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Full text of "History of the Doles-Cook brigade of northern Virginia, C.S. A.; containing muster roles of each company of the Fourth, Twelfth, Twenty-first and Forty-fourth Georgia regiments, with a short sketch of the services of each member, and a complete history of each regiment, by one of its own members"

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THE NEW YORkI 

PUBLIC LIBRARY,! 



A8TOR, LENOX >ND 
TILDEN FOUNDATIONS. 




HENRY W. THOMAS 



HISTORY 



OF THE 



DOLES-COOK BRIGADE 



Army of Northern Virginia, C. S. A. 



CONTAINING 



Muster Roi^ls of Bach Company of the Fourth, 

Twelfth, Twenty-First and Forty-Fourth 

Georgia Regiments, with a Short Sketch 

of the Services of Each Member, and 

A Complete History of Bach 

Regiment, by One of Its 

Own Members 

and other matters of interest 



HENRY W. THOMAS 

Twe;i<fth Georgia Regiment 



\Yi > 

ATLANTA, GA. : ; '/'j ' ^^ 

THE FRANKI.IN PRINTING AND PUBLISHING C<3M±»ANY 
(SEP W. HARRISON (STATE PRINTER) GEN. JINSR', • ' 

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('■'■■(JSiJCilBRARy 

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COPYRIGHTED 1903 BY 

HENRY W. THOMAS 



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-• •.» • , - . -, . , ,, 
• »»'• • ■' **. 






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XTo tbe 

Beceaeeb anb Surviving flDcmbcrs 

OF THE 

2)olc0*»(rooft Brigade, 

Who Won Fadeless Laurels under Lee, Jackson, Ewell, 
Early, Gordon, and other Heroes of the South, 
ON THE Battle-fields of Virginia, Mary- 
land AND Pennsylvania, this work 
is Affectionately Dedicated 
BY THE Author. 



Preface. 



The distinctive feature of this work is, that the author has en- 
deavored to give a true and correct account of the services rendered 
by each member of this brigade while in the Confederate army oppo- 
site their respective names. To accomplish this he used every means 
within his power to procure the data herein recorded. 

The records of file in the office of Adjutant-General of Georgia 
copied from papers of file in the War Department at Washington, 
D. C, are so incomplete and inaccurate as to the number of enlisted 
men, promotions, discharges, transfers, wounds, deaths, etc., that he 
had to rely to a large extent upon members of the various companies 
of each regiment for reliable information. It is probable, therefore, 
that some errors may exist, but in the main it is correct. 

No brigade in the Confederate army did more service, or suffered 
more hardships, and none can boast of a prouder or more brilliant 
record than that made by the Doles-Cook Brigade. Its regiments 
were amongst the first to take arms in defense of the South, and did 
not lay them down until General Kobert E. Lee surrendered the army 
of Northern Virginia at Appomattox Court-house, Virginia, on the 
9th day of April, 1865. On that fatal day the remnant of the Doles- 
Cook Brigade followed the Stars and Bars as gallantly, fought as 
bravely, and drove the enemy as steadily as they had done in the 
past. Not until then did they cease to bear arms in defense of 
the South. 

Read the history of all the armies of any nation, and you will not 
find a single one to compare to that of the Confederate army. They 
were intelligent, brave, fearless and determined, but kind and gentle- 
manly in their bearings, respectful to their officers and obedient to 
orders. They did not fight for conquest or glory, but simply for the 
protection of their homes and the independence of the South. 

The life of the Confederacy was brief, but brilliant and glorious. 
No nation possesses such a priceless record as that made by her sol- 
diers ; none ever contended with so many disadvantages and against 
such fearful odds; none ever displayed more courage, or exhibited 
more loyal devotion to any cause than the Confederate soldier. 

(V) 



Vi IPreface. 

The South is justly proud of the record made by her sons in this 
unequal contest, and the ex-Confederate soldier whose record during 
the dark and trying days from 18(31 to 1865 entitles him to a 
"Southern Cross of Honor," should desire no higher honor, for it 
stamps its wearer a hero of the mightiest and most terrible war of 
which we have any record. This badge of distinction has been pre- 
sented by ''The Daughters of the Confederacy" as a mark of esteem, 
and in recognition of their appreciation for the sacrifices made, the 
hardships endured and dangers encountered by the Southern soldiers 
in camp, along the march and upon the battle-field in defense of the 
South, and its wearer should prove to these noble women that he is 
worthy of their love, confidence and respect. 

''The flag of no country or cause ever went down in defeat with 
such a halo of glory. No cause ever had a more devoted, self-sacrific- 
ing people to sustain it ; while the bravery, the devotion, the energy, 
the unselfishness and heroism of the noble women of the South, 
throughout the entire struggle, is unparalleled in the history of the 
world. 

"No armies were ever led to battle by greater generals, and no 
generals ever commanded better, braver, or more patriotic soldiers. 
And last, but not least, no brighter intellect, or purer statesman, no 
patriot with clearer conscience, purer heart, or more lofty purposes 
ever wielded power or guided the Ship of State than JeflJ'erson Davis, 
the gifted and noble President of the Confederate States." 

For our participation in this struggle we have no apologies to make, 
for our cause was just and holy. 

This period in Georgia's history is the most brilliant jewel in her 
crown, and the records of these stirring and eventful days should be 
sacredly kept and put in tangible shape regardless of cost, so that 
future generations may know of the splendid services rendered by her 
volunteer soldiers. But little information is to be gained from the 
records in the oflBce of Secretary of State in regard to the Kevolu- 
tionary, Indian, and Mexican wars. In a few years the same state of 
affairs will exist in regard to the Confederate records unless steps are 
taken for their preservation. 

In securing the information contained in this work the author had 
much to contend with, but by patient and persistent labor has suc- 
ceeded in getting it in satisfactory shape to himself, and he trusts that 
it may prove interesting and satisfactory to his comrades. A pardon- 



Preface. vii 

able pride in the achievements of this brigade urged him forward, and 
now that his task is done, he has the consciousness of having performed 
his duty to the best of his ability. 

The author is indebted to Charles Tim Furlow of the Fourth, 
Charles D. Camp and B. F. Jones of the Twenty-first, and M. V. B. 
Estes of the Forty- fourth Georgia Regiments for their services in 
writing the histories of their respective regiments which form a part 
of the history of the Doles-Cook Brigade. 

With few exceptions the members of this brigade to whom letters 
were addressed responded promptly, and gave full and explicit an- 
swers to all questions propounded, and their co-operation and assist- 
ance has been of incalculable benefit to the author, for without their 
aid he would have been almost helpless because of the meager and 
unsatisfactory information to be had at the State and National 
Capitols. To each and every member of this brigade, and to all 
others who have rendered any assistance in the preparation of this 
work, he tenders his sincere thanks. 



INTRODUCTION. 



The volume of historical records following this introduction is the 
product of Confederate comrades who have survived to tell a story 
of heroism in the just cause of the Confederacy, The facts were 
made to the hand of the historian by the men of four Georgia infantry 
regiments — the Fourth, Twelfth, Twenty-first and Forty-fourth — each 
regiment making historic fame for itself, and all making famous the 
name of the Doles-Cook Brigade. That the story was written by an 
author who was himself an actor and whose skill in recital was sharp- 
ened by personal experience will be apparent on every page. That 
indefatigable industry has been put into exercise to collect scattered 
data and compile records that ought to, and will endure for all time 
is shown throughout the work. It is evident, also, that the author's 
warm heart, throbbing in unison with common brigade memories and 
in the community of a dear comradeship with all fellow-soldiers, 
inspired and led every faculty of his nature to the achievement of 
this permanent archive. Thousands yet unborn will call "blessed" 
the men who rescued from obscurity the history of the distinguished 
brigade and the names of the gallant young soldiers who fought to- 
gether under its flags. 

It is an old saying, that the victor writes the history of a struggle. 
This is nearly true of many wars where the resistance of a people to 
superior force failed of success. Lands overrun by conquerors have 
been blighted, their resistance defamed and their heroes maligned in 
story, and the records made up to suit the conqueror's policies. But 
the South was never conquered. It was not understood by Lee and 
Johnston on the Confederate part, nor Grant and Sherman on 
the Federal part, that surrender meant subjugation. If it was 
conquest that was eflfected at Appomattox and Bentonville the Con- 
federate soldiers and Southern people behaved with singular disregard 
of such a result. They returned home and resumed the pursuits of 
peaceful life, fought down the sectional fury of the first years after 
the surrender, outlived the sectional prejudice of their former foes, 
and maintained a noble, dignified, patriotic attitude which challenged 
and commanded the just admiration of mankind. As to the writing 

(IX) 



X Introduction. 

of the history by the victor, that was indeed attempted, but every 
page of that history was so replete with undesigned suggestions of 
Confederate intelligence, heroism, endurance, and high regard for 
honor and humanity, that the readers began to suspect the whole 
truth by reading between the lines. The written histories of the first 
years after the war were like the monuments at Gettysburg and 
Chickamauga where the Southern story would be well told if not one 
Southern tablet had been placed on either field. The Southern people 
made a history which can not be effaced any easier than the stars can 
be swept from the sky by a broom. 

It is, however, too true that the Southern States have been culpa- 
ble in neglecting their records, rosters, biography and history. Geor- 
gia is especially faulty in this neglect. Her patriotic men of 1860 
to 1865, to the number of nearly a hundred thousand, defended her 
honor at the cost of privation, wounds, imprisonment and life, yet 
there is but a scant roll of their names in her archives. 

Confederate soldiers themselves are not blameless in regard to this 
neglect of our history. They have even permitted their children to 
be misled by partisan books taught in the schools. They have not in- 
sisted on the collection and compilation of our records, rosters and 
muster-rolls. They have rested their cause on the truth of history, 
but they have not published the lustrous facts. 

It should be taken as a sign that long-neglected obligations will be 
now performed when we see this volume issued. It is a pioneer in 
the most important work now remaining for the survivors of the 
Confederate army. The book itself proves what can be done, and it 
invites companionship. It will be read by many who were not mem- 
bers of the brigade, and every reader will have the desire aroused that 
his own command should have a like honorable place in history. 
Thus, the author and the Confederate soldiers of the Doles-Cook 
Brigade who assisted him in the production of this work, did some- 
thing even greater by providing a plan and producing an incentive 
which, it is trusted, will result in a full library of similar volumes. 

It remains to be properly said that the Georgia brigade which the 
writer of this introduction had the honor to command was in the same 
campaigns of the Army of Northern Virginia where the Doles-Cook 
Brigade often won the cheers of their associated commands. He had, 
therefore, frequent opportunity to admire the valor and fidelity of the 
regiments of which there can not be praise too great. 

Clement A. Evans. 



DOLES-COOK BRIGADE 

Army of Northern Virginia, 

V-^. w. x\.. 



BRIGADE HISTORY. 



CHAPTER I. 

This brigade was composed of the Fourth, Twelfth, Twenty-first 
and Forty-fourth Regiments Georgia Volunteer Infantry. 

The Twelfth and Twenty-first Georgia Regiments were transferred 
from Hoke's to Doles' Brigade on the 19th of January, 1863, which 
at that date consisted of the Fourth and Forty-fourth Georgia and 
the First and Third North Carolina. When the Twelfth and 
Twenty-first were assigned to Doles' Brigade, the First and Third 
North Carolina Regiments were transferred to a North Carolina brigade. 
From this date the four Georgia regiments named remained together 
until the surrender of Lee's Army at Appomattox Court House, Vir- 
ginia, April 9, 1865, without change except as to brigade commanders, 
General Philip Cook being placed in command of the brigade July, 
1864, on account of the death of General George Doles, who was 
killed at Cold Harbor, Va., July 2, 1864. 

Previous to this consolidation the Fourth Georgia Regiment was 
in Blanchard's, Wright's and Ripley's brigade ; the Twelfth Georgia 
was in Henry R. Jackson's, Edward Johnson's, Arnold Elzey's, Jubal 
A. Early's, Isaac R. Trimble's and Robert F. Hoke's brigade ; the 
Twenty-first Georgia was in Crittenden's, Trimble's and Hoke's bri- 
gade, and the Forty-fourth Georgia was in J. G. Walker's and Rip- 
ley's brigade. 

The Twelfth Georgia was transferred from Early's to Trimble's 
Brigade August 27, 1862. This transfer placed the Twelfth and 
and Twenty-first Georgia in the same brigade, and they were together 
from that date until they were transferred to Doles' Brigade, and there- 
after until the close of hostilities. 

Id-c 



2 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

BATTLE OF CHANCELLORSVILLE. 

The first battle in which this brigade participated after its consoli- 
dation was at Chancellorsville, then in D. H. Hill's Division, com- 
manded by Brigadier-General R. E. Rodes. This battle was one of 
the most brilliant and successful engagements to the Confederate arms 
which occurred during the entire war. 

The division at that time was composed of the following brigades, 
yiz. : Doles', Colquitt's, Iverson's, Ramseur's and Ro^les*. 

On the morning of April 29 the enemy crossed the Rappahannock 
river, and we marched from Grace Church to Hamilton's Crossing, 
and were placed in position on the extreme right of the army. On 
the 1st of May we marched by the Military road from Hamilton's 
Crossing until we reached the junction of the Fredericksburg and 
Orange Court House Plank road, thence up the Plank road for two 
miles. Being in advance of the corps, after leaving one brigade to 
reinforce Major-General Anderson, we continued our march for about 
half a mile, when the division was marched by the right flank to the 
top of a hill and formed line of battle, where we remained until sun- 
set, when our march was resumed up the Plank road, and that 
night we camped near Aldrich's Tavern, one and a quarter miles from 
Chancellorsville. We resumed our march about eight o'clock on the 
morning of the 2d, and at four p.m. were formed in line of battle 
across the old Turnpike two and a half miles from Chancellorsville. 
Doles' Brigade was on the right center, the right of Rodes' and left of 
Doles' resting on the road. Each brigade commander had positive 
instructions to make the road his guide, and to push forward as rapidly 
as possible until the enemy's position at Talley's house was carried. 
The word was given to move forward at five fifteen p.m., our sharp- 
shooters being about four hundred yards in advance. The line of battle 
rushed forward with a yell. As Doles' Brigade came out of the woods 
it encountered the enemy and a battery with two guns intrenched. Doles 
detached two of his regiments to flank the position, and charged with- 
out halting, sweeping everything before him, and pressing on, gal- 
lantly carried the works at Talley's, capturing by a flank move- 
ment with a portion of his command five guns. The success of the 
whole line was so complete and the movement such a surprise that it 
met with scarcely any organized resistance after the first volley was 
fired. The confusion was so great that the enemy fled, leaving the 
field strewn with arms, accouterments, clothing, caissons and field- 



Brigade History. 3 

pieces in every direction. The larger portion of this force occupied in- 
trenchments at right angles to our line, and being taken in flank and 
rear, did not wait for the attack. An effort was made to check 
this fleeing column when it reached an extended line of works near 
Melzi Chancellor's house, which faced in our direction, but they only 
held their position long enough to flre a hasty volley at our gallant 
troops as they dashed at them with a wild shout, then continued their 
headlong flight to Chancellorsville. Our troops continued to pursue 
the enemy until the confusion and darkness were such that it was not 
deemed advisable to make a farther advance. 

On the morning of May 3 Doles' Brigade was placed on the right 
of the division, and the attack was resumed about six a.m. Doles ad- 
vanced on the right, and after passing the first line of intrenchments, 
which had been carried, and the first and second line of our troops, 
he became fiercely engaged. After deflecting to the right and pass- 
ing up a ravine behind the graveyard on Chancellor's Hill, he finally 
came out in the field nearly opposite the house, and drove the enemy 
before him, and reached a point several hundred yards in rear of the 
troops opposing General Anderson's Division and the rest of Rodes' 
Division. He was finally compelled to fall back, and was then direc- 
ted by General Lee to take charge of a large body of prisoners. That 
afternoon Doles' Brigade was on the right of the division, and posted 
parallel with and close to the Plank road. The next day Doles was 
thrown across the road, connecting with General Pender on the left. 
On the 5th skirmishers were sent out to ascertain the enemy's posi- 
tion and strength, and found him in strong numbers and well in- 
trenched. On Wednesday, the 6th, skirmishers were again ordered 
to feel the enemy. They found that the Army of the Potomac had 
evacuated its position and withdrawn across the river. We were then 
ordered to march back to our old encampment. 

General Doles, in his official report, says : *' I cannot speak in terms 
too high of Colonel Cook and Lieutenant-Colonel (D. R. E.) Winn, 
of the Fourth Georgia ; Colonel (Edward) Willis and Major (Isaac) 
Hardeman, of the Twelfth Georgia ; Colonel (John T.) Mercer and 
Major (T. C ) Glover, Twenty-first Georgia ; Lieutenant-Colonel 
{Samuel P.) Lumpkin, Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment. To their 
promptness and gallantry, and the able manner in which they were 
sustained by the officers and men of their commands, all of whom did 
their whole duty, I acknowledge my indebtedness. To my Staff 
<Japtain (F. T.) Snead, A. A. General; Lieutenant (E. A.) Hawk- 



4 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

ins, A. D. C; Lieutenant (Richard V.) Jones, Brigade Inspector ;: 
Sergeant Furlow and Privates Cheeves and Ornisby, Couriers, I am 
under many obligations for assistance given me. I respectfully com- 
mend them for gallantry and meritorious conduct." 

General R. E. Rodes, in closing his report, has this to say : **The 
division sustained a heavy loss in killed and wounded, principally on 
the second day. The conduct of its men and officers was such as to 
"win the highest encomiums from General Jackson, and such as had? 
been rarely equaled. It is impossible for me within reasonable limits 
to mention all the officers and men who were distinguished for gallant, 
and meritorious conduct at this battle. It is, however, my duty to 
call attention to the great gallantry in this action of Brigadier-Gen- 
eral Doles, Colonel Edward Willis, Twelfth Georgia ; Colonel Philip 
Cook, Fourth Georgia, severely wounded. Four of my couriers — 
C. S. Ellis, Company B, Fourth Georgia, etc. — were of great service 
to me during the battle, and exhibited great courage and intelligence.'" 

Colonel Augustus C. Hamlin, a Federal soldier, of the Eleventh 
Corps, United States Army, in a pamphlet written by him in regard- 
to the battle of Chancellorsville, has this to say: "The Army of 
Northern Virginia at this time was a remarkable and powerful body- 
of men, led by one of the ablest soldiers of the age. It was skilled in- 
the use of arms, hardened in service, animated in a high degree witL 
the enthusiasm of the cause and the desperate courage of self-defense.. 

'*The Confederate in his faded uniform was almost invincible in the- 
woods, and his skill as a marksman, his knowledge in bushcraft, cer- 
tainly compensated largely for a considerable inequality in numbers,. 
and in the thickets of Chancellorsville, and later in the Wilderness, 
the Confederate soldier was certainly superior to his antagonist, man 
for man, courage reckoned as equal. So confident was Lee in the 
strength of his army and his position at this time that he had sent 
Longstreet, with two of his divisions, away down to southeastern Vir- 
ginia, having at his disposal but sixty thousand men, which he deemed' 
ample to meet any movement made by the Army of the Potomac, 
with double its number of men. 

" The skirmish line of Rodes' Division was composed of select rifle- 
men, and was led by Colonel Willis, of the Twelfth Georgia, and so 
well did he perform his duty that Jackson spoke highly of him in his 
last moments. Another part of the skirmish line was commanded by 
Colonel Blackford, and Jackson's orders were carried out so accurately^ 



BiUGADE History. 6 

by these men that, although over ten thousand men rested on their 
arms for two hours or more within a mile of the right flank of the 
Army of the Potomac, not a man deserted or escaped to give warning 
of the coming storm. Treachery could not have placed the faithful, 
obedient and patient army of the Potomac in a more unfortunate and 
perilous position than that in which it found itself at this moment, 
when Sickles and a select force of the Federal army was about to at- 
tack Lee's * retreating and dismayed ' men, supposed to be at or near 
the Welford House ; and Hooker, completely blinded by the brilliant 
reports coming from the front, sent word to Sedgwick that Lee was 
in full retreat and Sickles was among his retreating trains. . 

*' Jackson was in the best of feelings when he ordered Rodes to ad- 
vance. He saw that his men, though fatigued, were full of enthu- 
siasm and fight, and also that the way was apparently clear for the 
destruction of a large part of the Federal army." 

Jackson made a forced march of about twenty miles, and succeeded 
in reaching the right flank of Hooker's army late in the afternoon of 
May 2. This unexpected movement took the Federals completely 
by surprise, and the charge of the Confederates was so terrible that 
nothing could withstand its onward and brilliant advance. The enemy 
fled in confusion, throwing away everything that would impede their 
reckless flight. The battle raged with terrific force until long after 
dark, and the havoc was fearful. If this battle had commenced two 
or three hours earlier in the day Hooker's whole army would either 
have been destroyed or captured. The splendid victory gained was 
dearly bought with the loss of the illustrious and successful Confeder- 
ate Lieutenant-General, Thomas J. ("Stonewall") Jackson. The 
official returns give the Federals 132,000 men and the Confederates 
60,000 on the field and ready for active duty at Chancellorsville, 
and report the Federal loss at 17,300, and that of the Confederates 
at 12,500. A great many cannon and small arms were captured. 



THE GETTYSBURG CAMPAIGN. 

Elated by the splendid victory of Chancellorsville, to which Doles' 
Brigade had contributed its full share, the troops returned to their 
old quarters on the 6th. Here we remained quietly until June 4, 
when we broke camps and began the Pennsylvania campaign. We 
marched to Culpepper Court House, and bivouacked about three miles 



6 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

beyond the place. On the 9th -we went to the support of Stuart's- 
Cavalry, which was being hard pressed by a superior force of Fed- 
eral cavalry, but we were not engaged, the enemy having retreated 
across the Rappahannock. General Rodes, who had been promoted 
to major-general, now commanded our division. There was no braver 
or better officer in the army, and his subsequent record proved that h& 
well deserved his promotion. On the afternoon of the 10th we again 
took the road, and after a ten-mile march bivouacked near Gourd 
Vine church. The next day the march was resumed at an early 
hour, and passing Gaines' Cross Roads, and on through Flint Hill,. 
we camped about one and a half miles beyond. On the 12th, in ad- 
vance of the balance of the army, we crossed the Blue Ridge at Ches- 
ter's Gap, passed through Front Royal, forded both forks of the Shen- 
andoah river, then on through Cedarville toward Millwood, by an un- 
frequented road, for Berryville. After a march of seventeen mile* 
we camped near Stone Bridge. At sunrise, the 13th, we were on the 
way and marched rapidly through Millwood upon Berryville, which 
was held by a force of cavalry, artillery and infantry. Our brigade,, 
with Daniel's, Ramseur's and Iverson's, endeavored to surround the 
enemy by marching around the town under cover. Before we could 
do so the enemy, abandoning his tents, stores, etc., fled precipitately 
toward Winchester. At sunrise the next day set out for Martins- 
burg, where we arrived about sundown after a rapid and fatigueing 
march of twenty miles. 

The enemy held the town with two regiments of infantry, a bat- 
tery of six rifled cannon and a regiment of cavalry. We formed 
line of battle and advanced at once to the attack, but the enemy, 
after firing a few shells, retreated hurriedly toward Charlestown and 
Williamsport. Our cavalry pursued, capturing their battery, with 
its caissons and horses and ambulances. We found in the town six 
thousand bushels of fine grain and a considerable quantity of com- 
missary stores and some ammunition and small arms. On the 15th, 
we were allowed to rest until ten a.m., then took the road to Wil- 
liamsport, Md., forded the Potomac about sunset and bivouacked in 
the outskirts of the town. 

In his official report General Rodes says : *'It was not until this 
day that the troops began to exhibit unmistakable signs of exhaus- 
tion, and that stragglers could be found on the line of march, and 
even then none but absolutely worn-out men fell out of line. The 
whole march from Culpepper Court House to Williamsport, whicK 



Brigade History. 7 

was an extremely rapid one, was executed in a manner highly credit- 
able to the officers and men of the division. A halt at "Williams- 
port was absolutely necessary, from the condition of the feet of the 
unshod men. Very many of these gallant fellows were still march- 
ing in ranks, with feet bruised, bleeding and sw^ollen, and withal so 
cheerfully as to entitle them to be called the heroes of the Pennsyl- 
vania campaign. None but the best soldiers could have made such 
a march under such circumstances." 

Here we remained until the 19th, when we marched to Hagers- 
town, Md., and bivouacked two miles beyond, on the road to Boons- 
borough. We remained here for two days, and on the 22d re- 
sumed our march, entered Pennsylvania and camped at Greencastle. 

When General Lee invaded Maryland and Pennsylvania he issued 
stringent orders in regard to the conduct of the Confederate soldiers 
while in the enemy's country, and the penalties to be inflicted for a 
violation of these orders were extremely severe. As to his approval 
of their obedience to his orders we find this in his official report of 
the battle of Gettysburg : 

" The highest praise is due to both the officers and men for their 
conduct during the campaign. The privations and hardships of the- 
march and camp were cheerfully encountered, and borne with a forti- 
tude unsurpassed by our ancestors in their struggle for independence^ 
while their courage in battle entitles them to rank with the soldiers 
of any army of any time. Their forbearance and discipline, under 
strong provocation to retaliate for the cruelty of the enemy in our 
own country is not their least claim to the respect and admiration of 
their countrymen and of the world." Did any army ever have such 
a high and beautiful tribute bestowed upon it by one so competent, so 
grand, so good, pure, true and noble, so modest, yet so brave, who 
ranks as one of the greatest and most illustrious generals of any age 
or country? Every man, woman and child in the South loved, hon- 
ored and admired him, while the Army of Northern Virginia was de- 
voted to him, and was ever ready to follow him blindly, knowing that 
he would not needlessly sacrifice his men. 

On the 24th, starting early, we passed through Chambersburg, with 
bands at the head of the regiments playing Dixie and other Southern 
airs, arms at the right-shoulder-shift, the boys stepping out lively to 
the music, laughing and shouting to the gloomy- faced citizens, "Here's- 
your played-out rebellion." The Northern newspapers had been trying 
to bolster up the faith of the Yankees in the success of their cause 



S Doles-Cook Brigade. 

before this by publishing that the rebellion was about played out, 
etc. That night we camped a few miles beyond the town. Contin- 
uing the march on the 25th we reached Carlisle on the 27th, and our 
brigade bivouacked in the campus of Dickinson College. We were 
within twenty miles of Harrisburg, the capital of Pennsylvania, and 
were elated with the hope that we would have that city before the 
setting of another sun. Our cavalry proceeded thither, reconnoitered 
it to learn the strength of its defenses, and our generals intended to 
occupy it. But in consequence of the advance of Meade we were 
held at Carlisle until June 30, when General Lee ordered our corps 
to Cash Town to form a junction with Longstreet's Corps. We ac- 
cordingly moved toward it on the morning of the oOth, bivouacking 
near Heidlersburg that night. Resuming the march the next morn- 
ing we arrived at Middletown, when the head of column was turned 
towards Gettysburg. When the brigade was in about seven miles of 
the place, the roar of cannon in front revealed to us the presence of 
the enemy. At once all was excitement, and quickening our pace we 
hurried forward to the aid of General Hill, who had engaged the en- 
emy. We arrived on the field about one p.m., and the division was 
formed in line of battle on the left of General Hill's troops, with 
Doles' Brigade on the left, Rodes' old brigade in the center, Iverson's 
on the right, Ramseur's and Daniel's in reserve. 

General Doles, in his official report, says : " The enemy's cavalry 
appearing in force in front and on our left flank, skirmishers from this 
command were ordered to dislodge them. After a short engagement, 
they were driven from their position, which we occupied about three 
thirty p.m. The enemy moved his force from our front and made a 
strong demonstration on our left, driving our skirmishers from the 
hill from which we had driven him. The command was them moved 
by the left flank to meet any attack the enemy might make on our 
left and rear. We found the enemy strongly posted, with infantry 
and artillery on the hill from which our sharpshooters had been 
driven. The brigade of General Gordon, of Major-General Early's 
Division, having made a junction with our left, we moved forward to 
the attack. We were successful. The enemy was driven from behind 
a rock fence, with heavy loss and a large number of prisoners capt- 
ured. We suffered severely from the enemy's batteries and musketry 
in this attack." 

When we were ordered forward our brigade charged with that 



Brigade History. 9 

soul-stirring rebel yell, which once heard on the field of battle can 
never be forgotten. 

The Yankees soon broke, and fled in wild confusion, pursued by our 
shouting, exultant men. 

In doing so, we came upon a fresh force of the enemy who had lain 
down in the growing wheat through which we were advancing, who 
suddenly poured a volley into our line, killing and wounding many 
men. Promptly wheeling, we formed into line facing them and very 
soon killed, wounded, and captured the whole force. We then con- 
tinued our advance toward the Theological college, to the right of the 
town, which placed us on the right flank of the enemy retreating be- 
fore the other brigades of our division. The enemy then fell back 
from College hill to the railroad. 

Our brigade then marched rapidly by the left flank in an attempt 
to cut the enemy ofi'from the town, but was unable to do so. We 
continued the pursuit through the town, and had a sharp engagement 
in the streets, killing, wounding and capturing a good many men, with 
small loss to ourselves. After driving the enemy through the town 
we were halted in the outskirts of it, and returning formed line of 
•battle in one of the streets running east and west through it, which 
we held until about eight p.m. the next day, when we moved for- 
ward beyond the town, formed line of battle, together with the bri- 
gades of Ramseur and Iverson, and advanced to attack Cemetery 
Ridge. AVhen within a hundred yards of the enemy's position we were 
halted, and after a short time we retired a few hundred yards and 
formed line of battle in a dirt road, which we held until July 4, when 
~we fell back to a hill near the Theological college. The brigade was 
not in battle after the 1st, but was engaged in skirmishing during the 
2d, 3d and 4th, sustaining some loss. While pursuing the routed 
Eleventh Corps on July 1 the brigade had the unpleasant experience 
of being mistaken for union troops and were fired upon by our own ar- 
tillery, which killed and wounded several men. Again, on July 3, 
while lying in line of battle in front of Cemetery Ridge, we suf- 
fered some loss from our own shells in consequence of the fuses being 
cut too short. General Rodes, in his report after speaking of the for- 
mation of the line of battle on July 1 with Doles on the left, says : 
''Before my dispositions were made, the enemy began to show large 
bodies of men in front of the town, most of which were directed upon 
the position which I held, and almost at the same time a portion of 
the force opposite to General Hill changed position so as to occupy the 



10 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

woods on the summit of the ridge I occupied. Either these last troops,, 
or others which had hitherto been unobserved behind the same body 
of woods, soon made their appearance directly opposite my position. 
Being thus threatened from two directions, I determined to attack 
with my center and right, holding at bay still another force, then 
emerging from the town (apparently with the intention of turning 
my left), with Doles' Brigade, which was moved somewhat to the left 
for this purpose, and trusting to this gallant brigade, thus holding 
them until General Early's division arrived, which I knew would be 
soon, and which would strike this portion of the enemy's force on the 
flank before it could overpower Doles. 

*'In the meantime. General Early's division had been brought into- 
action on my left with great success, and Doles, thus relieved, without 
waiting for orders, and though greatly outnumbered, boldly attacked, 
the heavy masses of the enemy in his front. After a short but des- 
perate contest, in which his brigade acted with unsurpassed gallantry,, 
he succeeded in driving them before him, thus achieving on the left, 
and about the same time, a success no less brillant than that of Ram- 
seur in the center and Daniel on the right. ... In this affair 
Doles handled his men with a skill and effect truly admirable, exhibit- 
ing marked coolness and courage. . . The enemy was thus routed 
at all points. My division followed him closely into and through the 
town. Doles and Ramseur entering in such close contact with the* 
enemy that the former, who penetrated the heart of the town first of 
all, had two sharp and successful encounters with the enemy in its- 
streets. ... In the pursuit the division captured about two 
thousand and five hundred prisoners — so many as to embarrass its 
movements materially." 

On the morning of July 5, about one a.m., the army of Lee began, 
its retreat, and camped that night at the foot of South mountain, near 
Fairfield. The next day our division was the rear guard of the army, 
and until after mid-day we would march a short distance and the 
brigades successively form line of battle to receive the Federals in 
case of attack, all the time skirmishing with them and subjected to 
the fire of their artillery. During the afternoon we continued our 
march undisturbed, and bivouacked beyond Waterloo. Resuming our 
march on the morning of the 7th we reached Hagerstown before noon. 
The Potomac, swollen by the recent rains, being too high to ford, Lee 
here selected and fortified a position and offered Meade battle. Our 
brigade had position near Funktown. On the night of the 14th we 



Brigade History. 11 

crossed the river, fording it at the mouth of the aqueduct atWil- 
liamsport, Md. It was no pleasant experience and attended with con- 
siderable danger. The river was swollen by recent rains until it was 
neck deep to the men, the water cold and rising. The men buckled 
their cartridge boxes around their necks, and forded the river four 
abreast with locked arms, in order to advoid being swept from their 
feet by the force of the current and carried down stream. But in 
spite of this precaution their cartridges were nearly all spoilt by the 
water. 

In his report General Rodes says: "All the circumstances attending 
this crossing combined to make it an affair not only involving great 
danger to the men and company officers, but, be it said to the ever- 
lasting honor of these brave fellows, they encountered it not only 
promptly, but actually with cheers and laughter." . . . '*I can- 
not, however, close this report without expressing my pride and ad- 
miration of the men and officers of this division from the time it left 
Grace church until our return to Virginia ; better marching, less 
straggling, hardships more cheerfully borne, conduct in an enemy's 
country more commendable, and more generally marked by gentle- 
manly and soldierly characteristics, and, finally, better behavior irt 
battle than was exhibited by this divison during the period has not 
been, and I believe will never be exhibited by any other troops in the 
service. By their conduct at Gettysburg, I claim to have won the 
expression from the general commanding the army, who saw their at- 
tack on July 1, *I am proud of your division.' 

"In concluding what I have to say about this campaign, I beg leave 
to call attention to the heroes of it ; the men who day by day sacrificed 
self on the alter of freedom ; those bare-footed North Carolinians,- 
Georgians, and Alabamians, who, with bloody and swollen feet, kept 
to their ranks day after day for weeks. When the division reached 
Darkesville nearly one-half of the men and many officers were bare- 
footed, and fully one-fourth had been so since we crossed the Blue 
Ridge. These poor fellows had kept up with the column and in ranks 
during the most rapid march of this war, considering its length, over 
that worst of roads for footmen, the turnpike, and during the hottest 
days of summer. These are the heroes of the campaign." 

General Doles, in his report of the operations of his brigade, pays 
the following high tribute to the officers and men composing it: "To 
Colonel Edward Willis and Major Isaac Hardeman of the Twelfth 
Georgia ; Colonel J. T. Mercer, Lieutenant-Colonel T. W. Hooper 



12 Doles Cook Brigade. 

and Major T. C. Glover of the Twenty-first Georgia; Major W. H. 
Willis of the Fourth Georgia and Major W. H. Peebles of the Forty- 
fourth Georgia, I attribute the success of this command. The con- 
duct and gallantry of each of these officers on the march and dur- 
ing the engagements around Gettysburg are worthy of emulation. 
The company officers and men all did their duty nobly. To Cap- 
tain S. G. Pryor, Twelfth Georgia ; Captain Joseph B. Reese, 
Forty-fourth Georgia ; Lieutenant Jeremiah G. Stephens, Fourth 
Georgia ; Lieutenant James S. Wilder, Twenty-first Georgia, who 
were in command of the sharpshooters of the brigade, too much 
praise cannot be awarded. To Captain F. T. Snead, Assistant Ad- 
jutant-General, Lieutenant E. A. Hawkins, Aide-de-Camp, and C. 
T. Furlow, of my staff, I am under obligations for valuable services 
rendered. I have the honor to report and return one flag captured 
by the Twelfth Georgia." 

General Rodes, in his report among the officers of his division, who : 
*'For conduct which entitles them to the admiration of brave men and 
to the gratitude of a good people, 'mentions General George Doles,'" 
. Afterwards says: "All the field officers, with one exception, 
are highly commended for their conduct. Company officers did their 
duty nobly. The men generally acted in a manner worthy of all 
praise." 

On the 15th the brigade marched to Darkesville, near which it 
bivouacked and remained until the 22d, and then proceeded up the 
valley and camped near Winchester. The following day the division 
went to the relief of Wright's brigade, which was confronting a heavy 
force of Meade's army advancing through Manassas Gap. It arrived 
in an opportune time and saved Wright's Brigade, which was confront- 
ing an overwhelming force of the enemy. We found Wright's entire 
brigade deployed as skirmishers and engaged with the enemy. Our 
sharpshooters were sent to strengthen Wright, while our division 
formed line of battle a little in his rear on a spur of the mountains. 
Our artillery opening upon the enemy in aid of Wright, drove back 
the attacking force and put an end to the engagement. 

That night our troops fell back on the Luray road and bivouacked 
near Front Roj'^al. The next day we continued the march and camped 
near Luray for a day or two and then proceeded to Madison Court 
House, via Thorntons, Va., where we arrived on the 29th. Here we 
remained until September 14, when we removed to Somerville Ford 
on the Rapidan to support our cavalry, but we were not engaged. 



Brigade History. 15: 

We then took position at Moreton's Ford on the Rapidan and threw- 
up intrenchments and remained here until the 8th day of October, 
when we marched up the river and crossed, seeking the rear of Meade's 
army. Marching over country roads we traversed Madison and Cul- 
pepper counties. Near Warrenton Springs we were engaged in sup- 
porting our cavalry all day of October 14, skirmishing with the enemy, 
losing several men wounded. After this we did not come into contact 
with the enemy, as our division brought up the rear of the army in its 
advance. On the return of the army we were stationed on the Rap- 
pahannock to guard Kelly's Ford, and expected to remain through the 
winter. 

But the Union forces unexpectedly advanced and drove back our 
troops on picket at the ford and crossed the river. We marched down 
near the river, formed line of battle and held our positions until after 
dark. We then fell back, marching all night, occasionally taking 
position and forming line of battle, and kept doing so all the next day, 
and crossed the Rapidan about midnight at Raccoon Ford. In ad- 
dition to the loss of sleep our troops suffered on this march for lack of 
food, and the men endeavored to appease their hunger with acorns. 

We camped near here doing picket duty until November 27^ 
when Meade crossed the river at Germanna Ford. We marched 
down the river to meet him. 

Our division brought up the rear of the army, and late in the day 
formed line of battle and had some skirmishing with the enemy, sus-- 
taining some loss. 

General Lee took position on the hills above Mine Run and awaited 
attack. There was considerable skirmishing during the next day or 
two, but no battle occurred. On the night of December 1, the enemy 
recrossed the river and our brigade returned to Moreton's Ford and 
continued to do picket duty there until December 20, when we 
marched to a point a few miles below Orange Court House, and built . 
winter quarters, which we occupied in quiet until February 6, 1864. 
On that day the Union forces crossed the Rapidan at Moreton's Ford 
and we moved down and took position about a mile from the river in 
front of this ford. There was some fighting during the afternoon, but 
we were not engaged, and during the night the enemy retreated 
across the river. 

We then returned to our winter quarters, and continued to do our 
share of picket duty on the river until the opening of the campaign, 
of the Wilderness in May. 



14 Doles-Cook Brioade. 

BATTLES OF THE WILDERNESS AND 
SPOTTSYLVANIA. 

On the 4th of May, 1864, Grant's army crossed the Rapidau at 
Germanna Ford, and on the same day about noon Ewell's Corps of the 
Army of Northern Virginia moved from its camps on the Rapidan, 
some twelve miles from Germanna Ford, toward Locus Grove, on the 
old turnpike from Orange Court House to Fredericksburg. Rodes' 
Division bivouacked about two miles south of Locus Grove. The next 
day, May 5, the enemy made a demonstration against Jones' Brigade, 
and Battle's Brigade of Rodes' Division was ordered to support it, with 
Doles on Battle's right. These troops had orders not to bring on an 
engagement, but if pressed to fall back slowly. Some artillery was 
withdrawn from Jones' front near the pike. Not long after this the 
enemy fell suddenly upon Jones' right flank and front, and drove it 
back on Battles Brigade, which became disordered, Daniel's Brigade 
•of Rodes' Division, and Gordon's of Early's soon regained the lost 
ground. The latter captured several hundred prisoners, and relieved 
Doles who, though hard pressed, had held his ground. The 6th was 
occupied by partial assaults on our line. There was no fighting on the 
7th, except when we joined General Hill's left. Our lines were ex- 
tended to the right that night. The fighting at the \Vilderness lasted 
■three days, May 5, 6, and 7, and was most terrific. On the 8th 
we marched to Spottsylvania, and reached there about five p.m. 

On the 9th, our lines were defined and intrenched. There were two 
Salients on our line — General Doles' Brigade occupied one on the 
right of the division, the other being at Johnson's center. On the 10th, 
about 4 p.m.. Doles' skirmishers were driven in, and while preparing 
to drive the enemy back. Doles' line was attacked and broken, and 
he lost three hundred prisoners. Battle's Brigade and Gordon's 
Division were rapidly brought to our relief, and Battle's Brigade 
was thrown across the head of the enemy's column, while R. 
D. Johnston's Brigade, with the remnants of Doles' and the 
Tight of Daniel's Brigade, struck them on one flank and the 
Stonewall (Walker's) Brigade on the other. The enemy was driven 
from our works in a short time, leaving one hundred dead within 
them and a large number in front. Our loss was about six hundred 
^nd fifty, three hundred and fifty of the number being prisoners. It 
rained all day Wednesday, May 11, and no fighting took place in 
our immediate front. On the 12th of May, the enemy attacked 



Brigade History. 15 

General Edward Johnson's Division with an overwhelming force at 
dawn and broke through his lines and drove his troops back in great 
confusion. His main effort was evidently against Rodes' position to 
the left of the angle, and here the fighting was of the most desperate 
character. General Edward Johnson and the most of his division 
were captured, and he estimated the force of the enemy at this point 
on our line at forty thousand, and ours at less than ten thousand. The 
fighting lasted all day long and until after midnight, and when it 
ceased our forces were in possession of two-thirds of the works first 
taken from us. General Lee's chief engineer laid out a new line 
during the day some eight hundred yards in rear of the first, and it 
was constructed at night. After midnight our forces were quietly 
•withdrawn to it. 

There was no other attack on the Confederates from the 12th until 
the 18th, when a strong force under Hancock and Wright advanced 
past the McCool house on our new line. General Long opened fire 
upon them with thirty pieces of artillery which broke and drove them 
back with severe loss and in great confusion. 

On the 19th, General Ewell was directed to demonstrate against 
the enemy in his front. He determined to move to their right, as they 
were strongly intrenched. After marching several miles he came on 
the enemy, when they attacked him. He held his ground until after 
night-fall, when he retired, having developed the enemy's position and 
accomplished his object. This ended the battles of Spottsylvania. 
General Ewell estimated that the enemy's losses at Spottsylvania ex- 
ceeded ours in the proportion of at least six to one, taking all the 
engagements together. On the 20th of May we moved to the North 
Anna. Grant, after spending two days in trying to find a w^eak place 
in our lines, and after considerable skirmishing, concluded not to at- 
tack. 



BATTLE OF COLD HARBOR. 

Grant moved his forces on the night of the 26th, again, and attempt- 
ed to flank Lee's army, but failed, as usual. The two armies confront- 
ed each other along the Totopotomy on the 28th, but he again con- 
cluded that Lee's position was too strong for him to attack, and 
another flank movement toward Richmond was tried. 

On the 2d of June, Rodes' Division moved forward along the road 
from Hundley's corner toward Old Church, and drove the enemy 



16 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

from his intrenchments, and forced back his left toward Bethesda 
Church. In this movement there was some heavy fighting and sev- 
eral hundred prisoners were taken. Brigadier-General George Doles 
was killed in this engagement. Grant moved to Cold Harbor, and at 
half past four o'clock a.m., on the morning of the 3d, attacked Lee. 
The attack was gallantly made, and as gallantly repulsed, with fearful 
loss on the enemy's side. In less than half an hour after the en- 
gagement began he had lost ten thousand men, while our loss did not 
exceed one thousand two hundred. Grant gave orders later in the 
day for a renewal of the attack, but every officer and man in his army 
refused to obey orders. 

Grant's whole force, including reinforcements from May 5 to June- 
3, 1864, numbered 153,926, and he lost in killed 7,406; wounded, 
37,246; captured and missing 8,118, making his total loss amount to 
52,788 for the period named. 

Lee's whole force for the same period, including reinforcements, 
was 78,400, while his total loss in killed, wounded, captured and miss- 
ing did not exceed 20,000. In addition to Grant's loss as stated 
above, he lost over 2,000 in two cavalry expeditions. 

Grant's whole campaign, from the time he crossed the Rapidan and 
attacked Lee on the 5th of May until it ended with the battle of Cold- 
Harbor, had been a complete failure. He had not gained a single vic- 
tory, although his forces were vastly superior to those of General Lee. 



EARLY^S VALLEY CAMPAIGN. 

While the Second Corps (E well's) of the Army of Northern Virginia 
(now under command of General Jubal A. Early) was lying near 
Gaines' Mill, it received orders to be in readiness to move to the 
Shenandoah Valley. General Early selected Nelson's and Braxton's 
batteries, and Brigadier-General Long as chief of artillery to ac- 
company him. 

At dark on the same day he received written instructions to move 
with the above named force, at three o'clock next morning, for the val- 
ley, by way of Louisa Court House and Charlottsville, and through 
Brown's or Swift's Run Gap in the Blue Ridge, as he might find most 
advisable, and to destroy Hunter's force if possible by striking it in the 
rear, then move down the valley and cross the Potomac near Lees- 
burg or Harper's Ferry (leaving the point at which he crossed discre- 



Brigade History. 17 

tionary with him), and then threaten Washington City. He was also 
directed to communicate with General Breckinridge, who was to co- 
operate with him in the attack on Hunter, and also in his march into 
Maryland. The Second Corps had been actively engaged in the field for 
forty days, suffering all the hardships and disadvantages and encoun- 
tering all the dangers on the march, and in the fights from the Wilder- 
ness to Cold Harbor, and now numbered a little over eight thousand 
muskets for duty. At Spottsylvania it had lost nearly an entire divi- 
sion, including its commander, General Edward Johnson, and the losses 
in the other commands were very heavy. General McCausland's Bri- 
gade of cavalry had delayed Hunter's advance from Staunton. Our 
troops reached Lynchburg on the evening of the 18th, and arrange- 
.ments were made for an attack on Hunter the 19th, at daylight, but 
when we moved in line of battle it was discovered that Hunter had 
left. His rear was overtaken at Liberty, twenty- five miles from 
Lynchburg, just before night, and driven through that place. The 
pursuit was resumed early on the morning of the 20th, and when we 
reached Buford's the enemy's rear guard was seen going into the 
mountains toward Salem. Eodes led the advance on the morning of 
the 21st, and on arriving at Big Lick it was learned that the 
•enemy had turned off from Salem toward Lynchburg, with the inten- 
tion of crossing the mountain at Hanging Kock. Our troops imme- 
-diately took the same route, but when we arrived there we learned 
that his rear guard had passed through the gorge. McCausland had 
:8truck the enemy at this point, and captured ten pieces of artillery, 
some wagons, and a number o^ prisoners. We did not continue the 
pursuit, as nothing was to be gained by such a course. We had marched 
sixty miles in three days, and the troops from the Army of Northern 
Virginia had had no rest since leaving Gaines' Mill. 

We rested on the 22d, so as to allow the wagons and artillery to 
get up, and the men to prepare for the long march that they were to 
make. 

Our march was resumed on the 23d, and that night we reached 
Buchanan. On the 27th, we reached Staunton, and the day was spent 
in reducing transportation and procuring provisions from Waynesboro, 
where they had been ordered. The march was continued on the 28th, 
with five days' rations in the wagons and two days' in our haversacks. 
The empty wagons were left to bring shoes to our army when they 
arrived. 

2dc 



18 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

On the 2d of July we reached Winchester, where General Earljr 
received a telegram from General Lee directing him to remain in the 
lower valley, destroy the Baltimore and Ohio railroad and the Chesa- 
peake and Ohio canal as far as possible, and then cross the Potomac. 

General Early in his book says of Hunter's operations and 
conduct in the valley : 

" The scenes on Hunter's route from Lynchburg had been truly 
heartrending. Houses had been burned, and helpless women and 
children left without shelter. The country had been stripped of pro- 
visions and many families left without a morsel to eat. Furniture 
and bedding had been cut to pieces, and old men and women and 
children robbed of all the clothing they had except that on their 
backs. Ladies' trunks had been rifled and their dresses torn to pieces 
in mere wantonness. Even the negro girls had lost their little finery. 
We now had renewed evidences of the outrages committed by Hun- 
ter's orders in burning and plundering private houses. We saw the 
ruins of a number of houses to which the torch had been applied by 
his orders. At Lexington he had burned the Military Institute, with 
all its contents, including its library and scientific apparatus ; and 
Washington College had been plundered and the statue of Washing- 
ton stolen. The residence of Ex-Governor Letcher at that time had; 
been burned by orders, and but a few minutes given Mrs. Letcher 
and her family to leave the house. In the same county a most excel- 
lent Christian gentleman, a Mr. Creigh, had been hung, because on a. 
former occasion he had killed a straggling and marauding Federal 
soldier while in the act of insulting and outraging the ladies of his 
family. These are but some of the outrages committed by Hunter 
or his orders, and I will not insult the memory of the ancient barba- 
rians of the North by calling them ' acts of vandalism.' If those old 
barbarians were savage and cruel, they at least had the manliness- 
and daring of rude soldiers, with occasional traits of magnanimity. 
Hunter's deeds were those of a malignant and cowardly fanatic, who^ 
was better qualified to make war upon helpless women and children 
than upon armed soldiers. The time consumed in the perpetration of 
those deeds was the salvation of Lynchburg, with its stores, foun- 
dries and factories, which were so necessary to our army at Richmond."' 
Rodes moved through Rohersville, on the 7th, on the road to 
Crampton's Gap in South Mountain, and had some skirmishing with 
a small force of the enemy. When we reached Monocacy we found 
the Federal army under General Lew Wallace strongly posted be- 



Brigade History. 19 

hind breastworks and two blockhouses on the eastern bank of the 
Monocacy near the Junction. A division was deployed and drove 
his skirmishers across the river. A sharp artillery duel then occurred. 

Troops were thrown across the river and attacked the enemy's left, 
as his position was too strong to attack in front. The enemy was 
thrown into great confusion and forced from his position. Kamseur 
at this period crossed the railroad bridge and pursued the enemy's 
flying force, and Rodes crossed on the left and joined in the pursuit. 
Wallace's entire force fled on the road towards Baltimore, and our 
troops did not continue the pursuit long, as they did not wish to be 
encumbered with prisoners. 

The enemy's force numbered nearly ten thousand, and their loss in 
killed and wounded was very heavy, and ours about seven hundred. 
We captured between six hundred and seven hundred prisoners. 

While at Monocacy, a contribution of two hundred thousand dollars 
in money was levied on the city of Frederick, and some needed sup- 
plies were obtained. 

When our army reached the fortifications near Washington City on 
the 11th of July, Rodes, whose division was in front, was immediately 
ordered to bring it into line as rapidly as possible, throw out skir- 
mishers, and occupy the works if possible. Our whole force was 
moving by flank, and before Rodes' Division could be brought up, a 
cloud of dust was seen in rear of the works toward Washington, and 
then a column of the enemy filed into them, and skirmishers in our 
front, and artillery opened on us from several batteries. This barred 
the possibility of our taking the works by surprise, and it became 
necessary for us to reconnoitre. Rodes threw out skirmishers and 
drove those of the enemy to the cover of the works, and endeavored 
to ascertain if it were possible to carry the works by assault. They 
were found to be very strong, every appliance of science and unlim- 
ited means had rendered them practically impregnable. McCausland 
reported that the works on the Georgetown pike were too strongly 
manned for him to assault. After a thorough reconnoissance which 
consumed the entire day, it was decided, after learning that large re- 
inforcements had arrived from Grant's army, to abandon the project 
of capturing Washington. We remained in front of Washington 
during the 12th and retreated at night without molestation. Passing 
through Rockville and Poolsville we crossed the Potomac at White's 
Ford, above Leesburg, on the morning of the 14th, bringing off the 
prisoners captured at Monocacy and everything else in safety. Be- 



20 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

eides the money collected at Hagerstown and Frederick, we brought 
oflf quite a large number of cattle, and the cavalry obtained a number 
of horses, and the artillery procured some. We rested on the 14th 
and 15th near Leesburg, and resumed our march up the valley on 
the 16th. Nothing of importance occurred until the 17th, when we 
had some skirmishing on the Shenandoah, near Snickers' Gap. In 
the afternoon the enemy's infantry crossed over the river below Par- 
ker's Ford, and our picket line was driven back. Rodes' Division 
attacked them on the left and drove them across the river, inflicting 
heavy loss, and causing much confusion. On the 18th the enemy 
moved through Snickers' Gap, and there was some skirmishing when 
they appeared on the banks of the Shenandoah. A heavy column of 
the enemy's infantry made a dash at Parker's Ford, one mile below 
the ferry, in the afternoon, and crossed over and drove back our 
picket of one hundred men. Gordon's and Echols' Divisions were 
moved to the front and held the enemy in check, and Rodes' Division 
was brought up from the left, and drove him across the river, with 
heavy loss and in much confusion. On the 19th the enemy's main 
body still occupied the eastern bank of the Shenandoah, while small 
bodies were moving up and down the river in order to effect a cross- 
ing. It was reported that Averill was moving toward Winchester 
from Martinsburg. General Early determined to attack the enemy, 
after moving his trains to the rear to prevent capture. Ramseur's 
Division was sent to Winchester, the other divisions moved through 
Millwood and White Post to the valley at Newtown and Middletown. 
On the 20th, while General Ramseur was moving from Winchester 
to Stephenson's depot, to attempt the capture of a small body of the 
enemy, he was attacked by a large force under Averill, and his com- 
mand was thrown into confusion and had to retire, with the loss of 
four pieces of artillery and a number killed and wounded. Colonel 
Jackson made a vigorous charge on the enemy with his cavalry, which 
arrested the progress of Averill, and enabled Ramseur to rally his 
men and restore order. General Early, as soon as informed of Ram- 
seur's misfortune, moved with Rodes' Division to his assistance, but 
when he reached Winchester, found that Averill had fallen back a 
short distance after being checked. General Early did not follow 
Averill, but moved the whole command to Newtown. Our whole 
force of infantry was concentrated near Middletown on the 21st, and on 
the 22d we moved across Cedar Creek towards Strasburg, and our 
troops were posted so a^ to cover all the roads from the direction of 



Brigade History. 21 

Winchester. We rested on the 23d, but General Early learned dur- 
ing the day that Crook and Averill had united and were at Kerns- 
town, and he determined to attack at once, and marched against them 
early on the 24th, and gave battle. Their force consisted of the army 
of West Virginia, including Hunter's and Seigle's forces, and Av- 
erill's cavalry. They occupied the same position that Shields did in 
the fight with Jackson March 23, 1862. Their left flank was exposed, 
extending through Kernstown. General Breckinridge attacked 
them, and their whole line was thrown into great confusion. The 
other divisions then advanced, and the rout of the enemy became 
complete. Rodes' Division pursued them to Stephenson's depot, six 
miles from Winchester, but the failure of our cavalry to participate 
in the pursuit allowed them to escape with their artillery and most of 
their wagons. Our loss was very slight. The enemy's was severe in 
killed and wounded. Colonel Mulligan, commanding a division, was 
mortally wounded. Our infantry was so worn out that they were un- 
able to pursue them on the 25th, and only moved as far as Bunker 
Hill, some twelve miles from Winchester. The cavalry pursued them , 
however, and after skirmishing with them at Martinsburg, they re- 
treated from that place, and their whole force crossed the Potomac 
and sought refuge on Maryland Heights and at Harper's Ferry. The 
road from Winchester to Williamsburg was strewn with debris of 
their hurried retreat — twelve caissons and seventy-two wagons were 
abandoned, and most of them burned. The 26th, 27th and 28th, we 
devoted our time to marching and destroying the railroads which had 
been repaired since the beginning of the month. McCausland was 
sent to Chambersburg on this trip, and ordered to levy a contribution 
of one hundred thousand dollars in retaliation for the burning of 
houses and towns in Virginia and other Southern States, and in de- 
fault of payment the town was to be destroyed. He made a demand 
in writing, which the municipal authorities refused. McCausland 
then proceeded to carry out his orders, and the town was burned. 
Early moved back to Martinsburg on the 30th, and to Bunker Hill 
on the 31st, where we remained on the 1st, 2d and 3d of August. We 
moved to the Potomac on the 4th, and on the 5th Rodes' and Ram- 
seur's Divisions crossed at Williamsport and took position near St. 
James' College. Vaughn's Cavalry went into Hagerstown. Breckin- 
ridge and Jackson's Cavalry crossed at Shepherdstown and took posi- 
tion at Sharpsburg. This position was in full view of Maryland 
Heights. The enemy sent out a cavalry force to reconnoiter, and after 



22 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

skirmishing with Jackson's Cavalry, Gordon's sharpshooters drove 
them back. Our whole force recrossed the Potomac at AVilliamsport 
and moved to Martinsburg on the 6th, and to Bunker Hill on the 7th. 
McCausland was pursued from Chambersburg by Averill, who on Au- 
gust 7, surprised Johnson's Brigade of Cavalry in camp at Moorfield, 
in Hardy County, and routed it. This defeat caused McCausland to 
be routed also, and they lost four pieces of artillery and about three 
hundred prisoners from the whole command. The balance of the 
command retreated to Mount Jackson in great disorder. It was re- 
ported to General Early on the 9th that a large force of the enemy 
had concentrated at Harper's Ferry under command of General Sher- 
idan from Grant's army. We moved to Bunker Hill on the 10th. 
The enemy moved to our right on the 11th, and Ramsuer engaged a 
portion of their cavalry in a sharp skirmish and repulsed them. We 
moved to Hupp's Hill on the 12th, and on learning that the enemy 
was advancing in heavy force we took position at Fisher's Hill and 
awaited attack. Sheridan appeared on the banks of Cedar Creek the 
same day, when there was some skirmishing. The enemy fell back on 
the 17th and we took position so as to cover Winchester on the 18th, 
where we were joined by General Anderson with Kershaw's Division, 
and learned that Torbert's and Wilson's Division had united with 
Sheridan. Anderson remained near Winchester on the 19th and our 
main force moved to Bunker Hill. General Early states that '*on 
the 20th (August) our cavalry had some skirmishing with the enemy's 
on the Opequon, and on the 2l8t, by consent, there was a general 
movement towards Harper's Ferry. My command moved through 
Smithfield towards Charlestown, and Anderson's on the direct road by 
Summit Point. A body of the enemy's cavalry was driven from the 
Opequon, and was pursued by part of our cavalry towards Summit 
Point. I encountered Sheridan's main force near Cameron's depot, 
about three miles from Charlestown, in a position which he com- 
menced fortifying at once. Rodes' and Ramseur's Divisions were 
advanced to the front, and very heavy skirmishing ensued and was 
continued until night, but I waited for General Anderson to arrive 
before making a general attack. He encountered Wilson's Division 
of Cavalry at Summit Point, and, after driving it off, went into camp 
at that place. At light next morning it was discovered that the 
enemy had retired during the night, and his rear guard was driven 
through Charlestown towards Halltown, where Sheridan had taken a 
strong position under the protection of the heavy guns on Maryland 



Brigade History. 23 

Beights." There was some skirmishing on the 22d, 23d and 24th. 
A large force of the enemy's cavalry was encountered on the 25th 
between Leetown and Kerneysville, and after a sharp engagement 
driven across the Potomac. We then moved to Shepherdstown, and on 
the 26th to Leetown, We moved to Bunker Hill on the 27th. Our 
cavalry had a spirited engagement with the enemy on the 28th at 
Smithfield. Our pickets were driven in on the 29th near Smithfield, 
our infantry then drove them back across the Opequon. There were 
some demonstrations on the Opequon by the enemy's cavalry on the 
30th and 31st. Kodes' Division moved to Martinsburg on the 31st, 
and drove a force of the enemy's cavalry from that place who were 
preparing to repair the railroad. 

Nothing of importance occurred on the 1st of September, but three 
divisions of infantry and part of McCausland's Cavalry moved to- 
wards Summit Point, while Bodes' Division protected the trains 
which moved to Stephenson's depot. Vaughn's and Johnson's Cavalry 
were attacked and driven back in some confusion while moving 
towards Summit Point on the 2d, but Kodes returned towards Bunker 
Hill and drove Averill back. Bodes moved to Bunker Hill in sup- 
port of Lomax, and drove the enemy's cavalry out of and beyond 
that place. Nothing of interest occurred from the 3d until the morn- 
ing of the 19th of September, when the battle of Winchester was 
fought. 



BATTLE OF WINCHESTER. 

After Sheridan learned that General Early's force had been reduced 
l)y sending a portion of his army to General Lee, he determined to at- 
tack the small Confederate force of 13,000 with his army of 43,000 men. 
Accordingly, on the 19th of September, 1864, he advanced on Early's 
troops near Winchester early in the morning. 

About ten thousand of Sheridan's force was cavalry, and the cavalry 
of Early amounted to about three thousand men. When the attack 
was made Ramseur's Division of infantry, which did not exceed one 
thousand and seven hundred, was about one and one half miles from 
Winchester on an elevated position between Abraham's Creek and 
Red Bud Run. There was also present Nelson's Artillery, Lomax's and 
Jackson's Cavalry and a part of Johnston's on the right, Fitz Lee's 
Cavalry on the left, and a battery of horse artillery, also a detachment 
^f Johnson's Cavalry. These troops held the enemy's main force in 



24 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

check until Gordou's and Rodes' Divisions came up, which were at 
Stephenson's depot when the battle commenced. Gordon's Division 
arrived first, and vtas placed in a piece of woods between Ramseur's 
line and the Red Bud. Gordon was instructed to examine the ground- 
on the left with a view of attacking the enemy's force in his front which 
had taken position in a piece of woods. While so engaged, Rodes 
arrived with three of his brigades, and was ordered to form on Gor- 
don's right in rear of another piece of woods. While this movement 
was being executed a heavy column of the enemy had been massed 
between the Red Bud and the Berryville road, and were moving to 
attack Ramseur on his left flank, while another force was pressing 
him in front. At this period Rodes' and Gordon's Divisions were- 
hurled upon the flank of the advancing column. They advanced 
gallantly through the woods into the open ground and attacked vig- 
orously, while Nelson's Artillery on the right and Braxton's on the 
left opened a destructive and galling fire upon the enemy's advancing 
columns, but they continued to advance until they reached the very 
rear of the woods, within musket range of seven pieces of Braxton's: 
Artillery, which was unsupported. Our advance was forced to halt 
for a moment, and our position was most critical, for it was evident 
that the day was lost unless this force was driven back. Braxton's 
guns stood their ground, and Colonel Carter opened with canister on 
the enemy. They then staggered, halted, and commenced falling 
back under this rapid and well-directed fire. Battle's Brigade of 
Rodes' Division, which had just arrived and was formed in line for 
the purpose of supporting the rest of the division, swept through the 
woods, driving the enemy before it, and General Clement A. Evans' 
Brigade joined in the charge. Our advance, which had been tempo- 
rarily suspended, was then resumed, and the enemy's attacking column 
was thrown into the wildest confusion and driven from the field. This^ 
occured about eleven a.m., when we had gained a splendid victory over 
overwhelming numbers. The enemy's dead and wounded were 
strewn in our front, and some prisoners had been captured. 

General Early says: * 'Major-General Rodes had been killed in the 
very moment of triumph, while conducting the attack of his division 
with great gallantry and skill, and this was a heavy blow to me. In 
his death I had to regret the loss not only of a most accomplished, 
skillful, and gallant officer, upon whom I placed great reliance, but 
also a personal friend, whose counsels had been of great service to me 
in the trying circumstances with which I found myself surrounded. 



Brigade History. 25- 

He fell at his post, doing a soldier's and patriot's duty to his country, 
and his memory will long be cherished by his comrades." 

One of Sheridan's Corps had not been engaged up to this time, and. 
there remained his large force of cavalry. Wharton's Division and 
King's Artillery had not arrived, and Imboden's Cavalry, under Colo- 
nel Smith, and McCausland's under Colonel Ferguson, were engaged 
in watching the enemy's cavalry. Our lines were now formed across 
from Abraham's Creek to Red Bud. At the junction of the Front 
Royal and Millwood roads, which overlapped us about one mile, the 
country was open between this force and the Valley Pike and Cedar 
Creek Pike, and the enemy was in formidable force in our front. 
Late in the afternoon Crook's Corps, which had not been engaged, 
drove in the small force posted on the Martinsburg road, and at the 
same time advanced on that flank, on the north side of Red Bud, and 
before this overwhelming force Patton's Brigade of Infantry and 
Payne's Brigade of Cavalry under Fitz Lee were compelled to fall 
back. A large force of the enemy's cavalry swept along the Martins- 
burg road to Winchester in our rear. Two brigades of Wharton's 
Division moved in double quick to our left and rear, and with the aid 
of King's Artillery and some of Braxton's guns succeeded in driving 
them back. Breckinridge then threw Wharton's Division into line in 
rear of our left at right angles to the Martinsburg road, and handsomely 
repulsed another charge of the enemy's cavalry. Many of our men on 
the front line, when they heard this firing in the rear, supposing they 
were flanked and cut ofl*, commenced falling back, thus creating 
great confusion. Our whole front line then gave way, but a large 
portion of the men were rallied and formed behind breast-works just 
outside of Winchester, which had been made during the first year of 
the war, and with the aid of artillery the progress of the enemy's in- 
fantry was arrested. It was then reported that the enemy had turned 
our left flank, and our troops were ordered to retire, but immediately 
afterward it was discovered that the supposed force of the enemy was 
Ramseur's Division, which had moved back to be in line with our 
troops. They had orders before they had gone more than twenty paces 
to return to the works. This order was not fully complied with, and 
we were forced to retire, as the enemy's cavalry force was too large for 
us and had the advantage of open ground, which enabled them to get 
around our left. The battle lasted from daylight until dark, and at 
its close our army had been forced back two miles, after repelling the 
enemy's first attack with feariul slaughter, and afterward contested. 



^6 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

with obstinacy every iuch of ground. Cons^idering the immense differ- 
ence in numbers and equipment Sheridan had but little to boast of. 
We lost a few pieces of artillery and some valuable officers and men. 
The main part of our army and all of our wagons were saved, and the 
enemy's loss in killed and wounded was much greater than ours. Our 
troops moved to Fisher's Hill without annoyance from the enemy 
on the 20th. General Ramseur was placed in command of the Rodes' 
Division, and General Pegram was given the command of Ramseur's 
old division. In the afternoon Sheridan's f(>rces moved to Cedar 
Creek, near Fisher's Hill, and on the 21st and 22d he reconnoitered 
and advanced his forces to our front under cover of breastworks. He 
secured a strong position, which he commenced to fortify. It was then 
discovered that another attack was contemplated, when orders were 
given for our troops to retire, after dark, as our force was not strong 
■enough to resist a determined assault. After sunset Crook's Corps 
moved to our left and forced Lomax's dismounted cavalry to fall back, 
and advanced against Ramseur's left. Ramseur attempted to meet 
this movement by throwing his brigades successively into line to the 
left, and Wharton's Division, which was on the right, was sent for but 
did not arrive. Pegram's Brigade was also thrown into line in the 
same manner as Ramseur's. This movement produced some disorder 
in both divisions, and this was observed by the enemy, and his whole 
line was advanced. 

After a short contest our whole force retired in considerable con- 
fusion. Our entire force fell back through Woodstock to Narrow 
Passage, and the enemy did not make a vigorous pursuit. All the 
trains were moved off in safety. 

Our loss in killed and wounded was slight, but some prisoners were 
captured by the enemy while attempting to make their way across the 
North Fork of the Massanutten mountain. On the morning of the 
23d we moved back to Mount Jackson, and halted in order to move 
the sick and wounded and hospital stores from that place. Averill's 
Division of Cavalry was driven back in the afternoon after some 
heavy skirmishing. We then moved to Rudes' Hill. On the morn- 
ing of the 24th a body of the enemy's cavalry crossed the North Fork 
below Mount Jackson and attempted to get around our right flank. 
We retired in line of battle through New Market to a point where 
the road to Port Republic leaves the Valley Pike, nine miles from 
Rudes' Hill. In this retreat the conduct of our troops was admirable 
and perfect order was preserved, notwithstanding their diminished 



Brigade History. 27 

numbers, and the fact that the enemy was pursuing in full force, and 
would dash up with horse -artillery under the support of cavalry, and 
open on our retiring lines. At the last halt, at a placed called Tenth 
Legion, near where the Port Republic road leaves the Pike, a little 
before sunset, in order to enable our trains to reach Port Republic, 
a stand was made, and skirmishers thrown out, and artillery opened 
on the advancing enemy. After some skirmishing the enemy went in- 
to camp, in sight, but out of reach of our guns. At dark we retreated 
five miles on the Port Republic road, and then went into camp. On 
the morning of the 25th, we moved toward Port Republic in order 
to unite with Kershaw's Division, which had been ordered to join our 
command from Culpepper Court House. Having ascertained that the 
enemy's infantry were at Harrisonburg, we moved out on the morn- 
ing of the 27th and drove a division of his cavalry from Port Republic, 
and then went into camp in the fork of the rivers. It was here learned 
that two divisions of cavalry under Torbet had been sent through 
Staunton to Waynesboro, and were engaged in the destruction of the 
railroad bridge at that place, and the tunnel through the Blue Ridge 
nt Rock Fish Gap. We moved on those points, and on the 28th, 29th 
and 30th repaired the bridge at Waynesboro, which had been partially 
•destroyed. 

Our -whole force moved to Mount Sidney on the 1st of October, and 
took position between that place and North river, the enemy having 
concentrated around Harrisonburg. We remained in this position 
until the 6th, awaiting the arrival of Rosser's Brigade of Cavalry from 
General Lee's Army. It was now discovered that the enemy was 
retiring, and we moved at once to New Market with our infantry on 
the 7th of August. Rosser established his line of pickets across the 
valley from Columbia Furnace to Edinburg, and on the 11th Lomax 
was sent to Millford in the Luray valley to take position. Having 
heard that Sheridan was preparing to send part of his troops to Grant, 
we moved down the valley on the 12th. On the morning of the 
loth we reached Fisher's Hill, and part of our command moved to 
Hupp's Hill. While there a division of the enemy's infantry moved 
to his left and stacked arms. A battery of our artillery was run out 
and opened on it, causing it to scatter in great confusion. The en- 
emy then displayed a large force, and a division was sent across 
the creek to capture the guns, when one of Kershaw's Brigades drove 
them back in confusion, and with severe loss. Some prisoners were 
captured, and Colonel Wells, commanding the division, was- mortally 



28 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

wounded and fell into our hands. Having accomplished the object 
of our reconnoissance we moved back to Fisher's Hill. We learned 
that the Sixth Corps had started for Grant's Army, but was brought 
back after this afiair. We remained at Fisher's Hill until the 16th, 
observing the enemy, wuth the hope that he would move out of hi& 
strong position, where we could attack him in a different posi- 
tion, but he refused to move. On the 16th Rosser captured a 
strong picket post of the enemy's cavalry. General Gordon went 
with a brigade of his division on the 17th to ascertain if the position 
of the enemy was fortified, and reported that it was, on his return^ 



BATTLE OF CEDAR CREEK. 

The want of provisions and forage for his army rendered it absolutely 
necessary for General Early to move back or attack the enemy. He 
selected the latter alternative. General Gordon and Captain Hotch- 
kiss were sent to our signal station to find out if it were practicable 
to surprise the enemy on the right flank, and if troops could be 
moved between the base of the mountain and the river. Their report 
being favorable, General Early decided to attack and gave orders ta 
his division commanders to have everything in readiness to move on 
the night of the 18th. The three divisions, Gordon's, Ramseur's and 
Pegram's, were to move under the command of General Gordon to- 
the enemy's rear, by moving between the base of the mountain and 
the river. Swords and canteens were directed to be left in 
camp so as to make as little noise as possible. They were directed 
to make the attack at five o'clock in the morning. Kershaw's and 
Wharton's Divisions were ordered to move at one o'clock in the morn- 
ing under the personal superintendence of General Early, towards 
Strasburg. Division commanders were reminded of the importance 
of being prompt and energetic in all their movements and were or- 
dered to press the enemy with vigor, and to continue the pursuit 
until the enemy's forces were completely routed. Gordon moved 
promptly and so did the other infantry commands. The cavalry 
were posted on the flanks and were prompt in obeying orders. The 
artillery followed Kershaw's and Wharton's Divisions and did effect- 
tive service. The attack was promptly made as ordered, and the en- 
emy routed, and many pieces of artillery and small arms captured. 
Our victory was complete in the morning, but in the afternoon re- 



Brigade History. 29 

verses overtook our army and we were compelled to retreat in confu- 
sion. General Early says: *'My loss in the battle of Cedar Creek 
was twenty-three pieces of artillery, some ordnance and medical wag- 
ons and ambulances, which had been carried to the front for the use 
of the troops on the field; about 1860 in killed and wounded, and 
something over 1,000 prisoners. Major- General Ramseur fell 
into the hands of the enemy mortally wounded, and in him not only 
my command, but the country, sustained a heavy loss. He was a 
most gallant and energetic oflBcer whom no disaster appalled, but his 
■courage and energy seemed to gain new strength in the midst of con- 
fusion and disorder. He fell at his post fighting like a lion at bay, 
and his native State has reason to be proud of his memory. Briga- 
dier-General Battle was wounded at the beginning of the fight, and 
other valuable oflScers were lost. Fifteen hundred prisoners were 
captured from the enemy and brought oflf, and his loss in killed and 
wounded in this action was very heavy. This was the case of a glo- 
rious victory given up by my own troops after they had won it, and 
it is to be accounted for on the ground of the partial demoralization 
caused by the plunder of the enemy's camps, and from the fact that 
the men undertook to judge for themselves when it was proper to re- 
tire. Had they but waited, the mischief on the left would have been 
remedied. I have never been able to satisfy myself that the enemy's 
attack in the afternoon was not a demonstration to cover his retreat 
■during the night. It certainly was not a vigorous one, as is shown by 
the fact that the very small force with Ramseur and Goggin held him 
in check so long and the loss in killed and wounded in the division 
which first gave way, was not heavy, and was the least in numbers 
of all but one, though it was the third in strength, and its relative 
loss was the least of all the divisions. I read a sharp lecture to my 
troops, in an address published to them a few days after the battle, 
but I have never attributed the result to want of courage on their 
part, for I had seen them perform too many prodigies of valor to 
doubt that. There was an individuality about the Confederate soldier 
which caused him to act often in battle according to his own opinions 
^and thereby impair his own efficiency; and the tempting bait of- 
fered by the rich plunder of the camps of the enemy's well-fed and 
well-clothed troops was frequently too great for our destitute soldiers 
and caused them to pause in the career of victory. 

"Had my cavalry been sufficient to contend with that of the enemy, 
the rout in the morning would have been complete ; as it was, I had 



30 Doles Cook Brigade. 

only about twelve hundred cavalry on the field under Rosser, and^ 
Loraax's force, which numbered less than 1,700, did not get up. My 
infantry and artillery was about the same t^treugth as at Winchester. 
The reports of the ordnance oflBcers showed in the hands of my troops 
about 8,800 muskets, in round numbers as follows: In Kershaw's Di- 
vision 2,700; Ramseur's, 2,100; Gordon's, 1,700; Pegram's, 1,200, and 
Wharton's, 1,100. Making a moderate allowance for the men left to 
guard the camps and the signal station on the mountain, as well as 
for a few sick and wounded, I went into this battle with about 8,500- 
muskets and a little over forty pieces of artillery. The book con- 
taining the reports of the chief surgeon of Sheridan's Cavalry Corps, 
which has been mentioned as captured at this battle, showed that 
Sheridan's Cavalry numbered about 8,700 men for duty a few days 
previous, and from information which I had received of reinforce- 
ments sent him, in the way of recruits and returned convalescents, I 
am satisfied that his infantry force was fully as large as at Y/^inches- 
ter. Sheridan was absent in the morning at the beginning of the 
fight, and had returned in the afternoon before the change in the fort- 
unes of the day. Nevertheless, I saw no reason to change the esti- 
mate I had formed of him. It may be asked, why, with my small 
force, I made the attack ? I can only say we had been fighting large 
odds during the whole war, and I knew there was no chance of lessen- 
ing them. It was of the utmost consequence that Sheridan should be 
prevented from sending troops to Grant, and General Lee, in a letter 
received a day or two before, had expressed an earnest desire that a 
victory should be gained in the valley if possible, and it could not be 
gained without fighting for it. I did hope to gain one by surprising 
the enemy in his camps, and then thought, and still think, I would 
have had it, if my directions had been strictly complied with and my 
troops had awaited my orders to retire." After the battle of Cedar 
Creek we remained in camp without being disturbed until the 26th 
of October, when General Lomax was attacked at Mil^ord, where he 
repulsed the enemy's cavalry, after a sharp engagement. We moved 
down the valley on the 10th of November, when it was learned that 
Sheridan was preparing to send troops to Grant, and repairing the 
Manassas Gap railroad. When we approached Cedar Creek on the 
11th the enemy had fallen back towards Winchester from their forti- 
fied position at Hupp's Hill. Colonel Payne drove a small body of the 
enemy's cavalry through Middletown to Newtown, and our main 
force then followed and took position at the latter place. It then was- 



Brigade History. 31 

discovered that Sheridan's main force had selected a position north of 
Newtown and was engaged in fortifying it. We remained in his 
front on the 11th and 12th. Rosser, who was on our left flank, had 
some skirmishing with the enemy's cavalry on the 11th and two di- 
visions advanced against him on the 12th, and after a heavy fight the 
enemy was repulsed and lost some prisoners. On the same day Mc- 
Causland was attacked at Cedarville by Powell's Division of Cavalry,, 
and after severe fighting was driven back across the river, with the 
loss of two pieces of artillery. As the enemy did not seem inclined 
to leave his intrenched position, and we were unwilling to attack him 
there, we moved back to Fisher's Hill after dark on the 12th, so that 
we might be nearer our base of supplies. We marched in the direc- 
tion of New Market on the 14th and were not pursued. After our 
return to New Market, Kershaw's Division was returned to General 
Lee, and Cosby's Cavalry to Breckinridge. Two divisions of the 
enemy's cavalry moved to Mount Jackson on the 22d of November, 
and drove in our pickets. A portion of our infantry then drove the 
enemy's cavalry back, and they were pursued by Wickham's Brigade 
of Cavalry to Woodstock. 

General Early, in writing of the close of his valley campaign, says :. 
" On the 27th Rosser crossed Great North Mountain into Hardy 
county, with his own and Payne's Brigade, and about the 29th sur- 
prised and captured the fortified post at New Creek, on the Baltimore 
and Ohio railroad. At this place two regiments of cavalry with 
their arms and colors were captured, and eight pieces of artillery and 
a very large amount of ordnance, quartermaster and commissary 
stores fell into our hands. The prisoners, numbering eight hundred, 
four pieces of artillery, and some wagons and horses were brought off, 
the other guns, which were heavy siege pieces, being spiked, and 
their carriages and a greater part of the stores destroyed. Rosser also 
brought off several hundred cattle and a large number of sheep from 
Hampshire and Hardy counties. 

"This expedition closed the material operations of the campaign of 
1864 in the Shenandoah Valley. At that time the enemy held pre- 
cisely the same portion of the valley which he held before the opening 
of the campaign in the spring, and no more, and the headquarters of 
his troops were at the same place, to wit : Winchester. There was 
this difference, however : At the beginning of the campaign he held it 
with comparatively a small force, and at the close he was compelled 
to employ three corps of infantry and one of cavalry for that purpose,. 



^2 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

and to guard the approaches to Washington, Maryland and Pennsyl- 
vania. 

'•When I was detached from General Lee's army, Hunter was ad- 
vancing on Lynchburg, one hundred and seventy miles south of 
Winchester, with a very considerable force, and threatening all of 
General Lee's communications with a very serious danger. By a 
rapid movement my force had been thrown to Lynchburg just in time 
to arrest Hunter's march into that place, and he had been driven back 
and forced to escape into the mountains of Western Virginia, with a 
loss of ten pieces of artillery, and subsequent terrible suffering to his 
troops. 

"Maryland and Pennsylvania had been invaded, Washington threat- 
ened and thrown into a state of frantic alarm, and Grant had been 
compelled to detach two corps of infantry and two divisions of cavalry 
from his army. Five or six thousand prisoners had been captured 
from the enemy and sent to Richmond, and, according to a published 
statement by Sheridan, his array had lost thirteen thousand, eight 
hundred and thirty-one, in killed and wounded, after he took com- 
mand of it. Heavy losses had been inflicted on that army by my 
command before Sheridan went to the Valley, and the whole loss 
could not have been far from double my entire force. The enemy, 
moreover, had been deprived of the use of the Baltimore and Ohio 
railroad, and the Chesapeake and Ohio canal for three months. It 
is true that I had lost many valuable officers and men, and about 
sixty pieces of artillery, counting those lost by Ramseur and McCaus- 
land, and not deducting the nineteen pieces captured of the enemy ; 
but I think I may safely state that the fall of Lynchburg, with its 
foundries and factories, and the consequent destruction of General 
Lee's communications, would have rendered necessary the evacuation 
of Richmond, and that, therefore, the fall of the latter place had 
been prevented ; and, by my subsequent operations, Grant's opera- 
tions against Lee's army had been materially impeded, and for some 
time substantially suspended. 

"My loss in killed, wounded and prisoners, at Winchester and Fish- 
er's Hill, had been less than four thousand, and at Cedar Creek about 
three thousand, but the enemy has attempted to magnify it to a much 
larger figure, claiming as prisoners several thousand more than my 
entire loss. How he makes out his estimate is not for me to explain. 
He was never scrupulous as to the kinds of persons of whom he made 
prisoners, and the statements of the Federal officers were not always 



Brigade History. 33 

confined to the truth, as the world has probably learned. I know 
that a number of prisoners fell into the enemy's hands who did not 
belong to my command, such as cavalrymen on details to get fresh 
horses, soldiers on leave of absence, conscripts on special details, citi- 
zens not in the service, men employed in getting supplies for the 
departments, and stragglers and deserters from other commands. 

''My army, during the entire campaign, had been self-sustaining so 
far as provisions and forage were concerned, and a considerable num- 
ber of beef cattle had been sent to General Lee's army; and, when the 
difficulties under which I labored are considered, I think I may con- 
fidently assert that I had done as well as it was possible for me to do. 

"Shortly after Rosser's return from the New Creek expedition Colo- 
nel Munford was sent with Wickham's Brigade to the counties of 
Hardy and Pendleton to procure forage for his horses; and, cold 
weather having now set in so as to prevent material operations in the 
field, the three divisions of the Second Corps were sent, in succession, 
to General Lee — Wharton's Division, the cavalry and most of the ar- 
tillery being retained with me." 

In the preface to the pamphlet written in 1866 and 1867 by Gen- 
eral Early, entitled "Campaign in Virginia, from the Rapidan to 
James River," he says : "I have not found it necessary to be guilty 
of the injustice of attempting to pull down the reputation of any of 
my fellow officers in order to build up my own. My operations and 
my campaign stand on their own merits, whatever they may be. Nor 
in anything I may have found it necessary to say in regard to the 
conduct of my troops do I wish to be understood as, in any way, de- 
crying the soldiers who constituted the rank and file of my com- 
mands. I believe that the world has never produced a body of men 
superior in courage, patriotism and endurance to the private soldiers 
of the Confederate armies. 

"I have repeatedly seen those soldiers submit, with cheerfulness, to 
privations and hardships which would appear to be almost incredible ; 
and the wild cheers of our brave men (which were so different from 
the studied hurrahs of the Yankees) when their thin lines sent back 
opposing hosts of Federal troops, staggering, reeling and flying, have 
often thrilled every fiber in my heart. I have seen, with my own 
eyes, ragged, barefooted and hungry Confederate soldiers perform 
deeds which, if performed in days of yore by mailed warriors in 
glittering armor, would have inspired the harp of the minstrel and the 

3 d-c 



34 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

pen of the poet I have not undertaken to speculate 

as to the cause of our failure, as I have seen abundant reason for it 
in the tremendous odds brought against us. Having had some 
means of judging, I will, however, say that, in my opinion, both 
President Davis and General Lee, in their respective spheres, did all 
for the success of our cause which it was possible for mortal man to 
do ; and it is a great privilege and comfort for me so to believe, and 
to have been able to bring with me into exile a profound love and 

veneration for these great men I have not sought 

refuge in another land from insensibility to the wrongs and sufferings 
of my own country, but I feel deeply and continually for them, and 
could my life secure the redemption of that country, as it has been 
often risked, so now it would be as freely given for that object. 

"There were men born and nurtured in the Southern States, and 
some of them in my own State, who took sides with our enemies, and 
aided in desolating and humiliating the land of their own birth, and 
of the graves of their ancestors. Some of them rose to high positions 
in the United States Army, and others to high civil positions. I 
envy them not their dearly bought prosperity. I had rather be the 
humblest private soldier who fought in the ranks of the Confederate 
army, and now, maimed and disabled, hobbles on his crutches from 
house to house to receive his daily bread from the hands of the grate- 
ful women for whose homes he fought, than the highest of those 
renegades and traitors. Let them enjoy the advantages of their 
present positions as best they may, for the deep and bitter execrations 
of an entire people now attend them and an immortality of infamy 
awaits them Our enemies are in the habit of refer- 
ring scoffingly to Virginia as the 'Sacred Soil'; and in the hearts of 
all her true sons and daughters her soil is, and from time immemorial 
has been, held sacred, as well because of the associations connected 
with her history as because it is the land of their birth, and with that 
soil mingle the ashes of their ancestors. This sentiment all true men 
everywhere must appreciate and honor. But the soil of Virginia is 
now, and henceforth will be, held sacred in the hearts of all true 
Southern men and women, because she has been baptized in the 
blood and has received into her bosom the remains of thousands upon 
thousands of the truest and noblest sons of the entire Confederacy. 

My narrative is now given to the public, and the sole 

merit I claim for it is that of truthfulness. In writing it I have re- 
ceived material aid from an accurate diary kept by Lieutenant 



Brigade History. 35 

William W. Old, aide to Major-General Edward Johnson, who was 
-with me during the campaign in Maryland and the Shenandoah Val- 
ley until the 12th of August, 1864, and the copious notes of Captain 
J. Hotchkiss, who acted as topographical engineer for the Second 
Corps and the array of the Valley District, and recorded the events 
of each day from the opening of the campaign on the Rapidan in 
.May, 1864, until the affair at Waynesboro in March, 1865." 

After the consolidation of the Twelfth and Twenty-first Georgia with 
•the Fourth and Forty-fourth Georgia regiments. General George Doles 
commanded this brigade until he was killed at Cold Harbor on the 2d 
of July, 1864, and after his death it was commanded by General Philip 
Cook until the surrender of Lee's army. At the date of consolidation 
this brigade was in the division of Major-General D. H. Hill, but at 
Chancellorsville Brigadier-General Robert E. Rodes had been as- 
signed to its command temporarily, but was soon afterwards promoted 
major-general and assigned to its command. We remained in his 
•division until his death at Winchester, Va., September 19, 1864. 
Major-General Ramseur succeeded General Rodes, and was in com- 
mand until he was killed at Cedar Creek, October 19, 1864. After 
the death of General Ramseur, Brigadier-General Bryan Grimes was 
promoted major-general and placed in command of our division and 
xjommanded it until the surrender. Our division was in the Second 
Corps, Army of Northern Virginia, and was commanded successively 
by Generals '* Stonewall'' Jackson, Ewell, Early and Gordon. 

After the Second Corps of the Army of Northern Virginia (which 
had been under the command of General Jubal A. Early, and par- 
ticipated in his valley campaign from June 12 until December, 
1864) returned to Lee's army it was placed on the right flank of his 
army, and its line extended from Hatcher's Run to the Boydton Plank 
road. It was commanded by General John B. Gordon, who had suc- 
ceeded General Early as its corps commander. In March, 1865, it 
was transferred to Petersburg for the express purpose of allowing 
General Gordon to become familiar with the works in and around that 
city, and to prepare for one of the most daring and desperate assaults 
upon the enemy's line that was made during the entire war. While 
occupying the trenches in the vicinity of Petersburg, we were 
skirmishing and fighting almost continually, and our line was so 
thin that it amounted to nothing more than a skirmish line. It 
was at this period that General Lee, after a consultation with General 
-Gordon, determined that the latter should attack Fort Steadraan on 



36 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

the 25th of March, 1865. The attack was made, and the Fort cap- 
tured, but the forts in the rear were not taken because the guides had 
been lost, and for the same reason our cavalry could not pass, pontoons 
could not be destroyed, and the telegraph wires were not cut. In ad- 
dition to these drawbacks Pickett's Division and other troops that were 
to participate in the assault did not arrive. When this attack was made. 
Lee's army did not number more than 45,000 men, and only about 
40,000 of them were able for duty, and none of them in good condi- 
tion, while Grant's army numbered 160,000 strong and confident men.. 
The sufferings of Lee's army were terrible, and the men were feeble 
from exhaustion and the want of food. But notwithstanding the un- 
favorable circumstances which surrounded them, they were full of 
fight and determination. It is true that a few grew faint-hearted and( 
deserted, but the majority remained faithful to the end. 

Our brigade commander. General Philip Cook, was ordered on the- 
24th to find the way to the rear of Blandford's Cemetery and be iib. 
position to advance by three o'clock a.m. of the 25th of March. They 
were in position as ordered, ready for the movement. After the corpse 
of sharpshooters and General Terry's Brigade passed, our brigade- 
crossed the works at the point carried by the advance. We were or- 
dered by General Grimes, our division commander, to occupy an, 
eminence about three hundred yards in advance and open fire upon 
the enemy. Two batteries were observed in our rear supported by 
troops, and we ascertained that our brigade was unsupported by the- 
balance of the division, or other troops. The enemy fired upon us 
from the rear, which caused us to change position to the opposite 
sideof the intrenchment and to fire on the enemy in the rear. No- 
large body of the enemy had been discovered up to this time. Gen- 
eral Cook was wounded here and directed the brigade to retire to a 
ditch running nearly parallel with the works, which was considerably 
in advance of the other troops, and await orders. 

This position was held until we were surrounded on three sides by 
the enemy, and exposed to a heavy fire from their forts and batteries.. 
We were then ordered back and rejoined the division. 

General Cook, in his report of this battle, says: "I regret the loss in- 
this engagement of Major F. H. DeGraffenreid, Fourth Georgia Regi- 
ment, a gallant and meritorious officer, mortally wounded and left in 
the hands of the enemy, and Adjutant L. F. Bakewell, Twenty-first 
Georgia Regiment, an officer whose education, intelligence and con- 
spicuous gallantry has long since entitled him to honorable promotion,. 



Brigade History. 37 

-killed. Several other officers were wounded and some captured ; 
among the former was Captain O. F. Evans, commanding Twelfth 
Georgia Regiment, and of the latter Captain T. R. Daniel, command- 
ing Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment. On no occasion had the officers 
and men behaved better than on that day. Private Harvey, Com- 
pany K, Twelfth Georgia Regiment, and Sergeant J. F. Cook, Com- 
pany K, Twenty-first Georgia Regiment, are mentioned by their regi- 
mental commanders for their good conduct. Captain F. T. Snead, 
A. A. G. ; Lieutenant R. V. Jones, A. A. and I. G., and Lieutenant 
C. H. Law, A. D. C. , rendered efficient service, and conducted them- 
selves with their uniform gallantry. Captain Snead was slightly 
mounded and disabled for a short time." 



CAPTURE OF FORT STEADMAN. 

Captain Joseph P. Carson, Company I, Fourth Georgia Regiment, 
the hero of Fort Steadman, was as gallant a soldier as ever wore the 
gray. He went to Virginia in April, 1861, with the first company that 
left his county, and followed the fortunes of Stonewall Jackson, Ewell, 
Early and Gordon until the fateful morning at Appomattox in 1865, 
participating in all the great battles in which his regiment took a part. 
The following graphic account of the capture of Fort Steadman by 
the sharpshooters of General Gordon's Corps, under his command, was 
given by him to a reporter of the press several years after the close 
of the war : 

**The spring of 1865 found Lee's army in a critical position. His 
line was curved around Petersburg, confronting Grant's for nearly 
twenty miles. Grant's center rested on the Appomattox river. Every 
reinforcement he received would be thrown on his left, which made 
it necessary that Lee's line should also be extended until it threatened 
to snap. The average strength of it was one man to every six or eight 
feet, and as day after day death claimed its victims from the heavy 
fire directed upon us, it grew weaker. Our line was protected by a 
long, deep ditch, with cross ditches in rear from the cannon and 
musket fire, but not from the shells which were dropped from mortars 
with fatal precision directly upon us. To avoid them, we had to bur- 
row under ground. Previous to this time an effort was made to break 
our line by mining. The great crater was the result of this effort. 
The events I am about to describe occurred a half mile to the left of 
Ihis crater. 



38 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

''About the 18th of March, General Lee sent for General Gordon^ 
■whose sharpshooters I commanded, for consultation. They discussed 
the almost hopeless task of trying longer to hold the long line held by 
our army. They agreed that the situation was desperate and alarm- 
ing. General Lee stated that he had just received the reports of his- 
officers and that he had only forty thousand men fit for duty, while 
Grant confronted him with one hundred and sixty thousand. After 
consultation they decided to make one last desperate effort to break. 
Grant's line and, if possible, destroy his left wing, and then join- 
General Johnson in North Carolina and attack Sherman. No other 
alternative was left except to abandon Petersburg and Richmond, or 
to treat with the United States Government for the best terms they 
could obtain. Preparations for the assault were at once begun. 

"I was at that time captain of the sharpshooters, about one hundred 
strong. They had been selected for their bravery from the entire 
corps, and represented every Southern State, and were armed witb 
the celebrated Whitworth rifle, of the latest pattern, having a range of 
eighteen hundred yards. The men were tried and trusty. Their 
courage had been proven on a hundred battle-fields. General Gor- 
don informed me of what had been decided upon, but enjoined the 
strictest secrecy. The battle was to begin with a night assault upon 
Fort Steadman by my sharpshooters, and if successful, it was to be 
promptly followed up by General Gordon's Corps. Fort Steadman 
occupied a hill about two hundred yards from our line, which was also 
on a hill, and between the two hills flowed a branch about ten feet 
wide, but only a few inches deep. Between the branch and the fort 
there were three lines of obstructions as perfect as human ingenuity 
and labor could devise. 

" The first was composed of pine logs, about eight inches thick, in 
which holes had been bored at intervals and sharpened spikes inserted. 
Then logs about twenty-five feet long had been crossed and recrossed 
and fastened together with wire. About forty steps farther back was 
the second line, composed of tangled brush piled up with the sharp- 
ened butts projecting towards us. The third and last line was com- 
posed of fence-rails planted in the ground with their sharpened ends- 
slanted towards us. 

" These obstructions extended all along the enemy's line. There was 
no weak place in it. These obstacles were to be surmounted by us in 
the face of eight siege guns trained upon them, in addition to nearly 
five hundred infantry in the fort. The fort was also surrounded by a 



Brigade History. 39 

wide moat four feet deep and nearly full of water. The earth taken 
from this ditch had been piled up on the inner side of it, forming an 
almost perpendicular wall from bottom to top of thirteen feet. A 
man could not, unhindered, if unassisted, climb up to the fort. To 
cross these obstructions, scale the fort and capture it, was the task as- 
signed my sharpshooters. 

" On the afternoon of March 24, a courier rode up to my camp with 
orders for me to organize my corps and to follow him to the point from 
which the assault was to be made. I immediately formed my men 
into line and made them a speech. I told them we were going to un- 
dertake a hazardous task, from which very likely few of us would re- 
turn. That I had every confidence in their courage and devotion, 
which I had so often seen tested, but that if any one desired to with- 
draw he was at liberty to do so. To this only two, and they were 
sick, fell out of ranks. We then followed the courier, who led us by 
a circuitous route through the outskirts of Petersburg, and finally 
brought us up in front of Fort Steadman about dark, and then we 
awaited orders. 

" Arriving at this place I noticed for the first time that my brother 
Bob, a boy of eighteen years, was with my men. He did not belong 
to my command, but was serving as courier for General Phil Cook. 
Surprised at his appearance there, I asked him what he desired. He 
replied that he had come to go with me wherever I went. I talked 
to him about the folly of such a course aud implored him to give up 
the idea. But all in vain. I reminded him that both of our broth- 
ers had been killed, and that our old father at home would look to 
him to lean upon in his old age ; that I was going upon a perilous 
expedition, with but little chance of returning alive. He admitted 
that he, too, believed that I would be killed, and for that reason he 
was going with me in order to bring back my body. What could I 
say then ? Nothing ! We spread our blankets on the ground and 
lay down, he to sleep and I to lie awake and think. It was very dark. 
No sound broke the stillness of the night as we lay waiting the last 
orders. I could not sleep ; I was unable to rid myself of the thought 
that it was the boy beside me who would be killed. It came over me 
as we lay there side by side for the last time. At three o'clock Gen- 
eral Gordon came. He furnished strips of white cloth to the men ; 
they were drawn over the right shoulder to the left side, passed around 
the body and tied. This was done so that we could recognize each 
other in the darkness. General Gordon then made the men a speech. 



40 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

He told them that if they succeeded their names would go down to 
posterity upon the roll of honor. That he would see to it that, living 
or dead, the name of every one of their number should be honorably 
mentioned in his native State, and that the survivors should go home 
on a thirty days' furlough, and each receive a silver medal bearing 
his own and Lee's name. It was a stirring and impressive speech as 
we heard it, standing there in the night, with the awful task and eter- 
nity staring us in the face. 

* ' The assault was to be made at a given signal, and at last it came. In 
an instant we were over our works and heading for the fort with all the 
speed we could command. We had hoped to reach it undiscovered, 
but had not gone twenty-five yards before its guns opened upon us. 
I do not, even now, understand it. We were not visible, and made 
no noise. At the flash of their guns darkness disappeared, and at in- 
tervals, as the guns were discharged, it was as light as day. We soon 
got beneath their line of fire at the foot of the hill. I think, up to 
this time, we had not lost a man. We were still going on the run, 
as fast as we could, crossed the branch. and mounted the hill. I am 
very fleet of foot, but when I reached the line Bob was there ahead 
of me. I saw him for an instant by the flash of the cannon tearing 
apart and dragging aside the wire and logs. He was very strong, and 
had broken the wire when I got up. We went through the gap 
together, followed by the others. The next minute we struck the 
middle line of brush, climbing, falling and rolling over into the open 
ground beyond. Then the wind from the cannon and flying balls was 
BO strong we could not keep our hats on, while the frightful roar of 
the guns drowned every other sound. We went the balance of the 
way with hats and guns in hand until we reached the last line of ob- 
structions. 

** The men seized the rails with the strength of desperation, dragged 
them out of the ground and rushed through the gap. The next in- 
stant we came into the fire of the small arms, but continued to ad- 
vance on the run. Not only were we exposed to the musketry fire, 
but had risen to the line of fire from the artillery. I do not know how 
we got through it all, but in a few minutes we were in the moat. 

** We had struck the fort about the middle. The infantry in the 
fort was out upon the works firing straight down upon us. Lieuten- 
ant Gay, of the Fourth Georgia, fell at this time, mortally wounded, 
and would have drowned had we not carried him out of the water 
and placed him upon the bank, where he died. We were in the dark. 



Brigade History. 41 

"while the enemy above us were faintly outlined against the sky. I 
shouted to the men to shoot every man who showed himself. They 
began firing at once, and in a few moments the works were cleared. 
It was but thirteen feet up, and my men were sharpshooters. When 
the enemy found that it was death to show themselves, they thrust 
their guns over and discharged them downward. 

•' It was a critical moment. We could neither retreat nor advance. 
The men began to inquire all along the line what they must do, and 
several suggested that we fall back. But just at this time, with the 
utmost coolness, word was quietly passed from the right of our line 
• that a low place had been found. I heard the intelligence before the 
man next to me repeated it. Returning the command ' By the 
right flank ! ' ' March ! ' we filed along until the place was reached 
and scrambled into the fort. Forming my line we struck the en- 
emy's at right angles, and they in a few minutes surrendered. The 
fort was commanded by General McLaughlin, and over five hundred 
men surrendered with him. Generally, when a man surrenders, he 
is demoralized. The night being very dark the Yankees thought our 
"whole army was attacking. As soon as they laid down their arms I 
ordered them to form into line and double-quick to our works, which 
they did in a hurry. We had killed a good many, as my men were 
-excellent shots. My orders had been executed, and we waited the 
arrival of General Gordon, whom we expected every moment. But 
for some reason he did not come, and after a time, on my own respon- 
sibility, I determined to advance. Forming my men into line we ad- 
vanced several hundred yards. 

''Just before daylight, as we stood awaiting developments, an oflScer 
■coming from the Federal side dashed up. He was magnificently 
mounted and reined up almost against me, with the words, 'Hello ! 
boys, how are things going?' I replied, 'They are going pretty 
•well,' and invited him to dismount. Two of my men leveling their 
guns upon him, he dismounted and gave up his horse, with the in- 
junction to take good care of him. The prisoner was a colonel, but 
I have forgotten his name. I then deployed my men as skirmishers 
just back of the fort along the crest of the hill. Soon after I met 
General Gordon, who received my report, commended my movement 
and ordered me back to my command. There I remained until day- 
break, when a great commotion set in. I could hear the popping of 
whips, the shouts of drivers, the whistling of engines and the rumble 
of wagons and artillery. The Confederate attack on Grant's left 



42 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

wing bad failed. Pickett's Division, the largest in Gordon's Corps^ 
which had been ordered to make an attack, had failed to get up, and 
without it the Confederate forces were too weak to make the intended 
assault. Pickett was fifteen miles off, and was to have come by rail, 
but the railroad service was unreliable at that time, and the division 
did not arrive. About eight o'clock I saw the Federals coming. The 
whole field was blue with them ; their lines must have been ten or 
fifteen deep. With our Whitworth guns we began to pick off a few,, 
but were soon forced back. We retired slowly to Gordon's line, 
which occupied the enemy's works. I did not let my men merge with 
this line, but halted them in front of it, where they stood for a little 
time enjoying the honors they had so hardly won. In the meantime 
the Federal artillery and sharpshooters opened fire upon us, and it be- 
gan to grow warm. I was still mounted on my captured horse, and, 
being the only person on horseback, was a conspicuous mark. When 
Captain F. T. Suead was wounded, I placed him on my horse and 
helped to carry him out as our troops retired. The fire of the 
enemy became terrific, and it seemed that nothing could live in it. 

'*At this moment one of my men asked me if I knew where Bob was. 
For the first time since I saw him tearing away the obstructions I 
remembered that he had gone into the fight with us. The soldier 
said, after a few moments, that he believed Bob had been killed in 
front of the fort. Overwhelmed with fear I hurried back to the 
spot. When I reached it, I saw a form lying about twenty feet from 
the moat. I recognized my overcoat. We had exchanged the night 
before, but not until I had turned him over did I know positively 
that it was my brother. He was dead, shot through the heart. I 
called up one of the men, determined to carry the body back to our 
lines. We started with it across the open space under a heavy fire. 
2^ either my companion nor myself was struck, but the body was shot 
through four times. As I entered our works again, from which we 
had so hopefully emerged early in the morning, I looked back 
toward Fort Steadman. Over it, in the sunlight, floated again the 
stars and stripes. The last aggressive movement of Lee's army had 
ended. Fifteen days later Richmond was evacuated." 

General Gordon, in his "Last Days of the Confederacy," says: 
'*The result of the audacious attempt that had been made upon his 
line and its complete success up to the time that it was ruined by a 
mistake was to awaken Grant's forces into more aggressive measures. 
A sort of respite was had for a day, after the night atttack on Fort 



Brigade History. 43^ 

Steadman, and then the death-struggle began. Grant hurled his 
masses against our starved and broken -down veterans. His main at- 
tack was made upon our left, A. P. Hill's Corps The 

fighting was fearful and continuous. It was a miracle that we held 
our lines for a single day. With barely six thousand men I wa& 
holding six miles of line .... The main fight was on ray line 
and Hill's, as General Longstreet was nearer Richmond .... 
Our line would bend and twist, and swell and break, and close again, 
only to be battered against once more. Our people performed prodi- 
gies of valor. How they endured through those terrible, hopeless, 
bloody days I do not know. They fought desperately and heroically, 
although they were so weakened through hunger and work that they 
could scarcely stand upon their feet and totter from one point of as-^ 
sault to another. But they never complained. They fought sternly, 
grimly, as men who had made up their minds to die. And we held 
our lines. Somehow or other — God only knows how — we managed 
day by day to wrest from the Federals the most of our lines. Then 
the men, dropping in the trenches, would eat their scanty rations, try 
to forget their hunger, and snatch an hour or two of sleep . . . 
My men fought with a valor and a desperate courage that has been 
rarely equaled in my opinion, in military annals." 

We evacuated Petersburg on the night of April 2, and our ad- 
vance reached Amelia Court House on the morning of the 4th, where 
we remained for nearly twenty-four hours in endeavoring to obtain 
subsistence for men and horses from the surrounding country because 
the supplies that had been ordered there failed to reach us. On the 
5th we reached Jetersville and found the enemy's cavalry there^ 
and learned that his infantry was approaching, and that the general 
advance of Grant's army was toward Burkeville. This rendered it im-^ 
possible to obtain supplies there as we expected, as the enemy was in 
possession of the railroad leading to that place, and nothing could be 
obtained from the adjacent country. Owing to this state of affairs 
our line of march had to be changed from the Roanoke to Farmville, 
where our supplies were then ordered from Lynchburg. While 
moving toward Farmville on the 6th, the enemy's cavalry attacked 
our wagon-train, and on the same day Generals Ewell, Kershaw and 
Curtis Lee were captured, with most of their commands. Generals 
Gordon and VV^. H. F. Lee checked the enemy on the road from 
Amelia Springs in the morning and protected the trains, but after 
this W. H. F. Lee was withdrawn to another part of the line, and. 



■^4 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

late that afternoon the enemy attacked him on both of his flanks and 
he was driven in confusion from the field. That night our army 
marched the entire night, and efforts "were made to reorganize our 
shattered divisions, but the men being worn-out and weakened for 
want of rest and food, many of them threw their guns away, while 
•others were with the wagon-trains and embarrassed their progress 
materially. On the 7th as we passed Farmville rations were issued 
to the troops, who reached there before the enemy approached, and 
the supply-trains moved on. Some, however, on this account, were 
not supplied. With considerable difficulty the head of our column 
reached Appomattox Court House on the evening of the 8th, 
~where the troops were halted for rest. Our march was ordered to be 
resumed at one o'clock a.m. on the 9th. Fitz Lee was to advance 
and Gordon was to support him and drive the enemy from his front, 
and wheel to the left in order to cover the passage or the trains. The 
ammunition wagons and two battalions of artillery were directed to 
accompany the army. The balance of the wagons and artillery were 
to move toward Lynchburg. An attack in the early part of the 
night on Walker's Artillery, near Appomattox Station, on the rail- 
road to Lynchburg, was repulsed. There were indications during the 
night that a large force was massing on our left and front. Fitz Lee 
was ordered to ascertain its strength and postpone his advance until 
daylight, if necessary. Fitz Lee, with Gordon on his left, moved at 
five o'clock a.m., in order to open the way. Gordon discovered a 
large force on his right, moving toward Appomattox Court House, 
which drove back the left of the cavalry and threatened to cut him 
off from Longstreet, while the cavalry of the enemy threatened his 
left. General Lee in his official report says: "Gordon withdrew 
across the Appomattox river, and the cavalry advanced on the 
Lynchburg road and became separated from the army. Learning the 
condition of affairs on the lines, where I had gone, under the expecta- 
tion of meeting General Grant, to learn definitely the terms he pro- 
posed in a communication received from him on the 8th, in the event of 
the surrender of the army, I requested a suspension of hostilities un- 
til these terms could be arranged. In the interview which occurred 
with General Grant, in compliance with my request, terms having 
been agreed on, I surrendered that portion of the Army of Northern 
Virginia which was on the field, with its arms, artillery and wagon- 
irains, the officers and men to be paroled, retaining their side-arms 



Brigade History. 45; 

and private effects. I deemed this course the best under all the cir- 
cumstances by which we were surrounded. 

"On the morning of the 9th. according to the reports of the ord-- 
nance officers, there were 7,892 organized infantry with arms, with an 
average of seventy-five rounds of ammunition per man. The artil- 
lery, though reduced to sixty-three pieces, with ninety-three rouuds- 
of ammunition, was sufficient. These comprised all the supplies of" 
ordnance that could be relied on in the State of Virginia. I have no 
accurate report of the cavalry, but believe it did not exceed twenty- 
one hundred effective men. The enemy was more than five times our 
numbers. If we could have forced our way one day longer it would, 
have been at a great sacrifice of life, and at its end I did not see how 
a surrender could have been avoided. We had no subsistence for man- 
or horse, and it could not be gathered in the country. The supplies^ 
ordered to Pamplin's Station from Lynchburg could not reach us, and 
the men, deprived of food and sleep for many days, were worn-out and. 
exhausted." 

This brigade participated in the last engagement of the Army of" 
Northern Virginia, and was fighting and driving the enemy steadily- 
before them at Appomattox Court House, Va., on the 9th day of 
April, 1865, when the Flag of Truce was borne into our lines. 

The Fourth Georgia surrendered 92 non-commissioned officers and 
men ; the Twelfth Georgia, 60 ; the Twenty -first, 50, and the Forty-.. 
fourth Georgia Regiment, 73. The number of brigade, regimental, 
and company officers who surrendered was 28, making a total of 
304 officers and men, of which 50 were non-combatants. Sketches, 
of the brigade officers and some of the regimental and company offi- 
cers appear in this history, but the list is not complete. There may 
be, and doubtless are, other members of this brigade in this and other- 
States who are, or have been, in public life that are entitled to special 
mention, but the author is not aware of this fact. Numerous minor 
officers and hundreds of private soldiers of the brigade, who were just 
as intelligent, brave and gallant, and entitled to as much praise as. 
those mentioned, have not had special attention called to their deeds, 
of valor and patriotic devotion simply because space forbids, and the 
extra expense which it would entail would not justify the author in 
following the impulse of his nature and mentioning each of them sep- 
arately. 

This history has been written to commemorate the deeds of this, 
patriotic band of Southern soldiers, so that coming generations may- 



46 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

know of its splendid services voluntarily given in defense of our South- 
land in her greatest hour of peril. No brigade in the Confederate 
army can boast of a prouder record than that made by the Doles- 
Cook Brigade. It followed the Confederate flag, which was borne by 
strong and loyal hands, through the stormiest and hardest-fought bat- 
tles that the world has ever witnessed, which waved so proudly and 
defiantly amid the carnage of death and destruction that it challenged 
the admiration of all civilized nations and caused them to respect our 
manhood, honor our bravery and applaud our splendid achievements 
and devotion to a cause that was just and against which such fearful 
odds were hurled. This flag floated as the emblem of truth and justice 
for four long and bloody years, and then went down before overwhelm- 
ing numbers at Appomattox. Its life was a stormy but brilliant and 
glorious one, and its memory will ever shed a halo of glory over the 
South. No other nation possesses such a priceless record, none ever 
contended with so many disadvantages and against such fearful odds ; 
none ever displayed more courage or exhibited more loyal devotion 
to any cause than the Confederate soldier, and time will add new 
luster to his bright and glorious fame. 

For more information in regard to the organization and services of 
^he various regiments see their regimental histories. 




GEORGE DOLES 
Brigadier-General. 



■;oRK 
BLIC LIBRARY. 



ASTOR, LENOX AND 
fiLDEN FOUNDATION^. 



Sketches of Brigade Field and Staff Officers. 47 



GENERAL GEORGE DOLES. 

General Doles was born in Milledgeville, Ga., May 14, 1830. 
His father was Josiah Doles, and his mother Martha Pierce, a daugh- 
ter of Rev. Dr. Lovic Pierce and a sister of Bishop George Pierce. 

He was not educated at any military school or college, but was a 
born soldier, and at an early date in life he was skilled in military 
tactics. 

He rose rapidly in his chosen profession, and had he been spared 
higher honors awaited him. 

He was one of the bravest, best beloved and most accomplished 
soldiers Georgia furnished to the Confederate army. 

Although he was a member of the Fourth Georgia Regiment, 
and it claimed him as its own, there were three other gallant 
Georgia regiments in his brigade, viz.: Twelfth, Twenty -first and 
Forty -fourth, who were proud of their illustrious commander, and 
who loved him in life and delight to honor his memory now. 

On the 19th of January, 1863, the Twelfth and Twenty-first Georgia 
Regiments were transferred to Doles' Brigade. After this transfer 
the brigade consisted of the Fourth, Twelfth, Twenty-first and Forty- 
fourth. 

In the beautiful and lovely cemetery at Milledgeville, Ga., the 
body of this illustrious soldier rests, where lie buried many distin- 
guished Georgians and unknown heroes of the Confederate army. 

The bodies of his devoted and faithful wife and his lovely and only 
child Minnie rest beside him. 

By resolution of the surviving members of the Fourth Georgia 
Minnie was adopted as the "Daughter of the Regiment." 

The surviving members of his regiment, as a tribute of their love 
and devotion for their idolized and first commander, erected a beau- 
tiful monument to his memory in July, 1894, which bears the follow- 
ing inscription : 

West Side — "Erected by his old comrades of the Fourth Regiment 
of Georgia Volunteers, in honor of Brigadier-General George Doles; 
killed in battle at Cold Harbor, Va., June the 2, 1864. 

"Covered with earth's fadeless laurels, he lies sleeping upon this 
sacred spot, where love is keeping his honored dust." 

East >Sirfe— "Captain of the Baldwin Blues, 1860; Colonel Fourth 



48 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

Regiment of Georgia Volunteers, 1861 ; Brigadier-General of Georgia 
Volunteers, 1862. 

South Side — "Minnie, daughter of General George Doles, and his 
wife Sarah. 

Xorth Side — "Sarah, wife of General George Doles." 

After General Doles was killed "The Richmond Whig" of June 6,. 
1864, published the following sketch of him : 

"The announcement of the death of Brigadier-General George Doles,, 
of Georgia, will be received with universal regret, and will produce- 
among the people of his native State a profound sensation of grief. 

"To a vast circle of friends and acquaintances the tidings will 
have a painful and crushing effect. Here among those who knew him 
best and loved him most will the grief be deeper and more enduring. 
The old and the young, the brave and timid, the rough and gentle,, 
have been swept away by the storm of battle ; thousands of the purest 
hearts and bravest spirits of the South have passed from life to death 
in defense of home and country , but among the heroic dead sleeps- 
not a nobler or purer spirit than, his of whom we write. 

"Pierced through the left breast by a minie ball, he fell on the 
battle-field near Cold Harbor, June 2, 1864, in the full vigor of mind 
and body. General Doles was, we believe, a native of Baldwin 
county, State of Georgia, and at the time of his death about thirty-four 
years of age. By nature he was gentle, kind, forgiving, charitable 
and brave — a devoted husband and father and a steadfast friend. 
Although not a graduate of any military institution. General Doles 
was familiar with every arm of the service, and so extensive and' 
varied was this information that the principles and details of every 
branch of the profession were clearly and practically understood by 
him. 

"At the commencement of hostilities he was in command as captain 
of the Baldwin Blues, one of the oldest and best-drilled volunteer 
companies in the State of Georgia. 

"This splendid company he had the honor to carry into the service.. 
In May, 1861, at Gosport Navy Yard, Virginia, when the Fourth 
Georgia Regiment was organized, he was elected colonel and entered 
at once upon the discharge of his duties. By his genial disposition,, 
polite manners, strict discipline and prompt obedience to orders, he 
won the admiration of inferiors as well as superiors, of citizens as well 
as soldiers. The excellent character of the regiment, sustained, as it 
was, by intelligent and polished Southern youths, under his adminis- 



Sketches of Brigade Field and Staff Officers. 49 

tration acquired a permanence and splendor that will not be forgotten 
by the people of Nansemond county. 

"Under his direction the regiment attained that proficiency in drill 
and maneuvers for which it was so much admired. On the 9th day 
of May, 1862, Colonel Doles, with his regiment, left Camp Jackson 
for the city of Richmond, to take an active part in the bloody scenes 
soon to follow on the banks of the Chickahominy river. On the 21st 
of May, 1862, Doles' Regiment (being the right of Blanchard's Bri- 
gade) moved to take a position on the battle-field of Seven Pines. 
The enemy were at that time sullenly retiring. The appearance of 
the Fourth Georgia attracted universal attention. Those Georgians 
who saw the regiment file down the Williamsburg road that morning 
felt a glow of pride and a swell of exultation. Every step was 
cadenced, every limb elastic. With compact and closed ranks, with the 
precision and regularity of unity, the regiment moved on the field 
of battle. 

* 'On the 25th of June, 1862, at eight o'clock a. m., and while on 
picket, the enemy, under General Kearney, advanced suddenly 
against our line. Doles quickly assembled three companies as skir- 
mishers and disputed the hostile advance. This was his first engage- 
ment, and well did he sustain his previous character and realize the 
fondest expectations of his friends. From eight o'clock a.m. until 
twelve o'clock m., with three small companies, he kept the entire 
Twentieth Indiana Regiment at bay. The want of ammunition and 
support caused his little band to fall back to the lines, when, after 
being supported, the regiment was formed, and with Doles at its head 
a charge was made, resulting in a complete rout of the enemy and a 
terrible loss of men. 

"A writer speaking of the regiment during this day's fight, said: 
*The Fourth Georj/ia fought like devils.' 

"At Malvern Hill, led on by Doles, the regiment again made a 
splendid charge, but from the loss of men and want of support the 
assault failed. In the charge Colonel Doles was so disabled by a 
shell that he had to retire to the rear after the fight. 

''On the 1st day of November, 1862, he was promoted to brigadier- 
general, since which time he has been identified with, and has borne 
a conspicuous part in all the battles of Lee's army. He rendered 
signal and splendid service at Sharpsburg, Gettysburg and Chancel- 
lorsville, always attracting plaudits by his soldierly bearing on the 
field and challenging the admiration of all. 

4dc 



50 Doles- Cook Brigade. 

''He fell while the elements of [death were raging around him. 
With a determination to recover a temporary advantage obtained by 
the enemy, he rushed to the front like a lion rendered desperate by 
the blood and carnage surrounding, threw his slender brigade against 
the foe, and fell as his dev^oted companions drove the yelling enemy 
back. Thus, while illustrating his native State and while displaying 
the highest and noblest attributes of the human soul, he fell in the 
moment of victory. Such a death, at such a monent, is all that a 
true soldier can desire." 



THE NEW YORK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



A8TOR, LENOX AND 
TILOtN FOUNDATIONS. 



Sketches of Brigade Field and Staff Officers. 51 



GENERAL PHILIP COOK. 

General Cook was born in Twiggs county, Georgia, July 30, 1817. 
At the age of sixteen he moved to Forsyth, Monroe county, Georgia, 
and attended school. When nineteen years of age he joined the 
Monroe Musketeers as a private and enlisted in the Seminole War. 
This company was one of the five companies that served in that cam- 
paign from the State of Georgia, and was commanded by Captain 
W. A. Black, and after serving three months was mustered out of ser- 
vice. He then entered Oglethorpe University, where he remained 
three years; he then went to the University of Virginia, and in 1841 
returned to Forsyth and became the law partner of Zachariah Harmon, 
solicitor-general of the Flint Circuit. After three years' residence 
there he moved to Sumter county because of failing health, and en- 
gaged in farming. He moved to Oglethorpe, Macon county, in 1850, 
and formed a partnership with Colonel T. W. Montford, and prac- 
ticed law for several years. The firm was then dissolved, but he re- 
mained there until he enlisted in the Macon County Volunteers and 
was elected second sergeant. This company afterwards was known as 
Company I, and upon the organization of the Fourth Georgia Regiment 
he was appointed adjutant of the regiment. In July, 1862, by peti- 
tion of the ofiicers of his regiment, he was made lieutenant-colonel, 
and when Colonel Doles was appointed brigadier-general he became 
colonel of his regiment. After the death of General George Doles he 
was promoted brigadier-general and assigned to the command of Doles' 
Brigade. At the battle of Malvern Hill he was wounded, and again 
at Chancellorsville. 

While at home on wounded furlough in 1863 he was elected to the 
Senate of Georgia ; after serving forty days he returned to his com- 
mand. He returned to Georgia in 1864 and completed his term as 
senator, and then rejoined his command. At Fort Steadman, Va., 
March 25, 1865, he was again wounded, and became a prisoner of 
war and was not released until July 30, 1865. After his release he 
returned to Oglethorpe, and as soon as he was able to perform any 
kind of duty resumed the practice of law. He moved to Americus 
in 1870 and became the law partner of Honorable Charles F. Crisp 
until 1880, when the firm was dissolved. He then engaged in farming 
in Lee county. 



52 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

Governor McDaniel appointed him one of the capitol commissioners 
and he served until its completion. He was elected to the Thirty-sev- 
enth Congress, but not seated. In 1872 he was elected from the Third 
Congressional District a member of the Forty-second Congress, 
where he served continuously until 1882, when he was succeeded by 
Honorable Charles F. Crisp. 

Governor Gordon appointed him Secretary of State February, 1890, 
to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Honorable N. C. Barnett. 
He was elected Secretary of State for the full term of two years at 
the general election in 1890, and again elected to the same ofiSce in 
1892, but before the expiration of his term died in Atlanta, Ga., 
on May 23, 1894. 

At a meeting of the Survivors' Association of the Fourth Georgia 
Kegiment held in Milledgeville, Ga., July 25, 1894, the following 
resolutions by Captain Charles Tim Furlow were adopted by a rising 
vote, viz.: 

''Since our last meeting death has invaded our ranks, and with 
ruthless hand has removed from our midst our beloved comrade and 
friend, General Philip Cook. . . . Recognizing, as we do, his 
usefulness as a citizen, his gallantry as a soldier and his fidelity as a 
friend, be it 

^^ Resolved, That in the death of General Cook, the first president 
and always active supporter of this Association, we have suffered an 
irreparable loss. 

^^ Resolved Jurtlier, That while we realize that his place in our ranks 
can never be filled, we will ever keep his memory green in our hearts, 
a sacred memento of the past. 

Resolved further, That a blank page on our minutes be inscribed 
with his name, date of birth and death, and that a copy of these 
resolutions be forwarded to his family." 

General Cook was a brave and determined man, but as gentle, 
kind-hearted and sympathetic as a woman. jNo one ever applied to 
him for assistance who was in distress that he did not treat kindly and 
considerately, and substantially aid. 

Only a short time before his death he received a letter from an un- 
known man in North Georgia telling him of his poverty, and of his 
afilicted and bed-ridden wife, and requesting him to send him a pan for 
the purpose of panning gold, which he believed could be found in the 
branches running through the land upon which he lived, in order that 




PHILIP COOK 

Bri'iadier-General. 



THE New TOR PC I 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 



L6N0X AND 
TILDEN FOOnDATIONS. 



Sketches of Brigade Field and Staff Officers. 53 

he might be able to make a living for himself and family instead of 
asking charity of his neighbors. After reading it he handed it to 
the writer of this article, who, after reading its contents, asked what he 
proposed to do in regard to the matter. 'SSend it to him, as a matter 
of course," he replied, "for I sympathize Avith him in his poverty and 
affliction, and am always willing to help any one in distress, and espe- 
-cially those who are willing and anxious to work." The next day he 
sent to every hardware store in the city but could not procure one ; 
he seemed disappointed, but was fully determined to get one and send 
to him, but shortly after this his untimely death prevented him from 
carrying out his desires. 

His death was a severe shock to his many friends throughout the 
entire State, and his surviving comrades felt as though they had lost 
a true friend and brother. 



54 Doles-Cook Brigade. 



CAPTAIN FLETCHER TILLMAN SNEAD. 

Fletcher T. Snead was born in Milledgeville, Ga., July 28, 1829, 
and was a descendant of the Sneads and "Washingtons, two of the 
oldest and noblest families in Georgia. His father, Rev. Tillman 
Snead, of Baldwin county, was a Methodist minister of the old type, 
who possessed great strength of character and of mind. These traits 
were inherited by his son. 

Fletcher Snead was pre-eminently a Georgian. Early in life he 
lived in Milledgeville, next in Columbus, and when twenty years of 
age he moved to Oglethorpe, Macon county, where he resided until 
his death, except four years spent in the Confederate army. 

On July 28, 1852, he married Miss Czarina Eunice Young, but 
her early death, which occurred January 20, 1854, cast for many years 
a gloom over his life. He first engaged in business as a druggist, 
but in the meanwhile studied law, and in 1857 was admitted to the 
bar. He practiced law successfully till 1861, when, in answer to the 
first call for volunteers, he enlisted in the Confederate army. He 
entered as fourth sergeant of the Macon County Volunteers, after- 
wards known as Company I, Fourth Georgia Regiment. This com- 
pany and nineteen others were mustered into service at Augusta, Ga., 
April 29, 1861. 

Captain Snead was promoted to first sergeant, October 2, 1861; first 
lieutenant and adjutant of the Fourth Georgia Regiment in Sep- 
tember, 1862. In November, 1862, he was promoted captain and 
assistant adjutant-general of Doles' Brigade. After the death of 
General Doles Captain Snead held the same position under General 
Cook until the surrender. Captain Snead served through the entire 
war and never missed a fight in which his command was engaged, and 
he surrendered with his command at Appomattox Court House, Va. 

In disposition he was kind, gentle and retiring, but as a soldier he 
was brave, fearless and daring, and was ever ready and willing to 
perform any duty assigned to him. Every man in his brigade loved 
and honored him. His intrepidity and gallantry on the battle-field 
commanded the admiration of both men and officers. 

In 1864, on one occasion, when the extreme illness of a member of 
his family rendered his presence at home imperative, he asked for a 



Sketches of Brigade Field and Staff Officers. 55 

short leave of absence, and his application was indorsed by General 
Ramseur, as follows : 

"Headquarters, Rodes' Division, October 16, 1864. 

"Captain Snead has participated with distinguished gallantry in 

every battle and skirmish in which his command has been engaged 

since the beginning of the war. If not inconsistent with the public 

service, I hope his application may be granted. 

S. D. Ramseur." 

The leave of absence was granted, and was the only one asked for 
by him during the war. 

In January, 1865, after many hard-fought battles, the consolidation 
of the Fourth and Twelfth Georgia Regiments, now battle-scarred, de- 
pleted in numbers, reduced and broken, was seriously considered, and 
General Cook wrote the following letter : 

"Headquarters Cook's Georgia Brigade, January 20, 1863. 
"Lieutenant-Colonel W. H. Taylor, A. A. General: 

"In suggesting the most proper consolidation of the regiments of 
this brigade and the officers of the same, I have recommended Cap- 
tain Fletcher T. Snead, A. A. General of the brigade, for promotion 
to the colonelcy of the Fourth and Twelfth Regiments. There is now 
no colonel in either regiment, and no field officer of the Fourth Geor- 
gia except Lieutenant-Colonel Nash. The Twelfth Georgia has no 
field officer except Lieutenant-Colonel Hardeman, now prisoner of 
war. Captain Snead has been in the service since April, 1861. He 
has been in every engagement with his regiment (Fourth Georgia) 
and his brigade during the war, and he has always conducted himself 
with the greatest coolness, courage and gallantry. He was men- 
tioned in every report by General Doles for gallant conduct. On sev- 
eral occasions he commanded the admiration and praise of Generals 
Rodes and Ramseur. He is the superior of any other officer in the 
two regiments in general intelligence, in military reading, and he is 
perfectly familiar with all that pertains to the organization and disci- 
pline of the regiment. He will make a superior officer in the field, 
and in camp he has that force of character, decision and promptness 
which would guarantee the highest degree of discipline. 
I am. Colonel, very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 
Phil Cook, 
Brigadier- General . " 



56 Doles Cook Brigade. 

After the surrender he returued to Oglethorpe, Ga., and resumed 
the practice of law. In 1865 he was one of the secretaries of the 
Constitutional Convention, and for several sessions of the General 
Assembly after the surrender, he was assistant secretary of the Sen- 
ate. 

Captain Snead was a leader in politics and he held at different 
times a number of important offices in his own county. At the time 
of his death he was mayor of Oglethorpe, county solicitor and presi- 
dent of both the Macon County Veterans' Association and the Survi- 
vors' Association, Fourth Georgia Regiment. 

On December 29, 1874, Captain Snead was married to Miss Mary 
L. Wardlaw, daughter of Rev. John B. Wardlaw of the South 
Georgia (Methodist) Conference. From this union three sons were 
born, Fletcher Wardlaw Snead, John B. Wardlaw Snead and Albert 
Charles Snead. 

Several times when a boy Albert attended the reunion of the sur- 
vivors of the Fourth Georgia Regiment, and each time recited for 
the veterans patriotic ])oems commemorating their brave deeds and 
recalling memories of the * 'Grand Old Fourth Georgia." These 
poems were written for the occasions by Mrs. W. H. Willis, the 
"Mother of the Regiment." At the reunion held in Talbotton in 
1893 this talented son of their brave captain was elected "Son of the 
Regiment," an honor greatly esteemed by him and by his family. 

Captain Snead joined the Methodist Church early in life and re- 
mained a faithful and consistent member until his death. For many 
years he was superintendent of the Sabbath-school of his town. In 
the support of his church he was liberal and ready to champion any 
cause which looked to the upbuilding of his section and Siate, and 
aided all worthy objects of charity to the extent of his ability. 

Captain Snead's death was sudden. Stricken with apoplexy 
while at his business office, he was brought home in a state of uncon- 
sciousness which continued for four days, and then he quietly passed 
to his eternal rest. He died Friday, May 8, 1891, and is buried 
in Oglethorpe, Ga., where he lived so long, and where his good deeds 
and kindness of heart, his readiness ever to serve and to help others 
fondly endeared him to every heart. 

Did space allow a full history of his life as a man, dwelling upon 
the beauties of his character in his social, civil and church relations, 
there would be much to say. Gifted in mind, possessed of a wonder- 
ful memory, cultured in heart and life, courtly in manner, he was 



Sketches of Brigade Field and Staff Officers. 57 

nature's nobleman. As a husband he was tender, devoted, thought- 
ful; as a father, loving, kind, considerate; as a friend, faithful and 
true. To his children he left a rich inheritance in his good name and 
in the example of a noble life. 



Charles Tim Furlow enlisted as a private soldier in Company 
K, Sumter Light Guards, Fourth Georgia Regiment, May 27, 1861, 
at Camp Doles, Virginia. During the year 1861 he was detailed as 
regimental marker, and as orderly to General Doles. Promoted 
iirst lieutenant and A. D. C. on General Doles' staff, 1863. Slightly 
"wounded at Gettysburg, Pa. Promoted captain and A. A. G., in 
Adjutant-General's Department, 1864. 

After being slightly wounded in the head at Spottsylvania he sat 
down at the root of a tree, fully convinced that his skull had been torn 
off by a bursting shell. The blood was trickling down his face, and he 
was regretting his misfortune and thinking of the near approach of 
death, when one of his company, in passing, asked him if he was badly 
wounded ; he replied that his wound was mortal. His friend ex- 
amined and reported the wound a very slight one; after this assurance 
he realized his mistake and again entered the fight. 

He served through the entire war, and was in every engagement in 
^hich his regiment participated except in the latter part of the war, 
when he was stricken down with typhoid fever in North Carolina, 
being confined to his bed in Salisbury when Lee's army surrendered. 

He was a gallant and fearless soldier, and both Generals Doles and 
•Cook complimented him in several of their official reports for gal- 
lantry on the field of battle. 

He was born near Holton, Bibb county, Ga., April 15, 1842. 
Soon after his birth his father moved to Americus, Ga., and he 
attended the schools there until he entered Emory College. Before 
graduation he joined the Confederate army. 

In 1884 Hon. Wm. A. Wright appointed him chief clerk in the 
office of Comptroller-General. After serving in this position for twelve 
years he resigned and was appointed by Hon. Wm. J. Speer, 
Assistant Treasurer of Georgia. Hon. R. E. Park reappointed him 
to the same office, which he now holds. 

After the surrender he married Miss Carrie Meriwether, of Colum- 
vbia county, Ga. They have five sons and one daughter living. 



58 Doles Cook Brigade. 

The surviving members of the Doles-Cook Brigade are proud that 
they served in the Confederate army with such a manly little man 
as Captain Furlow. 

Major H. K. Daniel was a private soldier in the Sumter 
Light Guards, Company K, Fourth Georgia Regiment, when he 
was mustered into service. He was promoted regimental quarter- 
master, and in November, 1862, brigade quartermaster, where he re- 
mained throughout the war. He was a cultured gentleman, and made 
an efficient and satisfactory official. He died after the surrender. 

Captain Eugene A. HaW'Kins went out with the famous Baldwin 
Blues as a private in April, 1861. In 1862 was promoted second and 
then first lieutenant of his company. Appointed A. D. C. on staflT 
of General Doles December, 1862. Promoted captain and brigade^ 
inspector in November, 1863. Was killed at the battle of the Wil- 
derness May 5, 1864. There was no better nor more popular officer ia 
the brigade. He was a brave, dashing and daring soldier ; a true 
gentleman and a warm friend. In every battle he was complimented 
by General Doles for faithful service rendered, and gallantry in action. 
His untimely death was deeply regretted by his comrades, and hm 
loss to the service was great. 

Lieutenant Richard V. Jones was mustered into service as 
second corporal in the Baldwin Blues, Company H, Fourth Geor- 
gia Regiment. His promotions were rapid until he attained the rank 
of first lieutenant in 1862. He was then detailed as inspector 
general of Doles' Brigade in 1864. He surrendered at Appomattox 
Court House, Va., and a few years thereafter died of that dread disease 
consumption at his home in Milledgeville, Ga. He was a good and 
brave soldier and a man of fine character, who made friends wherever 
he went. 

Lieutenant Charles H. Law entered the service as a private in 
the LaGrange Light Guards, Company B ; was promoted ser- 
geant-major of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. Promoted first lieuten- 
ant and A. D. C. on staff of General Philip Cook. Surrendered at 
Appomattox Court House, Va. He was a true, brave and faithful sol- 
dier, and his commanding general complimented him for his gallantry 
in action more than once. His death, which occurred in Savannah, Ga., 
in 1879, was deeply regretted by his comrades and many admiring 
friends. 

Lieutenant William Darius Ivey was mustered into the Con- 



Sketches of Brigade Field and Staff Officers. 59 

federate service at Richmond, Va., on the 26th of June, 1861, as 
second lieutenant of the Calhoun Rifles, Company D, Twelfth 
Greorgia Regiment. Assigned to duty on staff of General Edward 
Johnson, at Alleghaney Mountain, Ya. , and served in that capacity 
until the battle of McDowell, Va., May 8, 2862. On this date he was 
promoted first lieutenant of his company. General Johnson having 
received a wound in this battle, ordered Lieutenant Ivey to report to 
General "Stonewall" Jackson; he was then assigned to the Ordnance 
Department of his division, and was subsequently made ordnance 
officer of Doles' Brigade. Afterwards he returned and took command 
of his company. On the 10th of May, 1864, he was captured at 
Spottsylvania,Va., and was one of the six hundred Confederate officers 
who were exposed to the fire of our batteries on Morris Island, S. C, 
and was then transferred to Fort Pulaski, Ga. Released from prison in 
Philadelphia, Pa., June, 1865. He attended the Georgia Military 
Institute for two years and was a fine drilled officer. As a Confeder- 
ate soldier he w^as brave and gallant, ever ready to answer to the call 
of duty. He is now a very zealous Ex-Confederate, and takes much 
pleasure in attending our reunions and is greatly interested in every 
thing that has a tendency to perpetuate the fame of the Confederate 
soldier and the memory of the Lost Cause. He is a resident of Ar- 
lington, Ga. 

Lieutenant Thomas B. Cabaniss went into service as a private 
in the Quitman Guards, First Georgia Regiment. The captain of the 
Dahlonega Guards resigned on account of feeble health, and at the 
instance of its members private Thomas B. Cabapiss was appointed 
captain of the company. 

The First Georgia, Colonel Ramsey commanding, enlisted for 
twelve months, and at the expiration of its term disbanded. Four com- 
panies reinlisted and formed the Twelfth Battalion of Artillery, the 
remaining companies joining other commands. In the latter part of 
1863 Cabaniss was appointed ordnance officer of Doles' Brigade,, 
with the rank of first lieutenant, and served in that position until 
he surrendered with the brigade at Appomattox Court House, Va. 

He was an efficient officer and commanded the respect of both offi- 
cers and men. Since the war he represented his district in the Con- 
gress of the United States for one term, and afterwards President 
Cleveland appointed him a member of the Daws Indian Commission, 
which position he held for five years and then resigned. He is now a 
prominent lawyer of Forsyth, Ga. 



■60 Doles-Cook Brigade. 



ROSTER OF FIELD AND STAFF OF THE DOLES- 
COOK BRIGADE, SECOND ARMY CORPS, ARMY 
NORTHERN VIRGINIA, C. S. A. 

George Doles, Brigadier-General. 

Philip Cook, Brigadier-General. 

Fletcher T. Snead, Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General. 

Eugene A. Hawkins, First Lieutenant and A, D. C. 

Richard V. Jones, First Lieutenant and Acting Inspector-General. 

Eugene A. Plawkins, Captain and Brigade Inspector. 

Charles Tim Furlow, First Lieutenant and A. D, C. 

Charles H. Law, Sergeant-Major and Acting A. D. C. 

Julian Mitchell, Major and Brigade Commissary, living in Charles- 
ton, S. C. 

Samuel McComb, Captain and Acting Brigade Commissary. 

H. K. Daniel, Major and Brigade Quartermaster. 

Howard Tinsley, Captain and Acting Brigade Quartermaster. 

William H. Philpot, Major and Brigade Surgeon. 

James A. Etheridge, Major and Brigade Surgeon. 

William D. Ivey, First Lieutenant and Acting Brigade Ordnance 
Officer. 

Thomas B. Cabaniss, First Lieutenant and Ordnance Officer. 

James Q. ("Put") Adams, Brigade Commissary Sergeant. 

Palmer L. Miller, Brigade Quartermaster-Sergeant. 

R. S. Cheeves, 

Eugene P. Black, 

Zaccheus B. Johnson, 

Robert H. Carson, h ^^"^^^^^ 

Joseph Cloud, 

James M. Jones, 

James M. Patterson, 





. k 




FLETCHER T. SXEAD 

Captain and. Assistant Adjutant-General 
Doles Brigade. 



EUGENE A. HAWKINS 
Captain and Brigade Inspector, 





CHARLES TIM FURLOW 
Captain and Aide-de-Camp. 



WILLIAM D. IVEY 

First Lieutenant and Acting Brigade Ordnance 
Ofiicer. 





J. BROWX MORGAN 

Captain and Commissary Fourth Gporsia 
Regiment ; afterwards Major and Com- 
missary Colquitt's Brigade. 



HOWARD TIXSLEY 
Captain and Quartermaster Fourth Geor- 
gia Regiment. 





SAMUEL M COMB 

Captain and Commissary Fourth Geor- 

gia Regiment. 



ROBERT F. EYAXS 
Captain and Chaplain Fourth Georgia Reg- 
iment. 



Poem Relating to the Brigade. 61 

THE OLD BRIGADE ON ''BRUMBY" DAY. 

The brilliant pageant on Brumby Day is now vividly recalled by the 
passing of the distinguished young Georgian in whose honor countless 
thousands thronged our streets only a few short weeks ago. ISTo feature 
of the parade was more impressive than the appearance of the war-worn 
Confederate veterans with their tattered but illustrious banners. 

The following touching lines were inspired by that scene and are from 
the pen of Mrs. Leonora Beck Ellis, the daughter of Colonel Beck, of 
the Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment of the gallant Doles-Cook Brigade. 
The poem was sent to the Order of Robert E. Lee, of which Mrs. Ellis is 
an enthusiastic member, to be read at their next meeting, but is here- 
with given to the public as being peculiarly appropriate at this time : 

When the men of the old brigade marched by, 

With a wavering pace, but a look clear and high. 

Here an empty sleeve, there a halting crutch, 

Gray locks above shoulders that stooped overmuch, 

Oh, heartstrings were vibrant, keen-thrilled 'neath the touch 
Of the old brigade ! 

The bug'es were sweet, and the trumpet's fine blare 

With the deep call of drums smote the palpitant air ; 
Gay guardsmen and troopers aglitter with gold 

Under broidered silk banners rode martial and bold. 
But a bullet-rent flag, wrecked by moth and by mold, 

Led the old brigade ! 
High-hearted, the hero of our new day 

Read a people's proud love as the shouts cleft their way. 
The triumph's rich pageant stirred all the vast throng ; 

Smooth and gallant the supple young ranks swept along, 
But worn in the combat with years and with wrong 

Tramped the old brigade. 
Ah, courage and honor are ever the same. 

And, winning or losing, they forfeit not same. 
Long ago from the throes of the deadliest fight 

That ever envenomed a brave land with blight, 
Home again, to a contest still harder to right, 
Came that broken brigade. 

They strove — how they strove ! and they won at the last ; 

The struggle is ended, the long bitterness past. 
Through paeans, over drum-beat and bugle to-day, 

The thinned ranks listen eager for God's great reveille ; 

Soon they'll answer the call ; and no heart but will pray 
That their countrymen's love and sweet heaven for aye,. 
Hold the old brigade ! 



62 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

HOW OUR GENERALS FOUGHT. 

One of the most vivid recollections of our struggle, one which 
stands out upon the canvas of the past clear and distinct, is a scene I 
wituested near Spottsylvania Court House, Ya. , May 10, 1864. Late 
in the afternoon of that day the Federals massed their charging col- 
umns for an assault against a part of the line held by Swell's Second 
Corps. The brunt of this attack fell upon Doles' Brigade. They 
fought as they always fought, with cool determination to drive back 
the mass of Federals coming against them. The enemy advanced 
rapidly, and with overwhelming odds carried part of the line and cap- 
tured a portion of the Eorty-fourth Regiment and some from the 
other regiments of the brigade. This was a very severe blow to our 
brave comrades of this glorious brigade, who had so often whipped 
as great and even greater odds on other fields. But they never left 
that field. Those who had been captured were hurried back by their 
captors, but the remainder still fought as they yielded up part of the 
position and joined the reinforcements which were brought to their 
assistance in retaking the day. The brigades of Generals Johnson, 
of North Carolina, and John B. Gordon, of Georgia, were close at 
hand and were ordered in to the relief of Doles' men. These soon 
drove back the exultant Federal column and rendered their success 
of very short duration. Many of this column of attacking Federals 
became the victims of the steady aim of Doles' veteran riflemen and 
the ground was thickly strewn with their dead. Their bodies were 
subsequently buried by their comrades under flag of truce. 

When the Federals were sent rushing back to their own lines the 
brigades of Gordon, Johnson and Doles quickly reoccupied the bro- 
ken Confederate position and sent defiant volleys into the fleeing 
Federals. 

In this charge to retake our line I chanced to land at the point 
where the left of Doles' Brigade had rested, and near where two 
Napoleon guns were in position. These guns had been captured and 
the gunners, or the most of them, carried away as prisoners. Our ad- 
vancing line prevented the carrying away of the artillery. As soon 
as we reestablished this line volunteers from some reserve artillery 
behind our line came forward to work the guns, and their thunderous 
fire added to the horrid din of the night's battle. At one of these 
guns I noticed a handsome officer hard at work helping to run the 
gun "into battery" as soon as loaded. "Now, let them have it, boys," 



o 

QO 




How Our Generals Fought. 63 

be would say, as everything was ready, and the lanyard would be 
quickly pulled and the screeching shell went in its wild search for 
the blue-coated chaps who were seeking shelter under the hill in our 
front. 

" Load her up again, boys," he commanded, and again his shoulder 
was pressed against the pondererous wheel, while some other soldier 
pushed the other one forward for another fire. 

And thus for many rounds this officer, for the time being, played 
the part of a private of artillery. 

As soon as the fire slackened and the lull, which always follows the 
storm of battle, came, this officer, who was none other than the gallant 
George Doles, resumed the command of his brigade. 

There were many thrilling scenes witnessed in and near this his- 
toric spot, but none impressed me more than the one just told. It 
proves the statement often made that the Confederate generals were 
always at the front and recklessly exposed themselves in battle. 

In contrast to this I quote from a little book, written by an ex- 
Federal soldier, in which the following words are found : 

*' The aggregate losses (in Grant's army), after the fighting at 
Korth Anna, were 46,989 enlisted men and officers. And the enlisted 
men never heard of but one general officer being killed. He was 
Brigadier-General Burnham. They heard of three or four other gen- 
erals being wounded and of two being captured. During this same 
time, that is, between May 31 and October 28, 1864, we learned from 
the Confederate prisoners that the Confederate generals Doles, Cham- 
bliss, Gherardio, Dunnavan and Gregg, had been killed, and many 
of their generals wounded. ....... 

Our losses of general officers, if they had fearlessly ijerformed their 
duty, should have been at least four times as heavy as those of 
the Confederates. Instead of one Union general being killed to 
our 46,000 enlisted men stricken in battle, there should have been 
at least twenty of them killed and eighty others wounded, and there 
probably would have been if they had done their duty as recklessly as 
the Confederate generals did theirs." 

These are historical facts. They tell the story of the South's heroic 
struggle. Her soldiers .and their leaders knew how to fight for 
their homes, and how to face danger. The record they made will 
live as long as men honor patriotism and self-sacrificing devotion to 
their country's cause. W. H. Harrison. 



History of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. 



CHAPTER II. 

In April, 1861, Joseph E. Brown, Governor of Georgia, ordered 
twenty companies of infantry to rendezvous at Augusta, Ga., for 
service in the army of the Confederate States. Ten of these compa- 
nies were mustered in as the Third Regiment, Georgia Volunteers, 
and the other ten as the Fourth Eegiment, Georgia Volunteers, 
commonly known as the ''Fourth Georgia." The companies assigned 
to this regiment were as follows : 

Letter after 
Name. Commander. Where From. Organization. 

Southern Rifles Capt. B. Curley Talbot county. Co. A. 

LaGrange Lt. Guard " R. S. Smith... .Troup " " B. 

Twiggs County Volunteers " .7. M. Folsom. .Twiggs " " C. 

West Point Guard " J. J. Mathews. Troup " " D. 

AlbanyGuard " Y. G. Rust. .. .Dougherty " " E. 

Toombs Volunteers " B. R. Mayes. . .Gordon " " F. 

Glover Guards " G. T. Bartlett. Jasper " " G. 

Baldwin Blues. " George Doles. .Baldwin " " H. 

Macon County Volunteers. " S. M. Prothro. .Macon " " I. 

Sumter Light Guard " W. L. Johnson. Sumter " " K. 

Nearly all of these companies arrived at Augusta April 27 and ex- 
pected to perfect a regimental organization, but, after being mustered 
in as twelve months troops, the exigencies of the service demanded 
that they be sent at once to Portsmouth, Va., in order to secure the 
Navy Yard and other public property at that place before the enemy 
could receive reinforcements. The regiment left Augusta May 3, 
and arrived at Portsmouth May 5. The enemy had evacuated the 
place, after attempting to blow up the dry dock and burn the building, 
and the regiment quietly went into camp in the Navy Yard. The 
Third and Fourth Georgia Regiments and the Second Georgia Battal- 
ion were the first Confederate troops to enter the State of Virginia at 
the commencement of the war. The regiment was armed with smooth 
bore muskets but had received no ammunition; so, to put itself in 
fighting trim, it borrowed one round of fixed ammunition and three 
caps from the Second Georgia Battalion. 

On May 9 the organization was completed by the election and 
appointment of the following ofiicers : 

(64) 




PHILIP COOK 
Colonel Fourth Georgia Regiment. 



iT"B^ 



^ew 



^pUBUC 



LIBRXR"^ 



Lenox 



^no 



^'^^^oo^o^iaS; 



History of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. 65 

George Doles Capt. Baldwin Blues Colonel. 

J. J. Mathews '* West Point Guards Lieut.-Colonel. 

G. L. Whitehead Sergt. Albany Guards Major. 

Philip Cook " Macon County Volunteers. Adjutant. 

H. K. Daniel Private Co. " K " Quartermaster, 

J. B. Morgan Lieut. Go. " B ^' Commissary. 

Thos. M. Nelson Private Go. "E" Surgeon. 

W. H. Philpot " " "A" Asst. Surgeon. 

William Flinn Chaplain. 

A.F.Hill Sergt. Co. "K" Sergeant-Major. 

P. L. Miller Private Co. "B" Q. M. Sergt. 

T. J.Flynt " '* "E" Com. Sergt. 

J. S. Burney '* " "G" Ordnance Sergt. 

Ghas. H.Low - --B"] Ee^imental 

AllieN. Hines " " ''E"^ ^r!?lli^^^ 



Chas. Tim Furlow .... " " " K " J Markers. 

On IMay 20 the regiment left the Navy Yard and moved to a 
camp near Hodges' Bridge on the Western Branch, and on May 30 
moved again to a point on Hampton roads, opposite Newport News 
and Fortress Monroe and between Pigs Point and Cramy Island, eight 
miles from Norfolk, which was named Camp Jackson in honor of the 
hotel-keeper, of Alexandria, Va., who killed Colonel Ellsworth, of 
the New York Zouaves, for pulling down the Confederate flag. We 
remained here for nearly a year and became practically perfect in the 
school of the soldier. Besides the daily company and regimental 
drills, the men were drilled in artillery practice, built bridges, signal 
stations and winter quarters and erected fortifications. We were in 
full view of those exciting naval engagements of the Merrimac with 
the Federal Blockading Squadron, in which she sunk the Frigate 
Cumberland, burned and sunk the Congress and disabled the Monitor. 
Colonel Doles was one of the finest' officers developed by the volun- 
teer service. He was intelligent and firm, knew what to do and how to 
do it, and as the regiment was composed almost entirely of compa- 
nies organized and drilled before the war, it did not require much time 
to bring it to a high state of drill and discipline. 

Very few changes occurred in the personnel of the officers during the 
year. On April 27, 1862, our term of enlistment expired, but the 
conscript act of April 15 retained all twelve-months troops then 
in service. So we did not disband and go home, but were allowed to 
reorganize. Some of the older officers did not offer for reelection ; a 
few were defeated, but the majority were reelected. Captain W. F. 
Jordan, of Company G, was elected major in place of Major White- 
head. Surgeon Nelson had resigned and Assistant Surgeon Philpot 
had taken his place. Colonel Doles was enthusiastically reelected, 

5d-c 



66 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

and he made no changes in the staff. At this time we were in Huger's. 
Division and Blanchard's Brigade. This brigade was composed of 
the Third, Fourth and Twenty-second Georgia regiments and the 
First Louisiana. As these regiments were camped some distance 
apart only one or two efforts at brigade drill were attempted. 

On May 8, 1862, orders were received to prepare to move, as the 
evacuation of Norfolk was deemed advisable. Accordingly at twelve 
o'clock on May 10 the regiment took up its line of march for 
Petersburg. All had an idea that marching would be easy work, as 
we had been drilling constantly for a year, but very few reached 
their destination without blistered feet or without having straggled at 
some time during the march. 

We reached Petersburg on the morning of May 15 and went into 
camp on the ''Heights." While here Company I, Captain Willis- 
doing picket duty near City Point, had quite a spirited engagement 
with the crews of the gunboats of the enemy, killing a number and 
capturing nine, the first prisoners brought to Petersburg. Lieutenant- 
Colonel Mathews resigned while here. Major Jordan was promoted 
to lieutenant-colonel, and Captain E. S. Smith, Company B, became 
major. 

The regiment left here on May 29, and on the morning of the 
30th passed through Kichmond, camping in the eastern suburbs. The 
next day we marched by slow stages to the vicinity of Seven Pines, 
where heavy fighting was in progress. 

June 1 we marched on the battle-ground, expecting to take part 
in the engagement, but the ememy retired before we could be placed. 
We went into camp on the edge of the battle-field and threw up breast- 
works. We remained at this place until June 29, doing heavy 
picket duty. While here General Blanchard was removed and 
Colonel A. R. Wright, of the Third Georgia, was appointed brigadier- 
general and succeeded to the command. Commissary Morgan re- 
signed and Lieutenant Samuel McComb, Company H, was ap- 
pointed to the place. While on picket on the morning of June 
25 the enemy advanced upon us in force, but was held in check for 
several hours. Nearly all of Lee's troops had been sent to our left to 
join Jackson, and only a thin line was left between the enemy and 
Richmond. The Federals suspected something of the kind and or- 
dered Sickles to make a reconnaissance in force with his entire division. 
This was the column engaging us. We fought, skirmished, retreated 
and put up as big a bluff as possible until about four o'clock, when we 



History of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. 67 

charged and drove the enemy back to their works, losing about fifty 
men, killed and wounded, but inflicting a much greater loss upon the 
enemy. The "Richmond Dispatch," in speaking of this fight, known as 
the battle of King's Schoolhouse, said : "The Fourth Georgia acted 
like very devils, and fought and charged three regiments several times 
and routed them." 

Brigadier-General Augustus R. Wright, in his official report of the 
battle of King's Schoolhouse, says: "On our extreme right the 
enemy still maintained their position in the heavy woods about four 
hundred yards in advance of King's Schoolhouse and not more than 
one thousand yards in advance of our line of rifle pits. Colonel 
Doles' Fourth Georgia Regiment, supported by Colonel Hill's North 
Carolina Regiment, was ordered to advance, engage the enemy, and, if 
possible, dislodge them from their advanced position in the" woods and 
drive them back beyond the lines occupied by our pickets in the morn- 
ing. This order was promptly obeyed by Colonel Doles, who with his 
small command, now worn-out and completely exhausted by the fa- 
tigue and want of rest on the night before and the constant fight dur- 
ing the whole day, rushed forward and soon found themselves con- 
fronted by Sickles' Brigade, strongly posted in a thick growth of 
pines. The fire hei^e for twenty minutes was furious and terrific be- 
yond anything I have ever witnessed. But the gallant Fourth pressed 

on amid a deadly fire and soon the foe began to fall back 

In this severe and long-contested battle all our troops behaved well 
without exception. . . . The conduct of Colonel Doles' Fourth 
Georgia Regiment challenges our warmest admiration and thanks for 
the gallant manner in which it rallied in the evening and drove from 
their stronghold the famous Excelsior Brigade." 

"I fully concur in the commendations General Wright makes on the 
conduct of Colonel George Doles, and can bear witness to his con- 
tinued attention to his duties as well as to his gallantry in action. 

"Benj. Huger, Major-General." 

"Falling Creek, July 21, 1862. 
"General: — In forwarding my reports of the diflferent engage- 
ments of the division which I commanded I have to request of you, 
as a reward to the regiments who most distinguished themselves, that 
an order be given authorizing the following regiments to inscribe on 
their banners as follows : 



68 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

First, Third Georgia Volunteers, ' South Mills.' 
Second, First Louisiana Volunteers, ' King's Schoolhouse.' 
Third, Fourth Georgia Volunteers, ' King's Schoolhouse.' 
Fourth, Tweuty-fifth North Carolina, ' King's Schoolhouse.' 
Fifth, Forty-ninth Virginia Volunteers, 'King's Schoolhouse.' 

"Benj. Huger, Major-General." 

On June 29 we left this camp and on July 1 we were engaged in 
the attack upon Malvern Hill. The regiment advanced through an 
open field, swept by a terrible fire irom the Federal batteries, to a 
l^oint where but few went with them, and beyond which none ever 
went, and remained there until withdrawn by order of General 
"Wright. Colonel Doles and Adjutant Cook were both wounded, the 
latter severely. After this battle the enemy withdrew and the Fourth 
Georgia encamped at various points around Kichmond until the mid- 
dle of August. 

The regiment had lost heavily in killed and wounded, and the fa- 
tigue and privations it had undergone rendered this rest acceptable, 
if not absolutely necessary. During this time the regiment was trans- 
ferred to Ripley's Brigade, D. H. Hill's Division. The other regi- 
ments in the brigade were the First and Third North Carolina and 
the Forty-fourth Georgia. While with this brigade we did consider- 
able work upon the permanent fortifications around Richmond. Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel Jordan resigned here, and Adjutant Cook was recom- 
mended for the place by unanimous vote of all the of&cers for ''dis- 
tingui.^hed gallantry at King's Schoolhouse and Malvern Hill." 

On August 19 the regiment was loaded on box cars and sent to 
Orange Court House. D. H. Hill's Division was the last of the reg- 
ular troops to leave Richmond and did not rejoin the army until the 
battles of Second Manassas were practically over. 

From this time on we were regularly incorporated into the Army of 
Northern Virginia, and shared its glories and vicissitudes. We 
marched with the army into Mar^dand and camped a few days at Fred- 
erick City. We then moved through Boonsboro Gap, £i.t South 
Mountain, and were shortly after followed by McClellan and his army. 
On September 14 the regiment was sent to the left of our line to 
guard a pass and remained all day w^ithout molestation. The entire 
regiment came very near being captured that night, however, for, 
when our army was ordered to evacuate the position, General Ripley 
forgot all about us and started with the rest of the brigade for Sharps- 



History of the Fourth Georgia Regbient. 69 

burg. Colonel DeRosset, of Third North Carolina, discovered our ab- 
sence and a courier Avas dispatched to notify us. We left hurriedly, 
but none too soon, for as we passed through the town the enemy was 
entering it. Had our notice been ten minutes later we would have 
been certainly cut off and captured in a body. As it was we reached 
Sharpsburg in safety and were ready to play our part in the engage- 
ment which followed. 

As soon as it was light enough, on the morning of September 17, 
for the enemy to see our line lying exposed upon a hillside, they 
opened upon us with several batteries and did considerable execution. 
We moved to the left and formed line of battle at right angles to our 
former position in an open field, and were murderously assailed by 
the enemy concealed in a piece of woods a short distance in front. 
Our loss was fearful. At this juncture General Ripley was wounded 
and the command of the brigade devolved upon Colonel Doles. He 
immediately ordered a charge and the enemy was easily repulsed. 
Just as this movement was completed Major Smith was killed by a 
grape-shot. Adjutant Cook had recovered from his wound sufiiciently 
to report for duty and had just received his commission as lieutenant- 
colonel. He took command of the regiment and held it through the 
engagement. We moved by the left again, through an open field, 
and took position on a ridge overlooking an immense corn field which 
seemed literally alive with Yankees. The regiment suffered great loss 
here ; had three color-bearers shot in a few moments. Ammunition 
was now exhausted and the regiment was withdrawn and sent to the 
rear to replenish. It was then ordered back and the remainder of the 
day was occupied in supporting batteries. It rested that night within 
two hundred yards of its bivouac of the night before. Thus ended 
what was considered by many as the bloodiest and most hotly con- 
tested battle of the war. Certain it is that McClellan, with a force 
more than doubling ours, did not see fit to renew the battle, and on the 
night of September 18 we withdrew to the south side of the Potomac 
quietly and unmolested. 

General D. H. Hill, in his official report of the battle of Sharps- 
burg, says: "Major Robert S. Smith, Fourth Georgia, fell fight- 
ing most heroically, at Sharpsburg. He had received a military 
education and gave promise of eminence in his profession. And 
Colonel Doles (now commanding Ripley's Brigade) pays a tribute to 
the memory of Major Robert S. Smith, Fourth Georgia, and speaks 
in the most complimentary terms of Colonel Phil Cook, Captains W. 



70 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

H. Willis, F. H. DeGraftenreid, uud Lieutenants E. A. Hawkins, 
R. M. Bisel, W. W. Hulbert, J. T. Gay (wounded), J. G. Stephens, 
C. R. Ezell, F. T. Snead, L. M. Cobb (killed), J. C. Macon 
(severely wounded). 'All commended themselves to my special 
notice by their gallant and meritorious conduct.' Captain John C. 
Key, commanding Forty-fourth Georgia, and Captain Read, Assist- 
ant Adjutant-General, are equally commended. Assistant Surgeon 
William P. Young remained on the field after he was wounded, 
caring for the wounded, and fell into the hands of the enemy. Pri- 
vates Thomas S. Cartright, Joseph L. Richardson and Henry E. 
Welch, Fourth Georgia, are mentioned with distinction. The first 
named fell with the colors of his regiment in his hand. Richardson 
was wounded. Privates R. Dudley Hill and Thomas J. Dingier, two 
lads in the Forty-fourth Georgia, attracted, in an especial manner, 
the attention of their commander by their extraordinary daring." 

After recrossing into Virginia the army moved slowly and the 
troops had frequent opportunities for resting and recuperating. The 
regiment camped several days on the Opequon creek and then moved 
to a camp near Martinsburg, and in a day or two moved again to 
Bunker Hill, where it camped for a week. Captain Winn, Com- 
pany K, was here promoted major in place of Major Smith, killed 
at Sharpsburg. After camping in this neighborhood nearly three 
weeks the regiment was ordered to a point on the Winchester and 
Harper's Ferry railroad, three miles above Charlestown, and proceeded 
to tear up the road. Remained here a few days and then marched 
by easy stages through Berry ville, Millwood and Ashby's Gap to 
Paris. The enemy approaching here in force we fell back to Front 
Royal and remained there two days in line of battle. The enemy 
continuing to advance, the command retired to the north bank of the 
Shenandoah river. A heavy fall of snow caused the enemy to retreat. 
As soon as the snow disappeared the regiment moved to Strasburg 
and assisted in tearing up the Manassas Gap railroad. While at 
Strasburg Colonel Doles received his commission as brigadier-general. 
Colonel Cook was promoted to colonel and Major Winn to lieuten- 
ant-colonel. No one was promoted to major at that time. Adjutant 
F. T. Snead was appointed assistant adjutant-general on General 
Doles' staff, and Lieutenant A. J. Robert, Company E, was made 
adjutant. Surgeon Philpot was promoted, and Assistant Surgeon W. 
P. Young, who had been assigned to the regiment the previous sum- 
mer, was made regimental surgeon, and Howard Tinsley was ap- 



History of the Fourth Georgia Kegiment. 71 

pointed quartermaster ia place of Captain Daniel, promoted. Left 
this camp November 21 and marched down the Shenandoah Valley 
to New iNIarket and crossed the Blue Ridge mountains, and continued 
the march through Madison Court House, Gordonsville, Orange 
Court House, Guinea Station to Port Royal, on the Rappahannock, 
where we remained a week. On the evening of December 12 we 
were ordered to make a forced march to Fredericksburg, as Burnside 
was crossing the river. The division occupied the right of the Con- 
federate line and did but little fighting, though it was under fire all 
the time and the Fourth Georgia lost several men, killed and wounded. 
The division then went into camp on Conway's Farm, where it re. 
mained until January 1, 1863, when it was moved back farther from 
the river. While at this camp the Twelfth and Twenty-first Georgia 
regiments were assigned to our brigade in place of the First and Third 
North Carolina regiments, thus making it a Georgia brigade. While at 
this camp the regiment worked on fortifications when not doing picket 
duty. On February 9 moved camp to Grace Church about three 
miles from Guinea Station, where we went into winter quarters. 
■Captain W. H. Willis, Company I, was here made major. We 
remained here until April 29 when we received orders to move at 
once, as the enemy was crossing the river. Marched to Hamilton's 
crossing and formed line of battle behind breastworks, where we re- 
mained two days. On morning of May 1 the regiment marched 
towards Chancellorsville, reaching there about dark, after having sev- 
eral times formed line of battle to repel anticipated attacks. About 
sunup, May 20, General Jackson commenced his famous flank 
movement, which was destined to be his last. We went through 
fields, woods, by pastures, country roads and other places, where no 
other leader than Jackson would have attempted to go, and no other 
troops than his could have gone. After a very fatiguing march we 
reached the stone pike running between Fredericksburg and Orange 
Court House. Brigadier-General Rodes commanded our division in 
place of D. H. Hill, and under General Jackson's directions placed 
the troops. Doles' Brigade was on the right of the pike, and as the 
Fourth Georgia was on the left of the brigade, its left was immediately 
upon the road. Rodes' Brigade was on the left of the pike. These 
two brigades were to make the attack, and the other brigades of the 
division were to protect our flanks. About five o'clock General 
Jackson rode up to General Rodes and told him to move in and oc- 
cupy the position he had told him about. Doles' Brigade was the 



72 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

guide, so General Rodes ordered General Doles to advance and take 
that position, remarking, "If any brigades can go there, yours and 
mine can." The two brigades then moved forward slowly through 
the tangled undergrowth until our sharpshooters became engaged, 
when General Doles took off his cap, raised himself in his stirrups, 
gave a yell and shouted, " Charge them, boys." The men raised the 
"rebel yell " and charged at a run. The enemy was taken entirely by 
surprise and offered but feeble resistance. We emerged from the woods 
behind their regular line of breastworks, and most of the Yankees 
were scattered over the field cooking coffee and their guns were some 
distance from them. They became panic-stricken and thought only 
of safety by flight. We killed and captured a great many while our 
loss was comparatively small, though we lost some of our best officers 
and men. Colonel Cook was severely wounded and was taken from 
the field. When near Chancellors House we were halted to reform 
our lines. We had driven the enemy nearly three miles, most of 
this on the run. General Jackson remarked to General Rodes 
that he had never seen the enemy driven so far, so fast and in so 
short a time. We slept on our arms that night. At sunup the next 
day the command was ordered forward, and in going through some 
thick woods General Doles and the Twelfth Georgia became detached 
from the rest of the brigade and the Fourth, Twenty-first and Forty- 
fourth w^ent into the fight under Colonel Mercer, of the Twenty-first. 
We charged across an open field fully exposed to the enemy's artil- 
lery. Our loss was so great that we moved into a piece of woods 
for protection. The enemy then shelled the woods, doing great 
execution until they were flanked and driven oflT. Our regiment lost 
very heavily here. The fighting was practically over for the day 
and we rejoined General Doles. Later we took position behind the 
plank road near Chancellors House and the next day built breast- 
work?. The next day we moved across the road and built more 
breastworks. When we awoke May 6 we found that the enemy 
had retreated across the river during the night. It rained very hard 
all the morning, and a little after noon we started back to our camp 
at Grace Church, about fifteen miles distant. 

The regiment remained at this camp until June 4, when it left 
for a summer campaign. We marched by way of Spottsylvania 
Court House, and camped the second night at Virdierville. 

From here we marched to Culpeper Court House and camped 
about three miles beyond the town on the Warrenton road. Early 



History of the Fourth Georgia Kegiment. 73 

on the morning of June 9 we were ordered to make a forced march 
to Brandy Station to reinforce Stewart's Cavalry, which had been at- 
tacked and driven back by a superior force. The Yankee cavalry re- 
tired as soon as it learned that infantry support was at hand. We 
marched and countermarched all day, and, without having seen a 
Yankee, we returned to Culpeper Court House. The next day the 
march was continued, going by way of Gaine's crossroads and Flint 
Hill. We crossed the Blue Eidge at Chester's Gap, and passing through 
Front Koyal, pushed on to Berry ville, where we expected to meet the 
enemy. We formed line of battle on the left of the road leading 
from Millwood to Berryville, and, as the Yankee tents were still 
standing, we expected immediate fighting. We advanced cautiously 
through the camp and into the town without firing a gun. We dis- 
covered that the enemy had left so hurriedly that they didn't take 
time to destroy anything and we secured a considerable quantity of 
valuable stores. We left this place for Martinsburg, passing by Sum- 
mit Point and Bunker Hill. Our cavalry had been skirmishing with 
a Yankee force at Martinsburg and we were hurried forward to their 
assistance. We formed line of battle about sundown and advanced 
upon the town. 

The enemy retreated almost immediately, and several pieces of ar- 
tillery and a number of prisoners fell into our hands. We also cap- 
tured several thousand bushels of corn and oats which the Yankees 
had vainly tried to burn. We destroyed a portion of the Baltimore 
and Ohio railroad here. We then marched to Williamsport, Mary- 
land. After several days' rest we moved to Hagerstown, and from 
there to Greencastle, Pa. We remained here two days and left 
for Carlisle, passing through Chambersburg and Shippenburg, where 
we expected to encounter some Pennsylvania militia. We marched 
into town unmolested and bivouacked in the campus of Dickinson 
College. Left Carlisle on the morning of June 30, by way of the 
Baltimore pike. Camped that night at Heidlersburg. On the 
morning of July 1 we moved towards Gettysburg, and were soon 
startled by rapid artillery firing in our front. Orders to "step 
out" were given and obeyed, and we soon came in sight of the 
town. Our brigade was soon in line, with the Fourth Georgia on 
the left. The Yankees had taken possession of a hill in our front. 
It was a strong position and they soon made it very unpleasant 
for us with their artillery. Finally General Doles gave the or- 
der to charge and the men responded with alacrity. The enemy 



74 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

fired one volley, doing considerable execution, but before they could 
reload our men were upon them. Lieutenant-Colonel Winn was 
killed in this charge. The retreat of the enemy soon became a rout 
and they fled panic-stricken to and through the town. The Yankee 
loss in killed, wounded and missing was appalling. The Fourth Geor- 
gia here met and fought for the second time the Twenty-second In- 
diana, having previously encountered it at King's Schoolhouse. Our 
command stopped in the town and bivouacked that day and the next in 
the streets. On the night of July 2 our division was ordered to join 
in an attack upon Cemetery Ridge, and formed line near the foot of 
it, but owing to some confusion of orders the attack was not made. 
The regiment was under heavy fire a portion of the time and lost sev- 
eral men. The regiment was not actively engaged again, although 
-continually under fire. A little after midnight of the 5th of July 
the army commenced to retreat, Early's Division of Ewell's Corps 
acting as rear guard. The enemy made no effort to molest us and 
we camped that night at the foot of the Blue Ridge, at a little place 
called Fairfield. Rodes' Division brought up the rear of the army 
-on July 6 and our brigade was next to rear. The enemy was more 
aggressive than on the previous day, and we did little else than form 
line of battle and throw out sharpshooters until about one o'clock, 
after which we were not troubled. Camped at night between Water- 
loo and Waynesboro. Reached Hagerstown, Md., about ten o'clock 
on the morning of July 7. The Potomac river was so swollen 
by recent rains that it was not fordable, so a position for defense 
was selected and fortifications thrown up. Meade's army took posi- 
tion in our front, but made no demonstration, and as soon as the river 
subsided we retired into Virginia, and camped at Martinsburg the 
next night and to Darksville the next morning, where we remained for 
several days. Marched through Winchester and Front Royal, and at 
the latter place were ordered to support Wright's Brigade, which was 
guarding a pass in the mountains and bad been attacked by a greatly 
superior force. We did not become actively engaged, but had two 
men wounded. This day the command marched thirty-four miles 
^nd was in line of battle over three hour.^. The regiment moved 
down the valley by way of Luray and crossed the Blue Ridge moun- 
tains at Thornton's Gap, and, passing through Madison Court House, 
went into camp near Orange Court House, where it remained for a 
month. On September 14 we w-ere ordered to Summerville's ford, 
•on the Rapidan, to support our cavalry, but did no fighting. We 



History of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. 75 

^ere then ordered to Morton's Ford for picket duty, and as this ford 
was the easiest place for the enemy to cross we threw up strong forti- 
fications. Left this place October 8 and joined the army in its 
flank movement around Meade's army. We crossed the Kapidan at 
Borent's ford and marched through Madison and Culpeper counties, 
using country roads and bypaths to conceal our movements from the 
^enemy. On the 12th of October the regiment was engaged all day 
in supporting cavalry at JefFersonton, near Warrenton Springs. We 
had several men wounded, among them Lieutenant Stephens, Com- 
pany E, commanding the Fourth Georgia Sharpshooters, and Eugene 
Black, courier for General Doles. Lieutenant W. W. Hulbert, Com- 
,pany D, was detailed to take command of the sharpshooters. The 
regiment was in no active engagement, and, besides tearing up rail- 
roads, did little except follow the army. 

When the army recrossed the Rappahannock we were ordered to 
Xelley's Ford, below Brandy Station. The army expected to spend 
the winter here and the troops were ordered to build winter quarters. 
•Considerable progress was made in this direction, but before they 
were completed the army fell back across the Rapidan and the regi- 
ment went into camp at More ton's ford, but was soon moved to Rac- 
coon Ford. We remained in this vicinity until November 27, when 
Meade crossed the Rapidan at Germanna ford, and we started out to 
meet him, which we did at Mine Run, a small creek between very high 
hills. We acted as reserve during the day and about sundown were 
ordered to the support of Ed Johnson's Division and came very near 
being captured, as Johnson withdrew his forces as soon as we went in. 
We held the enemy in check until the artillery could withdraw and then 
retired with the loss of ten or twelve men. We threw up breast- 
works and remained in line of battle until the morning of December 
2, when we discovered that the enemy had retired across the river. 
The regiment was not actively engaged again, nor was the army, but 
no one who was present will ever forget the suffering we underwent 
for two days, on account of a cold, cutting wind, which blew steadily 
for two days and nights. 

The regiment returned to Moreton's ford and did picket duty until 
December 20, when it moved to a point on the old Orange Pike, a 
few miles below the court-house. Here we went into regular winter 
quarters and remained undisturbed until February 6, 1864, when the 
enemy crossed at Moreton's ford and we helped to drive them back. 



76 Doles Cook Brigade. 

Oo May 4 we broke camp and, marching down the pike, camped 
at Locust Grove, near Mine Run. 

The next morning the march was resumed, but soon indications of 
an approaching engagement became apparent, and about eleven o'clock 
the opposing forces met and the battle of the Wilderness had com- 
menced. ^ye formed line of battle parallel to, and about one hun- 
dred yards from the pike, facing to the right, with Fourth Georgia 
on left of the brigade, joining the right of J. M. Jones' Virginia 
Brigade. Jones' front, from some cause, was left exposed, and a sud- 
den attack by the enemy stampeded the command, leaving our flank 
unprotected and we were attacked from front, flank and rear. The 
regiment never showed to better advantage than in this emergency, 
for, notwithstanding the loss in killed and wounded was appalling, 
when the order to change front was given the movement was 
eflfected without the least evidence of panic or nervousness. 
The battle raged at close quarters until Gordon came to our 
support, when the enemy was driven for a mile through the 
dense undergrowth, leaving the ground strewn with its dead and 
wounded. We reformed upon a ridge and remained in line until 
nearly dark, when we moved to the left of the pike and assisted 
Gordon in a night attack. The movement was entirely successful 
and we returned to our former position and threw up breastworks. 
There was no more fighting at this point, but the skirmishing was 
heavy and continuous. On the morning of the 8th we were relieved 
by Early's Division and moved to the right towards Spottsylvania 
Court House, which point we reached about five o'clock, after a very 
fatiguing march. The enemy was making for the same point and 
the advance of the two armies reached it almost together. We imme- 
diately formed line of battle and drove the enemy from a position we 
wished to occupy and lay upon our arms all night, as we supposed an 
efl^ort would be made to retake it. 

The next day one of our sharpshooters, Sergeant Charles D. Grace, 
Company B, while on picket, shot and killed General vSedgewick, one 
of the most prominent officers of the Federal army. General Sedge- 
wick was superintending the construction of some redouts, and, as he 
was more than half a mile from our picket line, considered himself 
perfectly safe. Sergeant Grace was a fine shot and was armed with 
one of the few Whitworth rifles in our army, which made the deed 
not only practicable but simple. We threw up breastworks on the 
edge of a small clearing which sloped gently to a dense thicket 



HiSTOEY OF THE FoURTH GEORGIA ReGIMENT. 77 

-about two hundred yards in front. On the morning of the 10th the 
enemy drove in our pickets and occupied this piece of woods. Our 
line was so completely dominated by this movement that our men could 
not show their heads above the works. The enemy had massed quite 
a large force under cover of the trees and a little before six o'clock 
charged our position with five columns. Our men gave them a warm 
reception and killed and wounded hundreds of them, but were soon 
overwhelmed and forced to retire, leaving many prisoners. The Yan- 
kees followed us, but we soon rallied and drove them back and soon 
retook the works. We were then withdrawn from the front and i>laced 
in the reserve line, where we remained until the morning of the 12th. 
Johnson's position was attacked about sunup and soon the engagement 
became general. We were hurried to the right about half a mile and 
soon became engaged. We drove the enemy back and held the position 
for the remainder of the day. On the 17th we made a reconnaissance 
to our left, but beyond some brisk sharpshooting nothing came of it. 
Grant continued his flank movement towards Richmond, and we 
moved accordingly. At Hanover Junction we had quite a spirited 
engagement without decisive results. We moved nearer to Richmond, 
and on the 27th met the enemy again at Bethesda Church and desul- 
tory fighting continued all day, the enemy finally retiring. We threw 
up earthworks and remained until June 2, when we were ordered 
to Cold Harbor, where Grant had massed a large force. As we were 
getting into position General Doles was shot and instantly killed. He 
was the only one in the brigade struck during the day. Colonel 
Cook, of the Fourth Georgia, assumed command of the brigade and 
Lieutenant-Colonel Willis took charge of the regiment. After this 
battle Grant crossed the James and the siege of Petersburg was com- 
menced. But the Fourth Georgia did not participate in the opera- 
tions around Petersburg at this time, A short while after the battle 
of Cold Harbor, Early's Corps, to which the regiment had been 
attached, started from the valley to drive back the Federals under 
Hunter, who was advancing upon Lynchburg, burning and plunder- 
ing as he came. By rapid and forced marches Lynchburg was reached 
in time to save it, and Hunter was driven across the mountains into 
West Virginia. This left the valley open and we marched down it 
unmolested and occupied Winchester, July 2. Sigel retired across 
the Potomac and w^e followed. On the 9th the Yankees were defeated 
at the Monocacy river, and we advanced to Frederick City. Valua- 
ble supplies were obtained here and we proceeded to invest Washing- 



78 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

ton, Rodes' Division in front, and on the 11th engaged the enemy's- 
skirmishers, driving tDem back into the city. On the evening of the 
12th we had a sharp skirmish. That night we retired and on the 14th 
we recrossed the Potomac. During the next month we remained in 
the neighborhood of Winchester without any regular engagement, 
but with enough skirmishing to keep us on the alert. On September 
19 the battle of Winchester was fought, and we retired late in the day 
on account of being flanked. The battle of Fisher's Hill was fought 
on the 22d, and we were again repulsed with heavy loss. In both 
these battles we were outnumbered three to one, as is shown by the 
official records. On October 19 the battle of Cedar Creek occurred. 
We achieved a brilliant victory during the morning and had every- 
thing our own way, but the tide turned in the evening and we were 
forced to retire before vastly superior numbers. Our loss was very 
heavy and we retired to New Market, where we remained until Novem- 
ber 10, when we again advanced down the valley, and after skirmish- 
ing for a day or two with the enemy near Cedar Creek, we returned 
to New Market. On the 19th we met the enemy at Rudes' Hill and 
defeated them. Early in December we left the valley and rejoined 
the army under General Lee at Petersburg. From this time the his- 
tory of the regiment was synonymous with that of other regiments in 
the Army of Northern Virginia, and nobly performed its part in the 
daily fighting which was rapidly decimating the ranks of that immor- 
tal body of men, and rapidly leading up to the inevitable end. The 
regiment was conspicuously engaged at Fort Steadman, and the attack- 
ing party from Cook's Brigade was led by the gallant Captain Carson 
of Company I, Fourth Georgia. It fell back from Petersburg with 
General Lee, and the final day at Appomattox found it in line of bat- 
tle as ready to obey Gordon's order to charge as it was to obey the call 
to arms when the tocsin of war sounded in 1861. 




WILLIAM II, WILLIS 

Colonel Fourth Georgia Regiment. 



Sketches of Regjmental Officers. 79' 



SKETCHES OF REGIMENTAL OFFICERS. 

Colonel William H. Willis was one of the few who entered the 
service as an officer and continued with the regiment until it laid down 
its arms at Appomattox. Going out a first lieutenant he became 
captain on the reorganization. He was promoted lieutenant-colonel 
in July, 18(33, and colonel in June, 1864. He was a splendid officer, 
careful of the comfort of his men, always at his post and ready for 
every call of duty. His regiment is proud of his record, and cher- 
ishes his memory with undying aHection. He returned to Macon 
county after the surrender and continued in business there until his 
death, which occurred several years ago. 

Lieutenant- Colonel John J. Mathews was the ante-bellum 
captain of the West Point Guards, and Avas elected lieutenant-colonel 
on the organization of the regiment at Portsmouth, Va. He resigned 
in May, 1862, on account of failing health. He never saw active 
service with the regiment, but enjoyed the confidemce of the men, 
and his loss was regretted by every one. He died at home in 1869. 

Lieutenant-Colonel David R. E. Winn, going as first-lieuten- 
ant of his company in 1861, was elected captain in April, 1862, 
and in October following promoted major; in November thereafter 
lieutenant-colonel of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. He was with his 
command through all the campaigns, and in all the battles in which it 
participated, winning the encomiums of the general under whom he 
served and enjoying the confidence and admiration of all his comrades 
in arms. While gallantly leading his regiment in a charge in tha 
first day's battle of Gettysburg, Pa., he died a soldier's glorious 
death. His comrades will ever cherish his memory until all cross over 
the river. 

Lieutenant-Colonel E. A. Nash entered the service as second 
lieutenant in 1861, and by successive promotions became, in 1864, 
lieutenant-colonel of his regiment; at the surrender was in command of 
the brigade. He was always at his post, a brave and competent officer, 
who deserved and possessed the respect and confidence of all his 
comrades. 

Lieutenant-Colonel AVilliam F. Jokdan went out as first 
lieutenant of his company, was elected captain in April, 1862, pro- 



80 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

moted major and then lieutenant-colonel in a short time. He resigned 
in June, 1862, and returned home, where he resided until his death, 
■which occurred in 1901. 

Major Charles L. Whitehead was mustered into service with 
the Albany Guards as fourth sergeant. Promoted major of the 
Fourth Georgia Regiment May 8, 1861 ; he retired April 26, 1862. 
He was a prominent and agreeable gentleman, and his death, which 
occurred after the surrender, was deeply regretted. 

Major Robert C. Smith was mustered into service as captain of 
the LaGrange Light Guards. Was promoted major of the Fourth 
Georgia Regiment in July, 1862, and killed in the battle of Sharps- 
burg, Md., September 17, 1862. He was a brave soldier and by his 
death the regiment lost one of its brightest ornaments. 

Major Francis H. DeGraffenreid went to the war as first 
sergeant of his company. Was subsequently promoted lieutenant, 
acting adjutant of the regiment, and then promoted captain of his 
company. Afterward he was promoted major of the Fourth Georgia 
Regiment. He was killed in battle at Fort Steadmau, Va., March 
25, 1865. He was a gallant, earnest soldier, devoted to the cause of 
the South and worthy of the honors he won. 

Dr. Wixliam H. Philpot was mustered into the service of the 
Confederate States as a private in the Southern Rifles on the 26th 
day of April, 1861. In May of the same year he was appointed 
assistant surgeon, and in July, 1861, surgeon of the Fourth Georgia 
Regiment ; afterwards was senior surgeon of the bi igade. He is an 
intelligent and polished gentleman, kind and sympathetic, and has a 
heart in him as big as a barrel. He seems to be in a good humor 
with himself, and in love with the world and the fullness thereof. 
No gathering of ex-Confederates is complete without he is present, 
and whenever he is there, it is by a very large majority. He is gen- 
erally the central and controlling spirit in any assembly that he may 
chance to be in. The boys all love and enjoy his company. May he 
be spared many years to shed sunlight and happiness upon his ad- 
miring friends. 

Dr. Thomas M. Nelson was the first surgeon of the Fourth 
Georgia Regiment. He enlisted as a private in the Albany Guards. 
Soon after his promotion he resigned and raised a company of cav- 
alry called the " Nelson Rangers," joined a Mississippi regiment and 




ROBERT S. SMITH 
Major Fourth Georgia Regiment. 



Sketches of Regimental Officers. 81 

was promoted colonel. He was killed in battle in 1865. He was a 
brave and competent officer, and an intelligeut and refined gentleman. 
Captain J. Brown Morgan was second lieutenant in the La- 
Grange Light Guards when that company was mustered into service 
April 26, 1861. On the 8th of May of the same year he was pro- 
moted commissary of the Fourth Georgia Regiment, and resigned 
October 11, 1861. He was then appointed commissary of Colquitt's 
Brigade with the rank of major. He was a man of much prominence 
in his county, and a gentleman of refinement who commanded the 
respect of all with whom he came in contact. His death, which oc- 
curred near Atlanta, Ga., in 1884, was sincerely regretted by his 
comrades and many admiring friends. 

Dr. Edward A. Leggett was mustered into service as a private 
in the Macon County Volunteers in April, 1861. Was appointed 
assistant surgeon of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. Was transferred, 
but continued in service until the war closed. He died after the 
surrender. 

Rev. J. O. A. Sparks enlisted as a private in the Southern 
Rifles. Was appointed chaplain of the Fourth Georgia Regiment in 
1861, and resigned in 1862. After he returned home he joined the 
Georgia Methodist Conference and became a prominent and influen- 
tial member of that body When the war began he was a student at 
Emory College, but left his studies to take up arms in defense of his 
native State. He was a good and true man, a sincere and devout 
Christian. He died a number of years ago in Florida. 

Dr. M. E. Vason was a private in the Albany Guards when he 
entered the army. In August, 1862, he was promoted assistant sur- 
geon of his regiment, but was afterwards transferred and served the 
Confiederacy until the close of the war. Previous to his promotion 
he engaged in all the battles in which his regiment participated, and 
was a brave and good soldier. He died after the close of the war. 

Dr. L. L. Strozier was a private in the Albany Guards when he 
enlisted in the Confederate Army on the 26th of April, 1861. Was 
appointed assistant surgeon in the Fourth Georgia Regiment. After, 
wards he was transferred to some other command, or to hospital duty, 
where he served throughout the entire war. He died after the 
surrender. 

Dr. Henry S. Orme enlisted as a private in the Baldwin Blues 
in April, 1861. Wounded at Malvern Hill,! Va., 1862. Was ap- 

6d-c 



S2 DoLE-s-CooK Brigade. 

pointed assistant surgeon and assigned to duty in Riciimond, Va. 
His residence is in Los Angeles, Cal., where he is a noted phy- 
sician, and has built up a large nnd lucrative practice. He was a 
brave and good soldier, and is an intelligent and refined gentleman. 

Captain Howard Tinsley was appointed quartermaster of the 
Fourth Georgia Regiment when it was organized, and served in that 
capacity until the close of the war with credit to himself and to his 
regiment. He is a gentleman of irreproachable character, and a man 
of superior business qualifications. His manners are agreeable and 
prepossessing, and his friends are numerous. He surrendered with 
Lee's army at Appomattox, Va. His residence is in Macon, Ga. 

Adjutant Alexander J. Robert was a private when he went 
into service with the All)any Guards Aj)ril 26, 1861, but before the 
close of the year he was appointed first lieutenant and adjutant of 
the Fourth Georgia Regiment, and served throughout the entire war. 
He was a gallant and efficient officer, always cheerful and ready for 
any duty or hardships required of him. He is now a resident of 
Alabama. 

Dr. William Proby Young, born in Portsmouth, Va., bred 
in Washington, D. C. Attended Ritterhouse Academy and Colum- 
bian College, and was graduated from Jefferson Medical College, 
Philadelphia. For two and a half years thereafter was assistant 
physician in the Government Hospital for the Insane near the city. 
Came South at the beginning of hostilities. In the spring of 1863 
was assigned to the Fourth Georgia Regiment as assistant surgeon. 
At the battle of Sharpsburg, Md., September 17, 1862, he was 
wounded, and General Doles, in his official report, says : *' Assistant 
Surgeon William P. Young remained on the field after he was 
wounded, caring for the wounded, and fell into the hands of the 
enemy." Became surgeon June 9, 1863, the day of the big cav- 
alry fight near Brandy Station, in Culpeper county, Ya., and was 
with the command in every engagement until the surrender at Ap- 
pomattox Court House. Returned to Washington, and engaged in 
business there, and is one of the best known men in the District of 
Columbia. Dr. Young is an intelligent and refined gentleman, fond 
of his friends as well as of a good joke. He has a sunny and pleasant 
disposition, a»d seems to be always in a good humor with himself and 
the rest of mankind. He was a truly brave man, and never hesi- 
tated to go into the hottest fire on the field of battle in the discharge 




WILLIAM PROBY YOUNG 

Major and Surgeon Fourth Georgia Regiment. 



jt UrLiC LIB 



RAKY. 



Sketches of Regimental Officers. 83 

of duty. Nearly every man in the brigade loved and respected him, 
and the surviving members wish him much prosperity and happiness. 
Dr. John E. Blocker, assistant surgeon, enlisted in the Calhoun 
Kifles, Company D, Twelfth Georgia Regiment. Was promoted assist- 
ant surgeon and assigned to duty with the Fourth Georgia Regiment, 
where he served throughout the war. He was a kind and tender- 
hearted gentleman who treated the private soldier with consideration. 
His death occurred near Bluffton, Ga., after the surrender. 

Rev. William Flinn was a resident of Milledgeville, Ga., and 
pastor of the Presbyterian Church at that place when the war began. 
He promptly entered the service, and was appointed chaplain of the 
Fourth Georgia Regiment on its organization. After several months 
service he resigned his position. He made many friends while in the 
army, and was beloved by his regiment. He was an intelligent and 
refined gentleman, a sincere and earnest teacher of the Christian relig- 
ion. His death, which occurred a number of years ago, was deeply de- 
plored by his old comrades and by hosts of friends throughout the 
entire South. 

Captain Samuel McComb was second lieutenant in the Baldwin 
Blues when they were mustered into service on the 26th of April, 
1861. He was promoted first lieutenant in May, 1861, and commis- 
sary of the Fourth Georgia Regiment in June, 1862, and was acting 
commissary of Doles' Brigade from July, 1863, until the close of the 
war. He was elected to the General Assembly of Georgia after he 
returned home. In the spring of 1871 he was killed by being thrown 
from a buggy while his horses were running away. He was a very 
popular man in his home county, and his business qualifications were 
of a fine order. His management of the commissary department was 
highly satisfactory. 

Lieutenant William W. Hulbert went into the army as first 
corporal in the West Point Guards, and his promotions were rapid and 
well deserved. Captured at Spottsylvania while in command of the 
sharpshooters of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. He was one of the 
six hundred Confederate officers who were placed under fire of 
our batteries on Morris Island, S. C, afterwards transferred to 
Fort Pulaski, Ga., and paroled December, 1864. He was a gallant 
Confederate soldier, always ready to face any danger or undergo 
hardships of any character. Colonel Doles, who was in command of 
Ripley's Brigade, speaks in very complimentary terms of Lieutenant 



84 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

Hulbert's gallantry in action during the seven days' battles around' 
Richmond. There is not a more enthusiastic ex-Confederate in the 
South, and none that love^ the Lost Cause more dearly. A reunion 
without his presence would loose much of its interest to his many ad- 
miring friends, for he is the prince of good fellows. He is now an in- 
fluential citizen of the city of Atlanta, Ga., and holds the respon- 
sible position of division superintendent with the Southern Express- 
Company. 

Captain Barnard Curley organized and commanded the South- 
ern Bifles several years before the war. While he and the greater 
number of the company officers that composed the regiment in 1861. 
did not participate in the battles in which the regiment was engaged,. 
they did an excellent work in drilling and moulding it into the splen- 
did fighting machine it became. He returned to Talbotton on the 
reorganization of the regiment in April, 1862, and continued to reside 
there until his death, which occurred in 18 9-. He w^as a genial gentle- 
man with hosts of friends and not an enemy in the world. 

Captain J. P. Strickland went to Virginia with his company as- 
junior second lieutenant; was unanimously elected captain at the ex- 
piration of its term of enlistment. He was a model soldier, always- 
at his post ready to respond to every call of duty. In a desperate 
charge upon Malvern Hill he fell mortally wounded at the head of 
his company. In his death the regiment lost one of its most promis- 
ing officers. 

Captain James H. Weeks, without any inclination for a soldier's- 
life, but actuated by an exalted patriotism, went as a private with the 
first company that left his county. At the reorganization of the regi- 
ment he was elected first lieutenant and upon the death of Captain 
Strickland became captain. From that time he was at the head of 
the company in all the campaigns and battles in which it took part 
until he was shot dead in the battle of the Wilderness on May 5,, 
1864. He was a good soldier, a charming comrade and an elegant 
gentleman, and died lamented by the whole regiment. 

Captain Miles H. Hill, prior to the war, was engaged in the 
practice of law in LaGrange, Ga. He went to the war as first 
lieutenant of the LaGrange Light Guards and was elected captain on 
the reorganization of the regiment. He was a fine officer and his- 
company deeply regretted to be deprived of his services when failing; 
health compelled him to resign. He died in Valdosta, Ga., 1870. 



Sketches of Regimental Officers. 85 

Captain Allen C. Gibson entered the service as a private at the 
outset of the war, and after the regiment got into active service in 
1862 was successively promoted until he became captain in December, 
1862. He was one of the six hundred officers exposed to the fire of 
our batteries on Morris Island, S. C. He was ever at the post of 
duty, and always careful of the comfort of his men. He is now a 
resident of Gabbett, Ala. 

Captain James I\I. Folsom was captain of his company, the 
Twiggs County Volunteers, when mustered into service, and while he 
remained with the regiment only a short time he contributed much in 
making it a splendid body of soldiers. He died after the surrender. 

Captain L. A. Nash was mustered into service as second sergeant; 
in April, 1861, was elected junior second lieutenant at the reorganiza- 
tion, and promoted captain in 1863. Was severely wounded at Chancel- 
lorsville. Elected sheriff of Twiggs county, Georgia, and resigned Jan- 
uary, 1864, He was a gallant soldier, and yet lives among his fewsur. 
viviug comrades, enjoying the respect and confidence of every one. 

Captain Jeremiah Sanders was fourth sergeant of Company C 
when it went out, and rose by merit to be captain of it in 1861. He 
was a brave man and well deserved the honors he won in many bat- 
tles. He came home after the surrender; has since joined the great 
majority. 

Captain Adam C. Frost Avas second sergeant of the West Point 
Guards when it went out, elected first lieutenant in 1862, and was pro- 
moted captain in July the same year. He was a gallant soldier, at- 
tentive to the wants of his men and loved by every one. He died 
a soldier's death, fighting like a lion at bay at Winchester, Va., 
September 19, 1864, one of the South's great host of martyrs in the 
cause of liberty. 

Captain George Fauntleroy Todd was regarded by his friends 
as the most brilliant and promising officer of the Fourth Georgia 
Regiment. While at Camp Jackson, Va., his company presented him 
with a beautiful sword, in a brass scabbard elaborately embossed, and 
having the letters C. S. over an eagle. The sword was beautifully 
figured. On one side was inscribed in large German text, "George F. 
Todd from West Point Guards, 1862." On the reverse side the firm 
name "E. J. Johnston & Co.," Macon, Ga., appeared, and in large 
monogram letters "C. S.," and two Confederate flags crossed, and 



86 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

above them two cannoDS crossed. Captain Todd had enjoyed the ad- 
vantages of military training at the Georgia Military Institute. He 
was familiar with tactics, popular with the regiment, and idolized by 
his company. Brave to a fault, and had he lived higher honors 
awaited him. But alas! in the morning of life, stainless as Bayard, 
chivalrous as any knight that ever wielded a sword, in that hopeless 
charge upon overwhelming numbers at Malvern Hill, he fell at the 
head of his company, an irreparable loss to the regiment. 

Captain Y. G. Rust, as captain of the Albany Guards, entered the 
service in April, 1861, and remained until the expiration of its term 
of enlistment. He was an intelligent, refined and true gentleman, and 
did much to bring the regiment to that state of discipline for which it 
was always celebrated. He died in Albany, Ga., in 1901, 

Captain William E. Smith was mustered into service as first 
lieutenant of Company E, and became captain by the retirement of 
Captain Rust. He was a brave and promising ofiicer and a severe loss 
to the regiment, when, by the loss of his leg at King's Schoolhouse, 
he was compelled to quit the service. Returning home, he engaged 
in the practice of law, and after the war was elected to Congress and 
served for several terms, making a fine reputation for his ability, and 
attention to the interests of his constituents. He died in Albany, 
Ga., several years ago. 

Captain Henry C. Williams, of Company E, served for a year 
in the ranks. Elected second lieutenant in 1862, and afterwards pro- 
moted captain in 1864. He served with honor through the war, re- 
turned home after the surrender and made his home in Baker county,, 
where he resided until his death, which occurred in 188-. 

Captain Blair R. Mayes carried Company F from Gordon 
county to Virginia as its captain, and remained with it during its 
twelve months' enlistment. He then returned home, being exempt 
by reason of age. Like all the first captains of the regiment he was a 
man of fine character, and left his mark for good upon his men. He 
died in Sumter county, Georgia, in 1895, 

Captain George W. Cary was mustered into service as second 
lieutenant of Company F, and was elected captain when Captain 
Mayes returned home. He resigned in 1862 and joined the Fourth 
Georgia Cavalry and was promoted captain of his company. After- 
ward he was promoted major of his regiment for gallant and merito- 



Sketches of Regimental Officers. 87 

rious service. He was a splendid business man, and an elegant gen- 
tleman. He was killed on the hard-fought field of Franklin, Tenn. 
Captain James S. Sullivan entered the service as second lieu- 
tenant of the Toombs' Volunteers in 1861, and on the resignation of 
Captain Cary succeeded him. He served with distinction until killed 
in the Valley Campaign in 1864. His company and county are justly 
proud of him as one of the heroes of the Lost Cause. 

Captain Joseph McConnell, beginning as corporal, rose by 
merit successively until he became captain of the Toombs' Volunteers. 
In the desperate attack on Fort Steadman on the 25th of March, 
1865, he lost a leg and fell into the hands of the enemy. He was a 
fine ofiicer, and ready at all times to respond to every call of duty. 
He died in Gordon county, Georgia, in 1890. 

Captain George T. Bartlett took the Glover Guards to Vir- 
ginia and served as captain during its first term of enlistment. He 
then returned home and resumed the practice of law, and became 
judge of the Ocmulgee Circuit. Although he saw no active service 
with the regiment he was a fine ofiicer and made his company, by his 
energy and intelligence, one of the best in the service. He died a 
good many years ago in Monticello, Ga. 

Captain John T. Lane was first sergeant of Company G, elected 
second lieutenant in August, 1861, and j^romoted to captain when the 
regiment was reorganized. He was killed while leading his men in 
the battle of Gettysburg on July 1, 1863. He was a brave man and 
a model officer, and died a hero's death in defense of the rights of the 
South. 

Captain Cullen R. Ezell, of Company G, entered the service as 
corporal in 1861, and at the reorganization was elected second lieu- 
tenant and promoted captain in July, 1863. Was wounded and cap- 
tured in the battle of the Wilderness and held in prison until the close 
of the war. He was one of the six hundred Confederate officers ex- 
posed to the fire of our batteries on Morris Island, S. C. He was a 
brave soldier, prompt to respond to every call of duty, and enjoyed 
the respect and confidence alike of officers aod men. He now lives 
in Huron, Putnam county, Ga. 

Captain Jacob M. Caraker, entering the army as first lieutenant 
of the Baldwin Blues, became captain by seniority in consequence 
of General Doles' promotion to the colonelcy. He proved himself 
worthy to wear the mantle of his gallant predecessor, and served with 



88 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

honor until failing health necessitated his resignation ia 1862. He 
was wounded in the battle of Sharpsburg, Md. He is yet living in 
Milledgeville, Ga., surrounded by troops of life-long friends. 

Captain Wallace Butts was one of the unselfish patriots who 
responded to the call of his country and went out as a private in the 
Baldwin Blues. Was elected second lieutenant and afterwards pro- 
moted first lieutenant, and subsequently captain. At Chancellors- 
ville he lost a hand, and in 1864 lost a leg and fell into the hands of the 
enemy near Washington, D. C. He was kept in prison until the close 
of the war, then returned to his home in Baldwin county, Ga. , where 
he died in 1891. He was a splendid soldier, brave to recklessness, 
devoted to the cause, a hero indeed and in truth. 

Captain Samuel M. Peothro, at the outbreak of the war, was a 
physician of large practice and high reputation. He went out as cap- 
tain of Company I, and served in that capacity during the term for 
which he had enlisted. As did nearly all the first captains of the 
regiment, he returned home at the end of twelve months, where he con- 
tinued to reside until his death, which occurred several years after the 
close of the war. 

Captain Joseph P. Carson was one of the many educated gen- 
tlemen who, inspired by a pure and lofty patriotism, enlisted and went 
to the front as private soldiers in 1861 to suffer and, in many cases, to 
die in defense of the rights of the South. When the twelve months 
expired he was elected junior second lieutenant, and in a short time 
first lieutenant, and in 1863 captain. He was wounded at Sharps- 
burg, at the Wilderness, at Winchester, and twice at the siege of Pe- 
tersburg. He commanded Gordon's Division Sharpshooters at the 
close of the war. He was a gallant soldier, a model officer, and 
everywhere and at all times a modest gentleman and a consistent 
Christian. He made his home after the war in Reynolds, Ga., where 
he died March 25, 1889. 

Captain William L. Johnson, of Company K, was one of the 
original captains of the Fourth Georgia, who did much to give tone 
and character to that splendid regiment. He retired at the expira- 
tion of his term of enlistment, and entered the Quartermaster's De- 
partment under Major George W. Grice, where he remained until the 
close of the war. He is a man of high character and unblemished 
reputation, and is yet living in Macon, Ga., respected and honored by 
a large circle of friends. 




E. A. NASH 
Lieutenant-Colonel Fourth Georgia Regiment. 



Sketches of Regimental Officers. 89 

Captain Robert M. Bisell was one of that great host of heroes 
•who gave their lives to the Lost Cause. Going out as second sergeant 
he was elected second lieutenant in April, 1862, and in July there- 
after promoted first lieutenant, and the following October promoted 
captain of the Sumter Light Guards. In that glorious charge upon 
Howard's Corps at Chancellorsville, Va., he fell at the head of his 
men with their victorious cheers ringing in his ears. No brighter, 
braver soldier fell upon the field of honor than Bob Bisell. 

Captain Jerry C. Macon went forth as a private in Company K 
in 1861. Was elected junior second lieutenant, and rose by promo- 
tion to be captain in May, 1863. In the fierce and bloody battle of 
the Wilderness on the 5th of May, 1864, he gave his life for the cause 
he loved so well. As he had lived he died, faithful to every trust, 
true to every call of duty. 

Captain John M. Shiver went to the war as first corporal in the 
Sumter Light Guards, was elected second lieutenant in the spring of 

1863, and in July was promoted first lieutenant. He served in this 
capacity, making a fine record for conspicuous gallantry. In May, 

1864, he became captain, and at the surrender of Lee's army was in 
command of the regiment. Returning home at the end of the war 
he applied himself with the same energy to the pursuits of civil life 
that had characterized him as a soldier. He died at his home in 
Sumter county, Georgia, several years ago. 

Lieutenant John T. Blount was enlisted as first corporal of the 
Southern Rifles, Aj)ril 26, 1861. In June, 1861, he was promoted 
fourth sergeant; in April, 1862, junior second lieutenant, and in July 
of the same year second lieutenant. Was wounded at Malvern Hill 
and Gettysburg. Resigned in March, 1864, and enlisted in Com- 
pany A, Second Kentucky Cavalry of Morgan's Command. He was 
a gallant and faithful soldier, and no one loves the cause better than 
he does. He reads nearly all the histories published in regard to the 
war, especially those by Southern authors, and is well posted as to 
all movements made and battles fought from 1861 to 1865. His 
reading is not confined to this class of literature, for he is a great 
lover of books, and is well posted on almost any subject that can be 
mentioned. He is a resident of Atlanta, Ga. 

Lieutenant James L. Greer was mustered into service as a 
private in the West Point Guards, Company D, Fourth Georgia 
Regiment, April 26, 1861. Afterwards he was promoted until he 



90 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

became junior second lieutenant of his company. He was severely 
wounded and captured at Spottsylvania, Va., on the 10th of May, 
1864, in a hand-to-hand conflict with the enemy while in command 
of the Twiggs Volunteers, Company C, it having lost all of its com- 
missioned officers in the battle of the Wilderness on the 5th of May. 
Was one of the six hundred Confederate officers who were exposed to 
the fire of our batteries on Morris Island, S. C; he was then trans- 
ferred to Beaufort Island, S. C, and paroled in December, 1864. 
He moved to Texas in 1866, and has prospered in business. 
Elected to the General Assembly of his adopted State, and served 
for four years. During his term of office introduced a bill to pension 
Confederate Veterans, he being the first and prime mover for the re- 
lief of the Southern soldiers. He takes much interest in the organ- 
ization and establishment of Confederate camps, and is an enthusiastic 
lover of the memories of our heroic struggle for independence. He 
was a brave and good soldier, and has the love and respect of his 
comrades. 

Lieutenant William S. Evans was a private in the LaGrange 
Light Guards when it was mustered into service on the 26th of April, 
1861. Was promoted junior second lieutenant in 1862, and lost a 
leg at Monocacy, Md., July 9, 1864. There was not a better or 
braver soldier in the Confederate Army. He is one of the most 
popular citizens of Troup county. An enthusiastic ex-Confederate, 
with views of his own, ready and willing at all times to serve his 
comrades as faithfully as he did the Confederacy. He is a broad- 
minded and true gentleman of the old school. May long life, pros- 
perity and happiness be in store for him, and when life's work is 
done may his spirit cross over the river and rest in the sunlight of 
siipreme happiness. He is now a resident of LaGrange, Ga. 

Lieutenant Egbert B. Eidley entered the service as a private 
in the LaGrange Light Guards. Afterwards he was promoted to 
the position of sergeant and then junior second lieutenant. 
Wounded in the shoulder and leg at Spottsylvania, Va., and surren- 
dered with Lee's army at Appomattox Court House, Va. He is of 
a kind and happy disposition, a perfect Chesterfield in his manners, 
and withal one of the cleverest of men. He was an accomplished 
and brave soldier, and ever ready to face any danger or answer the 
call of duty. Every member of his regiment and brigade loved and 
respected him for his many good qualities. He is now a prominent 



Sketches of Regimental Officers. 91 

citizen and noted physician of Atlanta, Ga., and his fame as a healer 
of disease is not confined to his home city, but is recognized through- 
out the State. 

John H. Traylor enlisted as a private in the LaGrange Light 
Guards, Company B, Fourth Georgia Regiment, on the 26th of April, 
1861. Wounded at Warrenton Springs, Ciiancellorsville and Spott- 
sylvania, Va. After the battle of Cedar Creek, October 19, 1864, 
he was appointed to a position in the quartermaster's department on 
account of disability caused by the wound received at Spottsylvania, 
Va. He served in this position until the surrender of Lee's army. 
He moved to Texas in 1867, and has served five years as sheriflT and 
tax-collector, two years in the House of Representatives, four years as 
State senator, and two years as mayor of Dallas, He was a brave 
and good soldier, and his record in his adopted State has been honora- 
ble and conspicuous. The memories of the sixties are still dear to 
him, and he attends nearly all of the Confederate reunions. His com- 
rades in Georgia are proud of the record he has made in the "Lone 
Star" State. 

Charles D. Grace was a private in the LaGrange Light Guards 
when mustered into service in April, 1861. He was promoted ser- 
geant in the corps of sharpshooters, and it is the general belief with 
members of Doles' Brigade that he killed General Sedgwick, as he 
used a globe-sighted rifle, and shot at a group of officers, when one of" 
them fell at the spot at which it was afterwards learned that Sedge- 
wick was killed. General Doles, in his report of the engagements 
near Mine Run, Va., says: " I would respectfully mention private 
Charles Grace of Company B, Fourth Georgia, for special gallantry. 
He and eighteen other sharpshooters came across the enemy's rear 
guard, numbering about three hundred, posted behind an embank- 
ment on the plank road, charged and captured one hundred and. 
thirty-seven of the enemy. He was a brave and gallant soldier. 
He surrendered at Appomattox, Va., and afterward moved to Bon- 
ham, Texas, where he is a prominent lawyer. At present he is a 
rnember of the State senate. He still loves the cause for which he 
fought, and can be seen at all our annual reunions. 

Lieutenant Gustavus A. Bull was mustered into service as 
junior second lieuteoant in the LaGrange Light Guards, Company 
B, Fourth Georgia Regiment, April 2(5, 1861. Resigned and was 
promoted lieutenant-colonel of the Thirty-fifth Georgia, October 15, 



92 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

1861. He was born in LaGrange, Ga., 1835, entered Franklin 
College and was graduated with the first honor in 1854. After 
teaching school for several years, read law, and located in Newnan, 
Ga. He soon won a high reputation in his chosen profession, and in 
1860 was one of the Breckinridge electors. Senator B. H. Hill 
pronounced him the most promising young man in the South. He 
was a strict disciplinarian, but always courteous and kind to his men 
and thoughtful of their comfort. On the 31st of May, 1862, on the 
battle-field of Seven Pines, this bright star went down in blood. 
Early in the engagement General Pettigrew was badly wounded and 
the command of the brigade devolved upon Colonel E. L. Thomas, 
Lieutenant-Colonel Bull then assumed command of his regiment and 
led it in a desperate charge upon a battery which was pouring upon 
them a murderous fire of grape and cannister. The column halted 
and began to waver, when, riding in front of it. Colonel Bull gave the 
command, " forward," and appealed to the men to follow him. At 
that moment he fell mortally wounded and the regiment retreated in 
confusion, leaving him in the hands of the enemy. He died the 
following day and was buried by the enemy and fills an unknown 
grave. The whole regiment admired and loved him. One of its 
members expressed the sentiments of all when he wrote to Colonel 
Bull's father: " The crushed and broken hearts that mourn the loss 
•of the hero of the Thirty-fifth Georgia are not confined to your 
family circle." General Pettigrew, commanding the brigade, said : 
" If there was a better ofiicer in the army than Colonel Bull, and one 
to whom the prospect of distinction in any department of life was 
iDrighter, I did not know him. He was indeed a loss to his country." 
The soil of the Old Dominion will forever be sacred because in it rests 
in their bloody gray so many of the hero martyrs of the South. As 
long as the South is trod by men worthy to be free, all honor will be 
accorded her sons of the sixties, and their heroism and devotion will 
be an example and in-spiration for all time to come. 




WILLIAM H. PIIILPOT 
M.ijoraiid Surgeon Fourt i Georgia R'^giinent. 



.'LiL' 



Regimental Poem. 93^^- 



MEMORIES. 

BY MRS. W. H. WILI^IS. 

Never was step more steady as the " band-box soldiers" filed 

Out from tlie famed "Camp Jackson," while the gods looked down and 

smiled 
On troops so fair and graceful in their stainless garb of gray ; 
Each man ready, each man panting, for the thickest of the fray. 

They were leaving there in Portsmouth, in the city of her dead, 
The first brave Georgia soldier who had bowed his gallant head 
On the soil of Old Virginia, pillowed on a spot so fair, 
Where many a woman's tears had fallen above his golden hair. 

He had yielded, ere the battle came, to power none dare defy, 

And in a stranger land, poor boy, had lain him down to die. 

But he was sweetly sleeping in his calm, untroubled rest. 

While fair hands strewed earth's lov^eliest flowers above his quiet breast 

And his comrades all were hasting to a fierce baptismal fire — 
Not a laggard in the ranks, from sturdy boy to gray-haired sire ; 
Each with a picture in his heart of a dear Southern home — 
Oh heaven, guard the homes till these brave wanderers shall come. 

How they illustrated Georgia all along the well-fought front. 
As 'mid the thickest of the fight they bore the battle's brunt. 
How proudly waved the Southern Cross where'er their lot was cast ; 
Ah, Hill, the "band-box soldiers" are the fighting force at last. 

The patrician was the private, high of soul and pur.e of blood. 

And as if in armor clad, lo, how invincible he stood ; 

And on the weary road, anon, a soldier without fear, 

He marched along with bleeding feet and sang a song of cheer. 

Many moons had waned, j'et they, on either stormy side 
Of the Classic Old Potomac, sternly fought and bravely died, 
Grim death had aimed his cruel shaft at many a shining mark. 
And had crossed the Stygian river with his over-laden barque. 

Tongue of mortal ne'er can tell it, history can never show 
Half the valor of the Southron as he met his Northern foe ; 
While nations gazed, awestricken, on the bitter, unmatched fray ; 
Marvelling the while they looked upon the troop who wore the gray. 

Oh, grand old uniform of gray, so faded, worn and old. 
Ye covered many a princely form and many a heart of gold ; 
What if they wore the rough old jeans in the dark hour of need ? 
"A man's a man for a' that, and these be men indeed." 

Note.— When after the evacuation of Norfolk the Fourth Georgia reached Richmond,, 
the troops who had been through the Peninsula Campaign dubbed them the band-box 
soldiers, because they were so well uniformed and so neat and clean. 



"94 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

On the fatal field, Cold Harbor, there their gallant leader fell, 
And strong men looked their last upon the form they loved so well, 
^Vhile pale lips whispered to sad hearts so full of grief and pride, 
"He had lived long enough who in his country's cause had died." 

Died at his post : O record meet for such exalted souls, 
Who shall a fitter tribute ask for our beloved Doles ? 
His life was o'er, mysterious fate denied him victory, 
But blessed him at last with glorious immortality. 

Let us raise a fair white tablet o'er our honored chieftain's breast, 
That shall tell in living words of him so early crowned and blest ; 
Of deathless love and memory, fresh from our hearts aglow. 
And reverent passers-by shall say, "Behold, they loved him so." 

There is no love like this, it fills his soldiers' hearts to-day ; 
Its height and depth be naeasured not, it fadeth not away ; 
'Twas born upon the battle-field where brave men's souls were tried, 
It burns in every w^arrior's heart, whatever fate betide. 

And sweet shall be his slumber in his own sunny clime, 
For he sleeps in dear Old Georgia, where for all the coming time 
His flashing sword is sheathed, and with its wearer is laid down, 
And the laurel w^reath is but exchanofed for the immortal crown. 




J>AVID K. E. UINX 

Lieutenant-Colonel Fourth Georgia Regiment. 



THE NEW YORK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



ASTOR, LENOX AND 
TILDEN FOUNDATIONS. 



Fourth Regement Field and Staff Officers. 95 



ROSTER OF FIELD AND STAFF OF THE FOURTH 
REGIMENT, GEORGIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, 
DOLES-COOK BRIGADE, ARMY NORTHERN VIR- 
GINIA, C. S. A. 

George Doles Colonel. 

John J. Matthews Lieutenant-Colonel. 

Charles L. Whitehead Major. 

Philip Cook Adjutant. 

H. K. Daniel Quartermaster. 

J. Brown Morgan Commissary. 

Thomas M. Nelson Surgeon. 

William H. Philpot Assistant Surgeon. 

William Flinn Chaplain. 

Philip Cook Colonel. 

William H. Willis Colonel. 

William F. Jordan Lieutenant-Colonel. 

Philip Cook Lieutenant-Colonel. 

D. R. E. Winn Lieutenant-Colonel. 

E. A. Nash Lieutenant-Colonel. 

William F. Jordan Major. 

D. R. S. Winn Major. 

William H. Willis Major. 

Robert S. Smith Major. 

E. A. Nash Major. 

Francis H. DeGraffenreid Major. 

Fletcher T. Snead Adjutant. 

Alexander J. Robert Adjutant. 

Howard Tinsley Quartermaster. 

Samuel McComb Commissary. 

William H. Philpot Surgeon. 

L. L. Strozier Assistant Surgeon. 

yi. E. Vasou Assistant Surgeon. 

E. A. Leggett Assistant Surgeon. 

Wm. P. Young, Jr Assistant Surgeon. 

Wm. P. Young, Jr Surgeon. 

J. E. Blocker Assistant Surgeon. 

J. O. A. Sparks Chaplain. 

.lames F. Murphy Ensign. 

NOX-COMMISSIONED STAFF. 

P. L. Miller Quartermaster-Sergeant. 

Thomas J. Flynt Commissary-Sergeant. 



96 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

James S. Burney Ordnance-Sergeant. 

Thornton Wlieatley Quartermaster-Sergeant. 

A. H. (Nip) Herring Hospital Steward 

Andrew F. Hill Sergeant-Major. 

John T. Hill Sergeant-Major. 

Charles H. Law Sergeant-Major. 

MEMBERS OF THE FOURTH GEORGIA REGIMENT BRASS BAND. 

Zitterbart, Louis Chief Musician, Company K. 

Freeman, David C Musician, Company G. 

Garner, W. W Musician, Company F. 

Geeks, Henry Musician, Company H. 

Harwell, Vr. A Musician, Company D. 

Harwell, James R Musician, Company D. 

Lemon, John R Musician, Company K. 

Hendrick, Chas. A Musician, Company K, 

Smith, Lewis A Musician, Company K. 

Cleghom, W, C. P Musician, Company K. 

Ford, James C Musician. Company K. 

Ford, Wm. "W Musician, Company K. 

Twitty, Peter S Musician, Company K. 

"N'S'illey, John Musician, Company K. 

Hester, James G Musician. Company E. 

McCants, Jno. J Musician, Company D. 

Stern, Anseler Musician, Company D. 

Westheimer, Henry Musician, Company B. 



Muster Rolls of the Foubth Georgia Regiment. 97 



MUSTER ROLL OF THE SOUTHERN RIFLES, COM- 
PANY A, FOURTH REGIMENT, GEORGIA VOLUN- 
TEER INFANTRY, A. N. V., C. S. A. 

TAI.BOT COUNTY, GEORGIA. 

CURLEY, BARNARD— 

Captain, April 26, 1801. Retired at expiration of term of service, 
April 26, 1862. Died in Talbot county, Ga., January 1, 1898. 
WIMBERLY, WILLIAM C— 
First Lieutenant, April 20, 1801. Retired at expiration of term of 
service, April 20, 1802, account over age. Died since the war. 

DANIEL, WILLIAM A.— 

Second Lieutenant, April 21, 1861. Resigned December 18, 1801. Or- 
ganized a company, enlisted in Forty-sixth Georgia Regiment, and 
promoted Lieutenant-Colonel. Died since the war. 
STRICKLAND, J. P.— 
Junior Second Lieutenant April 20, 1801. Promoted Second Lieu- 
tenant, December 18, 1801; Captain, April 26, 1802. Killed at Mal- 
vern Hill, Va. 
CALLIER, EDWIN L.— 
First Sergeant, April 20, 1801. Wounded at Malvern Hill, Ya., 1862. 
Woun,ded and disabled at Wilderness, Ya. Detailed as ambulance 
driver. Surren,dered at Appomattox, Ya. Living in Thomaston, 
Ga. 
COTTINGHAM, JAMES D.~ 
Second Sergeant, April 26, ISOi. Honorably discharged at Camp 
Jackson, Ya., 1861. Living in Atlanta, Ga. 
MAUND, L. B.— 
Third Sergeant, April 26, 1861. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant 
July, 1802. Mortally wounded at Wilderness, Ya., May 5. 1804, 
and died in field hospital. After being shot down he was fired 
upon and then bayoneted by tlie enemy. 
GARDNER, JAMES B.— 
Fourth Sergeant, April 26, 1801. Transferred to Twenty-seventh 
Georgia Regiment, November 10, 1801, and promoted Adjutant. 
Promoted Major May 3, 1863; Lieutenant-Colonel April 1, 1804. 
Killed at Petersburg, Va., .Tune 24, 1804. 
BLOUNT, JOHN T.— 

First Corporal, April 20, 1801. Promoted Fourth Sergeant June, 1861; 
elected Junior Second Lieutenant, April, 1862. Promoted Second 
Lieutenant July, 1862. Wounded at Malvern Hill, Ya. Wounded 
7dc 



98 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

at Gettysburg, Pa. Resigned March, 1864. Re-enlisted in Company 
A, Second Kentucky Cavalry, of Morgan's command. Living in 
Atlanta, Ga. 
LOCKHART, B. A.— 
Second Corporal. April 26, 1861. Captured and imprisoned. Served 
through the war. Died in Texas, 1881. 

McGURTY, JOHN— 
Third Corporal, April 26, 1861. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md., and 
died from wound. 

REXFROE, DAVID T.— 
Fourth Corporal, April 26, 1861. Wounded and captured at Chancel- 
lorsville, Va. Wounded and captured at Wilderness, 1864. Died 
in prison. 

ADAMS, DAVID— 
Private, July 17, 1861. Killed at Wilderness, Va. 

ADAMS, LEMUEL G.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Wounded at Malvern Hill, Va. 

ADAMS, JOHN Q.— 
Private, May 20, 1862. Captured. Released after the surrender. Liv- 
ing in Texas. 

ADAMS, WILLIAM S.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Died of smallpox in hospital at Richmond, 
Va., 1863. 

AMMONS, HENRY— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Died of disease in hospital, 1863. 

AMMONS, JOHN— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Killed in 
South Georgia since the war. 

ARCHER, FREDERICK— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Transferred to Navy, 1861; served on the 
Merrimac. After its destruction transferred to cavalry. 
ARNOLD, ROBERT E.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Wounded at Spottsylvania, Va., and dis- 
charged. Now a practicing physician in Arkansas. 

BACON, WILLIAM N.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Captured at Wilderness, Va. Released after 
the surrender. Died in Texas, 1893. 

BAISDEN, J. A. S.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Wounded at King's Schoolhouse, Va. Trans- 
ferred to Company K, Fourth Georgia Regiment. Wounded at 
Wilderness, Va,, 1864. Living in Atlanta, Ga. 

BAKER, CORNELIUS— 

Private, September 30, 1862. Dicharged at Martinsburg, Va. 



Muster Rolls of the Fourth Georgia Eegiment. 99 

BAKER, JOHN— 

Private. Recruit. Died in hospital. 
BAKER, WILLIAM— 

Private. Recruit. Discharged, 1864. 
BALDWIN, LUCIUS C— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Dicharged June 6, 1861, and died in Ports- 
mouth, Va., soon afterwards. 
BALDWIN, SAMUEL B.— 
Private. Recruit. Captured at Gettysburg, Pa. Wounded at Wilder- 
ness, Va. Captured at Petersburg, Va. Released from Point Look- 
out June 24, 1865. Living in Talbot county, Ga. 
BALDWIN, SIDNEY A.— 
Private, July 17, 1861. Captured at Gettysburg, Pa. Served through 
the war. Living in Talbot county, Ga. 
BARNES, NAPOLEON B.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Discharged account disability June 6, 1861. 
Dead. 
BARR, JAMES" A.— 
Private, July 1, 1861. Killed in battle. 

BASKIN, HUGH P.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Killed at Spottsylvania, Va. 

BEACH, THOMAS J.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Detailed as teamster in Ordnance Depart- 
ment. Served through the war. Living in Texas. 

BELYEU, SIMS H.— 
Private, 1862. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Living in St. Louis, 
Mo. 

BELYEU, THOMAS C— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Discharged at Camp Jackson, Va., July, 
1861. Enlisted in Cutt's Artillery. Living in Atlanta, Ga. 

BL ANTON, JAMES A.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Wounded and captured at Winchester, Va., 
1864. Released after the surrender. Died since the war. 
BOSWELL, GEORGE.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Discharged 1862. Re-enlisted and was killed 
at Winchester, Va., 1864. 

BOYNTON, AMOS C— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Captured at Petersburg, Va. Survived the 
war. Living in Texas. 

BRANNAN, TOLIVER S.— 
Private, July 17, 1861. Killed at Snickers' Gap, Va., while on picket 
duty. 



0'< ^:'-? 1: 1C7 



100 Doles Cook Brigade. 

BREEDLOVE, MOSES B.— 

Private, May 30, 18G2. Served throu?:li the war. Died in Talbot 
county, Ga., 1870. 

BROOKS, ROBERT AUGUSTUS— 
Private, July 1. 1801. Killed in battle 1803. 

BRYANT, ALLEN C— 

Private, April 20, 1801. Died at Camp Jackson, Va., July 10, 1801. 

BURGE, BURWELL— 

Private, April 20, 1801. Discharged August, 1801. Died 1880. 

BURGE, NICHOLAS— 

Private, April 20, ISOl. Discharged May 0, 1802. Living in Jack- 
sonville, Fla. 

BUSSEY, WILLLIM M.— 

Private, October 0, 1802. Died in Richmond, Va. 

CALDWELL, JAMES H.— 
Private, July 7, 18t)l. Lost eye at Morton's Ford, Va. Surrendered 
at Appomattox, Va. Died in Chipley, Ga., 1902. 

CALDWELL, P. CREDE— 

Private, July 7, 1801. Promoted Third Sergeant, Surrendered at 
Appomattox, Va. Died September, 1893. 

CARNES, HENRY— 

Private, April 20, 1801. Killed in battle 1863. 

GUILDS, JAMES M.— 

Private, April 20, 1801. Captured at Fort Steadman, Va. Died in 
Talbot county, Ga., 1893. 

CONNER, JOHN W.— 

Private. April 20, 1801. Wounded at Chancellorsville. Va. Dis- 
charged and survived the war. 

COOK, WILLIAM W.— 

Private, April 20, 1801. Discharged at Camp Jackson, Va., 1802. 

CORLEY, HIRAM P.— 
Private, April 20, 1801. Captured at Fort Steadman, Va. Released 
after the surrender. Living in Columbus, Ga. 

DANIEL, JOHN D.— 

Private, April 20, 1801. Killed at Wilderness, Va. 

DANIEL, THOMAS H.— 

Private, April 20, 1801. Served through the war. Living in Texas. 

DIXON, MUNROE— 

Private, April 20, 1801. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant 1801. Re- 
tired at expiration of term of service, April 2(>, 1802, account of 
being over age. Living in Paschal, Ga. 




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BARNARD CURLEY 
Captain Company A, Fourth Georgia Reg- 
iment. 



J. POPE STRICKLAND 
Captain Company A, Fourth Georgia Reg- 
iment. 




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ROBERT A. MIZELL 

Second Lieutenant Company A, Fourth 

Georgia Regiment. 



J. HAMP WEEKS 

Captain Company A, Fourtli Georgia 

Regiment. 




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Muster Rolls of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. 101 

DOWNS, G. T.— 

Private, July 17, ISGl. Killed in battle 18G3. 
DOWNS, J. B.— 
Private. Recruit. Captured and imprisoned. Served through the 
war. Living in Talbot county, Ga. 

EDWARDS, JAMES M.— 
Private. Recruit. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. 

ELLIS, JOHN T.— 
Private, April 2G, 18G1. Killed in battle 1862. 

EMANUEL, BENJAMIN— 

Private, Recruit. Died of smallpox in Richmond, Va., 1863. 
EMANUEL, LEWIS A.— 

Private, July 1, 1861. Killed at Fisher's Hill, Va. 
EMANUEL, ROBERT— 

Private, Recruit. Died of smallpox. 
FORD, JOHN W.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Died at Camp Jackson, Va., July 28, 1861. 
GOODWIN, JOHN L.— 

Private. April 26, 1861. Discharged 1861. Died afterwards in Tal 
bot county, Ga. 

GOODWIN, J. T.— 

Private. Recruit. Discharged. Enlisted in the cavalry service 1863. 
Died in hospital. 

GOODWIN, THOMAS J.— 
Private, July 17, 1861. Captured at Fort Steadman, Va. Released 
1865. Living in Talbot county, Ga., November, 1900. 

GOODSON, L. G.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Talbot- 
ton, Ga. 

GORMAN, JOHN B.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Furnished substitute. Died since the war 
in Mexico. 

GORMAN, O. D.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Captured at Gettysburg, Pa. Survived the 
war. Living in Talbotton, Ga. 

GOSLIN, WILLIAM C— 

Private, April 2(5, 1861. Discharged 1862. Afterwards joined the 
cavalry. Living in Arkansas. 
GRAY, JAMES H.— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Discharged May 6, 1862. Living in Taylor 
county, Ga. 



102 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

GREEX, WILLIAM P.— 

Private, April 26, 18G1. Killed at Malvern Hill, Va. 

GREER. RICHARD C— 

Private. April 26. 1861. Regimental Color-Bearer. Killed at Fisher's 
Hill, Va., 1864. 

GREER, ROBERT— 
Private. Recruit. Killed at Spottsylvanla, Va. 

GREER, THOMAS A.— 
Private. April 26. 1861. Discharged November 14, 1861. Living in 
Talbot county, Ga. 

GREER. WILLIAM A.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Living 
in Talbot county, Ga. 

HAGAX. THOMAS^ 

Private, April 26. 1861. Killed in battle in Virginia. 
HARTMAN, JOHN M.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Discharged account disability. Died since the 
war. 

HARVEY, MICHAEL H.— 

Private. April 26, 1861. Discharged August 24, 1861. Living ir 
Alabama. 

HARVEY, WILLIAM H.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Died of smallpox 1863. 

HARVEY, WILLIAM T.— 

Private. April 26, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Colum- 
bus, Ga. 

HINTON, ROBERT— 
Private, September 30. 1862. Captured at Petersburg. Va. Re- 
leased 1865. Living in Talbot county, Ga. 

HODGE, JOHN W.— 
Private. Recruit, Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. 

HOGG, HENRY— 
Private, May 20, 1862. Killed in battle 1862. 

HOGG. LEWIS— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Wounded at Chancellorsville, and died ic 
hospital from wound. 

HOGG, THOMAS— 
Private. Recruit. Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 

HOGG, WILLIAM— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Killed in battle. 



Muster Roli^ of the Foubth Georgia REGEirES'T. 103 

HOLT, C. C— 

Private. April 26. 1861. Transferred to Signal Corps 1862. Died 
in Texas 1S90. 

HOWARD, DAVIS— 

Private, October 4. 1862. Wounded and remained at home. Living 
in Talbot county, Ga, 

JAMISON, JOSEPH D.— 
Private, April 26. 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va, Died in 
Buena Vista, Ga., 1899. 
JOHNSON, JAMES M.— 

Private. April 26, 1861. Wounded and discharged. 
JOHNSON, THOMAS— 

Private. July 17. 1861. Discharged August 14, 1861. 
JOHNSON, WILLIAM E.— 
Private. July 1, 1861. Captured and imprisoned. Surrendered at 
Appomattox, Va, Living in Alabama. 
KAUGHMAN, JULIUS— 
Private. April 26, 1861. Discharged May 2, 1862. Died in Colum- 
bus, Ga.. 1892. 

KEATING, JEFFERSON P.— 
Private, April 26. 1861. Killed at Fort Steadman, Va.. March 25. 
1865. 

KINSEY, JAMES— 

Private. Recruit. Killed in battle 1862. 
KINSEY, JOHN— 

Private. Recruit. Killed in battle 1863. 
KINSEY. JOSEPH W.— 

Private. July 17. 1S61. Wounded at Wilderness. Va.. and died in 
hospital. 
KINSEY. WILLIAM PERRY— 

Private. July 17. 1S61. Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 

LEONARD, OSBORN R.— 

Private, Recruit, Died of disease 1864. 
LESSER. LEWIS— 
Private. April 26. 1861. Wounded and disabled at Sharpsburg. Md. 
Detailed as hospital nurse. Surrendered at Appomattox. Va. 
Died 1892. 

LOVE. EUGENE E.— 
Private. April 26. 1861. Discharged 1862. Killed since the war. 

McGARIGLE. OWEN— 
Private. May 20, 1862. Wounded and disabled at Spottsylvania, Va. 
Died since the war in Talbotton, Ga. 



104 Doles- Cook Brigade. 

McGEHEE, AUGUSTUS H.— 
Private, July 17, ISGl. Wounded at Frederick City, Md., July, 1864. 
and died from ^vound. 
McLANE, WILLIAM L.— 
Private, April 20, 1801. Wounded and captured at Sbarpsburg, 
Md. Died while in prison at Washington, D. C; buried at Arling- 
ton. 

MAUND, JOSEPH H.— 
Private, May 20, 1802. Wounded at Fishers Hill, Va. Living in 
Talbot county, Ga. 
MAUND, WILLIAM S.— 

Private, May 20, 1802. Killed at Cedar Creek, Va. 
MAXWELL, BENSON— 

Private. Recruit. Killed at Cedar Creek, Va. 
MAXWELL, RICHARD H.— 

Private, July 17, 1801. Discharged 1862. Living in Belton, Texas, 
MAXWELL, Z. T.— 

Private. Recruit. Killed at Wilderness, Va. 
MILLER, GUSTAVUS A.— 

Private, April 26, 1801. Killed at King's Schoolhouse, Va. 
MILLER, ISAAC R.— 
Private, April 20, 1801. Discharged account accidental wound 
October 15, 1801. Living when last heard from. 
MILLER, RO WAN- 
Private, April 26, 1801. Served through the war. Living in Tal- 
botton, Ga. 
MITCHELL, WILLIAM B.— 

Private, April 20, 1801. Fate unknown. 
MIZELL, ROBERT A.— 
Private, April 20, 1801. Promoted Second Lieutenant April, 1862. 
Wounded at Wilderness, and Winchester, Va. Resigned March 
1804. Re-enlisted in Company A, Second Kentucky Cavalry of Mor- 
gan's Command. Living iu Talbot county, Ga. 
MULKY, OSBORNE B.— 
Private, April 20, 1801. Discharged October 24, 1801. Died 1802. 

MULKY, STEPHEN— 

Private. Recruit. Killed at Wilderness, Va. 
MYNCH, CHARLES H. — 

Private, June 20, 1802. Captured at Gettysburg, Pa. Fate un- 
known. 
NELSON. R. W.— 

Private, April 20, 1861. Transferred to Navy, and served on the 



Muster Rolls of the Fourth Georgia Kegjment. 105 

Merrimac. Transferred to tbe cavalry service after the Merri- 
mac was destroyed. 

NIXON, WILLIAM— 
Private, April 20, 1861. Discharged 1802. Died in hospital. 

PARKER, JOHN S.— 
Private, April 20, 1801. Wounded at Spottsylvania, Va., and died 
from wound. 

PEARSON, CHARLES— 
Private. Recruit. Killed at Wilderness, Va. 

PERSONS, WILLIAM T.— 

Private, April 20, 1801. Discharged in 1802, afterwards joined the 
cavah'y. Served through the war. Killed accidentally 1890. 
PHILPOT, W. H.— 
Private, April 26, 1801. Promoted Assistant Surgeon May, 1801 r 
Surgeon July, 1801. Served as Brigade and Division Surgeon. 
Living in Talbot county. Ga. 

POU, SAMUEL H.— 

Private, April 20, 1801. Transferred to Third Alabama Regiment 
1802. Died since the war in Alabama. 

RAY, AUGUSTUS W.— 

Private, July 17, 1801. Lost arm at Wilderness, Va,, 1804. Sup- 
posed to be living in Alabama. 

RAY, DANIEL W.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Killed at Sharpsburg, Md. 

RICHARDS, B. A.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Died in Portsmouth, Va., May, 1861. 

ROACH, DAVID— 
Private, April 26, 1801. Captured at Gettysburg, Pa. Living in 
New Y'ork City. 

SMITH, S. G. — 
Private, July 7, 1801. Captured at Fort Steadman, Va. Released 
after the surrender. Died in Thomaston, Ga., 1890. 

SNELLINGS, .JOHN H.— 
Private, July 1, 1801. Promoted First Sergeant 1802. Captured 
and imprisoned. Served through the war. Died in Texas. 

SNELLINGS, W. HENRY— 
Private, July 1, 1801. Lost arm at Wilderness, Va., 1804. Living in 
Putnam county, Ga, 

SPARKS, J. O. A.— 
Private, April 20, 1801. Promoted Chaplain Fourth Georgia Regi- 
ment, May, 1801. Resigned 1802. Died since the war. 



106 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

SPARKS, RICHARD WATTY— 

Private, July 1, 1861. Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 

SPINKS, WILLIAM— 
Private. Recruit. Killed at Wilderness, Ya. 

STALLINGS, THOMAS H.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Killed at Wilderness, Va., 1864. 
STEVENSON, JOHN W.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va., and paroled. 
Living in Columbus, Ga. 

STORY, JOHN M.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Killed in battle 1863. 
SUTTON, STEPHEN A.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Killed at Gettysburg, Pa. 
TERRY, FREDERICK M.— 

Private, July 1, 1861. Discharged. Living in Atlanta, Ga. 
TERRY, STEPHEN— 

Private, July 1, 1861. Captured at Petersburg, Va. Released 1865. 
Living in Harris county, Ga., 1900. 

TURNER, JAMES A.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Discharged August 14, 1861. Supposed to 
be dead. 

WALTON, GEORGE— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Killed at Wilderuess, Va. 

WATLEY, JAMES S.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Detailed as teamster in Ordnance Depart 
ment. Captured at Fort Steadman, Va. Living. 
WATLEY, WILLIAM— 

Private, May 20, 1862. Killed at Cedar Creek, Va. 

WEEKS, JAMES HAMPTON— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Promoted First Lieutenant 1862. Promoted 
Captain June, 1862. Killed at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864. 

WILLIS, JAMES P.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Captured at Petersburg, Va. Survived the 
waj*. Died in Columbus, Ga., 1895. 
WILSON, W. W.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Sent home from Augusta, Ga., before being 
mustered into servive. Died during the war. 



Muster Rolls of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. 107 



MUSTER ROLL OF LaGRANGE LIGHT GUARDS, 
COMPANY B, FOURTH REGIMENT, GEORGIA 
VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, C. S. A. 

TROUP COUNTY, GEORGIA. 

.SMITH, ROBERT C— 

Captain, April 26, 1861. Promoted Major May 8, 1862. Killed at 
Sliarpsburg, Md. 

HILL, MILES H.— 

First Lieutenant, April 26, 1861. Promoted Captain May, 1862. 
Resigned December, 1862. Died in Valdosta, Ga., 1870. 

MORGAN, J. BROWN— 

Second Lieutenant, April 26, 1861. Promoted Commissary Fourth 
Georgia Regiment, May 9, 1861. Resigned October 11, 1861, and 
appointed Brigade Commissary of Colquitt's Brigade. Died near 
Atlanta, Ga., 1884. 

^ULL, GUSTAVUS A.— 

Junior Second Lieutenant, April 26, 1861. Resigned October 17, 1861. 
Promoted Lieutenant-Colonel Thirty-fifth Georgia Regiment, Octo- 
ber 15, 1861. Wounded at Seven Pines, Va., May 31, and died 
June 1, 1862. His body was never recovered. 

WARE, EUGENIUS S.— 
First Sergeant, April 26, 1861. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant 
October 19, 1861. Killed at King's Schoolhouse, Va., June, 1862. 
First member of the company killed in battle. 

DIX, WILLIAM J.— 

Second Sergeant, April 26, 1861. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md. 
Died in LaGrange, Ga., 1866. 

^COOK, BURRELL B.— 

Third Sergeant, April 26, 1861. Discharged July 26, 1862. Died in 
LaGrange, Ga., 1862. 

BOYD, ANDREW J.— 
li'ourth Sergeant, April 26, 1861. Promoted First Sergeant October 
19, 1861. Died in LaGrange, Ga., June 7, 1899. 

ZIMMER. CHRISTIAN— 
Fifth Sergeant, April 26, 1861. Promoted Second Sergeant. Living 
in Richmond, Va. 

OLINE, JOEL P.— 

Fir«t Corporal, April 26, 1861. Died in LaGrange, Ga., 1863. 



108 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

HERRING, ALEXANDER H. ("Nir")— 
Second Coi-poral, April 2«j, ISGl. Promoted Hospital Steward Fourth 
Georgia Rej2:iineiit. Surreudered at Appomattox, Va, Moved to 
Louisiana. Died 1883. 
HILL, JOSEril N.— 
Third Corporal, April 2G, ISGI. Killed at Fredericksburg, Va., 
December, 1SG2. 

HERRING, HENRY E. ("SPANK")— 
Fourth Con^oral, April 20, 1801. Survived the war. Moved to 
Louisiana. Died 1880. 

AKERS, FRANKLIN C— 

Private, April 20, 1801. Discharged July 21, 1804. Living in 
Florida. 
ARMSTRONG, WILLIAM— 
Private, April 20, 1801. Severely wounded at Winchester, Va. Liv- 
ing in Greshamville, Greene county, Ga. 
ARRINGTOX, LEWIS— 
Private, February 16, 1804. Killed at Fort Steadman, Va., March 
25, 1805. 

ASHFORD, GEORGE R.— 
Private, June 4, 1801. Discharged July 24, 1804. Died in Alabama. 

BAKER, EARLY— 

Private, April 20, 1801. Discharged July 17, 1802. Died in Floriaa 
1800. 
BODDIE, THOMAS A.— 
Private, April 20, 1801. Discharged August 21, 1804. Died in Troup 
county, Ga., 1894. 
BOYD, WILLIAM M.— 
Private, April 26, 1801. Discharged July 20, 1802. Living in 
Hogansville, Ga, 
BURKE, JOSEPH IL— 
Private, April 20, 1801. Discharged. Promoted Adjutant Geoigia- 
Militia, and Major Fourth Regiment Georgia Reserves. Died in 
LaGrange, Ga., 1899. 
CALLAWAY, ANDREW J.— 

Private, April 20, 1801. Died in Georgia ISCA. 
CAMERON, THOMAS G.— 
Private, April 20, 1801. Wounded at Wilderness, Va. Living in 
LaGrange, Ga. 
CAMP, THOMAS A.— 
Private, May 21, 1801. Survived the war. Died in Heard county^ 
Ga., 1898. 





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Muster Rolls of the Foueth Georgia Regfment. 109 

CARR, R. L.— 
Private. Recruit, Survived the war. Living in Troup county, Ga. 

COLQUITT, ROBERT A.— 

Private, April 20, 1S61. Died at Camp Jackson, Va., April 29, 18G1. 
COOK, JEREMIAH— 

Private, April 26, 18G1. Killed at Spottsylvania, Va., May 10, 1864. 

COOPER, JOHN N.— 

Private, April, 26, 1861. Served through the war. Died in La- 
Grange, Ga., 1898. 
€RUMBY, NATHAN— 

Private, July 21, 1861. Captured and died in prison. 

€UTRIGHT, THOMAS S.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Promoted Coi'poral. Killed while carrying 
regimental colors at Sharpsburg, Md. 

DIX, JAMES T.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Died in LaGrange, Ga., 1862. 

DIX, ROBERT L.— 
Private, February 23, 1863. Wounded in battle. Surrendered at 
Appomattox, Ya. Living in LaGrange, Ga. 

ELLIS, CHARLES S.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md. Courier for 
General R. E. Rodes, 1863. Surrendered at Appomattox, Ya. 
When last heard from he was in the U. S. Navy at New York. 

EYANS, WILLIAM S.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Promoted Second Lieutenant 1862. Lost 
leg at Monocacy, Md., July 9, 1864. Living in LaGrange, Ga. 

<iAY, C. E.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Wounded in battle April 26, 1864. 

GAY, JOHN T,— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant 18G2. 
Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md. Promoted First Lieutenant 1862. 
Wounded at Fort Steadman, and died in Richmond, Ya. 

GIBSON, ALLEN C— 

Pri^-ate, .April 26, 1861. Promoted Second and First Lieutenant, 
and Captain 1862. Captured at Spottsylvania, Ya. One of the 
600 Confederate officers exposed to the fire of our guns on Morris 
Island, S. C. Living in Gabbett, Ala. 
GIBSON, ABEL T.— 

Private, June 4, 1861. Promoted Corporal. Killed near Washington, 
D. C, July 12, 1864. 
<JIBSON, THAD— 

Private, June 4, 1861. Killed at Petersburg, Va. 



110 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

GRACE, CHARLES D.— ' 

Private, April 26, 1861. Promoted Sergeant in Corps Sbarpshooters.. 
It is believed that he killed General Sedgwick. He, with eight 
others, captured 125 cavalrymen near Chancellorsville, Va., 1862^ 
Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Living in Bonham, Texas. 
GREENE, JOHN C— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Wounded and captured at Morton's Ford,~ 
Va. Died in prison February 6, 1863. Buried at Arlington, D. C. 
GREENE, WILLIAM H.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Discharged August 24, 1861. Died at home- 
1862. 

GRIFFIN, CHARLES H.— 
Private, February 16, 1864. Lost arm at Wilderness, Va. Living ins 
LaGrange, Ga. 

GRIGGS, E. Y.- 

Private, June 4, 1861. Discharged May 6, 1862. Died in Putnam^ 
county, Ga., 1862. 
HOGAN, WILLIAM— 

Private, June 4, 1861. Survived the war. Living in Corinth, Ga. 
HOPSON, FRANCIS G.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 
HOPSON, WILLIAM B.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Discharged August 14, 1861. Living in: 
Hogansville, Ga. 
HUMBER, ROBERT C— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Promoted Second Lieutenant October 16, 
1861. Retired at expiration of his term of service, April, 1862.. 
Died in Putnam county, Ga., 1891. 
HUNTLEY, W. H.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Promoted Second Sergeant. Discharged 
May 1, 1862. Joined a Georgia cavalry regiment. Participated- 
in the St. Albans raid. Died in New Castle, Pa., 1894. 
HUTCHINS, WILLIAM H.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Died in service 1862. 
JACKSON, ROBERT H.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Discharged November 14, 1861. Died in' 
Troup coun,ty, Ga., 1891. 

JOHNSON, ERASTUS T. F.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Promoted First Sergeant. Killed at Wilder- 
ness, Va. 

JOHNSON, FLETCHER— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Killed at Wilderness, Va, 



Muster Rolls of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. Ill 

JONES, GEORGE W.— 

Private, April 2G, 18G1. Discharged November 14, 1861. Died of 
consumption 1882. 

JONES, GEORGE W. (No 2. )— 
Private, September 25, 1862. Survived the war. Died in, Troup^ 
county, Ga.. 1882. 

JONES, JOHN A.— 

Private, June 4, 1861. Killed at Spottsylvania, Va., May 12, 1864. 
JONES, JOHN M.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Killed at Spottsylvania, Va. May 12, 1864. 
KIDD, JOHN T.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Texas^ 
LANDRUM, JOHN T.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Discharged November 14, 1861. Died 1863. 
LANDRUM, ROBERT W.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Killed at Wilderness, Va. 

LAW, CHARLES H. — 
Private, April 26, 1861. Promoted Sergeant-Major Fourth Georgia 
Regiment. Promoted First Lieutenant and A. D. C. on staff of 
General Philip Cook. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Died in 
Savannah, Ga., 1879. 

LAW, JO SI AH H.— 

Private, June 4, 1861. Killed at Gettysburg, Pa. 
LIKENS, RUFUS G.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. A man who always "toted his own skillet."" 
Served through the war. Living in Georgia. 

McGEE, GEORGE W.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Survived the war. Died in Atlanta, Ga., 
July 21. 1897. 

McGEE, J. M.— 
Private, June 4, 1861. Served through the war. Living in, Troup 
county, Ga. 

McGEE, THO'MAS W.— 
Private, June 4, 1861. Transferred to Fourth Georgia Battalion^ 
Died in LaGrange, Ga., 1890. 

MAFFETT, THOMAS P.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Transferred to Signal Coi-ps November 1, 
1862. Died in Atlanta, Ga., 1868. 

MEHLINGER, MAYER— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Served through the war. Died in Pine- 
Bluff, Ark., 1899. 

MILLER, FRANCIS T.— 
Private, July 30, 1861. Killed at Snickers' Gap, Va., July 18, 1864. 



112 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

MILLER, PALMER L. — 
Private, April 2(), 18G1. Promoted Quartermaster-Sergeant of tlie 
Fourth Georgia Regiment, aud Brigade Quartermaster-Sergeant. 
Served tlirougli tlie war. Died in LaGrange, Ga., April 13, 1870. 
3100RE, THOMAS R.— 

Private, June 4, 1861. Discharged August 21, 18G1. Living in At- 
lanta, Ga, 

MOORE, SAMUEL— 

Private, April 2G, 1861. Wounded at Shai-psburg, Md. Served 
through the war. Living in Texas. 
MOORE, WATSON N.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Killed at Malvern Hill, Ya. 
MOOTY, NATHAN A.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Promoted First Sergeant. Wounded at Fort 
Steadman, Ya. Died in LaGrange, Ga., 1892. 
MOOTY, J. PAYNE— 
Private, June 4, 1861. Discharged September 7, 1861. Living in 
LaGrange, Ga. 
MORGAN, CHARLES S.— 

Private, June 4, 1861. Killed at Williamsport, Md., July 6, 1863. 

MORTON, ADOLUHUS S.— 
Private, June 4, 1861. Died in Norfolk, Ya., August 14, 1861. 

MORTON, SAMUEL A.— 

Private, June 4, 1861. Died in Norfolk, Ya., August 15, 1861. 
MOSS, NATHANIEL S.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Killed at Gettysburg, Pa. 

:XORWOOD, JAMES A.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Promoted First Lieutenant 1862. Resigned 
December 12, 1862. He was a veteran of the Mexican war, and 
a member of the famous Palmetto Regiment, and was promoted 
First Lieutenant for gallantry at the storming of Chapultepec. 
In recognition of his gallant service the State of South Carolina 
presented him with a very large and handsome medal, and an 
elegant sword. Died in Georgia 1866. 
PERDUE, WILLIAM G.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Died in Richmond, Ya., 1862. 
PERDUE, WILLIAM J.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Died of typhoid fever in Richmond, Ya., 
July 10, 1862. 

FERRYMAN, STEPHEN C— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Surrendered at Appomattox, Ya. Died 
since the war in Ai-kansas. 



Muster RoLia of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. 113 

PHILLIPS, GEORGE W — 
Private, April 26, 1861. Killed at Cedar Creek, Va. 

PHILLIPS, JOHN D — 
Private, June 4, 1861. Promoted Corporal. Served through the 
war. Died in Hogan,sville, Ga., 1869. 

PHILLIPS, WILLIAM A.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Killed at Monocacy, Md. Buried at Arling- 
ton, D. C. 
RAMSEY, ELBERT C— 
Private, June 4, 1861. Discharged August 3, 1862. Died in Milledge- 
ville, Ga.. 1890. 

REID, WILLIAM A.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Killed at Malvern Hill, Va. 

RIDLEY, ROBERT B.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Promoted Sergeant; Junior Second Lieuten- 
ant, 1862. Wounded in shoulder and leg at Spottsylvania, Va. Sur- 
rendered at Appomattox, Va. Now a prominent citizen, and noted 
physician of Atlanta, Ga. 

ROBERTS, GEORGE— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Killed at Wilderness, Va. 

ROBERTS, WILEY P.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Survived the war. Died in West Point, 
Ga., 1892. 

ROBERTSON, GEORGE— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Coweta 
county, Ga. 

ROBERTSON, WILLIAM A.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Discharged May, 1862. Living in San 
Francisco, Cal. 
ROBINSON, ANDREW J.— 
Private, March 4, 1863. Transferred to Phillips' Legion. Wounded 
at Win,chester, Va., and died from wound. 
ROWLAND, SAMUEI^ 
Private, June 4, 1861. Discharged June 27, 1861. Died in Atlanta, 
Ga., 1884. 

ROWLAND, WILEY B.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Died in 
Troup county, Ga., 1888. 
ROSE, EDWARD— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Served through the war. Now a whole- 
sale dry-goods merchant of Chicago, 111. 
SAMPLE, JOHN N.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Killed at Wilderness, Va. 
8d-c 



114 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

SHEPHERD, ROBERT S.— 
Private, April 2t>, 18G1. Served through the war. Living in Quin- 
lan, Texas. 
SIMS, ROBERT D.— 
Private, April 20, 1861. Discharged June 24, 18G2. Living in Ala- 
bama. 

SLOAN, A. B.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Killed at Winchester, Va., September 19, 
1864. 

SLOAN, LEWIS R.— 
Private, September 26, 1862. Killed at Winchester, Va. 

SPEER, JOHN A.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Discharged November 14, 1861. Died at 
Clinton Springs, N. Y., 1879. 

STANLEY, HENRY O.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Wounded at Malvern Hill, Va. Moved to 
Texas. Died 1874. 

STERLING, JOHN R.— 
Private, Jun,e 4, 1861. Survived the war. Living in Troup county, 
Ga. 
STRICKLAND, JAMES K.— 
Private, April 26, 1861, Wounded at Malvern Hill, Va. Served 
through the war. Died 1882. 

STRICKLAND, WILLIS W.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Discharged November 14, 1861. Died 1887. 

SWINDLE, W. J. C— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Died of typhoid fever in Richmond, Va., 
June 15. 1862. 

SWINDLE, SAMUEI^ 
Private, June 4, 1861. Died at Camp Jackson, Va., June 14, 1861. 

TERRY, WILLIAM W.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Died in Norfolk, Va., July 22, 1861. 

TODD, WILLIAM— 
Private, April 1, 1864. Killed at Wilderness, Va. 

TOMLINSON, JAMES M.— 
Private, April 28, 1862. Served through the war. Died in La- 
Grange, Ga., 1898. 

TRAYLOR, HILL M.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Promoted First Sergeant. Killed at 
Chancellorsville, Va. 

TRAYLOR, JOHN H.— 
Private, June 4, 1861. Wounded at Warrenton Springs, Chancellors- 
ville, and Spottsylvania, Va. Transferred to Quartermasters' De- 



Muster Rolls of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. 115 

partment October, 1864. He is now a resident of the city of 
Dallas. 
TRIMBLE, JOSEPH— 
Private, June 4, 1861. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va. Served 
through the war. Died in Hogansville, Ga,, August 28, 1896. 
TRIMBLE, MOSES M.— 

Private, June 4, 1861. Killed at Malvern Hill, Ya. 
TRIMBLE, WILLIAM S.— 
Private, June 4, 1861. Survived the war. Died in Hogansville, 
Ga., 1896. 
TRUITT, SAMUEL C— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Served through the war. Living in West 
Point, Ga. 

TUGGLE, WILLIAM O.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Discharged July 24, 1862. Died in Thomas- 
ville, Ga.. 1885. 

TURNER, STERLING G.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Transferred to Company H, Sixth Georgia 
Regiment, December 25, 1862. Killed at Kinston, N. C. 
TURNER, WILLIAM W.— 
Private, July 27, 1861. Discharged July 24, 1862. Living in La- 
Grange, Ga. 

WALKER, GEORGE C.— 

Private, June 4, 1861. Died in Norfolk, Va., September 14, 1861. 
WARE, JOSEPH J.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va. 
Wounded in battle July 10, 1864. Courier for Generals Hill and 
Rodes. Served through the war. Died in LaGrange, Ga., June 
20, 1902. 

WARTHEN, JOE— 
Private. Recruit. Wounded at Winchester, Va. Living in Coweta 
county, Ga. 

WESTHEIMER, AARON A.— 

Private, July 15, 1861. Survived the war. Living in Baltimore, Md. 
WESTHEIMER, HENRY— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Detailed as musician in Fourth Georgia 
Band. Survived the war. Living in Baltimore, Md. 
WHITFIELD, BENJAMIN F.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Wounded in battle at Appomattox, Va., 
April 9, 1865. Served through the war. Living in Savannah, Ga. 
WHITFIELD, MATHEW S.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Killed by railroad train in Troup county, 
Ga., 1870. 



116 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

WILDER, WILLIAM W. — 
Private, April 26, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Ala- 
bama. 

WILKES, LUCIUS C— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Discharged November 14, 1861. Died in 
Georgia 1862. 
WILKES, ROBERT B.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Killed at Winchester, Va., September 19, 
1864. 
WILKINSON, NEALY J.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Served through the war. Died in Troup 
county, Ga.. 1887. 
WILLIAMS, ELISHA D.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Promoted Ambulance Sergeant of Doles* 
Brigade. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. While on a trip on the 
Chattahoochee river in 1887, the steamboat Rebecca Everingham, 
on which he was a passenger, caught fire and he was burned to 
death between Columbus, Ga., and Eufaula, Ala. 

WILLIAMS. U. B.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Killed at Cedar Creek, Va., October 19, 1864. 
WILSON, WILEY W.— 
Private, May 16, 1862. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Killed by 
accident at Lake Geneva, Ga., 1898. 
WISE, ISAAC— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Promoted Second Sergeant. Survived 
the war. Died in New York City 1893. 



Muster Rolls op the Fourth Georgia Regiment. 117 



MUSTER ROLL OF THE TWIGGS COUNTY VOL- 
UNTEERS, COMPANY C, FOURTH REGIMENT, 
GEORGIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, C. S. A. 

TWIGGS COUNTY, GEORGIA. 

FOLSOM, JAMES M — 

Captain, April 25, 1861. Resigned October 22, 1861. Died since 
the war. 

CHAMPION, E. F.— 

First Lieutenant, April 25, 1861. Resigned October 22, 1861. Joined 
another command and was killed in battle at Griswoldville, Ga., 
1864. 

NASH, E. A.— 

Second Lieutenant, April 25, 1861. Promoted First Lieutenant 
August 26, 1861. Captain 1861. Major 1863. Lieutenant-Colonel 
1864. In command of Cook's Brigade when Lee's army sur- 
rendered at Appomattox, Va. Living in, Helena, Ga. 

MORTON, E. G.— 
Junior Second Lieutenant, April 25, 1861. Resigned August 26, 1861. 
Died since the war. 
SOLOMON, M. E.— 
First Sergeant, April 25, 1861. Promoted Second Lieutenant 
August 26, 1861; First Lieutenant October 1, 1861. Resigned May 
21, 1862. Died since the war. 
NASH, L. A.— 
Second Sergeant, April 25, 1861. Junior Second Lieutenant and 
Second Lieutenant 1862; Captain 1863. Wounded at Chancellors- 
ville, Va. Elected sheriff of Twiggs county, Ga., and resigned 
January, 1864. Living in Twiggs county, Ga. 
EPPS, EDW^ARD D.— 

Third Sergeant, April 26, 1861. Killed at Malvern Hill, Va., 1862. 
SANDERS, JEREMIAH— 
Fourth Sergeant, April 25, 1861. Promoted First Lieutenant, Cap- 
tain, January, 1864. Died since the war. 
EPPS, JOHN E.— 

First Corporal, April 26, 1861. Killed at Sharpsburg, Md. 
JBSSUP, BENJAMIN— 

Second Corporal, April 26, 1861. Captured and died in prison 1864. 
JESSUP, SAMUEL— 
Third Corporal, April 25, 1861. Promoted Second Sergeant. 
Died and was buried at Arlington, D. C. 



118 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

DONNALLY, P.— 

Fourth Corporal, April 25, 1861. Served through the war. Returned 
to Ireland after surrender. 

LAMB, A. J.— 
Surgeon of Company, April 25, 1861. Survived the war. Died since 
the surrender. 

ADKINS, CALVIN— 
Private, June 20, 1862. Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 

ADKINS, JOHN H.— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md. Served 
through the war. Living in Jefifersonville, Ga. 

ALEXANDER, FRANKLIN— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Killed at Wilderness, Va. 

ALEXANDER, SAMUEL— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Served through the war; died afterwards. 

ANDERSON, L. W.— 

Private, October 8, 1863. Killed in battle. 

ANDREWS, J. B.— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Discharged July 15, 1861. 

ANDREWS, T. H.— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Wounded at Fort Steadman, Va. Died in 
Florida since the war. 

ARRINGTON, R. H.— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Lost arm at Wilderness, Va. Living in 
Twiggs, county, Ga. 

BABBETT, JOSEPH— 
Private, September 25, 1863. Discharged account ill health. Die<J 
since the war. 

BABBETT, WILLIAM J.— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Killed at Wilderness, Va. 
BALKCOM, BRYANT— 

Musician, April 25, 1861. Died in service. 
BALKCOM, LaFAYETTE— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Promoted First Sergeant. Transferred 
to Company B, Twelfth Georgia Regiment. Living in Jones 
county, Ga. 

BALKCOM, W. T.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Killed at Winchester, Va. 
BARRENTINE, WILLIAM— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Wounded at Seven Pines, Va., and died 
from wound. 



Muster Rolls of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. 119 

BECKHAM, A. F.- 

Private April 25, 18G1. Discharged August 14, 1861. Died since the 
war. 

BIRDSONG, BENJAMIN— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Killed at Wilderness, Va. 
BLALOCK, SAUNDERS— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Died at Camp Jaclison, Va., August 4, 1861. 
BURKETT, ASA— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Killed at Malvern Hill, Va. 

BURKETT, SOLOMON— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Killed at Malvern Hill, Va. 

CALHOUN, B. D.— 
Private, June 9, 1861. Promoted Second Lieutenant 1864. Killed 
at Winchester, Va. 

CANNON, JAMES— 
Private, 1863. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Died since the 
war. 

CLANCE, JOHN— 
Private. Recruit. Wounded at Petersburg, Va., April, 1865. Sur- 
rendered at Appomattox, Va, Living in Big Oak, Ga. 
CLANCE, REUBEN— 

Private, February 20, 1864. Killed at Petersburg, Va., 1865. 
CLANCE, WILEY— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Wounded at Malvern Hill, Va. Served 
through the war. Died October 21, 1896. 
CLANCE, WILLIAM H.— 

Private. Recruit. Killed at Wilderness, Va. 
COLLINS, A. J.— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Dan- 
ville, Twiggs county, Ga. 

COLLINS, ETHERIDGE— 

Private, October 6, 1862. Killed at Wilderness, Va. 
COLLINS, JACOB— 

Private, February 8, 1864. Killed at Wilderness, Va. 
COLLINS, J. DENHAM— 

Private, July 9, 1861. W^ounded by shell at Gettysburg, Pa. Living 
in Twiggs county, Ga. 

COLLINS, JOHN O.— 
Private, August 25, 1861. Killed near Appomattox Court House, Va., 
1865. 

COLLINS, LEWIS M.— 
Private, October 6, 1862. Served through the war. Died after sur- 
render. 



120 DoLE8-CooK Brigade. 

COOK, GEORGB- 
Private, April 25, 1861. Died in service. 

CRAWFORD, BENJAMIN— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Killed at WilderneBS, Va. 

CRAWFORD, JAMES— 
Private, 1862, Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Died since the 
war. 
CRAWFORD, JOHN— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Served through the war. Died after sur- 
render. 
CRAWFORD, STEPHEN— 
Private. Recruit. Wounded at Fort Steadman, Va. Living in 
Tvriggs county, Ga. 
CRAWFORD, WASHINGTON F.— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Died at Camp Jackson, Va., August 12,. 
1861. 

CRAWFORD, WILLIAM— 
Private. Recruit Served through the war; died aften^-ards. 

DAVIS, JOHN— 
Private, February 8, 1862. Killed at Spottsylvania, Va. 

DAY, WILLIAM— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Living^ 
in Twiggs county, Ga. 
DENNINGTON, CHARLES— 
Private. Recruit. Captured. Died of measles in prison at Rock Is- 
land 1864. 
DENSON, BERRIEN— 
Private, June 20, 1861. Served through the war. Died after sur- 
render. 

DENSON, ELIAS J.— 

Private, June 20, 1861. Served through the war. Died after the 
surrender. 
DENSON, JOHN B.— 

Private, June 20, 1861. Served through the war. Died after the 
surrender. 
DENSON J. J.— 
Private, June 20, 1861. Promoted Second Lieutenant Died in 
hospital December 17, 1861. 

DENSON, TILMAN S.— 

Private, June 20, 1861. Killed in battle. 

DYKES J. D.— 
Private, June 20, 1861. Wounded May 8, 1863. Served through the 
war. Living in Twiggs county, Ga. 



Muster Rolls of the Fourth Georgla. Regiment. 121 

DYER, JOHN D.— 
Private, February 8, 1862. Surrendered at Appomattox, Ya. 

DYER, THOMAS— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Served through the war. Died after the- 
surrender in Twiggs county, Ga. 

DYER, WILLIAM— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. 

ENGLISH, J. M.— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Survived the war. Living in Zolata, Ga. 

EPPS, DANIEI^ 

Private, August 28, 1861. Killed at Wilderness, Va. 

EPPS, ELBERT— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Wounded June 25, 1864. Surrendered at 
Appomattox, Va. Living in Twiggs county, Ga. 
EVANS, DANIELr- 

Private, June 20, 1861. Killed at Malvern Hill, Va. 

EVANS, ROBERT— 
Private. Recruit. Died in service. 

EVANS, WILLIAM N.— 
Private. Recruit. Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 

FLOWERS. MARTIN— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Died in service. 
FOWLER, SAMUEL R.— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Died of measles April 2, 1862. 

GREEN, ROBERT— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Fate unknown. 

GREEN, WESLEY— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Discharged July 24, 1861. Died since th<> 
war. 

HAMMERICK, WILLIAM J.— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Wounded at Seven Pines, Va., and died of 
wound. 

HAMMOCK, ALBERT— 

Private. Recruit. Killed at Spottsylvania, Va. 
HAMMOCK, JOHN— 

Private. Recruit. Killed at Spottsylvania, Va. 

HAMMOCK, J.— 
Private. Recruit. Served through the war. Died after the sur^ 
render. 

HARDY, WILLIAM— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 



122 Doles Cook Brigade. 

HARRISON, J. H.— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Died in Navy Yard Hospital, Va., July 5, 
1861. 
HARRISON, W. J.— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Wounded at Wilderness, Va. Served through 
the war. Living in Macon, Ga. 
HENDERSON, BRADY— 

Private. Recruit. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Died since the 
war. 
HENDERSON, EPHRIAM— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Killed at Malvern Hill, Va. 

HENDERSON, JOHN— 
Private. Recruit. Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 

HINSON, TILMAN— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Served through the war. Died after the 
surrender. 
HOWELL, WRIGHT S.— 

Private, September 29, 1863. Died in service. 

JESSUP, JOHN H.— 
Private, February 9, 1863. Captured at Spottsylvania. Living 
in Big Oak, Ga, 

KENNINGTON, HIRAM— 

Private, March 4, 1862. Killed at Snickers' Gap, Va. 
KENNINCiTON, JAMES— 

Private, March 4, 1862. Surrendered at Appomattox, Ya. Died 
since the war. 

KENNINGTON, JOHN— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Lost leg at King's Schoolhouse, Va. Died 
since the war. 

KENNINGTON, WILLIAM G.— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Wounded at Wilderness, Va. Served 
through the war. Living in Twiggs county, Ga. 
T^aGRANGE, EUGENE— 

Private. Recruit Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 
LANIER, ALEXANDER— 

Private, April fi5, 1861. Discharged June, 1862. Died since the 
war. 
LANIER, AVERY— 

Private, February 13, 1864. Killed at Spottsylvania, Va. 

LOCKHART, JAMES— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Discharged December 4, 1861. Died in 
Wilkinson county, Ga., since the war. 



Muster Rolxs of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. 123 

XORD, JESSE W — 

Private, October 9, 1863. Killed at Wilderness, Va. 

McGEE, WILLIAM K.— 

Private, August 2, 1862. Fate unknown. 

MARTIN, E. B.— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md., and died 
of wound. 

MARTIN, GREEN B.— 
Private, November 22, 1863. Killed at Spottsylvania, Va. 

MARTIN, H. J.— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Captured and died in prison. 

MARTIN, H. M.— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Lost arm at Winchester, Va., 1864. Living 
in Twiggs county, Ga. 

MARTIN, JAMES M.— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Promoted Second Corporal. Served 
ttirough the war. Died after the surrender. 

MARTIN, JOHN M.— 
Private, February 15, 1863. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Died 
since the war. 

MARTIN, J. W.— 
Private. Recruit. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Died since 
the war. 

-MARTIN, WILLIAM F.— 

Private, October 1, 1861. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Living 
at Hughes Springs, Texas. 

MATHIS, WILLIAM D.— 
Private, September 14, 1863. Captured and imprisoned. Died 
since the war. 
MAXWELL, JOHN T.— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Died in service 1864. 

MAXWELL, JOSEPH— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Died in service September 22, 1861. 

MIMS, DAVID— 
Private. Recruit. Served through the war. Died after the sur 
render. 

MOORE, GEORGE— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Transferred to Navy. Served on the Merri- 
mac. Died since the war. 

-MOORE, JOHN H.— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Killed at Chancellors ville, Va. 



124 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

MOORE, P. T.— 
Private. Recruit. Transferred to Navy. Served on the Merrimac;. 
Died in service. 

MURPHEY, M. N.— 

Private, April 25, 18G1. Served through the war. Died after the 
surrender. 
NICHOLS, YANCEY— 
Private. Recruit. Survived the war. Living in Paulding county,. 
Ga. 
PETTIS, WILLIAM J.- 

Private, April 25, 1865. Killed in battle. 
PETTIS, WILLIAM M.— 
Private, February 9, 1863. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Died' 
since the war. 

PROCTOR, THOMAS— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Killed at Chancellorsville, Ya. 

PROCTOR, WITT— 
Private. Recruit. Killed in battle. 

REYNOLDS, JOHN— 
Private. Recruit. Died In service. 

RHODES, WILLIAM H.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Died in service. 

RICHARDSON, E. A.— 

Private, October 3, 1863. Killed in battle. 
ROBERTSON, T. J.— 

Musician, April 26, 1861. Served through the war. Died after thf 
surreuder. 

ROGERS, STEPHEN.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Served through the war. Died after 
the surrender. 

RYLES, COATES— 

Private, November 3, 1862. Served through the war. Died after 
the surrender. 
RYLES. DAVID J.— 
Private, September 4, 1862. Served through the war. Died after 
the surrender. 
SKETOE, WILLIAM— 
Private. Recruit. Died in service. 

SMITH, GEORGE— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Killed in battle. 

SMITH, THOMAS— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Killed in battle. 



Muster Rolls of the Fourth Georgla. Regiment. 125 

SOUTHALL, B. F.— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Transferred to Navy. Served on the Merri- 
mac. Living in Florida, 
STAFFORD, JOSHUA— 

Musician, April 25, 1861. Died in service. 
TAYLOR, CHARWICK— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Died of typhoid fever in Richmond, Va. 
^HARP, M. A.— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Transferred to Navy. Served on the Merri- 
mac. Died in Worth county, Ga., 1899. 
THARP, SIMEON— 

Private. Recruit. Promoted First Lieutenant, Served through 
the war. Died after the surrender. 
TIDWBLL. JONATHAN— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Discharged July 18, 1861. 
VANN, APPLING— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Captured and died in prison. 
TANN, REUBEN— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Fate unknown. 
AVE ST, JOHN W.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Wounded at Malvern Hill, Va. Surrendered 
at Appomattox, Va. Living in Twiggs county, Ga. 
WESTON, HEZEKIAH— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Served through fhe war. Died Septemoer, 
1865. 
WILLIAMS, ALLEN— 

Private. Recruit. Killed in battle in Virginia 1864. 
WILLIAMS, BENJAMIN— 

Private. Recruit. Died in service. 
WILLIAMS, FRANKLIN— 

Private, August 3, 1861. Died in Richmond, Va. 
WILLIAMS, JOHN W.— 

Private, September 15, 1863. Killed in battle. 
^'ILLIAMS, JOSEPH— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Discharged June 6, 1861. Died since the 
war. 
WILLINGHAM, D. S.— 

Private. Recruit. Died of chronic dysentery February 14, 1865. 
WISE, JOSEPH W.— 

Private, September 4, 1862. Wounded at Wilderness, Va. Sur- 
rendered at Appomattox, Va. Died since the war. 
WITT, JAMES— 

Private. Recruit. Fate unknown. 
YOUNG, JOHN B.— 

Private, October 7, 1863. Wounded in battle. Living in Jones 
county, Ga. 



126 Doles-Cook Brigade. 



MUSTER ROLL OF WEST POINT GUARDS, COM- 
PANY D, FOURTH REGIMENT, GEORGIA VOL- 
UNTEER INFANTRY, C. S. A. 

TROUP COUNTY, GEORGIA. 

MATHEWS, JOHN J — 

Captain, April 26, 1801. Promoted Lieutenant-Colonel May 8,. 
1861. Re-elected Lieutenant-Colonel April 26, 1862. Resigned on- 
account of ill health May 8, 1862. Died 1869. 

TODD, GEORGE FAUNTLEROY— 
First Lieutenant, April 26, 1861. Promoted Captain May 8, 3861. 
Wounded at Malvern Hill, Va., and died in Richmond Va., a few- 
days afterwards. 

HILL, WADE— 

Second Lieutenant, April 26. 1861. Promoted First Lieutenant May^ 
8, 1861. Resigned May, 1862. Joined an Alabama regiment. 

CROFT, L. L.— 
Junior Second Lieutenant, April 26, 1861. Resigned May, 1862. Died" 
since the war. 

WINSTON, O. D.— 
First Sergeant, April 26, 1861. Promoted Junior Second Lieu- 
tenant May, 1862. Resigned November, 1862. Died in West 
Point, Ga., February 6, 1900. 

FROST, ADAM C— 
Second Sergeant, April 26, 1861. Promoted First Lieutenant April' 
28, 1862. Captain July 15, 1862. Killed at Winchester, Va., 1864. 
CHERRY, SAMUEL— 
Third Sergeant, April 26, 1861. Promoted Second Sergeant April 28, 
1862. Detailed in Quartermaster's Department 1862. Served* 
through the war; died afterwards. 

MORRIS, JAMES T.— 
Fourth Sergeant, April 26, 1861. Wounded and disabled at Chancel- 
lorsville, Ya., and discharged. Dead. 
BRIDGES, JOHN R.— 
Fifth Sergeant, April 26, 1861. Discharged account disability August 
1, 1861. 

HULBERT, WILLIAM W.— 
First Corporal, April 26, 1861. Promoted First Sergeant April 28, 
1862; Junior Second Lieutenant July 15, 1862; Second and First 
Lieutenant 1863. Captured at Spottsylvania, Ya., while command- 
ing Sharpshooters of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. 



^^ 





GEORGE FAUXTLEROY TOnn 

Captain Company D, Fourth Georgia Regi- 

aient. 



ADAM C. FROST 
Captain Company D, Fourth Georgia Regi- 
ment. 





THOMAS J. ATKIXSOX 
First Lieutenant Company D, Fourth Geor- 
gia Regiment. 



AVILLIAM W. HLLBERT 

First Lieutenant Company D, Fourth 

Georgia Regiment. 





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Muster Rolls of the Fourth Georgll Regiment. 127 

TRAYLOR, GEORGE F.— 
Second Corporal, April 26, 1861. Appointed Color Guard 1861.. 
Discharged (over age) August 18, 1862. 

DUFFIE, WILEY— 
Third Corporal, April 26, 1861. Discharged (over age) November 
27, 1861. Died in Atlanta, Ga., 1896. 

HEYMAN, ISAAC— 

Fourth Corporal, April 26, 1861. Wounded and disabled at Mal- 
vern Hill, Va. Detailed in Quartermaster's Department at West 
Point, Ga. 

HILL, JAMES M.— 
Drummer, April 26, 1861. Killed near Petersburg, Va., 1865. 

HURST, MARSHALI^ 
Fifer, April 26, 1861. Transferred to an Alabama regiment Decem- 
ber 1. 1861. 

ALLEN, JOHN W.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Wounded at Winchester, Va., September 
19, 1864, and died October, 1864. 

ALSTON, NOAH— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Served through the war. Subsequent his- 
tory unknown. 

ANDERSON, JAMES M.— 
Private, July 21, 1861. Promoted Sergeant^ May, 1862. Killed at 
Wilderness, Va. 

ANDERSON, NICHOLAS— 
Private, July 21, 1861. Discharged July 20, 1862 (under age). 

ASKEW, BENJAMIN— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Discharged at Camp Jackson, Va., Septem- 
ber 16, 186 L. Living in Cusseta, Ala. 

ATKINS, THOMAS G.— 
Private, June 21, 1861. Discharged 1862 (under age). 

ATKINSON, THOMAS J.— 
Private, June 21, 1861. Promoted Second Lieutenant April 28, 
1862; First Lieutenant July 15, 1862. Died in camp near Guinnie's 
Station, Va., 1862. 

BAKER, JAMES S.— 
Private, September 10, 1861. Surrendered at Appomattox. Va. Liv- 
ing in West Point, Ga. 
BLACKWELL, ROBERT— 
Private, July 30, 1862. Remained with the company only a few 
days. 



128 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

BLEDSOE, WARREN B.— 
Private, April 26, 18G1. Wounded and captured at Petersburg, Va., 
April 2, 18G5. Released June, 1865. Living in LaFayette, Ala, 

BOYD, WILLIAM M.— 
Private, May 8, 1862. Died in Richmond, Va., September, 1862. 

BRADY, KING— 

Private, May 13, 1862. Served through the vrar. Living in Texas. 

BRIDGES, DR. G. R.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Discharged account disability at Camp 
Jackson, Va. 

BROOKS, JOHN W.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Discharged account disability September 16, 
1861. 

CHAPPELL, A. H.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Discharged June 30, 1862. Joined Western 
army and was killed by lightning. 

CHERRY, JAMES A.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va, Living in 
Texas. 

CHERRY, WILLIAM C— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Promoted Sergeant and Second Lieuten- 
ant. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Was one of the 600 Con- 
federate officers who were placed under fire of our guns on 
Morris Island, S. C. Remained in prison until close of war. 

CHISHOLM, ALBERT F.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Discharged 1862. Living in Atlanta, Ga. 

<::hristian, john n.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Detailed in hospital at Camp Jackson, Va. 
Died July. 1870. 

CLOUD, WILLIAM J.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Captured in the Valley of Virginia 1864. 

€OLLINS, ROBERT E.— 

Private, June 21, 1861. Wounded and disabled at Chancellorsville, 
Va. Detailed in hospital. Living in Columbus, Ga. 

COTTON, ALONZO T.— 

Private, May 13, 1862. Survived the war. Living in Bozeman, Ala. 
"COOPER, WATSON H.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Discharged account disability at Camp 
Jackson, Va. Living in Anniston, Ala. 

CRAWFORD, WILLIAM J.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Discharged account disability. 



Muster Rolls of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. 129 

DANIELS, JOHN T.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Discharged accoun,t disability at Camp 
Jackson, Va. Living in Fulton county, Ga. 

DAVENPORT, THOMAS M.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Killed at Cbancellorsville, Va. 
EDWARDS, MICKELBERRY E.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Wounded at Kinig's Schoolhouse, Va. Ap- 
pointed musician. Discharged (over age). Living in Atlanta, Ga. 
FERRELL, MICKELBERRY P.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Discharged 1861. Promoted Captain in 
an Alabama Regiment. 
FERRELL, P. E.— 
Private, June 21, 1861. Died in hospital at Portsmouth, Va. Septem- 
ber 30, 1861. 
FREEL, W. P.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Killed at Fort Steadman, Va., March 25, 
1865. 

FREESLEBEN, JACOB— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Captured at Fisher's Hill, Va. Released 
after the surrender. Living in West Poin,t, Ga. 
FROST, B. C— 
Private, August 21, 1861. Discharged at Camp Ripley, Va., July 20, 
1862 (under age). 
GILBERT, WILLIAM A.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Detailed in Medical Department. Living in 
Atlanta, Ga. 

GREER, JAMES L.— 
Privates June 26, 1861. Promoted Corporal and Fifth Sergeant 1861; 
First Sergeant 1862; Junior Second Lieutenant 1863. Severely 
vrounded and captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Living in, McKin- 
ney, Texas. 

GREER, THOMAS W.— 
Private, April 26, 1865. Lost right arm at Wilderness, Va. Living 
in Anna, Texas. 

GRIGGS, MARSHALL J.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Discharged 1862. Died in Atlanta, Ga., 

1898. 

HALL, DOCK— 
Private, June 21, 1861. Served through the war. Inmate of Georgia 
Soldiers' Home. 

HAINES, W. M.— 

Private, June 21, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Mont- 
gomery, Ala. 

9d-c 



130 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

HAMMOND, W. T — 
Private, June 21, ISGl. Killed at Wilderness, Ya. 

HARDEN, R. C— 
Private, June 21, 18(31. Died in Portsmouth, Va., December 15, 1861. 

HARKNESS, JAMES— 
Private, June 21, 1861. Killed at Shai-psburg, Md. 

HARWELL, JAMES R.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Detailed in Fourth Georgia Band. Sur- 
rendered at Appomattox, Va. Living in Atlanta, Ga. 

HARWELL, W. A.— 

Private, May 12, 1861. Detailed in Fourth Georgia Band. Sur- 
rendered at Appomattox, Ya. Living in West Point, Ga. 

HEARD, P. N.— 

Private. April 26, 1861. Served through the war. Died 1871. 

HILL, JOHN T.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Promoted Sergeant-Major. Served through 
the war. Moved to Arkansas. Died 1895. 

HILL, MARK A. — 
Private, May 12, 1862. Killed at King's Schoolhouse, Ya. The first 
member of the company killed in battle. 

HILL, WILLIAM H.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Ya. Released 
after the surrender. Living in Texas. 
HOGUE, H. H.— 

Private, June 26, 1861. W^ounded at Seven Pines, Ya., and dis- 
charged. Died 1895. 
HOLMES, WILLIAM Y.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Discharged at Camp Jackson, Ya., 1862. 
HURST, DR. H. E.— 

Private, June 21, 1861. Transferred to Medical Department 1861. 

JAMES, LEE L.— 
Private. April 26, 1861. Killed at Sharpsburg, Md. 

JAMES, WARREN F. — 

Private, April 26, 1861. Promoted Fourth Corporal April, 1862. 
Killed at Wilderness, Ya, 

JOHNSON, JESSE P.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Killed at Chancellorsville, Ya. 

JOHNSON, THOMAS W.— 
Private, May 12, 1862. He was in command of the remnant of his 
company at Appomattox Court House, Ya., where they surrendered. 
Living in West Point, Ga. 

JONES, JOHN A.— 
Private, May 12, 1862. Remained with Company only a few weeks. 



Muster Eolls of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. 131 

LANE, LEVIN A — 
Private, April 26, 1861. Discharged at Camp Jacksou, Va., July, 
18G1. 
LANIER, REUBEN P.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Wounded and disabled at Chancellorsville, 
Va. Detailed in Quartermaster's Department, at West Point, Ga. 
Died 1880. 

LANIER, WILLIAM H.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Promoted Second Lieutenant May 9, 
1861. Resigned May, 1862. Killed in battle near Macon, Ga., July 
30, 1864. 

LITTLE, CHARLES O.— 

Private, July 21, 1861. Promoted Fourth Sergeant. Surrendered 
at Appomattox, Va. Living in Columbus, Ga. 
LOVELACE, BENJAMIN— 

Private, July 21, 1861. Killed at Sharpsburg, Md. 
LOVELACE, JAMES L.— 

Private, May 12, 1862. Killed at Sharpsburg, Md. 
LOVELACE, JOHN F.— 

Private, July 21, 1861. Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 
LOVELACE, L. T. C— 

Private, August 10, 1861. Wounded and disabled at Wilderness, Va. 
Living in West Point, Ga. 

LOYD, ALEXANDER C— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Promoted Fourth Corporal. Detailed in 
hospital at Richmond, Va. Living in Bridgeport, Ala. 
LYONS, GEORGE C— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Wounded in battle. Transferred to the 
Navy in the fall of 1863. 

McCANTS, JAMES J.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Survived the war. Subsequent history un- 
known. 

Mccormick, williaj^i— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Captured at Wilderness, Va. Released after 

the surrender. Died in New York City. 
McCOY, WILLIAM C— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Wounded near Richmond, Va., a^d died 

from wound. 

McGONIGAL, RUFUS L.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Discharged August 10, 1861. Elected Cap- 
tain in an Alabama company. 

McCUTCHIN, MARTIN V.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Captured at Fisher's Hill, Va. 



132 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

McMillan, e. t.— 

Private, June 8, 18G2. Killed at Winchester, Va. 

McMillan, john f.— 

Private, May 15, 1862. Discharged June 10, 18G2. 

MARABLE, GEORGE B.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Promoted First Sergeant. Captured near 
Washington, D. C., 1864. 

MARTIN, JOHN H.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md. Died of 
wound in Richmond, Va. 

MERRETT, JAMES D.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Discharged June 1, 1861. 

MERTZ, LEWIS— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Killed one hundred yards in advance of his 
company at Sharpsburg, Md. 

MILLER, JOHN W.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Promoted Fourth Sergeant April, 1862. 
Discharged. Afterwards joined a cavalry command. 

MITCHAM, E. J.— 
Private, July 21, 1861. Wounded in battle, and captured. 

MITCHAM, JOSEPH T.— 
Private, July 21, 1861. Died of typhoid fever at Portsmouth, Va., 
August 8, 1862. 
MOSLEY, ULYSSES— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Discharged account disability. May 18. 
1861. 

PARKER, JAMES M.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Discharged August 4, 1862. Joined an 
Alabama regiment. 

PARKER, JOHN P.— 
Private, July 21, 1861. Died in camp near Petersburg, Va., July 30, 

1862. 

PATTON, JAMES— 
Private, May 12, 1862. Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 

PATTON, MOSES S.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Killed at King's Schoolhouse, Va., June 
25, 1862. 

PECK, I. S. 

Private, September, 1864. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. 
PHARR, SAMUEL T.— 

Private, May 12, 1862. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va. Detailed 
in field hospital. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. 



Muster Rolls of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. 133 

POER, BENJAMIN G — 
Private, July 21, 18G1. Served through the war. Practiced medicine 
successfully after the war, but has retired and is living in Harris 
county, Ga. 

POER, JOHN A.— 

Private, July 21, 1861. Captured at Hagerstown, Md. Died in Old 
Capitol prison, Washington, D. C. Buried at Arlington, D. C. 
PRESLEY, EVAN A.— 

Private, July 21, 1861. Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 
REESE, MILTON E.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Discharged account disability August 10, 
1861. 
REID, BENJAMIN F.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Discharged August 26, 1861. Joined an 
Alabama company and elected First Lieutenant. Died 1892. 

RHODES, TRAVIS C— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Discharged account disability at Camp 
Jackson, Va. 

ROBINSON, DAVIS O.— 
Private, September 12, 1862. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Liv- 
ing in West Point, Ga. 

ROBINSON, JAMES J.— 
Private, July 21, 1861. Lost arm at Chancellorsville, Va. Now Pro- 
bate Judge in LaFayette, Ala. 

SCOTT, JAMES M.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Promoted First Corporal April, 1862. 
Wounded and disabled at Sharpsburg, Md. 
SHARPE, EDWIN R.— 
Private, May 12, 1862. Promoted Third Sergeant. Surrendered at 
Appomattox, Va. Died in Carrollton, Ga., 1899. 

SIMMONS, WILLIAM J.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md. Died in 
Richmond, Va., May, 1864. 

SLAUGHTER, ALFRED S.— 
Private, July 21, 1861. Wounded in battle. Served through the war. 
Moved to Alabama and died. 
SLAUGHTER, THOMAS J.— 
Private, May 12, 1862. Survived the war. Living at Warrior Sta- 
tion, Ala. 

SMITH, JASPER N.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Discharged account disability November 13, 
1861. 



134 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

SMITH, JOHN L.— 
Private, May 12, ]S02. Died from the effects of an aecMental shot 
at Staunton. Va., 1SG3. 

SPURLING, JAMES A.— 
Private, April 20, 18G1. Killed at Malvern Hill, Va. 

STANLEY, EZEKIEL P.— 
Private, July 21, 1861. Promoted Sergeant. Wounded and captured 
at Monocacy, Md. Died in hospital at Washington, D. C. 
Buried at Arlington, D. C. 

STANLEY, JAMES— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Served through the war. Died 1894. 

STANLEY, W. L.— 
Private, April, 1864. Surreudered at Appomattox, Va. Died 1894. 

STERN, ANSELN— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Captured at Winchester, Va. Served 
through the war. Living in Anniston, Ala. 

STERN, LEVI— 
Private, August 20, 1861. Discharged 1862. Dead. 

TATE, HENRY C— 
Private, 1864. Killed at Petersburg, Va., 1865. 

THROWER, M. CHOICE— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Detailed for special duty in Navy 1862. 
Killed near West Point, Ga., 1865. 

TILMAN, ROBERT A.— 

Private, July 21, 1861. Killed at Fort Steadman, Va., March 25, 1765. 

TOWERS, WILLIAM A.— 

Private, July 21, 1861. Served through the war. Now a promi- 
nent citizen and ranchman. Living in Kansas City, Mo. 

TRAMMELL, JOHN P.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Transferred May 13, 1862. 

TRAYLOR, A. B.— 

Private, May 12, 1862. Died in Petersburg, Va., July 12, 1862. 

TRAYLOR, GEORGE W.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Wounded in battle and disabled. Living in 
Alabama. 

TRAYLOR, JOHN T.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Killed at Wilderness, Va. 

TURLEY, CORNELIUS— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Wounded at Monocacy, and left at Feder- 
ick City, Md., 1864. 



Muster Roli^ of the Fourth Georgia Regesient. 135 

WALLACE, SEABORNE M.— 

Private, May 15, 18(32. Wounded in battle, and captured April 7, 
1865. Living. 

WALKER, JOEL W.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania. Ya. Released 
after the surrender. 
WEAVER, HENRY C— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Lost eye at Sharpsburg, Md. Transferred 
to a North Carolina regiment. Died at Center Post, Walker 
county, Ga., 1898. 
WHITAKER, JOHN— 

Private, April 26, 1S61. Killed near Washingtou, D. C, 1864. 
WHITAKER, W. H.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Died at Madison Court House, Ya., 1863. 
WHITAKER, WYCHE W.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Killed while carrying the regimental colors 
at Snickers' Gap, Ya. 
WISE, R. B.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Survived the war. Living in Long Cane, 
Ga. 



136 Doles-Cook Brigade. 



MUSTER ROLL OF ALBANY GUARDS, COMPANY 
E, FOURTH REGIMENT, GEORGIA VOLUNTEER 
INFANTRY, C. S. A. 

DOUGHERTY COUNTY, GEORGIA. 

RUST, Y. G.— 
Captaiu, April 28, 18G1. Resigned April 27, 1862. Died in Albany,. 
Ga., 1901. 

SMITH, WILLIAM E.— 

First Lieutenant, April 28, 1861. Promoted Captain April 27, 1862. 
Lost leg at King's Schoolhouse, Va. Died since the war in 
Albany, Ga. 

JONES, EDWIN T.— 

Second Lieutenant, April 28, 1861. Resigned August 1, 1862. Died 
since the war in Albany, Ga. 

DeGRAFFENREID, S. F.- 
Junior Second Lieutenant, April 28, 1861. Resigned September 10,. 
1861. Died since the war. 

DeGRAFFENREID, FRANCIS H.— 

First Sergeant, April 28, 1861. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant,^ 
First Lieutenant, Adjutant, Captain and Major. Killed at Fort 
Steadman, Va., March 25, 1865. 

CAMFIELD, C. H.— 

Second Sergeant, April 28, 1861. Transferred to Cobb's Legion and 
promoted Captain of Company C. Living in Birmingham, Ala.^ 
1898. 

WELCH, IKE— 

Third Sergeant, April 28, 1861. Transferred to Cutts' Artillery June 
14, 1864, and promoted Quartermaster-Sergeant. Died since the 
war. 

WHITEHEAD, CHARLES L.— 

Fourth Sergeant April 26, 1861. Promoted Major Fourth Georgia 
Regiment May 8, 1861. Resigned April 26, 1862. Died since the 
war. 

HUNGER, TERRELL T.— 

Fifth Sergeant, April 28, 1861. Promoted Third Sergeant. Trans- 
ferred to Fourteenth Georgia Regiment July 9, 1861, and promoted 
First Lieutenant November 14, 1861; Captain February 22, 1862, 
Wounded at Warrenton Springs, Va., May 12, 1863. 

STEVENS, JEREMIAH GRIFFITH— 
First Corporal, April 28, 1861. Promoted Second Lieutenant May 6, 



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McsTEE Rolls of the Fourth Georgia REGiMzyT. 137 

1862; First Lieutenant Augnst, 1S»52. Lost leg at Warrenton 
Springs, Va. Living in Albany, Ga. 
BARKSDALE. MATHEW F.— 
Second Corporal, April 28, 1861. Surrendered at Appomattox, Ya. 
Living. 
HARRIS. BENJAMIN F.— 

Third Corporal. April 28, 1861. Discharged June 11, 1862. Living. 
HESTER, JA3IES G.— 

Fourth Corporal, April 28. 1861. Detailed in Fourth Georgia Band. 
Survived the war. Died in Atlanta, Ga., 19C»0. 

ALEXANDER. HENRY C— 
Private, April 28, 1861. Promoted First Sergeant. Killed at Sharps- 
burg. Md. 

ALEXANDER. PLEASANT W.— 

Private. April 2.S. 1S61. Discharged October 25, 1861. Living ia 
Berrien county, Ga. 

ANDERSON. JAMES GRAY— 

Private. April 2S. 1S61. Discharged. Died since the war. 
BEAZLEY. CORNELIUS J.— 

Private, July 21. 1S61. Discharged Dec-ember 7, 1861. Living. 
BETTISON. WILLIA3I— 

Private. April 28. 1861. Discharged July 28. 1862 (over age). Died 
since the war. 
BOYNTON, COLUMBUS A.— 

Private. April 28. 1861. Discharged April 30, 1862. Living. 
BRINKLEY. JOHN Q. W.— 

Private. May 2. 1S62. Wounded at Sharpsburg. Md. 
BRINKLEY. JOSEPH W.— 

Private. April 28, 1S61. 
BRINSON. ISAAC J.— 

Private, April 28, 1S61. Promoted Sergeant Served through the- 
nar. Died after the surrender. 
BROWN, ROBERT A.— 

Private. April 28, 1861. Discharged January 22, 1862. Died since 
the war. 
BUTLER. MICHAEL— 

Private. April 28. 1S61. 

CAMFIELD. JOSEPH S.— 
Private April 28, 1861. Promoted First Sergeant. Killed a? 
Chancellorsville, Ya. 

CAMPBELL. HENRY M.— 

Private, April 2S, 1861. Survived the war. Living. 



138 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

CARGILE, JOHN F.— 

rrivate, April 28, 18G1. Served through the war. Died after the 
surrender. 
CHASTAIN, WILLIAM J.— 

Private, April 28, 1861. Died of typhoid fever at Camp Jackson, Va.. 
August 22, 18G1. 
CHURCHILL, THOMAS H.— 
Private, April 28, 1861. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant. 
Wounded at Malvern Hill, Va., and died from wound July 8, 1862. 

CLARK, THOMAS H.— 

Private, April 28, 186lL. Wounded at Malvern Hill, Va., and dis- 
charged. 
CROLEY GEORGE M.— 

Private, June 30, 1861. Killed in battle. 
CROLEY, WILLIAM H.— 

Private, April 28, 1861. Killed at Fredericlv City, Md., July 9, 18W. 
COSBY, ABSALOM W.— 

Private, July 21, 1861. Lost leg at Wilderness, Va. Died since the 
war. 
COSBY, JOHN H.— 

Private, July 26, 1862. Captured and died in prison. 
€OSBY, WILLIAM G.— 

Private, July 26, 1862. Served through the war. Living. 
CROMWELL, BENJAMIN M.— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Transferred to Fourteenth Louisiana 
Regiment and promoted Assistant Surgeon. Living. 
DANIEL, BEN.JAMIN B.— 

Private, September, 26, 1862, Fate unknown. 
DAVIS, ANDREW L.— 

Private, April 28, 1861. Killed at Chancellorsrille, Va. 
DIKE, WARREN F.— 

Private, April 28, 1861. Wounded at Fort Steadman, Va. Living. 
DUNCAN, .JOSEPH R.— 

Private, September 24, 1862. Fate unknown. 
ELY, ROBERT N.— 

Private, April 28, 1861. Transferred and promoted Quartermaster 
Sixth Georgia Regiment. Died since the war. 

FAULKNER, E. .L— 

Private, April 28, 1861. Promoted Corporal. Killed at Hanover 
Junction, Va. 

FLINT, THOMAS J.— 
Private, April 28, 1861. Transferred and promoted Assistant Com- 



Muster Rolls of the Fourth Georgia Regevient. 139 

missary Second Georgia Cavalry May 17, 1802, Died since the 
war. 

^GARDNER, REV. T. E.— 

Private, August 26, 18G2. Killed at Sharpsburg, Md. 

■GILBERT, R. H.— 

Private. Recruit. Killed at Fort Steadman, Va., March 25, 1865. 

'GILBERT, WILLIAM H.— 

Private, April 28, 1861. Promoted First Sergeant. Lost foot at 
Spottsylvania, Va. Living in Albany, Ga. 

-GREEN, JESSE C. — 

Private, July 21, 1861. Discharged January 7, 1862. Living. 

GREER, JAMES A.— 

Private, April 28, 1861. Discharged June 28, 1862. Died since the 
war. 

GREENWOOD, GEORGE S.— 

Private. Recruit. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Died since 
the vrar. 
GREENWOOD, JOHN C— 

Private, July 21, 1861. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md., and died from 
wound. 
'GREGORY, AARON T.— 

Private, July 21, 1861. Died in Petersburg, Va., June 7, 1862. 

GRIGGS, MORGAN.— 

Private, April 28, 1861. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md., and dis- 
charged. Died since the war. 
-GUNNISON, SAMUEL W.— 

Private, April 28, 1861. Lost leg at Charlestown, Va. Living. 

HARRIS, HINES H.— 

Private, June 2, 1862. Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 

fiARRIS, THOMAS H. ("GOVERNOR")— 

Private, August 31, 1863. Killed at Cedar Run, Va. 

HERRINGTON, JOHN J.— 

Private, April 28, 1861. 

HESTER, JOHN T.— 

Private, July 21, 1861. Transferred and promoted Captain Company 
G, Sixty-first Georgia Regiment, 1863. Wounded at Spottsylvania, 
Va. Wounded slightly and captured at Fort Steadman, Va., March 
25, 1865. Released after the surrender. Living in Albany, Ga. 

HILL, A. J.— 

Piivate. Recruit. Died in service. 
HILL, JAMES A.— 

Private, April 28. 1861. Transferred and promoted Assistant Quarter- 
master Second Georgia Cavalry June 6, 1862. Died since the war. 



140 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

HILL, JOHN L.— 

Private, April 28, 1861. Died in service August 29, 1861. 
HINES, ALLIE W.— 

Private, April 28, 1861. Discharged June 28, 1861. Died since the 
war. 

HINES, IVERSON A.— 
Private, April 28, 1861. Transferred and promoted Lieutenant and 
Captain Thirty-second Georgia Regiment. 
HOYT, HENRY F.— 
Private. Recruit. Transferred and promoted Chaplain Tenth Geor- 
gia Regiment. 
HUGHES, MALCOM D.— 
Private, August 31, 1863. Lost an arm at Winchester, Va., 1864.. 
Living. 
JACKSON, JOSEPH A.— 

Private, April 28, 1861. Discharged July 20, 1862. Died since the; 
war. 
JENNINGS, A. K.— 

Private, September 24, 1861. Survived the war. Living. 

JOHNSON, GEORGE W. — 

Private, July 21, 1861. Served through the war. Died after the sur- 
render. 
JOHNSON, MALCOM T.— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Discharged. Dead. 

JONES, MARTIN C— 

Private, April 28, 1861. Transferred and promoted Second Lien- 
tenant in Coi-ps of Sharpshooters, Army of Mississippi, June 12,. 
1862. Living. 
KEER, WILLIAM T.- 

Private, September 10, 1861. Captured and died in prison. 
KEMP, JAMES W.— 
Private, April 28, 1861. Survived the war. Living. 

KENDRICK, ANDREW J.— 
Private, April 28, 1861. Killed at Sharpsburg, Md. 

KOLBFLINCH, PETER— 
Private, April 28, 1861. Captured at Sharpsburg, Md., and exchanged.. 
Survived the war. Living. 
LaROGUE, JOHN G.— 

Private, June .3, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Albany^ 
Ga. 

LEVY, MAURACE— 

Private, April 28, 1861. Discharged. 



Muster Rclls of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. 141 

XINDSY, WILLIAM F.— 

Private, October . 0, 1863. Died in hospital 1864. 
LOYD, WILLIAM M.— 

Private, October 29, 1863. Died in hospital 1864. 

McAllister, w. g.— 

Private, April 28, 1861. Discharged September 19, 1861. Dead. 
McCALL, J, H. — 

Private, August 27, 1863. Killed at Wilderness, Va. 
McCALL, WILLIAM H.— 

Private, August 27, 1863. Fate unknown. 
McCORKLE, JOHN M.— 

Private, June 3, 1861. Wounded in battle June 30, 1864, and died 
from wound. 
McDANIEL, JAMES— 

Private, October 1, 1863. Fate unknown. 
McDANIEL, JOHN— 

Private, October 1, 1863. Killed at Spottsylvanla, Ya. 

McGregor, james a.— 

Private, April 28, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Pitts- 
burg, Texas. 

McINTlRE, FRANK— 

Private, June 3, 1861. Survived the war. Died after the surrender. 
McNAIR, FELIX L.— 

Private, June 3, 1861. Discharged May 29, 1862. Died since the 
war. 

MARLIN, JAMES N.— 

Private, April 28, 1861. Survived the war. Living. 
MAYER, GABRIEL — 

Private, April 28, 1861. Discharged May 3, 1862. Dead. 
MAYSON, JAISIES D.— 

Private, April 28, 1861. 

MERRITT. HENRY P.— 

Private, March 7, 1864. Fate unknown. 
MOSS, LEWIS A.— 

Private. Recruit. Fate unknown. 

NELSON, THOMAS M.— 
Private, April 28, 1861. Promoted Assistant Surgeon. Resigned. 
Raised the "Nelson Rangers" of Cavalry, joined a Mississippi 
regiment 1864 and was promoted Colonel. Killed in battle 1865. 

O'CONNELL, EDWARD— 
Private, April 28, 1861. Promoted Fourth Corporal. Served through 
the war. Living in Macon, Ga., 1898. 



142 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

PAYNE, MARK C— 

Private. April 28, ISGl. Died in hospital at Roclimond, Ya., Septem-- 
ber 2, 1S62. 

REEYES, NOAH— '^ 

Private, September 26, 1863. Fate unknown. 

REYNOLDS. JOHN W.— 
Private, April 28, 1861. Survived the war. Died after the sur- 
render. ». 

RHODES, JAMES R.— 
Private, April 28, 1861. Discharged September 24, 1861. Dead. 

RICHARDSON, JOSEPH L.— 
Private, April 28. 1861. Wounded at Sharpsburg Md. Promoted i 
Sergeant for gallantry on the battlefield of Sharpsburg. Living. 

ROBERT, A. C— 
Private, April 28, 1861. Survived the war. Living. 

ROBERT, ALEXANDER J.— 

Private, April 28, 1801. Promoted Fourth Sergeant May 10, 1861.- 
First Lieutenant and Adjutant 1861. Living in Alabama. 
ROBERT, BENJAMIN F.— 

Private, April 28, 1861. Survived the war. Living. 

ROBERTS. JOSEPH C. — 
Private. May 8, 1862. Promoted Second Lieutenant November 1,. 
1862. Transferred to Western army. 

ROBERTS, U. M.— 

Private. October 22, 1861. Survived the war. Living. 
ROBINSON, GEORGE F.— 

Private, April 28, 1861. Transferred to Thirty-fourth Georgia Regi- 
ment and promoted Adjutant and Captain. Died since the war.. 
SEAMAN, EMANUEL— 

Private, April 28, 1861. Discharged November, 1862. 
SELLERS, FRANCIS— 

Private, October 19, 1861. Fate unknown. 
SITTEN, R. J.— 

Private, April, 1861. Wounded at New Market, Ya. 
SOLOMON, GARY E.— 

Private, April 28, 1861. Transferred to Sixth Georgia Regiment and' 
promoted Quartermaster-Sergeant. Served through the war. Liv- 
ing in Houston county, Ga. 

SPENCER, AMBROSE— 

Private, April 28, 1861. Discharged September 24, 1861. Dead. 
STINA, E.— 

Private. Recruit. 



Muster Rolls of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. 14S 

STROZIER, CYRUS S.— 
Private, April 28, 1861. Survived the war. Died after the surrender. 

STROZIER, L. L.— 
Private, April 28, 1861. Promoted Assistant Surgeon Fourth Geor- 
gia Regiment. Transferred and remained in service until the close 
of the war. Died since the war. 

STURGES. ALFRED P.— 
Private, September 23, 1863. Wounded in battle and discharged. 

TANKERLY, JAMES E.— 
Private, April 28, 1861. Lost arm at Sharpsburg, Md. Died since 
the war. 

TOMPKINS, EUBANKS— 
Private, April 28, 1861. Discharged December 27, 1861. Died since- 
the war. 

TOMPKINS, M. TV.— 

Private, April 28, 1861. Promoted Lieutenant. Died since the war. 
TOWNS, GEORGE W.— 

Private, April 28, 1861. Killed at Chancellorsville, Ta. 
TRYEP^ EDWARD— 

Private, April 28, 1861. 
VASON, M. E.— 
Private, April 28, 1861. Promoted Assistant Surgeon C. S. A. 
August 30, 1862. Transferred and remained in service until the 
close of the war. Died since the war. 
VASON, WILLIAM ,J.— 
Private, April 28, 1861. Promoted Second Lieutenant. Resigned. 
Raised a Company of Cavalry, and was promoted Colonel of his- 
regiment. Living in Florida. 

VOLKER, CHARLES— 
Private, April 28, 1861. Discharged July 28, 1862. Died since the 
war. 

WALTERS, GEORGE W.— 
Private, April 28, 1861. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md., and dis- 
charged. Living. 

WELCH, HENRY E.— 
Private, September 24, 1861. Promoted Sergeant for gallantry in the 
battle of Sharpsburg, Md. Died since the war. 
WILDER, B. F.— 

Private, July 21, 1861. Disabled. Killed since the war accidentally. 
WILDER, JAMES T.— 
Private, April 28, 1861. Wounded in battle and captured. Served 
through the war. Living in Albany, Ga, 



144 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

WILLIAMS, HENRY C— 

Trivate, April 28, 18G1. Promoted Junior Second, Second and First 
Lieutenant, and Captain. Died in Baker county, Ga., since the 
war. 
WILLIAMS, FRANCIS N.— 

Frivate, August 19, 18G3. Wounded in battle. 

W^RIGHT, JOHN— 
Private, 1861. Discharged July 28, 1862. Died since the war. 

WYER, OBEDIAH— 
Private, October 21, 1863. Captured. Fate unknown. 

TOUNGBLOOD, JOHN W.— 

Private, August 3, 1863. Fate unknown. 



Muster Rolls of the Fourth Georgia REGuyiENT. 145 



MUSTER ROLL OF TOOMBS VOLUNTEERS, COM- 
PANY F, FOURTH REGIMENT, GEORGIA VOL- 
UNTEER INFANTRY, C. S. A. 

GORDON COUNTY, GEORGIA. 

MAYES, BLAIR R.— 

Captain, April 29, 1861. Resigned May 4, 18G2. Died in Sumter 
county, Ga., 1895. 

JACKSON, JAMES W.— 

First Lieutenant, April 29, 1861. Resigned May 4, 1862. Died in 
Gordon county, Ga. 
SULLIVAN, JAMES S.— 

Second Lieutenant, April 29, 1861. Promoted First Lieutenant May 
4, 1862, Captain 1863. Killed in Valley of Virginia 1864. 

CARY, GEORGE W.— 

Junior Second Lieutenant, April 29, 1861. Promoted Captain May 
4, 1862. Resigned 1862. Enlisted in Fourth Georgia Cavalry and 
was promoted Captain and Major. Killed at Franklin, Tenn., 1864. 
McCONNELL, JOHN C— 
First Sergeant, April 29, 1861. Transferred to Sixth Georgia Cavalry 
May, 1862. Living in Texas. 
COBB, LEWIS M. — 

Second Sergeant, April 29, 1861. Promoted Second Lieutenant May 
4, 1862. Killed at Sharpsburg, Md. 

KIKER, E. J.— 

Third Sergeant, April 29, 1861. Promoted First Sergeant. Lost arm 
at Fredericksburg, Va., and discharged. Died in Gordon county, 
Ga., 1897. 

SUMMEY, PETER A.— 

Fourth Sergeant, April 29, 1861. Wounded at Malvern Hill, Va., 
Sharpsburg, Md., and Fredericksburg. Va. Discharged account 
disability. An inmate of the Georgia Soldiers' Home. 
HIGDON, JOHN B.— 

Fifth Sergeant, April 29, 1861. Transferred to Thirty-eighth Geor- 
gia Regiment 1862. Served through the war. Supposed to be 
living in Texas. 

McCONNELL, JOSEPH— 

First Corporal, April 29, 1861. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant 
May 4, 1862; Second Lieutenant September, 1862; First Lieutenant 
1863; Captain 1864. Lost leg and captured at Fort Steadman, Va., 
March 25, 1865. Died 1900. 

lOd-c 



146 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

MALONE, AUGUSTUS F.— 

Second Corporal, April 29, 1861. Died in Richmond, Va., June 2-4^ 
1SG2. 

CARTER, JOSEPH M. M.— 
Third Corporal, April 29, 18G1. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md., and 
discharged. Died 18G3. 
JOHNSON, TYRE H.— 
Fourth Corporal, April 29, 1861. Discharged account disability May 
13, 1863. Died of measles 1862. 

BEDFORD, PETER— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md. Surrendered', 
at Appomattox, Va. Died 1876. 

BELCHER, WILLIS— 
Private, May 7, 1861. Died in hospital 1862. 

BINION, WILLIAM A.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Lost arm at Sharpsburg, Md., and dis- 
charged. Died 1880. 
BLACKBURN, MILTON S. — 

Private, April 29, 1861. Discharged (over age). 
BOAZ, FRANCIS M.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Promoted Second Lieutenant. Wounded 
at Chancellorsville, Va. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Died" 
1895. 
BOAZ, GEORGE R. — 
Private, April 29, 1861. Transferred to Eighth Georgia Cavalry 1863. 
Wounded in battle. 
BRADLEY, EBENEZER H.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Died of typhoid fever in Richmond, Va.,. 
July 14, 1862. 
BRADLEY, GEORGE W.— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Died in hospital 1862. 

BRADLEY, N.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Died in hospital 1862. 

BRAY, B.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Discharged account disability 1862. Living- 
in Tampa, Fla. 

BRAY, GEORGE W.— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Wounded at Fredericksburg, Va. 

BROWNLOW, WILLIAM B.— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Wounded at Kelly's Ford, Va., 1863. Died* 
of wound 1864. 

BURCH, ANDREW J.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Captured 1864, and died in prison. 



Muster Rolls of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. J 47 

BURCH, J. MONROE— 

Private, April 29, ISGl. Died in hospital 18G2. 

BUTLER, ELIAS— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Died in Richmond, Ya., November 7, 1862. 

CANTRELL, JESSE C— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md. Surrendered 
at Appomattox, Ya. 

CANTRELL, STEPHEN T.— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Promoted First Corporal and Second Ser- 
geant 1862. Woun,ded at Sharpsburg, Md., and at Chancellorsville, 
Ya. Surrendered at Appomattox, Ya. Living. 

CAPART, ROBERT— 
Private, September 21, 1861. Killed at Wilderness, Ya. '. 

CARLTON, SPENCER— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Ya. Died 1886. 

CHAFIN, GEORGE W.— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md. Captured at 
Spottsylvania, Ya. 

CHANDLER, DAYID B.— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Wounded at Wilderness, Ya. Captured at 
Spottsylvania, Ya. 

CHRISTIAN, GEORGE W.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md. Dead. 
CLARK, WYLY— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Promoted Third Sergeant 1864. Captured 
at Amelia Springs, Ya., 1865. 
COOPER, FRANCIS H.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Lost arm at Sharpsburg, Md., and dis- 
charged. 
COSBY, G. W.— 

Private, April 29, 186L Killed at Wilderness, Ya. 
COSBY, WILLIAM A.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Killed in battle. 
COX, SANFORD H.— 

Private, April 29, 1S()1. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Ya. Cap- 
tured at Spottsylvania, Ya. Living in Texas. 
CRAWFORD, AYILLIAM H.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Discharged September 25, 1861. 
DARNELL, ANDREW J.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Ya. Captured 
at Spottsylvania, Ya. 



148 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

DILLARD, BRADLEY K.— 

Private, April 29, 18G1. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md., and dis- 
charged. 
DILLARD, ELIJAH G.— 
Private, April 29, 18G1. Wounded in battle and discharged. 

DILLARD, LOVE— 

Private, April 29, 18G1. Killed at Wilderness, Va. 

DOESON, ALEXANDER— 
Private, April 29, 1801. Died of fever at Camp Jackson, Va., August 
14, 1861. 

DORSET, JAMES M.— 

Private, May 7, 1862. Wounded at Cedar Creels, Va. Captured at 
Fort Steadman, Va. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. 

DORSET, JOHN L.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Floyd 
county, Georgia. 

DORSETT, CHARLES A.— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Promoted Fifth Sergeant. Wounded at 
Gettysburg, Pa., and captured. Paroled 1864. Died 1895. 

DORSETT, J. P.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Wounded at Wilderness, Va. 

DORSETT, RICHARD H.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Died of fever at Camp Jackson, Va., Sep- 
tember 7, 1861. 
EAVES, ARCHIBALD— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Killed at Sharpsburg, Md. 

EAVES, DUDLET— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Killed at Sharpsburg, Md. 

EAVES, SAMUEL— 

Private, April 29. 1861. Captured at Fort Steadman, Va. Died in 
Rome, Ga., 1888. 

EDWARDS, ROBERT W.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Killed at Spottsylvania, Va. 

EDWARDS, THOMAS J.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Wounded at Wilderness, Va. Surrendered 
at Appomattox, Va. Living near Adairsville, Ga. 

ELLIS, HAMMIA— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. 

ELLIS, JESSE H.— 

Private, September 21, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. 

ELLIS, JOHN M.— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md. Captured at 
Spottsylvania, Va. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Died 1899. 



Muster Kolls of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. 149 

ELLIS, N. FRxiNK— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Supposed to have been captured or killed at 
Frederick City, Md. Never heard of afterwards. 
FITE, HOUSTON— 

Private, September 21, 18G1. Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 

FOWLER, JAMES L.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Died of measles at Camp Jackson, Va., July 
2, 1861. 
FOX, JAMES H.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Wounded at Shai-psburg, Md. Died 1882. 

FOX, JOSEPH— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Killed at Shai-psburg, Md. 

FREE, MADISON— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Detailed as teamster. Surrendered at Ap- 
pomattox, Va. Dead. 

GARNER, MARION— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Lost leg in railroad accident 1861. 

GARNER, WASHINGTON W.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Wounded at Cold Harbor, Va. Captured at 
Fort Steadman, Va., March 25, 1865. Living in Arkansas. 

GINN, WILLIAM W.— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Died of measles at Camp Jackson, Va., J-'^j 
9, 1861. 
HANES, WILLIAM H.— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Appointed drummer. Wounded at Winches- 
ter. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Living in Gordon county, Ga. 

HENSON, SOLOMON C— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Lost leg at Fredericksburg, Va., and disk 
charged. Living in Fulton county, Ga. 
HICKMAN, THOMAS H.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Wounded at Shai-psburg, Md. Captured at 
Spottsylvania, Va. Never heard of afterwards. 
HIGGINBOTHAM, J. T.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Survived the war. Living in West Point, 
Ga., 1898. 

IIIGDON, EBENEZER G.— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Transferred to Thirty-eighth Georgia Regi- 
ment. Dead. 
HOLDEN, GEORGE W.— 

Private, Recruit. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. 
HOLDEN, H. R.— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Gor- 
don county, Ga. 



150 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

HOLLIS, GREEN W.- 

Private, April 29, ISGl. Killed at Sharpsburg, Md. 

HOLSEY, ^y. H.— 

Private, April 20, ISGl. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md. 

HUNT, G. M.— 

Private, April 29, 18G1. Wounded and captured at Fort Steadman, 
Va. Served through the vi'ar. 

HUNT, JAMES J.— 

Private, April 29, 18G1. Discharged December 3, 1861. Enlisted 
in the Dobson Rifles, Fortieth Georgia Regiment, and promoted 
Lieutenant. Served through the war. Moved to Califoriiia, elected 
judge of the circuit court. Died of consumption while on a visit to 
Gordon county, Ga. 
HUNT. J. N.— 

Private, April 29, 18G1. Wounded at Fort Steadman, Va., March 25, 
1865. 
JOHNSON, CHARLES M.— 

Private, April 29, 18G1, Killed at Sharpsburg, Md. 

JOHNSON, JOHN R.— 
Private, September 20, 18G1. Killed at Wilderness, Va. 

LEAK, ARM STEAD C— 
Private, April 29, ISGl. Captured at Fort Steadman, Va. Sur- 
rendered at Appomattox, Va. 

LOVE, B. K.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md., and died from 
wound 18G3. 
LOVE, ROBERT J.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Killed at Malvern Hill, Va. 

LYNCH, ELIAS M.— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Promoted Third Corporal and Color-bearer 
1862. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md. Surrendered at Appomattox, 
Va. Moved to Arkansas. Supposed to be living. 

McCLAIN, L. DOW— 
Private, April 29, 18G1. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Dead. 

McCLURE, JOHN— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Promoted Third Sergeant and Junior Second 
Lieutenant 1862. Killed at Sharpsburg, Md. 

MIMS, A. JUDSON— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Promoted Second Sergeant 1862. Captured 
at Cedar Creek, Va, Never heard of afterwards. 

MOBLEY, HIRAM G.— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Wounded in seven days' flight around Rich- 
mond, Va. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. 



Muster Rolls of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. 151 

MOBLEY, WILLIAM— 

Private, April 20, 18G1. Appointed Fifer. Discharged May, 1SG2— 
over age. Dead. 

NICHOLS, E. T.— 

Private, April 29, 18G1. Honorably discharged May, 18G2. Dead. 
NORTON, DUNCAN A.— 

Private, April 29, 18G1. Transferred to Twenty-eighth Georgia Regi- 
ment 18G2. Living in Resaca, Ga. 
OSBURN, WILLIAM B.— 

Private, April 29, 18G1. Killed at Wilderness, Va. 

OWENS, WILLIAM M.— 

Private, April 29, 18G1. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md., and at Wilder- 
ness, Va. Died in Gordon county, Ga., 18G8. 

PHILLIPS, CHARLES A.— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Died of fever at Camp .Jackson, Va., Au- 
gust 9, 18G1. 

PHILLIPS, JONATHAN D.— 
Private, April 29, 18G1. Honorably discharged October 24, ISGl. 
Died 1864. 

POARCH, BEN,JAMIN W.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Killed at Wilderness, Va. 

POARCH, ANDREW— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Captured at Frederick City, Md. Never 
heard of afterwards. 
POARCH, ROBERT H.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Killed at Wilderness, Va. 

REEVES, B. D.— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Promoted Second Lieutenant 1862. Wounded 
at Fredericksburg, Va. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Died 1878. 

REEVES, D. L.— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Wounded and disabled at Malvern Hill, Va. 
Discharged 1863. Living in Cash, Ga., 1898. 

ROBERTSON, THOMAS MELL— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Wounded accidentally June, 1862. 

ROSS, JOSEPH D.— 
Private, May 7, 1862. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Survived the 
war. 

SMITH, SAMUEL— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Survived the 
war. Moved to Baltimore, Md. 
SMITH, W. H.— 
Private, September 21, 1861. Lost leg at Wilderness, Va., and dis- 
charged. Living near Resaca, Ga. 



152 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

SOLOMON, JOSEPH— 
Private, April 29, 1801. Wounded at Chancellors ville, Va. Returned 
to Germany after the surrender. 

SPARKS, CASWELL S.— 
Private, April 29, 1801. Discharged account disability May 17, 1802. 
Died 1804. 

STANFORD, JOHN H.— 

Private, April 29, 1801. Discharged account disability May 0, 1802. 

TAYLOR, ADOLPHUS— 
Private, April 29, 1801. Died in service 1802. 

TAYLOR, ALBERT B.— 

Private, April 29, 1801. Wounded at Wilderness, Va. Survived the 
war. 

TAYLOR, ASA— 

Private, April 29, 1801. Died in hospital. 

TAYLOR, ROBERT H.— 

Private, April 29, 1801. Died at hospital in Richmond, Va., June 25, 

1802. 

THOMAS, ISAAC N.— 
Private, May 7, 1802. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Living in 
Moultrie, Ga. 

THOMAS, LEWIS L.— 
Private, April 29, 1801. Detailed as ambulance driver. 

TIMMS, WILLIAM A.— 

Private, September 21, 1801. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va. Sur- 
rendered at Appomattox, Va. Living in Gordon county, Ga. 

UNDERWOOD, A. J.— 
Private, April 29, 1801. Promoted First Sergeant 1802. Wounded 
at Chancellorsville, Va. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Living 
in Floyd county, Ga. 

UNDERWOOD, W. J.— 
Private, April 29, 1801. Died in service. 

VAN DYKE, CHARLES R.— 

Private, April 29, 1801. Killed at Malvern Hill, Va. 

VAN DYKE, JAMES A.— 
Private, June 27, 1801. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Survived 
the war. 

VAN DYKE, WILLIAM G.— 
Private, April 29, 1801. Killed at Gettysburg, Pa. 

VAUGHN, WILLIAM— 
Private, April 29, 1801. Killed at Gettysburg, Pa. 



Muster Rolls of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. 153- 

WADE, THOMAS J.— 

Private, April 29, 18(31. Wounded at Wilderness, Va. Living in 
Texas. 

WALRAVEN, ORANGE— 
Private, April 29, 18G1. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md. Transferred 
to Sixth Georgia Cavalry 1863. Survived tlie war. 
WALRAVEN, SHADE— 

Private, April 29, 1801. Captured at Spottsylvania, Ya. 

WHITE, JAMES G.— 
Private, April 29, 1S6L Fate unknown. 

WHITE, LaPAYETTE M.— 

Private, April 29, 1801. Promoted Fourth Sergeant. Died at Camp- 
.Tackson, Ya., 1861. 

WHITFIELD, .JOHN W.— 

Private, April 29, 1801. Died in service. 

WHITFIELD, ROBERT A.— 

Private, May 7, 1862. Died of fever 1862. 

WILLINGHAM, JOHN K.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Wounded at Wilderness, Ya. Dead. 

WITCHER, JAMES C— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md. Died since 
the war. 

WOFFORD, ELIAS C— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Killed at Wilderness, Ya. 
WYLIE, CLARKE— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Promoted Fourth Corporal, Junior Second 
Lieutenant. Captured at Amelia Springs, Ya., 186.5. Supposed to 
be living in Hall county, Ga. 
WYLIE, ROBERT— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Promoted First Corporal. Wounded at 
Chancellorsville, Ya., and died from wound. 



154 Doles-Cook Brigade. 



MUSTER ROLL OK GLOVER GUARDS, COMPANY 
G, FOURTH REGIMENT, GEORGL^ VOLUNTEER 
INFANTRY, C. S. A. 

JASPER COUNTY, GEORGIA. 

BARTLETT, GEORGE T.— 
Captaiu, April 25, ISGl. Retired at expiratiou of term of service. 
April 20, 1802. Died since the war in Jasper county, Ga. 
JORDAN, WILLIAM F.— 

First Lieutenant, April 25, 1801. Promoted Captain and Major April 
20, 1802, Lieutenant-Colonel June, 1802. Resigned June, 1802. 
Died in Jasper county, Ga., 1901. 
MERIWETHER, GEORGE F.— 

Second Lieutenant, April 25, 1801. Resigned June, 1861. Enlisted in 
Comijany F, Tenth Confederate Cavalry, and promoted Second 
Lieutenant. ^Younded at Saltville, Va., through right knee. Died 
in Jasper county, Ga,, 1890. 

SMITH, CHARLES— 
Junior Second Lieutenant, April 25, 1801. Retired at expiration of 
term of service, April 20, 1802. Living in Rome, Ga. 

LANE, JOHN T.— 

First Sergeant, April 25, 1801. Promoted Second Lieutenant Au- 
gust 20, 1801, First Lieutenant and Captain April 20, 1802. Killed 
at Gettysburg, Pa. 
FREEMAN, D. C— 

Second Sergeant, April 25, 1801. Promoted First Sergeant April 26, 
1802. Detailed in Fourth Georgia Band 1803. 
PRITCHARD, E. H.— 
Third Sergeant, April 20, 1801. Dicharged August, 1801. Living in 
Gladesville, Ga. 
McCULLOUGH, JOHN— 
Fourth Sergeant, April 20, 1801. Wounded through both thighs 
severely at Gettysburg, Pa., and captured. Discharged account of 
permanent disability from wounds. 
PETTIE, H. C— 

Fifth Sergeant, April 25, 1801. Dead. 
PENN, CHARLES A.— 

First Corporal, April 25, 1801. Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 
AARON, JOHN L.— 

Second Corporal, April 25, 1801. Wounded at Spottsylvania, Va. 
Served through the war. Living in Starrsville, Ga. 





GEORGE AV. GARY 
Captain Company F, Fourth Georgia Regi- 
ment. 



JAMES W. .TACKSOX 
First Lieutenant Company F, Fourtli Geor- 
gia Regiment. 






JOSEPH m'cOXXELL 

Captiin Compiny F, Fourth Georgia r.e.?i- 
meut. 



JOHN M CLURE 

Second Lieutenant Company F, Fourth 

Georgia Regiment. 




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Muster Rolls of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. 155 

EZELL, CULLEN R.— 

Third Corporal, April 25, 18G1. Promoted Second Lieutenant April 
20, 1802, Captain, August, 1863. Wounded and Captured at Wilder- 
ness, Va. Paroled June 17, 18G5. Living in Huron, Putnam county. 
Ga. 

STANDIFER, JORDAN M.— 
Fourth Corporal, April 25, ISGl. Killed at Malvern Hill, Va., 1SG2. 

AARON, .Tames H.— 

Private, April 25, 18G1. Killed at Malvern Hill, Ya. 

AARON, RICHARD A.— 

Private, April 25, 18G1. Discharged September 22, 1861— over age. 
Dead. 

AARON, THOMAS M.— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Died of typhoid fever in Richmond, Va., 
August 7, 1862. 

ALEXANDER, N. O.— 

Private, May 22, 1861. Lost arm in skirmish at Berryville, Va. Dead. 

ALEXANDER, THOMAS J.— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Discharged April 27, 1862. Dead. 

BANKS, EATON D.— 

Private, May 25, 1861. Died in Virginia 1863. 

BANKS, JO SI AH C— 

Private, September 23, 1861. Died of typhoid fever at Drewry's 
Bluff, Va., July 23, 1862. 

BARNES, THOMAS H.— 
Private, August 5, 1861. Wounded at Cedar Creek, Va. Served 
through the war. Living in Eudora, Jasper county, Ga. 

BARR, W. J.— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Dead. 

BELCHER, RUSSELL— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Texas. 

BELCHER, RUSSELL O.— 

Private, May 26, 1862. Died in Strasburg, Va., August 23, 1864. 

BEUFORD, .JAMES L.— 
Private, ISIay 25, 1861. Died of fever in Marine hospital, Norfolk, 
Va., August 7, 1861. 

BEUFORD, THADDEUS L.— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va., and dis- 
charged. Living at Farrar, Ga. 

BEUFORD, WILLIAM H.— 
Private, , — , . Killed at Petersburg, Va., 1865. 



156 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

BROOKS, THOMAS J.— 
Private, August 15, 1SG2. Died of disease in hospital at Mount Jack, 
son, Va., 1863. 
BURNEY, JA:MES S.— 
Private, April 2o, 1861. Promoted Orduance Sergeaut. Served 
through the war. Living in Texas. 
BURNEY, WILLIAM J.— 
Private, March 4, 1862. Served through the war. Living m Starrs- 
ville, Ga. 
CAMPBELL, ELBERT L.— 
Private, May 12, ISGl. Wounded and captured at Gettysburg, Pa, 
Wounded at Winchester and Cedar Creek, Va., 1804. Living in 
Wilkinson county, Ga. 
CAMPBELL, JAMES L.— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Wounded at Chancellorsville, and captured, 
at Spottsylvania, Ya. Living in Monticello, Ga. 

CAMPBELL, O. G.— 

Private, May 21, 1861. Discharged September 22, 1861. 
CAMPBELL, SHERWOOD C— 

Private, September 22, 1861. Killed at Chancellorsville, Ya. 
CARDELL, EDWARD— 

Private, August 15, 1862. Killed at Wilderness, Ya., May 5, 1864. 
CARDELL, JOHN— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa. Captured at 
Spottsylvania, Ya. Living in Monticello, Ga. 
CARYERS, Z. T.— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Survived the war. Living in Wilkins, Ga., 
Floyd county. 

CHARRING, SAMUEL C— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Surrendered at Appomattox, Ya. Living in 
Monticello, Ga. 
CHEEK, ARCH AY.— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Discharged November 24, 1861. Enlisted, 
in the cavalry service and was killed in Kentucky 1863. 

CHEEK, MALLORY L.— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Appointed drummer. Discharged 1862. 
Dead. 
CHEEK, AYALKER N.— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Chapel 
Hill, N. C. 
CHILDS, ROBERT— 
Private, June 1, 1861. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant April, 1862. 
Wounded and captured at Spottsylvania, Ya. Living in Newton. 



Muster Rolls of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. ^ ^f57 

county, Ga. One of the 600 Confederate oflBicers exposed to the 
fire of our guns on Morris Island, S. C. 
COHEN, SAMUEL— 

Private, April 25, ISGl. Claimed foreign protection and was dis- 
charged 1SG2. 
CONNELLY, JAMES— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Discharged August 21, 1861. Living at New- 
ton Factory, Newton county, Ga. 

DENT, OLIVER H.— 

Private, May 23, 1861. Killed at Wilderness, Va. 
DUKE, B. H.— 

Private, xVpril 25, 1861. Discharged April, 1862— over age. Dead. 
ELDER, BENJAMIN F.— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa. Dead. 
ELDER, .JAMES L.— 
Private, May 17. 1862. Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa. Served through 
the war. Living in Texas. 
EZELL, BRAXTON R.— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Jasper 
county. 
EZELL, ROBERT F.— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Discharged September 22, 1861. 
GASTON, CHARLES R.— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa. Served 
through the war. Living in Starrsville, Ga, 
GASTON, THOMAS R.— 
Private, May 23, 1861. Killed while retreating from Richmond, Va., 
April. 1865. 
GAY, JOHN W.— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va. Served 
as color-bearer. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Died since the war 
in .Jasper county, Ga. 

GAY, WILLIAM F.— 
Private, June 7, 1861. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md. Wounded twice 
at AA'ilderness, Va. Served through the war. Living in Newborn, 
Ga. 
GILSTRAP, .JOHN B.— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Discharged June, 1862— under age. Dead. 

GLOVER, ELI— 

Private, March 12, 1864. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Died in 
prison at Fort Delaware. 
•GODKIN, .JOHN R.— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Detailed in hospital. Dead. 



Ibb Doles-Cook Brigade. 

GODKIN, S. C— 
Private. Survived the war. Died November 7, 1888. 

GOOLSBY, JAMES B.— 
Private, April 2.j, 18G1. Furnished substitute. Dead. 

GOOLSBY, WADE B.— 
Private, March 27, 1803. Served through the war. Living in Monti- 
cello, Ga. 
GRUBBS, JAMES M.— 
Private, April 25, 18G1. Served through the war. Living in Southern, 
Ga. 
HARPvLS, BRADFORD— 

Private, April 25, 18G1. Killed at Gettysburg, Pa. 

HARRIS, DAVID S.— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Transferred to Company H, Third Georgia 
Regiment. Living in Palalto, Ga. 

HAWTHORN, DAVID C— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Wounded at Winchester. Va. Surrendered' 
at Appomattox, Va. Living in Loganville, Ga. 

HAWTHORN, JAMES O.— 

Private, April 5, 1861. Wounded at Fort Steadman. Va. Living in 
Auburn, Ga.. 1898. 

HODGE, C. L.— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Dead. 
HODGE, DUKE R.— 

Private, June 7, 1861. Transferred from Tliird Georgia Regimen^, 

Dead. 
HOLLAND, WILLIAM M.- 
Private, April 25, 1861. Promoted First Lieutenant and assigned to 

General Blanchard's staff. 

HOLSENBACK, A. H.— ' 

Private, April 25, 1861. Volunteered in Confederate States 
Navy and served on the Merrimac on the .Tames river. 
Transferred to Privateer, Tallahassee; made two trips to Ncvia 
Scotia; was then transferred to the Iron Clad Richmond, where he 
remained until the surrender. 
HOLSENBACK, MARSHAL!^ 

Private, April 25, I'^Gl. Discharged 1862. Living in Putnam county,. 
Ga. 
HOWARD, WILLIAM F.- 

Private, April 25, 1861. Killed at Wilderness, Va. 

HUDGINS, W. D.— 
Private, , — . W^ounded July 6, 1862. 



^Muster Rolls of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. 159* 

HUSTON, OBEDIAH H.— 

Private, April 25, 1801. Wounded at Cold Harbor, Va., 1864, and 
died from wound. 
HUTCHINSON, THOMAS L.— 
Private, April 25, 1801. Promoted Fourth Sergeant. Served through 
the "war. Living— post-othce, Texas, Ga. 

HYMEN, CHARLES- 

Private, April 25, 18G1. Lost eye at Spottsylvania, Va. SeiTed 
through the war. Died in Columbus Ga., since the war. 
.TOBSON, JAMES E.— 

Private, May 25, 18G1. Discharged July 12, 1861. 

JONES, JAMES R.— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Wounded at Malvern Hill, Va., and dis- 
charged. Living in Jasper county, Ga., post-ofl3ce, Winfield. 

JORDAN, FLEMING— 
Private, March 12, 1864. Wounded and captured near Washington, 
D. C, and died in prison. Buried at Arlington. 
KELLY, JOHN R. - 
Private, April 2.5, 1861. Lost hand accidentally July 1, 1862, and 
discharged. E»ead. 
KELLY, SEABORN .L— 
Private, September 10, 1861. Served through the war. Living at 
Kellj-'s, Ga. 
LANE, JOHN L. B.— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Served through the war. Moved to Ar- 
kansas after the surrender. 
LANGSTON, JOHN— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Killed at Snickers' Gap, Va., June. 1864. 
LEWIS, E. T.— 

Private, June 14, 1864. Killed at Snickers' Gap, Va. 
LOYD. JOHN D.— 
Private, October 31, 1862. Killed at Winchester, Va., September 19, 
1864. 

McDowell, .james m.— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Killed at Malvern Hill, Va. 

Mcdowell, m. a.— 

Private, May 23. 1861. Wounded at Malvern Hill, Va. Lost leg at 
battle Cedar Creek, Va., October 19, 1864, and discharged. Dead. 
McKINNEY, S. V.— 

Private, May 22, 1861. Killed at Spottsylvania, Va. 
MURPHY, .JAMES F.— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Appointed Color-Sergeant. Commissioned 
Ensign June, 1862; held that rank until the surrender of Lee's- 



160 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

army. Wounded through both jaws at Malvern Hill. Wounded 
at Sharpsburg and Chaueellorsville. Wounded through left shoul- 
der and right wrist at Spottsylvania. Wounded at Winchester, 
Va., September 19, 18G4. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Died 
in Georgia Soldiers' Home 1901. 
■OSBORN, E. J.— 

Private, May 22, 1801. Survived the war. Died after the surrender. 
PARHAM, W. P.— 

Private, llocruit. Died in hospital. 
PARKER, CHARLES W.— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Discharged May 21, 1862. Dead. 
PATTERSON, .TAMES G.— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Lost arm and received bayonet wound in 
the head at Spottsylvania, Ya. Living at Sunnyside, Ga. 
PENN, JOSEPH— 

Private, May 23, 1861. Discharged 1862. Died since the war in 
.Lasper county, Ga. 

PENN, THOMAS R.— 

Private, May 10, 1862. Wounded at Gettysburg. Pa., and at Mine 
Run, Ya. Yolunteered in Confederate States Navy and served on 
the Merrimac on the James river. Transferred to Privateer Talla- 
hassee; made two trips to Novia Scotia: was then transferred to 
the Iron Clad Richmond, where he remained until the surrender. 
Living in Monticello, Ga. 
"PERSONS, BEN.LVMIN F.— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant 
Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa. Lost foot near Washington, D. C, 
1864. Captured and died in prison from wound. Buried at Arling- 
ton. 

PHILLIPS, ASA C— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Killed at Malvern Hill, Ya. 

PHILLIPS, RICHARD B.— 
Private, May 17, 1862. Surrendered at Appomattox, Ya. Living in 
Hillsboro, .Jasper county, Ga. 

POTTS, WILLIAM L.— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Killed at Sharpsburg Md. 
PRESTON, HENRY H.— 

Private, May 22, 1861. Wounded at King's Schoolhouse, Ya., and 
died from wound. 
RAINES— 

Private. Recruit. Died in hospital. 
TIAINEY, NATHANIEL B.— 

Private, September 18, 1863. Captured at Spottsylvania, Ya., and 
died in prison. 



Muster Rolls of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. 161 

REEVES, THOMAS— 
Private, April 25, 18G1. Transferred to Third Georgia Regiment. 

REID, JAMES— 

Private, April 25, 18U1. Vv'onnded at Cedar Creek, Va., October 19, 
1864. 

ROBERTS, ASHLEY G.— 

Private, April 25, 1801. Killed near Washington, D. C, 1864. 

SANDERS, E. S.— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Lost arm at Mine Run, Va., 1863. Dead.. 

SHIPP, JOSEPH F.— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Discharged April, 1862— under age. Dead. 

SHY, PEYTON R.— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Transferred to Third Georgia Regiment.. 
Living in Dublin, Ga. 
SHY, SEABORN W,— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa. Served 
through the v^^ar. Living in Machcn, Ga. 
SMITH, ANDREW R.— 

Private, April 25 1861. Discharged 1862. Dead. 
SMITH, HENRY— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Died of typhoid fever in hospital at Rich- 
mond, Va., July, 1862. 

SMITH, W. J.— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Captured 1862 and died in prison. 
SMITH, WILLIAM R.— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Promoted First Lieutenant April 26, 1862. 
Resigned June, 1862. Moved to Texas and died. 
SPEARS, CICERO M.— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Discharged 1862. Living at Farrar, Ga. 
STANDIFER, WILLIAM R.— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Wounded at Sharpsburg, and died from 
wound at Shepardstown, Md., September 25, 1862. 
TAYLOR, CHARLES D.— 
Private, September 22, 1861. Wounded in battle. Served through 
the war. Living in Texas. 

TILMAN, GEORGE.— 

.Private, April 25, 1861. Killed at Spottsylvania, Va. 
TWEEDY, WILLIAM T.— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Killed at Sharpsburg, Md. 

TTIGGLB, LEROY— 

Private, April 25, 1861. W^ounded in seven days' fight near Rich- 
mond, Va., 1862. 

11 d-c 



162 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

TYLER, JOB N., JR.— 

Privato, April 25, ISGl. Captured at Chancellorsville, Va. Wounded 
at Wilderness, and captured at Fort Steadman, Va., March 25, 18G5. 
Living in Gladesville, Jasper county, Ga. 

TYNER, DAVID W.— 

Privato, April 25, 18G1. Wounded at Winchester, Va. Surren lert ! 
at Appomattox, Va. Died since the war. 

VINCENT, WILLIAM T.— 
Private, April 25, 1801. Served through the war. Died after the 
surrender. 
WALLER, ZACCHEUS E.— 

Private, April 25, 1861. Wounded at Spottsylvania, Va., and died 
from wound. 
WILLINGHAM, JOHN— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Discharged 1862. Dead. 

WINBURN, DAVID W.— 
Private, April 25, 1861. Discharged July 30, 1862— under age. En- 
listed in Eleventh Georgia P.attalion Cavalry April, 1864, Sur- 
rendered at Goldsboro, N. C. Living in Atlanta, Ga. 
ZORKOWOSKY, ALFRED— 
Private, May 23, 1861. Discharged May 7, 1862. Living in Monti- 
cello, Ga. 



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Muster Rolls of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. 163 



MUSTER ROLL OF THE BALDWIN BLUES, COM- 
PANY H, FOURTH REGIMENT, GEORGIA VOL- 
UNTEER INFANTRY, C. S. A. 

BALDWIN COUNTY, GEORGIA. 

DOLES, GEORGE — 

Captain, April 2(3, 1861. Promoted Colonel Fourth Georgia Regiment 
May 8, 1861. Re-elected Colonel April 26, 1862. Wounded at Mal- 
vern Hill, Ya., 1862. Promoted Brigadier-General November 1, 
1862. Killed at Cold Harbor, Ya., June 2, 1864. 
-CARAKER, JACOB M.— 

First Lieutenant, April 26, 1861. Promoted Captain May 9, 1861. 
AYounded at Sliarpsburg, Md. Resigned November, 1862. Living 
in Milledgeville, Ga. 
McCOMB, SAMUEL— 

Second Lieutenant, April 26, 1861. Promoted First Lieutenant May 
9, 1861; Captain and A. C. S. Fourth Georgia Regiment June, 1862; 
A. C. S. Doles' Brigade July, 1863, and served as such until close 
of war. Killed by being thrown from a buggy in Milledgeville, 
Ga., spring of 1871. 
WALKER, SAMUEL— 
Junior Second Lieutenant, April 26, 1861. Promoted Second Lieu- 
tenant May 9, 1861. He held these two offices until April 27, 1862. 
Died in Milledgeville, Ga., since the war. 
;STALEY, JOSEPH— 

First Sergeant, April 26, 1861. Discharged account of disability May 
20, 1862. Living in Milledgeville, Ga. 
KRAMER, CHRIS— 
Second Sergean,t, April 26, 1861. Discharged May 16, 1861, and died 
of disease during the war. 
FAIR, JOHN B.— 
Third Sergeant, April 26, 1861. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant 
May 20, 1861. Resigned 1862. Living in Milledgeville, Ga. 
HERTY, BERNARD R.— 
Fourth Sergeant, April 26, 1861. Promoted Second Sergeant May 
20, 1861; Second Lieutenant December, 1862. Wounded at 
Spottsylvania, Ya. At home on furlough when Lee's army sur- 
rendered. Died in Milledgeville, Ga., IS—. 
■SHONBEIN, FRED— 

Fifth Sergeant, April 26, 1861. Died of disease in Milledgeville, Ga., 
July 8, 1861. 



164 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

LANE, EDWARD P.— 
First Corporal, April 2(5, 18(>1. Promoted Fourth Sergeant. Wounderf 
at Sliarpsbiirj;-, Md., and disabled. Assigned to light duty ia 
Milledgeville, Ga., and discharged afterwards. Living in Milledge- 
ville, Ga. 

JONES, RICHARD V.— 
Second Corporal, April 2(>, 18(>1. Promoted Fifth Sergeant May 20, 
18G1; Junior Second Lieutenant, Second Lieutenant and First Lieu- 
tenant 1862. Detailed Inspector-General of Doles' Brigade 1864. 
Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Died since the war in Milledge- 
ville, Ga. 

CONE, A. J.— 
Third Corporal, April 26, 1861. Promoted First Corporal May 20, 
1861; Fifth Sergeant September 1, 1861. Captured at Spottsyl- 
vania, Va. Died at Fort Delaware, fall of 1864, 

NELSON, JAMES L.— 
Fourth Corporal, April 26, 1861. Promoted Second and First Corporal 
1861. Killed at Sharpsburg, Md. 

GARDNER, REUBEN E — 
Fifth Corporal, April 26, 1861. Discharged— over age. Died since 
the war. 

FLYNN, REV, WILLIAM— 

Chaplain of Company, April 26, 1861, Promoted Chaplain Fourth 
Georgia Regiment 1861, Died since the war. 

ALLING, E. T.— 
Private, May, 1862, Captured and imprisoned at Point Lookout, Md., 
April 7, 1865. Released after the surrender. Died in Milledge- 
ville, Ga., September 25, 1902. 

BABB, JAMES W.— 

Private, August 5, 1861. Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 
BABB, JOHN— 

Private, August 5, 1861. Died of typhoid fever in Richmond, Va., 
July 9, 1862. 

BAGLEY, CHARLES IL— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Promoted Second Sergeant April 28, 1862. 
Wounded in battle May, 1864, and disabled. Assigned to light 
duty in Milledgeville, Ga. 

BAGLEY, F. A.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Fate unknown. 

BAGLEY, JOHN R.— 

Private, May 23, 1862. Wounded in battle October 12, 1864. At 
home on furlough when Lee's army surrendered. 



Muster Rolls of the Fourth Georgia Regevient. 165 

BARNES, JxiMES W.— 
Private, May 14, 18G2. Captured at Wiuchester, Va., September 19, 
1864. 

BEASLEY, FllEUEKICK A.— 

Private, April 2(), 18(Jl. Discliarged account disability May 5, 1862. 
BEKAND, TEKKELL M.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant April 
28, 1862. Discliarged account disability. Died since the war. 
BOUT WELL, JAMES A.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Detailed in Confederate States department. 
Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Living in Macon, Ga. 

BRADBERRY, WM. J.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Discharged account disability July 28, 1861. 
BUTLER, J. D.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Fate unknown. 

BUTLER, JOHN F — 

Private, April 26, 1861. Wounded at Fort Steadman, Va. At home 
on furlough when Lee's army surrendered. Living in Baldwin 
county, Ga. 
BUTLER, J. W.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Fate unknown. 
BUTLER, W. R.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Killed at Gettysburg, Pa. 

BUTTS, DANIEL— 

Private, March 4, 1864. Killed near Washington, D. C, 1864. 

BUTTS, H. M. E. ("CASE")— 

Private, August 5, 1S61. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va., May 10, 
1864. Released after surrender. Living in Staunton, Ala. 

BUTTS, WALLACE— 

Private, June 14. 1861. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant, First 
Lieutenant and Captain 1862. Lost hand at Chancellorsville, Va. 
Lost leg and captured near Washington, D. C, 1864. Released 
after surrender. Died in Baldwin county, Ga., May 18, 1891. 

BUTTS, SIM— 

Private, April 26. 1861. Killed near Washington, D. C, 1864. 
BYINGTON, CHARLES A.— 

Private, August 5, 1861. Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 

OALLAWAY, ELISHA J.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va., and died 
in prison at Fort Delaware, fall of 1864. 
CALLAWAY, RICHARD C— 
Private, May 30, 1861. Discharged account ill health November 14, 
1861. Died in Milledgeville, Ga., since the war. 



166 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

CAMPBELL, R. M — 
Private, April 20, 1861. Promoted Fourth and Third Corporal 1861. 
Wounded at Sharpsburg, and died at Hagerstown, Md. 

CARAKER, GEORGE W.— 

Private, May 16, 1862. Wounded at Malveru Hill, Ya., and dis- 
charged. Living in Milledgeville, Ga. 

CASH, JAMES M.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Joined a cavalry company in Tennessee 
while at home on furlough. 

COLLINS, J. R.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Discharged account disability. Dead. 
COMPTOX, JORDAN C— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Discharged. Living in Selma, Ala. 
CONE, WILLIAM A.— 

Private, May 16, 1862. Wounded in battle and discharged. Living" 
in Jewells, Ga. 

COOPER, JOHN C— 

Private, May 16, 1862. Wounded at King's Schoolhouse, Ya., and 
discharged. Living in Dooly county, Ga. 
COOPER, MARK A.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Promoted Second Corporal April 28, 1862.. 
Killed at Fort Steadman, Ya. 
GUSHING, WALTER B.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Died in Portsmouth, Ya., October 4, 1861. 
DANIELS, WILLIAM L.— 

Private, August 5, 1861. Died in Richmond, Ya., June 20, 1862. 
DARNELL, S. H.— 

Private, May, 1862. Killed at Petersburg, Ya. 
De LAUNAY, EDWARD W.— 

Private, June 22, 1861. Killed at Gettysburg, Pa. 
DENTON, JAMES W.— 

Private, May 16, 1862. Captured at Gettysburg, Pa. Dead. 
DICKSON, JAMES A.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Discharged account disability and age. 
Died since the war. 

EDWARDS, A. M. ("BUCK")— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Discharged account disability. Died in 
Milledgeville, Ga., since the war. 
ELDER, JOHN F.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Wounded at Spottsylvania, Ya. 

ELDER, J. G.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Wounded and captured at Spottsylvania, 
Released after surrender. 



Muster Rolls of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. 167 

ELLINGTON, JAMES F.— 

Private, April 20, 1801. Discharged January 16, 1802. Died since 
the war. 

EZELL, JAMES— 

Private, June 19, 1802. Wounded and captured at Wilderness, Va. 
Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. 

FORSYTH, HENRY E.— 

Private, April 20, 1801. Discharged account disability November 
23, 1801. 

FOWLER, JOHN— 
Private, April 20, 1801. Discharged account disability September 1, 
1801. Died in Milledgeville, Ga., since the war. 

FOWLER, MILES A.— 

Private, June 18, 1802. Assigned to hospital duty in Richmond, Va^ 
Discharged 1802. Inmate of the Georgia Soldiers' Home. 
FREENEY, ELIJAH— 

Private, April 20, 1801. Discharged account disability September 1, 
1801. Died since the war. 

GEEKS, HENRY S.— 
Private, April 20, 1801. Detailed as musician in band of Fourth 
Georgia Regiment. 

GIBSON, ADAM J.— 

Private, April 20, 1801. Transferred to Governor's Horse Guard. 
GILLESPIE, THOMAS C— 
Private, April 20, 1801. Killed at Sharpsburg, Md. 

GREEN, JOSEPH— 
Private, April 20, 1801. Promoted First Sergeant and Junior Sec- 
ond Lieutenant 1802. Survived the war. 

GREEN, THOMAS F., Jr.— 
Private, June 22, 1801. Transferred to Governor's Horse Guard. 
Died since the war. 

GRIFFIN, J. AUGUSTUS— 

Private, April 20, ISOl. Killed at Spottsylvania, Va., May 10, 1864. 
GURLINGER, PHILIP— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Discharged account disability. Died of con- 
sumption 1802. 

HALL, DAVID M.— 

Private, August 5, 1801. Killed at Charlestown, Va. 
HALL, JAMES A.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Detailed in Quartermasters' department. 
Died since the war. 



168 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

HALL, ROLAND B.— 

Private, April 2iJ, 18G1. Transferred to Ninth Georgia Regiment. 

Living in Macon, Ga. 
HANFT, FERNANDER— 

Private, April 2(5, 1801. Discharged. Died since the war in Mil- 

ledgeville, Ga. 

HARPER, A. P.— 

Private, May 11, 1S()2. Wounded and captured at Cedar Creek, Va. 
At home on furlough when Lee's army surrendered. 

HARDEN, W. D.— 
Private, May 11, 18G2. Wounded at Spottsylvania, Va., May 12, 
1864. 
HAUG, FREDERICK— 

Private, April 20, 1801. Discharged. Living in Milledgeville, Ga. 
HAWK. THOMAS H.— 
Private, May 30, 1801. Disabled and detailed in Provost Guard. 
Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Living in Calhoun county, Ga. 
HAWKINS, EUGENE A.— 

Private, May 30, 1801. Promoted Second Lieutenant April 28. 1802: 
first Lieutenant, June, 1802. Appoiuted A. D. C. on staff of Gen- 
eral Doles, December 8, 1862. Promoted Captain and Brigade In- 
spector November, 1863. Killed at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864. 

HAWKINS, W^ILLIAM G.— 

Private, May 30, 1861. Wounded at Malvern Hill, Va., and dis- 
charged. Living in Milledgeville, Ga. 
HAYGOOD, WYATT J. M.— 
Private, August 5, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Died in 
prison at Fort Delaware, fall of 1864, 

HOLCOMB, ELISHA D.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvauia, Va. Died in 
prison at Fort Delaware, fall of 1864. 
HORTON, WILLIAM D.— 
Private, :May 11, 1862. W^ounded at Spottsylvania, Va. Surrendered 
at Appomattox, Va. 

HUFF, REUBEN— 

Private, August 5, 1861. Discharged November 23, 1861. Died dur- 
ing the war. 

JENKINS, THOMAS— 

Private, April 20, 1861. Promoted Fourth Sergeant. Captured at 
Gettysburg, Pa. Living in Atlanta, Ga. 
JOHNSON, .JOHN L.— 

Private, April 20, 1861. Detailed on Division Provost Guard. Sur- 
rendered at Appomattox, Va. Died iu Savannah, Ga., 1900. 



Muster Rolls of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. 169 

JONES, DANIEL— 

Recruit. Discharged. 
KIKKPATRICK, GEORGE W. C— 

Private, February 15, 18(>2. At home on tarlough when Lee's army 
surrendered. Died since the war. 

KIRKPATRICK, JOHN D.— 

Private," April 20, 1801. Killed at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1SG4. 

KIRKPATRICK, SAMUEL W.— 
Private, August 5, 18(>1. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va., May 10, 

1804. Died in prison at Fort Delaware fall of 1804. 

LANE, JOHN G.— 
Private, June 1, 1802. Killed at Charlestown, Va. 

LANE, WILLIAM H.- 
Private, April 20, 1801. Wounded and captured at Spottsylvania, 
Va., May 10, 1804. Released 1805. Died in Milledgeville, Ga. 
since the war. 

LAWLER, PATRICK H.— 

Private, April 2(>, 1801. Discharged account disability and age. 
Died in Milledgeville, Ga., since the war. 

LEWIS, FAUNTLEROY— 

Private, June 1, 1802. Assigned to light duty. Survived the war. 
Living in Atlanta, Ga. 

LEWIS, JAMES— 
Recruit. Transferred to Rylander's battalion. 

LIPSEY, UNION— 

Private, August 5, 1801. Killed at Wilderness, Va. 

MeCOMB, FREDERICK— 

Private. July 4, 18(>1. Wounded at Spottsylvania, Va. At home 
on wounded furlough when Lee's army surrendered. Died in 
Milledgeville, Ga., 1875. 

McCOMB, MARK H.— 

Private, May 30, 1802. Detailed as clerk at brigade headquarters. 
Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Living in Milledgeville, Ga. 

McKINLEY, .TAMES J.— 

Private, June 18, 1802. Unable for field duty. Detailed in Quarter- 
masters' department. Died since the war. 

McMillan, Alexander— 

Private, August 5, 1801. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Released 

1805. Living. 

MAHLER, HENRY— 

Private, April 20, 1801. Discharged at Warrenton. Va., 1802. 



170 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

MAPPIN, THOMAS W.— 

Private, April 20, ISGl. Captured at Gettysburg, Pa. Released 1865.. 
Died in Milledgeville, Ga., since the war. 

MASON, JOSEPH O.— 
Private, June 18, lSt>2. Captured and imprisoned. Released 1865. 

MATHIS, ROBERT H.— 

Private, April 26, 1S61. Killed at Petei-sburg, Ya., July 9, 1864. 

MILLER, WILLIAM— 

Private, March 14, 1862. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Died in. 
prison at Fort Delaware, fall of 1864. 
MIMS, J. PINKNEY— 

Private, August 5, 1861. Discharged account disability May, 1861i 
Died since the war in Baldwin county, Ga. 
MITCHELL, R. HUBBARD— 

Private, August 5, 1861. Killed at Chancellorsville, Ya. 
MORAN, JESSE— 

Private, August 5, 1861. Died in Portsruouth, Ya., October 9, 1861.. 

MORAN, JAMES W.— 

Private, June 18, 1862. Died in service. 
MOSELEY, WARREN— 

Private, August 5, 1861. Wounded and captured at Strasburg, Ya.. 
Exchanged soon afterwards. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Ya. 
Appointed captain w^hile at home on, furlough by Governor Brown, 
and assigned to duty in, North Georgia, as commander of Company 
A, Fourth Battalion of cavalry State troops, commanded by Colonel 
J. J. Findley, of Dahlonega, Ga., and served in that capacity until; 
the close of the war. Living in Macon, Ga. 
MULLER, OSWALD E.— 

Private, May 3, 1861. Died of fever in Richmond, Ya., July 31, 1862. 
ORME, HENRY S.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Wounded and disabled at Malvern Hill, Ya.. 
Promoted Assistant Surgeon and assigned to duty in Richmond, 
Ya. Living in Los Angeles, Cal. 
PALMER, BENJAMIN F.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Died during the war. 
RE AMY, JAMES S.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Promoted Fourth Corporal, Transferred 
to Ninth Yirginia Cavalry. 

RESPESS, lep: M.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Died in Norfolk, Ya., June 6, 1861. The 
first member of his company to die of disease. 
ROBERTS, BENJAMIN F.— 
Private, June 14, 1861. Discharged account ill health. 



Muster Rolls of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. 171 

ROBERTS, JAMES S.— 

Private, May 14, 1862. Wounded in battle. 
ROBERTS, N. C— 
Private. Recruit. Wounded in battle. At home on wounded fur- 
lough when Lee's army surrendered. Living in Haddock Station, 
Ga. 
ROBERTS, SIMEON— 

Private, April 2(3, 1801. Discharged accoun.t of disability. 
ROBERTS, WILLIAM— 
Private, August 5, 1801. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Living in 
East Macon, Ga. 
ROBERTS, W. HENRY— 
Private, August 5, 1861. Lost arm at King's Schoolhouse, Va., and 
captured. Living in Milledgeville, Ga. 
ROBISON, WILLIAM H.— 

Private, September 1, 1861. Promoted Fourth and First Corporal. 
Surrendered at Appomattox. 
RUSSELL, F. :M.— 

Private, July 1, 1861, Died during the war. 
RUSSELL, W.— 

Private, July 1, 1861. Discharged account ill health. 
SANFORD, JOHN W. A.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Discharged April 26, 1861— over age. Died 
in Milledgeville, Ga., since the war. 

SANFORD, T. G. ("DODIE")— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Discharged account disability July 21, 1861. 
Died in ^Milledgeville, Ga., since the war. 
SHEPHERD, JOSHUA— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Died of typhoid fever in Richmond, Va., July 
16, 1862. 

SHEPARD, JOHN B.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant 1864. 
Wounded and captured at Spottsylvania, Va., July 12, 1864. Re- 
leased 1S65, 

SINGLETON, SAMUEL, .Jr.— 
Private, May 14, 1862. Captured and died in prison at Elmira, New 
York. 

SMITH, E. P.— 

Private, September, 1861. Discharged. Died April 16, 1863. 
SMITH, JOSEPH- 
Private, April 26, 1S61. Discharged account of disability November 
28, 1861. 



172 Doles-Cook Briuade. 

SMITH, JOHN II.— 

Private, August 5, 1801. Discharged. Living. 

SMITH, THOMAS J.— 
Private, May 14, 1SG4. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. 

SNEAl), .JOHN AV. W.— 
Private, April 20, 1801. Killed at King's Schoolliouse, Va. First 
member of the company killed in battle. 

SPEIGHTS, WILLIAM M.— 

Private, July 3, 1801. Discharged. Living in Fort Gaines, Ga. 

STANLEY, RICHARD R.— 

Private, May 14, 1802. Wounded in battle. 

STEPHENS, ISAAC C— 
Private, May 14, 1801. Discharged November 23, 1801. Died Decem- 
ber 13, 1801. 

TINSLEY, W. DAVIS— 
Private, April 20, 1801. Wounded and disabled. Detailed in Quarter- 
masters' department. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Died 
since the war. 

TORRANCE, W. HAMP— 

Private, April 20, 1801. Discharged — over age. Died in Baldwin 
county, Ga., since the war. 

"TUTTLE, GEROME— 

Private, April 20, 1801. Discharged — over age. Died in Milledge- 
ville, Ga., since the war. 

VAUGHN, WILLIS— 

Private, April 26, 1801. Discharged— over age. Died in Milledge- 
ville, Ga., since the war. 

VINSON, HENRY C— 
Private, August 5, 1801. Promoted Third Sergeant. Captured at 
Spottsylvania. Released 1865. Living. 

WALLS, WILLIAM— 
Private, April 20, 1801. Wounded and disabled. Detailed as ambu- 
lance driver. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Died since the 
war. 

WARD, LUKE— 
Private, March 4, 1802. Fate unknown. 

WEST, EDWARD R.— 

Private, April 20, 1801. Promoted Third and Second Sergeant. Sur- 
rendered at Appomattox, Va. Living in Eufaula, Ala. He as- 
sisted in bringing the body of General George Doles from the bat- 
tle-field at Cold Harbor, Va., July 2, 1864, where he was killed. 
He being in charge of the Ambulance Corps at that time. 



Muster Rolls of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. 173. 

WHITAKEK, WILLIAM B.~ 
Private, September 1, 18(i2. Woimdecl near Washington, D. C, July 
12, 1804. Captured aud iiiiprisoued at Elmira, N. Y. Released 
18G5. Liviug iu Baldwin county, Ga. 

WIGGINS, JOHN J — 

Private, June 4, Ibol. Killed at Spottsylvania, Va., May 12, 1864. 
WILLIAMS, EDWARD J.— 

Private. Recruit. Detailed in Ordnance Department, Died since 
the war. 

WILLIAMS, JAMES H.— 

Private, April 20, 1801. Killed at Petersburg, Va. 
WILLIAMS, J. R.— 
Private, August 5, 1801. Wounded and captured at Spottsylvania, 
Va. Released 1865. 

WILLIAMS, WM. A. ("RUFF")— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Wounded at Malvern Hill, Va., 1862. Trans- 
ferred to First Georgia Regulars, and promoted Second Lieutenant. 
Died in Knoxville, Tenn., 1901. 

Private, March 4, 1862. Killed at Cedar Creek, Ya., October 19, 
1864. 

WORSHAM, .JOHN G.— 
Private, April 26, 1861. Promoted Second Coi-poral. Wounded in 
battle September 22, 1864. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Liv- 
ing in, Eastman, Ga., 1898. 



174 Doles-Cook Brigade. 



MUSTER ROLL OF THE MACON COUNTY VOLUN- 
TEERS, COMPANY I, FOURTH REGIMENT, GEOR- 
GIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, C. S. A. 

MACON COUNTY, GEORGIA. 

PROTHRO, SAMUEL M.— 

Captain, April 29, 1861. Retired at expiration of term of service, 
April 29, 1862. Died since the war. 

WILLIS, WILLIAM H.— 

First Lieutenant, April 29, 1861. Promoted Captain April 29, 1862; 
Major, March, 1863. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va. Promoted 
Lieutenant-Colonel July, 1863; Colonel, 1864. Died since the war 
in Oglethorpe, Ga. 

HALL, THOMAS G.— 
Second Lieutenant, April 29, 1861. Retired at expiration of term of 
service, April 29, 1862. Enlisted in a North Carolina regiment. 
Living in Fayetteville, N, C. 

WORSHAM, .TEFFERSON J.— 
Junior Second Lieutenant, April 29, 1861. Retired at expiration of 
term of service, April 29, 1862. Enlisted in Griffin,'s Georgia Cav- 
alry and promoted Captain. Died since the war. 

"HARRISON, JAMES M.— 

First Sergeant April 29, 1861. Discharged account lung trouble 
October 2, 1861. Dead. 

^COOK, PHILIP— 

Second Sergeant, April 29, 1861. Promoted Adjutant May 9, 1861; 
Lieutenant-Colonel, August, 1862; Colonel, November 1, 1862. 
Wounded at Malvern Hill and Chancellorsville, Va. Promoted 
Brigadier-General and assigned to command of Doles' Brigade July, 
1864. Wounded at Fort Steadman, Va., March 25, 1865, and cap- 
tured. Released July 30, 1865. Died in Atlanta, Ga., May 23, 1894. 

"BRANTLEY, JOSEPH— 

Third Sergeant, April 29, 1861. Discharged account disease March 
5, 1862. Died since the war. 

.SNEAD, FLETCHER T.— 

Fourth Sergeant, April 29, 1861. Promoted First Sergeant October 
2, 1861; Second Lieutenant, April 29, 1862; First Lieutenant and 
Adjutant, September — , 1862; Captain and A. A. Gen. of Doles' 
Brigade, November 1, 1862. Served in the same capacity under 
General Cook until the surrender of Lee's army. Died in Ogle- 
thorpe, Ga., 1891. 



Muster Rolls of the Fourth Georgia. Regiment. 175 

FOLK. LEVI E.— 
First Corporal, April 29, 18G1. Lost arm at Spottsylvania, Va. Died 
since the war, 

RODGERS, JAMES M.— 

Second Corporal, April 29, 1861. Discharged. Died in Sumter 
county, Ga.t after the surrender. 

SMITH, JAMES A — 

Third Corporal, April 29, 1861. Discharged account disease. Died 
since the war. 

TARBROUGH, J. C— 

Fourth Corporal, April 29, 1861. Died of Typhoid fever at Drewry's 
Bluff, Va.. June 26. 1862. 

BARFIELD, C. C— 
Vvh ate, July 26, 1862. Wounded at Wilderness, Va. Served through 
the war. Living in Bibb county, Ga. 

BLACKMAN, DAVID— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Discharged March 5, 1862. 

BLACKMAN, WILLIAM— 

Private, September 12, 1862. Captured near Washington, D. C, 
1864. Served through the war. Living in Macon county, Ga. 

BLEDSOE, WILLIAM H.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va. Pro- 
moted Corporal. Served through the war. Living in Delta, Ga. 

BLOUNT, EDWARD— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Discharged. Died since the war. 
BROWN, JOHN J.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Wounded and captured at Wilderness, Va. 
Served through the war. Living in Plains, Sumter county, Ga. 

-CANTRELL, TERRELL A.— 

Private, April 29. 1861. Discharged October, 1861. Died since the 
war in Columbus, Ga. 

CARSON, JOSEPH P.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Promoted Junior Second and First Lieu- 
teuant, 1862. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md. Promoted Captain 
1863. Wounded at Wilderness and Winchester, Va., 1864. Wounded 
twice at Petersburg, Va. Commanded sharpshooters of Gordon's 
corps at close of war. Died in, Reynolds, Ga., March 25, 1889. 

"CARSON, ROBERT H.— 

Private. Recruit. Transferred from Company C, Twelfth Georgia 
Regiment. Courier for Generals Doles and Cook. Wounded at 
Wilderness, Va. Killed at Fort Steadman, Va., March 25, 1865. 



176 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

CLOUD, ALEXANDER H.— 
rrivate, April 29, ISOL WouDded at Spottsylvania, Va., and died 
from woniid. 

CLOUD, JAMES W.— 
Private, April 25), ISOl. Wounded at Sliarpsburg, Md. Served 
through the war. Moved to Texas and died. 

CLOUD, JOSEPH— 

Private. Recruit. Courier for General Doles. Served through the 
war. Moved to Texas after the surrender. 

CLOUD, WILLL\M W.— 

Private, April 29, ISUl. Wounded at Spottsylvania, Ya. Served 
through the war. Living in Bryan, Texas. 

COCKRELL, WILLIAM C— 
Private, April 29, 18G1. Discharged at Camp Jackson, Va., January 
20, 1862. 

COOK, ROBERT— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Captured and died in prison at Fort Dela- 
ware. 

COVINGTON, D. E.— 
Private, May 12, 18(>1. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va. Wounded 
and captured at Wilderness, Va., and died from wound in prison. 

COVINGTON, WILLIAM W.— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Wounded at Wilderness, Va., and died from' 
wound. 
DAVIS, RICHARD A.— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md. Served' 
through tlie war. Died in Twiggs county, Ga., after the surrender. 
DIXON, WARREN M.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Promoted Third Sergeant. Wounded at 
Chancellorsville, Va. Promoted First Sergeant 1863. Wounded- 
at Cedar Creek, Va., October 19, 1864. Surrendered at Appomattox. 
Va. Living in Atlanta, Ga. 
EARLY, ALLEN H.— 

Private, October 20, 1863. Died and was buried at Arlington, D. C. 

EDDIE, 

Private. Recruit. Killed at Winchester, Va., 1864. 
FELTON, .TAMES G.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Served through the war. Died after the- 
surrender. 

FISH, DAVID A.— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Lost arm at Sharpsburg, Md. Died in Moul- 
trie, Ga,, December, 1902. 



Muster Rolls of the Fourth Georgia Reglment. 177 

FISH, THOMAS J.— 

Priyate, April 29, 1861. Promoted First Sergeaut. Wounded at 
Chancellorsville, Va., and died from wound in Richmond, Ya. 

FISH, WILLIAM T.— 

Private, April 29, ISGl. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Died in 
Athens, Ala., after the surrender. 

GAINES, ANDREW J.— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Discharged November 13, 1861. 

GAINES, ROBERT B.— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Wounded near Washington, D. C, 1864. 
Served through the war. Died after the surrender. 

GILBERT, THOMAS J.— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Wounded and captured at Sharpsburg, Md. 
Survived the war. Killed after the surrender. 

GREER, JOHN M.— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Discharged— over age. Died since the war. 

GREEN, .JAMES W.— 
Private, May 12, 1862. Detailed in, Pioneer Corps. Served through 
the war. Died after the surrender. 

GRIFFIN, JOEL B.— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Orderly to General Cook. Discharged. Died 
October 13, 1879. 

GRIMES, JOHN R.— 
Private, May 12, 1862. Wounded in battle. Surrendered at Appo- 
mattox. Died since the war. 

GRIMES, MORRIS— 
Private. Recruit, vrounded in battle. Served through the war. 
Living in Butler, Ga. 

HALL, EZEKIEL ("Zach")— 
Private. Recruit. Wounded at Fort Steadman, Va., March 25, 1865. 
Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Died in Albany, Ga., since the 
war. 

HALL, WILLIAM K.— 
Private, May 13, 1862. Wounded at Malvern Hill, Va. Lost arm at 
Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865. Died in Grangerville, Ga., 1902. 
HARRISON, BENJAMIN F.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 
HARRISON, WILLIAM H.— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Promoted Corporal. Wounded at Chancel- 
lorsville, Va. Promoted First Lieutenant in Georgia Reserves. Died 
in Montezuma, Ga., July 27, 1902. 

12 dc 



178 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

HAUGABOOK, W. C. P.- 

Private, April 29, 1861. Discharged accouixt left arm being disabled. 
Died since the war. 

HERRING, CHARLES— 
Private. Recruit. Wounded at Winchester, and Petersburg, Va. 
Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Living in Garden Valley, Ga. 

HICKS, ARETUS W.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Discharged October 19, 1861. Living in 
Reynolds, Ga. 
HICKS, EDWARD D.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Discharged December 6, 1862. Died since 
the war. 
HICKS, WILLIAM R.— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Promoted First Sergeant. Wounded at Win- 
chester, Va. Served through the war. Living in Reynolds, Ga. 

HILL, W. B.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Discharged November 10, 1861— over age. 
Died since the wslt. 
HOGG, DAVID M.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Killed at Sharpsburg, Md. 

HOGG, JAMES W.— 

Private. Recruit. Served through the war. Living in Oglethorpe, 
Ga. 

HOGG, THOMAS B.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Died at Camp .Jackson, Va., July 30, 1861. 

HORNADY, JAMES M.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Killed at Malvern Hill, Va. 
HUNNICUTT, W. H.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Died in Portsmouth, Va., May, 1861. 
JAY, .JACKSON T.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Wounded and captured at Chancellorsville, 
Va. Served through the war. Living at Hilton Station, Ga. 

JOINER, JEREMIAH— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Killed at Sharpsburg, Md. 
KAIGLER, HENRY M.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Discharged December 26, 1861. Living in 
Oglethorpe, Ga. 

LACY, HEZEKIAH— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Killed In battle. 
LAW, ALEXANDER— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va., and died 
from wound In Richmond, Va. 



Muster Rolls of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. 179 

!LAW, EBENEZER— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Promoted Second Sergeant. Killed at 
Petersburg, Va. 

I.EGGETT, EDMUND A.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Promoted Assistant Surgeon. Died since 
the war. 

LLOYD, JOHN D.— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Killed at Winchester, Va., September 19, 
1864. 

LLOYD, THOMAS P.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Promoted Third Sergeant June, 1861. 
Wounded and captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Promoted captain 
in Fourth Georgia Reserves. Living in Florida. 

LOW, AARON A.— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Discharged November 10, 1861. Living in 
Hawkinsville, Ga. 
McLENDON, JOHN J.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Killed at Malvern Hill, Va. 
McLENDON, WILLIAM C— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant. 
Killed at Wilderness, Va. 

Mcmullen, r. t.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Lost leg at Chancellorsville, Va. Died since 
the war. 

McMURRIAN, r. p.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Died of typhoid fever in hospital at Rich- 
mond, Va., July 6, 1862. 
McNEIL, A. A.— 

Private, May 11, 1862. Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 
McNEIL, BURWELL J.— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Wounded at Chancellorsville and Wilder- 
ness, Va. Served through the war. Died after the surrender. 
McNEIL, GEORGE W.— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Wounded at Winchester, Va. Transferred 
to Signal Corps. Served through the war. Died after the sur- 
render. 

MARTIN, ARCH M.— 
Private, August 3, 1862. Wounded at Wilderness, Va., and died from 
wound. 

MARTIN, ROBERT— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Promoted Second and First Lieutenant. 
Wounded at Malvern Hill, and Spottsylvania, Va. Served through 
the war. Living in Eatonton^ Ga, 



180 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

MARTIN, THOMAS F.— 

Pi-ivate, April 29, 1861. Wounded at Wilderness, Va., and died from 
wound. 
MARTIN, WILLIAM— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 

MATHIS, JOHN E. B.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Promoted Third Sergeant. Discharged ac- 
count disability. Promoted Lieutenant in Fourth Georgia Re- 
serves. Died since the war. 

MOSELEY, B.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Buena. 
Vista, Ga. 

MOTT, GEORGE W.— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Promoted First Sergeant. Wounded and 
captured 1863. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Died since the 
war. 

ODOM, SHEPARD— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Captured and imprisoned. Survived the war. 
Died after the surrender. 

PARKS, JAMES K.— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Died of typhoid fever in Richmond, Va.,. 
April 11. 1862. 

PARKS, JOHN W.— 
Private, May 11, 1862. Killed at Petersburg, Va. 

PATTERSON, C. H.— 
Private. Recruit. Killed at Wilderness, Va. 

PATTERSON, JAMES M.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Promoted Sergeant. Wounded at Spottsyl- 
vania, Va. Courier for General Cook. Surrendered at Appomat- 
tox, Va. Living in Brooks county, Ga., post-oflSce, Quitman. 

PEISTER, PHILIP— 

Private. Recruit. Killed at Sharpsburg, Md. 

PLASTER, PHILIP— 
Private. Recruit. Killed at Sharpsburg, Md. 

QUATTLEBAUM, ED.— 

Private. Recruit. Fate unknown. 

QUATTLEBAUM, THOMAS— 

Private. Recruit. Fate unknown. 
QUICK, JOHN J.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Served through the war. Died after the- 
surrender. 
QUICK, J. LaFAYETTE— 

Private, May 12, 1862. Killed at Wilderness, Va. 



Muster Rolls of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. 181 

RALEY, ROBERT R.— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Discharged 1862— over age. Died since the 
war, 
REYNOLDS, .JAMES H.— 
Private^ May 12, 1862. Promoted Second Corporal. Surrendered at 
Appomattox, Va. Living in Oglethorpe, Ga. 

REYNOLDS, THOMAS— 

Private, August 4, 1862. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Survived 
the war. Died after the surrender. 

RHODES, DR.— 

Private. Recruit. Survived the war. Living in Florida. 
ROBINSON, FRANK E.— 
Private, April 19, 1861. Wounded at Spottsylvania, Va., and died 
from wound. 
ROBINSON, J. T.— 
Private. Recruit. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md. Served through 
the war. Living in Oglethorpe, Ga. 

ROBINSON, WILLIAM A.— 
Private, April 19, 1861. Lost arm at Chancellorsville, Va. Died 
since the war. 
ROBINSON, W. C— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Died since 
the war. 

SIMPSON, JESSE P.— 
Private, May 12, 1862. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Released 
1865. Died since the war. 
SIMPSON, JOHN M.— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va. Served 
through the war. Died after the surrender. 
SMITH, CHARLES E.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Died at Portsmouth, Va., May 8, 1861. 
SMITH, FRANCIS M.— 
Private, August 4, 1862. Died at Mount Jackson, Va., October 14, 
1862. 

SMITH, GEORGE W.— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Served through the war. Died after the 
surrender. 

SMITH, JOHN G.— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Discharged November 13, 1861. Living 
in Birmingham, Ala. 

isMITH, YOUNG H. C— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Died of pneumonia in Portsmouth, Va., 
May 11, 1861. 



182 DoLEB-CooK Brigade. 

SOLOMON, GARY— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Nothing l?nown of his fate. 

SUTTON, J. D. N.— 
Private. Recruit. Wounded at Wilderness, Va. Served through the 
war. Died after the surrender. 

TAYLOR, CHARLES A.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Promoted Fourth Sergeant May, 1861. 
Wounded and Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Living in Amerlcus^ 
Ga. 
THIGPEN, A. N.— 
Private, August 11, 1862. Served through the war. Living in Ab- 
beville, Ga. 
THIGPEN, N. T.— 

Private. Recruit Served through the war. Living in Abbeville^ 
Ga. 
TURNER, JAMES S.— 
Private. Recruit. Wounded severely at Wilderness, Va. Served 
through the war. Living in Bruner, Ala. 

UNDERW^OOD, JOHN H.— 
Private, October 2, 1861. Wounded and captured at Spottsylvania,. 
Va. Living in Brooks county, Ga. 

WALTERS, CHARLES W.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Wounded at Winchester and captured at 
Fort Steadman, Va. Living in Atlanta, Ga. 
WALTERS. E. M.— 

Private, May 1, 1861. Transferred from Third Mississippi Regiment. 
Served through the war. Died after the surrender. 

WHITMORE, .— 

Private. Recruit. Fate unknown. 

WILKES, JAMES H.— 
Private. Recruit. Died of pneumonia in Lynchburg, Va., December 
9, 1862. 

WILKINSON, BENJAMIN B.— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Discharged September 30, 1861. Died since 
the war in Oglethorpe, Ga. 

WILKINSON, THOMAS H.— 
Private, September 30, 1861. Killed at Malvern Hill, Va. 

WILLIAMS, F. A.— 
Private, May 12, 1862. Killed at Wilderness, Va. 

W^ILLIAMS, JAMES L.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Wounded at Malvern Hill, Va., and died 
from wound December 27, 1862. 



Muster Rolls of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. 183 

WILSON, W. T.— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant Aprfi, 
1862. Wounded at Fort Steadman, Va. Died since the war. 
WOOD, DAVID— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Served through the Tvar. Died after the 
surrender. 

YARBROUGH, — . — .— 

Private, April 29, 1861. Died of typhoid fever at Mount Jackson, Va., 
October 14, 1862. 



184 Doles-Cook Brigade. 



MUSTER ROLL OF SUMTER LIGHT GUARDS, COM- 
PANY K, FOURTH REGIMENT, GEORGIA VOLUN- 
TEER INFANTRY, C. S. A. 

SUMTER COUNTY, GEORGIA. 

JOHNSON, WILLIAM L.— 

Captain, April 27, 1861. Retired at expiration of term of service, 
April 27, 1862, and entered the Quartermasters' Department, under 
Major George W. Grice, where he remained until the close of the 
war. Living in Macon, Ga. 

WINN, DAVID R. E.— 

First Lieutenant, April 27, 1861. Promoted Captain April 27, 1862; 

Major, October, 1862; Lieutenant-Colonel, November 1, 1862. 

Killed at Gettysburg, Pa., July 1, 1863. 
TOOLE, WILLIAM T.— 

Second Lieutenant, April 27, 1861. Retired at expiration of term of 

service, April 27, 1862. Died since the war. 

BROWN, ADAM R.— 
Junior Second Lieutenant, April 27, 1861. Retired at expiration of 
term of service, April 27, 1862. Died since the war. 

SIRRINE, WILLIAM— 
First Sergeant, April 27, 1861. Promoted First Lieutenant April 27, 
1862. Resigned July 1, 1862. Died since the war. 

BISEL, ROBERT M.— 

Second Sergeant, April 27, 1861. Promoted Second Lieutenan,t April 
27, 1862; First Lieutenant, July 1, 1862; Captain, October, 1862. 
Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 
SULLIVAN, SIDNEY S.— 
Third Sergeant, April 27, 1861. Served through the war as Third 
Sergeant. Died after the surrender. 

HORNADY, ALBERT C— 

Fourth Sergeant, April 27, 1861. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenaut 
April 27, 1862; Second Lieutenant, July 1, 1862; First Lieutenant, 
October, 1862. Resigned account of physical disability. Died 
1868. 
BROWN, RICHARD A.— 

Fifth Sergeant, April 27, 1861. Wounded at King's Schoolhouse, Va., 
and at Sharpsburg, Md. Promoted Captain in Sixty-fourth Geor- 
gia Regiment. Died since the war. 
SHIVER, JOHN M.— 

First Corporal, April 27, 1861. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant 



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Captain Company K, Fourth Georgia Regi- 
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First Lieutenant Company K, Fourth Geor- 
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First Lieutenant Company K, Fourth Geor- 
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Muster Rolls of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. 185 

February, 1863; Second Lieutenant, May 2, 1863; First Lieutenant, 
July 1, 1863; Captain, May 5, 1804, Commanded Fourth Georgia 
Regiment at surrender of Lee's army. Died since the war. 

VVHEATLEY, ISRAEL T.— 
Second Corporal, April 27, 1861. Wounded at Malvern Hill, Va. Pro- 
moted Quartermaster-Sergeant Fourth Georgia Regiment 1862. 
Surrendered at Appomattox, Ya. He was a member of the General 
Assembly of Georgia, 1895-0, from Sumter county, Ga. Living in 
Americus, Ga. 

DUNLAP, M. M.— 
Third Coiporal, April 27, 1861. Promoted Fourth Sergeant 1862. 
Wounded and captured near Washington, D, C, July 12, 1864. 
Served through the war. Living in Schley county, Ga. 

FINN, JOHN— 

Fourth Corporal, April 27, 1861. Discharged account over age and 
disability January 1, 1862, Died since the war. 

-ANSLEY, JAMES R.— 

Private, April 27, 1861. Promoted Third Sergeant 1862. Wounded 
at Wilderness, Ya, Served through the war. Living in Sumter 
county, Ga, 

ANSLEY, WILLIAM A,— 
Private, August 8, 1861. Wounded at Wilderness, Ya. 

BAISDEN, J, A. S.— 

Private, April 26, 1861. Transferred from Company A, Fourth Geor- 
gia Regiment. Wounded at King's Schoolhouse, and Wilderness, 
Ya. Served through the war. Living in Atlanta, Ga. 

TilSEL, AMOS K.— 

Private, April 27, 1801. Served through the war. Living in Augusta, 
Ga. 

BIVINS, GEORGE C— 

Private, April 27, 1861. Killed at Spottsylvania, Ya., May 10, 1864. 
BIVINS, SAMUEL W.— 

Private, April 27, 1861. Lost arm accidentally near Richmond, Ya., 
June, 1862. Dead. 

BLACK, EUGENE P.— 

Private, May 27, 1801. Appointed Orderly to General Doles .July 1, 
1863. Wounded in battle October, 1863. Captured July 7, 1864. Re- 
leased after the surrender. Living in Atlanta, Ga. 

BORING, ROBERT McBRIDE— 

Private, May 27, 1801. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Ya. Wounded 
and captured at Gettysburg, Pa. Died from wound while in prison. 



186 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

BORING, ISAAC W.— 
Private, April 27, 18G1. Discharged account disability January 22, 
1862. Living in Florida. 

BREWER, MILTON H.— 
Private, April 27, 1801. Discharged 1862. Died since the war. 

BROWN, GEORGE A.— 
Private, April 27, 1861. Discharged April 27, 1862— over age. Died 
1877. 
BROWN, ROBERT R.— 

Private, April 27, 1861. Transferred to Cutts' Artillery 1861. Sur- 
vived the war. Living in Oregon. 

BRONSON, DAVID T.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Living in. 
Arkansas. 

EYRD, JAMES O.— 

Private, April 27, 1861. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md., and died fron\ 
wound October 12, 1862. 

CAMERON, GILBERT C— 

Private, May 21, 1861. Survived the war. Died after the surrender. 

CARTER, LAWSON H.— 
Private, April 27, 1861. Appointed Adjutant of Rylander's Battalion- 
April, 1862. Served through the war. Living in Americus, Ga. 

CHEEVES, ROSWELL S.— 
Private, April 27, 1861. Wounded at Malveru Hill, Va. Appointed: 
Orderly to General Doles. Living in Unicoi, Tenn. 

CHEVES, THOMAS J.— 
Private, April 27, 1861. Discharged at Camp Jackson, Va. Died" 
since the war. 

CLARK. >. J.— 
Private, March 12, 1862. Wounded at Malvern Hill, Va. Survived 
the war. Living in Cuthbert, Ga. 

CLARK, WILLIAM M.— 
Private, April 27, 1861. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md. Surrendered^ 
at Appomattox, Va. Living In Sumter county, Ga. 

CLEGHORN, WILLIAM C. P.— 
Private, May 27, 1861. Detailed as musician in Fourth Georgia: 
Band. Discharged December 20, 1861— over age. Died since the 
war. 

CLAYTON, GEORGE R.— 
Private, April 27, 1861. Wounded in battle July 18, 1864. Died from, 
wound August 4, 1864. 



Muster Rolls of the Fourth Georgia Kegiment. 187 

GOKBR. DAVID G.— 
Private, April 27, 1861. Discharged July 18, 1861. Died since the 
war. 

COOK, WILLIAM A.— 
Private, May 12, 1862. Detailed in Georgia. Survived the war- 
Living. 

DANIELS, HENRY K.— 

Private, April 27, 1861. Promoted Regimental Quartermaster July 
19, 1861; Acting Brigade Quartermaster, 1862. Survived the war. 
Died after the surrender. 

DANIELS, RICHARD H.— 
Private, April 27, 1861. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va. Sur- 
rendered at Appomattox, Va. 

DANN, BENEDICT L.— 
Private, April 27, 1861. Detailed 1862. Survived the war. Died 
after the surrender. 

DUNCAN, N, A. L.— 
Private, May 17, 1861. Discharged August 2, 1861, and died soon 
afterwards. 

BLAM, SAMUEL C— 
Private, April 27, 1861. Discharged account disability October 21, 
1861. Died since the war. 

FELDER, JOSEPH J.— 
Private, April 27, 1861. Promoted Fifth Sergeant April, 1862. Killed 
near Winchester, Va., 1864. 

FORD, JAMES C— 
Private, May 27, 1861. Detailed as musician In Fourth Georgia 
Band. Wounded at Malvern Hill, Va. Survived the war. Inmate 
of the Georgia Soldiers' Home, Atlanta, Ga. 

FORD, WILLIAM W.— 
Private, May 27, 1861. Detailed as musician In Fourth Georgia 
Band. Survived the war. Living In Macon, Ga. 

FOSTER, ROBERT T.— 
Private, April 29, 1861. Died at Camp Jackson, Va., November 2, 
1861. 

FOSTER, JOHN J.— 
Private, April 27, 1861. Promoted Corporal May, 1862. Died In ser- 
vice July 28, 1862. 

FULTON, ROBERT A.— 
Private, May 27, 1861. Wounded at Malvern Hill, Va., and died from 
wound. 



188 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

FULTON, WILLIAM T.— 

Private, August 10, 1862. Captured at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864, 
and died in prison. 

FURLOW, CHARLES T.— 
Private, April 27, 1861. Discharged January 6, 1862. Re-enlisted 
May 10, 1862. Wounded severely at Sliarpsburg, Md. Wounded at 
Chancellorsville, Va. Wounded in Valley of Virginia, 1864. Killed 
at Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865. 

J^URLOW, CHARLES TIM.— 

Private, ]May 27, 1861. Detailed as Regimental Marker 1861; Orderly 
to General Doles September, 1862. Promoted First Lieutenant and 
A. D. C, staff of General Doles 1863. Slightly wounded at Gettys- 
burg, Pa. Promoted Captain in Adjutant-Generals' Department 
1864. Wounded slightly in head at Spottsylvania, Va. Served 
through the war. Living in Atlanta, Ga. 

FURLOW, JAMES M.— 

Private, May 10, 1862. Wounded and captured at Winchester, Va., 
and died from wound in prison. 

GATEWOOD, JOHN R.— 

Private, April 27, 1861. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md. Surrendered 
at Appomattox, Va. Living in Sumter county, Ga. 

GREEN. MILTON C— 

Private, April 27, 1861. Detailed in Ordnance Department, in Rich- 
mond, Va. Served through the war. Died after the surrender. 

GUINN, RICHARD— 

Private, April 27. 1861. Discharged account disability 1861. Died 
since the war in Baltimore, Md. 

HAMIL, ANDREW J.— 

Private, April 27, 1861. Transferred to Signal Corps 1862. Served 
through the war. Living in Americus, Ga. 

HANCOCK, CHARLES W.— 

Private, May 27, 1861. Discharged April, 1862— over age. Died since 
the war in Americus, Ga. 

HARRIS, JEROME— 

Private, April 27, 1861. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Living in 
Texas. 

HARDY, HENRY C— 

Private, April 27, 1861. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md. Surrendered 
at Appomattox, Va. Living in Richland, Ga. 

HILL, ANDREW F.— 

Private, April 27, 1861. Promoted Sergeant Major May 10, 1861. 
Transferred to Navy 1863. Living. 



Muster Rolls of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. 189 

HILL, EUGENE B — 

Private, April 27, 1861. Killed at Parkers' Ford, Va., July, 1864. 

HOWELL, L. P.— 
Private, April 27, 1861. Promoted Junior Second and Second Lieu- 
tenant 1864. Wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864. Served 
through the war. Died after the surrender. 
HOWELL, WILLIAM— 
Private. Recruit. Killed at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864. 

IRONMONGER, JOSEPH W.— 

Private, April 27, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va., May 10, 
1864. Killed in Americus, Ga., after the. surrender. 

JACKSON, WILLIAM— 

Private, April 27, 1861. Died in Richmond, Va., July, 1862. 
JENNINGS, JOHN R.— 

Private, April 27, 1861. Detailed in Ordnance Department in Rich- 
mond, Va,, 1862. Served through the war. Living in Putnam 
county, Ga. 

JOINER, JOHN C— 

Private, April 27, 1861. Transferred to Signal Corps 1862. Served 
through the war. Living in Atlanta, Ga. 

LEMAN, JOHN R.— 
Private, May 27, ISOl. Detailed as musician in Fourth Georgia 
Band. Captured April 7, 1865. Released after the surrender. Liv- 
ing in Atlanta, Ga. 

LEMAN, .JAMES S.— 
Private, May 10, 1862. Detailed in Signal Corps. Served through 
the war. Died in Americus, Ga., April 24, 1899. 

LESSER, G. M.— 
Private, April 27, 1861. Discharged August 1, 1862, by order Secre- 
tary war. 

LESTER, STEPHEN M.— 
Private, May 27, 1862. Discharged 1862. Died in Americus, Ga., 
September 4, 1902. 

LOWRY, JAMES— 
Private, April 27, 1861. Served in the Sharpshooters' Corps during 
the entire war. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Living in Pel- 
ham, Ga. 

McCRARY, E. B.— 

Private, May 27, 1861. Served through the war. Living. 

Mccarty, tarply c. b.— 

Private, April 27, 1861. Discharged on Surgeon's certificate July 17,. 
1862, Died since the war. 



190 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

McMURRIAN, CHARLES— 
Private, April 27, 1861. Discharged 1862. Killed In Sumter county, 
Ga., 1863. 

McMURRIAN, SILAS- 
Private, April 27, 1861. Died In hospital at Richmond, Va., 1862. 

MACON, JERRY C— 
Private, April 27, 1861. Promoted Junior Second, Second, and First 
Lieutenant 1862; Captain, May, 1863. Killed at Wilderness, Va., 
May 5, 1864. 

MALONE, CHARLES E.— 
Private, May 27, 1861. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va. Detailed 
in, Regimental Commissary Department July, 1863. Survived the 
war. Died in Alabama after the surrender. 

MARSHALL, ELI S.— 
Private, April 27, 1861. Discharged on Surgeon's certificate July 25, 
1862. Died soon after the surrender. 

MARSHALL, JOSEPH L.— 
Private, May 27, 1861. Promoted Corporal 1862. Killed at Sharps- 
burg, Md. 

MAYO, DAVID A.— 
Private, April 27, 1861. Discharged— over age. Died since the war. 

MIERS, JOHN S.— 

Private, April 27, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Survived 
the war. Died in Americus, Ga., 1895. 
MITCHELL, WILLIAM E.— 

Private, May 27, 1861. Died in Hospital 1862. 
MOORE, NAPOLEON B.— 

Private, April 27, 1861. Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 
MULKEY, LEONIDAS J.— 
Private, April 27, 1861. Promoted Corporal April, 1862. Captured 
at Spottsylvania, Va. Survived the war. Died after the surrender. 
MURRAY, JOHN J.— 
Private, April 27, 1861. Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, aud 
died soon afterwards. 
NUNN, HAWKINS— 
Private, May 21, 1861. Detailed as Railroad Agent in Georgia. Died 
1899. 

NUNN, HERBERT— 

Private. Recruit. Fate unknown. 
PHILLIPS, WILLIAM J.— 

Private, August 8, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va., May 10, 
1864. 



Muster Rolls of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. 191 

PILGHER, FRANCIS M.— 

Private, May 27, 1861. Discharged July 1, 1861. Living In Schley 
county, Ga. 

PITMAN, JAMES N.— 

Private, August 8, 1861. Discharged on Surgeon's certificate August 
31, 1861. 

RANDLE, AVALTER H.— 

Private, April 27, 1861. Killed In battle. 
RANSOME, URIAH A.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Died in service December 20, 1861. 
REVIERE, ERASMUS— 

Private, May 27, 1861. Discharged December 20, 1861. 
REVIERE, JOSEPH H.— 

Private, April 27, 1861. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant October, 
1862; First Lieutenant, May, 1863. Killed at Gettysburg, Pa. 
ROSEMAN, ISAAC— 

Private, April 27, 1861. Captured In Maryland 1863. Served 
through the war. Living in Alabama. 

ROSENWALD, ISAAC— 

Private, April 27, 1861. Discharged July 14, 1862, by order Secre- 
tary of war. Living In New York. 

SCOTT, MADISON H.— 
Private, August 8, 1861. Promoted Corporal April, 1862. Wounded 
at Spottsylvanla, Va., May 10, 1864. Living In, Boston, Ga. 

SEIG, FRANCIS L.— 
Private, May 17, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvanla, Va. Survived the 
war. Living in Irwin county, Ga. 

SHERMAN, NAPOLEON B.— 
Private, April 27, 1861. Lost arm at Malvern Hill, Va. Living in 
Atlanta, Ga. 

SIMS, P. B.— 
Private, May 27, 1861. Promoted Sergeant. Captured at Spottsyl- 
vanla, Va. Served through the war. Living In Texas. 

SMITH, JAMES W.— 
Private, April 27, 1861. Discharged on. Surgeon's certificate July 12, 
1862, and died soon afterwards. 

SMITH, LEWIS A.— 

Private, May 27, 1861. Detailed as musician in Fourth Georgia 
Band. Living In Americus, Ga. 
SMITH, MILES R.— 

Private, April 27, 1861. Died in service. 



192 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

SMITH, S. A.— 
Private, April 6, 18G4. Lost leg at Fort Steadman, Va., and cap- 
tured. Living \u Americus, Ga. 

SPEER, AMOS C— 
Private, May 10, 18G2. Lost leg at Fort Steadman, Va., and cap- 
tured. Living in Americus, Ga. 

SPEER, MOSES— 
Private, April 27, 1S61. Wounded at Malvern Hill, Va., and dis- 
charged July 13, 1SG2. Major in Georgia Militia 1864-5. Died 1899. 

STALLINGS, JAMES S.— 
Private, April 27, 1861. Died in service. 

SULLIVAN, JOHN E.— 
Private, April 27, 1861. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant 1864. 
Wounded at Spottsylvania, Va., May 12, 1864. Resigned 1865. Re- 
enlisted in a cavalry company at Macon, Ga., which acted as 
Couriers to General Howell Cobb. Surrendered at Macon, Ga. 
TOOLE, BENJAMIN F.— 

Private, April 27, 1861. Served through the war. Living. 
TOWNSLEY, SAMUEL A.— 

Private, April 27, 1861. Discharged on Surgeon's certificate 186.5. 
Promoted Captain in Sixty-fourth Georgia Regiment. Dead. 

TWITTY, PETER S.— 

Private, May 27, 1861. Detailed as musician in Fourth Georgia 
Band. Promoted First Sergeant April, 1862. Wounded and cap- 
tured at Gettysburg, Pa. Wounded near Washington, D. C, July 
12, 1864. Dead. 
VOGLESANG, FRED— 

Private, April 27, 1861. Killed at Malvern Hill, Va., .July 1, 1862. 

WALKER, CHARLES T.— 

Private, April 27, 1861. Discharged September 2, 1861. 

WALLACE, JAMES W.— 

Private, May 10, 1862. Wounded in battle. Detailed in Georgia. 

WALLACE, WILLIAM K.— 
Private, May 27, 1861. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va. Wounded 
in battle August 21, 1864. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Died 
since the war. 
WEIL, .JACOB— 

Private, August 13, 1861. Discharged August 13, 1861, by order of 
Secretary of war. 

WHEATLEY, CHARLES M.— 
Private, May 27, 1861. Wounded by a fragment of shell at Chancel- 
lorsville, Va. Detailed in Quartermasters' Department at Ameri- 
cus, Ga., after the Gettysburg campaign. Living in Americus, Ga.. 



Muster Rolls of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. 193 

WHITTLE, JOHN S.— 

Private, April 27, ISOl. Wounded at Malvern Hill, Va. Killed at 
Wilderness, Ya., May 5, 1SG4. 

WILDER, THOMAS J.— 

Private, April 27, 1S(J1. Killed at Cbancellorsville, Va. 
WILDER, S. G. B.— 
Private, Aiii?nst 8, 1801. Captured .Inly 5, 1803, near Gettysburg, 
Pa. Survived the war. Living in Terra Cira, Fla. 
WILDER, WILLIAM W.— 

Private, April 27, 1801. Wounded at Spottsylvania, Ya., May 6, 
1864. Served through the vrar. Living in Alabama, 
WILLEY, JOHN— 

Private, May 27, 1801. Detailed as musician in Fourth Georgia 
Band. Detailed in Ordnance Department at ^Nlacon, Ga. Dead. 
WILKERSON, W. H.— 
Private, May 10, 1802. Detailed in hospital at Gordonsville. Ya. 
Surrendered at Appomattox, Ya. Living in Sumter county, Ga. 
2ITTERBART, LOUIS— 

Private, May 27, 1801. Detailed as musician in Fourth Georgia 
Band. Severely vs^ounded in Yalley of Virginia 1804, while acting 
as Bugler for Brigade Sharpshooters. Served through the war. 
Living in Pennsylvania. 



li d-c 



History of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 



CHAPTER III. 

In the city of Richmond, Va., on the 26th day of June, 1861, the- 
Twelfth Regiment, Georgia Volunteer Infantry, was organized and 
mustered into the service of the Confederate States of America for a 
period of three years, or during the continuance of the war. Edward 
Johnson (who had resigned his commission as captain and brevet 
major of the Sixth Infantry in the United States Army, on the 10th 
day of June, 1861,) was appointed colonel; Z. T. Conner, lieutenant- 
colonel; Abner Smead, major; Edward Willis (who had resigned as- 
a cadet from the West Point Military Academy), adjutant; H. K. 
Green, surgeon ; Robert J. Lightfoot, commissary ; Henry K. McKay,, 
quartermaster ; W. P. Pledger, chaplain ; William D. Elam, sergeant- 
major ; B. M. McGettrick, hospital steward ; Harper Black, commis- 
sary sergeant ; John K. Harmon, quartermaster-sergeant, and John 
K. Warren, ordnance-sergeant. 

The regiment was composed of the following companies, to wit : 
Muckalee Guards, Company A, Willis A. Hawkins, captain ; Jones 
County Volunteers, Company B, Peyton T. Pitts, captain ; Davis 
Rifles, Company C, John McMillan, captain ; Calhoun Rifles, Com- 
pany D, William L. Furlow, captain ; Muscogee Rifles, Company E,. 
Thaddeus B. Scott, captain ; Davis Guards, Company F, William F. 
Brown, captain ; Putnam Light Infantry, Company G, Richard T. 
Davis, captain ; Central City Blues, Company H, James G. Rodgers, 
captain ; Lowndes County Volunteers, Company I, James W. Patter- 
son, captain; and the Marion Guards, Company K, Mark H. Bland- 
ford, captain. The companies were from the following counties in the 
order named, viz.: Sumter, Jones, Macon, Calhoun, Muscogee, Dooly, 
Putnam, Bibb, Lowndes and Marion. Orders for them to rendezvous- 
in Richmond were received on the following dates, to wit : Companies 
B and H, June 9; D, June 10; F, June 11; I, June 14; A, 
C, E, G, and K, June 15, 1861. Each of the companies were or- 
ganized and had tendered their services to the Confederate Govern- 
ment some time previous to the dates on which they received orders to 

(194) 



History of the Twelfth GEORorA Regiment. 195 

report for duty in Richmond, Va. The regiment was ordered to West 
Virginia, and left by rail for Staunton, Va., July 7, 1861. Upon 
their arrival they were marched toward Laurel Hill for the purpose 
of reinforcing General Garnett near Greenbrier river. Before reach - 
iug there, however, they met the defeated and retreating command of 
General Garnett, who had been killed near Carrick's Ford, on the 
13th of June, 1861. The regiment was then ordered to Monterey, 
where it remained until early in August, when it was ordered to Camp 
Bartow, on the Greenbrier river, at the head of a little valley known 
as Traveler's Repose. 

During the month of August, 1861, General Robert E. Lee was 
assigned to the command of all the troops in the Department of West 
Virginia. Soon after assuming command he learned that the rear of 
the Federal position on Cheat Mountain could be reached by infantry. 
He therefore decided to send an expedition against them, and fixed 
upon September 12 as the date on which the attack should be made. 
Colonel Rust, of the Third Arkansas Regiment, was to make the at- 
tack, and General Anderson with two Tennessee regiments was to 
support him. Henry R. Jackson's Brigade was to advance from Green- 
brier river and Loring's command was to march from Huntersville, 
both to assist in the movement. Jackson's command was preceded b^ 
one hundred men from the First and Twelfth Georgia Regiments, com- 
manded by Lieutenant Dawson of the Twelfth Georgia, whose duty it 
was to attack the enemy's pickets. After this was accomplished 
they were mistaken for Federals while on their way to rejoin their re- 
spective commands, and several shots were fired by both sides before 
the mistake was discovered ; two men were killed and one wounded. 
All of the troops reached the positions assigned them promptly and 
at the time designated. General Anderson was in supporting dis- 
tance of Colonel Rust, but he was not aware of the fact, and he failed 
to make the attack as ordered because of his failure to hear from 
General Anderson. The troops were then withdrawn to their original 
positions because the only hope of success was in surprising the enemy, 
and when this became impossible the intended attack was abandoned. 
While on this expedition twenty- five or thirty Federals were killed 
and seventy-five prisoners taken. The loss of the Confederates was 
very small. 



196 Doles-Cook Brkjadk. 

BATTLE OF GREENBRIER RIVER. 

On the 3d day of October, 1861, Henry K Jackson's command 
was attacked by the Federals at Greenbrier river, and the engage- 
ment lasted from seven o'clock in the morning to two thirty o'clock in 
the afternoon. The Federals were defeated and retired in confusion, 
leaving their killed and wounded at different points along the route as 
they fled, throwing away guns, knapsacks, canteens and everything 
that had a tendency to retard their flight. Their loss in killed and 
wounded was from two hundred and fitty to three hundred, among 
them one officer of superior rank. Our loss did not exceed fifty in 
killed and wounded. It was estimated that the Federals had from six 
to seven thousand men in this engagement, while the Confederate force 
did not exceed two thousand. Our advance pickets were driven in 
early in the morning. About seven o'clock this force was reinforced 
to one hundred, and Colonel Johnson commanded them in person and 
posted them on the right side of the turnpike about one mile from 
•our lines. They held the Federals in check for one hour, and poured 
a galling fire into their ranks. Even after they had been attacked by 
infantry and six pieces of artillery they held their ground until out- 
flanked on the right, then retired in perfect order. 

During the engagement Colonel Johnson had his horse killed under 
him, and for his gallant and meritorious conduct General Jackson 
complimented him in his ofl&cial report of this battle. 

When Loring's forces were withdrawn from West Virginia they were 
assigned to General "Stonewall" Jackson's Command. Henry R. Jack- 
son's Brigade was left at Camp Alleghany under command of Colonel 
Edward Johnson of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 



BATTLE OF ALLEGHANY MOUNTAIN. 

On the 13th of December, 1861, Colonel Johnson's command was 
attacked by General Reynolds, who commanded the whole of the ene- 
my's forces, and was assisted by General Milroy, who commanded the 
attack on his right. The Federal force amounted to five thousand, and 
the Confederates did not exceed twelve hundred effective men of all 
arms. Colonel Johnson states in his oflScial report of this battle that — 

*'The enemy left upon the field thirty-five dead and thirteen 
wounded. They carried from the field large numbers of dead and 



History of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 197" 

wounded. Ten or twelve ambulances were seen conveying their 
wounded. , . . Our casualties amounted to twenty killed, ninety- 
six wounded and twenty-eight missing. Many of the missing have re- 
turned since the day of the battle. I am much indebted to Surgeons 
H, R. Green, of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment, and W. T. Blance, 
of the Thirty-first Virginia Volunteers, for their attention to our 
wounded as well as those of the enemy. 

"Lieutenant Moore, Twelfth Georgia Volunteers, whilst gallantly 
leading a charge, fell mortally wounded. This gallant officer was ever 
ready for any expedition involving danger ; he was truly brave. 
Captains Davis, Blandford, Hardeman and Hawkins, their officers and 
men, behaved admirably. Captain Davis and his company were con- 
spicuous for their gallantry and good conduct. The Federals were 
defeated and retreated in confusion to their old camp." 

Honorable J. P. Benjamin, Secretary of War, in a communication 
to Brigadier- General Edward Johnson, dated December 23, 1861, 
writes: " . . . I am happy to add that the President readily^ 
and cheerfully assented to my suggestion that you should be promoted 
to the rank of brigadier-general, as a mark of his approval of your 
conduct, and your nomination will accordingly be this day sent in to 
the Congress, and take date from the day of the battle." It appears 
from the above official notice that Colonel Edward Johnson, of the 
Twelfth Georgia Regiment, was promoted brigadier-general December 
13, 1861. 

Resolution of thanks to Colonel Edward Johnson, his officers and 
men, for services in the battle of Alleghany Mountain : 

^^ First, Resolved by the Congress of the Confederate States of 
America, That the thanks of Congress are due, and are hereby ten- 
dered, to Colonel Edward Johnson, and to the officers and men under 
his command, for gallant and meritorious services at the summit of 
Alleghany Mountain, in Virginia, on the 13th day of December, 
1861, when, for more than six hours, they, with remarkable courage 
and constancy, sustained an assault made upon their position by four- 
fold their number, and finally drove the enemy in disorder and with 
heavy loss from the field. 

^^ Second, That the foregoing resolution be communicated to said com- 
mand by the Secretary of War, and be made known in general or- 
ders." (See volume 51, series 1, part 2 (supplement), "War of the 
Rebellion.") 



198 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

BATTLE OF McDOWELL. 

The battle of McDowell was fought on the 8th of May, 1862. The 
Federal force was commanded by General Milroy, and the Confeder- 
ates by Brigadier-General Edward Johnson, to whom General ''Stone- 
wall " Jackson had intrusted the management of the troops engaged 
in this battle. General Johnson moved in the direction of the enemy 
on the morning of the 7th, followed by the brigades of General Talia- 
ferro, Colonel Campbell and General Winder. All of General John- 
son's regiments were used in securing the hill. The Fifty- second 
Virginia was posted on the left as skirmishers, and it soon became 
hotly engaged with the skirmishers of the enemy, whom they repulsed 
handsomely. It was not long after this when the other three regi- 
ments arrived. The Twelfth Georgia was posted on the crest of the 
hill which formed the center of our line; the Fifty-eighth Virginia on 
the left to support the Fifty-second Virginia, and the Forty-ninth 
Virginia on the right of our line near a ravine. Milroy had been re- 
inforced by Schenck during the day, and determined to make a direct 
attack on the hill occupied by our troops. The enemy advanced in 
force along the western slope of the hill, being protected by the char- 
acter of the ground and woods in our front, aud drove our skirmishers 
before them, and when his troops emerged from the woods poured a 
galling fire into our right. Our troops returned the fire and a brisk en- 
gagement was kept up for some time. The Twenty-fifth and Thirty-first 
Virginia Regiments were then brought up and posted on the right. 
The firing on both sides was rapid and the conflict raged fiercely. The 
engagement became general now along our entire line. The situation 
became serious and General Taliaferro's Brigade came to our relief. 
The Twenty-third and Thirty-seventh Virginia Regiments were sent to 
support the center, which was occupied by the Twelfth Georgia Regi- 
ment with heroic gallantry, and the Tenth Virginia was ordered to the 
support of the Fifty-second Virginia, which had driven the enemy 
from our left and was engaged in making a flank movement on the 
enemy's line. At this moment the Federals endeavored to flank our 
position on the right by advancing a strong column, but were promptly 
met by General Taliaferro's Brigade, the Twelfth Georgia Regiment 
and several companies of the Twenty-fifth and Thirty-first Virginia 
Regiments. The battle raged from four thirty to eight thirty p.m. 
-with terrific violence. All attempts of the enemy to advance up 
the hill were repulsed with fearful slaughter. The Federals in their 



History of the Twelfth Georgia Kegiment. 199 

Tetreat left their dead unburied, burned their stores at McDowell and 
destroyed large quantities of ammunition, camp equipage, etc. 

General Jackson, in his official report of this engagement, says: 
"General Johnson, to whom I had intrusted the management of the 
troops engaged, proved himself eminently worthy of the confidence 
reposed in him by the skill, gallantry and presence of mind which he 
displayed on the occasion. Having received a wound near the close 
of the engagement which compelled him to leave the field, he turned 
over the command to General Taliaferro." 

Our victory was complete. The enemy lost between five hundred 
and one thousand, killed and wounded. Their dead were found piled 
up in different places, in houses and churches, and it was reported 
that some were burned up with their commissary stores. General 
Jackson's report shows that our loss was 71 killed and 390 wounded, 
making a total of 461. Members of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment 
claim that their regiment alone lost in killed and wounded 258. Gen- 
eral Johnson, in his official report, says : " The brigade commanders 
and the regiments generally behaved with remarkable coolness and 
courage." He compliments a number of officers for their gallant 
conduct during the engagement, among them Colonel Conner, Twelfth 
Georgia Regiment. He also compliments his medical staff for cool- 
ness and efficiency on the field, and activity in making preparations 
for the removal of the wounded, and attention to them afterward. 
Among the number was Dr. James A. Etheridge, Assistant Surgeon 
Twelfth Georgia Regiment, who was severely wounded. Dr. Dabney, 
in his "Life of Lieutenant-General Jackson," has this to say of the 
•conduct of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment in the battle of McDowell. 
" The greatest carnage occurred in the ranks of the famous Twelfth 
Georgia Regiment. . . . This noble body, trained under the eye 
of General Edward Johnson, when colonel, held the center of the 
battle from the beginning to the end. But their heavy loss was also 
due to their own zeal and chivalry. Having been advanced at first, 
in front of the crest of the hill, where their lines showed to their en- 
emies from beneath, in bold relief against the sky, they could not be 
persuaded to retire to the reverse of the ridge, where many of the 
other regiments found partial protection without sacrificing the effi- 
ciency of their fire. Their commander, perceiving their useless ex- 
posure, endeavored again and again to withdraw them, but amidst the 
roar of the musketry his voice was lifted up in vain; and when, by 
passing along the ranks, he persuaded or entreated one wing of the 



200 Doles-Cook Brigadb. 

regiment to recede, they rushed again to the front while he was gone- 
to expostulate with the other." 

Among the killed were Captains Dawson, Furlow, McMillan, and 
Patterson, and Lieutenants Goldwire, Massey, Turpin and Wood- 
ward. Colonel Conner and Major Hawkins, of the Twelfth Georgia 
Regiment, were complimented by General Johnson in his official re- 
port, for gallantry on the field. 

Dr. Dabney says : "The battle is especially worthy of note as the 
first of a series of victories that has joined forever the names of 
'Stonewair Jackson and the Shenandoah Valley." 

On the morning of May 9, Colonel Preston was left at McDowell 
with a detachment of cadets and a small force of cavalry in charge of 
the prisoners and public property ; while the main army, with Captain 
Sheets' cavalry in our front, pursued the retreating enemy to the 
vicinity of Franklin, capturing a few prisoners and stores along the 
line of march. The junction between Banks and Milroy had been 
prevented, and General Jackson decided not to press them farther, 
but to return to the Shenandoah Valley and defeat Banks' army be- 
fore reinforcements could reach him. 

On the 15th we marched toward McDowell and encamped at ^-eb- 
anon Springs. On the 17th we halted at Mount Solon, where ^ 
eral Ewell met General Jackson for a conference. Banks v 
completely cut off from Fremont, and fell back to Strasburg, ^ 
was exposed to a combined attack from Jackson, Ewell and J 
After two days of needed rest we moved down the valley 
18th, and reached New Market on the 20th, and a junction with 
Ewell's Division was made near there. We left the valley turnpike 
at New Market and moved through Luray toward Front Roy.'il, with 
the hope that we would be able to capture or disperse the gai on at 
the latter place and reach the rear of Banks, or force him to leave 
his fortifications at Strasburg. 

The '' Army of the Valley," commanded by General Th* s J. 
("Stonewall") Jackson, was now organized into two divisions. Jack- 
son's Division and Ewell's Division. The Twelfth Georgia Regiment 
was in Elzey's Brigade, of the latter division. 



BATTLE OF FRONT ROYAL. 

On Thursday the 22d the entire command moved on the road 
leading from Luray to Front Royal and camped about ten miles from 



History of the Twelfth Georgia Kegiment. 201 

the last named place. At dawn on Friday the 2od our march was 
resumed and encountered no opposition until within one and a half 
miles of Front Royal. About two p.m., we drove in the enemy's 
picket, and followed rapidly. The main body of the enemy retired 
to a commanding hill just outside of the town, formed line of battle, 
and opened on our troops with artillery as they advanced beyond the 
town. The Federals soon retreated across both forks of the Shenan- 
doah, and attempted to burn the bridge over the North Fork, but be- 
fore their purpose was fully accomplished our troops extinguished the 
flames and crossed the river while they were in full retreat toward 
Winchester, pursued by our infantry and artillery. 

The stores and provisions captured at Front Royal were not the only 
fruits of this victory ; the road to Winchester had been opened by 
turning the enemy's flank. Upon arriving at Middletown with the 
main body of our army under command of General Jackson, we 
found the valley turnpike crowded with retreating Federal cavalry. 
The battalions of Poague and Chew, with Taylor's Brigade of Infan- 
try, opened fire upon them, and in a few moments the turnpike pre- 
sented a fearful spectacle of carnage and destruction. The road was 
obstructed with confused masses of struggling and dying horses and 
-• '^ The wildest confusion had seized the surviving cavalry, and 
'^tered in every direction, and some two hundred prisoners, 
ir equipments, were captured. A train of wagons was seen 
ring toward Winchester, when Ashby's Cavalry, some artil- 
1 Taylor's Infantry were sent in pursuit. After a spirited re- 
sistance the Federal army retreated toward Strasburg, and then made 
its escape through the mountains across the Potomac. A large 
amount of baggage fell into our hands, whole regiments having thrown 
away t .ir knapsacks iu order to retreat more rapidly. General Jack- 
son being satisfied that the main body of Banks' army had passed on 
its wa'' Yf inchester, ordered his troops that were halted to pursue 
the e; ^.y in that direction. In the hurried retreat of the enemy 
large numbers of wagons loaded with stores were abandoned between 
Middletown and Newtown. General Jackson considered it so ioipor- 
tant to secure the heights at Winchester before dawn, that the ad- 
vance continued until morning. The troops were only permitted to 
halt for one hour during the night. 

Stanton, the Federal Secretary of War, in a communication to 
General McClellan, dated May '11, said : "The attack upon Banks 
was a bold and sudden push by Jackson, that surprised the troops at 



-202 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

Front Royal. The affair has served to quicken the spirit of the States, 
and will bring us fresh troops quickly." 



BATTLE OF WINCHESTER. 

Our troops approached Winchester at daylight, and finding that the 
enemy's skirmishers occupied the hill southwest of the town drove 
them from it. The enemy's infantry moved to the left while his ar- 
tillery was playing on us with the intention of getting possession of 
that portion of the hill immediately to the north of us. A portion 
of our infantry was ordered to form line of battle to the left and 
-check the movement. This line was formed in face of a heavy fire 
from the enemy's artillery and sharpshooters. They advanced against 
large numbers of the enemy and drove them back, and all of Win- 
der's troops joined in the advance except those supporting batteries. 
The whole Federal army gave way in this charge, and General 
Elzey, whose troops were held in reserve on the valley turnpike, was 
ordered to pursue, when they eagerly united in the general advance, 
entering Winchester with the balance of the troops. 

General Ewell then moved to the eastern outskirts of the town. 
'The enemy's entire force now gave way, fearing that this simultaneous 
movement on both flanks of his army would cut oflf his retreat. 
His troops made only slight resistance while passing through the 
town. Our troops were now in rapid pursuit of the retreating Federals. 
As the Confederate troops passed hurriedly through Winchester, its 
loyal citizens, who had been oppressed for more than two months by 
the Federal army, received them with the wildest enthusiasm, and 
shouted with joy for their deliverance from the enemy's despotism. 
Our infantry and artillery continued to pursue the Federals on the 
road to Martinsburg for about two hours for the purpose of preventing 
him from reorganizing his shattered ranks and forming in line of 
battle. We looked eagerly for our cavalry to appear on the field and 
continue the pursuit, but nothing was seen or heard of them, and as 
nothing could be accomplished without them General Jackson halted 
the command and went into camp, as our infantry was completely ex- 
hausted from long and continued marches. 

Brigadier-General George H. Stewart came up with his cavalry in 
about an hour after we had halted and renewed the pursuit and cap- 
•tured a number of prisoners, but the main body of Banks' army had 



HiSTOBY OF THE TWELFTH GEORGIA ReGEVIENT. 203 

crossed the Potomac. If our cavalry had joined in the pursuit at the 
beginning of Banks' retreat but few of his army would have suc- 
ceeded in making their escape. General Winder was ordered to make 
a demonstration toward the Potomac on the 28th, and moved down 
the pike until within five miles of Charleston, when he learned that 
the enemy was in possession of that place. 

GeneralJackson, upon receipt of this information, instructed Gen- 
eral Ewell to reinforce him. Winder, however, did not wait, but 
cautiously approached the town and attacked the enemy's force of 
one thousand five hundred, and after a few well-directed shots 
from our batteries the enemy fled in confusion, throwing away arms, 
blankets, haversacks, etc. 

Our troops pursued rapidly with infantry and artillery as far as 
Halltown. Observing the enemy on Boliver Heights, Winder re- 
turned to Charlestown. Shields was moving from Fredericksburg 
•on our right, and Fremont on our left from the South Branch, with 
the intention of concentrating in our rear and cutting off* our retreat 
up the valley. All of our troops, except Winder's Brigade and the 
cavalry, were ordered to return to Winchester in order to avoid such 
a result. Winder was instructed to recall the Second Virginia Regiment 
from Loudon Heights and rejoin the main army. We moved up the 
•valley early on the morning of the 31st with two thousand three 
hundred Federal prisoners, and camped that night near Strasburg. 
Our outpost was attacked the next morning by Fremont, who was 
approaching by way of Wardensville. As it was necessary for Gen- 
eral Jackson to remain near Strasburg until Winder's Brigade came 
up, General Ewell was ordered to hold Fremont in check with his 
division. Other troops went to his assistance, when the enemy fell 
back after a spirited resistance. Winder arrived that afternoon, the 
•Second Virginia Regiment having marched thirty-six miles that day. 
We then moved toward Harrisonburg. 

The public property captured at Front Royal, Winchester, Mar- 
tinsburg and Charleston was of great value, but much of it had to 
be destroyed for want of transportation. The medical stores, which 
filled one of the largest storehouses in Winchester, were saved. Com- 
missary supplies consisting of over one hundred head of cattle, 
34,600 pounds of bacon, flour, salt, sugar, coffee, hard bread and 
cheese were turned over to proper officers, besides large amounts 
used by the troops and not accounted for. We also captured $25,- 



204 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

000 dollars' worth of sutler's stores, which, for the want of transpor- 
tation, were abandoned to the troops. 

Quartermaster's stores amounting to $125,185 were taken, and a 
large amount destroyed besides. The cavalry secured many horses, 
and we removed 9,304 stands of small arms and two pieces of artil- 
lery. The official reports of our casualties during this expedition, 
including the engagements at Front Royal and Winchester, show 
that 68 were killed, 329 wounded, and 3 missing ; total losy, 400. 

General Jackson, in general order No. 53, dated May 26, 1862, 
says: *' Within four weeks this army has made long and rapid 
marches, fought six combats and two battles, signally defeating the 
enemy in each one, captured several stands of colors and two pieces 
of artillery, with numerous prisoners and vast medical, ordnance and 
army stores, and finally driven the boastful host, which was ravaging 
our beautiful country, into utter rout. The general commanding 
would warmly express to the officers and men under his command 
his joy in their achievements and his thanks for their brilliant gal- 
lantry in action, and their patient obedience under the hardships of 
forced marches, often more painful to the brave soldier than the dan- 
gers of battle. The explanation of the severe exertions to which the 
commanding general called the army, which were endured by them 
with such cheerful confidence in him, is now given in the victory of 
yesterday. He receives this proof of their confidence in the past 
with pride and gratitude, and asks only a similar confidence in the 
future. But his chief duty to-day and that of the army is to recog- 
nize devoutly the hand of a protecting providence in the brilliant 
successes of the last three days, which have given us the results of a 
great victory without great losses, and to make the oblation of our 
thanks to God for his mercies to us and our country in heartfelt acts 
of religious worship. For this purpose the troops will remain in 
camp to-day, suspending as far as practicable all military exercises, 
and the chaplains of regiments will hold divine service in their sev- 
eral charges at four p.m. to-day." 



BATTLE OF CROSS KEYS. 

On the evening of June 1, Jackson's army moved up the valley. 
Fremont advanced while we retreated, and after dark attacked our 
cavalry rear-guard, but he was soon driven back, and some prisoners 
captured . 



History of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 205 

On the 2d of June the enemy secured a position where their artil- 
lery was able to cannonade the Confederates' rear. Our cavalry was 
thrown into confusion by the bursting shells and fled, and a part of 
the battery which was supporting them followed in their flight. 

After this the Federal cavalry advanced, but Ashby met them 
with a small body of infantry, posted in a wood near the roadside, 
and poured a galling fire into their ranks. Some were killed and 
wounded, and some retired in haste, while others rode into our lines, 
and all of them except one was either killed or captured. We 
crossed the Shenandoah on the 3d, and General Ashby then burned 
the bridge, which delayed the movement of Fremont for a day. ^Ve 
reached Harrisonburg early on the morning of the 5th, passed 
through the town and turned east in the direction of Port Republic. 
While General Ashby was in position on the road between Harrison- 
burg and Port Republic on the 6th, the enemy charged his position, 
but was repulsed, and Colonel Windham and sixty-three of his men 
were captured. General Ewell then gave Ashby two regiments of 
infantry who were attacked by the Federal infantry, when a fierce en- 
gagement ensued until one of our infantry regiments charged them 
in front and the other attacked them on the flank, when they gave 
way. General Ashby was killed in this affair. Our loss was seven- 
teen killed and fifty wounded. Lieutenant-Colonel Kane, com- 
manding the Pennsylvania Bucktails, was captured. 

The main body of our army reached the vicinity of Port Republic 
on the 7th of June. General Fremont was near Harrisonburg, and 
General Shields at Conrad's Store, fifteen miles below Port Republic, 
moving up the east side of the Shenandoah river. The bridge over 
this river at that point had been destroyed in order to prevent a 
junction of the Federal armies. 

Soon after sunup on Sunday morning, June 8, our pickets in 
front of Shields' army rushed to headquarters in the village in con- 
fusion, followed by the Federal cavalry and a section of artillery. 
Our resistance was so feeble that the enemy's advance dashed across 
the ford of South river and General Jackson narrowly escaped capture. 
Two members of his staff were taken prisoners. Our artillery was soon 
in position on the heights overlooking the river, and our infantry 
formed a line of battle. The artillery opened on the enemy, and 
our infantry charged at a double quick, captured the bridge, 
crossed over and drove the enemy from the field in confusion. 

The enemy's infantry then advanced in considerable force up the 



206 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

road. Our batteries opened on the retreating cavalry and advancing 
infantry, and it was not long before the infantry followed the cavalry 
and disappeared in the wood at a bend in the road. 

The attack of Shields had hardly been repulsed when Ewell become 
hotly engaged with Fremont on the opposite side of the river. This 
advance was checked long enough to allow General Ewell sufficient 
time to choose his position. The position that he selected was on a 
ridge, a rivulet and a large field of open ground being in his front, and 
woods on both flanks, the center of his line intersecting the road lead- 
ing to Port Republic. Trimble's Brigade was posted on the ridge 
somewhat in advance of his center, Courtney's, Lusk's, Brockenbrough's 
and Raine's batteries in the center, General Stewart's Brigade on 
the left, and General Elzey's Brigade in rear of the center, and in 
position to strengthen either wing, both being in the woods. The 
enemy threw out skirmishers and posted his artillery opposite to our 
batteries about ten o'clock. The artillery fire was kept up for several 
hours by both sides. In the meantime the Federals advanced a bri- 
gade upon the right. General Trimble, who held this position, waited 
until the enemy was in musketry range, when he poured a deadly 
fire from his whole line, which forced them to fall back. Late in the 
afternoon General Ewell's forces advanced and drove in the enemy's 
skirmishers, and when night closed, was in the position previously 
held by the enemy. Brigadier-Generals Elzey and Stewart were 
both wounded and disabled during the day. 



BATTLE OF PORT REPUBLIC. 

General Jackson remained at Port Republic during the 8th, expect- 
ing a renewal of the attack, but as Shields made no movement in^ 
that direction he decided to attack him. 

General Ewell was instructed to move toward Port Republic early 
on the morning of the 9th, leaving Trimble's Brigade, the Forty- 
second Virginia Regiment and the First Battalion of Virginia Regu- 
lars to hold Fremont in check, with instructions to retire, if hard 
pressed, across North river, and burn the bridge in their rear. About 
midnight the pioneers commenced to hastily construct a foot-bridge 
across the tords at South river by placing wagons without their 
bodies across the stream. This bridge was intended to be so con- 
structed as to allow several men to cross it abreast, but the workmen- 



History of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 207 

in their haste placed two wagoas ia the deepest part of the stream so 
that the front and rear axles came together, thereby causing a nar- 
row place and a step at that point, which retarded the march of the 
troops, because they had to pass this place in single file. By five 
o'clock a.m. Winder's Brigade had crossed over. Taylor's was the next 
to cross. General Jackson, ignorant of the cause of delay, ordered 
Winder to move down the river road and attack Shields. After ad- 
vancing one and a half miles the Federal pickets were driven in. 
The enemy had planted six guns on an elevated position near the 
Lewis house, which commanded the road from Port Republic and 
for a considerable distance in his front. Winder, being reinforced, 
advanced to the attack, but encountered a large body of infantry 
and artillery, and was driven back in disorder. The enemy then 
moved across the field and drove our infantry back and compelled 
the artillery to retire. 

Winder's command was now in a critical condition. Taylor ad- 
vanced on the left and rear and diverted the enemy's attention. He 
emerged from the woods just as the Federal movement in front proved 
successful, and was in point blank range of their guns. He was 
assaulted in front and flank by greatly superior numbers, but charged 
gallantly, and the battery was lost and won several times in the des- 
perate and determined efforts to capture and recover it. General 
Ewell, who had passed his whole division across South river, was- 
hurrying to the front. 

While these movements were being made Colonel Scott went ta 
the support of Taylor, who, advancing with his brigade and rein- 
forcements, assisted by the excellent fire of our battery, forced the 
Federals back, and caused them to hastily retreat, leaving many 
killed and wounded on the field. General Taliaferro had been left 
at Port Republic to cooperate with General Trimble if necessary, and 
prevent his being cut off from the main body of the army by the de- 
struction of the bridge in the rear. But the situation on our side- 
became so serious that it was necessary to order both Taliaferro and 
Trimble to join the main body. Taliaferro reached the field in time 
to pour an effective volley into the retreating enemy. The pursuit 
was continued by Generals Taliaferro and Winder, and a portion of 
the batteries of Wooding and Caskie, for five miles. The cavalry 
continued three miles beyond our other troops. In the pursuit we 
captured 450 prisoners, some wagons, one piece of abandoned artil- 
lery and 800 muskets. The official reports of the battle show su 



208 Doles-Cook: Brigade. 

total loss in killed, wounded and missing of 1,006, including the 
skirmishes on the 6th. 

The brigade of General Trimble, with the two regiments left at 
Cross Keys, was slowly retiring toward the river. The brigade of 
General Taliaferro, which had been left to occupy the village, was 
hurried to the front, and gave the parting volley to the retreating 
enemy. In this battle the Federals had eight thousand men engaged, 
and the Confederates three small brigades of infantry, with three 
regiments of cavalry and a superior artillery. Jackson had from 
first to last the whole of his command present, but only those men- 
tioned above were engaged. It was reported that Shields was fifteen 
miles in the rear with his reserves when the battle occurred, and that 
Brigadier-General Tyler commanded the forces engaged. 

The army remained near Weyer's Cave until the 17th, when we 
moved toward Richmond. 



SEVEN DAYS^ BATTLES. 

The Twelfth Georgia Regiment during these engagements was in 
the Fourth Brigade (General Arnold Elzey commanding) of Ewell's 
Division, Second Corps of the Army of Northern Virginia, and the 
brigade was composed of the following regiments, viz.: Thirteenth, 
Twenty-fifth, Thirty-first, Forty-fourth, Fifty second and Fifty- 
eighth Virginia Regiments, and the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 

On the 25th of June, 1862, the Second Corps reached the vicinity 
of Ashland, about twelve miles from Richmond, on its march to join 
the forces of General Lee in the attack on General McCle Han's army. 

On the 26th we marched in the direction of Cold Harbor, and 
camped that night near Hundley's Corner. 

Early on the morning of the 27th our march was resumed, Ewell's 
Division being in the lead. About three thirty p.m., while General 
A. P. Hill's troops were hard pressed at Cold Harbor, General Jack- 
son ordered a general advance of his entire corps. This movement com- 
menced with D. H. Hill's Division on the left, and extended to the 
right through the divisions of Ewell, Jackson and Whiting in the 
order named. The position occupied by the enemy was naturally a 
very strong one and greatly strengthened by artificial works. His 
position was on an elevated ridge nearly parallel to the Chickahorainy, 
his right being near McGehee's house, and his left on an abrupt bluff, 



History of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 209 

surrounded by artillery, and protected by a deep ravine and two lines 
of breastworks for infantry. On his right he was further protected 
by a ridge overlooking his advanced position from which batteries 
could be effectively used against an advancing line over the heads of 
his infantry. During the engagement, General Ewell, who was on 
General D. H. Hill's right, moved the Fourth Brigade (General El- 
zey) to the left of the road passing from Gaines' house to McGehee's, 
and a portion of the Seventh and Eighth Brigades into the woods on 
the right of the road. After crossing the swamp and commencing 
to ascend the hill, the division became hotly engaged with the enemy. 
The Twelfth Georgia, and the Twenty-fifth and Fifty-second Vir- 
ginia Regiments were detached by General Elzey to support some bat- 
teries during this engagement, and did not rejoin the brigade until the 
next morning, June 28. Late in the afternoon of the 27th General 
Elzey was wounded, and Colonel J. A. Walker, of the Thirteenth Vir- 
ginia Regiment, was placed in temporary command of the brigade^ 
and in his official report states that he knew nothing of the move- 
ments of any of the regiments of the brigade prior to that time, 
except that of his own regiment, the Thirteenth Virginia. The un- 
fortunate wounding of General Elzey prevented special mention of 
the services performed by the several regiments of his brigade. 

On Saturday the 28th Ewell's Division moved down the north 
bank of the Chickahominy to Dispatch Station and destroyed a por- 
tion of the railroad track. The enemy's stores at that place had been 
destroyed by our cavalry before we arrived. 

About noon on Sunday the 29th the division was ordered to pre- 
vent the enemy from crossing Bottoms bridge, and late in the after- 
noon was ordered to return to Grapevine bridge and follow Jackson's 
Division. While on the march Tuesday morning, July 1, Brigadier- 
General Jubal A. Early was placed in command of the Fourth Brig- 
ade in place of Brigadier-General Arnold Elzey, who had been dan. 
gerously wounded at Cold Harbor. 

At Malvern Hill, Ewell's Division was in reserve, Early's Brigade 
being placed in rear of the Eighth Brigade, commanded by Colonel 
Stafford. About dark Early's Brigade was ordered to the support of 
General D. H. Hill, and was put in motion immediately under the 
guidance of an officer appointed for the purpose. After crossing the 
road they were marched through the woods, passing along the side of 
a ravine covered with trees and thick undergrowth, until the head of 

14d-c 



210 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

it reached a small road leading across an open bottom on a creek. 
The brigade was halted here for a short while so as to enable the 
guide to find the route over which the troops were to move ; they were 
again put in motion and commenced their march across the bottom, 
while Generals Ewell and Early were directed to move to the right 
and cross over an old dam, that being the only practicable route for 
horses. General Early, after arriving at the point at which he ex- 
pected to meet the head of the brigade, awaited their arrival for some 
time, and then went in search of them ; while thus engaged he found 
large numbers of men retreating in confusion, which he attempted to 
rally, being assisted by his assistant adjutant-general, but found the 
task a difficult one. While attempting to rally these men the Twelfth 
Georgia Regiment came up, under command of Captain James G. 
Kodgers, and he marched it off accompanied by Colonel Benning, wdth 
a few of his men from Toombs' Brigade. Soon after this one of Gen- 
eral Early's aides. Captain S. H. Early, brought up the Twenty-fifth 
and Thirty-first Virginia Regiments. These three regiments of Early's 
Brigade remained on the field during the night in the position desig- 
nated by General Ewell, and when morning came were the only 
troops on that part of the field. 

General Early, in his report, says : " During the march the brigade 
was exposed to a terrific cannonading, and shells were constantly 
bursting over and around it. For some time the regiments with me 
on the field, which were ordered to lie down, were exposed to the 
fiercest artillery fire that I have ever witnessed. . . .As soon as 
it was light enough next morning an appalling spectacle was pre- 
sented to our view in front. The field for some distance from the 
enemy's position was literally strewn with the dead and wounded, and 
arms were lying in every direction. It was apparent that the enemj's 
main body with his artillery had retired, but a body of his cavalry, 

supported by infantry, was soon discovered on the field 

In the meantime parties of our men were going to the front in search 
of the wounded, and after a demonstration by the enemy's cavalry, 
which was abandoned on the firing of a few shots by the Maryland 
Regiment posted in the woods some distance to my left, the parties 
from both armies in search of the dead and wounded gradually ap- 
proached each other and continued their mournfu work without mo- 
lestation on either side, being apparently appalled for the moment into 
a cessation from all hostile purposes by the terrible spectacle presented 
to their view. ... I was favorably impressed with the deport- 



History of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 211 

ment of the officers and men of the brigade so far as it came under 
my own observation, and was particularly struck with that of Cap- 
tain James G. Kodgers, in command of the Twelfth Georgia Regi- 
ment, who led the regiment through a large body of disorganized 
men who were giving the most disheartening accounts of the state of 
things in front, he all the time encouraging his own men and endeav- 
oring to induce the fugitives to fall into his ranks and return to the 
battlefield." The other regiments of Early's Brigade were in front 
of those mentioned above when the advance began, and, unable to 
find any practicable way for marching over the route designated by 
the guide across ihe bottom heretofore alluded to, attempted to dis- 
cover a better and plainer route, and in doing so reached the battle- 
field at a different point and got very near the enemy, but amid the 
confusion and darkness were unable to distinguish friend from foe, 
and then went back to the position where the brigade was first drawn 
up in line of battle. 

General Richard Taylor, in writing of the Seven Days' Battles 
around Richmond, in his book entitled "Destruction and Recon- 
struction," says : " The sound of battle continued until it became 
unendurable, and I was put into the ambulance by Tom and the 
driver, the former following with the horses. We took the route by 
which the troops had marched, the din of conflict increasing with 
every mile, the rattle of small arms mingling with the thud of guns. 
After weary hours of rough road, every jolt on which threatened to 
destroy my remaining vitality, we approached Cold Harbor and met 
numbers of wounded. Among these was General Elzey, with a dread- 
ful wound in the head and face. His aide was taking him to the rear 
in an ambulance, and, recognizing Tom, stopped a moment to tell of 
the fight. Eweli's Division, to which Elzey and I belonged, had just 
been engaged with heavy loss. This was too much for my illness, and 
I managed somehow to struggle on to my horse and get into the action. 
It was a wild scene. Battle was raging furiously. Shot, shell and 
ball exploded and whistled. Hundreds of wounded were being car- 
ried off, while the ground was strewn with dead. Dense thickets of 
. small pines covered much of the field, further obscured by clouds of 
smoke. The first troops encountered were D. H. Hill's, and, making 
way through these, I came upon Winder's, moving across the front 
from right to left. Then succeeded Elzey's of Eweli's Division, and 
across the road leading to Gaines' mill, my own. Mangled and bleed- 
ing, as were all of Eweli's, it was holding the ground it had won close 



212 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

to the enemy's line, but unable to advance. The sun was setting as 
I joined, and at the moment cheers came up from our left, raised by- 
Winder's command, which had turned and was sweeping the Federal 
right, while Law ton's Georgians, fresh and eager, attacked in our 
front. The enemy gave way, and, under cover of the night, retired 
over the Chickahominy. Firing continued for two hours, though 
darkness concealed everything 

*'To return to the field of Cold Harbor, the morning (Saturday) after 
the battle. McClellan had chosen an excellent position, covering his 
military bridges over the Chickahominy, his left resting on the river 
and his center covered by a small stream, one of its affluents, boggy 
and of difficult passage. His right was on high ground near Cold 
Harbor, in a dense thicket of pine-scrub, with artillery massed. This 
position, three miles in extent and enfiladed in front by heavy guns on 
the south bank of the Chickahominy, was held by three lines of in- 
fantry, one above the other on the rising ground, which was crowned 
with numerous batteries concealed by timber. McClellan reported 
thirty-six thousand men present, including Sykes' and Porter's Regu- 
lars; but reinforcements brought over during the action probably in- 
creased this number to fifty thousand. Lee had forty thousand on the 
field. Longstreet attacked on our right, near the river, A. P. Hill on 
his left. Jackson approached Cold Harbor from the north, his divi- 
sion in column on one road as follows : Ewell's, Whiting's, Lawton's 
(Georgians), and Winder's. At Cold Harbor Jackson united with the 
division of D. H. Hill in advance of him, and directed it to find and 
attack the enemy's right. His own divisions, in the order above 
named, were to come up on D. H. Hill's right and connect it with 
A. P. Hill's left. Artillery was only employed by the Confederates 
late in the day, and on their extreme left. 

"D. H. Hill andEwell were speedily engaged, and sufiered heavily^ 
as did A. P. Hill and Longstreet, all attacking in front. Ignorance 
of the ground, densely wooded, and want of guides occasioned confu- 
sion and delay in the divisions to Ewell's rear. 

"Lawton came to Ewell's support, Whiting to A. P. Hill's, while of 
the three brigades of the last division, the second went to Longstreet's 
right, the third to A. P. Hill's center, and the first was taken by Win- 
der with a fine soldierly instinct from right to left, across the, battle, 
to reinforce D. H. Hill and turn the Federal position. The movement 
was decisive, and if executed earlier would have saved loss of men 
and time. So much for fighting on unknown ground." 



History of the Twelfth Georgia Kegiment. 213 

The last of the Seven Days' battles around Richmond was fought 
at Malvern Hill, and all of them had proven to be complete victories 
for the Confederates. The Federals were beaten and despondent, 
acd called for three hundred thousand additional men to reinforce 
their armies. Pope had been placed in command of the armies of 
Banks, Fremont and Shields, and was preparing to advance upon 
Richmond from the Rapidan river. In order to check this movement 
Jackson's and Ewell's Divisions were sent to Gordonsville, and they 
were afterwards reinforced by other troops. Longstreet was kept 
near Richmond to engage McClellan if he attempted to advance upon 
Hichmond. Jackson moved toward Pope's position. 



BATTLE OF CEDAR RUN. 

On the morning of August 8, 1862, our cavalry drove the enemy's 
cavalry north of the Rapidan back, and our infantry followed the 
cavalry, Ewell's Division leading. Lawton's Brigade was detached to 
guard our train, and was thus prevented from taking part in the bat- 
tle on the 9 th. 

We found the enemy in our front on the 9th, about eight miles from 
Culpeper Court House, near Cedar Run, and a short distance west 
and north of Slaughter mountain. His cavalry occupied a ridge to 
the right in large force. Our artillery opened upon them, and some 
of his guns beyond the ridge responded. Early's Brigade was ordered 
forward, while General Ewell diverged from the road to the right 
with Trimble's and Hays' Brigades advancing along the western slope 
of Slaughter mountain. Early's Brigade moved to the right of the 
road and drove the enemy from the crest of the hill. It was then 
ordered forward, and the Twelfth Georgia Regiment, which was on the 
right, was posted behind a ridge, beyond which the enemy's cavalry 
was stationed. The brigade then advanced until it reached the position 
of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment, when the whole moved forward until 
the enemy's cavalry was discovered. The brigade was then ordered 
to retire a short distance and lie down under the protection of the hill 
so' as to avoid the effects of the enemy's artillery. Our artillery was 
moved in advance of our line and opened fire upon the Federal bat- 
teries. Early asked for a brigade to support his right, but before the 
support reached him several pieces of artillery from our left dashed 
down the hill to within range of the enemy's skirmishers, whom they 



214 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

had not seen. The enemy's skirmishers and infantry in their rear com- 
menced to move and fire on them immediately. Early, seeing their dan- 
ger, oidered the brigade forward at double-quick, reaching the pieces 
just in time to save them. Just at this time some of General Winder's 
troops opened fire from the woods to the left, and the infantry fight 
commenced. The front regiments of the enemy soon gave way, but 
other regiments were seen advancing to our left through the wheat 
field, and in our front through the corn field. The Twelfth Georgia 
Regiment was thrown to the left along the crest of a ridge, which 
made a curve in front and afforded a good natural defense. From 
this position they were enabled to give the enemy a flank fire. Just 
as this movement was completed a brigade commanded by Colonel 
Edward L. Thomas of Major-General Hill's Division was seen passing 
from the rear to our right. This brigade was posted immediately to 
the right of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment and at right angles with it 
where it had a strong position. Our artillery then retired and the 
regiments of Early's Brigade to the left had fallen back, and the 
enemy was advancing up the hill. The situation of our troops was 
now critical. The Twelfth Georgia Regiment and four companies of 
the Fifty-second Virginia Regiment and a part of the Fifty-eighth 
Virginia Regiment of Early's Brigade had not given way, and the 
brigade of Colonel Thomas was still on our right. These troops were 
now isolated and in an advanced position. General Early in his re- 
port says : ' 'Had they given way the day in all probability would have 
been lost." In a short while it was discovered that the enemy was re- 
tiring before some of our advancing troops. Amongst the advancing 
forces was a portion of Early's Brigade, which had been rallied. The 
enemy then attempted to retrieve the fortune of the day by charging 
with his cavalry, but was repulsed. The troops that had driven the 
enemy back advanced into a corn field. The troops on the right main- 
tained their ground against a body of infantry in front of Thomas' 
Brigade. The ammunition of both Early's and Thomas' Brigades being 
nearly exhausted, they were directed by General Early to maintain 
their position at all hazards, and to use the bayonet if necessary, and 
they did not waver for a moment. The last of the enemy's regiments 
left the ground as our troops advanced a little before dusk to the left 
in the corn field. We then advanced in pursuit of the enemy with 
Hill's Division until ordered by General Ewell to wait until the other 
two brigades of his division came upon the road from the right, and 
follow them, which we did, but in a short while afterward we halted 



History of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 215 

and went into camp for the night. General Early in his official report 
says: "The conduct of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment, with which I 
was more than any other, elicited my especial approbation. It is a 
gallant, fighting regiment, and I have had occasion before to notice 
its good conduct. Its commander in this action, Captain William F. 
Brown, who is over sixty years of age, displayed great courage and 
energy. He is eminently deserving the command of a regiment, and 
I recommend him for promotion to fill the first vacancy that may oc- 
cur among the field officers of the regiment." We remained in posi- 
tion until the night of August 11th, and then returned to the vicinity 
of Gordonsville to avoid being attacked by greatly superior numbers 
before we could receive reinforcements. 



OPERATIONS FROM AUGUST i6 TO SEPTEMBER i, 
INCEUDING THE BATTLES OF SECOND 

MANASSAS. 

On the 16th of August, 1862, Ewell's Division moved from Liberty 
Mills to Mountain Run, below Rapidan Station, where it remained 
until the 20th, when it crossed the Rapidan river at Cunningham's 
Ford, and bivouacked near Stevensburg. 

On the next day, August 21, it passed Brandy Station and camped 
near St. James Church on the road to a ford on the Rappahannock, 
below the mouth of Hazel river. 

On the 22d it crossed Hazel river at a mill, and then moved above 
the mouth of the river, where the enemy was found in force. We soon 
marched in the direction of Warrenton Springs. General Trimble's 
Brigade was left to protect the flank of our wagon-train from the 
enemy, who was moving to the north side, while we were advancing 
on the south side of the Rappahannock. The remainder of the divi- 
sion moved to the vicinity of Warrenton Springs on the south bank, 
and the Thirteenth Georgia Regiment of Lawton's Brigade crossed at 
the springs that afternoon and captured a cavalry picket. Eight guns 
of Brown's and Dement's Batteries were also crossed over at that point. 
Early's Brigade crossed over on an old dam one mile below the springs 
the same afternoon. Early was ordered to occupy a piece of woods in 
front of his place of crossing, and to establish communication with 
General Lawton, as it was understood that his entire brigade would 
cross over at the springs. There had been a heavy shower and the 



216 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

river was somewhat swollen before Early's Brigade had orders to cross, 
and when they did cross it was still raining. When the left of our 
line was extended into the woods a road was discovered running from 
the springs to the two fords and Rappahannock Station. Our left was 
near this road, and our right extended to an old field below where we 
crossed. 

The river was so much swollen the next morning that it was impos- 
sible to cross it. General Early learned the next morning that the 
Thirteenth Georgia Regiment was the only regiment of Lawton's 
Brigade that had crossed, and informed General Jackson that his 
whole command would be captured if the enemy advanced in force, 
and suggested the propriety of his moving toward Waterloo bridge in 
order to extricate his command. General Jackson instructed him to 
move toward the springs and take command of the troops there, and 
so post his command that his left flank would rest on the river and 
the right on a creek north of the springs, and stated that the bridge 
which he was repairing would soon be in condition for the infantry to 
pass over. Afterward he received instructions from General Jackson 
to move toward Waterloo bridge if the enemy appeared in too heavy 
force, and to keep near the river so that he (Jackson) could follow 
along the opposite bank with his whole force and protect him. Gen- 
eral Early then posted the Thirteenth and Twenty-first Virginia on 
the road so as to protect his rear, but when he reached the springs 
found that Colonel Douglass had moved the Thirteenth Georgia and 
the artillery to a hill below the springs which runs across the river 
to the creek. The Twelfth Georgia, Twenty-fifth, Forty-fourth, 
Fifty-second, and Fifty-eighth Virginia Regiments were then posted 
to the left of the Thirteenth Georgia, so as to present a front to 
the northwest, the rear being guarded by the Thirteenth and Thirty- 
flrst Virginia Regiments, and the right flank, the only one exposed, 
was secure on account of the condition of the creek called Great 
Run. An officer was sent over during the morning to pilot one of 
Early's staff officers to Waterloo bridge, so that he might know the 
route if it became necessary for him to move in that direction. The 
creek began to fall rapidly, and was in a condition to be crossed dur- 
ing the afternoon. It now became evident that the enemy was mov- 
ing up from below in heavy force, and that our troops were in a crit- 
ical position. The fact that our troops were concealed by the woods 
no doubt saved them from capture. The enemy was doubtless aware of 
the fact that a force was across the river, but thought it much larger 



History of the Twelfth Georgia Kegiment. 217 

than it really was. A heavy column of infantry and artillery ap- 
peared opposite our right flank late in the afternoon, when General 
Early changed front so as to present it toward the enemy. His artil- 
lery was also posted so as not to be observed by the enemy. About 
this time Brigadier-General Robertson came from the direction of 
Warrenton with two or three regiments of cavalry, and two pieces of 
artillery, and after a consultation with General Early, the two pieces 
were posted on the hill north of the springs which commanded a view 
of the enemy, when he opened fire upon him. A battery of the 
enemy responded to this fire in a few moments. General Early sent 
two Parrott guns from Captain Brown's battery to his assistauce, 
when a brisk cannonading commenced and continued until near sun- 
down, with no damage to our infantry or artillery ; the only persons 
injured belonged to the cavalry in rear of our pieces. 

After the artillery fire ceased a column of the enemy advanced, 
but objects were rendered quite indistinct on account of the approach- 
ing darkness. Infantry was now seen advancing to our left, and in a 
few moments they fired a volley into the woods where our infantry 
was posted and gave three cheers. Our infantry was placed at a 
point from which they could fire upon the enemy, and two of Cap- 
tain Dement's Napoleon guns were run to the left of our line and 
opened with canister upon the enemy. This fire was so well directed 
that it drove them back in confusion ; the cries and groans of his men 
could be plainly heard by our troops. 

There was no other attack upon our troops that night, but it was 
evident that preparations were being made to surround our troops. 
General Early sent a messenger to General Jackson and informed him 
of the state of affairs, when the remainder of General Lawton's Brig- 
ade was sent over on the temporary bridge that had been constructed, 
the Sixtieth Georgia Regiment having crossed over just before night. 
When General Lawton arrived at one p.m., he informed General 
Early that he had seen written instructions to General Ewell direct- 
ing him to cross over himself at daylight, and if it was evident that 
the enemy was in heavy force to recross the troops, as it was not de- 
sired to have a general engagement at that place. General Early 
sent a messenger to General Ewell at once and informed him that if 
the troops were to be recrossed the sooner it was done the better, 
as there was no doubt of the enemy's being in heavy force, and 
that if he waited until daylight the enemy could, by moving to 
the left place artillery so as to command both the bridge and the ford, 



21*8 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

and thus prevent his recrossing at either place. After receiving this 
message General Ewell crossed over the river a little before three 
o'clock a.m., and after consultation with General Early gave orders 
to recross. Lawton's Brigade crossed over first, carrying the artillery 
by hand ; Early's Brigade followed, the whole being completed a lit- 
tle after daylight. It appears from General Pope's report that he 
supposed this force to be the whole of Jackson's army, and had moved 
his whole force up to attack him. The men did not murmur, al- 
though they had had no rations since the day they crossed over, and 
for two nights and a day they lay upon their arms, but exhibited the 
utmost resolution to repulse the enemy should he attack them. The 
men did not throw away ammunition when the enemy fired upon 
them in the woods, but reserved their fire for close quarters, deter- 
mined to make it a death-struggle, for they knew full well the terri- 
ble strait they were in. 

Early on the morning of the 2oth, Ewell's Division moved to 
Henson's Mill, above Waterloo bridge, and crossed the Rappahan- 
nock and camped that night at Salem. We marched very early on 
the morning of the 26th, and went through Thoroughfare Gap in the 
direction of Gainesville. At the latter place we took the road to 
Bristoe Station. Ewell's Division marched in advance on the 25th 
and 26th, and on the latter day moved as follows: First, Hays' 
Brigade ; second, Trimble's ; third, Lawton's ; and fourth, Early's. 

The Fifteenth Alabama Regiment, of Trimble's Brigade, and the 
Twelfth Georgia, in the meantime, were sent to join General Trimble 
at Manassas Junction, an order having been received for the transfer 
of the latter regiment. 

The troops of Ewell's Division moved in the direction of Centre- 
ville as soon as they were supplied with provisions obtained at Ma- 
nassas, and bivouacked between Manassas and Bull Run. At light 
the next morning Early's Brigade was followed by Trimble's, and, 
when it reached Blackburn's Ford, crossed and proceeded up to 
the stone bridge through the fields on the north side of Bull Run, 
then moved along the Warrenton turnpike and finally halted in 
the woods north of that road. After remaining in this position for 
some time the division moved under cover of the woods in the direc- 
tion of Gainesville, following Jackson's Division. Early's Brigade 
was leading the division in this movement, and reached the track 
graded for a railroad near Groveton. We here turned to the right 
and were formed in line in the edge of a piece of woods, with the left 



History of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 219 

resting on the railroad track and the right a short distance in rear of 
Stark's Brigade, of Jackson's Division. Hays' Brigade was formed 
behind Early's; Lawton's and Trimble's were formed further to the 
right by General Ewell, who accompanied them, and directed Gen- 
eral Early to take command of his own and Hays' Brigade. After- 
ward Lawton's and Trimble's Brigades were placed on the right of 
Starke's by General Ewell, and led them in the advance made 
on the enemy down the turnpike late in the afternoon. These 
two brigades were on the left of our line of attack, and advanced 
to close quarters with the enemy. The loss in these two brigades 
was quite heavy. General Ewell himself received a very serious 
wound in the knee while leading one of the regiments near the 
close of the fight. He fell, when wounded, very near Company G, 
Twelfth Georgia Regiment. Just before dark General Early was or- 
dered to advance to the front, and in making the movement it brought 
him near the left of the position to which Trimble's Brigade had 
advanced, and while making it his brigade was exposed to a galling 
fire of shells and canister. When he had succeeded in forming his 
line in front of the railroad the enemy commenced to retire. It had 
become so dark that he could not tell friend from foe, and halted on 
the railroad. General Ewell was lying in front wounded, and he had 
him carried to the hospital. Lawton's and Trimble's Brigades lay 
on their arms a short distance to the right of Early's, near the points 
where they were at the close of the fight. 

The division was now commanded by Brigadier-General Lawton, 
and early the next morning it was formed in line of battle on a ridge 
near the railroad track, facing toward Groveton, with the right rest- 
ing on the Warrenton turnpike. Afterward General Lee ordered 
Early to take his own and Hays' Brigade to a ridge west of the 
turnpike and railroad track to prevent the enemy from flanking our 
troops on the right. Our whole line of battle in the meantime had 
been so modified as to place it along the railroad track. Lawton and 
Trimble's Brigades were moved so as to conform to the new disposi- 
tion. After this there was considerable fighting, and the enemy cap- 
tured a portion of the railroad track, but were finally driven out arid 
pursued for several hundred yards. This was on Friday afternoon 
the lJ9th, and the last attempt made by the enemy to get possession 
of the line of railroad. 

General Trimble was very seriously wounded that afternoon by a shot 
fired by the enemy's sharpshooters. Captain William F. Brown, of 



220 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

the Twelfth Georgia Regiment, succeeded him as commander of the 
brigade. 

During the morning of the 30th the position of the various bri- 
gades was as follows: Trimble's on the right; Lawton's on the left of 
Trimble, and three regiments of Early's Brigade on the left of Law- 
ton, the whole occupying the line of railroad. 

Hays' Brigade went to the rear after ammunition and did not re- 
turn. 

When General Longstreet made his advance a short while before 
night, Lawton's, Trimble's and Early's Brigades were ordered forward. 
General Jackson ordered Early's Brigade to move by the flank, as the 
enemy was reported to be advancing to our left. After throwing out 
skirmishers it was discovered that this movement was being made by 
some of our troops instead of the Federals. We were then ordered 
back and bivouacked for the night. Our losses during the day had 
been heavy, that of the enemy much heavier. 

On Sunday the olst Ewell's Division moved forward crossing Bull 
Run at a ford below Sudley's, then turned to the left and marched 
along a country road until it reached Little River turnpike, and fol- 
lowed it in the direction of Germantown until ordered to bivouac 
late that night. The division was again put in motion early the next 
morning, September 1, and moved in single column until we reached 
Chantilly. The division was then placed in two columns, one on each 
side of the road, and the artillery in the road ; Trimble's and Hays' 
Brigades were on the right and Lawton's and Early's on the left. On 
reaching Ox Hill that afternoon it was learned that the enemy was 
approaching from Centerville. Trimble's and Hays' Brigades were 
then moved to the right and placed in line of battle on the right of 
Jackson's Division, and occupied a position on the edge of a field beyond 
a piece of woods through which the Ox road runs. Lawton's and 
Early's Brigades were placed in rear of Trimble's and Hays' Brigades. 
As we moved into position the enemy opened with artillery, and in a 
short time infantry opened fire in our front. A cold rain swept over 
the field at this time, beating directly into the faces of our troops. The 
division lay in the wet woods during the night, on their arms. Captain 
William F. Brown of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment, who was in com- 
mand of Trimble's Brigade, was killed in this fight. When our line 
of battle was formed Hill's Division was on the right, Ewell's Division 
in the center and Jackson's Division on the left, all on the turnpike 
road. On an eminence to the left of the road our artillery was posted. 



History of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 221 

Branch's and Field's Brigades were advanced to feel and engage 
the enemy. These brigades attacked the enemy, but the fire was 
so severe in front and flank that they were forced to fall back. 
Gregg's, Thomas' and Pender's Brigades were then thrown into the 
fight, and soon a portion of Ewell's Division became engaged. The 
battle now raged with intense fury and the enemy contested the ground 
until Generals Kearney and Stevens, their commanders, fell in front 
of Thomas' Brigade, when they retired from the field. 

Colonel James A. Walker, of the Thirteenth Virginia Regiment, was 
assigned to the command of Trimble's Brigade. 

We left Ox Hill on the 3d and took the road to Dranesville and 
Leesburg, and on the 4th bivouacked near the Big Spring between 
Leesburg and the Potomac. 

Our division commander, General R. S. Ewell, having been wounded 
on the night of August 28 near Groveton, Brigadier-General Law. 
ton was assigned to command of the division, and remained in that 
position until he was wounded at Sharpsburg, Md., September 17, 
1862. After this Brigadier-General Jubal A. Early was assigned to 
command of the division. 



MARCH TO AND CAPTURE OF HARPER'S FERRY. 

On the 3d of September, 1862, our division with the rest cf the 
troops moved to the left and crossed the Loudon and Hampshire 
Railroad above Vienna, then passed through Dranesville in the direc- 
tion of Leesburg, and camped not far from Dranesville. We passed 
through Leesburg on the 4th, and camped that night. We crossed 
the Potomac at White's Ford on the 5th into Maryland, and camped 
three or four miles from the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, and on the 
morning of the Gth marched to the railroad bridge over the Monocacy 
at the junction of the railroad to Frederick City with the Baltimore 
and Ohio Railroad. We remained in this position until the morning 
of the 10th, We then moved westward, passing through Middletown 
and bivouacked about ten miles from Frederick. 

The next day we moved through Boonsborough and recrossed the 
Potomac at Williamsport, and moved to North Mountain depot, on 
the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, and camped near there. We passed 
through Martinsburg the next day in the direction of Harper's Ferry, 
and camped on the Opequon. On the morning of the 13th we 



222 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

marched towards Harper's Ferry and encamped one mile above Hall- 
town. Late in the afternoon of the 14th we advanced upon Harper's 
Ferry in three columns. After passing Halltown the division advanced 
to the woods on Schoolhouse Hill, in the following order : Lawton's 
and Trimble's Brigades were formed in line of battle on the right of 
the turnpike, Hays' Brigade on the left of it, and Early's Brigade in 
rear of Lawton's. We then moved to the woods and took position on 
this hill, which fronted Bolivar Heights, in easy range for artillery. 
Early's Brigade was placed in rear of Hays'. This division lay on its 
arms during: the nig-ht. 

Tiie brigades were advanced to the front of the woods at daylight, 
and our batteries opened fire, which was kept up until the enemy sur- 
rendered. Lawton's Brigade was moved to the bottom on the right 
of the turnpike, between Schoolhouse Hill and Bolivar Heights, for 
the purpose of supporting A. P. Hill's advance from the right, but 
the white flag was displayed in a short time and no further movement 
Avas made by our brigade or division. Late in the afternoon of the 
loth General Lawton received orders to move to Boetler's Ford, and 
Lawton's and Trimble's Brigades were put in motion. Hays' and 
Early's Brigades were detained until after night, in order to secure 
rations at Harper's Ferry, when they joined the other brigades in camp 
about four miles from the ford. The division moved at dawn next 
morning, crossed the Potomac at Boetler's Ford and camped about 
one and a half miles from Sharpsburg. 



BATTLE OF SHARPSBURG. 

It remained in this position for several hours, and then moved to the 
right to cover a bridge over the Antietam; it was then directed to fol- 
low Jackson to the left. The division followed Jackson's Division until 
it reached a Dunkard Church. Lawton's and Trimble's Brigades were 
halted in the woods near the church; during the night they relieved 
some of Hood's Division that had been engaged during the evening. 
Trimble's Biigade was posted on the riglit next to D. H. Hill's Di- 
vision, and Lawton's on the left of it. Skirmishing commenced in front 
of Lawton's and Trimble's Brigades, and in a short time the enemy 
across Antietam river opened on them with artillery so as to enfilade 
them with a destructive fire. At sunrise, after the enemy had driven in 
our skirmisliers, he advanced to the edge of the woods. Artillery in 



History of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 223 

front of the woods opened upon us with shell and canister, and we were 
exposed to a terrible fire. Colonel Walker commanding Trimble's 
Brigade, by moving the Twenty-first Georgia and Twenty-first North 
Carolina Regiments and concentrating that of the Twelfth Georgia 
upon a part of the enemy's line in front of the Twelfth Georgia, suc- 
ceeded in breaking it. A fresh brigade at this moment came up to 
support Lawton's and Hays' Brigades, when Colonel Walker ordered 
an advance, but had to fall back to his first position because the bri- 
gade that had come to his support failed to move forward. Trimble's 
Brigade had suffered terribly and Colonel Walker's horse was killed 
under him, and he had been struck by a piece of shell. 

General Early in his report says: "The terrible nature of the con- 
flict in which these brigades had been engaged and the steadiness with 
which they maintained their position are shown by the losses they 
sustained. They did not retire from the field until General Lawton 
had been wounded and borne from the field, Colonel Douglass, com- 
manding Lawton's Brigade, had been killed, and the brigade had sus- 
tained a loss of 554 killed and wounded out of 1,150, losing five 
regimental commanders out of six; Hays' Brigade had sustained a loss 
of 323 out of 350, including every regimental commander and all of 
his staff, and Colonel Walker and one of his staff" had been disabled, 
and the brigade he was commanding (Trimble's) had sustained a loss 
of 228 out of less than 700 present, including three out of four regi- 
mental commanders." 

Colonel James A. Walker, commanding Trimble's Brigade, says : 
"The whole force of the enemy opposed to my regiments occupied 
the shelter of the wood, except that portion which confronted the left 
of my line, where the Twelfth Georgia was posted. Observing that 
the cool and deliberate fire of this tried and veteran regiment was an- 
noying that portion of the enemy's line very greatly, I ordered the 
Twenty-first Georgia and the Twenty-first North Carolina Regiments 
to the left, taking shelter under a low stone fence running at right 
angles to their former line, to direct their fire upon the wavering Yankee 
re!j;iment, with the view of breaking the enemy's line at this point. 
They did so promptly, and a few rounds from them had the desired 
effect and the enemy's line was entirely broken. It gives me great 
pleasure to bear testimony to the gallantry of the officers and men of 
this brigade, which I had the honor to command for a short while. 
Captain Rodgers, commanding the Twelfth Georgia, and Captain 
Miller, commanding the Twenty-first North Carolina Regiment, were 



224 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

both killed on the field while gallantly discharging their duty. 
Major Glover, commanding the Twenty-first Georgia, was severely 
wounded." 

At the close of the day our troops held the ground which they oc- 
cupied early in the morning. We held the same position during the 
next day awaiting the attack of the enemy, but he made no attack, 
although he remained in our front in heavy force. We recrossed the 
Potomac at Shepherdstown early on the morning of the 19th. After 
we had crossed the enemy appeared on the opposite side of the Potomac 
in considerable force. Under protection of their guns they com- 
menced to cross the Potomac, Lawton's Brigade and Pendlton's 
Artillery being driven back. By the next morning a considerable 
body of the enemy had crossed over. Generals Early and Hill, who 
had proceeded some four miles on their march, were ordered to return 
and attack them. Hill, who was in advance, formed his line of battle 
in two lines. General Early took position on the left side of the road 
leading to the ford, with the brigades of Early, Trimble and Hays. 
The Federal infantry and artillery were in strong force on the oppo- 
site heights. General Hill's Division advanced with great gallantry 
against his infantry in the face of a continued discharge of shot and 
shell from their batteries. They attempted to turn Pender's left, when 
Archer's Brigade moved to his left ; a simultaneous charge was then 
made, which drove the enemy into the river, followed by an appalling 
scene of destruction of human life. We continued to hold this posi- 
tion during the day, although exposed to the enemy's guns and within 
range of his sharpshooters. Our infantry remained at the river until 
relieved by Fitz Lee's Cavalry. We then moved from Shepherdstown 
and encamped in the vicinity of Martinsburg on the 20th of Septem- 
ber, and remained near there until the 27th, and then moved to 
Bunker Hill, where we rested for several weeks and gained consider- 
able strength by the return of soldiers who had recovered from sick- 
ness and wounds, and by return of those who had fallen out exhausted 
in the severe marches in this trying campaign. No other engagement 
occurred until the Federals, with a reorganized army under a new 
commander, Ambrose P. Burnside, crossed the Potomac again and 
started another "On-to-Richmond" campaign. General Lee moved 
his army across the Blue Ridge mountains and reached the south 
bank of the Rappahannock at Fredericksburg in time to confront 
the enemy and dispute his further progress toward the Confederate 
capitol. 



History of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 225 

BATTLE OF FREDERICKSBURG. 

The Second Corps of the Army of Northern Virginia marched on 
the morning of the 13th to the vicinity of Hamilton's Crossing, and 
bivouacked for the night. Brigadier-General Early was in command 
of Swell's Division. The right of Trimble's Brigade, commanded by 
Colonel R. F. Hoke, rested upon the Richmond and Fredericksburg 
railroad at Hamilton's Crossing, and in rear of Hays' Brigade. We 
remained in this position for more than two hours under a heavy 
cannonading, and lost a number of men. A little after noon the 
infantry fire became quite severe, and we were ordered to move by the 
left flank so that our right might rest on the left of Hays' Brigade. 
We had hardly settled in this position before we had orders to go to 
the support of General Archer, who had been driven from his position. 
The enemy was found in possession of the trench which had been oc- 
cupied by Archer on the crest of the hill in the woods in rear of it. 
The Federals were vigorously attacked by Hoke and driven from the 
woods and trench to the railroad in front where their reserve force was 
in position. Hoke followed up his attack and drove the enemy from 
his strong position on the railroad for some distance in front, killing 
about two hundred and wounding a large number, one hundred of 
the wounded falling into our hands, and we afterwards secured sev- 
eral hundred stand of arms. Hoke's Brigade, which was then ad- 
vanced in front of the railroad for some distance, received orders from 
General Early to fall back, because of the danger of being flanked, as 
the enemy had brought up large fresh columns. Lieutenant-Colonel 
Thaddeus B. Scott, commanding the Twelfth Georgia Regiment, 
was killed in this battle while acting gallantly and doing his duty 
nobly while the regiment was falling back to the woods. Lieu- 
tenant Thomas J. Verdery, adjutant of the Twenty-first Georgia 
Regiment, was also killed. Hoke, however, had anticipated the 
possibility of being flanked, and retired in good order, leaving two 
regiments and a battalion in the railroad cut, and occupying the 
trench on the hill with two other regiments and the Thirteenth 
Georgia Regiment, which, having failed to accompany its brigade 
on account of a misapprehension of orders, had been ordered for- 
ward with Hoke's Brigade, and got up in time to occupy the 
trench but not to participate in the charge. Hoke moved forward 
just as orders were received from General Jackson for the whole di- 
vision to advance. This movement was promptly executed. The 

15 d-c 



226 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

€Demy had discontinued his artillery fire, and his infantry was ad- 
vancing on the hill, having reopened his batteries, so that Hoke's 
Brigade was exposed to a galling fire while advancing. Hays' Brig- 
ade did not engage in the infantry fight because the enemy had been 
effectually repulsed before it reached the front line of the enemy. 

About sundown Hoke received orders to advance in support of the 
artillery, which was about to be sent forward. Some pieces of artil- 
lery had advanced a short distance to the front, and Colonel Hoke 
moved the balance of his brigade to the railroad where the other por- 
tion was posted. The enemy immediately opened a terrible artillery 
fire, and our own artillery was withdrawn and the movement to ad- 
vance countermanded. Orders were received from General Jackson 
instructing General Early to move his division back, make them as 
comfortable as possible, and procure rations for them as soon as Gen- 
eral A. P. Hill took position in front. No troops, however, relieved 
us, and we remained during the night in the position we occupied at 
the close of the fight. General Early received an order during the 
night to fill the vacancy in our line which would be left after Talia- 
ferro relieved A. P. Hill's Corps. We were already occupying the 
front line with three brigades of our division. Our division contin- 
ued to hold the same position on the line during the 14th. We were 
relieved on the morning of the 15th by the division of General 
D. H. Hill, and moved to the rear in reserve. The Twelfth Georgia 
Regiment was in Hoke's Brigade in this battle. 

After this battle we remained in camp near Fredericksburg until 
transferred to Doles' Brigade. Soon after this transfer Doles' Brigade 
moved to camp at Grace church, five or six miles below Fredericks- 
burg, where we remained until Hooker crossed the Rappahannock, 
when we were ordered out to meet him. 

In the winter of 1863 and 1864 our regiment was sent to New Ho])e 
Church in the valley of Virginia, some twenty-five miles from Staun- 
ton, for the purpose of arresting conscripts and deserters and sending 
them to the army and to guard the left flank of Lee's army. While 
on this mission we had the most delightful time that we had during 
the entire war. We were amongst our friends and sympathizers, and 
they were exceedingly kind to us. Our duties were very light. Out- 
side of sending out detachments for the purpose named we had but 
little to do, and enjoyed a season of much-needed rest. 

We could procure almost anything desired in the way of vegeta- 
bles, fresh meats, chickens, eggs, butter and milk, and fared sumptu- 



History of the Twelfth Georgia Kegiment. 227 

ously. When the time came to rejoin the army the next spring we 
left this pleasant and agreeable place with many regrets. When at 
New Hope Church the nearest Confederate camp was about twenty- 
five miles distant. 

The foregoing account completes the separate and individual his- 
tory of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. After this the history of the 
brigade is the history of each of the four regiments which composed 
it, viz. : The Fourth, Twelfth, Twenty-first, and Forty-fourth Georgia 
Regiments. Therefore, in order to complete the history of either of 
the regiments named, you are requested to read carefully the brigade 
history, which is full and complete, covering every battle and march 
in which it participated, commencing with the battle of Chancellors- 
ville, and ending with the surrender of Lee's army at Appomattox 
Court House, Va., April 9, 1865. 



228 Doles-Cook Brigade. 



GENERAL EDWARD WILLIS. 

At the beofinninor of the War between the States Edward Willis 
was a cadet at West Point. When Georgia seceded he resigned, re- 
turned to his native State and tendered his services to the Confederate 
Government. He was appointed adjutant of the Twelfth Georgia 
Regiment, July, 1861, and continued in that position until after the 
battle of Alleghany mountain, December 13, 1861. After this bat- 
tle he was appointed to a position on General " Stonewall" Jackson's 
Staff, where he remained until after the battle of Fredericksburg, De- 
cember 13, 1862, when he was appointed colonel of the Twelfth 
Georgia Regiment. 

In his book, "The Battle of Chancellorsville," Colonel Hamlin, th& 
historian of the Eleventh Army Corps of the Federal army, pays Col- 
onel Willis the following high and well-deserved compliment : 

''The skirmish line of Rodes' Division was composed of selected 
riflemen, and was led by Colonel Willis, of the Twelfth Georgia, and 
so well did he perform his duty that Jackson spoke highly of him in 
his last moments. Another part of the skirmish line was commanded 
by Colonel Blackford, and Jackson's orders were carried out so accu- 
rately by these men that, although over ten thousand men rested on 
their arms for two hours or more within a mile of the right flank of 
the Army of the Potomac, not a man deserted or escaped to give 
warning of the coming storm." 

From the date of his appointment as colonel he led his regiment in 
all of the movements made by the Army of Northern Virginia, and 
participated in all of its engagements up to a few days before he was 
killed. 

On the 30th of May, 1864, while in command of Pegram's Brigade, 
to which he had been assigned, while gallantly leading them he wa& 
wounded with a grapeshot, being carried from the field bleeding and 
mortally wounded. He received the tenderest and most careful nurs- 
ing, and the best surgeons in the corps attended him and exerted all 
their skill to stay the fell destroyer; but all in vain, the fiat had gone 
forth and death came next morning. He was cut down in the vigor of 
young manhood, when higher and brighter honors awaited him in his 
brilliant and promising career as a military man. Thus, while on the 
threshold of renown, his pure, gentle and brave spirit was stilled in 





EDWARD WILLIS 
Colonel Twelfth Georgia Regiment; afterwards Brigadier- 
General. 



-W YORK' 

3RARY, 



ASTOR, LENOX ANO 
"111 0"'^ T'^i'MOftTIONS. 



General Edward Willis. 229 

death, and the life of one of the brightest and most promising young 
-officers in the Confederate army was closed forever. He was devot- 
edly attached to our cause, and nothing could swerve him from the 
path of duty, and no danger appalled him. No hardships were too 
severe for his iron will if borne for his beloved country. While one 
of the best drilled officers in our command and a strict disciplinarian, 
he never wantonly overtaxed the strength or endurance of his men, 
or treated them harshly. His disposition was kind, and his treatment 
of his soldiers so considerate that they soon learned to love and re- 
spect their young commander. With a lofty ambition and heroic 
courage he braved every difficulty with cheerfulness. He not only 
gained the love and respect of his own regiment, but that of every 
good and true soldier in Doles' Brigade, and his death cast a heavy 
gloom of sorrow over the whole command. His character was lofty 
and pure, his demeanor dignified and courteous, and his bravery un- 
questioned. General Lee had made application to the War Depart- 
ment for his promotion as brigadier-general, and his commission came 
the day after his death. As long as one of the Twelfth Georgia Reg- 
iment survives his memory will be cherished with a devotion that can 
not be doubted and a never dying love. 



230 Doles-Cook Brigade. 



SKETCHES OF REGIMENTAL OFFICERS. 

Edward Johnson was born in Kentucky, April 16, 1816; gradu- 
ated at West Point Military Academy ; served in the Florida and 
Mexican wars ; resigned his commission as captain and brevet major- 
in the Sixth Infantry of the U. S. Army on the 10th day of June, 
1861 ; was appointed colonel of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment, June 
26, 1861 ; promoted brigadier- general, December 13, 1861 ; major- 
general. May 8, 1863; captured at Spottsylvania, Va., May 12, 1864. 
General Ewell, in his report of the battle of Spottsylvania, says r 
" General Edward Johnson once said of General Stafford, that he 
was the bravest man he ever saw. Such a compliment from one him.- 
self brave almost to a fault, and habitually sparing of praise, needs 
no remark." General Johnson was a planter in Virginia after the^ 
surrender. He died February 22, 1872. 

Colonel Z. T. Conner was appointed lieutenant-colonel of the 
Twelfth Georgia Regiment, June 26, 1861, and afterwards coloneL 
He resigned the latter part of 1862. General Edward Johnson com- 
plimented him for gallantry in the battle of McDowell. He was an 
intelligent and excellent business man. After the surrender he died 
in Macon, Ga. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Abner Smead was appointed major of the 
Twelfth Georgia Regiment, June 26, 1861, and afterwards promoted 
lieutenant-colonel. He was subsequently appointed colonel and in- 
spector-general on General "Stonewall" Jackson's staff. He was 
highly complimented for gallantry by General Jackson during the 
Seven Days' Battles. After this he was made colonel of artillery. 
He was an accomplished and brave soldier. 

Colonel Willis A. Hawkins enlisted as captain of Company A, 
Twelfth Georgia Regiment, rose to the rank of major and lieutenant- 
colonel, and in January, 1863, was promoted colonel of the regi- 
ment, but resigned very soon afterwards. Major Hawkins was com- 
plimented for gallantry by General Edward Johnson at the battle of 
McDowell. He was considered one of the ablest criminal lawyers in 
Georgia. After the war he was appointed Associate Justice of the 
Supreme Court of Georgia. He died November 28, 1886, in Ameri- 
cus, Ga. 




EDWARD JOHNSON 
Colonel Twelfth Georgia Regiment ; afterwards Major- General C. S. A . 



THE NEW YORK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



~ TOR, LENOX AND 
3EN FOUNDATIONS. 



Sketches of Regimental Officers. 231 

H. K. Green, surgeon, resigned soon after his appointment. He 
was an intelligent and accomplished gentleman, and enjoyed the rep- 
utation of being a fine physician. Died in Georgia after his resig- 
nation. 

W. P. Pledger, chaplain, entered the service as a private in Com> 
pany H ; resigned December, 1861. Afterwards was a member of the 
Methodist Conference in Georgia. He was a man of education, an 
excellent preacher, and a genial and good Christian gentleman. He 
died a number of years ago in Atlanta, Ga. 

Robert J. Lightfoot was a private in Company H when that 
company was mustered into service, and promoted commissary of the 
regiment, July 6, 1861, but did not hold the position long. He died 
since the war in Macon, Ga. 

Henry K. McKay, quartermaster, was mustered into service a& 
second lieutenant of Company A; wounded at Alleghany, Va., De- 
cember 13, 1861 ; promoted quartermaster of the regiment February 
6, 1862, afterwards resigned. He was a lawyer of fine legal attain- 
ments, and after the surrender was appointed Associate Justice of the- 
Supreme Court of Georgia, and then Judge of the United States 
District Court for Georgia. He died a number of years ago in At- 
lanta, Ga. 

James A. Etheridge, surgeon, enlisted as first lieutenant in Com- 
pany G; wounded at McDowell, Va., May 8, 1862; promoted assist- 
ant surgeon, and then surgeon of the Twelfth Georgia regiment. 
Afterwards he was brigade surgeon. He was a brave and gallant 
Confederate soldier, an intelligent, accomplished and earnest Chris- 
tian gentleman. He died in Eatonton, Ga. , September 30, 1893. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Mark H. Blandford was mustered into 
service as captain of Company K; lost an arm at McDowell, Va.; re- 
signed June 9, 1863. After his resignation was a member of the 
Confederate Congress from Georgia. After the surrender he was ap- 
pointed Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of Georgia. When 
his term of office as Associate Justice expired he returned to Colum* 
bus and resumed the practice of law. Neither his bravery in the 
army nor his fidelity to the cause was ever questioned. Died in Co- 
lumbus, Ga., January 31, 1902. 

Captain James R. McMichael was second lieutenant of Com- 
pany K when his company was mustered into service. He was 
wounded at Second Manassas, captured at Spottsylvania, Va., and was 



232 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

one of the six hundred Confederate officers that were exposed to 
the fire of our guns on Morris Island, 8. C. He was a brave and 
gallant officer and a modest and devout Christian gentleman. His 
death occurred in Macon county, Ga., after the surrender. 

Rev. a. M. Marshall, chaplain, was mustered into the service 
as a private in Company G, June 26, 1861. He resigned 1863. His 
record as a Confederate soldier is splendid. He is a Baptist minister 
and resides in Putnam county, Ga. While faithfully serving his Mas- 
ter, he still cherishes the memory of the Lost Cause, and attends nearly 
all of our reunions. The members of Company G love and respect 
Parson Marshall, and hope that he may be spared many years to con- 
tinue his good work among our people. 

Captain Josiah N. Beall was second sergeant in Company B, 
when it was mustered into service. He was wounded at Sharpsburg, 
Md. Every one liked Captain Beall, for he was a good-hearted and 
genial man and a brave and gallant Confederate soldier. He was in 
command of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment at the surrender of Lee's 
army at Appomattox Court House, Va. He died a number of years 
ago in Atlanta, Ga. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Thaddeus B. Scott was captain of the 
Muscogee Rifles when he entered the Confederate service. Wounded 
at Cold Harbor, Va., June 2, 1862. Promoted lieutenant-colonel of 
the Twelfth Georgia Regiment, November 5, 1862, and was killed at 
Fredericksburg, Va., December 13, 1862, while acting gallantly and 
doing his duty nobly as commander of his regiment. He was a brave 
soldier and an accomplished gentleman. His death was a severe loss 
to his regiment. 

Captain James A, Whitesides was mustered into service as first 
lieutenant of Company E ; wounded at Second Manassas. Captain 
Whitesides was a brave and conscientious officer, and performed all 
duties required of him cheerfully. He served throughout the entire 
war, and died in Macon, Ga., after the surrender. 

Captain James Everett was first lieutenant in Company F 
when the Twelfth Georgia Regiment was organized. Was wounded 
at Gettysburg, Pa. , and served throughout the entire war. He was a 
brave and efficient officer who commanded the respect of his regi- 
ment and was beloved by the members of his company. He died in 
Georgia after the surrender. 



Sketches of Regimental Officer&. 233 

Captain Samuel Dawson was first lieutenant in the Muckalee 
iruards, Company A, Twelfth Georgia Regiment, when it entered the 
service of the Confederacy. He was killed at McDowell, Va., May 
8, 1862, where so many of his regiment gave their lives in defense 
of the South. He was a splendid ofiicer and his bravery was con- 
spicuous. His loss was a great blow to his company, the regiment 
deeply deplored his loss, and the army was deprived of the services 
of one of its must efficient and faithful officers. 

Major John T. Caeson was mustered into the service as first lieu- 
tenant in Company C. He was captured in March, and released in 
July, 1864. At Winchester, Va., on the 19th of September, 1864, 
he was wounded, and died from the effects of that wound. Major 
Carson was a man of strong character, a brave and efficient officer, an 
earnest and enthusiastic Confederate, having implicit faith in the just- 
ness of our cause. He was kind and courteous to all with whom he 
came in contact, and was beloved by his comrades. In his death the 
Twelfth Georgia Regiment lost one of its best and bravest officers. 

Captain James W. Patterson, of Company I, was killed at Mc- 
Dowell, Va. , May 8, 1862. He was a Virginian by birth, but moved 
to Forsyth, Ga., previous to the war, where he taught school, read 
law, and married. From there he moved to Valdosta, Ga., and prac- 
ticed law until the commencement of hostilities, when he enlisted in 
the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. He was a gentleman of fine legal 
attainments and a brave and gallant soldier. 

Dr. John R. Cook, assistant surgeon of the Twelfth Georgia Reg- 
iment, enlisted as second lieutenant in Company C. He resigned 
September 20, 1861. After his resignation he was assigned to hos- 
pital duty, and remained in this position until the close of the war. 
He was a gentleman of fine literary attainments and a physician of 
considerable note. He located in Marshallville after the surrender 
and practiced medicine until his death, which occurred in 1885. 

Rev. F. G. Powlage enlisted as a private in Company A, June 15, 
1861. He was first promoted hospital steward, and then chaplain of 
the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. Resigned late in the war. Supposed 
to be living in Alabama. He was a conscientious man, a good sol- 
dier, and a Christian gentleman. 

Captain William L. Furlow was mustered into service as cap- 
tain of Company D. He was educated at the Georgia Military Acad- 
•emy. He was a splendid man and a very efficient officer. His prom- 



234 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

isiug career was cut short when he was only twenty-five years of age 
by his untimely death at McDowell, Va., May 8, 1862. The casual- 
ties in this engagement were fearful for the number of men engaged, 
and many bright and promising lives were ended there, but amongst 
this fearful carnage no purer or more promising life was closed than 
that of Captain Furlow. He was modest and retiring in disposition, 
but as brave and daring an officer as the South could boast of. He 
w'as deeply mourned by his comrades, and the surviving members of 
his regiment revere his memory. 

William H. Hodnett enlisted as second corporal in Company D,. 
and was promoted assistant surgeon of the Twelfth Georgia Regi- 
ment. He was a faithful and competent officer, a modest and consci- 
entious gentleman, who won the respect of his comrades. He died in 
Calhoun county after the surrender. 

Captain James M. Briggs was mustered into service as second 
lieutenant of Company I. He was a gallant and faithful officer, ever 
ready to perform any duty required of him. He was killed at Wil- 
derness, Va., May 5, 1864. His death was deeply regretted both 
by his company and regiment, for he was a true and tried soldier and 
an excellent gentleman. 

Joseph A. Ansley was third sergeant of Company A when he 
was mustered into service, and afterward promoted first sergeant. He 
has been judge of both the county and superior courts of Sumter 
county since the surrender, and has been successful in the practice of 
law. He remained a member of his company until the close of the 
war, and made a good soldier. He occupies a prominent position as 
a worthy citizen of his city and county. 

Captain James G. Rodgers was in command of Company H 
when mustered into service. In the Seven Days' Battles around 
Richmond he was in command of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment, and 
General Ewell, in his official report of the battle of Malvern Hill, com- 
pliments him very highly. At Sharpsburg, Md,^ he was killed in the 
thickest of the fight, while gallantly leading his regiment. He was a. 
brave and accomplished officer and an excellent gentleman. 

Caltain Oliver F. Evans, of Company H, was first sergeant of 
his company when mustered into service. His bravery was unques- 
tioned and his devotion to duty was remarkable. He possessed every 
virtue of the old-time Southern gentleman, and his religious charac- 
ter was noticeable. He still lives in his native city of Macon, Ga.,. 




JOHX T. CARSON 

M:ijor Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 



THE NEW YORk| 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 



A6TOR, LENOX AN.) 
TILDEN FOUNOATIOf'<r>. 



Sketches of Regimental Officers. 235 

where he is honored and respected by every one. Though burdened 
with age his health is good, and his mental faculties are unimpaired. 
May his life be prolonged for many years and his example be pro- 
ductive of much good to the rising generations. 

Adjutant Newton T. Johnson enlisted as first sergeant of Com- 
pany C. He was wounded in the battle of the Wilderness, and re. 
tired on account of disability. He was a brave and accomplished 
officer, and seemed to take pride in the performance of his duties. 
He was a partner in the wholesale grocery firm of Jaques & Johnson^ 
of Mat 'U, Ga., and accumulated quite a fortune after the surrender. 
A number of years ago he died in Macon, Ga. 

Captain Dayid D. Peden enlisted as first lieutenant of the Cal- 
houn Rifles, Company D, Twelfth Georgia Regiment, June 26, 1861, 
and on the 8th of May, 1862, was promoted captain. In the last 
charge at Malvern Hill, Va. , July 1, 1862, he lost an eye, which dis- 
abled him for some time, but he returned to the army and command- 
ed his company in the battle of Chancellorsville. Soon after this bat- 
tle, on account of impaired sight and disability from wound, he was 
assigned to duty as inspector-general on the staff of Major-General 
Robert E. Rodes, in recognition of meritorious service performed. 
After the battle of Gettysburg he resigned because of feeble health, 
and was assigned to post duty in Georgia until the close of the 
war. In 1890, he moved to Houston, Texas, where he now re- 
sides, and, with his two sons, Edward A. and D. D. Jr., is engaged in 
the wholesale hardware business under the firm name of Peden & 
Co. This venture has proved very successful, and their business con- 
tinues to grow. He was born in South Carolina, and at the age of 
twelve his father moved to Georgia, and his education was received 
in LaGrange and at the Georgia Military Institute. In 1868 he mar- 
ried Miss Fannie D. Plowden, who left the two sons named abova 
when she died in 1897. Captain Peden was a brave and accomplished 
soldier, and is an intelligent and cultured gentleman. He is ever 
ready to assist needy and deserving ex-Confederate soldiers, and 
loves the cause for which he fought. 

Dr. George W. Thomas, assistant surgeon of the Twelfth Geor- 
gia Regiment, enlisted as a private in Company A, and served 
throughout the entire war. He was a genial, whole-souled and affa- 
ble gentleman. Extremely modest and retiring in his disposition, but 
was ever ready to face any danger or obey any call to duty. He 



■236 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

seemed to be as cool and collected on the battle-field as on drill, and 
did not appear to know what fear was. There was not a better or 
braver soldier in the Confederate army than Dr. Thomas. He com- 
manded the respect of every member of his regiment. His death oc- 
■curred in Eatonton, Ga., February 2, 1902. 

Captain Alexander Sidney Reid was mustered into service as 
second lieutenant in Company G. He surrendered with Lee's army at 
Appomattox, Va., but was never wounded during the war, though it 
was not because he did not expose himself, for in every battle he bore 
himself with conspicuous gallantry. He was a brave and capable 
-officer, ever ready to go where duty called him. No officer in the 
regiment was more popular, for he was always in a good humor with 
himself and the rest of mankind, and he made friends wherever he 
went. Every surviving member of his company loves, honors and 
respects him, for he is still the whole-souled gentleman that he was in 
the days that tried men's souls. He is still living in Eatonton, the 
town of his nativity, where he is very popular. 

Captain Abner R. Zachery was first corporal when he was mus- 
tered into service with Company G, and served during the entire war. 
The war did not produce a braver, better or more ardent soldier. 
After the surrender he moved to Morgan county, Ga., where he 
farmed. While sitting with his family on the night of December 16, 
1896, he was murdered ; the assassin fired through a window and he 
was instantly killed. What could have prompted the cowardly and 
dastardly deed is shrouded in mystery, and will probably remain so. 
It was not believed that he had an enemy in the world, for his whole 
soul seemed to be filled with love for his fellow men. The members 
of his company who were still in life at the date of his death were 
shocked at the terrible tragedy, and their sympathies still go out to 
his grief-stricken wife and children. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Isaac Hardeman entered the service as 
ifirst sergeant in Company B. He was captured at Spottsylvania, Va., 
May 10, 1864, and remained a prisoner until July, 1865. Therefore, 
hy reason of his imprisonment he was never promoted colonel of the 
regiment, although a vacancy existed from July, 1864, until the close 
of the war in April, 1865, to which he would have been promoted, 
for he was entitled to this promotion and was thoroughly competent 
to stand the examination. He was a brave, gallant and competent 




JAMES A. ETHERIDGE 

Major and Surgeon Twelfth Georgia Regiment, 



[the new YORK 

, PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



AffTOR, LENOX ANO 
TILDEN FOUNDATIONS. ^ 



\ 



Sketches of Regimental Officers. 237 

oflBcer. He is now a resident of Macon, Ga., a distinguished lawyer, 
enjoying a large and lucrative practice. He is also prominent in city 
affairs, and commander of one of the Confederate camps there. 

Captain William F. Brown was mustered into service as com- 
mander of Company F when he was sixty years old. In all of the 
engagements in which he participated up to the time of his death he 
exhibited unusual courage. He was in command of the Twelfth- 
Georgia Regiment at Cedar Creek, or Slaughter Mountain, and Sec- 
ond Manassas until General Trimble was wounded, when he was 
placed in command of the brigade, and served in this capacity 
throughout the battle with great credit to himself and the brigade, and 
while still occupying this position was killed at Ox Hill, Va., on the 
1st of September, 1862. The complimentary remarks made by Gen- 
eral Early of his conduct at Cedar Creek or Slaughter Mountain are 
given in full in the history of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. He 
was ever ready for duty, and no one was more devoted to our cause 
than this grand old man. 

Captain Peyton T. Pitts was in command of Company B when 
he entered the Confederate service. He resigned October 17, 1861. 
Therefore he saw but little service. He was a man of culture and 
pleasant in his manners to every one with whom he came in contact. 
He died in Jones county, Ga. , in 1885. 

Captain Richard T. Davis enlisted as commander of Company 
G. He was born in Newton county, Ga.; moved to Eatonton, where 
he married and practiced law a number of years previous to the war. 
He was a lawyer of decided ability, and enjoyed a large and lucra- 
tive practice. He was conspicuous for his many noble traits of char- 
acter and extraordinary bravery. While as brave as the bravest, he 
was as modest and as tender as a woman. His company almost idol- 
ized him, and the citizens of his adopted county honored and respec- 
ted him for his many virtues. At McDowell, Va., on the 8th of 
May, 1862, he received a flesh wound in the thigh, from which he 
died soon afterwards. No truer patriot, better citizen or more sin- 
cere Christian ever lived than Captain Richard T. Davis. 

William C. Bannon enlisted in Company C as a private, but was pro- 
moted sergeant-major, and for several months before the war closed act- 
ed as adjutant of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. He was born in the 
State of New York, but resided in Macon county, Ga. , when the war 
commenced. After the surrender he moved to Hudson, N. Y. , where he 



"SSS Doles-Cook Brigade. 

engaged in the hotel business. While on a visit to Macon, Ga. , in 1901, 
he died, and the following resolutions were adopted by the Veterans' 
Association of the Twelfth Georgia, which was in annual session : 

''Whereas, Our comrade, friend and brother, William C. Bannon 
of Hudson, N. Y. , who was a member of the Twelfth Georgia Regi- 
ment during the War between the States, June, 1861, to April, 1865, 
and who came to the city of Macon on Saturday the 19th to meet his 
old friends and attend the Reunion of the Confederate Veterans here 
the 23d and 24th inst. ; and 

''Whereas, He suddenly died at the residence of his niece, Mrs. 
Charles J. Bannon, at one thirty o'clock on Sunday the 20th ; there- 
fore, 

^* Resolved, That we his comrades and friends, who admired and 
loved him in war and peace, feel keenly the sad providence by which 
he was so suddenly and unexpectedly taken from us; that we will 
cherish his memory as a gallant soldier, an honest citizen and a true 
Christian friend ; that our heartfelt sympathies are hereby tendered to 
his grief-stricken family. 

(Signed) "A. S. Reid, Chairman, 

"Veterans' Association, Twelfth Georgia Regiment." 

Captain Thomas W. Harris was mustered into service as a private 
in Company C. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va., and was one of the 
^ix hundred Confederate officers exposed to the fire of our guns on 
Morris Island, S. C. He was graduated at Oxford, Ga. He is a 
splendid gentleman and a devout Christian, but not one of those long- 
faced, sad looking members of the church that we sometimes meet, 
but a good-hearted, jovial gentleman who is full of fun and enjoys a 
good joke, even if it is at his own expense. Captain Harris was a 
T>rave and gallant soldier. His residence is now in Chicago, 111. 

W. F. Jenkins enlisted as a private in Company G, and surrendered 
:at Appomattox, Va. After the close of the war he went to the 
University of Virginia and was graduated from the Law Department 
of that institution with high honors. He returned to Eatonton and 
commenced the practice of law and soon had a large and lucrative 
practice. He has represented Putnam county in the General Assem- 
bly of Georgia, served as judofc of the Ocmulgee Circuit for eight 
years, and is now a trustee of the Georgia Soldiers' Home. There 
was no better soldier in the Confederate army than Frank Jenkins. 
He is a noble and gifted man, and his friends are innumerable. 




JAMKS B. GANTT 

First Sergeant Company B, Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 
Now Associate Justice Supreme Court of Missouri. 



Sketches of Regimental Officers. 239 

Judge James B. Gannt, of the Supreme Court of Missouri, was 
born in Putnam county, Ga., but enlisted in Company B as a private 
and was promoted to first sergeant. He was wounded and disabled at 
Cedar Creek, Va., October 19, 1864, and after the surrender of Lee's 
army paroled in Milledgeville, Ga. He read law under Judge L. N. 
Whittle of Macon, Ga., entered the University of Virginia and was 
graduated from that institution in 1868. He then moved to Missouri 
and opened a law office in Clinton. In 1875 he became a law partner 
of Senator George G. Vest and moved to Sedalia ; afterward he re- 
turned to Clinton and was elected circuit judge of the Twenty-second 
Judicial District, and held the position for one term, when he declined 
to again make the race, but opposed Hon. William J. Stone for Con- 
gress and was defeated by only one vote. In 1890 he was elected 
Associate Justice of the Supreme Court for a period of ten years. 
From 1898 to 1900 he was Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. He 
was reelected Associate Justice of the Supreme Court in 1900 for tea 
years. The Kansas City Star states that the strongest elements in the 
democratic party are looking to him as a probable leader of the party 
in the campaign of 1904 for Governor of the State. He was a brave 
and gallant Confederate soldier. 

Captain John McMillan went into service as captain of the Davis 
Rifles, Company C, Twelfth Georgia Regiment, He was killed in the 
memorable battle of McDowell, Va., May 8, 1862, where the regi- 
ment lost four captains and four lieutenants killed on the field, and 
two hundred and fifty non-commissioned officers and men killed and 
wounded in action. There was not a more accomplished or braver 
officer in the regiment. He was a man of fine character, kind to his 
men, and beloved by every one. In his death the regiment lost one 
of its best and most competent ofiicers. 

Captain Shepard G. Pryor entered the service as second sergeant 
in the Muckalee Guards, Company A, Twelfth Georgia Regiment, 
and was promoted successively until he became captain on the 8th of 
May, 1862. He was elected sheriff" of Sumter county, Ga., and re- 
signed his commission as captain in June, 1864, to accept the position 
tendered by his county. He was a brave and efficient officer and com- 
manded the confidence and respect of every member of his company. 
He died in Sumter county after the surrender. 

Captain Joseph E. Market was mustered into service as a private 
soldier in the Muckalee Guards, Company A, Twelfth Georgia Regi- 



^HY. 



r^LuEN FOUNDATinl 



Twelfth Regiment Field and Staff Officers. 241 



ROSTER OF FIELD AND STAFF OF TWELFTH 
REGIMENT, GEORGIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, 
DOLES-COOK BRIGADE, ARMY NORTHERN VIR- 
GINIA, C. S. A. 

Edward Johnson Colonel. 

Z. T. Conner Lieutenant-Colonel, 

Abner Smead Major. 

Edward Willis Adjutant. 

Henry K. McKay Quartermaster. 

Robert J. Lightf oot Commissary. 

H. K. Green Surgeon. 

James A. Etheridge Assistant Surgeon. 

W. P. Pledger Chaplain. 

Z. T. Conner Colonel. 

Willis A. Hawkins Colonel. 

Edward Willis Colonel. 

Abner Smead Lieutenant-Colonel. 

Willis A. Hawkins Lieutenant-Colonel. 

Thaddeus B. Scott Lieutenant-Colonel. 

Mark H. Blandford Lieutenant-Colonel. 

Isaac Hardeman Lieutenant-Colonel. 

Willis A. Hawkins Major. 

Edward Willis Major. 

John T. Carson Major. 

Isaac Hardeman Major. 

George W. Thomas Adjutant. 

Newton T. Johnson Adjutant. 

A. S. Reid Quartermaster. 

Richmond A. Reid Commissary. 

James A. Etheridge Surgeon. 

.John R. Cook Assistant Surgeon. 

Wm. H. Hodnett Assistant Surgeon. 

George W. Thomas Assistant Surgeon. 

A. M. Marshall Chaplain. 

F. G. Powlage Chaplain. 

NCN-COMMISSIONED T.TAFF. 

William D. Elam Sergeant-Major. 

George W. Thomas Sergeant-Major. 

William C. Bannon Sergeant-Major. 

B. M. McGetrick Hospital Steward. 

I6d-c 



242 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

F. G. Powlage Hospital Steward. 

Henry W. Thomas Hospital Steward. 

J. Harper Blacli Commissary Sergeant 

A. D. Gatewood Commissary Sergeant. 

James Q ("Put") Adams Commissary Sergeant 

Irby G. Hudson Commissary Sergeant 

Tliomas E. Carson Commissary Sergeant 

John K. Harmon Quartermaster Sergeant 

John K. Warren Ordnance Sergeant. 

S. M. Beavers Color Bearer. 



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SHEPARD G. PRYOR 

Captain Company A, Twelfth Georgia Reg- 
iment. 



JOSEPH E. MARKETT 
Captain Company A, Twelfth Georgia Reg- 
iment. 




*|'%||; 





HIRAM A. CRITTEXDEX 

Second Lieutenant Company A, Twelfth 
Georgia Regiment. 



JAMES C. ALLEX 

Junior Second Lieutenant Company K, 
Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 



Muster Rolls of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 243 



MUSTER ROLL OF MUCKALEE GUARDS, COM- 
PANY A, TWELFTH REGIMENT, GEORGIA VOL- 
UNTEER INFANTRY, A. N. V., C. S. A. 

SUMTER COUNTY, GEORGIA. 

HAWKINS, WILLIS A. 
Captain, June 15, 1861. Promoted Major April 10, 1862; Lieutenant- 
Colonel, December 13, 1862; Colonel, January, 1863. Resigned 
Januai-y 24, 1863. Died since the war in Americus, Ga. 

DAWSON, SAMUEI^ 
First Lieutenant, June 15, 1861. Promoted Captain, April 10, 1862. 
Killed at McDowell, Va. 
McKAY, HENRY K.— 
Second Lieutenant, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Allegheny, Va. Pro- 
moted Captain and Assistant Quartermaster Twelfth Georgia Regi- 
ment, February 6, 1862. Resigned. Died since the war in At- 
lanta, Ga. ♦ 
TURPIN, WILLIAM A.— 
Junior Second Lieutenant, June 15, 1861. Promoted Second Lieu- 
tenant February 6, 1862. Killed at McDowell, Va. 

RYLANDER, JOHN E.— 
First Sergeant, June 15, 1861. While at home on furlough was au- 
thorized by President Davis to raise a company. Enlisted in 
Tenth Georgia Battalion as Captain, and promoted Major. Killed 
at Cold Harbor, Va. 

PRYOR, SHEPARD G.— 
Second Sergeant, June 15, 1861. Promoted Junior Second Lieuten- 
ant February 6, 1862; Captain, May 8, 1862. Wounded October 12, 
1863. Elected sheriff of Sumter county, Ga., and resigned his 
commission .June, 1864. Died since the wai* in Sumter county, Ga. 

ANSLBY, JOSEPH A.— 
Third Sergeant, June 15, 1861. Promoted First Sergeant 1863. 
Served through the war. Living in Americus, Ga. 

GUICE, WILLIAM H.— 
Fourth Sergeant, June 15, 1861. Killed at McDowell, Va. 

STEWART, WASHINGTON H.— 

First Corporal, June 15, 1861. Discharged March 14, 1862. 
CRITTENDEN, HIRAM A.— 
Second Corporal, June 15, 1861. Promoted Sergeant. Promoted Sec- 
ond Lieutenant January 22, 1862. Wounded at McDowell, Va. 
Served through the w^ar. Living in. Shellman, Ga. 



244 Doles-Cook Bkigade. 

PARLEY, CHARLES S.— 
Third Corporal, June 15, 18G1. Woimded at Gettysburg, Pa., and 
■ discbarj?ed. Died in Sumter county, Ga., 1884. 

RAY, ALLEN— 

Fourth Coi-poral, June 15, 18G1. Killed at McDowell, Va. 

ALLEN, S. Y.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Va. Served through 
the war. ]Moved out West after the surrender. 

ALEXANDER, R. W.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged 1861. 

AVERY, JAMES— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged. Died in Sumter county, Ga., 
1897. 

BAILEY, THOMAS A.— 
Private, March 6, 1862. Missing at Spottsylvania, Va,, May 19, 1864. 

BAILEY, WILLIAM— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged. 
BATTLE, JOE L.— 

Private, April 27, 1862. Wounded and disabled at Gettysburg, Pa. 
Living in Smithville, Ga. 

BATTLE, JOHN R.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged. Died near Thomasville, Ga., 
1896. 

BATTS, WILLIAM— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, and killed at Cedar 
Run, Va. 

BEACHAM, LEWIS— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Killed at McDowell, Va. 
BELL, JAMES— 

Private. Recruit. Killed at Spottsylvania, Va., May 10, 1864. 
BEVERIDGE, JOHN L.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged account consumption. Died after 
returning home. 

BLACK, J. HARPER— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Promoted Commissary Sergeant Twelfth 
Georgia Regiment, July 6, 1861. Served through the war. Died 
1900. 

BOLTON, JEREMIAH S.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Detailed as ambulance driver 1863. Served 
through the war. Living in Americus, Ga. 




WILLIS A HAWKINS 
Colonel Twelfth G orgia Regiment. 



THE NEW YORkI 

PUBLIC WPPAPV. 



A8TOR, LENOX AND 
TILDEN FOUNDATfONfi, 



Muster IIolls of the Iwelfth Georg a '^F/^r-.TPAc. 245 

BRADY, WRIGHT, Jr.— 

Private, June 15, 1801. Wounded at Gainos' :Mill, Va. Transferred 
to Company C, Ciitts' Aitillery, October 22, 1803. Died in Sumter 
county, Ga., 1898. 

BROWN, JOHN— 

Private, June 15, 1801. Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., and died from 
wound. 

BROWNING, R. J.— 
Private, June 15, 1801. Wounded at Greenbrier River, Va. Pro- 
moted Corporal and Fifth Sergeant. Wounded twice in battle. 
Served through the war. Died in Sumter county, Ga., 1900. 

BRYANT, ISAAC— 

Private, October 8, 1803. Missing; supposed to have been captured 
at Cedar Creek, Ya., October 19, 1804. 

BRUNT, SIMEON H.— 

Private, June 15, 1801. Killed at Spottsylvania, Ya. 

BUTTS, JOHN A.— 

Private, June 15, 1801. Discharged. Moved to Mississippi after the 
surrender. 

CARTER, ABNER W.— 

Private, June 15, 1801. Killed at Allegheny, Ya. First member of 
the company killed in battle. 

CARTER, WILLIAM A.— 

Private, September 12, ISGl. Killed by falling from cars July 30, 
1802. 

CHAPPELL, BENJAMIN F.— 
Private, June 15, 1801. Killed at McDowell, Ya. 

CLARK, CHARLES E.— 

Private, June 15, 1801. Killed at Second Manassas. 

CLARK, CHARLES E.— 

Private, June 15, 1801. Appointed musician. Surrendered at Appo- 
mattox, Ya. Died in Cuthbert. Ga., 1897. 

CLARK, COUNCIL C— 

Private, June 15, 18.01. Discharged— over age. Died in Sumter 
county, Ga. 

CLARK, JAMES H.— 
Private, April 21, 1802. Wounded at Spottsylvania, Ya. Served 
through the war. 

CLARK, S. G.— 
Private, June 15, 1801. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md. Served 
through the war. Living in Andersonville, Ga. 



246 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

CLARK, W. D.— 
Private, June 15, 18G1. Lost eye at Spottsylvania, Va. Served 
through the war. 
CRAWFORD, JOHN— 
Private. Recruit. Wounded at Cbaucellorsville, Ya., and died from 
wound. 
CRAW^FORD, RUSSELL— 
Private, April 18, ISGS. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va. Served 
through the war. 

CURL, MATHEAV- 
Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged 1861. Moved to Alabama. 

CURR, SAMUEL— 
Private. Recruit. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va., May 10, 1864. 

DANIEL, J. A.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Lost eye at Allegheny, Va. Served through 
the war. 

DAVENPORT, H. T.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. W^ounded at Chancellorsville, Sharpsburg 
and W^ilderness, twice in each battle. Wounded with saber by 
guard after capture at Spottsylvania, Va. In prison nearly a year 
when he bought his freedom from a sentinel at Elmira, N. Y. Liv- 
ing in Americus. Ga. 

DEES, JOHN— 
Private, June 15, 1861. AVounded at Second Manassas. Killed at 
Winchester, Va. 

DeLOACH, SEABORN W^- 
Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged. Died in Leslie, Sumter county, 
Ga. 
DeLOACH, W^ILLIAM C— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Detailed as teamster. Served through the 
war. Living in Leslie, Ga. 

DENNIS, W. D. T.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Died and was buried at Mount Jackson, Va. 

DIXON, JAMES P.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Died at Greenbrier River, Va., December, 
1861. 
DOUGLAS, ANDREW^ B.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged 1861. 
DOUGLAS, NEWTON— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged July 20, 1861. Died in Sumter 
county, Ga. 

DYKES, ANDREW J.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Killed on skirmish line at Second Manassas. 



Muster Rolls of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 247 

EDWARDS, D. HENRY— 
Private, November 18, 1862. Wounded at Chancellors ville, Va. Sur- 
rendered at Appomattox, Va. Died since the war in Sumter 
county, Ga. 
ELAM, E. O.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Kicked by a horse and killed after the sur- 
render in Americus, Ga. 
ELAM, H. O. S.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Va. Served through 
the war. Dead. 
FAUST, W. E.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Died at Camp Allegheny, Va., 1861. 
FELDER, JOHN B.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged. Joined Rylanders' Battalion. 
Promoted Quartermaster-Sergeant. Served through the war. Liv- 
ing in Americus. Ga. 
GATEWOOD, A. D.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Promoted Quartermaster-Sergeant. Served 
through the war. Died in Sumter county, Ga., 1897. 
GILLESPIE, ADOLPH W.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged. Living in Cuthbert, Ga. 

GLASS, JOHN W.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Promoted Corporal and Sergeant. Killed at 
Spottsylvania, Va., May 10, 1864. 
GLAZE, WILLIAM F.— 

Private, January 20, 1862. Killed at Second Manassas. 
GLOVER, ISHAM E.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Second Manassas, and killed 
near Washington, D. C, July 12, 1864. 
GLOVER. STERLING, Jr.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Killed at Wilderness, Va. 
GLOVER, WILLIAM H.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Transferred to Cutts' Artillery. Living in 
Andersonville, Ga. 
GOODMAN, LUKE R.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Detailed in hospital at Macon, Ga., March, 
1863. Served through the war. Dead. 
GOODMAN, R. H.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged. Died in Americus, Ga. 
GRAVES, JAMES R.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged May 14, 1862. Living in Kissi- 
mee, Fla. 



248 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

GKIFFIN, JOHN C— 

Private, June 15, 1801. Wounded at McDowell, Va., and discharged. 
GRiFFEN, JOHN L.— 

Private, IMareli 1, 3 804. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Died since 
the war in Dawson, Ga. 

GRICE, GEORGE W.— 
Private, September 23, 1863. Captured at Spottsylvan,ia, Va. Died 
in prison at Elmira. N. Y. 

GRICE, M. B.— 

Private, June 15, ISGl. Killed at ]\IcDowell, Va. 
GUERRY, JOHN CROMWELI.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Promoted Corporal and Sergeant 1863. 
Wounded in battle 1804. Served through the war. Living in 
Chickasawhatchie, Ga. 
GUERRY, J. LOWERY— 
Private, June 15, 1801. Discharged December, 1861. Died of con- 
sumption. 
GUFFORD, WILLIAM— 

Private, June 15, 1801. Died of pneumonia September 27, 1861. 
HAINES, WILLIAM P.— 

Private, June 15, 1801. Discharged .July 2, 1801. 

HODGES, elIas p:.— 

Private, June 15, 1801. Died at Camp Bartow, Va., August 28, 1801. 
HOLM AN, JAMES T.— 

Private, June 15, 1801. Discharged July 20, 1801. Dead. 
HORNE, CULLEN S. S.— 

Private, June 15, 1801. Transferred to Cutts' Battalion March 18, 
1802. Living in Americus, Ga. 

JONES, HENRY T.— 

Private, June 15, 1801. Died at Monterey, Va., April 3, 1802. 
KEMP, BURRELL T.— 

Private, June 15, 1801. Discharged 1802. Died in Albany, Ga. 
KENDRICK, WILLIAM C— 

Private, June 15, 1801. Discharged August 17, 1802— over age. Died 
in Sumter county, Ga. 

KITCHENS, JAMES T.— 

Private, June 15. 1801. Killed at McDowell, Va. 
LADD, GEORGE T.— 

Private, June 15, 1801. Wounded at McDowell, Va. Died of small- 
pox while on furlough in Lee county, Ga., October, 1802. 

LASSITER, ISAAC— 

Private, June 15, 1801. Died in Lynchburg, Va., May 12, 1802. 



Muster Rolls of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 249 

LASSITEK, JOHN— 

Private, June 15, 18G2. Died at Greenbrier River, Va., 18G2. 
LEONAItD, WILLIAM A — 

Private, June 15, 18G1. Killed at Second Manassas. 
LIGGIN, ELISHA W.— 

Private, June 15, 18G1. Discharged April 13, 1862. 

LIVINGSTONE, GEORGE— 
Private, October 12, 18G3. Transferred from Tenth Georgia Bat- 
talion. Killed at Wilderness, Ya. 

LIVINGSTONE, JAMES M.— 

Private, June 15, 18G1, Wounded at Gaines' Farm, and Chancellors- 
ville, Va. Served through the war. Living in Bennett county, 
Texas. 

McCarthy, john w.— 

Private, June 15, ISGl. Wounded at McDowell and Cedar Creek, Ya. 
Served through the war. Died in Terrell county, Ga., 1897. 

McLAIN, THOMAS M.— 
Private, June 15, ISGl. Killed at McDowell, Ya, 

McLENDON, THADDEUS— 
Private, June 15, 18G1. Discharged 18G2. Enlisted in another com- 
mand and was promoted Lieutenant. 

MANN, J. T. L.— 
Private, June 15, 18G1. Discharged 1861. Living in Americus, Ga. 

MANN, R. J. W.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged. Died in Sumter county, Ga. 

MARKET, B. ¥.— 

Private. Recruit. Wounded at Second Manassas. Captured at 
Spottsylvania, Va, Living in Sumter county, Ga. 

MARKET, EMORY W.— 
Private, June 15, 18G1. Died at Greenbrier River, Va., 1861. First 
member of the company to die of disease, 
MARKET, JOSEPH E.— 
Private, June 15, 18G1, Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant Decem- 
ber, 18G1. AVounded at McDowell, Va. Promoted Second and First 
Lieutenant 1862; Captain, June, 1864. Wounded at Fort Stead- 
man, Va,, March 25, 1865. Died in Americus, Ga., 1888. 

^lARKET, THOMAS— 
Private. Recruit. Killed at Sharpsburg, Md. 

MATHEWS, JOHN E.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Promoted Second Sergeant. Wounded at 
Spottsylvania, Va., May 10, 1864, and died next day. 



250 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

MARTIN, J. P.— 
Private, June 15, ISGl. Wounded in Maryland July 9, 18G4. Living 
in Fulton county, Ga. 

MIMS, GEORGE P.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged. Living in Albany, Ga. 

MURPHY, JOHN ^V.— 
Private, June 15, ISGl. Wounded at McDowell, Va., and discharged. 
Living in Americus, Ga. 

NEWBERRY, ISAAC J.— 

Private, June 15, 18G1. Discharged March 25, 18G2. Died in Dooly 
county, Ga. 
OGLETREE, ABRAHAM H.— 

Private, June 15, 18G1. AVounded at Second Manassas and Mine 
Run, Va. Appointed Company Commissary. Served through the 
war. Dead. 
OGLETREE, WILLIAM H.— 
Private, March 27, 18G4. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Served 
through the war. Dead. 

O'HARA, THOMAS— 

Private, June 15, 186L Captured at Front Royal, Ya. Supposed to 
have died. Never heard of afterwards. 
PAGE, JOHN B.— 

Private, June 15, 18G1. Killed at Sharpsburg, Md. 
PARHAM, MATHEW B.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Died at Camp Allegheny, Va., 1861. 
PICKETT, ROBERT L.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Allegheny, Va., and Second 
Manassas. Served through the war. 

PIERCE, WILLIAM— 
Private, March 1, 1864. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Supposed 
to have died, as he fell from exhaustion on the road near Freder- 
icksburg, Va., and has never been heard of since. 
POWLAGE, F. G., Dr.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Promoted Hospital Steward. Promoted 
Chaplain Twelfth Georgia Regiment May 6, 1864. Resigned. Sup- 
posed to be living in Alabama. 

PRYOR, WILLIAM A.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Served through the war. Living near Tyler, 
Texas. 

RAG AN, JAMES W.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md., and dis- 
charged. Died in Terrell county, Ga. 



Muster Rolls of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 251 

RAIFORD, HENRY B.— 
Private, June 15, 18G1. Wounded at McDowell, Va. Wounded and 
captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Served through the war. Died in 
Americus, Ga., 1898. 

RANDIT, FRANCIS— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged 1861. 

RANDIT, HENRY J.— 
Private, June 15, 18G1. Wounded at Fredericksburg, and captured 
at Spottsylvania, Va. Served through the war. Dead. 

RANDIT, JEREMIAH W.— 
Private, June 15, 18G1. Discharged February 3, 1862. 

RANSOM, WASHINGTON— 
Private, March 22, 1864. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va., May 10, 
1864. Supposed to have died in Elmira prison, as nothing has ever 
been heard of him since. 

RAY, ALLEN W.— 
Private, June 15. 1861. Killed at McDowell, Va. 

REDDING, CRAWFORD— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 

REESE, JOEL J.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged November 18, 1862. Died soon 
afterwards in Schley county, Ga. 

RIVERS, MARK A.— 

Private, April 15, 1864. Served through the war. Moved to Alabama. 

REVIERE, R. T.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Sick when the company left for Vu-ginia. 
After recovery joined another command from Sumter county, and 
became a commissioned officer. 

RYLANDER, A. E.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Killed in. battle at Gaines' Mill, Va., 1864. 

SASCER, JOHN— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Va., and discharged. 

SIMMONS, J. E.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Va. Served through 
the war. 

SMALL, STEPHEN W.— 
Private, April 15, 1864. Wounded at Spottsylvania, Va. Served 
through the war. Died in Sumter county, Ga., 1897. 

SMITH, BLACKSHEAR— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Va., and discharged. 
Enlisted in another command and was killed at Atlanta, Ga. 



252 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

SNELLGROVE, JOSEPH J.— 

Private, June 15, 1801. Wounded at McDowell, Va., and discharged. 
Living in Smithville, Ga. 
STE^^•AKT, BENJAMIN F.— 

Private, June 15, 1801. Discharged and died soon afterwards. 

STEWART, THOMAS J.— 

Private, June 15, 1801. Served through the war. Living in Smith- 
ville, Ga. ' 
STEAVART, WASHINGTON— 
Private, June 15, 1801. Discharged, A member of the South Geor- 
gia Methodist Conference for many years. 
SURRENCY, JAMES— 
Private, September 10, 1803. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Sup- 
posed to have died in Elmira prison, as nothing has ever been heard 
of him since. 
SUTTON, WARREN— 
Private, June 15, 1801. Died at Allegheny, Va., January 0, 1802. 

TAYLOR, ISAAC— 

Private, September 20, 1803. Killed at Gettysburg, Pa. 

TAYLOR, JESSE M.— 

Private, June 15, 1801. Wounded at Allegheny, Ya. Killed at Sec- 
ond Manassas. 
TEEL, BRADLEY— 
Private, June 15, 1801. Wounded at McDowell, Ya. Wounded in 
battle. Surrendered at Appomattox, Ya. Living in Ellaville, Ga. 

THOMAS, GEORGE W.— 

Private, June 15, 1801. Promoted Sergeant-Major, and Adjutant 
Twelfth Georgia Regiment. Wounded and captured at Sharps- 
burg, Md. Promoted Assistant Surgeon Twelfth Georgia Regi- 
ment. Served through the war. Died in Eatonton, Ga., Febru- 
ary 2, 1902. 
THOMAS, JOSEPH L.— 

Private, June 15, 1801. Wounded at McDowell, Ya., and discharged. 
Died since the war. 
THOMPSON, D. P.— 

Private, September 20, 1803. Killed at Spottsylvania, Ya., May 10, 
1864. 

TIMMONS, JAMES— 

Private, March 1, 1864. Wounded at Fort Steadman, Ya. Served 
through the w^ar. 
TINSLEY, THOMAS H. L.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Killed at Cedar Run, Ya. 



Muster Rolls of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 253 

TISON, JOHN T.— 

Private, October 22, 18G2. Transferred from Cutts' Artillery. Killed 
in battle. 

TOMLINSON, JAMES M.— 

Private, June 15, ISGl. Promoted Corporal and Third Sergeant. 
Wounded at Spottsylvania, Ya., and in another battle. Served 
through the war. Living at Beloit, Lee county, Ga. 

TORBERT, WILLIAM T.— 

Private, June 15, 18G1. Captured at Allegheny Mountain, Va. 
Wounded at Spottsylvania, and killed at Winchester, Ya., 1864. 

WADS WORTH, GEORGE S.— 
Private, June 15, 18G1. Died of measles at Greenbrier River, Va., 
1861. 

WADSWORTH, MICAJAH J.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged. 

WALLACE, JOHN B.— 

Private. Recruit. Served through the war. Died in Sumter county, 
Ga. 

WALLACE, NATHANIEL H.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Allegheny, Ya. Promoted 
Junior Second Lieutenant July 22, 1862. W^ounded at Spottsyl- 
vania, Ya., May 8, 1864, and died from wound. 

WARREN, JAMES M.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged March 25, 1862. 

WATTS, GEORGE S.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged 1861. Living in St. Louis, Mo. 

WESTBROOKS, J. M. R.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged March, 1862. Died in Americus, 
Ga., 1897. 

WHITE, N. H.— 
Private, April 15, 1864. Wounded at Spottsylvania, Ya., May 8, 
1864. Surrendered at Appomattox, Ya. Died since the war. 

WILKINSON, JAMES— 

Private, August 12, 1861. Died at Camp Allegheny, Ya., March 9, 

1862. 

WILLIS, JAMES— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 

WILSON, E. A.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged. Died in Sumter county, Ga., 

1888. 



254 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

WILSON, ISAAC L.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged 1862. Enlisted in another com- 
mand. Promoted Captain. Killed at Griswoldville, Ga. 

WILSON, JOHN W.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged March 14, 1862. Died in Sumter 
county, Ga., 1880. 

WRIGHT, AUGUSTUS- 
Private, June 15, 1861. Killed at Wilderuess, Va. 

WRIGHT, THADDEUS A.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Va., and in another 
battle. Died since the war. 



Mustek Rolls of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 255 



MUSTER ROI.L OF JONES COUNTY VOLUNTEERS, 
COMPANY B, TWELFTH REGIMENT, GEORGIA 
VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, C. S. A. 

JONES COUNTY, GEORGIA. 

PITTS, PEYTON T.— 

Captain, June 9, 1801. Resigned October 17, 1861. Died 1885. 
GLOVER, N. S.— 

First Lieutenant, June 9, 1861. Resigned August 1, 1861. Died 1878. 
BOWEN, JOHN H.— 

Second Lieutenant, June 9, 1861. Promoted First Lieutenant Janu- 
ary 22, 1863. Killed at Spottsylvania, Va., after capture. 
FINNEY, O. H. P.— 

Junior Second Lieutenant, June 9, 1861. Resigned August, 1861. 
Died in Jones county, Ga., 1881. 

HARDEMAN, ISAAC— 
First Sergeant, June 9, 1861. Promoted First Lieutenant August 10, 
1861; Captain, May 8, 1862. Captured at Second Manassas, and 
exchanged. Promoted Major January 22, 1863; Lieutenant-Colonel, 
June 9, 1863. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va., May 10, 1864. Re- 
leased from Fort Delaware July 24, 1865. Living in Macon, Ga. 

BEALL, JOSIAH N.— 

Second Sergeant, June 9, 1861. Promoted First Lieutenant Novem- 
ber 8, 1861. Woumded at Sbarpsburg, Md. Promoted Captain Jan- 
uary 22, 1863. In command of Twelfth Georgia Regiment at sur- 
render of Lee's army, April, 9, 1865. Died in Atlanta, Ga., since 
the war. 

WOODALL, ROBERT, Jr.— 
Third Sergeant, June 9, 1861. Lost leg at Spottsylvania, Va., and 
died from wound. 
BARRON, WILLIAM— 
Fourth Sergeant, June 9, 1861. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant 
September 2, 1861. Died in service October 10, 1861. 
PENDER, WILLIAM A.— 
First Corporal, June 9, 1861. Killed at Fredericksburg, Va. 

BALKCOM, LaFAYETTE— 
Second Corporal, June 9, 1861. Transferred to Company A, Fourth 
Georgia Regiment. Living in James, Ga. 

CHILDS, SAMUEL L.— 
Third Corporal, June 9, 1861. Transferred to Forty-fifth Georgia 
Regiment. Living in Staunton, Va. 



256 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

HUNT, HENRY P — 

Fourth Corporal, June 9, 18G1. Killed thirty yards in advance of 
his companj^ at Sharpsburg, Md. 

BARBEE, JOSEPH C — 

Private, May 6, 1864. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Died since 
the war. 
BARBEE, MARTIN V.— 

Private, June 29, 1SG4. Died in service. 

BARFIELD, A. H.— 

Private, June 9, 1801. Survived the war. Living in Wayside, Ga., 
1898. 
BARFIELD, JAMES M.^ 

Private, June 9, 18(31, Lost arm at Cedar Creek, Va., and discharged. 

BARFIELD, S. F.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Discharged April 10, 1862. 

BARNES, JAMES T.- 

Private, June 9, 1861. Died at Westview Camp, Va., April 26, 1862. 

BARNES, J. W.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Discharged. Living in Florida. 

BARRON, WILLIAM C— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Discharged November 10, 1861. Dead. 

BEALL, ALBERT B.— 

Private, July 24, 1863. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va., and died in 
prison. 
BEALL, EGBERT— 

Private, August 19, 1863. Captured August 21, 1864. Living in 
Texas. 
BENNETT, ALBERT A.— 

Private, January 31, 1832. V^ounded at McDowell, Va. Captured at 
Spottsylvania, Va., and died in prison. 
BR ANNAN, THOMAS— 

Pilvate, March 26, 1862. Killed at Second Manassas. 
P.LiANTLEY, THOMAS— 

Private, June 9, ISGl. Killed at Fredericksburg, Va. 
BRINKLEY, ROBERT W.— 

Private, May 18, 1862. V/ounded at Mine Run, Va., and died from 
wound November 29, 1803. 
BROWN, BERRY F.— 

Private, August 9, 1861. 
BROWN, THOMAS S.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Died in service. 



Muster Rolls of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 257 

BURGY, HENRY C — 

Private, June 9, 18G1. Discharged July 23, 1861. Dead. 

CARD, JULIUS J.— 
Private, June 9, 1861. Promoted Corporal. Killed at Gettysburg, 
Pa. 
CHAMBERS, ROBERT A.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Discharged July 25, 1861. Dead. 
CHRISTIAN, JOSEPH R.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Killed at Petersburg, Va., 1864. 
CHRISTIAN, WILLIAM R.— 
Private, June 9, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Va. Lost arm at 
Cedar Mountain, Ya., and discharged. Died since the war. 
CHILDS, JOHN A.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Survived the war. Living in Jones county, 
Ga. 
CHILDS, THOMAS J.— 
Private, June 9, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Staunton, 
Va. 
CLARK, W. FRANK— 

Private, March 12, 1864. Appointed Musician. Surrendered at Ap- 
pomattox, Va. Living In Gray, Ga. 

CLARK, VAN BUREN— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Lost part of foot at Spottsylvania, Va. Liv- 
ing in Fortville, Ga. 

CRITTENDEN, THOMAS J.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Promoted First Sergeant November 8, 1861. 
Wounded at Allegheny, and McDowell, Va. 
CURRY, GEORGE S.— 

Privare, June 9, 1861. Killed at Wilderness, Va. 
CURRY, GREEN R.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Living in 
Forsyth, Ga. 

DAME, JOHN W.— 

Private, March 18, 1864. Killed at Wilderness, Va. 
DAVIDSON, WILLIAM— 

Private, April 4, 1862. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Dead. 
DEMMING, JAMES H.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Died in service. 
DORSEY, HARRY— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Killed at Winchester, Va., September 19, 1864. 
FENNELL, DAVID R. T.— 

Private, March 26, 1862. Died in service. 
I7d-c 



258 Doles-Cook Brigadk. 

FEXNELL, EPHRIAM M.— 
Private, Juue 9, ISGl. Died at Camp Allegheny, Va., December 20,. 
ISGl. 

FEXNELL, PIARVEY C— 

Private, June 9, ISGl. Survived tlie v^'ar. Died in Macon, Ga. 
FENNELL, JAMES M.— 

Private, June 9, 1801. Killed at Sharpsburg, Md. 
FINNEY, — . — .— 

Private, May, 18G2. Died a few days after enlistment. 
FRANKS, FRANCIS M.— 

Private, June 9, 18G1. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Died sincef 
the war in Louisiana. 

FRANKS, RICHMOND C— 

Private, June 9, 18G1. Captured at Gettysburg, Pa., and died in 
prison. 
FRANKS, WILLIAM— 
Private, June 9, 18G1. Died in service May 27, 18G2. 

FUNDERBURKE, WILLIAM— 

Private, May 10, 18G2. Captured at Front Royal, and Spottsylvania,. 
Va. Died since the war. 
GANTT, JAMES B.— 

Private, March, 1862. Promoted First Sergeant January, 1863^. 
Wounded twice at Gettysburg, Pa. Wounded at Wilderness, V.«i., 
]SIay 5, 1864. Wounded and permanently disabled at Cedar Creek, 
Va., October 19, 1864. Paroled at Milledgeville, Ga., 1865. Living 
in Clinton, Mo. 

GIBSON, THOMAS J.— 

Private. Juue 9, 18G1. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md., and discharged. 
Living in Mexia, Texas. 
GIBSON, WILLIAM G.— 

Private, June 9, 18G1. Died in service ISOl. 

GLOVER, JOHN T.— 
Private, June 9, 18G1. Wounded at Allegheny, and McDowell, Va. 
Living at Pope's Ferry, Ga. 

GLOVER, NATHANIEL S.— 
Private, June 9, 1861. Discharged August, 1861. Died 1878. 

GOOLSBY, JAMES— 
Private, June 9, 1861. Discharged July 25, 1864. Dead. 

GOOLSBY, THOMAS— 
Private, June 9, 1861. Died in service 1863. 

GOOLSBY, WILLIAM H.— 

Private, May 18, 18G2. Died at Kelly's Ford, Va., November 5, 1863. 



Muster Rolls op the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 259 

GORDON, ZACHARIAH P.— 

Private, June 9, 18G1. Discharged December 19, 1861. Dead. 
GRAY, AVILLIAM C— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Died at Camp Allegheny, Ya., August 11, 1861. 
GREEN, FRANCIS P.— 
Private, June 9, 1861. Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa. Living at Way- 
side, Ga. 

GREEN, JAMES T.— 
Private, September 4, 1861. Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa. Died since 
the war. 

GREEN, THORNBERRY— 

Private, May 1, 1862. Died in service June 13, 1862. 
GREEN, WILLIAM H.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Killed at SecoAd Manassas. 
GREEN, Vv'ILLIAM M.— 

Private, March 22, 1862. Wounded at McDowell, Va. Living in 
Clinton, Ga. 

GRESHAM, MARMADUKE— 

Private, March 26, 1862. Died in service June 14, 1862. 
HARDEMAN, FRANK— 

Private, March 26, 1862. Detailed as Courier on staff of General 
Ewell. Died in service at Staunton, Va. 

HARDEMAN, JOHN— 

Private, March 26, 1862. Discharged. Living in Haddock, Ga. 
HARRIS, IVEY— 

Private, March 26, 1862. Discharged July 13, 1862. Died 1870. 
HAWKINS, JOHN J.— 

Private, March 26, 1862. Served through the war. Died after the 
surreuder. 

HEARNDON, CHARLES J.— 

Private, March 26, 1862. Served through the war. Moved from 
Jones county after the surrender. Supposed to be dead. 
HENDERSON, ALFRED— 
Private, March 26, 1862. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant, No- 
vember 8, 1861. Killed at Sharpsburg, Md. 

HICKMAN, THOMAS H.— 

Private, August 1, 1863. Wounded near Washington, D, C, and died 
from wound. Buried at Arlington. 

HUNTER, JAMES C— 

Private, March 10, 1862. Served through the war. Living in Dooly 
county, Ga. 



260 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

JACKSON, JOHN— 

Private, March 20, 1SG2. Wounded near Washington, D. C. Sur- 
rendered at Appomattox, Va. Living in Texas. 
JACKSON, JOHN A.— 
Private, June 9, 18G1. Wounded near Washington, D. C, and died 
from wound. Buried at Arlington. 

JACKSON, JONAH— 

Private, March 2G, 18G2, Wounded at McDowell, Va. Living in 
Pennsylvania. 
JACKSON, JOSHUA— 

Private, June 9, 18G1. Killed at McDowell, Va. 
JACKSON, WILLIAM G.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Died 1895. 

JAMES, ABEL— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Living in 
Clinton, Ga. 

JAMES, GREEN B.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va., and died in 
prison. 

JAMES, THOMAS J.— 

Private, June 2, 1863. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. 

JAMES, WILLIAM T.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Captured and died in prison. 

JARRELL, JOHN A. F.— 
Private, June 9, 1861. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Living in 
Macon, Ga. 

JARRELL, THOMAS F.— 

Private. Recruit. Died in service 1864. 

JONES, G. T.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Discharged July 22, 1861. Died during the 
war. 

JONES, THOMAS L.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Killed at Spottsylvania, Va. 

JONES, THOMAS L.— 
Private, March 26, 1862. Killed at Wilderness, Va. 

LANE, GREEN T.— 
Private, June 9, 1861. Died in Richmond, Va., July 8, 1862. 

LANE, WILLIAM A.— 

Private, May 10, 1862. Killed at Wilderness, Va. 

LEWIS, GEORGE D.— 
Private, June 9, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Served 
through the war. Died in Texas 1886. 



Muster Rolls of the Twelfth Geokgii Regiment. 261 

McKILLIAN, HENRY— 

Private, Jime 9, 1801. Discharged April 10, 1862. Died during the 
war, 
MADDOX, WILLIAM— 
Private, June 9, 18G1. Killed at Petersburg, Va., 1804. 

MARSH, JAMES W.— 
Private, June 9, 1801. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Living in 
Pike county, Ga. 
MASON, JOSEPH J.— 
Private, August 7, 1801. Wounded at McDowell, Va. Captured at 
Spottsylvania, Va. 
.AIASON, WILLIAM H.— 
Private, August 7, ISOl. Died at Camp Bartow, Va., August 30, 1861. 

MASSENGALE, JAMES C— 
Private, June 9, 1801. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Survived the 
war. Died 1871. 
MAY, O. H. P.— 
Private, June 9, 1861. Wounded and captured at Spottsylvania, Va. 
Served through the war. Died 1899. 

MERCER, JESSE H.— 
Private, June 9, 1801. Wounded at McDowell, and died from wound 
at Staunton, Va., June 10, 1802. 
MERCER, NEWTON W.— 

Private, October 22, 1803. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. 
MIDDLEBROOKS, DAVID T.— 

Private, June 9, 1801. Wounded at McDowell, Wilderness an(? 
Petersburg, Va. 

MIDDLEBROOKS, EBENEZER— 

Private, June 9, 1801. Dead. 
MOORE, HENRY T.— 

Private, June 9, 1801. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Living in 
Griswoldville, Ga. 
NEWBY, WILLIAM F.— 

Private, July 9, 1801. Killed at Wilderness, Va. 

PHILLIPS, .JAMES— 

Private, May, 1802. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. 
PITTS, ABNER F.— 

Private, June 9, 1801. Discharged July 12, 1801. Died 1802. 
RENFROE, JAMES F.— 
Private, June 9, 1801. Wounded at McDowell, Va., and Sharps- 
burg, Md. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Living in Magnolia, 
Ark. 



262 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

RICKETS, RICHARD S.— 

Private, March 26, 1802. Died since the war. 
RITCHIE, THOMAS J.— 

Private, June 0, ISGl. Died at Lynchburg, Va., 18G3. 
RITCHIE, WILLIAM H.— 

Private, June 9, 1801. Died in service January, 1862. 
ROBERTS, JOHN S.— 

Private, June 9, 1801. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. 
ROWLAND, JAMES D.— 

Private, June 9, 1801. Dischai-ged 180i. Died 1875. 
RUSSAU, ABNER— 

Private, June 9, 1801. Killed at Wilderness, Va. 
RUSSAU, EZEKIEL— 

Private, June 9, 1801. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Died since 
the war. 

SCOGGINS, JOHN H.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Died in service 1862. 
SEABORN, JAMES— 

Private, June 9, 1801. Died at Camp Allegheny', Va., August 20, 1801. 

SIMPSON, LEVI— 
Private, June 9, 1801. Died at Stribling Springs, Va., December 20, 

1801. 

SMITH, LEONIDAS— 
Private, June 9, 1801. Wounded at Second Manassas. Discharged 
October 31, 1803. Living in Blountsville, Ga. 
SMITH, ROBERT J.— 
Private, June 9, 1801. Wounded at Winchester, Va. Served through 
the war. Died since the surrender. 

gMITH WILLIAM J.— 
Private, June 9, 1801. Died at Monterey, Va., August 21, 1801. 

SPEER, GEORGE— 
Private, June 9, 1801. Wounded in battle 1804, and died from wound. 

STRIPLING, ALLEN M.— 

Private, June 9, 1801. 
STRIPLING, DAVID R.— 

Private, 1862. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md., September 17, 1862, 
and discharged November 24, 1862. 

STEWART, JOHN F.— 
Private, June 9, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 

STEWART, SILAS— 
Private, June 9, 1861. Died in service 1862. 





PEYTOX T. PITTS 
Captain Company B, Twelfth Georgia Re^ 
iment. 



JOHN H. BOWEX 

First Lieutenant Company B, Twelfth 

Georgia Regiment. 





JAMES A. WALKER 

Second Lieutenant Company B, Twelfth 
Georgia Regiment, 



WILLIAM BARROX 

Junior Second Lieutenant Company B, 

Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 








JOHN m'mILLAN 
Captain Company C, Twelfth Georgia Regi- 
ment. 



THOMAS W. HARRIS 
Captain Company C, Twelf tli Georgia Regi- 
ment. 





JOHN W. DIXON 

First Lieutenant Company C, TwelftU 

Georgia Regiment, 



JAMES T. WOODWARD 

Junior Second Lieutenant Comjany D. 

Twelftli Georgia Regiment. 



Muster Rolls of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 263 

THIGPEN, ZACHARIAH— 

Private, Jiiue 9, 18G1. Discharged account disability and over age 
July 18, 18G1. Died in Jones county, Ga. 

WALKER, JAMES A.— 
Private, June 9, 18G1. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant Novem- 
ber 1, 1862; Second Lieutenant January 22, 1863. Captured at 
Spottsylvania, Ya. Paroled June 17, 1865. Living in Wayside, Ga. 

WARD, URIAH G.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Captured at battle at Allegheny, Ya., Decem- 
ber 13, 1861. Served through the war. Died 1869. 

WARREN, O. L.— 
Private, June 4, 1864. Not remembered by the members of this com- 
pany. Fate unknown. 

WELLS, FRANKLIN— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Died at Camp Allegheny, Ya., August 18, 1861. 

WHIDBY, L. T.— 
Private, June 9, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Ya. 

WHIDBY, THOMAS J.— 
Private, June 9, 1861. Wou^ded at Second Manassas, and Winches- 
ter, Ya. Surrendered at Appomattox, Ya. Living in Gray, Ga. 

WILCOXON, WILEY F.— 
Private, June 9, 1861. Promoted Fourth Sergeant 1861; Junior Sec- 
ond Lieutenant, 1864. Captured May 8, 1864. Died in Eatonton, 
Ga., February 1, 1901. 
WILLIAMSON, WILEY J.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Discharged July 24, 1861. Died during the 
war. 
YOUNGBLOOD, GEORGE W.— 
Private, October 1, 1863. 



264 Doles-Cook Brigade. 



MUSTER ROLL OF DAVIS RIFLES, COMPANY C,. 
TWELFTH REGIMENT, GEORGIA VOLUNTEER 
INFANTRY, C. S. A. 

macon county, georgia. 
McMillan, john— 

Captaiu, June 15, 1S61. Killed at McDowell, Va. 

CARSON, JOHN T.— 
First Lieutenant, June 15, 1861. Promoted Captain May 8, 1862;. 
Major, June 9, 1863. Captured March, 1864. Released July, 1864. 
Wounded at Winchester, Va., September 19, 1864, and died from 
wound a few days afterwards. 

COOK, JOHN R.— 

Second Lieutenant, June 15, 1861. Promoted Assistant Surgeon 
Twelfth Georgia Regiment. Resigned September 20, 1861. 

WORSHAM, ROBERT D.— 
Junior Second Lieutenant, June 15, 1861. Resigned account disease 
August 10, 1861. Died soon afterwards. 

JOHNSON, NEW^TON T.— 

First Sergeant, June 15, 1861. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant 
May 8, 1862; Second Lieutenant, 1863; First Lieutenant, June 9, 
1863; Adjutant Twelfth Georgia Regiment, September 28, 1863.. 
Captured and released 1863. Wounded at Wilderness. Va.. and re- 
tired account disability. Died since the war in Macon, Ga. 

McCASKILL, W. N.— 

Second Sergeant, .June 15, 1861. Promoted First Sergeant May 8,, 
1862. Killed at Cedar Run, Va., August 9, 1862. 

McCASKILL, DONALD C— 
Third Sergeant, June 15, 1861. Died of disease September 20, 1861.. 

DAVIS, REUBEN B.— 
Fourth Sergeant, June 15, 1861. Promoted Second Sergeant May 8,^, 
1862. Killed at McDowell, Va. 

DUKES, WILLIAM F.— 

First Corporal, June 15, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Va., and died 
from wound May 9, 1862. 



Muster Rolls of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 265 

MATHIS, COLUMBUS C— 

Second Corporal, June 15, 18G1. Promoted Fourth Sergeant May 8 
1SG2; First Sergeant, August 9, 18G2; Second Lieuten,ant September 
28, 1SG3. Killed at Winchester, Va., September 19, 1864. 
HARRELL, J. W — 

Third Corporal, June 15, 1861. Killed at McDowell, Va., May S. 
1862. 

PRICE, JOHN W.— 
Fourth Corporal, June 15, 1861. Promoted First Sergeant Novem- 
ber 1, 1863. Wounded at Spottsylvania, Ya., and disabled. 

BANNON, WILLIAM C— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Promoted Corporal. Wounded at Sharps- 
burg, Md. Promoted Third Sergeant October 13, 1862; Sergeant- 
Major, November 1, 1863. Acted as Adjutant Twelfth Georgia 
Regiment 1864 an.d 1865. Captured at Fort Steadmau, Va. Moved 
to Hudson, New York, after the surrender. Died suddenly while- 
in Macon, Ga., October 20, 1901. 

BARROW, WILLIAM J.~- 

Private, May 1, 1862. Killed at Cross Keys, Va., 1862. 

BEAVERS, S. M.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Promoted Color-Bearer. Wounded at Chan 
cellorsville, Va. Captured at Gettysburg, Pa., and exchanged 
Wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864. 

BEDENBAUGH, JACOB W\— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged August, 1861— under age. 

BEELAND, BENJAMIN— 
Private, Ju^e 15, 1861. Promoted Fourth Sergeant October 15, 1862. 
Killed at Spottsylvania, Va., May 12, 1864. 

BEGGS, GEORGE W.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Second Manassas. Captured at 
Spottsylvania, Va. Served through the war. Living. 

BOWMAN, LUCIUS B.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded May 12, 1861. Wounded and cap- 
tured at Spottsylvania, Va. 

BRANTLEY, JOHN W.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Killed at Cold Harbor, V-a., June 3, 1S64. 

BRIDGES, JOHN W.— 
Private, April 1, 1864. Detailed as teamster, Rodes' Division. Sur- 
rendered at Appomattox, Va. Living. 

BROWN, THOMAS W.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded and disabled at McDowell, Va. 
Detailed in Winder hospital 1863. Discharged 1864. Died since, 
the war. 



266 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

BRUMBELO, WILLIAM A.— 
Private, Juue 15, 1S61. Killed at McDowell, Ya. 

BRYAN, W. A. ("Berry")— 

Private, May, 18(32. Captured at Wilderness, Ya. Survived the war. 
Died after the surrender. 

BRYAN, JAMES B.— 

Private, June 15, ISGl. Killed at Spottsylvania, Ya., May 12, 18G4. 

BURMAN, ELIJAH— 

Private, June 15, ISGl. Died of disease October, 1801, at GreenbrleB 
River, Ya. 

BUSH, SOLOMON— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged on Surgeon's certificate Novem- 
ber 5, 1861. Died during the war. 

€ARSON, JAMES A.— 

Private, May, 1862. Promoted Sergeant June, 1862. Died of disease 
at hospital in Lynchburg, Ya., August 27, 1862. 

CARSON, ROBERT H.— 

Private, April 1, 1864. Transferred to Company I, Fourth Georgia 
Regiment. Killed at Fort Steadman, Ya. 

CARTER, DAYID J. W.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Surrendered at Appomattox, Ya. Living in 
Reynolds, Ga. 

CHAUNCEY, HENRY— 

Private. Recruit. Killed at Winchester, Ya., September 19, 1864. 

-CHILDREE, DAYID A.— 

Private, March 25, 1863. Wounded at Petersburg, Ya., April 2, 1865. 
Living in Reynolds, Ga. 

CHILDREE, DRURY W.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged on Surgeon's certificate April 12, 
1862. Living. 

€HILDREE, WILLIAM— 

Private, June 30, 1864. Wounded and disabled at Winchester, Ya. 
Died in Service. 

-COOGLE, JOHN T.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Killed at Chancellorsville, Ya. 

€00K, DANIEL J.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded and disabled at McDowell, Ya. 
Discharged. Living in Rochelle, Ga. 

•CORBIN, CICERO B.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Second Manassas. Killed at 
Wilderness, Ya., May 5, 1864. 



Muster Rolls of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 267 

COVINGTON, CHARLES H.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Died of disease September, 1801, at Green- 
brier River, Va. 

CUMMINGS, JAMES G.— 
Private, June 15, ISGl. Wounded and disabled at Cedar Creek, Va, 
Living in Marshallville, Ga. 
DANCE, T. J.— 
Private, June 15, 18(31. Survived the war. Living in Round Mound, 
Ala., 1898. 
DIXON, JOHN W.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Promoted Third Sergeant May 8, 1862. Cap- 
tured at Fort Royal, Va., May 30, 1862. Promoted Junior Second 
Lieutenant June 15, 1862; First Lieutenant, September 28, 1863. 
Wounded near Washington, D. C, Cedar Creek, and Fort Stead- 
man, Va. SuiTendered at Appomattox, Va. Living in Birmlnj*- 
ham, Ala. 
DYESS, WILLIAM H.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Second Manassas. Captured 
and died in prison 1864. Buried at Arlington. 

EASTERLIN, JOSEPH J.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded and captured at Gettysburg, Pa. 
Transferred to Third Georgia Reserves. Living in Montezuma, Ga. 

EICHBAUM, JOSEPH— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Second Manassas. Captured 
1864. Living in Montezuma, Ga. 

ELLIOTT, JAMES— 
Private, April 1, 1864. Missing July, 1864. Never heard of since. 

EPTING, THOMAS P.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Promoted Fourth Corporal May 8, 1862. 
Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md., and died from wound October 12, 
1862. 
OAMMAGE, LEROY— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Died of disease 1862, at Camp Allegheny, Va. 

OAMMAGE, NATHANIEL H.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Promoted Corporal. Killed at Wilderness, 
Va., May 5, 1864. 
GATLIN, L. J.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Promoted Corporal. Discharged account dis- 
ability October, 1861. Died since the war. 

GEE, CHARLES H.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded in battle 1862. Promoted Ser- 
geant 1863. Captured at Greencastle, Pa., 1863. Wounded at 
Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864. Living in Morgan, Ga. 



268 Doles-Cook Bpugadb. 

HALL, WILLIAM A. J.— 
Private, June 15, 18(31. Detailed as teamster 1863. Captured at 
Spottsylvania, Va. Living in Vienna, Ga. 
HAND, A. H. G.— 

Private, June 15, 18G1. Killed at McDowell, Va. 
HARRIMAX, HENRY H.— 
Private, June 15, 1801. Wounded at Winchester, Va. Surrendered 
at Appomattox, Va. Living in Dawson, Ga. 

HARRIS, THOMAS W.— 
Private, June 15, 18G1. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant August 
10, 1861; First Lieutenant, May 8, 1862. Wounded at Cross Keys^ 
Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and Cedar Mountain, Va. Pro- 
moted Captain June 9, 1803. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Re- 
leased after the surrender. Living in Chicago, 111. 
HARRIS, WILLIAM HENRY— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Charlestown, Va. Surrendered 
at Appomattox, Va. Died since the war. 

HILL, BUNT— 
Private, August 31, 1862. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md. Wounded 
at Spottsylvania, Va., May 9, 1804. Served through the war. Dead. 

HILL, GILES— 
Private, April 1, 1864. Captured and died in prison 1864. 

HILL, HENRY C— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded and disabled at Second Manassas. 
Served through the war. Dead. 

HILL, HOWARD— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Transferred to Tenth Georgia Battalion in 
exchange for Bunt Hill, 1862. Died since the war. 

HILL, ROBERT— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Died of disease October 1861. 

HILL, SLAUGHTER— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Fairfax Court House, Va. Sur- 
rendered at' Appomattox, Va. Living in Macon county, Ga. 

HILTON, ABNER— 
Private. Recruit. Wounded and captured at Fort Steadman, Va. 
Living at Hilton Station, Ga. 

HORADY, HENRY Y.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Killed at Sharpsburg, Md. 

HUFFMAN, J. B.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Captured at Wilderness, Va. Served through 
the war. Living in Tupelo, Miss. 



Muster Rolls of the Twelfth Georgia Reglment. 269 

IVERSON, ALFRED— 
Private, June 15, 18G1. Wounded in battle 1SG3. Served through the 
war. Dead. 
JOHNSON. BENJAMIN L.— 

Private, June 15, 18«n. Died of disease September, 1SG2. 
JOHNSON, J. M.— 
Private, June 15, 18G1. Discharged account of disease July 19, ISGl. 
Died during the war. 

JOLLY, JOHN R.— 

Private, May, 18G2. Promoted CoiiDoral and Sergeant. Surrendered 
at Appomattox, Va. Living in Dawson, Ga. 

JOLLY, THOMAS— 

Private, February, 18G5. Captured at Petersburg, Ta., April 1, 1865. 
Died since the war. 

JONES, GREGORY T.— 

Private, March 25, 1862. Wounded at Malvern Hill, Va. Wounded 
at Wilderness, Ya., May 5, 18G4. Served through the war. Dead. 

KILLEBREW, W. H.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Lost leg and captured at Gettysburg, Pa. 
Living in Montezuma, Ga. 

KLECKLEY, JACOB A.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Killed at Cedar Mountain, Ya., August 9, 
1862. 

KLECKLEY, JOHN W.— 
Private. Recruit. Wounded at Wilderness, Winchester and Peters- 
burg, Ya. Died in service. 

LYTLE, JOSEPH F.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Killed at Spottsylvania, Ya. 

LYTLE, WILLIAM H.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Promoted Corporal 1862. Wounded at Sec- 
ond Manassas. Captured at Winchester, Ya. Served through the 
war. Living in Texas. 

LUGUIRE, FRANCIS L.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Killed at Fredericksburg, Ya. 

McBRIDE, BISHOP.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged account disease, and died soon 
afterwards. 

McBRIDE, JAMES W.— 
Private, June 15, J 861. Wounded at Winchester, Ya., and discharged. 
Rejoined company 1862. Surrendered at Appomattox, Ya. Living 
in Oglethorpe, Ga. 



270 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

Mccarty, james madison— 

Private, June 15, ISGl. Died of measles September, 18G1, at Green- 
brier River, Va. 

Mccarty, william a.— 

Private, June 35, 1861. Killed at McDowell, Ya. 

McCASKILL, JOHN B.— 
Private, June 15, ISGl. Discharged 1861— over age. Died during the 
war. 

McDANIEL, CHARLES J.— 
Private, February, 1862, Wounded at McDowell and Fredericksburg. 
Ya. Wounded in battle December 13, 1864. Surrendered at Ap- 
pomattox, Ya. Living in Morgan, Ga. 

McLAIN, JOHN— 
Private. Recruit. Killed at Wilderness, Ya., May 5, 1864. 

MABRY, DANIEL S.— 
Private, December 9, 1862. Captured and died of measles at Point 
Lookout, Md., June 24, 1865. 

MATHEWS, BENJAMIN H.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded and captured at Sharpsburg, Md. 
Died in prison 1864, at Elmira, N. Y. 

MERRITT, LUKE— 
Private, February, 1862. Discharged account disease 1862. 

MILLER, GEORGE W.— 
Private. Recruit. Captured at Spottsylvania, Ya. Died during the- 
war. 

MULKY, B. G.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Ya. Living in. 

Cordele, Ga. 

NEWSOME, HUGH G.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Died of disease 1861, at Greenbrier River, Ya. 

NEWSOME, JEROME B.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Killed at Wilderness, Ya. 

O'BRIEN, RICHARD L.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged account disease 1861. 

PASSMORE, JOHN A.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged account disease 1862. Died dur- 
ing the war. 
PAYNE, CHARLES W.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Died of disease 1861, at Petersburg, Ya. 

PAYNE, JOHN T.- 

Private, April 10, 1862. Died of disease 1863. 



Muster Rolls of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 271 

PAYNE, THOMAS— 
Private, March 25, 18G2. Wounded in battle. Captured 18G4. Died 
since the war. 
PHILLIPS, THOMAS D. A.— 
Private, June 15, 18G1. Detailed in Division Pioneer Corps August 
29, 1862. Served through the war. Dead. 
PRICE, JOHN— 
Private, May 1, 18G2. Died of disease 18G4. 

PRICE, THOMAS W.— 
Private, May 1, 18G2. Killed at Second Manassas. 

REEVES, JOHN W.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Promoted Sergeant Sharpshooters 1862, 
Wounded and disabled at Spottsylvania, Ya. Died since the war. 
ROGERS, WILLIAM DAWSON— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded 1863. Captured 1864. Living in 
Garden Valley, Ga. 
ROLIN, RICHARD J.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Detailed as teamster 1863. Killed at Spott- 
sylvania, Va., May 10, 1864. 

ROUSE, THOMAS— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged account disease 1861. Died dur- 
ing the war. 

SHEALEY, ANDREW W.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Captured at Gettysburg, Pa. Survived the 
war. 
SHEPHERD, ELI. H.— 

Private,. May 1, 1862. Died of disease 1863, in Richmond, Va. 

SHORT, JOHN W.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Died of disease at Greenbrier River, Va., 
1861. 
SLAPPEY, AUGUSTUS- 
Private, April 1, 1864. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Living in 
Doerun, Ga. 

SLIGH, DAVID J.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Va. Lost arm at 
Spottsylvania, Va., May 12, 1864, and died from wound. 

SMITH, GEORGE C— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Promoted Fifth Sergeant. Wounded three 
times during the war. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Living in 
Camilla, Ga. 

SMITH, JAMES H.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Killed at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864. 



272 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

SMITH, JOHN A.— 
Private, June 15, 1S61. Discharged account disease December 9, 
1861. 

SMITH, AVILEY— 

Private, June 15, ISGl, Wou^ded twice while in service. Fired last 
hostile gun of his company and regiment at Appomattox, Va., 
where he surrendered. Living in Grangerville, Ga. 
SOLOMON, CAREY W.— 

Private, June 15, ISOl. Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 
SPRAGGINS, ALLEN— 

Private, April 18, 18G4. Discharged account disability 1864. An in- 
mate of the Georgia Sanatorium at Milledgeville, Ga. 
TAYLOR, JOHN T.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Lost arm at McDowell, Va. Died since the 
war. 

TURNER, GREGORY— 

Private, January, 1864. Captured and died in prison 1864. 
TURNER, JULIUS C— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Cedar Run, Va. Served through 
the war. Dead. 

TURNER, RICHARD F.— 

Private, March 4, 1864. Disabled by disease. Living in Florida. 
TURNER, THOMAS W.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Promoted Coi-poral. Wounded and captured 
near Washington, D. C. Died in, prison 1864. Buried at Arlington. 
UNDERWOOD, ISAIAH— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged account disease July 12, 1861. 
Living. 

WATSON, JOHN W.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Shai-psburg, Md. Lost leg at 
Winchester, Va., September 19, 1864, and died from wound. 

WESTBERRY, RICHARD D.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Va., and discharged. 
Living in. Texas. 

WESTBROOK, R. A.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged 1861 — over age. Living in Al- 
bany, Ga. 
WHITE, WILLIAM F.— 

Private, April 15, 1864. Died of disease 1864. 

WHITTINGTON, C. C— 
Private. Recruit. Killed at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864. 



Muster Rolls of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 273 

WHITINGTON, JOHN— 

Private. Recruit. Killed at Wilderness, Va., May o, 18G4. 
WICKER, WILLIS A.— 

Private, June 15, ISGl. Wounded at Sbarpsburg, Md., and dis- 
charged. Living in Macon, Ga. 

WIGGINS, J. CAD— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged account disease 18G2. Died dur- 
ing the war, 

WILKES, HENRY C— 
Private, June 15, ISGl. Wounded in battle. Surrendered at Appo- 
mattox, Va. Died since the war. 

WOODS, WILLIAM J.— 
Private, June 15, 18G1. Promoted Corj jral. Died of disease 1804. 



I8d-c 



274 Doles-Cook Brigade. 



MUSTER ROLL OF THE CALHOUN RIFLES, COM- 
PANY D, TWELFTH REGIMENT, GEORGIA VOL- 
UNTEER INFANTRY, C. S. A. 

CALHOUN COUNTY, GEORGIA. 

FURLOW, AVILLIAM L — 
Captain, Juue 10, 18G1. Killed at McDowell, Ya., May 8, 18G2. 

PEDEN, DAYID D.— 
First Lieuteuant, June 10, 1801. Promoted Captain May 8, 1862. 
Lost eye in last charge at Malvern Hill, Ya., July 1, 18G2. Disabled 
for some time from this Avound. He was assigned to duty as In- 
spector-General on the staff of Major-General Robert E. Rodes. 
After the battle of Gettysburg he resigned because of impaired 
health, and was assigned to post duty in Georgia. He is now a 
resident of Houston, Tex. 

lYEY, WILLIAM D.— 

Second Lieutenant, June 10, 18G1. Promoted First Lieutenant May 
8, 18G2. Assigned to duty on staff of General Edward Johnson, 
then, in the Ordnance Department of Jackson's Division, and was 
subsequently assigned to General Doles' command as Brigadier 
Ordnance Officer. Captured at Spottsylvania Court House, Ya,, 
May 10, 1SG4. Released from prison June, 18G5. Living in Ar- 
lington, Ga. 
HARYIN, WILLIAM E.— 

Junior Second Lieutenant, June 10, 1861. Resigned account ill 
health December 30, ISGl. Re-enlisted in Captain Dickey's Com- 
pany, Fifty-first Georgia Regiment. Promoted Lieutenant. Was 
captured and died in prison in Elmira, N. Y. 

WOODWARD, JAMES T.— 
First Sergeant, June 10, 1861. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant 
January, 1862. Killed at McDowell, Ya. 

WRIGHT, ABRAHAM B.— 
Second Sergeant, June 10, 1861. Discharged October 30, 1861. Died 
in Calhoun county, Ga. 
ZACHERY, JOHN M.-- 
Third Sergeant, June 10, 1861. Promoted Second Sergeant Novem- 
ber, 1861. Captured May 30, 1862. Transferred to Twenty-sev- 
enth Georgia Regiment. Living in Atlanta, Ga. 

COLLEY, JOHN M.— 
Fourth Sergeant, June 10, 1861. Promoted Third Sergeant Novem- 
ber, 1861. Junior Second Lieutenant 1863. Killed at Spottsylvania, 
Ya., May 10, 1864. 



Muster Kolls of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 275 

DAVIS, H. ARTHUR— 

Fifth Sergeant, June 10, 1S61. Killed at Winchester, Va., Septem- 
ber 19, 1SG4. 

ATKINS, JAMES— 

First Corporal, June 10, 18G1. Appointed IT. S. Collector of Customs, 
and Internal Revenue Officer at Savannah, Ga,, after the war. 
Dead. 
HODNETT, WILLIAM H.— 

Second Corporal, June 10, 1861. Promoted Assistant Surgeon 
Twelfth Georgia Regiment. Died in Calhoun county, Ga. 
BROWN, A. M.— 
Third Corporal, June 10, 1861. Promoted Sergeant April 18, 1862. 
Killed at Sharpsburg, Md. 
McFADDEN, JAMES T.— 
Fourth Corporal, June 10, 1861. Captured at Front Royal, Va. Sur- 
vived the war. Living in South Carolina. 

ALBRITTON. WILLIAM R.— 

Private, December 13, 1862. Killed at Petersburg, Va., April, 1865. 
AUSTIN, JOHN A.— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 
AUTREY, FRANK M.— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Killed near Washington, D. C, July, 1864. 
Buried at Arlington. 
BARWICK, JOSEPH W.— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Died in prison in Washington, D. C. Bur- 
ied at Arlington. 
BASS, MARTIN— 
Private, June 10, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Va. Killed at 
Charlestown, Va., 18^4. 
BEASLEY, BRYANT 

Private. Recruit. Survived the war. Living in Early county, Ga. 
BEASLEY, R. B.— 

Private. Recruit. Survived the war. Living in Early county, Ga. 
BECKOM, WILLIAM A.— 

Private, September 17, 1861. Captured at Front Royal, May 30, 1862. 
Wounded in battle. Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa. Lost arm at 
Spottsylvania, Va. Living in Arlington, Ga. 
BELL, ANDREW J. ("STONEMAN"j— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Died re- 
cently in Calhoun county, Ga. 
BLOCKER, JOHN E.— 
Private, June 10, 1861. Promoted Assistant Surgeon Fourth Georgia 
Regiment. Survived the war. Died after the surrender, near 
Bluffton, Ga. 



276 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

BOYD, A. W. C— 
Private. Recruit. Engaged in several battles. Living. 

BOWICK, B. B.— 

Private. Buried at Arlington, D. C. 
BRADDY, DANIEL P.— 
Private, June 10, 18G1. Wounded on railroad 1803. Died since the 
war in Calhoun county, Ga. 

BRIDGES, WILLIAM H.— 

Private, February 25, 1SG2. Sent to hospital 1862, where it is sup- 
posed he died, as nothing has been heard of him since. 
BROWN, CLARENCE D.— 
Private, December 5, 1861. Wounded at Fort Steadman, Ya. Liv- 
ing near Arlington Ga. 

BROWN, PETER— 
Private, December 5, 1861. Killed at McDowell, Ya. 

BRYAN, DAYID W.— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Lost arm at Spottsylvania, Ya., May 12, ISGL 
Died since the war in Bluffton, Clay county, Ga. 

BUNCH, DAYID A.— 

Private, June 10, 1801. Killed in battle 1864. 
CARSON, JOHN J.— 
Private, June 10, 1861. Wounded at Alleghany, Ya. Captured May 
10, 1862. Wounded at Winchester, Ya. Detailed as ambrlance 
driver. Conveyed General Stonewall .Jackson from the battle-field 
at Chancellorsville, Y^a., after he was wounded. Living in G;-it33n, 
Ga. 

CARSON, THOMAS E.— 
Private, June 10, 1861. Promoted Commissary Sergeant. Served 
through the war. Living in Montana, Texas. 
CHAMPION, JOHN F. W.— 
Private, June 10, 1861. Missing at Wilderness, Ya., May 8, 1864. 
Never heard of afterwards. 
CLINTON, JOSHUA C. B.— 
Private, August 1, 1862. Served through the war. Died in Ala- 
bama after the surrender. 

COBB, OLIYER U.— 
Private, June 10, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Ya. Died in Cal- 
houn, county, Ga. 
COLEMAN, MATHEW— 

Private, .Tune 10, 1861. Killed at McDowell, Ya. 
COLEMAN, WILLIAM T.— 
Private, June 10, 1861. Died of disease at Greenbrier River, Va.^ 
1861. 



Muster Rolls of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 277 

COWART, LAWSOX E.— 

Private, June 10, 1801. Served through the war. Living in Hous- 
ton, Texas. 
COWART, NEWTOX H.— 
Private, June 10, ISOl. Died at Greenbrier River, Va., September 
14, 1861. 
CULEREATH. STARLIXG— 

Private, June 10, 1801. Killed at McDowell, Va. 
DAXIEL, JOHX T. H.— 

Private, June 10, 1801. Captured May 10, 1802. Died in Calhoun 
county, Ga., 1894. 

DAXIEL, ISAAC S.— 
Private, June 10, 1861. Captured May 30, 1862. Living in Early 
county, Ga. 

DAXIEL, WILLIAM W. W.— 

Private, February 25, 1862. Killed at McDowell, Va. 

DAXCER, JAMES— 

Private. June 10, 1801. Died in service Xovember, 1861. 

DAISEY, BEXJAMIX W.— 

Private, February 25, 1862. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va. Sur- 
rendered at Appomattox, Va. Living at Eagle Springs, Texas. 
DARSEY, SETH— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Killed at -McDowell, Va. 

DAVIS, L. H.— 

Private, February 25, 1862. Served through the war. Living in 
Morgan, Ga. 

DORMAXY, JAMES B.— 
Private, June 10, 1861. Captured May 30, 1862. Survived the war. 
Dead. 

DUKE, BEXTOX— 

Private, February 25, 1862. Served through the war. Living in 
Garden, Ala. 
DUKE, BEXJAMIX S.— 
Private, June 10, 1861. Died near Stribbling Springs, Va., Xovember 
23, 1861. 
DUKE, BEXXETT I.— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Promoted Corporal. Captured at Front 
Royal, Va., May 30, 1862. Died in hospital at Stribling Springs, 
Va. 
DUKE, G. B.— 
Private, June 10, 1861. Engaged in numerous battles. Served 
through the war. Living in Texas. 



278 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

DUKE, LEONIDAS— 
Private, Juue 10, ISGl. Captured and died in prison at Washington, 
D. C. 
EDWARDS, FRANKLIN— 
Private, June 10, 18G1. Died of pneumonia at Staunton, Va., De- 
cember 25. ISGl. 

EUBANKS, ENOCH— 
Private, June 10, 1801. Wounded at McDoTvell, Ya., Second Manas- 
sas, and Gettysburg, Pa. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Died 
since the war, 
FAIN, EBENEZER— 

Private, June 10, 18G1. Wounded at McDowell, Ya. Served through 
the war. Living at Jeff, Calhoun county, Ga. 
FENTRESS, JOHN T.— 

Private, June 10, 18G1. Died in camp, 1863. 

FORRESTER, WILLIAM W.— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Captured at Front Royal, Ya., May 30, 1862. 
Lost leg at Chancellorsville, Ya. Died since the war. 

GLISSON, HENRY— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Discharged account disabilty December, 
1861, and died in hospital in Staunton, December 25, 1861. 
GODWIN, JAMES— 

Private, Jun,. 10, 1861. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Ya. Captured 
at Gettysburg, Pa. Never heard of since. 
HALL, WILLIAM B.— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Ya. Served through 
the war. Killed in Louisiana after the surrender. 
HARRIS, DAYID W.— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Wounded at Second Manassas, and died from 
wound. 

HARRIS, JOHN K.— 
Private, August 10, 1862. Transferred from Company B. Provost 
Battalion. Wounded May 31, 1864, and died from wound. 

HARRIS, NICHOLAS D.— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Ya. Died of 
pneumonia in camp, 1863. 
HAY, JOHN D.— 

Private, June 10, 18G1. Captured at Front Royal, Ya., May 30, 1862. 
Served through the war. Dead. 

HOLT, WILLIAM R.— 
Private, June 10, ISGl. Killed at McDowell, Ya. 

HOOD, JAMES A.— 

Private, May 6, 1862. Wounded in battle, and discharged. Died 
since the war. 



Mustek Rolls of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 279 

INGRAM, AUGUSTUS D.— 

Private, May S, 18G1*. AVounded at Cbancellorsville, Va. Living in 
Bliiffton, Ga. 

INGRAM, DAVID BRINSON— 

Private, December 17, 1SG2. Captured and died in prison at El- 
mira, N. Y. 
INGRAM, D. W.— 

Private, December 17, 1SG2. Survived the war. Died in Calboun 
county, Ga. 

INGRAM, DANIEL, Jr.— 

Private, December 17, 1SG2. Survived the war. Died in Calboun 
county, Ga. 

INGRAM, JAMES L.— 

Private, May 8, 18G2. Wounded at Cross Keys, Va, Living at Pease 
Creek, Texas. 
INGRAM, JOHN W. ("Comodore")— 

Private, June 10, ISGl. Survived the war. Died in Calboun county, 
Ga., 1898. 
IVEY, ROBERT P.— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Wotmded at Fredericksburg, Ya. Served 
tbrougb tbe war. Living in Sbellman, Ga. 

JACKSON, THOMAS J.— 

Private, June 10, 18G1. Wounded at McDowell, Ya. Living in 
Gracey, Fla. 
JOHNSON, JACOB C— 

Private, June 10, 18G1. Wounded at McDowell, Ya. Died in hos- 
pital while in service. 

JONES, J. P.— 

Private. Recruit. Wounded at Wilderness, Ya. 

JONES, JOHN T. B.— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Ya. Wounded in 
battle, October, 1862. Surrendered at Appomattox, Ya. Living 
at Cow Boy P. O., Texas. 

JONES, WILLIAM T.— 

Private, June 10. 1861. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Ya., and dis- 
charged. Died near Dawson, Ga., since the war. 
KEEL, HANSEL— 

Private. Recruit. Killed at Front Royal, Ya. 
KEEL, WILLIAM J.— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Wounded at Highbridge, Ya., April 6, 
1865. Living in Leary, Ga. 
KELLY, JARED N.— 
Private, June 10, 1861. Died at Greenbrier River, Ya., September 
25, 1861. 



280 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

KNIGHT, THOMAS J.— 

Private, June 10. ISGl. Captured at Front Royal, Va., May 30, 
18G2. Missing at Sharpsburg, Md., and never heard of since. 
LAING, D. Q.— 

Private, June 10, ISGl. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md., and died 
from wound. 

LAINEY, NOAH S.— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Captured at Front Royal, Ya. Promoted 
Fourth Sergeant. Living in Fort Worth, Texas. 
LEE. WILLIAM R.— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Died at hospital in Staunton, Va., July 3, 
1864. 

LEWIS. EDWIN R.— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Wounded at McDowell. Ya. Detailed in 
Ordnance Department. Captured, and died in prison, 1863. 
LEWIS, JOHN W.— 
Private, June 10. 1861. Captured at Front Royal, Ya., May 30, 1862. 
Served through the war. Living near Hawkinsville, Ga. 
LEWIS, SAMUEL N.— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Died at Greenbrier River, Ya., September 
25, 1861. 

LEWIS, WILLIAM A.— 
Private, June 10, 1861. Died at Mount Crawford, Ya., October 7, 
1861. 

LITTLE, DAYID W.— 
Private. June 10, 1861. Died at Greenbrier River, Ya., September 
7, 1861. 
LOMAX, ROBERT A.— 
Private, June 10, 1861. Discharged account disal^lity, August 25, 
1861. Died in Calhoun county, Ga. 

LONG, N. T.— 
Private, June 10, 1861. Killed in Yalley of Yirginia. 

LOWE, GEORGE H.— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Promoted corporal April 18, 1862. Captured 
at Front Royal, Ya., May 30, 1862. Promoted Fifth Sergeant. 
Lost arm at Wilderness, Ya. Living in Pelham. Ga. 

LUMLEY, COOT— 

Private. Recruit. Killed at Wilderness, Xa. 

McCALL, MARTIN C— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Surrendered at Appomattox, Ya. Moved to 
South Carolina. Living when last heard from in South Carolina. 
McMATH, JOHN— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Killed at McDowell, Ya. 



Muster Eolls of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 281 

McMATH, ZED— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Captured at Front Royal, Va., May 30, 18G2. 
Served tliroug-li the war. Living in Americus, Ga. 

McXAIR, DU^XAX B.— 

Private, June 10, 1S<J1. Supposed to have been killed at Fisher's 
Hill, Va. 

McXAIR, JOHN F.— 

Private. June 10, 18G1. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Died since 
the war. 

McNAIR. ROBERT— 

Private. Recruit. Died at Hospital in Liberty, Va., August 3, 1862. 
McXAIR, WILLLIM J.— 

Private, June 10, 1801. Killed at Second Manassas. 
MAXSFIELD, FREDERICK— 

Private, December 19, 18G2. Engaged in several battles. Died 
since the war. 

MAXSFIELD, GIDEOX— 

Private. Recruit. Engaged in several battles. Died since the war. 

MARTIX, JOHX W.— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Captured at Front Royal, Va.. May 30, 
1862. Served through the war. Living in Florida. 

MARTIX, IMBODEX— 
Private. Recruit. Fate unknown. 

MARTIX, RILEY T.— 
Private. Recruit. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Murdered after 
the war in Bainbridge, Ga. 

MARTIX, ROBERT L.— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Captured at Front Royal, Va., May 30, 
1862. Killed at Petersburg, Va., April, 1865. 

MARTIX, THOMAS Y.— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Survived the war. Died in Dawson, Ga. 

MILLS, CHARLES A.— 
Private, June 10, 1861. Killed at McDowell, Va. 

MILLS. WILLIAM E.— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Died in hospital, July 13, 1862. 

MILLS, WILLIAM J.— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Captured and died in prison at Washington, 
D. C. 

MOODY, DEXXIS— 

Private. June 10, 1861. Died at Stribling Springs, Va. 

MURRAY, SWIXTOX T.— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Captured at Front Royal, Va., May 30, 
1862. Wounded and captured at Fort Sreadman, Va. Living in 
Cochran, Ga. 



282 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

NORWOOD, ALEXANDER H.— 

rrivate, June 10, ISGl. Died at Stribling Springs, Va., December 3^ 
1861. 

x\ORWOOD, WILLIAM H.— 

Private, June 10, 18G1. Killed at Sharpsburg, Md. 

OLIVER, GEORGE W.— 

Private, June 10, 18G1. Captured at Front Royal, Va.. May 30, 
1862. Promoted Corporal. Lost leg at Chancellorsville, Va. Died 
in Calhoun county, Ga. 

PALMER, JOHN W.— 

Private. February 28, 1SG2. Lost arm at McDowell, Va., and dis- 
charged. Died at home from wound. 

PALMER, ZACHARIAH— 
Private, February 28, 1SG2. Died at Alleghany, Va., April 1, 1862. 

PERRY, JOHN I.— 

Private, June 10, ,18G1. Promoted Second Lieutenant September 30, 
1862. Killed at Wilderness, Va., May, 1864. 

PERRY, JOHN W.— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Died of disease at Greenbrier River, Va.,. 
October 2, 1861. 

PERRY, T. J.— 

Private, June 10, ISGl. Wounded at McDowell, Va. Living in Cuth- 
bert, Ga. 

PERRY, WILLIAM P.— 

Private, June 10, 18G1. Survived the vrar. Living near Arlington,. 
Ga. 

PIERCE, EZEKIEL H.— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Served through the war. Died in Calhoua 
county, Ga., 1865. 

PIERCE, POLK— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Died in service. 

PIERCE, RICHARD C— 
Private, June 10, ISGl. Wounded in battle October 12. 1863. Pro- 
moted Corporal. Killed at Petersburg, Va., April, 1865. 
PLATT, BENJAMIN— 

Private, June 10, 18G1. Captured at Front Royal, Va., May 30, 1862. 
Killed at Cold Harbor, Va. 

PLATT, JOSEPH P.— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Killed at Sharpsburg, Md. 

PLOWDEN, SAMUEL E.— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Died of disease at Greenbrier River, Va., 
September 20, 1861. 



Muster Rolls of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 28^ 

PLOWDEN, THOMAS E.— 
Private, October 31, 1SG2. Appointed Orderly to Col. Willis. Sur- 
rendered at Appomattox, Va. Living in Dickey, Calhoun county, 

RIVERS, JACOB J.— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Captured and died in prison at Elmira, N. Y. 
RIVERS, MALACHI C— 

Private, June 10. ISOl, Killed at McDowell, Va. 
ROBERSON, ALFRED L.— 

Private, June 10, 18bl. Captured at Front -Royal, Va., May 30, 1862. 
Promoted Sergeant. Killed at Winchester, Va., September 19, 
1864. 
ROBERSON, JAMES W.— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Promoted Corporal. Wounded at Gettys- 
burg, Pa. Killed at Wilderness, Va., May 8, 1864. 

ROBERSON, JOHN W.— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Captured and died in prison. 

RODGERS, GEORGE W.— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Died at Camp Alleghany, Va., August 26, 
1861. 
RODGERS, JOHN S.— 

Private, June 10, 18G1. Killed at McDowell, Va. 

ROYAL, STEPHEN— 

Private, December 9, 1862. Engaged in several battles. Died since 
the war. 
SAUNDERS, A. C— 

Private, December 9, 1862. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Liv- 
ing in Edison, Ga. 

SAUNDERS, JOHN D. H.— 
Private, December 9, 1862. Detailed as Provost Guard. Surren- 
dered at Appomattox, Va. Living in Peace, Baker county, Ga. 

SAUNDERS, W. J.— 

Private, June 10, 18G1. Engaged in several battles. Living in Cal- 
houn county, Ga. 
SEGARE, WILEY— 

Private, October 8, 1862. Died from disease in prison. 

SESSIONS, ROBERT J.— 
Private, June 10, 1861. Captured at Front Royal, Va., May 30, 1862. 
Killed at Wilderness, Va. 
SINGLETON, PATRICK H.— 
Private, February 25, 1862. Captured at Front Royal, Va., May 30, 
1862. Living in Bluffton, Ga. 

SINQUEFIELD, JOEL T. H.— 
Private, February 25, 1862. Captured at Front Royal, Va., May 
30, 1862. Wounded at Spottsylvania, Va., May 10, 1864. Living- 
near Leary, Ga. 



■^84 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

TIMMONS, JAMES— 

Private. Recruit. Wounded in battle. Served through the war. 
Living in Arlington, Ga. 

TODD, HOUSTON— 

Private, Februaiy 25, 18G2. Died of measles in Staunton, Va., 1862. 
T\'OODALL. JAMES W.— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Died of disease at Greenbrier River, Va., 
1861. 

WARD, JOHN M.— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Camilla, 
Ga. 

WHITE. GEORGE W.— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Died 'in service in Virginia, 1864. 

WILLIS, RICHARD W.— 

Private, June 10, 1861. Promoted Hospital Surgeon. Died in Madi- 
son, Ga., 1897. 



Muster Rolls of the Twelfth Geokgia Regiment. 285 



MUSTER ROLL OF THE MUSCOGEE RIFLES, COM^ 
PANY E, TWELFTH REGIMENT, GEORGIA VOL- 
UNTEER INFANTRY, C. S. A. 

MUSCOGEE COUNTY, GEORGIA. 

SCOTT, THADDEUS B.— 

Captain, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Cold Harbor, Ya., June, 1862. 
Promoted Lieutenant-Colonel November 5, 1862. Killed at Fred- 
ericksburg, Md. 

WHITE SIDES, JAMES A.— 

First Lieutenant, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Second Manassas^ 
Promoted Captain, November 5, 1862. Served through the war. 
Died in Macon, Ga. 

SYKES, JESSE H.— ' 

Second Lieutenant, June 15, 1861. Resigned May G, 1862. Organ- 
ized Company D, 7th Georgia Cavalry, and was promoted Major,, 
and served in that capacity until the close of the war. Died 1874. 

DECKROW, JAMES K.— 
Junior Second Lieutenant, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Second Ma- 
nassas, and died from wound September 24, 1862. 

ROBINSON, WILLIAM L.— 

First Sergeant, June 15, 1861. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant 
June 13, 1862. Wounded and disabled at Sharpsburg, Md. Pro- 
moted First Lieutenant November 8, 1862, and assigned to duty in 
Columbus, Ga. Died 1865. 

GREEN, AUGUSTUS M.— 

Second Sergeant, June 15, 1861. Promoted First Sergeant, June 13, 
1862. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md. Promoted Junior Second 
Lieutenant December 1, 1862. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. 
Served through the war, and moved to Salem, Ala. 

THORNTON, PATRICK H.— 

Third Sergeant, June 15, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Ya. Pro- 
moted Second Sergeant June 13, 1862. Detailed in Ordnance De- 
partment at Macon, Ga. Served through the war, and returned 
to Columbus, Ga. 

GIBSON, HIRAM A.— 

Fourth Sergeant, June 15, 1861. Promoted Second Sergeant. Cap- 
tured at Spottsylvania, Ya. Served through the war. Living in 
Columbus, Ga. 

HOLMES, JOSEPH W.— 

First Corporal, June 15, 1861. Promoted Third Sergeant June 13, 
1862. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Ya. First Sergeant, Decem- 
ber 18, 1862. Served through the war. 



286 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

LLOYD, SIDNEY C— 

Second Corporal, June 15. 1861. Surrendered at Appomattox, Ya. 
Died since the vrav in Columbus, Ga. 

SIMMONS, JAMES R.— 
Third Corporal, June 15, ISGl. Promoted Fifth Sergeant July 22, 
1862; Second Lieutenant November 1, 1862. Wounded at Chan- 
cellorsville, Ya. Dismissed by ^General Court-martial Second Army 
Corps August 11, 1863. Restored by order President Davis De- 
cember 21, 1863. Captured at Spottsylvania, Ya., May 10, 1864. 
Returned to Columbus, Ga., 1877. Living in Farmerville, La. 

COOPER, GEORGE W.— 

Fourth Corporal, June 15, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Ya., 
May 9, 1864. Released after the surrender, and returned to Co- 
lumbus, Ga. 

ALLEN, JOHN W.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Ya. Released 
after the surrender, and moved to Macon, Ga. 

ANDERSON, JOHN— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Second Manassas. 

AWTRY, A. J.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded and disabled at Gettysburg, Pa. 
Detailed in hospital. 
AWTRY, W^ILLIAM W.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Ya. Released 
after the surrender. Returned to Muscogee county, Ga. 

BARTLETT, WILLIAM Y.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged 1862 — under age. 

BERGAMY, JEPHTHA— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged July 20, 1862. 

BLACKMAR, AMOS R.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Died at Camp Alleghany, Ya. 

BLANKENSHIP, GEORGE W.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Appointed musician. Captured at Gettys- 
burg, Pa. Surrendered at Appomattox, Ya. 
BLUHM, H.— 

Private. Recruit. Fate unknown. 
BLUHM, JACOB— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged July 11, 1862. 

BOBO, , 

Private. Recruit. Fate unknown. 

BRITT, JOHN H.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Detailed as teamster in Ordnance Depart- 
ment, 1862. i 



Muster Kolls of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 287 

BRITT. WILLIAM R.— 

Private. June 15, ISGl. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md. Detailed in 
arsenal at Columbus, Ga. Died in Columbus, Ga. 
BROOKS, ISHAM R.— 

Private, June 15, 18(31. Served through the war. Living. 
BROOKS, JAMES C— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Detailed as teamster in Ordnance Depart- 
ment. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. 

BROOKS, JOSEPH H.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Second Manassas. Promoted 
Fifth Sergeant. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va. Captured at 
Spottsylvania, Va. Released after the surrender. 
3R00KS, J. M.— 

Private. Recruit. Fate unknown. 
BROWN, BRYANT— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Served through the war. 
BRYAN, MARCELLUS A.— 
Prvate, June 15, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Ya. Released 
after the surrender. 

BURNS, BRYAN— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Missing at battle of Cedar Run, Ya. Sup- 
posed to have been killed. 
CARNLINE, RICHARD C— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Ya. Released 
after the surrender. Moved to Montgomery, Ala. 

CHAMBLISS, R. P.— 

Private. Recruit. Fate unknown. 

CHERRY, WILLIAM— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded and disabled at Sharpsburg, Md. 
Detailed in Columbus, Ga. Died since the war. 

CLAY, MOSES— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Ya. Released 
after the surrender. Moved to Montgomery, Ala. 
COLTER, BEN.JAMIN M.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Ya. Served through 
the war. 
COLTER, R. SMITH— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded and captured at Gettysburg, Pa. 
Died in prison from wound. 

CORNETT, S. E.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. 

•CURETON, JAMES W.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Ya. Released 
after the surrender. Died in Columbus, Ga., 1867. 



288 D0LE6-C00K iJKIGADE. 

CURRY, J. A.— 

Private, June 15, 18G1. Died in service. Buried at Arlington. 
DAWSON, JAMES H.— 

Private, June 15, 18(51. Promoted Fourth Sergeant. AYounded at 
Cliancellorsville, Va. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. 
DAVIS, J. F.— 

I'rivate, May 1, 18G2. Discharged — under age. Enlisted in Com- 
pany D, Seventh Georgia Cavalry. Diving in Columbus, Ga. 
DAVIS, JOHN W.— 
Private, June 15. IHBI. Detailed as teamster in Ordnance Depart- 
ment, September, 1862. 

DAVIS, JOSEPH— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Promoted Sergeant. Killed vrhile acting as 
Color Bearer Twelfth Georgia Regiment at Gettysburg, Pa. 

DAVIS, JOSEPH H.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Missing July 1, 1864. Never heard of since. 
DEAN, JOHN T.— 

Private. June 15, 1861. Wounded and disabled at Greenbrier Rdver^ 
Va., October 3, 1861. Living in Columbus, Ga. 

DUKES, JAMES J.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Fate unknown. 

DUNN, HENRY— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged January 25, 1862. 

ELLIS, JOSHUA— 

Private, .June 15, 1861. Died at Stribling Springs, Va., December 
20, 1861. 
ELLIOTT, 

Private. Recruit. Fate unknown. 

FLOYD. JAMES P.— 

Private, Recruit. Detailed as printer in Columbus, Ga. 

GALLOWAY, A. J.— 

Private, March 1, 1862. Discharged December 3, 1862. 

GEDDIS, GEORGE— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Killed at Spottsylvania, Va. 

GERMAN, . 

Private. Recruit. Died in hospital. 

GIDDENS, A, J.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Killed in battle. 

GRANT, CALVIN L.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Fate unknown. 

GRIFFIN, JOHN C— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 7, 1864^ 

GUTHRIE, JOHN H.— 
Private, September 29, 1863. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. 



Muster Rolls of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 289 

HARRIS, ALFRED— 

Private, June 15, 1861. 

HARRIS, ARMENIUS— 

Private. Recruit. Fate unknown. 

HARRIS, G.— 

Private. Recruit. Fate unknown. 
HE WELL, ALLEN— 

Private, September 25, 18C3. Missing July, 1864. Never heard of 
since. 

HEWETT, CALEB— 

Private, May 2, 1864. Fate unknown. 
HILL, ISAAC T.— 

Private, September 29, 1863. Fate unknown. 
HILL, WILLIAM L.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Promoted Second Corporal July 22, 1862. 
Wounded at Cedar Mountain, Va., August 9, 1862. Served 
through the war. Moved to Chambers county, Ala. 
HOBBS, ARCHIBALD B.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged December 12, 1861. 
HOLLIMAN, WILLIAM M.— 

Private, September 29, 1863. Captured at Spottsylvania, Ya., May 
10, 1864. 

HOLMES, JACKSON M.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Died at Camp Alleghany, Ya., January 5, 
prison at Point Lookout, Md. 
JARNIGAN, CALYIN— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Died at Camp Allegheny, Ya., January 5, 
1862. 

KELLY, PATRICK— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Served through the war. 
KILGORE, ALBERT— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Served through the war. 
KILGORE, L.— 

Private. Recruit. Fate unknown. 
KNIGHT, WILLIAM— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Surrendered at Appomattox, Ya. 
KIRKLAND, JOHN— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Cedar Mountain, Ya. Died in 
hospital from wound. 
LATHAM, JOHN W. H.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Lost eye at Locust Grove, Ya. Wounded 
at Gettysburg, Pa., and died from wound. 
LEWIS, RICHARD— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Served through the war. 

19 d-c 



290 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

LIGON, J.— 

Private. Recruit. Killed at Spottsylvania, Va. 
LIPMAN, JULIUS— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged 1862. Living in Columbus, Ga^ 

LOYD, CHAKLES C— 

Private. Recruit. Served through the war. Living in Columbus^ 
Ga. 

LYNN, ISAAC— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Wilderness, Va. Dead. 

McCOY, R. CLAY— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged November 4, 1861. Under age.. 
Dead. 
McTEAGUE, HUGH— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged October 6, 1863. 

MARKHAM, SOWELL M.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Died at Camp Alleghany, Va., November 
21, 1861. 

MARCHANT, WILLIAM N.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Served through the war. Moved to Spar- 
tanburg, S. C. 

MILLER, WILLIAM H.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded and captured at Gettysburg, Pa. 

MITCHELL, FRANCIS M.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Fate unknown. 

MILTON, JOHN C— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Killed accidentally December 16, 1863. 

MOONEY, WILLIAM— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Fate unknown. 

MOORE, G. F.— 

Private, May 1, 1862. Discharged 1862. 

MOTLEY, LEWIS W.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Died at Camp Alleghany, Va., February 1^ 
1862. 
MOTLEY, W.— 

Private. Recruit. Fate unknown. 

MOSLEY, LEWIS P.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged 1862. 

MOYE, GARDNER— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Died at Stribling Springs, Va. 

ORMSBY, WILLIAM— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Captured at Front Royal, Va., May 30, 1862. 

ORR. ROBERT J.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Served through the war. 



Muster Rolls of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 291 

PATTERSON, J. AI. T.— 

Private, March 12, 18G4. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va., May 10, 
1864. 

PATTERSON, NATHAN W.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Killed at Malvern Hill, Va., 1862. 
PUTNAM, JOSEPH— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged, November, 1862. 
QUICK, JESSE— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Killed at Gettysburg, Pa. 
ROLAND, DAVID— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Va. Died from 
wound in Staunton, Va., May 28, 1862. 
ROLAND, J.— 

Private. Recruit. Fate unknown. 
SINGLETON, DAVID D.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va., May 10, 1864. 
SKATES, WILLIAM W.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Fate unknown. 
SLAUGHTER, W. G.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Appointed musician. Discharged. Under 
age. 

SMITH, DAVID— 

Private, April 25, 1864. Wounded near Washington, D. C, July 12, 
1864. 

SMITH, JAMES— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Captured at Front Royal, Va., May 30, 1862. 

SMITH, JAMES L.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged July 13, 1861. 

SMITH, JESSE W.— 
Private. Recruit. Served through the war. Living in Opelika, Ala. 

SMITH, JOSIAH M.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged. Dead. 

STONAKER, B. J.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged July 23, 1861. 

TAYLOR, LOUIS A.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 

TEEL, 

Private. Recruit. Fate unknown. 

THURMAN, JOSEPH C— 

Private, March 22, 1864. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va., May 10, 
1864. 
TURNER, WILLIAM M.— 

Private, September 29, 1863. Killed at Wilderness, Va. 



292 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

WARREN, JOHN R.— 

Private, July 4. 18(51. Promoted Fifth Sergeant. Detailed as Regi- 
mental Ordnance Sergeant 1802. Promoted First Sergeant. Sur- 
rendered at Appomattox, Va. 
WHITE, GEORGE N.— 

Private, April 24, 18<>4. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va., May 10, 18^. 

WOULFE, CHARLES J.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va., May 10, 1864. 

WOULFE, W. W.— 

Private, April 1, 1862. Captured at Front Royal, Va., May 30, 1«62. 

WELCH, THOMAS— 

Private. Recruit. Wounded at Cedar Creek, Va. Dead. 



Muster Rolls of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 293 



MUSTER ROLL OK DAVIS GUARDS, COMPANY F, 
TWELFTH REGIMENT, GEORGIA VOLUNTEER 
INFANTRY, C. S. A. 

DOOLY COUNTY, GEORGIA. 

BR OWN, W. F.— 

Captain, June 11, 1861. Killed at Ox HiU, Va., September 1, 1862, 
while commanding Trimble's Brigade. 
EVERETT, JAMES— 

First Lieutenant, June 11, 1861. Promoted Captain September 4, 
1862. Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa. Served through the war. 
Dead. 

BROWN, JOHN G.— 

Second Lieutenant, June 11, 1861. Died in service September 1, 
1861. 
THOMPSON, W. Y.— 

Junior Second Lieutenant, June 11, 1861. Promoted Second Lieu- 
tenant September 1, 1861. Wounded at Alleghany, Ya. Promoted 
First Lieutenant September, 1862. Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa. 
Served through the war. Dead. 

HOWARD, A. M.— 
First Sergeant, June 11, 1861. Served through the war. Moved to 
Tennessee. 

REDDING, J. R.— 

Second Sergeant, June 11, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 

OSTEEN, JOSEPH E.— 
Third Sergeant, June 11, 1861. Died at Camp Bartow, Va., August 
26, 1861. 

DEYERAUX, A. C— 

Fourth Sergeant, June 11, 1861. Discharged December 16, 1861. 

YAWN, THOMAS R.— 

First Corporal, June 11, 1861. Died im service March 20, 1862. 

PAUL, H. J.— 

Second Corporal, June 11, 1861. Promoted Third Sergeant 1862. 
Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa. Killed at Petersburg, Va., 1865. 

COLLINS, J. T.— 

Third Corporal, June 11, 1861. KiUed at Cedar Run, Va. 

PENNY, JAMES M.— 

Fourth Corporal, June 11, 1861. Served through the war. Dead. 

ADAMS, W. L.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Promoted Fourth Sergeant. Wounded at 
Chancellorsville, Va., and Gettysburg, Pa. Living in Dooly county, 
Ga. 



294 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

BOND, J. U.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Served through the war. Dead. 

BRANNAN, JAMES K.— 

Private, May 1, 1864. Fate unknown. 

BRANNAN, JOHN A.— 

Private, May 1, 1864. Fate unknown. 
BRETT, M. W.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Promoted Sergeant, 1861. Wounded at Mc- 
Dowell and Cedar Creek, Va. Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., and 
captured, paroled September, 1863. Exchanged afterwards, and 
wounded at Wilderness, Ya. Captured at Fort Steadman, Va. R^ 
leased from prison at Point Lookout, Md., June 24, 1865. Living in 
Rome, Oa. 

BROWN, JAMES M.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant May 
9, 1862. Captured at Front ,Poyal, Va., May 30, 1862. Promoted 
Second Lieutenant December, 1862. Wounded at Winchester, Va.; 
captured near Harrisonburg, Va., after being wounded. Wounded 
at Sharpsburg, Md., and at Gettysburg, Pa. Living in Monte- 
zuma, Ga. 
BRUNDAGE, JOSEPH— 

Private, September 28, 1862. Fate unknown. 

BUTLER, ADAM J.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Died at Gamp Bartow, Va., August 28, 1861. 
BUTLER, GEORGE W.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Surrendered at Appomattox Va. Living in 
Dooly county, Ga. 

BUTLER, JOHN E.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Served through the war. Living in South 
Georgia. 

BUTLER, JOHN K.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Killed at Cedar Mountain, Va. 

BUTLER, ROBERT— 
Private, June 11, 1861. Died at Alleghany, Va., 1861. 

BYRON, JOHN H.— 

Private, May 1, 1864. Captured July 14, 1864. 
CLARKE, JAMES— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Killed at Chancellorsville. 

CLARKE, SAMUEL R.— 

PriTate, June 11, 1861. Lost leg at Monocacy, Md. Died since the 
war. 
COLLINS, FRANK L.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Wounded in battle June 3, 1862, and died 
from wound. 



Muster Rolls of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 295 

COLLINS, JAMES T.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Killed at Cedar Creek, Va. 
COLLINS, THOMAS L.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Killed at Fort Steadman, Va. 
COLLINS, WILLIAM G.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Killed at McDowell, Va. 
CULPEPPER, A.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Died 
since the war. 
DINKINS, J. W.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Wounded at Second Manassas, and Cedar 
Run, Va. Served through the war. Living in Dooly county, Ga. 

DINKINS, WILLIAM— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Wounded in battle. Served throngh the 
war. Living in Dooly county, Ga. 

DOZIER, JOHN A.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Killed at Spottsylvania, Va. 
DURHAM, JOHN H.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Killed at Cedar Mountain, Va. 

FOREHAND, G. W.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Promoted Corporal. Surrendered at Appo- 
mattox, Va. Living 'in Macon county, Ga. 

FOREHAND, JAMES A.— 
Private, June 11, 1861. Died at Camp Alleghany, Va., August 3, 
1861. 

FUDGE, J. D.— 

Private, May 1, 1862. Left with wounded at Gettysburg, Pa. 
Served through the war. Living. 

GEAR, R. R. M.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Lost arm at Winchester, Va. 

GODW^IN, SOLOMON— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Killed at Fredericksburg, Va. 

HAMIL, THOMAS— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Promoted Sergeant. Lost leg at Winches- 
ter, Va. 

HAMILTON, P. N.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Died 
since the war. 

HARRISON, A.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Wounded and disabled at Sharpsburg, Md. 

HAYMON, ARCHIBALD— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Lost leg at Cedar Mountain, Va. Died since 
the war. 



296 DoLZ3-CooK Brigade. 

HODGE, B. FRA^•K— 

Private, June 11, 1S61. Killed at Sharpsburg. Md. 
JOHNSON, R. ALLEN— 

Private. June 11, 1S61. Killed in battle near Richmond, Va. 
JOHNSON. SOLOMON D.— 

Private. June 11. 1S61. Captured at Sponsylvania, Va. Living. 
JOINER, J. ANDREW— 

Private, June 11, 1S61. Died at Camp Allegheny, Ya., August 8,. 
1861. 

JONES, D. WRIGHT— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Died at Greenbrier River, Va., 1861. 
KELLY. B. F.— 

Private, April 25, 1S64. Missing in battle near Washington, D. C. 
Never heard of since. 
KERBOW, JOHN F.— 

Private, July 25, 1864. Missing on the Maryland Campaign, 18&i. 
Never heard of since. 

KING, WILLIA^I— 

Private, March 22, 1864. Captured 1864, and died in prison. 
LAMB. S. E.— 

Private. .Tune 11, 1861. Served through the war. Living. 

LANE, WILLIAM— "^ 

Private, May 12. 1862. Left in Maryland July, 1863. Died July^ 
1864, in hands of the enemy. 

LEWIS, GREEN W.— 

Private, June 11. 1861. Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa. Dead. 
LEWIS. THOMAS S.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Dead. 

LEWIS, W. H. H.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Detailed as teamster Divi>;ion wagon-train 
1864. Served through the war. Living in Macon county, Ga. 

LOWE, JAMES A.— 
Private, June 11, 1861. Capttired and died in prison. 

LOWE. THOMAS H.— 

Private. June 11, 1861. Killed at Brownsville, Md., July 7, 1864. 

LOWE, W. F.— 
Private June 11, 1861. Promoted Second Lieutenant December^ 
1862. KOled near Snickers Gap, Va., July 18, 1864. 

McCORREY, DANIEI^- 

Private, June 11, 1801. Killed near Snickers Gap, Va. 

McCORVEY, ANDREW J.— 
Private, March 24, 1864. Killed near Berryville, Va, 



Muster Rolls of the Twelfth Geoegl^. REGLM.E^'T. 297 

McKENZIE, SAMUEL— 
Private, June 11, ISOl. Died at Camp Alleghany, Va., December 11, 
1861. 
MINOR, WILLIAM— 

PriTate, June 11, 1S61. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Died since 
the war. 
OLIVER, WILLIAM H.— 

Private, June 11, 1S61. Captured at Spottsylvania, Ya. Living In 

Tifton, Ga. 
PENNY, H. FRANK— 

Private, June 11, 1S61. Killed at Gettysburg, Pa. 
POWELL, W. J.— ' ■ '^ 

Private, June 11, 1S61. Served through the war. Living at Bow- 
en's Mill, Ga. 

RAINES, G. H.— 
Private, June 11, ISCl. Wounded in seven days' fight around Rich- 
mond, Ya. Surrendered at Appomattox, Ya. Living in Dooly 
county, Ga. 
RAINES. RICHARD— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Dooly 
county, Ga. 

REDDING, JAMES T.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Killed at ChanceUorsville, Va. 

REDDING, W. G.— 

Private, June 11, 1S61. Assigned to hospital duty in Macon. Ga.. 
1864. Served through the war. Living In Macon, Ga. 

ROGERS, JOHN R.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Served through the war. Moved to Texas. 

ROWELL, A. J.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Ya. Died since 
the war. 
ROWLAND, W. F.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Living. 

ROYALS, J. P.— 

Private, June 11, 1S61. Died at Camp Allegheny, Ya., August 14^ 
1861. 

ROYALS, TILLER— 

Private, June 11. ISGl. Died at Camp Alleghany, Ya., 1861. 

RUTLAND, J. W.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Died at Camp Alleghany, Ya., August 20, 
1861. 
RUTLAND, WILLIAM— 

Private. June 11, 1861. Died since the war near Richland, Ga. 



298 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

SASHBURN, ALLEN— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Discharged. Dead, 
SAUNDERS, L. Q.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Served through the vrar. Living in Macon 
county, Ga. 
SILER, E. B.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Discharged May 8, 1862. Dead. 
BLADE, JERRY C— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Served through the war. Died in Dooly 
county, Ga., 1890. 

SLADE, J. Z.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Captured May, 1864. Dead. 
SLADE, THOMAS G.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Died at Camp Alleghany, Va., 1861. 

SLADE, WILLIAM— 
Private, June 11, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va., May 8, 1864. 
Living in Florida. 

SMITH, QBE M.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Died at Greenbrier River, Va,, 1861. 

SMITH, W. AMBROSE— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Died at Greenbrier River, Va., 1861. 

SUMMERFORD, J. N.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Wounded at Fredericlisburg, Va. Served 
through the war. Living in Dooly county, Ga. 

SUMMERFORD, W. H. H.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Appointed musician. Died at Camp Alle- 
ghany. 

SUMNER, JOE— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Killed near Washington, D. C, July 12, 
18^. 
SWEARINGEN, D. T.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Served "through the war. Living in Irwin 
county, Ga. 
SWEARINGEN, RICE— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Wounded at Wilderness, Va, Dead. 

TAYLOR, J. TIM— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Killed at Harper's Ferry, Va. 

THOMAS, CHARLES R.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Died in service, 1861. 

THOMPSON, H. J. B.— 
Private, June 11, 1861. Died at Camp Alleghany, Va., 1861. 

THOMPSON, WILLIAM C— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Dooly 
county, Ga. [ 



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Muster Rolls of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 299 

TURNER, WILLIAM B.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Died in service 1S61. 
YARNADORE, J. H.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 
WADE, JEFF C— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Killed at McDovrell, Va. 
WADE, LEWIS— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Died at Greenbrier River, Va., 1861. 

WALTON, ELISHA— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va. Served 
through the war. Living in Fuqua, Ga. 

WATERS, D. A.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Died at Camp Alleghany, Va., August 10, 
1861. 

WATERS, JAMES A.— 
Private, June 11, 1861. Died at Camp Alleghany, Va., August 11, 
1861. 
WATSON, ALLEN— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Died since 
the war. 

WATSON, D.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Killed at Fredericksburg, Va. 

W^ATSON, R. J.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Wounded at Fredericksburg, Va. Living. 

WEBB, W. F.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Va. Wounded twice 
at Winchester, Va., September 19, 1864. Living in Dooly county, 
Ga. 

WIGGINS, W. L.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Served through the war. Died in Dooly 
county, Ga., 1900. 
WRIGHT, JOE B.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Fate unknown. 

YAWN, D. S.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Wounded in battle. Served through the 
war. Living in Dooly county, Ga. 
YEW^BANKS, JAMES E.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Died in service 1861. 

'iOUNG, R. N.— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Killed at Winchester, Va. 

YOUNGBLOOD, E. C— 

Private, October 1, 1863. Died in hospital 1863. 



300 Doles-Cook Brigade. 



MUSTER ROLL OF PUTNAM LIGHT INFANTRY, 
COMPANY G, TWELFTH REGIMENT, GEORGIA 
VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, C. S. A. 

PUTNAM COUNTY, GEORGIA. 

DAVIS, RICHARD T.— 
Captain, June 15, 18G1. Wounded at McDowell, Va., and died from 
wound May 22, 1862. 

ETHERIDGE, JAMES A.— 

First Lieutenant, June 15, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Va. Pro- 
moted Surgeon Twelfth Georgia Regiment, May 15, 1862. Pro- 
moted Brigade Surgeon. Died inj Eatonton, Ga., September 30, 
1893. 

REED, ALEXANDER SIDNEY— 

Second Lieutenant, June 15, 1861. Promoted Captatin May 22. 1862.. 
Assistant Quartermaster Twelfth Georgia Regiment, April 21, 
1864. Promoted Assistant Quartermaster Grimes' Division. Sur- 
rendered at Appomattox, Va. Living in Eatonton, Ga. 

MARSHALL, STEPHEN B.— 
Junior Second Lieutenant, June 15, 1861. Promoted Second and 
First Lieutenant, 1862. Wounded at McDowell, Va. Wounded 
and disabled at Fredericksburg, Va. Resigned April 16, 1868. 
Died in Eatonton, Ga., September, 1898. 

LITTLE, A. F.— 

First Sergeant, June 15, 1861. Mortally wounded at Alleghany, Va., 
and died from wound December 25, 1861. 

EATCHELOR, JESSE T.— 

Second Sergeant, June 15, 1861. Promoted First Sergeant Decem- 
ber 25, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Va. Discharged account 
wound December 26, 1862. Living in Putnam county, Ga. 
JENKINS, ROBERT H.— 

Third Sergeant, June 15, 1861. Promoted Second Sergeant Decem- 
ber 25, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Va. Promoted First Ser- 
geant December 26, 1862. Served through the war. Living in 
Haddock, Jones county, Ga. 

DAVIS, EDWARD S.— 

Fourth Sergeant, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Alleghany, Va. Pro- 
moted Third Sergeant December 25, 1861. Killed at McDowell^ 
Va. 

ZACHRY, ABNER R.— 

First Corporal, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Alleghany, Va. Pro- 
moted Second Lieutenant August 7, 1862; First Lieutenant April 



Muster Rolls of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 301 

16, 1863; Captain April 21, 18G4. Wounded and captured near _ 
Washington, D. C, July. 1864. Released after the surrender. 
Murdered in Morgan county, Ga., December 16, 1896. 
HITCHCOCK, W. I.— 

Second Corporal, June 15, 1861. Died of disease at Greenbrier River, 
Va., August, 1861. 

JOHNSON, BENJAMIN F.— 

Third Corporal, June 15, 1861. Discharged at Greenbrier River, Va., 
August 30, 1861. account disal^ility. Enlisted in Twenty-seventh 
Georgia Battalion as First Lieutenant Company A. Promoted 
Captain April 24, 1864. Living in Atlanta, Ga. 

LITTLE. ROBERT J.— 

Fourth Corporal, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md. Pro- 
moted Second Lieutenant April 16, 1863. Captured while sick at 
Chambersburg, Pa., June, 1863. Exchanged fall of 1864. Surren- 
dered at Appomattox, Va. Died in Putnam county, Ga., March 
22, 1883. 

ADAMS, BENJAMIN F.— 

Private, July 25, 1861. Wounded and disabled at Front Royal, Va. 
Detailed as ambulance driver, and as teamster for Brigade med- 
ical wagon. Served through the war. Living in Pennington, Ga. 
ADAMS, IRBY HUDSON— 

Private, May 2. 1862. Discharged account disability July 15, 1862. 
Enlisted in Twenty-seventh Georgia Battalion as First Lieuten- 
ant Company B. Served through the war. Died in Eatonton, Ga., 
1900. 

ADAMS, JAMES Q ("PUT")— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Detailed in Commissary Department Au- 
gust 31, 1861. Promoted Regimental Commissary Sergeant April 
30, 1862. Brigade Commissary Sergeant 1864. Surrendered at 
Appomattox, Va. Died in Eatonton, Ga., July 13, 1896. 
ADAMS, JOHN C— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Appointed musician Twelfth Georgia Regi- 
ment. Wounded at McDowell. Va. Wounded mortally at Summit 
Point, Va., August 21, 1864. Supposed to have died soon after 
either at Winchester, or Mount Jackson, Va. 
ADAMS, .L FLOURNOY ("COY")— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Elected Second Lieutenant Company F, 
Sixty-sixth Georgia Regiment, while at home on furlough, and was 
transfeiTed to that regiment. Living in Eatonton, Ga. 
ALFORD, GREEN B.— 

Pnivate, June 15, 1861. Discharged account disabili'ty December 25, 
1861. Living in Morgan county, Ga. 

ALFORD, HENRY— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Richmond. Va., June 27, 1862. 
Killed at Winchester. Va., September 19, 1864. 



302 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

ALFORD. WILLIAM H.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Cedar Run, Va. Killed at 
Cbantilly, Va., September 2, 1862. 
ALFORD, WILLIAMS— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Living in Morgan county, Ga. 

ARNOLD, WILLIAM T.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Alleghany, Va. Captured at 
Spottsylvania, Va. Released after the surrender. Living in Mar- 
shall, Texas. 
ATHON, A. W.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Snickers Ferry, Va., August 1, 
1864. Living in Putnam county, Ga. 

AVERY, THOMAS G.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Wilderness and slightly at 
Winchester, Va. Dead. 

BARNARD, L. J.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged account rheumatism, January 
3, 1862. Re-enlisted September 29, 1863. Discharged August 31, 
1864. Living in Putnam county, Ga. 
BATCHELOR, CORDY— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Captured at Front Royal, Va, Exchanged 
from Fort Delaware September 30, 1862. Wounded at Chancellors- 
ville, and at Spottsylvania, Va. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. 
Living in Morgan county, Ga. 

BATCHELOR, DAVID— 

Private, May, 1862. Killed at Spottsylvania, Va. 

BATCHELOR, EARLY— 

Private, April, 1862, Captured at Front Royal, Va, Exchanged 
from Fort Delaware September 30, 1862. Died 1891. 

BATCHELOR, LEVERETT— 

Private, October 10, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Va. Surren- 
dered at Appomattox, Va. Living in Putnam county, Ga. 

BATCHELOR, RICHARD— 

Private, May, 1862. Wounded at Fredericksburg, Va. Living in 
Putnam county, Ga. 

BATCHELOR, SOLOMON— 

Private, May, 1862. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va. Captured at 
Wilderness, Va. Released on parole. Died February, 1878. 

BEALL, JAMES A.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Va. Killed at Get- 
tysburg, Pa. 

BEALL, .L4MES— 

Private, July 20, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Va. Lost leg and 
was captured at Winchester, Va., September 19, 1864. Made his 
escape after getting well. Died since the war. 



Muster Rolls of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 30S 

BEDELL, JOHN K.— 

First Sergeant, June 15, ISGl. Was never mustered into service be- 
cause of discharge June, 1861, account of sunstroke at Richmond^ 
Va. Died, since the war. 

EULLARD, JAMES N.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. "Wounded at Second Manassas. Lost leg at 
Chancellorsville, Va., and discharged. Died September 5, 1891. 
CARTER, ROBERT O.— 

Private, February 1, 1862. Wounded at Cedar Run, Spottsylvania,. 
and Fort Steadman, Va. Died since the war in Florida. 
CARTER, THOMAS W.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Detailed in Pioneer Corps July, 1863. 
Served through the war. Died in Texas after the surrender. 
COCHRAN, BANISTER R.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Dead. 
COCHRAN, MARK A. 

Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged account disability November 16,. 

1861. Living in Morgan county, Ga. 

CONANT, O. H. P.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged at Alleghany, Va., January 

1862. Enlisted in Sixty-sixth Georgia Regiment. Killed at Cal- 
houn, Ga. 

COUGHLY, JOHN— 

Private, June 15, 1862. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va., and was 
killed after he surrendered. 

DANNIELLY, JAMES W.— 

Private, July 25, 1862. Captured May 19, 1864. Died in prison at 
Elmira, N. Y., 1865. 
DANNIELLY, JOHN E.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Richmond, Va., June 27, 1862. 
Living in Randolph county, Ga. 

DANNIELLY, WILLIAM H.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded and captured at Winchester, Va., 
September 19, 1864. Relea^d after the surrender. Died Feb- 
ruary 8, 1886. 

DAVIS, JAMES W.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Cedar Run, Second Manassas, 
and Chancellorsville, Va. Killed at Spottsylvania, Va. 

DAVIS, W. H.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Killed at Alleghany, Va., December 13, 1861. 

DENHAM, DAVID— 

Private, April 4, 18(>4. Wounded at Wilderness, Va. Wounded and 
captured at Fort Steadman, Va. Released after the surrender. 
Living in Putnam county, Ga. 



504 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

DEXHAM, JOHN T.— 
Private, June 15, ISGl. Wounded by stray shot at Lynchburg, Va., 
and died from wound June 19, 18t>4. 
DISMUKE, G. TEKRY— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Va. Promoted 
Third Corporal August 7, 1862. Captured at Wilderness, Va., 
and exchanged. Captured at Fort Steadman, Va. Released after 
the surrender. Died in Baldwin county, Ga., April 17, 1903. 
EAKIN, JAMES L.— 

Private, June 15, 18G1. Died of disease August, 1861. 
ETHERIDGE, HENRY C— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Promoted Fourth Corporal 1863. Appointed 
musician. Twelfth Georgia Regiment. SuiTendered at Appomat- 
tox, Va. Living in Chattooga county, Ga. 

FEILER, JACOB— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Richmond, Va., June, 1862. 
Captured near Natchez, Miss. Released on taking amnesty oatb 
to United States Government. Living iu Columbus, Ga. 

GHOLSON, JOHN E. 

Private, June 15, 1861, Wounded at Second Manassas. Captured 
at Spottsylvania, Va. Released after the surrender. Living. 

GORLEY, THOMAS E.— 
Private, May 14, 1862. Cut off at Front Royal, Va., May 30, 1862., 
and died of sickness in the Valley of Virginia, June 15, 1862. 
GORLEY, WILLIAM ANDREW— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Va. Wounded and 
captured at Gettysburg, Pa. Died from wound July 10, 1863. 

GRIGGS, C. W.— 

Private, September 17, 1863. Transferred to hospital duty. 

HASKIN, J. WOODSON— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Alleghany, Va. Discharged ac- 
count of w^ound. Living in Putnam county, Ga. 

HETLAND, A. A.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Killed at Sharpsburg, Md. 

HOLLIS, JOHN— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Died of disease at Greenbrier River, Va., 
August, 1861. 

HUBERT, M. A.— 

Private, March 28, 1863. Wounded at Spottsylvania, Va., May 19, 
1864. Killed at Petersburg, Va., April 1, 1865. 

HUDSON, IRBY G.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Richmond, Va., June 27, 1862, 
and at Sharpsburg, Md. Promoted Commissary Sergeant Twelfth 
Georgia Regiment. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Died De- 
cember 21, 1895. 



Muster Rolls of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 305 

JENKINS, W. FRANK— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Promoted First Corporal August 7, 1862. 
Wounded at Cedar Run, Va., and at Second Manassas. Promoted 
Ordnance Sergeant Coolv's Brigade April, 1864. Surrendered at 
Appomattox, Va. Living in Eatonton, Ga. 

JOHNSON, JOHN D.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 
JOHNSON, ZACCHEUS B.— 

Private, May 14, 1862, Wounded slightly at Front Royal, Gaines 
Mill, and Clian,eellorsville, Va. Courier to General Doles. Trans- 
ferred to Navy October, 1864. Living in Putnam county, Ga. 
KILPATRICK, W. T.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Died of disease at Alleghany, Va., August 
1861. 
LITTLE, F. M.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Promoted Fourth Sergeant December 25, 
1861. Wounded at Cross Keys, Va., June 8, 1862. Discharged ac- 
count wound August, 1862. Living in Hancock county, Ga. 
LITTLE, JOHN W.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at McDowell. Va. Promoted Sec- 
ond Sergeant December 26, 1862. Captured at Spottsylvania, May 

8, 1864. Paroled February, 1865. Died at Indian Spring, Ga., 
May 25, 1903. Buried in Atlanta, Ga., May 27, 1903. 

LITTLE, LITTLETON L.— 

Private, October 8, 1863. Discharged account disability December 
11, 1863. Dead. 

LYNCH, HARVEY J.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Cedar Run and Spottsylvania, 
Va. Survived the war. Killed in, Jasper county, Ga., November 

9, 1868. 

McDADE, WILLIAM T.— 

Private, September 12, 1863. Discharged January, 1864, after being 
elected Judge of the Inferior Court of Putnam county, Ga. Died 
since the war. 

McGETTRICK, B. M.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Promoted Hospital Steward Twelfth Geor- 
gia Regiment 1861. Discharged at Alleghany, Va., January, 1862. 
Died since the war. 

McLEROY, DAVID D.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Alleghany, Va. Captured an 
Spottsylvania, Va, Released after the surrender. Living in Oco- 
nee county, Ga. 

MADDOX, FRANK A.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Chancellorsyille, Va. Pro- 

20 d-c 



^06 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

moted Fourth Corporal November, 1863. Captured at Spottsylva- 
nia, Va. Released after the surrender. Living in Putnam county, 
Ga. 

MADDOX, NOTLEY— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Severely wounded at Second Manassas, and 
discharged. Living in Putnam county, Ga. 
MAHONE, GIBSON G.— 

Private, June 15, 1801. Killed at Cross Keys, A' a., 1802. 
MANSFIELD, JAMES L.— 

Private, June 18, 1862. Wounded through both legs near Cold Har- 
bor, Va., May 30, 1864. 

JNIAPPIN, J. WILLIS— 

Private, December 17, 1863. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va., May 10, 
1864. Died in prison at Point Looliout, Md. 
MARSHALL, A. M.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Alleghany, Va. Promoted 
Chaplain Twelfth Georgia Regiment August 1, 1862. Resigned 

1863. Living in Putnam county, Ga. 

MARSHALL, HENRY H.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Va. Promoted 
Third Sergeant December 26, 1862. Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., 
and at Summit Point, Va. Died of cancer of the mouth and throat 
in Atlanta, Ga., June 27, 1894. 
MIDDLETON, ALEXANDER— 

Private, June 15 1861. Wounded at Alleghany, Va., December 13, 
1861, and died from wound January, 1862. 

MOORE. JOHN M.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Killed at Sharpsburg, Md. 

MORTON, H. W.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Died of disease at Greenbrier River, Va., 
August 15, 1861. 

OLIVER, JAMES N.— 

Private. July 20, 1861. .. Wounded_'at Malvern Hill, Va. Died since 
the war. 

PARKER, JAMES R.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Va., and discharged. 
Living in Lincolnton, Ga. 

PARKER, .JOHN S.— 

Private, May 14, 1862. Lost leg at Cedar Creek, Va., October 19, 

1864, and died from amputation. 

PASCHAL, HOMER V.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Living in Putnam county, Ga. 

PASCHAL, WILLIAM C— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Captured and paroled at Middleburg, Va., 
September 30, 1862. Living in Dawson, Ga. 



Muster Rolls of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 307 

PEARMAN, WILLIAM W.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Second Manassas. Killed at 
Cbancellorsville, Va. 

PEARSON, W. THOMAS— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Va. Discharged. 
Died since the war. 
PERRYMAN, ELISHA B.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Killed at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864. 
PORTER, JOSEPH H.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Released 
after the surrender. Living in Macon, Ga. 

PRITCHARD, DONALDSON— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged July 31, 1862. Over age. Died 
since the war. 
REID, ALEXANDER H.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Va., and discharged. 
Died In Eatonton, Ga., 1899. 

HEID, DAVID H.— 

Private, April 4, 1862. Wounded at Front Royal, Va., May 30, 
1862, and discharged. Living in Eatonton, Ga. 

REID, EDWARD B.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Killed at McDowell, Va., May 8, 1862. 

REID, JAMES H.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Died of disease December 20, 1861. 

REID, RICHMOND A.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Promoted Commissary Twelfth Georgia 
Regiment. Promoted Provost Marshal of Jackson's Corps. Died 
since the war in Eatonton, Ga. 

RICKERSON, HENRY R.— 

Private, August 2, 1861. Living in Rutledge, Ga. 

8C0TT, IRBY GOODWIN— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant August 
7, 1862. Wounded at Second Manassas. Promoted Second Lieu- 
tenant April 16, 1863; First Lieutenant April 21, 1864. Surren- 
dered at Appomattox, Va. Living in Putnam county, Ga. 

SCOTT, N. EWING— 

Private, June 1, 1863. Killed at Spottsylvania, Va., May 10, 1864. 

gPIVEY, THOMAS R.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Promoted Fifth Sergeant August, 1863. 
Wounded at Spottsylvania, and at Cedar Creek, Va. Living in Put- 
nam county, Ga. 
STUBBS, THOMAS JEFFERSON— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Va., and discharged. 
Dead. 



308 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

SUTHER, S. FRANK— 
Private, June 15, 18G1. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va. Captured 
at Winchester, Va., 1864. Living in Selma, Ala. 

SUTHER, WILLIAM W.— 

Private, April 4, 18G2. Wounded at McDowell, Va. Captured at 
Spottsylvania, Va. Released after the surrender. Died in Macon, 
Ga., October 20, 1894. 
THOMAS, HENRY W.— 

Private, May 14, 1862. Captured near Front Royal, Va., June 10, 
1862, while sick. Imprisoned at Washington, D. C, and Fort Del- 
aware. Exchanged August 10, 1862. Promoted Hospital Steward 
Twelfth Georgia Regiment May 6, 1864. Surrendered at Appo- 
mattox, Va. Living in Atlanta, Ga. 

THOMAS, LOVIC H. C'TUCK")— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Alleghany, McDowell, Chancel- 
lorsville, and Kernstown, Va. Detailed in Quartermaster's Depart- 
ment, Grimes' Division, February, 1865. Surrendered at Appo- 
mattox, Va. Living in Milledgeville, Ga. 

YINING, ELIJAH— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va., May 10, 
1864. Died in Eatonton, Ga., January 21, 1876. 

WALLER, CHARLES B.— 

Private, March 13, 1862. Died of small-pox November 18, 1862. 

WALLER, WILLIAM H.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded and captured at Gettysburg, Pa. 
Died in prison at Point Lookout March 30, 1864. 

WALKER, THOMAS A.— 

Private, July 30, 1861. Wounded at McDowell. Killed at Winches- 
ter, Va., September 19, 1864. 
WELCH, REUBEN R.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Killed at Cedar Run, Va., August 9, 1862. 

W HALEY, N. E.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Died of disease December 25, 1861. 
WILLIAMS, F. M.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Killed at McDoweU, Va. 

WILLIAMS, J. WESLEY— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Spottsylvania, Va., May 8, 1864. 
Captured at Spottsylvania, May 20, 1864. Released after the sur- 
render. Living in Madison, Ga. 

WILSON, JAMES L.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Sharpsburg. Md. Wounded at 
Winchester, Va., September 19, 1864. Appointed Captain and Su- 
perintendent Georgia Soldiers' Home at Atlanta, Ga., 1901 and 
1902. Died In Eatonton, Ga., 1903. 



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Muster Rolls of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 309 

WILSON, WILLIAM E.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged account age July 21, 1862. Died 
June, 1882. 
WINCHEL, WILLIAM H.— 

Prlrate, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Cedar Run, Ya. Lost arm at 
Gettysburg, Pa., and captured. Died in hospital from wound July 
6, 1863. 
YOUNG, ROBERT— 

Private, May 14, 1862. Wounded at Malvern Hill, Chancellorsville, 
and Summit Point, Va. Captured at Petersburg, Ya., April 1, 
1865. Released from prison June 22, 1865. Living in Eatonton, 
Ga. 



310 Doles-Cook Brigade. 



MUSTER ROIvL OF CENTRAIv CITY BLUES, COM- 
PANY H, TWELFTH REGIMENT, GEORGIA VOL- 
UNTEER INFANTRY, C. S. A. 

BIBB COUNTY, GEORGIA. 

RODGERS, JAMES G.— 

Captain, June 9, 1861. Killed at Sharpsburg, Md. 

STUBBS, JOHN M.— 

First Lieutenant, June 9, 1861. Resigned April 14, 1862. Living in 
Dublin, Ga. 

WILLET. CHARLES M.— 

Second Lieutenant, June 9, 1861. Resigned January 21, 1862. Died 
since the war. 

MASSEY, WILLIAM A.— 

Junior Second Lieutenant, June 9, 1861. Promoted Second Lieuten- 
ant Januai-y 21, 1862. Wounded at McDowell, Va., and died from 
wound. 

EVANS, OLIVER F.— 

First Sergeant, June 9, 1861. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant 
January 21, 1862. First Lieutenant April 14, 1862. Wounded at 
McDowell, Va., and Sharpsburg, Md. Promoted Captain Septem- 
ber 17, 1862. Wounded at Fort Steadman, Va. Living in Macon, 
Ga. 

WATERMAN, EDWARD— 

Second Sergeant, June 9, 1861. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant 
April 18, 1862. Captured at Front Royal, Va., May 30, 1862. Pro- 
moted First Lieutenant September 17, 1862. Wounded while on 
the march between Wilderness and Richmond, Va., 1864. KiUed 
at Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865. 

KEEL, GEORGE H.— 
Third Segeant, June 9, 1861. Promoted Second Sergeant April 18, 
1862. On detached service in Macon, Ga. Died since the war. 

HOOKER, JOHN P.— 

Fourth Sergeant, June 9, 1861. Discharged October 28, 1861. Died 
since the war in Macon, Ga. 

SHERWOOD, ASA B.— 

First Corporal, June 9, 1861. Promoted First Sergeant April 18, 
1862. Killed at McDowell, Va. 

JOHNSON, SAMUEL— 

Second Corporal, June 9, 1861. Promoted First Sergeant October, 
1862. Killed at Cedar Run, Va. 



Muster Rolls of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 311 

ECKMAN, JOHN G.— 
Third Corporal, June 9, 1861. On detached service in Macon, Ga., 
greater portion of war. Died since the war in Florida. 
KIXEBREW, WILLIAM W.— 
Fourth Corporal, June 9, 1861. Promoted lUrst Sergeant November 
1, 1862. Promoted Lieutenant. Died since the war. 
ADKINS, WILLIAM J.— 

Private, September 7, 1861. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Died 
since the war in Macon, Ga. 

ALLEN, JEFFERSON— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Survived the war. Dead. 

AMMONS, ASA— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Survived the war. Supposed to be dead. 

AMMONS, JOHN— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Discharged June, 1864. Died since the war 
in Macon, Ga. 

BEASLEY, WILLIAM B.— 

Private, April 2, 1862. Promoted Fourth Sergeant November, 1862. 
Killed at Spottsylvania, Ya., May 10, 1864. 

BLANCHARD, WILLIAM F.— 

Private, June 2, 1862. Captured at Gettysburg, Pa. Survived the 
war. Dead. 
BLOUNT, HENRY J.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Survived 
the war. Supposed to have died since. 

BRADY, BARNEY— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Discharged July 16, 1862. Died since the 
war. 

BRADY, THOMAS E.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Appointed musician. Survived the war. 
Dead. 
BRANDON, GEORGE A.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va. Died 
since the war. 
BROOME, B. R.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Discharged July 14, 1862. Supposed to have 
died since the war. 
BROOKS, ELI W.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Killed at Gettysburg, Pa. 

BROOKS, LEWIS— 

Private, September, 1861. Died at Stribling Springs, Va., 1861. 

BROWN, ELI— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., and Wilder- 
ness, Va. Died of consumption in Macon, Ga., 1880. 



312 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

BULLARD, BENJAMIN B.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Va., May 8; and 
died from wound May 10, 1862. 

CANNON, ISAAC— 

Private, May, 1864. Served through the war. 
CLARK, JARED R.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Wounded at Malvern Hill, Ya. Died since 
the war in Macon, Ga. 

COLLIER, CHARLES E.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Survived the war. Died in Macon, Ga. 
COOK, SAMUEL T.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Discharged account disability July 14, 1861. 
Died since the war in Schley county, Ga. 
COUSSER, JAMES— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Killed at Chancellors ville, Ya. 
CREWS, JOSEPH— 

Private, September 17, 1863. Wounded at Wilderness, Ya. 
CULVER, WILLIAM F.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Served through the war. Supposed to be 
living at his old home in Culverton, Hancock county, Ga. 

DAYIS, HENRY— 

Private, May, 1864. Served through the war. 

DUNCAN, JOHN M.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Discharged July 20, 1861. Died since the 
war in Macon, Ga. 

DUNCAN, MICHAEL W.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Discharged. Enlisted in the Cavalry service. 
Died since the war. 

DYER, W. SCOTT— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Killed at Alleghany, Ya., December 13, 1861. 

ELLIS, JOHN W.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Promoted Third Sergeant, 1862, Second Lieu- 
tenant November 1, 1862. Living in Macon, Ga. 
ELLIOTT, JAMES— 

Private, May, 1864. Served through the war. 

FINNEY, JAMES— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Died at Greenbrier River, Ya., October, 1861. 

FORSYTH, GEORGE W.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Served through the war. Died since the 
war in Macon, Ga. 

FRANKLIN, E. H.— 

Private. June 9, 1861. Died in Staunton, Ya., August, 1861. 

FREENEY, THOMAS J.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Discharged July 16, 1861. 



Muster Rolls of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 313 

GLOYER, JOHN— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Wounded in battle. Living in Arkansas. 

GOOGE, J. W.— 

Private, December 24, 1863. Fate unknown. 

GRIFFIN, DORSET— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Died at Greenbrier River, Va., 1861. 

GRIFFIN, JOHN D.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Ya. Died since 
the "war in Macon, Ga. 
HARRIS, HOWELL P.— 

Private, September 7, 1861. Fate unknown. 
HARMAN, JOHN K.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Appointed Quartermaster-Sergeant July 6, 
1861. Discharged March 17, 1862. Died since the war in Macon, 
Ga. 

HENDERSON, WASHINGTON— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Died at Greenbrier River, Ya., 1861. 
HERRINGTON, W. J.— 

Private, September, 1861. Missing at Spottsylvania, Ya. Supposed 
to have been killed. 

HOOKS, JOSEPH M.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Survived the war. Died in Macon, Ga. 

HURD, ISAAC— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Served through the war. Murdered in Bibb 
county, Ga. 

HURD, WILLIAM— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Killed at McDowell, Ya. 
JOHNSON, JOSEPH— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Killed at Gettysburg, Pa. 
JOti., '^N, RICHARD M.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Appointed musician. Served through the 
war. Dead. 
KAYENAUGH, MICHAEL— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Ten- 
nessee. 

KENT, THOMAS J.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Survived the war. Died in Macon, Ga. 

KITCHENS, CHARLES— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Died at Camp Alleghany, Ya., December, 
1861. 

LIGHTFOOT, ROBERT J.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Promoted Quartermaster Twelfth Georgia 
Regiment, July 6, 1861, but declined. Discharged. Died since the 
war in Macon, Ga. 



314 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

LOWE, GEORGE H.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md., and dis- 
charged. Died near Macon, Ga., 1868. 

LOUGHREE, THOMAS J.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Discharged July 16, 1861. 

McCarthy, james— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Discharged at Camp Alleghany, Ya. Died 
during the war. 

Mcdonald, Archibald— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Died in Staunton, Va., December 19, 1861. 

McKINNEY, CALEB— 

Private, August 28, 1862. Wounded and captured June, 1863. On 
detached service in Macon, Ga. Died since the war in Macon, Ga. 

MALLETTE, JASPER N.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Wounded at Alleghany, Va. Captured at 
Spottsylvania, Va. Died since the war in Macon, Ga. 

MARTIN, CHRISTOPHER— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Left with the wounded at Gettysburg, Pa. 

MAYNARD, GEORGE H.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Bibb 
county, Ga. 

MILLS, JOHN— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Killed at Spottsylvania, Va., May 12, 1864. 

MITCHELL, THOMAS J.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Survived the war. Killed in Macon, Ga., 
after the surrender. 

NEWSOME, JOHN— 

Private, September 7, 1861. Served through the war. Supposed to 
be living in Texas. 

NICHOLS, SILAS— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Killed at Spottsylvania, Va., May 10, 1864. 

OWENS, JOHN W.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Promoted Corporal. Promoted Sergeant Oc- 
tober, 1863. Living in Bibb county, Ga. 

PA'INE, WILLIAM H.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Survived the war. Supposed to be living in 
Massachusetts. 

PERKERSON, M. M.— 

Private, September 21, 1863. Fate unknown. 

PHILLIPS, EDWARD J.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Wounded and disabled at Sharpsburg, Md. 
Died since the war in Macon, Ga. 



Muster Rolls of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 315 

PLEDGER, WILEY P.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Promoted Chaplain Twelfth Georgia Regi- 
ment, resigned December, 1861. Died since the war in Atlanta, Ga. 
PUCKETT, JOHN— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Wounded twice in battle. Died since the 
war in Macon, Ga. 
RABUN, WILLIAM— 
Private, June 9, 1861. Discharged July 9, 1861. 

READY, ANDREW— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Dischai'ged at Camp Alleghany, Va., 1861. 
Died, during the war. 

RENFROE, WILLIAM S.— 

Prfvate, June 9, 1861. Promoted Sergeant, and Lieutenant. Killed 
near Washington, D. C, July 12, 1864. 

RICHARDS, WILLIAM C— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Discharged at Camp Greenbrier, Va., Jan- 
uary 9, 1862. Died since the war in Macon, Ga. 

ROBERTS, GEORGE W.— 

Private, Juue 9, 1861. I^Iissing at Camp Alleghany, Va., 1862. 

RODAN, WILLIAM— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Wounded at Alleghany, Va. Served through 
the war. Died in Augusta, Ga. 

ROGERS, WILLIAM S. C— 
Private, June 9, 1861. Killed at McDowell, Va. 

ROSS, JAMES P.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Served through the war. Died in Bibb 
county, Ga. 
SCOTT, HEZEKIAH K.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Killed at Spottsylvania, Va., May 10, 1864. 

SHRIMPSHIRE, JAMES V.— 
Private, June 9, 1861. Wounded at Spottsylvania, Va. Killed by 
Stoneman's Raiders in East Macon, Ga., while at home on wound- 
ed furlough. 

SMITH, LEWIS— 

Private, September 23, 1863. Fate unknown. 

SMITH, JAMES J.— 
Private, October 12, 1863. Wounded at Spottsylvania, Va., May 10, 

1864. 

SPIKES, DANIEL— 
Private, September 17, 1863. Fate unknown. 

STEWART, MICHAEL K.— ' 

Private, June 9, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va., and died in 
prison. 



316 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

SUMMERLIN, LEROY F.— 

Private, June 9, ISGl. Died iu Staunton, Va., August 1, 1861. 

SWEXEY, JOHN— 

Private, June 9, ISGl. Fate unknown. 

WELCH. MARTIN— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Captured at Front Royal, Ya. Never heard 
of since. 

WEST. WILLIAM H.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Wounded in battle and disabled. Living in 
Dooly county, Ga. 
WILDER, CHRISTOPHER C— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Promoted Corporal, and First Sergeant. 
Wounded at Fort Steadman, Va. Living in Macon, Ga. 

WILDER. JOSEPH— 

Private. June 9, 1861. Killed at McDowell, Ya. 

WILDER. WILLIAM A.— 

Private, March 21, 1862. Served through the war. Living in Ma- 
con, Ga. 

WIMBERLY, THOMAS J.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Killed accidentally in Virginia, July 6, 1862. 

WIMBERLY, THOMAS T.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Discharged July 9, 1861. 

YOUNGBLOOD, ANDREW J.— 

Private, June 9, 1861. Promoted Corporal, 1862. Promoted Ser- 
geant. Killed near Washington, D. C, July 12, 1864. 



Muster Rolls of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 317 



MUSTER ROLL OF THE LOWNDES COUNTY VOL- 
UNTEERS, COMPANY I, TWELFTH REGIMENT, 
GEORGIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, C. S. A. 

I.OWNDES COUNTY, GEORGIA. 

TATTERSON, JAMES W.— 

Captain, June 14, 1861. KiUed at McDowell, Va. 
MOORE, HENRY !E.— 

Fii-st Lieutenant, June 14, 18G1. Killed at Alleghany, Va., Decem- 
ber 13, 1861. 

BRIGGS, JAMES M.— 

Second Lieutenant, June 14, 1861. Promoted First Lieutenant De. 
cember 13, 1861. Captain May 8, 1862. Wounded at McDowell, 
and Chancellorsville, Va. Killed at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864. 
PHILLIPS, R. W.— 

Junior Second Lieutenant, June 14, 1861. Resigned October 15, 
1S61. Living in Suwannee, Fla., and is a Baptist preacher. 
GRAHAM, ADAM— 
First Sergeant, June 14, 1861. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant 
October 15, 1861. Second Lieu^tenant December 13, 1861, First 
Lieutenant May 8, 1862. Wounded near Washington, D. C, and 
died from wound. 
OUSLEY, WILLIAM H.— 

Second Sergeant, June 14, 1861. Discharged November 20, 1861. 
Died in Texas 1898. 
EZELL, J. H.— 

Third Sergeant, June 14, 1861. Died while at home on sick fur- 
lough, 1862. 

BRYAN, J. A. A.— 

Fourth Sergeant, June 14, 1861. Died at Camp Bartow, Va., Oc- 
tober, 1861. 

TUCKER, A. J.— 

Second Corporal, June 14, 1861. Promoted Third Sergeant June 25, 
1862. Junior Second Lieutenant December, 1862. Killed at 
Spottsylvanla, Va., May 12, 1864. 

GRACE, C. C— 

First Corporal, June 14, 1861. Promoted Second Sergeant October 
15, 1861, Junior Second Lieutenant December 13, 1861, Second 
Lieutenant May 8, 1862. Captured at Spottsylvanla, Va. One of 
the six hundred Confederate officers exposed to the fire of our 
guns on Morris Island, S. C. Living in Screven, Ga. 



318 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

MORGAN, C. S.— 
Third Corporal, June 14, ISGl. . Promoted Third Sergeant winter 
of lSGl-2. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va., May 9, 1864. Living in 
Valdosta, Ga. 

SMITH, W. F.— 

Fourth Corporal, .Tune 14, 18(31. Died at Camp Alleghany, Va., 
July, 1861. 
ALLEN, W. C— 

Private, June 14, ISGl. Discharged March 18, 1862. Died, 186—. 

ANDERSON, C. W.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Promoted Third Corporal October 7, 1861; 
Fourth Sergeant June 18, 1862. Wounded at Second Manassas. 
Moved out West after the surrender. 

BAILEY, JOSEPH H.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Died at Camp Bartow, Va., November 2, 

1861. 
BARFIELD, FRANK— 

Private, June 14, 1S61. Died at Camp Alleghany, Ya., August, 1861. 

BARKER, ROBERT— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Died at Front Royal, Va., May 29, 1862. 
BASS, GEORGE P.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Living, 
P. O., Naylor, Ga. 

BECKTON, J. E.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Detailed at General Lee's Headquarters. 
Living in Madison county, Fla. 

BOSTICK, H. J.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Appointed Drummer June, 1861. Captured 
at Wilderness, Va. Died in prison in New York. 

BOSTON, J. H.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Promoted Fourth Sergeant. Served through 
the war. Living. 
BOYD, GEORGE W.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va. Captured 
at Spottsylvania, Va. Died in Lowndes county, Ga., 1871. 
BRYAN, J. H.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Died at Camp Bartow, Va., November, 1861. 

BROWN, DAVID O.— 

Private, March 11, 1862. Detailed as Provost Guard. Surrendered 
at Appomattox, Va. Living. 

BURGSTYNER, J. S.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Captured at Front Royal, Va., May 30, 
1862. Wounded at Monocacy, Md. Living in Valdosta, Ga. 



Muster Rolls of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 319 

BURNETT, CHRIS. C— 

Private, June 14, 18G1. Lost leg at Alleghany, Va. Died 1870. 
CAMERON, JAIMES— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Died at Camp Bartow, Va., November, 1861. 
CLAYTON, J. M.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Died at Camp Alleghany, Va., August IS, 
1861. 
COPE LAND, DAVID S.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Va., and died from 
wound. 

COPELAND, EDWARD— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Va., and died from 
wound. 
CORLEY, WILLIAM G.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Wounded at Alleghany, Va. Killed at Win- 
chester, Va., September 19, 1864. 

DAMPIER, .1. W.— 

Private, March 14, 1862. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Never 
heard of since. 

DAMPIER, R. W.— 

Private, June 14. 1861. Wounded at McDowell and Wilderness, Va. 
Living in Lowndes county, Ga. 
DAMPIER, W. B.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Died at Camp Alleghany, Va., August 18, 
1861. 

DAMPIER, W. E.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Died at Camp Alleghany, Va., August 18, 

1861. 
DANIEL, ELISHA— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Died at Camp Bartow, Va., November 1, 

1861. 

DASHER, LEONARD— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Died at Camp Alleghany, Va. 

DASHER, L. F.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Wounded at Monocacy, Md. Served through 
the war. Living in Dasher, Ga. 

DASHER, V. F.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Captured at Front Royal, Va. Served 
through the war. Died in Dasher, Ga., 1902. 

DAUGHTRY, JOHN M.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Survived the war. Moved to Florida. 

DOUGHERTY, W. J.— 

Private. June 14, 1861. Fate unknown. Missing since the battle Sec- 
ond Manassas. 



320 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

EATON, B. w.— 

Private, June 14, 1S61. Survived the war. Died in Lake City, Fla,, 
1898. 

EZELL, T. D.— 

Private, June 14. 1861. Captured at Front Royal, Va. Survived tlie 
war. Moved to North Carolina. 

FAY, W. H.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Va. Detailed in 
Richmond, Va. Served through the war. Died in Louisville, Ga., 
1899. 

FLETCHER, DEKALB— 
Private. June 14, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Chancellorsville, 
and Wilderness, Va. Died 1889. 

GANEY, JAMES M.— 
Private, June 14, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Va. Died of small- 
pox in Staunton, Va., 1862. 

GOLDWIRE, JOHN R.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Promoted Second Lieutenant December 13, 
1861. Killed at McDowell, Va., May 8, 1862. 

GREEN, ALFRED— 
Private, June 14, 1861. Wounded at Spottsylvania, Va. Moved to 
Brunswick, Ga. 

HALL, B. G.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Lost leg at Alleghany, Va. Living in 
Brooks county, Ga. 
HALL, J. E. B.— 
Private, June 14. 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Va. Died from 
wound in Staunton, Va. ™~ 

HANNAH, WILLIAM— 
Private, June 14, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Discharged 
account over age February, 1865. 
HARDEE, R. A.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Captured at Front Royal, Va., and died of 
smallpox at Fort Delaware July, 1862. 
HARDEE, W. D.— 
Private, June 14. 1861. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va. Surren- 
dered at Appomattox, Va. Living in Mineola, Ga. 

HARRIS, N. P.— 
Private, June 14, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Survived 
the war. Died in Florida 1898. 
HARP, JOSEPH B.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Captured at Front Royal, Va. Killed at 
Chancellorsville, Va. 



Muster Rolls of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 321 

HARVEY, J. E.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Died at Camp Bartow, Va., November 5, 
1861. 

HENDRICK, J. W.— 

Private, June 14, 1801. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Survived 
the war. Living near Milltown, Ga. 

HERN, PETER— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Survived tlie war. Living in Knoxville, 
Tenn. 

HESTER, J. T.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Detailed as teamster. Never beard of af- 
ter the battle of Wilderness, Va. 

HEWETT, JOHN J.— 

Private. June 14, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Living near 
Ousley, Ga. 

BOWELL, J. W.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Va. Acted as Color 
Bearer on the Gettysburg Campaign, and recommended for pro- 
motion as Ensign of the Regiment for gallantry on the field of 
battle, but was captured at Mine Run. Va., before receiving a 
commission and remained in prison for fifteen months at Wash- 
ington, D. C. and Point Lookout. Paroled and reached his home 
March 23, 1865. Living at Lake Park, Ga. 

HOWELL, W. R.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Wounded at Second Manassas, and died 
from wound. 

HUGHES, GEORGE— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Died at Camp Alleghany, Va., July, 1861. 

HUGHES, JOHN— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Died at Camp Alleghany, Va., July, 1864. 
HUNNICUTT, G. H.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Va. Sent to Hos- 
pital and never heard of afterwards. 

JONES, J. L.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Died at Camp Alleghany, Va., March 3, 
1862. 
JORDAN, H. H.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Died at Camp Alleghany, A'a., July, 1861. 
JORDAN, WILLIS— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Captured at Front Royal, Va. Wounded at 
Second Manassas. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va., and died 
from wound. 

21d-C 



822 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

KERN, PETER— 

Private, Juue 14, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Ta. Detailed itt 
Richmond, Va. 

LEWIS, C. W.— 
Private, June 14, 1861. Captured at Front Royal, Va. Wounded at 
Chancellorsville, Va. Living near Ousley, Ga. 

LIGHTSEY, S. J.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Captured at Front Royal, Va., May 30, 1862. 
Living near Plant City, Fla. 

LOFTON, SAMUEI^- 

Private, June 14, 1861. Fate unknown. 

LOGUE, W. E.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Promoted Second Sergeant. Surrendered' 
at Appomattox, Va. Died since the war. 

McCALL, DAVID— 
Private, June 14, 1861. Died at Camp Bartow, Va., September, 1861.. 

McCRAY, H. F.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Killed at Wilderness, Vu,. 

McLEOD, ALEXANDER— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Died at Camp Alleghany, Va., September, 
1861. 

McLEOD, CHARLES— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Wounded in battle 1864. Living in Echols- 
county, Ga. 

McLEOD, JOHN— 
Private, June 14, 1861. Died in Fredericksburg, Va., February, 1863-. 

McLEOD, NEAL— 

Private, October 31, 1862. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Survived 
the war. Dead. 

McNAIR, M. F.— 

Private, March 11, 1862. Died at Mount Jackson, Va., November 
24, 1862. 

McNEILY, C. H.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Va. Detailed in? 
Richmond, Va. 
MILLEN, JAMES T.— 
Private, June 14, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Survived the 
war. Died 1869. 

MILLER, ARCH— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Wounded at Second Manassas. Promoted 
Sergeant. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va., May 10, 1864. Served 
through the war. Living in Statenville, Ga. 



Muster Rolls of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 323 

MONEY, DAVID J.— 
Private, June 14, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Va., and discharged. 
Died since the war. 
MORGAN, J. L.— 
Private, June 14, 1861. Wounded at Spottsylvania, and died from 
wound in Richmond, Va. 

MURRAY, J. W.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Died at Camp Alleghany, Va., August, 1861. 
NOBLES, H. H.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Died at Camp Alleghany, Va., August, 1861. 
NOBLES, W. J.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Va., and dis- 
charged. Died since the war. 

PARKER, RUFUS— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Va., and supposed 
to have died from wound. 
PARISH, A. L.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Died at Camp Alleghany, Va., July, 1861. 

PATTERSON, DANIEL M.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Died at Camp Bartow, Va., November, 1861. 
PERRY, C. B.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Died at Camp Alleghany, Va., August, 1861. 

RANDOLPH, REV.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Died at Camp Alleghany, Va. 

RENTZ, S. R.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Captured at Front Royal, and Spottsylva- 
nia, Va. Living near Lenox, Ga. 

ROBERTS, HARRIS— 
Private, June 14, 1861. Appointed Drummer. Survived the war. 
Died in Echols county, Ga., 1890. 

ROBERTS, THOMAS J.— 
Private, June 14, 1861. Killed at Spottsylvania, Va., May 10, 1864. 

ROBERTS, WAYNE— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Died in Monterey, Va., December 10, 1861. 

ROWLAND, REDRICK P.— 
Private, June 14, 1861. Wounded in foot at Richmond, Va., June 
27, 1862. Killed at Gettysburg, Pa. 

RYAN, THOMAS— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Killed at Gettysburg, Pa. 

SHANNON, PATRICK— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Va. Never heard 
of since. 
SMILLEY. SAMUEL E.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Died at Camp Alleghany, Va., July, 1861. 



324 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

SMITH, J. A.— 
Private, June 14, 18G1. Wounded at McDowell, Va. Discharged 
March 19, 1862. Moved to Bibb county, Ga. 

SMITH, J. E.— 

Private, June 14, 1801. Died at Camp Alleji:hany, Va., August, 1861. 

SMITH, JOHN— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Died in Virginia, 1862. 

STEVENS, B. L.— 

Private, June 14, 1801. Wounded at McDowell. Va. Promoted First 
Sergeant. Captui*ed at Spottsylvania, Va., May 10, 1864. Died 
1891. 
STEVENS, R. B.— 

Private, June 14. 1861. Drum Major. Died at Camp Alleghany, 
Va., August, 1861. 
STRICKLAND, R. M.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Killed at McDowell, Va. 

TERRELL, D. W.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Wounded at Greenbrier River, Va., and died 
from wound. 
TRIPPE, J. F.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Va., May 8, 1861. 
Died from wound June 6, 1861. 
TURNBULL, H. A.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Fate unknown. 
TURNBULL, L.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Discharged November 20, 1861. Died of 
consumption soon after the surrender. 
TYLER, WILLIAM M.— 

Private, 1864. Survived the war. Died 1895. 

VALENTINE. HENRY— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Captured at Front Royal, Va. Wounded in 
battle near Winchester, Va., July 28, 1864. Living in Howard, 
Ga. 

VALENTINE, JOHN— 

Private, September 26, 1863. Fate unknown. 

WESTBERRY, A. J.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Fate unknown. Missing, 1862. 

WESTBERRY, JOHN S.— 
Private, April 9, 1862. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Never heard 
of since. 

WILLARD, GEORGE W.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Died at Camp Alleghany, Va., July, 1861. 

WILLIAMS, BYRD— 

Private, May 14, 1864. Fate unknown. 



Muster Rolls of the Twelfth Georgia Kegiment. 325 

WILSON, ALFRED— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Died in Monterey, Va., October 27, 1861. 
WILSON, L. W.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Killed at McDowell, Va. 
WISENBAKER, G. H.— 
Private, June 14, 1861. Captured at Front Royal, Va. Detailed as 
Guard. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Died 1886. 
WISENBAKER, J. A.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Wounded at Cedar Creek, Va. Served 
through the war. Living near Valdosta, Ga. 
WISENBAKER, J. F.— 
Private, June 14, 1861. Transferred to Cavalry 1862. Wounded 
May, 1864. Murdered at home 1893. 
ZEIGLER, L. F.— 
Private, June 14, 1861. Detailed as teamster. Living in Valdo&ta, 
Ga. 

ZEIGLER, W. J.— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Va. Promoted Ser- 
geant, June, 1862. Died in Charlton county, Ga., 1899. 
ZITTERHOUSE, DAVID— 

Private, June 14, 1861. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Died in 
Lowndes county, Ga., 1894. 



326 Doles-Cook Brigade. 



MUSTER ROLL OF THE MARION GUARDS, COM- 
PANY K, TWELFTH REGIMENT, GEORGIA VOL- 
UNTEER INFANTRY, C. S. A. 

MARION COUNTY, GEORGIA. 

BLANDFORD, MARK H.— 

Captain, June 15, 1861. Lost arm at McDowell, Va. Promoted 
Lieutenant-Colonel Twelfth Georgia Regiment January 12, 18G3, 
Resigned June 9, 1863. Died in Columbus, Ga., January 31, 1902. 
CHAMBLISS, JOHN T.— 

First Lieutenant, June 15, 1861. Killed at Cedar Run, Va. 
McMICHAEL, JAMES R.— 

Second Lieutenant, June 15, 1861. Promoted First Lieutenant Au- 
gust 9, 1862. Wounded at Second Manassas. Promoted Captain 
January 22, 1863. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Died since the 
war in Marion county, Ga. 

BROWN, JAMES F.— 
Junior Second Lieutenant, June 15, 1861. Resigned September 1, 
1861. Living in Cameron, Screven county, Ga. 

HAMILTON, HENRY N.— 

First Sergeant, June 15, 1861. Promoted Second Lieutenant Au- 
gust 9, 1862. Wounded at Second Manasses, and Sharpsburg, 
Md. Promoted First Lieutenant January 22, 1863. Dead. 

GILL, BAILEY R.— 

Second Sergeant, Jtine 15, 1861. Discharged August 3, 1861. Died 
July, 1900. 
PARKER, NATHANIEL W.— 
Third Sergeant, June 15, 1861. Promoted Second Sergeant August 
9, 1862. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Died in prison at Elmira, 
N. Y., 1865, of smallpox. 

DAVENPORT, A. H.— 

Fourth Sergeant, June 15, 1861. Killed in Texas after the surren- 
der. 
BUTT, WILLIAM R.— 

First Corporal, June 15, 1861. Discharged 1861. Enlisted in Third 
Georgia Cavalry, 1862. Dead. 

ROBINETT, WILLIAM H.— 

Third Corporal, June 15, 1861. Died at Camp Alleghany, Va., Au- 
gust 16, 1861. 

PARK, JOHN H.— 
Third Corporal, June 15, 1861. Wounded at McDowell. Killed at 
Fredericksburg, Va. 



Mustek Rolls of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 327 

I^NIER, WILLIAM— 

Fourth Corporal, June 15, 1861, Captured at battle Allegliany, Va. 
Killed at Wilderness, Va. 
ADAMS, R. FRANKLIN— 

Private, June 15, 1801. Served through the war. Living in Marion 
county, Ga. 

ADAMS, S. W — 

Private, March 26, 1863. Captured while at home on furlough. 
Never heard of since. 

ALLEN, JAMES C— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant 1863. 

Wounded at Spottsylvania, Va. Killed at Petersburg, Va., April 

2, 1865. 
ANDREWS, WYATT F.— 

Private, July 1, 1861. Wounded while sick in hospital at Camp 

Bartow, Va., and died from wound November 22, 1861. 

ATTAWAY, WILLIAM R.— 

Private, September 19, 1862. Discharged 1862. Living in Marion 
county, Ga. 

BARRHTT, JACK— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Survived the war. Living in Columbus, Ga, 

BARNES, M. R.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Second Manassas, and dis- 
charged October 3, 1862. Living in Schley county, Ga. 

BASS, E. B.— 

Private, October 11, 1863. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. 
BIGHAM, WILLIAM— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Second Manassas. Detailed 
as blacksmith 1863. Dead. 
BOND, SAMUEL— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Died of disease in service. 

BRANNEN, E. F.— 

Private, March 22, 1862. Lost arm at Second Manassas. 
-BRANNEN, WILLIAM F.— 

Private, March 22, 1862. Fate unknown. 

BRANTLEY, WILLIAM— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Lost arm in battle and discharged 1863. 

BRUCE, JACK— 

Private, July 1, 1861. Survived the war. Killed in Memphis, Term., 
since the w^ar. 

BRUCE, JAMES L.— 

Private, July 1, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Rochelle, 
Ga. 



328 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

BURGAMY, WILLIAM H.— 

Private, July 1, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va., and died in 
prison. 

BURT, WILLIS P.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged September i, 1861. Enlisted in 
Company D, Forty-sixth Georgia Regiment. Living in Atlanta^ 
Ga. 
CANTRELL, JOHN W— . 
Private, June 15, 1801. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant Au- 
gust 9, 1862. KiUed in battle May 11, 1863. 
CARROLL, WILLIAM— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Survived the war. Living in Doyle, Ga. 
CHESHIRE, M. H.— 

Private, August 11, 1863. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. 
CLEMENTS, C. L.— 

Private, August 19, 1862. Served through the war. 
CLEMENTS, FRANCIS— 

Private, August 19, 1862. Served through the war. 
CLEMENTS, JOHN W.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Lost arm at Second Manasses. Living in 
Columbus, Ga. 

CLEMENTS, R. F.— 

Private, April 10, 1862. Wounded and captured near Washington, 
D. C, July 12, 1864. 

CLEMENTS, THOMAS J.— 

Private. October 8, 1803. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Living in 
Texas. 
COLEMAN, JAMES L.— 

Private, August 11, 1863. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. 
COVINGTON, JAMES D.— 

Private, August 19, 1861. Wounded lat McDowell, Va. Died in 
Staunton, Va., from wound. 

COVINGTON, JOHN F.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Captured at Second Manassas. Served 
through the war. Living in Americus, Ga. 

COX, JOHN C— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Captured at Second Manassas. Exchanged 
September 15, 1862. Served through the war. Living in Kansas. 

CRAWFORD, GREEN W — 

Private, July 1, 1861. Captured at Second Manassas. Promoted 
Junior Second Lieutenant 1863, Second Lieutenant 1864. Killed at 
Spottsylvania, Va. 

CRAWFORD, S. H.— 

Private, July 1, 1861. Killed at Wilderness, Va. 



Muster Kolls of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 329- 

CRYE, RICHARD— 

Private, June 15, 18G1. Killed at Greenbrier River, Va., October 
3, 1861. 
CROCKER, WILLIAM H.— 
Private, June 15, 18G1. Killed at Wilderness, Va. 

CUSHIN, MURDOCK— 

Private, June 15, 18G1. Fate unknown. 

DANIEL, JAMES— 

Private, June 15, 18G1. Killed by cars in Virginia 1862. 

DANIEL, JOHN W.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Died of disease December, 1862. 

DAVIS, JESSE— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Killed at Port Republic, Va. 
DAVIS, JOHN W.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Died in Staunton at hospital April, 1862. 
DAVIS, JOSEPH T.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Died of disease 1862. 
DAUGHTRY, BENJAMIN— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Detailed as nurse August 28, 1862. Wound- 
ed at Wilderness, Va. Living in Texas. 

DAUGHTRY, ELIAS— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Second Manassas. 
EDWARDS, LOXLAS— 
Private, April 17, 1862. Died of fever at Bentonville, Va., June 6,. 
1862. 

EL AM, WILLIAM D.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Promoted Sergeant-Major Twelfth Georgia 
Regiment April, 1862. Discharged from service on being elected 
a member of the General Assembly of Georgia. Died since the- 
war in Rome, Ga. 

ENNIS, ARTHUR— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 

ENNIS, GEORGE H.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Died 
since the war in Arkansas. 
FLOYD, JOHN L— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged January, 1862. Died 1900. 
FRENCH, ELLIS— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Captured June 21, 1862. Wounded at 
Sharpsburg, Md. Wounded and captured at Spottsylvania, Va. 
GATES, . 

Private, June 15, 1861. Fate unknown. 
GILL, B. R.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged August 11, 1861. Died 1900. 



530 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

<JILL, WILLIAM F.— 

Private, June 15, 18G1. Discharged January, 1862. Died in Lee 
county, Ga., 1900. 

GOLDEN, GILLEY— 

Private, April 22, 1862. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va., and died in 

prison. 

GORDON, JOHN W.— 

Private, April 22, 1862. Wounded and captured at Spottsylvania, Va. 
Living in Randolph county, Ga. 

GUY, TINSLEY— 

Private, September 9, 1863. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Died 
since the vrar in Marion county, Ga. 

HADAWAY, WILEY D.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Killed at Alleghany, Va. 

HALE, WILLIAM F.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Died of disease September 19, 1861. 

HAMILTON, HENRY C— 

Private, June 1, 1863. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va., and died in 
prison. 

HAMILTON, N. W.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Died of disease in service. 

HAMILTON, ROBERT— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Geneva, 
Ga. 

HAMILTON, WILLIAM W.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va., and died in 
prison. 

HARRIS, F. A.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Ve. Served 
through the war. Moved out West. 

HARRIS, JORDAN— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Died in service 1861. 

HARRIS, THOMAS A.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Captured at Second Manasses, and Spottsyl- 
vania, Va. Living in Arkansas. 

HARVEY, MILTON M. D.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Acting Ordnance Sergeant Twelfth GeoF' 
gia Regiment. Died of fever October 16, 1861. 

HARVEY, MOSES J.— 

Private, .June 15, 1861. Wounded at Alleghany, Va. Captured at 
Spottsylvania, Va., May 10, 1864. Captured at Petersburg, Va., 
April 1, 1865. Living in Yeatsville, Ga. 



Muster Rolls of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 381 

HILLMAN, HENRY W.— 

Priyate, April 15, 18G2. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Living in 
Texas. 
HILLMAN, SAMUEL W.— 
Private, February 27, 1864. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Died 
1872. 
HOGG, CHRISTOPHER— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Rich- 
land, Ga. 

HOGG, JAMES W.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Served through the waur. 

HOGG, LEWIS— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Survived the v^^ar. Living in Tazewell, Ga. 

HOOKS, JOHN R.— 

Private, February 27, 1864. Wounded and captured at Spottsylva- 
nia, Va. 
HUNLEY, JAMES E.— 

Private, April 15, 1862. Captured at Front Royal, Va., May 30, 1862. 
Dead. 

HUTCHINSON, WILLIAM A.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at McDowell, Va., May 8, 1862, 
and died from wound next day. 

JOHNSON, JESSE J.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Captured 1864, and joined the Federal 
Army. Deserted and returned to the Twelfth Georgia Regiment 
1865. Living in Dranesville, Ga. 

JOHNSON, WILLIAM A.— 

Private, Jnne 15, 1861. Discharged May 30, 1862. 

JOHNSON, WILLIAM H.— 

Private, June 21, 1864. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Living in 

Buena Vista, Ga. 
JONES, DANIEL, Jr.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Killed by railroad train in Virginia, June 

21, 1862. 

JORDAN, IRWIN W.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged July 8, 1861. Living in Buena 
Vista, Ga. 

JORDAN, W. H. H.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va., and died in 
prison of smallpox. 

JOSEY, JOHN F.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Died of disease at Greenbrier River, Va., 
October 2, 1861. 



332 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

KEMP, MORGAN— 

Private, June jl5, 1861. Discharged July, 1862. Dead. 
KIDD, WILLIAM— 

Private, Jime 15, 1861. Captured at Front Royal, and Spottsylvanla, 
Va. Living in Sumter county, Ga. 
KREAMER, ROBERT I.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Died of disease November, 1861. 
LAWTON, J.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Fate unknown. 

LOCKETT, AUGUSTUS A.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Died in Staunton, Va., at hospital February, 
1862. 

MARTIN, A. C— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Fishers Hill, Va., July 9, 1864. 
Living in Atlanta, Ga. 

MATHEWS, ARCHIBALD W.— 

Private, April 17, 1862. Died of disease 1862. 

MATHEWS, B.— 

Private, April 17, 1862. Dead. 
MATHEWS, N.— 

Private, April 17, 1862. Dead. 

MATHEWS, WILLIAM E.— 

Private, April 21, 1862. Survived the war. Died 1877. 
MELTON, ELBERT M.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Died in service January 2, 1863. 
MELTON, MILES H.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged July 8, 1861. Dead. 

MELTON, RICHARD W.— 

Private, April 21, 1862. Survived the war. Living in Louisiana 1875. 

MELTON, W. B.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Survived the war, and died in Louisiana. 

MOORE, JAMES J.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged May 20, 1862. Dead. 

MURRAY, DAVID L.— 

Pcrivate, June 15, 1861. Killed at McDowell, Va. 

MURPHY, GEORGE W.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 

NEWSOME, JOHN B.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Co- 
lumbus, Ga. 
NEWSOME, KITCHEN M.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Lost leg at Spottsylvania, Va. Living in 
Arkansas. 



Muster Rolls of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 333 

OWENS, JOSEPH A.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Died in hospital April 5, 1862. 

PARKER, NATHANIEL W.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Died of smallpox in prison at Elmira, N. Y., 
1865. 

PEACOCK, B. T.— 
Private, April 8, 1864. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Exchanged 
December, 1864. Captured at Petersburg, Va., April 1, 1865. Re- 
leased from Point Lookout, Md., July, 1865. Living in Buena 
Ylsta, Ga. 

PEACOCK, ROBERT H.— 

Private, April 27, 1862. Killed at Petersburg, Ya., April 1. 1865. 

PEARSON, CHRISTOPHER— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Dranes- 
ville, Ga. 

PERRY, AMOS C— 
Private, March 1, 1862. Detailed as ambulance driver 1862. Died 
near Rome, Ga., 1872. 

PERRY, GEORGE vV.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Died in seiwice September 24, 1861. 

PERRY, JESSE M.— 
Private, February 23, 1863. Captured at Spottsylvania, Ya. Died in 
prison at Washington, D. C. Buried at Arlington. 

PERRY, WILLIS B.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Killed at Port Republic, Ya. 

PHELPS, AUGUSTUS— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Served through the war. 
POTTER, BURWELL— 

Private, October 11, 1863. Fate unknown. 

POWELL, JEREMIAH— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Captured at Spottsylvania, Ya., and died in 
prison of smallpox. 

RANES, S. J.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Fate unknown. 

ROBERTS, W. T.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Captured at Gettysburg, Pa. 

ROLAND, S. D.— 

Private, October 8, 1863. Fate unknown. 

ROSSER, JAMES W.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Promoted Corporal August 17, 1861. 
Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md. Promoted Second Sergeant 1863. 
Captured at Spottsylvania, Ya. Living in Lee county, Ga. 



334 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

RUSHIN, THOMAS J.— 

Private, June 15, 18(51. Promoted Second Sergeant July 23, 1861. 
Junior Second Lieutenant. Killed at Sbarpsburg, Md. 

SCOGGIN, HIRAM C— 
Private, June 15, 1801. Wounded at Cedar Run, Va., and died from 
wound. 
SMITH, OLIVER— 

Private, March 1, 1862. Wounded at Cedar Run, Va., died from 
wound September 15, 1862. 

SMITH, THOMAS J.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Served through the war. Dead. 

SPINKS, ALEXANDER— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged March 23, 1863. Died in Texas 
since the war. 

STORY, WILLIAM S.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Survived the war. Dead. 

SWAIN, STEPHEN— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Dead. 

THACKER, JAMES A.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Wounded at Alleghany, Va. Promoted First 
Sergeant. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. While in prison he was 
urged by his uncle to take the oath of allegiance to the United 
States Government. Offered to furnish a substitute, but he 
stoutly refused all offers, and remained true to the South, and 
served through the entire war. He was of Northern birth. Liv- 
ing in Troup county, Ga. 

THAGGARD, JOHN B.— 
Private, April ly, 1862. Died of disease July 24, 1862. 

TULLIS, JAMES— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged July 10, 1861. Dead. 

WALLACE, ROBERT— 
Private, September 19, 1863. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Served 
through the war. Dead. 

WATSON, ARTHUR B.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Died in service September, 1861. 

WATSON, CHARLES— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Dead. 

WEAVER, JOHN— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Died in service September 1, 1861. 

WHITE, HUGH— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Died in service January 1, 1862. 

WORRELL, JOSEPH W.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Lost leg at Alleghany, Va., and discharged. 
Living in Marion county, Ga. 



Muster Rolls of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 335 

WORSHAM, WILLIAM A., Sr.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Discharged August 19, 1862. Over age. 
Dead. 

WORSHAM, WILLIAM A., Jr.— 

Private, June 15, 1861. Dead. 
YATES, WILLIAM F. M.— 
Private, June 15, 1861. Died of disease in service. 



336 Doles-Cook Brigade. 



A WOUNDED CONFEDERATE. 



BY CHAPLAIN NORMAN FOX, SEVENTY-SEVENTH NEW YORK 

VOLUNTEERS. 

On the evening of May 10, at Spottsylvania, under the leadership 
of General Upton, a column of a dozen selected regiments, including 
my own, all of the Sixth Corps (Sedgwick's), made a charge ; and, 
although the movement was unsuccessful in the end, they held for a 
time a portion of the Confederate works. 

Among the wounded brought to the rear was a boy in gray, Private 
Thomas J. Roberts, of Company I, Twelfth Georgia. We lifted him 
from the ambulance, and having spread a blanket on the grass and 
laid him on it, I called a surgeon. A minie ball had struck him in 
the groin, and but a slight examination was enough to show that the 
wound was fatal. He was a mere boy, and I can still see his really 
beautiful face as he lifted his dark, lustrous eyes to mine. It was 
little that I could do for him, but I spoke such words of comfort as I 
could command. He showed fortitude and cheerfulness for one in so 
sad a situation, and he told me about his friends at home, speaking 
also of those from his own family circle who had already been killed 
in the war. While we were talking he asked for a drink of water. I 
brought it, and as I raised him to a sitting posture so that he could 
drink he leaned his head forward upon my shoulder, and without a 
struggle was dead. We could give him only the rude burial of a 
soldier, but over his grave was lifted the prayer that the God of all 
comfort would tenderly support those far away who would wait in vain 
the return of the boy of their love and hopes. 

Often since that night have I thought of that Southern soldier lad 
who died actually in my arms, as if in a mother's embrace, and I pen 
this reminiscence that possibly it may make known to some surviving 
comrade or dear one that in his last hour what little could be done for 
him was tenderly performed. 

More than one of those of my regiment who, being wounded, fell 
into the hands of the enemy spoke afterwards of kindnesses shown 
them by Southern soldiers. Thanks, noble Confederate veterans, for 
acts of tenderness to those whom the stern fortunes of war cast at your 



A Wounded Confederate. 337 

feet. Your names may be unknown to the Northern mothers and 
sisters of those to whom you showed kindness, but their prayers have 
gone up to God for you all the same. You yourself may have for- 
gotten your gentle deeds, deeming them little things, but God's angels 
have kept the records of them all. 

Morristown, N. J., September 4, 1894. 



22d-c 



338 Doles-Cook Brigade. 



IN MEMORY OF CAPTAIN JOHN McMILLAN, WIL- 
LIE McCASKILL AND DONNIE McCASKILL. 

On old Virginia's hallowed sod 
No braver trio ever trod 
Than Will McOaskill, gallant Don 
And bold McMillan — Captain John. 

The leader of a chosen band 
Left home, his friends, his native land ; 
In Freedom's cause he gave his life, 
In far-famed McDowell's fatal strife. 

They found brave Will among the slain 
At Cedar Run — Virginia's plain ; 
He died as heroes love to die, 
While shouts of triumph rent the sky. 

In camp — alone— no loved ones near, 
No mother's — sister's voice to cheer, 
Young Donnie's earthly course was run , 
Death's river crossed, Heaven's vict'ry won. 

'* Here sleeps these brave who sank to rest 
By all their country's wishes blest ; 
When Spring, with dewy fingers cold, 
Returns to deck their hallowed mold. 
She here shall dress a sweeter sod 
Than Fancy's feet have ever trod." 

By fairy hands their knell is rung, 
By childish tongues their praise is sung ; 
Here woman comes, Memorial day, 
To deck the turf that wraps their clay. 

With violets, roses, lilies fair, 
We'll scatter sweetest flowers there, 
And ne'er, while love our hearts doth sway, 
Will we forget our boys in grey. 



Battle-Flag of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 339 



BATTLB-FLAG OF THE TWEI.FTH GEORGIA 

REGIMENT. 

In a history published by the People's Publishing Company of 
Philadelphia, Pa., entitled "Under Both Flags," on page 208, there is 
a picture of a flag purporting to be the battle^flag of the Twelfth 
Georgia Regiment, which one Captain W. N. Green, of the One 
Hundred and Second New York Regiment, claims to have caj^tured at 

the battle of Chancellorsville, Va. , and in volume XXV., part , 

page 765, one Colonel James C. Lane, of the One Hundred and 
Second New York State Volunteers, in his official report of the battle 
of Chancellorsville, says : "The One Hundred and Second being 
within rifle-shot, left the trenches and formed at right angles to it and 
poured volleys of musketry into the advancing rebels, which halted 
them, giving these regiments time to withdraw. After they had passed 
rebels came in on both sides, left and right, saying we were surrounded 
and must surrender, but instead of doing so we disarmed two com- 
missioned officers, one flag- sergeant and twenty privates, taking the 
flag and bringing our prisoners safe to the rear. The battle-flag and 
prisoners were from the Twelfth Georgia Volunteers." 

We denounce both of the above statements as utterly false, for the 
Twelfth Georgia Regiment did not lose a flag during the entire period 
of the war. 

A denial of the surviving members of the Twelfth Georgia Regi- 
ment, at their annual reunion, held in Atlanta, Ga., is herewith pre- 
sented : 

Atlanta, Ga., July 21, 1898. 

At a meeting of the Doles- Cook Brigade Survivors' Association 
the veterans of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment issued the following 
address : 
' ' To all Confederate Veterans and lovers of true history and justice. 

" We the survivors of the Twelfth Regiment, Georgia Volun- 
teers, call your attention to an illustration on page 208 in a history 
published by People's Publishing Company, of Philadelphia, Pa. , en- 
titled 'Under Both Flags.' The picture represents the capture of 
the battle-flag of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment, on the battle-field of 
Chancellorsville, Va., by one Captain W. N. Green, of the One 
Hundred and Second New York Regiment. 



340 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

"We, the undersigned, were in that battle, and members of the 
glorious old Twelfth Georgia, and hereby declare unto the world, and 
especially to the honest veterans of both the armies of the North and 
South, that this picture is a slander on one of the best regiments in 
history. 

*' We appeal, as honest patriots of a reunited Union and as proud 
survivors of our famous regiment, to the honesty and justice of the 
people of this day, and to all Confederate camps, and especially to 
the committee on the history of the war, to have this false statement 
corrected. 

''On July 22, 1898, it was moved, seconded and adopted that the 
Association of Survivors of the Doles-Cook Brigade indorse as a 
brigade the declaration made in a card, and published in the Atlanta 
Constitution and Journal, of July 21, 1898, denouncing the alleged 
capture of the battle-flag of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment, as false." 

[Brigadier-General George Doles, our commander, in his official re- 
port of the battle of Chancellorsville, on page 969, volume XXV., 

part , War of the Rebellion, reports one officer and eleven enlisted 

men killed, four officers and fifty-four enlisted men wounded, and only 
two enlisted men missing — making the total casualties in the Twelfth 
Georgia Regiment, in killed, wounded and missing, seventy-two, but 
does not report the loss of a single battle-flag in his brigade. Major- 
General R. E. Rodes, our division commander, in his official report 
of the battle of Chancellorsville, on pages 949 and 950, volume XXV., 

part , War of the Rebellion, reports eleven flags captured from 

the enemy and three flags lost by his division. Two of the flags were 
lost by North Carolina Regiments, and one by an Alabama Regiment. 

It is always the duty of the commanding officer of regiments to 
report the loss of colors, and a failure to do so would be considered a 
breach of honor and discipline. It is equally the duty of brigade and 
division commanders to embody such loss in their reports. The fact 
that no such statement occurs in any Southern report would of itself 
be sufficient refutation. 

From the foregoing it will be seen that our denunciation of the 
falsity of the capture of the battle-flag of the Twelfth Georgia Regi- 
ment, at Chancellorsville, Va., May, 1863, is fully sustained by ex- 
tracts from official reports issued by the United States Government. 

It is evident that the officers who reported the capture of this flag 

were mistaken as to the command from whom the capture was made, 

or they maliciou-sly made false statements in regard to the matter with 



Battle-Flag of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment. 341 

the intention of injuring the reputation of the Twelfth Georgia Regi- 
ment. In either event we are justified by the official reports in de- 
nouncing the story of the capture as false.] 

'* We, the committee to whom this matter was referred, respectfully 
submit the foregoing report. 

"0. T. FuRLOW, Fourth Georgia Regiment, 
" H. W. Thomas, Twelfth Georgia Regiment, 
" H. T. Davenport, Twelfth Georgia Regiment, 

" Committee.'' 



REUNION survivors' ASSOCIATION, DOI.ES-COOK BRIGADE, 
ARMY NORTHERN VIRGINIA. 

Macon, Ga., September 26, 1900. 

Meeting called to order by Commander Robert Young, at eleven 
o'clock a.m. Minutes of the previous meeting were read and approved. 
The report of the committee on the alleged capture of 
the battle-flag of the Twelfth Georgia Regiment was read and unani- 
mously adopted, and Comrade H. W. Thomas requested to publish said 
report in his forthcoming book, "History of the Doles-Cook Brig- 
ade, A. N. v., C. S. A." 

I hereby certify that the above is a true extract from the minutes. 

H. "W. Thomas, Secretary and Treasurer, 
Survivors' Association of the Doles-Cook Brigade. 



History of the Twenty-first Georgia Regiment. 



CHAPTER IV. 

At the request of many of our comrades of the gallant old Twenty- 
first, we have undertaken, by collaboration, to write a brief history 
of the regiment. 

After a lapse of forty years, with little outside of our memories to 
depend upon, there must of necessity be many things of importance 
omitted, and in some instances the facts given may not be as full and 
explicit as they should be, and again, the incidents related and the 
chronological order in which they are written may vary somewhat 
from the memory of other survivors of the regiment, but we have 
endeavored to perpetuate in this volume nothing but the plain un- 
varnished truth of history. We therefore beg the careful reading of 
every survivor of the dear old regiment, and if any inaccuracies are 
discovered, that we may be notified of same so that proper correction 
may be made, in order that the history of our achievements may be 
handed down to posterity absolutely correct. 

While the seat of the Confederate Government was in Montgom- 
ery, Ala., Captain James J. Morrison of the United States Cavalry 
service resigned his position in the regular army and went to Mont- 
gomery and tendered his services to President Jefferson Davis, and 
asked to raise a regiment of cavalry for the Confederate service. Presi- 
dent Davis told him that he thought the bulk of the fighting would 
be in Virginia, and that from the nature of the service that would be 
required of the cavalry, he thought it best that the cavalry arm of 
the army should be composed of Virginians who knew the coun- 
try. He would, however, authorize him to raise a regiment of Infan- 
try Volunteers for service in Virginia. 

In the meantime the call to arms was resounding throughout the 
State, and companies were being organized for the defense of the 
South against the hordes from the North. A number of gentlemen 
who had organized companies tendered their services to Governor Jo- 
seph E. Brown, the war governor of Georgia, but in consequence of 

(342) 



History of the Twenty-first Georgia Regiment. 343 

some disagreement with President Davis the services of these organi- 
zations were rejected by Governor Brown. It becoming known that 
Morrison had authority from President Davis to organize a regiment, 
correspondence was opened between him and a number of those who 
had been elected captains of companies, and upon a prearranged date 
in the latter part of April, 1861, these captains met Colonel Morrison 
in Rome, Georgia, to perfect an organization. 

At this meeting J. J. Morrison was elected colonel, Daniel S. 
Printup, of Rome, lieutenant- colonel, and Alexander M. Wallace, of 
Atlanta, major. 

It was also agreed at this Rome meeting that each captain should 
take his company to Richmond as soon as possible, and Lieutenant- 
Colonel Printup was designated to go on to Richmond and prepare a 
camp and have everything ready for the men as they should arrive. 
From a lack of transportation and uniforms it was the middle of 
June before any of them reached Richmond. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Printup had arranged for the regiment to ren- 
dezvous at the old fair grounds, and after being there for quite a 
while. Companies A and C, which were mustered into the Confederate 
service on June 6, 1861, arrived, and were then known as the 
'' Fourth Georgia Battalion." After this the other companies of the 
regiment were mustered in as they arrived, as follows : 

Company B, June 24, 1861; Company E, June 24, 1861 ; Com- 
pany D, June 27, 1861 ; Company H, July 2, 1861 ; Company G, 
July 4, 1861 ; Company F, July 9, 1861 ; Company I, July 17, 
1861 ; Company K, August 28, 1861. 

In May, 1862, Company E, above (captain, J. R. Hart), was trans- 
ferred to the cavalry and assigned to service in the Western Army in 
Tennessee and Kentucky. From this time there were only nine com- 
panies in the regiment until the latter part of 1864, another com- 
pany, E (captain, Edward Smith), was attached to the regiment. 

On July 17, 1861, the services of the regiment, as then organized, 
were formally tendered to President Davis, and while he accepted the 
services of the regiment, he declined to do so under the officers as 
then constituted, claiming the right to appoint the regimental officers; 
and in pursuance of this claim of right, the President, at the sug- 
gestion of J. J. Morrison, appointed John T. Mercer (a cousin of 
Colonel Morrison), who had just resigned a first lieutenancy in the 
First Dragoons of the regular army, to the colonelcy of the regi- 
ment. He then appointed J. J. Morrison lieutenant-colonel, Alex- 



344 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

ander M. AVallace, major, and Thomas W. Hooper, adjutant. These 
appointments were made July 19 and 20, 1861. 

Wallace refused to accept the office of major, and never did join 
the regiment. Shortly afterwards he was made lieutenant-colonel of 
another regiment, and served with distinction throughout the war. On 
September 27, 1861, Adjutant Thomas W. Hooper was promoted ta 
major of the regiment, and Thomas J. Verdery, of Augusta, Ga., on 
October 12, 1861, was made adjutant of the regiment. 

In March, 1862, Lieutenant-Colonel Morrison was promoted to a 
colonelcy and given permission to organize a regiment of cavalry for 
service in the Army of Tennessee. He came home and organized the 
First Georgia Cavalry Regiment and served with marked distinction 
throughout the war, being promoted to brigadier-general and having^ 
command of a brigade for nearly two years before the close of the war. 

On tbe promotion and transfer of Lieutenant-Colonel Morrison, 
Major Thomas W. Hooper was promoted to lieutenant-colonel, and 
Captain Thomas C. Glover, of Company A, was made major. 

Adjutant Thomas J. Verdery was killed in battle at Fredericks- 
burg, Va. , on January 4, 1863, when Captain Lee F. Bakewell, of 
New Orleans. La., who had been a captain in Wheat's famous bat- 
talion of Louisiana Tigers, was assigned to the regiment as adjutant, 
and served in that capacity until he was killed at Fort Steadman, 
Petersburg, Va., March 25, 1865. Of Captain Bakewell too much 
in his praise can not be said. He was as pitying and tender as a wo- 
man, yet as brave and fearless as a Marshal Ney. He was as true a 
friend to those whom he liked as truth itself, and held himself en- 
tirely aloof from everything that pertained to littleness or meanness. 
He was one of God's true noblemen — a gentleman. When he wa& 
kiUed he had a sixty days' furlough in his pocket, but persistently 
refused to take advantage of it and leave the army even a day while 
the boys were daily fighting. 

On April 18, 1864, at Plymouth, N. C, Colonel John T. Mercer 
was killed in battle, and Lieutenant-Colonel Hooper was promoted to 
the colonelcy. Major Thomas C. Glover to lieutenant-colonel, and 
Captain Michael Lynch, of Company I, to major. 

On September 19, 1864, at Winchester, Va., Lieutenant-Colonel 
Glover was killed in battle, it being the one hundred and seventh en- 
gagement in which he had led his men, not one of whom but that 
loved and revered him as a child does its father, and who would have 



History of the Twenty-first Georgia Regiiment. 345 

followed him into the very jaws of hell, had he but said " Come on, 
boys." 

At the formal organization of the regiment, July 19, 1861, Dr. 
Cicero Holt was appointed surgeon, and Dr. LeGrande C. Capers, of 
Savannah, Ga., assistant surgeon. On February 20, 1862, Dr. Holt 
was discharged from the army and Dr. Capers made surgeon and Dr. 
W. F. Dewitt assistant surgeon. In the fall of 1862, Dr. Dewitt 
was transferred and Dr. A. E. McGarrity appointed assistant surgeon. 
Drs. Capers and McGarrity remained in charge of the medical depart- 
ment of the regiment until the early fall of 1863, when they were 
transferred to other commands, and that grandest of medical men, 
Dr. Louis E. Gott, of Alexandria, Va., was assigned to the regiment 
as surgeon, and Dr. C. E. Cowherd as assistant surgeon. 

Dr. Louis E. Gott, although still living, is another, like the brave 
and lamented Glover and Bakewell, whose memory should be pre- 
served and honored by the descendants of the brave men of the Twenty- 
first Georgia, for the aid, comfort and consolation he gave their fath- 
ers when sick, wounded and dying, and that this may be done, we beg 
the indulgence of the readers that we may here present an extract from 
a letter written by him in answer to one asking for some facts in connec- 
tion with his services for the Confederacy. Dr. Gott is now an old man, 
and this letter, though written nearly forty years after the war 
and necessarily omitting many things of which he was cognizant at 
the time, will still be read with interest by the survivors of the regi- 
ment, and we hope by their descendants : 

''Falls Church, Va., May 25, 1901. 
. . . . " Before my connection with the Twenty-first Georgia 
Regiment began, I had served in the capacity of medical officer in a 
number of commands, entering the Confederate service as an assistant 
surgeon under General John Bankhead Magruder ; my first service 
was in charge of batteries in front of Yorktown. I was relieved by 
a Dr. Todd, a brother-in-law of President Abraham Lincoln, who was 
a Southern man and chose to attach himself to the Confederacy rather 
than take a more promising position under his distinguished relative. 
From Yorktown I was ordered to Williamsburg, and placed in charge 
of the hospital at that point, located in the Baptist Church. From 
Williamsburg I was ordered to Mulberry Island, James River, not 
far from Newport News, where I was medical officer to a detached 
company of infantry stationed there in charge of heavy ordnance. 



346 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

" When McClellan made his appearance at Yorktown we fell back 
with Joe Johnston, abandoning this island. Our company was placed 
aboard the little gunboat " Teaser," Captain Ward, and taken to Rich- 
mond to join its regiment. I reported to the surgeon-general and 
was ordered to Camp Winder Hospital, just outside of Richmond. 
This was some weeks before the battle of Seven Pines. After the 
seven days' fight was over I was ordered to report to the Forty-ninth 
Virginia Regiment, at that time a part of Mahone's Brigade, under 
Colonel William Smith, subsequently governor of the State, and 
known as ''Extra Billy." The regiment was soon after transferred 
to Early's Brigade, and saw service with that regiment up to and in- 
cluding the battle of Gettysburg, taking part in the battles of Slaugh- 
ter Mountain, Second Manassas, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Win- 
chester, and finally Gettysburg, after which I became attached to the 
Twenty-first Georgia as its surgeon. 

"After the battle of Gettysburg I was ordered to remain with the 
wounded of Early's Division at the hospital five miles from Gettys- 
burg on the Fairfield road. I was there about three weeks, when I 
was taken as a prisoner of war to Fort Henry, near Baltimore, and 
confined therein about six weeks, when I was exchanged, and returned 
to Richmond. Again reporting to the surgeon-general I received my 
orders to report to the medical director of the Army of Northern 
Virginia for assignment to duty. My place in the Forty-ninth Vir- 
ginia Regiment having been supplied, I was ordered to report to the 
medical director of Rodes' Division, and he assigned me to the Twenty- 
first Georgia Regiment, stationed near Orange Court House. This 
was early in the fall of 1863, the exact date I can not now recall. 

"The regiment under detached service accompanied General Pickett 
to North Carolina for the purpose of capturing Newberne, which we 
failed to accomplish. We came back to Kinston, N. C, remaining 
there for some time. Pickett went back, and subsequently we were 
put under command of General Hoke, under whom we participated 
in the battle of Plymouth. The colonel of the regiment, John Mer- 
cer, who commanded the left wing of the army in that fight, was 
killed by a shot through the head. He was a brave as well as a tal- 
ented man. Hooper succeeded Mercer as colonel, and Major Glover 
was made lieutenant-colonel. 

"After the battle of Plymouth we were hurried back to Petersburg, 
and then followed the battle of Drewry's Bluff, in May, 1864. Grant 
and Lee were then fighting in the Wilderness and Spottsylvania. 



History of the Twenty-first Georgia Kegiment. 347 

From Drewry's Bluff we went to Guinea Station on the Richmond 
and Fredericksburg railroad. There we joined the Army of Northern 
Virginia as a part of Doles' Brigade, Kodes' Division. Falling back 
from this point we marched parallel with Grant's army, watching his 
movements and anticipating his plans. We had several fights before 
Grant reached the James, in one of which General Doles was killed. 
I was talking with the general not more than half an hour before his 
death. Everything was quiet, no enemy in sight, when suddenly the 
enemy marched from behind the woods, and in the engagement the 
gallant Doles fell shot through the heart. When we got around in 
front of Richmond we pushed on to Lynchburg to attack Gen- 
eral Hunter, he falling back at our approach, retreating by the 
Peaks of Otter up the Kanawha Valley, while we went by way 
of Staunton and Winchester, crossed the Potomac below Shepherds- 
town and hurried on unimpeded to Frederick City, Maryland. There 
we had a fight with General Lew Wallace, driving him off, he re- 
treating towards Baltimore. AVe marched to Rockville, from which 
place we approached Washington, and had a skirmish with the Fed- 
eral troops at Brightwood within sight of that city. The Nineteenth 
Army Corps under Wright coming up next day, we were compelled 
to fall back to Rockville, from which point we marched towards the 
Potomac, crossing at Edward's Ferry to Leesburg, Va. Pushing on 
to the Blue Ridge we crossed the Shenandoah at Snicker's Ferry, fol- 
lowed closely by the Nineteenth Army Corps. Here Early fell back, 
and after permitting Wright to cross the Shenandoah he attacked and 
drove him back, when the enemy gave up the chase, and we pro- 
ceeded. In this battle near Snicker's Ferry, Lieutenant Glover, a 
relative of Colonel Glover, was seriously wounded. 

" The next battle in which we participated was the battle of Kerns- 
town with Sheridan's forces, in which the enemy was driven back. 
We took part in the battle of Winchester, September 19, 1864, where 
Colonel Glover and General Rodes were killed. Forced to retreat, we 
fell back to Strasburg, where we remained nearly a month, when 
Sheridan made his famous advance down the valley, and on the 19th 
of October we fought the battle of Cedar Creek. In the first part of 
this fight we were successful, but in the afternoon we were driven 
back to Fisher's Hill. We remained here four or five days, and 
Sheridan advancing we were compelled to again retreat. After this 
the division was sent back to the Army of Northern Virginia at 
Petersburg, and put in the trenches around that city. 



348 Doles- Cook Brigade. 

" The next engagement in which our regiment took prominent part 
was near Hatcher's Kun to the right of Petersburg, the enemy's sor- 
ties being repulsed in a number of instances. 

*' The next general fight was Fort Steadman, which proved a failure 
on our part. In this fight, Lee F. Bakewell, the adjutant of the reg- 
iment was killed. He was a native of Cincinnati, a gallant fellow 
and brave as a lion. General Cook was wounded during this fight in 
the arm, though not seriously. We remained in the fortifications in 
front of Petersburg until the army fell back to Appomattox Court 
House, where I surrendered with the regiment, then under command 
of Captain Edward Smith. 

"With kindest regards, I beg to remain, 

"Yours very sincerely, 

"L. E. GoTT, M.D." 

At the organization of the regiment, July 19, 1861, R. O. Barrett 
was made commissary, D. M. Hood, quartermaster and Benjamin P. 
Bartow, sergeant-major. In May, 1863, William Haslett was made 
chaplain of the regiment, S. P. Rowland, sergeant-major and George 
Darden, ordnance sergeant. April, 1864, S. J. Rowland was made 
ordnance sergeant and W. J. Duke, sergeant-major ; R. O. Barrett 
was succeeded as commissary by George F. Hoover, and then by B. A. 
Camp ; D. M. Hood was succeeded as quartermaster-sergeant by 
L. H. Dawson, then by W. M. Danforth, next George F. Hoover 
and then A. J. Whitlock. Joseph S. Glover was the original color 
sergeant, and being elected to a lieutenancy in Company A, was suc- 
ceeded by John Tucker, who was afterwards captain of Company B. 
F. P. Parker was the original ensign. He was killed at Chancellors- 
ville, and was succeeded by James D. King, who was killed at 
Drewry's Blufl^, May 16, 1864. 

The brigadier-generals under whom the regiment served were Crit- 
tenden, Trimble, Hoke, Doles and Cook. 

The original companies of the regiment were : 

A, Campbell county Captain, T. C. Glover. 

B, Floyd county Captain, A. S. Hamilton. 

C, Fulton county Captain, J. F. Waddail. 

D, Polk county Captain, S. A. Borders. 

E, Floyd county Captain, J. R.Hart. 

F, Troup county Captain, J. T. Boykin. 

G, Gordon county Captain, W. Kinman. 



History of the Twenty-first Georgia Kegiment. 349 

H, Dade county Captain, J. C. Nesbett. 

T, Stewart county Captain, M. Lynch. 

K, Chattooga county Captain, J. B. Akridge. 

As stated above, the companies were mustered into service at differ- 
ent times and the command was originally designated the Fourth 
Georgia Battalion ; some of the companies being late in arriving at 
Bichmond, and in the meantime other regiments having been organ- 
ized, when the command was changed from a battalion to a regiment 
it had to take a number (21st) much higher than other regiments that 
had gone into the service after this one. 

Just after the first battle of Manassas, the regiment was ordered 
from Bichmond to Manassas, and just then began a feud among some 
of the officers that grew and spread and lasted until death claimed 
the principal, Colonel Mercer. 

Before going into the army Captain Glover was one of the most 
eminent physicians in the State. When the order came to go to Ma- 
nassas a large number of the regiment were down in their tents with 
measles. When the order to strike tents was received the rain was 
pouring down in torrents, and Captain Glover went to Colonel Mercer 
and asked that the tents be not struck down from over the men sick 
with measles, stating the danger to their lives that would ensue from 
their getting wet. 

Colonel Mercer refused to listen to him, and peremptorily ordered 
the tents down. Captain Glover refused to obey the order so far as 
his company's sick were concerned, and was placed in arrest. The 
command of the company then devolved on the first lieutenant, who 
obeyed the order, struck the tents and left about twenty men with 
measles lying in the rain. Almost all the other company ofiicers of 
the regiment took sides with Captain Glover, and the breach thus 
made was never healed as long as the principals lived. 

On arriving at Manassas, under command of General Crittenden, 
the regiment went into camp and a few days later the arrested officers 
were returned to duty without anything further having been done. 
We remained at Manassas in quarters until the retreat of General 
Johnston in the spring of 1862. While at Manassas that bravest of 
IMarylauders and most cliivalrous of gentlemen, General Trimble, was 
assigned to the command of the brigade, which was composed of the 
Fifteenth Alabama, Sixteenth Mississippi, Twenty-first North Caro- 
lina and Twenty-first Georgia Regiments and First North Carolina 
Battalion, and assigned to Ewell's Division. 



350 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

On leaviug Manassas, after crossing the Rappahannock river, the 
brigade was ordered to the Shenandoah Valley to join Stonewall Jack- 
son, and almost immediately on arrival, on May 23, 1862, went into 
the battle of Front Koyal, where the conspicuous gallantry displayed 
by the brigade, and especially by the Twenty-first North Carolina and 
Twenty-first Georgia, which were under the most galling fire, gained 
for them the appellation applied by General Trimble, "My two 
Twenty-ones." 

Two days later. May 25, we were rushed into the battle of Win- 
chester. In this battle the Federals were strongly posted behind a 
stone fence. Repeated charges had been made on this stone fence and 
repulsed, and the day seemed almost lost, when the Twenty-first Geor- 
gia was ordered forward to make an assault and carry the works, which 
they did in fine style. The remainder of the division following 
poured over the fence after the enemy, who was completely routed, 
and the day was saved to the Confederates. Following closely on the 
heels of the battle of Winchester came the battle of Strasburg, in 
which the regiment took an active part. Soon thereafter came the 
battle of Cross Keys, in which the Twenty-first Georgia drove the 
enemy from the field and captured a stand of colors for which the 
regiment was publicly thanked and highly complimented by General 
Ewell. 

In his report of the battle of Cross Keys, General Ewell says : 

" Brigadier-General Trimble, Seventh Brigade, had the brunt of the 
action and is entitled to most thanks. 

" Colonel Bradley T. Johnson (First Maryland), Colonel Carnot 
Posey (Sixteenth Mississippi), Colonel J. T. Mercer (Twenty-first 
Georgia), Captain Courtney (of the Courtney Battery), are officers 
who were able to render highly valuable service. 

" I regret that I can not go more into details of those lower in rank, 
whose gallant services are recompensed by the esteem of their com- 
rades and their own self-approval — after all the highest and most 
enduring record." 

Soon thereafter came on the battle of Port Republic, the last of 
"Jackson's First Valley Campaign," in which the regiment took an 
active part. 

After this battle we were sent forward to reinforce General Lee at 
Chickahominy, and reached the battle-fields in time to go through 
with all the terrible assaults made by Stonewall Jackson June 25 to 



History of the Twenty-first Georgia Regiment. 351 

July 1, 1862, at Mechauicsville, Chickahominy, Cold Harbor, Fra- 
zier's Farm, Savage Station, Malvern Hill, etc., in all of which the 
regiment lost heavily, but not in a ningle instance did they ever shirk 
their duty or give up a single inch of ground captured. 

After the seven days' fight we moved back towards the Rappahan- 
nock river. On August 9, 1862, we met and engaged General Pope 
at Cedar Run, after which Jackson moved up the river to find a cross- 
ing to reach Pope's rear. The Twenty-first Georgia and Twenty-first 
North Carolina (Trimble's two Twenty-ones) were ordered to ford 
Hazel Run, a tributary of the Rappahannock. After crossing and 
taking up a position, we were attacked by a full brigade of renegade 
Virginians carrying the Virginia flag. A heavy picket line reached 
our rear and captured our ambulance. Company A, Twenty-first 
Georgia, was thrown forward to find the position of the main body, 
being closely followed by the remainder of the regiment and the 
Twenty-first North Carolina. 

The company found the enemy posted in a corn field near the river, 
where an engagement followed which lasted only a few minutes. The 
regiment coming up, a charge was ordered and we drove the whole 
brigade into the river, pouring volley after volley into them while 
they were wading, swimming and floundering in the water, until the 
river seemed filled with the dead, wounded and dying floating down 
stream, almost covering its surface. 

The next morning we succeeded in crossing the Rappahannock, and 
then that great and historic flank movement by Stonewall Jackson in 
Pope's rear was made, his army marching fifty-five miles in two days, 
each man carrying eighty rounds of ammunition and with nothing to 
eat but roasting-ears. 

On the second day's march, August 26, 1862, the Twenty-first 
Georgia was in front of the brigade, and when in about two miles of 
Bristow Station was thrown forward in line of battle with Company 
A deployed as sharpshooters, and commenced advancing on the place. 
On nearing the station we heard the trains approaching which had 
carried reinforcements to General Pope. 

The first of these trains passed before we reached the railroad. It 
was fired at, but we failed to capture it. By the time the next train 
following arrived we had thrown a railroad bar of iron across the 
track, which threw the train off, the engine running some distance out 
on the hard wagon-road without turning over. The engineer who was 
driving this train was a nervy fellow and had the presence of mind 



352 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

and daring, notwithstanding he was surrounded by Confederate sol- 
diers who had derailed him, to blow the danger-signal for the trains 
following him to stop. Sergeant Ed Smith, of Company A, an old 
locomotive engineer, understanding the signal, sprang into the cab 
and wrenching the Yankee engineer away from the throttle, seized the 
whistle lever and blew the safety-signal for the following trains to 
come on. These recognized the signal and obeyed it, came ahead at 
the highest speed, two or three trains being wrecked and piled upon 
each other in an indescribable mass. (This plucky Yankee engineer 
was a resident of Elmira, N. Y., and named William Dunham. As 
his train approached Bristow Station we fired on it before it was de- 
railed and Dunham was shot in the shoulder, though not so seriously 
as to prevent him staying at his post, and after his own train was de- 
railed trying to save the trains following from destruction. One of 
the collaborators hereof had the pleasure of meeting and recognizing 
him in Texas in 1876, and found him to be a most courteous and 
cultured gentleman. He was then, 1876, a civil engineer, and I think 
doing railroad work in Texas. I think he is still living in Elmira, 
N. Y., but whether living or dead, I beg to make this tribute to his 
bravery. 

During the afternoon of this day, August 26, 1862, while on the 
march. General Trimble suggested to General Jackson the propriety 
of sending a brigade that night to capture Manassas Junction, as he 
had received information that there were only a few hundred Federal 
troops guarding the place, and there were millions of supplies there 
intended for Pope's army. The wrecking of the trains above men- 
tioned occurred about sunset, and soon after it was over General 
Jackson rode up and told General Trimble that he had considered his 
(Trimble's) suggestion of the afternoon, and ordered Trimble to take 
his brigade and capture the Junction. General Trimble replied that 
he did not make the suggestion in order that he might be given the 
task, but with General Jackson's permission he would take two of his 
regiments and make the attempt. General Jackson replied that two 
regiments might not be enough to capture it. 

To this General Trimble raising his hat and saluting General Jack- 
son, replied : "I beg your pardon. General, but give me my two 
Twenty-ones and I'll charge and capture hell itself." 

Having obtained General Jackson's permission, General Trimble 
formed the Twenty-first North Carolina in line of battle on the right 
of the railroad and the Twenty-first Georgia on the left, and thus, 



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History of the Twenty-first Georgia Eegiment. 353 

with the raih'oad between the two regiments, they began a forward, 
silent movement along the railroad toward Manassas Junction, know- 
ing nothing of the topography of the land over which they had to go 
nor of the position or strength of the enemy they were looking for. 
After marching thus, feeling their way and keeping such an alignment 
as the darkness would permit for a few hours, they arrived within about 
a fourth to half mile of the Junction, and suddenly ran into the 
pickets who fired into them and ran to the rear. Our brush with the 
enemy was brisk but of short duration ; the Federals being taken so 
completely by surprise soon broke ranks and fled. A battery was 
located on each side of the railroad and these poured canister, grape 
and shell into us at a lively rate for a while, doing us more damage by 
far than we had received by the small arms, one shell bursting in the 
midst of the companies while in a compact form and killing and 
wounding quite a number of them. 

We soon charged and captured the batteries, each regiment captur- 
ing one about the same time, and then we swept through the town, 
capturing some six or eight hundred prisioners, about two hundred of 
whom were negroes. In addition to the prisoners we captured what 
was estimated at a million dollars' worth of commissary stores. Of 
these every man helped himself to all he could carry, and the re- 
mainder was burned August 27, while many expressions of regret 
were uttered that we could not save all of it, for we knew we would 
soon need it. But we certainly feasted for a little while. 

The next day, August 28, .Jackson's army was drawn up in line 
to hold Pope's army in check until Longstreet and Lee could reach us 
over the same route we had come. The Federals occupied an old rail- 
road cut near Groveton, and the taking of this cut was essential to 
the Confederates to enable them to hold out against Pope's entire 
army until reinforcements could reach us. Trimble's Brigade was 
drawn up in line of battle on an eminence in a small piece of woods 
in the rear and to the left of Pelham's Battery, near Groveton, with 
the Twenty-first Georgia resting on General Lawton's right. 

Orders were given to take off and pile everything except cartridge 
boxes and make ready for desperate work in our front, for by this 
time Pope's whole army had been forced to fall back from the Rappa- 
hannock and had taken a position to annihilate Jackson's Corps of 
only three small divisions before Lee and Longstreet could come to 
his relief. 

28 dc 



354 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

General Trimble riding in front of the Twenty-first Georgia, gave 
the command : "i^orward." We soon reached an open field, discov- 
ering the enemy well posted some two hundred and fifty yards dis- 
tant, at the base of a small hill, with a rotten rail fence some thirty 
yards in their front. They had three lines of battle, so situated one 
above the other on the rise of the hill as to fire over each other, all 
Ijdng down in the sedge and briers. The infantry and artillery at 
once opened fire on us. We were given orders to reach the fence. In 
obedience to this command there was exhibited the most daring 
bravery that came under our observation during the war — a bravery 
not surpassed in the charge of the famous Light Brigade at Balaklava. 
Volley after volley was poured into the Twenty-first Georgia, mowing 
down the men by scores, yet they never faltered nor wavered, but 
onward went, closing up the gaps in the lines as if on dress parade, 
with their gallant commander Colonel T. C. Glover in front with 
sword in his uplifted hand calling to his men to follow. And they 
did. Oh God ! what a sight, w^hat carnage ! what a feast of death 
was that! 

The fence being reached, the work of death commenced at short 
range. From this fence we poured volley after volley into them for 
jsome thirty or forty minutes, when orders were given to fix bayonets 
And charge. The regiment went over the fence wdth one of its most 
blood-curdling rebel yells. One voice above all others was heard com- 
ing down the line. It was that of General Lawton, who, with hat and 
fiword in hand, was urging the men to charge, saying: "Close in on 
them, boys, I will have the Twenty-ninth Georgia to reinforce you in 
a few minutes." 

It was now getting dark and the Federals held their lines until we 
were so close to them that when they fired their last volley the blazes 
from their guns seemed to pass through our ranks. Then they fled 
and the day was ours ; but at what a cost ! We went into this battle 
with something over three hundred and fifty men in the regiment, and 
stacked arms that night with thirty-five. Company A went into 
the battle with forty-five men ; nineteen were killed and twenty-one 
wounded, some of them fatally and others crippled for life. On the 
next day, August 29, in the fight near Groveton, the regiment lost 
about half a dozen of the few who were left and General Trimble 
himself was severely wounded. 

While this continuous fighting was in progress the Sixteenth Missis- 
sippi was transferred to another brigade and the Twelfth Georgia was 



History of the Twenty-first Georgia Regiment. 355 

sent to Trimble to take its place, and when General Trimble was 
wounded it was found that there were no field officers in the brigade 
to take command of it, and the command temporarily devolved on a 
Captain Brown of the Twelfth Georgia. 

On the 30th of August the brigade held a position on the unfinished 
railroad to the left and near the Cross building, with the right of the 
Twenty-first Georgia resting on a gap in the embankment left for 
building a culvert. Across this space, which was unprotected, and 
behind the embankment to the right of Twenty- first Georgia rested 
the left of Hayes' Brigade, and in our front was an open field of some 
hundreds of yards. This ground had been fought over for the past 
two days and was literally covered with the dead. The field was 
strewn with guns which the men gathered and loaded, having them 
ready for the day's work which all knew was coming. 

After this the men lay down to catch a few moments sleep, of which 
they were sorely in need. Late in the afternoon thirty pieces of our 
artillery opened on the approaching enemy. This brought our men 
to their feet, peering over the embankment. We soon ascertained 
that the field in our front had been transformed from a mat of green 
to a moving, living mass of blue. Six lines of battle had been massed 
in our front to cut their way through, the marines, dressed in red 
blouse, in front, led by their oflScers. 

An order from Colonel Glover was passed down the line for the 
men to hold their fire for short range. At the same time he called 
for two of the best shots from his old Company A to take position at 
the end of the embankment and shoot the officer leading the Feder- 
als, which order was immediately carried out, the officer proving to 
be a colonel. When he was shot his horse ran riderless through the 
culvert into our lines. 

When the enemy had advanced to within about one hundred yards 
of our lines fire was opened on them with terrible effect, the extra 
guns being brought into use, but onward they came without a halt. 
The embankment being reached, a hand-to-hand combat followed. 
Numerous attempts were made to break through our lines and through 
the culvert, all of which failed. During these assaults on our lines 
the most reckless daring that could be exhibited was shown by a pri- 
vate named Latham, of Company C, from Atlanta. He stood on top 
of the embankment in full view of the assaulting lines of Federals 
and fired gun after gun into them until he was shot through by a 
Federal soldier, whose gun was not more than two feet from Latham's 



356 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

breast. As lie fell to the bottom of the embankment with the blood 
spurting from his gaping wound, he implored his comrades never to 
give up their lines, saying that if he ever got well he would try them 
again. To the great surprise of every one he did get well, and lived 
to do valiant service for the Confederacy. A monument should be 
erected to the special memory of the gallant boys who fell in this bat- 
tle. Several times the enemy's colors waved over our lines across the 
embankment. Our ammunition running short, the battle was con- 
tinued awhile with bayonets, butts of guns and rocks, when the fear- 
ful rebel yell was heard in the distance. Nearer and nearer it came 
while the battle with rocks continued. We soon learned that it was 
Jackson coming down the line at full speed pointing his hand to our 
right and front. He was accompanied by Longstreet's Corps, 
which was pressing the enemy's left with a cloud of dust rising from 
the parched earth as if from a cyclone. Our ammunition being re- 
plenished, our line, as if actuated by one impulse, sprang over the em- 
bankment and through the culvert, regardless of consequences, when 
the enemy fled panic-stricken. The Twenty-first Georgia lost in this 
fight sixteen killed and wounded. The enemy's loss was absolutely 
appalling. They lay in heaps, and the green sward was dyed crimson 
with their blood. At no time during the war did we see so many dead 
and wounded on so small an area of ground. Our artillery, in taking 
position after position, passed over, crushing many of the dead. Con 
sidering the numbers engaged, the second battle of Manassas was the 
hardest fought by the Confederates and the victory the dearest bought 
during the war. 

On August 31, 1862, the regiment was engaged in the battle of 
Chantilly, where we lost a lew killed and wounded, among the 
killed being Captain AYm. M. Butt, of Company A. On Septem- 
ber 1 we were at Ox Hill, after which we started on the Maryland 
campaign, participating on September 14 in the capture of Harper's 
Ferry, andjin the battles of Sharpsburg, Md., on September 16 and 
17, where Colonel Glover was severely wounded, being shot entirely 
through the body, and where we lost quite a number killed and 
wounded. After these battles the regiment was transferred to Port 
Royal, where it remained for some time, after which it was removed 
to Fredericksburg, where, on December 13, we participated in the 
battle of Fredericksburg and captured a battery which we 
failed to carry off in consequence of the marshy condition of the 
ground. In this battle Thos, J. Verdery, the adjutant of the regi- 



History of the Twenty-first Georgia Regiment. 357 

ment, was killed. At this time the brigade was commanded by Gen- 
eral Hoke, and we remained in this brigade until January 19, 1863, 
when the Twelfth and Twenty-first Georgia Kegiments were trans- 
ferred to Doles' Brigade, which was composed of the Fourth, Twelfth, 
Twenty-first and Forty-fourth Georgia Regiments. Just here we beg 
to digress far enough to say that from this time to the close of the 
war the history of the Twenty-first Georgia, except for a few months 
when it was on detached service with General Hoke in North Caro- 
lina, is the same, so far as hardships, hard fighting, glorious victo- 
ries, brave deeds and loyalty to the cause for which we struggled, as 
that of the Fourth, Twelfth and Forty-fourth Regiments • and no 
brigade in any war in the history of the world was composed of 
braver men, and no men ever had a more chivalrous or braver leader 
than General George Doles. He loved his men and they adored 
him, and would have attempted any feat of daring, however difficult, 
had he only given the order. 

At Chancellorsville we were in front and on the flank of Hooker, 
and when the brigade reached Hooker's extreme right, and just before 
we came upon the enemy, General Jackson, who was with the Twenty- 
fir-it Georgia, with a smile on his face, gave the order : "■ By the right 
flank, march j" and never did brigade step oflT in finer style. We went 
only a short distance, through woods densely strewn with underbrush, 
when we came upon the enemy preparing their evening meal. Our 
appearance was a complete surprise to them and such a stampede of 
infantry and artillery was rarely ever seen. 

During the next two days the Twenty -first sustained quite a heavy 
loss in the engagements that occurred. Company A, out of about 
twenty-five men, had six killed and quite a number wounded. Among 
the killed and wounded of Company A was Captain Allen C. Wat- 
kins. Taking the loss of Company A as an average the regiment 
must have lost about sixty killed. Colonel J. T. Mercer of the Twenty 
first Georgia, in his official report of the battle of Chancellorsville, 
says : '• Many acts of individual gallantry were observed even where 
every officer and man of the regiment did his whole duty. The be- 
havior of Color-Bearer Francis P. Parker was conspicuous. In mov- 
ing to the front he bore his colors in advance of every one, till he was 
shot down and disabled on the morning of the 3d. Captain M. Lynch 
deserves honorable mention, not only for his uniform gallantry but 
for his firmness and the good service rendered in maintaining his 
ground when the whole flank of the regiment next to him 



358 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

faltered and fell back, thus preventing the propagation of that which 
would have been disastrous." 

After the battle of Chancellorsville the regiment was returned to 
the Rappahannock to be rested and recruited after the hard service 
through which it had gone. While resting at Rappahannock the regi- 
ment was brought up to about two hundred and fifty men, about the 
number we had in the Gettysburg campaign. 

In January, 1864, General Hoke was sent with his brigade into 
eastern North Carolina to recapture that part of the State from the 
Federals, who had occupied it for over two years. Before going he 
obtained permission from the Secretary of War to take the Twenty- 
first to North Carolina with him. Having obtained the permission 
he came in person to the regiment and told us of what he had done, 
and said he was going to give us a fine time in his native State catch- 
ing deserters. He complimented us on the many valorous deeds we 
had performed, and said we needed recreation, and he was going to 
take us where we could get it. He knew almost every man in the 
regiment by name, and the men all adored him, and loud, lusty cheers 
rent the air Avhen we found that we were off for a frolic with " Our 
Bob." But alas ! the culmination ! *' Our Bob" had planned to recap- 
ture New Berne starting from Kinston. Immediately on arriving 
there we started on the march to New Berne, and at Batchelor's creek, 
a few miles from the city, we struck the enemy's outposts and sur- 
prised and captured them, scattering the enemy all over the country. 
The Federals had some blockhouses just across the creek from where 
we struck them, and it was necessary to capture these before we could 
proceed. 

The bridge having been destroyed. Colonel Glover ordered a tree 
cut so that it would fall across the creek for a foot-log. This was ac- 
complished under a galling fire from the enemy's sharpshooters, and 
the moment it fell Colonel Glover mounted it and called to his regi- 
ment to follow. In a few minutes the regiment had crossed over on 
the fallen tree, and the Yankees were fleeing in every direction. Squads 
from the command were sent out to capture the scattered Federals, and 
one of these squads, consisting of eight men under command of Cap- 
tain W. B. Kimbrough of Company A, got off some two or three 
miles from the command when they ran upon a railroad. They started 
along this railroad when, to their utter astonishment, they saw a regi- 
ment of Federals with colors flying coming toward them going in the 
direction of New Berne. It developed that this regiment had been 



History of the Twenty-first Georgia Regiment. 359 

out on picket duty, and hearing the firing had started to return to 
New Berne. When Captain Kimbrough saw them he knew that it 
was either a grand bluff or be captured himself, and so he decided on 
a bluff. When the Yankees came close up to where he and his eight 
men were concealed he boldly stepped out and ordered a surrender, 
telling the colonel that if any resistance was offered he would show no 
quarter. After a short consultation with his officers he said that he 
would capitulate, and Kimbrough ordered him to stack his arms. This 
was done and then Kimbrough ordered Sergeant Jot Camp to make a 
detail of a guard to take charge of the prisoners and march them to 
the command. Sergeant Camp took the entire squad, and having 
formed the prisoners in column started with them back to Batchelor's 
creek. After having gone some half or three quarters of a mile the 
Yankee colonel, having seen no other Confederates, became suspicious 
that he had been tricked and turning suddenly to Captain Kimbrough 
asked him if the guaid was all the men he had. On being answered 
in the affirmative, he replied that had he known it he would have 
hickory- whipped the last one of them. Kimbrough told him it was 
too late then, and that if any resistance was shown he would be the 
first man ordered shot. This had the desired effect, and they were safely 
carried back to the command and turned over to General Hoke. 
Among the prisoners captured in this fight at Batchelor's creek were 
a lot of the deserters General Hoke had spoken of, but he failed to 
tell us when we were so jubilant over the prospect of the fun we were 
going to have in capturing them that they were in the Yankee army 
and that we would have to fight like blue blazes to get them. Oh no, 
he didn't tell us that. The other column on this expedition to cap- 
ture New Berne having failed to accomplish what General Hoke had 
planned for it, we were taken back to Kinston where we went into 
camp and remained until near the middle of April, with occasional 
scraps with the enemy's pickets. While we were in camp at Kinston 
twenty-seven of the deserters who were captured were court-martialed 
and hung, twelve being hung at one time, thirteen at another and 
two at another. At these executions the Twenty-first was designated 
as a guard and was formed in hollow square around the gallows. 

In April General Hoke planned the capture of Plymouth, a strongly 
fortified city at the head of the Albemarle sound, garrisoned by three 
thousand troops under command of General Wessels. About the 
middle of the month we left Kinston on a quiet but rapid march for 
Plymouth, hoping to surprise and capture the place before they could 



3 GO Doles-Cook Brigade. 

get reioforcements from other points. Late in the afternoon ot the 
18th we arrived near the town, and Hoke's Brigade, under command 
of Colonel Mercer of the Twenty-first, was assigned to the duty of 
capturing Fort Williams, which was situated about a half mile in front 
of the enemy's main lines of works. The brigade was carried quietly 
through a terrible swamp, the men frequently sinking to the waist in 
slimy mud and water, until we got through to within some two hun- 
dred yards of the fort. It was good dark, and the order was given 
**Bythe right flank, march ! Double quick, charge ! " The *'Two 
Twenty-ones" obeyed the order (leaving most of the others in the 
swamp), and charged up the hill through an old field, being pelted by 
showers of grape and canister. On reaching the fort we found it 
surrounded by a deep moat, and on the outside of this moat a strong 
abattis of apple trees with sharpened points of limbs sticking outwards, 
the whole fastened together with barbed wires. On reaching this 
abattis, the Twenty-first Georgia went on the left and the Twenty-first 
North Carolina on the right, members from each regiment climbing 
through the abattis, dropping into the moat, and scaling the walls of 
the fort. James D. King, the color-bearer of the Twenty-first Geor- 
gia, had seme one push him up the wall of the fort and planted his 
colors on top of it. One of the garrison struck at him with a cutlass 
and cut the flag-staff" in two pieces. The fort not yet surrendering, 
King secured his flag, got down into the moat and climbed out, safely 
rejoining the regiment. When the Tsventy-first Georgia and the 
Twenty-first North Carolina passed on each side of the fort, on get- 
ting beyond it, each thought the other was the enemy leaving the fort, 
and in the darkness they fired two or three volleys into each other 
before the mistake was discovered. Sergeant J. T. Camp of Company 
A, Twenty-first Georgia, first discovered the mistake, and calling 
Colonel Mercer's attention to it he turned to see if the enemy still 
occupied the fort, and just as he gave the order for another charge 
from the side of the fort next to the town he was shot dead by a 
rifleman in the fort. The fort was captured soon thereafter, and by 
daylight of the 19th its guns, together with our own artillery, were 
trained on the town. During the 19th General Hoke placed his little 
army in position around the town, and on the morning of the '20th a 
general assault was made which culminated in the capture of the place 
with great quantities of stores and supplies. C. D. Camp, of Com- 
pany A, had the honor of being the first man (or boy) to 
get into the last fort to surrender and capture the garrison colors, 



History of the Twenty-first Georgia Regiment. 361 

which he turned over to General Hoke. The regiment lost about 
thirty killed at this place. After the capture of Plymouth the Twenty- 
first Georgia was made a provost guard for a week or ten days and 
charged with the duty of gathering together and shipping the large 
amount of army supplies captured with the place. After this was ac- 
complished General Hoke decided to make another attempt to capture 
New Berne, and we were put on the march for that place. We went 
by Tarboro and Little Washington, having slight skirmishes with the 
enemy occasionally, and after driving the enemy from these places 
arrived at New Berne early in May. A canal had been cut from one 
river to the other above the town, completely surrounding it with water, 
and there was no way to get in to attack the enemy except to sv;im. 
General Hoke sent a column around below the town to make a feint, 
and draw the attention of the enemy to that side while it was his pur- 
pose to have men swim the canal and make the real attack from above. 
To this end volunteers had been called for to swim the canal, and every 
man of the Twenty-first Georgia stepped forward. One of them, a 
private named Petty, of Company A, was about six feet four inches 
high and thin as a rail. It was known he could not swim a stroke, 
and when he stepped forward as a volunteer some one said : " Why, 
George, what are you stepping out for ; you can't swim." '' I know 
that," replied Petty, ''but I can wade like h — 1." Just as the men were 
stripped and had their cartridge boxes tied on their heads and were 
waiting for the feint attack from below and for orders to swim the 
canal and make the attack, hurried orders came from Richmond for 
General Hoke to proceed in all haste to that city to repel the ad- 
vances of Butler, who was trying to enter Richmond on the south side 
of the James river. Then came one of the hardest forced marches of 
the war from New Berne to Kinston, many of the stoutest men in 
the regiment giving out from the hard march through the deep sandy 
roads and falling by the wayside. The command reached Richmond 
about the 10th or 12th of May, and after marching and counter- 
marching around the city for a day or two were sent to Drewry's 
Bluff, where, early on the morning of May 16, 1864, we gave Butler 
the whipping of his life, capturing his works and about five thousand 
of his troops with their arms. We lost quite a large number of men 
killed and wounded in this battle. 

After the battle was over General Beauregard came along and per- 
sonally complimented the men for their bravery. General Hoke then 
introduced him to the Twenty-first Georgia and Twenty-first North 



362 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

Carolina, and told him that these two regiments had made him (Hoke) 
a major-general. 

After the battle of Drewry's Bluff, on May 20, the Twenty-first 
Georgia was returned to Doles' Brigade, which was then at Spottsyl- 
vania Court House. Soon alter reaching Spottsylvauia, the parallel 
march with Grant down the Pomonkey began, with fighting almost 
hourly. It was then that we lost the brave and chivalrous General 
Doles. 

After the death of General Doles Colonel Phil Cook was promoted 
to brigadier-general, and we served under him during the remainder 
of the war. 

Soon after the promotion of General Cook we were ordered to the 
Shenandoah Valley under General Early, and crossing the Potomac 
the second Maryland campaign was commenced. 

During this campaign we almost reached Washington City, a bat- 
tle being fought in the suburbs of that city. In this battle Company 
A of the Twenty-first Georgia lost two men killed. Sergeant Henry 
Green and Wyatt Gibson, whom we had to leave on the battle-field. 
These were the only men lost by Company A during the war that 
we did not bury ourselves. 

On the 19th of September, 1864, at the battle of Winchester, the 
regiment suffered the irreparable loss of Lieutenant-Colonel Thomas 
C. Glover, it being the one hundred and seventh engagement in 
which he had led his men. No braver or truer man than he ever drew 
the breath of life. He was always at his post of duty ready to lead 
his men to battle. His own safety was of no consideration to him 
when or where duty called. Not a single battle was ever fought by 
the regiment, but that this noble officer was with it, encouraging and 
leading his men to victory and glory. But a few hours before his 
death news reached us of the fall of Atlanta. Turning to one of his 
old company standing near him, he said : * 'Atlanta has fallen, and I 
fear all is lost, but I shall not live to see it." Colonel Glover was to 
the Twenty-first Georgia what Stonewall Jackson was to the army of 
the valley. 

From Winchester to the siege of Petersburg the regiment partici- 
pated in all the engagements and hardships that the brigade had to 
encounter. At the siege of Petersburg the regiment was stationed to 
the right, and near where the Confederate works were mined and 
blown up by the Federals. On March 25, 1864, we were engaged in 
the assault on the enemy's works when we captured Fort Steadman, 



History of the Twenty-first Georgia Regiment. 363 

but soon had to give it up on account of the enemy being reinforced. 
In this assault we lost the brave and chivalrous Captain Lee F. Bake- 
well, adjutant of the regiment. 

After the battle of March 25 came the evacuation of Petersburg 
and the continuous fighting on the retreat to Appomattox, during 
which time the regiment became almost decimated, there being at the 
surrender but two members of Company A present, W. B. Kim- 
brough and B, F. Jones. Thos. J. McKown who really belonged to 
Company A, but whose name was carried on the rolls of Company B, 
for some military regulation concerning the band, was also at the 
surrender. 

One instance of fidelity to the Southern Cause stands out in such 
bold relief when compared with some others that might be mentioned, 
that we wish to make perpetual record of it here ; 

A private, James Mullens, whose home at the commencement of 
the war was at Harrisburg, Pa., came South and joined Company B 
of the Twenty-first Geeorgia when it was organized at Rome. Dur- 
ing the entire progress of the war he proved to be one of the bravest, 
most dauntless soldiers in the Confederate army, participating in every 
battle with his regiment from the beginning to the close of the war. 
While our army was in Pennsylvania, near Carlisle, and within 
twenty miles of where his father, mother and sisters lived, he was se- 
verely punished for the supposed infraction of some order. Being en- 
tirely innocent and having been so unjustly punished, every one sup- 
posed that he would certainly return to his home ; but to the great 
surprise and intense delight of the regiment he did not do so, but 
remained with the cause he espoused as true as truth itself up to 
the day of the surrender. On our retreat from Petersburg, when 
some one intimated that General Lee would have to surrender, he 
became frantic with rage, and declared that if he was in General 
Lee's place he would have every man in the army die fighting with 
gun in hand before he would surrender ; and when General Lee did 
surrender he cried like a whipped child. 

After the surrender he went to Rome, Ga., with the remnant of his 
old company, and has resided there ever since the war, an honored 
and upright citizen. 

The By-Laws of the Doles-Cook Brigade Survivors' Association re- 
quire that the commander of the association shall be elected annually, 
and that the regiments shall furnish the commander in their numer- 
ical order. When it first came to the time for the Twenty-first to 



364 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

furnish the commander, James Mullens was unanimously elected to 
that honored distinction. 

One important historical fact should be recorded here : Of all the 
regiments engaged in the war between the States, North and South, 
the Twenty-first Georgia was the third in number of men killed in 
battle. The regiment that lost the greatest number was the Eighth 
New York, and they were killed by the Twenty-first Georgia. 

In connection with the history of the Twenty-first Georgia, it is but 
just that we should record the fact that to Mrs. Elizabeth Glover, 
widow of Lieutenant-Colonel T. C. Glover, belongs the honor of orig- 
inating the annual reunions of the ex-Confederates. 

In June, 1867, she called together in reunion the survivors of Com- 
pany A, Twenty-first Georgia, the company that was carried into the 
service by her husband as its captain. At that meeting only twelve 
of the old company got together. They arranged at that meeting to 
hold an annual reunion as long as any two of them lived to meet to- 
gether and talk over the days that tried men's souls. At the next 
Annual meeting a big basket-dinner was given and all the old soldiers 
in the county (Campbell) were invited to meet with them. At this 
meeting an agreement was entered into that all ex-Confederates of 
Campbell county should hold annual reunions, and from this begin- 
ning sprang the immense gatherings of to-day. 

The following is a copy of a letter written by Mrs. Glover to the 
Atlanta Chapter, Daughters of the Confederacy, some years since, 
giving her version of the origin of the Confederate reunions : 

THE INCEPTION OF THE ANNUAL REUNIONS OF CONFED- 
ERATE VETERANS. 

''After the fateful day of Appomattox the men of the South 
wended their way to their desolated homes, many broken in health 
and in fortune. 

*' The first problem to solve was how to support their families; the 
struggles, trials and hardships undergone to accomplish this is unwrit- 
ten history. God alone knows the suffering endured, but the men 
who had fought under Lee and Jackson were equal to the task of sup- 
plying food, shelter and raiment for their loved ones. Soon this was 
a matter of minor consideration. 

"The South was in the throes of reconstruction, bleeding at every 
pore, under military and carpetbag rule ; the Northern press brand- 
ing the men who fought for the Confederacy as rebels and traitors, 



HiSTOEY OF THE TwENTY-FIEST GeOEGIA ReGIMENT. 365 

urging that our leaders be hanged and imprisoned ; here the Union 
Leaguers trying to get all the landholders to join them to prevent 
confiscation. If a man refused, or dared uphold secession, he was con. 
sidered a traitor. Ben Hill was the only man who had courage to 
denounce their infamous rule in the papers of the day ; Dunlap Scott 
the only man in the Bulloch Legislature who dared protest against 
their wasteful expenditure of the people's money. 

"My husband was killed at Winchester, Va., in 1864, and is buried 
there in the beautiful Stonewall Cemetery. I had to toil to support 
and school my children and keep the wolf from the door. Must my 
children and the children of other brave men who fought and died 
for the love of home be branded as children of rebels and traitors? ' 
Must the men who were spared, wiih their children, be branded as 
rebels and traitors for all time ? Must the finger of scorn be pointed 
at these men and their children for having fought for our cause and 
homes ? Must they be disgraced as were the Tories who fought for 
King George in the Revolution ? No, no, a thousand times no ! The 
cause was just and right and by the help of God I vowed to so teach 
this to my children and to call the men of our company (A, Twenty- 
first Georgia Regiment) together, talk over the war and its incidents 
and charge them to teach their children for all time to come that the 
cause for which they fought was just and right ; teach them to be 
proud of the part they took in the conflict; teach their children that 
we were overcome by numbers, three and five to one — not whipped, 
but overcome. 

" With this view and hope and thought, I called our company to 
meet at old Campbellton. Of the two hundred who went out not 
more than thirty got home, and only twelve met that day ; there were 
others of other regiments. Colonel Tom Latham was orator of the 
day. We had the same drummer and fifer at the next reunion who 
went all through the war. That day we had an excellent free dinner, 
and many amusing reminiscences of the war. 

" From this little reunion has grown the immense reunions of the 
day. 

" Our veterans, God bless them ! are going one by one to the 'other 
side.' Their ranks are thinning, they will all soon be gone, and there 
will be a happy reunion on the other shore. 

'' Hoping to meet them, with a heart full of love for the cause, lam, 
*' Respectfully, 

*'Mes. Lizzie Glovee." 



366 Doles-Cook Brigade. 



SKETCHES OF REGIMENTAL OFFICERS. 

John T. ]\Iercer was a first lieutenant in the First Dragoons U. S. 
Cavalry, and when Georgia seceded from the Union he resigned his 
commission in the U. S. Array and came to Richmond, Va., and ten- 
dered his services to President Jefferson Davis. On July 19, 1861, 
when the services of the Twenty-first Georgia Volunteers were ac- 
cepted by the President, he appointed John T. Mercer colonel of the 
regiment. While Colonel Mercer was as brave as the bravest and a 
splendid military officer, he was never promoted, but remained colo- 
nel of the regiment until he was killed in battle at Plymouth, N. C, 
April 18, 1864. 

J. J. Morrison was appointed by President Davis as lieutenant- 
colonel of the regiment on July 19, 1861. In March, 1862, Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel Morrison was promoted to a colonelcy and authorized 
to organize a cavalry regiment in the army of Tennessee. He organ- 
ized the First Georgia Cavalry and was promoted to brigadier-general, 
and commanded a brigade of cavalry ior almost; two years before the 
close of the war. He served with distinction throughout the war 
and is still living, his home being in Decatur, Ga. 

Thomas W. Hooper was appointed adjutant July 20, 1861. On 
September 27, 1861, he was promoted major. March, 1862, when 
Colonel Morrison left the regiment. Hooper was made lieutenant-col- 
onel, and was promoted to the colonelcy April 18, 1864, at the death 
of Colonel Mercer. He served throughout the war with distinguished 
gallantry. At the beginning of the war he was a practicing attor- 
ney at law, and after the surrender he resumed the practice in At- 
lanta, Ga., where he remained for some years. He finally left At- 
lanta and went to Arkansas, where he died. 

Thomas Coke Glover at the beginning of the war was a practic- 
ing physician who had won for himself an interstate reputation. He 
organized the first company that left Campbell county, Georgia, for 
the conflict and was elected its captain. His company (A) with others 
of the regiment were originally organized and known as the Fourth 
Georgia Battalion. Afterwards when the Twenty-first Georgia Regi- 
ment was organized his commission and company being the oldest, 
his company was still designated as A. Captain Glover was promoted 
major July 27, 1862, and lieutenant-colonel April 18, 1864. He 




THOMAS C. GLOVER 

Lieutenant-Colonel Twenty-first Georgia Regiment. 



THE NEW York' 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



A8TOR, LENOX AND 

tilden foundations. 



Sketches of Regimental Officers. 367 

held this office until he was killed at Winchester, Va., September 19, 
1864, in the one hundred and seventh engagement into which he had 
led his men. No braver spirit or truer friend ever lived, and he was 
mourned at his death by the men of the regiment as though each had 
a personal bereavement. 

Michael Lynch went into the army as captain of Company I 
from Stewart county. On April 18, 1864, he was promoted major 
and held that office until the surrender No more gallant officer wore 
the gray than dear old Major Lynch, and no man had more friends 
among officers and men than he. He is still living near Atlanta, in 
DeKalb county, Georgia, and I think he dreams yet, sometimes, that 
Confederate money will again be good. 

Thomas J. Verdery, of Augusta, Ga., was appointed adjutant 
by the President, October 12, 1861, and retained that office until he 
was killed in battle at Fredericksburg, Va. , January 4, 1863. He 
was a most excellent gentleman and a brave and faithful officer. 

Lee F. Bakewell was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, July 30, 1829, 
In 1849 he went to New Orleans and clerked in a commission house 
until the war began. For his bravery and efficiency he was made 
foreman of the famous Hook and Ladder Company No. 2 of the 
New Orleans Fire Department. He was a member of the noted 
Washington Artillery of New Orleans, and when the war began 
went into the army with that organization and remained with it until 
after the battle of Shiloh, when he was elected captain of the gal- 
lant Louisiana Zouaves of Wheat's Battalion of "Tigers." When 
Major Wheat was killed his battalion disbanded and Captain Bake- 
well was assigned to the Twenty-first Georgia as adjutant to succeed 
Lieutenant Verdery. He held that office until he was killed at Fort 
Steadman, Petersburg, Va., March 25, 1865. When killed he had a 
sixty days' furlough in his pocket, but had persistently refused to take 
advantage of it and leave the army while we were daily fighting. A 
more courteous gentleman or braver man never lived than he. 

COMPANY A. 

Thomas C. Glover, physician, entered army as captain of Com- 
pany A June 6, 1861 ; was promoted major July 27, 1862, and 
lieutenant-colonel April 18, 1864. Was killed at Winchester, Va., 
September 19, 1864. 

Wm. M. Butt entered service as first lieutenant June 6, 1861 ; 



368 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

was promoted captain July 27, 1862, and killed at Cbantilly, Va.,. 
September 1, 1862. He was a young lawyer of marked ability and 
had made quite a name for himself before entering the army. He 
was one of God's noblemen — a true gentleman in every sense of the 
word and as brave as the bravest. 

Allen C. Watkins entered the army as second lieutenant ; was 
promoted to first lieutenant July 27, 1862, and to the captaincy Sep- 
tember 1, 1862. He was killed at the battle of Chancellorsville, 
Va., May 3, 1863. Before entering the service Captain Watkins 
was a merchant at Campbellton, Ga., and had served one or two 
terms as sheriff of the county. He was a most popular young man, 
loved by all who knew him and knew not the meaning of fear, mor- 
ally or physically. 

Wm, Bradley Kimbrough was a clerk in a dry-goods store at 
Campbellton, and entered the service as first sergeant of Company A 
June 6, 1861. He was elected junior second lieutenant July 27, 
1862; second lieutenant September 2, 1862, and promoted captain 
May 24, 1863. He commanded the company from then until the 
close of the war and surrendered with the regiment at Appomattox. 
He was a most gallant ofiicer and at the battle of Batchelor's creek, 
N. C, in February, 1865, with eight of his company, captured a regi- 
ment of Yankees by bluffing them into the belief that he had a 
large number of men and would show them no quarter. He was 
brought up in Tennessee and is living there now. 

COMPANY B. 

Algernon S, Hamilton organized Company B at Rome, Ga., 
was elected captain and uniformed the company at his own expense. 
His company was mustered into service June 24, 1861. He remained 
with his company until 1863, when he with Captain Cooper Nesbit 
organized the Sixty-sixth Georgia, and Captain Hamilton was made 
lieutenant-colonel of that regiment. He retained this office until the 
close of the war, making a gallant, feai:less soldier. He lost an eye 
at the battle of Franklin, Tenn., and died since the war at Clinton, 
Ga., honored and beloved by all who knew him. 

George A. Yarbrough succeeded Captain Hamilton in the com- 
mand of his company and made a most excellent and gallant oflScer. 
He was killed at the battle of Gettysburg, Pa. 

John A. Tucker enlisted as a private and was for quite a while the 



Sketches of Regimental Officers. 369 

color-bearer of the regiment. He was made captain of the company 
at the death of Captain Yarbrough, and held that office until the close 
of the war. At the surrender at Appomattox, he was in command of 
the Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment. After the war he returned to 
Floyd county and made one of its best and most popular citizens. He 
accumulated a good property and had an elegant home a few miles 
out from Rome, which was totally destroyed by fire in 1901. While 
looking at the fire destroying his home he dropped dead of heart-fail- 
ure. A brave soldier, a true friend, a kindly gentleman was he. 

COMPANY C. 
Joseph F. Waddail organized and was elected captain of Com- 
pany C at Atlanta, Ga., and his company was mustered into service 
June 6, 1861. He was killed at second battle of Manassas. 

M. Thomas Castlebeery entered the service as first lieutenant, and 
was promoted captain at the death, of Captain Waddail. His health 
having failed, he resigned in February, 1863, and returned to Atlanta. 

Samuel D. Haslett entered the army as second lieutenant, was 
promoted first lieutenant at the Second Battle of Manassas, 
and captain in February, 1863. He retained this ofiice until 
close of the war. For several months prior to the surrender he 
was in command of the division provost guard while Lieutenant 
Henry Jones commanded the company. Captain Haslett returned 
to Atlanta after the war and for several years was a successful 
merchant in that city. He died in Atlanta about the year 1895. 

COMPANY D. 

Stephen A. Borders organized and was elected captain of Com- 
pany D at Cedartown, Polk county, and his company was mustered 
into the service June 27, 1861. He resigned his commission Novem- 
ber 18, 1861, and returned home. He died near Cedartown, Ga., in 

1892. 

Henry I. Battle enlisted as a private and was elected captain to 
succeed Captain Borders, and served in that capacity during the war, 
making a most excellent officer and one who was loved by his men and 
all who knew him. He died in Polk county in 1899. 

COMPANY E. 

John R. Hart organized and was elected captain of Company E, 
at Rome, Floyd county, and entered the service June 24, 1861. His 

24 d-e 



370 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

company was detached from the regiment May 8, 1862, and assigned 
to Smith's Legion of Georgia Cavalry. He was made lieutenant-colo- 
nel of the legion and afterwards became colonel of the Sixth Georgia 
cavalry, and served in that capacity until the close of the war. He 
died in Rome, Ga., several years after the war. » 

Alfred F. Bales, who was first lieutenant, became captain after 
the transfer, and was killed at Dandridge, East Tennessee, December 
24, 1863. 

John R. Lay, who was first sergeant while with the Twenty-first 
Georgia, became captain after the death of Captain Bales, and served 
in that capacity during the war. He is now living at Cresson, Texas. 

SECOND COMPANY E. 

Edward Smith, captain of a company, was transferred with his 
company to the Twenty-first Georgia in 1865, and designated Com- 
pany E, the regiment having had only nine companies since Captain 
Hart's company was transferred. Captain Smith was a gallant officer 
and was in command of the regiment at the surrender at Appomattox. 
We have not heard from him since the war. 

COMPANY F. 

John T. Boykin organized and was elected captain of Company F 
in Troup county, and entered the service July 9, 1861. He resigned 
May 31, 1862. Died in Troup county in 1901. 

U. C. Allen enlisted as junior second lieutenant, was promoted 
captain and killed at Chancellorsville. 

Edward M. Henderson enlisted as first sergeant, was promoted 
to the captaincy at the death of Captain Allen, and served in that 
capacity until the close of the war, being a brave, fearless officer and 
one dearly loved by his men. He is still living in LaGrange, Ga., 
honored and respected by all who know him. 

COMPANY G. 

Wesley Kinman was the first captain of Company G, and with his 
company entered the service July 4, 1861. He was a gallant officer 
but had to resign on account of disability, April 24, 1863. He died 
from disabilities received during the war in 1869. 

N. B. HuDGiNS enlisted as second lieutenant, was promoted captain 
on the resignation of Captain Kinman, and served in that office dur- 



Sketches of Regimental Officees. 371 

ing the war. He was ever at his post of duty and never failed to lead 
and encourage his men in the face of danger. He is still living at 
Calhoun, Ga., an honorable and upright citizen, beloved and re- 
spected by all. 

COMPANY H. 

J. Cooper Nisbet organized and was made captain of Company H 
at Trenton, Dade county, and entered the service July 2, 1861. He 
remained with his company in this capacity until 1863, when he and 
Captain A. S. Hamilton organized the Sixty-sixth Georgia Regiment 
and Captain Cooper was made colonel of it. He remained colonel of 
the Sixty-sixth Georgia until the close of the war and surrendered at 
Columbus, Ga. He is still living an honored and respected citizen 
of Dade county. 

John B. Countess enlisted as a private and was promoted to the 
captaincy when Captain Nisbet resigned, and served in that capacity 
during the war. He was a man who feared nothing on earth and was 
always a leader when danger threatened. No better soldier served the 
Confederacy than John B. Countess and no better citizen lives in 
Georgia to-day than he who is still living in Trenton, Dade county. 

COMPANY I. 

Michael Lynch organized and was made captain of Company I, 
at Stewart, Lumpkin county, and entered the service July 17, 1861. 
He remained in command of his company until April 18, 1864, when 
he was promoted major and served in that capacity for the remainder 
of the war. No braver man or better officer than Major Lynch ever 
drew sword in defense of his country. He is still living an honored 
resident of DeKalb county near Atlanta, and frequently comes into the 
city to see some of his ''old b'yes,"as he calls them and talk over the 
old days. 

John F. Irwin enlisted as a private, was promoted to a lieutenancy 
and on the promotion of Captain Lynch was made captain. He was 
the youngest officer in the regiment and was the pet and pride of the 
entire regiment. He was captured April 6, 1865, just a few days 
before the surrender at Appomattox. He is still living an honored 
citizen of Lumpkin county, Ga. 

COMPANY K. 
John B. Akridge was the first captain of Company K, which en 



372 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

tered the service August 28, 1861, and remained in command of the 
company until May 16, 1864, when he died in the field hospital from 
a wound received early that morning at Drewry's Bluff, Va. He was 
a splendid officer, an excellent gentleman and a brave soldier. 

K. R. Foster entered the service as first lieutenant and was promo- 
ted to the captaincy on May 16, 1864, when Captain Akridge died. 
He remained in command until September 19, 1864, when he was 
captured at Winchester, Va,, and was not released until after the sur- 
render. He was a brave, chivalrous officer and gentleman. He is now 
living in Milledgeville, Ga. 

Charles D. Camp was, from the beginning to the end of the war, 
a private soldier in the Campbell County Guards, Company A, Twenty- 
first Georgia Regiment. There were none better or braver, none that 
did their duty more promptly, cheerfully or fearlessly than Charlie 
Camp. Always in a good humor, kind and courteous to both officers and 
men, he possessed the friendship of all who knew him. He was wounded 
at Drewry's Bluff, Va., May 16, 1864. He entered the State University 
after the war, and at the end of three years was graduated from that 
institution. He then engaged in the mercantile business in Athens, 
Ga., for three years. Afterwards read law, was admitted to the bar 
and practiced his profession until ten years ago, w-hen President Cleve- 
land gave him a clerkship in the United States District Attorney's 
office. After some two months' service he became chief clerk, and for 
nine years was considered one of the best and most efficient clerks that 
the department ever had. Five years of that time he served under 
the civil service law. About one year ago he was appointed one of 
the Assistant District Attorneys for the Northern District of Georgia, 
which position he now holds. There is not a bigger-hearted or more 
enthusiastic ex-Confederate in the South. He is devoted to the mem- 
ories that cling around the Lost Cause. He is on the staff of 
Major-General Clement A. Evans, U. C. V., and holds the rank of 
colonel. His residence is in Atlanta, Ga. 

The author has written the above sketch because Charlie was too 
modest to say anything of his services, and because he is worthy of' 
anything that can be said of him in a complimentary way. 



Twenty-first Regiment Field and Staff Officers. 373 

ROSTER OF FIELD AND STAFF OF TWENTY- 
FIRST REGIMENT, GEORGIA VOLUNTEER IN- 
FANTRY, DOLES-COOK BRIGADE, ARMY OF 
NORTHERN VIRGINIA, C. S. A. 

Mercer, John T Colonel. 

Morrison, James J Lieutenant-Colopel. 

Hooper, Thomas W Major. 

Hooper, Thomas W Adjutant. 

Hood, D. M Quartermaster. 

Barrett, R. O Commissary, 

Holt, Cicero Surgeon. 

Capers, L. C Assistant Surgeon. 

Haslett, William Chaplain. 

Hooper, Thomas W Colonel. 

Hooper, Thomas W Lieutenant-Colonel. 

Glover, Thomas C Lieutenant-Colonel. 

Glover, Thomas C Major. 

Lynch, Michael Major. 

Verdery, T. J Adjutant. 

Bakewell, L. F Adjutant. 

McGarrity, A. E Assistant Surgeon. 

Gott, L. E Surgeon 

DeWitt, W. F Assistant Surgeon. 

Cowherd, C Assistant Surgeon. 

Parker, F. P Ensign. 

NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF. 

Barton, Benjamin F Sergeant-Major. 

Rowland, S. J Sergeant-Major. 

Duke, W. J Sergeant-:Major. 

Hoover, George F Commissary Sergeant. 

Hooker, G. W Commissary Sergeant. 

Camp, B. A Commissary Sergeant. 

Whitlock, A. J Commissary Sergeant. 

Darden, George Ordnance Sergeant. 

Dawson, L, H Quartermaster Sergeant. 

Danforth, W. M Quartermaster Sergeant. 

Hoover, George F Quartermaster Sergeant. 

Rowland, S. J Ordnance Sergeant. 

Glover, Joseph S Color Bearer. 

Wisdom, Robert A Color Bearer. 

Hudgins, B. F Color Bearer. 

Tucker, John A Color Bearer. 

King, James H Color Bearer. 

Abbott, William Hospital Steward. 



374 Doles-Cook Brigade. 



MUSTER ROLL OF CAMPBELL COUNTY GUARDS, 
COMPANY A, TWENTY-FIRST REGIMENT, GEOR- 
GIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, A. N. V., C. S. A. 

CAMPBELI. COUNTY, GEORGIA. 

GLOVER, THOMAS C— 

Captain, June 6, 1861. Promoted Major July 27, 1862. Lieutenant- 
Colonel April 18, 18&i. Killed at Winchester, Va., September 19, 
1864. 
BUTT, WILLIAM M.— 

First Lieutenant, June 6, 1861. Promoted Captain July 27, 1862. 
Killed at Chantilly, Va., September 1, 1862. 

WATKINS, ALLEN C— 

Second Lieutenant, June 6, 1861. Promoted First Lieutenant July 
27, 1862, Captain September 1, 1862. Killed at Chancellorsville. 
Va. 

ADDERHOLD, GEORGE W.— 
Junior Second Lieutenant, June 6, 1861. Promoted Second Lieuten- 
ant July 27, 1862. Killed at Second Manassas. 

KIMBROUGH, WILLIAM B.— 

First Sergeant, June 6, 1861. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant 
July 27, 1862; Second Lieutenant September 1, 1862; Captain May 
24, 1863. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Living in Chattanooga, 
Tenn. 

MILFORD, WILLIAM A.— 

Second Sergeant, June 6, 1861. Died of disease 1862. 

SMITH, EDWARD C— 
Third Sergeant, June 6, 1861. Promoted Second Sergeant 1863. 
Discharged June 6, 1864. Died since the war. 

TEAL, LOVETT— 

Fourth Sergeant, June 6, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 

DOUGHERTY, GEORGE M.— 

First Corporal, June 6, 1861. On detached service last two years 
of the war in Richmond, Va. Died since the war. 
DANFORTH, FREDERICK W.— 

Second Corporal, June 6, 1861. Wounded at Petersburg, Va., and 
Batchelor's Creek, N. C. Killed accidentally since the war. 

BOMAR, WILLIAM P.— 
Third Corporal, June 6, 1861. Died at Sudley Church, Va., 1862. 

LEWIS, WILLIAM T.— 

Fourth Coi*poral, June 6, 1861. Promoted First Corporal 1862. 
Killed at Cedar Run, Va. 



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Muster Rolls Twenty-first Georgia Regiment. 375 

ADDERHOLD, JAMES M.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Appointed musician. Discharged. Died 
eince the war. 

ALLEN, JAMES W.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Wounded at Frederick City, Md. Served 
through the war. Living in Texas. 

ALLEN, WILLIAM P.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 

ARNOLD, ABIJAH F.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Wounded at Drewry's Bluff, Va., and died 
from wound. 

ATKINSON. MARCUS L.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Wounded by bayonet in battle 1862, and 
died from wound. 

BANKS, EZEKIEL M.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Captured and remained in prison last year 
of war. Living in Douglas county, Ga. 

BEST, LITTLETON P.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Captured at Winchester, Ta. Served 
through the war. Living in Meriwether county, Ga. 

BEAVERS, ROBERT O.— 
Private, May 12, 1862. Assassinated by deserters 1862. 

BOMAR, ERWIN— i • 

Private, June 6, 1861. Died of disease 1862. 

BOMAR, THOMAS— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 

BROCK, JAMES H.— 
Private, June 6, 1861. Served through the war. Dead. 

BROCK, WILLIAM— 

Private, February 24, 1862. On the same day, near Winchester, 
Va., 1864, he killed four (4) of Sheridan's cavalrymen. Served 
through the war. Living in Douglas county, Ga. 
BROWN, JAMES— 
Private, September 20, 1861. Captured. Released after the sur- 
render. Living. 

BROWN, J. M. T.— 

Private, September 20, 1861. Captured and died in prison. 
BROWN, RICHARD H.— 

Private, September 20, 1861. Captured and died in prison. 

BULLARD, EUGENIUS A.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Killed in Seven Days' Battle around Ricli- 
mond, Va. First member of company killed in battle. 



Of 



Doles-Cook Brigade. 



BULLARD. WILLIAM T.— 

Private, June G, ISGl. Wounded at Second Manassas. Served 
through the war. Living in Fairburn, Ga. 

CAMP, BCXJAMIN A.— 

Private, June G, 1S61. Wounded at Chancellorsville and Winchester, 
Va. Served through the war. Living in Atlanta, Ga. 

CAMP, CHARLES D.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Wounded at Drewry's Bluff, Va. Served 
through the war. Living in Atlanta, Ga. 

CAMP, JONATHAN T.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Wounded at Fredericksburg, Ya. Promoted 
Third Sergeant 1863, First Sergeant 1864. Served through the 
war. Living in Powder Springs, Ga. 

CAMP, JOSEPHUS— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 

CAMP, JOSEPH W.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 

CAMP, WILLIAM A.— 

Private. April 1, 1863. Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 

CAMPBELL, RICHARD T.— 

Private, June 6. 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 

CAMPBELL, WILLIAM J.— 

Private. June 6, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Campbell 
county, Ga. 

CANTRELL, FRANCIS M.— 

Private, March 22. 1S<34. Served through the war. Living 'in Ohio. 

CANTRELL, JAMES M.— 

Private, March 22, 1864. Served through the war. Living in Ala- 
bama. 
CANTRELL, JOHN L.— 

Private. March 22, 1S»j4. Served through the war. Living in Coweta 
county, Ga. 
CARR, JAMES M.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Killed at Gettysburg. Pa. 

CARTER. WILEY W.— 

Private, May 13, 1863. Killed at Plymouth, N. C, April 18, 1864. 

CHAMBLISS, A. Z.— 

Private. August 19. 1861. Discharged November 8, 1861. 

CHAMBLISS, WILLIAM C— 

Private. August 19, 1861. Captured 1864. Released after the sur- 
render. Living. 

COMPTON, JAMES— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Captured 1864. Released after the surrender. 
Supposed to be living. 



Mustek Rolls Twenty-first Georgia Regi^ient. 377 

COMPTON, JOSEPH L.— 

Private, August 19, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 
COOK, REUBEN J.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Captured 1864. Released after the surrender. 
Living in Campbell county, Ga. 

CROUCH, JOHN A.— 

Private, March 22, 1864. Killed at Petersburg, Va., 1865. 

DANFORTH, JAMES B.— 

Private. June 6, 1861. Discharged November 28, 1861. Died since 
the war. 

DANFORTH, WILLIAM M.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Killed at Chancellorsville, Ya. 

DANFORTH, WILLIAM R.— 

Private, January 1, 1862. Killed at Chancellorsville, Ya. 
DARNELL, M. J.— 

Private, June 28, 1861. Captured 1864. Released after the surren- 
der. Died since the war. 

DERYIS. Dr. ISAIAH G.— 
Private, June 6, 1861. Assigned to hospital duty 1864. Served 
through the war. Living in Campbell county, Ga. 

DUGGAN, JOHN N.— 

Private, July 30, 1862. Discharged. Died since the war. 
DUGGAN, ROBERT O.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Died of disease 1863. 

DUPREE, AUGUSTUS N.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Killed at Drewry's Bluff, Ya. 

EDMONDS, JOHN A.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Killed at Chancellorsville, Ya. 

ELDER, IRWIN H.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Wounded at Cross Keys, Ya., Sharpsburg, 
Md., and Drewry's Bluff, Ya. Liying in Texas. 

FARRINGTON, JAMES— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Died of disease 1863. 

FARRINGTON, G. W.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Died of disease 1863. 

FIELDS, JAMES A.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Served through the war. Died in Texas 1901. 

FOLSOM, REUBEN— 

Private, July 30, 1862. Captured 1864. Released after the surren- 
der. Living in Indian Territory. 

FORBS, GEORGE T.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Captured 1864. Released after the surren- 
der. Died since the war. 



378 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

FORBS, JEFFERSON— 

Private, June 6, ISGl. Died of disease 1863. 

FORBS, WARREN T.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Died after the surrender of disease con- 
tracted during the war. 

FOSTER, ADAM R.— 

Private, August 26, 1862. Captured 18G4. Released after the sur- 
render. Died in Texas 1902. 

FOSTER, ELISHA P.— 

Private, August 26, 1862. Captured 1864. Released after the sur- 
render. Supposed to be living. 

FOSTER, JAMES K— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Killed ^at Second Manassas. 

FOSTER, JOHN C— 
Private, June 6, 1861. Died of disease 1863. 

GIBSON, NICHOLAS M.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 

GIBSON, THOMAS— 

Private, January 1, 1862. Killed at Second Manassas. 

GIBSON. WYATT J.— 

Private, January 1, 1862. Killed near Washington, D. C, July 12^ 
1864. 

GLOVER, JOSEPH S.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Promoted Color Sergeant November 18, 1861. 
First Lieutenant March, 1864. Wounded at Monocacy, Md., and 
died from wound after the surrender. 

GORMAN, JAMES M.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Transferred to Army of Tennessee. Served 
through the war. Dead. 

GREEN, HENRY M.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Promoted Sergeant 1863. Killed near Wash- 
ington, D. C, July 12, 1864. 
GRIFFIN, JACK— 

Private, January 1, 1862. Died of disease at Sudley Church, Va., 
1862. 

GRIFFIN, IVY— 

Private, January 1, 1862. Died of disease. 
HAMMOND, NEWTON— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Killed at Gettysburg, Pa. 
HARDY, JOHN A.— 

Private, July 20, 1862. Lost eye at Martinsburg, Va. Discharged 
November 21, 1862. Died since the war. 



Muster Rolls Twenty-first Georgia Regiment. 379' 

HARVEY, WILLIAM S.— 
Private, June 6, 1861. At home on sick furlough when Lee's army 
surrendered. Served the latter part of the war in Wheeler's 
Command as it was impossibl to rejoin his company in Virginia. 
Living in Campbell county, Ga. 

HAMPERLY, ANDERSON— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Died of disease 1862. 
HIGGINS, HENRY T.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Captured in North Carolina, May, 1864. Sup- 
posed to be living and in the Federal army. 
HIGGINS, JOHN— 

Private, February 24, 1862. Died of disease. 
HINESLEY, ANDERSON— 

Private, February 24, 1862. Died of disease 1863. 
HINESLEY, LINDSEY— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Living in Clarke county, Ga. 
HOBGOOD, HEZEKIAH R.— 

Private, February 24, 1862. Detailed as musician. Served through 
the war. Living in Fairburn, Ga. 

HORNSBY, CHARLES D.— 
Private, August 19, 1861. Captured at Petersburg, Va. Living in- 
Campbell county, Ga. 

HUMPHRIES, M. M.— 
Private, June 6, 1861. Survived the war. Living In Douglas coun- 
ty, Ga. 

JAMES, JOHN M.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Promoted Second Lieutenant 1863. Lost leg 
at Kelly's Ford, Va. Died since the war in Douglas county, Ga. 

JENNINGS, JAMES T.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Wounded at Second Manassas. Died in Dal* 
ton, Ga., in hospital. 
JOHNSON, JAMES M.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Survived the war. Dead. 

JONES, BENJAMIN F.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Wounded at Winchester, Va. Appointed mu- 
sician 1864. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Living in Camp- 
bell county, Ga. 

JONES, DANIEL E.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Wounded in battle 1864. Hand crippled for 
life. At home on furlough when Lee's army surrendered. Liv- 
ing. 

JONES, EDWARD J.— 

Private, August 16, 1862. Died of disease March 11, 1863, while at 
home on fourlough. 



380 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

JONES, FRANCIS M.— 

Private, October 15, 18G1. Died of disease in Culpeper C. H., Va., 

1863. 

KING, JAMES D.— 

Private, June 6, 1801. Appointed Color Corporal 18G3. Wounded 
at Drewry's Bluff, Va., May 16, 1864, and died from wound. 

LUCK, PARKER R.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Died of disease at Sudley Church, Va., 1862. 

LUCK, WILLIAM G.— 

Private, August 19, 1861. Died of disease at Sudley Church, Va., 
1862. 
McCARVER, MICAJAH— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Discharged 1861. 

McGUIRE, GREEN B.— 

Private, December 11, 1862. Discharged account deafness caused 
by explosion of shell at Gettysburg, Pa. Died 1899. 

McKOWN, JAMES R.— 
Private, June 6, 1861. Died of disease while at home on furlough 
1863. 

McKOWN, THOMAS J.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Transferred to Company B Twenty-first 
Georgia Regiment. Served through the war. Living in Atlanta, 
Ga. 

MALONE, WALTER C— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Appointed musician 1863. Living in Fulton 
county, Ga. 

MAPP, JOHN W.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 

MAPP, W. F. M.— 

Private, July 30, 1862. Killed at Drewry's Bluff, Va. 

MERRITT, JAMES D.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Captured. Released after the surrender. 
Supposed to be dead. 

MILFORD, JAMES C— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Served through the war. Supposed to be 
living in Texas. 

MILFORD, JAMES J.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Served through the war. Supposed to be 
dead. 
MILFORD, JEFF C— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Served through the war. Died in Texas af- 
ter the surrender. 

MILFORD, POLK— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Texas. 



Muster Eolls Twenty-first Georgia Kegiment. 381 

MILFORD, WILEY B.— 

Private, June G, 18G1. Served through the war. Supposed to be 
dead. 

MILLER, ANDREW J.— 

Private, June G, 18G1. Died in service. 

MILLER, JAMES L.— 
Private, June 6, 1861. Died of disease 1862. 

MILLER, JOSEPH— 

Private. June 6, 1861. Captured. Released after the surrender. 
Supposed to be living. 

MORRIS, THOMAS— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 

MORRIS, WILLIAM J.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 

MORROW, MADISON M.— 

Private, March 25, 18&4. Died at Goldsboro, N. C, May 17, 1864. 

MORROW, THOMAS N.— 
Private, June 6, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 

MORROW, WILLIAM J.— 
Private, June 6, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 

NORRIS, JOSEPH C— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Disabled by railroad accident in Virginia. 
Living in Fulton county, Ga. 

NORTHCUTT, JAMES C— 

Private, September 11, 1861. Served through the war. Living in 
Campbell county, Ga. 
NORTHCUTT, ROBERT W.— 

Private. June 6, 1861. Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 

PETTY, GEORGE W.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Captured. Released after the surrender- 
Died since the war. 

PHILLIPS, ARMSTEAD— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Captured. Released after the surrender. 
Supposed to be dead. 

PHILLIPS, ELIJAH M.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Captured. Released after the surrender- 
Living in Bill Arp, Douglas county, Ga. 

PHILLIPS, MARTIN V.— 

Private, July 5, 1801. Captured. Released after the surrender. Liv- 
ing in Alabama. 
PHILLIPS, J. ROBERT— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Captured. Released after the surrender. 
Living in Haralson county, Georgia. 



382 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

PHILLIPS, WARREN H.— 

Private, June G, 186L Killed at Second Manassas. 

POSEY, MORGAN— 

Private, April 11, 1864. Captured. Released after the surrender. 
Living. 

SHAW, JAMES M.— 

Private, February 24, 1862. Fate unknown. 

SHAW, SYLVESTER— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Captured. Released after the surrender. 
Living in Douglas county, Ga. 

SHORT, BENJAMIN F.— 

Private, February 24, 1862. Wounded at Fredericksburg, and Win- 
chester, Va. Died after the surrender in Campbell county, Ga. 
from effects of wound received during the war. 

«IMS, WILLIAM M.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Captured. Supposed to have died in prison. 

SKIPPER, DANIEI^ 

Private, June 6, 1861. Dead, 

SKIPPER, JOHN— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 

SMITH, BENJAMIN P.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Captured. Released after the surrender. 
Died since the war. 

SMITH, FELIX C— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Wounded at Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, 
and Drewry's Bluff. Served through the war. Living in Fulton 
county, Ga. 

TACKETT, GEORGE— 

Private, February 24, 1862. Died of disease 1862. 

TACKETT, WILEY P.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Promoted Third Sergeant 1863. Wounded 
at Harper's Ferry, Va. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant April 
10, 1864. Served through the war. Living in Douglas county, Ga. 

TEAL, THOMAS— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Promoted Fifth Sergeant. Never wounded, 
but in every engagement in which his regiment participated. 
Served through the war. Living in Carroll county, Ga. 

THOMASON, JOHN P.— 

Private, February 28, 1864. Captured. Released after the surren- 
der. Living in Alabama. 

TURNER, PETER— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Killed accidentally in Campbellton, Ga., 1863. 



Muster Rolls Twenty-first Georgia Regevlent. 383 

VAUGHN, JOHN J.— 

Private, February 24, 1862. Wounded at Hanover Junction, Va., 
May 24, 1864. Served through the war. Dead. 
VAUGHN, WYATT W.— 

Private, February 24, 1862. Died of disease, 1864. 
VICKERY, WILLIAM— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Died in hospital November, 1861. 
WALKER, HENRY— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Died of fever in Richmond, Va., 1862. 
WATKINS, MOSES D.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md., and Chancel- 
lorsville, Va. Promoted Third Sergeant 1863. Living in Carroll 
county, Ga. 
WILKERSON, A. J.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Wounded at Drewry's Blufe, Va. Living out 
West. 

WOOD, JAMES B.— 

Private, February 24, 1862. Survived the war. Dead. 
WOOD, RICHARD G.— 

Private, February 24, 1862. Captured. Released after the surren- 
der. Living in Indiana. 
WORTHY, JOHN W.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Lost arm at Cold Harbor, Va. Living in 
Texas. 

YANCEY, FRANCIS M.— 

Private, February 24, 1862. Served through the war. At home on 
furlough when Lee's army surrendered. Living in Douglas coun- 
ty, Ga. 

YANCEY, JAMES W.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 
YATES, BERRY W.— 

Private, September 11, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 

YATES, CHARLES P.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 
YARBROUGH, JOSEPH P.— 

Private, February 24, 1862. Captured. Released after the surren- 
der. Died since the war. 



384 Doles-Cook Brigade. 



MUSTER ROLL OF THE FLOYD SHARPSHOOTERS, 
COMPANY B, TWENTY-FIRST REGIMENT, GEOR- 
GIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, C. S. A. 

FLOYD COUNTY, GEORGIA. 

HAMILTON, ALGERNON S.— 

Captain, June 24, 1861. Transferred to Sixty-sixth Georgia Regi- 
ment, 1863, by special order from Secretary of War, and pro- 
moted Lieutenant-ColoneL Lost his right arm at battle of Frank- 
lin, Tenn. Died since the war in Clinton, Ga. 

ATHAWAY, THOMAS D.— 

First Lieutenant, June 24, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 

BUTLER, GREEN B.— 

Second Lieutenant, June 24, 1861. Resigned July 10, 1862. Died 
since the war in Atlanta, Ga. 

REYNOLDS, NAPOLEON B.— 

Junior Second Lieutenant, June 24, 1861. Transferred to Cavalry, 
May 13, 1862. Living. 
GRAVES, ALGERNON S.— 
First Sergeant, June 24, 1861. Furnished substitute. Died since 
the war in Rome, Ga. 

YARBROUGH, GEORGE N.— 

Second Sergeant, June 24, 1861. Transferred to Eighth Georgia 
Regiment and promoted Captain. Killed at Gettysburg, Pa. 

ISBELL, ELI— 

Third Sergeant, June 24, 1861. Killed at Winchester, Va., 1862. 

McBEE, ROBERT V.— 

Fourth Sergeant, June 24, 1861. Wounded at Cross Keys, Ya., and" 
died from wound in Charlottesville. Va. 

MACK, J. M.— 

Fifth Sergeant, June 24, 1861. Wounded at Cross Keys, Va., and 
died from wound in Charlottesville, Va. 

KIRTLEY, WILLIAM J.— 

First Corporal, June 24, 1861. Fate unknown. 

MARONEY, CYRUS B.— 

Second Corporal, June 24, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 

GILLIAM. ROBERT C— 

Third Corporal, June 24, 1861. Supposed to be dead. 
GILPEN, JOHN W.— 

Fourth Corporal, June 24, 1861. Promoted Fourth Sergeant. Served- 
through the war. Living in Texas. 



Muster Rolls Twenty-first Georgia Regiment. 385 

AARON, JOHN F.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Wounded twice at Fredericksburg, Va. 
Discharged June 28, 1804. Died in 1890. 
ANDERSON, JAMES L.— 

Private. June 24. 1861. Wounded in battle and died from wound. 
ANDERSON, JOHN M.— 

Private, August 26, 1801. Lost leg at Batchelor's Creek, N. C, and 
discharged. Died in Adairsville, Ga., August, 1897. 

ANDERSON, THOMAS J.— 

Private, June 24, 1801. Served through the war. Living in Sum- 
merville, Ga. 
ASH, BERNARD.— 
Private, June 24, 1861. 

ATKINS, A. S.— I , 

Private, February 20, 1862. Fate unknown. 

ATKINS, BENJAMIN G.— 

Private, February 20, 1862. Fate tinknown. 

BAILEY, GEORGE W.— , 

Private, June 24, 1861. Discharged December, 1861. Dea'd. 

BAILEY, JOHN— ; 

Private, June 24, 1861. Fate unknown. 

BEAVERS, ROBERT.— 

Private, June 24, 1801. Discharged December, 1802. 

BOWEN, FRANCIS E.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Promoted Third Sergeant June, 1864. 
Served through the war. Living in Texas. 

BOWEN, GEORGE— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Wounded in battle, and died from wound. 

BRIDGES, W. D.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Wounded in battle June, 1862. Served 
through the war. Living in Polk county, Ga. 

BRYANT, ROBERT V. J.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Wounded in battle June, 1862, and died from 
wound. 
BRYANT, T. F. E.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Promoted Fourth Sergeant. Detailed in 
Commissary Department 1864. Served through the war. Living 
in Floyd county, Ga. 
CASHION, A. S.— 
Private, June 24, 1861. Killed at Winchester, Va., 1862. 

CASHION, JAMES T.— 

Private, June 25, 1801. Lost log at Sharpsburg, Md. Died after 
surrender from effects of this wound. 

25d-c 



3b6 DoLE3-CooK Brigade, 

CASHION, ROBERT W.— 
Private, June 24, 1861. Promoted Fourth Corporal 1863, Fifth Ser- 
geant July 1, 1864. Served through the war. Living in Floyd 
county, Ga. 

CHESEK, BENJAMIN J.— 

Private, February 20, 1862. Killed at Second Manassas. 

CHESER, WILLIAM J.— 

Private, February 20, 1862. Killed at Chancelloi^ville, Va. 

CLOWDIS, ED. F.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Leg fractured by fall from horse. Dis- 
charged March 13, 1863. Died since the war. 

COOPER, JOHN R.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Fate unknown. 

COPELAND, JAMES M.— 

Private, February 20, 1862. 
DAWSON, WILLIAM B.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Fate unlinown. 

DAVIS, JOHN— 
Private, June 24, 1861. Fate unknown. 

DEMPSEY, GEORGE.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Died near Rome, 
Ga., after the surrender. 

DENSON, AUGUSTUS G.— 

Private, February 20, 1862. Wounded in battle, and died from 
wound. 

DENSON, GEORGE— 

Private, February 20, 1862. Wounded in battle, and died from 
wound. 
DENSON, WILLIAM F.— 

Private, September 1, 1861. Fate unknown. 

DETWILER, B. F.— 

Private, June 25, 1862. Fate unknown. 

DETWILER, JOSEPH— 

Private, June 25, 1862. Died in Mount Jackson, Va. 
DOUGHERTY, CICERO— 

Private,. June 24, 1861. Survived the war. Living near Rome, Ga. 
EATON, SAMUEL F.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Wounded at Cross Keys, Va., June 8, 1862, 
and died from wound in Charlottesville, Va. 

FAIR, HEZEKIAH F.— 

Private, Februarj- 20, 1862. Died in hospital 1862. 

FARRIS, JOHN M.— .: 

Private, June 24, 1861. Fate unknown. 



Muster Rolls Twenty-first Georgia Regiment. 387 

FINLEY, LEROY J.— 1 

Private, June 24. 1861. Died in hospital. 

FORMBY, NEWTON— 

Private, June 24, 1861. KiUed at Plymouth, N. C, April 18, 1864. 

FORMBY, WILLIAM T.— 
Private, June 24, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 

FOWLER, JOHN B.— 
Private, June 24, 1861. Died in hospital. 

FRICKS, NAPOLEON B.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Died at Sudley's Ford of fever, November 
4, 1861. 

GALLAGHER, MICHAEL^— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Died near Rome, 
Ga. 

GARNER, GREEN B.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Ten- 
nessee. 
GARNER, ROBERT M.— 
Private, June 24, 1861. Promoted Second Corporal 1863. Served 
through the war. Living in Comanchee, Texas. 

GATEWOOD, JOHN H.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Wounded at Richmond, Va., and died from 
wound February, 1864. 

GIFFORD, WILLIAM— 

Private, February 20, 1862. Wounded in battle and died from 
wound in Richmond, Va. 

GILPEN, BEN— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Fate unlinown. 

GOSSETT, WILLIAM P.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Died in hospital in Virginia. 

GRAVES, T. J.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Lost leg at Monocacy, Md., July 10, 1864, 
and died from wound. 

GRIFFIN, WILLIAM J.— 
Private, June 24, 1861. Dead. 

HALL, JAMES E.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Promoted First Sergeant. Acted Sergeant- 
Major for several months before the surrender. Surrendered at 
Appomattox, Va. Living in Cartersville, Ga. 

HAMBY, MANLEY T.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Killed at Drewry's Bluff, Va., May 16, 1864. 



388 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

HARDEN, JOHN L.— 
Private, June 24, 1861. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant 1863, 
Second Lieutenant 1864. Served througti the war. Living near 
Rome, Ga. 

HARRISON, FRANKLIN B.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Died in hospital 1862. 

HARRISON, J. B.— 
Private, June 24, 1861. Died in hospital 1862. 

HESS, JAMES A.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Died in hospital 1862. 

HOLT, WILLIAM J.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Promoted Second Lieutenant 1863, Fii'st 
Lieutenant 1864. Resigned 1864. 

HUTCHINS, B. F.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Killed at Fort Steadman, Va., March 2.5, 
1865. 

LATER, E. L.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Survived the war. Living in Esom Hill, Ga. 

LEAZER, JOHN R.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Promoted Third Sergeant 1863. Served 
through the war. Died near Rome, Ga. 

LEAZER, WILLIAM— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Died in hospital. 

LEMING, HARVEY D.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Texas. 

LEMING, JOSEPH M.— 
Private, June 24, 1861. Promoted Second Sergeant. Served through 
the war. Living near Rome, Ga. 

LONG, JOHN— 

Private, August 7, 1861. Served through the war. Died in Rome, 
Ga. 

LOWREY, .JAMES C— 
Private, September 1, 1861. Died while at home on furlough in 
Rome, Ga. 
LUCKEY, J. CALVIN— 

Private, June 26, 1862. Fate unknown. 
McKOWN, T. J.— 
Private, June 24, 1861. Transferred from Company A, Twenty-first 
Georgia Regiment, July 5, 1864. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. 
Living in Atlanta. Ga. 

MAROONEY, DAVID R. C— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Supposed to have died in hospital. 



Muster Rolls Twenty-first Georgia Regiment. 389 

MAROONEY, JACOB N.— 

Private, January 1, 18G2. Promoted Second Sergeant 1862. Fate 
unknown. 

MAROONEY, JOHN— 
Private, January 1, 1862. Fate unknown. 

MARTIN, J. C— 

Private, June 27, 1862. Fate unknown. 

MARTIN, NEWTON J.— 
Private, June 24, 1861. Fate unknown. 

MILLS, FRANK A.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Wounded at Cross Keys, Ya. Served tlirough 
tlie war. Died in Rome, Ga., 1894. 

MORROW, ANDREW J.— 

Private. Promoted Fifth Sergeant, 1863. 

MULLEN, JAMES E.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Promoted Second Sergeant. Acted First 
Sergeant for quite a while. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. 
Living in Rome, Ga. 
NIX, JAMES— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md. Promoted 
First Corporal 1863. Died in Staunton, Va., 18(>4. 

PHIPPS, ANDREW C— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Discharged 1861. Died since the war. 
PYLE, CHARLES H.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Living in 
CedartoTvn, Ga. 

PYLE, GEORGE W.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Floyd 
county, Ga. 

PYLE, JOHN L.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Discharged 1862. Died since the war. 
RAINWATER, G. P.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Died in hospital. 
RAINWATER, U. P.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Died in Jacksonville, Ala., 1899, from effects 
of wound received in battle during the war. 
RAWLS, FRANCIS R.— 

Private, August 7, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Ala- 
bama. 

REID, ANDREW A.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Discharged December, 1861. 
SELF, HAYNE— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Discharged 1861. 



390 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

SHORES, A. A.— 

Private, February 20, 1862. Served through the war. Living at 
Wax P. O., Ga. 

SHORES, J. A.— 
Private, February 20, 1862. Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 

SLOAN, W. J.— 

Private, February 20, 1862. Wounded in battle and died from 
wounds. 

SMITH, C. C— 

Private, February 20, 1862. Wounded in battle and died from 
wounds. 

SMITH, MARSHALL L.— 

Private, February 20, 1862. Served through the war. Living near 
Rome, Ga. 

SMITH, WILLIAM A.— 
Private, August 25, 1861. 

STAFFORD, JOSHUA A.— 

Private, February 20, 1862. Severely wounded in battle. Served 
through the war. Living in Texas. 

STEWART, JOHN— 

Private, July 7, 1862. Fate unknown. 

STEWART, ROBERT W.— 
Private, February 20, 1862. Fate unknown. 

STEWART, THOMAS J.— 
Private, February 20, 1861. Fate unknown. 

STONER, BENJAMIN G.— 
Private, June 24, 1861. Wounded in battle and died from wound. 

STONER, HENRY— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Wounded in battle and died from wound. 

STOVALL, JAMES E.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Promoted Fourth Corporal. Killed at 
Drewry's Bluff, Va. 

STOVALL, JAMES— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Wounded in battle and died from wound. 

STRICKLAND, SIMEON C— 

Private, Februay 20, 1862. Died at Camp Winder, Va., 1863. 

TATE, E. A.— 

Private, February 20, 1862. Served through the war. Living near 
Cedartown, Ga. 
TRAUB, SOLOMON— 

Private, June 24, 1861. ' U ' - 



Muster Rolls Twenty-fiest Georgia Regiment. 

TROUT, GREEN N.— 

Private, June 24, 18C1. Promoted Second Corporal June, 1864. 
Wounded in battle 18()c}. Served through the war. Living iD 
Pendergrass, Ga. 
TROUT, N. P.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Pen- 
dei'grass, Ga. 
TUCKER, GEORGE P.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Wounded in battle and died from wound. 
TUCKER, JOHN A.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Promoted First Lieutenant ISaS, Captain 
1864. In command of the Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment when 
Lee's army surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Died in Floyd 
county, Ga., 1901. 
TUCKER, WRIGHT— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Fate unknown. 
TURNER, JAMES L.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Fate unknown. 
TURNER, L. L.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Fate unknown. 
UNDERWOOD, ABE— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Texas. 
WADSWORTH, JOHN— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Died in Rome, 
Ga., 1871. 
WANSLEY, JAMES P.— 
Private, June 24, 1861. Wounded at Cross Keys, Va. Discharged 
December 15, 1861. 
WARD, THADDEUS C— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Died in Richmond, Va., 1864. 
WARD, WADE— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Fate unknown. 
WARE, JAMES N.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Died while on his way home on furlough in 
Bristol, Tenn., December 15, 1861. 
WHITE, JAMES H.— 

Private, February 20, 1862. Wounded in battle 1863. Killed at 
Drewry's Bluff, Va., May 16, 1864. 
WHITE, STEPHEN A.— 

Private, February 20, 1862. Fate unknown. 
WILLIAMS, DAVID— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Discharged 1861. Dead. 
WRIGHT, ELISHA— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Discharged December 15, 1861. 
WRIGHT, R. B.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Discharged. Living in Jackson county, Ga. 



390.^ Doles-Cook Brigade. 



MUSTER ROLL OF BUCK WADDAIL'S COMPANY, 
COMPANY C, TWENTY-FIRST REGIMENT, GEOR- 
GIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, C. S. A. 

FULTON COUNTY, GEORGIA. 

WADDAIL, JOSEPH F.— 

Captain, June 6, 18G1. Killed at Second Manassas. 

CASTLEBERRY, M. T.— 
First Lieutenant, June 6, 1861. Wounded at Ellison's Mill, Va., and 
Second Manassas. Promoted Captain August 28, 1862. Resigned 
February 24, 1863. Died since the war in Atlanta, Ga. 

HASLETT, SAMUEL D.— 

Second Lieutenant, June 6, 1801. Promoted First Lieutenant Au- 
gust 28, 1862; Captain, March, 1863. Detailed as Provost Marshal 
of Ewell's Corps 1864. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Died 
since the war in Atlanta, Ga. 

RUCKER, JESSE G.— 
Junior Second Lieutenant, June 6, 1861. Promoted Second Lieuten- 
ant August 28, 1SG2; First Lieutenant March, 1863. Wounded at 
Charlestown, Va., August 21, 1864. Died in Atlanta, Ga., 1898. 

GOSS, BENJAMIN F. W.— 

First Sergeant, June 6, 1861. Wounded at Second Manassas. 

JONES, HENRY W.— 

Second Sergeant, June 6, 1861. Promoted First Sergeant October, 
1861, Second Lieutenant March, 1863. Served through the war. 
Died in Toccoa, Ga. 

BARTON, BENJAMIN P.— 

Third Sergeant, June 6, 1861. Discharged. 

CLARKE, ALLEN M.— 

Fourth Sergeant, June 6, 1861. Discharged July, 18^. 

HAMMOND, JOHN, Sr.— 
First Corporal, June 6. 1861. Discharged July, 1862. Died since the 
war in Augusta, Ga. 

BERRY, WILLIAM G.— 

Second Corporal, June 6, 1861. Served through the war. Died in 
Fulton county, Ga. 

WELLS, COLUMBUS M.— 

Third Corporal, June 6, 1861. Fate unknown. 
BRUCE, CALLAWAY— 

Fourth Corporal, June 6, 1861. Promoted Third Corporal 1861. 
Served through the war. Died in Atlanta, Ga. 



Muster Rolls Twenty-first Georgia Regiment. 393 

AGNEW, JOHN T.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Killed at Ellison's Mill, Va. 

AGNEW, 



Private, June G, 1861. Killed at Ellison's Mill, Ya. 

BALL, MARK— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Wounded at Batchelor's Creek, N. C. De- 
tailed as teamster 1864. Served through the war. Living in Ala- 
bama. 

BARTON, ROBERT H.— 

Private, June 6. 1861. Lost eye at Sharpsburg, Md.. and dis- 
charged. Living in Atlanta, Ga. 

BENEDICT, J. C— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Promoted Second Corporal 1863. Wounded 
at Fredericksburg, Va. Served through the war. Dead. 

BROWN, WILLIAM G.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Promoted Third Corporal 1863. Served 
through the war. Moved to North Georgia. 

BURNES, JOHN— 

Private, March 1, 1862. Wounded at Ellison's Mill, Va., 1862. Dis- 
charged March, 1863. Died since the war in Atlanta, Ga. 

CAMPBELL, JAMES L. V.— 

Private, June 22, 1863. Captured at Gettysburg, Pa. Served 
through the war. Supposed to be living in Campbell county, Ga. 

CAMPBELL, J. L.— 
Private, June 6, 1861. Captured at Gettysburg, Pa., never heard of 
since. 

CARLISLE, C— 

Private, June 6. 1861. Missing at Gettysburg, Pa., supposed to be 
have been killed. 

CARLISLE, GREEN— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Missing at Gettysburg, Pa., supposed to have 
died. 

CARMICHAEL, JAMES— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Fate unknown. 

CLARK, DEAN— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Served through the war. Died in Atlanta, 
Ga. 

CLARK, JAMES R.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Killed at Ellison's Mill, Va. 
CLARK, MILES W.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Wounded at Second Manassas. Served 
through the war. Living in Fulton county, Ga. 



394 DoLi.8-CooK Brigade. 

COOPER, JESSE— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Died at Sudley Church, Va., November 2, 
1861. 

COURSEY, FRANCIS M.— 

Private, August 15, 1861. Fate unknown. 

COURSEY, HARRISON— 

Private, August 15, 1861. Wounded in battle May 23, 1864. Living 
in Rockdale county, Ga. 

COURSEY, JOSEPH— 

Private, August 15, 1861. Served through the war. Died in Fulton 
county, Ga. 

COURSEY, WESLEY— 

Private, August 15, 1861. Assigned to hospital duty, 1863. 

CRITES, PETER L.— 
Private, June 6, 1861. Promoted Second Sergeant, October, 1861. 
Lost leg at Charlestown, Va., August 21, 1864. 

DARTELL, NAPOLEON B.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Promoted Fourth Corporal 1863. Assigned 
to hospital duty 1864. Served through the war. 

DAVIS, IRA R.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Killed in battle. 

DUNN, JOHN W.— 

Private, March 1, 1862. Detailed in rolling mill in Atlanta, Ga., 
1863. 

DUNN, WILLIAM E.— 

Private, March 1, 1862. Detailed in shoeshop in Atlanta, Ga., 1863. 

DYCH, H. P.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Wounded in battle. Served through the war. 

Living in South Carolina. 
DYCH, WILLIAM R.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Served through the war. Living in South 

Carolina. 

FARLOW, EDWARD E. A.— 
Private, March 1, 1862. Captured at Gettysburg, Pa. Survived the 
war. Died in Alabama. 
FORD, NORMAN M.— 

Private, March 1, 1862. Died of measles in Richmond, Va., May 17 
1862. 

FUTCH, HENRY— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Served through the war. Died in Atlanta, Ga, 
FUTCH, WILLIAM— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Atlanta, 
Ga. 



Muster Rolls Twenty-first Georgia Regx 

^NT. 397 

GALT, WILLIAM T.— 
Private, March 1, 1862. Detailed as drummer 1863. Served U 
the war. "^^^O" 

GALWAY, J. W.— 
Private, June 6, 1861. Fate unknowu. 

GROVETT, J. G.— 
Private, June 6, 1861. Fate unknown. 

HAMBY, AUGUSTUS C.— 

Private, March 1, 1862. Wounded at Plymouth, N. C. Served 
through the war. 

HAMBY, L. H.— 
Private, March 1, 1862. Died of measles in Richmond, Va., 1862. 

HAMBY, MAJOR B.— 

Private, March 1, 1862. Promoted First Corporal 1863. Detailed 
in Signal Corps. Served through the war. Living in Oxford, Gfi. 

HAMMOND, ABNER— 
Private, March 1, 1862. Discharged 1862. 

HAMMOND, JOHN, Jr.— 
Private, March 1, 1862. Discharged 1862. 

HAMMOND, JOHN T.— 

Private, March 1, 1862. Fate unknown. 

HARDEN, HENRY T.— 

Private, March 1, 1862. Promoted Third Sergeant October, 1862. 
Fate unknown. 

HASKINS, WILLIAM H.— 
Private, March 1, 1862. Fate unknown. 

HASLETT, GEORGE H.— 

Private, June 1, 1862. Detailed in Ewell's Provost Guard. Served 
through the war. Living in Lawrenceville, Ga. 

HASLETT, HAYDEN C— 
Private, July 19, 1861. Discharged. 

HASLETT, LUKE R.— 
Private, June 6, 1861. Promoted Fourth Sergeant October, 1861, 
Junior Second Lieutenant 1862. Died of smallpox 1863. 

HENSLEY, WILLIAM J.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Fate unKnown. 

HERRING, JAMES F.— 
Private, July 22, 1861. Wounded by shell in battle. Served through 
the war. Died in Cobb county, Ga. 

HUDGINS, R. C— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Tate unknown. 



394 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

COOPER, /INS, HENRY H.— 

PrivaVate, June G, 1801. Died in Orange C. H., Va., 1862. 

-^CTTCHINS, MEREDITH J.— 

Cr Private, February 27, 18G4. Served through the war. Living in 
Hapeville, Ga. 

JOHNSON, WILLIAM T.— 

Private, March 4, 1862. Fate unlinown. 

JONES, JAMES J.— 

Private, March 4, 1862. Died of bronchitis in Richmond, Va., 1862. 

JORDAN, HENRY E.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Lost arm at Charlestown, Va., August 21, 
1864. Living in Fulton county, Ga. 

JOSEY, WILLIAM F.— 

Private, June 23, 1861. Promoted Second Corporal October, 1861. 
Died in service of measles. 
KELLEY, LEANDER— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Killed at Richmond, Va., 1862. 
KENT, WILLIAM R. ("Tom, the Old Veteran Cigar-Maker")— 
Private, August 19, 1861. Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., and honor- 
ably discharged. At the battle of Atlanta, Ga., July 22, 1864, 
while not in the service of the Confederate States he volunteered 
and fought through that desperate struggle. Previous to his en- 
listment in this Company he was a member of Company L, First 
Georgia Regulars, and was discharged account disability. Living 
in Atlanta, Ga. 
KNIGHT, BENJAMIN— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Detailed as teamster 1863. Discharged July 
1864. Living in Logansville, Ga. 

LANGSTON, ELIJAH W.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Captured at Gettysburg, Pa. Living in At- 
lanta, Ga. 

LATHAM, CHARLES H.— 

Private, August 19, 1862. Fate unknown. 
LATHAM, JOHN M.— 

Private, March 1, 1862. Wounded in battle. Lost leg at Charles- 
town, Va., and died from wound. 
LEACH, JAMES M.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Served through the war. Supposed to be 
living. 

LONG, WILEY M.— 

Private, March 1, 1862. Served through the war. 
McDADE, BENJAMIN F.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Died of congestion in Lynchburg, Va., 1862. 
McGINTY, JAMES— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Discharged July 16, 1864. Died since the 
war in Flowery Branch, Ga. 



Muster Rolls Twenty-fiest Georgia Regiment. 397 

McWILLIAMS, J. W.— 

Private, March 1, 1SG2. Died of fever in Charlottesville, Va., Octo- 
ber 30, 1862. 

MOORE, AUGUSTUS L.— 
Private, March 1, 18G2. Detailed in hospital 1863. Served through 
the war. Died in Clayton county, Ga. 
MORGAN, WILLIAM— 

Private, March 1, 18&1. Detailed in rolling mill in Atlanta, Ga., 
1863. 

MORSE, GEORGE P.— 

Private, August 9, 1862. Missing at battle Chancellorsville, Va. 
Supposed to have been killed. 
MYRES, HENRY L.— 

Private, August 19, 1861. Fate unknown. 
NELMS, WILLIAM C. D.— _ 

Private, June 6, 1861. Lost arm and captured at Gettysburg, Pa. 
NICHOLS, JOHN A.— 

Private, March 1, 1862. Fate unlyiown. 
NICHOLS, W\\SHINGTON L.— 

Private, March 1, 1862. Detailed in navy department in Richmond, 
Va., 1863. 

PARRISH, C. C— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Wounded at Plymouth, N. C, 1864. Living 
in Fayetteville, Ga. 

PERKINS, GEORGE W.— 
Private, March 1, 1862. Wounded at Second Manassas, and sup- 
posed to have died from wounds. 
PRICER, JOHN M.— 
Private, June 6, 1861. Lost arm at Cedai- Creek, Va., and discharged. 
Living at Little River P. O., Texas. 

PUCKETT, GEORGE— 
Private, June 6, 1861. Died in service. 

PUCKETT, THOMAS— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Fate unknoAvn. 
RANSOM, GEORGE W.— 

Private, March 1, 1863. Wounded at Plymouth, N. C, April 19, 1864, 
and died from wound. 
ROGERS, ROBERT R.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Fate unknown. 

ROSS, JAMES— 
Private, August 9, 1862. Wounded and captured at Sharpsburg, Md. 

ROSSER, W^ILLIAM S.— 
Private, June 6, 1861. Wounded at Second Manasses. Served 
through the war. Died in Fulton county, Ga. 



398 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

RUTLEDGE, NATHAN A.— 
Private, June 6, 1861. Killed in battle. 

RUSH, ANDREW J.— 

Private, March 1, 1863. Wounded at Second Manassas. Served 
through the war. Living in Haralson county, Ga. 

RUSH, COLUMBUS G.— 
Private, June 6, 1861. Lost both legs above the l^nee at Petersburg, 
Va. Died since the war in Fulton county, Ga. 

SHIRLEY, JAMES P.— 
Private, March 1, 1863. Fate unknown. 

STAPLES, HENRY PERRY— 

Private, March 1, 1862. Detailed in Pioneer Corps 1863. Served 
through the war. Living in DeKalb county, Ga. 

STONAKER, B. F.— 
Private, August 15, 1862. Died in Staunton, Ya., November 22, 1862. 

SWEAT, ABNER B.— 
Private, August 15, 1862. Wounded at Cold Harbor, Va., 1864. 
Served through the war. Died in Atlanta, Ga., March, 1903. 

SWEAT, ANDREW J.— 
Private, March 1, 1862. Wounded at Second Manassas. 

SWEAT, JOHN— 
Private, June 6, 1861. Detailed in Hospital at Farmville, Va., 1863. 
Served through the war. 

SWEAT, WILLIAM— 
Private, March 1, 1862. Fate unknown. 

THOMAS, ROBERT R.— 
Private, June 6, 1861. Captured at Gettysburg, Pa. Never heard of 
since. 

THURMAN, DAVID— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Discharged 1862. Died since the war in Ful- 
ton county, Ga. 

THURMAN, ISAAC— 
Private, June 6, 1861. Promoted Sergeant October, 1861. Missing at 
battle Drewry's Bluff, Va. Supposed to have been killed. 

THURMAN, JOHN— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Discharged 1862. 

TIDWELL, OBADIAH— 
Private, June 6, 1861. Promoted Fifth Sergeant 1863, Fourth Ser- 
geant 1864. 

TONEY, MATHEW R. J.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Wounded at 3harpsburg, Md. 



Muster Rolls Twenty-first Georgia Regiment. 399 

VEAL, A. D.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Detailed in Brigade Commissary Depart- 
ment, 18G3. Captured at Gettysburg, Pa. Never heard of since. 

VEAL, HENRY— 

Private, March 1, 1862. Detailed in Brigade Commissary Depart- 
ment 1863. Fate unknovrn. 

VEAL, JOSEPH— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Assigned to hospital duty 1863. Fate un- 
known. 
WADDAIL, THOMAS— 

Private, June 11, 1861. Discharged. 
WALKER, FULTON L.— 

Private, February 4, 1863. Fate unknown. 

WALKER, TARPLEY L.— 
Private, March 1, 1863. Fate unknown. 

WARD, AUSTIN— 

Private, March 1, 1863. Captured at Gettysburg, Pa. Never heard 
of since. 

WARD, THOMAS R.— 

Private, March 1, 1862. Assigned to hospital duty 1863. Fate un- 
known. 

WARD, WILLIAM— 

Private, March 1, 1862. Served through the war. Living in Bartow 
county, Ga. 

WATTS, DENNIS L.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Promoted Third Sergeant 1863. Wounded 
in battle, and died from wound. 

WEAVER, JOHN W.— 

Private, March 30, 1863. Fate unknown. 

WEST, JAMES NIM— 

Private, August 29, 1861. Wounded at Second Manassas. Served 
through the war. Living in Atlanta, Ga. 

WEST, WILLIAM J.— 

Private, August 19, 1861. Promoted .^unior Second Lieutenant 1863. 
Served through the war. Died in Augusta, Ga. 
WHITE, JOHN A.— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Promoted Fourth Sergeant 1863, Third Ser- 
geant 1864. Wounded at Charlestown, Va., August 21, 1864. Liv- 
ing in Lovelace, Alabama. 
WHITWORTH, JOSEPH— 

Private, March 1, 1863. Killed in battle near Drewry's Bluff, Va. 
WILLIAMS, lENOS C— 

Private, March 1, 1863, Detailed as teamster at Division Head- 
quarters 1863. Served through the war. , 



400 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

WILSON, WILLIAM H. ("PET")— 

Private, June 6, 1861. Captured at Gettysburg, Pa. Never heard 
of since. 

WOOD, J. B.— 

Private, March 1, 1862. Died in Lynchburg, Va., January 12, 1803. 

WOOD, T. R.— 

Private, March 1, 1862. Detailed 'n hospital 1864. Fate unknown. 






Muster Rolls Twenty-first Georgia Regiment. 401 



MUSTER ROLL OF CEDARTOWN GUARDS, COM- 
PANY D, TWENTY-FIRST REGIMENT, GEORGIA 
VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, C. S. A. 

POLK COUNTY, GEORGIA. 

BORDERS, STEPHEN A.— 

Captain, June 27, 1861. Resigned November 18, 1861. Died near 
Cedartown, Ga., 1892. 

TERDERY, THOMAS J.— 

First Lieutenant, June 27, 1861. Promoted Adjutant, Twenty- 
First Georgia Regiment, October 12, 1861. Killed at Fredericks- 
burg, Va.,' December 13, 1862. 

ATWOOD, BERRY A.— 

Second Lieutenant, June 27, 1861. Resigned November, 1861. En- 
listed in First Georgia Cavalry. Died in Texas 1886. 

BRANCH, JOHN L.— 

Junior Second Lieutenant, June 27, 1861. Resigned November, 
1861. Enlisted in First Georgia Cavalry, and was promoted Sur- 
geon of the Regiment. Living and practicing medicine in Green- 
way, Ga. 

WRIGHT. WILLIAM D.— 

First Sergeant, June 27, 1861. Promoted Second Lieutenant 1862. 
Wounded at Cedar Run, Va. D^'ed since the war in Cedar town, 
Ga. 

WEST, JOHN R.— 

Second Sergeant, June 27, 1861. Transferred November 19, 1861. 
Died since the war. 

DUN AWAY, ELISHA R.— 

Third Sergeant, June 27, 1861. Discharged October, 1861. Died 
near Cedartown, Ga., 1862. 

BRANCH, EDWIN R.— 

Fourth Sergeant, June 27, 1861. Transferred to First Georgia Cav- 
alry. Died of smallpox during 1he war. 
JOHNS, JEREMIAH R.— 

First Corporal, June 27, 1861. iVounded in seven days' fight 
around Richmond, and at Winchester, Va. Killed in battle 1864. 
Buried in Mount Jackson, Ya. 

CAMBRON, JACKSON M.— 

Second Corporal, June 27, 1861. Killed at Cross Keys, Va., June 8, 
1862. 

26 d-c 



402 Doles-Cook BriGxVde. 

CRIBB, SAMUEL J.— 

Third Corporal, June 27, 18G1. Promoted First Corporal 1862. Dis- 
charged 1864. Died since the war. 

CRUTCHFIELD, JAMES— 

Fourth Corporal, June 27, 1861. Died at Sudley Church, Va., 1801. 

ADDISON, BERRY A.— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Wounded at Second Manassas. Promoted 
Third Corporal, 1864. Captured May 30, 1864. Died since the 
war. 

ADDISON, GEORGE— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Wounded at Second Manassas. Served 
through the war. Moved to Texas. 

ADKINS, BENJAMIN— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Killed at Chancellorsville, Ya. 

ALEXANDER, O. A.— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Killed at Cold Harbor, Va., June 27, 1862. 

ATKINS, GEORGE W.— 

Private, August 1, 1862. Killed at Sharpsburg, Md. 

ATWOOD, LEWIS B.— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Promoted Fourth Sergeant December, 1861. 
Wounded at Second Manassas, and died from wound. 

BATTLE, HENRY T.— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Promoted Captain November 18, 1861. 
Served through the war. Died in Polk county, Ga., 1899. 

BATTLE, JESSE— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Died in Service, 1862. 

BECK, WILLIAM— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Wounded at Hai-pers Ferry, Ya., September, 
1862. Served through the war. Died in Floyd county, Ga., 1881. 

BOBO, JAMES Y.— 

Private, March 1, 1802. Killed at Charlestown, Ya., 3804. 

BOLES, JOSEPH H.— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Promoted First Sergeant 1862. Wounded 
in battle. Served through the war. Died in Arkansas after the 
surrender. 

BRIDGES, JAMES— 

Private, March 1, 1862. Living in Polk county, Ga. 

BRIDGES, JOHN— 

Private, March 1, 1862. Killed at Cold Harbor, Ya., June, 1862. 

BRIDGES, NELSON— 

Private, March 1, 1802. Died in service 1802. 



Muster Kolls Twenty-first Georgia Regiment. 403 

BRIDGES, WILLIAM A.— 
Private, March 1, 1862. Wounded at Richmond, and Chancellors- 
ville, Va. Living in Polk county, Ga. 

BROWN, JOHN A.— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Promoted First Corporal. Wounded at 
Cross Keys, Va., and died from wound. 

CAMERON, E. B.— 

Private, April 22, 1864. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Living 
near Piedmont, Ala. 

CAMERON, J. F.— 

Private, 1862. Killed at Plymouth, N. C, 1864. " -^ 

CAMERON, JOSEPH A.— 

Private, 1862. Served through the war. Dead. ■ 

CARTER, EDVv^ARD C— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Discharged account disease 1861. Living 
in Polk county, Ga. 

CHESER, ISAAC V.— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Wounded and disabled at Cold Harbor, 
Va., 1862. Detailed in Richmond, Va. Served through the war. 
Living in Floyd county, Ga. 

COLLINS, RICHARD— 

Private, March 27, 1864. 

COOPER, J. R.— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Survived the war. Died in Rome, Ga. 
COOPER, WILLIAM C— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Served through the war. Dead. 
COPELAND, JESSE W.— 

Private, March 1, 1862. Wounded at Fredericksburg, Va. Detailed 
in Pioneer Corps, 1864. Died since the war. 

COPELAND, JOHN E.— 

Private, March 1, 1862. Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 
CRABB, J. E.— 

Private, September 18, 1861. Wounded at Fredericksburg. Va. 
Transferred to First Georgia Cavali*y. Living in Cedartown, Ga. 
CRABB, JESSE W.— 

Private, .Tune 27, 1861. Discharged November 18, 1861. Enlisted 
in First Georgia Cavalry and promoted Captain. Wounded in 
battle 1864. Moved to Tt-:r.« and died 1881. 

CRUTCHFTELD. E.— 

Private, June 27, 1861. 
DANIEL, RICHARD— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Died in Richmond, Va., 1862. 



'^^'i Doles-Cook Brigade. 

DANIEL, THOMAS R.— 

Privato, June 27, ISGl. Discharged account rheumatism 18G2. 

Living in Cedartown, Ga. 
DARDEN, GEORGE— 

Private, June 27, 1S61. Promoted Ordnance Sergeant. Transferred 

to Eighth Georgia Cavahy, April 20, 1864. Died in Mississippi 

1866. 

DARDEN, WILLIAM ARCH— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Promoted Second Sergeant. Killed at Sec- 
ond Manassas. 

DAVIS, JAMES— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Wounded at Cold Harbor, Va., 1862, and 
died at home from wound while on furlough. 

DAVIS, LEVI B.— 

Private, August 27, 1861. Wounded three times in battle. Pro- 
moted Fifth Sergeant. Wounded at Plymouth, N. C, 1864. Sur- 
rendered at Appomattox, Va. Living in Texas. 

DILINDER, L. B.— 

Private, March 27, 1864. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Moved 
to Alabama. Supposed to be living. 
DOROUGH, THOMAS— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Survived the war. Died in Alabama. 

DUDLEY, NICHOLAS— 

Private, June 27. 1861. Discharged November, 1861. Enlisted in 
First Georgia Cavalry 1862. 

DUKE, JOHN S.— 

Private, March 1, 1862. Wounded at Winchester, Va., September 
- 19, 1864, and died from wound. 

DUKE, W^ILLIAM J.— 

Private, August 13, 1861. Promoted Third Sergeant 1862. Wound- 
ed at Fredericksburg, Va. Promoted Sergeant Major Twenty- 
first Georgia Regiment, August 6, 1863. Living in Bremen, Ga. 

EARLY, MARION— 

Private, September 1, 1863. Died since the war. 

EARLY, ROBERT — 

Private, June 27, 1861. Killed at Second Mannssas. 

FBNNELL, GEORGE L.— 

Private, Aug. 27, 1861. Wounded at Plymouth, N. C, April 18, 
1864. Moved to West Tennessee after the surrender and died. 

FENNELL, WILLIAM — 

Private Aug. 27, 1861. Wounded at Winchester, Va., Sept. 19. 
1864. Moved to West Tennessee after the surrender. 
FORTUNE, JOHN W.— 

Private June 27, 1861. Discharged 1861. Living m Rome, Ga. 



Muster Rolls Twenty-first Georgia Regiment. 405 

FRIX, BENJAMIN.— 
Private June 27, 1861. Died in Richmond, Va. 

FRIX, WILLIAM C— 
Private, June 27, 1861. Discharged. Died in Polk county, Ga. 

GARNER, JAKE.— 

Private, 1862. Died in Culpepper, Va., 1862. 

GARRISON, H. A.— 
Private, July 2, 1864. Wounded at Winchester, Va. Living io 
Texas. 

GILPEN, BENJAMIN F.— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Wounded at Cedar Mountain, Va. Served 
through the war. Supposed to be living. 

GOGGINS, JOHN W.— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 

GOGGINS. WILLIAM R.— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Promoted corporal. Killed at Charlestown,. 
Va., 1864. 

GOUZE, EMIL.— 
Private, June 27, 1861. Captured at Frederick City, Md., July 
8, 1864. Survived the war. Living in Arizona. 

GRAVERLY, JAMES R.— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Wounded at Winchester, Va., 1862. Died 
in Virginia, 1862. 

GREEN, SAMUEL W.— 
Private, March 1, 1862. Living in Polk county, Ga. 

GRESHAM, W^ILLIAM D.— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Promoted Second Sergeant, 1862. Wounded 

near Richmond, Va. Served through the war. Died in Cedar- 
town, Ga., 1893. 

HACKNEY, DOCK.— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Died in Polk county, Ga., 1892. 

HACKNEY, JOHN F.— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Died in Culpeper, Va., soon after enlistment. 

HACKNEY, JOHN T.— 

Private, February, 1863. Wounded Dec. 23, 1864. Living in Polk 
county, Ga. 

HACKNEY, JOHN W.— 

Private, February 1863. Detailed as teamster 1864. Died in 
Polk county, Ga., 1893. 

HACKNEY, JOSEPH W.— 
Private. 1862. Killed in Polk county, Ga., 1890. 



406 Doles-Cook ^Brigade. 

HACKNEY, THOMAS — 

Private, 1SG2. Wounded at Cross Keys, Va., June 8, 1862. Sur- 
rendered at Appomattox, Va. Died in Pollc county, Ga., 1899. 

HAYES, RICHARD B.— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Died in service 1862. 

HIGHTOWER, JEFFERSON T.— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Died of smallpox at White Sulphur Springs, 
Va., 1863. 

HIGHTOWER, THOMAS M.— 

Private. June 27. 1861. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant, Second 
Lieutenant and First Lieutenant. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. 
Living in Cedartown, Ga. 

HOLCOMB, JAMES.— 

Private, March 1st, 1862. Wounded at Richmond, Va., 1862. Sur- 
vived the war. 

ISBELL, JAMES M.— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Promoted Third Sergeant. Wounded at 
Chancellorsville, Va. Served through the war. Living in Texas. 

JARRELL, A. R.— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Killed at Plymouth, N. C, 1864. 

JARRELL, LUMP — 

Private, 1862. Died in Hospital in Richmond, Va., 1862. 

JARRELL, WILLIAM A.— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Killed at Cold Harbor, Va., 1862. 

JOHNS, MARSHALL — 

Private, 1862. Promoted First Corporal, and Third Sergeant. 
Wounded in valley of Virginia. Transferred to First Georgia 
Cavalry. Killed, 1864. 

JOHNSON, T. J.— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Killed in battle near Gordonville, Va., 1862. 

JORDAN, JAMES H.— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Wounded at Cold Harbor, Va., and Sec- 
ond Manassas. Promoted Sergeant. Surrendered ^at Appomat- 
tox, Va. Living in Lake Creek, Ga. 

JORDAN, JOSEPH N.— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Promoted Third Corporal, 1862. Wounded 
in battle. Living in Haralson county, Ga. 

KIGHTEN, BENJAMIN — 

Private, 1862. Killed at Harper's Ferry, Va., 1863. 

KIGHTEN, JOSIAH C— 

Private, March 26, 1863. Killed in battle, 1863. 



Muster Rolls Twenty-first Georgia Regiment. 407 

LOGAN, JAMES E.— 
Private, January 31, 1862. Detailed as Provost Guard, Ewell's 
Corps. Surrendered at Appomattox, Ya. Living in Polk county, 
Ga. 
LOGAN, E. JONES - 

Private, June 27, 18(31. Served through the war. Died in Polk 
county, Ga, 

LYONS, WILLIAM — 

Private, June 27, 1861. Wounded and captured at Second Manas- 
sas. Died from wound while in prison. 

Mccormick, joseph p.— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Discharged Nov. 22, 1861. Enlisted in 
First Georgia Cavalry, and was killed in battle. 

Mccormick, william l.— 

Private, June 27, 1801. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant, 1862. 
Wounded at Winchester, Ya. Served through the war. Killed 
by falling from the third story of a hotel in Birmingham, Ala. 
McDANIEL, WILLIAM D.— 
Private, June 27, 18G1. 

MABRY, E. K.— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Discharged. Dead. 

MADDOX, JOHN — 

Private, March 1, 1862. Died near Esom Hill. 

MADDOX, SANDERS — 

Private, April 13, 1864. Living in Polk county, Ga. 

MADDOX, YARD— 

Private, March 1, 1862. Died in hospital in Lynchburg, Ya., 1863. 

MANN, J. H. H.— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Discharged 1861. Died at home soon 
afterward. 

MAXEY, JAME? .— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Detailed in shoe factory, 1864. 

MOBLEY, JOHN H.— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Died at Sudley Church, Ya., Nov. 3, 1861. 

MOBLEY, W^ILLIAM R.— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 

MORTON, JOHN K.— 

Private, March 1, 1862. Detailed in Litter Corps. Surrendered 
at Appomattox, Ya. Living In Polk county, Ga. 

MOTES, HENRY F.— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Promoted Third Sergeant Dec. L I^^M. 
Wounded at Second Manassas. Died since the war. 

PHILLIPS. JOHN T.— 

Private, June 27, 1S6L 



408 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

POOL, A. MABRY — 
Private, Juue 27. 1861. Woundea in battle. Detailed as teamsteL', 
1864. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Moved to Texas after the 
surrender. 

POWELL, GEORGE L.— 
Private, June 27, 1861. Wounded and captured at Gettysburg, P;i. 
Living in Texas. 

POWELL, JOHN W.— 
Private, June 27, 1861. Wounded and captured at Gettysburg, Pa. 
Served througth the war. Died, April, 1901. 
PRICE, JAMES v.— 
Private, June 27, 1861. Promoted Fourth Sergeant, 1862. Wounded 
at Cold Harbor, Va., 1862. Captured near Gettysburg, Pa. 
Never heard of since. 

RICHARDS, MILTON V.— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Promoted Second Corporal. 1862. Wounded 
in battle. Served through the war. Now an inmate of the 
Georgia State Sanatorium. 

RICHARDSON, JOHN B.— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Died in Richmond, Va. 

ROPER, JOSEPH T.— 
^ Private, Aug. 13, 1861. Promoted Sergeant. Killed at Winchester, 
Va., Sept. 19, 1864. 

SPALDING, WYLIE A.— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Transfen-ed to First Georgia Cavalry, 
and promoted June 1, 1864. Moved to Texas after the surrender. 

TATE, JAMES S.— 

Private, June 27. 1861. Killed at Charlestown, Va. 

TOLTY, HENRY BUSH — 

Private, June 27, 1861. Died in service. 

THOMPSON, J. BOSE — 

Private, March 1, 1862. Wounded near Richmond, Va., May 3, 
1864. Killed in battle. May 30, 1864. 

THURMOND, C. C— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Promoted Fourth Corporal. Captured 
at Gettysburg, Pa. 

WADE, THOMAS H.— 

Private. Recruit. Wounded at Winchester, Va., Sept. 19, 1864. 
Died in Alabama. 

WHITE, MARION.— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Died in Centerville,Va., 1861. 
WIGGINS, THOMAS.— 

Private, March 1, 1862. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md. Served 
through the war. Died in Texas, 1896. 



Muster Rolls Twenty-first Georgia Regiment. 409 

WIGGINS, WILLIAM r- 
Private, March 1, 18G2. Living in Polk county, Ga. 

WILLIA:\[S, GEORGE W.— 

Private, June 27, 18G1. Died in Richmond, Va. 

WITCHER, lEMORY T.— 

Private, March 6, 1862. Wounded at Cold Harbor, Va., 1862. Cap- 
tured at Gettysburg, Pa. Served through the war. Moved to 
Texas. 

WITCHER, J. T.— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Killed at Cold Harbor, Va., 1862. 

WITZEL, JOHN J.— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Promoted Second Sergeant Dec. 1, 1861. 
Wounded at Winchester, Va., 1862. Captured near Gettysburg, Pa. 
Died since the war in Floyd county, Ga. 

WRIGHT, E. J.— 

Private, June 27, 18G1. Died of smallpox in Richmond, Va., 1861. 

WRIGHT, JACK.— 

Private, 1862. Killed at Cold Harbor. Va., 1862. 

WRIGHT, SPENCER — 

Private, 1862. Killed at Second Manassas. 

WOOD, BENJAMIN H. L.— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Died of disease in Richmond, Va., 1862. 

WOOD, WILLIAM J.— 

Private, June 27, 1861. Wounded at Winchester, Va., Sept. 1&, 
1864, and died of wound. 



410 Doles-Cook Brigade. 



MUSTER ROLL OF SARDIS VOLUNTEERS, COM- 
PANY E, TWENTY-FIRST REGIMENT, GEORGIA 
VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, C. S. A. 

FLOYD COUNTY, GEORGIA. 

HART, JOHN R.— 

Captain, June 24, 1861. This company was detached from the 
Twenty-first Georgia Regiment by Special Order No. 106, Adjutant 
and Inspector-General Office, Richmond, Va., May 8, 1862, and or- 
dered to report for duty as a cavalry company to Major-Generai 
Pemberton at Charleston, S. C, and assigned to Smith's Legion of 
Georgia Cavalry. Captain Hart was promoted Lieutenant-Colonel 
of the Battalion, and afterwards Colonel of the Sixth Georgia Cav- 
alry, where he served until the close of the war, and died a few 
years ago in Rome, Ga. 

BALES, ALFRED F.— 

First Lieutenant, June 24, 1861. Promoted Captain after being 
transferred to Smith's Legion,-iOeorgia Cavalry. Promoted ]Major 
Sixth Georgia Cavalry. Killed at Dandridge, East Tennessee. 
Dec. 24, 1863. 

TUTT, WILLIAM H.— 

Second Lieutenant, June 24, 1861. Died in the fall of 1862, while 
at home on sick furlough. 

BOUCHILLON, JOHN D.— ; 

Junior Second Lieutenant, June 24, 1861. Resigned Nov. 1861. 
Living in Chattooga county, Ga. 

LAY, JOHN R.— 

First Sergeant, June 24, 1861. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant 
Dec. 2, 1861. First Lieutenant, 1862. Captain, 1863. Wounded 
at or near Chickamauga, Ga. Returned to his command in East 
Tennessee the last of November, 1863, and served through the 
war. Living in Cresson, Texas. 

MATHIS, GEORGE W.— 
Second Sergeant, June 24, 1861. Promoted Junior Second Lieuten- 
ant, 1862. Captured, Dec. 24, 1863. Dead. 

AVILLIAMSON, CHARLES C— 

Third Sergeant, June 24, 1861. Wounded by Bushwhackers in East 
Tennessee, 1863, and died in Hospital from wound, in Knox- 
ville, Tenn. 

MOORE, WILLIAM D.— 

Fourth Sergeant, June 24, 1861. Killed in battle. 



Muster Rolls Twenty-first Georgia Regiment. 411 

FLEMING, JOHN P.— 

First Corporal, June 24, 1861. Died in service, ISCl. 

SMITH, ISAAC P.— 

Second Corporal, June 24, 18G1. Supposed to have been killed at 
Perryville, Ky., as he has never been heard of since. 

WILLIAMSON, JOHN H. 

Third Corporal, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Died after 
the surrender, in N. C. 

HAYS, ROBERT N.— 

Fourth Corporal, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Moved 
out West. 

AUSTIN, LEMUEL N.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Supposed to be 
dead. 

BUFORD, JAMES E.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Died in hospital. 

BUFORD, JOHN W.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Died in hospital. 

BURNS, HENRY H.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Living in 
Randolph, Bibb county, Ala. 

CALLENS, JAMES M.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Living at Valley 
Mills, Texas. 

CALLENS, MARTIN V.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Promoted Sergeant. Served through the 
war. Living at Valley Mills, Texas. 

CARDER, WILLIAM A.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Died in service. 
CARPENTER, LEWIS.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Discharged, 1862. 

CARY, RICHARE — 

Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Nothing known 
of him since. 
CHAPMAN, A. F.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Bir- 
mingham, Ala. 

COFER, JAMES A.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Farrell, 
Ala. 
COLLINS, WILLIAM G.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. 



412 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

COMER, JOSEPH A. D.— 
Private, .Time 24, 1861. Promoted First Sergeant. Living in Chat- 
tooga county, Ga. 

CRAWFORD, GEORGE B.— 

Private, .Time 24, 1861. Served througti the war. Nothing known 
of him since. 

DAVIS, JOHN - 

Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Floyd 
county, Ga. 

DAVIS, WILLIAM — 

Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Died in Floyd 
county, Ga. 

DAVIDSON, HUGH S.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Discharged account disability, 1861. 

DOOGAN, JOHN H.— 
Private, June 24, 1861. 

DUKE, JAMES A.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Killed by Bushwhackers in East Tennessee, 
while on picket. 

DUKE, WILLIAM C— 
Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Supposed to be 
living in Floyd county, Ga. 

DUTTON, HENR'X - 

Private, June 24, 1861. Discharged 1861 account of disease. Living 
in Alabama. 

FISHER, HENRY W,— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Died in Floyd 
county, Ga. 
FRAZER, JAMES A.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Died in Chat- 
tooga county, Ga. 

FRAZER, ROBERT N.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Pitts- 
burg, Texas. 

FRAZER, TRUSTINE — 

Private, June 24, 1861. 

FRAZER, WILLIAM N.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Ar- 
kansas. 

GREENE, CURTIS — 

Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Living at Leon 
Junction, Texas. 



Muster Rolls Twenty-first Georgia Regiment. 413 

GRIFFIN, WILLIAM H.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Supposed to be 
dead. 

GRISWELL, JOHNSON S.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Nothing known 
of him since. 

GUTHRIE, DAVID W.— 
Private, June 24, 1861. Appointed Musician. Discharged, 1861. 

GUTHRIE, JOHN S.— 
Private, June 24, 1861. Appointed Musician. Discharged, 1861. 

HALL, J. W.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Discharged Nov. 12, 1861. Living in Fulton 
county, Ga. 

HALL, WATTY J.- 

Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Indian 
Territory. 

HALL, WILLIAM J.— 
Private, June 24, ISGl. Promoted First Sergeant Dec. 2, 1861: 
Junior Second Lieutenant, 1863. Served through the war. Living 
in Farrill, Ala. 

HAMILTON, HARRISON ^ 

Private, June 24, 1861. Discharged account disability, Nov. 12, 1861. 
HAYS, WILLIAM H. H.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Moved out West. 
HOLCOMB, JAMES D.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. 

HUSKY, WILLIAM M.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Discharged account ill health, 1863. 

JAMES, WILLIAM J. M.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Promoted First Corporal, Oct. 1861; First 
Lieutenant, 1863. Served through the war. Died in Texas. 
JOHNSON, G. J.— 

Private, Aug. 30, 1861. Discharged account disease. Died since the 
war. 
JOHNSON, WILLIAM H.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Discharged account disease. Died since the 
war, 

JOHNSON, W. R.— 

Private, June 24. 1861. Promoted Second Lieutenant, 186.3. Served 
through the war. Killed in Chattanooga, Tenn., 1897, on railroad. 

KINCAID, R. W.— 

Private, Aug. 1, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Ala- 
bama, 



414 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

KING. GEORGE — 
Private, Nov. 1, 1802. Discharged account of disease. Died since 
the war. 

LESTER, GERMAN M.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Discharged account old age and disability, 
Dec. 2, 18G1. Died in Polk county, Ga., Sept. 26, 1891. 

LESTER, H. F.— 
Private, Aug. 1, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Atlanta, 
Ga. 

LOWERY, JOHN T.— 
Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Moved out West. 
Supposed to be living. 

LOVE, THOMAS F.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Died in Chattooga 
county, Ga. 

McCULLOUGH, JAMES S.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Died in Floyd 
county, Ga. 

McKINNEY, ROBERT — 

Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Rome, 
Ga. 

MILLICAN, T. S.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Early, 
Ga. 

MILLICAN, JAMES C— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Died in Floyd 
county, Ga. 

MOORE, NATHAN S.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Nothing known 
of him since. 

MURDOCK, JAMES R.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Texas. 

NELMS, WILLIAM B.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. 

NEYMAN, DAVID C— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Living at How- 
ell's Cross Roads, Ala. 

NEYMAN, JOSEPH R.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Living at How- 
ell's Cross Roads, Ala. 
NORTH, SAMUEL — 

Private, June 24, 1861. Discharged, 1862. 



Muster Rolls Twenty-first Georgia Reglment. 415 

NORTON, J. A.— 

Private, Aug. 1, 1801. Served through the war. Died in Floyd 
county, Ga. 

PERRY, L. G.— 
Private, June 24, 1861. Died in Lynchburg, Ya,, 1861. 

PILGRIM, ISAAC— 
Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Pitts- 
burg, Tex. 

PILGRIM, WILLIAM M.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Moved out West. 

POWELL, JEREMIAH A.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the v^^ar. Died in Ala- 
bama. 

RAINES, DRAYTON L.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Moved to Texas. 

ROBINSON, THOMAS S.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Wounded at Cassville, Ga. Served through 
the vrar. Living in Texas. 

ROSS, ANDREW J.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Moved to Texas. 

SELF, DAYID A.— 

Private, June 24, 1861. Died in service, 1862. 

SHIRY, A. L.— 

Private, Aug. 1, 1861. Killed near Chickamauga, Ga., Sept. 12, 1863. 

SHIRY, ENOCH P.— 

Private, June 24. 1861. Killed in battle in Georgia, 1864. 

SMITH, HENRY B.— 
Private, June 24, 1861. Discharged account disease, 1862. 

SMITH, JOHN A.— 
Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Moved out West. 

SMITH, JOHN F.— 

Private. June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Moved to Texas. 

WALKER, HENRY — 

Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Died in Floyd 
county, Ga. 

WEST, JOSEPH W.— 
Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Living In Lln- 
dale, Floyd county, Ga. 
WILLIAMS, WILLIAM H.— 
Private, June 24, 1861. Served through the war. Nothing known of 
him since. 



416 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

WOOD, JOHN R.— 

I'rivate, June 24, 1861. Promoted Fourth Corporal Oct., 18G1. Served 
through the war. Died in Floyd county, Ga. 

WRIGHT, WILLIAM H. H.— 

Private, June 24, 18G1. Served through the war. Nothing known 
of him since. 



Note.— A large number of recruits whose names do not appear on this 
roll joined this company after it was transferred to the cavalry service. 

H. W. T. 



Muster Rolls Twenty-first Georgia Regiment. 417 



MUSTER ROLL OF CONCORD RANGERS, COMPANY 
E, TWENTY-FIRST REGIMENT, GEORGIA VOL- 
UNTEER INFANTRY, C. S. A. 

FORSYTH AND DAWSON COUNTIES, GEORGIA. 

SMITH, EDWARD— 

Captain, July 22, ISGl. Was in command of Twenty-first Georgia 
Regiment when Lee surrendered at Appomattox, Va. 

HILL, JOHN W.— 

First Lieutenant, July 22, 1861. Retired at expiration of his term 
of service, July, 1862. 

JULIAN, ROBERT— 

Second Leutenant, July 22, 1861. Captured at Gettysburg, Pa. Im- 
prisoned at Johnson's Island, N. Y. 
HARRIS, DAVID T., Jr.— 

Junior Second Lieutenant, July 22, 1861. Captured at Wilderness, 
Va. One of the 600 Confederate Officers who were placed under 
fire of our guns on Morris Island, S. C. Released after the sur- 
render. 

JULIAN, MICHAEL S.— 

First Sergeant, July 22, 1861. Captured at Gettysburg, Pa. En- 
gaged in battle at Columbus, Ga., 1865, under command of Gen. 
Toombs. Living in Long Beach, California. 

HOPE, JAMES H.— 

Second Sergeant, July 22, 1861. Died at W^inston, N. C, March 
1862. 
LEDBETTER, L. .JOHNSON— 

Third Sergeant, July 22, 1861. Served through the war. 
CROCKER, JACOB A.— 

Fourth Sergeant, July 22, 1861. Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa. Died 
while on his way to prison from wound. 

COPELAND, WILLIAM C— 

First Corporal, July 22, 1861. Captured at Gettysburg, Pa. Paroled 
1865. 
SCOTT, ALFRED W.— 

Second Corporal, July 22, 1861. Killed at Roanoke Island, N. C, 
February 9, 1862. 

ASHW^ORTH, JOHN A.— 

Third Corporal, July 22, 1861. Died in Richmond, Va., 1861. 

W^^LLS, WILLIAM L.— i 

Fourth Corporal, July 22, 1861. Served through the war. 
27 d-c 



418 Doles-Cook Bkigade. 

ASHWORTH, WILLIAM— 
Private, September 1, 18G2. Served through the war. 

BAGWELL, JOHN— 

Private, September 1, 1862. Fate unknown. 

BANISTER, COLUMBUS— 

Private, January 19, 1804. Captured. Served through the war. 

BANISTER, JAMES— 

Private, September 1, 1862. Captured at Gettysburg, Pa., and died 
in prison at Point Lookout, Md., October, 1864. 

BARNETT, FRANCIS M.— 

Private, September 1, 1862. Served through the war. 

BEAN, ANDREW J.— 

Private, September 1, 1862. Served through the war. 

BLACKSTOCK, ALLEN— 

Private, September 1, 1862. Served through the war. 

BLANTON, ASA— 

Private, September 1, 1862. Captured and died in prison at Point 
Lookout, Md., 1864. 

BLANTON, GRANDISON— 

Private, January 15. 1862. Wounded and captured at Gettysburg, 
Pa. Paroled 1865. 

BOND, JAMES W.— 

Private, September 1, 1862. Died in Richmond, Va., 1862. 

BROOKS, JOHN— 

Private, September 12, 1862. Died in North Carolina, 1863. 

CAIN, HECTOR V.— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Discharged January 23, 1862. 

CAIN, JOHN D.— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Died in service November 4, 1861. 

CAIN, WILLIAM J.— 

Private, September 1, 1862. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. 

CLARK, MILTON L.— 
Private, May 22, 1862. Fate unknown. 

COPELAND, SYLVANUS C— 

Private, September 1, 1862. Captured 1863. Paroled 1865. 

COX, NATHANIEL L.— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Served through the war. 

GRAIN, HARPER— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Served through the war. 

CROCKER, THOMAS E.— 
Private, July 22, 1861. Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., and died from 

wound. 



Muster Rolls Twenty-first Georgia Regiment. 419 

DOOLY, JOHN H.— 

Private, October 22, 18G1. Captured 18G3. Supposed to have been 
killed at Wilderness, Va., 1864. 

DOOLY, JOSHUA— 

Private, October 19, 18G2. Discharged February 5, 1862. Served 
through the war. Living in Forsyth county, Ga. 

DUNLAP, TYLER— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Died in service 1863. 

ELLIOTT, HIRAM— 

Private, November 28, 1861. Discharged account of age. 

ELLIOTT, JOHN K.— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Promoted Third Sergeant. Died ,in Kin- 
ston, N. C, May, 1863. 
ELLIS, THOMAS J.— 

Private, November 19, 1862. Captured 1863. Paroled 1865. 
FULLER, URIAH— 

Private, November 19, 1862. Fate unknown. 
GAINES, GREEN B.— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Wounded and captured at Gettysburg, Pa. 
1863. Paroled 1865. 

GENTRY, JOHN B.— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Died in Richmond, Va., January 23, 1862. 
GOSS, TYREE G.— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Died in Richmond, Va., October 26, 1861. 
HAMBY, BENJAMIN J.— 

Private, November 28, 1861. Promoted Third Corporal 1863. Fate 
unknown. 

HARRIS, JOHN— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Wounded and captured at Gettysburg, Pa. 
Paroled 1865. 
HARRISON, ALFRED G.— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Discharged January 23, 1862, and enlisted 
in Home Guards. 
HARRISON, LEROY— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Served through the war. 

HEAD, WILLIAM D.— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Promoted First Corporal 1863. Fate un- 
known. 
HERNDON, JASPER C— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Fate unknown. 

HENSON, JOHN H.— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Discharged November 2, 1862. Died at 
home 1862. 



420 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

HENSON, WILLIAM— 
Private, Jul^ n22, 1861. Captured 1863. Paroled from Point Look- 
out, Md., March, 1865. 

HIGGINS, WILLIAM S.— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Died in Richmond, Va., October 24, 1861. 

HILL, DAVID M.— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Fate unknown. 

HILL, JAMES— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Discharged October 17, 1861. 

HILL, REUBEN— 

Private, January 23, 1862. Served through the war. 

JONES, YOUNG J.— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Captured 1863. Promoted Sergeant. Lost 
eye at Wilderness, Ya., and captured. Paroled 1865. 

JULIAN, ALFRED W.— 
Private, November 28, 1861. Wounded and captured at Gettysburg, 
Pa. Paroled 1865. 

JULIAN, SAMUEL D.— 
Private, November 28, 1861. Discharged November, 1862. Under 
age. 

LAMB, BENJAMIN— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Captured 1863. Paroled 1865. 

LEE, ELISHA— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Fate unknown. 

LOWE, HIRAM— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Served through the war. 
McBRAYER, GEORGE W.— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Captured, imprisoned and paroled 1863. 
Died in Richmond, Va., 1865. 

McCLURE, W. H.— 

Private, November 28, 1861. Promoted First Lieutenant September^ 
1862. Wounded and Captured 1863. Paroled 1865. 
McCORMICK, WILLIAM H.— 

Private, November 28, 1861. Discharged September 1862. Over age. 
MARTIN, CHARLES B.— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Wounded and captured at Charlestown, 

Va., August 21, 1864. Died in prison at Point Lookout, Md. 
MARTIN, HUGH W.— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Died in Richmond, Va., November 11, 1861. 
MILFORD, W. P.— 

Private, November 19, 1862. Promoted Fourth Sergeant 1863. 
Captured. Paroled 1865. 



Muster Rolls Twenty-first Georgia Regiment. 421 

MITCHELL, GOODWIN L.— 
Private, July 22, 1861. Served through the war. 

MITCHELL, WILLIAM B.— 
Private, July 22, 1861. Discharged January 23, 1862. 

MOORE, A. L.— 
Private, July 22, 1863. Died of disease in Richmond, Ya., 1862. 

MULLINEX, THOMAS P.— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Killed at Roanoke Island, N. C, 1864. 

NEISLER, DANIEL— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Died in Richmond, Va., October 11, 1861. 

NICHOLS, THOMAS J.— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Wounded and captured at Gettysburg, Pa. 
Paroled 1865. 

PAW, A. J.— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Lost arm at Shepherdstown, Md. 

PORTER, JOHN W.— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Died in Richmond, Ya., October 22, 1861. 

PRUITT, HARYEY M.— 
Private, January 15, 1862. 

RAINES, DAYID— 

Private, November 28, 1861. Died near Kinston, N. C, March !?6, 
1862. 

RAINES, WESLEY— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Discharged October 17, 1862. Over age. 
RAKESTRAW, JAMES— 

Private, November 28, 1861. Captured 1863. Paroled 1865. 
RAKESTRAW, LIPHSIE— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Captured 1863. Paroled 1865. 
SEAY, EFFORD— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Promoted Second Corporal 1863. Captured at 
Gettysburg, Pa. Released 1865. 
SEAY, IRYING— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Died in Richmond, Ya., October, 1861. 
SEAY, J. B.— 

Private, February 23, 1863. Detailed as nurse in Winder Hospital, 
Ya., 1863. 

SEAY, RANSOM— 
Private, July 22, 1861. Captured at Gettysburg, Pa., 1863. Paroled 
1865. 

SHERILL, HENRY W.— 
Private, July 22, 1861. Wounded and captured at Gettysburg, Pa. 
Died in prison at Fort Delaware. 



422 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

SHUMAKER, A. J.— 
Private, October 29, 1861. Died at home May, 1862. 

SHUMAKER, JOHN W.— 
Private, July 22, 1861. Captured at Gettysburg, Pa., 1863. Paroled 
1865. 

SMITH, iSIATHEW A.— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Died in Wilmington, N. C, January 16, 1862. 

SMITH, EDWARD R.— 
Private, July 22, 1861. Discharged October 17, 1862. Under age. 

SMITH, ROBERT H.— 

Private, November 28, 1861. Died in Wilmington, N. C, February 
7, 1862. 

STEWART, JOHN— 

Private, September 1, 1862. Discharged September, 1862. Re-en- 
listed in the service and was killed near Atlanta, Ga., 1864. 

STEWART, THOMAS J.— 
Private, July 22, 1861. Killed at Gettysburg, Pa. 

STILMAN, HENRY— 
Private, July 22, 1861. Captured 1863. Paroled 1865. 

STRIPLING, T. E. L.— 
Private, July 22, 1861. Captured 1863. Paroled 1865. 

STOWERS, JOHN— 

Private, November 19, 1862. Detailed as Division wagon master 

1863. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. 
THACKER, ISAAC— 
Private, July 22, 1861. Captured at Gettysburg, Pa., 1863. Died In 

Point Lookout prison 1864. 

THACKER, JAMES W.— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Captured at Gettysburg, Pa., 1863. Died in 
Point Lookout prison 1864. 
THOMAS, JAMES R.— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Fate unknown. 

THOMAS, LEWIS— 

Private, January 19, 1862. Discharged September, 1862. Under age. 

THOMAS, REUBEN— 

Private, October 19, 1862. Fate unknown. 

THOMAS, SAMUEL— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa. 

TRIBBLE, BENJAMIN J.— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Died in Richmond, Va., 1861. 

TURNER, JOHN P.— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Captured 1863. Paroled 1865. 



Muster Rolls Twenty-first Georgia Regiment. 423 

TURNER, LEMUEL L.— 

Private, March 10, 1864. Captured 1863. 

TURNER, WILLIAM C— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Served through the war. 

WALKER, DRURY M.— 

Private, November 28, 1861. Captured at Gettysburg, Pa., 1863. 
Paroled 1865. 

WALLACE, WILLIAM T.— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Promoted Second Sergeant. Killed at Get- 
tysburg, Pa. 

WALLS, MEEKS— 

Private, November 28, 1861. Detailed in medical department 1863. 

WESTER, JOHN M.— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Died in service March 24, 1862. 

WHITEHEAD, MILES— 

Private, November 28, 1861. Died in Wilmington, N. C, February, 
1862. 

WILKINS, MARCUS L.— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Captured at Gettysburg, Pa., 1863. Paroled 
1865. 
WILLIAMS, JONATHAN— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Killed at Roanoke Island, N. C, February 
8, 1862. 

WOFFORD, GEORGE— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Promoted Fourth Sergeant. Surrendered at 
Appomattox, Va. 

W^OFFORD, W. H.— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Discharged October 17, 1862. Under age. 

WOOD, LUKE— 

Private, July 22, 1861. Captured 1863. Surrendered at Appomat- 
tox, Va. 



This company was originally Company B, Second North Carolina 
Battalion. Transferred to the Twenty-first Georgia Regiment August 
11, 1864, by special order No. 84, A. and I. G. O. When transferred it 
was designated, and known as Company E, Twenty-first Georgia Reg- 
iment until the surrender of Lee's army at Appomattox C. IL, Va., 
April 9, 1865. 



424 Doles-Cook Brigade. 



MUSTER ROLL OF BEN HILL INFANTRY, COM- 
PANY F, TWENTY-FIRST REGIMENT, GEORGIA 
VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, C. S. A. 

TROUP COUNTY, GEORGIA. 

BOYKIN, JOHN T.— 

Captain, July 9, 1861. Resigned May 31, 18G2. Died In Troup 
county, Ga., 1901. 

DAWSON, D. EUGENE— 
First Lieutenant, July 9, 1861. Died at Sudley Church, Va., No- 
vember 21, 1861. 

WALLER, LEROY T.— 

Second Lieutenant, July 9, 1861. Promoted First Lieutenant De- 
cember 3, 1861. Resigned February 12, 1863. Died since the war 
in Texas. 

ALLEN, UJANIRTUS C— 
Junior Second Lieutenant, July 9, 1861. Promoted Second Lieuten- 
ant December 3, 1861, Captain May 31, 1862. Killed at Chancel- 
lorsville, Ya. 

HENDERSON, EDWARD M.— 

First Sergeant, July 9, 1861. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant 
December 3, 1861, First Lieutenant February 12, 1863. Captain 
May 8, 1863. Wounded at Winchester, Va., September 19, 1864. 
Living in Troup county, Ga. 

ROWLAND, WILLIAM HENRY— 

Second Sergeant, July 9, 1861. Promoted First Sergeant. Wounded 
at Second Manassas. Served through the war. Living in At- 
lanta, Ga. 

GREEN, JOSEPH— 
Third Sergeant, July 9, 1861. Promoted Second Sergeant. Served 
through the war. Living in Cartersville, Ga. 

ROWLAND, SAMUEL J.— 

Fourth Sergeant, July 9, 1861. Promoted Third Sergeant Decem- 
ber 3, 1861, Sergeant Major Twenty-first Georgia Regiment, Jan- 
uary, 1863, Ordnance Sergeant April 20, 18&4. Surrendered at 
Appomattox, Va. Died in Atlanta, Ga. 

TERRY, GEORGE W.— 

First Corporal, July 9, 1861. Died in Richmond, Va., 1862. 

TARPLEY, SOUTHEY— 

Second Corporal, July 9, 1861. Promoted Second Sergeant. Served 
through the war. Living in Alabama. 



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Muster Rolls Twenty-first Georgfa Regiment. 425 

HORSLEY, JOSEPH S.— 

Third Corporal, July 9, 1861. Wounded at Cold Harbor, Va.. 1862. 
Promoted Fourth Sergeant January, 1863. Wounded at Snickers 
Gap, Va. Promoted First Sergeant 1864. Wounded and captured 
at Winchester, Va., 1864. Paroled after six months' imprison- 
ment at Point Lookout, Md. Living in West Point, Ga. 

McLAIN, SAMUEL J.— 

Fourth Corporal, July 9, 1861. Promoted Fourth Sergeant Decem- 
ber 3, 1861. Died in camp. 

AINSWORTH, DAVID H.— 

Private, March 1, 1862. Wounded at Second Manassas. Moved to 
Texas after the surrender. 

AKERS, REUBEN A.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Wounded at Kernstown, Va. Served through 
the war. Died in Birmingham, Ala., 1885. 
ANDERSON, JOHN R.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Killed at Cold Harbor, Va. 
ARRINGTON, FRANCIS M.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Served through the war. Living. 
BAGBY, JAMES T.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Promoted First Sergeant December 3. 1861, 
Second Lieutenant February 12, 1863, First Lieutenant May 8, 
1863. Wounded at Cold Harbor, Va. 

BAGBY, MOUNT— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 

BAGWELL, MADISON M.— 
Private, February 16, 1863, Fate unknown. 

BANKS, JEPTHA D.— 

Private, March 1, 1862. Wounded in Seven Days' fight around 
Richmond, Va., and crippled for life. Dead. 

BANKS, W. J.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Wounded at Monocacy, Md. 

BASSETT, RUFUS H.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Killed at Monocacy, Md. 

BEDDINGTON, JOHN— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Fate unknown. 

BENNETT, H.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Survived the war. Living. 

BENNETT, JESSE E.— 

Private, March 4, 1863. Wounded several times in battle. Living. 

BENNETT, WILLIAM— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Survived the war. Living. 
BETTERTON, JOHN— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Killed at Richmond, Va. 



426 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

BIRDSONG, G. W.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Served through the war. Dead. 

BIRDSONG, WASHINGTON F.— 

Private, July 9, 1801. Detailed in Provost Guard, November 17,. 
1863. Died 1881. 

BLACK, W. J.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Survived the war. Living. 
BOLIN, JOHN— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Survived the war. Dead. 

BOLIN, TIP— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Served through the war. Dead. 
BOLIN, WILLIAM B.— 

Private, May 1, 1862. Detailed as teamster. 
BOWLING, DAVID ASBURY— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Killed at Plymouth, N. C., July 12, 1864. 
BOYKIN, ASBURY— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Killed at Plymouth, N. C, July 12, 1864. 
BREWER, JOHN C— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 
BRITT, JOHN H.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Served through the war. Dead. 
BRITTON, LON— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Killed at Seven Pines, Va. 
BRITTON, THOMAS J.— 

Private, October 4, 1861. Killed at Winchester, Va., 1864. 

BURK, FRANCIS M.— 

Private, March 4, 1863. Promoted Sergeant. Wounded at Fort 
Steadman, Va. Served through the war. 

BURKS, LON— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Survived the war. Living. 

CLINTON, MICHAEL— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Wounded at Cedar Creek, Va. 

COOLEY, HENRY S.— 

Private, May 1, 1862. Killed at Winchester, Va. 

COOLEY, JAMES A.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Wounded at Richmond and Fredericksburg, 
Va. Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa. Served through the war. Liv- 
ing in Troup county, Ga. 

COOLEY, WILLIAM E.— 

Private, March 4, 1862. Served through the war. Living in Troup 
county, Ga. 
CRENSHAW, HENRY W.— 

Private, July 9. 1861. Discharged. 



Muster Rolls Twenty-first Georgia Regiment. 427 

CROWDER, ASBURY— 

Private, July 9, 18G1. Served through the war. Living in Troup 
county, Ga. 

CROWDER, CHARLES G.— 

Private, March 8, 1863. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. 

CROUCH, LEANDER S.— 
Private, July 9, 1861. Wounded and captured at Sharpsburg, Md. 
Released after the surrender. Died in Troup county, Ga. 

CROUCH, THOMAS— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Survived the war. Dead. 

DAWSON, HAWK— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Waverly. 
Ala. 

DAWSON, LEMUEL H.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Served through the war. Living in W^averly, 
Ala. 

DAWSON, THOMAS— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Served through the war. Living. 

ESCOE, THOMAS J.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Wounded at Charlestown, Va. Died since 
the war. 
ESTES, D. ZACHARIAH— 
Private, July 9, 1861. Wounded at Summit Point, Va., August 21, 
1864. Dead. 

ESTES, JAMES P.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Wounded ,, August 22, 1862. Wounded at 
Fredericksburg, and Chancellorsville, Va. Detailed in hospital 
November, 1863. Served through the war. Living in Troup- 
county, Ga. 

ESTES, R. E.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Troup 
county, Ga. 

FEARS, OLIVER T.— 
Private, July 9, 1861. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant, and 
Second Lieutenant 1863. Wounded at Fort Steadman, Va., March 
25, 1865. Killed at Appomattox, Va., April 9, 1865. 
FOMBY, A. T.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Wounded at Fort Steadman, Va. Died since- 
the war in Troup county, Ga. 
FOMBY, DUG— 

Private, July 9, 1861, Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa. 

FOMBY, GEORGE W.— 
Private, July 9, 1861. Wounded at Fort Steadman, Va. 



428 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

FOMBY, LUCIUS H.— 

Private, March 15, 18G2. Wounded at Second Manassas. Surren- 
dered at Appomattox, Va. Living. 

FOMBY, WILLIAM— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Killed at Drewry's Bluff, Va. 

FOMBY, WILLIAM A.— 

Private, February 16, 1862. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. 

FORBUS, HENRY— 
Private, February 26, 1863. Survived the war. Living in Heard 
county, Ga. 

FREEMAN, J. C. C— 

Private, March 21, 1864. Wounded at Winchester, Va. Living Jn 
Antioch, Ga. 
GARRETT, GEORGE W.— 

Private, March 4, 1862. Wounded at Second Manassas, and died 
from wound. 
GARRETT, T. R.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 
GLENN, G. W.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Wounded at Second Manassas. Detailed as 
enrolling officer Heard county, Ga. Died since the war. 
-GILHAM, THOMAS— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Troup 
county, Ga. 

GOGER, THOMAS— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 
GOSS, B. F.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Wounded at Plymouth, N. C. Died since the 
war in Troup county, Ga. 

GOSS, WILLIAM HENRY— 

Private, March 4, 1862. Served through the war. Dead. 

GREEN, THOMAS— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 
HAINSWORTH, HENRY— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Wounded at Second Manassas. Served 
through the war. 

HARPER, BENJAMIN— 

Private, March 14, 1862. Fate unknown. 
HARPER, SAMUEL— 

Private, March 14, 1862. Detailed in Pioneer Corps, October, 1863. 
Served through the war. Living. 

HARPER, WINSTON— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Survived the war. Living. 



Muster Rolls Twenty-first Georgia Regiment. 429- 

HARALSON, JESSE B.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant 1863.. 
Wounded in several battles. Living in Troup county, Ga. 
HARALSON, THOMAS S. E.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Wounded at Richmond, Ya. Living in Troup 
county, Ga. 

HEARSTON, SAMUEI^- 

Private, July 9, 1861. Survived the war. Died in Troup county, Ga.. 

HENDERSON, H. J.— 
Private, May 1, 1862. Wounded at Richmond, Ya. Living in Troup 
county, Ga. 

HENDERSON, THOMAS— 
Private, July 9, 1861. Discharged. Living in Alabama. 

HIGGINBOTHAM, JOHN T.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Wounded at Second Manassas, and Cedar 
Creek, Va. Living in West Point, Ga. 

HORSLEY, ROBERT G.— 

Private, March 4, 1864. Served through the war. Living in Texas. 

HORSLEY, WILLIAM H. H.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Wounded at Winchester, Richmond, and Ce- 
dar Mountain, Va. Living in Texas. 
HUNT, HENRY— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Discharged. Died since the war in Heard' 
county, Ga. 

HUMPHRIES, JOHN— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Died at home while in service. 
INGRAM, SAMUEL— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Killed at Sharpsburg, Md. 
JOHNSON, A. A.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Served through the war. Died in Troup 
county, Ga. 
JOHNSON, BRICE C— 

Private, April 1, 1863. Served through the war. Living in Texas. 
JOHNSON, JEPTHA— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Served through the war. Died in Troup 
county, Ga. 

JOHNSON, THOMAS— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Served through the war. Living. 
LANIER, JAMES J.— 

Private, February 28, 1862. Wounded at Second Manassas. Liv- 
ing in Alabama. 

McCLURE, HENRY J.— 

Pi'ivate, February 20, 1864. Survived the war. Living. 



430 J)OLE8-CooK Brigade. 

Mcdonough, john— 

Private, July 9, 18(J1, Survived the war. Living. 

Mcdonough, william b.— 

Private, February 15, 1862. Survived the war. Living. 

McLAIN, JAMES M.— 

Private, May 15, 1862. Assigned to hospital duty February 17, 
1863. Living in Troup county, Ga. 

McLAIN, WILLIAM H.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Killed at Winchester, Va. 

MANNING, JAMES— 

Private, March 9, 1862. Wounded at Snickers Gap, Va., July, 1864. 
Died at home. 
MARKETT, PATRICK H.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Wounded at Snickers Gap, Ya., and in sev- 
eral other battles in Virginia. Living in LaGrange, Ga. 

MATHEWS, JOHN— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Served through the war. Died in Troup 
county, Ga. 
MOBLEY, WILEY— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Fate unknown. 
MOBLEY, WILLIAM— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Fate unknown. 

MOORE, C. B.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Wounded at Richmond, Va. Living near La- 
Grange, Ga. 
NICHOLS, WILLIAM M.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Served throug"h the war. Living in Alabama. 

NORMAN, JAMES A.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Died in hospital January, 1863. 

PARKER, J. ISHAM— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Died at Orange Courthouse, Va., 1862. 

PARKER, THOMAS— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Wounded at Harpers Ferry, Va. Living. 

PARKER, WILLIAM H.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Survived the war. Living. 

PARTRIDGE, HENRY T.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Died in service in Virginia. 
PARTRIDGE, J. T.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Wounded at Drewry's Bluff, Va. 
PARTRIDGE, LEW^IS— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Survived the war. Living. 

PERRY, WILLIAM— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 



Muster Rolls Twenty-first Georgia Regiment. 431 

PHILLIPS, HENRY R.— 
Private, July 9, 1861. Fate unknown. 

PHILLIPS, JAMES— 

Private, July 9, 1801. Died of disease in Richmond, Va., 1862. 

PHILLIPS, WILLIAM B.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md. Living in 
Troup county, Ga. 

PITTS, SAMUEL— 
Private, July 9, 1861. Wounded at Second Manassas. Living. 

PORTER, DAVID A.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Killed at Cross Keys, Va. 

PORTER, JAMES— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Survived the war. Living. 

PORTER, JOHN— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Survived the war. Living. 

RAMSEY, AUGUSTUS— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Discharged. Enlisted in Forrest's Cavalry, 
and died in service. 

REID, JAMES L. B.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Wounded at Harper's Ferry, Va. Living. 

REID, .JOHN B., Sr.— 
Private, July 9, 1861. Died in Camp, 2362. 

REID, JOHN B., Jr.— 
Private, July 9, 1861. Fate unknown. 

REID, RICHARD— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Wounded at Fredericksburg, Va. Living. 

BEID, THOMAS B.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Died in camp in Virginia, 1861. First mem- 
ber of the company to die of disease. 

REID, WILLIAM R.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Discharged. 

REYNOLDS, JOHN L.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va. Living. 

ROBERTSON, BENJAMIN— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Died in service. 

ROGERS, JOSEPH L.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 

ROWLAND, LITTLEBERRY B.— 

Private, February 23, 1862. Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa. Living 
in LaGrange, Ga. 



432 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

RUTLEDGE, LEWIS— 

Private, February 23, 1862. Fate nnknoTvn. 

SAMPLES, J. A.— 

Private, September IG, 1862. Discharged. 

SAMPLES, THOMAS J.— 
Private, July 9, 1861. Died in camp. 

SHARBUTH, JAMES— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Fate unknown. 
SKIPPER, LEVI— 

Private, March 4, 1864. Died in service January, 1865. 

SKIPPER, THOMAS— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Served through the war. Dead. 

SKIPPER, WILLIAM— 

Private, March 4, 1862. Served through the war. Dead. 

SMITH, GEORGE W.— 
Private, July 9, 1861. Lost arm at Strasburg, Va., June, 1862. 

STRONG, R. H., Sr.— 
Private, July 9, 1861. Lost eye from disease, and discharged No- 
vember 1, 1861. Living in Waco, Ga. 
STRONG, R. H., Jr.— 
Private, July 9, 1861. Discharged. Enlisted in the Western Army.. 
Living in LaGrange, Ga. 

STRONG, W. W.— 
Private, July 9, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 

SWINT, A. J.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Killed at Raccoon Ford, Va. 
SWINT, JOHN— 

Private, February 13, 1863. Served through the war. Living in 
Troup county, Ga. 

TALLEY, J. THOMAS— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa. Surrendered at 
Appomattox, Va. Living. 

TERRY, GEORGE W.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Died in camp while in service. 
TERRY, JOHN— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Promoted Sergeant November, 1861. Sur- 
vived the war. Died in Troup county, Ga. 

TODD. GEORGE— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa. Killed at Win- 
chester, Va. 

TYREE, ARCHIBALD W.— 

Private, March 1, 1862. Promoted Sergeant 1863. Killed at Sum- 
mit Point, Va., August 21, 1864. 



Muster Rolls Twenty-first Georgia Regiment. 433 

TJSRY, MALACHI G.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Served through the war. Living. 
TANCE, JAMES— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Wounded severely in arm. Assigned to hos- 
pital duty February 17, 1863. Living. 
VANCE, WILLIAM— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Killed at Fredericksburg, Va. 
WALLACE, J. H.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Captured. Died, and was buried at Arlington. 
W^ALLER, STEPHEN— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Alabama. 
WALLER, THOMAS— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Wounded at Richmond, Va. 
VTHATLEY, C. C— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Died in camp in Virginia. 
WHATLEY, GIBSON F.— 

Private, February 21, 1863. Transferred to Company H, Twenty- 
first Georgia Regiment, January, 1864. Living in Alabama. 

WHATLEY, O. M.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Troup 
county, Ga. 
WHATLEY, V. D.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Killed at Woodstock, Va. 

WHATLEY, W. B.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Discharged 1861. 

WHATLEY, W. H.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Served through the war. Died in Troup 
county, Ga. 

WHITAKER, JAMES T.— 

Private, February 1, 1864. Died in Winston, N. C, April 20, 1864. 

WHITAKER, WILLIAM A.— 

Private, February 1, 1864. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. 

WILKES, HARRY— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Served through the war. Dead. 

WILKES, LEONARD H.— 

Private, February 1, 1864. Served ti^rough the war. Living. 

WILKES, THOMAS B.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Killed at Cold Harbor, Va., 1864. 

WILKES, WALKER- 

Private, July 9, 1861. Died of fever in camp. 

WILKES, WILLIAM H.— '' 

Private, July 9, 1861. Fate unknown. 

28d-c 



434 Doles-Cook Beigade. 

WILLIAJNIS, FREDERICK— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Survived the war. Living. 

WILLIAMS, GEORGE W.— 

Private, July 9, 18G1. Killed at Fredericksburg, Va. 

WILLIAMS, ISRAEL— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Served through the war. Living. 

WILLIAMS, J. C— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Troup' 
county, Ga. 

WILLIAMS, THOMAS M.— 

Private, May 15, 1862. Served through the war. Living in Troup- 
county, Ga. 
WINN, WILLIAM— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Discharged 1861. 
WISDOM, H. McGEE— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Discharged*. Died since the war in Troupe 
county, Ga. 

WISDOM, ROBERT A.— 

Private, October 27, 1861. Color-Bearer. Killed at Second Manas- 
sas. 

WRIGHT, SAMUEL F.— 

Private, February 15, 1862. Wounded at Cedar Creek, Va. Sur^ 
rendered at Appomattox, Va. Living. 

YARBROUGH, WILLIAM— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Killed at Cross Keys, Va. 

YOUNG, JOHN L.— 

Private, July 9, 1861. Died of fever at Page's Landing, Va., 1861;. 



Muster Rolls Twenty-first Georgia Regiment. 435 



MUSTER ROIvIv OF DABNBY RIFI.ES, COMPANY G, 
TWENTY-FIRST REGIMENT, GEORGIA VOI.UN- 
TEER INFANTRY, C. S. A. 

GORDON COUNTY, GEORGIA. 

KINMAN, WiESLEY— 

Captain, July 4, 1861. Resigned account disability April 24, 1863. 
Died 1869. 

CHANDLER, SAMUEL G.— 

First Lieutenant, July 4, 1861. Resigned January 18, 1862. 
HUDGINS, NAPOLEON B.— 

Second Lieutenant, July 4, 1861. Promoted First Lieutenant Jan- 
uary 18, 1862. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md. Promoted captain 
April 24, 1863. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va., and Williams- 
port, Md., July 6, 1864. Living in Calhoun, Ga. 

WALKER, WILLIAM S.— 

Junior Second Lieutenant, July 4, 1861. Resigned May, 1862. Liv- 
ing near Sherman, Texas. 
CHANDLER, ABRAHAM R.— 

First Sergeant July 4, 1861. Fate unknown. 
TATE, THEODORE C— 

Second Sergeant, July 4, 1861. Fate unknown. 
HOOKER, GEORGE F.— 

Third Sergeant, July 4, 1861. Detailed as Commissary Sergeant 
October, 1861, and as Quartermaster's Sergeant, June, 1864. 
GATEWOOD, PHILIP H.— 

Fourth Sergeant, July 4, 1861. Died in hospital, 1862. 

KINMAN, JAMES P.— 

First Corporal, July 4, 1861. Discharged 1862. Living in Adairs- 
ville, Ga. 

DERHAM, WILLIAM W.— 

Second Corporal, July 4, 1861. Discharged April, 1863. Died dur- 
ing the war. 

CAMERON, ALLEN A.— 
Third Corporal, July 4, 1861. Fate unknown. 

WOODS, WILLIAM F.— 

Fourth Corporal, July 4, 1861. Wounded at Port Republic, Freder- 
icksburg, and Chancellorsville, Va. Promoted Second Sergeant, 
1864. Wounded at Plymouth, N. C, April 18, 1864. Living in 
Planeville, Gordon county, Ga. 
ADAMS, WILLIAM F.— 

Private, May 5, 1864. Fate unknown. 



436 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

AUSTIN, WILLIAM M.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Died in service, 1861. 

BAILEY, BANISTER R.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Fate unknown. 

BAILEY, JAMES W.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Fate unknown. 

BAILEY, R. C— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md. Served 
through the war. Living in Texas. 

BARRETT, GEORGE W.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Died at Sudley Church, Va. 

BARRETT, ROBERT O.— 
Private, July 4, 1861. Discharged September, 1861. Living in Cal- 
ifornia. 

BARRETT, WILLIAM P.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Died in service 1862. 

BARTON, R. H.— 
Private, July 4, 1861. Fate unknown. 

BLACK, DAVID H.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Lost eye at Sharpsburg, Md. Promoted 
Third Corporal 1864. Killed in battle. 

BLOUNT, JACOB N.— 

Private, September 10, 1863. Fate unknown. 

BOGGS, A. J.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Died in service 1863. 

BOWMAN, CORNELIUS— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Promoted Fifth Sergeant. Surrendered at 
Appomattox, Va. Living in Gordon county, Ga. 

BRAY, BANISTER R.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Fate unknown. 

CAMP, THOMAS— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Fate unknown. 

CAMPRON, ALLEN— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Died of measles 1862. 

CARPENTER, ANDREW S.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Died in hospital of measles 1862. 

CHAMPION, E. W.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., and died 
of wound next day. 

CHAINI^ION, R.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Killed at Fredricksburg, Va., December 13, 
1862. 



Muster Rolls Twenty-fiest Georgia Regiment. 437 

CHANDLER, R.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. 

CHRISTIAN, JOSEPH P.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Died at Sudley Church, Va., November 2, 
1861. 
CLARK, EPHRIAM— 

Private, October 23, 1863. Fate unknown. 

CLARK, HENRY S.— 

Private, October 23, 1863. Discharged August 2, 1864. 
COMPTON, SAMUEL W.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Fate unknovni. 
CREW, THOMAS H.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Promoted Third Sergeant October, 1861. 
First Lieutenant, 1864. Killed at Winchester, Va., 1864. 
CRISMAN, JOSEPH— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Killed in battle. 
CROSSLEY, ANDREW, Jr.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Died in Richmond, Va., March 8, 1862. 
CRUMP, THOMAS— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Pate unknown. 

DODD, B. H.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Wounded at Fredericksburg, and Chancel- 
lorsville, Va. Served through the war. Died in Texas 1893. 

DODD, JOHN H.— 

Private, September 1, 1861. Wounded at Port Republic, Va. Pro- 
moted Third Sergeant 1864. Served through the war. Died 1897. 

DODD, THOMAS— 

Private, 1862. Discharged account disability 1862. Died soon after- 
wards. 

DONALD, DAVID— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 

DONALD, HILL— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 

DOUGLAS, JAMES M.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Wounded at Petersburg, Va., 1865. Surren- 
dered at Appomattox, Va. Living in Atlanta, Ga. 

DOUGLAS, WILLIAM C— 

Private, July 28, 1862. Promoted Fourth Corporal 1864. Served 
through the war. Living in Arkansas. 

DURHAM, WILLIAM— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Died of measles 1861. 

DYE, J. M.— 

Private, 1862. Died of measles 1863. 



438 Doles- Cook Brigade. 

EADS, WILLIAM H.— 

Private, July 4, 18G1. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md. Wounded at 
Petersburg, Ya., 1865. Served through the war. Living in Gor- 
don county, Ga. 

EZELL, 

Private, 1864. Fate unknown. 

FIELDS, WILLIAM A. M.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Died at Sudley Church, Va., November 6, 1861. 

GIBBS, JOHN— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Discharged 1864. 
GIBSON, DANIEI^ 

Private, May 3, 1862. Survived the v^ar. Living. 
GIBSON, JOHN— 

Private, April 30, 1864. 
GODWIN, SAMUEL— 

Private, October 23, 1863. Killed at Snickers Ford, Va.. July 18, 
1864. 

GOODWIN, JOSEPH— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Wounded at Charlestown, Va., Plymouth, 
N. C, and Petersburg, Va. Served through the war. Living In 
Texas. 

HENDERSON, WATSON— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Fate unknown. 
HERUTH, ALLEN— 

Private, 1864. Captured 1864. Paroled 1865. Living in Chattooga 
county, Ga. 

HEWETT, ALLEN— 

Private, 1864. Captured and died in prison at Elmira, N. Y., 1864. 
HOLLIS, TURNER— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Fate unknown. 

HOOVER, G. F.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 

HOOVER, G. W.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Detailed as Regimental Commissary Ser- 
geant. Killed at Second Manassas. 

HOWARD, JEFFERSON— 

Private, September 23, 1863. Fate unknown. 

HUDGINS, BENJAMIN T.— 
Private, March 1, 1862. Promoted Second Corporal 1864. Promoted 
Regimental Color-Bearer. Killed at Fort Steadman, Va. 

HUDGINS, JOHN— 

Private, July 11, 1864. Detailed as nurse and left with the 
wounded at Gettysburg, Pa. Served through the war. Living in 
Arkansas. 



Muster Rolls Twenty-first Georgia Eegiment. 439 

HUDGINS, LaFAYETTE A.— 

Private, March 6, 1864. Wounded and captured at Fort Steadman, 
Va. Released 1865. 

HUDGINS, RICHARD C— 

Private, October 27, 1863. Wounded at Fort Steadman, Va. Served 
through the war. Living in Floyd county, Ga. 

HYATT, JAMES— 

Private, 1862. Died of fever 1862. 

HYATT, MORDECAI— 

Private, 1862. Died in service 1862. 
HYATT, PHILIP E.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Killed at Port Republic, Va., June 9, 1862. 
JOHNSON, JAMES M.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. 
JONES, DAVID N.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Killed at Berryville, Va. 
JONES, JAMES M.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Wounded and left in hospital at Winchester, 
Va., May 26, 1862. Detailed as courier at Brigade Headquar- 
ters 1864. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Living in Brown- 
wood, Texas. 

JONES, LEWIS W.— - 

Private, April 10, 1864. Wounded at Plymouth, N. C., April 18, 
1864. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Living In Versales, Cali- 
fornia. 
KENNEDY, HENRY C— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Wounded In battle, and died from wound. 
KEYS, ALLEN L.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Discharged 1864. Died 1894. 

KEYS, BENJAMIN— 

Private, 1862. Killed at Second Manassas. 
KEYS, WILLIAM— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Wounded in battle. Served through the war. 
Living in Planevllle, Gordon county, Ga. 

KING, ELIAS L.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Killed at Cross Keys, Va., June 8, 1862. 
KNIGHT, GEORGE W.— 

Private, March 3, 1862. Died In service 1862. 
KNIGHT, HARRISON— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 

LAY, JOHN O.— 

Private, February 28, 1864. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Liv- 
ing in Brownville, Tenn. 



440 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

LINDSAY, JOHN T. C- 

Private, July 4, 18G1. Died in hospital at Sudley Church, Va., No- 
vember 30, 1861. 

LINDSAY, WILLIAM F. M.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Fate unknown. 

LONG, JAMES F., Sr.— 

Private, 1863. Killed at Second Manassas. 

LONG, JAMES F., Jr.— 

Private, April 10, 1864. Served through the war. Liviug in Gor- 
don county, Ga. 

LONG, JOHN H.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Wounded in battle several times. Served? 
through the war. Living in Texas. 

LONG, WILLIAM L.— 

Private, April 10, 1864. Wounded in battle. Surrendered at Appo- 
mattox, Va. Died since the war. 

LOVE, ANDREW J.— 

Private, March 4, 1862. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va., May lOf 
1864. Living in Farmville, Gordon county, Ga. 

LOVE, WILLIAM— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Died in service 1862. 
LOVELESS, WILLIAM M.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Promoted Sergeant. Wounded and disabled' 
at Cold Harbor, Va., 1862. Detailed as Hospital Nurse, and as^ 
Presidential Guard 1864. 
McELREATH, JAMES J.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Promoted Corporal. Wounded at Sharps- 
burg, Md. Served through the war. Living in Texas. 

McDANIEL, JAMES M.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 

McGINNIS, NOAH H.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Fate unknown. 

MALONE, JOHN H.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Promoted Junior Second and Second Lieu- 
tenant; First Lieutenant 1864. Commanded his company at the 
surrender of Lee's army at Appomattox, Va. Living in Arkansas. 

MILLER, ADAM J.— 

Private, May 1, 1864. Served through the war. Living in Southf 
Georgia. 

MILLER, GEORGE W.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Promoted Corporal. Wounded in Seven Days'" 
Fight near Richmond, Va. Promoted Fourth Sergeant 1864. Cap- 
tured April 1865. Living in Texas. 



Muster Rolls Twenty -first Georgia Regiment. 441 

MILLER, JAMES A.— 
Private, July 4, 1861. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Living in 
South Georgia. 

MOOST, JOHN— 
Private, July 4, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 

MORGAN, EPHRIAM H.— 

Private, September 24, 1863. Fate unknown. 

MORROW, A. J.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Wounded at Second Manassas. Detailed as 
Division Teamster. Served through the war. Living in Alabama. 

MORROW, HIRAM B.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Discharged account eyesight. Died since the 
war. 

MORSE, JOHN— 
Private, July 17, 1862. Killed at Second Manassas. 

PHILLIPS, JOHN C.— 
Private, September 13, 1861. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Died- 
since the war. 

PHILLIPS, URIAH— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Died of measles 1861. 

PORCH, GEORGE L.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Discharged account disability. Living in Lit- 
tle Rock, Ark. 

PRICE, BOOKER J.— 
Private, July 4, 1861. Killed at Port Republic, Va., 1862. 

PUTNAM, POSEY M.— 

Private, March 3, 1862. Promoted First Corporal 1864. Wounded: 
and captured at Winchester, Va., 1864, and died from wound. 
REEVES, ENOCH O.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Killed at Cold Harbor, Va., 1864. 

REEVES, HAYWOOD H.— 

Private, February 28, 1862. Wounded at Second Manassas. 

REEVES, STEPHEN F.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Wounded in battle, and died from wound. 

ROBELINGS, STEPHEN W.— 
Private, July 4, 1861. Wounded at Gaines Mill, and Fredericksburg,. 
Va. Discharged March 17, 1863. Living in Planesville, Gordon 
county, Ga. 
ROBERTSON, BENJAMIN A.— 

Private, March 6, 1864. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Liviug. 

ROBINETT, WARDLY S.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Killed in battle 1862. 



442 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

JtOBINETT, WILEY B.— 

Private, March 3, 1862. Wounded at Plymouth, N. C, February, 
18&4. Captured and paroled. Living in Texas. 

RODGERS, THOMAS— 

Private, March 3, 1862. Wounded at Second Manassas. Detailed 
as hospital nurse 1864. Captured, died and was buried at Ar- 
lington. 

RUSSELL, WILLIAM M.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Fate unknown. 

SHIFTLET, LEWIS— 
Private, July 4, 1861. 

SMITH, GEORGE— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Died in hospital. 

SMITH, JOHN M.— 
Private, July 4, 1861. Promoted Sergeant. Wounded at Second 
Manassas and died from wound. 

SMITH, JOHN T.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Promoted Fifth Sergeant, 1864. 

SMITH, THOMAS C— 

Private, September 1, 1861. Died in Hospital. 

STAGG, JOHN H.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 

STEPHENS, WILLIAM N.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Discharged account eyesight May, 1864. 
Dead. 

STEWART, FRANCIS M.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Died in hospital while in service. 

STEWART, GEORGE W.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Fate unknown. 

-STEWART, JAMES A.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Wounded at Cold Harbor, Va., 1862. Killed 
in battle. 

STEWART, MARION— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Died in hospital while in service. 

STEWART, REUBEN B.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Died of measles in service. 

STEWART, WARREN S.— 
Private, July 4, 1861. Living. 

rSTEWART, WILLIAM R.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Promoted Fifth Sergeant October, 1861. 
Acted as Commissary Sergeant 1864. Died since the war. 



Muster Rolls Twenty-first Georgia Regiivient. 443 

TATE, TUCKER— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 

TEAL, DUNCAN A.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Wounded at Second Manassas. Served 
through the war. Living. 

TERRELL, GEORGE W — 

Private, July 4, 1861. Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 

TERRELL, SOLOMON W.— 

Private, March 1, 1862. Died in hospital in Danville, Va. March 7, 
1863. 
THOMAS, WILLIAM N.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Fate unknown. 

TIMS, GEORGE W.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Wounded at Winchester, Va., 1864. Surren- 
dered at Appomattox, Va. Living in South Carolina. 

TREADAWAY, ANDREW J.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Died in hospital 1863. 

TUTOR, 'tHOMAS N.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Died in hospital while in service. 

WALKER, ABRAHAM B.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Fate unknown. 

WALRAVEN, HEZEKIAH C— 

Private, March 3, 1862. Killed at Cold Harbor, Va., June 27, 1862. 
WALRAVEN, PERRY— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Wounded at Second Manassas, and Sharps- 
burg, Md. Promoted First Sergeant 1864. Surrendered at Ap- 
pomattox, Va. Living in Gordon county, Ga. 

WARD, WILLIAM— 

Private, August 25, 1862. Wounded near Washington, D. C, and 
died from wound in hospital. 
WING, BENJAMIN F.— 

Private, September 19, 1861. Fate unknown. 

WOODS, STEPHEN M.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Wounded at Plymouth, N. C, and dis- 
charged. Enlisted in Fortieth Georgia Regiment and died in ser- 
vice. 
WRIGHT, JAMES B.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Fate unknown. 
ZUBER, ROBERT H.— 

Private, October 27, 1863. Discharged June 26, 1864. Under age. 
Living in Alabama. 

ZUBER, WILLIAM B.— 

Private, July 4, 1861. Fate unknown. 



444 Doles-Cook Brigade. 



MUSTER ROIvL OF SILVER GRAYS, COMPANY H,. 
TWENTY-FIRST REGIMENT, GEORGIA VOLUN- 
TEER INFANTRY, C. S. A. 

DADE COUNTY, GEORGIA. 

NISBET, J. COOPER— 
Captain, July 2, 1861. Wounded at Cold Harbor, Va., June 26, 1862,. 
and at Sliarpsburg, Md. Promoted Colonel of the Sixty-sixtli 
Georgia Regiment, January, 1863, and served in that capacity un- 
til the surrender of Johnston's army. The Sixty-sixth Georgia 
Regiment, and Twenty-sixth Georgia Battalion were organized 
by Col. Nisbet In Macon, Ga., January, 1863. The Twenty-sixth 
Georgia Battalion surrendered at Columbus, Ga. Col. Nisbet is 
now a resident of Dade county, Ga. 

EASLEY, CHARLIES B.— 
First Lieutenant, July 2, 1861. Wounded at Winchester, Va., May,. 
1862. Killed at Cold Harbor, Va., June 26, 1862. 

HICKS, ISAAC— 

Second Lieutenant, July 2, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 

DANIEL, FRANCIS— 
Junior Second Lieutenant, July 2, 1861. Resigned September, 1861.. 
Enlisted in the Thirty-ninth Georgia Regiment, and promoted' 
Second Lieutenant. Dead. 

EVANS, LEONIDAS— 

First Sergeant, July 2, 1861. Promoted Second Lieutenant, July,. 
1862. Wounded in battle. Resigned. Dead. 

BOULDEN, GEORGE W.— 

Second Sergeant, July 2, 1861. Promoted Second Lieutenant, Au- 
gust, 1862. Killed at Second Manassas. 

BLEVINS, JAMES W.— 

Third Sergeant, July 2, 1861. Promoted Second Lieutenant Sep- 
tember, 1862. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md. Resigned. Died in- 
Rising Fawn, Ga., 1902. 

LOWRY, SAMUEL C— 

Fourth Sergeant, July 2, 1861. Promoted Second Sergeant. Pro- 
moted Second Lieutenant 1863, First Lieutenant 1864. Served' 
through the war. Living in Cordelle, Ala. 

BENGE, JOHN— 

Fifth Sergeant, July 2, 1861. Killed at Cold Harbor, Va., 1862. 
COOKE, NICHOLAS H.— 

First Corporal, July 2, 1861. Died in Sandersville, Va. 



Muster Rolls Twenty-first Georgia Regiment. 445 

JONES, JOHN E.— 

Second Corporal, July 2, 1861. Promoted Fifth Sergeant. Killed 
at Winchester, Va., 1864. 

JONES, MARTIN W.— 

Third Corporal, July 2, 1861. Killed at Richmond, Va., 1862. 

EASLEY, BENJAMIN— 

Fourth Corporal, July 2, 1861. Wounded at Charlestown, Va., and 
died from wound. 

ADKINS, JAMES S.— 
Private, July 2, 1861. Wounded in battle several times. Promoted 
Second Lieutenant 1864. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va., in 
command of company. 

ALLEN, JOHN— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 

AMOS, M. F.— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Wounded at Cold Harbor, Va., 1862, and died 
from wound. 

BECKHAM, GEORGE— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Killed at Cross Keys, Va. 

BECKHAM, JAMES— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Served through the war. Living in West 
Tennessee. 

BECKHAM, JESSE— 

Private, March 20, 1862. Served through the war. Dead. 

BECKHAM, JOHN— 

Private, March 20, 1862. Died in Hospital in Richmond, Va., 1SG2. 

BLEVINS, GEORGE B.— 

Private. Recruit. Wounded and captured 1863, Discharged on 
parole from Camp Chase, Ohio, June 14, 1865. Inmate of the Geor- 
gia Soldiers' Home. 

BLEVINS, LEWIS— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Living in 
Texas. 

BLEVINS, STEPHEN— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Lost leg in night attack at Second Manassas. 
Dead. 

BLEVINS, WILLIAM— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Wounded at Winchester, and Cedar Run, Va., 
1862. 

BLEVINS, W. E.— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Dead. 
BOATMAN, GEORGE W.— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Died in hospital in Richmond, Va. 



446 



Doles-Cook Brigade. 



Killed at Second Manassas. 



Killed in battle in Virginia. 



Served througti the war. 
Served through the war. 



Living in Texas. 



Living in Texas. 



BOULDEN, ENOCH— 
Private, July 2, 1861. 

BRYANT, J. B.— 
Private, July 2, 1861. 

CARNEY, PATRICK— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Detailed as hospital nurse. Surrender'3d at 
Appomattox, Va. When last heard from he was an inmate of the- 
Tennessee Soldiers' Home. 
CHRISTOPHER, AV. A.— 
Private, March 10, 1862. 

CLARKE, JOHN— 

Private, March 10, 1862. Died in Richmond, Va., 1861. 
CLARKE, J. J.— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Wounded at Plymouth, and died from wound 
in Weldon, N. C, May 15, 1864. 

CLARKE, W. A.— 

Private, July 2, 1861. 

COBB, LaFAYETTE— 

Private, July 2, 1861. 

COBB, ROBERT— 

Private, July 2, 1861. 
COOPER, J. C— 

Private, July 2, 1861. KiUed at Malvern Hill, Va., 1862. 

COUNTESS, BENJAMIN F.— 
Private, July 2, 1861. Promoted Fifth Sergeant, and Commissary 
of Company. Died in hospital at Sudley Church, Va., October 25, 
1861. 

COUNTESS, JOHN B.— 
Private, July 2, 1861. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant October, 
1861, First Lieutenant October, 1862; Captain 1863. Court-mar- 
tialed and cashiered just before the battle of Gettysburg, Pa., for 
insubordination. He went into, and fought, through all of the 
engagements of his regiment in the three days' battle at Gettys- 
burg as a private. After the battle he was restored to his former 
rank for gallantry on the field of battle, and commanded his com- 
pany until the surrender of Lee's army at Appomattox, Va. Liv- 
ing in Trenton, Ga. 

COUNTESS, PATRICK— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Promoted First Corporal. Died of disease in 
in Dade county, Ga., 1864. 
CROSBY, J. C— 

Private, July 2, 1861 
CRUMBLEY, JOHN— 

Private, September 10, 1863 



Served through the war. 



Fate unknown. 



Muster Rolls Twenty-first Georgia Regiment. 447 

CRUMBLEY, W. A.— 

Private, September 11, 1863. Fate unknown. 
DEMPSEY, JOHN— 

Private, September 11, 1863. Surrendered at Appomattox, Ya. 

EARP, ROMULUS— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Died in Richmond, Va., 1861. 

FLETCHER, HARVEY— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Served through the war. 
FLETCHER, JACKSON— 

Private, May 22, 1862. Served through the war. 

FLETCHER, JAMES— 

Private, May 22, 1862. Served through the war. 
FORRESTER, COLENDER-^ 

Private, March 4, 1862. 
FORRESTER, DAVE— 

Private, March 4, 1862. Discharged account maimed hand. Living 
in Rising Fawn, Ga. 

FORTENBERRY, M. D.— 

Private, June 4, 1861. Promoted Fifth Sergeant. Surrendered at 
Appomattox, Va. 

FRIZZELL, LUKE— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Wounded at Winchester, Va. Living in Mor- 
ganville, Ga. 

GATTIN, JOSHUA— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Wounded at Plymouth, and died from 
wound in Weldon, N. C. 

GIBSON, H.— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Died in Richmond, Va., 1862. 

GILLIAND, JAMES— 
Private, July 2, 1861. 

GILLIAM, JOHN— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Died in service. 
GRIFFIN, WILLIAM— 

Private, April 1, 1863. 
HAWKINS, J. T.— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Living in Arkansas. 
HENDERSON, H. H.— 

Private, July 2, 1861. 
HERRON, JEFFERSON— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Killed in battle. 

JOHNSON, H.— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Detailed as teamster December 15, 1861. 
Promoted Fourth Corporal 1863, Second Sergeant 1864. Served 
through the war. 



448 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

JOHNSON, JOHN— 

Private, September 11, 1863. Fate unknown. 
JONES, JOHN— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Killed in battle. 
JONES, WARREN— 

Private, April 12, 1862. Killed in battle. 

JONES, WILBORN— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Killed at Cold Harbor, Va., 1862. 
JONES, W. C— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Fate unknown. 
KING, PINCKNEY— 

Private, April, 1862. Fate unknown. 

KNIGHT, MERRETT— 
Private, August 25, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Wal- 
ker county, Ga. 

McBEE, R. MICHAEL— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Killed in battle. 

McDANIEL, GEORGE— 
Private. Fate unknown. 

McDANIEL, WILLIAM— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Killed in battle. 
MALONE, AUGUSTUS W. H.— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Promoted Second Corporal 1863. Captured 
1864. Served through the war. 

MILLSAPS, B.— 

Private, July 2, 1861. 

MOORE, GEORGE W.— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Promoted First Sergeant. Captured in Vir- 
ginia. 
MURRAY, J. W.— 

Private, July 2, 1861. 
O'NEAL, AUGUSTUS— 

Private, March 1, 1862. Detailed as hospital nurse in Richmond, 
Va., 1863. Died in service. 

O'NEAL, A. J.— 

Private, March 4, 1862. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va. Living 
in Cedar Grove, Ga. 

O'NEAL, B. B.— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Killed at Cold Harbor, Va., 1862. 
O'NEAL, JAMES— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Killed at Cold Harbor, Va., 1862. 
O'NEAL, J. B.— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Died in Culpeper Court House, Va., Decem- 
ber 15, 1861. 



Muster Rolls Twenty-first Georgia Regiment. 449 

O'NEAL, J. w.— 

Private, July 10, 1861. Wounded at Cold Harbor, Ya., 18G2. Dead 
O'NEAL, JOHN W.— 

Private, July 10, 1861. 
OYLER, DANIEL— 

Private, July 10, 1861. Discharged. 

OYLER, FREDERICK— 

Private, July 10, 1861. 
OYLER, GILLIAM— 

Private, July 10, 1861. Killed in night attack at Second Manassas. 
OYLER, JAMES M.— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Living in, 
Illinois. 

OYLER, SMITH— 
Private, July 2, 1861. Living in Illinois. 

PARMLEY, N. B.— 

Private, March 5, 1862. Killed in battle. 
PENNINGTON, WILLIAM— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Birming- 
ham, Ala. 

POTTER, JOHN— 
Private, March 5, 1862. 

REVELLE, ABLE W.— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Wounded at Winchester, Va., 1862, and dis 
charged. 

REVELLE, JAMES M.— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Wounded at Winchester, Va., 1862. Pro- 
moted Fourth Sergeant 1862. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va. 
and discharged. 

ROE, GEORGE— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Died in Hospital at Sudley Church, Va., 1861. 
ROE, WILLIAM— \ 

Private, July 2, 1861. Died in hospital at Sudley Church, Va., 1861. 
RUSSELL, HENRY— 

Private, July 2, 1861. 

SOLOMONS, WILLIAM S.— 
Private, July 2, 1861. Promoted Second Sergeant 1862. Killed at 
Second Manassas.. 
SMITH, JOHN C— 
Private, July 2, 1861. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md. Living in 
Pittsburgh, Tenn. 

SMITH, LANGSTON— 
Private, July 2, 1861. Wounded at Richmond, Va., and discharged. 

'29 d-c 



450 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

SMITH, L. T.— 

Private, March 4, 1862. Detailed in hospital in Richmond, Va.- 
SMITH, WILLIAM C— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Living in Pittsburgh, Tenn. 
STEWART, JERRY— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Discharged. 

TATUM, GEORGE— 

Private, September 11, 1863. Died in service. 

THURMAN, R. V.— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Promoted Second Corporal 1863. 

TINKER, JACOB— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Died in hospital while in service. 

TINKER, JAMES W.— 
Private, July 2, 1861. 

TINKER, WILLIAM— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Killed at Cold Harbor, Va., 1862. 

WARREN, CHARLES— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Color Bearer and Litter Bearer. Died in Ken- 
tucky, 1902. 
WARREN, SAMUEL H.— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Killed at Cold Harbor, Va., 1862. 

WARREN, WILLIAM— 

Private, July 2, 1861, Died in Culpepper Courthouse, Va. 

WATTEY, GIBSON— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Transferred from Company F, Twenty-first 
Georgia Regiment. Promoted First Sergeant. 

WHITEHEAD, JOHN— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Died in Starnesville, Va. 

WIGLEY, DANIEL— 
Private, March 4, 1862. 

WIGLEY, F. M.— 

Private, March 4, 1862. Wounded and disabled at Fredericksburg^ 
Va. Survived the war. Supposed to be living. 

WIGLEY, JACKSON— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Served through the war. 

WRIGLEY, MARION— 
Private, July 2, 1861. Wounded at Fredericksburg, Va. 

YOUNG, SAMUEL C— 

Private, July 2, 1861. Fate unknown. 



Muster Rolls Twenty-first Georgia Regiment. 451 



MUSTER ROLL OF STEWART INFANTRY, COM- 
PANY I, TWENTY-FIRST REGIMENT, GEORGIA 
VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, C. S. A. 

STEWART COUNTY, GEORGIA. 

LYNCH, MICHAEL— 

Captain, July 17, 1861. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va. Pro- 
moted Major April 18, 1864. Living in Dekalb county, Ga. 

WALTON, ROBERT W.— 

First Lieutenant, July 17, 1861. Resigned May 2, 1862. Died since 
the war in Texas. 

JOHNSON, C. S.— 

Second Lieutenant, July 17, 1861. Resigned November 28, 1861. 
Enlisted in the Forty-sixth Georgia Regiment, and was promoted 
Lieutenant. Living in Stewart (bounty, Ga. 

WARREN, W. J.— 

Junior Second Lieutenant, July 17, 1861. Promoted Second Lieu- 
tenant 1861, First Lieutenant 1862. Killed in battle June 3, 186i. 

KENYON, JOHN P.— 

First Sergeant, July 17, 1861. Wounded and captured at Freder- 
icksburg, Va., 1862. Never heard of since. 

MAY, JOSEPH W^.— 

Second Sergeant, July 17, 1861. Promoted Junior Second Lieuten- 
ant November, 1861. Wounded at Second Manassas. Promoted 
Second Lieutenant 1863. W^ounded and disabled at Plymouth, N. 
C, April 18, 1864. Died in Stewart county, Ga., 1899. 

McMICKLE, JAMES M.— 

Third Sergeant, July 17, 1861. Died in hospital while in service. 

MAY, BENJAMIN W.— 
Fourth Sergeant July 17, 1861. Killed at Cold Harbor, Va., 1864. 

DUDNEY, JOHN— 
First Corporal, July 17, 1861. Promoted Second Sergeant 1862. 
Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 

THORNTON, JAMES M.— 

Second Corporal, July 17, 1861. Killed at Fredericksburg, Va. 
ADAMS, GEORGE W.— 

Third Corporal, July 17, 1861. Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 
RICHARDSON, SYDNEY J.— 

Fourth Corporal, July 17, 1861. Promoted First Corporal 1862. 
Killed at Plymouth, N. C, April 18, 1864. 



452 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

ABBOTT, WILLIAM K.— 

Private, February 25, 1862. Captured at Fort Steadman, Va. Served 
throiigli the war. Died in Lumpkin, Ga., 1872. 

ADAMS, CALEB C— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Served tlirougb tlie war. Moved to Texas. 

ARGO, RICHARD— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Killed in battle in Valley of Virginia. 

ATKINSON, JAMES A.— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Died in service November 21, 1861. 

BANKS, G. H.— 

Private, September 9, 1861. Sent to hospital. Never heard of after- 
wards. Supposed to be dead. 

BARNES, JOHN— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Killed at Petersburg, Va. 

BELL, GEORGE C— 

Private, January 5, 1864. Dead. 

BELL, JACOB C— 

Private, September 9, 1861. Served through the war. Died in 
Stewart county, Ga. 

BELL, MADISON L.— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Dead. 

BELL, WILLIAM G.— 

Private, February 20, 1862. Served through the war. Living in 
Texas. 

BENTON, JAMES— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Transferred to another command. 

BENTON, JOHN— 
Private, July 17, 1861. Died of colic at Centerville, Va., 1861. 

BOYETT, ANDREW J.— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Promoted Sergeant. Surrendered at Ap- 
pomattox, Va. 

BOYETT, JAMES— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Killed In battle. 

BOYETT, .JOSHUA- 

Private, July 17, 1861. Fate unknown. 

BROWN, GEORGE L.— 

Private, March 30. 1864. Fate unknown. 

BROWN, WILLIAM L.— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Killed near Washington, D. C. Buried at 
Arlington. 
BULLARD, WILLIAM— 

Private, October 21, 1863. Fate unknown. 



Muster Kolls Twenty- first Georgia Regbient. 453 

BURKS, CHARLES R.— 

Private, July 17, 18G1. Served through the war. Died in Clay 
county, Ga., 1901. 

BURKS, WILLIAM J.— 

Private, July 17. 1861. Promoted Corporal. Wounded in battle. 
Served through the war. Living in Union, Ga. 

CAHILL, THOMAS— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Killed at Plymouth, N. C, April 18, 18G4. 

CAXADY, JAMES— 

Private, July 17, 1861. ^ 

CHRISTIAN, EDMUND— 
Private, July 17, 1861. Wounded in battle August 21, 1864. 

COLLINS, FLOYD— 
Private, July 17, 1861. Fate unknown. 

COLSON, MARTIN N. L.— 
Private, October 21, 1863. Fate unknown. 

CORDELL, ABRAHAM L.— 

Private, September 9, 1862. Fate unknown. 

COX, GEORGE C— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Fate unknown. 

COX, G. Q.— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Captured at Fort Steadman, Va. Surren- 
dered at Appomattox, Va. Died since the war. 

CURRIAN, EDWARD— 

Private, February 22, 1862. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md. 

CURRIAN, JOHN— 

Private, February 22, 1862. Fate unknown. 

DAVENPORT, BRYANT— 

Private, March 6, 1863. Fate unknown. 
DAVENPORT, FRANK— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Fate unknown. 

DAVENPORT, JOHN F.— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Promoted Fourth Sergeant July 1, 1864. 
Killed on picket in Valley of Virginia, July 18, 1864. 

DAVIS, CHARLES L.— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Served through the war. Died in Stewart 
county, Ga. 
DOYAL, D. J.— 

Private, October 20, 1863. Wounded at Plymouth, N. C, April 18, 
1864. 
DUNNAWAY, JOHN F. M.— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Killed at Cold Harbor, Va., 1862. 



454 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

DUNN AWAY, WILEY M.— 

Private, July 17, 1801. Appointed musician. Fate unknown. 

ELBERT, SAMUEL— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 

ELAM, THOMAS J.— 

Private, July 17,(18(31. Fate unknown. 

GARTRELL, JOSEPH S. W.— 

Private, March 4. 1862. Discharged. 

GIBBON, WILLIAM— 

Private, July 17. 1861. Wounded in battle. Detailed in Columbus, 
Ga., October 17, 1863. 

GILBERT, WILLIAM H.— 

Private, March 3, 1864. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. 

GLASS, DAN— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa. 

GLASS, JOHN— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 

GLYNN, JOHN— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 

GOODMAN, .TAMES G.— 

Private, July 17, 1861. 
GOODMAN, JOEL— 

Private, April 1, 1864. Fate unknown. 

GOODWIN, PARKER— 

Private, September 9, 1861. Fate unknown. 

GRAVES, THOMAS J.— 
Private, July 17, 1861. Promoted Fourth Sergeant 1862. Killed at 
Gettysburg, Pa. 

HARPER, WILLIAM P.— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Fate unknown. 

HARRELL, JOSEPH E.— 

Private, December 1, 1863. Appointed musician. Fate unknown. 

HEARN, JOHN— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Discharged account eyesight. Died since 
the war in Lumpkin, Ga. 

HERRING, HENRY— 
Private, October 24, 1863. Captured near Strasburg, Va. Served 
through the war. Moved to Texas. 

HICKMAN, B. F.— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Fate unknown. 

HINES, ERASMUS R.— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Killed in battle. 



Muster Rolls Twenty-first Georgia Regiment. 455 

!HIXON, W. H.— 

Private, July 17. 1861. Killed at Cold Harbor, Va. 

HOBSON, EDWIN F.— 

Private, July 17, 18G1. Killed at Sharpsburg, Md. 

HUNT, JOHN A.— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Stewart 
county, Ga. 
IRWIN, JOHN F.— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Promoted First Sergeant December 17, 
1861; Junior Second Lieutenant 1862. Wounded at Cross Keys, 
Va., June 8, 1862, Wounded at Cedar Mountain, Va., August 9, 
1862. Promoted Captain 1864. Captured April 6, 1865. Living in 
Lumpkin, Ga. 

JOHNSON, CHARLES J.— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Detailed in Quartermaster's Department. 

JOHNSON, RALEIGH M.— 

Private, September 9, 1861. Detailed in Division Pioneer Corps. 

.JOHNSON, W. J.— 

Private, July 7, 1861. Fate unknown. 

JONES, GEORGE W.— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Killed in battle in Valley of Virginia. 

.JONES, JASPER F.— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Killed in battle in Valley of Virginia early 
part of 1862. 

JONES, WILLIAM P.— 

Private, .July 17, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 

KENT, JOHN W.— 

Private, September 28, 1863. Killed at Petersburg, Va. 

KENYON, ALLEN— 
Private, February 25, 1862. Served through the war. Died in Wes- 
ton, Webster county, Ga., 1899. 
KENYON, HARRISON— 

Private, February 25, 1862. Killed at Second Manassas. 
KIRBY, JOHN C— 

Private. July 17, 1861. Discharged. 
KNIGHTON, SAMUEL E.— 

Private, September 28, 1863. Served through the war. Living in 
Stewart county, Ga. 
KOLB, RICHARD S.— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Wounded at Second Manassas. Served 
through the war. 

Mcelroy, barney s.— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Stewart 
county, Ga. i 



456 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

McMICKLE, WILLIAM D — 
Private, July 17, 1861. Promoted Third Corporal 1863; Fourth Ser- 
geaut August 1, 1864. Served through the war. Living in Stew- 
art county, Ga. 

MAY, JAMES— 

Private, August 18, 1861. Died in Alabama while in service. 

MAY, JAMES B.— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Promoted Third Sergeant 1862. Died in: 

Alabama. 

MAREE, JAMES— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Killed in battle in Valley of Virginia. 

MARTIN, SAMUEL P.— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Died of measles in Virginia, 1864. 

MARTIN, WILLIAM H.— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Served through the war. 

MATHEWS, THOMAS T.— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Promoted First Sergeant. Surrendered at 
Appomattox, Va., with the Invalid Corps. Died in Stewart 
county, Ga., 1882. 

MERCER, GREEN L.— 

Private, May 1, 1864. Wounded in battle. 
MIMMS, HENRY— 

Private, September 29, 1863. Feet badly frost bitten. Sent to hos- 
pital in Richmond, Va. 

MOORE, JAMES J.— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Died of disease in Virginia 1864. 

MORRIS, JAMES C— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Served through the war. Died in Stewart 
county, Ga. 

MORRIS, JOHN A.— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Wounded In battle 1864. Served through 
the war. Living in Stewart county, Ga. 

OWENS, IRWIN— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Killed in battle. 

OWENS, JAMES— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Wounded ^t Winchester, Va., wounded in 
another battle. Served through the war. Living in South Georgia. 

OWENS, JAMES M.— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Fate unknown. 

PARKER, FRANCIS P.— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Wounded several times during the war.. 
Promoted Ensign of Regiment June 17, 1864. Served through the 
war. 



Muster Kolls Twenty-first Georgia Regiment. 457^ 

PETERSBURG, SAMUEL— 
Private, July 17, 1861. Discharged 1861. 

PHILLIPS, JAMES— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Died of disease in service. 

PIERCE, CAPEL— 

Private, February 15, 1863. Died in service in Virginia. 

POPE, JOHN D. W.— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Wounded in battle and retired. Moved to 
Texas after the surrender. 

POPE, LITTLEBERRY B.— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Fate unknown. 

POWERS, JESSE M.— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Promoted Fourth Corporal 1864. Wounded' 
at Cold Harbor, Va., July 1, 1864. 
PRATHER, JESSE— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Fate unknown. 
PRICE, JAMES F.— 

Private, March 30, 1863. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. 
PRICE, WILLIAM E.— 

Private, February 22, 1862. Promoted Corporal. Surrendered at 
Appomattox, Va. Living in South Georgia. 

RENFROE, E. L.— 

Private, September 9, 1861. Fate unknown. 
RENFROE, THOMAS— 

Private, September 9, 1861. Discharged. 
RUSSAU, JOHN— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Killed at Chancellors ville, Va. 
SASSER, BRYANT S.— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Killed at Richmond, Va. 
SAPP, LEMUEL— 

Private, September 24, 1862. Fate unknown. 
SKIPPER, JOHN W.— 

Private, September 9, 1861. Killed in battle in Virginia. 
SHIREY, AUGUSTUS— 

Private, September 9, 1861. Killed in battle. 

SPIRES, WILLIAM— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Killed at Fredericksburg, Va. 

STEPTOE, ABRAM— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Transferred to Company D, Fifty-nintb' 
Georgia Regiment, March, 1863. Killed in battle. 

STEPTOE, HENRY— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Discharged December, 1861. 



458 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

STEVENS, JAMES R.— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Appointed musician. Fate unknown. 

STEVENS, JOHN W.— 
Private, July 17, 1861. Promoted Second Corporal 1863. Killed at 
Charlestown, Va., August 21, 1864. 
STOVALL, JOSEPHUS— 

Private, July 17, 1861. "Wounded at Second Manassas. Surreo- 
dered at Appomattox, Va. 

THOMASTON, 

Private, July 17, 1861. Fate unknown. 
TILLEY, WALTER J.— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 
TRAMMELL, CULLEN A.— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Lump- 
kin county, Ga., 1898. 
TRAMMELL, JOHN^^^^ 

Private, July 17, 1861. Killed at Fredericksburg, Va. 
TRIPPE, DAVID L.— 

Private, July 17, 1861. Wounded at Cold Harbor, Va., and died 
from wound. 

TROTMAR, COLIN— 

Private, February 25, 1862. Served through the war. 
TURNER, THOMAS J.— 

Private, February 2.5, 1862. Wounded at Winchester, Va. Served 
through the war. Living in Richland, Ga. 
WASHINGTON, SAMUEL W.— 

Private, March 5, 1864. Fate unknown. 
WEEKS, DAVID M.— 

Private, September 9, 1861. Lost arm at Sharpsburg, Md., and dis- 
charged. 

WELSH, BIRD— 

Private, September 9, 1861. Died at Guineas Station, Va., April 
19, 1863. 
WELSH, SHEPPARD— 

Private, September 9, 1861. Killed in battle in Virginia 1863. 
WILLIAMSON, HENRY C— 

Private, September 9, 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 

TOUMANS, BEDING— 

Private, October 21, 1863. Fate unknown. 



Muster Rolls Twenty-first Georgia Regenient. 459 



MUSTER ROLL OF BARTOW AVENGERS, COM- 
PANY K, TWENTY-FIRST REGIMENT, GEORGIA 
VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, C. S. A. 

CHATTOOGA COUNTY, GEORGIA. 

AKRIDGE, JOHN B.— 

Captain, August 28, 1861. Wounded at Drewry's Bluff, Ta., May 
16, 1864, and died from wound. 
POSTER, K. R.— 
First Lieutenant. August 28, 1861. Promoted Captain May 16, 1864. 
Captured at Winchester, Va., September 19. 1864. Released after 
the surrender. Living lin Milledgeville, Ga. 

PATRICK, J. W.— 

Second Lieutenant, August 28, 1861. Promoted First Lieutenant 
May 16, 1864. Wounded near Washington, D. C, July, 18^1. At 
home on furlough when Lee's Army surrendered at Appomattox, 
Ta. Died in Gordon county, Ga., since the war. 

WILDER, J. S.— 

Junior Second Lieutenant, August 28, 1861. Promoted Second Lieu- 
tenant May 16. 1864. Wounded in the Valley of Virginia. At 
home on furlough when Lee's Army surrendered at Appomattox, 
Va. Living in Broomtown, Ala. 

ALEXANDER, ANDREW T.— 

First Sergeant, August 28, 1861. Wounded, disabled and dis- 
charged 1862. Died in Chattooga county, Ga., since the war from 
effects of wound received while in service. 
LITTLE. MARION— 

Second Sergeant. August 28. 1861. Killed at Second Manassas. 

WILLIAMS, LEWIS R.— 

Third Sergeant, August 28, 1861. Served through the war. Died in 
Chattooga county, Ga. 

TAYLOR. JONATHAN J.— 

Fourth Sergeant, August 28, 1861. Killed at Drewry's Bluff, Va., 
May 16, 18U. 
SMALLWOOD, GREENBERRY— 

First Corporal. August 28, 1861. Fate unknown. 

W^ILLIAMS. FRANCIS M.— 

Second Cori">oral. August 28, 1861. Died of pneumonia at Manassas, 
February 14, 1862. 

SIMS. WILLIS— 

Third Corporal. August 28, 1861. Died in camp on the Rappahan- 
nock river, Va. 



460 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

SMITH, GEORGE W. 

Fourth Corporal, August 28, 1861. Wounded in battle and dis- 
charged. 

ALEXANDER, JOHN— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Wounded at Second Manassas August 
28, 1862, and discharged at Gordonsville, Va. 

ALLEN, JAMES A.— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Served through the war. Living at 
Floyd Spring, Ga. 

ALLEN, JAMES— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va., and 
died from wound. 

ALLEN, ROBERT— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Fate unknown. 

ALLEN, THOMAS K.— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Died of disease in service. 

BAKER, JACOB— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Discharged December 6, 1861. Living at 
Raccoon Mills, Ga. 

BALL, GEORGE M.— 

Private, March 1, 1862. Wounded in battle June 3, 1864. 

BALL, HENRY H.— 

Private, March 1, 1864. Died since the war. 

BALL, JOHN N.— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Wounded in battle and died from wounds 

BARTLEY, JOHN— 

Private, 1863. Fate unknown. 

BEATY, THOMAS— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Discharged November 2, 1861. 

BUSH, JAMES R.— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Died of disease in service. 

BUSH, JOHN— 

Private. August 28, 1861. Died of disease in service. 

CAPE, LEWIS B.— 

Private, October, 1863. Died of disease in service. 

COLE, FRANCIS B.— 

Private, October, 1863. Wounded at Drewry's Bluff, Va., May 16^ 
1864. 

COLE, H. F.— 

Private, October, 1863. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. 

COLE, JOHN N.— 
Private, October, 1863. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. 



Muster Rolls Twenty-first Georgia Regiment. 461 

COOK, HENRY— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Wounded at Second Manassas, and died 
from wound. 

COOK, J. FRANK— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Promoted Third Corporal 1862, Second 
Sergeant 1863. Surrendered with colors of Twenty-first Georgia 
Regiment at Appomattox, Va. 

COOK, JOHN T.— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Fate unknown. 

COOK, THOMAS— 
Private, August 28, 1861. Wounded at Second Manassas. 

DANIEL, IRWIN— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Died at Sudley Church, Va. 

DANIEL, JOHNSON— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Died at Sudley Church, Va., November 
2, 1861. 

DANIEL, SAMUEL— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Captured five (5) Federal soldiers at 
Gaines Mill, Va., and carried them to the rear without assistance. 
Killed in battle. 

DANIEL, WILLIAM S.— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Died of disease in service. 

DORSETT, EDWARD— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Died of disease in service. 

DORSETT, ENON— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Died of disease in service. 

DORSETT, JOHN B.— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Died of disease in service. 
FLOURNOY, SAMUEL P.— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Died of disease in service. 

FOSTER, BRISON C— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Promoted First Corporal May 1, 1864. 
Died in service. 

FOSTER, JAMES B.— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Living 
in Texas. 

FOSTER, NATHAN— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Died from disease at a private residence 
in Centreville, Va. 

FOSTER, ROBERT S.— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Transferred to Company December 6, 
1861. Died in hospital in Richmond, Va., December, 1861. 



462 Doles- Cook Brigade. 

FULLER, FRANCIS M.— 
Frivate, August 28, 1861. Promoted Fourth Corporal, 1864. Dledt 
in service. 

GILLILAND, ABSALOM— 

Private, February 18, 1862. Missing at Staunton, Va. 
GILLILAND, JAMES— 

Private, March 8, 1862. Missing at Staunton, Va. 

GREEN, JAMES R.— 

Private. August 28, 1861. Died of disease in service. 
GREEN, JOSEPH A.— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Died of disease In service. 

GREESON, JAMES— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Wounded at Cross Keys, Va., and died 
from woitod. 

HARP, ANDREW J.— 

Private, July 1, 1862. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md. Surrendered at 
Appomattox, Va. Living in Dooly county, Ga. 

HILL, CRAWFORD— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Fate unknown. 
HILL, JOHN C— 
Private, August 28, 1861. Promoted Second Sergeant 1862. Wound- 
ed at Drewry's Bluff, Va., ^ay 16, 1864. 

HOLLIS, CHARLES T.— 

Private, July 5, 1862. Wounded in battle. Surrendered at Appo- 
mattox, Va. 

HOLLIS, JOHN M.— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Promoted Second Corporal May 1, 1864. 
Killed at Winchester, Va., September 19, 1864. 

HOOD, 

Private, August 28, 1861. Wounded in battle and died from wound. 

HOOD, JAMES L.— ^ 

Private, August 28, 1861. Died of disease in service. 

HOOD, JOHN E.— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Detailed as hospital nurse in Richmond, 
Va., 1863. 
HOOD, LARKIN— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Served through the war. Living in Chat- 
tooga county, Ga. 
HOOD, WILLIAM A.— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Died in Culpepper courthouse, Va., De-^ 
cember 26, 1861. 
HOWARD, JACOB W. B.— 

Private, September 24, 1863. Killed at Plymouth, N. C, April 18^ 
1864. 



Muster Rolls Twenty-first Georgia Regiment. 463- 

HOWELL, JABEZ— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Died in service. 
HOWELL, JOHN— 

Private, August 28, 18G1. Died in service. 

HOWELL, WILLIAM P.— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Died of disease in service. 
HOUCK, JOHN J.— 

Private, August 28, 1801. Died of disease in service. 
HOULLE, JOHN M.— 

Private, September 10, 1863. Fate unlinown. 
HUMPHREY, ANDREW J.— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Captured at Gettysburg, Pa. Wounded 
at Cross Keys, Va., and died from wound. 
HUMPHREY, CROCKETT— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Died of disease in service. 
HUMPHREY, DAVID— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Killed in battle. 
HUMPHREY, JOHN— 

Private, March 18, 1862. Died in hospital March 20, 1864. 
KELLETT, AUSTIN— 

Private, March 25, 1864. Killed at Charlestown, Va., August 21, 
1864. 

KELLETT, JOSEPH W.— 

Private, August 28, 1864. Promoted First Sergeant 1862. Wounded 
in battle and discharged. Died since the war in Chattooga 
county, Oa. 

KENDRICK, THOMAS F.— 
Private, March 1, 1862. Wounded in battle June 3, 1864. Surren- 
dered at Appomattox, Va. 
KILLEN, JAMES M.— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Promoted Fifth Sergeant 1864. Killed 
in battle. 
KIMBRO, JOHN R.— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Killed in battle. 
KIMZEY, GARDNER J.— 
Private, August 28, 1861. Detailed in Richmond, Va., as Presiden- 
tial Guard 1863. 
LITTLE, JOHN— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 
LITTLE, SIMPSON— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Killed in battle. 
LITTLE, WILLIAM H.— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Served through the war. Living at Trion 
Factory, Ga. 



464 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

LOVELESS, ANDREW— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Killed in battle in Maryland. 

LOA^ELESS, GEORGE H.— 

Private, March 3, 1863. Wounded in battle near Richmond, Va., 
June 2, 1864, and died from wound June 5, 1864. 

LOVELESS, JOHN— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Killed in battle. 

LOVELESS, THOMAS J.— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Died in service. 

LOVELESS, WILLIAM A.— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Promoted Fourth Corporal 1862: Ser- 
geant 1864. Wounded at Drewry's Bluff, Va. Surrendered at Ap- 
pomattox, Va. 

MALONEY, AUGUSTUS B.— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Promoted Fifth Sergeant 1862. Killed at 
Chancellorsville, Va. 

MAYO, SIDNEY M.— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Promoted Second Corporal. Killed at 
Plymouth, N. C, April 18, 1864. 

MAYO. WILEY C— 

Private, January 28, 1864. Killed near Frederick City, Md., July 8, 
1864. 

MINAT, THOMAS D.— 

Private, March 1, 1862. Promoted Third Corporal 1864. Died in ser- 
vice. 

MORGAN, WILLIAM D.— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Died of disease in service. 
MOUND, THOMAS— 

Private, August 28. 1861. At home when Lee's army surrendered 
at Appomattox, Va. 
NORMAN, ALBERT F.— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Killed in battle. 
NORTON, JAMES— 

Private, March 1, 1862. Wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., and dis- 
charged. 

OWENS, WILLIS— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Died in Centerville, Va., December 15. 
1861. 
PARKER, WILLIAM S.— 

Private, September 10, 1863. Killed at Drewry's Bluff, Va., May 
16, 1864. 

PERRY, JOHN E.— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Killed at Drewry's Bluff, Va., May 16, 
1864. 



Muster Rolls Twenty-first Georgia Regiment. 4(5 

PETTIJOHN, ELISHA— 

Private, August 28. ISGl. Killed in battle. 
PHILLIPS, ELIJAH— 

Private, September 10, 1S63. Died in hospital June 30, 1SG4. 
REESE, WILLIAM B.— 

Private, March 1, 1802. Killed in battle. 
RHINEHART, WILLIAM— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Discharged account deafness. 
ROBERT, JAMES— 

Private, September 24, 1803. Discharged January 4, 1864. 
ROMIXES. JAMES— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Killed at Fredericksburg, Va. 
RUSSELL, WILLIAM— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Promoted Sergeant. 
SELF, JOSEPH— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Died at Sudley Church. Ya., December 6, 
1861. 

SHAW. JOHN— 

Private, September 23, 1803. Died in service. 
SHERMAN, JOHN J.— 

Private, September 24, 1863. Discharged April 14, 1864. 
SMALLWOOD, PLEASANT— 

Private, August 28, 1861. 

SMALLWOOD, WILLIAM M.— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Promoted First Corporal. 
SMITH, JACOB— 

Private, October 12, 1863. Killed in battle. 

SMITH, MATHEW B.— 

Private, September 22, 1863. Killed in battle. 

SMITH, THOMAS— 

Private, 1863. Killed in battle. 
SMITH, WILLIAM M.— > 

Private. August 28, 1861. Died of fever in service. 
STEPHENS, JOHN— 

Private, September 10, 1863. Killed in battle. 

SURRENCY, HENRY J.— ; 

Private, September 26, 1803. Discharged account deafness. 

SURRENCY, JOHN— 

Private, September 26, 1863. Killed in battle. 

TATE, CLAY— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Wounded at Boonsboro, Md. 

TATE, JAMES C— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. 

30d-c 



466 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

TAYLOR, JAMES— 

Private, August 28, 18G1. Promoted Corporal. Killed at Drewry's 
Bluff, Va. 

WALKER, JOHN M. B.— 

Private, August 28, 18G1. Wounded at Freemans, Va. Living in 
Kamper, Ga. 

WATSON, HARDY— 

Private, September 10, 18G3. Killed in battle. 

WEST, DAWSON— 

Private, September 10, 1863. Died of disease in service. 

WHITE, GEORGE W.— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Died of disease in service. 

WHITE, HENRY— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Wounded in battle and died from wound. 

WILDER, EDWIN B.— 
Private, August 28, 1861. Died at Sudley Church, Va., November 
25, 1861. 

WILLIAMS, JAMES T.— 

Private, September 10, 1863. Killed in battle. 

WILSON, JOHN— 

Private, 1863. Killed in battle. 

WOODS, NATHAN R.— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Discharged by order General Early, 
July 15, 1864. 

W^OOTEN, JOHN W.— 

Private, August 28, 1861. Killed in battle. 
WOOTEN, THOMAS K.— 

Private, November 1, 1861. Died at Mount Jackson, Va., December 
29, 1861. 



History of the Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment. 



CHAPTER V. 

On the 11th day of March, 1862, some four thousand volunteers 
assembled at Camp Stephens, near Griffin, Ga., under Govenor Brown's 
proclamation of February 11, 1862, to organize and prepare to strike 
for our liberties, our families, our homes and our altars. Among 
these volunteers were Captain W. H. Peebles, of Henry county; Cap- 
tain Jno. C. Key, of Jasper county; Captain Samuel P. Lumpkin, of 
Clarke county ; Captain J. B. Estes, of Clayton county ; Captain 
J. W. Adams, of Spalding county; Captain D. L. Hitchcock, of 
Putnam county ; Captain John Huie, of Fayette county ; Captain 
John C. Redding, of Pike county ; Captain Charles Allison, of Mor- 
gan county, and Captain James W. Beck, of Green county, with their 
companies. 

These ten companies united and formed the Forty-fourth Georgia 
Regiment, and elected Robert A. Smith, of Macon, colonel ; Captain 
J. B. Estes, lieutenant-colonel ; R. O. Banks, major ; Charles M. 
Wiley, adjutant ; Gabriel Harrison, surgeon ; Nathaniel S. Walker, 
assistant surgeon ; Fleming Jourdan, commissary; William J. Neary, 
quartermaster. A. J. Barron was appointed sergeant-major; James 
M. McCleland, quartermaster-sergeant; W. J. Reese, ordinance ser- 
geant, and Oscar S. Winn, hospital steward. 

On the 17th day of March, 1862, this regiment was mustered into 
the service of the Confederate States for the period of three years, or 
during the war. 

On the 7th day of April, the regiment was ordered to Goldsboro, 
N. C, and arrived there on the 11th day of the same month, and 
established a camp, known as '*Camp Mcintosh." While at this camp, 
the Third Arkansas, First North Carolina, and Third North Carolina, 
and the Forty-fourth Georgia Regiments were formed into a brigade, 
with J. G. Walker as brigadier-general, and the brigade was assigned 
to General T. H. Holmes' division. This brigade was ordered to 
Richmond, Va., on the 28th of May and arrived there on the 1st day 
of June, just at the close of the battle of Seven Pines. We were 

(467) 



468 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

marched to the battle-field expecting to take part in the eDgagenient, 
but the enemy retired before we were placed. 

A few days after reaching Richmond, the Third Arkansas was trans- 
ferred, and the Forty-eighth Georgia substituted in its place. Gen- 
eral R. S. Ripley succeeded General J. G. Walker as brigade com- 
mander and General D. H. Hill succeeded General T. H. Holmes as 
division commander. The brigade did picket duty until June 26 
and advanced our line considerably, capturing one commissioned offi- 
cer, ten men and twenty stand of arms. Two men were killed and 
two wounded in the Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment while making 
the advance. The brigade was moved on June 26 across the 
Chickahominy near Mechanicsville, one company each from First 
North Carolina, Third North Carolina, Forty-fourth Georgia, 
and Forty-eighth Georgia Regiments, were detailed as skirmishers 
under command of Colonel DeRossett. They advanced late in 
the afternoon to Ellison's mill. The whole brigade was then 
ordered to charge the enemy's line. They did so in splendid style, 
but suffered terribly, as they had to charge across the mill-pond 
directly in front of three of the enemy's batteries, and the pond being 
full of fallen trees and other obstructions, coupled with the fact that 
the embankments were very steep, compelled our men to fall back, as 
it was simply impossible to advance under such circumstances. The 
Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment lost in this fight four hundred and 
sixty-four men, three hundred and thirty-five being killed and 
wounded, and one hundred and twenty-nine captured. Among the 
wounded in this fight was our colonel, as gallant a soldier as drew a 
sword during the war. He died from his wounds June 28, and John 
B. Estes, lieutenant-colonel, was promoted to take his place. 

The Federals evacuated their lines and retreated during the night 
of June 26. On the 27th we advanced toward Malvern Hill, passing 
through White Oak Swamp. At Malvern Hill we again attacked the 
enemy early in the night of July 1. During that night the Federals 
retreated to their gunboats, thus putting an end to the seven days' fight 
around Richmond. We lost nine killed and forty wounded at Mal- 
vern Hill. After these engagements the regiment with the remainder 
of the brigade, was marched to near Richmond, where it remained 
until the 18th of August. While there the Forty-eighth Georgia 
Regiment was transferred to General A. R. Wright's Brigade, and the 
Fourth Georgia Regiment under Colonel Geo. Doles substituted in 
its place. 



History of the Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment. 469 

On the 18th of August, Ripley's Brigade was ordered to Orange 
Court House, and reached there on the 19th, where they remained in 
camp until the 27th, when the first Maryland campaign was com- 
menced, and the brigade was marched via Rapidan Station, Cul- 
peper Court House, Warrenton, Gainesville and Manassas. The 
latter named place was reached August 30, just about the close of the 
second battle of Manassas. We marched on the 1st of September to 
near Centerville where the Forty-fourth Georgia and the Thirteenth 
Alabama Regiments, under command of Colonel B. D. Fry, did picket 
duty that night. The brigade moved next day to Stewart's farm. It 
was at this place that General Lee had his hand hurt very painfully by 
his horse, and Dr. N. S. Walker, surgeon of the Forty-fourth Geor- 
gia, dressed his wound and gave him a bottle of liniment, which greatly 
relieved him, and he returned the bottle at the battle of Sharpsburg, 
and told Dr. Walker to keep it for the next patient with a sprained 
or broken finger or hand. 

We were at Drainsville on the 3d, at Leesburg on the 4th, crossed 
the Potomac river at Monocacy on the night of the 5th, at Frederick 
City, Md., on the 6th, where we remained until the 11th. We then 
marched to Boonsboro, and then to near Hagerstown; then back to 
Boonsboro on the 13th. On the 14th the Fourth Georgia Regiment 
was ordered to Hamburgh Pass, the balance of the brigade were or- 
dered to the top of the mountain on the pike road and formed a line of 
battle. After receiving a severe shelling from the enemy's batteries, 
we were moved back to Boonsboro, and joined the Fourth Georgia 
early on the morning of the 18th. We were then marched to Sharps- 
burg, crossing Antietam creek on the stone bridge ; marched a short 
distance to the right and formed line of battle facing the Antietam. 
One of our batteries was placed in our front. Our position was on 
the extreme right of D. H. Hill's Division until the 16th, when we 
were moved to the extreme left of his division. While thus situated 
we were continually exposed to severe shelling, which was very an- 
noying, as we were not allowed to return the fire. On the night of 
the 16th, we were moved in a northwesterly direction and formed a 
new line. The enemy opened a very severe cannonade on us, and 
kept it up continually until about nine o'clock. Next morning, Sep- 
tember 17, the battle opened at an early hour. It will be easy to 
locate the ground we occupied, as there was a graveyard just to the 
right of the Fourth Georgia. A little to the right of this graveyard 
there was a large barn, and numerous other out-houses that were set 



470 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

on fire by the enemy's shells. Our brigade was considerabl}^- contused 
owing to the heat from these burning buildings, and at one time the 
regiments got "mixed up," and just in the midst of the confusion and 
before order was restored General Ripley was wounded. Colonel 
George Doles of the Fourth Georgia, however, the senior ofiicer in 
the brigade, was on hand and took immediate command. He was not 
many minutes in settling the confusion. His first order was to 
"Charge bayonets ! " and placed himself in front. It is unnecessary to 
say the order was promptly obeyed. The men forgot in a moment 
their empty haversacks and sore feet, and sprang forward at a double- 
quick, yelling like so many demons. The Federal line in our front 
gave way like chaff" before a cyclone. A second and third line were 
formed by the enemy, but each met the fate of the first. This magnifi- 
cent charge brought the brigade to the summit of a hill, from which, 
some three or four hundred yards to the left in a large cornfield, could 
be seen thousands of Federal troops. Colonel Doles here ordered a 
halt until a fresh supply of cartridges could be obtained. From this 
point, the brigade was ordered to move to the left into a skirt of woods, 
where it was halted and reformed, and awaited the advance of the 
enemy. The Federals soon located our position, and their artillery 
opened on us with grape and canister. This shelling continued all the 
time we occupied this position and until we were relieved, when we 
repaired to the ordnance train, where we got something to eat (the 
first we had had in forty hours), and a full supply of ammunition. 
About three o'clock p.m. the brigade was moved to the front and 
formed line of battle, and so remained until late in the afternoon. 
Late in the night of the 18th, the Fourth Georgia and First 
and Third North Carolina (except two companies of the last 
named regiment) were detached, and moved to some other point, 
leaving the Forty-fourth Georgia and the two companies of the 
Third North Carolina to hold the ground occupied by the bri- 
gade, until about daylight on the morning of the 19th, when they 
marched to the Potomac and crossed over to Sheppardstown, Va. 
While they were fording the river, they were attacked by Federal 
cavalry, but General Lee had anticipated this, and met the attack and 
easily repulsed the cavalry with men posted on the Virgin ia side of 
the river. It is but simple justice to remark in this connection, that 
much of the success attending the crossing of the Potomac in this in- 
stance was due to the cool demeanor of Captain John C. Key. Dur- 
ing this campaign in Maryland of nine days, rations were only issued 



History of the For'.y-fourth Georgia Regiment. 471 

to the brigade three times, and still they were marching and fighting 
all the time, and many of them were barefooted, and all were suffer- 
ing with sore feet and limbs. No troops during the war were ever in 
worse condition to go into a fight than were the men of the Fourth 
and Forty- fourth Georgia Regiments on the 17th day of September, 
1862, and none ever did more gallant and effective service or accom- 
plished more in the same length of time. As proof of this as- 
sertion, it is only necessary to refer to the Federal official reports 
of the battle, which shows that the charge led by Colonel Doles 
so demoralized the enemy that they could not be reinforced for 
several hours. The Forty-fourth Georgia carried into this fight 
only 162 guns, and lost 17 men killed and 65 wounded. After 
crossing back into Virginia, the brigade remained near Sheppards- 
town until the 19th, and moved to near Opequon creek and to Mar- 
tinsburg, thence to Bunker Hill and remained there until October 8. 
It then moved to Willow Springs and camped until October 25. The 
next work was to destroy the railroad from near Harpers' Ferry to 
Charlestown, near which place we camped until the 28th. On this 
date the brigade moved to Berryville, and remained until the 
31st, then crossed the Shennandoah river on November 1 to Paris 
and on to Upperville and thence to Front Royal, and recrossed the 
Shennandoah and camped until the 8th. It was at this camp that 
Colonel Doles was commissioned a brigadier-general and placed in com- 
mand of our brigade permanently. The com^mand remained in and 
around Strasburg and Middletown until the 20th engaged in tear- 
ing up the railroad from Front Royal to Strasburg. When this 
work was finished we moved by way of Woodstock and New Marke t 
over the mountain to Godonsville, where we arrived on the 26th, and 
remained to the 28th. 

While at this camp General D. H. Hill issued an order that the raw 
hides of the beef cattle butchered in camp be made into shoes for th e 
men, and on the next day the General discovered some of the 
men of the Forty-fourth Georgia barefooted, and ordered Adju- 
tant C. M. Wiley under arrest for not obeying his order; but when 
the adjutant informed the General that he had made into shoes all 
the hides that fell to the lot of the Forty-fourth Georgia, and that this 
small supply of the "raw material" was not sufBcient to shoe all the 
unshod men, the General saw the point was well taken, and promptly 
released the gallant adjutant. 

We moved to Orange Court House on the 29th, just three months 



472 Doles-Cook B aoADE. 

from the time we left, and in our rounds had marched over four hun- 
dred miles. 

On the 1st of December the brigade left Orange Court House for 
Port Royal, on the Rappahannock below Fredericksburg, and arrived 
there on the 3d of December. 

On the night of the 12th, just after dark, the "long roll" called us 
to arms. A snow was on the ground ten inches deep, with a crust of 
ice on top, but this did not prevent the men from responding as 
promptly as they would have done in mid-summer. We marched all 
night long, and at sun-up next morning appeared at Guinea Station 
near Fredericksburg ready for duty. We were assigned to a position 
on the right of Lee's army at Fredericksburg, in a skirt of woods 
bordering on an open field, a short distance from Hamilton's Crossing. 
Here we remained in line of battle for hours under a terrific shelling 
from the enemy's batteries located beyond the river. 

On the night of December 14, General Burnside, the Federal com- 
mander, in storm and darkness of the night, withdrew his army to the 
north side of the river and left the Confederates in possession of 
Fredericksburg. 

The brigade, after doing picket duty for awhile on the river below 
Fredericksburg, went into camp on Conway's farm, where it remained 
until January 1, 1863, when it was moved to another location near 
Hamilton's Crossing. At this camp the Twelfth and Twenty-first 
Georgia Regiments were assigned to our brigade, taking the place of 
the First and Third North Carolina Regiments, making it a Georgia 
Brigade. While at this camp the regiment worked on fortifications, 
and did picket duty. On the 28th of January our camp was again 
changed to near Guinea Station, where we remained until the 29th of 
April. 

On the 29th day of April, 1863, Doles' Brigade left its camp near 
Guinea Station and moved to Hamilton's Crossing just below Freder- 
icksburg and formed line of battle facing towards the Rappahannock 
river — the Forty-fourth Georgia on the right of the brigade. The 
line of battle was advanced and drove in the enemy's pickets. 

During the night the brigade was moved by the right flank further 
down the river and remained in this position until the forenoon of 
May 1, building fortifications. Early on the morning of May 1, 
the brigade was marched in the direction of Chancellorsville, and 
about two or three o'clock p.m. halted near Todd's Tavern and 
formed line of battle. The line was advanced and drove in the 



History of the Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment. 473 

enemy's pickets. lu this skirmish the Forty-fourth Georgia had a few 
men wounded, among them being Captain John C. Key. After this 
skirmish the brigade came back to the road and camped that night 
in a mile or so of Chancellorsville. Early next morning we filed to 
the left and passed an old iron furnace, and marched through woods 
and fields, hollows and by-ways, until two or three o'clock p.m., and 
halted. Here, three days' rations were issued to us, consisting of bis- 
cuits and meat that had been cooked the night before. Alter eating 
a hearty meal, we were required to fall in line of battle. Doles' 
Brigade was on the right of the plank road leading from Orange Court 
House to Fredericksburg, and the Fourth Georgia was on the left of 
the brigade, its left resting on the plank road mentioned, then the 
Forty-fourth Georgia, Twenty-first and Twelfth Georgia, in the order 
mentioned. Our battle line was soon advanced through a dense 
woods and swamp, making as little noise as possible. On the far side 
of this swamp or thicket, our skirmishers encountered the outposts of 
the enemy. All at once a grand rush was made, the old familiar 
'* Rebel yell " was pitched on a high key, and we were soon in an open 
field filled with infantry and artillery, but every man seemed to be 
engaged cooking and eating, as though they were not expecting the 
much dreaded "rebels." They had breastworks, but they proved to 
be useless, as we had made our appearance on the flank, instead of in 
front, as they evidently thought we would. Hundreds of prisoners 
were captured before they got to their guns. After a few minutes 
of confusion the officers on the Federal side began to try to rally 
their men and make the best stand they could, but the surprise was 
complete, and the Federals did not recover from the shock during the 
evening's engagement. 

During the first few minutes of this engagement a Federal battery 
was placed immediately in front of the Fourth and Forty-fourth Geor- 
gia Regiments, and fired a few shots, but before it could be trained on 
the boys, so as to do much execution, they removed it at a double- 
quick. General Doles ordered the Twenty-first Georgia to the left 
about this time, and it passed in the rear of the Fourth and Forty- 
fourth Georgia, and was soon in a position to enfilade the Federals 
in their rifle-pits at another battery. The Twelfth Georgia was moved 
to the right and the whole line at a double-quick swept forward, driv- 
ing or capturing everything in their front. 

Darkness finally put an end to our advance. Just about sun-down 
Doles' Brigade was relieved by fresh troops, and we were ordered to 



474 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

the rear to get a fresh supply of ammunition. In the early part of 
the night, Lieutenant- General " Stonewall " Jackson rode out in front 
of the Confederate lines with his staff on a reconoitering expedition. 
He returned to our lines at a different point from where he had passed 
out, and was shot and mortally wounded by his own men, who mis- 
took him and his staff for Yankee cavalry. General Stewart, of the 
cavalry, was immediately placed in command of Jackson's corps. 

Early on Sunday morning, Lee's army advanced on the enemy, who 
had strongly entrenched himself in front of the old " Chancel- 
lorsville Inn." Enthused with the victory of the day before, our 
men met with few obstacles that they were not able to overcome 
promptly. After a gallant charge under a galling fire, we cap- 
tured the breastworks in front of the Chancellor House at ten o'clock. 
General R. E. Rhodes commanded our division in this battle, in the 
absence of General D. H. Hill. 

We remained in line of battle near the Chancellor House until 
May 6, when we advanced and found the Federals had withdrawn as 
they had at Fredericksburg, under cover of the night, and had gotten 
safely on the north side of the Rappahannock. In the evening we 
took up the line of march for our old camp near Fredericksburg. In 
the battle of Chancellorsville the Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment lost 
11 killed and 111 wounded. 

The regiment rested after the arduous Chancellorsville campaign at 
their old camp near Fredericksburg until June 4th, when it again 
took to the road, moving via Spottsylvania Court House to Culpeper 
Court House, and camped on the Warrenton road. On the 9th we 
moved to Brandy Station to assist Stewart's Cavalry that was holding 
in check a greatly superior force of Federal cavalry. As soon as the 
Federals discovered that they were opposed by infantry, they with- 
drew, and we marched all day without seeing a bluecoat. On the 
10th we moved to Culpeper Court House, and thence via Flint Hill to 
Chester's Gap where we crossed the Blue Ridge, and moved by way 
of Front Royal and Berry ville, where it was reported we were to meet 
the enemy. At the latter place we formed a line in plain view of the 
Federal camp and advanced through it into Berryville. The enemy 
had evacuated the place so hurriedly that they could not take along 
their camp equipage. We moved from here to Martinsburg by 
way of Bunker Hill, where our cavalry was being pressed by the 
Federals. Late in the evening we formed line of battle and ad- 
vanced upon the town, but the enemy gave way upon our approach 



History of the Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment. 475 

and we captured some artillery, a large number of prisoners and a 
quantity of much-needed quartermaster and commissary stores. 
Alter destroying a part of the B. and O. railroad, we marched to 
Williarasport, Md., where we camped and rested a few days. We 
then moved to Haggerstown, Md., and from there to Greencastle, 
Pa., where we remained two days, and then marched to Carlisle. 
Here we camped on the beautiful college campus of Dickerson Col- 
lege. In the forenoon of June 30, we marched out of Carlisle, by 
way of the Baltimore pike towards Gettysburg, where we arrived 
July 1, 1863. Before reaching the latter named place, we could hear 
the roar of artillery in the vicinity of Gettysburg. On reaching the 
vicinity of the town our brigade was formed in line of battle on the 
north side, with the Twelfth Georgia on the left, then the Fourth 
Georgia, then the Forty-fourth Georgia, which reached to the pike 
road, and the Twenty-first Georgia just across the road. Between two 
and three o'clock p.m. our line was advanced through an orchard 
crossed a branch and a hedge fence, and soon came in contact with 
two lines of the enemy. We charged the first one, and it fell back 
on the second ; we charged it and it gave way. Over the ground 
there were some lime-sinks, and many of the Federals threw down 
their arms and took shelter in them, and we charged over them. By 
this time we were in the edge of the city, and saw no Yankees in our 
front. We had killed, wounded and captured all of the two battle 
lines in our front, except those that outrun us, and we were in the act 
of entering Gettysburg, when suddenly a large body of the enemy 
were discovered advancing towards us on our right flank. The 
Twelfth Georgia, Fourth Georgia and Forty-fourth Georgia Regi- 
ments wheeled to the right to face them. My recollection is that up 
to this time the gallant Twenty-first Georgia had taken no part in the 
battle, as there was no enemy in their front, but had been under a 
galling fire during the engagement. They had advanced their line, 
however, with the other regiments to near the city, and when the 
Fourth, Twelfth and Forty-fourth had repulsed the Federals, the 
Twenty-first Georgia lay down in the edge of a wheat field to conceal 
themselves as much as possible. In this wheel to the right, the Fourth 
and Forty-fourth moved together, and were on the left of the brigade. 
In this change ot front, the Twelfth Georgia came up on the right of 
the Twenty-first Georgia. In the new line, the Twenty-first Georgia 
was a little in front of our line, at exactly the right place, and lay on 
the ground until the Federals had advanced to within a 



476 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

short distance of tliem when at the command of their col- 
onel, they sprang to their knees and poured such a volley into the 
enemy that they were not only checked but stampeded. The brigade 
then with a wild yell sprang forward and entered the city, the Fed- 
erals flying like chaff before a stiff breeze. Doles' Brigade was the 
first Confederate troops to enter the city of Gettysburg, on July 1, 
1863. In this battle the Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment had ten men 
killed and fifty-eight w^ounded. Among those mortally wounded and 
left on the field at Gettysburg was that grand, peerless man, Samuel 
P. Lumpkin, colonel of the Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment. 

After entering the town the brigade bivouacked in the streets until 
July 2, when we were ordered to join in the attack on Cemetery 
Ridge, and formed line of battle near foot of it, but for some cause 
the attack was not made. We were not actually engaged again, al- 
though continually under an annoying fire. Before day on the 6th 
of July, the army commenced to retreat and was not molested by the 
Yankees. Our first day's march was ended when we arrived at Fair- 
field, where we spent the night. The Federals followed us and kept 
us annoyed all during the 7th. We spent the night of the 7th near 
Waynesboro, and reached Hagerstown next day about noon. We 
found the Potomac river so swollen by recent rains that we could not 
ii>rd it, so we had to fortify our position. The Yankees came up to 
our pickets, but did not seem disposed to bring on an engagement. 
As soon as we could we crossed the Potomac into Virginia and moved 
via Martinsburg to Darksville, where we went into camp to enable 
the men to take a much-needed rest. We finally broke up this camp 
and moved by way of Front Royal to Thornton's Gap, where we crossed 
the Blue Ridge, passing through Madison Court House, and went into 
camp at Orange Court House, where we remained until September 
14. On that date we were ordered to Somerville ford on the Rapi- 
dan. From here we were ordered to Morton's ford to do picket duty 
and incidentally fortify it. We moved on October 8 to join the 
remainder of the army, and marched through Madison and Culpeper 
counties. At a place near Warren ton springs we had a little brush 
with the enemy, but no casualties When the army reached the Rap- 
pahannock we were placed at Kelly's ford, where we expected to go 
into winter quarters, and indeed we had already constructed many of 
the shanties, but before we had completed our camp we were ordered 
back across the Rapidan and camped at Morton's ford. We were soon 
moved from here to Raccoon ford. We remained at this point until 



History of the Forty-fourth Georgia Kegiment. 477 

27th when we were ordered to Gerraana ford. At Mine Run we en- 
countered the advance of Mead's army, but were only used as reserve 
and were not actively engaged. Late in the evening we were sent 
to support Johnson's Division, and came near being captured as 
Johnson withdrew before we got into position. We held the enemy in 
check, however, until the artillery was withdrawn and then retired 
with the loss of a few men. We remained in this vicinity until the 
first of December, when the Yankess crossed the river leaving our 
front. About the 20th of December, we moved to a camp a few miles 
from Orange Court House and went into winter quarters and remained 
here until February 6, 1864. About this time the enemy crossed the 
Rapidan at Morton's ford and we hurriedly repaired to that point 
ready to give him battle. The weather was bitter cold and we were 
great sufferers from exposure. After this little brush with the enemy 
we returned to our winter quarters and rested quietly during the re- 
mainder of the winter. 

On the morning of May 4th, we were ordered to prepare two days' 
rations and get ready for the road. We broke camp and marched tc 
Locust Grove and camped. Next morning we found that General 
Grant with an army of 130,000 men had crossed the Rapidan at 
Germana ford and was preparing to make the last "on to Richmond." 
This army was confronted by Lee's 60,000 poorly fed, ragged men, 
but every one of them veterans ; heroes of many battles ; and ready 
still to measure arms with any army of invasion. 

On themorning of May 5 we met the enemy. The brigade was 
formed in line of battle with Jones' Virginia Brigade on our left. 
After the battle had opened Jones' Brigade gave way ; that caused 
our left flank to be exposed. The Fourth Georgia was on our ex- 
treme left, adjoining the Virginians, and when they saw the break in 
our lines they immediately changed front under a galling fire and gal- 
lantly met the enemy and thereby saved a panic. The Twelfth and 
Forty-iburth Georgia Regiments (the Twenty-first Georgia was on 
detached service in North Carolina at this date) were not moved from 
their position by the enfilading fire of the enemy, but met the Yan- 
kees in their front, charged and drove them for a mile or more. (Mr. 
G. W. Nichols, of Jesup, Ga., has written a book purporting to be 
a "History of the Sixty-first Georgia Regiment, and incidentally of 
the Lawton-Gordon-Evans Brigade." In that book, on page 141, he 
makes this statement in regard to this battle : "Next morning, May 
5, we were ordered up early and put on the march at quick-step. We 



478 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

soon heard heavy musketry and some cannonading. We met Doles' 
Brigade coming out badly confused with General Lee in the rear, 
right by himself." This historian then proceeds to give a couple of 
very patriotic speeches ; one made by General Lee, asking that the 
historian's brigade throw itself in the breach and save the day. 
This speech was responded to by General Gordon, who promised to 
comply with General Lee's request. It is not my purpose to deny 
Mr. Nichols' statements about the speeches of those grand men. Gener- 
als Lee and Gordon, although it must be admitted that they were 
made under very warm conditions. I do deny, though, that Mr. Nich- 
ols or his brigade *'met Doles' Brigade coming out badly confused." 
No brigade engaged in that battle did better or more eflfectual service. 
They never gave back an inch, but drove the enemy from the firing 
of the first to the last gun. Evans' Brigade, it is true, came to our as- 
sistance after the battle was on and did their duty nobly. ) This 
battle was the opening of the Wilderness campaign. The Forty-fourth 
Georgia lost a considerable number of good men in this engagement ; 
among them being Lieutenant Sidney D, Mann, of Company D, 
who was mortally wounded and died July 10, following. After the 
charge we reformed and remained in line of battle all day. After 
dark we were moved to another part of the line and engaged in a 
night attack with Gordon's Brigade on the enemy. We were then 
moved to our former position on the line and commenced the con- 
struction of breastworks. On the 8th we were moved to near Spottsyl- 
vania Court House, after a tiresome march. Grant's army was headed 
for the same place, and reached there about the time we arrived. 
We formed, attacked the enemy and drove him back and occupied 
the position we found him in on our arrival. We constructed a line 
of breastworks in the edge of an old pine field. In our front was a 
broom-sedge field, gradually sloping to a branch some two hundred 
and fifty yards away. Along the branch was a thicket that cut off our 
view of the land beyond. On the 10th the enemy moved his troops 
beyond the branch and into the thicket above mentioned, and in the 
evening attacked our line with five columns. They came on us with 
a yell and never made any halt. Our men did all in their power to 
repel the assault, but the enemy outnumbered us ten to one. Num- 
bers prevailed ; they ran upon our works and killed and captured a 
large number of our brigade. But they were punished fearfully for 
this bold movement; we killed and wounded thousands of them, but 
we were great sufferers too. We were simply overwhelmed and forced 



History of the Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment. 479 

to retire, every man for himself. The enemy followed us, but we in 
our retreat met reinforcements and "went back at them," retaking 
our breastworks and regaining every inch of the ground we had lost. 
Among the killed in this battle were Captain Raby R. Haines and 
Lieutenant James D. Stewart of Company D, Forty-fourth Georgia, 
two as brave and honorable officers as laid down their lives in the cause 
for which we were fighting. Among the captured were numbered our 
chivalrous colonel, Wm. H. Peebles, who had been in command of 
the regiment since the battle of Gettysburg, 

When night closed in on us we were back in our -breastworks, all 
awake and ready for a renewal of the engagement at any moment, 
for we knew the battle had not been fought to a finish. By midnight 
our wounded had all been moved off the field, leaving only the dead 
of both armies scattered in front and rear of our breastworks. The 
situation was a sad one, and to vary the monotony a little, a Confeder- 
ate band moved up to an elevated position on the line and played 
"Nearer my God to Thee." The sound of this beautiful piece of music 
had scarcely died away when a Yankee band over the line gave us the 
"Dead March." This Avas followed by the Confederate band playing 
"Bonnie Blue Flag." As the last notes were wafted out on the crisp 
night-air a grand old-style rebel yell went up. The Yankee band 
then played "The Star Spangled Banner," when it seemed, by the res- 
ponsive yell, that every man in the Army of the Potomac was awake 
and listening to the music. The Confederate band then rendered 
"Home, Sweet Home," when a united yell went up in concert from 
the men on both sides, such a one as was never heard among the hills 
of Spottsylvania county before or since. 

On the morning of May 12, the "long roll" awoke our regiment 
from a sound sleep. It was a dismal looking morning. A heavy fog 
hung over the earth so dense, that we could not see a man thirty feet 
away even after the sun had risen. We were told that Johnson's 
Division of two thousand eight hundred men and officers had been 
captured in what was known as the "horse-shoe bend" in our line, and 
we were expected to drive the enemy back and help to re-establish 
our lines. After marching at double-quick for a mile or so, we were 
finally formed in line and in a few minutes we met the enemy. A 
charge was ordered, and after a desperate engagement and a running 
fight, we recaptured our breastworks and again established our line. 
Lieutenant-Colonel James W. Beck had taken command of the 
regiment after Colonel Peebles was captured on the 10th, and 



480 DoLEs-CooK Brigade. 

in this battle no officer in tbe army showed himself to better 
advantage, and none ever did more effective service. Our losses 
in this battle in killed and wounded were considerable, and cut 
our numbers down to a mere handful. (The compiler of this 
sketch of the Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment was badly wounded in 
this battle, and did not rejoin his command again until October, 1864. 
As to the future movements of the regiment, the reader is referred to 
the history of the Doles-Cook Brigade to be found in this book.) 

In closing this sketch of the Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment, my 
only regret is, that I have not had space to say what I should like to 
have said of the individual ; of the doings and acts of gallantry of the 
"men behind the guns." They, in all histories, are in one sense left 
in the background ; officers only are known and recognized in the 
great struggle, when in reality the privates were the men deserving 
most of the honors for results, for they were at the froiit always and 
bore the brunt of the battle. The privates in the Confederate army, 
be it known to all men, were not fighting for money or favors. They 
did not suffer all the hardships they were subjected to for gold or sil- 
ver or honors, but because they knew the cause in which they were 
engaged was a just one before God and man. 

Never in the history of the world has an army been made of such 
material as composed the Confederate army, and particularly the rank 
and file of the same. That the intelligent, unprejudiced people of the 
North are beginning to recognize this fact, is amply proven by refer- 
ence to a history of the battle of Chancellorsville by Augustus C. Ham- 
lin, formerly a lieutenant-colonel and medical inspector of the United 
States army, who was connected with the army of the Potomac and 
saw with his own eyes the battle he describes. On page 13 of that 
history he says : 

** At this time, Jackson's collection of fighters, trudging along the 
woods and its by-paths, would certainly have presented a curious ap- 
pearance to a martinet critic of any of the military schools of Europe. 
The first sight of the commander (Stonewall Jackson) in his dingy 
clothes, with ragged cap perched over his brow, astride "old sorrell;" 
the tattered flags, worthless as material, but priceless to the hearts who 
carried them — the strange appearance of the men in ragged and rusty 
clothes, marching along careles-ly and at will, might have suggested 
Falstaff and his ragamuffins. But a closer and keener look would 
have soon convinced him that outward appearances do not always in- 
dicate the true measure of the soldier, and he would soon have seen 



History of the Forty- fourth Georgia Kegiment. 481 

that this shabby-looking and apparently undisciplined rabble, would 
at a word from their trusty leader, be transformed into a resolute army, 
more than a match for any equal number of the best troops of the 
European armies in the singular contest about to commence. And it 
may be affirmed that thirty thousand of these European troops would 
have been as helpless before them in the tangled thickets of this wilder- 
ness as Braddock and his British regulars were before the French and 
unseen Indians in the woods near Fort Duquesne in the colonial times." 

They were volunteers, not hired or recruited from the slums of the 
great cities of the country, but at the call of their respective States they 
came from every walk in life and every line of industry ; from the 
country home and city mansion, the shops, the offices, schools and 
colleges. All plunged into the fray to battle for their homes and fire- 
sides, without the thought of being elected to some office, or placed in 
some soft position. In the ranks, beside the lawyer, merchant and 
doctor, stood their more hardy comrades fresh from the plow-handles. 
Thousands left palatial homes where every comfort and luxury 
abounded, for the trials, tribulations and hardships of the field and 
camp. 

Of such material the Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment was made up. 
When they had been in service barely three months, they were carried 
into the seven days' fight before Richmond — indeed they opened the 
battles around that city at Ellison's Mill, on the Chickahominy, where 
the regiment received its baptism of fire. The impartial historian, 
when he collects up the facts and figures, will show that the Forty- 
fourth Georgia Regiment suffered a greater casualty in killed and 
wounded in proportion to the number of men carried into action, than 
any other regiment on the Southern side, in this or any other battle 
fought during the war between the States. But they stood their 
ground like Spartans, and never gave an inch, except under orders. 
And this is the record of this battle-scarred regiment, from Ellison's 
Mill to Appomattox. In all their marches and battles they were 
ever at the front, and invariably acted well the part assigned them. 



31 d-c 



482 Doles-Cook Brigade. 



SKETCHES OF REGIMENTAL OFFICERS. 

Robert A. Smith, who was elected colonel of the Forty-fourth Geor- 
gia Regiment, at the organization of the same, was born in Clinton, 
Jones county, Ga., on December 19, 1824. His family removed to 
Macon when Robert was a boy. At the age of fourteen he joined the 
M. E. Church, and remained a consistent Christian to the end of his 
life. He entered Oglethorpe College when sixteen years of age, from 
which he was graduated in 1843. He read law and was admitted to the 
bar in his adopted city. He entered the Confederate service in April, 
1861, as captain of the Macon Volunteers, Second Georgia Battalion. 
At the organization of the Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment he was 
elected colonel. In the first battle in which his regiment was engaged, 
on June 26, 1862, he gave up his life on the altar of his country. This 
was the battle of Ellison's Mill, near Richmond, Va. He went into 
the fight an invalid — indeed he had to be lifted on his horse before 
going into the engagement. He was desperately wounded three times 
in the engagement before being carried from the field. He died June 
28, loved, respected and adored by the Forty-fourth Georgia Regi- 
ment. No ofiicer ever came nearer gaining and retaining the respect 
and confidence of his men in so short a time than did Colonel Robert 
A. Smith. 

John B. Estes, who was elected lieutenant-colonel on the organi- 
zation of the Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment, entered the service of 
the Confederate States as captain of the "Estes Guards," afterwards 
known and designated in the regiment as " Company D." Colonel 
Estes was before the war a school teacher by profession, and had 
also been admitted to the bar late in the fifties. He was wounded at 
the sanguinary battle of Ellison's Mill, where the Forty-fourth Georgia 
received its baptism of fire, and hovered for months afterwards be- 
tween life and death as the result of his wound, that has given him 
much trouble at times since the war. He was promoted to be colonel 
of the Forty-fourth Georgia on June 28, 1862, and held that posi- 
tion until after the battle of Chancellorsville. On May 26, 1863, he 
resigned, owing to his physical condition caused from his old wound. 
After the war Colonel Estes engaged in the practice of law, and 
was remarkably successful at the bar. He has represented his county 
(Hall) in the Legislature, and for a number of years has been judge 




ROBERT A. SMITH 

Colonel Forty -fourth Georgia Regiment. 






J*. , i J"0. 



Sketches of Regimental Officers. 483 

of the Superior Courts of the Northeastern circuit. Colonel Estes, in 
war or in peace, has always had the respect of his neighbors and asso- 
ciates. He made a good soldier and has made a good citizen since the 
war. As a lawyer, particularly as a criminal lawyer, he ranks 
among the best in the State. He is still living in Hall county, and 
is reasonably active for a man of his age. [After this sketch was put 
in type, Col. J. B. Estes died on the 16th day of September, 1903, at 
his home in Gainesville, Ga.] 

Richard O. Banks entered the service of the Confedate States as 
-captain of Company H, from Pike county, Ga. He was elected major 
on the organization of the regiment, and held that position until 
December 3„ 1862, when he resigned. Major Banks was a gentle- 
man and made a good record while he was an officer in the regiment. 
When he left he had hundreds of friends and no enemies in the Forty - 
fourth Georgia. 

Charles M. Wiley entered the service of the Confederate States 
as a sergeant in the Macon Volunteers, Second Georgia Battalion. 
He was selected as adjutant of the Forty- fourth Georgia Regiment 
on the organization, and acted in that capacity until July 24, 
1863. He was severely wounded at the battle of Ellison's Mill, 
and never entirely recovered from the effects of his wound. Adju- 
tant Wiley was a good soldier, and was greatly beloved by the 
Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment for his noble qualities. On the field 
he was brave, watchful and careful. In camp and on the march he 
mixed and mingled with his comrades, but never lost that proper re- 
serve and decorum so necessary to retain discipline and order. At 
the close of the war he engaged for several years in farming. Remov- 
ing to Macon, Ga., he engaged in mercantile pursuits. He was sub- 
sequently elected chief of police of Macon, and filled that position 
with credit to himself. He was afterwards elected ordinary of Bibb 
county, and still occupies that position. In 1899 he was chosen brig- 
adier-general of the United Confederate Veterans for the eastern 
division of Georgia, and still holds that position. 

Nathaniel S. Walker was made assistant surgeon of the Forty- 
fourth Georgia Regiment at the organization, and acted in that capacity 
until he was made surgeon on the resignation of Dr. G. Harrison. He 
resigned in November, 1862, returning to his home inPutnan county, 
Ga., where he practiced medicine until his death, January 25, 1902, 
Dr. Walker was a high-toned gentleman of the old Southern school. 
He recognized the fact that the common soldier had rights and feel- 



484 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

ings as well as himself, and the night was never too dark nar the daj 
too hot for hira to go to a man in distress when his services were 
needed. Always kind and considerate, always pleasant and affable^ 
he made lasting friends of both officers and men of his regiment. After 
returning to his old home in Putnam, he had many responsible places 
offered and thrust on him. AVhen he died he held the responsible 
position of trustee of the State Lunatic Asylum at Milledgeville, Ga. 
The Confederacy had no better or truer man than Dr. Walker^ 
and I am certain that all his old comrades of the Forty-fourth Georgia, 
and particularly those who were wounded or sick while he was in 
charge, will join me in this last tribute to a good man. "Peace to- 
his ashes ! " 

A. E. McGarrity was an assistant surgeon of the Forty- fourth. 
Georgia for about a year, appointed in the fall of 1863, and re- 
mained until he was transferred to the Sixty-first Alabama Regiment.. 
Dr. McGarrity was a good man, treated the sick and wounded under 
his charge humanely and kindly. Always in a good humor and 
always ready to speak a kind word, he made true friends and no ene- 
mies in the Forty- fourth Georgia while connected with it. 

AsBURY H. Jackson entered the army as junior second lieutenant 
of Company C Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment, and was made com-^ 
missary of subsistence of the regiment, December 2, 1862. "HulP 
Jackson, as he was known among the boys of the regiment, was a first> 
class commissary and always saw that the Forty-fourth Georgia got 
all that was coming to it in the way of rations. He was not 
very good looking so far as beauty was concerned, but he had a big- 
heart and a good conscience that more than compensated for his- 
want of good looks. He was changed to another command in August,. 
1863, by order of General Lee, and I know that every man and offi- 
cer in the Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment regretted it. He returned- 
to his old home after the war and engaged in the mercantile business. 
He died a few years ago in Athens, loved and respected by all the 
people of Clarke and Oconee counties. 

William J. Neary was appointed quartermaster of the Forty- 
fourth Georgia Regiment August 8, 1863, and remained with the 
command during all our marches, counter-marches and battles ia 
Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania. Captain Neary was a good 
man and when he could get anything in the way of quartermasters' 
stores, the boys always got it. He had the respect of all the officers- 
and men of the Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment. 




JOHN B. ESTES 
Colonel Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment. 



,8T0R, L5* 
' TiLDEN FCr 



Sketches of Regiriental Officers. 485 

R. W. Feeeman was made adjutant of the Forty- fourth Georgia 
Regiment August 8, 1863, and acted in that capacity until May 10, 
1864. On that date, at the battle of Spottsylvania Court House, he 
was severely wounded, and never came back to the command after- 
wards. Lieutenant Freeman was a brave, good officer and never 
failed to do his duty. 

A. M. BuKNSiDE, a second lieutenant of Company D Forty-fourth 
Georgia Regiment, was appointed acting adjutant after the battle of 
Ellerson's Mills in place of Adjutant Wiley while he was at home 
wounded. At the battle of Chancellorsville, May 3, 1863, he was 
killed. It seemed that Lieutenant Burnside had a presentiment of 
his coming death, for he told Colonel Estes, just before going into the 
fight, that he would be killed that day. He was correct, for on that 
stormy Saturday evening, while the Confederates were carrying every- 
thing before them, poor Burnside was mortally wounded. He lived 
for a day or two after the fight, when his noble spirit passed out " over 
the river" to rest with that of our noble Jackson " under the shade 
of the trees." There was never any braver or truer soldier that gave 
up his life in the cause for which we were fighting, than Addison 
M. Burnside. 

Samuel P. Lumpkin entered the Confederate army as captain of 
Company C at the organization of the Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment. 
He was made lieutenant-colonel of the regiment, June 28, 1862, and 
colonel May 26, 1863. He was engaged in all the battles the regi- 
ment was in up to the battle of Gettysburg, Pa. In this fight he lost 
his leg. He was also wounded at Malvern Hill, in the battles around 
Richmond. He fell into the hands of the enemy when General Lee 
retired from Gettysburg and died of his wounds September 11, 1863. 
There was no better, braver or cooler officer in the army than Colonel 
Lumpkin. Always at the front and always ready for duty, he had 
the confidence of his superior officers and the men he commanded. 
Colonel Lumpkin came of one of the oldest and best families in Geor* 
gia. At home he was a practicing physician and left a good and lucra- 
tive practice when he entered the Confederate army. When he 
died the old veterans of the Forty-fourth Georgia mourned his loss 
for they knew such leaders were hard to duplicate. 

Joseph W. Adams was mustered into the service of the Confederate 
States as captain of Company E, Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment. He 
was promoted major June 28, 1862, and died of smallpox in Decem- 
ber, 1862. Major Adams was a good soldier, and one of the most 



486 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

jovial, good-hearted men the writer of this sketch ever knew. In 
camp or on the march he was always the same. Like General J. E. B. 
Stewart, he was a great singer, and was always humming some favor- 
ite song. He made a good soldier, and when his death was announced 
to his comrades, it threw a gloom over the whole regiment. 

William H. Peebles was mustered into the service of the Confed- 
eracy as captain of Company A Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment, 
was promoted major March 4, 1862, lieutenant-colonel May 2H, 1863, 
and colonel September 11, 1863, and captured at Spottsylvania Court 
House, Va., May 10, 1864, and never was with the regiment any 
more. After he was released from prison he returned to his old home at 
Bear Creek (now Hampton), Henry county, Ga., where he resided until 
his death, a few years ago. Colonel Peebles, before the war was a 
practicing physician and left a good practice when he entered the 
Confederate army. He made a good record as a soldier, and wa& 
loved and respected by his men. He was in all the fights in which 
his regiment was engaged, from Ellison's Mill to Spottsylvania Court 
House (May 10, 1864). He commanded the regiment after the death 
of Colonel Lumpkin at Gettysburg until he was taken prisoner. 
There was no better soldier than Colonel W. H. Peebles. 

James W. Beck entered the Confederate service as a private in 
the Second Regiment of Georgia Volunteers, where he served for one 
year. At the expiration of his year of service be raised a company^ 
that was later known as Company K Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment. 
His company was mustered into the service of the Confederacy March 
17, 1862, and he was captain of the same. He was promoted major 
May 26, 1863, and lieutenant-colonel September 11, 1863. He was- 
wounded at Malvern Hill July 1, 1862. Colonel Beck was with hia 
regiment at all times until he left it at Petersburg a sick man. He 
was in all the fights and on all the long marches, and at all times he wa& 
the same true, honest, brave chivalrous soldier. After Colonel Peebles 
was captured at Spottsylvania Court House on May 10, Colonel Beck 
took command of the Regiment. In battle he was brave, cool and 
deliberate and had the confidence of the men he commanded. At the 
battle of Hatcher's Run Colonel Beck exposed himself, and owing to 
said exposure, was prostrated with pneumonia and was sent to Rich- 
mond to the hospital. From here he was sent to Greensboro, N. C. 
After recovering sufficiently to travel he was given leave of absence, 
that he might visit his home in Georgia. He was at his home when 
General Lee surrendered, and about that time he went to Augusta 




JOHN C. KEY 
Major Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment, 



THE NEW YORKJ 

PUBLIC LIB^i^^^ • 



A8T0R, LENOX 



Sketches of Regimental Officers. 487 

and reported for duty. He was sent to Madison, Ga., and ordered to 
detain all returning men to Lee's Array. He was attending to this 
duty when the end came. After the war Colonel Beck returned to 
his old avocation of teaching school, until he considered himself 
called of the Master to preach the gospel. He has been an active 
and prominent minister of the Baptist Church in Georgia ever since. 
At this time he is teaching a select school in Miiuer, Ga. 

John C. Key was mustered into the service as captain of the 
"Jasper Volunteers," afterwards Company B, Forty-fourth Regi- 
ment Georgia Volunteers, March 17, 1862. He was wounded at 
Chancellorsville May 4, 1863, and promoted major in September, 
1863. He was retired in May, 1864, on account of disability from 
w^ound, assigned to duty in Augusta, Ga. , under Brigadier-Gen- 
eral \V. M. Browne, where he remained to the close of the war. 
He was a brave, gallant and accomplished officer, and commanded 
the respect and confidence of every man in the brigade. His public 
life was very prominent, having represented his county in the Gen- 
eral Assembly of Georgia several times, and was a candidate before 
the people for Representative when he died, in June, 1902, with fair 
prospect of success. Besides being a member of the Legislature, he 
was a fine lawyer, and was honored by his county with several county- 
offices. He was a kind-hearted, genial gentleman, and his comrades 
mourn his death. He was commander of the Doles-Cook Brigade 
Survivors' Association, and also President of the Forty-Fourth Geor- 
gia Regimental Association at the time of his death. 

Augustus D. McKenzie went into the service of the Confederacy 
as first lieutenant of Company A, and acted in that capacity until 
he was made captain, May 4, 1863. He was captured in Pennsylva- 
nia July 4, 1863, and remained a prisoner at Johnson's Island until 
February, 1865, when he was paroled and sent home. Captain 
McKenzie made a good and faithful soldier. He is living now in 
Henry county, Ga. 

James Henderson was mustered into the service as first lieu- 
tenant of Company B, Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment. When Cap- 
tain Key was made major. Lieutenant Henderson was made captain 
of his company, and remained in that capacity until his death. He 
was wounded at Spottsylvania Court House, Va., on the 8th day of 
May, and died from the wound. Captain Henderson was an excel- 
lent officer, a brave and gallant soldier, ever ready and willing to 
perform his duty or face any danger. His loss was keenly felt by 



488 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

his regiment and company, but, like thousands of other good men, he 
gave up his life freely in defense of his country. 

James S. Griffith was mustered into the service as first lieutenant 
of Company C at the organization of the regiment and was promoted 
to the captaincy of the company June 28, 1862, and resigned on the 
29th of July following. Captain Griffith was with the command 
only a short time, but he left the impression on his fellow soldiers that 
he was a good man, and with experience would have made a good sol- 
dier. Died in Oconee county, Georgia, February 29, 1898. 

William B. Haygood entered the service at the organization of 
the regiment as second lieutenant of Company C. He was promoted 
to be first lieutenant July 15, 1862, and captain July 29, 1862. He 
lost his arm in the battle of Gettysburg, and was captured at Hagers- 
town, Maryland, and was in prison during the remainder of the war. 
Captain Haygood was not only a good soldier but a Christian gentle- 
man ever ready to go where duty to his country or his God called him. 
No man had more friends in the Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment than 
Captain William B. Haygood. He died since the war in DeKalb 
county, Georgia. 

Raby R. Haines was mustered into the service as first lieutenant 
of Company D, Forty-fourth Regiment, Georgia Volunteers, on 
March 17, 1862, and was made captain on March 17, 1862. He was 
killed at the battle of Spottsylvania Court House May 10, 1864. No 
officer had more friends in the Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment than 
did Captain Haines. He was a polished gentleman, brave and aggres- 
sive as an officer. A Yankee plunged a bayonet entirely through 
Captain Haines' body at Spottsylvania Court House. His death was 
regretted by every man in the regiment. 

Thomas R. Daniel was mustered into service in Company D, 
Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment, as a private, on March 17, 1862. He 
was elected second lieutenant May 23, 1863, and was made captain 
of the company December 5, 1862. He was wounded at Winchester, 
Virginia, September 19, 1864, and captured at Fort Steadman, below 
Petersburg, Virginia, March 25, 1865, and remained in prison dur- 
ing the remainder of the war. Captain Daniel made a good soldier 
and a conscientious ofl&cer, and always did his duty. He died in 
Clayton county, Georgia, a few years ago. 

James H. Connally. Captain Connally entered the service of the 
Confederate States March 17, 1862, as first lieutenant of Company E, 
Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment and was made captain June 28, 




SAMUEL P. LUMFKIN 
Colonel Forty-fourth Georgia Regimenl. 






=vi^V^^ "^ 



X^^^' 



.<»o 






vt'^*>.-^^°'2^ 



Sketches of Regimental Officers. 489 

1862. He was with his company in all the campaigns up to the bat- 
tle of Spottsylvania Court House, where he was captured on the 10th 
>day of May, 1864, and remained in prison during the balance of the 
war. Captain Connally was one of the six hundred Confederate offi- 
cers who were brutally exposed to the fire of our batteries on Morris 
Island, South Carolina. Captain Connally was a brave soldier and a 
perfect gentleman, always ready to do to the best of his ability any 
duty assigned him. He survived the war and the brutal treatment 
of the Yankees while a prisoner, and died in peace at his old home in 
Spalding county, Georgia. 

David L. Hitchcock went into the service as captain of Company 
F, Forty-fourth Georgia Eegiment, March 17, 1862, but resigned on 
the 25th of June following, and returned home. He was consider- 
ably advanced in years when he left home, and was doubtless unable 
to stand the hardships and fatigue of camp life. He was looked 
upon as a conscientious and good Christian man in his home county, 
and was by profession and practice a minister of the Primitive Bap- 
Mst Church. He died in Putnam county, Georgia. 

CharlesDrew Peakson was first lieutenant in the Putnam County 
Volunteers, afterwards Company F, Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment, 
when mustered into the service on the 17th of March, 1862. He was 
promoted to captain June 25, 1862, and killed at Sharpsburg, Mary- 
land, September 17, 1862. Modest and retiring in his disposition as 
a woman — with all the tender sympathies that belong to that sex — 
yet when aroused he was as bold and brave a man as ever went forth 
to battle. There was no better, braver or truer man than Captain 
Pearson. Every one that knew him loved and respected him for his 
many virtues. His company, regiment and his State and county 
lost one of their best men and truest citizens in the death of Captain 
-Pearson. 

George G. Green was junior second lieutenant of Company F 
when mustered into the service. He was promoted captain of his 
company after the death of Captain Pearson. He was a bold, brave 
and gallant soldier, a good and faithful officer, a man of broad and 
conservative views, and popular both in the army and at home. He 
was killed at Chancellorsville, May 2, 1863. His loss was deeply 
regretted by his comrades and friends. 

Joseph B. Reese was a private soldier when he was mustered into 
the service in the "Putnam County Volunteers," later Company F, 
Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment. He was promoted rapidly until he 



490 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

became captain of his company in May, 1863. He was wounded at 
Gettysburg. AYilderness and Winchester, Virginia, and captured at 
Fisher's Hill, Virginia, and remained in prison at Fort Delaware until 
after the surrender, when he was released. Captain Reese was a 
brave and splendid soldier, and his rapid rise to the command of his 
company can only be attributed to deserv^ed merit. He is a man of 
prominence and bears a fine reputation in his home county and where- 
ever known, and is now a citizen of Putnam couaty, Georgia. 

JoHX HuiE. This old gentleman raised a company after he had 
passed three score years of age, and was elected captain of the same. 
Captain Huie was mustered into the service as commander of Com- 
pany G, Forty-fourth Regiment Georgia Volunteers. After engag- 
ing in several battles — in fact all in which the regiment was engaged 
while he was in the service, he saw that he could not stand the hard- 
ships at his age, and reluctantly tendered his resignation in May, 
1863. His friends — and they were all who knew him — reluctantly 
gave him up. Captain Huie was a fine lawyer and gave up a lucra- 
tive practice when he entered the service as a soldier. After the war 
he emigrated to Texas, where he died several years ago. 

John L. Blalock entered the service of the Confederacy as sec- 
ond lieutenant of Company G at the organization of the Forty-fourth 
Georgia Regiment. He was made captain on the resignation of Cap- 
tain Huie, and his mantle could not have descended to better shoul- 
ders. Captain Blalock was a good soldier and a good citizen and 
always acted well his part in anything that was to be done. He died 
in Virginia while on detached service, March 28, 1864. 

Joseph A. Edmundson was mustered into the service as a private 
on the organization of the Forty-fourth Regiment Georgia Volun- 
teers and belonged to Company G. He was elected junior second 
lieutenant July, 1863, and promoted Captain April 18, 1864. He 
was captured at Spottsylvania Court House, Virginia. Captain 
Edmundson was a brave, good officer who knew his place and was 
always in it. While he was a prisoner of war he was made one of 
the six hundred officers who were, contrary to all rules of civilized 
warfare, exposed to the fire of the Confederate batteries on Morris 
Island. He was held a prisoner until the close of the war, and. 
returned to his old home where he has since died. 

John C. Redding entered the service as first lieutenant of Com- 
pany H, Forty-fourth Georgia. He was promoted to captain of his- 
company March 17, 1862, and died in Richmond, Virginia, July 9,, 




JAMES ^y. BECK 
Lieutenant-Colonel Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment. 



Sketches of Regimental Officers. 491 

1862. Captain Redding was a brave, conscientious, good man and 
discharged his duty fearlessly and well during his short life as a 
soldier. 

John W. Butler was second lieutenant of Company H when 
the Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment was organized. He was made 
captain July 9, 1862, and died in Pike County, Georgia, November 
18, 1862. Captain Butler was a good officer and made a good record 
as a soldier. 

M. T. Butler entered the service as a private and in September, 

1862, was elected second lieutenant of Company H, Forty-fourth 
Regiment Georgia Volunteers. In November of the same year he 
was promoted to be captain of said company. He died August 
22, 1864. Captain Butler made a faithful officer and gave entire 
satisfaction to the company and regiment while he was in command 
of Company H. 

James J. Cook was elected from the ranks to a second lieutenancy 
in Company H, Forty- fourth Regiment, Georgia Volunteers, May 13, 

1863. He was promoted captain December 5, 1864. Captain Cook 
made a good soldier and his rise from the ranks to the command of 
his company is abundant evidence of that fact. He was always ready 
for duty and always performed it with alacrity and no grumbling. 

T. J. Kendrick was made a second lieutenant in Company H, 
Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment, March 17, 1862, from the ranks. 
He was severely wounded at the battle of Ellison's Mill. On Au- 
gust 15, 1862, he was made first lieutenant, and captain November 
18, 1862. He resigned April 29, 1863. Captain Kendrick made a 
fine officer while he was in command of his company and his men 
regretted to give him up when he resigned. 

Charles W. Allison entered the Confederate service as captain 
of Company I, Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment. He was killed at 
Malvern Hill July 12, 1862. Captain Allison was a brave, fearless 
and gallant soldier, an accomplished and educated gentleman. In 
his death his State and country lost one of their best and most 
earnest soldiers. 

Levi J. Smith was mustered into the service of the Confederacy 
as first lieutenant of the Morgan and Henry volunteers, afterwards 
Company I, Forty-fourth Regiment Georgia Volunteers. He was 
promoted captain October 19, 1864. He was captured with thirty- 
seven of his men at Spottsylvania Court House May 10, 1864. When 
ordered to surrender his sword he refused ; one of his captors then 



492 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

thrust a bayonet into his hip, but failed to get the sword, for he 
threw it as far as he could back into our lines. He was one of the six 
hundred Confederate officers exposed to the fire of our batteries on 
Morris Island, South Carolina, the most fiendish and brutal act ever 
perpetrated by any pretended civilized government. Captain Smith 
was one of the bravest of the brave — always ready to obey the call 
to duty. For twelve years previous to his death he was sorely 
afflicted, most of the time confined to his bed ; and always in a most 
helpless condition — but with it all he was patient and cheerful and 
bore his affliction with Christian resignation. No better soldier or 
Christian followed the Southern Cross from 1861 to 1865. He served 
during the entire war and died at his home in Decatur, Georgia, 
April 20, 1900. 

Kev. Thomas J. Beck, Eev. Heney T. Brooks. These two 
gentlemen were at different times chaplain of the Forty-fourth Regi- 
ment. The record does not show when Mr. Beck was appointed, but 
does show that he resigned July 24, 1862, and that Mr. Brooks was 
appointed chaplain May 2, 1864. They were both good and true 
men, and Christian gentlemen. They were attentive to the men when 
wounded and looked faithfully after the spiritual interests of the sol- 
■diers when in camp. 

John D. Gentry entered the service of the Confederate States as 
second lieutenant of Company K, Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment. 
He was promoted first lieutenant December 2, 1862, and captain May 
26, 1863. He resigned October 14, 1863. Captain Gentry was a 
good man and made a good soldier while he was with his company. 
He was a great favorite with his company and there was universal re- 
gret when he severed his connection with his men. He died at home 
since the war. 

Thomas T. Eason was junior second lieutenant at the organization 
of Company K, Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment, in 1862. He was 
appointed first lieutenant May 26, 1863, and captain October 14, 
1863, and was placed on the retired list February 17, 1864. Cap- 
tain Eason made a good soldier, and was a brave and deserving 
offlcer. 

John F. McClellan was mustered into the service as second ser- 
■geant of Company K, Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment, on March 
17, 1862; captured at Spottsylvania, Va., and exchanged soon after. 
He was promoted junior second lieutenant September 19, 1864, on 
account of his good conduct as a soldier. He was ever faithful to any 




NATHANIEL S. WALKER 

Major and Surgeon Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment. 



THE N£:W YORK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY, 



ASTOR, LENOX AND 
TIL'"'"" ^■-' ••'0ATI0N8. 



Sketches of Regimental Officers. 493- 

trust placed in his hands, and after the war he entered the ministry of 
the Presbyterian Church. He made a good preacher an^ served his 
Maker as faithfully as he had served his country during the war. He 
died at Stone Mountain, Ga. , a few years ago, loved and respected 
by all who knew him. 

M. V. B. EsTES was a private in Company D, Forty-fourth Geor- 
gia Regiment, having been transferred from Company A, Second 
Georgia Regiment, in June, 1862, where he served for more than a 
year. Soon after his transfer he was appointed sergeant-major, and 
in 1863 he was appointed acting adjutant of his regiment after the 
capture of Adjutant Freeman. In the battle of May 12 at Spottsyl- 
vania Court House, Va., he was desperately wounded in the head, but 
to the surprise of all he recovered, and rejoined his command at New 
Market, Va., October, 1864, and remained with it until the close of 
the war. Lieutenant-Colonel James W. Beck furnishes the follow- 
ing in regard to him and his services : " On the night of May 10,. 
1864, as we were recapturing our breastworks, he asked my permis. 
sion to go out in front of our breastworks where he had seen a Fed. 
eral colonel killed during the afternoon, for the purpose of getting his 
sword. I informed him that it was a dangerous mission, but he per- 
sisted, and I finally yielded. He went and when he returned had 
his sword, coat, boots, and a pocket full of greenbacks. The sword he 
gave to General Doles, and the boots to some one else. I do not 
know what he did with the coat and greenbacks, but suppose that he 
kept and spent the latter. He made a fine soldier. In camp, on the 
march or in battle, he was always at the post of duty — ready for any 
emergency. No better or truer soldier wore the gray during the six- 
ties." He represented his district after the war in the State Senate 
for four years. He is now a resident of Atlanta, Ga. 



Note.— The author has written the above article because Mr. Estes 
deserved all that has been said in his behalf, and because he was too 
modest to sound his own praises, and because he has assisted very 
materially in perfecting the history of his regiment. 



494 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

ROSTER OF FIELD AND STAFF OF THE FORTY- 
FOURTH REGIMENT, GEORGIA VOLUNTEER IN- 
FANTRY, DOLES-COOK BRIGADE, ARMY NORTH- 
ERN VIRGINIA, C. S. A. 

Smith, Robert A Colonel. 

Estes, John B Lieutenant-Colonel. 

Banlis, Richard O Major. 

Wiley, Charles M Adjutant. 

Brown, P. E Commissary. 

Jourdan, Fleming Commissary. 

.Tackson, A, H Commissary. 

Harrell, John D Quartermaster. 

Harrison, Gabriel Surgeon. 

Walker. Nathaniel S Assistant Surgeon. 

Beck, Thomas J Chaplain. 

Estes, John B Colonel. 

Lumpkin, Samuel P ColoneL 

Peebles, William H Colonel. 

Lumpkin, Samuel P Lieutenant-Colonel. 

Peebles, William H Lieutenant-Colonel. 

Beck, James W Lieutenant-Colonel. 

Adams, John W Major. 

Peebles, William H Major. 

Beck, James W Major. 

Key, John C Major. 

Freeman, R. W Adjutant. 

Darnell, F. W Adjutant. 

Taylor, Augustus Surgeon. 

McGarity, A. E. . Assistant Surgeon. 

Rowland, William A Assistant Surgeon. 

Campbell, Robert E Assistant Surgeon. 

Christian, Robert A Assistant Surgeon. 

Brooks, Henry T Chaplain. 

NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF. 

Reese, W. H Ordnance Sergeant. 

Parker, E. Brown A. O. S. 

Jackson, Asberry H A. O. S. 

Barron, A. .7 Sergeant-Major. 

Estes, M. V. B Sergeant-Major. 

Weems, J. W Sergeant-Major. 

McClellan, James M Quartermaster Sergeant. 

Wallace, Nicholas G Commissary Sergeant. 

Reese. W. J Ordnance Sergeant. 

Harp, A. G Hospital Steward. 

Wynn, Oscar S Hospital Steward. 



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Muster Rolls Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment. 495 



MUSTER ROLL OF WEEMS GUARDS, COMPANY A, 
FORTY-FOURTH REGIMENT, GEORGIA VOLUN- 
TEER INFANTRY, A. N. V., C. S. A. 

HENRY COUNTY, GEORGIA. 

PEEBLES, WILLIAM H.— 

Captain. March 17, 18G2. Promoted Major March 4, 1863; Lieuten- 
ant-Colonel May 21, 1863; Colonel September 11, 1863. Captured 
at Spottsylvania, Ya. Released. Wounded at Winchester; Va., 
September 19, 1864. and furloughed. Was on his way to rejoin 
the army when General Lee surrendered. Died in Hampton, Ga., 
October 1, 1885. 

McKENZIE, AUGUSTUS D.— 

First Lieutenant, March 17, 1862. Promoted Captain March 4, 1863. 
Captured at Gettysburg, Pa., and remained in prison on Johnson's 
Island, Ohio, until February, 1865. Living near McDonough, Ga. 

CREDILLE, HENRY M.— 

Second Lieutenant, March 17, 1862. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md. 
Promoted First Lieutenant March 4, 1863. Lost arm at Cl^ancel- 
lorsville, Ya., and died from wound May 4, 1863. 

WILKINS, SAMUEL J.— 

Junior Second Lieutenant :March 17, 1862. Promoted Second Lieu- 
tenant March 4, 1863. Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., and died 
from wound July 7, 1863. 

MOORE, CHARLES— 

First Sergeant. March 17, 1862. Wounded at Ellison's Mill, and 
went home on furlough. Returned and died in service. 

ADAMS, THOMAS J.— 

Second Sergeant, March 17, 1862. Captured June. 1864. Living in 
Montgomery, Ala. 

STRICKLAND, LEROY— 

Third Sergeant, INIarch 17, 1862. Killed near Washington, D. C, 
July 12, 1864. 

LINDER, THOMPSON D. T.— 

Fourth Sergeant, March 17, 1862. Promoted Third Sergeant. 1864. 
Captured at Spottsylvania, Ya. Died of smallpox at Fort Dela- 
wai^, 1864. 

DERRICK, JAMES W.— 

Fifth Sergeant, March 17, 1862. Wounded and disabled at Sharps- 
burg, Md. Detailed as teamster 1864. Surrendered at Appomat- 
tox, Ya. Living in Hampton, Ga. 



496 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

PONDER, GEORGE T.— 

First Corporal, March 17, 1862. Promoted Fifth Sergeant June, 
1864. Captured June, 1864. Died in Henry county, Ga., after the- 
surrender. 

JACKSON, JOHN R.— 

Second Corporal, March 17, 1862. Promoted First Corporal June,. 
,1864. Wounded in battle June, 1864. Living in Georgiana, Ala. 

DERRICK, TVILLIAM D.— 

Third Corporal, March 17, 1862. Wounded at Ellison's Mill, Va. 
Living near Fairburn, Ga. 

JACKSON, EDWARD E.— 

Fourth Corporal, March 17, 1862. Wounded and captured June, 
1864. Living near Hampton, Ga. 

ADAMS, JOHN W.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Promoted First Lieutenant May 4, 1863. 
Wounded in battle, and died from wound, July 28, 1864. 

ADAMS, WILLIAM J.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Killed in battle 1864. 

AKIN, C. E.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Killed at Ellison's Mill, Va., June 26, 1862. 

AMIS, W. W.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Living in McDonough, Ga. 

ANDERSON, ROWAN C— 

Private. March 17, 1862. Died of measles at Goldsboro, N. C, May 
25, 1862. 

BANKSTON, JOHN— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Living in Henry county, Ga. 

BANKSTON, WILLIAM— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Living in Henry county, Ga. 

BERNHERD, WILLIAM P.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Wounded and captured 1864. Died in 
prison, buried at Arlington, D. C. 
BRIDGES, J. C— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Living in Griffin, Ga. 
BUNN, G. W.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Wounded at Ellison's Mill, Va. Moved to 
Alabama after the surrender. Supposed to be living. 
BUNN, JOSEPH L.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Supposed to have been killed at Gettys- 
burg, Pa. 

CAGLE, DAVID— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Died at home while on furlough February, 
1863. 



Muster Rolls Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment. 497 

CAGLE, WILLIAM— 
Private, March 17, 1862. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va., May 2 
and died from wound May 4, 1863. 

CALLAWAY, BURTON— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Discharged account of rheumatism. Died 
in Henry county, Ga., after the surrender. 

CALLAWAY, JAMES S.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Wounded in battle, 1864, and died from 
vround. 

CAMP, AARON N.— 
Private, August 6, 1864. Wounded in battle, 1864. Dead. 

CARMICHAEL, J. C— 
Private, May 6, 1862. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va. Living in 
Henry county, Ga. 

CARMICHAEL, S. H.— 

Private, May 6, 1862. Wounded at Spottsylvania, Va., May 10, 
1864, by musket ball, pistol shot, and bayonet thrust. Living in 
McDonough, Ga. 

CLOUD, CULLEN— 

Private. Recruit. Died of disease in Winchester, Va., 1863. 

COOPER, JARRATT T.— 
Private, September 2, 1863. Fate unknown. 

CREDILLE, CULLEN G.— 

Private, May 18, 1862. Captured July, 1864. Died in service. 

CREDILLE, JOSEPH— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Killed at Malvern Hill, Va. 
DANIEL, CICERO H.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md. Living 
near Locust Grove, Ga. 
DANIEL, HENRY— 

Private. Recruit. Killed at Spottsylvania, Va. 

DEES, DAVID B.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Wounded at Boonsboro, Md. Detailed as 
division blacksmith 1864. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. 

DEES, HENRY T.— 

Private, March 17. 1862. Promoted Fourth Corporal 1864. Wound- 
ed in battle 1864. Living in Alabama. 

DEES, SIMEON A.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Wounded at Spottsylvania, Va. 

DERRICK, J. G.— 
Private. Recruit. Died in Fulton county, Ga., 1891. 

32d-c 



498 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

DERRICK, T. S.— 

Private. Recruit. Wounded at Hamilton's Crossing, Va. Died 
from wound in Richmond, Va., June, 1SG3. 

DERRICK. WALLACE J.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md. Living 
near Fairburn, Ga. 

DORSEY, GEORGE M.— 

Private, March 17, 1SG2. Living in Sunny Side, Ga. 

DORSEY, JOHN T.— 
Private, March 17, 1862. Living near Hampton, Ga. 

DRIVER, CHARLES— 
Private, March 17, 18G2. Transferred to Fifty-third Georgia Regi- 
ment. Living at Flippen, Ga. 

DULIN, JOHN C— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Dead. 
FARMER, CHARLES— 

Private. Recruit. Fate unknown. 

FIELDS, AMASIA— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Died of typhoid fever August, 1862. 

GAY, JACOB— 

Private, September 23, 1863. Fate unknown. 
GIBSON, JAMES— 

Private. Recruit. Killed at Spottsylvania, Va. 
GIBSON, HARRISON— 

Private. Recruit. Living in Haralson county, Ga. 
GIBSON, PAT— 

Private. Recruit. Killed at Spottsylvania, Va. 
GOSS. THOMAS M.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Wounded by shock from bursting shell at 
Sharpsburg, Md. Captured June, 1864. Living in McDonough, 
Ga. 

GOSS, Y. A.— 
Private, March 17, 1862. Died of measles in Richmond, Va., 1862. 

GREEN, CRAWFORD— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Captured June, 1864. Died in Henry 
county, Ga., after the surrender. 

GUICE, .JOSEPH- 

Private, March 17, 1862. Wounded at Winchester, Va., September 
19, 1864. Living in Cordele, Ga. 
HAND, .JAMES H.— 

Private, May 8, 1862. Moved to Tallapoosa county, Ala. Living. 
HARDAGREE, HIRAM— 

Private, May 8. 1862. Fate unknown. 



MimrKK Koi,»,M I'\>im y-imu'imii ({i;i)K(iia Kkoimkn r. ID*.) 

IIAKKNIOSS, ELI AS— 

IMivjitc. March 17. 1S(;l\ Living in ll<«niy couiily, <3a. 

HAIU'IOK, IIIONUY— 

rrlvato. K««crult. Ivlllcd jiL . Mllisc^u's Mill. Va. 

IIAKIUS, JAMICS— 

Prlvalr. Mar«li 17. ISC.LV Kill. .I ;il MIIIsoii'h Mill. \ ii. 

IlKNItY, UlOlimON— 

I'livati', Manh 17, IKOU. DUmI In Ht'iiry <-()unly, (Ja., after Iho Hiir 
rciKlrr. 

IIOl'KINS, IllKill 10.— 

IM-lvalc. March 17, \HiV2. Died al. Wliiclicslcr, Va., In ISdJ. 

llUnMAKI), MAKHIIAlJi (>\— 

rrlvntcs March 17, \HiV2. Surroiulorcd at Appoiiiutldx, Va. Living 
in Cowola couidy, <Ja. 
JACKSON, SANI<'()UI) 

I'riv.'ilt'. Kccruil. Died in Ileniy cnnnly, (Ja., af(tr (hi' MurrmcliT. 
J A Kit ATT, .1. II.— 

l*rlvato, May H. ISiVI. Died in llemy eonnly, (In., aCIrr (lie Hiir- 
ronder, 
.FAltKAT'l', WlIJdAM .1. 

rrlvalc, S('|>l<'inlt«T S, |,S(w{. Caidiircd .luly, ISlH, Died In Henry 
connly, (in., afler Uio Hnncndcr. 

.loiNiou, si<:amok,m n. w.— 

Trivaie. SepLcnilHi- L'l. IH(i;{. Died m llniiiHonltin^,', Va., IHUi, of 
typhoid fever. 
JONIOS, JOHN M.— 

r*rlvn(<', AnK'iiKl 1.'?, \H(V2. He was nnd<'r a^'e, hnl look the i)la<*e of 
his fadicr VVIIIi.'irn JoncH. l/osl Icj^ al (.'lianct'llorHvilh', Va. liiv- 
in^ in Ihnry county, (.'a. 

JONKS, WILLIAM— 

Trlvatts March 17, IHtJli, HIh Ron Jotin M. .loncH, who w»ih under 
ayro, rellev(»d hitn l»y (akln;jj IiIh plae<* and ho lel.inned home. Hup 
poKod fo he living?. 
KIMIiKLL, J. 11.— 

rrlvai.e. U<'cndt:. DlKchar;,'ed on account of cyeHJKlil. Living n<'ar 
McDonouKh, (hi. 
lA'l'VLK. ADAM E.— 

I'rivate, March 17. 1H({L'. Dle.I of /n.aHleM In (JoldMhoro, N. C, May 
1, lHn2. 

LITTIJO, D. C— 

Private, .M:ir<li 17, ]HiV2. Cafjlnrcd .linu', IHUI. Dh-d lii Faytjtto 
coinify, (in., after the 8urrender. 
LIT'riJO, Z. Ii. 

I'rivate. Itecruit. Di<'d in Alnlmiiiti after llie HurrciuJcr' 



500 DoLE3-CooK Brigade. 

LOWERY, GEORGE L.— 

Private, February 24, 1864, Supposed to be living. 
LOWERY, JACKSON— 
Private, April 10, 1863. Promoted Second Sergeant 1864. Died In 
Henry county, Ga., after the surrender. 

MILLS, R. L.— 

Private. Recruit. Living in Pike county, Ga. 

MINTER, R. H.— 

Private. Recruit. Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa. Died after the war 
from the effects of being thrown from his buggy while his horse 
was running away. 

MOORE, H. M.— 
Private, March 17, 1862. Discharged. Died in Clayton county, Ga., 
November, 1900. 

MOORE, JESSE— 
Private, March 17, 1862. Died m service. 

MOORE, ROBERT— 
Private, March 17, 1862. Died in service. 

MOORE, ROBERT A— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Killed at Spottsylvania, Va. 

MOORE, SANFORD R.— 
Private, March 17, 1862. Promoted Second Lieutenant July 7, 186.3. 
and killed at Spottsylvania, Va., May 10, 1864. 

MOORE, JAMES— 

Private. Recruit. Killed in battle. 

MORRIS, WILLIAM J.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Captured June, 1864. Died in Spalding 
county, Ga., after the surrender. 

NIXON, WILLIAM J.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Promoted Fifth Sergeant. Promoted 
Fourth Sergeant, 1864. Captured June, 1864. Supposed to be 
living in Coweta county, Ga. 

ORR, JOHN S.— 
Private, March 17, 3862. Captured July, 1864. Supposed to be living. 

PEEBLES, HENRY H.— 

Private, March 17, 1862, Wounded in battle .July, 1864. Living in 
Fayette county, Ga, 

PEEBLES, JOHN— 

Private. Recruit. Killed accidentally after the surrender in Henry 

county, Ga. 
PENDLEY, JOHN M,— 

Private, :March 17. 1862, Wounded at Ellison's Mill, Va„ June 26, 

1862, Wounded at Winchester, Va., September 19, 1864, Living 

in McDonough. Ga, 



Muster Rolls Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment. 501 

PENDLEY WILLIAM J.— 
Private, May 5, 1862. Wounded twice at Chancellorsville, Va. Liv- 
ing in McDonough, Ga. 

PHILLIPS, CRAWFORD— 

Private, August 22, 1862. Captured June, 1864. Living near Mc- 
Donough, Ga. 

PHILLIPS, JAMES W.— 

Private, December 9, 1862. Living in Henry county, Ga. 
PIERCE, WILLIAM B.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Captured June, 1864. Died in Hampton, 
Ga., after the surrender. 

PRICE, WILLIAM C— 
Private, March 17, 1862. Detailed as teamster 1864. Moved to Ala- 
bama after the surrender. Supposed to be living. 

PRICE, W. P.— 

Private. Recruit. Died since the war in Alabama. 

PULLIN, JEPTHA P.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Wounded in battle at Spottsylvanla, and 
died from wound. 

RAWLS, JOHN— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md., September 
17, and died from wound October 11, 1862. 

RAWLS, WILLIAM— 

Private. March 17, 1862. Died in Richmond, Va., 1862. 

RICHARDSON, WILLIAM— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Fate unknown. 
RICHARDSON, WILLIAM M.— 

Private, August 22, 1862. Captured June, 1864. Fate unknown. 

ROSSER, JOHN A.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Detailed as Provost Guard April, 1864. 
Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. 

RUSSELL, JOHN— 
Private, March 17, 1862. Wounded at Sharpsburg, Md., September 
17, and died from wound October 11, 1862. 

SALTER, WILLIAM— 

Private, August 22, 1862. Captured June, 1864. Fate unknown. 

SHAW, JAMES W.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Captured June, 1864. Living near Locust 
Grove, Ga. 

SHAW, J. M.— 

Private, May 5, 1864. Living near Locust Grove, Ga. 
SMITH, JOSEPH— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Killed at Ellison's Mill, Va. 



502 D3LES-CooK Brigade. 

SMITH, WILLIAM H.— 

Private, August 22, 18G2. Wounded in battle July, 18G4. LiTing- in 
Atlanta, Ga. 

SNOW, J. M.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Discharged. Living near Locust Grove, Ga. 

SOWELL, M. v.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Transferred to Company F, Twenty- 
seventh Georgia Regiment Living near McDonough, Ga. 

SOWELL, PERRY— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Killed at Ellison's Mill, Va. 

STANDFIELD, ABNER L.— 

Private, February 15, 1863. Died in Alabama after the surrender. 
STANFIELD, JAMES— 

Private, May 5, 1862, Living in Clayton county, Ga. 

STANFIELD, JOHN— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Living in Clayton county, Ga. 

STANFIELD, WILLIAM M.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa. Died in 
Henry county, Ga., after the surrender. 
STEWART, LEVI— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Living in Henry county, Ga. 

STREET, F. M.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Discharged in 1862. Living in Coweta 
county, Ga. 

TARPLEY, HENRY C— 

Private, December 1, 1862. Died in Fayette county, Ga., after the 
surrender. 

TARPLEY, LUKE— 

Private. Recruit. Fate unknown. 
TARPLEY, WILLIAM H.— 

Private, May 5, 1862. Wounded at Ellison's Mill, Va., June 26, 
1862. Living In Henry county, Ga. 

THOMPSON, ALFRED— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Killed accidentally while in service. 
THOMPSON, WILEY— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va. Living 
in Clayton county, Ga. 

TURNIPSEED, CENTER— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Killed in battle. 
TURNIPSEED, J. C— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Died in Atlanta, Ga., after the surrender. 
TURNIPSEED, JOHN W.— 

Private, May 5, 1862. Living near Hampton, Ga. 



Muster Rolls Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment. 503 

TURNER, CHARLES— 
Private, March 17, 1862. Fate unknown. 

TURNER, DAVID T.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Appointed Forage Master April, 1864. 
Living near Hampton, Ga. 

TURNER, H. A.— 
Private. Recruit. Fate unknown. 

TURNER, JOE— 
Private. Recruit. Fate unknown. 

TURNER, M. F.— 

Private, April 24, 1864. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Living in 
Griffin, Ga. 

TURNER, PEYTON S.— 

Private, March 17 1862. Wounded at Petersburg, Va. Living in 
Newton county, Ga. 

UPSHAW, JAMES M.— 

Private, May 1, 1862. Captured June, 1884. Living near McDon- 
ough, Ga. 

UPSHAW, JASPER— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Living near McDonough, Ga. "% 

WEEMS, GILBERT G.— 
Private, March 17, 1862. Transferred from Second Georgia Battal- 
ion where he enlisted 1861. Promoted First Sergeant 1862. 
Wounded at Fort Steadman, Va., March 25, 1865. Living in Mc- 
Donough, Ga. 

WEEMS, JAMES— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Died of disease 1862. 

WEEMS, JOHN WESLEY— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Killed at Ellison's MiU, Va., June 26, 

1862. 

WEEMS, JOHN WALKER— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Transferred from Second Georgia Bat- 
talion where he enlisted 1861. Promoted Sergeant Major Forty- 
fourth Georgia Regiment. Wounded and disabled at Chancellors- 
ville, Va. Discharged, afterwards detailed on light duty in At- 
lanta, Ga., until the surrender. Living near Hampton, Ga. 

WEEMS, JOHN R.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Fate unknown. 

WILLIAMS, JAMES M.— 
Private, March 17, 1862. Promoted Third Corporal. Wounded at 
Sharpsburg, Md. Promoted Second Corporal June, 1864. Died in 
Henry county, Ga., after the surrender. 



5^4 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

WILKINS, J. W.— 
Private, March 17, 18G2. Promoted Junior Second Lieutenant IS&L 
Wounded near Washington, D. C, July 12, 1864. Laving in Mc- 
Donough, Ga. 

WYATT, GEORGE W.— 
Private, March 17, 1862. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va. Living 
near Locust Grove, Ga, 

WYATT, FRANK— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Living in North Alabama. 



Muster Rolls Forty-foujrth Georgia Regiment. 505 



MUSTER ROLL OF JASPER VOLUNTEERS, COM- 
PANY B, FORTY-FOURTH REGIMENT, GEORGIA 
VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, C. S. A. 

JASPKR COUNTY, GEORGIA. 

KEY, JOHN C— 

Captain, March 17, 1862. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va., and 
Gettysburg, Pa. Promoted Major September 11, 1863. Retired 
to Invalid Corps May 18, 1864, and assigned to duty in Augusta, 
Ga., under Brigadier-General W, M, Browne, where he remained 
until close of the war. Died in Monticello, Ga., June 1, 1902. 

HENDERSON, JAMES— 

First Lieutenant, March 17, 1862. Promoted Captain September 11, 

1863. Wounded at Spottsylvania, Va., May 8, 1864, and died 
from wound. 

NEWTON, ARIS— 

Second Lieutenant, March 17, 1862. Resigned August 2, 1862. Died 

since the war. 
JOHNSTON, STEPHEN H.— 

Junior Second Lieutenant, March 17, 1862. Resigned August 30, 

1862. Died since the war. 

POPE, M. W.— 

First Sergeant, March 17, 1862. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va. 
Promoted Second Lieutenant September 11, 1863. Captured April 

1864. Wounded at Fort Steadman, Va., March 25, 1865. Living 
in Locust Grove, Ga. 

MADDOX, E. M.— 

Second Sergeant, March 17, 1862. Promoted Junior Second Lieuten- 
ant September 11, 1863. 

KING, B. G.— 

Third Sergeant, March 17, 1862. Served through the war. Living in 
Hillsboro, Ga. 

DIGBY, THOMAS L.— 

Fourth Sergeant, March 17, 1862. Wounded at Ellison's Mill, Va., 
and died from wound. 

SMITH, ANDREW R.— 

Fifth Sergeant, March 17, 1862. Killed at Ellison's Mill, Va. 
BRYANT, J. L.— 

First Corporal, March 17, 1862. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va., 
May 10, 1864. Living near Indian Springs, Ga. 
KELLEY, J. B.— 

Second Corporal, March 17, 1862. Killed at Ellison's Mill, Va. 



506 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

KELLEY, W. A.— 

Third Corporal, March 17, 1862. Lost arm at Chancellorsville, Va. 
Died since the war. 

ALLEN, HARRIS N.— 

Fourth Corporal, March 17, 1862. Wounded at Ellison's Mill, Va. 
Detailed in Provost Guard. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. 

AARON, W. A.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Served through the war. Killed acciden- 
tally August 17, 1900. 

ADAMS, THOMAS G.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Served through the war. Dead. 

AIKEN, E. K.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Discharged account ill health July, 1862. 

AIKEN, R. H.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Wounded at Cedar Creek, Va. 

AIKEN, R. S.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Died in service. 

AIKEN, SEABORN S.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Died in service December 11, 1862. 

AIKEN, STEED S.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Died of disease March 11, 1862. 

AVANT, J. J.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Transferred to Forty-fifth Georgia Regi- 
ment. Dead. 

BARR, JAMES M.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Wounded at Malvern Hill, Va. Detailed 
as ambulance driver June 18, 1864. Wounded at Amelia Court- 
house, Va., April, 1865. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Living in 
Jasper county, Ga. 

BARR, WILLIAM J.— 

Private, May 16, 1864. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Died since 
the war. 

BARR, R. L.— 

Private, May 16, 1864. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. 
BEARDEN, JUDSON G.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va., May 10, 
1864. Served through the war. 
BAILEY, ZACHARIAH— 

Private, March 17, 1802. Wounded at Ellison's Mill, Va., and died 
from wound. 
BREWER, MONROE— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Discharged 1862. Died 1863. 



Mustek Rolls Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment. 507 

BROWN, HENRY L.— 

Private, May 17, 1862. Detailed as teamster May, 1864. Served 
through the war. Living in Butts county, Ga. 

CAMPBELL, ANDREW, J.— 

Private, April 23, 1863. Died in service 1862. 

CAMPBELL, C. G.— 

Private, April 23, 1863. Living in Monticello, Ga. 

CHEEK, LaFAYETT— 

Private, May 17, 1862. Killed at Ellison's Mill, Va. 

CHEEK, WILLIAM R — 

Private, May 10, 1862. Served through the war. Living in Barnes- 
ville, Ga. 

CLAY, JESSE— 

Private, May 17, 1862. Lost left arm at Chancellorsville, Va. Liv- 
ing in Jasper county, Ga. 

COLE, HENRY— 

Private, August 10, 1862. Served through the war. Died in Dallas, 
Ga. 

COLE, JOHN— 

Private, August 10, 1862. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va., May 10, 
1864. 

COLE, THOMAS— 

Private, August 10, 1862. Wounded at Cedar Creek, Va. Surren- 
dered at Appomattox, Va. Living in Dallas, Ga. 

COOK, JOHN W.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Wounded at Ellison's Mill, Va., and died 
from wound. 

CORNWELL, ELIJAH— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Discharged 1862. 

COUCH, J. P.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Died in Richmond, Va., July 22, 1862. 

CRANE, JOSIAH H.— 

Private, August 30, 1862. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va., May 10, 
1864. 

CUNDRA, ELBERT— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Discharged account ill health 1862. 

DAWKINS, FRANK— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Discharged account ill health and died 
1862. 

DOSTER, JOHN— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Lost left arm at Ellison's Mill, Va. Liv- 
ing in Jasper county, Ga. 



508 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

EDWARDS, JOEL J.— 

Private, May 10, 1862. Wounded at Malvern Hill, Va., and died 
from wound July 8, 1862. 

EDW^ARDS, RICHARD M.— 

Private, May 10, 1862. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Died since 
the war. 

EDWARDS, REUBEN R.— 
Private, September 2, 1862. Wounded at Spottsylvania, Va., and 
died from wound. 
EDWARDS, ROBERT S.— 
Private, March 17, 1862. Promoted Second Corporal. Captured at 
Spottsylvania, Va., May 10, 1864. 

EDWARDS, SOLOMON H.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Died since 
the war. 

EDWARDS, Wy J.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Died in service July 7, 1863. 
ELDER, J. E.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Discharged account disability July, 1862. 
Died since the war. 

ELLIS, J. B.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Died of disease in Richmond, Va., August 
8, 1862. 

FEARS, WILLIAM T.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Promoted Second Sergeant. Wounded at 
Gettysburg, Pa. On detached service in Gordonsville, Va., April, 
1864. 

FISH, W. L.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Discharged May, 1863. 
FREEMAN, ALFRED— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Died of disease in Richmond, Va., Au- 
gust 2, 1862. 

FREEMAN, GEORGE— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Wounded at Spottsylvania, Va., and died 
from wound September 5, 1864. 
FREEMAN, H. W. B.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Died while on his way home on sick fur- 
lough September 3, 1862. 
GARNER, R. W.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Discharged account ill health June, 1862. 
Died since the war. 
GARRETT, G. S.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Wounded in Seven Days' Fight around 
Richmond, Va., and died from wound. 



Muster Rolls Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment. 509 

OILMORE, JAMES L.— 

Private, March 12, 1864. Promoted Fourth Sergeant. Captured at 
Spottsylvania, Va. 

GILMORE, WILLIAM A.— 

Private, May 1, 1863. Promoted Fourth Corporal. On detached ser- 
vice May, 1864. Killed at Fort Steadman, Ya., March 25, 1865. 
GLENN, GEORGE W.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Killed at Gettysburg, Pa. 
GOOLSBY, C. R.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Survived the war. Living in Hillsboro, 
Ga. 

GOOLSBY, JACOB— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Killed at Sharpsburg, Md. 
GRIFFIN, JEFFERSON J.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Died 
since the war. 

GRIFFIN, GEORGE Y.— 
Private, March 17, 1862. Captured aft Spottsylvania, Va., May 10, 
1864. 

GRUBBS, JOHN A. D.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Promoted Fourth Sergeant. Served 
through the war. Died in Randolph county, Ga., August 16, 1899. 

GRUBBS, JOHN W.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Promoted Fourth Sergeant. Captured at 
Spottsylvania, Va. Died since the war. 

HARWELL, J. M.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Discharged June, 1862. 

HARWELL, SAMUEL J—. 

Private, March 17, 1862. Promoted Third Sergeant. Captured at 
Spottsylvania, Va., May 10, 1864. 

KINSLY, WILLIAM— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Died of smallpox in Richmond, Va., 1863. 

HENDERSON, I. W.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Survived the war. Living In Hillsboro, 
Ga. 

HODGES, J. A.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Wounded at Ellison's Mill, Va., and died 
from wound. 

HOLLAND, J. A.— 

Private,. March 17, 1862. Transferred to Company E, Forty-fourth 
Georgia Regiment. Served through the war. 

HOOKS, C. D.— 

Private. March 17, 1862. Died while at home on sick furlough De- 
cember 29, 1862. 



510 DoLE-sCooK Brigade. 

HOOTEN, JOHN W. ("Blue Hawk")— 
Private, March 17, 1862. Served through the war. Living near 
Indian Spring, Ga. 

HUFF, DAVID— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Died since the war. 

HUFF, GEORGE W— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Died 
since the war. 

HUFF, J. T.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 

JOHNSON, ALEX L.— 

Private, May 10, 1862. Wounded at Cold Harbor, Va. Died 1900. 

JOHNSON, JOSEPH H.— 

Private, March. 17, 1862. Assigned to hospital duty a greater part 
of the war. Survived the war. 

JOHNSON, WILLIAM S.— 

Private, August 29, 1863. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Served 
through the war. Died in Jasper county, Ga., 1868. 
JORDAN, FLEMING— 
Private, March 17, 1862. Promoted Regimental Commissary 1862. 
Resigned; afterwards Captain Company I Sixth Georgia State 
Troops. 

KINARD, F. M.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Wounded at Ellison's Mill, Va., and died 
from wound. 

LANE, E. D.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Wounded at Ellison's Mill, Va. 

LANE, R. M.— 
Private, March 17, 1862. Killed at Malvern Hill, Va., 1862. 

LETSON, GEORGE A. D.— 
Private, March 17, 1862. Wounded at Ellison's Mill, Va. Surren- 
dered at Appomattox, Va. 
LEVERETT, JOHN D.— 

Private, May 10, 1862. Killed at Fishers Hill, Va. 
LEVERETT, NATHAN H.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Promoted Fifth Sergeant. Surrendered at 
Appomattox, Va. Living in Mechanicsville, Ga. 

McBEAN, H. L.— 
Private, March 17, 1862. Promoted Third Sergeant. Killed at Fort 
Stead man, Ta. 

McCLURE, ALLEN— 
Private, March 17, 1862. Discharged account iU health July, 1862. 
Living in Gladesville, Ga. 



Muster Rolls Forty-fourth Georgia Eegiment. 511 

McCLURE, W. F.— 
Private, March 17, 1862. Died of disease In Richmond, Va., Feb- 
ruary, 1863. 

Mcdowell, w. t.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Promoted Lieutenant 1863. Served 
through the war. Died in Texas. 

Mcelroy, jesse— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Served through the war. Living in Jack- 
son, Ga. 

McMICHAEL, ASHLEY A.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Killed at Spottsylvania, Va. 

MADDOX, J. W.— 

Private, May 10, 1862. Died while at home on sick furlough 1863. 

MARTIN, J. P.— 

Private, May 10, 1862. Killed at Spottsylvania, Va. 

MATHEWS, ALEXANDER— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Survived the war. Died in Macon, Ga. 

MEEKS, JOSEPH H.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Transferred to Company C, Sixteenth 
Georgia, Partisan Rangers. 

NOLES, Z. H.— 

Private, March 17 ,1862. Died in camp of pnuemonia May 24, 1863. 

NORRIS, N. W. 

Private, March 17, 1862. Died of disease in Richmond, Va.. August 
5, 1862. 

OSBURN, B. S.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Received some slight wounds. Served 
through the war. Living in Covington, Ga. 

OSBURN, CHARLES T.— 

Private, May 1, 1863. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va. Surren- 
dered at Appomattox, Va. 

PARTWOOD, J. H.— 

Private, March 19, 1862. Survived the war. Died from disease con- 
tracted while in service 1865. 

PINLEY, A. J.— 

Private. March 17, 1862. Killed at ChancellorsvlUe, Va. 

PRICE, J. W.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Lost an arm and a leg in battle July 22, 

1864. 

PULLIAM, BLUFORD— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Died in camp of measles September 19, 
1862. 



512 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

PULLIAM, W. C— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Died in camp of disease May 6, 1862. 

TYE, T. B.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Wounded and captured at Spottsylvania, 
Va. Served through the war. Died in Jasper county, Ga., 1880. 

REESE, W. H.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Promoted Ordnance Sergeant. Died since 
the war in Macon county, Ga. 

REYNOLDS, C. C— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Died while in prison on Johnson's Island. 

ROBERTSON, J. E.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Wounded in battle, and died from wound 
July 7, 1862. 

SANSOM, W. C.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Lost arm at Sharpsbuj-g, Md. 

SELLERS, JOSEPH— 
Private, March 17, 1862. Killed at Ellison's Mill, Ya. 

SHAW, N. M.— 
Private, March 17, 1862. Killed at Gettysburg, Pa. 

SHY, T. B.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Discharged account ill health June, 1862. 

SMITH, H. T.— 
Private, March 17, 1862. Wounded at Ellison's Mill, Va. 

SMITH, WILLIAM— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Discharged account ill health. Living at 
Indian Spring, Ga. 
SPEARMAN, G. T.— 

Private, January 27, 1863. Served through the war. Living in So- 
cial Circle, Ga. 

SPEARMAN, JOHN— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Wounded at Ellison's Mill, Va., and died 
from wound. 
SPEARMAN, J. F.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Discharged account ill health. Died 1866. 
SPEARMAN, M. W.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va. Cap- 
tured at Spottsylvania, Va., May 10, 1864. 
SPEARS, ALFONZA F.— 
Private, March 17. 1862. Wounded at Ellison's Mill, Va. Detailed 
in hospital in Richmond, Va., 1864. Living at Farrar P. O., Ga. 
SPEARS, C. A.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Died in Lynchburg, Va., 1864. 

SPEARS, C. E.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Died at home while in service 1863. 



Mustek Bolls Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment. 513 

SPEARS, T. J.~ 

Private, September 14, 18G2. Discharged on accoimt of ill health 
1SG2. Died 1863. 

SPEARS, W. C— 

Private, March 17, 18G2. Died in Richmond, Va., 1864. 
TEDDERS, CHARLES M.— 

Private, May 10, 1862. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va., and died 
in prison at Fort Delaware, 1864. 

TILMAN, RICHARD— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Killed at Ellison's Mill, Va. 
THORNTON, LEWIS— 

Private, March 17. 1862. Died of smallpox at Fort Delaware, De- 
cember, 1864. 

THORNTON, WILLIAM J.— 

Private, October 29, 1863. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va., and died 
of smallpox at Fort Delaware, 1864. 

TUCKER, GREEN C— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Wounded at Petersburg, Va., March, 1865. 
Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. 
TURK, JONATHAN— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Wounded and captured April, 1864. 
Served through the war. Moved to Texas. 

WAITS, G. M. T.— 

Private, March 17, 1864. Wounded in July, 1862, and died from 
wound. 

WAITS, WILLIAM B.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. Living 
in Gladesville, Ga. 
W^ALLER, ROAN A.— 

Private, September 7, 1862. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va. 

WATKINS, JOHN G.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va., and died 
of smallpox at Fort Delaware, 1864. 

WARD, F. M.— 

Private, May 10, 1864. Discharged account deafness. Living in 
Covington, Ga. 

WEBB, G. W.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Acted as hospital steward. Served 
through the war. Living in Starrsville, Ga. 

WHITE, JOHN J.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Promoted First Sergeant 1862. Captured 
at Spottsylvania, Va., May 10, 1864. Living in Randolph county, 
Ga. 

'W d-c 



514 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

WILBURN, J. P.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Killed at Cbancellorsville, Va. 

WILLINGHAM, JEFFERSON— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 

WILLINGHAM, THEOPILUS— 
Private, March 17, 1862. Lost arm at Chancellorsville, Va. 

WOOTEN, RILEY— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va., May 10, 
1864. Served through the war. Died July 31, 1899. 



Muster Rolls Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment. 515 



MUSTER ROLL OF JOHNSON GUARDS, COMPANY 
C, FORTY-FOURTH REGIMENT, GEORGIA VOL- 
UNTEER INFANTRY, C. S. A. 

CLARKE COUNTY, GEORGIA. 

LUMPKIN, SAMUEL T.— 
Captain, March 17, 1SG2. Wounded in Seven Days' Fight around 
Richmond. Va., 1862. Promoted Lieutenant-Colonel June 28, 
1862, Colonel May 26, 1863. Lost leg at Gettysburg, Pa., and cap- 
tured. Died of typhoid fever while in prison at Hagerstown, Md., 
September 11, 1863. 

GRIFFETH, JAMES S.— 

First Lieutenant, March 17, 1862. Promoted Captain June 28, 1862. 
Resigned account disability July 29, 1862. Died in Oconee county, 
Ga., February 29, 1898. 

HAYGOOD. WILLIAM B.— 

Second Lieutenant, March 17, 1862. Promoted First Lieutenant 
July 15, 1862, Captain July 29, 1862. Wounded at Sharpsburg, 
Md. Lost arm at Gettysburg, Pa. Captured at Hagerstown, Md. 
Released after the surrender. Died since the war in DeKalb 
county, Ga. 

REAVES, JOHN W.— 

Junior Second Lieutenant, March 17, 1862. Killed at Ellison's 
Mill, Va., June 26, 1862. 

LESTER, PATMAN— 

First Sergeant, March 17, 1862. Discharged account disability 
September 10, 1862. Living in Clarke county, Ga. 

KLUTTS, GEORGE W.— 

Second Sergeant. March 17, 1862. Wounded at Chancellorsville, 
Va., May 2, 1863, and died from wound in Richmond, Va., June 2, 

1863. 

HINTON, WILLIAM B.— 
Third Sergeant, March 17, 1862, Transferred to Ordnance Depart- 
ment May 20, 1862. Dead. 

THOMPSON, BENJAMIN S.— 

Fourth Sergeant, March 17, 1862. Discharged account disability 
August 5, 1862. Died 1899. 

MALCOM, D. H.— 

Fifth Sergeant, March 17, 1862. Wounded at Ellison's Mill, Va. 
Discharged account disability 1863. Living in Oconee county, Ga. 



516 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

McREE, JOSEPH H.— 

First Corporal, March 17, 1862. Wounded at Gettysburj?, Pa., and 
Fort Steadman, Va. Promoted First Sergeant. Served through 
the war. Living in Decatur, Ga. 

ELDER, D. B.— 

Second Corporal, March 17, 1862. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va. 
Promoted Fifth Sergeant. Served through the war. Living in 
Oconee county, Ga. 

HUNT, JOHN H.— 

Third Corporal, March 17, 1862. Died of disease in Richmond, Va„ 
July, 1863. 

MOONEY, MARSHALL— 

Fourth Corporal March 17, 1862. Killed at Malvern Hill, Va., 1862. 

DICKEN. CALVIN A.— 

Fifth Corporal, March 17, 1862. Promoted Third Corporal. Cap- 
tured at Spottsylvania, Va., May 10, 1864. Released 1865. 

ADAMS, JOSEPH A.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Died of disease in camp near Richmond, 
Va., June 1, 1862. 

ADAMS, W. F.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Killed at Ellison's Mill, Va. 

ALLEN, ANDREW J.— 

Private. March 17, 1862. Served through the war. Living in Oco- 
nee county, Ga. 

ALLEN, CHARLES H.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Discharged account disability August 5. 
1862. Living in Oconee county, Ga. 

ANDERSON, E. F.— 

Private, IMarch 17, 1862. Discharged account disability May 2, 1862. 
Living in Atlanta, Ga. 

AUTRY, GEORGE W.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Wounded and captured at Sliarpsbarg, 
Md. Exchanged January, 1863. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. 
Living in Oconee county, Ga. 
AUTRY, WILLIS N.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Released 
1865. Living in Athens, Ga. 

AYCOCK, A. J.— 
Private, March 17, 1862. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va. 

AYCOCK, JOHN R.— 

Private, March 17. 1862. Wounded at Ellison's Mill, Va. Died of 
disease March, 1863. 



Muster Rolls Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment. 517 

BEARDEN, WILLIAM P.— 

Private, March 17, 18G2. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va. Lost 
arm at Wilderness, Ya. Living in Madison, Ga. 

BEAVERS, xVLFRED L.— 

Private, August 30, 18G2. Captured near Front Royal, Va., 1863. 

BIGGS. JAMES P.— 

Private, March 17. 18G2. Died in hospital 1863. 

BIGGS, WILLIAM L.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va. Surren- 
dered at Appomattox, Va. Living in Oconee county, Ga. 

BISHOP, WILLIAM H.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. W^ounded at Gettysburg, Pa. Promoted 
Second Sergeant. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Released 1865. 
Living in Bishop, Ga. 

BREWER, SAMUEL W.— 

Private, August 18, 1862. Captured near Front Royal, Va., 1863. 

BURGER, ALEXANDER— 

Private, August 30, 1862. Died in hospital in Danville, Va. 

BURGER, CHARLES L.— 

Private, August 30, 1862. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va. Cap- 
tured at, Spottsylvania, Va. Living In Oconee county, Ga. 

BURGER, W. D.— 

Private, August 30, 1862. Discharged account disability August 2, 
1862. Living in Clarke county, Ga. 

BURGESS, J. A.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Died of fever in Richmond, Va., 1862. 

BUTLER, DOCTOR R.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Died of disease near Orange C. H., Va., 
March 5, 18t)4. 

BUTLER, JESSE M.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Killed at Ellison's Mill, Va. 

CONNELLY, GEORGE R.— 
Private, March 17, 1862. Served through the war. Living in Oconee 
county, Ga. 

COOPER, L, C— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Wounded at Ellison's Mill, and Wilder- 
ness, Va. Surrendered at Appomattox, Va. 

CRAFT, JEFF V.— 
Private, October 23, 1863. Detailed in hospital In Lynchburg, Va., 
May, 1864. 

DANIEL. JOHN B.— 
Private, March 17, 1862. Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 



518 Doles-Cook Brigade. 

DANIEL, JOSIAH H.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Killed at Ellison's Mill, Va. 

DANIEL, N. J.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. Killed 
accidentally while returning from prison March, 1865. 

DANIEL, F. M.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa. Killed at 
Winchester, Va., September 19, 1864. 

DARNELL, F. M.— 
Private, March 9, 1863. Promoted First Lieutenant and Acting Ad- 
jutant Forty-fourth Georgia Regiment. Killed at Winchester, Va., 
September 19, 1804. 

DARNELL, NATHANIEL— 
Private, March 9, 1863. Captured at Spottsylvania, Va. 

DAVENPORT, J. W.— 
Private, March 17, 1862. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Va. Trans- 
ferred to C. S. Navy 1864. Served through the war. Living In 
Athens, Ga. 

DOGGETT, JOHN W.— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Transferred to C. S. Navy April, 1864. 
Served through the war. Living out West. 

DOOLITTLE, HOWARD— 

Private, March 17, 1862. Killed at Ellisen's Mill, Va.