, by E. N. Tucker; present membership, 
89; value of property, $6,100; Bible school began 1905; 
present enrollment, 117. 

LA SALLE COUNTY. 

About 1865 there was a Christian congregation in Lostant 
of near thirty members. It was gathered together by J. G. 
Waggoner, who was then teaching the public school there. 
It included in its membership Dr. King and family and Dr. 
Vandervoort, all of Tonica. Meetings were held in the 
Baptist and M. E. chapels. When Mr. Waggoner returned 
to college the meetings soon ceased, deaths and removals 
occurring. The Baptist chapel there is now waiting for the 
use of others. 

James A. Garfield was interested in building the railroad 
leading southwest of Streator. A few years after the close 
of the Civil War he made a trip over the right-of-way with 
Colonel Plumb. They took dinner with a Mr. Allen and 
family. It was decided to establish a station near this place. 



CHURCHES 249 

The people of the neighborhood were so much pleased with 
Mr. Garfield that they cheerfully approved of the proposition 
of Colonel Plumb to name the town Garfield. 

A few families of the Streator Church who reside in the 
community have kept a union Sunday school going for some 
time, but the Papal influences have hindered the building of 
a church. Meetings are held in a hall owned by Mr. Stro- 
snider, an aged and intelligent Disciple. His daughter, Mrs. 
Maud Stewart, is the Bible-school superintendent. 

Dana. 

Organized 1865, by J. Q. A. Houston ; present member- 
ship, 57; value of property, $8,000; Bible school began 1861 ; 
present enrollment, 194. 

The Christian people living near Diamond Creek, in the 
early sixties, in the panhandle of La Salle County, met for 
public worship in schoolhouses and their own homes. A 
chapel was completed in the village of Dana in 1868. This 
house gave place in 1909 to a new and modern structure 
built of cement blocks. 

Four of the first members are living: Mrs. Elizabeth Mar- 
tin, Dana ; Mrs. E. Jones and Mrs. P. Martin, of Minonk, 
and R. S. Manning, of Nebraska State. Of the earlier 
preachers, Messrs. Watson, Trowbridge, Lindsey, Crogan, 
Brokaw, Prophater and Boggs served the congregation. 

The Bible school is front rank and the church has grown 
in power and influence in the community. 

W. O. Lappin is the pastor. 

Ottatva. 

Organized 1913, by J. Fred Jones: present membership, 
20; value of property, $2,000; Bible school began 1913: pres- 
ent enrollment, 40. 

The Fourth Missionary District led in the formation of 
the church of Christ in this county-seat. The building and 
lot formerly used by the St. Paul's Evangelical Church were 
sold at auction and bought by the District Board. Mr. 



250 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

George Armstrong, of Ancona, and John Vissering, of Dana, 
had promised financial help. 

C. M. Smithson, the pastor at Streator, and H. H. Jenner, 
pastor at Long Point, have given valuable assistance. 

The Long Point Church gave $200 on the purchase of 
the property. 

Rutland. 

Organized 1868, by W. H. Watson; present membership, 
180; value of property, $4,300; Bible school began 1868; 
present enrollment, 100. 

Minister Watson held a series of meetings, and at the 
close, assisted by Min. A. H. Trowbridge, organized a church 
with thirty-eight members, as follows: John Roe, Abram 
Mullin, David Mullin, George Boyd, John Ware, G. T. 
Crumrine, James Rowland and their wives severally; Mrs. 
Sarah, Mrs. Martha and Miss Maria Crumrine ; Jonathan 
Wilson, James Cox, Mrs. Jane and Miss Elizabeth Wilson, 
Josiah Richmond, Jesse W. Evans, Samuel Ware, Mrs. Clara 
Rickey, Mrs. Catherine Ansborn and Thomas Bane ; the 
other names were not secured. Only six of these now reside 
in Rutland. 

A. H. Trowbridge served the congregation eleven years. 
The Roe, Mullin, Boyd, Richmond and Sutton families have 
been active forces in the congregation. Wm. Drummet was 
given to the ministry. 

T. Wilson Milteer is clerk. 

Streator. 

Organized 1870, by J. C. Tully; present membership, 385; 
value of property, $22,500; Bible-school enrollment, 270. 

J. W. Barnhart, a devout and devoted man, was the 
leader in establishing this church. In 1870 there was a 
chapel there that members of all religious bodies had paid 
for, but the legal title was held by the Cumberland Presby- 
terian Church. In this building Mr. Tully began a meeting 
in June of that year. After he had preached a few sermons 



CHURCHES 251 

the doors were closed against him. The following Sunday 
morning the few Disciples met for worship in the front yard 
of Wm. Ley, on South Monroe Street. Then and there the 
church was organized. Mr. Ley was chosen deacon and has 
given the church commendable service in this capacity to the 
present time. Thereafter meetings were held in a small hall. 
Charles Rowe became the first pastor, and a small frame 
chapel was built and occupied the next year. Dr. Streator, 
for whom the town was named and a leading Disciple of 
Cleveland, O., held large financial interests there, so he 
readily gave a location and helped in the building. This 
chapel was used until 1906, when, during the pastorate of 
C. D. Hougham, the present modern edifice was completed. 
Its location is more central. 

Following Mr. Rowe came students from Eureka, by 
whom the pulpit was supplied. 

In addition to J. W. Barnhart, whose memory is revered, 
and Wm. Ley, whose long fidelity is honored, the church 
also highly esteems Mrs. Mary Anderson. It was here that 
she left a large and popular church to become a Christian 
only. When the spiritual life of the church ran low because 
competent leadership was lacking, she, with a few others, met 
regularly and maintained the order of the Lord's house. 

The church is steadily growing in power and influence in 
the community and the outlook is bright. C. M. Smithson 
is the pastor. 

Tonica. 

Organized 1912, by Chas. P. Murphy; present member- 
ship, 19; Bible school began 1913; present enrollment, 100. 

Mrs. Chas. I. Haughey and her husband, assisted by Min. 
C. M. Smithson, of Streator, led in the formation of this 
congregation. The meeting conducted by Evangelist Murphy 
was held in the vacant Baptist chapel, which is offered to the 
Discinles for a small fraction of its value. 

There were nine charter members. Min. E. E. Hartley 
and wife held a meeting early in 1913 which added others, 



252 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

organized a Bible school and a ladies' aid with twenty 
members. 

LAWRENCE COUNTY. 

Allison (Vincennes, Ind.). 

Organized 1815-28; present membership, 170; value of 
property, $5,500; Bible school began 1874; present enroll- 
ment, 102. 

This society was first formed by members of the Chris- 
tian Denomination. A reorganization took place in 1828, at 
which time it is probable that the membership came nearer 
the position of the Disciples. A purely country church, 
located on a wide, rich prairie, in continuous Christian activi- 
ties for ninety-seven years is a singular and magnificent rec- 
ord. Its location is seven miles northeast of Lawrenceville. 
Its first meetings for public worship were held in the homes 
of the people ; then in Center Schoolhouse until the forties, 
when a neat frame chapel was built. This served for more 
than fifty years. About 1896 a new, modern and up-to-date 
building was erected. The church is abreast of the times in 
a remarkable degree for a country membership. It shows 
what can be done when the people have a mind to work. 

It has given to the ministry C. L. Organ and Mrs. 
Rochester Irwin. 

This community was known from its beginning as "The 
Christian Settlement." The fine formative influences of 
those sturdy pioneers have come down through all the inter- 
vening years. 

Bethany (Lawrenceville). 

Organized 1879, by Cyrus Clemments; present member- 
ship, 35; value of property, $1,200; Bible school began 1879; 
present enrollment, 33. 

This church is located ten miles north of Lawrenceville. 
The first Christians only in the neighborhood were Mr. and 
Mrs. Romelia Norris. Through their efforts Minister Corter 
first preached in what is known as the "Cornbread School- 



CHURCHES 253 

house." Later Min. Cyrus Clemments preached there several 
weeks without visible results. Finally, Miss Frances Judy, 
a young lady of nineteen, accepted Christ. This led others 
to obedience, and a congregation was formed. Among the 
first members there were the following named men and their 
wives ; Romelia Norris, Richard Judy, Jonathan Smith, 
Amelia Lester, William Kimmell, Henry Bennier, Berry 
Carter ; also these persons with their families : Jackson Grey, 
James D. Updyke and Mrs. Sarah Groves. 

Bridgeport. 

Organized 1866, by James McMillen; present member- 
ship, 252; value of property, including parsonage, $22,000; 
Bible school began 1863 ; present enrollment, 225. 

In 1861 members of the Pleasant Hill Church who were 
residing in the village of Bridgeport built a house of worship 
there. The lot was given by David Lanterman. Occasional 
meetings were held therein until 1866, when these brethren 
obtained formal but willing permission from the mother 
church to organize in the village. Ministers McMillen and 
W. B. F. Treat were present and so advised and directed. 
There were sixty-three charter members. The church has 
had a checkered history, but the regular meetings conducted 
by the elders have been held every Lord's Day. Revival 
meetings were held by representative evangelists. The con- 
gregation, having outgrown its old building during the pas- 
torate of George W. Schroeder, a modern brick building, 
costing $16,000, was erected. Dr. H. V. Lewis gave the 
parsonage lot. T. H. Lindenmeyer is the present pastor. 

Andrew Baird was given to the ministry. 

Chauncey. 

Organized 1890, by John A. Williams; present member- 
ship, 35; value of property, $1,000; Bible school began 1890; 
present enrollment, 30. 

Eleven persons from several congregations, including 
Baptists, formed this church. Daniel Patton and wife 



254 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

donated the lot. The old M. E. Church was bought, moved 
onto the lot and remodeled. The church made but little 
progress, so in 1909 it was reorganized by J. F. Rosboro. 

Lawrenceville. 

Organized 1833, by M. R. Trimble; present membership, 
450; value of property, including parsonage, $25,500; Bible- 
school enrollment, 350. 

This church was the outgrowth of preaching in various 
sections of the county. An organization had been effected 
at the Old Center Schoolhouse as early as 1817. 

M. R. Trimble had preached at Springhill, and a house 
had been built there as early as 1820. West of Lawrence- 
ville meetings had been held in Lewis' Schoolhouse and La- 
Mott's barn. Mr. Trimble had preached and conducted com- 
munion services in the courthouse yard, and also in the "Old 
Yellow Courthouse" in Lawrenceville. James Y. Beard, of 
the Christian Denomination, had also preached there occa- 
sionally. This church started with forty-one members. The 
first officers were C. M. Eaton, Joseph LaMott and Mr. 
Travis. Soon thereafter Mr. Eaton gave the land in the 
village for a church building, and paid $1,100 of the money 
used in its erection, quite a princely gift for those days. The 
ground was spacious and ample. The house served the con- 
gregation till 1895, when a commodious and up-to-date build- 
ing was erected. This was remodeled in 1908, a good par- 
sonage added and the former parsonage turned into the jani- 
tor's residence. This church is a living link in the Foreign 
Society, supporting Mrs. Fred E. Hagin in Japan. The church 
has held in its membership many representative citizens who 
were thoroughly good men. J. W. McCleave was one of these. 
Thomas A. Hall is the present pastor. 

Mt. Erie (Sumner). 

Present membership, 25; value of property, $500; Bible- 
school enrollment, 30. 

This is five miles about south of Sumner. 



CHURCHES 255 

Mt. Zion (Sumner). 

Organized 1815, by William Kinkade; present member- 
ship, 40; value of property, $1,200; Bible-school enroll- 
ment, 40. 

Mr. P. W. Sutherland, of Sumner, 111., has the old church 
record-book that tells of this beginning. The book is dis- 
colored by age, but the writing is very legible. On the first 
page are the words, "Sold to Ean Miller for 12^2, Church 
Book for Springhill Church." No date is given. On the 
second page a list of 110 names is started which fills six 
pages. William Kinkade's is the first, and he was the official 
elder. Many of these names have utterly faded from the 
community. It can not be determined from this list who 
were the charter members. A revision of it is begun on 
page 7, where it is said to be "a list of the members of the 
Church of Christ at Springhill." A second revision is begun 
on page 9, and this entry is added: "Saturday before the 
first Sunday in November, 1825, the church at Springhill 
entered a resolution to appoint a clerk to keep a record of 
all their acts and particular business, and appointed Thomas 
Spencer." The records of the next ten years follow. Mr. 
Sutherland says that Mr. Kinkade was a Greek and Latin 
scholar, the author of a book on the Holy Spirit, a member 
of the Legislature, the first preacher in the community, and 
that he organized the Spring-hill congregation as "the Church 
of Christ" there. He died before 1833. 

There is a lapse in the records from 1835 to 1842, when 
the following appears : 

In the name of Jesus Christ, Amen. The church of God which is in 
Christ Jesus at Sprirerhill in Lawrence County, Illinois, reorganized 
October 2nd, A. D. 1842. All names. Creeds, Confessions of Faith, Dis- 
ciplines, rules and formulas of hrman invention and contrivance are 
. totally discarded. The Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments alone 
are the only and all-sufficient standard and rule of faith and practice, 
of morals and of discipline. No name or names are acknoweldged but 
those contained and used in the Scriptures and therein given to the 
people of God. 



256 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

This was signed by M. R. Trimble, William Clark, Robert 
Johnson and thirty-four names follow. Within five days 
Ephraim D. Turner and John Fish were appointed deacons, 
and M. J. Hancock, clerk. The next Lord's Day Alexander 
Turner and Milan Z. Hancock were chosen elders. 

It is admitted that this church was associated with the 
Christian Denomination till 1835, but whether it then came 
into the Restoration movement or not till 1842 is not clear. 
Following the latter date there was much preaching in the 
Springhill meeting-house by Sylvanus Ades and Wm. Cour- 
ter and many turned to the Lord. 

About 1854 the congregation was reorganized as the Mt. 
Zion Church, but the former name was much used for the 
next fifteen years. A frame chapel was built in 1862 through 
the leading and sacrifice of Henry Vandament. About 1854 
Marshall Stivers became an elder, and in this office served 
the church for fifty years with great good to the people. 

Two swarms have gone out from this old hive Bridge- 
port and Mt. Erie. 

It has given to the ministry Geo. P. Smith, F. M. Shick, 
E. T. Stivers, J. R. Sutherland and four or five others. 

Over 530 people have been members here. Mrs. Melissa 
Day has been a member since 1854. 

Evangelist Harvey Mullins held a great meeting here 
in 1871. 

Pleasant Hill (Bridgeport). 

Organized 1843, by M. R. Trimble; present membership, 
110; Bible school began 1860. 

This church is known as White House or Pleasant Hill. 
It is located four miles northwest of Bridgeport. In 1842 
a company of twenty-six Christians some from Cornbread 
Schoolhouse, some from Lawrenceville and some from a con- 
gregation of the older Christian Church, including Min. Asa 
W. Baird got together under the lead of Maurice R. Trim- 
ble. The following January they were organized, accepting 
no name but the Bible names. 



CHURCHES 257 

A piece of land was bought for $50 of Daniel Barns. A 
small but comfortable house was built thereon. This was 
replaced in 1872 by the larger and more modern building. 

Some of the preachers who have served them were M. 
R. Trimble, Asa M. Baird, D. D. Miller, James McMillan, 
Harvey Mullins and George Morrell. 

Pleasant Ridge (Lawrenceville). 

Organized 1834, by M. R. Trimble; present membership, 
60; value of property, $1,200; Bible school began 1869; pres- 
ent enrollment, 50. 

This chapel is seven miles north of Lawrenceville. Its 
first local name was McNiece. Its first chapel was burned 
about 1870. Meetings were then held in Roberts School- 
house till 1880, when the present chapel was built. The name 
was then changed to Pleasant Ridge. 

Gilbert Jones was given to the ministry, while George 
and Thomas Reed are preparing therefor. 

Rising Sun ( Russell ville). 

Organized 1877, by J. L. Griffin; present membership, 
40; value of property, $1,000; Bible-school enrollment, 22. 

This location is about eight miles northeast of Lawrence- 
ville. There were seventeen charter members and the organ- 
ization was made in the Rising Sun Schoolhouse. The chapel 
was finished in 1880. This is a good country church and has 
a fine missionary spirit. A C. E. society. 

It has given Frank Powers and Leslie Wolfe to the min- 
istry. The latter is a missionary in the Philippine Islands. 

Ritssellville. 

Organized 1840, by M. R. Trimble ; present membership, 
50; value of property, $1,200; Bible-school enrollment, 75". 

For more than seventy years this little church has lived 
in this little villasre. In it good people have served God, but 
to the great world unknown. A house was built in the for- 
ties, rebuilt in the seventies and yet serves as the place for 

9 



258 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

public worship. The following preachers have served there: 
M. R. Trimble, John Howard, Fanner Howard, Jacob and 
Josiah Wolf and Hiram Boyles. 

St. Francisville. 

Organized 1894, by W. R. Couch ; present membership, 
121; value of property, $1,500; Bible school began 1894; 
present enrollment, 83. 

Twenty-five Disciples, wishing to hold to Christ as their 
only creed and the Bible as their only rule of faith and prac- 
tice, constituted this church. For two years their meetings 
were held in various places, when the house of worship was 
erected in 1896. Old Father Gee, at the age of eighty-one, 
helped to fell the first tree that went into the building. The 
church has been faithful in the face of opposition, is well 
organized and is awake to the duty of world-wide missions. 

Sumner. 

Organized 1850, by Cornelius Ades; present membership, 
124; value of property, $12,000; Bible school began 1868; 
present enrollment, 111. 

This church was the result of a series of. meetings con- 
ducted by Mr. Ades. Meetings were held in the homes of 
the members till about 1868, when a chapel was built. In 
recent years this gave place to a modern structure. 

The Willow Branch Church was formed northwest of 
Sumner by Min. H. Y. Keller in 1890. It continued for 
fifteen to twenty years. 

LEE COUNTY. 

Dixon. 

Organized 1894, by J. B. Wright and T. A. Boyer; pres- 
ent membership, 260 ; value of property, $5,000 ; Bible school 
began 1894; present enrollment, 200. 

A tent meeting was conducted here by Ministers Wright 
and Boyer, resulting in the formation of a church of Christ 



CHURCHES 259 

with 170 members. This was the first preaching by the 
Disciples in Lee County. 

In the early years of the congregation storms broke and 
perils threatened from within as well as without, but better 
counsels prevailed, and within a brief period this church has 
become united, prosperous and useful. S. E. Fisher is the 
pastor. 

LIVINGSTON COUNTY. 

Ancona. 

Organized 1859 ; present membership, 191 ; value of prop- 
erty, $3,200; Bible school began 1894; present enrollment, 82. 

Members of the Methodist Protestant and Christian 
Churches united in building a chapel in 1860. This place 
proved to be a good recruiting-place for the Disciples. 
Among the first members were Samuel E. Maxwell, Phineas 
Green, Alfred Grim, John Showman, Silas Coe, Caleb Mathis, 
R. W. Hick, Margaret Beckworth and Jessie Carpenter. 
Others of recent years were Dr. Foredyce, G. W. Mathis, 
Frank Clark, Geo. Armstrong, John Carrithers, and John, 
Cephas and Joseph Coe. 

In various ways the congregation has been served by 
Benjamin Franklin, J. B. McCleary, J. W. Monser, Rochester 
Irwin ; Mr. Thompson, a Scotchman ; Mr. Nevins, Isaac 
Slick, Mr. Sabin, W. B. F. Treat ; John, Jefferson and Wash- 
ington Houston, who were great evangelists and singers ; 
Mr. Watson, Mr. Taylor, Perry Hoge, Mr. Spencer and N. 
J. Wright, whose great meeting led to the erection of the 
present building in 1894. 

The church has given to the ministry C. C. Carpenter and 
Robert Witchen. 

Antioch (Long Point). 

Organized 1912, by B. L. Wray; present membership, 24; 
value of property, $1,500; Bible school began 1909; present 
enrollment, 45. 

This church is about five miles from Long Point, Flana- 



260 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

gan and -Dana. A Bible school was started in the community 
about 1887. In 1909, two miles west of the former meeting- 
place, Mrs. H. P. Thompson formed a Sunday school in a 
schoolhouse near the site of the present chapel. Min. Roches- 
ter Irwin held a tent meeting there in 1909. Out of this grew 
the building of the chapel. The meeting by Mr. Wray was 
three years later. The church has half-time afternoon 
preaching by H. H. Jenner. The credit of this work is 
largely due to David London, David Carlton and H. P. 
Thompson. 

Fairbury. 

Organized 1868, by J. B. McCorkle; present membership, 
163; value of property, $8,000; Bible school began 1868; 
present enrollment, 80. 

Minister McCorkle introduced the apostolic faith in Fair- 
bury. There were nine charter members, only one of whom 
survives. They were Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Thompson, Mr. and 
Mrs. John Adkins, Mr. and Mrs. Hotchkiss, Mrs. McCurdy, 
Mrs. Lizzie Spence and Mrs. De Ford. 

The first place of meeting was a room over a wagon- 
shop. Later a chapel was purchased of the Presbyterians. 
In 1894, during the pastorate of J. W. Porter, a more com- 
modious house was built. 

The life of the congregation has ebbed and flowed. After 
various removals, vicissitudes and discouragements, there was 
a reorganization in 1880 by A. B. Markle. W. C. Chapman 
is now the pastor. 

Mr. M. Hotaling stood by this work for many years and 
very faithfully. His son, Lewis R. Hotaling, was given to 
the ministry. 

Flanagan. 

Organized 1862, by Houston brothers; present member- 
ship, 195; value of property, including parsonage, $3,500; 
Bible-school enrollment, 177. 

A few families of the neighborhood met for worship 
sometimes in their own homes, sometimes in Mt. Zion 



CHURCHES 261 

Schoolhouse, three miles northeast of Flanagan, and some- 
times in the old Berean Schoolhouse, three miles to the 
southwest. Min. A. H. Trowbridge occasionally rode horse- 
back thirty miles across the country to preach to them. 
There were few roads then through the prairies. A 
great impulse was given to the work here and elsewhere by 
the coming, about this time, of the three brothers Wash- 
ington, Jefferson and John Houston from Kentucky. They 
settled on farms near Cornell. They were all preachers and 
fine singers. Among the faithful families of that time there 
were the Hoovers, Pearsons, Martins, Hopwoods, Wilcoxes 
and Mouldseas. 

J. F. Ghormley, then a student in Eureka College, by a 
fine effort led in building a chapel in the village in 1881. 
Thereafter the congregation grew steadily under his minis- 
tration and that of J. T. Ogle, E. A. Gilliland, K. C. Ven- 
tres and J. T. Alsup, also Eureka students. 

The church has never been large. At times so many 
moved away that it could hardly stand. Those left, by 
prayer and diligence, rebuilt the numbers. Those who left 
became active members of congregations in several States. 

The church has always been strong in missionary activi- 
ties in the home and foreign fields. In 1912 it was a living 
link to Eureka College. 

It has given to the ministry R. J. Bamber and J. P. Rolli- 
son. Earnest Pearson is preparing for the work of medical 
missionary. 

Forrest. 

Organized 1868, by J. B. McCorkle; present membership, 
18; value of property, $5,000; Bible school died. 

Since its organization this church has never been numer- 
ically strong enough to maintain itself according to prevail- 
ing standards. Many of its efficient members have moved to 
other places and others have died. Among the latter, Mr. 
and Mrs. S. A. Hoyt, John Rudd and John Elmore are held 
in affectionate remembrance. 



262 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Indian Grove (Fairbury). 

Organized 1861, by John Miller; present membership, 35; 
value of property, $1,000. 

This location is six miles south of Fairbury. A union 
chapel was built in 1861 and Evangelist John Miller held a 
meeting at once. There were about fifty charter members. 

In its early period the congregation was served by Min- 
isters Sharpies, Spence, Loar, Hollo way, Houston, Robenson, 
Carrithers, Ledgerwood, Poynter and Markle. W. C. Chap- 
man, of Fairbury, now preaches for them Sunday afternoons. 
A union Bible school is maintained. The church of Christ 
only keeps up its public worship. 

Long Point. 

Organized 1889, by I. R. Spencer; present membership, 
151; value of property, $9,150; Bible school began 1889; 
present enrollment, 91. 

Minister Spencer led in a series of meetings in the Meth- 
odist Protestant chapel and the organization of a church of 
Christ immediately followed. There were sixty charter mem- 
bers. Ministers of the two congregations alternated in the 
use of the chapel until 1903. Then the Disciples, led by 
Min. M. L. Pontius, erected a good building of their own. 
In addition to a parsonage, built during the pastorate of 
Rochester Irwin, the church also owns a cottage for its jan- 
itor and nine lots for gardening. Mr. Irwin and wife gave 
fine service here. 

The church counts itself fortunate in having had for its 
ministers, in addition to those above named, F. W. Burnham, 
S. H. Zendt, H. G. Bennett, L. O. Lehman, F. W. Sutton, 
J. W. Camp, and now H. H. Jenner. 

Pontiac. 

Organized 1859, by D. D. Miller; present membership, 
377; value of property, $18,100; Bible school began 1859; 
present enrollment, 275. 



CHURCHES 263 

This church was the result of a series of evangelistic 
meetings conducted by Min. Washington Houston. The first 
meetings were held in the old schoolhouse on the bank of 
the Vermilion River. The church prospered under the min- 
istry of the Houston brothers, so that the place of meeting- 
was changed to the courthouse to accommodate the crowds 
of people. The first elders were John Powell, Henry Hill 
and James W. Perry. Mrs. D. J. Lyon is the sole surviving 
charter member. 

Mr. Newell was a schoolteacher and at the same time a 
minister in charge of the church. During his pastorate an 
agreement was made between the Disciples and the Christian 
Denomination to erect a union house of worship. It was a 
brick building without any claims to architectural beauty. 
However, it was honored by the presence of Abraham Lin- 
coln, who delivered an address therein. After five years the 
legal title was passed to the church of Christ exclusively, and 
later to Mr. Powell. "The organ question" came up ; the 
congregation became financially involved and disbanded. 

Quite a few drifted into other fellowships. But during 
all the years of spiritual ruin, eight or ten constituted a faith- 
ful band and met when and where they could to pray and 
remember the Lord in his appointments. 

In 1873, Min. J. G. Waggoner reorganized the church, 
since which it has gone steadily forward in usefulness. 
Charles Rowe became the first pastor. He was followed by 
students from Eureka. Meanwhile the women of the church 
bought the church property from the estate of Mr. Powell. 
The State Board fostered the reviving congregation. During 
the pastorate of G. W. McColley a new lot was bought and 
a modern church structure was erected in 1904. 

During the days of tribulation, Washington Houston con- 
ducted a public discussion in the old M. E. chapel with a 
representative of that denomination. 

The church is now vigorous and prosperous aggressive 
in all good works. It is a living link in the Eureka College. 
B. W. Tate is its efficient pastor. 



264 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

It has given to the ministry Charles Scrivens, L. F. Star- 
buck, Frank Cummings and M. L. Bodine. 

Saunemin. 

Organized 1874, by W. P. Carrithers; present member- 
ship, 139; value of property, including parsonage, $5,000; 
Bible school began 1874; present enrollment, 42. 

The organization was formed in the Bethel Schoolhouse. 
Then it met for worship in a hall in the village. The first 
chapel was built in 1887 at a cost of $2,000. This was 
burned in 1904. The same year a much better house was 
built, and also a parsonage. 

The congregation has passed many vicissitudes. Deaths 
and removals have greatly reduced the membership in late 
years. 

W. P. Carrithers has long been the mainstay in the 
church. The other two elders are George Moulds and S. D. 
Vawter. The deacons are Robert Williams, John Farr, W. 
S. Rustin, C. L. Farner and Mona Fieldcamp. 

H. C. Reichel preaches half-time. 

LOGAN COUNTY. 

It is a source of regret that no written records have been 
left of the first work of the preachers of the Disciples of 
Christ in Logan County. Without doubt there was preach- 
ing at a number of places in the thirties and forties by W. P. 
Bowles and his father (Hughes Bowles), by John England, 
Wm. Ryan, A. J. Kane and others. 

The first church of Christ, so far as discovered, was 
formed about 1848. It was located seven miles west of Mt. 
Pulaski, on the Springfield road. It was known as the 
Bridge Church because it stood near the bridge that spanned 
the stream called Lake Fork. It was probably organized by 
Father Morrow. At least, he preached there for years. 
Residing on his farm, it was his custom to come from his 
home to the meeting-house, riding a mule, with a sheepskin 
saddle and saddlebags. This congregation continued until 



CHURCHES 265 

about 1860. Then those members who lived on the west of 
the lake formed a congregation known as the Turley Church 
and built a small chapel four miles north of the site of Corn- 
land. Those residing east of the lake formed a congregation 
known as the Buckles Church and built a meeting-house two 
miles east of the old church and five miles west of Mt. 
Pulaski. This congregation continued to be an active Chris- 
tian force until 1905. Then some of its members went to Mt. 
Pulaski and some to the Lake Fork congregation. The 
chapel was moved to the Carlisle Cemetery, where it still 
stands. 

In the forties there was some preaching by Christian 
ministers and some conversions at French's ford, on Salt 
Creek, south of Lincoln, but whether a congregation was 
formed, could not be learned. 

In late years a congregation was formed at Lawndale, 
but it has become extinct. 

Armington. 

Organized 1828, by William Miller; present membership, 
222; value of property, including parsonage, $17,000; Bible- 
school enrollment, 300*. 

Hittle's Grove and the prairies round about it were as 
pleasing as any upon which human eyes ever rested. Into 
that locality, eighty-five years ago, the following named fami- 
lies began to settle: the Hittles and Judys from Ohio; the 
Albrights from Tennessee; the Burts, Quisenberrys, Hain- 
lines, Dills and Millers from Kentucky, and the Hieronymuses 
from Virginia. 

The first sermon ever preached in Hittle's Grove was by 
a Methodist minister named Walker, in a log cabin 16 x 16, 
owned by Michael Hittle. 

After a time two women of the settlement wished to be 
baptized and a Baptist minister was sent for. Finding no 
church there to vote on the fitness of the candidates, after 
deliberation it was decided to immerse them on the simple 
confession of their faith in Christ. Thereupon, a Baptist 



266 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

church was organized with the following charter members: 
William Miller and wife, Isaac Miller and wife, Walker 
Miller and wife, and Sarah Miller. 

On Jan. 11, 1829, this church became Christian only. The 
agreement signed with the seventeen names follows : 

We, the undersigned, do give ourselves to the Lord and to each 
other as a church of Jesus Christ to be governed by His word con- 
tained in the Old and New Testaments. William Miller and wife, 
Jacob Albright and wife Esther, Strother Hittle and wife, Robert 
Musick and wife, William Darnell and wife Sally, William Burt and 
wife China, Joseph Lancaster and wife Hannah, John Judy and wife 
Christena, Jacob Judy unmarried. 

These people met for public worship for a short time in 
their log-cabin homes, then used the log schoolhouse; later 
a church was built three miles west of the site of Armington. 
This served till 1865, when a more commodious house was 
built, one and a fourth miles west of Armington. In 1886, 
during the pastorate of John T. Owens, lots were bought in 
the village of Armington and the building moved to them. 
From this time the congregation was called by the name of 
the town. The last Lord's Day in August, 1906, the people 
bade a tender farewell to the old house; on the next Sunday 
they moved into their new and modern brick structure. J. 

C. Lappin was their pastor. 

Hittle Grove Church was a familiar name to all the old- 
time Disciples in central Illinois for a period of sixty-five 
years. Most of the pioneers preached there. In the thirties 
there were James Mitchell and Abner Peeler; in the forties, 
W. P. Bowles and G. W. Minier ; then later Samuel Knight, 
James A. and John Lindsey, William Davenport, Leroy 
Skelton, Daily Chaplain, Samuel and Joseph Lowe, L. M. 
Robinson, and Isaac and Elijah Stout. In recent years the 
pastors have been Mr. Edwards, Albert Nichols, J. E. Diehl, 
Mr. Jennette, E. J. Stanley, C. A. Heckel, J. E. Parker, W. 

D. Deweese, L. E. Chase, J. C. Lappin, and now R. B. Doan. 
In 1857 the church made the following report to the State 

meeting: "Members, 136; meet twice a month; we break the 



CHURCHES 267 

loaf once a month and have preaching once a month. We 
pay teaching brethren $2 a day." 

The Britt, Burt, Albright, Judy, Darnell, Hieronymus and 
Mason families have done much for the church. 

Atlanta. 

Organized 1855, by George W. Minier; present member- 
ship, 300; value of property, including parsonage, $14,000; 
Bible school began 1856; present enrollment, 302. 

This church was organized in the Baptist chapel, where 
meetings were held Lord's Day afternoons the first year. 
The first elders were C. F. Ewing and Andrew Wright; the 
first deacons, Jacob Judy and Jefferson Howser; James 
Shores, clerk. The additional twenty-five charter members 
were the following: J. P. Hawes and wife, Jefferson Britt 
and wife, T. H. Dills and wife, Ambrose Hall and wife, John 
Miller and wife, Calvin Riley and wife, George Dyer and 
wife, Dr. Arterburn and wife, Mrs. Dr. J. B. Tenney, Mrs. 
Sallie Strong, Mr. Gill and Mrs. Christenson. 

At Atlanta the Disciples were publicly depreciated in the 
early years by the self-styled orthodox people, as they were 
in most places. It was a town where infidelity ran riotously. 
But after the Burgess-Burrows debate in 1868, many phases 
of religion changed. 

The first pastor of the church was W. M. Guilford, who 
was at the same time principal of the public schools. Those 
who succeeded him were John Lindsay, W. P. Bowles, R. B. 
Chaplin, J. W. Monser, Leroy Skelton, Samuel and Joseph 
Lowe, J. A. Seaton, T. V. Berry, T. T. Holton, R. D. Cotton, 
R. W. Callaway, Dr. S. H. Bundy, L. M. Robinson. B. O. 
Aylesworth, L. G. Thompson, J. P. Davis, Mr. Miller, C. E. 
Selby, R. F. Thrapp, T. B. Stanley, L. W. Morgan, S. S. 
Lappin, W. R. Jinnett, Ivan W. Magee, and now R. H. 
Newton. 

The first church building was erected in 1856. A modern 
building was occupied in 1913. 

This church has given to the ministry J. H. Wright, Wai- 



268 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

ter Rhodes, Roy A. Miller and Merritt Hoblit, a missionary 
in Mexico. 

Bethel (Emden). 

Organized 1853, by William B. Ryan; present member- 
ship, 105; value of property, $5,000; Bible school began 
1853 ; present enrollment, 75. 

This congregation, located four and one-half miles east 
of Emden, grew out of the old Sugar Creek Church. A few 
members, desiring a more convenient place for their public 
worship, selected the site, which was given by one of the 
number, Norman Sumner. There were nineteen charter 
members, as follows: William B. and Elizabeth Ryan, Wil- 
liam R. and Elizabeth Shirley, Samuel and Jemima Waters, 
Jeremiah and Sarah A. Miller, Norman and Margaret Stun- 
ner, George G. and Melville Ryan, Jesse P. and Marial 
Bowles, David and Elizabeth Bowles, James W. and Henry 
Shirley, and Nancy Bevans, who married John Lumbeck. Of 
these, only three survive Sarah A. Miller, and James W. and 
Henry Shirley. The names of the other sixteen are read on 
the marble slabs in the four cemeteries located in two States. 

The first officers were: Elders, David Bowles and William 
R. Shirley; deacons, George G. Ryan and Jeremiah Miller; 
clerk, Norman Sumner, with two trustees. The Christian 
faith of the Bowles and Shirley families has been so excellent 
that some of their members have filled the office of elder 
during the sixty years of the church's life. 
, The first house was built in 1853. The men went to the 
forest, felled the trees, cut and hauled the logs together, and, 
with broadax, foot-adz and such other tools as they had, 
fashioned and built this first temple for the Lord. For a 
period of twenty years this house was the happy home of its 
builders and their children. In 1873 it gave place to the 
structure that is still in use. 

In addition to Mr. Ryan's, the old house heard the voices 
of Benjamin Franklin, G. W. Minier, W. P. Bowles, Dudley 
Downs, R. B. Chaplin, Leroy Skelton, Isaac Stout, Peter 



CHURCHES 269 

Hawes, James Mitchell, Charles Short, Peter Sheik, J. A. 
Seaton, R. D. Cotton, J. V. Beekman, Samuel Knight, Henry 
Smithers, S. C. Pruitt and many others. In addition to many 
of those who also ministered to the congregation in the new 
house, the following have served there: L. M. Robinson, T. 
T. Holton, G. VV. Warner, H. S. Mavity, J. C. Hall, J. W. 
Porter, J. E. Jewett, J. A. Barnett, I. L. Parvin, H. B. East- 
erling, F. B. Jones and R. E. Stevenson. 

This church has always been noted for the good common 
sense of its members. The spirit of brotherliness has always 
predominated. The people delighted to make others happy. 
In the period of the old house, families came to church in 
farm-wagons, seated with chairs which were carried into the 
house and used on occasion. The blankets and comforters 
which were used as wraps to protect from cold or rain were 
brought in at night and made into beds on seats or in a cor- 
ner on the floor, and there the little ones slept during the 
worship. This church is proud of the fact that it is a country 
church. Its watchwords through sixty years have been, 
"Move Forward." Many of its members have gone out to 
help in the Lord's work in the world. R. E. liieronymus 
began his Christian service here, and W. H. Kindred and 
Frank Sumner are in the ministry. 

The old songs were an inspiration, as they are yet a tender 
memory with many. 

C. R. Bowles has served as superintendent of the Sunday 
school for thirty years. In the earlier time children were 
encouraged to commit the Scriptures to memory and repeat 
them on Sundays. Many now past life's meridian can repeat 
whole chapters learned in childhood there. 

Through sixty years the table of the Lord has been 
spread on every first day of the week. Preaching is main- 
tained for half-time. The church is alive to all missionary 
activities. It has no other thought than to live by doing 
the will of God. The glorious memories of the past unite 
with the duties of the present in filling these people with 
high purposes. 



27C HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Broadwell. 

Organized 1863, by C. J. Berry; present membership, 99; 
value of property, $1,600; Bible school began 1863; present 
enrollment, 56. 

This church was formed in the public-school house with 
the following charter members : Samuel Buckley, Spencer 
Grogan, Jacob Eisminger, P. Eisminger, Elizabeth Eisminger, 
Mary Eisminger, Eliza Lloyd, Nancy Kline, Ellen Kline, May 
Critchfield, M. Wiley, L. Wiley and M. Wright. These per- 
sons organized as "The Church of Christ at Broadwell," upon 
the Bible as their creed and the New Testament as their 
only discipline. They "vowed before the Lord, angels and 
men to walk in obedience to the requirements of the gospel 
in all things." 

The church was built in 1864. 

Cop eland (Mt. Pulaski). 

Organized 1866, by John England; present membership, 
100; value of property, $4,000; Bible school began 1868; 
present enrollment, 125. 

This church is located seven miles southwest of Mt. 
Pulaski. It was organized at the Copeland Schoolhouse. 
The charter members were Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Harbert, 
Mr. and Mrs. David Birks, Mr. and Mrs. John Birks, Mr. 
and Mrs. William Copeland, Mr. and Mrs. Roland Birks, Mr. 
and Mrs. Abner Copeland, Polly Peters, George W. White- 
sides and Maria Copeland. 

The church house was built in 1867. An addition and 
repairs were made in 1906 at a cost of $400. It was mod- 
ernized in 1911 at a cost of $2,500. 

The congregation has been a leading force for good in 
the neighborhood there many years. 

The present officers are: Elders, Elmer Turley, Charles 
Bowers, Calvin Payne and J. H. Clendenen; deacons, George 
Bowers, Fred Bellatti, Stephen Edwards, R. Drabing and 
W. E. Simpson. 



CHURCHES 271 

Cornland. 

Organized 1874, by D. D. Miller; present membership, 
120; value of property, $1,350; Bible school began 1875; 
present enrollment, 72. 

A few years prior to the formation of the Cornland 
Church a congregation had been formed, and a small house 
erected four miles north of the town site, called the Turley 
Church. 

A series of meetings was held in the Day Schoolhouse in 
the village by D. D. Miller in 1874, which resulted in the 
formation of the church there. Of this the congregation 
four miles north became a part, and that building was moved 
into town. The congregation was much strengthened by a 
series of meetings conducted by Min. J. E. Cain in 1875. 
Many removals have reduced their numbers. 

Emden. 

Organized 1888, by W. H. Boles ; present membership, 
94; value of property, $2,500; Bible school began 1873; 
present enrollment, 70. 

A union Sunday school was formed in the public-school 
house in 1873 with E. L. Carnahan as superintendent. Three 
years thereafter gospel temperance meetings began to be held 
there on Sunday evening. Next came some sermons at the 
same time and place by G. W. Minier and R. B. Chaplin. 
A three weeks' meeting conducted by Evangelist Boles 
resulted in the organization of the church with fifty -three 
members. 

The house of worship was completed in 1889 and the 
organization perfected. Later an addition was built. 

The honored names in the congregation include Mr. J. 
L. Searle, Mrs. Lizzie Bennett and Mrs. Betsy Sumner. 

Eminence (Atlanta). 

Organized 1838, by its own members ; present member- 
ship, 180; value of property, $5,000; Bible school began 
1845 ; present enrollment, 62, 



272 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

This is a country church, located five miles northwest of 
Atlanta. It has been known by three or four local names. 
The first building was at Pekin Ford, near Morgan's Mill; 
hence it was first known as Morgan's Church. Later moved 
to the present site, where it was known as Smith Ewing or 
Sugar Creek Church ; the latter name, however, held through 
the larger part of the seventy-five years of its life. In recent 
years it has been known by the name of the township in 
which it is located. 

The first record reads as follows : 

On Lord's Day, June 17, 1838, the Brothers and Sisters whose 
respective names are hereafter annexed, do agree to live together in 
Gospel order, as a Church of Jesus Christ, to take the Word of 
God as the rule of faith and man of our council. The following are 
the names of the members who joined themselves together on the 
day above named : Robert Musick, Charles F. Ewing, Mary Ewing, 
Elizabeth Simmonds, Sarah Miller, Sarah Stroud, James Hieronymus, 
Barbary Johnson, Melinda Johnson, Catherine Thompson, Esther A. 
Hawes, Sarah Hawes. 

This was a spontaneous organization, originating among 
and completed by the members themselves. Lord's Day, 
Aug. 25, 1839, the elders elected were Charles F. Ewing and 
David G. Thompson, who were ordained on Lord's Day, the 
15th of the following month. The records give the names 
of those who have served the congregation as elders from 
that clay to the present time. 

Until 1845 the congregation met for worship where they 
could. In that year the first house was built, costing $1,000. 
This served eleven years and was then torn down. In 1856 
the second house, costing $1,600, was erected. After being 
used for thirty-five years it wasr sold. In 1891 the third 
building, costing $3,600, was occupied. This was burned in 
1901. The same year the present building, costing $6,000, 
was erected. It has a bell, a baptisterv and gasoline lights. 

Among the preachers of the earlier years there were 
Abner Peeler, Hughes and W. P. Bowles, William Daven- 
port, James A. Lindsey, John England, G. W. Minier, 
William Ryan, Baily Chaplain, L. M. Robinson, John Lind- 



CHURCHES 273 

sey, Isaac Stout, Leroy Skelton, Samuel and Joseph Lowe, 
J. V. Beekman and T. T. Holton. Alexander Campbell 
visited the church in 1844. 

The records show that the church has ordained the fol- 
lowing men to the ministry: William Ryan, George Hatfield 
and George Carlock. 

The church now has a resident minister for all the time 
and is flourishing. Sarah A. Miller, the only living charter 
member, resides in Atlanta. Elizabeth Howser, who united 
with the church the next day after its formation, also sur- 
vives at the age of ninety- four. 

In the early days, when harness for horses came into use, 
with lines to drive with, a member of this congregation 
bought a set. Not knowing how to attach the lines properly, 
he hitched his team to the wagon one Sunday morning, 
placed his wife and children in the wagon, then mounted one 
of the horses and thus took his family to church and home 
again. His "style" attracted no particular attention and 
called out no comments. 

One of the laymen produced by this church is responsible 
for the following: 

Business in Religion and Religion in Business. 

Before national banks were organized we had private or State 
banks issuing currency, or paper money, as in the fifties. I saw names 
of private parties placed on the backs of such bills with the dates ; 
so if they failed to pass they could be returned to those from whom 
they were received as "no good." Now we have currency good in 
any and all States. If that currency is best that is good in all the 
States, then that baptism is best that is good in all the churches, and 
we all know that immersion is good in all the churches. 

The following incident deserves to be rescued from 
oblivion. This picture is from the pleasing pen of Min. T. 
T. Holton. He says: 

In 1889 G. W. Minier called me to assist him in a meeting at the 
Sugar Creek Church. He was then in his seventy-sixth year. He 
said to me, "Bro. Holton, you do the preaching and I'll do the bap- 
tizing." This was a very successful meeting. There were forty-three 
added to the church thirty-eight by confession and baptism. When 



274 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

we went to select a place for baptism we found Sugar Creek too scant 
of water. We crossed the creek and found a beautiful little lake. The 
venerable Peter Bruner, who had been an elder in the church for 
a long time, was with us. He had done the baptizing for the church 
for many years, but had become too frail for the task. While the 
good elder and I were looking for a pole to test the depth of the 
water, we heard a splash and, turning suddenly, we saw Bro. Minier 
swimming around in the lake. It was late in October and there had 
been two cold spells that froze ice. Bro. Minier was not afraid of 
water. It was his custom to bathe every morning, sometimes of neces- 
sity at great inconvenience. He thoroughly explored the lake and 
marked a good place for the baptism. He had secreted a towel in 
his pocket, and, having thoroughly dried and reclothed himself, said, 
"Brethren, now for the 'Wolf's Den.' " This took us up quite a 
steep high hill, Bro. Minier in the lead. From the "Wolf's Den" 
we viewed the landscape. Then Bro. Minier set about gathering some 
botanical specimens. As we returned to the Bruner home, at his sug- 
gestion we visited the Eminence school. Of course Bro. Minier was 
asked to address the school. The plants he held in his hand he made 
his text. He gave their common names, also their botanical names, 
and descanted on the leaves, the bark, the roots, the sap, fruit, etc., to 
the delight of the whole school. When the day of the baptism came, an 
urgent matrimonial engagement called him, so I had to do the bap- 
tizing. It was the most beautiful scene I ever saw. The lake was 
surrounded by sugar maples and the leaves were like gold. It was 
a beautiful afternoon and the great crowd of people gathered there 
was quiet and reverent. The sloping ground gave all an opportunity 
to see and hear. I gave an invitation at the water's edge. A young 
lady came forward. Her mother approached and whispered to me, 
"My daughter is deaf and dumb. She is educated and I think she 
understands the step she desires to take." This was the first experience 
I had ever had in introducing a deaf mute into the kingdom. I took 
a blank book and pencil from my side pocket and wrote, "Do you 
believe with all your heart that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God?" 
In response she took the pencil and wrote, "I do." And I baptized her. 

Hartsburg. 

Organized 1870; present membership, 29; value of prop- 
erty, $600; Bible school began 1870; present enrollment, 48. 

The early records of the church were lost. A few Disci- 
ples living in the country near the village began meetings 
for public worship. Later a building was erected on the 
farm of Henry Musick. Within four or five years nearly 
all of the original members moved away, some to other 



CHURCHES 275 

States. In 1875, under the lead of Fielding Musick, the 
chapel was moved to Hartsburg, where it is yet used. 

Lake Fork. 

Organized 1905, by J. D. Williams; present membership, 
100; value of property, including parsonage, $3,200; Bible 
school began 1905 ; present enrollment, 100. 

This congregation is the product and continuance of the 
Buckles Church. The village grew up after the railroad was 
built. 

The chapel was built in 1903. 

Besides Minister Williams, the congregation has been 
served by M. M. Snow, D. H. Carrick and M. M. Hughes. 

The officers are Henry Horn and W. L. Follis, elders, 
with C. M. Shinn, Wm. Tebus, Galveston Thuer, E. R. 
Jones and Obid Gaffney, deacons. 

Latham. 

Organized 1891, by J. O. Sutherland ; present member- 
ship, 250; value of property, $15,000; Bible school began 
1891; present enrollment, 113. 

The church was the first result of a series of meetings 
conducted by Minister Sutherland. He also served the con- 
gregation two terms as its pastor. Those who succeeded him 
were G. W. Hughes, Mr. Weather ford, Z. M. Brubeck, C. 
S. Weaver, D. A. Lindsey, and now Ira A. Engle. 

The first chapel was built during the ministry of Mr. 
Sutherland and occupied early in 1892. The present excel- 
lent modern structure was erected during the pastorate of 
Mr. Weaver. It cost $13,325, and was finished in 1910. 

This church is largely rural. Its auxiliaries are large and 
active. In 1912 it paid $325 for general benevolences. 

Lincoln. 

Organized 1856, by W. H. Brown ; present membership, 
695; value of property, including parsonage, $29,000; Bible 
school began 1856; present enrollment, 370. 



276 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

John England and Walter P. Bowles preached the primi- 
tive gospel in various parts of Logan County in the forties 
and early fifties. One place they visited was French's Ford, 
on Salt Creek, about four miles south of Lincoln. Among 
those who became Christians was Miss Sarah Wade, who 
married Fred Wolf. When the town of Lincoln was 
started, Mr. Wolf, with others, moved there. He has fur- 
nished these facts. He was born in 1831. Thomas H. 
Denny had bought a farm near Lincoln and settled on it. 
Being a Disciple, he sent for Evangelist "Billy Brown," who 
held a series of meetings and constituted a church. There 
were about thirty charter members, Mrs. Wolf being one of 
these. The first officers were T. H. Denny and Hopkins C. 
Judy, elders, and Charles H. Miller and John M. Edwards, 
deacons. 

Meetings for public worship were held in Boren's Hall, 
in a warehouse and other places. In 1854 they set to build 
a chapel that was finished the next year. After its enclosure 
it required a struggle of years to pay for it. The Circuit 
Court was held in this building in 1856, as the courthouse 
had burned just before that time. The present modern 
edifice was erected in 1903-04, during the pastorate of W. 
H. Cannon. 

Other ministers include Dr. J. M. Allen, J. S. Sweeney, 
Alexander Johnson, Allen H. Rice, Charles L. Berry, George 
Owen, B. W. and N. H. Johnson, T. V. Berry, H. D. Clark, 
G. W. Minier, S. C. Humphrey, R. A. Gilcrist, Jesse 
Gresham, Dr. S. H. Bundy, T. T. Holton, W. H. Cannon, 
J. E. Jewett, T. F. Weaver, Albert Nichols, E. A. Gilliland 
and G. W. Wise. 

Among those who did much for the church were John A. 
Simpson, R. C. Maxwell, H. O. Merry and L. P. Hanger; 
they merit remembrance. Three charter members are still 
living Mrs. B. F. Warfield, Mrs. Wielan Ryan and Mrs. 
Ellen Chowning. 

Not many years since the church "had a revival" that is 
said to have been a distinct injury. 



CHURCHES 277 

Mt. Pulaski. 

Organized 1868, by D. D. Miller; present membership, 
361 ; value of property, $9,000 ; Bible school began 1868 ; 
present enrollment, 271. 

Min. D. D. Miller conducted a series of meetings in a 
public hall on the west side of the public square in the fall 
of 1868. This resulted in *he organization of the church, in 
the following spring, of thirty members. Of these only two 
are left living Mrs. Caroline Snyder and Mrs. Amanda 
Prompelly, who have continued faithfully. The first elders 
were Alfred Samms and Samuel Turley. 

Through the efforts of Mrs. Pomelia Fisher and others, 
a lot was bought and a building, costing $2,000, was erected 
in 1870. In 1906, during the pastorate of David A. Lindsay, 
the old building was removed and its materials used in the 
construction of a modern house, costing $10,000. 

For a number of years the church was without preach- 
ing and the congregation dwindled, but in 1887 a new start 
was made, since which time the church has gone steadily 
forward. 

The pastorate of Gilbert Jones was especially fruitful. 

The Bible school is front rank, while the missionary and 
benevolent offerings continue to grow. 

M'DONOUGH COUNTY. 

In 1832 the first Christian Church was organized in 
McDonough County at a point about one and a half miles 
north of Blandinsville, known as the Liberty Christian 
Church. Here the people of two pioneer settlements met to 
worship, the one known as the Jobe settlement a few miles 
to the south, and the other a few miles to the north, com- 
posed of a number of families, among whom were the 
Brightwells, Bradshaws, Cyruses and Hustons. In 1842 the 
town of Blandinsville was laid out and platted. In 1849 
Liberty was abandoned as a meeting-place and the church 
of Blandinsville was organized by the members of the Jobe 



278 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

settlement. And about the same time the members of the 
north settlement organized the Bedford Church. 

Blandinsville. 

Organized 1849; present membership, 384; value of prop- 
erty, $25,000 ; Bible school began 1861 ; present enrollment, 
164. 

The history of the church at Blandinsville is not materially 
different from others of like environments. The following 
have served as preachers or pastors: James K. Knox, Uriah 
Long, A. J. Kane, James D. Eads, John Rigdon, Milton 
Dodge, James R. Ross, Cornelius Ades, Patrick Murphy, 
Bedford Murphy, J. M. Martin, Robert Lieurance, J. H. 
Coffee, S. K. Hallam, H. R. Trickett, J. F. Leek, T. H. 
Goodnight, G. F. Adams, M. P. Hay den, J. Carroll Stark, 
George W. Ross, William Sumpter, J. S. Clements, W. A. 
Malone, Clarence Townley, Edward Richey, A. M. Hale, M. 
C. R. Wolford and D. J. Elsla. 

The third house of worship was finished in 1911. It is 
a modern and beautiful structure with a seating capacity of 
eight hundred. The congregation has held many admirable 
people in its membership. It has given Allen Hitch and Win. 
Enders to the ministry. 

Bushnell. 

Present membership, 20; value of property, $2,500; Bible- 
school enrollment, 23. 

Many efforts have been made to establish a good church 
here, but without success. 

Central ( Blandinsville ) . 

Present membership, 50; value of property, $3,000; Bible- 
school enrollment, 60. 

Colchester. 

Organized 1867, by Cornelius Ades ; present membership, 
190; value of property, $8,000; Bible school began 1867; 
present enrollment, 140. 



CHURCHES 279 

The church was formed in the public-school house. The 
chapel was built in 1870, repaired in 1901 and burned in 

1908. A new brick structure was finished in 1908. 

Colmar. 

Organized 1906, by Edward Stebbins; present member- 
ship, 140; value of property, $1,000; Bible school began 
1906; present enrollment, 55. 

Fandon. 

Organized 1898, by F. M. Branic; present membership, 
80; value of property, $1,500; Bible school began 1898; pres- 
ent enrollment, 108. 

The church was constituted in Woodman Hall with forty- 
three charter members. The chapel was first occupied in 
.1903. 

Macomb. 

Organized 1845, by A. J. Kane; present membership, 
500; value of property, including parsonage, $29,500; Bible 
school began 1848; present enrollment, 427. 

Mr. Kane at that time was a young evangelist ; held a 
meeting of days, at the close of which Dr. Young came and 
assisted in perfecting the organization. The courthouse was 
the first place of meeting. A small frame chapel was soon 
built, which served till 1877. Then a second frame building 
costing $4,400. The present modern edifice was erected in 

1909. Some pastors who served the church were Levi 
Hatchett, W. W. Hopkins, W. P. Shockley, W. O. Miller, 
Samuel Lowe, J. C. Reynolds, J. H. Garrison, P. K. Dibble, 
J. H. Smart and G. W. Mapes two periods. 

Those given to the ministry were J. S. Gash, D. H. 
Shields, Samuel G. Buckner, Champ Clark, G. W. Buckner, 
Geo. L. Purdy, Clarence L. Timmons and Abram E. Cory, 
a missionary in China. The membership has always held 
a number of people who were representative in the com- 
munity and the kingdom. 



280 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Alexander Campbell visited the church in his later years. 
Mrs. Margaret Martin is now (1913) the only living 
member who united in the Kane meeting. 

New Philadelphia. 

Present membership, 86; value of property, $2,000; Bible- 
school enrollment, 78. 

New Salem (Adair). 

Organized 1859, by J. B. Royal ; value of property, 
$2,000; Bible school began 1859. 

The church was formed in the Wetsel Schoolhouse with 
sixteen charter members, all of whom have gone to their 
reward. W. A. Griffin and Daniel Wilson were the first 
elders, with Josiah Herlocker and Caleb Hipsley, deacons. 

The chapel was built in 1867. 

M. W. Crim is the correspondent. 

Old Bedford (Stronghurst). 

Organized 1849 ; present membership, 125 ; value of prop- 
erty, including parsonage, $3,250 ; Bible-school enrollment, 60. 

This place is six miles north of Blandinsville. It is a 
country church that has lived long and done well for its 
members and the community. 

Sciota. 

Present membership, 62; value of property, $1,000; 
Bible-school enrollment, 57. 

M'HENRY COUNTY. 
North Crystal Lake. 

Present membership, 30 ; value of property, including par- 
sonage, $2,100; Bible-school enrollment, 35. 

In the sixties a few congregations were formed in this 



CHURCHES 281 

county by ministers from Lake County. They lived only a 
few years. 

M'LEAN COUNTY. 

Ebenezer Rhodes was born in Holland in 1780. Coming 
to America, he first settled in Maryland, thereafter moved 
to Ohio, and in 1824 came to Illinois and settled in Keg's 
Grove, so called because a keg with some whisky in it was 
found there. Within a few years the name was changed to 
Blooming Grove, which it still retains. It is five miles south 
of Bloomington. Mr. Rhodes was a Baptist preacher. He 
preached whenever and wherever he could get two or three 
families together. In those early years he preached at 
Hittle's Grove, Cheney's Grove, Sugar Grove, Long Point, 
Big Grove, Twin Grove, Dry Grove, Blooming Grove, at 
the head of the Mackinaw and elsewhere. He was the first 
preacher in McLean County, and is said to have married the 
first couple in the county; namely, Thomas Orendorff and 
Miss Malinda Walker. Mr. Rhodes organized the first 
church in the county. This was in 1824, in his own house 
in Blooming Grove. There, so it is said by some, were seven 
charter members; namely, Ebenezer Rhodes and wife, and 
his sons (John H. S. and Samuel Rhodes) and their wives, 
and the other, it is believed, was Jeremiah Rhodes. 

Reuben Carlock was a native of Overton County, Tenn. 
He came to Illinois in 1827. and on October 10 settled in 
Dry Grove, five miles southwest of the present site of Car- 
lock. Mr. Carlock's family was the fifth to settle in Dry 
Grove. That was then a part of Tazewell County. In that 
year the county-seat was located at Mackinaw town. There 
were then five families in Twin Grove, seven families in 
Stout's Grove, three families in Brown's Grove, thirteen 
families in Keg's or Blooming Grove, two families in Funk's 
Grove and one family in Three Miles Grove. All of the first 
settlers made their homes along the timber. Indians were 
then many in this section. Old Town was one of their 
camps. It was a strip of timber some two miles wide, thir- 



282 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

teen miles east of Bloomington. The country was full of 
deer, wild turkeys, prairie chickens and pigeons. These set- 
tlers traded at Springfield and Pekin. 

William Brown was a Christian preacher who came from 
Tennessee to Dry Grove, 111., in 1828. He was a friend of 
Reuben Carlock. In August of that year, Mr. Carlock 
hitched up his ox team, and, accompanied by some members 
of his own family and his guest, Preacher Brown, drove to 
the cabin of Ebenezer Rhodes, in Blooming Grove, for a 
three days' meeting. It was during this meeting that the 
Rhodes and Carlock families were united in one church. 
Whether the organization above referred to did not take 
place till this year, or whether it was reorganized upon 
receiving the Carlocks, is not clear. But when these families 
were united in that little church in August, 1828, Ebenezer 
Rhodes, the recognized leader, said : "And now, brethren, we 
must have some articles of faith." 

Whereupon Reuben Carlock, drawing a small copy of the 
New Testament from his pocket and holding it up, said: 
"Bro. Rhodes, this Book has all the articles of faith we 
need." 

Mr. Rhodes at once in full assurance answered: "That 
is true." 

Then and there a primitive and apostolic church of 
Christ was born. From that time Mr. Rhodes was known 
as a Christian minister. He continued to preach the gospel, 
without the admixture of human traditions, till his death in 
1842. Later the members went to other local churches. 
Preacher Brown returned to Tennessee. 

Grassy Ridge was another fruitful little vine that served 
its generation well and then went the way of all flesh. It 
was located five miles south of Bloomington ; on Morris 
Avenue, and was organized by Min. J. G. Campbell in the 
White Schoolhouse in 1853 with thirteen charter members. 
In 1854 a chapel was built on a piece of ground donated by 
Mr. Campbell. The congregation grew and prospered and 
did much good. It was pervaded by the admirable spirit of 



CHURCHES 283 

its leader, Mr. Campbell. He saw to it that many of the fine 
ministers of the Restoration movement preached there. In 
1886, by a formal action, the church disbanded, the members 
uniting with near-by congregations Lytleville, Heyworth, 
Shirley, Blooming Grove and Bloomington. Trustees for 
the cemetery were incorporated under the civil statute. 

The Blooming Grove Church was organized again in 1872 
by State Evangelist John Lindsay and County Evangelist 
W. G. Anderson. In 1862 a Sunday school was formed at 
the Walker Schoolhouse. Mrs. W. J. Rhodes was superin- 
tendent, and Mrs. Amos Cox, the wife of a Presbyterian 
minister, and Miss Sallie Walker were the teachers. A 
decade later the church was constituted with twenty-six char- 
ter members. 

The well-to-do farmers moved away, so after a period 
of thirty-eight years the church was closed in November, 
1910. Most of the members have united with the Blooming- 
ton Church or with the church at Heyworth. 

Anchor. 

Organized 1884, by Dr. A. W. Green ; present member- 
ship, 17; value of property, $1,000; Bible school began 1884; 
none at present. 

Worship was first held in the schoolhouse. The old 
Antioch Church building was moved to Anchor when its 
membership was transferred to Colfax. There were thirty- 
seven charter members, but the church has been weakened i 

by removals. 

Arrow smith. 

Organized 1879, by H. G. Van Dervoort ; present member- 
ship, 142; value of property, including parsonage, $14,250; 
Bible school began 1879; present enrollment, 134. 

This church was the immediate result of a series of meet- 
ings conducted by Min. H. G. Van Dervoort in the old United 
Brethren chapel. However, previous organizations in this 
vicinity were also contributing factors. Min. Moses H. 
Knight, one of the earlier evangelists of this county, and 



284 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

J. G. Campbell began preaching to the people south of Ells- 
worth in 1858. Later the congregation removed to the West 
log schoolhouse and an organization of eighteen members 
was formed under the leadership of Russell Watson. They 
grew in numbers and strength so that in 1868 a frame build- 
ing was erected three and one-half miles southwest of 
Arrowsmith, which was known as the Pleasant Ridge 
Church. This house was dedicated by Uncle Jimmie Robeson. 
Later this building was torn down and the material worked 
into the Arrowsmith Church. 

In 1865 a revival was held in the Center Schoolhouse, 
one-half mile south of the site of Arrowsmith. A small 
organization was formed which in 1868 united with the 
Pleasant Ridge Church. 

In 1873, Evangelist George F. Adams held a series of 
meetings in the Martin Valley United Brethren Church. 
These brethren were very kind to the Disciples until, under 
the preaching of Mr. Adams, people began to turn to the 
Lord ; then the Brethren turned him and those working with 
him out of their house. The Martin Valley Church of 
Christ was formed with sixty-one members. J. G. Campbell 
helped in this work. These several local congregations came 
into the Arrowsmith Church at the time of its organization. 

This church has a commendable pride in all the Lord's 
work. 

It has given C. D. Hougham to the ministry. 

Bellflower. 

Organized 1891, by J. S. Clements; present membership, 
196; value of property, including parsonage, $12,000; Bible- 
school enrollment, 139. 

Pioneer John England preached the primitive gospel in 
Osman. a village in the southeast corner of McLean County, 
in 1875-76. At that time a Sunday school was held there in 
the public-school house. In 1877 a church of twelve mem- 
bers was formed, probably by John W. Snyder. In 1885 a 
union church was built to be used one-half time each by the 



CHURCHES 285 

church of Christ and the Protestant Methodist congregation. 
In 1886, J. H. Gilliland held a successful revival there. But 
so many of the members moved away that the church dis- 
banded in 1892. Most of those who were left united with the 
church at Bellflower. 

Mr. and Mrs. William McDaniel led the work that pro- 
duced this church. Min. J. S. Clements held a tent meeting 
there in the summer of 1891. That fall a house costing 
$3,500 was built and the church was weak. The present 
modern edifice was completed in 1913. 

Bloomington First. 

Organized 1837, by Mr. William T. Major; present mem- 
bership, 1,666; value of property, $47,500; Bible-school 
enrollment, 601. 

This church was organized in the home of Mr. Major, 
which was then on the southwest corner of Front and East 
Streets. There were thirteen charter members ; namely, Mr. 
and Mrs. W. T. Major and their two daughters (Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Hawks and Mrs. Judith H. Bradner) and one son (John 
now living at Davenport, la.), Mr. and Mrs. Martin Scott, 
"Father" Maxwell and two daughters, and three others 
whose names are not known. This little company met regu- 
larly for worship in the home of Mr. Major, who was the 
leading spirit. 

About 1840 a small frame church was built on East 
Street, between Front and Grove Streets. In those years 
the church was helped by the able ministry of James A. Lind- 
say, James Robeson, W. P. Bowles, William Davenport and 
W. H. Brown. Dr. W. O. Warriner was a leading elder 
and preacher during that period. 

In 1856 the lot at the corner of West Jefferson and North 
West (now Roosevelt) Streets was purchased for $1,500 in 
gold and a two-story brick building erected thereon at a 
cost of $8,000. The house was occupied in January, 1857, 
Charles Louis Loos preaching the first sermon. Some of the 
leaders in this enterprise were E. H. Didlake, Thomas P. 



286 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Brown, Edwin Boston, Dr. E. K. Crothers, F. W. Emerson, 
Robert Moore, E. W. Bakewell and R. E. Williams, all of 
whom have passed to the higher life. 

The pastors who served the church were Leroy Skelton, 
T. V. Berry, D. R. Van Buskirk (two terms), Henry S. 
Earl, J. H. McCullough, A. I. Hobbs, H. D. Clark and B. 
J. Radford, who filled interregnums. The pastorate of 
J. W. Lamphear was uniting and healing. 

J. H. Gilliland came to the pastorate in February, 1888. 
He says: "I entered upon the work with fear and trembling." 
A few years proved him to be a masterful leader. In 1890 
the old building gave place to a new and modern structure. 
In this church Mr. Gilliland's ministry was richly blessed. 
In 1894, without any outside help, 480 additions were made 
to the church. There were influential men of fine character 
who gave him good support, among whom were Dr. G. D. 
Sitherwood, M. Swan, Henry Kiser, Peter Whitmer, J. T. 
Lillard, H. J. Higgins and Jacob Bergman, the faithful and 
much loved doorkeeper in the house of the Lord. Mr. Gilli- 
land came to the church with about four hundred members 
and left, after a ministry of fourteen and a half years, with 
a membership of 1,550. 

Those succeeding him were Arthur Wilson, W. R. Lloyd 
and Edgar D. Jones, the present pastor. 

Those who have gone to minister to the world's needs 
through the gospel were Knox P. Taylor, S. M. Jefferson, 
W. W. Denham, Otto C. Moomaw, D. W. Madden and Mrs. 
Kate Lawrence-Brown, a missionary in India. N. W. Evans 
is preparing for the work of the ministry. 

The church maintained a mission Sunday school on Moul- 
ton Street for forty years. It was closed the last Lord's Day 
in 1912 because of a lack of teachers. 

The church has a fine record for Christian hospitality. 
From 1853 to 1900 it entertained the State Missionary Con- 
vention seven times free. Other assemblies have enjoyed 
the generosity of its people. 

Leroy Skelton, while pastor, fell sick and died July 4, 



CHURCHES 287 

1870. Alonzo A. Wilson, another pastor, was stricken by 
the great Destroyer March 4, 1903. J. H. Gilliland, while 
not pastor of the First Church at the time, yet enshrined in 
the hearts of its people, fell before the great Reaper Apr. 
29, 1912. Few churches have such a heritage of tender and 
glorious memories of mighty men. 

Bloomington Second. 

Organized 1902, by J. H. Gilliland ; present membership, 
565; value of property, $30,000; Bible school began 1902; 
present enrollment, 276. 

This church is a child of the mind and heart of J. H. 
Gilliland. The First Church approved the movement upon 
two conditions : first, that one hundred persons enter into 
covenant to become charter members, and. second, that 
$10,000 be pledged for the new property. The building is 
located at the corner of North Evans and East Mulberry 
Streets and was finished and occupied in November. The 
entire indebtedness was provided for before the dedication, 
which was conducted by Mr. Gilliland. He continued as pas- 
tor until July, 1909, when he was succeeded by S. H. Zendt, 
the present minister. 

The church has sent into the ministry Alva Ragsdale, W. 
B. Phillips and Prof. O. L. Lyon, who came from the M. 
E. Church and is a teacher in Texas Christian University. 

Bloomington Third. 

Organized 1901, by E. M. Harlis; present membership, 
40; value of property, including parsonage, $4,000; Bible 
school began 1901 ; present enrollment, 18. 

This is a church of negroes. There were thirteen char- 
ter members. They now own a beautiful pebble-dash church. 

Bloomington Centennial. 

Organized 1910, by J. H. Gilliland ; present membership, 
241; value of property, $25,000; Bible school began 1908; 
present enrollment, 257. 



288 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

In February, 1908, a lot at the corner of East Grove 
Street and Willard Avenue was purchased by Mrs. Aaron 
Rhodes, Dr. O. M. Rhodes and J. H. Gilliland, with the hope 
that, in due time, there might be a new church built upon it. 

In March following, the officers and members of the 
Second Christian Church formally resolved to establish a 
church east of the Illinois Central Railroad, and seventy 
members signed an agreement to constitute themselves into 
a church when the enterprise could be placed on a satisfactory 
financial basis and a suitable building, erected on the above 
designated lot, should be ready for occupancy. 

Action was taken in October following, and the building 
was completed, furnished and first occupied May 1, 1910. 
Mr. Gilliland preached the dedicatory sermon. September 1 
following, he turned the pastorate of the church over to 
Milo Atkinson. Previously the incorporated name adopted 
was "Centennial Christian Church of Bloomington, 111." It 
enjoys a strategic location and promises large usefulness. 

Buck Creek (Lexington). 

Organized 1850, by P. M. Connors and Dr. Young; pres- 
ent membership, 30; value of property, $1,000. 

There were thirteen charter members, among them Mr. 
and Mrs. John Franklin, Sr. ; John Franklin, Jr. ; Thomas 
Pirtle, Samuel Scott, Uriah Hanson, William Hanson and 
Mrs. Andrew Pirtle. The first meetings were held in the 
groves, residences, schoolhouses, and the barn of John 
Franklin. In 1869 the first house was built, but several 
miles west of the first site. It is still in good condition and 
in use. 

The earlier preachers were James Robeson, J. G. Camp- 
bell. J. S. Stagner, H. D. Ledgerwood, M. H. Knight and 

T. W. Schick. . , 

Carlo ck. 

Organized 1836, by Henry D. Palmer; present member- 
ship, 250; value of property, including parsonage, $4,300; 
Bible-school enrollment, 139. 



CHURCHES 289 

On Aug. 13, 1836, Henry D. Palmer, William Daven- 
port and James Robeson united in a meeting for public 
worship at White Oak Grove in the wild, open woods. Those 
mighty men of God, pioneers in a new country and of a 
better faith, have long since gone to their rewards. On that 
August day they were young, agile and masterful in their 
faith. Then and there the White Oak Grove Church was 
born. For half a century this church held faithfully on its 
way and ministered to the needs of the community. Most 
of the pioneer preachers of central Illinois proclaimed the 
gospel there at various times. Among these was Abner 
Peeler, who, some now say, organized the church. The 
meetings were held in the homes of the people, in school- 
houses and groves until 1854, when a house was built. 
Evidently it was a good house, since it served the church 
for thirty-five years and was then sold and moved to Conger- 
ville for a union church. 

The building of a railway grew the town of Carlock. A 
church building was erected there and on Aug. 13, 1889, the 
place of meeting was transferred. Thus, after fifty-three 
years, to a day, of life and service, the White Oak Grove 
Church "fell on sleep." Among those who contributed to 
its strength and usefulness there were Jonas Benson, John 
Benson, Sr. and Jr. ; William Benson, Reuben and Abram 
Carlock and Reuben Brown. 

The ministers who have served the Carlock Church were 
G. A. Miller, C. C. Rowlison, S. T. Spitler, C. S. Medbury, 
S. H. Zendt, R. L. Beshers, J. S. Smith, J. N. Thomas, E. 
E. Boyer, and now Miss Myrtle B. Parke. 

Colfax. 

Organized 1867, by James Robeson; present membership, 
308; value of property, $18,500; Bible school began 1867; 
present enrollment, 300. 

The first organization of the Christian Church on upper 
Mackinaw was in 1859 at the Wiley Schoolhouse, one-half 

mile west of the present site of Colfax. There the work was 
10 



290 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

carried on four years by Mins. W. G. Anderson, A. W. 
Green and Speed Stagner. This congregation disbanded in 
1863 because the members were so widely separated. They 
affiliated with more convenient churches of Christ. 

In 1867, James Robeson held a meeting in a schoolhouse 
two and a half miles southeast of the site of Colfax, and 
instituted a church with sixteen members. This congrega- 
tion used several schoolhouses until in the early seventies, 
when a chapel, that was called Antioch, was built two and 
a half miles north on a piece of ground given by Min. M. 
H. Knight. The railway came in 1880 and the town of 
Colfax was born. Meetings for public worship began there 
in 1881. The membership of Antioch was gradually merged 
into Colfax. A house was built in 1883. This served the 
congregation until 1907, when the present modern house was 
erected during the pastorate of N. H. Robertson. 

William Poynter gave the Antioch Church good service. 
At Colfax there were W. G. Anderson, Dr. A. W. Green, 
Speed Stagner, M. H. Knight, H. W. Everest, J. F. Ghorm- 
ley, W. G. Campbell, Jasper Hieronymus, Dr. Sabin, A. L. 
Sabin, A. W. Dean, J. S. Clements, John Lemmon, John Gid- 
dens, J. D. Dabney, J. H. Smart, C. D. Purlee, P. Baker, C. 
W. Dean, N. H. Robertson and G. R. Southgate. 

The church has given to the ministry James W. Knight 
and Lawrence B. Anderson. 

Cooksville. 

Organized 1902, by John R. Golden ; present membership, 
144; value of property, $4,000; Bible school began 1902; 
present enrollment, 86. 

The Blue Mound Church was organized by John S. 
Stagner in 1862. It was an influential church in the country 
for nearly forty years until the railways came through on 
both sides of it and towns grew up on these lines. It gave 
four men to the ministry John S. Stagner and his son, John 
S. Stagner, Jr. ; H. G. Van Dervoort and John R. Golden. 

In 1894 members from Blue Mound organized a church 



CHURCHES 291 

at Cooksville. A restricting clause was written in the deed 
to the church lot which led many members to hold them- 
selves aloof. A C. W. B. M. auxiliary was formed in 1902. 
Through the lead of these women, Minister Golden con- 
ducted a revival there in the fall of that year and started 
the church on its useful way. The old Blue Mound building 
was torn down and the material used in the construction of 
that at Cooksville. 

Ellsworth. 

Organized 1867, by John Houston ; present membership, 
100; value of property, $2,000; Bible school began 1867; 
present enrollment, 90. 

James Mitchell, James Robeson and G. W. Minier were 
the earlier ministers ; later they were A. A. Burr, Louis 
Goos, Roby Orahood and A. F. Larson. 

Previous to this date there was a church at "Old Town" 
that contributed to the life of the church at Ellsworth. The 
Old Town Church was the product of pioneer laborers. 

Gridlcy, 

Organized by Upton Coombs; present memoership, 50; 
value of property, $2,000; Bible-school enrollment, 40. 

Mr. Gridley, for whom this place was named, gave the 
church its lot because it was the first congregation to begin 
work there. John Lambert and William Wilson, who was a 
Presbyterian, hauled blocks from the timber for the founda- 
tion of the building. Among the first members were John 
and Nancy Lambert, James and Ursley Locke, Silas Green- 
man and wife, Thomas and Elizabeth Tarmen, and Joseph 
Huston and wife. Min. James Robeson reorganized the 
church in 1878. H. D. Ledgerwood preached there eleven 
years. He was a sincere and consecrated preacher, but the 
adverse conditions in the community were many. R. L. 
Beshers, J. E. Prophater, Osceola McNemar and C. H. 
Scrivens followed. 

Reduced by removals, the church has had a precarious life. 



292 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Heyworth. 

Organized 1872, by J. S. Stagner; present membership, 
261 ; value of property, $10,000 ; Bible school began 1882 ; 
present enrollment, 207. 

While serving as county evangelist, Mr. Stagner held 
a seven weeks' meeting here in the winter of 1871-72. The 
public hall on the second floor was used. The singing was 
led by Mr. M. W. Powell without the aid of any instrument. 
His home was four miles out in the country, yet he missed 
only one service during the entire meeting. The religious 
peace of the village was greatly disturbed by Mr. Stagner's 
plain, earnest and Scriptural preaching. The town was 
vibrant with arguments on Biblical questions. However, 
some "who came to scoff remained to pray." There were 
twelve charter members. To these, many were added during 
this revival. The baptizing was done in the Kickapoo one 
mile north of town. The ice was cut away at the place used. 

A year later a church building was erected. This served 
till 1906, when a modern building was erected and occupied 
during the pastorate of J. P. Givens. 

Mr. Stagner became pastor of the church in 1872 and 
died during the year a good, brave soldier, who fell on 
the firing-line. 

The earlier years of the church were disturbed by "the 
organ question," but its vision cleared and it has come to be 
a strong and useful body of believers. As farmers became 
well-to-do and moved to town, the churches at Grassy Ridge, 
Lytleville, Long Point and Fairview contributed to the 
growth and strength of Heyworth. 

It has given to the ministry Frank Davis and Roy O. 
Ball. 

Holder. 

Organized 1867, by Robert Moore; present membership, 
35; value of property, $1,000; no Bible school. 

This church was organized as "The Evergreen Congre- 
gation of Disciples." Three years later the name was 



CHURCHES 293 

changed to "The Benjamanville Christian Church." This 
was about the time of the dedication of the building at Ben- 
jamanville, at which time the Christian Church of Mt. 
Prospect united with them. In 1877 the house was moved 
to Holder and the name changed accordingly. It has never 
been strong. The ministers who did the pioneer work in the 
community were Robert Moore, N. O. Lacock, James Robe- 
son and J. G. Campbell. 

Hudson. 

Organized 1877, by Speed Stagner; present membership, 
89; value of property, $3,000; Bible school began 1910; pres- 
ent enrollment, 81. 

The East White Oak Church was organized about 1857 
in Franklin Schoolhouse by James Robeson. In 1859 a frame 
house was built. This house stood just over the line in 
Woodford County, at the center of Section 14 of the White 
Oak Township. The chief men were J. D. Franklin, Jehu 
Hinshaw, Zachariah Brown, Cyrus Leatherman, Jesse Chism, 
Dr. Sabin and his son. It is credited with Jehu Hinshaw 
and M. H. Knight in the ministry. 

After twelve years' service, the congregation, by death 
and removals, went down. Of the remaining, some went to 
Carlock and others to Oneida Schoolhouse. In this house, 
si January, 1877, John Hinshaw, a layman, held Bible-study 
meetings for two weeks. As considerable interest was shown, 
Minister Stagner came, conducted a short meeting and organ- 
ized a congregation of thirteen persons, which took the name 
of Oneida. Weekly meetings were held there regularly for 
thirty-two years, when the place of meeting was changed to 
Hudson. W. D. Deweese is now pastor. 

Leroy. 

Organized 1888, by T. T. Holton ; present membership, 
240; value of property, including parsonage, $22,400; Bible 
school began 1888; present enrollment, 240. 

Under the auspices of the State Board of Missions, Mr. 



294 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Holton began this work. He secured the use of the Cum- 
berland Presbyterian Church. About forty Disciples were 
discovered in the community, among them Mrs. Dr. McKen- 
sie, Mrs. Devinney and Mr. L. S. Kilborn, superintendent of 
the public schools. A church of twenty-nine charter members 
was organized. They covenanted to meet every Lord's Day and 
proved to be a faithful little band. A series of meetings 
later by Evangelist J. S. Clements added many. 

In 1891 the congregation occupied a chapel of their own. 
In 1907 they entered a stately and beautiful edifice that was 
erected during the pastorate of L. E. Chase. 

The church has lived and grown through sunshine and 
shadows. From its beginning there have always been faithful 
men and women with hope and courage. 

Lexington. 

Organized 1860, by B. H. Smith; present membership, 
285 ; value of property, including parsonage, $19,300 ; Bible 
school began 1887; present enrollment, 189. 

J. G. Campbell and James Robeson were the two pioneer 
preachers of the church of Christ who visited Lexington 
previous to 1859. In November of that year, Benjamin 
Franklin held a public debate there with John Luccock, of 
the M. E. Church. The organization of this church was one 
of the results of this discussion. The charter members were 
Mr. and Mrs. C. N. Long, Mr. and Mrs. John Franklin, and 
Mr. and Mrs. G. T. Dement. A frame building was erected 
the following year. 

The first pastor was Theodore Brooks, who was followed 
by Joseph Lowe, Samuel Lowe, J. F. Ghormley, M. F. Ingra- 
ham and W. D. Pollard, who entered the ministry from this 
church. In the early seventies the church lost its spiritual 
life and the house was closed for seventeen years. Some 
good women opened it again in 1887, starting a Sunday 
school. Meetings were held by Evangelists T. A. Boyer and 
O. W. Stewart, which brought to it new life and large num- 
bers. The pastors who followed were J. H. Reece, W. H. 



CHURCHES 295 

Cannon (during whose ministry a brick building costing 
$8,000 was erected), E. A. Gilliland, A. A. Wilson, O. L. 
Smith, George H. Brown, B. H. Sealock and J. P. Givens. 

In August, 1912, there were eleven octogenarians who 
were members of this church. 

McLean. 

Organized 1903, by Harold E. Monser; present member- 
ship, 50; value of property, $5,000; Bible school began 1903; 
present enrollment, 60. 

Some of the pastors have been J. A. Serena, J. E. Jewett, 
L. B. Appleton, G. E. Duffy and F. L. Starbuck. 

Normal First. 

Organized 1873, by S. M. Connor; present membership, 
420; value of property, $40,000; Bible school began 1872; 
present enrollment, 192. 

There were thirty-three charter members. S. M. Shurt- 
leff and H. G. Fisher were the first elders, and John Gregory 
and William and Isaiah Dillon the first deacons. The old 
Baptist Church was first rented for a Sunday school, and 
here the first meetings were held and the church organized. 
A frame house, with a brick basement, costing $7,000, was 
finished and occupied at the close of 1873. This building 
was remodeled in 1887. It gave place to a new and modern 
structure in 1912. This was the last work of the lamented 
J. H. Gilliland. 

The pastors who have served the church were S. M. 
Connor (two terms), H. W. Everest, John Ensell, A. P. Cobb 
(two terms), G. M. Goode, G. A. Miller, J. H. Wright, E. 
B. Barnes, J. P. Givens, Andrew Scott, R. H. Newton, W. 
G. McColley, J. H. and E. A. Gilliland, the present minister. 

Normal Second. 

Organized 1884, by Preston Taylor; present membership, 
28; value of property, $1,700; Bible school began 1884; 
present enrollment, 38. 



296 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

This church is located at the corner of Cherry and Lin- 
den Streets. It is made up of "colored" people. There were 
sixteen charter members. It is incorporated under the civil 
statute and owns its own property. 

It has given George Hoagland to the ministry. 

Saybrook. 

Organized 1868, by James Robeson ; present membership, 
292; value of property, $10,000; Bible-school enrollment, 
202. 

In 1860, Min. Jesse Richards formed a small church in 
a schoolhouse just west of the town, but it soon disbanded. 

In 1867, Min. J. M. Stagner began holding some meet- 
ings in the Thompson Schoolhouse, one mile east of the 
town. Conversions were made and scattered members gath- 
ered together. In the early winter of 1868 another meeting 
was held at the same place by Mins. James Robeson and 
James Mitchell, when others were gained and the church 
organized. In 1869, G. W. Cline became the pastor. The 
place of meeting was changed from Thompson Schoolhouse 
to Harrison Hall, in Saybrook. Several series of meetings 
were held in this hall. A good church house, costing $3,400, 
was finished and occupied in the fall of 1871 under the min- 
istry of G. W. Cline. All the materials for this building 
were hauled from Bloomington. The congregation was 
unable to pay for this property ; so Joseph Newcomb, Sr., 
one of the members, mortgaged his farm for $1,000 and 
relieved the situation. It is not known whether the church 
ever reimbursed him. During the pastorate of H. L. Malt- 
man the building was worked over and made practically new 
throughout. C. C. Wisher is pastor. The church has also 
had the assistance of able evangelists and Bible instructors. 

Shirley. 

Organized 1869, by Jonathan Park; present membership, 
168; value of property, including parsonage, $5,000; Bible 
school began 1870; present enrollment, 60. 



CHURCHES 297 

This is considered one of the very best country churches 
in central Illinois. 

A new building was erected in 1912. The following min- 
isters have served here: Samuel Lowe, Jonathan Park, Dr. 
J. M. Allen, G. F. Adams, J. A. Seaton, John Lindsay, G. 
M. Wood, J. E. Jewett, Miles J. Hodson, G. W. Minier, G. 
W. Warner, Mr. Doty, Samuel Reynolds, K. P. Taylor, and 
at present F. L. Starbuck. 

Stanford. 

Organized 1870, by James Robeson; present membership, 
323 ; value of property, including parsonage, $22,000 ; Bible 
school began 1879; present enrollment, 195. 

In 1869, "Uncle Jimmie" Robeson held a brief meeting 
in an upper room with a few believers who desired to be 
known as Christians only. The next year a frame building 
was erected and a church of Christ organized. There were 
ten charter members. A new and commodious brick building 
was finished in 1900 during the pastorates of Fred Hagin 
and J. M. Porter. This church paid $30 for missions the 
first year of its life. 

Cassius Garst and Howard Kaufman have been given to 
the ministry, and Miss Elsie Roth and Miss Vera Morris are 
efficient singing evangelists. 

After James Robeson, the following ministers came: 
George Cline, John Owen, Isaac Stout, Samuel Lowe, G. 
W. Minier, W. P. Berry, John Lindsay, H. G. Van Dervoort, 
C. B. Dabney, J. Fred Jones, Melvin Menges, Fred Hagin, 
J. W. Porter, S. S. Lappin, C. W. Marlow and N. H. Rob- 
ertson. Two of these are now successful missionaries on 
foreign fields. 

Twin Grove ( Bloomington ) . 

Organized 1841, by James Robeson; present membership, 
40; value of property, $3,000; Bible-school enrollment, 50. 

This church was organized at the house of Samuel 
Barker with twenty-five charter members. The families rep- 



298 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

resented in its membership were the Webbs, Barkers, John- 
sons, Beelers, Hinshaws, Dickens and Harbord. Of these, 
Mrs. Martha Hinshaw is the sole survivor. This church has 
exerted a wide and lasting influence in the community west 
of Bloomington. 

The first house of worship was built in 1848. It gave 
place in 1868 to a larger building. This was burned down in 
1911. A new and better concrete-stone building has grown 
on the spot where the other two stood. 

More than one hundred preachers have ministered to this 
church. Among them there were James Robeson, William 
Ryan, W. P. Bowles, Amos Watkins, Dr. Young, Dr. War- 
riner, William Davenport, G. W. Minier, James Mitchell, 
J. G. Campbell, Albert Peeler, Jonathan Park, David Lind- 
say, ST., William Brownell, Dr. J. M. Allen, O. A. Burgess, 
John Lindsay, Washington and Jefferson Houston, P. W. 
Schick, J. W. Owen and J. J. Stagner. 

G. R. Southgate and Bert Ross have gone from this 
church into the ministry. 

NOTE. To Mr. Geo. W. Nance, of Bloomington, is the 
credit of the good record for this county. 

MACON COUNTY. 

Antioch (Decatur). 

Organized 1850, by John W. Tyler ; present membership, 
70; value of property, $6,000; Bible school began 1859; 
present enrollment, 68. 

This church was formed in the Salem Schoolhouse, one- 
half mile west of the present site. In 1864, Mr. Tyler gave 
the congregation one acre of ground on the south edge of 
his farm. There, in the same year, a very strong frame 
building was erected. This was used until 1909, when the 
present attractive building: was begun and finished in 1910, 
during the ministry of N. S. Haynes. Its cost was about 
$5,000. 

This little country church, located five miles east of 



CHURCHES 299 

Decatur, on the C., H. & D. Railway, has given to the 
ministry B. B. and J. Z. Tyler (sons of J. W. Tyler), W. 
S. Harmon, C. A. Heckel and J. P. Lichtenberger. 

The chief honor for establishing this church belongs to 
"Uncle John Tyler." Of late years Mrs. Emma Heckel has 
been its most faithful and useful member. 

Argenta. 

Organized 1848, by Dr. J. B. Millison; present member- 
ship, 65; value of property, $1,500; Bible school began 1883; 
present enrollment, 26. 

This church was formed in a schoolhouse in Newberg, 
a country village one mile east of Argenta. In 1872 the 
place of meeting was transferred to the railway village of 
Argenta. The Clifton and Hill families were prominent in 
the work of the church in its earlier years. 

William Brennan gave the church helpful service in its 
early life. 

Blue Mound. 

Organized 1861, by A. D. Northcutt; present membership, 
224; value of property, including parsonage, $16,500; Bible 
school began 1867; present enrollment, 132. 

This church was formed in the farm residence of Mar- 
shall Randall, two and one-half miles northwest of Blue 
Mound. The charter members were Marshall Randall and 
wife, J. C. Rose and wife, Daniel Daniels and wife, William 
Overman and wife, Denman H. Clements and wife, C. C. 
Hollier and wife, and Horace Stivers. All of these have 
gone to their reward. The meetings for public worship were 
held in the residence of Mr. Randall and in the schoolhouse 
till 1873. The building of the railway started Blue Mound 
and turned the village of Randallville back into farm fields. 
In this, transference of membership was made. Under the 
leadership of A. D. Northcutt, a U. B. chapel was bought, 
moved to the town, repaired and used until the present fine 
brick edifice was completed in 1906. Mrs. Nancy Lewis was 



300 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

one of the leaders in this enterprise. In 1880, at the sug- 
gestion of Mr. Northcutt, she was chosen to serve as a dea- 
conness and gave the church faithful and efficient service. 

Center Ridge (Maroa). 

Organized 1867, by Dr. L. A. Engle; present member- 
ship, 60; value of property, $2,000; Bible school began 1875; 
present enrollment, 35. 

This church was organized in the Center Ridge School- 
house, where it met for worship for twenty years. In 1887 
a neat frame building was erected at a crossroads two and 
one-fourth miles due west of Emery. It is kept in good 
condition. 

The charter members are the following: James D. Ross 
and wife and their children Albert F., James M. and Nancy 
E. Ross ; Jordan Simpson and wife, Peter W. Wycoff and 
wife and son J. W. ; D. Jones and wife, Thomas Shockey 
and wife, W. W. and Edward Shockey, and E. Blackerly. 
Of these, James D. Ross was the leading spirit. This little 
church has gone steadily on, serving the community well for 
forty-five years. 

It gave George W. Ross to the ministry. 

Mrs. J. D. Lyman is the clerk. 

Harristown. 

Organized 1861, by Dr. W. A. Mallory; present member- 
ship, 180; value of church property, including parsonage, 
$4,500; Bible school began 1861 ; present enrollment, 118. 

Of the twenty charter members, all except three have 
passed away. James M. Eyman, Aliff C. Willard and Mrs. 
Ella J. Averitt are the survivors. 

This church has always had fine conceptions of Christian 
privileges and responsibilities. Probably the one entitled to 
more honor for this divine outlook was that superior man, 
J. H. Pickerell. The church has other choice spirits. 

A modest, well-kept building has met its needs. The 
church gave George Hamilton to the ministry. He died in 



CHURCHES 301 

early manhood. But three of its daughters are wives of 
ministers Mrs. C. S. Medbury, Mrs. I. N. McCash, and 
Mrs. R. A. Gilcrist, who recently died. 

Oreana. 

Organized 1864, by Dr. J. W. Thayer; present member- 
ship, 125; value of property, $3,500; Bible school began 
1864; present enrollment, 112. 

For about ten years the public meetings were held in 
Zion Schoolhouse. In 1874 a frame building, costing $1,365, 
was erected. This gave place to the modernized building 
in 1895. 

The earlier ministers of the church were William Bren- 
nan, E. C. Weekly, J. B. Millison and John Wilson. 

It is in the records that the church paid $50 to missionary 
work in 1874. 

The church has always served the community well. 
Among the honored families of the church in its early years 
there were Noble, Boyer, Spooner, Moothart and others. 

Maroa. 

Organized 1862, by A. N. Page : value of property, includ- 
ing parsonage, $23,700; Bible school began 1869; present 
enrollment, 210. 

This church was organized in the residence of Dr. J. W. 
Thayer, who was an ordained minister, but whose life was 
chiefly given to the practice of medicine. There were twenty- 
four charter members, most of whom came from the Texas 
congregation in De Witt County. J. S. Clough and M. M. 
Thomas were the first elders ; D. J. Harlan and Samuel 
Potter, deacons, and Dr. Thayer, clerk. 

For several years the meetings for public worship were 
held regularly in the schoolhouse. The first building was 
finished in 1869. More than one thousand persons turned to 
the Lord in that sanctuary. It gave place in 1911 to a new, 
large and modern structure, during the pastorate of W. H. 
Harding. 



302 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

John W. Tyler was the church's first preacher. Dr. 
Thayer followed for several years. While the church was 
struggling in its earlier years, it was helped by the ministry 
of Dudley Downs, Leroy Skelton, John Craycroft, John Wil- 
son and Charles Rowe. During the pastorate of J. V. Beck- 
man the church had a large numerical growth. 

Niantic. 

Organized 1868; present membership, 364; value of prop- 
erty, including parsonage, $10,500; Bible-school enrollment, 
170. 

Niantic grew after the railway was built. The first mem- 
bers came from the Long Point Church. Meetings were 
first held in the town hall. The subscription for building 
the chapel specifically stated that none of the fund should 
be used for a steeple or tower. A special fund was raised 
for this purpose. Among the leading men in the early years 
of the church were T. A. and J. W. Prichett, George Wree, 
and Griffin and Peter Chamberlain. B. J. Radford was the 
first pastor. 

From the first the church had a healthy growth. It has 
always had a part in every good work. Its officers have 
been efficient. It is strong in material property and apostolic 
in outlook. Nearly $1,000 is paid annually for general benev- 
olences. 

Long Point (Niantic). 

Organized 1850, by John Powell; value of property, 
$1,200. 

This location is about two miles south of Niantic. In 
the late forties several families came from Morgan County 
and settled there. There were fourteen charter members. 
The first officers were Nathan G. Averitt, elder, with James 
Dingman and James Sanders as deacons. Of the original 
members, Mrs. Elizabeth Chamberlain and Mrs. Rebecca 
Ford, both daughters of N. G. Averitt, are still living. Mins. 
A. J. Kane, Dr. John Hughes, John England, A. D. North- 



CHURCHES 303 

cutt and others served the congregation in its earlier years. 

Above the entrance door of the chapel is a marble slab, 
on which are carved the following words : "This building was 
erected by the Long Point Church of Christ and is dedicated 
to the worship oi almighty God so long as instrumental 
music is not used therein." 

James Dingman and James Sanders were the two strong 
and unique characters of the community who, in their later 
years, gave to the congregation its ultra-conservative cast. 
But the memory of each is rightfully held in high regard. 
The congregation as such paid $5 to the State Missionary 
Society in 1865. 

It now has preaching one- fourth of the time. 

Decatur. 

The town site of Decatur was laid out late in 1829. 
Within a year or two a log courthouse was built near the 
present spot of the Transfer Station. This house still 
stands now in Fairview Park. If its logs could echo all 
the voices they have heard, the souls of the living would be 
strangely stirred. In that primitive temple of justice Joseph 
Hostetler first preached in 1833. The next year there he 
organized a church upon the Bible as the only rule of faith 
and practice. In 1835 he gave the infant church a piece 
of hazel-brush-covered ground at what is now the corner of 
Wood and Water Streets. On this plot a log church, about 
twenty feet square, was soon built. Among the charter 
members of the church there were James and Polly Carter, 
Landy and Elizabeth Harrold, Joseph Hostetler and wife, 
Mrs. Martha Williams, Mrs. Rebecca Hanks, Mrs. Elizabeth 
Cantrall and Mrs. Pratt. Soon there were added Warren 
G. Strickland and wife, and Mrs. Charlotte Turpin. John 
W. Tyler, with his family, came from Kentucky in 1836 and 
shortly thereafter united with the church. Among those 
who began the Christian life in the log church were Mrs. 
J. W. Tyler, John and Elizabeth Rucker, and Mrs. Judith 
Oglesby, a sister-in-law of Richard J. Oglesby. 



304 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Carroll Edds came in 1851 and, with Dr. A. L. Keller, 
formed the first prayer-meeting. 

This building served as the place of public worship for 
twenty years. In 1855 it gave place to the plain brick house 
that stood at the corner of North Main and North Streets. 
In this year Ebenezer McNabb came to the town and the 
church organized the first Sunday school. In the fifties the 
church grew by conversions and by those of like faith who 
came from Tennessee, Kentucky and Ohio. For about 
twenty-five years the church had as its preachers Joseph 
Hostetler, J. W. Tyler, Bushrod W. Henry, Robert Foster, 
J. P. Lancaster, James Fanning, G. W. Patterson, Walter P. 
Bowles, William Morrow, H. Bowles, Tobias Grider, W. W. 
Happy, Dr. A. L. Keller and A. J. Kane. They were self- 
sacrificing pioneers, mighty in the Scriptures, heroic in their 
devotion. The pastors who followed were William Ebert, 
Alford Paden, Dr. John Hughes, A. J. Taft, W. C. Dawson, 
P. D. Vermilion, Ira Mitchell, Lucius Ames, A. D. Northcutt, 
N. S. Haynes, T. W. Pinkerton, E. B. Cake, Simon Rorher 
and George F. Hall. Interims were occupied by Dr. L. A. 
Engle, C. E. Weekley and J. W. Tyler. During the pas- 
torate of Mr. Haynes the "little brick church" gave place to 
a frame building in 1875. It was more attractive, com- 
modious and modern. This church gave to the ministry A. 
P. Cobb and W. A. Humphrey. In 1893 the lot at Main and 
North Streets was sold and the building moved to the rear 
of the newly purchased lot at Edward and William Streets. 
During the pastorate of Mr. Hall, lots were bought and the 
Tabernacle erected in 1894 to accommodate his audiences. 
In 1896 the church was divided and a part returned to the 
old house at Edwards and William Streets. This is known 
as the 

Central Church of Christ. 

Present membership, 800 ; value of property, including 
parsonage, $40,000. 

During the pastorate of F. W. Burnham, the present 



CHURCHES 305 

house was built. After its occupancy the old frame building 
was moved to the corner of Leafland Avenue and Warren 
Street, where a mission Sunday school was maintained for 
twenty years. Later the mission was abandoned and the 
property sold. 

The people who remained with Mr. Hall at the Taber- 
nacle organized as 

The First Christian Church. 

Present membership, 879; value of property, $35,000; 
Bible-school enrollment, 380. 

The building was improved and renamed the "Temple" 
during the pastorate of F. B. Jones. It was torn down in 
1913 to give place to a modern structure during the pastorate 
of E. M. Smith. 

Seventy-two people withdrew from the First Church in 
1908 under the lead of the retiring pastor, O. P. Wright, 
and were organized as 

The East Side Christian Church. 

Present membership, 75; value of property, $14,000: 
Bible-school enrollment, 125. 

It has made small growth and is heavily in debt. The 
field is wide and deserving. (The church is dead.) 

MACOUPIN COUNTY. 

Atwater. 

Present membership, 143 ; value of property, including 
parsonage, $4,000; Bible-school enrollment, 59. 

Blooming Grove (Nilwood). 

Organized 1873, by Aslver Solomon and George McElroy ; 
present membership, 64; value of property, $2,000; Bible 
school began 1874 ; present enrollment, 58. 

This congregation is located six miles east of Palmyra. 
The charter members were Elizabeth A., Thomas and Sarah 
Mahan; Mary A. Cleery; James B. and Nancy A. Burleson; 



306 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

James A. Williams, Rosetta A. Lair, William and Eliza- 
beth Crum, Ellin Slagle, Amiel and Mary Hunt, John A. 
and Emily Hart. First elders were James M. Lair and 
Thomas Mahan; first deacons, Amiel Hunt and Richard 
Cramp. 

Berean (Modesto). 

Organized 1830, by Jack Nifing; present membership, 
25 ; value of property, $800 ; no Bible school. 

This congregation is located three miles northeast of 
Modesto. It is "the church of Christ and not the Christian 
Church." It has Bible classes, but no Bible school. It is 
opposed to "the pastor," but has preaching one Lord's Day 
in the month ; also is opposed to "so much preach for so 
much money" and to instrumental music in the public wor- 
ship. The correspondent is J. C. Ready, Fidelity, 111. 

Boston Chapel (Girard). 

Present membership, 60; value of property, $1,800; Bible- 
school enrollment, 38. 

This is four miles east of Girard. 

Carllnville. 

Organized 1896, by R. A. Omer; present membership, 
132; value of property, including parsonage, $14,000; Bible 
school began 1896; present enrollment, 88. 

The charter members were as follows: Rhoda Macknet; 
II. T., Cleopatra G., Georgia and Harry B. Richardson ; 
John and Lucinda E. Wilson ; Emma, Willie and Lelia Gib- 
erson ; E. A. Utt, Annie E. Glover, Jennie Hayes, Florence 
and Mary Cunningham, John Taylor, Selma Egnew, Franklin 
and Susan Smith, Lodusky Miller, William and Jane Clark, 
Darius Swain, Luther Crowdy, Mary Deeds, Elizabeth Frick- 
ers, Jesse H. and Margaret T. Smith: total, twenty-nine. Ot 
these, thirteen are dead and five have removed. M. T. Rich- 
ardson is the clerk. The church has half-time preaching. 

W. A. Green has been given to the ministry. 



CHURCHES 307 

Gillespie. 

Organized 1859; present membership, 84; value of prop- 
erty, $4,000; Bible-school enrollment, 50. 

The first congregation grew to number about sixty, but 
was left without competent leaders and failed. In 1898 the 
church was revived. Mrs. J. P. Gross is clerk. 

Girard. 

Organized 1860, by Alexander Johnston ; present mem- 
bership, 177; value of property, including parsonage, $8,000; 
Bible school began 1860; present enrollment, 166. 

C. H. Metcalf says : "The following names are those of 
the charter members : Sisters Thurman, Moore, Grandma and 
Miss Kate Eastman, Miss Fannie Eastman, Mrs. Belle 
Woods, and John Ewing and wife." The church was formed 
by Evangelist Johnston under the auspices of the State Mis- 
sion Board. The meetings were held in residences and the 
Universalist chapel till the completion of the first house in 
1865. The present building was finished in 1900. The first 
elders were John Ewing and James Duncan : later Jacob 
Deck, J. D. Metcalf, L. J. Thompson, Isaac Moore and Dr. 
Clark. These were Scriptural elders to whom the church 
owes very much. 

Good revival meetings were held by able evangelists and 
wise pastors have served the church. It is well organized 
and has a very honorable record. Leonard G. Thompson 
was given to the ministry. 

Modesto. 

Organized 1890, by J. W. McGuffin ; present membership, 
61; value of property, $2,500; Bible school began 1890; pres- 
ent enrollment, 49. 

The charter members were R. T. and E. E. Allyn ; P. R. 
Cox ; J. M., Flora and S. E. Allyn ; Sarah and Rose David- 
son ; J. J. Sims, Walter and Fannie Allyn, A. S. Chapman 
and N. A. Jones. 



308 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Oak Grove (Rhorer). 

Present membership, 36; value of property, $1,400. 
Mrs. J. F. Haynes, Modesto, is correspondent. 

Palmyra. 

Organized 1867; present membership, 392; value of prop- 
erty, including parsonage, $4,500; Bible school began 1867; 
present enrollment, 300. 

There is no record of the earlier years of this congrega- 
tion. It has given to the ministry of the gospel Messrs. 
Albert Cherry, Lowell, Perry and John McPherson, three 
brothers in the flesh and in the Lord, and Miss Inez Hum- 
phrey, a schoolteacher in the Southern Christian Institute at 
Edwards, Miss. L. E. Chase is the efficient pastor, and P. 
G. Mahon, clerk. 

Round Prairie (Bunker Hill). 

Organized 1845; present membership, 20; value of prop- 
erty, $500; no Bible school. 

The location is six miles southeast of Bunker Hill. Its 
record of late years is the pathetic and oft-repeated one 
deaths and removals, and the occupation of the farms by 
foreign-born people. 

L. S. Mize, Scottville, is the clerk. 

Scottville. 

Present membership, 160; value of property, $3,000; 
Bible-school enrollment, 67. 



Point (Barnett). 

Organized 1882; present membership, 64; value of prop- 
erty, $850; Bible-school enrollment, 59. 

This is about three miles northwest of Barnett. It was 
formed after the older church of this name moved to Bar- 
nett, and was hence called by the name of the new town. 



CHURCHES 309 

Staunton. 

Present membership, 50; value of property, $1,200; Bible- 
school enrollment, 78. 

Weak. Paul N. Stone is correspondent. 

West Prairie (Dorchester). 

Present membership, 12; value of property, $500; no 
Bible school. 

Virden. 

Organized 1882, by W. F. Black; present membership, 
240; value of property, including parsonage, $3,500; Bible 
school began 1883 ; present enrollment, 175. 

The charter members were Samuel and Mrs. Mary E. 
Williams, L. N. Roland, Jacob and Mrs. Cardace Groves, 
Dempsey and Mrs. Lucy Solomon, James A. and Mrs. 
Amelia M. Bronaugh, John Aldmon, Henry M. and Mrs. 
Flora Gates, Mrs. Lizzie Rice, Mrs. D. W. Williams, Mrs. 
D. M. and Mrs. Maxie Z. Henderson, Mrs. Nancy J. 
McNight, Mrs. Newton Allen, Mrs. Susan and Mrs. Lottie 
Plowman, Mrs. Eva Strong, Mrs. Laura Piper, Mrs. Anna 
Kable, Mrs. Louise Spaulding and Mrs. M. J. Wigginton. 

The church has been prosperous from its beginning. The 
present edifice was built in 1812. S. M. Connor was the 
first pastor, and A. M. Hale the present one. 

Mr. J. P. Henderson has been actively connected with the 
church from its beginning. His grandmother was Anna 
Provine, and his grandfather, John Henderson. Both were 
associated with Barton W r . Stone in Kentucky. John Hender- 
son was ordained to the ministry at Bloomington. Ind., in 
1821. 

Extinct Congregations. 

The Sulphur Springs chapel stands four miles west of 
Waggoner. It was built as a union house in 1852. It is 
now used only for funerals, a cemetery holding the sacred 
dust of several thousand people having grown there during 



310 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

the sixty years. At this place a church of Christ was organ- 
ized in 1857. It prospered, and as the years passed away 
gave its members to Atwater, Boston Chapel, McVey, Shaw's 
Point and Waggoner congregations. It disbanded in 1888. 

The churches at McVey and Dorchester have died, the 
latter after a life of thirty-five years. This is the home of 
J. E. Masters, the oldest Christian minister in the county. 

Chapman's Point, so called from John Chapman, who 
settled there in an early day, was nine miles west of Virden, 
from whence came the Goode brothers M. M. and G. M. 

MADISON COUNTY. 

Edwardsinlle. 

Organized 1889, by J. H. Garrison; present membership, 
37; value of property, $4,000; Bible school began 1889; 
present enrollment, 36. 

Mr. E. J. Jeffries and Dr. William Olive led in the work 
of forming this church. They were heartily assisted by Mr. 
A. O. French, a prominent member of the M. E. Church. 
Capable ministers have served here, but the city is so largely 
made up of foreign-born people that the congregation grows 
slowly. It has given G. H. Rowe to the ministry. Messrs. 
Jeffries and Olive are elders, and H. M. Groves is clerk. 

Granite City. 

Present membership, 260; value of property, $9,000; 
Bible-school enrollment, 185. 

Marine. 

Present membership, 60; value of property, $2,000; Bible- 
school enrollment, 97. 

Neiv Douglas. 

Present membership, 90 ; value of property, including par- 
sonage, $2,500; Bible-school enrollment, 72. 



CHURCHES 311 

Ridgely (Dorsey). 

Organized 1850, by Mrs. Matilda Dorsey O'Bannon; 
present membership, 10; value of property, $800. 

The chapel was built the same year. It is three miles 
east of Dorsey. The church is in good condition, with 
monthly preaching by W. H. Groner. G. R. Sutton, Moro, 
is the correspondent. 

Warden. 

Organized 1892, by W. Wilbur; present membership, 112; 
value of property, $2,000; Bible school began 1892; present 
enrollment, 108. 

There were fourteen charter members. 

The chapel was built in 1895. Mrs. J. R. Piper is the 
clerk. 

MARION COUNTY. 

Alma. 

Organized 1867, by John Ross; present membership, 50; 
value of property, $2,500; Bible school began 1867; present 
enrollment, 83. 

There were fifteen charter members. The church grew 
steadily for a time. It, like many others, came under the 
reactionary spirit of the early seventies, by which the numer- 
ical growth and spirituality were crippled for years. 

Cartter. 

Organized 1866, by W. C. Hill ; present membership, 35 ; 
value of property, $2,400; Bible school began 1866; present 
enrollment, 36. 

The Cartter Church is the outgrowth of the Harvey's 
Point congregation. In 1808, Captain Harvey and his com- 
panion overtook two horse-thieves on the road leading from 
Salem to Old Foxville, and captured them. In order to 
get some water, Captain Harvey left his companion in charge 
of the outlaws. But he left his gun, and when he returned 
one of the thieves fired upon the captain and killed him. So 



312 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

ill his honor the place was named Harvey's Point. This 
church, in the early years of its life, built a large frame 
house on the spot where Harvey died. Mins. William C. 
Hill, J. M. Mulkey and James Snow did much for the 
church in its earlier years. 

G. W. Stevenson came from this congregation to the 
ministry. 

The church grew feeble by removals, so in September, 
1911, it was reorganized by Min. J. F. Rosboro in Cartter, 
the near-by railway town. 

Centralia. 

Organized 1856, by John A. Williams ; present member- 
ship, 675 ; value of property, $35,000 ; Bible-school enroll- 
ment, 835. 

This church was formed at Central City. It soon became 
apparent that the center of business would be moved to 
Centralia, and hence the church was transferred to that 
place. The eight charter members were the following: Jacob, 
Harriet and Simpson Frazier; Daniel Meyers, James and 
Jane McCarthy, Margeret Whitton and Louisa Hawkins. A 
lot was bought and a commodious frame building erected 
thereon. In 1866 this building was burned. Thereafter, for 
several years, the meetings were held in rented halls. As a 
consequence, the church continued to become weaker and 
weaker. In 1872 another frame chapel, costing $2,400, was 
erected. This gave place in 1909 to a new, modern and 
beautiful edifice, costing $32,000. This was during the pas- 
torate of J. F. Rosboro. 

During the Civil War and for years following, the church 
sustained serious injury from the bitter political feeling that 
then existed. The church is alive to all good works. 

Donahue Prairie (Kell). 

Organized 1898, by C. A. Burton ; present membership, 
100; value of property, $1,000; Bible school began 1898; 
present enrollment, 100. 



CHURCHES 313 

About 1850 a congregation was formed and met for 
worship in the residence of John Hill, Sr. As the years 
passed and churches were organized in that section, many 
of these members united with them. Through the work of 
W. C. Hill and others, the remnant of the old church was 
gathered up and a new start was made. The chapel was 
finished in 1899. The Church Extension Board loaned this 
country congregation $250, which has been paid. There 
were sixteen charter members. S. S. Turley, S. C. and 
Isaac Hill are elders, and the last named is clerk also. 

Cast on Grove (Cartter). 

Organized 1884, by J. H. G. Brinkerhoff; present mem- 
bership, 89; value of property, $900; Bible school began 
1887; present enrollment, 46. 

A meeting was held in the Huff Schoolhouse in 1886 by 
Minister Brinkerhoff and was followed up by a year's work. 
There were forty-two charter members, most of whom came 
from the Mt. Moriah and Harvey's Point Churches. The 
site was selected and the Gaston Grove chapel was built. 
Like most country churches, there have been many losses by 
removals, but the work is maintained. 

This church has given A. Leroy Huff to the ministry. 
Bessie Huff is clerk. 

Kell. 

Organized 1896, by J. F. Rosboro; present membership, 
15; value of property, $1,200; Bible school began 1895; 
present membership, 30. 

The preachers having served the church were C. A. Bur- 
ton, Clark Braden, W. J. Simer, R. M. Philips, F. O. 
Fannon and George Foley. 

Kinmundy. 

Organized 1899, by J. H. Smart ; present membership, 
110; value of property, $5,000; Bible school began 1899; 
present enrollment, 134. 



314 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

E. C. Bargh and his family, with a few other Disciples, 
had held meeting irregularly for thirteen years. Min. J. H. 
Smart, then the pastor of the church in Centralia, was 
engaged by the mission board of the district to hold a series 
of meetings and organize a church. This was done in the 
summer of 1899. These meetings were held in the M. E. 
Church South, and in a public hall. There were fifty char- 
ter members. A lot was bought and a good building finished 
the next year. The church has continued to grow in mem- 
bers and influence. 

Lovel Grove (luka). 

Present membership, 60; value of property, $1,050; Bible- 
school enrollment, 34. 

This church is about one mile south of the village of 
Omega. In the early fifties this congregation met in a log 
house about two miles south of the present chapel. It was 
known as Bee Branch Church. A nice, up-to-date country 
chapel was built in 1880. In the earlier years, H. A. Van- 
dusen, John A. Williams, John Tinkler, Rolla B. Henry, 
William T. Williams, H. A. Harrell and William Chaffin 
ministered to the people. All these have gone to their 
reward. W. J. Simer has served the church for the past 
thirty years. What better proof could be given of a genuine 
preacher and a fine people? 

From this church there came to the ministry H. A. Van- 
dusen, F. M. Philips, John Tinkler, W. J. Simer and A. 
A. Millican. 

Mt. Moriah (Mt. Vernon). 

Organized 1829 ; present membership, 135 ; value of prop- 
erty, $500; Bible-school enrollment, 134. 

This is the oldest church in Marion County. It was 
organized as a Free Will Baptist church and held this name 
until 1837. In that year it renounced this name for "Church 
of Christ" and came into full accord with the principles of 
the Restoration movement. Among the consecrated leaders 



CHURCHES 315 

in the early years there were William Chaffin, David R. 
Chance, Samuel Shook and Charles Drennen. They were 
pioneer preachers who underwent hardships and dangers 
uncomplainingly for the truth's sake. 

The first meeting-house was of logs. After its decay 
three successive frame buildings have been occupied. The 
second of these was partly wrecked by a windstorm, but was 
repaired and used till 1904, when the present neat chapel was 
built. It is located about eight miles southwest of Salem. 
John A. Williams was the gift of this church to the min- 
istry a magnificent contribution. 

Odin. 

Organized 1878, by James M. Hawley; present member- 
ship, 188; value of property, $2,000; Bible school began 
1878; present enrollment, 113. 

There were sixteen charter members. A neat frame 
church, costing $2,000, was built and occupied early in 1880. 
Before that the meetings were held in a public hall. 

This church gave to the ministry R. Leland Brown. He 
had served as a deacon and an elder before he was set apart 
to the ministry of the Word. He has served a number of 
strong churches, as well as the evangelist of the Seventh and 

Eighth Districts. 

Patoka. 

Organized 1875, by Samuel Hawley; present member- 
ship, 125; value of property, $2,000; Bible school began 
1882; present enrollment, 129. 

This church made but little progress for five years. 
In 1880 it was reorganized by Min. J. D. Morgan. There 
were then twenty-nine males and eleven females composing 
the membership. The church then began to grow. A 
church building was erected in 1882, and in 1905 an addition 
was built, making it a very neat structure. A large portion 
of the membership reside in the country south of town. They 
have erected a chapel and maintain a Bible school there as 
well as in town. C. M. Ashton is clerk. 



316 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Salem. 

Organized 1866, by John A. Williams ; present member- 
ship, 265; value of property, $25,000; Bible school began 
1867; present enrollment, 310. 

This church was formed in the house of John A. Wil- 
liams. The members were few in number, but they at once 
bought a frame building that had been used by the Cumber- 
land Presbyterians. They repaired and used it until 1879. 
The next year a brick chapel was occupied. This gave way 
in 1906 to a new and modern building, costing about $22,000. 
This was during the ministry of F. O. Fannon. 

Mr. Williams preached for this church a long time. In 
its earlier years it was also served by John W. Monehan, 
John Bradley, J. O. Henry, J. H. G. Brinkerhoff and others. 

Sandoval. 

Organized 1889, by A. Martin; present membership, 320; 
value of church property, including parsonage, $6,000; Bible 
school began 1889; present enrollment, 144. 

The meetings of the congregation were held the first year 
in the Congregational Church. In 1890 the building now in 
use was erected during the ministry of J. H. G. Brinkerhoff. 

Smith's Grove (Kinmundy). 

Organized 1882, by Joseph D. Morgan ; present member- 
ship, 25 ; value of property, $400 ; Bible school began 1882 ; 
present enrollment, 67. 

This church is about seven miles east of Omega. About 
eighty years ago a log church stood two miles east of 
Smith's Grove. It was known as the Bluff Church because 
it stood on a high bank of Skillet Fork, by a rock-bottomed 
pool that has been used in baptizing through all these years. 
When the old log house burned down, some of the members 
formed the Old Union Church in Clay County. In the early 
eighties, J D. Morgan gathered together members from the 
Old Union Church, and others living in Krutchfield Prairie, 



CHURCHES 317 

and formed the Smith's Grove Church. The organization 
was in a schoolhouse, but a chapel was soon built which the 
congregation has outgrown. W. J. Sinier has preached for 
this church for twenty-five years. Of it he says: "This 
place can show more little folks out to Sunday school and 
church to the square foot than any place that I have ever 
been. Nearly all of the young folks are members of the 
church." 

Turkey Creek (Odin). 

Organized 1867, by A. Martin. 

This is a country church that has not grown much in 
work or membership. It is also called Deadman, and is three 
miles south of Odin. 

Young's Chapel (Salem). 

Organized 1883, by John A. Williams; present member- 
ship, 82; value of property, $500; Bible school began 1883; 
present enrollment, 46. 

A country church. Preaching services had been held in a 
schoolhouse in the community for forty years, but no organ- 
ization was made till 1883. There were about twenty char- 
ter members. J. H. G. Brinkerhoff and F. M. Morgan have 
served the church. 

Little Grove Church was two miles southeast of Cen- 
tralia, and formed in the thirties or early forties. It dis- 
solved about 1870. 

Ministers. 

]. W. Monnahan was a farmer, teacher and county super- 
intendent of schools in the sixties and seventies. A good 
preacher and able debater; an energetic and useful man. 

Samuel Shook resided on his farm three miles southeast 
of Centralia. His work was mainly in Marion County in 
the thirties. He traveled on horseback, followed by his dog 
"Trip," that lay under the pulpit while his master preached. 

William Chaffin also resided on his farm in this county, 
where he preached in the thirties and also in Clay and Jef- 



318 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

ferson Counties. He had a habit of placing his hand upon 
his cheek while preaching, and often said: "I would work 
my finger-nails off before I would make a price for my 
preaching." He died before the Civil War. 

David R. Chance lived on his farm five miles from luka. 
He was a forceful and useful man, going all over that region. 
At the table he would sometimes say: "You can tell a 
preacher by the cups of coffee he drinks one, two or three; 
J take three." 

Richard Huelin's home was near Walnut Hill in 1840. 
He was a plain man who knew the Bible and traveled and 
preached much. 

James Snow resided in the same community. He was a 
good man with a gentle disposition and his preaching con- 
trasted with most of that of his brother ministers. He 
resided on his farm and traveled widely. 

H. A. Vandusen lived on his farm near Omega. He was 
told that he had hurt a congregation by serving it for noth- 
ing. He replied : "I don't know but what that is true." He 
was a conservative, but earnestly opposed any thought of 
division on questions of opinion. 

It was in this county that an aged M. E. preacher said: 
"A man can be a good Christian in any denomination except 
the Campbellite or Mormon." 

MARSHALL COUNTY. 

The Crow Creek congregation, afterward known as trie 
Salem Christian Church, was located about seven miles south 
and a little east of Lacon. It was constituted probably in the 
home of Nathan Owen, just down the hill from the old 
Salem Cemetery, June 12, 1836. The agreement signed was 
the following: 

The believers in Christ on Crow Creek mutually agree to consti- 
tute themselves in a congregational capacity on the Bible alone, and 
to t?ke the Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments for their rule 
of faith, practice and discipline. And to have their n?mes registered 
together and to live in subjection to each other according to the above- 
named rule. 



CHURCHES 319 

This is signed by Nathan and Elizabeth Owen, William 
B. and Stephen James, Milly Ann Davis, Isaac and Elizabeth 
Black, I. F. and Mary Ann Miller, Betsy Martin, Susanah 
Bird, Elder H. D. and Patsey Palmer, Isaac and Eliza Polk, 
William and Alethee Maxwell. Meetings were held in the 
homes of the members and in groves when weather per- 
mitted. About 1845 a house was built which served the 
people except during protracted meetings or on County 
Co-operation days, when they adjourned to the groves. This 
chapel stood two miles east of old Salem Cemetery. Its 
walls were of brick made near by, but the lumber was 
hauled by ox teams from Chicago, a distance of 125 miles 
as the crow flies. Some of the sons of the men who helped 
in this work are yet living. In later years it was used for 
a schoolhouse and was finally torn down. 

Henry D. Palmer was doubtless the great spiritual leader 
in this work through many years and its influences were far- 
reaching. It was here that Mr. Palmer taught O. A. Bur- 
gess the right way of the Lord, saving him from unbelief 
and starting him on his great career. Nathan Owen was 
chosen deacon in 1836 and the next year Mr. Palmer was 
chosen elder. Both of them were resident preachers and 
farmers, as also John L. McCune. The church grew at one 
time to a membership of 193 and was visited by all the 
pioneer ministers in that section of the State. The last rem- 
nant of the membership went to Washburn about 1896. 

Belle Plain (La Rose). 

Organized 1845; present membership, 115; value of prop- 
erty, including parsonage, $4,500; Bible-school enrollment, 92. 

Mr. A. F. Hatten, the clerk, says: 

The church of Christ at Belle Plain was organized at the head- 
waters of Crow Creek in a schoolhouse, May 10, 1845, by the follow- 
ing: William, Robert, Rebecca, Olive and James Bennington; Isaac 
M. and Eliza M. Polke, Elijah and Sarah Vandervoort, Geo. W. and 
Margaret J. Taylor, James and Mary Martin, Jane Hester and Mary 
Hatten. The meetings for worship were irregular for several years. 



320 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

In 1854, at a meeting in James Martin's barn, an unsuccessful effort 
was made to build a chapel. But in 1856 Pattonsburg, the former 
name of the town, was selected as the place and the house was built 
there. It was then called the Liberty Church of Christ. This local 
name was dropped when the name of the place was changed. 

Among the early preachers there were James Robeson, 
John T. Jones, Amos Watkins, James A. and John Lindsay, 
and Carrol Ghent. Since then twenty-two others have served 
the church. 

Henry. 

Organized 1889, by T. A. Boyer; present membership, 
54; value of property, $3,500; Bible school began 1889; 
present enrollment, 30. 

This congregation was the immediate result of a five 
weeks' meeting conducted by Evangelist Boyer. Many of its 
members have moved away, so that it has never grown to be 
strong. Miss Clara B. Waughop is the correspondent. 

Toluca. 

Organized 1858, by J. Q. A. Houston; value of property, 
including parsonage, $9,000; Bible-school enrollment, 170. 

For about thirty- four years this was known as the Antioch 
Church and was located one mile west of Toluca town site. 
Among the first families there were Skelton, Ball, Fetters, 
Bennington, Stratton and Trowbridge. It was a country 
church fruitful of great good. Leroy Skelton was given to 
the ministry. Toluca grew up when the railway was built 
and the chapel was moved there in 1892. A new building 
was erected in 1895. 

S. S. Lappin began his ministry in this church. 

MASON COUNTY. 

The following is furnished by Min. R. E. Henry, pastor 
of the Havana Church: 

The first church of the Christians dates its beginning from the 
coming into the county of Uncle Jimmie Ross, from Morgan County, 



CHURCHES 321 

in 1840. He had been for more than forty years a class-leader in 
the M. E. Church, but before coming into this county he had been 
won by the plea of the Restoration. Upon his settlement on Quiver 
Prairie, six miles northeast of Havana, he began to preach from 
house to house, and in the spring of 1841, in an unfinished barn, with 
the assistance of Elder Josiah Crawford of the Old Salem Church, 
held a revival of several weeks and organized a church. Elder Craw- 
ford continued to preach here for many years once or twice a month. 
A building was later built and, while the work is not kept up at 
present, occasional services are held in it. Among the early preachers 
were William Davenport, W. A. Poynter, Andrew Page, John Lindsay 
and J. I. Judy. Of the charter members Grandma Kroell, formerly 
Mrs. Atwater, remains in vigorous health and mind at the advanced 
age of ninety years. 

The next church organized in the county some years after the one 
at Quiver was at Bath, which is still in fair condition. 

Some thirty-five years ago the church at Mason City was organized 
and is one of the strong religious forces in the eastern part of the 
county for righteousness. They have only recently built a fine house 
of worship. 

The work in Havana was organized about fifteen years ago by the 
State Missionary Society under the leadership of J. Fred Jones. Be- 
fore the church was organized, G. M. Goode and J. B. Dabney held a 
meeting, finding twenty-six who had fellowship with the church else- 
where and ready to organize. Twelve years ago a building was pur- 
chased from the Dutch Reformed Church and rededicated by J. H. 
Gilliland. The first few years the church was supplied by students 
from Eureka among whom for three years was Joseph Serena. Dur- 
ing the pastorate of Louis O. Lehman the work was organized at 
Topeka and Kilbourne. The work at the former place has been dis- 
continued, while at the latter place a good half-time work is main- 
tained with a Bible school. 

There is also an organization of Disciples at Pleasant Plains and 
a work is maintained as a union church with the Baptists. 

In later years Min. J. M. Haughey gave this county 
excellent service, often walking to his appointments. 

MASSAC COUNTY. 

Bethel (Grand Chain). 

Organized 1885, by George Barrows ; present member- 
ship, 60; value of property, $1,500; Bible school began 1885; 
present enrollment, 78. 

This church is near Hillerman. 
11 



322 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Brookport. 

Organized 1885, by Dr. D. M. Breaker; present member- 
ship, 60; value of property, including parsonage, $2,600; 
Bible school began 1885 ; present enrollment, 79. 

This church lived ten years without a building. It has 
grown and done good service all the time. 

Joppa. 

Organized 1881, by C. H. Waddell; present membership, 
40; value of property, including parsonage, $1,800; Bible 
school began 1881 ; present enrollment, 50. 

There were seventy-three charter members. The church 
made no progress for five years. Under the ministry of R. 
P. Warren new life came to it; but he was killed in 1890 
by a runaway horse. Another period of depression followed. 
Under the ministry of O. J. Page the church took on new 
life. In 1895 a new building was erected. 

Liberty Ridge (Metropolis). 

Organized 1867, by Dr. Joseph Brown ; present member- 
ship, 40; value of property, $1,200; no Bible school. 

A country church located six miles northwest of Metrop- 
olis. It was organized in a log schoolhouse. Soon thereafter 
a cheap building was erected which in later years was mod- 
ernized and rebuilt. In its early years Stanton Fields 
preached for the congregation. 

Little Rock (Unionville). 

Organized 1875, by W. W. Dugger; present membership, 
80; value of property, $2,000; Bible school began 1875; 
present enrollment, 75. 

This church is made up of negroes. It is located in the 
east end of the county. They meet regularly every Lord's 
Day for worship, with half-time preaching. They are doing 
good work. 



CHURCHES 323 

Metropolis. 

Organized 1864, by Joseph Brown; present membership, 
300; value of property, including parsonage, $3,100; Bible 
school began 1867; present enrollment, 160. 

The church was at first made up largely of refugees who 
had come from Kentucky and Tennessee during the Civil 
War. After its close many of them moved away. The 
organization was made in the courthouse. The first church 
house was built in 1867. It was wrecked by a cyclone and 
rebuilt. 

This church has baptized more than one thousand people. 
It has given to the ministry J. P. Alsup, B. L. Beshers and 
T. J. Golightly. J. F. McCartney was one of its most force- 
ful and useful men. 

The first pastor was B. C. Deweese; the last, J. S. Clem- 
ents. 

Mt. Pleasant (Brookport). 

Present membership, 24; value of property, $800. 
Conservative. 

Samouth. 

Present membership, 40; Bible-school enrollment, 50. 
This is a union church. 

Unionville. 

Organized 1865, by W. W. Dugger; present member- 
ship, 100; value of property, $2,000; Bible school began 
1902; present enrollment, 100. 

This place is ten miles southeast of Metropolis. Mr. 
Dugger was invited to preach in the M. E. Church, which 
he did. The invitation was soon withdrawn. Min. G. W. 
Hughey, of the M. E. Church, denounced Mr. Dugger as a 
"Baptist infidel," and of his brethren in faith he said: "They 
are not Christians, but Campbellites, and Campbellites they 
shall be called." However, a church was organized that 
aimed to be Christian only. A small church building was 



324 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

erected which was the first owned by the Disciples in the 
county. Another and better house has since been built. 

MENARD COUNTY. 

Athens. 

Organized 1838, by John A. Powell; present member- 
ship, 201; value of property, $5,500; Bible-school enrollment, 
146. 

A wagon-maker named Brockman went from Jackson- 
ville to Athens about 1836. He was quite an exhorter and 
moved those who heard him to tears. About that time a 
large, well-formed man, with a powerful voice and dressed 
in homespun, began to preach there; he spoke just as the 
Disciples preached on Pentecost and afterward. That was 
John A. Powell, of Sugar Grove. Shortly he secured Evan- 
gelist Robert Foster to help in a meeting. There a little 
congregation was formed. But by reason of a lack of com- 
petent leadership, in a few years the congregation went 
down. Peter Akers, M. E. Church, did what he could in 
three-hour sermons toward pounding the life out of this 
little church. 

About 1850, Adam Grove, a tailor, located in Athens and 
began to agitate the question of a church of Christ there. 
He was soon joined by James Mott, a cabinet-maker, who, 
with others, began to build a small brick chapel about 1851. 
The lot cost $10 and is yet owned by the congregation. The 
trustees at that time were C. R. Pierce, John Jordan, Wil- 
liam Price, James Hall, William Primm, Robert Edwards, 
and A. H. Foster, clerk. The congregation was served by 
the central Illinois pioneer preachers of those years. Dur- 
ing the earlier years of the Civil War the congregation again 
went to pieces. But it was renewed again in 1864 by the 
return and faithful ministry of Clayborne Hall. Since then 
the work has gone steadily on. In 1858 a new building was 
erected. 

Mr. Hall was a faithful man and to him this church is 



CHURCHES 325 

much indebted. Twenty-one years of his life were passed in 
Iowa. 

Greenview. 

Organized 1869, by D. D. Miller; present membership, 
215; value of property, including parsonage, $2,700; Bible- 
school enrollment, 140. 

"The church of Christ, meeting for worship at Green- 
view, 111.," grew out of the efforts of the church at Sweet 
Water. Previous to the organizing there was regular 
preaching for eight months in a hall by Mins. T. W. Raney 
and D. T. Hughes. All of the charter members except one 
came from Sweet Water. They were: Wm. N. and Silas 
Alkine, C. R. Rice, M. M. Ingle; G. W., Elijah C, Nancy 
and Manda A. Pierce; S. H. Blane, William C. and Elizabeth 
S. Yowell, D. T. and Martha Hughes, Paulina and Jane 
Killion, Mary A. Propst, Mary Samson, James Meadows, 
Lewis and Eliza Yuens, J. H. Applegate, Annie Cogal and 
Alvina Roberts. These members mutually pledged them- 
selves to faithful Christian service to the close of their lives. 
The congregation grew in numbers. In 1870, C. R. Pierce 
and James Yowell were chosen as elders, with Alonzo Matts 
and Mr. Ingle as deacons. In 1879 the place of meeting 
was changed from a hall to the Baptist chapel and the two 
Sunday schools united. Then, being without a pastor, the 
congregation waned for a few years. Then Joel Shoemaker 
served as pastor. The church house was not built until 1890. 
Then there was a reconsecration of the members, led by 
Min. David Husband. There were about forty persons. 
Chas. Smoot, J. P. Lichtenberger, C. A. Heckel, W. T. 
McConnell, Mr. Allen, Lewis Goos, J. W. Flynn and R. D. 
Cartwright have served the congregation. C. W. Freeman 
is now pastor. 

E. A. Propst has served as superintendent of the Bible 
school since its beginning. S. H. Blane and family have been 
most helpful members. 

It has given to the ministry Ralph Callaway. 



326 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Petersburg. 

Organized 1863, by Alexander Johnston; present mem- 
bership, 620; value of property, $30,000; Bible school began 
1863; present enrollment, 275. 

In the forties, Aaron B. White, a Christian minister 
residing in Petersburg, and his sons cleared out the under- 
brush and built a stand for an open-air meeting just across 
the street east from his residence. This is the spot on 
which the present church now stands. Evangelist W. H. 
Brown preached on that outdoor stand in 1846; with what 
results it is not known. 

About 1860 the Davis, Arnold, Lamar, Capps and 
Cheaney families were residents of that community and 
began to meet on the Lord's Days for public worship accord- 
ing to the word of God. The L. A. and Jackson Whipp 
families came, too, a little later. The most zealous and 
devoted of all these was Mrs. James W. Cheaney, whose 
presence in the house of the Lord is to this day an inspira- 
tion. The first elders were Dr. K. B. Davis and Robert 
Arnold. A few years after the organization L. A. Whipp 
was made an elder, and continues to this time to fill the 
place with zeal and earnestness. In 1875 a forward move- 
ment, led by Mrs. Cheaney, was determined upon. Mr. and 
Mrs. J. W. Judy, of Tallula, promised their help. When the 
big tent in which the meeting was to be held was hauled 
from the depot to the location, Colonel Judy rode astride 
of it. Some of his friends along the street twitted him. 
Within two months, they learned that he who laughs last 
laughs best. The meeting conducted by Evangelist D. R. 
Lucas resulted in about 260 additions and placed the church 
firmly upon its feet. 

The first house was built in 1876 and the present modern 
structure in 1909, during the pastorates of W. M. Groves 
and B. H. Sealock. J. W. Judy and W. G. Green, of 
Tallula, and L. A. Whipp and A. G. Nance have given the 
church valuable financial support. The pastorate of M. M. 



CHURCHES 327 

Goode is remembered to have been 01 great service to the 
congregation. 

Two public debates were held here the Lucas-Miller and 
J. S. Sweeney with Min. "Universalist" Marvin. 

The church has had eleven pastors. Dr. D. T. Hughes, 
Harrison Osborne, John Owen and Dr. L. A. Engle were 
among the early preachers. 

Sweet Water. 

Organized 1825; present membership, 115; value of prop- 
erty, $4,000; Bible-school enrollment, 100. 

Menard County was a part of Sangamon until the meet- 
ing of the General Assembly in 1838-39. The first name of 
this locality was Sugar Grove, which was applied to it 
because of the large grove of these trees that grew there. 
The congregation was first organized as a Baptist church; 
next it affiliated with the "New Lights," or Christian Denom- 
ination ; later it became a part of the Restoration movement. , 

The earliest extant records bear date of 1851. The mem- 
bers of the congregation at that time were the following: 
William, Elizabeth, Catherine, John N., James, Alvira and 
John D. Alkine ; Thompson, H. D., Tomsey, Margaret and 
Elizabeth Hughes ; Joseph N. Peeler ; Amanda and Melissa 
Whipp ; J. N., Franklin, Jemima, Stephen and Ervilla Pow- 
ell ; Lucinda Propst ; George, Madeline, Edward and Marea 
Blane ; Arminda, O. P., Nancy, George W. and Louisa 
Bracken ; Charles, Cleva and Susan Montgomery ; Jane and 
Mary Ann Swank; Louisa Gibbs, Malinda Taylor, Angline 
Shure, William and Thrissa McFadden ; William, Elizabeth 
and Catherine Engle; Elizabeth, Jane and Abner Peccla; 
Putnam Brown, Cloe Creviston, F. P. Cowan, Hermann and 
Sarah Sykes. At that date, William Alkine was an elder 
and William Engle was chosen to that office. Thompson 
Hughes and Joseph N. Peeler were the deacons. J. N. 
Powell was an evangelist. Mrs. Elizabeth Propst and her 
husband were killed on their way to Oregon by Indians. 

Wm. Ribea, a minister of the Christian Denomination, 



328 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

preached in this community after the congregation had left 
that fellowship. He affirmed that they had departed from 
the ground they once occupied. He hence instituted a new 
church, to which some of the members attached themselves. 

About 1866 another disturbance arose relative to employ- 
ing J. K. Speer as their minister. It was held that he taught 
"soul sleeping" and kindred theories. The questions were 
threshed out in a public debate in January, 1867. Mr. Speer 
affirmed that "death extinguishes man's conscious existence." 
Min. L. M. Linn opposed. The church then numbered about 
230 members. About twenty-three persons followed Mr. 
Speer, including one elder and one deacon. They built a 
chapel, but discussions among themselves soon ended the 
society. The Presbyterians bought the house. A few 
returned to the church. 

In the earlier years, Dr. W. A. Mallory, Peter Vogel, T. 
W. Rainey and E. G. Rice preached for the congregation. 
For many years C. E. Smoot gave them most helpful service. 
About thirty others have preached here. 

The present large brick church was built in 1861. The 
old chapel is now used as a dwelling. 

The church ordained to the ministry D. I. Hughes, Dr. 
L. A. Engle and C. E. Smoot. 

Tallula. 

Organized 1834, by Theophilus Sweet; present member- 
ship, 200; value of property, $5,000; Bible-school enroll- 
ment, 200. 

In October, 1834, "the church of Christ in Clary's Grove" 
was formed of the six following persons: John Willson, 
William G. White, Jane White, Jesse L. Trailer, Obedience 
Trailer and Miss Lydia Ann Caldwell. James W. Simpson 
and wife came from Kentucky the following year and at 
once united with the church. Their meetings were held in 
their residences and the old-time schoolhouse until the chapel 
was built in 1844. After serving them twenty years, it was 
sold. 



CHURCHES 329 

Besides Mr. Sweet, this church was ministered to by 
Robert Foster, B. W. Stone, Maurice R. Trimble, W. W. 
Happy, W. H. Brown and others of the heroes of the faith. 
But the congregation always met for the divinely appointed 
worship upon the Lord's Days. 

The coming of a railway built Tallula, and the place of 
meeting and local name were accordingly changed. The 
Tallula chapel was dedicated by John O'Kane in January, 
1865. From first to last, this church has been served by 
about fifty preachers. 

This church has held in its fellowship an unusual num- 
ber of brainy, forceful and helpful men and women. 
Colonel Judy and his wife, Dr. J. F. Willson and wife, W. 
G. Green, and not a few others, were of this class. 

MERCER COUNTY. 

Keithsburg. 

Organized 1864, by Elias Shortridge; present member- 
ship, 142 ; value of property, $5,200 ; Bible school began 
1866; present enrollment, 128. 

The organization of the church was made in the old 
brick schoolhouse three miles east of town. Prayer-meetings 
were held there every Sunday when no preacher was present. 
Ministers Shortridge, Speer, Warren, Fiske and Lucas 
preached there and in the courthouse in the town, which 
was the meeting-place within a year or two. Levi Ender 
gave the ground and the first chapel was occupied in 1866. 
This was enlarged and reconstructed in 1909. 

There were about fifty members when the first chapel 
was built, all of whom have gone hence except Josephus 
Ogle and wife, of Waterville, Wash., who wait in the dawn 
of the endless day. They were consecrated members and 
most helpful to the church. 

Among the ministers who have served the church there 
were J. B. Royal, Mr. Kincaid, M. Jones, L. M. Linn, James 
Connoran, F. M. Branic, Wm. G. Smith, J. E. Parker, E. 



330 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Ward, G. E. Sheerer, A. A. Burr, J. Quinlan, W. E. Meloan, 
John Larimore and L. F. DePoisters. 

S. M. Booie was an efficient and faithful elder in the 
congregation for fifteen years till his death in 1893. 

The church has given to the ministry F. W. and F. A. 
Emmerson. 

New Boston. 

Organized 1902, by G. E. Sheerer; present membership, 
152; value of property, $1,000; Bible-school enrollment, 64. 

Ohio Grove (Aledo). 

Present membership, 40; value of property, $1,000; Bible- 
school enrollment, 75. 

This church is six miles southeast of Aledo. It is an 
old congregation. 

In the sixties there was a congregation at the village of 
Sunbeam that was probably the progenitor of Ohio Grove. 

MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 

Barnett. 

Organized 1878, by J. S. Sweeney; present membership, 
40; value of property, $1,500; Bible-school enrollment, 40. 

This was first known as the Shaw's Point Church and 
moved after the town grew on the new railroad. While in 
the country, it had a large and influential membership. 

Harvel. 

Organized 1888, by Isaac Beckelhymer; present member- 
ship, 89; value of property, including parsonage, $2,300; 
Bible school began 1888; present enrollment, 80. 

Daniel Adams led in the formation of this congregation. 
Evangelist Beckelhymer led in a three weeks' meeting and 
organized with twenty-three members. These meetings were 
held in the M. E. chapel, for which the community had paid 
with the understanding that it should be for all Onstian 



CHURCHES 331 

people. In another meeting the next year the doors were 
closed against Mr. Beckelhymer. A chapel was soon finished. 
The church was once temporarily crippled by an unwor- 
thy pastor from Arkansas. Mr. Beckelhymer is held in high 
regard by this church. They have had many protracted 
meetings and have always maintained the order of the Lord's 
house on the Lord's Day. H. M. Carey is clerk. 

Hillsboro. 

Organized 1905, by E. O. Sharpe; present membership, 
60; value of property, $2,200; Bible school began 1905; 
present enrollment, 64. 

Mr. Sharpe, as evangelist of the Fifth District, first 
preached in the courthouse in 1904. A series of meetings, 
continuing fifty-one days, was led by Evangelists Lawrence 
and Edward Wright. There were seventy-one charter mem- 
bers. Mr. Sharpe became the first pastor. A good lot was 
bought and the chapel finished in 1909. J. W. Wilkes is 
clerk. 

Irving. 

Organized 1853; present membership, 100; value of 
property, $2,000; Bible school began 1890; present enroll- 
ment, 75. 

There were eighteen charter members, some of whom 
were: J. M. Tanlbee; James, Nancy and Maria Markham; 
Elijah, Mary, William and Eliza Osborn ; James Osborn and 
wife and son ; Henry Lowery and wife and two daughters. 
Maria Markham is the sole survivor. They held their meet- 
ings in the schoolhouse when it was available and in groves 
in the summer-time. Ministers Ward and Taulbee preached 
when a place could be secured. In 1876, Minister Gilbert 
reorganized the congregation with twenty-one members. In 
1878 a chapel was built and L. M. Linn served the church 
one-half time. W. H. Boles held a great meeting in 1885. 
Then J. H. Garrison preached for the church. Finis Idle- 
man held the congregation a good meeting. The resident 



332 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

pastor is C. W. Garst. W. M. Berry has led the Bible 
school faithfully and efficiently as superintendent since its 
beginning. B. B. Tyler held a meeting here, as district 
evangelist, in 1863, which he then thought a failure, but it 
gave J. C. Mason, now of Texas, to the church and to the 
Christian ministry. 

Litchfield. 

Organized 1856, by J. C. Reynolds ; present membership, 
742; value of property, $11,000; Bible school began 1856; 
present enrollment, 743. 

Minister Reynolds was evangelizing under the direction 
of the State Board when the church was constituted. Among 
the first who preached there were Ministers Sims, W. H. 
Brown, J. W. Kellar, J. S. Sweeney and B. B. Tyler. 

First a small frame chapel was built. Later a one-room 
brick building. During the pastorate of Mr. Purlee the 
present edifice was erected at the corner of Union Avenue 
and Harrison Street. 

Among those who did faithful service in establishing the 
church there were W. C. Henderson, H. A. Jones, Thomas 
Harlow, M. C. Hoagland, Mrs. Matilda O'Bannon and Mrs. 
Adeline Elliott. 

Charles W. Ross closed a very successful pastorate of 
several years in 1913. I. W. Agee is the present pastor. 

Pleasant Hill (Barnett). 

Present membership, 71; value of property, $1,000; Bible- 
school enrollment, 58. 

Raymond. 

Organized 1871, by Minister Ewing; present membership, 
156; value of property, $3,000; Bible school began 1871; 
present enrollment, 151. 

Meetings were held in a storeroom for a year when the 
chapel, which is still used for public worship, was built. 
Min. J. W. Ballinger reorganized the church in 1875 with 
forty-three members and served as pastor for two to three 



CHURCHES 333 

years. The officers at that time were J. R. Wylder, Orman 
White, J. W. Potts, D. J. Parrott and Isaac Dodson, elders; 
J. H. Nevins, T. J. Scott, W. A. Parrott and S. W. McElroy, 
deacons. Then there was occasional preaching by sundry 
ministers till 1890. Isaac Beckelhymer then served as pastor 
and was followed by others. The congregation has had 
about thirteen protracted meetings by as many evangelists. 

Miss Lou Watson was given to the ministry and served 
the church efficiently as its pastor. 

The congregation is united in its work, has a good C. E. 
and a well-attended mid-week prayer-meeting. Fred Guthrie 
is the clerk; C. F. Shaul, pastor. 

Waggoner. 

Organized 1889, by Isaac Beckelhymer; present member- 
ship, 114; value of property, $2,500; Bible school began 
1889 ; present enrollment, 79. 

The Sulphur Spring congregation was organized in 1857. 
Its location was four miles west of Waggoner on the east 
edge of Macoupin County. Its first elders were W. H. 
Kent, Wm. Street, Robert Brown and C. F. Richard- 
son. It served the community well during the period of its 
life and disbanded in 1884. The building is now used for 
funerals only. A large cemetery has grown around it. 

The Waggoner congregation was organized by members 
from Sulphur Spring. There were about twenty charter 
members. Jefferson Borton, H. H. Beektnan and Willis 
Plain were the first elders. In 1890 the ladies' aid society 
bought two lots and the chapel was finished in 1893. Mean- 
while the meetings were held in a hall. The same year 
Mrs. McCoy Crank held a successful revival. The congre- 
gation has had eleven pastors. Orin Dilly is in the sixth 
year of a very helpful pastorate. 

Walshville. 

Organized 1874, by T. J. Shelton ; present membership, 
50; value of property, $2,200; Bible-school enrollment, 56. 



334 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Min. A. D. Northcutt was prominent in the beginning of 
this effort. The organization was made in the town hall with 
ten charter members. With little social influence or means, 
and overshadowed by three strong denominations, this little 
band trusted God, went to prayer and work and grew up to 
an influential position. 

The pastors were L. M. Linn, J. H. Garrison, J. H. 
Smart, H. P. Tandy and L. F. Wood. For several years 
the Baptist chapel was used. In 1878 a very neat house of 
worship was built. A number of ministers preached for the 
congregation through several years. In 1904 their chapel 
was destroyed by fire. The Bible school secured the priv- 
ilege of using the M. E. chapel, but was turned out the 
next year. The second building was finished early in 1908. 

J. E. Story, Miss Rachael Dangerfield and Isaac Beckel- 
hymer have served the congregation in recent years. Miss 
Dangerfield was the pastor when the last house was built. 

There is a good C. E., and the congregation is active 
under the ministry of W. A. Green. T. O. Tiffin is the clerk. 

MORGAN COUNTY. 

Antioch (Jacksonville). 

Organized 1833, by D. P. Henderson; present member- 
ship, 40; value of property, including parsonage, $5,000; 
Bible-school enrollment, 45. 

The location is seven miles east of Jacksonville, on the 
Springfield road. The neighborhood was settled by people 
from Kentucky, many of whom were Disciples before leav- 
ing that State. For a time meetings were held in residences. 
In 1835 a substantial frame building was erected. This 
housed the congregation till 1876, when it was sold to Isaac 
Findall, who moved it to his farm, where it is still used as 
a shop and carriage-house. In that year the present com- 
fortable house was built during the pastorate of M. M. 
Goode. He was highly esteemed there for his personal 
worth and for his work. 



CHURCHES 335 

A. Campbell and B. W. Stone visited the church in its 
early period. Mr. Stone died near there and his body rested 
in its cemetery for a time. Other ministers who served the 
church were E. G. Rice, M. R. Elder, J. B. Graves, J. W. 
Strawn and H. P. Shaw. Mr. Shaw and his wife left the 
congregation to go as missionaries to China. 

During the past twenty years many of its members have 
rented their farms and moved to the city; hence the struggle 
to exist. 

Berea (Prentice). 

Organized 1852; present membership, 75; value of prop- 
erty, $550; Bible-school enrollment, 35. 

The church was organiz2d August 15, with twenty-five 
charter members. A part of the agreement was as follows: 

We, the body of Christ, agree to organize ourselves after the prim- 
itive practice; to watch over one another and to admonish each other, 
for our good; to take the Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments 
for our rule of faith and practice. . . . We agree to continue stead- 
fastly in the apostles' doctrine, in fellowship, in breaking of bread and 
in prayers ... to be known as the church of Christ on Indian Creek, 
meeting at Morgan Schoolhouse No. 2. 

Charles Rowe was chosen elder, and Joel Robinson and 
Wesley Corrington, deacons. Mr. Rowe was a product of 
this church and served it as elder and preacher for six 
years. Most of the first members came from the Antioch 
congregation. It was ministered to at times by most of the 
preachers of that time and section. Four of its leading 
members were Joel and Isaac Robinson, Dr. John C. Cobb 
and Benjamin Mclntyre. 

Chapin. 

Organized 1875, by H. C. Cassell; present membership, 
240; value of property, including parsonage, $5,000; Bible 
school began 1875 ; present enrollment, 108. 

The earliest organization of a church of Christ in this 
community was the old Manvaisterre or Jordon congrega- 
tion, three miles east of the site of Chapin. In March, 1839, 



336 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

nine Disciples of Christ entered into a covenant to observe 
the ordinances of the Lord as revealed in the New Testa- 
ment. They were Nathaniel and Martha H. Fisk, Thomas 
O. and Nancy Taylor, Jane Hill, Mary Boyd, Catherine 
Gillpatrick, and Nathan J. and Mary Averitt. Mr. Fisk was 
the first preacher and served the church four and a half 
years. 

Meetings were held in homes and schoolhouses till a 
chapel was built. It stood in the cemetery that is still used. 
This congregation grew till its members were scattered 
through that entire region. For the accommodation of those 
residing toward the northwest, the Bethel congregation was 
formed at a point one and a half miles from the site of 
Chapin. This was a part of the Manvaisterre Church until 
the time of the Civil War, when Minister Mclntire organ- 
ized a church. The shifting population and the coming of 
railways long since carried it away. 

A colony from the old church moved into Macon County 
and formed the nuclei of the Long Point and Niantic con- 
gregations. It was a fruitful hive, and the influences of the 
Taylors, Averitts, Boyds, Jones, Tichnors, Bobbitts, Camp- 
bells, Strodes, Riggs, Hatfields, Pruitts, Mansfields and many 
others of their time are yet widely out-reaching. They were 
heroes of the faith in their day the fragrance of whose mem- 
ories yet lingers. 

In 1877 twenty- four people from the Jordon and Bethel 
congregations enrolled into the Chapin Church, so this 
church came of fine spiritual ancestry. The Congregational 
chapel was bought, which served until the present building 
was erected in 1902. It has given to the ministry F. W. 
Burnham and Ivan W. Agee. Since its formation more than 
five hundred people have been led by it in the way of life. 

Concord. 

Organized 1868, by William Rice ; present membership, 
96; value of property, $5,000; Bible school began 1868; 
present enrollment, 90. 



CHURCHES 337 

Christian ministers preached about the site of Concord 
in the early sixties. A chapel was built seven miles to the 
northwest, which was sold to the Lutherans and then another 
was built in the town. This house was rebuilt in 1911. 

Twenty- four ministers have served the church, which has 
done good work. S. M. Henderson is an elder and the clerk. 

Franklin. 

Present membership, 140; value of property, including 
parsonage, $4,900; Bible-school enrollment, 120. 

Jacksonville ( Central) . 

Organized 1832, by B. W. Stone; present membership, 
1,200; value of property, $85,000; Bible school began 1860; 
present enrollment, 900. 

This church was organized in October in the old court- 
house that stood near the southwest corner of the square. 
There were seventy-two charter members. Among them 
were Harrison W. Osborne, Philip Coffman, John T. Jones 
and Josephus Hewitt all leading spirits. 

The meetings for public worship were continued in the 
courthouse and residences of the members until a chapel was 
built on Beardstown Street, which is now North Main 
Street. This chapel served until the early fifties, when, dur- 
ing the pastorate of A. J. Kane, a two-story brick building 
was erected on the same street. Joel Hedington taught 
school in this house. It was in use till 1869, when, during 
the pastorate of Enos Campbell, a new brick house was built 
on East State Street. This was enlarged and remodeled in 
1888, while A. N. Gilbert was pastor. The present stone 
structure was finished during the pastorate of R. F. Thrapp 
in 1906. 

Throughout its life this church has always held a goodly 
number of representative citizens. Its ministers also have 
generally been men of a high type. Among the pioneers, 
besides those above named, there were Henry Cyrus, the 
first pastor; Jerry Lancaster, Jonathan Atkinson, W. W. 



338 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Happy and D. P. Henderson. The church was divided dur- 
ing the pastorate of W. S. Russel by his unscriptural teach- 
ing. The two parties came to a mutual agreement in 1866, 
and under the superior ministry of Enos Campbell were 
welded into one. The teaching of Mr. Russel not only 
crippled the church for a time, but also affected adversely 
other congregations in the county and lost to the Disciples 
Berean College. 

W. W. Happy, Sr. and Jr., James Stark and William 
Gilliam were ordained to the ministry by this congregation. 

The pastorate of Mr. Thrapp "was characterized by 
splendid missionary expansion and progressive civic reform." 

This is a great church, abounding in many good works. 

Jacksonville ( Negro ) . 

Organized 1904, by E. M. Harlis; present membership, 
35; value of property, $2,500; Bible school began 1894; 
present enrollment, 25. 

A mission Bible school was begun by Minister Harlis 
on South Mauvaisterre Street in 1894. This was fostered 
by the First Christian Church and especially by Mrs. E. C. 
Ewing. Ten years afterward this mission grew into a 
church. Mr. Harlis has been faithful in his work. He still 
ministers to the congregation. The C. E. numbers twenty- 
five. 

Literberry. 

Organized 1869, by E. W. Clark; present membership, 
160; value of property, $4,500; Bible school began 1869; 
present enrollment, 176. 

E. G. Rice and M. M. Goode were two of the early min- 
isters. The church is now active and zealous. 

Lynn-mile (Jacksonville). 

Organized 1833, by Barton W. Stone; present member- 
ship, 140; value of property, including parsonage, $4,500; 
Bible school began 1863; present enrollment, 138. 



CHURCHES 339 

The church was constituted in the residence of James 
Leeper. The officers were James B. and William Gordon, 
elders, with John Banson, James Leeper and A. A. Wilson, 
deacons. Besides Mr. Stone, among the early ministers 
there were D. P. Henderson, Dr. Robert Foster, W. W. 
Happy, Jonathan Atkinson, A. J. Kane, E. L. Craig and E. 
C. Rice. 

The first chapel, built in 1838, was a union house. It 
was sold for taxes in 1848 and bought by the Disciples. It 
gave place to the present house in 1882. 

This church ordained A. C. Foster and Joseph B. Camp 
to the ministry. 

John B. Gordon was elected to the Legislature, for two or 
three terms, in the seventies. S. F. Campbell and Geo. W. 
Camp were leading members of the church and citizens in 
the community for many years. Mr. Camp was the father 
of John B., Mark D. and Joseph B. Camp. 

In the union chapel Min. Peter Akers, of the M. E. 
Church, on one Sunday preached four hours in order "to 
keep the Campbellites from occupying the house the same 

Oak Ridge (Prentice). 

Organized 1876. 

The location is twelve miles northeast of Jacksonville. 
The members of a congregation that had worshiped a period 
at the eld Jordanville Schoolhouse, with some friends, met 
on March 18, 1876, at the residence of Lewis Hamilton. 
They decided to build a chapel at the old Stockton Cemetery. 
This house was finished in 1878. 

The charter members were Rosetta Armstrong, Samuel 
and Catherine Beach, Margaret Coker, Margaret Coulston ; 
Tyre, John, Julia and Anna Brown ; Mary Demarest, John 
Hamilton, J. L. and Mary S. Jordon, Charles Paul, William 
Robinson, Isaac Smith, and A. B., Elizabeth and Emma 
Wiswell. The elders elected were John Hamilton, A. B. 
Wiswell and Tyre Brown. 

About seventeen preachers have served the congregation. 



340 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Waverly. 

Organized 1847, by Austin Sims; present membership, 
131; value of property, $5,000; Bible school began 1847; 
present enrollment, 90. 

This is an average church of its class. 

Woodson. 

Organized 1869, by E. G. Rice and H. W. Osborne; pres- 
ent membership, 151; value of property, including parsonage, 
$4,500; Bible school began 1868; present enrollment, 93. 

This church was the result of a series of meetings con- 
ducted by Ministers Osborne and Rice in the schoolhouse in 

1868. There were thirty-five charter members, some of 
whom came from the "Old Concord" congregation. The 
latter, located about six miles northeast of Woodson, was 
once a strong and prosperous country church, but the adverse 
tides carried it away. The Woodson chapel was built in 

1869. Ministers Osborne and Rice first preached for the 
congregation for several years, part time. William Ferguson 
was for a long time a true and faithful elder, feeding and 
leading the flock. 

Dr. G. W. Miller, a practicing physician of the town, 
having served the church well as an elder, was ordained to 
the ministry and has been the pastor for nineteen years. 

The church is well organized and active in good works. 

MOULTRIE COUNTY. 

In 1832, A. H. Kellar, Abram Southern, Rebecca Stevens, 
and a few other Baptists from Kentucky, with Joseph and 
Solomon Hostetler and their wives from Indiana, came 
together in November and organized the West Okaw Church 
of Christ. Joseph Hostetler was an ordained minister, while 
his brother Solomon and A. H. Kellar were teaching elders. 
They were righteous men, full of zeal. The West Okaw 
Church may properly be called the mother of all the Chris- 
tian Churches in the county. Its meetings, when the weather 



CHURCHES 341 

compelled, were held in the twenty- feet-square log school- 
house, with stick-and-mud chimney at the west and with a 
log left out at the east end for a window. It had what was 
known as a weight-pole roof. From this point the primi- 
tive gospel began and continued to be sounded out. From 
Cunningham's Grove on the north to Jerry Provolt's at the 
forks of the Okaw on the south, the seeds of the truth were 
sown by this pioneer church. 

In 1837, Levi Flemming, a zealous preacher, settled on 
upper Jonathan Creek and laid the foundation of the church 
there. 

Later the Lillys and the Smysers came from Kentucky 
and settled on Whitley Creek. They were re-enforced by 
Jackson Storm, a preacher from Tennessee, who, like 
Apollos, was mighty in the Scriptures ; also by Tobias Grider 
from Indiana. 

These Disciples were further helped, as occasion per- 
mitted or required, by Bushrod W. Henry, of Shelby County, 
and John W. Tyler and Geo. A. Patterson, of Macon 
County. These were all men whose chief learning had been 
acquired in the school of the great Teacher. 

The congregation that could have regular preaching once 
a month considered itself very fortunate, and if there were 
no additions at these meetings it was thought something was 
wrong. There were giants in those days who would suc- 
cessfully grapple with sectarian dogmas and throttle the 
mightiest champion of human authority as binding on men's 
consciences. 

Levi Flemming and Jackson Storm were two of the 
pioneer preachers of whom the printed records say little, but 
their names are in the book of life and long ago they went 
to their rewards in heaven. 

The Wilburn Creek Church, for a long time a flourish- 
ing and forceful country congregation, yielding to the law 
of change, has disbanded. 

These men were supremely loyal to the truth and with 
them the word of the Lord was final. 



342 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Allenville. 

Organized 1884, by H. Y. Keller; present membership, 
200; value of property, $1,000; Bible school began 1895; 
present enrollment, 113. 

The church met for worship in the old Nelson School- 
house until the chapel was built. 

Arthur. 

Organized 1882, by W. F. Black; present membership, 
132; value of property, $10,000; Bible school began 1882; 
present enrollment, 168. 

This church grew out of a series of meetings led by 
Evangelist Black. It was organized in an implement store. 
A chapel was finished in the fall of 1883. This gave place 
at the close of 1909 to the present house, costing $8,000. 
Joel T. Davis was then pastor. 

Bethany. 

Organized 1881, by S. B. Lindsey; present membership, 
180; value of property, $4,500; Bible school began 1881; 
present enrollment, 89. 

There were twenty charter members. The first elders 
were Charles Ronley, A. S. Younger and G. W. Logan, and 
the first deacons, W. W. Lennell, William Gough and W. 
J. Ledbretter. 

The house of worship was completed and occupied at the 
close of 1882. 

Cadwell. 

Organized 1902, by J. O. Henry; present membership, 
86; value of property, $3,500; Bible school began 1902; 
present enrollment, 68. 

Organized in a schoolhouse. Church built the next year. 
A fine community. Rich soil, with very muddy roads in wet 
weather. A C. W. B. M. 



CHURCHES 343 

Dalton City. 

Organized 1865, by John W. Sconce; present member- 
ship, 75; value of property, $3,000; Bible school began 1865; 
present enrollment, 51. 

About the year 1865, John W. Sconce, assisted by J. W. 
Tyler, of Decatur, and Jackson Page, of Shelbyville, formed 
a church of Christ in the New Hope Schoolhouse near Free- 
land's Point. When Mr. Sconce settled in Dalton City, in 
1873, through his earnest effort a church building was put 
up there and the congregations at New Hope transferred 
their place of meeting thither. 

Gays. 

Organized 1869, by Thomas Goodman; present member- 
ship, 150; value of property, $1,800; Bible school began 
1871 ; present enrollment, 104. 

Met in schoolhouse for two years, when chapel was fin- 
ished and occupied. The first elders were Edward Rouse 
and W. S. Colson ; the first deacons, W. T. Watson and S. 
P. Bristow. E. C. Harrison is now the clerk. 

Jonathan's Creek (Sullivan). 

Organized 1859, by Christie Hostetler; present member- 
ship, 70; value of property, $1,500; Bible school began 
1862 ; present enrollment, 80. 

Organized in the Lauders Schoolhouse, where it met for 
three years. In 1862 a church house had been built at the 
Jonathan's Creek Cemetery, and was occupied. This gave 
place to a new house in 1891. 

David Campbell was given to the ministry. 

The church is six miles east of Sullivan. 

Lake City. 

Organized 1886, by Minister Gates ; present membership, 
33; value of property, $800; Bible school began 1886; pres- 
ent enrollment, 32. 



344 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

John T. Ho well, John McMullin, and John and Frank 
Lovings and their families, led in the formation of this 
church. The chapel was built the same year. There are 
many Irish Papists in the community. After a few years 
members of the church began to sell their farms and move. 
This continued until only a few Disciples are left. 

Lovington. 

Organized 1832, by Joseph Hostetler; present member- 
ship, 408; value of property, $12,000; Bible school began 
1865 ; present enrollment, 324. 

On Nov. 17, 1832, a meeting was held at the home of 
Nathan Stevens, one mile west of the place where Lovington 
has grown, on the Okaw River, and a church was organized 
with seventeen members. Joseph Hostetler, who had come 
from Indiana that year, was the leader in this work. He 
and his brother Solomon had been preachers in the German 
Baptist Church, but were now proclaiming the primitive 
gospel. A. H. Kellar, a farmer and Regular Baptist 
preacher, associated himself with them. These three were 
the first elders. The church was known as the Okaw 
Church of Christ. The meetings for public worship were 
held in the residences and schoolhouses until 1846. Then a 
small frame building was erected one mile south of the site 
of Lovington, on the old Kellar farm now the Lovington 
Cemetery. The congregation sustained a steady growth 
under the leadership of Min. H. Y. Kellar until 1866. In 
that year a large frame building was erected on the present 
church site in Lovington. This was used until 1901, when 
the present church was built. It is a large, modern brick 
structure, well adapted to the work of the church. F. C. 
Overbaugh was the pastor at that time. The church now 
has nine elders and thirteen deacons, the largest Bible school 
in Moultrie County, with Senior and Junior C. E. societies. 

This church has given to the ministry Finis Idleman 
and Paul E. Million. H. Y. Kellar came from the Okaw 
Church. 



CHURCHES 345 

Smyser (Gays). 

Organized 1837, by Tobias Grider; present membership, 
180; value of property, $1,000; Bible school began 1858; 
present enrollment, 63. 

This is frequently called the Whitley Creek Church from 
the near-by stream of water of that name. S. M. Smyser 
was one of the leading members in the early days ; hence it 
came to be known by his name. Its location is about seven 
miles northwest of Mattoon. The charter members were 
John and Synthia Hendricks, S. M. and Rebecca Smyser, 
Polly A. Hendricks and John Hendricks, Jr. Their names 
are fragrant remembrances. A church home was built at 
once. It was used till 1875, when the present house was 
erected. Tobias Grider, Jack Storms and B. W. Henry 
preached there in the thirties and forties. S. M. Smyser 
and A. H. Edwards were efficient elders who served the 
church for a long time. In the sixties, J. G. Waggoner was 
"working the roads" in that community. At the time, S. M. 
Connor was holding a series of meetings there, and became 
sick. Mr. Smyser said to Mr. Waggoner : "Go home and 
get ready to preach to-night." Had this church done nothing 
more in its seventy-five years than produce and give to the 
world J. G. Waggoner, its work would have been most com- 
mendable. J. H. McCormick, E. L. Lilly, J. D. Layton and 
Henry Boyd are the present elders. 

Sullivan. 

Organized 1840, by Levi Fleming; present membership, 
561; value of property, $15,000; Bible school began 1856; 
present enrollment, 219. 

Before the town of Sullivan was laid out, a little church 
was formed at Asa's Creek by Min. Levi Fleming, in the 
home of Levi Patterson. It made little progress until reor- 
ganized by B. W. Henry in 1846 with fourteen members. 
This church worshiped in the schoolhouse in Sullivan, which 
was also used as a courthouse at that time. The lack of a 



346 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

suitable and permanent place of worship, and internal dis- 
cord, retarded the growth of the church. Later, A. H. and 
H. G. Kellar set things in order and a number came in from 
the Lovington Church. About 1852 a series of meetings, 
conducted by Mins. John Wilson and B. W. Henry, was held 
in the M. E. Church. A house of worship was finished and 
occupied in 1853. In after years revivals were conducted 
by A. J. Kane, William Mathes, W. M. Brown, Milton Hop- 
kins, W. F. Black, A. I. Hobbs, T. A. Boyer and C. R. Sco- 
ville. In the fifties, Mins. J. S. Etheridge, B. W. Henry, 
H. Y. and Dr. A. L. Kellar moved to Sullivan and con- 
tributed much to the growth of the church. Later there 
came J. R. Lucas, L. P. Phillips, N. S. Bastian and James 
Hyatt. At the beginning of his second year the church was 
divided, but was reunited five years thereafter. There fol- 
lowed J. M. Morgan, Dr. A. L. Kellar, Thomas Edwards, 
L. C. Haulman, E. H. Kellar, J. S. Clements, J. P. Davis, 
G. E. Platt, B. C. Lamplugh, A. J. DeMiller, J. E. Diehl, 
J. M. Bovee, Edwards Davis, M. J. Martin, Amzi Atwater, 
T. F. Weaver, E. W. Brickert, E. E. Curry, H. A. Davis, 
J. M. McNutt, J. W. Waters, J. W. Kilborn and W. B. 
Hopper, the present pastor. 

In July, 1901, a new and commodious brick building was 
finished and occupied. 

The church has an L. A. society, C. W. B. M. auxiliary 
and girls' missionary circle. 

The church at Sullivan was not singular in its damaging 
experiences. Not a few of those that are now strong and 
efficient passed through similar trials. The preachers were 
not always wise. But their problems were many and the 
support for their families came largely from their manual 
toil, and they held to no principles of self-seeking poli- 
ticians. Oftener disturbances arose from men of partial 
knowledge and small vision who assumed to be bosses rather 
than leaders in the congregation. They were generally good 
men with confused aims. Happily such conditions have 
largely passed. 



CHURCHES 347 

Union Prairie (Arthur). 

Organized 1870, by Nathan Wright; present membership, 
47; value of property, $4,000; Bible school began 1873; 
present enrollment, 35. 

Among the ministers who have served the church, there 
were David Campbell, Abram Bovie, James Connor, Thomas 
Goodman, Harmon Gregg, H. Y. Kellar, J. O. Henry, Clin- 
ton Hostetler, W. M. Gordon, L. M. Mulligan and John 
Howell. 

The congregation has a good house for worship, located 
three and one-half miles west of Arthur and one-fourth 
mile west of the Douglas County line. It was built in 1865. 
Much of the labor was donated by brethren and friends. 

The Haneys and Powels were among the prominent 
charter members. 

OGLE COUNTY. 

Grand Detour. 

Organized 1894, by J. B. Wright; present membership, 
27; value of property, $1,500; Bible school began 1895; 
present enrollment, 34. 

This little church was a child of persecution. Minister 
Wright began to preach to a few Disciples there in a union 
chapel. Conversions resulted almost immediately, which 
called for an organization. This was made with thirty-one 
charter members. Meanwhile, the legal owners of the prop- 
erty shut the Disciples out of the chapel. The use of the 
schoolhouse was also denied them. This treatment aroused 
the interest of others, so that five months thereafter a new 
church house was ready for use. 

A good Bible school and C. E. are maintained. 

Mt. Morris. 

Organized 1880, by J. H. Wright; present membership, 
93; value of property, $3,500; Bible school began 1880; 
present enrollment, 143. 

A few Disciples had held some meetings for worship in 



348 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

a hall, with an occasional sermon by L. D. Waldo, of Rock-, 
ford, and D. R. Howe, of Lanark. In March, State Evan- 
gelist Wright organized the church with the following 
twenty-eight charter members: Mrs. Sarah Warner, Mrs. 
Mary E. Thomas, Mary E. Spielman, Mrs. Anna Long, Mrs. 
Rose Diehl, Mrs. E. Miller, Geo. S. Kennedy, Wm. S. and 
Catherine Blake, Charles G. and Sarah Blakslee, Hattie 
Finnikle, Mrs. Eliza Hammer, Jacob and Susan Keedy, Mrs. 
Laura Kennedy, Charles and Mrs. Vallee Keedy ; Florence 
V., Fannie and Susan Long; Adam Shaw, Letha Sprecher. 
Mrs. Susan Thomas, Anna and Mildred F. Thomas, and 
Mary E. and Clay Wagner. Of these, the seven first named 
only are living. 

A brick building was bought of the Lutherans and remod- 
eled. 

The pastors were G. W. Ross, J. H. Carr, T. B. Stanley, 
J. B. Wright, C. T. Spitler, G. W. Pearl, D. G. Wagner, 
D. F. Seyster, Mr. De Poister, Mr. Goss, Mr. Hacker, and 
now H. F. Sayles. 

Those given to the ministry are J. H. Shellenberger, Z. 
O. Do ward, D. H. Wagner, J. W. Baker, W. F. Kohl and 
H. L. Eyrick. 

Pine Creek (Polo). 

Organized 1860, by Robert Moffett and Charles Sher- 
wood ; present membership, 98 ; value of property, $3,500 ; 
Bible school began 1860; present enrollment, 55. 

This is one of the truly great churches of Illinois. It is 
located ten miles southeast of Polo. Into this community 
there came, about 1857, David I. Funk, Charles Widney, 
Abram Witmer, David Bovey and other kindred spirits. Mr. 
Funk was a native of Washington County, Md. For thirty 
years he had been an elder in the "Dunker" Church, but 
under the preaching of Mr. Campbell was led to more 
Scriptural ground. He died in 1876 at the age of eighty- 
nine years. These men, with their families, began to hold 
meetings for public worship in the Pennsylvania Corners 



CHURCHES 349 

Schoolhouse. Here the church was organized. At this 
meeting Robert Moffett presided and C. W. Sherwood 
served as secretary. The officers elected were Charles Wicf- 
ney, Abram Witmer, G. T. Johnson, elders, with David I. 
Funk, Daniel Bovey and John Welty, deacons. 

The chapel was built at the same "corners" the same year. 
In after years a lecture-room was added and other modern 
improvements made. It still serves the community well. 

Of the earlier preachers who served the church, other 
than Mr. Sherwood and Mr. Moffett, were Geo. F. John- 
ston, John Ross, Daniel and Henry Howe, L. D. Waldo, 
Adam Adamson, Mr. Thornberry and Jasper Moss; later 
came G. L. Applegate, T. B. Stanley, G. W. Ross, J. H. 
Carr, G. W. Pearl, W. H. McGinnis and J. B. Wright. D. 
F. Seyster is now in the fifth year of the third period of 
his pastorate. 

The congregation has made very liberal and cheerful con- 
tributions of its members to the churches at Mt. Morris, 
Polo, Grand Detour and Dixon. 

Besides, the following men have been given by this fruit- 
ful mother to the Christian ministry: Geo. Hamilton, D. F. 
Seyster, G. A. Miller, L. T. Faulders, C. Roy Stauffer and 
C. Lee Stauffer. This church has indeed walked well pleas- 
ing before the Lord to have had her service crowned with 
such significant products. 

The congregation has been always actively interested in 
all missionary and benevolent activities. When the question 
came up in the district missionary convention of trying to 
establish a church of Christ in the city of Sterling, one of 
the delegates of the Pine Creek congregation spoke with 
such confidence and earnestness that the vote was unanimous 
to begin the effort at once. Henry H. Powell has been 
Bible-school superintendent for thirteen consecutive years. 

Besides the names already written, those of Wilson, 
Hammer, Drenner, Johnson, Wise, Netz, Pohrer, Wolf, 
Sheely and Higby will be honored and remembered for 
fidelity and good works. 



350 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Polo. 

Organized 1904, by B. H. Sealock; present membership, 
94; value of property, $2,000; Bible school began 1904; 
present enrollment, 112. 

There had been occasional preaching in Polo by Christian 
ministers before the formation of the congregation. The 
Pine Creek Church gave to it some of its most valued mem- 
bers, but with the kindest spirit. 

The Baptist chapel was bought, remodeled and repaired. 
John M. Grimes is the pastor. 

PEORIA COUNTY. 

Peoria Central. 

Organized 1845 ; present membership, 635 ; value of prop- 
erty, $40,000; Bible school began 1855; present enrollment, 
792. 

There were twelve charter members. The last of these 
to die was Mrs. Eliza Wadsworth Smith, who passed away 
in 1904. The first elder was William Tilford, and the first 
deacon, Sampson Schockley. For a time these Disciples met 
from house to house to keep the Lord's ordinances, later in 
the engine-house in the 200 block on North Adams Street, 
and afterward in the old courthouse. The first church build- 
ing was erected, costing $3,600, in 1855. It was the first 
public building in the city with a self-supporting roof. Peo- 
ple said it would fall in, but it still stands at the corner of 
Franklin Street and Seventh Avenue. The present location 
at the corner of Monroe and Fulton Streets was bought of 
the "New School Presbyterians" in 1875. It had on it an 
old-fashioned brick building that was comfortable, but unin- 
viting. Ira J. Chase was pastor at that time. A modern 
and convenient edifice was erected in 1894 during the pas- 
torate of J. M. Kersey. This building was destroyed by 
fire early in 1913. 

In its earlier years the church had such preaching as it 
could get. When there was none, Deacon Schockley con- 



CHURCHES 351 

ducted the worship on the Lord's Day morning. His trade 
was a brickmason ; his business was to serve God. Some of 
the pastors were John Lindsey, I. N. Carman, D. R. Howe, 
John Miller, John O'Kane, William Thompson, Ira J. Chase, 
B. O. Aylesworth, J. B. Mayfield, N. S. Haynes, J. M. Ker- 
sey, J. P. McKnight, G. B. Van Arsdale, H. T. Burns, W. 
F. Turner, and now M. L. Pontius. 

The baneful influence of denominationalism is such that 
the Disciples have found it necessary to come to social as 
well as ecclesiastical recognition in cities before they have 
made much growth. This condition has developed a superior 
type of character. Not a few choice spirits were grown in 
this church. Among them were Miss Pauline White, a mem- 
ber since 1854, and her sisters. In the last days of the 
church's weakness, Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Darst were invaluable 
helpers ; the Ford family, particularly "Aunty Ford," a beau- 
tiful flower whom God caused to bloom on earth for awhile, 
that his people might have here an object-lesson of what 
heaven is to be ; the Shockley family ; and the schoolmaster 
who declined a handsome compensation to lead the singing 
in a near-by congregation, to perform this service in the 
Central free of charge, C. R. Vandervoort, whose sun set at 
his high noon. H. C. Reichel and Harry Streibich were given 
to the ministry. 

Peoria West Bluff Chapel. 

This is a mission Bible school. It was the first chapel 
ever built in one day. The credit of the conception belongs 
to Mr. A. J. Elliott. The Brotherhoods of the Central and 
Howett Street Churches, re-enforced by about sixty volun- 
teers of the local carpenters' union, united in building the 
chapel on May 30, 1910. Min. William Price had laid the 
foundation. 

Peoria Howett Street. 

Organized 1909, by William Price; present membership, 
192; value of property, $3,500; Bible school began 1875; 
present enrollment, 365. 



352 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

About 1875, Mr. A. B. Tyng, Sr., an active member of 
the Reformed Episcopal Church, started a mission Sunday 
school at Cedar and Brotherson Streets. It was called the 
Tyng Mission. As it was about to be abandoned, the women 
of the W. C. T. U. assumed the duty of its maintenance. 
Through the influence of Mrs. F. M. Barrett it passed to the 
Central Church in 1885. Thereafter a lot was bought at 
224 Howett Street, and later a chapel was built thereon. 
This was during the pastorate of N. S. Haynes at the Cen- 
tral Church. Afterward this building was enlarged. Fos- 
tered faithfully by members of the Central, the Howett 
Street school grew finally into an independent congregation. 
Among these were J. P. Darst, William Ford and Miss 
Lorena Simonson, who has given twenty-eight years of 
service there as a teacher a rare and beautiful example of 
efficient devotion. Of late years, Mr. M. W. Rotchford has 
been Bible-school superintendent and an enthusiastic helper. 
The neighborhood was as unpromising thirty years ago as a 
field could well be. The gratifying results are the blessings 
of the Lord upon prayerful and faithful work. 

On June 17, 1841, Dr. P. G. Young reported the organ- 
ization of a church of Christ, with sixteen members, at 
Mount Hawley. 

In 1842 he reported the organization of a church of forty 
members at Rome, on the west bank of the Illinois River. 

As late as 1888 there was a self-supporting church at 
Elmore. It sustained a pastor for full time, gave the com- 
munity helpful service, and contributed to missions. 

The changing tides of population carried all these away. 

PERRY COUNTY. 

Duquoin. 

Organized 1857, by Lysias Heape; present membership, 
650; value of property, including parsonage, $22,000; Bible- 
school enrollment, 266. 

Previous to 1857 there was monthly preaching in resi- 



CHURCHES 353 

dences by Ministers Pyle, Wells, and Dr. Isaac and J. N. 
Mulkey. In that year, Messrs. Keyes and Metcalf, the 
founders of the town, gave the feeble congregation a lot on 
which the chapel was built. Some of the charter members 
were Lysias Heape and family, William and Abner Wil- 
liams, Mrs. McElvain Wells, Mr. Pyle, Isaac Wheatley and 
family, Daniel and Frederick Williams, John Brown, Robert 
Parks, Thomas Wiffin and family, and Robert J. Wheatley, 
who had just moved from Pennsylvania. In after years he 
was a great man of God and a tower of strength in the 
church. 

In 1857 a financial panic swept the country like a cyclone. 
Poor crops came the next year, and muttering thunderings 
of the Civil War were heard. Besides, at that time more 
papers avowedly infidel were taken and read in Duquoin 
than those that were Christian. Early in 1861, Mr. Wheat- 
ley sent for O. A. Burgess. He preached to an audience of 
fifty people for days and thought to quit. But, encouraged 
by Mr. Wheatley, he continued to use his splendid spiritual 
artillery upon the strong citadel of Satan until seventy per- 
sons surrendered to King Jesus. Later W. F. Black, J. Z. 
Taylor and Ira J. Chase led the church in great revivals. 

The eight years' pastorate of J. J. Harris was a rich 
blessing to the church. In that period the new church was 
built. 

Adam Adcock is now leading the flock in all good ways. 

R. A., a son of R. J. Wheatley, has been a faithful mem- 
ber since the Burgess meeting. 

Friendship ( Tamaroa ) . 

Organized 1867, by P. W. Jones; present membership, 
60; value of property, $600; Bible school began 1867; pres- 
ent enrollment, 85. 

A country church three miles west of Tamaroa. It was 
instituted by Mr. Jones, a Baptist minister. In 1869, G. W. 
Puckett, another Baptist minister, located with the church. 
On the first Saturday in March, 1870, the declaration of 

13 



354 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

faith, covenant and rules of decorum were repealed and the 
Bible alone, without any other written creed, was adopted as 
the rule of faith and practice. Moderator, G. W. Puckett; 
clerk, S. C. Moore. 

The present house of worship was built in 1870. Elders, 
D. L. Benson, John Miller; deacons, Michael Goos, Abraham 
Heape. 

Besides Mr. Puckett, the following ^ave served the 
church: Lysias Heape, J. N. and Isaac Mulkey, John A. Wil- 
liams, Louis Goos, David Husband, and now J. J. Harris 
one- fourth time. 

Two young men were given to the ministry Louis Goos 
and C. W. Marlow. 

Tamaroa, 

Present membership, 50; value of property, $3,000; Bible- 
school enrollment, 57. 

PIATT COUNTY. 

Antioch (Atwood). 

Organized 1854, by John C. Mathes; present member- 
ship, 50; value of property, $1,500; Bible-school enroll- 
ment, 50. 

The beginning of this church, located about six miles 
north of Atwood, was unique and significant. Jacob Mos- 
barger was born in Indiana in 1818 and settled near the site 
of this church in 1844. He was an infidel. In 1853 a hurt 
befell him which put him on his back for eleven months. He 
read everything within his reach and then asked for the 
Bible. It was to him a book of surprising interest. He read 
and read until he decided that he should become a Christian; 
so he sent for Mr. Mathes, in Indiana, to come and baptize 
him. He came, preached awhile and immersed Jacob Mos- 
barger and his wife, who was a member of the "New Light" 
congregation in that community; Gilbert Green and his wife 
Martha, David Samuels and his wife Ruth, and Gilford 
Green. These seven were formed into a church of Christ. 



CHURCHES 355 

They met in the Gregory log schoolhouse. About 1866 a 
chapel was built which in later years was remodeled. Jacob 
Mosbarger was elder of this church for forty-five years. 
During this period he rarely missed one of its meetings. On 
Thursday afternoons he and his sons always left the field 
one hour earlier than usual that they might attend the weekly 
prayer-meetings two and a half miles distant. He was a 
great and good man of God. 

Elijah Goodwin, Joseph Hostetler and J. C. Mathes 
served the church for twenty-five years. Then James Con- 
nor and J. W. Monser did good work here. 

Ativood. 

Organized 1879, by John C. Mathes ; present membership, 
112; value of property, $3,000; Bible-school enrollment, 75. 
The following is the church covenant: 

We, whose names are subscribed, agree with each other, that we 
will take the Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments, known as 
the Bible, as the only rule of faith and practice, and that we will take 
the name "Christian" as the only divinely authorized name and will 
be known as the Church of Christ at Atwood, Douglas and Piatt 
Counties. 

The county line passed through the center of the town. 
The charter members were Peter, W. H. and Hannah Mos- 
barger; Frank and Angelina Browning; Aaron and Anna 
Shaw; John C., Ruth J. and J. Mathes; Adam Star, Nancy 
Painter and Nancy Tryon. 

The present elders are Wm. White, J. H. Easton and C. 
M. Flickinger. The chapel was built in 1883, following a 
good revival by W. F. Black. 

Bement. 

Organized 1862; present membership, 120; value of prop- 
erty, $4,000; Bible-school enrollment, 125. 

There were seventeen charter members, with William 
Munroe and J. Ruble, elders, and Samuel Hopkins and 
Thomas Dunn, deacons. Among those who were especially 



356 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

helpful to the church were G. W. Thompson, pastor in 
1878-79, who collected the church records; C. H. Bridges, 
E. H. Graves and C. E. Evans. The church is active and 
prosperous with good officers. 

In 1913, Mrs. Lillie Bowyer Hedges went from this 
church as a missionary to Central Africa. 

Cerro Gordo. 

Organized 1883, by H. F. Tandy; present membership, 
74; value of property, $2,000; Bible-school enrollment, 67. 

This church has had varied experiences that are common 
to those in small towns. It has lost by removals until it is 
feeble 

De Land. 

Organized 1877, by Samuel Lowe; present membership, 
199; value of property, including parsonage, $15,500; Bible- 
school enrollment, 191. 

Min. Charles Rowe first preached the plain gospel in this 
neighborhood in the early seventies. He was followed by 
Min. S. K. Hallam, who was pastor at Farmer City. Among 
the charter members there were Mrs. Martha Bondurant, 
Thomas E. Bondurant, Mr. and Mrs. Joel Churchill, and Mr. 
and Mrs. H. G. Porter, all of whose services to the congre- 
gation were invaluable. 

A union chapel was built, the Protestant Methodists shar- 
ing it one-half. During the pastorate of J. M. Francis a new 
building was erected, which was much enlarged and improved 
during the pastorate of W. T. McConnell. J. H. Stambaugh 
is now pastor. The church is active in all good works. 

Hammond. 

The church here was organized about 1875 by the Macon 
County Missionary Co-operation, Min. Thomas Cully serving 
as the evangelist. The ultra-conservatives have long since 
taken it off the map as an active force for truth and 
righteousness. 



CHURCHES 357 

Monticello. 

Organized 1911, by Andrew Scott; present membership, 
39; value of property, $2,500; Bible school began 1911; pres- 
ent enrollment, 131. 

In years past a church was organized here, but it failed. 
The charter members of the present congregation were Mrs. 
Hattie Eshelman, Gussie and Mrs. L. M. Baker, Mrs. J. L. 
Hicks, Mrs. J. Hough, Mrs. Cora Johann, W. M. and Mrs. 
Hannah Holden, R. M. Wilkens and wife, Mrs. Elizabeth 
Cramer, Mrs. Lillian Henry, Mrs. J. C. Miller, Pansy Dool- 
ing, L. E. Bowyer and wife, J. D. Duffy and Mrs. Hanna 
T. Anderson. 

The unused Baptist chapel was bought. 

PIKE COUNTY. 
Atlas. 

Organized 1908, by J. R. Campbell; present membership, 
140; value of property, $4,000; Bible school began 1910; 
present enrollment, 90. 

There were two families in this village who called them- 
selves Christians only. The spiritual life of the place had 
run low, so they decided to organize a church of Christ. 
Several successful meetings were held. A house of worship 
was occupied in 1910. 

Leonard Angel was ordained to the ministry. 

Barry. 

Organized 1842 ; present membership, 275 ; value of prop- 
erty, including parsonage, $18,000; Bible-school enroll- 
ment, 250. 

The earlier records of this church were burned. It has 
served the community well. 

Bee Creek (Pearl). 

Organized 1911, by G. W. Williams; present membership, 
60; value of property, $500; Bible-school enrollment, 40. 



358 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

This congregation is five miles south of Pearl. It is 
feeble. 



Present membership, 326; value of property, including 
parsonage, $7,500; Bible-school enrollment, 166. 

An old church with a good record. Oscar Dennis is cor- 

respondent. 

Detroit. 

Organized 1882; present membership, 133; value of 
property, including parsonage, $6,000; Bible-school enroll- 
ment, 152. 

An old church that has served the community well. Glen 
Fields, Pittsfield, is the correspondent. It is a fine com- 

munity ' El Dara. 

Organized 1873, by W. H. Crow ; present membership, 
190; value of property, including parsonage, $3,500; Bible 
school began 1873 ; present enrollment, 100. 

This church was the first result of a meeting held by Mr. 
Crow. There were twenty- four charter members. Of these 
there are now (1913) living: Mrs. Martha Coley, Mrs. Cyn- 
thia Worsham, Mrs. Charlotte Pursley, Mrs. Ethel Pursley- 
Brown, Mrs. Jennie Pursley-Reynolds and Mrs. Mary 
Hewitt. 

The church continues to do good work. J. W. Pearson 

is the pastor. . . 

Green Pond (Pearl). 

Present membership, 100; value of property, $1,500; 
Bible-school enrollment, 60. 

This church dates back to the log house with puncheon 
floor. It is alive under the half-time preaching of S. R. 
Lewis. Geo. Graham, R. R. 1, is correspondent. 

Griggsville. 

Organized 1876, by R. H. Moss; present membership, 
116; value of property, $4,000; Bible school began 1876; 
present enrollment, 75. 



CHURCHES 359 

The churches of Christ in Pike County had long desired 
to plant a congregation after the New Testament pattern 
in this thrifty town. Its New Englandism was slow to 
accept anything that had its beginning west of Boston. 

D. R. Lucas held a great tent meeting shortly after the 
organization. It proved an expansion, but not a growth. 
Since then the work has been difficult and slow. A large 
house was planned, but never finished. The present house 
was built during the pastorate of J. E. Diehl. J. D. Dabney 
is the pastor. 

Independence (Pittsfield). 

Organized 1858, by James Burbridge ; present member- 
ship, 160; value of property, $2,500; Bible school began 
1882; present enrollment, 101. 

At first the congregation was called the Highland Church 
of Christ. In 1882 it took the village name. James Bur- 
bridge, Robert Nicholson and Andrew Main led in the move- 
ment. The present building was completed in 1866. Most 
prominent in this work were Joseph Troutner and Robert 
Nicholson. 

The church has had the services of thirty-seven ministers. 

Martinsburg. 

Present membership, 75; value of property, $2,000; no 
Bible school. 

An old church of good but conservative people. 

Milton. 

Present membership, 250; value of property, $2,000; 
Bible-school enrollment, 142. 

An old church that has done much good work. It has 
always had many superior people. C. E. Bolin, Jr., is cor- 
respondent. 

Nebo. 

Organized 1885; present membership, 200; value of prop- 
erty, $5,000; Bible school began 1885; present enrollment, 
165. 



360 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

The first elders were G. W. Burbridge and N. B. 
Grimes, with T. J. Shaw, James Burbridge and G. N. 
Creech, deacons. There were about fifty original members. 
J. J. W. Miller served as pastor for a number of years. J. 
D. Harpole and T. L. Minier are among the active members. 

New Canton. 

Present membership, 75; value of property, $2,000; Bible- 
school enrollment, 67. 
A weak church. 

New Hartford. 

Organized 1851, by Hardin Gooden and David Roberts; 
present membership, 150; value of property, $3,000; Bible 
school began 1851 ; present enrollment, 152. 

The first officers were Wm. Shambaugh and W. H. 
McClintock, elders, and W. R. Mathes, Jonathan Goble and 
D. K. Harris, deacons. All of them have passed on. 

Meetings were held in the schoolhouse till 1856, when a 
chapel was built, which was used until 1903, when the pres- 
ent building was erected. 

From first to last, about six hundred people have held 
membership here. The church has entirely transformed the 
life of the community. J. W. Pearson is now pastor. 

There is a Y. P. S. C. E. and C. W. B. M. Elmer 
Attor, Pittsfield, is correspondent. 

Old Pearl (Straut). 

Present membership, 60. 

An old church of conservatives five miles south of Pearl. 

Pearl. 

Organized 1885, by C. H. Maynard and M. L. Anthony ; 
present membership, 277; value of property, $2,000; Bible- 
school enrollment, 200. 

This congregation was formed in the M. E. chapel. It 
struggled along till 1894, when its own home was finished. 



CHURCHES 361 

To this an addition was built in 1906. H. S. Van Dervoort 
and M. L. Anthony held successful revivals. The church is 
active in all missionary and benevolent work. 

It has given O. C. Bolman to the ministry. Min. W. H. 
Kerns furnished these facts. 

Perry. 

Organized 1837, by David Hobbs; present membership, 
330; value of property, $4,000. 

Near the site of Perry, in the residence of Nicholas 
Hobbs, this church was organized, with the following among 
the charter members: Abraham Chenoweth and wife, Gideon 
Bentley and wife, William Van Pelt and wife, Samuel Van 
Pelt, Nicholas Hobbs and others. Mr. Hobbs, Mr. Chen- 
oweth and William Van Pelt were the first elders and they 
taught the people the Word for a few years. 

The first house of worship was built in 1839. Four years 
thereafter, W. H. Brown, the great evangelist, held a series 
of meetings, and the multitudes attending were so great that 
one side of the chapel was removed and a shed was added 
to accommodate the people. This house gave place in 1851 
to a more commodious building, and this to the third house 
in 1880, during the pastorate of John T. Smith. 

Two of the early preachers were Wm. Strong and John 
Curl. The first pastor was David Hobbs. 

The helpful families in the church have been the Chen- 
oweths, Dorseys, Brownings and others. 

Pittsfield. 

Organized 1836, by Mr. Jacob Hodgen; present member- 
ship, 600; value of property, $15,000; Bible school began 
1855 ; present enrollment, 37. 

The first meetings for public worship that aimed to follow 
the apostolic pattern were held in the house of Mr. Hodgen. 
Then they met in various halls in the then village, and next 
in the courthouse. 

In 1841 the organization was completed, with the follow- 



362 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

ing charter members: W. H. Strong and wife, Jonas Clark 
and wife, Jacob Hodgen and wife, Jonathan Piper and wife, 
John G. Shastid and daughter (later known as Mrs. Cow- 
den), Joseph Sanders and wife, Caroline Barber and Calista 
Bennet (afterward Mrs. Holmes). The elders were Jacob 
Hodgen and Jonas Clark ; the deacon was Joseph Sanders. 
Soon after this time many others were added, among whom 
were the Wyatts, Bennetts, Hendricks, Rubles, Quimbys and 
Johnsons. 

Among the early-day preachers, there were Wm. Gale, 
W. H. Strong, James Burbridge and Charles Bolin. Mr. 
Strong became the first regular minister in 1839. In the 
same year the "State Meeting" was held with this church. 

In 1844 a small frame chapel was bought from the Con- 
gregationalists. This gave place, in 1853, to a two-story 
frame building. 

The lower story was owned by a stock company and 
used for school purposes. This house was used for twenty- 
five years and was filled with many sacred memories. 

In 1890, during the pastorate of W. A. Meloan, a modern 
brick structure was erected. Five years later, two rooms 
were added during the ministry of Geo. L. Snively. 

To the Christian ministry the church has given C. G. 
Kindred, W. H. Cannon and Clarence Rainwater. The pas- 
torate of H. D. Clark is very tenderly remembered. 

The church has many honored names of men who grew 
large in character and usefulness, among them Hicks, Bar- 
ber, Hall, Swan, Steers, Binns and Chamberlain. 

Pleasant Hill. 

Present membership, 231; value of property, $2,500; 
Bible-school enrollment, 90. 

This church is about forty years old and has done good 
work. W. E. Turnbaugh is correspondent. 

Rock Hill (Nebo). 
This is six miles west of Pearl. 



CHURCHES 363 

Rockport, 

Organized 1869; present membership, 44; value of prop- 
erty, $3,000; Bible-school enrollment, 69. 

F. M. Curver, S. Lomax and J. Ogle formed this church. 
By removals and deaths it soon failed. It was revived by 
Min. T. J. Keller and started again with 115 members. Upon 
the removal of Mr. Keller, another disbanding followed. In 
1911 he returned, and through his efforts the congregation 
again began to work with fourteen members. A modern 
chapel, with a concrete basement, was built and the outlook 
is better. 

Time (Pittsfield). 

Present membership, 15; value of property, $1,000; no 
Bible school. 

This is seven miles southeast of Pittsfield. The com- 
munity has been seriously handicapped by infidel notions. 

POPE COUNTY. 
Dixon Springs. 

This church is five miles east of Grantsburg, near the 
road leading from Vienna to Golconda. It is of the ultra- 
conservative class. 

Thirty years ago there was a church at Golconda that 
aimed to be Christian only, but removals and deaths dis- 
solved it. Within the last decade, Mins. K. A. Williams and 
R L. Cartwright conducted meetings there. Some turned 
to the Lord. Again, those \vho could serve as leaders moved 
away. Mr. Kimball led the first effort. 

Dehvood. 

Organized 1912, by E. C. Stark; present membership, 12. 

Mr. Stark recently located in this community and needed 
a church home for himself and family. Aided only by the 
Lord, he went to work to make one. As nearly always in 
the beginning, the preaching of the primitive gospel raised 
the ire of sectarians. They demanded a public debate. Mr. 



364 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Stark accommodated them. Then they denied him the fur- 
ther use of the public-school house. His teaching was 
grossly misrepresented, and a boycott was made as effective 
as could be. 

PULASKI COUNTY. 

America. 

Organized 1889, by I. A. J. Parker; present membership, 
55; value of property, $1,500; Bible school began 1889; 
present enrollment, 30. 

Christian Chapel (Pulaski). 

Organized 1890, by I. A. J. Parker and S. A. Holt; pres- 
ent membership, 75; value of property, $1,000; Bible school 
began 1899; present enrollment, 50. 

Grand Chain. 

Organized 1858 ; present membership, 73 ; value of prop- 
erty, $2,500; Bible-school enrollment, 80. 

PUTNAM COUNTY. 

Putnam. 

Organized 1850, by D. R. Howe; present membership, 
100; value of property, $2,000; present enrollment, 50. 

This place was called Snatchwine until the railroad came. 
The chapel was built in 1866 and is still in good condition. 
This little church was fruitful in preachers. First, there was 
John Wherry, a farmer, a strong, prayerful and true man of 
God. Next, his son-in-law, J. F. M. Parker, then his two 
sons J. E. and Lesly Parker, Mr. Malone, Mr. McCurdy, 
and possibly others. William Drake is correspondent. 

RANDOLPH COUNTY. 

Mt. Summitt (Leanderville). 

Organized 1887, by David Husband; present membership, 
40; value of property, $1,000. 

In 1844, Herman Husband, with his wife, came from 



CHURCHfcS 365 

Somerset, Pa., and settled in the southern part of this county. 
They were both earnest Christians. The first meeting con- 
ducted by a Christian minister was by Wm. Lile in 1855, in 
the home of Mr. Husband. Next, Lysias Heape preached 
there. He was a great preacher, and his sermons usually 
were from two to three hours long. A schoolhouse was 
built near by during the Civil War and was used for public 
worship. Dr. Hezekiah Hodges, a country physician, and 
Wm. Frederick, a miller, preached there. These men, with 
Mr. Husband, supported themselves and their families by 
their daily labors while they proclaimed the gospel. In 1886, 
Min. L. M. Linn and H. D. Banton held a meeting and 
formed a church at Rockwood. They were followed by Dr. 
Isaac Mulkey. The church passed away. In 1869, Peter 
Vogel, of Duquoin, held a meeting and formed a congrega- 
tion at Mill Creek. J. Buford Allen served as its pastor. It 
also failed. About 1872, John Friend and John Jones, two 
young men from the Bible School at Lexington, Ky., 
held a meeting at Mt. Summit and formed a congregation. 
It continued only a few years. J. T. Baker gathered a con- 
gregation at Baldwin, but it also failed. In 1886, David 
Husband, a son of Herman Husband, held a seventy-one 
days' meeting and reorganized the Mt. Summit Church. 
Then they were turned out of the schoolhouse. The first 
name on the subscription-list to build a chapel was Albert 
Conder, a boy five years of age, who pledged a coonskin. 
The house was built and dedicated free from debt. It still 
stands and is used in worship. 

David Husband and T. J. Holloman were given to the 
ministry by this county. 

HIGHLAND COUNTY. 

Antioch (Olney). 

Present membership, 81; value of property, $590; Bible- 
school enrollment. 47. Like many others, nothing more could 
be learned. 



366 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Berryville ( Parkersburg) . 

Present membership, 80; value of property, $1,000; Bible- 
school enrollment, 47. 

Calhoun. 

Organized 1864, by Erastus Lathrop; present member- 
ship, 66; value of property, $700; Bible school began 1864; 
present enrollment, 58. 

The first meetings were held in the schoolhouse and grove 
till 1867, when the chapel was built. 

During this period the preaching was done mainly by 
Minister Lathrop, an aged and godly man, and Marion 
Shick. A. J. Brittain and James Hundley were the first 
elders, with Harry Barney, Henry Dean and Lewis Van 
Matre, deacons. All these are dead except Mr. Brittain. 
The church has had high and low tides in its life. It has 
always maintained worship on the Lord's Day when without 
a preacher. Has a C. E. society. 

John Crawford was given to the ministry. 

Noble. 

Organized 1884, by H. M. Sanderson, Sr. ; present mem- 
bership, 72; value of property, $2,000; Bible school began 
1885 ; present enrollment, 40. 

A good C. E. society. J. W. Whitaker was given to the 
ministry. 

Olney. 

Organized 1866, by W. B. F. Treat; present member- 
ship, 280; value of property, $3,000; Bible school began 
1866; present enrollment, 195. 

For ten years there were only a few members, who wor- 
shiped in a rented hall. G. W. Morrell, a much-loved resi- 
dent minister, was the chief servant of the church during this 
period. 

A commodious house of worship was built in 1896, to 
which additions were made in later years. The church is 
harmonious and hopeful, with good organized activities. 



CHURCHES 367 

Parkersburg. 

Present membership, 124; value of property, $1,500; 
Bible-school enrollment, 150. 
A good C. E. society. 

Prairie Hall (Claremont). 
Present membership, 35; value of property, $1,000. 

ROCK ISLAND COUNTY. 

Moline. 

Organized 1906, by O. W. Lawrence; present member- 
ship, 152; value of property, $6,000; Bible school began 
1906; present enrollment, 200. 

The house of worship was built in 1909. The church 
was formed and fostered by the State Board of Missions. 
Mr. W. F. Eastman was the leading spirit. 

Rapids City. 

Organized 1847; present membership, 10; value of prop- 
erty, $1,000; Bible-school enrollment, 24. 

This was once a prosperous coal-mining community, but 
when the mineral was exhausted the town lost its popula- 
tion. A fine brick building was erected in 1850. Messrs. 
Steele and Shadle were the first elders. Ministers Lucas and 
Sherwood were among the first preachers. By removals and 
death the church went down and the house was closed for 
many years. The same was true of the M. E. Church. Mrs. 
C. C. Babcock revived the work in the seventies. Now there 
is only a small Bible school. Perry Willard is the elder. 

Rock Island First. 

Organized 1868, by C. W. Sherwood ; present member- 
ship, 725; value of property, including parsonage, $45,500; 
Bible-school enrollment, 353. 

In March, 1856, a few Disciples met in Rock Island for 
public worship. These meetings continued for two years, 



368 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

when it was thought best to discontinue them. Through the 
invitations of P. L. Mitchell and Mrs. Almyria Holt, the 
State Board of Missions sent Evangelist C. W. Sherwood 
there in March, 1868. Just twelve years to a day from the 
last meeting held in 1858 the Disciples again met and the 
organization was effected. Some of the same wine was used 
on both occasions, having been faithfully kept by Mrs. Holt, 
and the same basket, containing a dollar or two in nickels 
and dimes placed therein ten years before, and cared for by 
Mrs. Holt, the former treasurer, was used at that time. In 
April, Minister Sherwood reported to State Sec. Dudley 
Downs that the mission then numbered thirty persons, 

Mr. Mitchell rented the hall over the post-office, which 
was used as the place of meeting. In 1870 he purchased the 
old Baptist chapel, remodeled and refitted it, and gave it to 
the congregation. 

During this period 746 people had been received, but 
there were but 370 when they left the old house, the differ- 
ence having gone in the usual ways. 

In 1895, Mrs. Mary Wadsworth offered to replace the old 
chapel with a new and commodious structure as a memorial 
of her beloved father, P. L. Mitchell. The conditions were 
that the congregation should furnish and care for the build- 
ing and that its doors should be open to all who would enter, 
without price. With many tender memories and tearful 
hearts, the old home was left. The new one was first fully 
occupied in January, 1896. Since then the church has con- 
tinually grown in strength and usefulness. 

It has given Frank L. Bowen and Fred S. Nichols to the 
ministry. 

Rock Island Second (Thirty-sixth Street and 
Fifteenth Avenue). 

Organized 1913, by J. Fred Jones ; present membership, 
45; value of property, $2,500; Bible-school enrollment, 110. 
For several years a Bible school had been conducted 



CHURCHES 369 

tinder the superintendency of Dr. J. D. Nichols. In the 
church there were twenty-five charter members. 

SALINE COUNTY. 

Eldorado. 

Organized 1903, by Gilbert Jones; present membership, 
100; value of property, $2,000; Bible school began 1903; 
present enrollment, 75. 

Mr. Jones was residing here while serving as evangelist 
of the Eighth Missionary District. The church grew out of 
meetings conducted by him in the public-school building. 
There were thirty-three charter members. The same year a 
lot was bought and a chapel built thereon. Before leaving 
it, Mr. Jones placed the church well upon its feet. 

J. H. Bramlet, J. A. Davis, Mrs. C. E. Osburn and 
family, S. S. Karnes, with the Bean and Banks families, con- 
tributed much to the progress of this church. 

Harrisburg. 

Present enrollment, 100; value of property, $2,200; Bible- 
school enrollment, 108. 

Stone Fort. 

Organized 1898, by I. A. J. Parker; present membership, 
25; no church building; Bible school began 1898; present 
enrollment, 25. 

Miss Flora Parker is clerk. 

SANGAMON COUNTY. 

Auburn. 

Organized 1868; present membership, 70; value of prop- 
erty, $3,000 ; Bible school began 1868 ; present enrollment, 40. 

One or two efforts to form a church here that should be 
Christian only had come to naught. But in the spring of 
1868 the following named Disciples constituted themselves 
into such church : A. G. and Mary A. Harvey, John and 
Laura Piper, George W. and Margaret Hackley, M. G. and 



370 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Mary E. Wads worth, A. M. and Salome T. Black, and 
Nancy F. Wineman. Meetings for public worship were held 
on the second floors of store buildings. A good Bible school 
was held. Preaching for half-time was arranged. 

John Piper and G. W. Hackley, two carpenters of limited 
means, led in the building enterprise. The former gave the 
lot. On a $600 subscription they began to build a house. 
When the structure was about ready for the doors and win- 
dows, it was wrecked one night by a hurricane. It was the 
only building in the town that was damaged. The next day 
the two carpenters began on the work again. After two or 
three years the building was finished. These facts attest 
their faith and heroism. 

Barclay. 

This congregation grew from the Wolf Creek Church, 
located two miles southeast, which was one of the early 
churches of the county, and prosperous and influential in its 
time. As indicating the conceptions of "discipline" then cur- 
rent, the following transcript is made from the original rec- 
ords of the Wolf Creek Church: 

Jerry Richerson husband of Alley Richerson. 

The above named person is excommunicated from this congrega- 
tion for the following disobedience. 

He dissembled from the Brethren, almost altogether. (Forbiden 
Hebrews 10 & 25). His works were those of the flesh. (Galacians 
5 & 22-23.) we are commanded to withdraw ourselves from every 
person who walks disorderly. Second Thessalonians 3rd & 6, and 
first Corinthians 5 & 4 says, In the name of our Lord, Jesus Christ, 
when you are gethered together and my spirit, with the power 
of our Lord Jesus Christ, to deliver such an one unto Satan for the 
destruction of the flesh that the Spirit may be saved in the day of 
the Lord Jesus. This done Feb. 7th, 1841. 

W. M. ELLIS, Clerk. 

On the same day and in the same formal manner, Alley 
Richerson was excommunicated because "she did not meet 
with Brethern on the first day of the week to commemorate 
the death and suffering of our Savior, violated even the laws 
of morality, in her conversation; in short, she refused to 



CHURCHES 371 

live that character and carry out that principle taught in the 
Christian Religion," etc., etc. 

The Wolf Creek Church was organized Sept. 3, 1837, 
with Adam J. Groves, Rezin H. Constant and Melitus W. 
Ellis as elders, and Samuel Wilson, James Taylor and Wil- 
liam F. Elkin as deacons. Up to Feb. 5, 1849, there had 
been 282 members. 

The old building was burned, so that in 1890 the chapel 
in Barclay was built and the congregation met there. 
Removals and the influx of miners decimated the congrega- 
tion so that only a small Sunday school is kept going. 

Berlin. 

Organized 1825, by Andrew Scott; present membership, 
80; value of property, including parsonage, $1,500; Bible 
school began 1867; present enrollment, 100. 

(See Chap. II.) In its early years the church was served 
by Andrew Scott, Theophilus Sweet, Judge J. W. Taylor, 
A. J. Kane and Dr. Mallory. Charles O. Rowe came from 
Indian Creek and so strengthened the congregation that a 
frame chapel was built in 1842, one and a half miles north- 
west of Berlin. Then it was known as the Mt. Zion Chris- 
tian Church. The elders then were Mr. Scott, William Grant 
and Henry Ellis. Then Harrison Osborn and Robert Fos- 
ter served the church for six years. It was here, in 1855, 
that Mr. Foster, removing his coat in order to immerse 
thirty converts in Spring Creek before a large assembly, dis- 
closed the fact that he was wearing his "boiled shirt" with 
the bosom behind. In 1859 a new chapel was built in Berlin, 
which thereafter became the place of meeting. This town 
was the boyhood home of War Governor Richard Yates. 
Early in 1861 he visited the place and made a "war speech" 
in the Christian chapel that greatly perturbed the congrega- 
tion. Two of his sisters, Mrs. Martha Scott and Mrs. 
Elliott, were members here. A four days' public discussion 
was held in this house during the Civil War. Since then 
sixteen pastors have served the church. 



373 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Buffalo. 

Organized 1875, by G. M. Goode and J. B. Allen; pres- 
ent membership, 125 ; value of property, including parsonage, 
$4,000; Bible school began 1875. 

Two pastors, G. M. Goode, then of Illiopolis, and J. B. 
Allen, then of Mechanicsburg, conducted a series of meet- 
ings in the schoolhouse in the fall of 1874. The work was 
purely missionary on their part and resulted in eight conver- 
sions. The organization of thirty members was made early 
in the following January. T. J. Underwood, John Jacobs 
and Samuel Garvey were chosen elders. A church building, 
costing $2,000, was erected the same year. 

Cantrall. 

Organized 1820, by Stephen England; present member- 
ship, 125; value of property, including parsonage, $3,300; 
Bible-school enrollment, 29. 

(See Chap. II.) In 1819 a band of pioneers made the 
first settlement north of the Sangamon River, a few miles 
northwest of Springfield. Stephen England was the leader. 
He was born in Virginia in 1773. When quite young he was 
taken to Bath County, Ky. There he married Anna Harper. 
They became the parents of twelve children. The family 
moved to Madison County, O., in 1813, and in the fall of 
1818 to Madison County, 111. Mr. England was a Baptist 
preacher in Kentucky, but was never known as such in 
Sangamon County. In June, 1819, he first preached to his 
neighbors who assembled in his home. The next year (May 
15) he formed a church with the following members: 
Stephen and Anna England, Jachoniah and Nancy Langston, 
Levi and Fanny Cantrall, Mrs. Adelphia Wood, Mrs. Sarah 
Cantrall and Mrs. Lucy Scott. This was the first church 
organized in this county. These nine people then signed the 
following agreement: 

We, members of the church of Jesus Christ, being providentially 
moved from our former place of residence from distant part, and 



CHURCHES 373 

being baptized on the profession of our faith and met at the house 
of Stephen England, on a branch of Higgins Creek, in order to form 
a constitution, having first given ourselves to the Lord and then to 
one another, agree that our constituion shall be on the Holy Scrip- 
tures of Old and New Testaments, believing them to be the only 
rule of faith and practice. 

In 1823 a log meeting-house was built one and a half 
miles southeast of the site of Cantrall, near what is now 
known as the Britten Cemetery. The cracks were chinked, 
and greased paper was used for the windows. This primi- 
tive temple was built by the volunteer labor of the settle- 
ment. In 1846 the second house was built in the village, and 
the third in 1873. Mr. England continued to serve the 
church till his death, preaching his last sermon sitting. He 
solemnized the first marriage in the county in his own home. 
On one occasion a couple came from Fort Clark, now 
Peoria, to be married by him. 

The congregation was served by about all of the pioneer 
preachers of central Illinois. It gave John England and R. 
E. Dunlap to the ministry. Besides these, many great and 
good men and women have gone forth from this church. 

David England served the congregation as an officer over 
half a century. George T. Sayles as an efficient elder for 
forty years, and later, John and Robert Grant and John S. 
Lake have given invaluable service. The names of Carlile, 
Livi and John T. Canterbury, Hiram Powell, "Uncle Jack" 
Cline and Carlile Witts are cherished. 

The church has always been missionary. It was never 
affiliated with the Christian Denomination. 

Clear Lake (Springfield). 

Organized 1865, by A. J. Kane; value of property, $1,500. 

The charter members of this church were H. D. Turley 
and wife, M. D. Whitesides and wife, B. Turley and wife, 
J. Cartmel and wife, C. Churchill and wife, B. F. White- 
sides and wife, Mrs. Black, T. King and Mary F. Turley. 

Its house of worship was built the same year. For many 



374 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

years the church was a strong force in the community for 
truth and righteousness. Its most active and useful members 
were H. D. Turley and family. Denominational opposition 
was active for a long time. It was here that A. J. Kane 
baptized Dr. W. A. Mallory. 

By deaths and removals the church has become feeble. 
The remnant are dividing between Riverton and Springfield 
Churches. 

Daivson. 

Organized 1887; present membership, 30; value of prop- 
erty, $2,500; Bible school began 1887; present enrollment, 30. 

The chapel was bought of the Presbyterians. The con- 
gregation has lost by removals. The influx of coal miners 
adds to the difficulties to be met. 

Illiopolis. 

Organized 1866, by C. P. Short; present membership, 
408; value of property, including parsonage, $17,600; Bible 
school began 1868; present enrollment, 240. 

The original members of this church were Mr. and Mrs. 
A. C. Ford, Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Garvey, Mr. and Mrs. John 
C. McGuffin, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Bourland, W. L. Rob- 
erts, W. N. Streeter, F. M. Green, Mrs. Mary Ruby, Mrs. 
Sarah Dake, Archibald Boyd and Mrs. Mary Skeen. 

For a long time the meetings were held in the M. E. 
Church, with only occasional preaching. But this privilege 
was withdrawn and the meetings were held in the public- 
school house. 

On a cold, misty, windy day in November, 1867, the con- 
gregation met in the street in front of a hotel, as the school- 
house was undergoing repairs. At this meeting there were 
eight conversions to Christ, and the determination to build 
was reached. A plain frame house was finished and occu- 
pied in August, 1868. This served the church until 1909, 
when the building was reconstructed, enlarged and mod- 
ernized during the pastorate of Robert A. Sickles. 



CHURCHES 375 

The church has always had some admirable men and 
women. The present pastor is B. H. Sealock. 

It has given to the ministry John McGuffin and Charles 
O. Williams. Possibly H. M. Brooks should be credited here. 

Loami. 

Organized 1892, by C. S. Medbury; present membership, 
150; value of property, $1,500; Bible school began 1892; 
present enrollment, 75. 

The church was organized with sixty-eight charter mem- 
bers. A convenient frame building, costing $3,400, was 
occupied the following January. 

The church has had twelve pastors and has done fine 

service. 

Mechanicsburg. 

Organized 1845, by Walter P. Bowles ; present member- 
ship, 175; value of property, including parsonage, $3,500; 
Bible-school enrollment, 100. 

Mr. Bowles and Dr. Robert Foster preached the apostolic 
gospel in the early forties in this community. The people 
met in residences, barns, groves and schoolhouses. There 
were about thirty charter members. The first officers were 
Wm. S. Pickrell, John Churchill and John Dawson, elders, 
with James McRee, Joseph Green and Wileby Churchill, 
deacons. The house of worship was finished in 1856. Mr. 
Pickrell gave the lot and made the brick used in the con- 
struction. It still stands, having received only modern 
improvements. The dedication sermon was preached in 
August, 1856, by A. Campbell. Besides Ministers Bowles 
and Foster, A. J. Kane, W. H. Brown, W. A. Mallory, A. 
D. Northcutt, and John Wilson, who was a product of this 
church, served the congregation in its earlier years. 

By 1885 the tide had gone out so that John Garvey, with 
twenty-four women, constituted the membership. Miss 
Emma Pickrell, a daughter of Wm. S. Pickrell, during this 
period superintended the Bible school and administered the 
Lord's Supper with grace and fidelity. 



376 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

In 1887, Evangelist W. F. Black conducted a great 
revival, since which the work has moved forward. 

This church is noted for the number of great, noble and 
helpful people it has produced. The Pickrells, Garveys, 
Churchills, Elkins and others are enshrined in the hearts of 
many. 

Pleasant Plains. 

Organized 1869, by John Wilson; present membership, 
102; value of property, including parsonage, $4,000; Bible 
school began 1870; present enrollment, 78. 

W. M. Brown preached the gospel in this community in 
the early years. There was a congregation of Christians 
formed four miles east of the town site and worshiped there 
for several years. The town grew when the railroad was 
built. The church was formed in a hall. In 1870 the house 
of worship was built. A period of strife and division ensued, 
but gradually disappeared. 

In the earlier years, A. T. Kane, G. W. Minier, Ministers 
Osborn, Norton, Burton and John Lemmon served the con- 
gregation. 

Riverton. 

Organized 1876, by Dr. W. A. Mallory; present member- 
ship, 90; value of property, $6,000; Bible school began 1876; 
present enrollment, 50. 

Meetings for public worship had been held in school- 
houses in the neighborhood of Riverton for years. The first 
name of the town was Howlet. This was the home of Dr. 
Mallory. He first preached in the village "little brick school- 
house" in 1874, and then baptized the first converts there 
Louise Fox and Georgiana Flagg. In 1876, Evangelist 
Logan conducted a series of meetings with about fifty con- 
verts to Christ. A small building was then rented and regu- 
lar church work begun. But the M. E. congregation offered 
more rent and got the use of the room. Then the Christian 
congregation went to the Good Templars' Hall. Next, the 
Opera Hall was used. Then Temperance Hall again. Jacob 



CHURCHES 377 

Bunn, of Springfield, gave the congregation a lot, but they 
were unable to build a chapel thereon. The death of Dr. 
Mallory proved a severe loss to the congregation, and they 
scattered. A few stood true to their convictions of Christian 
truth and duty; they were Emma King and Mrs. Amanda 
Steele and her daughter Etta, who is now Mrs. Etta C. 
White, the church clerk. 

During the pastorate of J. B. Briney in Springfield, he 
preached here occasionally. In 1894, B. F. Flagg and 
Archie Neal led in an effort to revive the work. Min. J. O. 
Sutherland conducted a series of meetings and reorganized 
the church. The next year an effort was made to build a 
chapel, but it only partially succeeded. But the women held 
true until the house was finished, furnished, and even mod- 
ernized and improved. The ashes made by burning the mort- 
gage were turned over to the church clerk to keep. 

Riverton is a coal-mining town. Its population is shift- 
ing. The congregation is composed of laboring people. The 
legalized groggeries do their fatal work. It is said that min- 
isters do not wish to reside there. 

Rochester. 

The first church by this name was formed in Rochester 
Township, independent of the South Fork congregation, in 
1841. A. Richardson and B. Williams were elected elders, 
with S. West and W. Bashaw, deacons. This congregation 
was served by Mins. W. M. Brown, A. J. Kane, W. P. 
Bowles and W. A. Mallory. For years it was strong and a 
power for good in the community. 

Organized 1877, by A. J. Kane; present membership, 90; 
value of property, including parsonage, $2,500; Bible school 
began 1877; present enrollment, 50. 

With the coming of the railroad, the town grew and the 
place of meeting was changed. The first elders were W. P. 
Clark and J. McClure, with W. Windsor and S. Wolford, 
deacons. The chapel was built in 1877. 

A. J. Kane and W. A. Mallory served the church for 



378 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

several years. There followed a few ministers whose lives 
did not vindicate their calling, and disturbance ensued. The 
church, however, has recovered and is doing good work. 

Springfield First. 

Organized 1833, by Josephus Hewitt; present member- 
ship, 992; value of property, $133,000; Bible school began 
1848; present enrollment, 450. 

Were this not a great and good church, it would be 
untrue to its antecedents. Minister Hewitt was a man of 
superior versatility and eloquence, and passed like a comet 
through the Springfield sky. In the residence of Mrs. Gar- 
ner Goodan, located on the lot now occupied by the Chicago 
& Alton passenger station, the church was constituted in 
October with the following charter members : Philo and Mar- 
tha Beers, Joseph and Lucy Bennett, Alfred and Martha 
Elder, Dr. James R. Gray, Mrs. Garner Goodan, Mrs. Ann 
McNabb, William Shoup, Reuben Radford and Elisha Tabor. 
To these were soon added America T. Logan, wife of Judge 
Stephen T. Lcran ; Gen. Jas. Adams, Lemuel and Evaline 
Higby, Mordecai Mobley and wife, George Bennett and 
wife, Col. E. D. Baker and wife, the Woodworth family and 
others. 

The passing years further brought to and took away from 
this fellowship Alexander Graham, its second minister ; Win. 
H. Brown, its third, and great evangelist; William Lavely 
and Daniel B. Hill ; A. J. Kane, whom it added to the Chris- 
tian ministry ; Jonathan R. Saunders ; Mary Logan, who 
became Mrs. Milton Hay ; J. W. Taylor, who was an earnest 
preacher and served four years as county judge; John G., 
Thomas C. and Wm. F. Elkin ; Richard Latham, J. H. 
Pickrell and his sister, Mrs. H. P. Pasfield, and many others 
whose names are held in sacred remembrance. In that hon- 
orable company, A. J. Kane may easily be counted the 
leader. The gospel, working through his clear mind and 
pure heart, gave direction to the thought and character of 
the church. His wife, Mrs. Caroline Beers Kane, was the 



CHURCHES 379 

last one of the old guard to pass to the church triumphant. 

The first house of worship was of brick, completed in 
1834, and stood on the north side of Madison Street, between 
Fourth and Fifth ; the second in 1853, at the northeast cor- 
ner of Sixth and Jefferson; the third in 1882, at the corner 
of Fifth and Jackson, built during the pastorate of J. Buford 
Allen ; the present splendid edifice was finished in 1912, dur- 
ing the pastorate of F. W. Burnham, and stands on the 
southeast corner of Sixth and Cook Streets. 

This church has now many good people who abound in 
good works. They supported Mrs. Susie C. Rijnhart in 
Tibet; paid $2,500 to build a dormitory in Tokyo, Japan, 
when Miss Rose J. Armbruster went out there, and pays 
$600 yearly to the Foreign Society. Dr. Paul Wakefield and 
his wife, who is a daughter of Mrs. Lindsay, went out from 
this church to China, and E. T. Williams left its pastorate 
thirty-five years ago for the same field. He is secretary of 
the American Legation at Peking. The church has enter- 
tained the National Missionary Convention twice and the 
State Convention six times. 

The pastors have mostly been noted men. Besides those 
already named, the list includes the names of D. R. Howe, 
L. B. Wilkes, T. T. Holton, H. W. Everest, J. M. Atwater, 
J. Z. Taylor, E. V. Zollars, J. B Briney, A. P. Cobb, J. E. 
Lynn and F. W. Burnham. 

Among the now forceful members are H. C. Latham, 
Charles P. Kane, B. R. Hieronymus, L. H. Coleman (whose 
son, C. B. Coleman, entered the ministry and is a teacher in 
Butler College), Mrs. Catherine Lindsay (for thirty years 
president of the C. W. B. M. auxiliary), G. A. Hulett, C. E. 
Brown and Mrs. Mary L. Morrison. Others equally worthy, 
both among the dead and the living, have their names in 
God's book of remembrance. 

Springfield Stezvart Street. 

Organized 1905, by C. C. Morrison ; present membership, 
550; value of property, $10,000; Bible-school enrollment, 264. 



380 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

This church was the result of a tent meeting conducted 
by C. C. Morrison in the southeast part of the city while he 
was pastor of the First Church. 

A good property costing $9,000 was completed and occu- 
pied in May, 1906. This congregation was nourished and 
helped by the other two churches of the city. It does good 
work. The pastors were R. A. Finnell, H. H. Jenner and 
Gifford Earnest. 

Springfield West Side. 

Organized 1902, by J. E. Lynn; present membership, 
674; value of property, $45,000; Bible-school enrollment, 346. 

On the 5th of January, 1902, this church was organized, 
its Bible school formed and its building dedicated. There 
were ninety-eight charter members and twelve were added 
that day. The church has grown seven-fold, possesses an 
admirable spirit and is doing excellent work. In 1910 an 
addition was made to the building, costing $14,000. 

The church has given Chester Gruble to the ministry. 

Salisbury. 

Organized 1875, by John Lemmon ; present membership, 
50; value of property, $5,000; Bible school began 1875; pres- 
ent enrollment, 57. 

This is an inland village in the northern edge of the 
county. The subscription paper for building the house had 
some unique conditions ; as, "The house should be used for 
religious purposes only; that no entertainment that required 
admission fee at the door should be given there, or any polit- 
ical meeting held there ; and when not in use by the owners, 
the church of Christ, it should be open to all religious pro- 
clivities." It has served the community well for a third of 
a century. 

South Fork (Rochester). 

Organized 1832, by W. P. Bowles ; present membership, 
75; value of property, $1,000; Bible-school enrollment, 50. 
This congregation is located southwest of Rochester. It 



CHURCHES 381 

was organized in the residence of Thos. Baker, that stood 
one and one-half miles west of the town site. The charter 
members were W. P. Bowles and wife, A. Bowles and wife, 
Joseph Walter, Elizabeth Bowles, Anna Payne, J. Baker and 
wife, Thos. Baker and wife, A. Richards and wife, W. Poor 
and wife, E. Delay, D. Stokes and L. Gooden. 
The church now has preaching part of the time. 

Williamsville. 

Organized 1842; present membership, 200; value of prop- 
erty, including parsonage, $11,800; Bible-school enrollment, 
137. 

This church was first organized in the home of W. F. 
Jones. At first it was known as the Fancy Creek Christian 
Church. There were members scattered from Wolf Creek 
to Fancy Creek; hence, about thirty of them withdrew from 
the Wolf Creek congregation and organized at Fancy Creek. 

Meetings for public worship were held in the homes of 
the people until 1856, when the Lake Schoolhouse was 
secured. In 1858 a house of worship was built in Williams- 
ville, and thus the name of the congregation was changed. 
In 1852, W. Jones and James Lester were chosen elders, 
with G. W. Constant and J. Barr as deacons. In 1866, A. J. 
Kane ordained T. M. Helm and A. W. Elder as elders, and 
F. A. Merriman, C. Turley and J. Groves as deacons of this 
congregation. 

Minister Kane served the church for several periods as 
preacher in charge. 

J. S. Sweeney held a public discussion here with Minister 
Davies, of the M. E. Church. By this, many people in the 
community were helped to a better knowledge of the Scrip- 
tures. 

This church is composed of excellent people. For many 
years it has been noted for its liberality and fidelity in all 
Christian work. 

The Richland congregation, twelve miles westward of 
Springfield, and four miles east of Pleasant Plains, was a 



382 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

country church of the early time. For many years it was 
the home of John Wycliffe Taylor and his wife, Aunt Sallie. 

SCHUYLER COUNTY. 

Bader. 

Present membership, 90; value of property, $1,000; Bible- 
school enrollment, 75. 

Bethany (Rushville). 

Organized 1871, by Alpheus Brown and A. S. Robinson; 
present membership, 30; value of property, $600; Bible 
school began 1871 ; present enrollment, 37. 

The church has been served chiefly by the pastors in 
Rushville. 

Browning. 

Organized 1894, by L. F. Davis ; present membership, 12 ; 
value of property, $1,000; Bible school began 1894; present 
enrollment, 48. 

Meetings were held in a hall for a year and a half, when 
the chapel was built. 

Camden. 

Organized 1865, by Henry Smithers; present member- 
ship, 45; value of property, $1,500; Bible school began 1865; 
present enrollment, 92. 

The church was reorganized in 1871. Besides Mr. Smith- 
ers, the following ministers have served the congregation: 
\V. T. Dunkerson, Martin Sharpies, Alpheus Brown, Henry 
Pruett, B. F. Shepard, C. B. Newnan, J. O. Walton, D. E. 
Hughes, Hervey Scott, C. B. Dabney, Geo. Chandler and W. 
E. Roberts. 

Frederick. 

Organized 1890, by D. E. Husrhes ; present membership, 
12; value of property, $1,000; Bible school began 1852; 
present enrollment, 59. 

A Sunday school was begun in 1852. A number of Dis- 



CHURCHES 383 

ciples resided here, for whom J. B. Royal and Orin Dilley 
preached occasionally. The church was organized at the 
close of a meeting conducted by Minister Hughes. A chapel 
was built at once. 

As preachers, D. L. Kincaid, W. G. Groves, L. F. Davis, 
Isaac Beckelhymer, J. W. Knight and Clyde Lyon have 
served the congregation. Removals and indifference have 
made the church few and feeble. 

Pleasantvieiv. 

Value of property, $600; Bible-school enrollment, 60. 

Ray. 

Organized 1895, by D. E. Hughes; present membership, 
75; value of property, $2,000; Bible school began 1890; 
present enrollment, 84. 

Public worship was conducted in the schoolhouse until 
the chapel was built the next year. Besides Mr. Hughes, 
H. C. Littleton, G. W. Ford, J. W. Carpenter, G. W. Ross, 
H. L. Maltman and Evangelist J. D. Williams have served 
the church. 

Rushville. 

Organized 1833, by Barton W. Stone; present member- 
ship, 225; value of property, $5,000; Bible-school enroll- 
ment, 200. 

The first preaching in Schuyler County by a Christian 
minister was about 1829 by James Hughes. He was on his 
way home from Ohio to Missouri and stopped at the home 
of Benjamin Chadsey, one of the prominent early settlers. 
This was two and a half miles northeast of Rushville. The 
preaching of Mr. Hughes was eagerly welcomed by the 
scattered Christians in the community. 

In 1832, Barton W. Stone came up from Jacksonville 
and held a series of meetings in the old log courthouse in 
Rushville. His preaching awakened great interest in the 
community. In 1833, James W. Davis and James Urbank 



384 



came from Kentucky to continue the work. The organiza- 
tion of the church was perfected December 29. 

The first house of worship was built in 1834 and the 
present one in 1874. The congregation has passed through 
high tides and low tides of prosperity and spiritual life. 

SCOTT COUNTY. 

Exeter. 

Organized by David Hobbs; present membership, 88; 
value of property, $1,500; Bible-school enrollment, 78. 

Glasgow. 

Present membership, 45; value of property, $1,000; Bible- 
school enrollment, 40. 

Manchester. 

Organized 1864; present membership, 68; value of prop- 
erty, $1,500; Bible-school enrollment, 45. 

Two of the charter members were James F. Curtis, who 
was baptized by Mr. Campbell in 1832, and Mrs. Eliza 
Billings, who is the sole survivor. J. R. Belvins is the clerk. 

Winchester. 

Organized 1832; present membership, 300; value of prop- 
erty, $7,000; Bible-school enrollment, 140. 

Early in the thirties a few families of Disciples came to 
Winchester. They soon found one another. As a result, 
they instituted regular weekly meetings in their homes for 
public worship. They "broke bread," read the Scriptures and 
exhorted one another. Among them there were Levi Harlan 
and Theophilus Sweet, to whom, doubtless, belongs the honor 
of this beginning. In 1838 this church had 100 members. 
In the earlier years a lot was secured in the southeast part 
of town and a substantial brick house built thereon. This 
served the congregation until 1855, when it was sold to the 
Roman Catholics. A more central place was secured and a 



CHURCHES 385 

two-story brick structure was erected and furnished in 1866, 
during the pastorate of T. J. Marlow. A modern edifice was 
completed in 1913. 

Among the early preachers here there were William 
Strong, John T. Jones, D. P. Henderson, W. H. Brown, J. 
S. Patton, W. W. Happy, John Atkinson; then David Hobbs, 
N. S. Bastian, E. P. Belsher, J. H. Coats, J. S. Sweeney and 
others. 

The church has the usual auxiliaries and is in a healthy, 
growing condition. 

SHELBY COUNTY. 

About 1837, Min. B. W. Henry organized a congrega- 
tion near his home on the west side of Okaw Township. 
Two or three years later a log house was built for the 
double purpose of school and church, and was so occupied 
for about twenty years. Among the pioneer preachers who 
worked there were B. W. Henry, Tobias Grider, Fleming, 
Goodman, Storm, Mulkey and Sconce. In the early fifties 
it was active in co-operative missionary work. The changing 
tides of human life later on carried it away. 

In 1871, Min. P. P. Warren organized the Bethany con- 
gregation in Windsor Township with fifty-three members. 
From 1860 preaching had been kept up at this point by 
Ministers Warren and Tobias Grider, under the direction of 
the Sand Creek Church, and the converts thus made were 
received by this congregation until the new organization. 
Minister Warren served Bethany once per month for more 
than twenty years. The chapel was built in 1871. The con- 
gregation gave A. J. Nance to the ministry. It died by con- 
servatism. 

The Green Creek congregation was formed in Big Spring 
Township about 1850 and did good service. In 1855, Evan- 
gelist Thomas Goodman organized the Mount Pleasant con- 
gregation in Prairie Township, and this absorbed the first 
named. The meetings were held first in the Baker, and next 
in the Forrest, Schoolhouse. 

13 



386 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

James Carr preached for this congregation for thirty 
years, and died there in 1880 in a good old age, loved and 
respected by all. Others who preached here were Tobias 
Grider, Wm. Colson, A. A. Lovins, J. I. Seward, J. M. Mor- 
gan and Isaac McCash. 

In January, 1880, Min. L. M. Linn held a meeting of 
days in Shelby Township and formed the Oak Grove congre- 
gation with thirty-six members. A union chapel, part Uni- 
tarian, was built. The spiritual life is feeble. 

In 1873, Tobias Grider formed the Union congregation in 
the Hidden Schoolhouse, on the line of Okaw and Shelby 
Townships, with fourteen members. It died at the close of 
thirty years. 

Min. B. R. Gilbert organized the Zion congregation on 
the west side of Todd's Point Township in 1878 with thirty- 
two members. The same year a chapel costing $1,200 was 
built. The church met regularly for worship on the Lord's 
Days and maintained a mid-week prayer-meeting. It died of 
conservatism. 

In April, 1860, Min. John Sconce formed a congregation 
in a log schoolhouse near the northeast corner of Todd's 
Point Township with fifty-eight members, which was known 
as Welborn Creek Church. A chapel costing $1,200 was 
built in 1871, located three miles north of the site of Findley. 
The growth of towns on railways reduced its strength, but 
its dissolution was hastened by a contention of two of its 
men over a stalk-field. It disbanded about 1900. The house 
still stands there. Its remnants went to Findley and Bethany 
Churches. 

The Pleak congregation, six miles southeast of Mowea- 
qua, was formed with twenty members by Min. J. D. Morgan 
in 1880. A substantial chapel was built in a few years, but 
the title never passed to the congregation. A political 
quarrel divided the membership and killed the church. F. 
M. Pleak, the leader of this work, died in 1902. 

Many of these were sincere but mistaken efforts to justly 
apply the great principles of the gospel. 



CHURCHES 387 

Ash Grove (Windsor). 

Organized 1832, by Jackson Storm; present membership, 
400; value of property, $4,000; Bible-school enrollment, 80. 

This location is four miles southeast of Windsor. For 
many years it was known as the Cochran's Grove Church. 
It was organized in a log residence. Some time later a log 
chapel was built, which was used till 1858. Then a large 
frame building was erected, which in turn gave place to the 
present building in 1887. The site of these four buildings 
has changed but little. The lot, with the adjacent cemetery 
ground, was given to the congregation by Greenup Storm, 
one of the strong and godly pioneers. The thirteen charter 
members were: John Storm, Sr., and wife, Wm. Duggar and 
wife, Wm. Bennett and wife, Daniel Green and wife, John 
Storm, Jr., and wife, Joseph Dickerson and wife, and Stella 
Good. The church has had a long, useful and honorable 
life. It was the mother of Windsor, Gays and Lower Ash 
Grove, a conservative society. W. B. Bennett served the 
congregation fifty years as an elder. Most of the pioneers 
of that section preached there. H. H. Harrell served the 
church ten years. It is now in sympathy with world-wide 
missions. It has given to the ministry James Brady, W. R. 
Storm and Homer Storm. 

Brunswick. 

Organized 1860, by B. W. Henry; value of property, 
$2,000; Bible school began 1869; present enrollment, 57. 

For many years this was known as the Antioch Church 
of Christ. The charter members were John, Sr., Sarah S., 
James and Mary, Andy and Elizabeth Barrickman ; Martha 
Christman, Rebecca Galyer, W. H. Jackson, Leah James ; 
William. Isaac, Sr., Samuel, Nathan, Eleanor, Lydia and 
Ellen Killam ; E. J. and James Miller, Jacob Morehouse, 
Hiram and Rachel Pogue, Henry and Isabel Prichard, H. C. 
and Margaret Robertson, John and Eliza Smith, and C. L. 
Scott. 



388 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

When the village of Brunswick grew up about the 
church its name was changed to harmonize therewith. The 
present chapel was built in 1868. An organ was first used 
in 1910 

Cowden. 

Organized 1899, by W. Bedell; present membership, 120; 
value of property, $2,100; Bible school began 1899; present 
enrollment, 145. 

This church started right and has grown steadily in use- 
fulness. It is well organized. The active members include 
the McMillen, Mason, Reynolds, Ballenbaugh, Prater and 
Jewett families. 

Findlay. 

Organized 1906, by H. E. Monser; present membership, 
90; value of property, $6,000; Bible school began 1906; 
present enrollment, 94. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Terry moved from Shelbyville to 
Findley in 1903. The Christian Church there was so con- 
servative that it was doing little. In 1905, through the influ- 
ence of Mrs. Terry, an auxiliary to the C. W. B. M. of 
twelve members was formed. A meeting by Mr. Monser in 
November, 1906, resulted in the organization of a church of 
eighty-eight members. It is active and aggressive. A brick 
building was finished and occupied in January, 1909. Miss 
Olive was set apart to the ministry by this church. There 
is also a conservative church here. 

Henton. 

Organized 1850, by B. W. Henry; present membership, 
127; value of property, $4,500; Bible-school enrollment, 100. 

Mr. Henry and others preached for several years in this 
community before 1850. There were twenty-five charter 
members in the Prairie Bird Church. This beautiful name 
gave way to Henton when the railroad came and the village 
started. The first elders were Lindsay McMorris, Chatter 



CHURCHES 389 

Kelly and Elijah Waggoner, and the first deacons, J. T. and 
W. M. Smith. The first house was built in 1857. 
J. O. Henry was here ordained to the ministry. 

Herrick. 

Present membership, 25; value of property, $2,000; Bible- 
school enrollment, 84. 

Mode. 

Organized 1880, by L. M. Linn ; value of property, $500. 

Evangelist Linn, working under the auspices of the 
County Co-operation, held a meeting of weeks in the winter 
of this year and formed the church with fifty-one members. 
A union chapel was built shortly thereafter. Now there is 
only a small Bible school. 

Moweaqua. 

Organized 1896, by M. Ingles; present membership, 258; 
value of property, $6,000; Bible school began 1896; present 
enrollment, 119. 

William Richhart led in the formation of this church. 
On his invitation the first sermons by a Christian preacher 
were delivered by Minister Doty. There were forty-two 
charter members. 

A good church building was soon put up. A. R. Spicer 
was the first pastor. 

New Liberty (Windsor). 

Organized 1871. 

About 1840 a log chapel was built in the northeast corner 
of Windsor Township. It had two chimneys and a dirt floor. 

Ministeis Grider, Henry, Storm, Fleming and Goodman 
preached there. The resident members formed part of the 
Sand Creek Church till 1871, when a separate congregation, 
called Wolf Creek, was formed. The log house had then 
disappeared, for meetings were held in the Dodson and 
Baker Schoolhouses till 1874, when a chapel was built. The 



390 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

name was then changed to New Liberty. It gave Jesse 
Baugher to the ministry. About 1880, under the lead of P. 
P. Warren, it became ultra-conservative. 

Rocky Branch (Tower Hill). 

Organized 1850, by B. W. Henry. 

Meetings were held in Rose Township by Ministers 
Henry, M. R. Chew and Edward Evy about this date in resi- 
dences, in Black Log Schoolhouse and in a grove. One of 
these, conducted by Mr. Henry, resulted in fifty conversions. 
The consequent congregation passed through many expe- 
riences, prosperous and adverse. Many times all efforts 
ceased. A neat chapel was built. Now no meetings of any 
kind are held. 

Sand Creek (Windsor). 

Organized 1834, by John Storm ; present membership, 25. 

This place is three and a half miles northwest of Wind- 
sor. The eleven charter members were Benjamin Weeks 
and wife, Joseph Baker, wife and son, Ashley Baker and 
wife, Louis Ledbetter and wife, Sarah Bougher and Rachel 
Wallace. Min. Tobias Gricler gave one acre of land for the 
building-site. The first house was of logs, built in 1834; 
the second, a frame, built in 1857, and the third, a brick, 
built in 1874. 

For fifty years this congregation was prosperous and 
useful. It enrolled from twelve hundred to fifteen hundred 
members, and gave to the ministry Isaac Miller, Nathan 
Rice, P. P. Warren, A. A. Loomis and L. P. Phillips. In 
the log chapel in 1850 a missionary co-operation, including 
Shelby, Moultrie and Macon Counties, was formed. Peace 
and prosperity continued till 1889, when Min. Daniel Som- 
mer came and began an aggressive opposition to the use of 
instrumental music in public worship and other "innova- 
tions." This church had never used an organ and had no 
thought of introducing one until the preaching of Mr. Som- 
mer created a desire and a demand for its introduction. 



CHURCHES 391 

This led to a division in 1904 and to a suit at law for the 
property. This was decided by the State Supreme Court at 
the October term, 1905, in favor of the conservatives, they 
being the majority. It was here that the pigmy and disloyal 
"Address and Declaration" was issued in 1889 (see Chap. 
VIII.). By that act this church wrote "Ichabod" in large 
letters upon its record. 

Those members who protested against these puerile pro- 
ceedings have since then conducted public worship and work 
in a near-by schoolhouse. They have been faithful and 
blessed of God. 

Shelbyville. 

Organized 1831, by Bushrod W. Henry; present member- 
ship, 500; value of property, $7,500; Bible school began 
1831 ; present enrollment, 140. 

This church was constituted as the "First Baptist Church 
of Christ in Shelbyville." Mr. Henry's sermons reflected his 
growing knowledge of the Scriptures and called out the 
opposition of his conservative Baptist brethren. Their doc- 
trinal differences widened so that Mr. Henry and his friends 
were excluded from the Baptist fellowship. By 1834 they 
had discarded the name Baptist, and by 1836 had fully 
organized "the church of God in Christ in Shelbyville." The 
first elders were B. W. Henry and J. J. Page. The former 
giving much of his time to evangelizing, the care of the 
church devolved chiefly upon Mr. Page. For thirty-five 
years he was a most faithful elder in every way as set forth 
in the New Testament. Reuben and Martha Wright, Mrs. 
Enfield Tacket and Mrs. Polly Smith were also among the 
first members whose devotion to the church was long known. 
Mr. Henry continued his ministry with the congregation as 
he was able. About 1845 the first church house was built. 
It stood diagonally across the street from the present build- 
ing. This was used until about 1878. when the brick build- 
ing still in use was finished. In 1849, A. D. Northcutt 
served the church, which prospered under his ministry. 



392 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

About the same time, Min. W. H. Brown held a public debate 
in the Christian chapel. General Thornton served as presid- 
ing moderator. The discussion resulted in greatly strength- 
ening the church of Christ. 

Some of the pastors who have served the church were 
N. S. Bastian, Dr. A. L. Kellar, Theo. Brooks, J. G. Wag- 
goner, and now W. G. McColley. It gave O. P. Wright to 
the ministry. 

J. Fred Miller, Wm. Chew, W. F. Turney and J. W. 
Loyd are held in grateful remembrance. J. D. Miller and 
W. C. Kelly have been active and efficient members for the 
past twenty years. 

The church is well organized, with an average aggressive- 
ness. , 

StewarcLson. 

Present membership, 320; value of property, $2,000; 
Bible-school enrollment, 142. 

Tower Hill. 

Organized by W. H. Boles; present membership, 50; 
Bible-school enrollment, 46. 

Windsor. 

Organized 1857; present membership, 273; value of prop- 
erty, including parsonage, $3,500; Bible school began 1860; 
present enrollment, 110. 

It is not known who of the pioneers planted this congre- 
gation or the exact year. It was served in its earlier period 
by those ministers who laid the foundations of the Restora- 
tion movement in that section. Later, there were Z. T. 
Sweeney, Thomas Edwards and J. H. Hite. Many pro- 
tracted meetings were held by Ellis Zound, Isaac Mulkey, 
W. F. Black, Wm. Patterson. James Connor and E. J. Hart. 
A. D. Fillmore, the sweet singer, led the church. The chapel 
was built in 1859. In the later seventies, Dr. Jesse Yoar 
left by his will $1,000 to the congregation to be permanently 
invested for its benefit. 



CHURCHES 393 

J. H. Price and Thomas Henry were elders and strong 
men in the community. Mr. Henry served in the House of 
the General Assembly of Illinois. J. D. Bruce, a deacon, is 
the sole surviving charter member. 

ST. CLAIR COUNTY. 

East St. Louis First. 

Organized 1890, by J. T. Boone ; present membership, 
445; value of property, $34,000; Bible school began 1890; 
present enrollment, 149. 

This church had what most people call a feeble beginning. 
There were eight women, residents here at the time, who had 
been Disciples at various other places. These united their 
heads and their hearts to have a church home that should be 
Christian only. A third-floor hall was secured and Minister 
Boone, then a resident of St. Louis, Mo., conducted a two 
weeks' meeting with thirty additions. Then the thirty-eight 
members organized and moved to another hall. Next, meet- 
ings were held in a schoolhouse until the growing congre- 
gation moved into their chapel at Seventh Street and St. 
Clair Avenue. There they met for nineteen years. In 1910 
they moved into the beautiful modern edifice at the corner 
of Washington Place and Belmont Avenue. 

The church has had fifteen pastors, the present minister 
being Meade E. Dutt. 

There is a strong Papal following in this city, yet this 
church of Christ has moved steadily forward. Many things 
have happened in their Christian service which have caused 
their hearts to rejoice. Their prospects are bright. 

East St. Louis Lansdowne. 

Organized 1905, by C. O. Reynard ; present membership, 
120; value of property, $4,000; Bible school began 1905; 
present enrollment, 162. 

This was the second church in St. Clair County that 
aimed to be Christian only. There were thirty-two charter 



394 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

members. The first meetings were held in a portable school 
building, the use of which was secured for this purpose by 
Mr. D. Walter Potts, city superintendent of the public 
schools. A chapel was built in a short time. 

Mrs. Agnes Potts, whose father was a minister and who 
is the oldest member of the congregation, had much to do 
with its organization. The first elders were J. H., A. A. and 
D. Walter Potts. There are many "Potts" in this church, but 
the material is good. 

STARK COUNTY. 

La Fayette. 

Organized 1847, by John E. Murphy; present member- 
ship, 62; value of property, including parsonage, $5,000; 
Bible school began 1848; present enrollment, 46. 

The charter members were Charles, Tyrus, Laura, Ezra 
and Emiline Himes ; Lewis H., David T. and Polly M. Fitch ; 
Henry Hardman, Hyram Nance, William and Maria Lake, 
and Melia Dunbar. The first elders were Charles Himes and 
John Bryan; the first deacons, Le.wis H. Fitch and William 
Lake. 

Fifteen members were added Aug. 21, 1848. There were 
nearly one hundred on the roll at the end of 1858. 

The earlier ministers, besides Mr. Murphy, were M. P. 
King, F. M. Dodge and Messrs. Woodruff, Sick, Yearnshaw, 
Davenport, Arne and Adams. 

The first money paid for missions was $7.40. It was col- 
lected and paid over by the church treasurer, W. Lovely, to 
the State Missionary Society, meeting at Walnut Grove, 
Sept. 5, 1851. 

These data are taken from the first records of the church 
by Irvin Ingles. 

Toulon. 

Organized 1849, by David McCance; present membership, 
82; value of property, $5,000; Bible school began 1855; 
present enrollment, 65. 



CHURCHES 395 

The organization was made in the old courthouse, with 
the following charter members: David McCance and wife, 
Edward Wilson and wife, Elijah McClennahan and wife, 
Henry Sweet and James Boles. The congregation grew, so 
that meetings were held next in the sc.hoolhouse, then in 
Temperance Hall, which was the place of meeting till 1855, 
when the present church building was erected. 

Robert H. Newton and Clyde Lyon have gone from this 
church into the ministry. 

There was a church also at Wyoming, but it was short- 
lived. 

A church with six members was formed at the residence 
of Ephraim Earth, in the south part of this county, in 1846. 

STEPHENSON COUNTY. 

Freeport. 

Organized 1906, by O. F. Jordon and J. M. Taylor; 
present membership, 60; value of property, $4,000; Bible 
school began 1906; present enrollment, 60. 

This work has been difficult and slow, but under the pas- 
torate of E. T. Cornelius it has advanced to hopefulness. 
The meetings have been held in the courthouse, Y. M. C. A. 
building and, for a considerable time, in the Masonic 
Temple, but a chapel in the near future is a possibility. 

A small congregation was formed in this county in 1840 
by Henry Howe. 

About 1847, Dr. W. P. Naramore formed a church of 
Christ about two miles west of Oneca, where he then 
resided. It was known as the Mt. Pleasant Church and still 
lives. 

TAZEWELL COUNTY. 

The first sermon preached in Little Mackinaw Township 
was in the home of Thomas F. Railsback by Min. John Oat- 
man in 1831. This residence was four miles south and one- 
quarter mile east of Mackinaw town. In Mr. Railsback's 
residence the Little Mackinaw Church was organized in 



396 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

1833, but its local name was applied later. The original 
members were Thomas F. Railsback and wife Louisa, A. B. 
Davis, Catherine Aliens worth, and Benjamin Herndon and 
wife Nancy. For many years they met in a log schoolhouse 
one-half mile south at the Gaines Cemetery. Here rests 
the sacred dust of these six godly pioneers. 

Min. James A. Lindsey was the first preacher in charge. 
Others who followed him were Wm. Ryan, Wm. Davenport, 
H. D. Palmer and G. W. Minier. From 1853-63 their meet- 
ings were held one mile north in the Four Corners School- 
house. In 1863 a church building was erected two miles 
eastward. This place is three miles north of Minier. For 
nearly forty years at this place this church did admirable 
work. For decades the Little Mackinaw Church was well 
and widely known. New towns grew as the railways were 
built. Out of this hive there went swarms of Disciples, to 
Mackinaw town, to Minier, to Concord and to Lilly congre- 
gations. And so the dear mother died, and in 1893 her house 
was sold. The records are with W. L. Dickson, Minier, 111. 

The Antioch Church was located six miles south of Fre- 
mont and one and a half miles east of the village of Dillon. 
It was organized in the middle thirties and was the first 
church in that township. Those forming it were Jesse 
Fisher, Jerome Waltmire, William Dillon, Abner Rulon and 
others. The first building was erected in 1838 and the pres- 
ent one in 1858 at a cost of $600. It is beautifully located 
and is yet in good condition. The congregation has disap- 
peared. Its records are with William Bennett, Delavan, 111. 

Tennessee Point Church was about three miles northeast 
of Fremont. It consisted of only five families; namely, the 
Front, Speece, I. Stout, Shaw and A. N. Page. Their meet- 
ings were held in a schoolhouse. It disappeared with the 
forming of the Concord congregation. 

The Hieronymus Grove Church house, located four miles 
northeast of Armington, was built, at a cost of $3,000, in 
1869 by Enoch Hieronymus, deceased. The congregation 
organized in October. It did good work for forty years and 



CHURCHES 397 

then disbanded, its members uniting with other near-by 
churches of Christ. All of its original members have passed 
except B. R. Hieronymus, of Springfield, and Wm. Darnell, 
of Stanford. 

For a little while there was a small congregation in 
Fremont, but they never owned a chapel. Wm. Gaither, 
Stephen Stout and Wm. Johnson and wife were members 
there. They united with the Antioch congregation. 

At the village of Boynton a church grew and served for 
many years, but finally failed by reason of removals and the 
formation of congregations in other towns. The Armington 
people are giving the Boynton community some attention. 

An earnest effort was made to establish a church after 
the primitive order at Delavan. Mr. Jerome Waltmire, a 
sincere and devoted Disciple, moved there to reside and led 
in the effort. Through his work a good church house was 
built and a congregation gathered. Delavan had a large per- 
centage of people of New England blood and traditions and 
they were mostly satisfied with the denominational phases of 
faith and life. The effort failed and the property was sold. 

Concord (Minier). 

Organized 1870, by George Campbell; present member- 
ship, 90; value of property, $1,000; Bible school began 1870; 
present enrollment, 107. 

A Sunday school was formed in the Black Jack School- 
house about 1863, about eight miles northwest of the site of 
Minier. Beginning in 1867, Mr. Slater taught the school 
there for two years and often preached on Sundays. He 
made a number of converts. Others who preached there in 
the early days were James Robeson, James and Ira Mitchell, 
Bailey Chaplin, Caleb Mainline, Eli Fisher, G. W. Minier 
and Isaac and Elijah Stout. These ministers received little 
or no remuneration for this work. Those meetings were 
attended by multitudes and many became Christians. There 
were forty or more charter members, thirty-one of whom 
brought letters from the Little Mackinaw Church. It was 



398 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

about this time also that the congregation at Tennessee Point 
disbanded and some of those members came here. 

Under the leadership of Min. Isaac Stout a church house 
was completed in 1872. Most of the materials, except the 
heavy timbers and walnut seating, were hauled from Peoria. 
Samuel Nutty gave one acre and a half of ground for the 
site. An addition was made to this building in 1894. Mr. 
Campbell conducted the worship when the house was first 
occupied and gave to the place and congregation the local 
designation "Concord," and he prayed that it might never 
become a discord. 

Since then, preaching has been maintained half-time, but 
rarely has the observance of the Lord's Supper been omitted. 
A good Bible school and C. W. B. M. are maintained. 

Deer Creek. 

Organized 1906, by A. L. Huff ; present membership, 91 ; 
value of property, $1,400; Bible school began 1896; present 
enrollment, 50. 

This church came of the conscious need of divine truth 
by a number of Disciples. The charter members were Mr. 
and Mrs. D. C. Slyter, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Peifer, Mr. and 
Mrs. J. M. Davis, Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Foster, Mr. and Mrs. 
Albert Wagner, Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Graham, Dr. C. M. 
Chapman, Miss Ruth Chapman, Wilford Miller, Isaac 
Malone, Albert Foster, John P. Hall, William Therolis, Mrs. 
Nancy S. Bogardus, Mrs. Fanny M. Stumbaugh. Mrs. 
Seville M. Mooberry, Mrs. Sadie Ammerman, Mrs. Alice 
Ransburg, Misses Grace and Cora Ransburg, and Miss Adda 
Ten Eyck. 

The meetings were held in a public hall. Then the Pres- 
byterian chapel was bought and improved. 

Lilly. 

Organized 1837, by James A. Lindsey ; present member- 
ship, 79; value of property, $1,500; Bible school began 1871; 
present enrollment, 90. 



CHURCHES 399 

In 1859 a number of members peaceably withdrew from 
the Mackinaw Church and formed a congregation at the Mt. 
Pleasant Schoolhouse, the former meeting-place. It was one 
mile south of Lilly, which grew after the building of the 
railway. In 1871 the present chapel was erected there, 
which has since been the meeting-place. The church has 
never been strong, but has done good work. 

William Lindsay, one of its charter members, devoted his 
best energies to this church as an elder for more than forty 
years. 

Mackinaw. 

Organized 1837, by James A. Lindsey; present member- 
ship, 509; value of property, $20,000; Bible-school enroll- 
ment, 417. 

Min. James A. Lindsey came from Kentucky to Illinois 
in 1824 and settled in the eastern part of Mackinaw Town- 
ship, Tazewell County. It is prolable that meetings for 
public worship were held in his residence. A meeting was 
held in what in later years was known as Mt. Pleasant 
Schoolhouse, and from the record made at the time the fol- 
lowing is copied: 

On Saturday, the last day of September, 1837, a meeting was held 
at a Schoolhouse. Elder Jas. A. Lindsey addressed the meeting, urging 
the propriety of organizing a church in our immediate neighborhood 
on purely gospel principles. Before adjourning, the Disciples present 
mutually agreed to procure letters of commendation from the churches 
where they held membership and at a future meeting effect such an 
organization. Accordingly, on the following Thursday, the 5th day 
of October, a meeting was held at the residence of Michael Hittle, 
and the church was fully organized. The following preamble was pre- 
sented : 

"We whose names are herewith subscribed, all having been im- 
mersed on a profession of our faith in Jesus Christ the Son of God, do 
agree to associate and co-operate as a church of Christ, to be known 
by the name of the 'Congregation of Disciples of Christ,' and meet 
for worship in Tazewell County, 111.. Township 24 North. Range 2 
West of the 3rd. Principal Meridian ; taking the Scriptures of the Old 
and New Test?ment for the articles of our faith, and the law of 
our Lord as exhibited in the New Testament and the precepts taught 



400 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

by our Lord and his Apostles, together with the examples of the 
churches set in order by them, as the law and rule of discipline. May 
the Lord help us to know and do his will." 

The foregoing was then signed by the following persons : James A. 
Lindsey, Jane Lindsey, Michael Kittle, Mary Kittle,, R. F. Houston, 
E. I. L. Houston, Nehemiah Hill, Emely Hill, Jas. Lindsey, Mariah 
Lindsey, Jesse E. Jackson, Catharine Jackson, Elijah Sargent, Elinor 
R. Miller, Elizabeth Lindsey, Delila Lindsey, Wm. Lindsey, Alfred 
Lindsey, John Lindsey, David Lindsey, Samuel Flesher, Geo. Hittle, 
Nancy Hittle: twenty-three. 

R. F. Houston was chosen clerk, Geo. Hittle and Samuel Flesher 
were chosen elders, and Michael Hittle and Nehemiah Hill as deacons. 
James A. Lindsey, being at that time an efficient preacher with 
extended acquaintance, was chosen as evangelist and authorized to 
administer all the ordinances and perform all the duties usually 
recognized as belonging to a preacher of the gospel. It was unani- 
mously agreed on that occasion to meet on the first day of every 
week for worship if not providentially prevented, or by general agree- 
ment to meet with congregations at near-by neighborhoods. Alexander 
B. Davis, clerk of Little Mackinaw Christian Church, was clerk of 
this meeting. 

Such was the beginning of this church, at first called Mt. 
Zion, that has come steadily on its way through seventy-six 
years. Ordinarily no records were kept of meetings in those 
early times. The names of those coming into the church 
were added and cases of discipline were noted. Names and 
dates of additions to this church indicate a regular growth, 
mostly by primary obedience. 

The following deserved tribute has been paid to the mem- 
ory of three of those pioneers: 

Samuel Flesher, though not a preacher, was well read in the Bible, 
of unblemished character, fluent in exhortation and delighted in the 
public service of the church. The church sustained a serious loss 
when in May. 1841, he was accidentally drowned. 

George Hittle, though his German brogue somewhat hindered his 
speech, by his earnest zeal, his deep piety, his thorough knowledge 
of the Bible and withal his cheerful, social manner with everybody, 
had a power not often excelled as a leader. Often as he stood before 
the little gatherings, telling of the supreme love of the Saviour, his 
deep-feelirg exhortation had a joyous effect on all that heard. He 
died in 1842. 

Michael Hittle was active as a deacon for more than twenty years. 



CHURCHES 401 

He held steadfastly to the supremacy of the gospel and helped in its 
furtherance, particularly in charity for the needy. He died in 1888. 

In the earlier years the congregation enjoyed the preach- 
ing of Ministers Lindsey, Davenport, Palmer, Jones, Peeler, 
Robeson, Major and Minier. In 1846-47, William Davenport 
rode horseback from Eureka once a month and preached 
three sermons each time to the church. He was paid $2.50 
per trip. 

Up to 1848 the congregation had no settled place for its 
meetings. In that year they decided to hold the regular 
meetings in the village of Mackinaw, and soon built a church 
house there, which was the first in the township. This house 
was first seated with six-inch boards laid on some kind of 
supports. On these the people sat the day the house was first 
used and listened attentively to Henry D. Palmer preach a 
sermon three hours long. The second house was built in 
1875. 

This church finds much satisfaction in the fact that it 
has always been missionary in sentiment and practice. In 
1850, James A. Lindsey went as a delegate to Shelbyville 
when the State Missionary Society was organized. He was 
made chairman of that meeting and counted it one of the 
supreme joys of his long and faithful ministry. The church 
record shows that $10 was contributed to State Missions 
Aug. 31, 1851. 

The church holds in sacred and honored memory the 
names of not a few men and women ; among them are Solo- 
mon Puterbaugh, H. J. Puterbaugh and wife, and George 
Patterson. 

About three thousand people have been members of this 
church. 

It has given to the ministry John Lindsey and Roscoe 

TT-11 

Malone (Green Valley). 

Organized 1866; present membership, 20; value of prop- 
erty, $1,200; Bible school began 1866; present enrollment, 52. 
This church is six miles southwest of Green Valley. The 



402 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

first records were lost. A reorganization was made in 1879, 
when the location was changed four miles and a new house 
built. Like all country churches, the numbers are continually 
reduced by removals. The Bible school is Evergreen. There 
have been thirty-seven preachers who have served here. 

Minicr. 

Organized 1874, by charter members ; present member- 
ship, 222; value of property, $12,000; Bible school began 
1874: present enrollment, 150. 

The charter members were the following: James E. and 
Ann P. Railsback, N. P. and Catherine Williams, Louisa 
Railsback, Mary Elliff, T. L. Minier, Jennie Edmiston, John 
F. Quigg, Elizabeth and Betsy Johnson, Lou Ireland, Lou 
McDowell, Carrie Baker, Sophia, Rodney J. and Mary 
Mitchell. All of these were former members of the church 
of Christ at Little Mackinaw. The first officers were R. J. 
Mitchell and J. B. Chaplin, elders, and B. N. Ewing, J. W. 
Chidister and L. L. Munn, deacons. 

The church has had some superior people, one of whom 
was Rodney J. Mitchell. 

Pekin. 

Organized 1876, by W. F. Richardson ; present member- 
ship, 250; value of property, $5,000; Bible school began 
1876; present enrollment, 310. 

This church was organized by the Tazewell County 
Christian Co-operation. It was the first result of a month's 
series of meetings led by Mr. Richardson. There were 
thirty-two charter members. Of these, Mrs. Emma Inman 
is the only faithful member remaining here now. The 
Co-operation rented the Universalist chapel for one year. 
The management of the congregation was given temoorarily 
to a business committee. Later Joseph Hiett, B. R. Hierony- 
mus and J. E. Jewett were chosen elders, and J. S. Salee, 
William Hiett, James Newkirk and Jobe Hedges, deacons. 
During the pastorate of T. T. Holton, a lot was purchased 



CHURCHES 403 

for $500 and a chapel, costing $3,000, was built thereon. 
Later, it was enlarged and improved. 

During the first years the pulpit was supplied by Profs. 
B J. Radford, H. W. Everest and others. The first pastor 
did the church much harm. 

The records made commendable mention of Mrs. Frances 
E. Van Etta for her wise and efficient services. 
The church has all helpful auxiliaries. 

Washington. 

Organized 1834, by Richard B. McCorcle ; present mem- 
bership, 110; value of property, $3,700; Bible-school enroll- 
ment, 70. 

The following were the charter members: Richard B. 
McCorcle, Isabel McCorcle, James and Mary McClure, John 
and Martha Johnson, William Holland, Sr., Peter and Cath- 
erine Scott, Dr. and Mrs. Goodwin, Ruful and Catherine 
North, Eliza McCorcle, Levi and Mrs. Moulton, Josiah and 
Airs. Yager. 

This church has had its ups and downs. Many of its 
members have gone West to found homes in the newer coun- 
try. They are faithful Christians in Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska 
and other States. At Ulysses, Neb., twenty-six of the char- 
ter members were from the Washington Church. It is not 
now as strong as formerly. 

The first building was erected in 1850, a brick which is 
now used by the German Lutheran congregation. More room 
being needed, the second house was finished and occupied in 

1869. This building was burned the following February. 
The third house was completed and occupied in August, 

1870. This was burned in October, 1876. The fourth and 
present building was first used in July, 1877. 

The church has given to the ministry three brothers B. 
W., R. H. and J. B. Johnson, sons of John and Martha John- 
son and James Kirk. 

The church still has its face toward the future and is 
ourposeful. 



404 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 
UNION COUNTY. 

Anna. 

Present membership, 115; value of property, $5,000; 
Bible-school enrollment, 108. 

Toledo (Cobden). 

Present membership, 50; value of property, $1,000; Bible- 
school enrollment. 36. 

This is one of the oldest churches in the State. Converts 
were immersed here as early as 1836. This is the home of 
Min. C. S. Towne, now past eighty, an able writer and 
faithful preacher. Robert Brown, R. R. No. 1, is the cor- 
respondent. 

VERMILION COUNTY. 

July 12, 1836, Dr. W. Walters wrote that he had organ- 
ized a church of Christ in Danville ; also four others in Ver- 
milion County ; further, that he had gone twenty-two miles 
west of Danville and there organized another church. W. S. 
Shockey and Hughes Bowles were associated with Dr. Wal- 
ters in these evangelistic labors in those early days. 

About 1875 there was a small congregation at Fair- 
mount, but the chapel was sold under the mortgage and the 
members scattered. 

Alvin. 

Organized 1897, by T. L. Stipp ; present memoership, 85 ; 
value of property, $2,300; Bible school began 1887; present 
enrollment, 60. 

This congregation was the first direct result of a series 
of meetings conducted by Evangelist Stipp, with seventy-five 
additions. The place was an old building that had been used 
for a saloon, but became a public hall after the town expelled 
the traffic. The sittings were chiefly boards placed on the 
ends of beer-kegs. An old pool-table added to the furnish- 
ings. 

The chapel was built the next year. Mr. Stipp continued 



CHURCHES 405 

his ministry half-time for three years. Since then the life 
of the congregation has been precarious. However, a good 
school is maintained and the public worship is kept up regu- 
larly. 

Antioch (Rossville). 

Organized 1866, by James Connor, Sr. ; present member- 
ship, 195; value of property, $12,500; Bible school began 
1868; present enrollment, 191. 

This location is six miles southeast of Hoopeston. The 
congregation grew out of a meeting of days conducted by 
Minister Connor, who served the church several years. The 
charter members were Mrs. Huldah Brown, Joseph Heaton 
and wife, Samuel B. Smith and wife, Joseph Youngblood, 
Frank Youngblood and wife, David Newman and wife, John 
Norton and wife, John Oliver, Peter Marlatt, Thomas Bietz 
and wife and Mrs. Mary Kight. All of these have gone to 
their long home except Joseph Youngblood and Mrs. Thomas 
Bietz. 

In 1868 two acres of ground were secured and a frame 
chapel built thereon. This was a union chapel, being shared 
in its uses by Methodist brethren. It was added to in 1890. 
In 1910 a new structure of brick, fully modern and very 
convenient and pleasing, was erected. 

This is known as the Antioch Church of Christ. It has 
always had the missionary spirit. Every year the congre- 
gation makes its offerings to all the regular benevolences. 
In 1911 they amounted to $240. 

This church has given to the Christian ministry Turlie 
McConnell, Eldon Norton, Rudolph Heicke and Orren Ora- 
hood. 

Irving Cromkite, R. R. 2, is the clerk. 

Bethany. 

Organized 1875, by J. C. Myers; present membership, 20; 
value of property, $1,500; Bible school began 1875; present 
enrollment, 40. 



406 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

The location is five miles northwest of Danville. It is 
also known as Lone Oak. For years the congregation held 
large influence for good in a wide community. Preachers 
who made their opinions of equal authority with the Scrip- 
ture came and sowed the seeds of dissension. Wrangling 
supplanted worship, and vilification of men the praise of 
God. The congregation was divided and feebleness followed. 

Bismark. 

Organized 1880, by T. L. Stipp; present membership, 
100; value of property, $3,000; Bible school began 1880; 
present enrollment, 60. 

Mins. J. J. Cosat and J. C. Myers were associated with 
Mr. Stipp in forming this church. There were about forty 
charter members. The first officers were Riley Chandler, 
Wm. Wilson and Samuel Munnell, elders ; with David and 
Andrew Claypool and Wm. Holland, deacons. The church 
was rent with division on the question of instrumental music, 
Sunday school and missions. Finally, those opposing these 
things withdrew. The congregation then reorganized and 
turned its thought and effort to do the things that please 
God. They have semi-monthly preaching, but the public 
worship every Lord's Day. J. J. Cosat is the pastor. 

Catlin, 

Present membership, 212; value of property, $5,000; 
Bible-school enrollment, 161. 

Central Park (Danville). 

Organized 19X39, by E. M. Norton; present membership, 
47; value of property, $1,500; Bible school began 1909; 
present enrollment, 57. 

This congregation is also known as Brook's Chapel. It 
is in a suburb of Danville, with both electric and steam 
roads, and has a fine class cf citizens. 

The faithful work of Minister Norton led also in build- 
ing the chapel. Roy Cronchite is the pastor. 



CHURCHES 407 

Center Point (Fairmount). 

Organized 1891, by B. N. Anderson; present member- 
ship, 50; value of property, $1,500; Bible school began 1891; 
present enrollment, 57. 

The location is six miles southwest of Fairmount. The 
congregation contributes to missions and other benevolences. 
There is a good Bible school, with Adda Smith, superin- 
tendent. The elders are E. L. Hawkins and E. F. Mines. 
Geo. F. Hedges is the clerk. Half-time preaching by Pastor 
H. H. Williams. 

Cheneyville. 

Organized 1891, by J. N. Lester; present membership, 
109; value of property, $1,500; Bible school began 1891; 
present enrollment, 77. 

The present elders are J. M. Swaner and Frank Dice, 
with Quince Teagarden and Oscar Young, deacons. B. T. 
Nicholson is the pastor. This is his first work in Illinois. 
He is an alert and earnest minister. 

Danville First. 

Organized 1871, by John F. Rowe; present membership, 
407; value of property, including parsonage, $35,000; Bible 
school began 1871 ; present enrollment, 261. 

Minister Rowe conducted a meeting of days in Lincoln 
Hall, on West Main Street, near the location of the Plaza 
Hotel, which resulted in the formation of this church. There 
were about forty members. H. A. Coffeen, Parley Martin 
and Geo. Dillon were the first elders. . Soon thereafter a 
small chapel was built on Franklin Street where 415 is now. 
This was used till 1895, when the present commodious edifice 
was erected on the corner of Oak and Seminary Streets, dur- 
ing the pastorate of S. S. Jones. 

W. R. Jewell first preached for the congregation, mean- 
while editing a secular paper. 

The church and Bible school are thoroughly organized for 
efficient service. In 1912, $450 was paid for missions. 



408 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

In the years of struggle, Mr. and Mrs. Hiram Woods 
were most valuable members. 

Danville Second. 

Organized 1899, by S. S. Jones; present membership, 
100; value of property, $10,000; Bible school began 1899; 
present enrollment, 72. 

This church was formed in a rented building in German- 
town, which is now a part of Danville, with seventy-five 
charter members. It was later incorporated as "The Second 
Church of Christ." 

Danville Third. 

Organized 1902, by S. S. Jones; present membership, 
770; value of property, $20,000; Bible school began 1902; 
present enrollment, 396. 

This congregation is the outgrowth of a mission formed 
by the First Church in the northern part of the city in 1901. 
Those directly interested "covenanted together to form a 
church to be known as the Third Church of Christ of Dan- 
ville, Illinois." The meetings of the congregation were held 
in a hall, a storeroom and the Garfield School building till 
the completion of the church building in 1904. It is located 
on the corner of English and Walnut Streets. 

S. S. Jones was the first pastor. 

Danville Fourth. 

Organized 1904, by E. M. Norton ; present membership, 
120; value of property, $12,000; Bible school began 1904; 
present enrollment, 95. 

There were about seventy-five charter members. The 
elders are Jehiel Vance, Jacob Knee, John Hilman, Joseph 
Boles and Harris Smith, with Dr. Redmon, Dell Peeler and 
Edward Swisher, deacons. Its location is at the northwest 
corner of Fourth Street and Cunningham Avenue. The min- 
istry of S. S. Jones in Danville was richly blessed. 



CHURCHES 409 

Fithian. 

Organized 1884, by B. A. Anderson; present membership, 
11; value of property, $1,000; no Bible school. 

Formerly this church was a power for good in the com- 
munity. Death and removals have nearly dissolved it. 
Fithian is a good little town in a fine agricultural section. 

Georgetown. 

Organized 1901, by S. S. Jones ; present membership, 198 ; 
value of property, $7,000; Bible school began 1901; present 
enrollment, 145. 

This congregation started with ninety-two members in 
January, and before the close of the year had housed itself 
in a good brick building. 

James H. Hewitt has been one of the most valuable 
factors in the church. F. H. Vernon is the pastor. 

Henning. 

Organized 1898, by J. W. Street; present membership, 
140; value of property, $2,250; Bible-school enrollment, 139. 

The church was constituted in a hall. There were seven- 
teen charter members, most of whom have moved away or 
died. With experiences that are common to village congre- 
gations, it prospers and does good. 

C. C. Gaumer is the pastor. Miss Edith E. M. Seymore 
is correspondent. 

Hoopeston. 

Organized 1873, by Rolla M. Martin; present member- 
ship, 535 ; value of property, including parsonage, $20,000 ; 
Bible school began 1873 ; present enrollment, 270. 

This church of Christ had its beginning almost with the 
city. The few members there first met in storerooms and 
shops. J. F. Mathers and Rolla M. Martin were the early 
preachers. 

The first house of worship was built in 1873, under Mr. 



410 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Martin's ministry. The present brick edifice was erected in 
1899, during the pastorate of R. H. Robertson. 

Hoopeston is a city of superior intelligence, and the 
church of Christ is abreast of the times. Andrew Scott is 
pastor. 

Indianola. 

Present membership, 68; value of property, $3,500; Bible- 
school enrollment, 67. 

Lowe's Chapel (Danville). 

Organized 1876, by J. C. Myers ; present membership, 68 ; 
value of property, $2,000; Bible school began 1876; present 
enrollment, 50. 

This chapel is eight miles southeast of Danville. Mr. 
Myers, like his Master, was a carpenter, so after forming the 
congregation he built their chapel. 

James A. Fishback is elder; Oscar Huff and Joseph Fish- 
back, deacons, and J. J. Cosat, minister for one-fourth time. 
The church has never been strong, and has been further 
handicapped by ultra-conservative preachers. 

No. Eight (Armstrong). 

Organized 1888, by Wm. Hamilton ; present membership, 
23; value of property, $400; Bible school began 1892; pres- 
ent enrollment, 37. 

This congregation was formed in No. 8 Schoolhouse, in 
Champaign County, with about eighty members. When the 
chapel was built, in 1892, it was located in Vermilion 
County, five miles southwest of Armstrong. 

Among the charter members were O. P. and Allen 
McGlaughlin and wives, Anthony Long and wife. James 
Stuckev and wife, John Jeakim, Marv and Carrie Robertson, 
Viola McGlaughlin, and Jessie and Flora Tattershell. From 
the first. 157 persons have held membership here. Harley 
Fetters is clerk. 



CHURCHES 411 

No. Ten (Potomac). 

Organized 1870, by Rolla M. Martin; present member- 
ship, 270; value of property, $1,500; Bible school began 
1870; present enrollment, 131. 

The charter members were George, George W., Irene, 
Jr., Margaret, Samuel, Matilda and Irene French; Hosea, 
Alonzo, Ellen, Warren and Sarah Knight; Caleb and Mary 
J. Albert; William, Martha, Samuel, John and Rebecca 
McGee ; Jane Sweet, Rebecca Clemm, Louisa Cronkhite and 
Mary Tillotson. The first officers were Hosea Knight, elder, 
with George French and Caleb Albert, deacons. To the 
original twenty-three members, 321 have been added. 

The church is wide awake to Home and Foreign Mis- 
sions. 

It is served by four elders and fourteen deacons. E. C. 
Creighton is the clerk, and E. M. Norton, pastor. It is 
located six miles southeast of Armstrong. 

Oakwood. 

Organized 1886, by Minister Pine; present membership, 
129; value of property, $5,000; Bible school began 1886; 
present enrollment, 130. 

There were fourteen charter members. In 1892 the con- 
gregation was reorganized by S. H. Creighton with 114 
members. The house is modern, the Bible school front rank 
and a mid-week prayer-meeting. Geo. J. Huff is the pastor 
full time. Contributes to Home and Foreign Missions. W. 
D. Rogers is the clerk. 

Potomac. 

Present membership, 125; value of property, $3,500; 
Bible-school enrollment, 103. 

Prairie Chapel (Rossville). 

Organized 1865, by Rolla M. Martin: present member- 
ship, 74; value of property, $2,000; Bible-school enroll- 
ment, 110, 



412 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

This chapel is five miles west of Rossville. A few scat- 
tered neighbors were gathered together by Minister Martin at 
old Blue Grass. They soon moved their place of meeting 
to the home of Simon Armentrout, thence to the Bratton 
Schoolhouse till 1866, when the present building was bought 
of the United Brethren and moved to the present site. It 
has been repaired several times and is now a creditable 
house. 

The congregation has grown through trials and struggles 
to efficiency. 

Minister Martin served the church twenty years. C. F. 
Gaumer has served the church for the past eight years. 
There is a good board of thirteen officers. Charles Villiars 
is the clerk. 

Ridge Farm. 

Organized 1899, by C. E. Evans; present membership, 
50; value of property, $3,000; Bible school began 1899; 
present enrollment, 48. 

P. F. York is the pastor of this church. It contributes 
to missions, and is striving to attain unto the best things in 
Christian service. 

There is a good board of six officers. L. C. Osborne is 
the clerk. 

Rossville. 

Organized 1894, by S. R. Creighton ; present membership, 
264; value of property, including parsonage, $12,000; Bible 
school began 1894; present enrollment, 154. 

Sidell. 

Organized 1895, by S. H. Creighton; present member- 
ship, 125; value of property, including parsonage, $7,500; 
Bible school began 1895 ; present enrollment, 138. 

For a few years, meetings were held in the Maple Grove 
Schoolhouse, a few miles southwest of Sidell. These led to 
the building of a union chapel in the north end of Edgar 
County in 1882. In 1884, Evangelist W. F. Black conducted 



CHURCHES 413 

a meeting of days there, when most of the congregation 
became Christians only. These he then organized into the 
Antioch Christian Church. In about ten years this congre- 
gation was absorbed by others, and the chapel was sold and 
turned into a barn. 

Evangelist Creighton held a meeting in Sidell in the 
Baptist chapel in 1895 and organized a church of Christ of 
about one hundred members. Among them were members 
from Antioch, a goodly number of Baptists and converts to 
the Lord. 

The church has given Clay F. Gaumer to the Christian 
ministry and Mrs. Marie Jackson McCoy to the mission field 

in Japan. . 

Union (Danville). 

Organized 1838, by Jacob Swisher; present membership, 
60; value of property, $1,000; Bible school began 1850; 
present enrollment, 50. 

The location is seven miles northwest of Danville. This 
congregation has been served by all the first and second gen- 
eration of Vermilion County preachers, among them Robert 
Sears, H. H. Gunn, W. P. Shockey, Wm. Mapes, R. M. and 
J. L. Martin, J. H. Broom, Abner Hubbard and J. H. 
Mavity. 

It has given the following men to the Christian ministry: 
Wm. Pilkington, J. H. Martin, J. J. Cosat, T. L. Stipp, O. 
B. Gravat and P. L. Cunningham. 

The church was divided through the preaching of ultra- 
conservatives. These damages have been measurably repaired 
by the ministry of J. J. Cosat, who is serving the congregation 
for the twenty-fifth year as its pastor. They maintain a good 
Bible school and C. E. 

Bertha White, R. 2, is the clerk. 

Walnut Corners (Danville). 

Organized 1843, by H. H. Gunn; present membership, 
98; value of property, $2,500; Bible school began 1875; 
present enrollment, 72. 



414 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

In the early forties the Stony Creek Church was consti- 
tuted some ten miles northeast of Danville. It continued in 
a prosperous condition till 1856, when the new railroad 
started a town three and a half miles away, called State 
Line, Ind. Then most of the congregation moved into a new 
brick building in that town. However, a cemetery had grown 
near the old church. For the convenience of funeral occa- 
sions, the house was remodeled and repaired. After some 
years a Bible school was formed for the neighborhood, and 
from this school grew the Walnut Corners Church. The 
school is front rank and there is a good C. E. 

J. C. Myers, J. J. Cosat, W. H. Kerr and others have 
served the church. John Smith and Irvine Cunningham are 
the elders. 

Westville. 

Organized 1866, by R. M. Martin; present membership, 
40; value of property, $1,600; Bible school began 1907. 

This church was first organized on the site of Westville. 
It grew to a membership of four hundred and exercised a 
wide influence for good in the surrounding community. 
Then a strong ultra-conservative preacher was engaged to 
serve the congregation. Under his teaching, in six years it 
sickened and died, and its members were scattered to the 
four winds. 

In 1907, Min. E. M. Norton gathered up and reorganized 
the surviving remnants. A building formerly used by the 
Presbyterians was bought. It was much damaged by a 
stroke of lightning in 1912, and the title is in litigation. So 
a union school is held in the Congregational chapel. A. C. 
Ellsworth and C. M. Snooks are the elders. 

Willow Springs (Grape Creek). 

Organized 1870, by J. H. Martin ; present membership, 
40; value of property, $1,000; Bible school began 1870; 
present enrollment, 50. 

It is located one mile southeast of Grape Creek. The 



CHURCHES 415 

spiritual life is feeble. Samuel Jumps and John Wilson are 
the elders. 

W ABASH COUNTY. 

Adam's Corners (Allendale). 

Organized 1851, by William Courter; present member- 
ship, 75; value of property, $1,000; Bible-school enroll- 
ment, 33. 

At a meeting the fifth Lord's Day in June, at the resi- 
dence of Allen R. Jackman, it was decided that, for the con- 
venience of that part of the Barney's Prairie Church living 
in that neighborhood, a congregation be established at 
Adam's Corners. Soon afterward a union chapel was built. 
This was burned. Then the Christian congregation built a 
house of their own. 

Mr. Courter served both as minister and elder. Under 
his untiring efforts the church grew to be strong and influ- 
ential. It is still one of the best country congregations in 
the county. Many of its members are leading citizens. Geo. 
W. Morrell preached here three years with fine results. 

A flourishing Bible school and the regular worship are 
well attended. 

Allendale. 

Organized 1891 ; present membership, 117; value of prop- 
erty, including parsonage, $3,700; Bible school began 1891; 
present enrollment, 143. 

There were forty charter members. The chapel was built 
the same year. 

There is an efficient Y. P. S. C. E. and Bible school, of 
which F. S. Gray has been superintendent since the church 
was started, except three years. John Walser is clerk. 

Antioch (Keensburg). 

Organized 1886, by Loean Gillaspie ; present membership, 
70; value of property, $1,200; Bible school began 1886; 
present enrollment, 50. 

This congregation is thirteen miles southwest of Mt. 



416 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Carmel. There were fifteen charter members. James H. 
Dinnel and A. B. Denham were chosen elders, and W. B. 
Stewart, deacon. 

The first chapel was built as a union house in 1870, but 
in 1886 the legal title passed to the Christian congregation. 

A. B. Denham, an efficient elder for twenty-six years, was 
recently lost by removal. James Deputy is clerk. 

Barney's Prairie (Allendale). 

Organized 1819, by James Pool; present membership, 
140; value of property, $1,350; Bible school began 1860; 
present enrollment, 110. 

William Barney, with his family, left the banks of the 
Genesee River, in New York, in 1808. They came by raft 
down the Ohio River to the mouth of the W abash. There 
the raft was sold and a keel-boat bought. In this they 
pushed upstream to Ramsey's Rapids, afterward the site of 
Bedell's Mill. This was eight miles up-river from the site 
of Mt. Carmel. His family consisted of Mr. Barney, his 
wife and his twelve children and three sons-in-law. (See 
Chap. II.) The male members of the family struck out 
through the forest to find a place on which to build their 
cabins. They reached a beautiful stretch of land, covered 
with grass ten feet high, and afterward known as Barney's 
Prairie. Shortly afterward came Mr. Barney's three sons- 
in-law. They were Ranson Higgins, Philo Ingram and Wil- 
liam Aldridge. 

Other settlers were then in that section and still others 
came afterward. Among these were Seth Card and Gervaise 
Hazelton. These two men located Palmyra, two and a half 
miles north of the site of Mt. Carmel, near the river Wabash, 
Apr. 22, 1815. But Palmyra was abandoned in 1821 because 
of its unhealthiness. The Indians had so told the settlers, 
and it proved true. 

This section was then in Edwards County, which was 
created by an act of the Territorial legislative body in 1814, 
and which reached north to the Canadian line. 



CHURCHES . 417 

Joseph Wood came to the settlement about 1815. Ira 
Keen and others came from Ohio, New York, Virginia and 
Kentucky all by the rivers. 

Fort Barney was built in 1811. It was northwest of Pal- 
myra. Fort Wood was southwest and Fort Compton north- 
east of Palmyra. These places were from five to eight miles 
apart. These forts were built by placing large poles firmly 
in the ground, reaching up about twelve feet, the top ends 
hewed off to sharp points. Early settlements were made 
round about these forts for protection, since the Indians had 
murdered several families near Fort Compton. 

On a woodland spot, midway between the forts, a meet- 
ing assembled on July 17, 1819, and then and there organ- 
ized the Barney's Prairie Christian Church. Seth Card was 
elected elder ; Joseph Wood, deacon, and Jarvis Fordice, 
clerk. The number of charter members is not known, but 
they had mostly come from the East and were the most 
intelligent and influential people in the settlement. (See 
James Pool, Seth Card and Joseph Wood in biographies.) 
Some of these people had been members of the Christian 
Denomination, known at that time as "New Lights." But 
when they formed the Barney's Prairie Church, they re- 
nounced the name "New Light" and decided to be known 
simply as Christians. This is the written record, which is 
confirmed by the testimony of D. H. Wood now near 
seventy years of age a grandson of Joseph Wood, the first 
deacon. He has been a member of this church for fifty 
years, and through all these years had heard that this church 
started on apostolic ground. 

The congregation met later near Fort Barney, in a grove 
near the prairie. Here a stand was built and surrounded by 
seats made of split logs, smoothed on the flat sides. They 
were more substantial than comfortable. Public worship was 
held here when the weather permitted ; otherwise, in dwell- 
ings or barns. In 1843 a chapel was built. This has been 
repaired and refurnished and is still in use. 

This was the first church of Christ in Illinois. 

14 



418 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Bellmont. 

Organized 1896, by Erastus Lathrop; present member- 
ship, 110; value of property, $800; Bible school began 1876; 
present enrollment, 75. 

The first members were Dr. N. Briston and wife, Christ 
Shoenert and wife, John J. Sloan, A. W. French and wife, 
Wm. H. Davis, A. P. Manley, John G. McClary and wife, 
Mariah E. Knowles, Eliza J. Rigg, Nancy Jane Carter, 
Lafayette Read, Alice Bristow, Clara Briston, Lydia E. 
Kimbel, T. H. Burton, Ellen Imes, Nancy J. Parmenter, 
Elizabeth Sloan, Thompson Davis and Elizabeth M. McClary. 
Messrs. Briston, McClary and Baird were chosen elders, and 
Burton and French, deacons. The organization was made in 
the office of Dr. E. T. McClane, where the meetings for 
public worship were held till 1879, when the Silvan M. E. 
meeting-house, that stood five miles north of the village, was 
bought. As it was a very strong building, it was torn down, 
moved to town and rebuilt. This was done mainly by the 
volunteered labor of the members. Since then it has been 
much improved. 

The church has been fruitful of good. D. M. Durham 

is the pastor. ., 

Keensburg. 

Organized 1819, by its members; present membership, 
180; value of property, $5,000; Bible-school enrollment, 100. 
The original record reads as follows: 

At a meeting held at Brother Daniel Keen's on Saturday before 
the fifth Sabbath in August, 1819, a church of Christ was constituted 
consisting of seven members : 1 Thomas Thompson : 2 Nancy 
Thompson : 3 Daniel Keen : 4 Polly Keen : 5 William Arnold : 6- 
Ely Reed: 7 Dennis Sayles. 

The record shows that John Auldridge was chosen as the 
first elder, and Daniel Keen, the first deacon ; that meetings 
were held monthly and that additions were made to the 
church at these meetings, and also that several were dropped 
from the record for various reasons. In 1825 the church 
reported twenty-eight members in good standing. 



CHURCHES 419 

This was the Coffee Creek Church, located one-half mile 
east of the site of Keensburg. The place of meetings was 
changed to the village in 1882. 

This congregation has from its beginning, in 1819, always 
been a church of Christ; it was never of the Christian 
Denomination. Such is the united testimony of the oldest 
residents of the community, the original records of the con- 
gregation and the history of Wabash County. It was, there- 
fore, only six weeks younger than the Barney's Prairie 
Church. 

Lancaster (Mt. Carmel). 

Organized 1842, by Maurice R. Trimble; present mem- 
bership, 95; value of property, $1,000; Bible-school enroll- 
ment, 85. 

Lancaster was formerly known as Round Prairie. In the 
life of Elijah Goodwin (pp. 183-4) the following lines 
appear : 

During this year [1842] a Methodist preacher named Dickens 
made an appointment on Round Prairie to preach on baptism. There 
being no meeting-house in the settlement, one of our brethren opened 
his large barn for the occasion. Th& preacher came and put in two 
days preaching on the subject. The brethren sent me word that I 
must come and give them a two days' meeting and preach on the same 
subject. This I could not do, but sent them an appointment, promising' 
to give them two days' preaching in one. I went and preached in the 
same barn five hours without leaving the stand. I spoke on the sub- 
ject, action and design of baptism. Preached two hours and thirty 
minutes and gave an intermission of fifteen minutes. Then I resumed 
the subject and preached two hours and thirty minutes more all 
before leaving the stand. The large barn was full of people and a 
great multitude stood outside before a large door the whole time, 
giving the most earnest attention. 

Elijah and Moses Goodwin, H. A. Hayward, James Pool, 
Joseph Ballard, and probably others, had preached the 
apostolic gospel in this community previous to Elijah Good- 
win's five-hour sermon. Alfred Flower came later. 

This church organized the third Lord's Day in October 
and had the following charter members: William Ridgeley 



420 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

and Robert Johnson, elders; Horace A. Woodward and John 
Higgins, deacons, with Wm. Clark, Sophia Woodward, 
Hiram and Polly Couch, Lydia McMillen, Martha Jones, 
Sarah Russell, Nancy and Elizabeth Lewis, Maria Courter, 
Sarah Pryant, Warren and Tamar Winders. 

Mr. Woodward, one of the first deacons, was a famous 
showman in his early life and had built the large barn 
(where big meetings assembled), in which to keep the animals 
of his menagerie during the winters. He died in Grayville 
in 1878. The organization of the church is still celebrated 
by an annual meeting the third Sunday in October. Public 
worship, a basket dinner and a home-coming of former 
residents, make it a delightful occasion. Min. W, R. Couch 
has written these words: "The most, perhaps all, of the 
charter members of the Lancaster Church were converted 
under the preaching of Elijah and Moses Goodwin and 
Maurice R. Trimble at the old stand on Barney's Prairie." 
The last of them to go home to God was Elder John Hig- 
gins, of blessed memory, who died in 1902. 

The church has given to the ministry James McMillen 
and James E. Moyer. 

This is now a weak church. I. G. Williams is the min- 
ister in charge. 

Lick Prairie (Mt. Carmel). 

Organized 1830, by Joseph Wasson ; present membership, 
125; value of property, $600; Bible-school enrollment. 45. 

This church is located twelve miles west of Mt. Carmel. 
Among the charter members there were Adam, Samuel, John 
and Andrew Baird; Eli Moore, Thomas and William Hill, 
John Steward, Samuel and Eban Putnam, and all their wives 
severally. This was organized as a church of the Christian 
Denomination, but in 1853, when another chapel was built, 
it became a part of the Restoration movement. Elijah and 
Moses Goodwin did efficient service at this place. 

The first house of worship was of logs, built, in 1831. 
This was used for fourteen years. Then another log house 



CHURCHES 421 

was built one mile south of the present site. By 1853 the 
congregation had outgrown the building. Then a union 
chapel was built, the Universalists using it one-fourth of the 
time. Elements so conflicting were not peaceable. After 
twenty-eight years of confusion, the old house, being unfit 
for use, was torn down. In 1881 a neat frame chapel was 
built and called the Garfield Memorial Church. 

Maud (Mt. Carmel). 

Organized 1896, by Geo. W. Morrell; present member- 
ship, 90; value of property, $1,200; Bible school began 1896. 

This church is located about five miles west of Mt. Car- 
mel. It was the first general result of a meeting held in the 
schoolhouse there by Minister Morrell. The charter mem- 
bers were James, Winifred and Lula Bell; John and Vashti 
Williams; Henry Obold and wife; J. R., Jr., Virginia, Jane 
and Flora V. Brines ; David P. Wright, Harris Roll and 
wife, David K. and Rosaline Seiler, David H. and Susan 
Brown, Hannah Aborn, Anna Fearheiley, Mary Read, 
Samantha Van Senden, Mary E. Halbig, Irene Bell, Rose 
Getz and Cassie Shellhorn. 

Mrs. H. Aborn and husband gave one acre of land and 
the chapel was built thereon in 1896. 

This church is in a farming community and is sustained 
wholly by farmers. Since 1901 they have the "Annual May 
Meeting." Meetings for worship are held forenoon, after- 
noon and evening, a free basket dinner intervening. In the 
afternoon the anniversary sermon is preached and the church 
roll is called. There are two elders and four deacons. D. 
M. Durham is now pastor. 

Mt. Carmel. 

Organized 1862, by D. D. Miller; present membership, 
760; value of property, $15,000; Bible school began 1862; 
present enrollment, 335. 

This church had thirty-three charter members. Only one 
of them Maria L. Filton is left in the community. The 



422 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

first officers were, elders, John A. Morgan and Charles Red- 
man; the deacons, Amos Walter and Daniel Titus. 

The first house of worship was built in 1864, which was 
enlarged and remodeled in 1893. The first meetings were 
held in the courthouse and were violently opposed by relig- 
ious bodies then established in the city. But it has grown 
to be strong and representative. All departments of Chris- 
tian growth and service are aggressive. 

Besides Mr. Miller, who worked under the auspices of 
the State Missionary Society, the following evangelists held 
meetings here: Franklin, Black, Clements, Ingram, Coombs, 
Courter, Pearl, Updike, Martin, Scoville, Thompson and 
Wilhite. 

W. W. Weedon is the pastor. 

WARREN COUNTY. 

Alexis. 

Organized 1897, by J. C. Alsup; present membership, 60; 
value of property, $3,000. 

Berwick. 

Organized 1902, by D. E. Hughes; present member- 
P' ' Cameron. 

Organized 1831 ; present membership, 290 ; value of prop- 
erty, including parsonage, $6,500; Bible-school enrollment, 
144. 

This church, with its antecedents, is one of the oldest 
and most interesting in the State. Its first name was Cold- 
brook, because a cold spring there formed a cold brook. The 
location was one and a half miles northwest of the site of 
Cameron. It was on the old trail leading from Peoria to 
Oquaka and about midway between the sites of Galesburg 
and Monmouth. A little town grew up around the Cold- 
brook Church that was called Savana. With the building of 
the railroad in 1854-55 the place and name of the church 
were changed and the village faded away. 



CHURCHES 423 

The original record-book is still in the possession of the 
Cameron Church, and from it the following facts are 
gleaned : 

"On the 30th day of April, 1831, this church was consti- 
tuted upon the belief that the Scriptures of the Old and New 
Testaments are the only rule of faith and practice and suf- 
ficient for the government of the church." The names of 
the seventeen persons who signed this covenant were these: 
William M:, Elizabeth, Elijah, Sr., Margaret, Sr., Elijah, 
Jr., Margaret, Jr., Davidson ; Henry E., Elizabeth and John 
G. Haley; John E. and Frances Murphy; Richard and Nancy 
Ragland, and William, Sarah, Josiah and Julia Whitman. 
Three of these men were preachers William Whitman, 
John E. Murphy and Elijah Davidson and as many as 
eight of them were good public speakers. Squire Whitman, 
a nephew of William and Josiah Whitman, with his wife 
and sixteen other members of this church, went to Oregon 
in 1850 by the old caravan route, and there helped to found 
the town of Monmouth and to plant the college there. 

The Coldbrook congregation called itself "the Church of 
Christ on Cedar Fork of Henderson River," Warren County. 
The record-book says : "Second Saturday in Feb., 1832. 
Agreed to send four dollars by Elijah Davidson, Jr., to St. 
Lewis to purchase a record-book for the church and one 
gallon of wine. 

"Second Saturday, Aug., 1833. Agreed to meet on every 
Sabbath for worship." 

For two years the record-book was made to do duty for 
other than church business. For example, on the first page 
there is a "Receipt for Felon," apparently from the pen of 
Henry Haley. It reads: "Bathe the part affected in ashes 
and water, take the yolk of an egg, six drops of the spirits 
of turpentine and a few beet leaves cut fine, a small quantity 
of hard soap, and one teaspoonful of snuff or fine tobacco, 
then add one teaspoonful of burnt salt and one of Indian 
meal and apply to the part affected." The records of per- 
sonal business transactions also appear. But in June, 1834, 



424 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

"the church appointed four brethren to transcribe the church 
book, leaving out all that the church now believes unneces- 
sarily committed to record." 

The second Saturday in June, 1832, the church debated 
the question, "What encouragement should be granted young 
gifts by the church?" It was decided that it was the duty of 
every individual member to teach the Scriptures to the best 
of his ability, and those having the ability to teach publicly 
should be given letters of recommendation by the church. 

In December, 1834, some parties wished to be married, 
so a few members of the church met on the llth of that 
month and "appointed Alex. Reynolds to solemnize the 
right." But the following month the church took time by 
the forelock for the matrimonial business and authorized 
Joseph and Isaac Murphy, in addition to Elijah Davidson 
and William Whitman, who had been previously appointed, 
"to solemnize the right of matrimony." In December, 1838, 
the church granted one, J. R. Melton, this right, but the fol- 
lowing March they examined his case, found him to be an 
impostor and excluded him from the church. 

In May, 1834, the congregation received by immersion 
"Bro." Richard, a colored man; in 1838, Sister Polly, a col- 
ored woman, and in 1843 by commendation Sister Susan 
Richardson, a colored woman. 

This church grew and prospered. It had the word, the 
spirit and the blessings of the Lord. In its earlier years it was 
served by Mins. Alexander Davidson, Levy Hatchett. Pat- 
rick H. Murphy, J. W. Butler, J. C. Reynolds, L. S. Wal- 
lace, George W. Lucy, S. T. Shelton and Alexander John- 
son, who were all farmers. 

Two deacons were chosen in 1833, but not till 1850 was 
an elder elected in the person of Samuel Shelton. In 1839 
three swarms went out from the fruitful hive. The second 
Sunday in February the church granted permission to organ- 
ize a congregation "across the creek." This became the 
Talbot Creek Church. The last Lord's Day in March, 
twenty-two persons received letters who became the nucleus 



CHURCHES 425 

of the Monmouth Church. June 26 there were twenty-six 
persons who received letters and formed the Meredian 
Church. 

These Christians aimed to be strictly apostolic, but only 
with the passing years did they come to see some minor 
matters clearly. In the late thirties Elijah Goodwin, of 
Indiana, visited the congregation and preached one Lord's 
Day morning. Then a leading brother, presiding at the 
table, proceeded to break the loaf into small pieces con- 
venient for each to take one. Whereupon, Mr. Goodwin 
spoke aloud: "Don't, brother. Let the disciples break the 
bread." The effect was like a thunderbolt from a clear sky. 
Silence brooded for a minute. Then the people saw, and 
from that time the custom was changed. On one Sunday 
morning the congregation met for worship, but the preacher 
failed to come, so a social meeting was held. During the 
singing of the closing hymn, a stranger, who was passing 
through to another State, went forward to accept Jesus as 
his Saviour. The leaders were puzzled; so they sent the 
stranger back to his seat in the chapel, extended the cus- 
tomary invitation and announced the invitation hymn. Then 
the earnest traveler was received according to their custom and 
went on his way rejoicing. The brethren had to be "regular." 

When Mr. Campbell preached in the State before rail- 
ways were built, he was often conveyed from place to place 
by friends. One of these called his attention to the great 
fertility of the soil and the wealth that would be produced 
from it. He replied: "Yes, but how hard it will be for the 
people to live as Christians." Naturally, there was a wide- 
spread wish to see him and hear him preach. A crowd of 
people waited to welcome him. In it was a man of bucolic 
habits who, as the great preacher approached, said to his 
wife: "Arise, Peggy, and behold him with your natural 
eyes." 

In 1860 the old chapel was moved from Coldbrook to 
Cameron. In 1890 a new house was built. Since then Clark 
H. Marsh was given to the ministry. 



426 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Coldbrook No. 2 (Cameron). 

Organized 1839; present membership, 200; value of prop- 
erty, including parsonage, $4,200; Bible-school enrollment, 
114. 

The Talbot Creek Church was formed in the northeast 
corner of Monmouth Township at the home of William 
Hopper, March 3, of forty-three members, most of whom 
were of the mother congregation and five miles northeast of 
it. Some of the ministers who resided near the Talbot 
Creek congregation and were members of it were S. L. and 
Thomas Wallace, John E. and Joseph E. Murphy and F. M. 
Bruner. In 1845 the congregation built a small frame 
chapel. In 1860 a more commodious house was built two 
miles east and one mile south of the former place, which is 
four miles north of Cameron. Here a modern frame build- 
ing was erected in 1895. The name Talbot Creek gave place 
to Coldbrook. This is three miles nearly north of the first 
place of this name. It is a living and flourishing country 
congregation. 

Gerlaw. 

Organized 1859 ; present membership, 100 ; value of prop- 
erty, including parsonage, $8,000; Bible-school enrollment, 
109. 

In 1859 a number of members from the Talbot Creek 
Church organized at Mauch's Grove, a few miles north. 
When the railway was built and the town started, the meet- 
ing-place was changed to Gerlaw. At a critical time in this 
congregation, Min. J. W. Kelsey rendered very helpful 
service. 

Monmouth. 

Organized 1839; present membership, 930; value of prop- 
erty, $30,000; Bible-school enrollment, 247. 

This congregation was a child of the Coldbrook Church. 
In March of this year twenty-two persons received letters 
and these became the charter members of the Monmouth 



CHURCHES 427 

Church. This city is the center of United Presbyterianism 
iti Illinois. The Christian Church has grown slowly but 
steadily to influence. Pastor D. E. Hughes has served it 
well for more than a decade. 

Roseville, 

Present membership, 160; value of property, including 
parsonage, $5,000; Bible-school enrollment, 73. 

Yottngstown. 

Present membership, 230; value of property, $2,500; 
Bible-school enrollment, 80. 

WASHINGTON COUNTY. 

Ashley. 

Organized 1871, by John A. Williams; present member- 
ship, 90; value of property, $800; no Bible school. 

Mr. Williams conducted a series of meetings in the Bap- 
tist chapel, but formed the Christian congregation in the 
residence of Robert Coffey. The charter members were G. 
W. Cammack and wife, Thomas Graves, Byron Marrow and 
wife, Wallace Coffey and wife, Drew Foster and wife, 
Mollie Hammond and I. J. Reeder and wife. For years the 
church did good service, but is now feeble in every way. 

It gave F. M. Morgan and one other to the ministry. 

This was the early Christian home of J. F. Winters, who 
has been for many years one of the most helpful members 
of the First Church in Lincoln, Neb. 

WAYNE COUNTY. 

Baily. 

Organized 1867, by Jas. A. Chowning; present member- 
ship, 65; value of property, $1,000. 

For eighteen years this congregation met for worship in 
residences, groves and schoolhouses. In 1885 a chapel was 
built on the farm of Daniel Logan. 



428 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

To the ministry this little congregation has given Daniel 
Logan, Samuel and Charles L. Wood. The latter is 
reported as a strong and effective preacher and a member 
now (1913) of the State Legislature. 

Beech Bluff (Fairfield). 

Organized 1912, by Wylie H. Keen; present member- 
ship, 26; no church property; Bible-school enrollment, 70. 

This congregation, located about six miles southeast of 
Fairfield, is one of its children. 

Black Oak (Fairfield). 

Organized 1909; no church building. 

This is a mission point of the Fairfield Church. It is 
six miles east and north of there. It was organized with 
forty-five members and did well for several years. Then a 
traveling preacher of the ultra-conservatives came in and 
measurably crippled its usefulness. 

Boyleston. 

Organized 1890; value of property, $800. 

This is a child of the Fairfield Church, six miles west. 
In this small village five denominations sought to control. 
The house was completed in 1892 and the little church prom- 
ised good until an ultra-conservative preacher came in and 
divided them. 

Buckeye ( Jefferson ville). 

Organized 1840 ; present membership, 85 ; value of prop- 
erty, $500; Bible school began 1869: present enrollment, 73. 

In 1839 a number of families emigrated from Columbiana, 
Carroll and Stark Counties, O., and settled in Lamard 
Prairie. All of these were Disciples. Among them there 
were Jesse Milner, Isaac and Edward Whitaker, Jonas and 
Fentore Lumm, John Morgan, Martin Emmons. Noah 
Towns, James McNeeley, John Skelton, James A. Maslan 
and Townsend Richards. About the same time a few fami- 



CHURCHES 429 

lies came from Tennessee and settled in the same neighbor- 
hood. Among them were the Butcher and Candle families, 
Edward Puckett and others, who were also members of the 
Christian Church. At that time Lamard Prairie was very 
sparsely settled, there being only a few squatters there. 
There was neither church nor school near this settlement. 
The first work of these settlers was to locate their homes, 
build their houses and clear up a little land for cultivation. 
Their next work was to build a house that would answer the 
double purpose of school and church. They called this house 
"Buckeye," and it still stands as a memorial of those royal 
pioneers. It is not now known all who went into this 
church, but among them were a number of preachers who 
did good work in establishing the primitive gospel in this and 
adjoining counties. Buckeye was indeed a glorious and 
fruitful mother. About thirty ministers have served here. 

The chapel was built in 1871. 

In 1850-52 another large immigration came from central 
Ohio and settled in the western part of Lamard Township. 
Among them were Isaac and George Brock and John Bunt- 
ing. The two last named were preachers who helped much 
in building up the Christian Church. 

Cisnc. 

Organized 1854, by Peter Stine and George Brock; pres- 
ent membership, 150; value of property, $2,500; Bible school 
began 1878; present enrollment, 140. 

This church was organized at the Way Schoolhouse, 
where it met until 1874, when it moved to Cisne. The house 
was built the previous year. 

George Brock, Peter and Stephen Stine, J. C. Ashley, 
Michael and John Flick and others came from Monroe 
County, O., in the forties and earlv fifties and settled near 
the site of Cisne. They were all Disciples. Thev all knew 
the Bible. Many of them carried a copy of the New Testa- 
ment in their pockets and were prepared to give a "thus 
saith the Lord" for all doctrinal questions. They wielded a 



430 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

molding influence in the community and left a rich legacy 
to their posterity. 

Oscar Eaton entered the ministry here. 

The congregation has steadfastly discouraged all games 
of amusement. 

Fairfield. 

Organized 1853, by J. C. Ashley; present membership, 
320; value of property, $5,000; Bible school began 1878; 
present enrollment, 225. 

The beginning of the record is this: 

The names of the members of the Church of God in Fairfield, 
Wayne County, Illinois. The following named persons met and 
organized upon the Word of God alone as the only Rule of Faith and 
Practice, constituted this the 18th day of October, A. D. 1853. Min- 
ister present, Elder J. C. Ashley. Names of Disciples : William 
McNeely appointed Deacon ; Sampson Wickersham, George W. Tur- 
ney, J. M. Kenner, America Kenner, Cyntha Ann Edmonson, Antha 
Wickersham, Bridget E. McNeely, James T. Organ, James Austin, 
R. P. King, Parlia Ann Ayles, Virginia Spooner, Edwin A. Spooner, 
Ermess Organ, Charles Lichtenberger and Jane his wife. 

Meetings for worship were held in residences, court- 
house, opera-hall and Cumberland Presbyterian Church until 
1883, when a building was erected. 

Harry Holmes and J. C. Hall were given to the ministry. 

This church has been exceptionally wise in establishing 
three congregations in its adjacent territory. It is still fruit- 
ful in all good works. 

Frame (Mill Shoals). 

Organized 1842; present membership, 65; value of prop- 
erty, $1,000; Bible-school enrollment, 60. 

About 1842 a few Disciples from Tennessee settled in 
and around Turney's Prairie, about six miles south of Fair- 
field, and formed a congregation in the Walker Schoolhouse. 
This is now known as Frame. Some of the charter members 
were William Boye, P. J. and Thomas Puckett, Joseph Odell, 
John Shruseberry and Anderson Walker. They toiled 



CHURCHES 431 

together and met great opposition in building up primitive 
Christianity in their community. 

Jeffersonville. 

Organized 1861, by D. D. Miller; present membership, 
83; value of property, $1,600; Bible school began 1871; 
present enrollment, 98. 

The church was organized in the schoolhouse and set in 
order when the house of worship was occupied in 1871. At 
this time, Jasper Branch, Jesse Ward and John Morlan 
were chosen elders and continued for many years true serv- 
ants of the Lord. 

The church has the honorable credit of giving to the min- 
istry the Lappin brothers S. S., J. C. and W. O. Lappin 
also Daniel Logan, Jr. 

r\ j -inn Keenes. 

Organized 1911. 

Middleton (Keenes). 

Present membership, 85 ; Bible-school enrollment, 100. 
Mount Erie. 

Organized 1911, by O. M. Eaton; present membership, 
52; value of property, $1,800; Bible school began 1911; pres- 
ent enrollment, 125. 

This congregation was the result of a series of meetings 
held by Evangelist O. M. Eaton. The church building was 
erected in 1912. I. G. Williams is serving the church as 

minister. - . , 

Oakwood (Goldengate). 

Organized 1895; present membership, 130; value of prop- 
erty, $2,000; Bible school began 1908; present enrollment, 
250. 

A congregation was organized in a barn in the village 
of Goldengate. The ministers present and participating were 
Z. A. Harris, H. H. Peters and C. L. Wood. Meetings for 
public worship were held in the public-school house, which 
after a time was closed against the Disciples. The congre- 



432 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

gation, being then without a house in which to meet, dis- 
banded. In 1908, Min. I. G. Williams held a meeting in the 
Oak wood Schoolhouse, two and a half miles north of the 
village, and in the same year Min. W. H. Keen organized 
a congregation there. A good chapel was built. 

Pleasant Grove (Jeffersonville). 

Organized 1854, by J. C. Ashley; present membership, 
200; value of property, $1,000; Bible school began 1870. 

This congregation was a swarm from the old Buckeye 
hive. It is four miles west of Buckeye and was formed for 
the convenience of the members residing in the community 
and for the purpose of extending the gospel. Among the 
charter members there were George and Isaac Brock, Joseph 
Phillips, Townsend and Sylvester Richards, George Sim- 
mons, Robinson Lappin, Henry Henthorn and Jesse Ward. 

This church is apostolic in its faith and practice. From 
the first there have been men in the congregation able to 
speak to edification. It has turned out a good many preach- 
ers, but not of the professional class. It has preaching one 
Sunday in the month, but the communion service has not 
been omitted ten times in fifty years, except on unusual occa- 
sions. Quietly and without discord, the work has moved 
steadily on through fifty years. A goodly number of the 
men and women who received their Christian training in this 
country church are now scattered from Ohio to the Pacific 
Coast, but they are in the front ranks of useful service. 

A plain frame chapel, built in 1866, is still in use. About 
fifty preachers have served here. 

Pleasant Hill (Cisne). 

Organized 1873 ; present membership, 65 ; value of prop- 
erty, $1,000; Bible-school enrollment, 60. 

This congregation is located four miles northeast of 
Cisne. There was preaching in the community from 1855 
by Ministers Schooley, Jerry Butcher and Barney Robertson. 
When the chapel was built, the church was organized with 



CHURCHES 433 

about twenty charter members. Meets every Lord's Day for 
worship with or without a preacher. 

Rinard. 

Organized 1909, by E. E. Violett and Adam K. Adcock ; 
present membership, 40; value of property, $1,700; Bible 
school began 1909; present enrollment, 48. 

Church building occupied in 1910. 

S. E. Fugate has entered the ministry. 

Six Mile. 

This is one of the oldest churches in the west side of the 
county. Willard T. Luther, Wm. Hill, H. Swan, Rose Rich 
and others did the early preaching. But its growth was due 
to John Wright, the first elder, and Samuel Wood, a young 
man and one of the first converts. Besides Samuel Wood, 
the congregation has sent out Charles L. Wood and W. W. 
Solomon as ministers. 

Turney's Prairie. 

Organized 1839, by Moses and Elijah Goodwin; value of 
property, $1,200; Bible school began 1845. 

This congregation was formed at the Anderson Walker 
Schoolhouse. It is not known when the first house of wor- 
ship was built. The present is a neat frame chapel, where 
the members meet regularly. 

J. T. Purvis has entered the ministry. 

Wayne City. 

Organized 1887, by J. S. Rose ; present membership, 125 ; 
value of property, $1,200; Bible school began 1888; present 
enrollment, 70. 

The congregation was organized in the M. E. Church. 
There were sixty charter members. J. M. Lee, J. C. Ashley 
and W. W. Reid were chiefly instrumental in the formation 
of the church, and its first elders. 

There is a ladies' aid and Y. P. S. C. E. 



434 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Zif (Clay City). 

Organized 1878, by J. C. Black and W. W. Weedon; 
present membership, 42; value of property, $1,000; Bible 
school began 1878; present enrollment, 31. 

Congregation met in residences and schoolhouse till the 
chapel was built in 1896. 

In former years there were churches at Barnhill, from 
which came W. W. Weedon; Gum, that gave W. M. Garri- 
son and Leander Harrington to the ministry ; at Brown's, at 
Blue Point, at Brush Creek, at Pleasant Hill, at Gethsemane 
and other points, but by reason of emigration and new con- 
gregations springing up in new villages grown by railroads, 
all these organizations have disappeared. 

WHITE COUNTY. 

Ashland (Mill Shoals). 

Organized 1883, by W. H. Johnson; present membership, 
57; value of property, $1,000; Bible school began 1883; pres- 
ent enrollment, 40. 

This is a country church in the northwest part of the 
county. The congregation was formed under the lead of 
Mr. Johnson as president of the County Co-operation. 

George B. Carter gave for a building-place an acre of 
ground from the corner of his farm, on which there was a 
fine grove of ash-trees ; hence the local name of the church. 
The house was built in 1884. 

Bryant's Valley (Crossville). 

Present membership, 100; value of property, $1,000; 
Bible-school enrollment, 100. 

Carmi. 

Organized 1851, by P. K. Dibble; present membership, 
125; value of property, $20,000; Bible-school enrollment, 130. 

The twelve charter members were as follows: Mr. and 
Mrs. Daniel Hay, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel R. Hay, Mr. and 



CHURCHES 435 

Mrs. D. G. Hay, Mrs. Mary Robinson, Mrs. Sarah Kearney, 
Mrs. Robert Gamble, Miss Susan Wood, Miss Mary DeTest 
and Miss Shoemaker. 

At first meetings were held in the courthouse. Many 
came into the church. The first house was a small brick, 
built in 1852; the second, a frame, built in 1867, and the 
third and present modern edifice in 1905, during the pastor- 
ate of Frank Thompson. Alfred Flower was the first pastor. 

The church is active and ambitious for the highest use- 
fulness. 

These members of this church have served the county: 
Jesse Grissom as treasurer, William Poynton as circuit clerk, 
Arthur Poynton as deputy, and Otis Downen as deputy 
county clerk. 

Mrs. Mary Robinson was the widow of Gen. John M. 
Robinson, who served in the United States Senate from Illi- 
nois from 1830 to 1841 and was a justice of the State's 
Supreme Court when he died. 

Enfield. 

Organized 1868, by W. H. Crow; present membership, 
77; value of property, $1,800; Bible school began 1868; 
present enrollment, 55. 

Jonah Marian and Naomi, his wife, were the leading 
spirits in this organization. He, Jacob Fleck and J. B. 
Holmes were the first elders. Mr. Crow resided in Enfield 
at the time. He was teaching in the public school as well as 
preaching. Other faithful members were Mr. Stile, Tolvin 
Rice, G. W. Berry and J. B. Odell. There were faithful 
sisters too. The chapel was built in 1890. 

Grayville. 

Organized 1840, by Elijah Goodwin ; present member- 
ship, 165; value of property, $5,000; Bible-school enroll- 
ment, 164. 

Minister Goodwin began to preach in Grayville in 1837. 
The following were the seven charter members: Daniel 



436 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Buckley and wife, Jeremiah Ruth and wife, Martha Lumb, 
Sarah Mills and her sister, later Mrs. B. W. Kenner. Mr. 
Buckley was the first elder, Mr. Ruth the first deacon. 

Besides Mr. Goodwin, among the preachers of the earlier 
years there were Andrew Beard, D. K. Biddle, Moses Good- 
win, J. W. Allen, W. P. Slade, Mr. Goff and W. F. Black. 

The first building was erected in 1844 and the present 
one in 1872, the latter during Mr. Allen's pastorate. 

The church has passed through many trials, but is now 
alert and active. Its roll has many honored names. 

Mill Shoals. 

Organized 1911, by themselves; present membership, 62; 
value of property, $1,200; Bible school began 1911; present 
enrollment, 50. 

Disciples residing here had owned a lot for some time. 
In 1911 they decided to build thereon and a neat frame 
chapel went right up. Then they organized and began to 
keep the ordinances of the Lord. 

The outlook is bright. The elders are J. B. Johnson, L. 
D. Harland and Goodwin Pucket. 

Seven Mile (Carmi). 

Organized 1839, by Moses Goodwin ; present membership, 
90: value of property, $800: Bible-school enrollment, 70. 

This church, located six miles northwest of Carmi, was 
one of the pioneer churches of White County. The follow- 
ing is a copy of a paper that was written by one of the orig- 
inal members, Dr. Martin Johnson: "The Christian Church 
at Seven-mile Prairie was organized on the 24th day of 
February, A. D. 1839, by Elder Moses Goodwin, upon the 
following constitution ; to-wit : 'We take the Scriptures of 
the Old and New Testaments as the only rule of our faith 
and practice.' " Those who then siened this agreement were 
Arthur Johnson, Lucy Johnson, John Johnson, Polly John- 
son, A. L. Johnson, Luranah Johnson, Martin John- 
son and Comfort Johnson. These eight people and other 



CHURCHES 437 

baptized believers who later affiliated with them came 
from the Old Union Church of the Christian Denomination 
in Gibson County, Ind. Another entry, on August 21, of 
records show that there were twenty-eight members, that 
Moses Goodwin had moved to the Prairie and united with 
the church, and that he and A. L. Johnson were elders of 
the congregation, with John and James M. Johnson, deacons. 
Hon. W. H. Johnson, of Lancaster, 111., writing of these 
people and this church, says: 

My great-grandfather, Arthur Johnson, and wife, and my grand- 
father, John Johnson, and his wife, original or charter members of 
the Seven Mile Prairie Church, had been charter members of the 
Old Union Church in Indiana, which organized over one hundred 
years ago. About the time the church in Seven Mile Prairie was 
organized, Elder Moses Goodwin succeeded in bringing Old Union 
Church, as a whole, into what was called the Campbell Reformation. 
Elijah Goodwin, whose mother (then the wife of my Grandfather 
Johnson), brother Moses and two sisters (Mrs. Luranah Johnson and 
Mrs. Axie Crabtree) lived in the Prairie, often visited the neighbor- 
hood and preached here. Moses Goodwin and Fenton Lumm, both 
natural orators and splendid preachers, lived in Seven Mile Prairie 
and their labors took in all the surrounding country. My uncle, 
Arthur Johnson, one of the first elders, was an able preacher and a 
strong defender of the faith, but never became an evangelist. He 
conducted three public discussions successfully. Frank Murdock, S. F. 
Rogers, Barton W. Kellp and Isaac Kello were faithful ministers 
sent out by Old Seven Mile Prairie Church. 

There have been three chapels. The first of logs, with 
a long shed on the south side, built on the land of John 
Johnson. The second, a frame, near the east end of the 
bridge over the creek. The third stands on the Carmi and 
Mill Shoals Road nearly a mile east of the second house. 

This church has contributed much to the production of 
other congregations. Its members held clearly defined con- 
victions of Christian truth and were filled with the spirit of 
conquest. 

Springerton. 

Present membership, 100; value of property, $1,000; 
Bible-school enrollment, 84. 



438 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 
WHITESIDE COUNTY. 

Coleta. 

Organized 1847, by Henry Howe and John Yager; pres- 
ent membership, 71; value of property, $2,500; Bible school 
began 1855 ; present enrollment, 75. 

In 1837 the Yager family came from Ohio and settled 
in Genesse Grove, about three miles from the site of 
Coleta. The Stanley, Crum and Nance families, from dif- 
ferent places, soon followed. John Yager, then a young 
farmer and minister, began to preach at the Grove and to 
the widely separated pioneers more or less regularly. Min. 
Henry Howe came down from Wisconsin and held a pro- 
tracted meeting. Then the church was formed with the 
following members: John Yager and wife, Mrs. Rose Ann 
Crum- Wick, John Moxley and wife, Mrs. Margaret Ann Crum- 
Wick, Miss Rose Ann Crum, Clement D. Nance and wife, 
Mrs. David Nance, Benjamin Tripp, Mrs. Sarah Jane Crum- 
Stanley and Samuel Landis and wife. The following were 
converted during Mr. Howe's meeting: Thomas J. Stanley 
and wife, Pleasant Stanley, Wm. Stanley and wife, David 
Nance, John T. Crum, John Hill, John Shepherd and wife, 
Miss Ruth Nance, Nathaniel Landis, Mr. Sperling and wife, 
and Dr. Hopkins and wife. These thirty were the charter 
members. This meeting was held in the house of John Mox- 
ley. The place of baptizing was Moxley's Ford, and was 
for many years. To these were soon added Wm. Crum and 
wife, John Tryer and wife, Dr. Dodd and wife, C. W. Sher- 
wood and wife, Oscar Royer and wife, Fred Strand and 
wife, Henry Mason and wife, James Mason and wife, C. B. 
Peugh and wife, and Mrs. Polly Harrison, who came from 
North Carolina and was well known for her fidelity to the 
Lord's work. 

John Yager and Clement D. Nance were the Scriptural 
elders for many years. The first deacons were Thompson 
and William Crum and David Nance. 

The first meetings were held in the cabins of the settlers, 



CHURCHES 439 

next in the schoolhouse till 1864, when a chapel was built, 
mainly by John Yager. This gave place to a more modern 
building in Coleta about 1885. 

C. W. Sherwood, E. J. and F. B. Stanley were given to 
the ministry. 

This congregation was composed of substantial people and 
exerted a fine influence in its own community. It was a 
willing helper in establishing churches of Christ in that part 

of the State. 

brie. 

Organized 1870, by J. N. Smith and Chas. W. Sherwood; 
present membership, 100; value of property, $4,200; Bible 
school began 1870; present enrollment, 58. 

In the early sixties, Erie was known chiefly for its sand- 
fleas and Jim Pratt, a local and noted infidel. His aim was 
to run every preacher out of the town who tried to preach 
the gospel there. Whereupon, at the solicitation of Mr. 
Matthews, a loyal and royal Disciple, Pastor J. N. Smith 
came down from Lanark and ground Mr. Pratt through the 
mill of a public debate. The next spring, Mr. Smith 
returned and organized a church with thirteen charter mem- 
bers. Of these, Luther Matthews and Mrs. Carrie 
Matthews-Greidly are the only survivors. 

They first met in the schoolhouse. In 1871 an old chapel 
was bought and remodeled. Later, a good house was built 

Among those who served the congregation there were 
John Yager, L. D. Waldo, D. J. Howe, T. B. Stanley and 
Mrs. Clara C. Babcock. The feeble condition of the church 
led Mrs. Babcock to take up its care. She served it three 
terms, aggregating fourteen years. 

Fulton. 

Organized 1896, by N. S. Haynes and Mrs. C. C. Bab- 
cock ; present membership, 40 ; Bible school began 1896 ; 
present enrollment, 45. 

The church has never secured a firm hold in the com- 
munity. It has given Frank Bear to the ministry. 



440 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Rock Falls. 

Organized 1905, by H. E. Monser and W. E. Spicer; 
present membership, 200; value of property, $2,300; Bible 
school began 1897; present enrollment, 272. 

About 1890, Arthur Babcock, son of Mrs. C. C. Babcock, 
gathered together in his own home a number of children 
who were not attending Sunday school. The number grew 
to near one hundred. An appeal to the general public for 
means to build a chapel was well answered. Mr. Morrell 
gave the lot. Mrs. Babcock conducted a meeting of days at 
the dedication and about twenty were added to the Sterling 
Church. The organization of the Rock Falls congregation 
was delayed till 1905. 

Elmer Frost and Walter Miner became ministers. 

Sterling. 

Organized 1875, by Knowles Shaw and J. J. Moss; pres- 
ent membership, 276; value of property, $3,500; Bible school 
began 1875 ; present enrollment, 163. 

The churches of Christ in northern Illinois, though few 
in numbers, have always been aggressively missionary. 

They led in and financed the effort that produced the 
Sterling Church. Evangelist Knowles Shaw conducted a 
tent meeting that continued thirty-three davs. There were 
about seventy-five charter members. For five Lord's Days 
the Coleta congregation came en masse, bringing provisions 
to feed all the hungry, and for three Sundays the Pine 
Creek Church did the same. 

The first elders were W. F. Eastman, J. S. Detweiler and 
Geo. W. Nance, and the first deacons, R. B. Colcord and J. 
D. Nance. 

Six great meetings have been held by evangelists since 
the first one. 

The church has given to public service Mfcs Mary Kings- 
bury, a missionary in India ; Mrs. Clara C. Babcock, G. W. 
Pearl, S. H. Zendt, L. O. Lehman and Miss Rachel Crouch. 



CHURCHES 441 

In 1880 the State Board fostered the church by $360 
and Peter Whitmer, of Bloomington, by $400, both on condi- 
tion that the congregation purchase and pay for a chapel, 
which was done. 

Tampico. 

Organized 1900, by J. S. Clements; present membership, 
95; value of property, $3,500; Bible school began 1900; 
present enrollment, 60. 

This year the State Mission Board sent Knox P. Taylor 
here to hold a two weeks' Bible-school institute on condition 
that the Yorktown congregation follow up with a meeting. 
This was done, but it cost Yorktown thirty of its own 
members. 

WILL COUNTY. 

Joliet First. 

Organized 1897, by John Williams ; present membership, 
50; value of property, $8,200, Bible school began 1897; 
present enrollment, 45. 

There were twenty-one charter members. The house of 
worship was finished and dedicated free from debt in 1905. 
This was largely due to the liberality of Col. D. H. Darling 
and his wife, who were devoted members of the church. 
Slow but steady progress is made now. 

In 1905 the Central Church was organized with forty- 
two members by Sec. J. Fred Jones. It grew out of a fac- 
tional spirit and after a short period disbanded. 

WILLIAMSON COUNTY. 

The early churches were organized in residences, groves 
and schoolhouses. Some of them were short-lived, but 
served as seed-sowers in planting the primitive gospel. The 
exact dates can not be given, but they were planted in about 
the following order and principally by the men named below : 
About 1840 a church was formed in the Pulley settlement, 
northeast of Marion; one in the Grain settlement, west of 



442 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Marion; one in the Goodall settlement, east of Marion; 
another north of Spillertown, where a log chapel was built. 
Then came the Lake Creek Church in the northern part of 
the county and Bond Church in the northwest corner. These 
all served their time and have long since become extinct. 

Wm. H. Willford, of Tennessee, was one of the first 
Christian ministers who came to this county. About 1840 
he located near Crab Orchard. He owned the first printing- 
press in the county and issued a small paper called the 
Western Monitor. He also published a few books and 
preached the gospel. 

Arch T. Benson, a Marion merchant, preached the gospel 
from house to house in a very acceptable and sympathetic 
manner. 

Among others of the early preachers were Dr. Bundy and 
William Spiller, of Marion; Cyrus Heape, of Tamaroa; 
Mathew Wilson, of Carterville, and Isaac and Newton 
Mulkey, of Mulkeytown. 

Carterville. 

Organized 1885, by J. J. Hudson ; present membership, 
290; value of property, $10,000; Bible school began 1885; 
present enrollment, 225. 

Met in hall till chapel was built in 1888. The commo- 
dious brick structure came recently. Active church, with 

good C. E. 

Creal Springs. 

Organized 1895, by J. J. Bobbitt; present membership, 
50; value of property, $700; Bible school began 1895; pres- 
ent enrollment, 40. 

A product of the Eighth District. Only a Bible school 
has been maintained for several years. 

Fordville ( Carterville ) . 

Organized 1868, by Mathew Wilson; present member- 
ship, 25; value of property, $500; Bible school began 1870; 
present enrollment, 74. 



CHURCHES 443 

Three miles southwest of Carterville. When Mr. Wilson 
reached the community to preach, it was dark and no one 
had brought a light. He began by saying: "Seeing that you 
peopl^ are in darkness, I will proceed to give you the light 
of the gospel." The chapel was built in 1870. Repeated 
swarms from this Christian hive have reduced its numbers. 

H err in. 

Organized 1864, by Samuel Wilson; present membership, 
145; value of property, including parsonage, $5,000; Bible 
school began 1864; present enrollment, 184. 

Meetings were held in the schoolhouse till 1867, when a 
modest chapel was built. It gave way in 1898 to the present 
building. 

The original members were Newton Bradley, Samuel 
Stotlar, William and Louisa Williams; George, Nathan and 
Sarah J. Cox; Eliza Spillar, Eliza Stotlar and "Grandma" 
Lawrence. 

Johnson City. 

Organized 1904, by Gilbert Jones ; present membership, 
90; value of property, $2,000; Bible school began 1904; 
present enrollment, 54. 

This congregation was the result of a five weeks' meeting 
conducted by District Evangelist Jones. There were sixty 
charter members. 

The chapel was built at once. Mr. Jones worked thereon 
in the daytime and preached at night. This task, including 
manual and ministerial labor, was the gift of Mr. Jones. 

Marion. 

Organized 1865, by H. T. Banta and A. T. Benson ; pres- 
ent membership, 430; value of property, including parsonage, 
$18,500; Bible school began 1865; present enrollment, 213. 

The house of worship was erected in 1875 and remodeled 
in 1901. A goodly number of representative people have 
always belonged to its membership. 



444 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Reeves. 

Organized 1905, by F. L. Davis; present membership, 
125; value of property, $2,000; Bible-school enrollment, 80, 
Chapel built in 1896. Irregular preaching. 

Shiloh (Marion). 

Organized 1866, by Mathew Wilson ; present membership, 
100; value of property, $800; Bible-school enrollment, 48. 

Three miles north of Marion. Organized in a grove. 
Have done good work and do yet. 

West Chapel (Carbondale). 

Organized 1897, by F. M. Phillips; present membership, 
35; value of property, $800; Bible school began 1899; pres- 
ent enrollment, 60. 

This is six miles south of Carterville. Organized in 
schoolhouse. Chapel built in 1894. 

A congregation at Grange Hall, and another at Rail's 
Grove, both having chapels, have ceased to meet. 

WIN NEB AGO COUNTY. 

Rockford. 

Organized 1856, by A. P. Jones and Wm. Hayden; pres- 
ent membership, 291; value of property, $25,000; Bible- 
school enrollment, 369. 

There were thirty-five charter members in this organiza- 
tion. The church made feeble progress and disappeared in 
the early nineties. The property was sold for debt. Other 
Disciples moved into the city and the Central Christian 
Church was formed by Min. L. E. Prather in 1898. During 
the seven years' pastorate of O. F. Jordan, a stone chapel 
was bought and paid for, but during the next ministry, that 
of W. B. Ward, this property was sold and the present prop- 
erty, better located, was bought. Wm. B. Clemner, the pres- 
ent well-equipped and efficient pastor, led in the erection of 
this fine building. 



CHURCHES 445 

WOODFORD COUNTY. 

The county-seat of Woodford has had three locations. 
This fact has naturally led to changes in population. The 
first was Versailles, located four miles southeast of Eureka, 
the second, Metamora, and the third, Eureka. There was a 
congregation of Christians at Versailles in the early years, 
and also a second one when the place had become wholly 
rural, but both passed away. At Metamora there was for- 
merly a self-supporting church of Christ, but later the com- 
munity became so Romanized that only a union church has 
been maintained for two decades. 

The Panther Creek congregation was the second church 
of Christ formed in the county, according to the testimony of 
Mr. Aaron A. Richardson. It was located about five miles 
southeast of Eureka and about six miles southwest of Secor. 
It was organized about 1840, with Amos Watkins and James 
Robeson, elders, and Warren Watkins one of the deacons. 
The first meeting was held in the residence of Amos Wat- 
kins, says Mr. Richardson. "The first time I ever remember 
being at church was in this house. John Hibbs preached the 
sermon. My grandmother united and Elmia and Martha 
Watkins were baptized that day." This church continued 
until about 1860. Many of its members had moved away. 
Of the remainder, some went to Secor, others to Palestine. 

Palestine congregation was located about seven miles east 
and south of Eureka. The meeting-house of the Panther 
Creek Church was moved there. It carried on its work for 
about fifty years, but has ceased to be. 

A congregation was formed at Cram's Schoolhouse, about 
two and one-half miles northeast of the site of Secor. This 
was probably about 1848, as the McCords, Patricks and 
Eillberrys were among its members. This was known as the 
Panther Grove Church. Sympson Y. Barnard and Wm. 
Perry were the first elders. Meetings were later held in 
Willow Tree Schoolhouse and finally moved to the village 
of Roanoke. 



446 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

There was a flourishing church at Bowling Green, a vil- 
lage eight miles southeast of Eureka, in the early fifties. For 
some years this was the home of Min. James Robeson. This 
congregation long since passed away. 

The Partridge congregation was located west of Meta- 
mora, but conservatism finally closed its doors. 

Cazenovia. 

Organized 1903, by E. O. Sharp ; Bible school began 1903. 

The church at Washburn planted a mission here. The 
meetings were held in a storeroom, the use of which was 
given by its owner, Mr. C. B. Pickerell. Mr. Sharp was the 
evangelist of the Fourth Missionary District when the organ- 
ization was effected with twenty-seven members. Thereafter, 
the preaching was by the pastors of the Washburn congre- 
gation and Eureka College students. During the ministry 
of B. L. Wray, a substantial chapel was built, the church 
became self-supporting and was fairly prosperous. But 
removals and death soon weakened it. 

Now the congregation is made up of members of various 
denominations and is ministered to by Fred Carr, of Eureka. 

El Paso. 

Organized 1864, by John Lindsay: present membership, 
250; value of property, $12,000; Bible school began 1864; 
present enrollment, 125. 

For twenty years this church was feeble. The following 
was the beginning: 

We, the undersigned disciples of Christ, do hereby constitute our- 
selves into a congregation of Christ for the purpose of worshiping God 
together in El Paso, taking the Bible as our rule of faith and practice, 
and to be known and styled the Christian Church in El Paso, Illinois. 

The forty names which were subscribed were these: J. 
H., Jvtliett, Mary L. and L. B. Moore; M. R. Bullock, John 
and Margaret Canfield, Jane and Alice Dixon, Maggie Him- 
mond, Jackson Luttril, Sarah C. Bayles, Lucenda and Evar- 



CHURCHES 447 

gatine McLord, Mary Packard, Elizabeth King, M. Potter; 
F. J., S. J., Martha and Maria Barnard; Mary Ann Stephen- 
son, Mary Brewer, Amanda J. Willis, John and Hannah D. 
Hibbs, Mary Smith, Elizabeth O'Neal, Esther Reeves, M. 
W. and Julia Y. Thompson, Hannah Montgomery, D. P. 
and M. A. Harber, Agnes and Elmira Gibson. 

John Hibbs and D. P. Harber were chosen elders, with 
F. T. Barnard and (afterward) Cyrus Gibson, deacons. 

This meeting was held at 10:30 A. M. on July 4, 1864. 
John Lindsay and James Robeson both preached. 

The church was then constituted by the labors of Mr. John Lind- 
say, working in the service of the Woodford County Co-operation. 

J. H. MOORE, Chairman. 

A small frame chapel was built in 1865. The pulpit was 
supplied for fifteen years. But El Paso did not increase in 
population as rapidly as it was surmised at that time that 
every railroad crossing would. The church lapsed from the 
spring of 1881 to December, 1886. Then E. J. Lampton 
held a meeting of days and reorganized the congregation 
with thirty-four members. This M'as the beginning of the 
permanent growth of the church. J. E. Jewett, J. D. Dabney 
and C. S. Medbury were then pastors. During the latter's 
ministry the congregation grew, and the present building was 
finished in 1895. 

Eureka. 

Organized 1832, by John Oatman ; present membership, 
805; value of property, including parsonage, $23,400; Bible 
school began 1852; present enrollment, 526. 

In April, 1832, what was then known as the Walnut 
Grove Church of Christ was organized in the log-cabin resi- 
dence of Min. John Oatman, that stood about one-half mile 
northeast of the railway depot now there. The thirteen 
charter members were the following: John Oatman and 
Nancy, his wife, and their children, Eliza, Joseph, Clement, 
Jesse and Hardin Oatman ; Daniel and Rhoda Travis. Joshua 
and Mary Woosley, and Samuel and Rebecca Arnold. 



448 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Meetings were held in the residences of the settlers, in 
groves and in the barns of Daniel Meek, Caleb Davidson 
and Ben Major until the summer of 1846, when the "old 
meeting-house" was built. It stood on the spot now occupied 
by the Soldiers' Monument in Olio Cemetery. This build- 
ing was used until 1864, when a two-story brick house was 
erected on the site of the present structure. At that time 
the pulpit was filled by H. W. Everest, Dr. J. M. Allen and 
A. G. Ewing. The present edifice was erected in 1901 
during the pastorate of N. S. Haynes. 

The Sunday school was organized in 1852 with Ben 
Major as superintendent. Previous to this a Bible class had 
been conducted by Min. John T. Jones, which met in the 
homes of its members. The school was broken up in 1852 
by cholera. 

Mr. Oatman served the church three years. In 1836, 
Ben Major and Elijah Dickinson, Sr., were elected elders 
and continued with active efficiency until relieved by death 
the former in 1852 and the latter in 1862. Min. William 
Davenport was the local minister of the church from 1835 
to 1855. When he was away the elders led the public wor- 
ship. From 1855 to 1868 the pulpit was supplied, in addition 
to the three above named, by O. A. Burgess, C. L. Loos, 
William Poynter and B. W. and R. H. Johnson. In 1868, 
A. S. Hayden became the pastor of the congregation, serving 
three years. During the next fifteen years the pulpit was 
filled by B. J. Radford, H. W. Everest and Dr. J. M. 
Allen, very much the longer part of the period falling to 
Mr. Radford. The two brief 'pastorates during this period 
were those of J. H. Berry and B. J. Pinkerton. The pastors 
who succeeded were J. G. Waggoner for two terms, W. H. 
Cannon, N. S. Haynes, A. W. Taylor and D. H. Shields. 

Great special meetings were held with the congregation 
by Evangelists D. P. Henderson, James Robeson, Alexander 
Proctor, William Davenport, Knowles Shaw and George F. 
Hall. 

This has been, and is yet, one of the great churches of 



CHURCHES 449 

the State. For eighty years it has been noted for its cheer- 
ful hospitality, generous liberality and its manifold good 
works. 

Minonk. 

Organized 1865, by John Roberts; present membership, 
69; value of property, $3,200; Bible school began 1867; 
present enrollment, 75. 

The first meetings were held in the old East Side School- 
house once a month, alternating with the Baptists, Presby- 
terians and Methodists. The first elders were Craigie Sharp, 
Sr., Jonathan Macy and Joseph F. Burt. The deacons were 
Wm. Norris, J. T. Taylor and J. L. Vance. 

The building was first occupied in 1867. It was remod- 
eled in 1907. 

About 1870 the harmony and usefulness of the congre- 
gation were seriously impaired by strife over the use of an 
organ in the public worship. 

The pastors were J. C. Stark, A. H. Trowbridge, J. F. 
Ghormley, S. D. Vawter, G. A. Miller, Paul H. Castle, F. 
E. Hagin, D. H. Shields and Byron Piatt. These were at 
intervals as death and removals depleted the membership. 
The church house was closed from the fall of 1897 to the 
close of 1904. Then W. F. Kohl, the pastor at Rutland, 
revived the remnant and reorganized the congregation with 
eighteen members. 

Since then, J. H. Bullock, C. D. Hougham, H. C. 
Reichel, Ernest Reed, Silas Jones and F. M. Morgan have 
served the church. R. L. Beshers is the present pastor. 
Clara B. Vance is the clerk. 

Mt. Zion (Eureka). 

Organized 1855, by John T. Jones and William Poynter; 
present membership, 40; value of property, $1,500; Bible 
school began 1855 ; present enrollment, 38. 

On April 29, in the schoolhouse which stood near the 
site of the present chapel, "the church of Christ, meeting 

15 



450 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

for worship at the head of Walnut Grove," was constituted 
with the following members: Joshua, Sarah V., James, T. 
C. and Eleanor R. Jones; Jane Todd; William S., Sarah C. 
and Rhoda J. Magarity; Robert Carr; R. R., Mary A. and 
John Grady; William T., Senith A., Mary and Elijah Woos- 
ley; Margaret and P. Buckner Stitt; Martha, Peter, Susan 
and Mary Crow; James R., Letitia A. and Adolphus G. Oat- 
inan; David and Martha Harber; Mary and Lucy W. Parke; 
Mary W. and Lorenzo Bateman; James, Nancy O., J. 
Pleasant and Eliza J. Mitchell; Robert, Harriett, Sarah A. 
and John Foster; Robert and Mary A. Nance; Solomon, 
Thomas, Wilson, Sarah A., Nathan and Sarah Tucker; Har- 
riett, Ellis, Caroline and Nancy J. Trunnel ; Patsey Parker, 
Albert U. Barber, Isaac Swearingen, Jacob A. Casart, Alonzo 
Pratt, William Higgens, George Davier; John O., Sarah, 
William, Susan and Nancy Mitchell. 

Most of these brought letters from "The Church of 
Christ, Walnut Grove." Joshua Jones, Robert Foster and 
Wm. S. Magarity were elected elders ; William Mitchell, 
James R. Oatman and Wilson Tucker, deacons; James R. 
Bateman, clerk, and William Mitchell, treasurer. 

This little congregation, located about four miles north- 
west of Eureka, has always held a large percentage of most 
excellent Christian people. 

About 125 preachers have ministered here. Many of 
them were college students who have gone forward to the 
first rank in the ministry. 

Roanoke. 

Organized 1872, by J. B. McCorkle; present membership, 
20; value of property, $2,500; Bible school began 1872; 
present enrollment, 30. 

The first meetings were held in the old Bunch School- 
house, then at the Willow Tree Schoolhouse. 

While the meeting's were held in these places, 1872 to 
1874, Min. Rufus Gish, a "Dunkard" preacher, used to 
debate with Mr. McCorkle. 



CHURCHES 451 

Mr. D. F. Fanber gave lots for the church building, and 
the chapel was dedicated by Dr. J. M. Allen in 1874. Min- 
isters McCorkle and W. C. Poynter served the congregation 
on alternate Sundays for several years, and the latter con- 
tinued his service after the decease of the former. 

Messrs. D. T. Fanber, C. M. Stephens, B. G. Kindig and 
J. R. Wilson were some of the men who did faithful work 
in the earlier years. 

Secor. 

Organized 1862, by James Robeson; present membership, 
30; value of property, $1,000; Bible school began 1862; 
present enrollment, 50. 

Minister Robeson, assisted by Min. John Lindsay, held a 
meeting of days in an old corn-crib, during which over forty 
people turned to the Lord. 

The first elders were James M. Richardson and H. B. 
Mathews, and the first deacons, Aaron A. Richardson, Henry 
B. Smith, and Garrett and Rankin Armstrong. 

The congregation met for worship in the little old school- 
house until the chapel was built. As the years passed, an 
increasing percentage of Germans came into the community. 
The church finally divided on questions of opinion. In 1898 
the conservatives received a deed to a lot that specifically 
proscribes the use or placing of any musical instrument on 
the premises, the organizing of any societies of any kind, 
and the permission to preach in the house by any one who 
favors these prohibited things. That both congregations 
have maintained only a feeble life under all the circum- 
stances is apparent. 

Washburn. 

Organized 1864, by David Sharpies; present membership, 
250; value of property, including parsonage, $10,500; Bible 
school began 1864; present enrollment, 297. 

Evangelist Sharpies was in the service of the Wood ford 
County Co-operation when he held the meeting that resulted 
in the formation of this church. There were thirty charter 



452 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

members, the larger part of whom came from Vernon 
Schoolhouse, two miles southeast, and the old Salem Church, 
seven miles northwest of Washburn. 

In 1867 a substantial building, just across the line in 
Marshall County, was dedicated by Min. Theodore Brooks. 
In 1890 it was moved to a more suitable location nearer the 
center of the village, remodeled and enlarged. Additional 
improvements were made in it during 1912. 

The following pastors have served the congregation: 
John L. McCunne, Charles Rowe, David Sharpies (two 
periods), Hugh B. Rice, John D. Henry, Theodore Brooks, 
A. P. Cobb, J. A. Brenenstuhl, R. E. Dunlap, William Hay- 
den, W. A. Humphrey, S. S. Lappin, I. H. Fuller, J. W. 
Kilborn, H. H. Jenner, Rochester Irwin and R. G. Jones. 

The church has always held its ministers in high esteem, 
for they have been very worthy men. From the first, it 
has grown in numbers and influence. No discord has ever 
stained its fair name nor hindered its admirable progress. 
It has always responded promptly to all calls for benevolent 
work. It is well organized and officered. 

It has given to the Christian ministry L. B. Pickerell, 
Stephen E. Fisher, Charles Richards and Gilbert Gish. 

SECTION 2. 
Bible Schools. 

The Disciples of Christ in Illinois were slower in the 
appreciation of the value of Sunday schools than other 
evangelical bodies. Their first work was to clear away the 
theological debris of the centuries by teaching and preaching 
the word of God. Very naturally, this advocacy was 
addressed to adult rather than to adolescent minds. Only with 
the passing years was the necessity and duty of child-train- 
ing recognized. With it came questions about methods and 
many meetings for conference and fraternal discussions. To 
the State Meeting that convened in Springfield, Aug. 30, 
1865, Eli Fisher, evangelist in the Second District, reported: 



BIBLE SCHOOLS 453 

"In reference to the Sunday-school enterprise, I have to say 
that there is little interest taken in it." From the extant 
information, it is a fair conclusion that only from one-third 
to one-half of the churches of Christ in Illinois had Sunday 
schools at that time. All of them were primitive and many 
suspended during the winter. 

An effort was made to convene a State Assembly in the 
Sunday-school interest at Macomb, Feb. 19 and 20, 1868, 
but the attendance was more local than general. An insti- 
tute was held there November 11-13, the same year. The 
State Missionary Convention met there in 1869 and gave 
some attention to Sunday-school work; so also did the con- 
vention in Chicago in 1870. In the early seventies, Mr. L. 
H. Dowling served as Sunday-school evangelist for a time. 
The State Convention held in Jacksonville in 1873 resolved 
in favor of a State Assembly in the interest of Sunday 
schools, to convene in the following October. It appears 
that this meeting did not convene until the spring of 1874, 
when the State Sunday-school Association was organized. 
Thereafter, these meetings were held for eleven years in the 
month of May, with limited and somewhat local attendance. 
At these meetings, primary questions were considered and 
interest in the work was stimulated. The State Missionary 
Convention at Springfield, Aug. 29, 1877, declined to take 
over the work of the State Sunday-school Association; so 
it convened for its business on the morning of the 30th. Ira 
J. Chase was president, and that forenoon addresses were 
made by B. J. Radford, N. S. Haynes and J. Carroll Stark, 
the last named speaking on "How to Interest Children in 
Church Services." The total receipts for that year were $75, 
and the expenditures were $35. In 1882 the question of a 
closer relation of the two State Assemblies came up again, 
but with no definite results. 

In the early eighties a meeting of the executive committee 
of this Association convened at the residence of N. S. 
Haynes in Decatur. Its chairman, Min. J. W. Allen, said 
that its object was to inaugurate aggressive work in behalf 



454 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

of the Sunday schools in the State. He proposed very 
earnestly that Mr. Knox P. Taylor be recalled from Texas 
and be given this business. This was done, although not a 
dollar for his support was in sight and offerings for all 
general Christian activities were then small. For about two 
years all the meetings of this executive committee were held 
in the same place where it first met, always including free 
entertainment. The return of Mr. Taylor to the State was 
a godsend. No man has ever given a superior service to 
Illinois. His vocabulary was limited, but his soul was large. 
His sincerity and piety left imperishable impressions upon 
all with whom he associated. Frequently his hosts saw him 
upon his knees in communion with his Father. He taught 
people by eye-gate and ear-gate, the Bible first, then methods 
of school work. Having come through denominationalism, 
he had much sympathy for his brethren who were still 
enmeshed therein. He believed the plain truth, and taught 
it as though all who heard him accepted it. Mr. Taylor 
continued in the active service of the Association till 1900, 
and thereafter as his waning strength permitted. 

The Association generally met in May. The following 
are the places that afforded free entertainment to its mem- 
bers, the years and additional evangelists: Sullivan, 1886, 
J. Jones ; Decatur, 1887 ; no report for 1888 ; Jacksonville, 
1889. Mr. S. W. Leffingwell then became assistant evan- 
gelist, but, finding his need of a better knowledge of the 
Bible, he turned himself into Eureka College for a year's 
study under the lead of Prof. F. M. Bruner. Then he con- 
tinued with the Association till 1894. Charleston, 1890, J. 
M. Morris and David Husband; Bloomington, 1891, when 
the four evangelists last named reported sixty-one additions 
to the churches ; Lawrenceville. 1892, Mrs. Sarah C. McCoy 
and Charles Ballard ; Olney, 1893, G. W. Warner; Carthage, 
1894; Decatur, 1895, Miss Anna M. Hale; Peoria, 1896, 
Miss Hale; Danville, 1897, Miss Hale; Decatur, 1898; 
Eureka, 1899, when the State Sunday-school Association 
ceased to be and its work was properly committed to the 



BIBLE SCHOOLS 455 

State Missionary Society. Under its direction, Min. A. C. 
Roach worked from 1901-03. He organized missions at 
Bradford, Cambridge, Wyoming and Kewanee, but only the 
last named of the four infants survived and grew into a 
church. Min. M. McFarland was Bible-school evangelist in 
1905, and Min. Marion Stevenson from Sept. 1, 1905, to 
Feb. 28, 1907. Mr. Stevenson combined a fine knowledge of 
the Scriptures with the best modern Bible-school methods ; 
hence his period of service was the beginning of clearly 
defined and definite aims in Bible schools. A fruitful har- 
vest continues to grow from his wise seed-sowing. 

Mr. Clarence L. DePew entered this work Oct. 1, 1907, 
and continues therein. His aim has been to bring the schools 
up to the best national ideals, first in grading them, and, 
second, in making them "Front Rank." 

Graded schools have the following classification: First, 
the family, which includes (1) the Home Department, who 
are non-attendants, and (2) the Cradle Roll, which includes 
infants, from birth to three years. 

Second, Elementary, including (1) Beginners, four and 
five years; (2) Primary, six to eight years; (3) Juniors, 
nine to twelve years. 

Third, Secondary: (1) Intermediate, from thirteen to 
sixteen years, and (2) Seniors, from seventeen to twenty 
years. 

Fourth, Adult, all over twenty years of age. 

A Front Rank school aims and tries to conform to the 
following standard: 

1. Workers' conference at least monthly, using a prepared 
program and library. 

2. Teacher-training class. 

3. Graded school, using graded lessons. 

4. Bibles owned generally and used in the school. 

5. Organized classes. All secondary and adult classes 
holding International certificates. 

6. Service, which includes (1) definite instruction on 
temperance, (2) evangelistic or direct efforts to lead the 



456 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

members of the school to become Christians, and (3) mis- 
sionary education and offerings. 

In 1911 there were 169 Front Rank schools, of which 
sixty-five had reached all the requirements and were awarded 
the seals and pennant. These numbers grew steadily, so that 
in July, 1913, there were 202 in the Front Rank, of which 
eighty-two had reached all the requirements. 

In 1913 there were in all the Bible schools of Illinois 
forty-three hundred organized adult classes, of which twelve 
hundred belonged to the Disciples. In the teen age they 
then had eighty-six organized classes. For several years 
they have had more than four times as many students and 
graduates in teacher-training than were enlisted in all other 
schools in the State combined. For the year closing July, 
1913, they had 1,048 out of a total of 1,360 in teacher-train- 
ing classes in Illinois. 

In sixty years the Disciples have come from the foot to 
the head of the evangelistic class in the appreciation of and 
efficiency in the Bible school one of the greatest agencies 
for the salvation of the world. 

In 1907 there were 223 that contributed $1,293 to the 
National Benevolent Association. To the same cause, 246 
schools in 1913 contributed $3,195. 

There were 627 schools reported in 1913, with an aggre- 
gate membership of 81,576. 

SECTION 3. 
Christian Endeavor, 

The Endeavor movement was begun in February, 1881. 
A few years thereafter many young people in the churches 
of Christ in Illinois organized themselves into these societies. 
They were classified into Senior, Intermediate and Junior. 
These grew steadily. The first years were filled with the 
enthusiasm of youth, and in a measure the movement became 
interdenominational. Among the Disciples in Illinois the 
high tide was reached in 1897, when they had, of the three 



CHRISTIAN ENDEAVOR 45/ 

classes, 577 societies, with an aggregate membership of ten 
thousand or more. During the later period of the Eureka 
Encampment, which ran from 1885 to 1899, the young 
people occupied a Saturday with very profitable programs. 
Up to that time, the sphere of the Christian Endeavor had 
not been clearly defined; so there was a tendency to make 
a church within the church. Local church officers, instead 
of helping and directing, generally held themselves aloof, 
while missionary secretaries actively encouraged separate and 
special contributions. The State Endeavor Society had a 
complement of officers. For the young people all this had 
an educational value. When the tide of enthusiasm reached 
its crest it at once began to recede. By 1905 it was decided 
that so many State officers were not needed ; hence they gave 
place to a superintendent. Min. H. H. Peters gave gratu- 
itous but efficient service in this position for four years, 
resigning in 1910. Later, State Endeavor was incorporated 
in the work of the State Missionary Society. In 1913 there 
were 284 societies reported, with an aggregate membership 
of 9,571. 

The Endeavor work has been helpful to the Disciples of 
Christ in Illinois. 1. It has taught many young people to 
take active parts in public worship and continues to train 
others for service. 2. To many of them it has opened the 
window of world-wide missions and they have seen some- 
thing of human needs. Their support of mission places in 
the State was most commendable. 3. It has cultivated the 
spirit of fraternity and co-operation among the young people 
of the various communions and has promoted the idea of 
Christian union. 4. The failure of some local societies in 
their virility or their lives has been due not so much to their 
unwillingness to serve, as a lack of practical encouragement 
by church officers. Very rarely has an Endeavor society 
risen above the spiritual level of the church of which it is 
a part. Its present need is the active and practical encourage- 
ment by the spiritual officers of the churches. 



458 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

SECTION 4. 
The Brotherhood. 

The organization of the Brotherhood among the Disciples 
of Christ was made during the National Missionary Conven- 
tion at New Orleans, La., in 1908. Mr. R. A. Long, of 
Kansas City, Mo., was the first president, and through his 
ability as an organizer and his financial liberality, the move- 
ment was given wide publicity and made good progress. 

The organization in Illinois was effected at the State Mis- 
sionary Convention at Eureka in 1909. Toller Swift served 
the first two years as president, and was followed by Min. 
J. A. Barnett to the present time. 

The Brotherhood aims to promote general church inter- 
ests. It seeks to train the men of the churches for greater 
and more effective service. It encourages Bible study and 
the organization of men into large Bible-study classes. A 
number of young men have already been led into the Chris- 
tian ministry through the observance of Men's and Boys' 
Day by the churches. The men have become more generally 
interested in missions, benevolences and educational institu- 
tions. Many students have been induced to attend the col- 
leges of the Christian Church through this agency. Investi- 
gation of these educational institutions and a report on their 
equipment and needs has been made by the National Broth- 
erhood. A helpful service has been afforded in the large 
number of conferences conducted upon men's work in the 
churches. It affords a common platform, program and 
agency for the co-operation of all benevolent activities. 
These aims are commendable, but too general to insure the 
continuance of this Brotherhood in Illinois. When they 
determine to build up and sustain a representative Christian 
college, they will have an object worthy of their splendid 
abilities. 

The work of the Brotherhood, local and general, is wisely 
and well directed by the secretary of the National Society, 
Mr. E. E. Elliott, Kansas City, Mo. According to his annual 



MINISTERIAL ASSOCIATIONS 459 

report in 1913, there were 933 local Brotherhoods affiliated 
with the national organization, of which over two hundred 
were in Illinois. 

SECTION 5. 

Ministerial Associations. 

There had been meetings of ministers of the Christian 
Church in Illinois previous to 1873, with varying aims. On 
July 14 of that year fifteen preachers from the central part 
of the State assembled in Springfield. This meeting was in 
response to a call signed by H. W. Everest, Thomas Mun- 
nell, and J. W. and J. B. Allen. Mr. Everest was then 
pastor of the Springfield Church. He stated that the object 
of the meeting was, if thought best, to form a Ministerial 
Union, the aim and work of which should be to place the 
State missionary work upon a better footing, and especially 
to devise some ways by which the weak and languishing 
churches could be helped. 

This Ministerial Association was formed the next day 
with A. J, Kane, president; H. W. Everest, vice-president, 
and N. S. Haynes, secretary. Nine of the preachers present 
pledged $500 to begin the work, which was to be done under 
the direction of the State Missionary Society. The Minis- 
terial Association of Central Illinois grew in numbers and 
did very efficient service for a period of six years. Its sec- 
ond meeting was held in Jacksonville, in May, 1875 ; the 
third at Peoria, in May, 1876; the fourth at Normal, in May, 
1877. 

There was a special meeting of this Association at 
Springfield in August, 1877, when it was decided to make the 
aims and work of the Association more directly ministerial 
than they had hitherto been. In 1878 the Association met 
in August at Eureka, in 1879 at Princeton, and in 1880 at 
Bloomington, which was the last. 

In the spring of 1882 the Central Illinois Ministerial 
Institute was organized, and has continued to the present 
time with very helpful annual meetings. 



460 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

About the same year the Ministerial Institute of the 
Military Tract was formed. At one of its annual meetings 
there were present ninety-three preachers and elders. Unfor- 
tunately, it was permitted to die years ago. 

The Ministerial Institute of Southern Illinois was formed 
in the nineties and continues to this time. 

These institutes should become fixed spiritual feasts for 
the Christian ministers of the State. 

The Chicago Christian Ministerial Association. 

This Association was organized about 1894. It has met 
weekly from September to June. Its membership includes 
the pastors of the churches of Christ in Chicago and its 
environs, including Harvey on the south, Evanston on the 
north and Maywood on the west, with teachers and resident 
students of the Disciples' Divinity House. Two of the pas- 
tors serve on the board of the Chicago Christian Missionary 
Society, all of the pastors in its quarterly rallies and city 
mission work, and, with other representatives of the several 
congregations, these pastors- serve in the annual city mission 
business session. Its members are also affiliated with the 
organized union for civic reform work in the city, including 
the Law and Order, Young People's Civic and Anti-Saloon 
Leagues; also with the Laymen's Evangelistic Movement and 
Laymen's Missionary Council. Min. O. F. Jordan, secretary 
of this Ministers' Association, co-operates with the Feder- 
ated Council of Churches. Herbert L. Willett represented 
the Association on the Chicago Vice Investigation Committee. 
Its members also co-operate in the quarterly C. W. B. M. 
meetings, and some are active in the Men and Millions cam- 
paign. 




R. E. HENRY. 
S. H. ZENDT. 



R. F. THRAPP. 



J. R. GOLDEN. 
E. M. SMITH. 



CHAPTER VII. 
BIOGRAPHIES. 

George F. Adams. 

Born in Elizaville, Ky. Died in 1884, at Blandinsville, 111. 

Educated in the schools of his native village and the 
Bible College of Kentucky University. He came to Illinois 
about 1870. Held several pastorates, for which work he was 
not well fitted, but in the evangelistic field he was an 
unusually brilliant and successful preacher. Many were well 
taught and brought into the church through his ministry. 
His early death came by an accidental gunshot wound. 

/. Buford Allen. 

Fleming County, Ky., 1847. 1902, Spokane, Wash. 

Was the youngest of three brothers who served in the 
Christian ministry Dr. J. M. and J. W. Allen being the 
other two. Was educated in the public schools at Blooming- 
ton and at Eureka College. He began the study of law with 
Judge W. E. Nelson, of Decatur, but soon decided to enter 
the ministry. Besides other congregations in Illinois, he 
served the First Church in Springfield for a period of seven 
years. His health failing, he moved to Hutchinson, Kan., 
and later to Spokane, Wash. 

Mr. Allen was a clear and vigorous thinker, a sincere and 
frank man and an efficient preacher. 

John W. Allen. 

Kentucky, 1843. 

Mr. Allen was a native of Fleming County, Ky. He was 
well born and has always been a fine type of a Christian 
gentleman. After three years' service in the Federal Army, 

461 



462 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

during which time he "did duty" at Donaldson, Shiloh and 
Vicksburg, he graduated at Eureka in 1867. He ministered 
to the church at Grayville, 111. ; served as State evangelist 
for one and one-half years; was pastor at Shelbyville and 
Jacksonville, and the following sixteen years in Chicago, two 
years with the South Side Christian Church, two years with 
the First, now a part of the Memorial, and twelve years with 
the Westside, now the Jackson Boulevard Church. That 
was the period in which the Disciples in the commercial 
metropolis were coming out of religious contention, chaos 
and confusion into sympathetic activities and orderly co-op- 
eration. It was a time of stress and storm, and Mr. Allen 
put into it virile years of his splendid life. To no one man 
is our cause in Chicago more indebted for a saner spirit and 
better vision than to him. His ministry has always been 
Scriptural, unselfish, forceful, sympathetic and constructive. 
Since 1895 his work has been in Spokane, Wash. 

William G. Anderson. 

Jefferson County, Ind., 1818. 1908, Colfax, 111. 

Came to McLean County in 1855. In 1858 he settled on 
a farm of 350 acres on the upper Mackinaw. When the 
railroad was built, the town of Colfax was located on part 
of his land. This, with the underlying coal, placed him in 
good pecuniary circumstances. Mr. Anderson received a 
limited education, but he had fine common sense and was 
devoted to duty. He preached much in the pioneer days, 
served as field solicitor for Eureka College five years, and 
was a public-spirited, progressive and aggressive citizen. 

John Clinton Ashley. 

On Atlantic Ocean, 1800. 1850, Walnut Hill, 111. 

He was one of the pioneer preachers of the Restoration 
movement and a coworker with A. Campbell. He was on a 
missionary tour from Ohio into Illinois when he sickened 
and died. His body was buried at Walnut Hill. 



BIOGRAPHIES 463 

Dr. John Kossuth Ashley. 

Portsmouth, O., 1824. 1905, Cisne, 111. 

A son of the former. Having graduated in medicine 
from the Ohio State University at Athens, he practiced his 
profession in that State for ten years. He came to Wayne 
County in 1856, and continued his work there till the close 
of his life. He was an intelligent, broad-minded and useful 
Christian man. 

The Ashley family was interesting and distinguished. 
John M. represented Toledo (O.) district in Congress for 
a long term of years, and was a trusted adviser of President 
Lincoln in the dark days of war. Later, he was appointed 
territorial governor of Montana by President Grant. E. M. 
Ashley was engaged in the department of public surveys for 
a long period. During this time he entered the land on 
which the city of Denver, Colo., now stands. 

Mrs. Alice Porter, of Albion, is a daughter of Dr. Ashley. 

Aaron Prince At en. 

Near Eaton, O., 1839. 

Mr. Aten came to Illinois in 1849, where he grew up on 
a farm. Educated at Rochester Seminary and Abingdon 
College. Received the A.B. and A.M. degrees, and later 
the LL.D. degree from another institution. He was ordained 
to the Christian ministry in 1860 and has preached continu- 
ously since. With his ministerial service he has united edu- 
cational work through many years. He was pastor of the 
churches at Rochester and La Fayette and Abingdon, mean- 
while serving as principal of Rochester Seminary and eight 
years as professor of belles lettres in Abingdon College. 
From 1861-65 he was recording secretary of the I. C. M. S. 
and a member of its board of managers. In 1864 he was 
the evangelist of the society in the old Tenth District. In 
1876. Mr. Aten left Illinois. Since then he has been busy 
in his twofold service in Texas, Tennessee, Kentucky, Kan- 
sas and Oklahoma. In 1913 he was pastor of the Southside 



464 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Christian Church in Oklahoma City. Besides, he has done 
considerable editorial and literary work. 

It goes without saying that Mr. Aten has been a very 
active man, but his good habits have helped to wide and 
varied usefulness and continued efficiency. 

Elias Ayles. 

Was born in Washington County, O., 1831. He became 
a Christian in 1863 and began preaching at once. He was 
also a railway engineer. Loss of hearing came with advanc- 
ing years, so that he was compelled to cease work. He is a 
man of fine character whose life has been filled with good 
works. He resides at Fairfield. 

Mrs. Clara Celestia Hale-Babcock. 

Fitchville, O., 1850. 

Her father was a Methodist preacher of the most rigid 
type. The daughter was zealous in her religious life and was 
quite content with the teachings of her church. She was 
past her twenty-fifth natal day before she ever heard a ser- 
mon from any other class of preachers. Curiosity led her to 
attend church one evening in Sterling, 111., when Evangelist 
Geo. F. Adams was conducting a series of meetings there. 
As she passed out, Mr. Adams said to her: "I hope you 
enjoyed the services." She made no reply. He repeated 
the inquiry. She answered: "I can't say that I did." He 
asked her what there was in the meeting that she did not 
approve. Several persons had publicly confessed their faith 
in Christ. Waving her hand, she said: "Is that all there is 
in it? Dare you make it so easy to get into Christ?" He 
answered: "You must be accustomed to the use of the 
mourners' bench." "Surely I am," she replied. He said: 
"You are the very woman I have been looking for. If you 
will bring me a Scriptural authority for it, chapter and verse, 
I will install it to-morrow night." She said, "I will," and 
passed on, Mr. Adams remarking, "You know there are no 
records of conversions outside of the Acts of the Apostles, 




A. D. NORTHCUTT. JOSEPH HOSTETLER. 

MRS. C. C. BABCOCK. 
N S HAYNES. WILLIAM B. RYAN. 



BIOGRAPHIES 465 

so it must be there." Mrs. Babcock did not sleep that night 
till she had read the Book of Acts. Not finding what she 
read for, in the morning she visited her pastor and asked 
him where she could find in God's word authority for the 
altar. He answered: "Where have you been? Have you 
been listening to that Campbellite exhorter over the river?" 
She said "Yes." Then he said: "He will lead you to the 
devil, for they are not orthodox. They don't believe in the 
Holy Spirit or in prayer." She replied that she had not gone 
from choice, "but you have not answered my question." 
After some other such conversation, the pastor said that the 
altar for those trying to come to Christ was not commanded, 
but the church teaches it as a good method. Then she asked : 
"How much does the church teach that is not in the Bible? 
If you have one human plan, how shall we know the divine 
plan? It weakens my faith." A few evenings later Mr. 
Babcock persuaded his wife to hear Mr. Adams again. On 
that occasion she witnessed Scriptural baptism for the first 
time, and the sermon was on baptism. Passing out, Mr. 
Adams asked her about the Scripture for the use of the 
mourners' bench. She replied frankly: "It is not there and 
we have no right to use it." He inquired: "Have you been 
baptized?" "Not according to that form," she answered. 
"Will you not obey Christ in the Bible way?" he asked. 
She went home sad and thoughtful. The next morning she 
went to see her pastor, who prayed with her and scolded 
her. "Will you immerse me?" she asked. "No, no; you 
have been baptized according to your father's faith and the 
church's teaching," he answered. She said: "What does the 
Bible teach? You must show me where the Scripture com- 
mands sprinkling or I shall go down into the water like my 
Saviour." A week later, Mr. and Mrs. Babcock were bap- 
tized by Mr. Adams. With Bible in hand, she went from 
door to door of her friends, many of whom turned to the 
Lord. She did not formally unite with the Sterling Church 
until she first measured its teachings and practices by the 
word of God. Later, she went out into the service of the W. 



466 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

C. T. U. in Illinois. Being in Erie on a Sunday, she was 
induced to speak to the Christian congregation in the fore- 
noon. The presence and approval of God were so manifest 
that she was led to continue in the service of that congre- 
gation. Later, after wise counsel and mature deliberation, 
she was ordained to the Christian ministry in 1888. Her 
work proved a great blessing to the church in that part of 
the State. She proved herself both a good evangelist and 
pastor. She has conducted twenty-eight fruitful meetings 
and has made about fourteen hundred converts, one thou- 
sand of whom she baptized with her own hand. The little 
church of Erie she served altogether fifteen years. In that 
community she preached 172 funeral sermons. She was the 
first woman in Illinois to enter the Christian ministry. In 
all this splendid service she had the cordial moral support 
of her husband. After twenty-five years of this work, she 
has retired to the quiet of a Canadian farm home. 

George E. Bacon. 

Madison, Ind., 1851. 1896, Aurora, 111. 

Came with his parents to Kansas, 111., in 1854. His mis- 
chievous disposition in boyhood was irrepressible. Coming 
to maturity, he entered the ministry, but soon decided that 
he was unwilling to make the full surrender that its obliga- 
tions impose. He became a lawyer and State's attorney of 
Edgar County. In 1886 he was elected to the State Senate 
and returned in 1890, serving eight years. He was a fluent 
and brilliant orator. In the formal eulogies pronounced by 
representatives of the General Assembly upon John A. 
Logan, Mr. Bacon's far surpassed all others. 

Col. Edzvard D. Baker. 

London, England, 1811. 1861, Ball's Bluff (Va.) Bat- 
tlefield. 

At the age of four years this boy was brought to Phila- 
delphia, and at the age of fifteen he was teaching school. 
He was admitted to the bar in Carrollton, 111., in 1830; the 



BIOGRAPHIES 467 

next year married Mrs. Mary Ann Lee, and in 1832 partici- 
pated actively in the Black Hawk War. 

It was shortly after his marriage that he was immersed 
and became a member of the church in Carrollton. It is 
not probable that he was formally set apart to the Christian 
ministry, but his ardent disposition, superior ability as a 
public speaker and his sincere devotion to the pure gospel 
led him to its public proclamation for near a decade. He 
also baptized some converts. Min. W. H. Cannon, pastor 
of the Central Church, Decatur, says that his own grand- 
father, Hardin Goodin, whom he knew well, was immersed 
by Mr. Baker in Honey Creek, Pike County. Nor was this 
an exceptional instance. He was also associated with those 
Disciples in the early thirties at Jacksonville in their first 
efforts looking toward co-operative missionary work. 

In 1835 he moved to Springfield. There he met and 
became the sincere and lifelong friend of Abraham Lincoln. 
Two such magnificent and magnanimous souls could easily 
understand and love each other. This friendship proved of 
incalculable value to the Federal Union in the black night of 
bloody horrors in which both suns went down. 

In 1837, Mr. Baker was elected to the House in the 
Legislature and in 1840 to the Senate. In 1844 he beat Mr. 
Lincoln for the nomination for Congress on the Whig ticket, 
and was elected. But Mr. Lincoln's feelings were reflected 
in the fact that a baby boy who came into his home in 1846 
was named Edward Baker Lincoln. While representing the 
Springfield district in Congress, Mr. Baker raised a regi- 
ment of infantry and saw active service as its colonel in the 
Mexican War. Meanwhile, his official duties calling him to 
Washington, he addressed the House of Representatives 
wearing his military uniform. In 1848, Colonel Baker, 
rather than contest a second time with Mr. Lincoln the nomi- 
nation for Congress, moved to Galena. There he was nomi- 
nated on the Whig ticket, and elected. Mr. Lincoln was 
returned from the Springfield district. In 1851, Colonel 
Baker was engaged in superintending the construction of the 



468 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Panama Railroad. In 1852 he moved to California. In San 
Francisco he quickly took a leading place at the bar, and for 
eight years was one of the representative and most influ- 
ential citizens of the State. 

Upon the urgent invitation of friends he was induced to 
move to Salem, Ore., in February, 1860. Such was his 
fidelity to principle, his commanding ability, his matchless 
eloquence and urbanity, that he was elected to the United 
States Senate at the next meeting of the Oregon Legislature. 

In 1912, Mr. E. R. Kennedy published a volume entitled 
"The Contest for California in 1861," in which he clearly 
shows that it was chiefly through the statesmanship of 
Colonel Baker that the Pacific Coast was then saved to the 
Union. The book is charmingly written and is a distinct con- 
tribution to American history. 

With the coming of the Civil War, Mr. Baker was busy 
in the United States Senate. However, he raised a regiment 
in New York and Philadelphia of sixteen hundred men and 
was commissioned to command the brigade to which it 
belonged. It was encamped near the Capital. On August 1, 
1861, members of the Senate hastily summoned Colonel and 
Senator Baker to the chamber to reply to a speech to be 
delivered there that day by Senator Breckenridge, of Ken- 
tucky. He came in, laid his sword upon his desk, and sat 
down to listen. His reply is classed among the great ora- 
tions of the world. James G. Elaine says that its delivery 
was the most extraordinary of any occurrence that ever 
transpired in the Senate chamber. 

October 21, having stood at the head of his brigade for 
hours against great odds, he was struck by four or five rifle- 
balls almost simultaneously and fell in death "as gentle and 
pure and unselfish and generous and eloquent and valiant a 
man as ever cheerfully gave his life for a noble cause." 
Mrs. Judith Bradner, a charter member of the First Church 
in Bloomington, passed on in 1912 at the age of ninety-eight 
years. She at one time entertained at dinner in her home 
Stephen A. Douglas, Abraham Lincoln and Edward D. 



BIOGRAPHIES 469 

Baker. She described Mr. Baker as a most attractive per- 
sonality, a fine conversationalist and an engaging presence, 
at once commanding and kindly. A marble statue inscribed 
"Baker" stands in one of the rooms of the nation's Capitol. 

Dr. J. W. Ballinger. 

Emmerson, Mo., 1837. 1879, Niantic, 111. 

Most of the life of Mr. Ballinger was passed in the State 
of his birth. In the five closing years of his life, which were 
devoted to the Niantic community, he gripped the people as 
few men can. In the places of his residence he served as 
elder, teacher, physician and minister. He was careful to 
remember the poor, but held continuously the good will of 
all classes. He was one of the truest friends of humanity 
and the noblest pattern of manhood. 

N. S. Bastian. 

Was of Holland descent and a native of New York State. 
He received a liberal education, and throughout his life was 
esteemed both for his learning and culture. 

He became a member of the M. E. Church in early life, 
and shortly thereafter entered the Christian ministry. In 
1843 this church wished to send a missionary to one of the 
districts of the West African coast. Mr. Bastian was asked 
to go. After consideration, he answered: "Christ died for 
me. I will go." His first child was born there. The native 
chiefs came from far to see a white baby and make it a 
present. The child lived only a few months. After a time, 
Mr. Bastian was sent to Europe on business connected with 
the African mission. He left his wife there and set sail. 
On his voyage, one evening just after he had retired to bed 
and before he had closed his eyes, apparently his wife stood 
before him. Ere he could address her, she vanished. When 
he landed in Europe he met orders from his Mission Board 
to return to America. Landing in New York, he was met 
by a member of the Board, to whom he said, "Have you 
heard from Africa?" The reply was, "Yes. And Sarah is 



470 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

dead." This was Mr. Bastian's wife. On comparing the 
day and the hour, he found that his wife had gone to be at 
home with, her Lord at the moment when he saw her appear- 
ance to him on shipboard. 

Mr. Bastian's studies of the New Testament had unsettled 
his thoughts on the subject of Christian baptism. Finding 
himself more in harmony with the Baptist than with the 
Methodist Church, he peaceably changed his ecclesiastical 
affiliation. Coming West, he soon fell in with the Disciples. 
He was at once attracted and charmed by the Scripturalness 
of their preaching and the simplicity of their plea; hence, 
he was not long in casting in his lot with the people whose 
teaching and practice were so fully in accord with his own 
conclusions. Some of his Methodist brethren said that the 
fact of his "joining the Campbellites" was proof that "he 
was rattled ;" whereas, his thoughts and aims were only mov- 
ing in wider orbits. 

His sacred dust and that of his second wife a Christian 
woman ot the highest type repose in unmarked graves at 
Sullivan, 111. Nor is a memorial window there in the house 
of God for these, his faithful servants. 

Archibald T. Benson. 

Tennessee, 1818. 1894, Marion, 111. 

Came to Williamson County when a young man, and 
shortly thereafter became a Christian and a preacher. His 
ministry reached out to many places in that part of the 
State. In the years of his active service, he baptized more 
converts, married more couples and conducted more funerals 
than any preacher in the county. He served as chaplain of 
the 128th Illinois Volunteer Infantry during the Civil War. 
He was noted for his hospitality and many good works. 

Charles J. and Thomas V. Berry. 

St. Andrews, New Brunswick. 1871, Lincoln, 111. 

St. Andrews, New Brunswick, 1822. 1882, Creston, la. 
Charles J. came to Boston when in his teens, and for a 



BIOGRAPHIES 471 

period was a member of the Tremont Temple Free Will 
Baptist Church. His moral convictions were strong, and his 
opposition to slavery and all secret societies became so radical 
that, as his pastor, Nathaniel Colver, put it, "Charles com- 
pelled the church to disfellowship him." Meanwhile, by the 
aid of the Millennial Harbinger, he came to a knowledge of 
the Restoration movement. Whereupon, he helped his 
brother Thomas in the formation of a church of Christ and 
instituted worship on the Lord's Days after the apostolic 
example. In 1855 he succeeded James Darsie as pastor of 
the church at Connersville, Pa. He came to Illinois in 1859, 
and resided at Princeton, Abingdon and Lincoln, at which 
places, or in the surrounding sections, he labored assiduously 
in the gospel till his death, which came by tuberculosis. 

Thomas V. also came to Boston in his teens, and there 
learned the trade of a piano-maker. In 1845 he learned the 
gospel from a Mr. Dungan, of Baltimore, who had gone to 
Boston to buy leather goods. To the little church formed 
there Thomas gave most of his earnings from his manual 
labor for hall rent, etc. He graduated from Bethany. Com- 
ing to Illinois in 1860, he first served the Bloomington 
Church seven years and later the churches at Princeton, Lin- 
coln and Monmouth. 

These brothers were the sons of Methodist parents. The 
home was one of regular prayer and practical piety. They 
were men of a high spiritual type and gave their time to 

genuine service. ~ T ,, , 

Dr. James M. Bell, 

Sangamon County, 111., 1856. 

Educated at the University of Michigan. Was elected 
to the House of the Legislature in 1910-12. Dr. Bell is a 
member of the church at Rochester. 

Prof. W. F. Black. 

Moorefield, Ky., 1839. 1908, Chicago, 111. 

Mr. Black's early years were passed in schoolrooms as 
student and teacher. He graduated at Asbury, now DePauw 



472 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

University, and spent some time at Hiram while J. A. Gar- 
field was there. He entered the ministry at the age of 
eighteen, and for many years was a very popular and suc- 
cessful preacher. He served as pastor at Terre Haute, 
Greencastle and Indianapolis, Ind., and Tuscola and Chicago, 
111., and was president of the Northwest University, now 
Butler College, in 1872-74. He was best known as a great 
evangelist. His meetings in cities, towns and country were 
equally successful the additions were counted by hundreds 
and by thousands. Many of these were leading and influ- 
ential citizens of their communities. He did his work with- 
out the aid of professional singers or special helpers. His 
custom was to teach the people the Scriptures and follow 
this lesson in the same meeting with a great sermon. Illinois 
owes much to his self-denying and faithful service, for not 
a few of her feeble congregations were thereby saved from 
death to large usefulness, and many from all classes of 
society were led to know and to walk in the better way. He 
is held in tender memory by a host of grateful friends. 

William Henry Boles. 

Perry County, 111., 1850. 

Educated in country schools, Ewing College and Butler 
College. Entered the Christian ministry in 1870. Served 
the churches at De Soto, Marion, Carbondale, Duquoin, 
Pekin and Christopher as pastor. Mr. Boles has been widely 
and well known for a quarter of a century as a live wire. 
He has been a successful evangelist and a popular lecturer, 
speaking to many multitudes on Mormonism, the liquor 
traffic, evidences of Christianity, Romanism, and other sub- 
jects that delude and enslave people in error. He was never 
known to run away from a public discussion when it was 
thrust upon him. He is industrious, genial, democratic and 
enthusiastic in his work. Over eight thousand people have 
been added to the churches by his ministry. In March, 
1888, he conducted a series of meetings in Duquoin. At its 
beginning he entered into an agreement with Dr. A. J. Fish- 



BIOGRAPHIES 473 

back, a rationalist of local notoriety. First, the doctor was 
to hear every sermon preached by Mr. Boles. Second, for 
two hours a day, four days in the week, they were privately 
to consider the fundamentals of Christianity. Third, if the 
doctor was convinced that the Bible came from God and 
that Jesus is divine, he should quit the "Freethinkers" and 
preach the gospel henceforward. Fourth, if Mr. Boles 
should be convinced to the contrary, he should quit the pulpit 
and take the platform for infidelity. Before the meeting 
closed, Dr. Fishback became a Christian. To the close of his 
life, nine years thereafter, he was an able minister of Jesus 
Christ. Air. Boles is a brave and unselfish patriot, and bears 
in his body the marks of the Lord Jesus. 

Dr. William Booz. 

Woodford County, Ky., 1831. 1901, Carthage, 111. 

Those who were personally acquainted with this gentle- 
man called him a noted physician, preacher, philosopher and 
friend. His father's family came to Illinois in 1837, and in 
1839 into Hancock County. Orphaned of his parents at the 
age of fourteen, he was one of six children left penniless 
and alone. He appealed to the judge for the privilege of 
choosing his own guardian, which was granted. In the 
home of this friend he became one of the family. The only 
schoolbook he there had was an English novel, from which 
he would read aloud to the pleasure of the whole school. 
By his persistence and pine-knot efforts, at the age of fifteen 
he secured a subscription school, which he taught in the 
kitchen of David Mason's cabin. The money thus earned 
was used to enable him to make some trips to Carthage and 
to buy and borrow some books. For three years he studied 
medicine, for his great ambition was to be a physician. 
Meanwhile, he taught schools as necessary. He became a 
Christian under the ministry of Gilmore Callison and began 
to preach at the age of seventeen. His knowledge of the 
Bible soon became remarkable, and later he was widely rec- 
ognized as an eloquent preacher. A minister of another 



474 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

church asked Dr. Booz to come to Pontoosuc at one time 
and meet an opponent in a public discussion. So well was 
the work done that the opponent failed to appear the second 
evening. 

All his life he was a country doctor. Despite his early 
disadvantages and later handicaps, he rose to wide recogni- 
tion. At one time he had the entire practice in 170 square 
miles around his home, except in twelve families. He had 
patients all over western Illinois as well as in Iowa, Mis- 
souri, Ohio and Kentucky. When he began the practice of 
medicine at the age of twenty-two, he laid down certain 
rules, from which he never deviated through the forty-seven 
years of his professional work. He was always a hard stu- 
dent a progressive, a discoverer, a leader. During the 
period of his practice he rode more than one-half-million 
miles, mostly through the brakes of Crooked Creek. He 
regarded a call to a bed of pain as a call to duty. Through 
trackless forests, bridgeless streams and Egyptian darkness, 
he made countless trips to the homes of suffering, and oft- 
times where no compensation could be expected except the 
love and gratitude that followed him to his dying day. He 
was the embodiment of cheerfulness, and his peculiar per- 
sonality inspired his patients with confidence. 

Without personal political ambition, he was a leader in 
politics. 

He wrote well. His papers for township literary societies 
were gems of pathos, wit and homely good sense. In the 
early sixties he sent a communication to the Carthage 
Republican over the pseudonym, "Country Jake." The 
editor was so impressed with its pungent character that he 
encouraged him to send weekly contributions. Thus was 
born provincial journalism in Illinois. 

In medicine Dr. Booz was a genius, to the world a Chris- 
tian, to his contemporaries a philosopher, and to his family 
and to all people, a gentleman. He was the soul of honor, 
justice and generosity. There was not a selfish or mean 
streak in him. The pride of his Kentucky blood was appar- 



BIOGRAPHIES 475 

ent in his exalted character. And a country doctor all his 
life because he wanted to be! 

Thomas E. Bondurant. 

Near Mechanicsburg, 111., 1831. 1905, De Land, 111. 

His parents were Kentuckians who came to Illinois in 
1828. In 1854, Mr. Bondurant entered 290 acres of land in 
Piatt County, under the graduation act of Congress, at fifty 
cents per acre. He moved there in 1856, which was his 
home to the close of his life. The year before he had 
attended Eureka College, but, becoming engrossed in his 
business, did not return. 

Mr. Bondurant was never married. In 1861 his mother 
and a sister, Miss Mary E. Bondurant, went to De Land, 
and the three constituted the family. Throughout his life 
he was a farmer and live-stock man. He was a shrewd and 
far-sighted business man. His advice to men starting in life 
was, "Buy land." He continued to follow this maxim, and 
accumulated large property. 

He came into the church in 1851, and for fifty- four years 
was an intelligent and active Christian. He always stood 
openly for the better things in life and against the saloon 
and kindred evils. And he was never willing to compromise 
with wrong. He was generous to many worthy causes while 
he lived, but did not talk about his benefactions. 

At the time of his decease, his estate was valued at about 
$450,000. By his last will, the larger part of this wealth is 
to be used, after ten years, for educational and missionary 
purposes. His end was peace. 

Hughes Bowles. 

Virginia, 1786. 1846, DeWitt County, 111. 

This man came from Virginia to Caneridge, Ky., and was 
probably a product of the great revival held there in 1801. 
His education was limited, but he was a great reader and a 
good historian. He united with the Baptist Church and was 



476 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

licensed to preach. He soon decided that denominationalism 
was wrong, and he believed that God had revealed to every 
man his whole duty in plain and unmistakable terms in the 
Bible. 

He settled on a farm in DeWitt County, near the site of 
Old Union Church, Turnbridge Township, on the banks of 
Salt Creek, in the spring of 1830. He had then been mar- 
ried twice and was the father of twelve living children. 
Members of his family maintained the farm of two hundred 
acres while the father gave his time to preaching the gospel. 
His trips were made on horseback and reached from ten to 
fifty miles. The storms of the winters, the miry sloughs and 
swollen streams of the springs and early summers frequently 
challenged the faith and courage of the itinerant preachers. 
But Mr. Bowles seldom missed an appointment. 

He was well versed in the Scriptures and could almost 
quote the New Testament from beginning to end. Asso- 
ciated with him in his Christian work there were Abner 
Peeler, powerful in argument and appeal and a true 
prophet's vision; James Scott, who spoke with the "old Bap- 
tist tone," and when the weather was warm would, in the 
progress of his sermon, lay off his coat, unbutton his collar 
and sleeves and plead most earnestly with his hearers ; and 
Alfred Lindsey, mild, gentle and with wonderful winning 
power. Ten dollars was the largest sum Hughes Bowles 
ever received for holding a meeting, which was at the Lake 
Fork Church. This money he gave to a Mrs. Frakes, a 
widowed sister in the Lord, who was thrown from her horse, 
breaking her hip, while going to his meeting. He was a 
kind and sympathetic man, but very positive. All his chil- 
dren were in the fold ere their father went away to be with 
the Good Shepherd. 

David Bowles. 

Bourbon County, Ky., 1825. 1911, Emden, 111. 

David was the oldest son. He was a farmer, residing on 
Delavan Prairie, in Logan County. He read much, was 



BIOGRAPHIES 477 

decidedly conservative and a good public speaker. He 
assisted in the organization of several churches within the 
radius of his Christian service. 

March 10, 1903, from his home in Emden, III, David 
Bowles wrote to T. T. Holton. From his communication the 
following is taken: 

I do not know of a meeting-house in this part of the State before 
1840. The people met for worship in the summer-time in the groves, 
in the winter-time in their dwelling-houses. The houses were nearly 
all log cabins eighteen feet square. Two beds in this room. A big 
fireplace in one end. No windows. Glass could not be had. So, you 
see, this left but a small meeting-house. But you would be surprised 
at the number of people that would get into one of these houses for 
worship. The young women and some married women would pull off 
their shoes and get up on the beds, till sometimes there would be from 
eight to ten on each bed. Some people may say, "This is unreason- 
able the beds could not hold them up." They were not such bedsteads 
as we have now. Usually there was but one post to the bedstead. 
Holes bored into the logs of the wall with a two-inch auger and a 
strong rail sharpened to fit was inserted and strong rope cords made 
at home of hemp made them very strong. Still, once in awhile, one 
of these cords would break and let them to the floor. Soon everything 
would be quiet again. With all ovr glorious meetings we would 
sometimes have some of the ridiculous. I will only name one or two. 
One cold winter day we met at old Father Hall's. Bro. Walter 
Bowles was to preach. The house was just such as I have described, 
with a loft laid with large clapboards. A ladder going up in the 
right-hand corner by the fireplace. The door shut. A lamp lighted. 
Brother Walter stood right by or under the ladder that led to the 
loft. He was lining his hymn, when a big tomcat raised a racket up 
in the loft and came tearing down the ladder. Brother Walter rather 
dodged. But some of the older ones were able to sing the hymn. 
The house was so crowded that none could kneel. Everybody's face 
was turned toward the fire. While Brother Walter was offering 
prayer the cat that had got whipped came and sat down in front of 
the fire. The cat that had whipped came slipping through the crowd, 
and, seeing the one he had whipped sitting before the fire, he aimed 
to give him a big lick. But the other saw him in time to slip out of 
the way. The boss cat went right under the fore-stick into the fire 
and came out squalling and carried the fire and coals back through 
the crowd. Old Mother Hall saw it would set the house on fire. 
Broke in with a broom on him. Everybody in the house saw it, and 
Brother Walt brought his prayer to a close very quickly. Soon we 
were dismissed. 



478 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

I will give just one more to show the inconveniences we had to 
labor under. We had prayer-meeting at old Bro. James Ferrice's one 
night. The old grease-lamp was stuck in the wall of the house just 
about as high as a man's shoulder. Bro. Ambrose Hall was up talking. 
Forgot himself and threw his head back, and the blaze was all over his 
head in an instant. Some of the brethren sprang to him and extin- 
guished the flame. So that brought that meeting to a sudden close. 
This is enough of the ridiculous. 

William F. Bowles. 

Kentucky, 1829. 

William F. Bowles was brought by his parents to Illinois 
in 1830. He became a Christian at thirteen and served the 
Old Union Church as deacon and elder for many years. A 
great student of the Bible, his judgment was regarded as 
based upon truth and justice. He always helped in the 
aggressive work of the church, and his conclusions on church 
government were rarely questioned. His one son and four 
grandchildren are all prominent in the work of the church. 
He is the sole survivor of the family that came to Illinois, 
and resides with his son in Des Moines, la. 

Walter P. Bozvles. 

Kentucky, 1811. 1863, Illinois. 

This man was the most forceful and noted of this 
remarkable family. He was the son of Hughes and Ruth 
Prather Bowles. During his mature years he was called by 
nearly all of his acquaintances "Wattie Bowles." 

He was physically a man of the finest type. Standing 
six feet and one inch in his stocking feet, his weight was 
190 pounds. Rarely could any man follow him with ax, 
cradle or scythe. He could stand with both feet in a half- 
bushel measure and shoulder four bushels of wheat in one 
sack. 

There was an admirable co-ordination between his phys- 
ical forces and his mental energies. At about the age of 
twenty-two he was married to Miss Isabel Wallace, a daugh- 
ter of Col. Andrew Wallace, who served in our army in the 
war of 1812. At that time Mr. Bowles could not read. His 



BIOGRAPHIES 479 

wife proved herself to be a fine teacher her husband an 
unusually bright pupil. Five years thereafter he could quote 
nearly all of the New Testament from memory, and before 
the close of his life, most of the Old as well. His memory 
was extraordinary. He knew the map of Palestine better 
than most people know their own State. 

Of course Mr. Bowles was a farmer, owning and culti- 
vating his land. But shortly after his marriage he became 
a preacher. Those who heard him, testify that he was pow- 
erful and eloquent. His superior ability to sing and induce 
others to sing, added much to his efficiency. He was mighty 
in prayer as well. Sometimes he would stop in his discourse, 
drop down upon his knees, and passionately plead for the 
salvation of sinners. In plo wing-time he would work in his 
fields Saturdays till 11 o'clock A. M V then come to his 
house. Then he would whet his razor on his boot-leg, hone 
it on the palm of his left hand, and shave his face clean 
and smooth without the aid of a mirror; then grease his 
boots, wash up and redress ; after eating his dinner, he 
would saddle his horse and gallop away ten to thirty miles 
and preach Saturday night and Sunday in a residence or 
schoolhouse to fifteen or more people. For this work he 
received not a dollar. His reward was the sweet conscious- 
ness of duty well done and that God was pleased. Thus 
he traveled through DeWitt, Sangamon, Morgan, Logan and 
McLean Counties. At one time he held a "big meeting" in 
the barn of John Campbell, in Tazewell County, at which 
three hundred additions were received. 

Mr. Bowles lived in a farmhouse in Turnbridge Town- 
ship. He was a pronounced antislavery man and a lifelong 
friend of Abraham Lincoln, who was entertained a number 
of times in the hospitable home of Mr. Bowles. In the 
earlier period of Mr. Lincoln's life, on one of these occa- 
sions he said : "Watt, if I could preach like you, I would 
rather do that than be President." 

Mr. Bowles was absolutely fearless. In one of his meet- 
ings in a schoolhouse two young men got to playing cards. 



480 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

He asked them to desist, urging that it was quite out of 
place. In a few minutes they were at it again. The 
preacher said they must stop it. When they started their 
game the third time he walked back to them, grasped each 
one by his collar with his vise-like hands, led them to the 
door, bumped their heads together and told them to go. 
They went. 

At one time Mr. Bowles and his cousin, John G. Camp- 
bell, of McLean County, were driving together in some kind 
of a one-horse rig. At high noon they came to the home of 
a pioneer farmer, located not far from the present site of 
Waynesville. The farmer and his "hired man" had just 
come in from the field, when the following conversation 
took place: 

"Hello, neighbor," called out Mr. Bowles; "we wish to 
go to New Jerusalem and have stopped to ask you about the 
way." 

"To where?" asked the farmer. 

"To New Jerusalem." 

"Never heard of any such place. This road leads up to 
Bloomington." 

"No," answered Bowles, "we are going to New Jerusa- 
lem. But we are hungry. Now, if you will give us our 
dinner and feed our horse I will tell you the way to New 
Jerusalem." 

"The devil you will," answered the farmer. "I will give 
you your dinners and feed your horse for fifty cents." 

When they had finished dinner, Mr. Bowles pushed back 
a little from the table and began to preach to them the way 
of the Lord. When they rose from their places it was to go 
to a near-by stream, where Mr. Bowles baptized the farmer, 
his wife and the hired man the entire family. 

His body sleeps in Old Union Cemetery, within six feet 
of the spot where stood the pulpit in which he had preached 
hundreds of times. 

God always provides the man for the time, and Wattie 
Bowles was a child of Providence. 



BIOGRAPHIES 481 

Christopher C. Boyer. 

Edgar County, 111., 1839. 1908, Edgar County, 111. 

Mr. Boyer resided on a farm all his lite in the county of 
his birth. However, for a long period he was an active but 
a conservative and useful minister, chiefly in Edgar, Coles 
and Clark Counties. His financial compensation for his 
ministerial labors was always small. He was the father of 
Mm. T. A. Taylor and Prof. E. E. Boyer, of Eureka College. 

Clark Braden. 

Trumbull County, O., 1831. 

Mr. Braden graduated from Farmers College, Cincin- 
nati, O., in 1860. No one aided him by a dollar after he 
left the country district school. For ten years he labored, 
taught and attended school as he could. Aiding his younger 
brothers and sisters, in their struggles for an education, 
delayed the completion of his own course. His father and 
mother were pioneer Abolitionists and active teetotaler- 
temperance advocates from 1835 to 1855. Mr. Braden was 
himself in line with the enemies of slavery from his youth. 
He cast his first vote for Freesoil in 1852. He stumped and 
voted for Fremont in 1856, and for Lincoln in 1860. In 
this work his life was twice in peril from friends of the 
saloons and thrice by Mormons. He made war speeches and 
carried a gun as a soldier in the 127th Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry. 

Many years of his life have been given to educational 
work. In this field he filled many positions, from the 
teacher of a "deestrick skule and board round" to the presi- 
dency of three colleges. 

He has served in the Christian ministry for fifty-seven 
years and has been pastor of thirty-five churches. He has 
been a voluminous writer and has edited one political and 
one religious pauer. He has delivered more than six thou- 
sand lectures. He has conducted 133 public discussions, on 
nearly all topics agitating the public mind. Twenty-six of 

16 



482 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

these discussions were in Illinois. He was endorsed for 
more than one hundred other debates at which his opponents 
failed to appear, including "Seventh-dayists," infidels and 
Mormons. For more than twenty years it was a standing 
formula with these errorists, when they challenged for a 
debate, to condition, "any one except Braden." Some of 
his opponents, when hard pressed by Mr. Braden, uncere- 
moniously fled from the halls where the discussions were 
in progress, amid the jeers and hisses of audiences. His 
debates and lectures have reached through many States and 
Provinces of Canada. In April, 1872, Mr. Braden sent a 
challenge to the great agnostic, Robert G. Ingersoll, to 
debate in Peoria. When asked by Colonel Wright, "Why 
do you not accept?" he replied, "I am not such a 
fool as to debate. He would wear me out." Mr. Braden's 
last public discussion was successfully conducted in his sev- 
enty-eighth year. A prominent minister declared in a church 
paper that Mr. Braden, by his assaults upon errors and his 
earnest advocacy of the truth, had saved the Pacific Coast 
from a tidal wave of infidelity. Mr. Braden was sometimes 
criticized for his neglect or disregard of the social ameni- 
ties of life. However, he was always a companionable man, 
when he had time. A fine physique has enabled him to do 
the work of two or three men. He has been "a crank all 
his life and grows no better," for he is now an active advo- 
cate of Christian socialism. The storms of eighty years have 
not cooled the ardor of his love for "the truth as it is in 
Jesus." For more than sixty years he has studied, inves- 
tigated, written, taught and debated, and through these six 
eventful decades his master aim has been, "Accept the 
Christ's teachings, live the Christ life, realize the Christ char- 

Dr. J. H. Breeden. 

Sullivan County, Ind., 1834. 1911, Tpava, 111. 

Dr. Breeden was a born leader of people. He came from 
Pike County, 111., about 1858, and settled in the village of 
Summum, in Fulton County, to practice medicine. At that 



BIOGRAPHIES 483 

time his material possessions consisted of his wife a woman 
of superior mind and heart one son, a pony, a dog, a little 
house furniture and his medicine-case. He began life there 
in a two-roomed house, in which he resided for a long time. 
His first concern was the formation of a church in his new 
home, after the primitive order, for he had learned the word 
of God and how to preach it. He was chiefly instrumental 
in establishing the church in Summum, and its care devolved 
mainly upon him for many years. Besides, he was active 
in preaching the gospel in the communities around and about. 
Meanwhile, his work as a physician grew and increased and 
became very extensive. In this he was sincere, prudent, 
frank and kindly, so that his friends were counted by thou- 
sands. He was a genial and companionable man. With the 
acquisition of property his liberality grew. He was the 
friend of every good cause and the liberal supporter of every 
good work. For a term of years he served well as a trustee 
of Eureka College. During his life and by his last will he 
contributed thousands of dollars to advance the kingdom 
of God. He was a brotherly man, skillful in his profession, 
successful in business and a good preacher as well. H. O. 
Breeden is his gifted son. 

7. H. G. Brinkerhoff. 

Hackensack, N. J., 1844. 

Came with his father's family to Illinois in 1852. Edu- 
cated in common schools, Steele's Seminary, Indiana Normal, 
and graduated in law at McKendrie College. He has taught 
in high schools twenty years, been frequently engaged in 
newspaper work and has preached the gospel as well. 

H. M. Brooks. 

Meigs County, O., 1855. 

Was educated in the school of hard manual work and 
trained in the common and select schools, U. C. College and 
literary correspondence courses of two universities. He was 
an ordained minister in the Christian Denomination for four 



484 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

years. In January, 1889, at Illiopolis, 111., he united with 
the Christian Church during the pastorate of U. M. Browder, 
Pie served the Paris Church with much efficiency; also 
preached for the Kansas and Bell Ridge Churches in Edgar 
County, and the church at Tuscola, besides churches in other 
States. He has organized five congregations and induced 
fourteen young men to enter the Christian ministry. He 
conducted the funeral of Dennis Hanks, who taught Abra- 
ham Lincoln to read. Mr. Hanks died at the age of ninety- 
three years from the effects of a runaway. 

Theodore Brooks. 

Came from Troy, N. Y., to Lexington, 111., in 1860. The 
recently formed church there had invited him to become its 
pastor. He served this congregation and that at Lincoln 
half-time each. Mr. Brooks was a scholarly man, with a 
ready command of a fine vocabulary. Of companionable 
disposition, he was a superior conversationalist. As a 
preacher he was fervent and interesting. It was his custom 
when he came to Illinois not to preach "first principles" and 
to never give, at the close of his sermons, the public invita- 
tion for people to accept the Saviour. One Sunday in June, 
1861, when preaching in Lexington, he was informed that 
a lady wished to present her letter and be received into the 
congregation ; so he gave the invitation. While the hymn 
was being sung, a gentleman passed up one aisle and his 
sister the other both to make the good confession. The 
preacher, learning the facts, cried out, "O God, forgive my 
lack of faith!" His continued ministry in Illinois was most 
helpful to both congregations and preachers. 

George Matthew Brown. 

Kentucky, 1816. 1893, Pike County, 111. 

He was a brother of Wm. H. Brown, and was usually 
called Matty Brown. He was peculiar to marked eccen- 
tricity, but did useful work in Pike County and elsewhere. 



BIOGRAPHIES 485 

William M. Brown. 

Kentucky. 1863, Tennessee. 

This man was a striking personality. He was six feet 
and two inches in height and of fine form, weighing two 
hundred pounds. His head was large, his face strong and 
clean-shaven, and his dark hair he wore long for a male and 
decidedly pompadour. 

He came to Springfield in 1841 and for a time was pas- 
toi of the church there. 

He was elected as the first president of Eureka College, 
but his service was only nominal. 

His chief work was that of an evangelist. In this sphere 
he was probably the most noted among the Disciples during 
his period of service in Illinois. He was regarded as a 
powerful preacher. His sermons united argument with 
impassioned appeal. In dealing with what he considered 
denominational doctrinal errors he was often as inexorable 
as logic could be, even to rasping. On one such occasion, 
a woman auditor, not in sympathy with all his teaching, per- 
sonally expressed the wish that she "might have his scalp 
for a scrub-brush." At one of the earlier State Meetings 
held in Springfield, the mountain-top was reached on the 
Lord's Day. It was the custom then, at the close of the 
communion, to shake hands throughout the assembly. Some 
of the elder brethren would embrace each other and weep 
tears of joy. On this occasion, Mr. Brown and the gentle 
Barton W. Stone were quite carried from the usual self- 
poise by the ecstacy of joy. Then Mr. Stone cried out, 
"Brother Brown, you speak too harshly of people's errors. 
Dear brother, when you find a stone across the path of 
truth, just carefully roll it away, but don't try to spat the 
man who laid it there." It is said that a sermon that he 
delivered at Mt. Pulaski, following the Kane-Bunn debate 
on Universalism, was such a terrific indictment of other 
Protestant preachers and so filled with ginger and salt, that 
several days passed before those in the great audience 
regained sufficient composure to talk about the discourse. 



486 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

To his aggressiveness he added a brilliant imagination. His 
pictures of heavenly things were sublime. Great crowds 
attended his meetings and many were turned to the Lord. 
After all, a sweet tenderness was in his soul. Conducting a 
meeting in Bloomington in a cold winter, he was entertained 
in the inviting home of Dr. R. O. Warriner. After the even- 
ing meetings, going home the doctor led his little daughter 
Belle by the hand. The child, tired and very sleepy, as all 
normal children should be in such circumstances, cried. Then 
Mr. Brown would sing to her: 

"Rings on her fingers, bells on her toes, 
She keeps boohooing wherever she goes." 

The churches at Springfield, Bloomington, Pittsfield, and 
at many other places in the State, are yet much indebted to 
this great preacher. He became chaplain in the Thirty-eighth 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and, contracting a cold at the 
battle of Chickamauga, died ten days later. 

Uriah Marion Broivder. 

Jamestown, O., 1846. 1907, Dayton, O. 

Mr. Browder was a pastor and evangelist and a public 
debater in Illinois for a period of the seventies and eighties. 
He was clear in thinking, masterful in logic, and forceful 
in the presentation of the truth, which he never questioned 
or compromised. He was the author of several books. 

Francis M. Bruner. 

Kentucky, 1833. 1899, Iowa. 

Mr. Bruner was of German ancestry and rugged pioneer 
progenitors. His boyhood and youth were passed upon his 
father's farm in Illinois. He graduated from Knox College 
in 1857 with the honors of his class. He went to Europe 
in 1858, where he spent three years at the Universities of 
Halle in Prussia and '1 Ecloe de Paris in France. Some 
time was also passed in the great libraries, the museums and 
art galleries of Berlin and London. He was a diligent stu- 



BIOGRAPHIES 487 

dent and an indefatigable worker, so that he came to a 
strength of intellect, breadth of scholarship and greatness of 
character that made him the peer of the best men of his 
time. He was captain of Company A of the Seventh United 
States Colored Infantry one year, during which time he con- 
tracted the germs of relentless disease from which he was 
never thereafter free. In 1866-67 he was a member of the 
Illinois Legislature, serving with high honor. 

In 1870 he became president of Oskaloosa College, Iowa, 
where he served efficiently as executive, teacher and solicitor 
for six years. He was induced to accept the presidency of 
Abingdon College in 1877. Into his efforts to restore the 
school to its former prosperity and usefulness he threw the 
indomitable energy of all his splendid faculties ; but the seeds 
of its death had already been sown. With the union of 
Abingdon and Eureka Colleges he became the head of the 
Bible Department. The ripest fruit of his whole life was 
there gathered by the young men who sat in the shade of 
this great tree. After four years there, failing health com- 
pelled his resignation. 

Mr. Bruner was a great teacher of the word of God. His 
much learning did not make him mad in either mind or 
heart. Intellectual pride and self -righteousness had no place 
in him. Cast in a heroic mold, he was genuinely humble 
and loving. In health and sickness, in prosperity and 
adversity, in appreciation of his worth or its lack, he was a 
great soul who moved forward unwaveringly to his high 
aims. 

John Buckles. 

Illinois, 1822. 1909, Illinois. 

In 1822, when John Buckles was three weeks old, his 
parents left White County, 111., to find and make a home in 
that part of central Illinois now known as Logan County. 
John was the third child, and on this journey was carried 
in the arms of his mother, who rode on horseback. The 
distance was about 150 miles as the crow flies. The hard- 
ships of such a trip are unknown to most people of this day. 



488 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

At that time there were only six families living within the 
present boundaries of Logan County. John's father, Robert 
Buckles, was a man of iron mold. Without the education 
of schools, he answered clearly all the questions that per- 
tained to his business and life. At the outbreak of the 
Black Hawk War he was one of the first to enlist, and 
bunked with and fought side by side with Abraham Lincoln. 
John's mother, Mary (''Polly") Birks Buckles, was one of 
the uncrowned heroines of history. She was the mother of 
fifteen children. The family residence was a mud-daubed 
cabin. In this for many years she did all the cooking before 
an open fireplace, made all the clothing for her family from 
the raw materials, and when her husband was absent from 
home at some distant market, or at war, she would fell the 
trees and cut the wood for use during the cold winters. It 
was a new land upon which the Buckles babies first looked 
out. Small growths of trees skirted the streams of water, 
and the wide prairies, reaching out in every direction to the 
horizon, were seas of grass and wild flowers. Wolves 
howled, foxes stole and wildcats screamed. Great herds of 
agile deer moved gracefully hither and thither, and count- 
less thousands of wild chickens made the prairies vocal with 
their thrummings in the early mornings of spring. And 
there were 'coons in those days. Later in his life, John 
Buckles said: "Well do I remember the winter I captured 
thirty of these midnight travelers, and the day I received my 
first money fifteen dollars in silver for their hides. It was 
one of the happiest events of my life." He attended school 
altogether about one year. The house was made of logs, 
with the ground for a floor, split logs for seats and the chil- 
dren's knees for desks. In his early manhood he assisted 
his father in driving hogs to Racine, Wis., and sheep to St. 
Louis, Mo. In his twenty-second year he helped a neighbor 
drive a herd of cattle to the New York City market, and 
again in the following year, 1845. It was he who led the 
largest ox before the drove. The time required for the 
round trip was 130 days one hundred in going and thirty 



BIOGRAPHIES 489 

in returning. His pay was twelve dollars per calendar 
month. Such experiences cultivated his inbred industry and 
thrift, taught him independence of judgment and self- 
reliance, and developed his sagacity, courage and force. By 
commendable methods as farmer and stockman, he accumu- 
lated good property and lived a long and useful life. He 
was an open foe of the organized liquor traffic, a helpful 
friend of our college and a sincere disciple of our Lord. 
His life is a heritage to his children and his children's 
children. 

0. A. Burgess. 

Thompson, Conn., 1829. 1882, Chicago, 111. 

Mr. Burgess came of Puritan stock. His mother trained 
him in the straitest thought of Calvinism. Her death 
came in 1843, which led the son to seek the Lord. He 
failed to receive the blessing at the "mourners' bench" and 
turned away from religion, believing himself given over to 
hardness of heart or predestined to be damned. He attended 
Norwich Academy, New York, and came to Metamora, 111., 
in 1847, where he taught three years. He became a Chris- 
tian in 1850 under the ministry of Henry D. Palmer. Shortly 
he went to Bethany College, reaching there with $4.50, but 
by resourceful labors graduated in 1854. His life thereafter 
was passed in Illinois and Indiana, where he served as 
teacher in Eureka and president of Butler College, pastor 
of churches and as a mighty champion and triumphant 
defender of the truth of the gospel against all opposers. 

Thomas D. Butler. 

Shrewsbury, England, 1838. 

The chief event of Mr. Butler's childhood was a visit of 
Alexander Campbell to his native city in 1847. It was then 
arranged that Thomas should be sent to Bethany College 
in a few years. But his father dying soon, postponed the 
visit of the son until he reached his majority. In 1859 he 
spent sixty days and nights in crossing the Atlantic. Mr. 



490 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Butler has done but little ministerial work in Illinois except 
in a general way. He served for a time the church at 
Batavia and on the editorial staff of the Christian Century. 
He is widely known as a writer, his contributions having 
appeared many times in the Millennial Harbinger, New York 
Independent, Christian Standard and other papers. He is a 
man of fine mental and spiritual culture. His literary taste 
is discriminating and refined. His wife, Marie Radclift'e 
Butler, was for a long period well known as a charming 
writer. Mr. Butler firmly believes the gospel as it is writ- 
ten in the Book. 

W. F. Burnham. 

Chapin, 111., 1871. 

Educated in public schools, Illinois College and graduated 
at Eureka in 1895. He learned telegraphy and worked at the 
business in Illinois and Montana for a period of five years. 
He served as pastor in Carbondale, Charleston, Decatur 
Central, and is now with the First in Springfield. In Mr. 
Burnham are combined the qualities of a successful minister. 
He is the secretary of the National Commission on Christian 

Judge Albert G. Burr. 

Western New York, 1829. 1882, Carrollton, 111. 

Was brought by his widowed mother to Illinois in 1830. 
The first home was near Springfield. He was almost entirely 
a self-educated man. At the age of twenty he taught a 
school at Vandalia. In 1850 he went to Winchester and in 
1856 was admitted to the bar. He served two terms in the 
Legislature and was a member of the Constitutional Con- 
vention of 1862. In 1868 he moved to Carrollton, where he 
resided till the close of his life. He was a member of the 
fortieth and forty-first Congresses. In 1877 he was elected 
circuit judge, and served in this position till the day of his 
final victory. As a jurist, Mr. Burr was eminent and had 
few equals. His analyses of intricate questions were clear 
and explicit and his decisions satisfactory. As an orator he 
was well-nigh perfect. In his early years he entered the 



BIOGRAPHIES 491 

Christian Church, and to the close of his life he was not 
only a member, but a support and an inspiration. When 
there was no other one present in the Lord's Day meetings 
to preach, he proclaimed the unsearchable riches. While he 
filled high positions and was the peer of any man, he was 
not in the least ostentatious or distant. He had a genuine 
affection for and was intimately associated with the common 
people. As man and jurist he made it the rule of his life 
to do justly and love mercy. He frequently expressed him- 
self in verse. The following was written by him about 1852: 

LIFE'S VOYAGE. 

Though waves may swell and billows rise, 
And threatening clouds hang o'er the skies, 

O'er me and mine 
Though driven on where breakers roar, 
And ragged rocks surround the shore, 

I'll not repine. 

Though riding on the maddened wave, 
To time and circumstance a slave, 

I'll bear my lot; 
I'll raise aloft religion's sail, 
And strive to ride throughout the gale, 

And falter not. 

Though friends upon the sea of life 
Are from my bosom torn in strife, 

And by the swell 

Of ocean wave, borne from my side, 
I'll bid them with a stoic's pride 

A long farewell. 

Though all desert me in the gloom 
And leave me o'er life's sea to roam 

Without one friend, 
Still I will always onward keep, 
Triumphant o'er the raging deep, 
Till life shall end. 

Alexander Campbell. 

Was born Sept. 12, 1788, in the County of Antrim, Ire- 
land. He was descended from Scotch and Huguenot ances- 
tors. Both his physical and mental constitution was vigorous 



492 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

and well balanced. From his earliest years he was trained 
by his learned and accomplished father in habits of severe 
application. He was a graduate of the University of Glas- 
gow. Reared in the strictest school of Presbyterianism, he 
early formed and cultivated habits of piety and a taste for 
theological studies. From his youth he had a profound 
reverence for the word of God. 

He came to America in 1809 and joined his father, 
Thomas Campbell, in western Pennsylvania. From that 
time father and son were one in their aims, spirit and work. 
Both were deeply impressed with the conviction of the evils 
and inherent sinfulness of sectarianism. Their first advocacy 
was the repudiation of human creeds as tests of fellowship, 
and the union of all our Lord's people upon the catholic 
truth of the Bible as the only authoritative standard of 
faith and practice. Taking their stand upon the principles 
set forth in the "Declaration and Address," neither foresaw 
the conclusions to which he would be led. They and those 
associated with them searched the Scriptures as free as pos- 
sible from party bias. From these investigations they con- 
cluded that sprinkling for baptism and infant membership 
in the church were unauthorized of God. They were there- 
fore accordingly immersed and united with the Regular Bap- 
tists. It was stipulated, however, that they should not be 
required to subscribe to any creed or articles of faith other 
than the Bible. After a few years in this fellowship they 
found it prudent to withdraw. There were prejudiced and 
intolerant men who held a leading influence in the Redstone 
Association who were unwilling to break from the Baptist 
name, creed and traditions. They stirred up fierce opposi- 
tion against those who stood for the catholic truth of the 
New Testament. Hence the Campbells, and others who held 
to the principles of the "Declaration and Address," cut loose 
from their religious connections and entered untrammeled 
upon the advocacy and the defense of the plea for the return 
to primitive Christianity. 

Alexander Campbell died in 1866. 



BIOGRAPHIES 493 

John C. Campbell. 

Bourbon County, Ky., 1813. 1901, Elcomington, 111. 

Mr. Campbell became a Christian at North Middleton, 
Ky., in 1832. In 1834 he was married to Miss Sally Ann 
Campbell, who was the partner of his faithful labors for 
almost sixty-seven years. 

He passed one year as a student in the State University 
at Bloomington, Ind. 

In 1849 he came to McLean County, and bought and 
settled upon a small farm five miles south of Bloomington. 
This he made his home for twenty-four years. His first 
residence there was a log cabin. With the proceeds of his 
labor on his land he supported his family. 

He began to preach the gospel about 1840, and made 
this the chief business of his life until incapacitated by the 
disabilities of age. This work was done mainly at his own 
charges. In 1853, in the schoolhouse of his community, he 
organized a church of thirteen people, which he named the 
Grassy Ridge Christian Church. Here, by his faithful and 
loving ministry, hundreds were turned to the Lord. This 
little congregation became a mother of churches. Besides, 
at one time during this period there were twenty individuals 
or families who were members of the church in Bloomington, 
who had begun the Christian life at Grassy Ridge. Among 
those who came there to preach on Mr. Campbell's invita- 
tion were John I. Rogers, B. K. Smith, John B. New, 
George Campbell, B. U. Watkins, Walter P. Bowles, James 
Robeson, Dudley Downs, James Mitchell, G. W. Minier, T. 
V. Berry, B. B. Tyler, Dr. J. M. Allen, B. W. Johnson and 
D. R. Van Buskirk. These ministers were usually enter- 
tained in Mr. Campbell's hospitable home. Evidently he 
believed in having the very best in the kingdom. 

He was a man of God in whom was united a strong will 
with a gentle spirit, self-sacrifice with cheerful hopefulness, 
the trust of a little child with the courage of a Daniel, and 
a beautiful simplicity and sincerity of life. 



<94 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Thomas Campbell. 

Was born in County Down, near Newry, Ireland, Feb. 1, 
1763. His father, Archibald Campbell, was a soldier in the 
British Army under General Wolfe and was at the capture 
of Quebec. He was a strict member of the Episcopal 
Church. But its rigid formalities repelled the son, Thomas, 
in his early life. He found more congenial associations 
among the warm-hearted and zealous Seceders the body of 
the Presbyterians that had separated from the established 
church of Scotland in 1733. He was educated in the Uni- 
versity of Glasgow. In 1787 he was married to Miss Jane 
Cooneigle, a descendant of the French Huguenots. She was 
a woman of fine mental and moral endowments. From his 
early manhood, Thomas Campbell was a reverent and earnest 
student of the Bible. Upon the completion of his theological 
course, he became a minister in the Scotch Seceder Church, 
with the full credentials of the Christian ministry. After 
one pastorate, he came to America in 1807 and settled in 
western Pennsylvania. There he found many of his friends 
who had preceded him to this country. At once he began 
to preach to them. His charitable spirit and able expositions 
of Scripture drew around him the pious of different 
churches. There were no reasons for the separation of these 
sheep in that new country, but rather many for their union 
in public worship and Christian work on Bible principles. 
They agreed to form an association of Christians to meet 
statedly for personal advancement in knowledge and duty. 
Thus came into being the "Christian Association" of Wash- 
ington, Pa. Under its auspices the "Declaration and Ad- 
dress," written by Thomas Campbell, was issued in 1809. 
For its catholicity, its exaltation of the word of God, its 
clear statement of the only ground of practical Christian 
union, its recognition of the sole and supreme authority of 
our Lord the Christ, it was a remarkable production. In 
significance it ranks with the ninety-five theses that Luther 
nailed upon the gate of the church at Wittenberg. 



BIOGRAPHIES 495 

Thomas Campbell lived a full century in advance of his 
generation. He was a rare and beautiful soul. In him the 
vital elements of Christ's gospel united in charming fruition. 
At the age of ninety-one he passed on. 

W. H. Cannon. 

Near Pittsfield, 111., 1862. 

Grew up on the farm. Educated in the public schools, 
Eureka College and Drake University. Has been pastor at 
Sterling, Illiopolis, Lincoln (two terms), Lexington, Eureka, 
Chapin, Pittsfield, and now at Central in Decatur. Mr. Can- 
non is a man of very clear perception and a superior min- 
ister. 

W. R. Carle. 

In 1870, Mr. Carle was elected to the lower house of the 
twenty-seventh Legislature of Illinois on the Democratic 
ticket. He was a successful business man and accumulated 
much property. He was a member of the Wapella Church, 
which town was his home. In religion he was conservative, 
but held that Christians should pay one-tenth of their income 
to the Lord's work. He did something for two of our col- 
leges in his last years. He was never married, and for many 
years made his home with his uncle and aunt, Joshua and 
Margaret Carle. They were natives of West Virginia and 
were immersed by Alexander Campbell. 

Joshua Carle claimed that he was the first among the 
pioneers to "publicly teach the universal priesthood of all 
believers." 

Thomas Carlin. 

Near Frankfort, Ky., 1789. 1852, Illinois. 

Came to Illinois in 1812, settling near Carrollton. He 
was twice elected to the State Senate. Commanded a bat- 
talion in the Black Hawk War. Was elected Governor of 
the State in 1848, serving four years. Historians say he was 
one of the best Governors the State ever had. Mr. Carlin 
was a member of the church of Christ in Quincy. 



496 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

IV. P. Carrithers. 

Sullivan County, Ind., 1829. 

Came with his parents to Illinois in 1847. Educated in 
the public school. Served in the ministry for forty years. 
His preaching was mainly in Livingston, Marshall, Ford and 
McLean Counties, but he also worked in Missouri, Iowa and 
Nebraska. Mr. Carrithers is a gentle, earnest and faithful 
man whose ministry was distinctly constructive. His home 
is at Saunemin, where he quietly awaits the day of his coro- 
nation. 

John Chandler. 

Was born near Cynthiana, Ky., March 25, 1822, and is 
now (1913) a resident of Decatur, 111. His early education 
was such as was afforded by the winter country schools of 
Kentucky and Ohio at that time. 

Crawford County, 111., was organized in 1817. Coles 
County was cut out of Crawford in 1831, and Douglas 
County was cut out of Coles in 1857. Mr. Chandler came 
to what is now Douglas County in 1838. Here he became 
a schoolteacher and an official. Before the division of Coles 
County, he served as assessor and treasurer; after the 
division, he was deputy sheriff, then served as county clerk 
two and one-half years by appointment, and the next four 
years by an election in Douglas County. He was in the 
Mexican War. 

Mr. Chandler was the presiding moderator in the debate 
between David Walk and the M. E. attorney at Tuscola in 
1863. Shortly thereafter, he became a Christian. When the 
little congregation needed a house of worship, he furnished 
$3,450 of the $3,800 that it cost. He never received any 
money returned. The building was a two-story frame. Mr. 
Walk said that his wife would conduct a "dav school" on the 
first floor, but this aim was not realized. The most of Mr. 
Chandler's many years were passed on his farm. He has 
lived a long, an honorable and a useful life a public-spirited 
and intelligent gentleman. 



BIOGRAPHIES 497 

Bernard J. Claggett. 

Lexington, 111., 1861. 

Educated at Wesleyan. Farmer and banker. Served as 
mayor of Lexington and in the House of the Legislature; 
elected in 1892. Long time a member of the Lexington 
Church. 

/. S. Clements. 

Edgar County, 111., 1856. 

His grandmother, Mary Holland, came out of the Pres- 
byterian Church with Barton W. Stone at Caneridge, Ky., 
and his mother was baptized by Maurice R. Trimble in 
southern Illinois. He grew up on the farm, attended the 
public schools and was five years at Eureka. He has been 
in the ministry thirty-eight years, an energetic pastor and 
successful evangelist in Illinois, Missouri and Kansas, hav- 
ing added near ten thousand members to the churches. His 
single purpose has been to preach the pure gospel and follow 
the Master. "If I had my life to live over again, I would 
do just what I have done, barring a few mistakes." 

L. E. Chase. 

Coolville, O., 1876. 

Grew up on the farm. Attended the country school, the 
village his"h school, Hiram College and the University of 
Illinois. Taught school at nineteen. The first year of his 
married life he worked on a farm and preached to weak 
churches in Ohio. For this service, he received twenty-five 
cents in money and much valuable experience. Then he went 
to a small church in Michigan for full time at $300 per 
year. While there, the advice and encouragement given him 
by A. P. Frost, the father of Miss Adelaide Frost, were 
worth as much to him as years of college work. After five 
years in Michigan, he came to Illinois, where he has served 
the churches at Armington, Leroy, Carbondale, New Bed- 
ford and Palmvra. He was converted in a little country M. 
E. church. While he never joined the church, his Methodist 



498 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

brethren treated him most fraternally. He has helped in the 
building of three houses of worship, and has received more 
than two thousand into the church. 

A. P. Cobb. 

Wooster, O., 1853. 

Mr. Cobb's family came to Decatur in 1867. Here he 
attended school, and while in his teens learned the machinist 
trade. He was strong in body and vigorous in mind, and 
made good progress in both lines of work. In those years 
he was in the school of adversity as well. Graduating at 
Eureka in 1878, he entered the ministry. As a pastor he 
served the church at Normal two periods, at Springfield six 
years, at Des Moines, la., and San Antonio, Tex. For ten 
years he served as an efficient evangelist in the United States 
and Canada. He held successful meetings in Boston, New 
York City, Minneapolis and other great centers. For four- 
teen years he has been the platform manager at summer 
Chautauquas. In him industry, large energy and capacity 
for work, with thirst for knowledge and wide readings, have 
united in producing a scholar of more than average attain- 
ments. 

The Connors. 

James Connor was born in Tennessee in 1810, was brought 
to Indiana in 1812, and died there in 1893. His ministry in 
Illinois reached only from 1859-65. He resided on his farm 
near Humboldt. That was the time of monthly preaching 
and protracted meetings. He worked in Coles, Moultrie and 
Douglas Counties. He was a preacher for more than sixty 
years. 

S. M. Connor was a son of James Connor. He served 
the Normal Church two terms and the churches at Girard 
and Virden. His period of work in Illinois was from 
1878-88. In laying the foundation of the church at Normal 
he stood brave and firm against bitter sectarian opposition. 

Daniel Connor, a brother of Tames, resided in Cumber- 



BIOGRAPHIES 499 

land County for about thirty years, and preached in that 
part of the State. 

John H. Coats. 

A preacher for many years and a long-time elder of the 
church in Winchester. Military service in Company A, 
Sixty-eighth, and Company K, Fourteenth Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry. Captured and several months a prisoner in Ander- 
sonville. Treasurer of Scott County for several years, mem- 
ber of the Illinois Legislature in 1882, and Presidential 
elector in 1896. 

Nathan E. Cory. 

Ohio, 1837. 

Mr. Cory attended the Baptist College at Franklin, Ind., 
and Oskaloosa College, la. He was a lay preacher in the 
Methodist Church before uniting with the Christian Church 
in 1857. Besides holding a great number of meetings in 
Illinois, he served the churches at Monmouth, Virginia, Mt. 
Sterling, Barry, Colchester and Augusta. He has been a 
faithful preacher of the word of God and his ministry has 
always been constructive. Between four and five thousand 
people were added to the church in Illinois by his labors. 
He is father of A. E. Cory, a missionary in China. 

John J. Cosat. 



Vermillion County, 111., 1844. 

Grew to manhood on the farm, receiving only such edu- 
cation as the common schools of the time could give him. 
Returning to civil life in the summer of 1865, he began as a 
teacher in the public school, in which he continued for about 
thirty years. He became a Christian in 1866, and four years 
thereafter was ordained to the ministry by the old Union 
Church and the venerable Rolla M. Martin. Since then he 
has preached almost continually on Saturdays and Sundays, 
much of the time without financial compensation. He has 
fostered weak congregations, brought into the kingdom about 
three thousand people, organized churches and endured hard- 



500 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

ness as a good soldier of Jesus Christ. Mr. Cosat's is a 
peaceable disposition, but he has always been ready to defend 
the truth. Being invited there in 1893, he held two public 
discussions in Labette County, Kan., with Priest Peter Fer- 
rell, of the Roman Catholic Church. The propositions were 
the following: "The Holy Scriptures alone furnish all the 
necessary knowledge to obtain pardon and everlasting life," 
and, "To pray acceptably to God, our prayers should be 
addressed to the Holy Virgin, saints and angels." In 1895 
he debated the question of instrumental music in public wor- 
ship with Min. William Elmore, at Bismark, and in 1898 the 
same question with Min. J. W. Perkins, at Georgetown. Mr. 
Cosat has stood for better things in Christian life, and his 
ministry has been a very great help to the congregations in 
Vermilion County. 

His military record was one of unusual brilliancy and 
thrilling to a degree. Being away from home on a visit, at 
the beginning of the Civil War, he enlisted in the Fifth Wis- 
consin Infantry. He was under the command of General 
Sheridan at Harper's Ferry, Martinsburg, Winchester and 
Cedar Creek; later, under General Meade at Petersburg, 
Sailor's Creek and on to Appomattox. On the morning of 
Apr. 6, 1865, Lieutenant-General Ewell had placed his corps 
in rifle-pits on the brow of a hill south of Sailor's Creek. 
This Confederate force was savagely and simultaneously 
assaulted by the Second and Sixth Federal Corps, and with 
such skill and determination as to virtually destroy it. In 
this assault, Mr. Cosat and five of his comrades were sepa- 
rated from their regiment, with the Confederate forces 
between them. The official report of Thomas S. Allen, 
colonel in command of the regiment, War Records, History 
of Appomattox Campaign, page 953, gives the names of the 
six men ; to-wit : Sergeant Anetis Cameron, Corporals 
Charles Ronsfhan and August Brocker, and Private John W. 
Davis, of Companv C, and Corporal John J. Cosat and Pri- 
vate Herod W. True, of Company I, all of the Fifth Wis- 
consin Volunteer Infantry. Sergeant Cameron suggested 



BIOGRAPHIES 501 

that they try to capture General Ewell. The six men ran 
across an open field and took position in a fence row that 
had grown up in dense brush. The sergeant crawled to the 
end of this, and reported that General Ewell, his staff and 
body-guard, probably a hundred in all, were riding directly 
toward them. The sergeant ordered that, when the Confed- 
erates came within hearing distance, they move in single file 
with cocked guns out of the brush the sixth man stopping 
at the edge and he himself would demand the surrender. 
General Ewell, thus completely surprised and supposing there 
were many Federals concealed in the brush, at once ordered 
his adjutant-general (Beglar) to unfurl the white flag, which 
he did. Shortly thereafter this immortal six had the honor 
of presenting to General Meade this famous old, battle- 
scarred veteran of the Confederacy, his staff and body-guard, 
as prisoners of war. 

Walter R. Couch. 

Wabash County, III., 1839. 

The parents of Walter R. Couch settled in Wabash 
County in 1816. At the age of sixteen he became a Chris- 
tian at the historic Barney's Prairie Church under the 
ministry of William Courter, who was one of the faithful 
preachers of the early days. When a young man he began 
to preach. He graduated from Northwestern Christian Uni- 
versity, now Butler College, and thereafter gave eleven years 
to churches in Indiana. He then returned to Illinois. While 
he managed his farm in Wabash County, his time and talents 
were mainly given to the service of the churches in that and 
contiguous counties. For fifty years he has been actively 
and faithfully identified with the work of the Lord, and his 
generous and helpful services have been widely influential in 
promoting every good cause. 

William L. Crlrn. 

Washington County, Ind., 1829. 1910, West Frank- 
fort, 111. 



502 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

He taught school in his neighborhood and served three 
years in the Union Army during the Civil War. He came 
to Franklin County in 1865, but did not enter the ministry 
till four years later. Thereafter his farm was the center 
from which he radiated in all directions conducting meet- 
ings, holding public discussions and organizing churches. 
He was an earnest student of the Bible itself. In preach- 
ing a sermon on "Sanctification" he quoted 130 passages by 
his memory, as shown by a stenographic report. His knowl- 
edge of the Scriptures was comprehensive and profound; 
his sermons clear, forceful and impressive. He lived close 
to nature and near to God. 

Daniel H. Darling. 

Painesville, O., 1834. 1909, Joliet, 111. 

Was educated in the schools of his native town. His 
life-work was teaching and training the young. Before 
reaching his majority he began his work at Toledo, O. Next, 
he was principal of the school at Lockport, 111., for three 
years, and then superintendent of schools in Joliet up to the 
beginning of the Civil War. He returned to this position in 
1882, and continued therein till 1896, when failing health 
compelled his retirement. His fine character left imperish- 
able impressions upon the multitudes of children. 

He was rejected, because of his size, by the recruiting 
officer in Chicago in 1861. Then he went to Michigan, 
where, receiving authority from the Governor, he raised 
Company C of the Seventh Cavalry. He was engaged in all 
the campaigns of the Army of the Potomac and participated 
in many battles. He was wounded at Gettysburg, but would 
not leave the field till the battle ended. After the close of 
the Civil War he continued in the military service on the 
Western plains against the Indians. There he was colonel 
in command, and helped in opening the Overland Mail Route 
to California. He retired bv reason of broken health. 

Mr. Darling- entered Christ's service in early life, and 
was active and earnest therein to its close. In Joliet he 



BIOGRAPHIES 503 

worked and worshiped with the Baptist Church until he 
thought the time had come to form a congregation after the 
New Testament pattern. He was its leader and support in 
every way. 

William Davenport. 

Jessamine County, Ky., 1797. 1869, Nebraska City, Neb. 

Mr. Davenport was a man of large physical, mental and 
spiritual strength. He became a lawyer, and his fine pres- 
ence and oratorical powers gave promise of a brilliant career. 
In early life he united with the Baptist Church, but, hearing 
the advocates of the primitive gospel, he was captivated by 
the simplicity and Scripturalness of their teaching. He then 
united with the church of Christ and entered its ministry 
with characteristic enthusiasm. He came with his family to 
Walnut Grove (Eureka) in 1835. There he settled on his 
farm, but his life's work was preaching the gospel, of which 
he was a powerful advocate. His public ministry reached 
many places, both near and far, in Illinois and was greatly 
blessed. He was also one of the leaders in founding the 
school at Eureka, and, having married a sister of Ben Major, 
helped to cast that community in a superior mold. 

Miss Elmira J. Dickinson. 

Hopkinsville, Ky., 1831. 1912, Eureka, 111. 

Few women in Illinois exerted a wider or better influence 
on her generation than Miss Dickinson. Her father brought 
her in 1835, with his family, to Walnut Grove, now Eureka. 
This was her place of residence throughout her life. She 
was in almost all of her Christian service a true pioneer. 
Beginning her teaching with the "little ones" in the academy, 
she continued her work in the classroom through twenty- 
nine years. She was actively associated with the Woman's 
Christian Temperance Union, and traveled in its interest 
during its formative period for five years. It was her desire 
to serve in some foreign mission field, and, as the Disciples 
of Christ had not then reached this point in their growth, 



504 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Miss Dickinson asked the Baptists to send her out. They 
could not accept her unless she would become a Baptist, 
which she could not do. The Woman's Union Missionary 
Society of New York were financially unable to send her. 
Thus was she providentially kept at home for a larger 
service. She became the founder and leader of the Chris- 
tian Woman's Board of Missions in Illinois, and one of the 
most efficient co-operants in their national society. Her self- 
imposed task of laying the foundation of this work in Illinois 
was a most difficult one. As a missionary advocate and edu- 
cator she was an unwelcome visitor in many places. Not a 
few wished that she would pass them by. She was keenly 
sensitive to all this uninformed indifference and crass oppo- 
sition, but with a divine vision she bore it all and worked on. 
The years vindicated her wisdom, and a multitude of 
Christly women now rejoice in the magnificent results and 
move forward. Her life was thoroughly devoted, and her 
moral courage the finest. She was a true handmaid of the 
Lord, whose work will survive all the mutations of time. 

Dudley Downs. 

Edgar County, 111., 1838. 1869, Minnesota. 

Mr. Downs' parental inheritance was excellent. He went 
to school in the country and at Paris. He entered the Chris- 
tian ministry early in life. After one year in Pennsylvania, 
he returned to Illinois, where his work was chiefly done. He 
served at Wapella and Clinton, and was State Evangelist for 
several years. Also, he helped edit a monthly Christian 
paper for several years. 

Mr. Downs was a man of sweet spirit and gentle dispo- 
sition, but he was full of moral courage and energy. He 
was wholly consecrated to his work and wore himself out 
in it all too soon. 

W. F. Eastman. 

New York, 1847. 1909, Illinois. _ 

Mr. Eastman received a liberal education in his native 
State and was for a time a schoolmaster there. He was well 



BIOGRAPHIES 505 

read and versatile. He became a Disciple from intelligent 
conviction, and throughout his life was as true to his ideals 
as the needle to the pole. In him, gentleness and firmness 
were united so as to remind one of his Master. His esti- 
mable wife was an earnest Congregationalist, so that his 
church life was lived alone. In a modest but becoming man- 
ner he always showed his colors. Every one that knew him 
knew that he was a member of the church of Christ. He 
was the prime mover in the formation of the church at Ster- 
ling. Thereafter, he went West, and, by a mistake in judg- 
ment in business, he lost not only the means he had accumu- 
lated, but was left heavily involved. He then came to 
Moline, 111., and engaged in the newspaper business. This 
paper he made one of the most influential in northern Illinois. 
Again he took his own place in planting a church of Christ 
in that city as its sustaining force. He was serving as post- 
master there in 1909. As the end approached, he took $500 
from the bank and paid the last dollar of indebtedness that 
he had unfortunately incurred more than twenty years before 
that time. Then he said, "I will never have a home on this 
earth, but will have to wait for a mansion in heaven." 

L. N. Early. 

Boone County, Ky., 1848. 

Attended public and private schools at Petersburg, Ky. 
Taught ten years. Next, after seven years' work, graduated 
with first honors from the classical and Biblical schools of 
Kentucky University. Later, did work in the University of 
Missouri, where he received his A.M. degree, and at Har- 
vard. Has served the church at Grayville, Kansas and Dan- 
ville Second. Is a good teacher and preacher. 

Caleb Edzvards. 

Brighton, England, 1832. 1905, Quincy, 111. 

Was brought to Cincinnati, O., in 1844, and came to 
Edwards County in 1848. He did not begin to preach till 
1864. From that time to the close of his life he gave him- 



506 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

self to a most sincere and upbuilding ministry. He was 
unassuming, gentle and steadfast, and was loved by many 
people. He dropped dead on a street in Quincy. 

Daniel W. Elledge. 

Bourbon County, Ky., 1813. 1890, Yoncolla, Ore. 

Daniel W. Elledge was one of our true pioneer preachers. 
In 1816 his parents brought him from Bourbon County, Ky., 
to Edgar County, 111. They were high Calvinists, and com- 
monly called, in the vernacular of the time, "Hardshell Bap- 
tists." They were ambitious to make a Baptist preacher of 
this son, and hence gave him unusual attention. The schools 
of the community were not of a very high grade. Any man 
who could read, write and teach arithmetic was considered 
a competent master. But young Elledge hungered for 
knowledge, was a keen observer and thoughtful. In later 
years, on one of his preaching-tours, he met a college-bred 
minister who, after hearing him preach, said, "Bro. Elledge, 
where did you receive your education?" 

"Down in Edgar County, at the Big Creek Schoolhouse." 

"You use good language for one with only a common- 
school education." 

Mr. Elledge was a student of the Bible from his boyhood. 
Shortly after his marriage in 1831, Michael Combs came over 
from Indiana and held a meeting in the neighborhood. He 
organized a Christian Church. Mr. Elledge was one of the 
converts and soon thereafter began to preach. At first his 
efforts were poor, but he improved rapidly. The earlier 
years of his ministry were confined mainly to Edgar, Clark 
and Coles Counties, where he preached in log cabins of the 
people, in schoolhouses and in groves. He was a logical 
reasoner and an earnest exhorter. Many were turned to the 
Lord by his preaching. About the year 1833 he moved to 
Clark County, and settled on a new tract of land some three 
miles east of Dalson Prairie. While he improved his farm 
and from it supported his family, his preaching was stead- 
fastly continued. About 1836 he organized his home church, 



BIOGRAPHIES 507 

six miles west of his residence and three miles west of Dai- 
son Prairie. This he named the Blue Grass Christian 
Church. Later he helped build their house for public wor- 
ship. 

The path of his ministry was marked by converts, con- 
gregations formed and their houses built. Not infrequently 
he was associated with Nathan Wright and Michael Combs, 
of Indiana, and Thomas Goodman, of Illinois, in what were 
called "Big Meetings." And they were big in clear-cut 
teaching of the Bible, big in fellowship and hospitality, big 
in sincerity and simplicity, big in Christian joy and help- 
fulness, and big in results, for they were the enduring foun- 
dation of our civilization. They were big in everything 
except the financial compensation of the preachers. There 
was little money in circulation, and frequently these pioneers 
were squeamish about "taking pay for preaching." But the 
pioneer sisters knew that a man needed food and clothing, 
so every now and then they gave Bro. Elledge a pair of 
home-made woolen socks, and on one occasion they gave 
him enough of homespun "Blue Jeans" to make him a pair 
of trousers. As his physical weight had come to be 230 
pounds, it is apparent that this was a liberal donation. Many 
of the early settlers kept a few sheep and raised flax to make 
their own clothing. 

Game was plentiful in southeastern Illinois. At one 
time Mr. Elledge had seven deer hung up in the woods. On 
another occasion, having killed one of these fine animals 
about a mile from his home, he left it on the ground till he 
could "get the old mare and sled to haul it home." On his 
return he found that a panther had dragged the carcass to 
the side of an old log and had covered it up with leaves. 

While Mr. Elledge cleared and cultivated his land, he 
carried a copy of the New Testament in his pocket. When 
he sat down to rest he would read it. At one time, he was 
preaching at the home of Robert Downs, father of Dudley 
Downs, in the southern part of Edgar County. Because of 
the crowd of people, the preacher stood just inside the 



508 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

entrance door, and, turning around, he saw one of Mr. 
Downs' three large hounds standing with his front feet on 
the threshold, stretching his head upward. Quick as light- 
ning the preacher's big fist smote the hound's jaw, knocking 
him out into the middle of the yard. ''My book tells me to 
beware of dogs," said Mr. Elledge, and went on with his 
sermon as though nothing had happened. 

In 1853 he sold his farm and moved to Putnam County, 
Mo. He settled within three miles of the Iowa State line. 
In that new country he began his work again as a frontier, 
pioneer farmer and preacher. For a number of years he 
stood alone in that region as an advocate of the New Testa- 
ment order. According to the customs of the time, the 
Methodists took pleasure in calling him "the fighting Camp- 
bellite preacher." But in one public discussion they learned 
to respect him. His ministry in northern Missouri was sig- 
nally fruitful in people turned to the Lord and churches 
constituted. 

In 1865, Mr. Elledge sold his farm and moved to Oregon, 
where he continued his earnest ministry through the Grand 
Ronde Valley, at Eugene, at Portland, at Salem three years, 
and at various places in the State of Washington. 

When the infirmities of his body became such that he 
could not stand in preaching, he sat and taught the people 
the word of God. He fought a good fight, he kept the 
faith, and on his little farm near Yoncolla, Ore., in his sev- 
enty-fourth year, he finished his triumphant course and went 
away to receive his eternal crown. 

John Ellis. 

The vital data of this good preacher failed to come in 
answer to earnest requests. It is probable that he was asso- 
ciated with the Christian Denomination, but he preached for 
a few of the churches of Christ in Madison County, 111., in 
the early seventies. Later he served some kindred congrega- 
tions in western Pennsylvania. He was then an asred and 
feeble man. In answer to protests against his holding to 



BIOGRAPHIES 509 

*: ; s ministry under such conditions, he replied that he wished 
to ^o on to the close of his earthly life. Let the following 
poem (his production) be his memorial. It was popular for 
a ! ng period and is worth preserving. 

The writer is indebted to Min. A. J. Carrick, Montezuma, 
la., for these copies: 

THE WHITE PILGRIM'S GRAVE. 
(Written at Johnsonburg, N. J., 1836.) 

I came to the spot where White Pilgrim lay, 

And pensively stood by his tomb; 
When, in a low whisper, I heard something say: 

"How sweetly I sleep here alone. 

"The tempest may howl and the loud thunders roll, 

And gathering storms may arise ; 
Yet calm are my feelings, at rest is my soul, 
The tears are all wiped from my eyes. 

"The cause of my Master impelled me from home, 

I bade my companion farewell : 
I left my sweet children who for me now mourn, 
In far distant regions to dwell. 

"I wandered an exile and stranger below, 

To publish salvation abroad; 
The trump of the gospel endeavor to blow, 
Inviting poor sinners to God. 

"But when among strangers, and far from my home, 

No kindred or relative nigh, 
I met the contagion and sank in the tomb, 
My spirit to mansions on high. 

"Go tell my companion and children most dear, 

To weep not for Joseph, though gone ; 
The same hand that led me through scenes dark and drear, 
Has kindly conducted me home." 

REPLY TO WHITE PILGRIM. 
(Written at Yellow Springs, O., 1843.) 

I called at the house of the mourner below, 

I entered the mansion of grief; 
The tears of deep sorrow most freely did flow; 

I tried, but could give no relief. 



510 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

There sat a lone widow, dejected and sad, 

By affliction and sorrow oppressed; 
And there were her children in mourning arrayed, 

And sighs were escaping their breast. 

I spoke to the widow concerning her grief, 

I asked her the cause of her woe ; 
And if there was nothing to give her relief, 

Or soothe her deep sorrows below. 

She looked at her children, then looked upon me 

(That look I shall never forget), 
More eloquent far than a seraph could be ; 

It spoke of the trials she met. 

"The hand of affliction falls heavily now, 
I'm left with my children to mourn ; 
The friend of my youth lies silent and low 
In yonder cold graveyard alone. 

"But why should I murmur or feel to complain, 

Or think that my portion is hard? 
Have I met with affliction? 'Tis surely his gain 
He has entered the joy of his Lord." 

M. R. Elder. 

Illinois, 1836. 1907, Harristown, 111. 

Mr. Elder was an active and useful preacher in west- 
central Illinois for forty-five years. His disposition was 
genial, his heart tender and sympathetic, and loyalty to the 
Lord supreme. 

Ashley J. Elliott. 

Evansville, Ind., 1862. 1910, Peoria, 111. 

Mr. Elliott was a "railroad man" of fine mind and habits. 
His business brought him into contact with many men and 
its conduct was recognized as exceptionally forceful and 
efficient. Without obtrusiveness, every one who wished knew 
where he stood. He was never ashamed of his Master or 
his church. He hated intemperance of all kinds, including 
the use of tobacco. He was resourceful and had perspective 
and initiative. To him belongs the honor of first "building 
a church in a day." 



BIOGRAPHIES 511 

John England. 

Kentucky, 1811. 1884, Illinois. 

John England was a son of Stephen England. The 
family came into Sangamon County in 1819, where Stephen 
England formed, in the following year, the first church of 
Christ in central Illinois. It is now known as the Cantrall 
Christian Church. 

John England's education was very limited. He grew up 
before the schoolhouses were built. What he learned, he 
knew well. He became a blacksmith, wagon-maker, farmer 
and preacher. As a minister he was well and widely known 
and very useful. He moved with his family to Logan 
County, where he entered forty acres of land, and as the 
years passed added to it until he owned 140 acres, where he 
resided the larger part of his life. This was near Mt. 
Pulaski. He preached at the Antioch Church, now Cantrall; 
Athens ; Wolf Creek, now Barclay ; Fancy Creek, now Wil- 
hamsville ; Mt. Pulaski, at different places along Lake Fork, 
and elsewhere. His memory of the Scriptures was surpris- 
ing. He always had conscientious scruples about taking 
money for preaching. This, to some, was a very wholesome 
doctrine and full of comfort. Indeed, in everything Mr. 
England was finely conscientious. His son, A. T. England, 
says that his father was "always, in his deals, afraid he would 
get the better of the other fellow." Further: "If, in the 
evening, the topic of conversation would run upon anything 
of a financial character, in five to ten minutes he would be 
sleeping; but if there would be anything said pertaining to 
the Scriptures and the life beyond, he would be standing on 
his feet in a few minutes talking. He never seemed to be 
the least tired or skeptical about his hope for the future 
world. His mind was earnestly set on what good he might 
do other people. I have known him to ride fifteen miles 
home after preaching at night before he went to bed. I used 
to think the people gave him such wonderful troubles about 
coming to settle difficulties in the churches. One of the 
sisters sent for him one day, and when he got there she told 



512 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

him that she 'had terribly fell out with her man' and was so 
troubled that their little boy would necessarily 'have the 
husband's stock somewhat.' There and then she wanted 
father to tell her if they couldn't cut one of the boy's blood- 
veins and let the husband's part of the blood run out of him 
then he would be purely of her blood." 

"Uncle John" England's hospitality was known afar in 
that day, when the latch-string always hung outside of the 
door. Quoting again from his son: "Billy Brown, A. J. 
Kane, Walter Bowles and the Pickrells from Mechanicsburg 
would often come to our place. You better believe I had a 
hustling time taking care of their horses. It didn't make any 
difference what denomination a preacher was, we always 
kept him for nothing. Sometimes the old folks would go 
away, and my older sister and I concluded we would charge 
the people for staying all night. She did the cooking and 
I tended to their horses and made out their bills. The first 
thing I bought with my part of the money was a pair of 
boots with red on the tops. I was ten years old, and oh, but 
I stepped high, for this was the first pair of boots I ever 
had. Father would scold me like everything when he got 
home." 

John England was a true servant of God and his fellow- 
men self-forgetful, self-sacrificing and supremely loyal to 
his Christian convictions. He died in great hope of the life 
to come. 

Robert Seymour Ensign. 

Dalton, Mass., 1836. 1912, Long Point, 111. 

Was of Puritan lineage and Revolutionary stock. Both 
of his grandfathers served with distinction in the Colonial 
Army. He was a manufacturer of woolen goods and a 
farmer. He came to Illinois in 1864, settling on a farm near 
Dana. There he was a schoolmaster and filled such civil 
offices as he was elected to. While yet a young man, he 
became a Christian, uniting with the Baptist Church. He 
united with the church of Christ at Dana on his coming 



BIOGRAPHIES 513 

there. Later he moved to the vicinity of Long Point. It 
was at his suggestion that the work there was started that 
led to the organization of the church of Christ. He was 
one of its charter members, and was chosen one of its first 
elders, in which capacity he served to the close of his life. 
He was a modest and unassuming man, of ability and genu- 
ine worth, and had the moral courage to apply the principles 
of our Lord's teachings to personal conduct in all of life's 
practical affairs. 

Alfred Flower. 

Albion, 111., 1822. 1907, Worcester, Mass. 

Beginning in his early manhood, Mr. Flower gave sixty- 
five years to the ministry of the gospel. Most of his work 
was done in Illinois, but he labored also in Indiana, Ken- 
tucky, and in the closing period of his life in New England. 
At this time he spent his winters in Florida, where he 
preached continually. The church in St. Petersburg was 
founded and fostered by him. In him, there was a fine 
correlation of mind and heart. He was a man of superior 
spiritual fiber, broad culture and genuine sympathies. His 
expository sermons were interestingly illustrated and most 
helpful. In his prime, he often arose at three or four 
o'clock in the morning to reach his appointments, and much 
of his ministry was without financial compensation. His 
faith was always serene and his love sincere. His patience 
never grew weary and his enthusiasm never faltered. He 
moved toward the land of eternal dawn with the hopefulness 
of youth. He was a son of God and a friend of men. Mrs. 
Sarah Flower Adams, author of the hymn, "Nearer, My 
God, to Thee," was his cousin. 

Dr. Robert Foster. 

Tennessee, 1814. 1875, Palmyra, 111. 

Mr. Foster was a unique character. Small in body, he 
was in mind alert and quick to learn and understand. At 
the age of fifteen he was baptized by Philip Mulkey in Ten- 

17 



514 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

nessee. His father was a high and stern Calvinist and drove 
Robert from home when he became a Christian. So he came 
to Illinois with Tandy Trice, a pioneer preacher. The period 
of his youth must have been diligently improved, for he 
became a successful physician and remarkable preacher. The 
Christian ministry was the absorbing and consuming work of 
his life. His labors were chiefly in central Illinois, where 
he was associated with D. P. Henderson, W. P. Bowles, B. 
W. Henry, A. J. Kane and other mighty men of that time. 
How much this part of the State is indebted to his zeal, toils 
and sacrifices, only a few know. After he was well started 
in the ministry, he made a visit to his childhood's home in 
Tennessee. While there, he conducted a meeting of days, 
and baptized his mother, two brothers and a sister. His 
proud father gave him no countenance, and he came away 
without even seeing him. In April, 1836, he started horse- 
back on an evangelizing tour, and the next November 
reported 150 baptisms. In 1837 he was associated with B. 
W. Stone in a meeting in Lynnville. 

In December, 1838, he was married to Miss Mary A. 
Burnett, near Palmyra. They began housekeeping in a log 
cabin on Wolf Creek, north of the site of Riverton. One of 
their sons, W B. Foster, became a brilliant and successful 
preacher, but died in his young prime. Several other chil- 
dren survive. 

At one time, Dr. Foster had a lucrative medical practice 
in Carlinville, but this could not tie him to that profession. 
His desire to preach pushed all else aside. His generosity 
knew no limit. It was that trait in him that led Dr. Bostick, 
of Scottsville, to say: "Robert Foster is the smartest man I 
ever knew, but has the least common sense of any man I ever 
saw." John M. Palmer said that Robert Foster would give 
away the last dollar he had, then borrow another dollar and 
give that away. 

He is said to have been the ablest and most convincing 
preacher in the State on the Bible way to become a Chris- 
tian. Claiborn Hall, long a great man of God at Athens; 



BIOGRAPHIES 515 

Thos. E. Bondurant, first at Mechanicsburg, and M. M. and 
G. M. Goode, first at Chapman's Point, were turned to the 
Lord by Mr. Foster. He called the younger Mr. Goode his 
"son Timothy." Preaching on the conversion of the jailer, 
and replying to the contention that there were infants in this 
family, Mr. Foster said: "This jailer had one daughter. She 
married a shoemaker who was lame in one leg and blind in 
one eye. How did I learn this? Why, just like the preach- 
ers who say there were babies in this family who were 
baptized. / inferred it." His sermon on Philip and the 
eunuch was made very striking by modernizing the Scripture 
to suit the then prevalent conception for conversion. 

Some amusing incidents are told of him. In those days 
it was the custom to have high, boxed-up pulpits. Mr. Fos- 
ter was too short to see over the big Bible ; so he was pro- 
vided with a box on which to stand. When he began to 
exhort, he could not stay on the box, so his head would 
appear and disappear behind the high enclosure. A little 
girl in the audience witnessed his movements and was much 
troubled thereby ; so she began to cry, saying : "Mother, why 
don't they let him o-u-t?" 

Some of the good sisters somewhere had given him a 
stiff-bosomed shirt. They were shocked to notice at an out- 
of-doors baptismal occasion, when Mr. Foster removed his 
coat, that he had his shirt on front part behind, so occupied 
was he with his work. He was always himself. He did not 
"put on" or play a part. His eccentricities were as natural 
as the color of his eyes or the shape of his face. 

At the close of his life, he said to George Sims, an aged 
comrade in the gospel: "Brother Sims, what a blessed thing 
it is that a Christian can die and exchange his old, wornout 
body for a spiritual one with Christ." 

Chas. W. Freeman. 

Greenup, 111., 1859. 

Grew up on the farm. Attended country school, County 
Normal and State School at Normal, 111. He was a teacher 



516 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

for eleven years in the country and town schools. When 
twelve years of age he made a violin of a cigar-box and 
learned to play about eighty pieces by ear. Later he studied 
music. Before his conversion, he made music for dances; 
since then he has made music more earnestly for the Lord. 
The first three years of his preaching were connected with 
his work as a schoolmaster. During that period he received 
less than three dollars for his ministerial service. His work 
in Illinois was mostly in southeastern counties. Mr. Free- 
man has been an earnest and efficient evangelist, having led 
in eighty revivals. He baptized his own mother on the 
seventieth anniversary of her birth. His preaching always 
rings true to the word of God, of course. 

Seth Card. 

Came from an Eastern State to Barney's Prairie settle- 
ment, in what is now Wabash County, in 1813. He was a 
man of ability, initiative and perspective, and was probably 
the leading man in that section. He was a member of the 
third Territorial Legislature, and was also a member of the 
convention that framed the State Constitution in 1818. He 
was the first elder of the Barney's Prairie Church. To him, 
with Min. James Pool, Joseph Wood and others, is due the 
honor of starting that church on the apostolic basis. Mr. 
Card died in 1845. 

James S. Gash. 

Kentucky, 1833. 1909, Illinois. 

Mr. Gash turned to the Lord at the age of thirty. He 
began preaching at once. His ministry was confined to the 
Military Tract. For many years he led the singing in his 
home church at Macomb. At the time of his death he had 
united more people in wedlock than any minister in McDon- 
ough County. He was a brotherly man of sweet spirit and 
a consecrated and helpful Christian. His end came by 
apolexy. The democracy of the gospel was well illustrated 
in his spirit and life. 





J. H. GILLILAND. 



COL. E. D. BAKER. 





JOHN J. COSAT. 



J. G. CAMPBELL. 



BIOGRAPHIES 517 

Clay F. Gaumer. 

Knox County, O., 1870. 

Grew up on the farm. Taught school and attended 
school, graduating with honor from the Ohio Northwestern 
University in 1893. Was principal of the public schools at 
Sidell, 111., for nine years, when he resigned to enter the 
ministry in 1903. Mr. Gaumer has given the churches of 
that part of Vermilion County helpful service. He was 
elected to the forty- fourth General Assembly of Illinois on 
the Prohibition ticket ; and again in 1906 by a large majority. 

James H. Gilliland. 

Illinois, 1855. 1912, Illinois. 

Mr. Gilliland was born on his father's farm near Ver- 
mont. While a boy he lived and worked there. He grad- 
uated from Abingdon College in 1875, and from Eureka in 
the class of 1880. The following year he received from the 
latter institution his master's degree. 

He served the church at Mechanicsburg four years and 
at Harristown until he was called to Bloomington in Febru- 
ary, 1888. His service in that city has been well called "a 
monumental ministry." Under his wise leadership and force- 
ful, Scriptural preaching the congregations there grew from 
one to three, with large, modern, well-equipped buildings 
paid for, and the number of Disciples increased from four 
hundred to about twenty-five hundred. The ministry of very 
few men is crowned with such substantial and abiding results. 

As a man and a minister, Mr. Gilliland was unassuming 
and wholly without ostentation. His master ambition was 
to be a capable and faithful preacher of the Word. He read 
widely and wisely, and thought profoundly and clearly upon 
all the great religious problems of our time. His last work 
was the preparation of an address on "Twenty-five Years of 
Christian Work in Bloomington," read by another at the 
seventy-fifth anniversary of the formation of the Christian 
Church in that city. In its closing he said : "The ministry of 
the Word is the transcendent calling. It is a God-revealing, 



518 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Christ-uplifting and Bible-interpreting calling. The preacher 
may well visit the critic's school, but his residence is at the 
interpreter's house. The ministry is a man-saving, a truth- 
seeking, a world-redeeming calling. The minister is the 
champion of the needy, the advocate of the poor, the pro- 
tector of the helpless, the apostle of every good cause. Hon- 
ored with the presence of God and his power, clothed with 
the authority of Jesus and the truth, directed by the prin- 
ciples of faith, love and sacrifice, the ministry is the supreme 
calling among men." 

In his passing, the cause of truth and righteousness sus- 
tained a distinct loss. The hearts of thousands were touched 
with sincere regret and sorrow. "He sets as sets the morn- 
ing star that goes not down, but melts away into the light 
of heaven." 

Archibald A. Glenn. 

Nicholas County, Ky., 1819. 1901, Wichita, Kan. 

Mr. Glenn was of Scotch-Irish lineage. His paternal 
grandfather came from Ireland to America just before the 
Revolution. His mother was a Kentuckian a woman of 
refinement and great strength of character. 

His father's family moved to Indiana in 1820, from there 
to Vermilion County, 111., in 1823, and afterward to Schuyler 
County. The father died in 1832, leaving his family but 
little property. Archibald, then a lad of fourteen, with his 
mother, kept the family of six younger children together and 
managed the farm. When his brothers were older and able 
to work, Archibald went to Rushville, learned the printing 
business and published a paper in the interests of the Whig 
party. Next, he went to Mt. Sterling and became a book- 
keeper in a store. In 1853 he was elected county clerk. 
This was the beginning of his political career. He served 
as superintendent of schools in Brown County one term. He 
was a delegate to the convention that amended the State's 
Constitution in 1862. General Lippencott, State Auditor in 
1868, regarded Mr. Glenn as one of the most capable mem- 



BIOGRAPHIES 519 

bers of the State Board of Equalization. He was elected to 
the State Senate in 1872, and became president of that body 
and ex-officio Lieutenant Governor in 1874. The little school 
training- that Mr. Glenn received was in the country schools. 
Technically, he was not an educated man, but he came, by 
reading and absorbing the contents of many good books, into 
the possession of a prodigious fund of information that he 
used with commanding ability. 

He was a member of the church of Christ at Mt. Ster- 
ling and was a staunch and true Disciple. Always and 
everywhere and in all things he stood four-square for the 
best things of life. 

Galen M. Goode. 

Macoupin County, 111., 1842. 

Grew up on farm. Attended public schools. Began 
preaching about 1863. He has served the churches at 
Illiopolis, Harristown, Normal, Buffalo, Hartsburg and Lex- 
ington, Mo. Besides, much miscellaneous Christian work. 
He has been a genial man of fine humor and wit and always 
devoted to the truth. He is the father of Min. W. S. Goode, 
of Ohio. 

M. M. Goode. 

Illinois, 1835. 

A brother of G. M. Goode. Was a very active and useful 
preacher in Illinois in the earlier years. Entered the min- 
istry in 1862. Served at Antioch, Berea and Literberry, in 
Morgan County, and Petersburg. These two brothers had 
quick wit and fine humor and were most enjoyable com- 
panions. But he went to Missouri more than thirty years ago. 

In August, 1867, he conducted a public discussion at 
Palmyra, 111., with Min. Richard McVey, of the M. E. 
Church. One of the speeches of Mr. Goode was full of 
unction, and as he spoke a Mr. Vancamp pressed his way to 
the front to make the erood confession : he was at once fol- 
lowed by two sisters, Misses Lucy and Leona Gardner, Rich- 
ard Allyn and Taylor McPherson. Then Mr. Short, who 



520 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

was Mr. McVey's moderator and a teacher in the female 
college at Jacksonville, stepped to the front and exhorted the 
people to come forward and confess the Saviour. It was a 
moment of profound spiritual pathos. At the meeting for 
immersion the following day a number of others turned to 
the Lord. 

Thomas Goodman. 

Virginia, 1808. 1888, Charleston, 111. 

In early manhood he was a schoolmaster and a merchant, 
and accumulated some property. Meanwhile, he was preach- 
ing some, and the conviction grew in him that he ought to 
be wholly consecrated to the work of the Christian ministry; 
hence, to this work he gave his life and in it spent most of 
the means he had acquired. 

He came to Illinois in the pioneer days. While yet a 
schoolteacher he would often ride horseback to his appoint- 
ments, preach Saturday evening and twice on the Lord's Day, 
then ride most of the night to begin his school work Monday 
morning. Later his preaching-tours were so extended that 
two or three days' riding was required, and on these trips 
as often as necessary he swam his horse through swollen 
streams. 

"Uncle Tom" Goodman was one of the most intense men. 
His was the material of which heroes and martyrs are made. 
He was never kept in his bed by sickness a whole day in his 
life until his last illness, that lasted only three days. He 
never voted, but when Mr. Lincoln was a candidate for the 
Presidency in 1860 the conscience of the preacher was sorely 
tried, such was his admiration for the great man. To have 
stipulated a term of ministerial service for a named amount 
of money would have been to Mr. Goodman well-nigh an act 
of sacrilege. It was said of him that if one would quote 
from memory or read a passage in the New Testament, he 
could at once name the chapter and verse. In his preaching 
he often became so impassioned with the love of the truth and 
his desire for the salvation of people that he dashed little 



BIOGRAPHIES 521 

flecks of foam from his mouth like a mighty warhorse in 
battle. 

He conducted the funeral of Thomas Lincoln, the father 
of Abraham Lincoln, a few miles southeast of Mattoon, 
where the sacred dust of the paternal progenitor of the 
great Emancipator lies entombed. Thomas and Nancy Lin- 
coln were members of the Christian Church. 

Mr. Goodman, with patient and well-directed aim, hum- 
bled himself through his life; so God has highly exalted him* 

John R. Golden. 

McLean County, 111., 1876. 

Grew up on farm. Learned carpenter's trade. Educated 
at Eureka College. Was pastor at Moweaqua, Walnut, Gib- 
son and Westside Church in Springfield. Was elected to the 
House of the Legislature on the Prohibition ticket in 1906. 

Elijah Goodwin. 

Ohio, 1807. 1889, Ohio. 

Elijah Goodwin belonged to Indiana, as that was his 
home most of his life. But since nc man did more to plant 
the Restoration movement in Edwards, Wabash and White 
Counties than he, these lines are due here. At the age of 
fourteen he became a member of the Christian Denomina- 
tion. Four years later he was licensed by their conference 
to preach. In a few years his preaching began to distress 
their older ministers. He soon identified himself with the 
Disciples. His ministerial labors in the counties above 
named, as well as southern Indiana and northern Kentucky, 
were incessant. Besides, he did considerable editorial work. 
His book of sermons entitled "The Family Companion" was 
published in 1873. If any one thinks he was only a common 
backwoods preacher, let him learn his mistake by reading it. 
At the time of his decease his talented and accomplished 
wife was the editor of the Christian Monitor. The closing 
words of the last of three poems she wrote on the death of 
her husband follow: 



522 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

"His glorious crown of silver hair ! 
His face like marble, pure and fair; 
His folded hands, in holy calm, 
Worthy to bear the martyr's palm. 
I'll lay white flowers upon his breast, 
Emblem of his peaceful rest; 
Never more for him shall be 
The pain of death's Gethsemane." 

Moses Goodwin 

Was a younger brother of Elijah Goodwin. He had little 
of school training, but knew the Bible from end to end. He 
was strong both physically and mentally, and was a born 
orator. No one ever went to sleep or became indifferent 
when he was preaching. Through the teaching and preach- 
ing of Maurice R. Trimble, of Knox County, Ind., Moses 
came fully into the Restoration movement a little before his 
brother Elijah. While Moses Goodwin was preaching for 
Union Church in Gibson County, Ind., that congregation 
came over bodily into "gospel order," as they called it, with- 
out change of name, officers or records. The only change 
apparent afterward was that the mourners' bench was used 
no more and penitent believers publicly confessed their faith 
in the Christ and were baptized for the remission of sins. 

Moses Goodwin settled in White County, 111., some time 
before 1840. Feb. 24, 1839, he organized the Christian 
Church at Seven-mile Prairie, which became the mother of 
all the churches of Christ in White County. His labors 
were constant and successful, but they undermined his health. 
He died at Grayville about the time he reached his prime. 

Harmon Gregg. 

Illinois, 1830. 

Mr. Gregg was born in a log cabin a short distance west 
of the site of the city of Charleston. Indians were still liv- 
ing thereabout. In the winter-time he attended school in a 
log house when the days were not fit to break and scutch 
flax. In 1849 the California gold fever attacked him. He 



BIOGRAPHIES 523 

crossed the plains with the view of gathering gold by the 
basketful. Like many others, in this he was disappointed, 
and after two years returned to Illinois. The trip had cost 
him two years of schooling. 

In the southeast part of Douglas County there was a 
community of intelligent settlers. It came to be known as 
Rural Retreat and is yet so called. A debating society was 
formed and its weekly meetings were held in the schoolhouse. 
In these meetings Mr. Gregg soon became an active par- 
ticipant. 

It was not long until the Disciples in the community 
encouraged him to preach. He was modest and timid, but 
they insisted. Thus it was that he was led into the ministry. 
His work was done mainly in Douglas, Coles and Edgar 
Counties. Associated with him were A. D. Fillmore, Thomas 
Goodman, Gershom Rude, Joseph Hostetler and W. F. Black. 

One day Mr. Gregg was plowing in his field. A neighbor 
residing five miles away called on business. In the course 
of the conversation the caller misquoted a passage of Scrip- 
ture, which Mr. Gregg corrected. Then the neighbor so 
persistently besought him to come over and preach in their 
schoolhouse that a promise was given. The results were 
conversions among the people, the organization of a church 
of Christ and the building of a substantial church. His 
ministry was continued there four or five years. A good 
sister remarked to the preacher one day that honey-bees 
always did well for a man who lived amicably with his wife; 
whereupon, she gave him a colony. This was the sole mate- 
rial compensation received from that congregation for those 
years of service. Frequently Mr. Gregg's preaching was of 
the militant type. It could hardly have been different. In 
those years he and his brethren, pleading for the authority 
of Jesus Christ and the word of God, were often called 
"water-dogs" by pious denominationalists. Sometimes even 
women would shake their fists in his face and mutter their 
dissent. But this preacher was always true to the word of 
God. 



524 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Tobias G rider. 

Monroe County, Ky., 1800. 1880, Shelby County, 111. 

At the age of twenty he married and moved to Indiana, 
where he soon became a Christian and began to preach. He 
came to Illinois in 1836, and settled on Sand Creek in Shelby 
County, where he died. As a proclaimer of the gospel, he 
labored under many disadvantages, but by persevering indus- 
try he supported his family from his farm and gained a good 
knowledge of the Scriptures. His life was filled with self- 
sacrifices for others' good. He was never called an eloquent 
preacher, but his sermons were full of Bible truth, logically 
stated, and he was a powerful exhorter. Many hundreds 
were won to Christ by his ministry, in which he continued 
faithful unto death. 

W . M. Groves. 

Hancock County, 111., 1865. 

Educated in the public schools of his native county and 
Abingdon College. As pastor, he served the churches at 
Stillwell, Columbus, Rushville, Carrollton, Girard, Shelby- 
ville and Petersburg. He is a leader among the Odd Fellows 
of Illinois. He was first elected to the State Legislature in 
1909, and is now (1913) serving his third term. 

John I. Gunn. 

Scotland, 1866. 

Educated at Evanston, 111. Served several years as a 
minister in the M. E. Church. Mr. Gunn combines the 
literary and spiritual in fine proportions, and his ministry is 
pleasing and profitable. 

George F. Hall. 

Near Clarksville, la., 1864. 

Mr. Hall began his mundane career in a log cabin and 
grew up on the farm. He attended the district school and 
four and a half years in Drake University. He has read 
widely and written much. In 1904 he received the Ph.D. 



BIOGRAPHIES 525 

degree from what was then known as Ruskin University. 
The aggregate sale of his books has been about one hundred 
thousand volumes. He paid his way in school by his own 
labors. Thereafter he served as pastor five years in Kansas 
and seven in Illinois. Meanwhile, he was afield as a very 
forceful and successful evangelist. And he gave not a few 
lectures on a variety of subjects. For nearly seven years he 
preached Sunday mornings at Bush Temple of Music, 
Chicago, to multitudes of people. In this work he was 
unassisted save by the volunteer offering of the people who 
attended there. Mr. Hall is vigorous in body and brain. 
He is not easily abashed or discouraged. His sermons have 
always rung true to the word of God. 

/. C. T. Hall. 

Ewel, England, 1818. 1901, Albion, 111. 

Was brought by his parents to America in 1821, and later 
into Edwards County. At the Little Prairie Church there he 
became a Christian and a minister. He worked with his 
hands to* support himself and family while he preached, and 
was successful both in his secular business and his public 
ministry. He was a lover of good books and had a large 
library. He was firm in his faith, a man of sweet and 
gracious spirit, and, with his increasing means, liberal to a 
fault. For about sixty-one years he continued his public 
service in southern Illinois, but particularly in Edwards 
County. A short time before his death he said: "It is the 
last step that a man makes that takes him into heaven." 

Jonathan Hall 

Was for many years an efficient elder of the Old Union 
Church. Beginning in 1873, he served as judge of DeWitt 
County for four years. 

Caleb Hawline 

Was baptized by Abner Peeler in August, 1836. He began 
as a local teacher in the Hittle's Grove Church in 1840, con- 



526 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

tinuing until his death in 1901 over sixty-one years. In 
1871 he preached fifty-nine sermons, married three couples, 
and received a total compensation of $2.10. 

/. E. Harris. 

Fulton County, 111., 1854. 

Educated at Abingdon College. Is a farmer and grain- 
dealer. Served three terms as mayor of Bushville, and was 
elected to the House of the Legislature in 1904-06. 

/. /. Harris. 

Summit County, O., 1853. 

Grew up on the farm and with decidedly infidel notions. 
Fortunately, marrying a Christian of intelligent convictions, 
she led him to the knowledge of the truth. Then he attended 
Bethany College a year. He served as pastor in Ohio and 
Michigan, and came to Illinois in 1887. His eight years' 
pastorate at Duquoin was a great blessing to the church in 
every way. Since then he has resided in Marion and has 
evangelized and served congregations. He was the evan- 
gelist of the Eighth District three years, and has been a 
public advocate of prohibition. Mr. Harris is one of the 
common people, a man of fine common sense and a true 
preacher. His ministry in southern Illinois has been dis- 
tinctly constructive. 

W. W. Happy. 

Kentucky, 1806. 1875, Illinois. 

At the age of eighteen, Mr. Happy united with the Bap- 
tist Church. He came to Jacksonville in 1830, and soon 
thereafter became a member of the church of Christ there. 
In the thirties he was twice elected to the lower House of 
the Illinois Legislature from the Jacksonville district as a 
Whig. He served his constituents with fidelity and efficiency. 

When about thirty years of age, he was urged by his 
brethren to give his life to the Christian ministry, and shortly 
thereafter entered upon this work. He traveled through the 



BIOGRAPHIES 527 

State with Mr. Campbell in 1853 in the interest of Bethany 
College, and frequently preached for the churches they 
visited. Later, the great reformer said of Mr. Happy that 
in intellectual endowments he was the equal of any man in 
the West, and that his grasp of the scheme of redemption 
was quite superior. He was a great thinker and had the 
courage of his convictions. His affiliation with the Russell 
defection grew out of his deep spiritual desires and his long- 
ing to be right with God. His return to the church in later 
years was evidence of his Christlike humility. He was a 
Christian pioneer of noble character, who gave his life in 
unselfish devotion to the gospel's advocacy. He died in 
humble circumstances. 

/. M. Haughey. 

Jamestown, O., 1833. 1912, Mason City, 111. 

Became a Christian in 1859 at Rothchild's Schoolhouse, 
west of Lincoln, 111., under the preaching of Minister Good- 
sell, of the Baptists. In June, 1861, he took charge of the 
Baptist Church in Mason City, and the following winter 
transferred his membership to the church of Christ in that 
place. Thereafter, his ministry was continuous till failing 
health compelled his retirement. He never sought to serve 
a church because of the salary, but supported his family by 
the newspaper business. In his ministry he walked through- 
out Mason County and added multitudes to the Lord. 

On one occasion he was preaching, in a schoolhouse packed 
full of people, on "The Four Baptisms." Just in front of him 
sat an old gentleman with steady eyes on the preacher. He 
spoke first of the baptism of suffering; second, of water, and, 
third, of fire. "Now I come to the baptism of the Holy 
Spirit," said the preacher. Just then the old gentleman 
extended his arm full length, and, pointing his index finger 
almost into the speaker's face, said, loud enough for all to 
hear, "Yes, sir, and it's the only baptism I'd give a snap 
for, by ginger." He had formed the habit of saying "by 
ginger" in his youth, and it stuck. 



528 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Robert Moffett Allison Hawk. 

Indiana, 1839. 1882, Washington, D. C. 

Brought with his father's family to Carroll County, 111., 
in 1846. Educated in common schools and at Eureka Col- 
lege. First lieutenant of Company C, Ninety-second Regi- 
ment Illinois Volunteers, in 1862. Promoted to captaincy 
early in 1863. Lost his right leg in the battle of Raleigh, 
N. C., the day of Lee's surrender. Breveted major by Presi- 
dent Johnson for meritorious service. Was county clerk of 
Carroll County from 1865 to 1878. Was elected to forty- 
sixth and forty-seventh Congresses from the Fifth District. 
On the night before the assembling of the convention of his 
district to nominate him for the third time, Major Hawk 
was stricken by apoplexy and died within a few hours at 
his rooms in Washington, D. C., at 11 P. M., June 29, 1882. 
General and Mrs. John A. Logan were with him at the time 
of his death. Major Hawk was a large man in every way 
physically, mentally and morally. He was a commanding 
personality, and commanded the confidence and respect of all 
who knew him. He was a faithful Christian man. 

Morgan P. Hayden. 

Deerfield, O., 1845. 

Graduated at Hiram College. He served two periods in 
Illinois covering twelve years at Ludlow, Blandinsville, 
Augusta, Watseka, Rock ford, Washington and elsewhere. 
Mr. Hayden has a fine knowledge of the Bible, out of which 
he has enriched his generation. 

Lysias Heape. 

York County, Pa., 1813. 1889, Illinois. 

Mr. Heape's family moved to Ohio in 1816. He was 
baptized there in 1832 by Wm. Dowling. He came to Perry 
County, 111., about 1835. Soon he was chosen as an elder 
of a congregation near Duquoin. In the discharge of his 
Scriptural duties he was soon led into the work of the min- 



BIOGRAPHIES 529 

istry. In his experience he had the privations and the joys 
of a pioneer preacher. From 1847 to 1855 he was employed 
by a Co-operation of Christian Churches in southern Illinois. 

D. P. Henderson. 

It is humiliating to the writer that such a fine character 
and useful life fails of a befitting mention from a lack of 
the facts. Mr. Henderson was, at different times, actively 
associated with the churches of Christ in Illinois for fifty 
years. He was a successful pastor and evangelist and a 
resourceful leader in co-operative missionary work and Chris- 
tian education. He was a writer and editor as well. He 
worked in the thirties in Morgan County and one of his 
pastorates was in Chicago. T. T. Holton says of him: "He 
was a model of grace for an old man and very winning and 
persuasive in his address. I think in his youth he could have 
courted a princess. He was a man of wonderful energy, 
though slight of build." When clerk of the court in Jack- 
sonville, he preached in villages and country churches on the 
Lord's Days. His great meeting in Louisville, Ky., in 
which five hundred additions were received, called special 
attention to him. During his pastorate there, the great 
pillared Temple at the corner of Fourth and Walnut Streets 
was erected. In its basement the Foreign Christian Mis- 
sionary Society was organized. In the same place a daily 
morning prayer-meeting during the Civil War was held, and 
the unity of the congregation was thus conserved. He was 
an earnest Union man, and there were influential numbers 
there who differed with him. Mr. Henderson was thoroughly 
democratic. He knew nothing of snobbery save as he saw it 
in others. While a forceful leader, he was admirably con- 
ciliatory. He was a fine example of the snaviter in modo, 

fortiter in re. D . , TJ7 ,.,. 

Bushrod W. Henry. 

Culpeper County, Va., 1805. 1879, ShelbyvilleT 111. 
Became a member of the Baptist Church at the age of 
nineteen and soon after began to preach. Came from Ten- 



530 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

nessee to Shelby County, 111., in the fall of 1830. His min- 
istry among the Baptists there was fruitful, resulting in the 
formation of several congregations. In 1832 he began to 
preach clearly three things : "The Bible as an infallible guide, 
baptism for the remission of sins, no name but Scriptural 
names for the followers of Christ to wear." In reaching 
these conclusions, his son, J. O. Henry, testified that his 
father was helped by no human being except his wife. Sym- 
pathizers with the views of Mr. Henry early began to be 
called "The Henry Party." These questions were debated 
until in 1834, when Mr. Henry and his friends were sum- 
marily excluded from the Baptist Church. This date was 
recalled because it was associated with the "sickly season" 
which occurred in that year. 

Before this time among the converts of Mr. Henry were 
Willis Whitfield, Colonel Vaughn and Silas Rhodes, who 
never left the fellowship of the Baptist Church. 

He was a man of prodigious industry. He led the work 
on his six-hundred-acre farm and traveled and preached in 
many places a strong, valiant and intelligent proclaimer of 
the Word. In the earlier part of his ministry he was county 
evangelist for two years in Shelby. The first year he 
received as salary enough blue jeans for a pair of trousers, 
one pair of home-made woolen socks and $1.25 in money. 
The next year his salary was five dollars in cash. He was 
the first Disciple of Christ to take part in Sunday-school 
work in that county, helped in the organization of the State 
Missionary Society at Shelby ville in 1850, and was one of 
the original trustees of Eureka College. He was a mighty 
spiritual force in his time, all the while exemplifying his 
preaching by his daily life. In 1868 a venerable and stately 
man went into the church in Springfield one Lord's Day 
morning and sat down well forward. He declined an invita- 
tion to preach, but presided at the table. He said: "This is 
an institution of the Lord's own appointment. The command 
to do this in remembrance of him is so gentle that it sounds 
like a request of one who loves us and desires to be remem- 



BIOGRAPHIES 531 

bered. That member of the church of Christ who has no 
providential hindrance and yet refuses to be present and bear 
a part in this memorial service, deliberately decides, for that 
time at least, he will not obey his Lord." That man was 
Bushrod W. Henry. 

Mrs. O. W. Stewart and Mrs. Errett Gates are two of 
his grandchildren. 

James 0. Henry. 

Culpeper County, Va., 1827. 1914, Findley, 111. 

Was the eldest son of Bushrod W. Henry. He was a 
preacher of the gospel for sixty-five years. Most of his 
ministerial work was done in Fayette and Shelby Counties. 
He served in Company E of the Fourth Regiment Illinois 
Volunteers during the Mexican War. He and Richard J. 
Oglesby were in adjoining companies, and formed a friend- 
ship there that continued through their lives. Ever after- 
ward when they met it was "Jim" and "Dick" until the latter 
came to honors. When Mr. Oglesby was the last time Gov- 
ernor, Mr. Henry took luncheon with him at the Mansion. 
Then they slowly walked together to the entrance of the 
State House grounds. The time of their final separation 
had come. "Well, Jim," said the Governor, "we have been 
friends for a long time. In life you took one course and I 
another. If I had my life to live over again, I would pursue 
the course you have followed." Then they shook hands for 
the last time on earth and the eyes of both of the old boys 
were more than moist. 

Rolla B. Henry. 

1887, Clay County, 111. 

The earlier years of his ministry were given to Ohio. In 
Illinois he preached for congregations in Clay County, where 
he also served as county judge for a number of years. He 
never allowed his official duties to interfere with his regular 
ministerial work. He was a fine Christian gentleman who 
commanded high respect and general esteem. 



532 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

William C. Hill. 

Zemuree, Term., 1828. 1908, Illinois. 

His parents brought him to Illinois in 1829 on a pack- 
horse. They went to Montgomery County, but afterward 
settled on Turkey Creek, south of Odin, in Marion County. 
He had the education imparted in backwoods subscription 
schools. He became a Christian in 1841 under the ministry 
of Mr. Schooly, and began to preach in early life. His min- 
istry in southeastern Illinois reached through sixty years, 
during which he immersed about five thousand people. His 
work was in the pioneer settlements and for many years in 
private houses and groves. He encountered intense bigoted 
sectarianism, generally ignorant and superstitious. He was 
a valued counselor and rarely equaled as a controversialist in 
private personal encounters. Many congregations grew from 
his labors. His sincerity in all he said and did, his earnest, 
sympathizing nature and his power in exhortation enabled 
him to win many souls for Christ, while his own life strength- 
ened and confirmed their faith. His many and great sacri- 
fices have had their reward. 

Judge Andrew Hinds. 

Eden, Vt., 1822. 1887, Lena, 111. 

Was admitted to the bar in 1846, and came to Stephen- 
son County, 111., in 1849. There he taught school, farmed, 
served as county treasurer and county judge and as a mem- 
ber of the board of supervisors for twenty years. While a 
member of the State Legislature, he introduced the Hinds 
prohibitory liquor bill. It did not pass, but was an important 
step in the right direction. He was one of the most trusted 
men in his county, and was an intelligent and faithful 
Christian. 

David Hobbs. 

Shelby County, Ky., 1807. 1876, Liberty, 111. 

Mr. Hobbs was trained up in the Baptist Church. His 
education was such as the common schools at that time 



BIOGRAPHIES 533 

afforded. He came to Illinois in September, 1830, and set- 
tied near the site of Columbus. There he taught school as 
he had in his native State. He also owned and tilled a farm. 
He early became an earnest and devout student of the sacred 
Scriptures. This led him to reject the custom of "relating 
an experience" on becoming a Christian, and to the adoption 
of the Scriptural order. In 1832 he preached in the resi- 
dence of John Yeargin, who had preceded him from 
Kentucky. This was the first sermon in Gilmer Township. 
With ten others, he moved to Concord Township. It is 
claimed that on Apr. 24, 1835, he organized the church, on 
the Bible as the all-sufficient creed, known now as the Pleas- 
ant View congregation. He served this church as elder and 
it? principal teacher till 1850. While a resident of Adams 
County, he associated with John B. Curl, T. S. Brockman, 
James McPherson and Wm. H. Strong in the pioneer work 
of the gospel. His ministry was extended into the contigu- 
ous counties and beyond. In 1850 he sold his farm and moved 
to Pike County, where he gave himself more exclusively to 
preaching. 

Mr. Hobbs would never accept any civil or military office 
and held himself wholly aloof from politics. He was six feet 
and three inches tall, well proportioned and very strong. 
Having read himself to the apostolic ground, his ministry 
was fruitful of great good. 

Jacob Hodgen 

Was born in Hodgenville, Ky., in 1793, and came to Pike 
County, 111., in 1832. Mrs. Emma Crow, of Pittsfield, has 
written of him as follows: 

He was in turn a wagon-maker, farmer and merchant. He was 
one of the grand characters among the pioneers of the county and the 
church. Of the strictest integrity, sturdiest manhood and unwavering 
faith, he was a man whose faith and opinions commanded the respect 
of his fellow-men. His genial and whole-souled nature made him a 
host of friends, and his enthusiasm in the cause of Christianity made 
his house the home of the ministry so that it was known as "the 
preachers' hotel." It was said of him that whatever the need, he 



534 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

stepped into the breach, whether it was to pray, to preach, to plead 
or to cry. 

Such was the character and spirit of the man who helped 
so much in laying the foundations of a purer gospel in Pike 

Mrs. Sarah A. Holman 

Was a unique personality. She was intelligent, cultured, 
independent, self-reliant, and had visited many places of 
interest in the United States and had traveled throughout 
Europe, Egypt and Palestine. She first visited the Central 
Christian Church in Peoria during the pastorate of N. S. 
Haynes. At that time she looked as if she might be fifty 
years young; her actual age was seventy-two. She was a 
widow. Her husband had lived and died a member of the 
Baptist Church a devout Christian man. Her only living 
child was a married daughter, who soon after passed away. 
Mrs. Holman said to the pastor, in a personal interview, that 
when a young woman she had heard Alexander Campbell 
preach, and that she could not conscientiously become a 
member of any church but the Christian ; that her home had 
never been where there had been such a congregation, and 
so through her life she had stood aloof from all churches. 
Within a few weeks she was led by the pastor to publicly 
accept Christ and place her membership in the Central 
Church. She was not then a resident of Peoria, but was 
lr.ter. When she came to be baptized it was found that the 
baptistery had sprung a leak and was empty. "There it is 
again," exclaimed Mrs. Holman; "the Lord intends that I 
shall never be baptized." The minister assured her that the 
Lord had nothing to do with the leaky pool, but maybe the 
devil had. At the conclusion of her baptism three days after- 
ward, she said to the two women that assisted her: "And 
now, ladies, what do I owe you?" They were shocked and 
protested. She answered: "It is my custom to pay those 
who assist me in any way." When further protest would 
have been rudeness, they each accepted the five dollars that 
she gave each of them and turned it into the church hymnal 



BIOGRAPHIES 535 

fund. Mrs. Holman passed to the life to come, at the age 
of ninety-three years. During the twenty-one years in 
which she was a member of the Central Church, she gave to 
it, to Eureka College and the Church Extension Society the 
aggregate sum of $22,000. 

William Holt. 

Illinois, 1837. 1880, Illinois. 

Mr. Holt was born in Edgar County. His ministry was 
mainly there and in the surrounding territory. He was 
highly esteemed as a man and was an able and brilliant 
preacher. Familiar with the Scriptures, he presented their 
teaching in a clear, logical and forceful manner. The 
results of his ministry were abiding. His sun set at his 
life's noon. 

Thomas Tilghman Holton. 

Aberdeen, O., 1839. 

Nature cast Mr. Holton in a large mould. His grand- 
father, William Holton, served through the War of 1812 and 
was in the battle of- Tippecanoe. There he commanded a 
company in which were four of his brothers. He was also 
a member of the first legislative body of Virginia, his 
adopted State. From Fanquier County he migrated to 
Mason County, Ky., where William Holton, the father of 
the subject of this sketch, was born. His mother was Sally 
Price Tilghman, a native of Albemarle County, Va. Both 
branches of his family were of pre-Revolutionary stock. 

He enjoyed superior educational advantages. He went 
to the country school, to Aberdeen Seminary, to the South- 
western Normal School at Lebanon, O., and graduated from 
Bethany College July 4, 1862. Before he was seventeen he 
was a schoolmaster at Genntown, O. On a certificate marked 
100 he conducted a school of eighty-five pupils efficiently for 
nine months. Leaving Bethany after graduation, he served 
as vice-president of Jefferson College, near Louisville, Ky., of 
which O. A. Bartholomew was president. Early in 1864, 
Mr. Holton became the head of Falmouth Academy. Miss 



536 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

Sally E. Holton, his sister, served as assistant. Under their 
lead this school did superior work for two and a half years. 

In 1866 he became pastor of the church at Vincennes, 
Ind. In 1868 he became pastor of the church at Springfield, 
111. Next he served the Berlin Church, and at the same time 
was principal of the public schools there for three years. In 
1873 he moved to Lincoln and served the church there and 
at Atlanta half-time each. Thereafter, with Lincoln as the 
center, he ministered to many churches; as, Broadwell, 
Mason City, Pekin, Old Union, Hallville, Emden, Bethel, 
Delavan and Eminence. The Old Union Church he served 
fourteen and a half years. In the meantime, he moved to 
Tallula and served the church there four years, and to De 
Land also, with the same period of pastorate. 

During his first years in Lincoln he did considerable 
secular work, clerking in bank and bookstore. Later, he 
served eight years as circuit clerk in Logan County. There- 
after, when his political principles had improved and his civic 
perspective became clarified, he stood for the State Legisla- 
ture on the Prohibition ticket and received five thousand 
votes. 

His religious experiences have been marked. When a 
young man at school, he had for his room-mate Ira J. Bloom- 
field, who won his star in the Civil War. The two attended 
Sunday school and church together. Being well intentioned, 
they decided to become members of this church, provided 
they could be immersed. The minister, however, desired 
that they should "conform to their religious usage." They 
were likely lads, so the preacher left with them a booklet 
entitled "Immersion Not Baptism." This declared that 
immersion was "unscriptural, inconvenient and indecent." 
When the dominie returned he found the lads unchanged. 
"Well, now," he said, "boys, we want you, and will immerse 
you if that is your choice." Whereupon, they declared that 
neither he nor his church had any right to do an unscriptnral 
and indecent thing in the name of the Lord. In 1858, Mr. 
Holton was baptized by Min. Marsena Stone and received 



BIOGRAPHIES 537 

into the Baptist Church. He related no visions nor won- 
derful experiences. The formula that the preacher used was 
this: "My brother, upon a confession of your faith in the 
Lord Jesus Christ and by his authority, I baptize you into 
the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy 
Spirit, for the remission of sins." Up to this time this 
young man had thought to become a lawyer. Now the good 
Baptist sisters urged him to prepare to preach the gospel; 
thus God changed his life purpose. During his four years 
at Bethany he changed his church affiliation. On one occa- 
sion, George W. Minier said to him: "Brother Holton, you 
are entirely too modest." So he entered into the active work 
of the ministry only by the urgency of the lamented preacher, 
J. Z. Taylor. 

Mr. Helton's life has been very active and fruitful. He 
has been much in demand for public addresses, at Commence- 
ments, on Memorial Days, at Old Settlers' Reunions, Fourth 
of July celebrations and Ministerial Institutes. He has 
united in marriage six hundred couples, has preached one 
thousand funerals, and led near two thousand persons into 
the kingdom of God. Such facts indicate his wisdom, his 
worth and his place in the confidence and affections of the 
people. He has filled a large place of usefulness, preaching 
in schoolhouses and doing most all sorts of miscellaneous 
and unclassified Christian work. 

In 1907 he moved to Bloomington. Since then, his help- 
ful ministry has been continued in the regions round about. 

Joseph Hostetler. 

Kentucky, 1797. 1870, Illinois. 

Joseph Hostetler was a remarkable man. He is properly 
classified with the pioneer preachers of Indiana, but his 
services in Illinois entitle him to this notice here. 

He was of German blood and German Baptist parentage. 
Though a typically mischievous boy, under the influence of 
his mother he very early in life learned to love the Scrip- 
tures, particularly the biographies of the Old Testament 



538 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

characters. In the great revival of 1811 he wished to enter 
the church, but his parents thought him too young. But one 
of his companions, of his own age, was received upon the 
following experience, which illustrates the prevalent thought 
of the time on the subject of conversion. When asked to 
describe the work of grace upon his heart, the lad sobbingly 
replied: "I don't know as I has any work of grace to tell. 
I is a poor sinner." 

"Do you believe in Christ?" asked the leader. 

"Oh, yes, ever since I can recollect." 

When further asked if he had dreamed anything remark- 
able, he related, in substance, as follows: He went to bed 
as usual in great distress; dreamed that he was going he 
knew not where, when the devil met him and was hurrying 
him off toward hell; thinking himself lost forever, just then 
a young man met them and rescued him; and that he then 
awoke in a transport of joy. Whereupon, a gray-haired 
deacon arose and said: "Brethern, I have been a Baptist for 
twenty-five years, and ef I ever heerd a experience of true 
grace, this boy has given us one. So it is with the poor 
sinners. They are goin' they know not where 'tel the Lord 
meets 'em. I can interpret this dream. He's powerfully 
converted. Glory to God." This incident impressed young 
Hostetler deeply. As he had no such experience, he read 
the Bible through and with remarkable persistence searched 
the New Testament, where he learned that his faith in 
Christ and repentance toward God should be expressed in 
his public confession of the Lord Jesus and his baptism "for 
the remission of sins." In his nineteenth year he was thus 
received into the German Baptist Church by his uncle, Adam 
Hostetler. 

Shortly thereafter he was married and about the same 
time authorized by the church to preach. On that solemn 
occasion his uncle presented him with a small Bible, saying: 
"Preach and practice only what you find in this Holy Book." 
Many things were yet confused in the thought of this young 
preacher, but he made daily use of the Bible and an English 



BIOGRAPHIES 539 

dictionary. About 1824 the first volume of the Christian 
Baptist fell into his hands, which he read with eagerness, but 
not with entire approbation. He was strong, self-reliant, 
clear-minded, purposeful, and with a tremendous capacity 
for work, both physical and mental. In mature life he spoke 
both the English and German languages with equal ease and 
fluency. He was noted for the accuracy of his speech, both 
in his private conversation and in his public addresses. 

Mr. Hostetler came to Illinois in 1832 and settled on a 
farm about twenty miles east of the then village of Decatur. 
There he served as a pioneer farmer and preacher, organ- 
izing in that year what was then called the Okaw Church. 
He entered Decatur the same year to preach. The Meth- 
odists and Presbyterians had preceded him, and, according 
to the custom of those days, bitterly denounced his discourses 
as Campbellism, Romanism, infidelity, etc. Such men as he 
are never intimidated, and a number of the people, hearing 
his message, believed in Jesus Christ and were baptized. 
The first church in Decatur, that was Christian only, was 
organized there by him in 1833. He moved there the next 
year, and during his two years' residence supported his 
family by the practice of medicine, for which he had fitted 
himself by his unflagging industry. He returned to Indiana 
in 1836. 

During this period of four years, he met Bushrod W. 
Henry, a mighty, resolute and deeply religious Baptist 
preacher. He also met John W. Tyler, also a Baptist min- 
ister of fine mind. Both of these men had come from 
Kentucky to Illinois in the early thirties. Under the guiding 
influence of Mr. Hostetler, Mr. Tyler discarded his "articles 
of faith" for the Scriptures solely and dropped his denomina- 
tional name for Christian only. Mr. Tyler conducted the 
obsequies of Mr. Hostetler, and in his funeral discourse 
stated this fact as it related to himself. Mr. Hostetler 
returned to Lovington, 111., in 1861, where he passed the 
remnant of his days. He was a self-reliant and aggressive 
leader of men. 



540 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS - 

Daniel Radcliffe Howe. 

Ohio, 1819. 1905, Illinois. 

James Howe, the father of the subject of this sketch, was 
a native of Virginia and a Baptist preacher. He was a mem- 
ber of the Mahoning Association and came with its members 
into the Restoration movement. So spiritually D. R. Howe 
was both free-born and of the blood royal. In his youth he 
attended private schools in Ohio. In 1835 he came with his 
parents to Burean County, 111. There at Leepertown he went 
to school six weeks to George W. Minier. A little knowl- 
edge of Latin and Greek he got by the help of his brother- 
in-law, Amos Hays. At twenty-one he taught the first 
school ever held in Green County, Wis. He became a 
Christian in his eighteenth year and thereafter preached 
some for seven years. Then he became a settled minister of 
the churah at Princeton at a salary of $250 a year. He 
served there through a period of ten years, during the last 
half of which he received $1,000 per year. He served the 
churches at Washington two terms, Peoria, Springfield, 
Minonk, Quincy, Putnam, Henry, Lanark two terms, Monroe, 
Wisconsin two terms, two terms at Princeton, and Ulysses, 
Neb. Besides, Mr. Howe was a very successful evangelist 
and a noted builder of church houses. He was one of the 
finest men of his time. In him there were combined 
in an unusual degree the elements of a great gospel 
preacher. He enlightened the mind by a knowledge of the 
Scriptures and then appealed to the heart and conscience 
with great earnestness. Withal, he had fine business ability. 
During the fifty years of his active ministry he missed the 
public worship on the Lord's Day only eight times. 

In 1860 he was elected to the House of the State Legis- 
lature, where he gave the great war Governor of Illinois 

faithful support. , . TT 

John PI oust on. 

Near Blandinsville, 111., 1848. 

Educated at Abingdon College. Farmer, live-stockman 
and banker. Elected to the House of the Legislature in 



BIOGRAPHIES 541 

1908, 1910 and 1912. Mr. Houston has been an elder in 
the Blandinsville Church for thirty-five years. 

The Houston Brothers. 

They were Washington J., John Quincy A. and Jefferson 
P. Houston. All natives of Bourbon County, Ky. Moved 
to Bloomington, Ind., in 1840, and to Illinois in 1857, settling 
in La Salle County. 

Washington J. Houston. 

Kentucky, 1814. 1873, Illinois. 

Was a very successful evangelist, baptizing several thou- 
sand converts, chiefly in central Illinois. He preached for a 
time under the auspices of the State Board of Missions, 
served as financial agent of Eureka College, and met all 
errorists in public discussions as they desired. His closing 
years were spent at Marshall, where he died. 

John Q. A. Houston. 

Kentucky, 1821. 1870, Illinois. 

He was employed as an evangelist in Marshall and 
Livingstone Counties, and also by the State Board. He 
was a sweet singer, which contributed to his ministerial work. 
His labors reached south to Centralia. While engaged at 
Maroa in raising funds to complete the church building, he 
sickened and died there. 

Jefferson P. Houston. 

Kentucky, 1816. 1892, Missouri. 

His work was confined to Livingstone and near-by 
counties. 

John S. Hozvard. 

Tennessee, 1807. 1890, Ohio. 

With his father's family came to Illinois in 1817 and 
became a part of the Christian Settlement on Allison Prairie. 
He became one of the earlier preachers in that section. He 



542 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

resided in Russellville, where he proclaimed the gospel and 
in the regions beyond. A true man and faithful servant of 
God, he passed on at the age of eighty-three. 

William A. Howard 

Came from Kentucky and settled in the southern part of 
Fulton County about 1840. He there cleared and cultivated 
his farm. His most used tools were his ax and mattock. He 
was a strong man, both physically and mentally. For years 
he chopped, grubbed, split rails and worked his land six days 
in the week, and preached two or three sermons on the 
Lord's Days. Often he would walk five miles, preach two 
sermons in a schoolhouse, and return to his home congrega- 
tion for a discourse in the evening. Like most men of his 
time and place, he was clad in homespun. He was a devout 
man, well versed in the Scriptures and gave himself to his 
Master's work. In a wide territory he was well known and 
tenderly loved by many people. He moved to Texas in 1857. 

Charles E. Hull. 

Salem, 111., 1862. 

Mr. Hull has been a merchant, an editor and otherwise 
usefully and successfully engaged. He was elected to the 
House of the General Assembly in 1879 and to the Senate 
in 1896 and 1904. He is an active member of the church at 
Salem. 

Andrezv J. Hunter. 

Indiana, 1831. 1913, Paris, 111. 

Shortly after his birth, the parents of Mr. Hunter moved 
from Greencastle, Ind., to Illinois, and settled on a farm in 
Hunter Township. He graduated from Edgar Academy in 
1848 and began his business life as a civil engineer. Then 
he studied law, was admitted to the bar and in a few years 
became a prominent attorney. In 1864 he was elected to the 
State Senate. He was a member of the National House of 
Representatives in the fifty-third and fifty-fifth Congresses, 
and rendered efficient service on various committees. During 



BIOGRAPHIES 543 

the latter, he voted for the appropriation of fifty million 
dollars to be put into the hands of President McKinley for 
carrying on the war with Spain. Mr. Hunter was a lifelong 
Democrat, but he was always stronger than his party, 
because he possessed the confidence and respect of the people 
on account of his character. His heart always beat in sym- 
pathy with the sons of toil, for from them he sprang. Hence 
he championed the interests of the laboring people. He was 
a large-hearted, generous and broad-minded man, a splendid 
"mixer." In the days of his prime he was a superior f'._t- 
form orator. For more than fifty years he was a member 
of the church at Paris. In addition to serving the church as 
trustee and elder, during all this period he was the chief 
usher stationed at the main entrance at both Sunday meet- 
ings, where he received the people with dignity and cordiality. 
And thousands found pleasure in going to worship there 
because of this sincere and hearty welcome. 

Harrison T. Ireland. 

La Forte County, Ind., 1848. 

Came to Marshall County, 111., in 1855. A farmer. Was 
elected to the House of the Legislature in 1904-6-8-10. Mr. 
Ireland has long been a useful member of the Washburn 
Church. 

James E. Jewett. 

Belfast, Me., 1844. 1912, Lincoln, 111. 

Came with his parents to Illinois in 1856, who settled on 
the wild prairie in Livingston County four miles northeast 
of Gridley. His education was received in the public schools 
of that time. Mr. Jewett came of fine, patriotic stock. One 
of his grandfathers, John Cochran, was a member of the 
"Boston Tea Party," a soldier in the Revolution and an 
inmate of a British prison for nine months. His paternal 
grandfather was a soldier in the War of 1812. He himself 
enlisted Aug. 7, 1862, as a private in Company G, 129th 
Illinois Infantry, in which he served with superior courage 



544 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

and distinction till the close of the war. He followed the 
flag through all that high carnival of blood and death that 
led to Atlanta, to the sea and to the "Grand Review" at 
Washington, D. C. 

Returning home, he went to the farm, next to the school- 
room as teacher, and then to the ministry of the gospel. He 
also read law and was admitted to the bar, but only little 
of his time was given to the practice of this profession. He 
was also prominent in some of the fraternal societies of the 
State, and filled a number of minor civil offices with recog- 
nized ability and credit. 

His mind was always alert and his life full of action. 
His disposition was genial and kindly and his companionship 
pure and helpful. He sought and saw the best in human 
life and was serene in adversity. 

Hale Johnson. 

Indiana, 1847. 1902, Illinois. 

Mr. Johnson's father, Dr. John B. Johnson, served as 
assistant surgeon during the Civil War. His grandfather 
was a Baptist minister who was a chaplain in the War of 
1812. Hale Johnson inherited the fighting blood of his 
ancestors. At the age of seventeen he enlisted in Company 
D, 135th Indiana Infantry. He, with his father's family, 
came to Illinois in 1865. 

Mr. Johnson was an attorney. His residence was in 
Newton. He became a Christian in 1870. To the close of 
his life he was a praying, active, sincere man. His church 
came first in his life. His generosity was unfailing. His 
last contribution, made the day before he died, was to a 
Christian Orphans' Home. He was open-minded, always 
willing i:> investigate and learn what would contribute to the 
religious, social and civic betterment of society. 

At one time he was mayor of the city of Newton. In 
1882 he left the Republican party because it refused to 
submit a prohibition constitutional amendment to a vote of 
the people. In a public address he gave Min. N. S. Haynes 



BIOGRAPHIES 545 

the credit of pulling him loose from his old party moorings. 
Thereafter, he was one of the most effective, prominent and 
influential party Prohibitionists in America. He served well 
on committees, State and national. In 1896 he was nomi- 
nated for Governor. Later in the same year he was placed 
on the national ticket for the Vice-Presidency, with Joseph 
Levering for the office of President. During this campaign 
he stumped in more than thirty States, speaking day and 
night. While party Prohibitionists have rarely been success- 
ful as such, the fruits of their self-sacrificing and heroic 
labors are manifest in the growing public sentiment that 
finds increasing expression in State and national legislation. 
The Christian conscience of the nation has decreed that the 
liquor traffic must die. The handwriting is even now on 
the wall. 

Mr. Johnson's death was tragic. He had gone to a 
country merchant to try to persuade him to settle a debt 
peaceably. The merchant became enraged and shot him. A 
few hours later the assassin committed suicide. Mr. John- 
son's untimely death was deplored, particularly among 
Prohibitionists. They placed a beautiful monument over his 
grave in the cemetery at Newton. 

William H. Johnson 

Was born near Enfield, 111., in 1841. The family from 
which he came has been noted for its intelligence, patriotism 
and loyalty to Christian convictions for a hundred and fifty 
years. His grandfather, Arthur Johnson, was a soldier in 
the Revolution. The subject of this sketch received such 
education as the time and place of his residence afforded. 
He became an attorney and a Christian of intelligence and 
culture. Enlisting in 1861 in Company I, First Regiment 
Illinois Cavalry, he was made first sergeant, and after four 
years of service he was mustered out as first lieutenant of 
Company I, Eighty-seventh Regiment Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry. In 1880 he was chosen an elector and voted 
directly for Garfield for President. In 1882 he was elected 

18 



546 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

to the State Legislature. He has served several congrega- 
tions as preacher in charge. He is a modest, sympathetic 
and all-round Christian man. 

John T. Jones. 

Cincinnati, O., 1795. 1877, Eureka, 111. 

Mr. Jones was one of the true leaders of the Restoration 
movement in Illinois in its beginning. In 1831 he came from 
Cincinnati to Jacksonville. There he gave the church for 
fifteen years active and efficient service. He moved to 
Eureka in 1847. He was a gentleman of fine intelligence 
and culture. His hospitality was cheerful and his dignity 
commanding. With the beginning of the college, he was 
made a trustee, and for twenty-five years never missed a 
board meeting. His discrimination between things funda- 
mental and incidental was superior. When objections were 
urged to voluntary meetings of individuals and representa- 
tives of congregations for the most effective dissemination 
of the truth, he was one of the first to answer these clearly 
and conclusively. He was a minister, a schoolmaster and a 
writer. His counsel was always wise and his spirit amiable 
and conciliatory. His influence was distinctly constructive. 
The memory of the just is his. 

6". 5\ Jones. 

Bath County, Ky., 1859. 

Educated in country schools, at Ladoga find.) Normal, 
Owingsville (Ky.) Seminary, North Middletown (Ky.) 
College, and in classrooms as a teacher. Came to Illinois in 
1884, and for a decade he served the churches at Homer, 
Champaign and St. Joseph. In 1894 he became pastor of 
the First Church in Danville, which he continued to serve 
for eight years. Then he went to the Third Church, where 
he continued for ten years. When Mr. Jones went to Dan- 
ville the Disciples numbered about 150, with a property 
worth about $3,000. At the close of his eighteen years he 
left four churches whose combined membership is near two 



BIOGRAPHIES 547 

thousand, all well housed in properties whose aggregate 
value is about $85,000. He received into the congregations 
there near two thousand people, fourteen hundred of whom 
were by primary obedience. That work will be his enduring 

memorial. 

E. A. Jordan. 

Rockport, Ind., 1880. 

The facts in this sketch were furnished the author by 
Mr. Jordon in writing. 

His parents were both devout members of the Roman 
Catholic Church. He attended the public schools. In 1888 
the father sold his farm, moved to New Boston, Ind., in the 
same county, and there engaged in the grocery and saloon 
business a business not thought to be inconsistent among 
Roman Catholics. The son was then placed in the parochial 
school there, which was taught by the sisters. In this school 
the doctrines of the Roman Church were given prominence 
and the rudiments of true education were sadly neglected. 
At ten years of age he was confirmed by Bishop Donahue, 
of Indianapolis. Shortly thereafter, his mother died, leaving 
three sons. She had dedicated this son in his early life to 
the priesthood, and her dying request of her husband was 
that he would send this son to St. Meinrod Monastery to 
prepare him, that she might thus fulfill her vow. In that 
institution, which was in charge of the Benedictines, he 
remained eight years. He completed the college course and 
received the A.B. degree. Then two years were passed in 
the seminary, where he took the minor vows and deacons' 
orders. He was held to this work by the memory of his 
mother's vow. It was a custom of the seminary for the stu- 
dents to be sent out on Sundays to near-by hamlets, to 
conduct "missions" or religious services. He, with others of 
his fellow-students, went to Eddyville one third Sunday in 
the month. They found the room they expected to use occu- 
pied by a band of people who called themselves "Christians." 
Min. Ira Scott, an elderly man, preached. He announced 
that the Catholic students were there to conduct their 



548 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

"mission" and asked the people to remain and hear them. 
This kindness caused the students to feel rather small, since 
they had remained outside the building throurh Mr. Scott's 
meeting. At the close of the students' "mission," one of 
them, Loyola Chatron, challenged Mr. Scott to debate the 
question which of the two churches was right. Chatron was 
well versed in the traditions and doctrines of Rome, was 
brilliant, and had recently come from the Jesuit College in 
Rome. He had a mighty good opinion of himself. Min. 
W. B. F. Treat represented the church of Christ and Mr. 
Chatron the Romanists in a week's public debate. Mr. 
Treat's powerful logic in presenting the word of God and 
facts of history was irresistible. The first result of the dis- 
cussion was that five students of the monastery left the 
Roman Church. Mr. Jordon was one of these. For a year 
thereafter he was tossed about on a sea of doubt. He 
regarded all Protestants as alike. Finally, he found the 
people who took the word of God as the only rule of faith 
and practice. He was baptized by Min. J. T. Jacobs, of 
Rockport, Ind., and greatly enjoys his freedom in Jesus 
Christ. He later baptized his father, who had opposed his 
son's leaving the Roman Church in every possible way. Mr. 
Jordon is pastor of the church at La Harpe. 

Jacob Judy 

Became a Christian in Greene County, O., before he was 
fifteen years of age and just before a church of Christ was 
organized in his home. This was early in August, 1828. 
He applied for and received a letter, of which the following 
is a copy: 

The Baptized Church of Jesus Christ, meeting at Brother Jacob 
Darst's, Greene County, Ohio, believing the Scriptures of the Old 
and New Testaments to be the Word of God and the only and all- 
sufficient rule of faith and practice to any Christian Church, and 
whereas our Brother Jacob Judy, having requested a letter of dis- 
mission in order to join a church where God in his divine providence 
may cast his lot, This is to certify that he is a member in good stand- 
ing and in full fellowship with us and his brethren in the Lord, and 



BIOGRAPHIES 549 

when received by you he is dismissed from us. And may the God of 
all grace preserve you and him to his Heavenly Kingdom is the 
prayer of your brethren in the Gospel bonds. 

Done by order of the church when met on Saturday before the 
third Lord's day in August, 1828. JACOB DARST, Clerk. 

Signed in behalf of the Church. 

Mr. Judy's recollection was that this was a Baptist 
church. He came to Illinois in 1824. He helped to build the 
first house in Mackinaw, and then assisted Mordecai Mobley, 
who lived and kept a store in this building. Later, Mr. 
Judy built him a home in Hittle's Grove, and was one of the 
active Christian men of the neighborhood. Later his home 
was in Atlanta, where he died in September, 1903. Had he 
lived till the following January, he would have been one 
hundred years old. He always wished to say a word or two 
at every meeting. The substance of his talks was: "Let us 
love one another. How great is the goodness of God." 
These words will always go with his memory. 

/. /. Judy. 

Mackinaw, 111., 1832. 1913, Independence, Mo. 

Mr. Judy became a Christian in 1848 under the preach- 
ing of Walter P. Bowles. He gave about forty years to the 
ministry. His work was mainly in Tazewell, Logan, Mason 
and Fulton Counties. For a period of twenty years he 
received an average of one hundred persons by conversion, 
and organized twelve congregations. His work also reached 
out into Iowa, Missouri and Arkansas. 

Col. J. W. Judy. 

Clark County, Ky., 1822. 

During the years of his active life, Mr. Judy was one of 
the most favorably and widely known men in the State. He 
was colonel of the 114th Illinois Volunteer Infantry. In the 
siege of Vicksburg he was on the firing-line for forty-five 
days. He came to Illinois in 1851, and was a farmer in 
Menard County. After the war, he served as a member of 



550 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

the State Board of Agriculture, and during a period was its 
president. He was an expert on thoroughbred cattle, and 
traveled from ocean to ocean as an auctioneer of such live 
stock. He is a fine type of Christian gentleman. His wife, 
Mrs. Kate A. S. Judy, was a daughter of J. W. Simpson, 
of Clary's Grove Church, and was highly esteemed by many 
for her Christian activity and usefulness. The home was 
at Tallula, where Mr. Judy waits in the twilight of life for 
the eternal morning. 

Andretv J. Kane. 

Guilford County, N. C, 1817. 1896, Springfield, 111. 

Both of Mr. Kane's parents died in his infancy. He 
grew to manhood in the home of his eldest brother, Morri- 
son Kane. This was in Indiana. At Indianapolis, in 1836, 
he became a Christian under the preaching of John O'Kane 
and Love H. Jameson. At twenty-one he began life for him- 
self. He went to Chicago, thence to Peoria, and on to 
Sangamon County in 1839. His first work there was to 
assist in building the first bridge across the Sangamon River. 
By trade he was a carpenter. Uniting with the church in 
Springfield, he was led by its members to give his life 
to the Christian ministry ; hence, he began the study of 
Hebrew, Latin, Greek and English Literature under private 
tutors. Later, he was ordained by the church. Of Mr. 
Kane's ministry, T. T. Holton has well written: 

His field of labor was central Illinois, though he at times passed 
the border of the State. He went on horseback with his saddle-bags 
behind him in one side was his Bible ; in the other, baggage. He 
rode through a country sparsely inhabited and when there were but 
few settled pastors. No man was better known than he no voice 
more widely heard in those early days of the settlement and develop- 
ment of central Illinois. Meetings were held, churches organized, 
infant congregations cared for, and occasionally an encounter was 
had with some champion of opposition in public debate. Some of his 
evangelistic meetings were marvelously successful for the time, and 
his converts ran into the thousands. He regarded not the clouds or 
the wind. I have seen him ride up to his door with his ears frozen 
and his beard bristling with icicles, but never for a moment thinking 





ANDREW J. KANE. 



DAVID D. MILLER. 





JOHN W. TYLER. 



JOHN ENGLAND. 



BIOGRAPHIES 551 

of quitting his work. It was with great reluctance that within a year 
of his death, at eighty years of age, he found he must relinquish all 
further efforts to preach. 

Mr. Kane was a passionate lover of the Bible. He 
devoured its great truths. He was jealous of its integrity 
and its interpretation. Always abreast of the times in 
religious thought, he vigorously opposed the trend of 
destructive criticism. Judge W. E. Nelson said of him: 
"He was a most efficient preacher of the gospel a man of 
great power deeply convinced of the authority and sover- 
eignty of God, of the divinity of the Christ and of the force 
and authority of the Bible." He was a reasoner rather than 
an exhorter, but his sermons appealed both to the imagina- 
tion and the conscience. A careful reader and painstaking 
student, this master workman was heard by intelligent people, 
even in his closing years, with delight. A wide-visioned 
man, he assisted in the organization of the State and General 
Missionary Societies. One who knew him well said: "When 
Bro. Kane stands like a giant before the congregation, shuts 
his lips together, runs his left hand under his chin, and gives 
an emphatic look upward and all around, you are going to 
hear something." 

"His life was gentle; and the elements 
So mild in him, that Nature might stand up, 
And say to all the world, This was a man." 

Dr. A. L. Kcllar. 

Oldham County, Ky., 1827. 1908, Covina, Cal. 

Was the youngest of eight children. He received, for 
his time, an exceptionally good education in Bacon College, 
and graduated from the medical department of the Uni- 
versity of Louisville, Ky., in 1851. In the same year he was 
ordained to the ministry. He came to Decatur, 111., in 1852 
and began his practice there, but most of the years of his 
active life were passed at Sullivan. There he was one of 
the most persevering and efficient men the church ever had. 
His medical practice was very large, but much of it paid 



552 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

him little or no money. His disposition was most charitable. 
For forty- four years he practiced the healing art for both 
body and soul. He was rugged in body, vigorous in mind 
and energetic in action. His faithful services were a distinct 
contribution to the foundations of society in the counties of 
Macon, Moultrie and Shelby. He was well known and 
highly esteemed by many for his integrity of character. 
Min. E. H. Kellar, of California, is his son. 

H. Y. Kellar. 

Oldham County, Ky., 1825. 1902, Effingham, 111. 

Mr. Kellar and his brother, Dr. A. L. Kellar, were sons 
of A. H. Kellar, a Baptist minister who came to Moultrie 
County in 1832. There meeting Joseph Hostetler, he chose 
to be simply a Christian and assisted in the formation of the 
West Okaw Church of Christ. H. Y. Kellar's education 
was limited to the common schools of that time, but he came 
to be a well-informed and well-developed man. For a num- 
ber of years he served as a schoolmaster. In 1847 he was 
ordained to the ministry by the West Okaw Church. He 
served congregations in Indiana, Kentucky, Missouri, Iowa 
and California, but the larger part of his ministry was given 
to Illinois, both as evangelist and pastor. He assisted in the 
organization of the State Missionary Society at Shelbyville 
in 1850, and was a member of its board of managers for 
many years. He was always the advocate of an educated 
ministry. He was an earnest preacher, but not a disputant. 
He was a ready helper in every good work, a wise coun- 
selor and a faithful servant of God and his fellow-men. 

Nathan M. Knapp. 

Member of Winchester Church. Member of the Consti- 
tutional Convention of 1847, of State Legislature in 1850, 
and paymaster in the Federal Army in the sixties. Retired 
with rank of lieutenant-colonel. Mr. Knapp was a man full of 
vigor and action and exerted a wide influence. 



BIOGRAPHIES 553 

James Worcester Knight. 

Illinois, 1869. 1902, California. 

Was a son of Moses H. Knight. Attended school at 
Eureka. Was engaged in the newspaper business and in the 
public advocacy of good citizenship. In this later work, Sec. 
J. Fred Jones met him in 1896 and induced him to enter the 
ministry. He served the churches at Browning, Youngs- 
town, Frederick, Carlinville and Champaign. When the 
University Place Church was nearing completion in 1902 
under his leadership, ill health compelled him to go to Cali- 
fornia, where he died the next spring. 

Moses H. Knight. 

Vermont, 1830. 1878, Illinois. 

Mr. Knight's parents were devout old-school Presby- 
terians, while an uncle, who had much influence over him, 
was an earnest Congregationalist. He was educated in a 
Baptist school. These surroundings greatly perplexed him 
in his religious views. He came to Illinois in 1850, settling 
in the western part of McLean County. He heard Min. J. 
G. Campbell present the simple New Testament teaching, and 
accepted with joy. He was ordained to the ministry in 1858, 
and continued faithfully therein for a period of twenty 
years. He served the churches at Lower and Upper White 
Oak and various communities in the northeast part of the 
county, where he was associated with Mr. Campbell in evan- 
gelistic work. In his preaching trips he traveled horseback 
or walked. Much of his service was without financial com- 
pensation. He was a pure, true and efficient servant of God 
and men. 

A. R. Knox. 

New York, 1824. 1914, Waukegan, 111. 

Shortly after his marriage in 1846, Mr. Knox, with his 
wife, came to Lake County, 111. Both were active members 
of the Baptist Church. He was a "licentiate" and she a 
pioneer and leader in all church work. He heard that a 
minister had been traveling in Kentucky, Ohio and Indiana, 



554 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

and that his "preaching was tearing Baptist churches all to 
pieces." On inquiring, he learned that the name of this 
disrupter was Alexander Campbell. There were at that 
time a few Disciples scattered through that section who had 
come from Ohio. Some of them loaned Mr. Knox a copy 
of the "Christian Baptist." Before they had read the book 
half through, he and his wife were in full accord with the 
principles and aims of the Restoration movement. To these 
their lives were devoted. They were the parents of Mrs. 
Louise Kelly, so widely and favorably known as a Christian 
woman of superior ability and usefulness. For more than 
half a century, Mr. Knox lived and labored in Lake County 
for the primitive gospel. With a well-informed faith, he 
was as immovable as a mountain. In his evening-time he 
waited in the twilight of the eternal day. 

E. J. Lampton. 

Was born in Kentucky, reared in Missouri, became a Chris- 
tian in 1852, entered the ministry in 1859, and continues 
therein. He gave twenty years' work to Illinois, during 
which time he baptized about three thousand people and 
added not a few others to the churches. His work, like his 
character, is of the substantial kind. 

6*. 5. Lappin. 

Wayne County, 111., 1870. 

The same year his parents moved to Missouri. Six 
years thereafter, while the family was returning in a movers' 
wagon to their former home in Illinois, the father died and 
was buried on the way. S. S. Lappin grew to his majority 
on the farm, working there and in stores, and attending and 
teaching schools. At the age of six years he had read 
McGuffey's old "Third Reader" through three times, having 
learned the words by spelling them aloud to his mother, 
whose eyesight was too dim to make out the letters. At 
twenty-one he began to preach in schoolhouses and country 
churches, but was still selling goods in a store in Fairfield. 



BIOGRAPHIES 555 

After one year in Eureka College, he served the churches 
at Toluca, Washburn, Paxton, Atlanta and Stanford. He 
entered the editorial office of the Christian Standard in 1909, 
where he continues as its managing editor. Through the 
school of early adversity, his native endowments, with grace 
and grit, have led him to a place of great usefulness. 

He has two brothers who are twins, and were born after 
their father's death : John C, a teacher in Phillips University, 
Enid, Okla., and William O., a teacher in Atlantic Christian 
College, Wilson, N. C. 

Richard and Henry C. Latham Father and Son. 

James Latham, the father of Richard, was the first settler 
within the bounds of what is now Logan County. He was 
a Virginian, but came to Illinois from Union County, Ky., 
where all of his ten children were born. 

Richard Latham was born about 1799, and came to 
Illinois in 1819, soon after locating at Elkhart. There he 
was married and built the best residence of the early settlers. 
This home came to be known near and far as one of unusual 
hospitality even in that period of domestic generosity. He 
became a Christian during the wide-reaching revival in 
which Robert Foster was the chief factor. For several 
years he went to the Lake Fork Church, eight miles east of 
Elkhart, and rarely missed a meeting there. When not 
there, the order of the Lord's house was maintained in his 
own home. This led to the formation of the Elkhart con- 
gregation. In 1852 he moved to Springfield. He was soon 
made an elder of the church there, and filled this place till 
his passing in 1868. Of him a writer has well said: 

Of the character of Richard Latham we find only good to record. 
He was a man whose honor was dear to him as his own life and 
whose word was sacred as his oath. While his career in the main 
savored little of adventure or striking achievement, it was enriched 
throughout by kindness and the benefactions which quietly but cease- 
lessly welled up from the bounty of his nature, endearing him to all 
with whom he came in contact. For miles around he was known as 
"Uncle Dick," and the whole community looked to him as arbitrator, 



556 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

guardian and adviser, rarely questioning the wisdom voiced in his 
gentle counsels. 

He presided at the Lord's table in such a way as to make 
all present feel thrilled and worshipful. When his sacred 
dust was borne away to its final resting-place, the number 
of gray-haired men who followed was a sight to see. 

The epitomized character of Henry C. Latham may be 
written in four words an ideal Christian gentleman. He 
is a worthy son of an honored sire. For many years he has 
been steadfast and reliable in the First Church of Springfield. 
There is no part of the worship that he has not led and no 
part of the service that he has not performed, and all has 
been done well. He has been a lifelong student. 

John Lemmon. 

Sangamon County, 111., 1838. 

Grew up on the farm and attended the public school. En- 
listed in Company D, Thirty-third Illinois Volunteer Infantry. 
Lost his right leg and index finger on his left hand in the 
battle of Black River the last stand the Confederates made 
outside of Vicksburg. 

After the war, attended Bible College at Lexington, Ky., 
three years. Then taught school. Entered the ministry in 
1874. Has served fourteen congregations in central Illinois, 
that at Buffalo seven years. 

Mr. Lemmon is a man of clear and deep convictions 
sincere, frank and outspoken. When a ministerial institute 
had given a half-day to the consideration of an unprofitable 
subject, he then publicly asked : "How long will it take this 
kind of talk to convert the world?" He holds that the same 
wise economy should be used in the management of public 
trusts as is exercised in one's personal business. 

Silas White Leonard. 

Louisville, Ky., 1814. 1870, near Centralia, 111. 

His parents dying when he was quite young, he was 
adopted by a Captain White, a Baptist, who reared and 



BIOGRAPHIES 557 

educated him in Ohio. He began to preach the primitive 
gospel at the age of twenty, but spent much time in teaching 
vocal music for the next eight years. About 1848 he, with 
A. D. Fillmore, published "The Christian Psalmist." It was 
in figure- faced notes and was the first hymnal having the 
music ever in use among the churches of Christ. It reached 
a circulation of 560,000 copies. In 1856 he moved from 
Jeffersonville, Ind., to his farm near Centralia, where he 
resided to the close of his life. From that point he went out 
and preached in many places. He was a sweet-spirited, but 
an aggressive and progressive, preacher. 

Five days before his death he rode nine miles horseback 
and gave a temperance lecture. The cold thus contracted 
hastened his demise. He had just finished a new "Psalmist" 
in both kinds of notes, at a cost of $3,000, and had placed 
the material in the publisher's hand when his call came. 

Cicero J. Lindly. 

Near St. Jacobs, 111., 1857. 

Graduated in scientific and law departments of McKen- 
dree College and admitted to the bar in 1879. He has 
farmed extensively and has been active in civil life for many 
years. He has served as county judge in Bond County, was 
Presidential elector in 1884, and served also as Railroad and 
Warehouse Commissioner. Was elected to the House of the 
Legislature in 1902, 1904 and 1906. Mr. Lindly is an active 
member of the Greenville Church. 

James A. Lindsey. 

Kentucky, 1792. 1872, Illinois. 

Mr. Lindsey came to Illinois in 1824 and settled in Taze- 
well County. At that time he was a Baptist. In 1827 he 
associated himself with the Disciples. He was a reverent 
and faithful student of the Bible, and early in his life became 
a preacher of the primitive gospel. He resided on his farm. 
He carried a small copy of the New Testament in his pocket, 
and as he plowed he read and thought on the Word. This 



558 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

was a custom of most of the pioneers. He was the leading 
spirit in the formation of the Mackinaw Church in 1837, 
which at once formally recognized his ability and fitness to 
preach the gospel and commissioned him thereto. After 
that, his wife superintended the farm and his sons did most 
of the work there. One year he evangelized on the condi- 
tion that his brethren pay the wages of a male helper on his 
farm. Most of his ministry, reaching through sixty years, 
brought him little or no money compensation. Much of his 
work was done in Tazewell County, but he also evangelized 
and formed congregations in McLean, DeWitt and Marshall 
Counties, also west of the Illinois River. His style of 
preaching was exegetical. He read and unfolded a chapter, 
more or less. His sermons usually continued from one and 
a half to two hours. He taught people publicly and from 
house to house. This was the business of his life. Once 
where he stayed overnight he so taught the host and his 
wife that they expressed the wish to enter the Christian life. 
The next morning, before leaving, he immersed them. He 
patiently bore the derision that was too often thrown at the 
Disciples in the earlier years. As he rode quietly along the 
roads he sometimes would hear people say: "There goes a 
Campbellite. See the hump on his back." He was ardently 
missionary in his convictions, teaching and life. Three of 
his sons were preachers. From his home near Lilly, where 
he had resided for thirty-eight and a half years, he passed 
to his great reward. 

John Lindsey. 

Christian County, Ky., 1821. 1887, Eureka, 111. 

Came with his parents to Tazewell County in 1824. Was 
a son of James A. Lindsey. Graduated at Bethany College 
in 1848. For some time was a traveling companion in the 
ministry with Alexander Campbell. Was a teacher in Wal- 
nut Grove Academy and a valuable helper at Eureka College 
in many ways through many years. He served as pastor 
with many churches, but was more engaged in evangelistic 



BIOGRAPHIES 559 

work. About five thousand persons were added to the 
churches through his efforts. Mr. Lindsey's life was a very 
useful one to his time. He was always outspoken on the 
right side of every moral question. 

Henry C. Littleton. 

Ipava, 111., 1851. 

Received such education as the common schools afforded. 
After his baptism by Dr. J. H. Brinkerhoff in 1867, he 
served as a lay preacher. Then he traveled with some of 
the strong preachers of that time, by whom he was instructed 
in the things pertaining to the kingdom of God. He served 
the churches at New Philadelphia, Bryant, Cuba, La Harpe, 
Barry, Mason City, Pekin and Astoria. He was a single- 
purposed, guileless and industrious preacher whose service 
was always constructive. He moved to Iowa in 1900. 

F. M. Lollar. 

Ingraham, 111., 1840. 

Mr. Lollar grew to manhood on a farm in Clay County 
and attended the subscription and public schools of his com- 
munity. He entered the military service in October, 1861, 
and served four years and three months in Company F, 
Forty-sixth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He was discharged 
with the rank of captain. Upon his return home he attended 
school and taught schools. He did not begin to preach until 
1882. Then he served the Ingraham Church part time for 
twenty years and the Union Chapel Church for eleven years. 
He held many successful revivals in Clay and Effingham 
Counties. He was a good man of fine common sense, whose 
work the Lord richly blessed. He moved from his farm in 
1904 to Olney and from there in 1908 to Wynne, Ark. 

Pent on Lutnm 

Was another of the old-time preachers of White County. 
He lived in Seven-mile Prairie. His labors were contem- 
poraneous with those of Moses Goodwin. While he always 



560 HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES IN ILLINOIS 

resided on his farm, he was a man of some culture. He 
was a pleasing and inspiring speaker. A man who had been 
reared a Methodist heard Mr. Lumm preach one day. At 
the close of the sermon, with tears streaming down his 
cheeks, he turned to the man who sat next to him and said: 
"That is the first Methodist sermon I ever heard in my life." 
Jonas Lumm, of Grayville, who was also an old-time 
preacher, was Fenton's brother. 

Alexander McCollum. 

Washington County, Pa., 1820. 1895, Taylorville, 111. 

Grew up on a farm in Miami County, O., and received 
his early education there. Taught school and studied medi- 
cine, but did not graduate. First united with the Baptist 
Church, but, hearing Alexander Campbell in a public debate, 
he took the Bible alone as the rule of his faith and practice. 
Was licensed to preach in 1844 as a man of recognized 
ability. He came to Morgan County about 1850. In that 
section he was associated with D. P. Henderson, W. W. 
Happy and others in evangelistic work. He became the 
pastor of the Taylorville Church in 1856, but in 1858 moved 
to a farm in Locust Creek Township. There, in a settle- 
ment of Ohioans, he formed a Christian congregation that 
gave P. D. Vermillion to the ministry. This band never 
built a chapel. In 1863, Mr. McCollum returned to Taylor- 
ville, where he resided till the close of his life. He rendered 
the church there most valuable help. From that place he 
preached in all the surrounding region for miles and years. 
He led Mrs. Henry Davis to the Lord she was the mother 
of Mrs. Hoover and Mrs. Detterding, both of honored 
memory. Mrs. Davis and her husband built the present 
house of worship in Taylorville. 

Mr. McCollum lived in a time when liquor was in most 
homes, but he never knew its taste. In his ministry he was 
intrepid and aggressive. On one occasion he entered a 
denominational assembly in the country. The regular min- 
ister did not come; so the leaders, after a private consulta- 



BIOGRAPHIES 561 

tion, asked the unorthodox McCollum to "make a few 
remarks." He opened up with such unction that there were 
tears in many eyes and not a few fervent "Amens." He 
came to the great commission, and the tears gave place to 
disappointment and the "Amens" to vexation. Next he 
stood on Mt. Zion under the throne of the King and amid 
the fiery tongues of Pentecost. The preacher's words did 
not affect the people like those of Peter. There were hurried 
nods and whisperings among the leaders, and a concerted 
move among them toward the door. The people followed 
so did the preacher, proclaiming insistently the word of the 
Lord. It was an irregular panic, and looked like a flight 
from fire or an invasion of Indians. Away went the people 
down the main road with the preacher a close second, still 
making himself heard and understood. He told them about 
Philip in Samaria. At another sign from the leaders the 
people took to the woods in squads and singly. The peerless 
defender of the faith poured the truth into the squads as he 
came upon them. An elderly man, out of breath, heard the 
whole story of the eunuch's conversion ; a woman with a 
babe in arms heard for the first time about the salvation of 
Lydia. Had it not been for the saplings and pawpaw bushes, 
the whole history of conversions would have been declared. 

John Byram McCorkle. 

Lawrenceville, 111., 1819. 1882, Eureka, 111. 

His father, Richard B. McCorkle, with his family, moved 
to Tazewell County about 1830 and settled a few miles 
north of Washington. There he built a strong log residence 
that furnished a home and a safe place for women and chil- 
dren during the raids of Indians upon the early settlers. His 
eldest daughter married John Johnson, and became the 
mother of three noted preachers B. W., R. H. and J. B. 
Johnson. 

During his early manhood, J. B. McCorkle marketed 
farm products at Ft. Dearborn, now Chi